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Sample records for bacteriorhodopsin coated microcavities

  1. Photonic Potential of Haloarchaeal Pigment Bacteriorhodopsin for Future Electronics: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwini, Ravi; Vijayanand, S; Hemapriya, J

    2017-08-01

    Haloarchaea are known for its adaptation in extreme saline environment. Halophilic archaea produces carotenoid pigments and proton pumps to protect them from extremes of salinity. Bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is a light-driven proton pump that resides in the membrane of haloarchaea Halobacterium salinarum. The photocycle of Bacteriorhodopsin passes through several states from K to O, finally liberating ATP for host's survival. Extensive studies on Bacteriorhodopsin photocycle has provided in depth knowledge on their sequential mechanism of converting solar energy into chemical energy inside the cell. This ability of Bacteriorhodopsin to harvest sunlight has now been experimented to exploit the unexplored and extensively available solar energy in various biotechnological applications. Currently, bacteriorhodopsin finds its importance in dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC), logic gates (integrated circuits, IC's), optical switching, optical memories, storage devices (random access memory, RAM), biosensors, electronic sensors and optical microcavities. This review deals with the optical and electrical applications of the purple pigment Bacteriorhodopsin.

  2. Photoaffinity labeling of bacteriorhodopsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Weidong; Tsipouras, Athanasios; Ok, Hyun; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Gawinowicz, M.A.; Nakanishi, Koji

    1990-01-01

    14 C-Labeled optically pure 3S- and 3R-(diazoacetoxy)-all-trans-retinals were incorporated separately into bacterioopsin to reconstitute functional bacteriorhodopsin (bR) analogues, 3S- and 3R-diazo-bRs. UV irradiation at 254 nm generated highly reactive carbenes, which cross-linked the radiolabeled retinals to amino acid residues in the vicinity of the β-ionone ring. The 3S- and 3R-diazo analogues were found to cross-link, respectively, to cyanogen bromide fragments CN 7/CN 9 and CN 8/CN 9. More specifically, Thr121 and Gly122 in fragment CN 7 were found to be cross-linked to the 3S-diazo analogue. The identification of cross-linked residues and fragments favors assignments of the seven helices A-G-F-E-D-C-B or B-C-D-E-F-G-A to helices 1-2-3-4-5-6-7 in the two-dimensional electron density map. The present results show that the chromophore chain is oriented with the ionone ring inclined toward the outside of the membrane (the 9-methyl group also faces the extracellular side of the membrane)

  3. Molecular dynamics of bacteriorhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, J A; Pachter, R

    1997-02-01

    A model of bacteriorhodopsin (bR), with a retinal chromophore attached, has been derived for a molecular dynamics simulation. A method for determining atomic coordinates of several ill-defined strands was developed using a structure prediction algorithm based on a sequential Kalman filter technique. The completed structure was minimized using the GROMOS force field. The structure was then heated to 293 K and run for 500 ps at constant temperature. A comparison with the energy-minimized structure showed a slow increase in the all-atom RMS deviation over the first 200 ps, leveling off to approximately 2.4 A relative to the starting structure. The final structure yielded a backbone-atom RMS deviation from the crystallographic structure of 2.8 A. The residue neighbors of the chromophore atoms were followed as a function of time. The set of persistent near-residue neighbors supports the theory that differences in pKa values control access to the Schiff base proton, rather than formation of a counterion complex.

  4. Biexcitons in semiconductor microcavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borri, P.; Langbein, W.; Woggon, U.

    2003-01-01

    in the microcavity, even if the vacuum Rabi splitting exceeds the biexciton binding energy. However, the presence of a longitudinal built-in electric field that results in a Stark effect slightly reducing the binding energy compared to the value measured on a reference bare quantum well is experimentally pointed out...

  5. Multiwall carbon nanotube microcavity arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Rajib; Butt, Haider, E-mail: h.butt@bham.ac.uk [Nanotechnology Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Rifat, Ahmmed A. [Integrated Lightwave Research Group, Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Yetisen, Ali K.; Yun, Seok Hyun [Harvard Medical School and Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, 65 Landsdowne Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Dai, Qing [National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2016-03-21

    Periodic highly dense multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) arrays can act as photonic materials exhibiting band gaps in the visible regime and beyond terahertz range. MWCNT arrays in square arrangement for nanoscale lattice constants can be configured as a microcavity with predictable resonance frequencies. Here, computational analyses of compact square microcavities (≈0.8 × 0.8 μm{sup 2}) in MWCNT arrays were demonstrated to obtain enhanced quality factors (≈170–180) and narrow-band resonance peaks. Cavity resonances were rationally designed and optimized (nanotube geometry and cavity size) with finite element method. Series (1 × 2 and 1 × 3) and parallel (2 × 1 and 3 × 1) combinations of microcavities were modeled and resonance modes were analyzed. Higher order MWCNT microcavities showed enhanced resonance modes, which were red shifted with increasing Q-factors. Parallel microcavity geometries were also optimized to obtain narrow-band tunable filtering in low-loss communication windows (810, 1336, and 1558 nm). Compact series and parallel MWCNT microcavity arrays may have applications in optical filters and miniaturized optical communication devices.

  6. All silicon waveguide spherical microcavity coupler device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xifré-Pérez, E; Domenech, J D; Fenollosa, R; Muñoz, P; Capmany, J; Meseguer, F

    2011-02-14

    A coupler based on silicon spherical microcavities coupled to silicon waveguides for telecom wavelengths is presented. The light scattered by the microcavity is detected and analyzed as a function of the wavelength. The transmittance signal through the waveguide is strongly attenuated (up to 25 dB) at wavelengths corresponding to the Mie resonances of the microcavity. The coupling between the microcavity and the waveguide is experimentally demonstrated and theoretically modeled with the help of FDTD calculations.

  7. Reconstitution of Biological Molecular generators of electric current. Bacteriorhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drachev, L A; Frolov, V N; Kaulen, A D; Liberman, E A; Ostroumov, S A; Plakunova, V G; Semenov, A Y; Skulachev, V P

    1976-11-25

    1. Photoinduced generation of electric current by bacteriorhodopsin, incorporated into the planar phospholipid membrane, has been directly measured with conventional electrometer techniques. 2. Two methods for bacteriorhodopsin incorporation have been developed: (a) formation of planar membrane from a mixture of decane solution of phospholipids and of the fraction of violet fragments of the Halobacterium halobium membrane (bacteriorhodopsin sheets), and (b) adhesion of bacteriorhodopsin-containing reconstituted spherical membranes (proteoliposomes) to the planar membrane in the presence of Ca2+ or some other cations. In both cases, illumination was found to induce electric current generation directed across the planar membrane, an effect which was measured by macroelectrodes immersed into electrolyte solutions on both sides of the membrane. 3. The maximal values of the transmembrane electric potential were of about 150 mV at a current of about 10(-11) A. The electromotive force measured by means of counterbalancing the photoeffect by an external battery, was found to reach the value of 300 mV. 4. The action spectrum of the photoeffect coincides with the bacteriorhodopsin absorption spectrum (maximum about 570 nm). 5. Both components of the electrochemical potential of H+ ions (electric potential and delta pH) across the planar membrane affect the bacteriorhodopsin photoelectric response in a fashion which could be expected if bacteriorhodopsin were a light-dependent electrogenic proton pump. 6. La3+ ions were shown to inhibit operation of those bacteriorhodopsin which pump out H+ ions from the La3+-containing compartment. 7. The photoeffect, mediated by proteoliposomes associated with thick planar membrane, is decreased by gramicidin A at concentrations which do not influence the planar membrane resistance in the light. On the contrary, a protonophorous uncoupler, trichlorocarbonylcyanidephenylhydrazone, decreases the photoeffect only if it is added at a

  8. Enhanced photocurrent in engineered bacteriorhodopsin monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Amol V; Premaruban, Thenhuan; Berthoumieu, Olivia; Watts, Anthony; Davis, Jason J

    2012-01-12

    The integration of the transmembrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (BR) with man-made electrode surfaces has attracted a great deal of interest for some two decades or more and holds significant promise from the perspective of derived photoresponse or energy capture interfaces. Here we demonstrate that a novel and strategically engineered cysteine site (M163C) can be used to intimately and effectively couple delipidated BR to supporting metallic electrode surfaces. By virtue of the combined effects of the greater surface molecular density afforded by delipidation, and the vicinity of the electrostatic changes associated with proton pumping to the transducing metallic continuum, the resulting films generate a considerably greater photocurrent density on wavelength-selective illumination than previously achievable with monolayers of BR. Given the uniquely photoresponsive, wavelength-selective, and photostable characteristics of this protein, the work has implications for utilization in solar energy capture and photodetector devices.

  9. Bacteriorhodopsin-based photochromic pigments for optical security applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampp, Norbert A.; Fischer, Thorsten; Neebe, Martin

    2002-04-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin is a two-dimensional crystalline photochromic protein which is astonishingly stable towards chemical and thermal degradation. This is one of the reasons why this is one of the very few proteins which may be used as a biological pigment in printing inks. Variants of the naturally occurring bacteriorhodopsin have been developed which show a distinguished color change even with low light intensities and without the requirement of UV-light. Several pigments with different color changes are available right now. In addition to this visual detectable feature, the photochromism, the proteins amino acid sequence can be genetically altered in order to code and identify specific production lots. For advanced applications the data storage capability of bacteriorhodopsin will be useful. Write-once-read-many (WORM) recording of digital data is accomplished by laser excitation of printed bacteriorhodopsin inks. A density of 1 MBit per square inch is currently achieved. Several application examples for this biological molecule are described where low and high level features are used in combination. Bacteriorhodopsin-based inks are a new class of optical security pigments.

  10. Multifunctional optical security features based on bacteriorhodopsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampp, Norbert A.; Neebe, Martin; Juchem, Thorsten; Wolperdinger, Markus; Geiger, Markus; Schmuck, Arno

    2004-06-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin (BR), a photochromic retinal protein, has been developed into a new materials platform for applications in anti-counterfeiting. The combination of three different properties of the material on its molecular level, a light-inducible color change, photochemical data storage and traceability of the protein due to molecular marker sequences make this protein a promising material for security applications. The crystalline structure of the biopigment combines these properties with high stability. As BR is a biological material specialized knowledge for modification, cost- effective production and suitable processing of the material is required. Photochromic BR-based inks have been developed for screen printing, pad printing and ink jet printing. These prints show a high photochromic sensitivity towards variation of illumination. For this reason it is not possible to reproduce the dynamic color by photocopying. In addition to such visual inspection the printed symbols offer the possibility for digital write-once-read-many (WORM) data storage. Photochemical recording is accomplished by a two-photon process. Recording densities in a range from 106 bit/cm2 to 108 bit/cm2 have been achieved. Data structures are stored in a polarization sensitive mode which allows an easy and efficient data encryption.

  11. Branching pathways in the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalisky, O.; Ottolenghi, M.

    1982-01-01

    The pulsed laser photolysis of light-adapted bacteriorhodopsin (BR 570 ) is carried out between 25 C and -92 C in neutral and alkaline water-glycerol solutions. At relatively low temperatures the primary photoproduct K 610 equilibrates with a blue-shifted species, Ksub(p). Both K 610 and the new intermediate subsequently decay into another species, K'sub(p), in a process which competes with the formation of L 550 . Finally, K'sub(p) converts very slowly to L 550 . This branched pathway delays the formation of L 550 and thus of M 412 , without affecting the final yield of either species. A thermal back-reaction regenerating BR 570 takes place at the stage of L 550 , inhibiting the formation of M 412 . The reaction which also predominates at low temperatures, is relatively inefficient at high pH when the forward L 550 → M 412 step is highly catalyzed. It is the superposition of both these branching mechanisms which accounts for the complex effects of temperature and pH on the photocycle of BR 570 . The latter mechanism is accounted for by a molecular scheme in which deprotonation of a tyrosine moiety at the stage of L 550 constitutes a prerequisite for deprotonation of the retinal-lysine schiff-base as required for forming M 412 . This scheme appears to be directly related to the proton pump. (author)

  12. Branching pathways in the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalisky, O.; Ottolenghi, M. (Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Physical Chemistry)

    1982-01-01

    The pulsed laser photolysis of light-adapted bacteriorhodopsin (BR/sub 570/) is carried out between 25 C and -92 C in neutral and alkaline water-glycerol solutions. At relatively low temperatures the primary photoproduct K/sub 610/ equilibrates with a blue-shifted species, Ksub(p). Both K/sub 610/ and the new intermediate subsequently decay into another species, K'sub(p), in a process which competes with the formation of L/sub 550/. Finally, K'sub(p) converts very slowly to L/sub 550/. This branched pathway delays the formation of L/sub 550/ and thus of M/sub 412/, without affecting the final yield of either species. A thermal back-reaction regenerating BR/sub 570/ takes place at the stage of L/sub 550/, inhibiting the formation of M/sub 412/. The reaction which also predominates at low temperatures, is relatively inefficient at high pH when the forward L/sub 550/ ..-->.. M/sub 412/ step is highly catalyzed. It is the superposition of both these branching mechanisms which accounts for the complex effects of temperature and pH on the photocycle of BR/sub 570/. The latter mechanism is accounted for by a molecular scheme in which deprotonation of a tyrosine moiety at the stage of L/sub 550/ constitutes a prerequisite for deprotonation of the retinal-lysine schiff-base as required for forming M/sub 412/. This scheme appears to be directly related to the proton pump.

  13. Single Nanoparticle Detection Using Optical Microcavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Yanyan; Yu, Xiao-Chong; Gong, Qihuang; Yang, Lan; Xiao, Yun-Feng

    2017-03-01

    Detection of nanoscale objects is highly desirable in various fields such as early-stage disease diagnosis, environmental monitoring and homeland security. Optical microcavity sensors are renowned for ultrahigh sensitivities due to strongly enhanced light-matter interaction. This review focuses on single nanoparticle detection using optical whispering gallery microcavities and photonic crystal microcavities, both of which have been developing rapidly over the past few years. The reactive and dissipative sensing methods, characterized by light-analyte interactions, are explained explicitly. The sensitivity and the detection limit are essentially determined by the cavity properties, and are limited by the various noise sources in the measurements. On the one hand, recent advances include significant sensitivity enhancement using techniques to construct novel microcavity structures with reduced mode volumes, to localize the mode field, or to introduce optical gain. On the other hand, researchers attempt to lower the detection limit by improving the spectral resolution, which can be implemented by suppressing the experimental noises. We also review the methods of achieving a better temporal resolution by employing mode locking techniques or cavity ring up spectroscopy. In conclusion, outlooks on the possible ways to implement microcavity-based sensing devices and potential applications are provided. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Biexcitons or bipolaritons in a semiconductor microcavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang Werner; Woggon, U

    2000-01-01

    A well-resolved nonlinear optical transition associated with biexcitons is observed in a high-quality microcavity with a Rabi splitting exceeding the binding energy of biexcitons in the embedded quantum well. This transition is identified as an induced absorption from the lower polariton to the b......A well-resolved nonlinear optical transition associated with biexcitons is observed in a high-quality microcavity with a Rabi splitting exceeding the binding energy of biexcitons in the embedded quantum well. This transition is identified as an induced absorption from the lower polariton...

  15. Studies on light transduction by bacteriorhodopsin and rhodopsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braiman, M.; Bubis, J.; Doi, T.; Chen, H.B.; Flitsch, S.L.; Franke, R.R.; Gilles-Gonzalez, M.A.; Graham, R.M.; Karnik, S.S.; Khorana, H.G.; Knox, B.E.; Krebs, M.P.; Marti, T.; Mogi, T.; Nakayama, T.; Oprian, D.D.; Puckett, K.L.; Sakmar, T.P.; Stern, L.J.; Subramaniam, S.; Thompson, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The visual photoreceptor pigments in vertebrates and invertebrates all use retinal (vitamin A aldehyde) as the light-absorbing molecule. Recently, Stoeckenius et al. discovered bacteriorhodopsin (bR) in the purple membrane of the extreme halophile, Halobacterium halobium, which also contains all-trans retinal as the chromophore, bR carries out light-dependent proton translocation from the inside to the outside of the H. halobium cell. Since the discovery of bR, H. halobium has been found to elaborate three more retinal-based light-transducing proteins. These are halorhodopsin, a chloride ion pump, and sensory rhodopsins I and II. The authors are carrying out structure-function studies of bacteriorhodopsin, bovine rhodopsin, and related proteins primarily by the technique of recombinant DNA; they summarize below the results they have obtained recently

  16. Ultranarrow polaritons in a semiconductor microcavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jacob Riis; Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang

    2000-01-01

    We have achieved a record high ratio (19) of the Rabi splitting (3.6 meV) to the polariton linewidth (190 mu eV), in a semiconductor lambda microcavity with a single 25 nm GaAs quantum well at the antinode. The narrow polariton lines are obtained with a special cavity design which reduces...

  17. Directional Secondary Emission of a Semiconductor Microcavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langbein, Wolfgang; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the time-resolved secondary emission of a homogeneously broadened microcavity after resonant excitation. The sample consists of a 25nm GaAs single quantum well (QW) in the center of a wedged ¥ë cavity with AlAs/AlGaAs Bragg reflectors, grown by molecular beam epitaxy. At zero detun...

  18. Stimulated secondary emission from semiconductor microcavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, John Erland; Mizeikis, V.; Langbein, Wolfgang Werner

    2001-01-01

    We find strong influence of final-state stimulation on the time-resolved light emission dynamics from semiconductor microcavities after pulsed excitation allowing angle-resonant polariton-polariton scattering on the lower-polariton branch. The polariton dynamics can be controlled by injection...

  19. Rayleigh scattering in coupled microcavities: theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vörös, Zoltán; Weihs, Gregor

    2014-12-03

    In this paper we theoretically study how structural disorder in coupled semiconductor heterostructures influences single-particle scattering events that would otherwise be forbidden by symmetry. We extend the model of Savona (2007 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 19 295208) to describe Rayleigh scattering in coupled planar microcavity structures, and find that effective filter theories can be ruled out.

  20. Fractal morphological analysis of Bacteriorhodopsin (bR) layers deposited onto Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vengadesh, P.; Muniandy, S.V.; Majid, W.H. Abd.

    2009-01-01

    Uniform Bacteriorhodopsin layers for the purpose of fabricating Bacteriorhodopsin-based biosensors were prepared by allowing drying of the layers under a constant electric field. To properly observe and understand the 'electric field effect' on the protein Bacteriorhodopsin, the electric and non-electric field influenced Bacteriorhodopsin layers prepared using a manual syringe-deposition method applied onto Indium Tin Oxide electrodes were structurally investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy. The results yield obvious morphological differences between the electric and non-electric field assisted Bacteriorhodopsin layers and brings to attention the occurrence of the so-called 'coffee-ring' effect in the latter case. We applied stochastic fractal method based on the generalized Cauchy process to describe the morphological features surrounding the void. Fractal dimension is used to characterize the local regularity of the Bacteriorhodopsin clusters and the correlation exponent is used to describe the long-range correlation between the clusters. It is found that the Bacteriorhodopsin protein tends to exhibit with strong spatial correlation in the presence of external electric field compared to in absence of the electric field. Long-range correlation in the morphological feature may be associated to the enhancement of aggregation process of Bacteriorhodopsin protein in the presence of electric field, thereby inhibiting the formation of the so-called 'coffee-ring' effect. As such, the observations discussed in this work suggest some amount of control of surface uniformity when forming layers.

  1. All-optical switching based on optical fibre long period gratings modified bacteriorhodopsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korposh, S.; James, S.; Partridge, M.; Sichka, M.; Tatam, R.

    2018-05-01

    All-optical switching using an optical fibre long-period gating (LPG) modified with bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is demonstrated. The switching process is based on the photo-induced RI change of bR, which in turn changes the phase matching conditions of the mode coupling by the LPG, leading to modulation of the propagating light. The effect was studied with an LPG immersed into a bR solution and with LPGs coated with the bR films, deposited onto the LPGs using the layer-by-layer electrostatic self-assembly (LbL) method. The dependence of the all-optical switching efficiency upon the concentration of the bR solution and on the grating period of the LPG was also studied. In addition, an in-fibre Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) composed of a cascaded LPG pair separated by 30 mm and modified with bR was used to enhance the wavelength range of all-optical switching. The switching wavelength is determined by the grating period of the LPG. Switching efficiencies of 16% and 35% were observed when an LPG and an MZI were immersed into bR solutions, respectively. The switching time for devices coated with bR-films was within 1 s, 10 times faster than that observed for devices immersed into bR solution.

  2. Weak Localization of Light in a Disordered Microcavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurioli, M.; Bogani, F.; Cavigli, L.; Gibbs, H.; Khitrova, G.; Wiersma, D. S.

    2005-05-01

    We report the observation of weak localization of light in a semiconductor microcavity. The intrinsic disorder in a microcavity leads to multiple scattering and hence to static speckle. We show that averaging over realizations of the disorder reveals a coherent backscattering cone that has a coherent enhancement factor ≥2, as required by reciprocity. The coherent backscattering cone is observed along a ring-shaped pattern due to confinement by the microcavity.

  3. Rate Constant Change of Photo Reaction of Bacteriorhodopsin Observed in Trimeric Molecular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujiuchi, Yutaka; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Goto, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    To elucidate the time evolution of photo reaction of bacteriorhodopsin in glycerol mixed purple membrane at around 196 K under irradiation by red light, a kinetic model was constructed. The change of absorption with irradiation at times of 560 nm and 412 nm was analyzed for the purpose of determining reaction rates of photo reaction of bacteriorhodopsin and its product M intermediate. In this study it is shown that reaction rates of conversion from bacteriorhodopsin to the M intermediate can be explained by a set of linear differential equations. This model analysis concludes that bacteriorhodopsin in which constitutes a trimer unit with other two bacteriorhodopsin molecules changes into M intermediates in the 1.73 of reaction rate, in the initial step, and according to the number of M intermediate in a trimer unit, from three to one, the reaction rate of bacteriorhodopsin into M intermediates smaller as 1.73, 0.80, 0.19 which caused by influence of inter-molecular interaction between bacteriorhodopsin.

  4. Anomalous normal mode oscillations in semiconductor microcavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States). Dept. of Physics; Hou, H.Q.; Hammons, B.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Semiconductor microcavities as a composite exciton-cavity system can be characterized by two normal modes. Under an impulsive excitation by a short laser pulse, optical polarizations associated with the two normal modes have a {pi} phase difference. The total induced optical polarization is then expected to exhibit a sin{sup 2}({Omega}t)-like oscillation where 2{Omega} is the normal mode splitting, reflecting a coherent energy exchange between the exciton and cavity. In this paper the authors present experimental studies of normal mode oscillations using three-pulse transient four wave mixing (FWM). The result reveals surprisingly that when the cavity is tuned far below the exciton resonance, normal mode oscillation in the polarization is cos{sup 2}({Omega}t)-like, in contrast to what is expected form the simple normal mode model. This anomalous normal mode oscillation reflects the important role of virtual excitation of electronic states in semiconductor microcavities.

  5. Wavelength tuning of porous silicon microcavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulders, J.; Reece, P.; Zheng, W.H.; Lerondel, G.; Sun, B.; Gal, M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In the last decade much attention has been given to porous silicon (PS) for optoelectronic applications, which include efficient room temperature light emission as well as microcavity formation. Due to the large specific surface area, the use of porous silicon microcavities (PSMs) has been proposed for chemical sensing. Large wavelength shifts have indicated that the optical properties of PSMs are indeed strongly dependent on the environment. In this paper, we report the shifting of the resonance frequency of high quality PSMs, with the aim of tuning a future PS device to a certain required wavelength. The PSM samples were prepared by anodically etching p + -doped (5mΩcm) bulk silicon wafer in a solution (25%) of aqueous HF and ethanol. The device structure consisted of a PS layer sandwiched between 2 stacks of thin PS layers with alternating high and low effective refractive indices (RI), i.e. distributed Bragg mirrors (DBM). The layer thickness depends on the etch time while the porosity and hence refractive index is determined by the current density as the Si is etched. The position and the width of the stop-band can be fully controlled by the design of the DBMs, with the microcavity resonance mode sitting within the stop-band. We achieved tuning of the microcavity resonance by a number of methods, including temperature dependent tuning. The temperature induced wavelength shift was found to be of the order of 10 -15 nm. Computer modeling of these changes in the reflectivity spectra allowed us to quantify the changes of the effective refractive index and the respective layer thicknesses

  6. Synthetic holography based on scanning microcavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Di Donato

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic optical holography (SOH is an imaging technique, introduced in scanning microscopy to record amplitude and phase of a scattered field from a sample. In this paper, it is described a novel implementation of SOH through a lens-free low-coherence system, based on a scanning optical microcavity. This technique combines the low-coherence properties of the source with the mutual interference of scattered waves and the resonant behavior of a micro-cavity, in order to realize a high sensitive imaging system. Micro-cavity is compact and realized by approaching a cleaved optical fiber to the sample. The scanning system works in an open-loop configuration without the need for a reference wave, usually required in interferometric systems. Measurements were performed over calibration samples and a lateral resolution of about 1 μm is achieved by means of an optical fiber with a Numerical Aperture (NA equal to 0.1 and a Mode Field Diameter (MDF of 5.6 μm.

  7. Studying of Phototransformation of Light Signal by Photoreceptor Pigments - Rhodopsin, Iodopsin and Bacteriorhodopsin

    OpenAIRE

    Ignat Ignatov; Oleg Mosin

    2014-01-01

    This review article views predominately the structure and function of animal and bacterial photoreceptor pigments (rhodopsin, iodopsin, bacteriorhodopsin) and their aspects of nano- and biotechnological usage. On an example of bacteriorhodopsin is described the method of its isolation from purple membranes of photo-organotrophic halobacterium Halobacterium halobium by cellular autolysis by distilled water, processing of bacterial biomass by ultrasound at 22 KHz, alcohol extraction of low and ...

  8. Micro-Cavity Fluidic Dye Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbo, Bjarne; Kristensen, Anders; Menon, Aric Kumaran

    2003-01-01

    We have successfully designed, fabricated and characterized a micro-cavity fluidic dye laser with metallic mirrors, which can be integrated with polymer based lab-on-a-chip microsystems without further processing steps. A simple rate-equation model is used to predict the average pumping power...... threshold for lasing as function of cavity-mirror reflectance, laser dye concentration and cavity length. The laser device is characterized using the laser dye Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethanol. Lasing is observed, and the influence of dye concentration is investigated....

  9. Self-Cleaning Microcavity Array for Photovoltaic Modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vüllers, Felix; Fritz, Benjamin; Roslizar, Aiman; Striegel, Andreas; Guttmann, Markus; Richards, Bryce S; Hölscher, Hendrik; Gomard, Guillaume; Klampaftis, Efthymios; Kavalenka, Maryna N

    2018-01-24

    Development of self-cleaning coatings is of great interest for the photovoltaic (PV) industry, as soiling of the modules can significantly reduce their electrical output and increase operational costs. We fabricated flexible polymeric films with novel disordered microcavity array (MCA) topography from fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) by hot embossing. Because of their superhydrophobicity with water contact angles above 150° and roll-off angles below 5°, the films possess self-cleaning properties over a wide range of tilt angles, starting at 10°, and contaminant sizes (30-900 μm). Droplets that impact the FEP MCA surface with velocities of the same order of magnitude as that of rain bounce off the surface without impairing its wetting properties. Additionally, the disordered MCA topography of the films enhances the performance of PV devices by improving light incoupling. Optical coupling of the FEP MCA films to a glass-encapsulated multicrystalline silicon solar cell results in 4.6% enhancement of the electrical output compared to that of an uncoated device.

  10. Optical micro-cavities on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Daoxin; Liu, Erhu; Tan, Ying

    2018-01-01

    Silicon-based optical microcavities are very popular for many applications because of the ultra-compact footprint, easy scalability, and functional versatility. In this paper we give a discussion about the challenges of the optical microcavities on silicon and also give a review of our recent work, including the following parts. First, a near-"perfect" high-order MRR optical filter with a box-like filtering response is realized by introducing bent directional couplers to have sufficient coupling between the access waveguide and the microrings. Second, an efficient thermally-tunable MRR-based optical filter with graphene transparent nano-heater is realized by introducing transparent graphene nanoheaters. Thirdly, a polarization-selective microring-based optical filter is realized to work with resonances for only one of TE and TM polarizations for the first time. Finally, a on-chip reconfigurable optical add-drop multiplexer for hybrid mode- /wavelength-division-multiplexing systems is realized for the first time by monolithically integrating a mode demultiplexer, four MRR optical switches, and a mode multiplexer.

  11. Rabi-like splitting from large area plasmonic microcavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Hosseini Alast

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Rabi-like splitting was observed from a hybrid plasmonic microcavity. The splitting comes from the coupling of cavity mode with the surface plasmon polariton mode; anti-crossing was observed alongside the modal conversional channel on the reflection light measurement. The hybrid device consists of a 10x10 mm2 ruled metal grating integrated onto the Fabry-Perot microcavity. The 10x10 mm2 ruled metal grating fabricated from laser interference and the area is sufficiently large to be used in the practical optical device. The larger area hybrid plasmonic microcavity can be employed in polariton lasers and biosensors.

  12. Strong Exciton-photon Coupling in Semiconductor Microcavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jacob Riis; Borri, Paola; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1999-01-01

    The basic building block of vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) and high efficiency diodes, is a quantum well embedded in a semiconductor microcavity. The high finesse that may be achieved in such a cavity is utilised to get a low threshold current in the VCSELs and a high directiona......The basic building block of vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) and high efficiency diodes, is a quantum well embedded in a semiconductor microcavity. The high finesse that may be achieved in such a cavity is utilised to get a low threshold current in the VCSELs and a high......-optical switches based on semiconductor microcavities....

  13. Quantum Logic Using Excitonic Quantum Dots in External Optical Microcavities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Raymer, Michael

    2003-01-01

    An experimental project was undertaken to develop means to achieve quantum optical strong coupling between a single GaAs quantum dot and the optical mode of a microcavity for the purpose of quantum...

  14. Polariton-acoustic-phonon interaction in a semiconductor microcavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassabois, G.; Triques, A. L. C.; Bogani, F.; Delalande, C.; Roussignol, Ph.; Piermarocchi, C.

    2000-01-01

    The broadening of polariton lines by acoustic phonons is investigated in a semiconductor microcavity by means of interferometric correlation measurements with subpicosecond resolution. A decrease of the polariton-acoustic phonon coupling is clearly observed for the lower polariton branch as one approaches the resonance between exciton and photon states. This behavior cannot be explained in terms of a semiclassical linear dispersion theory but requires a full quantum description of the microcavity in the strong-coupling regime.

  15. Optical Microcavity: Sensing down to Single Molecules and Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yu Su

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This review article discusses fundamentals of dielectric, low-loss, optical micro-resonator sensing, including figures of merit and a variety of microcavity designs, and future perspectives in microcavity-based optical sensing. Resonance frequency and quality (Q factor are altered as a means of detecting a small system perturbation, resulting in realization of optical sensing of a small amount of sample materials, down to even single molecules. Sensitivity, Q factor, minimum detectable index change, noises (in sensor system components and microcavity system including environments, microcavity size, and mode volume are essential parameters to be considered for optical sensing applications. Whispering gallery mode, photonic crystal, and slot-type microcavities typically provide compact, high-quality optical resonance modes for optical sensing applications. Surface Bloch modes induced on photonic crystals are shown to be a promising candidate thanks to large field overlap with a sample and ultra-high-Q resonances. Quantum optics effects based on microcavity quantum electrodynamics (QED would provide novel single-photo-level detection of even single atoms and molecules via detection of doublet vacuum Rabi splitting peaks in strong coupling.

  16. Fourier Transform Infrared and Resonance Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Bacteriorhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earnest, Thomas Nixon

    Fourier transform infrared and resonance Raman spectroscopy were used to investigate the structure and function of the light-activated, transmembrane proton pump, bacteriorhodopsin, from the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium. Bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is a 27,000 dalton integral membrane protein consisting of 248 amino acids with a retinylidene chromophore. Absorption of a photon leads to the translocation of one or two protons from the inside of the cell to the outside. Resonance Raman spectroscopy allows for the study of the configuration of retinal in bR and its photointermediates by the selective enhancement of vibrational modes of the chromophore. This technique was used to determine that the chromophore is attached to lysine-216 in both the bR _{570} and the M _{412} intermediates. In bR with tyrosine-64 selectively nitrated or aminated, the chromophore appears to have the same configuration in that bR _{570} (all- trans) and M _{412} (13- cis) states as it does in unmodified bR. Polarized Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) permits the study of the direction of transition dipole moments arising from molecular vibrations of the protein and the retinal chromophore. The orientation of alpha helical and beta sheet components was determined for bR with the average helical tilt found to lie mostly parallel to the membrane normal. The beta sheet structures also exhibit an IR linear dichroism for the amide I and amide II bands which suggest that the peptide backbone is mostly perpendicular to the membrane plane although it is difficult to determine whether the bands originate from sheet or turn components. The orientation of secondary structure components of the C-1 (residues 72-248) and C-2 (residues 1-71) fragments were also investigated to determine the structure of these putative membrane protein folding intermediates. Polarized, low temperature FTIR -difference spectroscopy was then used to investigate the structure of bR as it undergoes

  17. The Integration of Bacteriorhodopsin Proteins with Semiconductor Heterostructure Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian

    2008-03-01

    Bioelectronics has emerged as one of the most rapidly developing fields among the active frontiers of interdisciplinary research. A major thrust in this field is aimed at the coupling of the technologically-unmatched performance of biological systems, such as neural and sensing functions, with the well developed technology of microelectronics and optoelectronics. To this end we have studied the integration of a suitably engineered protein, bacteriorhodopsin (BR), with semiconductor optoelectronic devices and circuits. Successful integration will potentially lead to ultrasensitive sensors with polarization selectivity and built-in preprocessing capabilities that will be useful for high speed tracking, motion and edge detection, biological detection, and artificial vision systems. In this presentation we will summarize our progresses in this area, which include fundamental studies on the transient dynamics of photo-induced charge shift in BR and the coupling mechanism at protein-semiconductor interface for effective immobilizing and selectively integrating light sensitive proteins with microelectronic devices and circuits, and the device engineering of BR-transistor-integrated optical sensors as well as their applications in phototransceiver circuits. Work done in collaboration with Pallab Bhattacharya, Jonghyun Shin, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; Robert R. Birge, Department of Chemistry, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269; and György V'ar'o, Institute of Biophysics, Biological Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Science, H-6701 Szeged, Hungary.

  18. Transient Fourier holography with bacteriorhodopsin films for breast cancer diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Devulapalli; Kothapalli, Sri-Rajasekar; Wu, Pengfei; Yelleswarapu, Chandra

    X-ray mammography is the current gold standard for breast cancer screening. Microcalcifications and other features which are helpful to the radiologist for early diagnostics are often buried in the noise generated by the surrounding dense tissue. So image processing techniques are required to enhance these important features to improve the sensitivity of detection. An innovative technique is demonstrated for recording a hologram of the mammogram. It is recorded on a thin polymer film of Bacteriorhodopsin (bR) as photo induced isomerization grating containing the interference pattern between the object beam containing the Fourier spatial frequency components of the mammogram and a reference beam. The hologram contains all the enhanced features of the mammogram. A significant innovation of the technique is that the enhanced components in the processed image can be viewed by the radiologist in time scale. A technician can record the movie and when the radiologist looks at the movie at his convenience, freezing the frame as and when desired, he would see the microcalcifications as the brightest and last long in time. He would also observe lesions with intensity decreasing as their size increases. The same bR film can be used repeatedly for recording holograms with different mammograms. The technique is versatile and a different frequency band can be chosen to be optimized by changing the reference beam intensity. The experimental arrangement can be used for mammograms in screen film or digital format.

  19. The kinetics of the photochemical reaction cycle of deuterated bacteriorhodopsin and pharaonis halorhodopsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szakacs, Julianna; Lakatos, Melinda; Varo, Gy.; Ganea, Constanta

    2005-01-01

    Kinetic isotope effects in the photochemical reaction cycle of bacteriorhodopsin and pharaonis halorhodopsin were determined in H 2 O and D 2 O at normal pH, to get insight in the proton dependent steps of the transport process. All the steps of the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle at normal pH exhibited a strong isotope effect. In the case of halorhodopsin in both the chloride and nitrate transporting conditions the photocycle was not strongly affected by the deuterium exchange. In the case of chloride, a slight slow down of the photocycle could be observed. On the opposite, in the nitrate transport conditions a reverse effect is present. (author)

  20. Molecular mechanisms controlling proton pumping by bacteriorhodopsin. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouch, Rosalie K.; Ebrey, Thomas G.

    2000-02-10

    Bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is the simplest biological system for the transduction of light energy. Light energy is directly converted to transmembrane proton gradient by a single, small membrane protein. The extraordinary stability of bR makes it an outstanding subject for bioenergetic studies. This project has focused on the role of interactions between key residues of the pigment involved in light-induced proton transfer. Methods to estimate the strength of these interactions and their correlation with the rate and efficiency of proton transfer have been developed. The concept of the coupling of the protonation states of key groups has been applied to individual steps of the proton transfer with the ultimate goal of understanding on the molecular level the driving forces for proton transport and the pathway of the transported proton in bT. The mechanism of light-induced proton release, uptake and the mechanism of recovery of initial state of bT has been examined. The experiments were performed with genetically engineered, site-specific mutants of bR. This has enabled us to characterize the role of individual amino acid residues in bR. Time resolved and low temperature absorption spectroscopy and light-induced photocurrent measurements were used in order to study the photochemical cycle and proton transfer in mutant pigments. Chemical modification and crosslinking of both the specific amino acids to the chromophore or to other amino acids were used to elucidate the role of light-induced conformational changes in the photocycle and the structure of the protein in the ground state. The results of this project provided new knowledge on the architecture of the proton transfer pathways inside the protein, on the mechanism of proton release in bR, and on the role of specific amino acid residues in the structure and function of bR.

  1. Photochemical cycle of bacteriorhodopsin studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockburger, M; Klusmann, W; Gattermann, H; Massig, G; Peters, R

    1979-10-30

    Individual species of the photochemical cycle of bacteriorhodopsin, a retinal-protein complex of Halobacteria, were studied in aqueous suspensions of the "purple membrane" at room temperature by resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy with flow systems. Two pronounced deuterium shifts were found in the RR spectra of the all-trans complex BR-570 in H2O-D2O suspensions. The first is ascribed to C=NH+ (C=ND+) stretching vibrations of the protonated Schiff base which links retinal to opsin. The second is assigned tentatively to an "X-H" ("X-D") bending mode, where "X" is an atom which carries an exchangeable proton. A RR spectrum of the 13-cis-retinal complex "BR-548" could be deduced from spectra of the dark-adapted purple membrane. The RR spectrum of the M-412 intermediate was monitored in a double-beam pump-probe experiment. The main vibrational features of the intermediate M' in the reaction M-412 in equilibrium hv M' leads to delta BR-570 could be deduced from a photostationary mixture of M-412 and M'. Difference procedures were applied to obtain RR spectra of the L-550 intermediate and of two new long-lived species, R1'-590 and R2-550. From kinetic data it is suggested that T1'-590 links the proton-translocating cycle to the "13-cis" cycle of BR-548. The protonation and isomeric states of the different species are discussed in light of the new spectroscopic and kinetic data. It is found that conformational changes during the photochemical cycle play an important role.

  2. Conformational change during photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin and its proton-pumping mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, K C

    1993-06-01

    Based on the recent finding on the structural difference of seven helix bundles in the all-trans and 13-cis bacteriorhodopsins, the distances among the key groups performing the function of proton translocation as well as their microenvironments have been investigated. Consequently, a pore-gated model was proposed for the light-driven proton-pumping mechanism of bacteriorhodopsin. According to this model, the five double-bounded polyene chain in retinal chromophore can be phenomenologically likened to a molecular "lever," whose one end links to a "piston" (the beta-ionone ring) and the other end to a pump "relay station" (the Schiff base). During the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin, the molecular "lever" is moving up and down as marked by the position change of the "piston," so as to trigger the gate of pore to open and close alternately. When the "piston" is up, the pore-controlled gate is open so that the water channel from Asp-96 to the Schiff base and that from the Schiff base to Asp-85 is established; when the "piston" is down, the pore-controlled gate is closed and the water channels for proton transportation in both the cytoplasmic half and extracellular half are blocked. The current model allows a consistent interpretation of a great deal of experimental data and also provides a useful basis for further investigating the mechanism of proton pumping by bacteriorhodopsin.

  3. Evidence of multipolar response of Bacteriorhodopsin by noncollinear second harmonic generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovino, F A; Larciprete, M C; Sibilia, C; Váró, G; Gergely, C

    2012-06-18

    Noncollinear second harmonic generation from a Bacteriorhodopsin (BR) oriented multilayer film was systematically investigated by varying the polarization state of both fundamental beams. Both experimental results and theoretical simulations, show that the resulting polarization mapping is an useful tool to put in evidence the optical chirality of the investigated film as well as the corresponding multipolar contributions to the nonlinear.

  4. Modal analysis of spontaneous emission in a planar microcavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigneault, H.; Monneret, S.

    1996-01-01

    A complete set of cavity modes in planar dielectric microcavities is presented which naturally includes guided modes. We show that most of these orthonormal fields can be derived from a coherent superposition of plane waves incoming on the stack from the air and from the substrate. Spontaneous emission of a dipole located inside the microcavity is analyzed, in terms of cavity modes. Derivation of the radiation pattern in the air and in the substrate is presented. The power emitted into the guided modes is also determined. Finally, a numerical analysis of the radiative properties of an erbium atom located in a Fabry-Pacute erot multilayer dielectric microcavity is investigated. We show that a large amount of light is emitted into the guided modes of the structure, in spite of the Fabry-Pacute erot resonance, which increases the spontaneous emission rate in a normal direction. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  5. Spin noise amplification and giant noise in optical microcavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryzhov, I. I.; Poltavtsev, S. V.; Kozlov, G. G.; Zapasskii, V. S. [Spin-Optics Laboratory, St. Petersburg State University, 198504 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kavokin, A. V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Spin-Optics Laboratory, St. Petersburg State University, 198504 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Lagoudakis, P. V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-14

    When studying the spin-noise-induced fluctuations of Kerr rotation in a quantum-well microcavity, we have found a dramatic increase of the noise signal (by more than two orders of magnitude) in the vicinity of anti-crossing of the polariton branches. The effect is explained by nonlinear optical instability of the microcavity giving rise to the light-power-controlled amplification of the polarization noise signal. In the framework of the developed model of built-in amplifier, we also interpret the nontrivial spectral and intensity-related properties of the observed noise signal below the region of anti-crossing of polariton branches. The discovered effect of optically controllable amplification of broadband polarization signals in microcavities in the regime of optical instability may be of interest for detecting weak oscillations of optical anisotropy in fundamental research and for other applications in optical information processing.

  6. Ultraviolet lasing behavior in ZnO optical microcavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxing Dong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Zinc oxide (ZnO optical microcavity modulated UV lasers have been attracting a wide range of research interests. As one of the most important materials in developing high quality microcavity and efficient UV–visible optoelectronic devices due to its wide band gap (3.37 eV and large exciton binding energy (∼60 meV. In this review, we summarized the latest development of ZnO optical cavity based microlasers, mainly including Fabry-Perot mode lasers and whispering gallery mode lasers. The synthesis and optical studies of ZnO optical microcavities with different morphologies were discussed in detail. Finally, we also consider that the research focus in the near future would include new nanotechnology and physical effects, such as nano/micro fabrication, surface plasmon enhancement, and quantum dot coupling, which may result in new and interesting physical phenomena.

  7. Microcavity single virus detection and sizing with molecular sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantham, V. R.; Holler, S.; Kolchenko, V.; Wan, Z.; Arnold, S.

    2013-02-01

    We report the label-free detection and sizing of the smallest individual RNA virus, MS2 by a spherical microcavity. Mass of this virus is ~6 ag and produces a theoretical resonance shift ~0.25 fm upon adsorbing an individual virus at the equator of the bare microcavity, which is well below the r.m.s background noise of 2 fm. However, detection was accomplished with ease (S/N = 8, Q = 4x105) using a single dipole stimulated plasmonic-nanoshell as a microcavity wavelength shift enhancer. Analytical expressions based on the "reactive sensing principle" are developed to extract the radius of the virus from the measured signals. Estimated limit of detection for these experiments was ~0.4 ag or 240 kDa below the size of all known viruses, largest globular and elongated proteins [Phosphofructokinase (345 kDa) and Fibrinogen (390 kDa), respectively].

  8. Acoustic trapping in bubble-bounded micro-cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahoney, P.; McDougall, C.; Glynne-Jones, P.; MacDonald, M. P.

    2016-12-01

    We present a method for controllably producing longitudinal acoustic trapping sites inside microfluidic channels. Air bubbles are injected into a micro-capillary to create bubble-bounded `micro-cavities'. A cavity mode is formed that shows controlled longitudinal acoustic trapping between the two air/water interfaces along with the levitation to the centre of the channel that one would expect from a lower order lateral mode. 7 μm and 10 μm microspheres are trapped at the discrete acoustic trapping sites in these micro-cavities.We show this for several lengths of micro-cavity.

  9. Cavity QED with a single QD inside an optical microcavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, E.; Bloch, J.; Lemaitre, A.; Hours, J.; Patriarche, G.; Cavanna, A.; Laurent, S.; Robert-Philip, I.; Senellart, P.; Martrou, D.; Gerard, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    To demonstrate strong coupling regime for a single quantum dot inside an optical microcavity, large oscillator strength quantum dots are needed. We show that quantum dots formed by the interface fluctuations of a thin GaAs quantum well are ideal systems for this purpose since they can present an oscillator strength larger than 100. By inserting a GaAs QD inside a state of the art microdisk microcavity, we demonstrate the strong coupling regime with a Rabi splitting of 400 μeV. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Femtosecond coherent emission from GaAs bulk microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurioli, Massimo; Bogani, Franco; Ceccherini, Simone; Colocci, Marcello; Beltram, Fabio; Sorba, Lucia

    1999-02-01

    The emission from a λ/2 GaAs bulk microcavity resonantly excited by femtosecond pulses has been characterized by using an interferometric correlation technique. It is found that the emission is dominated by the coherent signal due to light elastically scattered by disorder, and that scattering is predominantly originated from the lower polariton branch.

  11. A new microcavity design for single molecule detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, M.; Schleifenbaum, F.; Stupperich, C.; Failla, A.V.; Hartschuh, A.; Meixner, A.J.

    2006-01-01

    We present a new microcavity design which allows for efficient detection of single molecules by measuring the molecular fluorescence emission coupled into a resonant cavity mode. The Fabry-Perot-type microresonator consists of two silver mirrors separated by a thin polymer film doped with dye molecules in ultralow concenctration. By slightly tilting one of the mirrors different cavity lengths can be selected within the same sample. Locally, on a μm scale, the microcavity still acts as a planar Fabry-Perot resonator. Using scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy, single emitters on resonance with a single mode of the microresonator can be spatially addressed. Our microcavity is demonstrated to be well-suited for investigating the coupling mechanism between single quantum emitters and single modes of the electromagnetic field. The microcavity layout could be integrated in a lab-on-a-microchip design for ultrasensitive microfluidic analytics and can be considered as an important improvement for single photon sources based on single molecules operating at room temperature

  12. Computational Modeling of Photonic Crystal Microcavity Single-Photon Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulnier, Nicole A.

    Conventional cryptography is based on algorithms that are mathematically complex and difficult to solve, such as factoring large numbers. The advent of a quantum computer would render these schemes useless. As scientists work to develop a quantum computer, cryptographers are developing new schemes for unconditionally secure cryptography. Quantum key distribution has emerged as one of the potential replacements of classical cryptography. It relics on the fact that measurement of a quantum bit changes the state of the bit and undetected eavesdropping is impossible. Single polarized photons can be used as the quantum bits, such that a quantum system would in some ways mirror the classical communication scheme. The quantum key distribution system would include components that create, transmit and detect single polarized photons. The focus of this work is on the development of an efficient single-photon source. This source is comprised of a single quantum dot inside of a photonic crystal microcavity. To better understand the physics behind the device, a computational model is developed. The model uses Finite-Difference Time-Domain methods to analyze the electromagnetic field distribution in photonic crystal microcavities. It uses an 8-band k · p perturbation theory to compute the energy band structure of the epitaxially grown quantum dots. We discuss a method that combines the results of these two calculations for determining the spontaneous emission lifetime of a quantum dot in bulk material or in a microcavity. The computational models developed in this thesis are used to identify and characterize microcavities for potential use in a single-photon source. The computational tools developed are also used to investigate novel photonic crystal microcavities that incorporate 1D distributed Bragg reflectors for vertical confinement. It is found that the spontaneous emission enhancement in the quasi-3D cavities can be significantly greater than in traditional suspended slab

  13. Optical properties of semiconductors quantum microcavity structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afshar, A.M.

    1996-12-01

    The principal phenomenon investigated in this thesis is vacuum Rabi coupling in semiconductor microcavity structures. In these structures quantum well excitons are embedded in a Fabry - Perot like cavity, defined by two semiconductor dielectric mirrors. In such a system the coupled exciton and cavity photon mode form a mixed - mode polariton, where on - resonance there are two branches, each having 50% exciton and 50% photon character. The separation between the upper and lower branches is a measure of the coupling strength where the strength is dependent on the exciton oscillator strength. This interaction is known as vacuum Rabi coupling, and clear anticrossing is seen when the exciton is tuned through the cavity. In our reflectivity experiments we demonstrate control of the coupling between the cavity mode and the exciton by varying temperature, applied electric or magnetic field. Modelling of the reflectivity spectra and the tuning was done using a Transfer Matrix Reflectivity (TMR) model or a linear dispersion model, where in both cases the excitons are treated as Lorentz oscillators. Temperature tuning is achieved because exciton energy decreases with temperature at a much faster rate than the cavity mode. We have demonstrated vacuum Rabi coupling of the cavity mode with both the heavy - hole and light - hole excitons. Electric field tuning is achieved via the quantum confined Stark effect which decreases the exciton energy with increasing field, whilst at the same time the cavity mode energy remains constant. A study of how the electric field reduction of exciton oscillator strength reduces the vacuum Rabi coupling strength is performed. We report the first observation in a semiconductor structure of motional narrowing, seen in both electric field and in temperature tuning experiments at high magnetic field. In magnetic field studies we show how magnetic field induced increase in exciton oscillator strength affects the vacuum Rabi coupling. We also show by

  14. Time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy of intermediates of bacteriorhodopsin: The bK(590) intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terner, J; Hsieh, C L; Burns, A R; El-Sayed, M A

    1979-07-01

    We have combined microbeam and flow techniques with computer subtraction methods to obtain the resonance Raman spectrum of the short lived batho-intermediate (bK(590)) of bacteriorhodopsin. Comparison of the spectra obtained in (1)H(2)O and (2)H(2)O, as well as the fact that the bK(590) intermediate shows large optical red shifts, suggests that the Schiff base linkage of this intermediate is protonated. The fingerprint region of the spectrum of bK(590), sensitive to the isomeric configuration of the retinal chromophore, does not resemble the corresponding region of the parent bR(570) form. The resonance Raman spectrum of bK(590) as well as the spectra of all of the other main intermediates in the photoreaction cycle of bacteriorhodopsin are discussed and compared with resonance Raman spectra of published model compounds.

  15. Development and Characterization of Titanium Dioxide Gel with Encapsulated Bacteriorhodopsin for Hydrogen Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kaitlin E; Gakhar, Sukriti; Risbud, Subhash H; Longo, Marjorie L

    2018-06-06

    We study bacteriorhodopsin (BR) in its native purple membrane encapsulated within amorphous titanium dioxide, or titania, gels and in the presence of titania sol-particles to explore this system for hydrogen production. Förster resonance energy transfer between BR and titanium dioxide sol particles was used to conclude that there is nanometer-scale proximity of bacteriorhodopsin to the titanium dioxide. The detection of BR-titania sol aggregates by fluorescence anisotropy and particle sizing indicated the affinity amorphous titania has for BR without the use of additional cross-linkers. UV-Visible spectroscopy of BR-titania gels show that methanol addition did not denature BR at a 25 mM concentration presence as a sacrificial electron donor. Additionally, confinement of BR in the gels significantly limited protein denaturation at higher concentration of added methanol or ethanol. Subsequently, titania gels fabricated through the sol-gel process using a titanium ethoxide precursor, water and the addition of 25 mM methanol were used to encapsulate BR and a platinum reduction catalyst for the production of hydrogen gas under white light irradiation. The inclusion of 5 µM bacteriorhodopsin resulted in a hydrogen production rate of about 3.8 µmole hydrogen mL -1 hr -1 , an increase of 52% compared to gels containing no protein. Electron transfer and proton pumping by BR in close proximity to the titania gel surface are feasible explanations for the enhanced production of hydrogen without the need to crosslink BR to the titania gel. This work sets the stage for further developments of amorphous, rather than crystalline, titania-encapsulated bacteriorhodopsin for solar-driven hydrogen production through water-splitting.

  16. Fourier transform infrared difference spectroscopy of bacteriorhodopsin and its photoproducts regenerated with deuterated tyrosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dollinger, G.; Eisenstein, L.; Lin, S.L.; Nakanishi, K.; Termini, J.

    1986-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectroscopy has been used to detect the vibrational modes due to tyrosine residues in the protein that change in position or intensity between light-adapted bacteriorhodopsin (LA) and other species, namely, the K and M intermediates and dark-adapted bacteriorhodopsin (DA). To aid in the identification of the bands that change in these various species, the FTIR spectra of the free amino acids Tyr-d0, Tyr-d2 ( 2 H at positions ortho to OH), and Tyr-d4 ( 2 H at positions ortho and meta to OH) were measured in H 2 O and D 2 O at low and high pH. The characteristic frequencies of the Tyr species obtained in this manner were then used to identify the changes in protonation state of the tyrosine residues in the various bacteriorhodopsin species. The two diagnostically most useful bands were the approximately 1480-cm-1 band of Tyr(OH)-d2 and the approximately 1277-cm-1 band of Tyr(O-)-d0. Mainly by observing the appearance or disappearance of these bands in the difference spectra of pigments incorporating the tyrosine isotopes, it was possible to identify the following: in LA, one tyrosine and one tyrosinate; in the K intermediate, two tyrosines; in the M intermediate, one tyrosine and one tyrosinate; and in DA, two tyrosines. Since these residues were observed in the difference spectra K/LA, M/LA, and DA/LA, they represent the tyrosine or tyrosinate groups that most likely undergo changes in protonation state due to the conversions. These changes are most likely linked to the proton translocation process of bacteriorhodopsin

  17. Evidence for a tyrosine protonation change during the primary phototransition of bacteriorhodopsin at low temperature.

    OpenAIRE

    Rothschild, K J; Roepe, P; Ahl, P L; Earnest, T N; Bogomolni, R A; Das Gupta, S K; Mulliken, C M; Herzfeld, J

    1986-01-01

    Isotopically labeled tyrosines have been selectively incorporated into bacteriorhodopsin (bR). A comparison of the low-temperature bR570 to K Fourier transform infrared-difference spectra of these samples and normal bR provides information about the role of tyrosine in the primary phototransition. Several tyrosine contributions to the difference spectrum are found. These results and comparison with the spectra of model compounds suggest that a tyrosinate group protonates during the bR570 to K...

  18. Full color organic light-emitting devices with microcavity structure and color filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Liu, Hongyu; Sun, Runguang

    2009-05-11

    This letter demonstrated the fabrication of the full color passive matrix organic light-emitting devices based on the combination of the microcavity structure, color filter and a common white polymeric OLED. In the microcavity structure, patterned ITO terraces with different thickness were used as the anode as well as cavity spacer. The primary color emitting peaks were originally generated by the microcavity and then the second resonance peak was absorbed by the color filter.

  19. Cell-free expressed bacteriorhodopsin in different soluble membrane mimetics: biophysical properties and NMR accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etzkorn, Manuel; Raschle, Thomas; Hagn, Franz; Gelev, Vladimir; Rice, Amanda J; Walz, Thomas; Wagner, Gerhard

    2013-03-05

    Selecting a suitable membrane-mimicking environment is of fundamental importance for the investigation of membrane proteins. Nonconventional surfactants, such as amphipathic polymers (amphipols) and lipid bilayer nanodiscs, have been introduced as promising environments that may overcome intrinsic disadvantages of detergent micelle systems. However, structural insights into the effects of different environments on the embedded protein are limited. Here, we present a comparative study of the heptahelical membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin in detergent micelles, amphipols, and nanodiscs. Our results confirm that nonconventional environments can increase stability of functional bacteriorhodopsin, and demonstrate that well-folded heptahelical membrane proteins are, in principle, accessible by solution-NMR methods in amphipols and phospholipid nanodiscs. Our data distinguish regions of bacteriorhodopsin that mediate membrane/solvent contacts in the tested environments, whereas the protein's functional inner core remains almost unperturbed. The presented data allow comparing the investigated membrane mimetics in terms of NMR spectral quality and thermal stability required for structural studies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Tyrosine and carboxyl protonation changes in the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle. 1. M412 and L550 intermediates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roepe, P.; Ahl, P.L.; Gupta, S.K.D.; Herzfeld, J.; Rothschild, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    The role of tyrosines in the bacteriorhodopsin (bR) photocycle has been investigated by using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and UV difference spectroscopies. Tyrosine contributions to the BR 570 → M 412 FTIR difference spectra recorded at several temperatures and pH's were identified by isotopically labeling tyrosine residues in bacteriorhodopsin. The frequencies and deuterium/hydrogen exchange sensitivities of these peaks and of peaks in spectra of model compounds in several environments suggest that at least two different tyrosine groups participate in the bR photocycle during the formation of M 412 . One group undergoes a tyrosinate → tyrosine conversion during the BR 570 → K 630 transition. A second tyrosine group deprotonates between L 550 and M 412 . Low-temperature UV difference spectra in the 220-350-nm region of both purple membrane suspensions and rehydrated films support these conclusions. The UV spectra also indicate perturbations(s) of one or more tryptophan group(s). Several carboxyl groups appear to undergo a series of protonation changes between BR 570 and M 412 , as indicated by infrared absorption changes in the 1770-1720-cm -1 region. These results are consistent with the existence of a proton wire in bacteriorhodopsin that involves both tyrosine and carboxyl groups

  1. Extended Macroscopic Study of Dilute Gas Flow within a Microcavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Hssikou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour of monatomic and dilute gas is studied in the slip and early transition regimes using the extended macroscopic theory. The gas is confined within a two-dimensional microcavity where the longitudinal sides are in the opposite motion with constant velocity ±Uw. The microcavity walls are kept at the uniform and reference temperature T0. Thus, the gas flow is transported only by the shear stress induced by the motion of upper and lower walls. From the macroscopic point of view, the regularized 13-moment equations of Grad, R13, are solved numerically. The macroscopic gas proprieties are studied for different values of the so-called Knudsen number (Kn, which gives the gas-rarefaction degree. The results are compared with those obtained using the classical continuum theory of Navier-Stokes and Fourier (NSF.

  2. Interference effect in the resonant emission of a semiconductor microcavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassabois, G.; Bogani, F.; Triques, A. L.; Delalande, C.; Roussignol, Ph.

    2001-07-01

    We present a phenomenological description of the coherent emission from a semiconductor microcavity in the strong-coupling regime. We consider two main contributions which are calculated in the framework of the semiclassical approach of the linear dispersion theory: reflectivity corresponds to the response of a uniform microcavity while resonant Rayleigh scattering (RRS) arises from disorder. Our simulations are compared to experimental results obtained at normal incidence in a backscattering geometry by means of cw spectroscopy and interferometric correlation with subpicosecond resolution. In this geometry, a fair agreement is reached assuming interferences between the two aforementioned contributions. This interference effect gives evidence of the drastic modification of the RRS emission pattern of the embedded quantum well induced by the Fabry-Pérot cavity.

  3. Seeding Dynamics of Nonlinear Polariton Emission from a Microcavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, John Erland; Langbein, Wolfgang Werner; Jensen, Jacob Riis

    2000-01-01

    Summary form only given. The dynamics of polaritons in microcavity samples is presently under intense debate, in particular whether or not the so-called Boser action is possible. In this work, we investigate a λ cavity with a homogeneously broadened 25 nm GaAs quantum well at the antinode...... at a temperature of 10 K. We can thus inject well-defined polariton populations in k-space revealing how different initial and final state populations may influence the dynamics....

  4. Optical responses in single-crystalline organic microcavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, H.; Yamamoto, Y.; Takeda, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Kurisu, H.

    2008-01-01

    The anisotropic response of cavity polaritons is investigated in an organic microcavity composed of a single-crystalline anthracene film sandwiched between two distributed Bragg reflectors. Upper and lower cavity polariton modes are observed as sharp spectral peaks in the transmission spectra. Dispersion relation for cavity polaritons is obtained as a function of thickness of the thin film. Using this relation, the vacuum Rabi splitting energy for this system is estimated to be 340 meV

  5. Optical responses in single-crystalline organic microcavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, H. [Department of Physics, Ehime University, Matsuyama, 2-5 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan)], E-mail: kondo@phys.sci.ehime-u.ac.jp; Yamamoto, Y.; Takeda, A. [Department of Physics, Ehime University, Matsuyama, 2-5 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Yamamoto, S.; Kurisu, H. [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Yamaguchi University, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8611 (Japan)

    2008-05-15

    The anisotropic response of cavity polaritons is investigated in an organic microcavity composed of a single-crystalline anthracene film sandwiched between two distributed Bragg reflectors. Upper and lower cavity polariton modes are observed as sharp spectral peaks in the transmission spectra. Dispersion relation for cavity polaritons is obtained as a function of thickness of the thin film. Using this relation, the vacuum Rabi splitting energy for this system is estimated to be 340 meV.

  6. Quantum condensation from a tailored exciton population in a microcavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastham, P. R.; Phillips, R. T.

    2009-01-01

    An experiment is proposed on the coherent quantum dynamics of a semiconductor microcavity containing quantum dots. Modeling the experiment using a generalized Dicke model, we show that a tailored excitation pulse can create an energy-dependent population of excitons, which subsequently evolves to a quantum condensate of excitons and photons. The population is created by a generalization of adiabatic rapid passage and then condenses due to a dynamical analog of the BCS instability.

  7. Microcavity polariton linewidths in the weak-disorder regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang Werner; Woggon, U.

    2000-01-01

    Polariton linewidths have been measured in a series of high-quality microcavities with different excitonic inhomogeneous broadening in the weak-disorder regime. We show experimentally that the influence of the disorder on the polariton linewidths is canceled when the polariton energies are far in...... in the tail of the excitonic absorption. The measured linewidths are quantitatively compared with an estimation using the measured excitonic absorption spectrum of the bare quantum wells, and good agreement is found....

  8. Exceptional points enhance sensing in an optical microcavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weijian; Kaya Özdemir, Şahin; Zhao, Guangming; Wiersig, Jan; Yang, Lan

    2017-08-01

    Sensors play an important part in many aspects of daily life such as infrared sensors in home security systems, particle sensors for environmental monitoring and motion sensors in mobile phones. High-quality optical microcavities are prime candidates for sensing applications because of their ability to enhance light-matter interactions in a very confined volume. Examples of such devices include mechanical transducers, magnetometers, single-particle absorption spectrometers, and microcavity sensors for sizing single particles and detecting nanometre-scale objects such as single nanoparticles and atomic ions. Traditionally, a very small perturbation near an optical microcavity introduces either a change in the linewidth or a frequency shift or splitting of a resonance that is proportional to the strength of the perturbation. Here we demonstrate an alternative sensing scheme, by which the sensitivity of microcavities can be enhanced when operated at non-Hermitian spectral degeneracies known as exceptional points. In our experiments, we use two nanoscale scatterers to tune a whispering-gallery-mode micro-toroid cavity, in which light propagates along a concave surface by continuous total internal reflection, in a precise and controlled manner to exceptional points. A target nanoscale object that subsequently enters the evanescent field of the cavity perturbs the system from its exceptional point, leading to frequency splitting. Owing to the complex-square-root topology near an exceptional point, this frequency splitting scales as the square root of the perturbation strength and is therefore larger (for sufficiently small perturbations) than the splitting observed in traditional non-exceptional-point sensing schemes. Our demonstration of exceptional-point-enhanced sensitivity paves the way for sensors with unprecedented sensitivity.

  9. Novel emission phenomena in organic microcavities (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Karl

    2016-09-01

    Organic light emitting diodes (OLED) are today a mature techology and have reached high efficiency both in monochrome and white devices. One of the main research areas for further improvement is still the optical design which enables many new approaches to enhance efficiency and realize special emission properties. In this talk, I will review our recent work on OLED outcoupling, in particular for devices encapsulated in microcavities and patterned structures.

  10. Transition between bulk and surface refractive index sensitivity of micro-cavity in-line Mach-Zehnder interferometer induced by thin film deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śmietana, Mateusz; Janik, Monika; Koba, Marcin; Bock, Wojtek J

    2017-10-16

    In this work we discuss the refractive index (RI) sensitivity of a micro-cavity in-line Mach-Zehnder interferometer in the form of a cylindrical hole (40-50 μm in diameter) fabricated in a standard single-mode optical fiber using a femtosecond laser. The surface of the micro-cavity was coated with up to 400 nm aluminum oxide thin film using the atomic layer deposition method. Next, the film was progressively chemically etched and the influence on changes in the RI of liquid in the micro-cavity was determined at different stages of the experiment, i.e., at different thicknesses of the film. An effect of transition between sensitivity to the film thickness (surface) and the RI of liquid in the cavity (bulk) is demonstrated for the first time. We have found that depending on the interferometer working conditions determined by thin film properties, the device can be used for investigation of phenomena taking place at the surface, such as in case of specific label-free biosensing applications, or for small-volume RI analysis as required in analytical chemistry.

  11. Multimode laser emission from free-standing cylindrical microcavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter, Jaison, E-mail: jaisonpeter@cusat.ac.in; Radhakrishnan, P.; Nampoori, V.P.N.; Kailasnath, M.

    2014-05-01

    We report a well resolved whispering gallery mode (WGM) laser emission from a free-standing microring cavity based on a dye doped hollow polymer optical fiber (DDHPOF), which is transversely pumped by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The microring laser is characterized by a well-defined, low threshold pump power at which the emission spectral intensity dramatically increases and collapses into several dominant microcavity laser modes with reduced mode spacing and high Q-value. Resonant modes are excited inside the gain medium which is strongly confined along the radial direction so that the spacing of lasing modes is controlled by the diameter of the cylindrical microcavity. A variation in the free spectral range of WGM spectra from 0.23 to 0.09 nm coupled with a red-shift is observed with an increase in the diameter of DDHPOFs. - Highlights: • Different diameter free-standing cylindrical microcavity lasers have been fabricated and their performances have been evaluated. • The microring laser is characterized by a well-defined, low threshold pump power, with reduced mode spacing and high Q-value. • When the diameter of DDHPOF increases, the number of lasing peaks increases along with the decrease of the FSR as observed from our studies. • It is also found that whispering gallery lasing envelope is shifted from 559 to 571 nm (Stokes shift) with the diameter.

  12. Optical trapping of metal-dielectric nanoparticle clusters near photonic crystal microcavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Camilo A; Huang, Ningfeng; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2012-09-01

    We predict the formation of optically trapped, metal-dielectric nanoparticle clusters above photonic crystal microcavities. We determine the conditions on particle size and position for a gold particle to be trapped above the microcavity. We then show that strong field redistribution and enhancement near the trapped gold nanoparticle results in secondary trapping sites for a pair of dielectric nanoparticles.

  13. Improved free-energy landscape reconstruction of bacteriorhodopsin highlights local variations in unfolding energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heenan, Patrick R; Yu, Hao; Siewny, Matthew G W; Perkins, Thomas T

    2018-03-28

    Precisely quantifying the energetics that drive the folding of membrane proteins into a lipid bilayer remains challenging. More than 15 years ago, atomic force microscopy (AFM) emerged as a powerful tool to mechanically extract individual membrane proteins from a lipid bilayer. Concurrently, fluctuation theorems, such as the Jarzynski equality, were applied to deduce equilibrium free energies (ΔG 0 ) from non-equilibrium single-molecule force spectroscopy records. The combination of these two advances in single-molecule studies deduced the free-energy of the model membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin in its native lipid bilayer. To elucidate this free-energy landscape at a higher resolution, we applied two recent developments. First, as an input to the reconstruction, we used force-extension curves acquired with a 100-fold higher time resolution and 10-fold higher force precision than traditional AFM studies of membrane proteins. Next, by using an inverse Weierstrass transform and the Jarzynski equality, we removed the free energy associated with the force probe and determined the molecular free-energy landscape of the molecule under study, bacteriorhodopsin. The resulting landscape yielded an average unfolding free energy per amino acid (aa) of 1.0 ± 0.1 kcal/mol, in agreement with past single-molecule studies. Moreover, on a smaller spatial scale, this high-resolution landscape also agreed with an equilibrium measurement of a particular three-aa transition in bacteriorhodopsin that yielded 2.7 kcal/mol/aa, an unexpectedly high value. Hence, while average unfolding ΔG 0 per aa is a useful metric, the derived high-resolution landscape details significant local variation from the mean. More generally, we demonstrated that, as anticipated, the inverse Weierstrass transform is an efficient means to reconstruct free-energy landscapes from AFM data.

  14. Two-photon polarization data storage in bacteriorhodopsin films and its potential use in security applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhof, Martin; Hampp, Norbert, E-mail: hampp@staff.uni-marburg.de [Department of Chemistry, Material Sciences Center, University of Marburg, Hans-Meerwein-Str., D-35032 Marburg (Germany); Rhinow, Daniel [Max-Planck-Institute of Biophysics, Max-von-Laue-Straße 3, D-60438 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2014-02-24

    Bacteriorhodopsin (BR) films allow write-once-read-many recording of polarization data by a two-photon-absorption (TPA) process. The optical changes in BR films induced by the TPA recording were measured and the Müller matrix of a BR film was determined. A potential application of BR films in security technology is shown. Polarization data can be angle-selective retrieved with high signal-to-noise ratio. The BR film does not only carry optical information but serves also as a linear polarizer. This enables that polarization features recorded in BR films may be retrieved by merely using polarized light from a mobile phone display.

  15. Photolytic interruptions of the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle examined by time-resolved resonance raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieger, I; Atkinson, G H

    1985-09-24

    An investigation of the photolytic conditions used to initiate and spectroscopically monitor the bacteriorhodopsin (BR) photocycle utilizing time-resolved resonance Raman (TR3) spectroscopy has revealed and characterized two photoinduced reactions that interrupt the thermal pathway. One reaction involves the photolytic interconversion of M-412 and M', and the other involves the direct photolytic conversion of the BR-570/K-590 photostationary mixture either to M-412 and M' or to M-like intermediates within 10 ns. The photolytic threshold conditions describing both reactions have been quantitatively measured and are discussed in terms of experimental parameters.

  16. An analysis of 3D solvation structure in biomolecules: application to coiled coil serine and bacteriorhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Kenji; Yokogawa, Daisuke; Sato, Hirofumi; Sakaki, Shigeyoshi

    2010-06-17

    Three-dimensional (3D) solvation structure around coiled coil serine (Coil-Ser) and inner 3D hydration structure in bacteriorhodopsin (bR) were studied using a recently developed method named multicenter molecular Ornstein-Zernike equation (MC-MOZ) theory. In addition, a procedure for analyzing the 3D solvent distribution was proposed. The method enables us to calculate the coordination number of solvent water as well as the strength of hydrogen bonding between the water molecule and the protein. The results for Coil-Ser and bR showed very good agreement with the experimental observations.

  17. Higher-order photon bunching in a semiconductor microcavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assmann, M.; Veit, F.; Bayer, M.

    2009-01-01

    Quantum mechanically indistinguishable particles such as photons may show collective behavior. Therefore, an appropriate description of a light field must consider the properties of an assembly of photons instead of independent particles. We have studied multiphoton correlations up to fourth order...... in the single-mode emission of a semiconductor microcavity in the weak and strong coupling regimes. The counting statistics of single photons were recorded with picosecond time resolution, allowing quantitative measurement of the few-photon bunching inside light pulses. Our results show bunching behavior...

  18. Scarred resonances and steady probability distribution in a chaotic microcavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soo-Young; Rim, Sunghwan; Kim, Chil-Min; Ryu, Jung-Wan; Kwon, Tae-Yoon

    2005-01-01

    We investigate scarred resonances of a stadium-shaped chaotic microcavity. It is shown that two components with different chirality of the scarring pattern are slightly rotated in opposite ways from the underlying unstable periodic orbit, when the incident angles of the scarring pattern are close to the critical angle for total internal reflection. In addition, the correspondence of emission pattern with the scarring pattern disappears when the incident angles are much larger than the critical angle. The steady probability distribution gives a consistent explanation about these interesting phenomena and makes it possible to expect the emission pattern in the latter case

  19. Finite-momentum condensation in a pumped microcavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brierley, R. T.; Eastham, P. R.

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the absorption spectra of a semiconductor microcavity into which a nonequilibrium exciton population has been pumped. We predict strong peaks in the spectrum corresponding to collective modes analogous to the Cooper modes in superconductors and fermionic atomic gases. These modes can become unstable, leading to the formation of off-equilibrium quantum condensates. We calculate a phase diagram for condensation and show that the dominant instabilities can be at a finite momentum. Thus we predict the formation of inhomogeneous condensates, similar to Fulde-Ferrel-Larkin-Ovchinnikov states.

  20. Multi-Valued Spin Switch in a Semiconductor Microcavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraïso, T. K.; Wouters, M.; Léger, Y.; Morier-Genoud, F.; Deveaudhyphen; Plédran, B.

    2011-12-01

    In this work, we report on the first realization of multi-valued spin switching in the solid-state. We investigate the physics of spinor bistability with microcavity polaritons in a trap. Spinor interactions lead to special bistability regimes with decoupled thresholds for spin-up and spin-down polaritons. This allows us to establish state-of-the-art spin switching operations. We evidence polarization hysteresis and determine appropriate conditions to achieve spin multistability. For a given excitation condition, three stable spin states coexist for the system. These results open new pathways for the development of innovative spin-based logic gates and memory devices.

  1. Ultra-fast polariton dynamics in an organic microcavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polli D.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We study an organic semiconductor microcavity operating in the strong-coupling regime using femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. By probing the photo-induced absorption bands, we characterize the time-dependent population densities of states in the two polariton branches. We found evidence of a scattering process from the upper-branch cavity polaritons to the exciton reservoir having a rate of (150 fs-1. A slower process similarly populates lower-branch polaritons with a rate of around (3ps-1

  2. Dynamics in terahertz semiconductor microcavity: quantum noise spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabri, H.; Eleuch, H.

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the physics of an optical semiconductor microcavity containing a coupled double quantum well interacting with cavity photons. The photon statistics of the transmitted light by the cavity is explored. We show that the nonlinear interactions in the direct and indirect excitonic modes generate an important squeezing despite the weak nonlinearities. When the strong coupling regime is achieved, the noise spectra of the system is dominated by the indirect exciton distribution. At the opposite, in the weak regime, direct excitons contribute much larger in the noise spectra.

  3. Enhanced photoconductivity and fine response tuning in nanostructured porous silicon microcavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urteaga, R; MarIn, O; Acquaroli, L N; Schmidt, J A; Koropecki, R R [INTEC-UNL-CONICET, Guemes 3450 - 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina); Comedi, D, E-mail: rkoro@intec.ceride.gov.a [CONICET y LAFISO, Departamento de Fisica, FACET, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman (Argentina)

    2009-05-01

    We used light confinement in optical microcavities to achieve a strong enhancement and a precise wavelength tunability of the electrical photoconductance of nanostructured porous silicon (PS). The devices consist of a periodic array of alternating PS layers, electrochemically etched to have high and low porosities - and therefore distinct dielectric functions. A central layer having a doubled thickness breaks up the symmetry of the one-dimensional photonic structure, producing a resonance in the photonic band gap that is clearly observed in the reflectance spectrum. The devices were transferred to a glass coated with a transparent SnO{sub 2} electrode, while an Al contact was evaporated on its back side. The electrical conductance was measured as a function of the photon energy. A strong enhancement of the conductance is obtained in a narrow (17nm FWHM) band peaking at the resonance. We present experimental results of the angular dependence of this photoconductance peak energy, and propose an explanation of the conductivity behaviour supported by calculations of the internal electromagnetic field. These devices are promising candidates for finely tuned photoresistors with potential application as chemical sensors and biosensors.

  4. Enhancing the Robustness of the Microcavity Coupling System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Ying-Zhan; Zhang Wen-Dong; Xiong Ji-Jun; Ji Zhe; Yan Shu-Bin; Liu Jun; Xue Chen-Yang

    2011-01-01

    A novel method to enhance the robustness of the microcavity coupling system (MCS) is presented by encapsulating and solidifying the MCS with a low refractive index (RI) curable UV polymer. The encapsulating process is illustrated in detail for a typical microsphere with a radius of R about 240μm. Three differences of the resonant characteristics before and after the package are observed and analyzed. The first two differences refer to the enhancement of the coupling strength and the shift of the resonant spectrum to the longer wavelength, which are both mainly because of the microsphere surrounding RI variation. Another difference is the quality factor (Q-factor) which decreases from 7.8×10 7 to 8.7×10 6 after the package due to the polymer absorption. Moreover, rotation testing experiments have been carried out to verify the robustness of the package MCS. Experimental results demonstrate that the packaged MCR has much better robust performance than the un-package sample. The enhancement of the robustness greatly promotes the microcavity research from fundamental investigations to application fields. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  5. Density matrix of strongly coupled quantum dot - microcavity system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Van Hop

    2009-01-01

    Any two-level quantum system can be used as a quantum bit (qubit) - the basic element of all devices and systems for quantum information and quantum computation. Recently it was proposed to study the strongly coupled system consisting of a two-level quantum dot and a monoenergetic photon gas in a microcavity-the strongly coupled quantum dot-microcavity (QD-MC) system for short, with the Jaynes-Cumming total Hamiltonian, for the application in the quantum information processing. Different approximations were applied in the theoretical study of this system. In this work, on the basis of the exact solution of the Schrodinger equation for this system without dissipation we derive the exact formulae for its density matrix. The realization of a qubit in this system is discussed. The solution of the system of rate equation for the strongly coupled QD-MC system in the presence of the interaction with the environment was also established in the first order approximation with respect to this interaction.

  6. Composite modulation of Fano resonance in plasmonic microstructures by electric-field and microcavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Fan; Wu, Chenyun; Yang, Hong; Hu, Xiaoyong; Gong, Qihuang

    2014-01-01

    Composite modulation of Fano resonance by using electric-field and microcavity simultaneously is realized in a plasmonic microstructure, which consists of a gold nanowire grating inserted into a Fabry-Perot microcavity composited of a liquid crystal layer sandwiched between two indium tin oxide layers. The Fano resonance wavelength varies with the applied voltage and the microcavity resonance. A large shift of 48 nm in the Fano resonance wavelength is achieved when the applied voltage is 20 V. This may provide a new way for the study of multi-functional integrated photonic circuits and chips based on plasmonic microstructures

  7. Composite modulation of Fano resonance in plasmonic microstructures by electric-field and microcavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fan; Wu, Chenyun; Yang, Hong [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics and Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Hu, Xiaoyong, E-mail: xiaoyonghu@pku.edu.cn; Gong, Qihuang [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics and Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-11-03

    Composite modulation of Fano resonance by using electric-field and microcavity simultaneously is realized in a plasmonic microstructure, which consists of a gold nanowire grating inserted into a Fabry-Perot microcavity composited of a liquid crystal layer sandwiched between two indium tin oxide layers. The Fano resonance wavelength varies with the applied voltage and the microcavity resonance. A large shift of 48 nm in the Fano resonance wavelength is achieved when the applied voltage is 20 V. This may provide a new way for the study of multi-functional integrated photonic circuits and chips based on plasmonic microstructures.

  8. Manipulating the optical properties of CdSe/ZnSSe quantum dot based monolithic pillar microcavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seyfried, Moritz; Kalden, Joachim; Lohmeyer, Henning; Sebald, Kathrin; Gutowski, Juergen [Semiconductor Optics, Institute of Solid state Physics, University of Bremen (Germany); Kruse, Carsten; Hommel, Detlef, E-mail: Seyfried@ifp.uni-bremen.d [Semiconductor Epitaxy, Institute of Solid state Physics, University of Bremen (Germany)

    2010-02-01

    A customization of the optical properties of pillar microcavities on the desired applications is essential for their future use as quantum-optical devices. Therefore, all-epitaxial cavities with CdSe quantum dot embedded in pillar structures with different geometries have been realized by focused-ion-beam etching. The quality factors of circularly shaped pillar microcavities have been measured and their dependence on the excitation power is discussed. As a possibility to achieve polarized light emission, asymmetrically shaped microcavities are presented. Examples of an elliptically shaped pillar as well as of photonic molecules are investigated with respect to their photoluminescence characteristics and polarization.

  9. Raman scattering enhancement in photon-plasmon resonance mediated metal-dielectric microcavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guddala, Sriram; Narayana Rao, D.; Dwivedi, Vindesh K.; Vijaya Prakash, G.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report the photon-plasmon interaction scheme and enhanced field strengths resulted into the amplification of phonon in a novel microcavity. A metal-dielectric microcavity, with unified cavity photonic mode and localized surface plasmon resonances, is visualized by impregnating the gold nanoparticles into the deep see-through nano-sized pores of porous silicon microcavity. The intense optical field strengths resulting from the photon-plasmon interactions are probed by both resonant and non-resonant Raman scattering experiments. Due to photon-plasmon-phonon interaction mechanism, several orders of enhancement in the intensity of scattered Raman Stokes photon (at 500 cm −1 ) are observed. Our metal nanoparticle-microcavity hybrid system shows the potential to improve the sensing figure of merit as well as the applications of plasmonics for optoelectronics, photovoltaics, and related technologies

  10. Whispering gallery mode emission from a composite system of J-aggregates and photonic microcavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnikau, Dzmitry; Savateeva, Diana [Centro de Física de Materiales (MPC, CSIC-UPV/EHU) and Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Po Manuel de Lardizabal 5, Donostia, San Sebastian 20018 (Spain); Rusakov, Konstantin I. [Department of Physics, Brest State Technical University, Brest 224017 (Belarus); Rakovich, Yury P., E-mail: Yury.Rakovich@ehu.es [Centro de Física de Materiales (MPC, CSIC-UPV/EHU) and Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Po Manuel de Lardizabal 5, Donostia, San Sebastian 20018 (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, Bilbao (Spain)

    2014-01-15

    We report on development and characterization of Whispering Gallery Modes spherical microcavities integrated with organic dye molecules in a J-aggregate state. The microcavities are studied using micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy, and fluorescence lifetime imaging confocal microscopy. Directional emission of light from the microcavity is also experimentally demonstrated and attributed to the photonic jets generated in the microsphere. -- Highlights: • Report on the development and characterization of hybrid system consisting of thin shell of J-aggregates and spherical Whispering Gallery Mode microcavity. • An investigation of spontaneous emission rate in the shell of J-aggregates integrated with a Whispering Gallery Mode cavity. • Demonstration of directional emission from Whispering Gallery Mode cavity with J-aggregates which is highly desirable functionality for both micro- and nano-scale cavities.

  11. Electrically Injected Polariton Lasing from a GaAs-Based Microcavity under Magnetic Field

    KAUST Repository

    Bhattacharya, Pallab; Das, Ayan; Jankowski, Marc; Bhowmick, Sishir; Lee, Chi-Sen; Jahangir, Shafat

    2012-01-01

    Suppression of relaxation bottleneck and subsequent polariton lasing is observed in a GaAs-based microcavity under the application of a magnetic field. The threshold injection current density is 0.32 A/cm2 at 7 Tesla.

  12. A parametric study on the PD pulses activity within micro-cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganjovi, Alireza A.

    2016-03-01

    A two-dimensional kinetic model has been used to parametric investigation of the spark-type partial discharge pulses inside the micro-cavities. The model is based on particle-in-cell methods with Monte Carlo Collision techniques for modeling of collisions. Secondary processes like photo-emission and cathode-emission are considered. The micro-cavity may be sandwiched between two metallic conductors or two dielectrics. The discharge within the micro-cavity is studied in conjunction with the external circuit. The model is used to successfully simulate the evolution of the discharge and yield useful information about the build-up of space charge within the micro-cavity and the consequent modification of the applied electric field. The phase-space scatter plots for electrons, positive, and negative ions are obtained in order to understand the manner in which discharge progresses over time. The rise-time and the magnitude of the discharge current pulse are obtained and are seen to be affected by micro-cavity dimensions, gas pressure within the micro-cavity, and the permittivity of surrounding dielectrics. The results have been compared with existing experimental, theoretical, and computational results, wherever possible. An attempt has been made to understand the nature of the variations in terms of the physical processes involved.

  13. Steady-State Characterization of Bacteriorhodopsin-D85N Photocycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timucin, Dogan A.; Downie, John D.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    An operational characterization of the photocycle of the genetic mutant D85N of bacteriorhodopsin, BR-D85N, is presented. Steady-state bleach spectra and pump-probe absorbance data are obtained with thick hydrated films containing BR-D85N embedded in a gelatin host. Simple two- and three-state models are used to analyze the photocycle dynamics and extract relevant information such as pure-state absorption spectra, photochemical-transition quantum efficiencies, and thermal lifetimes of dominant states appearing in the photocycle, the knowledge of which should aid in the analysis of optical recording and retrieval of data in films incorporating this photochromic material. The remarkable characteristics of this material and their implications from the viewpoint of optical data storage and processing are discussed.

  14. Analysis of high-quality modes in open chaotic microcavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, W.; Yamilov, A.; Cao, H.

    2005-01-01

    We present a numerical study of the high-quality modes in two-dimensional dielectric stadium microcavities. Although the classical ray mechanics is fully chaotic in a stadium billiard, all of the high-quality modes show a 'strong scar' around unstable periodic orbits. When the deformation (ratio of the length of the straight segments over the diameter of the half circles) is small, the high-quality modes correspond to whispering-gallery-type trajectories and their quality factors decrease monotonically with increasing deformation. At large deformation, each high-quality mode is associated with multiple unstable periodic orbits. Its quality factor changes nonmonotonically with the deformation, and there exists an optimal deformation for each mode at which its quality factor reaches a local maximum. This unusual behavior is attributed to the interference of waves propagating along different constituent orbits that could minimize light leakage out of the cavity

  15. Numerical study on discharge process of microcavity plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Guangqing; Xue Weihua; Wang Dongxue; Zhu Guoqiang; Zhu Yu

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of plasma parameters during high pressure discharge in the microcavity with a hollow anode was numerically studied, with a two-dimensional self-consistent fluid model. The simulations were performed with argon at 13.3 kPa. The numerical results show that during the discharge the electric field around the cathode transforms from an axial field to a radial field, the plasma density gets the maximum value on the central line of the cavity and the location of the maximum density moves from the region near anode at the initial stage to the cathode vicinity at the stable stage, and the maximum electron temperature occurs in the ring sheath of cathode. (authors)

  16. A porous silicon optical microcavity for sensitive bacteria detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Sha; Huang Jianfeng; Cai Lintao

    2011-01-01

    A porous silicon microcavity (PSM) is highly sensitive to subtle interface changes due to its high surface area, capillary condensation ability and a narrow resonance peak (∼10 nm). Based on the well-defined optical properties of a PSM, we successfully fabricated a bacteria detection chip for molecular or subcellular analysis by surface modification using undecylenic acid (UA), and the specific recognition binding of vancomycin to the D-alanyl-D-alanine of bacteria. The red shift of the PSM resonance peak showed a good linear relationship with bacteria concentration ranging from 100 to 1000 bacteria ml -1 at the level of relative standard deviation of 0.994 and detection limit of 20 bacteria ml -1 . The resulting PSM sensors demonstrated high sensitivity, good reproducibility, fast response and low cost for biosensing.

  17. A porous silicon optical microcavity for sensitive bacteria detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sha; Huang, Jianfeng; Cai, Lintao

    2011-10-01

    A porous silicon microcavity (PSM) is highly sensitive to subtle interface changes due to its high surface area, capillary condensation ability and a narrow resonance peak (~10 nm). Based on the well-defined optical properties of a PSM, we successfully fabricated a bacteria detection chip for molecular or subcellular analysis by surface modification using undecylenic acid (UA), and the specific recognition binding of vancomycin to the D-alanyl-D-alanine of bacteria. The red shift of the PSM resonance peak showed a good linear relationship with bacteria concentration ranging from 100 to 1000 bacteria ml - 1 at the level of relative standard deviation of 0.994 and detection limit of 20 bacteria ml - 1. The resulting PSM sensors demonstrated high sensitivity, good reproducibility, fast response and low cost for biosensing.

  18. A porous silicon optical microcavity for sensitive bacteria detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Sha; Huang Jianfeng; Cai Lintao, E-mail: lt.cai@siat.ac.cn [CAS Key Lab of Health Informatics, Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Cancer Nanotechnology, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518055 (China)

    2011-10-21

    A porous silicon microcavity (PSM) is highly sensitive to subtle interface changes due to its high surface area, capillary condensation ability and a narrow resonance peak ({approx}10 nm). Based on the well-defined optical properties of a PSM, we successfully fabricated a bacteria detection chip for molecular or subcellular analysis by surface modification using undecylenic acid (UA), and the specific recognition binding of vancomycin to the D-alanyl-D-alanine of bacteria. The red shift of the PSM resonance peak showed a good linear relationship with bacteria concentration ranging from 100 to 1000 bacteria ml{sup -1} at the level of relative standard deviation of 0.994 and detection limit of 20 bacteria ml{sup -1}. The resulting PSM sensors demonstrated high sensitivity, good reproducibility, fast response and low cost for biosensing.

  19. BCS-BEC crossover in a system of microcavity polaritons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeling, Jonathan; Eastham, P.R.; Szymanska, M.H.; Littlewood, P.B.

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the thermodynamics and signatures of a polariton condensate over a range of densities, using a model of microcavity polaritons with internal structure. We determine a phase diagram for this system including fluctuation corrections to the mean-field theory. At low densities the condensation temperature T c behaves like that for point bosons. At higher densities, when T c approaches the Rabi splitting, T c deviates from the form for point bosons, and instead approaches the result of a BCS-like mean-field theory. This crossover occurs at densities much less than the Mott density. We show that current experiments are in a density range where the phase boundary is described by the BCS-like mean-field boundary. We investigate the influence of inhomogeneous broadening and detuning of excitons on the phase diagram

  20. Advances of Optofluidic Microcavities for Microlasers and Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqing Feng

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Optofluidic microcavities with high Q factor have made rapid progress in recent years by using various micro-structures. On one hand, they are applied to microfluidic lasers with low excitation thresholds. On the other hand, they inspire the innovation of new biosensing devices with excellent performance. In this article, the recent advances in the microlaser research and the biochemical sensing field will be reviewed. The former will be categorized based on the structures of optical resonant cavities such as the Fabry–Pérot cavity and whispering gallery mode, and the latter will be classified based on the working principles into active sensors and passive sensors. Moreover, the difficulty of single-chip integration and recent endeavors will be briefly discussed.

  1. Solid state microcavity dye lasers fabricated by nanoimprint lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Daniel; Nielsen, Theodor; Kristensen, Anders

    2004-01-01

    propagating TE–TM modes. The laser cavity has the lateral shape of a trapezoid, supporting lasing modes by reflection on the vertical cavity walls. The solid polymer dye lasers emit laterally through one of the vertical cavity walls, when pumped optically through the top surface by means of a frequency...... doubled, pulsed Nd:YAG laser. Lasing in the wavelength region from 560 to 570 nm is observed from a laser with a side-length of 50 µm. In this proof of concept, the lasers are multimode with a mode wavelength separation of approximately 1.6 nm, as determined by the waveguide propagation constant......We present a solid state polymer microcavity dye laser, fabricated by thermal nanoimprint lithography (NIL) in a dye-doped thermoplast. The thermoplast poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA) is used due to its high transparency in the visible range and its robustness to laser radiation. The laser dye...

  2. Optical characterization of porous silicon microcavities for glucose oxidase biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palestino, G.; Agarwal, V.; Garcia, D. B.; Legros, R.; Pérez, E.; Gergely, C.

    2008-04-01

    PSi microcavity (PSiMc) is characterized by a narrow resonance peak in the optical spectrum that is very sensitive to small changes in the refractive index. We report that the resonant optical cavities of PSi structures can be used to enhance the detection of labeled fluorescent biomolecules. Various PSi configurations were tested in order to compare the optical response of the PSi devices to the capture of organic molecules. Morphological and topographical analyses were performed on PSiMc using Atomic Force (AFM) and Scanning Electron (SEM) microscopies. The heterogeneity in pores lengths resulting from etching process assures a better penetration of larger molecules into the pores and sensor sensitivity depends on the pore size. Molecular detection is monitored by the successive red shifts in the reflectance spectra after the stabilization of PSiMc with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). The glucose oxidase was cross linked into the PSiMc structures following a silane-glutaraldehyde (GTA) chemistry.

  3. Dynamics of polaritons in semiconductor microcavities near instability thresholds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Peng-Bin

    2012-01-01

    A theoretical study is presented on the dynamics of polaritons in semiconductor microcavities near parametric instability thresholds. With upward or downward ramp of optical pump, different instability modes emerge in parameter space defined by damping and detuning. According to these modes, stationary short-wave, stationary periodic, oscillatory periodic, and oscillatory uniform parametric instabilities are distinguished. By multiple scale expansion, the dynamics near threshold can be described by a critical mode with a slowly varying amplitude for the last three instabilities. Furthermore, it is found that the evolutions of their amplitudes are governed by real or complex Ginzburg–Landau equations. -- Highlights: ► Phase diagrams for different instability in extended parameter space. ► Different instability modes near thresholds. ► Different envelop equations near thresholds obtained by multi-scale expansion.

  4. Production of functional bacteriorhodopsin by an Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis system supplemented with steroid detergent and lipid

    OpenAIRE

    Shimono, Kazumi; Goto, Mie; Kikukawa, Takashi; Miyauchi, Seiji; Shirouzu, Mikako; Kamo, Naoki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2009-01-01

    Cell-free expression has become a highly promising tool for the efficient production of membrane proteins. In this study, we used a dialysis-based Escherichia coli cell-free system for the production of a membrane protein actively integrated into liposomes. The membrane protein was the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin, consisting of seven transmembrane α-helices. The cell-free expression system in the dialysis mode was supplemented with a combination of a detergent and a natural lip...

  5. Detection and light enhancement of glucose oxidase adsorbed on porous silicon microcavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palestino, Gabriela [GES-UMR 5650, CNRS-Universite Montpellier II, Montpellier (France); Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Martin, Marta; Legros, Rene; Cloitre, Thierry; Gergely, Csilla [GES-UMR 5650, CNRS-Universite Montpellier II, Montpellier (France); Agarwal, Vivechana [CIICAP, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Cuernavaca (Mexico); Zimanyi, Laszlo [EA4203, Faculte d' Odontologie, Universite Montpellier I, Montpellier (France); Institute of Biophysics, Biological Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Szeged (Hungary)

    2009-07-15

    Porous silicon (PSi) structure is used as support material to detect protein infiltration and to induce fluorescence and second harmonic light enhancement from glucose oxidase (GOX). Functionalization and protein infiltration is monitored by specular reflectometry. Optical response enhancement of PSi microcavity structures compared to PSi single layers or Bragg mirrors is observed, when GOX is impregnated. Penetration of organic molecules along the PSi microcavity structure is demonstrated by energy dispersive X-ray profile. Enhanced fluorescence emission of GOX when adsorbed on PSi microcavity is evidenced by multi-photon microscopy (MPM). Second harmonic light generation is observed at some particular pores of PSi and subsequent resonance enhancement of the signal arising from the GOX adsorbed within the pores is detected. Our work evidences an improved device functionality of GOX-PSi microcavities due to strongly confined and localized light emission within these structures. This opens the way towards the application of PSi microcavity structures as amended biosensors based on their locally enhanced optical response. The second main achievement lies in the novelty of the used techniques. In contrast to the specular reflectometry used to monitor the macroscopic optical response of PSi structures, MPM presents a valuable alternative microscopic technique probing individual pores. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Development of L-lactate dehydrogenase biosensor based on porous silicon resonant microcavities as fluorescence enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenie, S N Aisyiyah; Prieto-Simon, Beatriz; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-12-15

    The up-regulation of L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), an intracellular enzyme present in most of all body tissues, is indicative of several pathological conditions and cellular death. Herein, we demonstrate LDH detection using porous silicon (pSi) microcavities as a luminescence-enhancing optical biosensing platform. Non-fluorescent resazurin was covalently attached onto the pSi surface via thermal hydrocarbonisation, thermal hydrosylilation and acylation. Each surface modification step was confirmed by means of FTIR and the optical shifts of the resonance wavelength of the microcavity. Thermal hydrocarbonisation also afforded excellent surface stability, ensuring that the resazurin was not reduced on the pSi surface. Using a pSi microcavity biosensor, the fluorescence signal upon detection of LDH was amplified by 10 and 5-fold compared to that of a single layer and a detuned microcavity, respectively, giving a limit of detection of 0.08 U/ml. The biosensor showed a linear response between 0.16 and 6.5 U/ml, covering the concentration range of LDH in normal as well as damaged tissues. The biosensor was selective for LDH and did not produce a signal upon incubation with another NAD-dependant enzyme L-glutamic dehydrogenase. The use of the pSi microcavity as a sensing platform reduced reagent usage by 30% and analysis time threefold compared to the standard LDH assay in solution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Substantial enhancement of red emission intensity by embedding Eu-doped GaN into a microcavity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inaba, T.; Lee, D.-G.; Wakamatsu, R.; Kojima, T.; Mitchell, B.; Capretti, A.; Gregorkiewicz, T.; Koizumi, A.; Fujiwara, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate resonantly excited photoluminescence from a Eu,O-codoped GaN layer embedded into a microcavity, consisting of an AlGaN/GaN distributed Bragg reflector and a Ag reflecting mirror. The microcavity is responsible for a 18.6-fold increase of the Eu emission intensity at ∼10K, and a

  8. Research on the Band Gap Characteristics of Two-Dimensional Phononic Crystals Microcavity with Local Resonant Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new two-dimensional locally resonant phononic crystal with microcavity structure is proposed. The acoustic wave band gap characteristics of this new structure are studied using finite element method. At the same time, the corresponding displacement eigenmodes of the band edges of the lowest band gap and the transmission spectrum are calculated. The results proved that phononic crystals with microcavity structure exhibited complete band gaps in low-frequency range. The eigenfrequency of the lower edge of the first gap is lower than no microcavity structure. However, for no microcavity structure type of quadrilateral phononic crystal plate, the second band gap disappeared and the frequency range of the first band gap is relatively narrow. The main reason for appearing low-frequency band gaps is that the proposed phononic crystal introduced the local resonant microcavity structure. This study provides a good support for engineering application such as low-frequency vibration attenuation and noise control.

  9. Seeding of Polariton Stimulation in a Homogeneously Broadened Microcavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, John Erland; Langbein, Wolfgang Werner; Jensen, Jacob Riis

    2000-01-01

    In time-resolved light emission from a high-quality semiconductor microcavity after pulsed excitation suitable for angle-resonant polariton-polariton scattering on the lower-polariton branch, we find strong evidence for final-state stimulation of this process. The self-stimulated emission...... and the intensity of this emission can be controlled. The time-resolved data and the density dependences are in agreement with a rate equation model neglecting polarization mixing effects. This model gives a coupling coefficient of b(LP,k)=0 = 2.4 x 10(-9) cm(4) s(-1) for the stimulated angle-resonant polariton......, following single-pulse excitation, appears on a fast time scale of only a few lens of ps with a maximum at 15 ps. This is in striking contrast to the photoluminescence decay time of 110 ps observed in the low-density limit. By injection of polaritons into the final state by a seeding pulse, the dynamics...

  10. First results with a microcavity plasma panel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, R. [University of Michigan, Department of Physics, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Ben-Moshe, M.; Benhammou, Y.; Bensimon, R. [Tel Aviv University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv (Israel); Chapman, J.W. [University of Michigan, Department of Physics, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Davies, M.; Etzion, E. [Tel Aviv University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv (Israel); Ferretti, C., E-mail: claudiof@umich.edu [University of Michigan, Department of Physics, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Friedman, P.S. [Integrated Sensors, LLC, Ottawa Hills, OH 43606 (United States); Levin, D.S. [University of Michigan, Department of Physics, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Silver, Y. [Tel Aviv University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv (Israel); Varner, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Physics Division, Oak Ridge, TN 737831 (United States); Weaverdyck, C.; Zhou, B. [University of Michigan, Department of Physics, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    A new type of gaseous micropattern particle detector based on a closed-cell microcavity plasma panel sensor is reported. The first device was fabricated with 1×1×2 mm cells. It has shown very clean signals of 0.6–2.5 V amplitude, fast rise time of approximately 2 ns and FWHM of about 2 ns with very uniform signal shapes across all pixels. From initial measurements with β particles from a radioactive source, a maximum pixel efficiency greater than 95% is calculated, for operation of the detector over a 100 V wide span of high voltages (HV). Over this same HV range, the background rate per pixel was measured to be 3–4 orders of magnitude lower than the rate with which the cell was illuminated by the β source. Pixel-to-pixel count rate uniformity is within 3% and stable within 3% for many days. The time resolution is 2.4 ns, and a very low cell-to-cell crosstalk has been measured between cells separated by 2 mm.

  11. Experimental study of disorder in a semiconductor microcavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurioli, M.; Bogani, F.; Wiersma, D. S.; Roussignol, Ph.; Cassabois, G.; Khitrova, G.; Gibbs, H.

    2001-10-01

    A detailed study of the structural disorder in wedge semiconductor microcavities (MC's) is presented. We demonstrate that images of the coherent emission from the MC surface can be used for a careful characterization of both intrinsic and extrinsic optical properties of semiconductor MC's. The polariton broadening can be measured directly, avoiding the well-known problem of inhomogeneous broadening due to the MC wedge. A statistical analysis of the spatial line shape of the images of the MC surface shows the presence of static disorder associated with dielectric fluctuations in the Bragg reflector. Moreover, the presence of local fluctuations of the effective cavity length can be detected with subnanometer resolution. The analysis of the resonant Rayleigh scattering (RRS) gives additional information on the origin of the disorder. We find that the RRS is dominated by the scattering of the photonic component of the MC polariton by disorder in the Bragg reflector. Also the RRS is strongly enhanced along the [110] and [11¯0] directions. This peculiar scattering pattern is attributed to misfit dislocations induced by the large thickness of the mismatched AlGaAs alloy in the Bragg mirrors.

  12. Effective slip over partially filled microcavities and its possible failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhouyang; Holmgren, Hanna; Kronbichler, Martin; Brandt, Luca; Kreiss, Gunilla

    2018-05-01

    Motivated by the emerging applications of liquid-infused surfaces (LIS), we study the drag reduction and robustness of transverse flows over two-dimensional microcavities partially filled with an oily lubricant. Using separate simulations at different scales, characteristic contact line velocities at the fluid-solid intersection are first extracted from nanoscale phase field simulations and then applied to micronscale two-phase flows, thus introducing a multiscale numerical framework to model the interface displacement and deformation within the cavities. As we explore the various effects of the lubricant-to-outer-fluid viscosity ratio μ˜2/μ˜1 , the capillary number Ca, the static contact angle θs, and the filling fraction of the cavity δ , we find that the effective slip is most sensitive to the parameter δ . The effects of μ˜2/μ˜1 and θs are generally intertwined but weakened if δ 1 ), however, are immune to such failure due to their generally larger contact line velocity.

  13. Silicon on-chip bandpass filters for the multiplexing of high sensitivity photonic crystal microcavity biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Hai; Zou, Yi; Yang, Chun-Ju; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Wang, Zheng; Tang, Naimei; Chen, Ray T.; Fan, Donglei

    2015-01-01

    A method for the dense integration of high sensitivity photonic crystal (PC) waveguide based biosensors is proposed and experimentally demonstrated on a silicon platform. By connecting an additional PC waveguide filter to a PC microcavity sensor in series, a transmission passband is created, containing the resonances of the PC microcavity for sensing purpose. With proper engineering of the passband, multiple high sensitivity PC microcavity sensors can be integrated into microarrays and be interrogated simultaneously between a single input and a single output port. The concept was demonstrated with a 2-channel L55 PC biosensor array containing PC waveguide filters. The experiment showed that the sensors on both channels can be monitored simultaneously from a single output spectrum. Less than 3 dB extra loss for the additional PC waveguide filter is observed

  14. High quality factor GaAs microcavity with buried bullseye defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, K.; Gregersen, N.; Häyrynen, T.; Bradel, B.; Schade, A.; Emmerling, M.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.; Schneider, C.

    2018-05-01

    The development of high quality factor solid-state microcavities with low mode volumes has paved the way towards on-chip cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments and the development of high-performance nanophotonic devices. Here, we report on the implementation of a new kind of solid-state vertical microcavity, which allows for confinement of the electromagnetic field in the lateral direction without deep etching. The confinement originates from a local elongation of the cavity layer imprinted in a shallow etch and epitaxial overgrowth technique. We show that it is possible to improve the quality factor of such microcavities by a specific in-plane bullseye geometry consisting of a set of concentric rings with subwavelength dimensions. This design results in a smooth effective lateral photonic potential and therefore in a reduction of lateral scattering losses, which makes it highly appealing for experiments in the framework of exciton-polariton physics demanding tight spatial confinement.

  15. Strong exciton-photon coupling in organic single crystal microcavity with high molecular orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Kaname [Department of Electronics, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Yamashita, Kenichi, E-mail: yamasita@kit.ac.jp [Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Yanagi, Hisao [Graduate School of Materials Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan); Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu [Faculty of Materials Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

    2016-08-08

    Strong exciton-photon coupling has been observed in a highly oriented organic single crystal microcavity. This microcavity consists of a thiophene/phenylene co-oligomer (TPCO) single crystal laminated on a high-reflection distributed Bragg reflector. In the TPCO crystal, molecular transition dipole was strongly polarized along a certain horizontal directions with respect to the main crystal plane. This dipole polarization causes significantly large anisotropies in the exciton transition and optical constants. Especially the anisotropic exciton transition was found to provide the strong enhancement in the coupling with the cavity mode, which was demonstrated by a Rabi splitting energy as large as ∼100 meV even in the “half-vertical cavity surface emitting lasing” microcavity structure.

  16. Strong exciton-photon coupling in organic single crystal microcavity with high molecular orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Kaname; Yamashita, Kenichi; Yanagi, Hisao; Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu

    2016-08-01

    Strong exciton-photon coupling has been observed in a highly oriented organic single crystal microcavity. This microcavity consists of a thiophene/phenylene co-oligomer (TPCO) single crystal laminated on a high-reflection distributed Bragg reflector. In the TPCO crystal, molecular transition dipole was strongly polarized along a certain horizontal directions with respect to the main crystal plane. This dipole polarization causes significantly large anisotropies in the exciton transition and optical constants. Especially the anisotropic exciton transition was found to provide the strong enhancement in the coupling with the cavity mode, which was demonstrated by a Rabi splitting energy as large as ˜100 meV even in the "half-vertical cavity surface emitting lasing" microcavity structure.

  17. Strong exciton-photon coupling in organic single crystal microcavity with high molecular orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Kaname; Yamashita, Kenichi; Yanagi, Hisao; Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Strong exciton-photon coupling has been observed in a highly oriented organic single crystal microcavity. This microcavity consists of a thiophene/phenylene co-oligomer (TPCO) single crystal laminated on a high-reflection distributed Bragg reflector. In the TPCO crystal, molecular transition dipole was strongly polarized along a certain horizontal directions with respect to the main crystal plane. This dipole polarization causes significantly large anisotropies in the exciton transition and optical constants. Especially the anisotropic exciton transition was found to provide the strong enhancement in the coupling with the cavity mode, which was demonstrated by a Rabi splitting energy as large as ∼100 meV even in the “half-vertical cavity surface emitting lasing” microcavity structure.

  18. Silicon on-chip bandpass filters for the multiplexing of high sensitivity photonic crystal microcavity biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Hai, E-mail: hai.yan@utexas.edu; Zou, Yi; Yang, Chun-Ju [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Microelectronics Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, 10100 Burnet Rd., Austin, Texas 78758 (United States); Chakravarty, Swapnajit, E-mail: swapnajit.chakravarty@omegaoptics.com [Omega Optics, Inc., 8500 Shoal Creek Blvd., Austin, Texas 78757 (United States); Wang, Zheng [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Microelectronics Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, 10100 Burnet Rd., Austin, Texas 78758 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas Materials Institute, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Tang, Naimei; Chen, Ray T., E-mail: raychen@uts.cc.utexas.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Microelectronics Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, 10100 Burnet Rd., Austin, Texas 78758 (United States); Omega Optics, Inc., 8500 Shoal Creek Blvd., Austin, Texas 78757 (United States); Fan, Donglei [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas Materials Institute, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2015-03-23

    A method for the dense integration of high sensitivity photonic crystal (PC) waveguide based biosensors is proposed and experimentally demonstrated on a silicon platform. By connecting an additional PC waveguide filter to a PC microcavity sensor in series, a transmission passband is created, containing the resonances of the PC microcavity for sensing purpose. With proper engineering of the passband, multiple high sensitivity PC microcavity sensors can be integrated into microarrays and be interrogated simultaneously between a single input and a single output port. The concept was demonstrated with a 2-channel L55 PC biosensor array containing PC waveguide filters. The experiment showed that the sensors on both channels can be monitored simultaneously from a single output spectrum. Less than 3 dB extra loss for the additional PC waveguide filter is observed.

  19. Optimisation of spontaneous four-wave mixing in a ring microcavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuprina, I. N.; An, P. P.; Zubkova, E. G.; Kovalyuk, V. V.; Kalachev, A. A.; Gol'tsman, G. N.

    2017-11-01

    A theory of spontaneous four-wave mixing in a ring microcavity is developed. The rate of emission of biphotons for pulsed and monochromatic pumping with allowance for the dispersion of group velocities is analytically calculated. In the first case, pulses in the form of an increasing exponential are considered, which are optimal for excitation of an individual resonator mode. The behaviour of the group velocity dispersion as a function of the width and height of the waveguide is studied for a specific case of a ring microcavity made of silicon nitride. The results of the numerical calculation are in good agreement with the experimental data. The ring microcavity is made of two types of waveguides: completely etched and half etched. It is found that the latter allow for better control over the parameters in the manufacturing process, making them more predictable. Presented at the Russian - British Symposium on Quantum Technologies (Moscow, 20 - 23 March 2017)

  20. Effective atomic numbers and electron densities of bacteriorhodopsin and its comprising amino acids in the energy range 1 keV–100 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadi, Morteza; Lunscher, Nolan [Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology and Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave., W., Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Yeow, John T.W., E-mail: jyeow@uwaterloo.ca [Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology and Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave., W., Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2013-04-01

    Recently, there has been an interest in fabrication of X-ray sensors based on bacteriorhodopsin, a proton pump protein in cell membrane of Halobacterium salinarium. Therefore, a better understanding of interaction of X-ray photons with bacteriorhodopsin is required. We use WinXCom program to calculate the mass attenuation coefficient of bacteriorhodopsin and its comprising amino acids for photon energies from 1 keV to 100 GeV. These amino acids include alanine, arginine, asparagine, aspartic acid, glutamine, glutamic acid, glycine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, proline, serine, threonine, tryptophan, tyrosine, valine, Asx1, Asx2, Glx1 and Glx2. We then use that data to calculate effective atomic number and electron densities for the same range of energy. We also emphasize on two ranges of energies (10–200 keV and 1–20 MeV) in which X-ray imaging and radiotherapy machines work.

  1. Peculiar properties of photoinduced hydroxylaminolysis in different bacteriorhodopsin-based media using O-substituted hydroxylamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyukova, Tatyana V; Druzhko, Anna B

    2010-01-01

    The process of photoinduced hydroxylaminolysis has been re-examined in different bacteriorhodopsin (BR)-based media using O-substituted hydroxylamines, in particular, O-(4-nitrobenzyl) hydroxylamine hydrochloride (NBHA), O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl) hydroxylamine hydrochloride (FBHA) and O-(t-butyl) hydroxylamine hydrochloride (BHA). Both wild type (WT) and D96N BR-based gelatine films and gels were studied. The expected increase in the bleaching rate of BR in gelatin films by using O-substituted hydroxylamines in place of HA was not achieved. On the other hand, it was shown that in gels HA derivatives NBHA and FBHA (as against HA itself) do provide about three- to four-fold higher bleaching rate. By contrast to that in films, D96N BR in gels demonstrates more effective bleaching as compared to WT BR. The plausible interpretation for the results is discussed in frames of reduced mobilities of large-sized molecules of O-substituted hydroxylamines in dehydrated media. FBHA- or NBHA-modified gels possess higher photosensitivity both with D96N and WT BR (as compared with that for HA-modified gels) and offer a potentiality for application as an irreversible-recording medium. As anticipated, it is specifically D96N BR gel modified with FBHA that may present a promising medium suitable for write-once recording thus extending the range of recording materials in the optical processing field. © 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation. The American Society of Photobiology.

  2. Schiff base switch II precedes the retinal thermal isomerization in the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Wang

    Full Text Available In bacteriorhodopsin, the order of molecular events that control the cytoplasmic or extracellular accessibility of the Schiff bases (SB are not well understood. We use molecular dynamics simulations to study a process involved in the second accessibility switch of SB that occurs after its reprotonation in the N intermediate of the photocycle. We find that once protonated, the SB C15 = NZ bond switches from a cytoplasmic facing (13-cis, 15-anti configuration to an extracellular facing (13-cis, 15-syn configuration on the pico to nanosecond timescale. Significantly, rotation about the retinal's C13 = C14 double bond is not observed. The dynamics of the isomeric state transitions of the protonated SB are strongly influenced by the surrounding charges and dielectric effects of other buried ions, particularly D96 and D212. Our simulations indicate that the thermal isomerization of retinal from 13-cis back to all-trans likely occurs independently from and after the SB C15 = NZ rotation in the N-to-O transition.

  3. Vibrational motions associated with primary processes in bacteriorhodopsin studied by coherent infrared emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groma, Géza I; Colonna, Anne; Martin, Jean-Louis; Vos, Marten H

    2011-03-16

    The primary energetic processes driving the functional proton pump of bacteriorhodopsin take place in the form of complex molecular dynamic events after excitation of the retinal chromophore into the Franck-Condon state. These early events include a strong electronic polarization, skeletal stretching, and all-trans-to-13-cis isomerization upon formation of the J intermediate. The effectiveness of the photoreaction is ensured by a conical intersection between the electronic excited and ground states, providing highly nonadiabatic coupling to nuclear motions. Here, we study real-time vibrational coherences associated with these motions by analyzing light-induced infrared emission from oriented purple membranes in the 750-1400 cm(-)(1) region. The experimental technique applied is based on second-order femtosecond difference frequency generation on macroscopically ordered samples that also yield information on phase and direction of the underlying motions. Concerted use of several analysis methods resulted in the isolation and characterization of seven different vibrational modes, assigned as C-C stretches, out-of-plane methyl rocks, and hydrogen out-of-plane wags, whereas no in-plane H rock was found. Based on their lifetimes and several other criteria, we deduce that the majority of the observed modes take place on the potential energy surface of the excited electronic state. In particular, the direction sensitivity provides experimental evidence for large intermediate distortions of the retinal plane during the excited-state isomerization process. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Tyrosine and carboxyl protonation changes in the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle. 2. Tyrosine-26 and -64

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roepe, P.; Scherrer, P.; Ahl, P.L.; Gupta, S.K.D.; Bogomolni, R.A.; Herzfeld, J.; Rothschild, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    Low-temperature Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and UV difference spectroscopies combined with selective tyrosine nitration and tyrosine isotopic labeling have been used to investigate the participation of tyrosines-26 and -64 in the bacteriorhodopsin (bR) photocycle. Nitration of Tyr-26 has no detectable effect on the FTIR or UV difference spectra of the BR 570 → K 630 or BR 570 → M 412 transitions. In contrast, nitration of Tyr-64 causes changes in both the FTIR and UV spectra of these transitions. However, this nitration does not alter tyrosine peaks in the FTIR difference spectra which have previously been associated with the protonation of a tyrosinate by K 630 and the deprotonation of a tyrosine by M 412 . Instead, Tyr-64 nitration appears to affect other tyrosine peaks. These results and changes in UV difference spectra upon Tyr-64 nitration are consistent with the deprotonation of Tyr-64 by M 412 as concluded previously. Effects on chromophore vibrations caused by Tyr-64 nitration are unaltered upon reducing the nitrotyrosine to aminotyrosine with sodium dithionite. Finally, nitro-Tyr-64 causes a shift in the frequency of a positive peak at 1739 cm -1 in the BR 570 → M 412 FTIR difference spectrum which reflects the protonation of a carboxyl-containing residue. The shift does not occur for samples containing amino-Tyr-64. These data suggest that Tyr-64 may interact with this carboxyl group

  5. Black phosphorus-based one-dimensional photonic crystals and microcavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegel, Ilka; Toffanin, Stefano; Scotognella, Francesco

    2016-11-10

    The latest achievements in the fabrication of thin layers of black phosphorus (BP), toward the technological breakthrough of a phosphorene atomically thin layer, are paving the way for their use in electronics, optics, and optoelectronics. In this work, we have simulated the optical properties of one-dimensional photonic structures, i.e., photonic crystals and microcavities, in which few-layer BP is one of the components. The insertion of the 5-nm black phosphorous layers leads to a photonic band gap in the photonic crystals and a cavity mode in the microcavity that is interesting for light manipulation and emission enhancement.

  6. Weak-microcavity organic light-emitting diodes with improved light out-coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sang-Hwan; Song, Young-Woo; Lee, Joon-gu; Kim, Yoon-Chang; Lee, Jong Hyuk; Ha, Jaeheung; Oh, Jong-Suk; Lee, So Young; Lee, Sun Young; Hwang, Kyu Hwan; Zang, Dong-Sik; Lee, Yong-Hee

    2008-08-18

    We propose and demonstrate weak-microcavity organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays with improved light-extraction and viewing-angle characteristics. A single pair of low- and high-index layers is inserted between indium tin oxide (ITO) and a glass substrate. The electroluminescent (EL) efficiencies of discrete red, green, and blue weak-microcavity OLEDs are enhanced by 56%, 107%, and 26%, respectively, with improved color purity. Moreover, full-color passive-matrix bottom-emitting OLED displays are fabricated by employing low-index layers of two thicknesses. As a display, the EL efficiency of white color was 27% higher than that of a conventional OLED display.

  7. Strong coupling and polariton lasing in Te based microcavities embedding (Cd,Zn)Te quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousset, J.-G., E-mail: j-g.rousset@fuw.edu.pl; Piętka, B.; Król, M.; Mirek, R.; Lekenta, K.; Szczytko, J.; Borysiuk, J.; Suffczyński, J.; Kazimierczuk, T.; Goryca, M.; Smoleński, T.; Kossacki, P.; Nawrocki, M.; Pacuski, W. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 5, PL-02-093 Warszawa (Poland)

    2015-11-16

    We report on properties of an optical microcavity based on (Cd,Zn,Mg)Te layers and embedding (Cd,Zn)Te quantum wells. The key point of the structure design is the lattice matching of the whole structure to MgTe, which eliminates the internal strain and allows one to embed an arbitrary number of unstrained quantum wells in the microcavity. We evidence the strong light-matter coupling regime already for the structure containing a single quantum well. Embedding four unstrained quantum wells results in further enhancement of the exciton-photon coupling and the polariton lasing in the strong coupling regime.

  8. Efficient production and purification of functional bacteriorhodopsin with a wheat-germ cell-free system and a combination of Fos-choline and CHAPS detergents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genji, Takahisa; Nozawa, Akira; Tozawa, Yuzuru

    2010-10-01

    Cell-free translation is one potential approach to the production of functional transmembrane proteins. We have now examined various detergents as supplements to a wheat-germ cell-free system in order to optimize the production and subsequent purification of a functional model transmembrane protein, bacteriorhodopsin. We found that Fos-choline and CHAPS detergents counteracted each other's inhibitory effects on cell-free translation activity and thereby allowed the efficient production and subsequent purification of functional bacteriorhodopsin in high yield. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Low-power bacteriorhodopsin-silicon n-channel metal-oxide field-effect transistor photoreceiver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jonghyun; Bhattacharya, Pallab; Yuan, Hao-Chih; Ma, Zhenqiang; Váró, György

    2007-03-01

    A bacteriorhodopsin (bR)-silicon n-channel metal-oxide field-effect transistor (NMOSFET) monolithically integrated photoreceiver is demonstrated. The bR film is selectively formed on an external gate electrode of the transistor by electrophoretic deposition. A modified biasing circuit is incorporated, which helps to match the resistance of the bR film to the input impedance of the NMOSFET and to shift the operating point of the transistor to coincide with the maximum gain. The photoreceiver exhibits a responsivity of 4.7 mA/W.

  10. Surface pH controls purple-to-blue transition of bacteriorhodopsin. A theoretical model of purple membrane surface

    OpenAIRE

    Szundi, I.; Stoeckenius, W.

    1989-01-01

    We have developed a surface model of purple membrane and applied it in an analysis of the purple-to-blue color change of bacteriorhodopsin which is induced by acidification or deionization. The model is based on dissociation and double layer theory and the known membrane structure. We calculated surface pH, ion concentrations, charge density, and potential as a function of bulk pH and concentration of mono- and divalent cations. At low salt concentrations, the surface pH is significantly lowe...

  11. Cavity-polariton interaction mediated by coherent acoustic phonons in semiconductor microcavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lima, Mauricio; Hey, Rudolf; Santos, Paul

    The strong coupling between excitons in a quantum well (QW) and photons in a semiconductor microcavity leads to the formation of quasi-particles known as cavity-polaritons. In this contribution, we investigate their interaction with coherent acoustic phonons in the form of surface acoustic waves...

  12. High quality factor GaAs microcavity with buried bullseye defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, K.; Gregersen, Niels; Hayrynen, T.

    2018-01-01

    The development of high quality factor solid-state microcavities with low mode volumes has paved the way towards on-chip cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments and the development of high-performance nanophotonic devices. Here, we report on the implementation of a new kind of solid...

  13. The combination of high Q factor and chirality in twin cavities and microcavity chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qinghai; Zhang, Nan; Zhai, Huilin; Liu, Shuai; Gu, Zhiyuan; Wang, Kaiyang; Sun, Shang; Chen, Zhiwei; Li, Meng; Xiao, Shumin

    2014-01-01

    Chirality in microcavities has recently shown its bright future in optical sensing and microsized coherent light sources. The key parameters for such applications are the high quality (Q) factor and large chirality. However, the previous reported chiral resonances are either low Q modes or require very special cavity designs. Here we demonstrate a novel, robust, and general mechanism to obtain the chirality in circular cavity. By placing a circular cavity and a spiral cavity in proximity, we show that ultra-high Q factor, large chirality, and unidirectional output can be obtained simultaneously. The highest Q factors of the non-orthogonal mode pairs are almost the same as the ones in circular cavity. And the co-propagating directions of the non-orthogonal mode pairs can be reversed by tuning the mode coupling. This new mechanism for the combination of high Q factor and large chirality is found to be very robust to cavity size, refractive index, and the shape deformation, showing very nice fabrication tolerance. And it can be further extended to microcavity chain and microcavity plane. We believe that our research will shed light on the practical applications of chirality and microcavities. PMID:25262881

  14. Room temperature strong coupling effects from single ZnO nanowire microcavity

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Ayan; Heo, Junseok; Bayraktaroglu, Adrian; Guo, Wei; Ng, Tien Khee; Phillips, Jamie; Ooi, Boon S.; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2012-01-01

    Strong coupling effects in a dielectric microcavity with a single ZnO nanowire embedded in it have been investigated at room temperature. A large Rabi splitting of ?100 meV is obtained from the polariton dispersion and a non

  15. Photoluminescence eigenmodes in the ZnO semiconductor microcavity on the Ag/Si substrate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Luo, X.; Wang, J.; Mao, H.; Remeš, Zdeněk; Král, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 4 (2013), s. 821-825 ISSN 0947-8396 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12186 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : ZnO * photoluminescence * microcavity Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.694, year: 2013

  16. Observation of helix associations for insertion of a retinal molecule and distortions of helix structures in bacteriorhodopsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urano, Ryo; Okamoto, Yuko

    2015-12-01

    We applied a newly proposed prediction method for membrane protein structures to bacteriorhodopsin that has distorted transmembrane helices in the native structure. This method uses an implicit membrane model, which restricts sampling space during folding in a membrane region, and includes helix bending. Replica-exchange simulations were performed with seven transmembrane helices only without a retinal molecule. Obtained structures were classified into clusters of similar structures, which correspond to local-minimum free energy states. The two lowest free energy states corresponded to a native-like structure with the correct empty space for retinal and a structure with this empty space filled with a helix. Previous experiments of bacteriorhodopsin suggested that association of transmembrane helices enables them to make a room for insertion of a retinal. Our results are consistent with these results. Moreover, distortions of helices in the native-like structures were successfully reproduced. In the distortions, whereas the locations of kinks for all helices were similar to those of Protein Data Bank's data, the amount of bends was more similar for helices away from the retinal than for those close to the retinal in the native structure. This suggests a hypothesis that the amino-acid sequence specifies the location of kinks in transmembrane helices and that the amount of distortions depends on the interactions with the surrounding molecules such as neighboring helices, lipids, and retinal.

  17. Surface pH controls purple-to-blue transition of bacteriorhodopsin. A theoretical model of purple membrane surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szundi, I; Stoeckenius, W

    1989-08-01

    We have developed a surface model of purple membrane and applied it in an analysis of the purple-to-blue color change of bacteriorhodopsin which is induced by acidification or deionization. The model is based on dissociation and double layer theory and the known membrane structure. We calculated surface pH, ion concentrations, charge density, and potential as a function of bulk pH and concentration of mono- and divalent cations. At low salt concentrations, the surface pH is significantly lower than the bulk pH and it becomes independent of bulk pH in the deionized membrane suspension. Using an experimental acid titration curve for neutral, lipid-depleted membrane, we converted surface pH into absorption values. The calculated bacteriohodopsin color changes for acidification of purple, and titrations of deionized blue membrane with cations or base agree well with experimental results. No chemical binding is required to reproduce the experimental curves. Surface charge and potential changes in acid, base and cation titrations are calculated and their relation to the color change is discussed. Consistent with structural data, 10 primary phosphate and two basic surface groups per bacteriorhodopsin are sufficient to obtain good agreement between all calculated and experimental curves. The results provide a theoretical basis for our earlier conclusion that the purple-to-blue transition must be attributed to surface phenomena and not to cation binding at specific sites in the protein.

  18. Production of functional bacteriorhodopsin by an Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis system supplemented with steroid detergent and lipid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimono, Kazumi; Goto, Mie; Kikukawa, Takashi; Miyauchi, Seiji; Shirouzu, Mikako; Kamo, Naoki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2009-10-01

    Cell-free expression has become a highly promising tool for the efficient production of membrane proteins. In this study, we used a dialysis-based Escherichia coli cell-free system for the production of a membrane protein actively integrated into liposomes. The membrane protein was the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin, consisting of seven transmembrane alpha-helices. The cell-free expression system in the dialysis mode was supplemented with a combination of a detergent and a natural lipid, phosphatidylcholine from egg yolk, in only the reaction mixture. By examining a variety of detergents, we found that the combination of a steroid detergent (digitonin, cholate, or CHAPS) and egg phosphatidylcholine yielded a large amount (0.3-0.7 mg/mL reaction mixture) of the fully functional bacteriorhodopsin. We also analyzed the process of functional expression in our system. The synthesized polypeptide was well protected from aggregation by the detergent-lipid mixed micelles and/or lipid disks, and was integrated into liposomes upon detergent removal by dialysis. This approach might be useful for the high yield production of functional membrane proteins.

  19. The role of group index engineering in series-connected photonic crystal microcavities for high density sensor microarrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Yi; Zhu, Liang; Chen, Ray T.; Chakravarty, Swapnajit

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an efficient and robust method for series connection of photonic crystal microcavities that are coupled to photonic crystal waveguides in the slow light transmission regime. We demonstrate that group index taper engineering provides excellent optical impedance matching between the input and output strip waveguides and the photonic crystal waveguide, a nearly flat transmission over the entire guided mode spectrum and clear multi-resonance peaks corresponding to individual microcavities that are connected in series. Series connected photonic crystal microcavities are further multiplexed in parallel using cascaded multimode interference power splitters to generate a high density silicon nanophotonic microarray comprising 64 photonic crystal microcavity sensors, all of which are interrogated simultaneously at the same instant of time

  20. Optical microcavities based on surface modes in two-dimensional photonic crystals and silicon-on-insulator photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Sanshui; Qiu, M.

    2007-01-01

    Surface-mode optical microcavities based on two-dimensional photonic crystals and silicon-on-insulator photonic crystals are studied. We demonstrate that a high-quality-factor microcavity can be easily realized in these structures. With an increasing of the cavity length, the quality factor is gr...... is gradually enhanced and the resonant frequency converges to that of the corresponding surface mode in the photonic crystals. These structures have potential applications such as sensing.......Surface-mode optical microcavities based on two-dimensional photonic crystals and silicon-on-insulator photonic crystals are studied. We demonstrate that a high-quality-factor microcavity can be easily realized in these structures. With an increasing of the cavity length, the quality factor...

  1. The role of group index engineering in series-connected photonic crystal microcavities for high density sensor microarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Yi, E-mail: yzou@utexas.edu; Zhu, Liang; Chen, Ray T., E-mail: raychen@uts.cc.utexas.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Microelectronics Research Center, University of Texas at Austin, 10100 Burnet Rd., Austin, Texas 78758 (United States); Chakravarty, Swapnajit, E-mail: swapnajit.chakravarty@omegaoptics.com [Omega Optics, Inc., 8500 Shoal Creek Blvd., Austin, Texas 78757 (United States)

    2014-04-07

    We experimentally demonstrate an efficient and robust method for series connection of photonic crystal microcavities that are coupled to photonic crystal waveguides in the slow light transmission regime. We demonstrate that group index taper engineering provides excellent optical impedance matching between the input and output strip waveguides and the photonic crystal waveguide, a nearly flat transmission over the entire guided mode spectrum and clear multi-resonance peaks corresponding to individual microcavities that are connected in series. Series connected photonic crystal microcavities are further multiplexed in parallel using cascaded multimode interference power splitters to generate a high density silicon nanophotonic microarray comprising 64 photonic crystal microcavity sensors, all of which are interrogated simultaneously at the same instant of time.

  2. Determination of retinal chromophore structure in bacteriorhodopsin with resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S O; Lugtenburg, J; Mathies, R A

    1985-01-01

    The analysis of the vibrational spectrum of the retinal chromophore in bacteriorhodopsin with isotopic derivatives provides a powerful "structural dictionary" for the translation of vibrational frequencies and intensities into structural information. Of importance for the proton-pumping mechanism is the unambiguous determination of the configuration about the C13=C14 and C=N bonds, and the protonation state of the Schiff base nitrogen. Vibrational studies have shown that in light-adapted BR568 the Schiff base nitrogen is protonated and both the C13=C14 and C=N bonds are in a trans geometry. The formation of K625 involves the photochemical isomerization about only the C13=C14 bond which displaces the Schiff base proton into a different protein environment. Subsequent Schiff base deprotonation produces the M412 intermediate. Thermal reisomerization of the C13=C14 bond and reprotonation of the Schiff base occur in the M412------O640 transition, resetting the proton-pumping mechanism. The vibrational spectra can also be used to examine the conformation about the C--C single bonds. The frequency of the C14--C15 stretching vibration in BR568, K625, L550 and O640 argues that the C14--C15 conformation in these intermediates is s-trans. Conformational distortions of the chromophore have been identified in K625 and O640 through the observation of intense hydrogen out-of-plane wagging vibrations in the Raman spectra (see Fig. 2). These two intermediates are the direct products of chromophore isomerization. Thus it appears that following isomerization in a tight protein binding pocket, the chromophore cannot easily relax to a planar geometry. The analogous observation of intense hydrogen out-of-plane modes in the primary photoproduct in vision (Eyring et al., 1982) suggests that this may be a general phenomenon in protein-bound isomerizations. Future resonance Raman studies should provide even more details on how bacterio-opsin and retinal act in concert to produce an

  3. Room temperature current injection polariton light emitting diode with a hybrid microcavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tien-Chang; Chen, Jun-Rong; Lin, Shiang-Chi; Huang, Si-Wei; Wang, Shing-Chung; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2011-07-13

    The strong light-matter interaction within a semiconductor high-Q microcavity has been used to produce half-matter/half-light quasiparticles, exciton-polaritons. The exciton-polaritons have very small effective mass and controllable energy-momentum dispersion relation. These unique properties of polaritons provide the possibility to investigate the fundamental physics including solid-state cavity quantum electrodynamics, and dynamical Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). Thus far the polariton BEC has been demonstrated using optical excitation. However, from a practical viewpoint, the current injection polariton devices operating at room temperature would be most desirable. Here we report the first realization of a current injection microcavity GaN exciton-polariton light emitting diode (LED) operating under room temperature. The exciton-polariton emission from the LED at photon energy 3.02 eV under strong coupling condition is confirmed through temperature-dependent and angle-resolved electroluminescence spectra.

  4. Enhanced photoresponse of monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) based on microcavity structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yanan; Yang, Guofeng; Wang, Fuxue; Lu, Naiyan

    2018-05-01

    There is an increasing interest in using monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) for optoelectronic devices because of its inherent direct band gap characteristics. However, the weak absorption of monolayer MoS2 restricts its applications, novel concepts need to be developed to address the weakness. In this work, monolayer MoS2 monolithically integrates with plane microcavity structure, which is formed by the top and bottom chirped distributed Bragg reflector (DBR), is demonstrated to improve the absorption of MoS2. The optical absorption is 17-fold enhanced, reaching values over 70% at work wavelength. Moreover, the monolayer MoS2-based photodetector device with microcavity presents a significantly increased photoresponse, demonstrating its promising prospects in MoS2-based optoelectronic devices.

  5. Effect of interface disorder on quantum well excitons and microcavity polaritons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savona, Vincenzo

    2007-01-01

    The theory of the linear optical response of excitons in quantum wells and polaritons in planar semiconductor microcavities is reviewed, in the light of the existing experiments. For quantum well excitons, it is shown that disorder mainly affects the exciton centre-of-mass motion and is modelled by an effective Schroedinger equation in two dimensions. For polaritons, a unified model accounting for quantum well roughness and fluctuations of the microcavity thickness is developed. Numerical results confirm that polaritons are mostly affected by disorder acting on the photon component, thus confirming existing studies on the influence of exciton disorder. The polariton localization length is estimated to be in the few-micrometres range, depending on the amplitude of disorder, in agreement with recent experimental findings

  6. Scalable photonic quantum computing assisted by quantum-dot spin in double-sided optical microcavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2013-07-29

    We investigate the possibility of achieving scalable photonic quantum computing by the giant optical circular birefringence induced by a quantum-dot spin in a double-sided optical microcavity as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. We construct a deterministic controlled-not gate on two photonic qubits by two single-photon input-output processes and the readout on an electron-medium spin confined in an optical resonant microcavity. This idea could be applied to multi-qubit gates on photonic qubits and we give the quantum circuit for a three-photon Toffoli gate. High fidelities and high efficiencies could be achieved when the side leakage to the cavity loss rate is low. It is worth pointing out that our devices work in both the strong and the weak coupling regimes.

  7. Microcavity-coupled fiber Bragg grating with tunable reflection spectra and speed of light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Han, Ya; Liu, Qian; Liu, Yan-Ge; Zhang, Weigang; Chou, Keng C

    2018-04-15

    After a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is fabricated, the reflection spectrum of the FBG is generally not tunable without mechanical deformation or temperature adjustment. Here we present a microcavity-coupled FBG with both a tunable reflection lineshape and dispersion using electromagnetically induced transparency. The Fano interference of light in the FBG and the microcavity allows for dramatic modification of the reflection spectrum. The phase of the reflected spectrum is continuously tunable between 0 and 2π to produce various Fano lineshapes. The dispersion of the output light is adjustable from normal dispersion to abnormal dispersion, consequently providing an adjustable speed of light. Additionally, it allows the FBG to switch from a notch filter to a bandpass filter at the resonant wavelength, which is not possible in a conventional uniform FBG.

  8. Dye Giant Absorption and Light Confinement Effects in Porous Bragg Microcavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliva-Ramírez, Manuel; Gil-Rostra, Jorge; Simonsen, Adam C.

    2018-01-01

    This work presents a simple experimental procedure to probe light confinement effects in photonic structures. Two types of porous 1D Bragg microcavities with two resonant peaks in the reflection gap were prepared by physical vapor deposition at oblique angle configurations and then infiltrated...... with dye solutions of increasing concentrations. The unusual position shift and intensity drop of the transmitted resonant peak observed when it was scanned through the dye absorption band have been accounted for by the effect of the light trapped at their optical defect layer. An experimentally observed...... giant absorption of the dye molecules and a strong anomalous dispersion in the refractive index of the solution are claimed as the reasons for the observed variations in the Bragg microcavity resonant feature. Determining the giant absorption of infiltrated dye solutions is proposed as a general...

  9. Voltage-controlled colour-tunable microcavity OLEDs with enhanced colour purity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choy, Wallace C H; Niu, J H; Li, W L; Chui, P C

    2008-01-01

    The emission spectrum of single-unit voltage-controlled colour-tunable organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) has been theoretically and experimentally studied. Our results show that by introducing the microcavity structure, the colour purity of not only the destination colour but also the colour-tunable route can be enhanced, while colour purity is still an issue in typical single-unit voltage-controlled colour-tunable OLEDs. With the consideration of the periodical cycling of resonant wavelength and absorption loss of the metal electrodes, the appropriate change in the thickness of the microcavity structure has been utilized to achieve voltage-controlled red-to-green and red-to-blue colour-tunable OLEDs without adding dyes or other organic materials to the OLEDs

  10. Laser-machined microcavities for simultaneous measurement of high-temperature and high-pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Zengling; Liu, Shan; Liu, Qin; Huang, Ya; Bao, Haihong; Wang, Yanjun; Luo, Shucheng; Yang, Huiqin; Rao, Yunjiang

    2014-08-07

    Laser-machined microcavities for simultaneous measurement of high-temperature and high-pressure are demonstrated. These two cascaded microcavities are an air cavity and a composite cavity including a section of fiber and an air cavity. They are both placed into a pressure chamber inside a furnace to perform simultaneous pressure and high-temperature tests. The thermal and pressure coefficients of the short air cavity are ~0.0779 nm/°C and ~1.14 nm/MPa, respectively. The thermal and pressure coefficients of the composite cavity are ~32.3 nm/°C and ~24.4 nm/MPa, respectively. The sensor could be used to separate temperature and pressure due to their different thermal and pressure coefficients. The excellent feature of such a sensor head is that it can withstand high temperatures of up to 400 °C and achieve precise measurement of high-pressure under high temperature conditions.

  11. Stable integrated hyper-parametric oscillator based on coupled optical microcavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armaroli, Andrea; Feron, Patrice; Dumeige, Yannick

    2015-12-01

    We propose a flexible scheme based on three coupled optical microcavities that permits us to achieve stable oscillations in the microwave range, the frequency of which depends only on the cavity coupling rates. We find that the different dynamical regimes (soft and hard excitation) affect the oscillation intensity, but not their periods. This configuration may permit us to implement compact hyper-parametric sources on an integrated optical circuit with interesting applications in communications, sensing, and metrology.

  12. Bistability and self-oscillations effects in a polariton-laser semiconductor microcavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotta, E A; Matinaga, F M

    2007-01-01

    We report an experimental observation of polaritonic optical bistability of the laser emission in a planar semiconductor microcavity with a 100 0 A GaAs single quantum well in the strong-coupling regime. The bistability curves show crossings that indicate a competition between a Kerr-like effect induced by the polariton population and thermal effects. Associated with the bistability, laser-like emission occurs at the bare cavity mode

  13. Polariton solitons and nonlinear localized states in a one-dimensional semiconductor microcavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting-Wei; Cheng, Szu-Cheng

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents numerical studies of cavity polariton solitons (CPSs) in a resonantly pumped semiconductor microcavity with an imbedded spatial defect. In the bistable regime of the well-known homogeneous polariton condensate, with proper incident wave vector and pump strength, bright and/or dark cavity solitons can be found in the presence of a spatially confined potential. The minimum pump strength required to observe the CPSs or nonlinear localized states in this parametric pump scheme is therefore reported.

  14. Synthesis of 13C and 2H labelled retinals: spectroscopic investigations on isotopically labelled rhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardoen, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    In order to develop probes of the structure of chromophores, the author introduces isotopic modifications at specific chromophoric positions as structural probes. To obtain bacteriorhodopsin, rhodopsin and their photoproducts labelled in the chromophore at selected positions, bacterioopsin and opsin were reacted with the appropriate labelled a11-trans and 11-cis retinals. The author describes the synthesis of a11-trans retinal selectively 13 C labelled at different positions. The characterization of these labelled a11-trans retinals by mass spectrometry, 300 MHz 1 H NMR and 75 MHz 13 C NMR spectroscopy is given. The photochemical preparation and isolation of the pure 9-, 11- and 13-cis forms is described in the experimental part. (Auth.)

  15. Photoluminescence from a Tb-doped photonic crystal microcavity for white light generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yigang; Almeida, Rui M

    2010-01-01

    Terbium-doped one-dimensional triple microcavities have been prepared by sol-gel processing. The photoluminescence (PL) of Tb 3+ ions outside a microcavity structure, when excited by blue laser light at 488 nm, consisted of three distinct peaks at 542, 587 and 619 nm. When embedded in the microcavities, the three Tb 3+ PL peaks were enhanced, balanced and broadened by the photonic crystal structure and combined into a continuous broad band. An analysis in the CIE colour space showed that white light can be obtained by mixing the modified Tb 3+ PL with the blue exciting light, while this is impossible with the original PL profile. This novel technique may improve white light generation by enhancing and modifying the spontaneous emission of current phosphors. It may also lead to the development of new rare-earth phosphor materials based on 4f-4f transitions, able to generate white light more efficiently, via simpler and cheaper alternatives to the current phosphor compositions. A novel configuration to combine this kind of structure with a white light-emitting-diode (LED) is also proposed.

  16. Monitoring of benzene-induced hematotoxicity in mice by serial leukocyte counting using a microcavity array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Masahito; Asami, Marie; Yoshino, Tomoko; Tsujimura, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Masayuki; Nakasono, Satoshi; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2013-02-15

    Monitoring of hematotoxicity, which requires serial blood collection, is difficult to carry out in small animals due to a lack of non-invasive, individual animal-appropriate techniques that enable enumeration of leukocyte subsets from limited amounts of whole blood. In this study, a microfluidic device equipped with a microcavity array that enables highly efficient separation of leukocytes from submicroliters of whole blood was applied for hematotoxicity monitoring in mice. The microcavity array can specifically separate leukocytes from whole blood based on differences in the size and deformability between leukocytes and other blood cells. Mouse leukocytes recovered on aligned microcavities were continuously processed for image-based immunophenotypic analysis. Our device successfully recovered almost 100% of mouse leukocytes in 0.1 μL of whole blood without the effect of serial blood collection such as changes in body weight and total leukocyte count. We assessed benzene-associated hematotoxicity in mice using this system. Mice were administered with benzene once daily and the depression of leukocyte numbers induced in individual mice was successfully monitored from tail vein blood collected every other day for 2 weeks. Serial monitoring of the leukocyte number in individual mice will contribute to the understanding of hematotoxicity and reduction of the number of animal experiment trials. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cost-effective optical fiber pressure sensor based on intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric micro-cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, M. Fátima; Rodriguez, Camilo A.; Martins, Joana; Tavares, Cátia; Marques, Carlos; Alberto, Nélia; André, Paulo; Antunes, Paulo

    2018-05-01

    In this work, a cost-effective procedure to manufacture optical fiber pressure sensors is presented. This has a high relevance for integration in robotic exoskeletons or for gait plantar pressure monitoring within the physical rehabilitation scenarios, among other applications. The sensing elements are based on Fabry-Perot interferometric (FPI) micro-cavities, created from the recycling of optical fibers previously destroyed by the catastrophic fuse effect. To produce the pressure sensors, the fiber containing the FPI micro-cavities was embedded in an epoxy resin cylinder used as pressure transducer and responsible to transfer the pressure applied on its surface to the optical fiber containing the FPI micro-cavity. Before the embedding process, some FPI sensors were also characterized to strain variations. After that, the effect of the encapsulation of the FPI structure into the resin was assessed, from which a slight decrease on the FPI interferogram fringes visibility was verified, indicating a small increase in the micro-cavity length. Up on the sensors characterization, a linear dependence of the wavelength shift with the induced pressure was obtained, which leads to a maximum sensitivity of 59.39 ± 1.7 pm/kPa. Moreover, direct dependence of the pressure sensitivity with the micro-cavity volume and length was found.

  18. The Improved Method for Isolation of Photochrome Trans-membrane Protein Bacteriorhodopsin from Purple Membranes of Halobacterium Halobacterium Halobium ET 1001

    OpenAIRE

    Oleg Mosin; Ignat Ignatov

    2015-01-01

    It was developed the improved method for isolation of photochrome trans-membraine protein bacteriorhodopsin (output – 5 mg from 100 g of wet biomass) capable to transform light energy to electrochemical energy of generated protons H+ and АТP. The protein was isolated from purple membranes of photo-organotrophic halobacterium Halobacterium halobium ET 1001 by cellular autolysis by distilled water, processing of bacterial biomass by ultrasound at 22 KHz, alcohol extraction of low and high-weigh...

  19. Efficient analysis of mode profiles in elliptical microcavity using dynamic-thermal electron-quantum medium FDTD method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, E H; Ahmed, I; Goh, R S M; Lee, K H; Hung, T G G; Li, E P

    2013-03-11

    The dynamic-thermal electron-quantum medium finite-difference time-domain (DTEQM-FDTD) method is used for efficient analysis of mode profile in elliptical microcavity. The resonance peak of the elliptical microcavity is studied by varying the length ratio. It is observed that at some length ratios, cavity mode is excited instead of whispering gallery mode. This depicts that mode profiles are length ratio dependent. Through the implementation of the DTEQM-FDTD on graphic processing unit (GPU), the simulation time is reduced by 300 times as compared to the CPU. This leads to an efficient optimization approach to design microcavity lasers for wide range of applications in photonic integrated circuits.

  20. Protein changes associated with reprotonation of the Schiff base in the photocycle of Asp96-->Asn bacteriorhodopsin. The MN intermediate with unprotonated Schiff base but N-like protein structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, J.; Shichida, Y.; Lanyi, J. K.; Maeda, A.

    1992-01-01

    The difference Fourier transform infrared spectrum for the N intermediate in the photoreaction of the light-adapted form of bacteriorhodopsin can be recorded at pH 10 at 274 K (Pfefferle, J.-M., Maeda, A., Sasaki, J., and Yoshizawa, T. (1991) Biochemistry 30, 6548-6556). Under these conditions, Asp96-->Asn bacteriorhodopsin gives a photoproduct which shows changes in protein structure similar to those observed in N of wild-type bacteriorhodopsin. However, decreased intensity of the chromophore bands and the single absorbance maximum at about 400 nm indicate that the Schiff base is unprotonated, as in the M intermediate. This photoproduct was named MN. At pH 7, where the supply of proton is not as restricted as at pH 10, Asp96-->Asn bacteriorhodopsin yields N with a protonated Schiff base. The Asn96 residue, which cannot deprotonate as Asp96 in wild-type bacteriorhodopsin, is perturbed upon formation of both MN at pH 10 and N at pH 7. We suggest that the reprotonation of the Schiff base is preceded by a large change in the protein structure including perturbation of the residue at position 96.

  1. A versatile tunable microcavity for investigation of light-matter interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochalov, Konstantin E.; Vaskan, Ivan S.; Dovzhenko, Dmitriy S.; Rakovich, Yury P.; Nabiev, Igor

    2018-05-01

    Light-matter interaction between a molecular ensemble and a confined electromagnetic field is a promising area of research, as it allows light-control of the properties of coupled matter. The common way to achieve coupling is to place an ensemble of molecules or quantum emitters into a cavity. In this approach, light-matter coupling is evidenced by modification of the spectral response of the emitter, which depends on the strength of interaction between emitter and cavity modes. However, there is not yet a user-friendly approach that allows the study of a large number of different and replaceable samples in a wide optical range using the same resonator. Here, we present the design of such a device that can speed up and facilitate investigation of light-matter interaction ranging from weak to strong coupling regimes in ultraviolet-visible and infrared (IR) spectral regions. The device is based on a tunable unstable λ/2 Fabry-Pérot microcavity consisting of plane and convex mirrors that satisfy the plane-parallelism condition at least at one point of the curved mirror and minimize the mode volume. Fine tuning of the microcavity length is provided by a Z-piezopositioner in a range up to 10 μm with a step of several nm. This design makes a device a versatile instrument that ensures easy finding of optimal conditions for light-matter interaction for almost any sample in both visible and IR areas, enabling observation of both electronic and vibrational couplings with microcavity modes thus paving the way to investigation of various coupling effects including Raman scattering enhancement, modification of chemical reactivity rate, lasing, and long-distance nonradiative energy transfer.

  2. Matrix metalloproteinase sensing via porous silicon microcavity devices functionalized with human antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Marta; Gergely, Csilla [GES-UMR 5650, CNRS, Universite Montpellier 2, Pl. Eugene Bataillon 34095, Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Taleb Bendiab, Chakib; Massif, Laurent; Cuisinier, Frederic [EA4203, Faculte d' Odontologie, Universite Montpellier 1, Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Palestino, Gabriela [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Av. Salvador Nava 6, 78000 San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Agarwal, Vivechana [CIICAP, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, Col Chamilpa, Cuernavaca, Mor. (Mexico)

    2011-06-15

    Porous silicon microcavity (PSiMc) structures were used as support material for specific sensing of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). For lower concentrations of MMP-8, the structures were tested with two types of functionalization methods. Silanization of the oxidized porous silicon structures, followed by glutaraldehyde chemistry was found to give very inconsistent results. The use of biotinilated bovine serum albumin linked to the naked PSiMc was found to be an alternative method to attach the anti MMP-8 human antibody, previously modified with streptavidin, which was further used to sense MMP-8 (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Polarization-dependent solitons in the strong coupling regime of semiconductor microcavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Y.; Zhang, W.L.; Wu, X.M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the influence of polarization on formation of vectorial polariton soliton in semiconductor microcavities through numerical simulations. It is found that the polariton solution greatly depends on the polarization of both the pump and exciting fields. By properly choosing the pump and exciting field polarization, bright–bright or bright–dark vectorial polariton solitons can be formed. Especially, when the input conditions of pump or exciting field of the two opposite polarizations are slightly asymmetric, an interesting phenomenon that the dark solitons transform into bright solitons occurs in the branch of soliton solutions.

  4. Multi-state lasing in self-assembled ring-shaped green fluorescent protein microcavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, Christof P., E-mail: cpd3@st-andrews.ac.uk; Höfling, Sven; Gather, Malte C., E-mail: mcg6@st-andrews.ac.uk [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-08

    We demonstrate highly efficient lasing from multiple photonic states in microcavities filled with self-assembled rings of recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in its solid state form. The lasing regime is achieved at very low excitation energies of 13 nJ and occurs from cavity modes dispersed in both energy and momentum. We attribute the momentum distribution to very efficient scattering of incident light at the surface of the eGFP rings. The distribution of lasing states in energy is induced by the large spectral width of the gain spectrum of recombinant eGFP (FWHM ≅ 25 nm)

  5. Coherent response of a semiconductor microcavity in the strong coupling regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassabois, G.; Triques, A. L. C.; Ferreira, R.; Delalande, C.; Roussignol, Ph; Bogani, F.

    2000-05-01

    We have studied the coherent dynamics of a semiconductor microcavity by means of interferometric correlation measurements with subpicosecond time resolution in a backscattering geometry. Evidence is brought of the resolution of a homogeneous polariton line in an inhomogeneously broadened exciton system. Surprisingly, photon-like polaritons exhibit an inhomogeneous dephasing. Moreover, we observe an unexpected stationary coherence up to 8 ps for the lower polariton branch close to resonance. All these experimental results are well reproduced within the framework of a linear dispersion theory assuming a coherent superposition of the reflectivity and resonant Rayleigh scattering signals with a well-defined relative phase.

  6. Exciton-polariton dynamics in a GaAs bulk microcavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccherini, S.; Gurioli, M.; Bogani, F.; Colocci, M.; Tredicucci, A.; Bassani, F.; Beltram, F.; Sorba, L.

    1998-01-01

    We present a full analysis of exciton dynamics in a GaAs λ/2 bulk microcavity following excitation by ultrafast laser pulses. Coherent dynamics was probed by means of an interferometric technique; beating and dephasing times were studied for various excitation intensities. At high incident power, population effects begin to show up reducing exciton oscillator strength and suppressing Rabi splitting. This feature produces marked non-linearities in the input-output characteristic of the optical functions, which were studied in view of reaching bistable operation. Theoretical calculations performed within the transfer-matrix framework show good agreement with experimental results.

  7. Microcavity quantum-dot systems for non-equilibrium Bose-Einstein condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piper, I M; Ediger, M; Wilson, A M; Wu, Y; Phillips, R T; Eastham, P R; Hugues, M; Hopkinson, M

    2010-01-01

    We review the practical conditions required to achieve a non-equilibrium BEC driven by quantum dynamics in a system comprising a microcavity field mode and a distribution of localised two-level systems driven to a step-like population inversion profile. A candidate system based on eight 3.8nm layers of In 0.23 Ga 0.77 As in GaAs shows promising characteristics with regard to the total dipole strength which can be coupled to the field mode.

  8. Microcavity quantum-dot systems for non-equilibrium Bose-Einstein condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piper, I M; Ediger, M; Wilson, A M; Wu, Y; Phillips, R T [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Eastham, P R [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Hugues, M; Hopkinson, M, E-mail: imp24@cam.ac.u [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2010-09-01

    We review the practical conditions required to achieve a non-equilibrium BEC driven by quantum dynamics in a system comprising a microcavity field mode and a distribution of localised two-level systems driven to a step-like population inversion profile. A candidate system based on eight 3.8nm layers of In{sub 0.23}Ga{sub 0.77}As in GaAs shows promising characteristics with regard to the total dipole strength which can be coupled to the field mode.

  9. Influence of multi-exciton correlations on nonlinear polariton dynamics in semiconductor microcavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, P; Nelson, Keith A; Christmann, G; Baumberg, J J

    2013-01-01

    Using two-dimensional spectroscopy, we resolve multi-polariton coherences in quantum wells embedded inside a semiconductor microcavity and elucidate how multi-exciton correlations mediate polariton nonlinear dynamics. We find that polariton correlation strengths depend on spectral overlap with the biexciton resonance and that up to at least four polaritons can be correlated, a higher-order correlation than observed to date among excitons in bare quantum wells. The high-order correlations can be attributed to coupling through the cavity mode, although the role of high-order Coulomb correlations cannot be excluded. (paper)

  10. Probing specific molecular processes and intermediates by time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy: application to the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lórenz-Fonfría, Víctor A; Kandori, Hideki; Padrós, Esteve

    2011-06-23

    We present a general approach for probing the kinetics of specific molecular processes in proteins by time-resolved Fourier transform infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Using bacteriorhodopsin (bR) as a model we demonstrate that by appropriately monitoring some selected IR bands it is possible obtaining the kinetics of the most important events occurring in the photocycle, namely changes in the chromophore and the protein backbone conformation, and changes in the protonation state of the key residues implicated in the proton transfers. Besides confirming widely accepted views of the bR photocycle, our analysis also sheds light into some disputed issues: the degree of retinal torsion in the L intermediate to respect the ground state; the possibility of a proton transfer from Asp85 to Asp212; the relationship between the protonation/deprotonation of Asp85 and the proton release complex; and the timing of the protein backbone dynamics. By providing a direct way to estimate the kinetics of photocycle intermediates the present approach opens new prospects for a robust quantitative kinetic analysis of the bR photocycle, which could also benefit the study of other proteins involved in photosynthesis, in phototaxis, or in respiratory chains.

  11. The reaction of hydroxylamine with bacteriorhodopsin studied with mutants that have altered photocycles: selective reactivity of different photointermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, S; Marti, T; Rösselet, S J; Rothschild, K J; Khorana, H G

    1991-01-01

    The reaction of the retinylidene Schiff base in bacteriorhodopsin (bR) to the water-soluble reagent hydroxylamine is enhanced by greater than 2 orders of magnitude under illumination. We have used this reaction as a probe for changes in Schiff base reactivity during the photocycle of wild-type bR and mutants defective in proton transport. We report here that under illumination at pH 6, the D85N mutant has a 20-fold lower rate and the D212N mutant has a greater than 4-fold higher rate for the light-dependent reaction with hydroxylamine compared with wild-type bR. In contrast, the reactivities of wild-type bR and the D96N and T46V mutants are similar. It has been previously shown that the D96N and T46V replacements have no significant effect on the kinetics of "M" formation but have dramatic effects on rate of the decay of M. We therefore conclude that the hydroxylamine reaction occurs before formation of the M intermediate. Most likely it occurs at the "L" stage of the cycle and reflects increased water accessibility to the Schiff base due to a light-driven change in protein conformation. PMID:2006195

  12. Recent Advances in the Field of Bionanotechnology: An Insight into Optoelectric Bacteriorhodopsin, Quantum Dots, and Noble Metal Nanoclusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Knoblauch

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular sensors and molecular electronics are a major component of a recent research area known as bionanotechnology, which merges biology with nanotechnology. This new class of biosensors and bioelectronics has been a subject of intense research over the past decade and has found application in a wide variety of fields. The unique characteristics of these biomolecular transduction systems has been utilized in applications ranging from solar cells and single-electron transistors (SETs to fluorescent sensors capable of sensitive and selective detection of a wide variety of targets, both organic and inorganic. This review will discuss three major systems in the area of molecular sensors and electronics and their application in unique technological innovations. Firstly, the synthesis of optoelectric bacteriorhodopsin (bR and its application in the field of molecular sensors and electronics will be discussed. Next, this article will discuss recent advances in the synthesis and application of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs. Finally, this article will conclude with a review of the new and exciting field of noble metal nanoclusters and their application in the creation of a new class of fluorescent sensors.

  13. Optical Properties Of Polymeric Films Of Bacteriorhodopsin And Its Functional Variants: New Materials For Optical Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampp, Norbert; Braeuchle, Christoph R.; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    1990-01-01

    Purple membrane (PM) from Halobacterium halobium consists of a two-dimensional crystal of the photochromic retinal protein bacteriorhodopsin (BR). Purple membrane embedded in inert polymer matrices can be used as reversible recording medium in holography. The thermal and photochemical stability (at least 100.000 recording cycles at room temperature), the high quantum yield (70%), the high resolution (~ 5000 lines/mm) and the wide spectral range (400-680 nm) of these films are promising features for any possible technical application. The variability of this material was restricted to chemical modifications of the chromophoric group for a long time. new class of BR based recording media is introduced by the availability of variants of BR with a modified amino acid sequence. After generation of a mutant strain PM variants can be easily produced by the same cultivation and purification procedures as the PM of the wildtype and therefore are available in virtually unlimited amounts, too. As an example the properties of PM-films containing the variant BR-326, which differs from the wildtype by a single amino acid, are reported here. The improved diffraction efficiency (~ 2-fold) and increased sensitivity (~ 50%) of films containing BR-326 give an impression of the new possibilities for optimizing reversible recording media by biochemical and gentechnological methods as an alternative or an addition to conventional chemical methods.

  14. Laser-Machined Microcavities for Simultaneous Measurement of High-Temperature and High-Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengling Ran

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Laser-machined microcavities for simultaneous measurement of high-temperature and high-pressure are demonstrated. These two cascaded microcavities are an air cavity and a composite cavity including a section of fiber and an air cavity. They are both placed into a pressure chamber inside a furnace to perform simultaneous pressure and high-temperature tests. The thermal and pressure coefficients of the short air cavity are ~0.0779 nm/°C and ~1.14 nm/MPa, respectively. The thermal and pressure coefficients of the composite cavity are ~32.3 nm/°C and ~24.4 nm/MPa, respectively. The sensor could be used to separate temperature and pressure due to their different thermal and pressure coefficients. The excellent feature of such a sensor head is that it can withstand high temperatures of up to 400 °C and achieve precise measurement of high-pressure under high temperature conditions.

  15. Dynamical Fano-Like Interference between Rabi Oscillations and Coherent Phonons in a Semiconductor Microcavity System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, S; Oohata, G; Mizoguchi, K

    2015-10-09

    We report on dynamical interference between short-lived Rabi oscillations and long-lived coherent phonons in CuCl semiconductor microcavities resulting from the coupling between the two oscillations. The Fourier-transformed spectra of the time-domain signals obtained from semiconductor microcavities by using a pump-probe technique show that the intensity of the coherent longitudinal optical phonon of CuCl is enhanced by increasing that of the Rabi oscillation, which indicates that the coherent phonon is driven by the Rabi oscillation through the Fröhlich interaction. Moreover, as the Rabi oscillation frequency decreases upon crossing the phonon frequency, the spectral profile of the coherent phonon changes from a peak to a dip with an asymmetric structure. The continuous wavelet transformation reveals that these peak and dip structures originate from constructive and destructive interference between Rabi oscillations and coherent phonons, respectively. We demonstrate that the asymmetric spectral structures in relation to the frequency detuning are well reproduced by using a classical coupled oscillator model on the basis of dynamical Fano-like interference.

  16. Coupling of a single NV center to a fiber-based microcavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christoph Becher

    2014-01-01

    The read-out of the spin state of a NV center in diamond or the transfer of quantum information between its spin and a photon would profit enormously from coupling the NV center's optical transitions to a microcavity with a highly directional output. We here report on such a coupling of a single NV center in a nanodiamond to a fiber-based, tunable microcavity at room temperature. Making use of the NV center's strongly broadened emission we operate in the regime of phonon-assisted cavity seeding and realize a widely tunable, narrow-band single photon source. A master equation model well reproduces our experimental results and predicts a transition into a Purcell-enhanced emission regime at low temperatures where up to 65% of the NV emission would be channeled into the cavity mode for our given experimental parameters. Further reducing scattering losses from the nanodiamonds could enable schemes for cavity-enhanced spin measurements or creation of entangled states. (author)

  17. SERS-active ZnO/Ag hybrid WGM microcavity for ultrasensitive dopamine detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Junfeng; Xu, Chunxiang; Nan, Haiyan; Zhu, Qiuxiang; Qin, Feifei; Manohari, A. Gowri; Wei, Ming; Zhu, Zhu; Shi, Zengliang; Ni, Zhenhua

    2016-08-01

    Dopamine (DA) is a potential neuro modulator in the brain which influences a variety of motivated behaviors and plays a key role in life science. A hybrid ZnO/Ag microcavity based on Whispering Gallery Mode (WGM) effect has been developed for ultrasensitive detection of dopamine. Utilizing this effect of structural cavity mode, a Raman signal of R6G (5 × 10-3 M) detected by this designed surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS)-active substrate was enhanced more than 10-fold compared with that of ZnO film/Ag substrate. Also, this hybrid microcavity substrate manifests high SERS sensitivity to rhodamine 6 G and detection limit as low as 10-12 M to DA. The Localized Surface Plasmons of Ag nanoparticles and WGM-enhanced light-matter interaction mainly contribute to the high SERS sensitivity and help to achieve a lower detection limit. This designed SERS-active substrate based on the WGM effect has the potential for detecting neurotransmitters in life science.

  18. All-optical temporal fractional order differentiator using an in-fiber ellipsoidal air-microcavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lihong; Sun, Shuqian; Li, Ming; Zhu, Ninghua

    2017-12-01

    An all-optical temporal fractional order differentiator with ultrabroad bandwidth (~1.6 THz) and extremely simple fabrication is proposed and experimentally demonstrated based on an in-fiber ellipsoidal air-microcavity. The ellipsoidal air-microcavity is fabricated by splicing a single mode fiber (SMF) and a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) together using a simple arc-discharging technology. By changing the arc-discharging times, the propagation loss can be adjusted and then the differentiation order is tuned. A nearly Gaussian-like optical pulse with 3 dB bandwidth of 8 nm is launched into the differentiator and a 0.65 order differentiation of the input pulse is achieved with a processing error of 2.55%. Project supported by the the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61522509, 61377002, 61535012), the National High-Tech Research & Development Program of China (No. SS2015AA011002), and the Beijing Natural Science Foundation (No. 4152052). Ming Li was supported in part by the Thousand Young Talent Program.

  19. Modelling Laser Milling of Microcavities for the Manufacturing of DES with Ensembles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Santos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A set of designed experiments, involving the use of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser system milling 316L Stainless Steel, serve to study the laser-milling process of microcavities in the manufacture of drug-eluting stents (DES. Diameter, depth, and volume error are considered to be optimized as functions of the process parameters, which include laser intensity, pulse frequency, and scanning speed. Two different DES shapes are studied that combine semispheres and cylinders. Process inputs and outputs are defined by considering the process parameters that can be changed under industrial conditions and the industrial requirements of this manufacturing process. In total, 162 different conditions are tested in a process that is modeled with the following state-of-the-art data-mining regression techniques: Support Vector Regression, Ensembles, Artificial Neural Networks, Linear Regression, and Nearest Neighbor Regression. Ensemble regression emerged as the most suitable technique for studying this industrial problem. Specifically, Iterated Bagging ensembles with unpruned model trees outperformed the other methods in the tests. This method can predict the geometrical dimensions of the machined microcavities with relative errors related to the main average value in the range of 3 to 23%, which are considered very accurate predictions, in view of the characteristics of this innovative industrial task.

  20. The Detection of Helicobacter hepaticus Using Whispering-Gallery Mode Microcavity Optical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E. Anderson

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Current bacterial detection techniques are relatively slow, require bulky instrumentation, and usually require some form of specialized training. The gold standard for bacterial detection is culture testing, which can take several days to receive a viable result. Therefore, simpler detection techniques that are both fast and sensitive could greatly improve bacterial detection and identification. Here, we present a new method for the detection of the bacteria Helicobacter hepaticus using whispering-gallery mode (WGM optical microcavity-based sensors. Due to minimal reflection losses and low material adsorption, WGM-based sensors have ultra-high quality factors, resulting in high-sensitivity sensor devices. In this study, we have shown that bacteria can be non-specifically detected using WGM optical microcavity-based sensors. The minimum detection for the device was 1 × 104 cells/mL, and the minimum time of detection was found to be 750 s. Given that a cell density as low as 1 × 103 cells/mL for Helicobacter hepaticus can cause infection, the limit of detection shown here would be useful for most levels where Helicobacter hepaticus is biologically relevant. This study suggests a new approach for H. hepaticus detection using label-free optical sensors that is faster than, and potentially as sensitive as, standard techniques.

  1. Magnetic-field induced bistability in a quasi-one-dimensional semiconductor microcavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Chuanyi; Zhang, Weifeng

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically study the magnetic-field induced bistability in a quasi-one-dimensional semiconductor microcavity. A critical magnetic field is obtained, and the bistability appears if a magnetic field is greater than the critical value. For a positive energy detuning of the pump from the bare exciton polaritons, one bistability loop first emerges, then it divides into two loops, and finally one of them vanishes with the increasing magnetic field. This phenomenon originates from the magnetic-field modulated interactions for opposite spins. In the variational process, there are two important effects: one is a logic gate with a small variation of the excitation laser, and the other is a spin texture like skyrmion and this texture is periodic if the energy detuning varies periodically in real space, which is useful for designing the spin-dependent optoelectronic devices. - Highlights: • We study the bistability induced by a magnetic field in a microcavity. • One bistability loop can divide into two, and then the two loops return to one. • A spin texture like skyrmion and logic gate arise in the variation of bistability loop

  2. Tapered optical fiber tip probes based on focused ion beam-milled Fabry-Perot microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Ricardo M.; Warren-Smith, Stephen C.; Becker, Martin; Dellith, Jan; Rothhardt, Manfred; Zibaii, M. I.; Latifi, H.; Marques, Manuel B.; Bartelt, Hartmut; Frazão, Orlando

    2016-09-01

    Focused ion beam technology is combined with dynamic chemical etching to create microcavities in tapered optical fiber tips, resulting in fiber probes for temperature and refractive index sensing. Dynamic chemical etching uses hydrofluoric acid and a syringe pump to etch standard optical fibers into cone structures called tapered fiber tips where the length, shape, and cone angle can be precisely controlled. On these tips, focused ion beam is used to mill several different types of Fabry-Perot microcavities. Two main cavity types are initially compared and then combined to form a third, complex cavity structure. In the first case, a gap is milled on the tapered fiber tip which allows the external medium to penetrate the light guiding region and thus presents sensitivity to external refractive index changes. In the second, two slots that function as mirrors are milled on the tip creating a silica cavity that is only sensitive to temperature changes. Finally, both cavities are combined on a single tapered fiber tip, resulting in a multi-cavity structure capable of discriminating between temperature and refractive index variations. This dual characterization is performed with the aid of a fast Fourier transform method to separate the contributions of each cavity and thus of temperature and refractive index. Ultimately, a tapered optical fiber tip probe with sub-standard dimensions containing a multi-cavity structure is projected, fabricated, characterized and applied as a sensing element for simultaneous temperature and refractive index discrimination.

  3. Ultrastrong exciton-photon coupling in single and coupled organic microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Bramante, Rosemary; Valle, Brent; Singer, Kenneth; Khattab, Tawfik; Williams, Jarrod; Twieg, Robert

    2015-03-01

    We have demonstrated ultrastrong light-matter coupling in organic planar microcavities composed of a neat glassy organic dye film between two metallic (aluminum) mirrors in a half-cavity configuration. Such cavities are characterized by Q factors around 10. Tuning the thickness of the organic layer enables the observation of the ultrastrong coupling regime. Via reflectivity measurements, we observe a very large Rabi splitting around 1.227 eV between upper and lower polariton branches at room temperature, and we detect polariton emission from the lower polariton branch via photoluminescence measurements. The large splitting is due to the large oscillator strength of the neat dye glass, and to the match of the low-Q cavity spectral width to the broad absorption width of the dye film material. We also study the interaction between excitonic states of neat glassy organic dye and cavity modes within coupled microcavity structures. The high-reflectivity mirrors are formed from distributed Bragg reflectors (DBR), which are multilayer films fabricated using the coextrusion process, containing alternating layers of high (SAN25, n =1.57) and low (Dyneon THV 220G, n =1.37) refractive index dielectric polymers. Nonlinear optical measurements will be discussed. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation Center for Layered Polymer Systems (CLiPS) under Grant Number DMR-0423914.

  4. Optimization of three-dimensional micropost microcavities for cavity quantum electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuckovic, Jelena; Pelton, Matthew; Scherer, Axel; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed analysis, based on the first-principles finite-difference time-domain method, of the resonant frequency, quality factor (Q), mode volume (V), and radiation pattern of the fundamental (HE 11 ) mode in a three-dimensional distributed-Bragg-reflector (DBR) micropost microcavity. By treating this structure as a one-dimensional cylindrical photonic crystal containing a single defect, we are able to push the limits of Q/V beyond those achievable by standard micropost designs, based on the simple rules established for planar DBR microcavities. We show that some of the rules that work well for designing large-diameter microposts (e.g., high-refractive-index contrast) fail to provide high-quality cavities with small diameters. By tuning the thicknesses of mirror layers and the spacer, the number of mirror pairs, the refractive indices of high- and low-refractive index regions, and the cavity diameter, we are able to achieve Q as high as 10 4 , together with a mode volume of 1.6 cubic wavelengths of light in the high-refractive-index material. The combination of high Q and small V makes these structures promising candidates for the observation of such cavity-quantum-electrodynamics phenomena as strong coupling between a quantum dot and the cavity field, and single-quantum-dot lasing

  5. Two-photon interference from a quantum dot-microcavity: Persistent pure-dephasing and suppression of time-jitter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Unsleber, Sebastian; McCutcheon, Dara; Dambach, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the emission of highly indistinguishable photons from a quasi-resonantly pumped coupledquantum dot–microcavity system operating in the regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics. Changing thesample temperature allows us to vary the quantum dot–cavity detuning and, on spectral resonance...

  6. Two-photon interference from a quantum dot-microcavity: Persistent pure-dephasing and suppression of time-jitter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Unsleber, S.; McCutcheon, Dara; Dambach, M.

    We demonstrate the emission of highly indistinguishable photons from a quasiresonantly pumped coupled quantum dot–microcavity system operating in the regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics. Changing the sample temperature allows us to vary the quantum dot–cavity detuning, and on spectral...

  7. Ultra-compact and wide-spectrum-range thermo-optic switch based on silicon coupled photonic crystal microcavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xingyu; Chung, Chi-Jui; Pan, Zeyu; Yan, Hai; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Chen, Ray T.

    2015-01-01

    We design, fabricate, and experimentally demonstrate a compact thermo-optic gate switch comprising a 3.78 μm-long coupled L0-type photonic crystal microcavities on a silicon-on-insulator substrate. A nanohole is inserted in the center of each individual L0 photonic crystal microcavity. Coupling between identical microcavities gives rise to bonding and anti-bonding states of the coupled photonic molecules. The coupled photonic crystal microcavities are numerically simulated and experimentally verified with a 6 nm-wide flat-bottom resonance in its transmission spectrum, which enables wider operational spectrum range than microring resonators. An integrated micro-heater is in direct contact with the silicon core to efficiently drive the device. The thermo-optic switch is measured with an optical extinction ratio of 20 dB, an on-off switching power of 18.2 mW, a thermo-optic tuning efficiency of 0.63 nm/mW, a rise time of 14.8 μs, and a fall time of 18.5 μs. The measured on-chip loss on the transmission band is as low as 1 dB

  8. Advances in optoplasmonic sensors – combining optical nano/microcavities and photonic crystals with plasmonic nanostructures and nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Jolly

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanophotonic device building blocks, such as optical nano/microcavities and plasmonic nanostructures, lie at the forefront of sensing and spectrometry of trace biological and chemical substances. A new class of nanophotonic architecture has emerged by combining optically resonant dielectric nano/microcavities with plasmonically resonant metal nanostructures to enable detection at the nanoscale with extraordinary sensitivity. Initial demonstrations include single-molecule detection and even single-ion sensing. The coupled photonic-plasmonic resonator system promises a leap forward in the nanoscale analysis of physical, chemical, and biological entities. These optoplasmonic sensor structures could be the centrepiece of miniaturised analytical laboratories, on a chip, with detection capabilities that are beyond the current state of the art. In this paper, we review this burgeoning field of optoplasmonic biosensors. We first focus on the state of the art in nanoplasmonic sensor structures, high quality factor optical microcavities, and photonic crystals separately before proceeding to an outline of the most recent advances in hybrid sensor systems. We discuss the physics of this modality in brief and each of its underlying parts, then the prospects as well as challenges when integrating dielectric nano/microcavities with metal nanostructures. In Section 5, we hint to possible future applications of optoplasmonic sensing platforms which offer many degrees of freedom towards biomedical diagnostics at the level of single molecules.

  9. Nanosecond retinal structure changes in K-590 during the room-temperature bacteriorhodopsin photocycle: picosecond time-resolved coherent anti-stokes Raman spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Weidlich, O.; Ujj, L.; Jäger, F.; Atkinson, G.H.

    1997-01-01

    Time-resolved vibrational spectra are used to elucidate the structural changes in the retinal chromophore within the K-590 intermediate that precedes the formation of the L-550 intermediate in the room-temperature (RT) bacteriorhodopsin (BR) photocycle. Measured by picosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (PTR/CARS), these vibrational data are recorded within the 750 cm-1 to 1720 cm-1 spectral region and with time delays of 50-260 ns after the RT/BR photocycle is optical...

  10. Redshift of the purple membrane absorption band and the deprotonation of tyrosine residues at high pH: Origin of the parallel photocycles of trans-bacteriorhodopsin

    OpenAIRE

    Balashov, S. P.; Govindjee, R.; Ebrey, T. G.

    1991-01-01

    At high pH (> 8) the 570 nm absorption band of all-trans bacteriorhodopsin (bR) in purple membrane undergoes a small (1.5 nm) shift to longer wavelengths, which causes a maximal increase in absorption at 615 nm. The pK of the shift is 9.0 in the presence of 167 mM KCl, and its intrinsic pK is ∼8.3. The red shift of the trans-bR absorption spectrum correlates with the appearance of the fast component in the light-induced L to M transition, and absorption increases at 238 and 297 nm which are a...

  11. Structures of aspartic acid-96 in the L and N intermediates of bacteriorhodopsin: analysis by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, A.; Sasaki, J.; Shichida, Y.; Yoshizawa, T.; Chang, M.; Ni, B.; Needleman, R.; Lanyi, J. K.

    1992-01-01

    The light-induced difference Fourier transform infrared spectrum between the L or N intermediate minus light-adapted bacteriorhodopsin (BR) was measured in order to examine the protonated states and the changes in the interactions of carboxylic acids of Asp-96 and Asp-115 in these intermediates. Vibrational bands due to the protonated and unprotonated carboxylic acid were identified by isotope shift and band depletion upon substitution of Asp-96 or -115 by asparagine. While the signal due to the deprotonation of Asp-96 was clearly observed in the N intermediate, this residue remained protonated in L. Asp-115 was partially deprotonated in L. The C = O stretching vibration of protonated Asp-96 of L showed almost no shift upon 2H2O substitution, in contrast to the corresponding band of Asp-96 or Asp-115 of BR, which shifted by 9-12 cm-1 under the same conditions. In the model system of acetic acid in organic solvents, such an absence of the shift of the C = O stretching vibration of the protonated carboxylic acid upon 2H2O substitution was seen only when the O-H of acetic acid is hydrogen-bonded. The non-hydrogen-bonded monomer showed the 2H2O-dependent shift. Thus, the O-H bond of Asp-96 enters into hydrogen bonding upon conversion of BR to L. Its increased hydrogen bonding in L is consistent with the observed downshift of the O-H stretching vibration of the carboxylic acid of Asp-96.

  12. Absorptive lasing mode suppression in ZnO nano- and microcavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wille, M.; Michalsky, T.; Krüger, E.; Grundmann, M.; Schmidt-Grund, R. [Universität Leipzig, Institut für Experimentelle Physik II, Linnéstraße 5, 04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2016-08-08

    We conclusively explain the different lasing mode energies in ZnO nano- and microcavities observed by us and reported in literature. The limited penetration depth of usually used excitation lasers results in an inhomogeneous spatial gain region depending on the structure size and geometry. Hence, weakly or even nonexcited areas remain present after excitation, where modes are instantaneously suppressed by excitonic absorption. We compare the effects for ZnO microwires, nanowires, and tetrapod-like structures at room temperature and demonstrate that the corresponding mode selective effect is most pronounced for whispering-gallery modes in microwires with a hexagonal cross section. Furthermore, the absorptive lasing mode suppression will be demonstrated by correlating the spot size of the excitation laser and the lasing mode characteristic of a single ZnO nanowire.

  13. Ultrastrong light-matter coupling in electrically doped microcavity organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzeo, M., E-mail: marco.mazzeo@unisalento.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi”, Università del Salento, Via Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); NNL, Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Genco, A. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi”, Università del Salento, Via Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Gambino, S. [NNL, Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); CBN, Istituto Italiano Tecnologia, Via Barsanti 1, 73010 Lecce (Italy); Ballarini, D.; Mangione, F.; Sanvitto, D. [NNL, Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Di Stefano, O.; Patanè, S.; Savasta, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina, Viale F. Stagno d' Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Gigli, G. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi”, Università del Salento, Via Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); NNL, Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); CBN, Istituto Italiano Tecnologia, Via Barsanti 1, 73010 Lecce (Italy)

    2014-06-09

    The coupling of the electromagnetic field with an electronic transition gives rise, for strong enough light-matter interactions, to hybrid states called exciton-polaritons. When the energy exchanged between light and matter becomes a significant fraction of the material transition energy an extreme optical regime called ultrastrong coupling (USC) is achieved. We report a microcavity embedded p-i-n monolithic organic light emitting diode working in USC, employing a thin film of squaraine dye as active layer. A normalized coupling ratio of 30% has been achieved at room temperature. These USC devices exhibit a dispersion-less angle-resolved electroluminescence that can be exploited for the realization of innovative optoelectronic devices. Our results may open the way towards electrically pumped polariton lasers.

  14. Local Intensity Enhancements in Spherical Microcavities: Implications for Photonic Chemical and Biological Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Kirk A.

    2005-01-01

    In this report, we summarize recent findings regarding the use spherical microcavities in the amplification of light that is inelastically scattered by either fluorescent or Raman-active molecules. This discussion will focus on Raman scattering, with the understanding that analogous processes apply to fluorescence. Raman spectra can be generated through the use of a very strong light source that stimulates inelastic light scattering by molecules, with the scattering occurring at wavelengths shifted from that of the source and being most prominent at shifts associated with the molecules natural vibrational frequencies. The Raman signal can be greatly enhanced by exposing a molecule to the intense electric fields that arise near surfaces (typically of gold or silver) exhibiting nanoscale roughness. This is known as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). SERS typically produces gain factors of 103 - 106, but under special conditions, factors of 1010 - 1014 have been achieved.

  15. On-Chip High-Finesse Fabry-Perot Microcavities for Optical Sensing and Quantum Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad H. Bitarafan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available For applications in sensing and cavity-based quantum computing and metrology, open-access Fabry-Perot cavities—with an air or vacuum gap between a pair of high reflectance mirrors—offer important advantages compared to other types of microcavities. For example, they are inherently tunable using MEMS-based actuation strategies, and they enable atomic emitters or target analytes to be located at high field regions of the optical mode. Integration of curved-mirror Fabry-Perot cavities on chips containing electronic, optoelectronic, and optomechanical elements is a topic of emerging importance. Micro-fabrication techniques can be used to create mirrors with small radius-of-curvature, which is a prerequisite for cavities to support stable, small-volume modes. We review recent progress towards chip-based implementation of such cavities, and highlight their potential to address applications in sensing and cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  16. Room temperature strong coupling effects from single ZnO nanowire microcavity

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Ayan

    2012-05-01

    Strong coupling effects in a dielectric microcavity with a single ZnO nanowire embedded in it have been investigated at room temperature. A large Rabi splitting of ?100 meV is obtained from the polariton dispersion and a non-linearity in the polariton emission characteristics is observed at room temperature with a low threshold of 1.63 ?J/cm2, which corresponds to a polariton density an order of magnitude smaller than that for the Mott transition. The momentum distribution of the lower polaritons shows evidence of dynamic condensation and the absence of a relaxation bottleneck. The polariton relaxation dynamics were investigated by timeresolved measurements, which showed a progressive decrease in the polariton relaxation time with increase in polariton density. © 2012 Optical Society of America.

  17. High-Q submicron-diameter quantum-dot microcavity pillars for cavity QED experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Lermer, Matthias; Dunzer, Florian

    As/AlAs micropillar design where Bloch-wave engineering is employed to significally enhance the cavity mode confinement in the submicron diameter regime. We demonstrate a record-high vacuum Rabi splitting of 85 µeV of the strong coupling for pillars incorporating quantum dots with modest oscillator strength f ≈ 10....... It is well-known that light-matter interaction depends on the photonic environment, and thus proper engineering of the optical mode in microcavity systems is central to obtaining the desired functionality. In the strong coupling regime, the visibility of the Rabi splitting is described by the light...... coupling in micropillars relied on quantum dots with high oscillator strengths f > 50, our advanced design allows for the observation of strong coupling for submicron diameter quantum dot-pillars with standard f ≈ 10 oscillator strength. A quality factor of 13600 and a vacuum Rabi splitting of 85 µe...

  18. Hybrid quantum gates between flying photon and diamond nitrogen-vacancy centers assisted by optical microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Lu Long, Gui

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid quantum gates hold great promise for quantum information processing since they preserve the advantages of different quantum systems. Here we present compact quantum circuits to deterministically implement controlled-NOT, Toffoli, and Fredkin gates between a flying photon qubit and diamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers assisted by microcavities. The target qubits of these universal quantum gates are encoded on the spins of the electrons associated with the diamond NV centers and they have long coherence time for storing information, and the control qubit is encoded on the polarizations of the flying photon and can be easily manipulated. Our quantum circuits are compact, economic, and simple. Moreover, they do not require additional qubits. The complexity of our schemes for universal three-qubit gates is much reduced, compared to the synthesis with two-qubit entangling gates. These schemes have high fidelities and efficiencies, and they are feasible in experiment. PMID:26271899

  19. Anisotropic exchange interaction induced by a single photon in semiconductor microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappe, G.; Fernández-Rossier, J.; Louis, E.; Anda, E. V.

    2005-12-01

    We investigate coupling of localized spins in a semiconductor quantum dot embedded in a microcavity. The lowest cavity mode and the quantum dot exciton are coupled and close in energy, forming a polariton. The fermions forming the exciton interact with localized spins via exchange. Exact diagonalization of a Hamiltonian in which photons, spins, and excitons are treated quantum mechanically shows that a single polariton induces a sizable indirect anisotropic exchange interaction between spins. At sufficiently low temperatures strong ferromagnetic correlations show up without an appreciable increase in exciton population. In the case of a (Cd,Mn)Te quantum dot, Mn-Mn ferromagnetic coupling is still significant at 1 K : spin-spin correlation around 3 for exciton occupation smaller than 0.3. We find that the interaction mediated by photon-polaritons is 10 times stronger than the one induced by a classical field for equal Rabi splitting.

  20. Entropic Lattice Boltzmann study of hydrodynamics in a microcavity - Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlin, I. V.; Ansumali, S.; Frouzakis, Ch. E.; Boulouchos, K. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Labor fuer Aerothermochemie und Verbrennungssysteme ETHZ, ETH-Zentrum, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2005-07-01

    This yearly report for 2004 presents a review of work being done on behalf of the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) at the Laboratory for Aero-thermochemistry and Combustion Systems at the Federal Institute of Technology ETH in Zurich, Switzerland, on the development of a new approximation method for use in micrometer-scale flow calculations. The method, based on recently-developed so-called minimal entropy-kinetic models of the Boltzmann-kinetic equation, is discussed. Two detailed studies of micro-flows in specific geometries are discussed. The potential of the new method as a replacement for costly microscopic simulation methods is examined. The development and testing of a new thermal model - the so-called Thermal D2Q9 model - is discussed. A second study examined flows in a micro-cavity. A detailed parametric study of the quantitative and qualitative properties of the flows for a comprehensive range of dilution is mentioned.

  1. Mass and Momentum Transport in Microcavities for Diffusion-Dominant Cell Culture Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yew, Alvin G.; Pinero, Daniel; Hsieh, Adam H.; Atencia, Javier

    2012-01-01

    For the informed design of microfluidic devices, it is important to understand transport phenomena at the microscale. This letter outlines an analytically-driven approach to the design of rectangular microcavities extending perpendicular to a perfusion microchannel for microfluidic cell culture devices. We present equations to estimate the spatial transition from advection- to diffusion-dominant transport inside cavities as a function of the geometry and flow conditions. We also estimate the time required for molecules, such as nutrients or drugs to travel from the microchannel to a given depth into the cavity. These analytical predictions can facilitate the rational design of microfluidic devices to optimize and maintain long-term, physiologically-based culture conditions with low fluid shear stress.

  2. Metal Nanoparticles/Porous Silicon Microcavity Enhanced Surface Plasmon Resonance Fluorescence for the Detection of DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiajia Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A porous silicon microcavity (PSiMC with resonant peak wavelength of 635 nm was fabricated by electrochemical etching. Metal nanoparticles (NPs/PSiMC enhanced fluorescence substrates were prepared by the electrostatic adherence of Au NPs that were distributed in PSiMC. The Au NPs/PSiMC device was used to characterize the target DNA immobilization and hybridization with its complementary DNA sequences marked with Rhodamine red (RRA. Fluorescence enhancement was observed on the Au NPs/PSiMC device substrate; and the minimum detection concentration of DNA ran up to 10 pM. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR of the MC substrate; which is so well-positioned to improve fluorescence enhancement rather the fluorescence enhancement of the high reflection band of the Bragg reflector; would welcome such a highly sensitive in biosensor.

  3. Metal Nanoparticles/Porous Silicon Microcavity Enhanced Surface Plasmon Resonance Fluorescence for the Detection of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiajia; Jia, Zhenhong

    2018-02-23

    A porous silicon microcavity (PSiMC) with resonant peak wavelength of 635 nm was fabricated by electrochemical etching. Metal nanoparticles (NPs)/PSiMC enhanced fluorescence substrates were prepared by the electrostatic adherence of Au NPs that were distributed in PSiMC. The Au NPs/PSiMC device was used to characterize the target DNA immobilization and hybridization with its complementary DNA sequences marked with Rhodamine red (RRA). Fluorescence enhancement was observed on the Au NPs/PSiMC device substrate; and the minimum detection concentration of DNA ran up to 10 pM. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the MC substrate; which is so well-positioned to improve fluorescence enhancement rather the fluorescence enhancement of the high reflection band of the Bragg reflector; would welcome such a highly sensitive in biosensor.

  4. Purcell effect in an organic-inorganic halide perovskite semiconductor microcavity system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Yafeng; Hu, Tao; Wu, Lin; Shen, Xuechu; Chen, Zhanghai; Cao, Runan; Xu, Fei; Da, Peimei; Zheng, Gengfeng; Lu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Organic-inorganic halide perovskite semiconductors with the attractive physics properties, including strong photoluminescence (PL), huge oscillator strengths, and low nonradiative recombination losses, are ideal candidates for studying the light-matter interaction in nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate the coupling of the exciton state and the cavity mode in the lead halide perovskite microcavity system at room temperature. The Purcell effect in the coupling system is clearly observed by using angle-resolved photoluminescence spectra. Kinetic analysis based on time-resolved PL reveals that the spontaneous emission rate of the halide perovskite semiconductor is significantly enhanced at resonance of the exciton energy and the cavity mode. Our results provide the way for developing electrically driven organic polariton lasers, optical devices, and on-chip coherent quantum light sources

  5. On-Chip High-Finesse Fabry-Perot Microcavities for Optical Sensing and Quantum Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitarafan, Mohammad H; DeCorby, Ray G

    2017-07-31

    For applications in sensing and cavity-based quantum computing and metrology, open-access Fabry-Perot cavities-with an air or vacuum gap between a pair of high reflectance mirrors-offer important advantages compared to other types of microcavities. For example, they are inherently tunable using MEMS-based actuation strategies, and they enable atomic emitters or target analytes to be located at high field regions of the optical mode. Integration of curved-mirror Fabry-Perot cavities on chips containing electronic, optoelectronic, and optomechanical elements is a topic of emerging importance. Micro-fabrication techniques can be used to create mirrors with small radius-of-curvature, which is a prerequisite for cavities to support stable, small-volume modes. We review recent progress towards chip-based implementation of such cavities, and highlight their potential to address applications in sensing and cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  6. Spoked-ring microcavities: enabling seamless integration of nanophotonics in unmodified advanced CMOS microelectronics chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Mark T.; Shainline, Jeffrey M.; Orcutt, Jason S.; Ram, Rajeev J.; Stojanovic, Vladimir; Popovic, Milos A.

    2014-03-01

    We present the spoked-ring microcavity, a nanophotonic building block enabling energy-efficient, active photonics in unmodified, advanced CMOS microelectronics processes. The cavity is realized in the IBM 45nm SOI CMOS process - the same process used to make many commercially available microprocessors including the IBM Power7 and Sony Playstation 3 processors. In advanced SOI CMOS processes, no partial etch steps and no vertical junctions are available, which limits the types of optical cavities that can be used for active nanophotonics. To enable efficient active devices with no process modifications, we designed a novel spoked-ring microcavity which is fully compatible with the constraints of the process. As a modulator, the device leverages the sub-100nm lithography resolution of the process to create radially extending p-n junctions, providing high optical fill factor depletion-mode modulation and thereby eliminating the need for a vertical junction. The device is made entirely in the transistor active layer, low-loss crystalline silicon, which eliminates the need for a partial etch commonly used to create ridge cavities. In this work, we present the full optical and electrical design of the cavity including rigorous mode solver and FDTD simulations to design the Qlimiting electrical contacts and the coupling/excitation. We address the layout of active photonics within the mask set of a standard advanced CMOS process and show that high-performance photonic devices can be seamlessly monolithically integrated alongside electronics on the same chip. The present designs enable monolithically integrated optoelectronic transceivers on a single advanced CMOS chip, without requiring any process changes, enabling the penetration of photonics into the microprocessor.

  7. Analyzing a steady-state phenomenon using an ensemble of sequential transient events: A proof of concept on photocurrent of bacteriorhodopsin upon continuous photoexcitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Chang-Wei; Chu, Li-Kang, E-mail: lkchu@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Sec. 2, Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Ho, Ching-Hwa [Interdisplinary Program of Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Sec. 2, Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-14

    The proton pump activity of bacteriorhodopsin in aqueous solution upon excitation with modulated continuous light was monitored electrochemically and analyzed by superimposing a series of transient proton translocation events Hᵢ⁺(t). An evolution function f(t)=(he{sup –lt}+k)/(h+k) , including a decay and a stationary offset, was introduced to weight the contribution of the individual transient events evolving with time in the envelope of the steady-state event. The evolution of the total proton concentration can be treated as an ensemble of weighted sequential transient events, H{sub total}⁺(t)=Σ{{sub i=0}sup n}Hᵢ⁺(t)∙f(t), and the temporal profile of the photocurrent is derived by differentiating the proton concentration with respect to time, (table) . The temporal profiles of the bacteriorhodopsin photocurrent in pH range of 6.3–8.1 were analyzed using a well-defined kinetics model and restricted mathematical formulization, and fitted temporal behaviors agreed with the observations. This successful proof-of-concept study on analyzing a steady-state phenomenon using an ensemble of sequential transient events can be generalized to quantify other phenomena upon continuous stimulation, such as estimation of the light-driven ion pump activities of the photosynthetic proteins upon illumination.

  8. Microcavity structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kustom, R.L.; Grudzien, D.; Feinerman, A.D.

    1994-01-01

    The feasibility of building mm-wave cavities using deep x-ray lithography techniques is being investigated. These cavities could be considered for linac accelerating structures, undulators, free electron lasers, or mm-wave amplifiers. The construction process includes making precision x-ray masks, x-ray exposure of poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA), removal of PMMA, and electroplating a metal. Highly precise two-dimensional features can be machined onto wafers by this technique. The challenge is to fabricate the wafers onto three-dimensional rf structures. Rectangular cavity geometry is best suited to this fabrication technique. Status of wafer manufacture, fabrication and alignment techniques using capillaries bonded in precision grooves, 2π/3 120-GHz linac structures, heat extraction analysis, and beam dynamics in a 5-meter-long 50-MeV linac will be discussed. Measurements made on 10X larger scale models that were built with conventional techniques will also be discussed

  9. Broad-spectrum enhanced absorption of graphene-molybdenum disulfide photovoltaic cells in metal-mirror microcavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang-Tao, Liu; Yun-Kai, Cao; Hong, Tong; Dai-Qiang, Wang; Zhen-Hua, Wu

    2018-04-01

    The optical absorption of graphene-molybdenum disulfide photovoltaic cells (GM-PVc) in wedge-shaped metal-mirror microcavities (w-MMCs) combined with a spectrum-splitting structure was studied. Results showed that the combination of spectrum-splitting structure and w-MMC can enable the light absorption of GM-PVcs to reach about 65% in the broad spectrum. The influence of processing errors on the absorption of GM-PVcs in w-MMCs was 3-14 times lower than that of GM-PVcs in wedge photonic crystal microcavities. The light absorption of GM-PVcs reached 60% in the broad spectrum, even with the processing errors. The proposed structure is easy to implement and may have potentially important applications in the development of ultra-thin and high-efficiency solar cells and optoelectronic devices.

  10. Substantial enhancement of red emission intensity by embedding Eu-doped GaN into a microcavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Inaba

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We investigate resonantly excited photoluminescence from a Eu,O-codoped GaN layer embedded into a microcavity, consisting of an AlGaN/GaN distributed Bragg reflector and a Ag reflecting mirror. The microcavity is responsible for a 18.6-fold increase of the Eu emission intensity at ∼10K, and a 21-fold increase at room temperature. We systematically investigate the origin of this enhancement, and we conclude that it is due to the combination of several effects including, the lifetime shortening of the Eu emission, the strain-induced piezoelectric effect, and the increased extraction and excitation field efficiencies. This study paves the way for an alternative method to enhance the photoluminescence intensity in rare-earth doped semiconductor structures.

  11. Real-Time and In-Flow Sensing Using a High Sensitivity Porous Silicon Microcavity-Based Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Caroselli

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Porous silicon seems to be an appropriate material platform for the development of high-sensitivity and low-cost optical sensors, as their porous nature increases the interaction with the target substances, and their fabrication process is very simple and inexpensive. In this paper, we present the experimental development of a porous silicon microcavity sensor and its use for real-time in-flow sensing application. A high-sensitivity configuration was designed and then fabricated, by electrochemically etching a silicon wafer. Refractive index sensing experiments were realized by flowing several dilutions with decreasing refractive indices, and measuring the spectral shift in real-time. The porous silicon microcavity sensor showed a very linear response over a wide refractive index range, with a sensitivity around 1000 nm/refractive index unit (RIU, which allowed us to directly detect refractive index variations in the 10−7 RIU range.

  12. Real-Time and In-Flow Sensing Using a High Sensitivity Porous Silicon Microcavity-Based Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroselli, Raffaele; Martín Sánchez, David; Ponce Alcántara, Salvador; Prats Quilez, Francisco; Torrijos Morán, Luis; García-Rupérez, Jaime

    2017-12-05

    Porous silicon seems to be an appropriate material platform for the development of high-sensitivity and low-cost optical sensors, as their porous nature increases the interaction with the target substances, and their fabrication process is very simple and inexpensive. In this paper, we present the experimental development of a porous silicon microcavity sensor and its use for real-time in-flow sensing application. A high-sensitivity configuration was designed and then fabricated, by electrochemically etching a silicon wafer. Refractive index sensing experiments were realized by flowing several dilutions with decreasing refractive indices, and measuring the spectral shift in real-time. The porous silicon microcavity sensor showed a very linear response over a wide refractive index range, with a sensitivity around 1000 nm/refractive index unit (RIU), which allowed us to directly detect refractive index variations in the 10 -7 RIU range.

  13. High-fidelity quantum gates on quantum-dot-confined electron spins in low-Q optical microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Gao, Jian-Cun; Deng, Fu-Guo; Long, Gui-Lu

    2018-04-01

    We propose some high-fidelity quantum circuits for quantum computing on electron spins of quantum dots (QD) embedded in low-Q optical microcavities, including the two-qubit controlled-NOT gate and the multiple-target-qubit controlled-NOT gate. The fidelities of both quantum gates can, in principle, be robust to imperfections involved in a practical input-output process of a single photon by converting the infidelity into a heralded error. Furthermore, the influence of two different decay channels is detailed. By decreasing the quality factor of the present microcavity, we can largely increase the efficiencies of these quantum gates while their high fidelities remain unaffected. This proposal also has another advantage regarding its experimental feasibility, in that both quantum gates can work faithfully even when the QD-cavity systems are non-identical, which is of particular importance in current semiconductor QD technology.

  14. Universal quantum gates on electron-spin qubits with quantum dots inside single-side optical microcavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2014-01-13

    We present some compact quantum circuits for a deterministic quantum computing on electron-spin qubits assisted by quantum dots inside single-side optical microcavities, including the CNOT, Toffoli, and Fredkin gates. They are constructed by exploiting the giant optical Faraday rotation induced by a single-electron spin in a quantum dot inside a single-side optical microcavity as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. Our universal quantum gates have some advantages. First, all the gates are accomplished with a success probability of 100% in principle. Second, our schemes require no additional electron-spin qubits and they are achieved by some input-output processes of a single photon. Third, our circuits for these gates are simple and economic. Moreover, our devices for these gates work in both the weak coupling and the strong coupling regimes, and they are feasible in experiment.

  15. Polariton condensation phase diagram in wide-band-gap planar microcavities: GaN versus ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamadi, O.; Réveret, F.; Mallet, E.; Disseix, P.; Médard, F.; Mihailovic, M.; Solnyshkov, D.; Malpuech, G.; Leymarie, J.; Lafosse, X.; Bouchoule, S.; Li, F.; Leroux, M.; Semond, F.; Zuniga-Perez, J.

    2016-03-01

    The polariton condensation phase diagram is compared in GaN and ZnO microcavities grown on mesa-patterned silicon substrate. Owing to a common platform, these microcavities share similar photonic properties with large quality factors and low photonic disorder, which makes it possible to determine the optimal spot diameter and to realize a thorough phase diagram study. Both systems have been investigated under the same experimental conditions. The experimental results and the subsequent analysis reveal clearly that longitudinal optical phonons have no influence in the thermodynamic region of the condensation phase diagram, while they allow a strong (slight) decrease of the polariton lasing threshold in the trade-off zone (kinetic region). Phase diagrams are compared with numerical simulations using Boltzmann equations, and are in satisfactory agreement. A lower polariton lasing threshold has been measured at low temperature in the ZnO microcavity, as is expected due to a larger Rabi splitting. This study highlights polariton relaxation mechanisms and their importance in polariton lasing.

  16. Hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry of bacteriorhodopsin reveals light-induced changes in the structural dynamics of a biomolecular machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yan; Brown, Leonid; Konermann, Lars

    2011-12-21

    Many proteins act as molecular machines that are fuelled by a nonthermal energy source. Examples include transmembrane pumps and stator-rotor complexes. These systems undergo cyclic motions (CMs) that are being driven along a well-defined conformational trajectory. Superimposed on these CMs are thermal fluctuations (TFs) that are coupled to stochastic motions of the solvent. Here we explore whether the TFs of a molecular machine are affected by the occurrence of CMs. Bacteriorhodopsin (BR) is a light-driven proton pump that serves as a model system in this study. The function of BR is based on a photocycle that involves trans/cis isomerization of a retinal chromophore, as well as motions of transmembrane helices. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry was used to monitor the TFs of BR, focusing on the monomeric form of the protein. Comparative HDX studies were conducted under illumination and in the dark. The HDX kinetics of BR are dramatically accelerated in the presence of light. The isotope exchange rates and the number of backbone amides involved in EX2 opening transitions increase roughly 2-fold upon illumination. In contrast, light/dark control experiments on retinal-free protein produced no discernible differences. It can be concluded that the extent of TFs in BR strongly depends on photon-driven CMs. The light-induced differences in HDX behavior are ascribed to protein destabilization. Specifically, the thermodynamic stability of the dark-adapted protein is estimated to be 5.5 kJ mol(-1) under the conditions of our work. This value represents the free energy difference between the folded state F and a significantly unfolded conformer U. Illumination reduces the stability of F by 2.2 kJ mol(-1). Mechanical agitation caused by isomerization of the chromophore is transferred to the surrounding protein scaffold, and subsequently, the energy dissipates into the solvent. Light-induced retinal motions therefore act analogously to an internal heat

  17. Numerical modeling of exciton-polariton Bose-Einstein condensate in a microcavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronych, Oksana; Buraczewski, Adam; Matuszewski, Michał; Stobińska, Magdalena

    2017-06-01

    A novel, optimized numerical method of modeling of an exciton-polariton superfluid in a semiconductor microcavity was proposed. Exciton-polaritons are spin-carrying quasiparticles formed from photons strongly coupled to excitons. They possess unique properties, interesting from the point of view of fundamental research as well as numerous potential applications. However, their numerical modeling is challenging due to the structure of nonlinear differential equations describing their evolution. In this paper, we propose to solve the equations with a modified Runge-Kutta method of 4th order, further optimized for efficient computations. The algorithms were implemented in form of C++ programs fitted for parallel environments and utilizing vector instructions. The programs form the EPCGP suite which has been used for theoretical investigation of exciton-polaritons. Catalogue identifier: AFBQ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AFBQ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: BSD-3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2157 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 498994 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ with OpenMP extensions (main numerical program), Python (helper scripts). Computer: Modern PC (tested on AMD and Intel processors), HP BL2x220. Operating system: Unix/Linux and Windows. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes (OpenMP) RAM: 200 MB for single run Classification: 7, 7.7. Nature of problem: An exciton-polariton superfluid is a novel, interesting physical system allowing investigation of high temperature Bose-Einstein condensation of exciton-polaritons-quasiparticles carrying spin. They have brought a lot of attention due to their unique properties and potential applications in polariton-based optoelectronic integrated circuits. This is an out-of-equilibrium quantum system confined

  18. Realization and optical characterisation of micro-cavities in strong coupling regime using self-assembled multi-quantum wells structure of 2D perovskites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanty, Gaetan

    2011-01-01

    The research work which is reported in this manuscript focuses on 2D perovskites and their use to obtain micro-cavities working in the strong coupling regime. Perovskite structure forms a multi-quantum wells in which the excitonic states have a high oscillator strength and a large binding energy (a few 100 MeV) due to quantum and dielectric confinement effects. A first axis of this work was to collect information on the excitonic properties of these materials. On a particular perovskite (PEPI), we performed photoluminescence and pump-probe measurements, which seem to suggest the existence, under high excitation density, a process of Auger recombination of excitons. A second research axis was to put in cavity thin layers of some perovskites. With PEPI and PEPC perovskites, we have shown that the realization of micro-cavities with a quality factor of the order of ten is sufficient to obtain at room temperature, the strong coupling regime in absorption and emission with Rabi splitting up to 220 MeV. A bottleneck effect has been clearly demonstrated for the PEPI microcavity. We have also shown that perovskites could be associated with inorganic semiconductors in 'hybrid' micro-cavities. According Agranovich et al., these micro-cavities could present polariton lasing with lower quality factors. To this end, the ZnO/MFMPB association seems particularly promising. (author)

  19. An Observation of Diamond-Shaped Particle Structure in a Soya Phosphatidylcohline and Bacteriorhodopsin Composite Langmuir Blodgett Film Fabricated by Multilayer Molecular Thin Film Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujiuchi, Y.; Makino, Y.

    A composite film of soya phosphatidylcohline (soya PC) and bacteriorhodopsin (BR) was fabricated by the multilayer molecular thin film method using fatty acid and lipid on a quartz substrate. Direct Force Microscopy (DFM), UV absorption spectra and IR absorption spectra of the film were characterized on the detail of surface structure of the film. The DFM data revealed that many rhombus (diamond-shaped) particles were observed in the film. The spectroscopic data exhibited the yield of M-intermediate of BR in the film. On our modelling of molecular configuration indicate that the coexistence of the strong inter-molecular interaction and the strong inter-molecular interaction between BR trimmers attributed to form the particles.

  20. Bragg polaritons in a ZnSe-based unfolded microcavity at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebald, K.; Rahman, SK. S.; Cornelius, M.; Kaya, T.; Gutowski, J. [Semiconductor Optics, Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Bremen, 28334 Bremen (Germany); Klein, T.; Gust, A.; Hommel, D. [Semiconductor Epitaxy, Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Bremen, 28334 Bremen (Germany); Klembt, S. [Institut Néel, Université Grenoble Alpes and CNRS, B.P. 166, 38042 Grenoble (France)

    2016-03-21

    In this contribution, we present strong coupling of ZnSe quantum well excitons to Bragg modes resulting in the formation of Bragg polariton eigenstates, characterized by a small effective mass in comparison to a conventional microcavity. We observe an anticrossing of the excitonic and the photonic component in our sample being a clear signature for the strong-coupling regime. The anticrossing is investigated by changing the detuning between the excitonic components and the Bragg mode. We find anticrossings between the first Bragg mode and the heavy- as well as light-hole exciton, respectively, resulting in three polariton branches. The observed Bragg-polariton branches are in good agreement with theoretical calculations. The strong indication for the existence of strong coupling is traceable up to a temperature of 200 K, with a Rabi-splitting energy of 24 meV and 13 meV for the Bragg mode with the heavy- and light-hole exciton, respectively. These findings demonstrate the advantages of this sample configuration for ZnSe-based devices for the strong coupling regime.

  1. High-power microcavity lasers based on highly erbium-doped sol-gel aluminosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Ngoc Chung; Chu Thi Thu Ha; Nguyen Thu Trang; Pham Thu Nga; Pham Van Hoi; Bui Van Thien

    2006-01-01

    High-power whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) lasing from highly erbium-doped sol-gel aluminosilicate microsphere cavity coupled to a half-tapered optical fiber is presented. The lasing output power as high as 0.45 mW (-3.5 dBm) was obtained from sol-gel glass microsphere cavity with diameters in the range of 40-150 μm. The sol-gel method for making highly concentration Er-doped aluminosilicate glasses with Er-ion concentrations from 0.125 to 0.65 mol% of Er 3+ is described. Controlling collected lasing wavelength at each WGM is possible by adjusting the distance between the half-taper fiber and the microcavity and by diameter of the waist of half-taper fiber. Using the analytic formulas we calculated the TE and TM lasing modes and it is shown that the experimental results are in good agreement with the calculation prediction

  2. Cooperative spontaneous emission of nano-emitters with inter-emitter coupling in a leaky microcavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Suc-Kyoung; Nam, Seog Woo; Yang, Hyung Jin

    2015-01-01

    We study the spontaneous emission from a few two-level nano-emitters placed in a leaky microcavity with Lorentzian spectral density near a critically damped regime. Collective features of the spontaneous emission are investigated by numerical analysis of the excitation dynamics when initially one nano-emitter is totally excited but we do not know which one. The results show that there are three decay rates in the excitation dynamics, two for simple exponential decays and one for damped oscillatory decay. The excitation dynamics is found to critically depend on the regime of the system. It is shown that the spontaneous emission is enhanced or suppressed depending on whether the system is in the underdamped or overdamped regime, respectively. On the other hand, the cooperative spontaneous emission is suppressed in the underdamped while it is enhanced in the overdamped regime. Furthermore, the effect of the direct inter-emitter coupling on the breaking of the cooperativeness of the spontaneous emission is shown as well. (paper)

  3. Liquid sensing capability of rolled-up tubular optical microcavities: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fangyuan; Zhan, Tianrong; Huang, Gaoshan; Mei, Yongfeng; Hu, Xinhua

    2012-10-07

    Rolled-up tubular optical microcavities are a novel type of optical sensor for identifying different liquids and monitoring single cells. Based on a Mie scattering method, we systematically study the optical resonances and liquid sensing capability of microtubes. Analytical formulas are presented to calculate the resonant wavelengths λ(r), Q factors, sensitivities S and figures of merit QS. Both ideal and rolled-up microtubes are considered for different optical materials in tube walls (refractive indices ranging from 1.5 to 2.5) and for three setups: tube-in-liquid, hollow-tube-in-liquid and liquid-in-tube. It is found that for rolled-up microtubes, the highest QS can be achieved by using the liquid-in-tube setup and very thin wall thicknesses. A maximal sensitivity is found in the case of the liquid cylinder. Our theory well explains a recent experiment under the setup of tube-in-liquid. It is also found that, although it describes the case of tube-in-liquid well, the waveguide approximation approach is not suitable for the case of liquid-in-tube. The results could be useful to design better optofluidic devices based on rolled-up microtubes.

  4. Spectrum study of top-emitting organic light-emitting devices with micro-cavity structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiang; Wei Fuxiang; Liu Hui

    2009-01-01

    Blue and white top-emitting organic light-emitting devices OLEDs with cavity effect have been fabricated. TBADN:3%DSAPh and Alq 3 :DCJTB/TBADN:TBPe/Alq 3 :C545 were used as emitting materials of microcavity OLEDs. On a patterned glass substrate, silver was deposited as reflective anode, and copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) layer as HIL and 4'-bis[N-(1-Naphthyl)- N-phenyl-amino]biphenyl (NPB) layer as HTL were made. Al/Ag thin films were made as semi-transparent cathode with a transmittance of about 30%. By changing the thickness of indium tin oxide ITO, deep blue with Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage chromaticity coordinates (CIEx, y) of (0.141, 0.049) was obtained on TBADN:3%DSAPh devices, and different color (red, blue and green) was obtained on Alq 3 :DCJTB/TBADN:TBPe/Alq 3 :C545 devices, full width at half maxima (FWHM) was only 17 nm. The spectral intensity and FWHM of emission in cavity devices have also been studied.

  5. Simulations of emission from microcavity tandem organic light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Rana; Xu, Chun; Zhao, Weijun; Liu, Rui; Shinar, Ruth; Shinar, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Microcavity tandem organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are simulated and compared to experimental results. The simulations are based on two complementary techniques: rigorous finite element solutions of Maxwell's equations and Fourier space scattering matrix solutions. A narrowing and blue shift of the emission spectrum relative to the noncavity single unit OLED is obtained both theoretically and experimentally. In the simulations, a distribution of emitting sources is placed near the interface of the electron transport layer tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) Al (Alq 3 ) and the hole transport layer (N,N'-bis(naphthalen-1-yl)-N,N'-bis(phenyl)benzidine) (α-NPB). Far-field electric field intensities are simulated. The simulated widths of the emission peaks also agree with the experimental results. The simulations of the 2-unit tandem OLEDs shifted the emission to shorter wavelength, in agreement with experimental measurements. The emission spectra's dependence on individual layer thicknesses also agreed well with measurements. Approaches to simulate and improve the light emission intensity from these OLEDs, in particular for white OLEDs, are discussed.

  6. Development of the automated circulating tumor cell recovery system with microcavity array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Ryo; Hosokawa, Masahito; Nakamura, Seita; Kanbara, Hisashige; Kanetomo, Masafumi; Kikuhara, Yoshihito; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Yoshino, Tomoko

    2015-05-15

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are well recognized as useful biomarker for cancer diagnosis and potential target of drug discovery for metastatic cancer. Efficient and precise recovery of extremely low concentrations of CTCs from blood has been required to increase the detection sensitivity. Here, an automated system equipped with a microcavity array (MCA) was demonstrated for highly efficient and reproducible CTC recovery. The use of MCA allows selective recovery of cancer cells from whole blood on the basis of differences in size between tumor and blood cells. Intra- and inter-assays revealed that the automated system achieved high efficiency and reproducibility equal to the assay manually performed by well-trained operator. Under optimized assay workflow, the automated system allows efficient and precise cell recovery for non-small cell lung cancer cells spiked in whole blood. The automated CTC recovery system will contribute to high-throughput analysis in the further clinical studies on large cohort of cancer patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Limulus amoebocyte lysate test via an open-microcavity optical biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudder, Jonathan; Ye, Jing Yong

    2018-02-01

    Almost since its discovery, Limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) testing has been an important part of the pharmaceutical quality control toolkit. It allows for in vitro endotoxin testing, which has replaced tests using animals, such as using rabbits' thermal response to judge pyrogenicity of test samples, thus leading to a less expensive and faster test of parenteral pharmaceuticals and medical devices that contact blood or cerebrospinal fluid. However, limited by the detection mechanisms of the LAL assays currently used in industry, further improvement in their performance is challenging. To address the growing demand on optimizing LAL assays for increased test sensitivity and reduced assay time, we have developed an LAL assay approach based on a detection mechanism that is different from those being used in industry, namely, gel-clot, turbidimetric, and chromogenic detection. Using a unique open-microcavity photonic-crystal biosensor to monitor the change in the refractive index due to the reaction between LAL regents and endotoxins, we have demonstrated that this approach has improved the LAL assay sensitivity by 200 times compared with the commercial standard methods, reduced the time needed for the assay by more than half, and eliminated the necessity to incubate the test samples. This study opens up the possibility of using the significantly improved LAL assays for a wide range of applications.

  8. Near-infrared exciton-polaritons in strongly coupled single-walled carbon nanotube microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Arko; Tropf, Laura; Zakharko, Yuriy; Zaumseil, Jana; Gather, Malte C.

    2016-10-01

    Exciton-polaritons form upon strong coupling between electronic excitations of a material and photonic states of a surrounding microcavity. In organic semiconductors the special nature of excited states leads to particularly strong coupling and facilitates condensation of exciton-polaritons at room temperature, which may lead to electrically pumped organic polariton lasers. However, charge carrier mobility and photo-stability in currently used materials is limited and exciton-polariton emission so far has been restricted to visible wavelengths. Here, we demonstrate strong light-matter coupling in the near infrared using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in a polymer matrix and a planar metal-clad cavity. By exploiting the exceptional oscillator strength and sharp excitonic transition of (6,5) SWCNTs, we achieve large Rabi splitting (>110 meV), efficient polariton relaxation and narrow band emission (<15 meV). Given their high charge carrier mobility and excellent photostability, SWCNTs represent a promising new avenue towards practical exciton-polariton devices operating at telecommunication wavelengths.

  9. Methods for polarized light emission from CdSe quantum dot based monolithic pillar microcavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seyfried, Moritz; Kalden, Joachim; Sebald, Kathrin; Gutowski, Juergen; Kruse, Carsten; Hommel, Detlef [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Bremen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    A lifting of the polarization degeneracy of the fundamental cavity mode in pillar microcavities (MCs) would allow for controlling the polarization state of the emitted photons. Therefore, monolithic VCSEL structures were grown by molecular beam epitaxy containing either one CdSe/ZnSSe quantum dot layer or three quantum well layers as active material. By using focused-ion-beam etching, MC pillars with different geometries were prepared out of the planar samples. Among these are circularly shaped pillar MCs with diameters in the range from 500 nm up to 4 {mu}m and quality factors of up to 7860, elliptically shaped MCs, and so-called photonic molecules consisting of circular pillar MCs which are connected by small bars. Polarization dependent photoluminescence investigations of the fundamental cavity mode reveal a lifting of the polarization degeneracy for all three types of MCs. The energy splitting of up to 0.42 meV in the circularly shaped pillar MCs is probably caused by anisotropic strain conditions within the sample and directly dependent on the pillar diameter, whereas the larger energy splitting of up to 0.72 meV for the photonic molecules or even 4.5 meV for the elliptically shaped MC is based on their asymmetric cross sections.

  10. High figure of merit ultra-compact 3-channel parallel-connected photonic crystal mini-hexagonal-H1 defect microcavity sensor array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunhong; Sun, Fujun; Fu, Zhongyuan; Ding, Zhaoxiang; Wang, Chao; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Jiawen; Tian, Huiping

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, a photonic crystal (PhC) butt-coupled mini-hexagonal-H1 defect (MHHD) microcavity sensor is proposed. The MHHD microcavity is designed by introducing six mini-holes into the initial H1 defect region. Further, based on a well-designed 1 ×3 PhC Beam Splitter and three optimal MHHD microcavity sensors with different lattice constants (a), a 3-channel parallel-connected PhC sensor array on monolithic silicon on insulator (SOI) is proposed. Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations method is performed to demonstrate the high performance of our structures. As statistics show, the quality factor (Q) of our optimal MHHD microcavity attains higher than 7×104, while the sensitivity (S) reaches up to 233 nm/RIU(RIU = refractive index unit). Thus, the figure of merit (FOM) >104 of the sensor is obtained, which is enhanced by two orders of magnitude compared to the previous butt-coupled sensors [1-4]. As for the 3-channel parallel-connected PhC MHHD microcavity sensor array, the FOMs of three independent MHHD microcavity sensors are 8071, 8250 and 8250, respectively. In addition, the total footprint of the proposed 3-channel parallel-connected PhC sensor array is ultra-compactness of 12.5 μm ×31 μm (width × length). Therefore, the proposed high FOM sensor array is an ideal platform for realizing ultra-compact highly parallel refractive index (RI) sensing.

  11. Reciprocal-Space Engineering of Quasi-Bound States in the Continuum in Photonic Crystal Slabs for High-Q Microcavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Taghizadeh, Alireza

    2017-01-01

    The bound states in the continuum (BICs) in photonic crystal (PhC) slabs presume infinite periodicity in the inplane direction. Thus, a large number of unit cells are typically required to implement the BICs with a high quality (Q) factor. Here, we report on a method to engineer the reciprocal......-space properties of BICs, which enables to keep the effect of the BIC phenomenon strong even for a microcavity of a few unit cells. For example, based on this method, a 3D microcavity of 4 unit cells can attain a Q factor of 18k. This allows for various BIC studies in a very compact platform, as well as novel...

  12. Detection of protein kinases P38 based on reflectance spectroscopy with n-type porous silicon microcavities for diagnosing hydatidosis hydatid disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiaoyi; Lv, Guodong; Jia, Zhenhong; Wang, Jiajia; Mo, Jiaqing

    2014-11-01

    Detection of protein kinases P38 of Echinococcus granulosus and its homologous antibody have great value for early diagnosis and treatment of hydatidosis hydatid disease. In this experiment, n-type mesoporous silicon microcavities have been successfully fabricated without KOH etching or oxidants treatment that reported in other literature. We observed the changes of the reflectivity spectrum before and after the antigen-antibody reaction by n-type mesoporous silicon microcavities. The binding of protein kinases P38 and its homologous antibody causes red shifts in the reflection spectrum of the sensor, and the red shift was proportional to the protein kinases P38 concentration with linear relationship.

  13. Entanglement purification and concentration of electron-spin entangled states using quantum-dot spins in optical microcavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chuan; Zhang Yong; Jin Guangsheng

    2011-01-01

    We present an entanglement purification protocol and an entanglement concentration protocol for electron-spin entangled states, resorting to quantum-dot spin and optical-microcavity-coupled systems. The parity-check gates (PCGs) constructed by the cavity-spin-coupling system provide a different method for the entanglement purification of electron-spin entangled states. This protocol can efficiently purify an electron ensemble in a mixed entangled state. The PCGs can also concentrate electron-spin pairs in less-entangled pure states efficiently. The proposed methods are more flexible as only single-photon detection and single-electron detection are needed.

  14. Progress Toward Single-Photon-Level Nonlinear Optics in Crystalline Microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowligy, Abijith S.

    Over the last two decades, the emergence of quantum information science has uncovered many practical applications in areas such as communications, imaging, and sensing where harnessing quantum features of Nature provides tremendous benefits over existing methods exploiting classical physical phenomena. In this effort, one of the frontiers of research has been to identify and utilize quantum phenomena that are not susceptible to environmental and parasitic noise processes. Quantum photonics has been at the forefront of these studies because it allows room-temperature access to its inherently quantum-mechanical features, and allows leveraging the mature telecommunication industry. Accompanying the weak environmental influence, however, are also weak optical nonlinearities. Efficient nonlinear optical interactions are indispensible for many of the existing protocols for quantum optical computation and communication, e.g. high-fidelity entangling quantum logic gates rely on large nonlinear responses at the one- or few-photon-level. While this has been addressed to a great extent by interfacing photons with single quantum emitters and cold atomic gases, scalability has remained elusive. In this work, we identify the macroscopic second-order nonlinear polarization as a robust platform to address this challenge, and utilize the recent advances in the burgeoning field of optical microcavities to enhance this nonlinear response. In particular, we show theoretically that by using the quantum Zeno effect, low-noise, single-photon-level optical nonlinearities can be realized in lithium niobate whispering-gallery-mode microcavities, and present experimental progress toward this goal. Using the measured strength of the second-order nonlinear response in lithium niobate, we modeled the nonlinear system in the strong coupling regime using the Schrodinger picture framework and theoretically demonstrated that the single-photon-level operation can be observed for cavity lifetimes in

  15. Electrical investigations of hybrid OLED microcavity structures with novel encapsulation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Stefan; Brückner, Robert; Fröb, Hartmut; Leo, Karl

    2016-04-01

    An electrical driven organic solid state laser is a very challenging goal which is so far well beyond reach. As a step towards realization, we monolithically implemented an Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) into a dielectric, high quality microcavity (MC) consisting of two Distributed Bragg Reectors (DBR). In order to account for an optimal optical operation, the OLED structure has to be adapted. Furthermore, we aim to excite the device not only electrically but optically as well. Different OLED structures with an emission layer consisting of Alq3:DCM (2 wt%) were investigated. The External Quantum Efficiencies (EQE) of this hybrid structures are in the range of 1-2 %, as expected for this material combination. Including metal layers into a MC is complicated and has a huge impact on the device performance. Using Transfer-Matrix-Algorithm (TMA) simulations, the best positions for the metal electrodes are determined. First, the electroluminescence (EL) of the adjusted OLED structure on top of a DBR is measured under nitrogen atmosphere. The modes showed quality factors of Q = 60. After the deposition of the top DBR, the EL is measured again and the quality factors increased up to Q = 600. Considering the two 25-nm-thick-silver contacts a Q-factor of 600 is very high. The realization of a suitable encapsulation method is important. Two approaches were successfully tested. The first method is based on the substitution of a DBR layer with a layer produced via Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). The second method uses a 0.15-mm-thick cover glass glued on top of the DBR with a 0.23-μm-thick single-component glue layer. Due to the working encapsulation, it is possible to investigate the sample under ambient conditions.

  16. Utilizing an open-microcavity optoacoustic sensor for spectroscopic determination of methemoglobin concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Ralph W.; Kadugodinandareddy, Kavya; Karunakaran, Vinitha; Whitney, Casey; Ling, Jian; Ye, Jing Yong

    2015-03-01

    We present a simple, non-destructive photoacoustic spectroscopy method utilizing a unique open-microcavity optoacoustic sensor to measure the concentration ratio of Methemoglobin (MetHb) in an optically scattering medium. Elevated levels of MetHb, present for example in the blood disorder Methemeglobinemia, cannot be detected by conventional pulse oximetry, and may result in inaccurate arterial oxygen saturation measurements. Samples with different ratios of Oxygenated Hemoglobin (HbO2), Deoxygenated Hemoglobin (HHb), and MetHb were obtained and mixed with nanoscale latex beads to present an optical scattering effect. Polymer encapsulated hemoglobin (PEH) samples were also studied. A sample chamber containing 20 μL of each sample was positioned directly underneath our patented optoacoustic sensor. Unlike a piezoelectric transducer, our optoacoustic sensor allows an excitation laser beam from an OPO laser to pass through and be absorbed by the sample to produce a photoacoustic signal. The cavity layer of the optoacoustic sensor is exposed directly to the resulting ultrasound signal, which causes an intensity modulation of a HeNe laser that is used to monitor the resonance condition of the sensor. A probe laser beam is total internally reflected off of the sensor and detected with a fiber-coupled APD detector. Three wavelengths are chosen for our excitation laser based on the absorption peaks and isobestic points of HHb, HbO2, and MetHb. Using established values of the molar extinction coefficients of HbO2, HHb, and MetHb a set of three simultaneous equations can be solved to accurately determine the concentration ratio of MetHb.

  17. Pump-Power-Driven Mode Switching in a Microcavity Device and Its Relation to Bose-Einstein Condensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. M. Leymann

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the switching of the coherent emission mode of a bimodal microcavity device, occurring when the pump power is varied. We compare experimental data to theoretical results and identify the underlying mechanism based on the competition between the effective gain, on the one hand, and the intermode kinetics, on the other. When the pumping is ramped up, above a threshold, the mode with the largest effective gain starts to emit coherent light, corresponding to lasing. In contrast, in the limit of strong pumping, it is the intermode kinetics that determines which mode acquires a large occupation and shows coherent emission. We point out that this latter mechanism is akin to the equilibrium Bose-Einstein condensation of massive bosons. Thus, the mode switching in our microcavity device can be viewed as a minimal instance of Bose-Einstein condensation of photons. Moreover, we show that the switching from one cavity mode to the other always occurs via an intermediate phase where both modes are emitting coherent light and that it is associated with both superthermal intensity fluctuations and strong anticorrelations between both modes.

  18. Hard coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dan, J.P.; Boving, H.J.; Hintermann, H.E.

    1993-01-01

    Hard, wear resistant and low friction coatings are presently produced on a world-wide basis, by different processes such as electrochemical or electroless methods, spray technologies, thermochemical, CVD and PVD. Some of the most advanced processes, especially those dedicated to thin film depositions, basically belong to CVD or PVD technologies, and will be looked at in more detail. The hard coatings mainly consist of oxides, nitrides, carbides, borides or carbon. Over the years, many processes have been developed which are variations and/or combinations of the basic CVD and PVD methods. The main difference between these two families of deposition techniques is that the CVD is an elevated temperature process (≥ 700 C), while the PVD on the contrary, is rather a low temperature process (≤ 500 C); this of course influences the choice of substrates and properties of the coating/substrate systems. Fundamental aspects of the vapor phase deposition techniques and some of their influences on coating properties will be discussed, as well as the very important interactions between deposit and substrate: diffusions, internal stress, etc. Advantages and limitations of CVD and PVD respectively will briefly be reviewed and examples of applications of the layers will be given. Parallel to the development and permanent updating of surface modification technologies, an effort was made to create novel characterisation methods. A close look will be given to the coating adherence control by means of the scratch test, at the coating hardness measurement by means of nanoindentation, at the coating wear resistance by means of a pin-on-disc tribometer, and at the surface quality evaluation by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Finally, main important trends will be highlighted. (orig.)

  19. Spontaneous stacking of purple membranes during immobilization with physical cross-linked poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel with retaining native-like functionality of bacteriorhodopsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Yasunori; Tanaka, Hikaru; Yano, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Kikukawa, Takashi; Sonoyama, Masashi; Takenaka, Koshi

    2017-05-01

    We previously discovered the correlation between light-induced chromophore color change of a photo-receptor membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR) and its two-dimensional crystalline state in the membrane. To apply this phenomenon to a novel optical memory device, it is necessary that bR molecules are immobilized as maintaining their structure and functional properties. In this work, a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel with physical cross-linkages (hydrogen bonds between PVA chains) that resulted from repeated freezing-and-thawing (FT) cycles was used as an immobilization medium. To investigate the effects of physically cross-linked PVA gelation on the structure and function of bR in purple membranes (PMs), spectroscopic techniques were employed against PM/PVA immobilized samples prepared with different FT cycle numbers. Visible circular dichroism spectroscopy strongly suggested PM stacking during gelation. X-ray diffraction data also indicated the PM stacking as well as its native-like crystalline lattice even after gelation. Time-resolved absorption spectroscopy showed that bR photocycle behaviors in PM/PVA immobilized samples were almost identical to that in suspension. These results suggested that a physically cross-linked PVA hydrogel is appropriate for immobilizing membrane proteins in terms of maintaining their structure and functionality.

  20. Protective Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    General Magnaplate Corporation's pharmaceutical machine is used in the industry for high speed pressing of pills and capsules. Machine is automatic system for molding glycerine suppositories. These machines are typical of many types of drug production and packaging equipment whose metal parts are treated with space spinoff coatings that promote general machine efficiency and contribute to compliance with stringent federal sanitation codes for pharmaceutical manufacture. Collectively known as "synergistic" coatings, these dry lubricants are bonded to a variety of metals to form an extremely hard slippery surface with long lasting self lubrication. The coatings offer multiple advantages; they cannot chip, peel or be rubbed off. They protect machine parts from corrosion and wear longer, lowering maintenance cost and reduce undesired heat caused by power-robbing friction.

  1. Homoepitaxial nonpolar (10-10) ZnO/ZnMgO monolithic microcavities: Towards reduced photonic disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuniga-Perez, J.; Kappei, L.; Deparis, C.; Chenot, S.; Leroux, M.; Reveret, F.; Jamadi, O.; Leymarie, J.; Grundmann, M.; Prado, E. de

    2016-01-01

    Nonpolar ZnO/ZnMgO-based optical microcavities have been grown on (10-10) m-plane ZnO substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Reflectivity measurements indicate an exponential increase of the cavity quality factor with the number of layers in the distributed Bragg reflectors. Most importantly, microreflectivity spectra recorded with a spot size in the order of 2 μm show a negligible photonic disorder (well below 1 meV), leading to local quality factors equivalent to those obtained by macroreflectivity. The anisotropic character of the nonpolar heterostructures manifests itself both in the surface features, elongated parallel to the in-plane c direction, and in the optical spectra, with two cavity modes being observed at different energies for orthogonal polarizations.

  2. Homoepitaxial nonpolar (10-10) ZnO/ZnMgO monolithic microcavities: Towards reduced photonic disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuniga-Perez, J., E-mail: jzp@crhea.cnrs.fr; Kappei, L.; Deparis, C.; Chenot, S.; Leroux, M. [CRHEA-CNRS, Rue Bernard Gregory, 06560 Valbonne (France); Reveret, F.; Jamadi, O.; Leymarie, J. [Clermont Université, Institut Pascal (IP), BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6602, IP, F-63171 Aubière (France); Grundmann, M. [CRHEA-CNRS, Rue Bernard Gregory, 06560 Valbonne (France); Institut für Experimentelle Physik II, Fakultät für Physik und Geowissenschaften, Universität Leipzig, Linnestr. 5, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Prado, E. de [CRHEA-CNRS, Rue Bernard Gregory, 06560 Valbonne (France); Departamento de Física Aplicada y Electromagnetismo, Universitat de Valencia, c/Dr Moliner 50, Burjassot, Valencia 46100 (Spain)

    2016-06-20

    Nonpolar ZnO/ZnMgO-based optical microcavities have been grown on (10-10) m-plane ZnO substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Reflectivity measurements indicate an exponential increase of the cavity quality factor with the number of layers in the distributed Bragg reflectors. Most importantly, microreflectivity spectra recorded with a spot size in the order of 2 μm show a negligible photonic disorder (well below 1 meV), leading to local quality factors equivalent to those obtained by macroreflectivity. The anisotropic character of the nonpolar heterostructures manifests itself both in the surface features, elongated parallel to the in-plane c direction, and in the optical spectra, with two cavity modes being observed at different energies for orthogonal polarizations.

  3. Scalable quantum computing based on stationary spin qubits in coupled quantum dots inside double-sided optical microcavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2014-12-18

    Quantum logic gates are the key elements in quantum computing. Here we investigate the possibility of achieving a scalable and compact quantum computing based on stationary electron-spin qubits, by using the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in double-sided optical microcavities as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. We design the compact quantum circuits for implementing universal and deterministic quantum gates for electron-spin systems, including the two-qubit CNOT gate and the three-qubit Toffoli gate. They are compact and economic, and they do not require additional electron-spin qubits. Moreover, our devices have good scalability and are attractive as they both are based on solid-state quantum systems and the qubits are stationary. They are feasible with the current experimental technology, and both high fidelity and high efficiency can be achieved when the ratio of the side leakage to the cavity decay is low.

  4. Analysis of ultra-high sensitivity configuration in chip-integrated photonic crystal microcavity bio-sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravarty, Swapnajit, E-mail: swapnajit.chakravarty@omegaoptics.com; Hosseini, Amir; Xu, Xiaochuan [Omega Optics, Inc., Austin, Texas 78757 (United States); Zhu, Liang; Zou, Yi [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States); Chen, Ray T., E-mail: raychen@uts.cc.utexas.edu [Omega Optics, Inc., Austin, Texas 78757 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States)

    2014-05-12

    We analyze the contributions of quality factor, fill fraction, and group index of chip-integrated resonance microcavity devices, to the detection limit for bulk chemical sensing and the minimum detectable biomolecule concentration in biosensing. We analyze the contributions from analyte absorbance, as well as from temperature and spectral noise. Slow light in two-dimensional photonic crystals provide opportunities for significant reduction of the detection limit below 1 × 10{sup −7} RIU (refractive index unit) which can enable highly sensitive sensors in diverse application areas. We demonstrate experimentally detected concentration of 1 fM (67 fg/ml) for the binding between biotin and avidin, the lowest reported till date.

  5. Fabrication and characterization of microcavity lasers in rhodamine B doped SU8 using high energy proton beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal Rao, S.; Bettiol, A. A.; Vishnubhatla, K. C.; Bhaktha, S. N. B.; Narayana Rao, D.; Watt, F.

    2007-03-01

    The authors present their results on the characterization of individual dye-doped microcavity polymer lasers fabricated using a high energy proton beam. The lasers were fabricated in rhodamine B doped SU8 resist with a single exposure step followed by chemical processing. The resulting trapezoidal shaped cavities had dimensions of ˜250×250μm2. Physical characterization of these structures was performed using a scanning electron microscope while the optical characterization was carried out by recording the emission subsequent to pumping the lasers with 532nm, 6 nanosecond pulses. The authors observed intense, narrow emission near 624nm with the best emission linewidth full width at half maximum of ˜9nm and a threshold ˜150μJ/mm2.

  6. Highly efficient phosphor-converted white organic light-emitting diodes with moderate microcavity and light-recycling filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sang-Hwan; Oh, Jeong Rok; Park, Hoo Keun; Kim, Hyoung Kun; Lee, Yong-Hee; Lee, Jae-Gab; Do, Young Rag

    2010-01-18

    We demonstrate the combined effects of a microcavity structure and light-recycling filters (LRFs) on the forward electrical efficiency of phosphor-converted white organic light-emitting diodes (pc-WOLEDs). The introduction of a single pair of low- and high-index layers (SiO(2)/TiO(2)) improves the blue emission from blue OLED and the insertion of blue-passing and yellow-reflecting LRFs enhances the forward yellow emission from the YAG:Ce(3+) phosphors layers. The enhancement of the luminous efficacy of the forward white emission is 1.92 times that of a conventional pc-WOLED with color coordinates of (0.34, 0.34) and a correlated color temperature of about 4800 K.

  7. Analysis of ultra-high sensitivity configuration in chip-integrated photonic crystal microcavity bio-sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Hosseini, Amir; Xu, Xiaochuan; Zhu, Liang; Zou, Yi; Chen, Ray T.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the contributions of quality factor, fill fraction, and group index of chip-integrated resonance microcavity devices, to the detection limit for bulk chemical sensing and the minimum detectable biomolecule concentration in biosensing. We analyze the contributions from analyte absorbance, as well as from temperature and spectral noise. Slow light in two-dimensional photonic crystals provide opportunities for significant reduction of the detection limit below 1 × 10 −7 RIU (refractive index unit) which can enable highly sensitive sensors in diverse application areas. We demonstrate experimentally detected concentration of 1 fM (67 fg/ml) for the binding between biotin and avidin, the lowest reported till date

  8. Microcavity Plasma Devices and Arrays Fabricated in Semiconductor, Ceramic, or Metal/polymer Structures: A New Realm of Plasma Physics and Photonics Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eden, J. G.

    2005-01-01

    Micro discharge, or microcavity plasma, is the broad term that has come to be associated with an emerging class of glow discharge devices in which the characteristic spatial dimension of the plasma is nominally ) dia. Si wafers and operated in the rare gases and Ar/N2 gas mixtures. Also, photodetection in the ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared with microplasma devices has been observed by interfacing a low temperature plasma with a semiconductor. Carbon nanotubes grown directly within the microcavity of microplasma devices improve all key performance parameters of the device, and nanoporous Al2O3 grown onto Al by wet chemical processing yields microplasma devices of exceptional stability and lifetime. The opportunities such structures offer for accessing new avenues in plasma physics and photonics will be discussed. (Author)

  9. High Sensitivity Detection of CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dot-Labeled DNA Based on N-type Porous Silicon Microcavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Changwu; Jia, Zhenhong; Lv, Jie; Zhang, Hongyan; Li, Yanyu

    2017-01-01

    N-type macroporous silicon microcavity structures were prepared using electrochemical etching in an HF solution in the absence of light and oxidants. The CdSe/ZnS water-soluble quantum dot-labeled DNA target molecules were detected by monitoring the microcavity reflectance spectrum, which was characterized by the reflectance spectrum defect state position shift resulting from changes to the structures' refractive index. Quantum dots with a high refractive index and DNA coupling can improve the detection sensitivity by amplifying the optical response signals of the target DNA. The experimental results show that DNA combined with a quantum dot can improve the sensitivity of DNA detection by more than five times.

  10. Vibrational spectrum of the K-590 intermediate in the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle at room temperature: picosecond time-resolved resonance coherent anti-Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujj, L.; Jäger, F.; Popp, A.; Atkinson, G. H.

    1996-12-01

    The vibrational spectrum of the K-590 intermediate, thought to contribute significantly to the energy storage and transduction mechanism in the bacteriorhodopsin (BR) photocycle, is measured at room temperature using picosecond time-resolved resonance coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (PTR/CARS). The room-temperature BR photocycle is initiated by the 3 ps, 570 nm excitation of the ground-state species, BR-570, prepared in both H 2O and D 2O suspensions of BR. PTR/CARS data, recorded 50 ps after BR-570 excitation, at which time only BR-570 and K-590 are present, have an excellent S/N which provides a significantly more detailed view of the K-590 vibrational degrees of freedom than previously available. Two picosecond (6 ps FWHM) laser pulses, ω1 (633.4 nm) and ωS (675-700 nm), are used to record PTR/CARS data via electronic resonance enhancement in both BR-570 and K-590, each of which contains a distinct retinal structure (assigned as 13- rans, 15- anti, 13- cis, respectively). To obtain the vibrational spectrum of K-590 separately, the PTR/CARS spectra from the mixture of isomeric retinals is quantitatively analyzed in terms of third-order susceptibility ( η(3)) relationships. PTR/CARS spectra of K-590 recorded from both H 2O and D 2O suspensions of BR are compared with the analogous vibrational data obtained via spontaneous resonance Raman (RR) scattering at both low (77 K) and room temperature. Analyses of these vibrational spectra identify temperature-dependent effects and changes assignable to the substitution of deuterium at the Schiff-base nitrogen not previously reported.

  11. Coating materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozeki, Takao; Kimura, Tadashi; Kobayashi, Juichi; Maeda, Yutaka; Nakamoto, Hideo.

    1969-01-01

    A non-solvent type coating material composition having properties as good as thermosetting acrylic or amino alkid resins is provided by employing active energy irradiation, particularly electron beams, using a radically polymerizable low molecular compound (A) (hereafter called an oligomer) containing at least two vinyl radicals in one molecule. This oligomer is produced by reacting an epoxy-containing vinyl monomer with alpha-, beta-ethylene unsaturated carboxylic acids or their anhydrides. The composition (I) contains 10% - 100% of this oligomer. In embodiments, an oligomer having a fiberous trivinyl construction is produced by reacting 180 parts by weight of glycidyl methacrylate ester with 130 parts of itaconic acid in the presence of a polymerization-inhibitor and an addition reaction catalyst at 90 0 C for 6 hours. In practice, the coating material compositions (1), consist of the whole oligomer [I-1]; (2), consist of 10-90% of (A) component and 90%-10% of vinyl monomers containing at least 30% (meth) acrylic monomer [I-2]; (3), 10%-90% of component (A) and 90%-10% of other monomers containing at least two vinyl radicals [I-3]; (4), a mixture of (I-2) and (I-3), [I-4]; and (5), consist of 50% or less unsaturated polyester of 500-5,000 molecular weight range or drying oil, or alkyd resin of 500-5,000 molecular weight range modified by drying oil, [I-5]. As a catalyst a tertiary amino vinyl compound is preferred. Five examples are given. (Iwakiri, K.)

  12. Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The mission of the Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory is to develop and analyze the effectiveness of innovative coatings test procedures while evaluating the...

  13. A SIMULTANEOUS MULTI-PROBE DETECTION LABEL-FREE OPTICAL-RESOLUTION PHOTOACOUSTIC MICROSCOPY TECHNIQUE BASED ON MICROCAVITY TRANSDUCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YONGBO WU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the feasibility of simultaneous multi-probe detection for an optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM system. OR-PAM has elicited the attention of biomedical imaging researchers because of its optical absorption contrast and high spatial resolution with great imaging depth. OR-PAM allows label-free and noninvasive imaging by maximizing the optical absorption of endogenous biomolecules. However, given the inadequate absorption of some biomolecules, detection sensitivity at the same incident intensity requires improvement. In this study, a modulated continuous wave with power density less than 3 mW/cm2 (1/4 of the ANSI safety limit excited the weak photoacoustic (PA signals of biological cells. A microcavity transducer is developed based on the bulk modulus of gas five orders of magnitude lower than that of solid; air pressure variation is inversely proportional to cavity volume at the same temperature increase. Considering that a PA wave expands in various directions, detecting PA signals from different positions and adding them together can increase detection sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, we employ four detectors to acquire tiny PA signals simultaneously. Experimental results show that the developed OR-PAM system allows the label-free imaging of cells with weak optical absorption.

  14. The quantum dynamics of two qubits inside two distant microcavities connected via a single-mode optical fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Van Hieu; Nguyen, Bich Ha; Duong, Hai Trieu

    2010-01-01

    For application to studying the transmission of quantum information, also called quantum communication, between two identical qubits placed inside two identical single-mode microcavities connected via a single-mode optical fiber, the time evolution of this system is investigated. In the Markovian approximation, the von Neumann equation for its reduced density matrix contains a completely positive linear operator called the Liouvillian operator describing the decoherence of this system due to its interaction with the environment. By using the Linblad formula for the Liouvillian operator, a system of rate equations can be derived. In the special case of resonance between the energy difference of two states in each qubit and the energy of the fiber mode, the rate equations for the system excited up to the first level are solved in first order approximation with respect to the decoherence constants. It is shown that when there is no decoherence, the perfect quantum state transmission between two qubits can take place if the physical parameters of the system satisfy definite conditions. A possible extension to studying the system excited to high energy states is also discussed

  15. A study of the cavity polariton under strong excitation:dynamics and nonlinearities in II-VI micro-cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, Markus

    2000-01-01

    This work contains an experimental study of the photoluminescence dynamics of cavity polaritons in strong coupling micro-cavities based on II-VI semiconductor compounds. The small exciton size and the strong exciton binding energy in these materials allowed us to study the strong coupling regime between photon and exciton up to high excitation densities, exploring the linear and non-linear emission regimes. Our main experimental techniques are picosecond time-resolved and angular photoluminescence spectroscopy. In the linear regime and for a negative photon-exciton detuning, we observe a suppression of the polariton relaxation by the emission of acoustic phonons leading to a non-equilibrium polariton distribution on the lower branch. This 'bottleneck' effect, which has already been described for polaritons in bulk semiconductors, results from the pronounced photon like character of the polaritons near k(parallel) = 0 in this configuration. At high excitation densities, non-linear relaxation processes, namely final state stimulation of the relaxation and polariton-polariton scattering, bypass this bottleneck giving rise to a very rapid relaxation down to the bottom of the band. We show that this dramatic change in the relaxation dynamics is finally responsible of the super-linear increase of the polariton emission from these states. (author) [fr

  16. Graphene Coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoot, Adam Carsten; Camilli, Luca; Bøggild, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Owing to its remarkable electrical and mechanical properties, graphene has been attracting tremendous interest in materials science. In particular, its chemical stability and impermeability make it a promising protective membrane. However, recent investigations reveal that single layer graphene...... cannot be used as a barrier in the long run, due to galvanic corrosion phenomena arising when oxygen or water penetrate through graphene cracks or domain boundaries. Here, we overcome this issue by using a multilayered (ML) graphene coating. Our lab- as well as industrial-scale tests demonstrate that ML...... graphene can effectively protect Ni in harsh environments, even after long term exposure. This is made possible by the presence of a high number of graphene layers, which can efficiently mask the cracks and domain boundaries defects found in individual layers of graphene. Our findings thus show...

  17. Coating materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozeki, Takao; Kimura, Tadashi; Kobayashi, Juichi; Maeda, Yutaka; Nakamoto, Hideo.

    1969-01-01

    A non-solvent type coating material composition is provided which can be hardened by irradiation with active energy, particularly electron beams, using a composition which contains 10%-100% of a radically polymerizable low molecular compound (A), (hereafter called an oligomer), having at least two vinyl radicals in one molecule. These compositions have a high degree of polymerization and characteristics equivalent to thermosetting acrylic or amino alkyd resin. The oligomer (A) is produced by reacting an epoxy-containing vinyl monomer with saturated polycarboxylic acids or anhydrides. In one embodiment, 146 parts by weight of adipic acid and 280 parts of glycidyl methacrylate ester undergo addition reaction in the presence of a polymerization-inhibitor and a catalyst at 90 0 C for 6 hours to produce an oligomer having a fiberous divinyl construction. The coating composition utilizes this oligomer in the forms of (I-1), a whole oligomer; (I-2), 0%-90% of this oligomer and 90%-10% of a vinyl monomer containing at least 30% of (meth) acrylic monomer; (I-3), 10%-90% of such oligomer and 90%-10% of other monomers containing at least two vinyl radicals in one molecule; (I-4), a mixture of (I-2) and (I-3) in proportion of 1/9 to 9/1, and (I-5), above four compositions each containing 50% or less unsaturated polyester or drying oil having 500-5,000 molecules or a drying oil-modified alkyd resin having 500-5,000 molecules. Four examples are given. (Iwakiri, K.)

  18. Electrocurtain coating process for coating solar mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabagambe, Benjamin; Boyd, Donald W.; Buchanan, Michael J.; Kelly, Patrick; Kutilek, Luke A.; McCamy, James W.; McPheron, Douglas A.; Orosz, Gary R.; Limbacher, Raymond D.

    2013-10-15

    An electrically conductive protective coating or film is provided over the surface of a reflective coating of a solar mirror by flowing or directing a cation containing liquid and an anion containing liquid onto the conductive surface. The cation and the anion containing liquids are spaced from, and preferably out of contact with one another on the surface of the reflective coating as an electric current is moved through the anion containing liquid, the conductive surface between the liquids and the cation containing liquid to coat the conductive surface with the electrically conductive coating.

  19. Low Temperature Powder Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-09

    of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) • Legacy primers contain hexavalent chrome • Conventional powder coatings...coatings both in laboratory and field service evaluations • LTCPC allows environmental cost reductions through VOC/HAP elimination and hexavalent ... chrome reduction. • The LTCPC process greatly shortens the coating operation (LTCPC cures much more rapidly then conventional wet coatings) resulting in

  20. Optical microcavities and enhanced electroluminescence from electroformed Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ag diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickmott, T. W. [Department of Physics, State University of New York at Albany, Albany, New York 12222 (United States)

    2013-12-21

    Electroluminescence (EL) and electron emission into vacuum (EM) occur when a non-destructive dielectric breakdown of Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ag diodes, electroforming, results in the development of a filamentary region in which current-voltage (I-V) characteristics exhibit voltage-controlled negative resistance. The temperature dependence of I-V curves, EM, and, particularly, EL of Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ag diodes with anodic Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thicknesses between 12 nm and 30 nm, has been studied. Two filters, a long-pass (LP) filter with transmission of photons with energies less than 3.0 eV and a short-pass (SP) filter with photon transmission between 3.0 and 4.0 eV, have been used to characterize EL. The voltage threshold for EL with the LP filter, V{sub LP}, is ∼1.5 V. V{sub LP} is nearly independent of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thickness and of temperature and is 0.3–0.6 V less than the threshold voltage for EL for the SP filter, V{sub SP}. EL intensity is primarily between 1.8 and 3.0 eV when the bias voltage, V{sub S} ≲ 7 V. EL in the thinnest diodes is enhanced compared to EL in thicker diodes. For increasing V{sub S}, for diodes with the smallest Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thicknesses, there is a maximum EL intensity, L{sub MX}, at a voltage, V{sub LMX}, followed by a decrease to a plateau. L{sub MX} and EL intensity at 4.0 V in the plateau region depend exponentially on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thickness. The ratio of L{sub MX} at 295 K for a diode with 12 nm of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to L{sub MX} for a diode with 25 nm of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is ∼140. The ratio of EL intensity with the LP filter to EL intensity with the SP filter, LP/SP, varies between ∼3 and ∼35; it depends on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thickness and V{sub S}. Enhanced EL is attributed to the increase of the spontaneous emission rate of a dipole in a non-resonant optical microcavity. EL photons interact with the Ag and Al films to create surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) at the metal-Al{sub 2}O

  1. Flow coating apparatus and method of coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanumanthu, Ramasubrahmaniam; Neyman, Patrick; MacDonald, Niles; Brophy, Brenor; Kopczynski, Kevin; Nair, Wood

    2014-03-11

    Disclosed is a flow coating apparatus, comprising a slot that can dispense a coating material in an approximately uniform manner along a distribution blade that increases uniformity by means of surface tension and transfers the uniform flow of coating material onto an inclined substrate such as for example glass, solar panels, windows or part of an electronic display. Also disclosed is a method of flow coating a substrate using the apparatus such that the substrate is positioned correctly relative to the distribution blade, a pre-wetting step is completed where both the blade and substrate are completed wetted with a pre-wet solution prior to dispensing of the coating material onto the distribution blade from the slot and hence onto the substrate. Thereafter the substrate is removed from the distribution blade and allowed to dry, thereby forming a coating.

  2. Proposal for efficient mode converter based on cavity quantum electrodynamics dark mode in a semiconductor quantum dot coupled to a bimodal microcavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jiahua [School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Key Laboratory of Fundamental Physical Quantities Measurement of Ministry of Education, Wuhan 430074 (China); Yu, Rong, E-mail: yurong321@126.com [School of Science, Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Intelligent Robot, Wuhan Institute of Technology, Wuhan 430073 (China); Ma, Jinyong; Wu, Ying, E-mail: yingwu2@163.com [School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-10-28

    The ability to engineer and convert photons between different modes in a solid-state approach has extensive technological implications not only for classical communication systems but also for future quantum networks. In this paper, we put forward a scheme for coherent mode conversion of optical photons by utilizing the intermediate coupling between a single quantum dot and a bimodal photonic crystal microcavity via a waveguide. Here, one mode of the photonic crystal microcavity is coherently driven by an external single-frequency continuous-wave laser field and the two cavity modes are not coupled to each other due to their orthogonal polarizations. The undriven cavity mode is thus not directly coupled to the input driving laser and the only way it can get light is via the quantum dot. The influences of the system parameters on the photon-conversion efficiency are analyzed in detail in the limit of weak probe field and it is found that high photon-conversion efficiency can be achieved under appropriate conditions. It is shown that the cavity dark mode, which is a superposition of the two optical modes and is decoupled from the quantum dot, can appear in such a hybrid optical system. We discuss the properties of the dark mode and indicate that the formation of the dark mode enables the efficient transfer of optical fields between the two cavity modes.

  3. Scheme for implementing N-qubit controlled phase gate of photons assisted by quantum-dot-microcavity coupled system: optimal probability of success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Wen-Xue; Hu, Shi; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Zhang, Shou

    2015-01-01

    The direct implementation of multiqubit controlled phase gate of photons is appealing and important for reducing the complexity of the physical realization of linear-optics-based practical quantum computer and quantum algorithms. In this letter we propose a nondestructive scheme for implementing an N-qubit controlled phase gate of photons with a high success probability. The gate can be directly implemented with the self-designed quantum encoder circuits, which are probabilistic optical quantum entangler devices and can be achieved using linear optical elements, single-photon superposition state, and quantum dot coupled to optical microcavity. The calculated results indicate that both the success probabilities of the quantum encoder circuit and the N-qubit controlled phase gate in our scheme are higher than those in the previous schemes. We also consider the effects of the side leakage and cavity loss on the success probability and the fidelity of the quantum encoder circuit for a realistic quantum-dot-microcavity coupled system. (letter)

  4. European coatings conference - Marine coatings. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This volume contains 13 lectures (manuscripts or powerpoint foils) with the following topics: 1. Impact of containerization on polyurethane and polyurea in marine and protective coatings (Malte Homann); 2. The application of combinatorial/high-throughput methods to the development of marine coatings (Bret Chisholm); 3. Progress and perspectives in the AMBIO (advanced nanostructured surfaces for the control of biofouling) Project (James Callow); 4. Release behaviour due to shear and pull-off of silicone coatings with a thickness gradient (James G. Kohl); 5. New liquid rheology additives for high build marine coatings (Andreas Freytag); 6. Effective corrosion protection with polyaniline, polpyrrole and polythiophene as anticorrosice additives for marine paints (Carlos Aleman); 7. Potential applications of sol gel technology for marine applications (Robert Akid); 8: Performance of biocide-free Antifouling Coatings for leisure boats (Bernd Daehne); 9. Novel biocidefree nanostructured antifouling coatings - can nano do the job? (Corne Rentrop); 10. One component high solids, VOC compliant high durability finish technology (Adrian Andrews); 11. High solid coatings - the hybrid solution (Luca Prezzi); 12. Unique organofunctional silicone resins for environmentally friendly high-performance coatings (Dieter Heldmann); 13. Silicone-alkyd paints for marine applications: from battleship-grey to green (Thomas Easton).

  5. PIT Coating Requirements Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MINTEER, D.J.

    2000-01-01

    This study identifies the applicable requirements for procurement and installation of a coating intended for tank farm valve and pump pit interior surfaces. These requirements are intended to be incorporated into project specification documents and design media. This study also evaluates previously recommended coatings and identifies requirement-compliant coating products

  6. PIT Coating Requirements Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MINTEER, D.J.

    2000-10-20

    This study identifies the applicable requirements for procurement and installation of a coating intended for tank farm valve and pump pit interior surfaces. These requirements are intended to be incorporated into project specification documents and design media. This study also evaluates previously recommended coatings and identifies requirement-compliant coating products.

  7. Coatings for laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowdermilk, W.H.

    1981-01-01

    Optical coatings are used in lasers systems for fusion research to control beam propagation and reduce surface reflection losses. The performance of coatings is important in the design, reliability, energy output, and cost of the laser systems. Significant developments in coating technology are required for future lasers for fusion research and eventual power reactors

  8. Fuel particle coating data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollabaugh, C.M.; Wagner, P.; Wahman, L.A.; White, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    Development of coating on nuclear fuel particles for the High-Temperature Fuels Technology program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory included process studies for low-density porous and high-density isotropic carbon coats, and for ZrC and ''alloy'' C/ZrC coats. This report documents the data generated by these studies

  9. ATHENA optimized coating design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Desiree Della Monica; Christensen, Finn Erland; Jakobsen, Anders Clemen

    2012-01-01

    The optimization of coating design for the ATHENA mission si described and the possibility of increasing the telescope effective area in the range between 0.1 and 10 keV is investigated. An independent computation of the on-axis effective area based on the mirror design of ATHENA is performed...... in order to review the current coating baseline. The performance of several material combinations, considering a simple bi-layer, simple multilayer and linear graded multilayer coatings are tested and simulation of the mirror performance considering both the optimized coating design and the coating...

  10. Metallic coating of microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, S.F.

    1980-01-01

    Extremely smooth, uniform metal coatings of micrometer thicknesses on microscopic glass spheres (microspheres) are often needed as targets for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. The first part of this paper reviews those methods used successfully to provide metal coated microspheres for ICF targets, including magnetron sputtering, electro- and electroless plating, and chemical vapor pyrolysis. The second part of this paper discusses some of the critical aspects of magnetron sputter coating of microspheres, including substrate requirements, the sticking of microspheres during coating (preventing a uniform coating), and the difficulties in growing the desired dense, smooth, uniform microstructure on continuously moving spherical substrates

  11. Antibacterial polymer coatings.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Mollye C.; Allen, Ashley N.; Barnhart, Meghan; Tucker, Mark David; Hibbs, Michael R.

    2009-09-01

    A series of poly(sulfone)s with quaternary ammonium groups and another series with aldehyde groups are synthesized and tested for biocidal activity against vegetative bacteria and spores, respectively. The polymers are sprayed onto substrates as coatings which are then exposed to aqueous suspensions of organisms. The coatings are inherently biocidal and do not release any agents into the environment. The coatings adhere well to both glass and CARC-coated coupons and they exhibit significant biotoxicity. The most effective quaternary ammonium polymers kills 99.9% of both gram negative and gram positive bacteria and the best aldehyde coating kills 81% of the spores on its surface.

  12. Coated Aerogel Beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littman, Howard (Inventor); Plawsky, Joel L. (Inventor); Paccione, John D. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for coating particulate material are provided. The apparatus includes a vessel having a top and a bottom, a vertically extending conduit having an inlet in the vessel and an outlet outside of the vessel, a first fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a transfer fluid, a second fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a coating fluid, and a fluid outlet from the vessel. The method includes steps of agitating a material, contacting the material with a coating material, and drying the coating material to produce a coated material. The invention may be adapted to coat aerogel beads, among other materials. A coated aerogel bead and an aerogel-based insulation material are also disclosed.

  13. Anticorrosive coatings: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Per Aggerholm; Kiil, Søren; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2009-01-01

    of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have caused significant changes in the anticorrosive coating industry. The requirement for new VOC-compliant coating technologies means that coating manufacturers can no longer rely on the extensive track record of their time-served products to convince consumers...... of their suitability for use. An important aspect in the development of new VOC-compliant, high-performance anticorrosive coating systems is a thorough knowledge of the components in anticorrosive coatings, their interactions, their advantages and limitations, as well as a detailed knowledge on the failure modes......, and inhibitive coatings are outlined. In the past decades, several alternatives to organic solvent-borne coatings have reached the commercial market. This review also presents some of these technologies and discusses some of their advantages and limitations. Finally, some of the mechanisms leading to degradation...

  14. Pixelated coatings and advanced IR coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradal, Fabien; Portier, Benjamin; Oussalah, Meihdi; Leplan, Hervé

    2017-09-01

    Reosc developed pixelated infrared coatings on detector. Reosc manufactured thick pixelated multilayer stacks on IR-focal plane arrays for bi-spectral imaging systems, demonstrating high filter performance, low crosstalk, and no deterioration of the device sensitivities. More recently, a 5-pixel filter matrix was designed and fabricated. Recent developments in pixelated coatings, shows that high performance infrared filters can be coated directly on detector for multispectral imaging. Next generation space instrument can benefit from this technology to reduce their weight and consumptions.

  15. Combustion chemical vapor desposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings.

  16. Deterministic photonic spatial-polarization hyper-controlled-not gate assisted by a quantum dot inside a one-side optical microcavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Bao-Cang; Wei, Hai-Rui; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2013-01-01

    To date, all work concerning the construction of quantum logic gates, an essential part of quantum computing, has focused on operating in one degree of freedom (DOF) for quantum systems. Here, we investigate the possibility of achieving scalable photonic quantum computing based on two DOFs for quantum systems. We construct a deterministic hyper-controlled-not (hyper-CNOT) gate operating in both the spatial mode and polarization DOFs for a photon pair simultaneously, using the giant optical Faraday rotation induced by a single-electron spin in a quantum dot inside a one-side optical microcavity as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. With this hyper-CNOT gate and linear optical elements, two-photon four-qubit cluster entangled states can be prepared and analyzed, which give an application to manipulate more information with less resources. We analyze the experimental feasibility of this hyper-CNOT gate and show that it can be implemented with current technology. (letter)

  17. InGaN multiple-quantum-well epifilms on GaN-sillicon substrates for microcavities and surface-emitting lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, June Key; Cho, Hoon; Kim, Bok Hee; Park, Si Hyun; Gu, Erdan; Watson, Ian; Dawson, Martin

    2006-01-01

    We report the processing of InGaN/GaN epifilms on GaN-silicon substrates. High-quality InGaN/GaN multi-quantum wells (MQWs) were grown on GaN-silicon substrates, and their membranes were successfully fabricated using a selective wet etching of silicon followed by a dry etching of the AlGaN buffer layer. With atomic force microscope (AFM) measurements and photoluminescence (PL) measurements, we investigated the physical and the optical properties of the InGaN/GaN MQWs membranes. On the InGaN/GaN MQW membranes, dielectric distributed Bragg reflector (DBRs) were successfully deposited, which give, new possibilities for use in GaN microcavity and surface-emitting laser fabrication.

  18. Microcavity-Free Broadband Light Outcoupling Enhancement in Flexible Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with Nanostructured Transparent Metal-Dielectric Composite Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lu-Hai; Ou, Qing-Dong; Li, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Yi-Bo; Zhao, Xin-Dong; Xiang, Heng-Yang; Chen, Jing-De; Zhou, Lei; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Tang, Jian-Xin

    2016-01-26

    Flexible organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) hold great promise for future bendable display and curved lighting applications. One key challenge of high-performance flexible OLEDs is to develop new flexible transparent conductive electrodes with superior mechanical, electrical, and optical properties. Herein, an effective nanostructured metal/dielectric composite electrode on a plastic substrate is reported by combining a quasi-random outcoupling structure for broadband and angle-independent light outcoupling of white emission with an ultrathin metal alloy film for optimum optical transparency, electrical conduction, and mechanical flexibility. The microcavity effect and surface plasmonic loss can be remarkably reduced in white flexible OLEDs, resulting in a substantial increase in the external quantum efficiency and power efficiency to 47.2% and 112.4 lm W(-1).

  19. Preliminary coating design and coating developments for ATHENA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Anders Clemen; Ferreira, Desiree Della Monica; Christensen, Finn Erland

    2011-01-01

    We present initial novel coating design for ATHENA. We make use of both simple bilayer coatings of Ir and B4C and more complex constant period multilayer coatings to enhance the effective area and cover the energy range from 0.1 to 10 keV. We also present the coating technology used...... for these designs and present test results from coatings....

  20. Plasma sprayed thermoregulating coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudinov, V.V.; Puzanov, A.A.; Zambrzhitskij, A.P.; Soboleva, V.V.

    1979-01-01

    Shown is the possibility of plasma spraying application for thermoregulating coating formation. Given are test results of service properties of BeO, Al 2 O 2 plasma coatings on the substrates of the MA2-1 magnesium alloy. Described is a device for studying durability of coating optical parameters under ultraviolet irradiation in deep vacuum. Dynamics of absorption coefficient, growth caused by an increase in absorption centers amount under such irradiation is investigated

  1. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1997-01-01

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

  2. Silica coatings on clarithromycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bele, Marjan; Dmitrasinovic, Dorde; Planinsek, Odon; Salobir, Mateja; Srcic, Stane; Gaberscek, Miran; Jamnik, Janko

    2005-03-03

    Pre-crystallized clarithromycin (6-O-methylerythromycin A) particles were coated with silica from the tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS)-ethanol-aqueous ammonia system. The coatings had a typical thickness of 100-150 nm and presented about 15 wt.% of the silica-drug composite material. The properties of the coatings depended on reactant concentration, temperature and mixing rate and, in particular, on the presence of a cationic surfactant (cetylpyridinium chloride). In the presence of cetylpyridinium chloride the silica coatings slightly decreased the rate of pure clarithromycin dissolution.

  3. Recycling microcavity optical biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Heather K; Armani, Andrea M

    2011-04-01

    Optical biosensors have tremendous potential for commercial applications in medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and food safety evaluation. In these applications, sensor reuse is desirable to reduce costs. To achieve this, harsh, wet chemistry treatments are required to remove surface chemistry from the sensor, typically resulting in reduced sensor performance and increased noise due to recognition moiety and optical transducer degradation. In the present work, we suggest an alternative, dry-chemistry method, based on O2 plasma treatment. This approach is compatible with typical fabrication of substrate-based optical transducers. This treatment completely removes the recognition moiety, allowing the transducer surface to be refreshed with new recognition elements and thus enabling the sensor to be recycled.

  4. Handbook of optical microcavities

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Anthony H W

    2014-01-01

    An optical cavity confines light within its structure and constitutes an integral part of a laser device. Unlike traditional gas lasers, semiconductor lasers are invariably much smaller in dimensions, making optical confinement more critical than ever. In this book, modern methods that control and manipulate light at the micrometer and nanometer scales by using a variety of cavity geometries and demonstrate optical resonance from ultra-violet (UV) to infra-red (IR) bands across multiple material platforms are explored. The book has a comprehensive collection of chapters that cover a wide range

  5. Superhydrophobic silica coating by dip coating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahadik, Satish A.; Parale, Vinayak; Vhatkara, Rajiv S.; Mahadik, Dinesh B.; Kavale, Mahendra S.; Wagh, Pratap B.; Gupta, Satish; Gurav, Jyoti

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we report a simple and low cost method for the fabrication of superhydrophobic coating surface on quartz substrates via sol-gel dip coating method at room temperature. Desired surface chemistry and texture growth for superhydrophobicity developed under double step sol–gel process at room temperature. The resultant superhydrophobic surfaces were characterized by Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), Atomic force microscopy (AFM), water contact angle (WCA) measurement, differential thermal gravimetric analysis-differential thermal analysis (TGA-DTA) calorimetry and optical spectrometer. Coating shows the ultra high water contact angle about 168 ± 2° and water sliding angle 3 ± 1° and superoleophilic with petroleum oils. This approach allows a simple strategy for the fabrication process of superhydrophilic–superhydrophobic on same surfaces with high thermal stability of superhydrophobicity up to 560 °C. Thus, durability, special wettability and thermal stability of superhydrophobicity expand their application fields.

  6. Coated electroactive materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amine, Khalil; Abouimrane, Ali

    2016-08-30

    A process includes suspending an electroactive material in a solvent, suspending or dissolving a carbon precursor in the solvent; and depositing the carbon precursor on the electroactive material to form a carbon-coated electroactive material. Compositions include a graphene-coated electroactive material prepared from a solution phase mixture or suspension of an electroactive material and graphene, graphene oxide, or a mixture thereof.

  7. Rock-hard coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, M.

    2007-01-01

    Aircraft jet engines have to be able to withstand infernal conditions. Extreme heat and bitter cold tax coatings to the limit. Materials expert Dr Ir. Wim Sloof fits atoms together to develop rock-hard coatings. The latest invention in this field is known as ceramic matrix composites. Sloof has signed an agreement with a number of parties to investigate this material further.

  8. Metallurgical coating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, L.C.; Whittaker, G.S.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel metallurgical coating system which provides corrosion resistance and non-stick properties to metallic components which are subjected to unusually severe operating conditions. The coating system comprises a first layer comprising tantalum which is deposited upon a substrate and a second layer comprising molybdenum disilicide which is deposited upon the first layer

  9. Rock-hard coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, M.

    2007-01-01

    Aircraft jet engines have to be able to withstand infernal conditions. Extreme heat and bitter cold tax coatings to the limit. Materials expert Dr Ir. Wim Sloof fits atoms together to develop rock-hard coatings. The latest invention in this field is known as ceramic matrix composites. Sloof has

  10. Unobtrusive graphene coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugele, Friedrich Gunther

    2012-01-01

    The contact angle of water drops on substrates for which the wettability is dominated by van der Waals forces remains unchanged when the substrates are coated with a monolayer of graphene. Such 'wetting transparency' could lead to superior conducting and hydrophobic graphene-coated surfaces with

  11. Coating thickness measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-12-01

    The standard specifies measurements of the coating thickness, which make use of beta backscattering and/or x-ray fluorescence. For commonly used combinations of coating material and base material the appropriate measuring ranges and radionuclides to be used are given for continuous as well as for discontinuous measurements

  12. Duplex aluminized coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedwill, M. A.; Grisaffe, S. J. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    The surface of a metallic base system is initially coated with a metallic alloy layer that is ductile and oxidation resistant. An aluminide coating is then applied to the metallic alloy layer. The chemistry of the metallic alloy layer is such that the oxidation resistance of the subsequently aluminized outermost layer is not seriously degraded.

  13. Coated ceramic breeder materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Shiu-Wing; Johnson, Carl E.

    1987-01-01

    A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

  14. Radiation curable coating compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkinson, R.D.; Carder, C.H.

    1979-01-01

    The present invention provides a low-toxicity diluent component for radiation curable coating compositions that contain an acrylyl or methacryly oligomer or resin component such as an acrylyl urethane oligomer. The low-toxicity diluent component of this invention is chosen from the group consisting of tetraethlorthosilicate and tetraethoxyethylorthosilicate. When the diluent component is used as described, benefits in addition to viscosity reduction, may be realized. Application characteristics of the uncured coatings composition, such as flowability, leveling, and smoothness are notably improved. Upon curing by exposure to actinic radiation, the coating composition forms a solid, non-tacky surface free of pits, fissures or other irregularities. While there is no readily apparent reactive mechanism by which the orthosilicate becomes chemically bonded to the cured coating, the presence of silicon in the cured coating has been confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. 12 drawing

  15. Charged-particle coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.L.; Crane, J.K.; Hendricks, C.D.

    1980-01-01

    Advanced target designs require thicker (approx. 300 μm) coatings and better surface finishes that can be produced with current coating techniques. An advanced coating technique is proposed to provide maximum control of the coating flux and optimum manipulation of the shell during processing. In this scheme a small beam of ions or particles of known incident energy are collided with a levitated spherical mandrel. Precise control of the incident energy and angle of the deposition flux optimizes the control of the coating morphology while controlled rotation and noncontact support of the shell minimizes the possibility of particulate or damage generated defects. Almost infinite variability of the incident energy and material in this process provides increased flexibility of the target designs which can be physically realized

  16. Coating thickness measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joffe, B.B.; Sawyer, B.E.; Spongr, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    A device especially adapted for measuring the thickness of coatings on small, complexly-shaped parts, such as, for example, electronic connectors, electronic contacts, or the like. The device includes a source of beta radiation and a radiation detector whereby backscatter of the radiation from the coated part can be detected and the thickness of the coating ascertained. The radiation source and detector are positioned in overlying relationship to the coated part and a microscope is provided to accurately position the device with respect to the part. Means are provided to control the rate of descent of the radiation source and radiation detector from its suspended position to its operating position and the resulting impact it makes with the coated part to thereby promote uniformity of readings from operator to operator, and also to avoid excessive impact with the part, thereby improving accuracy of measurement and eliminating damage to the parts

  17. Fluorine Based Superhydrophobic Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Denis Brassard

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Superhydrophobic coatings, inspired by nature, are an emerging technology. These water repellent coatings can be used as solutions for corrosion, biofouling and even water and air drag reduction applications. In this work, synthesis of monodispersive silica nanoparticles of ~120 nm diameter has been realized via Stöber process and further functionalized using fluoroalkylsilane (FAS-17 molecules to incorporate the fluorinated groups with the silica nanoparticles in an ethanolic solution. The synthesized fluorinated silica nanoparticles have been spin coated on flat aluminum alloy, silicon and glass substrates. Functionalization of silica nanoparticles with fluorinated groups has been confirmed by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR by showing the presence of C-F and Si-O-Si bonds. The water contact angles and surface roughness increase with the number of spin-coated thin films layers. The critical size of ~119 nm renders aluminum surface superhydrophobic with three layers of coating using as-prepared nanoparticle suspended solution. On the other hand, seven layers are required for a 50 vol.% diluted solution to achieve superhydrophobicity. In both the cases, water contact angles were more than 150°, contact angle hysteresis was less than 2° having a critical roughness value of ~0.700 µm. The fluorinated silica nanoparticle coated surfaces are also transparent and can be used as paint additives to obtain transparent coatings.

  18. Coatings to prevent frost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lusada, Ricardo; Holberg, Stefan; Bennedsen, Jeanette Marianne Dalgaard

    2016-01-01

    The ability of hydrophobic, organic–inorganic hybrid coatings to decelerate frost propagation was investigated. Compared to a bare aluminum surface, the coatings do not significantly reduce the freezing probability of supercooled water drops. On both surfaces, the probability for ice nucleation...... at temperatures just below 0°C, for example at −4°C, is low. Freezing of a single drop on aluminum leads, however, to instant freezing of the complete surface. On hydrophobic coatings, such a freezing drop is isolated; the frozen area grows slowly. At −4°C surface temperature in a +12°C/90% relative humidity...

  19. Thermally joining and/or coating or thermally separating the workpieces having heat-sensitive coating, comprises restoring coating by thermally coating the coating material after thermally joining and/or coating or thermally separating

    OpenAIRE

    Riedel, Frank; Winkelmann, Ralf; Puschmann, Markus

    2011-01-01

    The method for thermally joining and/or coating or thermally separating the workpieces (1), which have a heat-sensitive coating (2), comprises restoring the coating by thermally coating a coating material (3) after thermally joining and/or coating or thermally separating the workpieces. A part of the thermal energy introduced in the workpiece for joining and/or coating or separating or in the workpieces is used for thermally coating the coating material. Two workpieces are welded or soldered ...

  20. POWDER COAT APPLICATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses an investigation of critical factors that affect the use of powder coatings on the environment, cost, quality, and production. The investigation involved a small business representative working with the National Defense Center for Environmental Excellence (ND...

  1. Inorganic Coatings Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The inorganic Coatings Lab provides expertise to Navy and Joint Service platforms acquisition IPTs to aid in materials and processing choices which balance up-front...

  2. Robust Fiber Coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goettler, Richard

    2002-01-01

    The highly desired ceramic matrix composite is the one in which the high strength and strain-to-failure is achieved through judicious selection of a fiber coating that can survive the high-temperature...

  3. Coating of substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cairns, J.A.; Nelson, R.L.; Woodhead, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    The process is concerned with providing substrates with coatings obtainable from sols, for example to protect the substrate (such as in nuclear reactors or hydrocarbon cracking plant) or to provide a carrier for catalytically active material. Hitherto, coatings obtained from sols have had a high porosity and high surface area so that they have not been entirely satisfactory for the above applications. In the process described, dense, low-porosity coatings are provided by contacting the substrate with a sol of refractory material (e.g. CeO 2 or SiO 2 ) convertible to a gel of density at least 40% of the theoretical density of the refractory material, and converting the sol to the gel. Optionally, the gel may be converted to a ceramic coating by firing. (author)

  4. Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R.; Rafi, H. Khalid; Ram, G.D. Janaki; Reddy, G. Madhusudhan; Nagalakshmi, R.

    2012-01-01

    Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: ► Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. ► Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. ► Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. ► Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

  5. Radiation hardening coating material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, W.H.; Prucnal, P.J.; DeMajistre, Robert.

    1977-01-01

    This invention concerns a radiation hardening coating material. First a resin is prepared by reaction of bisphenol diglycidylic ether with acrylic or methacrylic acids. Then the reactive solvent is prepared by reaction of acrylic or methacrylic acids with epichlorhydrine or epibromhydrine. Then a solution consisting of the resin dissolved in the reactive solvent is prepared. A substrate (wood, paper, polyesters, polyamines etc.) is coated with this composition and exposed to ionizing radiations (electron beams) or ultraviolet radiations [fr

  6. Hydroxyapatite coatings for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Sam

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite coatings are of great importance in the biological and biomedical coatings fields, especially in the current era of nanotechnology and bioapplications. With a bonelike structure that promotes osseointegration, hydroxyapatite coating can be applied to otherwise bioinactive implants to make their surface bioactive, thus achieving faster healing and recovery. In addition to applications in orthopedic and dental implants, this coating can also be used in drug delivery. Hydroxyapatite Coatings for Biomedical Applications explores developments in the processing and property characteri

  7. Biocompatibility of Niobium Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Olivares-Navarrete

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Niobium coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering were evaluated as a possible surface modification for stainless steel (SS substrates in biomedical implants. The Nb coatings were deposited on 15 mm diameter stainless steel substrates having an average surface roughness of 2 mm. To evaluate the biocompatibility of the coatings three different in vitro tests, using human alveolar bone derived cells, were performed: cellular adhesion, proliferation and viability. Stainless steel substrates and tissue culture plastic were also studied, in order to give comparative information. No toxic response was observed for any of the surfaces, indicating that the Nb coatings act as a biocompatible, bioinert material. Cell morphology was also studied by immune-fluorescence and the results confirmed the healthy state of the cells on the Nb surface. X-ray diffraction analysis of the coating shows that the film is polycrystalline with a body centered cubic structure. The surface composition and corrosion resistance of both the substrate and the Nb coating were also studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and potentiodynamic tests. Water contact angle measurements showed that the Nb surface is more hydrophobic than the SS substrate.

  8. Coated particle waste form development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oma, K.H.; Buckwalter, C.Q.; Chick, L.A.

    1981-12-01

    Coated particle waste forms have been developed as part of the multibarrier concept at Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the Alternative Waste Forms Program for the Department of Energy. Primary efforts were to coat simulated nuclear waste glass marbles and ceramic pellets with low-temperature pyrolytic carbon (LT-PyC) coatings via the process of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Fluidized bed (FB) coaters, screw agitated coaters (SAC), and rotating tube coaters were used. Coating temperatures were reduced by using catalysts and plasma activation. In general, the LT-PyC coatings did not provide the expected high leach resistance as previously measured for carbon alone. The coatings were friable and often spalled off the substrate. A totally different concept, thermal spray coating, was investigated at PNL as an alternative to CVD coating. Flame spray, wire gun, and plasma gun systems were evaluated using glass, ceramic, and metallic coating materials. Metal plasma spray coatings (Al, Sn, Zn, Pb) provided a two to three orders-of-magnitude increase in chemical durability. Because the aluminum coatings were porous, the superior leach resistance must be due to either a chemical interaction or to a pH buffer effect. Because they are complex, coated waste form processes rank low in process feasibility. Of all the possible coated particle processes, plasma sprayed marbles have the best rating. Carbon coating of pellets by CVD ranked ninth when compared with ten other processes. The plasma-spray-coated marble process ranked sixth out of eleven processes

  9. Coatings for directional eutectics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rairden, J. R.; Jackson, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    Coatings developed to provide oxidation protection for the directionally-solidified eutectic alloy NiTaC-B (4.4 weight percent Cr) were evaluated. Of seven Co-, Fe- and Ni-base coatings that were initially investigated, best resistance to cyclic oxidation was demonstrated by duplex coatings fabricated by depositing a layer of NiCrAl(Y) by vacuum evaporation from an electron beam source followed by deposition of an Al overlayer using the pack cementation process. It was found that addition of carbon to the coating alloy substantially eliminated the problem of fiber denudation in TaC-type eutectic alloys. Burner rig cycled NiTaC-B samples coated with Ni-20Cr-5Al-0.1C-0.1Y+Al and rupture-tested at 1100 deg C performed as well as or better than uncoated, vacuum cycled and air-tested NiTaC-13; however, a slight degradation with respect to uncoated material was noted in air-stress rupture tests at 870 deg C for both cycled and uncycled samples.

  10. METHOD OF PROTECTIVELY COATING URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eubank, L.D.; Boller, E.R.

    1959-02-01

    A method is described for protectively coating uranium with zine comprising cleaning the U for coating by pickling in concentrated HNO/sub 3/, dipping the cleaned U into a bath of molten zinc between 430 to 600 C and containing less than 0 01% each of Fe and Pb, and withdrawing and cooling to solidify the coating. The zinccoated uranium may be given a; econd coating with another metal niore resistant to the corrosive influences particularly concerned. A coating of Pb containing small proportions of Ag or Sn, or Al containing small proportions of Si may be applied over the zinc coatings by dipping in molten baths of these metals.

  11. Zirconium nitride hard coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, Daiane; Amorim, Cintia Lugnani Gomes de; Soares, Gabriel Vieira; Figueroa, Carlos Alejandro; Baumvol, Israel Jacob Rabin; Basso, Rodrigo Leonardo de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium nitride (ZrN) nanometric films were deposited onto different substrates, in order to study the surface crystalline microstructure and also to investigate the electrochemical behavior to obtain a better composition that minimizes corrosion reactions. The coatings were produced by physical vapor deposition (PVD). The influence of the nitrogen partial pressure, deposition time and temperature over the surface properties was studied. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and corrosion experiments were performed to characterize the ZrN hard coatings. The ZrN films properties and microstructure changes according to the deposition parameters. The corrosion resistance increases with temperature used in the films deposition. Corrosion tests show that ZrN coating deposited by PVD onto titanium substrate can improve the corrosion resistance. (author)

  12. Nanophase hardfaced coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reisgen, U.; Stein, L.; Balashov, B.; Geffers, C. [RWTH Aachen University (Germany). ISF - Welding and Joining Institute

    2009-08-15

    This paper demonstrates the possibility of producing iron or chromium-based nanophase hardfaced coatings by means of common arc welding methods (TIG, PTA). The appropriate composition of the alloys to be deposited allows to control the structural properties and thus also the coating properties of the weld metal. Specific variations of the alloying elements allow also the realisation of a nanostructured solidification of the carbides and borides with cooling rates that are common for arc surfacing processes. The hardfaced coatings, which had been thus produced, showed phase dimensions of approximately 100-300 nm. Based on the results it is established that the influence of the surfacing parameters and of the coating thickness and thus the influence of the heat control on the nanostructuring process is, compared with the influence of the alloy composition, of secondary importance. The generation of nanoscale structures in hardfaced coatings allows the improvement of mechanical properties, wear resistance and corrosion resistance. Potential applications for these types of hardfaced coatings lie, in particular, in the field of cutting tools that are exposed to corrosion and wear. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Diese Arbeit demonstriert die Moeglichkeit zur Herstellung Eisen- und Chrom-basierter nanophasiger Hartauftragschweissschichten mithilfe ueblicher Lichtbogenschweissverfahren (WIG-, Plasma-Pulver-Auftragschweissen - PPA). Eine geeignete Zusammensetzung der aufzutragenden Legierungen ermoeglicht es, die Gefuegeeigenschaften und damit die Schichteigenschaften des Schweissgutes zu kontrollieren. Gezielte Variationen der Legierungselemente erlauben die Realisierung einer nanostrukturierten Erstarrung der Karbide und Boride bei fuer Lichtbogen-Auftragschweissprozessen ueblichen Abkuehlgeschwindigkeiten. In den so erzeugten Hartschichten werden Phasengroessen von ca. 100-300 nm erreicht. Auf Basis der gewonnenen Ergebnisse kann

  13. Tribology and coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The future use of fuel-efficient, low-emission, advanced transportation systems (for example, those using low-heat-rejection diesel engines or advanced gas turbines) presents new challenges to tribologists and materials scientists. High service temperatures, corrosive environments, and extreme contact pressures are among the concerns that make necessary new tribological designs, novel materials, and effective lubrication concepts. Argonne is working on methods to reduce friction, wear and corrosion, such as soft metal coatings on ceramics, layered compounds, diamond coatings, and hard surfaces.

  14. Active Packaging Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis J. Bastarrachea

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Active food packaging involves the packaging of foods with materials that provide an enhanced functionality, such as antimicrobial, antioxidant or biocatalytic functions. This can be achieved through the incorporation of active compounds into the matrix of the commonly used packaging materials, or by the application of coatings with the corresponding functionality through surface modification. The latter option offers the advantage of preserving the packaging materials’ bulk properties nearly intact. Herein, different coating technologies like embedding for controlled release, immobilization, layer-by-layer deposition, and photografting are explained and their potential application for active food packaging is explored and discussed.

  15. Mechanically Invisible Polymer Coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    phase comprises particles, said particles comprising a filler material and an encapsulating coating of a second polymeric material, wherein the backbones of the first and second polymeric materials are the same. The composition may be used in electroactive polymers (EAPs) in order to obtain mechanically......The present invention relates to a composition comprising encapsulated particles in a polymeric material. The composition comprises a continuous phase and a discontinuous phase incorporated therein, wherein the continuous phase comprises a first polymeric material and wherein the discontinuous...... invisible polymer coatings....

  16. Methods and means for coating paper by film coating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Maarel, Marc; Ter Veer, Arend Berend Cornelis; Vrieling-Smit, Annet; Delnoye, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    This invention relates to the field of paper coating, more in particular to means and methods for providing paper with at least one layer of pigment using film coating to obtain a well printable surface. Provided is a method for preparing coated paper comprising the steps of: a) providing a

  17. Coordinating the Structural Rearrangements Associated with Unidirectional Proton Transfer in the Bacteriorhodopsin Photocycle Induced by Deprotonation of the Proton-Release Group: A Time-Resolved Difference FTIR Spectroscopic Study†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Joel E.; Vakkasoglu, Ahmet S.; Lanyi, Janos K.; Gennis, Robert B.; Maeda, Akio

    2014-01-01

    In the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin at pH 7, proton release from the proton releasing group (PRG) to the extracellular medium occurs during formation of the M intermediate. This proton release is inhibited at acidic pH, below the pKa of the PRG, ∼6 in M, and instead occurs later in the cycle as the initial state is restored from the O intermediate. Here, structural changes related to deprotonation of the PRG have been investigated by time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy at 25°C. The vibrational features at 2100-1790 cm-1, 1730-1685 cm-1, 1661 cm-1, and 1130-1045 cm-1 have greater negative intensity in the pure M-minus-BR spectrum and even in the M-minus-BR spectrum, that is present earlier together with the L-minus-BR spectrum, at pH 7, than in the corresponding M-minus-BR spectra at pH 5 or pH 4. The D212N mutation abolishes the decreases in the intensities of the broad feature between 1730 and 1685 cm-1 and the band at 1661 cm-1. The 1730-1685 cm-1 feature may arise from transition dipole coupling of the backbone carbonyl groups of Glu204, Phe208, Asp212 and Lys216 interacting with Tyr57 and C15-H of the chromophore. The 1661 cm-1 band, which is insensitive to D2O substitution, may arise by interaction of the backbone carbonyl of Asp212 with C15-H. The 2100-1790 cm-1 feature with a trough at 1885 cm-1 could be due to a water cluster. Depletion of these bands upon deprotonation of the PRG is attributable to disruption of a coordinated structure, held in place by interactions of Asp212. Deprotonation of the PRG is accompanied also by disruption of the interaction of the water molecule near Arg82. The liberated Asp212 may stabilize the protonated state of Asp85, and thus confer uni-directionality to the transport. PMID:20232848

  18. AntiReflection Coating D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AIKEN, DANIEL J.

    1999-01-01

    Analytical expressions used to optimize AR coatings for single junction solar cells are extended for use in monolithic, series interconnected multi-junction solar cell AR coating design. The result is an analytical expression which relates the solar cell performance (through J(sub sc)) directly to the AR coating design through the device reflectance. It is also illustrated how AR coating design be used to provide an additional degree of freedom for current matching multi-junction devices

  19. UV Coatings, Polarization, and Coronagraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Quijada, Manuel; West, Garrett; Balasubramanian, Bala; Krist, John; Martin, Stefan; Sabatke, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Presenation for the Large UltraViolet Optical Infrared (LUVOIR) and Habitable Exoplanet Imager (HabEx) Science and Technology Definition Teams (STDT) on technical considerations regarding ultraviolet coatings, polarization, and coronagraphy. The presentations review the state-of-the-art in ultraviolet coatings, how those coatings generate polarization aberrations, and recent study results from both the LUVOIR and HabEx teams.

  20. Coatings for transport industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof LUKASZKOWICZ

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The investigations concerned structural analysis, as well as mechanical properties and wear resistant of MeN/DLC double-layer coating deposited by hybrid PVD/PACVD method. In sliding dry friction conditions, after the break-in time, the friction coefficient for the investigated elements is set in the range between 0.03-0.06.

  1. Ion Deposited Carbon Coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-01

    PAGE ("’hen Dita t,,I,, efl TABLE OF CONTENTS Section No. Title Page No. 1.0 OBJECTIVE 1 2.0 SCOPE 2 3.0 BACKGROUND 3 4.0 COATINGS DEPOSITION 4 4.1...scientific, ards of measure. The Committee, and Confer- technical, practical, and teaching purposes.ence voting members, are leading professional On the

  2. Polydopamine-coated capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Scott R.; Sottos, Nancy R.; Kang, Sen; Baginska, Marta B.

    2018-04-17

    One aspect of the invention is a polymer material comprising a capsule coated with PDA. In certain embodiments, the capsule encapsulates a functional agent. The encapsulated functional agent may be an indicating agent, healing agent, protecting agent, pharmaceutical drug, food additive, or a combination thereof.

  3. Active coatings technologies for tailorable military coating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunino, J. L., III

    2007-04-01

    The main objective of the U.S. Army's Active Coatings Technologies Program is to develop technologies that can be used in combination to tailor coatings for utilization on Army Materiel. The Active Coatings Technologies Program, ACT, is divided into several thrusts, including the Smart Coatings Materiel Program, Munitions Coatings Technologies, Active Sensor packages, Systems Health Monitoring, Novel Technology Development, as well as other advanced technologies. The goal of the ACT Program is to conduct research leading to the development of multiple coatings systems for use on various military platforms, incorporating unique properties such as self repair, selective removal, corrosion resistance, sensing, ability to modify coatings' physical properties, colorizing, and alerting logistics staff when tanks or weaponry require more extensive repair. A partnership between the U.S. Army Corrosion Office at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ along with researchers at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, NJ, Clemson University, SC, University of New Hampshire, NH, and University of Massachusetts (Lowell), MA, are developing the next generation of Smart Coatings Materiel via novel technologies such as nanotechnology, Micro-electromechanical Systems (MEMS), meta-materials, flexible electronics, electrochromics, electroluminescence, etc. This paper will provide the reader with an overview of the Active Coatings Technologies Program, including an update of the on-going Smart Coatings Materiel Program, its progress thus far, description of the prototype Smart Coatings Systems and research tasks as well as future nanotechnology concepts, and applications for the Department of Defense.

  4. New temperable solar coatings: Tempsol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiryont, Hulya

    2001-11-01

    This paper deals with the large area deposition and coating properties of the thermo-stable (temperable/bendable) solar coating material, CuO, and some new optical coating systems comprising CuO films for architectural and automotive/transportation applications. The CuO solar coating is combined with other coating layers, for example, an anti-reflection film, a reflection film, a coloration coating layer, etc., which are also thermo-stable. The film systems are developed at the research laboratory by D.C. Magnetron reactive sputtering process. The new developed technologies then transferred to the production line. Product performances are compared before and after heat treatment of the coating systems. Performance tables and other physical properties, including optical parameters, mechanical and environmental stability, storage properties, etc., are also presented for this new product series.

  5. Flow accelerated organic coating degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qixin

    Applying organic coatings is a common and the most cost effective way to protect metallic objects and structures from corrosion. Water entry into coating-metal interface is usually the main cause for the deterioration of organic coatings, which leads to coating delamination and underfilm corrosion. Recently, flowing fluids over sample surface have received attention due to their capability to accelerate material degradation. A plethora of works has focused on the flow induced metal corrosion, while few studies have investigated the flow accelerated organic coating degradation. Flowing fluids above coating surface affect corrosion by enhancing the water transport and abrading the surface due to fluid shear. Hence, it is of great importance to understand the influence of flowing fluids on the degradation of corrosion protective organic coatings. In this study, a pigmented marine coating and several clear coatings were exposed to the laminar flow and stationary immersion. The laminar flow was pressure driven and confined in a flow channel. A 3.5 wt% sodium chloride solution and pure water was employed as the working fluid with a variety of flow rates. The corrosion protective properties of organic coatings were monitored inline by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) measurement. Equivalent circuit models were employed to interpret the EIS spectra. The time evolution of coating resistance and capacitance obtained from the model was studied to demonstrate the coating degradation. Thickness, gloss, and other topography characterizations were conducted to facilitate the assessment of the corrosion. The working fluids were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR) and conductivity measurement. The influence of flow rate, fluid shear, fluid composition, and other effects in the coating degradation were investigated. We conclude that flowing fluid on the coating surface accelerates the transport of water, oxygen, and ions into the coating, as

  6. Coating of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, F.

    1978-01-01

    A method is described for coating the surface of an article of Ti, Zr or Ta, or an alloy thereof, with a tinning metal or alloy, the article having a shape other than that of a sheet. The method comprises contacting the surface of the article at an elevated temperature with the molten tinning metal and moving an ultrasonically excited probe over the surface to be coated, the probe being in contact with the surface of the article and with the tinning metal. The tinning metal may be Sn or Zn or a binary alloy of Sn with Zn, Cd or Bi at a temperature of 300 0 to 450 0 C. The head of the probe may be shaped to conform with the surface of the article. The method may be used to form composite articles, and may be applied to a pre-tinned steel article. (U.K.)

  7. Coat of Arms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bryan

    1998-01-01

    Describes an activity, the "coat of arms," that can serve as an ice-breaker or warm-up for the first day of an English-as-a-Second/Foreign-Language class, as a motivating start to the week, or act as an innovative segue between skill lessons. The technique can be adapted for students ranging from elementary school to adult language learners of all…

  8. Scientific coats of arms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fara, Patricia

    2005-09-01

    With their mythical creatures and arcane symbolism, coats of arms seem to have little connection with modern science. Yet despite its chivalric origins, the ancient language of heraldry has long fascinated famous scientists. Although this idiosyncratic tradition was parodied by Victorian geologists, who laughingly replaced unicorns and griffins with images of dinosaurs that they had recently discovered, it has been perpetuated since by Ernest Rutherford, who liked to present himself as a new alchemist.

  9. Anti-Corrosion Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    SuperSpan RM 8000 is an anti-corrosion coating which effectively counteracts acid degradation, abrasive wear, and cracking in power industry facilities. It was developed by RM Industrial Products Company, Inc. with NERAC assistance. It had previously been necessary to shut down plants to repair or replace corroded duct-work in coal burning utilities. NASA-developed technology was especially useful in areas relating to thermoconductivity of carbon steel and the bonding characteristics of polymers. The product has sold well.

  10. for zeolite coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Renato Rambo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Biotemplating is the processing of microcellular ceramics by reproduction of natural morphologies, where the microstructural features of the biotemplate are maintained in the biomorphic ceramic. Different biotemplates with distinct pore anatomies were used to produce biomorphic supports for the zeolite coating: wood, cardboard, sea-sponge and sisal. The biomorphic ceramics were produced by distinguished processing routes: Al-gas infiltration-reaction, liquid-metal infiltration, dip-coating and sol-gel synthesis, in order to produce nitrides, carbides and oxides, depending on the processing conditions. The zeolite coating was performed by hydrothermal growth of MFI-type (Silicalite-1 and ZSM-5 zeolite crystals onto the internal pore walls of the biomorphic templates. The final biomorphic ceramic-zeolite composites were physically characterized, evaluated in terms of their gas adsorption capabilities and correlated to their microstructure and specific pore anatomy. The combination of the properties of the biomorphic ceramics with the adsorption properties of zeolites results in materials with distinct properties as potential candidates for adsorption and catalytic applications due to their characteristic porosity, molecular sieving capabilities and high thermo-mechanical strength.

  11. Coating and curing apparatus and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Brenor L; Maghsoodi, Sina; Neyman, Patrick J; Gonsalves, Peter R; Hirsch, Jeffrey G; Yang, Yu S

    2015-02-24

    Disclosed are coating apparatus including flow coating and roll-coating that may be used for uniform sol-gel coating of substrates such as glass, solar panels, windows or part of an electronic display. Also disclosed are methods for substrate preparation, flow coating and roll coating. Lastly systems and methods for skin curing sol-gel coatings deposited onto the surface of glass substrates using a high temperature air-knife are disclosed.

  12. Lotus Dust Mitigation Coating and Molecular Adsorber Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Kenneth M.; Abraham, Nithin S.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has developed two unique coating formulations that will keep surfaces clean and sanitary and contain contaminants.The Lotus Dust Mitigation Coating, modeled after the self-cleaning, water-repellant lotus leaf, disallows buildup of dust, dirt, water, and more on surfaces. This coating, has been successfully tested on painted, aluminum, glass, silica, and some composite surfaces, could aid in keeping medical assets clean.The Molecular Adsorber Coating is a zeolite-based, sprayable molecular adsorber coating, designed to prevent outgassing in materials in vacuums. The coating works well to adsorb volatiles and contaminates in manufacturing and processing, such as in pharmaceutical production. The addition of a biocide would also aid in controlling bacteria levels.

  13. Composition superconductive plumbous coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volodin, V.N.; Tuleushev, A.Zh.; Tuleushev, Yu.Zh.; Lisizin, V.N.

    2002-01-01

    Independent dispersion of two or more targets, precipitation of pulverized material on substrate and possibility of composition change in wide range of component concentrations made possible ion-plasma forming of film composition materials from materials with different chemical and physical qualities, particularly in lead-aluminum, lead-beryllium and lead-graphite systems. Named systems are characterized in wide sphere of immiscibility in solid and liquid state and absence of intermediate compounds. It is impossible to receive materials from them in traditional method in conditions of gravitational field. In lead-aluminum system there was received a number of film coatings with aluminum content up to 95 at. % at coating thickness up to 2 μm. Owing to X-ray investigations it is fixed that lead and aluminum have been performed by separate phases. Lead in sprayed layer represents well-crystallized phase with grain size more than 100 nm; texturing is not found. Study of physical qualities has shown that materials with lead base 21.6 at. % Al) have enough high crystalline current in comparison with compact lead, which reaches (2.5-3.0)·10 5 A)·cm 2 , while materials with aluminum base (21.6 at. % Al) loose this effect and critical temperature of transition is reduced from 7.1 to 5.8 K. It was impossible to carry out X-rayed analysis for lead-beryllium film because of weak intensity of beryllium lines against a background of lead owing to a quite large difference of atomic balance. Cryogen tests have shown the increase of critical current strength up to (3.1-3.6)·10 4 A)·cm 2 or composition coating of lead-beryllium (56.99 at. % or 5,45 mas. % Be), at that the critical temperature of transition does not differ from lead temperature. Samples of lead edge of state diagram have been received in the lead-graphite system. X-ray investigation subjected coating contained 6.81 at. % (55.82 mas. %) of lead. Choice of the composition is conditioned on possibilities of

  14. Nanoparticle/Polymer Nanocomposite Bond Coat or Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G.

    2011-01-01

    This innovation addresses the problem of coatings (meant to reduce gas permeation) applied to polymer matrix composites spalling off in service due to incompatibility with the polymer matrix. A bond coat/coating has been created that uses chemically functionalized nanoparticles (either clay or graphene) to create a barrier film that bonds well to the matrix resin, and provides an outstanding barrier to gas permeation. There is interest in applying clay nanoparticles as a coating/bond coat to a polymer matrix composite. Often, nanoclays are chemically functionalized with an organic compound intended to facilitate dispersion of the clay in a matrix. That organic modifier generally degrades at the processing temperature of many high-temperature polymers, rendering the clay useless as a nano-additive to high-temperature polymers. However, this innovation includes the use of organic compounds compatible with hightemperature polymer matrix, and is suitable for nanoclay functionalization, the preparation of that clay into a coating/bondcoat for high-temperature polymers, the use of the clay as a coating for composites that do not have a hightemperature requirement, and a comparable approach to the preparation of graphene coatings/bond coats for polymer matrix composites.

  15. Modeling of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, B. L.; Petrus, G. J.; Krauss, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    The project examined the effectiveness of studying the creep behavior of thermal barrier coating system through the use of a general purpose, large strain finite element program, NIKE2D. Constitutive models implemented in this code were applied to simulate thermal-elastic and creep behavior. Four separate ceramic-bond coat interface geometries were examined in combination with a variety of constitutive models and material properties. The reason for focusing attention on the ceramic-bond coat interface is that prior studies have shown that cracking occurs in the ceramic near interface features which act as stress concentration points. The model conditions examined include: (1) two bond coat coefficient of thermal expansion curves; (2) the creep coefficient and creep exponent of the bond coat for steady state creep; (3) the interface geometry; and (4) the material model employed to represent the bond coat, ceramic, and superalloy base.

  16. Tablet coating by injection molding technology - Optimization of coating formulation attributes and coating process parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Parind M; Puri, Vibha; Brancazio, David; Halkude, Bhakti S; Hartman, Jeremy E; Wahane, Aniket V; Martinez, Alexander R; Jensen, Keith D; Harinath, Eranda; Braatz, Richard D; Chun, Jung-Hoon; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2018-01-01

    We developed and evaluated a solvent-free injection molding (IM) coating technology that could be suitable for continuous manufacturing via incorporation with IM tableting. Coating formulations (coating polymers and plasticizers) were prepared using hot-melt extrusion and screened via stress-strain analysis employing a universal testing machine. Selected coating formulations were studied for their melt flow characteristics. Tablets were coated using a vertical injection molding unit. Process parameters like softening temperature, injection pressure, and cooling temperature played a very important role in IM coating processing. IM coating employing polyethylene oxide (PEO) based formulations required sufficient room humidity (>30% RH) to avoid immediate cracks, whereas other formulations were insensitive to the room humidity. Tested formulations based on Eudrajit E PO and Kollicoat IR had unsuitable mechanical properties. Three coating formulations based on hydroxypropyl pea starch, PEO 1,000,000 and Opadry had favorable mechanical (35% elongation, >95×10 4 J/m 3 toughness) and melt flow (>0.4g/min) characteristics, that rendered acceptable IM coats. These three formulations increased the dissolution time by 10, 15 and 35min, respectively (75% drug release), compared to the uncoated tablets (15min). Coated tablets stored in several environmental conditions remained stable to cracking for the evaluated 8-week time period. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Article Including Environmental Barrier Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced environmental barrier coating for a silicon containing substrate. The enhanced barrier coating may include a bond coat doped with at least one of an alkali metal oxide and an alkali earth metal oxide. The enhanced barrier coating may include a composite mullite bond coat including BSAS and another distinct second phase oxide applied over said surface.

  18. Coatings for fusion reactor environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattox, D.M.

    1979-01-01

    The internal surfaces of a tokamak fusion reactor control the impurity injection and gas recycling into the fusion plasma. Coating of internal surfaces may provide a desirable and possibly necessary design flexibility for achieving the temperatures, ion densities and containment times necessary for net energy production from fusion reactions to take place. In this paper the reactor environments seen by various componentare reviewed along with possible materials responses. Characteristics of coating-substrate systems, important to fusion applications, are delineated and the present status of coating development for fusion applications is reviewed. Coating development for fusion applications is just beginning and poses a unique and important challenge for materials development

  19. Properties of radiation cured coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, E.G.; Spencer, D.S.; Boettcher, T.E.; Melbauer, M.A.; Skarjune, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    Coatings were prepared from acrylate or methacrylate functionalized resins to study the effect of end group functionality on the physical properties of u.v. and electron beam cured coatings. Cure response was measured by solid state NMR and gel extraction, as expected, methacrylate resins cured much slower. Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) revealed acrylate coatings have greater thermal stability. Properties such as tensile strength and hardness showed little effect of end group functionality or curing method. The O 2 and H 2 O permeabilities of the coating were correlated with the processing conditions. (author)

  20. Decontamination and coating of lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, W.N.; Bush, S.P.; Lyon, C.E.; Walker, V.

    1988-01-01

    Technology is being developed to decontaminate lead used in shielding applications in contaminated environments for recycle as shieldings. Technology is also being developed to coat either decontaminated lead or new lead before it is used in contaminated environments. The surface of the coating is expected to be much easier to decontaminate than the original lead surface. If contamination becomes severely embedded in the coating and cannot be removed, it can be easily cut with a knife and removed from the lead. The used coating can be disposed of as radioactive (hot hazardous) waste. The lead can then be recoated for further use as a shielding material

  1. Coatings Technology Integration Office (CTIO)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — CTIO serves as the Air Force's central resource for aircraft coating systems and their applications. CTIO's primary objectives are pollution prevention and improved...

  2. Coating material composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Tadashi; Ozeki, Takao; Kobayashi, Juichi; Nakamoto, Hideo; Maeda, Yutaka.

    1969-01-01

    A coating material composition is provided which can easily be cross-linked by irradiation with active energy, particularly electron beams and ultraviolet light, using a mixture of a prepolymer (a) with an addition reaction product (b). Such compositions have coating properties as good as thermosetting acrylic or amino alkyd resins. The prepolymer (a) is produced by primarily reacting at least 0.1 mol of saturated cyclocarboxylic acid anhydrides and/or alpha-, beta-ethylene unsaturated carboxylic acid anhydrides by addition reaction with one mol of hydroxyl radicals of a basic polymer having a molecular weight of 1,000 to 100,000, the basic polymer being obtained from 1%-40% of a hydroxyl radical containing vinyl monomer and at least 30% of (meth)acrylate monomer. One mol of the sum of hydroxyl radicals and carboxyl radicals of the primary reaction product undergoes a secondary addition reaction with at least 0.1 mol of an epoxy radical-containing vinyl monomer to form the prepolymer(a). The addition reaction product(b) is produced by reacting an epoxy radical-containing vinyl monomer with alpha-, beta-ethylene unsaturated carboxylic acids or their anhydrides. The coating material composition contains a majority of a mixture consisting of 10%-90% of (a) and 90%-10% of (b) above by weight. Four examples of the production of basic polymers, seven examples of the production of prepolymers, seven examples of the production of oligomers, and five examples of applications are given. (Iwakiri, K.)

  3. Microplasma sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Arjun

    2015-01-01

    ""This unique book on development of microplasma sprayed HAp coating has been organized in a very compact yet comprehensive manner. This book also highlights the horizons of future research that invites the attention of global community, particularly those in bio-medical materials and bio-medical engineering field. This book will surely act as a very useful reference material for both graduate/post-graduate students and researchers in the field of biomedical, orthopedic and manufacturing engineering and research. I truly believ that this is the first ever effort which covers almost all the

  4. SPS: scrubbing or coating ?

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez, J M

    2012-01-01

    The operation of the SPS with high intensity bunched beams is limited by the electron cloud building-up in both the arcs and long straight sections. Two consolidation options have been considered: mitigation of the electron cloud using coatings or relying, as before, on the scrubbing runs. A status report on both options will be given with a particular emphasis on measurements plans for 2012 and pending issues. The testing needs, corresponding beam parameters and MD time in 2012 will be addressed. The criteria for the decision making and the corresponding schedule will be discussed.

  5. SPS: scrubbing or coating?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The operation of the SPS with high intensity bunched beams is limited by the electron cloud building-up in both the arcs and long straight sections. Two consolidation options have been considered: suppression of the electron cloud build-up using coatings or relying, as before, on the scrubbing mitigation. A status report on both options will be given with a particular emphasis on measurements plans for 2012 and pending issues. The testing needs, corresponding beam parameters and MD time in 2012 will be addressed. The criteria for the decision making and the corresponding schedule will be discussed. (author)

  6. Radiation hardenable coating mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, D.D.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to coatings that harden under radiation and to their compositions. Specifically, this invention concerns unsaturated urethane resins polymerisable by addition and to compositions, hardening under the effect of radiation, containing these resins. These resins feature the presence of at least one unsaturated ethylenic terminal group of structure CH 2 =C and containing the product of the reaction of an organic isocyanate compound with at least two isocyanate groups and one polyester polyol with at least two hydroxyl groups, and one unsaturated monomer compound polymerisable by addition having a single active hydrogen group reacting with the isocyanate [fr

  7. Holographic particle image velocimetry using Bacteriorhodopsin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek, W.D.

    2006-01-01

    To gain better insight into the behaviour of turbulent flow there is a demand for a practical measurement instrument to perform three-dimensional flow measurements. Holography is a three-dimensional imaging technique, and as such is ideally suited for this purpose. Because flow media (such as water

  8. Federal Highway Administration 100-year coating study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    The Federal Highway Administration 100-Year Coating Study was initiated in August 2009 to search for durable : coating systems at a reasonable cost. The objective of the study was to identify and evaluate coating materials that can : provide 100 year...

  9. Decoding white coat hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Dennis A; Park, Alex

    2017-01-01

    There is arguably no less understood or more intriguing problem in hypertension that the “white coat” condition, the standard concept of which is significantly blood pressure reading obtained by medical personnel of authoritative standing than that obtained by more junior and less authoritative personnel and by the patients themselves. Using hospital-initiated ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, the while effect manifests as initial and ending pressure elevations, and, in treated patients, a low daytime profile. The effect is essentially systolic. Pure diastolic white coat hypertension appears to be exceedingly rare. On the basis of the studies, we believe that the white coat phenomenon is a common, periodic, neuro-endocrine reflex conditioned by anticipation of having the blood pressure taken and the fear of what this measurement may indicate concerning future illness. It does not change with time, or with prolonged association with the physician, particularly with advancing years, it may be superimposed upon essential hypertension, and in patients receiving hypertensive medication, blunting of the nighttime dip, which occurs in about half the patients, may be a compensatory mechanisms, rather than an indication of cardiovascular risk. Rather than the blunted dip, the morning surge or the widened pulse pressure, cardiovascular risk appears to be related to elevation of the average night time pressure. PMID:28352632

  10. Ceramic protective coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harbach, F.; Nicoll, A.

    1987-01-01

    The basic material of the above-mentioned layer consists of pure aluminium oxide or essentially aluminium oxide. To improve this protective layer metal oxides from the groups IIA, IIIA, IIIB, VB, VIB, VIIB or VIII of the periodic system are added to its basic material before the said protective coating is applied. In this way a corundum structure is formed in the case of aluminium oxide. Gallium oxide, vanadium oxide, chromium oxide or iron oxide are particularly suited for the correlation of such a corundum structure. The formation of the corundum structure increases the resistance of the protective coating to the corrosive effects of vanadium pentoxide and sodium sulfate. By the addition of a specific quantity of magnesium oxide it is possible not only to stimulate the formation of corundum but also to reduce the increase in grain size in the case of the aluminium oxide. The other metallic oxides are especially favorable to the formation of the corundum structure, so that preferably magnesium oxide is to be added to these metallic oxides in order to reduce the increase in grain size. (author)

  11. Rapidly curable electrically conductive clear coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, Mark P.; Anderson, Lawrence G.; Post, Gordon L.

    2018-01-16

    Rapidly curable electrically conductive clear coatings are applied to substrates. The electrically conductive clear coating includes to clear layer having a resinous binder with ultrafine non-stoichiometric tungsten oxide particles dispersed therein. The clear coating may be rapidly cured by subjecting the coating to infrared radiation that heats the tungsten oxide particles and surrounding resinous binder. Localized heating increases the temperature of the coating to thereby thermally cure the coating, while avoiding unwanted heating of the underlying substrate.

  12. White coat hypertension in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurko, Alexander; Minarik, Milan; Jurko, Tomas; Tonhajzerova, Ingrid

    2016-01-15

    The article summarizes current information on blood pressure changes in children during clinic visit. White coat as a general dressing of physicians and health care personnel has been widely accepted at the end of the 19th century. Two problems can be associated with the use of white coat: white coat phenomenon and white coat hypertension. Children often attribute pain and other unpleasant experience to the white coat and refuse afterwards cooperation with examinations. Definition of white coat hypertension in the literature is not uniform. It has been defined as elevated blood pressure in the hospital or clinic with normal blood pressure at home measured during the day by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring system. White coat effect is defined as temporary increase in blood pressure before and during visit in the clinic, regardless what the average daily ambulatory blood pressure values are. Clinical importance of white coat hypertension is mainly because of higher risk for cardiovascular accidents that are dependent on end organ damage (heart, vessels, kidney). Current data do not allow any clear recommendations for the treatment. Pharmacological therapy is usually started in the presence of hypertrophic left ventricle, changes in intimal/medial wall thickness of carotic arteries, microalbuminuria and other cardiovascular risk factors. Nonpharmacological therapy is less controversial and certainly more appropriate. Patients have to change their life style, need to eliminate as much cardiovascular risk factors as possible and sustain a regular blood pressure monitoring.

  13. External coating of colonic anastomoses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Achiam, Michael Patrick; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Colon anastomotic leakage remains both a frequent and serious complication in gastrointestinal surgery. External coating of colonic anastomoses has been proposed as a means to lower the rate of this complication. The aim of this review was to evaluate existing studies on external coating of colonic...

  14. Moisture transport in coated wood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meel, P.A. van; Erich, S.J.F.; Huinink, H.P.; Kopinga, K.; Jong, J. DE; Adan, O.C.G.

    2011-01-01

    Moisture accumulation inside wood causes favorable conditions for decay. Application of a coating alters the moisture sorption of wood and prevents accumulation of moisture. This paper presents the results of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study on the influence of a coating on the moisture

  15. Electroless alloy/composite coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The market for these coatings is expanding fast as the potential applications are on the rise. In the present article, an attempt has been made to review different electroless alloy/composite coatings with respect to bath types and their composition, properties and applications. Different characterisation studies have been ...

  16. Lignin based controlled release coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, W.J.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Vingerhoeds, M.H.; Harmsen, P.F.H.; Eastham, D.

    2011-01-01

    Urea is a commonly used fertilizer. Due to its high water-solubility, misuse easily leads to excess nitrogen levels in the soil. The aim of this research was to develop an economically feasible and biodegradable slow-release coating for urea. For this purpose, lignin was selected as coating

  17. Foundry Coating Technology: A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2011-01-01

    is important. In this review, a detailed description of these topics and examples are provided where necessary. A potential area of research in foundry coating development, using sol-gel process is suggested. The application of sol-gel technology in the development of foundry coatings is a novel approach....

  18. Intumescent coatings under fast heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Kristian Petersen; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Català, Pere

    2012-01-01

    Intumescent coatings are widely used to delay or minimise the destructive effects of fire. They are usually tested under conditions that simulate the relatively slow build-up of heat in a normal fire. Here, the effects of damage during a fire causing sudden heating of the coating were studied....

  19. Steam initiated hydrotalcite conversion coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Lingli; Friis, Henrik; Roefzaad, Melanie

    2018-01-01

    A facile process of exploiting high-temperature steam to deposit nvironmentally friendly hydrotalcite (HT) coatings on Al alloy 6060 was developed in a spray system. Scanning electron microscopy showed the formationf a continuous and conformal coating comprised of a compact mass of crystallites. ...

  20. Evanescent wave assisted nanomaterial coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Samir K; Pal, Sudipta Sarkar; Kumbhakar, Dharmadas; Tiwari, Umesh; Bhatnagar, Randhir

    2013-08-01

    In this work we present a novel nanomaterial coating technique using evanescent wave (EW). The gradient force in the EW is used as an optical tweezer for tweezing and self-assembling nanoparticles on the source of EW. As a proof of the concept, we have used a laser coupled etched multimode optical fiber, which generates EW for the EW assisted coating. The section-wise etched multimode optical fiber is horizontally and superficially dipped into a silver/gold nanoparticles solution while the laser is switched on. The fiber is left until the solution recedes due to evaporation leaving the fiber in air. The coating time usually takes 40-50 min at room temperature. The scanning electron microscope image shows uniform and thin coating of self-assembled nanoparticles due to EW around the etched section. A coating thickness optical fiber probes and other plasmonic circuits.

  1. Functional Plasma-Deposited Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykhaylo Pashechko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the problem of low adhesion of plasma sprayed coatings to the substrate. The subsequent laser treatment modes and their influence on the coating-substrate interface were studied. This allows to decrease the level of metstability of the coating, thus decreasing its hardness down to 11-12 GPa on the surface and to about 9 GPa on depth of 400 µm. The redistribution of alloying elements through solid and liquid diffusion improves mechanical properties and rises the adhesion up to 450 MPa after remelting and up to 90-110 MPa after laser-aided thermal cycling. At he same time, remelting of coating helps to decrease its porosity down to 1%. Obtained complex of properties also allows to improve wear resistance of coatings and to decrease friction factor.

  2. Self-Healing anticorrosive coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nesterova, Tatyana

    %. The number is lower than anticipated and needs to be confirmed. Finally, a 3-D model, based on Monte-Carlo simulations, has been developed for prediction of healing efficiency of a microcapsule-based anticorrosive coating. Two kinds of cracks were considered: cracks accommodated within the bulk coating...... associated with development and testing of this type of coating. A laboratory investigation, to identify the most suitable method for production of mechanically stable (filled with industrially relevant core materials) and forming a free-flowing powder upon drying microcapsules, has been performed. Four...... reduces the intensity of crack formation (both in number and length) compared to filler-containing coatings and prevents the coating from flaking upon damage. Based on specular gloss measurements, a preliminary critical pigment (microcapsule) concentration (CPVC) value was estimated to about 30 vol...

  3. Understanding particulate coating microstructure development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Christine Cardinal

    How a dispersion of particulates suspended in a solvent dries into a solid coating often is more important to the final coating quality than even its composition. Essential properties like porosity, strength, gloss, particulate order, and concentration gradients are all determined by the way the particles come together as the coating dries. Cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryoSEM) is one of the most effective methods to directly visualize a drying coating during film formation. Using this method, the coating is frozen, arresting particulate motion and solidifying the sample so that it be imaged in an SEM. In this thesis, the microstructure development of particulate coatings was explored with several case studies. First, the effect of drying conditions was determined on the collapse of hollow latex particles, which are inexpensive whiteners for paint. Using cryoSEM, it was found that collapse occurs during the last stages of drying and is most likely to occur at high drying temperatures, humidity, and with low binder concentration. From these results, a theoretical model was proposed for the collapse of a hollow latex particle. CryoSEM was also used to verify a theoretical model for the particulate concentration gradients that may develop in a coating during drying for various evaporation, sedimentation and particulate diffusion rates. This work created a simple drying map that will allow others to predict the character of a drying coating based on easily calculable parameters. Finally, the effect of temperature on the coalescence and cracking of latex coatings was explored. A new drying regime for latex coatings was identified, where partial coalescence of particles does not prevent cracking. Silica was shown to be an environmentally friendly additive for preventing crack formation in this regime.

  4. Optical coating preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belleville, P.; Sabary, F.; Marcel, C.

    2003-01-01

    In order to optimize the properties of optical components, thin film deposition with controlled thickness and refractive index is often needed. Two different deposition techniques are proposed in this article and illustrated with examples: physical vapor deposition (PVD) and liquid sol-gel process (LSG). PVD and LSG techniques are equivalent as far as the following topics are concerned: elaboration of oxide or composite coated material, optical performance, mechanical performance, and laser performance. PVD is better for the elaboration of metallic films, the design of multi-layers or complex pile-up of layers. LSG is better for the treatment of large surfaces, for substrates with complicated shapes and for its low cost. PVD technique has been widely used so it benefited from an industrial maturity and a clean technology concerning wastes and effluents. On the contrary LSG is a new technique not yet widely used in industrial processes but that looks promising. (A.C.)

  5. Novel coating compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Tadashi; Kobayashi, Juichi; Nakamoto, Hideo.

    1969-01-01

    An acrylic coating composition rapidly hardenable by irradiating with ionizing radiations or light beams is given using hydroxyl group-containing vinyl monomers, polycarboxylic acid anhydrides, epoxy group-containing vinyl monomers and an organic solvent having a boiling point of at least 120 0 C. The process comprises the steps of first and second reactions. The first reaction takes place between one mol of a hydroxyl group of a basic polymer and at least 0.1 mol of polycarboxylic acid anhydride, wherein the basic polymer has a molecular weight ranging from 5,000 to 100,000 and consists of 1-40% by weight of vinyl monomer containing hydroxyl group, at least 30% of (meth)acrylic monomer and other vinyl monomers if required. The second reaction takes place between one mol of hydroxyl plus a carboxyl group of the thus obtained basic polymer and at least 0.1 mol of an epoxy group-containing vinyl monomer to produce a prepolymer. The prepolymer is mixed with a solvent such as ethyl benzene to produce the coating material. The electron beam accelerator energy level may be 0.1-2.0 MeV. In light beam polymerization, benzoin is particularly utilized as an intensifying substance. In one example, a basic polymer is produced by reacting 39 parts of styrene, 37 parts of ethyl acrylate, 24 parts of 2-hydroxyl ethyl acrylate, 4 parts of dimethyl amino ethyl methacrylate and others. A prepolymer is produced by reacting this basic polymer with 30 parts of glycidyl acrylate and others. (Iwakiri, K.)

  6. How PE tape performs under concrete coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dritt, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    The program objectives were to evaluate the performance of polyethylene tape plant coating and fusion bonded epoxy powder systems with particular respect to the following: 1. Concrete coating application procedures; 2. The shear resistance during laying and retrieving operations of the coating at the various interfaces (a) Pipe and anti-corrosion coating; (b) Anti-corrosion coating and outerwrap; (c) Overlap areas of the anti-corrosion and outerwrap layers; (d) Between concrete and the various corrosion coatings during laying and retrieving operations. 3. Resistance to damage of the coating as a consequence of cracking or slippage of the concrete weight coating. 4. Ability of various coatings to withstand the damage during concrete application by both impact and compression methods; 5. Evaluation of tape and shrink sleeve joint coatings at the cut-back area as well as performance of tape under hot asphalt coating

  7. Avian Egg and Egg Coat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Hiroki

    2017-01-01

    An ovulated egg of vertebrates is surrounded by unique extracellular matrix, the egg coat or zona pellucida, playing important roles in fertilization and early development. The vertebrate egg coat is composed of two to six zona pellucida (ZP) glycoproteins that are characterized by the evolutionarily conserved ZP-domain module and classified into six subfamilies based on phylogenetic analyses. Interestingly, investigations of biochemical and functional features of the ZP glycoproteins show that the roles of each ZP-glycoprotein family member in the egg-coat formation and the egg-sperm interactions seemingly vary across vertebrates. This might be one reason why comprehensive understandings of the molecular basis of either architecture or physiological functions of egg coat still remain elusive despite more than 3 decades of intensive investigations. In this chapter, an overview of avian egg focusing on the oogenesis are provided in the first section, and unique features of avian egg coat, i.e., perivitelline layer, including the morphology, biogenesis pathway, and physiological functions are discussed mainly on chicken and quail in terms of the characteristics of ZP glycoproteins in the following sections. In addition, these features of avian egg coat are compared to mammalian zona pellucida, from the viewpoint that the structural and functional varieties of ZP glycoproteins might be associated with the evolutionary adaptation to their reproductive strategies. By comparing the egg coat of birds and mammals whose reproductive strategies are largely different, new insights into the molecular mechanisms of vertebrate egg-sperm interactions might be provided.

  8. Intumescent Coatings as Fire Retardants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, J. A.; Fohlen, G. M.; Sawko, P. M.; Fish, R. H.

    1970-01-01

    The development of fire-retardant coatings to protect surfaces which may be exposed to fire or extreme heat is a subject of intense interest to many industries. A fire-retardant paint has been developed which represents a new chemical approach for preparing intumescent coatings, and potentially, is very important to fire-prevention authorities. The requirements for a superior coating include ease of application, suitability to a wide variety of surfaces and finishes, and stability over an extended period of time within a broad range of ambient temperature and humidity conditions. These innovative coatings, when activated by the heat of a fire, react to form a thick, low-density, polymeric coating or char layer. Water vapor and sulphur dioxide are released during the intumescent reaction. Two fire-protection mechanisms thus become available: (1) the char layer retards the flow of heat, due to the extremely low thermal conductivity; and (2) water vapor and sulfur dioxide are released, providing fire quenching properties. Still another mechanism functions in cases where the char, by virtue of its high oxidation resistance and low thermal conductivity, reaches a sufficiently high temperature to re-radiate much of the incident heat load. The coatings consist of dispersions of selective salts of a nitro-amino-arornatic compound. Specifically, para-nitroaniline bisulfate and the ammonium salt of para-nitroaniline-ortho sulphuric acid (2-amino-5-nitrobenzenesulphuric acid) are used. Suitable vehicles are cellulose nitrate of lacquer grade, a nitrite-phenolic modified rubber, or epoxy-polysulfide copolymer. Three separate formulations have been developed. A solvent is usually employed, such as methylethyl ketone, butyl acetate, or toluene, which renders the coatings suitably thin and which evaporates after the coatings are applied. Generally, the intumescent material is treated as insoluble in the vehicle, and is ground and dispersed in the vehicle and solvent like an

  9. Integrated Glass Coating Manufacturing Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brophy, Brenor [Enki Technology Inc., San Jose, CA (United States)

    2015-09-30

    This project aims to enable US module manufacturers to coat glass with Enki’s state of the art tunable functionalized AR coatings at the lowest possible cost and highest possible performance by encapsulating Enki’s coating process in an integrated tool that facilitates effective process improvement through metrology and data analysis for greater quality and performance while reducing footprint, operating and capital costs. The Phase 1 objective was a fully designed manufacturing line, including fully specified equipment ready for issue of purchase requisitions; a detailed economic justification based on market prices at the end of Phase 1 and projected manufacturing costs and a detailed deployment plan for the equipment.

  10. Laser-based coatings removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freiwald, J.G.; Freiwald, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    Over the years as building and equipment surfaces became contaminated with low levels of uranium or plutonium dust, coats of paint were applied to stabilize the contaminants in place. Most of the earlier paint used was lead-based paint. More recently, various non-lead-based paints, such as two-part epoxy, are used. For D ampersand D (decontamination and decommissioning), it is desirable to remove the paints or other coatings rather than having to tear down and dispose of the entire building. This report describes the use of pulse-repetetion laser systems for the removal of paints and coatings

  11. Hydrogen permeation resistant phosphate coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    A method for reducing hydrogen diffusion through metal wherein the metal is coated with a phosphate-radical-containing, phosphate-glass-forming material on at least one surface thereof. The coating is then heated to at least 350 0 C to form a phosphate glass. This method is especially applicable to nuclear reactors to minimize tritium diffusion. The coating is preferably formed with a solution of phosphoric acid which may also contain compounds such as MnSO 4 , SiO 2 and Na 2 Cr 2 0 7 . (author)

  12. Hydrogen permeation resistant phosphate coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    A method for reducing hydrogen diffusion through metal is described. The metal is coated with a phosphate-radical-containing, phosphate-glass-forming material on at least one surface. The coating is then heated to at least 350 0 C to form a phosphate glass. This method is especially applicable to nuclear reactors to minimize tritium diffusion. The coating is preferably formed with a solution of phosphoric acid which may also contain compounds such as MnSO 4 , SiO 2 and Na 2 Cr 2 O 7 . (author)

  13. Laser-based coatings removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freiwald, J.G.; Freiwald, D.A. [F2 Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Over the years as building and equipment surfaces became contaminated with low levels of uranium or plutonium dust, coats of paint were applied to stabilize the contaminants in place. Most of the earlier paint used was lead-based paint. More recently, various non-lead-based paints, such as two-part epoxy, are used. For D&D (decontamination and decommissioning), it is desirable to remove the paints or other coatings rather than having to tear down and dispose of the entire building. This report describes the use of pulse-repetetion laser systems for the removal of paints and coatings.

  14. Switchable lasing in multimode microcavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhukovsky, Sergei V.; Chigrin, Dmitry N.; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2007-01-01

    can be caused by injecting an appropriate optical pulse at the onset of laser action (injection seeding). Temporal mode-to-mode switching by reseeding the cavity after a short cooldown period is demonstrated by direct numerical solution. A qualitative analytical explanation of the mode switching...

  15. Experimental evaluation of coating delamination in vinyl coated metal forming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Young Ki; Lee, Chan Joo; Kim, Byung Min; Lee, Jung Min; Byoen, Sang Doek; Lee, Soen Bong

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a new evaluation and prediction method for coating delamination during sheet metal forming is presented. On the basis of the forming limit diagram (FLD), the current study evaluates the delamination of PET coating by using a cross cut specimen, dome test, and rectangular cup drawing test. Dome test specimens were subjected to biaxial, plane strain, and uniaxial deformation modes. Rectangular cup drawing test specimens were subjected to the deep drawing deformation mode, and compression deformation mode. A vinyl coated metal (VCM) sheet consists of three layers of polymer on the sheet metals: a protective film, a PET layer and a PVC layer. The areas with coating delamination were identified, and the results of the evaluation were plotted according to major and minor strain values, depicting coating delamination. The constructed delamination limit diagram (DLD) can be used to determine the forming limit of VCM during the complex press forming process. ARGUS (GOM) was employed to identify the strain value and deformation mode of the delaminated surface after the press forming. After identifying the areas of delamination, the DLD of the PET coating can be constructed in a format similar to that of the FLD. The forming limit of the VCM sheet can be evaluated using the superimposition of the delamination limit strain of the coating onto the FLD of VCM sheet. The experimental results showed that the proposed test method will support the sheet metal forming process design for VCM sheets. The assessment method presented in this study can be used to determine the delamination limit strain under plastic deformation of other polymer coated metals. The experimental results suggested that the proposed testing method is effective in evaluating delamination for specific applications

  16. Experimental evaluation of coating delamination in vinyl coated metal forming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Young Ki; Lee, Chan Joo; Kim, Byung Min [Pusan National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Min [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Byoen, Sang Doek [HA Digital Engineering Gr., Seongsan Gu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Soen Bong [Keimyung Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    In this paper, a new evaluation and prediction method for coating delamination during sheet metal forming is presented. On the basis of the forming limit diagram (FLD), the current study evaluates the delamination of PET coating by using a cross cut specimen, dome test, and rectangular cup drawing test. Dome test specimens were subjected to biaxial, plane strain, and uniaxial deformation modes. Rectangular cup drawing test specimens were subjected to the deep drawing deformation mode, and compression deformation mode. A vinyl coated metal (VCM) sheet consists of three layers of polymer on the sheet metals: a protective film, a PET layer and a PVC layer. The areas with coating delamination were identified, and the results of the evaluation were plotted according to major and minor strain values, depicting coating delamination. The constructed delamination limit diagram (DLD) can be used to determine the forming limit of VCM during the complex press forming process. ARGUS (GOM) was employed to identify the strain value and deformation mode of the delaminated surface after the press forming. After identifying the areas of delamination, the DLD of the PET coating can be constructed in a format similar to that of the FLD. The forming limit of the VCM sheet can be evaluated using the superimposition of the delamination limit strain of the coating onto the FLD of VCM sheet. The experimental results showed that the proposed test method will support the sheet metal forming process design for VCM sheets. The assessment method presented in this study can be used to determine the delamination limit strain under plastic deformation of other polymer coated metals. The experimental results suggested that the proposed testing method is effective in evaluating delamination for specific applications.

  17. Water permeability of pigmented waterborne coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkers, P.A.J.; Huinink, H.P.; Erich, S.J.F.; Reuvers, N.J.W.; Adan, O.C.G.

    2013-01-01

    Coatings are used in a variety of applications. Last decades more and more coating systems are transforming from solvent to waterborne coating systems. In this study the influence of pigments on the water permeability of a waterborne coating system is studied, with special interest in the possible

  18. Radiation cured coatings for fiber optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketley, A.D.; Morgan, C.R.

    1978-01-01

    A continuous protective coating is formed on a fiber optic by coating the fiber optic in a bath of a liquid radiation curable composition at a temperature up to 90 0 C and exposing the coated conductor to ultraviolet or high energy ionizing radiation to cure the coating

  19. Hex Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    The overall objective of the Hex Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics project is to evaluate and test pretreatment coating systems not containing hexavalent chrome in avionics and electronics housing applications. This objective will be accomplished by testing strong performing coating systems from prior NASA and DoD testing or new coating systems as determined by the stakeholders.

  20. Comparison of additive amount used in spin-coated and roll-coated organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Pei; Lin, Yuze; Zawacka, Natalia Klaudia

    2014-01-01

    All-polymer and polymer/fullerene inverted solar cells were fabricated by spin-coating and roll-coating processes. The spin-coated small-area (0.04 cm(2)) devices were fabricated on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrates in nitrogen. The roll-coated large-area (1.0 cm(2)) devices were...

  1. Overlay metallic-cermet alloy coating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gedwill, M.A.; Glasgow, T.K.; Levine, S.R.

    1982-01-01

    A substrate, such as a turbine blade, vane, or the like, which is subjected to high temperature use is coated with a base coating of an oxide dispersed, metallic alloy (cermet). A top coating of an oxidation, hot corrosion, erosion resistant alloy of nickel, cobalt, or iron is then deposited on the base coating. A heat treatment is used to improve the bonding. The base coating serves as an inhibitor to interdiffusion between the protective top coating and the substrate. Otherwise, the protective top coating would rapidly interact detrimentally with the substrate and degrade by spalling of the protective oxides formed on the outer surface at elevated temperatures

  2. Overlay metallic-cermet alloy coating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedwill, M. A.; Levine, S. R.; Glasgow, T. K. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A substrate, such as a turbine blade, vane, or the like, which is subjected to high temperature use is coated with a base coating of an oxide dispersed, metallic alloy (cermet). A top coating of an oxidation, hot corrosion, erosion resistant alloy of nickel, cobalt, or iron is then deposited on the base coating. A heat treatment is used to improve the bonding. The base coating serves as an inhibitor to interdiffusion between the protective top coating and the substrate. Otherwise, the protective top coating would rapidly interact detrimentally with the substrate and degrade by spalling of the protective oxides formed on the outer surface at elevated temperatures.

  3. Seal coat binder performance specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Need to improve seal coat binder specs: replace empirical tests (penetration, ductility) with : performance-related tests applicable to both : unmodified and modified binders; consider temperatures that cover entire in service : range that are tied t...

  4. Protective coatings for commercial particulates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kindl, B.; Teng, Y.H.; Liu, Y.L.

    1994-01-01

    SiC/Al composites are in large-scale production with Al-Si alloy matrices. The same composites with pure Al or low Si matrices need diffusion barriers on the SiC reinforcement to control the interfacial reaction. The present paper describes various approaches taken to obtain protective coatings...... of alumina and zirconia on SiC particulates by sol-gel techniques. Aqueous and organic precursors have been used. The extent of the reaction, i.e., the Si and Al4C3 content in the matrix, was determined by differential thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction. The reaction rates of some coated particulates...... in liquid Al are decreased by as much as one order of magnitude during the first 15 min of immersion. Pretreatments of the SiC surface, the composition and thickness of the coating interphase and heat treatments of the coated materials have been studied, and are discussed in relation to their effect...

  5. Cementless Hydroxyapatite Coated Hip Prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Antonio; Mateo, Jesús; Gil-Albarova, Jorge; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Ibarz, Elena; Gabarre, Sergio; Más, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    More than twenty years ago, hydroxyapatite (HA), calcium phosphate ceramics, was introduced as a coating for cementless hip prostheses. The choice of this ceramic is due to its composition being similar to organic apatite bone crystals. This ceramic is biocompatible, bioactive, and osteoconductive. These qualities facilitate the primary stability and osseointegration of implants. Our surgical experience includes the implantation of more than 4,000 cementless hydroxyapatite coated hip prostheses since 1990. The models implanted are coated with HA in the acetabulum and in the metaphyseal area of the stem. The results corresponding to survival and stability of implants were very satisfactory in the long-term. From our experience, HA-coated hip implants are a reliable alternative which can achieve long term survival, provided that certain requirements are met: good design selection, sound choice of bearing surfaces based on patient life expectancy, meticulous surgical technique, and indications based on adequate bone quality. PMID:25802848

  6. Black Sprayable Molecular Adsorber Coating

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The main objective of this technology project is to develop, optimize, and flight qualify a black version of the molecular adsorber coating and a conductive version...

  7. Self-stratifying antimicrobial coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yagci, M.B.

    2012-01-01

    Today, antimicrobial polymers/coatings are widely used in various areas, such as biomedical devices, pharmaceuticals, hospital buildings, textiles, food processing, and contact lenses, where sanitation is needed. Such wide application facilities have made antimicrobial materials very attractive for

  8. Smart Coatings for Corrosion Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Li, Wendy; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Johnsey, Marissa N.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. It is essential to detect corrosion when it occurs, and preferably at its early stage, so that action can be taken to avoid structural damage or loss of function. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it.

  9. Dielectric coatings on metal substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaros, S.S.; Baker, P.; Milam, D.

    1976-01-01

    Large aperture, beryllium substrate-based mirrors have been used to focus high intensity pulsed laser beams. Finished surfaces have high reflectivity, low wavefront distortion, and high laser damage thresholds. This paper describes the development of a series of metallic coatings, surface finishing techniques, and dielectric overcoatings to meet specified performance requirements. Beryllium substrates were coated with copper, diamond-machined to within 5 micro-inches to final contour, nickel plated, and abrasively figured to final contour. Bond strengths for several bonding processes are presented. Dielectric overcoatings were deposited on finished multimetallic substrates to increase both reflectivity and the damage thresholds. Coatings were deposited using both high and low temperature processes which induce varying stresses in the finished coating substrate system. Data are presented to show the evolution of wavefront distortion, reflectivity, and damage thresholds throughout the many steps involved in fabrication

  10. Cementless Hydroxyapatite Coated Hip Prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Herrera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available More than twenty years ago, hydroxyapatite (HA, calcium phosphate ceramics, was introduced as a coating for cementless hip prostheses. The choice of this ceramic is due to its composition being similar to organic apatite bone crystals. This ceramic is biocompatible, bioactive, and osteoconductive. These qualities facilitate the primary stability and osseointegration of implants. Our surgical experience includes the implantation of more than 4,000 cementless hydroxyapatite coated hip prostheses since 1990. The models implanted are coated with HA in the acetabulum and in the metaphyseal area of the stem. The results corresponding to survival and stability of implants were very satisfactory in the long-term. From our experience, HA-coated hip implants are a reliable alternative which can achieve long term survival, provided that certain requirements are met: good design selection, sound choice of bearing surfaces based on patient life expectancy, meticulous surgical technique, and indications based on adequate bone quality.

  11. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Jack J.; Elling, David; Reams, Walter

    1990-01-01

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  12. Nanocrystalline diamond coatings for machining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, M.; Breidt, D.; Cremer, R. [CemeCon AG, Wuerselen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    This history of CVD diamond synthesis goes back to the fifties of the last century. However, the scientific and economical potential was only gradually recognized. In the eighties, intensive worldwide research on CVD diamond synthesis and applications was launched. Industrial products, especially diamond-coated cutting tools, were introduced to the market in the middle of the nineties. This article shows the latest developments in this area, which comprises nanocrystalline diamond coating structures. (orig.)

  13. Dry and coating of powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, M.; Alguacil, F. J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a review on the mixing and coating of powders by dry processes. The reviews surveys fundamental works on mixture characterization (mixing index definitions and sampling techniques), mixing mechanisms and models, segregation with especial emphasis on free-surface segregation, mixing of cohesive powders and interparticle forces, ordered mixing (dry coating) including mechanism, model and applications and mixing equipment selection. (Author) 180 refs

  14. Silicone nanocomposite coatings for fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberts, Kenneth (Inventor); Lee, Stein S. (Inventor); Singhal, Amit (Inventor); Ou, Runqing (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A silicone based coating for fabrics utilizing dual nanocomposite fillers providing enhanced mechanical and thermal properties to the silicone base. The first filler includes nanoclusters of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and a metal oxide and a second filler of exfoliated clay nanoparticles. The coating is particularly suitable for inflatable fabrics used in several space, military, and consumer applications, including airbags, parachutes, rafts, boat sails, and inflatable shelters.

  15. Coating of silicon pore optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Ackermann, M.; Christensen, Finn Erland

    2009-01-01

    For the International X-ray observatory (IXO), a mirror module with an effective area of 3 m2 at 1.25 keV and at least 0.65 m2 at 6 keV has to be realized. To achieve this goal, coated silicon pore optics has been developed over the last years. One of the challenges is to coat the Si plates...

  16. Damage-resistant brittle coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawn, B.R.; Lee, K.S. [National Inst. of Stand. and Technol., Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Mater. Sci. and Eng. Lab.; Chai, H. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). Faculty of Engineering; Pajares, A. [Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz (Spain). Dept. de Fisica; Kim, D.K. [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technolgy, Taejon (Korea). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Wuttiphan, S. [National Metal and Materials Technology Center, Bangkok (Thailand); Peterson, I.M. [Corning Inc., NY (United States); Hu Xiaozhi [Western Australia Univ., Nedlands, WA (Australia). Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering

    2000-11-01

    Laminate structures consisting of hard, brittle coatings and soft, tough substrates are important in a wide variety of engineering applications, biological structures, and traditional pottery. In this study the authors introduce a new approach to the design of damage-resistant brittle coatings, based on a combination of new and existing relations for crack initiation in well-defined contact-induced stress fields. (orig.)

  17. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jor-Shan [El Cerrito, CA; Farmer, Joseph C [Tracy, CA; Lee, Chuck K [Hayward, CA; Walker, Jeffrey [Gaithersburg, MD; Russell, Paige [Las Vegas, NV; Kirkwood, Jon [Saint Leonard, MD; Yang, Nancy [Lafayette, CA; Champagne, Victor [Oxford, PA

    2012-05-29

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  18. Material Science Smart Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubinstein, A. I. [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Sabirianov, R. F. [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Namavar, Fereydoon [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The contribution of electrostatic interactions to the free energy of binding between model protein and a ceramic implant surface in the aqueous solvent, considered in the framework of the nonlocal electrostatic model, is calculated as a function of the implant low-frequency dielectric constant. We show that the existence of a dynamically ordered (low-dielectric) interfacial solvent layer at the protein-solvent and ceramic-solvent interface markedly increases charging energy of the protein and ceramic implant, and consequently makes the electrostatic contribution to the protein-ceramic binding energy more favorable (attractive). Our analysis shows that the corresponding electrostatic energy between protein and oxide ceramics depends nonmonotonically on the dielectric constant of ceramic, εC. Obtained results indicate that protein can attract electrostatically to the surface if ceramic material has a moderate εC below or about 35 (in particularly ZrO2 or Ta2O5). This is in contrast to classical (local) consideration of the solvent, which demonstrates an unfavorable electrostatic interaction of protein with typical metal oxide ceramic materials (εC>10). Thus, a solid implant coated by combining oxide ceramic with a reduced dielectric constant can be beneficial to strengthen the electrostatic binding of the protein-implant complex.

  19. Silane based coating of aluminium mold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    having at least one closed cavity is provided, at least one surface of the at least one cavity being an aluminium surface coated with a silane based coating layer. The silane based anti-stiction coating improves the anti-stiction properties of the mold which may allow for molding and demolding...... of structures which would otherwise be difficult to mold. The resistance of the coated aluminium mold is significantly improved by applying a silane-based coating layer....

  20. Switchable antifouling coatings and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Michele L. Baca; Dirk, Shawn M.; Johnson, Ross Stefan

    2017-02-28

    The present invention relates to antifouling coatings capable of being switched by using heat or ultraviolet light. Prior to switching, the coating includes an onium cation component having antimicrobial and antibacterial properties. Upon switching, the coating is converted to a conjugated polymer state, and the cationic component is released with any adsorbed biofilm layer. Thus, the coatings herein have switchable and releasable properties. Methods of making and using such coatings are also described.

  1. Graphene: corrosion-inhibiting coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasai, Dhiraj; Tuberquia, Juan Carlos; Harl, Robert R; Jennings, G Kane; Rogers, Bridget R; Bolotin, Kirill I

    2012-02-28

    We report the use of atomically thin layers of graphene as a protective coating that inhibits corrosion of underlying metals. Here, we employ electrochemical methods to study the corrosion inhibition of copper and nickel by either growing graphene on these metals, or by mechanically transferring multilayer graphene onto them. Cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal that the graphene coating effectively suppresses metal oxidation and oxygen reduction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements suggest that while graphene itself is not damaged, the metal under it is corroded at cracks in the graphene film. Finally, we use Tafel analysis to quantify the corrosion rates of samples with and without graphene coatings. These results indicate that copper films coated with graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition are corroded 7 times slower in an aerated Na(2)SO(4) solution as compared to the corrosion rate of bare copper. Tafel analysis reveals that nickel with a multilayer graphene film grown on it corrodes 20 times slower while nickel surfaces coated with four layers of mechanically transferred graphene corrode 4 times slower than bare nickel. These findings establish graphene as the thinnest known corrosion-protecting coating.

  2. Polymeric Coatings for Combating Biocorrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing; Yuan, Shaojun; Jiang, Wei; Lv, Li; Liang, Bin; Pehkonen, Simo O.

    2018-03-01

    Biocorrosion has been considered as big trouble in many industries and marine environments due to causing great economic loss. The main disadvantages of present approaches to prevent corrosion include being limited by environmental factors, being expensive, inapplicable to field, and sometimes inefficient. Studies show that polymer coatings with anti-corrosion and anti-microbial properties have been widely accepted as a novel and effective approach to preventbiocorrosion. The main purpose of this review is to summarize up the progressive status of polymer coatings used for combating microbially-induced corrosion. Polymers used to synthesize protective coatings are generally divided into three categories: i) traditional polymers incorporated with biocides, ii) antibacterial polymers containing quaternary ammonium compounds, and iii) conductive polymers. The strategies to synthesize polymer coatings resort mainly to grafting anti-bacterial polymers from the metal substrate surface using novel surface-functionalization approaches, such as free radical polymerization, chemically oxidative polymerization and surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization, as opposed to the traditional approaches of dip coating or spin coating.

  3. Electron beam-cured coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, Naoyuki

    1976-01-01

    The method for hardening coatings by the irradiation with electron beams is reviewed. The report is divided into seven parts, namely 1) general description and characteristics of electron beam-cured coating, 2) radiation sources of curing, 3) hardening conditions and reaction behaviour, 4) uses and advantages, 5) latest trends of the industry, 6) practice in the field of construction materials, and 7) economy. The primary characteristics of the electron beam hardening is that graft reaction takes place between base resin and coating to produce strong adhesive coating without any pretreatment. A variety of base resins are developed. High class esters of acrylic acid monomers and methacrylic acid monomers are mainly used as dilutants recently. At present, scanning type accelerators are used, but the practical application of the system producing electron beam of curtain type is expected. The dose rate dependence, the repetitive irradiation and the irradiation atmosphere are briefly described. The filed patent applications on the electron beam hardening were analyzed by the officer of Japan Patent Agency. The production lines for coatings by the electron beam hardening in the world are listed. In the electron beam-cured coating, fifty percent of given energy is consumed effectively for the electron beam hardening, and the solvents discharged from ovens and polluting atmosphere are not used, because the paints of high solid type is used. The running costs of the electron beam process are one sixth of the thermal oven process. (Iwakiri, K.)

  4. Coatings and Tints of Spectacle Lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Zeki Büyükyıldız

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Spectacle lenses are made of mineral or organic (plastic materials. Various coatings and tints are applied to the spectacle lenses according to the characteristic of the lens material, and for the personal needs and cosmetic purpose. The coatings may be classified in seven groups: 1 Anti-reflection coatings, 2 Hard coatings, 3 Clean coat, 4 Mirror coatings, 5 Color tint coating (one of coloring processes, 6 Photochromic coating (one of photochromic processes, and 7 Anti-fog coatings. Anti-reflection coatings reduce unwanted reflections from the lens surfaces and increase light transmission. Hard coatings are applied for preventing the plastic lens surface from scratches and abrasion. Hard coatings are not required for the mineral lenses due to their hardness. Clean coat makes the lens surface smooth and hydrophobic. Thus, it prevents the adherence of dust, tarnish, and dirt particles on the lens surface. Mirror coatings are applied onto the sunglasses for cosmetic purpose. Color tinted and photochromic lenses are used for sun protection and absorption of the harmful UV radiations. Anti-fog coatings make the lens surface hydrophilic and prevent the coalescence of tiny water droplets on the lens surface that reduces light transmission. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2012; 42: 359-69

  5. Analysis of Capillary Coating Die Flow in an Optical Fiber Coating Applicator

    OpenAIRE

    Kyoungjin Kim

    2011-01-01

    Viscous heating becomes significant in the high speed resin coating process of glass fibers for optical fiber manufacturing. This study focuses on the coating resin flows inside the capillary coating die of optical fiber coating applicator and they are numerically simulated to examine the effects of viscous heating and subsequent temperature increase in coating resin. Resin flows are driven by fast moving glass fiber and the pressurization at the coating die inlet, while ...

  6. Pin Wire Coating Trip Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spellman, G P

    2004-01-01

    A meeting to discuss the current pin wire coating problems was held at the Reynolds plant in Los Angeles on 2MAR04. The attendance list for Reynolds personnel is attached. there was an initial presentation which gave a brief history and the current status of pin wire coating at Reynolds. There was a presentation by Lori Primus on the requirements and issues for the coating. There was a presentation by Jim Smith of LANL on the chemistry and to some extent process development done to date. There was a long session covering what steps should be taken in the short term and, to a lesser extent, the long term. The coating currently being used is a blend of two polymers, polyethersulfone and polyparabanic acid (PPA) and some TiO2 filler. This system was accepted and put into production when the pin wire coating was outsourced to another company in 1974. When that company no longer was interested, the wire coating was brought in-house to Reynolds. At that time polyparabanic acid was actually a commercial product available from Exxon under the trade name Tradlon. However, it appears that the material used at Reynolds was synthesized locally. Also, it appears that a single large batch was synthesized in that time period and used up to 1997 when the supply ran out. The reason for the inclusion of TiO2 is not known although it does act as a rheological thickener. However, a more controlled thickening can be obtained with materials such as fumed silica. This material would have less likelihood of causing point imperfections in the coatings. Also, the mixing technique being used for all stages of the process is a relatively low shear ball mill process and the author recommends a high shear process such as a three roll paint mill, at least for the final mixing. Since solvent is added to the powder at Reynolds, it may be that they need to have the paint mill there

  7. Advanced Marine Coatings for Naval Vessels - Phase 1. Antifouling and Fouling Release Coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McCarthy, Gregory

    2003-01-01

    ... in combinatorial materials chemistry high-throughput discovery and evaluation methodology. The protective coatings application being addressed is environmentally compliant antifouling and fouling release coating for Navy ships...

  8. Process for preparing coating materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryoke, Hideyasu; Kobayashi, Juichi; Kobayashi, Kei.

    1972-01-01

    A coating material curable with ionizing radiations or ultraviolet radiation can be prepared by reacting a compound (A) having one OH group and at least one α,β-ethylenic or allyl group with a polyisocyanate. (A) is a diester of a dicarboxylic acid. One of the ester groups may have a terminal α,β-ethylenic or allyl group and the other contains one OH and one α,β-ethylenic or allyl group. (A) is reacted with a polyisocyanate to yield an urethane. The latter may be diluted with a vinyl monomer. When exposed to a radiation, the coating material cures to give a film excellent in adhesion, impact strength and resistances to pollution, water and solvents. Dose of the ionizing radiation (α-, β-, γ-rays, electron beams) is 0.2-20 Mrad. In one example, 116 parts of 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate was reacted with 148 parts of phthalic anhydride and 142 parts of glycidyl methacrylate to give (A). (A) was reacted with 87 parts of tolylenediisocyanate. A metallic panel was coated with the coating material and cured with electron beams (5 Mrad). Pencil hardness was H, and gel fraction measured in acetone was above 97%. The coating was excellent in resistances to solvent and chemicals, impact strength and adhesion. (Kaichi, S.)

  9. Chromate conversion coatings and their current application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pokorny

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes formation, composition and possible production technologies of application chromate coatings. Summation of common examples of applications of these coatings in corrosion protection of metals and alloys is provided. Individual chromate coatings are divided by their dominant anions either with CrVI or CrIII. Restrictions of chromate coatings with dominantly CrVI and related toxicity of hexavalent chromium is discussed in detail. In conclusion, examples of both chromium and other, alternative coatings are summed up. Application of these coatings as a protection for concrete hot-dip galvanized reinforcement is also reviewed.

  10. Radiation curable compositions useful as transfer coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarty, W.H.; Nagy, F.A.; Guarino, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    The invention is on a method for applying a coating to a thin porous substrate and reducing absorption of the coating into the substrate by applying a radiation-curable composition to a carrying web; the radiation-curable coating composition having a crosslink density of 0.02 to about 1.0 determined by calculation of the gram moles of branch points per 100 grams of uncured coating, and a glass transition temperature of the radiation cured coating within the approximate range of -80 degrees to +100 degrees C. The carrying web being of a nature such that the coating composition, when cured, will not adhere to its surface

  11. Mixed zirconia calcium phosphate coatings for dental implants: Tailoring coating stability and bioactivity potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardun, Karoline; Treccani, Laura; Volkmann, Eike; Streckbein, Philipp; Heiss, Christian; Destri, Giovanni Li; Marletta, Giovanni; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced coating stability and adhesion are essential for long-term success of orthopedic and dental implants. In this study, the effect of coating composition on mechanical, physico-chemical and biological properties of coated zirconia specimens is investigated. Zirconia discs and dental screw implants are coated using the wet powder spraying (WPS) technique. The coatings are obtained by mixing yttria-stabilized zirconia (TZ) and hydroxyapatite (HA) in various ratios while a pure HA coating served as reference material. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical profilometer analysis confirm a similar coating morphology and roughness for all studied coatings, whereas the coating stability can be tailored with composition and is probed by insertion and dissections experiments in bovine bone with coated zirconia screw implants. An increasing content of calcium phosphate (CP) resulted in a decrease of mechanical and chemical stability, while the bioactivity increased in simulated body fluid (SBF). In vitro experiments with human osteoblast cells (HOB) revealed that the cells grew well on all samples but are affected by dissolution behavior of the studied coatings. This work demonstrates the overall good mechanical strength, the excellent interfacial bonding and the bioactivity potential of coatings with higher TZ contents, which provide a highly interesting coating for dental implants. - Highlights: • Different ratios of zirconia (TZ) and calcium phosphate (CP) were deposited on zirconia substrates. • Enhancement of TZ content in mixed coatings increased coating stability. • Enhancement of CP content in mixed coatings increased bioactivity. • All tested coating compositions were non-toxic

  12. Mixed zirconia calcium phosphate coatings for dental implants: Tailoring coating stability and bioactivity potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardun, Karoline [University of Bremen, Advanced Ceramics, Am Biologischen Garten 2, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Treccani, Laura, E-mail: treccani@uni-bremen.de [University of Bremen, Advanced Ceramics, Am Biologischen Garten 2, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Volkmann, Eike [University of Bremen, Advanced Ceramics, Am Biologischen Garten 2, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Streckbein, Philipp [University Hospital, Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Department of Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery, Klinikstrasse 33, 35385 Giessen (Germany); Heiss, Christian [University Hospital of Giessen-Marburg, Department of Trauma Surgery, Rudolf-Buchheim-Strasse 7, 35385 Giessen, Germany, (Germany); Laboratory of Experimental Surgery, Kerkraderstrasse 9, 35392 Giessen (Germany); Destri, Giovanni Li; Marletta, Giovanni [Laboratory for Molecular Surfaces and Nanotechnology (LAMSUN), Department of Chemistry, University of Catania and CSGI, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Rezwan, Kurosch [University of Bremen, Advanced Ceramics, Am Biologischen Garten 2, 28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    Enhanced coating stability and adhesion are essential for long-term success of orthopedic and dental implants. In this study, the effect of coating composition on mechanical, physico-chemical and biological properties of coated zirconia specimens is investigated. Zirconia discs and dental screw implants are coated using the wet powder spraying (WPS) technique. The coatings are obtained by mixing yttria-stabilized zirconia (TZ) and hydroxyapatite (HA) in various ratios while a pure HA coating served as reference material. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical profilometer analysis confirm a similar coating morphology and roughness for all studied coatings, whereas the coating stability can be tailored with composition and is probed by insertion and dissections experiments in bovine bone with coated zirconia screw implants. An increasing content of calcium phosphate (CP) resulted in a decrease of mechanical and chemical stability, while the bioactivity increased in simulated body fluid (SBF). In vitro experiments with human osteoblast cells (HOB) revealed that the cells grew well on all samples but are affected by dissolution behavior of the studied coatings. This work demonstrates the overall good mechanical strength, the excellent interfacial bonding and the bioactivity potential of coatings with higher TZ contents, which provide a highly interesting coating for dental implants. - Highlights: • Different ratios of zirconia (TZ) and calcium phosphate (CP) were deposited on zirconia substrates. • Enhancement of TZ content in mixed coatings increased coating stability. • Enhancement of CP content in mixed coatings increased bioactivity. • All tested coating compositions were non-toxic.

  13. Optical characterization of antirelaxation coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkov, S.; Gateva, S.; Cartaleva, S.; Mariotti, E.; Nasyrov, K.

    2018-03-01

    Antirelaxation coatings (ARC) are used in optical cells containing alkali metal vapor to reduce the depolarization of alkali atoms after collisions with the cell walls. The long-lived ground state polarization is a basis for development of atomic clocks, magnetometers, quantum memory, slow light experiments, precision measurements of fundamental symmetries etc. In this work, a simple method for measuring the number of collisions of the alkali atoms with the cell walls without atomic spin randomization (Nasyrov et al., Proc. SPIE (2015)) was applied to characterize the AR properties of two PDMS coatings prepared from different solutions in ether (PDMS 2% and PDMS 5%). We observed influence of the light-induced atomic desorption (LIAD) on the AR properties of coatings.

  14. Radiation-curable coating composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mibae, Jiro; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masao.

    1970-01-01

    A radiation-curable coating composition, suitable for metal precoating, is provided. The composition is prepared by mixing 50 to 90 parts of a long chain fatty acid ester (A) with 10 to 50 parts of monomer (B) which is copolymerizable with (A). (A) is prepared by reacting a dimer acid (particularly the dimer of linolenic acid) with hydroxyalkyl methacrylate or glycidyl methacrylate. Upon irradiation with electron beams (0.1 to 3 MeV) the composition cures to yield a coating of high adhesion, impact resistance and bending resistance. In one example, 100 g of dimer acid (Versadime 216, manufactured by General Mills) was esterified with 50 g of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate. A zinc plated iron plate was coated with the product and irradiated with electron beams (2 Mrad). Pencil hardness was F; adhesion 0: impact resistance (Du Pont) 1 kg x 30 cm; bending resistance 2T. (Kaichi, S.)

  15. Evaluation of End Mill Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. J. Lazarus; R. L. Hester,

    2005-08-01

    Milling tests were run on families of High Speed Steel (HSS) end mills to determine their lives while machining 304 Stainless Steel. The end mills tested were made from M7, M42 and T15-CPM High Speed Steels. The end mills were also evaluated with no coatings as well as with Titanium Nitride (TiN) and Titanium Carbo-Nitride (TiCN) coatings to determine which combination of HSS and coating provided the highest increase in end mill life while increasing the cost of the tool the least. We found end mill made from M42 gave us the largest increase in tool life with the least increase in cost. The results of this study will be used by Cutting Tool Engineering in determining which end mill descriptions will be dropped from our tool catalog.

  16. Studies on soft centered coated snacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavithra, A S; Chetana, Ramakrishna; Babylatha, R; Archana, S N; Bhat, K K

    2013-04-01

    Roasted groundnut seeds, amaranth and dates pulp formed the center filling which was coated with sugar, breadings, desiccated coconut and roasted Bengalgram flour (BGF) to get 4 coated snacks. Physicochemical characteristics, microbiological profile, sorption behaviour and sensory quality of 4 coated snacks were determined. Centre filling to coating ratio of the products were in the range of 3:2-7:1, the product having BGF coating had the thinnest coating. Center filling had soft texture and the moisture content was 10.2-16.2% coating had lower moisture content (4.4-8.6%) except for Bengal gram coating, which had 11.1% moisture. Sugar coated snack has lowest fat (11.6%) and protein (7.2%) contents. Desiccated coconut coated snack has highest fat (25.4%) and Bengal gram flour coated snack had highest protein content (15.4%). Sorption studies showed that the coated snack had critical moisture content of 11.2-13.5%. The products were moisture sensitive and hence require packaging in films having higher moisture barrier property. In freshly prepared snacks coliforms, yeast and mold were absent. Mesophillic aerobes count did not show significant change during 90 days of storage at 27 °C and 37 °C. Sensory analysis showed that products had a unique texture due to combined effect of fairly hard coating and soft center. Flavour and overall quality of all the products were rated as very good.

  17. Nano-Ceramic Coated Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Junghyun

    2013-01-01

    Plastic products, due to their durability, safety, and low manufacturing cost, are now rapidly replacing cookware items traditionally made of glass and ceramics. Despite this trend, some still prefer relatively expensive and more fragile ceramic/glassware because plastics can deteriorate over time after exposure to foods, which can generate odors, bad appearance, and/or color change. Nano-ceramic coatings can eliminate these drawbacks while still retaining the advantages of the plastic, since the coating only alters the surface of the plastic. The surface coating adds functionality to the plastics such as self-cleaning and disinfectant capabilities that result from a photocatalytic effect of certain ceramic systems. These ceramic coatings can also provide non-stick surfaces and higher temperature capabilities for the base plastics without resorting to ceramic or glass materials. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) are the candidates for a nano-ceramic coating to deposit on the plastics or plastic films used in cookware and kitchenware. Both are wide-bandgap semiconductors (3.0 to 3.2 eV for TiO2 and 3.2 to 3.3 eV for ZnO), so they exhibit a photocatalytic property under ultraviolet (UV) light. This will lead to decomposition of organic compounds. Decomposed products can be easily washed off by water, so the use of detergents will be minimal. High-crystalline film with large surface area for the reaction is essential to guarantee good photocatalytic performance of these oxides. Low-temperature processing (nano-ceramic coatings (TiO2, ZnO) on plastic materials (silicone, Teflon, PET, etc.) that can possess both photocatalytic oxide properties and flexible plastic properties. Processing cost is low and it does not require any expensive equipment investment. Processing can be scalable to current manufacturing infrastructure.

  18. On niobium sputter coated cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnolds-Mayer, G.; Kaufmann, U.; Downar, H.

    1988-01-01

    To coat copper cavities with a thin film of niobium, facilities for electropolishing and sputter deposition have been installed at Dornier. Experiments have been performed on samples to optimize electropolishing and deposition parameters. In this paper, characteristics concerning surface properties, adhesion of the niobium film to the copper substrate, and film properties were studied on planar samples. A 1.5 GHz single cell cavity made from oxygen free high conductivity (OFHC) copper was sputter coated twice. First rf measurements were performed in the temperature range from 300 K to 2 K

  19. Corrosion-resistant coating development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinton, D.P.; Kupp, D.M.; Martin, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    SiC-based heat exchangers have been identified as the prime candidate material for use as heat exchangers in advanced combined cycle power plants. Unfortunately, hot corrosion of the SiC-based materials created by alkali metal salts present in the combustion gases dictates the need for corrosion-resistant coatings. The well-documented corrosion resistance of CS-50 combined with its low (and tailorable) coefficient of thermal expansion and low modulus makes CS-50 an ideal candidate for this application. Coatings produced by gelcasting and traditional particulate processing have been evaluated.

  20. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng [Newton, MA; Wen, Jian [Newton, MA; Chen, Jinghua [Chestnut Hill, MA; Huang, Zhongping [Belmont, MA; Wang, Dezhi [Wellesley, MA

    2008-10-28

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  1. Laser-based coatings removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freiwald, J.G.; Freiwald, D.

    1995-01-01

    Over the years as building and equipment surfaces became contaminated with low levels of uranium or plutonium dust, coats of paint were applied to stabilize the contaminants in place. Most of the earlier paint used was lead-based paint. More recently, various non-lead-based paints, such as two-part epoxy, are used. For D ampersand D (decontamination and decommissioning), it is desirable to remove the paints or other coatings rather than having to tear down and dispose of the entire building

  2. Aesthetic coatings for concrete bridge components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriha, Brent R.

    This thesis evaluated the durability and aesthetic performance of coating systems for utilization in concrete bridge applications. The principle objectives of this thesis were: 1) Identify aesthetic coating systems appropriate for concrete bridge applications; 2) Evaluate the performance of the selected systems through a laboratory testing regimen; 3) Develop guidelines for coating selection, surface preparation, and application. A series of site visits to various bridges throughout the State of Wisconsin provided insight into the performance of common coating systems and allowed problematic structural details to be identified. To aid in the selection of appropriate coating systems, questionnaires were distributed to coating manufacturers, bridge contractors, and various DOT offices to identify high performing coating systems and best practices for surface preparation and application. These efforts supplemented a literature review investigating recent publications related to formulation, selection, surface preparation, application, and performance evaluation of coating materials.

  3. Coated foams, preparation, uses and articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchane, D.V.; Barthell, B.L.

    1982-10-21

    Hydrophobic cellular material is coated with a thin hydrophilic polymer skin which stretches tightly over the foam but which does not fill the cells of the foam, thus resulting in a polymer-coated foam structure having a smoothness which was not possible in the prior art. In particular, when the hydrophobic cellular material is a specially chosen hydrophobic polymer foam and is formed into arbitrarily chosen shapes prior to the coating with hydrophilic polymer, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets of arbitrary shapes can be produced by subsequently coating the shapes with metal or with any other suitable material. New articles of manufacture are produced, including improved ICF targets, improved integrated circuits, and improved solar reflectors and solar collectors. In the coating method, the cell size of the hydrophobic cellular material, the viscosity of the polymer solution used to coat, and the surface tension of the polymer solution used to coat are all very important to the coating.

  4. Friction- and wear-reducing coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong [Farmington Hills, MI; Milner, Robert [Warren, MI; Elmoursi, Alaa AbdelAzim [Troy, MI

    2011-10-18

    A coating includes a first layer of a ceramic alloy and a second layer disposed on the first layer and including carbon. The coating has a hardness of from 10 to 20 GPa and a coefficient of friction of less than or equal to 0.12. A method of coating a substrate includes cleaning the substrate, forming the first layer on the substrate, and depositing the second layer onto the first layer to thereby coat the substrate.

  5. Functional coatings: the sol-gel approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belleville, Ph.

    2010-01-01

    CEA's sol-gel laboratory is specialized in the development of innovative sol-gel optical coatings and has extended its application field to membrane materials and coatings for energy conversion, to electric coatings for microelectronics devices and to thin films for gas sensing. This article describes, by way of examples, the laboratory's research on sol-gel functional coatings, including nano-material synthesis, organic-inorganic hybrid-based solution preparation as well as deposition process development and prototyping. (author)

  6. Sputter coating of microspherical substrates by levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, A.T.; Hosford, C.D.

    Microspheres are substantially uniformly coated with metals or nonmetals by simltaneously levitating them and sputter coating them at total chamber pressures less than 1 torr. A collimated hole structure comprising a parallel array of upwardly projecting individual gas outlets is machined out to form a dimple. Glass microballoons,, which are particularly useful in laser fusion applications, can be substantially uniformly coated using the coating method and apparatus.

  7. Laser reflector with an interference coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vol'pyan, O D; Semenov, A A; Yakovlev, P P

    1998-01-01

    An analysis was made of the reflectivity of interference coatings intended for the use in optical pumping of solid-state lasers. Ruby and Nd 3+ :YAG lasers were used as models in comparative pumping efficiency measurements, carried out employing reflectors with interference and silver coatings. Estimates of the service life of reflectors with interference coatings were obtained. The power of a thermo-optical lens was reduced by the use of such coatings in cw lasers. (laser system components)

  8. Absorptive coating for aluminum solar panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmet, D.; Jason, A.; Parr, A.

    1979-01-01

    Method for coating forming coating of copper oxide from copper component of sheet aluminum/copper alloy provides strong durable solar heat collector panels. Copper oxide coating has solar absorption characteristics similar to black chrome and is much simpler and less costly to produce.

  9. Multispectral Image Analysis for Astaxanthin Coating Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungqvist, Martin Georg; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Nielsen, Michael Engelbrecht

    2012-01-01

    Industrial quality inspection using image analysis on astaxanthin coating in aquaculture feed pellets is of great importance for automatic production control. The pellets were divided into two groups: one with pellets coated using synthetic astaxanthin in fish oil and the other with pellets coated...

  10. ETV Program Report: Coatings for Wastewater Collection ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Standard Cement Materials, Inc. Standard Epoxy Coating 4553™ (SEC 4553) epoxy coating used for wastewater collection system rehabilitation was evaluated by EPA’s Environmental Technology Verification Program under laboratory conditions at the Center for Innovative Grouting Material and Technology (CIGMAT) Laboratory at the University of Houston. Testing was conducted over a period of six months to evaluate the coating’s (1) chemical resistance and (2) bonding strength for infrastructure applications. For chemical resistance, coated concrete and clay bricks with holidays (holes created in the coating) were used to evaluate the chemical resistance of the coating/substrate bond under a corrosive environment. Twenty coated concrete (dry and wet) and 20 coated clay brick (dry and wet) specimens were exposed to DI water and sulfuric acid solution (pH=1), and the specimens were visually inspected and weight changes measured. Evaluation of the coating-to-substrate bonding strength was determined using two modified ASTM test methods – one to determine bond strength of the coating with two specimens sandwiched together using the coating, and the second to determine the bond strength by applying a tensile load to the coating applied to specimens of each substrate. Forty-eight bonding tests were performed over the six month evaluation. The tests resulted in the following conclusions about Standard Cement’s SEC 4553 coating: • After the six-month chemi

  11. Study on nano-coating on uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yongbin; Xian Xiaobin; Lu Xuechao; Lang Dingmu; Li Kexue; Tang Kai

    2002-01-01

    The SiO 2 , TiO 2 coatings on uranium have been prepared by sol-gel method under different processes. By evaluating the coating quality with SEM, the optimal process parameters have been determined. Corrosion test shows that the coatings have anticorrosion property

  12. Latest Developments in PVD Coatings for Tooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Strnad

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the recent developments in the field of PVD coating for manufacturing tools. A review of monoblock, multilayer, nanocomposite, DLC and oxinitride coatings is discussed, with the emphasis on coatings which enables the manufacturers to implement high productivity processes such as high speed cutting and dry speed machining.

  13. Method for coating substrates and mask holder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijkerk, Frederik; Yakshin, Andrey; Louis, Eric; Kessels, M.J.H.; Maas, Edward Lambertus Gerardus; Bruineman, Caspar

    2004-01-01

    When coating substrates it is frequently desired that the layer thickness should be a certain function of the position on the substrate to be coated. To control the layer thickness a mask is conventionally arranged between the coating particle source and the substrate. This leads to undesirable

  14. Sonochemical coating of magnetite nanoparticles with silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Feng; Enomoto, Naoya; Hojo, Junichi; Enpuku, Keiji

    2010-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles were coated with silica through the hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) under ultrasonic irradiation. The ultrasonic irradiation was used to prevent the agglomeration of the magnetite particles and accelerate the hydrolysis and condensation of TEOS. TEM, DLS, XRF, VSM, TG and sedimentation test were used to characterize the silica-coated magnetite particles. The dispersibility of silica-coated magnetite particles in aqueous solution was improved significantly and the agglomerate particle size was decreased to 110 nm. It was found that the agglomerate particle size of silica-coated magnetite particles was mainly decided by the coating temperature and the pH value in the silica-coating process. The weight ratio of silica in silica-coated magnetite particles was mainly decided by the pH value in the silica-coating process. The dispersibility of silica-coated magnetite particles was mainly decided by the agglomerate particle size of the suspension. The oxidation of magnetite particles in air was limited through the coated silica. The magnetism of silica-coated magnetite particles decreased slightly after silica-coating.

  15. Amphiphilic copolymers for fouling-release coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noguer, Albert Camós; Olsen, Stefan Møller; Hvilsted, Søren

    of the coatings [9,10,11]. This work shows the effect of an amphiphilic copolymer that induces hydrophilicity on the surface of the silicone-based fouling release coatings. The behaviour of these copolymers within the coating upon immersion and the interaction of these surface-active additives with other...

  16. Modifications of optical properties with ceramic coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besmann, T.M.; Abdel-Latif, A.I.

    1990-01-01

    Coatings of ceramic materials that exhibited high thermal absorptivities and emissivities were chemical vapor deposited on graphite and refractory metals. In this paper the coatings prepared were SiC and B 4 C, and the substrates used were graphite, molybdenum, titanium, and Nb-1Zr. The coatings are characterized with regard to adherence, optical properties, and response to potential harsh environments

  17. Coat Hangers across the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibble, Bob

    2012-01-01

    There are many ways in which wire coat hangers can be used other than for suspending clothes. The author has been making use of them in his teaching for many years--copying ideas from colleagues and creating some for himself. In this article, he shares five examples that can enrich learning about science. (Contains 6 figures.)

  18. Electron curing of surface coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nablo, S.V.

    1974-01-01

    The technical development of electron curing of surface coatings has received great impetus since 1970 from dramatic changes in the economics of the conventional thermal process. The most important of these changes are reviewed, including: the Clear Air Act, increasing cost and restrictive allocation of energy, decreased availability and increased costs of solvents, competitive pressure for higher line productivity. The principles of free-radical initiated curing as they pertain to industrial coatings are reviewed. Although such electron initiated processes have been under active development for at least two decades, high volume production applications on an industrial scale have only recently appeared. These installations are surveyed with emphasis on the developments in machinery and coatings which have made this possible. The most significant economic advantages of electron curing are presented. In particular, the ability of electron curing to eliminate substrate damage and to eliminate the curing station (oven) as the pacing element for most industrial surface coating curing applications is discussed. Examples of several new processes of particular interest in the textile industry are reviewed, including the curing of transfer cast urethane films, flock adhesives, and graftable surface finishes

  19. Polymer-coated quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomczak, N.; Liu, Rongrong; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2013-01-01

    Quantum Dots (QDs) are semiconductor nanocrystals with distinct photophysical properties finding applications in biology, biosensing, and optoelectronics. Polymeric coatings of QDs are used primarily to provide long-term colloidal stability to QDs dispersed in solutions and also as a source of

  20. Industrial Coatings at Extreme Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subramanian, Srinath; Pérez Hornero, Clara; Pedersen, Lars Thorslund

    With the gradual depletion of oil wells operable at relatively lower temperatures and pressures, the upstream oil industry relies on High Pressure High Temperature (HPHT) wells to source crude oil and gas. HPHT well extraction and processing require anticorrosive coatings applied on substrates...

  1. Water transport in multilayer coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baukh, V.

    2012-01-01

    Coatings form the interface between structures and the environment in many application domains. They play a crucial role in providing protection, e.g. against corrosion, they form a barrier against an aggressive environment and they create the aesthetic appearance. To fulfill such functionalities,

  2. UNDERWATER COATINGS FOR CONTAMINATION CONTROL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

    2004-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) deactivated several aging nuclear fuel storage basins. Planners for this effort were greatly concerned that radioactive contamination present on the basin walls could become airborne as the sides of the basins became exposed during deactivation and allowed to dry after water removal. One way to control this airborne contamination was to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls were still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market for marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives were easily applied and adhered well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INL fuel pools. Lab-scale experiments were conducted by applying fourteen different commercial underwater coatings to four substrate materials representative of the storage basin construction materials, and evaluating their performance. The coupons included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The evaluation criteria included ease of application, adherence to the four surfaces of interest, no change on water clarity or chemistry, non-hazardous in final applied form and be proven in underwater applications. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates was selected from the underwater coatings tested for application to all four pools. Divers scrubbed loose contamination off the basin walls and floors using a ship hull scrubber and vacuumed up the sludge. The divers then applied the coating using a special powered roller with two separate heated hoses that allowed the epoxy to mix at the roller surface was used to eliminate pot time concerns. The walls were successfully coated and water was removed from the pools with no detectable airborne contamination releases

  3. Atomically Bonded Transparent Superhydrophobic Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aytug, Tolga [ORNL

    2015-08-01

    Maintaining clarity and avoiding the accumulation of water and dirt on optically transparent surfaces such as US military vehicle windshields, viewports, periscope optical head windows, and electronic equipment cover glasses are critical to providing a high level of visibility, improved survivability, and much-needed safety for warfighters in the field. Through a combination of physical vapor deposition techniques and the exploitation of metastable phase separation in low-alkali borosilicate, a novel technology was developed for the fabrication of optically transparent, porous nanostructured silica thin film coatings that are strongly bonded to glass platforms. The nanotextured films, initially structurally superhydrophilic, exhibit superior superhydrophobicity, hence antisoiling ability, following a simple but robust modification in surface chemistry. The surfaces yield water droplet contact angles as high as 172°. Moreover, the nanostructured nature of these coatings provides increased light scattering in the UV regime and reduced reflectivity (i.e., enhanced transmission) over a broad range of the visible spectrum. In addition to these functionalities, the coatings exhibit superior mechanical resistance to abrasion and are thermally stable to temperatures approaching 500°C. The overall process technology relies on industry standard equipment and inherently scalable manufacturing processes and demands only nontoxic, naturally abundant, and inexpensive base materials. Such coatings, applied to the optical components of current and future combat equipment and military vehicles will provide a significant strategic advantage for warfighters. The inherent self-cleaning properties of such superhydrophobic coatings will also mitigate biofouling of optical windows exposed to high-humidity conditions and can help decrease repair/replacement costs, reduce maintenance, and increase readiness by limiting equipment downtime.

  4. Ultrasonic tests on materials with protective coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whaley, H.L.

    1977-01-01

    Protective coatings are applied to some nuclear components such as reactor vessels to inhibit surface corrosion. Since in-service ultrasonic inspection is required for such components, a study was performed to determine whether the use of protective coatings can affect ultrasonic tests. Two 2 in. thick steel plates were uniformly machined, sandblasted, and used as bases for two types of protective coatings. The type and thickness of the coating and the presence of contamination, such as fingerprints or mild oxidation under the paint, were the independent variables associated with the coating. Tests were run to determine the effects of the protective coatings on ultrasonic tests conducted on the steel plates. Significant variations in ultrasonic test sensitivity occurred as a function of the type and thickness of protective coating, couplant (material that conducts the ultrasound from the transducer into the test part, normally water or some type of oil), transducer wear plate, and ultrasonic test frequency. Ultrasonic tests can be strongly affected by a protective coating on the component to be inspected. As compared to the test sensitivity for an uncoated reference sample, the sensitivity may be dramatically shifted up or down on the coated surface. In certain coating thickness ranges, the sensitivity can fluctuate widely with small changes in coating thickness. If a coating is chosen properly, however, components with protective coatings can be tested ultrasonically with valid results. These results are for the case of ultrasonic input on the coated surface. It is not expected that an ultrasonic test conducted from the front surface would be appreciably affected by a coating on the rear surface

  5. Preparation of sustained release capsules by electrostatic dry powder coating, using traditional dip coating as reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan; Shen, Lian; Yuan, Feng; Fu, Hui; Shan, Weiguang

    2018-05-30

    Lately, a great deal of attention is being paid to capsule coating, since the coat protects active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) from damage, as is in the case of tablet and pellet. However, moisture and heat sensitivity of gelatin shells make it challenging to coat capsules using the conventional aqueous coating techniques. In an effort to overcome this challenge, the present study aims to coat capsules using two different coating techniques: electrostatic dry powder coating (EDPC) and dip coating (DC). Both capsule coatings and free films were prepared by these two coating techniques, and the effects of coating formulations and processing conditions on the film quality were investigated. The corresponding drug in vitro release and mechanisms were characterized and compared. The results of dissolution tests demonstrated that the drug release behavior of both EDPC and DC coated capsules could be optimized to a sustained release of 24 h, following the Fick's diffusion law. The results of this study suggest that EDPC method is better than DC method for coating capsules, with respect to the higher production efficiency and better stability, indicating that this dry coating technology has promised in gelatin capsule coating applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Levitation, coating, and transport of particulate materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    Several processes in various fields require uniformly thick coatings and layers on small particles. The particles may be used as carriers of catalytic materials (platinum or other coatings), as laser fusion targets (various polymer or metallic coatings), or for biological or other tracer or interactive processes. We have devised both molecular beam and electro-dynamic techniques for levitation of the particles during coating and electrodynamic methods of controlling and transporting the particles between coating steps and to final use locations. Both molecular beam and electrodynamic techniques are described and several advantages and limitations of each will be discussed. A short movie of an operating electrodynamic levitation and transport apparatus will be shown

  7. Coatings for fast breeder reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.N.

    1984-04-01

    Several types of metallurgical coatings are used in the unique environments of the fast breeder reactor. Most of the coatings have been developed for tribological applications, but some also serve as corrosion barriers, diffusion barriers, or radionuclide traps. The materials that have consistently given the best performance as tribological coatings in the breeder reactor environments have been coatings based on chromium carbide, nickel aluminide, or Tribaloy 700 (a nickel-base hard-facing alloy). Other coatings that have been qualified for limited applications include chromium plating for low temperature galling protection and nickel plating for radionuclide trapping

  8. Transparent nanocrystalline diamond coatings and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Khan, Adam

    2017-08-22

    A method for coating a substrate comprises producing a plasma ball using a microwave plasma source in the presence of a mixture of gases. The plasma ball has a diameter. The plasma ball is disposed at a first distance from the substrate and the substrate is maintained at a first temperature. The plasma ball is maintained at the first distance from the substrate, and a diamond coating is deposited on the substrate. The diamond coating has a thickness. Furthermore, the diamond coating has an optical transparency of greater than about 80%. The diamond coating can include nanocrystalline diamond. The microwave plasma source can have a frequency of about 915 MHz.

  9. Evaluation of irradiated coating material specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Jin; Nam, Seok Woo; Cho, Lee Moon

    2007-12-01

    Evaluation result of irradiated coating material specimens - Coating material specimens radiated Gamma Energy(Co 60) in air condition. - Evaluation conditions was above 1 X 10 4 Gy/hr, and radiated TID 2.0 X 10 6 Gy. - The radiated coating material specimens, No Checking, Cracking, Flaking, Delamination, Peeling and Blistering. - Coating system at the Kori no. 1 and APR 1400 Nuclear power plant, evaluation of irradiated coating materials is in accordance with owner's requirement(2.0 X 10 6 Gy)

  10. Statistical experimental design for refractory coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinnon, J.A.; Standard, O.C.

    2000-01-01

    The production of refractory coatings on metal casting moulds is critically dependent on the development of suitable rheological characteristics, such as viscosity and thixotropy, in the initial coating slurry. In this paper, the basic concepts of mixture design and analysis are applied to the formulation of a refractory coating, with illustration by a worked example. Experimental data of coating viscosity versus composition are fitted to a statistical model to obtain a reliable method of predicting the optimal formulation of the coating. Copyright (2000) The Australian Ceramic Society

  11. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott t.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on microencapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of existing microcapsulation designs, the corrosion controlled release function that triggers the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand, only when and where needed. Microencapsulation of self-healing agents for autonomous repair of mechanical damage to the coating is also being pursued. Corrosion indicators, corrosion inhibitors, as well as self-healing agents, have been encapsulated and dispersed into several paint systems to test the corrosion detection, inhibition, and self-healing properties of the coating. Key words: Corrosion, coating, autonomous corrosion control, corrosion indication, corrosion inhibition, self-healing coating, smart coating, multifunctional coating, microencapsulation.

  12. Black molecular adsorber coatings for spaceflight applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Nithin S.; Hasegawa, Mark M.; Straka, Sharon A.

    2014-09-01

    The molecular adsorber coating is a new technology that was developed to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination on spaceflight missions. The application of this coating would be ideal near highly sensitive, interior surfaces and instruments that are negatively impacted by outgassed molecules from materials, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, epoxies, and other similar compounds. This current, sprayable paint technology is comprised of inorganic white materials made from highly porous zeolite. In addition to good adhesion performance, thermal stability, and adsorptive capability, the molecular adsorber coating offers favorable thermal control characteristics. However, low reflectivity properties, which are typically offered by black thermal control coatings, are desired for some spaceflight applications. For example, black coatings are used on interior surfaces, in particular, on instrument baffles for optical stray light control. Similarly, they are also used within light paths between optical systems, such as telescopes, to absorb light. Recent efforts have been made to transform the white molecular adsorber coating into a black coating with similar adsorptive properties. This result is achieved by optimizing the current formulation with black pigments, while still maintaining its adsorption capability for outgassing control. Different binder to pigment ratios, coating thicknesses, and spray application techniques were explored to develop a black version of the molecular adsorber coating. During the development process, coating performance and adsorption characteristics were studied. The preliminary work performed on black molecular adsorber coatings thus far is very promising. Continued development and testing is necessary for its use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  13. Solar Absorptance of Cermet Coatings Evaluated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworske, Donald A.

    2004-01-01

    Cermet coatings, molecular mixtures of metal and ceramic, are being considered for the heat inlet surface of solar Stirling convertors. In this application, the key role of the cermet coating is to absorb as much of the incident solar energy as possible. To achieve this objective, the cermet coating has a high solar absorptance value. Cermet coatings are manufactured utilizing sputter deposition, and many different metal and ceramic combinations can be created. The ability to mix metal and ceramic at the atomic level offers the opportunity to tailor the composition, and hence, the optical properties of these coatings. The NASA Glenn Research Center has prepared and characterized a wide variety of cermet coatings utilizing different metals deposited in an aluminum oxide ceramic matrix. In addition, the atomic oxygen durability of these coatings has been evaluated.

  14. Armor systems including coated core materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Henry S [Idaho Falls, ID; Lillo, Thomas M [Idaho Falls, ID; McHugh, Kevin M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-07-31

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

  15. Electrical contact arrangement for a coating process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabagambe, Benjamin; McCamy, James W; Boyd, Donald W

    2013-09-17

    A protective coating is applied to the electrically conductive surface of a reflective coating of a solar mirror by biasing a conductive member having a layer of a malleable electrically conductive material, e.g. a paste, against a portion of the conductive surface while moving an electrodepositable coating composition over the conductive surface. The moving of the electrodepositable coating composition over the conductive surface includes moving the solar mirror through a flow curtain of the electrodepositable coating composition and submerging the solar mirror in a pool of the electrodepositable coating composition. The use of the layer of a malleable electrically conductive material between the conductive member and the conductive surface compensates for irregularities in the conductive surface being contacted during the coating process thereby reducing the current density at the electrical contact area.

  16. Electrostatic coating technologies for food processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barringer, Sheryl A; Sumonsiri, Nutsuda

    2015-01-01

    The application of electrostatics in both powder and liquid coating can improve the quality of food, such as its appearance, aroma, taste, and shelf life. Coatings can be found most commonly in the snack food industry, as well as in confectionery, bakery, meat and cheese processing. In electrostatic powder coating, the most important factors influencing coating quality are powder particle size, density, flowability, charge, and resistivity, as well as the surface properties and characteristics of the target. The most important factors during electrostatic liquid coating, also known as electrohydrodynamic coating, include applied voltage and electrical resistivity and viscosity of the liquid. A good understanding of these factors is needed for the design of optimal coating systems for food processing.

  17. Nanocomposite Coatings: Preparation, Characterization, Properties, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuong Nguyen-Tri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Incorporation of nanofillers into the organic coatings might enhance their barrier performance, by decreasing the porosity and zigzagging the diffusion path for deleterious species. Thus, the coatings containing nanofillers are expected to have significant barrier properties for corrosion protection and reduce the trend for the coating to blister or delaminate. On the other hand, high hardness could be obtained for metallic coatings by producing the hard nanocrystalline phases within a metallic matrix. This article presents a review on recent development of nanocomposite coatings, providing an overview of nanocomposite coatings in various aspects dealing with the classification, preparative method, the nanocomposite coating properties, and characterization methods. It covers potential applications in areas such as the anticorrosion, antiwear, superhydrophobic area, self-cleaning, antifouling/antibacterial area, and electronics. Finally, conclusion and future trends will be also reported.

  18. Nanostructured thin films and coatings mechanical properties

    CERN Document Server

    2010-01-01

    The first volume in "The Handbook of Nanostructured Thin Films and Coatings" set, this book concentrates on the mechanical properties, such as hardness, toughness, and adhesion, of thin films and coatings. It discusses processing, properties, and performance and provides a detailed analysis of theories and size effects. The book presents the fundamentals of hard and superhard nanocomposites and heterostructures, assesses fracture toughness and interfacial adhesion strength of thin films and hard nanocomposite coatings, and covers the processing and mechanical properties of hybrid sol-gel-derived nanocomposite coatings. It also uses nanomechanics to optimize coatings for cutting tools and explores various other coatings, such as diamond, metal-containing amorphous carbon nanostructured, and transition metal nitride-based nanolayered multilayer coatings.

  19. ANTIREFLECTION MULTILAYER COATINGS WITH THIN METAL LAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Gubanova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The design of anti-reflective coatings for metal surfaces of Al, Ti, N,i Cr is proposed. The coatings have the form of alternating layers of dielectric/metal/dielectric with the number of cells up to15. The method of calculation of such coatings is proposed. We have calculated the coatings of the type [HfO2/Cr/HfO2]15, [ZrO2/Ti/Al2O3]15, [ZrO2/Cr/ZrO2]15. It is shown that the proposed interference coatings provide reduction of the residual reflectance of the metal several times (from 3.5 to 6.0 in a wide spectral range (300-1000 nm. The proposed coatings can be recommended as anti-reflective coatings for energy saving solar systems and batteries, and photovoltaic cells.

  20. Wear performance of laser processed tantalum coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittrick, Stanley; Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Bose, Susmita; Bandyopadhyay, Amit, E-mail: amitband@wsu.edu

    2011-12-01

    This first generation investigation evaluates the in vitro tribological performance of laser-processed Ta coatings on Ti for load-bearing implant applications. Linear reciprocating wear tests in simulated body fluid showed one order of magnitude less wear rate, of the order of 10{sup -4} mm{sup 3}(N.m){sup -1}, for Ta coatings compared to Ti. Our results demonstrate that Ta coatings can potentially minimize the early-stage bone-implant interface micro-motion induced wear debris generation due to their excellent bioactivity comparable to that of hydroxyapatite (HA), high wear resistance and toughness compared to popular HA coatings. Highlights: {yields} In vitro wear performance of laser processed Ta coatings on Ti was evaluated. {yields} Wear tests in SBF showed one order of magnitude less wear for Ta coatings than Ti. {yields} Ta coatings can minimize early-stage micro-motion induced wear debris generation.

  1. High efficiency turbine blade coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youchison, Dennis L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gallis, Michail A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The development of advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) that exhibit lower thermal conductivity through better control of electron beam - physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processing is of prime interest to both the aerospace and power industries. This report summarizes the work performed under a two-year Lab-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project (38664) to produce lower thermal conductivity, graded-layer thermal barrier coatings for turbine blades in an effort to increase the efficiency of high temperature gas turbines. This project was sponsored by the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Investment Area. Therefore, particular importance was given to the processing of the large blades required for industrial gas turbines proposed for use in the Brayton cycle of nuclear plants powered by high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). During this modest (~1 full-time equivalent (FTE)) project, the processing technology was developed to create graded TBCs by coupling ion beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) with substrate pivoting in the alumina-YSZ system. The Electron Beam - 1200 kW (EB-1200) PVD system was used to deposit a variety of TBC coatings with micron layered microstructures and reduced thermal conductivity below 1.5 W/m.K. The use of IBAD produced fully stoichiometric coatings at a reduced substrate temperature of 600°C and a reduced oxygen background pressure of 0.1 Pa. IBAD was also used to successfully demonstrate the transitioning of amorphous PVD-deposited alumina to the -phase alumina required as an oxygen diffusion barrier and for good adhesion to the substrate Ni2Al3 bondcoat. This process replaces the time consuming thermally grown oxide formation required before the YSZ deposition. In addition to the process technology, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo plume modeling and spectroscopic characterization of the PVD plumes were performed. The project consisted of five tasks. These included the

  2. Wrinkling of solidifying polymeric coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Soumendra Kumar

    2005-07-01

    In coatings, wrinkles are viewed as defects or as desired features for low gloss, and texture. In either case, discovering the origin of wrinkles and the conditions that lead to their formation is important. This research examines what wrinkling requires and proposes a mechanism to explain the observations. All curing wrinkling coatings contain multi-functional reactants. Upon curing, all develop a depth-wise gradient in solidification that result in a cross-linked elastic skin atop a viscous bottom layer. It is hypothesized that compressive stress develops in the skin when liquid below diffuses up into the skin. High enough compressive stress buckles the skin to produce wrinkles. The hypothesis is substantiated by experimental and theoretical evidences. Effects of various application and compositional parameters on wrinkle size in a liquid-applied acrylic coating and a powder-applied epoxy coating were examined. All three components, namely resin, cross-linker and catalyst blocked with at least equimolar volatile blocker, proved to be required for wrinkling. The wrinkling phenomenon was modeled with a theory that accounts for gradient generation, cross-linking reaction and skinning; predictions compared well with observations. Two-layer non-curing coatings that have a stiff elastic layer atop a complaint elastic bottom layer wrinkled when the top layer is compressed. The top layer was compressed by either moisture absorption or differential thermal expansion. Experimental observations compared well with predictions from a theory based on force balance in multilayer systems subjected to differential contraction or expansion. A model based on the Flory-Rehner free energy of a constrained cross-linked gel was constructed that predicts the compressive stress generated in a coating when it absorbs solvent. Linear stability analysis predicts that when a compressed elastic layer is attached atop a viscous layer, it is always unstable to buckles whose wavelength exceeds a

  3. Development and electrochemical characterization of Ni‐P coated tungsten incorporated electroless nickel coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibli, S.M.A., E-mail: smashibli@yahoo.com; Chinchu, K.S.

    2016-08-01

    Ni‐P-W alloy and composite coatings were prepared by incorporation of sodium tungstate/tungsten and Ni‐P coated tungsten into electroless nickel bath respectively. Good inter-particle interactions among the depositing elements i.e. Ni and P with the incorporating tungsten particles were achieved by means of pre-coated tungsten particle by electroless nickel covering prior to its addition into the electroless bath. The pre-coated tungsten particles got incorporated uniformly into the Ni-P matrix of the coating. The particles and the coatings were characterized at different stages by different techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The electroless Ni-P coating incorporated with pre-coated tungsten exhibited considerably high hardness, thickness and deposition rate. The performance and corrosion resistance characteristics of the composite coating incorporated with the nickel coated tungsten were found to be superior over other conventional Ni-P-W ternary alloy coatings currently reported. - Highlights: • An amorphous Ni-P coating was effectively formed on tungsten particles. • Electroless ternary Ni-P-W composite coatings were successfully prepared. • Enhancement in the inter-particle interaction in the Ni-P composite matrix was achieved. • Efficient and uniform incorporation of the composite in the internal layer was evident. • The tungsten incorporated coating possessed effective barrier protection.

  4. Multiphase-Multifunctional Ceramic Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-30

    systems for high temperatura applications” “ Estudios de Ferroelasticidad en Sistemas Cerámicos Multifásicos para Aplicaciones en Alta Temperatura ...Ceramic Coatings Performing Organization names: Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional – Unidad Queretaro...materials, Cinvestav. Thesis: “Ferroelasticity studies in multiphase ceramic systems for high temperatura applications”. Her work mainly focused in the

  5. Beryllium coating on Inconel tiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailescu, V.; Burcea, G.; Lungu, C.P.; Mustata, I.; Lungu, A.M.; Rubel, M.; Coad, J.P.; Matthews, G.; Pedrick, L.; Handley, R.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The Joint European Torus (JET) is a large experimental nuclear fusion device. Its aim is to confine and study the behaviour of plasma in conditions and dimensions approaching those required for a fusion reactor. The plasma is created in the toroidal shaped vacuum vessel of the machine in which it is confined by magnetic fields. In preparation for ITER a new ITER-like Wall (ILW) will be installed on Joint European Torus (JET), a wall not having any carbon facing the plasma [1]. In places Inconel tiles are to be installed, these tiles shall be coated with Beryllium. MEdC represented by the National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, Bucharest and in direct cooperation with Nuclear Fuel Plant Pitesti started to coat Inconel tiles with 8 μm of Beryllium in accordance with the requirements of technical specification and fit for installation in the JET machine. This contribution provides an overview of the principles of manufacturing processes using thermal evaporation method in vacuum and the properties of the prepared coatings. The optimization of the manufacturing process (layer thickness, structure and purity) has been carried out on Inconel substrates (polished and sand blasted) The results of the optimization process and analysis (SEM, TEM, XRD, Auger, RBS, AFM) of the coatings will be presented. Reference [1] Takeshi Hirai, H. Maier, M. Rubel, Ph. Mertens, R. Neu, O. Neubauer, E. Gauthier, J. Likonen, C. Lungu, G. Maddaluno, G. F. Matthews, R. Mitteau, G. Piazza, V. Philipps, B. Riccardi, C. Ruset, I. Uytdenhouwen, R and D on full tungsten divertor and beryllium wall for JET TIER-like Wall Project, 24. Symposium on Fusion Technology - 11-15 September 2006 -Warsaw, Poland. (authors)

  6. Chrome - Free Aluminum Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, John H.; Gugel, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation concerns the program to qualify a chrome free coating for aluminum. The program was required due to findings by OSHA and EPA, that hexavalent chromium, used to mitigate corrosion in aerospace aluminum alloys, poses hazards for personnel. This qualification consisted of over 4,000 tests. The tests revealed that a move away from Cr+6, required a system rather than individual components and that the maximum corrosion protection required pretreatment, primer and topcoat.

  7. High temperature solar selective coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Cheryl E

    2014-11-25

    Improved solar collectors (40) comprising glass tubing (42) attached to bellows (44) by airtight seals (56) enclose solar absorber tubes (50) inside an annular evacuated space (54. The exterior surfaces of the solar absorber tubes (50) are coated with improved solar selective coatings {48} which provide higher absorbance, lower emittance and resistance to atmospheric oxidation at elevated temperatures. The coatings are multilayered structures comprising solar absorbent layers (26) applied to the meta surface of the absorber tubes (50), typically stainless steel, topped with antireflective Savers (28) comprising at least two layers 30, 32) of refractory metal or metalloid oxides (such as titania and silica) with substantially differing indices of refraction in adjacent layers. Optionally, at least one layer of a noble metal such as platinum can be included between some of the layers. The absorbent layers cars include cermet materials comprising particles of metal compounds is a matrix, which can contain oxides of refractory metals or metalloids such as silicon. Reflective layers within the coating layers can comprise refractory metal silicides and related compounds characterized by the formulas TiSi. Ti.sub.3SiC.sub.2, TiAlSi, TiAN and similar compounds for Zr and Hf. The titania can be characterized by the formulas TiO.sub.2, Ti.sub.3O.sub.5. TiOx or TiO.sub.xN.sub.1-x with x 0 to 1. The silica can be at least one of SiO.sub.2, SiO.sub.2x or SiO.sub.2xN.sub.1-x with x=0 to 1.

  8. Chemical Processing of Nanostructured Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    in the literature ranging from IR imaging to anti-scratch to smart windows and waveguides. Uhlmann and Towee have taken a survey of the sol-gel...Proteins and enzymes can be encapsulated in silica glass (12), while still retaining their activity. Sol-gel coatings (13,14) of hydroxyapatite should also...Technology, 13, 261-65. 14. Lolpatin, C. M. Pizziloni, V., Alford, T. L., and Lawsaon, T (1998) Hydroxyapatite powders ad thin films prepared by sol

  9. Diamond coating in accelerator structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, X.E.

    1998-08-01

    The future accelerators with 1 GeV/m gradient will give rise to hundreds of degrees instantaneous temperature rise on the copper surface. Due to its extraordinary thermal and electric properties, diamond coating on the surface is suggested to remedy this problem. Multi-layer structure, with the promise of even more temperature reduction, is also discussed, and a proof of principle experiment is being carried out

  10. Wear mechanisms of coated hardmetals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, V.

    2001-01-01

    In the paper several aspects of the wear mechanisms of coated hardmetals, ceramics and super-hard materials (CBN) in machining cast iron are discussed, with particular attention being given to high-speed machining of different cast iron grades. The influence of machining parameters, microstructure, composition and mechanical and chemical properties of the cutting tool and the work-piece material on wear are considered. (author)

  11. Coated Conductors under Tensile Stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonevici, Anca; Villaume, Alain; Villard, Catherine; Sulpice, Andre; Maron, Pierre Brosse; Bourgault, Daniel; Porcar, Laureline

    2006-01-01

    Critical current dependence versus strain is obtained for in-situ axial stress experiments on ISD YBCO and DyBCO coated conductors. The drop of critical current due to the apparition of first cracks in the superconducting ceramics is related to the passage in the plastic region of the substrate for a strain of about 0.3% and a stress higher then 500MPa. The superconductivity is preserved between the cracks

  12. Electron beam curing of coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujioka, S.; Fujikawa, Z.

    1974-01-01

    Electron beam curing (EBC) method, by which hardened coating film is obtained by polymerizing and cross-linking paint with electron beam, has finally reached industrialized stage. While about seven items such as short curing time, high efficiency of energy consumption, and homogeneous curing are enumerated as the advantages of EBC method, it has limitations of the isolation requirement from air needing the injection of inert gas, and considerable amount of initial investment. In the electron accelerators employed in EBC method, the accelerating voltage is 250 to 750 kV, and the tube current is several tens of mA to 200 mA. As an example of EBC applications, EBC ''Erio'' steel sheet was developed by the cooperative research of Nippon Steel Corp., Dai-Nippon Printing Co. and Toray Industries, Inc. It is a high-class pre-coated metal product made from galvanized steel sheets, and the flat sheets with cured coating are sold, and final products are fabricated by being worked in various shapes in users. It seems necessary to develop the paint which enables to raise added value by adopting the EBC method. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  13. High Critical Current Coated Conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paranthaman, M. P.; Selvamanickam, V. (SuperPower, Inc.)

    2011-12-27

    One of the important critical needs that came out of the DOE’s coated conductor workshop was to develop a high throughput and economic deposition process for YBCO. Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, the most critical steps in high technical micro fabrications, has been widely employed in semiconductor industry for various thin film growth. SuperPower has demonstrated that (Y,Gd)BCO films can be deposited rapid with world record performance. In addition to high critical current density with increased film thickness, flux pinning properties of REBCO films needs to be improved to meet the DOE requirements for various electric-power equipments. We have shown that doping with Zr can result in BZO nanocolumns, but at substantially reduced deposition rate. The primary purpose of this subtask is to develop high current density MOCVD-REBCO coated conductors based on the ion-beam assisted (IBAD)-MgO deposition process. Another purpose of this subtask is to investigate HTS conductor design optimization (maximize Je) with emphasis on stability and protection issues, and ac loss for REBCO coated conductors.

  14. ALARA trademark 1146 strippable coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fricke, V.

    1999-01-01

    Strippable or temporary coatings are innovative technologies for decontamination that effectively reduce loose contamination at low cost. These coatings have become a viable option during the deactivation and decommissioning of both US Department of Energy (DOE) and commercial nuclear facilities to remove or fix loose contamination on both vertical and horizontal surfaces. The ALARA trademark 1146 strippable coating was demonstrated as part of the Savannah River Site LSDDP and successfully removed transferable (surface) contamination from multiple surfaces (metal and concrete) with an average decontamination factor for alpha contamination of 6.68 and an average percentage of alpha contamination removed of 85.0%. Beta contamination removed was an average DF of 5.55 and an average percentage removed of 82.0%. This paper is an Innovative Technology Summary Report designed to provide potential users with the information they need to quickly determine if a technology would apply to a particular environmental management problem. They also are designed for readers who may recommend that a technology be considered by prospective users. This Innovative Technology offers a 35% cost savings over the Baseline Technology

  15. Oxidation study of Ta–Zr coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yung-I, E-mail: yichen@mail.ntou.edu.tw; Chen, Sin-Min

    2013-02-01

    Refractory metal alloy coatings, such as Mo–Ru and Ta–Ru coatings, have been developed to protect glass molding dies. Forming intermetallic compounds in the coatings inhibits grain growth in high temperature environments when mass producing optical components. After annealing in oxygen containing atmospheres, a surface roughening of the Mo–Ru coatings and a soft oxide layer on the Ta–Ru coatings have been observed in our previous works. Oxidation resistance becomes critical in high-temperature applications. In this study, Ta–Zr coatings were deposited with a Ti interlayer on silicon wafers using direct current magnetron sputtering at 400 °C. The as-deposited Ta–Zr coatings possessed nanocrystallite or amorphous states, depending on the chemical compositions. The annealing treatments were conducted at 600 °C under atmospheres of 50 ppm O{sub 2}–N{sub 2} or 1% O{sub 2}–Ar, respectively. After the annealing treatment, this study investigated variations in crystalline structure, hardness, surface roughness, and chemical composition profiles. Preferential oxidation of Zr in the Ta–Zr coatings was verified using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the microstructure was observed using transmission electron microscopy. - Highlights: ►The as-deposited Ta-rich Ta–Zr coatings revealed an amorphous structure. ►The Zr-rich coatings presented a crystalline β-Zr phase and an amorphous matrix. ►Zr oxidized preferentially as Ta–Zr coatings annealed at 600 °C. ►The hardness of coatings revealed a parabolic relationship with the oxygen content. ►A protective oxide scale formed on the surface of the crystallized Zr-rich coatings.

  16. Growth of self-assembled (Ga)InAs/GaAs quantum dots and realization of high quality microcavities for experiments in the field of strong exciton photon coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeffler, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    At the beginning, we improved the three dimensional optical confinement of the micropillars. The quality factor of the pillars could be increased by the use of higher reflectivity mirrors and a matched V/III ratio for the different epitaxial layers. Hence, a record quality factor of about 90000 was achieved for an active micropillar with 26 (30) mirror pairs in the top (bottom) DBR and a diameter of 4 μm. In parallel to this, we made studies on the growth of self-assembled GaInAs quantum dots on GaAs substrates. Here, the nucleation of three dimensional islands as well as their optical properties were object of the investigation. The morphological properties of the dots were analyzed by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, and the optical properties were investigated by photoluminescence and photoreflectance measurements. The optical and particularly the morphological properties of the self-assembled GaInAs quantum dots were essentially improved. Due to a low strain nucleation layer with an indium content of 30 %, the dot density could be reduced to 6-9 x 10 9 cm -2 and their geometric dimensions were increased to typical lengths between 50 and 100 nm and widths of about 30 nm. The lattice mismatch between the quantum dots and the surrounding matrix is decreased due to the reduced indium content. The minimized strain during the dot growth leads to an enhanced migration length of the deposited atoms on the surface. Finally, the obtained findings of the MBE growth of microcavities, their fabrication and the self-assembled island growth of GaInAs on GaAs were used for the realization of further samples. Low strain GaInAs quantum dots were embedded into the microresonators. These structures allowed for the first time the observation of strong coupling between light and matter in a semiconductor. In case of the low strain quantum dots with enlarged dimensions in the strong coupling regime, a vacuum Rabi-splitting of about 140 μeV between the cavity mode and

  17. Electron beam treatments of electrophoretic ceramic coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Riccardis, M.F.; Carbone, D.; Piscopiello, E.; Antisari, M. Vittori

    2008-01-01

    In this work a method to densify ceramic coating obtained by electrophoresis and to improve its adhesion to the substrate is proposed. It consists in irradiating the coating surface by electron beam (EB). Alumina and alumina-zirconia coatings were deposited on stainless steel substrates and treated by low power EB. SEM, XRD and TEM characterizations demonstrated that the sintering occurred. Moreover, it is shown that on alumina-zirconia coating the EB irradiation produced a composite material consisting principally of tetragonal zirconia particles immersed in an amorphous alumina matrix. The adhesion stress of EB treated coating was estimated by stud pull test and it was found to be comparable to that of plasma-sprayed coatings

  18. Laser cladding of bioactive glass coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comesaña, R; Quintero, F; Lusquiños, F; Pascual, M J; Boutinguiza, M; Durán, A; Pou, J

    2010-03-01

    Laser cladding by powder injection has been used to produce bioactive glass coatings on titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) substrates. Bioactive glass compositions alternative to 45S5 Bioglass were demonstrated to exhibit a gradual wetting angle-temperature evolution and therefore a more homogeneous deposition of the coating over the substrate was achieved. Among the different compositions studied, the S520 bioactive glass showed smoother wetting angle-temperature behavior and was successfully used as precursor material to produce bioactive coatings. Coatings processed using a Nd:YAG laser presented calcium silicate crystallization at the surface, with a uniform composition along the coating cross-section, and no significant dilution of the titanium alloy was observed. These coatings maintain similar bioactivity to that of the precursor material as demonstrated by immersion in simulated body fluid. Copyright 2009 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Crystallization of DNA-coated colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Yufeng; Zheng, Xiaolong; Ducrot, Étienne; Yodh, Jeremy S.; Weck, Marcus; Pine, David J.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-coated colloids hold great promise for self-assembly of programmed heterogeneous microstructures, provided they not only bind when cooled below their melting temperature, but also rearrange so that aggregated particles can anneal into the structure that minimizes the free energy. Unfortunately, DNA-coated colloids generally collide and stick forming kinetically arrested random aggregates when the thickness of the DNA coating is much smaller than the particles. Here we report DNA-coated colloids that can rearrange and anneal, thus enabling the growth of large colloidal crystals from a wide range of micrometre-sized DNA-coated colloids for the first time. The kinetics of aggregation, crystallization and defect formation are followed in real time. The crystallization rate exhibits the familiar maximum for intermediate temperature quenches observed in metallic alloys, but over a temperature range smaller by two orders of magnitude, owing to the highly temperature-sensitive diffusion between aggregated DNA-coated colloids. PMID:26078020

  20. Thin low Z coatings for plasma devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norem, J.; Bowers, D.A.

    1978-05-01

    Coating the walls of the vacuum chamber with beryllium or some other low Z material has been proposed as a possible means of solving the problems of high Z influx into plasmas. We attempt to demonstrate that very thin, low Z coatings are compatible with the operation of plasma devices and beneficial to plasma performance. We determine that the thickness of coating material required is only about 10 monolayers. In a radiation environment, radiation-induced solute segregation should help to maintain the integrity of such thin coatings against diffusion and other processes. We discuss the properties of these thin coatings and possible means of in situ application and maintenance. Since deposition of plasma impurities on the walls will occur anyway, we discuss injection of solid pellets into the plasma as a direct way of introducing impurities which would ultimately serve as coating material

  1. Tungsten thick coatings for plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riccardi, B.; Pizzuto, A.; Orsini, A.; Libera, S.; Visca, E.; Bertamini, L.; Casadei, F.; Severini, E.; Montanari, R.; Litunovsky, N.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the R and D activity was to realize thick W coatings on CuCrZr hollow bars and to test the mock ups with respect to thermal fatigue. Eight mock ups provided of 4 mm thick W coating were finally manufactured. The bonding integrity between coating and substrate was checked by means of an Ultrasonic apparatus. Characterisation of coatings was performed in order to assess microstructure, impurity content, density, tensile strength, adhesion strength, thermal conductivity and thermal expansion coefficient. Macroscopic residual strain measurements were performed by means of 'hole drilling' technique. The activities performed demonstrated the feasibility of thick Tungsten coatings on geometries with more complex residual strain distribution. These coatings are reliable armour of medium heat flux plasma facing component. (author)

  2. Simulation to coating weight control for galvanizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junsheng; Yan, Zhang; Wu, Kunkui; Song, Lei

    2013-05-01

    Zinc coating weight control is one of the most critical issues for continuous galvanizing line. The process has the characteristic of variable-time large time delay, nonlinear, multivariable. It can result in seriously coating weight error and non-uniform coating. We develop a control system, which can automatically control the air knives pressure and its position to give a constant and uniform zinc coating, in accordance with customer-order specification through an auto-adaptive empirical model-based feed forward adaptive controller, and two model-free adaptive feedback controllers . The proposed models with controller were applied to continuous galvanizing line (CGL) at Angang Steel Works. By the production results, the precise and stability of the control model reduces over-coating weight and improves coating uniform. The product for this hot dip galvanizing line does not only satisfy the customers' quality requirement but also save the zinc consumption.

  3. Cermet coatings for solar Stirling space power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Raack, Taylor

    2004-01-01

    Cermet coatings, molecular mixtures of metal and ceramic, are being considered for the heat inlet surface of a solar Stirling space power convertor. The role of the cermet coating is to absorb as much of the incident solar energy as possible. The ability to mix metal and ceramic at the atomic level offers the opportunity to tailor the composition and the solar absorptance of these coatings. Several candidate cermet coatings were created and their solar absorptance was characterized as-manufactured and after exposure to elevated temperatures. Coating composition was purposely varied through the thickness of the coating. As a consequence of changing composition, islands of metal are thought to form in the ceramic matrix. Computer modeling indicated that diffusion of the metal atoms played an important role in island formation while the ceramic was important in locking the islands in place. Much of the solar spectrum is absorbed as it passes through this labyrinth

  4. Microneedle Coating Techniques for Transdermal Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Haj-Ahmad

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Drug administration via the transdermal route is an evolving field that provides an alternative to oral and parenteral routes of therapy. Several microneedle (MN based approaches have been developed. Among these, coated MNs (typically where drug is deposited on MN tips are a minimally invasive method to deliver drugs and vaccines through the skin. In this review, we describe several processes to coat MNs. These include dip coating, gas jet drying, spray coating, electrohydrodynamic atomisation (EHDA based processes and piezoelectric inkjet printing. Examples of process mechanisms, conditions and tested formulations are provided. As these processes are independent techniques, modifications to facilitate MN coatings are elucidated. In summary, the outcomes and potential value for each technique provides opportunities to overcome formulation or dosage form limitations. While there are significant developments in solid degradable MNs, coated MNs (through the various techniques described have potential to be utilized in personalized drug delivery via controlled deposition onto MN templates.

  5. The application of epoxy resin coating in grounding grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Q.; Chen, Z. R.; Xi, L. J.; Wang, X. Y.; Wang, H. F.

    2018-01-01

    Epoxy resin anticorrosion coating is widely used in grounding grid corrosion protection because of its wide range of materials, good antiseptic effect and convenient processing. Based on the latest research progress, four kinds of epoxy anticorrosive coatings are introduced, which are structural modified epoxy coating, inorganic modified epoxy coating, organic modified epoxy coating and polyaniline / epoxy resin composite coating. In this paper, the current research progress of epoxy base coating is analyzed, and prospected the possible development direction of the anti-corrosion coating in the grounding grid, which provides a reference for coating corrosion prevention of grounding materials.

  6. ETV Program Report: Coatings for Wastewater Collection Systems - Standard Cement Materials, Epoxy Coating 4553

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Standard Cement Materials, Inc. Standard Epoxy Coating 4553™ (SEC 4553) epoxy coating used for wastewater collection system rehabilitation was evaluated by EPA’s Environmental Technology Verification Program under laboratory conditions at the Center for Innovative Grouting Ma...

  7. Cermet Coatings for Solar Stirling Space Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Raack, Taylor

    2004-01-01

    Cermet coatings, molecular mixtures of metal and ceramic are being considered for the heat inlet surface of a solar Stirling space power converter. This paper will discuss the solar absorption characteristics of as-deposited cermet coatings as well as the solar absorption characteristics of the coatings after heating. The role of diffusion and island formation, during the deposition process and during heating will also be discussed.

  8. Biomarkers in white-coat hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Catherine Ann

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in the 1960s provided new insights into the nature of high blood pressure disorders. Blood pressure is now categorised into four quadrants:normotension, masked hypertension, hypertension and white-coat hypertension. In white-coat hypertension blood pressure is elevated when taken at the doctor’s office but normal if taken outside the doctor’s office. Several controversies are associated with white-coat hypertension, which are discuss...

  9. Method to produce catalytically active nanocomposite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ali; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Urgen, Mustafa; Kazmanli, Kursat

    2016-02-09

    A nanocomposite coating and method of making and using the coating. The nanocomposite coating is disposed on a base material, such as a metal or ceramic; and the nanocomposite consists essentially of a matrix of an alloy selected from the group of Cu, Ni, Pd, Pt and Re which are catalytically active for cracking of carbon bonds in oils and greases and a grain structure selected from the group of borides, carbides and nitrides.

  10. Study of chromate coatings by radioisotope tracing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozda, T.; Maleczki, E.; Farkas, G.

    1984-01-01

    New radioactive tracer methods were developed to determine chromium(III) and total chromium [chromium(III)+chromium(VI)] content simultaneously. They are capable of investigating solutions and the conversion coating itself in the solid phase, respectively. The increase of chromium(III) concentration in the yellow chromate coating, and the chromium(III) to total chromium ratio in the conversion coating were determined as a function of the treating period. (author)

  11. New PVD Technologies for New Ordnance Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    characteristics using a Tantalum and a Chrome target; 4) Deposition of Ta coatings and reactive deposition of CrN; 5) Deposition parameters affecting film...Vapor Deposition (PVD); High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS); Modulated Pulsed Power (MPP); Tantalum; Chrome ; Ta coatings; CrN; coating...The pre-production chemicals and acids are hazardous and hexavalent Cr is a known carcinogen. Significant annual expenditures are necessary to

  12. Testing of coatings for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, G.

    1977-01-01

    Commercial scale nuclear power generating plant coatings must be able to withstand simultaneous exposure both to high humidity, and to cumulative radiation dosage, at elevated temperatures, for the design life of the plant. The coatings must be decontaminable by means other than by stripping, that is, actual physical removal, and must be of sufficient durability to withstand projected conditions of a loss of coolant accident. Tests to show that coatings are expected to do more than retard corrosion and erosion are described

  13. Heat-resistant hydrophobic-oleophobic coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Uyanik, Mehmet; Arpac, Ertugrul; Schmidt, Helmut K.; Akarsu, Murat; Sayilkan, Funda; Sayilkan, Hikmet

    2006-01-01

    Thermally and chemically durable hydrophobic oleophobic coatings, containing different ceramic particles such as SiO2, SiC, Al 2O3, which can be alternative instead of Teflon, have been developed and applied on the aluminum substrates by spin-coating method. Polyimides, which are high-thermal resistant heteroaromatic polymers, were synthesized, and fluor oligomers were added to these polymers to obtain hydrophobic-oleophobic properties. After coating, Al surface was subjected to Taber-abrasio...

  14. Surface coatings deposited by CVD and PVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, H.M.

    1982-01-01

    The demand for wear and corrosion protective coatings is increasing due to economic facts. Deposition processes in gas atmospheres like the CVD and PVD processes attained a tremendous importance especially in the field of the deposition of thin hard refractory and ceramic coatings. CVD and PVD processes are reviewed in detail. Some examples of coating installations are shown and numerous applications are given to demonstrate the present state of the art. (orig.) [de

  15. Method to produce catalytically active nanocomposite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdemir, Ali; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Urgen, Mustafa; Kazmanli, Kursat

    2017-12-19

    A nanocomposite coating and method of making and using the coating. The nanocomposite coating is disposed on a base material, such as a metal or ceramic; and the nanocomposite consists essentially of a matrix of an alloy selected from the group of Cu, Ni, Pd, Pt and Re which are catalytically active for cracking of carbon bonds in oils and greases and a grain structure selected from the group of borides, carbides and nitrides.

  16. Cold-Sprayed AZ91D Coating and SiC/AZ91D Composite Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available As an emerging coating building technique, cold spraying has many advantages to elaborate Mg alloy workpieces. In this study, AZ91D coatings and AZ91D-based composite coatings were deposited using cold spraying. Coatings were prepared using different gas temperatures to obtain the available main gas temperature. Compressed air was used as the accelerating gas, and although magnesium alloy is oxidation-sensitive, AZ91D coatings with good performance were obtained. The results show that dense coatings can be fabricated until the gas temperature is higher than 500 °C. The deposition efficiency increases greatly with the gas temperature, but it is lower than 10% for all coating specimens. To analyze the effects of compressed air on AZ91D powder particles and the effects of gas temperature on coatings, the phase composition, porosity, cross-sectional microstructure, and microhardness of coatings were characterized. X-ray diffraction and oxygen content analysis clarified that no phase transformation or oxidation occurred on AZ91D powder particles during cold spraying processes with compressed air. The porosity of AZ91D coatings remained between 3.6% and 3.9%. Impact melting was found on deformed AZ91D particles when the gas temperature increased to 550 °C. As-sprayed coatings exhibit much higher microhardness than as-casted bulk magnesium, demonstrating the dense structure of cold-sprayed coatings. To study the effects of ceramic particles on cold-sprayed AZ91D coatings, 15 vol % SiC powder particles were added into the feedstock powder. Lower SiC content in the coating than in the feedstock powder means that the deposition efficiency of the SiC powder particles is lower than the deposition efficiency of AZ91D particles. The addition of SiC particles reduces the porosity and increases the microhardness of cold-sprayed AZ91D coatings. The corrosion behavior of AZ91D coating and SiC reinforced AZ91D composite coating were examined. The Si

  17. ANALISIS STRUKTUR MIKRO LAPISAN BOND COAT NIAL THERMAL BARRIER COATING (TBC PADA PADUAN LOGAM BERBASIS CO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toto Sudiro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Kehandalan dan umur pakai sistem Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC ditentukan oleh kestabilan lapisan bond coat dan thermal grown oxide (TGO. Sehingga sangatlah penting untuk memahami mekanisme pembentukan dan degradasi lapisan ini. Pada makalah ini akan dibahas analisis struktur mikro lapisan bond coat NiAl yang dideposisikan pada substrat CoCrNi dengan menggunakan gabungan metoda electroplating dan pack-cementation. Pada makalah ini juga dibahas mekanisme pembentukan void disepanjang interface bond coat¬-substrat setelah tes oksidasi.

  18. Comparison of TiC coating and TD coating in actual application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.K.; Yoo, J.K.

    1995-01-01

    Large blocks of SKD-11 were treated by CVD-TiC coating process, TD coating process, TD coating process after vacuum heat treating, and vacuum heat treating. Amount of deformation was measured and compared to find the process which gives the least deformation. Wear tests were carried out for specimens treated by each process. Application of CVD-TiC and TD coating to the automotive press mold was studied

  19. Coatings for the NuSTAR mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Jakobsen, Anders Clemen; Brejnholt, Nicolai

    2011-01-01

    The NuSTAR mission will be the first mission to carry a hard X-ray(5-80 keV) focusing telescope to orbit. The optics are based on the use of multilayer coated thin slumped glass. Two different material combinations were used for the flight optics, namely W/Si and Pt/C. In this paper we describe...... the entire coating effort including the final coating design that was used for the two flight optics. We also present data on the performance verification of the coatings both on Si witness samples as well as on individual flight mirrors....

  20. Localized plasmons in graphene-coated nanospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas; Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Wubs, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    We present an analytical derivation of the electromagnetic response of a spherical object coated by a conductive film, here exemplified by a graphene coating. Applying the framework of Mie-Lorenz theory augmented to account for a conductive boundary condition, we derive the multipole scattering...... for the localized plasmons. We consider graphene coatings of both dielectric and conducting spheres, where the graphene coating in the former case introduces the plasmons and in the latter case modifies in interesting ways the existing ones. Finally, we discuss our analytical results in the context of extinction...