WorldWideScience

Sample records for bacterium strain r219

  1. [Colonization of silicate bacterium strain NBT in wheat roots].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Xiafang

    2003-11-01

    The strain NBT of silicate bacterium was labelled with streptomycin, and a stable streptomycin resistance strain NBT was obtained. Its colonization dynamics and affecting factors in wheat rhizosphere were studied in agar plates and greenhouse pots were studied by counting the method with selective medium. The results of pot culture experiment showed that strain NBT could successfully colonize in the rhizosphere of wheat. In pot cultures of sterile soil, the highest colonization level (3.4 x 10(7) cfu.g-1 root soil) was reached on 9th day after seeds sown; at 54th day, the population of strain NBT tended to stable, and decreased to 1.4 x 10(4) cfu.g-1 root soil. In pot cultures of unsterile soil, the highest colonization level (3.8 x 10(7) cfu.g-1 root soil) was reached at 9th day, and the population of strain NBT tended to a stationary state at 60th day, with the numbers being 1.4 x 10(4) cfu.g-1 root soil. Some biological and abiotic factors could greatly influence the colonization of the beneficial microorganism.

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of the Moderately Halophilic Bacterium Marinobacter lipolyticus Strain SM19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papke, R. Thane; de la Haba, Rafael R.; Infante-Domínguez, Carmen; Pérez, Dolores; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Lapierre, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Marinobacter lipolyticus strain SM19, isolated from saline soil in Spain, is a moderately halophilic bacterium belonging to the class Gammaproteobacteria. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this strain, which consists of a 4.0-Mb chromosome and which is able to produce the halophilic enzyme lipase LipBL. PMID:23814106

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of the Moderately Halophilic Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas ruthenica Strain CP76.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Haba, Rafael R; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; León, María José; Papke, R Thane; Ventosa, Antonio

    2013-05-23

    Pseudoalteromonas ruthenica strain CP76, isolated from a saltern in Spain, is a moderately halophilic bacterium belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria. Here we report the draft genome sequence, which consists of a 4.0-Mb chromosome, of this strain, which is able to produce the extracellular enzyme haloprotease CPI.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Advenella kashmirensis Strain W13003, a Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Decai; Zhou, Lisha; Wu, Liang; An, Wei; Zhao, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Advenella kashmirensis strain W13003 is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacterium isolated from PAH-contaminated marine sediments. Here, we report the 4.8-Mb draft genome sequence of this strain, which will provide insights into the diversity of A. kashmirensis and the mechanism of PAH degradation in the marine environment. PMID:24482505

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, Mun Su [University of Florida, Gainesville; Moritz, Brelan E. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Xie, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Patel, Milind [University of Florida, Gainesville; Ou, Mark [University of Florida, Gainesville; Harbrucker, Roberta [University of Florida, Gainesville; Ingram, Lonnie O. [University of Florida; Shanmugam, Keelnathan T. [University of Florida

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 and fer- ments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this spo- rogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attrac- tive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemi- cellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome se- quence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed.

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 and fer-ments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this sporogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attractive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemi-cellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome squence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed.

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Mun Su; Moritz, Brélan E.; Xie, Gary; Glavina del Rio, T.; Dalin, E.; Tice, H.; Bruce, D.; Goodwin, L.; Chertkov, O.; Brettin, T.; Han, C.; Detter, C.; Pitluck, S.; Land, Miriam L.; Patel, Milind; Ou, Mark; Harbrucker, Roberta; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, K. T.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 and ferments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this sporogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attractive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemicellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome sequence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed. PMID:22675583

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Desulfuromonas acetexigens Strain 2873, a Novel Anode-Respiring Bacterium

    KAUST Repository

    Katuri, Krishna

    2017-03-03

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Desulfuromonas acetexigens strain 2873, which was originally isolated from digester sludge from a sewage treatment plant in Germany. This bacterium is capable of anode respiration with high electrochemical activity in microbial electrochemical systems. The draft genome contains 3,376 predicted protein-coding genes and putative multiheme c-type cytochromes.

  9. Working draft genome sequence of the mesophilic acetate oxidizing bacterium Syntrophaceticus schinkii strain Sp3

    OpenAIRE

    Manzoor, Shahid; M?ller, Bettina; Niazi, Adnan; Schn?rer, Anna; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Syntrophaceticus schinkii strain Sp3 is a mesophilic syntrophic acetate oxidizing bacterium, belonging to the Clostridia class within the phylum Firmicutes, originally isolated from a mesophilic methanogenic digester. It has been shown to oxidize acetate in co-cultivation with hydrogenotrophic methanogens forming methane. The draft genome shows a total size of 3,196,921?bp, encoding 3,688 open reading frames, which includes 3,445 predicted protein-encoding genes and 55 RNA genes. Here, we are...

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of the Antitrypanosomally Active Sponge-Associated Bacterium Actinokineospora sp. Strain EG49

    KAUST Repository

    Harjes, Janno

    2014-03-06

    The marine sponge-associated bacterium Actinokineospora sp. strain EG49 produces the antitrypanosomal angucycline-like compound actinosporin A. The draft genome of Actinokineospora sp. EG49 has a size of 7.5 megabases and a GC content of 72.8% and contains 6,629 protein-coding sequences (CDS). antiSMASH predicted 996 genes residing in 36 secondary metabolite gene clusters.

  11. Morphological characterization of several strains of the rice-pathogenic bacterium Burkholderia glumae in North Sumatra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasibuan, M.; Safni, I.; Lisnawita; Lubis, K.

    2018-02-01

    Burkholderia glumae is a quarantine seed-borne bacterial pathogen causing panicle blight disease on rice. This pathogen has been detected in some locations in Java, and recently, farmers in North Sumatra have reported rice yield loss with symptoms similar with those on rice infeced by the rice-pathogenic bacterium B. glumae. This research was aimed to isolate several bacterial strains from several rice varieties in various locations in North Sumatra and characterize the morphology of the strains to detect and identify the unknown bacterial strains presumably B. glumae. Several rice seed varieties were collected from Medan and Deli Serdang Districts. The seed samples were extracted, isolated and purified, then grown in semi-selective media PPGA. The morphological characteristics of the bacterial strains were determined including Gram staining, bacterial colony’s and bacterial cell’s morphology. The results showed that of eleven strains isolated, two strains were Gram negative and nine strains were Gram positive. On the basis of colony morphology, all strains had circular form, flat elevation and cream colour while the colony margin varied, i.e. entire and undulate. Most strains had bacillus/rod shape (8 strains) and only 3 strains were coccus.

  12. Separation and characterization of a radioresistant bacterium strain BR501 from radiation polluted soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ming; Liu Xiumin; Zhang Wei; Lin Min

    2007-01-01

    Strain BR501, an extremely radioresistant bacterium isolated from the radioactive experimental soil. The optimal temperature for the growth of strain BR501 was 30 degree C. The UV radiation and γ-radiation survival curves showed the strain BR501 had highly radio-resistance. The strain was sensitive to Amp, Km, Rif, Cm and Tc. The 16S rDNA of the BR501 shared highly similarity to those of species in genus Deinococcus, especially to that of D.radiodurans r1(99%). Based on the 16S rDNA sequence analysis and the phenotype characteristics, the BR501 belongs to the evolution branch of Deinococcus and was designated Deinococcus sp. BR501. (authors)

  13. [Isolation, identification and characterization of a microcystin-degrading bacterium Paucibacter sp. strain CH].

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Di-Jie; Chen, Xiao-Guo; Xiang, Hui-Yi; Ouyang, Liao; Yang, Bing

    2014-01-01

    A bacterium capable of degrading microcystin (MC), strain CH, was isolated from the sediment of Lake Chaohu, China. Strain CH was tentatively identified as Paucibacter sp. based on the analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. Paucibacter sp. strain CH can use microcystin LR (MCLR) as the sole carbon and energy sources, and 11.6 microg x mL(-1) of MCLR was degraded to below the detection limit within 10 hours with the first-order reaction rate constant of 0.242 h(-1). The optimum temperature and initial pH for MC degradation were 25-30 degrees C and pH 6-9, respectively. A novel intermediate product containing the Adda residue was detected during the degradation of MCLR, which is different from those produced by strain ACM-3962, and Adda was recognized as the final product of the degradation process. Furthermore, no homologue to any of the four genes, mlrA, mlrB, mlrC and mlrD previously associated with the degradation of MCLR by strain ACM-3962 was found in strain CH. These findings suggest that Paucibacter sp. strain CH mighe degrade MC through a different pathway from that of strain ACM-3962.

  14. Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, a halophilic bacterium producing acetone, butanol, and ethanol under aerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Hamid; Azarbaijani, Reza; Parsa Yeganeh, Laleh; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Abolhassan; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2016-01-04

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, which was isolated from Aran-Bidgol Lake (Iran), has the ability to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) as well as acetic and butyric acids under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This result is the first report of ABE production with a wild microorganism from a family other than Clostridia and also the first halophilic species shown to produce butanol under aerobic cultivation. The cultivation of Nesterenkonia sp. strain F under anaerobic conditions with 50 g/l of glucose for 72 h resulted in the production of 105 mg/l of butanol, 122 mg/l of acetone, 0.2 g/l of acetic acid, and 2.5 g/l of butyric acid. Furthermore, the strain was cultivated on media with different glucose concentrations (20, 50, and 80 g/l) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Through fermentation with a 50 g/l initial glucose concentration under aerobic conditions, 66 mg/l of butanol, 125 mg/l of acetone, 291 mg/l of ethanol, 5.9 g/l of acetic acid, and 1.2 g/l of butyric acid were produced. The enzymes pertaining to the fermentation pathway in the strain were compared with the enzymes of Clostridium spp., and the metabolic pathway of fermentation used by Nesterenkonia sp. strain F was investigated.

  15. Survival Strategies of the Plant-Associated Bacterium Enterobacter sp. Strain EG16 under Cadmium Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanmei; Chao, Yuanqing; Li, Yaying; Lin, Qingqi; Bai, Jun; Tang, Lu; Wang, Shizhong; Ying, Rongrong; Qiu, Rongliang

    2016-01-04

    Plant-associated bacteria are of great interest because of their potential use in phytoremediation. However, their ability to survive and promote plant growth in metal-polluted soils remains unclear. In this study, a soilborne Cd-resistant bacterium was isolated and identified as Enterobacter sp. strain EG16. It tolerates high external Cd concentrations (Cd(2+) MIC, >250 mg liter(-1)) and is able to produce siderophores and the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), both of which contribute to plant growth promotion. Surface biosorption in this strain accounted for 31% of the total Cd accumulated. The potential presence of cadmium sulfide, shown by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, suggested intracellular Cd binding as a Cd response mechanism of the isolate. Cd exposure resulted in global regulation at the transcriptomic level, with the bacterium switching to an energy-conserving mode by inhibiting energy-consuming processes while increasing the production of stress-related proteins. The stress response system included increased import of sulfur and iron, which become deficient under Cd stress, and the redirection of sulfur metabolism to the maintenance of intracellular glutathione levels in response to Cd toxicity. Increased production of siderophores, responding to Cd-induced Fe deficiency, not only is involved in the Cd stress response systems of EG16 but may also play an important role in promoting plant growth as well as alleviating the Cd-induced inhibition of IAA production. The newly isolated strain EG16 may be a suitable candidate for microbially assisted phytoremediation due to its high resistance to Cd and its Cd-induced siderophore production, which is likely to contribute to plant growth promotion. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Novel Acetone Metabolism in a Propane-Utilizing Bacterium, Gordonia sp. Strain TY-5▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Tetsuya; Yurimoto, Hiroya; Kato, Nobuo; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2007-01-01

    In the propane-utilizing bacterium Gordonia sp. strain TY-5, propane was shown to be oxidized to 2-propanol and then further oxidized to acetone. In this study, the subsequent metabolism of acetone was studied. Acetone-induced proteins were found in extracts of cells induced by acetone, and a gene cluster designated acmAB was cloned on the basis of the N-terminal amino acid sequences of acetone-induced proteins. The acmA and acmB genes encode a Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO) and esterase, respectively. The BVMO encoded by acmA was purified from acetone-induced cells of Gordonia sp. strain TY-5 and characterized. The BVMO exhibited NADPH-dependent oxidation activity for linear ketones (C3 to C10) and cyclic ketones (C4 to C8). Escherichia coli expressing the acmA gene oxidized acetone to methyl acetate, and E. coli expressing the acmB gene hydrolyzed methyl acetate. Northern blot analyses revealed that polycistronic transcription of the acmAB gene cluster was induced by propane, 2-propanol, and acetone. These results indicate that the acmAB gene products play an important role in the metabolism of acetone derived from propane oxidation and clarify the propane metabolism pathway of strain TY-5 (propane → 2-propanol → acetone → methyl acetate → acetic acid + methanol). This paper provides the first evidence for BVMO-dependent acetone metabolism. PMID:17071761

  17. A novel electrophototrophic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris strain RP2, exhibits hydrocarbonoclastic potential in anaerobic environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnaveni Venkidusamy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An electrophototrophic, hydrocarbonoclastic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris stain RP2 was isolated from the anodic biofilms of hydrocarbon fed microbial electrochemical remediation systems (MERS. Salient properties of the strain RP2 were direct electrode respiration, dissimilatory metal oxide reduction, spore formation, anaerobic nitrate reduction, free living diazotrophy and the ability to degrade n-alkane components of petroleum hydrocarbons in anoxic, photic environments. In acetate fed microbial electrochemical cells, a maximum current density of 305±10 mA/m2 (1000Ω was generated (power density 131.65±10 mW/m2 by strain RP2 with a coulombic efficiency of 46.7 ± 1.3%. Cyclic voltammetry studies showed that anaerobically grown cells of strain RP2 is electrochemically active and likely to transfer electrons extracellularly to solid electron acceptors through membrane bound compounds, however, aerobically grown cells lacked the electrochemical activity. The ability of strain RP2 to produce current (maximum current density 21±3 mA/m2; power density 720±7 µW/m2, 1000Ω using petroleum hydrocarbon (PH as a sole energy source was also examined using an initial concentration of 800 mg l-1 of diesel range hydrocarbons (C9- C36 with a concomitant removal of 47.4 ± 2.7% hydrocarbons in MERS. Here, we also report the first study that shows an initial evidence for the existence of a hydrocarbonoclastic behavior in the strain RP2 when grown in different electron accepting and illuminated conditions (anaerobic and MERS degradation. Such observations reveal the importance of photoorganotrophic growth in the utilization of hydrocarbons from contaminated environments. Identification of such novel petrochemical hydrocarbon degrading electricigens, not only expands the knowledge on the range of bacteria known for the hydrocarbon bioremediation but also shows a biotechnological potential that goes well beyond its applications to MERS.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Chryseobacterium sp. Strain GSE06, a Biocontrol Endophytic Bacterium Isolated from Cucumber (Cucumis sativus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jin-Ju; Park, Byeong Hyeok; Park, Hongjae

    2016-01-01

    Chryseobacterium sp. strain GSE06 is a biocontrol endophytic bacterium against the destructive soilborne oomycete Phytophthora capsici, which causes Phytophthora blight of pepper. Here, we present its draft genome sequence, which contains genes related to biocontrol traits, such as colonization, antimicrobial activity, plant growth promotion, and abiotic or biotic stress adaptation. PMID:27313310

  19. Draft genome sequence of Enterobacter cloacae subsp. cloacae strain 08XA1, a fecal bacterium of giant pandas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yue; Zhao, Chuan-Wu; Zhang, Yi-Zheng; Zhang, Zhi-He; Pan, Guang-Lin; Liu, Wen-Wang; Ma, Qing-Yi; Hou, Rong; Tan, Xue-Mei

    2012-12-01

    Enterobacter cloacae, a common pathogenic bacterium, is a Gram-negative bacillus. We analyzed the draft genome of Enterobacter cloacae subsp. cloacae strain 08XA1 from the feces of a giant panda in China. Genes encoding a β-lactamase and efflux pumps, as well as other factors, have been found in the genome.

  20. Extracellular proteases of Halobacillus blutaparonensis strain M9, a new moderately halophilic bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Anderson F; Valle, Roberta S; Pacheco, Clarissa A; Alvarez, Vanessa M; Seldin, Lucy; Santos, André L S

    2013-12-01

    Halophilic microorganisms are source of potential hydrolytic enzymes to be used in industrial and/or biotechnological processes. In the present study, we have investigated the ability of the moderately halophilic bacterium Halobacillus blutaparonensis (strain M9), a novel species described by our group, to release proteolytic enzymes. This bacterial strain abundantly proliferated in Luria-Bertani broth supplemented with 2.5% NaCl as well as secreted proteases to the extracellular environment. The production of proteases occurred in bacterial cells grown under different concentration of salt, ranging from 0.5% to 10% NaCl, in a similar way. The proteases secreted by H. blutaparonensis presented the following properties: (i) molecular masses ranging from 30 to 80 kDa, (ii) better hydrolytic activities under neutral-alkaline pH range, (iii) expression modulated according to the culture age, (iv) susceptibility to phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride, classifying them as serine-type proteases, (v) specific cleavage over the chymotrypsin substrate, and (vi) enzymatic stability in the presence of salt (up to 20% NaCl) and organic solvents (e.g., ether, isooctane and cyclohexane). The proteases described herein are promising for industrial practices due to its haloalkaline properties.

  1. Rapid Aggregation of Biofuel-Producing Algae by the Bacterium Bacillus sp. Strain RP1137

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Ryan J.

    2013-01-01

    Algal biofuels represent one of the most promising means of sustainably replacing liquid fuels. However, significant challenges remain before alga-based fuels become competitive with fossil fuels. One of the largest challenges is the ability to harvest the algae in an economical and low-energy manner. In this article, we describe the isolation of a bacterial strain, Bacillus sp. strain RP1137, which can rapidly aggregate several algae that are candidates for biofuel production, including a Nannochloropsis sp. This bacterium aggregates algae in a pH-dependent and reversible manner and retains its aggregation ability after paraformaldehyde fixation, opening the possibility for reuse of the cells. The optimal ratio of bacteria to algae is described, as is the robustness of aggregation at different salinities and temperatures. Aggregation is dependent on the presence of calcium or magnesium ions. The efficiency of aggregation of Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1 is between 70 and 95% and is comparable to that obtained by other means of harvest; however, the rate of harvest is fast, with aggregates forming in 30 s. PMID:23892750

  2. Extracellular proteases of Halobacillus blutaparonensis strain M9, a new moderately halophilic bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson F. Santos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Halophilic microorganisms are source of potential hydrolytic enzymes to be used in industrial and/or biotechnological processes. In the present study, we have investigated the ability of the moderately halophilic bacterium Halobacillus blutaparonensis (strain M9, a novel species described by our group, to release proteolytic enzymes. This bacterial strain abundantly proliferated in Luria-Bertani broth supplemented with 2.5% NaCl as well as secreted proteases to the extracellular environment. The production of proteases occurred in bacterial cells grown under different concentration of salt, ranging from 0.5% to 10% NaCl, in a similar way. The proteases secreted by H. blutaparonensis presented the following properties: (i molecular masses ranging from 30 to 80 kDa, (ii better hydrolytic activities under neutral-alkaline pH range, (iii expression modulated according to the culture age, (iv susceptibility to phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride, classifying them as serine-type proteases, (v specific cleavage over the chymotrypsin substrate, and (vi enzymatic stability in the presence of salt (up to 20% NaCl and organic solvents (e.g., ether, isooctane and cyclohexane. The proteases described herein are promising for industrial practices due to its haloalkaline properties.

  3. Mechanism of biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids in Pseudomonas sp. strain E-3, a psychrotrophic bacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, M.; Fukunaga, N.; Sasaki, S. (Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan))

    1989-08-01

    Biosynthesis of palmitic, palmitoleic, and cis-vaccenic acids in Pseudomonas sp. strain E-3 was investigated with in vitro and in vivo systems. (1-{sup 14}C)palmitic acid was aerobically converted to palmitoleate and cis-vaccenate, and the radioactivities on their carboxyl carbons were 100 and 43%, respectively, of the total radioactivity in the fatty acids. Palmitoyl coenzyme A desaturase activity was found in the membrane fraction. (1-{sup 14}C)stearic acid was converted to octadecenoate and C16 fatty acids. The octadecenoate contained oleate and cis-vaccenate, but only oleate was produced in the presence of cerulenin. (1-{sup 14}C)lauric acid was aerobically converted to palmitate, palmitoleate, and cis-vaccenate. Under anaerobic conditions, palmitate (62%), palmitoleate (4%), and cis-vaccenate (34%) were produced from (1-{sup 14}C)acetic acid, while they amounted to 48, 39, and 14%, respectively, under aerobic conditions. In these incorporation experiments, 3 to 19% of the added radioactivity was detected in released {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, indicating that part of the added fatty acids were oxidatively decomposed. Partially purified fatty acid synthetase produced saturated and unsaturated fatty acids with chain lengths of C10 to C18. These results indicated that both aerobic and anaerobic mechanisms for the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acid are operating in this bacterium.

  4. Complete genome sequence of the gliding freshwater bacterium Fluviicola taffensis type strain (RW262T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Mwirichia, Romano [Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Nairobi, Kenya; Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Tindall, Brian [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2011-01-01

    Fluviicola taffensis O'Sullivan et al. 2005 belongs to the monotypic genus Fluviicola within the family Cryomorphaceae. The species is of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location in the genome-sequenced fraction of the tree of life. Strain RW262 T forms a monophyletic lineage with uncultivated bacteria represented in freshwater 16S rRNA gene libraries. A similar phylogenetic differentiation occurs between freshwater and marine bacteria in the family Flavobacteriaceae, a sister family to Cryomorphaceae. Most remarkable is the inability of this freshwater bacterium to grow in the presence of Na + ions. All other genera in the family Cryomorphaceae are from marine habitats and have an absolute requirement for Na + ions or natural sea water. F. taffensis is the first member of the family Cryomorphaceae with a completely sequenced and publicly available genome. The 4,633,577 bp long genome with its 4,082 protein-coding and 49 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  5. Pumilacidin-Like Lipopeptides Derived from Marine Bacterium Bacillus sp. Strain 176 Suppress the Motility of Vibrio alginolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, Pengyuan; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Dechao; Sun, Chaomin

    2017-06-15

    Bacterial motility is a crucial factor during the invasion and colonization processes of pathogens, which makes it an attractive therapeutic drug target. Here, we isolated a marine bacterium ( Vibrio alginolyticus strain 178) from a seamount in the tropical West Pacific that exhibits vigorous motility on agar plates and severe pathogenicity to zebrafish. We found that V. alginolyticus 178 motility was significantly suppressed by another marine bacterium, Bacillus sp. strain 176, isolated from the same niche. We isolated, purified, and characterized two different cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) from Bacillus sp. 176 using high-performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The two related CLPs have a pumilacidin-like structure and were both effective inhibitors of V. alginolyticus 178 motility. The CLPs differ by only one methylene group in their fatty acid chains. In addition to motility suppression, the CLPs also induced cell aggregation in the medium and reduced adherence of V. alginolyticus 178 to glass substrates. Notably, upon CLP treatment, the expression levels of two V. alginolyticus flagellar assembly genes ( flgA and flgP ) dropped dramatically. Moreover, the CLPs inhibited biofilm formation in several other strains of pathogenic bacteria without inducing cell death. This study indicates that CLPs from Bacillus sp. 176 show promise as antimicrobial lead compounds targeting bacterial motility and biofilm formation with a low potential for eliciting antibiotic resistance. IMPORTANCE Pathogenic bacteria often require motility to establish infections and subsequently spread within host organisms. Thus, motility is an attractive therapeutic target for the development of novel antibiotics. We found that cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) produced by marine bacterium Bacillus sp. strain 176 dramatically suppress the motility of the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus strain 178, reduce biofilm formation, and promote

  6. Nitrous Oxide Reduction by an Obligate Aerobic Bacterium, Gemmatimonas aurantiaca Strain T-27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Doyoung; Kim, Hayeon; Yoon, Sukhwan

    2017-06-15

    ,000 parts per million by volume [ppmv]). Although a large fraction of nosZ genes recovered from soil is affiliated with nosZ found in the genomes of the obligate aerobic phylum Gemmatimonadetes , N 2 O reduction has not yet been confirmed in any of these organisms. This study demonstrates that N 2 O is reduced by an obligate aerobic bacterium, Gemmatimonas aurantiaca strain T-27, and suggests a novel regulation mechanism for N 2 O reduction in this organism, which may also be applicable to other obligate aerobic organisms possessing nosZ genes. We expect that these findings will significantly advance the understanding of N 2 O dynamics in environments with frequent transitions between oxic and anoxic conditions. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Isolation and identification of berberine and berberrubine metabolites by berberine-utilizing bacterium Rhodococcus sp. strain BD7100.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kazuki; Takeda, Hisashi; Wakana, Daigo; Sato, Fumihiko; Hosoe, Tomoo

    2016-05-01

    Based on the finding of a novel berberine (BBR)-utilizing bacterium, Rhodococcus sp. strain BD7100, we investigated the degradation of BBR and its analog berberrubine (BRU). Resting cells of BD7100 demethylenated BBR and BRU, yielding benzeneacetic acid analogs. Isolation of benzeneacetic acid analogs suggested that BD7100 degraded the isoquinoline ring of the protoberberine skeleton. This work represents the first report of cleavage of protoberberine skeleton by a microorganism.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus aryabhattai Strain PHB10, a Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate)-Accumulating Bacterium Isolated from Domestic Sewerage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishna Pillai, Aneesh; Jaya Kumar, Arjun; Thulasi, Kavitha; Reghunathan, Dinesh; Prasannakumar, Manoj; Kumarapillai, Harikrishnan

    2017-10-12

    Bacillus aryabhattai PHB10 is a poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB)-accumulating bacterium isolated from domestic sewerage. Here, we report the 4.19-Mb draft genome sequence, with 4,050 protein-coding genes and a G+C content of 37.5%. This sequence will be helpful in the study of the high-level PHB accumulation mechanism of the strain. Copyright © 2017 Balakrishna Pillai et al.

  9. Genome sequencing and analysis of the first spontaneous Nanosilver resistant bacterium Proteus mirabilis strain SCDR1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr T. M. Saeb

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background P. mirabilis is a common uropathogenic bacterium that can cause major complications in patients with long-standing indwelling catheters or patients with urinary tract anomalies. In addition, P. mirabilis is a common cause of chronic osteomyelitis in Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU patients. We isolated P. mirabilis SCDR1 from a Diabetic ulcer patient. We examined P. mirabilis SCDR1 levels of resistance against Nanosilver colloids, the commercial Nanosilver and silver containing bandages and commonly used antibiotics. We utilized next generation sequencing techniques (NGS, bioinformatics, phylogenetic analysis and pathogenomics in the characterization of the infectious pathogen. Results P. mirabilis SCDR1 was the first Nanosilver resistant isolate collected from a diabetic patient polyclonal infection. P. mirabilis SCDR1 showed high levels of resistance against Nanosilver colloids, Nanosilver chitosan composite and the commercially available Nanosilver and silver bandages. The P. mirabilis -SCDR1 genome size is 3,815,621 bp. with G + C content of 38.44%. P. mirabilis-SCDR1 genome contains a total of 3533 genes, 3414 coding DNA sequence genes, 11, 10, 18 rRNAs (5S, 16S, and 23S, and 76 tRNAs. Our isolate contains all the required pathogenicity and virulence factors to establish a successful infection. P. mirabilis SCDR1 isolate is a potential virulent pathogen that despite its original isolation site, the wound, can establish kidney infection and its associated complications. P. mirabilis SCDR1 contains several mechanisms for antibiotics and metals resistance, including, biofilm formation, swarming mobility, efflux systems, and enzymatic detoxification. Conclusion P. mirabilis SCDR1 is the first reported spontaneous Nanosilver resistant bacterial strain. P. mirabilis SCDR1 possesses several mechanisms that may lead to the observed Nanosilver resistance.

  10. Ralstonia syzygii, the Blood Disease Bacterium and some Asian R. solanacearum strains form a single genomic species despite divergent lifestyles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remenant, Benoît; de Cambiaire, Jean-Charles; Cellier, Gilles; Jacobs, Jonathan M; Mangenot, Sophie; Barbe, Valérie; Lajus, Aurélie; Vallenet, David; Medigue, Claudine; Fegan, Mark; Allen, Caitilyn; Prior, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The Ralstonia solanacearum species complex includes R. solanacearum, R. syzygii, and the Blood Disease Bacterium (BDB). All colonize plant xylem vessels and cause wilt diseases, but with significant biological differences. R. solanacearum is a soilborne bacterium that infects the roots of a broad range of plants. R. syzygii causes Sumatra disease of clove trees and is actively transmitted by cercopoid insects. BDB is also pathogenic to a single host, banana, and is transmitted by pollinating insects. Sequencing and DNA-DNA hybridization studies indicated that despite their phenotypic differences, these three plant pathogens are actually very closely related, falling into the Phylotype IV subgroup of the R. solanacearum species complex. To better understand the relationships among these bacteria, we sequenced and annotated the genomes of R. syzygii strain R24 and BDB strain R229. These genomes were compared to strain PSI07, a closely related Phylotype IV tomato isolate of R. solanacearum, and to five additional R. solanacearum genomes. Whole-genome comparisons confirmed previous phylogenetic results: the three phylotype IV strains share more and larger syntenic regions with each other than with other R. solanacearum strains. Furthermore, the genetic distances between strains, assessed by an in-silico equivalent of DNA-DNA hybridization, unambiguously showed that phylotype IV strains of BDB, R. syzygii and R. solanacearum form one genomic species. Based on these comprehensive data we propose a revision of the taxonomy of the R. solanacearum species complex. The BDB and R. syzygii genomes encoded no obvious unique metabolic capacities and contained no evidence of horizontal gene transfer from bacteria occupying similar niches. Genes specific to R. syzygii and BDB were almost all of unknown function or extrachromosomal origin. Thus, the pathogenic life-styles of these organisms are more probably due to ecological adaptation and genomic convergence during vertical

  11. Ralstonia syzygii, the Blood Disease Bacterium and some Asian R. solanacearum strains form a single genomic species despite divergent lifestyles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Remenant

    Full Text Available The Ralstonia solanacearum species complex includes R. solanacearum, R. syzygii, and the Blood Disease Bacterium (BDB. All colonize plant xylem vessels and cause wilt diseases, but with significant biological differences. R. solanacearum is a soilborne bacterium that infects the roots of a broad range of plants. R. syzygii causes Sumatra disease of clove trees and is actively transmitted by cercopoid insects. BDB is also pathogenic to a single host, banana, and is transmitted by pollinating insects. Sequencing and DNA-DNA hybridization studies indicated that despite their phenotypic differences, these three plant pathogens are actually very closely related, falling into the Phylotype IV subgroup of the R. solanacearum species complex. To better understand the relationships among these bacteria, we sequenced and annotated the genomes of R. syzygii strain R24 and BDB strain R229. These genomes were compared to strain PSI07, a closely related Phylotype IV tomato isolate of R. solanacearum, and to five additional R. solanacearum genomes. Whole-genome comparisons confirmed previous phylogenetic results: the three phylotype IV strains share more and larger syntenic regions with each other than with other R. solanacearum strains. Furthermore, the genetic distances between strains, assessed by an in-silico equivalent of DNA-DNA hybridization, unambiguously showed that phylotype IV strains of BDB, R. syzygii and R. solanacearum form one genomic species. Based on these comprehensive data we propose a revision of the taxonomy of the R. solanacearum species complex. The BDB and R. syzygii genomes encoded no obvious unique metabolic capacities and contained no evidence of horizontal gene transfer from bacteria occupying similar niches. Genes specific to R. syzygii and BDB were almost all of unknown function or extrachromosomal origin. Thus, the pathogenic life-styles of these organisms are more probably due to ecological adaptation and genomic convergence

  12. Long non-coding RNA TUG1 promotes progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma through upregulating FMNL2 by sponging miR-219.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Guangqi; Wang, Xue; Yang, Mingliang; Lu, Li; Zhou, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a prevalent oral disease with a high morbidity and mortality rate. Several long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) were identified as important regulators of carcinogenesis. However, the pathogenic implications of TUG1 in OSCC are still unclear. In the present study, the expression of TUG1 was increased in OSCC cells. Knockdown of TUG1 inhibited cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, and induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase, whereas overexpression of TUG1 exerted the opposite effect on OSCC cells. A reciprocal repressive interaction between TUG1 and miR-219 was found, and miR-219 inhibition abolished the tumor-suppressive effect of TUG1 knockdown on cell growth and motility. Furthermore, bioinformatics analysis and luciferase reporter assay showed that FMNL2 was a direct target of miR-219. Restoration of FMNL2 abrogated the miR-219-induced inhibition of cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, migration, and invasion. Besides, overexpression of TUG1 promoted tumor growth and metastasis in vivo . Clinically, the expression of TUG1 and FMNL2 were increased, but miR-219 was decreased in primary tumors compared to non-tumor tissues. Both the upregulated TUG1, and FMNL2 and the downregulated miR-219 was associated with advanced stage of OSCC and poor overall survival. Notably, multivariate analyses confirmed that FMNL2 was an independent risk factor for OSCC. In conclusion, our data revealed that TUG1 confers oncogenic function in OSCC and TUG1/miR-219/FMNL2 axis may be a novel therapeutic strategy in this disease.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens EBL11, a New Strain of Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium Isolated from Rice Rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinghuan; Greenfield, Paul; Jin, Decai

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain EBL11 is a bacterium that can promote plant growth by inhibiting the growth of fungi on plant surfaces and providing nutrients as a nonchemical biofertilizer. The estimated genome of this strain is 4.05 Mb in size and harbors 3,683 coding genes (CDSs). PMID:25059875

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of the Antagonistic Rhizosphere Bacterium Serratia plymuthica Strain PRI-2C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garbeva, P.; van Elsas, J.D.; de Boer, W.

    Serratia plymuthica strain PRI-2C is a rhizosphere bacterial strain with antagonistic activity against different plant pathogens. Here we present the 5.39-Mb (G+C content, 55.67%) draft genome sequence of S. plymuthica strain PRI-2C with the aim of providing insight into the genomic basis of its

  15. Analysis of the genome-wide variations among multiple strains of the plant pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker M Andrew

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Gram-negative, xylem-limited phytopathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is responsible for causing economically important diseases in grapevine, citrus and many other plant species. Despite its economic impact, relatively little is known about the genomic variations among strains isolated from different hosts and their influence on the population genetics of this pathogen. With the availability of genome sequence information for four strains, it is now possible to perform genome-wide analyses to identify and categorize such DNA variations and to understand their influence on strain functional divergence. Results There are 1,579 genes and 194 non-coding homologous sequences present in the genomes of all four strains, representing a 76. 2% conservation of the sequenced genome. About 60% of the X. fastidiosa unique sequences exist as tandem gene clusters of 6 or more genes. Multiple alignments identified 12,754 SNPs and 14,449 INDELs in the 1528 common genes and 20,779 SNPs and 10,075 INDELs in the 194 non-coding sequences. The average SNP frequency was 1.08 × 10-2 per base pair of DNA and the average INDEL frequency was 2.06 × 10-2 per base pair of DNA. On an average, 60.33% of the SNPs were synonymous type while 39.67% were non-synonymous type. The mutation frequency, primarily in the form of external INDELs was the main type of sequence variation. The relative similarity between the strains was discussed according to the INDEL and SNP differences. The number of genes unique to each strain were 60 (9a5c, 54 (Dixon, 83 (Ann1 and 9 (Temecula-1. A sub-set of the strain specific genes showed significant differences in terms of their codon usage and GC composition from the native genes suggesting their xenologous origin. Tandem repeat analysis of the genomic sequences of the four strains identified associations of repeat sequences with hypothetical and phage related functions. Conclusion INDELs and strain specific genes

  16. The heterocyclic ring fission and dehydroxylation of catechins and related compounds by Eubacterium sp. strain SDG-2, a human intestinal bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L Q; Meselhy, M R; Li, Y; Nakamura, N; Min, B S; Qin, G W; Hattori, M

    2001-12-01

    A human intestinal bacterium, Eubacterium (E.) sp. strain SDG-2, was tested for its ability to metabolize various (3R)- and (3S)-flavan-3-ols and their 3-O-gallates. This bacterium cleaved the C-ring of (3R)- and (3S)-flavan-3-ols to give 1,3-diphenylpropan-2-ol derivatives, but not their 3-O-gallates. Furthermore, E. sp. strain SDG-2 had the ability of p-dehydroxylation in the B-ring of (3R)-flavan-3-ols, such as (-)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin, (-)-gallocatechin and (-)-epigallocatechin, but not of (3S)-flavan-3-ols, such as (+)-catechin and (+)-epicatechin.

  17. Genome Sequence of the Acidophilic Bacterium Acidocella sp. Strain MX-AZ02

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Servín-Garcidueñas, Luis E.; Garrett, Roger A.; Amils, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Acidocella sp. strain MX-AZ02, an acidophilic and heterotrophic alphaproteobacterium isolated from a geothermal lake in western Mexico.......Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Acidocella sp. strain MX-AZ02, an acidophilic and heterotrophic alphaproteobacterium isolated from a geothermal lake in western Mexico....

  18. Evaluation of Arthrobacter aurescens Strain TC1 as Bioaugmentation Bacterium in Soils Contaminated with the Herbicidal Substance Terbuthylazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Vera P.; Moreira-Santos, Matilde; Mateus, Carla; Teixeira, Tânia; Ribeiro, Rui; Viegas, Cristina A.

    2015-01-01

    In the last years the chloro-s-triazine active substance terbuthylazine has been increasingly used as an herbicide and may leave residues in the environment which can be of concern. The present study aimed at developing a bioaugmentation tool based on the soil bacterium Arthrobacter aurescens strain TC1 for the remediation of terbuthylazine contaminated soils and at examining its efficacy for both soil and aquatic compartments. First, the feasibility of growing the bioaugmentation bacterium inocula on simple sole nitrogen sources (ammonium and nitrate) instead of atrazine, while still maintaining its efficiency to biodegrade terbuthylazine was shown. In sequence, the successful and quick (3 days) bioremediation efficacy of ammonium-grown A. aurescens TC1 cells was proven in a natural soil freshly spiked or four-months aged with commercial terbuthylazine at a dose 10× higher than the recommended in corn cultivation, to mimic spill situations. Ecotoxicity assessment of the soil eluates towards a freshwater microalga supported the effectiveness of the bioaugmentation tool. Obtained results highlight the potential to decontaminate soil while minimizing terbuthylazine from reaching aquatic compartments via the soil-water pathway. The usefulness of this bioaugmentation tool to provide rapid environment decontamination is particularly relevant in the event of accidental high herbicide contamination. Its limitations and advantages are discussed. PMID:26662024

  19. Isolation and characterization of a novel bacterium, Sphingomonas bisphenolicum strain AO1, that degrades bisphenol A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiman, Ko-ichi; Tsutsumi, Yuji; Nishida, Tomoaki; Matsumura, Yoshinobu

    2007-04-01

    Bisphenol A (2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl) propane, BPA), which is used as a synthetic resin material or a plasticizer, is a pollutant that possesses endocrine-disrupting activity. Bioremediation of BPA is used to decrease its polluting effects, and here we report a novel bacterial strain AO1, which is able to degrade BPA. This strain was isolated using enrichment cultivation from a soil sample from a vegetable-growing field; the sample was one of 500 soil samples collected across Japan. Strain AO1 degraded 100 mg/l BPA to an undetectable level within 6 h in MYPG medium (containing malt extract, yeast extract, peptone, and glucose) and within 48 h in minimum medium containing 1% glucose at 30 degrees C. Strain AO1 can utilize BPA as a sole source of carbon and as an energy source under aerobic conditions. The estrogenic activity of BPA in MYPG medium was ultimately reduced by strain AO1, although the activity initially increased. Taxonomical analysis showed that strain AO1 is closely related to Sphingomonas chlorophenolicum and S. herbicidovorans, neither of which have a capacity for BPA degradation. DNA-DNA hybridization showed that strain AO1 is a novel species of the Sphingomonas genus, and we designated AO1 as S. bisphenolicum.

  20. Draft genome sequence of a caprolactam degrader bacterium: Pseudomonas taiwanensis strain SJ9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung-Jun; Park, Gun-Seok; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Jung, Byung Kwon; Shin, Jae-Ho

    Pseudomonas taiwanensis strain SJ9 is a caprolactam degrader, isolated from industrial wastewater in South Korea and considered to have the potential for caprolactam bioremediation. The genome of this strain is approximately 6.2 Mb (G+C content, 61.75%) with 6,010 protein-coding sequences (CDS), of which 46% are assigned to recognized functional genes. This draft genome of strain SJ9 will provide insights into the genetic basis of its caprolactam-degradation ability. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Draft genome sequence of a caprolactam degrader bacterium: Pseudomonas taiwanensis strain SJ9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Jun Hong

    Full Text Available Abstract Pseudomonas taiwanensis strain SJ9 is a caprolactam degrader, isolated from industrial wastewater in South Korea and considered to have the potential for caprolactam bioremediation. The genome of this strain is approximately 6.2 Mb (G + C content, 61.75% with 6,010 protein-coding sequences (CDS, of which 46% are assigned to recognized functional genes. This draft genome of strain SJ9 will provide insights into the genetic basis of its caprolactam-degradation ability.

  2. Antibiofilm Activity of the Marine Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. Strain 3J6▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheilly, Alexandra; Soum-Soutéra, Emmanuelle; Klein, Géraldine L.; Bazire, Alexis; Compère, Chantal; Haras, Dominique; Dufour, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Biofilm formation results in medical threats or economic losses and is therefore a major concern in a variety of domains. In two-species biofilms of marine bacteria grown under dynamic conditions, Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain 3J6 formed mixed biofilms with Bacillus sp. strain 4J6 but was largely predominant over Paracoccus sp. strain 4M6 and Vibrio sp. strain D01. The supernatant of Pseudoalteromonas sp. 3J6 liquid culture (SN3J6) was devoid of antibacterial activity against free-living Paracoccus sp. 4M6 and Vibrio sp. D01 cells, but it impaired their ability to grow as single-species biofilms and led to higher percentages of nonviable cells in 48-h biofilms. Antibiofilm molecules of SN3J6 were able to coat the glass surfaces used to grow biofilms and reduced bacterial attachment about 2-fold, which might partly explain the biofilm formation defect but not the loss of cell viability. SN3J6 had a wide spectrum of activity since it affected all Gram-negative marine strains tested except other Pseudoalteromonas strains. Biofilm biovolumes of the sensitive strains were reduced 3- to 530-fold, and the percentages of nonviable cells were increased 3- to 225-fold. Interestingly, SN3J6 also impaired biofilm formation by three strains belonging to the human-pathogenic species Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica, and Escherichia coli. Such an antibiofilm activity is original and opens up a variety of applications for Pseudoalteromonas sp. 3J6 and/or its active exoproducts in biofilm prevention strategies. PMID:20363799

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Salinibacillus aidingensis Strain MSP4, an Obligate Halophilic Bacterium Isolated from a Salt Crystallizer of the Rann of Kutch, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Rinku; Sherathia, Dharmesh; Dalsania, Trupti; Savsani, Kinjal; Patel, Ilaxi; Thomas, Manesh; Ghorai, Sucheta; Vanpariya, Sejal; Rupapara, Rupal; Acharya, Namrata; Rawal, Priya; Joshi, Pragnesh; Sukhadiya, Bhoomika; Mandaliya, Mona; Saxena, Anil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    We report the 7.42-Mbp draft whole genome sequence of Salinibacillus aidingensis strain MSP4, an obligate halophilic bacterium, isolated from a salt crystallizer of the Rann of Kutch in India. Analysis of the genome of this organism will lead to a better understanding of the genes and metabolic pathways involved in imparting osmotolerance. PMID:23833129

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Alkaliphilus metalliredigens Strain QYMF, an Alkaliphilic and Metal-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from Borax-Contaminated Leachate Ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, C; Copeland, A; Lucas, S; Lapidus, A; Barry, K; Detter, J C; Glavina Del Rio, T; Hammon, N; Israni, S; Dalin, E; Tice, H; Pitluck, S; Chertkov, O; Brettin, T; Bruce, D; Han, C; Schmutz, J; Larimer, F; Land, M L; Hauser, L; Kyrpides, N; Mikhailova, N; Ye, Q; Zhou, J; Richardson, P; Fields, M W

    2016-11-03

    Alkaliphilus metalliredigens strain QYMF is an anaerobic, alkaliphilic, and metal-reducing bacterium associated with phylum Firmicutes QYMF was isolated from alkaline borax leachate ponds. The genome sequence will help elucidate the role of metal-reducing microorganisms under alkaline environments, a capability that is not commonly observed in metal respiring-microorganisms. Copyright © 2016 Hwang et al.

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of the Phosphate-Solubilizing Bacterium Pseudomonas argentinensis Strain SA190 Isolated from the Desert Plant Indigofera argentea

    KAUST Repository

    Lafi, Feras Fawzi

    2016-12-23

    Pseudomonas argentinensis strain SA190 is a plant endophytic-inhabiting bacterium that was isolated from root nodules of the desert plant Indigofera argentea collected from the Jizan region of Saudi Arabia. Here, we report the genome sequence of SA190, highlighting several functional genes related to plant growth-promoting activity, environment adaption, and antifungal activity.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Aeribacillus pallidus Strain 8m3, a Thermophilic Hydrocarbon-Oxidizing Bacterium Isolated from the Dagang Oil Field (China).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltaraus, Andrey B; Sokolova, Diyana S; Grouzdev, Denis S; Ivanov, Timophey M; Malakho, Sophia G; Korshunova, Alena V; Rozanov, Aleksey S; Tourova, Tatiyana P; Nazina, Tamara N

    2016-06-09

    The draft genome sequence of Aeribacillus pallidus strain 8m3, a thermophilic aerobic oil-oxidizing bacterium isolated from production water from the Dagang high-temperature oil field, China, is presented here. The genome is annotated to provide insights into the genomic and phenotypic diversity of the genus Aeribacillus. Copyright © 2016 Poltaraus et al.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Aeribacillus pallidus Strain 8m3, a Thermophilic Hydrocarbon-Oxidizing Bacterium Isolated from the Dagang Oil Field (China)

    OpenAIRE

    Poltaraus, Andrey B.; Sokolova, Diyana S.; Grouzdev, Denis S.; Ivanov, Timophey M.; Malakho, Sophia G.; Korshunova, Alena V.; Rozanov, Aleksey S.; Tourova, Tatiyana P.; Nazina, Tamara N.

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of Aeribacillus pallidus strain 8m3, a thermophilic aerobic oil-oxidizing bacterium isolated from production water from the Dagang high-temperature oil field, China, is presented here. The genome is annotated to provide insights into the genomic and phenotypic diversity of the genus Aeribacillus.

  8. Genetic and Biochemical Characterization of 2-Chloro-5-Nitrophenol Degradation in a Newly Isolated Bacterium,Cupriavidussp. Strain CNP-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Jun; Chen, Weiwei; Wang, Jinpei; Hu, Xiaoke

    2017-01-01

    Compound 2-chloro-5-nitrophenol (2C5NP) is a typical chlorinated nitroaromatic pollutant. To date, the bacteria with the ability to degrade 2C5NP are rare, and the molecular mechanism of 2C5NP degradation remains unknown. In this study, Cupriavidus sp. strain CNP-8 utilizing 2-chloro-5-nitrophenol (2C5NP) and meta -nitrophenol (MNP) via partial reductive pathways was isolated from pesticide-contaminated soil. Biodegradation kinetic analysis indicated that 2C5NP degradation by this strain was concentration dependent, with a maximum specific degradation rate of 21.2 ± 2.3 μM h -1 . Transcriptional analysis showed that the mnp genes are up-regulated in both 2C5NP- and MNP-induced strain CNP-8. Two Mnp proteins were purified to homogeneity by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. In addition to catalyzing the reduction of MNP, MnpA, a NADPH-dependent nitroreductase, also catalyzes the partial reduction of 2C5NP to 2-chloro-5-hydroxylaminophenol via 2-chloro-5-nitrosophenol, which was firstly identified as an intermediate of 2C5NP catabolism. MnpC, an aminohydroquinone dioxygenase, is likely responsible for the ring-cleavage reaction of 2C5NP degradation. Gene knockout and complementation indicated that mnpA is necessary for both 2C5NP and MNP catabolism. To our knowledge, strain CNP-8 is the second 2C5NP-utilizing bacterium, and this is the first report of the molecular mechanism of microbial 2C5NP degradation.

  9. Production and characterization of a trehalolipid biosurfactant produced by the novel marine bacterium Rhodococcus sp., strain PML026.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D A; Hird, L C; Ali, S T

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate biosurfactant production by a novel marine Rhodococcus sp., strain PML026 and characterize the chemical nature and properties of the biosurfactant. A novel marine bacterium (Rhodococcus species; strain PML026) was shown to produce biosurfactant in the presence of hydrophobic substrate (sunflower oil). Biosurfactant production (identified as a trehalolipid) was monitored in whole-batch cultures (oil layer and aqueous phase), aqueous phase (no oil layer) and filtered (0·2 μm) aqueous phase (no oil or cells; extracellular) and was shown to be closely associated with growth/biomass production. Extracellular trehalolipid levels increased postonset of stationary growth phase. Purified trehalolipid was able to reduce the surface tension of water to 29 mN m(-1) at Critical Micellar Concentration (CMC) of c. 250 mg l(-1) and produced emulsions that were stable to a wide range of conditions (pH 2-10, temperatures of 20-100°C and NaCl concentrations of 5-25% w/v). Separate chemical analyses of the intact trehalolipid and its constituents demonstrated the compound was in fact a mixture of homologues (>1180 MW) consisting of a trehalose moiety esterified to a series of straight chain and hydroxylated fatty acids. The trehalolipid biosurfactant produced by the novel marine strain Rhodococcus sp. PML026 was characterized and exhibited high surfactant activity under a wide range of conditions. Strain PML026 of Rhodococcus sp. is a potential candidate for bioremediation or biosurfactant production for various applications. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Genetic and Biochemical Characterization of 2-Chloro-5-Nitrophenol Degradation in a Newly Isolated Bacterium, Cupriavidus sp. Strain CNP-8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Min

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Compound 2-chloro-5-nitrophenol (2C5NP is a typical chlorinated nitroaromatic pollutant. To date, the bacteria with the ability to degrade 2C5NP are rare, and the molecular mechanism of 2C5NP degradation remains unknown. In this study, Cupriavidus sp. strain CNP-8 utilizing 2-chloro-5-nitrophenol (2C5NP and meta-nitrophenol (MNP via partial reductive pathways was isolated from pesticide-contaminated soil. Biodegradation kinetic analysis indicated that 2C5NP degradation by this strain was concentration dependent, with a maximum specific degradation rate of 21.2 ± 2.3 μM h−1. Transcriptional analysis showed that the mnp genes are up-regulated in both 2C5NP- and MNP-induced strain CNP-8. Two Mnp proteins were purified to homogeneity by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. In addition to catalyzing the reduction of MNP, MnpA, a NADPH-dependent nitroreductase, also catalyzes the partial reduction of 2C5NP to 2-chloro-5-hydroxylaminophenol via 2-chloro-5-nitrosophenol, which was firstly identified as an intermediate of 2C5NP catabolism. MnpC, an aminohydroquinone dioxygenase, is likely responsible for the ring-cleavage reaction of 2C5NP degradation. Gene knockout and complementation indicated that mnpA is necessary for both 2C5NP and MNP catabolism. To our knowledge, strain CNP-8 is the second 2C5NP-utilizing bacterium, and this is the first report of the molecular mechanism of microbial 2C5NP degradation.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Dietzia sp. Strain WMMA184, a Marine Coral-Associated Bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, Doug R.; Chevrette, Marc G.; Acharya, Deepa; Currie, Cameron R.; Rajski, Scott R.; Ritchie, Kim B.; Bugni, Tim S.

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dietzia sp. strain WMMA184 was isolated from the marine coral Montastraea faveolata as part of ongoing drug discovery efforts. Analysis of the 4.16-Mb genome provides information regarding interspecies interactions as it pertains to the regulation of secondary metabolism and natural product biosynthesis potential.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus sp. Strain WMMA185, a Marine Sponge-Associated Bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Adnani, Navid; Braun, Doug R.; McDonald, Bradon R.; Chevrette, Marc G.; Currie, Cameron R.; Bugni, Tim S.

    2016-01-01

    The Rhodococcus strain WMMA185 was isolated from the marine sponge Chondrilla nucula as part of ongoing drug discovery efforts. Analysis of the 4.44-Mb genome provides information regarding interspecies interactions as pertains to regulation of secondary metabolism and natural product biosynthetic potentials.

  13. Genome sequence of the agar-degrading marine bacterium Alteromonadaceae sp. strain G7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Min-Jung; Song, Ju Yeon; Kim, Byung Kwon; Chi, Won-Jae; Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Choi, Soobeom; Chang, Yong-Keun; Hong, Soon-Kwang; Kim, Jihyun F

    2012-12-01

    Here, we present the high-quality draft genome sequence of the agar-degrading marine gammaproteobacterium Alteromonadaceae sp. strain G7, which was isolated from coastal seawater to be utilized as a bioresource for production of agar-derived biofuels. The 3.91-Mb genome contains a number of genes encoding algal polysaccharide-degrading enzymes such as agarases and sulfatases.

  14. Genome Sequence of the Agar-Degrading Marine Bacterium Alteromonadaceae sp. Strain G7

    OpenAIRE

    Kwak, Min-Jung; Song, Ju Yeon; Kim, Byung Kwon; Chi, Won-Jae; Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Choi, Soobeom; Chang, Yong-Keun; Hong, Soon-Kwang; Kim, Jihyun F.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we present the high-quality draft genome sequence of the agar-degrading marine gammaproteobacterium Alteromonadaceae sp. strain G7, which was isolated from coastal seawater to be utilized as a bioresource for production of agar-derived biofuels. The 3.91-Mb genome contains a number of genes encoding algal polysaccharide-degrading enzymes such as agarases and sulfatases.

  15. Purification, cloning, and sequence analysis of beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase from the chitinolytic bacterium Aeromonas hydrophila strain SUWA-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Xiqian; Ozawa, Naomi; Nishiwaki, Naohide; Kodaira, Ritsuko; Okazaki, Mitsuo; Shimosaka, Makoto

    2004-05-01

    A chitinolytic bacterium was isolated from Lake Suwa and identified as Aeromonas hydrophila strain SUWA-9. The strain grew well on a synthetic medium containing colloidal chitin as sole carbon source. Chitin-degrading activity was induced by colloidal chitin or N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc). Most of the activity, however, was not detected in culture fluid but was associated with cells. A beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase was purified after it was solubilized from cells by sonication. The purified enzyme hydrolyzed N-acetylchitooligomers from dimer to pentamer and produced GlcNAc as a final product. The enzyme also hydrolyzed synthetic substrates such as p-nitrophenyl (pNP)-N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminide and pNP-N-acetyl-beta-D-galactosaminide. A gene coding for the purified beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase was isolated. The ORF identified is 2661 nucleotides long and encodes a precursor protein of 887 amino acids including a signal peptide of 22 amino acid residues. The amino acid sequence deduced showed a high similarity to those of bacterial beta-N-acetylhexosaminidases classified in family 20 of glycosyl hydrolases.

  16. Formation of Highly Twisted Ribbons in a Carboxymethylcellulase Gene-Disrupted Strain of a Cellulose-Producing Bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Yasushi; Shoda, Makoto; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Oiwa, Kazuhiro; Tuzi, Satoru; Imai, Tomoya; Sugiyama, Junji; Takeuchi, Miyuki; Yamauchi, Daisuke

    2013-01-01

    Cellulases are enzymes that normally digest cellulose; however, some are known to play essential roles in cellulose biosynthesis. Although some endogenous cellulases of plants and cellulose-producing bacteria are reportedly involved in cellulose production, their functions in cellulose production are unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that disruption of the cellulase (carboxymethylcellulase) gene causes irregular packing of de novo-synthesized fibrils in Gluconacetobacter xylinus, a cellulose-producing bacterium. Cellulose production was remarkably reduced and small amounts of particulate material were accumulated in the culture of a cmcax-disrupted G. xylinus strain (F2-2). The particulate material was shown to contain cellulose by both solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis. Electron microscopy revealed that the cellulose fibrils produced by the F2-2 cells were highly twisted compared with those produced by control cells. This hypertwisting of the fibrils may reduce cellulose synthesis in the F2-2 strains. PMID:23243308

  17. Genome Sequence ofVerrucomicrobiumsp. Strain GAS474, a Novel Bacterium Isolated from Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pold, Grace; Conlon, Erin M; Huntemann, Marcel; Pillay, Manoj; Mikhailova, Natalia; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T B K; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja; DeAngelis, Kristen M

    2018-01-25

    Verrucomicrobium sp. strain GAS474 was isolated from the mineral soil of a temperate deciduous forest in central Massachusetts. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of this phylogenetically novel organism, which consists of a total of 3,763,444 bp on a single scaffold, with a 65.8% GC content and 3,273 predicted open reading frames. Copyright © 2018 Pold et al.

  18. The characteristics of a novel heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacterium, Bacillus methylotrophicus strain L7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-Ling; Liu, Ying; Ai, Guo-Min; Miao, Li-Li; Zheng, Hai-Yan; Liu, Zhi-Pei

    2012-03-01

    Bacillus methylotrophicus strain L7, exhibited efficient heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification ability, with maximum NH(4)(+)-N and NO(2)(-)-N removal rate of 51.58 mg/L/d and 5.81 mg/L/d, respectively. Strain L7 showed different gaseous emitting patterns from those strains ever described. When (15)NH(4)Cl, or Na(15)NO(2), or K(15)NO(3) was used, results of GC-MS indicated that N(2)O was emitted as the intermediate of heterotrophic nitrification or aerobic denitrification, while GC-IRMS results showed that N(2) was produced as end product when nitrite was used. Single factor experiments suggested that the optimal conditions for heterotrophic nitrification were sodium succinate as carbon source, C/N 6, pH 7-8, 0 g/L NaCl, 37 °C and a wide range of NH(4)(+)-N from 80 to 1000 mg/L. Orthogonal tests showed that the optimal conditions for aerobic denitrification were C/N 20, pH 7-8, 10 g/L NaCl and DO 4.82 mg/L (shaking speed 50 r/min) when nitrite was served as substrate. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A Cyanide-Induced 3-Cyanoalanine Nitrilase in the Cyanide-Assimilating Bacterium Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes Strain CECT 5344.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acera, Felipe; Carmona, María Isabel; Castillo, Francisco; Quesada, Alberto; Blasco, Rafael

    2017-05-01

    Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT 5344 is a bacterium able to assimilate cyanide as a sole nitrogen source. Under this growth condition, a 3-cyanoalanine nitrilase enzymatic activity was induced. This activity was encoded by nit4 , one of the four nitrilase genes detected in the genome of this bacterium, and its expression in Escherichia coli enabled the recombinant strain to fully assimilate 3-cyanoalanine. P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT 5344 showed a weak growth level with 3-cyanoalanine as the N source, unless KCN was also added. Moreover, a nit4 knockout mutant of P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT 5344 became severely impaired in its ability to grow with 3-cyanoalanine and cyanide as nitrogen sources. The native enzyme expressed in E. coli was purified up to electrophoretic homogeneity and biochemically characterized. Nit4 seems to be specific for 3-cyanoalanine, and the amount of ammonium derived from the enzymatic activity doubled in the presence of exogenously added asparaginase activity, which demonstrated that the Nit4 enzyme had both 3-cyanoalanine nitrilase and hydratase activities. The nit4 gene is located downstream of the cyanide resistance transcriptional unit containing cio1 genes, whose expression levels are under the positive control of cyanide. Real-time PCR experiments revealed that nit4 expression was also positively regulated by cyanide in both minimal and LB media. These results suggest that this gene cluster including cio1 and nit4 could be involved both in cyanide resistance and in its assimilation by P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT 5344. IMPORTANCE Cyanide is a highly toxic molecule present in some industrial wastes due to its application in several manufacturing processes, such as gold mining and the electroplating industry. The biodegradation of cyanide from contaminated wastes could be an attractive alternative to physicochemical treatment. P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT 5344 is a bacterial strain able to assimilate cyanide under alkaline conditions, thus

  20. Extracellular Pectinase from a Novel Bacterium Chryseobacterium indologenes Strain SD and Its Application in Fruit Juice Clarification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karabi Roy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pectinase is one of the important enzymes of industrial sectors. Presently, most of the pectinases are of plant origin but there are only a few reports on bacterial pectinases. The aim of the present study was to isolate a novel and potential pectinase producing bacterium as well as optimization of its various parameters for maximum enzyme production. A total of forty bacterial isolates were isolated from vegetable dump waste soil using standard plate count methods. Primary screening was done by hydrolysis of pectin. Pectinase activity was determined by measuring the increase in reducing sugar formed by the enzymatic hydrolysis of pectin. Among the bacterial isolates, the isolate K6 exhibited higher pectinase activity in broth medium and was selected for further studies. The selected bacterial isolate K6 was identified as Chryseobacterium indologenes strain SD. The isolate was found to produce maximum pectinase at 37°C with pH 7.5 upon incubation for 72 hours, while cultured in production medium containing citrus pectin and yeast extract as C and N sources, respectively. During enzyme-substrate reaction phase, the enzyme exhibited its best activity at pH of 8.0 and temperature of 40°C using citrus pectin as substrate. The pectinase of the isolate showed potentiality on different types of fruit juice clarification.

  1. Genome sequence of the ocean sediment bacterium Saccharomonospora marina type strain (XMU15T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lu, Megan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Potter, Gabriele [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Li, Wen-Jun [Yunnan University, Kunming, China; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2012-01-01

    Saccharomonospora marina Liu et al. 2010 is a member to the genomically so far poorly characterized genus Saccharomonospora in the family Pseudonocardiaceae. Members of the genus Sacharomonospora are of interest because they originate from diverse habitats, such as leaf litter, manure, compost, surface of peat, moist, over-heated grain, and ocean sediment, where they might play a role in the primary degradation of plant material by attacking hemicellulose. Organisms belonging to the genus are usually Gram-positive staining, non-acid fast, and classify among the actinomycetes. Next to S. viridis and S. azurea, S. marina is the third member in the genus Saccharomonospora for with a completely sequenced (permanent draft status) type strain genome will be published. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. The 5,965,593 bp long chromosome with its 5,727 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE funded Community Sequencing Program (CSP) 2010 at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI).

  2. Genome sequence of the soil bacterium Saccharomonospora azurea type strain (NA-128T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Held, Brittany [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Potter, Gabriele [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2012-01-01

    Saccharomonospora azurea Runmao et al. 1987 is a member to the genomically so far poorly characterized genus Saccharomonospora in the family Pseudonocardiaceae. Members of the genus Sacharomonosoras are of interest because they originate from diverse habitats, such as leaf litter, manure, compost, surface of peat, moist and over-heated grain, where they might play a role in the primary degradation of plant material by attacking hemicellulose. They are Gram-negative staining organisms classified among the usually Gram-positive actinomycetes. Next to S. viridis, S. azurea is only the second member in the genus Saccharomonospora for with a completely sequenced type strain genome will be published. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence with project status 'permanent draft', and annotation. The 4,763,832 bp long chromosome with its 4,472 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE funded Community Sequencing Program (CSP) 2010 at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI).

  3. Genome sequence of the chemoheterotrophic soil bacterium Saccharomonospora cyanea type strain (NA-134(T))

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P. [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lu, Megan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Potter, Gabriele [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomonospora cyanea Runmao et al. 1988 is a member of the genus Saccharomonospora in the family Pseudonocardiaceae that is moderately well characterized at the genome level thus far. Members of the genus Saccharomonospora are of interest because they originate from diverse habitats, such as soil, leaf litter, manure, compost, surface of peat, moist, over-heated grain, and ocean sediment, where they probably play a role in the primary degradation of plant material by attacking hemicellulose. Species of the genus Saccharomonospora are usually Gram-positive, non-acid fast, and are classified among the actinomycetes. S. cyanea is characterized by a dark blue (= cyan blue) aerial mycelium. After S. viridis, S. azurea, and S. marina, S. cyanea is only the fourth member in the genus for which a completely sequenced (non-contiguous finished draft status) type strain genome will be published. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the draft genome sequence, and annotation. The 5,408,301 bp long chromosome with its 5,139 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE funded Community Sequencing Program (CSP) 2010 at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI).

  4. [Development of a liquid fermentation system and encystment for a nitrogen-fixing bacterium strain having biofertilizer potential].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camelo-Rusinque, Mauricio; Moreno-Galván, Andrés; Romero-Perdomo, Felipe; Bonilla-Buitrago, Ruth

    The indiscriminate use of chemical fertilizers has contributed to the deterioration of the biological, physical and chemical properties of the soil, resulting in the loss of its productive capacity. For this reason, the use of biofertilizers has emerged as a technological alternative. The objective of this research was to develop a suitable liquid fermentation system and encystment for the multiplication of Azotobacter chroococcum AC1 strain, a bacterium employed in a biofertilizer formulation produced at present by CARPOICA, Colombia. Sequential statistical designs were used to determine the conditions in the fermentation system. The interaction between agitation, aeration and pH was evaluated on the viable biomass (CFU/ml) of AC1. In addition, the encystment ability of the strain was evaluated using two encystment agents and the potential plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) activity was assessed by different techniques, such as nitrogen fixation by ARA, phosphate solubilization by the phospho-molybdenum-blue reaction and indolic compound production by colorimetric reaction using the Salkowski reagent. Results showed significant effects (p<0.05) on the viable biomass in the three conditions (pH, aeration and agitation) tested individually, in one dual interaction and one tripartite interaction, were demonstrated to have a positive effect on the response variable aeration and agitation. The addition of the two encystment agents evaluated, AE01 and AE02, demonstrated the ability of AC1 to form cysts under stress conditions. Likewise, fermentation and encystment conditions did not affect the biological activities tested. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Falsirhodobacter sp. Strain alg1, an Alginate-Degrading Bacterium Isolated from Fermented Brown Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Tetsushi; Takahashi, Mami; Tanaka, Reiji; Shibata, Toshiyuki; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Takeyama, Haruko

    2014-08-21

    Falsirhodobacter sp. alg1 is an alginate-degrading bacterium, the second species from the nonphototrophic bacterial genus Falsirhodobacter. We report the first draft genome of a bacterium from this genus and point out possible important features related to alginate assimilation and its evolutionary aspects. Copyright © 2014 Mori et al.

  6. Genome sequence of the photoarsenotrophic bacterium Ectothiorhodospira sp. strain BSL-9, isolated from a hypersaline alkaline arsenic-rich extreme environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Maldonado, Jaime; Stoneburner, Brendon; Boren, Alison; Miller, Laurence; Rosen, Michael R.; Oremland, Ronald S.; Saltikov, Chad W

    2016-01-01

    The full genome sequence of Ectothiorhodospira sp. strain BSL-9 is reported here. This purple sulfur bacterium encodes an arxA-type arsenite oxidase within the arxB2AB1CD gene island and is capable of carrying out “photoarsenotrophy” anoxygenic photosynthetic arsenite oxidation. Its genome is composed of 3.5 Mb and has approximately 63% G+C content.

  7. Energetics of arginine and lysine transport by whole cells and membrane vesicles of strain SR, a monensin-sensitive ruminal bacterium.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Kessel, J S; Russell, J B

    1992-01-01

    Strain SR, a monensin-sensitive, ammonia-producing ruminal bacterium, grew rapidly on arginine and lysine, but only if sodium was present. Arginine transport could be driven by either an electrical potential or a chemical gradient of sodium. Arginine was converted to ornithine, and it appeared that ornithine efflux created a sodium gradient which in turn drove arginine transport. There was a linear decline in arginine transport as pH was decreased from 7.5 to 5.5, and the cells did not grow a...

  8. Analysis of the phylogenetic relationships of strains of Burkholderia solanacearum, Pseudomonas syzygii, and the blood disease bacterium of banana based on 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavi, M; Hayward, C; Sly, L I; Fegan, M

    1996-01-01

    We determined nearly complete 16S rRNA gene sequences for 19 isolates of Burkholderia solanacearum, three isolates of the blood disease bacterium of bananas, and two isolates of Pseudomonas syzygii, the cause of Sumatra disease of cloves. The dendrogram produced by comparing all of these sequences revealed that there were two divisions, which corresponded to the results obtained previously in a restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (D. Cook, E. Barlow, and L. Sequeira, Mol. Plant Microbe Interact. 2:113-121, 1989) and a total 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence analysis of four isolates representing four biovars of B. solanacearum (X. Li, M. Dorsch, T. Del Dot, L. I. Sly, E. Stackebrandt, and A. C. Hayward, J. Appl. Bacteriol. 74:324-329, 1993). Division 1 comprised biovars 3, 4, and 5 and an aberrant biovar 2 isolate (strain ACH0732), and division 2 included biovars 1, 2, and N2, the blood disease bacterium, and P. syzygii. Specific nucleotides at positions 458 to 460 (UUC) and 474 (A) characterized division 2, whereas in division 1 the nucleotides at these positions were ACU and U, respectively. However, strain ACH0732 had a U at position 458, as did division 2 isolates, and G instead of U at position 474. Division 2 consisted of two subdivisions; one subdivision contained two B. solanacearum isolates that originated from Indonesia, P. syzygii strains, and blood disease bacterium strains, and the other subdivision contained all of the other division 2 isolates. Within division 1, the level of 16S rDNA sequence similarity ranged from 99.8 to 100%, and within division 2, the levels of 16S rDNA sequence similarity ranged from 99.1 to 100%. The division 1 isolates exhibited an average level of 16S rDNA sequence similarity to division 2 isolates of 99.3% (range, 99.1 to 99.5%). The occurrence of consistent polymorphisms in the 16S rDNA sequences of B. solanacearum strains, in particular unique 16S rDNA sequence differences in aberrant biovar 2 isolate ACH

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Cupriavidus pauculus Strain KF709, a Biphenyl-Utilizing Bacterium Isolated from Biphenyl-Contaminated Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takahito; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Hosoyama, Akira; Fujihara, Hidehiko; Suenaga, Hikaru; Hirose, Jun; Futagami, Taiki; Goto, Masatoshi; Kimura, Nobutada; Furukawa, Kensuke

    2015-03-26

    We report the draft genome sequence of Cupriavidus pauculus strain KF709, which comprises 6,826,799 bp with 6,272 coding sequences. The strain KF709 utilizes biphenyl and degrades low-chlorinated biphenyls; however, it possesses fewer coding sequences involved in the degradation of aromatic compounds than other strains belonging to the Betaproteobacteria. Copyright © 2015 Watanabe et al.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Cupriavidus pauculus Strain KF709, a Biphenyl-Utilizing Bacterium Isolated from Biphenyl-Contaminated Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Takahito; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Hosoyama, Akira; Fujihara, Hidehiko; Suenaga, Hikaru; Hirose, Jun; Futagami, Taiki; Goto, Masatoshi; Kimura, Nobutada; Furukawa, Kensuke

    2015-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Cupriavidus pauculus strain KF709, which comprises 6,826,799 bp with 6,272 coding sequences. The strain KF709 utilizes biphenyl and degrades low-chlorinated biphenyls; however, it possesses fewer coding sequences involved in the degradation of aromatic compounds than other strains belonging to the Betaproteobacteria.

  11. Genome Sequence of Aeribacillus pallidus Strain GS3372, an Endospore-Forming Bacterium Isolated in a Deep Geothermal Reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    Sevasti Filippidou; Marion Jaussi; Thomas Junier; Tina Wunderlin; Nicole Jeanneret; Simona Regenspurg; Po-E Li; Chien-Chi Lo; Shannon Johnson; Kim McMurry; Cheryl D. Gleasner; Momchilo Vuyisich; Patrick S. Chain; Pilar Junier

    2015-01-01

    The genome of strain GS3372 is the first publicly available strain of Aeribacillus pallidus. This endospore-forming thermophilic strain was isolated from a deep geothermal reservoir. The availability of this genome can contribute to the clarification of the taxonomy of the closely related Anoxybacillus, Geobacillus, and Aeribacillus genera.

  12. Genome Sequence of Aeribacillus pallidus Strain GS3372, an Endospore-Forming Bacterium Isolated in a Deep Geothermal Reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippidou, Sevasti; Jaussi, Marion; Junier, Thomas; Wunderlin, Tina; Jeanneret, Nicole; Regenspurg, Simona; Li, Po-E; Lo, Chien-Chi; Johnson, Shannon; McMurry, Kim; Gleasner, Cheryl D; Vuyisich, Momchilo; Chain, Patrick S; Junier, Pilar

    2015-08-27

    The genome of strain GS3372 is the first publicly available strain of Aeribacillus pallidus. This endospore-forming thermophilic strain was isolated from a deep geothermal reservoir. The availability of this genome can contribute to the clarification of the taxonomy of the closely related Anoxybacillus, Geobacillus, and Aeribacillus genera. Copyright © 2015 Filippidou et al.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Halomonas elongata Strain K4, an Endophytic Growth-Promoting Bacterium Enhancing Salinity Tolerance In Planta

    KAUST Repository

    Lafi, Feras Fawzi

    2016-11-04

    Halomonas elongata strain K4 is an endophytic bacterial strain that was isolated from roots of Cyperus conglomeratus collected at the Red Sea coast in Thuwal, Saudi Arabia. Here, we present a draft genome sequence of this strain, highlighting a number of pathways involved in plant growth promotion under salt stress.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of the Soil Bacterium Burkholderia terrae Strain BS001, Which Interacts with Fungal Surface Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazir, Rashid; Hansen, Martin A.; Sorensen, Soren

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia terrae BS001 is a soil bacterium which was originally isolated from the mycosphere of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria proxima. It exhibits a range of fungus-interacting traits which reveal its propensity to actively interact at fungal interfaces. Here, we present the approximately...... 11.5-Mb (G+C content, 61.52 draft genome sequence of B. terrae BS001 with the aim of providing insight into the genomic basis of its ecological success in fungus-affected soil settings....

  15. Isolation and Characterization of Novel Denitrifying Bacterium sp. SG-01 Strain from Wood Chips Composted with Swine Manure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Hak Yang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate contamination in ground and surface water is an increasingly serious environmental problem and only a few bacterial strains have been identified that have the ability to remove nitrogen pollutants from wastewater under thermophilic conditions. We therefore isolated thermophilic facultative bacterial strains from wood chips that had been composted with swine manure under aerated high temperature conditions so as to identify strains with denitrifying ability. Nine different colonies were screened and 3 long rod-shaped bacterial strains designated as SG-01, SG-02, and SG-03 were selected. The strain SG-01 could be differentiated from SG-02 and SG-03 on the basis of the method that it used for sugar utilization. The 16S rRNA genes of this strain also had high sequence similarity with Geobacillus thermodenitrificans 465T (99.6%. The optimal growth temperatures (55°C, pH values (pH 7.0, and NaCl concentrations (1% required for the growth of strain SG-01 were established. This strain reduced 1.18 mM nitrate and 1.45 mM nitrite in LB broth after 48 h of incubation. These results suggest that the G. thermodenitrificans SG-01 strain may be useful in the removal of nitrates and nitrites from wastewater generated as a result of livestock farming.

  16. Oxidation of thiosulfate by a new bacterium, Bosea thiooxidans (strain BI-42) gen. nov., sp. nov.: analysis of phylogeny based on chemotaxonomy and 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, S K; Mishra, A K; Tindall, B J; Rainey, F A; Stackebrandt, E

    1996-10-01

    A gram-negative bacterium which was capable of oxidizing reduced inorganic sulfur compounds was isolated from agricultural soil and designated BI-42. This new isolate grew on a wide range of organic substrates but was not able to grow autotrophically and lacked ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase, a key enzyme of carbon dioxide fixation. These results suggested that strain BI-42 was a chemolithoheterotroph. Ammonia and nitrate were not used as sole nitrogen sources for growth, and strain BI-42 lacked glutamate synthase activity, which resulted in glutamate auxotrophy. The glutamate dehydrogenase activity of this organism was apparently insufficient for ammonia assimilation. On the basis of the results of additional biochemical tests, the G + C content of the DNA, the results of a respiratory ubiquinone analysis, the results of a 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis, the fatty acid composition, and the results of a membrane lipid analysis, strain BI-42 was identified as a phylogenetically and physiologically distinct taxon belonging to the alpha subclass of the Proteobacteria. Bosea thiooxidans gen. nov., sp. nov. is the name proposed for this taxon.

  17. Draft genome sequence of Agrobacterium sp. strain R89-1, a morphine alkaloid-biotransforming bacterium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zahradník, Jiří; Kyslíková, Eva; Kyslík, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 2 (2016), e00196-16 ISSN 2169-8287 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Agrobacterium sp. strain R89-1 * codeine/morphine * phylogenetic lineage Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  18. Genome Sequence of Vibrio campbellii Strain UMTGB204, a Marine Bacterium Isolated from a Green Barrel Tunicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Huan You; Noor, Mohd Ezhar Mohd; Saari, Nur Azna; Musa, Najiah; Mustapha, Baharim; Usup, Gires

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio campbellii strain UMTGB204 was isolated from a green barrel tunicate. The genome of this strain comprises 5,652,224 bp with 5,014 open reading frames, 9 rRNAs, and 116 tRNAs. It contains genes related to virulence and environmental tolerance. Gene clusters for the biosynthesis of nonribosomal peptides and bacteriocin were also identified. PMID:25814609

  19. Efficient breaking of water/oil emulsions by a newly isolated de-emulsifying bacterium, Ochrobactrum anthropi strain RIPI5-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohebali, Ghasemali; Kaytash, Ashk; Etemadi, Narges

    2012-10-01

    Water-oil emulsions occur throughout oil production, transportation, and processing. The breaking of the water/oil emulsion improves oil quality and as a consequence chemically synthesized de-emulsifiers are commonly used in the petroleum industries. Microbial de-emulsifiers represent potential alternatives to the chemicals and may become important products for petroleum industries. The main goal of this work was isolation, identification, and characterization of an efficient de-emulsifying bacterium. Following a multi-step enrichment programme a de-emulsifying bacterium, Ochrobactrum anthropi strain RIPI5-1was isolated from the oil-polluted sandy bank of Siri Island, Iran. The presence of an oil phase in growth medium was found to be unnecessary for production of the de-emulsifier. The de-emulsifying activity of both the whole culture and the cells of this strain was examined using a model multiple water-crude oil (w/o/w) emulsion. This w/o/w emulsion was used for the first time in microbial de-emulsification research. Whole cells of strain RIPI5-1 exhibited high de-emulsifying activity during the late-exponential growth and stationary phases; de-emulsifying activity of the whole culture was highest during the early-exponential growth phase. The time course of de-emulsification by whole culture and whole cells of strain RIPI5-1 was investigated; the initial rate (DeI(1)) of breaking of the multiple water-crude oil emulsion by whole culture and whole cells was calculated as 11% and 54%, respectively. However, overall de-emulsification (DeI(8.5)) for whole culture and whole cells was calculated as 63% and 72%, respectively. A clear correlation was observed between cell surface hydrophobicity and the de-emulsifying activity of whole cells. With the water/kerosene emulsion, emulsion half-life (t(1/2)) was found to be oilfield emulsion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Genome sequence of Ochrobactrum anthropi strain SUBG007, a plant pathogen and potential xenobiotic compounds degradation bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran S. Chudasama

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Ochrobactrum anthropi SUBG007 was isolated from the fruit of Prunus dulcis in Rajkot (22.30°N, 70.78°E, Gujarat, India. Here we present the 4.37 Mb genome sequence strain SUBG007, which may provide the genetic information for the application in environment pollution degradation and agriculture field. The strain also posses many genes cluster which involved in production of important secondary metabolites. The nucleotide sequence of this genome was deposited into NCBI GenBank under the accession LUAY00000000.

  1. Draft genome sequence of Paenisporosarcina sp. strain TG-14, a psychrophilic bacterium isolated from sediment-laden stratified basal ice from Taylor Glacier, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Hye Yeon; Lee, Sung Gu; Lee, Jun Hyuck; Doyle, Shawn; Christner, Brent C; Kim, Hak Jun

    2012-12-01

    The psychrophilic bacterium Paenisporosarcina sp. TG-14 was isolated from sediment-laden stratified basal ice from Taylor Glacier, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. Here we report the draft genome sequence of this strain, which may provide useful information on the cold adaptation mechanism in extremely variable environments.

  2. High genetic diversity among strains of the unindustrialized lactic acid bacterium Carnobacterium maltaromaticum in dairy products as revealed by multilocus sequence typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Abdur; Cailliez-Grimal, Catherine; Bontemps, Cyril; Payot, Sophie; Chaillou, Stéphane; Revol-Junelles, Anne-Marie; Borges, Frédéric

    2014-07-01

    Dairy products are colonized with three main classes of lactic acid bacteria (LAB): opportunistic bacteria, traditional starters, and industrial starters. Most of the population structure studies were previously performed with LAB species belonging to these three classes and give interesting knowledge about the population structure of LAB at the stage where they are already industrialized. However, these studies give little information about the population structure of LAB prior their use as an industrial starter. Carnobacterium maltaromaticum is a LAB colonizing diverse environments, including dairy products. Since this bacterium was discovered relatively recently, it is not yet commercialized as an industrial starter, which makes C. maltaromaticum an interesting model for the study of unindustrialized LAB population structure in dairy products. A multilocus sequence typing scheme based on an analysis of fragments of the genes dapE, ddlA, glpQ, ilvE, pyc, pyrE, and leuS was applied to a collection of 47 strains, including 28 strains isolated from dairy products. The scheme allowed detecting 36 sequence types with a discriminatory index of 0.98. The whole population was clustered in four deeply branched lineages, in which the dairy strains were spread. Moreover, the dairy strains could exhibit a high diversity within these lineages, leading to an overall dairy population with a diversity level as high as that of the nondairy population. These results are in agreement with the hypothesis according to which the industrialization of LAB leads to a diversity reduction in dairy products. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. D-xylose isomerase from a marine bacterium, Vibrio sp. strain XY-214, and D-xylulose production from β-1,3-xylan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemoto, Yoshiaki; Shibata, Toshiyuki; Araki, Toshiyoshi

    2012-02-01

    The xylA gene from a marine bacterium, Vibrio sp. strain XY-214, encoding D-xylose isomerase (XylA) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The xylA gene consisted of 1,320-bp nucleotides encoding a protein of 439 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 49,264. XylA was classified into group II xylose isomerases. The native XylA was estimated to be a homotetramer with a molecular mass of 190 kDa. The purified recombinant XylA exhibited maximal activity at 60°C and pH 7.5. Its apparent K (m) values for D-xylose and D-glucose were 7.93 and 187 mM, respectively. Furthermore, we carried out D-xylulose production from β-1,3-xylan, a major cell wall polysaccharide component of the killer alga Caulerpa taxifolia. The synergistic action of β-1,3-xylanase (TxyA) and β-1,3-xylosidase (XloA) from Vibrio sp. strain XY-214 enabled efficient saccharification of β-1,3-xylan to D-xylose. D-xylose was then converted to D-xylulose by using XylA from the strain XY-214. The conversion rate of D-xylose to D-xylulose by XylA was found to be approximately 40% in the presence of 4 mM sodium tetraborate after 2 h of incubation. These results demonstrated that TxyA, XloA, and XylA from Vibrio sp. strain XY-214 are useful tools for D-xylulose production from β-1,3-xylan. Because D-xylulose can be used as a source for ethanol fermentation by yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the present study will provide a basis for ethanol production from β-1,3-xylan.

  4. Biological consequences of ancient gene acquisition and duplication in the large genome soil bacterium, ""solibacter usitatus"" strain Ellin6076

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Challacombe, Jean F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eichorst, Stephanie A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Xie, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kuske, Cheryl R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hauser, Loren [ORNL; Land, Miriam [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial genome sizes range from ca. 0.5 to 10Mb and are influenced by gene duplication, horizontal gene transfer, gene loss and other evolutionary processes. Sequenced genomes of strains in the phylum Acidobacteria revealed that 'Solibacter usistatus' strain Ellin6076 harbors a 9.9 Mb genome. This large genome appears to have arisen by horizontal gene transfer via ancient bacteriophage and plasmid-mediated transduction, as well as widespread small-scale gene duplications. This has resulted in an increased number of paralogs that are potentially ecologically important (ecoparalogs). Low amino acid sequence identities among functional group members and lack of conserved gene order and orientation in the regions containing similar groups of paralogs suggest that most of the paralogs were not the result of recent duplication events. The genome sizes of cultured subdivision 1 and 3 strains in the phylum Acidobacteria were estimated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to determine the prevalence of the large genome trait within the phylum. Members of subdivision 1 were estimated to have smaller genome sizes ranging from ca. 2.0 to 4.8 Mb, whereas members of subdivision 3 had slightly larger genomes, from ca. 5.8 to 9.9 Mb. It is hypothesized that the large genome of strain Ellin6076 encodes traits that provide a selective metabolic, defensive and regulatory advantage in the variable soil environment.

  5. Characterization and Genomic Analysis of a Highly Efficient Dibutyl Phthalate-Degrading Bacterium Gordonia sp. Strain QH-12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decai Jin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A bacterial strain QH-12 isolated from activated sludge was identified as Gordonia sp. based on analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence and was found to be capable of utilizing dibutyl phthalate (DBP and other common phthalate esters (PAEs as the sole carbon and energy source. The degradation kinetics of DBP under different concentrations by the strain QH-12 fit well with the modified Gompertz model (R2 > 0.98. However, strain QH-12 could not utilize the major intermediate product phthalate (phthalic acid; PA as the sole carbon and energy source, and only a little amount of PA was detected. The QH-12 genome analysis revealed the presence of putative hydrolase/esterase genes involved in PAEs-degradation but no phthalic acid catabolic gene cluster was found, suggesting that a novel degradation pathway of PAEs was present in Gordonia sp. QH-12. This information will be valuable for obtaining a more holistic understanding on diverse genetic mechanisms of PAEs-degrading Gordonia sp. strains.

  6. Burkholderia cenocepacia Strain CEIB S5-1, a Rhizosphere-Inhabiting Bacterium with Potential in Bioremediation

    OpenAIRE

    Mart?nez-Ocampo, Fernando; Lozano-Aguirre Beltr?n, Luis Fernando; Hern?ndez-Mendoza, Armando; Rojas-Espinoza, Luis Enrique; Popoca-Ursino, Elida Carolina; Ortiz-Hern?ndez, Mar?a Laura; S?nchez-Salinas, Enrique; Ramos Quintana, Fernando; Dant?n-Gonz?lez, Edgar

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is considered an opportunistic pathogen from humans and may cause disease in plants. A bioprospection from a plaguicide-contaminated agricultural field in Mexico identified several methyl parathion-degrading bacteria. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of B. cenocepacia strain CEIB S5-1, which gave us clues into ecological biodiversity.

  7. Decolorization of textile azo dye and Congo red by an isolated strain of the dissimilatory manganese-reducing bacterium Shewanella xiamenensis BC01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, I-Son; Chen, Tingting; Lin, Rong; Zhang, Xia; Ni, Chao; Sun, Dongzhe

    2014-03-01

    Shewanella xiamenensis BC01 (SXM) was isolated from sediment collected off Xiamen, China and was identified based on the phylogenetic tree of 16S rRNA sequences and the gyrB gene. This strain showed high activity in the decolorization of textile azo dyes, especially methyl orange, reactive red 198, and recalcitrant dye Congo red, decolorizing at rates of 96.2, 93.0, and 87.5%, respectively. SXM had the best performance for the specific decolorization rate (SDR) of azo dyes compared to Proteus hauseri ZMd44 and Aeromonas hydrophila NIU01 strains and had an SDR similar to Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in Congo red decolorization. Luria-Bertani medium was the optimal culture medium for SXM, as it reached a density of 4.69 g-DCW L(-1) at 16 h. A mediator (manganese) significantly enhanced the biodegradation and flocculation of Congo red. Further analysis with UV-VIS, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, and Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry demonstrated that Congo red was cleaved at the azo bond, producing 4,4'-diamino-1,1'-biphenyl and 1,2'-diamino naphthalene 4-sulfonic acid. Finally, SEM results revealed that nanowires exist between the bacteria, indicating that SXM degradation of the azo dyes was coupled with electron transfer through the nanowires. The purpose of this work is to explore the utilization of a novel, dissimilatory manganese-reducing bacterium in the treatment of wastewater containing azo dyes.

  8. Genome sequence of the moderately halophilic bacterium Salinicoccus carnicancri type strain Crm(T) (= DSM 23852(T)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Dong-Wook; Whon, Tae Woong; Cho, Yong-Joon; Chun, Jongsik; Kim, Min-Soo; Jung, Mi-Ja; Shin, Na-Ri; Kim, Joon-Yong; Kim, Pil Soo; Yun, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Jina; Oh, Sei Joon; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2013-01-01

    Salinicoccus carnicancri Jung et al. 2010 belongs to the genus Salinicoccus in the family Staphylococcaceae. Members of the Salinicoccus are moderately halophilic and originate from various salty environments. The halophilic features of the Salinicoccus suggest their possible uses in biotechnological applications, such as biodegradation and fermented food production. However, the genus Salinicoccus is poorly characterized at the genome level, despite its potential importance. This study presents the draft genome sequence of S. carnicancri strain Crm(T) and its annotation. The 2,673,309 base pair genome contained 2,700 protein-coding genes and 78 RNA genes with an average G+C content of 47.93 mol%. It was notable that the strain carried 72 predicted genes associated with osmoregulation, which suggests the presence of beneficial functions that facilitate growth in high-salt environments.

  9. Isolation and characterization of phenol degrading bacterium strain Bacillus thuringiensis J20 from olive waste in Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ereqat, Suheir I; Abdelkader, Ahmad A; Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed F; Al-Jawabreh, Amer O; Zaid, Taher M; Letnik, Ilya; Abdeen, Ziad A

    2018-01-02

    This study aimed at isolation of phenol degrading bacteria from olive mill wastes in Palestine. The efficiency of phenol removal and factors affecting phenol degradation were investigated. A bacterial strain (J20) was isolated from solid olive mill waste and identified as Bacillus thuringiensis based on standard morphological, biochemical characteristics and 16SrRNA sequence analysis. The strain was able to grow in a phenol concentration of 700 mg/L as the sole carbon and energy source. The culture conditions showed a significant impact on the ability of these cells to remove phenol. This strain exhibited optimum phenol degradation performance at pH 6.57 and 30 °C . Under the optimized conditions, this strain could degrade 88.6% of phenol (700 mg/L) within 96 h when the initial cell density was OD 600 0.2. However, the degradation efficiency could be improved from about 88% to nearly 99% by increasing the cell density. Immobilization of J20 was carried out using 4% sodium alginate. Phenol degradation efficiency of the immobilized cells of J20 was higher than that of the free cells, 100% versus 88.6% of 700 mg/L of phenol in 120 h, indicating the improved tolerance of the immobilized cells toward phenol toxicity. The J20 was used in detoxifying crude OMWW, phenolic compounds levels were reduced by 61% compared to untreated OMWW after five days of treatment. Hence, B. thuringiensis-J20 can be effectively used for bioremediation of phenol-contaminated sites in Palestine. These findings may lead to new biotechnological applications for the degradation of phenol, related to olive oil production.

  10. Draft genome sequence of Halomonas sp. strain KM-1, a moderately halophilic bacterium that produces the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Yoshikazu; Kawasaki, Kazunori; Shigeri, Yasushi

    2012-05-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Halomonas sp. strain KM-1, which was isolated in Ikeda City, Osaka, Japan, and which produces the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate). The total length of the assembled genome is 4,992,811 bp, and 4,220 coding sequences were predicted within the genome. Genes encoding proteins that are involved in the production and depolymerization of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) were identified. The identification of these genes might be of use in the production of the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) and its monomer 3-hydroxybutyrate.

  11. Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus saerimneri 30a (Formerly Lactobacillus sp. Strain 30a), a Reference Lactic Acid Bacterium Strain Producing Biogenic Amines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romano, Andrea; Trip, Hein; Campbell-Sills, Hugo; Bouchez, Olivier; Sherman, David; Lolkema, Juke S.; Lucas, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus sp. strain 30a (Lactobacillus saerimneri) produces the biogenic amines histamine, putrescine, and cadaverine by decarboxylating their amino acid precursors. We report its draft genome sequence (1,634,278 bases, 42.6% G+C content) and the principal findings from its annotation, which

  12. Evidence for growth of strains of the plant epiphytic bacterium Erwinia herbicola and transconjugation among the bacterial strains in guts of the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K; Hara, W; Sato, M

    1998-09-01

    Growth of plant epiphytic bacteria Erwinia herbicola and Pseudomonas syringae in guts of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, was studied. Fifth instar silkworm larvae were fed artificial diets supplemented with these bacteria for 6 to 12 h followed by uncontaminated diets. At 1, 3, and 6 days after feeding, bacteria were isolated from insect guts and feces. A much larger population of E. herbicola was detected in the samples collected 3 and 6 days after the inoculation than in samples collected after 1 day, indicating that these bacteria grew in the insect gut, while P. syringae was unable to survive. Transconjugation between E. herbicola strains in the insect gut was also examined. First, either a donor or a recipient strain was fed to the insects in artificial diets containing the bacteria during 12 h, and then pairing strains were fed during 12 h after starvation for 12 h. The conjugative plasmid pBPW1::Tn7 was transferred into recipient cells at very high frequencies (10(-1)/recipient after 3 days and 10(-3) after 6 days) in insect guts. Indigenous plasmids of E. herbicola mobilized RSF1010 plasmid into recipient cells at frequencies of 10(-4) in insect guts. These transconjugants were detected in the feces of the insects. Thus, plasmid-mediated gene transfer among the epiphytic bacteria in insect guts was demonstrated. The results obtained suggest that in insecta gene transfer may play an important role in the evolution of plant epiphytic bacteria. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  13. A novel laccase from thermoalkaliphilic bacterium Caldalkalibacillus thermarum strain TA2.A1 able to catalyze dimerization of a lignin model compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatge, Sunil; Yang, Youri; Song, Woo-Young; Kim, Tae-Young; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2018-03-19

    In the present study, the gene encoding a multicopper oxidase, more precisely a laccase from the thermoalkaliphilic aerobic bacterium Caldalkalibacillus thermarum strain TA2.A1 (CtLac), was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. CtLac is a monomeric protein with a molecular weight of 57 kDa as determined by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The optimum pH and temperature for 2,6-dimethoxyphenol (2,6-DMP) oxidation were 8.0 and 70 °C, respectively. The kinetic constants K m and k cat for 2,6-DMP were of 200 μM and 23 s -1 , respectively. The enzyme was highly thermostable at 80 °C and retained more than 80% of its activity after 24 h preincubation under thermoalkaliphilic conditions. Remarkably, it showed a half-life of about 12 h at 90 °C. The enzyme activity was significantly enhanced by Cu 2+ and Mn 2+ and was not affected in the presence of most of the other metal ions. CtLac activity was stimulated in the presence of halides, organic solvents, and surfactants. Furthermore, the activity of CtLac on a dimeric lignin model compound, guaiacylglycerol-β-guaiacyl ether (GGGE) was investigated. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis indicated that CtLac catalyzes dimerization of GGGE to form a C5-C5 biphenyl tetramer. The stability and activity of CtLac characterized herein under thermoalkaliphilic conditions make it a highly suitable biocatalyst for various biotechnological and industrial applications.

  14. Identification of a 4-Deoxy-l-erythro-5-hexoseulose Uronic Acid Reductase, FlRed, in an Alginolytic Bacterium Flavobacterium sp. Strain UMI-01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Inoue

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In alginate-assimilating bacteria, alginate is depolymerized to unsaturated monosaccharide by the actions of endolytic and exolytic alginate lyases (EC 4.2.2.3 and EC 4.2.2.11. The monosaccharide is non-enzymatically converted to 4-deoxy-l-ery thro-5-hexoseulose uronic acid (DEH, then reduced to 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-gluconate (KDG by a specific reductase, and metabolized through the Entner–Doudoroff pathway. Recently, the NADPH-dependent reductase A1-R that belongs to short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR superfamily was identified as the DEH-reductase in Sphingomonas sp. A1. We have subsequently noticed that an SDR-like enzyme gene, flred, occurred in the genome of an alginolytic bacterium Flavobacterium sp. strain UMI-01. In the present study, we report on the deduced amino-acid sequence of flred and DEH-reducing activity of recombinant FlRed. The deduced amino-acid sequence of flred comprised 254 residues and showed 34% amino-acid identities to that of A1-R from Sphingomonas sp. A1 and 80%–88% to those of SDR-like enzymes from several alginolytic bacteria. Common sequence motifs of SDR-superfamily enzymes, e.g., the catalytic tetrad Asn-Lys-Tyr-Ser and the cofactor-binding sequence Thr-Gly-x-x-x-Gly-x-Gly in Rossmann fold, were completely conserved in FlRed. On the other hand, an Arg residue that determined the NADPH-specificity of Sphingomonas A1-R was replaced by Glu in FlRed. Thus, we investigated cofactor-preference of FlRed using a recombinant enzyme. As a result, the recombinant FlRed (recFlRed was found to show high specificity to NADH. recFlRed exhibited practically no activity toward variety of aldehyde, ketone, keto ester, keto acid and aldose substrates except for DEH. On the basis of these results, we conclude that FlRed is the NADH-dependent DEH-specific SDR of Flavobacterium sp. strain UMI-01.

  15. Marine Bacteria from Danish Coastal Waters Show Antifouling Activity against the Marine Fouling Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. Strain S91 and Zoospores of the Green Alga Ulva australis Independent of Bacteriocidal Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernbom, Nete; Ng, Yoke Yin; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2011-01-01

    attaching to steel surfaces. P. piscicida killed S91 bacteria in the suspension cultures, whereas P. tunicata and P. ulvae did not; however, they did prevent adhesion by nonbactericidal mechanism(s). Seven Pseudoalteromonas species, including P. piscicida and P. tunicata, reduced the number of settling Ulva......, representing the major taxonomic groups, different seasons, and isolation strategies, were tested for antiadhesive effect against the marine biofilm-forming bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain S91 and zoospores of the green alga Ulva australis. The antiadhesive effects were assessed by quantifying...... the number of strain S91 or Ulva spores attaching to a preformed biofilm of each of the 22 strains. The strongest antifouling activity was found in Pseudoalteromonas strains. Biofilms of Pseudoalteromonas piscicida, Pseudoalteromonas tunicata, and Pseudoalteromonas ulvae prevented Pseudoalteromonas S91 from...

  16. Determination of the chemical structure of the capsular polysaccharide of strain B33, a fast-growing soya bean-nodulating bacterium isolated from an arid region of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Carvajal, M A; Tejero-Mateo, P; Espartero, J L; Ruiz-Sainz, J E; Buendía-Clavería, A M; Ollero, F J; Yang, S S; Gil-Serrano, A M

    2001-01-01

    We have determined the structure of a polysaccharide from strain B33, a fast-growing bacterium that forms nitrogen-fixing nodules with Asiatic and American soya bean cultivars. On the basis of monosaccharide analysis, methylation analysis, one-dimensional 1H- and 13C-NMR and two-dimensional NMR experiments, the structure was shown to consist of a polymer having the repeating unit -->6)-4-O-methyl-alpha-D-Glcp-(1-->4)-3-O-methyl-beta-D-GlcpA-(1--> (where GlcpA is glucopyranuronic acid and Glcp is glucopyranose). Strain B33 produces a K-antigen polysaccharide repeating unit that does not have the structural motif sugar-Kdx [where Kdx is 3-deoxy-D-manno-2-octulosonic acid (Kdo) or a Kdo-related acid] proposed for different Sinorhizobium fredii strains, all of them being effective with Asiatic soya bean cultivars but unable to form nitrogen-fixing nodules with American soya bean cultivars. Instead, it resembles the K-antigen of S. fredii strain HH303 (rhamnose, galacturonic acid)n, which is also effective with both groups of soya bean cultivars. Only the capsular polysaccharide from strains B33 and HH303 have monosaccharide components that are also present in the surface polysaccharide of Bradyrhizobium elkanii strains, which consists of a 4-O-methyl-D-glucurono-L-rhamnan. PMID:11439101

  17. Complete genome sequence of the termite hindgut bacterium Spirochaeta coccoides type strain (SPN1T), reclassification in the genus Sphaerochaeta as Sphaerochaeta coccoides comb. nov. and emendations of the family Spirochaetaceae and the genus Sphaerochaeta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abt, Birte; Han, Cliff; Scheuner, Carmen; Lu, Megan; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxane; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Gronow, Sabine; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Detter, John C.

    2012-05-25

    Spirochaeta coccoides Dröge et al. 2006 is a member of the genus Spirochaeta Ehrenberg 1835, one of the oldest named genera within the Bacteria. S. coccoides is an obligately anaerobic, Gram-negative, non-motile, spherical bacterium that was isolated from the hindgut contents of the termite Neotermes castaneus. The species is of interest because it may play an important role in the digestion of breakdown products from cellulose and hemicellulose in the termite gut. Here we provide a taxonomic re-evaluation for strain SPN1T, and based on physiological and genomic characteristics, we propose its reclassification as a novel species in the genus Sphaerochaeta, a recently published sister group of the Spirochaeta. The 2,227,296 bp long genome of strain SPN1T with its 1,866 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes is a part of the GenomicEncyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  18. Whole-Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas putida Strain UASWS0946, a Highly Ammonia-Tolerant Nitrifying Bacterium Isolated from Sewage Sludge Aerobic Granules

    OpenAIRE

    Crovadore, Julien; Calmin, Gautier; Cochard, Bastien; Chablais, Romain; Grizard, Damien; Berthon, Jean-Yves; Lefort, François

    2015-01-01

    We report here the genome of Pseudomonas putida strain UASWS0946, a highly ammonia-tolerant nitrifying strain isolated from sewage sludge aerobic granules, which displays adequate genetic equipment for soil depollution, sludge treatment, and biological fertilization in agriculture.

  19. Genome Sequence of Thermotoga sp Strain RQ2, a Hyperthermophilic Bacterium Isolated from a Geothermally Heated Region of the Seafloor near Ribeira Quente, the Azores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swithers, Kristen S [University of Connecticut, Storrs; DiPippo, Jonathan L [University of Connecticut, Storrs; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pennacchio, Len [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lykidis, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Stetter, Karl O [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Nelson, Karen E [J. Craig Venter Institute; Gogarten, Peter [University of Connecticut, Storrs; Noll, Kenneth M [University of Connecticut, Storrs

    2011-01-01

    Thermotoga sp. strain RQ2 is probably a strain of Thermotoga maritima. Its complete genome sequence allows for an examination of the extent and consequences of gene flow within Thermotoga species and strains. Thermotoga sp. RQ2 differs from T. maritima in its genes involved in myo-inositol metabolism. Its genome also encodes an apparent fructose phosphotransferase system (PTS) sugar transporter. This operon is also found in Thermotoga naphthophila strain RKU-10 but no other Thermotogales. These are the first reported PTS transporters in the Thermotogales.

  20. Polyphasic taxonomic revision of the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex: proposal to emend the descriptions of Ralstonia solanacearum and Ralstonia syzygii and reclassify current R. syzygii strains as Ralstonia syzygii subsp. syzygii subsp. nov., R. solanacearum phylotype IV strains as Ralstonia syzygii subsp. indonesiensis subsp. nov., banana blood disease bacterium strains as Ralstonia syzygii subsp. celebesensis subsp. nov. and R. solanacearum phylotype I and III strains as Ralstonia pseudosolanacearum sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safni, Irda; Cleenwerck, Ilse; De Vos, Paul; Fegan, Mark; Sly, Lindsay; Kappler, Ulrike

    2014-09-01

    The Ralstonia solanacearum species complex has long been recognized as a group of phenotypically diverse strains that can be subdivided into four phylotypes. Using a polyphasic taxonomic approach on an extensive set of strains, this study provides evidence for a taxonomic and nomenclatural revision of members of this complex. Data obtained from phylogenetic analysis of 16S-23S rRNA ITS gene sequences, 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer (ITS) region sequences and partial endoglucanase (egl) gene sequences and DNA-DNA hybridizations demonstrate that the R. solanacearum species complex comprises three genospecies. One of these includes the type strain of Ralstonia solanacearum and consists of strains of R. solanacearum phylotype II only. The second genospecies includes the type strain of Ralstonia syzygii and contains only phylotype IV strains. This genospecies is subdivided into three distinct groups, namely R. syzygii, the causal agent of Sumatra disease on clove trees in Indonesia, R. solanacearum phylotype IV strains isolated from different host plants mostly from Indonesia, and strains of the blood disease bacterium (BDB), the causal agent of the banana blood disease, a bacterial wilt disease in Indonesia that affects bananas and plantains. The last genospecies is composed of R. solanacearum strains that belong to phylotypes I and III. As these genospecies are also supported by phenotypic data that allow the differentiation of the three genospecies, the following taxonomic proposals are made: emendation of the descriptions of Ralstonia solanacearum and Ralstonia syzygii and descriptions of Ralstonia syzygii subsp. nov. (type strain R 001(T) = LMG 10661(T) = DSM 7385(T)) for the current R. syzygii strains, Ralstonia syzygii subsp. indonesiensis subsp. nov. (type strain UQRS 464(T) = LMG 27703(T) = DSM 27478(T)) for the current R. solanacearum phylotype IV strains, Ralstonia syzygii subsp. celebesensis subsp. nov. (type strain UQRS 627(T

  1. Draft genome sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis strain BrMgv02-JM63, a chitinolytic bacterium isolated from oil-contaminated mangrove soil in Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcon, Joelma; Taketani, Rodrigo Gouvêa; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Mazzero, Giulia Inocêncio; Soares Junior, Fabio Lino; Melo, Itamar Soares; Azevedo, João Lúcio; Andreote, Fernando Dini

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence and the automatic annotation of Bacillus thuringiensis strain BrMgv02-JM63. This genome comprises a set of genes involved in the metabolism of chitin and N-acetylglucosamine utilization, thus suggesting the possible role of this strain in the cycling of

  2. Whole-Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas putida Strain UASWS0946, a Highly Ammonia-Tolerant Nitrifying Bacterium Isolated from Sewage Sludge Aerobic Granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crovadore, Julien; Calmin, Gautier; Cochard, Bastien; Chablais, Romain; Grizard, Damien; Berthon, Jean-Yves; Lefort, François

    2015-10-08

    We report here the genome of Pseudomonas putida strain UASWS0946, a highly ammonia-tolerant nitrifying strain isolated from sewage sludge aerobic granules, which displays adequate genetic equipment for soil depollution, sludge treatment, and biological fertilization in agriculture. Copyright © 2015 Crovadore et al.

  3. Genomic analysis of three African strains of Bacillus anthracis demonstrates that they are part of the clonal expansion of an exclusively pathogenic bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Rouli

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus anthracis is the causative agent of anthrax and is classified as a ‘Category A’ biological weapon. Six complete genomes of B. anthracis (A0248, Ames, Ames Ancestor, CDC684, H0491, and Sterne are currently available. In this report, we add three African strain genomes: Sen2Col2, Sen3 and Gmb1. To study the pan‐genome of B. anthracis, we used bioinformatics tools, such as Cluster of Orthologous Groups, and performed phylogenetic analysis. We found that the three African strains contained the pX01 and pX02 plasmids, the nonsense mutation in the plcR gene and the four known prophages. These strains are most similar to the CDC684 strain and belong to the A cluster. We estimated that the B. anthracis pan‐genome has 2893 core genes (99% of the genome size and 85 accessory genes. We validated the hypothesis that B. anthracis has a closed pan‐genome and found that the three African strains carry the two plasmids associated with bacterial virulence. The pan‐genome nature of B. anthracis confirms its lack of exchange (similar to Clostridium tetani and supports its exclusively pathogenic role, despite its survival in the environment. Moreover, thanks to the study of the core content single nucleotide polymorphisms, we can see that our three African strains diverged very recently from the other B. anthracis strains.

  4. Isolation and characterization of Bacillus subtilis strain BY-3, a thermophilic and efficient cellulase-producing bacterium on untreated plant biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, F; Ma, L; Ji, S; Yang, W; Cao, B

    2014-09-01

    Bioconversion of biomass, particularly crop wastes, into biofuels is being developed as an alternative approach in meeting the high energy demand. In this study, a thermophilic bacterial strain BY-3 that exhibits cellulolytic potential was isolated from faecal samples of Tibetan pigs; this strain was identified as Bacillus subtilis. The strain can produce cellulase when grown on various substrates, including carboxymethyl cellulose, rice straw, corn stover, soluble starch and wheat bran. The maximum cellulase activity of the strain was up to 4·323 ± 0·065 U ml(-1) when cultivated in the medium containing corn stover (30 g l(-1) ) for 24 h. The results demonstrated that corn stover is the most suitable substrate for cellulase production by the strain BY-3. The crude cellulase of strain BY-3 was most active at pH 5·5 and 60°C, and the enzyme in acetate buffer (50 mmol l(-1) ) demonstrated a good stability at 60°C for at least 1 h. The crude cellulase exhibited a strong antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. The strain can be used in cost-efficient cellulase production for bioconversion of agricultural residual biomass into biofuels. The increased consumption of fossil fuels has caused serious energy crisis and environmental problem. Thus, an alternative energy source is necessary. Bioconversion of biomass, particularly agricultural residuals, into value-added bioproducts, such as biofuels and chemical solvents, has received considerable attention. In this study, the newly isolated thermophilic Bacillus subtilis strain BY-3 produces cellulase efficiently with the use of untreated corn stover as a sole carbon source. This strain possesses the thermostable cellulase that is active with diverse crop wastes with a broad pH range and is a highly promising candidate for agricultural waste management. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Complete genome sequence of the halophilic bacterium Spirochaeta africana type strain (Z-7692T) from the alkaline Lake Magadi in the East African Rift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Abt, Birte [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Scheuner, Carmen [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Held, Brittany [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Tindall, Brian [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2013-01-01

    Spirochaeta africana Zhilina et al. 1996 is an anaerobic, aerotolerant, spiral-shaped bacte- rium that is motile via periplasmic flagella. The type strain of the species, Z-7692T, was iso- lated in 1993 or earlier from a bacterial bloom in the brine under the trona layer in a shallow lagoon of the alkaline equatorial Lake Magadi in Kenya. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. Considering the pending reclassification of S. caldaria to the genus Treponema, S. africana is only the second 'true' member of the genus Spirochaeta with a genome-sequenced type strain to be pub- lished. The 3,285,855 bp long genome of strain Z-7692T with its 2,817 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  6. A Sequential Statistical Approach towards an Optimized Production of a Broad Spectrum Bacteriocin Substance from a Soil Bacterium Bacillus sp. YAS 1 Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira M. Embaby

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriocins, ribosomally synthesized antimicrobial peptides, display potential applications in agriculture, medicine, and industry. The present study highlights integral statistical optimization and partial characterization of a bacteriocin substance from a soil bacterium taxonomically affiliated as Bacillus sp. YAS 1 after biochemical and molecular identifications. A sequential statistical approach (Plackett-Burman and Box-Behnken was employed to optimize bacteriocin (BAC YAS 1 production. Using optimal levels of three key determinants (yeast extract (0.48% (w/v, incubation time (62 hrs, and agitation speed (207 rpm in peptone yeast beef based production medium resulted in 1.6-fold enhancement in BAC YAS 1 level (470 AU/mL arbitrary units against Erwinia amylovora. BAC YAS 1 showed activity over a wide range of pH (1–13 and temperature (45–80°C. A wide spectrum antimicrobial activity of BAC YAS 1 against the human pathogens (Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Campylobacter jejuni, Enterobacter aerogenes, Enterococcus sp., Proteus sp., Klebsiella sp., and Salmonella typhimurium, the plant pathogen (E. amylovora, and the food spoiler (Listeria innocua was demonstrated. On top and above, BAC YAS 1 showed no antimicrobial activity towards lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus bulgaricus, L. casei, L. lactis, and L. reuteri. Promising characteristics of BAC YAS 1 prompt its commercialization for efficient utilization in several industries.

  7. Transcriptional responses of the bacterium Burkholderia terrae BS001 to the fungal host Lyophyllum sp strain Karsten under soil-mimicking conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ul Haq, Irshad; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    In this study, the mycosphere isolate Burkholderia terrae BS001 was confronted with the soil fungus Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten on soil extract agar plates in order to examine its transcriptional responses over time. At the initial stages of the experiment (T1-day 3; T2-day 5), contact between

  8. High quality draft genome sequence of the type strain of Pseudomonas lutea OK2(T), a phosphate-solubilizing rhizospheric bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Yunyoung; Park, Gun-Seok; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas lutea OK2(T) (=LMG 21974(T), CECT 5822(T)) is the type strain of the species and was isolated from the rhizosphere of grass growing in Spain in 2003 based on its phosphate-solubilizing capacity. In order to identify the functional significance of phosphate solubilization in Pseudomonas Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria, we describe here the phenotypic characteristics of strain OK2(T) along with its high-quality draft genome sequence, its annotation, and analysis. The genome is comprised of 5,647,497 bp with 60.15 % G + C content. The sequence includes 4,846 protein-coding genes and 95 RNA genes.

  9. Complete Genome Sequence ofAcetobacter pomorumOregon-R-modENCODE Strain BDGP5, an Acetic Acid Bacterium Found in theDrosophila melanogasterGut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Kenneth H; Yu, Charles; Park, Soo; Hammonds, Ann S; Booth, Benjamin W; Celniker, Susan E

    2017-11-30

    Acetobacter pomorum Oregon-R-modENCODE strain BDGP5 was isolated from Drosophila melanogaster for functional host-microbe interaction studies. The complete genome is composed of a single chromosomal circle of 2,848,089 bp, with a G+C content of 53% and three plasmids of 131,455 bp, 19,216 bp, and 9,160 bp. Copyright © 2017 Wan et al.

  10. Nitrogen-removal efficiency of a novel aerobic denitrifying bacterium, Pseudomonas stutzeri strain ZF31, isolated from a drinking-water reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tinglin; Guo, Lin; Zhang, Haihan; Su, Junfeng; Wen, Gang; Zhang, Kai

    2015-11-01

    An aerobic denitrifier, identified as Pseudomonas stutzeri strain ZF31, was isolated from the Zhoucun drinking-water reservoir. Strain ZF31 removed 97% of nitrate nitrogen after 16h, without nitrite accumulation. Sequence amplification indicated the presence of the denitrification genes napA, nirS, norB, and nosZ. Nitrogen balance analysis revealed that approximately 75% of the initial nitrogen was removed as gas products. Response surface methodology (RSM) experiments showed that maximum removal of total nitrogen (TN) occurred at pH 8.23, a C/N ratio of 6.68, temperature of 27.72°C, and with shaking at 54.15rpm. The TN removal rate at low C/N ratio (i.e., 3) and low temperature (i.e., 10°C) was 73.30% and 60.08%, respectively. These results suggest that strain ZF31 has potential applications for the bioremediation of slightly polluted drinking-water reservoirs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Roles of four chitinases (chia, chib, chic, and chid) in the chitin degradation system of marine bacterium Alteromonas sp. strain O-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orikoshi, Hideyuki; Nakayama, Shigenari; Miyamoto, Katsushiro; Hanato, Chiaki; Yasuda, Masahide; Inamori, Yoshihiko; Tsujibo, Hiroshi

    2005-04-01

    Alteromonas sp. strain O-7 secretes four chitinases (ChiA, ChiB, ChiC, and ChiD) in the presence of chitin. To elucidate why the strain produces multiple chitinases, we studied the expression levels of the four genes and proteins, their enzymatic properties, and their synergistic effects on chitin degradation. Among the four chitinases, ChiA was produced in the largest quantities, followed by ChiD, and the production of ChiB and ChiC changed at lower levels than those of ChiA and ChiD. The expression of the chiA, chiB, chiC, and chiD genes was investigated at the transcriptional level. The RNA transcript of chiA was most strongly induced in the presence of chitin, the expression of chiD followed, and the RNA transcripts of chiB and chiC changed at low levels. The hydrolyzing activities of the four chitinases against various substrates were examined. ChiA was the most active enzyme against powdered chitin, whereas ChiC was the most active against soluble chitin among the four chitinases. ChiD had activities closer to those of ChiA than to those of ChiB and ChiC. ChiB showed no distinctive feature against the chitinous substrates tested. When powdered chitin was treated with the proper combination of four chitinases, an approximately 2.0-fold increase in the hydrolytic activity was observed. These results, together with the results described above, indicate that ChiA plays a central role in chitin degradation for this strain.

  12. Genome sequence of the moderately thermophilic sulfur-reducing bacterium Thermanaerovibrio velox type strain (Z-9701(T)) and emended description of the genus Thermanaerovibrio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniappan, Krishna; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P; Teshima, Hazuki; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla; Tice, Hope; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Rohde, Manfred; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Spring, Stefan; Detter, John C; Göker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2013-10-16

    Thermanaerovibrio velox Zavarzina et al. 2000 is a member of the Synergistaceae, a family in the phylum Synergistetes that is already well-characterized at the genome level. Members of this phylum were described as Gram-negative staining anaerobic bacteria with a rod/vibrioid cell shape and possessing an atypical outer cell envelope. They inhabit a large variety of anaerobic environments including soil, oil wells, wastewater treatment plants and animal gastrointestinal tracts. They are also found to be linked to sites of human diseases such as cysts, abscesses, and areas of periodontal disease. The moderately thermophilic and organotrophic T. velox shares most of its morphologic and physiologic features with the closely related species, T. acidaminovorans. In addition to Su883(T), the type strain of T. acidaminovorans, stain Z-9701(T) is the second type strain in the genus Thermanaerovibrio to have its genome sequence published. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the non-contiguous genome sequence and annotation. The 1,880,838 bp long chromosome (non-contiguous finished sequence) with its 1,751 protein-coding and 59 RNA genes is a part of the G enomic E ncyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of recombinant adenine phosphoribosyltransferase from the thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus strain HB27

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinitsyna, E. V.; Timofeev, V. I.; Tuzova, E. S.; Kostromina, M. A.; Murav'eva, T. I.; Esipov, R. S.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2017-07-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) belongs to the type I phosphoribosyltransferase family and catalyzes the formation of adenosine monophosphate via transfer of the 5-phosphoribosyl group from phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate to the nitrogen atom N9 of the adenine base. Proteins of this family are involved in a salvage pathway of nucleotide synthesis, thus providing purine base utilization and maintaining the optimal level of purine bases in the body. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase from the extremely thermophilic Thermus thermophilus strain HB27 was produced using a highly efficient E. coli producer strain and was then purified by affinity and gel-filtration chromatography. This enzyme was successfully employed as a catalyst for the cascade biosynthesis of biologically important nucleotides. The screening of crystallization conditions for recombinant APRT from T. thermophilus HB27 was performed in order to determine the enzyme structure by X-ray diffraction. The crystallization conditions, which were found by the vapor-diffusion technique, were then optimized to apply the counter-diffusion technique. The crystals of the enzyme were grown by the capillary counter-diffusion method. The crystals belong to sp. gr. P1211 and have the following unitcell parameters: a = 69.86 Å, b = 82.16 Å, c = 91.39 Å, α = γ = 90°, β = 102.58°. The X-ray diffraction data set suitable for the determination of the APRT structure at 2.6 Å resolution was collected from the crystals at the SPring-8 synchrotron facility (Japan).

  14. Construction of a Rapid Feather-Degrading Bacterium by Overexpression of a Highly Efficient Alkaline Keratinase in Its Parent Strain Bacillus amyloliquefaciens K11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lian; Wang, Hui; Lv, Yi; Bai, Yingguo; Luo, Huiying; Shi, Pengjun; Huang, Huoqing; Yao, Bin

    2016-01-13

    Keratinase is essential to degrade the main feather component, keratin, and is of importance for wide industrial applications. In this study, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain K11 was found to have significant feather-degrading capacity (completely degraded whole feathers within 24 h). The keratinase encoding gene, kerK, was expressed in Bacillus subtilis SCK6. The purified recombinant KerK showed optimal activity at 50 °C and pH 11.0 and degraded whole feathers within 0.5 h in the presence of DTT. The recombinant plasmids harboring kerK were extracted from B. subtilis SCK6 and transformed into B. amyloliquefaciens K11. As a result, the recombinant B. amyloliquefaciens K11 exhibited enhanced feather-degrading capacity with shortened reaction time within 12 h and increased keratinolytic activity (1500 U/mL) by 6-fold. This efficient and rapid feather-degrading character makes the recombinant strain of B. amyloliquefaciens K11 have potential for applications in feather meal preparation and waste feather disposal.

  15. Studies on the O-specific polysaccharide of the lipopolysaccharide from the Pseudomonas mediterranea strain C5P1rad1, a bacterium pathogenic of tomato and chrysanthemum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdorovenko, Evelina L; Cimmino, Alessio; Marchi, Guido; Shashkov, Alexander S; Fiori, Mario; Knirel, Yuriy A; Evidente, Antonio

    2017-08-07

    An O-specific polysaccharide (OPS) was isolated from the lipopolysaccharide of Pseudomonas mediterranea strain C5P1rad1, the causal agents of tomato pith necrosis and Chrysanthemum stem rot, and studied by one- and two-dimensional 1 H and 13 C NMR spectroscopy. The following structure of the trisaccharide repeating unit of the OPS was established, which, to our knowledge, is unique among the known bacterial polysaccharide structures: →4)-β-d-ManpNAc3NAcA-(1 → 4)-β-d-ManpNAc3NAcA-(1 → 3)-α-d-QuipNAc4NAc-(1→ where QuiNAc4NAc and ManNAc3NAcA indicate 2,4-diacetamido-2,4,6-trideoxyglucose and 2,3-diacetamido-2,3-dideoxymannuronic acid, respectively. Pre-treatment of leaves with LPS or OPS preparations at 250 and 50 μg mL -1 did not inhibit development of a hypersensitivity reaction induced by P. mediterranea C5P1rad1 on tobacco, tomato and chrysanthemum plants. The same preparations at 250 μg mL -1 partially prevented elicitation of the hypersensitivity reaction by Pseudomonas syringae KVPT7RC on chrysanthemum but not tobacco and tomato. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. The atherogenic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis evades circulating phagocytes by adhering to erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belstrøm, Daniel; Holmstrup, Palle; Damgaard, Christian

    2011-01-01

    A relationship between periodontitis and coronary heart disease has been investigated intensively. A pathogenic role for the oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis has been suggested for both diseases. We examined whether complement activation by P. gingivalis strain ATCC 33277 allows the bacter......A relationship between periodontitis and coronary heart disease has been investigated intensively. A pathogenic role for the oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis has been suggested for both diseases. We examined whether complement activation by P. gingivalis strain ATCC 33277 allows...

  17. The hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacterium Cobetia sp. strain MM1IDA2H-1 produces a biosurfactant that interferes with quorum sensing of fish pathogens by signal hijacking

    OpenAIRE

    Ibacache-Quiroga, C; Ojeda, J; Espinoza-Vergara, G; Olivero, P; Cuellar, M; Dinamarca, M A

    2013-01-01

    Summary Biosurfactants are produced by hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacteria in response to the presence of water-insoluble hydrocarbons. This is believed to facilitate the uptake of hydrocarbons by bacteria. However, these diffusible amphiphilic surface-active molecules are involved in several other biological functions such as microbial competition and intra-or inter-species communication. We report the isolation and characterization of a marine bacterial strain identified as Cobetia sp. MM...

  18. Genome Sequence of the Milbemycin-Producing Bacterium Streptomyces bingchenggensis▿

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiang-Jing; Yan, Yi-Jun; Zhang, Bo; An, Jing; Wang, Ji-Jia; Tian, Jun; Jiang, Ling; Chen, Yi-Hua; Huang, Sheng-Xiong; Yin, Min; Zhang, Ji; Gao, Ai-Li; Liu, Chong-Xi; Zhu, Zhao-Xiang; Xiang, Wen-Sheng

    2010-01-01

    Streptomyces bingchenggensis is a soil-dwelling bacterium producing the commercially important anthelmintic macrolide milbemycins. Besides milbemycins, the insecticidal polyether antibiotic nanchangmycin and some other antibiotics have also been isolated from this strain. Here we report the complete genome sequence of S. bingchenggensis. The availability of the genome sequence of S. bingchenggensis should enable us to understand the biosynthesis of these structurally intricate antibiotics bet...

  19. Gracilibacillus kimchii sp. nov., a halophilic bacterium isolated from kimchi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Young Joon; Lee, Hae-Won; Lim, Seul Ki; Kwon, Min-Sung; Lee, Jieun; Jang, Ja-Young; Park, Hae Woong; Nam, Young-Do; Seo, Myung-Ji; Choi, Hak-Jong

    2016-09-01

    A novel halophilic bacterium, strain K7(T), was isolated from kimchi, a traditional Korean fermented food. The strain is Gram-positive, motile, and produces terminal endospores. The isolate is facultative aerobic and grows at salinities of 0.0-25.0% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 10-15% NaCl), pH 5.5-8.5 (optimum pH 7.0-7.5), and 15-42°C (optimum 37°C). The predominant isoprenoid quinone in the strain is menaquinone-7 and the peptidoglycan of the strain is meso-diaminopimelic acid. The major fatty acids of the strain are anteisio-C15:0, iso-C15:0, and, C16:0 (other components were < 10.0%), while the major polar lipids are diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, and three unidentified lipids. A phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity showed that the isolated strain was a cluster of the genus Gracilibacillus. High levels of gene sequence similarity were observed between strain K7(T) and Gracilibacillus orientalis XH-63(T) (96.5%), and between the present strain and Gracilibacillus xinjiangensis (96.5%). The DNA G+C content of this strain is 37.7 mol%. Based on these findings, strain K7(T) is proposed as a novel species: Gracilibacillus kimchii sp. nov. The type strain is K7(T) (KACC 18669(T); JCM 31344(T)).

  20. Intestinimonas butyriciproducens gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel butyrate-producing bacterium from the mouse intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kläring, K.; Hanske, L.; Bui, T.P.N.; Charrier, C.; Blaut, M.; Haller, D.; Plugge, C.M.; Clavel, T.

    2013-01-01

    Whilst creating a bacterial collection of strains from the mouse intestine, we isolated a Gram-negative, spore-forming, non-motile and strictly anaerobic rod-shaped bacterium from the caecal content of a TNFdeltaARE mouse. The isolate, referred to as strain SRB-521-5-IT, was originally cultured on a

  1. Isolation of Rhp-PSP, a member of YER057c/YjgF/UK114 protein family with antiviral properties, from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris strain JSC-3b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Pin; Feng, Tuizi; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Songbai; Zhang, Yu; Cheng, Ju'e; Luo, Yuanhua; Peng, Jing; Zhang, Zhuo; Lu, Xiangyang; Zhang, Deyong; Liu, Yong

    2015-11-04

    Rhodopseudomonas palustris strain JSC-3b isolated from a water canal adjacent to a vegetable field produces a protein that was purified by bioactivity-guided fractionation based on ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange absorption and size exclusion. The protein was further identified as an endoribonuclease L-PSP (Liver-Perchloric acid-soluble protein) by shotgun mass spectrometry analysis and gene identification, and it is member of YER057c/YjgF/UK114 protein family. Herein, this protein is designated Rhp-PSP. Rhp-PSP exhibited significant inhibitory activities against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in vivo and in vitro. To our knowledge, this represents the first report on the antiviral activity of a protein of the YER057c/YjgF/UK114 family and also the first antiviral protein isolated from R. palustris. Our research provides insight into the potential of photosynthetic bacterial resources in biological control of plant virus diseases and sustainable agriculture.

  2. The hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacterium Cobetia sp. strain MM1IDA2H-1 produces a biosurfactant that interferes with quorum sensing of fish pathogens by signal hijacking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibacache-Quiroga, C; Ojeda, J; Espinoza-Vergara, G; Olivero, P; Cuellar, M; Dinamarca, M A

    2013-07-01

    Biosurfactants are produced by hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacteria in response to the presence of water-insoluble hydrocarbons. This is believed to facilitate the uptake of hydrocarbons by bacteria. However, these diffusible amphiphilic surface-active molecules are involved in several other biological functions such as microbial competition and intra- or inter-species communication. We report the isolation and characterization of a marine bacterial strain identified as Cobetia sp. MM1IDA2H-1, which can grow using the sulfur-containing heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon dibenzothiophene (DBT). As with DBT, when the isolated strain is grown in the presence of a microbial competitor, it produces a biosurfactant. Because the obtained biosurfactant was formed by hydroxy fatty acids and extracellular lipidic structures were observed during bacterial growth, we investigated whether the biosurfactant at its critical micelle concentration can interfere with bacterial communication systems such as quorum sensing. We focused on Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, a fish pathogen whose virulence relies on quorum sensing signals. Using biosensors for quorum sensing based on Chromobacterium violaceum and Vibrio anguillarum, we showed that when the purified biosurfactant was mixed with N-acyl homoserine lactones produced by A. salmonicida, quorum sensing was inhibited, although bacterial growth was not affected. In addition, the transcriptional activities of A. salmonicida virulence genes that are controlled by quorum sensing were repressed by both the purified biosurfactant and the growth in the presence of Cobetia sp. MM1IDA2H-1. We propose that the biosurfactant, or the lipid structures interact with the N-acyl homoserine lactones, inhibiting their function. This could be used as a strategy to interfere with the quorum sensing systems of bacterial fish pathogens, which represents an attractive alternative to classical antimicrobial therapies in fish aquaculture. © 2013

  3. The hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacterium Cobetia sp. strain MM1IDA2H-1 produces a biosurfactant that interferes with quorum sensing of fish pathogens by signal hijacking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibacache-Quiroga, C; Ojeda, J; Espinoza-Vergara, G; Olivero, P; Cuellar, M; Dinamarca, M A

    2013-01-01

    Summary Biosurfactants are produced by hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacteria in response to the presence of water-insoluble hydrocarbons. This is believed to facilitate the uptake of hydrocarbons by bacteria. However, these diffusible amphiphilic surface-active molecules are involved in several other biological functions such as microbial competition and intra-or inter-species communication. We report the isolation and characterization of a marine bacterial strain identified as Cobetia sp. MM1IDA2H-1, which can grow using the sulfur-containing heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon dibenzothiophene (DBT). As with DBT, when the isolated strain is grown in the presence of a microbial competitor, it produces a biosurfactant. Because the obtained biosurfactant was formed by hydroxy fatty acids and extracellular lipidic structures were observed during bacterial growth, we investigated whether the biosurfactant at its critical micelle concentration can interfere with bacterial communication systems such as quorum sensing. We focused on Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, a fish pathogen whose virulence relies on quorum sensing signals. Using biosensors for quorum sensing based on Chromobacterium violaceum and Vibrio anguillarum, we showed that when the purified biosurfactant was mixed with N-acyl homoserine lactones produced by A. salmonicida, quorum sensing was inhibited, although bacterial growth was not affected. In addition, the transcriptional activities of A. salmonicida virulence genes that are controlled by quorum sensing were repressed by both the purified biosurfactant and the growth in the presence of Cobetia sp. MM1IDA2H-1. We propose that the biosurfactant, or the lipid structures interact with the N-acyl homoserine lactones, inhibiting their function. This could be used as a strategy to interfere with the quorum sensing systems of bacterial fish pathogens, which represents an attractive alternative to classical antimicrobial therapies in fish

  4. Lactococcus lactis - a diploid bacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Ole; Hansen, Flemming G.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    the next division. Thus, the regions of the chromosome that are the last to be replicated are haploid even in fast-growing bacteria. In contrast to this general rule for bacteria, we found that Lactococcus lactis, a bacterium which has been exploited for thousands of years for the production of fermented...... milk products, is born with two complete non-replicating chromosomes. L. lactis therefore remain diploid throughout its entire life cycle....

  5. Cloning and characterization of a beta-1,4-mannanase 5C possessing a family 27 carbohydrate-binding module from a marine bacterium, Vibrio sp. strain MA-138.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Megumi; Umemoto, Yoshiaki; Okamura, Hidenori; Nakano, Daiichirou; Tamaru, Yutaka; Araki, Toshiyoshi

    2009-01-01

    The beta-1,4-mannanase 5C gene (man5C) of Vibrio sp. strain MA-138 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The man5C gene consisted of 2,010 bp nucleotides encoding a protein of 669 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 76,309. beta-1,4-Mannanase (Man5C) is a modular enzyme composed of a catalytic module belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 5, a linker region, and a putative carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) belonging to family 27. Recombinant Man5C exhibited maximal activity at 50 degrees C at pH 7.0, and it had a K(m) of 0.6 mg ml(-1) and a V(max) of 556.2 micromol min(-1) mumol(-1) for glucomannan. Binding studies revealed that the C-terminal putative CBM27 had the ability to bind soluble beta-mannans and contributed to increasing the rate of depolymerization by binding to the polymeric substrate. Man5C of Vibrio sp. MA-138 is the first non-extremophile enzyme to be identified as a beta-mannanase possessing CBM27.

  6. Isolation and characterization of Caldicellulosiruptor lactoaceticus sp. nov., an extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic, anaerobic bacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mladenovska, Zuzana; Mathrani, Indra M.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1995-01-01

    and ethanol occurred as minor fermentation products. Only a restricted number of carbon sources (cellulose, xylan, starch, pectin, cellobiose, xylose, maltose and lactose) were used as substrates. During growth on Avicel, the bacterium produced free cellulases with carboxymethylcellulase and avicelase...... activity. The G + C content of the cellular DNA of strain 6A was 35.2 +/- 0.8 mol%. Complete 16S rDNA sequence analysis showed that strain 6A was phylogenetically related to Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus. It is proposed that the isolated bacterium be named Caldicellulosiruptor lactoaceticus sp. nov....

  7. Biodegradation of polyethylene by the thermophilic bacterium Brevibacillus borstelensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadad, D; Geresh, S; Sivan, A

    2005-01-01

    To select a polyethylene-degrading micro-organism and to study the factors affecting its biodegrading activity. A thermophilic bacterium Brevibaccillus borstelensis strain 707 (isolated from soil) utilized branched low-density polyethylene as the sole carbon source and degraded it. Incubation of polyethylene with B. borstelensis (30 days, 50 degrees C) reduced its gravimetric and molecular weights by 11 and 30% respectively. Brevibaccillus borstelensis also degraded polyethylene in the presence of mannitol. Biodegradation of u.v. photo-oxidized polyethylene increased with increasing irradiation time. Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) analysis of photo-oxidized polyethylene revealed a reduction in carbonyl groups after incubation with the bacteria. This study demonstrates that polyethylene--considered to be inert--can be biodegraded if the right microbial strain is isolated. Enrichment culture methods were effective for isolating a thermophilic bacterium capable of utilizing polyethylene as the sole carbon and energy source. Maximal biodegradation was obtained in combination with photo-oxidation, which showed that carbonyl residues formed by photo-oxidation play a role in biodegradation. Brevibaccillus borstelensis also degraded the CH2 backbone of nonirradiated polyethylene. Biodegradation of polyethylene by a single bacterial strain contributes to our understanding of the process and the factors affecting polyethylene biodegradation.

  8. Molecular identification of phosphate solubilizing bacterium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A phosphate solubilizing bacterium was isolated from the rhizosphere soil of upland rice and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The gene sequence showed 99% homology with Alcaligenes faecalis. Based on the gene sequence homology, it was identified as A. faecalis. Interaction effect of this bacterium on growth ...

  9. Porphyrobacter algicida sp. nov., an algalytic bacterium isolated from seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristyanto, Sylvia; Lee, Sang Don; Kim, Jaisoo

    2017-11-01

    A novel Gram-stain-negative, yellow-pigmented, catalase- and oxidase-positive, non-endospore-forming, flagellated bacterium, designated strain Yeonmyeong 2-22 T , was isolated from surface seawater of Geoje Island, Republic of Korea. Strain Yeonmyeong 2-22 T showed algalytic activity against the seven strains tested: Cochlodinium polykrikoides, Chattonella marina, Heterosigma akashiwo, Scrippsiella trochoidea, Heterocapsa triquetra, Prorocentrum minimum and Skeletonema costatum. A taxonomic study was carried out based on a polyphasic approach to characterize the exact taxonomic position of strain Yeonmyeong 2-22 T . The bacterium was able to grow at 10-40 °C, at salinities from 0 to 9 %, at pH from 4.0 to 9.0 and was not able to degrade gelatin or casein. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain Yeonmyeong 2-22 T was considered to represent a novel species of the genus Porphyrobacter, which belongs to the family Erythrobacteraceae, and was related most closely to Porphyrobacter dokdonensis DSW-74 T with 97.23 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. The dominant cellular fatty acids of strain Yeonmyeong 2-22 T were C18 : 1ω7c (49.7 %), C16 : 0 (12.0 %) and 11-methyl C18 : 1ω7c (11.5 %), and ubiquinone-10 (Q-10) was the predominant respiratory lipoquinone. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain Yeonmyeong 2-22 T was calculated to be 63.0 mol%. Phenotypic characteristics of the novel strain also differed from other members of the genus Porphyrobacter. On the basis of polyphasic taxonomic data, strain Yeonmyeong 2-22 T represents as a novel species of the genus Porphyrobacter, for which the name of Porphyrobacter algicida sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Yeonmyeong 2-22 T (=KEMB 9005-328 T =JCM 31499 T ).

  10. Thermaerobacter litoralis sp. nov., a strictly aerobic and thermophilic bacterium isolated from a coastal hydrothermal field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanaka, Reiji; Kawaichi, Satoshi; Nishimura, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    A novel thermophilic bacterium, strain KW1T, was isolated from a coastal hydrothermal field on the Satsuma Peninsula, Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan. The variably Gram-stained cells were motile rods with flagella, did not form spores and proliferated at 52-78°C (optimum, 70°C), pH 5-8 (optimum, pH 7...

  11. Desulfotomaculum thermobenzoicum subsp. thermosyntrophicum subsp. nov., a thermophilic, syntrophic, propionate-oxidizing, spore-forming bacterium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plugge, C.M.; Balk, M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    From granular sludge from a laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactor operated at 55 degrees C with a mixture of volatile fatty acids as feed, a novel anaerobic, moderately thermophilic, syntrophic, spore-forming bacterium, strain TPO, was enriched on propionate in co-culture with

  12. Colwellia agarivorans sp. nov., an agar-digesting marine bacterium isolated from coastal seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    A novel Gram-stain-negative, facultatively anaerobic, yellowish and agar-digesting marine bacterium, designated strain QM50**T, was isolated from coastal seawater in an aquaculture site near Qingdao, China. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequences revealed that the novel isolate represented...

  13. Thermotoga lettingae sp. nov. : a novel thermophilic, methanol-degrading bacterium isolated from a thermophilic anaerobic reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balk, M.; Weijma, J.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    A novel, anaerobic, non-spore-forming, mobile, Gram-negative, thermophilic bacterium, strain TMO(T), was isolated from a thermophilic sulfate-reducing bioreactor operated at 65 degrees C with methanol as the sole substrate. The G C content of the DNA of strain TMO(T) was 39.2 molÐThe optimum pH,

  14. Alteration of the Canine Small-Intestinal Lactic Acid Bacterium Microbiota by Feeding of Potential Probiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Manninen, Titta J. K.; Rinkinen, Minna L.; Beasley, Shea S.; Saris, Per E. J.

    2006-01-01

    Five potentially probiotic canine fecal lactic acid bacterium (LAB) strains, Lactobacillus fermentum LAB8, Lactobacillus salivarius LAB9, Weissella confusa LAB10, Lactobacillus rhamnosus LAB11, and Lactobacillus mucosae LAB12, were fed to five permanently fistulated beagles for 7 days. The survival of the strains and their potential effects on the indigenous intestinal LAB microbiota were monitored for 17 days. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) demonstrated that the five fed LAB ...

  15. Virgibacillus kimchii sp. nov., a halophilic bacterium isolated from kimchi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Young Joon; Jang, Ja-Young; Lim, Seul Ki; Kwon, Min-Sung; Lee, Jieun; Kim, NamHee; Shin, Mi-Young; Park, Hyo Kyeong; Seo, Myung-Ji; Choi, Hak-Jong

    2017-12-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, halophilic, rod-shaped, non-motile, spore forming bacterium, strain NKC1-2 T , was isolated from kimchi, a Korean fermented food. Comparative analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence demonstrated that the isolated strain was a species of the genus Virgibacillus. Strain NKC1-2 T exhibited high level of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with the type strains of Virgibacillus xinjiangensis SL6-1 T (96.9%), V. sediminis YIM kkny3 T (96.8%), and V. salarius SA-Vb1 T (96.7%). The isolate grew at pH 6.5-10.0 (optimum, pH 8.5-9.0), 0.0-25.0% (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 10-15% NaCl), and 15-50°C (optimum, 37°C). The major menaquinone in the strain was menaquinone-7, and the main peptidoglycan of the strain was meso-diaminopimelic acid. The predominant fatty acids of the strain were iso-C 14:0 , anteisio-C 15:0 , iso- C 15:0 , and iso-C 16:0 (other components were < 10.0%). The polar lipids consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol. The genomic DNA G + C content of NKC1-2 T was 42.5 mol%. On the basis of these findings, strain NKC1-2 T is proposed as a novel species in the genus Virgibacillus, for which the name Virgibacillus kimchii sp. nov. is proposed (=KACC 19404 T =JCM 32284 T ). The type strain of Virgibacillus kimchii is NKC1-2T.

  16. Perchlorate reduction by a novel chemolithoautotrophic, hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Husen; Bruns, Mary Ann; Logan, Bruce E

    2002-10-01

    Water treatment technologies are needed that can remove perchlorate from drinking water without introducing organic chemicals that stimulate bacterial growth in water distribution systems. Hydrogen is an ideal energy source for bacterial degradation of perchlorate as it leaves no organic residue and is sparingly soluble. We describe here the isolation of a perchlorate-respiring, hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium (Dechloromonas sp. strain HZ) that grows with carbon dioxide as sole carbon source. Strain HZ is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped facultative anaerobe that was isolated from a gas-phase anaerobic packed-bed biofilm reactor treating perchlorate-contaminated groundwater. The ability of strain HZ to grow autotrophically with carbon dioxide as the sole carbon source was confirmed by demonstrating that biomass carbon (100.9%) was derived from CO2. Chemolithotrophic growth with hydrogen was coupled with complete reduction of perchlorate (10 mM) to chloride with a maximum doubling time of 8.9 h. Strain HZ also grew using acetate as the electron donor and chlorate, nitrate, or oxygen (but not sulphate) as an electron acceptor. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA sequence placed strain HZ in the genus Dechloromonas within the beta subgroup of the Proteobacteria. The study of this and other novel perchlorate-reducing bacteria may lead to new, safe technologies for removing perchlorate and other chemical pollutants from drinking water.

  17. Organic metabolites produced by Vibrio parahaemolyticus strain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Identification and action of several antibacterial metabolites produced by a fish pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus strain An3 from marine ecosystem of Goa has been demonstrated. Antibacterial activity of the crude cell extract of the test bacterium has been evaluated against indicator pathogenic bacterial strains such as ...

  18. [Isolation of endophytic antagonistic bacterium from Amorphophallus konjac and research on its antibacterial metabolite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Chen, Lin; Chai, Xin-Li; Yu, Zi-Niu; Sun, Ming

    2007-12-01

    An endophytic antagonistic bacterium was isolated from Amorphophallus konjac calli. In order to identify this bacterium, 16S rDNA was amplified and partially sequenced. Sequence comparison showed that this sequence has the highest similarity to that in Bacillus subtilis, with 99.0% identities. That demonstrated this bacterium belongs to Bacillus subtili , named BSn5. The extracted extracellular protein from strain BSn5 had antibacterial activity against Erwinia carotovora subp. carotovora, which was unstable after heated, sensitive to proteinase K and resistant to trypsin. There was only a 31.6kDa protein component as by SDS-PAGE detection. Nondenaturing polyacrylaminde gel was used to purify this protein. The purified 31.6kDa protein exhibited inhibitory activity against Erwinia carotovora subp. carotovora. This protein is different from all known metabolites from Bacillus subtilis, suggesting that it may be a novel antibacterial protein.

  19. Genetic Engineering of a Radiation-Resistant Bacterium for Biodegradation of Mixed Wastes. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2003-01-01

    Aqueous mixed low level wastes (MLLW) containing radionuclides, solvents, and/or heavy metals represent a serious current and future problem for DOE environmental management and cleanup. In order to provide low-cost treatment alternatives under mild conditions for such contained wastes, we have proposed to use the radiation-resistant bacterium, Deinococcus radiodurans. This project has focused on developing D. radiodurans strains for dual purpose processes: cometabolic treatment of haloorganics and other solvents and removal of heavy metals from waste streams in an above-ground reactor system. The characteristics of effective treatment strains that must be attained are: (a) high biodegradative and metal binding activity; (b) stable treatment characteristics in the absence of selection and in the presence of physiological stress; (c) survival and activity under harsh chemical conditions, including radiation. The result of this project has been a suite of strains with high biodegradative capabilities that are candidates for pilot stage treatment systems. In addition, we have determined how to create conditions to precipitate heavy metals on the surface of the bacterium, as the first step towards creating dual-use treatment strains for contained mixed wastes of importance to the DOE. Finally, we have analyzed stress response in this bacterium, to create the foundation for developing treatment processes that maximize degradation while optimizing survival under high stress conditions

  20. Genetic Engineering of a Radiation-Resistant Bacterium for Biodegradation of Mixed Wastes--Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mary E. Lidstrom

    2003-12-26

    Aqueous mixed low level wastes (MLLW) containing radionuclides, solvents, and/or heavy metals represent a serious current and future problem for DOE environmental management and cleanup. In order to provide low-cost treatment alternatives under mild conditions for such contained wastes, we have proposed to use the radiation-resistant bacterium, Deinococcus radiodurans. This project has focused on developing D. radiodurans strains for dual purpose processes: cometabolic treatment of haloorganics and other solvents and removal of heavy metals from waste streams in an above-ground reactor system. The characteristics of effective treatment strains that must be attained are: (a) high biodegradative and metal binding activity; (b) stable treatment characteristics in the absence of selection and in the presence of physiological stress; (c) survival and activity under harsh chemical conditions, including radiation. The result of this project has been a suite of strains with high biodegradative capabilities that are candidates for pilot stage treatment systems. In addition, we have determined how to create conditions to precipitate heavy metals on the surface of the bacterium, as the first step towards creating dual-use treatment strains for contained mixed wastes of importance to the DOE. Finally, we have analyzed stress response in this bacterium, to create the foundation for developing treatment processes that maximize degradation while optimizing survival under high stress conditions.

  1. [Identification and function test of an alkali-tolerant denitrifying bacterium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ru; Zheng, Ping; Li, Wei; Chen, Hui; Chen, Tingting; Ghulam, Abbas

    2013-04-04

    We obtained an alkali-tolerant denitrifying bacterium, and determined its denitrifying activity and alkali-tolerance. An alkali-tolerant denitrifying bacterial strain was obtained by isolation and purification. We identified the bacterial strain by morphological observation, physiological test and 16S rRNA analysis. We determined the denitrifying activity and alkali-tolerance by effects of initial nitrate concentration and initial pH on denitrification. An alkali-tolerant denitrifier strain R9 was isolated from the lab-scale high-rate denitrifying reactor, and it was identified as Diaphorobater nitroreducens. The strain R9 grew heterotrophically with methanol as the electron donor and nitrate as the electron acceptor. The nitrate conversion was 93.25% when strain R9 was cultivated for 288 h with initial nitrate concentration 50 mg/L and initial pH 9.0. The denitrification activity could be inhibited at high nitrate concentration with a half inhibition constant of 202.73 mg N/L. Strain R9 showed a good alkali tolerance with the nitrate removal rate at pH 11.0 remained 86% of that at pH 9.0. Strain R9 was identified as Diaphorobater nitroreducens, and it was an alkali-tolerant denitrifying bacterium with optimum pH value of 9.0.

  2. Biodegradation of endosulfan by a soil bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivaramaiah, H M; Kennedy, I R

    2006-01-01

    A bacterium capable of metabolizing endosulfan (6,7,8,9,10,10-hexachloro-1,5,5a,6,9,9a-hexahydro-6,9-methano-2,4,3-benzodioxathiepine3-oxide) was isolated from cotton-growing soil and effectively shown to degrade endosulfan into endosulfan sulfate. The bacterium degraded 50% of the compound within 3 days of incubation. Endosulfan sulfate was the only terminal product and no other metabolites were formed during the incubation. Endosulfan and its metabolites were analyzed by gas chromatography. The metabolites formed indicated that the organism follows an oxidative pathway for metabolism of this pesticide. Therefore, the present study, microbial degradation of endosulfan by a soil bacterium, may provide a basis for the development of bioremediation strategies to remediate the pollutants in the environment.

  3. A bacterium that degrades and assimilates poly(ethylene terephthalate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Shosuke; Hiraga, Kazumi; Takehana, Toshihiko; Taniguchi, Ikuo; Yamaji, Hironao; Maeda, Yasuhito; Toyohara, Kiyotsuna; Miyamoto, Kenji; Kimura, Yoshiharu; Oda, Kohei

    2016-03-11

    Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) is used extensively worldwide in plastic products, and its accumulation in the environment has become a global concern. Because the ability to enzymatically degrade PET has been thought to be limited to a few fungal species, biodegradation is not yet a viable remediation or recycling strategy. By screening natural microbial communities exposed to PET in the environment, we isolated a novel bacterium, Ideonella sakaiensis 201-F6, that is able to use PET as its major energy and carbon source. When grown on PET, this strain produces two enzymes capable of hydrolyzing PET and the reaction intermediate, mono(2-hydroxyethyl) terephthalic acid. Both enzymes are required to enzymatically convert PET efficiently into its two environmentally benign monomers, terephthalic acid and ethylene glycol. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  4. Permanent draft genome of the malachite-green-tolerant bacterium Rhizobium sp. MGL06.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Runping; Zeng, Runying

    2014-12-01

    Rhizobium sp. MGL06, the first Rhizobium isolate from a marine environment, is a malachite-green-tolerant bacterium with a broader salinity tolerance (range: 0.5% to 9%) than other rhizobia. This study sequences and annotates the draft genome sequence of this strain. Genome sequence information provides a basis for analyzing the malachite green tolerance, broad salinity adaptation, nitrogen fixation properties, and taxonomic classification of the isolate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Isolation and characterization of a novel toluene-degrading, sulfate-reducing bacterium.

    OpenAIRE

    Beller, H R; Spormann, A M; Sharma, P K; Cole, J R; Reinhard, M

    1996-01-01

    A novel sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from fuel-contaminated subsurface soil, strain PRTOL1, mineralizes toluene as the sole electron donor and carbon source under strictly anaerobic conditions. The mineralization of 80% of toluene carbon to CO2 was demonstrated in experiments with [ring-U-14C]toluene; 15% of toluene carbon was converted to biomass and nonvolatile metabolic by-products, primarily the former. The observed stoichiometric ratio of moles of sulfate consumed per mole of tolu...

  6. Zymomonas mobilis: a bacterium for ethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baratti, J.C.; Bu' Lock, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Zymomonas mobilis is a facultative anaerobic gram negative bacterium first isolated in tropical countries from alcoholic beverages like the African palm wine, the Mexican pulque and also as a contaminant of cider (cider sickness) or beer in the European countries. It is one of the few facultative anaerobic bacteria degrading glucose by the Entner-Doudoroff pathway usually found in strictly aerobic microorganisms. Some work was devoted to this bacterium in the 50s and 60s and was reviewed by Swings and De Ley in their classical paper published in 1977. During the 70s there was very little work on the bacterium until 1979 and the first report by the Australian group of P.L. Rogers on the great potentialities of Z. mobilis for ethanol production. At that time the petroleum crisis had led the developed countries to search for alternative fuel from renewable resources. The Australian group clearly demonstrated the advantages of the bacterium compared to the yeasts traditionally used for the alcoholic fermentation. As a result, there was a considerable burst in the Zymomonas literature which started from nearly zero in the late 70s to attain 70 papers published in the field in 1984. In this article, papers published from 1982 to 1986 are reviewed.

  7. Microbacter margulisiae gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel propionigenic bacterium isolated from sediments of an acid rock drainage pond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez Andrea, I.; Luis Sanz, J.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    A novel anaerobic propionigenic bacterium, strain ADRIT, was isolated from sediment of an acid rock drainage environment (Tinto River, Spain). Cells were small (0.4-0.6 x 1-1.7 µm), non-motile and non-spore forming rods. Cells possessed a Gram-negative cell wall structure and were vancomycin

  8. Complete genome of Pandoraea pnomenusa RB-38, an oxalotrophic bacterium isolated from municipal solid waste landfill site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yan-Lue; Ee, Robson; Yong, Delicia; Tee, Kok-Keng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2015-11-20

    Pandoraea pnomenusa RB-38 is a bacterium isolated from a former sanitary landfill site. Here, we present the complete genome of P. pnomenusa RB38 in which an oxalate utilization pathway was identified. The genome analysis suggested the potential of this strain as an effective biocontrol agent against oxalate-producing phytopathogens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Complete genome sequence of the caprolactam-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas mosselii SJ10 isolated from wastewater of a nylon 6 production plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gun-Seok; Chu, Ji-Hun; Hong, Sung-Jun; Kwak, Yunyoung; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Jung, Byung Kwon; Ullah, Ihsan; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2014-12-20

    Pseudomonas mosselii strain SJ10 is a caprolactam-degrading bacterium belonging to the class Gammaproteobacteria, which was isolated from wastewater of the nylon 6 producing Seongseo industrial complex in Daegu, Republic of Korea. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the strain, providing genetic information for biodegradation of aromatic compounds.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of the Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium Alcanivorax dieselolei KS-293 Isolated from Surface Seawater in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Barbato, Marta

    2015-12-10

    We report here the draft genome sequence of Alcanivorax dieselolei KS-293, a hydrocarbonoclastic bacterium isolated from the Mediterranean Sea, by supplying diesel oil as the sole carbon source. This strain contains multiple putative genes associated with hydrocarbon degradation pathways and that are highly similar to those described in A. dieselolei type strain B5.

  11. Genomic Analysis of a Marine Bacterium: Bioinformatics for Comparison, Evaluation, and Interpretation of DNA Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagwan N. Rekadwad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of five highly related strains of an unidentified marine bacterium were analyzed through their short genome sequences (AM260709–AM260713. Genome-to-Genome Distance (GGDC showed high similarity to Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis (X67024. The generated unique Quick Response (QR codes indicated no identity to other microbial species or gene sequences. Chaos Game Representation (CGR showed the number of bases concentrated in the area. Guanine residues were highest in number followed by cytosine. Frequency of Chaos Game Representation (FCGR indicated that CC and GG blocks have higher frequency in the sequence from the evaluated marine bacterium strains. Maximum GC content for the marine bacterium strains ranged 53-54%. The use of QR codes, CGR, FCGR, and GC dataset helped in identifying and interpreting short genome sequences from specific isolates. A phylogenetic tree was constructed with the bootstrap test (1000 replicates using MEGA6 software. Principal Component Analysis (PCA was carried out using EMBL-EBI MUSCLE program. Thus, generated genomic data are of great assistance for hierarchical classification in Bacterial Systematics which combined with phenotypic features represents a basic procedure for a polyphasic approach on unambiguous bacterial isolate taxonomic classification.

  12. Acoustic sensing of the bacterium-substratum interface using QCM-D and the influence of extracellular polymeric substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Adam L J; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J; Sharma, Prashant K

    2011-05-01

    It is commonly assumed that bacterial presence on a QCM sensor-surface is associated with a negative frequency shift according to conventional mass-loading theory. Here, we demonstrate that bacteria adhering to QCM sensor-surface may yield positive frequency shifts up to 1.9×10(-6) Hz per bacterium according to a coupled-oscillator theory. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the excretion of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) by adhering bacteria can change the frequency shift in the negative direction by 1.7×10(-6) Hz per bacterium, according to conventional mass-loading theory. The difference in frequency shifts between an EPS-producing and a non-EPS producing staphylococcal strain correlated with the excretion of 3×10(-14) g EPS per bacterium, representing only a few percent of the weight of a bacterium. Thus an adsorbed molecular mass as low as a few percent of the mass of an adhering bacterium significantly alters the QCM-signal. Since adhesion of many different bacterial strains is accompanied by molecular adsorption of EPS, with potentially opposite effects on the QCM-signal, a combination of the coupled-oscillator and normal mass-loading theory has to be applied for proper interpretation of QCM-frequency shifts in bacterial detection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Whole genome shotgun sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens TF28, a biocontrol entophytic bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shumei; Jiang, Wei; Li, Jing; Meng, Liqiang; Cao, Xu; Hu, Jihua; Liu, Yushuai; Chen, Jingyu; Sha, Changqing

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens TF28 is a biocontrol endophytic bacterium that is capable of inhibition of a broad range of plant pathogenic fungi. The strain has the potential to be developed into a biocontrol agent for use in agriculture. Here we report the whole-genome shotgun sequence of the strain. The genome size of B. amyloliquefaciens TF28 is 3,987,635 bp which consists of 3754 protein-coding genes, 65 tandem repeat sequences, 47 minisatellite DNA, 2 microsatellite DNA, 63 tRNA, 7rRNA, 6 sRNA, 3 prophage and CRISPR domains.

  14. Extreme Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schwendner, Petra

    2013-01-01

    potential for transfer, and subsequent proliferation, on another solar body such as Mars and Europa. These organisms are more likely to escape planetary protection assays, which only take into account presence of spores. Hence, presences of extreme radiation-resistant Deinococcus in the cleanroom facility where spacecraft are assembled pose a serious risk for integrity of life-detection missions. The microorganism described herein was isolated from the surfaces of the cleanroom facility in which the Phoenix Lander was assembled. The isolated bacterial strain was subjected to a comprehensive polyphasic analysis to characterize its taxonomic position. This bacterium exhibits very low 16SrRNA similarity with any other environmental isolate reported to date. Both phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses clearly indicate that this isolate belongs to the genus Deinococcus and represents a novel species. The name Deinococcus phoenicis was proposed after the Phoenix spacecraft, which was undergoing assembly, testing, and launch operations in the spacecraft assembly facility at the time of isolation. D. phoenicis cells exhibited higher resistance to ionizing radiation (cobalt-60; 14 kGy) than the cells of the D. radiodurans (5 kGy). Thus, it is in the best interest of NASA to thoroughly characterize this organism, which will further assess in determining the potential for forward contamination. Upon the completion of genetic and physiological characteristics of D. phoenicis, it will be added to a planetary protection database to be able to further model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  15. Alicyclobacillus vulcanalis sp. nov., a thermophilic, acidophilic bacterium isolated from Coso Hot Springs, California, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simbahan, Jessica; Drijber, Rhae; Blum, Paul

    2004-09-01

    A thermo-acidophilic Gram-positive bacterium, strain CsHg2T, which grows aerobically at 35-65 degrees C (optimum 55 degrees C) and at pH 2.0-6.0 (optimum 4.0), was isolated from a geothermal pool located in Coso Hot Springs in the Mojave Desert, California, USA. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that this bacterium was most closely related to the type strains of Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius (97.8 % identity) and Alicyclobacillus sendaiensis (96.9 %), three Japanese strains denoted as UZ-1, KHA-31 and MIH 332 (96.1-96.5 %) and Alicyclobacillus genomic species FR-6 (96.3 %). Phenotypic characteristics including temperature and pH optima, G+C composition, acid production from a variety of carbon sources and sensitivity to different metal salts distinguished CsHg2T from A. acidocaldarius, A. sendaiensis and FR-6. The cell lipid membrane was composed mainly of omega-cyclohexyl fatty acid, consistent with membranes from other Alicyclobacillus species. Very low DNA-DNA hybridization values between CsHg2T and the type strains of Alicyclobacillus indicate that CsHg2T represents a distinct species. On the basis of these results, the name Alicyclobacillus vulcanalis sp. nov. is proposed for this organism. The type strain is CsHg2T (ATCC BAA-915T = DSM 16176T).

  16. Yersinia ruckeri sp. nov., the redmouth (RM) bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, W.H.; Ross, A.J.; Brenner, Don J.; Fanning, G. R.

    1978-01-01

    Cultures of the redmouth (RM) bacterium, one of the etiological agents of redmouth disease in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) and certain other fishes, were characterized by means of their biochemical reactions, by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) hybridization, and by determination of guanine-plus-cytosine (G+C) ratios in DNA. The DNA relatedness studies confirmed the fact that the RM bacteria are members of the family Enterobacteriaceae and that they comprise a single species that is not closely related to any other species of Enterobacteriaceae. They are about 30% related to species of both Serratia and Yersinia. A comparison of the biochemical reactions of RM bacteria and serratiae indicated that there are many differences between these organisms and that biochemically the RM bacteria are most closely related to yersiniae. The G+C ratios of RM bacteria were approximated to be between 47.5 and 48.5% These values are similar to those of yersiniae but markedly different from those of serratiae. On the basis of their biochemical reactions and their G+C ratios, the RM bacteria are considered to be a new species of Yersinia, for which the name Yersinia ruckeri is proposed. Strain 2396-61 (= ATCC 29473) is designated the type strain of the species.

  17. A Desulfitobacterium strain isolated from human feces that does not dechlorinate chloroethenes or chlorophenols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Pas, BA; Harmsen, HJM; Raangs, GC; de Vos, WM; Schraa, G; Stams, AJM

    An anaerobic bacterium, strain DP7, was isolated from human feces in mineral medium with formate and 0.02% yeast extract as energy and carbon source. This rod-shaped motile bacterium used pyruvate, lactate, formate, hydrogen, butyrate, and ethanol as electron donor for sulfite reduction. Other

  18. Isolation, identification, and biocontrol of antagonistic bacterium against Botrytis cinerea after tomato harvest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Feng Shi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Tomato is one of the most important vegetables in the world. Decay after harvest is a major issue in the development of tomato industry. Currently, the most effective method for controlling decay after harvest is storage of tomato at low temperature combined with usage of chemical bactericide; however, long-term usage of chemical bactericide not only causes pathogen resistance but also is harmful for human health and environment. Biocontrol method for the management of disease after tomato harvest has great practical significance. In this study, antagonistic bacterium B-6-1 strain was isolated from the surface of tomato and identified as Enterobacter cowanii based on morphological characteristics and physiological and biochemical features combined with sequence analysis of 16SrDNA and ropB gene and construction of dendrogram. Effects of different concentrations of antagonistic bacterium E. cowanii suspension on antifungal activity after tomato harvest were analyzed by mycelium growth rate method. Results revealed that antifungal activity was also enhanced with increasing concentrations of antagonistic bacterium; inhibitory rates of 1 × 105 colony-forming units (cfu/mL antagonistic bacterial solution on Fusarium verticillioides, Alternaria tenuissima, and Botrytis cinerea were 46.31%, 67.48%, and 75.67%, respectively. By using in vivo inoculation method, it was further confirmed that antagonistic bacterium could effectively inhibit the occurrence of B. cinerae after tomato harvest, biocontrol effect of 1 × 109 cfu/mL zymotic fluid reached up to 95.24%, and antagonistic bacterium E. cowanii has biocontrol potential against B. cinerea after harvest of fruits and vegetables.

  19. Aerobic Reduction of Arsenate by a Bacterium Isolated From Activated Sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozai, N.; Ohnuki, T.; Hanada, S.; Nakamura, K.; Francis, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    Microlunatus phosphovorus strain NM-1 is a polyphosphate-accumulating bacterium isolated from activated sludge. This bacterium takes up a large amount of polyphosphate under aerobic conditions and release phosphate ions by hydrolysis of polyphosphate to orthophosphate under anaerobic conditions to derive energy for taking up substrates. To understand the nature of this strain, especially, influence of potential contaminants in sewage and wastewater on growth, we have been investigating behavior of this bacterium in media containing arsenic. The present paper mainly reports reduction of arsenate by this bacterium under aerobic conditions. The strain NM-1 (JCM 9379) was aerobically cultured at 30 °C in a nutrient medium containing 2.5 g/l peptone, 0.5 g/l glucose, 1.5 g/l yeast extract, and arsenic [Na2HAsO4 (As(V)) or Na3AsO3 (As(III))] at concentrations between 0 and 50 mM. The cells collected from arsenic-free media were dispersed in buffer solutions containing 2mM HEPES, 10mM NaCl, prescribed concentrations of As(V), and 0-0.2 percent glucose. Then, this cell suspension was kept at 20 °C under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. The speciation of arsenic was carried out by ion chromatography and ICP-MS. The growth of the strain under aerobic conditions was enhanced by the addition of As(V) at the concentration between 1 and 10 mM. The maximum optical density of the culture in the medium containing 5mM As(V) was 1.4 times greater than that of the control culture. Below the As(V) concentration of 10mM, most of the As(V) was reduced to As(III). The growth of the strain under anaerobic conditions has not been observed so far. The cells in the buffer solutions reduced As(V) under aerobic condition. The reduction was enhanced by the addition of glucose. However, the cell did not reduce As(V) under anaerobic conditions. The strain NM-1 showed high resistance to As(V) and As(III). The maximum optical density of the culture grown in a medium containing 50 mM As(V) was only

  20. Geovibrio ferrireducens, a phylogenetically distinct dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccavo, F.; Coates, J.D.; Rossello-Mora, R. A.; Ludwig, W.; Schleifer, K.H.; Lovley, D.R.; McInerney, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    A new, phylogenetically distinct, dissimilatory, Fe(III)-reducing bacterium was isolated from surface sediment of a hydrocarbon-contaminated ditch. The isolate, designated strain PAL-1, was an obligately anaerobic, non-fermentative, motile, gram-negative vibrio. PAL-1 grew in a defined medium with acetate as electron donor and ferric pyrophosphate, ferric oxyhydroxide, ferric citrate, Co(III)-EDTA, or elemental sulfur as sole electron acceptor. PAL-1 also used proline, hydrogen, lactate, propionate, succinate, fumarate, pyruvate, or yeast extract as electron donors for Fe(III) reduction. It is the first bacterium known to couple the oxidation of an amino acid to Fe(III) reduction. PAI-1 did not reduce oxygen, Mn(IV), U(VI), Cr(VI), nitrate, sulfate, sulfite, or thiosulfate with acetate as the electron donor. Cell suspensions of PAL-1 exhibited dithionite-reduced minus air-oxidized difference spectra that were characteristic of c-type cytochromes. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of PAL-1 showed that the strain is not related to any of the described metal-reducing bacteria in the Proteobacteria and, together with Flexistipes sinusarabici, forms a separate line of descent within the Bacteria. Phenotypically and phylogenetically, strain PAI-1 differs from all other described bacteria, and represents the type strain of a new genus and species. Geovibrio ferrireducens.

  1. Economic Game Theory to Model the Attenuation of Virulence of an Obligate Intracellular Bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tago, Damian; Meyer, Damien F

    2016-01-01

    Diseases induced by obligate intracellular pathogens have a large burden on global human and animal health. Understanding the factors involved in the virulence and fitness of these pathogens contributes to the development of control strategies against these diseases. Based on biological observations, a theoretical model using game theory is proposed to explain how obligate intracellular bacteria interact with their host. The equilibrium in such a game shows that the virulence and fitness of the bacterium is host-triggered and by changing the host's defense system to which the bacterium is confronted, an evolutionary process leads to an attenuated strain. Although, the attenuation procedure has already been conducted in practice in order to develop an attenuated vaccine (e.g., with Ehrlichia ruminantium), there was a lack of understanding of the theoretical basis behind this process. Our work provides a model to better comprehend the existence of different phenotypes and some underlying evolutionary mechanisms for the virulence of obligate intracellular bacteria.

  2. High Prevalence of Antibodies against the Bacterium Treponema pallidum in Senegalese Guinea Baboons (Papio papio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauf, Sascha; Barnett, Ulrike; Maciej, Peter; Klapproth, Matthias; Ndao, Ibrahima; Frischmann, Sieghard; Fischer, Julia; Zinner, Dietmar; Liu, Hsi

    2015-01-01

    The bacterium Treponema pallidum is known to cause syphilis (ssp. pallidum), yaws (ssp. pertenue), and endemic syphilis (ssp. endemicum) in humans. Nonhuman primates have also been reported to be infected with the bacterium with equally versatile clinical manifestations, from severe skin ulcerations to asymptomatic. At present all simian strains are closely related to human yaws-causing strains, an important consideration for yaws eradication. We tested clinically healthy Guinea baboons (Papio papio) at Parc National Niokolo Koba in south eastern Senegal for the presence of anti-T. pallidum antibodies. Since T. pallidum infection in this species was identified 50 years ago, and there has been no attempt to treat non-human primates for infection, it was hypothesized that a large number of West African baboons are still infected with simian strains of the yaws-bacterium. All animals were without clinical signs of treponematoses, but 18 of 20 (90%) baboons tested positive for antibodies against T. pallidum based on treponemal tests. Yet, Guinea baboons seem to develop no clinical symptoms, though it must be assumed that infection is chronic or comparable to the latent stage in human yaws infection. The non-active character is supported by the low anti-T. pallidum serum titers in Guinea baboons (median = 1:2,560) versus serum titers that are found in genital-ulcerated olive baboons with active infection in Tanzania (range of medians among the groups of initial, moderate, and severe infected animals = 1:15,360 to 1:2.097e+7). Our findings provide evidence for simian infection with T. pallidum in wild Senegalese baboons. Potentially, Guinea baboons in West Africa serve as a natural reservoir for human infection, as the West African simian strain has been shown to cause sustainable yaws infection when inoculated into humans. The present study pinpoints an area where further research is needed to support the currently on-going second WHO led yaws eradication campaign with

  3. Evolution of a Biomass-Fermenting Bacterium To Resist Lignin Phenolics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerisy, Tristan; Souterre, Tiffany; Torres-Romero, Ismael; Boutard, Magali; Dubois, Ivan; Patrouix, Julien; Labadie, Karine; Berrabah, Wahiba; Salanoubat, Marcel; Doring, Volker; Tolonen, Andrew C

    2017-06-01

    Increasing the resistance of plant-fermenting bacteria to lignocellulosic inhibitors is useful to understand microbial adaptation and to develop candidate strains for consolidated bioprocessing. Here, we study and improve inhibitor resistance in Clostridium phytofermentans (also called Lachnoclostridium phytofermentans ), a model anaerobe that ferments lignocellulosic biomass. We survey the resistance of this bacterium to a panel of biomass inhibitors and then evolve strains that grow in increasing concentrations of the lignin phenolic, ferulic acid, by automated, long-term growth selection in an anaerobic GM3 automat. Ultimately, strains resist multiple inhibitors and grow robustly at the solubility limit of ferulate while retaining the ability to ferment cellulose. We analyze genome-wide transcription patterns during ferulate stress and genomic variants that arose along the ferulate growth selection, revealing how cells adapt to inhibitors through changes in gene dosage and regulation, membrane fatty acid structure, and the surface layer. Collectively, this study demonstrates an automated framework for in vivo directed evolution of anaerobes and gives insight into the genetic mechanisms by which bacteria survive exposure to chemical inhibitors. IMPORTANCE Fermentation of plant biomass is a key part of carbon cycling in diverse ecosystems. Further, industrial biomass fermentation may provide a renewable alternative to fossil fuels. Plants are primarily composed of lignocellulose, a matrix of polysaccharides and polyphenolic lignin. Thus, when microorganisms degrade lignocellulose to access sugars, they also release phenolic and acidic inhibitors. Here, we study how the plant-fermenting bacterium Clostridium phytofermentans resists plant inhibitors using the lignin phenolic, ferulic acid. We examine how the cell responds to abrupt ferulate stress by measuring changes in gene expression. We evolve increasingly resistant strains by automated, long-term cultivation at

  4. Application of antioxidant indicators to select nicotine-degrading bacterium for bioaugmented treatment of tobacco wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hongzhen, H.; Zheng, X.

    2013-01-01

    To select nicotine-degrading bacterium for bioaugmented treatment of tobacco wastewater, the activities of antioxidant indicators such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione (GSH), and the ability to treat pollutants including nicotine degradation and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, were compared between Acinetobacter sp. TW and Sphingomonas sp. TY. When complicated toxins were present, the activities of SOD induced in strain TY were significantly higher than those in strain TW. However, the activities of CAT were inhibited in strain TY (CAT/CATLB 1). Additionally, the levels of GSH induced in strain TW were significantly higher than those in strain TY. These findings suggest that the antioxidant ability of strain TW was higher than that of strain TY, especially in tobacco wastewater. Moreover, when applied to the treatment of tobacco wastewater, the rate of nicotine degradation at 24 h was 99.50% for TW and 28.76% for TY, while the rate of COD removal at 48 h was 62.69% for TW and 45.80% for TY. Taken together, these findings indicate that the pollution treatment ability of strain TW was stronger than that of TY, and that the stronger the ability of the antioxidant, the higher the potential for treatment of tobacco wastewater. (author)

  5. Colwellia polaris sp. nov., a psychrotolerant bacterium isolated from Arctic sea ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, De-Chao; Yu, Yong; Xin, Yu-Hua; Liu, Hong-Can; Zhou, Pei-Jin; Zhou, Yu-Guang

    2008-08-01

    A novel psychrotolerant, Gram-negative, aerobic bacterium, designated strain 537T, was isolated from sea-ice samples from the Arctic. Strain 537T was able to grow at 4-26 degrees C, with optimum growth occurring at 20-21 degrees C. Strain 537T had Q-8 as the major respiratory quinone and contained iso-C15:0 2-OH and/or C16:1 omega7c (22.95 %), C15:1 (17.64 %) and C17:1 omega8c (13.74 %) as the predominant cellular fatty acids. The genomic DNA G+C content was 38.9 mol%. A phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain 537T formed a coherent cluster within the genus Colwellia. The highest level of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (97.5 %) exhibited by strain 537T was obtained with respect to the type strain of Colwellia aestuarii. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic properties and DNA-DNA relatedness data, strain 537T represents a novel species of the genus Colwellia, for which the name Colwellia polaris sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 537T (=CGMCC 1.6132T =JCM 13952T).

  6. Isolation and characterization of a radiation resistant thermophilic bacterium from radon hot spring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Xinle; Yang Long; Zhang Hong; Zhang Lei

    2011-01-01

    A radiation resistant and thermophilic bacterium strain R4-33 was isolated from radon hot spring water samples, pretreated with 60 Co γ-rays and UV irradiation. Tests on morphological, physiological and biochemical characters, fatty acid compositions, (G + C) mol% contents, and 16S rDNA sequencing were conducted. The results showed that strain R4-33 was of rod-shape, Gram-negative, atrichous, and endospore-forming. The optimum growth temperature and pH were 60 ℃ and 7.5, respectively. The strain utilized glucose, maltose and trehalose as carbon sources, and hydrolyzed casein and starch. Its catalase positive. The strain was sensitive to penicillin, neomycin, erythromycin, vancomycin, streptomycin, gentamycin, amikacin and ampicillin. The major cellular fatty acids were C 14:1 (48.8%) and C 15:1 (15.2%). The (G + C) mol% content of DNA was 58.2%. Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rDNA sequence showed R4-33 shared highly similarity to those of species in genus Anoxybacillus, especially to that of Anoxybacillus gonensis (99.5%). Based on the above, the strain R4-33 was proposed to the evolution branch of Anoxybacillus and designated as Anoxybacillu sp. R4-33. The UV and γ-radiation tests showed that the strain R4-33 had an ability of resistance to UV of 396 J/m 2 and 60 Co γ-rays irradiation of 14.0 kGy, indicating that the strain was a radiation resistant and thermophilic bacterium. (authors)

  7. Alsobacter metallidurans gen. nov., sp. nov., a thallium-tolerant soil bacterium in the order Rhizobiales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Zhihua; Sato, Yoshinori; Fujimura, Reiko; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2014-03-01

    A thallium-tolerant, aerobic bacterium, designated strain SK200a-9(T), isolated from a garden soil sample was characterized using a polyphasic approach. Comparative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain SK200a-9(T) was affiliated with an uncultivated lineage within the Alphaproteobacteria and the nearest cultivated neighbours were bacteria in genera in the family Methylocystaceae (93.3-94.4% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity) and the family Beijerinckiaceae (92.3-93.1%) in the order Rhizobiales. Cells of strain SK200a-9(T) were Gram-stain-negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming, poly-β-hydroxybutyrate-accumulating rods. The strain was a chemo-organotrophic bacterium, which was incapable of growth on C1 substrates. Catalase and oxidase were positive. Atmospheric nitrogen fixation and nitrate reduction were negative. The strain contained ubiquinone Q-10 and cellular fatty acids C18 : 1ω7c, C18 : 0, C16 : 1ω7c and C16 : 0 as predominant components. The major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol. The DNA G+C content was 64.8 mol%. On the basis of the information described above, strain SK200a-9(T) is considered to represent a novel species of a new genus in the order Rhizobiales, for which the name Alsobacter metallidurans gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Alsobacter metallidurans is SK200a-9(T) ( = NBRC 107718(T) = CGMCC 1.12214(T)).

  8. Closed Genome Sequence of Phytopathogen Biocontrol Agent Bacillus velezensis Strain AGVL-005, Isolated from Soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylro, Victor Satler; Dias, Armando Cavalcante Franco; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Morais, Daniel Kumazawa; Varani, Alessandro de Mello; Andreote, Cristiane Cipolla Fasanella; Bernardo, Eduardo Roberto de Almeida; Zucchi, Tiago

    2018-02-15

    We report here the closed and near-complete genome sequence and annotation of Bacillus velezensis strain AGVL-005, a bacterium isolated from soybean seeds in Brazil and used for phytopathogen biocontrol. Copyright © 2018 Pylro et al.

  9. Genome Sequence of Campylobacter jejuni strain 327, a strain isolated from a turkey slaughterhouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takamiya, Monica; Özen, Asli Ismihan; Rasmussen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    , catalase positive bacterium obtains energy from the metabolism of amino acids and Krebs cycle intermediates. Strain 327 was isolated from a turkey slaughter production line and is considered environmentally sensitive to food processing (cold, heat, drying) and storage conditions. The 327 whole genome...

  10. Isolation and characterization of Alicycliphilus denitrificans strain BC, which grows on benzene with chlorate as the electron acceptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weelink, S.A.B.; Tan, N.C.G.; Broeke, H. ten; Kieboom, C. van den; Doesburg, W. van; Langenhoff, A.A.M.; Gerritse, J.; Junca, H.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    A bacterium, strain BC, was isolated from a benzene-degrading chlorate-reducing enrichment culture. Strain BC degrades benzene in conjunction with chlorate reduction. Cells of strain BC are short rods that are 0.6 μm wide and 1 to 2 μm long, are motile, and stain gram negative. Strain BC grows on

  11. Shedding light on microbial dark matter: a TM6 bacterium as natural endosymbiont of a free-living amoeba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delafont, Vincent; Samba-Louaka, Ascel; Bouchon, Didier; Moulin, Laurent; Héchard, Yann

    2015-12-01

    The TM6 phylum belongs to the so-called microbial dark matter that gathers uncultivated bacteria detected only via DNA sequencing. Recently, the genome sequence of a TM6 bacterium (TM6SC1) has led to suggest that this bacterium would adopt an endosymbiotic life. In the present paper, free-living amoebae bearing a TM6 strain were isolated from a water network. The amoebae were identified as Vermamoeba vermiformis and the presence of a TM6 strain was detected by polymerase chain reaction and microscopy. The partial sequence of its 16S rRNA gene showed this strain to be closely related to the sequenced TM6SC1 strain. These bacteria displayed a pyriform shape and were found within V. vermiformis. Therefore, these bacteria were named Vermiphilus pyriformis. Interactions studies showed that V. pyriformis was highly infectious and that its relation with V. vermiformis was specific and highly stable. Finally, it was found that V. pyriformis inhibited the encystment of V. vermiformis. Overall, this study describes for the first time an endosymbiotic relationship between a TM6 bacterium and a free-living amoeba in the environment. It suggests that other bacteria of the TM6 phylum might also be endosymbiotic bacteria and may be found in other free-living amoebae or other organisms. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Cellulomonas xylanilytica sp. nov., a cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacterium isolated from a decayed elm tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Raúl; Trujillo, Martha E; Mateos, P F; Martínez-Molina, E; Velázquez, Encarna

    2004-03-01

    A Gram-positive, aerobic, non-motile bacterium was isolated from a decayed elm tree. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequences revealed 99.0 % similarity to Cellulomonas humilata. Chemotaxonomic data that were determined for this isolate included cell-wall composition, fatty acid profiles and polar lipids; the results supported the placement of strain XIL11(T) in the genus Cellulomonas. The DNA G+C content was 73 mol%. The results of DNA-DNA hybridization with C. humilata ATCC 25174(T), in combination with chemotaxonomic and physiological data, demonstrated that isolate XIL11(T) should be classified as a novel Cellulomonas species. The name Cellulomonas xylanilytica sp. nov. is proposed, with strain XIL11(T) (=LMG 21723(T)=CECT 5729(T)) as the type strain.

  13. Thermotoga subterranea sp. nov., a new thermophilic bacterium isolated from a continental oil reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanthon, C; Reysenbach, A L; L'Haridon, S; Gambacorta, A; Pace, N R; Glénat, P; Prieur, D

    1995-08-01

    A thermophilic, strictly anaerobic bacterium, designated strain SL1, was isolated from a deep, continental oil reservoir in the East Paris Basin (France). This organism grew between 50 and 75 degrees C, with an optimum at 70 degrees C. It was inhibited by elemental sulfur and was able to reduce cystine and thiosulfate to hydrogen sulfide. The G+C content (40 mol%), the presence of a lipid structure unique to the genus Thermotoga, and the 16S rRNA sequence of strain SL1 indicated that the isolate belongs to the genus Thermotoga. Based on DNA-DNA hybridization, isolate SL1 does not show species-level similarity with the recognized species T. maritima, T. neapolitana, and T. thermarum. Based on this description of strain SL1, we propose the recognition of a new species: Thermotoga subterranea.

  14. Complete genome sequence of the naphthalene-degrading Pseudomonas putida strain ND6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shanshan; Zhao, Huabing; Li, Yaxiao; Niu, Shumin; Cai, Baoli

    2012-09-01

    Pseudomonas putida strain ND6 is an efficient naphthalene-degrading bacterium. The complete genome of strain ND6 was sequenced and annotated. The genes encoding the enzymes involved in catechol degradation by the ortho-cleavage pathway were found in the chromosomal sequence, which indicated that strain ND6 is able to metabolize naphthalene by the catechol meta- and ortho-cleavage pathways.

  15. Heavy Metal Induced Antibiotic Resistance in Bacterium LSJC7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Songcan; Li, Xiaomin; Sun, Guoxin; Zhang, Yingjiao; Su, Jianqiang; Ye, Jun

    2015-09-29

    Co-contamination of antibiotics and heavy metals prevails in the environment, and may play an important role in disseminating bacterial antibiotic resistance, but the selective effects of heavy metals on bacterial antibiotic resistance is largely unclear. To investigate this, the effects of heavy metals on antibiotic resistance were studied in a genome-sequenced bacterium, LSJC7. The results showed that the presence of arsenate, copper, and zinc were implicated in fortifying the resistance of LSJC7 towards tetracycline. The concentrations of heavy metals required to induce antibiotic resistance, i.e., the minimum heavy metal concentrations (MHCs), were far below (up to 64-fold) the minimum inhibition concentrations (MIC) of LSJC7. This finding indicates that the relatively low heavy metal levels in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficient to induce bacterial antibiotic resistance. In addition, heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance was also observed for a combination of arsenate and chloramphenicol in LSJC7, and copper/zinc and tetracycline in antibiotic susceptible strain Escherichia coli DH5α. Overall, this study implies that heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance might be ubiquitous among various microbial species and suggests that it might play a role in the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in metal and antibiotic co-contaminated environments.

  16. Optimization of liquid media and biosafety assessment for algae-lysing bacterium NP23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chunli; Liu, Xiaobo; Shan, Linna

    2014-09-01

    To control algal bloom caused by nutrient pollution, a wild-type algae-lysing bacterium was isolated from the Baiguishan reservoir in Henan province of China and identified as Enterobacter sp. strain NP23. Algal culture medium was optimized by applying a Placket-Burman design to obtain a high cell concentration of NP23. Three minerals (i.e., 0.6% KNO3, 0.001% MnSO4·H2O, and 0.3% K2HPO4) were found to be independent factors critical for obtaining the highest cell concentration of 10(13) CFU/mL, which was 10(4) times that of the control. In the algae-lysing experiment, the strain exhibited a high lysis rate for the 4 algae test species, namely, Chlorella vulgari, Scenedesmus, Microcystis wesenbergii, and Chlorella pyrenoidosa. Acute toxicity and mutagenicity tests showed that the bacterium NP23 had no toxic and mutagenic effects on fish, even in large doses such as 10(7) or 10(9) CFU/mL. Thus, Enterobacter sp. strain NP23 has strong potential application in the microbial algae-lysing project.

  17. Isolation, identification and characteristics of an endophytic quinclorac degrading bacterium Bacillus megaterium Q3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Liu

    Full Text Available In this study, we isolated an endophytic quinclorac-degrading bacterium strain Q3 from the root of tobacco grown in quinclorac contaminated soil. Based on morphological characteristics, Biolog identification, and 16S rDNA sequence analysis, we identified strain Q3 as Bacillus megaterium. We investigated the effects of temperature, pH, inoculation size, and initial quinclorac concentration on growth and degrading efficiency of Q3. Under the optimal degrading condition, Q3 could degrade 93% of quinclorac from the initial concentration of 20 mg/L in seven days. We analyzed the degradation products of quinclorac using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. The major degradation products by Q3 were different from those of previously identified quinclorac degrading strains, which suggests that Q3 may employ new pathways for quinclorac degradation. Our indoor pot experiments demonstrated that Q3 can effectively alleviate the quinclorac phytotoxicity in tobacco. As the first endophytic microbial that is capable of degrading quinclorac, Q3 can be a good bioremediation bacterium for quinclorac phytotoxicity.

  18. (Per)chlorate reduction by an acetogenic bacterium, Sporomusa sp., isolated from an underground gas storage.

    KAUST Repository

    Balk, Melike

    2010-08-03

    A mesophilic bacterium, strain An4, was isolated from an underground gas storage reservoir with methanol as substrate and perchlorate as electron acceptor. Cells were Gram-negative, spore-forming, straight to curved rods, 0.5-0.8 microm in diameter, and 2-8 microm in length, growing as single cells or in pairs. The cells grew optimally at 37 degrees C, and the pH optimum was around 7. Strain An4 converted various alcohols, organic acids, fructose, acetoin, and H(2)/CO(2) to acetate, usually as the only product. Succinate was decarboxylated to propionate. The isolate was able to respire with (per)chlorate, nitrate, and CO(2). The G+C content of the DNA was 42.6 mol%. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain An4 was most closely related to Sporomusa ovata (98% similarity). The bacterium reduced perchlorate and chlorate completely to chloride. Key enzymes, perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase, were detected in cell-free extracts.

  19. Methylocapsa acidiphila gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel methane-oxidizing and dinitrogen-fixing acidophilic bacterium from Sphagnum bog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedysh, Svetlana N; Khmelenina, Valentina N; Suzina, Natalia E; Trotsenko, Yuri A; Semrau, Jeremy D; Liesack, Werner; Tiedje, James M

    2002-01-01

    A novel genus and species, Methylocapsa acidiphila gen. nov., sp. nov., are proposed for a methane-oxidizing bacterium isolated from an acidic Sphagnum peat bog. This bacterium, designated strain B2T, represents aerobic, gram-negative, colourless, non-motile, curved coccoids that form conglomerates covered by an extracellular polysaccharide matrix. The cells use methane and methanol as sole sources of carbon and energy and utilize the serine pathway for carbon assimilation. Strain B2T is a moderately acidophilic organism with growth between pH 4.2 and 7.2 and at temperatures from 10 to 30 degrees C. The cells possess a well-developed system of intracytoplasmic membranes (ICM) packed in parallel on only one side of the cell membrane. This type of ICM structure represents a novel arrangement, which was termed type III. The resting cells are Azotobacter-type cysts. Strain B2T is capable of atmospheric nitrogen fixation; it possesses particulate methane monooxygenase and does not express soluble methane monooxygenase. The major phospholipid fatty acid is 18:1omega7c and the major phospholipids are phosphatidylglycerols. The G+C content of the DNA is 63.1 mol%. This bacterium belongs to the alpha-subclass of the Proteobacteria and is most closely related to the acidophilic methanotroph Methylocella palustris KT (97.3% 16S rDNA sequence similarity). However, the DNA-DNA hybridization value between strain B2T and Methylocella palustris K(T) is only 7%. Thus, strain B2T is proposed to comprise a novel genus and species, Methylocapsa acidiphila gen. nov., sp. nov. Strain B2T (= DSM 13967T = NCIMB 13765T) is the type strain.

  20. Aggregation of the rhizospheric bacterium Azospirillum brasilense in response to oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoun, Hamid; McMillan, Mary; Pereg, Lily

    2016-04-01

    Azospirillum brasilense spp. have ecological, scientific and agricultural importance. As model plant growth promoting rhizobacteria they interact with a large variety of plants, including important food and cash crops. Azospirillum strains are known for their production of plant growth hormones that enhance root systems and for their ability to fix nitrogen. Azospirillum cells transform in response to environmental cues. The production of exopolysaccharides and cell aggregation during cellular transformation are important steps in the attachment of Azospirillum to roots. We investigate signals that induce cellular transformation and aggregation in the Azospirillum and report on the importance of oxygen to the process of aggregation in this rhizospheric bacterium.

  1. A bacterium that can grow by using arsenic instead of phosphorus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe-Simon, F; Blum, J S; Kulp, T R; Gordon, G W; Hoeft, S E; Pett-Ridge, J; Stolz, J F; Webb, S M; Weber, P K; Davies, P W; Anbar, A D; Oremland, R S

    2010-11-01

    Life is mostly composed of the elements carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur and phosphorus. Although these six elements make up nucleic acids, proteins and lipids and thus the bulk of living matter, it is theoretically possible that some other elements in the periodic table could serve the same functions. Here we describe a bacterium, strain GFAJ-1 of the Halomonadaceae, isolated from Mono Lake, CA, which substitutes arsenic for phosphorus to sustain its growth. Our data show evidence for arsenate in macromolecules that normally contain phosphate, most notably nucleic acids and proteins. Exchange of one of the major bio-elements may have profound evolutionary and geochemical significance.

  2. A bacterium that can grow by using arsenic instead of phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe-Simon, Felisa; Switzer Blum, Jodi; Kulp, Thomas R; Gordon, Gwyneth W; Hoeft, Shelley E; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Stolz, John F; Webb, Samuel M; Weber, Peter K; Davies, Paul C W; Anbar, Ariel D; Oremland, Ronald S

    2011-06-03

    Life is mostly composed of the elements carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and phosphorus. Although these six elements make up nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids and thus the bulk of living matter, it is theoretically possible that some other elements in the periodic table could serve the same functions. Here, we describe a bacterium, strain GFAJ-1 of the Halomonadaceae, isolated from Mono Lake, California, that is able to substitute arsenic for phosphorus to sustain its growth. Our data show evidence for arsenate in macromolecules that normally contain phosphate, most notably nucleic acids and proteins. Exchange of one of the major bio-elements may have profound evolutionary and geochemical importance.

  3. A bacterium that can grow by using arsenic instead of phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe-Simon, Felisa; Blum, J.S.; Kulp, T.R.; Gordon, G.W.; Hoeft, S.E.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Stolz, J.F.; Webb, S.M.; Weber, P.K.; Davies, P.C.W.; Anbar, A.D.; Oremland, R.S.

    2011-01-01

    Life is mostly composed of the elements carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and phosphorus. Although these six elements make up nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids and thus the bulk of living matter, it is theoretically possible that some other elements in the periodic table could serve the same functions. Here, we describe a bacterium, strain GFAJ-1 of the Halomonadaceae, isolated from Mono Lake, California, that is able to substitute arsenic for phosphorus to sustain its growth. Our data show evidence for arsenate in macromolecules that normally contain phosphate, most notably nucleic acids and proteins. Exchange of one of the major bio-elements may have profound evolutionary and geochemical importance.

  4. [Identification and antagonistic activities of an endophytic bacterium MGP3 isolated from papaya fruit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jingying; Liu, Aiyuan; Li, Xueping; Chen, Weixin

    2011-09-01

    Postharvest decay resulted from anthracnose caused by pathogens Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and blight diseases caused by Phytophthora nicotianae leads to significant loss of papaya fruits. In order to reduce such loss, we isolated endophytic bacteria that may possess powerful antagonistic activities toward these pathogens for effective biological control of anthracnose and blight diseases. The methods of dilution and inhibition circle were used for isolating and screening endophytic bacteria from papaya fruit. Based on morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics, and homology analysis of the partial sequence of 16S rDNA, an endophytic bacterium was identified. The colonization of the antagonistic endophyte in papaya was detected by inoculating suspension of strains in caudices of papaya plant after Rifampicin-resistant mutants (rif(r)) induction. The effects on diseases caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and Phytophthora nicotianae were tested by preharvest and postharvest experiments. One of the endophytic bacteria named MGP3 was selected from the papaya pericarp and identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Accession No. JF708186). This bacterium was able to colonize in the laminae, leafstalk or pericarp of papaya, and strongly inhibit 10 phytopathogens. In the postharvest experiment, MGP3 inhibited 50% anthracnose and 71% blight of harvested papaya fruits. The application of MGP3 at five preharvest stages of papaya significantly reduced latent infection rate of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and disease index of anthracnose. Antagonistic endophytic bacterium MGP3 isolated from papaya fruit had potential application value as a biological control agent.

  5. In search of an uncultured human-associated TM7 bacterium in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinis, Jorge M; Barton, David E; Ghadiri, Jamsheed; Surendar, Deepa; Reddy, Kavitha; Velasquez, Fernando; Chaffee, Carol L; Lee, Mei-Chong Wendy; Gavrilova, Helen; Ozuna, Hazel; Smits, Samuel A; Ouverney, Cleber C

    2011-01-01

    We have identified an environmental bacterium in the Candidate Division TM7 with ≥98.5% 16S rDNA gene homology to a group of TM7 bacteria associated with the human oral cavity and skin. The environmental TM7 bacterium (referred to as TM7a-like) was readily detectable in wastewater with molecular techniques over two years of sampling. We present the first images of TM7a-like cells through FISH technique and the first images of any TM7 as viable cells through the STARFISH technique. In situ quantification showed TM7 concentration in wastewater up to five times greater than in human oral sites. We speculate that upon further characterization of the physiology and genetics of the TM7a-like bacterium from environmental sources and confirmation of its genomic identity to human-associated counterparts it will serve as model organisms to better understand its role in human health. The approach proposed circumvents difficulties imposed by sampling humans, provides an alternative strategy to characterizing some diseases of unknown etiology, and renders a much needed understanding of the ecophysiological role hundreds of unique Bacteria and Archaea strains play in mixed microbial communities.

  6. In search of an uncultured human-associated TM7 bacterium in the environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge M Dinis

    Full Text Available We have identified an environmental bacterium in the Candidate Division TM7 with ≥98.5% 16S rDNA gene homology to a group of TM7 bacteria associated with the human oral cavity and skin. The environmental TM7 bacterium (referred to as TM7a-like was readily detectable in wastewater with molecular techniques over two years of sampling. We present the first images of TM7a-like cells through FISH technique and the first images of any TM7 as viable cells through the STARFISH technique. In situ quantification showed TM7 concentration in wastewater up to five times greater than in human oral sites. We speculate that upon further characterization of the physiology and genetics of the TM7a-like bacterium from environmental sources and confirmation of its genomic identity to human-associated counterparts it will serve as model organisms to better understand its role in human health. The approach proposed circumvents difficulties imposed by sampling humans, provides an alternative strategy to characterizing some diseases of unknown etiology, and renders a much needed understanding of the ecophysiological role hundreds of unique Bacteria and Archaea strains play in mixed microbial communities.

  7. Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a diazotrophic bacterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanvinde, L.; Sastry, G.R.K.

    1990-01-01

    This is the first report that Agrobacterium tumefaciens can fix nitrogen in a free-living condition as shown by its abilities to grown on nitrogen-free medium, reduce acetylene to ethylene, and incorporate 15 N supplied as 15 N 2 . As with most other well-characterized diazotrophic bacteria, the presence of NH 4 + in the medium and aerobic conditions repress nitrogen fixation by A. tumefaciens. The system requires molybdenum. No evidence for nodulation was found with pea, peanut, or soybean plants. Further understanding of the nitrogen-fixing ability of this bacterium, which has always been considered a pathogen, should cast new light on the evolution of a pathogenic versus symbiotic relationship

  8. Akkermansia glycaniphila sp. nov., an anaerobic mucin-degrading bacterium isolated from reticulated python faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouwerkerk, Janneke P; Aalvink, Steven; Belzer, Clara; de Vos, Willem M

    2016-11-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, non-motile, strictly anaerobic, oval-shaped, non-spore-forming bacterium (strain PytT) was isolated from reticulated python faeces. Strain PytT was capable of using mucin as sole carbon, energy and nitrogen source. Cells could grow singly, in pairs, and were also found to aggregate. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of filamentous structures connecting individual bacterial cells. Strain PytT could grow on a limited number of single sugars, including N-acetylglucosamine, N-acetylgalactosamine, glucose, lactose and galactose, but only when a plentiful protein source was provided. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed strain PytT to belong to the Verrucomicrobiae class I, family Akkermansiaceae, genus Akkermansia, with Akkermansia muciniphila MucT as the closest relative (94.4 % sequence similarity). DNA-DNA hybridization revealed low relatedness of 28.3 % with A. muciniphila MucT. The G+C content of DNA from strain PytT was 58.2 mol%. The average nucleotide identity (ANI) of the genome of strain PytT compared to the genome of strain MucT was 79.7 %. Chemotaxonomic data supported the affiliation of strain PytT to the genus Akkermansia. Based on phenotypic, phylogenetic and genetic characteristics, strain PytT represents a novel species of the genus Akkermansia, for which the name Akkermansia glycaniphila sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is PytT (=DSM 100705T=CIP 110913T).

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Enterobacter sp. Strain EA-1, an Electrochemically Active Microorganism Isolated from Tropical Sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Lucinda E; Williams, Rohan B H; Rice, Scott A; Marsili, Enrico; Lauro, Federico M

    2018-03-01

    Enterobacter sp. strain EA-1 is an electrochemically active bacterium isolated from tropical sediment in Singapore. Here, the annotated draft genome assembly of the bacterium is reported. Whole-genome comparison indicates that Enterobacter sp. EA-1, along with a previously sequenced Enterobacter isolate from East Asia, forms a distinct clade within the Enterobacter genus. Copyright © 2018 Doyle et al.

  10. Halomonas indalinina sp.nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from a solar saltern in Cabo de Gata, Al,eria, southern Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cabrera, A.; Aguilera, M.; Fuentes Enriquez de Salamanca, S.; Incerti, C.; Russell, N.J.; Ramos-Cormenzana, A.; Monteoliva-Sanchez, M.

    2007-01-01

    moderately halophilic bacterium, strain CG2.1T, isolated from a solar saltern at Cabo de Gata, a wildlife reserve located in the province of Almería, southern Spain, was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. This organism was an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative rod that produced orange-pigmented

  11. Phenotypic and genomic properties of Chitinispirillum alkaliphilum gen. nov., sp. nov., a haloalkaliphilic anaerobic chitinolytic bacterium representing a novel class in the phylum fibrobacteres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Rakitin, Andrey L.; Gumerov, Vadim M.; Beletsky, Alexey V.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Mardanov, Andrey V.; Ravin, Nikolai V.

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic enrichment from sediments of hypersaline alkaline lakes in Wadi el Natrun (Egypt) with chitin resulted in the isolation of a fermentative haloalkaliphilic bacterium, strain ACht6-1, growing exclusively with insoluble chitin as the substrate in a sodium carbonate-based medium at pH

  12. Phenotypic and genomic properties of Chitinispirillum alkaliphilum gen. nov., sp. nov., a haloalkaliphilic anaerobic chitinolytic bacterium representing a novel class in the phylum fibrobacteres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Rakitin, Andrey L.; Gumerov, Vadim M.; Beletsky, Alexey V.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Mardanov, Andrey V.; Ravin, Nikolai V.

    Anaerobic enrichment from sediments of hypersaline alkaline lakes in Wadi el Natrun (Egypt) with chitin resulted in the isolation of a fermentative haloalkaliphilic bacterium, strain ACht6-1, growing exclusively with insoluble chitin as the substrate in a sodium carbonate-based medium at pH 8.5-10.5

  13. Cecembia lonarensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a haloalkalitolerant bacterium of the family Cyclobacteriaceae, isolated from a haloalkaline lake and emended descriptions of the genera Indibacter, Nitritalea and Belliella

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    AnilKumar, P.; Srinivas, T.N.R.; Madhu, S.; Sravan, R.; Singh, S.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Mayilraj, S.; Shivaji, S.

    A novel Gram-staining-negative, rod-shaped, non-motile bacterium, designated strain LW9T, was isolated from a water sample collected from Lonar Lake of Buldhana district, Maharashtra, India. Colonies and broth cultures were reddish orange due...

  14. “Nigerium massiliense” gen. nov., sp. nov., a new bacterium isolated from the gut from a patient with acute malnutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sory Ibrahima Traore

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We propose the main characteristics of a new bacterium named “Nigerium massiliense” strain SIT5 (CSURP1302 that was isolated from the stool of a 2-year-old Nigerian child suffering from kwashiorkor, a form of severe acute malnutrition. Keywords: Culturomics, Taxonomy, Genomics, Taxono-genomics, “Nigerium massiliense”

  15. Complete genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis IO-1, a lactic acid bacterium that utilizes xylose and produces high levels of L-lactic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiroaki; Shiwa, Yuh; Oshima, Kenshiro; Machii, Miki; Araya-Kojima, Tomoko; Zendo, Takeshi; Shimizu-Kadota, Mariko; Hattori, Masahira; Sonomoto, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2012-04-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis IO-1 (= JCM7638). It is a nondairy lactic acid bacterium, produces nisin Z, ferments xylose, and produces predominantly L-lactic acid at high xylose concentrations. From ortholog analysis with other five L. lactis strains, IO-1 was identified as L. lactis subsp. lactis.

  16. Pseudomonas glareae sp. nov., a marine sediment-derived bacterium with antagonistic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, Lyudmila A; Tanaka, Naoto; Svetashev, Vassilii I; Mikhailov, Valery V

    2015-06-01

    An aerobic, Gram-negative, motile, rod-shaped bacterium designated KMM 9500(T) was isolated from a sediment sample collected from the Sea of Japan seashore. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis affiliated strain KMM 9500(T) to the genus Pseudomonas as a distinct subline clustered with Pseudomonas marincola KMM 3042(T) and Pseudomonas segetis KCTC 12331(T) sharing the highest similarities of 98 and 97.9 %, respectively. Strain KMM 9500(T) was characterized by mainly possessing ubiquinone Q-9, and by the predominance of C18:1 ω7c, C16:1 ω7c, and C16:0 followed by C12:0 in its fatty acid profile. Polar lipids consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, an unknown aminophospholipid, and unknown phospholipids. Strain KMM 9500(T) was found to inhibit growth of Gram-negative and Gram-positive indicatory microorganisms. Based on the phylogenetic analysis and distinctive phenotypic characteristics, strain 9500(T) is concluded to represent a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas glareae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the species is strain KMM 9500(T) (=NRIC 0939(T)).

  17. Pseudomonas kunmingensis sp. nov., an exopolysaccharide-producing bacterium isolated from a phosphate mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fuhong; Ma, Huan; Quan, Shujing; Liu, Dehai; Chen, Guocan; Chao, Yapeng; Qian, Shijun

    2014-02-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped, exopolysaccharide-producing, strictly aerobic bacterium with a single polar flagellum, designated strain HL22-2(T), was isolated from a phosphate mine situated in a suburb of Kunmming in Yunnan province in south-western China. The taxonomic status of this strain was evaluated by using a polyphasic approach. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain HL22-2(T) was related to members of the genus Pseudomonas. 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities between strain HL22-2(T) and Pseudomonas xanthomarina KMM 1447(T), Pseudomonas alcaliphila AL15-21(T) and Pseudomonas stutzeri ATCC 17588(T) were 98.9, 98.10% and 98.06%, respectively. The major cellular fatty acids were C(18 : 1)ω7c, C(16 : 0) and summed feature 3 (C(16 : 1)ω7c and/or C(16 : 1)ω6c). The DNA G+C content was 60.3 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic characteristics, phylogenetic analysis and DNA-DNA relatedness values, strain HL22-2(T) represents a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas kunmingensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is HL22-2(T) ( = CGMCC 1.12273(T) = DSM 25974(T)).

  18. [Isolation and identification of Mn oxidizing bacterium Aminobacter sp. H1 and its oxidation mechanism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ping; Jiang, Li-Ying; Chen, Jian-Meng; He, Zhi-Min; Xiao, Shao-Dan; Jiang, Yi-Feng

    2014-04-01

    A bacterium with high manganese oxidizing activity was isolated from a biological manganese removal filter and named as H1. Based on its characteristics and the analysis of 16S rDNA sequence, the strain H1 belonged to the genus Aminobacter sp. and its manganese oxidizing ability had never been reported. In this paper, the microbiologic properties of the strain H1, the manganese oxidation mechanisms and characteristics of biogenic manganese oxides were investigated. The results showed that the maximal tolerant Mn concentration of strain H1 was 50 mmol x L(-1), and Mn(II) could be completely removed by strain H1 when the concentration was lower than 10 mmol x L(-1). Strain H1 could oxidize Mn2+ by both the production of manganese oxidizing activity factor and alkaline metabolites during growth, which were synthesized in the cell and then secreted into extracellular culture medium. During the oxidation process, the intermediate of soluble Mn(III) was detected. SEM showed that the biogenic manganese oxides were amorphous and poorly-crystalline, and it closely combined with bacteria. The components of the biogenic manganese oxides produced by strain H1 were identified as MnCO3, MnOOH, Mn3O4 and MnO2 by XRD, XPS and SEM-EDX.

  19. Psychromonas boydii sp. nov., a gas-vacuolate, psychrophilic bacterium isolated from an Arctic sea-ice core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auman, Ann J; Breezee, Jennifer L; Gosink, John J; Schumann, Peter; Barnes, Carmen R; Kämpfer, Peter; Staley, James T

    2010-01-01

    A gas-vacuolate bacterium, strain 174(T), was isolated from a sea-ice core collected from Point Barrow, Alaska, USA. Comparative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that this bacterium was most closely related to Psychromonas ingrahamii 37(T), with a similarity of >99 %. However, strain 174(T) could be clearly distinguished from closely related species by DNA-DNA hybridization; relatedness values determined by two different methods between strain 174(T) and P. ingrahamii 37(T) were 58.4 and 55.7 % and those between strain 174(T) and Psychromonas antarctica DSM 10704(T) were 46.1 and 33.1 %, which are well below the 70 % level used to define a distinct species. Phenotypic analysis, including cell size (strain 174(T) is the largest member of the genus Psychromonas, with rod-shaped cells, 8-18 microm long), further differentiated strain 174(T) from other members of the genus Psychromonas. Strain 174(T) could be distinguished from its closest relative, P. ingrahamii, by its utilization of D-mannose and D-xylose as sole carbon sources, its ability to ferment myo-inositol and its inability to use fumarate and glycerol as sole carbon sources. In addition, strain 174(T) contained gas vacuoles of two distinct morphologies and grew at temperatures ranging from below 0 to 10 degrees C and its optimal NaCl concentration for growth was 3.5 %. The DNA G+C content was 40 mol%. Whole-cell fatty acid analysis showed that 16 : 1omega7c and 16 : 0 comprised 44.9 and 26.4 % of the total fatty acid content, respectively. The name Psychromonas boydii sp. nov. is proposed for this novel species, with strain 174(T) (=DSM 17665(T) =CCM 7498(T)) as the type strain.

  20. Shewanella algicola sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from brown algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Young; Yoo, Han-Su; Lee, Dong-Heon; Park, So-Hyun; Kim, Young-Ju; Oh, Duck-Chul

    2016-06-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacterium motile by means of a single polar flagella, strain ST-6T, was isolated from a brown alga (Sargassum thunbergii) collected in Jeju, Republic of Korea. Strain ST-6T was psychrotolerant, growing at 4-30 °C (optimum 20 °C). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences revealed that strain ST-6T belonged to a distinct lineage in the genus Shewanella. Strain ST-6T was related most closely to Shewanella basaltis J83T, S. gaetbuli TF-27T, S. arctica IT12T, S. vesiculosa M7T and S. aestuarii SC18T, showing 96-97 % and 85-70 % 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences similarities, respectively. DNA-DNA relatedness values between strain ST-6T and the type strains of two species of the genus Shewanella were 5 %) were summed feature 3 (comprising C16:1ω7c and/ or iso-C15:0 2-OH), C16:0, iso-C13:0 and C17:1ω8c. The DNA G+C content of strain ST-6Twas 42.4 mol%, and the predominant isoprenoid quinones were menaquinone MK-7 and ubiquinones Q-7 and Q-8. On the basis of its phenotypic properties and phylogenetic distinctiveness, strain ST-6T is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Shewanella, for which the name Shewanella algicola sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is ST-6T (= KCTC 23253T = JCM 31091T).

  1. Paenibacillus mobilis sp. nov., a Gram-stain-negative bacterium isolated from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dahye; Cha, Seho; Choi, Jiwon; Seo, Taegun

    2018-04-01

    A novel Gram-stain-negative bacterium, designated strain S8 T , was isolated from a soil sample obtained in Gyeonggi Province, Republic of Korea. Cells of strain S8 T were endospore-forming, motile by means of peritrichous flagella, and rod-shaped. S8 T colonies were round, convex, wavy and white. Strain S8 T grew optimally at 37 °C, pH 6-8, and up to 2.0 % (w/v) NaCl. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strain S8 T was affiliated with the genus Paenibacillus in the family Paenibacillaceae and was most closely related to Paenibacillus yonginensis DCY84 T and Paenibacillus physcomitrellae XB T (98.8 and 97.1 % sequence similarity). The DNA G+C content of the novel strain was 53.1±0.3 mol%. Strain S8 T contained diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, two phospholipids, four aminophospholipids, an aminolipid and three unidentified lipids. The major fatty acid was anteiso-branched C15 : 0. The quinone was menaquinone MK-7. The peptidoglycan of strain S8 T contained meso-diaminopimelic acid. The DNA-DNA hybridization values of strain S8 T with P. yonginensis KCTC 33428 T and P. physcomitrellae DSM 29851 T were 44 % and 32 %, respectively. Data from the DNA-DNA hybridization, biochemical, phylogenetic and physiological analyses indicate that strain S8 T (=KCTC 33848 T =JCM 31672 T ) represents a novel species of the genus Paenibacillus, for which the name Paenibacillus mobilis sp. nov. is proposed.

  2. Noncontiguous finished genome sequence and description of Planococcus massiliensis sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from the human gut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.H. Seck

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We propose the main phenotypic characteristics and the complete genome sequence and annotation of Planococcus massiliensis strain ES2T (= CSUR P1103 = DSM 28915, the type strain of P. massiliensis sp. nov., isolated from a faeces sample collected from a healthy Senegalese man. It is an aerobic, Gram-positive, moderately halophilic, motile and rod-shaped bacterium. The 3 357 017 bp long genome exhibits a G+C content of 46.0% and contains 3357 protein-coding genes and 48 RNA genes.

  3. Genome sequence of the thermophilic fresh-water bacterium Spirochaeta caldaria type strain (H1T), reclassification of Spirochaeta caldaria, Spirochaeta stenostrepta, and Spirochaeta zuelzerae in the genus Treponema as Treponema caldaria comb. nov., Treponema stenostrepta comb. nov., and Treponema zuelzerae comb. nov., and emendation of the genus Tr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abt, Birte [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Scheuner, Carmen [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lu, Megan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Misra, Monica [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Gronow, Sabine [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

    2013-01-01

    Spirochaeta caldaria Pohlschroeder et al. 1995 is an obligately anaerobic, spiral-shaped bac- terium that is motile via periplasmic flagella. The type strain, H1T, was isolated in 1990 from cyanobacterial mat samples collected at a freshwater hot spring in Oregon, USA, and is of in- terest because it enhances the degradation of cellulose when grown in co-culture with Clos- tridium thermocellum. Here we provide a taxonomic re-evaluation for S. caldaria based on phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA sequences and whole genomes, and propose the reclassi- fication of S. caldaria and two other Spirochaeta species as members of the emended genus Treponema. Whereas genera such as Borrelia and Sphaerochaeta possess well-distinguished genomic features related to their divergent lifestyles, the physiological and functional ge- nomic characteristics of Spirochaeta and Treponema appear to be intermixed and are of little taxonomic value. The 3,239,340 bp long genome of strain H1T with its 2,869 protein-coding and 59 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  4. Novel Poly[(R-3-Hydroxybutyrate]-Producing Bacterium Isolated from a Bolivian Hypersaline Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Soledad Marqués-Calvo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly[(R-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB constitutes a biopolymer synthesized from renewable resources by various microorganisms. This work focuses on finding a new PHB-producing bacterium capable of growing in conventional media used for industrial biopolymer production, its taxonomical identification, and characterization of its biopolymer. Thus, a bacterial isolation process was carried out from environmental samples of water and mud. Among the isolates, strain S29 was selected and used in a fed-batch fermentation to generate a biopolymer. This biopolymer was recovered and identified as PHB homopolymer. Surprisingly, it featured several fractions of different molecular masses, and thermal properties unusual for PHB. Hence, the microorganism S29, genetically identified as a new strain of Bacillus megaterium, proved to be interesting not only due to its growth and PHB accumulation kinetics under the investigated cultivation conditions, but also due to the thermal properties of the produced PHB.

  5. The fate of a nitrobenzene-degrading bacterium in pharmaceutical wastewater treatment sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yuan; Yang, Juan; Chen, Shaoyi

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the fate of a nitrobenzene-degrading bacterium, Klebsiella oxytoca NBA-1, which was isolated from a pharmaceutical wastewater treatment facility. The 90-day survivability of strain NBA-1 after exposure to sludge under anaerobic and aerobic conditions was investigated. The bacterium was inoculated into sludge amended with glucose and p-chloronitrobenzene (p-CNB) to compare the bacterial community variations between the modified sludge and nitrobenzene amendment. The results showed that glucose had no obvious effect on nitrobenzene biodegradation in the co-metabolism process, regardless of the presence/absence of oxygen. When p-CNB was added under anaerobic conditions, the biodegradation rate of nitrobenzene remained unchanged although p-CNB inhibited the production of aniline. The diversity of the microbial community increased and NBA-1 continued to be one of the dominant strains. Under aerobic conditions, the degradation rate of both nitrobenzene and p-CNB was only 20% of that under anaerobic conditions. p-CNB had a toxic effect on the microorganisms in the sludge so that most of the DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) bands, including that of NBA-1, began to disappear under aerobic conditions after 90days of exposure. These data show that the bacterial community was stable under anaerobic conditions and the microorganisms, including NBA-1, were more resistant to the adverse environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Experimental evolution of aging in a bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stearns Stephen C

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aging refers to a decline in reproduction and survival with increasing age. According to evolutionary theory, aging evolves because selection late in life is weak and mutations exist whose deleterious effects manifest only late in life. Whether the assumptions behind this theory are fulfilled in all organisms, and whether all organisms age, has not been clear. We tested the generality of this theory by experimental evolution with Caulobacter crescentus, a bacterium whose asymmetric division allows mother and daughter to be distinguished. Results We evolved three populations for 2000 generations in the laboratory under conditions where selection was strong early in life, but very weak later in life. All populations evolved faster growth rates, mostly by decreasing the age at first division. Evolutionary changes in aging were inconsistent. The predominant response was the unexpected evolution of slower aging, revealing the limits of theoretical predictions if mutations have unanticipated phenotypic effects. However, we also observed the spread of a mutation causing earlier aging of mothers whose negative effect was reset in the daughters. Conclusion Our results confirm that late-acting deleterious mutations do occur in bacteria and that they can invade populations when selection late in life is weak. They suggest that very few organisms – perhaps none- can avoid the accumulation of such mutations over evolutionary time, and thus that aging is probably a fundamental property of all cellular organisms.

  7. Co-metabolism of DDT by the newly isolated bacterium, Pseudoxanthomonas sp. wax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangli Wang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbial degradation of 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenylethane (DDT is the most promising way to clean up DDT residues found in the environment. In this paper, a bacterium designated as wax, which was capable of co-metabolizing DDT with other carbon sources, was isolated from a long-term DDT-contaminated soil sample by an enrichment culture technique. The new isolate was identified as a member of the Pseudoxanthomonas sp., based on its morphological, physiological and biochemical properties, as well as by 16S rRNA gene analysis. In the presence of 100 mg l-1 glucose, the wax strain could degrade over 95% of the total DDT, at a concentration of 20 mg l-1, in 72 hours, and could degrade over 60% of the total DDT, at a concentration of 100 mg l-1, in 144 hours. The wax strain had the highest degradation efficiency among all of the documented DDT-degrading bacteria. The wax strain could efficiently degrade DDT at temperatures ranging from 20 to 37ºC, and with initial pH values ranging from 7 to 9. The bacterium could also simultaneously co-metabolize 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenylethane (DDD, 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl-1,1-dichlorethylene (DDE, and other organochlorine compounds. The wax strain could also completely remove 20 mg kg-1 of DDT from both sterile and non-sterile soils in 20 days. This study demonstrates the significant potential use of Pseudoxanthomonas sp. wax for the bioremediation of DDT in the environment.

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus aureus 6850, a Highly Cytotoxic and Clinically Virulent Methicillin-Sensitive Strain with Distant Relatedness to Prototype Strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraunholz, Martin; Bernhardt, Jörg; Schuldes, Jörg; Daniel, Rolf; Hecker, Michael; Sinha, Bhanu

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent human commensal bacterium and pathogen. Here we report the complete genome sequence of strain 6850 (spa type t185; sequence type 50 [ST50]), a highly cytotoxic and clinically virulent methicillin-sensitive strain from a patient with complicated S. aureus

  9. Enterobacter siamensis sp. nov., a transglutaminase-producing bacterium isolated from seafood processing wastewater in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khunthongpan, Suwannee; Bourneow, Chaiwut; H-Kittikun, Aran; Tanasupawat, Somboon; Benjakul, Soottawat; Sumpavapol, Punnanee

    2013-01-01

    A novel strain of Enterobacter, C2361(T), a Gram-negative, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped and facultative anaerobic bacterium with the capability to produce transglutaminase, was isolated from seafood processing wastewater collected from a treatment pond of a seafood factory in Songkhla Province, Thailand. Phylogenetic analyses and phenotypic characteristics, including chemotaxonomic characteristics, showed that the strain was a member of the genus Enterobacter. The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities between strain C2361(T) and Enterobacter cloacae subsp. cloacae ATCC 13047(T) and Enterobacter cloacae subsp. dissolvens LMG 2683(T) were 97.5 and 97.5%, respectively. Strain C2361(T) showed a low DNA-DNA relatedness with the above-mentioned species. The major fatty acids were C16:0, C17:0cyclo and C14:0. The DNA G+C content was 53.0 mol%. On the basis of the polyphasic evidence gathered in this study, it should be classified as a novel species of the genus Enterobacter for which the name Enterobacter siamensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is C2361(T) (= KCTC 23282(T) = NBRC 107138(T)).

  10. Pseudomonas aestus sp. nov., a plant growth-promoting bacterium isolated from mangrove sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcellos, Rafael L F; Santos, Suikinai Nobre; Zucchi, Tiago Domingues; Silva, Fábio Sérgio Paulino; Souza, Danilo Tosta; Melo, Itamar Soares

    2017-10-01

    Strain CMAA 1215 T , a Gram-reaction-negative, aerobic, catalase positive, polarly flagellated, motile, rod-shaped (0.5-0.8 × 1.3-1.9 µm) bacterium, was isolated from mangrove sediments, Cananéia Island, Brazil. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain CMAA 1215 T forms a distinct phyletic line within the Pseudomonas putida subclade, being closely related to P. plecoglossicida ATCC 700383 T , P. monteilii NBRC 103158 T , and P. taiwanensis BCRC 17751 T of sequence similarity of 98.86, 98.73, and 98.71%, respectively. Genomic comparisons of the strain CMAA 1215 T with its closest phylogenetic type strains using average nucleotide index (ANI) and DNA:DNA relatedness approaches revealed 84.3-85.3% and 56.0-63.0%, respectively. A multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) performed concatenating 16S rRNA, gyrB and rpoB gene sequences from the novel species was related with Pseudomonas putida subcluster and formed a new phylogenetic lineage. The phenotypic, physiological, biochemical, and genetic characteristics support the assignment of CMAA 1215 T to the genus Pseudomonas, representing a novel species. The name Pseudomonas aestus sp.nov. is proposed, with CMAA 1215 T (=NRRL B-653100 T  = CBMAI 1962 T ) as the type strain.

  11. Bacillus endozanthoxylicus sp. nov., an endophytic bacterium isolated from Zanthoxylum bungeanum Maxim leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Xi, Jia-Qin; Cao, Yong-Hong; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Zheng, Shuai-Chao; Yang, Cheng-Gang; Yang, Ling-Ling; Mi, Qi-Li; Li, Xue-Mei; Zhu, Ming-Liang; Mo, Ming-He

    2017-10-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, rod-shaped, motile bacterium, designated as 1404 T , was isolated from leaves of Chinese red pepper (Huajiao) (Zanthoxylum bungeanum Maxim) collected from Gansu, north-west China. Spores were not observed under a range of conditions. Strain 1404 T was observed to grow at 15-45 °C and pH 6.0-10.0 and in presence of 0-5 % (w/v) NaCl concentration. The cell wall of strain 1404 T was found to contain meso-diaminopimelic acid, and the predominant respiratory quinone was identified as MK-7. The major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and an unidentified phospholipid as well as three unidentified polar lipids. The major fatty acids profile of strain 1404 T consisted of iso-C15 : 0 (25.6 %), anteiso-C15 : 0 (18.4 %) and iso-C14 : 0 (12.1 %). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain 1404 T was affiliated to the genus Bacillus and was closely related to Bacillusoryzisoli 1DS3-10 T , Bacillusbenzoevorans DSM 5391 T and Bacilluscirculans DSM 11 T with sequence similarity of 98.3, 98.2 and 96.9 %, respectively. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was determined to be 39.4 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization values indicated that relatedness between strain 1404 T and the type strains of closely related species of the genus Bacillus was below 41 %. Therefore, on the basis of the data from the polyphasic taxonomic study presented, strain 1404 T represents a novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which the name proposed is Bacillus endozanthoxylicus sp. nov. The type strain is 1404 T (=CCTCC AB 2017021 T =KCTC 33827 T ).

  12. Exploring the symbiotic pangenome of the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galardini, Marco [University of Florence; Mengoni, Alessio [University of Florence; Brilli, Matteo [Universite de Lyon, France; Pini, Francesco [University of Florence; Fioravanti, Antonella [University of Florence; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Daligault, Hajnalka E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Mocali, Stefano [Agrobiol & Pedol Ctr ABP, Agr Res Council, I-50121 Florence, Italy; Bazzicalupo, Marco [University of Florence; Biondi, Emanuele [University of Florence

    2011-01-01

    Background: Sinorhizobium meliloti is a model system for the studies of symbiotic nitrogen fixation. An extensive polymorphism at the genetic and phenotypic level is present in natural populations of this species, especially in relation with symbiotic promotion of plant growth. AK83 and BL225C are two nodule-isolated strains with diverse symbiotic phenotypes; BL225C is more efficient in promoting growth of the Medicago sativa plants than strain AK83. In order to investigate the genetic determinants of the phenotypic diversification of S. meliloti strains AK83 and BL225C, we sequenced the complete genomes for these two strains. Results: With sizes of 7.14 Mbp and 6.97 Mbp, respectively, the genomes of AK83 and BL225C are larger than the laboratory strain Rm1021. The core genome of Rm1021, AK83, BL225C strains included 5124 orthologous groups, while the accessory genome was composed by 2700 orthologous groups. While Rm1021 and BL225C have only three replicons (Chromosome, pSymA and pSymB), AK83 has also two plasmids, 260 and 70 Kbp long. We found 65 interesting orthologous groups of genes that were present only in the accessory genome, consequently responsible for phenotypic diversity and putatively involved in plant-bacterium interaction. Notably, the symbiosis inefficient AK83 lacked several genes required for microaerophilic growth inside nodules, while several genes for accessory functions related to competition, plant invasion and bacteroid tropism were identified only in AK83 and BL225C strains. Presence and extent of polymorphism in regulons of transcription factors involved in symbiotic interaction were also analyzed. Our results indicate that regulons are flexible, with a large number of accessory genes, suggesting that regulons polymorphism could also be a key determinant in the variability of symbiotic performances among the analyzed strains.

  13. Mobilisporobacter senegalensis gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic bacterium isolated from tropical shea cake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbengue, Malick; Thioye, Abdoulaye; Labat, Marc; Casalot, Laurence; Joseph, Manon; Samb, Abdoulaye; Ben Ali Gam, Zouhaier

    2016-03-01

    A Gram-stain positive, endospore-forming, strictly anaerobic bacterium, designated strain Gal1 T , was isolated from shea cake, a waste material from the production of shea butter, originating from Saraya, Senegal. The cells were rod-shaped, slightly curved, and motile with peritrichous flagella. The strain was oxidase-negative and catalase-negative. Growth was observed at temperatures ranging from 15 to 45 °C (optimum 30 °C) and at pH 6.5-9.3 (optimum pH 7.8). The salinity range for growth was 0-3.5 % NaCl (optimum 1 %). Yeast extract was required for growth. Strain Gal1 T fermented various carbohydrates such as mannose, mannitol, arabinose, cellobiose, fructose, glucose, maltose, sucrose, trehalose and lactose and the major end-products were ethanol and acetate. The only major cellular fatty acid was C16 : 0 (19.6 %). The DNA base G+C content of strain Gal1 T was 33.8 mol%. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolate indicated that this strain was related to Mobilitalea sibirica DSM 26468 T with 94.27 % similarity, Clostridium populeti ATTC 35295 T with 93.94 % similarity, and Clostridium aminovalericum DSM 1283 T and Anaerosporobacter mobilis DSM 15930 T with 93.63 % similarity. On the basis of phenotypic characteristics, phylogenetic analysis and the results of biochemical and physiological tests, strain Gal1 T was clearly distinguished from closely related genera, and strain Gal1 T can be assigned to a novel species of a new genus for which the name Mobilisporobacter senegalensis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Gal1 T ( = DSM 26537 T  = JCM 18753 T ).

  14. Thermoactinomyces khenchelensis sp. nov., a filamentous bacterium isolated from soil sediment of a terrestrial hot spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokrane, Salim; Bouras, Noureddine; Meklat, Atika; Lahoum, Abdelhadi; Zitouni, Abdelghani; Verheecke, Carol; Mathieu, Florence; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Sabaou, Nasserdine; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2016-02-01

    A novel thermophilic filamentous bacterium, designated strain T36(T), was isolated from soil sediment sample from a hot spring source collected in Khenchela province, Algeria. Strain T36(T) was identified as a member of the genus Thermoactinomyces by a polyphasic approach. Strain T36(T) was observed to form white aerial mycelium and non-coloured to pale yellow substrate mycelium, both producing endospores, sessile or borne by short sporophores. The optimum growth temperature and pH were found to be 37-55 °C and 7.0-9.0, respectively and the optimum NaCl concentration for growth was found to be 0-7 % (w/v). The diagnostic diamino acid in the cell wall peptidoglycan was identified as meso-diaminopimelic acid. The predominant menaquinone of strain T36(T) was identified as MK-7 (H0). The major fatty acids were found to be iso-C15:0 and iso-C17:0. The phospholipids detected were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol and phosphoglycolipid. The chemotaxonomic properties of strain T36(T) are consistent with those shared by members of the genus Thermoactinomyces. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the sequence similarities between strain T36(T) and Thermoactinomyces species with validly published names were less than 98 %. Based on the combined genotypic and phenotypic evidence, it is proposed that strain T36(T) should be classified as representative of a novel species, for which the name Thermoactinomyces khenchelensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is T36(T) (=DSM 45951(T) = CECT 8579(T)).

  15. Noncontiguous finished genome sequence and description of Virgibacillus massiliensis sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from human gut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Khelaifia

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Strain Vm-5T was isolated from the stool specimen of a 10-year-old Amazonian boy. This bacterium is a Gram-positive, strictly aerobic rod, motile by a polar flagellum. Here we describe its phenotypic characteristics and complete genome sequence. The 4 353 177 bp long genome exhibits a G + C content of 36.87% and contains 4394 protein-coding and 125 predicted RNA genes. Phylogenetically and genetically, strain Vm-c is a member of the genus Virgibacillus but is distinct enough to be classified as a new species. We propose the creation of V. massiliensis sp. nov., whose type strain is strain Vm-5T (CSUR P971 = DSM 28587.

  16. Biochemical and genetical analysis reveal a new clade of biovar 3 Dickeya spp. strains isolated from potato in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slawiak, M.; Beckhoven, van J.R.C.M.; Speksnijder, A.G.C.L.; Czajkowski, R.L.; Grabe, G.; Wolf, van der J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Sixty-five potato strains of the soft rot-causing plant pathogenic bacterium Dickeya spp., and two strains from hyacinth, were characterised using biochemical assays, REP-PCR genomic finger printing, 16S rDNA and dnaX sequence analysis. These methods were compared with nineteen strains representing

  17. Regulation of Polyhydroxybutyrate Synthesis in the Soil Bacterium Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quelas, J I; Mesa, S; Mongiardini, E J; Jendrossek, D; Lodeiro, A R

    2016-07-15

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a carbon and energy reserve polymer in various prokaryotic species. We determined that, when grown with mannitol as the sole carbon source, Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens produces a homopolymer composed only of 3-hydroxybutyrate units (PHB). Conditions of oxygen limitation (such as microoxia, oxic stationary phase, and bacteroids inside legume nodules) were permissive for the synthesis of PHB, which was observed as cytoplasmic granules. To study the regulation of PHB synthesis, we generated mutations in the regulator gene phaR and the phasin genes phaP1 and phaP4 Under permissive conditions, mutation of phaR impaired PHB accumulation, and a phaP1 phaP4 double mutant produced more PHB than the wild type, which was accumulated in a single, large cytoplasmic granule. Moreover, PhaR negatively regulated the expression of phaP1 and phaP4 as well as the expression of phaA1 and phaA2 (encoding a 3-ketoacyl coenzyme A [CoA] thiolases), phaC1 and phaC2 (encoding PHB synthases), and fixK2 (encoding a cyclic AMP receptor protein [CRP]/fumarate and nitrate reductase regulator [FNR]-type transcription factor of genes for microoxic lifestyle). In addition to the depressed PHB cycling, phaR mutants accumulated more extracellular polysaccharides and promoted higher plant shoot dry weight and competitiveness for nodulation than the wild type, in contrast to the phaC1 mutant strain, which is defective in PHB synthesis. These results suggest that phaR not only regulates PHB granule formation by controlling the expression of phasins and biosynthetic enzymes but also acts as a global regulator of excess carbon allocation and symbiosis by controlling fixK2 IMPORTANCE: In this work, we investigated the regulation of polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis in the soybean-nodulating bacterium Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens and its influence in bacterial free-living and symbiotic lifestyles. We uncovered a new interplay between the synthesis of this carbon reserve polymer

  18. Methylohalobius crimeensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a moderately halophilic, methanotrophic bacterium isolated from hypersaline lakes of Crimea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyer, Jürgen; Berger, Ursula; Hardt, Martin; Dunfield, Peter F

    2005-09-01

    A novel genus and species are proposed for two strains of methanotrophic bacteria isolated from hypersaline lakes in the Crimean Peninsula of Ukraine. Strains 10Ki(T) and 4Kr are moderate halophiles that grow optimally at 1-1.5 M (5.8-8.7%, w/v) NaCl and tolerate NaCl concentrations from 0.2 M up to 2.5 M (1.2-15%). This optimum and upper limit are the highest for any methanotrophic bacterium known to date. The strains are Gram-negative, aerobic, non-pigmented, motile, coccoid to spindle-shaped bacteria that grow on methane or methanol only and utilize the ribulose monophosphate pathway for carbon assimilation. They are neutrophilic (growth occurs only in the range pH 6.5-7.5) and mesophilic (optimum growth occurs at 30 degrees C). On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence phylogeny, strains 10Ki(T) and 4Kr represent a type I methanotroph within the 'Gammaproteobacteria'. However, the 16S rRNA gene sequence displays <91.5 % identity to any public-domain sequence. The most closely related methanotrophic bacterium is the thermophilic strain HB. The DNA G+C content is 58.7 mol%. The major phospholipid fatty acids are 18:1omega7 (52-61%), 16:0 (22-23%) and 16:1omega7 (14-20%). The dominance of 18:1 over 16:0 and 16:1 fatty acids is unique among known type I methanotrophs. The data suggest that strains 10Ki(T) and 4Kr should be considered as belonging to a novel genus and species of type I methanotrophic bacteria, for which the name Methylohalobius crimeensis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. Strain 10Ki(T) (=DSM 16011(T)=ATCC BAA-967(T)) is the type strain.

  19. Taxonomic characterization of the cellulose-degrading bacterium NCIB 10462

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dees, C.; Ringleberg, D.; Scott, T.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Phelps, T. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The gram negative cellulase-producing bacterium NCIB 10462 has been previously named Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. or var. cellulosa. Since there is renewed interest in cellulose-degrading bacteria for use in bioconversion of cellulose to chemical feed stocks and fuels, we re-examined the characteristics of this microorganism to determine its proper taxonomic characterization and to further define it`s true metabolic potential. Metabolic and physical characterization of NCIB 10462 revealed that this was an alkalophilic, non-fermentative, gram negative, oxidase positive, motile, cellulose-degrading bacterium. The aerobic substrate utilization profile of this bacterium was found to have few characteristics consistent with a classification of P. fluorescens with a very low probability match with the genus Sphingomonas. Total lipid analysis did not reveal that any sphingolipid bases are produced by this bacterium. NCIB 10462 was found to grow best aerobically but also grows well in complex media under reducing conditions. NCIB 10462 grew slowly under full anaerobic conditions on complex media but growth on cellulosic media was found only under aerobic conditions. Total fatty acid analysis (MIDI) of NCIB 10462 failed to group this bacterium with a known pseudomonas species. However, fatty acid analysis of the bacteria when grown at temperatures below 37{degrees}C suggest that the organism is a pseudomonad. Since a predominant characteristic of this bacterium is it`s ability to degrade cellulose, we suggest it be called Pseudomonas cellulosa.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus rhodochrous Strain ATCC 21198

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shields-Menard, Sara A. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Klingeman, Dawn Marie [ORNL; Indest, Karl [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Hancock, Dawn [U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center; Wewalwela, Jayani [Mississippi State University (MSU); French, Todd [Mississippi State University (MSU); Donaldson, Janet [Mississippi State University

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus rhodochrous is a Gram-positive red-pigmented bacterium commonly found in the soil. The draft genome sequence for R. rhodochrous strain ATCC 21198 is presented here to provide genetic data for a better understanding of its lipid-accumulating capabilities.

  1. Bacillus nakamurai sp. nov., a black pigment producing strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two isolates of a Gram-positive, strictly aerobic, motile, rod-shaped, endospore-forming bacterium were identified during a survey of the Bacillus diversity of the Agriculture Research Service Culture Collection. These strains were originally isolated from soil and have a phenotype of producing a da...

  2. Complete genome sequence of Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virginia Chow; Guang Nong; Franz J. St. John; John D. Rice; Ellen Dickstein; Olga Chertkov; David Bruce; Chris Detter; Thomas Brettin; James Han; Tanja Woyke; Sam Pitluck; Matt Nolan; Amrita Pati; Joel Martin; Alex Copeland; Miriam L. Land; Lynne Goodwin; Jeffrey B. Jones; Lonnie O. Ingram; Keelnathan T. Shanmugam; James F. Preston

    2012-01-01

    Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, an aggressively xylanolytic bacterium isolated from sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) wood, is able to efficiently depolymerize, assimilate and metabolize 4-O-methylglucuronoxylan, the predominant structural component of hardwood hemicelluloses. A basis for this capability was first supported by...

  3. Elemental sulfur and thiosulfate disproportionation by Desulfocapsa sulfoexigens sp. nov., a new anaerobic bacterium isolated from marine surface sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finster, Kai; Liesack, Werner; Thamdrup, Bo

    1998-01-01

    A mesophilic, anaerobic, gram-negative bacterium, strain SB164P1, was enriched and isolated from oxidized marine surface sediment with elemental sulfur as the sole energy substrate in the presence of ferrihydrite. Elemental sulfur was disproportionated to hydrogen sulfide and sulfate. Growth...... was observed exclusively in the presence of a hydrogen sulfide scavenger, e.g., ferrihydrite. In the absence of a scavenger, sulfide and sulfate production were observed but no growth occurred. Strain SB164P1 grew also by disproportionation of thiosulfate and sulfite. With thiosulfate, the growth efficiency...... was higher in ferrihydrite-supplemented media than in media without ferrihydrite. Growth coupled to sulfate reduction was not observed. However, a slight sulfide production occurred in cultures incubated with formate and sulfate. Strain SB164P1 is the first bacterium described that grows...

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of the Type Strain Cupriavidus necator N-1 ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poehlein, Anja; Kusian, Bernhard; Friedrich, Bärbel; Daniel, Rolf; Bowien, Botho

    2011-01-01

    Here we announce the complete genome sequence of the copper-resistant bacterium Cupriavidus necator N-1, the type strain of the genus Cupriavidus. The genome consists of two chromosomes and two circular plasmids. Based on genome comparison, the chromosomes of C. necator N-1 share a high degree of similarity with the two chromosomal replicons of the bioplastic-producing hydrogen bacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16. The two strains differ in their plasmids and the presence of hydrogenase genes, which are absent in strain N-1. PMID:21742890

  5. Halomonas rifensis sp. nov., an exopolysaccharide-producing, halophilic bacterium isolated from a solar saltern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amjres, Hakima; Béjar, Victoria; Quesada, Emilia; Abrini, Jamal; Llamas, Inmaculada

    2011-11-01

    A polyphasic taxonomic study was conducted on strain HK31(T), a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from a solar saltern in Chefchaouen, Morocco. The strain was a Gram-reaction-negative, oxidase-positive rod, which was motile by means of peritrichous flagella. The strain required NaCl for growth and grew in salt concentrations (mixture of sea salts) of 0.5-20 % (w/v) (optimum 5-7.5 %, w/v), at 25-45 °C (optimum 32 °C) and at pH 5-10 (optimum pH 6-9). Strain HK31(T) did not produce acids from sugars and its metabolism was respiratory, using oxygen as terminal electron acceptor. The strain was positive for the accumulation of poly-β-hydroxyalkanoate granules and formed mucoid colonies due to the excretion of an exopolysaccharide. The DNA G+C content was 61.5 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that it belonged to the genus Halomonas in the class Gammaproteobacteria. The most phylogenetically related species was Halomonas anticariensis, with which strain HK31(T) showed a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 96.48 %. Its major fatty acids were C(18 : 1)ω7c, C(16 : 0), C(19 : 0) cyclo ω8c, C(16 : 1)ω7c/iso-C(15 : 0) 2-OH and C(12 : 0) 3-OH and the predominant respiratory lipoquinone was ubiquinone with nine isoprene units (Q-9). Based on the evidence provided in this study, strain HK31(T) (= CECT 7698(T) = LMG 25695(T)) represents a novel species of the genus Halomonas, for which the name Halomonas rifensis is proposed.

  6. Isolation of an indigenous imidacloprid-degrading bacterium and imidacloprid bioremediation under simulated in situ and ex situ conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guiping; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Bo; Song, Fengqing; You, Minsheng

    2013-11-28

    The Bacterial community structure and its complexity of the enrichment culture during the isolation and screening of imidacloprid-degrading strain were studied using denaturating gradient gel electrophoresis analysis. The dominant bacteria in the original tea rhizosphere soil were uncultured bacteria, Rhizobium sp., Sinorhizobium, Ochrobactrum sp., Alcaligenes, Bacillus sp., Bacterium, Klebsiella sp., and Ensifer adhaerens. The bacterial community structure was altered extensively and its complexity reduced during the enrichment process, and four culturable bacteria, Ochrobactrum sp., Rhizobium sp., Geobacillus stearothermophilus, and Alcaligenes faecalis, remained in the final enrichment. Only one indigenous strain, BCL-1, with imidacloprid-degrading potential, was isolated from the sixth enrichment culture. This isolate was a gram-negative rod-shaped bacterium and identified as the genus Ochrobactrum based on its morphological, physiological, and biochemical properties and its 16S rRNA gene sequence. The degradation test showed that approximately 67.67% of the imidacloprid (50 mg/l) was degraded within 48 h by strain BCL-1. The optimum conditions for degradation were a pH of 8 and 30°C. The simulation of imidacloprid bioremediation by strain BCL-1 in soil demonstrated that the best performance in situ (tea soil) resulted in the degradation of 92.44% of the imidacloprid (100 mg/g) within 20 days, which was better than those observed in the ex situ simulations that were 64.66% (cabbage soil), 41.15% (potato soil), and 54.15% (tomato soil).

  7. Draft genome sequence of Bacillus okhensis Kh10-101T, a halo-alkali tolerant bacterium from Indian saltpan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilla Sankara Krishna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the 4.86-Mb draft genome sequence of Bacillus okhensis strain Kh10-101T, a halo-alkali tolerant rod shaped bacterium isolated from a salt pan near port of Okha, India. This bacterium is a potential model to study the molecular response of bacteria to salt as well as alkaline stress, as it thrives under both high salt and high pH conditions. The draft genome consist of 4,865,284 bp with 38.2% G + C, 4952 predicted CDS, 157 tRNAs and 8 rRNAs. Sequence was deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the project accession JRJU00000000.

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Pediococcus pentosaceus Strain wikim 20, Isolated from Korean Kimchi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Se Hee; Jung, Min Young; Park, Boyeon; Sung-Oh, Sohn; Park, Hae Woong; Choi, Hak-Jong

    2016-01-01

    Pediococcus pentosaceus strain wikim 20 is a lactic acid bacterium that was isolated from kimchi, a representative traditional Korean fermented food. Here, we announce the complete genome sequence of P. pentosaceus strain wikim 20 consisting of a 1,830,629-bp chromosome and provide a description of its annotation. PMID:27834699

  9. Complete genome sequence of Lactobacillus fermentum CECT 5716, a probiotic strain isolated from human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Esther; Langa, Susana; Martín, Virginia; Arroyo, Rebeca; Martín, Rocío; Fernández, Leónides; Rodríguez, Juan M

    2010-09-01

    Lactobacillus fermentum is a heterofermentative lactic acid bacterium and is frequently isolated from mucosal surfaces of healthy humans. Lactobacillus fermentum CECT 5716 is a well-characterized probiotic strain isolated from human milk and, at present, is used in commercial infant formulas. Here, we report the complete and annotated genome sequence of this strain.

  10. Draft genome sequence of Xylella fastidiosa pear leaf scorch strain in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    The draft genome sequence of Xylella fastidiosa pear leaf scorch strain (PLS229) isolated from pear cultivar Hengshan (Pyrus pyrifolia) in Taiwan is reported. The bacterium has a genome size of 2,733,013 bp with a G+C content of 53.1%. The PLS229 strain genome was annotated to have 3,259 open readin...

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Ochrobactrum intermedium Strain SA148, a Plant Growth-Promoting Desert Rhizobacterium

    KAUST Repository

    Lafi, Feras Fawzi

    2017-03-03

    Ochrobactrum intermedium strain SA148 is a plant growth-promoting bacterium isolated from sandy soil in the Jizan area of Saudi Arabia. Here, we report the 4.9-Mb draft genome sequence of this strain, highlighting different pathways characteristic of plant growth promotion activity and environmental adaptation of SA148.

  12. Isolation and characterization of a novel toluene-degrading, sulfate-reducing bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beller, H R; Spormann, A M; Sharma, P K; Cole, J R; Reinhard, M

    1996-01-01

    A novel sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from fuel-contaminated subsurface soil, strain PRTOL1, mineralizes toluene as the sole electron donor and carbon source under strictly anaerobic conditions. The mineralization of 80% of toluene carbon to CO2 was demonstrated in experiments with [ring-U-14C]toluene; 15% of toluene carbon was converted to biomass and nonvolatile metabolic by-products, primarily the former. The observed stoichiometric ratio of moles of sulfate consumed per mole of toluene consumed was consistent with the theoretical ratio for mineralization of toluene coupled with the reduction of sulfate to hydrogen sulfide. Strain PRTOL1 also transforms o- and p-xylene to metabolic products when grown with toluene. However, xylene transformation by PRTOL1 is slow relative to toluene degradation and cannot be sustained over time. Stable isotope-labeled substrates were used in conjunction with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to investigate the by-products of toluene and xylene metabolism. The predominant by-products from toluene, o-xylene, and p-xylene were benzylsuccinic acid, (2-methylbenzyl)succinic acid, and 4-methylbenzoic acid (or p-toluic acid), respectively. Metabolic by-products accounted for nearly all of the o-xylene consumed. Enzyme assays indicated that acetyl coenzyme A oxidation proceeded via the carbon monoxide dehydrogenase pathway. Compared with the only other reported toluene-degrading, sulfate-reducing bacterium, strain PRTOL1 is distinct in that it has a novel 16S rRNA gene sequence and was derived from a freshwater rather than marine environment. PMID:8919780

  13. Isolation and characterization of an algicidal bacterium indigenous to lake Taihu with a red pigment able to lyse microcystis aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fei; Wei, Hai Yan; Li, Xiao Qin; Li, Yun Hui; Li, Xiao Bo; Yin, Li Hong; Pu, Yue Pu

    2013-02-01

    To isolate and characterize indigenous algicidal bacteria and their algae-lysing compounds active against Microcystis aeruginosa, strains TH1, TH2, and FACHB 905. The bacteria were identified using the Biolog automated microbial identification system and 16S rDNA sequence analysis. The algae-lysing compounds were isolated and purified by silica gel column chromatography and reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography. Their structures were confirmed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Algae-lysing activity was observed using microscopy. The algae-lysing bacterium LTH-2 isolated from Lake Taihu was identified as Serratia marcescens. Strain LTH-2 secreted a red pigment identified as prodigiosin (C20H25N3O), which showed strong lytic activity with algal strains M. aeruginosa TH1, TH2, and FACHB 905 in a concentration-dependent manner. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of prodigiosin with the algal strains was 4.8 (± 0.4)× 10⁻² μg/mL, 8.9 (± 1.1)× 10⁻² μg/mL, and 1.7 (± 0.1)× 10⁻¹ μg/mL in 24 h, respectively. The bacterium LTH-2 and its pigment had strong Microcystis-lysing activity probably related to damage of cell membranes. The bacterium LTH-2 and its red pigment are potentially useful for regulating blooms of harmful M. aeruginosa. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  14. Cellulomonas composti sp. nov., a cellulolytic bacterium isolated from cattle farm compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Myung-Suk; Im, Wan-Taek; Jung, Hae-Min; Kim, Myung Kyum; Goodfellow, Michael; Kim, Kwang Kyu; Yang, Hee-Chan; An, Dong-Shan; Lee, Sung-Taik

    2007-06-01

    A bacterial strain, TR7-06(T), which has cellulase and beta-glucosidase activities, was isolated from compost at a cattle farm near Daejeon, Republic of Korea. It was a Gram-positive, aerobic or facultatively anaerobic, non-motile, rod-shaped bacterium. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that this strain belongs to the genus Cellulomonas, with highest sequence similarity to Cellulomonas uda DSM 20107(T) (98.5 %). Cell wall analysis revealed the presence of type A4beta, L-orn-D-Glu peptidoglycan. The cell-wall sugars detected were mannose and glucose. The predominant menaquinone was MK-9(H(4)); MK-8(H(4)) was detected in smaller quantities. The major fatty acids were anteiso-C(15 : 0), C(16 : 0), C(14 : 0) and C(18 : 0). The polar lipids detected were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol. The results of DNA-DNA hybridization and physiological and biochemical tests clearly demonstrated that TR7-06(T) represents a novel species. The combined genotypic and phenotypic data show that strain TR7-06(T) (=KCTC 19030(T)=NBRC 100758(T)) merits description as the type strain of a novel Cellulomonas species, Cellulomonas composti sp. nov.

  15. Helicobacter Catalase Devoid of Catalytic Activity Protects the Bacterium against Oxidative Stress*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Stéphane L.; Maier, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Catalase, a conserved and abundant enzyme found in all domains of life, dissipates the oxidant hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori undergoes host-mediated oxidant stress exposure, and its catalase contains oxidizable methionine (Met) residues. We hypothesized catalase may play a large stress-combating role independent of its classical catalytic one, namely quenching harmful oxidants through its recyclable Met residues, resulting in oxidant protection to the bacterium. Two Helicobacter mutant strains (katAH56A and katAY339A) containing catalase without enzyme activity but that retain all Met residues were created. These strains were much more resistant to oxidants than a catalase-deletion mutant strain. The quenching ability of the altered versions was shown, whereby oxidant-stressed (HOCl-exposed) Helicobacter retained viability even upon extracellular addition of the inactive versions of catalase, in contrast to cells receiving HOCl alone. The importance of the methionine-mediated quenching to the pathogen residing in the oxidant-rich gastric mucus was studied. In contrast to a catalase-null strain, both site-change mutants proficiently colonized the murine gastric mucosa, suggesting that the amino acid composition-dependent oxidant-quenching role of catalase is more important than the well described H2O2-dissipating catalytic role. Over 100 years after the discovery of catalase, these findings reveal a new non-enzymatic protective mechanism of action for the ubiquitous enzyme. PMID:27605666

  16. Biosynthesis and characterization of polyhydroxyalkanoates produced by an extreme halophilic bacterium, Halomonas nitroreducens, isolated from hypersaline ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Uc, J M; Catzin, J; Vargas, I; Herrera-Kao, W; Moguel, F; Ramirez, E; Rincón-Arriaga, S; Lizama-Uc, G

    2014-10-01

    Morphological, biochemical and genotypic characterization of a halophilic bacterium isolated from hypersaline ponds located at Las Coloradas (Río Lagartos, Yucatán, Mexico). Characterization of polymer produced by this strain was also performed. Twenty strains were isolated from water samples of salt ponds and selected based on both morphological features and their PHA storage capacity, which were determined by SEM and staining methods with Nile red and Nile blue, respectively; strains were also analysed by the fluorescence imaging technique. Among them, JCCOL25.8 strain showed the highest production of PHA's reason why phenotypic and genotypic characterization was performed; this strain was identified as Halomonas nitroreducens. Polymer produced by this strain was characterized by FTIR, DSC, GPC and EDX spectroscopy. Results indicated that the biosynthesized polymer was polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) which had a melting peak at 170°C and a crystallinity percentage of about 36%. Based on phenotypic and genotypic aspects, JCCOL25.8 strain was identified as H. nitroreducens and it was capable to accumulate PHB. To our knowledge, there is only one study published on the biosynthesis of PHA's by H. nitroreducens strains, although the characterization of the obtained polymer was not reported. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Desulfotomaculum arcticum sp. nov., a novel spore-forming, moderately thermophilic, sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from a permanently cold fjord sediment of Svalbard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandieken, Verona; Knoblauch, Christian; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2006-01-01

    Strain 15T is a novel spore-forming, sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from a permanently cold fjord sediment of Svalbard. Sulfate could be replaced by sulfite or thiosulfate. Hydrogen, formate, lactate, propionate, butyrate, hexanoate, methanol, ethanol, propanol, butanol, pyruvate, malate...... growth occurred at 44 degrees C. Therefore, strain 15T apparently cannot grow at in situ temperatures of Arctic sediments from where it was isolated, and it was proposed that it was present in the sediment in the form of spores. The DNA G+C content was 48.9 mol%. Strain 15T was most closely related...

  18. Desulfotomaculum arcticum sp nov., a novel spore-formin, moderately thermophilic, sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from a permanently cold fjord sediment of Svalbard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandieken, V.; Knoblauch, C.; Jørgensen, BB

    2006-01-01

    Strain 15 T is a novel spore-forming, sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from a permanently cold fjord sediment of Svalbard. Sulfate could be replaced by sulfite or thiosulfate. Hydrogen, formate, lactate, propionate, butyrate, hexanoate, methanol, ethanol, propanol, butanol, pyruvate, malate...... and optimal growth occurred at 44 degrees C. Therefore, strain 15 T apparently cannot grow at in situ temperatures of Arctic sediments from where it was isolated, and it was proposed that it was present in the sediment in the form of spores. The DNA G+C content was 48(.)9 mol%. Strain 15 T was most closely...

  19. Rhizobium populi sp. nov., an endophytic bacterium isolated from Populus euphratica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozahon, Manziram; Ismayil, Nurimangul; Hamood, Buayshem; Erkin, Raziya; Abdurahman, Mehfuzem; Mamtimin, Hormathan; Abdukerim, Muhtar; Lal, Rup; Rahman, Erkin

    2014-09-01

    An endophytic bacterium, designated K-38(T), was isolated from the storage liquid in the stems of Populus euphratica trees at the ancient Ugan River in Xinjiang, PR China. Strain K-38(T) was found to be rod-shaped, Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, non-motile and non-spore-forming. Strain K-38(T) grew at temperatures of 25-37 °C (optimum, 28 °C), at pH 6.0-9.0 (optimum, pH 7.5) and in the presence of 0-3 % (w/v) NaCl with 1 % as the optimum concentration for growth. According to phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, strain K-38(T) was assigned to the genus Rhizobium with highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 97.2 % to Rhizobium rosettiformans W3(T), followed by Rhizobium nepotum 39/7(T) (96.5 %) and Rhizobium borbori DN316(T) (96.2 %). Phylogenetic analysis of strain K-38(T) based on the protein coding genes recA, atpD and nifH confirmed (similarities were less than 90 %) it to be a representative of a distinctly delineated species of the genus Rhizobium. The DNA G+C content was determined to be 63.5 mol%. DNA-DNA relatedness between K-38(T) and R. rosettiformans W3(T) was 48.4 %, indicating genetic separation of strain K-38(T) from the latter strain. The major components of the cellular fatty acids in strain K-38(T) were revealed to be summed feature 8 (comprising C18 : 1ω7c and/or C18 : 1ω6c; 57.2 %), C16 : 0 (13.6 %) and summed feature 2 (comprising C12 : 0 aldehyde, C14 : 0 3-OH/iso-C16 : 1 I and/or unknown ECL 10.928; 11.0 %). Polar lipids of strain K-38(T) include phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, two unidentified aminophospholipids and two unidentified phospholipids. Q-10 was the major quinone in strain K-38(T). Based on phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic properties, strain K-38(T) represents a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium populi sp. nov. is proposed

  20. Amerindian Helicobacter pylori strains go extinct, as european strains expand their host range.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria G Domínguez-Bello

    Full Text Available We studied the diversity of bacteria and host in the H. pylori-human model. The human indigenous bacterium H. pylori diverged along with humans, into African, European, Asian and Amerindian groups. Of these, Amerindians have the least genetic diversity. Since niche diversity widens the sets of resources for colonizing species, we predicted that the Amerindian H. pylori strains would be the least diverse. We analyzed the multilocus sequence (7 housekeeping genes of 131 strains: 19 cultured from Africans, 36 from Spanish, 11 from Koreans, 43 from Amerindians and 22 from South American Mestizos. We found that all strains that had been cultured from Africans were African strains (hpAfrica1, all from Spanish were European (hpEurope and all from Koreans were hspEAsia but that Amerindians and Mestizos carried mixed strains: hspAmerind and hpEurope strains had been cultured from Amerindians and hpEurope and hpAfrica1 were cultured from Mestizos. The least genetically diverse H. pylori strains were hspAmerind. Strains hpEurope were the most diverse and showed remarkable multilocus sequence mosaicism (indicating recombination. The lower genetic structure in hpEurope strains is consistent with colonization of a diversity of hosts. If diversity is important for the success of H. pylori, then the low diversity of Amerindian strains might be linked to their apparent tendency to disappear. This suggests that Amerindian strains may lack the needed diversity to survive the diversity brought by non-Amerindian hosts.

  1. Rhizobium hidalgonense sp. nov., a nodule endophytic bacterium of Phaseolus vulgaris in acid soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jun; Yan, Hui; Liu, Li Xue; Chen, Wen Feng; Zhang, Xiao Xia; Verástegui-Valdés, Myrthala M; Wang, En Tao; Han, Xiao Zeng

    2017-01-01

    One Gram-negative, aerobic, motile, rod-shaped bacterium, designated as FH14 T , was isolated from nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris grown in Hidalgo State of Mexico. Results based upon 16S rRNA gene (≥99.8 % similarities to known species), concatenated sequence (recA, atpD and glnII) analysis of three housekeeping genes (≤93.4 % similarities to known species) and average nucleotide identity (ANI) values of genome sequence (ranged from 87.6 to 90.0 % to related species) indicated the distinct position of strain FH14 T within the genus Rhizobium. In analyses of symbiotic genes, only nitrogen fixation gene nifH was amplified that had nucleotide sequence identical to those of the bean-nodulating strains in R. phaseoli and R. vallis, while nodulation gene nodC gene was not amplified. The failure of nodulation to its original host P. vulgaris and other legumes evidenced the loss of its nodulation capability. Strain FH14 T contained summed feature 8 (C 18:1 ω6c/C 18:1 ω7c, 59.96 %), C 16:0 (10.6 %) and summed feature 2 (C 12:0 aldehyde/unknown 10.928, 10.24 %) as the major components of cellular fatty acids. Failure to utilize alaninamide, and utilizing L-alanine, L-asparagine and γ-amino butyric acid as carbon source, distinguished the strain FH14 T from the type strains for the related species. The genome size and DNA G+C content of FH14 T were 6.94 Mbp and 60.8 mol %, respectively. Based on those results, a novel specie in Rhizobium, named Rhizobium hidalgonense sp. nov., was proposed, with FH14 T (=HAMBI 3636 T  = LMG 29288 T ) as the type strain.

  2. Dehalogenimonas formicexedens sp. nov., a chlorinated alkane-respiring bacterium isolated from contaminated groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Trent A; Bowman, Kimberly S; Lee, Imchang; Chun, Jongsik; Albuquerque, Luciana; da Costa, Milton S; Rainey, Fred A; Moe, William M

    2017-05-01

    A strictly anaerobic, Gram-stain-negative, non-spore-forming bacterium designated NSZ-14T, isolated from contaminated groundwater in Louisiana (USA), was characterized using a polyphasic approach. Strain NSZ-14T reductively dehalogenated a variety of polychlorinated aliphatic alkanes, producing ethene from 1,2-dichloroethane, propene from 1,2-dichloropropane, a mixture of cis- and trans-1,2-dichloroethene from 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, vinyl chloride from 1,1,2-trichloroethane and allyl chloride (3-chloro-1-propene) from 1,2,3-trichloropropane. Formate or hydrogen could both serve as electron donors. Dechlorination occurred between pH 5.5 and 7.5 and over a temperature range of 20-37 °C. Major cellular fatty acids included C18 : 1ω9c, C14 : 0 and C16 : 0. 16S rRNA gene sequence-based phylogenetic analysis indicated that the strain clusters within the class Dehalococcoidia of the phylum Chloroflexi, most closely related to but distinct from type strains of the species Dehalogenimonas alkenigignens (97.63 % similarity) and Dehalogenimonas lykanthroporepellens (95.05 %). A complete genome sequence determined for strain NSZ-14T revealed a DNA G+C content of 53.96 mol%, which was corroborated by HPLC (54.1±0.2 mol% G+C). Genome-wide comparisons based on average nucleotide identity by orthology and estimated DNA-DNA hybridization values combined with phenotypic and chemotaxonomic traits and phylogenetic analysis indicate that strain NSZ-14T represents a novel species within the genus Dehalogenimonas, for which the name Dehalogenimonas formicexedens sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NSZ-14T (=HAMBI 3672T=JCM 19277T=VKM B-3058T). An emended description of Dehalogenimonas alkenigignens is also provided.

  3. Chryseobacterium formosus sp. nov., a bacterium isolated from an ancient tree trunk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akter, Shahina; NGO, Hien T T; Du, Juan; Won, KyungHwa; Singh, Hina; Yin, Chang Shik; Kook, MooChang; Yi, Tae-Hoo

    2015-10-01

    A Gram-reaction-negative, non-motile and rod-shaped bacterium, designated as THG-DN3.6(T), was isolated from an ancient tree trunk from Republic of Korea. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain THG-DN3.6(T) was shown to belong to the genus Chryseobacterium and the highest similarity to Chryseobacterium indoltheticum LMG 4025(T) (97.2%) and the closest phylogenetic relatives were Chryseobacterium scophthalmum (96.8%), Chryseobacterium piscium (96.7%) and Chryseobacterium balustinum KCTC 2903(T) (96.3%). The DNA G + C content of the isolate was 33.2 mol%. The predominant isoprenoid quinone was menaquinone-6. The major fatty acids were iso-C15:0, summed feature 3 (C16:1 ω7c and/or C16:1 ω7t and/or iso-C15:0 2-OH), iso-C17:1 ω9c and iso-C17:0 3-OH. The major polar lipids of strain THG-DN3.6(T) were phosphatidylethanolamine. The mean DNA-DNA relatedness of strain THG-DN3.6(T) to C. indoltheticum LMG 4025(T) was 52 ± 0.5%. Based on the results of polyphasic characterization, strain THG-DN3.6(T) represented a novel species within the genus Chryseobacterium, for which the name Chryseobacterium formosus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is THG-DN3.6(T) (=KCTC 42606 = CCTCC AB 2015118). The NCBI GenBank accession number for the 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain THG-DN3.6(T) is KM035938.

  4. Caldicoprobacter algeriensis sp. nov. a new thermophilic anaerobic, xylanolytic bacterium isolated from an Algerian hot spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouanane-Darenfed, Amel; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Grégoire, Patrick; Joseph, Manon; Kebbouche-Gana, Salima; Benayad, Tahar; Hacene, Hocine; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Ollivier, Bernard

    2011-03-01

    A thermophilic anaerobic bacterium (strain TH7C1(T)) was isolated from the hydrothermal hot spring of Guelma in the northeast of Algeria. Strain TH7C1(T) stained Gram-positive, was a non-motile rod appearing singly, in pairs, or as long chains (0.7-1 × 2-6 μm(2)). Spores were never observed. It grew at temperatures between 55 and 75°C (optimum 65°C) and at pH between 6.2 and 8.3 (optimum 6.9). It did not require NaCl for growth, but tolerated it up to 5 g l(-1). Strain TH7C1(T) is an obligatory heterotroph fermenting sugars including glucose, galactose, lactose, raffinose, fructose, ribose, xylose, arabinose, maltose, mannitol, cellobiose, mannose, melibiose, saccharose, but also xylan, and pyruvate. Fermentation of sugars only occurred in the presence of yeast extract (0.1%). The end-products from glucose fermentation were acetate, lactate, ethanol, CO(2), and H(2). Nitrate, nitrite, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfate, and sulfite were not used as electron acceptors. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 44.7 mol% (HPLC techniques). Phylogenetic analysis of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequence indicated that strain TH7C1(T) was affiliated to Firmicutes, order Clostridiales, family Caldicoprobacteraceae, with Caldicoprobacter oshimai (98.5%) being its closest relative. Based on phenotypic, phylogenetic, and genetic characteristics, strain TH7C1(T) is proposed as a novel species of genus Caldicoprobacter, Caldicoprobacter algeriensis, sp. nov. (strain TH7C1(T) = DSM 22661(T) = JCM 16184(T)).

  5. Granulibacter bethesdensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a distinctive pathogenic acetic acid bacterium in the family Acetobacteraceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, David E; Porcella, Stephen F; Stock, Frida; Wong, Alexandra; Conville, Patricia S; Murray, Patrick R; Holland, Steven M; Zelazny, Adrian M

    2006-11-01

    A Gram-negative, aerobic, coccobacillus to rod-shaped bacterium was isolated from three patients with chronic granulomatous disease. The organism was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. A multilocus phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and the RecA protein demonstrated that the organism belongs to a new sublineage within the acetic acid bacteria in the family Acetobacteraceae. Phenotypic features are summarized as follows: the organism grew at an optimum temperature of 35-37 degrees C and optimum pH of 5.0-6.5. It produced a yellow pigment, oxidized lactate and acetate, the latter weakly, produced little acetic acid from ethanol and could use methanol as a sole carbon source. The two major fatty acids were a straight-chain unsaturated acid (C18:1omega7c) and C16:0. The DNA base composition was 59.1 mol% G+C. The very weak production of acetic acid from ethanol, the ability to use methanol, the yellow pigmentation and high optimum temperature for growth distinguished this organism from other acetic acid bacteria. The unique phylogenetic and phenotypic characteristics suggest that the bacterium should be classified within a separate genus, for which the name Granulibacter bethesdensis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CGDNIH1T (=ATCC BAA-1260T=DSM 17861T).

  6. Heterologous expression and functional characterization of a novel chitinase from the chitinolytic bacterium Chitiniphilus shinanonensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lanxiang; Shizume, Arisa; Nogawa, Masahiro; Taguchi, Goro; Shimosaka, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    Chitiniphilus shinanonensis strain SAY3(T) is a chitinolytic bacterium isolated from moat water of Ueda Castle in Nagano Prefecture, Japan. Fifteen genes encoding putative chitinolytic enzymes (chiA-chiO) have been isolated from this bacterium. Five of these constitute a single operon (chiCDEFG). The open reading frames of chiC, chiD, chiE, and chiG show sequence similarity to family 18 chitinases, while chiF encodes a polypeptide with two chitin-binding domains but no catalytic domain. Each of the five genes was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli, and the resulting recombinant proteins were characterized. Four of the recombinant proteins (ChiC, ChiD, ChiE, and ChiG) exhibited endo-type chitinase activity toward chitinous substrates, while ChiF showed no chitinolytic activity. In contrast to most endo-type chitinases, which mainly produce a dimer of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) as final product, ChiG completely split the GlcNAc dimer into GlcNAc monomers, indicating that it is a novel chitinase.

  7. Production and characterization of bioemulsifier from a marine bacterium, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus subsp. anitratus SM7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulnaree Phetrong

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Marine bacterium strain SM7 was isolated as a bioemulsifier-producing bacterium from oil-spilled seawater in Songkhla lagoon, Thailand. It was identified as Acinetobacter calcoaceticus subsp. anitratus based on morphology, biochemicalcharacteristics and 16S rRNA sequence. A. calcoaceticus subsp. anitratus SM7 produced an extracellular emulsifying agent when grown in a minimal salt medium (pH 7.0 containing 0.3% (v/v n-heptadecane and 0.1% (w/v ammoniumhydrogen carbonate as carbon source and nitrogen source, respectively, at 30oC with agitation rate of 200 rpm. Crude bioemulsifier was recovered from the culture supernatant by ethanol precipitation with a yield of 2.94 g/l and had a criticalemulsifier concentration of 0.04 g/ml. The crude bioemulsifier was capable of emulsifying n-hexadecane in a broad pH range (6-12, temperatures (30-121oC and in the presence of NaCl up to 12% (w/v. The bioemulsifier was stable in saltsolution ranging from 0 to 0.1% (w/v of MgCl2 and CaCl2. The broad range of pH stability, thermostability and salt tolerance suggested that the bioemulsifier from A. calcoaceticus subsp. anitratus SM7 could be useful in environmentalapplication, especially bioremediation of oil-polluted seawater.

  8. Biological control of postharvest pear diseases using a bacterium, Pantoea agglomerans CPA-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, C; Usall, J; Teixidó, N; Viñas, I

    2001-10-22

    Epiphytic microorganisms isolated from the fruits and leaf surfaces of apples and pears were screened for antagonistic activity against Penicillium expansum on pears. From 247 microorganisms tested for antagonistic properties against P. expansum, a bacterium strain identified as Pantoea agglomerans (CPA-2) was selected. This bacterium was very effective against Botrytis cinerea, P. expansum and Rhizopus stolonifer. Complete control at the three tested concentrations (2 x 10(7), 8 x 10(7) and 1 x 10(8) CFU ml(-1)) was obtained on wounded pears inoculated with 10(3), 10(4) and 10(5) conidia ml(-1) of P. expansum and R. stolonifer. At 8 x 10(7) CFU ml(-1), Pan. agglomerans reduced B. cinerea decay by more than 80% at the three concentrations of the pathogen. In over 3 years of experiments in semicommercial trials, Pan. agglomerans provided excellent control against B. cinerea and P. expansum under cold storage, either in air or in low oxygen atmospheres. Equal control was obtained with Pan. agglomerans at 8 x 10(7) CFU ml(-1), as with the fungicide imazalil at commercial doses, against both pathogens. Pan. agglomerans grew well inside wounds on pears at both room and cold temperatures and under modified atmospheres. In contrast, it grew poorly on the surface of intact fruit.

  9. The efficiency of gamma irradiation on the bacterium pseudomonas fluorescence (Migh) against the mediterranean fruit fly ceratitis capitata (wiedemann)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadel, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    The efficiency of the bacterium pseudomonas fluorescence against the mediterranean fruit fly ceratitis capitata (Wied.) was investigated. Adult emergence was significantly reduced by applying the wild and gamma irradiated strain (150 and 300 Gy). The highest reduction occurred by the mutant P1 and the highest concentration (10 8 ). The activity of this bacteria increased by gamma irradiation compared to that of the wild isolate. The reduction in adult survival of both males and females was highly significant by applying the irradiated bacteria with the two doses of gamma radiation and different concentration (10 8 , 10 6 and 10 4 ) of bacterial suspension. Applying the bacteria as a culture filtrate reduced adult survival of wild strain significantly, while the irradiated strain recorded a significant reduction in males and females with the highest concentration (100 %) and by applying the two doses of gamma radiation (150 and 300 Gy) and in females only at the concentration 50% by using the dose of 150 Gy

  10. Geobacillus zalihae sp. nov., a thermophilic lipolytic bacterium isolated from palm oil mill effluent in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salleh Abu

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thermophilic Bacillus strains of phylogenetic Bacillus rRNA group 5 were described as a new genus Geobacillus. Their geographical distribution included oilfields, hay compost, hydrothermal vent or soils. The members from the genus Geobacillus have a growth temperatures ranging from 35 to 78°C and contained iso-branched saturated fatty acids (iso-15:0, iso-16:0 and iso-17:0 as the major fatty acids. The members of Geobacillus have similarity in their 16S rRNA gene sequences (96.5–99.2%. Thermophiles harboring intrinsically stable enzymes are suitable for industrial applications. The quest for intrinsically thermostable lipases from thermophiles is a prominent task due to the laborious processes via genetic modification. Results Twenty-nine putative lipase producers were screened and isolated from palm oil mill effluent in Malaysia. Of these, isolate T1T was chosen for further study as relatively higher lipase activity was detected quantitatively. The crude T1 lipase showed high optimum temperature of 70°C and was also stable up to 60°C without significant loss of crude enzyme activity. Strain T1T was a Gram-positive, rod-shaped, endospore forming bacterium. On the basic of 16S rDNA analysis, strain T1T was shown to belong to the Bacillus rRNA group 5 related to Geobacillus thermoleovorans (DSM 5366T and Geobacillus kaustophilus (DSM 7263T. Chemotaxonomic data of cellular fatty acids supported the affiliation of strain T1T to the genus Geobacillus. The results of physiological and biochemical tests, DNA/DNA hybridization, RiboPrint analysis, the length of lipase gene and protein pattern allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of strain T1T from its validly published closest phylogenetic neighbors. Strain T1T therefore represents a novel species, for which the name Geobacillus zalihae sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain T1T (=DSM 18318T; NBRC 101842T. Conclusion Strain T1T was able to secrete extracellular

  11. Hydrogen Production by the Thermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Nirakar; Dipasquale, Laura; d’Ippolito, Giuliana; Panico, Antonio; Lens, Piet N. L.; Esposito, Giovanni; Fontana, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    As the only fuel that is not chemically bound to carbon, hydrogen has gained interest as an energy carrier to face the current environmental issues of greenhouse gas emissions and to substitute the depleting non-renewable reserves. In the last years, there has been a significant increase in the number of publications about the bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana that is responsible for production yields of H2 that are among the highest achievements reported in the literature. Here we present an extensive overview of the most recent studies on this hyperthermophilic bacterium together with a critical discussion of the potential of fermentative production by this bacterium. The review article is organized into sections focused on biochemical, microbiological and technical issues, including the effect of substrate, reactor type, gas sparging, temperature, pH, hydraulic retention time and organic loading parameters on rate and yield of gas production. PMID:26053393

  12. Hydrogen Production by the Thermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirakar Pradhan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available As the only fuel that is not chemically bound to carbon, hydrogen has gained interest as an energy carrier to face the current environmental issues of greenhouse gas emissions and to substitute the depleting non-renewable reserves. In the last years, there has been a significant increase in the number of publications about the bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana that is responsible for production yields of H2 that are among the highest achievements reported in the literature. Here we present an extensive overview of the most recent studies on this hyperthermophilic bacterium together with a critical discussion of the potential of fermentative production by this bacterium. The review article is organized into sections focused on biochemical, microbiological and technical issues, including the effect of substrate, reactor type, gas sparging, temperature, pH, hydraulic retention time and organic loading parameters on rate and yield of gas production.

  13. Whole-Genome Sequence of Streptococcus macedonicus Strain 33MO, Isolated from the Curd of Morlacco Cheese in the Veneto Region (Italy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendramin, Veronica; Treu, Laura; Bovo, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    A genetic characterization of Streptococcus macedonicus is important to better understand the characteristics of this lactic acid bacterium, frequently detected in fermented food bacteria communities. This report presents the draft genome sequence description of strain 33MO, the first publicly...

  14. Inhibition of a sulfate reducing bacterium, Desulfovibrio marinisediminis GSR3, by biosynthesized copper oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alasvand Zarasvand, Kiana; Rai, V Ravishankar

    2016-06-01

    To control the severe problem of microbiologically influenced corrosion, industries require highly potent antibacterial agent which can inhibit the growth of bacteria on man-made surfaces. This need drove the research towards the synthesis of nanoscale antimicrobial compounds. We, therefore, screened several bacteria for the biosynthesis of copper/copper compound nanoparticles which could inhibit the growth of Desulfovibrio marinisediminis, a sulfate reducing bacterium. Supernatant of thirty bacteria isolated from the biofilm formed on ship hull was mixed with 1 mM CuCl 2 solution at room temperature. Eight bacterial strains, whose mixtures exhibited colour change, were selected for antimicrobial test. One nanoparticle which has been biosynthesized by Shewanella indica inhibited the growth of D. marinisediminis. Characterization of this particle by UV-visible spectrophotometer, XRD, TEM, DLS and FTIR showed that the particle is polydisperse CuO nanoparticle with average size of 400 nm.

  15. Isolation and characterization of transducing bacteriophage BP1 for Bacterium anitratum (Achromobacter sp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twarog, R; Blouse, L E

    1968-07-01

    A small transducing phage has been isolated against a strain of Bacterium anitratum. The particle has a head dimension of 450 A and a tail approximately 200 A long. The latent period is 16 min and the average burst size is 98. The intact particle has an absorption maximum and minimum at 260 and 237 mmu, respectively. The sedimentation coefficient (S(20)) is 460. The phage contains double-stranded DNA with an S degrees (20,w) of 32.8. Molecular weight estimates of the deoxyribonucleic acid ranged from 2.33 x 10(7) to 2.66 x 10(7) based on sedimentation velocity studies. The percentage guanine plus cytosine compositions of the deoxyribonucleic acid, determined by melting temperature and cesium chloride equilibrium centrifugation, were 40.7 and 42.0, respectively.

  16. Influence of artisan bakery- or laboratory-propagated sourdoughs on the diversity of lactic acid bacterium and yeast microbiotas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minervini, Fabio; Lattanzi, Anna; De Angelis, Maria; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Gobbetti, Marco

    2012-08-01

    Seven mature type I sourdoughs were comparatively back-slopped (80 days) at artisan bakery and laboratory levels under constant technology parameters. The cell density of presumptive lactic acid bacteria and related biochemical features were not affected by the environment of propagation. On the contrary, the number of yeasts markedly decreased from artisan bakery to laboratory propagation. During late laboratory propagation, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) showed that the DNA band corresponding to Saccharomyces cerevisiae was no longer detectable in several sourdoughs. Twelve species of lactic acid bacteria were variously identified through a culture-dependent approach. All sourdoughs harbored a certain number of species and strains, which were dominant throughout time and, in several cases, varied depending on the environment of propagation. As shown by statistical permutation analysis, the lactic acid bacterium populations differed among sourdoughs propagated at artisan bakery and laboratory levels. Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus sakei, and Weissella cibaria dominated in only some sourdoughs back-slopped at artisan bakeries, and Leuconostoc citreum seemed to be more persistent under laboratory conditions. Strains of Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis were indifferently found in some sourdoughs. Together with the other stable species and strains, other lactic acid bacteria temporarily contaminated the sourdoughs and largely differed between artisan bakery and laboratory levels. The environment of propagation has an undoubted influence on the composition of sourdough yeast and lactic acid bacterium microbiotas.

  17. Degradation of pyrene by an enteric bacterium, Leclercia adecarboxylata PS4040.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Priyangshu Manab; Duraja, Prem; Deshpande, Shilpanjali; Lal, Banwari

    2010-02-01

    A newly discovered enteric bacterium Leclercia adecarboxylata PS4040, isolated from oily sludge contaminated soil sample was reported for degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (Appl Environ Microbiol 70:3163-3166, 2004a). This strain could degrade 61.5% of pyrene within 20 days when used as sole source of carbon and energy. The time course degradation experiment detected several intermediate products and the metabolites were identified by gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis. Metabolite I was the detected on the 5th day and was identified as 1-hydroxypyrene and was detected till 10th day. Metabolite II which was detected on 10th day was identified as 1,2-phenanthrenedicarboxylic acid. Metabolite III and Metabolite IV were identified as 2-carboxy benzaldehyde and ortho-phthalic acid, respectively and were detected in the culture broth on 10th and 15th day. 1,2-benzene diol (catechol) was the fifth metabolite detected in the culture extracts on the 15th day and was subsequently reduced on day 20. Identification of Metabolite I as 1-hydroxypyrene was further investigated as this intermediate was not previously reported as a ring oxidation product for degradation of pyrene by bacterial strains. Purification by preparative high performance liquid chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, confirmed the identification of Metabolite I as 1-hydroxypyrene. L. adecarboxylata PS4040 could also use 1-hydroxypyrene as a sole source of carbon and energy. Thus a probable pathway for degradation of pyrene by enteric bacterium is proposed in this study, with 1-hydroxypyrene as initial ring oxidation product.

  18. Production of polyhydroxybutyrate by the marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum P5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jinling; Wei, Ying; Zhao, Yupeng; Pan, Guanghua; Wang, Guangce

    2012-07-01

    The effects of different NaCl concentrations, nitrogen sources, carbon sources, and carbon to nitrogen molar ratios on biomass accumulation and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) production were studied in batch cultures of the marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum P5 under aerobic-dark conditions. The results show that the accumulation of PHB in strain P5 is a growth-associated process. Strain P5 had maximum biomass and PHB accumulation at 2%-3% NaCl, suggesting that the bacterium can maintain growth and potentially produce PHB at natural seawater salinity. In the nitrogen source test, the maximum biomass accumulation (8.10±0.09 g/L) and PHB production (1.11±0.13 g/L and 14.62%±2.2 of the cell dry weight) were observed when peptone and ammonium chloride were used as the sole nitrogen source. NH{4/+}-N was better for PHB production than other nitrogen sources. In the carbon source test, the maximum biomass concentration (7.65±0.05 g/L) was obtained with malic acid as the sole carbon source, whereas the maximum yield of PHB (5.03±0.18 g/L and 66.93%±1.69% of the cell dry weight) was obtained with sodium pyruvate as the sole carbon source. In the carbon to nitrogen ratios test, sodium pyruvate and ammonium chloride were selected as the carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. The best carbon to nitrogen molar ratio for biomass accumulation (8.77±0.58 g/L) and PHB production (6.07±0.25 g/L and 69.25%±2.05% of the cell dry weight) was 25. The results provide valuable data on the production of PHB by R. sulfidophilum P5 and further studies are on-going for best cell growth and PHB yield.

  19. Vibrio parahaemolyticus a causative bacterium for tail rot disease in ornamental fish, Amphiprion sebae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thangapandi Marudhupandi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study was performed to identify the tail rot disease causing bacterium in marine ornamental fish, Amphiprion sebae. Bacteria were isolated from the infected immune organs and tail region of A. sebae. Five different bacterial isolates (S1-S5 with different shape, size and colour were chosen for the infection study. The isolated strains were individually challenged with A. sebae at a constant dose of 1 × 107 CFU/fish. The virulent strain was found to be S-3, which showed maximum reproducing ability in A. sebae by causing typical tail rot disease and mortality. Furthermore, S-3 strain was identified as Vibrio parahaemolyticus by 16S rRNA gene sequencing (KF738005, biochemical analysis and amplification of tox R gene. Subsequently, extracellular products (ECPs of V. parahaemolyticus were prepared by cellophane overlay method. The LD50 value of V. parahaemolyticus and its ECPS were found to be 1 × 105 CFU and 5 μg/fish. The histology results revealed that V. parahaemolyticus and its ECPS are the major cause of tail rot disease in A. sebae.

  20. Bacillus notoginsengisoli sp. nov., a novel bacterium isolated from the rhizosphere of Panax notoginseng.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng-Yue; Cheng, Juan; Cai, Ying; Zhang, Tian-Yuan; Wu, Ying-Ying; Manikprabhu, Deene; Li, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Yi-Xuan

    2017-08-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, rod-shaped, motile bacterium designated as SYP-B691T was isolated from rhizospheric soil of Panax notoginseng. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that SYP-B691T clearly represented a member of the genus Bacillus and showed 16S rRNA gene similarity lower than 97.0 % with the type strains of species of the genus Bacillus, which indicates that it should be considered as a candidate novel species within this genus. The optimum growth of the strain was found to occur at 37 °C and pH 7.0-9.0. The genomic DNA G+C content was determined to be 45.2 mol%. It contained meso-2,6-diaminopimelic acid in the cell-wall peptidoglycan. The polar lipids consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and an unknown phospholipid. MK-7 was the only menaquinone identified. The major cellular fatty acids of SYP-B691T were identified as iso-C15 : 0 and anteiso-C15 : 0. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic characteristics, SYP-B691T merits recognition as a representative of a novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus notoginsengisoli sp. nov. is proposed, with SYP-B691T(=DSM 29196T=JCM 30743T) as the type strain.

  1. Jeotgalibacillus soli sp. nov., a Gram-stain-positive bacterium isolated from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Sofia; Tiago, Igor; Paiva, Gabriel; Nobre, Fernanda; da Costa, Milton S; Veríssimo, António

    2012-03-01

    A Gram-staining-positive, motile, rod-shaped, spore-forming bacterium, designated P9(T), was isolated from soil in Portugal. This organism was aerobic and catalase- and oxidase-positive. It had an optimum growth temperature of about 35 °C and an optimum growth pH of about 8.0-8.5, and grew in medium with 0-9% (w/v) NaCl. The cell-wall peptidoglycan was of the A1α type, with L-lysine as the diagnostic diamino acid. The major respiratory quinone was menaquinone 7 (MK-7) and the major fatty acids were anteiso-C(15:0) (45.4%), iso-C(15:0) (22.0%) and anteiso-C(17:0) (11.2%). The genomic DNA G+C content was about 39.4 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain P9(T) was most closely related to Jeotgalibacillus campisalis DSM 18983(T) (96.8%) and Jeotgalibacillus marinus DSM 1297(T) (96.5%). These two recognized species formed a coherent cluster with strain P9(T) that was supported by a bootstrap value of 99%. On the basis of the phylogenetic analysis and physiological and biochemical characteristics, strain P9(T) (=DSM 23228(T)=LMG 25523(T)) represents a novel species of the genus Jeotgalibacillus, for which the name Jeotgalibacillus soli sp. nov. is proposed.

  2. Characterization of the N2O-producing soil bacterium Rhizobium azooxidifex sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, Undine; Kämpfer, Peter; Glaeser, Stefanie P; Augustin, Jürgen; Ulrich, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    In the context of studying the bacterial community involved in nitrogen transformation processes in arable soils exposed to different extents of erosion and sedimentation in a long-term experiment (CarboZALF), a strain was isolated that reduced nitrate to nitrous oxide without formation of molecular nitrogen. The presence of the functional gene nirK, encoding the respiratory copper-containing nitrite reductase, and the absence of the nitrous oxide reductase gene nosZ indicated a truncated denitrification pathway and that this bacterium may contribute significantly to the formation of the important greenhouse gas N2O. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence and the housekeeping genes recA and atpD demonstrated that the investigated soil isolate belongs to the genus Rhizobium. The closest phylogenetic neighbours were the type strains of Rhizobium. subbaraonis and Rhizobium. halophytocola. The close relationship with R. subbaraonis was reflected by similarity analysis of the recA and atpD genes and their amino acid positions. DNA-DNA hybridization studies revealed genetic differences at the species level, which were substantiated by analysis of the whole-cell fatty acid profile and several distinct physiological characteristics. Based on these results, it was concluded that the soil isolate represents a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium azooxidifex sp. nov. (type strain Po 20/26T=DSM 100211T=LMG 28788T) is proposed.

  3. A polysaccharide-degrading marine bacterium Flammeovirga sp. MY04 and its extracellular agarase system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wenjun; Gu, Jingyan; Yan, Qiujie; Li, Jungang; Wu, Zhihong; Gu, Qianqun; Li, Yuezhong

    2012-09-01

    Bacteria of the genus Flammeovirga can digest complex polysaccharides (CPs), but no details have been reported regarding the CP depolymerases of these bacteria. MY04, an agarolytic marine bacterium isolated from coastal sediments, has been identified as a new member of the genus Flammeovirga. The MY04 strain is able to utilize multiple CPs as a sole carbon source and grows well on agarose, mannan, or xylan. This strain produces high concentrations of extracellular proteins (490 mg L-1 ± 18.2 mg L-1 liquid culture) that exhibit efficient and extensive degradation activities on various polysaccharides, especially agarose. These proteins have an activity of 310 U mg-1 ± 9.6 U mg-1 proteins. The extracellular agarase system (EAS) in the crude extracellular enzymes contains at least four agarose depolymerases, which are with molecular masses of approximately 30-70 kDa. The EAS is stable at a wide range of pH values (6.0-11.0), temperatures (0-50°C), and sodium chloride (NaCl) concentrations (0-0.9 mol L-1). Two major degradation products generated from agarose by the EAS are identified to be neoagarotetraose and neoagarohexaose, suggesting that β-agarases are the major constituents of the MY04 EAS. These results suggest that the Flammeovirga strain MY04 and its polysaccharide-degradation system hold great promise in industrial applications.

  4. Discovery of a Marine Bacterium Producing 4-Hydroxybenzoate and Its Alkyl Esters, Parabens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xue; Adachi, Kyoko; Chen, Choryu; Kasai, Hiroaki; Kanoh, Kaneo; Shizuri, Yoshikazu; Misawa, Norihiko

    2006-01-01

    Chemically synthesized 4-hydroxybenzoate (4HBA) is widely used in the chemical and electrical industries as a material for producing polymers such as those of the liquid crystal type. Its alkyl esters, called parabens, have been the most widely used preservatives by the food and cosmetic industries. We report here for the first time a microorganism, a marine bacterium, which biosynthesizes these petrochemical products. The marine bacterial strain, A4B-17, which was found to belong to the genus Microbulbifer on the basis of its rRNA and gyrB sequences, was isolated from an ascidian in the coastal waters of Palau. Strain A4B-17 was, surprisingly, found to produce 10 mg/liter of 4HBA, together with its butyl (24 mg/liter), heptyl (0.4 mg/liter), and nonyl (6 mg/liter) esters. We therefore characterized 23 other marine bacteria belonging to the genus Microbulbifer, which our institute had previously isolated from various marine environments, and found that these bacteria also produced 4HBA, although with low production levels (less than one-fifth of that produced by A4B-17). We also show that the alkyl esters of 4HBA produced by strain A4B-17 were effective in preventing the growth of yeasts, molds, and gram-positive bacteria. PMID:16885309

  5. Phosphorus uptake of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus is not effected by the biocontrol bacterium ¤Burkholderia cepacia¤

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnskov, S.; Larsen, J.; Jakobsen, I.

    2002-01-01

    intraradices (BEG87) were studied in root-free soil compartments separated from a rooting compartment by a fine nylon-mesh. B. cepacia had no effect on AM fungal biomass and energy reserves measured using the signature fatty acid 16:1omega5 from phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) and neutral lipid fatty acids......The biocontrol bacterium Burkholderia cepacia is known to suppress a broad range of root pathogenic fungi, while its impact on other beneficial non-target organisms such as arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi is unknown. Direct interactions between five B. cepacia strains and the AM fungus, Glomus...

  6. A heavy metal tolerant novel bacterium, Bacillus malikii sp. nov., isolated from tannery effluent wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Saira; Ahmed, Iftikhar; Kudo, Takuji; Iqbal, Muhammad; Lee, Yong-Jae; Fujiwara, Toru; Ohkuma, Moriya

    2015-12-01

    The taxonomic position of a Gram-stain positive and heavy metal tolerant bacterium, designated strain NCCP-662(T), was investigated by polyphasic characterisation. Cells of strain NCCP-662(T) were observed to be rod to filamentous shaped, motile and strictly aerobic, and to grow at 10-50 °C (optimum 30-37 °C) and at pH range of 6-10 (optimum pH 7-8). The strain was found to be able to tolerate 0-12 % NaCl (w/v) and heavy metals (Cr 1200 ppm, Pb 1800 ppm and Cu 1200 ppm) in tryptic soya agar medium. The phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain NCCP-662(T) showed that it belongs to the genus Bacillus and showed high sequence similarity (98.2 and 98.0 %, respectively) with the type strains of Bacillus niabensis 4T19(T) and Bacillus halosaccharovorans E33(T). The chemotaxonomic data showed that the major quinone is MK-7; the predominant cellular fatty acids are anteiso-C15 :0, iso-C14:0, iso-C16:0 and C16:0 and iso-C15:0; the major polar lipids are diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol along with several unidentified glycolipids, phospholipids and polar lipids. The DNA G+C content was determined to be 36.9 mol%. These data also support the affiliation of strain NCCP-662(T) with the genus Bacillus. The level of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain NCCP-662(T) and B. niabensis JCM 16399(T) was 20.5 ± 0.5 %. On the basis of physiological and biochemical characteristics, phylogenetic analyses and DNA-DNA hybridization data, strain NCCP-662(T) can be clearly differentiated from the validly named Bacillus species and thus represents a new species, for which the name Bacillus malikii sp. nov. is proposed with the type strain NCCP-662(T) (= LMG 28369(T) = DSM 29005(T) = JCM 30192(T)).

  7. Genomic analysis of Melioribacter roseus, facultatively anaerobic organotrophic bacterium representing a novel deep lineage within Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly V Kadnikov

    Full Text Available Melioribacter roseus is a moderately thermophilic facultatively anaerobic organotrophic bacterium representing a novel deep branch within Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi group. To better understand the metabolic capabilities and possible ecological functions of M. roseus and get insights into the evolutionary history of this bacterial lineage, we sequenced the genome of the type strain P3M-2(T. A total of 2838 open reading frames was predicted from its 3.30 Mb genome. The whole proteome analysis supported phylum-level classification of M. roseus since most of the predicted proteins had closest matches in Bacteriodetes, Proteobacteria, Chlorobi, Firmicutes and deeply-branching bacterium Caldithrix abyssi, rather than in one particular phylum. Consistent with the ability of the bacterium to grow on complex carbohydrates, the genome analysis revealed more than one hundred glycoside hydrolases, glycoside transferases, polysaccharide lyases and carbohydrate esterases. The reconstructed central metabolism revealed pathways enabling the fermentation of complex organic substrates, as well as their complete oxidation through aerobic and anaerobic respiration. Genes encoding the photosynthetic and nitrogen-fixation machinery of green sulfur bacteria, as well as key enzymes of autotrophic carbon fixation pathways, were not identified. The M. roseus genome supports its affiliation to a novel phylum Ignavibateriae, representing the first step on the evolutionary pathway from heterotrophic ancestors of Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi group towards anaerobic photoautotrophic Chlorobi.

  8. Bacillus tamaricis sp. nov., an alkaliphilic bacterium isolated from a Tamarix cone soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-Guang; Zhou, Xing-Kui; Guo, Jian-Wei; Xiao, Min; Wang, Hong-Fei; Wang, Yun; Bobodzhanova, Khursheda; Li, Wen-Jun

    2018-02-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, alkaliphilic bacterium, designated EGI 80668 T , was isolated from a Tamarix cone soil in Xinjiang, north-west China. Cells were facultatively anaerobic, terminal endospore-forming and motile by means of peritrichous flagella. Colonies were yellowish and the cells showed oxidase-negative and catalase-positive reactions. Strain EGI 80668 T grew at pH 8.0-10.0 and with 0-10 % (w/v) NaCl (optimally at pH 9.0 and with 1-2 % NaCl) on marine agar 2216. The predominant menaquinone was MK-7. The major fatty acids were anteiso-C17 : 0 and anteiso-C15 : 0. The cellular polar lipids contained diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, four unknown phospholipids and one unknown aminophospholipid. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 38.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain EGI 80668 T was affiliated to the genus Bacillus. The highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity between strain EGI 80668 T and a member of the genus Bacillus was 96.83 % with Bacillus cellulosilyticus JCM 9156 T . A polyphasic taxonomic study based on morphological, physiological, biochemical and phylogenetic data indicated that strain EGI 80668 T represents a novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus tamaricis sp. nov. (type strain EGI 80668 T =KCTC 33703 T =CGMCC 1.15917 T ) is proposed.

  9. Caldicoprobacter guelmensis sp. nov., a thermophilic, anaerobic, xylanolytic bacterium isolated from a hot spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouanane-Darenfed, Amel; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Hacene, Hocine; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2013-06-01

    A hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacterium, designated D2C22(T), was isolated from the hydrothermal hot spring of Guelma in north-east Algeria. The isolate was a Gram-stain-positive, non-sporulating, non-motile rod, appearing singly or in pairs (0.3-0.4 × 8.0-9.0 µm). Strain D2C22(T) grew anaerobically at 45-85 °C (optimum 65 °C), at pH 5-9 (optimum pH 6.8) and with 0-20 g NaCl l(-1). Strain D2C22(T) used glucose, galactose, lactose, fructose, ribose, xylose, arabinose, maltose, cellobiose, mannose, melibiose, sucrose, xylan and pyruvate (only in the presence of yeast extract or biotrypticase) as electron donors. The end products from glucose fermentation were acetate, lactate, CO2 and H2. Nitrate, nitrite, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfate and sulfite were not used as electron acceptors. The predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C15:0 and iso-C17:0. The DNA G+C content was 41.6 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain D2C22(T) was most closely related to Caldicoprobacter oshimai JW/HY-331(T), Caldicoprobacter algeriensis TH7C1(T) and Acetomicrobium faecale DSM 20678(T) (95.5, 95.5 and 95.3% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, respectively). Based on phenotypic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, strain D2C22(T) is proposed to be a representative of a novel species of the genus Caldicoprobacter within the order Clostridiales, for which the name Caldicoprobacter guelmensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is D2C22(T) (=DSM 24605(T)=JCM 17646(T)).

  10. Increased hyphal branching and growth of ectomycorrhizal fungus Lactarius rufus by the helper bacterium Paenibacillus sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspray, T J; Jones, E E; Davies, M W; Shipman, M; Bending, G D

    2013-07-01

    Paenibacillus sp. EJP73 has been previously demonstrated as a mycorrhization helper bacterium (MHB) for the Lactarius rufus-Pinus sylvestris symbiosis in both laboratory and glasshouse experiments. In the present study, the effect of Paenibacillus sp. EJP73 metabolites on L. rufus EO3 pre-symbiotic growth was tested in two agar plate-based systems. Specifically, volatile metabolites were investigated using a dual plate system, in which the presence of strain EJP73 resulted in a significant negative effect on L. rufus EO3 hyphal radial growth but enhanced hyphal branching and reduced internode distance. Soluble metabolites produced by strain EJP73 were tested on L. rufus EO3 growth in single-agar plate assays by incorporating bacterial cell-free whole or molecular weight fraction spent broth into the agar. Whole spent broth had a negative effect on hyphal growth, whereas a low molecular weight fraction (100-1,000) promoted colony radial growth. Headspace and spent broth analysis of strain EJP73 cultures revealed 2,5-diisopropylpyrazine to be the most significant component. Synthesised 2,5-diisopropylpyrazine and elevated CO2 (2,000 ppm) were tested as specific volatile metabolites in the dual plate system, but neither produced the response shown when strain EJP73 was present. Increased pre-symbiotic hyphal branching leading to increased likelihood of plant infection may be an important MHB mechanism for strain EJP73. Although the precise signal molecules could not be identified, the work suggests a number of metabolites may work synergistically to increase L. rufus root colonisation.

  11. Natural Competence of Xylella fastidiosa Occurs at a High Frequency Inside Microfluidic Chambers Mimicking the Bacterium's Natural Habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Prem P; Lopez, Samantha M; Almeida, Rodrigo P P; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2016-09-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited bacterium that is the causal agent of emerging diseases in a number of economically important crops. Genetic diversity studies have demonstrated homologous recombination occurring among X. fastidiosa strains, which has been proposed to contribute to host plant shifts. Moreover, experimental evidence confirmed that X. fastidiosa is naturally competent for recombination in vitro Here, as an approximation of natural habitats (plant xylem vessels and insect mouthparts), recombination was studied in microfluidic chambers (MCs) filled with media amended with grapevine xylem sap. First, different media were screened for recombination in solid agar plates using a pair of X. fastidiosa strains that were previously reported to recombine in coculture. The highest frequency of recombination was obtained with PD3 medium, compared to those with the other two media (X. fastidiosa medium [XFM] and periwinkle wilt [PW] medium) used in previous studies. Dissection of the media components led to the identification of bovine serum albumin as an inhibitor of recombination that was correlated to its previously known effect on inhibition of twitching motility. When recombination was performed in liquid culture, the frequencies were significantly higher under flow conditions (MCs) than under batch conditions (test tubes). The recombination frequencies in MCs and agar plates were not significantly different from each other. Grapevine xylem sap from both susceptible and tolerant varieties allowed high recombination frequency in MCs when mixed with PD3. These results suggest that X. fastidiosa has the ability to be naturally competent in the natural growth environment of liquid flow, and this phenomenon could have implications in X. fastidiosa environmental adaptation. Xylella fastidiosa is a plant pathogen that lives inside xylem vessels (where water and nutrients are transported inside the plant) and the mouthparts of insect vectors. This bacterium

  12. The physiology of the filamentous bacterium Microthrix parvicella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slijkhuis, H.

    1983-01-01

    A study has been made of the physiology of Microthrix parvicella. This filamentous bacterium often causes poor settleability of activated sludge in oxidation ditches supplied with domestic sewage. The organism was found to utilize only long chain fatty acids (preferably in

  13. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles by marine bacterium, Idiomarina ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Metal-tolerant microorganisms have been exploited in recent years to synthesize nanoparticles due to their potential to offer better size control through peptide binding and compartmentalization. In this paper, we report the intracellular synthesis of silver nanoparticles (SNPs) by the highly silver-tolerant marine bacterium, ...

  14. Control of magnetotactic bacterium in a micro-fabricated maze

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khalil, I.S.M.; Pichel, Marc Philippe; Pichel, M.P.; Reefman, B.A.; Sardan Sukas, Ö.; Abelmann, Leon; Misra, Sarthak

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the closed-loop control of a magnetotactic bacterium (MTB), i.e., Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum, within a micro-fabricated maze using a magneticbased manipulation system. The effect of the channel wall on the motion of the MTB is experimentally analyzed. This analysis is done by

  15. Amylase activity of a yellow pigmented bacterium isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the amylase activity of a yellow pigmented bacterium isolated from cassava wastes obtained from a dumpsite near a gari processing factory in Ibadan, Nigeria. Isolate was grown in nutrient broth containing 1% starch and then centrifuged at 5,000 rpm. Amylase activity was assayed using the DNSA ...

  16. Monitoring of a novel bacterium, Lactobacillus thermotolerans , in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. We successfully established fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method for specific detection and enumeration of a novel bacterium, Lactobacillus thermotolerans, in chicken feces. The specific FISH probes were designed based on the L. thermotolerans 16S rRNA gene sequences, and these sequences were ...

  17. Screening and characterization of petroleum-degrading bacterium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Petroleum-degrading bacterium JY6 was isolated from petroleum-contaminated soils in DaQing oil field. It was identified as Bacillus cereus based on its morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics, and analysis of its 16SrRNA gene. Biodegradation function of petroleum and oil degradation rates were ...

  18. Isolation and characterization of a Mycobacterium strain that metabolizes the insecticide endosulfan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, T D; Horne, I; Harcourt, R L; Russell, R J; Oakeshott, J G

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize a bacterium capable of metabolizing endosulfan. A endosulfan-degrading bacterium (strain ESD) was isolated from soil inoculum after repeated culture with the insecticide as the sole source of sulfur. Analysis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence, and morphological and physiological characteristics revealed it to be a new fast-growing Mycobacterium, closely related to other Mycobacterium species with xenobiotic-degrading capabilities. Degradation of endosulfan by strain ESD involved both oxidative and sulfur-separation reactions. Strain ESD did not degrade endosulfan when sulfite, sulphate or methionine were present in the medium along with the insecticide. Partial degradation occurred when the culture was grown, with endosulfan, in the presence of MOPS (3-(N-morpholino)propane sulphonic acid), DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide), cysteine or sulphonane and complete degradation occurred in the presence of gutathione. When both beta-endosulfan and low levels of sulphate were provided as the only sources of sulfur, biphasic exponential growth was observed with endosulfan metabolism being restricted to the latter phase of exponential growth. This study isolated a Mycobacterium strain (strain ESD) capable of metabolizing endosulfan by both oxidative and sulfur-separation reactions. The endosulfan-degrading reactions are a result of the sulfur-starvation response of this bacterium. This describes the isolation of a Mycobacterium strain capable of degrading the insecticide endosulfan. This bacterium is a valuable source of enzymes for use in enzymatic bioremediation of endosulfan residues.

  19. Humitalea rosea gen. nov., sp. nov., an aerobic bacteriochlorophyll-containing bacterium of the family Acetobacteraceae isolated from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margesin, Rosa; Zhang, De-Chao

    2013-04-01

    A Gram-staining-negative, pale-pink-pigmented, non-motile, obligately aerobic and rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain W37(T), was isolated from soil and subjected to a taxonomic investigation using a polyphasic approach. The strain grew at 1-30 °C, oxidized thiosulfate and accumulated polyhydroxyalkanoates. Photosynthetic pigments were represented by bacteriochlorophyll a and carotenoids. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain W37(T) was most closely related to members of the genera Roseococcus and Rubritepida (with sequence similarities of Acetobacteraceae. The polar lipid profile comprised diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, three unidentified aminolipids and one other unidentified lipid. The predominant cellular fatty acids were C18 : 1ω7c and summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or iso-C15 : 0 2-OH). The DNA G+C content of strain W37(T) was 68.2 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic characteristics and phylogenetic analysis, strain W37(T) represents a novel species of a new genus in the family Acetobacteraceae, for which the name Humitalea rosea gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the type species is W37(T) ( = CIP 110261(T) = LMG 26243(T)).

  20. Salinicola tamaricis sp. nov., a heavy-metal-tolerant, endophytic bacterium isolated from the halophyte Tamarix chinensis Lour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guo-Yan; Zhao, Li-Ya; Xia, Zhi-Jie; Zhu, Jin-Lei; Liu, Di; Liu, Chun-Yue; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Zhang, Yu-Zhong; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Dai, Mei-Xue

    2017-06-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped bacterium, strain F01T, was isolated from leaves of Tamarix chinensis Lour. The isolate grew optimally at 30 °C, at pH 7.0 and with 5.0 % (w/v) NaCl, and showed a high tolerance to manganese, lead, nickel, ferrous ions and copper ions. The major fatty acids were C18 : 1ω7c and C16 : 0, and the predominant respiratory quinone was Q-9. Polar lipids were dominated by diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, unidentified aminoglycolipids and phospholipids. The DNA G+C content was 65.8 %. Based on multilocus phylogenetic analysis, strain F01T belonged to the genus Salinicola, with highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Salinicola peritrichatus CGMCC 1.12381T (97.7 %). The level of DNA-DNA hybridization between strain F01T and closely related Salinicola strains was well below 70 %. According to the phenotypic, genetic and chemotaxonomic data, strain F01T is considered to represent a novel species in the genus Salinicola, for which the name Salinicola tamaricis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is F01T (=CCTCC AB 2015304T=KCTC 42855T).

  1. Chitinilyticum aquatile gen. nov., sp. nov., a chitinolytic bacterium isolated from a freshwater pond used for Pacific white shrimp culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu-Chen; Chen, Wen-Ming; Wang, Jih-Terng; Wu, Ming-Chang

    2007-12-01

    Strain c14(T), originally isolated from surface water of a freshwater pond located in Pingtung (southern Taiwan) used for culture of Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei), was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic approach. The strain exhibited strong chitinolytic activity and was able to grow under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by utilizing chitin exclusively as the carbon, nitrogen and energy source. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed a clear affiliation of the proposed bacterium to the Betaproteobacteria, most closely related to Chitinibacter tainanensis S1(T), Deefgea rivuli WB 3.4-79(T) and Silvimonas terrae KM-45(T), with 94.6, 93.6 and 92.9 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, respectively. The predominant fatty acids detected in cells of strain c14(T) were C(16 : 0), C(18 : 1)omega7c and summed feature 3 (C(16 : 1)omega7c and/or C(15 : 0) iso 2-OH). The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 69.5 (+/-1.0) mol%. Biochemical, physiological, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic analyses showed that strain c14(T) could not be assigned to any known genus of the Betaproteobacteria. Therefore, strain c14(T) is classified within a novel genus and species, for which the name Chitinilyticum aquatile gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Chitinilyticum aquatile is c14(T) (=LMG 23346(T) =BCRC 17533(T)).

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Enterococcus mundtii QU 25, an Efficient l-(+)-Lactic Acid-Producing Bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiwa, Yuh; Yanase, Hiroaki; Hirose, Yuu; Satomi, Shohei; Araya-Kojima, Tomoko; Watanabe, Satoru; Zendo, Takeshi; Chibazakura, Taku; Shimizu-Kadota, Mariko; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Enterococcus mundtii QU 25, a non-dairy bacterial strain of ovine faecal origin, can ferment both cellobiose and xylose to produce l-lactic acid. The use of this strain is highly desirable for economical l-lactate production from renewable biomass substrates. Genome sequence determination is necessary for the genetic improvement of this strain. We report the complete genome sequence of strain QU 25, primarily determined using Pacific Biosciences sequencing technology. The E. mundtii QU 25 genome comprises a 3 022 186-bp single circular chromosome (GC content, 38.6%) and five circular plasmids: pQY182, pQY082, pQY039, pQY024, and pQY003. In all, 2900 protein-coding sequences, 63 tRNA genes, and 6 rRNA operons were predicted in the QU 25 chromosome. Plasmid pQY024 harbours genes for mundticin production. We found that strain QU 25 produces a bacteriocin, suggesting that mundticin-encoded genes on plasmid pQY024 were functional. For lactic acid fermentation, two gene clusters were identified—one involved in the initial metabolism of xylose and uptake of pentose and the second containing genes for the pentose phosphate pathway and uptake of related sugars. This is the first complete genome sequence of an E. mundtii strain. The data provide insights into lactate production in this bacterium and its evolution among enterococci. PMID:24568933

  3. Structural investigation of an extracellular polysaccharide produced by the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans strain UA159

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Bo; Dobruchowska, Justyna M.; Hoogenkamp, Michel A.; Gerwig, Gerrit J.

    2012-01-01

    The structure of an extracellular polysaccharide EPS159 produced from sucrose by Streptococcus mutans UA159 was investigated through the main oligosaccharides obtained from partial acid hydrolysis, monosaccharide/methylation analysis, and 1D/2D H-1 NMR spectroscopy. The results showed that EPS159

  4. Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus erythropolis Strain CCM2595, a Phenol Derivative-Degrading Bacterium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strnad, Hynek; Pátek, Miroslav; Fousek, Jan; Szököl, Juraj; Ulbrich, P.; Nešvera, Jan; Pačes, Václav; Vlček, Čestmír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2 (2014) ISSN 2169-8287 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-28283S; GA MŠk 2B08062 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : Rhodococcus erythropolis * genome sequence Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  5. Complete genome sequence of the melanogenic marine bacterium Marinomonas mediterranea type strain (MMB-1T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas-Elio, Patricia [University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Detter, J C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Johnston, Andrew W. B. [University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom; Sanchez-Amat, Antonio [University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain

    2012-01-01

    Marinomonas mediterranea MMB-1 T Solano & Sanchez-Amat 1999 belongs to the family Oceanospirillaceae within the phylum Proteobacteria. This species is of interest because it is the only species described in the genus Marinomonas to date that can synthesize melanin pigments, which is mediated by the activity of a tyrosinase. M. mediterranea expresses other oxidases of biotechnological interest, such as a multicopper oxidase with laccase activity and a novel L-lysine-epsilon-oxidase. The 4,684,316 bp long genome harbors 4,228 proteincoding genes and 98 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  6. Exploring the symbiotic pangenome of the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daligault Hajnalka

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sinorhizobium meliloti is a model system for the studies of symbiotic nitrogen fixation. An extensive polymorphism at the genetic and phenotypic level is present in natural populations of this species, especially in relation with symbiotic promotion of plant growth. AK83 and BL225C are two nodule-isolated strains with diverse symbiotic phenotypes; BL225C is more efficient in promoting growth of the Medicago sativa plants than strain AK83. In order to investigate the genetic determinants of the phenotypic diversification of S. meliloti strains AK83 and BL225C, we sequenced the complete genomes for these two strains. Results With sizes of 7.14 Mbp and 6.97 Mbp, respectively, the genomes of AK83 and BL225C are larger than the laboratory strain Rm1021. The core genome of Rm1021, AK83, BL225C strains included 5124 orthologous groups, while the accessory genome was composed by 2700 orthologous groups. While Rm1021 and BL225C have only three replicons (Chromosome, pSymA and pSymB, AK83 has also two plasmids, 260 and 70 Kbp long. We found 65 interesting orthologous groups of genes that were present only in the accessory genome, consequently responsible for phenotypic diversity and putatively involved in plant-bacterium interaction. Notably, the symbiosis inefficient AK83 lacked several genes required for microaerophilic growth inside nodules, while several genes for accessory functions related to competition, plant invasion and bacteroid tropism were identified only in AK83 and BL225C strains. Presence and extent of polymorphism in regulons of transcription factors involved in symbiotic interaction were also analyzed. Our results indicate that regulons are flexible, with a large number of accessory genes, suggesting that regulons polymorphism could also be a key determinant in the variability of symbiotic performances among the analyzed strains. Conclusions In conclusions, the extended comparative genomics approach revealed a

  7. Fervidicella metallireducens gen. nov., sp. nov., a thermophilic, anaerobic bacterium from geothermal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogg, Christopher D; Patel, Bharat K C

    2010-06-01

    A strictly anaerobic, thermophilic bacterium, designated strain AeB(T), was isolated from microbial mats colonizing a run-off channel formed by free-flowing thermal water from a bore well (registered number 17263) of the Great Artesian Basin, Australia. Cells of strain AeB(T) were slightly curved rods (2.5-6.0x1.0 mum) that stained Gram-negative and formed spherical terminal to subterminal spores. The strain grew optimally in tryptone-yeast extract-Casamino acids medium at 50 degrees C (range 37-55 degrees C) and pH 7 (range pH 5-9). Strain AeB(T) grew poorly on yeast extract (0.2 %) and tryptone (0.2 %) as sole carbon sources, which were obligately required for growth on other energy sources. Growth of strain AeB(T) increased in the presence of various carbohydrates and amino acids, but not organic acids. End products detected from glucose fermentation were ethanol, acetate, CO2 and H2. In the presence of 0.2 % yeast extract, iron(III), manganese(IV), vanadium(V) and cobalt(III) were reduced, but not sulfate, thiosulfate, sulfite, elemental sulfur, nitrate or nitrite. Iron(III) was also reduced in the presence of tryptone, peptone, Casamino acids and amyl media (Research Achievement), but not starch, xylan, chitin, glycerol, ethanol, pyruvate, benzoate, lactate, acetate, propionate, succinate, glycine, serine, lysine, threonine, arginine, glutamate, valine, leucine, histidine, alanine, aspartate, isoleucine or methionine. Growth was inhibited by chloramphenicol, streptomycin, tetracycline, penicillin, ampicillin and NaCl concentrations >2 %. The DNA G+C content was 35.4+/-1 mol%, as determined by the thermal denaturation method. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain AeB(T) is a member of the family Clostridiaceae, class Clostridia, phylum 'Firmicutes', and is positioned approximately equidistantly between the genera Sarcina, Anaerobacter, Caloramator and Clostridium (16S rRNA gene similarity values of 87.8-90.9 %). On the basis of 16S rRNA gene

  8. Advenella alkanexedens sp. nov., an alkane-degrading bacterium isolated from biogas slurry samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huimin; Zhou, Shan; Wang, Yanwei; Kong, Delong; Guo, Xiang; Zhu, Jie; Dong, Weiwei; Ruan, Zhiyong

    2016-02-01

    A novel aerobic bacterium, designated strain LAM0050 T , was isolated from a biogas slurry sample, which had been enriched with diesel oil for 30 days. Cells of strain LAM0050 T were gram-stain-negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming and coccoid-shaped. The optimal temperature and pH for growth were 30-35 °C and 8.5, respectively. The strain did not require NaCl for growth, but tolerated up to 5.3 % (w/v) NaCl. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain LAM0050 T was a member of the genus Advenella , and was most closely related to Advenella faeciporci KCTC 23732 T , Advenella incenata CCUG 45225 T , Advenella kashmirensis DSM 17095 T and Advenella mimigardefordensis DSM 17166 T , with 98.1, 96.6, 96.6 and 96.3 % sequence similarity, respectively. The DNA-DNA hybridization relatedness between strain LAM0050 T and A. faeciporci KCTC 23732 T was 41.7 ± 2.4 %. The genomic DNA G+C content was 51.2 mol%, as determined by the T m method. The major fatty acids of strain LAM0050 T were C 16 : 0 , C 17 : 0 cyclo, summed feature 3 (C 16 : 1 ω7 c and/or C 16 : 1 ω6 c ) and summed feature 8 (C 18 : 1 ω7 c and/or C 18 : 1 ω6 c ). The predominant ubiquinone was Q-8. The main polar lipids were diphosphatidyglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylmethylethanolamine and four unidentified phospholipids. Based on the phenotypic and genotypic properties, strain LAM0050 T is suggested to represent a novel species of the genus Advenella , for which the name Advenella alkanexedens sp. nov., is proposed, the type strain is LAM0050 T ( = ACCC 06485 T  = JCM 30465 T ).

  9. Ponticoccus marisrubri sp. nov., a moderately halophilic marine bacterium of the family Rhodobacteraceae

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Guishan

    2017-10-06

    Strain SJ5A-1T, a Gram-stain-negative, coccus-shaped, non-motile, aerobic bacterium, was isolated from the brine-seawater interface of the Erba Deep in the Red Sea, Saudi Arabia. The colonies of strain SJ5A-1T have a beige to pale-brown pigmentation, are approximately 0.5-0.7 µm in diameter, and are catalase and oxidase positive. Growth occurred optimally at 30-33 °C, pH 7.0-7.5, and in the presence of 9.0-12.0 % NaCl (w/v). Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene indicates that strain SJ5A-1T is a member of the genus Ponticoccus within the family Rhodobacteraceae. Ponticoccus litoralis DSM 18986T is the most closely related described species based on 16S rRNA gene sequence identity (96.7 %). The DNA-DNA hybridization value between strain SJ5A-1T and P. litoralis DSM 18986T was 36.7 %. The major respiratory quinone of strain SJ5A-1T is Q-10; it predominantly uses the fatty acids C18 : 1 (54.2 %), C18 : 0 (11.2 %), C16 : 0 (8.6 %), 11-methyl C18 : 1ω7c (7.7 %), C19 : 0cyclo ω8c (3.3 %), and C12 : 1 3-OH (3.5 %), and its major polar lipids are phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphocholine, an unknown aminolipid, an unknown phospholipid and two unknown lipids. The genome draft of strain SJ5A-1T as presented here is 4 562 830 bp in size and the DNA G+C content is 68.0 mol %. Based on phenotypic, phylogenetic and genotypic data, strain SJ5A-1T represents a novel species in the genus Ponticoccus, for which we propose the name Ponticoccus marisrubri sp. nov. The type strain of P. marisrubri is SJ5A-1T (=JCM 19520T=ACCC19863T).

  10. Genome sequence of Pseudomonas putida S12, a potential platform strain for industrial production of valuable chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Fei; Shen, Yaling; Fan, Ziqi; Tang, Hongzhi; Xu, Ping

    2012-11-01

    Pseudomonas putida strain S12, a well-studied solvent-tolerant bacterium, is considered a platform strain for the production of many chemicals. Here, we present a 6.28-Mb assembly of its genome sequence. We have annotated 32 coding sequences (CDSs) encoding efflux systems of organic compounds and 195 CDSs responsible for the metabolism of aromatic compounds.

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Komagataeibacter intermedius Strain AF2, a Producer of Cellulose, Isolated from Kombucha Tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Renato Augusto Corrêa; Berretta, Andresa Aparecida; Barud, Hernane da Silva; Ribeiro, Sidney José Lima; González-García, Laura Natalia; Zucchi, Tiago Domingues; Goldman, Gustavo H; Riaño-Pachón, Diego M

    2015-12-03

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Komagataeibacter intermedius strain AF2, which was isolated from Kombucha tea and is capable of producing cellulose, although at lower levels compared to another bacterium from the same environment, K. rhaeticus strain AF1. Copyright © 2015 dos Santos et al.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Plant Growth–Promoting Micrococcus luteus Strain K39 Isolated from Cyperus conglomeratus in Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    Lafi, Feras Fawzi

    2017-01-27

    Micrococcus luteus strain K39 is an endophyte bacterium isolated from roots of the desert plant Cyperus conglomeratus collected from the Red Sea shore, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia. The draft genome sequence of strain K39 revealed a number of enzymes involved in salinity and oxidative stress tolerance or having herbicide-resistance activity.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of the Organophosphorus Compound-Degrading Burkholderia zhejiangensis Strain CEIB S4-3

    OpenAIRE

    Hern?ndez-Mendoza, Armando; Mart?nez-Ocampo, Fernando; Lozano-Aguirre Beltr?n, Luis Fernando; Popoca-Ursino, Elida Carolina; Ortiz-Hern?ndez, Laura; S?nchez-Salinas, Enrique; Dant?n-Gonz?lez, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia species are widely distributed in the environment. A Burkholderia zhejiangensis strain was isolated from pesticide-contaminated soil from an agricultural field in Mexico and identified as an organophosphorus compound-degrading bacterium. In this study, we report the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia zhejiangensis strain CEIB S4-3.

  14. Biodegradation of organophosphate pesticide quinalphos by Ochrobactrum sp. strain HZM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talwar, M P; Mulla, S I; Ninnekar, H Z

    2014-11-01

    Isolation and identification of bacteria capable of degrading organophosphate pesticide quinalphos and elucidation of its biodegradative pathway. A bacterium capable of degrading organophosphate pesticides was isolated from the pesticide-contaminated soil samples by selective enrichment on quinalphos (QP) as a sole source of carbon and energy. The bacterial strain was identified as Ochrobactrum sp. strain HZM on the basis of its morphological and biochemical characteristics and by phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. The organism utilized various organophosphate pesticides such as quinalphos, profenofos, parathion-methyl and chlorpyrifos as growth substrates. Response surface methodology (RSM) showed optimum conditions for quinalphos degradation at pH 7 and 27°C. 2-Hydroxyquinoxaline and diethyl phosphate were identified as metabolites of quinalphos degradation by HPLC and GC-MS analysis. Cell-free extract of Ochrobactrum sp. strain HZM grown on quinalphos contained the quinalphos hydrolase activity. A bacterial strain capable of degrading quinalphos was isolated and identified as Ochrobactrum sp. strain HZM. The organism utilized organophosphate pesticides quinalphos, profenofos, parathion-methyl and chlorpyrifos as carbon sources. The organism degraded quinalphos by hydrolysis to yield 2-hydroxyquinoxaline and diethyl phosphate which were further utilized as carbon sources. The isolated bacterium Ochrobactrum sp. strain HZM was versatile in degrading various organophosphate pesticides. There was complete mineralization of quinalphos by Ochrobactrum sp. This strain could potentially be useful in the bioremediation of soil and water contaminated with toxic organophosphate pesticides. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Characterization of Desulfovibrio salinus sp. nov., a slightly halophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from a saline lake in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ali Gam, Zouhaier; Thioye, Abdoulaye; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Joseph, Manon; Fauque, Guy; Labat, Marc

    2018-03-01

    A novel slightly halophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium, designated strain P1BSR T , was isolated from water of a saline lake in Tunisia. Strain P1BSR T had motile (single polar flagellum), Gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming cells, occurring singly or in pairs. Strain P1BSR T grew at temperatures between 15 and 45 °C (optimum 40 °C), and in a pH range between 6 and 8.5 (optimum pH 6.7). The strain required NaCl for growth (1 % w/v), and tolerated high NaCl concentration (up to 12 % w/v) with an optimum of 3 % (w/v). Sulfate, thiosulfate and sulfite served as terminal electron acceptors, but not elemental sulfur, fumarate, nitrate and nitrite. Strain P1BSR T utilized lactate, pyruvate, formate, d-fructose and glycerol as carbon and energy sources. The main cellular fatty acid was C16 : 0 (50.8 %). The genomic DNA G+C content was 47.7 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity indicated that strain P1BSR T was affiliated to the genus Desulfovibrio, with the type strains Desulfovibrio salexigens (96.51 %), Desulfovibrio zosterae (95.68 %), Desulfovibrio hydrothermalis (94.81 %) and Desulfovibrio ferrireducens (94.73 %) as its closest phylogenetic relatives. On the basis of genotypic, phenotypic and phylogenetic characteristics, it is proposed to assign strain P1BSR T to a novel species of the genus Desulfovibrio, Desulfovibrio salinus sp. nov. The type strain is P1BSR T (=DSM 101510 T =JCM 31065 T ).

  16. Hydrogen production by recombinant Escherichia coli strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Toshinari; Sanchez‐Torres, Viviana; Wood, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The production of hydrogen via microbial biotechnology is an active field of research. Given its ease of manipulation, the best‐studied bacterium Escherichia coli has become a workhorse for enhanced hydrogen production through metabolic engineering, heterologous gene expression, adaptive evolution, and protein engineering. Herein, the utility of E. coli strains to produce hydrogen, via native hydrogenases or heterologous ones, is reviewed. In addition, potential strategies for increasing hydrogen production are outlined and whole‐cell systems and cell‐free systems are compared. PMID:21895995

  17. Helicobacter Catalase Devoid of Catalytic Activity Protects the Bacterium against Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Stéphane L; Maier, Robert J

    2016-11-04

    Catalase, a conserved and abundant enzyme found in all domains of life, dissipates the oxidant hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori undergoes host-mediated oxidant stress exposure, and its catalase contains oxidizable methionine (Met) residues. We hypothesized catalase may play a large stress-combating role independent of its classical catalytic one, namely quenching harmful oxidants through its recyclable Met residues, resulting in oxidant protection to the bacterium. Two Helicobacter mutant strains ( katA H56A and katA Y339A ) containing catalase without enzyme activity but that retain all Met residues were created. These strains were much more resistant to oxidants than a catalase-deletion mutant strain. The quenching ability of the altered versions was shown, whereby oxidant-stressed (HOCl-exposed) Helicobacter retained viability even upon extracellular addition of the inactive versions of catalase, in contrast to cells receiving HOCl alone. The importance of the methionine-mediated quenching to the pathogen residing in the oxidant-rich gastric mucus was studied. In contrast to a catalase-null strain, both site-change mutants proficiently colonized the murine gastric mucosa, suggesting that the amino acid composition-dependent oxidant-quenching role of catalase is more important than the well described H 2 O 2 -dissipating catalytic role. Over 100 years after the discovery of catalase, these findings reveal a new non-enzymatic protective mechanism of action for the ubiquitous enzyme. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Complete genome of Pseudomonas sp. strain L10.10, a psychrotolerant biofertilizer that could promote plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See-Too, Wah Seng; Lim, Yan-Lue; Ee, Robson; Convey, Peter; Pearce, David A; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok Gan

    2016-03-20

    Pseudomonas sp. strain L10.10 (=DSM 101070) is a psychrotolerant bacterium which was isolated from Lagoon Island, Antarctica. Analysis of its complete genome sequence indicates its possible role as a plant-growth promoting bacterium, including nitrogen-fixing ability and indole acetic acid (IAA)-producing trait, with additional suggestion of plant disease prevention attributes via hydrogen cyanide production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Vibrio xiamenensis sp. nov., a cellulase-producing bacterium isolated from mangrove soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhao-Ming; Xiao, Jing; Wang, Xing-Na; Ruan, Ling-Wei; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2012-08-01

    A taxonomic study was carried out on a cellulase-producing bacterium, strain G21(T), isolated from mangrove soil in Xiamen, Fujian province, China. Cells were Gram-negative, slightly curved rods, motile with a single polar flagellum. The strain grew at 15-40 °C and in 0.5-10% (w/v) NaCl. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain G21(T) belonged to the genus Vibrio and formed a clade with Vibrio furnissii ATCC 350116(T) (97.4% sequence similarity), V. fluvialis LMG 7894(T) (97.1%) and V. ponticus CECT 5869(T) (96.1%). However, multilocus sequence analysis (using rpoA, recA, mreB, gapA, gyrB and pyrH sequences) and DNA-DNA hybridization experiments indicated that the strain was distinct from the closest related Vibrio species. Additionally, strain G21(T) could be differentiated from them phenotypically by the ability to grow in 10% NaCl but not on TCBS plates, its enzyme activity spectrum, citrate utilization, oxidization of various carbon sources, hydrolysis of several substrates and its cellular fatty acid profile. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 46.0 mol%. The major cellular fatty acids were summed feature 3 (C(16:1)ω7c and/or iso-C(15:0) 2-OH), C(16:0) and C(18:1)ω7c. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol, with trace amounts of diphosphatidylglycerol. The predominant quinones were Q-8 and Q-7. Based on phylogenetic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics and DNA-DNA hybridization analysis, it is concluded that strain G21(T) represents a novel species of the genus Vibrio, for which the name Vibrio xiamenensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is G21(T) ( = DSM 22851(T)  = CGMCC 1.10228(T)).

  20. Reclassification of Eubacterium desmolans as Butyricicoccus desmolans comb. nov., and description of Butyricicoccus faecihominis sp. nov., a butyrate-producing bacterium from human faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Toshihiko; Watanabe, Koichi; Makino, Hiroshi; Kushiro, Akira

    2016-10-01

    A Gram-positive-staining, coccoid-shaped, non-motile, asporogenous, obligately anaerobic and butyrate-producing bacterium was recovered from a healthy human's faeces. The organism was isolated by the enrichment culture technique using yeast extract-casein hydrolysate-fatty acids broth supplemented with 0.5 % mucin. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences demonstrated that the novel strain should be classified as a member of the Eubacterium desmolans-related cluster in the family Ruminococcaceae. Furthermore, this analysis demonstrated that the type strains of Butyricicoccus pullicaecorum (95.6 %) and Eubacterium desmolans (94.7 %) were the closest phylogenetic neighbours to strain YIT 12789T. However, DNA‒DNA reassociation values with these closest strains were less than 20 %. On the basis of the phenotypic, genotypic and chemotaxonomic features, the novel coccoid-shaped bacterium should be designated as a representative of a novel species of the genus Butyricicoccus, for which the name Butyricicoccus faecihominis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is YIT 12789T (=JCM 31056T=DSM 100989T). It is also proposed that Eubacterium desmolans be reclassified in the genus Butyricicoccus as Butyricicoccus desmolans comb. nov.

  1. Tenacibaculum agarivorans sp. nov., an agar-degrading bacterium isolated from marine alga Porphyra yezoensis Ueda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhen-Xing; Yu, Pei; Mu, Da-Shuai; Liu, Yan; Du, Zong-Jun

    2017-12-01

    A novel Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped, non-flagellated and agar-digesting marine bacterium, designated as HZ1 T , was isolated from the marine alga Porphyra yezoensis Ueda (AST58-103) collected from the coastal area of Weihai, PR China. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences placed HZ1 T in the genus Tenacibaculum, and it formed a distinct clade in the phylogenetic tree with the type strains of Tenacibaculum amylolyticum and Tenacibaculum skagerrakense, with 97.0 % and 96.7 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, respectively. The DNA G+C content of the isolate was 31.8 mol%. HZ1 T contained MK-6 as the predominant menaquinone and iso-C15 : 0, summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c), iso-C17 : 0 3-OH and iso-C15 : 1G as the major fatty acids. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, four unidentified lipids and five unidentified aminolipids. On the basis of the results of the phylogenetic analysis and phenotypic properties, it is concluded that HZ1 T represents a novel species of the genus Tenacibaculum, for which the name Tenacibaculumagarivorans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is HZ1 T (=MCCC 1H00174 T =KCTC 52476 T ).

  2. The complete genome sequence of the plant growth-promoting bacterium Pseudomonas sp. UW4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Duan

    Full Text Available The plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB Pseudomonas sp. UW4, previously isolated from the rhizosphere of common reeds growing on the campus of the University of Waterloo, promotes plant growth in the presence of different environmental stresses, such as flooding, high concentrations of salt, cold, heavy metals, drought and phytopathogens. In this work, the genome sequence of UW4 was obtained by pyrosequencing and the gaps between the contigs were closed by directed PCR. The P. sp. UW4 genome contains a single circular chromosome that is 6,183,388 bp with a 60.05% G+C content. The bacterial genome contains 5,423 predicted protein-coding sequences that occupy 87.2% of the genome. Nineteen genomic islands (GIs were predicted and thirty one complete putative insertion sequences were identified. Genes potentially involved in plant growth promotion such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA biosynthesis, trehalose production, siderophore production, acetoin synthesis, and phosphate solubilization were determined. Moreover, genes that contribute to the environmental fitness of UW4 were also observed including genes responsible for heavy metal resistance such as nickel, copper, cadmium, zinc, molybdate, cobalt, arsenate, and chromate. Whole-genome comparison with other completely sequenced Pseudomonas strains and phylogeny of four concatenated "housekeeping" genes (16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD of 128 Pseudomonas strains revealed that UW4 belongs to the fluorescens group, jessenii subgroup.

  3. Enterobacter cloacae, an Emerging Plant-Pathogenic Bacterium Affecting Chili Pepper Seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-González, Tanahiri; Sáenz-Hidalgo, Hilda Karina; Silva-Rojas, Hilda Victoria; Morales-Nieto, Carlos; Vancheva, Taca; Koebnik, Ralf; Ávila-Quezada, Graciela Dolores

    2018-01-01

    A previously unreported bacterial disease on chili pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) seedlings affecting as many as 4% of seedlings was observed in greenhouses in Chihuahua, Mexico (Delicias and Meoqui counties). Initial lesions appeared as irregular small spots on leaves and brown necrosis at margins tips were observed. Later, the spots became necrotic with a chlorotic halo. Advanced disease was associated with defoliation. A Gram negative, rod-shaped bacterium was isolated from diseased chili pepper seedlings. Three inoculation methods revealed that isolated strains produce foliage symptoms, similar to those observed in naturally infected seedlings. Pathogenic strains that caused symptoms in inoculated seedlings were re-isolated and identified to fulfill koch’s postulate. Polyphasic approaches for identification including biochemical assays (API 20E and 50CH), carbon source utilization profiling (Biolog) and 16S rDNA, hsp60 and rpoB sequence analysis were done. Enterobacter cloacae was identified as the causal agent of this outbreak on chili pepper seedlings. PMID:29422783

  4. Isolation and identification of antifungal peptides from Bacillus BH072, a novel bacterium isolated from honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Zhou, Zhi-jiang; Han, Ye; Wang, Zhan-zhong; Fan, Jie; Xiao, Hua-zhi

    2013-11-07

    A bacterial strain BH072 isolated from a honey sample showed antifungal activity against mold. Based on morphological, biochemical, physiological tests, and analysis of 16S rDNA sequence, the strain was identified to be a new subspecies of Bacillus sp. It had a broad spectrum of antifungal activity against various mold, such as Aspergillus niger, Pythium, and Botrytis cinerea. Six pairs of antifungal genes primers were designed and synthesized, and ituA, hag, tasA genes were detected by PCR analysis. The remarkable antifungal activity could be associated with the co-production of these three peptides. One of them was purified by 30-40% ammonium sulfate precipitation, Sephadex G-75 gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography on D201 resin. The purified peptide was estimated to be 35.615 kDa and identified to be flagellin by micrOTOF-Q II. By using methanol extraction, another substance was isolated from fermentation liquor, and determined to be iturin with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method. The third possible peptide encoded by tasA was not isolated in this study. The culture liquor displayed antifungal activity in a wide pH range (5.0-9.0) and at 40-100°C. The result of the present work suggested that Bacillus BH072 might be a bio-control bacterium of research value. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Iridescence of a Marine Bacterium and Classification of Prokaryotic Structural Colors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukusic, Peter; Luke, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Iridescence is a property of structural color that is occasionally encountered in higher eukaryotes but that has been poorly documented in the prokaryotic kingdom. In the present work, we describe a marine bacterium, identified as Cellulophaga lytica, isolated from the surface of an anemone, that exhibits bright green iridescent colonies under direct epi-illumination. This phenomenon has not previously been investigated in detail. In this study, color changes of C. lytica colonies were observed at various angles of direct illumination or observation. Its iridescent green appearance was dominant on various growth media. Red and violet colors were also discerned on colony edges. Remarkable C. lytica bacterial iridescence was revealed and characterized using high-resolution optical spectrometry. In addition to this, by culturing other bacterial strains to which various forms of faintly iridescent traits have previously been attributed, we identify four principal appearance characteristics of structural color in prokaryotes. A new general classification of bacterial iridescence is therefore proposed in this study. Furthermore, a specific separate class is described for iridescent C. lytica strains because they exhibit what is so far a unique intense glitter-like iridescence in reflection. C. lytica is the first prokaryote discovered to produce the same sort of intense iridescence under direct illumination as that associated with higher eukaryotes, like some insects and birds. Due to the nature of bacterial biology, cultivation, and ubiquity, this discovery may be of significant interest for both ecological and nanoscience endeavors. PMID:22267664

  6. Enterobacter cloacae, an Emerging Plant-Pathogenic Bacterium Affecting Chili Pepper Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanahiri García-González

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A previously unreported bacterial disease on chili pepper (Capsicum annuum L. seedlings affecting as many as 4% of seedlings was observed in greenhouses in Chihuahua, Mexico (Delicias and Meoqui counties. Initial lesions appeared as irregular small spots on leaves and brown necrosis at margins tips were observed. Later, the spots became necrotic with a chlorotic halo. Advanced disease was associated with defoliation. A Gram negative, rod-shaped bacterium was isolated from diseased chili pepper seedlings. Three inoculation methods revealed that isolated strains produce foliage symptoms, similar to those observed in naturally infected seedlings. Pathogenic strains that caused symptoms in inoculated seedlings were re-isolated and identified to fulfill koch’s postulate. Polyphasic approaches for identification including biochemical assays (API 20E and 50CH, carbon source utilization profiling (Biolog and 16S rDNA, hsp60 and rpoB sequence analysis were done. Enterobacter cloacae was identified as the causal agent of this outbreak on chili pepper seedlings.

  7. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium Pseudomonas sp. UW4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jin; Jiang, Wei; Cheng, Zhenyu; Heikkila, John J.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2013-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB) Pseudomonas sp. UW4, previously isolated from the rhizosphere of common reeds growing on the campus of the University of Waterloo, promotes plant growth in the presence of different environmental stresses, such as flooding, high concentrations of salt, cold, heavy metals, drought and phytopathogens. In this work, the genome sequence of UW4 was obtained by pyrosequencing and the gaps between the contigs were closed by directed PCR. The P. sp. UW4 genome contains a single circular chromosome that is 6,183,388 bp with a 60.05% G+C content. The bacterial genome contains 5,423 predicted protein-coding sequences that occupy 87.2% of the genome. Nineteen genomic islands (GIs) were predicted and thirty one complete putative insertion sequences were identified. Genes potentially involved in plant growth promotion such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis, trehalose production, siderophore production, acetoin synthesis, and phosphate solubilization were determined. Moreover, genes that contribute to the environmental fitness of UW4 were also observed including genes responsible for heavy metal resistance such as nickel, copper, cadmium, zinc, molybdate, cobalt, arsenate, and chromate. Whole-genome comparison with other completely sequenced Pseudomonas strains and phylogeny of four concatenated “housekeeping” genes (16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD) of 128 Pseudomonas strains revealed that UW4 belongs to the fluorescens group, jessenii subgroup. PMID:23516524

  8. Role of extracellular compounds in Cd-sequestration relative to Cd uptake by bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaveykova, Vera I., E-mail: vera.slaveykova@epfl.c [Environmental Biophysical Chemistry, IIE-ENAC, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 2, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Parthasarathy, Nalini [Department of Inorganic, Analytic and Applied Chemistry, University of Geneva, Sciences II, 30 Quai Ernest Ansermet, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Dedieu, Karine; Toescher, Denis [Environmental Biophysical Chemistry, IIE-ENAC, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 2, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2010-08-15

    The role of bacterially derived compounds in Cd(II) complexation and uptake by bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti wild type (WT) and genetically modified ExoY-mutant, deficient in exopolysaccharide production, was explored combining chemical speciation measurements and assays with living bacteria. Obtained results demonstrated that WT- and ExoY-strains excreted siderophores in comparable amounts, while WT-strain produced much higher amount of exopolysaccharides and less exoproteins. An evaluation of Cd(II) distribution in bacterial suspensions under short term exposure conditions, showed that most of the Cd is bound to bacterial surface envelope, including Cd bound to the cell wall and to the attached extracellular polymeric substances. However, the amount of Cd bound to the dissolved extracellular compounds increases at high Cd(II) concentrations. The implications of these findings to more general understanding of the Cd(II) fate and cycling in the environment is discussed. - Bacterial excreted extracellular compounds play minor role in Cd(II) sequestration relative to bacteria.

  9. A putative twin-arginine translocation system in the phytopathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciapina, Luciane Prioli; Picchi, Simone Cristina; Lacroix, Jean-Marie; Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes de Macedo; Ödberg-Ferragut, Carmen

    2011-02-01

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway of the xylem-limited phytopathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa strain 9a5c, responsible for citrus variegated chlorosis, was explored. The presence of tatA, tatB, and tatC in the X. fastidiosa genome together with a list of proteins harboring 2 consecutive arginines in their signal peptides suggested the presence of a Tat pathway. The functional Tat dependence of X. fastidiosa OpgD was examined. Native or mutated signal peptides were fused to the β-lactamase. Expression of fusion with intact signal peptides mediated high resistance to ampicillin in Escherichia coli tat+ but not in the E. coli tat null mutant. The replacement of the 2 arginines by 2 lysines prevented the export of β-lactamase in E. coli tat+, demonstrating that X. fastidiosa OpgD carries a signal peptide capable of engaging the E. coli Tat machinery. RT-PCR analysis revealed that the tat genes are transcribed as a single operon. tatA, tatB, and tatC genes were cloned. Complementation assays in E. coli devoid of all Tat or TatC components were unsuccessful, whereas X. fastidiosa Tat components led to a functional Tat translocase in E. coli TatB-deficient strain. Additional experiments implicated that X. fastidiosa TatB component could form a functional heterologous complex with the E. coli TatC component.

  10. Spongiimicrobium salis gen. nov., sp. nov., a bacterium of the family Flavobacteriaceae isolated from a marine sponge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jaewoo; Adachi, Kyoko; Kasai, Hiroaki

    2016-09-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, strictly aerobic, pale-yellow pigmented, rod-shaped, chemoheterotrophic bacterium, designated A6F-11(T), was isolated from a marine sponge collected in Japan. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that the novel marine strain was affiliated with the family Flavobacteriaceae of the phylum Bacteroidetes and that it shared the highest (92.9 %) sequence similarity with Arenibacter palladensis LMG 21972(T). The strain could be differentiated phenotypically from related members of the family Flavobacteriaceae. The major fatty acids of strain A6F-11(T) were iso-C15:1 G, iso-C15:0, C16:1 ω6c and/or C16:1 ω7c and iso-C17:0 3-OH. The polar lipid profile consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, two unidentified aminolipids and two unidentified lipids. The DNA G+C content was 34.7 mol%, and the major respiratory quinone was menaquinone 6 (MK-6). From the distinct phylogenetic position and combination of genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, the strain is considered to represent a novel taxon in the family Flavobacteriaceae, for which the name Spongiimicrobium salis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of S. salis gen. nov., sp. nov. is A6F-11(T) (= KCTC 42753(T) = NBRC 111401(T)).

  11. Biosorption of heavy metals by a marine bacterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, Anita; Mody, Kalpana; Jha, Bhavanath

    2005-01-01

    Heavy metal chelation property of exopolysaccharide produced by Enterobacter cloaceae, a marine bacterium, isolated from the West Coast of India, is reported in this paper. The exopolysaccharide demonstrated excellent chelating properties with respect to cadmium (65%) followed by copper (20%) and cobalt (8%) at 100 mg/l heavy metal concentration. However, it could not chelate mercury. A comparative study of the percentage biosorption of the above mentioned metals is presented here

  12. Initiation of chromosomal replication in predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Makowski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is a small Gram-negative predatory bacterium that attacks other Gram-negative bacteria, including many animal, human, and plant pathogens. This bacterium exhibits a peculiar biphasic life cycle during which two different types of cells are produced: non-replicating highly motile cells (the free-living phase and replicating cells (the intracellular-growth phase. The process of chromosomal replication in B. bacteriovorus must therefore be temporally and spatially regulated to ensure that it is coordinated with cell differentiation and cell cycle progression. Recently, B. bacteriovorus has received considerable research interest due to its intriguing life cycle and great potential as a prospective antimicrobial agent. Although we know that chromosomal replication in bacteria is mainly regulated at the initiation step, no data exists about this process in B. bacteriovorus. We report the first characterization of key elements of initiation of chromosomal replication – DnaA protein and oriC region from the predatory bacterium, B. bacteriovorus. In vitro studies using different approaches demonstrate that the B. bacteriovorus oriC (BdoriC is specifically bound and unwound by the DnaA protein. Sequence comparison of the DnaA-binding sites enabled us to propose a consensus sequence for the B. bacteriovorus DnaA box (5’-NN(A/TTCCACA-3’. Surprisingly, in vitro analysis revealed that BdoriC is also bound and unwound by the host DnaA proteins (relatively distantly related from B. bacteriovorus. We compared the architecture of the DnaA–oriC complexes (orisomes in homologous (oriC and DnaA from B. bacteriovorus and heterologous (BdoriC and DnaA from prey, E. coli or P. aeruginosa systems. This work provides important new entry points toward improving our understanding of the initiation of chromosomal replication in this predatory bacterium.

  13. Taxonomic characterization and metabolic analysis of the Halomonas sp. KM-1, a highly bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)-producing bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Yoshikazu; Shi, Lian-Hua; Kawasaki, Kazunori; Shigeri, Yasushi

    2012-04-01

    In a brief previous report, the gram-negative moderately halophilic bacterium, Halomonas sp. KM-1, that was isolated in our laboratory was shown to produce the bioplastic, poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB), using biodiesel waste glycerol (Kawata and Aiba, Biosci. Biotechnol. Biochem., 74, 175-177, 2010). Here, we further characterized this KM-1 strain and compared it to other Halomonas strains. Strain KM-1 was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. Strain KM-1 was rod-shaped and formed colonies on a plate that were cream-beige in color, smooth, opaque, and circular with entire edges. KM-1 grew under environmental conditions of 0.1%-10% (w/v) NaCl, pH 6.5-10.5 and at temperatures between 10°C and 45°C. The G+C content of strain KM-1 was 63.9 mol%. Of the 16 Halomonas strains examined in this study, the strain KM-1 exhibited the highest production of PHB (63.6%, w/v) in SOT medium supplemented with 10% glycerol, 10.0 g/L sodium nitrate and 2.0 g/L dipotassium hydrogen phosphate. The intracellular structures within which PHB accumulated had the appearance of intracellular granules with a diameter of approximately 0.5 μm, as assessed by electron microscopy. The intra- and extra-cellular metabolites of strain KM-1 were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry. In spite of the high amount of PHB stored intra-cellularly, as possible precursors for PHB only a small quantity of 3-hydroxybutyric acid and acetyl CoA, and no quantity of 3-hydroxybutyl CoA, acetoacetyl CoA and acetoacetate were detected either intra- or extra-cellularly, suggesting highly efficient conversion of these precursors to PHB. Copyright © 2011 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. All rights reserved.

  14. Genome sequence of Pantoea agglomerans strain IG1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzawa, Tomohiko; Mori, Kazuki; Kadowaki, Takeshi; Shimada, Misato; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru; Inagawa, Hiroyuki; Soma, Gen-ichiro; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2012-03-01

    Pantoea agglomerans is a gram-negative bacterium that grows symbiotically with various plants. Here we report the 4.8-Mb genome sequence of P. agglomerans strain IG1. The lipopolysaccharides derived from P. agglomerans IG1 have been shown to be effective in the prevention of various diseases, such as bacterial or viral infection, lifestyle-related diseases. This genome sequence represents a substantial step toward the elucidation of pathways for production of lipopolysaccharides.

  15. Construction of l-Isoleucine Overproducing Strains of Corynebacterium glutamicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahm, H.; Eggeling, L.; Morbach, S.; Eikmanns, B.

    Nowadays the gram-positive bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum is used for the industrial production of the amino acids l-glutamate (1×106tons/year) and l-lysine (300×103tons/year). The classical approach to obtain amino acid overproducing strains of C. glutamicum was mutagenesis and then a selection of mutants. In the past 10 years the genetic engineering and amplification of genes have become fascinating methods for studying metabolic pathways in greater detail and for constructing microbial strains with desired genotypes. To obtain l-isoleucine overproducing strains of C. glutamicum we therefore studied the l-isoleucine biosynthesis by overexpression of the various corresponding genes. To enable a flux increase in recombinant strains all genes specific for l-threonine and l-isoleucine biosynthesis were cloned from this bacterium. We demonstratet that amplification of the feedback inhibition insensitive homoserine dehydrogenase and homoserine kinase in a high l-lysine overproducing strain enable the channeling of the carbon flow from the intermediate l-aspartate semialdehyde towards homoserine, resulting in an accumulation of l-threonine. To obtain effective l-isoleucine overproduction a deregulated threonine dehydratase was overexpressed in l-threonine producing strains of C. glutamicum. In this way the l-threonine was converted to l-isoleucine, which was secreted up to 30g/l into the culture medium.

  16. Genome analysis and physiological comparison of Alicycliphilus denitrificans strains BC and K601T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oosterkamp, Margreet J. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Veuskens, Teun [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Saia, Flavia Talarico [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Weelink, Sander A.B. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Daligault, Hajnalka E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Langenhoff, A. M. [Deltares, The Netherlands; Gerritse, Jan [Deltares, The Netherlands; Van Berkel, Willem J. H. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Pieper, Dietmar [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Junca, Howard [CorpoGen, Bogota Colombia; Smidt, Hauke [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Schraa, Gosse [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Davids, Mark [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Schaap, Peter J [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Plugge, Caroline M. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Stams, Alfons J. M. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands

    2013-01-01

    The genomes of the Betaproteobacteria Alicycliphilus denitrificans strains BC and K601T have been sequenced to get insight into the physiology of the two strains. Strain BC degrades benzene with chlorate as electron acceptor. The cyclohexanol-degrading denitrifying strain K601T is not able to use chlorate as electron acceptor, while strain BC cannot degrade cyclohexanol. The 16S rRNA sequences of strains BC and K601T are identical and the fatty acid methyl ester patterns of the strains are similar. Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) analysis of predicted open reading frames of both strains showed most hits with Acidovorax sp. JS42, a bacterium that degrades nitro-aromatics. The genomes include strain-specific plasmids (pAlide201 in strain K601T and pAlide01 and pAlide02 in strain BC). Key genes of chlorate reduction in strain BC were located on a 120 kb megaplasmid (pAlide01), which was absent in strain K601T. Genes involved in cyclohexanol degradation were only found in strain K601T. Benzene and toluene are degraded via oxygenase-mediated pathways in both strains. Genes involved in the meta-cleavage pathway of catechol are present in the genomes of both strains. Strain BC also contains all genes of the ortho-cleavage pathway. The large number of mono- and dioxygenase genes in the genomes suggests that the two strains have a broader substrate range than known thus far.

  17. Salt-inducible promoter derivable from a lactic acid bacterium, and its use in a lactic acid bacterium for production of a desired protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Jan Willem; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerard; Ledeboer, Adrianus Marinus

    1998-01-01

    The invention provides a salt-inducible promoter present in SEQ ID NO: 10 and derivable from a lactic acid bacterium in isolation from the coding sequence normally controlled by said promoter in a wild-type lactic acid bacterium, with modifications and important parts thereof. Also provided are a

  18. Genome Sequence Analysis of the Naphthenic Acid Degrading and Metal Resistant Bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii CR3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Wang

    Full Text Available Cupriavidus sp. are generally heavy metal tolerant bacteria with the ability to degrade a variety of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, although the degradation pathways and substrate versatilities remain largely unknown. Here we studied the bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii strain CR3, which was isolated from a natural asphalt deposit, and which was shown to utilize naphthenic acids as a sole carbon source. Genome sequencing of C. gilardii CR3 was carried out to elucidate possible mechanisms for the naphthenic acid biodegradation. The genome of C. gilardii CR3 was composed of two circular chromosomes chr1 and chr2 of respectively 3,539,530 bp and 2,039,213 bp in size. The genome for strain CR3 encoded 4,502 putative protein-coding genes, 59 tRNA genes, and many other non-coding genes. Many genes were associated with xenobiotic biodegradation and metal resistance functions. Pathway prediction for degradation of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, a representative naphthenic acid, suggested that naphthenic acid undergoes initial ring-cleavage, after which the ring fission products can be degraded via several plausible degradation pathways including a mechanism similar to that used for fatty acid oxidation. The final metabolic products of these pathways are unstable or volatile compounds that were not toxic to CR3. Strain CR3 was also shown to have tolerance to at least 10 heavy metals, which was mainly achieved by self-detoxification through ion efflux, metal-complexation and metal-reduction, and a powerful DNA self-repair mechanism. Our genomic analysis suggests that CR3 is well adapted to survive the harsh environment in natural asphalts containing naphthenic acids and high concentrations of heavy metals.

  19. Loktanella spp. Gb03 as an algicidal bacterium, isolated from the culture of Dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus belizeanus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anmar Hameed Bloh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Bacteria associated with harmful algal blooms can play a crucial role in regulating algal blooms in the environment. This study aimed at isolating and identifying algicidal bacteria in Dinoflagellate culture and to determine the optimum growth requirement of the algicidal bacteria, Loktanella sp. Gb-03. Materials and Methods: The Dinoflagellate culture used in this study was supplied by Professor Gires Usup’s Laboratory, School of Environmental and Natural Resources Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, University Kebangsaan Malaysia, Malaysia. The culture was used for the isolation of Loktanella sp., using biochemical tests, API 20 ONE kits. The fatty acid content of the isolates and the algicidal activity were further evaluated, and the phenotype was determined through the phylogenetic tree. Results: Gram-negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming, short rod-shaped, aerobic bacteria (Gb01, Gb02, Gb03, Gb04, Gb05, and Gb06 were isolated from the Dinoflagellate culture. The colonies were pink in color, convex with a smooth surface and entire edge. The optimum growth temperature for the Loktanella sp. Gb03 isolate was determined to be 30°C, in 1% of NaCl and pH7. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the bacterium belonged to the genus Loktanella of the class Alphaproteobacteria and formed a tight cluster with the type strain of Loktanella pyoseonensis (97.0% sequence similarity. Conclusion: On the basis of phenotypic, phylogenetic data and genetic distinctiveness, strain Gb-03, were placed in the genus Loktanella as the type strain of species. Moreover, it has algicidal activity against seven toxic Dinoflagellate. The algicidal property of the isolated Loktanella is vital, especially where biological control is needed to mitigate algal bloom or targeted Dinoflagellates.

  20. Screening and identification of a Bacillus thuringiensis strain S1/4 with large and efficient insecticidal activities.

    OpenAIRE

    Jaoua, Samir; Sellami, Sameh; Zghal, Taheni; Cherif, Maroua; Zalila-Kolsi, Imen; Jaoua, Samir; Jamoussi, Kaïs

    2013-01-01

    The bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis was recognized for its entomopathogenic activities related to Cry and Cyt proteins forming the δ-endotoxins and some extracellular activities like the vegetative insecticidal proteins (VIP) and Cry1I. These activities may act specifically against diverse organisms and some of them typically characterize each strain. Here, we screened a set of 212 B. thuringiensis strains to search the higher insecticidal activities. These strains had bipyramidal and cubic ...

  1. Biotransformation of ginsenoside Rb1 to ginsenoside Rg3 by endophytic bacterium Burkholderia sp. GE 17-7 isolated from Panax ginseng.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Y; Yin, Z-H; Yin, C-Y

    2017-06-01

    To isolate a novel endophytic bacterium from Panax ginseng that could have excellent properties in converting ginsenoside Rb1 to ginsenoside Rg3. Based on a 16S rDNA gene sequence, the strain named GE 17-7 was identified as Burkholderia sp. This strain has shown the highest activity in converting ginsenoside Rb1 to 20(S)-ginsenoside Rg3. During the biotransformation of ginsenoside Rb1, the final metabolite was identified by nuclear magnetic resonance analysis and the transformation pathway of ginsenoside Rb1 was also identified by thin-layer chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography analysis in this study. We have successfully isolated a β-glucosidase-producing endophytic bacterium GE 17-7 from P. ginseng. Ginsenoside Rg3 was produced by strain GE 17-7 from ginsenoside Rb1 via ginsenoside Rd. This is the first report of the conversion of major ginsenoside Rb1 into minor ginsenoside Rg3 by fermentation with Burkholderia sp. endophytic bacteria in P. ginseng. These results suggest a new preparation method for ginsenoside Rg3 using strain GE 17-7 in the pharmaceutical industry. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Plant growth-promoting bacterium Acinetobacter calcoaceticus P23 increases the chlorophyll content of the monocot Lemna minor (duckweed) and the dicot Lactuca sativa (lettuce).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Wakako; Sugawara, Masayuki; Miwa, Kyoko; Morikawa, Masaaki

    2014-07-01

    Acinetobacter calcoaceticus P23 is a plant growth-promoting bacterium that was isolated from the surface of duckweed (Lemna aoukikusa). The bacterium was observed to colonize on the plant surfaces and increase the chlorophyll content of not only the monocotyledon Lemna minor but also the dicotyledon Lactuca sativa in a hydroponic culture. This effect on the Lactuca sativa was significant in nutrient-poor (×1/100 dilution of H2 medium) and not nutrient-rich (×1 or ×1/10 dilutions of H2 medium) conditions. Strain P23 has the potential to play a part in the future development of fertilizers and energy-saving hydroponic agricultural technologies. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Biodegradation of Phenol by Bacteria Strain Acinetobacter Calcoaceticus PA Isolated from Phenolic Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenghui Liu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A phenol-degrading bacterium strain PA was successfully isolated from the effluent of petrochemical wastewater. Based on its morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics, the strain PA was characterized as a Gram-negative, strictly aerobic, nonmotile and short rod-shaped bacterium that utilizes phenol as a sole carbon and energy source. 16S rDNA sequence analysis revealed that this strain is affiliated to Acinetobacter calcoaceticus in the group of Gammaproteobacteria. The strain was efficient in removing 91.6% of the initial 800 mg∙L−1 phenol within 48 h, and had a tolerance of phenol concentration as high as 1700 mg∙L−1. These results indicated that A. calcoaceticus possesses a promising potential in treating phenolic wastewater.

  4. Biodegradation of Phenol by Bacteria Strain Acinetobacter Calcoaceticus PA Isolated from Phenolic Wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenghui; Xie, Wenyu; Li, Dehao; Peng, Yang; Li, Zesheng; Liu, Shusi

    2016-03-09

    A phenol-degrading bacterium strain PA was successfully isolated from the effluent of petrochemical wastewater. Based on its morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics, the strain PA was characterized as a Gram-negative, strictly aerobic, nonmotile and short rod-shaped bacterium that utilizes phenol as a sole carbon and energy source. 16S rDNA sequence analysis revealed that this strain is affiliated to Acinetobacter calcoaceticus in the group of Gammaproteobacteria. The strain was efficient in removing 91.6% of the initial 800 mg ∙ L(-1) phenol within 48 h, and had a tolerance of phenol concentration as high as 1700 mg ∙ L(-1). These results indicated that A. calcoaceticus possesses a promising potential in treating phenolic wastewater.

  5. Isolation and identification of a cold-adapted lipase producing strain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cold-adapted lipase producing strain of mesophilic bacterium, named SYBC LIP-Y, was isolated from the decayed seeds of Ginkgo biloba L. by screening with plates containing Victoria Blue B and with the flask-shaking fermentation. It was identified as a novel Burkholderia species. The properties of its lipase after ...

  6. A zebrafish larval model to assess virulence of porcine streptococcus suis strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaccaria, Edoardo; Cao, Rui; Wells, Jerry M.; Baarlen, Van Peter

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an encapsulated Gram-positive bacterium, and the leading cause of sepsis and meningitis in young pigs resulting in considerable economic losses in the porcine industry. It is also considered an emerging zoonotic agent. In the environment, both avirulent and virulent strains

  7. Genome Sequence of the Rice Pathogen Dickeya zeae Strain ZJU1202

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Bin; Shi, Yu; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Liu, He; Shan, Changlin; Wang, Yanli; Kube, Michael; Xie, Guan-Lin; Sun, Guochang

    2012-01-01

    Dickeya zeae is a phytopathogenic bacterium causing soft rot diseases in a wide range of economically important crops. Here we present the draft genome sequence of strain ZJU1202, which is the causal agent of rice foot rot in China. The draft genome will contribute to epidemiological and comparative genomic studies and the quarantine of this devastating phytopathogen.

  8. Genome sequence of the rice pathogen Dickeya zeae strain ZJU1202.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Shi, Yu; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Liu, He; Shan, Changlin; Wang, Yanli; Kube, Michael; Xie, Guan-Lin; Sun, Guochang

    2012-08-01

    Dickeya zeae is a phytopathogenic bacterium causing soft rot diseases in a wide range of economically important crops. Here we present the draft genome sequence of strain ZJU1202, which is the causal agent of rice foot rot in China. The draft genome will contribute to epidemiological and comparative genomic studies and the quarantine of this devastating phytopathogen.

  9. Genome sequences of two Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides strains isolated from Danish dairy starter cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Bæk; Kot, Witold Piotr; Hansen, L.H.

    2014-01-01

    The lactic acid bacterium Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides can be found in mesophilic cheese starters, where it produces aromatic compounds from, e.g., citrate. Here, we present the draft genome sequences of two L. pseudomesenteroides strains isolated from traditional Danish cheese starters....

  10. Biodegradation pathway of L-glutamatediacetate by Rhizobium radiobacter strain BG-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van C.G.; Geerts, R.; Nguyen, P.D.; Plugge, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    An aerobic bacterium was isolated from activated sludge in a medium containing l-glutamate-N,N-diacetate (l-GLDA) as sole carbon and energy source. The isolate was identified as a Rhizobium radiobacter species. Besides l-GLDA, the strain utilized nitrilotriacetate (NTA) and proposed intermediates in

  11. Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis NCDO 2118, a GABA-Producing Strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira, Letícia C; Saraiva, Tessália D L; Soares, Siomar C

    2014-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis NCDO 2118 is a nondairy lactic acid bacterium, a xylose fermenter, and a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) producer isolated from frozen peas. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of L. lactis NCDO 2118, a strain with probiotic potential activity....

  12. Genome Sequence of Streptomyces viridosporus Strain T7A ATCC 39115, a Lignin-Degrading Actinomycete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Jennifer R. [Brown University; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Wei, Chia-Lin [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Szeto, Ernest [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Peters, Lin [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Sello, Jason K. [Brown University

    2013-01-01

    We announce the availability of the genome sequence of Streptomyces viridosporus strain T7A ATCC 39115, a plant biomass- degrading actinomycete. This bacterium is of special interest because of its capacity to degrade lignin, an underutilized compo- nent of plants in the context of bioenergy. It has a full complement of genes for plant biomass catabolism.

  13. Functional Identification of Conserved Residues Involved in Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strain GG Sortase Specificity and Pilus Biogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douillard, F.P.; Rasinkangas, P.; Ossowski, von I.; Reunanen, J.; Palva, A.; Vos, de W.M.

    2014-01-01

    In Gram-positive bacteria, sortase-dependent pili mediate the adhesion of bacteria to host epithelial cells and play a pivotal role in colonization, host signaling, and biofilm formation. Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG, a well known probiotic bacterium, also displays on its cell surface

  14. A Newly Sequenced Alcaligenes faecalis Strain: Implications for Novel Temporal Symbiotic Relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Hern?ndez-Mendoza, Armando; Lozano-Aguirre Beltr?n, Luis Fernando; Mart?nez-Ocampo, Fernando; Quiroz-Casta?eda, Rosa Estela; Dant?n-Gonz?lez, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of Alcaligenes faecalis strain MOR02, a bacterium that is able to colonize nematodes in a temporary fashion and kill insects for their own benefit. The availability of the genome should enable us to explain these phenotypes.

  15. Purification and Characterization of Haloalcohol Dehalogenase from Arthrobacter sp. Strain AD2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Wijngaard, Arjen J.; Reuvekamp, Peter T.W.; Janssen, Dick B.

    An enzyme capable of dehalogenating vicinal haloalcohols to their corresponding epoxides was purified from the 3-chloro-1,2-propanediol-utilizing bacterium Arthrobacter sp. strain AD2. The inducible haloalcohol dehalogenase converted 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol, 3-chloro-1,2-propanediol,

  16. Ni 2-uptake in Pseudomonas putida strain S4: a possible role of Mg ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Essential metal ion homeostasis is based on regulated uptake of metal ions, both during its scarcity and abundance. Pseudomonas putida strain S4, a multimetal resistant bacterium, was employed to investigate Ni2+ entry into cells. It was observed that Mg2+ regulates the entry of Ni2+ and by this plays a protective role to ...

  17. Azospirillum sp. strain B510 enhances rice growth and yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isawa, Tsuyoshi; Yasuda, Michiko; Awazaki, Hirotoshi; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Shinozaki, Satoshi; Nakashita, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    Inoculation experiments with the endophytic bacterium Azospirillum sp. strain B510, an isolate from surface-sterilized stems of field-grown rice, were conducted in pots in a greenhouse, and in paddy fields in Hokkaido, Japan. B510 significantly enhanced the growth of newly generated leaves and shoot biomass under greenhouse conditions. When rice seedlings were treated with 1×10(8) CFU ml(-1), then transplanted to paddy fields, tiller numbers and seed yield significantly increased. Azospirillum sp. strain B510 is a promising bacterial inoculant for plant growth promotion and agricultural practices.

  18. Draft genome sequence of Rhodococcus rhodochrous strain ATCC 17895

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Otten, Linda G.; Resch, Verena; Muyzer, Gerard; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Rhodococcus rhodochrous ATCC 17895 possesses an array of mono- and dioxygenases, as well as hydratases, which makes it an interesting organism for biocatalysis. R. rhodochrous is a Gram-positive aerobic bacterium with a rod-like morphology. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 6,869,887 bp long genome contains 6,609 protein-coding genes and 53 RNA genes. Based on small subunit rRNA analysis, the strain is more likely to be a strain of Rhodococcus erythropolis rather than Rhodococcus rhodochrous. PMID:24501654

  19. Computational prediction of essential genes in an unculturable endosymbiotic bacterium, Wolbachia of Brugia malayi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlow Clotilde KS

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wolbachia (wBm is an obligate endosymbiotic bacterium of Brugia malayi, a parasitic filarial nematode of humans and one of the causative agents of lymphatic filariasis. There is a pressing need for new drugs against filarial parasites, such as B. malayi. As wBm is required for B. malayi development and fertility, targeting wBm is a promising approach. However, the lifecycle of neither B. malayi nor wBm can be maintained in vitro. To facilitate selection of potential drug targets we computationally ranked the wBm genome based on confidence that a particular gene is essential for the survival of the bacterium. Results wBm protein sequences were aligned using BLAST to the Database of Essential Genes (DEG version 5.2, a collection of 5,260 experimentally identified essential genes in 15 bacterial strains. A confidence score, the Multiple Hit Score (MHS, was developed to predict each wBm gene's essentiality based on the top alignments to essential genes in each bacterial strain. This method was validated using a jackknife methodology to test the ability to recover known essential genes in a control genome. A second estimation of essentiality, the Gene Conservation Score (GCS, was calculated on the basis of phyletic conservation of genes across Wolbachia's parent order Rickettsiales. Clusters of orthologous genes were predicted within the 27 currently available complete genomes. Druggability of wBm proteins was predicted by alignment to a database of protein targets of known compounds. Conclusion Ranking wBm genes by either MHS or GCS predicts and prioritizes potentially essential genes. Comparison of the MHS to GCS produces quadrants representing four types of predictions: those with high confidence of essentiality by both methods (245 genes, those highly conserved across Rickettsiales (299 genes, those similar to distant essential genes (8 genes, and those with low confidence of essentiality (253 genes. These data facilitate

  20. Selective inhibition of toxic cyanobacteria by β-carboline-containing bacterium Bacillus flexus isolated from Saudi freshwaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamri, Saad A; Mohamed, Zakaria A

    2013-10-01

    A bacterial strain SSZ01 isolated from a eutrophic lake in Saudi Arabia dominated by cyanobacterial blooms, showed an antialgal activity against cyanobacteria species. Based on the analysis of the 16S rDNA gene sequence, the isolated strain (SSZ01) most likely belonged to the genus Bacillus with a 99% similarity to Bacillus flexus strain EMGA5. The thin layer chromatography (TLC) analysis of the ethyl acetate extract of this bacterium revealed that this strain can produce harmine and norharmane compared to different β-carboline analog standards. Harmine and norharmane were also detected in considerable amounts in bacterial growth medium, indicating a potential excretion of these compounds into the aquatic environment. The crude extract of Bacillus flexus as well as pure materials of harmine and norharmane inhibited the growth of tested species of cyanobacteria. However, the bacterial crude extract has a higher toxicity against tested species of cyanobacteria than harmine and norharmane. In addition, harmine was more toxic to cyanobacteria than norharmane. On the other hand, neither pure compounds of harmine and norharmane nor crude bacterial extract showed any antialgal activity against tested species of green algae. The results of the present study suggest that B. flexus SSZ01 or its crude extract containing harmine and norharmane could be a candidate for the selective control of cyanobacterial blooms without affecting other algal species.

  1. Chitin utilization by the insect-transmitted bacterium Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killiny, Nabil; Prado, Simone S; Almeida, Rodrigo P P

    2010-09-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is an insect-borne bacterium that colonizes xylem vessels of a large number of host plants, including several crops of economic importance. Chitin is a polysaccharide present in the cuticle of leafhopper vectors of X. fastidiosa and may serve as a carbon source for this bacterium. Biological assays showed that X. fastidiosa reached larger populations in the presence of chitin. Additionally, chitin induced phenotypic changes in this bacterium, notably increasing adhesiveness. Quantitative PCR assays indicated transcriptional changes in the presence of chitin, and an enzymatic assay demonstrated chitinolytic activity by X. fastidiosa. An ortholog of the chitinase A gene (chiA) was identified in the X. fastidiosa genome. The in silico analysis revealed that the open reading frame of chiA encodes a protein of 351 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 40 kDa. chiA is in a locus that consists of genes implicated in polysaccharide degradation. Moreover, this locus was also found in the genomes of closely related bacteria in the genus Xanthomonas, which are plant but not insect associated. X. fastidiosa degraded chitin when grown on a solid chitin-yeast extract-agar medium and grew in liquid medium with chitin as the sole carbon source; ChiA was also determined to be secreted. The gene encoding ChiA was cloned into Escherichia coli, and endochitinase activity was detected in the transformant, showing that the gene is functional and involved in chitin degradation. The results suggest that X. fastidiosa may use its vectors' foregut surface as a carbon source. In addition, chitin may trigger X. fastidiosa's gene regulation and biofilm formation within vectors. Further work is necessary to characterize the role of chitin and its utilization in X. fastidiosa.

  2. Metabolic Engineering of the Actinomycete Amycolatopsis sp. Strain ATCC 39116 towards Enhanced Production of Natural Vanillin

    OpenAIRE

    Fleige, Christian; Meyer, Florian; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Amycolatopsis sp. ATCC 39116 is used for the fermentative production of natural vanillin from ferulic acid on an industrial scale. The strain is known for its outstanding tolerance to this toxic product. In order to improve the productivity of the fermentation process, the strain's metabolism was engineered for higher final concentrations and molar yields. Degradation of vanillin could be decreased by more than 90% through deletion of the vdh gene, which codes for ...

  3. Colonization of Tomato Plants by Two Agrocin-Producing Strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    OpenAIRE

    Macrae, Sharmane; Thomson, Jennifer A.; Van Staden, Johannes

    1988-01-01

    For a bacterium to be a successful biocontrol agent against crown gall disease, it must produce an effective agrocin specific for Agrobacterium tumefaciens and be able to colonize host plants efficiently. The colonization abilities of K84 and J73, successful and potential biocontrolling strains, respectively, were compared both in vivo and in vitro. Both strains produced fibrils attaching them to tomato root surfaces and had similar colonization efficiencies up to 14 days after inoculation. H...

  4. Liver abscess associated with an oral flora bacterium Streptococcus anginosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hava Yılmaz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Viridans group Streptococcus, a bacterium of the oral flora has a low-virulence and rarely causes liver abscess. A 40-yearoldmale patient was admitted to the hospital complaining of high fever and malaise. A physical examination revealedpoor oral hygiene; there were caries on many teeth, and he had hepatomegaly. A hepatic abscess was identified inhis abdominal tomography. Streptococcus anginosus was isolated from the drainage material, and the bile ducts werenormal in his MRI cholangiography. An immunocompetent case of liver abscess caused by Streptococcus anginosusoriginated most probably from oral flora is presented here. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2012; 2(1:33-35

  5. Factors Affecting Zebra Mussel Kill by the Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2004-02-24

    The specific purpose of this research project was to identify factors that affect zebra mussel kill by the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens. Test results obtained during this three-year project identified the following key variables as affecting mussel kill: treatment concentration, treatment duration, mussel siphoning activity, dissolved oxygen concentration, water temperature, and naturally suspended particle load. Using this latter information, the project culminated in a series of pipe tests which achieved high mussel kill inside power plants under once-through conditions using service water in artificial pipes.

  6. Research Progress and Perspectives of Nitrogen Fixing Bacterium, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus, in Monocot Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Eskin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a nitrogen fixing bacterium originally found in monocotyledon sugarcane plants in which the bacterium actively fixes atmosphere nitrogen and provides significant amounts of nitrogen to plants. This bacterium mainly colonizes intercellular spaces within the roots and stems of plants and does not require the formation of the complex root organ like nodule. The bacterium is less plant/crop specific and indeed G. diazotrophicus has been found in a number of unrelated plant species. Importantly, as the bacterium was of monocot plant origin, there exists a possibility that the nitrogen fixation feature of the bacterium may be used in many other monocot crops. This paper reviews and updates the research progress of G. diazotrophicus for the past 25 years but focuses on the recent research development.

  7. Noncontiguous finished genome sequence and description of Paenibacillus antibioticophila sp. nov. GD11T, the type strain of Paenibacillus antibioticophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Dubourg

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Paenibacillus antibioticophila strain GD11T sp. nov. is the type strain of a new species within the genus Paenibacillus. This strain, whose genome is described here, was isolated from human faeces of a 63-year-old woman with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis who was receiving numerous antibiotics at the time of stool collection. P. antibioticophila is a Gram-positive aerobic bacterium. We describe here the features of this bacterium, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 5 562 631 bp long genome contains 5084 protein-coding and 71 RNA genes.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of the Plant Growth–Promoting Rhizobacterium Acinetobacter radioresistens Strain SA188 Isolated from the Desert Plant Indigofera argentea

    KAUST Repository

    Lafi, Feras Fawzi

    2017-03-03

    Acinetobacter radioresistens strain SA188 is a plant endophytic bacterium, isolated from root nodules of the desert plants Indigofera spp., collected in Jizan, Saudi Arabia. Here, we report the 3.2-Mb draft genome sequence of strain SA188, highlighting characteristic pathways for plant growth–promoting activity and environmental adaptation.

  9. Caloramator australicus sp. nov., a thermophilic, anaerobic bacterium from the Great Artesian Basin of Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogg, Christopher D; Patel, Bharat K C

    2009-01-01

    A strictly anaerobic, thermophilic bacterium, designated strain RC3T, was isolated from microbial mats colonizing thermal waters of a run-off channel formed by free-flowing waters from a bore well (registered no. 17263) of the Great Artesian Basin, Australia. The slightly curved rods (2.5-4.2x0.8-1.0 microm) of strain RC3T stained Gram-positive and grew optimally in tryptone-yeast extract-glucose medium at 60 degrees C (range 45-70 degrees C) and pH 7 (range pH 5-9). Strain RC3T grew poorly on yeast extract (0.2 %) but did not grow on tryptone (0.2 %) as a sole carbon source; yeast extract was required for growth on other energy sources, which included glucose, fructose, galactose, xylose, maltose, sucrose, raffinose, mannose, cellobiose, cellulose, starch, amylopectin, xylan, peptone, amyl media (Research Achievement), threonine and pyruvate but did not include arabinose, ribose, lactose, CM-cellulose, myo-inositol, mannitol, chitin, casein, formate, acetate, succinate, propionate, lactate, benzoate, glycerol, ethanol, Casamino acids, arginine, alanine, serine, glycine, glutamine, leucine, isoleucine, methionine or aspartate. The end products of glucose fermentation were ethanol and acetate. In the presence of 0.2 % yeast extract, iron(III), manganese(IV) and elemental sulfur were reduced but not sulfate, sulfite, thiosulfate, nitrate or nitrite. Iron(III) was also reduced in the presence of peptone, tryptone, amyl media, threonine and glycerol but not chitin, xylan, pectin, starch, pyruvate, acetate, benzoate, lactate, propionate, succinate, inositol, ethanol, mannitol, arginine, glutamine or serine. Strain RC3T was not able to utilize molecular hydrogen and/or carbon dioxide in the presence or absence of iron(III). In the presence of iron(III) and glycerol, increased concentrations of Fe(II) corresponded to increased cell numbers, demonstrating that strain RC3(T) was able to conserve energy to support growth from the reduction of Fe(III) to Fe

  10. Study on human intestinal bacterium Blautia sp. AUH-JLD56 for the conversion of arctigenin to (-)-3'-desmethylarctigenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-Yue; Li, Meng; Wang, Xiu-Ling; Liu, Peng; Hao, Qing-Hong; Yu, Xiu-Mei

    2013-12-11

    Arctium lappa L. (A. lappa) is a popularly used vegetable as well as herbal medicine. Human intestinal microflora was reported to convert arctiin, the lignan compound with highest content in the dried fruits of Arctium lappa, to a series of metabolites. However, the specific bacterium responsible for the formation of 3'-desmethylarctigenin (3'-DMAG), the most predominant metabolite of arctiin by rat or human intestinal microflora, has not been isolated yet. In the present study, we isolated one single bacterium, which we named Blautia sp. AUH-JLD56, capable of solely biotransforming arctiin or arctigenin to (-)-3'-DMAG. The structure of the metabolite 3'-DMAG was elucidated by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The biotransforming kinetics and maximum biotransforming capacity of strain AUH-JLD56 was investigated. In addition, the metabolite 3'-DMAG showed significantly higher 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging activity than that of the substrate arctigenin at the concentrations tested.

  11. Study on screening of anti-predator rhizosphere bacterium against Caenorhabditis elegans and its anti predation mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HE Qingling

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Althoughmicrobial fertilizer is multi-effect,environmental friendly and long-term efficient,its practical application effect is but decreased for being prey by the other creators living in soil frequently.Many bacterium have developed their mechanisms that expel or kill worms to defend themselves from predators.Screening of anti-predator rhizosphere bacterium helps us to find out competitive plant growth promoting rhizobacteria(PGPR.Using Caenorhabditis elegans as sample,this study roughly observed two strains of biocontrol:Pseudomonas aurantiaca JD37 and Pseudomonas fluorescens P13.Using Escherichia coli OP50 as control group,we find the preference order of worms,from highest to lowest,is P13,OP50 and JD37.In slow killing assay,the death rate of worms for JD37 and P13 are 26.12% and 18.66% respectively.The activity and reproduction rate of C.elegans decrease when it is fed on JD37.The results of chemical and micro-biological study show that JD37 cannot produce any currently studied second metabolites which kill worms,while P13 can produce Hydrogen cyanide (HCN.All these results show that JD37 has the ability of anti-predator,and is more competitive under predation pressure,which suggests its broad application prospect as microbial fertilizer.

  12. First report of a lipopeptide biosurfactant from thermophilic bacterium Aneurinibacillus thermoaerophilus MK01 newly isolated from municipal landfill site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafi, Hakimeh; Abdoli, Mahya; Hajfarajollah, Hamidreza; Samie, Nima; Alidoust, Leila; Abbasi, Habib; Fooladi, Jamshid; Zahiri, Hossein Shahbani; Noghabi, Kambiz Akbari

    2014-07-01

    A biosurfactant-producing thermophile was isolated from the Kahrizak landfill of Tehran and identified as a bacterium belonging to the genus Aneurinibacillus. A thermostable lipopeptide-type biosurfactant was purified from the culture medium of this bacterium and showed stability in the temperature range of 20-90 °C and pH range of 5-10. The produced biosurfactant could reduce the surface tension of water from 72 to 43 mN/m with a CMC of 1.21 mg/mL. The strain growing at a temperature of 45 °C produces a substantial amount of 5 g/L of biosurfactant in the medium supplemented with sunflower oil as the sole carbon source. Response surface methodology was employed to optimize the biosurfactant production using sunflower oil, sodium nitrate, and yeast extract as variables. The optimization resulted in 6.75 g/L biosurfactant production, i.e., 35% improved as compared to the unoptimized condition. Thin-layer chromatography, FTIR spectroscopy, 1H-NMR spectroscopy, and biochemical composition analysis confirmed the lipopeptide structure of the biosurfactant.

  13. Partial characterization of xylanase produced by Caldicoprobacter algeriensis, a new thermophilic anaerobic bacterium isolated from an Algerian hot spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouacem, Khelifa; Bouanane-Darenfed, Amel; Boucherba, Nawel; Joseph, Manon; Gagaoua, Mohammed; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Kecha, Mouloud; Benallaoua, Said; Hacène, Hocine; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2014-11-01

    To date, xylanases have expanded their use in many processing industries, such as pulp, paper, food, and textile. This study aimed the production and partial characterization of a thermostable xylanase from a novel thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Caldicoprobacter algeriensis strain TH7C1(T) isolated from a northeast hot spring in Algeria. The obtained results showed that C. algeriensis xylanase seems not to be correlated with the biomass growth profile whereas the maximum enzyme production (140.0 U/ml) was recorded in stationary phase (18 h). The temperature and pH for optimal activities were 70 °C and 11.0, respectively. The enzyme was found to be stable at 50, 60, 70, and 80 °C, with a half-life of 10, 9, 8, and 4 h, respectively. Influence of metal ions on enzyme activity revealed that Ca(+2) enhances greatly the relative activity to 151.3 %; whereas Hg(2+) inhibited significantly the enzyme. At the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the production of xylanase by the thermophilic bacterium C. algeriensis. This thermo- and alkaline-tolerant xylanase could be used in pulp bleaching process.

  14. Biological Control of Meloidogyne hapla Using an Antagonistic Bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyeong Park

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We examined the efficacy of a bacterium for biocontrol of the root-knot nematode (RKN Meloidogyne hapla in carrot (Daucus carota subsp. sativus and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum. Among 542 bacterial isolates from various soils and plants, the highest nematode mortality was observed for treatments with isolate C1-7, which was identified as Bacillus cereus based on cultural and morphological characteristics, the Biolog program, and 16S rRNA sequencing analyses. The population density and the nematicidal activity of B. cereus C1-7 remained high until the end of culture in brain heart infusion broth, suggesting that it may have sustainable biocontrol potential. In pot experiments, the biocontrol efficacy of B. cereus C1-7 was high, showing complete inhibition of root gall or egg mass formation by RKN in carrot and tomato plants, and subsequently reducing RKN damage and suppressing nematode population growth, respectively. Light microscopy of RKN-infected carrot root tissues treated with C1-7 showed reduced formation of gall cells and fully developed giant cells, while extensive gall cells and fully mature giant cells with prominent cell wall ingrowths formed in the untreated control plants infected with RKNs. These histopathological characteristics may be the result of residual or systemic biocontrol activity of the bacterium, which may coincide with the biocontrol efficacies of nematodes in pots. These results suggest that B. cereus C1-7 can be used as a biocontrol agent for M. hapla.

  15. Biochemical and genetical analysis reveal a new clade of biovar 3 Dickeya spp. strains isolated from potato in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Slawiak, M.; Beckhoven, van, J.R.C.M.; Speksnijder, A.G.C.L.; Czajkowski, R.L.; Grabe, G.; Wolf, van der, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Sixty-five potato strains of the soft rot-causing plant pathogenic bacterium Dickeya spp., and two strains from hyacinth, were characterised using biochemical assays, REP-PCR genomic finger printing, 16S rDNA and dnaX sequence analysis. These methods were compared with nineteen strains representing six Dickeya species which included the type strains. A group of twenty-two potato strains isolated between 2005-2007 in the Netherlands, Poland, Finland and Israel were characterised as belonging t...

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus vallismortis NBIF-001, a Novel Strain from Shangri-La, China, That Has High Activity against Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Min, Yong; Huang, Daye; Zhou, Ronghua; Fang, Wei; Liu, Cuijun; Rao, Ben; Zhang, Guangyang; Wang, Kaimei; Yang, Ziwen

    2017-11-30

    Bacillus vallismortis NBIF-001, a Gram-positive bacterium, was isolated from soil in Shangri-La, China. Here, we provide the complete genome sequence of this bacterium, which has a 3,929,787-bp-long genome, including 4,030 protein-coding genes and 195 RNA genes. This strain possesses a number of genes encoding virulence factors of pathogens. Copyright © 2017 Liu et al.

  17. A lactic acid bacterium isolated from kimchi ameliorates intestinal inflammation in DSS-induced colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Soo; Joe, Inseong; Rhee, Paul Dong; Jeong, Choon-Soo; Jeong, Gajin

    2017-04-01

    Some species of lactic acid bacteria have been shown to be beneficial in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In the present study, a strain of lactic acid bacterium (Lactobacillus paracasei LS2) was isolated from the Korean food, kimchi, and was shown to inhibit the development of experimental colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). To investigate the role of LS2 in IBD, mice were fed DSS in drinking water for seven days along with LS2 bacteria which were administered intragastrically to some of the mice, while phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) was administered to others (the controls). The administration of LS2 reduced body weight loss and increased survival, and disease activity indexes (DAI) and histological scores indicated that the severity of colitis was significantly reduced. The production of inflammatory cytokines and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity also decreased. Flow cytometry analysis showed that the number of Th1 (IFN-γ) population cells was significantly reduced in the LS2-administered mice compared with the controls. The administration of LS2 induced the increase of CD4 + FOXP3 + Treg cells, which are responsible for IL-10. Numbers of macrophages (CD11b + F4/80 + ), and neutrophils (CD11b + Gr-1 + ) among lamina propria lymphocytes (LPL) were also reduced. These results indicate that LS2 has an anti-inflammatory effect and ameliorates DSS-induced colitis.

  18. Degradation of Reactive Black 5 dye by a newly isolated bacterium Pseudomonas entomophila BS1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sana; Malik, Abdul

    2016-03-01

    The textile and dye industries are considered as one of the major sources of environmental pollution. The present study was conducted to investigate the degradation of the azo dye Reactive Black 5 (RB 5) using a bacterium isolated from soil samples collected around a textile industry. The bacterial strain BS1 capable of degrading RB 5 was isolated and identified as Pseudomonas entomophila on the basis of 16S rDNA sequencing. The effects of different parameters on the degradation of RB 5 were studied to find out the optimal conditions required for maximum degradation, which was 93% after 120 h of incubation. Static conditions with pH in the range of 5-9 and a temperature of 37 °C were found to be optimum for degrading RB 5. Enzyme assays demonstrated that P. entomophila possessed azoreductase, which played an important role in degradation. The enzyme was dependent on flavin mononucleotide and NADH for its activity. Furthermore, a possible degradation pathway of the dye was proposed through gas chromatography - mass spectrometry analysis, which revealed that the metabolic products were naphthalene-1,2-diamine and 4-(methylsulfonyl) aniline. Thus the ability of this indigenous bacterial isolate for simultaneous decolorization and degradation of the azo dye signifies its potential application for treatment of industrial wastewaters containing azo dyes.

  19. Antioxidant and DNA Damage Protecting Activity of Exopolysaccharides from the Endophytic Bacterium Bacillus cereus SZ1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ping Zheng

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available An endophytic bacterium was isolated from the Chinese medicinal plant Artemisia annua L. The phylogenetic and physiological characterization indicated that the isolate, strain SZ-1, was Bacillus cereus. The endophyte could produce an exopolysaccharide (EPS at 46 mg/L. The 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydracyl (DPPH radical scavenging activity of the EPS reached more than 50% at 3–5 mg/mL. The EPS was also effective in scavenging superoxide radical in a concentration dependent fashion with an EC50 value of 2.6 mg/mL. The corresponding EC50 for scavenging hydroxyl radical was 3.1 mg/mL. Moreover, phenanthroline-copper complex-mediated chemiluminescent emission of DNA damage was both inhibited and delayed by EPS. The EPS at 0.7–1.7 mg/mL also protected supercoiled DNA strands in plasmid pBR322 against scission induced by Fenton-mediated hydroxyl radical. The preincubation of PC12 cells with the EPS prior to H2O2 exposure increased the cell survival and glutathione (GSH level and catalase (CAT activities, and decreased the level of malondialdehyde (MDA and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activity in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting a pronounced protective effect against H2O2-induced cytotoxicity. Our study indicated that the EPS could be useful for preventing oxidative DNA damage and cellular oxidation in pharmaceutical and food industries.

  20. Thymidine uptake, thymidine incorporation, and thymidine kinase activity in marine bacterium isolates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffrey, W.H.; Paul, J.H.

    1990-01-01

    One assumption made in bacterial production estimates from [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation is that all heterotrophic bacteria can incorporate exogenous thymidine into DNA. Heterotrophic marine bacterium isolates from Tampa Bay, Fla., Chesapeake Bay, Md., and a coral surface microlayer were examined for thymidine uptake (transport), thymidine incorporation, the presence of thymidine kinase genes, and thymidine kinase enzyme activity. Of the 41 isolates tested, 37 were capable of thymidine incorporation into DNA. The four organisms that could not incorporate thymidine also transported the thymidine poorly and lacked thymidine kinase activity. Attempts to detect thymidine kinase genes in the marine isolates by molecular probing with gene probes made from Escherichia coli and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase genes proved unsuccessful. To determine if the inability to incorporate thymidine was due to the lack of thymidine kinase, one organism, Vibro sp. strain DI9, was transformed with a plasmid (pGQ3) that contained an E. coli thymidine kinase gene. Although enzyme assays indicated high levels of thymidine kinase activity in transformants, these cells still failed to incorporate exogenous thymidine into DNA or to transport thymidine into cells. These results indicate that the inability of certain marine bacteria to incorporate thymidine may not be solely due to the lack of thymidine kinase activity but may also be due to the absence of thymidine transport systems

  1. Metabolism of nitrodiphenyl ether herbicides by dioxin-degrading bacterium Sphingomonas wittichii RW1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keum, Young Soo; Lee, Young Ju; Kim, Jeong-Han

    2008-10-08

    Nitrodiphenyl ether herbicides, including chlomethoxyfen, nitrofen, and oxyfluorfen are potent herbicides. Some metabolites and parent compounds are considered as possible mutagens and endocrine disruptors. Both properties pose serious hygienic and environmental risks. Sphingomonas wittichii RW1 is a well-known degrader of polychlorinated dibenzo- p-dioxins, dibenzofurans, and diphenyl ethers. However, no detailed research of its metabolic activity has been performed against pesticides with a diphenyl ether scaffold. In this study, we report S. wittichii RW1 as a very potent diphenyl ether herbicide-metabolizing bacterium with broad substrate specificity. The structures of metabolites were determined by instrumental analysis and synthetic standards. Most pesticides were rapidly removed from the culture medium in the order of nitrofen > oxyfluorfen > chlomethoxyfen. In general, herbicides were degraded through the initial reduction and N-acetylation of nitro groups, followed by ether bond cleavage. Relatively low concentrations of phenolic and catecholic metabolites throughout the study suggested that these metabolites were rapidly metabolized and incorporated into primary metabolism. These results indicate that strain RW1 has very versatile metabolic activities over a wide range of environmental contaminants.

  2. Molecular cloning and characterization of a new peptide deformylase from human pathogenic bacterium Helicobacter pylori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Cong; Wang Qi; Dong Lei; Sun Haifang; Peng Shuying; Chen Jing; Yang Yiming; Yue Jianmin; Shen Xu; Jiang Hualiang

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative pathogenic bacterium, which is associated with peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. It is urgent to discover novel drug targets for appropriate antimicrobial agents against this human pathogen. In bacteria, peptide deformylase (PDF) catalyzes the removal of a formyl group from the N-termini of nascent polypeptides. Due to its essentiality and absence in mammalian cells, PDF has been considered as an attractive target for the discovery of novel antibiotics. In this work, a new PDF gene (def) from H. pylori strain SS1 was cloned, expressed, and purified in Escherichia coli system. Sequence alignment shows that H. pylori PDF (HpPDF) shares about 40% identity to E. coli PDF (EcPDF). The enzymatic properties of HpPDF demonstrate its relatively high activity toward formyl-Met-Ala-Ser, with K cat of 3.4 s -1 , K m of 1.7 mM, and K cat /K m of 2000 M -1 s -1 . HpPDF enzyme appears to be fully active at pH between 8.0 and 9.0, and temperature 50 deg. C. The enzyme activity of Co 2+ -containing HpPDF is apparently higher than that of Zn 2+ -containing HpPDF. This present work thereby supplies a potential platform that facilitates the discovery of novel HpPDF inhibitors and further of possible antimicrobial agents against H. pylori

  3. Molecular cloning and characterization of a new peptide deformylase from human pathogenic bacterium Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Cong; Wang, Qi; Dong, Lei; Sun, Haifang; Peng, Shuying; Chen, Jing; Yang, Yiming; Yue, Jianmin; Shen, Xu; Jiang, Hualiang

    2004-07-09

    Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative pathogenic bacterium, which is associated with peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. It is urgent to discover novel drug targets for appropriate antimicrobial agents against this human pathogen. In bacteria, peptide deformylase (PDF) catalyzes the removal of a formyl group from the N-termini of nascent polypeptides. Due to its essentiality and absence in mammalian cells, PDF has been considered as an attractive target for the discovery of novel antibiotics. In this work, a new PDF gene (def) from H. pylori strain SS1 was cloned, expressed, and purified in Escherichia coli system. Sequence alignment shows that H. pylori PDF (HpPDF) shares about 40% identity to E. coli PDF (EcPDF). The enzymatic properties of HpPDF demonstrate its relatively high activity toward formyl-Met-Ala-Ser, with K(cat) of 3.4s(-1), K(m) of 1.7 mM, and K(cat) / K(m) of 2000M(-1)s(-1). HpPDF enzyme appears to be fully active at pH between 8.0 and 9.0, and temperature 50 degrees C. The enzyme activity of Co(2+)-containing HpPDF is apparently higher than that of Zn(2+)-containing HpPDF. This present work thereby supplies a potential platform that facilitates the discovery of novel HpPDF inhibitors and further of possible antimicrobial agents against H. pylori.

  4. Encapsulated in silica: genome, proteome and physiology of the thermophilic bacterium Anoxybacillus flavithermus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saw, Jimmy H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mountain, Bruce W [NEW ZEALAND; Feng, Lu [NANKAI UNIV; Omelchenko, Marina V [NCBI/NLM/NIH; Hou, Shaobin [UNIV OF HAWAII; Saito, Jennifer A [UNIV OF HAWAII; Stott, Matthew B [NEW ZEALAND; Li, Dan [NANKAI UNIV; Zhao, Guang [NANKAI UNIV; Wu, Junli [NANKAI UNIV; Galperin, Michael Y [NCBI/NLM/NIH; Koonin, Eugene V [NCBI/NLM/NIH; Makarova, Kira S [NCBI/NLM/NIH; Wolf, Yuri I [NCBI/NLM/NIH; Rigden, Daniel J [UNIV OF LIVERPOOL; Dunfield, Peter F [UNIV OF CALGARY; Wang, Lei [NANKAI UNIV; Alam, Maqsudul [UNIV OF HAWAII

    2008-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria of the genus Anoxybacillus have been found in diverse thermophilic habitats, such as geothermal hot springs and manure, and in processed foods such as gelatin and milk powder. Anoxybacillus flavithermus is a facultatively anaerobic bacterium found in super-saturated silica solutions and in opaline silica sinter. The ability of A. flavithermus to grow in super-saturated silica solutions makes it an ideal subject to study the processes of sinter formation, which might be similar to the biomineralization processes that occurred at the dawn of life. We report here the complete genome sequence of A. flavithermus strain WK1, isolated from the waste water drain at the Wairakei geothermal power station in New Zealand. It consists of a single chromosome of 2,846,746 base pairs and is predicted to encode 2,863 proteins. In silico genome analysis identified several enzymes that could be involved in silica adaptation and biofilm formation, and their predicted functions were experimentally validated in vitro. Proteomic analysis confirmed the regulation of biofilm-related proteins and crucial enzymes for the synthesis of long-chain polyamines as constituents of silica nanospheres. Microbial fossils preserved in silica and silica sinters are excellent objects for studying ancient life, a new paleobiological frontier. An integrated analysis of the A. flavithermus genome and proteome provides the first glimpse of metabolic adaptation during silicification and sinter formation. Comparative genome analysis suggests an extensive gene loss in the Anoxybacillus/Geobacillus branch after its divergence from other bacilli.

  5. Remediation of contaminated subsurface materials by a metal-reducing bacterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorby, Y.A.; Amonette, J.E.; Fruchter, J.S.

    1994-11-01

    A biotic approach for remediating subsurface sediments and groundwater contaminated with carbon tetrachloride (CT) and chromium was evaluated. Cells of the Fe(iii)-reducing bacterium strain BrY were added to sealed, anoxic flasks containing Hanford groundwater, natural subsurface sediments, and either carbon tetrachloride, CT, or oxidized chromium, Cr(VI). With lactate as the electron donor, BrY transformed CT to chloroform (CF), which accumulated to about 1 0 % of the initial concentration of CT. The remainder of the CT was transformed to unidentified, nonvolatile compounds. Transformation of CT by BrY was an indirect process Cells reduced solid phase Fe(ill) to chemically reactive FE(II) that chemically transformed the chlorinated contaminant. Cr(VI), in contrast, was reduced by a direct enzymatic reaction in the presence or absence of Fe(III)-bearing sediments. These results demonstrate that Fe(ill)-reducing bacteria provide potential for transforming CT and for reducing CR(VI) to less toxic Cr(III). Technologies for stimulating indigenous populations of metal-reducing bacteria or for introducing specific metal-reducing bacteria to the subsurface are being investigated

  6. Genome sequence of Enterobacter sp. ST3, a quorum sensing bacterium associated with marine dinoflagellate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Zhou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Phycosphere environment is a typical marine niche, harbor diverse populations of microorganisms, which are thought to play a critical role in algae host and influence mutualistic and competitive interactions. Understanding quorum sensing-based acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL language may shed light on the interaction between algal-associated microbial communities in the native environment. In this work, we isolated an epidermal bacterium (was tentatively named Enterobacter sp. ST3, and deposited in SOA China, the number is MCCC1K02277-ST3 from the marine dinoflagellate Scrippsiella trochoidea, and found it has the ability to produce short-chain AHL signal. In order to better understand its communication information at molecular level, the genomic map was investigated. The genome size was determined to be 4.81 Mb with a G + C content of 55.59%, comprising 6 scaffolds of 75 contigs containing 4647 protein-coding genes. The functional proteins were predicted, and 3534 proteins were assigned to COG functional categories. An AHL-relating gene, LuxR, was found in upstream position at contig 1. This genome data may provide clues to increase understanding of the chemical characterization and ecological behavior of strain ST3 in the phycosphere microenvironment.

  7. Three Alginate Lyases from Marine Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens HZJ216: Purification and Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liyan, Li [Ocean University of China, Qingdao, PRC; Jiang, Xiaolu [Ocean University of China, Qingdao, PRC; Wang, Peng [Ocean University of China, Qingdao, PRC; Guan, Huashi [Ocean University of China, Qingdao, PRC; Guo, Hong [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Three alginate lyases (A, B, and C) from an alginate-degrading marine bacterium strain HZJ216 isolated from brown seaweed in the Yellow Sea of China and identified preliminarily as Pseudomonas fluorescens are purified, and their biochemical properties are described. Molecular masses of the three enzymes are determined by SDS-PAGE to be 60.25, 36, and 23 kDa with isoelectric points of 4, 4.36, and 4.59, respectively. Investigations of these enzymes at different pH and temperatures show that they are most active at pH 7.0 and 35 C. Alginate lyases A and B are stable in the pH range of 5.0 9.0, while alginate lyase C is stable in the pH range of 5.0 7.0. Among the metal ions tested, additions of Na+, K+, and Mg2+ ions can enhance the enzyme activities while Fe2+, Fe3+, Ba2+, and Zn2+ ions show inhibitory effects. The substrate specificity results demonstrate that alginate lyase C has the specificity for G block while alginate lyases A and B have the activities for both M and G blocks. It is the first report about extracellular alginate lyases with high alginate-degrading activity from P. fluorescens.

  8. FTIR and Raman spectroscopic studies of selenium nanoparticles synthesised by the bacterium Azospirillum thiophilum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugarova, Anna V.; Mamchenkova, Polina V.; Dyatlova, Yulia A.; Kamnev, Alexander A.

    2018-03-01

    Vibrational (Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman) spectroscopic techniques can provide unique molecular-level information on the structural and compositional characteristics of complicated biological objects. Thus, their applications in microbiology and related fields are steadily increasing. In this communication, biogenic selenium nanoparticles (Se NPs) were obtained via selenite (SeO32-) reduction by the bacterium Azospirillum thiophilum (strain VKM B-2513) for the first time, using an original methodology for obtaining extracellular NPs. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the Se NPs to have average diameters within 160-250 nm; their zeta potential was measured to be minus 18.5 mV. Transmission FTIR spectra of the Se NPs separated from bacterial cells showed typical proteinacious, polysaccharide and lipid-related bands, in line with TEM data showing a thin layer covering the Se NPs surface. Raman spectra of dried Se NPs layer in the low-frequency region (under 500 cm-1 down to 150 cm-1) showed a single very strong band with a maximum at 250 cm-1 which, in line with its increased width (ca. 30 cm-1 at half intensity), can be attributed to amorphous elementary Se. Thus, a combination of FTIR and Raman spectroscopic approaches is highly informative in non-destructive analysis of structural and compositional properties of biogenic Se NPs.

  9. The chemical cue tetrabromopyrrole from a biofilm bacterium induces settlement of multiple Caribbean corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneed, Jennifer M; Sharp, Koty H; Ritchie, Kimberly B; Paul, Valerie J

    2014-07-07

    Microbial biofilms induce larval settlement for some invertebrates, including corals; however, the chemical cues involved have rarely been identified. Here, we demonstrate the role of microbial biofilms in inducing larval settlement with the Caribbean coral Porites astreoides and report the first instance of a chemical cue isolated from a marine biofilm bacterium that induces complete settlement (attachment and metamorphosis) of Caribbean coral larvae. Larvae settled in response to natural biofilms, and the response was eliminated when biofilms were treated with antibiotics. A similar settlement response was elicited by monospecific biofilms of a single bacterial strain, Pseudoalteromonas sp. PS5, isolated from the surface biofilm of a crustose coralline alga. The activity of Pseudoalteromonas sp. PS5 was attributed to the production of a single compound, tetrabromopyrrole (TBP), which has been shown previously to induce metamorphosis without attachment in Pacific acroporid corals. In addition to inducing settlement of brooded larvae (P. astreoides), TBP also induced larval settlement for two broadcast-spawning species, Orbicella (formerly Montastraea) franksi and Acropora palmata, indicating that this compound may have widespread importance among Caribbean coral species. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  10. Behavior of the meat-borne bacterium Lactobacillus sakei during its transit through the gastrointestinal tracts of axenic and conventional mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaramonte, Fabrizio; Blugeon, Sébastien; Chaillou, Stéphane; Langella, Philippe; Zagorec, Monique

    2009-07-01

    A Lactobacillus sakei strain named FLEC01 was isolated from human feces and characterized genotypically. Comparison of the genetic features of this strain with those of both the meat-borne L. sakei strain 23K and another human isolate, LTH5590, showed that they belong to different but closely related clusters. The three L. sakei strains did not persist and only transited through the gastrointestinal tracts (GITs) of conventional C3H/HeN mice. In contrast, they all colonized the GITs of axenic mice and rapidly reached a population of 10(9) CFU/g of feces, which remained stable until day 51. Five days after mice were fed, a first subpopulation, characterized by small colonies, appeared and reached 50% of the total L. sakei population in mice. Fifteen to 21 days after feeding, a second subpopulation, characterized by rough colonies, appeared. It coexisted with the two other populations until day 51, and its cell shapes were also affected, suggesting a dysfunction of the cell division or cell wall. No clear difference between the behaviors of the meat-borne strain and the two human isolates in both conventional and axenic mice was observed, suggesting that L. sakei is a food-borne bacterium rather than a commensal one and that its presence in human feces originates from diet. Previous observations of Escherichia coli strains suggest that the mouse GIT environment could induce mutations to increase their survival and colonization capacities. Here, we observed similar mutations concerning a food-grade gram-positive bacterium for the first time.

  11. Host-adaptation of Francisella tularensis alters the bacterium's surface-carbohydrates to hinder effectors of innate and adaptive immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany M Zarrella

    Full Text Available The gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis survives in arthropods, fresh water amoeba, and mammals with both intracellular and extracellular phases and could reasonably be expected to express distinct phenotypes in these environments. The presence of a capsule on this bacterium has been controversial with some groups finding such a structure while other groups report that no capsule could be identified. Previously we reported in vitro culture conditions for this bacterium which, in contrast to typical methods, yielded a bacterial phenotype that mimics that of the bacterium's mammalian, extracellular phase.SDS-PAGE and carbohydrate analysis of differentially-cultivated F. tularensis LVS revealed that bacteria displaying the host-adapted phenotype produce both longer polymers of LPS O-antigen (OAg and additional HMW carbohydrates/glycoproteins that are reduced/absent in non-host-adapted bacteria. Analysis of wildtype and OAg-mutant bacteria indicated that the induced changes in surface carbohydrates involved both OAg and non-OAg species. To assess the impact of these HMW carbohydrates on the access of outer membrane constituents to antibody we used differentially-cultivated bacteria in vitro to immunoprecipitate antibodies directed against outer membrane moieties. We observed that the surface-carbohydrates induced during host-adaptation shield many outer membrane antigens from binding by antibody. Similar assays with normal mouse serum indicate that the induced HMW carbohydrates also impede complement deposition. Using an in vitro macrophage infection assay, we find that the bacterial HMW carbohydrate impedes TLR2-dependent, pro-inflammatory cytokine production by macrophages. Lastly we show that upon host-adaptation, the human-virulent strain, F. tularensis SchuS4 also induces capsule production with the effect of reducing macrophage-activation and accelerating tularemia pathogenesis in mice.F. tularensis undergoes host-adaptation which

  12. Pseudomonas sagittaria sp. nov., a siderophore-producing bacterium isolated from oil-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yao; Hameed, Asif; Liu, You-Cheng; Hsu, Yi-Han; Lai, Wei-An; Chen, Wen-Ming; Shen, Fo-Ting; Young, Chiu-Chung

    2013-07-01

    An aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped bacterium with a single polar flagellum, designated CC-OPY-1(T), was isolated from an oil-contaminated site in Taiwan. CC-OPY-1(T) produces siderophores, and can grow at temperatures of 25-37 °C and pH 5.0-9.0 and tolerate Pseudomonas alcaligenes BCRC 11893(T) (97.1 %), Pseudomonas. alcaliphila DSM 17744(T) (97.1 %), Pseudomonas tuomuerensis JCM 14085(T) (97.1 %), Pseudomonas toyotomiensis JCM 15604(T) (96.9 %) and lower sequence similarity to remaining species of the genus Pseudomonas. The phylogenetic trees reconstructed based on gyrB and rpoB gene sequences supported the classification of CC-OPY-1(T) as a novel member of the genus Pseudomonas. The predominant quinone system of strain CC-OPY-1T was ubiquinone (Q-9) and the DNA G+C content was 68.4 ± 0.3 mol%. The major fatty acids were C12 : 0, C16 : 0, C17 : 0 cyclo and summed features 3 and 8 consisting of C16 : 1ω7c/C16 : 1ω6c and C18 : 1ω7c/C18 : 1ω6c, respectively. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG), phosphatidylcholine (PC) and two unknown phospholipids (PL1-2). Due to distinct phylogenetic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic features, CC-OPY-1(T) is proposed to represent a novel species within the genus Pseudomonas for which the name Pseudomonas sagittaria sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CC-OPY-1(T) ( = BCRC 80399(T) = JCM 18195(T)).

  13. Marinirhabdus citrea sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from a seaweed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sung-Hyun; Oh, Ji Hye; Seo, Hyun-Seok; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Kwon, Kae Kyoung

    2018-02-01

    A gram-stain-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped (1.3-1.9×0.3-0.5 µm) and non-motile marine bacterium, designated MEBiC09412 T , was isolated from seaweed collected at Yeonggwang County, South Korea. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis demonstrated that strain MEBiC09412 T shared high sequence similarity with Marinirhabdus gelatinilytica NH83 T (95.4 %). Growth was observed at 17-38 °C (optimum 30 °C), at pH 4.0-8.5 (optimum pH 7.0) and with 0.5-6.0 % (w/v; optimum 2.5 %) NaCl. The predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0 (27.4 %), iso-C15 : 1 G (9.6 %), anteiso-C15 : 0 (14.6 %), iso-C16 : 0 (6.2 %), iso-C17 : 0 3OH (13.2 %) and summed feature 3 (comprising C16 : 1ω6c and/or C16 : 1ω7c; 7.4 %). The DNA G+C content was determined to be 43.1 mol%, while the major respiratory quinone was menaquinone-6. Several phenotypic characteristics such as indole production, the oxidizing patterns of several carbohydrtaes (of glucose, fructose, sucrose, maltose, mannose etc.) and organic acids, and the enzyme activities of α-chymotrypsin and α-glucosidase differentiated strain MEBiC09412 T from M. gelatinilytica NH83 T . On the basis of this polyphasic taxonomic data, strain MEBiC09412 T should be classified as a novel species of the genus Marinirhabduswith the suggested name Marinirhabdus citrea sp. nov. The type strain is MEBiC09412 T (=KCCM 43216 T =JCM 31588 T ).

  14. Intraspecies diversity of Lactobacillus sakei response to oxidative stress and variability of strain performance in mixed strains challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbaud, Morgan; Zagorec, Monique; Chaillou, Stéphane; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine

    2012-04-01

    Lactobacillus sakei is a meat-borne lactic acid bacterium species exhibiting a wide genomic diversity. We have investigated the diversity of response to various oxidative compounds, between L. sakei strains, among a collection representing the genomic diversity. We observed various responses to the different compounds as well as a diversity of response depending on the aeration conditions used for cell growth. A principal component analysis revealed two main phenotypic groups, partially correlating with previously described genomic clusters. We designed strains mixes composed of three different strains, in order to examine the behavior of each strain, when cultured alone or in the presence of other strains. The strains composing the mixtures were chosen as diverse as possible, i.e. exhibiting diverse responses to oxidative stress and belonging to different genomic clusters. Growth and survival rates of each strain were monitored under various aeration conditions, with or without heme supplementation. The results obtained suggest that some strains may act as "helper" or "burden" strains depending on the oxidative conditions encountered during incubation. This study confirms that resistance to oxidative stress is extremely variable within the L. sakei species and that this property should be considered when investigating starter performance in the complex meat bacterial ecosystems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Spectroscopic characterization of cell membranes and their constituents of the plant-associated soil bacterium Azospirillum brasilense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamnev, A. A.; Antonyuk, L. P.; Matora, L. Yu.; Serebrennikova, O. B.; Sumaroka, M. V.; Colina, M.; Renou-Gonnord, M.-F.; Ignatov, V. V.

    1999-05-01

    Structural and compositional features of bacterial membranes and some of their isolated constituents (cell surface lipopolysaccharide, phospholipids) of the plant-growth-promoting diazotrophic rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense (wild-type strain Sp245) were characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and some other techniques. FTIR spectra of the cell membranes were shown to comprise the main vibration modes of the relevant lipopolysaccharide and protein components which are believed to be involved in associative plant-bacterium interactions, as well as of phospholipid constituents. The role and functions of metal cations in the structural organization and physicochemical properties of bacterial cell membranes are also discussed considering their accumulation in the membranes from the culture medium.

  16. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopic characterisation of cells of the plant-associated soil bacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamnev, A. A.; Tarantilis, P. A.; Antonyuk, L. P.; Bespalova, L. A.; Polissiou, M. G.; Colina, M.; Gardiner, P. H. E.; Ignatov, V. V.

    2001-05-01

    Structural and compositional features of bacterial cell samples and of lipopolysaccharide-protein complex isolated from the cell surface of the plant-growth-promoting rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense (wild-type strain Sp7) were characterised using Fourier transform (FT) Raman spectroscopy. The structural spectroscopic information obtained is analysed and considered together with analytical data on the content of metal cations (Co 2+, Cu 2+ and Zn 2+) in the bacterial cells grown in a standard medium as well as in the presence of each of the cations (0.2 mM). The latter, being taken up by bacterial cells from the culture medium in significant amounts, were shown to induce certain metabolic changes in the bacterium revealed in FT-Raman spectra, which is discussed from the viewpoint of bacterial response to environmental stresses.

  17. Further characterization of o-nitrobenzaldehyde degrading bacterium Pseudomonas sp. ONBA-17 and deduction on its metabolic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fang-Bo; Li, Xiao-Dan; Ali, Shinawar Waseem; Shan, Sheng-Dao; Luo, Lin-Ping; Guan, Li-Bo

    2014-01-01

    A previously reported o-nitrobenzaldehyde (ONBA) degrading bacterium Pseudomonas sp. ONBA-17 was further identified and characterized. Based on results of DNA base composition and DNA-DNA hybridization, the strain was identified as P. putida. Its degradation effect enhanced with increase of inoculum amount and no lag phase was observed. Higher removal rate was achieved under shaking conditions. All tested ONBA with different initial concentrations could be completely degraded within 5 d. In addition, degradative enzyme(s) involved was confirmed as intra-cellular distributed and constitutively expressed. Effects of different compounds on relative activity of degradative enzyme(s) within cell-free extract were also evaluated. Finally, 2-nitrobenzoic acid and 2, 3-dihydroxybenzoic acid were detected as metabolites of ONBA degradation by P. putida ONBA-17, and relevant metabolic pathway was preliminary proposed. This study might help with future research in better understanding of nitroaromatics biodegradation.

  18. Comparative proteomics and activity of a green sulfur bacterium across the water column of Lake Cadagno, Switzerland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habicht, Kirsten Silvia; Miller, Mette; Cox, Raymond Pickett

    2011-01-01

    the bacteria survive in the dark. Although metagenomic data are not available for Lake Cadagno, proteome analysis was possible based on the completely sequenced genome of an isolated strain of Chl. clathratiforme. Using LC-MS/MS we identified 1321 Chl. clathratiforme proteins in Lake Cadagno and quantitatively...... participating in nitrogen and sulfur metabolism were twofold less abundant in the dark. From the proteome analysis we were able to show that Chl. clathratiforme in the photic zone contains enzymes for fixation of N2 and the complete oxidation of sulfide to sulfate while these processes are probably not active......Primary production in the meromictic Lake Cadagno, Switzerland, is dominated by anoxygenic photosynthesis. The green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium clathratiforme is the dominant phototrophic organism in the lake, comprising more than half of the bacterial population, and its biomass increases 3...

  19. Purification and Characterization of a New κ-Carrageenase from the Marine Bacterium Vibrio sp. NJ-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Benwei; Ning, Limin

    2016-02-01

    The carrageenan-degrading marine bacterium Vibrio sp. strain NJ-2 was isolated from rotten red algae, and κ-carrageenase with high activity was purified from the culture supernatant. The purified enzyme with molecular mass of 33 kDa showed the maximal activity of 937 U/mg at 40°C and pH 8.0. It maintained 80% of total activity below 40°C and between pH 6.0 and 10.0. The kinetics experiment showed the Km and Vmax values were 2.54 mg/ml and 138.89 mmol/min/mg, respectively. The thin layer chromatography and ESI-MS analysis of hydrolysates indicated that the enzyme can endolytically depolymerize the kappa-carrageenan into oligosaccharides with degrees of depolymerization of 2-8. Owing to its high activity, it could be a valuable tool to produce κ-carrageenan oligosaccharides with various biological activities.

  20. Phenotypical and molecular responses of Arabidopsis thaliana roots as a result of inoculation with the auxin-producing bacterium Azospirillum brasilense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaepen, Stijn; Bossuyt, Stijn; Engelen, Kristof; Marchal, Kathleen; Vanderleyden, Jos

    2014-02-01

    The auxin-producing bacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 can promote the growth of several plant species. The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana was chosen as host plant to gain an insight into the molecular mechanisms that govern this interaction. The determination of differential gene expression in Arabidopsis roots after inoculation with either A. brasilense wild-type or an auxin biosynthesis mutant was achieved by microarray analysis. Arabidopsis thaliana inoculation with A. brasilense wild-type increases the number of lateral roots and root hairs, and elevates the internal auxin concentration in the plant. The A. thaliana root transcriptome undergoes extensive changes on A. brasilense inoculation, and the effects are more pronounced at later time points. The wild-type bacterial strain induces changes in hormone- and defense-related genes, as well as in plant cell wall-related genes. The A. brasilense mutant, however, does not elicit these transcriptional changes to the same extent. There are qualitative and quantitative differences between A. thaliana responses to the wild-type A. brasilense strain and the auxin biosynthesis mutant strain, based on both phenotypic and transcriptomic data. This illustrates the major role played by auxin in the Azospirillum-Arabidopsis interaction, and possibly also in other bacterium-plant interactions. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. Development of plasmid vector and electroporation condition for gene transfer in sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Mun Su; Kim, Jin-Woo; Qian, Yilei; Ingram, L O; Shanmugam, K T

    2007-07-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a sporogenic lactic acid bacterium that ferments glucose and xylose, major components of plant biomass, a potential feedstock for cellulosic ethanol. The temperature and pH for optimum rate of growth of B. coagulans (50 to 55 degrees C, pH 5.0) are very similar to that of commercially developed fungal cellulases (50 degrees C; pH 4.8). Due to this match, simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of cellulose to products by B. coagulans is expected to require less cellulase than needed if the SSF is conducted at a sub-optimal temperature, such as 30 degrees C, the optimum for yeast, the main biocatalyst used by the ethanol industry. To fully exploit B. coagulans as a platform organism, we have developed an electroporation method to transfer plasmid DNA into this genetically recalcitrant bacterium. We also constructed a B. coagulans/E. coli shuttle vector, plasmid pMSR10 that contains the rep region from a native plasmid (pMSR0) present in B. coagulans strain P4-102B. The native plasmid, pMSR0 (6823bp), has 9 ORFs, and replicates by rolling-circle mode of replication. Plasmid pNW33N, developed for Geobacillus stearothermophilus, was also transformed into this host and stably maintained while several other Bacillus/Escherichia coli shuttle vector plasmids were not transformed into B. coagulans. The transformation efficiency of B. coagulans strain P4-102B using the plasmids pNW33N or pMSR10 was about 1.5x10(16) per mole of DNA. The availability of shuttle vectors and an electroporation method is expected to aid in genetic and metabolic engineering of B. coagulans.

  2. Characterization of a halophilic heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacterium and its application on treatment of saline wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jinming; Fang, Hongda; Su, Bing; Chen, Jinfang; Lin, Jinmei

    2015-03-01

    A novel halophilic bacterium capable of heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification was isolated from marine sediments and identified as Vibrio diabolicus SF16. It had ability to remove 91.82% of NH4(+)-N (119.77 mg/L) and 99.71% of NO3(-)-N (136.43 mg/L). The nitrogen balance showed that 35.83% of initial NH4(+)-N (119.77 mg/L) was changed to intracellular nitrogen, and 53.98% of the initial NH4(+)-N was converted to gaseous denitrification products. The existence of napA gene further proved the aerobic denitrification ability of strain SF16. The optimum culture conditions were salinity 1-5%, sodium acetate as carbon source, C/N 10, and pH 7.5-9.5. When an aerated biological filter system inoculated with strain SF16 was employed to treat saline wastewater, the average removal efficiency of NH4(+)-N and TN reached 97.14% and 73.92%, respectively, indicating great potential of strain SF16 for future full-scale applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Growth of hydroxyapatite on the cellular membrane of the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis for the preparation of hybrid biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervantes, Eric Reyes; Torres, Maykel González; Muñoz, Susana Vargas; Rosas, Efraín Rubio

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to grow hydroxyapatite (HAp) crystals on the cellular wall of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis using a bio-mimetic method. Several strains were phenotypically and genotypically characterized using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) gene markers to differentiate the strains and confirm the identity of the isolated species to guarantee that the selected species was not harmful to human health or the environment. Three of the analyzed strains were selected because they exhibited the best nucleation and growth of HAp on the bacterial surface. This innovative method to grow HAp crystals on a cellular membrane helps to elucidate the mechanisms by which osseous tissue is formed in nature. The optimum concentration for the simulated physiological fluid (SPF) was 1.5 ×. The hybrid materials were characterized by optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). - Highlights: • HAp crystals are grown on the cellular wall of a GP bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis. • The growing was carried out by using a bio-mimetic method. • Hybrid materials were characterized with morphological and spectroscopic techniques. • The reported method allows understanding the mechanisms to produce osseous tissue. • The membrane of Bacillus thuringiensis can grow more HAp than Bacillus halodurans.

  4. Isolation and polyphasic characterization of a novel hyper catalase producing thermophilic bacterium for the degradation of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sooch, Balwinder Singh; Kauldhar, Baljinder Singh; Puri, Munish

    2016-11-01

    A newly isolated microbial strain of thermophilic genus Geobacillus has been described with emphasis on polyphasic characterization and its application for degradation of hydrogen peroxide. The validation of this thermophilic strain of genus Geobacillus designated as BSS-7 has been demonstrated by polyphasic taxonomy approaches through its morphological, biochemical, fatty acid methyl ester profile and 16S rDNA sequencing. This thermophilic species of Geobacillus exhibited growth at broad pH and temperature ranges coupled with production of extraordinarily high quantities of intracellular catalase, the latter of which as yet not been reported in any member of this genus. The isolated thermophilic bacterial culture BSS-7 exhibited resistance against a variety of organic solvents. The immobilized whole cells of the bacterium successfully demonstrated the degradation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in a packed bed reactor. This strain has potential application in various analytical and diagnostic methods in the form of biosensors and biomarkers in addition to applications in the textile, paper, food and pharmaceutical industries.

  5. Genetic characterization, nickel tolerance, biosorption, kinetics, and uptake mechanism of a bacterium isolated from electroplating industrial effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, N; Gunasekaran, P; Rajendran, P

    2015-04-01

    Electroplating industries in Madurai city produce approximately 49,000 L of wastewater and 1200 L of sludge every day revealing 687-5569 ppm of nickel (Ni) with other contaminants. Seventeen Ni-tolerant bacterial strains were isolated from nutrient-enriched effluents. Among them one hyper Ni accumulating strain was scored and identified as Bacillus cereus VP17 on the basis of morphology, biochemical tests, 16S rDNA gene sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis. Equilibrium data of Ni(II) ions using the bacterium as sorbent at isothermal conditions (37 °C) and pH 6 were best adjusted by Langmuir (R(2) = 0.6268) and Freundlich models (R(2) = 0.9505). Experimental validation reveals Ni sorption takes place on a heterogeneous surface of the biosorbent, and predicted metal sorption capacity is 434 ppm. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model fitted the biosorption kinetic data better than the pseudo-first-order kinetic model (R(2) = 0.9963 and 0.3625). Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies of the bacterial strain with and without Ni(II) ion reveals the biosorption mechanism. The results conclude possibilities of using B. cereus VP17 for Ni bioremediation.

  6. Photobacterium galatheae sp. nov., a bioactive bacterium isolated from a mussel in the Solomon Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Henrique; Giubergia, Sonia; Mateiu, Ramona Valentina

    2015-01-01

    A novel, Gram-negative marine bacterium, S2753T, was isolated from a mussel of the Solomon Sea, Solomon Islands. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence and whole genome sequence data placed strain S2753T in the genus Photobacterium with the closest relative being Photobacterium halotolerans DSM...... 18316T (97.7 % 16S rRNA gene similarity). Strain S2753T was able to grow from 15 to 40 °C and in NaCl concentrations of 0.5 to 9 % (w/v). The predominant fatty acids were 16 : 1ω7c/16 : 1ω6c (27.9 %), 16 : 0 (22.1 %) and 18 : 1ω7c/8 : 1ω6c (21.4 %). The genomic DNA G+C mol content was 49.5 mol%. Based...... is genomically distinct enough to be considered a novel species. The name Photobacterium galatheae is proposed and the type-strain is S2753T( = LMG 28894T = DSM 100496T)....

  7. Thermostable hemicellulases of a bacterium, Geobacillus sp. DC3, isolated from the former Homestake gold mine in Lead, South Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergdale, Terran E; Hughes, Stephen R; Bang, Sookie S

    2014-04-01

    A thermophilic strain, Geobacillus sp. DC3, capable of producing hemicellulolytic enzymes was isolated from the 1.5-km depth of the former Homestake gold mine in Lead, South Dakota. The DC3 strain expressed a high level of extracellular endoxylanase at 39.5 U/mg protein with additional hemicellulases including β-xylosidase (0.209 U/mg) and arabinofuranosidase (0.230 U/mg), after the bacterium was grown in xylan for 24 h. Partially purified DC3 endoxylanase exhibited a molecular mass of approximately 43 kDa according to zymography with an optimal pH of 7 and optimal temperature of 70 °C. The kinetic constants, K m and V max, were 13.8 mg/mL and 77.5 μmol xylose/min·mg xylan, respectively. The endoxylanase was highly stable and maintained 70 % of its original activity after 16 h incubation at 70 °C. The thermostable properties and presence of three different hemicellulases of Geobacillus sp. DC3 strain support its potential application for industrial hydrolysis of renewable biomass such as lignocelluloses.

  8. Characterization of a novel melamine-degrading bacterium isolated from a melamine-manufacturing factory in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han; Geng, Chunnu; Li, Jiangwei; Hu, Anyi; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2014-04-01

    Melamine (2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-triazine, C3H6N6), belonging to the s-triazine family, is an anthropogenic and versatile raw material for a large number of consumer products and its extensive use has resulted in the contamination of melamine in the environment. A novel melamine-degrading bacterium strain CY1 was isolated from a melamine-manufacturing factory in China. The strain is phylogenetically different from the known melamine-degrading bacteria. Approximately, 94 % melamine (initial melamine concentration 4.0 mM, initial cell OD 0.05) was degraded in 10 days without the addition of additional carbon source. High-performance liquid chromatography showed the production of degradation intermediates including ammeline, ammelide, cyanuric acid, biuret, and urea. Kinetic simulation analysis indicated that transformation of urea into ammonia was the rate-limiting step for the degradation process. The melamine-cyanurate complex was formed due to self-assembly of melamine and cyanuric acid during the degradation. The tracking experiment using CY1 cells and (13)C3-melamine showed that the CY1 could mineralize s-triazine ring carbon to CO2. The strain CY1 could also catalyze partial transformation of cyromazine, a cyclopropyl derivative of melamine, to 6-(cyclopropylamino)-[1,3,5]triazine-2,4-diol.

  9. Alkanesulfonate degradation by novel strains of Achromobacter xylosoxidans, Tsukamurella wratislaviensis and Rhodococcus sp., and evidence for an ethanesulfonate monooxygenase in A. xylosoxidans strain AE4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdlenbruch, B N; Kelly, D P; Murrell, J C

    2001-12-01

    Novel isolates of Achromobacter xylosoxidans, Tsukamurella wratislaviensis and a Rhodococcus sp. are described. These grew with short-chain alkanesulfonates as their sole source of carbon and energy. T. wratislaviensis strain SB2 grew well with C(3)-C(6) linear alkanesulfonates, isethionate and taurine, Rhodococcus sp. strain CB1 used C(3)-C(10) linear alkanesulfonates, taurine and cysteate, but neither strain grew with ethanesulfonate. In contrast, A. xylosoxidans strain AE4 grew well with ethanesulfonate, making it the first bacterium to be described which can grow with this compound. It also grew with unsubstituted C(3)-C(5) alkanesulfonates and isethionate. Hydrolysis was excluded as a mechanism for alkanesulfonate metabolism in these strains; and evidence is given for a diversity of uptake and desulfonatase systems. We provide evidence for an initial monooxygenase-dependent desulfonation in the metabolism of ethanesulfonate and propanesulfonate by A. xylosoxidans strain AE4.

  10. Isolation, Identification, and Optimization of Culture Conditions of a Bioflocculant-Producing Bacterium Bacillus megaterium SP1 and Its Application in Aquaculture Wastewater Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Liang; Zhao, Zhigang; Huang, Xiaoli; Du, Xue; Wang, Chang’an; Li, Jinnan; Wang, Liansheng; Xu, Qiyou

    2016-01-01

    A bioflocculant-producing bacterium, Bacillus megaterium SP1, was isolated from biofloc in pond water and identified by using both 16S rDNA sequencing analysis and a Biolog GEN III MicroStation System. The optimal carbon and nitrogen sources for Bacillus megaterium SP1 were 20?g?L?1 of glucose and 0.5?g?L?1 of beef extract at 30?C and pH 7. The bioflocculant produced by strain SP1 under optimal culture conditions was applied into aquaculture wastewater treatment. The removal rates of chemical...

  11. Lactic acid production from xylose by Geobacillus stearothermophilus strain 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunasundari, B.; Naresh, S.; Chu, J. E.

    2017-09-01

    Lactic acid is an important compound with a wide range of industrial applications. The present study tested the efficiency of xylose, as a sole carbon source to be converted to lactic acid by Geobacillus stearothermophilus strain 15. To the best of our knowledge, limited information is available on the directed fermentation of xylose to lactic acid by this bacterium. The effects of different parameters such as temperature, pH, incubation time, agitation speed, concentrations of nitrogen and carbon sources on the lactic acid production were investigated statistically. It was found that the bacterium exhibited poor assimilation of xylose to lactic acid. Temperature, agitation rate and incubation time were determined to improve the lactic acid production slightly. The highest lactic acid yield obtained was 8.9% at 45°C, 300 RPM, 96 h, pH of 6.0 with carbon and nitrogen source concentrations were fixed at 5% w/v.

  12. Differential gene expression in Xylella fastidiosa 9a5c during co-cultivation with the endophytic bacterium Methylobacterium mesophilicum SR1.6/6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dourado, Manuella Nóbrega; Santos, Daiene Souza; Nunes, Luiz Roberto; Costa de Oliveira, Regina Lúcia Batista da; de Oliveira, Marcus Vinicius; Araújo, Welington Luiz

    2015-12-01

    Xylella fastidiosa, the causal agent of citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC), colonizes plant xylem, reducing sap flow, and inducing internerval chlorosis, leaf size reduction, necrosis, and harder and smaller fruits. This bacterium may be transmitted from plant to plant by sharpshooter insects, including Bucephalogonia xanthopis. The citrus endophytic bacterium Methylobacterium mesophilicum SR1.6/6 colonizes citrus xylem and previous studies showed that this strain is also transferred from plant to plant by B. xanthopis (Insecta), suggesting that this endophytic bacterium may interact with X. fastidiosa in planta and inside the insect vector during co-transmission by the same insect vector. To better understand the X. fastidiosa behavior in the presence of M. mesophilicum, we evaluated the X. fastidiosa transcriptional profile during in vitro interaction with M. mesophilicum SR1.6/6. The results showed that during co-cultivation, X. fastidiosa down-regulated genes related to growth and up-regulated genes related to energy production, stress, transport, and motility, suggesting the existence of a specific adaptive response to the presence of M. mesophilicum in the culture medium. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Dense populations of a giant sulfur bacterium in Namibian shelf sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, HN; Brinkhoff, T.; Ferdelman, TG

    1999-01-01

    A previously unknown giant sulfur bacterium is abundant in sediments underlying the oxygen minimum zone of the Benguela Current upwelling system. The bacterium has a spherical cell that exceeds by up to 100-fold the biovolume of the largest known prokaryotes. On the basis of 16S ribosomal DNA...

  14. Rhizobium yantingense sp. nov., a mineral-weathering bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Sheng, Xia-Fang; He, Lin-Yan; Huang, Zhi

    2015-02-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped bacterial strain, H66(T), was isolated from the surfaces of weathered rock (purple siltstone) found in Yanting, Sichuan Province, PR China. Cells of strain H66(T) were motile with peritrichous flagella. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain H66(T) belongs to the genus Rhizobium. It is closely related to Rhizobium huautlense SO2(T) (98.1 %), Rhizobium alkalisoli CCBAU 01393(T) (98.0 %) and Rhizobium cellulosilyticum ALA10B2(T) (98.0 %). Analysis of the housekeeping genes, recA, glnII and atpD, showed low levels of sequence similarity (Rhizobium. The predominant components of the cellular fatty acids were summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω7c and/or C18 : 1ω6c) and C16 : 0. The G+C content of strain H66(T) was 60.3 mol%. Strain H66(T) is suggested to be a novel species of the genus Rhizobium based on the low levels of DNA-DNA relatedness (ranging from 14.3 % to 40.0 %) with type strains of species of the genus Rhizobium and on its unique phenotypic characteristics. The namehttp://dx.doi.org/10.1601/nm.1279Rhizobium yantingense sp. nov. is proposed for this novel species. The type strain is H66(T) ( = CCTCC AB 2014007(T) = LMG 28229(T)). © 2015 IUMS.

  15. Genome analysis of the Anerobic Thermohalophilic bacterium Halothermothrix orenii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Anderson, Iain; Lykidis, Athanasios; Hooper, Sean D.; Sun, Hui; Kunin, Victor; Lapidus, Alla; Hugenholtz, Philip; Patel, Bharat; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2008-11-03

    Halothermothirx orenii is a strictly anaerobic thermohalophilic bacterium isolated from sediment of a Tunisian salt lake. It belongs to the order Halanaerobiales in the phylum Firmicutes. The complete sequence revealed that the genome consists of one circular chromosome of 2578146 bps encoding 2451 predicted genes. This is the first genome sequence of an organism belonging to the Haloanaerobiales. Features of both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria were identified with the presence of both a sporulating mechanism typical of Firmicutes and a characteristic Gram negative lipopolysaccharide being the most prominent. Protein sequence analyses and metabolic reconstruction reveal a unique combination of strategies for thermophilic and halophilic adaptation. H. orenii can serve as a model organism for the study of the evolution of the Gram negative phenotype as well as the adaptation under thermohalophilic conditions and the development of biotechnological applications under conditions that require high temperatures and high salt concentrations.

  16. Virtual bacterium colony in 3D image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badura, Pawel

    2018-04-01

    Several heuristic, biologically inspired strategies have been discovered in recent decades, including swarm intelligence algorithms. So far, their application to volumetric imaging data mining is, however, limited. This paper presents a new flexible swarm intelligence optimization technique for segmentation of various structures in three- or two-dimensional images. The agents of a self-organizing colony explore their host, use stigmergy to communicate themselves, and mark regions of interest leading to the object extraction. Detailed specification of the bacterium colony segmentation (BCS) technique in terms of both individual and social behaviour is described in this paper. The method is illustrated and evaluated using several experiments involving synthetic data, computed tomography studies, and ultrasonography images. The obtained results and observations are discussed in terms of parameter settings and potential application of the method in various segmentation tasks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Antitrypanosomal Alkaloids from the Marine Bacterium Bacillus pumilus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Martínez-Luis

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Fractionation of the ethyl acetate extract of the marine bacterium Bacillus pumilus isolated from the black coral Antipathes sp. led to the isolation of five compounds: cyclo-(L-Leu-L-Pro (1, 3-hydroxyacetylindole (2, N-acetyl-b-oxotryptamine (3, cyclo-(L-Phe-L-Pro (4, and 3-formylindole (5. The structures of compounds 1−5 were established by spectroscopic analyses, including HRESITOF-MS and NMR (1H, 13C, HSQC, HMBC and COSY. Compounds 2, 3 and 5 caused the inhibition on the growth of Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi, with IC50 values of 20.6, 19.4 and 26.9 μM, respectively, with moderate cytotoxicity against Vero cells. Compounds 1−5 were found to be inactive when tested against Plasmodium falciparum and Leishmania donovani, therefore showing selectivity against T. cruzi parasites.

  18. Vibrio oceanisediminis sp. nov., a nitrogen-fixing bacterium isolated from an artificial oil-spill marine sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sang Rim; Srinivasan, Sathiyaraj; Lee, Sang-Seob

    2015-10-01

    A Gram-staining-negative, halophilic, facultatively anaerobic, motile, rod-shaped and nitrogen-fixing bacterium, designated strain S37T, was isolated from an artificial oil-spill sediment sample from the coast of Taean, South Korea. Cells grew at 10-37 °C and pH 5.0-9.0, with optimal growth at 28 °C and pH 6.0-8.0. Growth was observed with 1-9 % (w/v) NaCl in marine broth, with optimal growth with 3-5 % NaCl, but no growth was observed in the absence of NaCl. According to the results of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain S37T represents a member of the genus Vibrio of the class Gammaproteobacteria and forms a clade with Vibrio plantisponsor MSSRF60T (97.38 %), Vibrio diazotrophicus ATCC 33466T (97.31 %), Vibrio aestuarianus ATCC 35048T (97.07 %) Vibrio areninigrae J74T (96.76 %) and Vibrio hispanicus LMG 13240T (96.76 %). The major fatty acids were C16 : 0, C16 : 1ω7c/C16 : 1ω6c and C18 : 1ω7c/C18 : 1ω6c. The DNA G+C content was 41.9 %. The DNA-DNA hybridization analysis results showed a 30.2 % association value with the closely related type strain V. plantisponsor DSM 21026T. On the basis of phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, strain S37T represents a novel species of the genus Vibrio, for which the name Vibrio oceanisediminis sp. nov., is proposed with the type strain S37T ( = KEMB 2255-005T = JCM 30409T).

  19. Genome Sequence of the Plant Growth Promoting Endophytic Bacterium Enterobacter sp. 638

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taghavi, S.; van der Lelie, D.; Hoffman, A.; Zhang, Y.-B.; Walla, M. D.; Vangronsveld, J.; Newman, L.; Monchy, S.

    2010-05-13

    improve establishment and sustainable production of poplar as an energy feedstock on marginal, non-agricultural soils using endophytic bacteria as growth promoting agents. Poplar is considered as the model tree species for the production of lignocellulosic biomass destined for biofuel production. The plant growth promoting endophytic bacterium Enterobacter sp. 638 can improve the growth of poplar on marginal soils by as much as 40%. This prompted us to sequence the genome of this strain and, via comparative genomics, identify functions essential for the successful colonization and endophytic association with its poplar host. Analysis of the genome sequence, combined with metabolite analysis and quantitative PCR, pointed to a remarkable interaction between Enterobacter sp. 638 and its poplar host with the endophyte responsible for the production of a phytohormone, and a precursor for another that poplar is unable to synthesize, and where the production of the plant growth promoting compounds depended on the presence of plant synthesized compounds, such as sucrose, in the growth medium. Our results provide the basis to better understanding the synergistic interactions between poplar and Enterobacter sp. 638. This information can be further exploited to improve establishment and sustainable production of poplar on marginal, non-agricultural soils using endophytic bacteria such as Enterobacter sp. 638 as growth promoting agents.

  20. Biomineralization of a calcifying ureolytic bacterium Microbacterium sp. GM-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guojing Xu

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The results of this research provide evidence that Microbacterium sp. GM-1 can biologically induce calcification and suggest that strain GM-1 may play a potential role in the synthesis of new biominerals and in bioremediation or biorecovery.

  1. Complete genome sequence of the photoautotrophic and bacteriochlorophyll e-synthesizing green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum limnaeum DSM 1677T

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tank, Marcus; Liu, Zhenfeng; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik

    2017-01-01

    Chlorobaculum limnaeum DSM 1677T is a mesophilic, brown-colored, chlorophototrophic green sulfur bacterium that produces bacteriochlorophyll e and the carotenoid isorenieratene as major pigments. This bacterium serves as a model organism in molecular research on photosynthesis, sulfur metabolism...

  2. [Screening and identification of an endophytic bacterium with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase activity from Panax ginseng and its effect on host growth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lei; Jiang, Yun; Chen, Changqing; Zhang, Guanjun; Li, Tong; Tong, Bin; Xu, Peng

    2014-07-04

    This study aimed to screen endophytic bacteria with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase activity from Panax ginseng and test the capability of growth promotion to its host. In total 120 endophytic bacterial strains isolated from Panax ginseng were screened for 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase activity using the qualitative and quantitative methods. The obtained strain was also tested for its ability of nitrogen fixation using the Ashby agar plates and the gene of nifH, for its ability of phosphate solubilization using the Pikovaskaia's plates and quantitative analysis of Mo-Sb-Ascrobiology acid colorimetry, for its ability of producing siderophores using the method of Chrome azurol S detecting, and its effect on promoting growth of Panax ginseng by laboratory and field experiments. The bacterial strain with ACC deaminase was identified based on morphology, physiological and biochemical traits, and 16S rRNA sequence analysis. The bacterial stain JJ8-3 with the ability of producing ACC deaminase activity was obtained through screening, which its ACC deaminase activity was alpha-ketobutyric acid 6.7 micromol/(mg x h). Strain JJ8-3 had other traits of phosphate solubilizing, nitrogen fixation, producing siderophores, and the ability of promoting growth of Panax ginseng. Strain JJ8-3 was identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens. Strain JJ8-3 of endophytic bacterium with ACC deaminase activity from Panax ginseng was obtained and would lay the foundation for its further study and application on plant growth promotion.

  3. Sediminibacillus massiliensis sp. nov., a moderately halophilic, Gram-positive bacterium isolated from a stool sample of a young Senegalese man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senghor, Bruno; Bassène, Hubert; Khelaifia, Saber; Robert, Catherine; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Ruimy, Raymond; Sokhna, Cheikh; Raoult, Didier; Lagier, Jean-Christophe

    2018-02-07

    A Gram-positive, moderately halophilic bacterium, referred to as strain Marseille-P3518 T , was isolated from a stool sample with 2% NaCl concentration from a healthy 15-year-old male living in Dielmo, a village in Senegal. Cells are aerobic, rod-shaped and motile and display endospore formation. Strain Marseille-P3518 T can grow in a medium with 0-20% (w/v) sodium chloride (optimally at 5-7.5% w/v). The major fatty acids were 12-methyl-tetradecanoic acid (45.8%), 13-methyl-tetradecanoic acid (26.9%) and 12-methyl-tridecanoic acid (12.8%). The genome is 4,347,479 bp long with 42.1% G+C content. It contains 4282 protein-coding and 107 RNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons showed that strain Marseille-P3518 T is a member of the Bacillaceae family and is closely related to Sediminibacillus albus (97.4% gene sequence similarity). Strain Marseille-P3518 T was clearly differentiated from its phylogenetic neighbors on the basis of phenotypic and genotypic features. Strain Marseille-P3518 T is, therefore, considered to be a novel representative of the genus Sediminibacillus, for which the name Sediminibacillus massiliensis sp. nov. is proposed, and the type strain is Marseille-P3518 T (CSUR P3518T, DSM69894).

  4. Studies on fibrolytic bacterium Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens isolated from sheep rumen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawanon, S.

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Fibrolytic Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens was an attractive target for genetic engineering in rumen bacteria. The experiment was initiated in making culture collection of this species, some of which may be useful ascandidate strain in the future. Hay suspended in sheep rumen was used as the source of isolates. The source was enriched with filter paper degradation, diluted with an anaerobic solution and used for pure culturing bya roll tube technique. After colony forming, Gram-negative curved rods bacteria were selected and screened for further identification with volatile fatty acid (VFA profiling and 16S rDNA sequencing. Fibrolyticstrains were selected to find fibrolytic enzymes and attachment to and digestion of various fibers. Fortyseven strains of Gram-negative curved rods were isolated. After determining cellulase, xylanase activities and VFA profile, 2 strains were chosen and employed for 16S rDNA sequencing. Both strains producingbutyrate were B. fibrisolvens. Of these 2 strains, most fibrolytic S-28 was selected. The strain S-28 could degrade natural fibers but not cellulose and showed strong attachment to them. A strong xylanase activitywas detected and presence of cellulase, β-glucosidase, β-xylosidase, α-L-arabinofuranosidase and β- cellobiosidase were also demonstrated.

  5. Haloalkane-utilizing Rhodococcus strains isolated from geographically distinct locations possess a highly conserved gene cluster encoding haloalkane catabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelarends, GJ; Bosma, T; Kulakov, LA; Larkin, MJ; Marchesi, [No Value; Weightman, AJ; Janssen, DB; Kulakov, Leonid A.; Larkin, Michael J.; Marchesi, Julian R.; Weightman, Andrew J.

    The sequences of the 16S rRNA and haloalkane dehalogenase (dhaA) genes of five gram-positive haloalkane-utilizing bacteria isolated from contaminated sites in Europe, Japan, and the United States and of the archetypal haloalkane-degrading bacterium Rhodococcus sp. strain NCIMB13064 were compared.

  6. Rhizoxin analogs, orfamide A and chitinase production contribute to the toxicity of Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 to Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a soil bacterium that was first described for its activity in biological control of plant diseases and has since been shown to be lethal to certain insects. Among these is the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, a well-established model organism for studies evalu...

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of the Biocontrol Strain Serratia plymuthica A30, Isolated from Rotting Potato Tuber Tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Czajkowski, R.L.; Van der Wolf, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Serratia plymuthica A30 is a Gram-negative bacterium expressing antagonistic activity toward blackleg- and soft rot-causing Dickeya sp. biovar 3 ("Dickeya solani"). Here, we present the draft genome sequence of strain A30, which has been isolated from rotten potato tuber tissue. [KEYWORDS: biovar 3

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of the Biocontrol Strain Serratia plymuthica A30, Isolated from Rotting Potato Tuber Tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Czajkowski, R.L.; Wolf, van der J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Serratia plymuthica A30 is a Gram-negative bacterium expressing antagonistic activity toward blackleg- and soft rot-causing Dickeya sp. biovar 3 (“Dickeya solani”). Here, we present the draft genome sequence of strain A30, which has been isolated from rotten potato tuber tissue

  9. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Propionibacterium acnes Strains Isolated from Progressive Macular Hypomelanosis Lesions of Human Skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rolf; Lomholt, Hans B.; Scholz, Christian F. P.

    2015-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a Gram-positive bacterium that is prevalent on human skin. It has been associated with skin disorders such as acne vulgaris and progressive macular hypomelanosis (PMH). Here, we report draft genome sequences of two type III P. acnes strains, PMH5 and PMH7, isolated from...

  10. Vibrio panuliri sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from spiny lobster, Panulirus penicillatus and transfer of Vibrio ponticus from Scophthalmi clade to the newly proposed Ponticus clade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Prabla; Poddar, Abhijit; Schumann, Peter; Das, Subrata K

    2014-12-01

    A novel marine bacterium, strain LBS2(T) was isolated from eggs carried on pleopods of the spiny lobster collected from Andaman Sea. Heterotrophic growth occurred at 1-7% NaCl. 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity revealed the strain LBS2(T) belonged to the genus Vibrio and showed above 97% similarity with eight type strains of the genus Vibrio. Multilocus analysis based on ftsZ, gapA, gyrB, mreB, pyrH recA, rpoA, and topA revealed LBS2(T) formed a separate cluster with Vibrio ponticus DSM 16217(T) with 89.8% multilocus gene sequence similarity. However, strain LBS2(T) is distantly related with other members of the Scophthalmi clade in terms of 16S rRNA signatures, phenotypic variations and multilocus gene sequence similarity, for which we propose LBS2(T) belongs to a new clade i.e. Ponticus clade with V. ponticus DSM 16217(T) as the representative type strain of the clade. DNA-DNA homologies between strain LBS2(T) and closely related strains were well below 70%. DNA G + C content was 45.3 mol%. On the basis of our polyphasic study, strain LBS2(T) represents a novel species of the genus Vibrio, for which the name Vibrio panuliri sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is LBS2(T) (= JCM 19500(T) = DSM 27724(T) = LMG 27902(T)). Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Aminobacterium thunnarium sp. nov., a mesophilic, amino acid-degrading bacterium isolated from an anaerobic sludge digester, pertaining to the phylum Synergistetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Olfa; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Postec, Anne; Bouallagui, Hassib; Hamdi, Moktar; Bonin, Patricia; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2015-02-01

    A new Gram-staining-positive, non-sporulating, mesophilic, amino acid-degrading anaerobic bacterium, designated strain OTA 102(T), was isolated from an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor treating wastewater from cooking tuna. The cells were curved rods (0.6-2.5×0.5 µm) and occurred singly or in pairs. The strain was motile by means of one lateral flagellum. Strain OTA 102(T) grew at temperatures between 30 and 45 °C (optimum 40 °C), between pH 6.0 and 8.4 (optimum pH 7.2) and NaCl concentrations between 1 and 5 % (optimum 2 %, w/v). Strain OTA 102(T) required yeast extract for growth. Serine, threonine, glycine, cysteine, citrate, fumarate, α-ketoglutarate and pyruvate were fermented. When co-cultured with Methanobacterium formicicum as the hydrogen scavenger, strain OTA 102(T) oxidized alanine, valine, leucine, isoleucine, aspartate, tyrosine, methionine, histidine and asparagine. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain OTA 102(T) was 41.7 mol%. The main fatty acid was iso-C15 : 0. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain OTA 102(T) was related to Aminobacterium colombiense and Aminobacterium mobile (95.5 and 95.2 % similarity, respectively), of the phylum Synergistetes. On the basis of phylogenetic, genetic and physiological characteristics, strain OTA 102(T) is proposed to represent a novel species of the genus Aminobacterium, Aminobacterium thunnarium sp. nov. The type strain is OTA 102(T) ( = DSM 27500(T) = JCM 19320(T)). © 2015 IUMS.

  12. Comparative proteomic analysis of pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains from the swine pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein Cátia S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is a highly infectious swine pathogen and is the causative agent of enzootic pneumonia (EP. Following the previous report of a proteomic survey of the pathogenic 7448 strain of swine pathogen, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, we performed comparative protein profiling of three M. hyopneumoniae strains, namely the non-pathogenic J strain and the two pathogenic strains 7448 and 7422. Results In 2DE comparisons, we were able to identify differences in expression levels for 67 proteins, including the overexpression of some cytoadherence-related proteins only in the pathogenic strains. 2DE immunoblot analyses allowed the identification of differential proteolytic cleavage patterns of the P97 adhesin in the three strains. For more comprehensive protein profiling, an LC-MS/MS strategy was used. Overall, 35% of the M. hyopneumoniae genome coding capacity was covered. Partially overlapping profiles of identified proteins were observed in the strains with 81 proteins identified only in one strain and 54 proteins identified in two strains. Abundance analysis of proteins detected in more than one strain demonstrates the relative overexpression of 64 proteins, including the P97 adhesin in the pathogenic strains. Conclusions Our results indicate the physiological differences between the non-pathogenic strain, with its non-infective proliferate lifestyle, and the pathogenic strains, with its constitutive expression of adhesins, which would render the bacterium competent for adhesion and infection prior to host contact.

  13. Characterization of the radioresistance in the radioresistant bacterium deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Xiangrong; Du Zeji

    1999-01-01

    The radioresistance of wild type Deinococcus radiodurans KD8301 and the factors affecting the radioresistance were investigated. KH3111 which was a DNA repair mutant of KD8301 (Zeji Du, 1998) was used to be compared with KD8301. Deinococcus radiodurans was discovered by Anderson et al (1956) in X-ray sterilized canned meat that was found to have undergone spoilage. this bacterium and other species of this genus share extreme resistance to ionizing radiation and other agents that damage DNA. Wild type KD8301 and its sensitive mutant KH3111 were irradiated with 60 Co γ-ray at the dose range 0.5 ∼ 10 kGy. Dose-survival fraction curves were made and the radio resistances were determined by LD 99 . The relative contents of DNA in cells were measured by Fluorescence Spectrophotometry (Freedman and Bruce, 1971). The results indicated that wild type KD8301 possesses more radioresistant than its mutant KH3111, LD99 were 9.5 kGy and 2.4 kGy respectively. KD8301 grown at exponential phase showed a decreased resistance to radiation, and the LD99 was 5.1 kGy. No differences of DNA/protein in cells were found between the exponential phase and the stationary phase. The results could be concluded that wild type KD8301 possesses remarkable radioresistance, but this ability was decreased or disappeared after mutation (in KH3111). None DNA relative content other than the growth stages were determinant factors of radioresistance in Deinococcus radiodurans. This results were different from other report (Dickie N et al, 1990). The cellular mechanisms might be the deference's of the bacterium cell morphology between the exponential phase and the stationary phase. Recently, the mutation site of KH3111 which was mutated chemically from wild type KD8301 was identified (Zeji Du, 1998). One base pair changed in the novel gene pprA which was isolated from KD8301 genomic DNA. This point mutation was confirmed to be responsible for the sensitivity of KH3111 to γ-ray and other DNA

  14. Tropheryma whipplei: a common bacterium in rural Senegal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alpha Kabinet Keita

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tropheryma whipplei is known as the cause of Whipple's disease, but it is also an emerging pathogen, detected in stool, that causes various chronic localized infections without histological digestive involvement and is associated with acute infections, including gastroenteritis and bacteremia. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a study in 2008 and 2009 using 497 non-diarrheic and diarrheic stool samples, 370 saliva samples, 454 sera samples and 105 samples obtained from water samples in two rural Sine-Saloum villages (Dielmo and Ndiop in Senegal. The presence of T. whipplei was investigated by using specific quantitative PCR. Genotyping was performed on positive samples. A serological analysis by western blotting was performed to determine the seroprevalence and to detect seroconversion. Overall, T. whipplei was identified in 31.2% of the stool samples (139/446 and 3.5% of the saliva samples (13/370 obtained from healthy subjects. The carriage in the stool specimens was significantly (p<10(-3 higher in children who were between 0 and 4 years old (60/80, 75% compared to samples obtained from individuals who were between 5 to 10 years old (36/119, 30.2% or between 11 and 99 years old (43/247, 17.4%. The carriage in the stool was also significantly more common (p = 0.015 in subjects with diarrhea (25/51, 49%. We identified 22 genotypes, 16 of which were new. Only one genotype (#53 was common to both villages. Among the specific genotypes, one (#52 was epidemic in Dielmo (15/28, 53.4%, p<10(-3 and another (#49 in Ndiop (27.6%, p = 0.002. The overall seroprevalence was estimated at 72.8% (291/400. Seroconversion was detected in 66.7% (18/27 of children for whom PCR became positive in stools between 2008 and 2009. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: T. whipplei is a common bacterium in the Sine-Saloum area of rural Senegal that is contracted early in childhood. Epidemic genotypes suggest a human transmission of the bacterium.

  15. Draft genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain BR 3267, an elite strain recommended for cowpea inoculation in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Luiz Simões-Araújo

    Full Text Available Abstract The strain BR 3267 is a nitrogen-fixing symbiotic bacteria isolated from soil of semi-arid area of Brazilian Northeast using cowpea as the trap plant. This strain is used as commercial inoculant for cowpea and presents high efficient in nitrogen fixation as consequence of its adaptation potential to semi-arid conditions. We report here the draft genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain BR 3267, an elite bacterium used as inoculant for cowpea. Whole genome sequencing of BR 3267 using Illumina MiSeq sequencing technology has 55 scaffolds with a total genome size of 7,904,309 bp and C+G 63%. Annotation was added by the RAST prokaryotic genome annotation service and has shown 7314 coding sequences and 52 RNA genes.

  16. Polyphasic analysis of Acidovorax citrulli strains from northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirley Michele Marques Silva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Bacterial fruit blotch (BFB of cucurbit plants is caused by Acidovorax citrulli and represents a serious concern to melon (Cucumis melo L. growers worldwide, including those in Brazil. Thirty-four A. citrulli strains from different melon production areas of northeastern Brazil were characterized for their virulence on melon fruits and their substrate utilization and molecular profiles. Based on the analysis of BFB severity on melon fruits, the A. citrulli strains were divided into three groups, classified as mildly, moderately or highly virulent. Although host-related groups were not observed, the watermelon and ‘melão-pepino’ strains exhibited only low or moderate virulence on melon fruit. Substrate utilization profiles revealed that 94 % of the 95 tested compounds were used by A. citrulli strains as a carbon source. Overall, based on substrate utilization, low variability was observed with no relationship to host of origin. The formation of one group of A. citrulli strains based on Repetitive Sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR analysis confirmed the low variability observed in the substrate utilization analyses. Bayesian inference based on the analysis of 23S rDNA partial sequence data resulted in one well-supported clade and clustered the strains with the A. citrulli-type species with high posterior probability support. Based on the markers used, the Brazilian A. citrulli strains belong to a single group, which corresponds to the previously described Group I for this bacterium in the United States.

  17. Virgibacillus albus sp. nov., a novel moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from Lop Nur salt lake in Xinjiang province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun-Jiao; Zhou, Yu; Ja, Man; Shi, Rong; Chun-Yu, Wei-Xun; Yang, Ling-Ling; Tang, Shu-Kun; Li, Wen-Jun

    2012-11-01

    A Gram-positive, moderately halophilic, strictly aerobic bacterium, designated YIM 93624(T), was isolated from a salt lake in Xinjiang province of China and subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. Strain YIM 93624(T) grew at 15-45 °C (optimum 25-30 °C), 1-17% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 5-10 %, w/v) and pH 4.0-9.0 (optimum pH 7.0). The predominant menaquinone was found to be MK-7. The major fatty acids were anteiso-C(15:0) and C(16:0). The polar lipids consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, a glycolipid and two unidentified phospholipids. The cell-wall peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 37.9 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain YIM 93624(T) was a member of the genus Virgibacillus and exhibited the highest similarity of 97.0 % to Virgibacillus koreensis KCTC 3823(T). However, the level of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain YIM 93624(T) and V. koreensis KCTC 3823(T) was 32.5 %. On the basis of phylogenetic, physiological and chemotaxonomic analysis data, the isolate is concluded to represent a novel species of the genus Virgibacillus, for which the name Virgibacillus albus sp. nov., is proposed, with type strain of YIM 93624(T) (=DSM 23711(T) = JCM 17364(T)).

  18. Salirhabdus euzebyi gen. nov., sp. nov., a Gram-positive, halotolerant bacterium isolated from a sea salt evaporation pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Luciana; Tiago, Igor; Rainey, Fred A; Taborda, Marco; Nobre, M Fernanda; Veríssimo, António; da Costa, Milton S

    2007-07-01

    A low-G+C, Gram-positive bacterium, designated CVS-14(T), was recovered from a sea salt evaporation pond on the island of Sal in the Cape Verde Archipelago. This organism was catalase- and oxidase-positive. Cells were motile, spore-forming aerobic rods, with an optimum growth temperature of about 35-40 degrees C and optimum pH between 7.0 and 8.5. Optimal growth occurred in media containing 4-6 % (w/v) NaCl, although the organism was able to grow in medium without added NaCl and in medium containing 16 % NaCl. The cell-wall peptidoglycan was of A1 gamma type and the major respiratory quinone was menaquinone 7 (MK-7). Major fatty acids were iso-15 : 0, anteiso-15 : 0, iso-17 : 0 and anteiso-17 : 0. The DNA G+C content was 37.0 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain CVS-14(T) formed a distinct new branch within the radiation of the moderately halophilic bacilli group, forming a separate lineage from species of the genera Salinibacillus, Paucisalibacillus, Oceanobacillus, Lentibacillus and Virgibacillus. Strain CVS-14(T) showed 16S rRNA gene pairwise similarity values of approximately 95 % with species of the genus Salinibacillus. On the basis of morphological, physiological, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic characteristics, strain CVS-14(T) is considered to represent a novel species in a new genus, for which the name Salirhabdus euzebyi gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CVS-14(T) (=LMG 22839(T)=CIP 108577(T)).

  19. Draft genome sequence of MCPA-degrading Sphingomonas sp. strain ERG5, isolated from a groundwater aquifer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tue Kjærgaard; Kot, Witold Piotr; Sørensen, Sebastian R.

    2015-01-01

    Sphingomonas sp. strain ERG5 was isolated from a bacterial community, originating from a groundwater aquifer polluted with low pesticide concentrations. This bacterium degrades 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) in a wide spectrum of concentrations and has been shown to function in bioaug......Sphingomonas sp. strain ERG5 was isolated from a bacterial community, originating from a groundwater aquifer polluted with low pesticide concentrations. This bacterium degrades 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) in a wide spectrum of concentrations and has been shown to function...... in bioaugmented sand filters. Genes associated with MCPA degradation are situated on a putative conjugative plasmid....

  20. Pantoea agglomerans: a mysterious bacterium of evil and good. Part IV. Beneficial effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Barbara; Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Golec, Marcin; Milanowski, Janusz

    2016-06-02

    a biocontrol agent permits the decrease of pesticide doses, being a healthy and environmental-friendly procedure. The application of the preparations of this bacterium efficiently protects the stored pome, stone and citrus fruits against invasion of moulds. P. agglomerans strains associated with both rhizosphere and plant tissues (as endophytes) efficiently promote the growth of many plants, including rice and wheat, which are the staple food for the majority of mankind. The promotion mechanisms are diverse and include fixation of atmospheric nitrogen, production of phytohormones, as well as degradation of phytate and phosphate solubilizing which makes the soil phosphorus available for plants. Accordingly, P. agglomerans is regarded as an ideal candidate for an environmental-friendly bioinoculant replacing chemical fertilizers. It has been documented that the Pantoea strains show biodegradation activity on various chemical pollutants of soil and water, including petroleum hydrocarbons and toxic metals. P. agglomerans prevents the penetration of harmful industrial contaminants into deeper parts of soil by biofilm formation, and has an ability to produce hydrogen from waste. Thus, this bacterium appears as a valuable bioremediator which, in some cases, may be acquired as a cheap form of energy. In conclusion, in spite of the proven pathologic role of P. agglomerans in causing occupational diseases of allergic and/or immunotoxic background and accidental infections, the beneficial traits of this species, and of related species of Pantoea genus, are of great value for potential use in many areas of biotechnology. Hence, any restrictions on the use of these organisms and their products should be declined, providing safety precautions at work with the Pantoea biopreparations are maintained.

  1. Pantoea agglomerans: a mysterious bacterium of evil and good. Part IV. Beneficial effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Dutkiewicz

    2016-06-01

    production, competition mechanisms or induction of plant resistance. Its use as a biocontrol agent permits the decrease of pesticide doses, being a healthy and environmental-friendly procedure. The application of the preparations of this bacterium efficiently protects the stored pome, stone and citrus fruits against invasion of moulds. [i]P. agglomerans[/i] strains associated with both rhizosphere and plant tissues (as endophytes efficiently promote the growth of many plants, including rice and wheat, which are the staple food for the majority of mankind. The promotion mechanisms are diverse and include fixation of atmospheric nitrogen, production of phytohormones, as well as degradation of phytate and phosphate solubilizing which makes the soil phosphorus available for plants. Accordingly, [i]P. agglomerans[/i] is regarded as an ideal candidate for an environmental-friendly bioinoculant replacing chemical fertilizers. It has been documented that the [i]Pantoea[/i] strains show biodegradation activity on various chemical pollutants of soil and water, including petroleum hydrocarbons and toxic metals. [i]P. agglomerans[/i] prevents the penetration of harmful industrial contaminants into deeper parts of soil by biofilm formation, and has an ability to produce hydrogen from waste. Thus, this bacterium appears as a valuable bioremediator which, in some cases, may be acquired as a cheap form of energy. In conclusion, in spite of the proven pathologic role of [i]P. agglomerans[/i] in causing occupational diseases of allergic and/or immunotoxic background and accidental infections, the beneficial traits of this species, and of related species of [i]Pantoea [/i]genus, are of great value for potential use in many areas of biotechnology. Hence, any restrictions on the use of these organisms and their products should be declined, providing safety precautions at work with the [i]Pantoea[/i] biopreparations are maintained.

  2. Pantoea agglomerans : a mysterious bacterium of evil and good. Part IV. Beneficial effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Dutkiewicz

    2016-06-01

    plant resistance. Its use as a biocontrol agent permits the decrease of pesticide doses, being a healthy and environmental-friendly procedure. The application of the preparations of this bacterium efficiently protects the stored pome, stone and citrus fruits against invasion of moulds. P. agglomerans strains associated with both rhizosphere and plant tissues (as endophytes efficiently promote the growth of many plants, including rice and wheat, which are the staple food for the majority of mankind. The promotion mechanisms are diverse and include fixation of atmospheric nitrogen, production of phytohormones, as well as degradation of phytate and phosphate solubilizing which makes the soil phosphorus available for plants. Accordingly, P. agglomerans is regarded as an ideal candidate for an environmental-friendly bioinoculant replacing chemical fertilizers. It has been documented that the Pantoea strains show biodegradation activity on various chemical pollutants of soil and water, including petroleum hydrocarbons and toxic metals. P. agglomerans prevents the penetration of harmful industrial contaminants into deeper parts of soil by biofilm formation, and has an ability to produce hydrogen from waste. Thus, this bacterium appears as a valuable bioremediator which, in some cases, may be acquired as a cheap form of energy. In conclusion, in spite of the proven pathologic role of P. agglomerans in causing occupational diseases of allergic and/or immunotoxic background and accidental infections, the beneficial traits of this species, and of related species of Pantoea genus, are of great value for potential use in many areas of biotechnology. Hence, any restrictions on the use of these organisms and their products should be declined, providing safety precautions at work with the Pantoea biopreparations are maintained.

  3. Construction of Bacillus thuringiensis Simulant Strains Suitable for Environmental Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sangjin; Kim, Changhwan; Lee, Daesang; Song, Dong Hyun; Cheon, Ki Cheol; Lee, Hong Suk; Kim, Seong Joo; Kim, Jee Cheon; Lee, Sang Yup

    2017-05-01

    For a surrogate bacterium to be used in outdoor studies, it is important to consider environmental and human safety and ease of detection. Recently, Bacillus thuringiensis , a popular bioinsecticide bacterium, has been gaining attention as a surrogate bacterium for use in biodefense. In this study, we constructed simulant strains of B. thuringiensis with enhanced characteristics for environmental studies. Through transposon mutagenesis, pigment genes were inserted into the chromosome, producing yellow-colored colonies for easy detection. To prevent persistence of spores in the environment, a genetic circuit was designed to produce a spore without sporulation capability. Two loxP sites were inserted, one on each side of the spo0A gene, which encodes a sporulation master regulator, and a sporulation-dependent Cre expression cassette was inserted into the chromosome. This genetic circuit successfully deleted spo0A during sporulation, producing spores that lacked the spo0A gene. In addition, two major α/β-type small acid-soluble spore protein (SASP) genes, predicted by synteny analysis, were deleted. The spores of the mutant strain showed increased UV-C sensitivity and quickly lost viability when tested in a solar simulator. When the spores of the mutant strain were administered to the lungs of BALB/c mice, cells were quickly removed from the body, suggesting enhanced in vivo safety. All strains constructed in this study contain no antibiotic resistance markers and all heterologous genes were inserted into the chromosome, which are useful features for simulants to be released into the environment. IMPORTANCE B. thuringiensis has recently been receiving increasing attention as a good spore simulant in biodefense research. However, few studies were done to properly address many important features of B. thuringiensis as a simulant in environmental studies. Since spores can persist in the environment for years after release, environmental contamination is a big problem

  4. Metabolomic response of a marine bacterium to 3,6-anhydro-l-galactose, the rare sugar from red macroalgae, as the sole carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Eun Ju; Yu, Sora; Kim, Sooah; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2018-03-20

    Marine red macroalgae have received much attention as sustainable resources for producing bio-based products. Therefore, understanding the metabolic pathways of carbohydrates from red macroalgae, in fermentative microorganisms, is crucial for efficient bioconversion of the carbohydrates into bio-based products. Recently, the novel catabolic pathway of 3,6-anhydro-l-galactose (AHG), the main component of red macroalgae, was discovered in a marine bacterium, Vibrio sp. strain EJY3. However, the global metabolic network in response to AHG remains unclear. Here, the intracellular metabolites of EJY3 grown on AHG, glucose, or galactose were comparatively profiled using gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The global metabolite profiling results revealed that the metabolic profile for AHG significantly differed from those for other common sugars. Specifically, the metabolic intermediate of the AHG pathway, 3,6-anhydrogalactonate, was detected during growth only in the presence of AHG; thus, the recently discovered key steps in AHG catabolism was found not to occur in the catabolism of other common sugars. Moreover, the levels of metabolic intermediates related to glycerolipid metabolism and valine biosynthesis were higher with AHG than those with other sugars. These comprehensive metabolomic analytical results for AHG in this marine bacterium can be used as the basis for having fermentative microbial strains to engineered to efficiently utilize AHG from macroalgal biomass. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Inhibitory activity of an extract from a marine bacterium Halomonas sp. HSB07 against the red-tide microalga Gymnodinium sp. (Pyrrophyta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juan; Li, Fuchao; Liu, Ling; Jiang, Peng; Liu, Zhaopu

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, red tides occurred frequently in coastal areas worldwide. Various methods based on the use of clay, copper sulfate, and bacteria have been successful in controlling red tides to some extent. As a new defensive agent, marine microorganisms are important sources of compounds with potent inhibitory bioactivities against red-tide microalgae, such as Gymnodinium sp. (Pyrrophyta). In this study, we isolated a marine bacterium, HSB07, from seawater collected from Hongsha Bay, Sanya, South China Sea. Based on its 16S rRNA gene sequence and biochemical characteristics, the isolated strain HSB07 was identified as a member of the genus Halomonas. A crude ethyl acetate extract of strain HSB07 showed moderate inhibition activity against Gymnodinium sp. in a bioactive prescreening experiment. The extract was further separated into fractions A, B, and C by silica gel column chromatography. Fractions B and C showed strong inhibition activities against Gymnodinium. This is the first report of inhibitory activity of secondary metabolites of a Halomonas bacterium against a red-tide-causing microalga.

  6. Pseudomonas sp. ZXY-1, a newly isolated and highly efficient atrazine-degrading bacterium, and optimization of biodegradation using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinyue; Wang, Li; Ma, Fang; Bai, Shunwen; Yang, Jixian; Qi, Shanshan

    2017-04-01

    Atrazine, a widely used herbicide, is increasing the agricultural production effectively, while also causing great environmental concern. Efficient atrazine-degrading bacterium is necessary to removal atrazine rapidly to keep a safe environment. In the present study, a new atrazine-degrading strain ZXY-1, identified as Pseudomonas, was isolated. This new isolated strain has a strong ability to biodegrade atrazine with a high efficiency of 9.09mg/L/hr. Temperature, pH, inoculum size and initial atrazine concentration were examined to further optimize the degradation of atrazine, and the synthetic effect of these factors were investigated by the response surface methodology. With a high quadratic polynomial mathematical model (R 2 =0.9821) being obtained, the highest biodegradation efficiency of 19.03mg/L/hr was reached compared to previous reports under the optimal conditions (30.71°C, pH7.14, 4.23% (V/V) inoculum size and 157.1mg/L initial atrazine concentration). Overall, this study provided an efficient bacterium and approach that could be potentially useful for the bioremediation of wastewater containing atrazine. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence ofPantoea agglomeransJM1, a Strain Isolated from Soil Polluted by Industrial Production of Beta-Lactam Antibiotics That Exhibits Valacyclovir-Like Hydrolase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahradník, Jiří; Plačková, Martina; Palyzová, Andrea; Marešová, Helena; Kyslíková, Eva; Kyslík, Pavel

    2017-09-21

    Strain Pantoea agglomerans JM1 was isolated from the soil of a microbiome that had been exposed to polluting pharmaceuticals. The bacterium exhibited enzymatic activities useful for the biotransformation of beta-lactams. The genome of the strain was assembled and described, and the gene encoding valacyclovir-like hydrolase was identified. Copyright © 2017 Zahradník et al.

  8. An arsenate-reducing and alkane-metabolizing novel bacterium, Rhizobium arsenicireducens sp. nov., isolated from arsenic-rich groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Balaram; Sarkar, Angana; Joshi, Swati; Chatterjee, Atrayee; Kazy, Sufia Khannam; Maiti, Mrinal Kumar; Satyanarayana, Tulasi; Sar, Pinaki

    2017-03-01

    A novel arsenic (As)-resistant, arsenate-respiring, alkane-metabolizing bacterium KAs 5-22 T , isolated from As-rich groundwater of West Bengal was characterized by physiological and genomic properties. Cells of strain KAs 5-22 T were Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped, motile, and facultative anaerobic. Growth occurred at optimum of pH 6.0-7.0, temperature 30 °C. 16S rRNA gene affiliated the strain KAs 5-22 T to the genus Rhizobium showing maximum similarity (98.4 %) with the type strain of Rhizobium naphthalenivorans TSY03b T followed by (98.0 % similarity) Rhizobium selenitireducens B1 T . The genomic G + C content was 59.4 mol%, and DNA-DNA relatedness with its closest phylogenetic neighbors was 50.2 %. Chemotaxonomy indicated UQ-10 as the major quinone; phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, and diphosphatidylglycerol as major polar lipids; C 16:0 , C 17:0 , 2-OH C 10:0 , 3-OH C 16:0 , and unresolved C 18:1 ɷ7C/ɷ9C as predominant fatty acids. The cells were found to reduce O 2 , As 5+ , NO 3 - , SO 4 2- and Fe 3+ as alternate electron acceptors. The strain's ability to metabolize dodecane or other alkanes as sole carbon source using As 5+ as terminal electron acceptor was supported by the presence of genes encoding benzyl succinate synthase (bssA like) and molybdopterin-binding site (mopB) of As 5+ respiratory reductase (arrA). Differential phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, genotypic as well as physiological properties revealed that the strain KAs 5-22 T is separated from its nearest recognized Rhizobium species. On the basis of the data presented, strain KAs 5-22 T is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium arsenicireducens sp. nov. is proposed as type strain (=LMG 28795 T =MTCC 12115 T ).

  9. Rhizobium metallidurans sp. nov., a symbiotic heavy metal resistant bacterium isolated from the Anthyllis vulneraria Zn-hyperaccumulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grison, Claire M; Jackson, Stephen; Merlot, Sylvain; Dobson, Alan; Grison, Claude

    2015-05-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming bacterium (ChimEc512(T)) was isolated from 56 host seedlings of the hyperaccumulating Anthyllis vulneraria legume, which was on an old zinc mining site at Les Avinières, Saint-Laurent-Le-Minier, Gard, South of France. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, strain ChimEc512(T) was shown to belong to the genus Rhizobium and to be most closely related to Rhizobium endophyticum CCGE 2052(T) (98.4%), Rhizobium tibeticum CCBAU 85039(T) (98.1%), Rhizobium grahamii CCGE 502(T) (98.0%) and Rhizobium mesoamericanum CCGE 501(T) (98.0%). The phylogenetic relationships of ChimEc512(T) were confirmed by sequencing and analyses of recA and atpD genes. DNA-DNA relatedness values of strain ChimEc512(T) with R. endophyticum CCGE 2052(T), R. tibeticum CCBAU 85039(T), R. mesoamericanum CCGE 52(T), Rhizobium grahamii CCGE 502(T), Rhizobium etli CCBAU 85039(T) and Rhizobium radiobacter KL09-16-8-2(T) were 27, 22, 16, 18, 19 and 11%, respectively. The DNA G+C content of strain ChimEc512(T) was 58.9 mol%. The major cellular fatty acid was C18 : 1ω7c, characteristic of the genus Rhizobium . The polar lipid profile included phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine and moderate amounts of aminolipids, phospholipid and sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol. Although ChimEc512(T) was able to nodulate A. vulneraria, the nodC and nifH genes were not detected by PCR. The rhizobial strain was tolerant to high concentrations of heavy metals: up to 35 mM Zn and up to 0.5 mM Cd and its growth kinetics was not impacted by Zn. The results of DNA-DNA hybridizations and physiological tests allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of strain ChimEc512(T) from species of the genus Rhizobium with validly published names. Strain ChimEc512(T), therefore, represents a novel species, for which the name Rhizobium metallidurans sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain

  10. Competitive Interactions in Mixed-Species Biofilms Containing the Marine Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas tunicata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Dhana; Webb, Jeremy S.; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2005-01-01

    Pseudoalteromonas tunicata is a biofilm-forming marine bacterium that is often found in association with the surface of eukaryotic organisms. It produces a range of extracellular inhibitory compounds, including an antibacterial protein (AlpP) thought to be beneficial for P. tunicata during competition for space and nutrients on surfaces. As part of our studies on the interactions between P. tunicata and the epiphytic bacterial community on the marine plant Ulva lactuca, we investigated the hypothesis that P. tunicata is a superior competitor compared with other bacteria isolated from the plant. A number of U. lactuca bacterial isolates were (i) identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, (ii) characterized for the production of or sensitivity to extracellular antibacterial proteins, and (iii) labeled with a fluorescent color tag (either the red fluorescent protein DsRed or green fluorescent protein). We then grew single- and mixed-species bacterial biofilms containing P. tunicata in glass flow cell reactors. In pure culture, all the marine isolates formed biofilms containing microcolony structures within 72 h. However, in mixed-species biofilms, P. tunicata removed the competing strain unless its competitor was relatively insensitive to AlpP (Pseudoalteromonas gracilis) or produced strong inhibitory activity against P. tunicata (Roseobacter gallaeciensis). Moreover, biofilm studies conducted with an AlpP− mutant of P. tunicata indicated that the mutant was less competitive when it was introduced into preestablished biofilms, suggesting that AlpP has a role during competitive biofilm formation. When single-species biofilms were allowed to form microcolonies before the introduction of a competitor, these microcolonies coexisted with P. tunicata for extended periods of time before they were removed. Two marine bacteria (R. gallaeciensis and P. tunicata) were superior competitors in this study. Our data suggest that this dominance can be attributed to the ability of

  11. Complete genome sequence of the industrial bacterium Bacillus licheniformis and comparisons with closely related Bacillus species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Michael W; Ramaiya, Preethi; Nelson, Beth A; Brody-Karpin, Shari D; Zaretsky, Elizabeth J; Tang, Maria; de Leon, Alfredo Lopez; Xiang, Henry; Gusti, Veronica; Clausen, Ib Groth; Olsen, Peter B; Rasmussen, Michael D; Andersen, Jens T; Jørgensen, Per L; Larsen, Thomas S; Sorokin, Alexei; Bolotin, Alexander; Lapidus, Alla; Galleron, Nathalie; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Berka, Randy M

    2004-01-01

    Background Bacillus licheniformis is a Gram-positive, spore-forming soil bacterium that is used in the biotechnology industry to manufacture enzymes, antibiotics, biochemicals and consumer products. This species is closely related to the well studied model organism Bacillus subtilis, and produces an assortment of extracellular enzymes that may contribute to nutrient cycling in nature. Results We determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the B. licheniformis ATCC 14580 genome which comprises a circular chromosome of 4,222,336 base-pairs (bp) containing 4,208 predicted protein-coding genes with an average size of 873 bp, seven rRNA operons, and 72 tRNA genes. The B. licheniformis chromosome contains large regions that are colinear with the genomes of B. subtilis and Bacillus halodurans, and approximately 80% of the predicted B. licheniformis coding sequences have B. subtilis orthologs. Conclusions Despite the unmistakable organizational similarities between the B. licheniformis and B. subtilis genomes, there are notable differences in the numbers and locations of prophages, transposable elements and a number of extracellular enzymes and secondary metabolic pathway operons that distinguish these species. Differences include a region of more than 80 kilobases (kb) that comprises a cluster of polyketide synthase genes and a second operon of 38 kb encoding plipastatin synthase enzymes that are absent in the B. licheniformis genome. The availability of a completed genome sequence for B. licheniformis should facilitate the design and construction of improved industrial strains and allow for comparative genomics and evolutionary studies within this group of Bacillaceae. PMID:15461803

  12. Global microarray analysis of carbohydrate use in alkaliphilic hemicellulolytic bacterium Bacillus sp. N16-5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajian Song

    Full Text Available The alkaliphilic hemicellulolytic bacterium Bacillus sp. N16-5 has a broad substrate spectrum and exhibits the capacity to utilize complex carbohydrates such as galactomannan, xylan, and pectin. In the monosaccharide mixture, sequential utilization by Bacillus sp. N16-5 was observed. Glucose appeared to be its preferential monosaccharide, followed by fructose, mannose, arabinose, xylose, and galactose. Global transcription profiles of the strain were determined separately for growth on six monosaccharides (glucose, fructose, mannose, galactose, arabinose, and xylose and four polysaccharides (galactomannan, xylan, pectin, and sodium carboxymethylcellulose using one-color microarrays. Numerous genes potentially related to polysaccharide degradation, sugar transport, and monosaccharide metabolism were found to respond to a specific substrate. Putative gene clusters for different carbohydrates were identified according to transcriptional patterns and genome annotation. Identification and analysis of these gene clusters contributed to pathway reconstruction for carbohydrate utilization in Bacillus sp. N16-5. Several genes encoding putative sugar transporters were highly expressed during growth on specific sugars, suggesting their functional roles. Two phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase systems were identified as candidate transporters for mannose and fructose, and a major facilitator superfamily transporter was identified as a candidate transporter for arabinose and xylose. Five carbohydrate uptake transporter 1 family ATP-binding cassette transporters were predicted to participate in the uptake of hemicellulose and pectin degradation products. Collectively, microarray data improved the pathway reconstruction involved in carbohydrate utilization of Bacillus sp. N16-5 and revealed that the organism precisely regulates gene transcription in response to fluctuations in energy resources.

  13. High-level production of the industrial product lycopene by the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Shu; Grammel, Hartmut; Abou-Aisha, Khaled; Sägesser, Rudolf; Ghosh, Robin

    2012-10-01

    The biosynthesis of the major carotenoid spirilloxanthin by the purple nonsulfur bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum is thought to occur via a linear pathway proceeding through phytoene and, later, lycopene as intermediates. This assumption is based solely on early chemical evidence (B. H. Davies, Biochem. J. 116:93-99, 1970). In most purple bacteria, the desaturation of phytoene, catalyzed by the enzyme phytoene desaturase (CrtI), leads to neurosporene, involving only three dehydrogenation steps and not four as in the case of lycopene. We show here that the chromosomal insertion of a kanamycin resistance cassette into the crtC-crtD region of the partial carotenoid gene cluster, whose gene products are responsible for the downstream processing of lycopene, leads to the accumulation of the latter as the major carotenoid. We provide spectroscopic and biochemical evidence that in vivo, lycopene is incorporated into the light-harvesting complex 1 as efficiently as the methoxylated carotenoids spirilloxanthin (in the wild type) and 3,4,3',4'-tetrahydrospirilloxanthin (in a crtD mutant), both under semiaerobic, chemoheterotrophic, and photosynthetic, anaerobic conditions. Quantitative growth experiments conducted in dark, semiaerobic conditions, using a growth medium for high cell density and high intracellular membrane levels, which are suitable for the conventional industrial production in the absence of light, yielded lycopene at up to 2 mg/g (dry weight) of cells or up to 15 mg/liter of culture. These values are comparable to those of many previously described Escherichia coli strains engineered for lycopene production. This study provides the first genetic proof that the R. rubrum CrtI produces lycopene exclusively as an end product.

  14. Comprehensive insights into the response of Alexandrium tamarense to algicidal component secreted by a marine bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueqian eLei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Harmful algal blooms occur throughout the world, threatening human health and destroying marine ecosystems. Alexandrium tamarense is a globally distributed and notoriously toxic dinoflagellate that is responsible for most paralytic shellfish poisoning incidents. The culture supernatant of the marine algicidal bacterium BS02 showed potent algicidal effects on A. tamarense ATGD98-006. In this study, we investigated the effects of this supernatant on A. tamarense at physiological and biochemical levels to elucidate the mechanism involved in the inhibition of algal growth by the supernatant of the strain BS02. Reactive oxygen species (ROS levels increased following exposure to the BS02 supernatant, indicating that the algal cells had suffered from oxidative damage. The levels of cellular pigments, including chlorophyll a and carotenoids, were significantly decreased, which indicated that the accumulation of ROS destroyed pigment synthesis. The decline of the maximum photochemical quantum yield (Fv/Fm and relative electron transport rate (rETR suggested that the photosynthesis systems of algal cells were attacked by the BS02 supernatant. To eliminate the ROS, the activities of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT, increased significantly within a short period of time. Real-time PCR revealed changes in the transcript abundances of two target photosynthesis-related genes (psbA and psbD and two target respiration-related genes (cob and cox. The transcription of the respiration-related genes was significantly inhibited by the treatments, which indicated that the respiratory system was disturbed. Our results demonstrate that the BS02 supernatant can affect the photosynthesis process and might block the PS II electron transport chain, leading to the production of excessive ROS. The increased ROS can further destroy membrane integrity and pigments, ultimately inducing algal cell death.

  15. Antibiofilm activity of an exopolysaccharide from marine bacterium Vibrio sp. QY101.

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    Peng Jiang

    Full Text Available Bacterial exopolysaccharides have always been suggested to play crucial roles in the bacterial initial adhesion and the development of complex architecture in the later stages of bacterial biofilm formation. However, Escherichia coli group II capsular polysaccharide was characterized to exert broad-spectrum biofilm inhibition activity. In this study, we firstly reported that a bacterial exopolysaccharide (A101 not only inhibits biofilm formation of many bacteria but also disrupts established biofilm of some strains. A101 with an average molecular weight of up to 546 KDa, was isolated and purified from the culture supernatant of the marine bacterium Vibrio sp. QY101 by ethanol precipitation, iron-exchange chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. High performance liquid chromatography traces of the hydrolyzed polysaccharides showed that A101 is primarily consisted of galacturonic acid, glucuronic acid, rhamnose and glucosamine. A101 was demonstrated to inhibit biofilm formation by a wide range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria without antibacterial activity. Furthermore, A101 displayed a significant disruption on the established biofilm produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but not by Staphylococcus aureus. Importantly, A101 increased the aminoglycosides antibiotics' capability of killing P. aeruginosa biofilm. Cell primary attachment to surfaces and intercellular aggregates assays suggested that A101 inhibited cell aggregates of both P. aeruginosa and S. aureus, while the cell-surface interactions inhibition only occurred in S. aureus, and the pre-formed cell aggregates dispersion induced by A101 only occurred in P. aeruginosa. Taken together, these data identify the antibiofilm activity of A101, which may make it potential in the design of new therapeutic strategies for bacterial biofilm-associated infections and limiting biofilm formation on medical indwelling devices. The found of A101 antibiofilm activity may also promote a

  16. Isolation of a Campylobacter lanienae-like bacterium from laboratory chinchillas (Chinchilla laniger).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turowski, E E; Shen, Z; Ducore, R M; Parry, N M A; Kirega, A; Dewhirst, F E; Fox, J G

    2014-12-01

    Routine necropsies of 27 asymptomatic juvenile chinchillas revealed a high prevalence of gastric ulcers with microscopic lymphoplasmacytic gastroenteritis and typhlocolitis. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis using Campylobacter genus-specific partial 16S rRNA primers revealed the presence of Campylobacter spp. DNA in the faeces of 12 of 27 animals (44.4%). Species-specific partial 16S rRNA PCR and sequencing confirmed that these animals were colonized with Campylobacter lanienae, a gram-negative, microaerophilic bacterium that was first identified on routine faecal screening of slaughterhouse employees and subsequently isolated from faeces of livestock. Campylobacter lanienae was isolated from the faeces of six PCR-positive animals and identified with species-specific PCR and full 16S rRNA sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these isolates clustered with C. lanienae strain NCTC 13004. PCR analysis of DNA extracted from gastrointestinal tissues revealed the presence of C. lanienae DNA in the caecum and colon of these chinchillas. Gastrointestinal lesions were scored and compared between C. lanienae-positive and C. lanienae-negative animals. There was no correlation between colonization status and lesion severity in the stomach, liver, duodenum, or colon. Possible routes of C. lanienae infection in chinchillas could include waterborne transmission and faecal-oral transmission from wild mice and rats or livestock. Based on these findings, the authors conclude that C. lanienae colonizes the lower bowel of chinchillas in the absence of clinical disease. This is the first report of C. lanienae in any rodent species. Campylobacter lanienae isolates from different mammalian species demonstrate heterogeneity by 16S rRNA sequence comparison. Analysis using rpoB suggests that isolates and clones currently identified as C. lanienae may represent multiple species or subspecies. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  17. Characterization of the surfaceome of the metal-reducing bacterium Desulfotomaculum reducens

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    Elena eDalla Vecchia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Desulfotomaculum reducens strain MI-1 is a Gram-positive, sulfate-reducing bacterium also capable of reducing Fe(III. Metal reduction in Gram-positive bacteria is poorly understood. Here, we investigated Fe(III reduction with lactate, a non-fermentable substrate, as the electron donor. Lactate consumption is concomitant to Fe(III reduction, but does not support significant growth, suggesting that little energy can be conserved from this process and that it may occur fortuitously. D. reducens can reduce both soluble (Fe(III-citrate and insoluble (hydrous ferric oxide, HFO Fe(III. Because physically inaccessible HFO was not reduced, we concluded that reduction requires direct contact under these experimental conditions. This implies the presence of a surface exposed reductase capable of transferring electrons from the cell to the extracellular electron acceptor. With the goal of characterizing the role of surface proteins in D. reducens and of identifying candidate Fe(III reductases, we carried out an investigation of the surface proteome (surfaceome of D. reducens. Cell surface exposed proteins were extracted by trypsin cell shaving or by lysozyme treatment, and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. This investigation revealed that the surfaceome fulfills many functions, including solute transport, protein export, maturation and hydrolysis, peptidoglycan synthesis and modification, and chemotaxis. Furthermore, a few redox-active proteins were identified. Among these, three are putatively involved in Fe(III reduction, i.e., a membrane-bound hydrogenase 4Fe-4S cluster subunit (Dred_0462, a heterodisulfide reductase subunit A (Dred_0143 and a protein annotated as alkyl hydroperoxide reductase but likely functioning as a thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase (Dred_1533.

  18. Electromicrobiology of Dissimilatory Sulfur Reducing Bacterium Desulfuromonas acetexigens

    KAUST Repository

    Bin Bandar, Khaled

    2014-12-01

    Bioelectrochmical systems (BES) are engineered electrochemical devices that harness hidden chemical energy of the wastewater in to the form of electricity or hydrogen. Unique microbial communities enrich in these systems for oxidation of organic matter as well as transfer of resulted electron to anode, known them as “electricigens” communities. Exploring novel electricigenesis microbial communities in the nature and understanding their electromicrobiology is one the important aspect for BES systems scale up. Herein, we report first time the electricigenesis property of an anaerobic, fresh water sediment, sulfur reducing bacterium Desulfuromona acetexigens. The electrochemical behavior of D. acetexigens biofilms grown on graphite-rod electrodes in batch-fed mode under an applied potential was investigated with traditional electroanalytical tools, and correlate the electron transfer from biofilms to electrode with a model electricigen Geobacter sulfurreducens electrochemical behavior. Research findings suggest that D. acetexigens has the ability to use electrode as electron acceptor in BES systems through establishing the direct contact with anode by expressing the membrane bound redox proteins, but not due to the secretion of soluble redox mediators. Preliminary results revealed that D. acetexigens express three distinct redox proteins in their membranes for turnover of the electrons from biofilm to electrode, and the 4 whole electricigenesis process observed to be unique in the D. acetexigens compared to that of well-studied model organism G. sulfurreducens.

  19. An efficient thermotolerant and halophilic biosurfactant-producing bacterium isolated from Dagang oil field for MEOR application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Langping; Richnow, Hans; Yao, Jun; Jain, Anil

    2014-05-01

    Dagang Oil field (Petro China Company Limited) is one of the most productive oil fields in China. In this study, 34 biosurfactant-producing strains were isolated and cultured from petroleum reservoir of Dagang oil field, using haemolytic assay and the qualitative oil-displacement test. On the basis of 16S rDNA analysis, the isolates were closely related to the species in genus Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus and Bacillus. One of the isolates identified as Bacillus subtilis BS2 were selected for further study. This bacterium was able to produce a type of biosurfactant with excessive foam-forming properties at 37ºC as well as at higher temperature of 55ºC. The biosurfactant produced by the strain BS2 could reduce the surface tension of the culture broth from 70.87 mN/m to 28.97 mN/m after 8 days of incubation at 37ºC and to 36.15 mN/m after 20 days of incubation at 55ºC, respectively. The biosurfactant showed stability at high temperature (up to 120ºC), a wide range of pH (2 to 12) and salt concentrations (up to 12%) offering potential for biotechnology. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrum of extracted biosurfactant tentatively characterized the produced biosurfactant as glycolipid derivative. Elemental analysis of the biosurfactant by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) reveals that the biosurfactant was anionic in nature. 15 days of biodegradation of crude oil suggested a preferential usage of n-alkane upon microbial metabolism of BS2 as a carbon substrate and consequently also for the synthesis of biosurfactants. Core flood studies for oil release indicated 9.6% of additional oil recovery over water flooding at 37ºC and 7.2% of additional oil recovery at 55 ºC. Strain BS2 was characterized as an efficient biosurfactant-producing, thermotolerant and halophillic bacterium and has the potential for application for microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) through water flooding in China's oil fields even in situ as adapted to reservoir chemistry and

  20. Characterization of a fluoride-resistant bacterium Acinetobacter sp. RH5 towards assessment of its water defluoridation capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Shraboni; Yadav, Vaibhav; Mondal, Madhumanti; Banerjee, Soumya; Halder, Gopinath

    2017-07-01

    The present study investigates the defluoridation capability of fluoride-resistant bacteria from contaminated groundwater collected from Asanjola and Madhabpur, West Bengal, India. Seven strains of fluoride-resistant bacteria were isolated employing culture media containing 10-250 mg/L of fluoride to evaluate their ability in reducing fluoride concentration in water. Five isolates exhibited significant amount of reduction in fluoride. Isolate RH5 achieved a maximum fluoride removal of 25.7 % from the media at 30 °C and pH 7 after 8 days of incubation. Based on morphological, physiological characteristics and analysis of 16S rDNA gene sequence, isolate RH5 was identified as Acinetobacter sp. RH5. Growth of RH5 was analysed at a diverse pH range, and it could thrive at pH 5-10. The present investigation revealed that the selective pressure of fluoride results in growth of fluoride-resistant bacteria capable of secreting high-affinity anion-binding compounds. This bacterium played a dominant bioremediative role by concentrating the anions so that they become less available. Hence, the fluoride-resistant bacteria, Acinetobacter sp. RH5, could be used as a promising strain for application in water defluoridation from contaminated sites.

  1. High production, purification, biochemical characterization and gene analysis of a novel catalase from the thermophilic bacterium Ureibacillus thermosphaericus FZSF03.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xianbo; Lin, Xinjian; Tian, Yandan; Chen, Jichen; You, Minsheng

    2017-10-01

    A catalase-producing thermophilic bacterium, Ureibacillus thermosphaericus FZSF03, was isolated from high-temperature compost. Catalase production in this strain increased 31 times and reached 57,630U/mL after optimization in a shake flask, which might represent the highest catalase activity level among reported wild strains. This catalase was further purified and identified. The purified enzyme showed a specific activity of 219,360U/mg, higher than many other catalases. The molecular weight of this enzyme is 52kDa according to sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and the enzyme was identified as a monofunctional haeme catalase of Ureibacillus thermosphaericus by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)/MS. The optimal reaction temperature for this catalase was found to be 60°C. Stability was observed at 60°C and at a pH of 10.0, indicating the superiority of this enzyme at a high temperature and under alkaline conditions. Therefore, this catalase is a prospective candidate for industrial production and applications. The gene encoding this catalase is 1503bp. As the amino acid sequence shows low similarity with other catalases, we suggest that this is a novel monofunctional haeme catalase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Atomic force microscopy study of the structure function relationships of the biofilm-forming bacterium Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Sarah E.; Kreth, Jens; Zhu, Lin; Qi, Fengxia; Pelling, Andrew E.; Shi, Wenyuan; Gimzewski, James K.

    2006-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has garnered much interest in recent years for its ability to probe the structure, function and cellular nanomechanics inherent to specific biological cells. In particular, we have used AFM to probe the important structure-function relationships of the bacterium Streptococcus mutans. S. mutans is the primary aetiological agent in human dental caries (tooth decay), and is of medical importance due to the virulence properties of these cells in biofilm initiation and formation, leading to increased tolerance to antibiotics. We have used AFM to characterize the unique surface structures of distinct mutants of S. mutans. These mutations are located in specific genes that encode surface proteins, thus using AFM we have resolved characteristic surface features for mutant strains compared to the wild type. Ultimately, our characterization of surface morphology has shown distinct differences in the local properties displayed by various S. mutans strains on the nanoscale, which is imperative for understanding the collective properties of these cells in biofilm formation.

  3. Isolation and characterization of Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic bacterium which reductively dechlorinates chlorophenolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utkin, I; Woese, C; Wiegel, J

    1994-10-01

    An organism that is able to reductively ortho-dechlorinate 2,4-dichlorophenol and 3-chloro-4-hydroxyphenylacetate (3-Cl-4-OHPA) was isolated from a methanogenic lake sediment. This organism, an anaerobic, motile, Gram-type-positive, rod-shaped bacterium, grew in the presence of 0.1% yeast extract when pyruvate, lactate, formate, or hydrogen was used as the electron donor for reductive dehalogenation of 3-Cl-4-OHPA. Sulfite, thiosulfate, and sulfur were reduced to sulfide, nitrate was reduced to nitrite, and fumarate was reduced to succinate. Dissimilatory reduction of sulfate could not be demonstrated, and no adenylylsulfate reductase was detected with an immunoassay. The organism fermented two pyruvate molecules to one lactate molecule, one acetate molecule, and one carbon dioxide molecule. The pH and temperature optima for both growth and dechlorination of 3-Cl-4-OHPA were 7.5 and 38 degrees C, respectively. The doubling time under these conditions was approximately 3.5 h. On the basis of the results of a 16S rRNA analysis and the inability of the organism to use sulfate as an electron acceptor, strain JW/IU-DC1 is described as the type strain of the new taxon Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans gen. nov., sp. nov.

  4. Characterisation of the phenanthrene degradation-related genes and degrading ability of a newly isolated copper-tolerant bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mengke; Yang, Ying; Jiang, Longfei; Hong, Qing; Zhang, Dayi; Shen, Zhenguo; Yin, Hua; Luo, Chunling

    2017-01-01

    A copper-tolerant phenanthrene (PHE)-degrading bacterium, strain Sphingobium sp. PHE-1, was newly isolated from the activated sludge in a wastewater treatment plant. Two key genes, ahdA1b-1 encoding polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase (PAH-RHDɑ) and xyLE encoding catechol-2,3-dioxygenase (C23O), involved in the PHE metabolism by strain PHE-1 were identified. The PAH-RHD gene cluster showed 96% identity with the same cluster of Sphingomonas sp. P2. Our results indicated the induced transcription of xylE and ahdA1b-1 genes by PHE, simultaneously promoted by Cu(II). For the first time, high concentration of Cu(II) is found to encourage the expression of PAH-RHDɑ and C23O genes during PHE degradation. Applying Sphingomonas PHE-1 in PHE-contaminated soils for bioaugmentation, the abundance of xylE gene was increased by the planting of ryegrass and the presence of Cu(II), which, in turn, benefited ryegrass growth. The best performance of PHE degradation and the highest abundance of xylE genes occurred in PHE-copper co-contaminated soils planted with ryegrass. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Heterologous expression of predicted promoter site for paraquat-inducible genes of the bacterium Chromobacterium violaceum is increased by plumbagin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Eyre Gabriel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate functionally the effect of plumbagin on the heterologous expression of a predicted promoter region of open reading frames of paraquat-inducible (pqi genes revealed during genome annotation analyses of the bacterium Chromobacterium violaceum. First, the promoter of interest was amplified using specific primers and cloned into a conjugative vector carrying the Escherichia coli lacZ gene without a promoter. The heterologous expression of the predicted promoter region was then examined in the presence of 50 µg/mL plumbagin by β-galactosidase expression assays. Significant differences were detected in the levels of β-galactosidase as a result of the activation of the promoter region of interest in response to plumbagin at the concentration tested. On the other hand, no growth of the wild strain of C. violaceum was found during its incubation in nutrient broth medium containing different concentrations of plumbagin compared to control group. The findings described herein demonstrate that the heterologous expression of a predicted promoter site of pqi genes of C. violaceum is induced by plumbagin in a fusion strain, giving insights into the functional characterization of intrinsic regulatory DNA motifs annotated in this bacterial genome.

  6. Heterologous expression of predicted promoter site for paraquat-inducible genes of the bacterium Chromobacterium violaceum is increased by plumbagin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Eyre Gabriel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2017v30n2p1 The aim of this study was to evaluate functionally the effect of plumbagin on the heterologous expression of a predicted promoter region of open reading frames of paraquat-inducible (pqi genes revealed during genome annotation analyses of the bacterium Chromobacterium violaceum. First, the promoter of interest was amplified using specific primers and cloned into a conjugative vector carrying the Escherichia coli lacZ gene without a promoter. The heterologous expression of the predicted promoter region was then examined in the presence of 50 µg/mL plumbagin by β-galactosidase expression assays. Significant differences were detected in the levels of β-galactosidase as a result of the activation of the promoter region of interest in response to plumbagin at the concentration tested. On the other hand, no growth of the wild strain of C. violaceum was found during its incubation in nutrient broth medium containing different concentrations of plumbagin compared to control group. The findings described herein demonstrate that the heterologous expression of a predicted promoter site of pqi genes of C. violaceum is induced by plumbagin in a fusion strain, giving insights into the functional characterization of intrinsic regulatory DNA motifs annotated in this bacterial genome.

  7. Isolation and characterization of a mesophilic heavy-metals-tolerant sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfomicrobium sp. from an enrichment culture using phosphogypsum as a sulfate source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azabou, Samia; Mechichi, Tahar; Patel, Bharat K.C.; Sayadi, Sami

    2007-01-01

    A sulfate-reducing bacterium, was isolated from a 6 month trained enrichment culture in an anaerobic media containing phosphogypsum as a sulfate source, and, designated strain SA2. Cells of strain SA2 were rod-shaped, did not form spores and stained Gram-negative. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolate revealed that it was related to members of the genus Desulfomicrobium (average sequence similarity of 98%) with Desulfomicrobium baculatum being the most closely related (sequence similarity of 99%). Strain SA2 used thiosulfate, sulfate, sulfite and elemental sulfur as electron acceptors and produced sulfide. Strain SA2 reduced sulfate contained in 1-20 g/L phosphogypsum to sulfide with reduction of sulfate contained in 2 g/L phosphogypsum being the optimum concentration. Strain SA2 grew with metalloid, halogenated and non-metal ions present in phosphogypsum and with added high concentrations of heavy metals (125 ppm Zn and 100 ppm Ni, W, Li and Al). The relative order for the inhibitory metal concentrations, based on the IC 50 values, was Cu, Te > Cd > Fe, Co, Mn > F, Se > Ni, Al, Li > Zn

  8. Cecembia lonarensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a haloalkalitolerant bacterium of the family Cyclobacteriaceae, isolated from a haloalkaline lake and emended descriptions of the genera Indibacter, Nitritalea and Belliella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anil Kumar, P; Srinivas, T N R; Madhu, S; Sravan, R; Singh, Shashi; Naqvi, S W A; Mayilraj, S; Shivaji, S

    2012-09-01

    A novel Gram-staining-negative, rod-shaped, non-motile bacterium, designated strain LW9(T), was isolated from a water sample collected from Lonar Lake of Buldhana district, Maharashtra, India. Colonies and broth cultures were reddish orange due to the presence of carotenoid pigments. Strain LW9(T) was positive for catalase, ornithine decarboxylase and lysine decarboxylase activities and negative for gelatinase, oxidase, urease and lipase activities. The predominant fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 0) (31.3 %), iso-C(16 : 0) (9.3 %), anteiso-C(15 : 0) (7.3 %), iso-C(16 : 1) H (6.1 %), summed feature 3 (comprising C(16 : 1)ω7c/C(16 : 1)ω6c; 5.9 %), iso-C(17 : 1)ω9c (5.4 %) and iso-C(17 : 0) 3-OH (5.0 %). Strain LW9(T) contained MK-7 as the major respiratory quinone. The polar lipids consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, two unidentified aminolipids and seven unidentified lipids. The DNA G+C content of strain LW9(T) was 40.5 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the type strains of Indibacter alkaliphilus and Aquiflexum balticum, two members of the family Cyclobacteriaceae (phylum 'Bacteroidetes') were the most closely related strains with sequence similarities of 93.0 and 94.0 %, respectively. Other members of the family Cyclobacteriaceae showed sequence similarities <93.0 %. Based on these phenotypic characteristics and on phylogenetic inference, strain LW9(T) is proposed as the representative of novel species in a new genus, Cecembia lonarensis gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of the type species, Cecembia lonarensis, is LW9(T) (= CCUG 58316(T) = KCTC 22772(T)). Emended descriptions of the genera Indibacter, Nitritalea and Belliella are also proposed.

  9. Optimization of lipid production in the oleaginous bacterium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The growth of an oleaginous bacteria strain Rhodococcus erythropolis on glycerol was studied. Lipid accumulation was influenced by the glycerol concentration, nitrogen source, nitrogen concentration, pH medium, incubation time and aeration rate. Under the best optimized flask culture medium; 30 g/L glycerol plus 0.75 ...

  10. Antagonistic bioactivity of an endophytic bacterium isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    one bacterial phytopathogen; it especially strongly inhibited Alternaria alternata, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Verticillium dahliae, Botrytis cinerea and Botrytis fabae. Identification of this strain based on morphology, physiological and chemical characteristics and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis demonstrated that it belonged ...

  11. Monitoring of a novel bacterium, Lactobacillus thermotolerans, in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-08-28

    Aug 28, 2012 ... Specificity test of the newly designed FISH probe for L. thermotolerans in FISH assay of pure culture of various species. Organism. Straina. Hybridization. Target strain. L. thermotolerans. JCM 11425T. +. Negative controls. Lactobacillus aviarius subsp. Araffinosus. JCM 1044. -. L. aviarius subsp. Aviaries.

  12. Active efflux of toluene in a solvent-resistant bacterium.

    OpenAIRE

    Isken, S; de Bont, J A

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the mechanisms behind the organic-solvent resistance of the solvent-tolerant strain Pseudomonas putida S12. By use of 14C-labeled toluene, we obtained evidence that an energy-dependent export system may be responsible for this resistance to toluene.

  13. Genome Sequence of Rhodoferax antarcticus ANT.BRT; A Psychrophilic Purple Nonsulfur Bacterium from an Antarctic Microbial Mat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Baker

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Rhodoferax antarcticus is an Antarctic purple nonsulfur bacterium and the only characterized anoxygenic phototroph that grows best below 20 °C. We present here a high-quality draft genome of Rfx. antarcticus strain ANT.BRT, isolated from an Antarctic microbial mat. The circular chromosome (3.8 Mbp of Rfx. antarcticus has a 59.1% guanine + cytosine (GC content and contains 4036 open reading frames. In addition, the bacterium contains a sizable plasmid (198.6 kbp, 48.4% GC with 226 open reading frames that comprises about 5% of the total genetic content. Surprisingly, genes encoding light-harvesting complexes 1 and 3 (LH1 and LH3, but not light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2, were identified in the photosynthesis gene cluster of the Rfx. antarcticus genome, a feature that is unique among purple phototrophs. Consistent with physiological studies that showed a strong capacity for nitrogen fixation in Rfx. antarcticus, a nitrogen fixation gene cluster encoding a molybdenum-type nitrogenase was present, but no alternative nitrogenases were identified despite the cold-active phenotype of this phototroph. Genes encoding two forms of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase were present in the Rfx. antarcticus genome, a feature that likely provides autotrophic flexibility under varying environmental conditions. Lastly, genes for assembly of both type IV pili and flagella are present, with the latter showing an unusual degree of clustering. This report represents the first genomic analysis of a psychrophilic anoxygenic phototroph and provides a glimpse of the genetic basis for maintaining a phototrophic lifestyle in a permanently cold, yet highly variable, environment.

  14. Rhodococcus biphenylivorans sp. nov., a polychlorinated biphenyl-degrading bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaomei; Liu, Yindong; Hashmi, Muhammad Zaffar; Hu, Jinxing; Ding, Linxian; Wu, Min; Shen, Chaofeng

    2015-01-01

    A Gram-positive, aerobic, non-motile and rod-coccus shaped novel actinobacterial strain, designated as TG9(T), was isolated from a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated sediment in Taizhou city, Zhejiang province, eastern China. The isolate was observed to grow at 10-45 °C (optimum 28-32 °C), pH 5.0-11.0 (optimum pH 7.0-8.0) and with 0-9.0 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 0-3.0 %). Comparison of the 16S rRNA gene sequences of strain TG9(T) and other members of the genus Rhodococcus showed that strain TG9(T) shared highest similarities with Rhodococcus pyridinivorans DSM 44555(T) (99.4 %), R. rhodochrous DSM 43241(T) (99.2 %), R. gordoniae DSM 44689(T) (99.2 %) and R. artemisiae DSM 45380(T) (98.2 %). However, low levels of DNA-DNA relatedness (15-48 %), which are below the 70 % limit for prokaryotic species identification, were obtained by DNA-DNA hybridization. Strain TG9(T) was found to contain meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid and arabinose and galactose in the whole-cell hydrolysate. Mycolic acids were found to be present. The major fatty acids were identified as C16:0, C16:1 ω7c and/or iso-C15:0 2-OH, 10-methyl C18:0 and C18:1 ω9c. The only menaquinone detected was MK-8 (H2). The major polar lipids detected were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, glycolipid and traces of some unknown lipids. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain TG9(T) was determined to be 62.8 %. The combined phenotypic and genotypic data show that the strain represents a novel species of the genus Rhodococcus for which the name Rhodococcus biphenylivorans sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain TG9(T) (=CGMCC 1.12975(T) = KCTC 29673(T) = MCCC 1K00286(T)).

  15. Genome analysis and physiological comparison of Alicycliphilus denitrificans strains BC and K601(T..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margreet J Oosterkamp

    Full Text Available The genomes of the Betaproteobacteria Alicycliphilus denitrificans strains BC and K601(T have been sequenced to get insight into the physiology of the two strains. Strain BC degrades benzene with chlorate as electron acceptor. The cyclohexanol-degrading denitrifying strain K601(T is not able to use chlorate as electron acceptor, while strain BC cannot degrade cyclohexanol. The 16S rRNA sequences of strains BC and K601(T are identical and the fatty acid methyl ester patterns of the strains are similar. Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST analysis of predicted open reading frames of both strains showed most hits with Acidovorax sp. JS42, a bacterium that degrades nitro-aromatics. The genomes include strain-specific plasmids (pAlide201 in strain K601(T and pAlide01 and pAlide02 in strain BC. Key genes of chlorate reduction in strain BC were located on a 120 kb megaplasmid (pAlide01, which was absent in strain K601(T. Genes involved in cyclohexanol degradation were only found in strain K601(T. Benzene and toluene are degraded via oxygenase-mediated pathways in both strains. Genes involved in the meta-cleavage pathway of catechol are present in the genomes of both strains. Strain BC also contains all genes of the ortho-cleavage pathway. The large number of mono- and dioxygenase genes in the genomes suggests that the two strains have a broader substrate range than known thus far.

  16. Reclassification of Clostridium proteoclasticum as Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus comb. nov., a butyrate-producing ruminal bacterium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moon, C. D.; Pacheco, D. M.; Kelly, W. J.; Leahy, S. C.; Li, D.; Kopečný, Jan; Attwood, G. T.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 58, - (2008), s. 2041-2045 ISSN 1466-5026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : Butyrivibrio * ruminal bacterium Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.222, year: 2008

  17. Carbohydrate utilization patterns for the extremely thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus reveal broad growth substrate preferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanfossen, A.L.; Verhaart, M.R.A.; Kengen, S.W.M.; Kelly, R.M.

    2009-01-01

    Co-utilization of hexoses and pentoses derived from lignocellulose is an attractive trait in microorganisms considered for consolidated biomass processing to biofuels. This issue was examined for the H2-producing, extremely thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus growing on

  18. Molecular characterization of the glucose isomerase from the thermophilic bacterium Fervidobacterium gondwanense

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluskens, L.D.; Zeilstra, J.B.; Geerling, A.C.M.; Vos, de W.M.; Oost, van der J.

    2010-01-01

    The gene coding for xylose isomerase from the thermophilic bacterium Fervidobacterium gondwanense was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The produced xylose isomerase (XylA), which closely resembles counterparts from Thermotoga maritima and T. neapolitana, was purified and characterized.

  19. High-level production of diacetyl in a metabolically engineered lactic acid bacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention provides a genetically modified lactic acid bacterium capable of producing diacetyl under aerobic conditions. Additionally the invention provides a method for producing diacetyl using the genetically modified lactic acid bacterium under aerobic conditions in the presence...... of a source of iron-containing porphyrin and a metal ion selected from Fe3+, Fe2+ and Cu2+. The lactic acid bacterium is genetically modified by deletion of those genes in its genome that encode polypeptides having lactate dehydrogenase (E.C 1.1.1.27/E.C.1.1.1.28); α-acetolactate decarboxylase (E.C 4.......C. 1.1.1.4/1.1.1.-) and alcohol dehydrogenase (E.C. 1.2.1.10) activity. The invention provides for use of the genetically modified lactic acid bacterium for the production of diacetyl and a food product....

  20. Evolutionary history of the plant pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas axonopodis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Mhedbi-Hajri

    Full Text Available Deciphering mechanisms shaping bacterial diversity should help to build tools to predict the emergence of infectious diseases. Xanthomonads are plant pathogenic bacteria found worldwide. Xanthomonas axonopodis is a genetically heterogeneous species clustering, into six groups, strains that are collectively pathogenic on a large number of plants. However, each strain displays a narrow host range. We address the question of the nature of the evolutionary processes--geographical and ecological speciation--that shaped this diversity. We assembled a large collection of X. axonopodis strains that were isolated over a long period, over continents, and from various hosts. Based on the sequence analysis of seven housekeeping genes, we found that recombination occurred as frequently as point mutation in the evolutionary history of X. axonopodis. However, the impact of recombination was about three times greater than the impact of mutation on the diversity observed in the whole dataset. We then reconstructed the clonal genealogy of the strains using coalescent and genealogy approaches and we studied the diversification of the pathogen using a model of divergence with migration. The suggested scenario involves a first step of generalist diversification that spanned over the last 25,000 years. A second step of ecology-driven specialization occurred during the past two centuries. Eventually, secondary contacts between host-specialized strains probably occurred as a result of agricultural development and intensification, allowing genetic exchanges of virulence-associated genes. These transfers may have favored the emergence of novel pathotypes. Finally, we argue that the largest ecological entity within X. axonopodis is the pathovar.

  1. Genetic characterization of type A enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agi Deguchi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens type A, is both a ubiquitous environmental bacterium and a major cause of human gastrointestinal disease, which usually involves strains producing C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE. The gene (cpe encoding this toxin can be carried on the chromosome or a large plasmid. Interestingly, strains carrying cpe on the chromosome and strains carrying cpe on a plasmid often exhibit different biological characteristics, such as resistance properties against heat. In this study, we investigated the genetic properties of C. perfringens by PCR-surveying 21 housekeeping genes and genes on representative plasmids and then confirmed those results by Southern blot assay (SB of five genes. Furthermore, sequencing analysis of eight housekeeping genes and multilocus sequence typing (MLST analysis were also performed. Fifty-eight C. perfringens strains were examined, including isolates from: food poisoning cases, human gastrointestinal disease cases, foods in Japan or the USA, or feces of healthy humans. In the PCR survey, eight of eleven housekeeping genes amplified positive reactions in all strains tested. However, by PCR survey and SB assay, one representative virulence gene, pfoA, was not detected in any strains carrying cpe on the chromosome. Genes involved in conjugative transfer of the cpe plasmid were also absent from almost all chromosomal cpe strains. MLST showed that, regardless of their geographic origin, date of isolation, or isolation source, chromosomal cpe isolates, i assemble into one definitive cluster ii lack pfoA and iii lack a plasmid related to the cpe plasmid. Similarly, independent of their origin, strains carrying a cpe plasmid also appear to be related, but are more variable than chromosomal cpe strains, possibly because of the instability of cpe-borne plasmid(s and/or the conjugative transfer of cpe-plasmid(s into unrelated C. perfringens strains.

  2. Influence of Environmental Parameters on Trichoderma Strains with Biocontrol Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsanna Antal

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Several mycoparasitic strains belonging to the filamentous fungal genus Trichoderma are promising candidates for the biological control of plant pathogenic fungi. When planning the application of antagonistic Trichoderma strains for the purposes of biological control, it is very important to consider the environmental parameters affecting the biocontrol agents in the soil. A series of abiotic and biotic environmental parameters has an influence on the biocontrol efficacy of Trichoderma. Some important parameters to be considered are the effects of temperature, water potential and pH, and the presence of pesticides, metal ions and antagonistic bacteria in the soil. Most of the Trichoderma strains are mesophilic. Low temperatures in winter may cause a problem during biological control by influencing the activity of the biocontrol agents. Another problem emerging during the application of Trichoderma strains as biocontrol agents is that they cannot tolerate dry conditions, however, we may need biocontrol agents against plant pathogenic fungi which are able to grow and cause disease even in dry soils. The pH characteristics of the soil also belong to the most important environmental parameters affecting the activities of mycoparasitic Trichoderma strains. Within the frames of a complex integrated plant protection strategy, we may have to combine Trichoderma strains with chemical pesticides or metal compounds, therefore it is important to collect information about the effects of pesticides and metal ions on the biocontrol strains. Antagonistic soil bacteria may also have negative effects on the biocontrol abilities of Trichoderma strains, therefore it may be advantageous if a biocontrol strain possesses bacterium- degrading abilities as well. This review will discuss the literature about the influence of temperature, water potential, pH, pesticides, metal ions and antagonistic bacteria on mycoparasitic Trichoderma strains including the results of our

  3. Effect of alginic acid decomposing bacterium on the growth of Laminaria japonica (Phaeophyceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, You; Tang, Xue-Xi; Yang, Zhen; Yu, Zhi-Ming

    2006-01-01

    We collected the diseased blades of Laminaria japonica from Yantai Sea Farm from October to December 2002, and the alginic acid decomposing bacterium on the diseased blade was isolated and purified, and was identified as Alteromonas espejiana. This bacterium was applied as the causative pathogen to infect the blades of L. japonica under laboratory conditions. The aim of the present study was to identify the effects of the bacterium on the growth of L. japonica, and to find the possibly effective mechanism. Results showed that: (1) The blades of L. japonica exhibited symptoms of lesion, bleaching and deterioration when infected by the bacterium, and their growth and photosynthesis were dramatically suppressed. At the same time, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation enhanced obviously, and the relative membrane permeability increased significantly. The contents of malonaldehyde (MDA) and free fatty acid in the microsomol membrane greatly elevated, but the phospholipid content decreased. Result suggested an obvious peroxidation and deesterrification in the blades of L. japonica when infected by the bacterium. (2) The simultaneous assay on the antioxidant enzyme activities demonstrated that superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) increased greatly when infected by the bacterium, but glutathione peroxidase (Gpx) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) did not exhibit active responses to the bacterium throughout the experiment. (3) The histomorphological observations gave a distinctive evidence of the severity of the lesions as well as the relative abundance in the bacterial population on the blades after infection. The bacterium firstly invaded into the endodermis of L. japonica and gathered around there, and then resulted in the membrane damage, cells corruption and ultimately, the death of L. japonica.

  4. Chitin Degradation Proteins Produced by the Marine Bacterium Vibrio harveyi Growing on Different Forms of Chitin

    OpenAIRE

    Svitil, A. L.; Chadhain, S.; Moore, J. A.; Kirchman, D. L.

    1997-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the number, diversity, and function of chitinases produced by bacteria, even though chitin is one of the most abundant polymers in nature. Because of the importance of chitin, especially in marine environments, we examined chitin-degrading proteins in the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi. This bacterium had a higher growth rate and more chitinase activity when grown on (beta)-chitin (isolated from squid pen) than on (alpha)-chitin (isolated from snow crab), pro...

  5. Decomposition of Corn Seed Hemicellulose (CSH)by Bacterium No.101 during Accumulating Culture

    OpenAIRE

    今里, 祥子; 大宮, 満男

    1981-01-01

    The bacterium No.101 inducibly produced Corn seed hemicellulase when Corn seed hemicellulose was used as a sole carbon source in the culture medium. The decomposition of crude Corn seed hemicellulose by the bacterium No.101 during an accumulating culture was studied. Analysis of the culture medium indicated that the Corn seed hemicellulose (M. W. 730,000) was decomposed into polysaccharides with molecular weights of 2,000-3,000 during the cultivation of bacteria for one week.

  6. Drug resistance analysis of bacterial strains isolated from burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L F; Li, J L; Ma, W H; Li, J Y

    2014-01-22

    This study aimed to analyze the spectrum and drug resistance of bacteria isolated from burn patients to provide a reference for rational clinical use of antibiotics. Up to 1914 bacterial strain specimens isolated from burn patients admitted to hospital between 2001 and 2010 were subjected to resistance monitoring by using the K-B paper disk method. Retrospective analysis was performed on drug resistance analysis of burn patients. The top eight bacterium strains according to detection rate. A total of 1355 strains of Gram-negative (G(-)) bacteria and 559 strains of Gram-positive (G(+)) bacteria were detected. The top eight bacterium strains, according to detection rate, were Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, and Enterococcus. Drug resistance rates were higher than 90% in A. baumannii, P. aeruginosa, S. epidermidis, and S. aureus, which accounted for 52.2, 21.7, 27.8, and 33.3%, respectively, of the entire sample. Those with drug resistance rates lower than 30% accounted for 4.3, 30.4, 16.7, and 16.7%, respectively. Multidrug-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE) accounted for 49.2 and 76.4% of the S. epidermis and S. aureus resistance, respectively. Antibacterial drugs that had drug resistance rates to MRSE and MRSA higher than 90% accounted for 38.9 and 72.2%, respectively, whereas those with lower than 30% drug resistance rates accounted for 11.1 and 16.7%, respectively. The burn patients enrolled in the study were mainly infected with G(-) bacteria. These results strongly suggest that clinicians should practice rational use of antibiotics based on drug susceptibility test results.

  7. Hamstring strain - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulled hamstring muscle; Sprain - hamstring ... There are 3 levels of hamstring strains: Grade 1 -- mild muscle strain or pull Grade 2 -- partial muscle tear Grade 3 -- complete muscle tear Recovery time depends ...

  8. Endosulfan degradation by a Rhodococcus strain isolated from earthworm gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, K; Agrawal, N; Farooq, M; Misra, R B; Hans, R K

    2006-07-01

    A Rhodococcus MTCC 6716 bacterial strain was isolated apparently for the first time from the gut microflora of an Indian earthworm (Metaphire posthuma). Endosulfan was used as a carbon source by the strain and degraded it up to 92.58% within 15 days. Furthermore, the isolated strain of the bacterium did not produce the persistent form of the toxic metabolite endosulfan sulfate. This strain exhibits luxury growth in minimal medium with high concentrations of endosulfan (80 microg mL(-1)). Degradation of the endosulfan occurred simultaneously with bacterial growth and an increase in chloride ion (87.1%) in the growth medium, suggesting nearly complete degradation of the insecticide. This strain is able to tolerate 45 degrees C and retain its degradation potential even under sunlight exposure. Since endosulfan is used worldwide for pest control and its residues have been retained for long periods in soil, water, and agricultural products, the strain isolated by us is valuable for bioremediation of endosulfan-contaminated soil and water.

  9. Obturator internus muscle strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caoimhe Byrne, MB BCh, BAO

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We report 2 cases of obturator internus muscle strains. The injuries occurred in young male athletes involved in kicking sports. Case 1 details an acute obturator internus muscle strain with associated adductor longus strain. Case 2 details an overuse injury of the bilateral obturator internus muscles. In each case, magnetic resonance imaging played a crucial role in accurate diagnosis.

  10. Bioaugmentation with endophytic bacterium E6S homologous to Achromobacter piechaudii enhances metal rhizoaccumulation in host Sedum plumbizincicola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying eMa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Application of hyperaccumulator–endophyte symbiotic systems is a potential approach to improve phytoremediation efficiency, since some beneficial endophytic bacteria are able to detoxify heavy metals, alter metal solubility in soil and facilitate plant growth. The objective of this study was to isolate multi-metal resistant and plant beneficial endophytic bacteria and to evaluate their role in enhancing plant growth and metal accumulation/translocation. The metal resistant endophytic bacterial strain E6S was isolated from stems of the Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator plant Sedum plumbizincicola growing in metalliferous mine soils using Dworkin and Foster salts minimal agar medium with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC as the sole nitrogen source, and identified as homologous to Achromobacter piechaudii based on morphological and biochemical characteristics, partial 16S rDNA sequence and phylogenetic analysis. Strain E6S showed high level of resistance to various metals (Cd, Zn and Pb. Besides utilizing ACC, strain E6S exhibited plant beneficial traits, such as solubilization of phosphate and production of indole-3-acetic acid. Inoculation with E6S significantly increased the bioavailability of Cd, Zn and Pb in soil. In addition, bacterial cells bound considerable amounts of metal ions in the following order: Zn ˃ Cd ˃ Pb. Inoculation of E6S significantly stimulated plant biomass, uptake and bioaccumulation of Cd, Zn and Pb. However, E6S greatly reduced the root to shoot translocation of Cd and Zn, indicating that bacterial inoculation assisted the host plant to uptake and store heavy metals in its root system. Inoculation with the endophytic bacterium E6S homologous to A. piechaudii can improve phytostabilization of metalliferous soils due to its effective ability to enhance in situ metal rhizoaccumulation in plants.

  11. Optimization of culture conditions and medium composition for the marine algicidal bacterium Alteromonas sp. DH46 by uniform design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing; Zheng, Wei; Tian, Yun; Wang, Guizhong; Zheng, Tianling

    2013-09-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) have led to extensive ecological and environmental issues and huge economic losses. Various HAB control techniques have been developed, and biological methods have been paid more attention. Algicidal bacteria is a general designation for bacteria which inhibit algal growth in a direct or indirect manner, and kill or damage the algal cells. A metabolite which is strongly toxic to the dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense was produced by strain DH46 of the alga-lysing bacterium Alteromonas sp. The culture conditions were optimized using a single-factor test method. Factors including carbon source, nitrogen source, temperature, initial pH value, rotational speed and salinity were studied. The results showed that the cultivation of the bacteria at 28°C and 180 r min-1 with initial pH 7 and 30 salt contcentration favored both the cell growth and the lysing effect of strain DH46. The optimal medium composition for strain DH46 was determined by means of uniform design experimentation, and the most important components influencing the cell density were tryptone, yeast extract, soluble starch, NaNO3 and MgSO4. When the following culture medium was used (tryptone 14.0g, yeast extract 1.63g, soluble starch 5.0 g, NaNO3 1.6 g, MgSO4 2.3 g in 1L), the largest bacterial dry weight (7.36 g L-1) was obtained, which was an enhancement of 107% compared to the initial medium; and the algal lysis rate was as high as 98.4% which increased nearly 10% after optimization.

  12. Isolation and characterization of a chromium-resistant bacterium Serratia sp. Cr-10 from a chromate-contaminated site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kundi; Li, Fuli [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao (China). Qingdao Inst. of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology

    2011-05-15

    A novel bacterium, Cr-10, was isolated from a chromium-contaminated site and capable of removing toxic chromium species from solution by reducing hexavalent chromium to an insoluble precipitate. Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene of strain Cr-10 showed that it was most closely related to Serratia rubidaea JCM 1240{sup T} (97.68%). Physiological and chemotaxonomic data also supported that strain Cr-10 was identified as Serratia sp., a genus which was never specially reported chromate-resistant before. Serratia sp., Cr-10 was tolerant to a concentration of 1,500 mg Cr(VI) L{sup -1}, which was the highest level reported until now. The optimum pH and temperature for reduction of Cr(VI) by Serratia sp. Cr-10 were found to be 7.0 and 37 C, respectively. The Cr(VI) reduction was significantly influenced by additional carbon sources, and among them fructose and lactose offered maximum reduction, with a rate of 0.28 and 0.25 mg Cr(VI) L{sup -1} h{sup -1}, respectively. The cell-free extracts and filtrate of the culture were able to reduce Cr(VI) while concentration of total chromium remained stable in the process, indicating that the enzyme-catalyzed mechanism was applied in Cr(VI) reduction by the isolate. Additionally, it was found that there was hardly any chromium on the cell surface of the strain, further supporting that reduction, rather than bioadsorption, plays a major role in the Cr(VI) removal. (orig.)

  13. Tailoring nutritional and process variables for hyperproduction of catalase from a novel isolated bacterium Geobacillus sp. BSS-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauldhar, Baljinder Singh; Sooch, Balwinder Singh

    2016-01-14

    Catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) is one of the important industrial enzyme employed in diagnostic and analytical methods in the form of biomarkers and biosensors in addition to their enormous applications in textile, paper, food and pharmaceutical sectors. The present study demonstrates the utility of a newly isolated and adapted strain of genus Geobacillus possessing unique combination of several industrially important extremophilic properties for the hyper production of catalase. The bacterium can grow over a wide range of pH (3-12) and temperature (10-90 °C) with extraordinary capability to produce catalase. A novel extremophilic strain belonging to genus Geobacillus was exploited for the production of catalase by tailoring its nutritional requirements and process variables. One variable at a time traditional approach followed by computational designing was applied to customize the fermentation process. A simple fermentation media containing only three components namely sucrose (0.55 %, w/v), yeast extract (1.0 %, w/v) and BaCl2 (0.08 %, w/v) was designed for the hyperproduction of catalase. A controlled and optimum air supply caused a tremendous increase in the enzyme production on moving the bioprocess from the flask to bioreactor level. The present paper reports high quantum of catalase production (105,000 IU/mg of cells) in a short fermentation time of 12 h. To the best of our knowledge, there is no report in the literature that matches the performance of the developed protocol for the catalase production. This is the first serious study covering intracellular catalase production from thermophilic genus Geobacillus. An increase in intracellular catalase production by 214.72 % was achieved in the optimized medium when transferred from the shake flask to the fermenter level. The extraordinary high production of catalase from Geobacillus sp. BSS-7 makes the isolated strain a prospective candidate for bulk catalase production on an industrial scale.

  14. Mechanism of Enhanced Activity of Liposome-Entrapped Aminoglycosides against Resistant Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugabe, Clement; Halwani, Majed; Azghani, Ali O.; Lafrenie, Robert M.; Omri, Abdelwahab

    2006-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is inherently resistant to most conventional antibiotics. The mechanism of resistance of this bacterium is mainly associated with the low permeability of its outer membrane to these agents. We sought to assess the bactericidal efficacy of liposome-entrapped aminoglycosides against resistant clinical strains of P. aeruginosa and to define the mechanism of liposome-bacterium interactions. Aminoglycosides were incorporated into liposomes, and the bactericidal efficacies of both free and liposomal drugs were evaluated. To define the mechanism of liposome-bacterium interactions, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), flow cytometry, lipid mixing assay, and immunocytochemistry were employed. Encapsulation of aminoglycosides into liposomes significantly increased their antibacterial activity against the resistant strains used in this study (MICs of ≥32 versus ≤8 μg/ml). TEM observations showed that liposomes interact intimately with the outer membrane of P. aeruginosa, leading to the membrane deformation. The flow cytometry and lipid mixing assays confirmed liposome-bacterial membrane fusion, which increased as a function of incubation time. The maximum fusion rate was 54.3% ± 1.5% for an antibiotic-sensitive strain of P. aeruginosa and 57.8% ± 1.9% for a drug-resistant strain. The fusion between liposomes and P. aeruginosa significantly enhanced the antibiotics' penetration into the bacterial cells (3.2 ± 2.3 versus 24.2 ± 6.2 gold particles/bacterium, P ≤ 0.001). Our data suggest that liposome-entrapped antibiotics could successfully resolve infections caused by antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa through an enhanced mechanism of drug entry into the bacterial cells. PMID:16723560

  15. Whole-Genome Sequence of Chlamydia abortus Strain GN6 Isolated from Aborted Yak Fetus

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhaocai; Cai, Jinshan; Cao, Xiaoan; Lou, Zhongzi; Chao, Yilin; Kan, Wei; Zhou, Jizhang

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The obligate intracellular Gram-negative bacterium Chlamydia abortus is one of the causative agents of abortion and fetal loss in sheep, goats, and cattle in many countries. It also affects the reproductivity of yaks (Bos grunniens). This study reports the whole-genome sequence of Chlamydia abortus strain GN6, which was isolated from aborted yak fetus in Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, China.

  16. Whole-Genome Sequence of Chlamydia abortus Strain GN6 Isolated from Aborted Yak Fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaocai; Cai, Jinshan; Cao, Xiaoan; Lou, Zhongzi; Chao, Yilin; Kan, Wei; Zhou, Jizhang

    2017-08-31

    The obligate intracellular Gram-negative bacterium Chlamydia abortus is one of the causative agents of abortion and fetal loss in sheep, goats, and cattle in many countries. It also affects the reproductivity of yaks ( Bos grunniens ). This study reports the whole-genome sequence of Chlamydia abortus strain GN6, which was isolated from aborted yak fetus in Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, China. Copyright © 2017 Li et al.

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Aeromonas sobria Strain 08005, Isolated from Sick Rana catesbeiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiu-Hua; Zhou, Chen; Lin, Qi; Lu, Zhen; He, Li-Bin; Guo, Song-Lin

    2017-01-12

    Aeromonas sobria is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped, and ubiquitous bacterium. We present here the draft genome sequence of A. sobria strain 08005, isolated from an infected bullfrog. It is composed of 66 contigs totaling 4,678,951 bp, contains 4,252 coding DNA sequences (CDSs), four rRNAs, and 88 tRNA sequences, and shows the presence of various putative virulence-related genes. Copyright © 2017 Yang et al.

  18. Genomic Diversity in the Endosymbiotic Bacterium Rhizobium leguminosarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Cañizares, Carmen; Jorrín, Beatriz; Durán, David; Nadendla, Suvarna; Rubio-Sanz, Laura; Lanza, Mónica; Prieto, Rosa Isabel; Brito, Belén; Giglio, Michelle G.; Ruiz-Argüeso, Tomás; Imperial, Juan

    2018-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae is a soil α-proteobacterium that establishes a diazotrophic symbiosis with different legumes of the Fabeae tribe. The number of genome sequences from rhizobial strains available in public databases is constantly increasing, although complete, fully annotated genome structures from rhizobial genomes are scarce. In this work, we report and analyse the complete genome of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae UPM791. Whole genome sequencing can provide new insights into the genetic features contributing to symbiotically relevant processes such as bacterial adaptation to the rhizosphere, mechanisms for efficient competition with other bacteria, and the ability to establish a complex signalling dialogue with legumes, to enter the root without triggering plant defenses, and, ultimately, to fix nitrogen within the host. Comparison of the complete genome sequences of two strains of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae, 3841 and UPM791, highlights the existence of different symbiotic plasmids and a common core chromosome. Specific genomic traits, such as plasmid content or a distinctive regulation, define differential physiological capabilities of these endosymbionts. Among them, strain UPM791 presents unique adaptations for recycling the hydrogen generated in the nitrogen fixation process. PMID:29364862

  19. Analysis of the genetic variation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains by multiple genome alignments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales Juan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent determination of the complete nucleotide sequence of several Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB genomes allows the use of comparative genomics as a tool for dissecting the nature and consequence of genetic variability within this species. The multiple alignment of the genomes of clinical strains (CDC1551, F11, Haarlem and C, along with the genomes of laboratory strains (H37Rv and H37Ra, provides new insights on the mechanisms of adaptation of this bacterium to the human host. Findings The genetic variation found in six M. tuberculosis strains does not involve significant genomic rearrangements. Most of the variation results from deletion and transposition events preferentially associated with insertion sequences and genes of the PE/PPE family but not with genes implicated in virulence. Using a Perl-based software islandsanalyser, which creates a representation of the genetic variation in the genome, we identified differences in the patterns of distribution and frequency of the polymorphisms across the genome. The identification of genes displaying strain-specific polymorphisms and the extrapolation of the number of strain-specific polymorphisms to an unlimited number of genomes indicates that the different strains contain a limited number of unique polymorphisms. Conclusion The comparison of multiple genomes demonstrates that the M. tuberculosis genome is currently undergoing an active process of gene decay, analogous to the adaptation process of obligate bacterial symbionts. This observation opens new perspectives into the evolution and the understanding of the pathogenesis of this bacterium.

  20. Vibrio algivorus sp. nov., an alginate- and agarose-assimilating bacterium isolated from the gut flora of a turban shell marine snail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Hidetaka; Chinen, Akito; Fukuda, Hiroo; Usuda, Yoshihiro

    2016-08-01

    An agarose- and alginate-assimilating, Gram-reaction-negative, non-motile, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain SA2T, was isolated from the gut of a turban shell sea snail (Turbo cornutus) collected near Noto Peninsula, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain SA2T was 99.59 % identical to that of Vibrio rumoiensis DSM 19141T and 98.19 % identical to that of Vibrio litoralis DSM 17657T. This suggested that strain SA2T could be a subspecies of V. rumoiensis or V. litoralis. However, DNA-DNA hybridization results showed only 37.5 % relatedness to DSM 19141T and 44.7 % relatedness to DSM 17657T, which was far lower than the 70 % widely accepted to define common species. Strain SA2T could assimilate agarose as a sole carbon source, whereas strains DSM 19141T and DSM 17657T could not assimilate it at all. Furthermore, results using API 20NE and API ZYM kits indicated that their enzymic and physiological phenotypes were also different. These results suggested that strain SA2T represented a novel species within the genus Vibrio. The major isoprenoid quinone in SA2T was Q-8, and its major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol. The major fatty acids were summed feature 3, (comprising C16 : 1ω6c and/or C16 : 1ω7c), C16 : 0, and summed feature 8 (comprising C18 : 1ω6c and/or C18 : 1ω7c). The DNA G+C content of SA2T was 40.7 mol%. The name proposed for this novel species of the genus Vibrio is Vibrio algivorus sp. nov., with the type strain designated SA2T (=DSM 29824T=NBRC 111146T).

  1. Sepsis and Hemocyte Loss in Honey Bees (Apis mellifera) Infected with Serratia marcescens Strain Sicaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burritt, Nancy L.; Foss, Nicole J.; Neeno-Eckwall, Eric C.; Church, James O.; Hildebrand, Jacob A.; Warshauer, David M.; Perna, Nicole T.; Burritt, James B.

    2016-01-01

    Global loss of honey bee colonies is threatening the human food supply. Diverse pathogens reduce honey bee hardiness needed to sustain colonies, especially in winter. We isolated a free-living Gram negative bacillus from hemolymph of worker honey bees (Apis mellifera) found separated from winter clusters. In some hives, greater than 90% of the dying bees detached from the winter cluster were found to contain this bacterium in their hemolymph. Throughout the year, the same organism was rarely found in bees engaged in normal hive activities, but was detected in about half of Varroa destructor mites obtained from colonies that housed the septic bees. Flow cytometry of hemolymph from septic bees showed a significant reduction of plasmatocytes and other types of hemocytes. Interpretation of the16S rRNA sequence of the bacterium indicated that it belongs to the Serratia genus of Gram-negative Gammaproteobacteria, which has not previously been implicated as a pathogen of adult honey bees. Complete genome sequence analysis of the bacterium supported its classification as a novel strain of Serratia marcescens, which was designated as S. marcescens strain sicaria (Ss1). When compared with other strains of S. marcescens, Ss1 demonstrated several phenotypic and genetic differences, including 65 genes not previously found in other Serratia genomes. Some of the unique genes we identified in Ss1 were related to those from bacterial insect pathogens and commensals. Recovery of this organism extends a complex pathosphere of agents which may contribute to failure of honey bee colonies. PMID:28002470

  2. Sepsis and Hemocyte Loss in Honey Bees (Apis mellifera) Infected with Serratia marcescens Strain Sicaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burritt, Nancy L; Foss, Nicole J; Neeno-Eckwall, Eric C; Church, James O; Hilger, Anna M; Hildebrand, Jacob A; Warshauer, David M; Perna, Nicole T; Burritt, James B

    2016-01-01

    Global loss of honey bee colonies is threatening the human food supply. Diverse pathogens reduce honey bee hardiness needed to sustain colonies, especially in winter. We isolated a free-living Gram negative bacillus from hemolymph of worker honey bees (Apis mellifera) found separated from winter clusters. In some hives, greater than 90% of the dying bees detached from the winter cluster were found to contain this bacterium in their hemolymph. Throughout the year, the same organism was rarely found in bees engaged in normal hive activities, but was detected in about half of Varroa destructor mites obtained from colonies that housed the septic bees. Flow cytometry of hemolymph from septic bees showed a significant reduction of plasmatocytes and other types of hemocytes. Interpretation of the16S rRNA sequence of the bacterium indicated that it belongs to the Serratia genus of Gram-negative Gammaproteobacteria, which has not previously been implicated as a pathogen of adult honey bees. Complete genome sequence analysis of the bacterium supported its classification as a novel strain of Serratia marcescens, which was designated as S. marcescens strain sicaria (Ss1). When compared with other strains of S. marcescens, Ss1 demonstrated several phenotypic and genetic differences, including 65 genes not previously found in other Serratia genomes. Some of the unique genes we identified in Ss1 were related to those from bacterial insect pathogens and commensals. Recovery of this organism extends a complex pathosphere of agents which may contribute to failure of honey bee colonies.

  3. Pantoea agglomerans : a mysterious bacterium of evil and good. Part III. Deleterious effects: infections of humans, animals and plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Dutkiewicz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pantoea agglomerans , a bacterium associated with plants, is not an obligate infectious agent in humans. However, it could be a cause of opportunistic human infections, mostly by wound infection with plant material, or as a hospital-acquired infection, mostly in immunocompromised individuals. Wound infection with P. agglomerans usually follow piercing or laceration of skin with a plant thorn, wooden splinter or other plant material and subsequent inoculation of the plant-residing bacteria, mostly during performing of agricultural occupations and gardening, or children playing. Septic arthritis or synovitis appears as a common clinical outcome of exogenous infection with P. agglomerans , others include endophthalmitis, periostitis, endocarditis and osteomyelitis. Another major reason for clinical infection with P. agglomerans is exposure of hospitalized, often immunodeficient individuals to medical equipment or fluids contaminated with this bacterium. Epidemics of nosocomial septicemia with fatal cases have been described in several countries, both in adult and paediatric patients. In most cases, however, the clinical course of the hospital-acquired disease was mild and application of the proper antibiotic treatment led to full recovery. Compared to humans, there are only few reports on infectious diseases caused by Pantoea agglomerans in vertebrate animals. This species has been identified as a possible cause of equine abortion and placentitis and a haemorrhagic disease in dolphin fish ( Coryphaena hippurus . P. agglomerans strains occur commonly, usually as symbionts, in insects and other arthropods. Pantoea agglomerans usually occurs in plants as an epi- or endophytic symbiont, often as mutualist. Nevertheless, this species has also also been identified as a cause of diseases in a range of cultivable plants, such as cotton, sweet onion, rice, maize, sorghum, bamboo, walnut, an ornamental plant called Chinese taro ( Alocasia cucullata , and a

  4. Pantoea agglomerans: a mysterious bacterium of evil and good. Part III. Deleterious effects: infections of humans, animals and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Barbara; Kinga Lemieszek, Marta; Golec, Marcin; Milanowski, Janusz

    2016-06-02

    Pantoea agglomerans, a bacterium associated with plants, is not an obligate infectious agent in humans. However, it could be a cause of opportunistic human infections, mostly by wound infection with plant material, or as a hospital-acquired infection, mostly in immunocompromised individuals. Wound infection with P. agglomerans usually follow piercing or laceration of skin with a plant thorn, wooden splinter or other plant material and subsequent inoculation of the plant-residing bacteria, mostly during performing of agricultural occupations and gardening, or children playing. Septic arthritis or synovitis appears as a common clinical outcome of exogenous infection with P. agglomerans, others include endophthalmitis, periostitis, endocarditis and osteomyelitis. Another major reason for clinical infection with P. agglomerans is exposure of hospitalized, often immunodeficient individuals to medical equipment or fluids contaminated with this bacterium. Epidemics of nosocomial septicemia with fatal cases have been described in several countries, both in adult and paediatric patients. In most cases, however, the clinical course of the hospital-acquired disease was mild and application of the proper antibiotic treatment led to full recovery. Compared to humans, there are only few reports on infectious diseases caused by Pantoea agglomerans in vertebrate animals. This species has been identified as a possible cause of equine abortion and placentitis and a haemorrhagic disease in dolphin fish (Coryphaena hippurus). P. agglomerans strains occur commonly, usually as symbionts, in insects and other arthropods. Pantoea agglomerans usually occurs in plants as an epi- or endophytic symbiont, often as mutualist. Nevertheless, this species has also also been identified as a cause of diseases in a range of cultivable plants, such as cotton, sweet onion, rice, maize, sorghum, bamboo, walnut, an ornamental plant called Chinese taro (Alocasia cucullata), and a grass called onion couch

  5. A strain gauge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The invention relates to a strain gauge of a carrier layer and a meandering measurement grid positioned on the carrier layer, wherein the strain gauge comprises two reinforcement members positioned on the carrier layer at opposite ends of the measurement grid in the axial direction....... The reinforcement members are each placed within a certain axial distance to the measurement grid with the axial distance being equal to or smaller than a factor times the grid spacing. The invention further relates to a multi-axial strain gauge such as a bi-axial strain gauge or a strain gauge rosette where each...... of the strain gauges comprises reinforcement members. The invention further relates to a method for manufacturing a strain gauge as mentioned above....

  6. Tepidibacillus infernus sp. nov., a moderately thermophilic, selenate- and arsenate-respiring hydrolytic bacterium isolated from a gold mine, and emended description of the genus Tepidibacillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podosokorskaya, Olga A; Merkel, Alexander Y; Gavrilov, Sergey N; Fedoseev, Igor; Heerden, Esta van; Cason, Errol D; Novikov, Andrey A; Kolganova, Tatyana V; Korzhenkov, Aleksei A; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Kublanov, Ilya V

    2016-08-01

    A novel aerotolerant anaerobic, moderately thermophilic, organotrophic bacterium, strain MBL-TLPT, was isolated from a sample of microbial mat, developed under the flow of subsurface water in TauTona gold mine, South Africa. Cells of the new isolate were flagellated, spore-forming rods, 0.25-0.5 µm in width and 3-15 µm in length. Strain MBL-TLPT grew in the temperature range from 25 to 58 °C, pH range from 5.6 to 8.8 and at NaCl concentration from 0 to 85 g l-1. The isolate was able to ferment yeast extract and mono-, oligo- and polysaccharides, including starch and xanthan gum. The G+C content of the DNA was 35 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences of strain MBL-TLPT and relatives showed its affiliation to the genus Tepidibacillus. Tepidibacillus fermentans STGHT was its closest relative (97.1 % identity of 16S rRNA gene sequences). Based on phylogenetic analysis and the physiological properties of the novel isolate, we propose a novel species, Tepidibacillus infernus sp. nov., with MBL-TLPT(=DSM 28123T=VKM В-2949T) as the type strain.

  7. The phosphotransferase system gene ptsI in the endophytic bacterium Bacillus cereus is required for biofilm formation, colonization, and biocontrol against wheat sharp eyespot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yu-Bin; Chen, Mai; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Miao; Wang, Ying; Huang, Qiu-bin; Wang, Xue; Wang, Gang

    2014-05-01

    Natural resistance of wheat plants to wheat sharp eyespot is inadequate, and new strategies for controlling the disease are required. Biological control is an alternative and attractive way of reducing the use of chemicals in agriculture. In this study, we investigated the biocontrol properties of endophytic bacterium Bacillus cereus strain 0-9, which was isolated from the root systems of healthy wheat varieties. The phosphotransferase system is a major regulator of carbohydrate metabolism in bacteria. Enzyme I is one of the protein components of this system. Specific disruption and complementation of the enzyme I-coding gene ptsI from B. cereus was achieved through homologous recombination. Disruption of ptsI in B. cereus caused a 70% reduction in biofilm formation, a 30.4% decrease in biocontrol efficacy, and a 1000-fold reduction in colonization. The growth of ΔptsI mutant strain on G-tris synthetic medium containing glucose as the exclusive carbon source was also reduced. Wild-type properties could be restored to the ΔptsI mutant strain by ptsI complementation. These results suggested that ptsI may be one of the key genes involved in biofilm formation, colonization, and biocontrol of B. cereus and that B. cereus wild-type strain 0-9 may be an ideal biocontrol agent for controlling wheat sharp eyespot. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Desulfotignum toluenicum sp. nov., a novel toluene-degrading, sulphate-reducing bacterium isolated from an oil-reservoir model column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ommedal, Hege; Torsvik, Terje

    2007-12-01

    A Gram-negative, sulphate-reducing bacterium (strain H3(T)) was isolated from an oil-reservoir model column. The new isolate was able to oxidize toluene coupled to hydrogen sulphide production. For growth, the optimum salt concentration was 1.5 % (w/v), the optimum pH was 7.2 and the optimum temperature was 34 degrees C. The cells were straight to slightly curved rods, 0.6-1.0 microm in diameter and 1.4-2.5 microm in length. The predominant fatty acids were C(16 : 0), C(16 : 1)omega7c and C(17 : 0) cyclo, and the cells also contained dimethylacetals. Cloning and sequencing of a 1505 bp long fragment of the 16S rRNA gene showed that strain H3(T) is a member of the Deltaproteobacteria and is related closely to Desulfotignum balticum DSM 7044(T). The G+C content of the DNA was 52.0 mol% and the DNA-DNA similarity to D. balticum DSM 7044(T) was 56.1 %. Based on differences in DNA sequence and the unique property of toluene degradation, it is proposed that strain H3(T) should be designated a member of a novel species within the genus Desulfotignum, for which the name Desulfotignum toluenicum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is H3(T) (=DSM 18732(T)=ATCC BAA-1460(T)).

  9. Selection of the N-acylhomoserine lactone-degrading bacterium Alteromonas stellipolaris PQQ-42 and of its potential for biocontrol in aquaculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta eTorres

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The production of virulence factors by many pathogenic microorganisms depends on the intercellular communication system called quorum sensing (QS, which involves the production and release of signal molecules known as autoinducers. Based on this, new-therapeutic strategies have emerged for the treatment of a variety of infections, such as the enzymatic degradation of signalling molecules, known as quorum quenching (QQ. In this study, we present the screening of QQ activity amongst 450 strains isolated from a bivalve hatchery in Granada (Spain, and the selection of the strain PQQ-42, which degrades a wide range of N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs. The selected strain, identified as Alteromonas stellipolaris, degraded the accumulation of AHLs and reduced the production of protease and chitinase and swimming motility of a Vibrio species in co-cultivation experiments in vitro. In the bio-control experiment, strain PQQ-42 significantly reduced the pathogenicity of V. mediterranei VibC-Oc-097 upon the coral Oculina patagonica showing a lower degree of tissue damage (29.25±14.63 % in its presence, compared to when the coral was infected with V. mediterranei VibC-Oc-097 alone (77.53±13.22 %. Our results suggest that this AHL-degrading bacterium may have biotechnological applications in aquaculture.

  10. A halophilic bacterium inhabiting the warm, CaCl2-rich brine of the perennially ice-covered Lake Vanda, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tregoning, George S; Kempher, Megan L; Jung, Deborah O; Samarkin, Vladimir A; Joye, Samantha B; Madigan, Michael T

    2015-03-01

    Lake Vanda is a perennially ice-covered and stratified lake in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The lake develops a distinct chemocline at about a 50-m depth, where the waters transition from cool, oxic, and fresh to warm, sulfidic, and hypersaline. The bottom water brine is unique, as the highly chaotropic salts CaCl2 and MgCl2 predominate, and CaCl2 levels are the highest of those in any known microbial habitat. Enrichment techniques were used to isolate 15 strains of heterotrophic bacteria from the Lake Vanda brine. Despite direct supplementation of the brine samples with different organic substrates in primary enrichments, the same organism, a relative of the halophilic bacterium Halomonas (Gammaproteobacteria), was isolated from all depths sampled. The Lake Vanda (VAN) strains were obligate aerobes and showed broad pH, salinity, and temperature ranges for growth, consistent with the physicochemical properties of the brine. VAN strains were halophilic and quite CaCl2 tolerant but did not require CaCl2 for growth. The fact that only VAN strain-like organisms appeared in our enrichments hints that the highly chaotropic nature of the Lake Vanda brine may place unusual physiological constraints on the bacterial community that inhabits it. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Genome sequence of the thermophilic sulfate-reducing ocean bacterium Thermodesulfatator indicus type strain (CIR29812T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

    2012-01-01

    Thermodesulfatator indicus Moussard et al. 2004 is a member of the genomically so far poorly characterized family Thermodesulfobacteriaceae in the phylum Thermodesulfobacteria. Members of this phylum are of interest because they represent a distinct, deep-branching, Gram-negative lineage. T. indicus is an anaerobic, thermophilic, chemolithoautotrophic sulfate reducer isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. The 2,322,224 bp long chromosome with its 2,233 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  12. Complete genome sequence of the thermophilic sulfate-reducing ocean bacterium Thermodesulfatator indicus type strain (CIR29812(T)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Iain; Saunders, Elizabeth; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Chang, Yun-Juan; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2012-05-25

    Thermodesulfatator indicus Moussard et al. 2004 is a member of the Thermodesulfobacteriaceae, a family in the phylum Thermodesulfobacteria that is currently poorly characterized at the genome level. Members of this phylum are of interest because they represent a distinct, deep-branching, Gram-negative lineage. T. indicus is an anaerobic, thermophilic, chemolithoautotrophic sulfate reducer isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. The 2,322,224 bp long chromosome with its 2,233 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  13. An attenuated strain of the facultative intracellular bacterium Francisella tularensis can iscape the phagosome of monocytic cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Golovliov, I.; Baranov, V.; Krocová, Z.; Kovářová, Hana; Sjostedt, A.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 71, - (2003), s. 5940-5950 ISSN 0019-9567 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A033 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5045916 Keywords : Francisella tularensis Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.875, year: 2003

  14. Complete genome sequence of 'Thermobaculum terrenum' type strain (YNP1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Hajnalka; Cleland, David; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Lu, Megan; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C; Göker, Markus; Tindall, Brian J; Beck, Brian; McDermott, Timothy R; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Cheng, Jan-Fang

    2010-10-27

    'Thermobaculum terrenum' Botero et al. 2004 is the sole species within the proposed genus 'Thermobaculum'. Strain YNP1(T) is the only cultivated member of an acid tolerant, extremely thermophilic species belonging to a phylogenetically isolated environmental clone group within the phylum Chloroflexi. At present, the name 'Thermobaculum terrenum' is not yet validly published as it contravenes Rule 30 (3a) of the Bacteriological Code. The bacterium was isolated from a slightly acidic extreme thermal soil in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming (USA). Depending on its final taxonomic allocation, this is likely to be the third completed genome sequence of a member of the class Thermomicrobia and the seventh type strain genome from the phylum Chloroflexi. The 3,101,581 bp long genome with its 2,872 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  15. Biodegradation of malathion by Bacillus licheniformis strain ML-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Sara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Malathion, a well-known organophosphate pesticide, has been used in agriculture over the last two decades for controlling pests of economically important crops. In the present study, a single bacterium, ML-1, was isolated by soil-enrichment technique and identified as Bacillus licheniformis on the basis of the 16S rRNA technique. The bacterium was grown in carbon-free minimal salt medium (MSM and was found to be very efficient in utilizing malathion as the sole source of carbon. Biodegradation experiments were performed in MSM without carbon source to determine the malathion degradation by the selected strain, and the residues of malathion were determined quantitatively using HPLC techniques. Bacillus licheniformis showed very promising results and efficiently consumed malathion as the sole carbon source via malathion carboxylesterase (MCE, and about 78% malathion was degraded within 5 days. The carboxylesterase activity was determined by using crude extract while using malathion as substrate, and the residues were determined by HPLC. It has been found that the MCE hydrolyzed 87% malathion within 96 h of incubation. Characterization of crude MCE revealed that the enzyme is robust in nature in terms of organic solvents, as it was found to be stable in various concentrations of ethanol and acetonitrile. Similarly, and it can work in a wide pH and temperature range. The results of this study highlighted the potential of Bacillus licheniformis strain ML-1 as a biodegrader that can be used for the bioremediation of malathion-contaminated soil.

  16. Culture conditions of Roseobacter strain 27-4 affect its attachment and biofilm formation as quantified by real-time PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Jesper Bartholin; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Bagge-Ravn, D.

    2006-01-01

    The fish probiotic bacterium Roseobacter strain 27-4 grows only as rosettes and produces its antibacterial compound under static growth conditions. It forms three-dimensional biofilms when precultured under static conditions. We quantified attachment of Roseobacter strain 27-4 using a direct real......-time PCR method and demonstrated that the bacteria attached more efficiently to surfaces during static growth than under aerated conditions.......The fish probiotic bacterium Roseobacter strain 27-4 grows only as rosettes and produces its antibacterial compound under static growth conditions. It forms three-dimensional biofilms when precultured under static conditions. We quantified attachment of Roseobacter strain 27-4 using a direct real...

  17. Purification of a glutathione S-transferase and a glutathione conjugate-specific dehydrogenase involved in isoprene metabolism in Rhodococcus sp. strain AD45

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hylckama Vlieg , van Johannes; Kingma, Jaap; Kruizinga, Wim; Janssen, Dick B.

    A glutathione S transferase (GST) with activity toward 1,2-eposy-2-methyl-3-butene (isoprene monoxide) and cis-1,2-dichloroepoxyethane was purified from the isoprene-utilizing bacterium Rhodococcus sp. strain AD45, The homodimeric enzyme (two subunits of 27 kDa each) catalyzed the glutathione

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of the Extremely Halophilic Bacillus sp. Strain SB49, Isolated from a Salt Crystallizer Pond of the Little Rann of Kutch, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Rinku; Thomas, Manesh; Sherathia, Dharmesh; Dalsania, Trupti; Patel, Ilaxi; Savsani, Kinjal; Ghorai, Sucheta; Vanpariya, Sejal; Sukhadiya, Bhoomika; Mandaliya, Mona; Rupapara, Rupal; Rawal, Priya

    2013-01-01

    Here we report the draft whole-genome sequence (3.72 Mbp) of Bacillus sp. strain SB49, an extremely halophilic bacterium isolated from a salt crystallizer pond of the Little Rann of Kutch in India. Unraveling the genome of this organism will facilitate understanding and isolation of the genes involved in imparting extreme osmotolerance. PMID:24136852

  19. Isolation and characterization of a new CO-utilizing strain, Thermoanaerobacter thermohydrosulfuricus subsp. carboxydovorans, isolated from a geothermal spring in Turkey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balk, M.; Heilig, G.H.J.; Eekert, van M.H.A.; Stams, A.J.M.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; Sinninghe-Damsté, J.S.; Vos, de W.M.; Kengen, S.W.M.

    2009-01-01

    A novel anaerobic, thermophilic, Gram-positive, spore-forming, and sugar-fermenting bacterium (strain TLO) was isolated from a geothermal spring in Aya¿, Turkey. The cells were straight to curved rods, 0.4-0.6 mum in diameter and 3.5-10 mum in length. Spores were terminal and round. The temperature

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces sp. Strain Wb2n-11, a Desert Isolate with Broad-Spectrum Antagonism against Soilborne Phytopathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-06

    Streptomyces sp. strain Wb2n-11, isolated from native desert soil, exhibited broad-spectrum antagonism against plant pathogenic fungi, bacteria and nematodes. The 8.2 Mb draft genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol activity and genes which enable the soil bacterium to directly interact beneficially with plants.