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Sample records for bacteriophage t7 rna

  1. Cloning and expression of the gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase.

    OpenAIRE

    Davanloo, P; Rosenberg, A H; Dunn, J J; Studier, F W

    1984-01-01

    The complete coding sequence of the gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase (T7 gene 1) has been cloned in the plasmid pBR322. Large amounts of active enzyme can be accumulated in Escherichia coli when the cloned gene is transcribed from the lac UV5 promoter. A protease activity that apparently can nick the protein without causing it to fall apart can be a problem during purification, but a procedure is described that gives good yields of essentially homogeneous, highly active enzyme suitabl...

  2. Bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase-based expression in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobl, Birgit; Hock, Björn; Schneck, Sandra; Fischer, Reinhard; Mack, Matthias

    2013-11-01

    A novel Pichia pastoris expression vector (pEZT7) for the production of recombinant proteins employing prokaryotic bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase (T7 RNAP) (EC 2.7.7.6) and the corresponding promoter pT7 was constructed. The gene for T7 RNAP was stably introduced into the P. pastoris chromosome 2 under control of the (endogenous) constitutive P. pastoris glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAP) promoter (pGAP). The gene product T7 RNAP was engineered to contain a nuclear localization signal, which directed recombinant T7 RNAP to the P. pastoris nucleus. To promote translation of uncapped T7 RNAP derived transcripts, the internal ribosomal entry site from hepatitis C virus (HCV-IRES) was inserted directly upstream of the multiple cloning site of pEZT7. A P. pastoris autonomous replicating sequence (PARS1) was integrated into pEZT7 enabling propagation and recovery of plasmids from P. pastoris. Rapid amplification of 5' complementary DNA ends (5' RACE) experiments employing the test plasmid pEZT7-EGFP revealed that transcripts indeed initiated at pT7. HCV-IRES mediated translation of the latter mRNAs, however, was not observed. Surprisingly, HCV-IRES and the reverse complement of PARS1 (PARS1rc) were both found to display significant promoter activity as shown by 5' RACE. PMID:24056257

  3. Promoter binding, initiation, and elongation by bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. A single-molecule view of the transcription cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Gary M; Baumann, Christoph G; Quinn, Diana M; Molloy, Justin E; Hoggett, James G

    2004-01-30

    A single-molecule transcription assay has been developed that allows, for the first time, the direct observation of promoter binding, initiation, and elongation by a single RNA polymerase (RNAP) molecule in real-time. To promote DNA binding and transcription initiation, a DNA molecule tethered between two optically trapped beads was held near a third immobile surface bead sparsely coated with RNAP. By driving the optical trap holding the upstream bead with a triangular oscillation while measuring the position of both trapped beads, we observed the onset of promoter binding, promoter escape (productive initiation), and processive elongation by individual RNAP molecules. After DNA template release, transcription re-initiation on the same DNA template is possible; thus, multiple enzymatic turnovers by an individual RNAP molecule can be observed. Using bacteriophage T7 RNAP, a commonly used RNAP paradigm, we observed the association and dissociation (k(off)= 2.9 s(-1)) of T7 RNAP and promoter DNA, the transition to the elongation mode (k(for) = 0.36 s(-1)), and the processive synthesis (k(pol) = 43 nt s(-1)) and release of a gene-length RNA transcript ( approximately 1200 nt). The transition from initiation to elongation is much longer than the mean lifetime of the binary T7 RNAP-promoter DNA complex (k(off) > k(for)), identifying a rate-limiting step between promoter DNA binding and promoter escape. PMID:14597619

  4. Early gene expression in bacteriophage T7. I. In vivo synthesis, inactivation, and translational utilization of early mRNA's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercules, K; Jovanovich, S; Sauerbrier, W

    1976-02-01

    In vivo decay rates for the individual T7 early mRNA species were determined. The physical half-lives, measured at 37 C, range from 1.1 min for gene 0.7 RNA to 4.5 min for gene 0.3 RNA. Physical half-lives, as observed after rifampin inhibition of RNA synthesis and polyacylamide electrophoresis of RNAs, are approximately 30% longer than functional half-lives, as observed by 14C-labeled amino acid uptake into individual T7 early proteins. The different RNA species are synthesized at grossly different rates, 0.3 RNA at four times the rate of 1.0 RNA, 0.7 RNA at twice the rate, and 1.1 and 1.3 RNAs at about the same or a slightly lower rate than 1.0 RNA. Rho-factor-mediated termination of transcription behind genes 0.3, 0.7, and perhaps behind 1.0 is inferred from these data. The in vivo translational utilization of the individual T7 early-message species was found to vary by not more than a factor of 2. PMID:1255850

  5. Electrostatic map of T7 DNA. Comparative analysis of functional and electrostatic properties of T7 RNA polymerase specific promoters

    OpenAIRE

    Kamzolova, S. G.; Beskaravainy, P. M.; Osypov, A. A.; Dzhelyadin, T. R.; Temlyakova, E. A.; Sorokin, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    The entire T7 bacteriophage genome contains 39937 base pairs (Database NCBI RefSeq N1001604). Here, electrostatic potential distribution around double helical T7 DNA was calculated by Coulomb method using the computer program of Sorokin A.A. Electrostatic profiles of 17 promoters recognized by T7 phage specific RNA polymerase were analyzed. It was shown that electrostatic profiles of all T7 RNA polymerase specific promoters can be characterized by distinctive motifs which are specific for eac...

  6. DNA damage under simulated extraterrestrial conditions in bacteriophage T7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, A.; Módos, K.; Hegedüs, M.; Kovács, G.; Rontó, Gy.; Péter, Á.; Lammer, H.; Panitz, C.

    The experiment "Phage and Uracil response" will be accommodated in the EXPOSE facility of the International Space Station. Its objective is to examine and quantify the effect of specific space conditions on nucleic acid models, especially on bacteriophage T7 and isolated T7 DNA thin films. In order to define the environmental and technical requirements of the EXPOSE, the samples were subjected to the experiment verification test (EVT). During EVT, the samples were exposed to vacuum (10 -4-10 -6 Pa) and polychromatic UV-radiation (200-400 nm) in air, in inert atmosphere, as well as in simulated space vacuum. The effect of extreme temperature in vacuum and the influence of temperature fluctuations around 0 °C were also studied. The total intraphage/isolated DNA damage was determined by quantitative PCR using 555 and 3826 bp fragments of T7 DNA. The type of the damage was resolved using a combination of enzymatic probes and neutral and alkaline agarose gel electrophoresis; the structural/chemical effects were analyzed by spectroscopic and microscopical methods. We obtained substantial evidence that DNA lesions accumulate throughout exposure, but the amount of damage depends on the thickness of the layers. According to our preliminary results, the damages by exposure to conditions of dehydration and UV-irradiation are larger than the sum of vacuum alone, or radiation alone case, suggesting a synergistic action of space vacuum and UV radiation with DNA being the critical target.

  7. Promoter and nonspecific DNA binding by the T7 RNA polymerase.

    OpenAIRE

    Smeekens, S.P.; Romano, L J

    1986-01-01

    T7 RNA polymerase plays an important role in both the transcription and replication of bacteriophage T7. In this study we have used a nitrocellulose filter binding assay to examine the binding properties of the T7 RNA polymerase with T7 promoters cloned into plasmid DNAs. Promoter-specific binding was shown to be relatively insensitive to variations in the ionic strength of the incubation solution but dependent on the helical structure of the DNA. On the other hand, nonpromoter interior-site ...

  8. Hexagonally packed DNA within bacteriophage T7 stabilized by curvature stress.

    OpenAIRE

    Odijk, T

    1998-01-01

    A continuum computation is proposed for the bending stress stabilizing DNA that is hexagonally packed within bacteriophage T7. Because the inner radius of the DNA spool is rather small, the stress of the curved DNA genome is strong enough to balance its electrostatic self-repulsion so as to form a stable hexagonal phase. The theory is in accord with the microscopically determined structure of bacteriophage T7 filled with DNA within the experimental margin of error.

  9. Response of bacteriophage T7 biological dosimeter to dehydration and extraterrestrial solar UV radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedüs, M.; Fekete, A.; Módos, K.; Kovács, G.; Rontó, Gy.; Lammer, H.; Panitz, C.

    2007-02-01

    The experiment "Phage and uracil response" (PUR) will be accommodated in the EXPOSE facility of the ISS. Bacteriophage T7/isolated T7 DNA will be exposed to different subsets of extreme environmental parameters in space, in order to study the Responses of Organisms to the Space Environment (ROSE). Launch into orbit is preceded by EXPOSE Experiment Verification Tests (EVT) to optimize the methods and the evaluation. Bacteriophage T7/isolated T7 DNA thin layers were exposed to vacuum ( 10-6Pa), to monochromatic (254 nm) and polychromatic (200-400 nm) UV radiation in air as well as in simulated space vacuum. Using neutral density (ND) filters dose-effect curves were performed in order to define the maximum doses tolerated. The effect of temperature fluctuation in vacuum was also studied. The structural/chemical effects on bacteriophage T7/isolated T7 DNA were analyzed by spectroscopic and microscopical methods. Characteristic changes in the absorption spectrum and in the electrophoretic pattern of phage/DNA have been detected indicating the damage of isolated and intraphage DNA. DNA damage was also determined by quantitative PCR (QPCR) using 555 and 3826 bp fragments of T7 DNA. We obtained substantial evidence that DNA lesions (e.g. strand breaks, DNA-protein cross-links, cyclobutane pirimidine dimers (CPDs) etc.) accumulate throughout exposure. Preliminary results suggest a synergistic action of space vacuum and UV radiation with DNA being the critical target.

  10. The genome of bacteriophage phiKMV, a T7-like virus infecting Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complete DNA sequence of a new lytic T7-like bacteriophage phiKMV is presented. It is the first genome sequence of a member of the Podoviridae that infects Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The linear G + C-rich (62.3%) double-stranded DNA genome of 42,519 bp has direct terminal repeats of 414 bp and contains 48 open reading frames that are all transcribed from the same strand. Despite absence of homology at the DNA level, 11 of the 48 phiKMV-encoded putative proteins show sequence similarity to known T7-type phage proteins. Eighteen open reading frame products have been assigned, including an RNA polymerase, proteins involved in DNA replication, as well as structural, phage maturation, and lysis proteins. Surprisingly, the major capsid protein completely lacks sequence homology to any known protein. Also, the strong virulence toward many clinical P. aeruginosa isolates and a short replication time make phiKMV attractive for phage therapy or a potential source for antimicrobial proteins

  11. Elucidating the pH-Dependent Structural Transition of T7 Bacteriophage Endolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Meenakshi; Kumar, Dinesh; Poluri, Krishna Mohan

    2016-08-23

    Bacteriophages are the most abundant and diverse biological entities on earth. Bacteriophage endolysins are unique peptidoglycan hydrolases and have huge potential as effective enzybiotics in various infectious models. T7 bacteriophage endolysin (T7L), also known as N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase or T7 lysozyme, is a 17 kDa protein that lyses a range of Gram-negative bacteria by hydrolyzing the amide bond between N-acetylmuramoyl residues and the l-alanine of the peptidoglycan layer. Although the activity profiles of several of the T7 family members have been known for many years, the molecular basis for their pH-dependent differential activity is not clear. In this study, we explored the pH-induced structural, stability, and activity characteristics of T7L by applying a variety of biophysical techniques and protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Our studies established a reversible structural transition of T7L below pH 6 and the formation of a partially denatured conformation at pH 3. This low-pH conformation is thermally stable and exposed its hydrophobic pockets. Further, NMR relaxation measurements and structural analysis unraveled that T7L is highly dynamic in its native state and a network of His residues are responsible for the observed pH-dependent conformational dynamics and transitions. As bacteriophage chimeric and engineered endolysins are being developed as novel therapeutics against multiple drug resistance pathogens, we believe that our results are of great help in designing these entities as broadband antimicrobial and/or antibacterial agents. PMID:27513288

  12. Detection and characterization of agarose-binding, capsid-like particles produced during assembly of a bacteriophage T7 procapsid.

    OpenAIRE

    Serwer, P; Watson, R H; Hayes, S J

    1982-01-01

    It has previously been shown that: (i) during infection of its host, the DNA bacteriophage T7 assembles a DNA-free procapsid (capsid I), a capsid with an envelope differing physically and chemically from the capsid of the mature bacteriophage, and (ii) capsid I converts to a capsid (capsid II) with a bacteriophage-like envelope as it packages DNA. Lysates of phage T7-infected Escherichia coli contained a particle (AG particle) which copurified with capsid II during buoyant density sedimentati...

  13. Dissection of the DNA Mimicry of the Bacteriophage T7 Ocr Protein using Chemical Modification

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanou, Augoustinos S.; Roberts, Gareth A.; Cooper, Laurie P.; Clarke, David J.; Thomson, Andrew R.; Mackay, C. Logan; Nutley, Margaret; Cooper, Alan; Dryden, David T. F.

    2009-01-01

    The homodimeric Ocr (overcome classical restriction) protein of bacteriophage T7 is a molecular mimic of double-stranded DNA and a highly effective competitive inhibitor of the bacterial type I restriction/modification system. The surface of Ocr is replete with acidic residues that mimic the phosphate backbone of DNA. In addition, Ocr also mimics the overall dimensions of a bent 24-bp DNA molecule. In this study, we attempted to delineate these two mechanisms of DNA mimicry by chemically modi...

  14. Assembly-associated structural changes of bacteriophage T7 capsids. Detection by use of a protein-specific probe.

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, S. A.; Griess, G A; Serwer, P

    1992-01-01

    To detect changes in capsid structure that occur when a preassembled bacteriophage T7 capsid both packages and cleaves to mature-size longer (concatameric) DNA, the kinetics and thermodynamics are determined here for the binding of the protein-specific probe, 1,1'-bi(4-anilino)naphthalene-5,5'-di-sulfonic acid (bis-ANS), to bacteriophage T7, a T7 DNA deletion (8.4%) mutant, and a DNA-free T7 capsid (metrizamide low density capsid II) known to be a DNA packaging intermediate that has a permeab...

  15. Crystallization of the C-terminal domain of the bacteriophage T7 fibre protein gp17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The C-terminal domain of the bacteriophage T7 fibre protein gp17, consisting of amino acids 371–553, has been crystallized. Diffraction data have been obtained to around 2.0 Å resolution from two different crystal forms. Multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing with a mercury derivative is in progress. Bacteriophage T7 attaches to its host using the C-terminal domains of its six fibres, which are trimers of the gp17 protein. A C-terminal fragment of gp17 consisting of amino acids 371–553 has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Crystals of two forms were obtained, belonging to space group P212121 (unit-cell parameters a = 61.2, b = 86.0, c = 118.4 Å) and space group C2221 (unit-cell parameters a = 68.3, b = 145.6, c = 172.1 Å). They diffracted to 1.9 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. Both crystals are expected to contain one trimer in the asymmetric unit. Multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing with a mercury derivative is in progress

  16. Synthesis of infectious poliovirus RNA by purified T7 RNA polymerase.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Der Werf, S.; Bradley, J; Wimmer, E; Studier, F W; Dunn, J J

    1986-01-01

    Plasmids containing the entire cDNA sequence of poliovirus type 1 (Mahoney strain) under control of a promoter for T7 RNA polymerase have been constructed. Purified T7 RNA polymerase efficiently transcribes the entire poliovirus cDNA in either direction to produce full-length poliovirus RNA [(+)RNA] or its complement [(-)RNA]. The (+)RNA produced initially had 60 nucleotides on the 5' side of the poliovirus RNA sequence, including a string of 18 consecutive guanine residues generated in the o...

  17. Quasi-atomic model of bacteriophage t7 procapsid shell: insights into the structure and evolution of a basic fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Velázquez-Muriel, Javier A; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Scheres, Sjors H W; Carazo, José M; Carrascosa, José L

    2007-04-01

    The existence of similar folds among major structural subunits of viral capsids has shown unexpected evolutionary relationships suggesting common origins irrespective of the capsids' host life domain. Tailed bacteriophages are emerging as one such family, and we have studied the possible existence of the HK97-like fold in bacteriophage T7. The procapsid structure at approximately 10 A resolution was used to obtain a quasi-atomic model by fitting a homology model of the T7 capsid protein gp10 that was based on the atomic structure of the HK97 capsid protein. A number of fold similarities, such as the fitting of domains A and P into the L-shaped procapsid subunit, are evident between both viral systems. A different feature is related to the presence of the amino-terminal domain of gp10 found at the inner surface of the capsid that might play an important role in the interaction of capsid and scaffolding proteins. PMID:17437718

  18. The complete genomic sequence of lytic bacteriophage gh-1 infecting Pseudomonas putida--evidence for close relationship to the T7 group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The genome of the lytic Pseudomonas putida bacteriophage gh-1 is linear double-stranded DNA containing 37,359 bp with 216-bp direct terminal repeats. Like other members of the T7 group, the gh-1 genome contains regions of high homology to T7 interspersed with nonhomologous regions that contain small open reading frames of unknown function. The genome shares 31 genes in common with other members of the T7 group, including RNA polymerase, and an additional 12 unique putative genes. A major difference between gh-1 and other members of this group is the absence of any open reading frames between the left direct terminal repeat and gene 1. Sequence analysis of the gh-1 genome also revealed the presence of 10 putative phage promoters with a consensus sequence similar to the promoters of T3 and phiYeO3-12 (consensus: TAAAAACCCTCACTRTGGCHSCM). P. putida mutants resistant to gh-1 were demonstrated to have an altered lipopolysaccharide structure, indicating that members of this group use lipopolysaccharide as their cellular receptor

  19. Bacteriophage T7 DNA polymerase: cloning and high-level expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Reutimann, H; Sjöberg, B M; Holmgren, A.

    1985-01-01

    Phage T7 DNA polymerase consists of a 1:1 complex of the viral T7 gene 5 protein and the host cell thioredoxin. A 3.25-kilobase T7 DNA fragment containing the complete coding sequence of gene 5, and the nearby genes 4.7 and 5.3, was cloned in the BamHI site of the plasmid pBR322. Transformation of the thioredoxin-negative (trxA-) Escherichia coli strain BH215 with the recombinant plasmid pRS101 resulted in large overproduction of gene 5 protein corresponding to a level about 60-fold higher th...

  20. Method for determining transcriptional linkage by means of inhibition of deoxyribonucleic acid transcription by ultraviolet irradiation: evaluation in application to the investigation of in vivo transcription in bacteriophage T7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique is presented for mapping promotor sites that utilizes the introduction of transcription-terminating lesions in DNA through uv irradiation which prevents transcription of genes in proportion to their distance from the promotor. This technique was applied to and evaluated in investigations of the transcriptional linkage of bacteriophage T7. All results substantiate the hypothesis that transcription in vivo does not proceed beyond the first uv lesion encountered in the template DNA and that such premature termination of transcription is the principal effect of the uv irradiation on the transcriptional template function of DNA. UV-induced inhibition of the initiation of transcription is insignificant by comparison. Uv inactivation of expression of individual T7 genes was found to follow pseudo first-order kinetics, allowing a gene-specific uv inactivation cross section to be evaluated for each gene. Promotor locations were inferred from the discontinuity in the numerical values of inactivation cross sections arising at the start of each new unit. By such analysis the bacteriophage T7 genome was found to consist of seven transcription units. In vivo E. coli RNA polymerase transcribes the T7 early region as a single unit from a pomotor region located at the left end of the genome. The T7 late region was found to consist of six transcription units, with promotors located just ahead of genes 1.7, 7, 9, 11, 13 and 17

  1. Genome, Proteome and Structure of a T7-Like Bacteriophage of the Kiwifruit Canker Phytopathogen Pseudomonas Syringae pv. Actinidiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah A. Frampton

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae is an economically significant pathogen responsible for severe bacterial canker of kiwifruit (Actinidia sp.. Bacteriophages infecting this phytopathogen have potential as biocontrol agents as part of an integrated approach to the management of bacterial canker, and for use as molecular tools to study this bacterium. A variety of bacteriophages were previously isolated that infect P. syringae pv. actinidiae, and their basic properties were characterized to provide a framework for formulation of these phages as biocontrol agents. Here, we have examined in more detail φPsa17, a phage with the capacity to infect a broad range of P. syringae pv. actinidiae strains and the only member of the Podoviridae in this collection. Particle morphology was visualized using cryo-electron microscopy, the genome was sequenced, and its structural proteins were analysed using shotgun proteomics. These studies demonstrated that φPsa17 has a 40,525 bp genome, is a member of the T7likevirus genus and is closely related to the pseudomonad phages φPSA2 and gh-1. Eleven structural proteins (one scaffolding were detected by proteomics and φPsa17 has a capsid of approximately 60 nm in diameter. No genes indicative of a lysogenic lifecycle were identified, suggesting the phage is obligately lytic. These features indicate that φPsa17 may be suitable for formulation as a biocontrol agent of P. syringae pv. actinidiae.

  2. Genome, Proteome and Structure of a T7-Like Bacteriophage of the Kiwifruit Canker Phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frampton, Rebekah A; Acedo, Elena Lopez; Young, Vivienne L; Chen, Danni; Tong, Brian; Taylor, Corinda; Easingwood, Richard A; Pitman, Andrew R; Kleffmann, Torsten; Bostina, Mihnea; Fineran, Peter C

    2015-07-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae is an economically significant pathogen responsible for severe bacterial canker of kiwifruit (Actinidia sp.). Bacteriophages infecting this phytopathogen have potential as biocontrol agents as part of an integrated approach to the management of bacterial canker, and for use as molecular tools to study this bacterium. A variety of bacteriophages were previously isolated that infect P. syringae pv. actinidiae, and their basic properties were characterized to provide a framework for formulation of these phages as biocontrol agents. Here, we have examined in more detail φPsa17, a phage with the capacity to infect a broad range of P. syringae pv. actinidiae strains and the only member of the Podoviridae in this collection. Particle morphology was visualized using cryo-electron microscopy, the genome was sequenced, and its structural proteins were analysed using shotgun proteomics. These studies demonstrated that φPsa17 has a 40,525 bp genome, is a member of the T7likevirus genus and is closely related to the pseudomonad phages φPSA2 and gh-1. Eleven structural proteins (one scaffolding) were detected by proteomics and φPsa17 has a capsid of approximately 60 nm in diameter. No genes indicative of a lysogenic lifecycle were identified, suggesting the phage is obligately lytic. These features indicate that φPsa17 may be suitable for formulation as a biocontrol agent of P. syringae pv. actinidiae. PMID:26114474

  3. Structure of the connector of bacteriophage T7 at 8A resolution: structural homologies of a basic component of a DNA translocating machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Martín-Benito, Jaime; Valle, Mikel; González, José M; Valencia, Alfonso; Valpuesta, José María; Carrascosa, José L

    2005-04-15

    The three-dimensional structure of the bacteriophage T7 head-to-tail connector has been obtained at 8A resolution using cryo-electron microscopy and single-particle analysis from purified recombinant connectors. The general morphology of the T7 connector is that of a 12-folded toroidal homopolymer with a channel that runs along the longitudinal axis of the particle. The structure of the T7 connector reveals many structural similarities with the connectors from other bacteriophages. Docking of the atomic structure of the varphi29 connector into the three-dimensional reconstruction of T7 connector reveals that the narrow, distal region of the two oligomers are almost identical. This region of the varphi29 connector has been suggested to be involved in DNA translocation, and is composed of an alpha-beta-alpha-beta-beta-alpha motif. A search for alpha-helices in the same region of the T7 three-dimensional map has located three alpha-helices in approximately the same position as those of the varphi29 connector. A comparison of the predicted secondary structure of several bacteriophage connectors, including among others T7, varphi29, P22 and SPP1, reveals that, despite the lack of sequence homology, they seem to contain the same alpha-beta-alpha-beta-beta-alpha motif as that present in the varphi29 connector. These results allow us to suggest a common architecture related to a basic component of the DNA translocating machinery for several viruses. PMID:15784250

  4. Interaction of bacteriophage T4 and T7 single-stranded DNA-binding proteins with DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacteriophages T4 and T7 are well-studied model replication systems, which have allowed researchers to determine the roles of many proteins central to DNA replication, recombination and repair. Here we summarize and discuss the results from two recently developed single-molecule methods to determine the salt-dependent DNA-binding kinetics and thermodynamics of the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding proteins (SSBs) from these systems. We use these methods to characterize both the equilibrium double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and ssDNA binding of the SSBs T4 gene 32 protein (gp32) and T7 gene 2.5 protein (gp2.5). Despite the overall two-orders-of-magnitude weaker binding of gp2.5 to both forms of DNA, we find that both proteins exhibit four-orders-of-magnitude preferential binding to ssDNA relative to dsDNA. This strong preferential ssDNA binding as well as the weak dsDNA binding is essential for the ability of both proteins to search dsDNA in one dimension to find available ssDNA-binding sites at the replication fork

  5. The ocr+ Gene Function of Bacteriophages T3 and T7 Counteracts the Salmonella typhimurium DNA Restriction Systems SA and SB

    OpenAIRE

    Krüger, Detlev H.; Hansen, Sigrid; Reuter, Monika

    1983-01-01

    In host cells containing the Salmonella typhimurium DNA restriction-modification systems SA+ and SB+, replication of the ocr+ bacteriophages T3 and T7 is not impaired. However, ocr (gene 0.3) mutants of these phages are susceptible to DNA restriction and modification by the SA+ and SB+ systems.

  6. Mechanism of sequence-specific template binding by the DNA primase of bacteriophage T7

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Seung-Joo

    2010-03-28

    DNA primases catalyze the synthesis of the oligoribonucleotides required for the initiation of lagging strand DNA synthesis. Biochemical studies have elucidated the mechanism for the sequence-specific synthesis of primers. However, the physical interactions of the primase with the DNA template to explain the basis of specificity have not been demonstrated. Using a combination of surface plasmon resonance and biochemical assays, we show that T7 DNA primase has only a slightly higher affinity for DNA containing the primase recognition sequence (5\\'-TGGTC-3\\') than for DNA lacking the recognition site. However, this binding is drastically enhanced by the presence of the cognate Nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs), Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and Cytosine triphosphate (CTP) that are incorporated into the primer, pppACCA. Formation of the dimer, pppAC, the initial step of sequence-specific primer synthesis, is not sufficient for the stable binding. Preformed primers exhibit significantly less selective binding than that observed with ATP and CTP. Alterations in subdomains of the primase result in loss of selective DNA binding. We present a model in which conformational changes induced during primer synthesis facilitate contact between the zinc-binding domain and the polymerase domain. The Author(s) 2010. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. Amplified RNA degradation in T7-amplification methods results in biased microarray hybridizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivell Richard

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amplification of RNA with the T7-System is a widely used technique for obtaining increased amounts of RNA starting from limited material. The amplified RNA (aRNA can subsequently be used for microarray hybridizations, warranting sufficient signal for image analysis. We describe here an amplification-time dependent degradation of aRNA in prolonged standard T7 amplification protocols, that results in lower average size aRNA and decreased yields. Results A time-dependent degradation of amplified RNA (aRNA could be observed when using the classical "Eberwine" T7-Amplification method. When the amplification was conducted for more than 4 hours, the resulting aRNA showed a significantly smaller size distribution on gel electrophoresis and a concomitant reduction of aRNA yield. The degradation of aRNA could be correlated to the presence of the T7 RNA Polymerase in the amplification cocktail. The aRNA degradation resulted in a strong bias in microarray hybridizations with a high coefficient of variation and a significant reduction of signals of certain transcripts, that seem to be susceptible to this RNA degrading activity. The time-dependent degradation of these transcripts was verified by a real-time PCR approach. Conclusions It is important to perform amplifications not longer than 4 hours as there is a characteristic 'quality vs. yield' situation for longer amplification times. When conducting microarray hybridizations it is important not to compare results obtained with aRNA from different amplification times.

  8. [Eukaryonization of T7 RNA polymerase prokaryotic expression system and development of its couple expression system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hai-Xue; Jin, Ye; Yin, Shuang-Hui; Guo, Hui-Chen; Shang, You-Jun; Bai, Xing-Wen; Liu, Xiang-Tao; Xie, Qing-Ge

    2007-09-01

    To make transcription of the target gene be driven by T7 RNA polymerase (T7 RNAP) in the eukaryotic cells, and the transcripts be CAP-independent translated. Firstly, the T7 RNAP was introduced into eukaryotic cells by two methods: (1) the BHK-21 cells were contransfected by the plasmid expressing T7 RNAP and pIERS-EGFP-ET vector; (2) by transfection of the cell line stably expressing T7 RNAP. The internal ribosome entry site (IRES) element from FMDV was cloned into the downstream of the T7 promoter sequence of the prokaryotic expressing vector pET-40a-c (+), resulted in the plasmid would express the transcripts carrying the IERS element at its 5' end. The enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene was cloned into the downstream of the IERS element, resulted in plasmid pIERS-EGFP-ET. Then, the two kinds of cells expressing T7 RANP were transfected by pIERS-EGFP-ET. The green fluorescence in the transfected cells was observed under a fluorescence microscope equipped with a video documentation system. And the expressional efficiency was analyzed with flow cytometry (FCM). The results show that the IRES element from FMDV has the role of initiating CAP-independent translation, and lay foundation for researching function of the element and interrelated proteins. It would be potential for expressing target gene by the T7 RNAP couple expression system. PMID:18051880

  9. Interaction of the ocr gene 0.3 protein of bacteriophage T7 with EcoKI restriction/modification enzyme

    OpenAIRE

    Atanasiu, C.; Su, T J; Sturrock, S. S.; Dryden, D T F

    2002-01-01

    The ocr protein, the product of gene 0.3 of bacteriophage T7, is a structural mimic of the phosphate backbone of B-form DNA. In total it mimics 22 phosphate groups over similar to24 bp of DNA. This mimicry allows it to block DNA binding by type I DNA restriction enzymes and to inhibit these enzymes. We have determined that multiple ocr dimers can bind stoichiometrically to the archetypal type I enzyme, EcoKI. One dimer binds to the core methyltransferase and two to the complete bifunctional r...

  10. W-reactivation and W-mutagenesis in bacteriophages lambda and T7: comparison of action of ultraviolet irradiation (254nm) and furocouma photosensitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When treating bacteriophage lambda with 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) and light (lambda>320 nm), two types of photoproducts are formed in DNA: monoadducts and diadducts or interstrand linkings. If a wild-type strain of Escherichia coli is used as horst, W-reactivation and W-mutagenesis (clear-mutation), approximately equal in magnitude to those of UV-irradiated phage lambda, are observed in the bacteriophage lambda treated with 8-MOP plus light. If mutant strains E coli uvrA-, recA- and lexA- are used as host W-reactivation and W-mutagenesis practically do not occur in phage lambda. Using the method of ''reirradiation'', it is shown that clear-mutations in 8-MOP plus light treated phage lambda are induced in the process of W-mutagenesis mainly due to the formation of diadducts (interstrand linking) in DNA. In the phage monoadducts of derived furocoumarins also have a mutageneous character but their mutagenesis effectiveness (mutation probability calculating on one photo product) is significantly inferior to that of diadducts (approximately 15-20 times). It has been demonstrated in the experiments on the determination of W-mutagenesis of phage lambda photosensitized with angelisine - an angular derivative of furocoumarins - that mainly formi monoadducts in DNA. It is also shown that W-reactivation and W-mutagenesis effects are observed when sowing UV-irradiated (254 nm) phage lambda on E coli uvrA- and wild-type strains treated with 8-MOP plus light. As to bacteriophage T7 treated with 8-MOP plus light, W-reactivation is not observed even on a wild strain E coli. Preliminary infection of cells with phage T7 that has been strongly inactivated using photosensitizer 8-MOP decreases repair's effectiveness of interstrand linkings in DNA of phage lambda

  11. 逆转录病毒载体介导的T7RNA聚合酶在猪源细胞PK15及SK6中的稳定表达%Stable Expression of T7 RNA Polymerase Gene Mediated by Retroviral Vector in PK15 and SK6 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴锦艳; 田宏; 郑海学; 陈妍; 靳野; 尚佑军; 刘湘涛

    2011-01-01

    本研究旨在利用逆转录病毒载体系统将T7RNA聚合酶基因导入猪源细胞,并对该基因的遗传稳定性进行分析.作者克隆并构建含T7RNA聚合酶基因的逆转录病毒重组载体pBABEpuro/T7.将pBABEpuro/T7与水泡性口炎病毒载体pVSV-G共转染GP2-293细胞,收获重组病毒并用该病毒在Polybrene的介导下分别感染PK15和SK6细胞,用嘌呤霉素筛选阳性细胞克隆.对此阳性细胞进行传代,并对不同代次细胞中的T7RNA聚合酶基因进行扩增,确定其遗传稳定性.用直接荧光法和聚丙烯酰胺凝胶电泳检测细胞中T7RNA聚合酶基因的表达及其活性.结果表明T7RNA聚合酶能够被稳定地整合进靶细胞基因组内,细胞系内的T7RNA聚合酶具有较好的转录活性,其活性传代不减弱.免疫荧光检测发现所表达的T7 RNAP蛋白具有良好的反应原性.本研究表明T7RNA聚合酶基因稳定整合进猪源细胞,该基因的稳定整合为建立高效体内病毒拯救系统提供了良好的工具.%The experiment was conducted to insert T7 RNA polymerase (RNAP) gene into cells of swine by retroviral vector system, then to analyze its hereditary stability. The bacteriophage T7 RNAP gene was amplified via PCR from lysogen DE3, and the gene was cloned into pBABEpuro retrovial vector to construct a recombinant plasmid that named as pBABEpuro/T7. Then the pT7BABEpuro and pVSV-G plasmids were cotransfected into GP2-293 packaging cells by Lipfection 2000, some pseudotype viruses were ingathered and transfected into PK15 and SK6 cells under polybrene, respectively. The T7-PK15 and T7-SK6 cells were propagated in DMEM with puromycin respectively. The genome extraction from the cells transfected different times, and the T7 RNAP gene was amplified from the genome by PCR. Expression and activity of T7 RNAP gene in T7-PK15 and T7-SK6 cells were analyzed by immediate fluorescence and SDS-PAGE assay. Results showed that the T7 RNAP gene had been integrated into

  12. On the promoter complex formation rate of E. coli RNA polymerases with T7 phage DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Belintsev, B N; Zavriev, S.K.; Shemyakin, M.F.

    1980-01-01

    Influence of ionic strength on the kinetics of the promoter complex formation between E. coli RNA polymerase and T7 phage DNA was investigated using a membrane filter assay. The enzyme-promoter association rate constant was determined. It varies from 10(9) to 3 x 10(7) M-1 sec-1 when the ionic strength is changed from zero to 0.15 M NaCl. Basing on the theoretical analysis of experimental data obtained the model for the promoter site selection assuming the enzyme sliding along the DNA is disc...

  13. Synthesis of bacteriophage-coded gene products during infection of Escherichia coli with amber mutants of T3 and T7 defective in gene 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issinger, O G; Hausmann, R

    1973-01-01

    During nonpermissive infection by a T7 amber mutant in gene 1 (phage RNA polymerase-deficient), synthesis of the products of the phage genes 3 (endonuclease), 3, 5 (lysozyme), 5 (DNA polymerase), and 17 (serum blocking power) was shown to occur at about half the rate as during wild-type infection...

  14. The role of DNA-protein interaction in the UV damage of T7 bacteriophage at high fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of higher fluences (0.5-10 kJm-2) and that of phage protein coat on the UV (lambda = 254 nm) damage of T7 DNA were studied by UV difference spectroscopy. Beside the pyrimidine dimers and adducts produced also in isolated DNA in the case of intact phages and fluences exceeding 0.5 kJ m-2 other photoproducts, probably DNA-protein cross-links were identified as well. Phages deprived of their protein coat by a thermal treatment show similar UV damage to that of isolated DNA. (author)

  15. Two modes of interaction of the single-stranded DNA-binding protein of bacteriophage T7 with the DNA polymerase-thioredoxin complex

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, Sharmistha

    2010-04-06

    The DNA polymerase encoded by bacteriophage T7 has low processivity. Escherichia coli thioredoxin binds to a segment of 76 residues in the thumb subdomain of the polymerase and increases the processivity. The binding of thioredoxin leads to the formation of two basic loops, loops A and B, located within the thioredoxin-binding domain (TBD). Both loops interact with the acidic C terminus of the T7 helicase. A relatively weak electrostatic mode involves the C-terminal tail of the helicase and the TBD, whereas a high affinity interaction that does not involve the C-terminal tail occurs when the polymerase is in a polymerization mode. T7 gene 2.5 single-stranded DNA-binding protein (gp2.5) also has an acidic C-terminal tail. gp2.5 also has two modes of interaction with the polymerase, but both involve the C-terminal tail of gp2.5. An electrostatic interaction requires the basic residues in loops A and B, and gp2.5 binds to both loops with similar affinity as measured by surface plasmon resonance. When the polymerase is in a polymerization mode, the C terminus of gene 2.5 protein interacts with the polymerase in regions outside the TBD.gp2.5 increases the processivity of the polymerase-helicase complex during leading strand synthesis. When loop B of the TBD is altered, abortive DNA products are observed during leading strand synthesis. Loop B appears to play an important role in communication with the helicase and gp2.5, whereas loop A plays a stabilizing role in these interactions. © 2010 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. A Jump-from-Cavity Pyrophosphate Ion Release Assisted by a Key Lysine Residue in T7 RNA Polymerase Transcription Elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da, Lin-Tai; E, Chao; Duan, Baogen; Zhang, Chuanbiao; Zhou, Xin; Yu, Jin

    2015-11-01

    Pyrophosphate ion (PPi) release during transcription elongation is a signature step in each nucleotide addition cycle. The kinetics and energetics of the process as well as how it proceeds with substantial conformational changes of the polymerase complex determine the mechano-chemical coupling mechanism of the transcription elongation. Here we investigated detailed dynamics of the PPi release process in a single-subunit RNA polymerase (RNAP) from bacteriophage T7, implementing all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We obtained a jump-from-cavity kinetic model of the PPi release utilizing extensive nanosecond MD simulations. We found that the PPi release in T7 RNAP is initiated by the PPi dissociation from two catalytic aspartic acids, followed by a comparatively slow jump-from-cavity activation process. Combining with a number of microsecond long MD simulations, we also found that the activation process is hindered by charged residue associations as well as by local steric and hydrogen bond interactions. On the other hand, the activation is greatly assisted by a highly flexible lysine residue Lys472 that swings its side chain to pull PPi out. The mechanism can apply in general to single subunit RNA and DNA polymerases with similar molecular structures and conserved key residues. Remarkably, the flexible lysine or arginine residue appears to be a universal module that assists the PPi release even in multi-subunit RNAPs with charge facilitated hopping mechanisms. We also noticed that the PPi release is not tightly coupled to opening motions of an O-helix on the fingers domain of T7 RNAP according to the microsecond MD simulations. Our study thus supports the Brownian ratchet scenario of the mechano-chemical coupling in the transcription elongation of the single-subunit polymerase. PMID:26599007

  17. [Homologous expression of Burkholderia cepacia G63 lipase gene based on T7 RNA polymerase expression system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Bin; Yang, Jiangke; Yan, Yunjun

    2009-02-01

    In order to realize over-expression of Burkholderia cepacia (B. cepacia) lipase, we introduced the widely used T7 RAN polymerase expression system into B. cepacia G63 to over-express the lipase gene. By using PCR technique, we amplified the T7 RNA polymerase gene (T7 RNAP) from the BL21 (DE3) and cloned it into the suicide plasmid pJQ200SK. After that, we flanked T7 RNAP with two 500 bp homologous fragments and integrated it into the genomes of B. cepacia by tri-parental mating, so that T7 RNAP was under-controlled by lipase gene (lipA) promoter. Then, we cloned the lipA and its partner gene lipB into the vector pUCPCM and pBBR22b both or separately. Therefore, we got 7 expression plasmids pBBR22blipAB, pBBR22blipA, pUCPCMlipAB, pUCPCMlipA, pUCPCMdeltalipAlipB, pUCPCMdeltalipA, pUCPCMdeltalipB, and then electroporated them into B. cepacia containing T7 RNA. After shake flask culture, we found B. cepacia containing pUCPCMlipAB produced the most quantity of lipase, and lipase activity was up to 607.2 U/mg, 2.8-folds higher than that of the wild strain. Moreover, lipase activities of all engineering strains except the one containing pUCPCMdeltalipB were enhanced to some extent. The specific activities of wild type B. cepacia and B. cepacia containing pUCPCMlipAB were respectively 29 984 U/mg and 30 875 U/mg after ammonium sulfate precipitation and gel filtration chromatography. The T7 RNA polymerase expression system could effectively enhanced lipase expression in B. cepacia, and secretion signal PelB and ribosome-binding site may promote lipase expression in engineering strain. PMID:19459326

  18. Relaxed rotational and scrunching changes in P266L mutant of T7 RNA polymerase reduce short abortive RNAs while delaying transition into elongation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Qing Tang

    Full Text Available Abortive cycling is a universal feature of transcription initiation catalyzed by DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RNAP. In bacteriophage T7 RNAP, mutation of proline 266 to leucine (P266L in the C-linker region connecting the N-terminal promoter binding domain with the C-terminal catalytic domain drastically reduces short abortive products (4-7 nt while marginally increasing long abortives (9-11 nt. Here we have investigated the transcription initiation pathway of P266L with the goal of understanding the mechanistic basis for short and long abortive synthesis. We show that the P266L mutation does not alter the affinity for the promoter, mildly affects promoter opening, and increases the +1/+2 GTP K(d by 2-fold. However, unlike wild-type T7 RNAP that undergoes stepwise rotation of the promoter binding domain and DNA scrunching during initial transcription, the P266L mutant does not undergo coupled rotational/scrunching movements until 7 nt RNA synthesis. The lack of rotation/scrunching correlates with greater stabilities of the initiation complexes of the P266L and decreased short abortive products. The results indicate that the increased flexibility in the C-linker due to P266L mutation enables T7 RNAP to absorb the stress from the growing RNA:DNA hybrid thereby decreasing short abortive products. Increased C-linker flexibility, however, has an adverse effect of delaying the transition into elongation by 1-2 nt, which gives rise to long abortive products. However, a mutation in the upstream promoter region greatly decreases long abortive products in P266L reactions, rendering the combination of P266L and A-15C promoter a desirable pair for efficient in vitro transcription for RNA production. We conclude that the conformational rigidity in the C-linker region conferred by the proline at position 266 is responsible for the undesirable short abortive products, but the rigidity is critical for efficient promoter clearance and transition into

  19. Bacteriophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacteriophages or phages are bacterial viruses and are present in the rumen in large numbers. They are obligate pathogens of bacteria and are ubiquitous to the rumen ecosystem. Bacteriophages are capable of lysing their bacterial hosts within the rumen and are therefore regarded as contributing to protein recycling within the rumen, a process identified as reducing the efficiency of feed utilization. However, their presence may not be entirely detrimental to the ecosystem, and it has been argued that phages may also be involved in the maintenance of a balanced ecosystem and may play a role in recycling limiting nutrients within the rumen. Furthermore, phage therapy is enjoying a renaissance and the use of phages to control or eliminate detrimental or unwanted microbes from the gastro-intestinal tract, such as Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (food-borne disease), Streptococcus bovis (acidosis in grain-fed cattle) and methanogens (produce the greenhouse gas methane), is the focus of current investigation. In order to be able to study the interaction between individual bacteriophages and their bacterial hosts, it is necessary to: (a) isolate the phage of interest from other viruses in the source material; (b) to derive stock cultures of known phage concentration; (c) store the isolated phages; and (d) determine basic physical characteristics, such as morphology. These procedures are achieved using classical microbiological procedures and this will be the methodology described in this chapter. It is also necessary to determine nucleic acid characteristics of the phage genome and to fingerprint the phage population in the rumen using molecular biological techniques. These will be described and discussed in Chapter 4.2

  20. Interaction of packaging motor with the polymerase complex of dsRNA bacteriophage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many viruses employ molecular motors to package their genomes into preformed empty capsids (procapsids). In dsRNA bacteriophages the packaging motor is a hexameric ATPase P4, which is an integral part of the multisubunit procapsid. Structural and biochemical studies revealed a plausible RNA-translocation mechanism for the isolated hexamer. However, little is known about the structure and regulation of the hexamer within the procapsid. Here we use hydrogen-deuterium exchange and mass spectrometry to delineate the interactions of the P4 hexamer with the bacteriophage phi12 procapsid. P4 associates with the procapsid via its C-terminal face. The interactions also stabilize subunit interfaces within the hexamer. The conformation of the virus-bound hexamer is more stable than the hexamer in solution, which is prone to spontaneous ring openings. We propose that the stabilization within the viral capsid increases the packaging processivity and confers selectivity during RNA loading

  1. Structural basis of RNA binding discrimination between bacteriophages Qbeta and MS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Wilf T; Tars, Kaspars; Grahn, Elin; Helgstrand, Charlotte; Baron, Andrew J; Lago, Hugo; Adams, Chris J; Peabody, David S; Phillips, Simon E V; Stonehouse, Nicola J; Liljas, Lars; Stockley, Peter G

    2006-03-01

    Sequence-specific interactions between RNA stem-loops and coat protein (CP) subunits play vital roles in the life cycles of the RNA bacteriophages, e.g., by allowing translational repression of their replicase cistrons and tagging their own RNA genomes for encapsidation. The CPs of bacteriophages Qbeta and MS2 each discriminate in favor of their cognate translational operators, even in the presence of closely related operators from other phages in vivo. Discrete mutations within the MS2 CP have been shown to relax this discrimination in vitro. We have determined the structures of eight complexes between such mutants and both MS2 and Qbeta stem-loops with X-ray crystallography. In conjunction with previously determined in vivo repression data, the structures enable us to propose the molecular basis for the discrimination mechanism. PMID:16531233

  2. A new generation of T7 RNA polymerase-independent inducible expression plasmids for Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Sunter

    Full Text Available Expression of transgenes is central to forward and reverse genetic analysis in Trypanosoma brucei. The inducible expression of transgenes in trypanosomes is based on the tetracycline repressor binding to a tetracycline operator to prevent transcription in the absence of tetracycline. The same inducible system is used to produce double-stranded RNA for RNAi knockdown of target genes. This study describes a new plasmid pSPR2.1 that drives consistent high-level expression of tetracycline repressor in procyclic form trypanosomes. A complementary expression plasmid, p3227, was constructed. The major difference between this and current plasmids is the separation of the inducible transgene and selectable marker promoters by the plasmid backbone. The plasmid p3227 was able to support inducible expression in cell lines containing pSPR2.1 as well as the established Lister 427 29-13 cell line. p3666, a derivative of p3227, was made for inducible expression of stem loop RNAi constructs and was effective for knockdown of DRBD3, which had proved problematic using existing RNAi plasmids with head-to-head promoters. The plasmid system was also able to support inducible transgene expression and DRBD3 RNAi knockdown in bloodstream form cells expressing tetracycline repressor from an integrated copy of the plasmid pHD1313.

  3. Characterization of bacteriophage KVP40 and T4 RNA ligase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacteriophage T4 RNA ligase 2 (Rnl2) exemplifies a subfamily of RNA strand-joining enzymes that includes the trypanosome RNA editing ligases. A homolog of T4 Rnl2 is encoded in the 244-kbp DNA genome of vibriophage KVP40. We show that the 335-amino acid KVP40 Rnl2 is a monomeric protein that catalyzes RNA end-joining through ligase-adenylate and RNA-adenylate (AppRNA) intermediates. In the absence of ATP, pre-adenylated KVP40 Rnl2 reacts with an 18-mer 5'-PO4 single-strand RNA (pRNA) to form an 18-mer RNA circle. In the presence of ATP, Rnl2 generates predominantly AppRNA. Isolated AppRNA can be circularized by KVP40 Rnl2 in the absence of ATP. The reactivity of phage Rnl2 and the distribution of the products are affected by the length of the pRNA substrate. Whereas 18-mer and 15-mer pRNAs undergo intramolecular sealing by T4 Rnl2 to form monomer circles, a 12-mer pRNA is ligated intermolecularly to form dimers, and a 9-mer pRNA is unreactive. In the presence of ATP, the 15-mer and 12-mer pRNAs are converted to AppRNAs, but the 9-mer pRNA is not. A single 5' deoxynucleotide substitution of an 18-mer pRNA substrate has no apparent effect on the 5' adenylation or circularization reactions of T4 Rnl2. In contrast, a single deoxyribonucleoside at the 3' terminus strongly and selectively suppresses the sealing step, thereby resulting in accumulation of high levels of AppRNA in the absence of ATP. The ATP-dependent 'capping' of RNA with AMP by Rnl2 is reminiscent of the capping of eukaryotic mRNA with GMP by GTP:RNA guanylyltransferase and suggests an evolutionary connection between bacteriophage Rnl2 and eukaryotic RNA capping enzymes

  4. The nucleotide sequence of threonine transfer RNA coded by bacteriophage T4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nucleotide sequence of a low molecular weight RNA coded by bacteriophage T4 (and previously identified as species α) has been determined. The molecule is of particular biological interest for its associated biosynthetic properties. This RNA is 76 nucleotides in length, contains eight modified bases, and can be arranged in a cloverleaf configuration common to tRNAs. The anticodon sequence is UGU, which corresponds to the threonine-specific codons ACsub(G)sup(A). The nucleotide sequence was determined primarily by nearest-neighbour analysis of RNA synthesized in vitro using [α-32P] nucleoside triphosphates. Using the single-strand specific nuclease S1, two in vivo labelled half-molecules were generated and analysed. This information together with restrictions imposed by nearest-neighbour data, provided a unique linear sequence of nucleotides with the features of secondary structure common to tRNA molecules. (author)

  5. Structural basis for RNA-genome recognition during bacteriophage Qβ replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Heidi Gytz; Mohr, Durita; Seweryn, Paulina; Yoshimura, Yuichi; Kutlubaeva, Zarina; Dolman, Fleur; Chelchessa, Bosene; Chetverin, Alexander B; Mulder, Frans A A; Brodersen, Ditlev E; Knudsen, Charlotte R

    2015-01-01

    Upon infection of Escherichia coli by bacteriophage Qβ, the virus-encoded β-subunit recruits host translation elongation factors EF-Tu and EF-Ts and ribosomal protein S1 to form the Qβ replicase holoenzyme complex, which is responsible for amplifying the Qβ (+)-RNA genome. Here, we use X-ray crys......Upon infection of Escherichia coli by bacteriophage Qβ, the virus-encoded β-subunit recruits host translation elongation factors EF-Tu and EF-Ts and ribosomal protein S1 to form the Qβ replicase holoenzyme complex, which is responsible for amplifying the Qβ (+)-RNA genome. Here, we use X...... the ability of Qβ replicase to amplify the genomic RNA in vitro. In contrast, replication of smaller replicable RNAs is not affected. Taken together, our data suggest that the β-subunit and protein S1 cooperatively bind the (+)-stranded Qβ genome during replication initiation and provide a foundation...... for understanding template discrimination during replication initiation....

  6. RNA Packing Specificity and Folding during Assembly of the Bacteriophage MS2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottar Rolfsson

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a combination of biochemistry, mass spectrometry, NMR spectroscopy and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM, we have been able to show that quasi-equivalent conformer switching in the coat protein (CP of an RNA bacteriophage (MS2 is controlled by a sequence-specific RNA–protein interaction. The RNA component of this complex is an RNA stem-loop encompassing just 19 nts from the phage genomic RNA, which is 3569 nts in length. This binding results in the conversion of a CP dimer from a symmetrical conformation to an asymmetric one. Only when both symmetrical and asymmetrical dimers are present in solution is assembly of the T = 3 phage capsid efficient. This implies that the conformers, we have characterized by NMR correspond to the two distinct quasi-equivalent conformers seen in the 3D structure of the virion. An icosahedrally-averaged single particle cryo-EM reconstruction of the wild-type phage (to ∼9 Å resolution has revealed icosahedrally ordered density encompassing up to 90% of the single-stranded RNA genome. The RNA is seen with a novel arrangement of two concentric shells, with connections between them along the 5-fold symmetry axes. RNA in the outer shell interacts with each of the 90 CP dimers in the T = 3 capsid and although the density is icosahedrally averaged, there appears to be a different average contact at the different quasi-equivalent protein dimers: precisely the result that would be expected if protein conformer switching is RNA-mediated throughout the assembly pathway. This unprecedented RNA structure provides new constraints for models of viral assembly and we describe experiments aimed at probing these. Together, these results suggest that viral genomic RNA folding is an important factor in efficient assembly, and further suggest that RNAs that could sequester viral CPs but not fold appropriately could act as potent inhibitors of viral assembly.

  7. A combined method for rescue of modified enteroviruses by mutagenic primers, long PCR and T7 RNA polymerase-driven in vivo transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, Outi; Kainulainen, Markus; Susi, Petri

    2011-01-01

    The current methods for manipulation of enteroviral RNA genomes and production of modified virus particles include stepwise subcloning procedures and in vitro transcription and RNA transfection steps that are both time-consuming and inefficient. Several enteroviral cDNA clones with 5'-terminal T7 promoter and coxsackievirus A9 (CAV9) PCR product with the T7 promoter were transfected successfully into target cells expressing T7 RNA polymerase for the rescue of virus particles. This demonstrated the overall feasibility of the in vivo transcription method. Furthermore, a rapid method using high-fidelity DNA polymerase, Phusion™, for amplification and mutagenesis of CAV9 cDNA was generated. A long PCR method was employed together with mutagenic primers for direct introduction of a unique restriction enzyme site into the VP1-2A junction of the CAV9 cDNA clone during the PCR amplification process. Enhanced green fluorescent protein was subcloned to that site, and CAV9-eGFP cDNA was transfected to the target cells for in vivo transcription and successful rescue of CAV9-eGFP particles. The method allowed a straightforward mutagenesis and in vivo production of infectious enteroviral particles, and may be applicable routinely for rapid production of the modified picornaviruses over the use of the traditional subcloning protocols. PMID:20974179

  8. Use of T7 RNA polymerase to direct expression of outer Surface Protein A (OspA) from the Lyme disease Spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, John J.; Lade, Barbara N.

    1991-01-01

    The OspA gene from a North American strain of the Lyme disease Spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, was cloned under the control of transciption and translation signals from bacteriophage T7. Full-length OspA protein, a 273 amino acid (31kD) lipoprotein, is expressed poorly in Escherichia coli and is associated with the insoluble membrane fraction. In contrast, a truncated form of OspA lacking the amino-terminal signal sequence which normally would direct localization of the protein to the outer membrane is expressed at very high levels (less than or equal to 100 mg/liter) and is soluble. The truncated protein was purified to homogeneity and is being tested to see if it will be useful as an immunogen in a vaccine against Lyme disease. Circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy was used to characterize the secondary structure and study conformational changes in the protein. Studies underway with other surface proteins from B burgdorferi and a related spirochete, B. hermsii, which causes relapsing fever, leads us to conclude that a strategy similar to that used to express the truncated OspA can provide a facile method for producing variations of Borrelia lipoproteins which are highly expressed in E. coli and soluble without exposure to detergents.

  9. The RNA core weakly influences the interactions of the bacteriophage MS2 at key environmental interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Nguyen, Thanh H.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the RNA core on interfacial interactions of the bacteriophage MS2 was investigated. After removal of the RNA core, empty intact capsids were characterized and compared to untreated MS2. Electron density of untreated MS2 and RNA-free MS2 were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and synchrotron-based small angle spectroscopy (SAXS). Suspensions of both particles exhibited similar electrophoretic mobility across a range of pH values. Similar effects were observed at pH 5.9 across a range of NaCl or CaCl2 concentrations. We compared key interfacial interactions (particle-particle and particle/air-water interface) between suspensions of each type of particle using time resolved dynamic light scattering (TR-DLS) to observe and quantify aggregation kinetics and axisymmetric drop shape analysis to measure adsorption at the air-water interface. Both suspensions showed insignificant aggregation over 4 h in 600 mM NaCl solutions. In the presence of Ca2+ ions, aggregation of both types of particles was consistent with earlier aggregation studies and was characterized by both reaction-limited and diffusion-limited regimes occurring at similar [Ca2+]. However, the removal of the RNA from MS2 had no apparent effect on the aggregation kinetics of particles. Despite some differences in the kinetics of adsorption to the air-water interface, the changes in surface tension which result from particle adsorption showed no difference between the untreated MS2 and RNA-free MS2. The interactions and structure of particles at the air-water interface were further probed using interfacial dilational rheology. The surface elasticity (E s) and surface viscosity (ηs) at the interface were low for both the untreated virus and the RNA-free capsid. This observation suggests that the factors that impact the adsorption kinetics are not important for an equilibrated interface. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  10. Melibiose permease and alpha-galactosidase of Escherichia coli: Identification by selective labeling using a T7 RNA polymerase/promoter expression system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Identification and selective labeling of the melibiose permease and alpha-galactosidase in Escherichia coli, which are encoded by the melB and melA genes, respectively, have been accomplished by selectively labeling the two gene products with a T7 RNA polymerase expression system. Following generation of a novel EcoRI restriction site in the intergenic sequence between the two genes of the mel operon by oligonucleotide-directed, site-specific mutagenesis, melA and melB were separately inserted into plasmid pT7-6 of the T7 expression system. Expression of melB was markedly enhanced by placing a strong, synthetic ribosome binding site at an optimal distance upstream from the initiation codon of melB. Expression of cloned gene products was characterized functionally and by performing autoradiographic analysis on total cell, inner membrane, and cytoplasmic proteins from cells pulse labeled with (35S)methionine in the presence of rifampicin and resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The results first confirm that alpha-galactosidase is a cytoplasmic protein with an Mr of 50K; in contrast, the membrane-bound melibiose permease is identified as a protein with an apparent Mr of 39K, a value significantly higher than that of 30K previously suggested

  11. Construction of carrier state viruses with partial genomes of the segmented dsRNA bacteriophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cystoviridae are bacteriophages with genomes of three segments of dsRNA enclosed within a polyhedral capsid. Two members of this family, PHI6 and PHI8, have been shown to form carrier states in which the virus replicates as a stable episome in the host bacterium while expressing reporter genes such as kanamycin resistance or lacα. The carrier state does not require the activity of all the genes necessary for phage production. It is possible to generate carrier states by infecting cells with virus or by electroporating nonreplicating plasmids containing cDNA copies of the viral genomes into the host cells. We have found that carrier states in both PHI6 and PHI8 can be formed at high frequency with all three genomic segments or with only the large and small segments. The large genomic segment codes for the proteins that constitute the inner core of the virus, which is the structure responsible for the packaging and replication of the genome. In PHI6, a carrier state can be formed with the large and middle segment if mutations occur in the gene for the major structural protein of the inner core. In PHI8, carrier state formation requires the activity of genes 8 and 12 of segment S

  12. Effect of the Concentration Difference between Magnesium Ions and Total Ribonucleotide Triphosphates in Governing the Specificity of T7 RNA Polymerase-Based Rolling Circle Transcription for Quantitative Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiyan; Lau, Choiwan; Lu, Jianzhong

    2016-06-01

    T7 RNA polymerase-based rolling circle transcription (RCT) is a more powerful tool than universal runoff transcription and traditional DNA polymerase-based rolling circle amplification (RCA). However, RCT is rarely employed in quantitative detection due to its poor specificity for small single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), which can be transcribed efficiently by T7 RNA polymerase even without a promoter. Herein we show that the concentration difference between Mg(2+) and total ribonucleotide triphosphates (rNTPs) radically governs the specificity of T7 RNA polymerase. Only when the total rNTP concentration is 9 mM greater than the Mg(2+) concentration can T7 RNA polymerase transcribe ssDNA specifically and efficiently. This knowledge improves our traditional understanding of T7 RNA polymerase and makes convenient application of RCT in quantitative detection possible. Subsequently, an RCT-based label-free chemiluminescence method for microRNA detection was designed to test the capability of this sensing platform. Using this simple method, microRNA as low as 20 amol could be quantitatively detected. The results reveal that the developed sensing platform holds great potential for further applications in the quantitative detection of a variety of targets. PMID:27167591

  13. Removal of F-specific RNA bacteriophages in artificial recharge of groundwater--a field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, R M; Kytövaara, A; Pääkkönen, J; Lahti, K

    2004-01-01

    Artificial recharge of groundwater offers a semi-natural means to produce raw water for drinking-water plants. Surface water works are increasingly being replaced by artificial groundwater works in Finland. Two municipalities, one serving 30,000 and the other 170,000 inhabitants, have considered filtering river water through eskers for the production of potable water. In this study the removal of bacteriophages during infiltration of river water was estimated, for the evaluation of treatment adequacy in a field study. A 5-m-deep column of sand was constructed and used to mimic the percolating phase in infiltration. An artificial esker was constructed on the riverbank by isolating a 2-m-wide, 2-m-deep and 18-m-long bed of coarse sand with plastic. The sand bed represented the saturated zone. River water was pumped at a rate of 40 L/h to the sand column. The river water was spiked with F+ specific RNA phage MS2 by adding phage suspension during one week at an average concentration of 4.3 x 10(9) PFU/mL. Samples for phage assays were taken during one month, from four sampling sites, on the basis of detention time as estimated by a tracer experiment with sodium chloride. The median count of MS2 for percolated water was 2.4 x 10(5) PFU/mL, representing a 96.7% reduction. During the passage of 6 m in the saturated zone, a further reduction of 98.5% occurred. During the passage from 6 m to 12 m the additional reduction was 99.97%. The overall reduction was between 6 and 7 log10 units. The removal of MS2 phages was rather efficient, although the esker material was coarse, mainly sandy, gravel. PMID:15318502

  14. Problem-Solving Test: RNA and Protein Synthesis in Bacteriophage-Infected "E. coli" Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2008-01-01

    The classic experiment presented in this problem-solving test was designed to identify the template molecules of translation by analyzing the synthesis of phage proteins in "Escherichia coli" cells infected with bacteriophage T4. The work described in this test led to one of the most seminal discoveries of early molecular biology: it dealt a…

  15. Detection of bacteriophage phi 6 minus-strand RNA and novel mRNA isoconformers synthesized in vivo and in vitro, by strand-separating agarose gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two urea-free agarose gel protocols that resolve the six individual strands of bacteriophage phi 6 dsRNA were developed and used to analyze phage RNA synthesis in vivo and in vitro. Citrate gels separate strands of the large and medium chromosomes while Tris-borate-EDTA (TBE) gels resolve the medium and small dsRNA segments. Minus strands migrate faster than plus strands on citrate gels but are retarded on TBE gels. A study of electrophoretic conditions showed that pH affects strand resolution on citrate gels, and that voltage gradient, agarose concentration, and ethidium bromide significantly alter strand migration on TBE gels. Analysis of native phi 6 RNA synthesized in vivo and in vitro showed that the large and medium message RNAs comigrate with the corresponding plus strands of denatured virion dsRNA. The small messenger RNA is exceptional. Native small mRNA was detected as three isoconformers in vivo and in vitro. The isoconformers were converted by heat denaturation to a single RNA species that comigrates with the virion s+ strand. Minus strands labeled in vivo were detected only after heat denaturation. Minus strand synthesis was detected also in heat-denatured samples from in vitro phi 6 nucleocapsid RNA polymerase reactions at pH values suboptimal for transcription

  16. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studier, F.W.; Rosenberg, A.H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest. 1 fig.

  17. Post-transcriptional control by bacteriophage T4: mRNA decay and inhibition of translation initiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Eric S

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Over 50 years of biological research with bacteriophage T4 includes notable discoveries in post-transcriptional control, including the genetic code, mRNA, and tRNA; the very foundations of molecular biology. In this review we compile the past 10 - 15 year literature on RNA-protein interactions with T4 and some of its related phages, with particular focus on advances in mRNA decay and processing, and on translational repression. Binding of T4 proteins RegB, RegA, gp32 and gp43 to their cognate target RNAs has been characterized. For several of these, further study is needed for an atomic-level perspective, where resolved structures of RNA-protein complexes are awaiting investigation. Other features of post-transcriptional control are also summarized. These include: RNA structure at translation initiation regions that either inhibit or promote translation initiation; programmed translational bypassing, where T4 orchestrates ribosome bypass of a 50 nucleotide mRNA sequence; phage exclusion systems that involve T4-mediated activation of a latent endoribonuclease (PrrC and cofactor-assisted activation of EF-Tu proteolysis (Gol-Lit; and potentially important findings on ADP-ribosylation (by Alt and Mod enzymes of ribosome-associated proteins that might broadly impact protein synthesis in the infected cell. Many of these problems can continue to be addressed with T4, whereas the growing database of T4-related phage genome sequences provides new resources and potentially new phage-host systems to extend the work into a broader biological, evolutionary context.

  18. T7 replisome directly overcomes DNA damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; Pandey, Manjula; Inman, James T.; Yang, Yi; Kashlev, Mikhail; Patel, Smita S.; Wang, Michelle D.

    2015-12-01

    Cells and viruses possess several known `restart' pathways to overcome lesions during DNA replication. However, these `bypass' pathways leave a gap in replicated DNA or require recruitment of accessory proteins, resulting in significant delays to fork movement or even cell division arrest. Using single-molecule and ensemble methods, we demonstrate that the bacteriophage T7 replisome is able to directly replicate through a leading-strand cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) lesion. We show that when a replisome encounters the lesion, a substantial fraction of DNA polymerase (DNAP) and helicase stay together at the lesion, the replisome does not dissociate and the helicase does not move forward on its own. The DNAP is able to directly replicate through the lesion by working in conjunction with helicase through specific helicase-DNAP interactions. These observations suggest that the T7 replisome is fundamentally permissive of DNA lesions via pathways that do not require fork adjustment or replisome reassembly.

  19. All-atom normal-mode analysis reveals an RNA-induced allostery in a bacteriophage coat protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykeman, Eric C.; Twarock, Reidun

    2010-03-01

    Assembly of the T=3 bacteriophage MS2 is initiated by the binding of a 19 nucleotide RNA stem loop from within the phage genome to a symmetric coat protein dimer. This binding event effects a folding of the FG loop in one of the protein subunits of the dimer and results in the formation of an asymmetric dimer. Since both the symmetric and asymmetric forms of the dimer are needed for the assembly of the protein container, this allosteric switch plays an important role in the life cycle of the phage. We provide here details of an all-atom normal-mode analysis of this allosteric effect. The results suggest that asymmetric contacts between the A -duplex RNA phosphodiester backbone of the stem loop with the EF loop in one coat protein subunit results in an increased dynamic behavior of its FG loop. The four lowest-frequency modes, which encompass motions predominantly on the FG loops, account for over 90% of the increased dynamic behavior due to a localization of the vibrational pattern on a single FG loop. Finally, we show that an analysis of the allosteric effect using an elastic network model fails to predict this localization effect, highlighting the importance of using an all-atom full force field method for this problem.

  20. RNA-primed initiation sites of DNA replication in the origin region of bacteriophage lambda genome.

    OpenAIRE

    Yoda, K.; Yasuda, H; Jiang, X W; Okazaki, T

    1988-01-01

    Using DNA molecules synthesized in the early stage of lambda phage infection, deoxynucleotides at the transition sites from primer RNA to DNA synthesis have been mapped in the 1.5 kbase area of the lambda phage genome containing the genetically defined replication origin (ori lambda). Sites in the 1-strand (the polarity of the 1-strand is 5' to 3' from the left to the right direction of the lambda phage genetic map) were distributed both inside and outside of the ori lambda, whereas the sites...

  1. Structure of human mitochondrial RNA polymerase

    OpenAIRE

    Ringel, Rieke; Sologub, Marina; Morozov, Yaroslav I.; Litonin, Dmitry; Cramer, Patrick; Temiakov, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    Transcription of the mitochondrial genome is performed by a single-subunit RNA polymerase (mtRNAP) that is distantly related to the RNAP of bacteriophage T7, the pol I family of DNA polymerases, and single-subunit RNAPs from chloroplasts1, 2, 3, 4. Whereas T7 RNAP can initiate transcription by itself, mtRNAP requires the factors TFAM and TFB2M for binding and melting promoter DNA5, 6, 7. TFAM is an abundant protein that binds and bends promoter DNA 15–40 base pairs upstream of the transcripti...

  2. Lysis delay and burst shrinkage of coliphage T7 by deletion of terminator Tφ reversed by deletion of early genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huong Minh; Kang, Changwon

    2014-02-01

    Bacteriophage T7 terminator Tϕ is a class I intrinsic terminator coding for an RNA hairpin structure immediately followed by oligo(U), which has been extensively studied in terms of its transcription termination mechanism, but little is known about its physiological or regulatory functions. In this study, using a T7 mutant phage, where a 31-bp segment of Tϕ was deleted from the genome, we discovered that deletion of Tϕ from T7 reduces the phage burst size but delays lysis timing, both of which are disadvantageous for the phage. The burst downsizing could directly result from Tϕ deletion-caused upregulation of gene 17.5, coding for holin, among other Tϕ downstream genes, because infection of gp17.5-overproducing Escherichia coli by wild-type T7 phage showed similar burst downsizing. However, the lysis delay was not associated with cellular levels of holin or lysozyme or with rates of phage adsorption. Instead, when allowed to evolve spontaneously in five independent adaptation experiments, the Tϕ-lacking mutant phage, after 27 or 29 passages, recovered both burst size and lysis time reproducibly by deleting early genes 0.5, 0.6, and 0.7 of class I, among other mutations. Deletion of genes 0.5 to 0.7 from the Tϕ-lacking mutant phage decreased expression of several Tϕ downstream genes to levels similar to that of the wild-type phage. Accordingly, phage T7 lysis timing is associated with cellular levels of Tϕ downstream gene products. This suggests the involvement of unknown factor(s) besides the known lysis proteins, lysozyme and holin, and that Tϕ plays a role of optimizing burst size and lysis time during T7 infection. IMPORTANCE Bacteriophages are bacterium-infecting viruses. After producing numerous progenies inside bacteria, phages lyse bacteria using their lysis protein(s) to get out and start a new infection cycle. Normally, lysis is tightly controlled to ensure phage progenies are maximally produced and released at an optimal time. Here, we have

  3. Deletion analysis of the expression of rRNA genes and associated tRNA genes carried by a lambda transducing bacteriophage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transducing phage lambda ilv5 carries genes for rRNA's, spacer tRNA's (tRNA1/sup Ile/ and tRNA/sub 1B//sup Ala/), and two other tRNA's (tRNA1/sup Asp/ and tRNA/sup Trp/). We have isolated a mutant of lambda ilv5, lambda ilv5su7, which carries an amber suppressor mutation in the tRNA/sup Trp/ gene. A series of deletion mutants were isolated from the lambda ilv5su7 phage. Genetic and biochemical analyses of these deletion mutants have confirmed our previous conclusion that the genes for tRNA1/sup Asp/ and tRNA/sup Trp/ located at the distal end of the rRNA operon (rrnC) are cotranscribed with other rRNA genes in that operon. In addition, these deletions were used to define roughly the physical location of the promoter(s) of the rRNA operon carried by the lambda ilv5su7 transducing phage

  4. Deletion analysis of the expression of rRNA genes and associated tRNA genes carried by a lambda transducing bacteriophage. [uv radiation, Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, E.A.; Nomura, M.

    1979-01-01

    Transducing phage lambda ilv5 carries genes for rRNA's, spacer tRNA's (tRNA/sub 1//sup Ile/ and tRNA/sub 1B//sup Ala/), and two other tRNA's (tRNA/sub 1//sup Asp/ and tRNA/sup Trp/). We have isolated a mutant of lambda ilv5, lambda ilv5su7, which carries an amber suppressor mutation in the tRNA/sup Trp/ gene. A series of deletion mutants were isolated from the lambda ilv5su7 phage. Genetic and biochemical analyses of these deletion mutants have confirmed our previous conclusion that the genes for tRNA/sub 1//sup Asp/ and tRNA/sup Trp/ located at the distal end of the rRNA operon (rrnC) are cotranscribed with other rRNA genes in that operon. In addition, these deletions were used to define roughly the physical location of the promoter(s) of the rRNA operon carried by the lambda ilv5su7 transducing phage.

  5. Control of transcription termination by an RNA factor in bacteriophage P4 immunity: identification of the target sites.

    OpenAIRE

    Sabbattini, P; Forti, F; Ghisotti, D; Dehò, G

    1995-01-01

    Prophage P4 immunity is elicited by a short, 69-nucleotide RNA (CI RNA) coded for within the untranslated leader region of the same operon it controls. CI RNA causes termination of transcription that starts at the promoter PLE and prevents the expression of the distal part of the operon that codes for P4 replication functions (alpha operon). In this work, we identify two sequences in the untranslated leader region of the alpha operon, seqA and seqC, that are the targets of the P4 immunity fac...

  6. Efficient cell-free expression with the endogenous E. Coli RNA polymerase and sigma factor 70

    OpenAIRE

    Noireaux Vincent; Shin Jonghyeon

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Escherichia coli cell-free expression systems use bacteriophage RNA polymerases, such as T7, to synthesize large amounts of recombinant proteins. These systems are used for many applications in biotechnology, such as proteomics. Recently, informational processes have been reconstituted in vitro with cell-free systems. These synthetic approaches, however, have been seriously limited by a lack of transcription modularity. The current available cell-free systems have been opt...

  7. Chlamydia bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwa-Dominiak, Joanna; Suszyńska, Ewa; Pawlikowska, Małgorzata; Deptuła, Wiesław

    2013-11-01

    Phages are called "good viruses" due to their ability to infect and kill pathogenic bacteria. Chlamydia are small, Gram-negative (G-) microbes that can be dangerous to human and animals. In humans, these bacteria are etiological agents of diseases such as psittacosis or respiratory tract diseases, while in animals, the infection may result in enteritis in cattle and chronic bowel diseases, as well as miscarriages in sheep. The first-known representative of chlamydiaphages was Chp1. It was discovered in Chlamydia psittaci isolates. Since then, four more species of chlamydiaphages have been identified [Chp2, Chp3, φCPG1 φCPAR39 (φCpn1) and Chp4]. All of them were shown to infect Chlamydia species. This paper described all known chlamydiaphages. They were characterised in terms of origin, host range, and their molecular structure. The review concerns the characterisation of bacteriophages that infects pathogenic and dangerous bacteria with unusual, intracellular life cycles that are pathogenic. In the era of antibiotic resistance, it is difficult to cure chlamydophilosis. Those bacteriophages can be an alternative to antibiotics, but before this happens, we need to get to know chlamydiaphages better. PMID:23903989

  8. Maturation of phage T7 involves structural modification of both shell and inner core components

    OpenAIRE

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Martín-Benito, Jaime; Castón, José R.; Miranda, Roberto; Valpuesta, José María; Carrascosa, José L.

    2005-01-01

    The double-stranded DNA bacteriophages are good model systems to understand basic biological processes such as the macromolecular interactions that take place during the virus assembly and maturation, or the behavior of molecular motors that function during the DNA packaging process. Using cryoelectron microscopy and single-particle methodology, we have determined the structures of two phage T7 assemblies produced during its morphogenetic process, the DNA-free prohead and the mature virion. T...

  9. Study of the effect of simulated space environment on phage T7 and isolated T7 DNA thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phage and uracil response (PUR) experiment is part of the ROSE consortium selected by the European Space Agency for the first mission on the EXPOSE facility of the International Space Station. Its main goal is to examine and quantify the effect of specific space conditions (e.g. solar UV radiation, vacuum) on nucleic acid models. To achieve this, an improved method was elaborated for the preparation of DNA and bacteriophage thin films. The homogeneity of the films was controlled by UV spectroscopy and microscopy. To provide experimental evidence for the hypothesis that interplanetary transfer of life is possible, phage T7 and isolated T7 DNA thin films have been exposed to selected space conditions: intense UVC radiation (λ=254 nm) and high vacuum (10-5 mbar). The effects of DNA hydration, conformation and packing on UV radiation damage were examined. Characteristic changes in the absorption spectrum, in the electrophoretic pattern of DNA and the decrease of the amount of PCR products have been detected indicating the photodamage of isolated and intraphage DNA. The paper summarizes the spectroscopical data

  10. Study of the effect of simulated space environment on phage T7 and isolated T7 DNA thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fekete, Andrea; Foeldvari, I. E-mail: foldvari@szfki.hu; Hegedues, M.; Modos, K.; Ronto, G.; Kovacs, G.; Berces, Attila; Peter, A

    2003-05-01

    Phage and uracil response (PUR) experiment is part of the ROSE consortium selected by the European Space Agency for the first mission on the EXPOSE facility of the International Space Station. Its main goal is to examine and quantify the effect of specific space conditions (e.g. solar UV radiation, vacuum) on nucleic acid models. To achieve this, an improved method was elaborated for the preparation of DNA and bacteriophage thin films. The homogeneity of the films was controlled by UV spectroscopy and microscopy. To provide experimental evidence for the hypothesis that interplanetary transfer of life is possible, phage T7 and isolated T7 DNA thin films have been exposed to selected space conditions: intense UVC radiation ({lambda}=254 nm) and high vacuum (10{sup -5} mbar). The effects of DNA hydration, conformation and packing on UV radiation damage were examined. Characteristic changes in the absorption spectrum, in the electrophoretic pattern of DNA and the decrease of the amount of PCR products have been detected indicating the photodamage of isolated and intraphage DNA. The paper summarizes the spectroscopical data.

  11. Bacteriophage-based nanoprobes for rapid bacteria separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juhong; Duncan, Bradley; Wang, Ziyuan; Wang, Li-Sheng; Rotello, Vincent M.; Nugen, Sam R.

    2015-10-01

    The lack of practical methods for bacterial separation remains a hindrance for the low-cost and successful development of rapid detection methods from complex samples. Antibody-tagged magnetic particles are commonly used to pull analytes from a liquid sample. While this method is well-established, improvements in capture efficiencies would result in an increase of the overall detection assay performance. Bacteriophages represent a low-cost and more consistent biorecognition element as compared to antibodies. We have developed nanoscale bacteriophage-tagged magnetic probes, where T7 bacteriophages were bound to magnetic nanoparticles. The nanoprobe allowed the specific recognition and attachment to E. coli cells. The phage magnetic nanprobes were directly compared to antibody-conjugated magnetic nanoprobes. The capture efficiencies of bacteriophages and antibodies on nanoparticles for the separation of E. coli K12 at varying concentrations were determined. The results indicated a similar bacteria capture efficiency between the two nanoprobes.The lack of practical methods for bacterial separation remains a hindrance for the low-cost and successful development of rapid detection methods from complex samples. Antibody-tagged magnetic particles are commonly used to pull analytes from a liquid sample. While this method is well-established, improvements in capture efficiencies would result in an increase of the overall detection assay performance. Bacteriophages represent a low-cost and more consistent biorecognition element as compared to antibodies. We have developed nanoscale bacteriophage-tagged magnetic probes, where T7 bacteriophages were bound to magnetic nanoparticles. The nanoprobe allowed the specific recognition and attachment to E. coli cells. The phage magnetic nanprobes were directly compared to antibody-conjugated magnetic nanoprobes. The capture efficiencies of bacteriophages and antibodies on nanoparticles for the separation of E. coli K12 at varying

  12. BACTERIOPHAGE: BIOLOGY AND GENETICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteriophage are viruses that infect bacteria. Bacteriophage are very small and made up of a protein coat with an inner core containing their genetic material. They infect bacterium, by attaching to the bacterial cell and injecting their nucleic acids into the bacteria. The phages then use the bac...

  13. A Model of Sequence Dependent Rna-Polymerase Diffusion Along Dna

    CERN Document Server

    Barbi, M; Popkov, V; Salerno, M; Barbi, Maria; Place, Christophe; Popkov, Vladislav; Salerno, Mario

    2001-01-01

    We introduce a probabilistic model for the RNA-polymerase sliding motion along DNA during the promoter search. The model accounts for possible effects due to sequence-dependent interactions between the nonspecific DNA and the enzyme. We focus on T7 RNA-polymerase and exploit the available information about its interaction at the promoter site in order to investigate the influence of bacteriophage T7 DNA sequence on the dynamics of the sliding process. Hydrogen bonds in the major groove are used as the main sequence-dependent interaction between the RNA-polymerase and the DNA. The resulting dynamical properties and the possibility of an experimental validation are discussed in details. We show that, while at large times the process reaches a pure diffusive regime, it initially displays a sub-diffusive behavior. The crossover from anomalous to normal diffusion may occur at times large enough to be of biological interest.

  14. Biophysical study of the DNA charge mimicry displayed by the T7 Ocr protein

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanou, Augoustinos S.

    2010-01-01

    The homodimeric Ocr protein of bacteriophage T7 is a molecular mimic of a bent double-stranded DNA molecule ~24 bp in length. As such, Ocr is a highly effective competitive inhibitor of the bacterial Type I restriction modification (R/M) system. Thus, Ocr facilitates phage infection of the bacterial cell to proceed unhindered by the action of the R/M defense system. The main aim of this work was to understand the basis of the DNA mimicry displayed by Ocr. The surface of the ...

  15. Biophysics and bioinformatics of transcription regulation in bacteria and bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Marko

    2005-11-01

    resembles temperate phages, such as lambda. It, however, encodes its own T7-like RNA polymerase (characteristic of virulent phages), whose role in gene expression was unclear. Our analysis resulted in quantitative understanding of the role of both host and phage RNA polymerase, and in the identification of the previously unknown promoter sequence for Xp10 RNA polymerase. More generally, an increasing number of phage genomes are being sequenced every year, and we expect that methods of quantitative data analysis that we introduced will provide an efficient way to study gene expression strategies of novel bacterial viruses.

  16. Efficient engineering of a bacteriophage genome using the type I-E CRISPR-Cas system

    OpenAIRE

    Kiro, Ruth; Shitrit, Dror; Qimron, Udi

    2014-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated (Cas) system has recently been used to engineer genomes of various organisms, but surprisingly, not those of bacteriophages (phages). Here we present a method to genetically engineer the Escherichia coli phage T7 using the type I-E CRISPR-Cas system. T7 phage genome is edited by homologous recombination with a DNA sequence flanked by sequences homologous to the desired location. Non-edited genomes are tar...

  17. Interrupted thymidylate synthase gene of bacteriophages T2 and T6 and other potential self-splicing introns in the T-even bacteriophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southern hybridization analyses of procaryotic DNA from Escherchia coli, λ bacteriophage, and T1 to T7 phages were carried out. The hybridization probes used consisted of DNA restriction fragments derived from the T4 phage intron-containing thymidylate synthase gene (td) and short synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides defining specific exon and intron regions of the gene. It was shown that intact as well as restricted DNA from the T-even phages hybridized not only to both T4 phage td intron- and exon-specific probes but also to probes defining the td 5' (exon I-intron) and 3' (intron-exon II) presplice junctions. These data strongly suggest that, analogous to the T4 phage, only the T2 and T6 phages among the procaryotes tested contain interrupted td genes. The td intervening sequence in each phage is roughly 1 kilobase pair (kb) in size and interrupts the td gene at a site analogous to that in the T4 phage. This was confirmed by data from Northern (RNA) hybridization analysis of td-specific in vitro transcripts of these phage DNAs. [α-32P]GTP in vitro labeling of total RNA from T4 phage-infected cells produced five species of labeled RNAs that were 1, 0.9, 0.83, 0.75, and 0.6 kb in size. Only the 1-, 0.9-, and 0.75-kb species were labeled in RNA from T2- or T6-infected cells. The commonly present 1-kb RNA is the excised td intron, which exists in both linear and circular forms in the respective T-even-phage-infected cells, while the 0.6-kb RNA unique to T4 may be the excised intron derived from the ribonucleotide reductase small subunit gene (nrdB) of the phage. The remaining labeled RNA species are likely candidates for other self-splicing introns

  18. Bacteriophage therapy against Enterobacteriaceae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youqiang; Xu; Yong; Liu; Yang; Liu; Jiangsen; Pei; Su; Yao; Chi; Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The Enterobacteriaceae are a class of gram-negative facultative anaerobic rods, which can cause a variety of diseases, such as bacteremia, septic arthritis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, lower respiratory tract infections, skin and soft-tissue infections, urinary tract infections, intra-abdominal infections and ophthalmic infections, in humans, poultry, animals and fish. Disease caused by Enterobacteriaceae cause the deaths of millions of people every year, resulting in enormous economic loss. Drug treatment is a useful and efficient way to control Enterobacteriaceae infections. However, with the abuse of antibiotics, drug resistance has been found in growing number of Enterobacteriaceae infections and, as such, there is an urgent need to find new methods of control. Bacteriophage therapy is an efficient alternative to antibiotics as it employs a different antibacterial mechanism. This paper summarizes the history of bacteriophage therapy, its bacteriallytic mechanisms, and the studies that have focused on Enterobacteriaceae and bacteriophage therapy.

  19. Plasmid-free T7-based Escherichia coli expression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striedner, Gerald; Pfaffenzeller, Irene; Markus, Luchner; Nemecek, Sabine; Grabherr, Reingard; Bayer, Karl

    2010-03-01

    In order to release host cells from plasmid-mediated increases in metabolic load and high gene dosages, we developed a plasmid-free, T7-based E. coli expression system in which the target gene is site-specifically integrated into the genome of the host. With this system, plasmid-loss, a source of instability for conventional expression systems, was eliminated. At the same time, system leakiness, a challenging problem with recombinant systems, was minimized. The efficiency of the T7 RNA polymerase compensates for low gene dosage and provides high rates of recombinant gene expression without fatal consequences to host metabolism. Relative to conventional pET systems, this system permits improved process stability and increases the host cell's capacity for recombinant gene expression, resulting in higher product yields. The stability of the plasmid-free system was proven in chemostat cultivation for 40 generations in a non-induced and for 10 generations in a fully induced state. For this reason plasmid-free systems benefit the development of continuous production processes with E. coli. However, time and effort of the more complex cloning procedure have to be considered in relation to the advantages of plasmid-free systems in upstream-processing. PMID:19891007

  20. Induction of protective anti-CTL epitope responses against HER-2-positive breast cancer based on multivalent T7 phage nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Pouyanfard

    Full Text Available We report here the development of multivalent T7 bacteriophage nanoparticles displaying an immunodominant H-2k(d-restricted CTL epitope derived from the rat HER2/neu oncoprotein. The immunotherapeutic potential of the chimeric T7 nanoparticles as anti-cancer vaccine was investigated in BALB/c mice in an implantable breast tumor model. The results showed that T7 phage nanoparticles confer a high immunogenicity to the HER-2-derived minimal CTL epitope, as shown by inducing robust CTL responses. Furthermore, the chimeric nanoparticles protected mice against HER-2-positive tumor challenge in both prophylactic and therapeutic setting. In conclusion, these results suggest that CTL epitope-carrying T7 phage nanoparticles might be a promising approach for development of T cell epitope-based cancer vaccines.

  1. Experimental Evolution of a Bacteriophage Virus Reveals the Trajectory of Adaptation across a Fecundity/Longevity Trade-Off

    OpenAIRE

    Heineman, Richard H.; Brown, Sam P.

    2012-01-01

    Life history theory attempts to account for how organisms lead their lives, balancing the conflicting demands of reproduction and survival. Here, we track the genomic and phenotypic evolution of the bacteriophage virus T7 across a postulated fecundity/longevity constraint. We adapted T7 to a challenging survival environment (6M urea). Our evolved strain displayed a significant improvement in propagule survival, coupled with a significant loss of fecundity (reduced growth rate on host cells). ...

  2. Bacteriophages and Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Harper, David R; Helena M. R. T. Parracho; James Walker; Richard Sharp; Gavin Hughes; Maria Werthén; Susan Lehman; Sandra Morales

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are an extremely common adaptation, allowing bacteria to colonize hostile environments. They present unique problems for antibiotics and biocides, both due to the nature of the extracellular matrix and to the presence within the biofilm of metabolically inactive persister cells. Such chemicals can be highly effective against planktonic bacterial cells, while being essentially ineffective against biofilms. By contrast, bacteriophages seem to have a greater ability to target this commo...

  3. Identification of mutations conferring 5-azacytidine resistance in bacteriophage

    OpenAIRE

    Arribas, María; Cabanillas, Laura; Lázaro, Ester

    2011-01-01

    RNA virus replication takes place at a very high error rate, and additional increases in this parameter can produce the extinction of virus infectivity. Nevertheless, RNA viruses can adapt to conditions of increased mutagenesis, which demonstrates that selection of beneficial mutations is also possible at higher-than-standard error rates. In this study we have analysed the evolutionary behaviour of bacteriophage Qβ populations when replication proceeds in the presence of the mutagenic nucleos...

  4. Cloning and sequencing of hfq (host factor required for synthesis of bacteriophage Q beta RNA gene of Salmonella Typhimurium isolated from poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parthasarathi Behera

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to clone and sequence hfq gene of Salmonella Typhimurium strain PM-45 and compare its sequence with hfq gene of other serovar of Salmonella. Materials and Methods: Salmonella Typhimurium strain PM-45 was procured from the G. B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar, India. The genomic DNA was isolated from Salmonella Typhimurium. Hfq gene was polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplified from the DNA using specific primers, which was subsequently cloned into pET32a vector and transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 pLys cells. The recombinant plasmid was isolated and subjected to restriction enzyme digestion as well as PCR. The clone was then sequenced. The sequence was analyzed and submitted in GenBank. Results: PCR produced an amplicon of 309 bp. Restriction digestion of the recombinant plasmid released the desired insert. The hfq sequence shows 100% homology with similar sequences from other Salmonella Typhimurium isolates. Both nucleotide and amino acid sequences are highly conserved. The submitted sequence is having Genbank accession no KM998764. Conclusion: Hfq, the hexameric RNA binding protein is one of the most important post-transcriptional regulator of bacteria. The sequence of hfq gene of Salmonella Typhimurium is highly conserved within and between Salmonella enterica serovars. This gene sequence is probably under heavy selection pressure to maintain the conformational integrity of its product in spite of its being not a survival gene.

  5. Multiple roles of genome-attached bacteriophage terminal proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein-primed replication constitutes a generalized mechanism to initiate DNA or RNA synthesis in linear genomes, including viruses, gram-positive bacteria, linear plasmids and mobile elements. By this mechanism a specific amino acid primes replication and becomes covalently linked to the genome ends. Despite the fact that TPs lack sequence homology, they share a similar structural arrangement, with the priming residue in the C-terminal half of the protein and an accumulation of positively charged residues at the N-terminal end. In addition, various bacteriophage TPs have been shown to have DNA-binding capacity that targets TPs and their attached genomes to the host nucleoid. Furthermore, a number of bacteriophage TPs from different viral families and with diverse hosts also contain putative nuclear localization signals and localize in the eukaryotic nucleus, which could lead to the transport of the attached DNA. This suggests a possible role of bacteriophage TPs in prokaryote-to-eukaryote horizontal gene transfer. - Highlights: • Protein-primed genome replication constitutes a strategy to initiate DNA or RNA synthesis in linear genomes. • Bacteriophage terminal proteins (TPs) are covalently attached to viral genomes by their primary function priming DNA replication. • TPs are also DNA-binding proteins and target phage genomes to the host nucleoid. • TPs can also localize in the eukaryotic nucleus and may have a role in phage-mediated interkingdom gene transfer

  6. Multiple roles of genome-attached bacteriophage terminal proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; Salas, Margarita, E-mail: msalas@cbm.csic.es

    2014-11-15

    Protein-primed replication constitutes a generalized mechanism to initiate DNA or RNA synthesis in linear genomes, including viruses, gram-positive bacteria, linear plasmids and mobile elements. By this mechanism a specific amino acid primes replication and becomes covalently linked to the genome ends. Despite the fact that TPs lack sequence homology, they share a similar structural arrangement, with the priming residue in the C-terminal half of the protein and an accumulation of positively charged residues at the N-terminal end. In addition, various bacteriophage TPs have been shown to have DNA-binding capacity that targets TPs and their attached genomes to the host nucleoid. Furthermore, a number of bacteriophage TPs from different viral families and with diverse hosts also contain putative nuclear localization signals and localize in the eukaryotic nucleus, which could lead to the transport of the attached DNA. This suggests a possible role of bacteriophage TPs in prokaryote-to-eukaryote horizontal gene transfer. - Highlights: • Protein-primed genome replication constitutes a strategy to initiate DNA or RNA synthesis in linear genomes. • Bacteriophage terminal proteins (TPs) are covalently attached to viral genomes by their primary function priming DNA replication. • TPs are also DNA-binding proteins and target phage genomes to the host nucleoid. • TPs can also localize in the eukaryotic nucleus and may have a role in phage-mediated interkingdom gene transfer.

  7. Genetically modified bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagona, Antonia P; Grigonyte, Aurelija M; MacDonald, Paul R; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2016-04-18

    Phages or bacteriophages, viruses that infect and replicate inside bacteria, are the most abundant microorganisms on earth. The realization that antibiotic resistance poses a substantial risk to the world's health and global economy is revitalizing phage therapy as a potential solution. The increasing ease by which phage genomes can be modified, owing to the influx of new technologies, has led to an expansion of their natural capabilities, and a reduced dependence on phage isolation from environmental sources. This review will discuss the way synthetic biology has accelerated the construction of genetically modified phages and will describe the wide range of their applications. It will further provide insight into the societal and economic benefits that derive from the use of recombinant phages in various sectors, from health to biodetection, biocontrol and the food industry. PMID:26906932

  8. Deletion mutations of bacteriophage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resolution of mutation mechanism with structural changes of DNA was discussed through the studies using bacteriophage lambda. One of deletion mutations inductions of phage lambda is the irradiation of ultraviolet ray. It is not clear if the inductions are caused by errors in reparation of ultraviolet-induced damage or by the activation of int gene. Because the effective site of int gene lies within the regions unnecessary for existing, it is considered that int gene is connected to deletion mutations induction. A certain system using prophage complementarity enables to detect deletion mutations at essential hereditary sites and to solve the relations of deletion mutations with other recombination system, DNA reproduction and repairment system. Duplication and multiplication of hereditary elements were discussed. If lambda deletion mutations of the system, which can control recombination, reproduction and repairment of added DNA, are constructed, mutations mechanism with great changes of DNA structure can be solved by phage lambda. (Ichikawa, K.)

  9. Bacteriophages of methanotrophic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyutikow, F.M. (All-Union Research Inst. for Genetics and Selection of Industrial Microorganisms, Moscow, USSR); Bespalova, I.A.; Rebentish, B.A.; Aleksandrushkina, N.N.; Krivisky, A.S.

    1980-10-01

    Bacteriophages of methanotrophic bacteria have been found in 16 out of 88 studied samples (underground waters, pond water, soil, gas and oil installation waters, fermentor cultural fluids, bacterial paste, and rumen of cattle) taken in different geographic zones of the Soviet Union. Altogether, 23 phage strains were isolated. By fine structure, the phages were divided into two types (with very short or long noncontractile tails); by host range and serological properties, they fell into three types. All phages had guanine- and cytosine-rich double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid consisting of common nitrogen bases. By all of the above-mentioned properties, all phages within each of the groups were completely identical to one another, but differed from phages of other groups.

  10. Isolation and characterization of a T7-like lytic phage for Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neubauer Peter

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the proven relevance of Pseudomonas fluorescens as a spoilage microorganism in milk, fresh meats and refrigerated food products and the recognized potential of bacteriophages as sanitation agents, so far no phages specific for P. fluorescens isolates from dairy industry have been closely characterized in view of their lytic efficiency. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of a lytic phage capable to infect a variety of P. fluorescens strains isolated from Portuguese and United States dairy industries. Results Several phages were isolated which showed a different host spectrum and efficiency of lysis. One of the phages, phage ϕIBB-PF7A, was studied in detail due to its efficient lysis of a wide spectrum of P. fluorescens strains and ribotypes. Phage ϕIBB-PF7A with a head diameter of about 63 nm and a tail size of about 13 × 8 nm belongs morphologically to the Podoviridae family and resembles a typical T7-like phage, as analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The phage growth cycle with a detected latent period of 15 min, an eclipse period of 10 min, a burst size of 153 plaque forming units per infected cell, its genome size of approximately 42 kbp, and the size and N-terminal sequence of one of the protein bands, which gave similarity to the major capsid protein 10A, are consistent with this classification. Conclusion The isolated T7-like phage, phage ϕIBB-PF7A, is fast and efficient in lysing different P. fluorescens strains and may be a good candidate to be used as a sanitation agent to control the prevalence of spoilage causing P. fluorescens strains in dairy and food related environments.

  11. Maturation of phage T7 involves structural modification of both shell and inner core components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Martín-Benito, Jaime; Castón, José R; Miranda, Roberto; Valpuesta, José María; Carrascosa, José L

    2005-11-01

    The double-stranded DNA bacteriophages are good model systems to understand basic biological processes such as the macromolecular interactions that take place during the virus assembly and maturation, or the behavior of molecular motors that function during the DNA packaging process. Using cryoelectron microscopy and single-particle methodology, we have determined the structures of two phage T7 assemblies produced during its morphogenetic process, the DNA-free prohead and the mature virion. The first structure reveals a complex assembly in the interior of the capsid, which involves the scaffolding, and the core complex, which plays an important role in DNA packaging and is located in one of the phage vertices. The reconstruction of the mature virion reveals important changes in the shell, now much larger and thinner, the disappearance of the scaffolding structure, and important rearrangements of the core complex, which now protrudes the shell and interacts with the tail. Some of these changes must originate by the pressure exerted by the DNA in the interior of the head. PMID:16211007

  12. Efficient cell-free expression with the endogenous E. Coli RNA polymerase and sigma factor 70

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noireaux Vincent

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli cell-free expression systems use bacteriophage RNA polymerases, such as T7, to synthesize large amounts of recombinant proteins. These systems are used for many applications in biotechnology, such as proteomics. Recently, informational processes have been reconstituted in vitro with cell-free systems. These synthetic approaches, however, have been seriously limited by a lack of transcription modularity. The current available cell-free systems have been optimized to work with bacteriophage RNA polymerases, which put significant restrictions to engineer processes related to biological information. The development of efficient cell-free systems with broader transcription capabilities is required to study complex informational processes in vitro. Results In this work, an efficient cell-free expression system that uses the endogenous E. coli RNA polymerase only and sigma factor 70 for transcription was prepared. Approximately 0.75 mg/ml of Firefly luciferase and enhanced green fluorescent protein were produced in batch mode. A plasmid was optimized with different regulatory parts to increase the expression. In addition, a new eGFP was engineered that is more translatable in cell-free systems than the original eGFP. The protein production was characterized with three different adenosine triphosphate (ATP regeneration systems: creatine phosphate (CP, phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP, and 3-phosphoglyceric acid (3-PGA. The maximum protein production was obtained with 3-PGA. Preparation of the crude extract was streamlined to a simple routine procedure that takes 12 hours including cell culture. Conclusions Although it uses the endogenous E. coli transcription machinery, this cell-free system can produce active proteins in quantities comparable to bacteriophage systems. The E. coli transcription provides much more possibilities to engineer informational processes in vitro. Many E. coli promoters/operators specific to sigma

  13. Lysogenic bacteriophage isolated from acidophilium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Thomas W.; Bruhn, Debby F.; Bulmer, Deborah K.

    1992-01-01

    A bacteriophage identified as .phi.Ac1 capable of infecting acidophilic heterotropic bacteria (such as Acidiphilium sp.) and processes for genetically engineering acidophilic bacteria for biomining or sulfur removal from coal are disclosed. The bacteriophage is capable of growth in cells existing at pH at or below 3.0. Lytic forms of the phage introduced into areas experiencing acid drainage kill the bacteria causing such drainage. Lysogenic forms of the phase having genes for selective removal of metallic or nonmetallic elements can be introduced into acidophilic bacteria to effect removal of the desired element form ore or coal.

  14. Isolation of Dickeya dadantii strains from potato disease and biocontrol by their bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Soleimani-Delfan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the most economically important bacterial pathogens of plants and plant products is Dickeya dadantii. This bacterium causes soft rot disease in tubers and other parts of the potato and other plants of the Solanaceae family. The application of restricted host range bacteriophages as biocontrol agents has recently gained widespread interest. This study purposed to isolate the infectious agent of the potato and evaluate its biocontrol by bacteriophages. Two phytopathogenic strains were isolated from infected potatoes, identified based on biochemical and 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and submitted to GenBank as D. dadantii strain pis3 (accession no. HQ423668 and D. dadantii strain sip4 (accession no. HQ423669. Their bacteriophages were isolated from Caspian Sea water by enriching the water filtrate with D. dadantii strains as hosts using spot or overlay methods. On the basis of morphotypes, the isolated bacteriophages were identified as members of the Myoviridae and Siphoviridae families and could inhibit the growth of antibiotic resistant D. dadantii strains in culture medium. Moreover, in Dickeya infected plants treated with bacteriophage, no disease progression was detected. No significant difference was seen between phage-treated and control plants. Thus, isolated bacteriophages can be suggested for the biocontrol of plant disease caused by Dickeya strains.

  15. Isolation of Dickeya dadantii strains from potato disease and biocontrol by their bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani-Delfan, Abbas; Etemadifar, Zahra; Emtiazi, Giti; Bouzari, Majid

    2015-01-01

    One of the most economically important bacterial pathogens of plants and plant products is Dickeya dadantii. This bacterium causes soft rot disease in tubers and other parts of the potato and other plants of the Solanaceae family. The application of restricted host range bacteriophages as biocontrol agents has recently gained widespread interest. This study purposed to isolate the infectious agent of the potato and evaluate its biocontrol by bacteriophages. Two phytopathogenic strains were isolated from infected potatoes, identified based on biochemical and 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and submitted to GenBank as D. dadantii strain pis3 (accession no. HQ423668) and D. dadantii strain sip4 (accession no. HQ423669). Their bacteriophages were isolated from Caspian Sea water by enriching the water filtrate with D. dadantii strains as hosts using spot or overlay methods. On the basis of morphotypes, the isolated bacteriophages were identified as members of the Myoviridae and Siphoviridae families and could inhibit the growth of antibiotic resistant D. dadantii strains in culture medium. Moreover, in Dickeya infected plants treated with bacteriophage, no disease progression was detected. No significant difference was seen between phage-treated and control plants. Thus, isolated bacteriophages can be suggested for the biocontrol of plant disease caused by Dickeya strains. PMID:26413062

  16. Replication of bacteriophage lambda DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper results of studies on the mechanism of bacteriophage lambda replication using molecular biological and biochemical approaches are reported. The purification of the initiator proteins, O and P, and the role of the O and P proteins in the initiation of lambda DNA replication through interactions with specific DNA sequences are described. 47 references, 15 figures

  17. Isolation, genome sequencing and functional analysis of two T7-like coliphages of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mianmian; Xu, Juntian; Yao, Huochun; Lu, Chengping; Zhang, Wei

    2016-05-10

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) causes colibacillosis, which results in significant economic losses to the poultry industry worldwide. Due to the drug residues and increased antibiotic resistance caused by antibiotic use, bacteriophages and other alternative therapeutic agents are expected to control APEC infection in poultry. Two APEC phages, named P483 and P694, were isolated from the feces from the farmers market in China. We then studied their biological properties, and carried out high-throughput genome sequencing and homology analyses of these phages. Assembly results of high-throughput sequencing showed that the structures of both P483 and P694 genomes consist of linear and double-stranded DNA. Results of the electron microscopy and homology analysis revealed that both P483 and P694 belong to T7-like virus which is a member of the Podoviridae family of the Caudovirales order. Comparative genomic analysis showed that most of the predicted proteins of these two phages showed strongest sequence similarity to the Enterobacteria phages BA14 and 285P, Erwinia phage FE44, and Kluyvera phage Kvp1; however, some proteins such as gp0.6a, gp1.7 and gp17 showed lower similarity (bacteria in liquid medium. Our results serve to further our understanding of phage evolution of T7-like coliphages and provide the potential application of the phages as therapeutic agents for the treatment of diseases. PMID:26828615

  18. Montmorillonite-induced Bacteriophage φ6 Disassembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusiak, A.; Gottlieb, P.; Katz, A.; Alimova, A.; Steiner, J. C.; Block, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    It is estimated that there are 1031 virus particles on Earth making viruses an order of magnitude more prevalent in number than prokaryotes with the vast majority of viruses being bacteriophages. Clays are a major component of soils and aquatic sediments and can react with RNA, proteins and bacterial biofilms. The clays in soils serve as an important moderator between phage and their host bacteria, helping to preserve the evolutionary balance. Studies on the effects of clays on viral infectivity have given somewhat contradictory results; possibly a consequence of clay-virus interactions being dependent on the unique structure of particular viruses. In this work, the interaction between montmorillonite and the bacteriophage φ6 is investigated. φ6 is a member of the cystovirus family that infects Pseudomonas syringe, a common plant pathogen. As a member of the cystovirus family with an enveloped structure, φ6 serves as a model for reoviruses, a human pathogen. Experiments were conducted with φ6 suspended in dilute, purified homoionic commercial-grade montmorillonite over a range of virus:clay ratios. At a 1:100000 virus:clay ratio, the clay reduced viral infectivity by 99%. The minimum clay to virus ratio which results in a measurable reduction of P. syringae infection is 1:1. Electron microscopy demonstrates that mixed suspensions of smectite and virus co-aggregate to form flocs encompassing virions within the smectite. Both free viral particles as well as those imbedded in the flocs are seen in the micrographs to be missing the envelope- leaving only the nucleocapsid (NC) intact; indicating that smectite inactivates the virus by envelope disassembly. These results have strong implications in the evolution of both the φ6 virus and its P. syringae host cells. TEM of aggregate showing several disassembled NCs.

  19. Bacteriophage biocontrol of foodborne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, Mustafa; Annapure, Uday S

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that only infect bacterial cells. Phages are categorized based on the type of their life cycle, the lytic cycle cause lysis of the bacterium with the release of multiple phage particles where as in lysogenic phase the phage DNA is incorporated into the bacterial genome. Lysogeny does not result in lysis of the host. Lytic phages have several potential applications in the food industry as biocontrol agents, biopreservatives and as tools for detecting pathogens. They have also been proposed as alternatives to antibiotics in animal health. Two unique features of phage relevant for food safety are that they are harmless to mammalian cells and high host specificity, keeping the natural microbiota undisturbed. However, the recent approval of bacteriophages as food additives has opened the discussion about 'edible viruses'. This article reviews in detail the application of phages for the control of foodborne pathogens in a process known as "biocontrol". PMID:27570260

  20. iriverT7 Volcano 火山爆发

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    iriver在今年的CES 2008上展示过的纯音乐MP3 Volcano于日前正式发布。T7 Volcano是iriver一次大胆而前卫的尝试,84.0mm×26.0mm×11.0mm的体形、26.3g的重量修长纤巧.如果放在几年以前应该被当作一个充满着后现代感的概念产品。在功能上,T7支持支持MP3、WMA、ASF和OGG音频格式。九种EQ选项、一个用户自定义EQ和SRS WOW HD系统,

  1. A minimal and predictive $T_7$ lepton flavor 331 model

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández, A E Cárcamo

    2015-01-01

    We present a model based on the $SU(3)_{C}\\otimes SU(3)_{L}\\otimes U(1)_{X}$ gauge group having an extra $T_{7}\\otimes Z_{3}\\otimes Z_{14}$ flavor group, where the light active neutrino masses arise via double seesaw mechanism and the observed charged lepton mass hierarchy is a consequence of the $Z_{14}$ symmetry breaking at very high energy. In our minimal and predictive $T_7$ lepton flavor 331 model, the spectrum of neutrinos includes very light active neutrinos and heavy and very heavy sterile neutrinos. The obtained neutrino mixing parameters and neutrino mass squared splittings are compatible with the neutrino oscillation experimental data, for both normal and inverted hierarchies. The model predicts CP conservation in neutrino oscillations.

  2. THE MASS OF CoRoT-7b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatzes, Artie P.; Wuchterl, Guenther [Thueringer Landessternwarte, D-07778 Tautenburg (Germany); Fridlund, Malcolm; Gandolfi, Davide [European Space Agency, ESTEC, SRE-SA, P.O. Box 299, NL-2200AG, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Nachmani, Gil; Mazeh, Tsevi [School of Physics and Astronomy, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Valencia, Diana [Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Hebrard, Guillaume; Borde, Pascal [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095 CNRS, Universite Pierre and Marie Curie, 98bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Carone, Ludmila; Paetzold, Martin [Rheinisches Institut fuer Umweltforschung, Universitaet zu Koeln, Abt. Planetenforschung, Aachener Str. 209, D-50931 Koeln (Germany); Udry, Stephane [Observatoire de l' Universite de Geneve, 51 chemin des Maillettes, 1290 Sauverny (Switzerland); Bouchy, Francois [Observatoire de Haute Provence, F-04670 Saint Michel l' Observatoire (France); Deleuil, Magali; Moutou, Claire; Barge, Pierre [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, CNRS and University of Provence, 38 rue Frederic Joliot-Curie, F-13388 Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Deeg, Hans; Tingley, Brandon [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Dvorak, Rudolf [University of Vienna, Institute of Astronomy, Tuerkenschanzstr. 17, A-1180, Vienna (Austria); Ferraz-Mello, Sylvio, E-mail: artie@tls-tautenburg.de, E-mail: malcolm.fridlund@esa.int [IAG, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); and others

    2011-12-10

    The mass of CoRoT-7b, the first transiting super-Earth exoplanet, is still a subject of debate. A wide range of masses have been reported in the literature ranging from as high as 8 M{sub Circled-Plus} to as low as 2.3 M{sub Circled-Plus }. This range in mass is largely due to the activity level of the star that contributes a significant amount of radial velocity (RV) 'jitter' and how the various methods correct this jitter. Although most mass determinations give a density consistent with a rocky planet, the lower value permits a bulk composition that can be up to 50% water. We present an analysis of the CoRoT-7b RV measurements that uses very few and simple assumptions in treating the activity signal. By analyzing those RV data for which multiple measurements were made in a given night, we remove the activity related RV contribution without any a priori model. We argue that the contribution of activity to the final RV curve is negligible and that the K-amplitude due to the planet is well constrained. This yields a mass of 7.42 {+-} 1.21 M{sub Circled-Plus} and a mean density of {rho} = 10.4 {+-} 1.8 gm cm{sup -3}. CoRoT-7b is similar in mass and radius to the second rocky planet to be discovered, Kepler-10b, and within the errors they have identical bulk densities-they are virtual twins. These bulk densities lie close to the density-radius relationship for terrestrial planets similar to what is seen for Mercury. CoRoT-7b and Kepler-10b may have an internal structure more like Mercury than the Earth.

  3. On the Mass of CoRoT-7b

    CERN Document Server

    Hatzes, Artie P; Nachmani, Gil; Mazeh, Tsevi; Valencia, Diana; Hebrard, Guillaume; Carone, Ludmila; Paetzold, Martin; Udry, Stephane; Bouchy, Francois; Borde, Pascal; Deeg, Hans; Tingley, Brandon; Dvorak, Rudolf; Gandolfi, Davide; Ferraz-Mello, Sylvio; Wuchterl, Guenther; Guenther, Eike; Rauer, Heike; Erikson, Anders; Cabrera, Juan; Csizmadia, Szilard; Leger, Alain; Lammer, Helmut; Weingrill, Joerg; Queloz, Didier; Alonso, Roi; Schneider, Jean

    2011-01-01

    The mass of CoRoT-7b, the first transiting superearth exoplanet, is still a subject of debate. A wide range of masses have been reported in the literature ranging from as high as 8 M_Earth to as low as 2.3 M_Earth. Although most mass determinations give a density consistent with a rocky planet, the lower value permits a bulk composition that can be up to 50% water. We present an analysis of the CoRoT-7b radial velocity measurements that uses very few and simple assumptions in treating the activity signal. By only analyzing those radial velocity data for which multiple measurements were made in a given night we remove the activity related radial velocity contribution without any a priori model. We demonstrate that the contribution of activity to the final radial velocity curve is negligible and that the K-amplitude due to the planet is well constrained. This yields a mass of 7.42 +/- 1.21 M_Earth and a mean density of rho = 10.4 +/- 1.8 gm cm^-3. CoRoT-7b is similar in mass and radius to the second rocky plane...

  4. Sea urchin mtDBP is a two-faced transcription termination factor with a biased polarity depending on the RNA polymerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Silva, Patricio; Polosa, Paola Loguercio; Roberti, Marina; Di Ponzio, Barbara; Gadaleta, Maria Nicola; Montoya, Julio; Cantatore, Palmiro

    2001-01-01

    The sea urchin mitochondrial displacement (D)-loop binding protein mtDBP has been previously identified and cloned. The polypeptide (348 amino acids) displays a significant homology with the human mitochondrial transcription termination factor mTERF. This similarity, and the observation that the 3′ ends of mitochondrial RNAs coded by opposite strands mapped in correspondence of mtDBP-binding sites, suggested that mtDBP could function as transcription termination factor in sea urchin mitochondria. To investigate such a role we tested the capability of mtDBP bound to its target sequence in the main non-coding region to affect RNA elongation by mitochondrial and bacteriophage T3 and T7 RNA polymerases. We show that mtDBP was able to terminate transcription bidirectionally when initiated by human mitochondrial RNA polymerase but only unidirectionally when initiated by T3 or T7 RNA polymerases. Time-course experiments indicated that mtDBP promotes true transcription termination rather than transcription pausing. These results indicate that mtDBP is able to function as a bipolar transcription termination factor in sea urchin mitochondria. The functional significance of such an activity could be linked to the previously proposed dual role of the protein in modulating mitochondrial DNA transcription and replication. PMID:11713324

  5. 非小细胞肺癌T7噬菌体展示文库的构建%Construction and quality identification of T7 recombination expression cDNA library form human lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wentao Yue; Zitong Wang; Yue Wang; Lina Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Currently, only a limited numbers of tumor markers for non small lung cancer (NSCLC) diagnosis, new biomarker, such as serum autoantibodies may improve the early detection of lung cancer. Our objective is construction human lung squamous carcinoma and adenocercinoma T7 phage display cDNA library from the tissues of NSCLC patients. Methods: mRNA was isolated from a pool of total RNA extract from NSCLC tissues obtained from 5 adenocarcinomas and 5 squamous carcinomas, and then mRNA was reverse transcribed into double stranded cDNA. After digestion, the cDNA was inserted into T7Select 10-3 vector. The phage display cDNA library was constructed by package reaction in vitro and plate proliferation. Plaque assay and PCR were used to evaluate the library. Results: Two T7 phage display cDNA library were established. Plaque assay show the titer of lung squamas carcinoma library was 1.8×106 pfu, and the adenocarcinoma library was 5×106pfu. The phage titer of the amplified library were 3.2×1010 pfu/mL and 2.5 x 1010 pfu/mL. PCR amplifica-tion of random plaque show insert ratio were 100% (24/24) in adenocarcinorna library and 95.8% in human lung squamas carcinoma library (23/24). Insert range from 300 bp to 1 500 bp. Conclusion: Two phage display cDNA library from NSCLC were constructed.

  6. Decreased survival of the λ15 bacteriophage induced by UV-365 nanometers in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of our investigation showed a new effect (not yet described in the current literature) of the UV-365 nm, verified when the bacteria E. coli was irradiated with this wavelenght and then infected with bacteriophage irradiated with short UV (254 nm). In these conditions we observed a decrease in the phage survival. This phenomenon was called Decreased Survival of the Bacteriophage (DSB). We were able to show that DSB was only induced in bacteria irradiated with UV-365 nm, proficient in recombination repair and owning 4-thiouridine in their tRNA. For the induction of DSB it is necessary to promote damage in the bacteriophage through UVA and UVB. It seems that DSB and SOS are antagonistic since DSB is able to suppress the mutation induced by SOS. (author)

  7. Simulation experiments of the effect of space environment on bacteriophage and DNA thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, A.; Ronto, Gy; Hegedus, M.; Modos, K.; Berces, A.; Kovacs, G.; Lammer, H.; Panitz, C.

    2004-01-01

    The main goal of PUR experiment (phage and uracil response) is to examine and quantify the effect of specific space conditions on nucleic acid models. To achieve this an improved method was elaborated for the preparation of DNA and bacteriophage thin films. The homogeneity of the films was controlled by UV spectroscopy and microscopy. To provide experimental evidence for the hypothesis that interplanetary transfer of the genetic material is possible, phage T7 and isolated T7 DNA thin films have been exposed to selected space conditions: intense UVC radiation (lambda=254 nm) and high vacuum (10(-4) Pa). The effects of DNA hydration, conformation and packing on UV radiation damage were examined. Characteristic changes in the absorption spectrum, in the electrophoretic pattern of DNA and the decrease of the amount of PCR products have been detected indicating the photodamage of isolated and intraphage DNA. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Relating quarks and leptons with the T7 flavour group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Bonilla

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this letter we present a model for quarks and leptons based on T7 as flavour symmetry, predicting a canonical mass relation between charged leptons and down-type quarks proposed earlier. Neutrino masses are generated through a Type-I seesaw mechanism, with predicted correlations between the atmospheric mixing angle and neutrino masses. Compatibility with oscillation results leads to lower bounds for the lightest neutrino mass as well as for the neutrinoless double beta decay rates, even for normal neutrino mass hierarchy.

  9. Two bacteriophages of Clostridium difficile.

    OpenAIRE

    Mahony, D E; Bell, P D; Easterbrook, K. B.

    1985-01-01

    Two temperate bacteriophages of differing morphology and host range were isolated by screening 94 isolates of Clostridium difficile. Phage 41 had a 300-nm flexible tail, whereas phage 56 had a shorter tail with a contractile sheath. Electron microscopy of phage 56 lysates exposed to elevated magnesium concentrations showed small virus-like particles which were 21 nm in diameter. The addition of MgCl2 to semisolid agar overlays enhanced both the titer and plaque size of phage 56. Phage 56 was ...

  10. Propagating the missing bacteriophages: a large bacteriophage in a new class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardies Stephen C

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The number of successful propagations/isolations of soil-borne bacteriophages is small in comparison to the number of bacteriophages observed by microscopy (great plaque count anomaly. As one resolution of the great plaque count anomaly, we use propagation in ultra-dilute agarose gels to isolate a Bacillus thuringiensis bacteriophage with a large head (95 nm in diameter, tail (486 × 26 nm, corkscrew-like tail fibers (187 × 10 nm and genome (221 Kb that cannot be detected by the usual procedures of microbiology. This new bacteriophage, called 0305φ8-36 (first number is month/year of isolation; remaining two numbers identify the host and bacteriophage, has a high dependence of plaque size on the concentration of a supporting agarose gel. Bacteriophage 0305φ8-36 does not propagate in the traditional gels used for bacteriophage plaque formation and also does not produce visible lysis of liquid cultures. Bacteriophage 0305φ8-36 aggregates and, during de novo isolation from the environment, is likely to be invisible to procedures of physical detection that use either filtration or centrifugal pelleting to remove bacteria. Bacteriophage 0305φ8-36 is in a new genomic class, based on genes for both structural components and DNA packaging ATPase. Thus, knowledge of environmental virus diversity is expanded with prospect of greater future expansion.

  11. Host receptors for bacteriophage adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertozzi Silva, Juliano; Storms, Zachary; Sauvageau, Dominic

    2016-02-01

    The adsorption of bacteriophages (phages) onto host cells is, in all but a few rare cases, a sine qua non condition for the onset of the infection process. Understanding the mechanisms involved and the factors affecting it is, thus, crucial for the investigation of host-phage interactions. This review provides a survey of the phage host receptors involved in recognition and adsorption and their interactions during attachment. Comprehension of the whole infection process, starting with the adsorption step, can enable and accelerate our understanding of phage ecology and the development of phage-based technologies. To assist in this effort, we have established an open-access resource--the Phage Receptor Database (PhReD)--to serve as a repository for information on known and newly identified phage receptors. PMID:26755501

  12. Adjoint $SU(5)$ GUT model with $T_{7}$ flavor symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Arbeláez, Carolina; Kovalenko, Sergey; Schmidt, Iván

    2015-01-01

    We propose an adjoint $SU(5)$ GUT model with a $T_{7}$ family symmetry and an extra $Z_{2}\\otimes Z_{2}^{\\prime }\\otimes Z_{3}\\otimes Z_{4}\\otimes Z_{12}$ discrete group, that successfully describes the prevailing Standard Model (SM) fermion mass and mixing pattern. The observed hierarchy of the charged fermion masses and the quark mixing angles arises from the $Z_{3}\\otimes Z_{4}\\otimes Z_{12}$ symmetry breaking, which occurs near the GUT scale. The light active neutrino masses are generated by type I and type III seesaw mechanisms mediated by the fermionic $SU(5)$ singlet and the adjoint $\\mathbf{24}$-plet. The model predicts the effective Majorana neutrino mass parameter of neutrinoless double beta decay to be $m_{\\beta \\beta }=$ 4 and 50 meV for the normal and the inverted neutrino spectrum, respectively. We construct several benchmark scenarios, which lead to $SU(5)$ gauge coupling unification and are compatible with the known phenomenological constraints originating from the lightness of neutrinos, prot...

  13. Stepwise Expansion of the Bacteriophage φ6 Procapsid: Possible Packaging Intermediates

    OpenAIRE

    Nemecek, Daniel; Cheng, Naiqian; Qiao, Jian; Mindich, Leonard; Steven, Alasdair C; Heymann, J. Bernard

    2011-01-01

    The initial assembly product of bacteriophage φ6, the procapsid, undergoes major structural transformation during the sequential packaging of its three segments of single-stranded RNA. The procapsid, a compact icosahedrally symmetric particle with deeply recessed vertices, expands to the spherical mature capsid, increasing the volume available to accommodate the genome by 2.5-fold. It has been proposed that expansion and packaging are linked, with each stage in expansion presenting a binding ...

  14. A bacteriophage transcription regulator inhibits bacterial transcription initiation by σ-factor displacement

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Bing; Shadrin, Andrey; Sheppard, Carol; Mekler, Vladimir; Xu, Yingqi; Severinov, Konstantin; Matthews, Steve; Wigneshweraraj, Sivaramesh

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) appropriate essential processes of bacterial hosts to benefit their own development. The multisubunit bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAp) enzyme, which catalyses DNA transcription, is targeted by phage-encoded transcription regulators that selectively modulate its activity. Here, we describe the structural and mechanistic basis for the inhibition of bacterial RNAp by the transcription regulator P7 encoded by Xanthomonas oryzae phage Xp10. We reveal that P7 uses a two-step ...

  15. Complete Genome Sequences of Five Bacteriophages That Infect Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardoni, Brooke; Bockman, Matthew R.; Miller, Brenda M.; Russell, Daniel A.; Delesalle, Veronique A.; Krukonis, Gregory P.; Hatfull, Graham F.; Cross, Madeline R.; Szewczyk, Marlena M.; Eppurath, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Five bacteriophages that infect the Rhodobacter capsulatus strain YW1 were isolated from stream water near Bloomington, Illinois, USA. Two distinct genome types are represented in the newly isolated bacteriophages. These genomes are different from other bacteriophage genomes previously described. PMID:27231352

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis Bacteriophage BMBtp2

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Zhaoxia; Peng, Donghai; Wang, Yueying; Zhu, Lei; Ruan, Lifang; Sun, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is an insect pathogen which has been widely used for biocontrol. During B. thuringiensis fermentation, lysogenic bacteriophages cause severe losses of yield. Here, we announce the complete genome sequence of a bacteriophage, BMBtp2, which is induced from B. thuringiensis strain YBT-1765, which may be helpful to clarify the mechanism involved in bacteriophage contamination.

  17. Inhibition of T7 and T3 RNA polymerase directed transcription elongation in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Rando, R. F.; DePaolis, L; Durland, R H; Jayaraman, K; Kessler, D J; Hogan, M E

    1994-01-01

    A class of oligonucleotides which binds to naturally-occurring duplex DNA sites at physiologic pH to form triple helical structures was used as transcription attenuators in an in vitro transcription assay. Oligonucleotides were designed to form triple helices with a purine-rich, double-stranded target by binding in the major groove in an orientation anti-parallel to the most purine-rich strand of the target. A 45 base-pair purine-rich region located within the gag gene of Friend Murine Leukem...

  18. The Bacteriophage Carrier State of Campylobacter jejuni Features Changes in Host Non-coding RNAs and the Acquisition of New Host-derived CRISPR Spacer Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooton, Steven P. T.; Brathwaite, Kelly J.; Connerton, Ian F.

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of self-derived CRISPR DNA protospacers in Campylobacter jejuni PT14 occurs in the presence of bacteriophages encoding a CRISPR-like Cas4 protein. This phenomenon was evident in carrier state infections where both bacteriophages and host are maintained for seemingly indefinite periods as stable populations following serial passage. Carrier state cultures of C. jejuni PT14 have greater aerotolerance in nutrient limited conditions, and may have arisen as an evolutionary response to selective pressures imposed during periods in the extra-intestinal environment. A consequence of this is that bacteriophage and host remain associated and able to survive transition periods where the chances of replicative success are greatly diminished. The majority of the bacteriophage population do not commit to lytic infection, and conversely the bacterial population tolerates low-level bacteriophage replication. We recently examined the effects of Campylobacter bacteriophage/C. jejuni PT14 CRISPR spacer acquisition using deep sequencing strategies of DNA and RNA-Seq to analyze carrier state cultures. This approach identified de novo spacer acquisition in C. jejuni PT14 associated with Class III Campylobacter phages CP8/CP30A but spacer acquisition was oriented toward the capture of host DNA. In the absence of bacteriophage predation the CRISPR spacers in uninfected C. jejuni PT14 cultures remain unchanged. A distinct preference was observed for incorporation of self-derived protospacers into the third spacer position of the C. jejuni PT14 CRISPR array, with the first and second spacers remaining fixed. RNA-Seq also revealed the variation in the synthesis of non-coding RNAs with the potential to bind bacteriophage genes and/or transcript sequences. PMID:27047470

  19. Inactivation of E. coli, B. subtilis spores, and MS2, T4, and T7 phage using UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the potential of an advanced oxidation process (AOP) for microbiocidal and virucidal inactivation. The viruses chosen for this study were bacteriophage MS2, T4, and T7. In addition, Bacillus subtilis spores and Escherichia coli were studied. By using H2O2 in the presence of filtered ultraviolet (UV) irradiation (UV/H2O2) to generate wavelengths above 295 nm, the direct UV photolysis disinfection mechanism was minimized, while disinfection by H2O2 was also negligible. Virus T4 and E. coli in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were sensitive to >295 nm filtered UV irradiation (without H2O2), while MS2 was very resistant. Addition of H2O2 at 25 mg/l in the presence of filtered UV irradiation over a 15 min reaction time did not result in any additional disinfection of virus T4, while an additional one log inactivation for T7 and 2.5 logs for MS2 were obtained. With E. coli, only a slight additional effect was observed when H2O2 was added. B. subtilis spores did not show any inactivation at any of the conditions used in this study. The OH radical exposure (CT value) was calculated to present the relationship between the hydroxyl radical dose and microbial inactivation

  20. Neutron irradiation of bacteriophage λ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Double strand breaks (DSB) are the most dangerous lesions in DNA caused by irradiation, but many other lesions, usually called mutations, have not been clearly identified. These lesions, like DSB, can be the source of serious chromosomal damages and finally - cell death. Growing interest in heavy particles for radiotherapy and radioprotection encourages the search of the molecular basis of their action. In this respect, we chose bacteriophage λ1390 as the model system for the study of consequences of neutron irradiation. This derivative of λ phage possesses an unique ability to reversibly reorganize their genome in response to various selective pressures. The phages were irradiated with 13 Gy of mixed neutrons (7.5 Gy from fast and 5.6 Gy from thermal neutrons) and phages genomes were tested to DSB and mutations. Additionally, the stability of λ capsid proteins were tested. After all tests, we can conclude that, under our conditions, low flux of neutrons does not induce neither DNA strand break or DNA mutation nor the stability of λ capsid proteins. (author)

  1. Complete Genomic Sequence of Bacteriophage Felix O1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Kropinski

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophage O1 is a Myoviridae A1 group member used historically for identifying Salmonella. Sequencing revealed a single, linear, 86,155-base-pair genome with 39% average G+C content, 131 open reading frames, and 22 tRNAs. Closest protein homologs occur in Erwinia amylovora phage φEa21-4 and Escherichia coli phage wV8. Proteomic analysis indentified structural proteins: Gp23, Gp36 (major tail protein, Gp49, Gp53, Gp54, Gp55, Gp57, Gp58 (major capsid protein, Gp59, Gp63, Gp64, Gp67, Gp68, Gp69, Gp73, Gp74 and Gp77 (tail fiber. Based on phage-host codon differences, 7 tRNAs could affect translation rate during infection. Introns, holin-lysin cassettes, bacterial toxin homologs and host RNA polymerase-modifying genes were absent.

  2. Photodynamic Inactivation of Mammalian Viruses and Bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Costa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic inactivation (PDI has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process.

  3. Evidence for a lineage of virulent bacteriophages that target Campylobacter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cummings Nicola

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our understanding of the dynamics of genome stability versus gene flux within bacteriophage lineages is limited. Recently, there has been a renewed interest in the use of bacteriophages as 'therapeutic' agents; a prerequisite for their use in such therapies is a thorough understanding of their genetic complement, genome stability and their ecology to avoid the dissemination or mobilisation of phage or bacterial virulence and toxin genes. Campylobacter, a food-borne pathogen, is one of the organisms for which the use of bacteriophage is being considered to reduce human exposure to this organism. Results Sequencing and genome analysis was performed for two Campylobacter bacteriophages. The genomes were extremely similar at the nucleotide level (≥ 96% with most differences accounted for by novel insertion sequences, DNA methylases and an approximately 10 kb contiguous region of metabolic genes that were dissimilar at the sequence level but similar in gene function between the two phages. Both bacteriophages contained a large number of radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM genes, presumably involved in boosting host metabolism during infection, as well as evidence that many genes had been acquired from a wide range of bacterial species. Further bacteriophages, from the UK Campylobacter typing set, were screened for the presence of bacteriophage structural genes, DNA methylases, mobile genetic elements and regulatory genes identified from the genome sequences. The results indicate that many of these bacteriophages are related, with 10 out of 15 showing some relationship to the sequenced genomes. Conclusions Two large virulent Campylobacter bacteriophages were found to show very high levels of sequence conservation despite separation in time and place of isolation. The bacteriophages show adaptations to their host and possess genes that may enhance Campylobacter metabolism, potentially advantaging both the bacteriophage and its host

  4. Bacteriophages as Potential Treatment for Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sybesma, Wilbert; Zbinden, Reinhard; Chanishvili, Nino; Kutateladze, Mzia; Chkhotua, Archil; Ujmajuridze, Aleksandre; Mehnert, Ulrich; Kessler, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most prevalent microbial diseases and their financial burden on society is substantial. The continuing increase of antibiotic resistance worldwide is alarming so that well-tolerated, highly effective therapeutic alternatives are urgently needed. Objective: To investigate the effect of bacteriophages on Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains isolated from the urine of patients suffering from UTIs. Material and methods: Forty-one E. coli and 9 K. pneumoniae strains, isolated from the urine of patients suffering from UTIs, were tested in vitro for their susceptibility toward bacteriophages. The bacteriophages originated from either commercially available bacteriophage cocktails registered in Georgia or from the bacteriophage collection of the George Eliava Institute of Bacteriophage, Microbiology and Virology. In vitro screening of bacterial strains was performed by use of the spot-test method. The experiments were implemented three times by different groups of scientists. Results: The lytic activity of the commercial bacteriophage cocktails on the 41 E. coli strains varied between 66% (Pyo bacteriophage) and 93% (Enko bacteriophage). After bacteriophage adaptation of the Pyo bacteriophage cocktail, its lytic activity was increased from 66 to 93% and only one E. coli strain remained resistant. One bacteriophage of the Eliava collection could lyse all 9 K. pneumoniae strains. Conclusions: Based on the high lytic activity and the potential of resistance optimization by direct adaption of bacteriophages as reported in this study, and in view of the continuing increase of antibiotic resistance worldwide, bacteriophage therapy is a promising treatment option for UTIs highly warranting randomized controlled trials.

  5. Isolation of a novel polyvalent virulent bacteriophage of E.coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To isolate virulent bacteriophage from environment samples and explore the potential way of decontaminating the environmental wastewater. Methods: The standard plaque assay, negative staining transmission electron microscopy (TEM), genome extraction and nucleases test were used to isolate bacteriophages. Then its morphology and characteristics were examined. Results: A novel bacteriophage XY-1 was isolated from a sewage pond in a hospital. It infected and killed 6 E. coli reference strains. The phage had a round head (diameter 40-50 nm), no tail and the genome was ssRNA of approximately 5. 0 kb. It was able to reduce E. coli to an extent of 44. 63% to 67. 00% when being added into the samples of different raw sewage water, depending on the contact time, the temperature and the phage dose. Conclusion; From the morphology typical and nucleotide characteristics (RNA) of the genome of phage, phage XY-1 appears to be closely related to phage f2. It may have some effects for the control of E. coli in sewage water.

  6. Bacteriophages from the forestomachs of Australian marsupials.

    OpenAIRE

    Klieve, A V

    1991-01-01

    Bacteriophages were observed in forestomach contents from three species of Australian macropodoid marsupials possessing a foregut fermentative digestion: the eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus), the eastern wallaroo (Macropus robustus robustus), and the rufous bettong (Aepyprymnus rufescens). Forty-six morphologically distinct phage types, representing the families Myoviridae, Siphoviridae, and Podoviridae, were identified. The range of forms varied between host species. The greatest d...

  7. An Undergraduate Laboratory Activity Demonstrating Bacteriophage Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E. Allen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophage are among the most diverse and numerous microbes inhabiting our planet. Yet many laboratory activities fail to engage students in meaningful exploration of their diversity, unique characteristics, and abundance. In this curriculum activity students use a standard plaque assay to enumerate bacteriophage particles from a natural sample and use the scientific method to address questions about host specificity and diversity. A raw primary sewage sample is enriched for bacteriophage using hosts in the family Enterobacteriaceae. Students hypothesize about host specificity and use quantitative data (serial dilution and plaque assay to test their hypotheses. Combined class data also help them answer questions about phage diversity. The exercise was field tested with a class of 47 students using pre- and posttests. For all learning outcomes posttest scores were higher than pretest scores at or below p = 0.01. Average individualized learning gain (G was also calculated for each learning outcome. Students’ use of scientific language in reference to bacteriophage and host interaction significantly improved (p = 0.002; G = 0.50. Improved means of expression helped students construct better hypotheses on phage host specificity (G = 0.31, p = 0.01 and to explain the plaque assay method (G = 0.33, p = 0.002. At the end of the exercise students also demonstrated improved knowledge and understanding of phage specificity as related to phage therapy in humans (p < 0.001; G = 51.

  8. Comparative genomics of Shiga toxin encoding bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Darren L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stx bacteriophages are responsible for driving the dissemination of Stx toxin genes (stx across their bacterial host range. Lysogens carrying Stx phages can cause severe, life-threatening disease and Stx toxin is an integral virulence factor. The Stx-bacteriophage vB_EcoP-24B, commonly referred to as Ф24B, is capable of multiply infecting a single bacterial host cell at a high frequency, with secondary infection increasing the rate at which subsequent bacteriophage infections can occur. This is biologically unusual, therefore determining the genomic content and context of Ф24B compared to other lambdoid Stx phages is important to understanding the factors controlling this phenomenon and determining whether they occur in other Stx phages. Results The genome of the Stx2 encoding phage, Ф24B was sequenced and annotated. The genomic organisation and general features are similar to other sequenced Stx bacteriophages induced from Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC, however Ф24B possesses significant regions of heterogeneity, with implications for phage biology and behaviour. The Ф24B genome was compared to other sequenced Stx phages and the archetypal lambdoid phage, lambda, using the Circos genome comparison tool and a PCR-based multi-loci comparison system. Conclusions The data support the hypothesis that Stx phages are mosaic, and recombination events between the host, phages and their remnants within the same infected bacterial cell will continue to drive the evolution of Stx phage variants and the subsequent dissemination of shigatoxigenic potential.

  9. Molecular Biology and Biotechnology of Bacteriophage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onodera, Kazukiyo

    The development of the molecular biology of bacteriophage such as T4, lambda and filamentous phages was described and the process that the fundamental knowledge obtained in this field has subsequently led us to the technology of phage display was introduced.

  10. Genetic diversity among five T4-like bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Claire

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteriophages are an important repository of genetic diversity. As one of the major constituents of terrestrial biomass, they exert profound effects on the earth's ecology and microbial evolution by mediating horizontal gene transfer between bacteria and controlling their growth. Only limited genomic sequence data are currently available for phages but even this reveals an overwhelming diversity in their gene sequences and genomes. The contribution of the T4-like phages to this overall phage diversity is difficult to assess, since only a few examples of complete genome sequence exist for these phages. Our analysis of five T4-like genomes represents half of the known T4-like genomes in GenBank. Results Here, we have examined in detail the genetic diversity of the genomes of five relatives of bacteriophage T4: the Escherichia coli phages RB43, RB49 and RB69, the Aeromonas salmonicida phage 44RR2.8t (or 44RR and the Aeromonas hydrophila phage Aeh1. Our data define a core set of conserved genes common to these genomes as well as hundreds of additional open reading frames (ORFs that are nonconserved. Although some of these ORFs resemble known genes from bacterial hosts or other phages, most show no significant similarity to any known sequence in the databases. The five genomes analyzed here all have similarities in gene regulation to T4. Sequence motifs resembling T4 early and late consensus promoters were observed in all five genomes. In contrast, only two of these genomes, RB69 and 44RR, showed similarities to T4 middle-mode promoter sequences and to the T4 motA gene product required for their recognition. In addition, we observed that each phage differed in the number and assortment of putative genes encoding host-like metabolic enzymes, tRNA species, and homing endonucleases. Conclusion Our observations suggest that evolution of the T4-like phages has drawn on a highly diverged pool of genes in the microbial world. The T4

  11. Bacteriophage-encoded shiga toxin gene in atypical bacterial host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casas Veronica

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contamination from fecal bacteria in recreational waters is a major health concern since bacteria capable of causing human disease can be found in animal feces. The Dog Beach area of Ocean Beach in San Diego, California is a beach prone to closures due to high levels of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB. A potential source of these FIB could be the canine feces left behind by owners who do not clean up after their pets. We tested this hypothesis by screening the DNA isolated from canine feces for the bacteriophage-encoded stx gene normally found in the virulent strains of the fecal bacterium Escherichia coli. Results Twenty canine fecal samples were collected, processed for total and bacterial fraction DNA, and screened by PCR for the stx gene. The stx gene was detected in the total and bacterial fraction DNA of one fecal sample. Bacterial isolates were then cultivated from the stx-positive fecal sample. Eighty nine of these canine fecal bacterial isolates were screened by PCR for the stx gene. The stx gene was detected in five of these isolates. Sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA gene PCR products from the canine fecal bacterial isolates indicated that they were Enterococcus and not E. coli. Conclusions The bacteriophage-encoded stx gene was found in multiple species of bacteria cultivated from canine fecal samples gathered at the shoreline of the Dog Beach area of Ocean Beach in San Diego, California. The canine fecal bacteria carrying the stx gene were not the typical E. coli host and were instead identified through phylogenetic analyses as Enterococcus. This suggests a large degree of horizontal gene transfer of exotoxin genes in recreational waters.

  12. Evolution and the complexity of bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serwer Philip

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genomes of both long-genome (> 200 Kb bacteriophages and long-genome eukaryotic viruses have cellular gene homologs whose selective advantage is not explained. These homologs add genomic and possibly biochemical complexity. Understanding their significance requires a definition of complexity that is more biochemically oriented than past empirically based definitions. Hypothesis Initially, I propose two biochemistry-oriented definitions of complexity: either decreased randomness or increased encoded information that does not serve immediate needs. Then, I make the assumption that these two definitions are equivalent. This assumption and recent data lead to the following four-part hypothesis that explains the presence of cellular gene homologs in long bacteriophage genomes and also provides a pathway for complexity increases in prokaryotic cells: (1 Prokaryotes underwent evolutionary increases in biochemical complexity after the eukaryote/prokaryote splits. (2 Some of the complexity increases occurred via multi-step, weak selection that was both protected from strong selection and accelerated by embedding evolving cellular genes in the genomes of bacteriophages and, presumably, also archaeal viruses (first tier selection. (3 The mechanisms for retaining cellular genes in viral genomes evolved under additional, longer-term selection that was stronger (second tier selection. (4 The second tier selection was based on increased access by prokaryotic cells to improved biochemical systems. This access was achieved when DNA transfer moved to prokaryotic cells both the more evolved genes and their more competitive and complex biochemical systems. Testing the hypothesis I propose testing this hypothesis by controlled evolution in microbial communities to (1 determine the effects of deleting individual cellular gene homologs on the growth and evolution of long genome bacteriophages and hosts, (2 find the environmental conditions that

  13. The high-energy environment in the super-Earth system CoRoT-7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppenhaeger, K.; Czesla, S.; Schröter, S.; Lalitha, S.; Kashyap, V.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2012-05-01

    High-energy irradiation of exoplanets has been identified to be a key influence on the stability of these planets' atmospheres. So far, irradiation-driven mass-loss has been observed only in two Hot Jupiters, and the observational data remain even more sparse in the super-Earth regime. We present an investigation of the high-energy emission in the CoRoT-7 system, which hosts the first known transiting super-Earth. To characterize the high-energy XUV radiation field into which the rocky planets CoRoT-7b and CoRoT-7c are immersed, we analyzed a 25 ks XMM-Newton observation of the host star. Our analysis yields the first clear (3.5σ) X-ray detection of CoRoT-7. We determine a coronal temperature of ≈ 3 MK and an X-ray luminosity of 3 × 1028 erg s-1. The level of XUV irradiation on CoRoT-7b amounts to ≈37 000 erg cm-2 s-1. Current theories for planetary evaporation can only provide an order-of-magnitude estimate for the planetary mass loss; assuming that CoRoT-7b has formed as a rocky planet, we estimate that CoRoT-7b evaporates at a rate of about 1.3 × 1011 g s-1 and has lost ≈4-10 earth masses in total.

  14. Small regulatory RNAs in lambdoid bacteriophages and phage-derived plasmids: Not only antisense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejman-Faleńczyk, Bożena; Bloch, Sylwia; Licznerska, Katarzyna; Felczykowska, Agnieszka; Dydecka, Aleksandra; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2015-03-01

    Until recently, only two small regulatory RNAs encoded by lambdoid bacteriophages were known. These transcripts are derived from paQ and pO promoters. The former one is supposed to act as an antisense RNA for expression of the Q gene, encoding a transcription antitermination protein. The latter transcript, called oop RNA, was initially proposed to have a double role, in establishing expression of the cI gene and in providing a primer for DNA replication. Although the initially proposed mechanisms by which oop RNA could influence the choice between two alternative developmental pathways of the phage and the initiation of phage DNA replication were found not true, the pO promoter has been demonstrated to be important for both regulation of phage development and control of DNA replication. Namely, the pO-derived transcript is an antisense RNA for expression of the cII gene, and pO is a part of a dual promoter system responsible for regulation of initiation of DNA synthesis from the oriλ region. Very recent studies identified a battery of small RNAs encoded by lambdoid bacteriophages existing as prophages in chromosomes of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli strains. Some of them have very interesting functions, like anti-small RNAs. PMID:25111672

  15. Characterization of a new ViI-like Erwinia amylovora bacteriophage phiEa2809.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagonenko, Alexander L; Sadovskaya, Olga; Valentovich, Leonid N; Evtushenkov, Anatoly N

    2015-04-01

    Erwinia amylovora is a Gram-negative plant pathogenic bacteria causing fire blight disease in many Rosaceae species. A novel E. amylovora bacteriophage, phiEa2809, was isolated from symptomless apple leaf sample collected in Belarus. This phage was also able to infect Pantoea agglomerans strains. The genome of phiEa2809 is a double-stranded linear DNA 162,160 bp in length, including 145 ORFs and one tRNA gene. The phiEa2809 genomic sequence is similar to the genomes of the Serratia plymutica phage MAM1, Shigella phage AG-3, Dickeya phage vB DsoM LIMEstone1 and Salmonella phage ViI and lacks similarity to described E. amylovora phage genomes. Based on virion morphology (an icosahedral head, long contractile tail) and genome structure, phiEa2809 was classified as a member of Myoviridae, ViI-like bacteriophages group. PhiEa2809 is the firstly characterized ViI-like bacteriophage able to lyse E. amylovora. PMID:25714551

  16. Use of bacteriophages to control biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Sillankorva, Sanna

    2009-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Engenharia Química e Biológica After several years of abandonment, the use of bacteriophages (phages) for killing bacteria has withdrawn recent attention and reappraisal. This has led to a vast phage research, in varied fields, with impressive outcomes and currently several studies are ongoing with animals, horticulture and agriculture products, and even with humans. Despite this enthusiasm, there is a lack of research conserning phage utilization to red...

  17. A new look at bacteriophage phylogenomics

    OpenAIRE

    Nóbrega, Franklin; Pinto, Graça; Azeredo, Joana; Kluskens, Leon

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophages or phages are viruses that only infect bacteria. The International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses classified these viruses in accordance with the morphology of their free virion particles and type and size of their genome. This system fails on the classification of several phages, which have their genome already sequenced. It also requires a morphological analysis by transmission electron microscopy, which is very expensive and time consuming [1]. In 2002 Rohwe...

  18. Long-circulating bacteriophage as antibacterial agents.

    OpenAIRE

    Merril, C.R.; B. Biswas; Carlton, R; Jensen, N C; Creed, G J; Zullo, S; Adhya, S

    1996-01-01

    The increased prevalence of multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens motivated us to attempt to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of bacteriophages. The therapeutic application of phages as antibacterial agents was impeded by several factors: (i) the failure to recognize the relatively narrow host range of phages; (ii) the presence of toxins in crude phage lysates; and (iii) a lack of appreciation for the capacity of mammalian host defense systems, particularly the organs of the reticuloendothe...

  19. Bacteriophage lambda: early pioneer and still relevant

    OpenAIRE

    Casjens, Sherwood R; Hendrix, Roger W.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular genetic research on bacteriophage lambda carried out during its golden age from the mid 1950's to mid 1980's was critically important in the attainment of our current understanding of the sophisticated and complex mechanisms by which the expression of genes is controlled, of DNA virus assembly and of the molecular nature of lysogeny. The development of molecular cloning techniques, ironically instigated largely by phage lambda researchers, allowed many phage workers to switch their ...

  20. Dark repair in bacteriophage systems: overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on dark repair of DNA in bacteriophages T4 and lambda are reviewed. Some topics discussed are: uv sensitivity of phage mutants; effects of endonuclease on uv-irradiated phage DNA; pyrimidine dimers as substrate sites for endonuclease in DNA; electron microscopic studies of enzyme-treated uv-irradiated DNA; role of phage T4 genes in DNA repair; and host-cell reactivation, prophage reactivation, and uv reactivation in phase lambda

  1. Bacteriophage biocontrol in animals and meat products

    OpenAIRE

    Atterbury, R. J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Since their discovery almost a century ago, bacterial viruses (bacteriophages or ‘phages’) have been used to prevent and treat a multitude of bacterial infections (phage therapy: PT). In addition, they have been the basis for many advances in genetics and biochemistry. Phage therapy was performed on human subjects in the United States, Europe and Asia in the few decades following their discovery. However, Western countries largely abandoned PT in favour of antibiotics in the 1940s. Th...

  2. Bacteriophages for detection of bacterial pathogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The G. Eliava Institute of Bacteriophages, Microbiology and Virology (Tbilisi, Georgia) is one of the most famous institutions focused on bacteriophage research for the elaboration of appropriate phage methodologies for human and animal protection. The main direction of the institute is the study and production of bacteriophages against intestinal disorders (dysentery, typhoid, intesti) and purulent-septic infections (staphylococcus, streptococcus, pyophage, etc.). These preparations were successfully introduced during the Soviet era, and for decades were used throughout the former Soviet Union and in other Socialist countries for the treatment, prophylaxis, and diagnosis of various infectious diseases, including those caused by antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains. Bacteriophages were widely used for identifying and detecting infections caused by the most dangerous pathogens and causative agents of epidemiological outbreaks. The specific topic of this presentation is the phage typing of bacterial species, which can be an important method for epidemiological diagnostics. Together with different genetic methodologies - such as PCR-based methods, PFGE, plasmid fingerprinting, and ribosomal typing - phage typing is one method for identifying bacterial pathogens. The method has a high percentage of determination of phage types, high specificity of reaction, and is easy for interpretation and use by health workers. Phage typing was applied for inter-species differentiation of different species of Salmonella, S. typhi, Brucella spp, Staphylococcus aureus, E. col,i Clostridium deficile, Vibrio cholerae, Yersinia pestis, Yersinia enterocolitica, Lysteria monocytogenes, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium tetani, plant pathogens, and other bacterial pathogens. In addition to addressing the utility and efficacy of phage typing, the paper will discuss the isolation and selection of diagnostic typing phages for interspecies differentiation of pathogens that is necessary

  3. Bacteriophages and bacteriophage-derived endolysins as potential therapeutics to combat Gram-positive spore forming bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakonieczna, A; Cooper, C J; Gryko, R

    2015-09-01

    Since their discovery in 1915, bacteriophages have been routinely used within Eastern Europe to treat a variety of bacterial infections. Although initially ignored by the West due to the success of antibiotics, increasing levels and diversity of antibiotic resistance is driving a renaissance for bacteriophage-derived therapy, which is in part due to the highly specific nature of bacteriophages as well as their relative abundance. This review focuses on the bacteriophages and derived lysins of relevant Gram-positive spore formers within the Bacillus cereus group and Clostridium genus that could have applications within the medical, food and environmental sectors. PMID:26109320

  4. Genetically modified bacteriophages in applied microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárdy, P; Pantůček, R; Benešík, M; Doškař, J

    2016-09-01

    Bacteriophages represent a simple viral model of basic research with many possibilities for practical application. Due to their ability to infect and kill bacteria, their potential in the treatment of bacterial infection has been examined since their discovery. With advances in molecular biology and gene engineering, the phage application spectrum has been expanded to various medical and biotechnological fields. The construction of bacteriophages with an extended host range or longer viability in the mammalian bloodstream enhances their potential as an alternative to conventional antibiotic treatment. Insertion of active depolymerase genes to their genomes can enforce the biofilm disposal. They can also be engineered to transfer various compounds to the eukaryotic organisms and the bacterial culture, applicable for the vaccine, drug or gene delivery. Phage recombinant lytic enzymes can be applied as enzybiotics in medicine as well as in biotechnology for pathogen detection or programmed cell death in bacterial expression strains. Besides, modified bacteriophages with high specificity can be applied as bioprobes in detection tools to estimate the presence of pathogens in food industry, or utilized in the control of food-borne pathogens as part of the constructed phage-based biosorbents. PMID:27321680

  5. Changes in Protein Domains outside the Catalytic Site of the Bacteriophage Qβ Replicase Reduce the Mutagenic Effect of 5-Azacytidine

    OpenAIRE

    Cabanillas, Laura; Sanjuán, Rafael; Lázaro, Ester

    2014-01-01

    The high genetic heterogeneity and great adaptability of RNA viruses are ultimately caused by the low replication fidelity of their polymerases. However, single amino acid substitutions that modify replication fidelity can evolve in response to mutagenic treatments with nucleoside analogues. Here, we investigated how two independent mutants of the bacteriophage Qβ replicase (Thr210Ala and Tyr410His) reduce sensitivity to the nucleoside analogue 5-azacytidine (AZC). Despite being located outsi...

  6. Bioengineering bacteriophages to enhance the sensitivity of phage amplification-based paper fluidic detection of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaine, S D; Law, K; Ho, S; Kinchla, A J; Sela, D A; Nugen, S R

    2016-08-15

    Bacteriophage (phage) amplification is an attractive method for the detection of bacteria due to a narrow phage-host specificity, short amplification times, and the phages' ability to differentiate between viable and non-viable bacterial cells. The next step in phage-based bacteria detection is leveraging bioengineered phages to create low-cost, rapid, and easy-to-use detection platforms such as lateral flow assays. Our work establishes the proof-of-concept for the use of bioengineered T7 phage strains to increase the sensitivity of phage amplification-based lateral flow assays. We have demonstrated a greater than 10-fold increase in sensitivity using a phage-based protein reporter, maltose-binding protein, over the detection of replicated T7 phage viron itself, and a greater then 100-fold increase in sensitivity using a phage-based enzymatic reporter, alkaline phosphatase. This increase in sensitivity enabled us to detect 10(3)CFU/mL of Escherichia coli in broth after 7h, and by adding a filter concentration step, the ability to detect a regulatory relevant E. coli concentration of 100CFU/100mL in inoculated river water after 9h, where the current standard requires days for results. The combination of the paper fluidic format with phage-based detection provides a platform for the development of novel diagnostics that are sensitive, rapid, and easy to use. PMID:27031186

  7. Evaluation of antibacterial and antiviral activity of N-arylamides of 9-methyl and 9-methoxyphenazine-1-carboxylic acids – inhibitors of the phage T7 model transctiption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hovorun D. M.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Search for compounds with antibacterial and antiviral properties among N-arylamides of 9-substituted phenazine-1-carboxylic acids (PCA, inhibitors of the RNA synthesis. Methods. Influence of N-aryl-amides on the RNA synthesis was tested in vitro in the model system of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase of phage T7 (T7 RNAP. Antimicrobial activities of the N-arylamides against bacteria Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae VR-2 var. IVM, Klebsiella spp. and Escherichia coli ATCC25922 were investigated by the method of two-fold dilution in a liquid medium. Antiviral effects against Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV and cytotoxicity of the N-arylamides were evaluated using Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK cells. Results. Twenty N-arylamides appeared to be efficacious inhibitors of the RNA synthesis at concent- rations of 0.48–61 µМ. The compound 16 proved to be the most effective inhibitor of T7 RNAP with the IC50 value being 0.48 µМ. Fourteen N-arylamides demonstrated antibacterial properties against gram positive and gram negative bacteria at the 0.1–10 µg/ml concentrations. A number of the N-arylamides revealed a multiplicity of their antimicrobial actions: 7 compounds against two bacteria and two compounds, 2 and 3, against three bacteria investigated. N-arylamides 16 and 26 showed high inhibitory activity as to BVDV with the IC50 values 0.43 and 0.88 µg/ml and SI values 160 and 10 correspondingly. Conclusions. The obtained data evidence that the most likely targets of the N-arylamides 9-substituted PCA in bacteria and viruses are their RNA synthesizing complexes.

  8. Call for a dedicated European legal framework for bacteriophage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeken, Gilbert; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Lavigne, Rob; Jennes, Serge; De Vos, Daniel; Casteels, Minne; Huys, Isabelle

    2014-04-01

    The worldwide emergence of antibiotic resistances and the drying up of the antibiotic pipeline have spurred a search for alternative or complementary antibacterial therapies. Bacteriophages are bacterial viruses that have been used for almost a century to combat bacterial infections, particularly in Poland and the former Soviet Union. The antibiotic crisis has triggered a renewed clinical and agricultural interest in bacteriophages. This, combined with new scientific insights, has pushed bacteriophages to the forefront of the search for new approaches to fighting bacterial infections. But before bacteriophage therapy can be introduced into clinical practice in the European Union, several challenges must be overcome. One of these is the conceptualization and classification of bacteriophage therapy itself and the extent to which it constitutes a human medicinal product regulated under the European Human Code for Medicines (Directive 2001/83/EC). Can therapeutic products containing natural bacteriophages be categorized under the current European regulatory framework, or should this framework be adapted? Various actors in the field have discussed the need for an adapted (or entirely new) regulatory framework for the reintroduction of bacteriophage therapy in Europe. This led to the identification of several characteristics specific to natural bacteriophages that should be taken into consideration by regulators when evaluating bacteriophage therapy. One important consideration is whether bacteriophage therapy development occurs on an industrial scale or a hospital-based, patient-specific scale. More suitable regulatory standards may create opportunities to improve insights into this promising therapeutic approach. In light of this, we argue for the creation of a new, dedicated European regulatory framework for bacteriophage therapy. PMID:24500660

  9. The high-energy environment in the super-earth system CoRoT-7

    CERN Document Server

    Poppenhaeger, K; Schröter, S; Lalitha, S; Kashyap, V; Schmitt, J H M M

    2012-01-01

    High-energy irradiation of exoplanets has been identified to be a key influence on the stability of these planets' atmospheres. So far, irradiation-driven mass-loss has been observed only in two Hot Jupiters, and the observational data remain even more sparse in the super-earth regime. We present an investigation of the high-energy emission in the CoRoT-7 system, which hosts the first known transiting super-earth. To characterize the high-energy XUV radiation field into which the rocky planets CoRoT-7b and CoRoT-7c are immersed, we analyzed a 25 ks XMM-Newton observation of the host star. Our analysis yields the first clear (3.5 sigma) X-ray detection of CoRoT-7. We determine a coronal temperature of ca. 3 MK and an X-ray luminosity of 3*10^28 erg/s. The level of XUV irradiation on CoRoT-7b amounts to ca. 37000 erg/cm^2/s. Current theories for planetary evaporation can only provide an order-of-magnitude estimate for the planetary mass loss; assuming that CoRoT-7b has formed as a rocky planet, we estimate that...

  10. Production of HIV-1 gp120 in packed-bed bioreactor using the vaccinia virus/T7 expression system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Y C; Kaufman, J; Cho, M W; Golding, H; Shiloach, J

    2000-01-01

    The HeLa cell-vaccinia virus system is an attractive method for producing recombinant mammalian proteins with proper post-translation modifications. This approach is especially important for the production of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, since more than half of its total mass is due to carbohydrates. A recombinant vaccinia virus/T7 RNA polymerase expression system was developed to express and produce large amounts of gp120 tagged with six histidine residues. In this system, the expressed T7 RNA polymerase from one virus drives the transcription of the gp120 encoded in the second virus. During the process development phase, the following parameters were studied: infection time, infection duration, multiplicity of infection, ratio of the two viruses, medium composition, and medium replacement strategy during the infection phase. The chosen production method was based on using the packed-bed bioreactor. The HeLa cells were immobilized on fibrous disks (Fibra-Cel) packed in an internal basket positioned in a vertically mixed bioreactor (Celligen Plus), and 25 g of carriers were packed in a 1.6-L (working volume) reactor. The process included a growth stage followed by a production stage. In the growth stage, the bed was perfused with a serum-containing medium, allowing the cells to grow to saturation, and in the production stage, done using serum-free medium, the cells were infected with the two recombinant viruses. The expressed protein was secreted, collected from the culture fluid, and purified. The specific production was found to be between 2 and 3 microg of protein/10(6) cells, and the volumetric production was around 10 mg/50 g carriers. PMID:11027165

  11. RNA-Based Vaccines in Cancer Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan A. McNamara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA vaccines traditionally consist of messenger RNA synthesized by in vitro transcription using a bacteriophage RNA polymerase and template DNA that encodes the antigen(s of interest. Once administered and internalized by host cells, the mRNA transcripts are translated directly in the cytoplasm and then the resulting antigens are presented to antigen presenting cells to stimulate an immune response. Alternatively, dendritic cells can be loaded with either tumor associated antigen mRNA or total tumor RNA and delivered to the host to elicit a specific immune response. In this review, we will explain why RNA vaccines represent an attractive platform for cancer immunotherapy, discuss modifications to RNA structure that have been developed to optimize mRNA vaccine stability and translational efficiency, and describe strategies for nonviral delivery of mRNA vaccines, highlighting key preclinical and clinical data related to cancer immunotherapy.

  12. Rates of spontaneous mutation among RNA viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Drake, J W

    1993-01-01

    Simple methods are presented to estimate rates of spontaneous mutation from mutant frequencies and population parameters in RNA viruses. Published mutant frequencies yield a wide range of mutation rates per genome per replication, mainly because mutational targets have usually been small and, thus, poor samples of the mutability of the average base. Nevertheless, there is a clear central tendency for lytic RNA viruses (bacteriophage Q beta, poliomyelitis, vesicular stomatitis, and influenza A...

  13. The bacteriophage T4 regA gene: primary sequence of a translational repressor.

    OpenAIRE

    Trojanowska, M.; Miller, E S; Karam, J; Stormo, G; Gold, L

    1984-01-01

    The regA gene product of bacteriophage T4 is an autogenously controlled translational regulatory protein that plays a role in differential inhibition (translational repression) of a subpopulation of T4-encoded "early" mRNA species. The structural gene for this polypeptide maps within a cluster of phage DNA replication genes, (genes 45-44-62-regA-43-42), all but one of which (gene 43) are under regA-mediated translational control. We have cloned the T4 regA gene, determined its nucleotide sequ...

  14. Prohead RNA: a noncoding viral RNA of novel structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Alyssa C; Bartley, Laura E; Schroeder, Susan J

    2016-07-01

    Prohead RNA (pRNA) is an essential component of the powerful Φ29-like bacteriophage DNA packaging motor. However, the specific role of this unique RNA in the Φ29 packaging motor remains unknown. This review examines pRNA as a noncoding RNA of novel structure and function. In order to highlight the reasons for exploring the structure and function of pRNA, we (1) provide an overview of Φ29-like bacteriophage and the Φ29 DNA packaging motor, including putative motor mechanisms and structures of its component parts; (2) discuss pRNA structure and possible roles for pRNA in the Φ29 packaging motor; (3) summarize pRNA self-assembly; and (4) describe the prospective therapeutic applications of pRNA. Many questions remain to be answered in order to connect what is currently known about pRNA structure to its novel function in the Φ29 packaging motor. The knowledge gained from studying the structure, function, and sequence variation in pRNA will help develop tools to better navigate the conformational landscapes of RNA. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:428-437. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1330 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26810250

  15. Complete Genome Sequences of Five Paenibacillus larvae Bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheflo, Michael A; Gardner, Adam V; Merrill, Bryan D; Fisher, Joshua N B; Lunt, Bryce L; Breakwell, Donald P; Grose, Julianne H; Burnett, Sandra H

    2013-01-01

    Paenibacillus larvae is a pathogen of honeybees that causes American foulbrood (AFB). We isolated bacteriophages from soil containing bee debris collected near beehives in Utah. We announce five high-quality complete genome sequences, which represent the first completed genome sequences submitted to GenBank for any P. larvae bacteriophage. PMID:24233582

  16. FRET Characterization of Complex Conformational Changes in a Large 16S Ribosomal RNA Fragment Site-Specifically Labeled Using Unnatural Base Pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavergne, Thomas; Lamichhane, Rajan; Malyshev, Denis A; Li, Zhengtao; Li, Lingjun; Sperling, Edit; Williamson, James R; Millar, David P; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2016-05-20

    Ribosome assembly has been studied intensively using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) with fluorophore-labeled fragments of RNA produced by chemical synthesis. However, these studies are limited by the size of the accessible RNA fragments. We have developed a replicable unnatural base pair (UBP) formed between (d)5SICS and (d)MMO2 or (d)NaM, which efficiently directs the transcription of RNA containing unnatural nucleotides. We now report the synthesis and evaluation of several of the corresponding ribotriphosphates bearing linkers that enable the chemoselective attachment of different functionalities. We found that the RNA polymerase from T7 bacteriophage does not incorporate NaM derivatives but does efficiently incorporate 5SICS(CO), whose linker enables functional group conjugation via Click chemistry, and when combined with the previously identified MMO2(A), whose amine side chains permits conjugation via NHS coupling chemistry, enables site-specific double labeling of transcribed RNA. To study ribosome assembly, we transcribed RNA corresponding to a 243-nt fragment of the central domain of Thermus thermophilus 16S rRNA containing 5SICS(CO) and MMO2(A) at defined locations and then site-specifically attached the fluorophores Cy3 and Cy5. FRET was characterized using single-molecule total internal reflection fluorescence (smTIRF) microscopy in the presence of various combinations of added ribosomal proteins. We demonstrate that each of the fragment's two three-helix junctions exist in open and closed states, with the latter favored by sequential protein binding. These results elucidate early and previously uncharacterized folding events underlying ribosome assembly and demonstrate the applicability of UBPs for biochemical, structural, and functional studies of RNAs. PMID:26942998

  17. CoRoT-7b: SUPER-EARTH OR SUPER-Io?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CoRoT-7b, a planet about 70% larger than the Earth orbiting a Sun-like star, is the first-discovered rocky exoplanet, and hence has been dubbed a 'super-Earth'. Some initial studies suggested that since the planet is so close to its host star, it receives enough insolation to partially melt its surface. However, these past studies failed to take into consideration the role that tides may play in this system. Even if the planet's eccentricity has always been zero, we show that tidal decay of the semimajor axis could have been large enough that the planet formed on a wider orbit which received less insolation. Moreover, CoRoT-7b could be tidally heated at a rate that dominates its geophysics and drives extreme volcanism. In this case, CoRoT-7b is a 'super-Io' that, like Jupiter's volcanic moon, is dominated by volcanism and rapid resurfacing. Such heating could occur with an eccentricity of just 10-5. This small value could be driven by CoRoT-7c if its own eccentricity is larger than ∼10-4. CoRoT-7b may be the first of a class of planetary super-Ios likely to be revealed by the CoRoT and Kepler spacecraft.

  18. Comparative studies on the structural proteins of T3 and T7 phages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issinger, O G; Falk, H

    1976-01-01

    A comparison of the coat protein patterns of the wild types of the related phages T3 and T7 on SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was carried out. After infection of the nonpermissive host with T7 amber mutants in genes 7, 11, 12, 13 or 17 and T3 amber mutants in genes 11, 12, 13 and 17...... respectively, noninfectious, DNA containing particles were produced. The protein pattern, as well as electron microscopy of defective particles of T3 and T7 led to the conclusion that the proteins specified by genes 11, 12, 13 and 17 are tail proteins whereas the proteins coded by genes 7, 8, 10, 14, 15 and 16...... enter the head structure. The "serum blocking protein" (gene 17 product) seems to play a different role in the assembly of T3 and T7 tails, since T3 particles defective in gene 17 did not show any tail structure connected with the head whereas T7 particles defective in gene 17 had a tail which looked...

  19. The protein interaction map of bacteriophage lambda

    OpenAIRE

    Uetz Peter; Casjens Sherwood; Rajagopala Seesandra V

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Bacteriophage lambda is a model phage for most other dsDNA phages and has been studied for over 60 years. Although it is probably the best-characterized phage there are still about 20 poorly understood open reading frames in its 48-kb genome. For a complete understanding we need to know all interactions among its proteins. We have manually curated the lambda literature and compiled a total of 33 interactions that have been found among lambda proteins. We set out to find ou...

  20. Intrinsic DNA Distortion of the Bacteriophage Mu momP1 Promoter Is a Negative Regulator of Its Transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Basak, Shashwati; Olsen, Lars; Hattman, Stanley; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2001-01-01

    The momP1 promoter of the bacteriophage Mu mom operon is an example of a weak promoter. It contains a 19-base pair suboptimal spacer between the 235 (ACCACA) and 210 (TAGAAT) hexamers. Escherichia coli RNA polymerase is unable to bind tomomP1 on its own.DNAdistortion caused by the presence of a run of six T nucleotides overlapping the 5* end of the 210 element might prevent RNA polymerase from binding to momP1. To investigate the influence of the T6 run on momP1 expression, defined substituti...

  1. Uncovering the planets and stellar activity of CoRoT-7 using only radial velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Faria, J P; Brewer, B J; Figueira, P; Oshagh, M; Santerne, A; Santos, N C

    2016-01-01

    Stellar activity can induce signals in the radial velocities of stars, complicating the detection of orbiting low-mass planets. We present a method to determine the number of planetary signals present in radial-velocity datasets of active stars, using only radial-velocity observations. Instead of considering separate fits with different number of planets, we use a birth-death Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to infer the posterior distribution for the number of planets in a single run. In a natural way, the marginal distributions for the orbital parameters of all planets are also inferred. This method is applied to HARPS data of CoRoT-7. We confidently recover both CoRoT-7b and CoRoT-7c although the data show evidence for additional signals.

  2. Class I self-splicing introns are found in the T-even bacteriophage family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thymidylate synthase gene (td) and ribonucleotide reductase B2 subunit gene (nrdB) EMBO both of bacteriophage T4 in origin, are procaryotic intron-containing protein-encoding genes. To screen for other procaryotic introns, southern hybridization analysis of several procaryotic genomes was carried out, using T4 phage td DNA restriction fragments and synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides defining strategic td exon and intron regions. Furthermore, the labeling pattern of total RNA with [α-32P]GTP, a typical reaction of self-splicing RNAs (class I), was examined. Experimental data implicate multiple self-splicing introns only in the T-even phages: five (1, 0.9, 0.83, 0.75 and 0.6 kb) in T4 and three (1, 0.9 and 0.75 kb) each in T2 and T6 phages. Northern hybridization analysis of total RNA extracted from T-even phage-infected cells confirms that the 1 kb RNA from each phage is in fact the excised intron segment from the precursor RNA transcribed from an intron-containing td gene in each case. This RNA cyclizes to form a contiguous circular molecule. The 0.6 kb RNA is most likely the T4 phage nrdB intron which seems to be absent from the corresponding gene in T2 and T6. The remaining RNA species are candidates for other self-splicing introns in these phages

  3. Characterization of a novel non-specific nuclease from thermophilic bacteriophage GBSV1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiaobo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thermostable enzymes from thermophiles have attracted extensive studies. In this investigation, a nuclease-encoding gene (designated as GBSV1-NSN was obtained from a thermophilic bacteriophage GBSV1 for the first time. Results After recombinant expression in Escherichia coli, the purified GBSV1-NSN exhibited non-specific nuclease activity, being able to degrade various nucleic acids, including RNA, single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA that was circular or linear. Based on sequence analysis, the nuclease shared no homology with any known nucleases, suggesting that it was a novel nuclease. The characterization of the recombinant GBSV1-NSN showed that its optimal temperature and pH were 60°C and 7.5, respectively. The results indicated that the enzymatic activity was inhibited by enzyme inhibitors or detergents, such as ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid, citrate, dithiothreitol, β-mercaptoethanol, guanidine hydrochloride, urea and SDS. In contrast, the nuclease activity was enhanced by TritonX-100, Tween-20 or chaps to approximately 124.5% – 141.6%. The Km of GBSV1-NSN nuclease was 231, 61 and 92 μM, while its kcat was 1278, 241 and 300 s-1 for the cleavage of dsDNA, ssDNA and RNA, respectively. Conclusion Our study, therefore, presented a novel thermostable non-specific nuclease from thermophilic bacteriophage and its overexpression and purification for scientific research and applications.

  4. Immuno compatibility of Bacteriophages as Nano medicines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacteriophage-based medical research provides the opportunity to develop targeted nano medicines with heightened efficiency and safety profiles. Filamentous phages also can and have been formulated as targeted drug-delivery nano medicines, and phage may also serve as promising alternatives/complements to antibiotics. Over the past decade the use of phage for both the prophylaxis and the treatment of bacterial infection, has gained special significance in view of a dramatic rise in the prevalence of antibiotic resistance bacterial strains. Two potential medical applications of phages are the treatment of bacterial infections and their use as immunizing agents in diagnosis and monitoring patients with immunodeficiencies. Recently, phages have been employed as gene-delivery vectors (phage nano medicine), for nearly half a century as tools in genetic research, for about two decades as tools for the discovery of specific target-binding proteins and peptides, and for almost a decade as tools for vaccine development. As phage applications to human therapeutic development grow at an exponential rate, it will become essential to evaluate host immune responses to initial and repetitive challenges by therapeutic phage in order to develop phage therapies that offer suitable utility. This paper examines and discusses phage nano medicine applications and the immunomodulatory effects of bacteriophage exposure and treatment modalities.

  5. Bacteriophage recombination systems and biotechnical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafissi, Nafiseh; Slavcev, Roderick

    2014-04-01

    Bacteriophage recombination systems have been widely used in biotechnology for modifying prokaryotic species, for creating transgenic animals and plants, and more recently, for human cell gene manipulation. In contrast to homologous recombination, which benefits from the endogenous recombination machinery of the cell, site-specific recombination requires an exogenous source of recombinase in mammalian cells. The mechanism of bacteriophage evolution and their coexistence with bacterial cells has become a point of interest ever since bacterial viruses' life cycles were first explored. Phage recombinases have already been exploited as valuable genetic tools and new phage enzymes, and their potential application to genetic engineering and genome manipulation, vectorology, and generation of new transgene delivery vectors, and cell therapy are attractive areas of research that continue to be investigated. The significance and role of phage recombination systems in biotechnology is reviewed in this paper, with specific focus on homologous and site-specific recombination conferred by the coli phages, λ, and N15, the integrase from the Streptomyces phage, ΦC31, the recombination system of phage P1, and the recently characterized recombination functions of Yersinia phage, PY54. Key steps of the molecular mechanisms involving phage recombination functions and their application to molecular engineering, our novel exploitations of the PY54-derived recombination system, and its application to the development of new DNA vectors are discussed. PMID:24442504

  6. A high-copy T7 Escherichia coli expression vector for the production of recombinant proteins with a minimal N-terminal His-tagged fusion peptide

    OpenAIRE

    C.R.R. Ramos; Abreu, P. A. E.; Nascimento, A.L.T.O.; Ho, P. L.

    2004-01-01

    We report here the construction of a vector derived from pET3-His and pRSET plasmids for the expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli based on T7 phage RNA polymerase. The resulting pAE plasmid combined the advantages of both vectors: small size (pRSET), expression of a short 6XHis tag at N-terminus (pET3-His) and a high copy number of plasmid (pRSET). The small size of the vector (2.8 kb) and the high copy number/cell (200-250 copies) facilitate the subcloning ...

  7. Study of the reactivation of X-ray inactivated lambda bacteriophages by irradiated Escherichia coli bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacteriophages lambda and E.coli cells were exposed to X-rays in LB medium. Host cells exposed to a dose of 85 to 765 Gy had a reactivation factor 1.3 to 3.0 for bacteriophages inactivated by X-rays. The capacity of the bacteria for bacteriophage mutliplication remained apparently unchanged in this dose range. After UV-irradiation of the host cells, only a reactivation factor of 1.3 was found for bacteriophages exposed to X-radiation. The comparatively low Weigle reactivation of bacteriophages exposed to X-radiation - as compared with bacteriophages exposed to UV radiation was analyzed by counting free, non-adsorbed bacteriophages determined by filtration of radioactively labelled bacteriophage-host complexes, it was found to be due to a reduced adsorptivity. Reactivation experiments with bacteriophages exposed to X-rays and host bacterias with different degrees of radiosensitivity proved this assumption to be correct. (orig.)

  8. Uncovering the planets and stellar activity of CoRoT-7 using only radial velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, J. P.; Haywood, R. D.; Brewer, B. J.; Figueira, P.; Oshagh, M.; Santerne, A.; Santos, N. C.

    2016-04-01

    Stellar activity can induce signals in the radial velocities of stars, complicating the detection of orbiting low-mass planets. We present a method to determine the number of planetary signals present in radial-velocity datasets of active stars, using only radial-velocity observations. Instead of considering separate fits with different number of planets, we use a birth-death Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to infer the posterior distribution for the number of planets in a single run. In a natural way, the marginal distributions for the orbital parameters of all planets are also inferred. This method is applied to HARPS data of CoRoT-7. We confidently recover the orbits of both CoRoT-7b and CoRoT-7c although the data show evidence for the presence of additional signals. All data and software presented in this article are available online at http://https://github.com/j-faria/exoBD-CoRoT7

  9. Influence of phage proteins on formation of specific UV DNA photoproducts in phage T7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fekete, A.; Vink, A.A.; Gaspar, S.; Modos, K.; Berces, A.; Ronto, Gy.; Roza, L.

    1999-01-01

    Phage T7 can be used as a biological UV dosimeter. Its reading is proportional to the inactivation rate expressed in HT7 units. To understand the influence of phage proteins on the formation of DNA UV photoproducts, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and (6-4)photoproducts ((6-4)PD) were determined

  10. Expression of zinc transporter ZnT7 in mouse superior cervical ganglion

    Science.gov (United States)

    The superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons contain a considerable amount of zinc ions, but little is known about zinc homeostasis in the SCG. It is known that zinc transporter 7 (ZnT7, Slc30a7), a member of the Slc30 ZnT family, is involved in mobilizing zinc ions from the cytoplasm into the Golgi...

  11. Profiling lethal factor interacting proteins from human stomach using T7 phage display screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona-Correa, Albin; Rios-Velazquez, Carlos

    2016-05-01

    The anthrax lethal factor (LF) is a zinc dependent metalloproteinase that cleaves the majority of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases and a member of NOD-like receptor proteins, inducing cell apoptosis. Despite efforts to fully understand the Bacillus anthracis toxin components, the gastrointestinal (GI) anthrax mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Previous studies demonstrated gastric ulceration, and a substantial bacterial growth rate in Peyer's patches. However, the complete molecular pathways of the disease that results in tissue damage by LF proteolytic activity remains unclear. In the present study, to identify the profile of the proteins potentially involved in GI anthrax, protein‑protein interactions were investigated using human stomach T7 phage display (T7PD) cDNA libraries. T7PD is a high throughput technique that allows the expression of cloned DNA sequences as peptides on the phage surface, enabling the selection and identification of protein ligands. A wild type and mutant LF (E687A) were used to differentiate interaction sites. A total of 124 clones were identified from 194 interacting‑phages, at both the DNA and protein level, by in silico analysis. Databases revealed that the selected candidates were proteins from different families including lipase, peptidase‑A1 and cation transport families, among others. Furthermore, individual T7PD candidates were tested against LF in order to detect their specificity to the target molecule, resulting in 10 LF‑interacting peptides. With a minimum concentration of LF for interaction at 1 µg/ml, the T7PD isolated pepsin A3 pre‑protein (PAP) demonstrated affinity to both types of LF. In addition, PAP was isolated in various lengths for the same protein, exhibiting common regions following PRALINE alignment. These findings will help elucidate and improve the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of GI anthrax, and aid in the development of potential therapeutic agents. PMID

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Croceibacter Bacteriophage P2559S

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Ilnam; Kang, Dongmin; Cho, Jang-Cheon

    2012-01-01

    Croceibacter atlanticus HTCC2559T, a marine bacterium isolated from the Sargasso Sea, is a phylogenetically unique member of the family Flavobacteriaceae. Strain HTCC2559T possesses genes related to interaction with primary producers, which makes studies on bacteriophages infecting the strain interesting. Here we report the genome sequence of bacteriophage P2559S, which was isolated off the coast of the Republic of Korea and lytically infects HTCC2559T. Many genes predicted in the P2559S geno...

  13. Targeting Antibacterial Agents by Using Drug-Carrying Filamentous Bacteriophages

    OpenAIRE

    Yacoby, Iftach; Shamis, Marina; Bar, Hagit; Shabat, Doron; Benhar, Itai

    2006-01-01

    Bacteriophages have been used for more than a century for (unconventional) therapy of bacterial infections, for half a century as tools in genetic research, for 2 decades as tools for discovery of specific target-binding proteins, and for nearly a decade as tools for vaccination or as gene delivery vehicles. Here we present a novel application of filamentous bacteriophages (phages) as targeted drug carriers for the eradication of (pathogenic) bacteria. The phages are genetically modified to d...

  14. Alternative bacteriophage life cycles: the carrier state of Campylobacter jejuni

    OpenAIRE

    Siringan, Patcharin; Connerton, Phillippa L.; Cummmings, Nicola J.; Connerton, Ian F.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the genus Campylobacter are frequently responsible for human enteric disease, often through consumption of contaminated poultry products. Bacteriophages are viruses that have the potential to control pathogenic bacteria, but understanding their complex life cycles is key to their successful exploitation. Treatment of Campylobacter jejuni biofilms with bacteriophages led to the discovery that phages had established a relationship with their hosts typical of the carrier state life cy...

  15. Novel Podoviridae Family Bacteriophage Infecting Weissella cibaria Isolated from Kimchi

    OpenAIRE

    Kleppen, Hans Petter; Holo, Helge; Jeon, Sang-Rok; Nes, Ingolf F.; Yoon, Sung-Sik

    2012-01-01

    The first complete genome sequence of a phage infecting Weissella cibaria (Weissella kimchii) is presented. The bacteriophage ϕYS61 was isolated from kimchi, a Korean fermented vegetable dish. Bacteriophages are recognized as a serious problem in industrial fermentations; however, ϕYS61 differed from many virulent phages associated with food fermentations since it was difficult to propagate and was very susceptible to resistance development. Sequence analysis revealed that ϕYS61 resembles Pod...

  16. Simulated hatchery system to assess bacteriophage efficacy against Vibrio harveyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghu Patil, J; Desai, Srividya Narayanamurthy; Roy, Panchali; Durgaiah, Murali; Saravanan, R Sanjeev; Vipra, Aradhana

    2014-12-01

    Vibriosis caused by luminous Vibrio harveyi commonly contributes to poor survival in shrimp hatcheries and aquaculture ponds. Lytic bacteriophages pathogenic for V. harveyi are currently being investigated as an alternative to antibiotics to prevent vibriosis. Here, 8 bacteriophages were isolated from oysters and clams using V. harveyi strains as baiting hosts. Among these bacteriophages, 1 strain (VHP6b) identified as broadly pathogenic for 27 V. harveyi strains examined was further characterized by electron microscopy and genome sequence analysis. Phage VHP6b possessed a tail and morphology consistent with it being a member of the family Siphoviridae, and its genome and proteome were most closely related to the Vibrio phages SSP02 and MAR10. An integrase gene essential for lysogeny was not evident. The ability of bacteriophage VHP6b to protect shrimp postlarvae against vibriosis caused by V. harveyi strain VH6 was demonstrated in a model system designed to simulate typical hatchery conditions. Bacteriophage treatment improved survival of postlarvae by 40 to 60% under these conditions, so therapies based on this or other bacteriophages may be useful in shrimp hatcheries. PMID:25449322

  17. Bacteriophage lambda: Early pioneer and still relevant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casjens, Sherwood R; Hendrix, Roger W

    2015-05-01

    Molecular genetic research on bacteriophage lambda carried out during its golden age from the mid-1950s to mid-1980s was critically important in the attainment of our current understanding of the sophisticated and complex mechanisms by which the expression of genes is controlled, of DNA virus assembly and of the molecular nature of lysogeny. The development of molecular cloning techniques, ironically instigated largely by phage lambda researchers, allowed many phage workers to switch their efforts to other biological systems. Nonetheless, since that time the ongoing study of lambda and its relatives has continued to give important new insights. In this review we give some relevant early history and describe recent developments in understanding the molecular biology of lambda's life cycle. PMID:25742714

  18. Why Be Temperate: Lessons from Bacteriophage λ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandon, Sylvain

    2016-05-01

    Many pathogens have evolved the ability to induce latent infections of their hosts. The bacteriophage λ is a classical model for exploring the regulation and the evolution of latency. Here, I review recent experimental studies on phage λ that identify specific conditions promoting the evolution of lysogenic life cycles. In addition, I present specific adaptations of phage λ that allow this virus to react plastically to variations in the environment and to reactivate its lytic life cycle. All of these different examples are discussed in the light of evolutionary epidemiology theory to disentangle the different evolutionary forces acting on temperate phages. Understanding phage λ adaptations yield important insights into the evolution of latency in other microbes, including several life-threatening human pathogens. PMID:26946976

  19. A Hypothesis for Bacteriophage DNA Packaging Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Serwer

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The hypothesis is presented that bacteriophage DNA packaging motors have a cycle comprised of bind/release thermal ratcheting with release-associated DNA pushing via ATP-dependent protein folding. The proposed protein folding occurs in crystallographically observed peptide segments that project into an axial channel of a protein 12-mer (connector that serves, together with a coaxial ATPase multimer, as the entry portal. The proposed cycle begins when reverse thermal motion causes the connector’s peptide segments to signal the ATPase multimer to bind both ATP and the DNA molecule, thereby producing a dwell phase recently demonstrated by single-molecule procedures. The connector-associated peptide segments activate by transfer of energy from ATP during the dwell. The proposed function of connector/ATPase symmetry mismatches is to reduce thermal noise-induced signaling errors. After a dwell, ATP is cleaved and the DNA molecule released. The activated peptide segments push the released DNA molecule, thereby producing a burst phase recently shown to consist of four mini-bursts. The constraint of four mini-bursts is met by proposing that each mini-burst occurs via pushing by three of the 12 subunits of the connector. If all four mini-bursts occur, the cycle repeats. If the mini-bursts are not completed, a second cycle is superimposed on the first cycle. The existence of the second cycle is based on data recently obtained with bacteriophage T3. When both cycles stall, energy is diverted to expose the DNA molecule to maturation cleavage.

  20. Bacteriophages show promise as antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alisky, J; Iczkowski, K; Rapoport, A; Troitsky, N

    1998-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has prompted interest in alternatives to conventional drugs. One possible option is to use bacteriophages (phage) as antimicrobial agents. We have conducted a literature review of all Medline citations from 1966-1996 that dealt with the therapeutic use of phage. There were 27 papers from Poland, the Soviet Union, Britain and the U.S.A. The Polish and Soviets administered phage orally, topically or systemically to treat a wide variety of antibiotic-resistant pathogens in both adults and children. Infections included suppurative wound infections, gastroenteritis, sepsis, osteomyelitis, dermatitis, empyemas and pneumonia; pathogens included Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Klebsiella, Escherichia, Proteus, Pseudomonas, Shigella and Salmonella spp. Overall, the Polish and Soviets reported success rates of 80-95% for phage therapy, with rare, reversible gastrointestinal or allergic side effects. However, efficacy of phage was determined almost exclusively by qualitative clinical assessment of patients, and details of dosages and clinical criteria were very sketchy. There were also six British reports describing controlled trials of phage in animal models (mice, guinea pigs and livestock), measuring survival rates and other objective criteria. All of the British studies raised phage against specific pathogens then used to create experimental infections. Demonstrable efficacy against Escherichia, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas and Staphylococcus spp. was noted in these model systems. Two U.S. papers dealt with improving the bioavailability of phage. Phage is sequestered in the spleen and removed from circulation. This can be overcome by serial passage of phage through mice to isolate mutants that resist sequestration. In conclusion, bacteriophages may show promise for treating antibiotic resistant pathogens. To facilitate further progress, directions for future research are discussed and a directory of authors from the reviewed

  1. Evidence of host-virus co-evolution in tetranucleotide usage patterns of bacteriophages and eukaryotic viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghose Chandrabali

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Virus taxonomy is based on morphologic characteristics, as there are no widely used non-phenotypic measures for comparison among virus families. We examined whether there is phylogenetic signal in virus nucleotide usage patterns that can be used to determine ancestral relationships. The well-studied model of tail morphology in bacteriophage classification was used for comparison with nucleotide usage patterns. Tetranucleotide usage deviation (TUD patterns were chosen since they have previously been shown to contain phylogenetic signal similar to that of 16S rRNA. Results We found that bacteriophages have unique TUD patterns, representing genomic signatures that are relatively conserved among those with similar host range. Analysis of TUD-based phylogeny indicates that host influences are important in bacteriophage evolution, and phylogenies containing both phages and their hosts support their co-evolution. TUD-based phylogeny of eukaryotic viruses indicates that they cluster largely based on nucleic acid type and genome size. Similarities between eukaryotic virus phylogenies based on TUD and gene content substantiate the TUD methodology. Conclusion Differences between phenotypic and TUD analysis may provide clues to virus ancestry not previously inferred. As such, TUD analysis provides a complementary approach to morphology-based systems in analysis of virus evolution.

  2. Identification of the N gene protein of bacteriophage lambda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The N gene protein, pN, of bacteriophage lambda stimulates early gene transcription by allowing mRNA chain elongation to proceed into genes distal to transcription termination sites normally recognized by the Escherichia coli transcription termination protein rho. pN has previously eluded detection on sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gels because of its small size, its instability, and the difficulty of distinguising pN itself both from host proteins and from other early lambda proteins whose synthesis depends on pN action. These problems have now been overcome and we find that the major form of pN present in crude cell extracts of infected cells has an apparent molecular weight of 13,500. Lambda bio256, a deletion-substitution mutant terminating in N, codes for a shorter pN of molecular weight 12,500. A nonsense fragment of 10,500 molecular weight coded by lambda N/sub am7/ has also been identified. These conclusions are based on examination of the electrophoretic profiles of the proteins synthesized after infection of UV-irradiated E. coli by various lambda N- temperature-sensitive, nonsense, and deletion-substitution mutants. It has also been possible to distinguish pN itself from other early lambda polypeptides by infecting ron- cells with either lambda N/sub mar/ phage allowing pN synthesis but not pN action or lambda N/sub am/ phage defective in pN synthesis and pN action. Our results together with previous data are discussed with respect to the possible existence of multiple molecular weight forms of pN and the location of the coding sequences in the N gene region

  3. Development of a T7 Phage Display Library to Detect Sarcoidosis and Tuberculosis by a Panel of Novel Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvinder Talwar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous inflammatory disease, diagnosed through tissue biopsy of involved organs in the absence of other causes such as tuberculosis (TB. No specific serologic test is available to diagnose and differentiate sarcoidosis from TB. Using a high throughput method, we developed a T7 phage display cDNA library derived from mRNA isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL cells and leukocytes of sarcoidosis patients. This complex cDNA library was biopanned to obtain 1152 potential sarcoidosis antigens and a microarray was constructed to immunoscreen two different sets of sera from healthy controls and sarcoidosis. Meta-analysis identified 259 discriminating sarcoidosis antigens, and multivariate analysis identified 32 antigens with a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 83% to classify sarcoidosis from healthy controls. Additionally, interrogating the same microarray platform with sera from subjects with TB, we identified 50 clones that distinguish between TB, sarcoidosis and healthy controls. The top 10 sarcoidosis and TB specific clones were sequenced and homologies were searched in the public database revealing unique epitopes and mimotopes in each group. Here, we show for the first time that immunoscreenings of a library derived from sarcoidosis tissue differentiates between sarcoidosis and tuberculosis antigens. These novel biomarkers can improve diagnosis of sarcoidosis and TB, and may aid to develop or evaluate a TB vaccine.

  4. Improved metagenome screening efficiency by random insertion of T7 promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu Jung; Kim, Haseong; Kim, Seo Hyeon; Rha, Eugene; Choi, Su-Lim; Yeom, Soo-Jin; Kim, Hak-Sung; Lee, Seung-Goo

    2016-07-20

    Metagenomes constitute a major source for the identification of novel enzymes for industrial applications. However, current functional screening methods are hindered by the limited transcription efficiency of foreign metagenomic genes. To overcome this constraint, we introduced the 'Enforced Transcription' technique, which involves the random insertion of the bi-directional T7 promoter into a metagenomic fosmid library. Then the effect of enforced transcription was quantitatively assessed by screening for metagenomic lipolytic genes encoding enzymes whose catalytic activity forms halos on tributyrin agar plates. The metagenomic library containing the enforced transcription system yielded a significantly increased number of screening hits with lipolytic activity compared to the library without random T7 promoter insertions. Additional sequence analysis revealed that the hits from the enforced transcription library had greater genetic diversity than those from the original metagenome library. Enhancing heterologous expression using the T7 promoter should enable the identification of greater numbers of diverse novel biocatalysts from the metagenome than possible using conventional metagenome screening approaches. PMID:27239964

  5. Planets and Stellar Activity: Hide and Seek in the CoRoT-7 system

    CERN Document Server

    Haywood, R D; Queloz, D; Barros, S C C; Deleuil, M; Fares, R; Gillon, M; Lanza, A F; Lovis, C; Moutou, C; Pepe, F; Pollacco, D; Santerne, A; Segransan, D; Unruh, Y C

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of the transiting super-Earth CoRoT-7b, several investigations have yielded different results for the number and masses of planets present in the system, mainly owing to the star's high level of activity. We re-observed CoRoT-7 in January 2012 with both HARPS and CoRoT, so that we now have the benefit of simultaneous radial-velocity and photometric data. This allows us to use the off-transit variations in the star's light curve to estimate the radial-velocity variations induced by the suppression of convective blueshift and the flux blocked by starspots. To account for activity-related effects in the radial-velocities which do not have a photometric signature, we also include an additional activity term in the radial-velocity model, which we treat as a Gaussian process with the same covariance properties (and hence the same frequency structure) as the light curve. Our model was incorporated into a Monte Carlo Markov Chain in order to make a precise determination of the orbits of CoRoT-7b a...

  6. pT7MT, a metallothionein 2A-tagged novel prokaryotic fusion expression vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marikar, Faiz M M T; Fang, Lei; Jiang, Shu-Han; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2007-05-01

    In the present article, a novel fusion expression vector for Escherichia coli was developed based on the pTORG plasmid, a derivative of pET32a. This vector, named pT7MT (GenBank Accession No DQ504436), carries a T7 promoter and it drives the downstream gene encoding Metallothionein 2A (MT2A). There are in-framed multiple cloning sites (MCS) downstream of the MT2A gene. A target gene can be cloned into the MCS and fused to the C-terminal of the MT2A gene in a compatible open reading frame (ORF) to achieve fusion expression. The metal-binding capability of MT2A allows the purification of fusion proteins by metal chelating affinity chromatogralhy, known as Ni2+-affinity chromatography. Using this expression vector, we successfully got the stable and high-yield expression of MT2A-GST and MT2A-Troponin I fusion proteins. These two proteins were easily purified from the supernatant of cell lysates by one-step Ni2+ -affinity chromatography. The final yields of MT2A-GST and MT2A-Troponin I were 30 mg/l and 28 mg/l in LB culture, respectively. Taken together, our data suggest that pT7MT can be applied as a useful expression vector for stable and high-yield production of fusion proteins. PMID:18051292

  7. The interactome of Streptococcus pneumoniae and its bacteriophages show highly specific patterns of interactions among bacteria and their phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariano, Rachelle; Wuchty, Stefan; Vizoso-Pinto, Maria G; Häuser, Roman; Uetz, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Although an abundance of bacteriophages exists, little is known about interactions between their proteins and those of their bacterial hosts. Here, we experimentally determined the phage-host interactomes of the phages Dp-1 and Cp-1 and their underlying protein interaction network in the host Streptococcus pneumoniae. We compared our results to the interaction patterns of E. coli phages lambda and T7. Dp-1 and Cp-1 target highly connected host proteins, occupy central network positions, and reach many protein clusters through the interactions of their targets. In turn, lambda and T7 targets cluster to conserved and essential proteins in E. coli, while such patterns were largely absent in S. pneumoniae. Furthermore, targets in E. coli were mutually strongly intertwined, while targets of Dp-1 and Cp-1 were strongly connected through essential and orthologous proteins in their immediate network vicinity. In both phage-host systems, the impact of phages on their protein targets appears to extend from their network neighbors, since proteins that interact with phage targets were located in central network positions, have a strong topologically disruptive effect and touch complexes with high functional heterogeneity. Such observations suggest that the phages, biological impact is accomplished through a surprisingly limited topological reach of their targets. PMID:27103053

  8. The interactome of Streptococcus pneumoniae and its bacteriophages show highly specific patterns of interactions among bacteria and their phages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariano, Rachelle; Wuchty, Stefan; Vizoso-Pinto, Maria G.; Häuser, Roman; Uetz, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Although an abundance of bacteriophages exists, little is known about interactions between their proteins and those of their bacterial hosts. Here, we experimentally determined the phage-host interactomes of the phages Dp-1 and Cp-1 and their underlying protein interaction network in the host Streptococcus pneumoniae. We compared our results to the interaction patterns of E. coli phages lambda and T7. Dp-1 and Cp-1 target highly connected host proteins, occupy central network positions, and reach many protein clusters through the interactions of their targets. In turn, lambda and T7 targets cluster to conserved and essential proteins in E. coli, while such patterns were largely absent in S. pneumoniae. Furthermore, targets in E. coli were mutually strongly intertwined, while targets of Dp-1 and Cp-1 were strongly connected through essential and orthologous proteins in their immediate network vicinity. In both phage-host systems, the impact of phages on their protein targets appears to extend from their network neighbors, since proteins that interact with phage targets were located in central network positions, have a strong topologically disruptive effect and touch complexes with high functional heterogeneity. Such observations suggest that the phages, biological impact is accomplished through a surprisingly limited topological reach of their targets. PMID:27103053

  9. Experimental evolution of a bacteriophage virus reveals the trajectory of adaptation across a fecundity/longevity trade-off.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard H Heineman

    Full Text Available Life history theory attempts to account for how organisms lead their lives, balancing the conflicting demands of reproduction and survival. Here, we track the genomic and phenotypic evolution of the bacteriophage virus T7 across a postulated fecundity/longevity constraint. We adapted T7 to a challenging survival environment (6M urea. Our evolved strain displayed a significant improvement in propagule survival, coupled with a significant loss of fecundity (reduced growth rate on host cells. However, the increased resistance to urea did not generalise to increased resistance against temperature stress, highlighting that propagule durability is environment dependent. Previous comparative studies predicted that changes in propagule resistance would be mediated by changes in capsid proteins or gene deletions. In contrast, we found that point mutations in internal core protein genes (6.7 and 16 were responsible for the increased urea resistance of our evolved strain. Prior to the emergence of the 6.7 and 16 mutations, a distinct set of 5-point mutations peaked at over 20% prevalence before attenuating, suggestive of negative epistatic interactions during adaptation. Our results illustrate that parasites can adapt to specific transmission environments, and that this adaptation can impose costs on the subsequent ability to exploit host cells, potentially constraining durable parasites to lower virulence.

  10. Recombination of bacteriophage phiX174 by the red function of bacteriophage lambda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recombination of bacteriophage phiX174 was effectively promoted when the Red function of lambda was supplied by either co-infection with lambda or induction of lambda lysogens. Mutations in redα and redβ genes of lambda abolished recombination nearly completely, whereas a mutation in gam gene reduced it only slightly. The Red-promoted recombination of phiX174 occurred in recA, recB, and polA mutants as well as in wild-type strains of Escherichia coli. It was further stimulated when phiX174 mutants were irradiated with uv light before infection

  11. Assessment of the Effects of Various UV Sources on Inactivation and Photoproduct Induction in Phage T7 Dosimeter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fekete, A.; Vink, A.A.; Gaspar, S.; Berces, A.; Modos, K.; Ronto, Gy.; Roza, L.

    1998-01-01

    The correlation between the biologically effective dose (BED) of a phage T7 biological dosimeter and the induction of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and (6-4) photoproducts ((6-4)PD) in the phage DNA was determined using seven various UV sources. The BED is the inactivation rate of phage T7 exp

  12. 40 CFR 180.1261 - Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. 180.1261 Section 180.1261 Protection of.... vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. An exemption from the requirement of... syringae pv. tomato specific bacteriophages in or on pepper and tomato....

  13. Bacteriophage Infection of Model Metal Reducing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, K. A.; Bender, K. S.; Gandhi, K.; Coates, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    Microbially-mediated metal reduction plays a significant role controlling contaminant mobility in aqueous, soil, and sedimentary environments. From among environmentally relevant microorganisms mediating metal reduction, Geobacter spp. have been identified as predominant metal-reducing bacteria under acetate- oxidizing conditions. Due to the significance of these bacteria in environmental systems, it is necessary to understand factors influencing their metabolic physiology. Examination of the annotated finished genome sequence of G. sulfurreducens PCA, G. uraniumreducens Rf4, G. metallireduceans GS-15 as well as a draft genome sequence of Geobacter sp. FRC-32 have identified gene sequences of putative bacteriophage origin. Presence of these sequences indicates that these bacteria are susceptible to phage infection. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer sets designed tested for the presence of 12 of 25 annotated phage-like sequences in G. sulfurreducens PCA and 9 of 17 phage-like sequences in FRC- 32. The following genes were successfully amplified in G. sulfurreducens PCA: prophage type transcription regulator, phage-induced endonuclease, phage tail sheath, 2 phage tail proteins, phage protein D, phage base plate protein, phage-related DNA polymerase, integrase, phage transcriptional regulator, and Cro-like transcription regulator. Nine of the following sequences were present in FRC-32: 4 separate phage- related proteins, phage-related tail component, viron core protein, phage Mu protein, phage base plate, and phage tail sheath. In addition to the bioinformatics evidence, incubation of G. sulfurreducens PCA with 1 μg mL-1 mytomycin C (mutagen stimulating prophage induction) during mid-log phase resulted in significant cell lysis relative to cultures that remained unamended. Cell lysis was concurrent with an increase in viral like particles enumerated using epifluorescent microscopy. In addition, samples collected following this lytic event (~44hours) were

  14. Alternative bacteriophage life cycles: the carrier state of Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siringan, Patcharin; Connerton, Phillippa L; Cummings, Nicola J; Connerton, Ian F

    2014-01-01

    Members of the genus Campylobacter are frequently responsible for human enteric disease, often through consumption of contaminated poultry products. Bacteriophages are viruses that have the potential to control pathogenic bacteria, but understanding their complex life cycles is key to their successful exploitation. Treatment of Campylobacter jejuni biofilms with bacteriophages led to the discovery that phages had established a relationship with their hosts typical of the carrier state life cycle (CSLC), where bacteria and bacteriophages remain associated in equilibrium. Significant phenotypic changes include improved aerotolerance under nutrient-limited conditions that would confer an advantage to survive in extra-intestinal environments, but a lack in motility eliminated their ability to colonize chickens. Under these circumstances, phages can remain associated with a compatible host and continue to produce free virions to prospect for new hosts. Moreover, we demonstrate that CSLC host bacteria can act as expendable vehicles for the delivery of bacteriophages to new host bacteria within pre-colonized chickens. The CSLC represents an important phase in the ecology of Campylobacter bacteriophage. PMID:24671947

  15. A Novel Three-Colour Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization Approach for the Detection of t(7;12)(q36;p13) in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia Reveals New Cryptic Three Way Translocation t(7;12;16)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naiel, Abdulbasit [Leukaemia and Chromosome Research Laboratory, Division of Biosciences, Brunel University, London, Middlesex UB8 3PH (United Kingdom); Vetter, Michael [MetaSystems, Altlussheim 68804 (Germany); Plekhanova, Olga [Regional Children’s Hospital N 1, Ekaterinburg 620149 (Russian Federation); Fleischman, Elena; Sokova, Olga [N.N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center Russian Academy of Medical Science, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation); Tsaur, Grigory [Regional Children’s Hospital N 1, Ekaterinburg 620149 (Russian Federation); Research Institute of Medical Cell Technologies, Ekaterinburg 620149 (Russian Federation); Harbott, Jochen [Oncogenetic Laboratory, Department of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology, Justus Liebig University, Giessen 35392 (Germany); Tosi, Sabrina, E-mail: sabrina.tosi@brunel.ac.uk [Leukaemia and Chromosome Research Laboratory, Division of Biosciences, Brunel University, London, Middlesex UB8 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2013-03-11

    The t(7;12)(q36;p13) translocation is a recurrent chromosome abnormality that involves the ETV6 gene on chromosome 12 and has been identified in 20–30% of infant patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). The detection of t(7;12) rearrangements relies on the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) because this translocation is hardly visible by chromosome banding methods. Furthermore, a fusion transcript HLXB9-ETV6 is found in approximately 50% of t(7;12) cases, making the reverse transcription PCR approach not an ideal screening method. Considering the report of few cases of variant translocations harbouring a cryptic t(7;12) rearrangement, we believe that the actual incidence of this abnormality is higher than reported to date. The clinical outcome of t(7;12) patients is believed to be poor, therefore an early and accurate diagnosis is important in the clinical management and treatment. In this study, we have designed and tested a novel three-colour FISH approach that enabled us not only to confirm the presence of the t(7;12) in a number of patients studied previously, but also to identify a cryptic t(7;12) as part of a complex rearrangement. This new approach has proven to be an efficient and reliable method to be used in the diagnostic setting.

  16. A Novel Three-Colour Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization Approach for the Detection of t(7;12)(q36;p13) in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia Reveals New Cryptic Three Way Translocation t(7;12;16)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The t(7;12)(q36;p13) translocation is a recurrent chromosome abnormality that involves the ETV6 gene on chromosome 12 and has been identified in 20–30% of infant patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). The detection of t(7;12) rearrangements relies on the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) because this translocation is hardly visible by chromosome banding methods. Furthermore, a fusion transcript HLXB9-ETV6 is found in approximately 50% of t(7;12) cases, making the reverse transcription PCR approach not an ideal screening method. Considering the report of few cases of variant translocations harbouring a cryptic t(7;12) rearrangement, we believe that the actual incidence of this abnormality is higher than reported to date. The clinical outcome of t(7;12) patients is believed to be poor, therefore an early and accurate diagnosis is important in the clinical management and treatment. In this study, we have designed and tested a novel three-colour FISH approach that enabled us not only to confirm the presence of the t(7;12) in a number of patients studied previously, but also to identify a cryptic t(7;12) as part of a complex rearrangement. This new approach has proven to be an efficient and reliable method to be used in the diagnostic setting

  17. The DNA ejection process in bacteriophage lambda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, Paul

    Bacteriophages have long served as model systems through which the nature of life may be explored. From a physical or mechanical point of view, phages are excellent examples of natural nanotechnology: they are nanometer-scale systems which depend critically on forces, pressures, velocities, and other fundamentally physical quantities for their biological functions. The study of the physical properties of phages has therefore provided an arena for application of physics to biology. In particular, recent studies of the motor responsible for packaging a phage gnome into a capsid showed a buildup of pressure within the capsid of tens of atmospheres. This thesis reports a combined theoretical and experimental study on various aspects of the genome ejection process, so that a comparison may be drawn with the packaging experiments. In particular, we examine various theoretical models of the forces within a phage capsid, deriving formulas both for the force driving genome ejection and for the velocity at which the genome is translocated into a host cell. We describe an experiment in which the force was measured as a function of the amount of genome within the phage capsid, and another where the genome ejection velocity was measured for single phages under the microscope. We make direct quantitative comparisons between the theory and experiments, stringently testing the extent to which we are able to model the genome ejection process.

  18. Evolution of plant phage-type RNA polymerases: the genome of the basal angiosperm Nuphar advena encodes two mitochondrial and one plastid phage-type RNA polymerases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Börner Thomas

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In mono- and eudicotyledonous plants, a small nuclear gene family (RpoT, RNA polymerase of the T3/T7 type encodes mitochondrial as well as chloroplast RNA polymerases homologous to the T-odd bacteriophage enzymes. RpoT genes from angiosperms are well characterized, whereas data from deeper branching plant species are limited to the moss Physcomitrella and the spikemoss Selaginella. To further elucidate the molecular evolution of the RpoT polymerases in the plant kingdom and to get more insight into the potential importance of having more than one phage-type RNA polymerase (RNAP available, we searched for the respective genes in the basal angiosperm Nuphar advena. Results By screening a set of BAC library filters, three RpoT genes were identified. Both genomic gene sequences and full-length cDNAs were determined. The NaRpoT mRNAs specify putative polypeptides of 996, 990 and 985 amino acids, respectively. All three genes comprise 19 exons and 18 introns, conserved in their positions with those known from RpoT genes of other land plants. The encoded proteins show a high degree of conservation at the amino acid sequence level, including all functional crucial regions and residues known from the phage T7 RNAP. The N-terminal transit peptides of two of the encoded polymerases, NaRpoTm1 and NaRpoTm2, conferred targeting of green fluorescent protein (GFP exclusively to mitochondria, whereas the third polymerase, NaRpoTp, was targeted to chloroplasts. Remarkably, translation of NaRpoTp mRNA has to be initiated at a CUG codon to generate a functional plastid transit peptide. Thus, besides AGAMOUS in Arabidopsis and the Nicotiana RpoTp gene, N. advena RpoTp provides another example for a plant mRNA that is exclusively translated from a non-AUG codon. In contrast to the RpoT of the lycophyte Selaginella and those of the moss Physcomitrella, which are according to phylogenetic analyses in sister positions to all other phage

  19. Bacteriophages as potential treatment option for antibiotic resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Robert; van der Westhuizen, Wouter; Lee, Ji-Yun; Coetsee, Elke; Boucher, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    The world is facing an ever-increasing problem with antibiotic resistant bacteria and we are rapidly heading for a post-antibiotic era. There is an urgent need to investigate alterative treatment options while there are still a few antibiotics left. Bacteriophages are viruses that specifically target bacteria. Before the development of antibiotics, some efforts were made to use bacteriophages as a treatment option, but most of this research stopped soon after the discovery of antibiotics. There are two different replication options which bacteriophages employ. These are the lytic and lysogenic life cycles. Both these life cycles have potential as treatment options. There are various advantages and disadvantages to the use of bacteriophages as treatment options. The main advantage is the specificity of bacteriophages and treatments can be designed to specifically target pathogenic bacteria while not negatively affecting the normal microbiota. There are various advantages to this. However, the high level of specificity also creates potential problems, the main being the requirement of highly specific diagnostic procedures. Another potential problem with phage therapy includes the development of immunity and limitations with the registration of phage therapy options. The latter is driving research toward the expression of phage genes which break the bacterial cell wall, which could then be used as a treatment option. Various aspects of phage therapy have been investigated in studies undertaken by our research group. We have investigated specificity of phages to various avian pathogenic E. coli isolates. Furthermore, the exciting NanoSAM technology has been employed to investigate bacteriophage replication and aspects of this will be discussed. PMID:24619620

  20. Bacteriophages of Soft Rot Enterobacteriaceae-a minireview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajkowski, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Soft rot Enterobacteriaceae (Pectobacterium spp. and Dickeya spp., formerly pectinolytic Erwinia spp.) are ubiquitous necrotrophic bacterial pathogens that infect a large number of different plant species worldwide, including economically important crops. Despite the fact that these bacteria have been studied for more than 50 years, little is known of their corresponding predators: bacteriophages, both lytic and lysogenic. The aim of this minireview is to critically summarize recent ecological, biological and molecular research on bacteriophages infecting Pectobacterium spp. and Dickeya spp. with the main focus on current and future perspectives in that field. PMID:26626879

  1. Complete genome sequence of Croceibacter bacteriophage P2559S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ilnam; Kang, Dongmin; Cho, Jang-Cheon

    2012-08-01

    Croceibacter atlanticus HTCC2559(T), a marine bacterium isolated from the Sargasso Sea, is a phylogenetically unique member of the family Flavobacteriaceae. Strain HTCC2559(T) possesses genes related to interaction with primary producers, which makes studies on bacteriophages infecting the strain interesting. Here we report the genome sequence of bacteriophage P2559S, which was isolated off the coast of the Republic of Korea and lytically infects HTCC2559(T). Many genes predicted in the P2559S genome had their homologs in Bacteroides phages. PMID:22843867

  2. Genetically engineered acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria by bacteriophage transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, T.E.; Bruhn, D.F.; Bulmer, D.F.

    1989-05-10

    A bacteriophage capable of infecting acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria and processes for genetically engineering acidophilic bacteria for biomining or sulfur removal from coal are disclosed. The bacteriophage is capable of growth in cells existing at pH at or below 3.0. Lytic forms of the phage introduced into areas experiencing acid drainage kill the bacteria causing such drainage. Lysogenic forms of the phage having genes for selective removal of metallic or nonmetallic elements can be introduced into acidophilic bacteria to effect removal of the desired element from ore or coal. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Mechanism of bacteriophage conversion of lipase activity in Staphylococcus aureus.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, C Y; Iandolo, J J

    1985-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus PS54 harbors two temperate bacteriophages and manifests no lipase activity on egg yolk agar. Curing of one of the resident prophages (L54a) restores lipase activity. To study the mechanism of bacteriophage conversion, the prophage was cured, and the gene encoding lipase activity was cloned into pBR322 in Escherichia coli on a 2.9-kilobase DNA fragment of the chromosome. The fragment was subcloned into a shuttle vector and subsequently transformed into S. aureus and Bacil...

  4. The Roles of Tidal Evolution and Evaporative Mass Loss in the Origin of CoRoT-7 b

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Brian; Miller, Neil; Barnes, Rory; Raymond, Sean N.; Fortney, Jonathan; Greenberg, Richard

    2010-01-01

    CoRoT-7 b is the first confirmed rocky exoplanet, but, with an orbital semi-major axis of 0.0172 AU, its origins may be unlike any rocky planet in our solar system. In this study, we consider the roles of tidal evolution and evaporative mass loss in CoRoT-7 b's history, which together have modified the planet's mass and orbit. If CoRoT-7 b has always been a rocky body, evaporation may have driven off almost half its original mass, but the mass loss may depend sensitively on the extent of tida...

  5. Novel bacteriophages containing a genome of another bacteriophage within their genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maud M Swanson

    Full Text Available A novel bacteriophage infecting Staphylococus pasteuri was isolated during a screen for phages in Antarctic soils. The phage named SpaA1 is morphologically similar to phages of the family Siphoviridae. The 42,784 bp genome of SpaA1 is a linear, double-stranded DNA molecule with 3' protruding cohesive ends. The SpaA1 genome encompasses 63 predicted protein-coding genes which cluster within three regions of the genome, each of apparently different origin, in a mosaic pattern. In two of these regions, the gene sets resemble those in prophages of Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki str. T03a001 (genes involved in DNA replication/transcription, cell entry and exit and B. cereus AH676 (additional regulatory and recombination genes, respectively. The third region represents an almost complete genome (except for the short terminal segments of a distinct bacteriophage, MZTP02. Nearly the same gene module was identified in prophages of B. thuringiensis serovar monterrey BGSC 4AJ1 and B. cereus Rock4-2. These findings suggest that MZTP02 can be shuttled between genomes of other bacteriophages and prophages, leading to the formation of chimeric genomes. The presence of a complete phage genome in the genome of other phages apparently has not been described previously and might represent a 'fast track' route of virus evolution and horizontal gene transfer. Another phage (BceA1 nearly identical in sequence to SpaA1, and also including the almost complete MZTP02 genome within its own genome, was isolated from a bacterium of the B. cereus/B. thuringiensis group. Remarkably, both SpaA1 and BceA1 phages can infect B. cereus and B. thuringiensis, but only one of them, SpaA1, can infect S. pasteuri. This finding is best compatible with a scenario in which MZTP02 was originally contained in BceA1 infecting Bacillus spp, the common hosts for these two phages, followed by emergence of SpaA1 infecting S. pasteuri.

  6. The protein interaction map of bacteriophage lambda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uetz Peter

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteriophage lambda is a model phage for most other dsDNA phages and has been studied for over 60 years. Although it is probably the best-characterized phage there are still about 20 poorly understood open reading frames in its 48-kb genome. For a complete understanding we need to know all interactions among its proteins. We have manually curated the lambda literature and compiled a total of 33 interactions that have been found among lambda proteins. We set out to find out how many protein-protein interactions remain to be found in this phage. Results In order to map lambda's interactions, we have cloned 68 out of 73 lambda open reading frames (the "ORFeome" into Gateway vectors and systematically tested all proteins for interactions using exhaustive array-based yeast two-hybrid screens. These screens identified 97 interactions. We found 16 out of 30 previously published interactions (53%. We have also found at least 18 new plausible interactions among functionally related proteins. All previously found and new interactions are combined into structural and network models of phage lambda. Conclusions Phage lambda serves as a benchmark for future studies of protein interactions among phage, viruses in general, or large protein assemblies. We conclude that we could not find all the known interactions because they require chaperones, post-translational modifications, or multiple proteins for their interactions. The lambda protein network connects 12 proteins of unknown function with well characterized proteins, which should shed light on the functional associations of these uncharacterized proteins.

  7. Combined use of Bacteriophage K and a novel Bacteriophage to reduce Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alves, DR; Gaudion, A.; Bean, JE;

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are major causes of impairment of wound healing and patient morbidity. One of the most common and aggressive wound pathogens is Staphylococcus aureus, displaying a large repertoire of virulence factors and commonly reduced susceptibility to antibiotics, such as the spread of methicillin-......-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Bacteriophages are obligate parasites of bacteria. They multiply intracellularly and lyse their bacterial host, releasing their progeny. We isolated a novel phage, DRA88, which has a ......Biofilms are major causes of impairment of wound healing and patient morbidity. One of the most common and aggressive wound pathogens is Staphylococcus aureus, displaying a large repertoire of virulence factors and commonly reduced susceptibility to antibiotics, such as the spread of methicillin...

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis Bacteriophage Smudge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Jessica L.; Breslin, Eileen; Schuhmacher, Zachary; Himelright, Madison; Berluti, Cassandra; Boyd, Charles; Carson, Rachel; Del Gallo, Elle; Giessler, Caris; Gilliam, Benjamin; Heatherly, Catherine; Nevin, Julius; Nguyen, Bryan; Nguyen, Justin; Parada, Jocelyn; Sutterfield, Blake; Tukruni, Muruj

    2016-01-01

    Smudge, a bacteriophage enriched from soil using Bacillus thuringiensis DSM-350 as the host, had its complete genome sequenced. Smudge is a myovirus with a genome consisting of 292 genes and was identified as belonging to the C1 cluster of Bacillus phages. PMID:27540049

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis Bacteriophage Smudge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Jessica L; Breslin, Eileen; Schuhmacher, Zachary; Himelright, Madison; Berluti, Cassandra; Boyd, Charles; Carson, Rachel; Del Gallo, Elle; Giessler, Caris; Gilliam, Benjamin; Heatherly, Catherine; Nevin, Julius; Nguyen, Bryan; Nguyen, Justin; Parada, Jocelyn; Sutterfield, Blake; Tukruni, Muruj; Temple, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Smudge, a bacteriophage enriched from soil using Bacillus thuringiensis DSM-350 as the host, had its complete genome sequenced. Smudge is a myovirus with a genome consisting of 292 genes and was identified as belonging to the C1 cluster of Bacillus phages. PMID:27540049

  10. Bacteriophage for prophylaxis and therapy in cattle, poultry, and pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The successful use of virulent (lytic) bacteriophages (phages) in preventing and treating neonatal enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infections in calves, lambs and pigs has prompted investigation of other applications phage therapy in food animals. While results have been very variable, some indica...

  11. Small catalytic RNA: Structure, function and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monforte, J.A.

    1991-04-01

    We have utilized a combination of photochemical cross-linking techniques and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain secondary and tertiary structure information for the self-cleaving, self-ligating subsequence of RNA from the negative strand of Satellite Tobacco Ringspot Virus. We have found that the helical regions fold about a hinge to promoting four different possible tertiary interactions, creating a molecular of similar shape to a paperclip. A model suggesting that the paperclip'' and hammerhead'' RNAs share a similar three dimensional structure is proposed. We have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids, a hammerhead,'' to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by RNA polymerase. We have used this method to determine the length of RNA sequestered within elongating E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase complexes. The data show that for E. coli RNA polymerase 12{plus minus}1 nucleotides are sequestered within the ternary complex, which is consistent with the presence of an RNA-DNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The result for T7 RNA polymerase differs from E. coli RNA polymerase, with only 10{plus minus}1 nucleotides sequestered within the ternary complex, setting a new upper limit for the minimum RNA-DNA required for a stable elongating complex. Comparisons between E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase are made. The relevance of the results to models or transcription termination, abortive initiation, and initiation to elongation mode transitions are discussed.

  12. Small catalytic RNA: Structure, function and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monforte, J.A.

    1991-04-01

    We have utilized a combination of photochemical cross-linking techniques and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain secondary and tertiary structure information for the self-cleaving, self-ligating subsequence of RNA from the negative strand of Satellite Tobacco Ringspot Virus. We have found that the helical regions fold about a hinge to promoting four different possible tertiary interactions, creating a molecular of similar shape to a paperclip. A model suggesting that the ``paperclip`` and ``hammerhead`` RNAs share a similar three dimensional structure is proposed. We have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids, a ``hammerhead,`` to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by RNA polymerase. We have used this method to determine the length of RNA sequestered within elongating E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase complexes. The data show that for E. coli RNA polymerase 12{plus_minus}1 nucleotides are sequestered within the ternary complex, which is consistent with the presence of an RNA-DNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The result for T7 RNA polymerase differs from E. coli RNA polymerase, with only 10{plus_minus}1 nucleotides sequestered within the ternary complex, setting a new upper limit for the minimum RNA-DNA required for a stable elongating complex. Comparisons between E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase are made. The relevance of the results to models or transcription termination, abortive initiation, and initiation to elongation mode transitions are discussed.

  13. Effect of environmental materials on R7T7 nuclear waste glass alteration. Clay effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alteration of R7T7 glass was investigated in contact with different environmental materials, with a special focus on clay effect. In a first part, experiments were conducted at 900C with eleven material including smectites, bentonites, illites, granic and sand. Kinetics studies, lasting up to 364 days, were performed on four selected materials. These studies were completed by several integral experiments simulating a geological repository. Almost all the selected clay appeared to enhance glass corrosion. The main role of clay seems to prevent or delay obtainment of saturation condition in which glass corrosion is extremely reduced. The duration of this clay effect seems directly related to the clay mass to glass surface ratio. However, an actived bentonite was found not to enhance glass corrosion, and let the way open for a backfilling without any detrimental effect on glass

  14. High density growth of T7 expression strains with auto-induction option

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studier, F. William

    2010-07-20

    A bacterial growth medium for promoting auto-induction of transcription of cloned DNA in cultures of bacterial cells grown batchwise is disclosed. The transcription is under the control of a lac repressor. Also disclosed is a bacterial growth medium for improving the production of a selenomethionine-containing protein or polypeptide in a bacterial cell, the protein or polypeptide being produced by recombinant DNA techniques from a lac or T7lac promoter, the bacterial cell encoding a vitamin B12-dependent homocysteine methylase. Finally, disclosed is a bacterial growth medium for suppressing auto-induction of expression in cultures of bacterial cells grown batchwise, said transcription being under the control of lac repressor.

  15. 火爆的身材 iRiver T7 Volcano

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    拥有简约USB直推式设计的T7 Volcano是iRiver一次大胆而前卫的尝试。84.0×26.0×11.0 mm、26.3g重的Volcano虽身材修长但却还是配备了1寸蓝色OLED液晶屏。它还包含了音乐/FM收音机/录音三项实用功能,内置锂电池可播放长达11小时的音乐,目前它拥有黑、白、粉、天蓝、巧克力五种颜色和1GB、2GB和4GB多种选择。

  16. Physical State of the Deep Interior of the CoRoT-7b Exoplanet

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, F W; Rückriemen, T; Rauer, H

    2011-01-01

    The present study takes the CoRoT-7b exoplanet as an analogue for massive terrestrial planets to investigate conditions, under which intrinsic magnetic fields could be sustained in liquid cores. We examine the effect of depth-dependent transport parameters (e.g., activation volume of mantle rock) on a planet's thermal structure and the related heat flux across the core mantle boundary. For terrestrial planets more massive than the Earth, our calculations suggest that a substantial part of the lowermost mantle is in a sluggish convective regime, primarily due to pressure effects on viscosity. Hence, we find substantially higher core temperatures than previously reported from parameterized convection models. We also discuss the effect of melting point depression in the presence of impurities (e.g., sulfur) in iron-rich cores and compare corresponding melting relations to the calculated thermal structure. Since impurity effects become less important at the elevated pressure and temperature conditions prevalent i...

  17. R7T7 glass alteration in the presence of mortar: effect of the cement grade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R7T7 glass alteration was investigated in the presence of four mortars prepared from four different cement grades: 'CPA' Portland cement (mortar M1), CPA with pozzolana additive (M2), CPA with amorphous silica additive (M3) and 'CLK' blast furnace slag cement (M4). Glass specimens were also altered in Volvic mineral water and in a cement effluent. Glass corrosion in the cement media was greater than in Volvic water, but well below what could be expected from the high pH (approx 12.5). The relatively low alteration was probably related to the protective action of the calcium-enriched gel layer that formed at the glass surface. The glass corrosion rate was 2 to 3 times lower with cement containing pozzolana or silica gel additives or with CLK cement than with CPA cement alone. 8 refs., 8 figs

  18. Assessment of radionuclides confinement for R7T7 and AVM French nuclear glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: The long term performance of nuclear waste glasses is usually evaluated with conservative assumptions through operational models, considering a basic model for the description of the chemical durability of glasses in contact with water. This contribution presents an approach towards an operational modeling of the glass source term taking into account the behavior of the radionuclides during the matrix alteration. The objective is to be able to evaluate the radioactivity (or radiotoxicity) released from the glass with different possible scenarios, in order to reduce the margins with regard to real performances. An approach including at the same time the decrease of the waste package temperature variations and the effect of the radioactive decay is applied for the R7T7 and AVM nuclear waste glasses which represent most important high level waste in France. Although the operational model used for AVM glasses (V0S) is very penalizing (alteration with the maximum alteration rate V0), their lower estimated chemical durability compared to the R7T7 glasses (for which a decrease of the alteration rate is taken into account through a V0 → Vr model) is partly compensated by their lower radiotoxicity. Thus, their potential released radiotoxicity during aqueous alteration has a similar behavior versus time in both cases. The compilation of numerous experimental studies found in the literature concerning the leaching of nuclear glasses is used to estimate more precisely the potential released radiotoxicity with the benefit of the radionuclides retention in the glass alteration products (gel and secondary crystalline phases). These results emphasize all the importance of reasoning in term of radiotoxicity to provide a more realistic matrix containment performance and interest to develop an operational model which would integrate both the retention of the whole radionuclides and the environment influence. (authors)

  19. Study of R7T7 nuclear waste glass alteration in silico-phosphatic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is a contribution to the study of the alteration process of the R7T7 nuclear waste glass. Two research themes have been developed: 1)a study of the alteration of the R7T7 glass in different silico-phosphatic media 2)a follow-up of the retention of some toxic elements on materials formulated during this work. The alteration tests have been carried out with different S/V ratios. Phosphorus seems to have no positive effect on the alteration of glass. Indeed, when phosphate and/or silica is/are present, the dissolution kinetics is always superior to those observed in pure water. On the other hand, in order to continually follow the dissolution kinetics, a new method coupling a leaching cell and an ICP-MS analysis device has been developed. It has then been possible to show a retention of some toxic elements (La, Ce, Nd) during the first steps of the alteration. Concerning the second theme of research, materials which have been chosen are zeolites and apatites because of their affinities with some polluting elements (cesium, lanthanides). These mineral phases have been elaborated from the alteration of glassy matrices in conditions supposed to be those of a storage (temperature..). The obtained results show that zeolites or apatites are developing at the surface of the glassy matrices. Cs, La and Sr have been simultaneously incorporated during the mineral phases growth. The analyses show an important decrease of the concentrations of these elements in the solution. The study of the solid fraction reveals the presence of lanthanum, strontium and cesium in crystals. (O.M.)

  20. Selection and design of high affinity DNA ligands for mutant single-chain derivatives of the bacteriophage 434 repressor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG; Tiebing

    2001-01-01

    ., 1996, 255: 373-386.[13]Kim, J. -S., Pabo, C. O., Getting a handhold on DNA: design of poly-zinc finger proteins with femtomolar dissociation constants, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 1998, 95: 2812-2817.[14]Wu, H., Yang, W. -P., BarbasIII, C. F., Building zinc fingers by selection: toward a therapeutic application, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 1995, 92: 344-348.[15]Wang, B. S., Pabo, C. O., Dimerization of zinc fingers mediated by peptides evolved in vitro from random sequences, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 1999, 96: 9568-9573.[16]Choo, Y., Sánchez-García, I., Klug, A., In vivo repression by a site-specific DNA-binding protein designed against an on-cogenic sequence, Nature, 1994, 372: 642-645.[17]Wolfe, S. A., Greisman, H. A., Ramm, E. I. et al., Analysis of zinc fingers optimized via phage display: evaluating the utility of a recognition code, J. Mol. Biol., 1999, 285: 1917-1934.[18]Chen, J. -Q., Pongor, S., Simoncsits, A., Recognition of DNA by single-chain derivatives of the phage 434 repressor: high affinity binding depends on both the contacted and non-contacted base pairs, Nucleic Acids Research, 1997, 25: 2047-2054.[19]Simoncsits, A., Tj?rnhammar, M. -L., Wang, S. -L. et al., Isolation of altered specificity mutants of the single-chain 434 repressor that recognize asymmetric DNA sequences containing the TTAA and TTAC subsites, Nucleic Acids Research, 1999, 27: 3474-3480.[20]Zhou, Y. -H., Busby, S., Ebright, R. H., Identification of the functional subunit of a dimeric transcription activator protein by use of oriented heterodimers, Cell, 1993, 73: 375-379.[21]Studier, F. W., Rosenberg, A. H., Dunn, J. J. et al., Use of T7 RNA polymerase to direct expression of cloned genes, Methods Enzymol., 1990, 185: 60-89.[22]Simoncsits, A., Bristulf, J., Tj?rnhammar, M. -L. et al., Deletion mutants of human interleukin 1? with significantly re-duced agonist properties: search for agonist/ antagonist switch in ligands to the interleukin 1

  1. Prevalence of Broad-Host-Range Lytic Bacteriophages of Sphaerotilus natans, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Ellen C.; Schrader, Holly S.; Rieland, Brenda; Thompson, Thomas L.; Lee, Kit W.; Nickerson, Kenneth W.; Kokjohn, Tyler A.

    1998-01-01

    Two bacteriophage collections were examined with regard to their ability to form plaques on multiple bacterial host species. Nine of 10 phages studied were found to be broad-host-range bacteriophages. These phages fell into two groups. Group 1, the SN series, was isolated from sewage treatment plant samples with Sphaerotilus natans ATCC 13338 as a host. The DNAs of these bacteriophages contained modified bases and were insensitive to cleavage by type I and II restriction endonucleases. The ef...

  2. The gene for type A streptococcal exotoxin (erythrogenic toxin) is located in bacteriophage T12.

    OpenAIRE

    Weeks, C R; Ferretti, J J

    1984-01-01

    The infection of Streptococcus pyogenes T25(3) with the temperate bacteriophage T12 results in the conversion of the nontoxigenic strain to type A streptococcal exotoxin (erythrogenic toxin) production. Although previous research has established that integration of the bacteriophage genome into the host chromosome is not essential for exotoxin production, the location of the gene on the bacteriophage or bacterial chromosome had not been determined. In the present investigation, recombinant DN...

  3. Simultaneous loss of bacteriophage receptor and coaggregation mediator activities in Actinomyces viscosus MG-1.

    OpenAIRE

    Tylenda, C A; Enriquez, E.; Kolenbrander, P. E.; Delisle, A L

    1985-01-01

    Actinomyces bacteriophages were used as tools to study coaggregation between actinomyces and streptococci. Four bacteriophage isolates, phages AV-1, AV-2, AV-3, and 1281, bound to coaggregation group A Actinomyces viscosus and to group E A. naeslundii. No binding to groups B, C, D, or F was observed. Only A. viscosus MG-1 was capable of supporting a productive infection by these phages. Spontaneously occurring bacteriophage-resistant mutants of A. viscosus MG-1 were isolated and were shown to...

  4. Template reporter bacteriophage platform and multiple bacterial detection assays based thereon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodridge, Lawrence (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The invention is a method for the development of assays for the simultaneous detection of multiple bacteria. A bacteria of interest is selected. A host bacteria containing plasmid DNA from a T even bacteriophage that infects the bacteria of interest is infected with T4 reporter bacteriophage. After infection, the progeny bacteriophage are plating onto the bacteria of interest. The invention also includes single-tube, fast and sensitive assays which utilize the novel method.

  5. Subunit Folds and Maturation Pathway of a dsRNA Virus Capsid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němeček, D.; Bouřa, Evžen; Wu, W.; Cheng, N.; Plevka, P.; Qiao, J.; Mindich, L.; Heymann, J. B.; Hurley, J. H.; Steven, A. C.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 8 (2013), s. 1374-1383. ISSN 0969-2126 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : RNA bacteriophage phi-6 * minus-strand synthesis * cryoelectron microscopy * angstrom resolution * atomic-structure Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 6.794, year: 2013

  6. Methods for generation of reporter phages and immobilization of active bacteriophages on a polymer surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applegate, Bruce Michael (Inventor); Perry, Lynda Louise (Inventor); Morgan, Mark Thomas (Inventor); Kothapalli, Aparna (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Novel reporter bacteriophages are provided. Provided are compositions and methods that allow bacteriophages that are used for specific detection or killing of E. coli 0157:H7 to be propagated in nonpathogenic E. coli, thereby eliminating the safety and security risks of propagation in E. coli 0157:H7. Provided are compositions and methods for attaching active bacteriophages to the surface of a polymer in order to kill target bacteria with which the phage comes into contact. Provided are modified bacteriophages immobilized to a surface, which capture E. coli 0157:H7 and cause the captured cells to emit light or fluorescence, allowing detection of the bacteria in a sample.

  7. Report of the Snowmass T7 working group on high performance computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Ko; R. Ryne; P. Spentzouris

    2002-12-05

    The T7 Working Group on High Performance Computing (HPC) had more than 30 participants. During the three weeks at Snowmass there were about 30 presentations. This working group also had joint sessions with a number of other working groups, including E1 (Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders), M1 (Muon Based Systems), M6 (High Intensity Proton Sources), T4 (Particle sources), T5 (Beam dynamics), and T8 (Advanced Accelerators). The topics that were discussed fall naturally into three areas: (1) HPC requirements for next-generation accelerator design, (2) state-of-the-art in HPC simulation of accelerator systems, and (3) applied mathematics and computer science activities related to the development of HPC tools that will be of use to the accelerator community (as well as other communities). This document summarizes the material mentioned above and includes recommendations for future HPC activities in the accelerator community. The relationship of those activities to the HENP/SciDAC project on 21st century accelerator simulation is also discussed.

  8. Investigation of transport and disruptions in the T-7 tokamak by poloidal-field perturbation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of experiments on the effect of magnetic fields excited by a quadrupole winding on the plasma in the T-7 tokamak are presented. The winding consists of two opposing coils situated in the upper and lower diagnostic ports in one of the meridional cross-sections of the torus. Application of the quadrupole field results in the formation of a step on the radial distribution profile of the electron temperature, and this is logically attributed to the formation of a magnetic island near the m=2 rational magnetic surface. By varying the Tsub(e) gradient outside the island, it is possible to obtain the electron thermal conductivity as a function of this gradient. It is found that the radial energy flux increases non-linearly with increasing grad Tsub(e). A further increase in the quadrupole field results in the evolution of disruptions. These results agree with existing reasoning on the plasma tearing instability, particularly with the model of small-scale tearing modes which can be used to calculate the position of the resonant magnetic surface close to that observed experimentally, and also explains the non-linear electron thermal conductivity mechanism and characteristics of the evolution of disruptions. (author)

  9. Cloning and expression of codon-optimized recombinant darbepoetin alfa in Leishmania tarentolae T7-TR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianmehr, Anvarsadat; Golavar, Raziyeh; Rouintan, Mandana; Mahrooz, Abdolkarim; Fard-Esfahani, Pezhman; Oladnabi, Morteza; Khajeniazi, Safoura; Mostafavi, Seyede Samaneh; Omidinia, Eskandar

    2016-02-01

    Darbepoetin alfa is an engineered and hyperglycosylated analog of recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) which is used as a drug in treating anemia in patients with chronic kidney failure and cancer. This study desribes the secretory expression of a codon-optimized recombinant form of darbepoetin alfa in Leishmania tarentolae T7-TR. Synthetic codon-optimized gene was amplified by PCR and cloned into the pLEXSY-I-blecherry3 vector. The resultant expression vector, pLEXSYDarbo, was purified, digested, and electroporated into the L. tarentolae. Expression of recombinant darbepoetin alfa was evaluated by ELISA, reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR), Western blotting, and biological activity. After codon optimization, codon adaptation index (CAI) of the gene raised from 0.50 to 0.99 and its GC% content changed from 56% to 58%. Expression analysis confirmed the presence of a protein band at 40 kDa. Furthermore, reticulocyte experiment results revealed that the activity of expressed darbepoetin alfa was similar to that of its equivalent expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. These data suggested that the codon optimization and expression in L. tarentolae host provided an efficient approach for high level expression of darbepoetin alfa. PMID:26546410

  10. Alteration of 'R7T7' type nuclear glasses: statistical approach, experimental validation, local evolution model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to propose an evolution of nuclear (R7T7-type) glass alteration modeling. The first part of this thesis is about development and validation of the 'r(t)' model. This model which predicts the decrease of alteration rates in confined conditions is based upon a coupling between a first-order dissolution law and a diffusion barrier effect of the alteration gel layer. The values and the uncertainties regarding the main adjustable parameters of the model (α, Dg and C*) have been determined from a systematic study of the available experimental data. A program called INVERSION has been written for this purpose. This work lead to characterize the validity domain of the 'r(t)' model and to parametrize it. Validation experiments have been undertaken, confirming the validity of the parametrization over 200 days. A new model is proposed in the second part of this thesis. It is based on an inhibition of glass dissolution reaction by silicon coupled with a local description of silicon retention in the alteration gel layer. This model predicts the evolutions of boron and silicon concentrations in solution as well as the concentrations and retention profiles in the gel layer. These predictions have been compared to measurements of retention profiles by the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) method. The model has been validated on fractions of gel layer which reactivity present low or moderate disparities. (author)

  11. The extreme physical properties of the CoRoT-7b super-Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Léger, A; Fegley, B; Codron, F; Albarede, A F; Barge, P; Barnes, R; Cance, P; Carpy, S; Catalano, F; Cavarroc, C; Demangeon, O; Ferraz-Mello, S; Gabor, P; Griessmeier, J -M; Leibacher, J; Libourel, G; Maurin, A-S; Raymond, S N; Rouan, D; Samuel, B; Schaefer, L; Schneider, J; Schuller, P A; Selsis, F; Sotin, C

    2011-01-01

    The search for rocky exoplanets plays an important role in our quest for extra-terrestrial life. Here, we discuss the extreme physical properties possible for the first characterized rocky super-Earth, CoRoT-7b (R_pl = 1.58 \\pm 0.10 R_Earth, Mpl = 6.9 \\pm 1.2 M_Earth). It is extremely close to its star (a = 0.0171 AU = 4.48 R_st), with its spin and orbital rotation likely synchronized. The comparison of its location in the (Mpl, Rpl) plane with the predictions of planetary models for different compositions points to an Earth-like composition, even if the error bars of the measured quantities and the partial degeneracy of the models prevent a definitive conclusion. The proximity to its star provides an additional constraint on the model. It implies a high extreme-UV flux and particle wind, and the corresponding efficient erosion of the planetary atmosphere especially for volatile species including water. Consequently, we make the working hypothesis that the planet is rocky with no volatiles in its atmosphere, ...

  12. Physicochemical properties and long-term behavior of french R7T7 nuclear waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The French R7T7 nuclear glass composition was carefully selected to allow incorporation of some thirty different oxides found in fission product solutions. The resulting glass exhibits very low crystallization, and its physical and chemical properties are very similar to those of standard industrial glasses. Nuclear glasses have been shown to withstand α doses corresponding to several hundred thousand years under repository conditions. Predicting the long-term behavior of fission product glasses subjected to aqueous corrosion is no doubt the most difficult aspect of the problem. Predictions are necessarily based on mathematical models. A substantial research effort has been undertaken to identify all the basic corrosion mechanisms liable to control long-term alteration. These mechanisms are now relatively well understood, and provide the basis for developing the indispensable models. Realistic storage conditions exist under which glass alteration occurs at a very slow rate, and can fulfill its role as the first containment barrier for several tens of thousands of years

  13. Revisiting the transits of CoRoT-7b at a lower activity level

    CERN Document Server

    Barros, S C C; Deleuil, M; Diaz, R F; Csizmadia, Sz; Cabrera, J; Chaintreuil, S; Cameron, A Collier; Hatzes, A; Haywood, R; Lanza, A F; Aigrain, S; Alonso, R; Bordé, R; Bouchy, F; Deeg, H J; Erikson, A; Fridlund, M; Grziwa, S; Gandolfi, D; Guillot, T; Guenther, E; Leger, A; Moutou, C; Ollivier, M; Pasternacki, T; Patzold, M; Rauer, H; Rouan, D; Santerne, A; Schneider, J; Wuchterl, G

    2014-01-01

    CoRoT-7b, the first super-Earth with measured radius discovered, has opened the new field of rocky exoplanets characterisation. To better understand this interesting system, new observations were taken with the CoRoT satellite. During this run 90 new transits were obtained in the imagette mode. These were analysed together with the previous 151 transits obtained in the discovery run and HARPS radial velocity observations to derive accurate system parameters. A difference is found in the posterior probability distribution of the transit parameters between the previous CoRoT run (LRa01) and the new run (LRa06). We propose this is due to an extra noise component in the previous CoRoT run suspected to be transit spot occultation events. These lead to the mean transit shape becoming V-shaped. We show that the extra noise component is dominant at low stellar flux levels and reject these transits in the final analysis. We obtained a planetary radius, $R_p= 1.585\\pm0.064\\,R_{\\oplus}$, in agreement with previous estim...

  14. Range of validity of the stability model of the R7T7 glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to validate the modeling of R7T7 glass-water reactions, about forty leaching tests obtained under various operating conditions were examined and compared with the results of the model. The key parameters taken into account to model the long term stability of the glass under repository conditions and their ranges of validity are: temperature between 50 deg C and 250 deg C, S/V ratio between 10 and 20 000 m-1, leachate renewal rate (corresponding to the flow rate in the repository) between 0 and 1 day-1 and this for a leachate composed of pure water or synthetic repository waters. The comparisons show a good agreement between the calculated values and the experimental data for the simple glass-water systems. However, the model is inadequate to account for the environmental experiments where the glass is in contact with water and materials (canister corrosion products, granite or clay). These discrepancies could be mainly related to the fact that the kinetic law based on a deviation concerning saturation with respect to silicic acid does not work correctly. (authors)

  15. Alteration of R7T7-type nuclear glass in deep geological storage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This PhD thesis is aimed to study the alteration of SON68 glass, French inactive glass of R7T7-type, in contact with near field materials of a deep geological storage (French concept from ANDRA) which are mainly metallic iron and Callovo-Oxfordian clay. Therefore, experiments involving a 'glass-iron-clay' system at lab-scale have been carried out. Interactions between glass, iron and clay have been characterised from submicron to millimeter scale by means of SEM, TEM, XRD and XAS and Raman spectroscopies in terms of chemistry and crystal-chemistry. In the mean time, a conceptual model of glass alteration has been developed to account for most of the experimental observations and known mechanisms of alteration. The model has been then transposed within the transport-chemistry code HYTEC, together with developed models of clay and iron corrosion, to simulate the experiments described above. This work is thus a contribution to the understanding of iron corrosion in Callovo-Oxfordian clay and subsequent glass alteration in the newly formed corrosion products, the whole process being considered as a lab-scale model of a deep geological storage of radioactive wastes. (author)

  16. $T_7$ flavor symmetry scheme for understanding neutrino mass and mixing in 3-3-1 model with neutral leptons

    CERN Document Server

    Vien, V V

    2015-01-01

    We construct a new version for the 3-3-1 model based on $T_7$ flavor symmetry where the left-handed leptons under $T_7$ differ from those of our previous work while the $\\mathrm{SU}(3)_C \\otimes \\mathrm{SU}(3)_L \\otimes \\mathrm{U}(1)_X$ gauge symmetry is retain. The flavor mixing patterns and mass splitting are obtained without perturbation. The realistic lepton mixing can be obtained if both the direction of breakings $T_7 \\rightarrow Z_3$ and $Z_3 \\rightarrow \\{\\mathrm{Identity}\\}$ are taken place in neutrino sector. Maximal CP violation is predicted and CKM matrix is the identity matrix at the tree-level.

  17. Insights into Bacteriophage Application in Controlling Vibrio Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letchumanan, Vengadesh; Chan, Kok-Gan; Pusparajah, Priyia; Saokaew, Surasak; Duangjai, Acharaporn; Goh, Bey-Hing; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Lee, Learn-Han

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infections from various organisms including Vibrio sp. pose a serious hazard to humans in many forms from clinical infection to affecting the yield of agriculture and aquaculture via infection of livestock. Vibrio sp. is one of the main foodborne pathogens causing human infection and is also a common cause of losses in the aquaculture industry. Prophylactic and therapeutic usage of antibiotics has become the mainstay of managing this problem, however, this in turn led to the emergence of multidrug resistant strains of bacteria in the environment; which has raised awareness of the critical need for alternative non-antibiotic based methods of preventing and treating bacterial infections. Bacteriophages – viruses that infect and result in the death of bacteria – are currently of great interest as a highly viable alternative to antibiotics. This article provides an insight into bacteriophage application in controlling Vibrio species as well underlining the advantages and drawbacks of phage therapy. PMID:27486446

  18. A method for the detection of bacteriophages from ocean water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moebus, K.

    1980-03-01

    A method for the isolation of bacteriophages from ocean water is described. It precludes sample storage before starting phage-enrichment cultures and provides for the use of 3 sub-samples enriched with organic nutrients after 1, 2 and 3 days of incubation. The method was used with samples collected from 6 m below the surface at 48 stations between the European continental shelf and the Sargasso Sea. With 213 among 931 bacterial isolates about 250 strains of bacteriophages were detected by two methods of different sensitivity. From 14 samples taken east of the Azores 115 host bacteria have been found versus only 98 from 34 samples collected at westerly stations. The employment of more than one sub-sample per station as well as the use of more sensitive phage-detection procedures was found to be more advantageous the lower the concentration of cultivatable bacteria in a sample.

  19. Biocontrol of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum using bacteriophage PP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jeong-A; Jee, Samnyu; Lee, Dong Hwan; Roh, Eunjung; Jung, Kyusuk; Oh, Changsik; Heu, Sunggi

    2013-08-01

    Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (formerly Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora) is a plant pathogen that causes soft rot and stem rot diseases in several crops, including Chinese cabbage, potato, and tomato. To control this bacterium, we isolated a bacteriophage, PP1, with lytic activity against P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the PP1 phage belongs to the Podoviridae family of the order Caudovirales, which exhibit icosahedral heads and short non-contractile tails. PP1 phage showed high specificity for P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum, and several bacteria belonging to different species and phyla were resistant to PP1. This phage showed rapid and strong lytic activity against its host bacteria in liquid medium and was stable over a broad range of pH values. Disease caused by P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum was significantly reduced by PP1 treatment. Overall, PP1 bacteriophage effectively controls P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum. PMID:23727798

  20. The nucleotide sequence of the bacteriophage T5 ltf gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliman, A V; Kulshin, V E; Shlyapnikov, M G; Ksenzenko, V N; Kryukov, V M

    1995-06-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the bacteriophage T5 Bg/II-BamHI fragment (4,835 bp in length) known to carry a gene encoding the LTF protein which forms the phage L-shaped tail fibers was determined. It was shown to contain an open reading frame for 1,396 amino acid residues that corresponds to a protein of 147.8 kDa. The coding region of ltf gene is preceded by a typical Shine-Dalgarno sequence. Downstream from the ltf gene there is a strong transcription terminator. Data bank analysis of the LTF protein sequence reveals 55.1% identity to the hypothetical protein ORF 401 of bacteriophage lambda in a segment of 118 amino acids overlap. PMID:7789514

  1. Bacteriophage application to control the contaminated water with Shigella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Jin Woo; Giri, Sib Sankar; Kim, Hyoun Joong; Yun, Sae Kil; Chi, Cheng; Chai, Ji Young; Lee, Byeong Chun; Park, Se Chang

    2016-01-01

    Shigella is one of the most important waterborne and foodborne pathogens around the world. Emergence of antibiotic-resistant Shigella has made the development of alternatives to conventional antibiotics necessary. In this study, a virulent Myoviridae bacteriophage, pSs-1 was isolated from environmental water in South Korea and showed infectivity to S. flexneri as well as S. sonnei strains. One-step growth analysis showed that pSs-1 has a short latent period (25 min) and a large burst size (97 PFU/cell). According to the genomic analysis, pSs-1 contains 164,999 bp of genome with a G + C content of 35.54% and it is considered as a member of the T4-like bacteriophage group. These results showed that pSs-1 may have potential as a biocontrol agent instead of conventional antibiotics for shigellosis. PMID:26971572

  2. Rapid generation of CRISPR/dCas9-regulated, orthogonally repressible hybrid T7-lac promoters for modular, tuneable control of metabolic pathway fluxes in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cress, Brady F; Jones, J Andrew; Kim, Daniel C; Leitz, Quentin D; Englaender, Jacob A; Collins, Shannon M; Linhardt, Robert J; Koffas, Mattheos A G

    2016-05-19

    Robust gene circuit construction requires use of promoters exhibiting low crosstalk. Orthogonal promoters have been engineered utilizing an assortment of natural and synthetic transcription factors, but design of large orthogonal promoter-repressor sets is complicated, labor-intensive, and often results in unanticipated crosstalk. The specificity and ease of targeting the RNA-guided DNA-binding protein dCas9 to any 20 bp user-defined DNA sequence makes it a promising candidate for orthogonal promoter regulation. Here, we rapidly construct orthogonal variants of the classic T7-lac promoter using site-directed mutagenesis, generating a panel of inducible hybrid promoters regulated by both LacI and dCas9. Remarkably, orthogonality is mediated by only two to three nucleotide mismatches in a narrow window of the RNA:DNA hybrid, neighboring the protospacer adjacent motif. We demonstrate that, contrary to many reports, one PAM-proximal mismatch is insufficient to abolish dCas9-mediated repression, and we show for the first time that mismatch tolerance is a function of target copy number. Finally, these promoters were incorporated into the branched violacein biosynthetic pathway as dCas9-dependent switches capable of throttling and selectively redirecting carbon flux in Escherichia coli We anticipate this strategy is relevant for any promoter and will be adopted for many applications at the interface of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering. PMID:27079979

  3. Aqueous corrosion of silicate glasses. Analogy between volcanic glasses and the French nuclear waste glass R7T7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of borosilicate glasses upon aqueous corrosion is controlled for long periods of time (>10,000 years) by processes which are not directly accessible by means of laboratory experiments. The analogical approach consists here to compare leaching performances between the french nuclear waste glass R7T7 and natural volcanic glasses, basaltic and rhyolitic ones. The three glasses were leached in the same conditions; open system, 90 deg C, initial pH of 9.7. Basaltic and R7T7 glasses having the same kinetic of dissolution, the basaltic glass was chosen as the best analogue. (author). refs., figs., tabs

  4. Bacteriophage-encoded depolymerases: their diversity and biotechnological applications

    OpenAIRE

    Pires, Diana Priscila Penso; Oliveira, Hugo Alexandre Mendes; Melo, Luís D. R.; Sillankorva, Sanna; Azeredo, Joana

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages), natural enemies of bacteria, can encode enzymes able to degrade polymeric substances. These substances can be found in the bacterial cell surface, such as polysaccharides, or are produced by bacteria when they are living in biofilm communities, the most common bacterial lifestyle. Consequently, phages with depolymerase activity have a facilitated access to the host receptors, by degrading the capsular polysaccharides, and are believed to have a better performance agai...

  5. P. fluorescens biofilm control using bacteriophage ΦS1

    OpenAIRE

    Sillankorva, Sanna; Oliveira, Rosário; Vieira, M. J.; Sutherland, Ian W.; Azeredo, Joana

    2004-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilms contribute to the spoilage of dairy industry products due to the proteolytic activity of some Pseudomonas fluorescens strains. The eradication of these biofilms is difficult using the traditional chemical biocides due to the low removal action of these agents. Additionally chemical control leaves inactivated cells attached to the surface that tends to provide an ideal environment for further bacterial adhesion and growth. Bacteriophages can be seen as good alt...

  6. Choline-containing bacteriophage receptors in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, R. (Rafael); Garcia, E.; Garcia, P.; Ronda, C; Tomasz, A.

    1982-01-01

    Choline-containing teichoic acid seems to be essential for the adsorption of bacteriophage Dp-1 to pneumococci. This conclusion is based on the following observations: In contrast to pneumococci grown in choline-containing medium, cells grown in medium containing ethanolamine or other submethylated aminoalcohols instead of choline were found to be resistant to infection by Dp-1. Live choline-grown bacteria and heat- or UV-inactivated cells and purified cell walls prepared from these cells wer...

  7. Bacteriophages : an underestimated role in human and animal health ?

    OpenAIRE

    Marianne eDe Paepe; Marion eLeclerc; Tinsley, Colin R.; Marie-Agnès ePetit

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomic approaches applied to viruses have highlighted their prevalence in almost all microbial ecosystems investigated. In all ecosystems, notably those associated with humans or animals, the viral fraction is dominated by bacteriophages. Whether they contribute to dysbiosis, i.e. the departure from microbiota composition in symbiosis at equilibrium and entry into a state favoring human or animal disease is unknown at present. This review summarizes what has been learnt on phages associa...

  8. Genetic analysis of bacteriophages from clinical and environmental samples

    OpenAIRE

    Knapik, Kamila Z.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophages, viruses infecting bacteria, are uniformly present in any location where there are high numbers of bacteria, both in the external environment and the human body. Knowledge of their diversity is limited by the difficulty to culture the host species and by the lack of the universal marker gene present in all viruses. Metagenomics is a powerful tool that can be used to analyse viral communities in their natural environments. The aim of this study was to investigate diverse populat...

  9. Molecular and Chemical Engineering of Bacteriophages for Potential Medical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Hodyra, Katarzyna; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in molecular engineering has contributed to the great progress of medicine. However, there are still difficult problems constituting a challenge for molecular biology and biotechnology, e.g. new generation of anticancer agents, alternative biosensors or vaccines. As a biotechnological tool, bacteriophages (phages) offer a promising alternative to traditional approaches. They can be applied as anticancer agents, novel platforms in vaccine design, or as target carriers in drug d...

  10. Salmonella bacteriophage diversity reflects host diversity on dairy farms

    OpenAIRE

    Switt, Andrea I. Moreno; den Bakker, Henk C.; Vongkamjan, Kitiya; Hoelzer, Karin; Warnick, Lorin D.; Cummings, Kevin J.; Wiedmann, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella is an animal and human pathogen of worldwide concern. Surveillance programs indicate that the incidence of Salmonella serovars fluctuates over time. While bacteriophages are likely to play a role in driving microbial diversity, our understanding of the ecology and diversity of Salmonella phages is limited. Here we report the isolation of Salmonella phages from manure samples from 13 dairy farms with a history of Salmonella presence. Salmonella phages were isolated from 10 of the 13...

  11. In vivo gene delivery and expression by bacteriophage lambda vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Lankes, HA; Zanghi, CN; Santos, K; Capella, C.; Duke, CMP; Dewhurst, S

    2007-01-01

    Aims Bacteriophage vectors have potential as gene transfer and vaccine delivery vectors because of their low cost, safety and physical stability. However, little is known concerning phage-mediated gene transfer in mammalian hosts. We therefore performed experiments to examine phage-mediated gene transfer in vivo. Methods and Results Mice were inoculated with recombinant lambda phage containing a mammalian expression cassette encoding firefly luciferase (luc). Efficient, dose-dependent in vivo...

  12. A second function of the S gene of bacteriophage lambda.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, D.B.; Okabe, A

    1982-01-01

    Infection of Escherichia coli by bacteriophage lambda caused an immediate inhibition of uptake by members of all three classes of E. coli active transport systems and made the inner membrane permeable to sucrose and glycine; however, infection stimulated alpha-methyl glucoside uptake. Phage infection caused a dramatic drop in the ATP pool of the cell, but the membrane did not become permeable to nucleotides. Infection by only one phage per cell was sufficient to cause transport inhibition. Ho...

  13. Isolation of Actinomyces bacteriophage from human dental plaque.

    OpenAIRE

    Tylenda, C A; Calvert, C.; Kolenbrander, P. E.; Tylenda, A

    1985-01-01

    Human dental plaque samples were screened for the presence of bacteriophage for Actinomyces viscosus and Streptococcus sanguis. None of the 336 samples yielded phage for S. sanguis, but 10 contained virulent actinomyces phage. A high host cell specificity was observed in that one phage isolate infected only A. viscosus T14V, eight phage isolates infected only A. viscosus MG-1, and one infected both strains. None was capable of productively infecting various other actinomyces strains that repr...

  14. Effects of sunlight on bacteriophage viability and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viruses are now widely recognized as the most abundant member of aquatic planktonic communities. Questions concerning the ecological role of viruses in such communities have lead to resurgent interest in the persistence of free fivuses in marine waters. This study seeks to evaluate the effects of solar radiation on the survival of viruses in surface waters. In situ effects of natural sunlight on infectivity and destruction of viral capsids of two estuarine bacteriophages were examined

  15. Characterization of bacteriophage communities and CRISPR profiles from dental plaque

    OpenAIRE

    Naidu, Mayuri; Robles-Sikisaka, Refugio; Abeles, Shira R.; Boehm, Tobias K; Pride, David T

    2014-01-01

    Background Dental plaque is home to a diverse and complex community of bacteria, but has generally been believed to be inhabited by relatively few viruses. We sampled the saliva and dental plaque from 4 healthy human subjects to determine whether plaque was populated by viral communities, and whether there were differences in viral communities specific to subject or sample type. Results We found that the plaque was inhabited by a community of bacteriophage whose membership was mostly subject-...

  16. A cinematographic view of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase translocation.

    OpenAIRE

    Metzger, W.; Schickor, P; Heumann, H

    1989-01-01

    A series of RNA synthesizing transcription complexes, initiated at the T7 A1 promoter and halted at specific base positions ranging from +12 to +40, were analyzed by footprinting techniques; exonuclease III was used to determine the position of the bound RNA polymerase on the DNA and hydroxyl radicals were used to visualize the protein--DNA contact sites within the protected areas. In the binding (open) complex without RNA there are two DNA-domains, differing in their protection pattern. The ...

  17. Bacteriophages and medical oncology: targeted gene therapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Karimi, Marzieh; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2014-08-01

    Targeted gene therapy of cancer is of paramount importance in medical oncology. Bacteriophages, viruses that specifically infect bacterial cells, offer a variety of potential applications in biomedicine. Their genetic flexibility to go under a variety of surface modifications serves as a basis for phage display methodology. These surface manipulations allow bacteriophages to be exploited for targeted delivery of therapeutic genes. Moreover, the excellent safety profile of these viruses paves the way for their potential use as cancer gene therapy platforms. The merge of phage display and combinatorial technology has led to the emergence of phage libraries turning phage display into a high throughput technology. Random peptide libraries, as one of the most frequently used phage libraries, provide a rich source of clinically useful peptide ligands. Peptides are known as a promising category of pharmaceutical agents in medical oncology that present advantages such as inexpensive synthesis, efficient tissue penetration and the lack of immunogenicity. Phage peptide libraries can be screened, through biopanning, against various targets including cancer cells and tissues that results in obtaining cancer-homing ligands. Cancer-specific peptides isolated from phage libraries show huge promise to be utilized for targeting of various gene therapy vectors towards malignant cells. Beyond doubt, bacteriophages will play a more impressive role in the future of medical oncology. PMID:25012686

  18. Bacteriophage P22 in vitro DNA packaging monitored by agarose gel electrophoresis: rate of DNA entry into capsids.

    OpenAIRE

    Gope, R.; Serwer, P

    1983-01-01

    Bacteriophage P22, like other double-stranded DNA bacteriophages, packages DNA in a preassembled, DNA-free procapsid. The P22 procapsid and P22 bacteriophage have been electrophoretically characterized; the procapsid has a negative average electrical surface charge density (sigma) higher in magnitude than the negative sigma of the mature bacteriophage. Dextrans, sucrose, and maltose were shown to have a dramatic stimulatory effect on the in vitro packaging of DNA by the P22 procapsid. However...

  19. Analysis of the complete DNA sequence of the temperate bacteriophage TP901-1: Evolution, structure, and genome organization of lactococcal bacteriophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted, Lone; Østergaard, Solvej; Pedersen, Margit; Hammer, Karin; Vogensen, F.K.

    2001-01-01

    -1 may have evolved by homologous recombination between the host chromosome and a mother phage and support the observation that phage remnants as well as prophages located in the Lactococcus chromosome contribute significantly to bacteriophage evolution. Some proteins encoded in the early transcribed...... bacteriophage TP901-1 proliferation. Short regions of microhomology in intergenic regions present in several lactococcal bacteriophages and chromosomal fragments of Lactococcus lactis are suggested to be points of exchange of genetic material through homologous recombination. Our results indicate that TP901...

  20. The OR control system of bacteriophage lambda. A physical-chemical model for gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, M A; Ackers, G K

    1985-01-20

    A quantitative model has been developed for processes in the bacteriophage lambda that control the switchover from lysogenic to lytic modes of growth. These processes include the interactions of cI repressor and cro proteins at the three DNA sites of the right operator, OR, the binding of RNA polymerase at promoters PR and PRM, the synthesis of cI repressor and cro proteins, and the degradative action of recA during induction of lysis. The model is comprised of two major physical-chemical components: a statistical thermodynamic theory for relative probabilities of the various molecular configurations of the control system; and a kinetic model for the coupling of these probabilities to functional events, including synthesis of regulatory proteins cI and cro. Using independently evaluated interaction constants and rate parameters, the model was found capable of predicting essential physiological characteristics of the system over an extended time. Sufficiency of the model to predict known physiological properties lends credence to the physical-chemical assumptions used in its construction. Several major physiological characteristics were found to arise as "system properties" through the non-linear, time-dependent, feedback-modulated combinations of molecular interactions prescribed by the model. These include: maintenance of the lysogenic state in the absence of recA-mediated cI repressor degradation; induction of lysis and the phenomenon of subinduction; and autogenous negative control of cro. We have used the model to determine the roles, within the composite system, of several key molecular processes previously characterized by studies in vitro. These include: co-operativity in cI repressor binding to DNA; interactions between repressors and RNA polymerase (positive control); and the monomer-dimer association of cI repressor molecules. A major role of cI repressor co-operativity is found to be that of guaranteeing stability of the lysogenic state against minor

  1. The Role of Alloy Composition and T7 Heat Treatment in Enhancing Thermal Conductivity of Aluminum High Pressure Diecastings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumley, Roger N.; Deeva, Natalia; Larsen, Robert; Gembarovic, Jozef; Freeman, Joe

    2013-02-01

    The thermal conductivity of some common and experimental high pressure diecasting (HPDC) Al-Si-Cu alloys is evaluated. It is shown that the thermal conductivity of some compositions may be increased by more than 60 pct by utilizing T7 heat treatments. This may have substantial performance and cost benefits for applications where thermal management is a key design parameter.

  2. Biocontrol of Escherichia coli O157:H7 using a bacteriophage cocktail in laboratory media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteriophages are natural enemies of bacteria, and therefore, logical candidates to evaluate as antibacterial agents for the control of foodborne pathogens. The effect of a bacteriophage treatment on the prevention of E. coli O157:H7 growth was investigated in Tryptic Soy Broth (TSB) laboratory med...

  3. Isolation and characterization of a lytic bacteriophage φKp-lyy15 of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinyin; Lu; Hongyan; Shi; Zhe; Zhang; Fang; Han; Jinghua; Li; Yanbo; Sun

    2015-01-01

    <正>Dear Editor,Bacteriophages(phages)are viruses that specifically infect and kill bacteria.They are ubiquitous throughout all environments that bacteria inhabit.Following their discovery by F.W.Twort in 1915 and F.d’Herele in 1917,bacteriophages were recognized as potential agents to treat bacterial diseases and phage therapy has been used

  4. Architecture of the bacteriophage T4 activator MotA/promoter DNA interaction during sigma appropriation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Meng-Lun; James, Tamara D; Knipling, Leslie; Waddell, M Brett; White, Stephen; Hinton, Deborah M

    2013-09-20

    Gene expression can be regulated through factors that direct RNA polymerase to the correct promoter sequence at the correct time. Bacteriophage T4 controls its development in this way using phage proteins that interact with host RNA polymerase. Using a process called σ appropriation, the T4 co-activator AsiA structurally remodels the σ(70) subunit of host RNA polymerase, while a T4 activator, MotA, engages the C terminus of σ(70) and binds to a DNA promoter element, the MotA box. Structures for the N-terminal (NTD) and C-terminal (CTD) domains of MotA are available, but no structure exists for MotA with or without DNA. We report the first molecular map of the MotA/DNA interaction within the σ-appropriated complex, which we obtained by using the cleaving reagent, iron bromoacetamidobenzyl-EDTA (FeBABE). We conjugated surface-exposed, single cysteines in MotA with FeBABE and performed cleavage reactions in the context of stable transcription complexes. The DNA cleavage sites were analyzed using ICM Molsoft software and three-dimensional physical models of MotA(NTD), MotA(CTD), and the DNA to investigate shape complementarity between the protein and the DNA and to position MotA on the DNA. We found that the unusual "double wing" motif present within MotA(CTD) resides in the major groove of the MotA box. In addition, we have used surface plasmon resonance to show that MotA alone is in a very dynamic equilibrium with the MotA element. Our results demonstrate the utility of fine resolution FeBABE mapping to determine the architecture of protein-DNA complexes that have been recalcitrant to traditional structure analyses. PMID:23902794

  5. RNA genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo, E. (Instituto de Biologia Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Canto Blanco, Madrid (ES)); Holland, J.J. (California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (USA). Dept. of Biology); Ahlquist, P. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on RNA genetics: Retroviruses, Viroids, and RNA recombination, Volume 2. Topics covered include: Replication of retrovirus genomes, Hepatitis B virus replication, and Evolution of RNA viruses.

  6. UV ability to destroy poliovirus end FRNA specific bacteriophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baron, J.; Joret, J.C.; Lesavre, J.; Perrot, J.Y.

    1996-01-01

    In France, the use of ultraviolet radiation to disinfect secondary effluents is only in its initial stage. The aim of this study was to examine the ability of UV to destroy Poliovirus Type 1 and FRNA specific bacteriophages (laboratory MS2 phages and indigenous phages). Concentrated viral solutions were mixed with secondary effluents artificially enriched with suspended solids and then irradiated at various UV dose in a collimated beam. Bacteriological analysis of Escherichia coli and enterococci were performed at the same time. UV were very efficient to kill Poliovirus : Inactivation of 3 and 5 log units were observed respectively at UV doses of 20 and 40 mW/cm{sup 2}. The Poliovirus disinfection rate was almost the same than Escherichia coli. Enterococci were more resistant than E. coli. Inactivation of MS2 bacteriophages was significantly correlated to UV dose following the relationship MS2 Inactivation = 0.047{sup *} Dose + 0,396. At UV dose of 20 mWs/cm{sup 2}, MS2 phages were 2.3 times more resistant to UV than Poliovirus, i.e. they need UV dose 2,3 times greater to be disinfected at the same level. A review of the literature has also shown that viruses more resistant to UV treatment have never been reported. All this would tend to confirm the interest of this group of virus as indicators of the disinfection efficiency of UV, which could indicate, on site, the inactivation of pathogenic viruses. Inactivation rates obtained for FRNA phages proved the good virucidal activity of UV. The inactivation of indigenous FRNA bacteriophages was not correlated with E. coli inactivation. On the other hand, it was correlated with enterococci inactivation. (Author). 23 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Structural Basis for the Coevolution of a Viral RNA-Protein Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao,J.; Patskovsky, Y.; Almo, S.; Singer, R.

    2008-01-01

    The cocrystal structure of the PP7 bacteriophage coat protein in complex with its translational operator identifies a distinct mode of sequence-specific RNA recognition when compared to the well-characterized MS2 coat protein-RNA complex. The structure reveals the molecular basis of the PP7 coat protein's ability to selectively bind its cognate RNA, and it demonstrates that the conserved beta-sheet surface is a flexible architecture that can evolve to recognize diverse RNA hairpins.

  8. Molecular Characterization of a Bacteriophage (Chp2) from Chlamydia psittaci

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, B. L.; Everson, J. S.; Fane, B.; Giannikopoulou, P.; Vretou, E.; Lambden, P R; Clarke, I N

    2000-01-01

    Comparisons of the proteome of abortifacient Chlamydia psittaci isolates from sheep by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis identified a novel abundant protein with a molecular mass of 61.4 kDa and an isoelectric point of 6.41. C-terminal sequence analysis of this protein yielded a short peptide sequence that had an identical match to the viral coat protein (VP1) of the avian chlamydiaphage Chp1. Electron microscope studies revealed the presence of a 25-nm-diameter bacteriophage (Chp2) with no...

  9. [Bacteriophage therapy of septic complications of orthopaedic surgery (author's transl].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, G; Kehr, P; Mathevon, H; Clavert, J M; Séjourne, P; Pointu, J

    1979-01-01

    Seven septic cases have been treated by bacteriophage; two infections after insertion of a hip prosthesis, two septic arthritis of the knee, one osteomyelitis of the tibia, one septic non-union of the femur and one septic complication following Harrington rodding. Only specific phages were used in association with several types of surgical procedure. The technique of treatment is described. All cases were long-term infections with resistant organisms. Results were good in five, fair in one and one case was a failure. It is concluded that phage therapy may be helpful in the treatment of long-term infections. PMID:156386

  10. Bacteriophage-Derived Vectors for Targeted Cancer Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Zahidul Islam Pranjol

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer gene therapy expanded and reached its pinnacle in research in the last decade. Both viral and non-viral vectors have entered clinical trials, and significant successes have been achieved. However, a systemic administration of a vector, illustrating safe, efficient, and targeted gene delivery to solid tumors has proven to be a major challenge. In this review, we summarize the current progress and challenges in the targeted gene therapy of cancer. Moreover, we highlight the recent developments of bacteriophage-derived vectors and their contributions in targeting cancer with therapeutic genes following systemic administration.

  11. Re-initiation repair in bacteriophage T4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation of bacteriophage T4 with ultraviolet light induces the formation of pyrimidine dimers in its DNA. These dimers hamper replication of DNA and, to a lesser extent, transcription of DNA after its infection of bacteria. A number of pathways enable phage T4 to multiply dimer-containing DNA. One of these pathways has been named replication repair and is described in this thesis. The properties of two phage strains, unable to perform replication repair, have been studied to obtain a picture of the repair process. The mutations in these strains that affect replication repair have been located on the genomic map of T4. (Auth.)

  12. [Factors influencing the pulse character of RNA elongation in vitro by E. coli RNA polymerase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aivazashvili, V A; Bibilashvili, R Sh; Vartikian, R M; Kutateladze, T V

    1981-01-01

    Pause location along primary structure of two RNA fragments each 200 nucleotide residues in the length synthesized from A1 promoters of T7 phage DNA and delta D111 T7 phage DNA was analyzed. No correlation between the location of pauses and GC-rich or self complementary regions of RNA were found. The location of pauses does not change upon the variation of the temperature or ionic strength. Concurrent variation of all four NTP concentrations also did not influence pausing pattern. However the distribution of pauses depends highly on the ratio of the individual substrate concentrations. Substitution of GTP by ITP changes the pausing pattern completely. Inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) of inhibits RNA elongation preferentially in the regions: NAUN, CGUAG. The study of PPi action on RNA terminated with 3' OCH3-NMP suggest that the sequence-specific inhibition of RNA elongation may be a result of pyrophosphorolysis of terminal nucleotide residues of RNA. It was proposed that the pulse character of RNA elongation stems rather from differences in the kinetic constants of nucleotides attachment and pyrophosphorolysis from the 3'-termini of RNA than by termination signals encoded in the primary structure of DNA. The stable location of pauses in certain short oligonucleotides: AUG, AUU, AAU and some others is in favour of the hypothesis. PMID:6265762

  13. Lepton mass and mixing in a simple extension of the Standard Model based on T7 flavor symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Vien, V V

    2016-01-01

    A simple Standard Model Extension based on $T_7$ flavor symmetry which accommodates lepton mass and mixing with non-zero $\\theta_{13}$ and CP violation phase is proposed. At the tree- level, the realistic lepton mass and mixing pattern is derived through the spontaneous symmetry breaking by just one vacuum expectation value ($v$) which is the same as in the Standard Model. Neutrinos get small masses from one $SU(2)_L$ doublet and two $SU(2)_L$ singlets in which one being in $\\underline{1}$ and the two others in $\\underline{3}$ and $\\underline{3}^*$ under $T_7$ , respectively. The model also gives a remarkable prediction of Dirac CP violation $\\delta_{CP}=172.598^\\circ$ in both normal and inverted hierarchies which is still missing in the neutrino mixing matrix.

  14. R7T7-type HLW glass alteration under irradiation. Study of the residual alteration rate regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In France, fission products and minor actinides remaining after reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel are confined in a borosilicate glass matrix, named R7T7, for disposal in a geological repository. However, in these conditions, after several thousand years, water could arrive in contact with glass and be radio-lysed. In this work, we investigated the irradiation influence and especially the influence of the energy deposition on the residual glass alteration rate regime in pure water. Two types of leaching tests have been carried out. The first were performed on radioactive glass and the second on a SON68 glass (nonradioactive surrogate of R7T7 glass) under external irradiation γ. (author)

  15. Analysis of intermolecular base pair formation of prohead RNA of the phage ø29 DNA packaging motor using NMR spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Kitamura, Aya; Jardine, Paul J.; Anderson, Dwight L; Grimes, Shelley; Matsuo, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    The bacteriophage ø29 DNA packaging motor that assembles on the precursor capsid (prohead) contains an essential 174-nt structural RNA (pRNA) that forms multimers. To determine the structural features of the CE- and D-loops believed to be involved in multimerization of pRNA, 35- and 19-nt RNA molecules containing the CE-loop or the D-loop, respectively, were produced and shown to form a heterodimer in a Mg2+-dependent manner, similar to that with full-length pRNA. It has been hypothesized tha...

  16. Application of bacteriophages in post-harvest control of human pathogenic and food spoiling bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Pulido, Rubén; Grande Burgos, Maria José; Gálvez, Antonio; Lucas López, Rosario

    2016-10-01

    Bacteriophages have attracted great attention for application in food biopreservation. Lytic bacteriophages specific for human pathogenic bacteria can be isolated from natural sources such as animal feces or industrial wastes where the target bacteria inhabit. Lytic bacteriophages have been tested in different food systems for inactivation of main food-borne pathogens including Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, Shigella spp., Campylobacter jejuni and Cronobacter sakazkii, and also for control of spoilage bacteria. Application of lytic bacteriophages could selectively control host populations of concern without interfering with the remaining food microbiota. Bacteriophages could also be applied for inactivation of bacteria attached to food contact surfaces or grown as biofilms. Bacteriophages may receive a generally recognized as safe status based on their lack of toxicity and other detrimental effects to human health. Phage preparations specific for L. monocytogenes, E. coli O157:H7 and S. enterica serotypes have been commercialized and approved for application in foods or as part of surface decontamination protocols. Phage endolysins have a broader host specificity compared to lytic bacteriophages. Cloned endolysins could be used as natural preservatives, singly or in combination with other antimicrobials such as bacteriocins. PMID:26042353

  17. Pulmonary bacteriophage therapy on Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis strains: first steps towards treatment and prevention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Morello

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant bacteria are the cause of an increasing number of deadly pulmonary infections. Because there is currently a paucity of novel antibiotics, phage therapy--the use of specific viruses that infect bacteria--is now more frequently being considered as a potential treatment for bacterial infections. Using a mouse lung-infection model caused by a multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mucoid strain isolated from a cystic fibrosis patient, we evaluated bacteriophage treatments. New bacteriophages were isolated from environmental samples and characterized. Bacteria and bacteriophages were applied intranasally to the immunocompetent mice. Survival was monitored and bronchoalveolar fluids were analysed. Quantification of bacteria, bacteriophages, pro-inflammatory and cytotoxicity markers, as well as histology and immunohistochemistry analyses were performed. A curative treatment (one single dose administrated 2 h after the onset of the infection allowed over 95% survival. A four-day preventive treatment (one single dose resulted in a 100% survival. All of the parameters measured correlated with the efficacy of both curative and preventive bacteriophage treatments. We also showed that in vitro optimization of a bacteriophage towards a clinical strain improved both its efficacy on in vivo treatments and its host range on a panel of 20 P. aeruginosa cystic fibrosis strains. This work provides an incentive to develop clinical studies on pulmonary bacteriophage therapy to combat multidrug-resistant lung infections.

  18. Isolation and Characterization of Bacteriophages Against Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Causing Bacterial Canker Disease in Kiwifruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ji-Gang; Lim, Jeong-A; Song, Yu-Rim; Heu, Sunggi; Kim, Gyoung Hee; Koh, Young Jin; Oh, Chang-Sik

    2016-02-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae causes bacterial canker disease in kiwifruit. Owing to the prohibition of agricultural antibiotic use in major kiwifruit-cultivating countries, alternative methods need to be developed to manage this disease. Bacteriophages are viruses that specifically infect target bacteria and have recently been reconsidered as potential biological control agents for bacterial pathogens owing to their specificity in terms of host range. In this study, we isolated bacteriophages against P. syringae pv. actinidiae from soils collected from kiwifruit orchards in Korea and selected seven bacteriophages for further characterization based on restriction enzyme digestion patterns of genomic DNA. Among the studied bacteriophages, two belong to the Myoviridae family and three belong to the Podoviridae family, based on morphology observed by transmission electron microscopy. The host range of the selected bacteriophages was confirmed using 18 strains of P. syringae pv. actinidiae, including the Psa2 and Psa3 groups, and some were also effective against other P. syringae pathovars. Lytic activity of the selected bacteriophages was sustained in vitro until 80 h, and their activity remained stable up to 50°C, at pH 11, and under UV-B light. These results indicate that the isolated bacteriophages are specific to P. syringae species and are resistant to various environmental factors, implying their potential use in control of bacterial canker disease in kiwifruits. PMID:26628254

  19. Ecology of Anti-Biofilm Agents I: Antibiotics versus Bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen T. Abedon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages, the viruses that infect bacteria, have for decades been successfully used to combat antibiotic-resistant, chronic bacterial infections, many of which are likely biofilm associated. Antibiotics as anti-biofilm agents can, by contrast, be inefficacious against even genetically sensitive targets. Such deficiencies in usefulness may result from antibiotics, as naturally occurring compounds, not serving their producers, in nature, as stand-alone disruptors of mature biofilms. Anti-biofilm effectiveness by phages, by contrast, may result from a combination of inherent abilities to concentrate lytic antibacterial activity intracellularly via bacterial infection and extracellularly via localized population growth. Considered here is the anti-biofilm activity of microorganisms, with a case presented for why, ecologically, bacteriophages can be more efficacious than traditional antibiotics as medically or environmentally applied biofilm-disrupting agents. Four criteria, it can be argued, generally must be met, in combination, for microorganisms to eradicate biofilms: (1 Furnishing of sufficiently effective antibacterial factors, (2 intimate interaction with biofilm bacteria over extended periods, (3 associated ability to concentrate antibacterial factors in or around targets, and, ultimately, (4 a means of physically disrupting or displacing target bacteria. In nature, lytic predators of bacteria likely can meet these criteria whereas antibiotic production, in and of itself, largely may not.

  20. Minimal gene regulatory circuits that can count like bacteriophage lambda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avlund, M; Dodd, Ian B; Sneppen, K; Krishna, S

    2009-12-11

    The behavior of living systems is dependent on large dynamical gene regulatory networks (GRNs). However, the functioning of even the smallest GRNs is difficult to predict. The bistable GRN of bacteriophage lambda is able to count to make a decision between lysis and lysogeny on the basis of the number of phages infecting the cell, even though replication of the phage genome eliminates this initial difference. By simulating the behavior of a large number of random transcriptional GRNs, we show that a surprising variety of GRNs can carry out this complex task, including simple CI-Cro-like mutual repression networks. Thus, our study extends the repertoire of simple GRNs. Counterintuitively, the major effect of the addition of CII-like regulation, generally thought to be needed for counting by lambda, was to improve the ability of the networks to complete a simulated prophage induction. Our study suggests that additional regulatory mechanisms to decouple Cro and CII levels may exist in lambda and that infection counting could be widespread among temperate bacteriophages, many of which contain CI-Cro-like circuits. PMID:19796646

  1. PET Imaging and biodistribution of chemically modified bacteriophage MS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Michelle E; Aanei, Ioana L; Behrens, Christopher R; Tong, Gary J; Murphy, Stephanie T; O'Neil, James P; Francis, Matthew B

    2013-01-01

    The fields of nanotechnology and medicine have merged in the development of new imaging and drug delivery agents based on nanoparticle platforms. As one example, a mutant of bacteriophage MS2 can be differentially modified on the exterior and interior surfaces for the concurrent display of targeting functionalities and payloads, respectively. In order to realize their potential for use in in vivo applications, the biodistribution and circulation properties of this class of agents must first be investigated. A means of modulating and potentially improving the characteristics of nanoparticle agents is the appendage of PEG chains. Both MS2 and MS2-PEG capsids possessing interior DOTA chelators were labeled with (64)Cu and injected intravenously into mice possessing tumor xenografts. Dynamic imaging of the agents was performed using PET-CT on a single animal per sample, and the biodistribution at the terminal time point (24 h) was assessed by gamma counting of the organs ex vivo for 3 animals per agent. Compared to other viral capsids of similar size, the MS2 agents showed longer circulation times. Both MS2 and MS2-PEG bacteriophage behaved similarly, although the latter agent showed significantly less uptake in the spleen. This effect may be attributed to the ability of the PEG chains to mask the capsid charge. Although the tumor uptake of the agents may result from the enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect, selective tumor imaging may be achieved in the future by using exterior targeting groups. PMID:23214968

  2. Phenotypic and genotypic variations within a single bacteriophage species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulakov Leonid

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although horizontal gene transfer plays a pivotal role in bacteriophage evolution, many lytic phage genomes are clearly shaped by vertical evolution. We investigated the influence of minor genomic deletions and insertions on various phage-related phenotypic and serological properties. Findings We collected ten different isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophage ϕKMV. All sequenced genomes (42-43 kb, long direct terminal repeats are nearly identical, which intuitively implied strongly similar infections cycles. However, their latent periods vary between 21 and 28 minutes and they are able to lyse between 5 and 58% of a collection of 107 clinical P. aeruginosa strains. We also noted that phages with identical tail structures displayed profound differences in host spectra. Moreover, point mutations in tail and spike proteins were sufficient to evade neutralization by two phage-specific antisera, isolated from rabbits. Conclusion Although all analyzed phages are 83-97% identical at the genome level, they display a surprisingly large variation in various phenotypic properties. The small overlap in host spectrum and their ability to readily escape immune defences against a nearly identical phage are promising elements for the application of these phages in phage therapy.

  3. Comparative analysis of two bacteriophages of Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dömötör, Dóra; Frank, Tamara; Rákhely, Gábor; Doffkay, Zsolt; Schneider, György; Kovács, Tamás

    2016-09-01

    Walnut blight caused by Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis (Xaj) is one of the most frequent infective diseases of walnut, resulting in serious economic losses. One potential solution to control this disease could be the application of bacteriophages. In this study, 24 phages were isolated from soil and walnut aerial tissues infected with Xaj. Two polyvalent bacteriophages, Xaj2 and Xaj24 were chosen for further characterization including their morphological, physiological and genomic analyses. Xaj2 was classified as Siphoviridae whereas Xaj24 belonged to the Podoviridae family. Both phages demonstrated lytic effect on Xaj in laboratory trials. Complete genomes of Xaj2 and Xaj24 were determined. Genomes of Xaj2 and Xaj24 consisted of 49.241 and 44.861 nucleotides encoding 80 and 53 genes, respectively. Comparative genome analyses have revealed that Xaj2 had a unique genome sequence, while Xaj24 was a phiKMV-like phage and it was most similar to the Prado phage which is virulent for Xylella fastidiosa and Xanthomonas spp. In this study, we present the first two complete Xaj phage sequences enabling an insight into the genomics of Xaj phages. PMID:27275846

  4. [Reconstruction of possible paths of the origin and morphological evolution of bacteriophages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letarov, A V

    1998-11-01

    The problem of the origin and evolution of viruses and, in particular, the origin and evolution of bacteriophages is of considerable interest. However, so far, this problem has not been solved with quantitative methods of molecular systematics. In the present study, an attempt to reconstruct the possible paths of appearance and evolution of bacteriophages based on their structural features and morphogenesis, as well as general characteristics of their life cycles and genome organization, was carried out. A scheme describing phylogeny of the main bacteriophage groups and evolution of their life cycles is suggested. Existence of two independently evaluating types of morphogenesis ("budding outward" and "budding inward") is postulated. PMID:10096023

  5. Complete Genome Sequences of Lytic Bacteriophages of Xanthomonas arboricola pv. Juglandis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Ignacio; Santos, Leonardo; Segovia, Cristopher; Ayala, Manuel; Alvarado, Romina; Nuñez, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Three bacteriophages, f20-Xaj, f29-Xaj, and f30-Xaj, with lytic activity against Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis were isolated from walnut trees (VIII Bío Bío Region, Chile). These lytic bacteriophages have double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genomes of 43,851 bp, 41,865 bp, and 44,262 bp, respectively. These are the first described bacteriophages with lytic activity against X. arboricola pv. juglandis that can be utilized as biocontrol agents. PMID:27257210

  6. [Combination of TLR7 agonist T7-ethacrynic acid conjugate with ROR1 has a stronger anti-breast cancer effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Na; Jin, Guangyi; Jin, Zhenchao; Liu, Bing; Peng, Boya; Gao, Ningning; Hu, Yunlong; Tang, Li

    2016-07-01

    Objective To investigate the synergistic anti-breast cancer effect of Toll-like receptor 7 agonist T7-ethacrynic acid conjugate (T7-EA) in combination with receptor-tyrosine-kinase-like orphan receptor 1 (ROR1). Methods ROR1 cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope was predicted using Syfpeithi online software. Mouse spleen lymphocytes and bone marrow dendritic cells (DCs) were separately stimulated with 4 μmol/L T7-EA and 4 μmol/L ROR1 alone or in combination. ELISA assay was used to measure the levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin 12 (IL-12) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Xenograft model was established via subcutaneous injection of mouse breast cancer 4T1 cells. The mice were weekly treated through intraperitoneal administration of 3 mg/kg T7-EA, 15 mg/kg ROR1 or the combination of T7-EA and ROR1. After four rounds of treatment, tumor tissues were weighed. Serum level of anti-4T1 tumor protein IgG was measured by ELISA. Specific CTL activity was detected by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Results The peptide PYCDETSSV was chosen as an antigen epitope of breast cancer. The T7-EA highly activated in vitro lymphocytes in a dose-dependent manner, which wasn't affected by other relevant peptides. The combination of T7-EA and ROR1 stimulated the secretion of IFN-γ and IL-12 by lymphocytes and TNF-α by bone marrow DCs. The growth of tumor in vivo was significantly inhibited by T7-EA combined with ROR1 compared with T7-EA or ROR1 alone. The specific CTL activity triggered by T7-EA combined with ROR1 was much stronger than that triggered by T7-EA or ROR1 alone. The titer of anti-4T1 tumor protein IgG induced by T7-EA combined with ROR1 was higher than that induced by T7-EA or ROR1. Conclusion The combination of T7-EA and ROR1 has a better killing effect on breast cancer. PMID:27363264

  7. A cyclopropene-modified nucleotide for site-specific RNA labeling using genetic alphabet expansion transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggert, F; Kath-Schorr, S

    2016-06-01

    Site-specific RNA modification with methyl cyclopropene moieties is performed by T7 in vitro transcription. An existing unnatural base is functionalized with a cyclopropene moiety and used in transcription reactions to produce site-specifically cyclopropene-modified RNA molecules. The posttranscriptional inverse electron demand Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction with a selected tetrazine-fluorophore conjugate is demonstrated. PMID:27181840

  8. Dexamethasone increases the number of RNA polymerase II molecules transcribing integrated mouse mammary tumor virus DNA and flanking mouse sequences.

    OpenAIRE

    Firzlaff, J M; Diggelmann, H

    1984-01-01

    In mouse Ltk- cells that were transfected with recombinant bacteriophage DNA containing a complete proviral copy of an integrated endogenous mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) with its flanking cellular sequences, the newly acquired MMTV proviruses were transcribed in a glucocorticoid-responsive fashion. After hormone treatment of selected cell clones in culture we isolated the nuclei, elongated the nascent RNA chains in vitro, and determined the number of RNA polymerase II molecules on the tra...

  9. BRED: a simple and powerful tool for constructing mutant and recombinant bacteriophage genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura J Marinelli

    Full Text Available Advances in DNA sequencing technology have facilitated the determination of hundreds of complete genome sequences both for bacteria and their bacteriophages. Some of these bacteria have well-developed and facile genetic systems for constructing mutants to determine gene function, and recombineering is a particularly effective tool. However, generally applicable methods for constructing defined mutants of bacteriophages are poorly developed, in part because of the inability to use selectable markers such as drug resistance genes during viral lytic growth. Here we describe a method for simple and effective directed mutagenesis of bacteriophage genomes using Bacteriophage Recombineering of Electroporated DNA (BRED, in which a highly efficient recombineering system is utilized directly on electroporated phage DNA; no selection is required and mutants can be readily detected by PCR. We describe the use of BRED to construct unmarked gene deletions, in-frame internal deletions, base substitutions, precise gene replacements, and the addition of gene tags.

  10. [The challenge of controlling foodborne diseases: bacteriophages as a new biotechnological tool].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorquera, Denisse; Galarce, Nicolás; Borie, Consuelo

    2015-12-01

    Foodborne diseases are an increasing public health issue, in which bacterial pathogens have a transcendental role. To face this situation, the food industry has implemented several control strategies, using in the last decade some biotechnological tools, such as direct application of bacteriophages on food, to effectively control bacterial pathogens. Their bactericidal and safe properties to humans and animals have been widely described in the literature, being nowadays some bacteriophage-based products commercially available. Despite this, there are so many factors that can interfere in their biocontrol effectiveness on food, therefore is essential to consider these factors before their application. Thus, the optimal bacterial reduction will be achieved, which would produce a safer food. This review discusses some factors to consider in the use of bacteriophages as biocontrol agents of foodborne pathogens, including historical background, taxonomy and biological description of bacteriophages, and also advantages, disadvantages, and considerations of food applications. PMID:26928505

  11. Pecularities of mutagenesis of T4Br bacteriophage under the direct and indirect radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different lethal and mutagenic effects were shown when bacteriophage T4Br+ (470 r/min) was irradiated in broth (direct effect) and a buffer solution (direct and indirect action). The survival rate of the bacteriophage in the buffer solution was 0.1 percent for a dose rate of 60 kr; in the broth it was 10 percent. The frequency of mutation of the bacteriophage also showed the greater effect of the irradiation in the buffer solution than in the broth (25 and 5 r-mutants respectively at a dose rate of 10 kr). An analysis of the ratio of the r-groups when the bacteriophage was treated in various ways revealed differences between mutagenesis produced in the broth and the buffer, and spontaneous mutagenesis. (V.A.P.)

  12. Xylanase production by Streptomyces viridosporus T7A in submerged and solid-state fermentation using agro-industrial residues

    OpenAIRE

    Luiz Romulo Alberton; Luciana Porto de Souza Vandenberghe; Ricardo Assmann; Ricardo Cancio Fendrich; José Rodriguéz-León; Carlos Ricardo Soccol

    2009-01-01

    The study of xylanase production was conducted by Streptomyces viridosporus T7A in submerged (SmF) and solid-state fermentation (SSF), using agro-industrial residues and sub-products. Napier grass, sugarcane bagasse and soybean bran were used as carbon source, substrate/support, and nitrogen source, respectively. In SmF, Napier grass (1% v/w) supplemented with soybean bran, hydroxyethylcellulose and B complex vitamins were used. Soybean bran (1.5 % w/v), B complex vitamins (0.1%), and hydroxy...

  13. 广拓(GATO)T7脉冲电子围栏系统测评

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余崇义

    2012-01-01

    周界脉冲电子围栏以“有形、威慑、主动”的特点和优势已被行业和用户广泛接受和认可,其取代红外对射等周界探测设备也已成定势。本期就上海广拓信息技术有限公司就带来其公司T7系列的智能脉冲电子围栏报警系统,与读者共同分享。

  14. Experimental investigation of the effects of aqueous species on the dissolution kinetics of R7T7 glass; Etude experimentale de l`influence d`especes aqueuses sur la cinetique de dissolution du verre nucleaire R7T7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gin, S.

    1994-10-01

    This contribution to the study of aqueous corrosion of the French ``R7T7`` reference nuclear containment glass includes a bibliographic survey of prior investigations, highlighting the problems encountered in interpreting the interactions in systems containing clay materials in contact with the glass. An experimental methodology is proposed to investigate the effects of inorganic aqueous species separately from those of a few organic acids on the dissolution mechanisms and kinetics of R7T7 glass at 90 deg. C. The experimental results discussed support the idea that several glass network forming elements may have a kinetically limiting role. The most likely hypothesis to account for the absence of saturation conditions with respect to the glass in certain clay media involves the formation of complexes with kinetically limiting metallic elements such as aluminum released by glass corrosion. This work contributes to a better understanding of the basic mechanisms of nuclear glass dissolution in a geological repository environment. It facilitates the interpretation of glass alteration studies in realistic or actual solutions and may contribute to specifying near field chemical barriers in the form of additives (amorphous silica, aluminum hydroxides or phosphates) around the glass disposal package to enhance the stability of the glass matrix. (author). 148 refs., 40 figs., 32 tabs., 1 append.

  15. BRED: A Simple and Powerful Tool for Constructing Mutant and Recombinant Bacteriophage Genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Marinelli, Laura J.; Mariana Piuri; Zuzana Swigonová; Amrita Balachandran; Oldfield, Lauren M.; van Kessel, Julia C.; Hatfull, Graham F.

    2008-01-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing technology have facilitated the determination of hundreds of complete genome sequences both for bacteria and their bacteriophages. Some of these bacteria have well-developed and facile genetic systems for constructing mutants to determine gene function, and recombineering is a particularly effective tool. However, generally applicable methods for constructing defined mutants of bacteriophages are poorly developed, in part because of the inability to use selectable m...

  16. Isolation of Dickeya dadantii strains from potato disease and biocontrol by their bacteriophages

    OpenAIRE

    Soleimani-Delfan, Abbas; Etemadifar, Zahra; Emtiazi, Giti; Bouzari, Majid

    2015-01-01

    One of the most economically important bacterial pathogens of plants and plant products is Dickeya dadantii. This bacterium causes soft rot disease in tubers and other parts of the potato and other plants of the Solanaceae family. The application of restricted host range bacteriophages as biocontrol agents has recently gained widespread interest. This study purposed to isolate the infectious agent of the potato and evaluate its biocontrol by bacteriophages. Two phytopathogenic strains were is...

  17. A Fluoroquinolone Induces a Novel Mitogen-Encoding Bacteriophage in Streptococcus canis

    OpenAIRE

    Ingrey, Keely T.; Ren, Jun; Prescott, John F.

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated whether the recently recognized emergence of canine streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) and necrotizing fasciitis (NF) might be partly attributed to the use of fluoroquinolones to treat Streptococcus canis infections in dogs. Both mitomycin and the fluoroquinolone enrofloxacin caused bacteriophage-induced lysis of S. canis strain 34, an isolate from a case of canine STSS and NF. Fluoroquinolone-evoked, bacteriophage-induced lysis occurred over a range of concentr...

  18. Bacteriophages LIMElight and LIMEzero of Pantoea agglomerans belonging to the 'phiKMV-like viruses'

    OpenAIRE

    Adriaenssens, Evelien; Ceyssens, Pieter-Jan; Dunon, Vincent; Ackermann, Hans-Wolfgang; Van Vaerenbergh, Johan; Maes, Martine; De Proft, Maurice; Lavigne, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Pantoea agglomerans is a common soil bacterium used in the biocontrol of fungi and bacteria but is also an opportunistic human pathogen. It has been described extensively in this context, but knowledge of bacteriophages infecting this species is limited. Bacteriophages LIMEzero and LIMElight of P. agglomerans are lytic phages, isolated from soil samples, belonging to the Podoviridae and are the first Pantoea phages of this family to be described. The double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genomes (43,03...

  19. Excision repair and patch size in UV-irradiated bacteriophage T4.

    OpenAIRE

    Yarosh, D B; Rosenstein, B S; Setlow, R B

    1981-01-01

    We determined the average size of excision repair patches in repair of UV lesions in bacteriophage T4 by measuring the photolysis of bromodeoxyuridine incorporated during repair. The average patch was small, approximately four nucleotides long. In control experiments with the denV1 excision-deficient mutant, we encountered an artifact, a protein(s) which remained bound to phenol-extracted DNA and prevented nicking by the UV-specific endonucleases of Micrococcus luteus and bacteriophage T4.

  20. Access to bacteriophage therapy: discouraging experiences from the human cell and tissue legal framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeken, G; Huys, I; De Vos, D; De Coninck, A; Roseeuw, D; Kets, E; Vanderkelen, A; Draye, J P; Rose, T; Jennes, S; Ceulemans, C; Pirnay, J P

    2016-02-01

    Cultures of human epithelial cells (keratinocytes) are used as an additional surgical tool to treat critically burnt patients. Initially, the production environment of keratinocyte grafts was regulated exclusively by national regulations. In 2004, the European Tissues and Cells Directive 2004/23/EC (transposed into Belgian Law) imposed requirements that resulted in increased production costs and no significant increase in quality and/or safety. In 2007, Europe published Regulation (EC) No. 1394/2007 on Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products. Overnight, cultured keratinocytes became (arguably) 'Advanced' Therapy Medicinal Products to be produced as human medicinal products. The practical impact of these amendments was (and still is) considerable. A similar development appears imminent in bacteriophage therapy. Bacteriophages are bacterial viruses that can be used for tackling the problem of bacterial resistance development to antibiotics. Therapeutic natural bacteriophages have been in clinical use for almost 100 years. Regulators today are framing the (re-)introduction of (natural) bacteriophage therapy into 'modern western' medicine as biological medicinal products, also subject to stringent regulatory medicinal products requirements. In this paper, we look back on a century of bacteriophage therapy to make the case that therapeutic natural bacteriophages should not be classified under the medicinal product regulatory frames as they exist today. It is our call to authorities to not repeat the mistake of the past. PMID:26678555

  1. A simple and novel modification of comet assay for determination of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairnar, Krishna; Sanmukh, Swapnil; Chandekar, Rajshree; Paunikar, Waman

    2014-07-01

    The comet assay is the widely used method for in vitro toxicity testing which is also an alternative to the use of animal models for in vivo testing. Since, its inception in 1984 by Ostling and Johansson, it is being modified frequently for a wide range of application. In spite of its wide applicability, unfortunately there is no report of its application in bacteriophages research. In this study, a novel application of comet assay for the detection of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis was described. The conventional methods in bacteriophage research for studying bacterial lysis by bacteriophages are plaque assay method. It is time consuming, laborious and costly. The lytic activity of bacteriophage devours the bacterial cell which results in the release of bacterial genomic material that gets detected by ethidium bromide staining method by the comet assay protocol. The objective of this study was to compare efficacy of comet assay with different assay used to study phage mediated bacterial lysis. The assay was performed on culture isolates (N=80 studies), modified comet assay appear to have relatively higher sensitivity and specificity than other assay. The results of the study showed that the application of comet assay can be an economical, time saving and less laborious alternative to conventional plaque assay for the detection of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis. PMID:24681053

  2. [Determination of Azospirillum Brasilense Cells With Bacteriophages via Electrooptical Analysis of Microbial Suspensions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulii, O I; Karavayeva, O A; Pavlii, S A; Sokolov, O I; Bunin, V D; Ignatov, O V

    2015-01-01

    The dependence-of changes in the electrooptical properties of Azospirillum brasilense cell suspension Sp7 during interaction with bacteriophage ΦAb-Sp7 on the number and time of interactions was studied. Incubation of cells with bacteriophage significantly changed the electrooptical signal within one minute. The selective effect of bacteriophage ΦAb on 18 strains of bacteria of the genus Azospirillum was studied: A. amazonense Ami4, A. brasilense Sp7, Cd, Sp107, Sp245, Jm6B2, Brl4, KR77, S17, S27, SR55, SR75, A. halopraeferans Au4, A. irakense KBC1, K A3, A. lipoferum Sp59b, SR65 and RG20a. We determined the limit of reliable determination of microbial cells infected with bacteriophage: - 10(4) cells/mL. The presence of foreign cell cultures of E. coli B-878 and E. coli XL-1 did not complicate the detection of A brasilense Sp7 cells with the use of bacteriophage ΦAb-Sp7. The results demonstrated that bacteriophage (ΦAb-Sp7 can be used for the detection of Azospirillum microbial cells via t electrooptical analysis of cell suspensions. PMID:26204775

  3. Bacteriophages in clinical samples can interfere with microbiological diagnostic tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Jaque, Maryury; Muniesa, Maite; Navarro, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria, and they are found everywhere their bacterial hosts are present, including the human body. To explore the presence of phages in clinical samples, we assessed 65 clinical samples (blood, ascitic fluid, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and serum). Infectious tailed phages were detected in >45% of ascitic fluid and urine samples. Three examples of phage interference with bacterial isolation were observed. Phages prevented the confluent bacterial growth required for an antibiogram assay when the inoculum was taken from an agar plate containing lysis plaques, but not when taken from a single colony in a phage-free area. In addition, bacteria were isolated directly from ascitic fluid, but not after liquid enrichment culture of the same samples, since phage propagation lysed the bacteria. Lastly, Gram-negative bacilli observed in a urine sample did not grow on agar plates due to the high densities of infectious phages in the sample. PMID:27609086

  4. The role of temperate bacteriophages in bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Emily V; Winstanley, Craig; Fothergill, Joanne L; James, Chloe E

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. There are an estimated 10(31) phage on the planet, making them the most abundant form of life. We are rapidly approaching the centenary of their identification, and yet still have only a limited understanding of their role in the ecology and evolution of bacterial populations. Temperate prophage carriage is often associated with increased bacterial virulence. The rise in use of technologies, such as genome sequencing and transcriptomics, has highlighted more subtle ways in which prophages contribute to pathogenicity. This review discusses the current knowledge of the multifaceted effects that phage can exert on their hosts and how this may contribute to bacterial adaptation during infection. PMID:26825679

  5. Capstan friction model for DNA ejection from bacteriophages

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosal, Sandip

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophages infect cells by attaching to the outer membrane and injecting their DNA into the cell.The phage DNA is then transcribed by the cell's transcription machinery.A number of physical mechanisms by which DNA can be translocated from the phage capsid into the cell have been identified. A fast ejection driven by the elastic and electrostatic potential energy of the compacted DNA within the viral capsid appears to be used by most phages, at least to initiate infection.In recent in vitro experiments, the speed of DNA translocation from a lambda phage capsid has been measured as a function of ejected length over the entire duration of the event.Here a mechanical model is proposed that is able to explain the observed dependence of exit velocity on ejected length, and that is also consistent with the accepted picture of the geometric arrangement of DNA within the viral capsid.

  6. Role of osmotic and hydrostatic pressures in bacteriophage genome ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemay, Serge G.; Panja, Debabrata; Molineux, Ian J.

    2013-02-01

    A critical step in the bacteriophage life cycle is genome ejection into host bacteria. The ejection process for double-stranded DNA phages has been studied thoroughly in vitro, where after triggering with the cellular receptor the genome ejects into a buffer. The experimental data have been interpreted in terms of the decrease in free energy of the densely packed DNA associated with genome ejection. Here we detail a simple model of genome ejection in terms of the hydrostatic and osmotic pressures inside the phage, a bacterium, and a buffer solution or culture medium. We argue that the hydrodynamic flow associated with the water movement from the buffer solution into the phage capsid and further drainage into the bacterial cytoplasm, driven by the osmotic gradient between the bacterial cytoplasm and culture medium, provides an alternative mechanism for phage genome ejection in vivo; the mechanism is perfectly consistent with phage genome ejection in vitro.

  7. Role of osmotic and hydrostatic pressures in bacteriophage genome ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Lemay, Serge G; Molineux, Ian J

    2012-01-01

    A critical step in the bacteriophage life cycle is genome ejection into host bacteria. The ejection process for double-stranded DNA phages has been studied thoroughly \\textit{in vitro}, where after triggering with the cellular receptor the genome ejects into a buffer. The experimental data have been interpreted in terms of the decrease in free energy of the densely packed DNA associated with genome ejection. Here we detail a simple model of genome ejection in terms of the hydrostatic and osmotic pressures inside the phage, a bacterium, and a buffer solution/culture medium. We argue that the hydrodynamic flow associated with the water movement from the buffer solution into the phage capsid and further drainage into the bacterial cytoplasm, driven by the osmotic gradient between the bacterial cytoplasm and culture medium, provides an alternative mechanism for phage genome ejection \\textit{in vivo}; the mechanism is perfectly consistent with phage genome ejection \\textit{in vitro}.

  8. Modelling the interaction between bacteriophages and their bacterial hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beke, Gabor; Stano, Matej; Klucar, Lubos

    2016-09-01

    A mathematical model simulating the interaction between bacteriophages and their bacterial hosts has been developed. It is based on other known models describing this type of interaction, enhanced with an ability to model the system influenced by other environmental factor such as pH and temperature. This could be used for numerous estimations of growth rate, when the pH and/or the temperature of the environment are not constant. The change of pH or the temperature greatly affects the specific growth rate which has an effect on the final results of the simulation. Since the model aims on practical application and easy accessibility, an interactive website has been developed where users can run simulations with their own parameters and easily calculate and visualise the result of simulation. The web simulation is accessible at the URL http://www.phisite.org/model. PMID:27393678

  9. A quorum-sensing-induced bacteriophage defense mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyland-Kroghsbo, Nina Molin; Mærkedahl, Rasmus Baadsgaard; Svenningsen, Sine

    2013-01-01

    . Specifically, E. coli reduces the numbers of ¿ receptors on the cell surface in response to N-acyl-l-homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing signals, causing a 2-fold reduction in the phage adsorption rate. The modest reduction in phage adsorption rate leads to a dramatic increase in the frequency of...... sensing plays an important role in determining the susceptibility of E. coli to infection by bacteriophages ¿ and ¿. On the basis of our findings in the classical Escherichia coli-¿ model system, we suggest that quorum sensing may serve as a general strategy to protect bacteria specifically under...... uninfected survivor cells after a potent attack by virulent phages. Notably, this mechanism may apply to a broader range of phages, as AHLs also reduce the risk of ¿ phage infection through a different receptor. IMPORTANCE To enable the successful manipulation of bacterial populations, a comprehensive...

  10. The Allosteric Switching Mechanism in Bacteriophage MS2

    CERN Document Server

    Perkett, Matthew R

    2015-01-01

    In this article we use all-atom simulations to elucidate the mechanisms underlying conformational switching and allostery within the coat protein of the bacteriophage MS2. Assembly of most icosahedral virus capsids requires that the capsid protein adopt different conformations at precise locations within the capsid. It has been shown that a 19 nucleotide stem loop (TR) from the MS2 genome acts as an allosteric effector, guiding conformational switching of the coat protein during capsid assembly. Since the principal conformational changes occur far from the TR binding site, it is important to understand the molecular mechanism underlying this allosteric communication. To this end, we use all-atom simulations with explicit water combined with a path sampling technique to sample the MS2 coat protein conformational transition, in the presence and absence of TR-binding. The calculations find that TR binding strongly alters the transition free energy profile, leading to a switch in the favored conformation. We disc...

  11. Sewage bacteriophage inactivation by cationic porphyrins: influence of light parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Liliana; Carvalho, Carla M B; Faustino, Maria A F; Neves, Maria G P M S; Tomé, João P C; Tomé, Augusto C; Cavaleiro, José A S; Cunha, Angela; Almeida, Adelaide

    2010-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of targeted photosensitizers. Although the photoinactivation of microorganisms has already been studied under different conditions, a systematic evaluation of irradiation characteristics is still limited. The goal of this study was to test how the light dose, fluence rate and irradiation source affect the viral photoinactivation of a T4-like sewage bacteriophage. The experiments were carried out using white PAR light delivered by fluorescent PAR lamps (40 W m(-2)), sun light (600 W m(-2)) and an halogen lamp (40-1690 W m(-2)). Phage suspensions and two cationic photosensitizers (Tetra-Py(+)-Me, Tri-Py(+)-Me-PF) at concentrations of 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0 microM were used. The results showed that the efficacy of the bacteriophage photoinactivation is correlated not only with the sensitizer and its concentration but also with the light source, energy dose and fluence rate applied. Both photosensitizers at 5.0 microM were able to inactivate the T4-like phage to the limit of detection for each light source and fluence rate. However, depending of the light parameters, different irradiation times are required. The efficiency of photoinactivation is dependent on the spectral emission distribution of the light sources used. Considering the same light source and a fixed light dose applied at different fluence rates, phage inactivation was significantly higher when low fluence rates were used. In this way, the light source, fluence rate and total light dose play an important role in the effectiveness of the antimicrobial photodynamic therapy and should always be considered when establishing an optimal antimicrobial protocol. PMID:20563346

  12. Bacteriophage and their potential roles in the human oral cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlund, Anna; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M.; Boehm, Tobias K.; Pride, David T.

    2015-01-01

    The human oral cavity provides the perfect portal of entry for viruses and bacteria in the environment to access new hosts. Hence, the oral cavity is one of the most densely populated habitats of the human body containing some 6 billion bacteria and potentially 35 times that many viruses. The role of these viral communities remains unclear; however, many are bacteriophage that may have active roles in shaping the ecology of oral bacterial communities. Other implications for the presence of such vast oral phage communities include accelerating the molecular diversity of their bacterial hosts as both host and phage mutate to gain evolutionary advantages. Additional roles include the acquisitions of new gene functions through lysogenic conversions that may provide selective advantages to host bacteria in response to antibiotics or other types of disturbances, and protection of the human host from invading pathogens by binding to and preventing pathogens from crossing oral mucosal barriers. Recent evidence suggests that phage may be more involved in periodontal diseases than were previously thought, as their compositions in the subgingival crevice in moderate to severe periodontitis are known to be significantly altered. However, it is unclear to what extent they contribute to dysbiosis or the transition of the microbial community into a state promoting oral disease. Bacteriophage communities are distinct in saliva compared to sub- and supragingival areas, suggesting that different oral biogeographic niches have unique phage ecology shaping their bacterial biota. In this review, we summarize what is known about phage communities in the oral cavity, the possible contributions of phage in shaping oral bacterial ecology, and the risks to public health oral phage may pose through their potential to spread antibiotic resistance gene functions to close contacts. PMID:25861745

  13. Bacteriophage and their potential roles in the human oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlund, Anna; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Boehm, Tobias K; Pride, David T

    2015-01-01

    The human oral cavity provides the perfect portal of entry for viruses and bacteria in the environment to access new hosts. Hence, the oral cavity is one of the most densely populated habitats of the human body containing some 6 billion bacteria and potentially 35 times that many viruses. The role of these viral communities remains unclear; however, many are bacteriophage that may have active roles in shaping the ecology of oral bacterial communities. Other implications for the presence of such vast oral phage communities include accelerating the molecular diversity of their bacterial hosts as both host and phage mutate to gain evolutionary advantages. Additional roles include the acquisitions of new gene functions through lysogenic conversions that may provide selective advantages to host bacteria in response to antibiotics or other types of disturbances, and protection of the human host from invading pathogens by binding to and preventing pathogens from crossing oral mucosal barriers. Recent evidence suggests that phage may be more involved in periodontal diseases than were previously thought, as their compositions in the subgingival crevice in moderate to severe periodontitis are known to be significantly altered. However, it is unclear to what extent they contribute to dysbiosis or the transition of the microbial community into a state promoting oral disease. Bacteriophage communities are distinct in saliva compared to sub- and supragingival areas, suggesting that different oral biogeographic niches have unique phage ecology shaping their bacterial biota. In this review, we summarize what is known about phage communities in the oral cavity, the possible contributions of phage in shaping oral bacterial ecology, and the risks to public health oral phage may pose through their potential to spread antibiotic resistance gene functions to close contacts. PMID:25861745

  14. Bacteriophage and their potential roles in the human oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Edlund

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The human oral cavity provides the perfect portal of entry for viruses and bacteria in the environment to access new hosts. Hence, the oral cavity is one of the most densely populated habitats of the human body containing some 6 billion bacteria and potentially 35 times that many viruses. The role of these viral communities remains unclear; however, many are bacteriophage that may have active roles in shaping the ecology of oral bacterial communities. Other implications for the presence of such vast oral phage communities include accelerating the molecular diversity of their bacterial hosts as both host and phage mutate to gain evolutionary advantages. Additional roles include the acquisitions of new gene functions through lysogenic conversions that may provide selective advantages to host bacteria in response to antibiotics or other types of disturbances, and protection of the human host from invading pathogens by binding to and preventing pathogens from crossing oral mucosal barriers. Recent evidence suggests that phage may be more involved in periodontal diseases than were previously thought, as their compositions in the subgingival crevice in moderate to severe periodontitis are known to be significantly altered. However, it is unclear to what extent they contribute to dysbiosis or the transition of the microbial community into a state promoting oral disease. Bacteriophage communities are distinct in saliva compared to sub- and supragingival areas, suggesting that different oral biogeographic niches have unique phage ecology shaping their bacterial biota. In this review, we summarize what is known about phage communities in the oral cavity, the possible contributions of phage in shaping oral bacterial ecology, and the risks to public health oral phage may pose through their potential to spread antibiotic resistance gene functions to close contacts.

  15. Review: elimination of bacteriophages in whey and whey products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep eAtamer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available As the cheese market faces strong international competition, the optimization of production processes becomes more important for the economic success of dairy companies. In dairy productions, whey from former cheese batches is frequently re-used to increase the yield, to improve the texture and to increase the nutrient value of the final product. Recycling of whey cream and particulated whey proteins is also routinely performed. Most bacteriophages, however, survive pasteurization and may re-enter the cheese manufacturing process. There is a risk that phages multiply to high numbers during the production. Contamination of whey samples with bacteriophages may cause problems in cheese factories because whey separation often leads to aerosol-borne phages and thus contamination of the factory environment. Furthermore, whey cream or whey proteins used for recycling into cheese matrices may contain thermo-resistant phages. Drained cheese whey can be contaminated with phages as high as 109 phages per mL. When whey batches are concentrated, phage titers can increase significantly by a factor of 10 hindering a complete elimination of phages. To eliminate the risk of fermentation failure during recycling of whey, whey treatments assuring an efficient reduction of phages are indispensable. This review focuses on inactivation of phages in whey by thermal treatment, ultraviolet (UV light irradiation and membrane filtration. Inactivation by heat is the most common procedure. However, application of heat for inactivation of thermo-resistant phages in whey is restricted due to negative effects on the functional properties of native whey proteins. Therefore an alternative strategy applying combined treatments should be favoured - rather than heating the dairy product at extreme temperature/time combinations. By using membrane filtration or UV treatment in combination with thermal treatment, phage numbers in whey can be reduced sufficiently to prevent subsequent

  16. Experimental investigation of the effects of aqueous species on the dissolution kinetics of R7T7 glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This contribution to the study of aqueous corrosion of the French ''R7T7'' reference nuclear containment glass includes a bibliographic survey of prior investigations, highlighting the problems encountered in interpreting the interactions in systems containing clay materials in contact with the glass. An experimental methodology is proposed to investigate the effects of inorganic aqueous species separately from those of a few organic acids on the dissolution mechanisms and kinetics of R7T7 glass at 90 deg. C. The experimental results discussed support the idea that several glass network forming elements may have a kinetically limiting role. The most likely hypothesis to account for the absence of saturation conditions with respect to the glass in certain clay media involves the formation of complexes with kinetically limiting metallic elements such as aluminum released by glass corrosion. This work contributes to a better understanding of the basic mechanisms of nuclear glass dissolution in a geological repository environment. It facilitates the interpretation of glass alteration studies in realistic or actual solutions and may contribute to specifying near field chemical barriers in the form of additives (amorphous silica, aluminum hydroxides or phosphates) around the glass disposal package to enhance the stability of the glass matrix. (author). 148 refs., 40 figs., 32 tabs., 1 append

  17. R7T7 glass alteration mechanism in an aqueous closed system: understanding and modelling the long term alteration kinetic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long term alteration rate of the French R7T7 nuclear glass has been investigated since many years because it will define the overall resistance of the radionuclide containment matrix. Recent studies have shown that the final rate remains constant or is slightly decreasing with time. It never reaches zero. Though this residual rate is very low, only 5 nm per year at 50 C, it would be the dominant alteration phenomenon in a geological repository. Two mechanisms are suggested for explaining such behaviour: diffusion in solution of elements from glass through an amorphous altered layer and precipitation of neo-formed phases. The diffusion processes are in agreement with a solid state diffusion mechanism and can lead to secondary phase precipitation due to solution concentration increases. Observed phases are mainly phyllosilicates and zeolites, in specific conditions. Phyllosilicates are expected to maintain the residual kinetic rate whereas alteration resumption could be observed in presence of zeolites at very high pH or temperature (10.5 at 90 C or temperature above 150 C). Both diffusion and neo-formed phase precipitation have been investigated in order to better understand their impact on the residual alteration rate and have then been modelled by a calculation code, coupling chemistry and transport, in order to be able to better anticipate the long term behaviour of the glass R7T7 in an aqueous closed system. (author)

  18. Aqueous corrosion mechanisms of the nuclear glass R7T7. Experimental approach. Kinetics and thermodynamic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An inactive borosilicate glass made of about 30 oxides is studied. The composition was developed by the CEA for encapsulation of calcinated fission product solutions from reprocessing. Hydration energy of glass is first calculated for 8 glasses and results are compared to experimental data. Dissolution of R7T7 glass is examined at 900C in a large range of pH and S/V ratios (glass surface/solution volume). In dilute media (S/V = 0.1 cm-1) dissolution is selective at acid pH and stoichiometric at basic pH. In alkaline media dissolution rate increases with pH. Corrosion products, generally amorphous or badly crystallized are observed on glass surface. For high S/V ratios (4, 20, 80 and 200 cm-1) the very low dissolution rate is explained by saturation. Orthosilic acid controls corrosion kinetics. A kinetic equation is proposed taking into account pH, S/V ratio and dissolved silica concentration. Geochemical consequences of R7T7 dissolution are modelled at 1000C and 900C. Affinity of dissolution reaction depends upon many factors (pH, silica concentration, nature and crystallinity of secondary phases. Reaction affinity is not constant for the long-term

  19. A Bima Array Survey of Molecules in Comets Linear (C/2002 T7) and Neat (C/2001 Q4)

    CERN Document Server

    Remijan, A J; Blake, G A; De Pater, I; Dickel, H R; Forster, J R; Friedel, D N; Hogerheijde, M R; Kraybill, C; Looney, L W; Palmer, P; Snyder, L E; Wright, M C H; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Palmer, Patrick; Pater, Imke de; Remijan, Anthony J.

    2006-01-01

    We present an interferometric search for large molecules, including methanol, methyl cyanide, ethyl cyanide, ethanol, and methyl formate in comets LINEAR (C/2002 T7) and NEAT (C/2001 Q4) with the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association (BIMA) array. In addition, we also searched for transitions of the simpler molecules CS, SiO, HNC, HN13C and 13CO . We detected transitions of methanol and CS around Comet LINEAR and one transition of methanol around Comet NEAT within a synthesized beam of ~20''. We calculated the total column density and production rate of each molecular species using the variable temperature and outflow velocity (VTOV) model described by Friedel et al.(2005).Considering the molecular production rate ratios with respect to water, Comet T7 LINEAR is more similar to Comet Hale-Bopp while Comet Q4 NEAT is more similar to Comet Hyakutake. It is unclear, however, due to such a small sample size, whether there is a clear distinction between a Hale-Bopp and Hyakutake class of comet or whether comets h...

  20. Spitzer Infrared Observations and Independent Validation of the Transiting Super-Earth CoRoT-7b

    CERN Document Server

    Fressin, Francois; Pont, Frederic; Knutson, Heather A; Charbonneau, David; Mazeh, Tsevi; Aigrain, Suzanne; Fridlund, Malcolm; Henze, Christopher E; Guillot, Tristan; Rauer, Heike

    2011-01-01

    The detection and characterization of the first transiting super-Earth, CoRoT-7 b, has required an unprecedented effort in terms of telescope time and analysis. Although the star does display a radial velocity signal at the period of the planet, this has been difficult to disentangle from the intrinsic stellar variability, and pinning down the velocity amplitude has been very challenging. As a result, the precise value of the mass of the planet - and even the extent to which it can be considered to be confirmed - have been debated in the recent literature, with six mass measurements published so far based on the same spectroscopic observations, ranging from about 2 to 8 Earth masses. Here we report on an independent validation of the planet discovery, using one of the fundamental properties of a transit signal: its achromaticity. We observed four transits of CoRoT-7 b with Spitzer, in order to determine whether the depth of the transit signal in the near-infrared is consistent with that observed in the CoRoT ...

  1. A high-copy T7 Escherichia coli expression vector for the production of recombinant proteins with a minimal N-terminal His-tagged fusion peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.R.R. Ramos

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available We report here the construction of a vector derived from pET3-His and pRSET plasmids for the expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli based on T7 phage RNA polymerase. The resulting pAE plasmid combined the advantages of both vectors: small size (pRSET, expression of a short 6XHis tag at N-terminus (pET3-His and a high copy number of plasmid (pRSET. The small size of the vector (2.8 kb and the high copy number/cell (200-250 copies facilitate the subcloning and sequencing procedures when compared to the pET system (pET3-His, 4.6 kb and 40-50 copies and also result in high level expression of recombinant proteins (20 mg purified protein/liter of culture. In addition, the vector pAE enables the expression of a fusion protein with a minimal amino-terminal hexa-histidine affinity tag (a tag of 9 amino acids using XhoI restriction enzyme for the 5'cloning site as in the case of pET3-His plasmid and in contrast to proteins expressed by pRSET plasmids (a tag of 36 amino acids using BamHI restriction enzyme for the 5'cloning site. Thus, although proteins expressed by pRSET plasmids also have a hexa-histidine tag, the fusion peptide is much longer and may represent a problem for some recombinant proteins.

  2. Simple Method for Constructing RNA Triangle, Square, Pentagon by Tuning Interior RNA 3WJ Angle from 60° to 90° or 108°.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khisamutdinov, Emil F; Bui, My Nguyen Hoan; Jasinski, Daniel; Zhao, Zhengyi; Cui, Zheng; Guo, Peixuan

    2015-01-01

    Precise shape control of architectures at the nanometer scale is an intriguing but extremely challenging facet. RNA has recently emerged as a unique material and thermostable building block for use in nanoparticle construction. Here, we describe a simple method from design to synthesis of RNA triangle, square, and pentagon by stretching RNA 3WJ native angle from 60° to 90° and 108°, using the three-way junction (3WJ) of the pRNA from bacteriophage phi29 dsDNA packaging motor. These methods for the construction of elegant polygons can be applied to other RNA building blocks including the utilization and application of RNA 4-way, 5-way, and other multi-way junctions. PMID:25967062

  3. The Effectiveness of Bacteriophages against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 Nasal Colonization in Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duim, Birgitta; Fluit, Ad C; Carney, Jennifer; van Nes, Arie; Wagenaar, Jaap A

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important colonizer in animals and an opportunistic pathogen in humans. In humans, MRSA can cause infections that might be difficult to treat because of antimicrobial resistance. The use of bacteriophages has been suggested as a potential approach for the control of MRSA colonization to minimize the—often occupational—exposure of humans. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of bacteriophage treatment on porcine nasal colonization with MRSA in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo. The effectiveness of a bacteriophage combination of phage K*710 and P68 was assessed in vitro by incubating them with MRSA V0608892/1 (ST398) measuring the OD600 hourly. To study the in vivo effect, bacteriophages were administered in a gel developed for human application, which contain 109 plaque-forming units (pfu)/mL (K and P68 in a 19.25:1 ratio) for 5 days to piglets (N = 8) that were experimentally colonized with the MRSA strain. Eight piglets experimentally colonized were used as a negative control. The MRSA strain was also used to colonize porcine nasal mucosa explants and bacteriophages were applied to assess the ex vivo efficacy of treatment. Bacteriophages were effective in vitro. In vivo, sixteen piglets were colonized with MRSA but the number of CFU recovered after the application of the bacteriophages in 8 piglets was not reduced compared to the control animals (approx. 105 CFU/swab). In the ex vivo model, 108 CFU were used to establish colonization with MRSA; a reduction of colonization was not observed after application of bacteriophages. However, application of mupirocin both in vivo and ex vivo resulted in a near eradication of MRSA. In conclusion: i) The MRSA strain was killed in the presence of the bacteriophages phage K*710 and P68 in vitro. ii) Bacteriophages did not reduce porcine nasal colonization in vivo or ex vivo. Physiological in vivo and ex vivo conditions may explain these observations. Efficacy

  4. Fecal Bacteria, Bacteriophage, and Nutrient Reductions in a Full-Scale Denitrifying Woodchip Bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambags, Femke; Tanner, Chris C; Stott, Rebecca; Schipper, Louis A

    2016-05-01

    Denitrifying bioreactors using woodchips or other slow-release carbon sources can be an effective method for removing nitrate (NO) from wastewater and tile drainage. However, the ability of these systems to remove fecal microbes from wastewater has been largely uninvestigated. In this study, reductions in fecal indicator bacteria () and viruses (F-specific RNA bacteriophage [FRNA phage]) were analyzed by monthly sampling along a longitudinal transect within a full-scale denitrifying woodchip bioreactor receiving secondary-treated septic tank effluent. Nitrogen, phosphorus, 5-d carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand (CBOD), and total suspended solids (TSS) reduction were also assessed. The bioreactor demonstrated consistent and substantial reduction of (2.9 log reduction) and FRNA phage (3.9 log reduction) despite receiving highly fluctuating inflow concentrations [up to 3.5 × 10 MPN (100 mL) and 1.1 × 10 plaque-forming units (100 mL) , respectively]. Most of the removal of fecal microbial contaminants occurred within the first meter of the system (1.4 log reduction for ; 1.8 log reduction for FRNA phage). The system was also efficient at removing NO (>99.9% reduction) and TSS (89% reduction). There was no evidence of consistent removal of ammonium, organic nitrogen, or phosphorus. Leaching of CBOD occurred during initial operation but decreased and stabilized at lower values (14 g O m) after 9 mo. We present strong evidence for reliable microbial contaminant removal in denitrifying bioreactors, demonstrating their broader versatility for wastewater treatment. Research on the removal mechanisms of microbial contaminants in these systems, together with the assessment of longevity of removal, is warranted. PMID:27136150

  5. Rescue of Newcastle disease virus from cloned cDNA using an RNA polymerase II promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao-Yu; Li, Xue-Rui; Lan, Xi; Yin, Xiang-Pin; Li, Zhi-Yong; Yang, Bin; Liu, Ji-Xing

    2011-06-01

    A new system was developed to improve the efficiency and simplify the procedure of recovery of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) from cloned cDNA. A full-length cDNA clone of mesogenic NDV vaccine strain Mukteswar was assembled from five subgenomic cDNA fragments and cloned into a plasmid allowing transcription driven by cellular RNA polymerase II. The full-length viral cDNA was flanked by hammerhead ribozyme (HamRz) and hepatitis delta virus ribozyme (HdvRz) sequences, resulted in the synthesis of antigenomic RNA with exact termini. Without supplying T7 RNA polymerase, infectious NDV could be generated efficiently in some eukaryotic cell lines by simultaneous transcription of antigenomic RNA from the full-length plasmid and expression of NP, P and L proteins from helper plasmids introduced by cotransfection. The efficiency of recovery with the conventional T7 promoter system based on BRS-T7 cells and the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter system was compared, and the results demonstrate that the new system facilitates the generation of recombinant NDV and more efficient than the T7 rescue system using BRS-T7. PMID:21327786

  6. CRISPR interference: RNA-directed adaptive immunity in bacteria and archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Marraffini, Luciano A.; Sontheimer, Erik J.

    2010-01-01

    Sequence-directed genetic interference pathways control gene expression and preserve genome integrity in all kingdoms of life. The importance of such pathways is highlighted by the extensive study of RNA interference (RNAi) and related processes in eukaryotes. In many bacteria and most archaea, clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) are involved in a more recently discovered interference pathway that protects cells from bacteriophages and conjugative plasmids. CR...

  7. Sequence-specific antimicrobials using efficiently delivered RNA-guided nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Citorik, Robert J.; Mimee, Mark; Lu, Timothy K.

    2014-01-01

    Current antibiotics tend to be broad spectrum, leading to indiscriminate killing of commensal bacteria and accelerated evolution of drug resistance. Here, we use CRISPR-Cas technology to create antimicrobials whose spectrum of activity is chosen by design. RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) targeting specific DNA sequences are delivered efficiently to microbial populations using bacteriophage or bacteria carrying plasmids transmissible by conjugation. The DNA targets of RGNs can be undesirable genes...

  8. Diagnostic Immunization with Bacteriophage ΦX 174 in Patients with Common Variable Immunodeficiency/Hypogammaglobulinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren L Smith

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Use of the T cell-dependent neoantigen bacteriophage ΦX 174 has been described since the 1960s as a method to assess specific antibody response in patients with primary immunodeficiencies. We reviewed a cohort of patients at Duke University Medical Center (DUMC who received immunization with bacteriophage and report the clinical utility and safety of the immunization, as well as patient characteristics. Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed of all Duke Immunology Clinic patients (pediatric and adult who received immunizations with bacteriophage, from 1976-2012. Subjects were selected for inclusion if their diagnosis at the time of bacteriophage was either presumed or confirmed common variable immunodeficiency (CVID, hypogammaglobulinemia, transient hypogammaglobulinemia, or antibody deficiency unspecified. Follow up post-immunization was also recorded.Results: One hundred twenty-six patients were identified, 36 adult and 90 pediatric patients. Diagnoses prior to bacteriophage were CVID (n=100, hypogammaglobulinemia (n=23, and antibody deficiency (n=3. Post-immunization diagnoses were CVID (n=65, hypogammaglobulinemia (n=19, unknown (n=23, no primary immune deficiency (n=10, and other primary immunodeficiency (n=9. Seventy-five patients had abnormal bacteriophage results, 37 were normal, and 14 were borderline. There were 257 recorded administrations of the immunization. Information was available on adverse reactions for 171 administrations. Fourteen immunizations were associated with minor adverse events. Nineteen patients stopped their immunoglobulin replacement therapy based on reported normal responses to immunization. Conclusions: Bacteriophage ΦX 174 immunization is a safe, well-tolerated, and clinically useful method to assess antibody response in patients with suspected antibody-mediated immunodeficiencies, particularly those who are on immunoglobulin replacement therapy at the time of immunization

  9. Nucleotide sequence of a human tRNA gene heterocluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leucine tRNA from bovine liver was used as a hybridization probe to screen a human gene library harbored in Charon-4A of bacteriophage lambda. The human DNA inserts from plaque-pure clones were characterized by restriction endonuclease mapping and Southern hybridization techniques, using both [3'-32P]-labeled bovine liver leucine tRNA and total tRNA as hybridization probes. An 8-kb Hind III fragment of one of these γ-clones was subcloned into the Hind III site of pBR322. Subsequent fine restriction mapping and DNA sequence analysis of this plasmid DNA indicated the presence of four tRNA genes within the 8-kb DNA fragment. A leucine tRNA gene with an anticodon of AAG and a proline tRNA gene with an anticodon of AGG are in a 1.6-kb subfragment. A threonine tRNA gene with an anticodon of UGU and an as yet unidentified tRNA gene are located in a 1.1-kb subfragment. These two different subfragments are separated by 2.8 kb. The coding regions of the three sequenced genes contain characteristic internal split promoter sequences and do not have intervening sequences. The 3'-flanking region of these three genes have typical RNA polymerase III termination sites of at least four consecutive T residues

  10. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the bacteriophage CUS-3 virion reveal a conserved coat protein I-domain but a distinct tailspike receptor-binding domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CUS-3 is a short-tailed, dsDNA bacteriophage that infects serotype K1 Escherichia coli. We report icosahedrally averaged and asymmetric, three-dimensional, cryo-electron microscopic reconstructions of the CUS-3 virion. Its coat protein structure adopts the “HK97-fold” shared by other tailed phages and is quite similar to that in phages P22 and Sf6 despite only weak amino acid sequence similarity. In addition, these coat proteins share a unique extra external domain (“I-domain”), suggesting that the group of P22-like phages has evolved over a very long time period without acquiring a new coat protein gene from another phage group. On the other hand, the morphology of the CUS-3 tailspike differs significantly from that of P22 or Sf6, but is similar to the tailspike of phage K1F, a member of the extremely distantly related T7 group of phages. We conclude that CUS-3 obtained its tailspike gene from a distantly related phage quite recently. - Highlights: • Asymmetric and symmetric three-dimensional reconstructions of phage CUS-3 are presented. • CUS-3 major capsid protein has a conserved I-domain, which is found in all three categories of “P22-like phage”. • CUS-3 has very different tailspike receptor binding domain from those of P22 and Sf6. • The CUS-3 tailspike likely was acquired by horizontal gene transfer

  11. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the bacteriophage CUS-3 virion reveal a conserved coat protein I-domain but a distinct tailspike receptor-binding domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parent, Kristin N., E-mail: kparent@msu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0378 (United States); Tang, Jinghua; Cardone, Giovanni [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0378 (United States); Gilcrease, Eddie B. [University of Utah School of Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Pathology, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Janssen, Mandy E.; Olson, Norman H. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0378 (United States); Casjens, Sherwood R., E-mail: sherwood.casjens@path.utah.edu [University of Utah School of Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Pathology, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Baker, Timothy S., E-mail: tsb@ucsd.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0378 (United States); University of California, San Diego, Division of Biological Sciences, La Jolla, CA, 92093 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    CUS-3 is a short-tailed, dsDNA bacteriophage that infects serotype K1 Escherichia coli. We report icosahedrally averaged and asymmetric, three-dimensional, cryo-electron microscopic reconstructions of the CUS-3 virion. Its coat protein structure adopts the “HK97-fold” shared by other tailed phages and is quite similar to that in phages P22 and Sf6 despite only weak amino acid sequence similarity. In addition, these coat proteins share a unique extra external domain (“I-domain”), suggesting that the group of P22-like phages has evolved over a very long time period without acquiring a new coat protein gene from another phage group. On the other hand, the morphology of the CUS-3 tailspike differs significantly from that of P22 or Sf6, but is similar to the tailspike of phage K1F, a member of the extremely distantly related T7 group of phages. We conclude that CUS-3 obtained its tailspike gene from a distantly related phage quite recently. - Highlights: • Asymmetric and symmetric three-dimensional reconstructions of phage CUS-3 are presented. • CUS-3 major capsid protein has a conserved I-domain, which is found in all three categories of “P22-like phage”. • CUS-3 has very different tailspike receptor binding domain from those of P22 and Sf6. • The CUS-3 tailspike likely was acquired by horizontal gene transfer.

  12. Constraining planet structure from stellar chemistry: the cases of CoRoT-7, Kepler-10, and Kepler-93

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, N C; Mordasini, C; Benz, W; Delgado-Mena, E; Dorn, C; Buchhave, L; Figueira, P; Mortier, A; Pepe, F; Santerne, A; Sousa, S G; Udry, S

    2015-01-01

    We explore the possibility that the stellar relative abundances of different species can be used to constrain the bulk abundances of known transiting rocky planets. We use high resolution spectra to derive stellar parameters and chemical abundances for Fe, Si, Mg, O, and C in three stars hosting low mass, rocky planets: CoRoT-7, Kepler-10, and Kepler-93. These planets follow the same line along the mass-radius diagram, pointing toward a similar composition. The derived abundance ratios are compared with the solar values. With a simple stoichiometric model, we estimate the iron mass fraction in each planet, assuming stellar composition. We show that in all cases, the iron mass fraction inferred from the mass-radius relationship seems to be in good agreement with the iron abundance derived from the host star's photospheric composition. The results suggest that stellar abundances can be used to add constraints on the composition of orbiting rocky planets.

  13. Rilevazione di un effetto di fase nella curva di luce pre-perielica. La cometa C/2002 T7 (LINEAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Giannantonio

    2005-04-01

    Comet C/2002 T7 (LINEAR) was intensively observed for the CARA project during the pre-perihelion phase (3.3 < R < 1.2 A.U.). Light curve and Afrho measurements show a temporary increase, interpreted as a phase effect with a brightening of 0.036±0.05 magnitudes/degree, in good agreement with the data available on other comets. For phase angle f < 23° it displays a steeper trend (0.08±0.01 magniutdes/degree). Taking into account the phase effect, it appears that in the considered period the Afrho quantity was nearly constant (Afrho = 3128±434 cm). This constant behaviour has interesting implications and rules out nuclear activity.

  14. The 16OH/18OH and OD/OH isotope ratios in comet C/2002 T7 (LINEAR)

    CERN Document Server

    Hutsemékers, D; Jehin, E; Zucconi, J -M; Arpigny, C

    2008-01-01

    The 16OH/18OH and OD/OH isotope ratios are measured in the Oort-Cloud comet C/2002 T7 (LINEAR) through ground-based observations of the OH ultraviolet bands at 3063 A (0,0) and 3121 A (1,1) secured with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) feeding the Ultraviolet-Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES). From the 16OH/18OH ratio, we find 16O/18O = 425 +/- 55, equal within the uncertainties to the terrestrial value and to the ratio measured in other comets, although marginally smaller. We also estimate OD/OH from which we derive D/H = 2.5 +/- 0.7 10-4 in water. This value is compatible with the water D/H ratios evaluated in other comets and marginally higher than the terrestrial value.

  15. SPITZER INFRARED OBSERVATIONS AND INDEPENDENT VALIDATION OF THE TRANSITING SUPER-EARTH CoRoT-7 b

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detection and characterization of the first transiting super-Earth, CoRoT-7 b, has required an unprecedented effort in terms of telescope time and analysis. Although the star does display a radial-velocity signal at the period of the planet, this has been difficult to disentangle from the intrinsic stellar variability and pinning down the velocity amplitude has been very challenging. As a result, the precise value of the mass of the planet—and even the extent to which it can be considered to be confirmed—has been debated in the recent literature, with six mass measurements published so far based on the same spectroscopic observations, ranging from about 2 to 8 Earth masses. Here we report on an independent validation of the planet discovery using one of the fundamental properties of a transit signal: its achromaticity. We observed four transits of CoRoT-7 b at 4.5 μm and 8.0 μm with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on board the Spitzer Space Telescope in order to determine whether the depth of the transit signal in the near-infrared is consistent with that observed in the CoRoT bandpass, as expected for a planet. We detected the transit and found an average depth of 0.426 ± 0.115 mmag at 4.5 μm, which is in good agreement with the depth of 0.350 ± 0.011 mmag (ignoring limb darkening) found by CoRoT. The observations at 8.0 μm did not yield a significant detection. The 4.5 μm observations place important constraints on the kinds of astrophysical false positives that could mimic the signal. Combining this with additional constraints reported earlier, we performed an exhaustive exploration of possible blend scenarios for CoRoT-7 b using the BLENDER technique. We are able to rule out the vast majority of false positives, and the remaining ones are found to be much less likely than a true transiting planet. We thus validate CoRoT-7 b as a bona fide planet with a very high degree of confidence, independently of any radial-velocity information. Our Spitzer

  16. Synthetic gene involving azobenzene-tethered T7 promoter for the photocontrol of gene expression by visible light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Yukiko; Takagi, Toshiki; Ooi, Hideaki; Ito, Hiroshi; Liang, Xingguo; Asanuma, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-17

    In the present study, we demonstrate photoregulation of gene expression in a cell-free translation system from a T7 promoter containing two azobenzene derivatives at specific positions. As photoswitches, we prepared azobenzene-4'-carboxlyic acid (Azo) and 2,6-dimethylazobenzene-4'-carboxylic acid (DM-Azo), which were isomerized from trans to cis upon irradiation with UV light (λ protein from a promoter modified with S-Azo or S-DM-Azo could be induced by harmless visible light whereas that from a promoter modified with Azo or DM-Azo was induced only by UV light (340-360 nm). Thus, efficient photoregulation of green fluorescent protein production was achieved in a cell-free translation system with visible light without photodamage. PMID:25144622

  17. Effects of the SA/V ratio on the long-term corrosion kinetics of R7-T7 glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A glass silica solubility limit near the value reported by Grambow was observed for R7-T7 glass. A constant residual corrosion rate was not observed, however. The final rate cannot be considered as a characteristic glass property which can be used in long-term behavior models. As the final rate dropped to less than (10-4 g·m-2d-1 for the higher SA/V ratios, it may be assumed that there is no glass residual affinity. The very low corrosion rates detected in distilled or crystalline water are not directly applicable to complex storage situations where environmental materials, notably clay particles, can prevent saturating conditions from being obtained

  18. Creep Properties of the As-Cast Al-A319 Alloy: T4 and T7 Heat Treatment Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfanian-Naziftoosi, Hamid R.; Rincón, Ernesto J.; López, Hugo F.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, the creep behavior of a commercial Al-A319 alloy was investigated in the temperature range of 413 K to 533 K (140 °C to 260 °C). Tensile creep specimens in the as-cast condition and after heat treating by solid solution (T4) and by aging (T7) were tested in a stress range varying from 60 to 170 MPa. It was found that steady-state creep strain rate was significantly low in the T7 condition when compared with either the T4 or as-cast alloy conditions. As a result, the time to failure behavior considerably increased. The experimentally determined creep exponents measured from the stress-strain curves were 4 for the as-cast alloy, 7.5 in the solid solution, and 9.5 after aging. In particular, after solid solution a grain substructure was found to develop which indicated that creep in a constant subgrain structure was active, thus accounting for the n exponent of 7.5. In the aged condition, a stress threshold is considered to account for the power law creep exponent n of 9.5. Moreover, It was found that the creep activation energy values were rather similar for the alloys in the as-cast (134 kJ/mol) and T4 (146 kJ/mol) conditions. These values are close to the one corresponding to pure Al self-diffusion (143 kJ/mol). In the aged alloy, the apparent creep activation energy (202 kJ/mol) exceeded that corresponding to Al self-diffusion. This deviation in activation energy is attributed to the effect of temperature on the alloy elastic modulus. Microstructural observations using transmission electron microscopy provided further support for the various dislocation-microstructure interactions exhibited by the alloy under the investigated creep conditions and implemented heat treatments.

  19. Creep Properties of the As-Cast Al-A319 Alloy: T4 and T7 Heat Treatment Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfanian-Naziftoosi, Hamid R.; Rincón, Ernesto J.; López, Hugo F.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the creep behavior of a commercial Al-A319 alloy was investigated in the temperature range of 413 K to 533 K (140 °C to 260 °C). Tensile creep specimens in the as-cast condition and after heat treating by solid solution (T4) and by aging (T7) were tested in a stress range varying from 60 to 170 MPa. It was found that steady-state creep strain rate was significantly low in the T7 condition when compared with either the T4 or as-cast alloy conditions. As a result, the time to failure behavior considerably increased. The experimentally determined creep exponents measured from the stress-strain curves were 4 for the as-cast alloy, 7.5 in the solid solution, and 9.5 after aging. In particular, after solid solution a grain substructure was found to develop which indicated that creep in a constant subgrain structure was active, thus accounting for the n exponent of 7.5. In the aged condition, a stress threshold is considered to account for the power law creep exponent n of 9.5. Moreover, It was found that the creep activation energy values were rather similar for the alloys in the as-cast (134 kJ/mol) and T4 (146 kJ/mol) conditions. These values are close to the one corresponding to pure Al self-diffusion (143 kJ/mol). In the aged alloy, the apparent creep activation energy (202 kJ/mol) exceeded that corresponding to Al self-diffusion. This deviation in activation energy is attributed to the effect of temperature on the alloy elastic modulus. Microstructural observations using transmission electron microscopy provided further support for the various dislocation-microstructure interactions exhibited by the alloy under the investigated creep conditions and implemented heat treatments.

  20. Genomics of Three New Bacteriophages Useful in the Biocontrol of Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardina, Carlota; Colom, Joan; Spricigo, Denis A.; Otero, Jennifer; Sánchez-Osuna, Miquel; Cortés, Pilar; Llagostera, Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Non-typhoid Salmonella is the principal pathogen related to food-borne diseases throughout the world. Widespread antibiotic resistance has adversely affected human health and has encouraged the search for alternative antimicrobial agents. The advances in bacteriophage therapy highlight their use in controlling a broad spectrum of food-borne pathogens. One requirement for the use of bacteriophages as antibacterials is the characterization of their genomes. In this work, complete genome sequencing and molecular analyses were carried out for three new virulent Salmonella-specific bacteriophages (UAB_Phi20, UAB_Phi78, and UAB_Phi87) able to infect a broad range of Salmonella strains. Sequence analysis of the genomes of UAB_Phi20, UAB_Phi78, and UAB_Phi87 bacteriophages did not evidence the presence of known virulence-associated and antibiotic resistance genes, and potential immunoreactive food allergens. The UAB_Phi20 genome comprised 41,809 base pairs with 80 open reading frames (ORFs); 24 of them with assigned function. Genome sequence showed a high homology of UAB_Phi20 with Salmonella bacteriophage P22 and other P22likeviruses genus of the Podoviridae family, including ST64T and ST104. The DNA of UAB_Phi78 contained 44,110 bp including direct terminal repeats (DTR) of 179 bp and 58 putative ORFs were predicted and 20 were assigned function. This bacteriophage was assigned to the SP6likeviruses genus of the Podoviridae family based on its high similarity not only with SP6 but also with the K1-5, K1E, and K1F bacteriophages, all of which infect Escherichia coli. The UAB_Phi87 genome sequence consisted of 87,669 bp with terminal direct repeats of 608 bp; although 148 ORFs were identified, putative functions could be assigned to only 29 of them. Sequence comparisons revealed the mosaic structure of UAB_Phi87 and its high similarity with bacteriophages Felix O1 and wV8 of E. coli with respect to genetic content and functional organization. Phylogenetic analysis of large

  1. Genomics of Three New Bacteriophages Useful in the Biocontrol of Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardina, Carlota; Colom, Joan; Spricigo, Denis A; Otero, Jennifer; Sánchez-Osuna, Miquel; Cortés, Pilar; Llagostera, Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Non-typhoid Salmonella is the principal pathogen related to food-borne diseases throughout the world. Widespread antibiotic resistance has adversely affected human health and has encouraged the search for alternative antimicrobial agents. The advances in bacteriophage therapy highlight their use in controlling a broad spectrum of food-borne pathogens. One requirement for the use of bacteriophages as antibacterials is the characterization of their genomes. In this work, complete genome sequencing and molecular analyses were carried out for three new virulent Salmonella-specific bacteriophages (UAB_Phi20, UAB_Phi78, and UAB_Phi87) able to infect a broad range of Salmonella strains. Sequence analysis of the genomes of UAB_Phi20, UAB_Phi78, and UAB_Phi87 bacteriophages did not evidence the presence of known virulence-associated and antibiotic resistance genes, and potential immunoreactive food allergens. The UAB_Phi20 genome comprised 41,809 base pairs with 80 open reading frames (ORFs); 24 of them with assigned function. Genome sequence showed a high homology of UAB_Phi20 with Salmonella bacteriophage P22 and other P22likeviruses genus of the Podoviridae family, including ST64T and ST104. The DNA of UAB_Phi78 contained 44,110 bp including direct terminal repeats (DTR) of 179 bp and 58 putative ORFs were predicted and 20 were assigned function. This bacteriophage was assigned to the SP6likeviruses genus of the Podoviridae family based on its high similarity not only with SP6 but also with the K1-5, K1E, and K1F bacteriophages, all of which infect Escherichia coli. The UAB_Phi87 genome sequence consisted of 87,669 bp with terminal direct repeats of 608 bp; although 148 ORFs were identified, putative functions could be assigned to only 29 of them. Sequence comparisons revealed the mosaic structure of UAB_Phi87 and its high similarity with bacteriophages Felix O1 and wV8 of E. coli with respect to genetic content and functional organization. Phylogenetic analysis of large

  2. Genomics of three new bacteriophages useful in the biocontrol of Salmonella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlota eBardina

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-typhoid Salmonella is the principal pathogen related to food-borne diseases throughout the world. Widespread antibiotic resistance has adversely affected human health and has encouraged the search for alternative antimicrobial agents. The advances in bacteriophage therapy highlight their use in controlling a broad spectrum of food-borne pathogens. One requirement for the use of bacteriophages as antibacterials is the characterization of their genomes. In this work, complete genome sequencing and molecular analyses were carried out for three new virulent Salmonella-specific bacteriophages (UAB_Phi20, UAB_Phi78, and UAB_Phi87 able to infect a broad range of Salmonella strains. Sequence analysis of the genomes of UAB_Phi20, UAB_Phi78, and UAB_Phi87 bacteriophages did not evidence the presence of known virulence-associated and antibiotic resistance genes, and potential immunoreactive food allergens. The UAB_Phi20 genome comprised 41,809 base pairs with 80 open reading frames (ORFs; 24 of them with assigned function. Genome sequence showed a high homology of UAB_Phi20 with Salmonella bacteriophage P22 and other P22likeviruses genus of the Podoviridae family, including ST64T and ST104. The DNA of UAB_Phi78 contained 44,110 bp including direct terminal repeats of 179 bp and 58 putative ORFs were predicted and 20 were assigned function. This bacteriophage was assigned to the SP6likeviruses genus of the Podoviridae family based on its high similarity not only with SP6 but also with the K1-5, K1E, and K1F bacteriophages, all of which infect Escherichia coli. The UAB_Phi87 genome sequence consisted of 87,669 bp with terminal direct repeats of 608 bp; although 148 ORFs were identified, putative functions could be assigned to only 29 of them. Sequence comparisons revealed the mosaic structure of UAB_Phi87 and its high similarity with bacteriophages Felix O1 and wV8 of E. coli with respect to genetic content and functional organization. Phylogenetic

  3. Mode of Action of RNase BN/RNase Z on tRNA Precursors: RNase BN DOES NOT REMOVE THE CCA SEQUENCE FROM tRNA*

    OpenAIRE

    Dutta, Tanmay; Deutscher, Murray P.

    2010-01-01

    RNase BN, the Escherichia coli homolog of RNase Z, was previously shown to act as both a distributive exoribonuclease and an endoribonuclease on model RNA substrates and to be inhibited by the presence of a 3′-terminal CCA sequence. Here, we examined the mode of action of RNase BN on bacteriophage and bacterial tRNA precursors, particularly in light of a recent report suggesting that RNase BN removes CCA sequences (Takaku, H., and Nashimoto, M. (2008) Genes Cells 13, 1087–1097). We show that ...

  4. Bacteriophage adenine methyltransferase: a life cycle regulator? Modelled using Vibrio harveyi myovirus like.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochow, S; Elliman, J; Owens, L

    2012-11-01

    The adenine methyltransferase (DAM) gene methylates GATC sequences that have been demonstrated in various bacteria to be a powerful gene regulator functioning as an epigenetic switch, particularly with virulence gene regulation. However, overproduction of DAM can lead to mutations, giving rise to variability that may be important for adaptation to environmental change. While most bacterial hosts carry a DAM gene, not all bacteriophage carry this gene. Currently, there is no literature regarding the role DAM plays in life cycle regulation of bacteriophage. Vibrio campbellii strain 642 carries the bacteriophage Vibrio harveyi myovirus like (VHML) that has been proven to increase virulence. The complete genome sequence of VHML bacteriophage revealed a putative adenine methyltransferase gene. Using VHML, a new model of phage life cycle regulation, where DAM plays a central role between the lysogenic and lytic states, will be hypothesized. In short, DAM methylates the rha antirepressor gene and once methylation is removed, homologous CI repressor protein becomes repressed and non-functional leading to the switching to the lytic cycle. Greater understanding of life cycle regulation at the genetic level can, in the future, lead to the genesis of chimeric bacteriophage with greater control over their life cycle for their safe use as probiotics within the aquaculture industry. PMID:22681538

  5. Control of Listeria monocytogenes growth in soft cheeses by bacteriophage P100.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Elaine Nóbrega Gibson; Figueiredo, Ana Cláudia Leite; Miranda, Fernanda Araújo; de Castro Almeida, Rogeria Comastri

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of bacteriophage P100 on strains of Listeria monocytogenes in artificially inoculated soft cheeses. A mix of L. monocytogenes 1/2a and Scott A was inoculated in Minas Frescal and Coalho cheeses (approximately 10(5) cfu/g) with the bacteriophage added thereafter (8.3 × 10(7) PFU/g). Samples were analyzed immediately, and then stored at 10 °C for seven days. At time zero, 30 min post-infection, the bacteriophage P100 reduced L. monocytogenes counts by 2.3 log units in Minas Frescal cheese and by 2.1 log units in Coalho cheese, compared to controls without bacteriophage. However, in samples stored under refrigeration for seven days, the bacteriophage P100 was only weakly antilisterial, with the lowest decimal reduction (DR) for the cheeses: 1.0 log unit for Minas Frescal and 0.8 log units for Coalho cheese. The treatment produced a statistically significant decrease in the counts of viable cells (p cycle in the number of viable cells of L. monocytogenes in the samples under refrigeration for seven days. Moreover, a smaller effect of phages was observed. These results, along with other published data, indicate that the effectiveness of the phage treatment depends on the initial concentration of L. monocytogenes, and that a high concentration of phages per unit area is required to ensure sustained inactivation of target pathogens on food surfaces. PMID:24948908

  6. Genetically engineered bacteriophage delivers a tumor necrosis factor alpha antagonist coating on neural electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports a novel approach for the formation of anti-inflammatory surface coating on a neural electrode. The surface coating is realized using a recombinant f88 filamentous bacteriophage, which displays a short platinum binding motif and a tumor necrosis factor alpha antagonist (TNF-α antagonist) on p3 and p8 proteins, respectively. The recombinant bacteriophages are immobilized on the platinum surface by a simple dip coating process. The selective and stable immobilization of bacteriophages on a platinum electrode is confirmed by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, atomic force microscope and fluorescence microscope. From the in vitro cell viability test, the inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α) induced cell death was prevented by presenting recombinant bacteriophage coating, albeit with no significant cytotoxic effect. It is also observed that the bacteriophage coating does not have critical effects on the electrochemical properties such as impedance and charge storage capacities. Thus, this approach demonstrates a promising anti-apoptotic as well as anti-inflammatory surface coating for neural implant applications. (paper)

  7. Proteins responsible for lysogeny of deep-sea thermophilic bacteriophage GVE2 at high temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qing; Ye, Ting; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2011-06-15

    The lytic and lysogenic life cycle switch of bacteriophages plays very important roles in virus-host interactions. However, the lysogeny of thermophilic bacteriophage infecting thermophile at high temperatures has not been addressed. In this study, two lysogeny-related genes encoding the CI protein and recombinase of GVE2, a thermophilic bacteriophage obtained from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent, were characterized. Temporal analyses showed that the two genes were expressed at early stages of GVE2 infection. Based on chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), the GVE2 CI protein was bound with only one DNA fragment located at 24264-24036 bp in the GVE2 genome. This location might be the original transcription site and the lysis-lysogeny switch site, which was very different from mesophilic bacteriophages. The GVE2 CI and recombinase proteins could function only at high temperatures. Therefore our study improved our understanding of the lysogeny process of bacteriophages at high temperatures. PMID:21303688

  8. Biocontrol of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on fresh-cut lettuce and cantaloupe by treatment with bacteriophage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Outbreaks of foodborne illness have been associated with the consumption of cantaloupes and fresh-cut lettuce. Bacteriophage mixtures may be effective biocontrol agents to reduce E. coli O157:H7 on produce. Purpose: The effectiveness of a mixture of bacteriophages (ECP-100) in reducin...

  9. Construction of infectious cDNA clones for RNA viruses: Turnip crinkle virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabov, Eugene V

    2008-01-01

    Reverse genetic approach is widely used in virology as it makes possible direct identification of viral gene function and uses RNA genomes as vectors. Production of infectious cDNA clones is an essential step in developing a reverse genetic system for an RNA virus. Here, we present rapid method for generation of infectious cDNA clone for Turnip crinkle virus (TCV). The infectious cDNA clone could be used for production of in vitro transcripts with the T7 RNA polymerase which could be used for infection of plants or plant cell protoplasts. The procedure described here includes purification of TCV, viral RNA extraction, reverse transcription, PCR amplification of the full-length cDNA copy of TCV linked to a T7 RNA polymerase promoter, cloning into a plasmid vector, in vitro transcription, and selection of infectious clones. PMID:18370276

  10. Disposable amperometric biosensor based on nanostructured bacteriophages for glucose detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yu Ri; Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Kim, Ju Hwan; Nam, Chang Hoon; Kim, Soo Won

    2010-10-01

    The selection of electrode material profoundly influences biosensor science and engineering, as it heavily influences biosensor sensitivity. Here we propose a novel electrochemical detection method using a working electrode consisting of bio-nanowires from genetically modified filamentous phages and nanoparticles. fd-tet p8MMM filamentous phages displaying a three-methionine (MMM) peptide on the major coat protein pVIII (designated p8MMM phages) were immobilized on the active area of an electrochemical sensor through physical adsorption and chemical bonding. Bio-nanowires composed of p8MMM phages and silver nanoparticles facilitated sensitive, rapid and selective detection of particular molecules. We explored whether the composite electrode with bio-nanowires was an effective platform to detect the glucose oxidase. The current response of the bio-nanowire sensor was high at various glucose concentrations (0.1 µm-0.1 mM). This method provides a considerable advantage to demonstrate analyte detection over low concentration ranges. Especially, phage-enabled bio-nanowires can serve as receptors with high affinity and specificity for the detection of particular biomolecules and provide a convenient platform for designing site-directed multifunctional scaffolds based on bacteriophages and may serve as a simple method for label-free detection.

  11. Dual Functionalized Bacteriophage Qβ as a Photocaged Drug Carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuo; Li, Na; Chen, Luxi; Lee, Jiyong; Gassensmith, Jeremiah J

    2016-09-01

    Proteinatious nanoparticles are emerging as promising materials in biomedical research owing to their many unique properties and our interest focuses on integrating environmental responsivity into these systems. In this work, the use of a virus-like particle (VLP) derived from bacteriophage Qβ as a photocaged drug delivery system is investigated. Ideally, a photocaged nanoparticle platform should be harmless and inert without activation by light yet, upon photoirradiation, should cause cell death. Approximately 530 photocleavable doxorubicin complexes are installed initially onto the surface of Qβ by CuAAC reaction for photocaging therapy; however, aggregation and precipitation are found to cause cell death at higher concentrations. In order to improve solution stability, thiol-dibromomaleimide chemistry has been developed to orthogonally modify the VLP. This chemistry provides a robust method of incorporating additional functionality at the disulfides on Qβ, which was used to increase the stability and solubility of the drug-loaded VLPs. As a result, the dual functionalied VLPs with polyethylene glycol and photocaged doxorubicin show not only negligible cytotoxicity before photoactivation but also highly controllable photorelease and cell killing power. PMID:27351167

  12. BENEFICIAL FACE OF BACTERIOPHAGES: APPLICATIONS IN FOOD PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. V. Raghu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Foods are processed to make them available at all places; consequently, our awareness regarding hygiene measures in food production has also increased dramatically over the last decades. In many countries cases associated with foodborne infectious are increased. However, available techniques are unable to effectively control the problem. Further, exploring novel methods and technologies for ensuring the safety of food with effective quality control approaches are under research. Phages are the natural enemies of bacteria, and are more specific to host renders them ideal candidates for applications designed to increase food safety during the production process. Scientific findings are available showing the possibility to use as biocontrol agents against various pathogens with out interfering with the natural microflora or the cultures in fermented products. Furthermore, phages or phage derived proteins can also be used to detect the presence of unwanted pathogens in food or the production environments, which allows quick and sp ecific identification of viable cells. Bacteriophages are natural, found in various environments including water; foods etc. and are not found significantly influence the human cells.

  13. The allosteric switching mechanism in bacteriophage MS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkett, Matthew R.; Mirijanian, Dina T.; Hagan, Michael F.

    2016-07-01

    We use all-atom simulations to elucidate the mechanisms underlying conformational switching and allostery within the coat protein of the bacteriophage MS2. Assembly of most icosahedral virus capsids requires that the capsid protein adopts different conformations at precise locations within the capsid. It has been shown that a 19 nucleotide stem loop (TR) from the MS2 genome acts as an allosteric effector, guiding conformational switching of the coat protein during capsid assembly. Since the principal conformational changes occur far from the TR binding site, it is important to understand the molecular mechanism underlying this allosteric communication. To this end, we use all-atom simulations with explicit water combined with a path sampling technique to sample the MS2 coat protein conformational transition, in the presence and absence of TR-binding. The calculations find that TR binding strongly alters the transition free energy profile, leading to a switch in the favored conformation. We discuss changes in molecular interactions responsible for this shift. We then identify networks of amino acids with correlated motions to reveal the mechanism by which effects of TR binding span the protein. We find that TR binding strongly affects residues located at the 5-fold and quasi-sixfold interfaces in the assembled capsid, suggesting a mechanism by which the TR binding could direct formation of the native capsid geometry. The analysis predicts amino acids whose substitution by mutagenesis could alter populations of the conformational substates or their transition rates.

  14. Bacteriophage-encoded depolymerases: their diversity and biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Diana P; Oliveira, Hugo; Melo, Luís D R; Sillankorva, Sanna; Azeredo, Joana

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophages (phages), natural enemies of bacteria, can encode enzymes able to degrade polymeric substances. These substances can be found in the bacterial cell surface, such as polysaccharides, or are produced by bacteria when they are living in biofilm communities, the most common bacterial lifestyle. Consequently, phages with depolymerase activity have a facilitated access to the host receptors, by degrading the capsular polysaccharides, and are believed to have a better performance against bacterial biofilms, since the degradation of extracellular polymeric substances by depolymerases might facilitate the access of phages to the cells within different biofilm layers. Since the diversity of phage depolymerases is not yet fully explored, this is the first review gathering information about all the depolymerases encoded by fully sequenced phages. Overall, in this study, 160 putative depolymerases, including sialidases, levanases, xylosidases, dextranases, hyaluronidases, peptidases as well as pectate/pectin lyases, were found in 143 phages (43 Myoviridae, 47 Siphoviridae, 37 Podoviridae, and 16 unclassified) infecting 24 genera of bacteria. We further provide information about the main applications of phage depolymerases, which can comprise areas as diverse as medical, chemical, or food-processing industry. PMID:26767986

  15. Disposable amperometric biosensor based on nanostructured bacteriophages for glucose detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The selection of electrode material profoundly influences biosensor science and engineering, as it heavily influences biosensor sensitivity. Here we propose a novel electrochemical detection method using a working electrode consisting of bio-nanowires from genetically modified filamentous phages and nanoparticles. fd-tet p8MMM filamentous phages displaying a three-methionine (MMM) peptide on the major coat protein pVIII (designated p8MMM phages) were immobilized on the active area of an electrochemical sensor through physical adsorption and chemical bonding. Bio-nanowires composed of p8MMM phages and silver nanoparticles facilitated sensitive, rapid and selective detection of particular molecules. We explored whether the composite electrode with bio-nanowires was an effective platform to detect the glucose oxidase. The current response of the bio-nanowire sensor was high at various glucose concentrations (0.1 µm–0.1 mM). This method provides a considerable advantage to demonstrate analyte detection over low concentration ranges. Especially, phage-enabled bio-nanowires can serve as receptors with high affinity and specificity for the detection of particular biomolecules and provide a convenient platform for designing site-directed multifunctional scaffolds based on bacteriophages and may serve as a simple method for label-free detection

  16. Salmonella bacteriophage diversity reflects host diversity on dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switt, Andrea I Moreno; den Bakker, Henk C; Vongkamjan, Kitiya; Hoelzer, Karin; Warnick, Lorin D; Cummings, Kevin J; Wiedmann, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Salmonella is an animal and human pathogen of worldwide concern. Surveillance programs indicate that the incidence of Salmonella serovars fluctuates over time. While bacteriophages are likely to play a role in driving microbial diversity, our understanding of the ecology and diversity of Salmonella phages is limited. Here we report the isolation of Salmonella phages from manure samples from 13 dairy farms with a history of Salmonella presence. Salmonella phages were isolated from 10 of the 13 farms; overall 108 phage isolates were obtained on serovar Newport, Typhimurium, Dublin, Kentucky, Anatum, Mbandaka, and Cerro hosts. Host range characterization found that 51% of phage isolates had a narrow host range, while 49% showed a broad host range. The phage isolates represented 65 lysis profiles; genome size profiling of 94 phage isolates allowed for classification of phage isolates into 11 groups with subsequent restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis showing considerable variation within a given group. Our data not only show an abundance of diverse Salmonella phage isolates in dairy farms, but also show that phage isolates that lyse the most common serovars causing salmonellosis in cattle are frequently obtained, suggesting that phages may play an important role in the ecology of Salmonella on dairy farms. PMID:24010608

  17. Computational approaches to predict bacteriophage-host relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Robert A; McNair, Katelyn; Faust, Karoline; Raes, Jeroen; Dutilh, Bas E

    2016-03-01

    Metagenomics has changed the face of virus discovery by enabling the accurate identification of viral genome sequences without requiring isolation of the viruses. As a result, metagenomic virus discovery leaves the first and most fundamental question about any novel virus unanswered: What host does the virus infect? The diversity of the global virosphere and the volumes of data obtained in metagenomic sequencing projects demand computational tools for virus-host prediction. We focus on bacteriophages (phages, viruses that infect bacteria), the most abundant and diverse group of viruses found in environmental metagenomes. By analyzing 820 phages with annotated hosts, we review and assess the predictive power of in silico phage-host signals. Sequence homology approaches are the most effective at identifying known phage-host pairs. Compositional and abundance-based methods contain significant signal for phage-host classification, providing opportunities for analyzing the unknowns in viral metagenomes. Together, these computational approaches further our knowledge of the interactions between phages and their hosts. Importantly, we find that all reviewed signals significantly link phages to their hosts, illustrating how current knowledge and insights about the interaction mechanisms and ecology of coevolving phages and bacteria can be exploited to predict phage-host relationships, with potential relevance for medical and industrial applications. PMID:26657537

  18. Effect of ultrashort laser irradiation on bacteriophage lambda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacteriophage lambda was irradiated by picosecond and nanosecond laser UV pulses with high intensity (105 - 109 W/cm2) at a wavelength of 266 nm. It was found that the photoreactivation in the phages decreased from 85% (continuous irradiation with low intensity 10-5 W/cm2) to 27% (laser nanosecond irradiation with intensity 3 x 105 W/cm2) and to 20% (laser picosecond irradiation with intensity 109 W/cm2), resp. Furthermore the ratio of D37 for phage lambda upon the infection of wild type (AB 1157) and uvrA-mutant E. coli K12 (AB 1886) is diminished from 6.2 (continuous irradiation with intensity 10-5 W/cm2) to 2.0 (pico- and nanosecond irradiation with intensity 7 x 107 W/cm2 and 3 x 105 W/cm2, resp.). It is supposed that high intensity DNA irradiation by UV laser pulses leads mainly to the formation of photoproducts, which do not correspond to cyclobutane-type pyrimidine dimers. (author)

  19. Factors influencing lysis time stochasticity in bacteriophage λ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennehy John J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite identical genotypes and seemingly uniform environments, stochastic gene expression and other dynamic intracellular processes can produce considerable phenotypic diversity within clonal microbes. One trait that provides a good model to explore the molecular basis of stochastic variation is the timing of host lysis by bacteriophage (phage. Results Individual lysis events of thermally-inducible λ lysogens were observed using a temperature-controlled perfusion chamber mounted on an inverted microscope. Both mean lysis time (MLT and its associated standard deviation (SD were estimated. Using the SD as a measure of lysis time stochasticity, we showed that lysogenic cells in controlled environments varied widely in lysis times, and that the level of lysis time stochasticity depended on allelic variation in the holin sequence, late promoter (pR' activity, and host growth rate. In general, the MLT was positively correlated with the SD. Both lower pR' activities and lower host growth rates resulted in larger SDs. Results from premature lysis, induced by adding KCN at different time points after lysogen induction, showed a negative correlation between the timing of KCN addition and lysis time stochasticity. Conclusions Taken together with results published by others, we conclude that a large fraction of λ lysis time stochasticity is the result of random events following the expression and diffusion of the holin protein. Consequently, factors influencing the timing of reaching critical holin concentrations in the cell membrane, such as holin production rate, strongly influence the mean lysis time and the lysis time stochasticity.

  20. Modeling the interactions between pathogenic bacteria, bacteriophage and immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Chung Yin (Joey); Weitz, Joshua S.

    The prevalence of antibiotic-resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria has led to renewed interest in the use of bacteriophage (phage), or virus that infects bacteria, as a therapeutic agent against bacterial infections. However, little is known about the theoretical mechanism by which phage therapy may work. In particular, interactions between the bacteria, the phage and the host immune response crucially influences the outcome of the therapy. Few models of phage therapy have incorporated all these three components, and existing models suffer from unrealistic assumptions such as unbounded growth of the immune response. We propose a model of phage therapy with an emphasis on nonlinear feedback arising from interactions with bacteria and the immune response. Our model shows a synergistic effect between the phage and the immune response which underlies a possible mechanism for phage to catalyze the elimination of bacteria even when neither the immune response nor phage could do so alone. We study the significance of this effect for different parameters of infection and immune response, and discuss its implications for phage therapy.

  1. Novel lytic bacteriophages from soil that lyse Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yordpratum, Umaporn; Tattawasart, Unchalee; Wongratanacheewin, Surasakdi; Sermswan, Rasana W

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a Gram-negative saprophytic bacterium that causes severe sepsis with a high mortality rate in humans and a vaccine is not available. Bacteriophages are viruses of bacteria that are ubiquitous in nature. Several lysogenic phages of Burkholderia spp. have been found but information is scarce for lytic phages. Six phages, ST2, ST7, ST70, ST79, ST88 and ST96, which lyse B. pseudomallei, were isolated from soil in an endemic area. The phages belong to the Myoviridae family. The range of estimated genome sizes is 24.0-54.6 kb. Phages ST79 and ST96 lysed 71% and 67% of tested B. pseudomallei isolates and formed plaques on Burkholderia mallei but not other tested bacteria, with the exception of closely related Burkholderia thailandensis which was lysed by ST2 and ST96 only. ST79 and ST96 were observed to clear a mid-log culture by lysis within 6 h when infected at a multiplicity of infection of 0.1. As ST79 and ST96 phages effectively lysed B. pseudomallei, their potential use as a biocontrol of B. pseudomallei in the environment or alternative treatment in infected hosts could lead to benefits from phages that are available in nature. PMID:21091532

  2. Comparative genomics and evolution of the tailed-bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casjens, Sherwood R

    2005-08-01

    The number of completely sequenced tailed-bacteriophage genomes that have been published increased to more than 125 last year. The comparison of these genomes has brought their highly mosaic nature into much sharper focus. Furthermore, reports of the complete sequences of about 150 bacterial genomes have shown that the many prophage and parts thereof that reside in these bacterial genomes must comprise a significant fraction of Earth's phage gene pool. These phage and prophage genomes are fertile ground for attempts to deduce the nature of viral evolutionary processes, and such analyses have made it clear that these phage have enjoyed a significant level of horizontal exchange of genetic information throughout their long histories. The strength of these evolutionary deductions rests largely on the extensive knowledge that has accumulated during intensive study into the molecular nature of the life cycles of a few 'model system' phages over the past half century. Recent molecular studies of phages other than these model system phages have made it clear that much remains to be learnt about the variety of lifestyle strategies utilized by the tailed-phage. PMID:16019256

  3. A promiscuous DNA packaging machine from bacteriophage T4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhihong; Kottadiel, Vishal I; Vafabakhsh, Reza; Dai, Li; Chemla, Yann R; Ha, Taekjip; Rao, Venigalla B

    2011-01-01

    Complex viruses are assembled from simple protein subunits by sequential and irreversible assembly. During genome packaging in bacteriophages, a powerful molecular motor assembles at the special portal vertex of an empty prohead to initiate packaging. The capsid expands after about 10%-25% of the genome is packaged. When the head is full, the motor cuts the concatemeric DNA and dissociates from the head. Conformational changes, particularly in the portal, are thought to drive these sequential transitions. We found that the phage T4 packaging machine is highly promiscuous, translocating DNA into finished phage heads as well as into proheads. Optical tweezers experiments show that single motors can force exogenous DNA into phage heads at the same rate as into proheads. Single molecule fluorescence measurements demonstrate that phage heads undergo repeated initiations, packaging multiple DNA molecules into the same head. These results suggest that the phage DNA packaging machine has unusual conformational plasticity, powering DNA into an apparently passive capsid receptacle, including the highly stable virus shell, until it is full. These features probably led to the evolution of viral genomes that fit capsid volume, a strikingly common phenomenon in double-stranded DNA viruses, and will potentially allow design of a novel class of nanocapsid delivery vehicles. PMID:21358801

  4. A promiscuous DNA packaging machine from bacteriophage T4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihong Zhang

    Full Text Available Complex viruses are assembled from simple protein subunits by sequential and irreversible assembly. During genome packaging in bacteriophages, a powerful molecular motor assembles at the special portal vertex of an empty prohead to initiate packaging. The capsid expands after about 10%-25% of the genome is packaged. When the head is full, the motor cuts the concatemeric DNA and dissociates from the head. Conformational changes, particularly in the portal, are thought to drive these sequential transitions. We found that the phage T4 packaging machine is highly promiscuous, translocating DNA into finished phage heads as well as into proheads. Optical tweezers experiments show that single motors can force exogenous DNA into phage heads at the same rate as into proheads. Single molecule fluorescence measurements demonstrate that phage heads undergo repeated initiations, packaging multiple DNA molecules into the same head. These results suggest that the phage DNA packaging machine has unusual conformational plasticity, powering DNA into an apparently passive capsid receptacle, including the highly stable virus shell, until it is full. These features probably led to the evolution of viral genomes that fit capsid volume, a strikingly common phenomenon in double-stranded DNA viruses, and will potentially allow design of a novel class of nanocapsid delivery vehicles.

  5. A one-step method for in vitro production of tRNA transcripts

    OpenAIRE

    Korenčić, Dragana; Söll, Dieter; Ambrogelly, Alexandre

    2002-01-01

    Sequencing of a large number of microbial genomes has led to the discovery of new enzymes involved in tRNA biosynthesis and tRNA function. Preparation of a great variety of RNA molecules is, therefore, of major interest for biochemical characterization of these proteins. We describe a fast, cost-effective and efficient method for in vitro production of tRNA transcripts. T7 RNA polymerase requires a double-stranded DNA promoter in order to initiate transcription; however, elongation does not r...

  6. Alteration of R7T7-type nuclear glass in deep geological storage conditions; Alteration du verre de confinement de dechets type R7T7 en condition de stockage geologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combarieu, G. de

    2007-02-15

    This PhD thesis is aimed to study the alteration of SON68 glass, French inactive glass of R7T7-type, in contact with near field materials of a deep geological storage (French concept from ANDRA) which are mainly metallic iron and Callovo-Oxfordian clay. Therefore, experiments involving a 'glass-iron-clay' system at lab-scale have been carried out. Interactions between glass, iron and clay have been characterised from submicron to millimeter scale by means of SEM, TEM, XRD and XAS and Raman spectroscopies in terms of chemistry and crystal-chemistry. In the mean time, a conceptual model of glass alteration has been developed to account for most of the experimental observations and known mechanisms of alteration. The model has been then transposed within the transport-chemistry code HYTEC, together with developed models of clay and iron corrosion, to simulate the experiments described above. This work is thus a contribution to the understanding of iron corrosion in Callovo-Oxfordian clay and subsequent glass alteration in the newly formed corrosion products, the whole process being considered as a lab-scale model of a deep geological storage of radioactive wastes. (author)

  7. Research of pathogenic bacteria and bacteriophages in the residuals of wastewater treatment plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to find the pathogenic bacteria Listeria and Salmonella and to detect of bacterial (fecal coliforms) and viral indicators (bacteriophage) of fecal contamination in the residues of three sewage treatment plants in Greater Tunis: Charguia, Jdaida and Wardia. Three types of samples were analyzed: raw sewage, treated wastewater and sludge. The study showed the presence of pathogenic bacteria in some samples with a frequency of 7 pour cent for Listeria and 21 pour cent for Salmonella. However, none of these organisms has been detected in treated water of Jdaida and Chargia reflecting the efficiency of the purification process in these stations. Furthermore, all samples were positive for the presence of fecal coliforms and bacteriophages with important titles: up to 8.23 log10 (CFU/L) for coliforms and 8.36 log10 (pfu/L) for bacteriophages.

  8. Magic-angle spinning NMR of intact bacteriophages: Insights into the capsid, DNA and their interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, Gili; Morag, Omry; Goldbourt, Amir

    2015-04-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. They are complex macromolecular assemblies, which are composed of multiple protein subunits that protect genomic material and deliver it to specific hosts. Various biophysical techniques have been used to characterize their structure in order to unravel phage morphogenesis. Yet, most bacteriophages are non-crystalline and have very high molecular weights, in the order of tens of MegaDaltons. Therefore, complete atomic-resolution characterization on such systems that encompass both capsid and DNA is scarce. In this perspective article we demonstrate how magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR has and is used to characterize in detail bacteriophage viruses, including filamentous and icosahedral phage. We discuss the process of sample preparation, spectral assignment of both capsid and DNA and the use of chemical shifts and dipolar couplings to probe the capsid-DNA interface, describe capsid structure and dynamics and extract structural differences between viruses.

  9. Xylanase production by Streptomyces viridosporus T7A in submerged and solid-state fermentation using agro-industrial residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Romulo Alberton

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The study of xylanase production was conducted by Streptomyces viridosporus T7A in submerged (SmF and solid-state fermentation (SSF, using agro-industrial residues and sub-products. Napier grass, sugarcane bagasse and soybean bran were used as carbon source, substrate/support, and nitrogen source, respectively. In SmF, Napier grass (1% v/w supplemented with soybean bran, hydroxyethylcellulose and B complex vitamins were used. Soybean bran (1.5 % w/v, B complex vitamins (0.1%, and hydroxyethilcellulose (0.15% led to an increase in xylanase production (23.41 U/mL. In SSF, the effects of the following parameters were studied: substrate composition (sugarcane bagasse, Napier grass and soybean bran, initial moisture, and inoculum rate. In SSF, the highest xylanase activity (423.9 U/g was reached with: 70 % sugarcane bagasse, 20% Napier grass and 10% soybean meal, 90% of moisture, and 10(7/g substrate.A produção de xilanase por Streptomyces viridosporus T7A foi realizada em fermentação submersa (FSm e fermentação no estado sólido (FES utilizando resíduos e sub-produtos agroindustriais. Capim Napier, bagaço de cana e farelo de soja foram empregados como fonte de carbono, suporte/substrato e fonte nitrogênio, respectivamente. Em FSm, o capim Napier (1 % p/v foi suplementado com farelo de soja (1,5 % p/v, hidroxietilcelulose (0,15 % e vitaminas do complexo B (1,5 % sendo que a produção de xilanase atingiu 23.41 U/mL. Em FES, o efeito dos seguintes parâmetros foi estudado: composição do substrato (bagaço de cana, Capim Napier e farelo de soja, umidade inicial, aeração e taxa de inoculação. A mais elevada produção de xilanase (423,9 U/g foi atingida com 70% bagaço de cana, 20% de capim Napier e 10 % farelo de soja, 90 % de umidade inicial e 10(7 células/g substrato.

  10. Antibacterial Efficacy of Lytic Bacteriophages against Antibiotic-Resistant Klebsiella Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Khajeh Karamoddini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a leading and highly prevalent problem in the treatment of infectious diseases. Bacteriophages (phages appear to be effective and safe alternatives for the treatment of resistant infections because of their specificity for bacterial species and lack of infectivity in eukaryotic cells. The present study aimed to isolate bacteriophages against Klebsiella spp. and evaluate their efficacy against antibiotic-resistant species. Seventy-two antibiotic-resistant Klebsiella spp. were isolated from samples of patients who referred to the Ghaem Hospital (Mashhad, Iran. Lytic bacteriophages against Klebsiella spp. were isolated from wastewater of the septic tank of the same hospital. Bactericidal activity of phages against resistant Klebsiella spp. was tested in both liquid (tube method; after 1 and 24 h of incubation and solid (double-layer agar plate method; after 24 h of incubation phases. In each method, three different concentrations of bacteriophages (low: 107 PFU/mL were used. Bacteriophages showed promising bactericidal activity at all assessed concentrations, regardless of the test method and duration of incubation. Overall, bactericidal effects were augmented at higher concentrations. In the tube method, higher activity was observed after 24 h of incubation compared to the 1-h incubation. The bactericidal effects were also higher in the tube method compared to the double-layer agar plate method after 24 h of incubation. The findings of the present study suggest that bacteriophages possess effective bactericidal activity against resistant Klebsiella spp. These bactericidal activities are influenced by phage concentration, duration of incubation, and test method.

  11. Genetic analysis of the bacteriophage T4-encoded cochaperonin Gp31.

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, A.; Georgopoulos, C

    1999-01-01

    Previous genetic and biochemical analyses have established that the bacteriophage T4-encoded Gp31 is a cochaperonin that interacts with Escherichia coli's GroEL to ensure the timely and accurate folding of Gp23, the bacteriophage-encoded major capsid protein. The heptameric Gp31 cochaperonin, like the E. coli GroES cochaperonin, interacts with GroEL primarily through its unstructured mobile loop segment. Upon binding to GroEL, the mobile loop adopts a structured, beta-hairpin turn. In this ar...

  12. Bacteriophages Carrying Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Fecal Waste from Cattle, Pigs, and Poultry▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Imamovic, Lejla; Jofre, Juan; Muniesa, Maite

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates the occurrence of bacteriophages carrying antibiotic resistance genes in animal environments. blaTEM, blaCTX-M (clusters 1 and 9), and mecA were quantified by quantitative PCR in 71 phage DNA samples from pigs, poultry, and cattle fecal wastes. Densities of 3 to 4 log10 gene copies (GC) of blaTEM, 2 to 3 log10 GC of blaCTX-M, and 1 to 3 log10 GC of mecA per milliliter or gram of sample were detected, suggesting that bacteriophages can be environmental vectors for the horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:21807968

  13. Identification of the bacteriophage T5 dUTPase by protein sequence comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliman, A V

    1996-01-01

    It is shown by protein sequence comparisons that a 148 amino acid open reading frame (ORF 148) located at 67% of the bacteriophage T5 genome encodes a protein with strong similarity to known dUTPases. This protein contains five characteristic amino acid sequence motifs that are common to the dUTPase gene family. A similarity in size and high degree of sequence identity strongly suggest that the protein encoded by the ORF 148 of bacteriophage T5 is dUTPase. PMID:8988373

  14. Synergistic inactivation of Escherichia coli and phage T7 by near-ultraviolet radiation and hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A non-lethal concentration of H2O2 enhances NUV inactivation of Escherichia coli and its pages. Three distinct types of synergistic interaction were identified. Conditions were established which allowed the specific examination of each synergism on an individual basis. An apparent NUV plus H2O2 synergism in single-strand break induction, as measured by alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation, is actually due to this enzyme repair inhibition, since the number of single-strand breaks induced by separate treatments was nearly additive in recA cells. High H2O2 Synergism (HHS) occurs in all E. coli strains tested, regardless of repair capacity. A third NUV plus H2O2 synergism operates to inactivate phage T7. A number of experiments were performed which support the contention that inactivation results from an impairment of DNA injection into the bacterial host. This supposition was confirmed via the use of a modified Hershey-Chase experiment which showed an actual reduction in the amount of radioactive DNA entering the host. The use of radioactive isotopes permitted the visualization of a covalent DNA-protein association, strongly suggesting that the injection defect results from a DNA-protein crosslink

  15. Irradiation behaviour of the R7T7 glass: comparison of studies by actinides doping and by external irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to compare the effects produced on the macroscopic properties of the R7T7 glass by ions irradiations (He, Kr, Au, Si) to those induced by the accumulation of alpha disintegrations in glasses doped with 244Cm. Similar changes, decrease followed by stabilization, of hardness and density in terms of the dose are observed for the two types of solicitations. Concerning the change of the glass hardness, a similar behaviour is observed between the glasses doped with curium and those irradiated by Kr, Au and Si ions, in terms of the nuclear energy deposited on the material which reveal that they are the ballistic effects which are responsible of the behaviour change. Concerning the density, its variation is observed on the same range of nuclear energy deposited for the two types of irradiation conditions, which reveal too that it is because of the ballistic effects. On the other hand, according to the external irradiations conditions, the observed swelling can be more important than those induced by the alpha disintegrations, that could revealed an influence of the nature of the sent ion. (O.M.)

  16. The Viral DNA Packaging Motor of Bacteriophage Lambda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Carlos E.

    2007-03-01

    Terminase enzymes are common to both eukaryotic and prokaryotic double-stranded DNA viruses. These enzymes, which serve as molecular motors that selectively ``package'' viral DNA into a pre-formed procapsid structure, are among the most powerful biological motors characterized to date. Bacteriophage lambda terminase is a heteroligomer composed of gpA and gpNu1 subunits. The smaller gpNu1 subunit is required for specific recognition of viral DNA, a process that is modulated by ATP. The gpA subunit possesses site-specific nuclease and helicase activities that ``mature'' the viral genome prior to packaging. The subunit further possesses a DNA translocase activity that is central to the packaging motor complex. Discrete ATPase sites in gpA modulate the DNA maturation reactions and fuel the DNA packaging reaction. Kinetic characterization of lambda terminase indicates significant interaction between the multiple catalytic sites of the enzyme and has led to a minimal kinetic model describing the assembly of a catalytically-competent packaging motor complex. Biophysical studies demonstrate that purified lambda terminase forms a homogenous, heterotrimeric structure consisting of one gpA subunit in association with two gpNu1 proteins. Four heterotrimers further assemble into a ring-like structure of sufficient size to encircle duplex DNA. The ensemble of data suggests that the ring tetramer represents the biologically relevant, catalytically-competent motor complex responsible for genome processing and packaging reactions. We present a model for the functional DNA packaging motor complex that finds general utility in our global understanding of the enzymology of virus assembly.

  17. Novel DNA packaging recognition in the unusual bacteriophage N15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phage lambda's cosB packaging recognition site is tripartite, consisting of 3 TerS binding sites, called R sequences. TerS binding to the critical R3 site positions the TerL endonuclease for nicking cosN to generate cohesive ends. The N15 cos (cosN15) is closely related to cosλ, but whereas the cosBN15 subsite has R3, it lacks the R2 and R1 sites and the IHF binding site of cosBλ. A bioinformatic study of N15-like phages indicates that cosBN15 also has an accessory, remote rR2 site, which is proposed to increase packaging efficiency, like R2 and R1 of lambda. N15 plus five prophages all have the rR2 sequence, which is located in the TerS-encoding 1 gene, approximately 200 bp distal to R3. An additional set of four highly related prophages, exemplified by Monarch, has R3 sequence, but also has R2 and R1 sequences characteristic of cosB–λ. The DNA binding domain of TerS-N15 is a dimer. - Highlights: • There are two classes of DNA packaging signals in N15-related phages. • Phage N15's TerS binding site: a critical site and a possible remote accessory site. • Viral DNA recognition signals by the λ-like bacteriophages: the odd case of N15

  18. Novel DNA packaging recognition in the unusual bacteriophage N15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feiss, Michael [Department of Microbiology, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Geyer, Henriette, E-mail: henriettegeyer@gmail.com [Division of Viral Infections, Robert Koch Institute, Berlin (Germany); Division of Viral Infections, Robert Koch Institute, Berlin (Germany); Klingberg, Franco, E-mail: franco.klingberg@thermofisher.com [Flow Cytometry, Imaging & Microscopy, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Frankfurter Strasse 129B 64293 Darmstadt (Germany); Flow Cytometry, Imaging & Microscopy, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Frankfurter Strasse 129B 64293 Darmstadt (Germany); Moreno, Norma, E-mail: nmoreno@islander.tamucc.edu [Texas A& M University – Corpus Christi, 6300 Ocean Drive, Corpus Christi, TX 78412, United States. (United States); Texas A& M University – Corpus Christi, 6300 Ocean Drive, Corpus Christi, TX 78412, United States. (United States); Forystek, Amanda, E-mail: eamanda-forystek@uiowa.edu [Flow Cytometry, Imaging & Microscopy, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Frankfurter Strasse 129B 64293 Darmstadt (Germany); Room # 2911 JPP, Dept. of Psychiatry, The University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa, 52242 (United States); Maluf, Nasib Karl, E-mail: fKarl.Maluf@ap-lab.com [Flow Cytometry, Imaging & Microscopy, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Frankfurter Strasse 129B 64293 Darmstadt (Germany); Alliance Protein Laboratories, Inc. 6042 Cornerstone Court West, Suite ASan Diego, CA 92121, USA. (United States); Sippy, Jean [Department of Microbiology, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Phage lambda's cosB packaging recognition site is tripartite, consisting of 3 TerS binding sites, called R sequences. TerS binding to the critical R3 site positions the TerL endonuclease for nicking cosN to generate cohesive ends. The N15 cos (cos{sup N15}) is closely related to cos{sup λ}, but whereas the cosB{sup N15} subsite has R3, it lacks the R2 and R1 sites and the IHF binding site of cosB{sup λ}. A bioinformatic study of N15-like phages indicates that cosB{sup N15} also has an accessory, remote rR2 site, which is proposed to increase packaging efficiency, like R2 and R1 of lambda. N15 plus five prophages all have the rR2 sequence, which is located in the TerS-encoding 1 gene, approximately 200 bp distal to R3. An additional set of four highly related prophages, exemplified by Monarch, has R3 sequence, but also has R2 and R1 sequences characteristic of cosB–λ. The DNA binding domain of TerS-N15 is a dimer. - Highlights: • There are two classes of DNA packaging signals in N15-related phages. • Phage N15's TerS binding site: a critical site and a possible remote accessory site. • Viral DNA recognition signals by the λ-like bacteriophages: the odd case of N15.

  19. Bacteriophage Amplification-Coupled Detection and Identification of Bacterial Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Christopher R.; Voorhees, Kent J.

    Current methods of species-specific bacterial detection and identification are complex, time-consuming, and often require expensive specialized equipment and highly trained personnel. Numerous biochemical and genotypic identification methods have been applied to bacterial characterization, but all rely on tedious microbiological culturing practices and/or costly sequencing protocols which render them impractical for deployment as rapid, cost-effective point-of-care or field detection and identification methods. With a view towards addressing these shortcomings, we have exploited the evolutionarily conserved interactions between a bacteriophage (phage) and its bacterial host to develop species-specific detection methods. Phage amplification-coupled matrix assisted laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) was utilized to rapidly detect phage propagation resulting from species-specific in vitro bacterial infection. This novel signal amplification method allowed for bacterial detection and identification in as little as 2 h, and when combined with disulfide bond reduction methods developed in our laboratory to enhance MALDI-TOF-MS resolution, was observed to lower the limit of detection by several orders of magnitude over conventional spectroscopy and phage typing methods. Phage amplification has been combined with lateral flow immunochromatography (LFI) to develop rapid, easy-to-operate, portable, species-specific point-of-care (POC) detection devices. Prototype LFI detectors have been developed and characterized for Yersinia pestis and Bacillus anthracis, the etiologic agents of plague and anthrax, respectively. Comparable sensitivity and rapidity was observed when phage amplification was adapted to a species-specific handheld LFI detector, thus allowing for rapid, simple, POC bacterial detection and identification while eliminating the need for bacterial culturing or DNA isolation and amplification techniques.

  20. Dynamics of bacteriophage genome ejection in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacteriophages, phages for short, are viruses of bacteria. The majority of phages contain a double-stranded DNA genome packaged in a capsid at a density of ∼500 mg ml−1. This high density requires substantial compression of the normal B-form helix, leading to the conjecture that DNA in mature phage virions is under significant pressure, and that pressure is used to eject the DNA during infection. A large number of theoretical, computer simulation and in vitro experimental studies surrounding this conjecture have revealed many—though often isolated and/or contradictory—aspects of packaged DNA. This prompts us to present a unified view of the statistical physics and thermodynamics of DNA packaged in phage capsids. We argue that the DNA in a mature phage is in a (meta)stable state, wherein electrostatic self-repulsion is balanced by curvature stress due to confinement in the capsid. We show that in addition to the osmotic pressure associated with the packaged DNA and its counterions, there are four different pressures within the capsid: pressure on the DNA, hydrostatic pressure, the pressure experienced by the capsid and the pressure associated with the chemical potential of DNA ejection. Significantly, we analyze the mechanism of force transmission in the packaged DNA and demonstrate that the pressure on DNA is not important for ejection. We derive equations showing a strong hydrostatic pressure difference across the capsid shell. We propose that when a phage is triggered to eject by interaction with its receptor in vitro, the (thermodynamic) incentive of water molecules to enter the phage capsid flushes the DNA out of the capsid. In vivo, the difference between the osmotic pressures in the bacterial cell cytoplasm and the culture medium similarly results in a water flow that drags the DNA out of the capsid and into the bacterial cell

  1. Mobile CRISPR/Cas-mediated bacteriophage resistance in Lactococcus lactis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M Millen

    Full Text Available Lactococcus lactis is a biotechnological workhorse for food fermentations and potentially therapeutic products and is therefore widely consumed by humans. It is predominantly used as a starter microbe for fermented dairy products, and specialized strains have adapted from a plant environment through reductive evolution and horizontal gene transfer as evidenced by the association of adventitious traits with mobile elements. Specifically, L. lactis has armed itself with a myriad of plasmid-encoded bacteriophage defensive systems to protect against viral predation. This known arsenal had not included CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated proteins, which forms a remarkable microbial immunity system against invading DNA. Although CRISPR/Cas systems are common in the genomes of closely related lactic acid bacteria (LAB, none was identified within the eight published lactococcal genomes. Furthermore, a PCR-based search of the common LAB CRISPR/Cas systems (Types I and II in 383 industrial L. lactis strains proved unsuccessful. Here we describe a novel, Type III, self-transmissible, plasmid-encoded, phage-interfering CRISPR/Cas discovered in L. lactis. The native CRISPR spacers confer resistance based on sequence identity to corresponding lactococcal phage. The interference is directed at phages problematic to the dairy industry, indicative of a responsive system. Moreover, targeting could be modified by engineering the spacer content. The 62.8-kb plasmid was shown to be conjugally transferrable to various strains. Its mobility should facilitate dissemination within microbial communities and provide a readily applicable system to naturally introduce CRISPR/Cas to industrially relevant strains for enhanced phage resistance and prevention against acquisition of undesirable genes.

  2. Quality-controlled small-scale production of a well-defined bacteriophage cocktail for use in human clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Merabishvili

    Full Text Available We describe the small-scale, laboratory-based, production and quality control of a cocktail, consisting of exclusively lytic bacteriophages, designed for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus infections in burn wound patients. Based on successive selection rounds three bacteriophages were retained from an initial pool of 82 P. aeruginosa and 8 S. aureus bacteriophages, specific for prevalent P. aeruginosa and S. aureus strains in the Burn Centre of the Queen Astrid Military Hospital in Brussels, Belgium. This cocktail, consisting of P. aeruginosa phages 14/1 (Myoviridae and PNM (Podoviridae and S. aureus phage ISP (Myoviridae was produced and purified of endotoxin. Quality control included Stability (shelf life, determination of pyrogenicity, sterility and cytotoxicity, confirmation of the absence of temperate bacteriophages and transmission electron microscopy-based confirmation of the presence of the expected virion morphologic particles as well as of their specific interaction with the target bacteria. Bacteriophage genome and proteome analysis confirmed the lytic nature of the bacteriophages, the absence of toxin-coding genes and showed that the selected phages 14/1, PNM and ISP are close relatives of respectively F8, phiKMV and phage G1. The bacteriophage cocktail is currently being evaluated in a pilot clinical study cleared by a leading Medical Ethical Committee.

  3. Isolation and characterization of glacier VMY22, a novel lytic cold-active bacteriophage of Bacillus cereus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiuling; Ji; Chunjing; Zhang; Yuan; Fang; Qi; Zhang; Lianbing; Lin; Bing; Tang; Yunlin; Wei

    2015-01-01

    As a unique ecological system with low temperature and low nutrient levels, glaciers are considered a "living fossil" for the research of evolution. In this work, a lytic cold-active bacteriophage designated VMY22 against Bacillus cereus MYB41-22 was isolated from Mingyong Glacier in China, and its characteristics were studied. Electron microscopy revealed that VMY22 has an icosahedral head(59.2 nm in length, 31.9 nm in width) and a tail(43.2 nm in length). Bacteriophage VMY22 was classified as a Podoviridae with an approximate genome size of 18 to 20 kb. A one-step growth curve revealed that the latent and the burst periods were 70 and 70 min, respectively, with an average burst size of 78 bacteriophage particles per infected cell. The pH and thermal stability of bacteriophage VMY22 were also investigated. The maximum stability of the bacteriophage was observed to be at pH 8.0 and it was comparatively stable at p H 5.0–9.0. As VMY22 is a cold-active bacteriophage with low production temperature, its characterization and the relationship between MYB41-22 and Bacillus cereus bacteriophage deserve further study.

  4. Changes in Protein Domains outside the Catalytic Site of the Bacteriophage Qβ Replicase Reduce the Mutagenic Effect of 5-Azacytidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanillas, Laura; Sanjuán, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The high genetic heterogeneity and great adaptability of RNA viruses are ultimately caused by the low replication fidelity of their polymerases. However, single amino acid substitutions that modify replication fidelity can evolve in response to mutagenic treatments with nucleoside analogues. Here, we investigated how two independent mutants of the bacteriophage Qβ replicase (Thr210Ala and Tyr410His) reduce sensitivity to the nucleoside analogue 5-azacytidine (AZC). Despite being located outside the catalytic site, both mutants reduced the mutation frequency in the presence of the drug. However, they did not modify the type of AZC-induced substitutions, which was mediated mainly by ambiguous base pairing of the analogue with purines. Furthermore, the Thr210Ala and Tyr410His substitutions had little or no effect on replication fidelity in untreated viruses. Also, both substitutions were costly in the absence of AZC or when the action of the drug was suppressed by adding an excess of natural pyrimidines (uridine or cytosine). Overall, the phenotypic properties of these two mutants were highly convergent, despite the mutations being located in different domains of the Qβ replicase. This suggests that treatment with a given nucleoside analogue tends to select for a unique functional response in the viral replicase. IMPORTANCE In the last years, artificial increase of the replication error rate has been proposed as an antiviral therapy. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms by which two substitutions in the Qβ replicase confer partial resistance to the mutagenic nucleoside analogue AZC. As opposed to previous work with animal viruses, where different mutations selected sequentially conferred nucleoside analogue resistance through different mechanisms, our results suggest that there are few or no alternative AZC resistance phenotypes in Qβ. Also, despite resistance mutations being highly costly in the absence of the drug, there was no sequential

  5. An Ensemble Method to Distinguish Bacteriophage Virion from Non-Virion Proteins Based on Protein Sequence Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophage virion proteins and non-virion proteins have distinct functions in biological processes, such as specificity determination for host bacteria, bacteriophage replication and transcription. Accurate identification of bacteriophage virion proteins from bacteriophage protein sequences is significant to understand the complex virulence mechanism in host bacteria and the influence of bacteriophages on the development of antibacterial drugs. In this study, an ensemble method for bacteriophage virion protein prediction from bacteriophage protein sequences is put forward with hybrid feature spaces incorporating CTD (composition, transition and distribution, bi-profile Bayes, PseAAC (pseudo-amino acid composition and PSSM (position-specific scoring matrix. When performing on the training dataset 10-fold cross-validation, the presented method achieves a satisfactory prediction result with a sensitivity of 0.870, a specificity of 0.830, an accuracy of 0.850 and Matthew’s correlation coefficient (MCC of 0.701, respectively. To evaluate the prediction performance objectively, an independent testing dataset is used to evaluate the proposed method. Encouragingly, our proposed method performs better than previous studies with a sensitivity of 0.853, a specificity of 0.815, an accuracy of 0.831 and MCC of 0.662 on the independent testing dataset. These results suggest that the proposed method can be a potential candidate for bacteriophage virion protein prediction, which may provide a useful tool to find novel antibacterial drugs and to understand the relationship between bacteriophage and host bacteria. For the convenience of the vast majority of experimental Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2015, 16 21735 scientists, a user-friendly and publicly-accessible web-server for the proposed ensemble method is established.

  6. A specific, UV-induced RNA-protein cross-link using 5-bromouridine-substituted RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The well-characterized RNA binding site of the bacteriophage R17 coat protein has been used to investigate the cross-linking of protein to 5-bromouridine (BrU)-substituted RNA using medium-wavelength UV light. The authors have demonstrated a specific RNA-protein cross-link and identified the site on the RNA of protein attachment. Formation of the covalent complex is dependent upon the presence of BrU at position -5 of the RNA and specific binding of the RNA by coat protein. The amount of cross-linking increases with time and depends on the light source and conditions used. Irradiations using a broad-spectrum UV transilluminator (peak at 312 nm) or monochromatic XeCl excimer laser (308 nm) gave levels of cross-linking exceeding 20 and 50%, respectively. The quantum yield of photo-cross-linking, determined with 308-nm excitation, was 0.003. While little strand breakage or debromination of the RNA occurred, significant protein photodamage was observed

  7. Isolation and Genetic Analysis of an Environmental Bacteriophage: A 10-Session Laboratory Series in Molecular Virology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Ryan P.; Barker, Brent T.; Drammeh, Hamidou; Scott, Jefferson; Lin, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial viruses, otherwise known as bacteriophage (or phage), are some of the most abundant viruses found in the environment. They can be easily isolated from water or soil and are ideal for use in laboratory classrooms due to their ease of culture and inherent safety. Here, we describe a series of 10 laboratory exercises where students collect,…

  8. Occurrence of Salmonella-specific bacteriophages in swine feces collected from commercial farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella is one of the primary foodborne pathogens associated with swine production and represents a significant threat to human health. Bacteriophage are naturally-occurring viruses that prey on bacteria and have been suggested as a potential intervention strategy to reduce Salmonella in food an...

  9. Fusions of bacteriophage P22 late genes to the Escherichia coli lacZ gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Riggs, P D; Botstein, D

    1987-01-01

    The late genes of bacteriophage P22 were fused to lacZ to study their differential expression from the late operon transcript. No instances of posttranscriptional regulation were uncovered, thus supporting the model that the late genes are expressed, by and large, in fixed ratios based on their translational efficiency and message stability.

  10. Isolation of Salmonella spp. and bacteriophage active against Salmonella spp. from commercial swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteriophage are viruses that prey on bacteria and may be a potential strategy to reduce foodborne pathogenic bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract of food animals. Phages are fairly common in the gastrointestinal microbial ecosystem of mammals, but the incidence is unknown. If phage are to be e...

  11. Induction of genetic recombination in the lambda bacteriophage by ultraviolet radiation of the Escherichia Coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work there are reported the results that show that although the stimulation of the recombination of the Lambda bacteriophage, by UV irradiation of the cells of Escherichia Coli, it looks to be the result of the high expression of the functions of the SOS system, doesn't keep some relationship with the high concentration of protein reached RecA. (Author)

  12. A century of phage research: bacteriophages and the shaping of modern biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, Eric C

    2015-01-01

    2015 marks the centennial of the discovery of bacteriophages, viruses that infect bacteria. Phages have been central to some of biology's most meaningful advances over the past hundred years (shown here); they greatly influence the workings of the biosphere, and are poised to play expanded roles in biomedicine, biotechnology, and ecology. PMID:25521633

  13. Interaction of Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633 and Bacteriophage gh-1 in Berea Sandstone Rock

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Philip Lee; Yen, Teh Fu

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of the passage of Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633 and a phage-resistant mutant through Berea sandstone rock were made. When bacteriophage gh-1 was adsorbed within the rock matrix, a reduction in the passage of the susceptible but not the resistant cells through the rock was observed.

  14. Interaction of Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633 and Bacteriophage gh-1 in Berea Sandstone Rock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, P L; Yen, T F

    1985-12-01

    Measurements of the passage of Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633 and a phage-resistant mutant through Berea sandstone rock were made. When bacteriophage gh-1 was adsorbed within the rock matrix, a reduction in the passage of the susceptible but not the resistant cells through the rock was observed. PMID:16346956

  15. The membrane-bound form of gene 9 minor coat protein of bacteriophage M13

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houbiers, M.C.

    2002-01-01

    Bacteriophage M13 is a virus that infects the bacteria Escherichia coli ( E. coli ), a single cell organism that resides in our intestines. It consists of the cytoplasm (contents) and a double membrane that keeps the contents together (the barrier to the outside world). The membra

  16. 76 FR 16285 - Food Additives Permitted for Direct Addition to Food for Human Consumption; Bacteriophage...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... Additives Permitted for Direct Addition to Food for Human Consumption; Bacteriophage Preparation AGENCY... own guidelines for assessing the safety of food additives. Specifically, FWW states that FDA did not... the NAS/NRC as a guide that the Agency uses in its safety evaluations of food additives....

  17. Bacteriophage remediation of bacterial pathogens in aquaculture: a review of the technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteriophages have been proposed as an alternative to antibiotic usage and several studies on their application in aquaculture have been reported. This review highlights progress to date on phage therapies for the following fish and shellfish diseases and associated pathogens: hemorrhagic septicem...

  18. Optimal foraging predicts the ecology but not the evolution of host specialization in bacteriophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Guyader

    Full Text Available We explore the ability of optimal foraging theory to explain the observation among marine bacteriophages that host range appears to be negatively correlated with host abundance in the local marine environment. We modified Charnov's classic diet composition model to describe the ecological dynamics of the related generalist and specialist bacteriophages phiX174 and G4, and confirmed that specialist phages are ecologically favored only at high host densities. Our modified model accurately predicted the ecological dynamics of phage populations in laboratory microcosms, but had only limited success predicting evolutionary dynamics. We monitored evolution of attachment rate, the phenotype that governs diet breadth, in phage populations adapting to both low and high host density microcosms. Although generalist phiX174 populations evolved even broader diets at low host density, they did not show a tendency to evolve the predicted specialist foraging strategy at high host density. Similarly, specialist G4 populations were unable to evolve the predicted generalist foraging strategy at low host density. These results demonstrate that optimal foraging models developed to explain the behaviorally determined diets of predators may have only limited success predicting the genetically determined diets of bacteriophage, and that optimal foraging probably plays a smaller role than genetic constraints in the evolution of host specialization in bacteriophages.

  19. Virulence Changes to Harveyi Clade Bacteria Infected with Bacteriophage from Vibrio owensii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busico-Salcedo, Nancy; Owens, Leigh

    2013-09-01

    Vibrio owensii is one of the most virulent vibrios known being able to kill crustacean larvae at 10(2) CFU ml(-1). This study describes virulence changes to naïve strains of Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio campbellii when infected with the bacteriophage VOB from a closely related species V. owensii 47666-1. The bacteriophage from V. owensii was induced into lytic phase by using mitomycin C at 100 ng ml(-1). One strain of V. harveyi and two strains of V. campbellii from 29 tested containing no prophage were susceptible to lysogenic conversion with VOB. Virulence changes induced in Harveyi clade bacteria included the up-regulation of protein secretion, statistically significant increased haemolysin and chitinase production and increased mortality to nauplii of Penaeus monodon. No change in siderophore production was observed. Bacteriophage VOB is likely to be responsible for some of the virulence factors expressed by V. owensii. As this bacteriophage is able to infect strains of V. harveyi and V. campbellii this phage may contribute to increased virulence of other vibrios in aquaculture and in the natural environment. PMID:24426274

  20. Detection and characterization of a lytic Pediococcus bacteriophage from the fermenting cucumber brine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Of the twelve lytic bacteriophages recovered from five different fermenting cucumber tanks that were inoculated with Pediococcus sp. LA0281, a lytic phage, 'ps05, was characterized in the present study. The plaques were mostly clear and round-shaped on the lawn of starter strain, indicating lytic ph...

  1. Primary Isolation Strain Determines Both Phage Type and Receptors Recognised by Campylobacter jejuni Bacteriophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Martine C. Holst; Gencay, Yilmaz Emre; Birk, Tina; Baldvinsson, Signe Berg; Jaeckel, Claudia; Hammerl, Jens A.; Vegge, Christina S.; Neve, Horst; Brøndsted, Lone

    2015-01-01

    In this study we isolated novel bacteriophages, infecting the zoonotic bacterium Campylobacter jejuni. These phages may be used in phage therapy of C. jejuni colonized poultry to prevent spreading of the bacteria to meat products causing disease in humans. Many C. jejuni phages have been isolated...

  2. Quantification and Evaluation of Infectivity of Shiga Toxin-Encoding Bacteriophages in Beef and Salad ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Imamovic, Lejla; Muniesa, Maite

    2011-01-01

    Stx bacteriophages in 68 samples of beef and salad were quantified by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). Stx phages from the samples were propagated in Escherichia coli C600, E. coli O157:H7, and Shigella strains and further quantified. Fifty percent of the samples carried infectious Stx phages that were isolated from plaques generated by lysis.

  3. Bacteriophage T4 genes sp and 40 apparently are the same.

    OpenAIRE

    Obringer, J; McCreary, P.; Bernstein, H

    1988-01-01

    The bacteriophage T4 spackle gene, which maintains host membrane integrity, mapped at the same position as gene 40 (head morphogenesis). The cloned spackle gene complemented and cross-reactivated a gene 40 mutant. Like the spackle mutant, gene 40 mutants were defective in genetic exclusion. Apparently, genes spackle and 40 are the same gene.

  4. Transfection of Bacillus subtilis protoplasts by bacteriophage phi do7 DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Perkins, J B; Dean, D H

    1983-01-01

    DNA from the Bacillus subtilis temperate bacteriophage phi do7 was found to efficiently transfect B. subtilis protoplasts; protoplast transfection was more efficient than competent cell transfection by a magnitude of 10(3). Unlike competent cell transfection, protoplast transfection did not require primary recombination, suggesting that phi do7 DNA enters the protoplast as double-stranded molecules.

  5. Evolutionarily distinct bacteriophage endolysins featuring conserved peptidoglycan cleavage sites protect mice from MRSA infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive pathogen relevant for both human and animal health. With multi-drug resistant S. aureus strains becoming increasingly prevalent, alternative therapeutics are urgently needed. Bacteriophage endolysins (peptidoglycan hydrolases, PGH) are capable of killing Gra...

  6. In vitro evaluation of a novel bacteriophage cocktail as a preventative for bovine coliform mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, J; Anderson, J; Carter, L; Donjacour, E; Paros, M

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the potential use of bacteriophage in preventing Escherichia coli mastitis on dairies. A cocktail consisting of 4 distinct bacteriophages was generated by screening against 36 E. coli isolates from dairy cows in Washington State with clinical mastitis. The bacteriophage significantly inhibited growth of 58% of the Washington State isolates and 54% of E. coli mastitis isolates from New York State, suggesting that the cocktail of phages had a relatively broad spectrum of action against relevant strains from 2 distinct geographies. The ability to suppress bacterial growth of these isolates in a liquid growth medium was not affected by the ratio of bacteriophage particles to bacterial cells (multiplicity of infection, MOI). For those E. coli that were completely inhibited by the phage cocktail, an MOI as low as 10had the same effect as 10µg/mL of ceftiofur on the growth rate of E. coli over a 12-h period using optical density measurements. A 3.3- to 5.6-log reduction of growth was achieved when E. coli was co-incubated with our phage cocktail in raw milk over a 12-h period at physiologic temperature. A modified gentamicin protection assay using bovine mammary epithelial cells provided a model to test whether bacteriophage could prevent cell attachment and invasion by chronic coliform mastitis strains. Pretreatment of cell cultures with the phage cocktail significantly reduced adhesion and intracellular survival of E. coli compared with controls. When combined with a bismuth-based teat sealant, the phage cocktail was able to inhibit bacterial growth when challenged with 1.6×10(3) cfu/mL of a clinical mastitis E. coli strain. In vitro results show bactericidal activity by our phage in raw milk and mammary tissue culture systems. Before a bacteriophage-based dry-cow treatment becomes a potential option for dairies, in vivo studies must be able to demonstrate that a specific dose of bacteriophage can protect cows from

  7. LF-15 & T7, synthetic peptides derived from tumstatin, attenuate aspects of airway remodelling in a murine model of chronic OVA-induced allergic airway disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karryn T Grafton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tumstatin is a segment of the collagen-IV protein that is markedly reduced in the airways of asthmatics. Tumstatin can play an important role in the development of airway remodelling associated with asthma due to its anti-angiogenic properties. This study assessed the anti-angiogenic properties of smaller peptides derived from tumstatin, which contain the interface tumstatin uses to interact with the αVβ3 integrin. METHODS: Primary human lung endothelial cells were exposed to the LF-15, T3 and T7 tumstatin-derived peptides and assessed for cell viability and tube formation in vitro. The impact of the anti-angiogenic properties on airways hyperresponsiveness (AHR was then examined using a murine model of chronic OVA-induced allergic airways disease. RESULTS: The LF-15 and T7 peptides significantly reduced endothelial cell viability and attenuated tube formation in vitro. Mice exposed to OVA+ LF-15 or OVA+T7 also had reduced total lung vascularity and AHR was attenuated compared to mice exposed to OVA alone. T3 peptides reduced cell viability but had no effect on any other parameters. CONCLUSION: The LF-15 and T7 peptides may be appropriate candidates for use as novel pharmacotherapies due to their small size and anti-angiogenic properties observed in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Catabolic fate of Streptomyces viridosporus T7A-Produced, acid precipitable polymeric lignin upon incubation with ligninolytic Streptomyces species and Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degradation of ground and hot-water-extracted corn stover (Zea mays) lignocellulose by Streptomyces viridosporus T7A generates a water-soluble lignin degradation intermediate termed acid-precipitable polymeric lignin (APPL). The further catabolism of T7A-APPL by S. viridosporus T7A, S. badius 252, and S. setonii75Vi2 was followed for 3 weeks. APPL catabolism by Phanerochaete chrysosporium was followed in stationary cultures in a low-nitrogen medium containing 1% (wt/vol) glucose and 0.05% (wt/vol) T7A-APPL. Metabolism of the APPL was followed by turbidometric assay (600 nm) and by direct measurement of APPL recoverable from the medium. Accumulation and disappearance of soluble low-molecular-weight products of APPL catabolism were followed by gas-liquid chromatography and by high-pressure liquid chromatography, utilizing a diode array detector. Mineralization of a [14C-lignin]APPL was also followed. The percent 14C recovered as 14CO2, 14C-APPL, 14C-labeled water-soluble products, and cell mass-associated radioactivity, were determined for each microorganism after 1 and 3 weeks of incubation in bubbler tube cultures at 370C. P. chrysosporium evolved the most 14CO2, and S. viridosporus gave the greatest decrease in recoverable 14C-APPL. The results show that S. badius was not able to significantly degrade the APPL, while the other microorganisms demonstrated various APPL-degrading abilities

  9. An anti-tumor protein produced by Trichinella spiralis and identified by screening a T7 phage display library, induces apoptosis in human hepatoma H7402 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichinella spiralis infection confers effective resistance to tumor cell expansion. In this study, a T7 phage cDNA display library was constructed to express genes encoded by T. spiralis. Organic phase multi-cell screening was used to sort through candidate proteins in a transfected human chronic m...

  10. Impact of chemical and structural anisotropy on the electrophoretic mobility of spherical soft multilayer particles: the case of bacteriophage MS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlet, Jérémie; Gaboriaud, Fabien; Gantzer, Christophe; Duval, Jérôme F L

    2008-04-15

    We report a theoretical investigation of the electrohydrodynamic properties of spherical soft particles composed of permeable concentric layers that differ in thickness, soft material density, chemical composition, and flow penetration degree. Starting from a recent numerical scheme developed for the computation of the direct-current electrophoretic mobility (mu) of diffuse soft bioparticles, the dependence of mu on the electrolyte concentration and solution pH is evaluated taking the known three-layered structure of bacteriophage MS2 as a supporting model system (bulk RNA, RNA-protein bound layer, and coat protein). The electrokinetic results are discussed for various layer thicknesses, hydrodynamic flow penetration degrees, and chemical compositions, and are discussed on the basis of the equilibrium electrostatic potential and hydrodynamic flow field profiles that develop within and around the structured particle. This study allows for identifying the cases where the electrophoretic mobility is a function of the inner structural and chemical specificity of the particle and not only of its outer surface properties. Along these lines, we demonstrate the general inapplicability of the notions of zeta potential (zeta) and surface charge for quantitatively interpreting electrokinetic data collected for such systems. We further shed some light on the physical meaning of the isoelectric point. In particular, numerical and analytical simulations performed on structured soft layers in indifferent electrolytic solution demonstrate that the isoelectric point is a complex ionic strength-dependent signature of the flow permeation properties and of the chemical and structural details of the particle. Finally, the electrophoretic mobilities of the MS2 virus measured at various ionic strength levels and pH values are interpreted on the basis of the theoretical formalism aforementioned. It is shown that the electrokinetic features of MS2 are to a large extent determined not only

  11. The bacteriophage ϕ29 tail possesses a pore-forming loop for cell membrane penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingwei; Gui, Miao; Wang, Dianhong; Xiang, Ye

    2016-06-23

    Most bacteriophages are tailed bacteriophages with an isometric or a prolate head attached to a long contractile, long non-contractile, or short non-contractile tail. The tail is a complex machine that plays a central role in host cell recognition and attachment, cell wall and membrane penetration, and viral genome ejection. The mechanisms involved in the penetration of the inner host cell membrane by bacteriophage tails are not well understood. Here we describe structural and functional studies of the bacteriophage ϕ29 tail knob protein gene product 9 (gp9). The 2.0 Å crystal structure of gp9 shows that six gp9 molecules form a hexameric tube structure with six flexible hydrophobic loops blocking one end of the tube before DNA ejection. Sequence and structural analyses suggest that the loops in the tube could be membrane active. Further biochemical assays and electron microscopy structural analyses show that the six hydrophobic loops in the tube exit upon DNA ejection and form a channel that spans the lipid bilayer of the membrane and allows the release of the bacteriophage genomic DNA, suggesting that cell membrane penetration involves a pore-forming mechanism similar to that of certain non-enveloped eukaryotic viruses. A search of other phage tail proteins identified similar hydrophobic loops, which indicates that a common mechanism might be used for membrane penetration by prokaryotic viruses. These findings suggest that although prokaryotic and eukaryotic viruses use apparently very different mechanisms for infection, they have evolved similar mechanisms for breaching the cell membrane. PMID:27309813

  12. Control of Listeria monocytogenes growth in soft cheeses by bacteriophage P100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Nóbrega Gibson Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of bacteriophage P100 on strains of Listeria monocytogenes in artificially inoculated soft cheeses. A mix of L. monocytogenes 1/2a and Scott A was inoculated in Minas Frescal and Coalho cheeses (approximately 10(5 cfu/g with the bacteriophage added thereafter (8.3 x 10(7 PFU/g. Samples were analyzed immediately, and then stored at 10 ºC for seven days. At time zero, 30 min post-infection, the bacteriophage P100 reduced L. monocytogenes counts by 2.3 log units in Minas Frescal cheese and by 2.1 log units in Coalho cheese, compared to controls without bacteriophage. However, in samples stored under refrigeration for seven days, the bacteriophage P100 was only weakly antilisterial, with the lowest decimal reduction (DR for the cheeses: 1.0 log unit for Minas Frescal and 0.8 log units for Coalho cheese. The treatment produced a statistically significant decrease in the counts of viable cells (p < 0.05 and in all assays performed, we observed an increase of approximately one log cycle in the number of viable cells of L. monocytogenes in the samples under refrigeration for seven days. Moreover, a smaller effect of phages was observed. These results, along with other published data, indicate that the effectiveness of the phage treatment depends on the initial concentration of L. monocytogenes, and that a high concentration of phages per unit area is required to ensure sustained inactivation of target pathogens on food surfaces.

  13. Galectin-1 as a fusion partner for the production of soluble and folded human {beta}-1,4-galactosyltransferase-T7 in E. coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasek, Marta [Structural Glycobiology Section, SAIC-Frederick, Inc., Center for Cancer Research Nanobiology Program, Center for Cancer Research, NCI-Frederick, Frederick, MD 2170 (United States); Boeggeman, Elizabeth; Ramakrishnan, Boopathy [Structural Glycobiology Section, SAIC-Frederick, Inc., Center for Cancer Research Nanobiology Program, Center for Cancer Research, NCI-Frederick, Frederick, MD 2170 (United States); Basic Science Program, SAIC-Frederick, Inc., Center for Cancer Research Nanobiology Program, Center for Cancer Research, NCI-Frederick, Frederick, MD 2170 (United States); Qasba, Pradman K., E-mail: qasba@helix.nih.gov [Structural Glycobiology Section, SAIC-Frederick, Inc., Center for Cancer Research Nanobiology Program, Center for Cancer Research, NCI-Frederick, Frederick, MD 2170 (United States)

    2010-04-09

    The expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli often leads to inactive aggregated proteins known as the inclusion bodies. To date, the best available tool has been the use of fusion tags, including the carbohydrate-binding protein; e.g., the maltose-binding protein (MBP) that enhances the solubility of recombinant proteins. However, none of these fusion tags work universally with every partner protein. We hypothesized that galectins, which are also carbohydrate-binding proteins, may help as fusion partners in folding the mammalian proteins in E. coli. Here we show for the first time that a small soluble lectin, human galectin-1, one member of a large galectin family, can function as a fusion partner to produce soluble folded recombinant human glycosyltransferase, {beta}-1,4-galactosyltransferase-7 ({beta}4Gal-T7), in E. coli. The enzyme {beta}4Gal-T7 transfers galactose to xylose during the synthesis of the tetrasaccharide linker sequence attached to a Ser residue of proteoglycans. Without a fusion partner, {beta}4Gal-T7 is expressed in E. coli as inclusion bodies. We have designed a new vector construct, pLgals1, from pET-23a that includes the sequence for human galectin-1, followed by the Tev protease cleavage site, a 6x His-coding sequence, and a multi-cloning site where a cloned gene is inserted. After lactose affinity column purification of galectin-1-{beta}4Gal-T7 fusion protein, the unique protease cleavage site allows the protein {beta}4Gal-T7 to be cleaved from galectin-1 that binds and elutes from UDP-agarose column. The eluted protein is enzymatically active, and shows CD spectra comparable to the folded {beta}4Gal-T1. The engineered galectin-1 vector could prove to be a valuable tool for expressing other proteins in E. coli.

  14. Galectin-1 as a fusion partner for the production of soluble and folded human β-1,4-galactosyltransferase-T7 in E. coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli often leads to inactive aggregated proteins known as the inclusion bodies. To date, the best available tool has been the use of fusion tags, including the carbohydrate-binding protein; e.g., the maltose-binding protein (MBP) that enhances the solubility of recombinant proteins. However, none of these fusion tags work universally with every partner protein. We hypothesized that galectins, which are also carbohydrate-binding proteins, may help as fusion partners in folding the mammalian proteins in E. coli. Here we show for the first time that a small soluble lectin, human galectin-1, one member of a large galectin family, can function as a fusion partner to produce soluble folded recombinant human glycosyltransferase, β-1,4-galactosyltransferase-7 (β4Gal-T7), in E. coli. The enzyme β4Gal-T7 transfers galactose to xylose during the synthesis of the tetrasaccharide linker sequence attached to a Ser residue of proteoglycans. Without a fusion partner, β4Gal-T7 is expressed in E. coli as inclusion bodies. We have designed a new vector construct, pLgals1, from pET-23a that includes the sequence for human galectin-1, followed by the Tev protease cleavage site, a 6x His-coding sequence, and a multi-cloning site where a cloned gene is inserted. After lactose affinity column purification of galectin-1-β4Gal-T7 fusion protein, the unique protease cleavage site allows the protein β4Gal-T7 to be cleaved from galectin-1 that binds and elutes from UDP-agarose column. The eluted protein is enzymatically active, and shows CD spectra comparable to the folded β4Gal-T1. The engineered galectin-1 vector could prove to be a valuable tool for expressing other proteins in E. coli.

  15. Single molecule studies of DNA packaging by bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Derek Nathan

    The DNA packaging dynamics of bacteriophages φ29, gamma, and T4 were studied at the single molecule level using a dual trap optical tweezers. Also, a method for producing long DNA molecules by PCR for optical tweezers studies of protein DNA interactions is presented and thoroughly characterized. This DNA preparation technique provided DNA samples for the φ29 and T4 studies. In the studies of φ29, the role of charge was investigated by varying the ionic conditions of the packaging buffer. Ionic conditions in which the DNA charge was highly screened due to divalent and trivalent cations showed the lowest resistance to packaging of the DNA to high density. This confirmed the importance of counterions in shielding the DNA interstrand repulsion when packaged to high density. While the ionic nature of the packaging buffer had a strong effect on packaging velocities, there was no clear trend between the counterion-screened charge of the DNA and the maximum packaging velocity. The packaging studies of lambda and T4 served as systems for comparative studies with φ29. Each system showed similarities to the φ29 system and unique differences. Both the lambda and T4 packaging motors were capable of generating forces in excess of 50 pN and showed remarkably high processivity, similar to φ29. However, dynamic structural transitions were observed with lambda that are not observed with φ29. The packaging of the lambda genome showed capsid expansion at approximately 30 percent of the genome packaged and capsid rupture at 90 percent of the genome packaged in the absence of capsid stabilizing protein gpD. Unique to the T4 packaging motor, packaging dynamics showed a remarkable amount of variability in velocities. This variability was seen both within individual packaging phages and from one phage to the next. This is possibly due to different conformational states of the packaging machinery. Additionally, lambda and T4 had average packaging velocities under minimal load of 600

  16. RNA oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L. K.; Cejvanovic, V.; Henriken, T.;

    2015-01-01

    .9 significant hazard ratio for death compared with the quartile with the lowest 8oxoGuo excretion when adjusted for age, sex, BMI, smoker status, s-HbA1c, urine protein excretion and s-cholesterol. We conclude that it is now established that RNA oxidation is an independent risk factor for death in type 2...

  17. Comparative genomics of four closely related Clostridium perfringens bacteriophages reveals variable rates of evolution within a core genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Biotechnological uses of bacteriophage gene products as alternatives to conventional antibiotics will require a thorough understanding of their genomic context. We sequenced and analyzed the genomes of four closely related phages isolated from Clostridium perfringens, an important agricu...

  18. Ability of Bacillus subtilis protoplasts to repair irradiated bacteriophage deoxyribonucleic acid via acquired and natural enzymatic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel form of enzyme therapy was achieved by utilizing protoplasts of Bacillus subtilis. Photoreactivating enzyme of Escherichia coli was successfully inserted into the protoplasts of B. subtilis treated with polyethylene glycol. This enzyme was used to photoreactivate ultraviolet-damaged bacteriophage deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Furthermore, in polyethylene glycol-treated protoplasts, ultraviolet-irradiated transfecting bacteriophage DNA was shown to be a functional substrate for the host DNA excision repair system. Previous results (R.E. Yasbin, J.D. Fernwalt, and P.I. Fields, J. Bacteriol.; 137: 391-396) showed that ultraviolet-irradiated bacteriophage DNA could not be repaired via the excision repair system of competent cells. Therefore, the processing of bacteriophage DNA by protoplasts and by competent cells must be different. This sensitive protoplast assay can be used to identify and to isolate various types of DNA repair enzymes

  19. Introns in the genome of bacteriophage T4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RNA from T4-infected cells yields multiple end-labeled species when incubated with [α-32P]GTP under self-splicing conditions. One of these corresponds to the previously characterized intron from the T4 td gene and, as shown in this work, the others represent additional group I introns in T4. Two loci distinct from the td gene were found to hybridize to the mixed GTP-labeled T4 RNA probe. These were mapped to the unlinked genes nrdB and sunY. Cloned DNA from the nrdB region that contained the intron was shown to generate characteristic group I splice products with RNA synthesized in vivo or in vitro. The splice junction of the nrdB gene was determined and the nature of the RNA reaction products characterized. In vivo expression of the nrdB gene and the open reading frame within the intron was studied using in-frame lacZ fusions and primer extension analyses. The data suggest that expression of the intron open reading frame is highly regulated during T4 infection. Possible regulatory mechanisms are discussed

  20. T4-Related Bacteriophage LIMEstone Isolates for the Control of Soft Rot on Potato Caused by 'Dickeya solani'

    OpenAIRE

    Adriaenssens, Evelien; Van Vaerenbergh, Johan; Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Dunon, Vincent; Ceyssens, Pieter-Jan; De Proft, Maurice; Kropinski, Andrew M; Noben, Jean-Paul; Maes, Martine; Lavigne, Rob

    2012-01-01

    The bacterium ‘Dickeya solani’, an aggressive biovar 3 variant of Dickeya dianthicola, causes rotting and blackleg in potato. To control this pathogen using bacteriophage therapy, we isolated and characterized two closely related and specific bacteriophages, vB_DsoM_LIMEstone1 and vB_DsoM_LIMEstone2. The LIMEstone phages have a T4-related genome organization and share DNA similarity with Salmonella phage ViI. Microbiological and molecular characterization of the phages deemed them suitable an...

  1. Comparative (Meta)genomic Analysis and Ecological Profiling of Human Gut-Specific Bacteriophage φB124-14

    OpenAIRE

    Ogilvie, Lesley A.; Caplin, Jonathan; Dedi, Cinzia; Diston, David; Cheek, Elizabeth; Bowler, Lucas; Taylor, Huw; Ebdon, James; Jones, Brian V.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophage associated with the human gut microbiome are likely to have an important impact on community structure and function, and provide a wealth of biotechnological opportunities. Despite this, knowledge of the ecology and composition of bacteriophage in the gut bacterial community remains poor, with few well characterized gut-associated phage genomes currently available. Here we describe the identification and in-depth (meta)genomic, proteomic, and ecological analysis of a human gut-s...

  2. Biological Properties and Cell Tropism of Chp2, a Bacteriophage of the Obligate Intracellular Bacterium Chlamydophila abortus

    OpenAIRE

    Everson, J. S.; Garner, S. A.; Fane, B.; Liu, B.-L.; Lambden, P R; Clarke, I N

    2002-01-01

    A number of bacteriophages belonging to the Microviridae have been described infecting chlamydiae. Phylogenetic studies divide the Chlamydiaceae into two distinct genera, Chlamydia and Chlamydophila, containing three and six different species, respectively. In this work we investigated the biological properties and host range of the recently described bacteriophage Chp2 that was originally discovered in Chlamydophila abortus. The obligate intracellular development cycle of chlamydiae has prec...

  3. Fc receptor-mediated, antibody-dependent enhancement of bacteriophage lambda-mediated gene transfer in mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sapinoro, Ramil; Volcy, Ketna; Shanaka, W.W.; Rodrigo, I.; Schlesinger, Jacob J.; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Lambda phage vectors mediate gene transfer in cultured mammalian cells and in live mice, and in vivo phage-mediated gene expression is increased when mice are pre-immunized with bacteriophage lambda. We now show that, like eukaryotic viruses, bacteriophage vectors are subject to Fc receptor-mediated, antibody-dependent enhancement of infection in mammalian cells. Antibody-dependent enhancement of phage gene transfer required FcγRI, but not its associated γ chain, and was not supported by othe...

  4. The Function of T7 Promoter as cis-Acting Elements for Polymerase II in Eukaryotic Cell%T7启动子具有真核生物聚合酶Ⅱ顺式作用因子的功能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李月琴; 朱嘉明; 李弘剑; 谢卫兵; 周天鸿; 王彤歌

    2000-01-01

    根据α-鹅膏蕈碱(α-amanitin)对真核生物RNA聚合酶的选择性抑制,以氯霉素乙酰转移酶基因(CAT)作为报道基因进行体内表达实验,证明T7噬菌体启动子可为真核生物RNA聚合酶所启动.应用建立的竞争性DNA-蛋白质凝胶沪动技术,分别以TATA框,CAAT框,GC框和八核苷酸序列(octamer)为竞争性寡核苷酸分子,发现人工合成的T7启动子可能与TFD起始转录因子结合,形成DNA-核蛋白质结合物.TATA框和八核苷酸序列分别接入T7启动子上游,CAT实验显示八核苷酸序列可以增强RNA聚合酶对T7启动子的转录起始作用.实验结果表明T7启动子可作为RNA聚合酶的顺式作用因子.

  5. Inactivation of F-specific bacteriophages during flocculation with polyaluminum chloride - a mechanistic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreißel, Katja; Bösl, Monika; Hügler, Michael; Lipp, Pia; Franzreb, Matthias; Hambsch, Beate

    2014-03-15

    Bacteriophages are often used as surrogates for enteric viruses in spiking experiments to determine the efficiencies of virus removal of certain water treatment measures, like e.g. flocculation or filtration steps. Such spiking experiments with bacteriophages are indispensable if the natural virus concentrations in the raw water of water treatment plants are too low to allow the determination of elimination levels over several orders of magnitude. In order to obtain reliable results from such spiking tests, it is essential that bacteriophages behave comparable to viruses and remain stable during the experiments. To test this, the influence of flocculation parameters on the bacteriophages MS2, Qβ and phiX174 was examined. Notably, the F-specific phages MS2 and Qβ were found to be inactivated in flocculation processes with polyaluminum chloride (PACl). In contrast, other aluminum coagulants like AlCl3 or Al2(SO4)3 did not show a comparable effect on MS2 in this study. In experiments testing the influence of different PACl species on MS2 and Qβ inactivation during flocculation, it could be shown that cationic dissolved PACl species (Al13) interacted with the MS2 surface and hereby reduced the surviving phage fraction to c/c0 values below 1*10(-4) even at very low PACl concentrations of 7 μmol Al/L. Other inactivation mechanisms like the irreversible adsorption of phages to the floc structure or the damage of phage surfaces due to entrapment into the floc during coagulation and floc formation do not seem to contribute to the low surviving fraction found for both F-specific bacteriophages. Furthermore, no influence of phage agglomeration or pH drops during the flocculation process on phage inactivation could be observed. The somatic coliphage phiX174 in contrast did not show sensitivity to chemical stress and in accordance only slight interaction between Al13 and the phage surface was observed. Consequently, F-specific phages like MS2 should not be used as

  6. Coupled orbital and spin evolution of the CoRoT-7 two-planet system using a Maxwell viscoelastic rheology

    CERN Document Server

    Colucci, Adrián Rodríguez; Correia, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the orbital and rotational evolution of the CoRoT-7 two-planet system, assuming that the innermost planet behaves like a Maxwell body. We numerically resolve the coupled differential equations governing the instantaneous deformation of the inner planet together with the orbital motion of the system. We show that, depending on the relaxation time for the deformation of the planet, the orbital evolution has two distinct behaviours: for relaxation times shorter than the orbital period, we reproduce the results from classic tidal theories, for which the eccentricity is always damped. However, for longer relaxation times, the eccentricity of the inner orbit is secularly excited and can grow to high values. This mechanism provides an explanation for the present high eccentricity observed for CoRoT-7 b, as well as for other close-in super-Earths in multiple planetary systems.

  7. Infantile spasms in a boy with an abnormal karyotype (46, XY, der(9t(7;9(p15;p22pat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infantile spasm (IS is an epilepsy syndrome affecting infants and young toddlers and many causes have been reported, including occasional chromosomal abnormalities. We describe a 6-month-oldboy who experienced his first seizure at 5 months of age. The seizures were characterized by brief head nods and forceful flexion of the trunk and limbs. The patient has been developmentally delayed since birth and had deteriorated remarkably in the last month. Interictal electroencephalography showed modified hypsarrhythmia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed delayed myelination and widened brain extracellular space. Chromosomal analysis revealed the karyotype 46, XY, der(9 t(7;9(p15;p22 pat. His father has the asymptomatic reciprocal translocation t(7;9(p15;p22. This chromosomal abnormality is probably the etiology for the ISs and severe developmental anomalies in this patient. Chromosomal analysis may be done in patients with IS with no obvious cause.

  8. 一株分离自潮间带污泥细菌Clostridium sp.T7产氢特性分析%Characterization of Hydrogen Production of a Strain Clostridium sp.T7 Isolated from Intertidal Sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪艳; 王文磊

    2011-01-01

    A hydrogen-producing bacterium, Clostridium sp. T7, was isolated form the sludge collected from intertidal zone of a bathing beach in Tianjin. The effects of initial pH value, carbon source, nitrogen source and NaCl concentration on hydrogen production of strain T7 were determined in this study. The results showed that strain T7 produced hydrogen production at maximal level when growing at initial pH of 6.0. The strain was able to produce hydrogen using many carbon sources, such as glucose, sucrose and fructose. The strain T7 could produce hydrogen by using yeast extract and beef as nitrogen source, but not peptone. The level of hydrogen production was affected by the salt concentration. In marine conditions (NaCl concentration as 3%) .hydrogen production was(1.48 ± 0.05)mol/mol glucose,whereas,it increased by 20% in fresh conditions. It could produce hydrogen at the NaCl concentration from 0.4% to 7%. As a result, Clostridium sp. T7 can be considered to be used for bio-hydrogen production and biological treatment of fresh or marine organic waste.%产氢菌株Clostridium sp.T7分离自天津海水浴场潮间带的污泥.研究起始pH、碳源、氮源、NaCl质量分数对菌株T7产氢性质的影响.结果表明:菌株T7最适产氢的起始pH是6.0,能够利用蔗糖、葡萄糖和果糖等碳源发酵产氢.菌株T7能够利用牛肉膏和酵母粉为单一氮源产氢,不能利用蛋白胨为氮源进行产氢.NaCl质量分数能影响菌株T7的产氢量,海水培养条件(NaCl质量分数为3%)下,最高产氢量是每摩尔葡萄糖(1.48±0.05) mol,相比之下,淡水培养条件下其产氢量提高20%.NaC1质量分数在0.4% ~ 7%时,菌株T7都能够产氢,这表明菌株T7有望应用于淡水或高盐有机废水产氢领域.

  9. Human Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein MRPL12 Interacts Directly with Mitochondrial RNA Polymerase to Modulate Mitochondrial Gene Expression*

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhibo; Cotney, Justin; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2007-01-01

    The core human mitochondrial transcription machinery comprises a single subunit bacteriophage-related RNA polymerase, POLRMT, the high mobility group box DNA-binding protein h-mtTFA/TFAM, and two transcriptional co-activator proteins, h-mtTFB1 and h-mtTFB2 that also have rRNA methyltransferase activity. Recapitulation of specific initiation of transcription in vitro can be achieved by a complex of POLRMT, h-mtTFA, and either h-mtTFB1 or h-mtTFB2. However, the nature of mitochondrial transcrip...

  10. An open reading frame in the Escherichia coli bacteriophage lambda genome encodes a protein that functions in assembly of the long tail fibers of bacteriophage T4.

    OpenAIRE

    Montag, D.; Henning, U

    1987-01-01

    Assembly of the long tail fibers of the Escherichia coli bacteriophage T4 requires the catalytic action of two auxiliary proteins. It was found that a gene of the entirely unrelated phage lambda codes for a protein which can substitute for one of these T4 polypeptides, protein 38. The lambda gene was designated tfa (tail fiber assembly). Protein 38 consists of 183 residues, and the Tfa protein consists of 194 residues; the two polypeptides are about 40% homologous. Although the tfa gene is di...

  11. Cloning, sequencing, and recombinational analysis with bacteriophage BF23 of the bacteriophage T5 oad gene encoding the receptor-binding protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Krauel, V; Heller, K J

    1991-01-01

    Binding of bacteriophage T5 to its receptor, the Escherichia coli FhuA protein, is mediated by tail protein pb5. In this article we confirm that pb5 is encoded by the T5 oad gene and describe the isolation, expression, and sequencing of this gene. In order to locate oad precisely, we analyzed recombinants between BF23, a T5-related phage with a different host range, and plasmid clones containing segments of the T5 chromosome. This analysis also showed that oad has little or no homology with h...

  12. Bacteriophage infections of microbiota can lead to leaky gut in an experimental rodent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetz, George; Tetz, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Increased intestinal permeability and translocation of gut microbiota from the intestinal lumen to the systemic circulation predispose patients to various diseases and may be one of the main triggers thereof. The role of microbiota in increased intestinal permeability is under intensive investigation. Here, we studied alterations in the host and increased intestinal permeability as a direct effect of treatment with a bacteriophage cocktail. After 10 days of challenge, the rats showed weight loss, messy hair, and decreased activity. Additionally, they displayed a significantly elevated lactulose:mannitol ratio and the level of circulating immune complexes. To our knowledge, this study demonstrates for the first time that increased intestinal permeability may be induced by bacteriophages that affect the microbiota. PMID:27340433

  13. Visualization of bacteriophage P1 infection by cryo-electron tomography of tiny Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacteriophage P1 has a contractile tail that targets the conserved lipopolysaccharide on the outer membrane surface of the host for initial adsorption. The mechanism by which P1 DNA enters the host cell is not well understood, mainly because the transient molecular interactions between bacteriophage and bacteria have been difficult to study by conventional approaches. Here, we engineered tiny E. coli host cells so that the initial stages of P1-host interactions could be captured in unprecedented detail by cryo-electron tomography. Analysis of three-dimensional reconstructions of frozen-hydrated specimens revealed three predominant configurations: an extended tail stage with DNA present in the phage head, a contracted tail stage with DNA, and a contracted tail stage without DNA. Comparative analysis of various conformations indicated that there is uniform penetration of the inner tail tube into the E. coli periplasm and a significant movement of the baseplate away from the outer membrane during tail contraction.

  14. Isolation and characterization of bacteriophages infecting nocardioforms in wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairnar, Krishna; Pal, Preeti; Chandekar, Rajshree H; Paunikar, Waman N

    2014-01-01

    Activated sludge plants (ASP) are associated with the stable foaming problem worldwide. Apart from the physical and chemical treatment methods, biological treatment method has been least explored and may prove to be a novel and ecofriendly approach to tackle the problem of stable foam formation. In ASP Nocardia species are commonly found and are one of the major causes for forming sticky and stable foam. This study describes the isolation and characterization of three Nocardia bacteriophages NOC1, NOC2, and NOC3 for the control of Nocardia species. The bacteriophages isolated in this study have shown promising results in controlling foam producing bacterial growth under laboratory conditions, suggesting that it may prove useful in the field as an alternative biocontrol agent to reduce the foaming problem. To the best of our knowledge to date no work has been published from India related to biological approach for the control of foaming. PMID:25140256

  15. Isolation and Characterization of Bacteriophages Infecting Nocardioforms in Wastewater Treatment Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Khairnar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated sludge plants (ASP are associated with the stable foaming problem worldwide. Apart from the physical and chemical treatment methods, biological treatment method has been least explored and may prove to be a novel and ecofriendly approach to tackle the problem of stable foam formation. In ASP Nocardia species are commonly found and are one of the major causes for forming sticky and stable foam. This study describes the isolation and characterization of three Nocardia bacteriophages NOC1, NOC2, and NOC3 for the control of Nocardia species. The bacteriophages isolated in this study have shown promising results in controlling foam producing bacterial growth under laboratory conditions, suggesting that it may prove useful in the field as an alternative biocontrol agent to reduce the foaming problem. To the best of our knowledge to date no work has been published from India related to biological approach for the control of foaming.

  16. Bacteriophage amplification assay for detection of Listeria spp. using virucidal laser treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.C. Oliveira

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A protocol for the bacteriophage amplification technique was developed for quantitative detection of viable Listeria monocytogenes cells using the A511 listeriophage with plaque formation as the end-point assay. Laser and toluidine blue O (TBO were employed as selective virucidal treatment for destruction of exogenous bacteriophage. Laser and TBO can bring a total reduction in titer phage (ca. 10(8 pfu/mL without affecting the viability of L. monocytogenes cells. Artificially inoculated skimmed milk revealed mean populations of the bacteria as low as between 13 cfu/mL (1.11 log cfu/mL, after a 10-h assay duration. Virucidal laser treatment demonstrated better protection of Listeria cells than the other agents previously tested. The protocol was faster and easier to perform than standard procedures. This protocol constitutes an alternative for rapid, sensitive and quantitative detection of L. monocytogenes.

  17. Eradication of Salmonella Typhimurium in broiler chicks by combined use of P22 bacteriophage and probiotic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Augusto Marietto Gonçalves

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that the phage therapy is effective in controlling the number of colony-forming unit (CFU of Salmonella spp. in chicken gut. This paper describes the protective effect of phage and Lactobacilli administration on Salmonella infection in 1-day-old chicks. We administered the bacteriophage P22 in a single dose and a probiotic mixture of four species of bacteriocin-producing Lactobacillus once a day for one week. Samples were analyzed every 48 hours, and intestinal eradication of S. Typhimurium was confirmed after treatments. We observed an increase in the size of duodenal villi and cecal crypts, as well as an increase in body weight in groups that received daily doses of Lactobacilli. This study confirms the efficiency of bacteriophage therapy in controlling salmonellosis in chicks and the beneficial effect of Lactobacilli mixtures in the weight gain of the birds.

  18. Plasmid insertion mutagenesis and lac gene fusion with mini-mu bacteriophage transposons.

    OpenAIRE

    Castilho, B A; Olfson, P; Casadaban, M J

    1984-01-01

    Small bacteriophage Mu transposable elements containing the lac operon structural genes were constructed to facilitate the isolation and use of Mu insertions and lac gene fusions. These mini-Mu elements have selectable genes for either ampicillin or kanamycin resistance and can be used to form both transcriptional and translational lac gene fusions. Some of the mini-Mu-lac elements constructed are deleted for the Mu A and B transposition genes and form stable insertions that cannot undergo tr...

  19. Antibody producing capacity to the bacteriophage phi X174 in yersinia arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Bucknall, R.; Leirisalo-Repo, M; Laitinen, O; Jones, J V

    1987-01-01

    Antibody production in response to the primary immunogen bacteriophage phi X174 was investigated in 14 patients with previous yersinia arthritis (YA) and in 15 controls. HLA-B27 occurred in 10 patients with YA and in three controls. After primary and secondary immunisation the antibody responses were essentially similar both in patients with YA and controls. Consequently our results suggest that antibody response to a foreign antigen does not differ between patients with YA and a normal contr...

  20. Molecular cloning of unintegrated Moloney mouse sarcoma virus DNA in bacteriophage lambda.

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, I M; Lai, M.H.; Bosselman, R A; McKennett, M. A.; Fan, H.; Berns, A

    1980-01-01

    The covalently closed circular forms of unintegrated viral DNA obtained from cells infected with Moloney mouse sarcoma virus was cloned in bacteriophage lambda. The viral DNA was cleaved with restriction endonuclease HindIII and inserted in the unique HindIII site of lambda Charon 21A DNA. Recombinant clones containing virus-reactive DNA sequences were analyzed by restriction endonuclease mapping, R-loop formation, and infectivity assays. Two of eight genome-length recombinant clones characte...

  1. Plasmid biology of natural Lactococcus lactis strains and molecular mechanisms of bacteriophage-host interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Fallico, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    Lacticin 3147, enterocin AS-48, lacticin 481, variacin, and sakacin P are bacteriocins offering promising perspectives in terms of preservation and shelf-life extension of food products and should find commercial application in the near future. The studies detailing their characterization and bio-preservative applications are reviewed. Transcriptomic analyses showed a cell wall-targeted response of Lactococcus lactis IL1403 during the early stages of infection with the lytic bacteriophage c2,...

  2. Enumeration of Bacteriophages and Host Bacteria in Sewage and the Activated-Sludge Treatment Process

    OpenAIRE

    Donald L. Ewert; Paynter, M. J. B.

    1980-01-01

    Bacteriophage populations in an activated-sludge sewage treatment plant were enumerated. A newly developed assay for quantitation of total phages, employing direct electron microscopic counts, was used in conjunction with the plaque assay. The total concentration of phages was significantly higher in reactor mixed liquor and effluent than in influent sewage, indicating a net production of phages within the reactor. Maximum total phage concentrations in the fluid phase of sewage, activated-slu...

  3. Extraction and Study of Bacteriophages, Used against Agents of Potato Soft Rot

    OpenAIRE

    Magda D. Davitashvili; Lela Z. Tsiklauri

    2012-01-01

    The use of specific bacteriophages and their complex mixtures against bacterial diseases is very effective. As for causative agent of potato soft rot Erwinia carotovora, specific phages (25 phages in total) were extracted from diseased potato, soil and sewage. The study of their biological properties showed the diversity of phages in terms of lytic action, virion plaque and morphology, as well as in relation to different environmental factors. Phages showed explicit antibacterial activity in ...

  4. Participation of the lytic replicon in bacteriophage P1 plasmid maintenance.

    OpenAIRE

    Yarmolinsky, M B; Hansen, E B; Jafri, S; Chattoraj, D K

    1989-01-01

    P1 bacteriophage carries at least two replicons: a plasmid replicon and a viral lytic replicon. Since the isolated plasmid replicon can maintain itself stably at the low copy number characteristic of intact P1 prophage, it has been assumed that this replicon is responsible for driving prophage replication. We provide evidence that when replication from the plasmid replicon is prevented, prophage replication continues, albeit at a reduced rate. The residual plasmid replication is due to incomp...

  5. Ecology of Anti-Biofilm Agents II: Bacteriophage Exploitation and Biocontrol of Biofilm Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen T. Abedon

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages are the viruses of bacteria. In the guise of phage therapy they have been used for decades to successfully treat what are probable biofilm-containing chronic bacterial infections. More recently, phage treatment or biocontrol of biofilm bacteria has been brought back to the laboratory for more rigorous assessment as well as towards the use of phages to combat environmental biofilms, ones other than those directly associated with bacterial infections. Considered in a companion ar...

  6. Isolation of Acanthamoeba-Specific Antibodies from a Bacteriophage Display Library

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Naveed A.; Greenman, John; Topping, Katherine P.; Victoria C. Hough; Temple, Graham S.; Paget, Timothy A.

    2000-01-01

    Acanthamoeba causes opportunistic eye infections in humans, which can lead to severe keratitis and may ultimately result in blindness. Current methods for identifying this organism rely on culture and microscopy. In this paper, we describe the isolation of antibody fragments that can be used for the unequivocal identification of Acanthamoeba. A bacteriophage antibody display library was used to isolate antibody fragments that bind specifically to Acanthamoeba. Individual clones were studied b...

  7. Expression of the bacteriophage T4 denV structural gene in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The expression of the T4 denV gene, which previously had been cloned in plasmid constructs downstream of the bacteriophage lambda hybrid promoter-operator oLpR, was analyzed under a variety of growth parameters. Expression of the denV gene product, endonuclease V, was confirmed in DNA repair-deficient Escherichia coli (uvrA recA) by Western blot analyses and by enhancements of resistance to UV irradiation

  8. A genomic approach to understand interactions between Streptococcus pneumoniae and its bacteriophages

    OpenAIRE

    Leprohon, Philippe; Gingras, Hélène; Ouennane, Siham; Moineau, Sylvain; Ouellette, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background Bacteriophage replication depends on bacterial proteins and inactivation of genes coding for such host factors should interfere with phage infection. To gain further insights into the interactions between S. pneumoniae and its pneumophages, we characterized S. pneumoniae mutants selected for resistance to the virulent phages SOCP or Dp-1. Results S. pneumoniae R6-SOCPR and R6-DP1R were highly resistant to the phage used for their selection and no cross-resistance between the two ph...

  9. Repair-defective mutants of Alteromonas espejiana, the host for bacteriophage PM2.

    OpenAIRE

    Zerler, B R; Wallace, S S

    1984-01-01

    The in vivo repair processes of Alteromonas espejiana, the host for bacteriophage PM2, were characterized, and UV- and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)-sensitive mutants were isolated. Wild-type A. espejiana cells were capable of photoreactivation, excision, recombination, and inducible repair. There was no detectable pyrimidine dimer-DNA N-glycosylase activity, and pyrimidine dimer removal appeared to occur by a pathway analogous to the Escherichia coli Uvr pathway. The UV- and MMS-sensitive mu...

  10. Chemical factors influencing adsorption of bacteriophage MS2 to membrane filters.

    OpenAIRE

    Farrah, S R

    1982-01-01

    Antichaotropic salts, such as magnesium sulfate, and metal chelators, such as citrate ions, promoted adsorption of bacteriophage MS2 to membrane filters. In contrast, compounds that disrupt hydrophobic interactions, such as chaotropic salts, urea, Tween 80, and ethanol, did not promote adsorption of MS2 to membrane filters and counteracted the ability of magnesium sulfate to promote such adsorption. These results provide evidence that magnesium sulfate promotes the association of MS2 with mem...

  11. Translesion synthesis is the main component of SOS repair in bacteriophage lambda DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Defais, M; Lesca, C; Monsarrat, B.; Hanawalt, P

    1989-01-01

    Agents that interfere with DNA replication in Escherichia coli induce physiological adaptations that increase the probability of survival after DNA damage and the frequency of mutants among the survivors (the SOS response). Such agents also increase the survival rate and mutation frequency of irradiated bacteriophage after infection of treated bacteria, a phenomenon known as Weigle reactivation. In UV-irradiated single-stranded DNA phage, Weigle reactivation is thought to occur via induced, e...

  12. Solid-state 31P NMR spectroscopy of bacteriophage M13 and tobacco mosaic virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Magusin, P.C.M.M.

    1995-01-01

    In this thesis, the results of various 31P NMR experiments observed for intact virus particles of bacteriophage M13 and Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV), are presented. To explain the results in a consistent way, models are developed and tested. 31P nuclei in M13 and TMV are only present in the phosphodiesters of the encapsulated nucleic acid molecule. Therefore, 31P NMR spectroscopy reveals structural and dynamic properties of the nucleic acid backbone selectively without isotope labeling, even th...

  13. Evidence for an electrostatic mechanism of force generation by the bacteriophage T4 DNA packaging motor

    OpenAIRE

    Migliori, Amy D.; Keller, Nicholas; Alam, Tanfis I.; Mahalingam, Marthandan; Rao, Venigalla B.; Arya, Gaurav; Smith, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    How viral packaging motors generate enormous forces to translocate DNA into viral capsids remains unknown. Recent structural studies of the bacteriophage T4 packaging motor have led to a proposed mechanism wherein the gp17 motor protein translocates DNA by transitioning between extended and compact states, orchestrated by electrostatic interactions between complimentarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal subdomains. Here, we show that site-directed alteratio...

  14. The membrane-bound form of gene 9 minor coat protein of bacteriophage M13

    OpenAIRE

    Houbiers, M.C.

    2002-01-01

    Bacteriophage M13 is a virus that infects the bacteria Escherichia coli ( E. coli ), a single cell organism that resides in our intestines. It consists of the cytoplasm (contents) and a double membrane that keeps the contents together (the barrier to the outside world). The membrane is formed by lipid molecules which consist of a head group that very much likes water (hydrophilic) and two fatty tails that dislike water (hydrophobic). In order to avoid contact with water the fatty tails group ...

  15. Proteasome Inhibitors Enhance Bacteriophage Lambda (λ) Mediated Gene Transfer in Mammalian Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Volcy, Ketna; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Bacteriophage lambda vectors can transfer their genomes into mammalian cells, resulting in expression of phage-encoded genes. However, this process is inefficient. Experiments were therefore conducted to delineate the rate limiting step(s) involved, using a phage vector that contains a mammalian luciferase reporter gene cassette. The efficiency of phage-mediated gene transfer in mammalian cells was quantitated, in the presence or absence of pharmacologic inhibitors of cell uptake and degradat...

  16. Initiation of bacteriophage lambda DNA replication in vitro with purified lambda replication proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Wold, M S; Mallory, J B; Roberts, J D; LeBowitz, J H; McMacken, R

    1982-01-01

    We have developed a soluble enzyme system that replicates exogenously added plasmid DNA (lambda dv) bearing the replication origin of the bacteriophage lambda chromosome. The system contains pure phage lambda O and P replication proteins and a partially purified mixture of Escherichia coli replication proteins [the enzyme system of Fuller, R.S., Kaguni, J.M. & Kornberg, A. (1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 78, 7370-7374). The features of lambda dv replication in this system closely resemble t...

  17. Simultaneous display of two large proteins on the head and tail of bacteriophage lambda

    OpenAIRE

    Pavoni, Emiliano; Vaccaro, Paola; D’Alessio, Valeria; De Santis, Rita; Minenkova, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Background Consistent progress in the development of bacteriophage lambda display platform as an alternative to filamentous phage display system was achieved in the recent years. The lambda phage has been engineered to display efficiently multiple copies of peptides or even large protein domains providing a powerful tool for screening libraries of peptides, proteins and cDNA. Results In the present work we describe an original method for dual display of large proteins on the surface of lambda...

  18. The protein interaction network of bacteriophage lambda with its host Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Blasche, Sonja; Wuchty, Stefan; Rajagopala, Seesandra V.; Uetz, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Although most of the 73 open reading frames (ORFs) in bacteriophage λ have been investigated intensively, the function of many genes in host-phage interactions remains poorly understood. Using yeast two-hybrid screens of all lambda ORFs for interactions with its host Escherichia coli, we determined a raw data set of 631 host-phage interactions resulting in a set of 62 high-confidence interactions after multiple rounds of retesting. These links suggest novel regulatory interactions between the...

  19. Bacteriophage-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Mutant Confers Broad Immunity against Staphylococcal Infection in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Capparelli, Rosanna; Nocerino, Nunzia; Lanzetta, Rosa; Silipo, Alba; Amoresano, Angela; Giangrande, Chiara; Becker, Karsten; Blaiotta, Giuseppe; Evidente, Antonio; Cimmino, Alessio; Iannaccone, Marco; Parlato, Marianna; Medaglia, Chiara; Roperto, Sante; Roperto, Franco

    2010-01-01

    In the presence of a bacteriophage (a bacteria-attacking virus) resistance is clearly beneficial to the bacteria. As expected in such conditions, resistant bacteria emerge rapidly. However, in the absence of the phage, resistant bacteria often display reduced fitness, compared to their sensitive counterparts. The present study explored the fitness cost associated with phage-resistance as an opportunity to isolate an attenuated strain of S. aureus. The phage-resistant strain A172 was isolated ...

  20. pH-Induced Stability Switching of the Bacteriophage HK97 Maturation Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    May, Eric R.; Arora, Karunesh; Brooks, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    Many viruses undergo large-scale conformational changes during their life cycles. Blocking the transition from one stage of the life cycle to the next is an attractive strategy for the development of antiviral compounds. In this work, we have constructed an icosahedrally symmetric, low-energy pathway for the maturation transition of bacteriophage HK97. By conducting constant-pH molecular dynamics simulations on this pathway, we identify which residues are contributing most significantly to sh...

  1. Experimental test of connector rotation during DNA packaging into bacteriophage phi29 capsids

    OpenAIRE

    Thorsten Hugel; Jens Michaelis; Hetherington, Craig L.; Jardine, Paul J.; Shelley Grimes; Walter, Jessica M.; Wayne Falk; Anderson, Dwight L.; Carlos Bustamante

    2007-01-01

    Author Summary The life cycles of many viruses include a self-assembly stage in which a powerful molecular motor packs the DNA genome into the virus's preformed shell (the capsid). Biochemical and biophysical studies have identified essential components of the packaging machinery and measured various characteristics of the packaging process, while crystallography and electron microscopy have provided snapshots of viral structure before and after packaging. In bacteriophage ϕ29 assembly, the D...

  2. Novel bacteriophage therapy for controlling metallo-beta-lactamase producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in Catfish

    OpenAIRE

    Khairnar, Krishna; Raut, Mahendra P; Rajshree H. Chandekar; Sanmukh, Swapnil G; Waman N. PAUNIKAR

    2013-01-01

    Background The bacteriophage therapy is an effective antimicrobial approach with potentially important applications in medicine and biotechnology which can be seen as an additional string in the bow. Emerging drug resistant bacteria in aquaculture industry due to unrestricted use of antibiotics warrants more sustainable and environmental friendly strategies for controlling fish infections. The isolated bacteria from fish lesions was characterised based on isolation on selective and differenti...

  3. Isolation and Characterization of Bacteriophages Infecting Nocardioforms in Wastewater Treatment Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Khairnar, Krishna; Pal, Preeti; Rajshree H. Chandekar; Waman N. PAUNIKAR

    2014-01-01

    Activated sludge plants (ASP) are associated with the stable foaming problem worldwide. Apart from the physical and chemical treatment methods, biological treatment method has been least explored and may prove to be a novel and ecofriendly approach to tackle the problem of stable foam formation. In ASP Nocardia species are commonly found and are one of the major causes for forming sticky and stable foam. This study describes the isolation and characterization of three Nocardia bacteriophages ...

  4. Isolation and Preliminary Characterization of Twenty Bacteriophages Infecting Either Brevibacterium or Arthrobacter Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Trautwetter, Annie; Blanco, Carlos

    1988-01-01

    Thirty-seven bacteriophages plaquing on Corynebacterium, Brevibacterium, or Arthrobacter strains were isolated from soil or vegetation samples. Restriction analysis of phage DNA indicated that 20 phages were unique; one of them produced entirely turbid plaques on Brevibacterium ketoglutamicum and was characterized as temperate. All these phages were assigned to group B of the classification of Bradley (Bacteriol. Rev. 31:230-314, 1967) and had relatively narrow host ranges.

  5. Growth of Salmonella bacteriophage P22 in Escherichia coli dna(Ts) mutants.

    OpenAIRE

    Schanda-Mulfinger, U E; Schmieger, H

    1980-01-01

    Salmonella bacteriophage P22 grows in two deoxyribonucleic acid initiation mutants of Escherichia coli under nonpermissive conditions, dnaA and dnaC. Functional products of genes dnaE, dnaZ, lig, dnaK, and dnaG are indispensable for deoxyribonucleic acid replication of P22. In 11 E. coli dnaB mutants belonging to all phenotypic groups, phage were produced at 42 degrees C.

  6. The mom gene of bacteriophage Mu: the mechanism of methylation-dependent expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Seiler, A.; Blöcker, H; Frank, R.; Kahmann, R

    1986-01-01

    Transcription of the DNA modification gene (mom) of bacteriophage Mu requires methylation of three GATC sites upstream of the mom promoter by the Escherichia coli deoxyadenosine methylation function (Dam). The three sites map within a 40-bp segment termed region I. Small deletions, inversions, duplications and specific point mutations have been introduced in region I. Their effect on mom expression has been studied in dam+ and dam strains. Dam-dependent expression of the mom gene requires a s...

  7. Genome and Proteome of Campylobacter jejuni Bacteriophage NCTC 12673▿†

    OpenAIRE

    Kropinski, Andrew M.; Arutyunov, Denis; Foss, Mary; Cunningham, Anna; Ding, Wen; Singh, Amit; Pavlov, Andrey R.; Henry, Matthew; Evoy, Stephane; Kelly, John; Szymanski, Christine M.

    2011-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni continues to be the leading cause of bacterial food-borne illness worldwide, so improvements to current methods used for bacterial detection and disease prevention are needed. We describe here the genome and proteome of C. jejuni bacteriophage NCTC 12673 and the exploitation of its receptor-binding protein for specific bacterial detection. Remarkably, the 135-kb Myoviridae genome of NCTC 12673 differs greatly from any other proteobacterial phage genome described (includin...

  8. Regions of incompatibility in single-stranded DNA bacteriophages phi X174 and G4.

    OpenAIRE

    van der Avoort, H G; van der Ende, A.; van Arkel, G A; Weisbeek, P J

    1984-01-01

    The intracellular presence of a recombinant plasmid containing the intercistronic region between the genes H and A of bacteriophage phi X174 strongly inhibits the conversion of infecting single-stranded phi X DNA to parental replicative-form DNA. Also, transfection with single-stranded or double-stranded phi X174 DNA of spheroplasts from a strain containing such a "reduction" plasmid shows a strong decrease in phage yield. This phenomenon, the phi X reduction effect, was studied in more detai...

  9. Computer Simulations of DNA Packing inside Bacteriophages: Elasticity, Electrostatics and Entropy

    OpenAIRE

    Marenduzzo, D.

    2008-01-01

    There is now a considerable literature on computer simulations of DNA packaging inside bacteriophage capsids. While most studies have reached a semiquantitative or qualitative agreement with single molecule packaging and ejection studies, several quantitative answers are to date still lacking, needing either more accurate measurements or more realistic or difficult simulations. Here, I briefly review the outstanding questions in this field and report some new numerical results on DNA packagin...

  10. Interactions of the cell-wall glycopolymers of lactic acid bacteria with their bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Pierre eChapot-Chartier

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are Gram positive bacteria widely used in the production of fermented food in particular cheese and yoghurts. Bacteriophage infections during fermentation processes have been for many years a major industrial concern and have stimulated numerous research efforts. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of bacteriophage interactions with their host bacteria is required for the development of efficient strategies to fight against infections. The bacterial cell wall plays key roles in these interactions. First, bacteriophages must adsorb at the bacterial surface through specific interactions with receptors that are cell wall components. At next step, phages must overcome the barrier constituted by cell wall peptidoglycan to inject DNA inside bacterial cell. Also at the end of the infection cycle, phages synthesize endolysins able to hydrolyze peptidoglycan and lyse bacterial cells to release phage progeny. In the last decade, concomitant development of genomics and structural analysis of cell wall components allowed considerable advances in the knowledge of their structure and function in several model LAB. Here, we describe the present knowledge on the structure of the cell wall glycopolymers of the best characterized LAB emphasizing their structural variations and we present the available data regarding their role in bacteria-phage specific interactions at the different steps of the infection cycle.

  11. Characterization of a novel Morganella morganii bacteriophage FSP1 isolated from river water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaki, Shogo; Omachi, Takuo; Kawai, Yuji; Yamazaki, Koji

    2014-10-01

    Morganella morganii has been identified as a causative agent of opportunistic infections and histamine poisoning. Bacteriophage is a virus and has recently been considered an alternative agent to antibiotics for the control of bacteria that have developed antibiotic resistance. In this study, a novel M. morganii bacteriophage isolated from river water was characterized. The isolated phage, termed FSP1, was purified by polyethylene glycol precipitation followed by cesium chloride density-gradient centrifugation. FSP1 has infectivity against only M. morganii and was identified as a Myoviridae bacteriophage through morphological analysis with transmission electron microscopy. According to the one-step growth curve, the FSP1 latent period, eclipse period, and burst size were 30, 20 min, and 42 PFU infected cell(-1) , respectively. The genome size of FSP1 was estimated to be c. 45.6-49.4 kb by restriction endonuclease analyses. Moreover, challenge testing against M. morganii in vitro revealed that FSP1 had high lytic activity and that the viable cell count of M. morganii was reduced by 6.12 log CFU mL(-1) after inoculation with FSP1 at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) = 10. These results suggested that FSP1 could be used as a biocontrol agent against M. morganii for treatment of infectious disease treatment or food decontamination. PMID:25168469

  12. Characterization of Bacteriophage Specific to Bacillus pumilus from Ciapus River in Bogor, West Java, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anik Kusmiatun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus pumilus is a spore-forming bacteria that is rod-shaped, gram positive, and aerobic. B. pumilus produced pumilacidins, known to have toxic effects on epithelial cells. Antibiotics were usually used to treat the disease caused by bacteria. Antibiotic typing test of B. pumilus indigenous from sewage water showed that this isolate was resistant to ampicillin and clindamycin. An alternative way was by application of bacteriophages as biocontrol agents to reduce B. pumilus in environment. The aim of this study were to isolate and characterize B. pumilus bacteriophage isolated from Ciapus River in Bogor, West Java. Bacteriophages infecting B. pumilus were isolated from river water using the double agar overlay method. Phages were defined by plaque morphology, structure, host range, and characteristic of molecular weight protein phage. Phage FBa1, FBa2, and FBa3 had narrow host range and they were specific for infecting B. pumilus. Electron microscope observation showed that phage FBa1 had icosahedral head without tail (166.67 nm in diameter, so it is called phage-like particles. Characterization of phage FBa1 by SDS-PAGE showed five proteins band. Molecular weight of FBa1 proteins was 70.9, 54.9, 33.8, 28.3, and 21.4 kDa.

  13. The diversity and host interactions of Propionibacterium acnes bacteriophages on human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jared; Yan, Riceley; Zhong, Qiao; Ngo, Sam; Bangayan, Nathanael J; Nguyen, Lin; Lui, Timothy; Liu, Minghsun; Erfe, Marie C; Craft, Noah; Tomida, Shuta; Li, Huiying

    2015-09-01

    The viral population, including bacteriophages, is an important component of the human microbiota, yet is poorly understood. We aim to determine whether bacteriophages modulate the composition of the bacterial populations, thus potentially playing a role in health or disease. We investigated the diversity and host interactions of the bacteriophages of Propionibacterium acnes, a major human skin commensal implicated in acne pathogenesis. By sequencing 48 P. acnes phages isolated from acne patients and healthy individuals and by analyzing the P. acnes phage populations in healthy skin metagenomes, we revealed that P. acnes phage populations in the skin microbial community are often dominated by one strain. We also found phage strains shared among both related and unrelated individuals, suggesting that a pool of common phages exists in the human population and that transmission of phages may occur between individuals. To better understand the bacterium-phage interactions in the skin microbiota, we determined the outcomes of 74 genetically defined Propionibacterium strains challenged by 15 sequenced phages. Depending on the Propionibacterium lineage, phage infection can result in lysis, pseudolysogeny, or resistance. In type II P. acnes strains, we found that encoding matching clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat spacers is insufficient to confer phage resistance. Overall, our findings suggest that the prey-predator relationship between bacteria and phages may have a role in modulating the composition of the microbiota. Our study also suggests that the microbiome structure of an individual may be an important factor in the design of phage-based therapy. PMID:25848871

  14. PCR method for detection and identification of Lactobacillus casei/paracasei bacteriophages in dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binetti, Ana G; Capra, M Luján; Alvarez, Miguel A; Reinheimer, Jorge A

    2008-05-31

    Bacteriophage infections of starter lactic acid bacteria (LAB) pose a serious risk to the dairy industry. Nowadays, the expanding use of valuable Lactobacillus strains as probiotic starters determines an increase in the frequency of specific bacteriophage infections in dairy plants. This work describes a simple and rapid Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) method that detects and identifies bacteriophages infecting Lactobacillus casei/paracasei, the main bacterial species used as probiotic. Based on a highly conserved region of the NTP-binding genes belonging to the replication module of L. casei phages phiA2 and phiAT3 (the only two whose genomes are completely sequenced), a pair of primers was designed to generate a specific fragment. Furthermore, this PCR detection method proved to be a useful tool for monitoring and identifying L. casei/paracasei phages in industrial samples since specific PCR signals were obtained from phage contaminated milk (detection limit: 10(4) PFU/mL milk) and other commercial samples (fermented milks and cheese whey) that include L. casei/paracasei as probiotic starter (detection limit: 10(6) PFU/mL fermented milk). Since this method can detect the above phages in industrial samples and can be easily incorporated into dairy industry routines, it might be readily used to earmark contaminated milk for use in processes that do not involve susceptible starter organisms, or processes which involve phage-deactivating conditions. PMID:18471918

  15. Physiological and Molecular Characterization of Salmonella Bacteriophages Previously Used in Phage Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Hong, Y; Fealey, M; Singh, A; Walton, K; Martin, C; Harman, N J; Mahlie, J; Ebner, P D

    2015-12-01

    The use of bacteriophages as biocontrol agents to control Salmonella in food production has gained popularity over the last two decades. Previously, our laboratory demonstrated that bacteriophages can be direct fed to limit Salmonella colonization and transmission in pigs. Here, we characterized the bacteriophages in our treatment cocktail in terms of lytic spectrum, growth kinetics, survivability under various conditions, and genomic sequencing. PCR-based fingerprinting indicated that 9 of the 10 phages, while related, were distinct isolates. Single-step growth kinetics analysis determined that the eclipse periods, latent periods, and burst sizes averaged 21.5 min, 31.5 min, and 43.3 particles, respectively. The viability of the phages was measured after exposure to various pH ranges, temperatures, digestive enzymes, UV light, and chlorinated water. Temperatures greater than 87.5°C, pH of biocontrol agent in various aspects of food production when the exact serovar or strain of contaminating Salmonella is not yet known. PMID:26613908

  16. Repair of near (365 nm)- and far (254 nm)- UV damage to bacteriophage of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intact bacteriophages were irradiated at 365 nm or 254 nm and then analyzed for DNA photoproducts or injected into their bacterial host to test susceptibility of the damage to both phage and host-cell mediated repair systems. Both thymine dimers and single-strand breaks were induced in the phage DNA by 365 nm radiation. The dimers appeared to be the major lethal lesion in both repair deficient bacteriophage T4 and bacteriophage lambda after 254 nm or 365 nm irradiation. Damage induced in T4 by either wavelength was equally susceptible to x-gene reactivation. v-gene reactivation acted on a larger fraction of the near-UV damage. The host-cell mediated photo-reactivation system was only slightly less effective for near-UV damage but host-cell reactivation (survival of phage lambda on uvr+ and uvr- host) was effective against a far smaller section of near-UV damage than far-UV damage. Weigle-reactivation (far-UV induced) of near-UV damage to phage lambda was not observed. The results suggested that unless the near-UV damaged phage DNA is repaired immediately after injection, the lesions rapidly lose their susceptibility to repair with a consequent loss of activity of the phage particles. (author)

  17. Interaction of Bacteriophage l with Its E. coli Receptor, LamB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujoy Chatterjee

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The initial step of viral infection is the binding of a virus onto the host cell surface. This first viral-host interaction would determine subsequent infection steps and the fate of the entire infection process. A basic understating of the underlining mechanism of initial virus-host binding is a prerequisite for establishing the nature of viral infection. Bacteriophage λ and its host Escherichia coli serve as an excellent paradigm for this purpose. λ phages bind to specific receptors, LamB, on the host cell surface during the infection process. The interaction of bacteriophage λ with the LamB receptor has been the topic of many studies, resulting in wealth of information on the structure, biochemical properties and molecular biology of this system. Recently, imaging studies using fluorescently labeled phages and its receptor unveil the role of spatiotemporal dynamics and divulge the importance of stochasticity from hidden variables in the infection outcomes. The scope of this article is to review the present state of research on the interaction of bacteriophage λ and its E. coli receptor, LamB.

  18. Biomimetic self-templating optical structures fabricated by genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won-Geun; Song, Hyerin; Kim, Chuntae; Moon, Jong-Sik; Kim, Kyujung; Lee, Seung-Wuk; Oh, Jin-Woo

    2016-11-15

    Here, we describe a highly sensitive and selective surface plasmon resonance sensor system by utilizing self-assembly of genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage. About 2700 copies of genetically expressed peptide copies give superior selectivity and sensitivity to M13 phage-based SPR sensor. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the M13 phage-based SPR sensor was enhanced due to the aligning of receptor matrix in specific direction. Incorporation of specific binding peptide (His Pro Gln: HPQ) gives M13 bacteriophage high selectivity for the streptavidin. Our M13 phage-based SPR sensor takes advantage of simplicity of self-assembly compared with relatively complex photolithography techniques or chemical conjugations. Additionally, designed structure which is composed of functionalized M13 bacteriophage can simultaneously improve the sensitivity and selectivity of SPR sensor evidently. By taking advantages of the genetic engineering and self-assembly, we propose the simple method for fabricating novel M13 phage-based SPR sensor system which has a high sensitivity and high selectivity. PMID:27295572

  19. Complete genome sequence of the cold-active bacteriophage VMY22 from Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Kunhao; Cheng, Benxu; Zhang, Shengting; Wang, Nan; Fang, Yuan; Zhang, Qi; Kuang, Anxiu; Lin, Lianbing; Ji, Xiuling; Wei, Yunlin

    2016-06-01

    The cold-active bacteriophage VMY22, belonging to the Podoviridae family, was isolated from Mingyong Glacier in China. Sequence analysis revealed that the genome is 18,609 bp long, with an overall G + C content of 36.4 mol%, and 25 open reading frames (ORFs). The sequence contains 46 potential promoters, 6 transcription terminators, and no tRNAs. Most of the ORFs show a high degree of similarity to B103 (NC_004165). Two noteworthy findings were made. First, one of the predicted proteins, ORF 19, shows high sequence similarity to the bacteriocin biosynthesis protein from Bacillus cereus. From this information, we propose that the VMY22 phage is at an intermediate phase in its coevolution with its bacterial host. Second, seven of the hypothetical proteins appear to be unique to this cold-active B. cereus phage (i.e., not found in temperate-active B. cereus phages). These observations add to our current knowledge about the coevolution of bacteriophages and their hosts. The identification of a novel group of gene and protein structures and functions will lead to a better understanding of cold-adaptation mechanisms in bacteria and their bacteriophages. PMID:26941234

  20. Survival of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and Stx bacteriophages in moisture enhanced beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langsrud, Solveig; Heir, Even; Rode, Tone Mari

    2014-07-01

    Moisture enhancement of meat through injection is a technology to improve the sensory properties and the weight of meat. However, the technology may increase the risk of food borne infections. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) or bacteriophages carrying cytotoxin genes (Shiga toxin genes, stx), which is normally only present on the surface of intact beef, may be transferred to the inner parts of the muscle during the injection process. Pathogens and bacteriophages surviving the storage period may not be eliminated in the cooking process since many consumers prefer undercooked beef. Measures to increase the microbial food safety of moisture enhanced beef may include sterilization or washing of the outer surface of the meat before injection, avoiding recycling of marinade and addition of antimicrobial agents to the marinade. This paper reviews the literature regarding microbial safety of moisture enhanced beef with special emphasis on STEC and Stx bacteriophages. Also, results from a European Union research project, ProSafeBeef (Food-CT-16 2006-36241) are presented. PMID:24134920

  1. Specific detection of DNA and RNA targets using a novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification assay based on the formation of a three-way junction structure

    OpenAIRE

    Wharam, Susan D.; Marsh, Peter; Lloyd, John S.; Ray, Trevor D.; Mock, Graham A.; Assenberg, René; McPhee, Julie E.; Brown, Philip; Weston, Anthony; Cardy, Donald L. N.

    2001-01-01

    The formation of DNA three-way junction (3WJ) structures has been utilised to develop a novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification assay (SMART) for the detection of specific DNA or RNA targets. The assay consists of two oligonucleotide probes that hybridise to a specific target sequence and, only then, to each other forming a 3WJ structure. One probe (template for the RNA signal) contains a non-functional single-stranded T7 RNA polymerase promoter sequence. This ...

  2. Simultaneous identification of DNA and RNA viruses present in pig faeces using process-controlled deep sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Sachsenröder

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Animal faeces comprise a community of many different microorganisms including bacteria and viruses. Only scarce information is available about the diversity of viruses present in the faeces of pigs. Here we describe a protocol, which was optimized for the purification of the total fraction of viral particles from pig faeces. The genomes of the purified DNA and RNA viruses were simultaneously amplified by PCR and subjected to deep sequencing followed by bioinformatic analyses. The efficiency of the method was monitored using a process control consisting of three bacteriophages (T4, M13 and MS2 with different morphology and genome types. Defined amounts of the bacteriophages were added to the sample and their abundance was assessed by quantitative PCR during the preparation procedure. RESULTS: The procedure was applied to a pooled faecal sample of five pigs. From this sample, 69,613 sequence reads were generated. All of the added bacteriophages were identified by sequence analysis of the reads. In total, 7.7% of the reads showed significant sequence identities with published viral sequences. They mainly originated from bacteriophages (73.9% and mammalian viruses (23.9%; 0.8% of the sequences showed identities to plant viruses. The most abundant detected porcine viruses were kobuvirus, rotavirus C, astrovirus, enterovirus B, sapovirus and picobirnavirus. In addition, sequences with identities to the chimpanzee stool-associated circular ssDNA virus were identified. Whole genome analysis indicates that this virus, tentatively designated as pig stool-associated circular ssDNA virus (PigSCV, represents a novel pig virus. CONCLUSION: The established protocol enables the simultaneous detection of DNA and RNA viruses in pig faeces including the identification of so far unknown viruses. It may be applied in studies investigating aetiology, epidemiology and ecology of diseases. The implemented process control serves as quality control, ensures

  3. Deciphering the details of RNA aminoglycoside interactions: from atomistic models to biotechnological applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilgu, Muslum [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    A detailed study was done of the neomycin-B RNA aptamer for determining its selectivity and binding ability to both neomycin– and kanamycin-class aminoglycosides. A novel method to increase drug concentrations in cells for more efficiently killing is described. To test the method, a bacterial model system was adopted and several small RNA molecules interacting with aminoglycosides were cloned downstream of T7 RNA polymerase promoter in an expression vector. Then, the growth analysis of E. coli expressing aptamers was observed for 12-hour period. Our analysis indicated that aptamers helped to increase the intracellular concentration of aminoglycosides thereby increasing their efficacy.

  4. LA TUMBA T7 DE LA NECRÓPOLIS DE EL CAÑO, TRADICIÓN ARQUEOLÓGICA GRAN COCLÉ, ISTMO DE PANAMÁ (Grave T7, El Caño Necropolis, Gran Coclé Archaeological Tradition, Isthmus of Panama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Mayo Torné

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Recientemente se ha excavado en El Caño un entierro múltiple, la tumba T7 —cal d. C. 770-905 (cal AP 1180-1045/cal d. C. 920-965 (cal AP 1030-985— con 43 individuos de diferentes estatus, edades y sexos y un paquete de huesos humanos, así como depósitos rituales post-entierro. Tanto los entierros múltiples como los depósitos rituales post-entierro ya habían sido observados en otras tumbas de El Caño y su presencia en la tumba T7 ha servido para depurar y definir el patrón funerario básico del yacimiento. Los símbolos de alto estatus del ajuar de uno de los infantes de la tumba podrían reflejar un estatus social heredado. ENGLISH: Recent excavations of Grave T7 at El Caño—radiocarbon date 770–905 cal AD (1180–1045 cal BP/920–965 cal AD (1030–985 cal BP—have revealed a multiple-individual burial containing 43 individuals of different social statuses, ages and sexes, a bundle of human bones, and post-burial ritual deposits. While multiple-individual burials and post-burial ritual deposits have both been observed in other tombs at El Caño, their presence in Grave T7 has helped to identify and refine the fundamental burial pattern at the site. The elite attire of one of the infants buried in T7 may provide evidence of inherited social status.

  5. Back to the future: evolving bacteriophages to increase their effectiveness against the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Alex; Vasse, Marie; Kaltz, Oliver; Hochberg, Michael E

    2013-11-01

    Antibiotic resistance is becoming increasingly problematic for the treatment of infectious disease in both humans and livestock. The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is often found to be resistant to multiple antibiotics and causes high patient mortality in hospitals. Bacteriophages represent a potential option to combat pathogenic bacteria through their application in phage therapy. Here, we capitalize on previous studies showing how evolution may increase phage infection capacity relative to ancestral genotypes. We passaged four different phage isolates (podoviridae, myoviridae) through six serial transfers on the ancestral strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. We first demonstrate that repeated serial passage on ancestral bacteria increases infection capacity of bacteriophage on ancestral hosts and on those evolved for one transfer. This result is confirmed when examining the ability of evolved phage to reduce ancestral host population sizes. Second, through interaction with a single bacteriophage for 24 h, P. aeruginosa can evolve resistance to the ancestor of that bacteriophage; this also provides these evolved bacteria with cross-resistance to the other three bacteriophages. We discuss how the evolutionary training of phages could be employed as effective means of combatting bacterial infections or disinfecting surfaces in hospital settings, with reduced risk of bacterial resistance compared with conventional methods. PMID:24187587

  6. The silicate model and carbon rich model of CoRoT-7b, Kepler-9d and Kepler-10b

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Yan-Xiang; Zhou, Ji-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Possible bulk compositions of the super-Earth exoplanets, CoRoT-7b, Kepler-9d, and Kepler-10b are investigated by applying a commonly used silicate and a non-standard carbon model. Their internal structures are deduced using the suitable equation of state of the materials. The degeneracy problems of their compositions can be partly overcome, based on the fact that all three planets are extremely close to their host stars. By analyzing the numerical results, we conclude: 1) The iron core of Co...

  7. Optimization of kerf and surface roughness of Al 7 475-T7 351 alloy machined with WEDM process using the grey-based Taguchi method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Köklü

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the eff ects of cutting parameters on kerf and surface roughness were experimentally investigated in WEDM. Al 7 475-T7 351 alloy was selected as the work material to conduct experiments. The factors selected for the optimization are the pulse on time, table feed rate and the wire speed, each of the factors in three diff erent levels. An optimal parameter combination of the WEDM process was obtained by applying the grey relational analysis (GRA. Also, the analysis of variance (ANOVA was carried out for fi nding out the contribution and the eff ects of machining parameters on the multiple performance characteristics (MPC.

  8. Optimization of kerf and surface roughness of Al 7 475-T7 351 alloy machined with WEDM process using the grey-based Taguchi method

    OpenAIRE

    Köklü, U.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the eff ects of cutting parameters on kerf and surface roughness were experimentally investigated in WEDM. Al 7 475-T7 351 alloy was selected as the work material to conduct experiments. The factors selected for the optimization are the pulse on time, table feed rate and the wire speed, each of the factors in three diff erent levels. An optimal parameter combination of the WEDM process was obtained by applying the grey relational analysis (GRA). Also, the analysis of variance (...

  9. Construction of RNA-Quantum Dot Chimera for Nanoscale Resistive Biomemory Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taek; Yagati, Ajay Kumar; Pi, Fengmei; Sharma, Ashwani; Choi, Jeong-Woo; Guo, Peixuan

    2015-07-28

    RNA nanotechnology offers advantages to construct thermally and chemically stable nanoparticles with well-defined shape and structure. Here we report the development of an RNA-QD (quantum dot) chimera for resistive biomolecular memory application. Each QD holds two copies of the pRNA three-way junction (pRNA-3WJ) of the bacteriophage phi29 DNA packaging motor. The fixed quantity of two RNAs per QD was achieved by immobilizing the pRNA-3WJ with a Sephadex aptamer for resin binding. Two thiolated pRNA-3WJ serve as two feet of the chimera that stand on the gold plate. The RNA nanostructure served as both an insulator and a mediator to provide defined distance between the QD and gold. Immobilization of the chimera nanoparticle was confirmed with scanning tunneling microscopy. As revealed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy, the conjugated pRNA-3WJ-QD chimera exhibited an excellent electrical bistability signal for biomolecular memory function, demonstrating great potential for the development of resistive biomolecular memory and a nano-bio-inspired electronic device for information processing and computing. PMID:26135474

  10. Single-molecule RNA observation in vivo reveals dynamics of co-transcriptional splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, M. L.; Coulon, A.; de Turris, V.; Palangat, M.; Chow, C. C.; Singer, R. H.; Larson, D. R.

    2013-03-01

    The synthesis of pre-mRNA and the splicing of that pre-mRNA to form completed transcripts requires coordination between two large multi-subunit complexes (the transcription elongation complex and the spliceosome). How this coordination occurs in vivo is unknown. Here we report the first experimental observation of transcription and splicing occurring at the same gene in living cells. By utilizing the PP7/MS2 fluorescent RNA reporter system, we can directly observe two distinct regions of the nascent RNA, allowing us to measure the rise and fall time of the intron and exon of a reporter gene stably integrated into a human cell line. The reporter gene consists of a beta globin gene where we have inserted a 24 RNA hairpin cassette into the intron/exon. Upon synthesis, the RNA hairpins are tightly bound by fluorescently-labeled PP7/MS2 bacteriophage coat proteins. After gene induction, a single locus of active transcription in the nucleus shows fluorescence intensity changes characteristic of the synthesis and excision of the intron/exon. Using fluctuation analysis, we determine the elongation rate to be 1.5 kb/min. From the temporal cross correlation function, we determine that splicing of this gene must be co-transcriptional with a splicing time of ~100 seconds before termination and a ~200 second pause at termination. We propose that dual-color RNA imaging may be extended to investigate other mechanisms of transcription, gene regulation, and RNA processing.

  11. Physicochemically tunable polyfunctionalized RNA square architecture with fluorogenic and ribozymatic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinski, Daniel L; Khisamutdinov, Emil F; Lyubchenko, Yuri L; Guo, Peixuan

    2014-08-26

    Recent advances in RNA nanotechnology allow the rational design of various nanoarchitectures. Previous methods utilized conserved angles from natural RNA motifs to form geometries with specific sizes. However, the feasibility of producing RNA architecture with variable sizes using native motifs featuring fixed sizes and angles is limited. It would be advantageous to display RNA nanoparticles of diverse shape and size derived from a given primary sequence. Here, we report an approach to construct RNA nanoparticles with tunable size and stability. Multifunctional RNA squares with a 90° angle were constructed by tuning the 60° angle of the three-way junction (3WJ) motif from the packaging RNA (pRNA) of the bacteriophage phi29 DNA packaging motor. The physicochemical properties and size of the RNA square were also easily tuned by modulating the “core” strand and adjusting the length of the sides of the square via predictable design. Squares of 5, 10, and 20 nm were constructed, each showing diverse thermodynamic and chemical stabilities. Four “arms” extending from the corners of the square were used to incorporate siRNA, ribozyme, and fluorogenic RNA motifs. Unique intramolecular contact using the pre-existing intricacy of the 3WJ avoids relatively weaker intermolecular interactions via kissing loops or sticky ends. Utilizing the 3WJ motif, we have employed a modular design technique to construct variable-size RNA squares with controllable properties and functionalities for diverse and versatile applications with engineering, pharmaceutical, and medical potential. This technique for simple design to finely tune physicochemical properties adds a new angle to RNA nanotechnology. PMID:24971772

  12. Hydrothermal alteration of the glass R7T7. Glass dissolution kinetics at 150 and 2500, role of neo-formed phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The glass R7T7 is chosen in France for vitrification of solution from reprocessing. Safety requires the knowledge of R7T7 long term behavior in deep geologic formations. Temperature dependence of leaching between 50 and 3000C is studied by static tests for 7 days. An activation energy of 30kJ/Mole is calculated between 50; 75 or 1000C and 2500C. Results suggest similar corrosion mechanisms between 90-100 and 2500C by a complete change between 250 and 2750C. Glass corrosion kinetics at 1500C and 2500C between 1 day and 1 year evidence the precipitation of aluminosilicates and formation of thick amorphous gels progressively enriched with silica. Glass dissolution at 1500C and 2500C is simulated with the geochemical DISSOL code. Results suggest that dissolution kinetics are controlled by activity of H4 SiO4 in solution only. Silica contained into the gel controls corrosion kinetics different from 0. Even if the nature of dissolution mechanisms does not seem modified between 150 and 2500C, sample cracking at 2500C induces an increase of dissolved glass that does not allow a direct comparison of corrosion kinetics between 150 and 2500C

  13. Mechanisms and kinetics laws of inactive R7T7 reference glass dissolution in water at 90 deg C: initial dissolution rate measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The initial dissolution rate of inactive R7T7 reference glass was measured at 90 deg C in dilute aqueous solutions first at unspecified pH, then with imposed pH values. In distilled water, R7T7 glass corrosion initially involved preferential extraction of boron and network modifier elements (Li, Na, Ca) as long as the solution pH remained acid. When the solution pH became alkaline, glass dissolution was stoichiometric. These two mechanisms were confirmed by dissolution tests in aqueous solutions at imposed pH values under acid and alkaline conditions. The initial dissolution rate r0 in mole.cm-3.s-1 also increased significantly in alkaline media when the pH of the aqueous phase increased: in slightly acid media, selective glass dissolution formed a residual, de-alkalinized, hydrated glass that was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Under steady-state dissolution conditions, the initial glass corrosion rate (in mole.cm-3.s-1) was: in acid and alkaline media, amorphous and crystallized alteration products formed after complete dissolution of the silicated glass network. The first products formed consisted mainly of Zr, Rare Earths, Fe and Al. (author). 67 refs., 29 figs., 26 tabs., 21 plates

  14. The silicate and carbon-rich models of CoRoT-7b, Kepler-9d and Kepler-10b

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Xiang Gong; Ji-Lin Zhout

    2012-01-01

    Possible bulk compositions of the super-Earth exoplanets CoRoT-7b,Kepler-9d,and Kepler-10b are investigated by applying a commonly used silicate model and a non-standard carbon model.Their internal structures are deduced using a suitable equation of state for the materials.The degeneracy problems of their compositions can be partly overcome,based on the fact that all three planets are extremely close to their host stars.By analyzing the numerical results,we conclude:1) the iron core of CoRoT-7b is not more than 27% of its total mass within lσ mass-radius error bars,so an Earth-like composition is less likely,but its carbon rich model can be compatible with an Earth-like core/mantle mass fraction; 2) Kepler-10b is more likely to have a Mercury-like composition,with its old age implying that its high iron content may be a result of strong solar wind or giant impact; 3) the transiting-only super-Earth Kepler-9d is also discussed.Combining its possible composition with the formation theory,we can place some constraints on its mass and bulk composition.

  15. Extracellular RNA Communication (ExRNA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Until recently, scientists believed RNA worked mostly inside the cell that produced it. Some types of RNA help translate genes into proteins that are necessary for...

  16. Analysis of a second bacteriophage hyaluronidase gene from Streptococcus pyogenes: evidence for a third hyaluronidase involved in extracellular enzymatic activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Hynes, W L; Hancock, L; Ferretti, J J

    1995-01-01

    The hyaluronidase gene (hylP2) from a second group A streptococcal bacteriophage was isolated from ATCC T-type-22 hyaluronidase-producing strain 10403, a strain known to produce increased amounts of extracellular hyaluronidase. Sequence analysis of hylP2 and alignment with the previously described bacteriophage hyaluronidase gene (hylP) showed a high degree of similarity; however, hylP2 had deletions of regions specifying 34 amino acids. Twenty-eight of the deleted amino acids were in a regio...

  17. Identification of Quaternary Structure and Functional Domains of the CI Repressor from Bacteriophage TP901-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Margit; Lo Leggio, Leila; Grossmann, J. Günter;

    2008-01-01

    The bacteriophage-encoded repressor protein plays a key role in determining the life cycle of a temperate phage following infection of a sensitive host. The repressor protein Cl, which is encoded by the temperate lactococcal phage TP901-1, represses transcription from both the lytic promoter P...... the protein is involved in the interaction with host proteins. By using small-angle X-ray scattering, we show for the first time the overall solution structure of a full-length wild-type bacteriophage repressor at low resolution revealing that the TP901-1 repressor forms a flat oligomer, most probably...

  18. Screening tumor-targeting bacteriophage particles by pre-clearing phage display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phage display technique provides a powerful approach for the discovery of new tumor-specific peptides. However, the peptides isolated through this technique usually did not possess high tumor-specific property. A pre-clearing step was introduced to increase the efficiency of biopanning by removal of particles that could interact with ubiquitously expressed cellular receptors in the non-target organs. The randomized Ph. D-CX7C phage library (Phage III) was first pre-cleared in normal mice to reduce vasculature- or organ-targeting phages to get the pre-cleared phage library, and then the tumor-targeting bacteriophage particles (Phage I) were screened from pre-clearing phage library in S180 tumor-bearing mice.The biodistribution results of 99mTc-labeled phages in mice bearing S180 tumor show that the uptake of 99mTc-labeled Phage I in tumor is high but low in normal organs, and the tumor-to-liver and tumor-to-spleen ratios of 99mTc-labeled Phage I are higher than those of 99mTc-labeled Phage II (tumor-specific phages screened from the original CX7C library) and Phage III (unscreened phages from the original CX7C library). It indicates that the yield of tumor-targeting bacteriophage particles could be improved and the non-specific binding in organs becomes weak. Consequently, the pre-clearing phage display method could improve the yield of positive hits by reducing the non-target organ accumulation of bacteriophage particles. (authors)

  19. Biochemical characterization of a thermostable HNH endonuclease from deep-sea thermophilic bacteriophage GVE2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Likui; Huang, Yanchao; Xu, Dandan; Yang, Lixiang; Qian, Kaicheng; Chang, Guozhu; Gong, Yong; Zhou, Xiaojian; Ma, Kesen

    2016-09-01

    His-Asn-His (HNH) proteins are a very common family of small nucleic acid-binding proteins that are generally associated with endonuclease activity and are found in all kingdoms of life. Although HNH endonucleases from mesophiles have been widely investigated, the biochemical functions of HNH endonucleases from thermophilic bacteriophages remain unknown. Here, we characterized the biochemical properties of a thermostable HNH endonuclease from deep-sea thermophilic bacteriophage GVE2. The recombinant GVE2 HNH endonuclease exhibited non-specific cleavage activity at high temperature. The optimal temperature of the GVE2 HNH endonuclease for cleaving DNA was 60-65 °C, and the enzyme retained its DNA cleavage activity even after heating at 100 °C for 30 min, suggesting the enzyme is a thermostable endonuclease. The GVE2 HNH endonuclease cleaved DNA over a wide pH spectrum, ranging from 5.5 to 9.0, and the optimal pH for the enzyme activity was 8.0-9.0. Furthermore, the GVE2 HNH endonuclease activity was dependent on a divalent metal ion. While the enzyme is inactive in the presence of Cu(2+), the GVE2 HNH endonuclease displayed cleavage activity of varied efficiency with Mn(2+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Fe(2+), Co(2+), Zn(2+), and Ni(2+). The GVE2 HNH endonuclease activity was inhibited by NaCl. This study provides the basis for determining the role of this endonuclease in life cycle of the bacteriophage GVE2 and suggests the potential application of the enzyme in molecular biology and biotechnology. PMID:27131500

  20. Persistence of naturally occurring antibiotic resistance genes in the bacteria and bacteriophage fractions of wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero-Cáceres, William; Muniesa, Maite

    2016-05-15

    The emergence and prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in the environment is a serious global health concern. ARGs from bacteria can be mobilized by mobile genetic elements, and recent studies indicate that phages and phage-derived particles, among others, could play a role in the spread of ARGs through the environment. ARGs are abundant in the bacterial and bacteriophage fractions of water bodies and for successful transfer of the ARGs, their persistence in these environments is crucial. In this study, three ARGs (blaTEM, blaCTX-M and sul1) that naturally occur in the bacterial and phage fractions of raw wastewater were used to evaluate the persistence of ARGs at different temperatures (4 °C, 22 °C and 37 °C) and pH values (3, 7 and 9), as well as after various disinfection treatments (thermal treatment, chlorination and UV) and natural inactivation in a mesocosm. Gene copies (GC) were quantified by qPCR; then the logarithmic reduction and significance of the differences between their numbers were evaluated. The ARGs persisted for a long time with minimal reductions after all the treatments. In general, they showed greater persistence in the bacteriophage fraction than in the bacterial fraction. Comparisons showed that the ARGs persisted under conditions that reduced culturable Escherichia coli and infectious coliphages below the limit of detection. The prevalence of ARGs, particularly in the bacteriophage fraction, poses the threat of the spread of ARGs and their incorporation into a new bacterial background that could lead to the emergence of new resistant clones. PMID:26978717