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Sample records for bacteriophage p2 capsids

  1. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of the major capsid protein P2 of the lipid-containing bacteriophage PM2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrescia, Nicola G. A.; Kivelä, Hanna M.; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Bamford, Jaana K. H.; Bamford, Dennis H.; Stuart, David I.

    2005-01-01

    The viral capsid protein P2 of bacteriophage PM2 has been crystallized. Preliminary X-ray analysis demonstrates the position and orientation of the two trimers in the asymmetric unit. PM2 (Corticoviridae) is a dsDNA bacteriophage which contains a lipid membrane beneath its icosahedral capsid. In this respect it resembles bacteriophage PRD1 (Tectiviridae), although it is not known whether the similarity extends to the detailed molecular architecture of the virus, for instance the fold of the major coat protein P2. Structural analysis of PM2 has been initiated and virus-derived P2 has been crystallized by sitting-nanodrop vapour diffusion. Crystals of P2 have been obtained in space group P2 1 2 1 2, with two trimers in the asymmetric unit and unit-cell parameters a = 171.1, b = 78.7, c = 130.1 Å. The crystals diffract to 4 Å resolution at the ESRF BM14 beamline (Grenoble, France) and the orientation of the non-crystallographic threefold axes, the spatial relationship between the two trimers and the packing of the trimers within the unit cell have been determined. The trimers form tightly packed layers consistent with the crystal morphology, possibly recapitulating aspects of the arrangement of subunits in the virus

  2. Magic-angle spinning NMR of intact bacteriophages: Insights into the capsid, DNA and their interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, Gili; Morag, Omry; Goldbourt, Amir

    2015-04-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. They are complex macromolecular assemblies, which are composed of multiple protein subunits that protect genomic material and deliver it to specific hosts. Various biophysical techniques have been used to characterize their structure in order to unravel phage morphogenesis. Yet, most bacteriophages are non-crystalline and have very high molecular weights, in the order of tens of MegaDaltons. Therefore, complete atomic-resolution characterization on such systems that encompass both capsid and DNA is scarce. In this perspective article we demonstrate how magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR has and is used to characterize in detail bacteriophage viruses, including filamentous and icosahedral phage. We discuss the process of sample preparation, spectral assignment of both capsid and DNA and the use of chemical shifts and dipolar couplings to probe the capsid-DNA interface, describe capsid structure and dynamics and extract structural differences between viruses.

  3. Functional analysis of the highly antigenic outer capsid protein, Hoc, a virus decoration protein from T4-like bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathaliyawala, Taheri; Islam, Mohammad Z; Li, Qin; Fokine, Andrei; Rossmann, Michael G; Rao, Venigalla B

    2010-07-01

    Bacteriophage T4 is decorated with 155 copies of the highly antigenic outer capsid protein, Hoc. The Hoc molecule (40 kDa) is present at the centre of each hexameric capsomer and provides a good platform for surface display of pathogen antigens. Biochemical and modelling studies show that Hoc consists of a string of four domains, three immunoglobulin (Ig)-like and one non-Ig domain at the C-terminus. Biochemical data suggest that the Hoc protein has two functional modules, a capsid binding module containing domains 1 and 4 and a solvent-exposed module containing domains 2 and 3. This model is consistent with the dumbbell-shaped cryo-EM density of Hoc observed in the reconstruction of the T4 capsid. Mutagenesis localized the capsid binding site to the C-terminal 25 amino acids, which are predicted to form two beta-strands flanking a capsid binding loop. Mutations in the loop residues, ESRNG, abolished capsid binding, suggesting that these residues might interact with the major capsid protein, gp23*. With the conserved capsid binding module forming a foothold on the virus and the solvent-exposed module able to adapt to bind to a variety of surfaces, Hoc probably provides survival advantages to the phage, such as increasing the virus concentration near the host, efficient dispersion of the virus and exposing the tail for more efficient contact with the host cell surface prior to infection.

  4. The NMR-Rosetta capsid model of M13 bacteriophage reveals a quadrupled hydrophobic packing epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morag, Omry; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G; Baker, David; Goldbourt, Amir

    2015-01-27

    Filamentous phage are elongated semiflexible ssDNA viruses that infect bacteria. The M13 phage, belonging to the family inoviridae, has a length of ∼1 μm and a diameter of ∼7 nm. Here we present a structural model for the capsid of intact M13 bacteriophage using Rosetta model building guided by structure restraints obtained from magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR experimental data. The C5 subunit symmetry observed in fiber diffraction studies was enforced during model building. The structure consists of stacked pentamers with largely alpha helical subunits containing an N-terminal type II β-turn; there is a rise of 16.6-16.7 Å and a tilt of 36.1-36.6° between consecutive pentamers. The packing of the subunits is stabilized by a repeating hydrophobic stacking pocket; each subunit participates in four pockets by contributing different hydrophobic residues, which are spread along the subunit sequence. Our study provides, to our knowledge, the first magic-angle spinning NMR structure of an intact filamentous virus capsid and further demonstrates the strength of this technique as a method of choice to study noncrystalline, high-molecular-weight molecular assemblies.

  5. A Bacteriophage Capsid Protein Is an Inhibitor of a Conserved Transcription Terminator of Various Bacterial Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Gairika; Reddy, Jayavardhana; Sambhare, Susmit; Sen, Ranjan

    2018-01-01

    Rho is a hexameric molecular motor that functions as a conserved transcription terminator in the majority of bacterial species and is a potential drug target. Psu is a bacteriophage P4 capsid protein that inhibits Escherichia coli Rho by obstructing its ATPase and translocase activities. In this study, we explored the anti-Rho activity of Psu for Rho proteins from different pathogens. Sequence alignment and homology modeling of Rho proteins from pathogenic bacteria revealed the conserved nature of the Psu-interacting regions in all these proteins. We chose Rho proteins from various pathogens, including Mycobacterium smegmatis , Mycobacterium bovis , Mycobacterium tuberculosis , Xanthomonas campestris , Xanthomonas oryzae , Corynebacterium glutamicum , Vibrio cholerae , Salmonella enterica , and Pseudomonas syringae The purified recombinant Rho proteins of these organisms showed variable rates of ATP hydrolysis on poly(rC) as the substrate and were capable of releasing RNA from the E. coli transcription elongation complexes. Psu was capable of inhibiting these two functions of all these Rho proteins. In vivo pulldown assays revealed direct binding of Psu with many of these Rho proteins. In vivo expression of psu induced killing of M. smegmatis , M. bovis , X. campestris , and E. coli expressing S. enterica Rho indicating Psu-induced inhibition of Rho proteins of these strains under physiological conditions. We propose that the "universal" inhibitory function of the Psu protein against the Rho proteins from both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria could be useful for designing peptides with antimicrobial functions and that these peptides could contribute to synergistic antibiotic treatment of the pathogens by compromising the Rho functions. IMPORTANCE Bacteriophage-derived protein factors modulating different bacterial processes could be converted into unique antimicrobial agents. Bacteriophage P4 capsid protein Psu is an inhibitor of the E. coli transcription

  6. Theory of morphological transformation of viral capsid shell during the maturation process in the HK97 bacteriophage and similar viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konevtsova, O. V.; Lorman, V. L.; Rochal, S. B.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the symmetry and physical origin of collective displacement modes playing a crucial role in the morphological transformation during the maturation of the HK97 bacteriophage and similar viruses. It is shown that the experimentally observed hexamer deformation and pentamer twist in the HK97 procapsid correspond to the simplest irreducible shear strain mode of a spherical shell. We also show that the icosahedral faceting of the bacteriophage capsid shell is driven by the simplest irreducible radial displacement field. The shear field has the rotational icosahedral symmetry group I while the radial field has the full icosahedral symmetry Ih. This difference makes their actions independent. The radial field sign discriminates between the icosahedral and the dodecahedral shapes of the faceted capsid shell, thus making the approach relevant not only for the HK97-like viruses but also for the parvovirus family. In the frame of the Landau-Ginzburg formalism we propose a simple phenomenological model valid for the first reversible step of the HK97 maturation process. The calculated phase diagram illustrates the discontinuous character of the virus shape transformation. The characteristics of the virus shell faceting and expansion obtained in the in vitro and in vivo experiments are related to the decrease in the capsid shell thickness and to the increase of the internal capsid pressure.

  7. Evolutionary changes in the capsid P2 region of Australian strains of the norovirus GII.Pe_GII.4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggink, Leesa D; Moselen, Jean M; Roberts, Jason A; Marshall, John A

    2017-07-01

    The protruding (P) 2 region of the norovirus capsid is thought to include hypervariable sites involved in receptor binding. This study examines the changes that occurred in the P2 region of GII.Pe_GII.4 norovirus in the course of its evolution from a precursor phase (2008-2009), to an intermediate phase (2010) and finally to an epidemic phase (2012-2015). Twenty-two P2 region amino acid (aa) sequences (166 aa long) from all phases of the evolution of the virus were compared and the changes analysed.Results/key findings. Twenty sites in the P2 region underwent aa change and of these, 10 corresponded to previously proposed hypervariable sites and 10 to novel hypervariable sites. It was notable that aa changes at two sites, X and Y, only emerged as the epidemic phase progressed. 3D computer modelling of the P2 region indicated that neither X nor Y were in the uppermost 'crown', but further down in the 'neck' portion. The location of X and Y and the nature of aa change at Y suggest these sites were important in enhancing the structural integrity of the capsid, which in turn may have facilitated the longer term viability of the virus. The current study helps establish the validity of previously proposed hypervariable sites in the P2 region as well as indicating new ones. It also provides quantitative and qualitative data on how these sites changed over the evolutionary history of a particular norovirus strain.

  8. Structure of the Three N-Terminal Immunoglobulin Domains of the Highly Immunogenic Outer Capsid Protein from a T4-Like Bacteriophage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fokine, Andrei; Islam, Mohammad Z.; Zhang, Zhihong; Bowman, Valorie D.; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G. (CUA); (Purdue)

    2011-09-16

    The head of bacteriophage T4 is decorated with 155 copies of the highly antigenic outer capsid protein (Hoc). One Hoc molecule binds near the center of each hexameric capsomer. Hoc is dispensable for capsid assembly and has been used to display pathogenic antigens on the surface of T4. Here we report the crystal structure of a protein containing the first three of four domains of Hoc from bacteriophage RB49, a close relative of T4. The structure shows an approximately linear arrangement of the protein domains. Each of these domains has an immunoglobulin-like fold, frequently found in cell attachment molecules. In addition, we report biochemical data suggesting that Hoc can bind to Escherichia coli, supporting the hypothesis that Hoc could attach the phage capsids to bacterial surfaces and perhaps also to other organisms. The capacity for such reversible adhesion probably provides survival advantages to the bacteriophage.

  9. Capsid expansion mechanism of bacteriophage T7 revealed by multistate atomic models derived from cryo-EM reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fei; Liu, Zheng; Fang, Ping-An; Zhang, Qinfen; Wright, Elena T; Wu, Weimin; Zhang, Ci; Vago, Frank; Ren, Yue; Jakana, Joanita; Chiu, Wah; Serwer, Philip; Jiang, Wen

    2014-10-28

    Many dsDNA viruses first assemble a DNA-free procapsid, using a scaffolding protein-dependent process. The procapsid, then, undergoes dramatic conformational maturation while packaging DNA. For bacteriophage T7 we report the following four single-particle cryo-EM 3D reconstructions and the derived atomic models: procapsid (4.6-Å resolution), an early-stage DNA packaging intermediate (3.5 Å), a later-stage packaging intermediate (6.6 Å), and the final infectious phage (3.6 Å). In the procapsid, the N terminus of the major capsid protein, gp10, has a six-turn helix at the inner surface of the shell, where each skewed hexamer of gp10 interacts with two scaffolding proteins. With the exit of scaffolding proteins during maturation the gp10 N-terminal helix unfolds and swings through the capsid shell to the outer surface. The refolded N-terminal region has a hairpin that forms a novel noncovalent, joint-like, intercapsomeric interaction with a pocket formed during shell expansion. These large conformational changes also result in a new noncovalent, intracapsomeric topological linking. Both interactions further stabilize the capsids by interlocking all pentameric and hexameric capsomeres in both DNA packaging intermediate and phage. Although the final phage shell has nearly identical structure to the shell of the DNA-free intermediate, surprisingly we found that the icosahedral faces of the phage are slightly (∼4 Å) contracted relative to the faces of the intermediate, despite the internal pressure from the densely packaged DNA genome. These structures provide a basis for understanding the capsid maturation process during DNA packaging that is essential for large numbers of dsDNA viruses.

  10. The use of low-resolution phasing followed by phase extension from 7.6 to 2.5 Å resolution with noncrystallographic symmetry to solve the structure of a bacteriophage capsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrescia, Nicola G A; Grimes, Jonathan M; Oksanen, Hanna M; Bamford, Jaana K H; Bamford, Dennis H; Stuart, David I

    2011-03-01

    P2, the major capsid protein of bacteriophage PM2, adopts the double β-barrel fold characteristic of the PRD1-adenoviral lineage. The 2.5 Å resolution X-ray data obtained by analysis of the two major lattices of a multiple crystal of P2 were phased by molecular replacement, using as a search model structure factors to 7.6 Å resolution obtained from electron density cut from the map of the entire PM2 virion. Phase extension to 2.5 Å resolution used solely sixfold cycling averaging and solvent flattening. This represents an atypical example of an oligomeric protein for which the structure has been determined at high resolution by bootstrapping from low-resolution initial phases.

  11. A pseudo-atomic model for the capsid shell of bacteriophage lambda using chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pragya; Nakatani, Eri; Goodlett, David R; Catalano, Carlos Enrique

    2013-09-23

    Bacteriophage lambda is one of the most exhaustively studied of the double-stranded DNA viruses. Its assembly pathway is highly conserved among the herpesviruses and many of the bacteriophages, making it an excellent model system. Despite extensive genetic and biophysical characterization of many of the lambda proteins and the assembly pathways in which they are implicated, there is a relative dearth of structural information on many of the most critical proteins involved in lambda assembly and maturation, including that of the lambda major capsid protein. Toward this end, we have utilized a combination of chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry and computational modeling to construct a pseudo-atomic model of the lambda major capsid protein as a monomer, as well as in the context of the assembled procapsid shell. The approach described here is generalizable and can be used to provide structural models for any biological complex of interest. The procapsid structural model is in good agreement with published biochemical data indicating that procapsid expansion exposes hydrophobic surface area and that this serves to nucleate assembly of capsid decoration protein, gpD. The model further implicates additional molecular interactions that may be critical to the assembly of the capsid shell and for the stabilization of the structure by the gpD decoration protein. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cleavage leads to expansion of bacteriophage P4 procapsids in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Sifang; Chandramouli, Preethi; Butcher, Sarah; Dokland, Terje

    2003-01-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of the structural proteins is an important part of the maturation process for most bacteriophages and other viruses. In the double-stranded DNA bacteriophages this cleavage is associated with DNA packaging, capsid expansion, and scaffold removal. To understand the role of protein cleavage in the expansion of bacteriophages P2 and P4, we have experimentally cleaved P4 procapsids produced by overexpression of the capsid and scaffolding proteins. The cleavage leads to particle expansion and scaffold removal in vitro. The resulting expanded capsid has a thin-shelled structure similar, but not identical, to that of mature virions

  13. Characterization of the major capsid genes (g23) of T4-type bacteriophages in the wetlands of northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chunyu; Wang, Guanghua; Liu, Junjie; Song, Changchun; Gao, Hongxing; Liu, Xiaobing

    2013-04-01

    To obtain genetic information and to evaluate the composition of T4-type bacteriophage (phage) communities in wetlands, environmental soil and water DNAs were obtained from two natural wetlands dominated by Carex lasiocarpa and Deyeuxia angustifolia plant species, and a neighboring paddy field in Sanjiang plain of northeast China. The biomarker gene of g23, which encodes the major capsid protein of T4-type phages, was amplified with primers MZIA1bis and MZIA6, and the PCR products were cloned and sequenced. In total, 96 and 50 different g23 clones were obtained from natural wetlands and a paddy field, respectively. A larger number of clones with low levels of identity to known sequences were found in water than in soil both in the natural wetlands and the paddy field, suggesting that many of T4-type phages in wetland water and paddy floodwater in Sanjiang plain are uncharacterized. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the g23 clones in natural wetlands, irrespective of water and soil, were distinctly different from those in marine waters, lake waters, and upland black soils, but were similar to those in paddy fields. The UniFrac analysis of g23 assemblages indicated that T4-type phage community compositions were different between soils and waters, and also were different between the natural wetlands and the paddy field. In general, the global analysis of g23 clone assemblages demonstrated that T4-type phage community compositions were different among natural wetlands, marines, lakes, paddy fields, and upland black soils.

  14. Using cryoEM Reconstruction and Phase Extension to Determine Crystal Structure of Bacteriophage ${\\Phi}$6 Major Capsid Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemecek, Daniel [Masaryk Univ., Brno (Czech Republic); Plevka, Pavel [Masaryk Univ., Brno (Czech Republic); Boura, Evzen [Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czech Republic). Inst. of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry

    2013-11-29

    Bacteriophage ${\\Phi}$6 is a double-stranded RNA virus that has been extensively studied as a model organism. In this paper we describe structure determination of ${\\Phi}$6 major capsid protein P1. The protein crystallized in base centered orthorhombic space group C2221. Matthews’s coefficient indicated that the crystals contain from four to seven P1 subunits in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. The self-rotation function had shown presence of fivefold axes of non-crystallographic symmetry in the crystals. Thus, electron density map corresponding to a P1 pentamer was excised from a previously determined cryoEM reconstruction of the ${\\Phi}$6 procapsid at 7 Å resolution and used as a model for molecular replacement. The phases for reflections at higher than 7 Å resolution were obtained by phase extension employing the fivefold non-crystallographic symmetry present in the crystal. Lastly, the averaged 3.6 Å-resolution electron density map was of sufficient quality to allow model building.

  15. Visualizing a Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor typing bacteriophage belonging to the Myoviridae group and the packaging of its genomic ends inside the phage capsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Anindito; Ghosh, Amar N

    2017-10-17

    Phage D10, an O1 El Tor tying vibriophage, has been successfully employed to tract the outspread of cholera epidemic. Using Transmission Electron Microscopy and computational image analysis, we have determined the structures of the capsid, head-to-tail connector, the contractile helical tail, the baseplate and combined them to form the complete three-dimensional (3D) D10 phage structure. Using partial denaturation experiments on the genome and using the computed 3D structure of the phage, we have established the packing of the genome ends inside the capsid together with the release styles during the phage infection, respectively. Finally, using the 3D density maps of the different components of the D10 phage, we have presented a simplified picture of morphogenesis of the D10 vibriophage. Using the complete assembled structure of the D10 phage, we have traced the path of the phage genome during the infection process, all the way from the phage head down the tail tube of the tail to the top of the baseplate. To the best of our knowledge, this is first structural study for a long-tailed vibriophage. We have tabulated the structural features of the different components of the phages belonging to the Myoviridae and Siphoviridae. The comparative study suggested the possibility of a common origin of the bacteriophages, irrespective of belonging to different groups and species.

  16. Bacteriophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klieve, A.V.

    2005-01-01

    Bacteriophages or phages are bacterial viruses and are present in the rumen in large numbers. They are obligate pathogens of bacteria and are ubiquitous to the rumen ecosystem. Bacteriophages are capable of lysing their bacterial hosts within the rumen and are therefore regarded as contributing to protein recycling within the rumen, a process identified as reducing the efficiency of feed utilization. However, their presence may not be entirely detrimental to the ecosystem, and it has been argued that phages may also be involved in the maintenance of a balanced ecosystem and may play a role in recycling limiting nutrients within the rumen. Furthermore, phage therapy is enjoying a renaissance and the use of phages to control or eliminate detrimental or unwanted microbes from the gastro-intestinal tract, such as Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (food-borne disease), Streptococcus bovis (acidosis in grain-fed cattle) and methanogens (produce the greenhouse gas methane), is the focus of current investigation. In order to be able to study the interaction between individual bacteriophages and their bacterial hosts, it is necessary to: (a) isolate the phage of interest from other viruses in the source material; (b) to derive stock cultures of known phage concentration; (c) store the isolated phages; and (d) determine basic physical characteristics, such as morphology. These procedures are achieved using classical microbiological procedures and this will be the methodology described in this chapter. It is also necessary to determine nucleic acid characteristics of the phage genome and to fingerprint the phage population in the rumen using molecular biological techniques. These will be described and discussed in Chapter 4.2

  17. Theory of the low frequency mechanical modes and Raman spectra of the M13 bacteriophage capsid with atomic detail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dykeman, Eric C; Sankey, Otto F

    2009-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the low frequency vibrational modes of the M13 bacteriophage using a fully atomistic model. Using ideas from electronic structure theory, the few lowest vibrational modes of the M13 bacteriophage are determined using classical harmonic analysis. The relative Raman intensity is estimated for each of the mechanical modes using a bond polarizability model. Comparison of the atomic mechanical modes calculated here with modes derived from elastic continuum theory shows that a much richer spectrum emerges from an atomistic picture.

  18. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studier, F. William; Rosenberg, Alan H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest.

  19. Structure of the small outer capsid protein, Soc: a clamp for stabilizing capsids of T4-like phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Li; Fokine, Andrei; O'Donnell, Erin; Rao, Venigalla B; Rossmann, Michael G

    2010-01-29

    Many viruses need to stabilize their capsid structure against DNA pressure and for survival in hostile environments. The 9-kDa outer capsid protein (Soc) of bacteriophage T4, which stabilizes the virus, attaches to the capsid during the final stage of maturation. There are 870 Soc molecules that act as a "glue" between neighboring hexameric capsomers, forming a "cage" that stabilizes the T4 capsid against extremes of pH and temperature. Here we report a 1.9 A resolution crystal structure of Soc from the bacteriophage RB69, a close relative of T4. The RB69 crystal structure and a homology model of T4 Soc were fitted into the cryoelectron microscopy reconstruction of the T4 capsid. This established the region of Soc that interacts with the major capsid protein and suggested a mechanism, verified by extensive mutational and biochemical studies, for stabilization of the capsid in which the Soc trimers act as clamps between neighboring capsomers. The results demonstrate the factors involved in stabilizing not only the capsids of T4-like bacteriophages but also many other virus capsids.

  20. Polarized DNA Ejection from the Herpesvirus Capsid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, William W.; Cockrell, Shelley K.; Homa, Fred L.; Brown, Jay C.

    2009-01-01

    Ejection of DNA from the capsid is an early step in infection by all herpesviruses. Ejection or DNA uncoating occurs after a parental capsid has entered the host cell cytoplasm, migrated to the nucleus and bound to a nuclear pore. DNA exits the capsid through the portal vertex and proceeds by way of the nuclear pore complex into the nucleoplasm where it is transcribed and replicated. Here we describe use of an in vitro uncoating system to determine which genome end exits first from the herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) capsid. Purified DNA-containing capsids were bound to a solid surface and warmed under conditions in which some, but not all, of the DNA was ejected. Restriction endonuclease digestion was then used to identify the genomic origin of the ejected DNA. The results support the view that the S segment end exits the capsid first. Preferential release at the S end demonstrates that herpesvirus DNA uncoating conforms to the paradigm in dsDNA bacteriophage where the last end packaged is the first to be ejected. Release of HSV-1 DNA beginning at the S end causes the first gene to enter the host cell nucleus to be α4, a transcription factor required for expression of early genes. PMID:19631662

  1. Campylobacter bacteriophages and bacteriophage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connerton, P L; Timms, A R; Connerton, I F

    2011-08-01

    Members of the genus Campylobacter are frequently responsible for human enteric disease with occasionally very serious outcomes. Much of this disease burden is thought to arise from consumption of contaminated poultry products. More than 80% of poultry in the UK harbour Campylobacter as a part of their intestinal flora. To address this unacceptably high prevalence, various interventions have been suggested and evaluated. Among these is the novel approach of using Campylobacter-specific bacteriophages, which are natural predators of the pathogen. To optimize their use as therapeutic agents, it is important to have a comprehensive understanding of the bacteriophages that infect Campylobacter, and how they can affect their host bacteria. This review will focus on many aspects of Campylobacter-specific bacteriophages including: their first isolation in the 1960s, their use in bacteriophage typing schemes, their isolation from the different biological sources and genomic characterization. As well as their use as therapeutic agents to reduce Campylobacter in poultry their future potential, including their use in bio-sanitization of food, will be explored. The evolutionary consequences of naturally occurring bacteriophage infection that have come to light through investigations of bacteriophages in the poultry ecosystem will also be discussed. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Lytic bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manan

    2013-01-01

    Foodborne illnesses resulting from the consumption of produce commodities contaminated with enteric pathogens continue to be a significant public health issue. Lytic bacteriophages may provide an effective and natural intervention to reduce bacterial pathogens on fresh and fresh-cut produce commodities. The use of multi-phage cocktails specific for a single pathogen has been most frequently assessed on produce commodities to minimize the development of bacteriophage insensitive mutants (BIM) in target pathogen populations. Regulatory approval for the use of several lytic phage products specific for bacterial pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in foods and on food processing surfaces has been granted by various agencies in the US and other countries, possibly allowing for the more widespread use of bacteriophages in the decontamination of fresh and minimally processed produce. Research studies have shown lytic bacteriophages specific for E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes have been effective in reducing pathogen populations on leafy greens, sprouts and tomatoes. PMID:24228223

  3. Capstan Friction Model for DNA Ejection from Bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Sandip

    2012-12-01

    Bacteriophages infect cells by attaching to the outer membrane and injecting their DNA into the cell. The phage DNA is then transcribed by the cell’s transcription machinery. A number of physical mechanisms by which DNA can be translocated from the phage capsid into the cell have been identified. A fast ejection driven by the elastic and electrostatic potential energy of the compacted DNA within the viral capsid appears to be used by most phages, at least to initiate infection. In recent in vitro experiments, the speed of DNA translocation from a λ phage capsid has been measured as a function of ejected length over the entire duration of the event. Here, a mechanical model is proposed that is able to explain the observed dependence of exit velocity on ejected length, and that is also consistent with the accepted picture of the geometric arrangement of DNA within the viral capsid.

  4. A novel approach for separating bacteriophages from other bacteriophages using affinity chromatography and phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceglarek, Izabela; Piotrowicz, Agnieszka; Lecion, Dorota; Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Owczarek, Barbara; Hodyra, Katarzyna; Harhala, Marek; Górski, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2013-11-14

    Practical applications of bacteriophages in medicine and biotechnology induce a great need for technologies of phage purification. None of the popular methods offer solutions for separation of a phage from another similar phage. We used affinity chromatography combined with competitive phage display (i) to purify T4 bacteriophage from bacterial debris and (ii) to separate T4 from other contaminating bacteriophages. In 'competitive phage display' bacterial cells produced both wild types of the proteins (expression from the phage genome) and the protein fusions with affinity tags (expression from the expression vectors). Fusion proteins were competitively incorporated into the phage capsid. It allowed effective separation of T4 from a contaminating phage on standard affinity resins.

  5. Portal protein functions akin to a DNA-sensor that couples genome-packaging to icosahedral capsid maturation

    OpenAIRE

    Lokareddy, Ravi K.; Sankhala, Rajeshwer S.; Roy, Ankoor; Afonine, Pavel V.; Motwani, Tina; Teschke, Carolyn M.; Parent, Kristin N.; Cingolani, Gino

    2017-01-01

    Tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses assemble infectious particles via an empty precursor capsid (or ?procapsid') built by multiple copies of coat and scaffolding protein and by one dodecameric portal protein. Genome packaging triggers rearrangement of the coat protein and release of scaffolding protein, resulting in dramatic procapsid lattice expansion. Here, we provide structural evidence that the portal protein of the bacteriophage P22 exists in two distinct dodecameric conformations: a...

  6. Modeling and simulation of the mechanical response from nanoindentation test of DNA-filled viral capsids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahadi, Aylin; Johansson, Dan; Evilevitch, Alex

    2013-03-01

    Viruses can be described as biological objects composed mainly of two parts: a stiff protein shell called a capsid, and a core inside the capsid containing the nucleic acid and liquid. In many double-stranded DNA bacterial viruses (aka phage), the volume ratio between the liquid and the encapsidated DNA is approximately 1:1. Due to the dominant DNA hydration force, water strongly mediates the interaction between the packaged DNA strands. Therefore, water that hydrates the DNA plays an important role in nanoindentation experiments of DNA-filled viral capsids. Nanoindentation measurements allow us to gain further insight into the nature of the hydration and electrostatic interactions between the DNA strands. With this motivation, a continuum-based numerical model for simulating the nanoindentation response of DNA-filled viral capsids is proposed here. The viral capsid is modeled as large- strain isotropic hyper-elastic material, whereas porous elasticity is adopted to capture the mechanical response of the filled viral capsid. The voids inside the viral capsid are assumed to be filled with liquid, which is modeled as a homogenous incompressible fluid. The motion of a fluid flowing through the porous medium upon capsid indentation is modeled using Darcy's law, describing the flow of fluid through a porous medium. The nanoindentation response is simulated using three-dimensional finite element analysis and the simulations are performed using the finite element code Abaqus. Force-indentation curves for empty, partially and completely DNA-filled capsids are directly compared to the experimental data for bacteriophage λ. Material parameters such as Young's modulus, shear modulus, and bulk modulus are determined by comparing computed force-indentation curves to the data from the atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments. Predictions are made for pressure distribution inside the capsid, as well as the fluid volume ratio variation during the indentation test.

  7. Immobilization and one-dimensional arrangement of virus capsids with nanoscale precision using DNA origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanopoulos, Nicholas; Liu, Minghui; Tong, Gary J; Li, Zhe; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao; Francis, Matthew B

    2010-07-14

    DNA origami was used as a scaffold to arrange spherical virus capsids into one-dimensional arrays with precise nanoscale positioning. To do this, we first modified the interior surface of bacteriophage MS2 capsids with fluorescent dyes as a model cargo. An unnatural amino acid on the external surface was then coupled to DNA strands that were complementary to those extending from origami tiles. Two different geometries of DNA tiles (rectangular and triangular) were used. The capsids associated with tiles of both geometries with virtually 100% efficiency under mild annealing conditions, and the location of capsid immobilization on the tile could be controlled by the position of the probe strands. The rectangular tiles and capsids could then be arranged into one-dimensional arrays by adding DNA strands linking the corners of the tiles. The resulting structures consisted of multiple capsids with even spacing (approximately 100 nm). We also used a second set of tiles that had probe strands at both ends, resulting in a one-dimensional array of alternating capsids and tiles. This hierarchical self-assembly allows us to position the virus particles with unprecedented control and allows the future construction of integrated multicomponent systems from biological scaffolds using the power of rationally engineered DNA nanostructures.

  8. A mechanical model of bacteriophage DNA ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, Rahul; Ghosal, Sandip

    2017-08-01

    Single molecule experiments on bacteriophages show an exponential scaling for the dependence of mobility on the length of DNA within the capsid. It has been suggested that this could be due to the ;capstan mechanism; - the exponential amplification of friction forces that result when a rope is wound around a cylinder as in a ship's capstan. Here we describe a desktop experiment that illustrates the effect. Though our model phage is a million times larger, it exhibits the same scaling observed in single molecule experiments.

  9. Orthogonal labeling of M13 minor capsid proteins with DNA to self-assemble end-to-end multiphage structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Gaelen T; Guimaraes, Carla P; Spooner, Eric; Ploegh, Hidde L; Belcher, Angela M

    2013-09-20

    M13 bacteriophage has been used as a scaffold to organize materials for various applications. Building more complex multiphage devices requires precise control of interactions between the M13 capsid proteins. Toward this end, we engineered a loop structure onto the pIII capsid protein of M13 bacteriophage to enable sortase-mediated labeling reactions for C-terminal display. Combining this with N-terminal sortase-mediated labeling, we thus created a phage scaffold that can be labeled orthogonally on three capsid proteins: the body and both ends. We show that covalent attachment of different DNA oligonucleotides at the ends of the new phage structure enables formation of multiphage particles oriented in a specific order. These have potential as nanoscale scaffolds for multi-material devices.

  10. The allosteric switching mechanism in bacteriophage MS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkett, Matthew R.; Mirijanian, Dina T.; Hagan, Michael F.

    2016-07-01

    We use all-atom simulations to elucidate the mechanisms underlying conformational switching and allostery within the coat protein of the bacteriophage MS2. Assembly of most icosahedral virus capsids requires that the capsid protein adopts different conformations at precise locations within the capsid. It has been shown that a 19 nucleotide stem loop (TR) from the MS2 genome acts as an allosteric effector, guiding conformational switching of the coat protein during capsid assembly. Since the principal conformational changes occur far from the TR binding site, it is important to understand the molecular mechanism underlying this allosteric communication. To this end, we use all-atom simulations with explicit water combined with a path sampling technique to sample the MS2 coat protein conformational transition, in the presence and absence of TR-binding. The calculations find that TR binding strongly alters the transition free energy profile, leading to a switch in the favored conformation. We discuss changes in molecular interactions responsible for this shift. We then identify networks of amino acids with correlated motions to reveal the mechanism by which effects of TR binding span the protein. We find that TR binding strongly affects residues located at the 5-fold and quasi-sixfold interfaces in the assembled capsid, suggesting a mechanism by which the TR binding could direct formation of the native capsid geometry. The analysis predicts amino acids whose substitution by mutagenesis could alter populations of the conformational substates or their transition rates.

  11. The allosteric switching mechanism in bacteriophage MS2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkett, Matthew R.; Mirijanian, Dina T.; Hagan, Michael F., E-mail: hagan@brandeis.edu [Martin Fisher School of Physics, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts 02474 (United States)

    2016-07-21

    We use all-atom simulations to elucidate the mechanisms underlying conformational switching and allostery within the coat protein of the bacteriophage MS2. Assembly of most icosahedral virus capsids requires that the capsid protein adopts different conformations at precise locations within the capsid. It has been shown that a 19 nucleotide stem loop (TR) from the MS2 genome acts as an allosteric effector, guiding conformational switching of the coat protein during capsid assembly. Since the principal conformational changes occur far from the TR binding site, it is important to understand the molecular mechanism underlying this allosteric communication. To this end, we use all-atom simulations with explicit water combined with a path sampling technique to sample the MS2 coat protein conformational transition, in the presence and absence of TR-binding. The calculations find that TR binding strongly alters the transition free energy profile, leading to a switch in the favored conformation. We discuss changes in molecular interactions responsible for this shift. We then identify networks of amino acids with correlated motions to reveal the mechanism by which effects of TR binding span the protein. We find that TR binding strongly affects residues located at the 5-fold and quasi-sixfold interfaces in the assembled capsid, suggesting a mechanism by which the TR binding could direct formation of the native capsid geometry. The analysis predicts amino acids whose substitution by mutagenesis could alter populations of the conformational substates or their transition rates.

  12. Diverse temperate bacteriophage carriage in Clostridium difficile 027 strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Y Nale

    Full Text Available The hypervirulent Clostridium difficile ribotype 027 can be classified into subtypes, but it unknown if these differ in terms of severity of C. difficile infection (CDI. Genomic studies of C. difficile 027 strains have established that they are rich in mobile genetic elements including prophages. This study combined physiological studies, electron microscopy analysis and molecular biology to determine the potential role of temperate bacteriophages in disease and diversity of C. difficile 027.We induced prophages from 91 clinical C. difficile 027 isolates and used transmission electron microscopy and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to characterise the bacteriophages present. We established a correlation between phage morphology and subtype. Morphologically distinct tailed bacteriophages belonging to Myoviridae and Siphoviridae were identified in 63 and three isolates, respectively. Dual phage carriage was observed in four isolates. In addition, there were inducible phage tail-like particles (PT-LPs in all isolates. The capacity of two antibiotics mitomycin C and norfloxacin to induce prophages was compared and it was shown that they induced specific prophages from C. difficile isolates. A PCR assay targeting the capsid gene of the myoviruses was designed to examine molecular diversity of C. difficile myoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis of the capsid gene sequences from eight ribotypes showed that all sequences found in the ribotype 027 isolates were identical and distinct from other C. difficile ribotypes and other bacteria species.A diverse set of temperate bacteriophages are associated with C. difficile 027. The observed correlation between phage carriage and the subtypes suggests that temperate bacteriophages contribute to the diversity of C. difficile 027 and may play a role in severity of disease associated with this ribotype. The capsid gene can be used as a tool to identify C. difficile myoviruses present within bacterial genomes.

  13. Dual-surface modified virus capsids for targeted delivery of photodynamic agents to cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanopoulos, Nicholas; Tong, Gary J; Hsiao, Sonny C; Francis, Matthew B

    2010-10-26

    Bacteriophage MS2 was used to construct a targeted, multivalent photodynamic therapy vehicle for the treatment of Jurkat leukemia T cells. The self-assembling spherical virus capsid was modified on the interior surface with up to 180 porphyrins capable of generating cytotoxic singlet oxygen upon illumination. The exterior of the capsid was modified with ∼20 copies of a Jurkat-specific aptamer using an oxidative coupling reaction targeting an unnatural amino acid. The capsids were able to target and selectively kill more than 76% of the Jurkat cells after only 20 min of illumination. Capsids modified with a control DNA strand did not target Jurkat cells, and capsids modified with the aptamer were found to be specific for Jurkat cells over U266 cells (a control B cell line). The doubly modified capsids were also able to kill Jurkat cells selectively even when mixed with erythrocytes, suggesting the possibility of using our system to target blood-borne cancers or other pathogens in the blood supply.

  14. Bacteriophage populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klieve, A.V.; Gilbert, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    Bacteriophages are ubiquitous to the rumen ecosystem; they have a role in nitrogen metabolism through bacterial lysis in the rumen, they may help to regulate bacterial population densities, be an agent for genetic exchange and be of use in biocontrol of bacterial populations through phage therapy. In Chapter 2.1, classical methodologies to enable the isolation, enumeration, storage and morphological characterization of phages were presented. In addition to these classic procedures, molecular biological techniques have resulted in a range of methodologies to investigate the type, topology and size of phage nucleic acids, to fingerprint individual phage strains and to create a profile of ruminal phage populations. Different phage families possess all the currently identified combinations of double-stranded or single-stranded RNA or DNA and may also possess unusual bases such as 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (found in T-even phage) or 5- hydroxymethyluracil and uracil in place of thymidine. In all morphological groups of phage except the filamentous phages, the nucleic acid is contained within a head or polyhedral structure, predominantly composed of protein. Filamentous phages have their nucleic acid contained inside the helical filament, occupying much of its length. Many of the procedures used with phage nucleic acids and double-stranded (ds) DNA, in particular, are not specific to ruminal phages but are the same as in other areas where nucleic acids are investigated and are covered elsewhere in the literature and this chapter. Most applications with rumen phages are similar to those reported for phages of non-ruminal bacteria and are covered in general texts such as Maniatis et al. In this chapter, we will concentrate on aspects of methodology as they relate to ruminal phages

  15. P2X receptors

    OpenAIRE

    North, R. Alan

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) activates cell surface P2X and P2Y receptors. P2X receptors are membrane ion channels preferably permeable to sodium, potassium and calcium that open within milliseconds of the binding of ATP. In molecular architecture, they form a unique structural family. The receptor is a trimer, the binding of ATP between subunits causes them to flex together within the ectodomain and separate in the membrane-spanning region so as to open a central channel. P2...

  16. Structure and assembly of bacteriophage T4 head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Black Lindsay W

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The bacteriophage T4 capsid is an elongated icosahedron, 120 nm long and 86 nm wide, and is built with three essential proteins; gp23*, which forms the hexagonal capsid lattice, gp24*, which forms pentamers at eleven of the twelve vertices, and gp20, which forms the unique dodecameric portal vertex through which DNA enters during packaging and exits during infection. The past twenty years of research has greatly elevated the understanding of phage T4 head assembly and DNA packaging. The atomic structure of gp24 has been determined. A structural model built for gp23 using its similarity to gp24 showed that the phage T4 major capsid protein has the same fold as that found in phage HK97 and several other icosahedral bacteriophages. Folding of gp23 requires the assistance of two chaperones, the E. coli chaperone GroEL and the phage coded gp23-specific chaperone, gp31. The capsid also contains two non-essential outer capsid proteins, Hoc and Soc, which decorate the capsid surface. The structure of Soc shows two capsid binding sites which, through binding to adjacent gp23 subunits, reinforce the capsid structure. Hoc and Soc have been extensively used in bipartite peptide display libraries and to display pathogen antigens including those from HIV, Neisseria meningitides, Bacillus anthracis, and FMDV. The structure of Ip1*, one of the components of the core, has been determined, which provided insights on how IPs protect T4 genome against the E. coli nucleases that degrade hydroxymethylated and glycosylated T4 DNA. Extensive mutagenesis combined with the atomic structures of the DNA packaging/terminase proteins gp16 and gp17 elucidated the ATPase and nuclease functional motifs involved in DNA translocation and headful DNA cutting. Cryo-EM structure of the T4 packaging machine showed a pentameric motor assembled with gp17 subunits on the portal vertex. Single molecule optical tweezers and fluorescence studies showed that the T4 motor packages

  17. P2X receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, R Alan

    2016-08-05

    Extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) activates cell surface P2X and P2Y receptors. P2X receptors are membrane ion channels preferably permeable to sodium, potassium and calcium that open within milliseconds of the binding of ATP. In molecular architecture, they form a unique structural family. The receptor is a trimer, the binding of ATP between subunits causes them to flex together within the ectodomain and separate in the membrane-spanning region so as to open a central channel. P2X receptors have a widespread tissue distribution. On some smooth muscle cells, P2X receptors mediate the fast excitatory junction potential that leads to depolarization and contraction. In the central nervous system, activation of P2X receptors allows calcium to enter neurons and this can evoke slower neuromodulatory responses such as the trafficking of receptors for the neurotransmitter glutamate. In primary afferent nerves, P2X receptors are critical for the initiation of action potentials when they respond to ATP released from sensory cells such as taste buds, chemoreceptors or urothelium. In immune cells, activation of P2X receptors triggers the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin 1β. The development of selective blockers of different P2X receptors has led to clinical trials of their effectiveness in the management of cough, pain, inflammation and certain neurodegenerative diseases.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  18. Insights into Bacteriophage T5 Structure from Analysis of Its Morphogenesis Genes and Protein Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivanovic, Yvan; Confalonieri, Fabrice; Ponchon, Luc; Lurz, Rudi; Chami, Mohamed; Flayhan, Ali; Renouard, Madalena; Huet, Alexis; Decottignies, Paulette; Davidson, Alan R.; Breyton, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophage T5 represents a large family of lytic Siphoviridae infecting Gram-negative bacteria. The low-resolution structure of T5 showed the T=13 geometry of the capsid and the unusual trimeric organization of the tail tube, and the assembly pathway of the capsid was established. Although major structural proteins of T5 have been identified in these studies, most of the genes encoding the morphogenesis proteins remained to be identified. Here, we combine a proteomic analysis of T5 particles with a bioinformatic study and electron microscopic immunolocalization to assign function to the genes encoding the structural proteins, the packaging proteins, and other nonstructural components required for T5 assembly. A head maturation protease that likely accounts for the cleavage of the different capsid proteins is identified. Two other proteins involved in capsid maturation add originality to the T5 capsid assembly mechanism: the single head-to-tail joining protein, which closes the T5 capsid after DNA packaging, and the nicking endonuclease responsible for the single-strand interruptions in the T5 genome. We localize most of the tail proteins that were hitherto uncharacterized and provide a detailed description of the tail tip composition. Our findings highlight novel variations of viral assembly strategies and of virion particle architecture. They further recommend T5 for exploring phage structure and assembly and for deciphering conformational rearrangements that accompany DNA transfer from the capsid to the host cytoplasm. PMID:24198424

  19. HIV Capsid Assembly, Mechanism, and Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo

    2016-05-10

    The HIV genome materials are encaged by a proteinaceous shell called the capsid, constructed from ∼1000-1500 copies of the capsid proteins. Because its stability and integrity are critical to the normal life cycle and infectivity of the virus, the HIV capsid is a promising antiviral drug target. In this paper, we review the studies shaping our understanding of the structure and dynamics of the capsid proteins and various forms of their assemblies, as well as the assembly mechanism.

  20. Saperi P2P

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Iaconesi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Il paper presenta l'architettura filosofica e logica di un progetto ongoing per la creazione di un'infrastruttura peer to peer per la diffusione dei saperi. Tale infrastruttura p2p vuole essere la base per costruire un framework aperto e orizzontale, che ospiti pratiche innovative di creazione, condivisione e disseminazione di informazioni e conoscenza.

  1. Morphological and genetic analysis of three bacteriophages of Serratia marcescens isolated from environmental water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Kenshi; Uchiyama, Jumpei; Kato, Shin-ichiro; Ujihara, Takako; Hoshiba, Hiroshi; Sugihara, Shigeyoshi; Muraoka, Asako; Wakiguchi, Hiroshi; Matsuzaki, Shigenobu

    2009-02-01

    Increases in multidrug-resistant strains of Serratia marcescens are of great concern in pediatrics, especially in neonatal intensive care units. In the search for bacteriophages to control infectious diseases caused by multidrug-resistant S. marcescens, three phages (KSP20, KSP90, and KSP100) were isolated from environmental water and were characterized morphologically and genetically. KSP20 and KSP90 belonged to morphotype A1 of the family Myoviridae, and KSP100 belonged to morphotype C3 of the family Podoviridae. Analysis of the DNA region coding virion proteins, together with their morphological features, indicated that KSP20, KSP90, and KSP100 were related to the P2-like phage (temperate), T4-type phage (virulent), and phiEco32 phage (virulent), respectively. Based on amino acid sequences of the major capsid protein, KSP90 formed a new branch with a Stenotrophomonas maltophilia phage, Smp14, in the T4-type phage phylogeny. Both Smp14 and phiEco32 have been reported as potential therapeutic phages. These results suggest that KSP90 and KSP100 may be candidate therapeutic phages to control S. marcescens infection.

  2. Maturation de la capside du bactériophage T5 : étude structurale et fonctionnelle de la protéine de décoration pb10

    OpenAIRE

    Vernhes, Emeline

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophage T5, a lytic phage which infects the bacterium Escherichia coli, is composed of an icosahedral capsid containing a double stranded DNA and a tail responsible for DNA transfer into the host cell cytoplasm. The capsid and the tail are assembled separately and then connected to form infectious viruses. The T5 capsid is first assembled as an empty procapsid composed of 775 copies of the major head protein organized in hexamers on the faces and pentamers on the vertices of the icosahe...

  3. Interaction of packaging motor with the polymerase complex of dsRNA bacteriophage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisal, Jiri; Kainov, Denis E.; Lam, TuKiet T.; Emmett, Mark R.; Wei Hui; Gottlieb, Paul; Marshall, Alan G.; Tuma, Roman

    2006-01-01

    Many viruses employ molecular motors to package their genomes into preformed empty capsids (procapsids). In dsRNA bacteriophages the packaging motor is a hexameric ATPase P4, which is an integral part of the multisubunit procapsid. Structural and biochemical studies revealed a plausible RNA-translocation mechanism for the isolated hexamer. However, little is known about the structure and regulation of the hexamer within the procapsid. Here we use hydrogen-deuterium exchange and mass spectrometry to delineate the interactions of the P4 hexamer with the bacteriophage phi12 procapsid. P4 associates with the procapsid via its C-terminal face. The interactions also stabilize subunit interfaces within the hexamer. The conformation of the virus-bound hexamer is more stable than the hexamer in solution, which is prone to spontaneous ring openings. We propose that the stabilization within the viral capsid increases the packaging processivity and confers selectivity during RNA loading

  4. Bacteriophages and Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, David R.; Parracho, Helena M. R. T.; Walker, James; Sharp, Richard; Hughes, Gavin; Werthén, Maria; Lehman, Susan; Morales, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are an extremely common adaptation, allowing bacteria to colonize hostile environments. They present unique problems for antibiotics and biocides, both due to the nature of the extracellular matrix and to the presence within the biofilm of metabolically inactive persister cells. Such chemicals can be highly effective against planktonic bacterial cells, while being essentially ineffective against biofilms. By contrast, bacteriophages seem to have a greater ability to target this common form of bacterial growth. The high numbers of bacteria present within biofilms actually facilitate the action of bacteriophages by allowing rapid and efficient infection of the host and consequent amplification of the bacteriophage. Bacteriophages also have a number of properties that make biofilms susceptible to their action. They are known to produce (or to be able to induce) enzymes that degrade the extracellular matrix. They are also able to infect persister cells, remaining dormant within them, but re-activating when they become metabolically active. Some cultured biofilms also seem better able to support the replication of bacteriophages than comparable planktonic systems. It is perhaps unsurprising that bacteriophages, as the natural predators of bacteria, have the ability to target this common form of bacterial life.

  5. Bacteriophages and Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Harper

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are an extremely common adaptation, allowing bacteria to colonize hostile environments. They present unique problems for antibiotics and biocides, both due to the nature of the extracellular matrix and to the presence within the biofilm of metabolically inactive persister cells. Such chemicals can be highly effective against planktonic bacterial cells, while being essentially ineffective against biofilms. By contrast, bacteriophages seem to have a greater ability to target this common form of bacterial growth. The high numbers of bacteria present within biofilms actually facilitate the action of bacteriophages by allowing rapid and efficient infection of the host and consequent amplification of the bacteriophage. Bacteriophages also have a number of properties that make biofilms susceptible to their action. They are known to produce (or to be able to induce enzymes that degrade the extracellular matrix. They are also able to infect persister cells, remaining dormant within them, but re-activating when they become metabolically active. Some cultured biofilms also seem better able to support the replication of bacteriophages than comparable planktonic systems. It is perhaps unsurprising that bacteriophages, as the natural predators of bacteria, have the ability to target this common form of bacterial life.

  6. Structural similarities in DNA packaging and delivery apparatuses in Herpesvirus and dsDNA bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rixon, Frazer J; Schmid, Michael F

    2014-04-01

    Structural information can inform our understanding of virus origins and evolution. The herpesviruses and tailed bacteriophages constitute two large families of dsDNA viruses which infect vertebrates and prokaryotes respectively. A relationship between these disparate groups was initially suggested by similarities in their capsid assembly and DNA packaging strategies. This relationship has now been confirmed by a range of studies that have revealed common structural features in their capsid proteins, and similar organizations and sequence conservation in their DNA packaging machinery and maturational proteases. This concentration of conserved traits in proteins involved in essential and primordial capsid/packaging functions is evidence that these structures are derived from an ancient, common ancestor and is in sharp contrast to the lack of such evidence for other virus functions. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Internalization of a polysialic acid-binding Escherichia coli bacteriophage into eukaryotic neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehti, Timo A; Pajunen, Maria I; Skog, Maria S; Finne, Jukka

    2017-12-04

    Eukaryotic organisms are continuously exposed to bacteriophages, which are efficient gene transfer agents in bacteria. However, bacteriophages are considered not to pass the eukaryotic cell membrane and enter nonphagocytic cells. Here we report the binding and penetration of Escherichia coli PK1A2 bacteriophage into live eukaryotic neuroblastoma cells in vitro. The phage interacts with cell surface polysialic acid, which shares structural similarity with the bacterial phage receptor. Using fluorescence and electron microscopy, we show that phages are internalized via the endolysosomal route and persist inside the human cells up to one day without affecting cell viability. Phage capsid integrity is lost in lysosomes, and the phage DNA is eventually degraded. We did not detect the entry of phage DNA into the nucleus; however, we speculate that this might occur as a rare event, and propose that this potential mechanism could explain prokaryote-eukaryote gene flow.

  8. Hyperexpansion of RNA Bacteriophage Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Siddharth R.; Janowski, Andrew B.; Zhao, Guoyan; Barouch, Dan; Wang, David

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophage modulation of microbial populations impacts critical processes in ocean, soil, and animal ecosystems. However, the role of bacteriophages with RNA genomes (RNA bacteriophages) in these processes is poorly understood, in part because of the limited number of known RNA bacteriophage species. Here, we identify partial genome sequences of 122 RNA bacteriophage phylotypes that are highly divergent from each other and from previously described RNA bacteriophages. These novel RNA bacteriophage sequences were present in samples collected from a range of ecological niches worldwide, including invertebrates and extreme microbial sediment, demonstrating that they are more widely distributed than previously recognized. Genomic analyses of these novel bacteriophages yielded multiple novel genome organizations. Furthermore, one RNA bacteriophage was detected in the transcriptome of a pure culture of Streptomyces avermitilis, suggesting for the first time that the known tropism of RNA bacteriophages may include gram-positive bacteria. Finally, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR)-based screening for two specific RNA bacteriophages in stool samples from a longitudinal cohort of macaques suggested that they are generally acutely present rather than persistent. PMID:27010970

  9. Mechanics of bacteriophage maturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, W.H.; Gertsman, I.; May, E.R.; Brooks, C.L.; Johnson, J.E.; Wuite, G.J.L.

    2012-01-01

    Capsid maturation with large-scale subunit reorganization occurs in virtually all viruses that use a motor to package nucleic acid into preformed particles. A variety of ensemble studies indicate that the particles gain greater stability during this process, however, it is unknown which material

  10. Chlamydial plasmids and bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlikowska-Warych, Małgorzata; Śliwa-Dominiak, Joanna; Deptuła, Wiesław

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia are absolute pathogens of humans and animals; despite being rather well recognised, they are still open for discovery. One such discovery is the occurrence of extrachromosomal carriers of genetic information. In prokaryotes, such carriers include plasmids and bacteriophages, which are present only among some Chlamydia species. Plasmids were found exclusively in Chlamydia (C.) trachomatis, C. psittaci, C. pneumoniae, C. suis, C. felis, C. muridarum and C. caviae. In prokaryotic organisms, plasmids usually code for genes that facilitate survival of the bacteria in the environment (although they are not essential). In chlamydia, their role has not been definitely recognised, apart from the fact that they participate in the synthesis of glycogen and encode proteins responsible for their virulence. Furthermore, in C. suis it was evidenced that the plasmid is integrated in a genomic island and contains the tetracycline-resistance gene. Bacteriophages specific for chlamydia (chlamydiaphages) were detected only in six species: C. psittaci, C. abortus, C. felis, C. caviae C. pecorum and C. pneumoniae. These chlamydiaphages cause inhibition of the developmental cycle, and delay transformation of reticulate bodies (RBs) into elementary bodies (EBs), thus reducing the possibility of infecting other cells in time. Plasmids and bacteriophages can be used in the diagnostics of chlamydioses; although especially in the case of plasmids, they are already used for detection of chlamydial infections. In addition, bacteriophages could be used as therapeutic agents to replace antibiotics, potentially addressing the problem of increasing antibiotic-resistance among chlamydia.

  11. Bacteriophages of Clostridium perfringens

    Science.gov (United States)

    The specific aims of the book chapter are to: (1) Briefly review the nomenclature of bacteriophages and how these agents are classified. (2) Discuss the problems associated with addition/removal of antibiotics in commercial animal feeds. (3) Provide a brief overview of Clostridium perfringens biolog...

  12. Gammasphaerolipovirus, a newly proposed bacteriophage genus, unifies viruses of halophilic archaea and thermophilic bacteria within the novel family Sphaerolipoviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, Alice; Rissanen, Ilona; Bamford, Jaana K H; Krupovic, Mart; Jalasvuori, Matti

    2014-06-01

    A new family of viruses named Sphaerolipoviridae has been proposed recently. It comprises icosahedral, tailless haloarchaeal viruses with an internal lipid membrane located between the protein capsid and the dsDNA genome. The proposed family Sphaerolipoviridae was divided into two genera: Alphasphaerolipovirus, including Haloarcula hispanica viruses SH1, PH1 and HHIV-2, and Betasphaerolipovirus, including Natrinema virus SNJ1. Here, we propose to expand the family Sphaerolipoviridae to include a group of bacteriophages infecting extreme thermophilic Thermus thermophilus and sharing a number of structural and genomic properties with archaeal sphaerolipoviruses. This new group comprises two members, lytic phage P23-77 and temperate phage IN93, as well as putative members P23-72 and P23-65H. In addition, several related proviruses have been discovered as integrated elements in bacterial genomes of the families Thermus and Meiothermus. Morphology of the virus particles and the overall capsid architecture of these bacteriophages resembles that of archaeal members of the Sphaerolipoviridae, including an unusual capsid arrangement in a T = 28 dextro lattice. Alpha- and betasphaerolipoviruses share with P23-77-like bacteriophages a conserved block of core genes that encode a putative genome-packaging ATPase and the two major capsid proteins (MCPs). The recently determined X-ray structure of the small and large MCPs of P23-77 revealed a single beta-barrel (jelly-roll) fold that is superimposable with the cryo-EM density maps of the SH1 capsomers. Given the common features of these viruses, we propose to include the so far unclassified P23-77-like bacteriophages into a new genus, "Gammasphaerolipovirus", within the family Sphaerolipoviridae.

  13. [RATIONAL ASPECTS OF BACTERIOPHAGES USE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarina, A A; Kataeva, L V; Karpukhina, N F

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of existing aspects of bacteriophage use and study features of their lytic activity by using various techniques. Effect of monophages and associated bacteriophages (staphylococci, piopolyvalent and piocombined, intestiphage, pneumonia klebsiella and polyvalent klebsiella produced by "Microgen") was studied with 380 strains of Staphylococcus aureus and 279 cultures of Klebsiella pneumoniae in liquid and solid nutrient media. From patients with intestinal disorder, sensitivity was analyzed to 184 strains of Salmonella genus bacteria 18 serological variants to salmonella bacteriophages, 137 strains of Escherichia coli (lactose-negative, hemolytic), as well as some members of OKA groups (21 serovars) to coli-proteic and piopolyvalent bacteriophages. Lytic ability of the piobacteriophage against Klebsiella and Proteus genus bacteria was determined. Staphylococcus aureus was sensitive to staphylococcus bacteriophage in 71.6% of cases and to piobacteriophage--in 86.15% of cases. A 100% lytic ability of salmonella bacteriophage against Salmonella spp. was established. Sensitivity of E. coli of various serogroups to coli-proteic and piobacteriophage was 66 - 100%. Klebsiella, Proteus genus bacteria were sensitive to piobacteriophage in only 35% and 43.15% of cases, respectively. A more rational use of bacteriophages is necessary: development of a technique, evaluation of sensitivity of bacteria to bacteriophage, introduction of corrections into their production (expansion of bacteriophage spectra, determination and indication of their concentration in accompanying documents).

  14. Bacteriophages of Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiangna; Skurnik, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophage play many varied roles in microbial ecology and evolution. This chapter collates a vast body of knowledge and expertise on Yersinia pestis phages, including the history of their isolation and classical methods for their isolation and identification. The genomic diversity of Y. pestis phage and bacteriophage islands in the Y. pestis genome are also discussed because all phage research represents a branch of genetics. In addition, our knowledge of the receptors that are recognized by Y. pestis phage, advances in phage therapy for Y. pestis infections, the application of phage in the detection of Y. pestis, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) sequences of Y. pestis from prophage DNA are all reviewed here.

  15. Characterisation of methacrylate monoliths for bacteriophage purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrekar, Franc; Ciringer, Mateja; Strancar, Aleš; Podgornik, Aleš

    2011-04-29

    Binding of three different bacteriophages (phages), namely T7, lambda and M13 on methacrylate monoliths was investigated. Phage M13 exhibited the highest dynamic binding capacity of 4.5×10(13) pfu/mL while T7 and lambda showed capacity of 1×10(13) pfu/mL, all corresponding to values of around 1mg/mL. Interestingly, capacity for lambda phage was increased 5-fold by increasing NaCl concentration in a loaded sample from 0 to 0.2M while there was a constant capacity decrease for T7 and M13 phages. Under optimal conditions, recovery for all three phages approached 100%. Measurement of a pressure drop increase during loading enabled estimation of adsorbed phage layer thickness. At a maximal capacity it was calculated to be around 50 nm for T7 phage and 60 nm for lambda phage matching closely capside size thus indicating monolayer adsorption while 80 nm layer thickness was estimated for M13 phage showing its orientation along the pore. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Stabilising the Herpes Simplex Virus capsid by DNA packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuite, Gijs; Radtke, Kerstin; Sodeik, Beate; Roos, Wouter

    2009-03-01

    Three different types of Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) nuclear capsids can be distinguished, A, B and C capsids. These capsids types are, respectively, empty, contain scaffold proteins, or hold DNA. We investigate the physical properties of these three capsids by combining biochemical and nanoindentation techniques. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) experiments show that A and C capsids are mechanically indistinguishable whereas B capsids already break at much lower forces. By extracting the pentamers with 2.0 M GuHCl or 6.0 M Urea we demonstrate an increased flexibility of all three capsid types. Remarkably, the breaking force of the B capsids without pentamers does not change, while the modified A and C capsids show a large drop in their breaking force to approximately the value of the B capsids. This result indicates that upon DNA packaging a structural change at or near the pentamers occurs which mechanically reinforces the capsids structure. The reported binding of proteins UL17/UL25 to the pentamers of the A and C capsids seems the most likely candidate for such capsids strengthening. Finally, the data supports the view that initiation of DNA packaging triggers the maturation of HSV-1 capsids.

  17. [A STUDY OF THE ISOLATED BACTERIOPHAGE ΦAB-SP7 ADSORPTION ON THE CELL SURFACE OF THE AZOSPIRILLUM BRASILENSE SP7].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guliy, O I; Karavaeva, O A; Velikov, V A; Sokolov, O I; Pavily, S A; Larionova, O S; Burov, A M; Ignatov, O V

    2016-01-01

    The bacteriophage ΦAb-Sp7 was isolated from the cells of the Azospirillum brasilense Sp7. The morphology, size of the gram-negative colonies, and range of lytic activity against other strains and species of the genus Azospirillum was tested. The isolated phage DNA was examined using electrophoretic and restriction analysis, and the size of the genome were established. The electron microscopy. resuIts show that the phage (capsid) has a strand-like form. The electron microscopy study of the bacteriophage ΦAb-Sp7 adsorption on the A. brasilense Sp7 bacterial surface was performed.

  18. Stochastic modeling of virus capsid assembly pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Russell

    2009-03-01

    Virus capsids have become a key model system for understanding self-assembly due to their high complexity, robust and efficient assembly processes, and experimental tractability. Our ability to directly examine and manipulate capsid assembly kinetics in detail nonetheless remains limited, creating a need for computer models that can infer experimentally inaccessible features of the assembly process and explore the effects of hypothetical manipulations on assembly trajectories. We have developed novel algorithms for stochastic simulation of capsid assembly [1,2] that allow us to model capsid assembly over broad parameter spaces [3]. We apply these methods to study the nature of assembly pathway control in virus capsids as well as their sensitivity to assembly conditions and possible experimental interventions. [4pt] [1] F. Jamalyaria, R. Rohlfs, and R. Schwartz. J Comp Phys 204, 100 (2005). [0pt] [2] N. Misra and R. Schwartz. J Chem Phys 129, in press (2008). [0pt] [3] B. Sweeney, T. Zhang, and R. Schwartz. Biophys J 94, 772 (2008).

  19. Predicting In Vivo Efficacy of Therapeutic Bacteriophages Used To Treat Pulmonary Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Marine; Lavigne, Rob

    2013-01-01

    The potential of bacteriophage therapy to treat infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria has now been well established using various animal models. While numerous newly isolated bacteriophages have been claimed to be potential therapeutic candidates on the basis of in vitro observations, the parameters used to guide their choice among billions of available bacteriophages are still not clearly defined. We made use of a mouse lung infection model and a bioluminescent strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to compare the activities in vitro and in vivo of a set of nine different bacteriophages (PAK_P1, PAK_P2, PAK_P3, PAK_P4, PAK_P5, CHA_P1, LBL3, LUZ19, and PhiKZ). For seven bacteriophages, a good correlation was found between in vitro and in vivo activity. While the remaining two bacteriophages were active in vitro, they were not sufficiently active in vivo under similar conditions to rescue infected animals. Based on the bioluminescence recorded at 2 and 8 h postinfection, we also define for the first time a reliable index to predict treatment efficacy. Our results showed that the bacteriophages isolated directly on the targeted host were the most efficient in vivo, supporting a personalized approach favoring an optimal treatment. PMID:24041900

  20. Nano/Micro Formulations for Bacteriophage Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Pilar; Cano-Sarabia, Mary; Colom, Joan; Otero, Jennifer; Maspoch, Daniel; Llagostera, Montserrat

    2018-01-01

    Encapsulation methodologies allow the protection of bacteriophages for overcoming critical environmental conditions. Moreover, they improve the stability and the controlled delivery of bacteriophages which is of great innovative value in bacteriophage therapy. Here, two different encapsulation methodologies of bacteriophages are described using two biocompatible materials: a lipid cationic mixture and a combination of alginate with the antacid CaCO 3 . To perform bacteriophage encapsulation, a purified lysate highly concentrated (around 10 10 -10 11  pfu/mL) is necessary, and to dispose of a specific equipment. Both methodologies have been successfully applied for encapsulating Salmonella bacteriophages with different morphologies. Also, the material employed does not modify the antibacterial action of bacteriophages. Moreover, both technologies can also be adapted to any bacteriophage and possibly to any delivery route for bacteriophage therapy.

  1. Isolation and Characterization of a Bacteriophage Preying an Antifungal Bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aryan Rahimi-Midani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Several Bacillus species were isolated from rice field soils, and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that Bacillus cereus was the most abundant. A strain named BC1 showed antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani. Bacteriophages infecting strain BC1 were isolated from the same soil sample. The isolated phage PK16 had an icosahedral head of 100 ± 5 nm and tail of 200 ± 5 nm, indicating that it belonged to the family Myoviridae. Analysis of the complete linear dsDNA genome revealed a 158,127-bp genome with G + C content of 39.9% comprising 235 open reading frames as well as 19 tRNA genes (including 1 pseudogene. Blastp analysis showed that the proteins encoded by the PK16 genome had the closest hits to proteins of seven different bacteriophages. A neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree based on the major capsid protein showed a robust clustering of phage PK16 with phage JBP901 and BCP8-2 isolated from Korean fermented food.

  2. Recombinant portal protein from Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteriophage CNPH82 is a 13-subunit oligomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luan, Weisha; Fesseler, Jochen; Chechik, Maria; Buttner, Carina R.; Antson, Alfred A.; Smits, Callum

    2012-01-01

    Crystals of the portal protein from Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteriophage CNPH82, diffracting to ∼4.2 Å resolution, have been obtained. The protein is a 13-subunit oligomer both in solution and in the crystal. The portal protein cn3 of bacteriophage CNPH82 is predicted to serve as a gateway for translocation of viral genome into preformed pro-capsid, like portal proteins from other double-stranded DNA tailed bacteriophages. The host of bacteriophage CNPH82 is the opportunistic human pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus epidermidis, a major cause of nosocomial infections. The portal protein of this phage has been cloned, overexpressed and purified. Size-exclusion chromatography–multi-angle laser light scattering analysis has indicated that the portal protein contains ∼13 subunits. Crystals of the portal protein, diffracting to 4.2 Å, have been obtained. These crystals belong to the space group C222 1 with the unit-cell parameters of a = 252.4, b = 367.0, c = 175.5 Å. The self-rotation function revealed the presence of a single 13-subunit oligomer in the asymmetric unit

  3. Dynamic pathways for viral capsid assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagan, Michael F.; Chandler, David

    2006-02-09

    We develop a class of models with which we simulate the assembly of particles into T1 capsid-like objects using Newtonian dynamics. By simulating assembly for many different values of system parameters, we vary the forces that drive assembly. For some ranges of parameters, assembly is facile, while for others, assembly is dynamically frustrated by kinetic traps corresponding to malformed or incompletely formed capsids. Our simulations sample many independent trajectories at various capsomer concentrations, allowing for statistically meaningful conclusions. Depending on subunit (i.e., capsomer) geometries, successful assembly proceeds by several mechanisms involving binding of intermediates of various sizes. We discuss the relationship between these mechanisms and experimental evaluations of capsid assembly processes.

  4. Bacteriophage in polar inland waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säwström, Christin; Lisle, John; Anesio, A.M.; Priscu, John C.; Laybourn-Parry, J.

    2008-01-01

    Bacteriophages are found wherever microbial life is present and play a significant role in aquatic ecosystems. They mediate microbial abundance, production, respiration, diversity, genetic transfer, nutrient cycling and particle size distribution. Most studies of bacteriophage ecology have been undertaken at temperate latitudes. Data on bacteriophages in polar inland waters are scant but the indications are that they play an active and dynamic role in these microbially dominated polar ecosystems. This review summarises what is presently known about polar inland bacteriophages, ranging from subglacial Antarctic lakes to glacial ecosystems in the Arctic. The review examines interactions between bacteriophages and their hosts and the abiotic and biotic variables that influence these interactions in polar inland waters. In addition, we consider the proportion of the bacteria in Arctic and Antarctic lake and glacial waters that are lysogenic and visibly infected with viruses. We assess the relevance of bacteriophages in the microbial loop in the extreme environments of Antarctic and Arctic inland waters with an emphasis on carbon cycling.

  5. Semisymmetric cubic graphs of order 16p2 16p2 16p2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An undirected graph without isolated vertices is said to be semisymmetric if its full automorphism group acts transitively on its edge set but not on its vertex set. In this paper, we inquire the existence of connected semisymmetric cubic graphs of order. 16p2. It is shown that for every odd prime p, there exists a ...

  6. Jumbo Bacteriophages: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yihui; Gao, Meiying

    2017-01-01

    Tailed bacteriophages with genomes larger than 200 kbp are classified as Jumbo phages, and are rarely isolated by conventional methods. These phages are designated "jumbo" owing to their most notable features of a large phage virion and large genome size. However, in addition to these, jumbo phages also exhibit several novel characteristics that have not been observed for phages with smaller genomes, which differentiate jumbo phages in terms of genome organization, virion structure, progeny propagation, and evolution. In this review, we summarize available reports on jumbo phages and discuss the differences between jumbo phages and small-genome phages. We also discuss data suggesting that jumbo phages might have evolved from phages with smaller genomes by acquiring additional functional genes, and that these additional genes reduce the dependence of the jumbo phages on the host bacteria.

  7. Synthetic Biology to Engineer Bacteriophage Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rita Costa, Ana; Milho, Catarina; Azeredo, Joana; Pires, Diana Priscila

    2018-01-01

    Recent advances in the synthetic biology field have enabled the development of new molecular biology techniques used to build specialized bacteriophages with new functionalities. Bacteriophages have been engineered towards a wide range of applications including pathogen control and detection, targeted drug delivery, or even assembly of new materials.In this chapter, two strategies that have been successfully used to genetically engineer bacteriophage genomes are addressed: a yeast-based platform and bacteriophage recombineering of electroporated DNA.

  8. Stepwise expansion of the bacteriophage ϕ6 procapsid: possible packaging intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemecek, Daniel; Cheng, Naiqian; Qiao, Jian; Mindich, Leonard; Steven, Alasdair C; Heymann, J Bernard

    2011-11-25

    The initial assembly product of bacteriophage ϕ6, the procapsid, undergoes major structural transformation during the sequential packaging of its three segments of single-stranded RNA. The procapsid, a compact icosahedrally symmetric particle with deeply recessed vertices, expands to the spherical mature capsid, increasing the volume available to accommodate the genome by 2.5-fold. It has been proposed that expansion and packaging are linked, with each stage in expansion presenting a binding site for a particular RNA segment. To investigate procapsid transformability, we induced expansion by acidification, heating, and elevated salt concentration. Cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions after all three treatments yielded the same partially expanded particle. Analysis by cryo-electron tomography showed that all vertices of a given capsid were either in a compact or an expanded state, indicating a highly cooperative transition. To benchmark the mature capsid, we analyzed filled (in vivo packaged) capsids. When these particles were induced to release their RNA, they reverted to the same intermediate state as expanded procapsids (intermediate 1) or to a second, further expanded state (intermediate 2). This partial reversibility of expansion suggests that the mature spherical capsid conformation is obtained only when sufficient outward pressure is exerted by packaged RNA. The observation of two intermediates is consistent with the proposed three-step packaging process. The model is further supported by the observation that a mutant capable of packaging the second RNA segment without previously packaging the first segment has enhanced susceptibility for switching spontaneously from the procapsid to the first intermediate state. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Lytic Properties of Bacteriophages Specific for M. haemolytica Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban-Chmiel, Renata; Wernicki, Andrzej; Stęgierska, Diana; Dec, Marta; Dudzic, Anna; Puchalski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was isolation and morphological characterization of temperate bacteriophages obtained from M. haemolytica strains and evaluation of their lytic properties in vitro against M. haemolytica isolated from the respiratory tract of calves. The material for the study consisted of the reference strain M. haemolytica serotype 1 (ATCC®) BAA-410™, reference serotypes A1, A2, A5, A6, A7, A9 and A11, and wild-type isolates of M. haemolytica. Bacteriophages were induced from an overnight bacterial starter culture of all examined M. haemolytica strains treated with mitomycin C. The lytic properties and host ranges were determined by plaque assays. The morphology of the bacteriophages was examined in negative-stained smears with 5% uranyl acetate solution using a transmission electron microscope. The genetic analysis of the bacteriophages was followed by restriction analysis of bacteriophage DNA. This was followed by analysis of genetic material by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Eight bacteriophages were obtained, like typical of the families Myoviridae, Siphoviridae and Podoviridae. Most of the bacteriophages exhibited lytic properties against the M. haemolytica strains. Restriction analysis revealed similarities to the P2-like phage obtained from the strain M. haemolytica BAA-410. The most similar profiles were observed in the case of bacteriophages φA1 and φA5. All of the bacteriophages obtained were characterized by the presence of additional fragments in the restriction profiles with respect to the P2-like reference phage. In the analysis of PCR products for the P2-like reference phage phi-MhaA1-PHL101 (DQ426904) and the phages of the M. haemolytica serotypes, a 734-bp phage PCR product was obtained. The primers were programmed in Primer-Blast software using the structure of the sequence DQ426904 of reference phage PHL101. The results obtained indicate the need for further research aimed at isolating and characterizing bacteriophages

  10. Acquisition of functions on the outer capsid surface during evolution of double-stranded RNA fungal viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Carlos P; Luque, Daniel; Gómez-Blanco, Josué; Rodríguez, Javier M; González, José M; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Ghabrial, Said A; Carrascosa, José L; Trus, Benes L; Castón, José R

    2017-12-01

    Unlike their counterparts in bacterial and higher eukaryotic hosts, most fungal viruses are transmitted intracellularly and lack an extracellular phase. Here we determined the cryo-EM structure at 3.7 Å resolution of Rosellinia necatrix quadrivirus 1 (RnQV1), a fungal double-stranded (ds)RNA virus. RnQV1, the type species of the family Quadriviridae, has a multipartite genome consisting of four monocistronic segments. Whereas most dsRNA virus capsids are based on dimers of a single protein, the ~450-Å-diameter, T = 1 RnQV1 capsid is built of P2 and P4 protein heterodimers, each with more than 1000 residues. Despite a lack of sequence similarity between the two proteins, they have a similar α-helical domain, the structural signature shared with the lineage of the dsRNA bluetongue virus-like viruses. Domain insertions in P2 and P4 preferential sites provide additional functions at the capsid outer surface, probably related to enzyme activity. The P2 insertion has a fold similar to that of gelsolin and profilin, two actin-binding proteins with a function in cytoskeleton metabolism, whereas the P4 insertion suggests protease activity involved in cleavage of the P2 383-residue C-terminal region, absent in the mature viral particle. Our results indicate that the intimate virus-fungus partnership has altered the capsid genome-protective and/or receptor-binding functions. Fungal virus evolution has tended to allocate enzyme activities to the virus capsid outer surface.

  11. Differential bacteriophage mortality on exposure to copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinyu; Dennehy, John J

    2011-10-01

    Many studies report that copper can be used to control microbial growth, including that of viruses. We determined the rates of copper-mediated inactivation for a wide range of bacteriophages. We used two methods to test the effect of copper on bacteriophage survival. One method involved placing small volumes of bacteriophage lysate on copper and stainless steel coupons. Following exposure, metal coupons were rinsed with lysogeny broth, and the resulting fluid was serially diluted and plated on agar with the corresponding bacterial host. The second method involved adding copper sulfate (CuSO(4)) to bacteriophage lysates to a final concentration of 5 mM. Aliquots were removed from the mixture, serially diluted, and plated with the appropriate bacterial host. Significant mortality was observed among the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) bacteriophages Φ6 and Φ8, the single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) bacteriophage PP7, the ssDNA bacteriophage ΦX174, and the dsDNA bacteriophage PM2. However, the dsDNA bacteriophages PRD1, T4, and λ were relatively unaffected by copper. Interestingly, lipid-containing bacteriophages were most susceptible to copper toxicity. In addition, in the first experimental method, the pattern of bacteriophage Φ6 survival over time showed a plateau in mortality after lysates dried out. This finding suggests that copper's effect on bacteriophage is mediated by the presence of water.

  12. Nuclear entry of hepatitis B virus capsids involves disintegration to protein dimers followed by nuclear reassociation to capsids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Rabe

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Assembly and disassembly of viral capsids are essential steps in the viral life cycle. Studies on their kinetics are mostly performed in vitro, allowing application of biochemical, biophysical and visualizing techniques. In vivo kinetics are poorly understood and the transferability of the in vitro models to the cellular environment remains speculative. We analyzed capsid disassembly of the hepatitis B virus in digitonin-permeabilized cells which support nuclear capsid entry and subsequent genome release. Using gradient centrifugation, size exclusion chromatography and immune fluorescence microscopy of digitonin-permeabilized cells, we showed that capsids open and close reversibly. In the absence of RNA, capsid re-assembly slows down; the capsids remain disintegrated and enter the nucleus as protein dimers or irregular polymers. Upon the presence of cellular RNA, capsids re-assemble in the nucleus. We conclude that reversible genome release from hepatitis B virus capsids is a unique strategy different from that of other viruses, which employs irreversible capsid destruction for genome release. The results allowed us to propose a model of HBV genome release in which the unique environment of the nuclear pore favors HBV capsid disassembly reaction, while both cytoplasm and nucleus favor capsid assembly.

  13. Hydrodynamics of bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsamba, Panayiota; Lauga, Eric

    2017-11-01

    Bacteriophage viruses, one of the most abundant entities in our planet, lack the ability to move independently. Instead, they crowd fluid environments in anticipation of a random encounter with bacteria. Once they 'land' on their victim's surface, they eject their genetic material inside the host cell. A big fraction of phage species, however, first attach to the flagella of bacteria. Being immotile, these so-called flagellotropic phages still manage to reach the cell body for infection, and the process by which they move up the flagellum has intrigued the scientific community for over four decades. In 1973 Berg and Anderson proposed the nut-and-bolt mechanism in which, just like a nut being rotated moves along a bolt, the phage wraps itself around a flagellum possessing helical grooves (due to the helical rows of flagellin molecules) and exploits the rotation of the flagellum in order to passively travel along it. We provide here a first-principle theoretical model for this nut-and-bolt mechanism and show that it is able to predict experiment observations.

  14. Lysogenic bacteriophage isolated from acidophilium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Thomas W.; Bruhn, Debby F.; Bulmer, Deborah K.

    1992-01-01

    A bacteriophage identified as .phi.Ac1 capable of infecting acidophilic heterotropic bacteria (such as Acidiphilium sp.) and processes for genetically engineering acidophilic bacteria for biomining or sulfur removal from coal are disclosed. The bacteriophage is capable of growth in cells existing at pH at or below 3.0. Lytic forms of the phage introduced into areas experiencing acid drainage kill the bacteria causing such drainage. Lysogenic forms of the phase having genes for selective removal of metallic or nonmetallic elements can be introduced into acidophilic bacteria to effect removal of the desired element form ore or coal.

  15. Properties and Functions of the Dengue Virus Capsid Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byk, Laura A; Gamarnik, Andrea V

    2016-09-29

    Dengue virus affects hundreds of millions of people each year around the world, causing a tremendous social and economic impact on affected countries. The aim of this review is to summarize our current knowledge of the functions, structure, and interactions of the viral capsid protein. The primary role of capsid is to package the viral genome. There are two processes linked to this function: the recruitment of the viral RNA during assembly and the release of the genome during infection. Although particle assembly takes place on endoplasmic reticulum membranes, capsid localizes in nucleoli and lipid droplets. Why capsid accumulates in these locations during infection remains unknown. In this review, we describe available data and discuss new ideas on dengue virus capsid functions and interactions. We believe that a deeper understanding of how the capsid protein works during infection will create opportunities for novel antiviral strategies, which are urgently needed to control dengue virus infections.

  16. Classification and Evolutionary Trends of Icosahedral Viral Capsids

    OpenAIRE

    Kerner, Richard

    2008-01-01

    A classification of icosahedral viral capsids is proposed. We show how the self-organization of capsids during their formation implies a definite composition of their elementary building blocks. The exact number of hexamers with three different admissible symmetries is related to capsids' sizes, labelled by their T-numbers. Simple rules determining these numbers for each value of T are deduced and certain consequences concerning the probabilities of mutations and evolution of viruses are disc...

  17. Classification and Evolutionary Trends of Icosahedral Viral Capsids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Kerner

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A classification of icosahedral viral capsids is proposed. We show how the self-organization of capsids during their formation implies a definite composition of their elementary building blocks. The exact number of hexamers with three different admissible symmetries is related to capsids' sizes, labelled by their T-numbers. Simple rules determining these numbers for each value of T are deduced and certain consequences concerning the probabilities of mutations and evolution of viruses are discussed.

  18. Large-scale functional purification of recombinant HIV-1 capsid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdeleine Hung

    Full Text Available During human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 virion maturation, capsid proteins undergo a major rearrangement to form a conical core that protects the viral nucleoprotein complexes. Mutations in the capsid sequence that alter the stability of the capsid core are deleterious to viral infectivity and replication. Recently, capsid assembly has become an attractive target for the development of a new generation of anti-retroviral agents. Drug screening efforts and subsequent structural and mechanistic studies require gram quantities of active, homogeneous and pure protein. Conventional means of laboratory purification of Escherichia coli expressed recombinant capsid protein rely on column chromatography steps that are not amenable to large-scale production. Here we present a function-based purification of wild-type and quadruple mutant capsid proteins, which relies on the inherent propensity of capsid protein to polymerize and depolymerize. This method does not require the packing of sizable chromatography columns and can generate double-digit gram quantities of functionally and biochemically well-behaved proteins with greater than 98% purity. We have used the purified capsid protein to characterize two known assembly inhibitors in our in-house developed polymerization assay and to measure their binding affinities. Our capsid purification procedure provides a robust method for purifying large quantities of a key protein in the HIV-1 life cycle, facilitating identification of the next generation anti-HIV agents.

  19. Hepatitis B Virus Capsid Completion Occurs through Error Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutomski, Corinne A; Lyktey, Nicholas A; Zhao, Zhongchao; Pierson, Elizabeth E; Zlotnick, Adam; Jarrold, Martin F

    2017-11-22

    Understanding capsid assembly is important because of its role in virus lifecycles and in applications to drug discovery and nanomaterial development. Many virus capsids are icosahedral, and assembly is thought to occur by the sequential addition of capsid protein subunits to a nucleus, with the final step completing the icosahedron. Almost nothing is known about the final (completion) step because the techniques usually used to study capsid assembly lack the resolution. In this work, charge detection mass spectrometry (CDMS) has been used to track the assembly of the T = 4 hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsid in real time. The initial assembly reaction occurs rapidly, on the time scale expected from low resolution measurements. However, CDMS shows that many of the particles generated in this process are defective and overgrown, containing more than the 120 capsid protein dimers needed to form a perfect T = 4 icosahedron. The defective and overgrown capsids self-correct over time to the mass expected for a perfect T = 4 capsid. Thus, completion is a distinct phase in the assembly reaction. Capsid completion does not necessarily occur by inserting the last building block into an incomplete, but otherwise perfect icosahedron. The initial assembly reaction can be predominently imperfect, and completion involves the slow correction of the accumulated errors.

  20. Replication of bacteriophage lambda DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsurimoto, T.; Matsubara, K.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper results of studies on the mechanism of bacteriophage lambda replication using molecular biological and biochemical approaches are reported. The purification of the initiator proteins, O and P, and the role of the O and P proteins in the initiation of lambda DNA replication through interactions with specific DNA sequences are described. 47 references, 15 figures

  1. Bacteriophage: from exploration to exploitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nobrega, Franklin L.

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decades, bacteriophage research has revealed the abundance of phages in nature, their morphological and genomic diversity, their influence in the regulation of microbial balance in the ecosystem and their impact on the evolution of microbial diversity. Since the 1950s, phages have also

  2. Bacteriophage endolysins as novel antimicrobials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endolysins are enzymes used by bacteriophages at the end of their replication cycle to degrade the peptidoglycan of the bacterial host from within, resulting in cell lysis and release of progeny virions. Due to the absence of an outer membrane in the Gram-positive bacterial cell wall, endolysins can...

  3. Bacteriophage therapy in animal production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concerns over the consequences of bacterial resistance to antibiotics with the use of antibiotics in animal production have led to an increase in research on alternatives to antibiotics. Bacteriophages kill bacteria, are natural, safe, plentiful, self replicating, self limiting, can be used to spec...

  4. Isolation and characterization of bacteriophages infecting Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis, the causal agent of walnut blight disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Suarez, Sandra; Jordan, Brian; Heinemann, Jack A

    2012-05-01

    Walnut orchards suffer from a blight caused by the bacteria Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis. These bacteria can be infected by viral bacteriophages and this study was carried out to isolate and characterize bacteriophages from walnut orchards located throughout the South Island of New Zealand. Twenty six X. arboricola phages were isolated from three hundred and twenty six samples of plant material representing phyllosphere and rhizosphere ecosystems. The phage isolates were characterized by host-range, plaque and particle morphology, restriction digest and phylogenetic analysis and stability under various storage conditions. From capsid and tail dimensions the bacteriophages were considered to belong to the double-stranded DNA families Podoviridae and Siphoviridae. Of the twenty six bacteriophages, sixteen belonged to Podoviridae and were found both in the phyllosphere and rhizosphere. In contrast, Siphoviridae were present only in the rhizosphere isolates. Phage genome sizes ranged from 38.0 to 52.0 kb from a Hind III restriction digestion and had in common a 400 kb fragment that was identical at the DNA level. Despite the similar restriction patterns, maximum parsimony bootstrap analysis showed that the phage were members of different groups. Finally, we hypothesise that these phage might have use in a biocontrol strategy and therefore storage stability and efficacy was tested. Titres declined more than 50% over a 12-months storage period. Deep-freezing temperatures (-34°C) increased while chloroform decreased the stability.

  5. Taxonomy of P2P Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, E.H.T.B.; Karagiannis, Georgios

    2009-01-01

    Peer-to-peer (p2p) networks have gained immense popularity in recent years and the number of services they provide continuously rises. Where p2p-networks were formerly known as file-sharing networks, p2p is now also used for services like VoIP and IPTV. With so many different p2p applications and

  6. Interaction of Bacteriophages with the Immune System: Induction of Bacteriophage-Specific Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2018-01-01

    In all cases when a bacteriophage makes direct contact with a mammalian organism, it may challenge the mammalian immunological system. Its major consequence is production of antibodies specific to the bacteriophage. Here we present protocols applicable in studies of bacteriophage ability to induce specific antibodies. The protocols have been divided into three parts: purification, immunization, and detection (ELISA).

  7. Single molecule studies of DNA packaging by bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Derek Nathan

    The DNA packaging dynamics of bacteriophages φ29, gamma, and T4 were studied at the single molecule level using a dual trap optical tweezers. Also, a method for producing long DNA molecules by PCR for optical tweezers studies of protein DNA interactions is presented and thoroughly characterized. This DNA preparation technique provided DNA samples for the φ29 and T4 studies. In the studies of φ29, the role of charge was investigated by varying the ionic conditions of the packaging buffer. Ionic conditions in which the DNA charge was highly screened due to divalent and trivalent cations showed the lowest resistance to packaging of the DNA to high density. This confirmed the importance of counterions in shielding the DNA interstrand repulsion when packaged to high density. While the ionic nature of the packaging buffer had a strong effect on packaging velocities, there was no clear trend between the counterion-screened charge of the DNA and the maximum packaging velocity. The packaging studies of lambda and T4 served as systems for comparative studies with φ29. Each system showed similarities to the φ29 system and unique differences. Both the lambda and T4 packaging motors were capable of generating forces in excess of 50 pN and showed remarkably high processivity, similar to φ29. However, dynamic structural transitions were observed with lambda that are not observed with φ29. The packaging of the lambda genome showed capsid expansion at approximately 30 percent of the genome packaged and capsid rupture at 90 percent of the genome packaged in the absence of capsid stabilizing protein gpD. Unique to the T4 packaging motor, packaging dynamics showed a remarkable amount of variability in velocities. This variability was seen both within individual packaging phages and from one phage to the next. This is possibly due to different conformational states of the packaging machinery. Additionally, lambda and T4 had average packaging velocities under minimal load of 600

  8. Hepatitis Virus Capsid Polymorph Stability Depends on Encapsulated Cargo Size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, L.; Porterfield, Z.; van der Schoot, P. P. A. M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/102140618; Zlotnick, A.; Dragnea, B.

    2013-01-01

    Protein cages providing a controlled environment to encapsulated cargo are a ubiquitous presence in any biological system. Well-known examples are capsids, the regular protein shells of viruses, which protect and deliver the viral genome. Since some virus capsids can be loaded with nongenomic

  9. Studies of viral DNA packaging motors with optical tweezers: a comparison of motor function in bacteriophages φ29, λ, and T4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas E.; Fuller, Derek N.; Raymer, Dorian M.; Rickgauer, Peter; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J.; Anderson, Dwight L.; Catalano, Carlos E.; Kottadiel, Vishal; Rao, Venigalla B.

    2007-09-01

    A key step in the assembly of many viruses is the packaging of double-stranded DNA into a viral procapsid (an empty protein shell) by the action of an ATP-powered portal motor complex. We have developed methods to measure the packaging of single DNA molecules into single viral proheads in real time using optical tweezers. We can measure DNA binding and initiation of translocation, the DNA translocation dynamics, and the filling of the capsid against resisting forces. In addition to studying bacteriophage φ29, we have recently extended these methods to study the E. coli bacteriophages λ and T4, two important model systems in molecular biology. The three systems have different capsid sizes/shapes, genome lengths, and biochemical and structural differences in their packaging motors. Here, we compare and contrast these three systems. We find that all three motors translocate DNA processively and generate very large forces, each exceeding 50 piconewtons, ~20x higher force than generated by the skeletal muscle myosin 2 motor. This high force generation is required to overcome the forces resisting the confinement of the stiff, highly charged DNA at high density within the viral capsids. However, there are also striking differences between the three motors: they exhibit different DNA translocation rates, degrees of static and dynamic disorder, responses to load, and pausing and slipping dynamics.

  10. Metagenomic Analysis of Dairy Bacteriophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muhammed, Musemma K.; Kot, Witold; Neve, Horst

    2017-01-01

    Despite their huge potential for characterizing the biodiversity of phages, metagenomic studies are currently not available for dairy bacteriophages, partly due to the lack of a standard procedure for phage extraction. We optimized an extraction method that allows to remove the bulk protein from ...... diversity. Possible co-induction of temperate P335 prophages and satellite phages in one of the whey mixtures was also observed....

  11. Inhibition of DNA ejection from bacteriophage by Mg+2 counterions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sell; Tran, C. V.; Nguyen, T. T.

    2011-03-01

    The problem of inhibiting viral DNA ejection from bacteriophages by multivalent counterions, specifically Mg+2 counterions, is studied. Experimentally, it is known that MgSO4 salt has a strong and nonmonotonic effect on the amount of DNA ejected. There exists an optimal concentration at which the minimum amount of DNA is ejected from the virus. At lower or higher concentrations, more DNA is ejected from the capsid. We propose that this phenomenon is the result of DNA overcharging by Mg+2 multivalent counterions. As Mg+2 concentration increases from zero, the net charge of DNA changes from negative to positive. The optimal inhibition corresponds to the Mg+2 concentration where DNA is neutral. At lower/higher concentrations, DNA genome is charged. It prefers to be in solution to lower its electrostatic self-energy, which consequently leads to an increase in DNA ejection. By fitting our theory to available experimental data, the strength of DNA-DNA short range attraction energies, mediated by Mg+2, is found to be -0.004 kBT per nucleotide base. This and other fitted parameters agree well with known values from other experiments and computer simulations. The parameters are also in agreement qualitatively with values for tri- and tetravalent counterions.

  12. Towards P2P XML Database Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Zhang (Ying)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractTo ease the development of data-intensive P2P applications, we envision a P2P XML Database Management System (P2P XDBMS) that acts as a database middle-ware, providing a uniform database abstraction on top of a dynamic set of distributed data sources. In this PhD work, we research which

  13. Portal protein functions akin to a DNA-sensor that couples genome-packaging to icosahedral capsid maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokareddy, Ravi K.; Sankhala, Rajeshwer S.; Roy, Ankoor; Afonine, Pavel V.; Motwani, Tina; Teschke, Carolyn M.; Parent, Kristin N.; Cingolani, Gino

    2017-01-01

    Tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses assemble infectious particles via an empty precursor capsid (or ‘procapsid') built by multiple copies of coat and scaffolding protein and by one dodecameric portal protein. Genome packaging triggers rearrangement of the coat protein and release of scaffolding protein, resulting in dramatic procapsid lattice expansion. Here, we provide structural evidence that the portal protein of the bacteriophage P22 exists in two distinct dodecameric conformations: an asymmetric assembly in the procapsid (PC-portal) that is competent for high affinity binding to the large terminase packaging protein, and a symmetric ring in the mature virion (MV-portal) that has negligible affinity for the packaging motor. Modelling studies indicate the structure of PC-portal is incompatible with DNA coaxially spooled around the portal vertex, suggesting that newly packaged DNA triggers the switch from PC- to MV-conformation. Thus, we propose the signal for termination of ‘Headful Packaging' is a DNA-dependent symmetrization of portal protein. PMID:28134243

  14. Portal protein functions akin to a DNA-sensor that couples genome-packaging to icosahedral capsid maturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lokareddy, Ravi K.; Sankhala, Rajeshwer S.; Roy, Ankoor; Afonine, Pavel V.; Motwani, Tina; Teschke, Carolyn M.; Parent, Kristin N.; Cingolani, Gino (Rutgers); (LBNL); (Connecticut); (TJU); (MSU)

    2017-01-30

    Tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses assemble infectious particles via an empty precursor capsid (or ‘procapsid’) built by multiple copies of coat and scaffolding protein and by one dodecameric portal protein. Genome packaging triggers rearrangement of the coat protein and release of scaffolding protein, resulting in dramatic procapsid lattice expansion. Here, we provide structural evidence that the portal protein of the bacteriophage P22 exists in two distinct dodecameric conformations: an asymmetric assembly in the procapsid (PC-portal) that is competent for high affinity binding to the large terminase packaging protein, and a symmetric ring in the mature virion (MV-portal) that has negligible affinity for the packaging motor. Modelling studies indicate the structure of PC-portal is incompatible with DNA coaxially spooled around the portal vertex, suggesting that newly packaged DNA triggers the switch from PC- to MV-conformation. Thus, we propose the signal for termination of ‘Headful Packaging’ is a DNA-dependent symmetrization of portal protein.

  15. Heterodimers as the Structural Unit of the T=1 Capsid of the Fungal Double-Stranded RNA Rosellinia necatrix Quadrivirus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Daniel; Mata, Carlos P; González-Camacho, Fernando; González, José M; Gómez-Blanco, Josué; Alfonso, Carlos; Rivas, Germán; Havens, Wendy M; Kanematsu, Satoko; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Ghabrial, Said A; Trus, Benes L; Castón, José R

    2016-12-15

    Most double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses are transcribed and replicated in a specialized icosahedral capsid with a T=1 lattice consisting of 60 asymmetric capsid protein (CP) dimers. These capsids help to organize the viral genome and replicative complex(es). They also act as molecular sieves that isolate the virus genome from host defense mechanisms and allow the passage of nucleotides and viral transcripts. Rosellinia necatrix quadrivirus 1 (RnQV1), the type species of the family Quadriviridae, is a dsRNA fungal virus with a multipartite genome consisting of four monocistronic segments (segments 1 to 4). dsRNA-2 and dsRNA-4 encode two CPs (P2 and P4, respectively), which coassemble into ∼450-Å-diameter capsids. We used three-dimensional cryo-electron microscopy combined with complementary biophysical techniques to determine the structures of RnQV1 virion strains W1075 and W1118. RnQV1 has a quadripartite genome, and the capsid is based on a single-shelled T=1 lattice built of P2-P4 dimers. Whereas the RnQV1-W1118 capsid is built of full-length CP, P2 and P4 of RnQV1-W1075 are cleaved into several polypeptides, maintaining the capsid structural organization. RnQV1 heterodimers have a quaternary organization similar to that of homodimers of reoviruses and other dsRNA mycoviruses. The RnQV1 capsid is the first T=1 capsid with a heterodimer as an asymmetric unit reported to date and follows the architectural principle for dsRNA viruses that a 120-subunit capsid is a conserved assembly that supports dsRNA replication and organization. Given their importance to health, members of the family Reoviridae are the basis of most structural and functional studies and provide much of our knowledge of dsRNA viruses. Analysis of bacterial, protozoal, and fungal dsRNA viruses has improved our understanding of their structure, function, and evolution, as well. Here, we studied a dsRNA virus that infects the fungus Rosellinia necatrix, an ascomycete that is pathogenic to a wide

  16. Use of Bacteriophages to control bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytic bacteriophages can provide a natural method and an effective alternative to antibiotics to reduce bacterial pathogens in animals, foods, and other environments. Bacteriophages (phages) are viruses which infect bacterial cells and eventually kill them through lysis, and represent the most abun...

  17. Nanoscale bacteriophage biosensors beyond phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Wook; Song, Jangwon; Hwang, Mintai P; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophages are traditionally used for the development of phage display technology. Recently, their nanosized dimensions and ease with which genetic modifications can be made to their structure and function have put them in the spotlight towards their use in a variety of biosensors. In particular, the expression of any protein or peptide on the extraluminal surface of bacteriophages is possible by genetically engineering the genome. In addition, the relatively short replication time of bacteriophages offers researchers the ability to generate mass quantities of any given bacteriophage-based biosensor. Coupled with the emergence of various biomarkers in the clinic as a means to determine pathophysiological states, the development of current and novel technologies for their detection and quantification is imperative. In this review, we categorize bacteriophages by their morphology into M13-based filamentous bacteriophages and T4- or T7-based icosahedral bacteriophages, and examine how such advantages are utilized across a variety of biosensors. In essence, we take a comprehensive approach towards recent trends in bacteriophage-based biosensor applications and discuss their outlook with regards to the field of biotechnology.

  18. Monte Carlo simulations of polyelectrolytes inside viral capsids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelescu, Daniel George; Bruinsma, Robijn; Linse, Per

    2006-04-01

    Structural features of polyelectrolytes as single-stranded RNA or double-stranded DNA confined inside viral capsids and the thermodynamics of the encapsidation of the polyelectrolyte into the viral capsid have been examined for various polyelectrolyte lengths by using a coarse-grained model solved by Monte Carlo simulations. The capsid was modeled as a spherical shell with embedded charges and the genome as a linear jointed chain of oppositely charged beads, and their sizes corresponded to those of a scaled-down T=3 virus. Counterions were explicitly included, but no salt was added. The encapisdated chain was found to be predominantly located at the inner capsid surface, in a disordered manner for flexible chains and in a spool-like structure for stiff chains. The distribution of the small ions was strongly dependent on the polyelectrolyte-capsid charge ratio. The encapsidation enthalpy was negative and its magnitude decreased with increasing polyelectrolyte length, whereas the encapsidation entropy displayed a maximum when the capsid and polyelectrolyte had equal absolute charge. The encapsidation process remained thermodynamically favorable for genome charges ca. 3.5 times the capsid charge. The chain stiffness had only a relatively weak effect on the thermodynamics of the encapsidation.

  19. Review of small synthetic molecules targeting HBV capsid assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Na; Zhao, Fabao; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the treatment for HBV infection suffers from adverse side effects and drug resistance. The dramatic development of new HBV inhibitors is focused on discovering diverse non-nucleoside compounds with either novel structures or new mechanisms of action. Capsid assembly is crucial to the completion of the viral life cycle, which makes it an attractive target for antivirus discovery. Inhibitors that block the formation of the HBV capsid have been developed, and several candidates have been proposed. In this review, we focus on the recent advances in several distinct classes of synthetic small molecular non-nucleosides targeting at the capsid assembly.

  20. The Role of the Coat Protein A-Domain in P22 Bacteriophage Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Morris

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophage P22 has long been considered a hallmark model for virus assembly and maturation. Repurposing of P22 and other similar virus structures for nanotechnology and nanomedicine has reinvigorated the need to further understand the protein-protein interactions that allow for the assembly, as well as the conformational shifts required for maturation. In this work, gp5, the major coat structural protein of P22, has been manipulated in order to examine the mutational effects on procapsid stability and maturation. Insertions to the P22 coat protein A-domain, while widely permissive of procapsid assembly, destabilize the interactions necessary for virus maturation and potentially allow for the tunable adjustment of procapsid stability. Future manipulation of this region of the coat protein subunit can potentially be used to alter the stability of the capsid for controllable disassembly.

  1. Structure of the Triatoma virus capsid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squires, Gaëlle; Pous, Joan [Laboratoire de Virologie Moléculaire et Structurale, CNRS, 1 Avenue de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette CEDEX (France); Agirre, Jon [Fundación Biofísica Bizkaia, Barrio Sarriena S/N, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (FBB) (Spain); Unidad de Biofísica (UBF, CSIC, UPV/EHU), PO Box 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Rozas-Dennis, Gabriela S. [U.N.S., San Juan 670 (8000) Bahía Blanca (Argentina); U.N.S., Avenida Alem 1253 (8000) Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Costabel, Marcelo D. [U.N.S., Avenida Alem 1253 (8000) Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Marti, Gerardo A. [Centro de Estudios Parasitológicos y de Vectores (CEPAVE-CCT, La Plata, CONICET-UNLP), Calle 2 No. 584 (1900) La Plata (Argentina); Navaza, Jorge; Bressanelli, Stéphane [Laboratoire de Virologie Moléculaire et Structurale, CNRS, 1 Avenue de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette CEDEX (France); Guérin, Diego M. A., E-mail: diego.guerin@ehu.es [Fundación Biofísica Bizkaia, Barrio Sarriena S/N, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (FBB) (Spain); Unidad de Biofísica (UBF, CSIC, UPV/EHU), PO Box 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Rey, Felix A., E-mail: diego.guerin@ehu.es [Laboratoire de Virologie Moléculaire et Structurale, CNRS, 1 Avenue de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette CEDEX (France)

    2013-06-01

    The crystallographic structure of TrV shows specific morphological and functional features that clearly distinguish it from the type species of the Cripavirus genus, CrPV. The members of the Dicistroviridae family are non-enveloped positive-sense single-stranded RNA (+ssRNA) viruses pathogenic to beneficial arthropods as well as insect pests of medical importance. Triatoma virus (TrV), a member of this family, infects several species of triatomine insects (popularly named kissing bugs), which are vectors for human trypanosomiasis, more commonly known as Chagas disease. The potential use of dicistroviruses as biological control agents has drawn considerable attention in the past decade, and several viruses of this family have been identified, with their targets covering honey bees, aphids and field crickets, among others. Here, the crystal structure of the TrV capsid at 2.5 Å resolution is reported, showing that as expected it is very similar to that of Cricket paralysis virus (CrPV). Nevertheless, a number of distinguishing structural features support the introduction of a new genus (Triatovirus; type species TrV) under the Dicistroviridae family. The most striking differences are the absence of icosahedrally ordered VP4 within the infectious particle and the presence of prominent projections that surround the fivefold axis. Furthermore, the structure identifies a second putative autoproteolytic DDF motif in protein VP3, in addition to the conserved one in VP1 which is believed to be responsible for VP0 cleavage during capsid maturation. The potential meaning of these new findings is discussed.

  2. Packaging of a unit-length viral genome: the role of nucleotides and the gpD decoration protein in stable nucleocapsid assembly in bacteriophage lambda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qin; Maluf, Nasib Karl; Catalano, Carlos Enrique

    2008-11-28

    The developmental pathways for a variety of eukaryotic and prokaryotic double-stranded DNA viruses include packaging of viral DNA into a preformed procapsid structure, catalyzed by terminase enzymes and fueled by ATP hydrolysis. In most instances, a capsid expansion process accompanies DNA packaging, which significantly increases the volume of the capsid to accommodate the full-length viral genome. "Decoration" proteins add to the surface of the expanded capsid lattice, and the terminase motors tightly package DNA, generating up to approximately 20 atm of internal capsid pressure. Herein we describe biochemical studies on genome packaging using bacteriophage lambda as a model system. Kinetic analysis suggests that the packaging motor possesses at least four ATPase catalytic sites that act cooperatively to effect DNA translocation, and that the motor is highly processive. While not required for DNA translocation into the capsid, the phage lambda capsid decoration protein gpD is essential for the packaging of the penultimate 8-10 kb (15-20%) of the viral genome; virtually no DNA is packaged in the absence of gpD when large DNA substrates are used, most likely due to a loss of capsid structural integrity. Finally, we show that ATP hydrolysis is required to retain the genome in a packaged state subsequent to condensation within the capsid. Presumably, the packaging motor continues to "idle" at the genome end and to maintain a positive pressure towards the packaged state. Surprisingly, ADP, guanosine triphosphate, and the nonhydrolyzable ATP analog 5'-adenylyl-beta,gamma-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP) similarly stabilize the packaged viral genome despite the fact that they fail to support genome packaging. In contrast, the poorly hydrolyzed ATP analog ATP-gammaS only partially stabilizes the nucleocapsid, and a DNA is released in "quantized" steps. We interpret the ensemble of data to indicate that (i) the viral procapsid possesses a degree of plasticity that is required to

  3. Salt-Dependent DNA-DNA Spacings in Intact Bacteriophage lambda Reflect Relative Importance of DNA Self-Repulsion and Bending Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    X Qiu; D Rau; V Parsegian; L Fang; C Knobler; W Gelbart

    2011-12-31

    Using solution synchrotron x-ray scattering, we measure the variation of DNA-DNA d spacings in bacteriophage {lambda} with mono-, di-, and polyvalent salt concentrations, for wild-type [48.5 x 10{sup 3} base pairs (bp)] and short-genome-mutant (37.8 kbp) strains. From the decrease in d spacings with increasing salt, we deduce the relative contributions of DNA self-repulsion and bending to the energetics of packaged phage genomes. We quantify the DNA-DNA interaction energies within the intact phage by combining the measured d spacings in the capsid with measurements of osmotic pressure in DNA assemblies under the same salt conditions in bulk solution. In the commonly used Tris-Mg buffer, the DNA-DNA interaction energies inside the phage capsids are shown to be about 1 kT/bp, an order of magnitude larger than the bending energies.

  4. Radiosensitivity of Vi bacteriophage 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaremba, E.; Kwiatkowski, B.; Ciesielski, B.

    1989-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of Vi bacteriophages 3 under conditions of predominantly indirect radiation effects has been studied. The survival of the phages changed exponentially, with characteristic dose D 0 decreasing, during the first 120 minutes after irradiation due to postirradiation inactivation of the phages. Catalase reduced the toxic features of the irradiated medium. Inactivation of the phages caused by the presence of exogeneous H 2 O 2 in the medium had a similar character to inactivation caused by the medium preirradiated with adequate dose. It is concluded that hydrogen peroxide plays a critical role in postirradiation inactivation of Vi phages 3. 14 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab. (author)

  5. P2X receptors in epithelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leipziger, Jens Georg

    2015-01-01

    P2X receptors are ubiquitously expressed in all epithelial tissues but their functional roles are less well studied. Here we review the current state of knowledge by focusing on functional effects of P2X receptor in secretory and in absorptive tissues. In glandular tissue like the parotid gland b...

  6. A theory for viral capsid assembly around electrostatic cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Michael F.

    2009-03-01

    We develop equilibrium and kinetic theories that describe the assembly of viral capsid proteins on a charged central core, as seen in recent experiments in which brome mosaic virus capsids assemble around nanoparticles functionalized with polyelectrolyte. We model interactions between capsid proteins and nanoparticle surfaces as the interaction of polyelectrolyte brushes with opposite charge using the nonlinear Poisson Boltzmann equation. The models predict that there is a threshold density of functionalized charge, above which capsids efficiently assemble around nanoparticles, and that light scatter intensity increases rapidly at early times without the lag phase characteristic of empty capsid assembly. These predictions are consistent with and enable interpretation of preliminary experimental data. However, the models predict a stronger dependence of nanoparticle incorporation efficiency on functionalized charge density than measured in experiments and do not completely capture a logarithmic growth phase seen in experimental light scatter. These discrepancies may suggest the presence of metastable disordered states in the experimental system. In addition to discussing future experiments for nanoparticle-capsid systems, we discuss broader implications for understanding assembly around charged cores such as nucleic acids.

  7. Simulations of impulsive laser scattering of biological protein assemblies: Application to M13 bacteriophage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykeman, Eric C.; Benson, Daryn; Tsen, K.-T.; Sankey, Otto F.

    2009-10-01

    We develop a theoretical framework, based on a bond-polarizability model, for simulating the impulsive force experienced on a protein or an assembly of proteins from a pulsed light source by coupling the laser electric field to an atomic distortion. The mechanism is impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) where mechanical distortions produce variation in the electronic polarization through atomic displacements similar to vibrational Raman scattering. The magnitude of the impulsive force is determined from the empirical two-body bond-polarizability model and the intensity of the incident light. We apply the method to the M13 bacteriophage protein capsid system by performing several classical molecular-dynamics simulations that include the additional impulsive laser scattering force at various light intensities and pulse widths. The results of the molecular-dynamics simulations are then qualitatively interpreted with a simple harmonic oscillator model driven by ISRS. The intensity of light required to produce damage to the capsid in the simulations was found to be far higher than what was found in recent pulsed laser scattering experiments of M13 phage, suggesting that the observed inactivation of viruses with ultrashort laser pulses involves processes and/or mechanisms not taken into account in the present simulations.

  8. DNA fusion product of phage P2 with plasmid pBR322 - A new phasmid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, M.; Bertani, G.

    1983-01-01

    The chromosome of the temperate bacteriophage P2 and that of the plasmid pBR322 have been joined in vitro after treatment with restriction endonuclease EcoRI. The fusion product - a phasmid - can behave as a plasmid, as a phage and as a prophage. It can replicate its DNA under the control of either the specific replication mechanism of the parent phage in a polA mutant or that of the parent plasmid in a rep mutant. Several interesting interactions between the two replication modes are indicated. In particular, phage particles may be produced even when the phage mode of DNA replication is blocked, and this throws new light on the involvement of the early gene A in the regulation of late gene expression in phage P2.

  9. Propagating the missing bacteriophages: a large bacteriophage in a new class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardies Stephen C

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The number of successful propagations/isolations of soil-borne bacteriophages is small in comparison to the number of bacteriophages observed by microscopy (great plaque count anomaly. As one resolution of the great plaque count anomaly, we use propagation in ultra-dilute agarose gels to isolate a Bacillus thuringiensis bacteriophage with a large head (95 nm in diameter, tail (486 × 26 nm, corkscrew-like tail fibers (187 × 10 nm and genome (221 Kb that cannot be detected by the usual procedures of microbiology. This new bacteriophage, called 0305φ8-36 (first number is month/year of isolation; remaining two numbers identify the host and bacteriophage, has a high dependence of plaque size on the concentration of a supporting agarose gel. Bacteriophage 0305φ8-36 does not propagate in the traditional gels used for bacteriophage plaque formation and also does not produce visible lysis of liquid cultures. Bacteriophage 0305φ8-36 aggregates and, during de novo isolation from the environment, is likely to be invisible to procedures of physical detection that use either filtration or centrifugal pelleting to remove bacteria. Bacteriophage 0305φ8-36 is in a new genomic class, based on genes for both structural components and DNA packaging ATPase. Thus, knowledge of environmental virus diversity is expanded with prospect of greater future expansion.

  10. Computational Determination of the Effects of Bacteriophage Bacteriophage Interactions in Human body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Marwa Mostafa; Nassef, Mohammad; Badr, Amr

    2017-10-19

    Chronic diseases are becoming more serious and widely spreading and this carries a heavy burden on doctors to deal with such patients. Although many of these diseases can be treated by bacteriophages, the situation is significantly dangerous in patients having concomitant more than one chronic disease, where conflicts between phages used in treating these diseases are very closer to happen. This research paper presents a method to detecting the Bacteriophage-Bacteriophage Interaction. This method is implemented based on Domain-Domain Interactions model and it was used to infer Domain-Domain Interactions between the bacteriophages injected in the human body at the same time. By testing the method over bacteriophages that are used to treat tuberculosis, salmonella and virulent E.coli, many interactions have been inferred and detected between these bacteriophages. Several effects were detected for the resulted interactions such as: playing a role in DNA repair such as non-homologous end joining, playing a role in DNA replication, playing a role in the interaction between the immune system and the tumor cells and playing a role in the stiff man syndrome. We revised all patents relating to bacteriophage bacteriophage interactions and phage therapy. The proposed method is developed to help doctors to realize the effect of simultaneously injecting different bacteriophages into the human body to treat different diseases. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Immunocompatibility of Bacteriophages as Nanomedicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tranum Kaur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophage-based medical research provides the opportunity to develop targeted nanomedicines with heightened efficiency and safety profiles. Filamentous phages also can and have been formulated as targeted drug-delivery nanomedicines, and phage may also serve as promising alternatives/complements to antibiotics. Over the past decade the use of phage for both the prophylaxis and the treatment of bacterial infection, has gained special significance in view of a dramatic rise in the prevalence of antibiotic resistance bacterial strains. Two potential medical applications of phages are the treatment of bacterial infections and their use as immunizing agents in diagnosis and monitoring patients with immunodeficiencies. Recently, phages have been employed as gene-delivery vectors (phage nanomedicine, for nearly half a century as tools in genetic research, for about two decades as tools for the discovery of specific target-binding proteins and peptides, and for almost a decade as tools for vaccine development. As phage applications to human therapeutic development grow at an exponential rate, it will become essential to evaluate host immune responses to initial and repetitive challenges by therapeutic phage in order to develop phage therapies that offer suitable utility. This paper examines and discusses phage nanomedicine applications and the immunomodulatory effects of bacteriophage exposure and treatment modalities.

  12. High diversity and potential origins of T4-type bacteriophages on the surface of Arctic glaciers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellas, Christopher M; Anesio, Alexandre M

    2013-09-01

    Tailed bacteriophages are the most abundant viruses in the biosphere. Here we examined the T4-type bacteriophage community inhabiting the surface of two glaciers in Svalbard. We used a molecular approach to target g23, the major capsid protein gene, to demonstrate that in the extreme cryoconite hole habitats the T4-type phages are surprisingly diverse. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that cryoconite hole sediments harbour a mixed phage community spanning multiple T4-type phage subgroups. The majority (71 %) of phage sequences clustered into three novel phylogenetically distinct groups, whilst the remainder clustered with known marine and soil derived phage sequences. The meltwater in cryoconite holes also contained a further distinct phage community which was related to previously detected marine phage variants. The ability of phages to move between marine and glacial habitats was tested in a transplantation experiment. Phages from the nearby marine fjord were found to be capable of initiating infection of supraglacial bacteria, suggesting suitable hosts could be found by non-native phages. Together this evidence suggests that the surface of glaciers contain both novel and cosmopolitan phages, some of which may have arrived in the cryosphere from other biomes.

  13. In vivo studies of genomic packaging in the dsRNA bacteriophage Φ8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindich Leonard

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Φ8 is a bacteriophage containing a genome of three segments of double-stranded RNA inside a polyhedral capsid enveloped in a lipid-containing membrane. Plus strand RNA binds and is packaged by empty procapsids. Whereas Φ6, another member of the Cystoviridae, shows high stringency, serial dependence and precision in its genomic packaging in vitro and in vivo, Φ8 packaging is more flexible. Unique sequences (pac near the 5' ends of plus strands are necessary and sufficient for Φ6 genomic packaging and the RNA binding sites are located on P1, the major structural protein of the procapsid. Results In this paper the boundaries of the Φ8 pac sequences have been explored by testing the in vivo packaging efficacy of transcripts containing deletions or changes in the RNA sequences. The pac sequences have been localized to the 5' untranslated regions of the viral transcripts. Major changes in the pac sequences are either tolerated or ameliorated by suppressor mutations in the RNA sequence. Changes in the genomic packaging program can be established as a result of mutations in P1, the major structural protein of the procapsid and the determinant of RNA binding specificity. Conclusion Although Φ8 is distantly related to bacteriophage Φ6, and does not show sequence similarity, it has a similar genomic packaging program. This program, however, is less stringent than that of Φ6.

  14. Identification of the major proteins of the virions of bacteriophage ZF40 Pectobacterium carotovorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korol, N A; Tovkach, F I

    2012-01-01

    The vast variety of bacteriophages and the uniqueness of their individual representatives dictate to perform the detailed study of the actual phage-cell interactions, the virion morphogenesis and morphopoiesis in particular. An analysis of the complete genome sequence of the temperate phage ZF40 Pectobacterium carotovorum has shown that it is a representative of a unique group of phages of the Myoviridae family [Comeau A. M, Tremblay D., Moineau S., Rattei T., Kushkina A. I, Tovkach F I., H.M. Krisch, H.W. Ackermann Phage Morphology Recapitulates Phylogeny: The Comparative Genomics of a New Group of Myoviruses // PLoS ONE.--July 2012. - 7. - N 7. - e40102]. Characteristic features of these viruses are a small length of the tail compared with the diameter of the capsid and a complicated pattern of the tail sheath, leading to its criss-cross striation. In the presented article the major proteins were identified by means of the SDS-PAGE method: the head proteins (mp2: 33.9 kDa), the sheath (mp1: 39.2 kDa) and the tail tube ones (mp3: 19.9 kDa). It was proved that the mp2 molecular weight is the same with the gp46, the putative major capsid protein derived from the results of the genome sequencing. Therefore, it is still not determined whether the gp46 (mp2) of the virulent mutant 421 of the phage ZF40 is exposed to post-translational modification in the course of the phage particle maturation during its development in the cells of the strain M2-4/50RI P. carotovorum. To study the morphogenetic development pathways it was proposed to use the phage variants that form an excess of individual components of the virion: capsids, procapsids and separate tails propagated on different hosts.

  15. Crystal structure of an antiviral ankyrin targeting the HIV-1 capsid and molecular modeling of the ankyrin-capsid complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praditwongwan, Warachai; Chuankhayan, Phimonphan; Saoin, Somphot; Wisitponchai, Tanchanok; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Nangola, Sawitree; Hong, Saw See; Minard, Philippe; Boulanger, Pierre; Chen, Chun-Jung; Tayapiwatana, Chatchai

    2014-08-01

    Ankyrins are cellular repeat proteins, which can be genetically modified to randomize amino-acid residues located at defined positions in each repeat unit, and thus create a potential binding surface adaptable to macromolecular ligands. From a phage-display library of artificial ankyrins, we have isolated AnkGAG1D4, a trimodular ankyrin which binds to the HIV-1 capsid protein N-terminal domain (NTDCA) and has an antiviral effect at the late steps of the virus life cycle. In this study, the determinants of the AnkGAG1D4-NTDCA interaction were analyzed using peptide scanning in competition ELISA, capsid mutagenesis, ankyrin crystallography and molecular modeling. We determined the AnkGAG1D4 structure at 2.2 Å resolution, and used the crystal structure in molecular docking with a homology model of HIV-1 capsid. Our results indicated that NTDCA alpha-helices H1 and H7 could mediate the formation of the capsid-AnkGAG1D4 binary complex, but the interaction involving H7 was predicted to be more stable than with H1. Arginine-18 (R18) in H1, and R132 and R143 in H7 were found to be the key players of the AnkGAG1D4-NTDCA interaction. This was confirmed by R-to-A mutagenesis of NTDCA, and by sequence analysis of trimodular ankyrins negative for capsid binding. In AnkGAG1D4, major interactors common to H1 and H7 were found to be S45, Y56, R89, K122 and K123. Collectively, our ankyrin-capsid binding analysis implied a significant degree of flexibility within the NTDCA domain of the HIV-1 capsid protein, and provided some clues for the design of new antivirals targeting the capsid protein and viral assembly.

  16. Bacteriophages as Potential Treatment for Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sybesma, Wilbert; Zbinden, Reinhard; Chanishvili, Nino; Kutateladze, Mzia; Chkhotua, Archil; Ujmajuridze, Aleksandre; Mehnert, Ulrich; Kessler, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most prevalent microbial diseases and their financial burden on society is substantial. The continuing increase of antibiotic resistance worldwide is alarming so that well-tolerated, highly effective therapeutic alternatives are urgently needed. To investigate the effect of bacteriophages on Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains isolated from the urine of patients suffering from UTIs. Forty-one E. coli and 9 K. pneumoniae strains, isolated from the urine of patients suffering from UTIs, were tested in vitro for their susceptibility toward bacteriophages. The bacteriophages originated from either commercially available bacteriophage cocktails registered in Georgia or from the bacteriophage collection of the George Eliava Institute of Bacteriophage, Microbiology and Virology. In vitro screening of bacterial strains was performed by use of the spot-test method. The experiments were implemented three times by different groups of scientists. The lytic activity of the commercial bacteriophage cocktails on the 41 E. coli strains varied between 66% (Pyo bacteriophage) and 93% (Enko bacteriophage). After bacteriophage adaptation of the Pyo bacteriophage cocktail, its lytic activity was increased from 66 to 93% and only one E. coli strain remained resistant. One bacteriophage of the Eliava collection could lyse all 9 K. pneumoniae strains. Based on the high lytic activity and the potential of resistance optimization by direct adaption of bacteriophages as reported in this study, and in view of the continuing increase of antibiotic resistance worldwide, bacteriophage therapy is a promising treatment option for UTIs highly warranting randomized controlled trials.

  17. Purification of phage display-modified bacteriophage T4 by affinity chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figura Grzegorz

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Affinity chromatography is one of the most efficient protein purification strategies. This technique comprises a one-step procedure with a purification level in the order of several thousand-fold, adaptable for various proteins, differentiated in their size, shape, charge, and other properties. The aim of this work was to verify the possibility of applying affinity chromatography in bacteriophage purification, with the perspective of therapeutic purposes. T4 is a large, icosahedral phage that may serve as an efficient display platform for foreign peptides or proteins. Here we propose a new method of T4 phage purification by affinity chromatography after its modification with affinity tags (GST and Histag by in vivo phage display. As any permanent introduction of extraneous DNA into a phage genome is strongly unfavourable for medical purposes, integration of foreign motifs with the phage genome was not applied. The phage was propagated in bacteria expressing fusions of the phage protein Hoc with affinity tags from bacterial plasmids, independently from the phage expression system. Results Elution profiles of phages modified with the specific affinity motifs (compared to non-specific phages document their binding to the affinity resins and effective elution with standard competitive agents. Non-specific binding was also observed, but was 102-105 times weaker than the specific one. GST-modified bacteriophages were also effectively released from glutathione Sepharose by proteolytic cleavage. The possibility of proteolytic release was designed at the stage of expression vector construction. Decrease in LPS content in phage preparations was dependent on the washing intensity; intensive washing resulted in preparations of 11-40 EU/ml. Conclusions Affinity tags can be successfully incorporated into the T4 phage capsid by the in vivo phage display technique and they strongly elevate bacteriophage affinity to a specific resin. Affinity

  18. Cyclophilin A interacts with diverse lentiviral capsids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerman Michael

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The capsid (CA protein of HIV-1 binds with high affinity to the host protein cyclophilin A (CypA. This binding positively affects some early stage of the viral life-cycle because prevention of binding either by drugs that occupy that active site of cyclophilin A, by mutation in HIV-1 CA, or RNAi that knocks down intracellular CypA level diminishes viral infectivity. The closely related lentivirus, SIVcpz also binds CypA, but it was thought that this interaction was limited to the HIV-1/SIVcpz lineage because other retroviruses failed to interact with CypA in a yeast two-hybrid assay. Results We find that diverse lentiviruses, FIV and SIVagmTAN also bind to CypA. Mutagenesis of FIV CA showed that an amino acid that is in a homologous position to the proline at amino acid 90 of HIV-1 CA is essential for FIV interactions with CypA. Conclusion These results demonstrate that CypA binding to lentiviruses is more widespread than previously thought and suggest that this interaction is evolutionarily important for lentiviral infection.

  19. Arthrobacter globiformis and its bacteriophage in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casida, L. E., Jr.; Liu, K.-C.

    1974-01-01

    An attempt was made to correlate bacteriophages for Arthrobacter globiformis with soils containing that bacterium. The phages were not detected unless the soil was nutritionally amended (with glucose or sucrose) and incubated for several days. Phage was continuously produced after amendment without the addition of host Arthrobacter. These results indicate that the bacteriophage is present in a masked state and that the bacteria are present in an insensitive form which becomes sensitive after addition of nutrient.

  20. Bacteriophages of Leuconostoc, Oenococcus, and Weissella

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kot, Witold; Neve, Horst; Heller, Knut J

    2014-01-01

    can be classified as either Ln. mesenteroides or Ln. pseudomesenteroides. They are important flavor producers in dairy fermentations and they initiate nearly all vegetable fermentations. Therefore, bacteriophages attacking Leuconostoc strains may negatively influence the production process....... Bacteriophages attacking Leuconostoc strains were first reported in 1946. Since then, the majority of described Leuconostoc phages was isolated from either dairy products or fermented vegetable products. Both lytic and temperate phages of Leuconostoc were reported. Most of Leuconostoc phages examined using...

  1. Characterization of P2P Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutzbach, Daniel; Rejaie, Reza

    The combination of large scale and geographically distributed nature of P2P system has led to their significant impact on the Internet. It is essential to characterize deployed P2P system for at least three reasons: (1) Accurately assessing their impact on the Internet, (2) identifying any performance bottleneck as well as any opportunity for performance improvement, (3) understanding user-driven dynamics in P2P systems. To characterize a P2P system, one needs to accurately capture snapshots of the resulting P2P overlay. This is challenging because the overlay is often large and dynamic. While the overlay is discovered by a crawler, it is changing which leads to a distorted view of the system. Capturing unbiased view of the traffic in the overlay is equally challenging because it is difficult to show that the captured behavior represent the observed behavior by all peers. In this chapter, we describe some of the fundamental problems in empirical characterization of widely deployed P2P systems. We present several examples to illustrate the effect of ad-hoc measurement/data collection on the resulting analysis/characterization. We then present two sampling techniques as a powerful approach to capture unbiased view of peer properties in a scalable fashion.

  2. Bacteriophage Applications for Food Production and Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moye, Zachary D; Woolston, Joelle; Sulakvelidze, Alexander

    2018-04-19

    Foodborne illnesses remain a major cause of hospitalization and death worldwide despite many advances in food sanitation techniques and pathogen surveillance. Traditional antimicrobial methods, such as pasteurization, high pressure processing, irradiation, and chemical disinfectants are capable of reducing microbial populations in foods to varying degrees, but they also have considerable drawbacks, such as a large initial investment, potential damage to processing equipment due to their corrosive nature, and a deleterious impact on organoleptic qualities (and possibly the nutritional value) of foods. Perhaps most importantly, these decontamination strategies kill indiscriminately, including many—often beneficial—bacteria that are naturally present in foods. One promising technique that addresses several of these shortcomings is bacteriophage biocontrol, a green and natural method that uses lytic bacteriophages isolated from the environment to specifically target pathogenic bacteria and eliminate them from (or significantly reduce their levels in) foods. Since the initial conception of using bacteriophages on foods, a substantial number of research reports have described the use of bacteriophage biocontrol to target a variety of bacterial pathogens in various foods, ranging from ready-to-eat deli meats to fresh fruits and vegetables, and the number of commercially available products containing bacteriophages approved for use in food safety applications has also been steadily increasing. Though some challenges remain, bacteriophage biocontrol is increasingly recognized as an attractive modality in our arsenal of tools for safely and naturally eliminating pathogenic bacteria from foods.

  3. Bacteriophage endolysins as novel antimicrobials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelcher, Mathias; Donovan, David M; Loessner, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    Endolysins are enzymes used by bacteriophages at the end of their replication cycle to degrade the peptidoglycan of the bacterial host from within, resulting in cell lysis and release of progeny virions. Due to the absence of an outer membrane in the Gram-positive bacterial cell wall, endolysins can access the peptidoglycan and destroy these organisms when applied externally, making them interesting antimicrobial candidates, particularly in light of increasing bacterial drug resistance. This article reviews the modular structure of these enzymes, in which cell wall binding and catalytic functions are separated, as well as their mechanism of action, lytic activity and potential as antimicrobials. It particularly focuses on molecular engineering as a means of optimizing endolysins for specific applications, highlights new developments that may render these proteins active against Gram-negative and intracellular pathogens and summarizes the most recent applications of endolysins in the fields of medicine, food safety, agriculture and biotechnology. PMID:23030422

  4. The host-binding domain of the P2 phage tail spike reveals a trimeric iron-binding structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Eiki; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Takahashi, Junichi; Tsunoda, Kin-ichi; Yamada, Seiko; Takeda, Shigeki

    2011-01-01

    The C-terminal domain of a bacteriophage P2 tail-spike protein, gpV, was crystallized and its structure was solved at 1.27 Å resolution. The refined model showed a triple β-helix structure and the presence of iron, calcium and chloride ions. The adsorption and infection of bacteriophage P2 is mediated by tail fibres and tail spikes. The tail spikes on the tail baseplate are used to irreversibly adsorb to the host cells. Recently, a P2 phage tail-spike protein, gpV, was purified and it was shown that a C-terminal domain, Ser87–Leu211, is sufficient for the binding of gpV to host Escherichia coli membranes [Kageyama et al. (2009 ▶), Biochemistry, 48, 10129–10135]. In this paper, the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of P2 gpV is reported. The structure is a triangular pyramid and looks like a spearhead composed of an intertwined β-sheet, a triple β-helix and a metal-binding region containing iron, calcium and chloride ions

  5. Thermoelastic properties of Zn3P2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerward, Leif; Olsen, J. Staun; Waśkowska, A.

    2011-01-01

    The bulk modulus and thermal expansion of Zn3P2 has been investigated at pressures up to 21GPa and temperatures down to 100K. The experimental zero-pressure bulk modulus is 80.7 ± 1.8GPa, in accordance with the bulk modulus scaling and lattice properties of the related compound Cd3P2. A tetragonal...... to orthorhombic phase transformation occurs above 11GPa with a relative volume change of-7.1%. Values for the thermal expansion coefficient are reported at 293, 200 and 100K....

  6. A study of variability of capsid protein genes of Radish mosaic virus

    OpenAIRE

    HOLÁ, Marcela

    2008-01-01

    The part of RNA2 genome segment of several isolates of Radish mosaic virus (RaMV) including capsid protein genes was sequenced. Variability of capsid protein genes among the isolates of Radish mosaic virus was studied.

  7. Biophysical characterization of the feline immunodeficiency virus p24 capsid protein conformation and in vitro capsid assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Serrière

    Full Text Available The Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV capsid protein p24 oligomerizes to form a closed capsid that protects the viral genome. Because of its crucial role in the virion, FIV p24 is an interesting target for the development of therapeutic strategies, although little is known about its structure and assembly. We defined and optimized a protocol to overexpress recombinant FIV capsid protein in a bacterial system. Circular dichroism and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments showed that the structure of the purified FIV p24 protein was comprised mainly of α-helices. Dynamic light scattering (DLS and cross-linking experiments demonstrated that p24 was monomeric at low concentration and dimeric at high concentration. We developed a protocol for the in vitro assembly of the FIV capsid. As with HIV, an increased ionic strength resulted in FIV p24 assembly in vitro. Assembly appeared to be dependent on temperature, salt concentration, and protein concentration. The FIV p24 assembly kinetics was monitored by DLS. A limit end-point diameter suggested assembly into objects of definite shapes. This was confirmed by electron microscopy, where FIV p24 assembled into spherical particles. Comparison of FIV p24 with other retroviral capsid proteins showed that FIV assembly is particular and requires further specific study.

  8. RNA-binding region of Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus capsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Zee Hong; Mohd, Nur Azmina Syakirin; Tan, Soon Guan; Bhassu, Subha; Tan, Wen Siang

    2014-09-01

    White tail disease (WTD) kills prawn larvae and causes drastic losses to the freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) industry. The main causative agent of WTD is Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV). The N-terminal end of the MrNV capsid protein is very rich in positively charged amino acids and is postulated to interact with RNA molecules. N-terminal and internal deletion mutagenesis revealed that the RNA-binding region is located at positions 20-29, where 80 % of amino acids are positively charged. Substitution of all these positively charged residues with alanine abolished the RNA binding. Mutants without the RNA-binding region still assembled into virus-like particles, suggesting that this region is not a part of the capsid assembly domain. This paper is, to the best of our knowledge, the first to report the specific RNA-binding region of MrNV capsid protein. © 2014 The Authors.

  9. Modelling the self-assembly of virus capsids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Iain G.; Louis, Ard A.; Doye, Jonathan P. K.

    2010-03-01

    We use computer simulations to study a model, first proposed by Wales (2005 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A 363 357), for the reversible and monodisperse self-assembly of simple icosahedral virus capsid structures. The success and efficiency of assembly as a function of thermodynamic and geometric factors can be qualitatively related to the potential energy landscape structure of the assembling system. Even though the model is strongly coarse-grained, it exhibits a number of features also observed in experiments, such as sigmoidal assembly dynamics, hysteresis in capsid formation and numerous kinetic traps. We also investigate the effect of macromolecular crowding on the assembly dynamics. Crowding agents generally reduce capsid yields at optimal conditions for non-crowded assembly, but may increase yields for parameter regimes away from the optimum. Finally, we generalize the model to a larger triangulation number T = 3, and observe assembly dynamics more complex than that seen for the original T = 1 model.

  10. The Mammalian Cell Cycle Regulates Parvovirus Nuclear Capsid Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riolobos, Laura; Domínguez, Carlos; Kann, Michael; Almendral, José M.

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown whether the mammalian cell cycle could impact the assembly of viruses maturing in the nucleus. We addressed this question using MVM, a reference member of the icosahedral ssDNA nuclear parvoviruses, which requires cell proliferation to infect by mechanisms partly understood. Constitutively expressed MVM capsid subunits (VPs) accumulated in the cytoplasm of mouse and human fibroblasts synchronized at G0, G1, and G1/S transition. Upon arrest release, VPs translocated to the nucleus as cells entered S phase, at efficiencies relying on cell origin and arrest method, and immediately assembled into capsids. In synchronously infected cells, the consecutive virus life cycle steps (gene expression, proteins nuclear translocation, capsid assembly, genome replication and encapsidation) proceeded tightly coupled to cell cycle progression from G0/G1 through S into G2 phase. However, a DNA synthesis stress caused by thymidine irreversibly disrupted virus life cycle, as VPs became increasingly retained in the cytoplasm hours post-stress, forming empty capsids in mouse fibroblasts, thereby impairing encapsidation of the nuclear viral DNA replicative intermediates. Synchronously infected cells subjected to density-arrest signals while traversing early S phase also blocked VPs transport, resulting in a similar misplaced cytoplasmic capsid assembly in mouse fibroblasts. In contrast, thymidine and density arrest signals deregulating virus assembly neither perturbed nuclear translocation of the NS1 protein nor viral genome replication occurring under S/G2 cycle arrest. An underlying mechanism of cell cycle control was identified in the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated VPs trimeric assembly intermediates, which accessed a non-conserved route distinct from the importin α2/β1 and transportin pathways. The exquisite cell cycle-dependence of parvovirus nuclear capsid assembly conforms a novel paradigm of time and functional coupling between cellular and virus life

  11. The Mammalian Cell Cycle Regulates Parvovirus Nuclear Capsid Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Ranedo, Jon; Hernando, Eva; Riolobos, Laura; Domínguez, Carlos; Kann, Michael; Almendral, José M

    2015-06-01

    It is unknown whether the mammalian cell cycle could impact the assembly of viruses maturing in the nucleus. We addressed this question using MVM, a reference member of the icosahedral ssDNA nuclear parvoviruses, which requires cell proliferation to infect by mechanisms partly understood. Constitutively expressed MVM capsid subunits (VPs) accumulated in the cytoplasm of mouse and human fibroblasts synchronized at G0, G1, and G1/S transition. Upon arrest release, VPs translocated to the nucleus as cells entered S phase, at efficiencies relying on cell origin and arrest method, and immediately assembled into capsids. In synchronously infected cells, the consecutive virus life cycle steps (gene expression, proteins nuclear translocation, capsid assembly, genome replication and encapsidation) proceeded tightly coupled to cell cycle progression from G0/G1 through S into G2 phase. However, a DNA synthesis stress caused by thymidine irreversibly disrupted virus life cycle, as VPs became increasingly retained in the cytoplasm hours post-stress, forming empty capsids in mouse fibroblasts, thereby impairing encapsidation of the nuclear viral DNA replicative intermediates. Synchronously infected cells subjected to density-arrest signals while traversing early S phase also blocked VPs transport, resulting in a similar misplaced cytoplasmic capsid assembly in mouse fibroblasts. In contrast, thymidine and density arrest signals deregulating virus assembly neither perturbed nuclear translocation of the NS1 protein nor viral genome replication occurring under S/G2 cycle arrest. An underlying mechanism of cell cycle control was identified in the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated VPs trimeric assembly intermediates, which accessed a non-conserved route distinct from the importin α2/β1 and transportin pathways. The exquisite cell cycle-dependence of parvovirus nuclear capsid assembly conforms a novel paradigm of time and functional coupling between cellular and virus life

  12. 21 CFR 866.2050 - Staphylococcal typing bacteriophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staphylococcal typing bacteriophage. 866.2050 Section 866.2050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Staphylococcal typing bacteriophage. (a) Identification. A staphylococcal typing bacteriophage is a device...

  13. P2X Receptors and Synaptic Plasticity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pankratov, Y.; Lalo, U.; Krishtal, A.; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 158, č. 1 (2009), s. 137-148 ISSN 0306-4522 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : ATP * P2X receptors * synaptic plasticity Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.292, year: 2009

  14. P2X receptory v bolesti

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jindřichová, Marie; Zemková, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 2 (2014), s. 74-77 ISSN 1210-6313 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP304/12/P371 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : extracellular ATP * purinergic P2X receptors * neuropathic pain Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  15. All-atom molecular dynamics calculation study of entire poliovirus empty capsids in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andoh, Y.; Yoshii, N.; Yamada, A.; Kojima, H.; Mizutani, K.; Okazaki, S., E-mail: okazaki@apchem.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Fujimoto, K. [Department of Pharmacy, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ritsumeikan University, Nojihigashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Nakagawa, A. [Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nomoto, A. [Institute of Microbial Chemistry, Kamiosaki, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-0021 (Japan)

    2014-10-28

    Small viruses that belong, for example, to the Picornaviridae, such as poliovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus, consist simply of capsid proteins and a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) genome. The capsids are quite stable in solution to protect the genome from the environment. Here, based on long-time and large-scale 6.5 × 10{sup 6} all-atom molecular dynamics calculations for the Mahoney strain of poliovirus, we show microscopic properties of the viral capsids at a molecular level. First, we found equilibrium rapid exchange of water molecules across the capsid. The exchange rate is so high that all water molecules inside the capsid (about 200 000) can leave the capsid and be replaced by water molecules from the outside in about 25 μs. This explains the capsid's tolerance to high pressures and deactivation by exsiccation. In contrast, the capsid did not exchange ions, at least within the present simulation time of 200 ns. This implies that the capsid can function, in principle, as a semipermeable membrane. We also found that, similar to the xylem of trees, the pressure of the solution inside the capsid without the genome was negative. This is caused by coulombic interaction of the solution inside the capsid with the capsid excess charges. The negative pressure may be compensated by positive osmotic pressure by the solution-soluble ssRNA and the counter ions introduced into it.

  16. First Isolation and Molecular Characterization of Bacteriophages Infecting Acidovorax citrulli, the Causal Agent of Bacterial Fruit Blotch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aryan Rahimi-Midani

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages of Acidovorax citrulli, the causal agent of bacterial fruit blotch, were isolated from 39 watermelon, pumpkin, and cucumber leaf samples collected from various regions of Korea and tested against 18 A. citrulli strains. Among the six phages isolated, ACP17 forms the largest plaque, and exhibits the morphology of phages in the Myoviridae family with a head diameter of 100 ± 5 nm and tail length of 150 ± 5 nm. ACP17 has eclipse and latent periods of 25 ± 5 min and 50 ± 5 min, respectively, and a burst size of 120. The genome of ACP17 is 156,281 base pairs with a G + C content of 58.7%, 263 open reading frames, and 4 transfer RNA genes. Blast search and phylogenetic analysis of the major capsid protein showed that ACP17 has limited homology to two Stentrophomonas phages, suggesting that ACP17 is a new type of Myoviridae isolated from A. citrulli.

  17. Single-molecule packaging initiation in real time by a viral DNA packaging machine from bacteriophage T4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafabakhsh, Reza; Kondabagil, Kiran; Earnest, Tyler; Lee, Kyung Suk; Zhang, Zhihong; Dai, Li; Dahmen, Karin A; Rao, Venigalla B; Ha, Taekjip

    2014-10-21

    Viral DNA packaging motors are among the most powerful molecular motors known. A variety of structural, biochemical, and single-molecule biophysical approaches have been used to understand their mechanochemistry. However, packaging initiation has been difficult to analyze because of its transient and highly dynamic nature. Here, we developed a single-molecule fluorescence assay that allowed visualization of packaging initiation and reinitiation in real time and quantification of motor assembly and initiation kinetics. We observed that a single bacteriophage T4 packaging machine can package multiple DNA molecules in bursts of activity separated by long pauses, suggesting that it switches between active and quiescent states. Multiple initiation pathways were discovered including, unexpectedly, direct DNA binding to the capsid portal followed by recruitment of motor subunits. Rapid succession of ATP hydrolysis was essential for efficient initiation. These observations have implications for the evolution of icosahedral viruses and regulation of virus assembly.

  18. Photodynamic inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Liliana; Faustino, Maria Amparo F; Neves, Maria Graça P M S; Cunha, Angela; Almeida, Adelaide

    2012-07-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i) summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii) discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process.

  19. Photodynamic Inactivation of Mammalian Viruses and Bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Liliana; Faustino, Maria Amparo F.; Neves, Maria Graça P. M. S.; Cunha, Ângela; Almeida, Adelaide

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i) summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii) discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process. PMID:22852040

  20. Photodynamic Inactivation of Mammalian Viruses and Bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Costa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic inactivation (PDI has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process.

  1. Molecular characterization of capsid protein gene of potato virus X ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular characterization of capsid protein gene of potato virus X from Pakistan. Arshad Jamal, Idrees Ahmad Nasir, Bushra Tabassum, Muhammad Tariq, Abdul Munim Farooq, Zahida Qamar, Mohsin Ahmad Khan, Nadeem Ahmad, Muhammad Shafiq, Muhammad Saleem Haider, M. Arshad Javed, Tayyab Husnain ...

  2. Giant capsids from lattice self-assembly of cyclodextrin complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Shenyu; Yan, Yun; Huang, Jianbin; Petukhov, Andrei V.; Kroon - Batenburg, Loes M. J.; Drechsler, Markus; Zhou, Chengcheng; Tu, Mei; Granick, Steve; Jiang, Lingxiang

    2017-01-01

    Proteins can readily assemble into rigid, crystalline and functional structures such as viral capsids and bacterial compartments. Despite ongoing advances, it is still a fundamental challenge to design and synthesize protein-mimetic molecules to form crystalline structures. Here we report the

  3. Human rhinovirus capsid dynamics is controlled by canyon flexibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reisdorph, Nichole; Thomas, John J.; Katpally, Umesh; Chase, Elaine; Harris, Ken; Siuzdak, Gary; Smith, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    Quantitative enzyme accessibility experiments using nano liquid chromatography electrospray mass spectrometry combined with limited proteolysis and isotope-labeling was used to examine the dynamic nature of the human rhinovirus (HRV) capsid in the presence of three antiviral compounds, a neutralizing Fab, and drug binding cavity mutations. Using these methods, it was found that the antivirals WIN 52084 and picovir (pleconaril) stabilized the capsid, while dansylaziridine caused destabilization. Site-directed mutations in the drug-binding cavity were found to stabilize the HRV14 capsid against proteolytic digestion in a manner similar to WIN 52084 and pleconaril. Antibodies that bind to the NIm-IA antigenic site and penetrate the canyon were also observed to protect the virion against proteolytic cleavage. These results demonstrate that quantifying the effects of antiviral ligands on protein 'breathing' can be used to compare their mode of action and efficacy. In this case, it is apparent that hydrophobic antiviral agents, antibodies, or mutations in the canyon region block viral breathing. Therefore, these studies demonstrate that mobility in the canyon region is a major determinant in capsid breathing

  4. Isolation of lytic bacteriophage against Vibrio harveyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crothers-Stomps, C; Høj, L; Bourne, D G; Hall, M R; Owens, L

    2010-05-01

    The isolation of lytic bacteriophage of Vibrio harveyi with potential for phage therapy of bacterial pathogens of phyllosoma larvae from the tropical rock lobster Panulirus ornatus. Water samples from discharge channels and grow-out ponds of a prawn farm in northeastern Australia were enriched for 24 h in a broth containing four V. harveyi strains. The bacteriophage-enriched filtrates were spotted onto bacterial lawns demonstrating that the bacteriophage host range for the samples included strains of V. harveyi, Vibrio campbellii, Vibrio rotiferianus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio proteolyticus. Bacteriophage were isolated from eight enriched samples through triple plaque purification. The host range of purified phage included V. harveyi, V. campbellii, V. rotiferianus and V. parahaemolyticus. Transmission electron microscope examination revealed that six purified phage belonged to the family Siphoviridae, whilst two belonged to the family Myoviridae. The Myoviridae appeared to induce bacteriocin production in a limited number of host bacterial strains, suggesting that they were lysogenic rather than lytic. A purified Siphoviridae phage could delay the entry of a broth culture of V. harveyi strain 12 into exponential growth, but could not prevent the overall growth of the bacterial strain. Bacteriophage with lytic activity against V. harveyi were isolated from prawn farm samples. Purified phage of the family Siphoviridae had a clear lytic ability and no apparent transducing properties, indicating they are appropriate for phage therapy. Phage resistance is potentially a major constraint to the use of phage therapy in aquaculture as bacteria are not completely eliminated. Phage therapy is emerging as a potential antibacterial agent that can be used to control pathogenic bacteria in aquaculture systems. The development of phage therapy for aquaculture requires initial isolation and determination of the bacteriophage host range, with subsequent creation of

  5. PPADS and suramin as antagonists at cloned P2Y- and P2U-purinoceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, S J; Brown, C A; Weisman, G A; Turner, J T; Erb, L; Boarder, M R

    1996-06-01

    1. The effect of suramin and pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulphonic acid (PPADS) on the stimulation of phospholipase C in 1321N1 cells transfected with the human P2U-purinoceptor (h-P2U-1321N1 cells) or with the turkey P2Y-purinoceptor (t-P2Y-1321N1 cells) was investigated. 2-Methylthioadenosine triphosphate (2MeSATP) was used as the agonist at t-P2Y-1321N1 cells and uridine triphosphate (UTP) at h-P2U-1321N1 cells. 2. Suramin caused a parallel shift to the right of the concentration-response curves for 2MeSATP in the t-P2Y-1321N1 cells, yielding a Schild plot with a slope of 1.16 +/- 0.08 and a pA2 value of 5.77 +/- 0.11. 3. Suramin also caused a shift to the right of concentration-response curves for UTP in the h-P2U-1321N1 cells, and on Schild plots gave a slope different from unity (1.57 +/- 0.19) and an apparent pA2 value of 4.32 +/- 0.13. Suramin was therefore a less potent antagonist at the P2U-purinoceptor than the P2Y-purinoceptor. 4. In the presence of the ectonucleotidase inhibitor, ARL 67156 (6-N,N-diethyl-beta,gamma-dibromomethylene-D-ATP) there was no significant difference in the EC50 or shapes of curves with either cell type, and no difference in pA2 values for suramin. 5. PPADS caused an increase in the EC50 for 2MeSATP in the t-P2Y-1321N1 cells. The Schild plot had a slope different from unity (0.55 +/- 0.15) and an X-intercept corresponding to an apparent pA2 of 5.98 +/- 0.65. 6. PPADS up to 30 microM had no effect on the concentration-response curve for UTP with the h-P2U-1321N1 cells. 7. In conclusion, suramin and PPADS show clear differences in their action at the 2 receptor types, in each case being substantially more effective as an antagonist at the P2Y-purinoceptor than at the P2U-purinoceptor. Ectonucleotidase breakdown had little influence on the nature of the responses at the two receptor types, or in their differential sensitivity to suramin.

  6. Medicinal chemistry of adenosine, P2Y and P2X receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Kenneth A; Müller, Christa E

    2016-05-01

    Pharmacological tool compounds are now available to define action at the adenosine (ARs), P2Y and P2X receptors. We present a selection of the most commonly used agents to study purines in the nervous system. Some of these compounds, including A1 and A3 AR agonists, P2Y1R and P2Y12R antagonists, and P2X3, P2X4 and P2X7 antagonists, are potentially of clinical use in treatment of disorders of the nervous system, such as chronic pain, neurodegeneration and brain injury. Agonists of the A2AAR and P2Y2R are already used clinically, P2Y12R antagonists are widely used antithrombotics and an antagonist of the A2AAR is approved in Japan for treating Parkinson's disease. The selectivity defined for some of the previously introduced compounds has been revised with updated pharmacological characterization, for example, various AR agonists and antagonists were deemed A1AR or A3AR selective based on human data, but species differences indicated a reduction in selectivity ratios in other species. Also, many of the P2R ligands still lack bioavailability due to charged groups or hydrolytic (either enzymatic or chemical) instability. X-ray crystallographic structures of AR and P2YRs have shifted the mode of ligand discovery to structure-based approaches rather than previous empirical approaches. The X-ray structures can be utilized either for in silico screening of chemically diverse libraries for the discovery of novel ligands or for enhancement of the properties of known ligands by chemical modification. Although X-ray structures of the zebrafish P2X4R have been reported, there is scant structural information about ligand recognition in these trimeric ion channels. In summary, there are definitive, selective agonists and antagonists for all of the ARs and some of the P2YRs; while the pharmacochemistry of P2XRs is still in nascent stages. The therapeutic potential of selectively modulating these receptors is continuing to gain interest in such fields as cancer, inflammation, pain

  7. Bacteriophages in the control of pathogenic vibrios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plaza, Nicolás; Castillo Bermúdez, Daniel Elías; Perez-Reytor, Diliana

    2018-01-01

    constitute a continuing threat for aquaculture. Moreover, the continuous use of antibiotics has been accompanied by an emergence of antibiotic resistance in Vibrio species, implying a necessity for efficient treatments. One promising alternative that emerges is the use of lytic bacteriophages; however......, there are some drawbacks that should be overcome to make phage therapy a widely accepted method. In this work, we discuss about the major pathogenic Vibrio species and the progress, benefits and disadvantages that have been detected during the experimental use of bacteriophages to their control....

  8. Periodic table of virus capsids: implications for natural selection and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannige, Ranjan V; Brooks, Charles L

    2010-03-04

    For survival, most natural viruses depend upon the existence of spherical capsids: protective shells of various sizes composed of protein subunits. So far, general evolutionary pressures shaping capsid design have remained elusive, even though an understanding of such properties may help in rationally impeding the virus life cycle and designing efficient nano-assemblies. This report uncovers an unprecedented and species-independent evolutionary pressure on virus capsids, based on the the notion that the simplest capsid designs (or those capsids with the lowest "hexamer complexity", C(h)) are the fittest, which was shown to be true for all available virus capsids. The theories result in a physically meaningful periodic table of virus capsids that uncovers strong and overarching evolutionary pressures, while also offering geometric explanations to other capsid properties (rigidity, pleomorphy, auxiliary requirements, etc.) that were previously considered to be unrelatable properties of the individual virus. Apart from describing a universal rule for virus capsid evolution, our work (especially the periodic table) provides a language with which highly diverse virus capsids, unified only by geometry, may be described and related to each other. Finally, the available virus structure databases and other published data reiterate the predicted geometry-derived rules, reinforcing the role of geometry in the natural selection and design of virus capsids.

  9. Bacteriophages as Potential Treatment for Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sybesma, Wilbert; Zbinden, Reinhard; Chanishvili, Nino; Kutateladze, Mzia; Chkhotua, Archil; Ujmajuridze, Aleksandre; Mehnert, Ulrich; Kessler, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most prevalent microbial diseases and their financial burden on society is substantial. The continuing increase of antibiotic resistance worldwide is alarming so that well-tolerated, highly effective therapeutic alternatives are urgently needed. Objective: To investigate the effect of bacteriophages on Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains isolated from the urine of patients suffering from UTIs. Material and methods: Forty-one E. coli and 9 K. pneumoniae strains, isolated from the urine of patients suffering from UTIs, were tested in vitro for their susceptibility toward bacteriophages. The bacteriophages originated from either commercially available bacteriophage cocktails registered in Georgia or from the bacteriophage collection of the George Eliava Institute of Bacteriophage, Microbiology and Virology. In vitro screening of bacterial strains was performed by use of the spot-test method. The experiments were implemented three times by different groups of scientists. Results: The lytic activity of the commercial bacteriophage cocktails on the 41 E. coli strains varied between 66% (Pyo bacteriophage) and 93% (Enko bacteriophage). After bacteriophage adaptation of the Pyo bacteriophage cocktail, its lytic activity was increased from 66 to 93% and only one E. coli strain remained resistant. One bacteriophage of the Eliava collection could lyse all 9 K. pneumoniae strains. Conclusions: Based on the high lytic activity and the potential of resistance optimization by direct adaption of bacteriophages as reported in this study, and in view of the continuing increase of antibiotic resistance worldwide, bacteriophage therapy is a promising treatment option for UTIs highly warranting randomized controlled trials. PMID:27148173

  10. Physical properties of the HIV-1 capsid from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perilla, Juan R.; Schulten, Klaus

    2017-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is highly dependent on its capsid. The capsid is a large container, made of ~1,300 proteins with altogether 4 million atoms. Although the capsid proteins are all identical, they nevertheless arrange themselves into a largely asymmetric structure made of hexamers and pentamers. The large number of degrees of freedom and lack of symmetry pose a challenge to studying the chemical details of the HIV capsid. Simulations of over 64 million atoms for over 1 μs allow us to conduct a comprehensive study of the chemical-physical properties of an empty HIV-1 capsid, including its electrostatics, vibrational and acoustic properties, and the effects of solvent (ions and water) on the capsid. The simulations reveal critical details about the capsid with implications to biological function.

  11. Structure, Adsorption to Host, and Infection Mechanism of Virulent Lactococcal Phage p2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebeacua, Cecilia; Tremblay, Denise; Farenc, Carine; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre; Sadovskaya, Irina; van Heel, Marin; Veesler, David

    2013-01-01

    Lactococcal siphophages from the 936 and P335 groups infect the Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis using receptor binding proteins (RBPs) attached to their baseplate, a large multiprotein complex at the distal part of the tail. We have previously reported the crystal and electron microscopy (EM) structures of the baseplates of phages p2 (936 group) and TP901-1 (P335 group) as well as the full EM structure of the TP901-1 virion. Here, we report the complete EM structure of siphophage p2, including its capsid, connector complex, tail, and baseplate. Furthermore, we show that the p2 tail is characterized by the presence of protruding decorations, which are related to adhesins and are likely contributed by the major tail protein C-terminal domains. This feature is reminiscent of the tail of Escherichia coli phage λ and Bacillus subtilis phage SPP1 and might point to a common mechanism for establishing initial interactions with their bacterial hosts. Comparative analyses showed that the architecture of the phage p2 baseplate differs largely from that of lactococcal phage TP901-1. We quantified the interaction of its RBP with the saccharidic receptor and determined that specificity is due to lower koff values of the RBP/saccharidic dissociation. Taken together, these results suggest that the infection of L. lactis strains by phage p2 is a multistep process that involves reversible attachment, followed by baseplate activation, specific attachment of the RBPs to the saccharidic receptor, and DNA ejection. PMID:24027307

  12. Python passive network mapping P2NMAP

    CERN Document Server

    Hosmer, Chet

    2015-01-01

    Python Passive Network Mapping: P2NMAP is the first book to reveal a revolutionary and open source method for exposing nefarious network activity. The ""Heartbleed"" vulnerability has revealed significant weaknesses within enterprise environments related to the lack of a definitive mapping of network assets. In Python Passive Network Mapping, Chet Hosmer shows you how to effectively and definitively passively map networks. Active or probing methods to network mapping have traditionally been used, but they have many drawbacks - they can disrupt operations, crash systems, and - most important

  13. Microglia P2Y13 Receptors Prevent Astrocyte Proliferation Mediated by P2Y1 Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Quintas

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral inflammation is a common feature of several neurodegenerative diseases that requires a fine interplay between astrocytes and microglia to acquire appropriate phenotypes for an efficient response to neuronal damage. During brain inflammation, ATP is massively released into the extracellular medium and converted into ADP. Both nucleotides acting on P2 receptors, modulate astrogliosis through mechanisms involving microglia-astrocytes communication. In previous studies, primary cultures of astrocytes and co-cultures of astrocytes and microglia were used to investigate the influence of microglia on astroglial proliferation induced by ADPβS, a stable ADP analog. In astrocyte cultures, ADPβS increased cell proliferation through activation of P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors, an effect abolished in co-cultures (of astrocytes with ∼12.5% microglia. The possibility that the loss of the ADPβS-mediated effect could have been caused by a microglia-induced degradation of ADPβS or by a preferential microglial localization of P2Y1 or P2Y12 receptors was excluded. Since ADPβS also activates P2Y13 receptors, the contribution of microglial P2Y13 receptors to prevent the proliferative effect of ADPβS in co-cultures was investigated. The results obtained indicate that P2Y13 receptors are low expressed in astrocytes and mainly expressed in microglia. Furthermore, in co-cultures, ADPβS induced astroglial proliferation in the presence of the selective P2Y13 antagonist MRS 2211 (3 μM and of the selective P2Y12 antagonist AR-C66096 (0.1 μM, suggesting that activation of microglial P2Y12 and P2Y13 receptors may induce the release of messengers that inhibit astroglial proliferation mediated by P2Y1,12 receptors. In this microglia-astrocyte paracrine communication, P2Y12 receptors exert opposite effects in astroglial proliferation as a result of its cellular localization: cooperating in astrocytes with P2Y1 receptors to directly stimulate proliferation and in

  14. Toward modern inhalational bacteriophage therapy: nebulization of bacteriophages of Burkholderia cepacia complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golshahi, Laleh; Seed, Kimberley D; Dennis, Jonathan J; Finlay, Warren H

    2008-12-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections have renewed interest in finding substitute methods of treatment. The purpose of the present in vitro study was to investigate the possibility of respiratory delivery of a Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) bacteriophage by nebulized aerosol administration. Bacteriophages in isotonic saline were aerosolized with Pari LC star and eFlow nebulizers, at titers with mean value (standard deviation) of 2.15 x 10(8) (1.63 x 10(8)) plaque-forming unit (PFU)/mL in 2.5-mL nebulizer fills. The breathing pattern of an adult was simulated using a pulmonary waveform generator. During breath simulation, the size distributions of the nebulized aerosol were measured using phase doppler anemometry (PDA). Efficiency of nebulizer delivery was subsequently determined by collection of aerosol on low resistance filters and measurement of bacteriophage titers. These filter titers were used as input data to a mathematical lung deposition model to predict regional deposition of bacteriophages in the lung and initial bacteriophage titers in the liquid surface layer of each conducting airway generation. The results suggest that BCC bacteriophages can be nebulized successfully within a reasonable delivery time and predicted titers in the lung indicate that this method may hold potential for treatment of bacterial lung infections common among cystic fibrosis patients.

  15. Using cryoEM Reconstruction and Phase Extension to Determine Crystal Structure of Bacteriophage .fi.6 Major Capsid Protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němeček, D.; Plevka, P.; Bouřa, Evžen

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 8 (2013), s. 635-640 ISSN 1572-3887 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 333916 - STARPI4K Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : molecular replacement * cryo-electron microscopy * non-crystallographic symmetry Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.039, year: 2013

  16. The Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec type V from Staphylococcus aureus ST398 is packaged into bacteriophage capsids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chlebowicz, Monika A.; Mašlaňová, Ivana; Kuntová, Lucie; Grundmann, Hajo; Pantůček, Roman; Doškař, Jiří; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Buist, Girbe

    The Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec (SCCmec) confers methicillin resistance to Staphylococcus aureus. While SCCmec is generally regarded as a mobile genetic element, the precise mechanisms by which large SCCmec elements are exchanged between staphylococci have remained enigmatic. In the

  17. Bacteriophage GC1, a Novel Tectivirus Infecting Gluconobacter Cerinus, an Acetic Acid Bacterium Associated with Wine-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Cécile; Krupovic, Mart; Jaomanjaka, Fety; Claisse, Olivier; Petrel, Melina; le Marrec, Claire

    2018-01-16

    The Gluconobacter phage GC1 is a novel member of the Tectiviridae family isolated from a juice sample collected during dry white wine making. The bacteriophage infects Gluconobacter cerinus , an acetic acid bacterium which represents a spoilage microorganism during wine making, mainly because it is able to produce ethyl alcohol and transform it into acetic acid. Transmission electron microscopy revealed tail-less icosahedral particles with a diameter of ~78 nm. The linear double-stranded DNA genome of GC1 (16,523 base pairs) contains terminal inverted repeats and carries 36 open reading frames, only a handful of which could be functionally annotated. These encode for the key proteins involved in DNA replication (protein-primed family B DNA polymerase) as well as in virion structure and assembly (major capsid protein, genome packaging ATPase (adenosine triphosphatase) and several minor capsid proteins). GC1 is the first tectivirus infecting an alphaproteobacterial host and is thus far the only temperate tectivirus of gram-negative bacteria. Based on distinctive sequence and life-style features, we propose that GC1 represents a new genus within the Tectiviridae , which we tentatively named " Gammatectivirus ". Furthermore, GC1 helps to bridge the gap in the sequence space between alphatectiviruses and betatectiviruses.

  18. M13 bacteriophage display framework that allows sortase-mediated modification of surface-accessible phage proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Gaelen T; Cragnolini, Juan J; Popp, Maximilian W; Allen, Mark A; Dougan, Stephanie K; Spooner, Eric; Ploegh, Hidde L; Belcher, Angela M; Guimaraes, Carla P

    2012-07-18

    We exploit bacterial sortases to attach a variety of moieties to the capsid proteins of M13 bacteriophage. We show that pIII, pIX, and pVIII can be functionalized with entities ranging from small molecules (e.g., fluorophores, biotin) to correctly folded proteins (e.g., GFP, antibodies, streptavidin) in a site-specific manner, and with yields that surpass those of any reported using phage display technology. A case in point is modification of pVIII. While a phage vector limits the size of the insert into pVIII to a few amino acids, a phagemid system limits the number of copies actually displayed at the surface of M13. Using sortase-based reactions, a 100-fold increase in the efficiency of display of GFP onto pVIII is achieved. Taking advantage of orthogonal sortases, we can simultaneously target two distinct capsid proteins in the same phage particle and maintain excellent specificity of labeling. As demonstrated in this work, this is a simple and effective method for creating a variety of structures, thus expanding the use of M13 for materials science applications and as a biological tool.

  19. Classification of Myoviridae bacteriophages using protein sequence similarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ackermann Hans W

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We advocate unifying classical and genomic classification of bacteriophages by integration of proteomic data and physicochemical parameters. Our previous application of this approach to the entirely sequenced members of the Podoviridae fully supported the current phage classification of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV. It appears that horizontal gene transfer generally does not totally obliterate evolutionary relationships between phages. Results CoreGenes/CoreExtractor proteome comparison techniques applied to 102 Myoviridae suggest the establishment of three subfamilies (Peduovirinae, Teequatrovirinae, the Spounavirinae and eight new independent genera (Bcep781, BcepMu, FelixO1, HAP1, Bzx1, PB1, phiCD119, and phiKZ-like viruses. The Peduovirinae subfamily, derived from the P2-related phages, is composed of two distinct genera: the "P2-like viruses", and the "HP1-like viruses". At present, the more complex Teequatrovirinae subfamily has two genera, the "T4-like" and "KVP40-like viruses". In the genus "T4-like viruses" proper, four groups sharing >70% proteins are distinguished: T4-type, 44RR-type, RB43-type, and RB49-type viruses. The Spounavirinae contain the "SPO1-"and "Twort-like viruses." Conclusion The hierarchical clustering of these groupings provide biologically significant subdivisions, which are consistent with our previous analysis of the Podoviridae.

  20. ADSORPTION OF BACTERIOPHAGES ON CLAY MINERALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theability to predict the fate of microorganisms in soil is dependent on an understanding of the process of their sorption on soil and subsurface materials. Presently, we have focused on studying the thermodynamics of sorption of bacteriophages (T-2, MS-2, and

  1. Bacteriophages as surface and ground water tracers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Rossi

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages are increasingly used as tracers for quantitative analysis in both hydrology and hydrogeology. The biological particles are neither toxic nor pathogenic for other living organisms as they penetrate only a specific bacterial host. They have many advantages over classical fluorescent tracers and offer the additional possibility of multi-point injection for tracer tests. Several years of research make them suitable for quantitative transport analysis and flow boundary delineation in both surface and ground waters, including karst, fractured and porous media aquifers. This article presents the effective application of bacteriophages based on their use in differing Swiss hydrological environments and compares their behaviour to conventional coloured dye or salt-type tracers. In surface water and karst aquifers, bacteriophages travel at about the same speed as the typically referenced fluorescent tracers (uranine, sulphurhodamine G extra. In aquifers of interstitial porosity, however, they appear to migrate more rapidly than fluorescent tracers, albeit with a significant reduction in their numbers within the porous media. This faster travel time implies that a modified rationale is needed for defining some ground water protection area boundaries. Further developments of other bacteriophages and their documentation as tracer methods should result in an accurate and efficient tracer tool that will be a proven alternative to conventional fluorescent dyes.

  2. Comparative genomics of Shiga toxin encoding bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Darren L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stx bacteriophages are responsible for driving the dissemination of Stx toxin genes (stx across their bacterial host range. Lysogens carrying Stx phages can cause severe, life-threatening disease and Stx toxin is an integral virulence factor. The Stx-bacteriophage vB_EcoP-24B, commonly referred to as Ф24B, is capable of multiply infecting a single bacterial host cell at a high frequency, with secondary infection increasing the rate at which subsequent bacteriophage infections can occur. This is biologically unusual, therefore determining the genomic content and context of Ф24B compared to other lambdoid Stx phages is important to understanding the factors controlling this phenomenon and determining whether they occur in other Stx phages. Results The genome of the Stx2 encoding phage, Ф24B was sequenced and annotated. The genomic organisation and general features are similar to other sequenced Stx bacteriophages induced from Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC, however Ф24B possesses significant regions of heterogeneity, with implications for phage biology and behaviour. The Ф24B genome was compared to other sequenced Stx phages and the archetypal lambdoid phage, lambda, using the Circos genome comparison tool and a PCR-based multi-loci comparison system. Conclusions The data support the hypothesis that Stx phages are mosaic, and recombination events between the host, phages and their remnants within the same infected bacterial cell will continue to drive the evolution of Stx phage variants and the subsequent dissemination of shigatoxigenic potential.

  3. Molecular Biology and Biotechnology of Bacteriophage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onodera, Kazukiyo

    The development of the molecular biology of bacteriophage such as T4, lambda and filamentous phages was described and the process that the fundamental knowledge obtained in this field has subsequently led us to the technology of phage display was introduced.

  4. Molecular subgrouping of Wolbachia and bacteriophage WO ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-12-16

    Dec 16, 2011 ... Kittayapong P. 2011 Infection incidence and relative density of the bacteriophage WO-B in Aedes albopictus mosquitoes from fields in Thailand. Curr. Microbiol. 62, 816–820. Baldo L. and Werren J. H. 2007 Revisiting Wolbachia supergroup typing based on WSP: spurious lineages and discordance with.

  5. What history tells us XLIII Bacteriophage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 42; Issue 3. What history tells us XLIII Bacteriophage: The contexts in which it was discovered. MICHEL MORANGE. Series Volume 42 Issue 3 September 2017 pp 359-362. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  6. Structure-Function Analysis of the DNA Translocating Portal of the Bacteriophage T4 Packaging Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Sanchez, Victor; Gao, Song; Kim, Hyung Rae; Kihara, Daisuke; Sun, Lei; Rossmann, Michael G.; Rao, Venigalla B.

    2013-01-01

    Tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses consist of a structurally well conserved dodecameric portal at a special five-fold vertex of the capsid. The portal plays critical roles in head assembly, genome packaging, neck/tail attachment, and genome ejection. Although the structures of portals from phages φ29, SPP1 and P22 have been determined, their mechanistic roles have not been well understood. Structural analysis of phage T4 portal (gp20) has been hampered because of its unusual interaction with the E. coli inner membrane. Here, we predict atomic models for the T4 portal monomer and dodecamer, and fit the dodecamer into the cryoEM density of the phage portal vertex. The core structure, like that from other phages, is cone-shaped with the wider end containing the “wing” and “crown” domains inside the phage head. A long “stem” encloses a central channel, and a narrow “stalk” protrudes outside the capsid. A biochemical approach was developed to analyze portal function by incorporating plasmid-expressed portal protein into phage heads and determining the effect of mutations on head assembly, DNA translocation, and virion production. We found that the protruding loops of the stalk domain are involved in assembling the DNA packaging motor. A loop that connects the stalk to the channel might be required for communication between the motor and portal. The “tunnel” loops that project into the channel are essential for sealing the packaged head. These studies established that the portal is required throughout the DNA packaging process, with different domains participating at different stages of genome packaging. PMID:24126213

  7. Specificity of interactions among the DNA-packaging machine components of T4-related bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Song; Rao, Venigalla B

    2011-02-04

    Tailed bacteriophages use powerful molecular motors to package the viral genome into a preformed capsid. Packaging at a rate of up to ∼2000 bp/s and generating a power density twice that of an automobile engine, the phage T4 motor is the fastest and most powerful reported to date. Central to DNA packaging are dynamic interactions among the packaging components, capsid (gp23), portal (gp20), motor (gp17, large "terminase"), and regulator (gp16, small terminase), leading to precise orchestration of the packaging process, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we analyzed the interactions between small and large terminases of T4-related phages. Our results show that the gp17 packaging ATPase is maximally stimulated by homologous, but not heterologous, gp16. Multiple interaction sites are identified in both gp16 and gp17. The specificity determinants in gp16 are clustered in the diverged N- and C-terminal domains (regions I-III). Swapping of diverged region(s), such as replacing C-terminal RB49 region III with that of T4, switched ATPase stimulation specificity. Two specificity regions, amino acids 37-52 and 290-315, are identified in or near the gp17-ATPase "transmission" subdomain II. gp16 binding at these sites might cause a conformational change positioning the ATPase-coupling residues into the catalytic pocket, triggering ATP hydrolysis. These results lead to a model in which multiple weak interactions between motor and regulator allow dynamic assembly and disassembly of various packaging complexes, depending on the functional state of the packaging machine. This might be a general mechanism for regulation of the phage packaging machine and other complex molecular machines.

  8. RNA Packing Specificity and Folding during Assembly of the Bacteriophage MS2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottar Rolfsson

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a combination of biochemistry, mass spectrometry, NMR spectroscopy and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM, we have been able to show that quasi-equivalent conformer switching in the coat protein (CP of an RNA bacteriophage (MS2 is controlled by a sequence-specific RNA–protein interaction. The RNA component of this complex is an RNA stem-loop encompassing just 19 nts from the phage genomic RNA, which is 3569 nts in length. This binding results in the conversion of a CP dimer from a symmetrical conformation to an asymmetric one. Only when both symmetrical and asymmetrical dimers are present in solution is assembly of the T = 3 phage capsid efficient. This implies that the conformers, we have characterized by NMR correspond to the two distinct quasi-equivalent conformers seen in the 3D structure of the virion. An icosahedrally-averaged single particle cryo-EM reconstruction of the wild-type phage (to ∼9 Å resolution has revealed icosahedrally ordered density encompassing up to 90% of the single-stranded RNA genome. The RNA is seen with a novel arrangement of two concentric shells, with connections between them along the 5-fold symmetry axes. RNA in the outer shell interacts with each of the 90 CP dimers in the T = 3 capsid and although the density is icosahedrally averaged, there appears to be a different average contact at the different quasi-equivalent protein dimers: precisely the result that would be expected if protein conformer switching is RNA-mediated throughout the assembly pathway. This unprecedented RNA structure provides new constraints for models of viral assembly and we describe experiments aimed at probing these. Together, these results suggest that viral genomic RNA folding is an important factor in efficient assembly, and further suggest that RNAs that could sequester viral CPs but not fold appropriately could act as potent inhibitors of viral assembly.

  9. Structure-function analysis of the DNA translocating portal of the bacteriophage T4 packaging machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Sanchez, Victor; Gao, Song; Kim, Hyung Rae; Kihara, Daisuke; Sun, Lei; Rossmann, Michael G; Rao, Venigalla B

    2014-03-06

    Tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses consist of a structurally well conserved dodecameric portal at a special 5-fold vertex of the capsid. The portal plays critical roles in head assembly, genome packaging, neck/tail attachment, and genome ejection. Although the structures of portals from phages φ29, SPP1, and P22 have been determined, their mechanistic roles have not been well understood. Structural analysis of phage T4 portal (gp20) has been hampered because of its unusual interaction with the Escherichia coli inner membrane. Here, we predict atomic models for the T4 portal monomer and dodecamer, and we fit the dodecamer into the cryo-electron microscopy density of the phage portal vertex. The core structure, like that from other phages, is cone shaped with the wider end containing the "wing" and "crown" domains inside the phage head. A long "stem" encloses a central channel, and a narrow "stalk" protrudes outside the capsid. A biochemical approach was developed to analyze portal function by incorporating plasmid-expressed portal protein into phage heads and determining the effect of mutations on head assembly, DNA translocation, and virion production. We found that the protruding loops of the stalk domain are involved in assembling the DNA packaging motor. A loop that connects the stalk to the channel might be required for communication between the motor and the portal. The "tunnel" loops that project into the channel are essential for sealing the packaged head. These studies established that the portal is required throughout the DNA packaging process, with different domains participating at different stages of genome packaging. © 2013.

  10. The RNA core weakly influences the interactions of the bacteriophage MS2 at key environmental interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Nguyen, Thanh H.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the RNA core on interfacial interactions of the bacteriophage MS2 was investigated. After removal of the RNA core, empty intact capsids were characterized and compared to untreated MS2. Electron density of untreated MS2 and RNA-free MS2 were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and synchrotron-based small angle spectroscopy (SAXS). Suspensions of both particles exhibited similar electrophoretic mobility across a range of pH values. Similar effects were observed at pH 5.9 across a range of NaCl or CaCl2 concentrations. We compared key interfacial interactions (particle-particle and particle/air-water interface) between suspensions of each type of particle using time resolved dynamic light scattering (TR-DLS) to observe and quantify aggregation kinetics and axisymmetric drop shape analysis to measure adsorption at the air-water interface. Both suspensions showed insignificant aggregation over 4 h in 600 mM NaCl solutions. In the presence of Ca2+ ions, aggregation of both types of particles was consistent with earlier aggregation studies and was characterized by both reaction-limited and diffusion-limited regimes occurring at similar [Ca2+]. However, the removal of the RNA from MS2 had no apparent effect on the aggregation kinetics of particles. Despite some differences in the kinetics of adsorption to the air-water interface, the changes in surface tension which result from particle adsorption showed no difference between the untreated MS2 and RNA-free MS2. The interactions and structure of particles at the air-water interface were further probed using interfacial dilational rheology. The surface elasticity (E s) and surface viscosity (ηs) at the interface were low for both the untreated virus and the RNA-free capsid. This observation suggests that the factors that impact the adsorption kinetics are not important for an equilibrated interface. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  11. Genome, Proteome and Structure of a T7-Like Bacteriophage of the Kiwifruit Canker Phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frampton, Rebekah A; Acedo, Elena Lopez; Young, Vivienne L; Chen, Danni; Tong, Brian; Taylor, Corinda; Easingwood, Richard A; Pitman, Andrew R; Kleffmann, Torsten; Bostina, Mihnea; Fineran, Peter C

    2015-06-24

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae is an economically significant pathogen responsible for severe bacterial canker of kiwifruit (Actinidia sp.). Bacteriophages infecting this phytopathogen have potential as biocontrol agents as part of an integrated approach to the management of bacterial canker, and for use as molecular tools to study this bacterium. A variety of bacteriophages were previously isolated that infect P. syringae pv. actinidiae, and their basic properties were characterized to provide a framework for formulation of these phages as biocontrol agents. Here, we have examined in more detail φPsa17, a phage with the capacity to infect a broad range of P. syringae pv. actinidiae strains and the only member of the Podoviridae in this collection. Particle morphology was visualized using cryo-electron microscopy, the genome was sequenced, and its structural proteins were analysed using shotgun proteomics. These studies demonstrated that φPsa17 has a 40,525 bp genome, is a member of the T7likevirus genus and is closely related to the pseudomonad phages φPSA2 and gh-1. Eleven structural proteins (one scaffolding) were detected by proteomics and φPsa17 has a capsid of approximately 60 nm in diameter. No genes indicative of a lysogenic lifecycle were identified, suggesting the phage is obligately lytic. These features indicate that φPsa17 may be suitable for formulation as a biocontrol agent of P. syringae pv. actinidiae.

  12. Cryo-EM structure of the bacteriophage T4 portal protein assembly at near-atomic resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lei; Zhang, Xinzheng; Gao, Song; Rao, Prashant A.; Padilla-Sanchez, Victor; Chen, Zhenguo; Sun, Siyang; Xiang, Ye; Subramaniam, Sriram; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2015-07-01

    The structure and assembly of bacteriophage T4 has been extensively studied. However, the detailed structure of the portal protein remained unknown. Here we report the structure of the bacteriophage T4 portal assembly, gene product 20 (gp20), determined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to 3.6 Å resolution. In addition, analysis of a 10 Å resolution cryo-EM map of an empty prolate T4 head shows how the dodecameric portal assembly interacts with the capsid protein gp23 at the special pentameric vertex. The gp20 structure also verifies that the portal assembly is required for initiating head assembly, for attachment of the packaging motor, and for participation in DNA packaging. Comparison of the Myoviridae T4 portal structure with the known portal structures of φ29, SPP1 and P22, representing Podo- and Siphoviridae, shows that the portal structure probably dates back to a time when self-replicating microorganisms were being established on Earth.

  13. Genome, Proteome and Structure of a T7-Like Bacteriophage of the Kiwifruit Canker Phytopathogen Pseudomonas Syringae pv. Actinidiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah A. Frampton

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae is an economically significant pathogen responsible for severe bacterial canker of kiwifruit (Actinidia sp.. Bacteriophages infecting this phytopathogen have potential as biocontrol agents as part of an integrated approach to the management of bacterial canker, and for use as molecular tools to study this bacterium. A variety of bacteriophages were previously isolated that infect P. syringae pv. actinidiae, and their basic properties were characterized to provide a framework for formulation of these phages as biocontrol agents. Here, we have examined in more detail φPsa17, a phage with the capacity to infect a broad range of P. syringae pv. actinidiae strains and the only member of the Podoviridae in this collection. Particle morphology was visualized using cryo-electron microscopy, the genome was sequenced, and its structural proteins were analysed using shotgun proteomics. These studies demonstrated that φPsa17 has a 40,525 bp genome, is a member of the T7likevirus genus and is closely related to the pseudomonad phages φPSA2 and gh-1. Eleven structural proteins (one scaffolding were detected by proteomics and φPsa17 has a capsid of approximately 60 nm in diameter. No genes indicative of a lysogenic lifecycle were identified, suggesting the phage is obligately lytic. These features indicate that φPsa17 may be suitable for formulation as a biocontrol agent of P. syringae pv. actinidiae.

  14. Increasing Type 1 Poliovirus Capsid Stability by Thermal Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemi, Oluwapelumi O.; Nicol, Clare

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Poliomyelitis is a highly infectious disease caused by poliovirus (PV). It can result in paralysis and may be fatal. Integrated global immunization programs using live-attenuated oral (OPV) and/or inactivated (IPV) PV vaccines have systematically reduced its spread and paved the way for eradication. Immunization will continue posteradication to ensure against reintroduction of the disease, but there are biosafety concerns for both OPV and IPV. They could be addressed by the production and use of virus-free virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines that mimic the “empty” capsids (ECs) normally produced in viral infection. Although ECs are antigenically indistinguishable from mature virus particles, they are less stable and readily convert into an alternative conformation unsuitable for vaccine purposes. Stabilized ECs, expressed recombinantly as VLPs, could be ideal candidate vaccines for a polio-free world. However, although genome-free PV ECs have been expressed as VLPs in a variety of systems, their inherent antigenic instability has proved a barrier to further development. In this study, we selected thermally stable ECs of type 1 PV (PV-1). The ECs are antigenically stable at temperatures above the conversion temperature of wild-type (wt) virions. We have identified mutations on the capsid surface and in internal networks that are responsible for EC stability. With reference to the capsid structure, we speculate on the roles of these residues in capsid stability and postulate that such stabilized VLPs could be used as novel vaccines. IMPORTANCE Poliomyelitis is a highly infectious disease caused by PV and is on the verge of eradication. There are biosafety concerns about reintroduction of the disease from current vaccines that require live virus for production. Recombinantly expressed virus-like particles (VLPs) could address these inherent problems. However, the genome-free capsids (ECs) of wt PV are unstable and readily change antigenicity to a form not

  15. Parvovirus Capsid Structures Required for Infection: Mutations Controlling Receptor Recognition and Protease Cleavages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaway, Heather M; Feng, Kurtis H; Lee, Donald W; Allison, Andrew B; Pinard, Melissa; McKenna, Robert; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Hafenstein, Susan; Parrish, Colin R

    2017-01-15

    Parvovirus capsids are small but complex molecular machines responsible for undertaking many of the steps of cell infection, genome packing, and cell-to-cell as well as host-to-host transfer. The details of parvovirus infection of cells are still not fully understood, but the processes must involve small changes in the capsid structure that allow the endocytosed virus to escape from the endosome, pass through the cell cytoplasm, and deliver the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) genome to the nucleus, where viral replication occurs. Here, we examine capsid substitutions that eliminate canine parvovirus (CPV) infectivity and identify how those mutations changed the capsid structure or altered interactions with the infectious pathway. Amino acid substitutions on the exterior surface of the capsid (Gly299Lys/Ala300Lys) altered the binding of the capsid to transferrin receptor type 1 (TfR), particularly during virus dissociation from the receptor, but still allowed efficient entry into both feline and canine cells without successful infection. These substitutions likely control specific capsid structural changes resulting from TfR binding required for infection. A second set of changes on the interior surface of the capsid reduced viral infectivity by >100-fold and included two cysteine residues and neighboring residues. One of these substitutions, Cys270Ser, modulates a VP2 cleavage event found in ∼10% of the capsid proteins that also was shown to alter capsid stability. A neighboring substitution, Pro272Lys, significantly reduced capsid assembly, while a Cys273Ser change appeared to alter capsid transport from the nucleus. These mutants reveal additional structural details that explain cell infection processes of parvovirus capsids. Parvoviruses are commonly found in both vertebrate and invertebrate animals and cause widespread disease. They are also being developed as oncolytic therapeutics and as gene therapy vectors. Most functions involved in infection or transduction

  16. Genetic and biochemical studies of the lipid-containing bacteriophage PR4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanden Boom, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    Bacteriophage PR4 is a lipid-containing bacterial virus able to infect Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. The icosahedral virion consists of an external protein capsid layer which surrounds a membrane vesicle enclosed ds DNA genome. The author has analyzed the time course of phage PR4 protein synthesis and have identified at least 34 proteins present in phage infected cells not detected in uninfected control cultures. In addition, he has isolated a more extensive set of conditional-lethal nonsense mutants of this virus. This collection of mutants permitted the identification of seven additional phage PR4 gene products, including the terminal genome protein and an accessory lytic factor. The present collection of phage PR4 mutants has been assigned to 19 distinct genetic groups on the basis of genetic complementation tests and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the proteins produced in mutant-infected UV-irradiated cells. A restriction endonuclease map of the phage PR4 genome was constructed which includes 59 sites for ten restriction endonucleases. In addition, he has constructed a collection of recombinant plasmids containing subgenomic DNA fragments of bacteriophage PR4. He has used this collection of plasmids to generate a physical-genetic map of the PR4 genome. The physical-genetic map localizes mutations in 13 phage PR4 genetic groups on the viral DNA molecule. To investigate the role of phosphatidylglycerol (PG) in phage assembly and infectivity, he propagated PR4 on an E. coli mutant defective in PG synthesis. The PG content of phage PR4 grown on the mutant host accounted for 0.4% of the total viral phospholipids, representing a 90-fold decrease in PG relative to the PG content of phage grown on a wild type host

  17. Visualization of uncorrelated, tandem symmetry mismatches in the internal genome packaging apparatus of bacteriophage T7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fei; Liu, Zheng; Vago, Frank; Ren, Yue; Wu, Weimin; Wright, Elena T; Serwer, Philip; Jiang, Wen

    2013-04-23

    Motor-driven packaging of a dsDNA genome into a preformed protein capsid through a unique portal vertex is essential in the life cycle of a large number of dsDNA viruses. We have used single-particle electron cryomicroscopy to study the multilayer structure of the portal vertex of the bacteriophage T7 procapsid, the recipient of T7 DNA in packaging. A focused asymmetric reconstruction method was developed and applied to selectively resolve neighboring pairs of symmetry-mismatched layers of the portal vertex. However, structural features in all layers of the multilayer portal vertex could not be resolved simultaneously. Our results imply that layers with mismatched symmetries can join together in several different relative orientations, and that orientations at different interfaces assort independently to produce structural isomers, a process that we call combinatorial assembly isomerism. This isomerism explains rotational smearing in previously reported asymmetric reconstructions of the portal vertex of T7 and other bacteriophages. Combinatorial assembly isomerism may represent a new regime of structural biology in which globally varying structures assemble from a common set of components. Our reconstructions collectively validate previously proposed symmetries, compositions, and sequential order of T7 portal vertex layers, resolving in tandem the 5-fold gene product 10 (gp10) shell, 12-fold gp8 portal ring, and an internal core stack consisting of 12-fold gp14 adaptor ring, 8-fold bowl-shaped gp15, and 4-fold gp16 tip. We also found a small tilt of the core stack relative to the icosahedral fivefold axis and propose that this tilt assists DNA spooling without tangling during packaging.

  18. The structure of avian polyomavirus reveals variably sized capsids, non-conserved inter-capsomere interactions, and a possible location of the minor capsid protein VP4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Peter S.; Enderlein, Dirk; Nelson, Christian D.S.; Carter, Weston S.; Kawano, Masaaki; Xing Li; Swenson, Robert D.; Olson, Norman H.; Baker, Timothy S.; Cheng, R. Holland; Atwood, Walter J.; Johne, Reimar; Belnap, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Avian polyomavirus (APV) causes a fatal, multi-organ disease among several bird species. Using cryogenic electron microscopy and other biochemical techniques, we investigated the structure of APV and compared it to that of mammalian polyomaviruses, particularly JC polyomavirus and simian virus 40. The structure of the pentameric major capsid protein (VP1) is mostly conserved; however, APV VP1 has a unique, truncated C-terminus that eliminates an intercapsomere-connecting β-hairpin observed in other polyomaviruses. We postulate that the terminal β-hairpin locks other polyomavirus capsids in a stable conformation and that absence of the hairpin leads to the observed capsid size variation in APV. Plug-like density features were observed at the base of the VP1 pentamers, consistent with the known location of minor capsid proteins VP2 and VP3. However, the plug density is more prominent in APV and may include VP4, a minor capsid protein unique to bird polyomaviruses.

  19. Determination of viral capsid elastic properties from equilibrium thermal fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Eric R; Brooks, Charles L

    2011-05-06

    We apply two-dimensional elasticity theory to viral capsids to develop a framework for calculating elastic properties of viruses from equilibrium thermal fluctuations of the capsid surface in molecular dynamics and elastic network model trajectories. We show that the magnitudes of the long wavelength modes of motion available in a simulation with all atomic degrees of freedom are recapitulated by an elastic network model. For the mode spectra to match, the elastic network model must be scaled appropriately by a factor which can be determined from an icosahedrally constrained all-atom simulation. With this method we calculate the two-dimensional Young's modulus Y, bending modulus κ, and Föppl-von Kármán number γ, for the T=1 mutant of the Sesbania mosaic virus. The values determined are in the range of previous theoretical estimates.

  20. Analysis of Bacteriophage Motion Through a Non-Static Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Samuel A.

    In this work, I investigated the motion of bacteriophages (phages) through their mucosal environment. Recently, biologists here at San Diego State University have proposed a model in which phages move sub-diffusively through mucosal fibers in their hunt for bacteria to prey upon. Through a Hoc protein located upon the capsid of the wild type phages, these phages are allowed to bind to mucosal fibers, and extend the amount of time spent in a single location hunting for bacteria. Contrarily, the delta hoc phages are unable to. The ability of the wild type phages to attach itself to mucosal fibers is what enables its subdiffusive behavior. This study investigates the diffusive behavior of these phages in different mucus concentrations. It expands on previous studies in which only short tracks could be observed. In the study at hand, phages are imaged in a highly doped optical fiber with varying concentrations of mucus present in solution. Through rigorous image processing techniques, trajectories of these phages are created with a minimized noise level. We developed code that created position-versus-time files for each phage present in the experimental data. These files were then further analyzed. The sub-diffusive behavior is investigated via mean squared displacement versus time. The diffusive exponent can be obtained from fits to these data. For large enough time intervals, I always obtained an exponent of one for space and time averaged data. This indicates that the diffusion is normal, or sub-diffusive of the CTRW type. CTRW sub-diffusive motion is characterized by waiting times that resemble a power law distribution and have long tails. I investigate these stuck time distributions, however am unable to determine if a power law or exponential fits the data best. Moreover, the distribution gives the same power law exponent for phages moving through water, or mucus, for wild type and delta hoc phages. These exponents would predict super-diffusive instead of sub

  1. The Architecture of Viral Capsids Based on Tiling Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Twarock, R.

    2005-01-01

    A vital constituent of a virus is its protein shell, called the viral capsid, that encapsulates and hence protects the viral genome. The surface structures of a large number of icosahedral viruses can be modelled via Caspar-Klug Theory, which has hence become one of the fundamental concepts in virology. However, growing experimental evidence have shown that a significant fraction of viruses falls out of the remit of this theory. Among them are the Papovaviridae, which are of particular intere...

  2. Nuclear Import of Hepatitis B Virus Capsids and Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallucci, Lara; Kann, Michael

    2017-01-21

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is an enveloped pararetrovirus with a DNA genome, which is found in an up to 36 nm-measuring capsid. Replication of the genome occurs via an RNA intermediate, which is synthesized in the nucleus. The virus must have thus ways of transporting its DNA genome into this compartment. This review summarizes the data on hepatitis B virus genome transport and correlates the finding to those from other viruses.

  3. RNA folding inside a virus capsid and dimensional reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafouri, Rouzbeh; Bruinsma, Robijn; Rudnick, Joseph

    2006-03-01

    As RNA folds on itself , in certain conditions, it takes the form of a branched polymer. So the problem of RNA folding in a virus capsid is essentially the problem of a branched polymer in a confined environment. In this paper we attack the problem using the technique of dimensional reduction which relates a branched polymer with self interation in D dimension to a hardcore classical gas in (D-2) dimension. We look for phase transitions and intersting physical quantities such as pressure.

  4. K. OXYTOCA BACTERIOPHAGES ISOLATION METHODS IMPROVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Sadrtdinova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of a study related to increasing the efficiency of phage isolation of bacteria of the species K. oxytoca, by developing the optimal composition of the medium used in the work. In scientific research, in almost all methods associated with the isolation of bacteriophages, meat-peptone broth and meat-peptone agar are used as the nutrient basis. The peculiarities of growth and cultivation of microorganisms create certain difficulties for the isolation of phages active against bacteria of the species K. oxytoca. The selection of components and the creation of an environment that would ensure the optimal growth of both the bacterial culture and the reproduction of the virus makes it possible to facilitate the isolation of bacteriophages. The number of bacterial strains used in the work was 7. All strains of cultures were obtained from the Museum of the Department of Microbiology, Virology, Epizootology and Veterinary and Sanitary Expertise of the Federal State Budget Educational Institution of Higher Education “Ulyanovsk State Agrarian University named after P.A. Stolypin”. The studies included 2 main stages. The first stage consisted in isolation of bacteriophages by the method of isolation from the external environment by the method of Adelson L.I., Lyashenko E.A. The material for the studies were samples: soil, sewage sample, fecal samples (2. Only 4 samples. According to the chosen method, the sowing of the putative phagolysate was carried out on meat-peptone agar (1.5% and the agar for isolating bacteriophages (Aph (1.5%. A positive result was the presence on the environment of negative colonies, clearly visible on the matt background of deep growth of bacteria. A negative result is a continuous growth (“lawn” of bacterial culture. As a control, the culture of the microorganism studied was used for the media. In the course of the conducted studies for the first stage, 2 bacteriophages were isolated, active

  5. Localized Multistreams for P2P Streaming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majed Alhaisoni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Streaming video over the Internet, including cellular networks, has now become a commonplace. Network operators typically use multicasting or variants of multiple unicasting to deliver streams to the user terminal in a controlled fashion. P2P streaming is an emerging alternative, which is theoretically more scalable but suffers from other issues arising from the dynamic nature of the system. Users' terminals become streaming nodes but they are not constantly connected. Another issue is that they are based on logical overlays, which are not optimized for the physical underlay infrastructure. An important proposition is to find effective ways to increase the resilience of the overlay whilst at the same time not conflicting with the network. In this article we look at the combination of two techniques, redundant streaming and locality awareness, in the context of both live and video-on-demand streaming. We introduce a new technique and assess it via a comparative, simulation-based study. We find that redundancy affects network utilization only marginally if traffic is kept at the edges via localization techniques.

  6. Assembly of recombinant Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus capsids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyuan Ren

    Full Text Available The dicistrovirus Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV has been implicated in the worldwide decline of honey bees. Studies of IAPV and many other bee viruses in pure culture are restricted by available isolates and permissive cell culture. Here we show that coupling the IAPV major structural precursor protein ORF2 to its cognate 3C-like processing enzyme results in processing of the precursor to the individual structural proteins in a number of insect cell lines following expression by a recombinant baculovirus. The efficiency of expression is influenced by the level of IAPV 3C protein and moderation of its activity is required for optimal expression. The mature IAPV structural proteins assembled into empty capsids that migrated as particles on sucrose velocity gradients and showed typical dicistrovirus like morphology when examined by electron microscopy. Monoclonal antibodies raised to recombinant capsids were configured into a diagnostic test specific for the presence of IAPV. Recombinant capsids for each of the many bee viruses within the picornavirus family may provide virus specific reagents for the on-going investigation of the causes of honeybee loss.

  7. Evolution and the complexity of bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serwer Philip

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genomes of both long-genome (> 200 Kb bacteriophages and long-genome eukaryotic viruses have cellular gene homologs whose selective advantage is not explained. These homologs add genomic and possibly biochemical complexity. Understanding their significance requires a definition of complexity that is more biochemically oriented than past empirically based definitions. Hypothesis Initially, I propose two biochemistry-oriented definitions of complexity: either decreased randomness or increased encoded information that does not serve immediate needs. Then, I make the assumption that these two definitions are equivalent. This assumption and recent data lead to the following four-part hypothesis that explains the presence of cellular gene homologs in long bacteriophage genomes and also provides a pathway for complexity increases in prokaryotic cells: (1 Prokaryotes underwent evolutionary increases in biochemical complexity after the eukaryote/prokaryote splits. (2 Some of the complexity increases occurred via multi-step, weak selection that was both protected from strong selection and accelerated by embedding evolving cellular genes in the genomes of bacteriophages and, presumably, also archaeal viruses (first tier selection. (3 The mechanisms for retaining cellular genes in viral genomes evolved under additional, longer-term selection that was stronger (second tier selection. (4 The second tier selection was based on increased access by prokaryotic cells to improved biochemical systems. This access was achieved when DNA transfer moved to prokaryotic cells both the more evolved genes and their more competitive and complex biochemical systems. Testing the hypothesis I propose testing this hypothesis by controlled evolution in microbial communities to (1 determine the effects of deleting individual cellular gene homologs on the growth and evolution of long genome bacteriophages and hosts, (2 find the environmental conditions that

  8. A first step toward liposome-mediated intracellular bacteriophage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieth, Anita; Verseux, Cyprien; Barnert, Sabine; Süss, Regine; Römer, Winfried

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria presents a severe challenge to medicine and public health. While bacteriophage therapy is a promising alternative to traditional antibiotics, the general inability of bacteriophages to penetrate eukaryotic cells limits their use against resistant bacteria, causing intracellular diseases like tuberculosis. Bacterial vectors show some promise in carrying therapeutic bacteriophages into cells, but also bring a number of risks like an overload of bacterial antigens or the acquisition of virulence genes from the pathogen. As a first step in the development of a non-bacterial vector for bacteriophage delivery into pathogen-infected cells, we attempted to encapsulate bacteriophages into liposomes. Here we report effective encapsulation of the model bacteriophage λeyfp and the mycobacteriophage TM4 into giant liposomes. Furthermore, we show that liposome-associated bacteriophages are taken up into eukaryotic cells more efficiently than free bacteriophages. These are important milestones in the development of an intracellular bacteriophage therapy that might be useful in the fight against multi-drug-resistant intracellular pathogens like Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  9. Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides Inactivate Shiga Toxin-Encoding Bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel E. Del Cogliano

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin (Stx is the principal virulence factor during Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC infections. We have previously reported the inactivation of bacteriophage encoding Stx after treatment with chitosan, a linear polysaccharide polymer with cationic properties. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (cAMPs are short linear aminoacidic sequences, with a positive net charge, which display bactericidal or bacteriostatic activity against a wide range of bacterial species. They are promising novel antibiotics since they have shown bactericidal effects against multiresistant bacteria. To evaluate whether cationic properties are responsible for bacteriophage inactivation, we tested seven cationic peptides with proven antimicrobial activity as anti-bacteriophage agents, and one random sequence cationic peptide with no antimicrobial activity as a control. We observed bacteriophage inactivation after incubation with five cAMPs, but no inactivating activity was observed with the random sequence cationic peptide or with the non-alpha helical cAMP Omiganan. Finally, to confirm peptide-bacteriophage interaction, zeta potential was analyzed by following changes on bacteriophage surface charges after peptide incubation. According to our results we could propose that: (1 direct interaction of peptides with phage is a necessary step for bacteriophage inactivation, (2 cationic properties are necessary but not sufficient for bacteriophage inactivation, and (3 inactivation by cationic peptides could be sequence (or structure specific. Overall our data suggest that these peptides could be considered a new family of molecules potentially useful to decrease bacteriophage replication and Stx expression.

  10. Functional and molecular evidence for heteromeric association of P2Y1 receptor with P2Y2 and P2Y4 receptors in mouse granulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro-Filho, Antonio Carlos; Buri, Marcus Vinicius; Barros, Carlos Castilho; Dreyfuss, Juliana Luporini; Nader, Helena Bonciani; Justo, Giselle Zenker; Craveiro, Rogério Bastos; Pesquero, João Bosco; Miranda, Antonio; Ferreira, Alice Teixeira; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar Julian

    2016-07-07

    All hematopoietic cells express P2 receptors, however pharmacological characteristics such as expression and affinity in granulocytes are unknown. Pharmacological characteristics of P2 receptors were evaluated by Ca(2+) measurements using Fura-2 fluorophore. P2 receptors expression were analyzed by flow cytometry and RT-PCR. P2 interaction were shown by coimmunoprecipitation, western blotting and FRET. Granulocytes were responsive to P2Y agonists, whereas P2X agonists were ineffective. Ca(2+) increase, elicited by ADP and UTP was dependent on intracellular stocks and sensitive to G-coupled receptor inhibition. Moreover, MRS2179, a specific antagonist of the P2Y1 receptor, abolished ADP response. Interestingly, ADP and UTP exhibited full heterologous desensitization, suggesting that these agonists interact with the same receptor. The heteromeric association between P2Y1 receptor and the P2Y2 and P2Y4 receptors was shown by immunoprecipitation and FRET analysis. Clear evidence of heteromeric association of P2Y receptors was found during the evaluation of P2 receptors present in mice granulocytes, which could impact in the classical pharmacology of P2Y receptors in granulocytes.

  11. A novelSulfolobusvirus with an exceptional capsid architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haina; Guo, Zhenqian; Feng, Hongli; Chen, Yufei; Chen, Xiuqiang; Li, Zhimeng; Hernández-Ascencio, Walter; Dai, Xin; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Zheng, Xiaowei; Mora-López, Marielos; Fu, Yu; Zhang, Chuanlun; Zhu, Ping; Huang, Li

    2017-12-06

    A novel archaeal virus, denoted Sulfolobus ellipsoid virus 1 (SEV1), was isolated from an acidic hot spring in Costa Rica. The morphologically unique virion of SEV1 contains a protein capsid with 16 regularly spaced striations and an 11-nm-thick envelope. The capsid exhibits an unusual architecture in which the viral DNA, probably in the form of a nucleoprotein filament, wraps around the longitudinal axis of the virion in a plane to form a multilayered disk-like structure with a central hole, and 16 of these structures are stacked to generate a spool-like capsid. SEV1 harbors a linear double-stranded DNA genome of ∼23 kb, which encodes 38 predicted open reading frames (ORFs). Among the few ORFs with a putative function is a gene encoding a protein-primed DNA polymerase. Six-fold symmetrical virus-associated pyramids (VAPs) appear on the surface of the SEV1-infected cells, which are ruptured to allow the formation of a hexagonal opening and subsequent release of the progeny virus particles. Notably, the SEV1 virions acquire the lipid membrane in the cytoplasm of the host cell. The lipid composition of the viral envelope correlates with that of the cell membrane. These results suggest the use of a unique mechanism by SEV1 in membrane biogenesis. IMPORTANCE Investigation of archaeal viruses has greatly expanded our knowledge of the virosphere and its role in the evolution of life. Here we show that Sulfolobus ellipsoid virus 1 (SEV1), an archaeal virus isolated from a hot spring in Costa Rica, exhibits a novel viral shape and an unusual capsid architecture. The SEV1 DNA wraps multiple times in a plane around the longitudinal axis of the virion to form a disk-like structure, and 16 of these structures are stacked to generate a spool-like capsid. The virus acquires its envelope intracellularly and exits the host cell by creating a hexagonal hole on the host cell surface. These results shed significant light on the diversity of viral morphogenesis. Copyright © 2017

  12. Bacteriophages and bacteriophage-derived endolysins as potential therapeutics to combat Gram-positive spore forming bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakonieczna, A; Cooper, C J; Gryko, R

    2015-09-01

    Since their discovery in 1915, bacteriophages have been routinely used within Eastern Europe to treat a variety of bacterial infections. Although initially ignored by the West due to the success of antibiotics, increasing levels and diversity of antibiotic resistance is driving a renaissance for bacteriophage-derived therapy, which is in part due to the highly specific nature of bacteriophages as well as their relative abundance. This review focuses on the bacteriophages and derived lysins of relevant Gram-positive spore formers within the Bacillus cereus group and Clostridium genus that could have applications within the medical, food and environmental sectors. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Bacteriophage interactions with marine pathogenic Vibrios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalatzis, Panagiotis

    Incidents of Vibrio-associated diseases in marine aquaculture are increasingly reported on a global scale, incited also by the world’s rising temperature. Administration of antibiotics has been the most commonly applied remedy used for facing vibriosis outbreaks, giving rise to concerns about...... pathogens. The combinatory administration of virulent bacteriophages φSt2 and φGrn1, isolated against Vibrio alginolyticus significantly reduced the Vibrio load in cultures of Artemia salina live prey, decreasing subsequently the risk of a vibriosis outbreak in the marine hatchery. During infection...... to studying the interactions between marine pathogenic Vibrio and their corresponding bacteriophages, while discussing the potential and limitations of phage therapy application in the biological control of vibriosis....

  14. N'-formylkynurenine-photosensitized inactivation of bacteriophage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walrant, P.; Santus, R.; Redpath, J.L.; Pileni, M.P.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the sensitizing properties of N'-formylkynurenine (FK) on bacteriophages, as part of a wider study of FK photosensitization of systems which have both protein and DNA components. Suspensions of bacteriophages T 6 and T 7 were near-U.V. (lambda > 320 nm) irradiated in solutions saturated with either O 2 or He in the presence of 5 x 10 -4 M FK. The survival curves obtained demonstrated that FK can act as a photosensitizer for biological inactivation. The involvement of singlet oxygen as one factor in this FK sensitized inactivation was clearly demonstrated by the increased rate of inactivation when the phage were suspended in O 2 -saturated D 2 O, in place of water, during irradiation. The complex mechanism of phage inactivation must involve direct interaction between excited FK and substrate, as well as singlet oxygen. FK is therefore a new natural photosensitizer of significance in cell photochemistry induced by sunlight. (U.K.)

  15. Application of bacteriophages in sensor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltomaa, Riikka; López-Perolio, Irene; Benito-Peña, Elena; Barderas, Rodrigo; Moreno-Bondi, María Cruz

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophage-based bioassays are a promising alternative to traditional antibody-based immunoassays. Bacteriophages, shortened to phages, can be easily conjugated or genetically engineered. Phages are robust, ubiquitous in nature, and harmless to humans. Notably, phages do not usually require inoculation and killing of animals; and thus, the production of phages is simple and economical. In recent years, phage-based biosensors have been developed featuring excellent robustness, sensitivity, and selectivity in combination with the ease of integration into transduction devices. This review provides a critical overview of phage-based bioassays and biosensors developed in the last few years using different interrogation methods such as colorimetric, enzymatic, fluorescence, surface plasmon resonance, quartz crystal microbalance, magnetoelastic, Raman, or electrochemical techniques.

  16. Bacteriophages in the control of pathogenic vibrios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Plaza

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibrios are common inhabitants of marine and estuarine environments. Some of them can be pathogenic to humans and/or marine animals using a broad repertory of virulence factors. Lately, several reports have indicated that the incidence of Vibrio infections in humans is rising and also in animals constitute a continuing threat for aquaculture. Moreover, the continuous use of antibiotics has been accompanied by an emergence of antibiotic resistance in Vibrio species, implying a necessity for efficient treatments. One promising alternative that emerges is the use of lytic bacteriophages; however, there are some drawbacks that should be overcome to make phage therapy a widely accepted method. In this work, we discuss about the major pathogenic Vibrio species and the progress, benefits and disadvantages that have been detected during the experimental use of bacteriophages to their control.

  17. Genomic impact of CRISPR immunization against bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrangou, Rodolphe; Coûté-Monvoisin, Anne-Claire; Stahl, Buffy; Chavichvily, Isabelle; Damange, Florian; Romero, Dennis A; Boyaval, Patrick; Fremaux, Christophe; Horvath, Philippe

    2013-12-01

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) together with CAS (RISPR-associated) genes form the CRISPR-Cas immune system, which provides sequence-specific adaptive immunity against foreign genetic elements in bacteria and archaea. Immunity is acquired by the integration of short stretches of invasive DNA as novel 'spacers' into CRISPR loci. Subsequently, these immune markers are transcribed and generate small non-coding interfering RNAs that specifically guide nucleases for sequence-specific cleavage of complementary sequences. Among the four CRISPR-Cas systems present in Streptococcus thermophilus, CRISPR1 and CRISPR3 have the ability to readily acquire new spacers following bacteriophage or plasmid exposure. In order to investigate the impact of building CRISPR-encoded immunity on the host chromosome, we determined the genome sequence of a BIM (bacteriophage-insensitive mutant) derived from the DGCC7710 model organism, after four consecutive rounds of bacteriophage challenge. As expected, active CRISPR loci evolved via polarized addition of several novel spacers following exposure to bacteriophages. Although analysis of the draft genome sequence revealed a variety of SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and INDELs (insertions/deletions), most of the in silico differences were not validated by Sanger re-sequencing. In addition, two SNPs and two small INDELs were identified and tracked in the intermediate variants. Overall, building CRISPR-encoded immunity does not significantly affect the genome, which allows the maintenance of important functional properties in isogenic CRISPR mutants. This is critical for the development and formulation of sustainable and robust next-generation starter cultures with increased industrial lifespans.

  18. Bacteriophages for detection of bacterial pathogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutateladze, M.

    2009-01-01

    The G. Eliava Institute of Bacteriophages, Microbiology and Virology (Tbilisi, Georgia) is one of the most famous institutions focused on bacteriophage research for the elaboration of appropriate phage methodologies for human and animal protection. The main direction of the institute is the study and production of bacteriophages against intestinal disorders (dysentery, typhoid, intesti) and purulent-septic infections (staphylococcus, streptococcus, pyophage, etc.). These preparations were successfully introduced during the Soviet era, and for decades were used throughout the former Soviet Union and in other Socialist countries for the treatment, prophylaxis, and diagnosis of various infectious diseases, including those caused by antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains. Bacteriophages were widely used for identifying and detecting infections caused by the most dangerous pathogens and causative agents of epidemiological outbreaks. The specific topic of this presentation is the phage typing of bacterial species, which can be an important method for epidemiological diagnostics. Together with different genetic methodologies - such as PCR-based methods, PFGE, plasmid fingerprinting, and ribosomal typing - phage typing is one method for identifying bacterial pathogens. The method has a high percentage of determination of phage types, high specificity of reaction, and is easy for interpretation and use by health workers. Phage typing was applied for inter-species differentiation of different species of Salmonella, S. typhi, Brucella spp, Staphylococcus aureus, E. col,i Clostridium deficile, Vibrio cholerae, Yersinia pestis, Yersinia enterocolitica, Lysteria monocytogenes, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium tetani, plant pathogens, and other bacterial pathogens. In addition to addressing the utility and efficacy of phage typing, the paper will discuss the isolation and selection of diagnostic typing phages for interspecies differentiation of pathogens that is necessary

  19. Bacteriophages as recognition and identification agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teodorescu, M.C.; Gaspar, Alexandre.

    1987-01-01

    Bacteriophages are employed as agents for recognition and identification of molecules and cellular materials, using their ability to recognize their bacterial host, by coating them with antibodies or by selecting them to perform in a manner analogous to antibodies. Visibility for identification is effected by incorporating a fluorescent agent, a radioisotope, a metal, an enzyme, or other staining material. The method of this invention may be utilized in selected clinical procedures, and is adaptable to use in an assay kit. (author)

  20. Mutagenesis in bacteriophage T 7. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, M.; Witte, W.

    1976-01-01

    UV induced mutagenesis of bacteriophage T 7 was investigated by using a forward mutation system (host range system) and a back mutation system (amber system). The results indicate a dependence of mutation of T 7 after UV irradiation only on the rec gene controlled functions of the bacterial host. The functions controlled by pol and uvr genes have no influence. Among other types of mutations UV irradiation leads to transitions from AT to GC. (author)

  1. Enteroviruses and Bacteriophages in Bathing Waters

    OpenAIRE

    Mocé-Llivina, Laura; Lucena, Francisco; Jofre, Juan

    2005-01-01

    A new procedure for detecting and counting enteroviruses based on the VIRADEN method applied to 10 liters of seawater was examined. It improved the efficiency of detection by taking into account both the number of positive isolations and numbers found with traditional methods. It was then used to quantify viruses in bathing waters. A number of bacterial indicators and bacteriophages were also tested. Cultivable enteroviruses were detected in 55% of the samples, most of which complied with bac...

  2. Genome of low-temperature T4-related bacteriophage vB_EcoM-VR7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliniene, Laura; Klausa, Vytautas; Zajančkauskaite, Aurelija; Nivinskas, Rimas; Truncaite, Lidija

    2011-10-01

    The complete genome sequence of the T4-related low-temperature Escherichia coli bacteriophage vB_EcoM-VR7 was determined. The genome sequence is 169,285 bp long, with a G+C content of 40.3%. Overall, 95% of the phage genome is coding. It encodes 293 putative protein-encoding open reading frames (ORFs) and tRNA(Met). More than half (59%) of the genomic DNA lacks significant homology with the DNA of T4, but once translated, 72% of the vB_EcoM-VR7 genome (211 ORFs) encodes protein homologues of T4 genes. Overall, 46 vB_EcoM-VR7 ORFs have no homologues in T4 but are derived from other T4-related phages, nine ORFs show similarities to bacterial or non-T4-related phage genes, and 27 ORFs are unique to vB_EcoM-VR7. This phage lacks several T4 enzymes involved in host DNA degradation; however, there is extensive representation of the DNA replication, recombination and repair enzymes as well as the viral capsid and tail structural genes.

  3. The Plasmid Complement of Lactococcus lactis UC509.9 Encodes Multiple Bacteriophage Resistance Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, Stuart; Mahony, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strains are used globally for the production of fermented dairy products, particularly hard cheeses. Believed to be of plant origin, L. lactis strains that are used as starter cultures have undergone extensive adaptation to the dairy environment, partially through the acquisition of extrachromosomal DNA in the form of plasmids that specify technologically important phenotypic traits. Here, we present a detailed analysis of the eight plasmids of L. lactis UC509.9, an Irish dairy starter strain. Key industrial phenotypes were mapped, and genes that are typically associated with lactococcal plasmids were identified. Four distinct, plasmid-borne bacteriophage resistance systems were identified, including two abortive infection systems, AbiB and AbiD1, thereby supporting the observed phage resistance of L. lactis UC509.9. AbiB escape mutants were generated for phage sk1, which were found to carry mutations in orf6, which encodes the major capsid protein of this phage. PMID:24814781

  4. The genome of bacteriophage phiKMV, a T7-like virus infecting Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavigne, Rob; Burkal'tseva, Maria V.; Robben, Johan; Sykilinda, Nina N.; Kurochkina, Lidia P.; Grymonprez, Barbara; Jonckx, Bart; Krylov, Victor N.; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.; Volckaert, Guido

    2003-01-01

    The complete DNA sequence of a new lytic T7-like bacteriophage phiKMV is presented. It is the first genome sequence of a member of the Podoviridae that infects Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The linear G + C-rich (62.3%) double-stranded DNA genome of 42,519 bp has direct terminal repeats of 414 bp and contains 48 open reading frames that are all transcribed from the same strand. Despite absence of homology at the DNA level, 11 of the 48 phiKMV-encoded putative proteins show sequence similarity to known T7-type phage proteins. Eighteen open reading frame products have been assigned, including an RNA polymerase, proteins involved in DNA replication, as well as structural, phage maturation, and lysis proteins. Surprisingly, the major capsid protein completely lacks sequence homology to any known protein. Also, the strong virulence toward many clinical P. aeruginosa isolates and a short replication time make phiKMV attractive for phage therapy or a potential source for antimicrobial proteins

  5. Genetically modified bacteriophages in applied microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárdy, P; Pantůček, R; Benešík, M; Doškař, J

    2016-09-01

    Bacteriophages represent a simple viral model of basic research with many possibilities for practical application. Due to their ability to infect and kill bacteria, their potential in the treatment of bacterial infection has been examined since their discovery. With advances in molecular biology and gene engineering, the phage application spectrum has been expanded to various medical and biotechnological fields. The construction of bacteriophages with an extended host range or longer viability in the mammalian bloodstream enhances their potential as an alternative to conventional antibiotic treatment. Insertion of active depolymerase genes to their genomes can enforce the biofilm disposal. They can also be engineered to transfer various compounds to the eukaryotic organisms and the bacterial culture, applicable for the vaccine, drug or gene delivery. Phage recombinant lytic enzymes can be applied as enzybiotics in medicine as well as in biotechnology for pathogen detection or programmed cell death in bacterial expression strains. Besides, modified bacteriophages with high specificity can be applied as bioprobes in detection tools to estimate the presence of pathogens in food industry, or utilized in the control of food-borne pathogens as part of the constructed phage-based biosorbents. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Widespread genetic exchange among terrestrial bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silander, Olin K; Weinreich, Daniel M; Wright, Kevin M; O'Keefe, Kara J; Rang, Camilla U; Turner, Paul E; Chao, Lin

    2005-12-27

    Bacteriophages are the most numerous entities in the biosphere. Despite this numerical dominance, the genetic structure of bacteriophage populations is poorly understood. Here, we present a biogeography study involving 25 previously undescribed bacteriophages from the Cystoviridae clade, a group characterized by a dsRNA genome divided into three segments. Previous laboratory manipulation has shown that, when multiple Cystoviruses infect a single host cell, they undergo (i) rare intrasegment recombination events and (ii) frequent genetic reassortment between segments. Analyzing linkage disequilibrium (LD) within segments, we find no significant evidence of intrasegment recombination in wild populations, consistent with (i). An extensive analysis of LD between segments supports frequent reassortment, on a time scale similar to the genomic mutation rate. The absence of LD within this group of phages is consistent with expectations for a completely sexual population, despite the fact that some segments have >50% nucleotide divergence at 4-fold degenerate sites. This extraordinary rate of genetic exchange between highly unrelated individuals is unprecedented in any taxa. We discuss our results in light of the biological species concept applied to viruses.

  7. Call for a dedicated European legal framework for bacteriophage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeken, Gilbert; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Lavigne, Rob; Jennes, Serge; De Vos, Daniel; Casteels, Minne; Huys, Isabelle

    2014-04-01

    The worldwide emergence of antibiotic resistances and the drying up of the antibiotic pipeline have spurred a search for alternative or complementary antibacterial therapies. Bacteriophages are bacterial viruses that have been used for almost a century to combat bacterial infections, particularly in Poland and the former Soviet Union. The antibiotic crisis has triggered a renewed clinical and agricultural interest in bacteriophages. This, combined with new scientific insights, has pushed bacteriophages to the forefront of the search for new approaches to fighting bacterial infections. But before bacteriophage therapy can be introduced into clinical practice in the European Union, several challenges must be overcome. One of these is the conceptualization and classification of bacteriophage therapy itself and the extent to which it constitutes a human medicinal product regulated under the European Human Code for Medicines (Directive 2001/83/EC). Can therapeutic products containing natural bacteriophages be categorized under the current European regulatory framework, or should this framework be adapted? Various actors in the field have discussed the need for an adapted (or entirely new) regulatory framework for the reintroduction of bacteriophage therapy in Europe. This led to the identification of several characteristics specific to natural bacteriophages that should be taken into consideration by regulators when evaluating bacteriophage therapy. One important consideration is whether bacteriophage therapy development occurs on an industrial scale or a hospital-based, patient-specific scale. More suitable regulatory standards may create opportunities to improve insights into this promising therapeutic approach. In light of this, we argue for the creation of a new, dedicated European regulatory framework for bacteriophage therapy.

  8. Bone phenotypes of P2 receptor knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orriss, Isabel; Syberg, Susanne; Wang, Ning

    2011-01-01

    The action of extracellular nucleotides is mediated by ionotropic P2X receptors and G-protein coupled P2Y receptors. The human genome contains 7 P2X and 8 P2Y receptor genes. Knockout mice strains are available for most of them. As their phenotypic analysis is progressing, bone abnormalities have...... been observed in an impressive number of these mice: distinct abnormalities in P2X7-/- mice, depending on the gene targeting construct and the genetic background, decreased bone mass in P2Y1-/- mice, increased bone mass in P2Y2-/- mice, decreased bone resorption in P2Y6-/- mice, decreased bone...... formation and bone resorption in P2Y13-/- mice. These findings demonstrate the unexpected importance of extracellular nucleotide signalling in the regulation of bone metabolism via multiple P2 receptors and distinct mechanisms involving both osteoblasts and osteoclasts....

  9. Live cell imaging of interactions between replicase and capsid protein of Brome mosaic virus using Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation: Implications for replication and genome packaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaturvedi, Sonali; Rao, A.L.N., E-mail: arao@ucr.edu

    2014-09-15

    In Brome mosaic virus, it was hypothesized that a physical interaction between viral replicase and capsid protein (CP) is obligatory to confer genome packaging specificity. Here we tested this hypothesis by employing Bimolecular Fluorescent Complementation (BiFC) as a tool for evaluating protein–protein interactions in living cells. The efficacy of BiFC was validated by a known interaction between replicase protein 1a (p1a) and protein 2a (p2a) at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) site of viral replication. Additionally, co-expression in planta of a bona fide pair of interacting protein partners of p1a and p2a had resulted in the assembly of a functional replicase. Subsequent BiFC assays in conjunction with mCherry labeled ER as a fluorescent cellular marker revealed that CP physically interacts with p2a, but not p1a, and this CP:p2a interaction occurs at the cytoplasmic phase of the ER. The significance of the CP:p2a interaction in BMV replication and genome packaging is discussed. - Highlights: • YFP fusion proteins of BMV p1a and p2a are biologically active. • Self-interaction was observed for p1a, p2a and CP. • CP interacts with p2a but not p1a. • Majority of reconstituted YFP resulting from bona fide fusion protein partners localized on ER.

  10. Live cell imaging of interactions between replicase and capsid protein of Brome mosaic virus using Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation: Implications for replication and genome packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaturvedi, Sonali; Rao, A.L.N.

    2014-01-01

    In Brome mosaic virus, it was hypothesized that a physical interaction between viral replicase and capsid protein (CP) is obligatory to confer genome packaging specificity. Here we tested this hypothesis by employing Bimolecular Fluorescent Complementation (BiFC) as a tool for evaluating protein–protein interactions in living cells. The efficacy of BiFC was validated by a known interaction between replicase protein 1a (p1a) and protein 2a (p2a) at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) site of viral replication. Additionally, co-expression in planta of a bona fide pair of interacting protein partners of p1a and p2a had resulted in the assembly of a functional replicase. Subsequent BiFC assays in conjunction with mCherry labeled ER as a fluorescent cellular marker revealed that CP physically interacts with p2a, but not p1a, and this CP:p2a interaction occurs at the cytoplasmic phase of the ER. The significance of the CP:p2a interaction in BMV replication and genome packaging is discussed. - Highlights: • YFP fusion proteins of BMV p1a and p2a are biologically active. • Self-interaction was observed for p1a, p2a and CP. • CP interacts with p2a but not p1a. • Majority of reconstituted YFP resulting from bona fide fusion protein partners localized on ER

  11. Genome Sequences of 19 Novel Erwinia amylovora Bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esplin, Ian N. D.; Berg, Jordan A.; Sharma, Ruchira; Allen, Robert C.; Arens, Daniel K.; Ashcroft, Cody R.; Bairett, Shannon R.; Beatty, Nolan J.; Bickmore, Madeline; Bloomfield, Travis J.; Brady, T. Scott; Bybee, Rachel N.; Carter, John L.; Choi, Minsey C.; Duncan, Steven; Fajardo, Christopher P.; Foy, Brayden B.; Fuhriman, David A.; Gibby, Paul D.; Grossarth, Savannah E.; Harbaugh, Kala; Harris, Natalie; Hilton, Jared A.; Hurst, Emily; Hyde, Jonathan R.; Ingersoll, Kayleigh; Jacobson, Caitlin M.; James, Brady D.; Jarvis, Todd M.; Jaen-Anieves, Daniella; Jensen, Garrett L.; Knabe, Bradley K.; Kruger, Jared L.; Merrill, Bryan D.; Pape, Jenny A.; Payne Anderson, Ashley M.; Payne, David E.; Peck, Malia D.; Pollock, Samuel V.; Putnam, Micah J.; Ransom, Ethan K.; Ririe, Devin B.; Robinson, David M.; Rogers, Spencer L.; Russell, Kerri A.; Schoenhals, Jonathan E.; Shurtleff, Christopher A.; Simister, Austin R.; Smith, Hunter G.; Stephenson, Michael B.; Staley, Lyndsay A.; Stettler, Jason M.; Stratton, Mallorie L.; Tateoka, Olivia B.; Tatlow, P. J.; Taylor, Alexander S.; Thompson, Suzanne E.; Townsend, Michelle H.; Thurgood, Trever L.; Usher, Brittian K.; Whitley, Kiara V.; Ward, Andrew T.; Ward, Megan E. H.; Webb, Charles J.; Wienclaw, Trevor M.; Williamson, Taryn L.; Wells, Michael J.; Wright, Cole K.; Breakwell, Donald P.; Hope, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Erwinia amylovora is the causal agent of fire blight, a devastating disease affecting some plants of the Rosaceae family. We isolated bacteriophages from samples collected from infected apple and pear trees along the Wasatch Front in Utah. We announce 19 high-quality complete genome sequences of E. amylovora bacteriophages. PMID:29146842

  12. Genome Sequences of 19 Novel Erwinia amylovora Bacteriophages

    OpenAIRE

    Esplin, Ian N. D.; Berg, Jordan A.; Sharma, Ruchira; Allen, Robert C.; Arens, Daniel K.; Ashcroft, Cody R.; Bairett, Shannon R.; Beatty, Nolan J.; Bickmore, Madeline; Bloomfield, Travis J.; Brady, T. Scott; Bybee, Rachel N.; Carter, John L.; Choi, Minsey C.; Duncan, Steven

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Erwinia amylovora is the causal agent of fire blight, a devastating disease affecting some plants of the Rosaceae family. We isolated bacteriophages from samples collected from infected apple and pear trees along the Wasatch Front in Utah. We announce 19 high-quality complete genome sequences of E. amylovora bacteriophages.

  13. Genomic diversity of bacteriophages infecting the fish pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Daniel; Middelboe, Mathias

    2016-12-01

    Bacteriophages infecting the fish pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum can potentially be used to prevent and control outbreaks of this bacterium in salmonid aquaculture. However, the application of bacteriophages in disease control requires detailed knowledge on their genetic composition. To explore the diversity of F. pyschrophilum bacteriophages, we have analyzed the complete genome sequences of 17 phages isolated from two distant geographic areas (Denmark and Chile), including the previously characterized temperate bacteriophage 6H. Phage genome size ranged from 39 302 to 89 010 bp with a G+C content of 27%-32%. None of the bacteriophages isolated in Denmark contained genes associated with lysogeny, whereas the Chilean isolates were all putative temperate phages and similar to bacteriophage 6H. Comparative genome analysis showed that phages grouped in three different genetic clusters based on genetic composition and gene content, indicating a limited genetic diversity of F. psychrophilum-specific bacteriophages. However, amino acid sequence dissimilarity (25%) was found in putative structural proteins, which could be related to the host specificity determinants. This study represents the first analysis of genomic diversity and composition among bacteriophages infecting the fish pathogen F. psychrophilum and discusses the implications for the application of phages in disease control. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Expression of a bioactive bacteriophage endolysin in Nicotiana benthamiana plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens has led to an increased interest in alternative antimicrobial treatments, such as bacteriophage, bacteriophage-encoded peptidoglycan hydrolases (endolysins) and antimicrobial peptides. In our study, the antimicrobial activity of the CP933 en...

  15. Bacteriophages: The viruses for all seasons of molecular biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karam Jim D

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bacteriophage research continues to break new ground in our understanding of the basic molecular mechanisms of gene action and biological structure. The abundance of bacteriophages in nature and the diversity of their genomes are two reasons why phage research brims with excitement. The pages of Virology Journal will reflect the excitement of the "New Phage Biology."

  16. Sequence and comparative analysis of Leuconostoc dairy bacteriophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kot, Witold; Hansen, Lars Henrik; Neve, Horst

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophages attacking Leuconostoc species may significantly influence the quality of the final product. There is however limited knowledge of this group of phages in the literature. We have determined the complete genome sequences of nine Leuconostoc bacteriophages virulent to either Leuconostoc...

  17. The effects of bacteriophage and nanoparticles on microbial processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Austin L.

    There are approximately 1031 tailed phages in the biosphere, making them the most abundant organism. Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. Due to the large diversity and abundance, no two bacteriophages that have been isolated are genetically the same. Phage products have potential in disease therapy to solve bacteria-related problems, such as infections resulting from resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus. A bacteriophage capable of infecting methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was isolated from bovine hair. The bacteriophage, named JB phage, was characterized using purification, amplification, cesium chloride banding, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. JB phage and nanoparticles were used in various in vitro and in vivo models to test their effects on microbial processes. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy studies revealed strong interactions between JB phage and nanoparticles, which resulted in increased bacteriophage infectivity. JB phage and nanoparticle cocktails were used as a therapeutic to treat skin and systemic infections in mice caused by MRSA.

  18. [THE IDENTIFICATION AND DIFFERENTIATION OF BACTERIOPHAGES OF HUMAN PATHOGENIC VIBRIO].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaevskaia, N E; Kudriakova, T A; Makedonova, L D; Kachkina, G V

    2015-04-01

    The issue of identification and differentiation of large group of bacteriophages of human pathogenic vibrio is still unresolved. In research and practical applied purposes it is important to consider characteristics of bacteriophages for establishing similarity and differences between them. The actual study was carried out to analyze specimens of DNA-containing bacteriophages of pathogenic vibrio. The overwhelming majority of them characterized by complicated type of symmetry--phages with double-helical DNA and also phages with mono-helical DNA structure discovered recently in vibrio. For the first time, the general framework of identification and differentiation of bacteriophages of pathogenic vibrio was developed. This achievement increases possibility to establish species assignment of phages and to compare with phages registered in the database. "The collection of bacteriophages and test-strains of human pathogenic vibrio" (No2010620549 of 24.09.210).

  19. How to disassemble a virus capsid: a computacional approach

    OpenAIRE

    Piedade, Claudio Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Tese de mestrado, Bioquímica (Bioquímica) Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências 2016 Viruses are one of the main subjects of study in science due to the amount of diseases and deaths they cause, not only in humans, but also in other organisms, such as plants, other mammals, insects and microorganisms. This raises the need to understand the mechanisms of host infection. Capsids surround the genetic information of viruses and many experimental and theoretical studies have been done t...

  20. Probing the biophysical interplay between a viral genome and its capsid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, J.; Uetrecht, C.; Rose, R. J.; Sanchez-Eugenia, R.; Marti, G. A.; Agirre, J.; Guerin, D. M. A.; Wuite, G. J. L.; Heck, A. J. R.; Roos, W. H.

    The interaction between a viral capsid and its genome governs crucial steps in the life cycle of a virus, such as assembly and genome uncoating. Tuning cargo-capsid interactions is also essential for successful design and cargo delivery in engineered viral systems. Here we investigate the interplay

  1. Probing the biophysical interplay between a viral genome and its capsid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, J.; Uetrecht, C.; Rose, R.J.; Sanchez-Eugenia, R.; Marti, G.A.; Agirre, J.; Guérin, D.M.A.; Wuite, G.J.L.; Heck, A.J.R.; Roos, W.H.

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between a viral capsid and its genome governs crucial steps in the life cycle of a virus, such as assembly and genome uncoating. Tuning cargo–capsid interactions is also essential for successful design and cargo delivery in engineered viral systems. Here we investigate the interplay

  2. Probing the biophysical interplay between a viral genome and its capsid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, J.; Uetrecht, C.; Rose, R.J.; Sanchez-Eugenia, R.; Marti, G.A.; Agirre, J.; Guérin, D.M.A.; Wuite, G.J.L.; Heck, A.J.R.; Roos, W.H.

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between a viral capsid and its genome governs crucial steps in the life cycle of a virus, such as assembly and genome uncoating. Tuning cargo-capsid interactions is also essential for successful design and cargo delivery in engineered viral systems. Here we investigate the interplay

  3. Antigenic structure of the capsid protein of rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L.; Cortes, Elena; Vela, Carmen

    1998-01-01

    Rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) causes an important disease in rabbits. The virus capsid is composed of a single 60 kDa protein. The capsid protein gene was cloned in Escherichia coli using the pET3 system, and the antigenic structure of RHDV VP60 was dissected using 11 monoclonal...

  4. Varicella-zoster virus induces the formation of dynamic nuclear capsid aggregates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebrun, Marielle [University of Liege (ULg), GIGA-Infection Immunity and Inflammation, Laboratory of Virology and Immunology, Liege (Belgium); Thelen, Nicolas; Thiry, Marc [University of Liege (ULg), GIGA-Neurosciences, Laboratory of Cellular and Tissular Biology, Liege (Belgium); Riva, Laura; Ote, Isabelle; Condé, Claude; Vandevenne, Patricia [University of Liege (ULg), GIGA-Infection Immunity and Inflammation, Laboratory of Virology and Immunology, Liege (Belgium); Di Valentin, Emmanuel [University of Liege (ULg), GIGA-Viral Vectors Platform, Liege (Belgium); Bontems, Sébastien [University of Liege (ULg), GIGA-Infection Immunity and Inflammation, Laboratory of Virology and Immunology, Liege (Belgium); Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine, E-mail: csadzot@ulg.ac.be [University of Liege (ULg), GIGA-Infection Immunity and Inflammation, Laboratory of Virology and Immunology, Liege (Belgium)

    2014-04-15

    The first step of herpesviruses virion assembly occurs in the nucleus. However, the exact site where nucleocapsids are assembled, where the genome and the inner tegument are acquired, remains controversial. We created a recombinant VZV expressing ORF23 (homologous to HSV-1 VP26) fused to the eGFP and dually fluorescent viruses with a tegument protein additionally fused to a red tag (ORF9, ORF21 and ORF22 corresponding to HSV-1 UL49, UL37 and UL36). We identified nuclear dense structures containing the major capsid protein, the scaffold protein and maturing protease, as well as ORF21 and ORF22. Correlative microscopy demonstrated that the structures correspond to capsid aggregates and time-lapse video imaging showed that they appear prior to the accumulation of cytoplasmic capsids, presumably undergoing the secondary egress, and are highly dynamic. Our observations suggest that these structures might represent a nuclear area important for capsid assembly and/or maturation before the budding at the inner nuclear membrane. - Highlights: • We created a recombinant VZV expressing the small capsid protein fused to the eGFP. • We identified nuclear dense structures containing capsid and procapsid proteins. • Correlative microscopy showed that the structures correspond to capsid aggregates. • Procapsids and partial capsids are found within the aggregates of WT and eGFP-23 VZV. • FRAP and FLIP experiments demonstrated that they are dynamic structures.

  5. Inner tegument proteins of Herpes Simplex Virus are sufficient for intracellular capsid motility in neurons but not for axonal targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Oliver; Ivanova, Lyudmila; Bialy, Dagmara; Pohlmann, Anja; Binz, Anne; Hegemann, Maike; Viejo-Borbolla, Abel; Rosenhahn, Bodo; Bauerfeind, Rudolf; Sodeik, Beate

    2017-01-01

    Upon reactivation from latency and during lytic infections in neurons, alphaherpesviruses assemble cytosolic capsids, capsids associated with enveloping membranes, and transport vesicles harboring fully enveloped capsids. It is debated whether capsid envelopment of herpes simplex virus (HSV) is completed in the soma prior to axonal targeting or later, and whether the mechanisms are the same in neurons derived from embryos or from adult hosts. We used HSV mutants impaired in capsid envelopment to test whether the inner tegument proteins pUL36 or pUL37 necessary for microtubule-mediated capsid transport were sufficient for axonal capsid targeting in neurons derived from the dorsal root ganglia of adult mice. Such neurons were infected with HSV1-ΔUL20 whose capsids recruited pUL36 and pUL37, with HSV1-ΔUL37 whose capsids associate only with pUL36, or with HSV1-ΔUL36 that assembles capsids lacking both proteins. While capsids of HSV1-ΔUL20 were actively transported along microtubules in epithelial cells and in the somata of neurons, those of HSV1-ΔUL36 and -ΔUL37 could only diffuse in the cytoplasm. Employing a novel image analysis algorithm to quantify capsid targeting to axons, we show that only a few capsids of HSV1-ΔUL20 entered axons, while vesicles transporting gD utilized axonal transport efficiently and independently of pUL36, pUL37, or pUL20. Our data indicate that capsid motility in the somata of neurons mediated by pUL36 and pUL37 does not suffice for targeting capsids to axons, and suggest that capsid envelopment needs to be completed in the soma prior to targeting of herpes simplex virus to the axons, and to spreading from neurons to neighboring cells. PMID:29284065

  6. The smallest capsid protein mediates binding of the essential tegument protein pp150 to stabilize DNA-containing capsids in human cytomegalovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinghong Dai

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a ubiquitous herpesvirus that causes birth defects in newborns and life-threatening complications in immunocompromised individuals. Among all human herpesviruses, HCMV contains a much larger dsDNA genome within a similarly-sized capsid compared to the others, and it was proposed to require pp150, a tegument protein only found in cytomegaloviruses, to stabilize its genome-containing capsid. However, little is known about how pp150 interacts with the underlying capsid. Moreover, the smallest capsid protein (SCP, while dispensable in herpes simplex virus type 1, was shown to play essential, yet undefined, role in HCMV infection. Here, by cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM, we determine three-dimensional structures of HCMV capsid (no pp150 and virion (with pp150 at sub-nanometer resolution. Comparison of these two structures reveals that each pp150 tegument density is composed of two helix bundles connected by a long central helix. Correlation between the resolved helices and sequence-based secondary structure prediction maps the tegument density to the N-terminal half of pp150. The structures also show that SCP mediates interactions between the capsid and pp150 at the upper helix bundle of pp150. Consistent with this structural observation, ribozyme inhibition of SCP expression in HCMV-infected cells impairs the formation of DNA-containing viral particles and reduces viral yield by 10,000 fold. By cryoEM reconstruction of the resulting "SCP-deficient" viral particles, we further demonstrate that SCP is required for pp150 functionally binding to the capsid. Together, our structural and biochemical results point to a mechanism whereby SCP recruits pp150 to stabilize genome-containing capsid for the production of infectious HCMV virion.

  7. Three-dimensional structure of the enveloped bacteriophage phi12: an incomplete T = 13 lattice is superposed on an enclosed T = 1 shell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wei

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophage phi12 is a member of the Cystoviridae, a unique group of lipid containing membrane enveloped bacteriophages that infect the bacterial plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola. The genomes of the virus species contain three double-stranded (dsRNA segments, and the virus capsid itself is organized in multiple protein shells. The segmented dsRNA genome, the multi-layered arrangement of the capsid and the overall viral replication scheme make the Cystoviridae similar to the Reoviridae.We present structural studies of cystovirus phi12 obtained using cryo-electron microscopy and image processing techniques. We have collected images of isolated phi12 virions and generated reconstructions of both the entire particles and the polymerase complex (PC. We find that in the nucleocapsid (NC, the phi12 P8 protein is organized on an incomplete T = 13 icosahedral lattice where the symmetry axes of the T = 13 layer and the enclosed T = 1 layer of the PC superpose. This is the same general protein-component organization found in phi6 NC's but the detailed structure of the entire phi12 P8 layer is distinct from that found in the best classified cystovirus species phi6. In the reconstruction of the NC, the P8 layer includes protein density surrounding the hexamers of P4 that sit at the 5-fold vertices of the icosahedral lattice. We believe these novel features correspond to dimers of protein P7.In conclusion, we have determined that the phi12 NC surface is composed of an incomplete T = 13 P8 layer forming a net-like configuration. The significance of this finding in regard to cystovirus assembly is that vacancies in the lattice could have the potential to accommodate additional viral proteins that are required for RNA packaging and synthesis.

  8. Reactive oxygen species promote heat shock protein 90-mediated HBV capsid assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yoon Sik; Seo, Hyun Wook; Jung, Guhung

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and has been associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). ROS are also an important factor in HCC because the accumulated ROS leads to abnormal cell proliferation and chromosome mutation. In oxidative stress, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and glutathione (GSH) function as part of the defense mechanism. Hsp90 prevents cellular component from oxidative stress, and GSH acts as antioxidants scavenging ROS in the cell. However, it is not known whether molecules regulated by oxidative stress are involved in HBV capsid assembly. Based on the previous study that Hsp90 facilitates HBV capsid assembly, which is an important step for the packing of viral particles, here, we show that ROS enrich Hsp90-driven HBV capsid formation. In cell-free system, HBV capsid assembly was facilitated by ROS with Hsp90, whereas it was decreased without Hsp90. In addition, GSH inhibited the function of Hsp90 to decrease HBV capsid assembly. Consistent with the result of cell-free system, ROS and buthionine sulfoximine (BS), an inhibitor of GSH synthesis, increased HBV capsid formation in HepG2.2.15 cells. Thus, our study uncovers the interplay between ROS and Hsp90 during HBV capsid assembly. - Highlights: • We examined H 2 O 2 and GSH modulate HBV capsid assembly. • H 2 O 2 facilitates HBV capsid assembly in the presence of Hsp90. • GSH inhibits function of Hsp90 in facilitating HBV capsid assembly. • H 2 O 2 and GSH induce conformation change of Hsp90

  9. Reactive oxygen species promote heat shock protein 90-mediated HBV capsid assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoon Sik, E-mail: yumshak@naver.com; Seo, Hyun Wook, E-mail: suruk@naver.com; Jung, Guhung, E-mail: drjung@snu.ac.kr

    2015-02-13

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and has been associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). ROS are also an important factor in HCC because the accumulated ROS leads to abnormal cell proliferation and chromosome mutation. In oxidative stress, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and glutathione (GSH) function as part of the defense mechanism. Hsp90 prevents cellular component from oxidative stress, and GSH acts as antioxidants scavenging ROS in the cell. However, it is not known whether molecules regulated by oxidative stress are involved in HBV capsid assembly. Based on the previous study that Hsp90 facilitates HBV capsid assembly, which is an important step for the packing of viral particles, here, we show that ROS enrich Hsp90-driven HBV capsid formation. In cell-free system, HBV capsid assembly was facilitated by ROS with Hsp90, whereas it was decreased without Hsp90. In addition, GSH inhibited the function of Hsp90 to decrease HBV capsid assembly. Consistent with the result of cell-free system, ROS and buthionine sulfoximine (BS), an inhibitor of GSH synthesis, increased HBV capsid formation in HepG2.2.15 cells. Thus, our study uncovers the interplay between ROS and Hsp90 during HBV capsid assembly. - Highlights: • We examined H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH modulate HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} facilitates HBV capsid assembly in the presence of Hsp90. • GSH inhibits function of Hsp90 in facilitating HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH induce conformation change of Hsp90.

  10. Revised Mimivirus major capsid protein sequence reveals intron-containing gene structure and extra domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan-Monti Marie

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acanthamoebae polyphaga Mimivirus (APM is the largest known dsDNA virus. The viral particle has a nearly icosahedral structure with an internal capsid shell surrounded with a dense layer of fibrils. A Capsid protein sequence, D13L, was deduced from the APM L425 coding gene and was shown to be the most abundant protein found within the viral particle. However this protein remained poorly characterised until now. A revised protein sequence deposited in a database suggested an additional N-terminal stretch of 142 amino acids missing from the original deduced sequence. This result led us to investigate the L425 gene structure and the biochemical properties of the complete APM major Capsid protein. Results This study describes the full length 3430 bp Capsid coding gene and characterises the 593 amino acids long corresponding Capsid protein 1. The recombinant full length protein allowed the production of a specific monoclonal antibody able to detect the Capsid protein 1 within the viral particle. This protein appeared to be post-translationnally modified by glycosylation and phosphorylation. We proposed a secondary structure prediction of APM Capsid protein 1 compared to the Capsid protein structure of Paramecium Bursaria Chlorella Virus 1, another member of the Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA virus family. Conclusion The characterisation of the full length L425 Capsid coding gene of Acanthamoebae polyphaga Mimivirus provides new insights into the structure of the main Capsid protein. The production of a full length recombinant protein will be useful for further structural studies.

  11. Structural and Molecular Modeling Features of P2X Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Anastacio Alves

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently, adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP is recognized as the extracellular messenger that acts through P2 receptors. P2 receptors are divided into two subtypes: P2Y metabotropic receptors and P2X ionotropic receptors, both of which are found in virtually all mammalian cell types studied. Due to the difficulty in studying membrane protein structures by X-ray crystallography or NMR techniques, there is little information about these structures available in the literature. Two structures of the P2X4 receptor in truncated form have been solved by crystallography. Molecular modeling has proven to be an excellent tool for studying ionotropic receptors. Recently, modeling studies carried out on P2X receptors have advanced our knowledge of the P2X receptor structure-function relationships. This review presents a brief history of ion channel structural studies and shows how modeling approaches can be used to address relevant questions about P2X receptors.

  12. Lytic bacteriophages reduce Escherichia coli O157

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Sean; Roberts, Cheryl; Handy, Eric; Sharma, Manan

    2013-01-01

    The role of lytic bacteriophages in preventing cross contamination of produce has not been evaluated. A cocktail of three lytic phages specific for E. coli O157:H7 (EcoShield™) or a control (phosphate buffered saline, PBS) was applied to lettuce by either; (1) immersion of lettuce in 500 ml of EcoShield™ 8.3 log PFU/ml or 9.8 log PFU/ml for up to 2 min before inoculation with E. coli O157:H7; (2) spray-application of EcoShield™ (9.3 log PFU/ml) to lettuce after inoculation with E. coli O157:H7 (4.10 CFU/cm2) following exposure to 50 μg/ml chlorine for 30 sec. After immersion studies, lettuce was spot-inoculated with E. coli O157:H7 (2.38 CFU/cm2). Phage-treated, inoculated lettuce pieces were stored at 4°C for and analyzed for E. coli O157:H7 populations for up to 7 d. Immersion of lettuce in 9.8 log PFU/ml EcoShield™ for 2 min significantly (p bacteriophages on the surface of fresh cut lettuce, potentially contributing to the efficacy of the lytic phages on lettuce. Spraying phages on to inoculated fresh cut lettuce after being washed in hypochlorite solution was significantly more effective in reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations (2.22 log CFU/cm2) on day 0 compared with control treatments (4.10 log CFU/cm2). Both immersion and spray treatments provided protection from E. coli O157:H7 contamination on lettuce, but spray application of lytic bacteriophages to lettuce was more effective in immediately reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations fresh cut lettuce. PMID:23819106

  13. An Overview on Bacteriophages: A Natural Nanostructured Antibacterial Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Vaibhav; Pragya; Verma, Navneet; Mishra, Arun Kumar; Nath, Gopal; Gaur, Praveen Kumar; Verma, Anurag

    2018-01-01

    Recent advances in the field of bionanomedicine not only enable us to produce biomaterials but also to manipulate them at molecular level. Viruses particularly bacteriophages are a promising nanomaterial that can be functionalized with great precision. Bacteriophages are the natural antimicrobial agents that fight against antibiotic resistant bacteria which cause infections in animals, humans, or in crops of agricultural value. The idea of utilizing bacteriophages as therapeutic agents is due to their ability to kill bacteria at the end of the infectious cycle. This paper reviewed the general biology of bacteriophages and the presence of receptors on the bacteria which are necessary for the recognition and adsorption of bacteriophages. Pharmacokinetics and therapeutic potential of bacteriophages administered through various routes in treating diverse bacterial infections is also reviewed along with the problems associated with bacteriophage therapy. Among various routes of administration, parenteral route is found to be the most thriving route for the treatment of systemic infections whereas oral route is meant to treat gastrointestinal infections and; local delivery (skin, nasal, ears) of phages has proven its potency to treat topical infections. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Hypermethylation downregulates P2X7 receptor expression in astrocytoma

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jing; Li, Ningning; Sheng, Ruofan; Wang, Rui; Xu, Zude; Mao, Ying; Wang, Yin; Liu, Ying

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the altered expression of p2X purinoceptor (P2X7R) in astrocytoma. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were used to determine the P2X7R expression in glioblastoma (GBM) and surrounding normal brain tissue. DNA methylation levels of P2X7R gene promoter in GBM were analyzed using a Sequenom MassARRAY® System. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to detect the expression of P2X7R in astrocytoma at different malignan...

  15. Sinorhizobium meliloti Phage ΦM9 Defines a New Group of T4 Superfamily Phages with Unusual Genomic Features but a Common T=16 Capsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew C; Tatum, Kelsey B; Lynn, Jason S; Brewer, Tess E; Lu, Stephen; Washburn, Brian K; Stroupe, M Elizabeth; Jones, Kathryn M

    2015-11-01

    Relatively little is known about the phages that infect agriculturally important nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria. Here we report the genome and cryo-electron microscopy structure of the Sinorhizobium meliloti-infecting T4 superfamily phage ΦM9. This phage and its close relative Rhizobium phage vB_RleM_P10VF define a new group of T4 superfamily phages. These phages are distinctly different from the recently characterized cyanophage-like S. meliloti phages of the ΦM12 group. Structurally, ΦM9 has a T=16 capsid formed from repeating units of an extended gp23-like subunit that assemble through interactions between one subunit and the adjacent E-loop insertion domain. Though genetically very distant from the cyanophages, the ΦM9 capsid closely resembles that of the T4 superfamily cyanophage Syn9. ΦM9 also has the same T=16 capsid architecture as the very distant phage SPO1 and the herpesviruses. Despite their overall lack of similarity at the genomic and structural levels, ΦM9 and S. meliloti phage ΦM12 have a small number of open reading frames in common that appear to encode structural proteins involved in interaction with the host and which may have been acquired by horizontal transfer. These proteins are predicted to encode tail baseplate proteins, tail fibers, tail fiber assembly proteins, and glycanases that cleave host exopolysaccharide. Despite recent advances in the phylogenetic and structural characterization of bacteriophages, only a small number of phages of plant-symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria have been studied at the molecular level. The effects of phage predation upon beneficial bacteria that promote plant growth remain poorly characterized. First steps in understanding these soil bacterium-phage dynamics are genetic, molecular, and structural characterizations of these groups of phages. The T4 superfamily phages are among the most complex phages; they have large genomes packaged within an icosahedral head and a long, contractile tail

  16. Contractile injection systems of bacteriophages and related systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Nicholas M I; van Raaij, Mark J; Leiman, Petr G

    2018-01-01

    through the target cell membrane. Subsequently, the bacteriophage genome is injected through the tube. The structural transformation of the bacteriophage T4 baseplate upon binding to the host cell has been recently described in near-atomic detail. In this review we discuss structural elements and features...... of this mechanism that are likely to be conserved in all contractile injection systems (systems evolutionary and structurally related to contractile bacteriophage tails). These include the type VI secretion system (T6SS), which is used by bacteria to transfer effectors into other bacteria and into eukaryotic cells...

  17. The role of bacteriophages in periodontal health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Graça; Silva, Maria Daniela; Peddey, Mark; Sillankorva, Sanna; Azeredo, Joana

    2016-10-01

    The human periodontium health is commonly compromised by chronic inflammatory conditions and has become a major public health concern. Dental plaque, the precursor of periodontal disease, is a complex biofilm consisting mainly of bacteria, but also archaea, protozoa, fungi and viruses. Viruses that specifically infect bacteria - bacteriophages - are most common in the oral cavity. Despite this, their role in the progression of periodontal disease remains poorly explored. This review aims to summarize how bacteriophages interact with the oral microbiota, their ability to increase bacterial virulence and mediate the transfer of resistance genes and suggests how bacteriophages can be used as an alternative to the current periodontal disease therapies.

  18. Bacteriophage therapy in implant-related infections: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Cengiz; Colak, Mehmet; Yilmaz, Banu Coskun; Ersoz, Gulden; Kutateladze, Mzia; Gozlugol, Mehmet

    2013-01-16

    Implant-related infections with bacteria resistant to multiple antibiotics represent one of the major problems in orthopaedic surgery. It was our hypothesis that local application of bacteriophages, which are bacteria-destroying viruses, would be effective against biofilm-forming bacteria. An implant-related infection model was created using methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in forty-eight rats and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in another forty-eight rats. Each group was divided into four subgroups; one subgroup received a bacterium-specific bacteriophage (Sb-1 in the MRSA group and PAT14 in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa group), one received antibiotic for fourteen days (20 mg/kg/day teicoplanin in the MRSA group, and 120 mg/kg/day imipenem + cilastatin and 25 mg/kg/day amikacin in the Pseudomonas group), one received antibiotic and bacteriophage, and one received no treatment. Animals receiving bacteriophage therapy were injected locally with 107 bacteriophages in a 0.1-mL suspension on three consecutive days. All animals were killed on the fifteenth day after initiation of treatment, and the tibia was excised. Results were assessed with use of microbiology, light microscopy, and electron microscopy. In the MRSA group, the antibiotic administration significantly decreased the number of colony-forming units per subject in quantitative cultures (control subgroup, 50,586; bacteriophage, 30,788; antibiotic, 17,165; antibiotic + bacteriophage, 5000; p = 0.004 for the comparison of the latter group with the control). Biofilm was absent only in the antibiotic + bacteriophage subgroup. In the Pseudomonas group, the number of colony-forming units per subject in quantitative cultures was significantly lower in each treatment subgroup compared with the control subgroup (control subgroup, 14,749; bacteriophage, 6484 [p = 0.016]; antibiotic, 2619 [p = 0.01]; antibiotic + bacteriophage, 1705 [p bacteriophage subgroup was also significantly lower than the values in the

  19. Bacteriophages use hypermodified nucleosides to evade host's defence systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kot, Witold; Olsen, Nikoline S.; Carstens, Alexander Byth

    Since the very beginning of life, primitive cells were forced to face selfish genetic elements like viruses or plasmids. Bacteria, continually exposed to infections, developed several phage resistance mechanisms e.g. restriction-modification and CRISPR-Cas systems. On the other hand, bacteriophages...... to investigate this mechanism in detail we have used several methods including direct plaque sequencing, restriction endonuclease analysis and CRISPR-Cas genome editing. Through generation of specific mutants, we were able to introduce a restriction sensitive phenotype in the CAjan bacteriophage providing new...... insight on use of alternative bases by bacteriophages....

  20. Two open states of P2X receptor channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milos B. Rokic

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The occupancy of the ATP binding sites of P2X receptor (P2XR channels causes the rapid opening of a small cation-permeable pore, followed by a gradual dilation that renders the pore permeable to large organic cations. Electrophysiologically, this phenomenon was shown using whole-cell current recording on P2X2R-, P2X2/X5R-, P2X4R- and P2X7R-expressing cells that were bathed in N-methyl-D-glucamine-containing buffers in the presence and/or absence of small monovalent and divalent cations. The pore dilation of P2X4R and P2X7R caused a secondary current growth, whereas that of P2X2R showed a sustained kinetic coupling of dilation and desensitization, leading to receptor channel closure. The pore size of the P2X7R open and dilated states was estimated to be approximately 0.85 nm and greater than 1 nm, respectively. The P2XR pore dilation was also observed in intact cells by measurement of fluorescent dye uptake/release, application of polyethylene glycols of different sizes, and atomic force microscopy. However, pore dilation was not observed at the single channel level. Structural data describing the dilated state are not available, and the relevance of orthosteric and allosteric ligand interactions to pore dilation was not studied.

  1. Bacteriophages and Their Role in Food Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanna M. Sillankorva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The interest for natural antimicrobial compounds has increased due to alterations in consumer positions towards the use of chemical preservatives in foodstuff and food processing surfaces. Bacteriophages fit in the class of natural antimicrobial and their effectiveness in controlling bacterial pathogens in agro-food industry has led to the development of different phage products already approved by USFDA and USDA. The majority of these products are to be used in farm animals or animal products such as carcasses, meats and also in agricultural and horticultural products. Treatment with specific phages in the food industry can prevent the decay of products and the spread of bacterial diseases and ultimately promote safe environments in animal and plant food production, processing, and handling. This is an overview of recent work carried out with phages as tools to promote food safety, starting with a general introduction describing the prevalence of foodborne pathogens and bacteriophages and a more detailed discussion on the use of phage therapy to prevent and treat experimentally induced infections of animals against the most common foodborne pathogens, the use of phages as biocontrol agents in foods, and also their use as biosanitizers of food contact surfaces.

  2. A bacteriophages journey through the human body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Jeremy J

    2017-09-01

    The human body is colonized by a diverse collective of microorganisms, including bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses. The smallest entity of this microbial conglomerate are the bacterial viruses. Bacteriophages, or phages for short, exert significant selective pressure on their bacterial hosts, undoubtedly influencing the human microbiome and its impact on our health and well-being. Phages colonize all niches of the body, including the skin, oral cavity, lungs, gut, and urinary tract. As such our bodies are frequently and continuously exposed to diverse collections of phages. Despite the prevalence of phages throughout our bodies, the extent of their interactions with human cells, organs, and immune system is still largely unknown. Phages physically interact with our mucosal surfaces, are capable of bypassing epithelial cell layers, disseminate throughout the body and may manipulate our immune system. Here, I establish the novel concept of an "intra-body phageome," which encompasses the collection of phages residing within the classically "sterile" regions of the body. This review will take a phage-centric view of the microbiota, human body, and immune system with the ultimate goal of inspiring a greater appreciation for both the indirect and direct interactions between bacteriophages and their mammalian hosts. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. [TL, the new bacteriophage of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and its application for the search of halo-producing bacteriophages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleteneva, E A; Burkal'tseva, M V; Shaburova, O V; Krylov, S V; Pechnikova, E V; Sokolova, O S; Krylov, V N

    2011-01-01

    The properties of new virulent bacteriophage TL of Pseudomonas aeruginosa belonging to the family Podoviridae (genome size of 46 kb) were investigated. This bacteriophage is capable of lysogenizing the bacterial lawn in halo zones around negative colonies (NC) of other bacteriophages. TL forms large NC, that are hardly distinguishable on the lawn of P. aeruginisa PAO1. At the same time, on the lawns of some phage-resistant PAO1 mutants, as well as on those produced by a number of clinical isolates, TL forms more transparent NC. It is suggested that more effective growth of the bacteriophage TL NC is associated with the differences in outer lipopolysaccharide (LPS) layer of the cell walls of different bacterial strains, as well as of the bacteria inside and outside of the halos. This TL property was used to optimize selection of bacteriophages producing halos around NC on the lawn of P. aeruginosa PAO1. As a result, a group of bacteriophages differing in the patterns of interaction between their halos and TL bacteriophage, as well as in some characters was identified. Taking into consideration the importance of cell-surfaced structures of P. aeruginosa in manifestation of virulence and pathogenicity, possible utilization of specific phage enzymes, polysacchadide depolymerases, for more effective treatment of P. aeruginosa infections is discussed.

  4. Effects of pulling forces, osmotic pressure, condensing agents and viscosity on the thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA ejection from bacteriophages to bacterial cells: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Anton S; Douglas, Scott S; Harvey, Stephen C

    2013-03-20

    In this work, we report on simulations of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) ejection from bacteriophage φ29 into a bacterial cell. The ejection was studied with a coarse-grained model, in which viral dsDNA was represented by beads on a torsion-less string. The bacteriophage's capsid and the bacterial cell were defined by sets of spherical constraints. To account for the effects of the viscous medium inside the bacterial cell, the simulations were carried out using a Langevin dynamics protocol. Our simplest simulations (involving constant viscosity and no external biasing forces) produced results compatible with the push-pull model of DNA ejection, with an ejection rate significantly higher in the first part of ejection than in the latter parts. Additionally, we performed more complicated simulations, in which we included additional factors such as external forces, osmotic pressure, condensing agents and ejection-dependent viscosity. The effects of these factors (independently and in combination) on the thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA ejection were studied. We found that, in general, the dependence of ejection forces and ejection rates on the amount of DNA ejected becomes more complex if the ejection is modeled with a broader, more realistic set of parameters and influences (such as variation in the solvent's viscosity and the application of an external force). However, certain combinations of factors and numerical parameters led to the opposition of some ejection-driving and ejection-inhibiting influences, ultimately causing an apparent simplification of the ejection profiles.

  5. UV-Sensitivity of Shiga Toxin-Converting Bacteriophage Virions Φ24B, 933W, P22, P27 and P32

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Bloch

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin-converting bacteriophages (Stx phages are present as prophages in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC strains. Theses phages can be transmitted to previously non-pathogenic E. coli cells making them potential producers of Shiga toxins, as they bear genes for these toxins in their genomes. Therefore, sensitivity of Stx phage virions to various conditions is important in both natural processes of spreading of these viruses and potential prophylactic control of appearance of novel pathogenic E. coli strains. In this report we provide evidence that virions of Stx phages are significantly more sensitive to UV irradiation than bacteriophage λ. Following UV irradiation of Stx virions at the dose of 50 J/m2, their infectivity dropped by 1–3 log10, depending on the kind of phage. Under these conditions, a considerable release of phage DNA from virions was observed, and electron microscopy analyses indicated a large proportion of partially damaged virions. Infection of E. coli cells with UV-irradiated Stx phages resulted in significantly decreased levels of expression of N and cro genes, crucial for lytic development. We conclude that inactivation of Stx virions caused by relatively low dose of UV light is due to damage of capsids that prevents effective infection of the host cells.

  6. UV-Sensitivity of Shiga Toxin-Converting Bacteriophage Virions Φ24B, 933W, P22, P27 and P32

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Sylwia; Nejman-Faleńczyk, Bożena; Topka, Gracja; Dydecka, Aleksandra; Licznerska, Katarzyna; Narajczyk, Magdalena; Necel, Agnieszka; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Shiga toxin-converting bacteriophages (Stx phages) are present as prophages in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains. Theses phages can be transmitted to previously non-pathogenic E. coli cells making them potential producers of Shiga toxins, as they bear genes for these toxins in their genomes. Therefore, sensitivity of Stx phage virions to various conditions is important in both natural processes of spreading of these viruses and potential prophylactic control of appearance of novel pathogenic E. coli strains. In this report we provide evidence that virions of Stx phages are significantly more sensitive to UV irradiation than bacteriophage λ. Following UV irradiation of Stx virions at the dose of 50 J/m2, their infectivity dropped by 1–3 log10, depending on the kind of phage. Under these conditions, a considerable release of phage DNA from virions was observed, and electron microscopy analyses indicated a large proportion of partially damaged virions. Infection of E. coli cells with UV-irradiated Stx phages resulted in significantly decreased levels of expression of N and cro genes, crucial for lytic development. We conclude that inactivation of Stx virions caused by relatively low dose of UV light is due to damage of capsids that prevents effective infection of the host cells. PMID:26402701

  7. Assessing the diversity of the g23 gene of T4-like bacteriophages from Lake Baikal with high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapov, Sergey; Belykh, Olga; Krasnopeev, Andrey; Gladkikh, Anna; Kabilov, Marsel; Tupikin, Aleksey; Butina, Tatyana

    2018-02-01

    Based on second generation sequencing (MiSeq platform, Illumina), we determined the genetic diversity of T4-like bacteriophages of the family Myoviridae by analysing fragments of the major capsid protein gene g23 in the plankton of Lake Baikal. The sampling depth in our study was significantly higher than in those obtained by the Sanger method before. We obtained 33 701 sequences of the g23 gene fragments, 141 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of which were identified. 86 OTUs (60.9%) had the closest relatives from lakes Bourget and Annecy, and 28 OTUs (19.8%) had the highest identity with the Baikal g23 clones, which had been previously identified in the northern and southern basins of the lake by the Sanger method. The remaining OTUs were similar to the clones from other ecosystems. We showed a high genetic diversity of T4-type bacteriophages and a genetic difference with the phage communities from other ecosystems. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Structural rigidity in the capsid assembly of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hespenheide, B M [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Arizona State University, PO Box 871504, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States); Jacobs, D J [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, 18111 Nordhoff Street, Northridge, CA 91330-8268 (United States); Thorpe, M F [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Arizona State University, PO Box 871504, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States)

    2004-11-10

    The cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) has a protein cage, or capsid, which encloses its genetic material. The structure of the capsid consists of 180 copies of a single protein that self-assemble inside a cell to form a complete capsid with icosahedral symmetry. The icosahedral surface can be naturally divided into pentagonal and hexagonal faces, and the formation of either of these faces has been proposed to be the first step in the capsid assembly process. We have used the software FIRST to analyse the rigidity of pentameric and hexameric substructures of the complete capsid to explore the viability of certain capsid assembly pathways. FIRST uses the 3D pebble game to determine structural rigidity, and a brief description of this algorithm, as applied to body-bar networks, is given here. We find that the pentameric substructure, which corresponds to a pentagonal face on the icosahedral surface, provides the best structural properties for nucleating the capsid assembly process, consistent with experimental observations.

  9. Structure of the capsid of Kilham rat virus from small-angle neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wobbe, C.R.; Mitra, S.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    1984-12-18

    The structure of empty capsids of Kilham rat virus, an autonomous parvovirus with icosahedral symmetry, was investigated by small-angle neutron scattering. From the forward scatter, the molecular weight was determined to be 4.0 x 10(6), and from the Guinier region, the radius of gyration was found to be 105 A in D2O and 104 A in H/sub 2/O. On the basis of the capsid molecular weight and the molecular weights and relative abundances of the capsid proteins, the authors propose that the capsid has a triangulation number of 1. Extended scattering curves and mathematical modeling revealed that the capsid consists of two shells of protein, the inner shell extending from 58 to 91 A in D2O and from 50 to 91 A in H/sub 2/O and containing 11% of the capsid scattering mass, and the outer shell extending to 121 A in H/sub 2/O and D2O. The inner shell appears to have a higher content of basic amino acids than the outer shell, based on its lower scattering density in D2O than in H/sub 2/O. The authors propose that all three capsid proteins contribute to the inner shell and that this basic region serves DNA binding and partial charge neutralization functions.

  10. A molecular breadboard: Removal and replacement of subunits in a hepatitis B virus capsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lye Siang; Brunk, Nicholas; Haywood, Daniel G; Keifer, David; Pierson, Elizabeth; Kondylis, Panagiotis; Wang, Joseph Che-Yen; Jacobson, Stephen C; Jarrold, Martin F; Zlotnick, Adam

    2017-11-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein is a model system for studying assembly and disassembly of icosahedral structures. Controlling disassembly will allow re-engineering the 120 subunit HBV capsid, making it a molecular breadboard. We examined removal of subunits from partially crosslinked capsids to form stable incomplete particles. To characterize incomplete capsids, we used two single molecule techniques, resistive-pulse sensing and charge detection mass spectrometry. We expected to find a binomial distribution of capsid fragments. Instead, we found a preponderance of 3 MDa complexes (90 subunits) and no fragments smaller than 3 MDa. We also found 90-mers in the disassembly of uncrosslinked HBV capsids. 90-mers seem to be a common pause point in disassembly reactions. Partly explaining this result, graph theory simulations have showed a threshold for capsid stability between 80 and 90 subunits. To test a molecular breadboard concept, we showed that missing subunits could be refilled resulting in chimeric, 120 subunit particles. This result may be a means of assembling unique capsids with functional decorations. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  11. ATP-Driven Contraction of Phage T3 Capsids with DNA Incompletely Packaged In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Serwer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine triphosphate (ATP cleavage powers packaging of a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA molecule in a pre-assembled capsid of phages that include T3. Several observations constitute a challenge to the conventional view that the shell of the capsid is energetically inert during packaging. Here, we test this challenge by analyzing the in vitro effects of ATP on the shells of capsids generated by DNA packaging in vivo. These capsids retain incompletely packaged DNA (ipDNA and are called ipDNA-capsids; the ipDNA-capsids are assumed to be products of premature genome maturation-cleavage. They were isolated via preparative Nycodenz buoyant density centrifugation. For some ipDNA-capsids, Nycodenz impermeability increases hydration and generates density so low that shell hyper-expansion must exist to accommodate associated water. Electron microscopy (EM confirmed hyper-expansion and low permeability and revealed that 3.0 mM magnesium ATP (physiological concentration causes contraction of hyper-expanded, lowpermeability ipDNA-capsids to less than mature size; 5.0 mM magnesium ATP (border of supraphysiological concentration or more disrupts them. Additionally, excess sodium ADP reverses 3.0 mM magnesium ATP-induced contraction and re-generates hyper-expansion. The Nycodenz impermeability implies assembly perfection that suggests selection for function in DNA packaging. These findings support the above challenge and can be explained via the assumption that T3 DNA packaging includes a back-up cycle of ATP-driven capsid contraction and hyper-expansion.

  12. The putative small terminase from the thermophilic dsDNA bacteriophage G20C is a nine-subunit oligomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loredo-Varela, Juan; Chechik, Maria; Levdikov, Vladimir M.; Abd-El-Aziz, Ahmad; Minakhin, Leonid; Severinov, Konstantin; Smits, Callum; Antson, Alfred A.

    2013-01-01

    The putative small terminase protein from the thermostable bacteriophage G20C has been produced, purified and crystallized. The assembly of double-stranded DNA bacteriophages is dependent on a small terminase protein that normally plays two important roles. Firstly, the small terminase protein specifically recognizes viral DNA and recruits the large terminase protein, which makes the initial cut in the dsDNA. Secondly, once the complex of the small terminase, the large terminase and the DNA has docked to the portal protein, and DNA translocation into a preformed empty procapsid has begun, the small terminase modulates the ATPase activity of the large terminase. Here, the putative small terminase protein from the thermostable bacteriophage G20C, which infects the Gram-negative eubacterium Thermus thermophilus, has been produced, purified and crystallized. Size-exclusion chromatography–multi-angle laser light scattering data indicate that the protein forms oligomers containing nine subunits. Crystals diffracting to 2.8 Å resolution have been obtained. These belonged to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 94.31, b = 125.6, c = 162.8 Å. The self-rotation function and Matthews coefficient calculations are consistent with the presence of a nine-subunit oligomer in the asymmetric unit

  13. P2X4: A fast and sensitive purinergic receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaanus Suurväli

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular nucleotides have been recognized as important mediators of activation, triggering multiple responses via plasma membrane receptors known as P2 receptors. P2 receptors comprise P2X ionotropic receptors and G protein-coupled P2Y receptors. P2X receptors are expressed in many tissues, where they are involved in a number of functions including synaptic transmission, muscle contraction, platelet aggregation, inflammation, macrophage activation, differentiation and proliferation, neuropathic and inflammatory pain. P2X4 is one of the most sensitive purinergic receptors (at nanomolar ATP concentrations, about one thousand times more than the archetypal P2X7. P2X4 is widely expressed in central and peripheral neurons, in microglia, and also found in various epithelial tissues and endothelial cells. It localizes on the plasma membrane, but also in intracellular compartments. P2X4 is preferentially localized in lysosomes, where it is protected from proteolysis by its glycosylation. High ATP concentration in the lysosomes does not activate P2X4 at low pH; P2X4 gets activated by intra-lysosomal ATP only in its fully dissociated tetra-anionic form, when the pH increases to 7.4. Thus, P2X4 is functioning as a Ca2+-channel after the fusion of late endosomes and lysosomes. P2X4 modulates major neurotransmitter systems and regulates alcohol-induced responses in microglia. P2X4 is one of the key receptors mediating neuropathic pain. However, injury-induced upregulation of P2X4 expression is gender dependent and plays a key role in pain difference between males and females. P2X4 is also involved in inflammation. Extracellular ATP being a pro-inflammatory molecule, P2X4 can trigger inflammation in response to high ATP release. It is therefore involved in multiple pathologies, like post-ischemic inflammation, rheumatoid arthritis, airways inflammation in asthma, neurodegenerative diseases and even metabolic syndrome. Although P2X4 remains poorly

  14. Stabilization of T4 bacteriophage at acidic and basic pH by adsorption on paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Abigail; Greene, Melissa; Kimmelshue, Chad; Cademartiri, Rebecca

    2017-12-01

    Bacteriophages find applications in agriculture, medicine, and food safety. Many of these applications can expose bacteriophages to stresses that inactivate them including acidic and basic pH. Bacteriophages can be stabilized against these stresses by materials including paper, a common material in packaging and consumer products. Combining paper and bacteriophages creates antibacterial materials, which can reduce the use of antibiotics. Here we show that adsorption on paper protects T4, T5, and T7 bacteriophage from acidic and basic pH. We added bacteriophages to filter paper functionalized with carboxylic acid (carboxyl methyl cellulose) or amine (chitosan) groups, and exposed them to pH from 5.6 to 14. We determined the number of infective bacteriophages after exposure directly on the paper. All papers extended the lifetime of infective bacteriophage by at least a factor of four with some papers stabilizing bacteriophages for up to one week. The degree of stabilization depended on five main factors (i) the family of the bacteriophage, (ii) the charge of the paper and bacteriophages, (iii) the location of the bacteriophages within the paper, (iv) the ability of the paper to prevent bacteriophage-bacteriophage aggregation, and (v) the sensitivity of the bacteriophage proteins to the tested pH. Even when adsorbed on paper the bacteriophages were able to remove E. coli in milk. Choosing the right paper modification or material will protect bacteriophages adsorbed on that material against detrimental pH and other environmental challenges increasing the range of applications of bacteriophages on materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. P2X1 receptors and the endothelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LS Harrington

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine triphosphate (ATP is now established as a principle vaso-active mediator in the vasculature. Its actions on arteries are complex, and are mediated by the P2X and P2Y receptor families. It is generally accepted that ATP induces a bi-phasic response in arteries, inducing contraction via the P2X and P2Y receptors on the smooth muscle cells, and vasodilation via the actions of P2Y receptors located on the endothelium. However, a number of recent studies have placed P2X1 receptors on the endothelium of some arteries. The use of a specific P2X1 receptor ligand, a, b methylene ATP has demonstrated that P2X1 receptors also have a bi-functional role. The actions of ATP on P2X1 receptors is therefore dependant on its location, inducing contraction when located on the smooth muscle cells, and dilation when expressed on the endothelium, comparable to that of P2Y receptors.

  16. Purinergic P2 receptors as targets for novel analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    2006-06-01

    Following hints in the early literature about adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) injections producing pain, an ion-channel nucleotide receptor was cloned in 1995, P2X3 subtype, which was shown to be localized predominantly on small nociceptive sensory nerves. Since then, there has been an increasing number of papers exploring the role of P2X3 homomultimer and P2X2/3 heteromultimer receptors on sensory nerves in a wide range of organs, including skin, tongue, tooth pulp, intestine, bladder, and ureter that mediate the initiation of pain. Purinergic mechanosensory transduction has been proposed for visceral pain, where ATP released from epithelial cells lining the bladder, ureter, and intestine during distension acts on P2X3 and P2X2/3, and possibly P2Y, receptors on subepithelial sensory nerve fibers to send messages to the pain centers in the brain as well as initiating local reflexes. P1, P2X, and P2Y receptors also appear to be involved in nociceptive neural pathways in the spinal cord. P2X4 receptors on spinal microglia have been implicated in allodynia. The involvement of purinergic signaling in long-term neuropathic pain and inflammation as well as acute pain is discussed as well as the development of P2 receptor antagonists as novel analgesics.

  17. Combined use of bacteriophage K and a novel bacteriophage to reduce Staphylococcus aureus biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alves, D.R.; Gaudion, A.; Bean, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are major causes of impairment of wound healing and patient morbidity. One of the most common and aggressive wound pathogens is Staphylococcus aureus, displaying a large repertoire of virulence factors and commonly reduced susceptibility to antibiotics, such as the spread of methicillin-......-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Bacteriophages are obligate parasites of bacteria. They multiply intracellularly and lyse their bacterial host, releasing their progeny. We isolated a novel phage, DRA88, which has a ...

  18. Dynamic allostery governs cyclophilin A-HIV capsid interplay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Suiter, Christopher L; Ahn, Jinwoo; Byeon, In-Ja L; Perilla, Juan R; Langmead, Christopher J; Hung, Ivan; Gor'kov, Peter L; Gan, Zhehong; Brey, William; Aiken, Christopher; Zhang, Peijun; Schulten, Klaus; Gronenborn, Angela M; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-11-24

    Host factor protein Cyclophilin A (CypA) regulates HIV-1 viral infectivity through direct interactions with the viral capsid, by an unknown mechanism. CypA can either promote or inhibit viral infection, depending on host cell type and HIV-1 capsid (CA) protein sequence. We have examined the role of conformational dynamics on the nanosecond to millisecond timescale in HIV-1 CA assemblies in the escape from CypA dependence, by magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR and molecular dynamics (MD). Through the analysis of backbone (1)H-(15)N and (1)H-(13)C dipolar tensors and peak intensities from 3D MAS NMR spectra of wild-type and the A92E and G94D CypA escape mutants, we demonstrate that assembled CA is dynamic, particularly in loop regions. The CypA loop in assembled wild-type CA from two strains exhibits unprecedented mobility on the nanosecond to microsecond timescales, and the experimental NMR dipolar order parameters are in quantitative agreement with those calculated from MD trajectories. Remarkably, the CypA loop dynamics of wild-type CA HXB2 assembly is significantly attenuated upon CypA binding, and the dynamics profiles of the A92E and G94D CypA escape mutants closely resemble that of wild-type CA assembly in complex with CypA. These results suggest that CypA loop dynamics is a determining factor in HIV-1's escape from CypA dependence.

  19. Dynamic allostery governs cyclophilin A–HIV capsid interplay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Suiter, Christopher L.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Langmead, Christopher J.; Hung, Ivan; Gor'kov, Peter L.; Gan, Zhehong; Brey, William; Aiken, Christopher; Zhang, Peijun; Schulten, Klaus; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    Host factor protein Cyclophilin A (CypA) regulates HIV-1 viral infectivity through direct interactions with the viral capsid, by an unknown mechanism. CypA can either promote or inhibit viral infection, depending on host cell type and HIV-1 capsid (CA) protein sequence. We have examined the role of conformational dynamics on the nanosecond to millisecond timescale in HIV-1 CA assemblies in the escape from CypA dependence, by magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR and molecular dynamics (MD). Through the analysis of backbone 1H-15N and 1H-13C dipolar tensors and peak intensities from 3D MAS NMR spectra of wild-type and the A92E and G94D CypA escape mutants, we demonstrate that assembled CA is dynamic, particularly in loop regions. The CypA loop in assembled wild-type CA from two strains exhibits unprecedented mobility on the nanosecond to microsecond timescales, and the experimental NMR dipolar order parameters are in quantitative agreement with those calculated from MD trajectories. Remarkably, the CypA loop dynamics of wild-type CA HXB2 assembly is significantly attenuated upon CypA binding, and the dynamics profiles of the A92E and G94D CypA escape mutants closely resemble that of wild-type CA assembly in complex with CypA. These results suggest that CypA loop dynamics is a determining factor in HIV-1's escape from CypA dependence. PMID:26553990

  20. Bacteriophage-antibiotic synergism to control planktonic and biofilm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacteriophage-antibiotic synergism to control planktonic and biofilm producing clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Amina Amal Mahmoud Nouraldin, Manal Mohammad Baddour, Reem Abdel Hameed Harfoush, Sara AbdelAziz Mohamed Essa ...

  1. Methods for Initial Characterization of Campylobacter jejuni Bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Martine Camilla Holst; Gencay, Yilmaz Emre; Brøndsted, Lone

    2017-01-01

    Here we describe an initial characterization of Campylobacter jejuni bacteriophages by host range analysis, genome size determination by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and receptor-type identification by screening mutants for phage sensitivity.

  2. Bacteria vs. bacteriophages: parallel evolution of immune arsenals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Abu Bakr Shabbir

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages are the most common entities on earth and represent a constant challenge to bacterial populations. To fend off bacteriophage infection, bacteria evolved immune systems to avert phage adsorption and block invader DNA entry. They developed restriction-modification systems and mechanisms to abort infection and interfere with virion assembly, as well as newly recognized clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR. In response to bacterial immune systems, bacteriophages synchronously evolved resistance mechanisms, such as the anti-CRISPR systems to counterattack bacterial CRISPR-cas systems, in a continuing evolutionary arms race between virus and host. In turn, it is fundamental to the survival of the bacterial cell to evolve a system to combat bacteriophage immune strategies.

  3. Bacteriophages displaying anticancer peptides in combined antibacterial and anticancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowska, Krystyna; Kaźmierczak, Zuzanna; Majewska, Joanna; Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Piotrowicz, Agnieszka; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Lecion, Dorota; Hodyra, Katarzyna; Nasulewicz-Goldeman, Anna; Owczarek, Barbara; Górski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Novel anticancer strategies have employed bacteriophages as drug carriers and display platforms for anticancer agents; however, bacteriophage-based platforms maintain their natural antibacterial activity. This study provides the assessment of combined anticancer (engineered) and antibacterial (natural) phage activity in therapies. An in vivo BALB/c mouse model of 4T1 tumor growth accompanied by surgical wound infection was applied. The wounds were located in the areas of tumors. Bacteriophages (T4) were modified with anticancer Tyr-Ile-Gly-Ser-Arg (YIGSR) peptides by phage display and injected intraperitoneally. Tumor growth was decreased in mice treated with YIGSR-displaying phages. The acuteness of wounds, bacterial load and inflammatory markers in phages-treated mice were markedly decreased. Thus, engineered bacteriophages combine antibacterial and anticancer activity.

  4. Comparative Genomics of Bacteriophage of the Genus Seuratvirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sazinas, Pavelas; Redgwell, Tamsin; Rihtman, Branko

    2017-01-01

    Despite being more abundant and having smaller genomes than their bacterial host, relatively few bacteriophages have had their genomes sequenced. Here, we isolated 14 bacteriophages from cattle slurry and performed de novo genome sequencing, assembly, and annotation. The commonly used marker genes...... polB and terL showed these bacteriophages to be closely related to members of the genus Seuratvirus. We performed a core-gene analysis using the 14 new and four closely related genomes. A total of 58 core genes were identified, the majority of which has no known function. These genes were used...... to construct a core-gene phylogeny, the results of which confirmed the new isolates to be part of the genus Seuratvirus and expanded the number of species within this genus to four. All bacteriophages within the genus contained the genes queCDE encoding enzymes involved in queuosine biosynthesis. We suggest...

  5. Cryptocurrency Networks: A New P2P Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Delgado-Segura

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available P2P networks are the mechanism used by cryptocurrencies to disseminate system information while keeping the whole system as much decentralized as possible. Cryptocurrency P2P networks have new characteristics that propose new challenges and avoid some problems of existing P2P networks. By characterizing the most relevant cryptocurrency network, Bitcoin, we provide details on different properties of cryptocurrency networks and their similarities and differences with standard P2P network paradigms. Our study allows us to conclude that cryptocurrency networks present a new paradigm of P2P networks due to the mechanisms they use to achieve high resilience and security. With this new paradigm, interesting research lines can be further developed, both in the focused field of P2P cryptocurrency networks and also when such networks are combined with other distributed scenarios.

  6. (p,2p) experiments at the University of Maryland cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, P.G.

    1976-11-01

    Some of the (p,2p) work which has been carried out at the Maryland Cyclotron is discussed. A brief introduction to the (p,2p) reaction is presented, and the types of experimental techniques utilized in (p,2p) studies are discussed. A brief introduction is given to the various theoretical treatments presently available to analyze (p,2p) reaction data. Secondly, experimental and theoretical studies of (p,2p) on d, 3 He, and 4 He carried out by the Maryland group are presented. Thirdly, (p,2p) results are discussed for 6 Li, 7 Li, and 12 C at 100 MeV. Fourthly, the effects of distortion on the experimental data are considered by presenting theoretical calculations for 12 C and 40 Ca at various bombarding energies

  7. AAV8 capsid variable regions at the two-fold symmetry axis contribute to high liver transduction by mediating nuclear entry and capsid uncoating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenney, Rebeca M.; Bell, Christie L.; Wilson, James M., E-mail: wilsonjm@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2014-04-15

    Adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8) is a promising vector for liver-directed gene therapy. Although efficient uncoating of viral capsids has been implicated in AAV8's robust liver transduction, much about the biology of AAV8 hepatotropism remains unclear. Our study investigated the structural basis of AAV8 liver transduction efficiency by constructing chimeric vector capsids containing sequences derived from AAV8 and AAV2 – a highly homologous yet poorly hepatotropic serotype. Engineered vectors containing capsid variable regions (VR) VII and IX from AAV8 in an AAV2 backbone mediated near AAV8-like transduction in mouse liver, with higher numbers of chimeric genomes detected in whole liver cells and isolated nuclei. Interestingly, chimeric capsids within liver nuclei also uncoated similarly to AAV8 by 6 weeks after administration, in contrast with AAV2, of which a significantly smaller proportion were uncoated. This study links specific AAV capsid regions to the transduction ability of a clinically relevant AAV serotype. - Highlights: • We construct chimeric vectors to identify determinants of AAV8 liver transduction. • An AAV2-based vector with 17 AAV8 residues exhibited high liver transduction in mice. • This vector also surpassed AAV2 in cell entry, nuclear entry and onset of expression. • Most chimeric vector particles were uncoated at 6 weeks, like AAV8 and unlike AAV2. • Chimera retained heparin binding and was antigenically distinct from AAV2 and AAV8.

  8. Antimicrobial Activity of Bacteriophage Endolysin Produced in Nicotiana benthamiana Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalskaya, Natalia; Foster-Frey, Juli; Donovan, David M; Bauchan, Gary; Hammond, Rosemarie W

    2016-01-01

    The increasing spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens has raised the interest in alternative antimicrobial treatments. In our study, the functionally active gram-negative bacterium bacteriophage CP933 endolysin was produced in Nicotiana benthamiana plants by a combination of transient expression and vacuole targeting strategies, and its antimicrobial activity was investigated. Expression of the cp933 gene in E. coli led to growth inhibition and lysis of the host cells or production of trace amounts of CP933. Cytoplasmic expression of the cp933 gene in plants using Potato virus X-based transient expression vectors (pP2C2S and pGR107) resulted in death of the apical portion of experimental plants. To protect plants against the toxic effects of the CP933 protein, the cp933 coding region was fused at its Nterminus to an N-terminal signal peptide from the potato proteinase inhibitor I to direct CP933 to the delta-type vacuoles. Plants producing the CP933 fusion protein did not exhibit the severe toxic effects seen with the unfused protein and the level of expression was 0.16 mg/g of plant tissue. Antimicrobial assays revealed that, in contrast to gram-negative bacterium E. coli (BL21(DE3)), the gram-positive plant pathogenic bacterium Clavibacter michiganensis was more susceptible to the plant-produced CP933, showing 18% growth inhibition. The results of our experiments demonstrate that the combination of transient expression and protein targeting to the delta vacuoles is a promising approach to produce functionally active proteins that exhibit toxicity when expressed in plant cells.

  9. Bacteriophage-based nanoprobes for rapid bacteria separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juhong; Duncan, Bradley; Wang, Ziyuan; Wang, Li-Sheng; Rotello, Vincent M.; Nugen, Sam R.

    2015-10-01

    The lack of practical methods for bacterial separation remains a hindrance for the low-cost and successful development of rapid detection methods from complex samples. Antibody-tagged magnetic particles are commonly used to pull analytes from a liquid sample. While this method is well-established, improvements in capture efficiencies would result in an increase of the overall detection assay performance. Bacteriophages represent a low-cost and more consistent biorecognition element as compared to antibodies. We have developed nanoscale bacteriophage-tagged magnetic probes, where T7 bacteriophages were bound to magnetic nanoparticles. The nanoprobe allowed the specific recognition and attachment to E. coli cells. The phage magnetic nanprobes were directly compared to antibody-conjugated magnetic nanoprobes. The capture efficiencies of bacteriophages and antibodies on nanoparticles for the separation of E. coli K12 at varying concentrations were determined. The results indicated a similar bacteria capture efficiency between the two nanoprobes.The lack of practical methods for bacterial separation remains a hindrance for the low-cost and successful development of rapid detection methods from complex samples. Antibody-tagged magnetic particles are commonly used to pull analytes from a liquid sample. While this method is well-established, improvements in capture efficiencies would result in an increase of the overall detection assay performance. Bacteriophages represent a low-cost and more consistent biorecognition element as compared to antibodies. We have developed nanoscale bacteriophage-tagged magnetic probes, where T7 bacteriophages were bound to magnetic nanoparticles. The nanoprobe allowed the specific recognition and attachment to E. coli cells. The phage magnetic nanprobes were directly compared to antibody-conjugated magnetic nanoprobes. The capture efficiencies of bacteriophages and antibodies on nanoparticles for the separation of E. coli K12 at varying

  10. Microarray analysis of gene expression during bacteriophage T4 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Kimberly; Radek, Agnes; Liu, XiuPing; Campbell, John; Uzan, Marc; Haselkorn, Robert; Kogan, Yakov

    2002-08-01

    Genomic microarrays were used to examine the complex temporal program of gene expression exhibited by bacteriophage T4 during the course of development. The microarray data confirm the existence of distinct early, middle, and late transcriptional classes during the bacteriophage replicative cycle. This approach allows assignment of previously uncharacterized genes to specific temporal classes. The genomic expression data verify many promoter assignments and predict the existence of previously unidentified promoters.

  11. Methods for initial characterization of Campylobacter jejuni bacteriophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Martine Camilla Holst; Gencay, Yilmaz Emre; Brøndsted, Lone

    2017-01-01

    Here we describe an initial characterization of Campylobacter jejuni bacteriophages by host range analysis, genome size determination by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and receptor-type identification by screening mutants for phage sensitivity.......Here we describe an initial characterization of Campylobacter jejuni bacteriophages by host range analysis, genome size determination by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and receptor-type identification by screening mutants for phage sensitivity....

  12. The Search for Therapeutic Bacteriophages Uncovers One New Subfamily and Two New Genera of Pseudomonas-Infecting Myoviridae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Marine; Bobay, Louis-Marie; Chevallereau, Anne; Saussereau, Emilie; Ceyssens, Pieter-Jan; Debarbieux, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, six virulent bacteriophages PAK_P1, PAK_P2, PAK_P3, PAK_P4, PAK_P5 and CHA_P1 were evaluated for their in vivo efficacy in treating Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections using a mouse model of lung infection. Here, we show that their genomes are closely related to five other Pseudomonas phages and allow a subdivision into two clades, PAK_P1-like and KPP10-like viruses, based on differences in genome size, %GC and genomic contents, as well as number of tRNAs. These two clades are well delineated, with a mean of 86% and 92% of proteins considered homologous within individual clades, and 25% proteins considered homologous between the two clades. By ESI-MS/MS analysis we determined that their virions are composed of at least 25 different proteins and electron microscopy revealed a morphology identical to the hallmark Salmonella phage Felix O1. A search for additional bacteriophage homologs, using profiles of protein families defined from the analysis of the 11 genomes, identified 10 additional candidates infecting hosts from different species. By carrying out a phylogenetic analysis using these 21 genomes we were able to define a new subfamily of viruses, the Felixounavirinae within the Myoviridae family. The new Felixounavirinae subfamily includes three genera: Felixounalikevirus, PAK_P1likevirus and KPP10likevirus. Sequencing genomes of bacteriophages with therapeutic potential increases the quantity of genomic data on closely related bacteriophages, leading to establishment of new taxonomic clades and the development of strategies for analyzing viral genomes as presented in this article. PMID:25629728

  13. Genomic Diversity of Type B3 Bacteriophages of Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Kurt T; Drake, Kristina M; Gibbs, Whitney S; Ely, Bert

    2017-07-01

    The genomes of the type B3 bacteriophages that infect Caulobacter crescentus are among the largest phage genomes thus far deposited into GenBank with sizes over 200 kb. In this study, we introduce six new bacteriophage genomes which were obtained from phage collected from various water systems in the southeastern United States and from tropical locations across the globe. A comparative analysis of the 12 available genomes revealed a "core genome" which accounts for roughly 1/3 of these bacteriophage genomes and is predominately localized to the head, tail, and lysis gene regions. Despite being isolated from geographically distinct locations, the genomes of these bacteriophages are highly conserved in both genome sequence and gene order. We also identified the insertions, deletions, translocations, and horizontal gene transfer events which are responsible for the genomic diversity of this group of bacteriophages and demonstrated that these changes are not consistent with the idea that modular reassortment of genomes occurs in this group of bacteriophages.

  14. Bacteriophages as indicators of faecal pollution and enteric ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteriophages are an attractive alternative to fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), particularly as surrogates of enteric virus fate and transport due to their closer morphological and biological properties compared to FIB. Based on a meta-analysis of published data, we summarize concentrations of coliphages (F+ and somatic), Bacteroides spp. and enterococci bacteriophages (phages) in human waste, non-human waste, fresh and marine waters as well as removal through wastewater treatment processes. We also provide comparisons with FIB and enteric viruses whenever possible. Lastly, we examine fate and transport characteristics in the environment and provide an overview of the methods available for detection and enumeration of bacteriophages. In summary, concentrations of FIB bacteriophages in various sources were consistently lower than FIB, but more reflective of infectious enteric virus levels. Our investigation supports use of bacteriophages as viral surrogates especially for wastewater treatment processes, while additional research is needed to clarify their utility as indicators of viral fate and transport in the ambient water. Describes concentrations and removal through environmental and engineered systems of bacteriophages, fecal indicator bacteria and viral pathogens.

  15. Bacteriophage cocktail for biocontrol of Salmonella in dried pet food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyse, Serena; Hanna, Leigh Farris; Woolston, Joelle; Sulakvelidze, Alexander; Charbonneau, Duane

    2015-01-01

    Human salmonellosis has been associated with contaminated pet foods and treats. Therefore, there is interest in identifying novel approaches for reducing the risk of Salmonella contamination within pet food manufacturing environments. The use of lytic bacteriophages shows promise as a safe and effective way to mitigate Salmonella contamination in various food products. Bacteriophages are safe, natural, highly targeted antibacterial agents that specifically kill bacteria and can be targeted to kill food pathogens without affecting other microbiota. In this study, we show that a cocktail containing six bacteriophages had a broadspectrum activity in vitro against a library of 930 Salmonella enterica strains representing 44 known serovars. The cocktail was effective against 95% of the strains in this tested library. In liquid culture dose-ranging experiments, bacteriophage cocktail concentrations of ≥10(8) PFU/ml inactivated more than 90% of the Salmonella population (10(1) to 10(3) CFU/ml). Dried pet food inoculated with a mixture containing equal proportions of Salmonella serovars Enteritidis (ATCC 4931), Montevideo (ATCC 8387), Senftenberg (ATCC 8400), and Typhimurium (ATCC 13311) and then surface treated with the six-bacteriophage cocktail (≥2.5 ± 1.5 × 10(6) PFU/g) achieved a greater than 1-log (P food that tested positive for Salmonella. Our results indicate that bacteriophage biocontrol of S. enterica in dried pet food is technically feasible.

  16. P2X7 Receptors in Neurological and Cardiovascular Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D. Skaper

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available P2X receptors are ATP-gated cation channels that mediate fast excitatory transmission in diverse regions of the brain and spinal cord. Several P2X receptor subtypes, including P2X7, have the unusual property of changing their ion selectivity during prolonged exposure to ATP, which results in a channel pore permeable to molecules as large as 900 daltons. The P2X7 receptor was originally described in cells of hematopoietic origin, and mediates the influx of Ca2+ and Na+ and Ca2+ and Na+ ions as well as the release of proinflammatory cytokines. P2X7 receptors may affect neuronal cell death through their ability to regulate the processing and release of interleukin-1, a key mediator in neurodegeneration, chronic inflammation, and chronic pain. Activation of P2X7, a key mediator in neurodegeneration, chronic inflammation, and chronic pain. Activation of P2X7 receptors provides an inflammatory stimulus, and P2X7 receptor-deficient mice have substantially attenuated inflammatory responses, including models of neuropathic and chronic inflammatory pain. Moreover, P2X7 receptor activity, by regulating the release of proinflammatory cytokines, may be involved in the pathophysiology of depression. Apoptotic cell death occurs in a number of vascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, restenosis, and hypertension, and may be linked to the release of ATP from endothelial cells, P2X7 receptor activation, proinflammatory cytokine production, and endothelial cell apoptosis. In this context, the P2X7 receptor may be viewed as a gateway of communication between the nervous, immune, and cardiovascular systems.

  17. Engineering of filamentous bacteriophage for protein sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasino, Michael

    Methods of high throughput, sensitive and cost effective quantification of proteins enables personalized medicine by allowing healthcare professionals to better monitor patient condition and response to treatment. My doctoral research has attempted to advance these methods through the use of filamentous bacteriophage (phage). These bacterial viruses are particularly amenable to both genetic and chemical engineering and can be produced efficiently in large amounts. Here, I discuss several strategies for modifying phage for use in protein sensing assays. These include the expression of bio-orthogonal conjugation handles on the phage coat, the incorporation of specific recognition sequences within the phage genome, and the creation of antibody-phage conjugates via a photo-crosslinking non-canonical amino acid. The physical and chemical characterization of these engineered phage and the results of their use in modified protein sensing assays will be presented.

  18. Ingestion without inactivation of bacteriophages by Tetrahymena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akunyili, Agnes A; Alfatlawi, Miaad; Upadhyaya, Bandana; Rhoads, Laura S; Eichelberger, Henry; Van Bell, Craig T

    2008-01-01

    Tetrahymena has been shown to ingest and inactivate bacteriophages, such as T4, in co-incubation experiments. In this study, Tetrahymena thermophila failed to inactivate phages PhiX174 and MS2 in co-incubations, although PhiX174 were ingested by T. thermophila, as demonstrated by: (1) recovery at defecation in a pulse-chase experiment, (2) recovery from Tetrahymena by detergent lysis, and (3) transmission electron microscopy. We conclude, therefore, that the phages must be digestion-resistant. Internalized PhiX174 were further shown to be partially protected from lethal damage by ultraviolet (UV) C and UVB irradiation. Finally, ingested PhiX174 were shown to be rapidly transported through buffer in a horizontal swimming, race tube-like assay. The transport and protection of phages may confer evolutionary advantages that explain the acquisition of digestion-resistance by some phages.

  19. Quasicrystalline and crystalline types of local protein order in capsids of small viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konevtsova, O. V.; Pimonov, V. V.; Lorman, V. L.; Rochal, S. B.

    2017-07-01

    Like metal alloys and micellar systems in soft matter, the viral capsid structures can be of crystalline and quasicrystalline types. We reveal the local quasicrystalline order of proteins in small spherical viral capsids using their nets of dodecahedral type. We show that the structure of some of the viral shells is well described in terms of a chiral pentagonal tiling, whose nodes coincide with centers of mass of protein molecules. The chiral protein packing found in these capsids originates from the pentagonal Penrose tiling (PPT), due to a specific phason reconstruction needed to fit the protein order at the adjacent dodecahedron faces. Via examples of small spherical viral shells and geminate capsid of a Maize Streak virus, we discuss the benefits and shortcomings of the usage of a dodecahedral net in comparison to icosahedral one, which is commonly applied for the modeling of viral shells with a crystalline local order.

  20. Remodeling nuclear architecture allows efficient transport of herpesvirus capsids by diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, Jens B; Hogue, Ian B; Feric, Marina; Thiberge, Stephan Y; Sodeik, Beate; Brangwynne, Clifford P; Enquist, Lynn W

    2015-10-20

    The nuclear chromatin structure confines the movement of large macromolecular complexes to interchromatin corrals. Herpesvirus capsids of approximately 125 nm assemble in the nucleoplasm and must reach the nuclear membranes for egress. Previous studies concluded that nuclear herpesvirus capsid motility is active, directed, and based on nuclear filamentous actin, suggesting that large nuclear complexes need metabolic energy to escape nuclear entrapment. However, this hypothesis has recently been challenged. Commonly used microscopy techniques do not allow the imaging of rapid nuclear particle motility with sufficient spatiotemporal resolution. Here, we use a rotating, oblique light sheet, which we dubbed a ring-sheet, to image and track viral capsids with high temporal and spatial resolution. We do not find any evidence for directed transport. Instead, infection with different herpesviruses induced an enlargement of interchromatin domains and allowed particles to diffuse unrestricted over longer distances, thereby facilitating nuclear egress for a larger fraction of capsids.

  1. Pt, Co–Pt and Fe–Pt alloy nanoclusters encapsulated in virus capsids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, M; Eloi, J-C; Jones, S E Ward; Schwarzacher, W; Verwegen, M; Cornelissen, J J L M

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured Pt-based alloys show great promise, not only for catalysis but also in medical and magnetic applications. To extend the properties of this class of materials, we have developed a means of synthesizing Pt and Pt-based alloy nanoclusters in the capsid of a virus. Pure Pt and Pt-alloy nanoclusters are formed through the chemical reduction of [PtCl 4 ] − by NaBH 4 with/without additional metal ions (Co or Fe). The opening and closing of the ion channels in the virus capsid were controlled by changing the pH and ionic strength of the solution. The size of the nanoclusters is limited to 18 nm by the internal diameter of the capsid. Their magnetic properties suggest potential applications in hyperthermia for the Co–Pt and Fe–Pt magnetic alloy nanoclusters. This study introduces a new way to fabricate size-restricted nanoclusters using virus capsid. (paper)

  2. Bacteriophages of Leuconostoc, Oenococcus and Weissella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold P. Kot

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Leuconostoc (Ln., Weissella and Oenococcus form a group of related genera of lactic acid bacteria, which once all shared the name Leuconostoc. They are associated with plants, fermented vegetable products, raw milk, dairy products, meat and fish. Most of industrially relevant Leuconostoc strains can be classified as either Ln. mesenteroides or Ln. pseudomesenteroides. They are important flavor producers in dairy fermentations and they initiate nearly all vegetable fermentations. Therefore bacteriophages attacking Leuconostoc strains may negatively influence the production process. Bacteriophages attacking Leuconostoc strains were first reported in 1946. Since then, the majority of described Leuconostoc phages was isolated from either dairy products or fermented vegetable products. Both lytic and temperate phages of Leuconostoc were reported. Most of Leuconostoc phages examined using electron microscopy belong to the Siphoviridae family and differ in morphological details. Hybridization and comparative genomic studies of Leuconostoc phages suggest that they can be divided into several groups, however overall diversity of Leuconostoc phages is much lower as compared to e.g. lactococcal phages. Several fully sequenced genomes of Leuconostoc phages have been deposited in public databases. Lytic phages of Leuconostoc can be divided into two host species-specific groups with similarly organized genomes that shared very low nucleotide similarity. Phages of dairy Leuconostoc have rather limited host-ranges. The receptor binding proteins of two lytic Ln. pseudomesenteroides phages have been identified. Molecular tools for detection of dairy Leuconostoc phages have been developed. The rather limited data on phages of Oenococcus and Weissella show that i lysogeny seems to be abundant in Oenococcus strains, and ii several phages infecting Weissella cibaria are also able to productively infect strains of other Weissella species and even strains of the genus

  3. Marine T4-type bacteriophages, a ubiquitous component of the dark matter of the biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filée, Jonathan; Tétart, Françoise; Suttle, Curtis A.; Krisch, H. M.

    2005-08-01

    Tailed bacteriophages are the most abundant biological entities in marine environments. However, most of these marine phages are uncharacterized because few of their hosts have been cultivated. To learn more about such phages, we designed a set of degenerate PCR primers for phage T4 g23, which encodes the major capsid protein in all of the T4-type phages, an important family of the tailed phage. These primers were used to amplify g23-related sequences from diverse marine environments (fjords and bays of British Columbia, the eastern Gulf of Mexico, and the western Arctic Ocean) revealing a remarkable level of molecular diversity, which in some cases was correlated with morphological variation of the virions. Phylogenetic analysis showed that although some of these sequences were closely related to well studied subgroups of the T4-type phage, such as the T-evens, the majority of them belong to five previously uncharacterized subgroups. These data indicate that the host range of T4-type phages is much broader than previously imagined and that the laboratory isolate T4 belongs to a phage family that is extraordinarily widespread and diverse in the biosphere. Author contributions: J.F., F.T., and H.M.K. designed research; J.F. and F.T. performed research; C.A.S. contributed new reagents/analytic tools; J.F., C.A.S., and H.M.K. analyzed data; and J.F., C.A.S., and H.M.K. wrote the paper.This paper was submitted directly (Track II) to the PNAS office.Data deposition: The nucleotide sequences of g23 reported in this paper have been deposited in the GenBank database (accession nos. DQ105858-DQ105942).

  4. Residues of the UL25 Protein of Herpes Simplex Virus That Are Required for Its Stable Interaction with Capsids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockrell, Shelley K.; Huffman, Jamie B.; Toropova, Katerina; Conway, James F.; Homa, Fred L.

    2011-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) UL25 gene product is a minor capsid component that is required for encapsidation, but not cleavage, of replicated viral DNA. UL25 is located on the capsid surface in a proposed heterodimer with UL17, where five copies of the heterodimer are found at each of the capsid vertices. Previously, we demonstrated that amino acids 1 to 50 of UL25 are essential for its stable interaction with capsids. To further define the UL25 capsid binding domain, we generated recombinant viruses with either small truncations or amino acid substitutions in the UL25 N terminus. Studies of these mutants demonstrated that there are two important regions within the capsid binding domain. The first 27 amino acids are essential for capsid binding of UL25, while residues 26 to 39, which are highly conserved in the UL25 homologues of other alphaherpesviruses, were found to be critical for stable capsid binding. Cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of capsids containing either a small tag on the N terminus of UL25 or the green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused between amino acids 50 and 51 of UL25 demonstrate that residues 1 to 27 of UL25 contact the hexon adjacent to the penton. A second region, most likely centered on amino acids 26 to 39, contacts the triplex that is one removed from the penton. Importantly, both of these UL25 capsid binding regions are essential for the stable packaging of full-length viral genomes. PMID:21411517

  5. SCHEMA computational design of virus capsid chimeras: calibrating how genome packaging, protection, and transduction correlate with calculated structural disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Michelle L; Adler, Benjamin A; Torre, Michael L; Silberg, Jonathan J; Suh, Junghae

    2013-12-20

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) recombination can result in chimeric capsid protein subunits whose ability to assemble into an oligomeric capsid, package a genome, and transduce cells depends on the inheritance of sequence from different AAV parents. To develop quantitative design principles for guiding site-directed recombination of AAV capsids, we have examined how capsid structural perturbations predicted by the SCHEMA algorithm correlate with experimental measurements of disruption in seventeen chimeric capsid proteins. In our small chimera population, created by recombining AAV serotypes 2 and 4, we found that protection of viral genomes and cellular transduction were inversely related to calculated disruption of the capsid structure. Interestingly, however, we did not observe a correlation between genome packaging and calculated structural disruption; a majority of the chimeric capsid proteins formed at least partially assembled capsids and more than half packaged genomes, including those with the highest SCHEMA disruption. These results suggest that the sequence space accessed by recombination of divergent AAV serotypes is rich in capsid chimeras that assemble into 60-mer capsids and package viral genomes. Overall, the SCHEMA algorithm may be useful for delineating quantitative design principles to guide the creation of libraries enriched in genome-protecting virus nanoparticles that can effectively transduce cells. Such improvements to the virus design process may help advance not only gene therapy applications but also other bionanotechnologies dependent upon the development of viruses with new sequences and functions.

  6. Nanobodies targeting norovirus capsid reveal functional epitopes and potential mechanisms of neutralization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna D Koromyslova

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Norovirus is the leading cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. Despite recent developments in norovirus propagation in cell culture, these viruses are still challenging to grow routinely. Moreover, little is known on how norovirus infects the host cells, except that histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs are important binding factors for infection and cell entry. Antibodies that bind at the HBGA pocket and block attachment to HBGAs are believed to neutralize the virus. However, additional neutralization epitopes elsewhere on the capsid likely exist and impeding the intrinsic structural dynamics of the capsid could be equally important. In the current study, we investigated a panel of Nanobodies in order to probe functional epitopes that could trigger capsid rearrangement and/ or interfere with HBGA binding interactions. The precise binding sites of six Nanobodies (Nano-4, Nano-14, Nano-26, Nano-27, Nano-32, and Nano-42 were identified using X-ray crystallography. We showed that these Nanobodies bound on the top, side, and bottom of the norovirus protruding domain. The impact of Nanobody binding on norovirus capsid morphology was analyzed using electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. We discovered that distinct Nanobody epitopes were associated with varied changes in particle structural integrity and assembly. Interestingly, certain Nanobody-induced capsid morphological changes lead to the capsid protein degradation and viral RNA exposure. Moreover, Nanobodies employed multiple inhibition mechanisms to prevent norovirus attachment to HBGAs, which included steric obstruction (Nano-14, allosteric interference (Nano-32, and violation of normal capsid morphology (Nano-26 and Nano-85. Finally, we showed that two Nanobodies (Nano-26 and Nano-85 not only compromised capsid integrity and inhibited VLPs attachment to HBGAs, but also recognized a broad panel of norovirus genotypes with high affinities. Consequently, Nano-26 and Nano-85 have a great

  7. Nanobodies targeting norovirus capsid reveal functional epitopes and potential mechanisms of neutralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Norovirus is the leading cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. Despite recent developments in norovirus propagation in cell culture, these viruses are still challenging to grow routinely. Moreover, little is known on how norovirus infects the host cells, except that histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) are important binding factors for infection and cell entry. Antibodies that bind at the HBGA pocket and block attachment to HBGAs are believed to neutralize the virus. However, additional neutralization epitopes elsewhere on the capsid likely exist and impeding the intrinsic structural dynamics of the capsid could be equally important. In the current study, we investigated a panel of Nanobodies in order to probe functional epitopes that could trigger capsid rearrangement and/ or interfere with HBGA binding interactions. The precise binding sites of six Nanobodies (Nano-4, Nano-14, Nano-26, Nano-27, Nano-32, and Nano-42) were identified using X-ray crystallography. We showed that these Nanobodies bound on the top, side, and bottom of the norovirus protruding domain. The impact of Nanobody binding on norovirus capsid morphology was analyzed using electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. We discovered that distinct Nanobody epitopes were associated with varied changes in particle structural integrity and assembly. Interestingly, certain Nanobody-induced capsid morphological changes lead to the capsid protein degradation and viral RNA exposure. Moreover, Nanobodies employed multiple inhibition mechanisms to prevent norovirus attachment to HBGAs, which included steric obstruction (Nano-14), allosteric interference (Nano-32), and violation of normal capsid morphology (Nano-26 and Nano-85). Finally, we showed that two Nanobodies (Nano-26 and Nano-85) not only compromised capsid integrity and inhibited VLPs attachment to HBGAs, but also recognized a broad panel of norovirus genotypes with high affinities. Consequently, Nano-26 and Nano-85 have a great potential to

  8. The role of P2X receptors in bone biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, N R; Syberg, S; Ellegaard, M

    2015-01-01

    come from studies on murine knockout models and from pharmacologic studies on cells and animals. More recently, the role of P2X receptors in human bone diseases has been documented. Loss-of-functions polymorphisms in the P2X7 receptorare associated with bone loss and increased fracture risk. Very...

  9. Binary phosphates NaLnP2O7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisimova, N.Yu.; Trunov, V.K.; Chudinova, N.N.

    1988-01-01

    The results of synthesis and identification of compounds of the NaLnP 2 O 7 (Ln=La,...Lu) composition are presented. 14 compounds of the above composition referring to two structural types are prepared and characterized. The data on NaLnP 2 O 7 synthesis in the Na 2 O-Ln:2O 3 -P 2 O 5 system are given. Binary phosphates of the NaLnP 2 O 7 -type (Ln=La,...Lu) are separated and identified in the subsolidus part of the Na 2 O-Ln 2 O 3 -P 2 O 5 system. Their crystallochemical parameters are determined and the presence of two structural types in the La-Lu series is shown. Thermal stability of binary phosphates is studied

  10. High Relaxivity Gadolinium Hydroxypyridonate-Viral Capsid Conjugates: Nano-sized MRI Contrast Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meux, Susan C.; Datta, Ankona; Hooker, Jacob M.; Botta, Mauro; Francis, Matthew B.; Aime, Silvio; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2007-08-29

    High relaxivity macromolecular contrast agents based on the conjugation of gadolinium chelates to the interior and exterior surfaces of MS2 viral capsids are assessed. The proton nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles of the conjugates show up to a five-fold increase in relaxivity, leading to a peak relaxivity (per Gd{sup 3+} ion) of 41.6 mM{sup -1}s{sup -1} at 30 MHz for the internally modified capsids. Modification of the exterior was achieved through conjugation to flexible lysines, while internal modification was accomplished by conjugation to relatively rigid tyrosines. Higher relaxivities were obtained for the internally modified capsids, showing that (1) there is facile diffusion of water to the interior of capsids and (2) the rigidity of the linker attaching the complex to the macromolecule is important for obtaining high relaxivity enhancements. The viral capsid conjugated gadolinium hydroxypyridonate complexes appear to possess two inner-sphere water molecules (q = 2) and the NMRD fittings highlight the differences in the local motion for the internal ({tau}{sub RI} = 440 ps) and external ({tau}{sub RI} = 310 ps) conjugates. These results indicate that there are significant advantages of using the internal surface of the capsids for contrast agent attachment, leaving the exterior surface available for the installation of tissue targeting groups.

  11. How viral capsids adapt to mismatched cargoes—identifying mechanisms of morphology control with simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrad, Oren

    2009-03-01

    During the replication of many viruses, hundreds to thousands of protein subunits assemble around the viral nucleic acid to form a protein shell called a capsid. Most viruses form one particular structure with astonishing fidelity; yet, recent experiments demonstrate that capsids can assemble with different sizes and morphologies to accommodate nucleic acids or other cargoes such as functionalized nanoparticles. In this talk, we will explore the mechanisms of simultaneous assembly and cargo encapsidation with a computational model that describes the assembly of icosahedral capsids around functionalized nanoparticles. With this model, we find parameter values for which subunits faithfully form empty capsids with a single morphology, but adaptively assemble into different icosahedral morphologies around nanoparticles with different diameters. Analyzing trajectories in which adaptation is or is not successful sheds light on the mechanisms by which capsid morphology may be controlled in vitro and in vivo, and suggests experiments to test these mechanisms. We compare the simulation results to recent experiments in which Brome Mosaic Virus capsid proteins assemble around functionalized nanoparticles, and describe how future experiments can test the model predictions.

  12. Oral Administration of Astrovirus Capsid Protein Is Sufficient To Induce Acute Diarrhea In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria A. Meliopoulos

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The disease mechanisms associated with the onset of astrovirus diarrhea are unknown. Unlike other enteric virus infections, astrovirus infection is not associated with an inflammatory response or cellular damage. In vitro studies in differentiated Caco-2 cells demonstrated that human astrovirus serotype 1 (HAstV-1 capsid protein alone disrupts the actin cytoskeleton and tight junction complex, leading to increased epithelial barrier permeability. In this study, we show that oral administration of purified recombinant turkey astrovirus 2 (TAstV-2 capsid protein results in acute diarrhea in a dose- and time-dependent manner in turkey poults. Similarly to that induced by infectious virus, TAstV-2 capsid-induced diarrhea was independent of inflammation or histological changes but was associated with increased intestinal barrier permeability, as well as redistribution of sodium hydrogen exchanger 3 (NHE3 from the membrane to the cytoplasm of the intestinal epithelium. Unlike other viral enterotoxins that have been identified, astrovirus capsid induces diarrhea after oral administration, reproducing the natural route of infection and demonstrating that ingestion of intact noninfectious capsid protein may be sufficient to provoke acute diarrhea. Based on these data, we hypothesize that the astrovirus capsid acts like an enterotoxin and induces intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction.

  13. Three-dimensional simulation of nanoindentation response of viral capsids. Shape and size effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahadi, Aylin; Colomo, Josep; Evilevitch, Alex

    2009-03-19

    The nanoindentation response of empty viral capsids is modeled using three-dimensional finite element analysis. Simulation with two different geometries, spherical and icosahedral, is performed using the finite element code Abaqus. The capsids are modeled as nonlinear Hookean elastic, and both small and large deformation analysis is performed. The Young's modulus is determined by calibrating the force-indentation curve to data from atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments. Force-indentation curves for three different viral capsids are directly compared to experimental data. Predictions are made for two additional viral capsids. The results from the simulation showed a good agreement with AFM data. The paper demonstrates that over the entire range of virus sizes (or Foppl-von Karman numbers) spherical and icosahedral models yield different force responses. In particular, it is shown that capsids with dominantly spherical shape (for low Foppl-von Karman numbers) exhibit nearly linear relationship between force and indentation, which has been experimentally observed on the viral shell studies so far. However, we predict that capsids with significant faceting (for large Foppl-von Karman numbers) and thus more pronounced icosahedral shape will exhibit rather nonlinear deformation behavior.

  14. Characterization of the endolysin from the Enterococcus faecalis bacteriophage VD13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteriophage infecting bacteria produce endolysins (peptidoglycan hydrolases) to lyse the host cell from within and release nascent bacteriophage particles. Recombinant endolysins can also lyse Gram-positive bacteria when added exogenously. As a potential alternative to antibiotics, we cloned and...

  15. Live cell imaging of interactions between replicase and capsid protein of Brome mosaic virus using Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation: implications for replication and genome packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Sonali; Rao, A L N

    2014-09-01

    In Brome mosaic virus, it was hypothesized that a physical interaction between viral replicase and capsid protein (CP) is obligatory to confer genome packaging specificity. Here we tested this hypothesis by employing Bimolecular Fluorescent Complementation (BiFC) as a tool for evaluating protein-protein interactions in living cells. The efficacy of BiFC was validated by a known interaction between replicase protein 1a (p1a) and protein 2a (p2a) at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) site of viral replication. Additionally, co-expression in planta of a bona fide pair of interacting protein partners of p1a and p2a had resulted in the assembly of a functional replicase. Subsequent BiFC assays in conjunction with mCherry labeled ER as a fluorescent cellular marker revealed that CP physically interacts with p2a, but not p1a, and this CP:p2a interaction occurs at the cytoplasmic phase of the ER. The significance of the CP:p2a interaction in BMV replication and genome packaging is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. DNA driven self-assembly of micron-sized rods using DNA-grafted bacteriophage fd virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, R R; Cabanas, R A; Yanagishima, T; Blower, T R; Takahashi, H; Salmond, G P C; Edwardson, J M; Fraden, S; Eiser, E

    2015-03-28

    We have functionalized the sides of fd bacteriophage virions with oligonucleotides to induce DNA hybridization driven self-assembly of high aspect ratio filamentous particles. Potential impacts of this new structure range from an entirely new building block in DNA origami structures, inclusion of virions in DNA nanostructures and nanomachines, to a new means of adding thermotropic control to lyotropic liquid crystal systems. A protocol for producing the virions in bulk is reviewed. Thiolated oligonucleotides are attached to the viral capsid using a heterobifunctional chemical linker. A commonly used system is utilized, where a sticky, single-stranded DNA strand is connected to an inert double-stranded spacer to increase inter-particle connectivity. Solutions of fd virions carrying complementary strands are mixed, annealed, and their aggregation is studied using dynamic light scattering (DLS), fluorescence microscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Aggregation is clearly observed on cooling, with some degree of local order, and is reversible when temperature is cycled through the DNA hybridization transition.

  17. T7 bacteriophage induced changes of gold nanoparticle morphology: biopolymer capped gold nanoparticles as versatile probes for sensitive plasmonic biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Palanisamy; Los, Marcin; Los, Joanna M; Niedziolka-Jonsson, Joanna

    2014-07-21

    The morphological changes of gold nanoparticles induced by T7 virus (bacteriophage) and the determination of its femtomolar concentration by a plasmonic method are presented. Carboxymethyl chitosan capped gold nanoparticles (CMC-AuNPs) are used as plasmonic probes and are synthesized by a simple one pot wet chemical method. HR-TEM images show that the spherical structure of the CMC-AuNPs is changed into chain-like nanostructures after the addition of T7 virus due to the strong coordination of CMC-AuNPs with T7. Since T7 capsids comprise a repeating motif of capsomers built from proteins that bind to the acid groups of chitosan, the conjugation of carboxymethyl chitosan-linked AuNPs with T7 virions enables colorimetric biosensing detection. The absorbance intensity (∼610 nm) increases in the concentration range of T7 from 2 × 10(-15) M to 2 × 10(-13) M and the detection limit is found to be 2 × 10(-15) M (2 fM). The present work demonstrates eco-friendly biopolymer stabilized AuNPs as potential nanomaterials for biosensing of viruses. Our method is very simple, low cost, selective and highly sensitive, and provides new insight into virus induced chain-like morphology of AuNPs.

  18. Structure of bacteriophage [phi]29 head fibers has a supercoiled triple repeating helix-turn-helix motif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Ye; Rossmann, Michael G. (Purdue)

    2011-12-22

    The tailed bacteriophage {phi}29 capsid is decorated with 55 fibers attached to quasi-3-fold symmetry positions. Each fiber is a homotrimer of gene product 8.5 (gp8.5) and consists of two major structural parts, a pseudohexagonal base and a protruding fibrous portion that is about 110 {angstrom} in length. The crystal structure of the C-terminal fibrous portion (residues 112-280) has been determined to a resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}. The structure is about 150 {angstrom} long and shows three distinct structural domains designated as head, neck, and stem. The stem region is a unique three-stranded helix-turn-helix supercoil that has not previously been described. When fitted into a cryoelectron microscope reconstruction of the virus, the head structure corresponded to a disconnected density at the distal end of the fiber and the neck structure was located in weak density connecting it to the fiber. Thin section studies of Bacillus subtilis cells infected with fibered or fiberless {phi}29 suggest that the fibers might enhance the attachment of the virions onto the host cell wall.

  19. Purinergní P2X rodina a specifické vlastnosti P2X7 podtypu

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jindřichová, Marie; Zemková, Hana

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 2 (2013), s. 40-46 ISSN 1210-6313 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP304/12/P371 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : extracellular ATP * purinergic P2X family * P2X7 receptor * cell proliferation and apoptosis Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  20. P2MP MPLS-Based Hierarchical Service Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaki, Kenji; Nakagawa, Ikuo; Nagami, Kenichi; Ogishi, Tomohiko; Ano, Shigehiro

    This paper proposes a point-to-multipoint (P2MP) Multi-Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) based hierarchical service management system. Traditionally, general management systems deployed in some service providers control MPLS Label Switched Paths (LSPs) (e.g., RSVP-TE and LDP) and services (e.g., L2VPN, L3VPN and IP) separately. In order for dedicated management systems for MPLS LSPs and services to cooperate with each other automatically, a hierarchical service management system has been proposed with the main focus on point-to-point (P2P) TE LSPs in MPLS path management. In the case where P2MP TE LSPs and services are deployed in MPLS networks, the dedicated management systems for P2MP TE LSPs and services must work together automatically. Therefore, this paper proposes a new algorithm that uses a correlation between P2MP TE LSPs and multicast VPN services based on a P2MP MPLS-based hierarchical service management architecture. Also, the capacity and performance of the proposed algorithm are evaluated by simulations, which are actually based on certain real MPLS production networks, and are compared to that of the algorithm for P2P TE LSPs. Results show this system is very scalable within real MPLS production networks. This system, with the automatic correlation, appears to be deployable in real MPLS production networks.

  1. Bacteriophages limit the existence conditions for conjugative plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Ellie; Wood, A Jamie; Dytham, Calvin; Pitchford, Jonathan W; Truman, Julie; Spiers, Andrew; Paterson, Steve; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2015-06-02

    Bacteriophages are a major cause of bacterial mortality and impose strong selection on natural bacterial populations, yet their effects on the dynamics of conjugative plasmids have rarely been tested. We combined experimental evolution, mathematical modeling, and individual-based simulations to explain how the ecological and population genetics effects of bacteriophages upon bacteria interact to determine the dynamics of conjugative plasmids and their persistence. The ecological effects of bacteriophages on bacteria are predicted to limit the existence conditions for conjugative plasmids, preventing persistence under weak selection for plasmid accessory traits. Experiments showed that phages drove faster extinction of plasmids in environments where the plasmid conferred no benefit, but they also revealed more complex effects of phages on plasmid dynamics under these conditions, specifically, the temporary maintenance of plasmids at fixation followed by rapid loss. We hypothesized that the population genetic effects of bacteriophages, specifically, selection for phage resistance mutations, may have caused this. Further mathematical modeling and individual-based simulations supported our hypothesis, showing that conjugative plasmids may hitchhike with phage resistance mutations in the bacterial chromosome. Conjugative plasmids are infectious loops of DNA capable of transmitting DNA between bacterial cells and between species. Because plasmids often carry extra genes that allow bacteria to live in otherwise-inhospitable environments, their dynamics are central to understanding bacterial adaptive evolution. The plasmid-bacterium interaction has typically been studied in isolation, but in natural bacterial communities, bacteriophages, viruses that infect bacteria, are ubiquitous. Using experiments, mathematical models, and computer simulations we show that bacteriophages drive plasmid dynamics through their ecological and evolutionary effects on bacteria and ultimately

  2. From Client-Server to P2P Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu; Antonopoulos, Nick

    Peer-to-peer (P2P) networks attract attentions worldwide with their great success in file sharing networks (such as Napster, Gnutella, Freenet, BitTorrent, Kazaa, and JXTA). An explosive increase in the popularity of P2P networks has been witnessed by millions of Internet users. In this chapter, an investigation of network architecture evolution, from client-server to P2P networking, will be given, underlining the benefits and the potential problems of existing approaches, which provides essential theoretical base to drive future generation of distributed systems.

  3. PPADS: an antagonist at endothelial P2Y-purinoceptors but not P2U-purinoceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C; Tanna, B; Boarder, M R

    1995-11-01

    1. Bovine aortic endothelial (BAE) cells contain two co-existing receptors for extracellular ATP, the P2Y and P2U-purinoceptors. Here we have determined whether the proposed P2X-purinoceptor antagonist, pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2', 4'-disulphonic acid (PPADS) could distinguish between these two receptor subtypes. 2. Cells labelled with myo-[2-3H]-inositol were stimulated with increasing concentrations of either the P2Y-agonist, 2MeSATP, or the P2U-agonist, UTP in the absence or presence of 30 microM PPADS. The accumulation of total [3H]-inositol (poly)phosphates mediated by 2MeSATP was markedly attenuated by PPADS, whereas the response to UTP was not significantly affected. 3. Stimulation of BAE cells with increasing concentrations of ATP showed a reduced response in the presence of 10 microM PPADS, but this effect of the antagonist was not significant. By contrast, inhibition of the response to ADP was profound and highly significant. 4. These observations show that PPADS is not a selective P2X-purinoceptor antagonist, but is able to distinguish between P2Y- and P2YU-purinoceptors in BAE cells, and indicate that this compound may provide a useful tool in the study of multiple subtypes of P2-purinoceptors. Furthermore the results are consistent with the hypothesis that ATP interacts with both receptor subtypes, but that the action of ADP is primarily at the P2Y-purinoceptor in these endothelial cells.

  4. 40 CFR 180.1261 - Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. 180.1261 Section 180.1261 Protection of.... vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. An exemption from the requirement of... syringae pv. tomato specific bacteriophages in or on pepper and tomato. [74 FR 26536, June 3, 2009] ...

  5. Whole-genome sequence of the bacteriophage-sensitive strain Campylobacter jejuni NCTC12662

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gencay, Yilmaz Emre; Sørensen, Martine C.H.; Brøndsted, Lone

    2017-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni NCTC12662 has been the choice bacteriophage isolation strain due to its susceptibility to C. jejuni bacteriophages. This trait makes it a good candidate for studying bacteriophage-host interactions. We report here the whole-genome sequence of NCTC12662, allowing future...

  6. Limited cross-reactivity of mouse monoclonal antibodies against Dengue virus capsid protein among four serotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noda M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Megumi Noda,1 Promsin Masrinoul,1 Chaweewan Punkum,1 Chonlatip Pipattanaboon,2,3 Pongrama Ramasoota,2,4 Chayanee Setthapramote,2,3 Tadahiro Sasaki,6 Mikiko Sasayama,1 Akifumi Yamashita,1,5 Takeshi Kurosu,6 Kazuyoshi Ikuta,6 Tamaki Okabayashi11Mahidol-Osaka Center for Infectious Diseases, 2Center of Excellence for Antibody Research, 3Department of Microbiology and Immunology, 4Department of Social and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Ratchathewi, Bangkok, Thailand; 5Graduate School of Life Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi, 6Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, JapanBackground: Dengue illness is one of the important mosquito-borne viral diseases in tropical and subtropical regions. Four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3, and DENV-4 are classified in the Flavivirus genus of the family Flaviviridae. We prepared monoclonal antibodies against DENV capsid protein from mice immunized with DENV-2 and determined the cross-reactivity with each serotype of DENV and Japanese encephalitis virus.Methods and results: To clarify the relationship between the cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies and the diversity of these viruses, we examined the situations of flaviviruses by analyses of phylogenetic trees. Among a total of 60 prepared monoclonal antibodies specific for DENV, five monoclonal antibodies stained the nuclei of infected cells and were found to be specific to the capsid protein. Three were specific to DENV-2, while the other two were cross-reactive with DENV-2 and DENV-4. No monoclonal antibodies were cross-reactive with all four serotypes. Phylogenetic analysis of DENV amino acid sequences of the capsid protein revealed that DENV-2 and DENV-4 were clustered in the same branch, while DENV-1 and DENV-3 were clustered in the other branch. However, these classifications of the capsid protein were different from those of the

  7. The role of P2X receptors in bone biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, N R; Syberg, S; Ellegaard, M

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a highly dynamic organ, being constantly modeled and remodeled in order to adapt to the changing need throughout life. Bone turnover involves the coordinated actions of bone formation and bone degradation. Over the past decade great effort has been put into the examination of how P2X...... receptors regulate bone metabolism and especially for the P2X7 receptor an impressive amount of evidence has now documented its expression in osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes as well as important functional roles in proliferation, differentiation, and function of the cells of bone. Key evidence has...... come from studies on murine knockout models and from pharmacologic studies on cells and animals. More recently, the role of P2X receptors in human bone diseases has been documented. Loss-of-functions polymorphisms in the P2X7 receptorare associated with bone loss and increased fracture risk. Very...

  8. Tetravalent one-regular graphs of order 4p2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Yan-Quan; Kutnar, Klavdija; Marusic, Dragan

    2014-01-01

    A graph is one-regular if its automorphism group acts regularly on the set of its arcs. In this paper tetravalent one-regular graphs of order 4p2, where p is a prime, are classified.......A graph is one-regular if its automorphism group acts regularly on the set of its arcs. In this paper tetravalent one-regular graphs of order 4p2, where p is a prime, are classified....

  9. The role of P2X receptors in bone biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, N R; Syberg, S; Ellegaard, M

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a highly dynamic organ, being constantly modeled and remodeled in order to adapt to the changing need throughout life. Bone turnover involves the coordinated actions of bone formation and bone degradation. Over the past decade great effort has been put into the examination of how P2X receptors regulate bone metabolism and especially for the P2X7 receptor an impressive amount of evidence has now documented its expression in osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes as well as important functional roles in proliferation, differentiation, and function of the cells of bone. Key evidence has come from studies on murine knockout models and from pharmacologic studies on cells and animals. More recently, the role of P2X receptors in human bone diseases has been documented. Loss-of-functions polymorphisms in the P2X7 receptorare associated with bone loss and increased fracture risk. Very recently a report from a genetic study in multiple myeloma demonstrated that decreased P2X7 receptor function was associated with increased risk of developing multiple myeloma. In contrast, the risk of developing myeloma bone disease and subsequent vertebral fractures was increased in subjects carrying P2X7 receptor gain-of-function alleles as compared to subjects only carrying loss-of-function or normal functioning alleles. It is evident that P2X receptors are important in regulating bone turnover and maintaining bone mass, and thereby holding great potential as novel drug targets for treatment of bone diseases. However, further research is needed before we fully understand the roles and effects of P2X receptors in bone.

  10. Meeting of the ITER SWG-P2 in Vienna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkau, K.; Kishimoto, H.

    1999-01-01

    The Special Working Group established under Protocol 2 to the ITER IDA Agreement (SWG-P2) met at the IAEA in Vienna in 6-9 December 1999. This report contains excerpts from the report of the ITER SWG-P2 to the ITER Council on the Joint Implementation of ITER, detailing benefits, contributions, the legal framework, siting, licensing and decommissioning as well as procurement, staffing and intellectual property rights

  11. Bacteriophages as an alternative strategy for fighting biofilm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasion, Sylwia; Kwiatek, Magdalena; Gryko, Romuald; Mizak, Lidia; Malm, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The ability of microbes to form biofilms is an important element of their pathogenicity, and biofilm formation is a serious challenge for today's medicine. Fighting the clinical complications associated with biofilm formation is very difficult and linked to a high risk of failure, especially in a time of increasing bacterial resistance to antibiotics. Bacterial species most commonly isolated from biofilms include coagulase-negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. The frequent failure of antibiotic therapy led researchers to look for alternative methods and experiment with the use of antibacterial factors with a mechanism of action different from that of antibiotics. Experimental studies with bacteriophages and mixtures thereof, expressing lytic properties against numerous biofilm-forming bacterial species showed that bacteriophages may both prevent biofilm formation and contribute to eradication of biofilm bacteria. A specific role is played here by phage depolymerases, which facilitate the degradation of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and thus the permeation of bacteriophages into deeper biofilm layers and lysis of the susceptible bacterial cells. Much hope is placed in genetic modifications of bacteriophages that would allow the equipping bacteriophages with the function of depolymerase synthesis. The use of phage cocktails prevents the development of phage-resistant bacteria.

  12. Alternative bacteriophage life cycles: the carrier state of Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siringan, Patcharin; Connerton, Phillippa L; Cummings, Nicola J; Connerton, Ian F

    2014-03-26

    Members of the genus Campylobacter are frequently responsible for human enteric disease, often through consumption of contaminated poultry products. Bacteriophages are viruses that have the potential to control pathogenic bacteria, but understanding their complex life cycles is key to their successful exploitation. Treatment of Campylobacter jejuni biofilms with bacteriophages led to the discovery that phages had established a relationship with their hosts typical of the carrier state life cycle (CSLC), where bacteria and bacteriophages remain associated in equilibrium. Significant phenotypic changes include improved aerotolerance under nutrient-limited conditions that would confer an advantage to survive in extra-intestinal environments, but a lack in motility eliminated their ability to colonize chickens. Under these circumstances, phages can remain associated with a compatible host and continue to produce free virions to prospect for new hosts. Moreover, we demonstrate that CSLC host bacteria can act as expendable vehicles for the delivery of bacteriophages to new host bacteria within pre-colonized chickens. The CSLC represents an important phase in the ecology of Campylobacter bacteriophage.

  13. Bacteriophage therapy for safeguarding animal and human health: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Ruchi; Dhama, Kuldeep; Kumar, Amit; Rahal, Anu; Kapoor, Sanjay

    2014-02-01

    Since the discovery of bacteriophages at the beginning of the 19th century their contribution to bacterial evolution and ecology and use in a variety of applications in biotechnology and medicine has been recognized and understood. Bacteriophages are natural bacterial killers, proven as best biocontrol agents due to their ability to lyse host bacterial cells specifically thereby helping in disease prevention and control. The requirement of such therapeutic approach is straight away required in view of the global emergence of Multidrug Resistant (MDR) strains of bacteria and rapidly developing resistance to antibiotics in both animals and humans along with increasing food safety concerns including of residual antibiotic toxicities. Phage typing is a popular tool to differentiate bacterial isolates and to identify and characterize outbreak-associated strains of Salmonella, Campylobacter, Escherichia and Listeria. Numerous methods viz. plaque morphology, ultracentrifugation in the density gradient of CsCl2, and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) have been found to be effective in detection of various phages. Bacteriophages have been isolated and recovered from samples of animal waste products of different livestock farms. High titer cocktails of broad spectrum lytic bacteriophages are usually used for clinical trial for assessing their therapeutic efficacy against antibiotic unresponsive infections in different animals. Bacteriophage therapy also helps to fight various bacterial infections of poultry viz. colibacillosis, salmonellosis and listeriosis. Moreover, the utility of phages concerning biosafety has raised the importance to explore and popularize the therapeutic dimension of this promising novel therapy which forms the topic of discussion of the present review.

  14. Accelerated FoxP2 Evolution in Echolocating Bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Wang, Jinhong; Rossiter, Stephen J.; Jones, Gareth; Zhang, Shuyi

    2007-01-01

    FOXP2 is a transcription factor implicated in the development and neural control of orofacial coordination, particularly with respect to vocalisation. Observations that orthologues show almost no variation across vertebrates yet differ by two amino acids between humans and chimpanzees have led to speculation that recent evolutionary changes might relate to the emergence of language. Echolocating bats face especially challenging sensorimotor demands, using vocal signals for orientation and often for prey capture. To determine whether mutations in the FoxP2 gene could be associated with echolocation, we sequenced FoxP2 from echolocating and non-echolocating bats as well as a range of other mammal species. We found that contrary to previous reports, FoxP2 is not highly conserved across all nonhuman mammals but is extremely diverse in echolocating bats. We detected divergent selection (a change in selective pressure) at FoxP2 between bats with contrasting sonar systems, suggesting the intriguing possibility of a role for FoxP2 in the evolution and development of echolocation. We speculate that observed accelerated evolution of FoxP2 in bats supports a previously proposed function in sensorimotor coordination. PMID:17878935

  15. P2P Data Management in Mobile Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nida Sahar Sayeda

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The rapid growth in wireless technologies has made wireless communication an important source for transporting data across different domains. In the same way, there are possibilities of many potential applications that can be deployed using WSNs (Wireless Sensor Networks. However, very limited applications are deployed in real life due to the uncertainty and dynamics of the environment and scare resources. This makes data management in WSN a challenging area to find an approach that suits its characteristics. Currently, the trend is to find efficient data management schemes using evolving technologies, i.e. P2P (Peer-to-Peer systems. Many P2P approaches have been applied in WSNs to carry out the data management due to similarities between WSN and P2P. With the similarities, there are differences too that makes P2P protocols inefficient in WSNs. Furthermore, to increase the efficiency and to exploit the delay tolerant nature of WSNs, where ever possible, the mobile WSNs are gaining importance. Thus, creating a three dimensional problem space to consider, i.e. mobility, WSNs and P2P. In this paper, an efficient algorithm is proposed for data management using P2P techniques for mobile WSNs. The real world implementation and deployment of proposed algorithm is also presented

  16. Accelerated FoxP2 evolution in echolocating bats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    Full Text Available FOXP2 is a transcription factor implicated in the development and neural control of orofacial coordination, particularly with respect to vocalisation. Observations that orthologues show almost no variation across vertebrates yet differ by two amino acids between humans and chimpanzees have led to speculation that recent evolutionary changes might relate to the emergence of language. Echolocating bats face especially challenging sensorimotor demands, using vocal signals for orientation and often for prey capture. To determine whether mutations in the FoxP2 gene could be associated with echolocation, we sequenced FoxP2 from echolocating and non-echolocating bats as well as a range of other mammal species. We found that contrary to previous reports, FoxP2 is not highly conserved across all nonhuman mammals but is extremely diverse in echolocating bats. We detected divergent selection (a change in selective pressure at FoxP2 between bats with contrasting sonar systems, suggesting the intriguing possibility of a role for FoxP2 in the evolution and development of echolocation. We speculate that observed accelerated evolution of FoxP2 in bats supports a previously proposed function in sensorimotor coordination.

  17. Dengue virus capsid protein usurps lipid droplets for viral particle formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo M Samsa

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus is responsible for the highest rates of disease and mortality among the members of the Flavivirus genus. Dengue epidemics are still occurring around the world, indicating an urgent need of prophylactic vaccines and antivirals. In recent years, a great deal has been learned about the mechanisms of dengue virus genome amplification. However, little is known about the process by which the capsid protein recruits the viral genome during encapsidation. Here, we found that the mature capsid protein in the cytoplasm of dengue virus infected cells accumulates on the surface of ER-derived organelles named lipid droplets. Mutagenesis analysis using infectious dengue virus clones has identified specific hydrophobic amino acids, located in the center of the capsid protein, as key elements for lipid droplet association. Substitutions of amino acid L50 or L54 in the capsid protein disrupted lipid droplet targeting and impaired viral particle formation. We also report that dengue virus infection increases the number of lipid droplets per cell, suggesting a link between lipid droplet metabolism and viral replication. In this regard, we found that pharmacological manipulation of the amount of lipid droplets in the cell can be a means to control dengue virus replication. In addition, we developed a novel genetic system to dissociate cis-acting RNA replication elements from the capsid coding sequence. Using this system, we found that mislocalization of a mutated capsid protein decreased viral RNA amplification. We propose that lipid droplets play multiple roles during the viral life cycle; they could sequester the viral capsid protein early during infection and provide a scaffold for genome encapsidation.

  18. Structural Characterization of H-1 Parvovirus: Comparison of Infectious Virions to Empty Capsids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Sujata; Nam, Hyun-Joo; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Vogel, Michèle; Dinsart, Christiane; Salomé, Nathalie; McKenna, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The structure of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) packaging H-1 parvovirus (H-1PV), which is being developed as an antitumor gene delivery vector, has been determined for wild-type (wt) virions and noninfectious (empty) capsids to 2.7- and 3.2-Å resolution, respectively, using X-ray crystallography. The capsid viral protein (VP) structure consists of an α-helix and an eight-stranded anti-parallel β-barrel with large loop regions between the strands. The β-barrel and loops form the capsid core and surface, respectively. In the wt structure, 600 nucleotides are ordered in an interior DNA binding pocket of the capsid. This accounts for ∼12% of the H-1PV genome. The wt structure is identical to the empty capsid structure, except for side chain conformation variations at the nucleotide binding pocket. Comparison of the H-1PV nucleotides to those observed in canine parvovirus and minute virus of mice, two members of the genus Parvovirus, showed both similarity in structure and analogous interactions. This observation suggests a functional role, such as in capsid stability and/or ssDNA genome recognition for encapsulation. The VP structure differs from those of other parvoviruses in surface loop regions that control receptor binding, tissue tropism, pathogenicity, and antibody recognition, including VP sequences reported to determine tumor cell tropism for oncotropic rodent parvoviruses. These structures of H-1PV provide insight into structural features that dictate capsid stabilization following genome packaging and three-dimensional information applicable for rational design of tumor-targeted recombinant gene delivery vectors. PMID:23449783

  19. Structure of a Human Astrovirus Capsid-Antibody Complex and Mechanistic Insights into Virus Neutralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdanoff, Walter A.; Campos, Jocelyn; Perez, Edmundo I.; Yin, Lu; Alexander, David L.; DuBois, Rebecca M. (UCSC)

    2016-11-02

    ABSTRACT

    Human astroviruses (HAstVs) are a leading cause of viral diarrhea in young children, the immunocompromised, and the elderly. There are no vaccines or antiviral therapies against HAstV disease. Several lines of evidence point to the presence of protective antibodies in healthy adults as a mechanism governing protection against reinfection by HAstV. However, development of anti-HAstV therapies is hampered by the gap in knowledge of protective antibody epitopes on the HAstV capsid surface. Here, we report the structure of the HAstV capsid spike domain bound to the neutralizing monoclonal antibody PL-2. The antibody uses all six complementarity-determining regions to bind to a quaternary epitope on each side of the dimeric capsid spike. We provide evidence that the HAstV capsid spike is a receptor-binding domain and that the antibody neutralizes HAstV by blocking virus attachment to cells. We identify patches of conserved amino acids that overlap the antibody epitope and may comprise a receptor-binding site. Our studies provide a foundation for the development of therapies to prevent and treat HAstV diarrheal disease.

    IMPORTANCEHuman astroviruses (HAstVs) infect nearly every person in the world during childhood and cause diarrhea, vomiting, and fever. Despite the prevalence of this virus, little is known about how antibodies in healthy adults protect them against reinfection. Here, we determined the crystal structure of a complex of the HAstV capsid protein and a virus-neutralizing antibody. We show that the antibody binds to the outermost spike domain of the capsid, and we provide evidence that the antibody blocks virus attachment to human cells. Importantly, our findings suggest that a subunit-based vaccine focusing the immune system on the HAstV capsid spike domain could be effective in protecting children against HAstV disease.

  20. Diffusion of bacteriophages through artificial biofilm models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Miyanaga, Kazuhiko; Tanji, Yasunori

    2012-01-01

    The simple two-chamber diffusion method was improved to study the diffusion properties of bacteriophage (phage) T4 through a model biofilm agarose gel membrane (AGM) embedded with dead host Escherichia coli K12 cells. The apparent diffusion coefficient (D(app) ) of phage T4 was calculated to be 2.4 × 10(-12) m(2) /s in 0.5% AGM, which was lower than the coefficient of 4.2 × 10(-12) m(2) /s in 0.5% AGM without host cells. The phage adsorption process by dead host cells slowed the apparent phage diffusion. The Langmuir adsorption equation was used to simulate phage adsorption under different multiplicity of infections (MOIs); the maximum adsorbed phage MOI was calculated to be 417 PFU/CFU, and the Langmuir adsorption constant K(L) was 6.9 × 10(-4) CFU/PFU. To evaluate the effects of phage proliferation on diffusion, a simple syringe-based biofilm model was developed. The phage was added into this homogenous biofilm model when the host cells were in an exponential growth phase, and the apparent diffusion coefficient was greatly enhanced. We concluded that D(app) of phages through biofilms could be distinctly affected by phage adsorption and proliferation, and that the idea of D(app) and these methods can be used to study diffusion properties through real biofilms. Copyright © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  1. A bacteriophage endolysin that eliminates intracellular streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yang; Barros, Marilia; Vennemann, Tarek; Gallagher, D Travis; Yin, Yizhou; Linden, Sara B; Heselpoth, Ryan D; Spencer, Dennis J; Donovan, David M; Moult, John; Fischetti, Vincent A; Heinrich, Frank; Lösche, Mathias; Nelson, Daniel C

    2016-03-15

    PlyC, a bacteriophage-encoded endolysin, lyses Streptococcus pyogenes (Spy) on contact. Here, we demonstrate that PlyC is a potent agent for controlling intracellular Spy that often underlies refractory infections. We show that the PlyC holoenzyme, mediated by its PlyCB subunit, crosses epithelial cell membranes and clears intracellular Spy in a dose-dependent manner. Quantitative studies using model membranes establish that PlyCB interacts strongly with phosphatidylserine (PS), whereas its interaction with other lipids is weak, suggesting specificity for PS as its cellular receptor. Neutron reflection further substantiates that PlyC penetrates bilayers above a PS threshold concentration. Crystallography and docking studies identify key residues that mediate PlyCB-PS interactions, which are validated by site-directed mutagenesis. This is the first report that a native endolysin can traverse epithelial membranes, thus substantiating the potential of PlyC as an antimicrobial for Spy in the extracellular and intracellular milieu and as a scaffold for engineering other functionalities.

  2. Proton sensitization in γ-radiation injury to bacteriophage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabarchina, L.I.; Sukhorukov, B.I.; Yurov, S.S.

    1979-01-01

    With exposure of bacteriophage T4Br + to doses up to 10 krad the phenomenon of proton sensitization is observed which is manifested by the considerable increase in the radiation inactivation and mutagenic effect of γ-quanta at the increased concentration of H + -ions in the exposed phage suspension. A mechanism of this phenomenon is proposed and the hypothesis is expounded that radiosensitivity of bacteriophages is determined chiefly by the content therein of the protonated structures of nitrogen bases and by amino acids. With a dose of above 7 krad, along with the proton sensitization, the phenomenon of proton protection is also observed which is related to the protonated structures of products of radiation disintegration of the bacteriophage

  3. Inactivation of clay-associated bacteriophage MS-2 by chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, C H; Wallis, C; Ward, C H

    1977-01-01

    The model system consisted of bacteriophage MS-2, bentonite clay, and hypochlorous acid (HOC1). Factors that influenced association of the bacterial virus with bentonite were the titer of unadsorbed viruses, clay concentration, cation concentration, temperature, stirring rate, and the presence of soluble organics. Variation of the kinetic adsorption rate constant with stirring speed indicates that phage attachment is a diffusion-limited process; the attachment reaction has an apparent activation energy of 1 kcal/mol. About 18% of clay-associated bacteriophages was recovered by mixing the suspension with an organic eluent. Inactivation data were obtained from batch reactors operated under those conditions in which loss of HOC1 was minimal during the reaction. Bacteriophages attached to clay were more resistant to HOC1 than were freely suspended phages; for equivalent HOC1 concentrations, clay-associated phages required about twice the time that freely suspended phages required for loss of 99% of the initial virus titer. PMID:192148

  4. TRIM5α SPRY/coiled-coil interactions optimize avid retroviral capsid recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin D Roganowicz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Restriction factors are important components of intrinsic cellular defense mechanisms against viral pathogens. TRIM5α is a restriction factor that intercepts the incoming capsid cores of retroviruses such as HIV and provides an effective species-specific barrier to retroviral infection. The TRIM5α SPRY domain directly binds the capsid with only very weak, millimolar-level affinity, and productive capsid recognition therefore requires both TRIM5α dimerization and assembly of the dimers into a multivalent hexagonal lattice to promote avid binding. Here, we explore the important unresolved question of whether the SPRY domains are flexibly linked to the TRIM lattice or more precisely positioned to maximize avidity. Biochemical and biophysical experiments indicate that the linker segment connecting the SPRY domain to the coiled-coil domain adopts an α-helical fold, and that this helical portion mediates interactions between the two domains. Targeted mutations were generated to disrupt the putative packing interface without affecting dimerization or higher-order assembly, and we identified mutant proteins that were nevertheless deficient in capsid binding in vitro and restriction activity in cells. Our studies therefore support a model wherein substantial avidity gains during assembly-mediated capsid recognition by TRIM5α come in part from tailored spacing of tethered recognition domains.

  5. X-Ray Structures of the Hexameric Building Block of the HIV Capsid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pornillos, Owen; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K.; Kelly, Brian N.; Hua, Yuanzi; Whitby, Frank G.; Stout, C. David; Sundquist, Wesley I.; Hill, Christopher P.; Yeager, Mark; (Scripps); (Utah)

    2009-09-11

    The mature capsids of HIV and other retroviruses organize and package the viral genome and its associated enzymes for delivery into host cells. The HIV capsid is a fullerene cone: a variably curved, closed shell composed of approximately 250 hexamers and exactly 12 pentamers of the viral CA protein. We devised methods for isolating soluble, assembly-competent CA hexamers and derived four crystallographically independent models that define the structure of this capsid assembly unit at atomic resolution. A ring of six CA N-terminal domains form an apparently rigid core, surrounded by an outer ring of C-terminal domains. Mobility of the outer ring appears to be an underlying mechanism for generating the variably curved lattice in authentic capsids. Hexamer-stabilizing interfaces are highly hydrated, and this property may be key to the formation of quasi-equivalent interactions within hexamers and pentamers. The structures also clarify the molecular basis for capsid assembly inhibition and should facilitate structure-based drug design strategies.

  6. A molecular thermodynamic model for the stability of hepatitis B capsids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jehoon; Wu, Jianzhong, E-mail: jwu@engr.ucr.edu [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States)

    2014-06-21

    Self-assembly of capsid proteins and genome encapsidation are two critical steps in the life cycle of most plant and animal viruses. A theoretical description of such processes from a physiochemical perspective may help better understand viral replication and morphogenesis thus provide fresh insights into the experimental studies of antiviral strategies. In this work, we propose a molecular thermodynamic model for predicting the stability of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids either with or without loading nucleic materials. With the key components represented by coarse-grained thermodynamic models, the theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with experimental data for the formation free energies of empty T4 capsids over a broad range of temperature and ion concentrations. The theoretical model predicts T3/T4 dimorphism also in good agreement with the capsid formation at in vivo and in vitro conditions. In addition, we have studied the stability of the viral particles in response to physiological cellular conditions with the explicit consideration of the hydrophobic association of capsid subunits, electrostatic interactions, molecular excluded volume effects, entropy of mixing, and conformational changes of the biomolecular species. The course-grained model captures the essential features of the HBV nucleocapsid stability revealed by recent experiments.

  7. A molecular thermodynamic model for the stability of hepatitis B capsids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jehoon; Wu, Jianzhong

    2014-06-01

    Self-assembly of capsid proteins and genome encapsidation are two critical steps in the life cycle of most plant and animal viruses. A theoretical description of such processes from a physiochemical perspective may help better understand viral replication and morphogenesis thus provide fresh insights into the experimental studies of antiviral strategies. In this work, we propose a molecular thermodynamic model for predicting the stability of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids either with or without loading nucleic materials. With the key components represented by coarse-grained thermodynamic models, the theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with experimental data for the formation free energies of empty T4 capsids over a broad range of temperature and ion concentrations. The theoretical model predicts T3/T4 dimorphism also in good agreement with the capsid formation at in vivo and in vitro conditions. In addition, we have studied the stability of the viral particles in response to physiological cellular conditions with the explicit consideration of the hydrophobic association of capsid subunits, electrostatic interactions, molecular excluded volume effects, entropy of mixing, and conformational changes of the biomolecular species. The course-grained model captures the essential features of the HBV nucleocapsid stability revealed by recent experiments.

  8. Spectroscopic Studies of Mosquito Iridescent Virus, its Capsid Proteins, Lipids, and DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravchenko, V.M.; Rud, Yu.P.; Buchatski, L.P.; Melnik, V.I.; Mogylchak, K.Yu.; Ladan, S.P.; Yashchuk, V.M.

    2012-01-01

    Mosquito iridescent virus (MIV) is an icosahedric lipid-containing virus which affects mosquitoes of Aedes, Culex, Culizeta genera. Apart from mosquitoes and other insects, iridoviruses cause the mass death of fish and can cause huge losses for industrial fish breedings. The MIV virion consists of a core of the genetic material (double-stranded viral DNA) surrounded by a capsid (icosahedral protein shell) and further encased in a lipid envelope. The aim of the work was to determine the role of MIV virion constituents (lipids, capsid proteins, and viral DNA) in the formation of spectral properties of the whole MIV virions. Measured are UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence, fluorescence excitation, and phosphorescence spectra of MIV virions, their capsid proteins, lipids, and viral DNA dissolved in various buffers. It is shown that the UV absorption of MIV virions is caused by the absorption of all virion constituents such as capsid proteins, lipids, and viral DNA. The fluorescence of MIV virions at room temperature is mainly due to the fluorescence of capsid proteins. The spectra measured at low temperatures make it possible to identify the type of a nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) inside the virion thanks to the fact that the DNA and RNA phosphorescence spectra are radically different.

  9. Synaptosomal protein synthesis in P2 and Ficoll purified fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyman, Maria; Cefaliello, Carolina; Bruno, Anna Paola; Bruno, Annapaola; Crispino, Marianna; Giuditta, Antonio

    2012-01-30

    Cytoplasmic protein synthesis of brain synaptosomes has generally been determined in the Ficoll purified fraction which contains fewer contaminating mitochondria, microsomes and myelin fragments than the parent P2 fraction. Using a highly selective assay of this activity we have compared the total translation activity and the specific activity of the proteins synthesized by either fraction in control rats and in rats trained for a two-way active avoidance task. In control rats the specific activity remained essentially the same in both fractions but in trained rats the value of the Ficoll fraction was markedly lower (38.5%) than in the P2 fraction. Furthermore, the total translation activity of the Ficoll fraction was 30% lower than in the P2 fraction in control rats and 62% lower in trained rats. These decrements indicate that a large proportion of active synaptosomes present in the P2 fraction is not recovered in the Ficoll fraction, notably in rats undergoing plastic brain changes. We conclude that cytoplasmic protein synthesis of brain synaptosomes is better preserved in the P2 fraction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Determinants of Default in P2P Lending

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies P2P lending and the factors explaining loan default. This is an important issue because in P2P lending individual investors bear the credit risk, instead of financial institutions, which are experts in dealing with this risk. P2P lenders suffer a severe problem of information asymmetry, because they are at a disadvantage facing the borrower. For this reason, P2P lending sites provide potential lenders with information about borrowers and their loan purpose. They also assign a grade to each loan. The empirical study is based on loans’ data collected from Lending Club (N = 24,449) from 2008 to 2014 that are first analyzed by using univariate means tests and survival analysis. Factors explaining default are loan purpose, annual income, current housing situation, credit history and indebtedness. Secondly, a logistic regression model is developed to predict defaults. The grade assigned by the P2P lending site is the most predictive factor of default, but the accuracy of the model is improved by adding other information, especially the borrower’s debt level. PMID:26425854

  11. Determinants of Default in P2P Lending.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Serrano-Cinca

    Full Text Available This paper studies P2P lending and the factors explaining loan default. This is an important issue because in P2P lending individual investors bear the credit risk, instead of financial institutions, which are experts in dealing with this risk. P2P lenders suffer a severe problem of information asymmetry, because they are at a disadvantage facing the borrower. For this reason, P2P lending sites provide potential lenders with information about borrowers and their loan purpose. They also assign a grade to each loan. The empirical study is based on loans' data collected from Lending Club (N = 24,449 from 2008 to 2014 that are first analyzed by using univariate means tests and survival analysis. Factors explaining default are loan purpose, annual income, current housing situation, credit history and indebtedness. Secondly, a logistic regression model is developed to predict defaults. The grade assigned by the P2P lending site is the most predictive factor of default, but the accuracy of the model is improved by adding other information, especially the borrower's debt level.

  12. Determinants of Default in P2P Lending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Cinca, Carlos; Gutiérrez-Nieto, Begoña; López-Palacios, Luz

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies P2P lending and the factors explaining loan default. This is an important issue because in P2P lending individual investors bear the credit risk, instead of financial institutions, which are experts in dealing with this risk. P2P lenders suffer a severe problem of information asymmetry, because they are at a disadvantage facing the borrower. For this reason, P2P lending sites provide potential lenders with information about borrowers and their loan purpose. They also assign a grade to each loan. The empirical study is based on loans' data collected from Lending Club (N = 24,449) from 2008 to 2014 that are first analyzed by using univariate means tests and survival analysis. Factors explaining default are loan purpose, annual income, current housing situation, credit history and indebtedness. Secondly, a logistic regression model is developed to predict defaults. The grade assigned by the P2P lending site is the most predictive factor of default, but the accuracy of the model is improved by adding other information, especially the borrower's debt level.

  13. Bacteriophages as potential treatment option for antibiotic resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Robert; van der Westhuizen, Wouter; Lee, Ji-Yun; Coetsee, Elke; Boucher, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    The world is facing an ever-increasing problem with antibiotic resistant bacteria and we are rapidly heading for a post-antibiotic era. There is an urgent need to investigate alterative treatment options while there are still a few antibiotics left. Bacteriophages are viruses that specifically target bacteria. Before the development of antibiotics, some efforts were made to use bacteriophages as a treatment option, but most of this research stopped soon after the discovery of antibiotics. There are two different replication options which bacteriophages employ. These are the lytic and lysogenic life cycles. Both these life cycles have potential as treatment options. There are various advantages and disadvantages to the use of bacteriophages as treatment options. The main advantage is the specificity of bacteriophages and treatments can be designed to specifically target pathogenic bacteria while not negatively affecting the normal microbiota. There are various advantages to this. However, the high level of specificity also creates potential problems, the main being the requirement of highly specific diagnostic procedures. Another potential problem with phage therapy includes the development of immunity and limitations with the registration of phage therapy options. The latter is driving research toward the expression of phage genes which break the bacterial cell wall, which could then be used as a treatment option. Various aspects of phage therapy have been investigated in studies undertaken by our research group. We have investigated specificity of phages to various avian pathogenic E. coli isolates. Furthermore, the exciting NanoSAM technology has been employed to investigate bacteriophage replication and aspects of this will be discussed.

  14. Human Bocavirus Capsid Messenger RNA Detection in Children With Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaberg, Robert; Ampofo, Krow; Tardif, Keith D; Stockmann, Chris; Simmon, Keith E; Hymas, Weston; Flygare, Steven; Kennedy, Brett; Blaschke, Anne; Eilbeck, Karen; Yandell, Mark; McCullers, Jon A; Williams, Derek J; Edwards, Kathryn; Arnold, Sandra R; Bramley, Anna; Jain, Seema; Pavia, Andrew T

    2017-09-15

    The role of human bocavirus (HBoV) in respiratory illness is uncertain. HBoV genomic DNA is frequently detected in both ill and healthy children. We hypothesized that spliced viral capsid messenger RNA (mRNA) produced during active replication might be a better marker for acute infection. As part of the Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) study, children aged <18 years who were hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and children asymptomatic at the time of elective outpatient surgery (controls) were enrolled. Nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal specimens were tested for HBoV mRNA and genomic DNA by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. HBoV DNA was detected in 10.4% of 1295 patients with CAP and 7.5% of 721 controls (odds ratio [OR], 1.4 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.0-2.0]); HBoV mRNA was detected in 2.1% and 0.4%, respectively (OR, 5.1 [95% CI, 1.6-26]). When adjusted for age, enrollment month, and detection of other respiratory viruses, HBoV mRNA detection (adjusted OR, 7.6 [95% CI, 1.5-38.4]) but not DNA (adjusted OR, 1.2 [95% CI, .6-2.4]) was associated with CAP. Among children with no other pathogens detected, HBoV mRNA (OR, 9.6 [95% CI, 1.9-82]) was strongly associated with CAP. Detection of HBoV mRNA but not DNA was associated with CAP, supporting a pathogenic role for HBoV in CAP. HBoV mRNA could be a useful target for diagnostic testing. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Crystal Structure of the Capsid Protein from Zika Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Zifang; Song, Hao; Shi, Yi; Qi, Jianxun; Gao, George F

    2018-03-30

    Recently, Zika virus (ZIKV) emerged as a global public health concern and is distinct from other flaviviruses in many aspects, for example, causing transplacental infection, fetal abnormalities and vector-independent transmission through body fluids in humans. The capsid (C) protein is a multifunctional protein, since it binds to viral RNA in the process of nucleocapsid assembly and plays important roles in virus infection processes by interacting with cellular proteins, modulating cellular metabolism, apoptosis and immune response. Here we solved the crystal structure of ZIKV C protein at a resolution of 1.9Å. The ZIKV C protein structure contains four α helices with a long pre-α1 loop and forms dimers. The unique long pre-α1 loop in ZIKV C contributes to the tighter association of dimeric assembly and renders a divergent hydrophobic feature at the lipid bilayer interface in comparison with the known C structures of West Nile and dengue viruses. We reported the interaction between the ZIKV C protein and lipid droplets through confocal microscopy analysis. Substitutions of key amino acids in the pre-α1 loop of ZIKV C disrupted the interaction with lipid droplets, indicating that the loop is critical for membrane association. We also recognized that ZIKV C protein possesses broad binding capability to different nucleotide types, including single-stranded and double-stranded RNAs or DNAs. Furthermore, the highly positively charged interface, mainly formed by α4 helix, is proposed to be responsible for nucleotide binding. These findings will greatly enhance our understanding of ZIKV C protein, providing information for anti-ZIKV drug design targeting the C protein. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Bacteriophages of Soft Rot Enterobacteriaceae-a minireview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajkowski, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Soft rot Enterobacteriaceae (Pectobacterium spp. and Dickeya spp., formerly pectinolytic Erwinia spp.) are ubiquitous necrotrophic bacterial pathogens that infect a large number of different plant species worldwide, including economically important crops. Despite the fact that these bacteria have been studied for more than 50 years, little is known of their corresponding predators: bacteriophages, both lytic and lysogenic. The aim of this minireview is to critically summarize recent ecological, biological and molecular research on bacteriophages infecting Pectobacterium spp. and Dickeya spp. with the main focus on current and future perspectives in that field. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Engineered enzymatically active bacteriophages and methods of uses thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, James J [Newton, MA; Kobayashi, Hideki [Yokohama, JP; Kearn, Mads [Ottawa, CA; Araki, Michihiro [Minatoku, JP; Friedland, Ari [Boston, MA; Lu, Timothy Kuan-Ta [Palo Alto, CA

    2012-05-22

    The present invention provides engineered bacteriophages that express at least one biofilm degrading enzyme on their surface and uses thereof for degrading bacterial biofilms. The invention also provides genetically engineered bacteriophages expressing the biofilm degrading enzymes and proteins necessary for the phage to replicate in different naturally occurring biofilm producing bacteria. The phages of the invention allow a method of biofilm degradation by the use of one or only a few administration of the phage because the system using these phages is self perpetuating, and capable of degrading biofilm even when the concentration of bacteria within the biofilm is low.

  18. Synthesis of Amylose-b-P2 VP Block Copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kamlesh; Woortman, Albert J J; Loos, Katja

    2015-12-01

    A new class of rod-coil block copolymers is synthesized by chemoenzymatic polymerization. In the first step, maltoheptaose, which acts as a primer for the synthesis of amylose, is attached to poly(2-vinyl pyridine) (P2 VP). The enzymatic polymerization of maltoheptaose is carried out by phosphorylase to obtain amylose-b-P2 VP block copolymers. The block copolymer is characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, gel permeation chromatography, and wide-angle X-ray scattering techniques. The designed molecules combine the inclusion complexation ability of amylose with the supramolecular complexation ability of P2 VP and therefore this kind of rod-coil block copolymers can be used to generate well-organized novel self-assembled structures. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Mobile P2P Web Services Using SIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Gehlen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Telecommunication networks and the Internet are growing together. Peer-to-Peer (P2P services which are originally offered by network providers, like telephony and messaging, are provided through VoIP and Instant Messaging (IM by Internet service providers, too. The IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS is the answer of the telecommunication industry to this trend and aims at providing Internet P2P and multimedia services controlled by the network operators. The IMS provides mobility and session management as well as message routing, security, and billing.

  20. Secure P2P Data Storage and Maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouha Oualha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available P2P data storage requires strong reliability and security assurances. Existing data storage solutions have been designed for centralized as well as distributed settings; yet they do not address the security and cooperation issues raised by self-organization. P2P systems also introduce new needs regarding data availability due to the dynamicity of the infrastructure, which are unaddressed so far. This paper first discusses the approaches for tackling these problems. A solution is then introduced that relies on self-organizing security mechanisms in conjunction with a data rejuvenation scheme using erasure codes.

  1. The Social Impact of P2P Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glorioso, Andrea; Pagallo, Ugo; Ruffo, Giancarlo

    The chapter deals with the social impact of P2P systems in light of a bidirectional connection by which technological developments influence, in a complex and often unpredictable way, the social environment whereas the dynamic evolution of the latter does affect technological progress. From this perspective, the aim is to deepen legal issues, sociological trends, economical aspects, and political dimensions of P2P technology, along with some of its next possible outputs, in order to assess one of the most compelling alternatives to the traditional frame of highly centralized human interaction.

  2. Norovirus and FRNA bacteriophage determined by RT-qPCR and infectious FRNA bacteriophage in wastewater and oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, John; Keaveney, Sinéad; Rajko-Nenow, Paulina; O'Flaherty, Vincent; Doré, William

    2013-09-15

    Norovirus (NoV), the leading cause of adult non-bacterial gastroenteritis can be commonly detected in wastewater but the extent of NoV removal provided by wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is unclear. We monitored a newly commissioned WWTP with UV disinfection on a weekly basis over a six month period for NoV using RT-qPCR and for FRNA bacteriophage GA using both RT-qPCR (total concentration) and a plaque assay (infectious concentration). Mean concentrations of NoV GI and GII in influent wastewater were reduced by 0.25 and 0.41 log10 genome copies 100 ml(-1), respectively by the WWTP. The mean concentration of total FRNA bacteriophage GA was reduced by 0.35 log genome copies 100 ml(-1) compared to a reduction of infectious FRNA bacteriophage GA of 2.13 log PFU 100 ml(-1). A significant difference between concentrations of infectious and total FRNA bacteriophage GA was observed in treated, but not in untreated wastewaters. We conclude that RT-qPCR in isolation underestimates the reduction of infectious virus during wastewater treatment. We further compared the concentrations of infectious virus in combined sewer overflow (CSO) and UV treated effluents using FRNA bacteriophage GA. A greater percentage (98%) of infectious virus is released in CSO discharges than UV treated effluent (44%). Following a CSO discharge, concentrations of NoV GII and infectious FRNA bacteriophage GA in oysters from less than the limit of detection to 3150 genome copies 100 g(-1) and 1050 PFU 100 g(-1) respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Impact of Capsid Proteins on Virus Removal and Inactivation During Water Treatment Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Brooke K; Yang, Yu; Gerrity, Daniel W; Abbaszadegan, Morteza

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effect of the amino acid composition of protein capsids on virus inactivation using ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and titanium dioxide photocatalysis, and physical removal via enhanced coagulation using ferric chloride. Although genomic damage is likely more extensive than protein damage for viruses treated using UV, proteins are still substantially degraded. All amino acids demonstrated significant correlations with UV susceptibility. The hydroxyl radicals produced during photocatalysis are considered nonspecific, but they likely cause greater overall damage to virus capsid proteins relative to the genome. Oxidizing chemicals, including hydroxyl radicals, preferentially degrade amino acids over nucleotides, and the amino acid tyrosine appears to strongly influence virus inactivation. Capsid composition did not correlate strongly to virus removal during physicochemical treatment, nor did virus size. Isoelectric point may play a role in virus removal, but additional factors are likely to contribute.

  4. Novel bacteriophages containing a genome of another bacteriophage within their genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Maud M; Reavy, Brian; Makarova, Kira S; Cock, Peter J; Hopkins, David W; Torrance, Lesley; Koonin, Eugene V; Taliansky, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A novel bacteriophage infecting Staphylococus pasteuri was isolated during a screen for phages in Antarctic soils. The phage named SpaA1 is morphologically similar to phages of the family Siphoviridae. The 42,784 bp genome of SpaA1 is a linear, double-stranded DNA molecule with 3' protruding cohesive ends. The SpaA1 genome encompasses 63 predicted protein-coding genes which cluster within three regions of the genome, each of apparently different origin, in a mosaic pattern. In two of these regions, the gene sets resemble those in prophages of Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki str. T03a001 (genes involved in DNA replication/transcription, cell entry and exit) and B. cereus AH676 (additional regulatory and recombination genes), respectively. The third region represents an almost complete genome (except for the short terminal segments) of a distinct bacteriophage, MZTP02. Nearly the same gene module was identified in prophages of B. thuringiensis serovar monterrey BGSC 4AJ1 and B. cereus Rock4-2. These findings suggest that MZTP02 can be shuttled between genomes of other bacteriophages and prophages, leading to the formation of chimeric genomes. The presence of a complete phage genome in the genome of other phages apparently has not been described previously and might represent a 'fast track' route of virus evolution and horizontal gene transfer. Another phage (BceA1) nearly identical in sequence to SpaA1, and also including the almost complete MZTP02 genome within its own genome, was isolated from a bacterium of the B. cereus/B. thuringiensis group. Remarkably, both SpaA1 and BceA1 phages can infect B. cereus and B. thuringiensis, but only one of them, SpaA1, can infect S. pasteuri. This finding is best compatible with a scenario in which MZTP02 was originally contained in BceA1 infecting Bacillus spp, the common hosts for these two phages, followed by emergence of SpaA1 infecting S. pasteuri.

  5. Human Cytomegalovirus Nuclear Capsids Associate with the Core Nuclear Egress Complex and the Viral Protein Kinase pUL97.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milbradt, Jens; Sonntag, Eric; Wagner, Sabrina; Strojan, Hanife; Wangen, Christina; Lenac Rovis, Tihana; Lisnic, Berislav; Jonjic, Stipan; Sticht, Heinrich; Britt, William J; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Marschall, Manfred

    2018-01-13

    The nuclear phase of herpesvirus replication is regulated through the formation of regulatory multi-component protein complexes. Viral genomic replication is followed by nuclear capsid assembly, DNA encapsidation and nuclear egress. The latter has been studied intensely pointing to the formation of a viral core nuclear egress complex (NEC) that recruits a multimeric assembly of viral and cellular factors for the reorganization of the nuclear envelope. To date, the mechanism of the association of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) capsids with the NEC, which in turn initiates the specific steps of nuclear capsid budding, remains undefined. Here, we provide electron microscopy-based data demonstrating the association of both nuclear capsids and NEC proteins at nuclear lamina budding sites. Specifically, immunogold labelling of the core NEC constituent pUL53 and NEC-associated viral kinase pUL97 suggested an intranuclear NEC-capsid interaction. Staining patterns with phospho-specific lamin A/C antibodies are compatible with earlier postulates of targeted capsid egress at lamina-depleted areas. Important data were provided by co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro kinase analyses using lysates from HCMV-infected cells, nuclear fractions, or infectious virions. Data strongly suggest that nuclear capsids interact with pUL53 and pUL97. Combined, the findings support a refined concept of HCMV nuclear trafficking and NEC-capsid interaction.

  6. Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein Phosphorylation Sites Affect Capsid Stability and Transient Exposure of the C-terminal Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selzer, Lisa; Kant, Ravi; Wang, Joseph C-Y; Bothner, Brian; Zlotnick, Adam

    2015-11-20

    Hepatitis B virus core protein has 183 amino acids divided into an assembly domain and an arginine-rich C-terminal domain (CTD) that regulates essential functions including genome packaging, reverse transcription, and intracellular trafficking. Here, we investigated the CTD in empty hepatitis B virus (HBV) T=4 capsids. We examined wild-type core protein (Cp183-WT) and a mutant core protein (Cp183-EEE), in which three CTD serines are replaced with glutamate to mimic phosphorylated protein. We found that Cp183-WT capsids were less stable than Cp183-EEE capsids. When we tested CTD sensitivity to trypsin, we detected two different populations of CTDs differentiated by their rate of trypsin cleavage. Interestingly, CTDs from Cp183-EEE capsids exhibited a much slower rate of proteolytic cleavage when compared with CTDs of Cp183-WT capsids. Cryo-electron microscopy studies of trypsin-digested capsids show that CTDs at five-fold symmetry vertices are most protected. We hypothesize that electrostatic interactions between glutamates and arginines in Cp183-EEE, particularly at five-fold, increase capsid stability and reduce CTD exposure. Our studies show that quasi-equivalent CTDs exhibit different rates of exposure and thus might perform distinct functions during the hepatitis B virus lifecycle. Our results demonstrate a structural role for CTD phosphorylation and indicate crosstalk between CTDs within a capsid particle. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Structural Model of the Tubular Assembly of the Rous Sarcoma Virus Capsid Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jaekyun; Qiao, Xin; Hung, Ivan; Mitra, Alok K; Desfosses, Ambroise; Huang, Daniel; Gor'kov, Peter L; Craven, Rebecca C; Kingston, Richard L; Gan, Zhehong; Zhu, Fangqiang; Chen, Bo

    2017-02-08

    The orthoretroviral capsid protein (CA) assembles into polymorphic capsids, whose architecture, assembly, and stability are still being investigated. The N-terminal and C-terminal domains of CA (NTD and CTD, respectively) engage in both homotypic and heterotypic interactions to create the capsid. Hexameric turrets formed by the NTD decorate the majority of the capsid surface. We report nearly complete solid-state NMR (ssNMR) resonance assignments of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) CA, assembled into hexamer tubes that mimic the authentic capsid. The ssNMR assignments show that, upon assembly, large conformational changes occur in loops connecting helices, as well as the short 3 10 helix initiating the CTD. The interdomain linker becomes statically disordered. Combining constraints from ssNMR and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), we establish an atomic resolution model of the RSV CA tubular assembly using molecular dynamics flexible fitting (MDFF) simulations. On the basis of comparison of this MDFF model with an earlier-derived crystallographic model for the planar assembly, the induction of curvature into the RSV CA hexamer lattice arises predominantly from reconfiguration of the NTD-CTD and CTD trimer interfaces. The CTD dimer and CTD trimer interfaces are also intrinsically variable. Hence, deformation of the CA hexamer lattice results from the variable displacement of the CTDs that surround each hexameric turret. Pervasive H-bonding is found at all interdomain interfaces, which may contribute to their malleability. Finally, we find helices at the interfaces of HIV and RSV CA assemblies have very different contact angles, which may reflect differences in the capsid assembly pathway for these viruses.

  8. Screening for the Location of RNA using the Chloride Ion Distribution in Simulations of Virus Capsids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Daniel S D; van der Spoel, David

    2012-07-10

    The complete structure of the genomic material inside a virus capsid remains elusive, although a limited amount of symmetric nucleic acid can be resolved in the crystal structure of 17 icosahedral viruses. The negatively charged sugar-phosphate backbone of RNA and DNA as well as the large positive charge of the interior surface of the virus capsids suggest that electrostatic complementarity is an important factor in the packaging of the genomes in these viruses. To test how much packing information is encoded by the electrostatic and steric envelope of the capsid interior, we performed extensive all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of virus capsids with explicit water molecules and solvent ions. The model systems were two small plant viruses in which significant amounts of RNA has been observed by X-ray crystallography: satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV, 62% RNA visible) and satellite tobacco necrosis virus (STNV, 34% RNA visible). Simulations of half-capsids of these viruses with no RNA present revealed that the binding sites of RNA correlated well with regions populated by chloride ions, suggesting that it is possible to screen for the binding sites of nucleic acids by determining the equilibrium distribution of negative ions. By including the crystallographically resolved RNA in addition to ions, we predicted the localization of the unresolved RNA in the viruses. Both viruses showed a hot-spot for RNA binding at the 5-fold symmetry axis. The MD simulations were compared to predictions of the chloride density based on nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation (PBE) calculations with mobile ions. Although the predictions are superficially similar, the PBE calculations overestimate the ion concentration close to the capsid surface and underestimate it far away, mainly because protein dynamics is not taken into account. Density maps from chloride screening can be used to aid in building atomic models of packaged virus genomes. Knowledge of the principles of

  9. Breaking a virus: Identifying molecular level failure modes of a viral capsid by multiscale modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamani, V.; Globisch, C.; Peter, C.; Deserno, M.

    2016-10-01

    We use coarse-grained (CG) simulations to study the deformation of empty Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus (CCMV) capsids under uniaxial compression, from the initial elastic response up to capsid breakage. Our CG model is based on the MARTINI force field and has been amended by a stabilizing elastic network, acting only within individual proteins, that was tuned to capture the fluctuation spectrum of capsid protein dimers, obtained from all atom simulations. We have previously shown that this model predicts force-compression curves that match AFM indentation experiments on empty CCMV capsids. Here we investigate details of the actual breaking events when the CCMV capsid finally fails. We present a symmetry classification of all relevant protein contacts and show that they differ significantly in terms of stability. Specifically, we show that interfaces which break readily are precisely those which are believed to form last during assembly, even though some of them might share the same contacts as other non-breaking interfaces. In particular, the interfaces that form pentamers of dimers never break, while the virtually identical interfaces within hexamers of dimers readily do. Since these units differ in the large-scale geometry and, most noticeably, the cone-angle at the center of the 5- or 6-fold vertex, we propose that the hexameric unit fails because it is pre-stressed. This not only suggests that hexamers of dimers form less frequently during the early stages of assembly; it also offers a natural explanation for the well-known β-barrel motif at the hexameric center as a post-aggregation stabilization mechanism. Finally, we identify those amino acid contacts within all key protein interfaces that are most persistent during compressive deformation of the capsid, thereby providing potential targets for mutation studies aiming to elucidate the key contacts upon which overall stability rests.

  10. Immobilization of Active Bacteriophages on Polyhydroxyalkanoate Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chanchan; Sauvageau, Dominic; Elias, Anastasia

    2016-01-20

    A rapid, efficient technique for the attachment of bacteriophages (phages) onto polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) surfaces has been developed and compared to three reported methods for phage immobilization. Polymer surfaces were modified to facilitate phage attachment using (1) plasma treatment alone, (2) plasma treatment followed by activation by 1-ethyl-3-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide (sulfo-NHS), (3) plasma-initiated acrylic acid grafting, or (4) plasma-initiated acrylic acid grafting with activation by EDC and sulfo-NHS. The impact of each method on the surface chemistry of PHA was investigated using contact angle analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Each of the four treatments was shown to result in both increased hydrophilicity and in the modification of the surface functional groups. Modified surfaces were immersed in suspensions of phage T4 for immobilization. The highest level of phage binding was observed for the surfaces modified by plasma treatment alone. The change in chemical bond states observed for surfaces that underwent plasma treatment is suspected to be the cause of the increased binding of active phages. Plasma-treated surfaces were further analyzed through phage-staining and fluorescence microscopy to assess the surface density of immobilized phages and their capacity to capture hosts. The infective capability of attached phages was confirmed by exposing the phage-immobilized surfaces to the host bacteria Escherichia coli in both plaque and infection dynamic assays. Plasma-treated surfaces with immobilized phages displayed higher infectivity than surfaces treated with other methods; in fact, the equivalent initial multiplicity of infection was 2 orders of magnitude greater than with other methods. Control samples - prepared by immersing polymer surfaces in phage suspensions (without prior plasma treatment) - did not show any bacterial growth inhibition, suggesting they did not bind

  11. Pollution Prevention Successes Database (P2SDb) user guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    When Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (P2OAs) were launched at the Hanford Site during the summer of 1994, the first comment received from those using them expressed the desire for a method to report assessments electronically. As a temporary measure, macros were developed for use on word processing systems, but a more formal database was obviously needed. Additionally, increased DOE and Washington state reporting requirements for pollution prevention suggested that a database system would streamline the reporting process. The Pollution Prevention Group of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) contracted with the Data Automation Engineering Department from ICF Kaiser Hanford Company (ICFKH) to develop the system. The scope was to develop a database that will track P2OAs conducted by the facilities and contractors at the Hanford Site. It will also track pollution prevention accomplishments that are not the result of P2OAs and document a portion of the Process Waste Assessments conducted in the past. To accommodate the above criteria, yet complete the system in a timely manner, the Pollution Prevention Successes Database (P2SDb) is being implemented in three phases. The first phase will automate the worksheets to provide both input and output of the data associated with the worksheets. The second phase will automate standard summary reports and ad hoc reports. The third phase will provide automated searching of the database to facilitate the sharing of pollution prevention experiences among various users. This User's Guide addresses only the Phase 1 system

  12. Comparing Pedophile Activity in Different P2P Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Fournier

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Peer-to-peer (P2P systems are widely used to exchange content over the Internet. Knowledge of pedophile activity in such networks remains limited, despite having important social consequences. Moreover, though there are different P2P systems in use, previous academic works on this topic focused on one system at a time and their results are not directly comparable. We design a methodology for comparing KAD and eDonkey, two P2P systems among the most prominent ones and with different anonymity levels. We monitor two eDonkey servers and the KAD network during several days and record hundreds of thousands of keyword-based queries. We detect pedophile-related queries with a previously validated tool and we propose, for the first time, a large-scale comparison of pedophile activity in two different P2P systems. We conclude that there are significantly fewer pedophile queries in KAD than in eDonkey (approximately 0.09% vs. 0.25%.

  13. Pollution Prevention Successes Database (P2SDb) user guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    When Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (P2OAs) were launched at the Hanford Site during the summer of 1994, the first comment received from those using them expressed the desire for a method to report assessments electronically. As a temporary measure, macros were developed for use on word processing systems, but a more formal database was obviously needed. Additionally, increased DOE and Washington state reporting requirements for pollution prevention suggested that a database system would streamline the reporting process. The Pollution Prevention Group of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) contracted with the Data Automation Engineering Department from ICF Kaiser Hanford Company (ICFKH) to develop the system. The scope was to develop a database that will track P2OAs conducted by the facilities and contractors at the Hanford Site. It will also track pollution prevention accomplishments that are not the result of P2OAs and document a portion of the Process Waste Assessments conducted in the past. To accommodate the above criteria, yet complete the system in a timely manner, the Pollution Prevention Successes Database (P2SDb) is being implemented in three phases. The first phase will automate the worksheets to provide both input and output of the data associated with the worksheets. The second phase will automate standard summary reports and ad hoc reports. The third phase will provide automated searching of the database to facilitate the sharing of pollution prevention experiences among various users. This User`s Guide addresses only the Phase 1 system.

  14. P2X(3) receptor gating near normal body temperature

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kmyhz, V.; Maximyuk, O.; Teslenko, V.; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Krishtal, O.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 456, č. 12 (2008), s. 339-347 ISSN 0031-6768 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : P2X3 receptors * Temperature-sensitivity * Gating Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.526, year: 2008

  15. Measurement and analysis of P2P IPTV program resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenxian; Chen, Xingshu; Wang, Haizhou; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of P2P technology, P2P IPTV applications have received more and more attention. And program resource distribution is very important to P2P IPTV applications. In order to collect IPTV program resources, a distributed multi-protocol crawler is proposed. And the crawler has collected more than 13 million pieces of information of IPTV programs from 2009 to 2012. In addition, the distribution of IPTV programs is independent and incompact, resulting in chaos of program names, which obstructs searching and organizing programs. Thus, we focus on characteristic analysis of program resources, including the distributions of length of program names, the entropy of the character types, and hierarchy depth of programs. These analyses reveal the disorderly naming conventions of P2P IPTV programs. The analysis results can help to purify and extract useful information from chaotic names for better retrieval and accelerate automatic sorting of program and establishment of IPTV repository. In order to represent popularity of programs and to predict user behavior and popularity of hot programs over a period, we also put forward an analytical model of hot programs.

  16. Measurement and Analysis of P2P IPTV Program Resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxian Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of P2P technology, P2P IPTV applications have received more and more attention. And program resource distribution is very important to P2P IPTV applications. In order to collect IPTV program resources, a distributed multi-protocol crawler is proposed. And the crawler has collected more than 13 million pieces of information of IPTV programs from 2009 to 2012. In addition, the distribution of IPTV programs is independent and incompact, resulting in chaos of program names, which obstructs searching and organizing programs. Thus, we focus on characteristic analysis of program resources, including the distributions of length of program names, the entropy of the character types, and hierarchy depth of programs. These analyses reveal the disorderly naming conventions of P2P IPTV programs. The analysis results can help to purify and extract useful information from chaotic names for better retrieval and accelerate automatic sorting of program and establishment of IPTV repository. In order to represent popularity of programs and to predict user behavior and popularity of hot programs over a period, we also put forward an analytical model of hot programs.

  17. P2X receptor channels in endocrine glands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stojilkovic, S. S.; Zemková, Hana

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 4 (2013), s. 173-180 ISSN 2190-460X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : ATP * purinergic P2X receptor channels * pituitary * endocrine glands Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  18. The P2 Masonic Lodge and Ceaușescu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabin Drăgulin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the following article the author aims at proving that Nicolae Ceausescu wasn't e member of the P2 masonic lodge. The conclusion has been driven following an in depth research conducted in the archives of the Italian state.

  19. Review of Brookhaven nuclear transparency measurements in (p,2p ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Review of Brookhaven nuclear transparency measurements in (p,2p) reactions at large Q. 2. ALAN S CARROLL. Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973, USA. Abstract. In this contribution we summarize the results of two experiments to measure the trans- parency of nuclei in ...

  20. p38 MAPK Mediates Glial P2X7R-Neuronal P2Y1R Inhibitory Control of P2X3R Expression in Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Li, Guangwen; Huang, Li-Yen Mae

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that endogenously active purinergic P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs) in satellite glial cells of dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) stimulate ATP release. The ATP activates P2Y1Rs located in the enwrapped neuronal somata, resulting in down-regulation of P2X3Rs. This P2X7R-P2Y1-P2X3R inhibitory control significantly reduces P2X3R-mediated nociceptive responses. The underlying mechanism by which the activation of P2Y1Rs inhibits the expression of P2X3Rs remains unexplored. Examining the effect of the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase on the expression of P2X3Rs in DRGs, we found that the p38 activator, anisomycin (Anis), reduced the expression of P2X3Rs. Blocking the activity of SGCs by the glial Krebs cycle inhibitor, fluorocitrate, did not change the effect of Anis. These results suggest that neuronal p38 plays a major role in the inhibition of P2X3R expression. Western blotting analyses showed that inhibiting P2Y1Rs by MRS2179 (MRS) or blocking P2X7Rs by either oxATP or A740003 reduced pp38 and increased P2X3R expression in DRGs. These results are further supported by the immunohistochemical study showing that P2X7R and P2Y1R antagonists reduce the percentage of pp38-positive neurons. These observations suggest that activation of P2X7Rs and P2Y1Rs promotes p38 activity to exert inhibitory control on P2X3R expression. Since activation of p38 by Anis in the presence of either A740003 or MRS could overcome the block of P2X7R-P2Y1R inhibitory control, p38 in DRG neurons is downstream of P2Y1Rs. In addition, inhibition of p38 by SB202190 was found to prevent the P2X7R and P2Y1R block of P2X3R expression and increase P2X3R-mediated nociceptive flinch behaviors. p38 in DRG neurons downstream of P2Y1R is necessary and sufficient for the P2X7R-P2Y1R inhibitory control of P2X3R expression. © 2015 Chen et al.

  1. Functionalized Congeners of P2Y1 Receptor Antagonists:

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Castro, Sonia [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health; Maruoka, Hiroshi [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health; Hong, Kunlun [ORNL; Kilbey, II, S Michael [ORNL; Costanzi, Stefano [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health; Hechler, Béatrice [University of Strasbourg; Gachet, Christian [EFS-Alsace, Strasbourg, France; Harden, T. Kendall [University of North Carolina School of Medicine; Jacobson, Kenneth A. [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health

    2010-01-01

    The P2Y{sub 1} receptor is a prothrombotic G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activated by ADP. Preference for the North (N) ring conformation of the ribose moiety of adenine nucleotide 3',5'-bisphosphate antagonists of the P2Y{sub 1} receptor was established by using a ring-constrained methanocarba (a bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane) ring as a ribose substitute. A series of covalently linkable N{sup 6}-methyl-(N)-methanocarba-2'-deoxyadenosine-3',5'-bisphosphates containing extended 2-alkynyl chains was designed, and binding affinity at the human (h) P2Y{sub 1} receptor determined. The chain of these functionalized congeners contained hydrophilic moieties, a reactive substituent, or biotin, linked via an amide. Variation of the chain length and position of an intermediate amide group revealed high affinity of carboxylic congener 8 (K{sub i} 23 nM) and extended amine congener 15 (K{sub i} 132 nM), both having a 2-(1-pentynoyl) group. A biotin conjugate 18 containing an extended {epsilon}-aminocaproyl spacer chain exhibited higher affinity than a shorter biotinylated analogue. Alternatively, click coupling of terminal alkynes of homologous 2-dialkynyl nucleotide derivatives to alkyl azido groups produced triazole derivatives that bound to the P2Y{sub 1} receptor following deprotection of the bisphosphate groups. The preservation of receptor affinity of the functionalized congeners was consistent with new P2Y{sub 1} receptor modeling and ligand docking. Attempted P2Y{sub 1} antagonist conjugation to PAMAM dendrimer carriers by amide formation or palladium-catalyzed reaction between an alkyne on the dendrimer and a 2-iodopurine-derivatized nucleotide was unsuccessful. A dialkynyl intermediate containing the chain length favored in receptor binding was conjugated to an azide-derivatized dendrimer, and the conjugate inhibited ADP-promoted human platelet aggregation. This is the first example of attaching a strategically functionalized P2Y receptor

  2. Evidence for requirement of tyrosine phosphorylation in endothelial P2Y- and P2U- purinoceptor stimulation of prostacyclin release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, A.; Patel, V.; Brown, C.; Boarder, M. R.

    1995-01-01

    1. The release of prostacyclin (PGI2) from vascular endothelial cells is stimulated by ATP acting at G protein-coupled P2-purinoceptors. Here we investigate the hypothesis that tyrosine protein phosphorylations are involved in this response. 2. The use of Western blots with anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies showed that 30 microM 2MeSATP (selective for P2Y-purinoceptors), 300 microM UTP (selective for P2U-purinoceptors) and 300 microM ATP (effective at both these purinoceptors), each stimulate the tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins in bovine cultured aortic endothelial cells. Each of these agonists also stimulates 6-keto PGF1 alpha accumulation in the medium (an index of PGI2 release) in these cells in the same period. 3. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein, inhibits the 6-keto PGF1 alpha response with the same concentration-dependency (1-100 microM) as the tyrosine phosphorylation response. 4. Tyrphostin, a structurally and functionally distinct tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is also a potent inhibitor (0.1-10 microM) of the 6-keto PGF1 alpha response. 5. Neither tyrphostin nor genistein inhibit the phospholipase C response to P2-purinoceptor stimulation. Furthermore, these inhibitors do not affect the 6-keto PGF1 alpha response to ionomycin. 6. These results show that the regulation of vascular endothelial cells by ATP acting at both P2Y- and P2U-purinoceptors involves the stimulation of tyrosine phosphorylation, and suggest that this is a necessary event for the purinoceptor-mediated stimulation of PGI2 production. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 PMID:8590971

  3. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to budgerigar fledgling disease virus major capsid protein VP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattaey, A.; Lenz, L.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Eleven hybridoma cell lines producing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against intact budgerigar fledgling disease (BFD) virions were produced and characterized. These antibodies were selected for their ability to react with BFD virions in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Each of these antibodies was reactive in the immunofluorescent detection of BFD virus-infected cells. These antibodies immunoprecipitated intact virions and specifically recognized the major capsid protein, VP1, of the dissociated virion. The MAbs were found to preferentially recognize native BFD virus capsid protein when compared with denatured virus protein. These MAbs were capable of detecting BFD virus protein in chicken embryonated cell-culture lysates by dot-blot analysis.

  4. Vibrating virus capsids and interactions with short light pulses -- picking up good vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankey, Otto; Benson, Daryn

    2009-10-01

    Viruses are the simplest ``life'' form. They reproduce by borrowing the machinery of their host cell. Viruses consist of an outer coat (capsid) that protects its genomic material inside. They are pathogenic to plants, bacteria, animals, and of course humans. Experimental studies at ASU by Tsen et al. have discovered that ultra-short laser pulses are capable of ``inactivating'' viruses. One potential mechanism is the coupling of light to the soft dynamical modes of the capsid. We describe theoretical modeling of this effect.

  5. Characterization of the mode of action of a potent dengue virus capsid inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaturro, Pietro; Trist, Iuni Margaret Laura; Paul, David; Kumar, Anil; Acosta, Eliana G; Byrd, Chelsea M; Jordan, Robert; Brancale, Andrea; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2014-10-01

    Dengue viruses (DV) represent a significant global health burden, with up to 400 million infections every year and around 500,000 infected individuals developing life-threatening disease. In spite of attempts to develop vaccine candidates and antiviral drugs, there is a lack of approved therapeutics for the treatment of DV infection. We have previously reported the identification of ST-148, a small-molecule inhibitor exhibiting broad and potent antiviral activity against DV in vitro and in vivo (C. M. Byrd et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 57:15-25, 2013, doi:10 .1128/AAC.01429-12). In the present study, we investigated the mode of action of this promising compound by using a combination of biochemical, virological, and imaging-based techniques. We confirmed that ST-148 targets the capsid protein and obtained evidence of bimodal antiviral activity affecting both assembly/release and entry of infectious DV particles. Importantly, by using a robust bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based assay, we observed an ST-148-dependent increase of capsid self-interaction. These results were corroborated by molecular modeling studies that also revealed a plausible model for compound binding to capsid protein and inhibition by a distinct resistance mutation. These results suggest that ST-148-enhanced capsid protein self-interaction perturbs assembly and disassembly of DV nucleocapsids, probably by inducing structural rigidity. Thus, as previously reported for other enveloped viruses, stabilization of capsid protein structure is an attractive therapeutic concept that also is applicable to flaviviruses. Dengue viruses are arthropod-borne viruses representing a significant global health burden. They infect up to 400 million people and are endemic to subtropical and tropical areas of the world. Currently, there are neither vaccines nor approved therapeutics for the prophylaxis or treatment of DV infections, respectively. This study reports the characterization of the

  6. General Model for Retroviral Capsid Pattern Recognition by TRIM5 Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jonathan M; Christensen, Devin E; Bhattacharya, Akash; Dawidziak, Daria M; Roganowicz, Marcin D; Wan, Yueping; Pumroy, Ruth A; Demeler, Borries; Ivanov, Dmitri N; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K; Sundquist, Wesley I; Pornillos, Owen

    2018-02-15

    Restriction factors are intrinsic cellular defense proteins that have evolved to block microbial infections. Retroviruses such as HIV-1 are restricted by TRIM5 proteins, which recognize the viral capsid shell that surrounds, organizes, and protects the viral genome. TRIM5α uses a SPRY domain to bind capsids with low intrinsic affinity ( K D of >1 mM) and therefore requires higher-order assembly into a hexagonal lattice to generate sufficient avidity for productive capsid recognition. TRIMCyp, on the other hand, binds HIV-1 capsids through a cyclophilin A domain, which has a well-defined binding site and higher affinity ( K D of ∼10 μM) for isolated capsid subunits. Therefore, it has been argued that TRIMCyp proteins have dispensed with the need for higher-order assembly to function as antiviral factors. Here, we show that, consistent with its high degree of sequence similarity with TRIM5α, the TRIMCyp B-box 2 domain shares the same ability to self-associate and facilitate assembly of a TRIMCyp hexagonal lattice that can wrap about the HIV-1 capsid. We also show that under stringent experimental conditions, TRIMCyp-mediated restriction of HIV-1 is indeed dependent on higher-order assembly. Both forms of TRIM5 therefore use the same mechanism of avidity-driven capsid pattern recognition. IMPORTANCE Rhesus macaques and owl monkeys are highly resistant to HIV-1 infection due to the activity of TRIM5 restriction factors. The rhesus macaque TRIM5α protein blocks HIV-1 through a mechanism that requires self-assembly of a hexagonal TRIM5α lattice around the invading viral core. Lattice assembly amplifies very weak interactions between the TRIM5α SPRY domain and the HIV-1 capsid. Assembly also promotes dimerization of the TRIM5α RING E3 ligase domain, resulting in synthesis of polyubiquitin chains that mediate downstream steps of restriction. In contrast to rhesus TRIM5α, the owl monkey TRIM5 homolog, TRIMCyp, binds isolated HIV-1 CA subunits much more tightly

  7. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a lactococcal bacteriophage small terminase subunit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Bin; Pham, Tam M.; Surjadi, Regina; Robinson, Christine P.; Le, Thien-Kim; Chandry, P. Scott; Peat, Thomas S.; McKinstry, William J.

    2013-01-01

    The small terminase subunit from a lactococcal 936 bacteriophage (strain 454) has been expressed, purified, crystallized and X-ray diffraction data collected to 2.4 Å resolution. Terminases are enzymes that are required for the insertion of a single viral genome into the interior of a viral procapsid by a process referred to as ‘encapsulation or packaging’. Many double-stranded DNA viruses such as bacteriophages T3, T4, T7, λ and SPP1, as well as herpes viruses, utilize terminase enzymes for this purpose. All the terminase enzymes described to date require two subunits, a small subunit referred to as TerS and a large subunit referred to as TerL, for in vivo activity. The TerS and TerL subunits interact with each other to form a functional hetero-oligomeric enzyme complex; however the stoichiometry and oligomeric state have not been determined. We have cloned, expressed and purified recombinant small terminase TerS from a 936 lactococcal bacteriophage strain ASCC454, initially isolated from a dairy factory. The terminase was crystallized using a combination of nanolitre sitting drops and vapour diffusion using sodium malonate as the precipitant, and crystallization optimized using standard vapour-diffusion hanging drops set up in the presence of a nitrogen atmosphere. The crystals belong to the P2 space group, with unit-cell parameters a = 73.93, b = 158.48, c = 74.23 Å, and diffract to 2.42 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. A self-rotation function calculation revealed that the terminase oligomerizes into an octamer in the asymmetric unit, although size-exclusion chromatography suggests that it is possible for it to form an oligomer of up to 13 subunits

  8. Multiple roles of genome-attached bacteriophage terminal proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; Salas, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    Protein-primed replication constitutes a generalized mechanism to initiate DNA or RNA synthesis in linear genomes, including viruses, gram-positive bacteria, linear plasmids and mobile elements. By this mechanism a specific amino acid primes replication and becomes covalently linked to the genome ends. Despite the fact that TPs lack sequence homology, they share a similar structural arrangement, with the priming residue in the C-terminal half of the protein and an accumulation of positively charged residues at the N-terminal end. In addition, various bacteriophage TPs have been shown to have DNA-binding capacity that targets TPs and their attached genomes to the host nucleoid. Furthermore, a number of bacteriophage TPs from different viral families and with diverse hosts also contain putative nuclear localization signals and localize in the eukaryotic nucleus, which could lead to the transport of the attached DNA. This suggests a possible role of bacteriophage TPs in prokaryote-to-eukaryote horizontal gene transfer. - Highlights: • Protein-primed genome replication constitutes a strategy to initiate DNA or RNA synthesis in linear genomes. • Bacteriophage terminal proteins (TPs) are covalently attached to viral genomes by their primary function priming DNA replication. • TPs are also DNA-binding proteins and target phage genomes to the host nucleoid. • TPs can also localize in the eukaryotic nucleus and may have a role in phage-mediated interkingdom gene transfer

  9. Toxicity test and bacteriophage typing of Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toxicity test and bacteriophage typing of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from food contact surfaces and foods prepared by families in Zaria, Nigeria. ... contamination of products by toxigenic strains of organisms. Keywords: Staphylococcus aureus, enterotoxin production, phage typing, haemolysis and food poisoning ...

  10. Structural characterization of bacteriophage M13 solubilization by amphiphiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stopar, D.; Spruijt, R.B.; Wolfs, C.J.A.M.; Hemminga, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    The structural properties of bacteriophage M13 during disassembly were studied in different membrane model systems, composed of a homologue series of the detergents sodium octyl sulfate, sodium decyl sulfate, and sodium dodecyl sulfate. The structural changes during phage disruption were monitored

  11. Bacteriophages as indicators of faecal pollution and enteric virus removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteriophages are an attractive alternative to fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), particularly as surrogates of enteric virus fate and transport due to their closer morphological and biological properties compared to FIB. Based on a meta-analysis of published data, we summarize con...

  12. Bacteriophages as enteric viral indicators in bivalve mollusc management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Kate R; Torok, Valeria A; Turnbull, Alison R

    2017-08-01

    Human enteric viruses, such as norovirus and hepatitis A virus, are spread by a variety of routes including faecal-oral transmission. Contaminated bivalve shellfish are regularly implicated in foodborne viral disease outbreaks internationally. Traditionally indicator bacteria, the coliforms and Escherichia coli, have been used to detect faecal pollution in growing waters and shellfish. However, studies have established that they are inadequate as indicators of the risk of human enteric viruses. Bacteriophages have been identified as potential indicators or surrogates for human enteric viruses due to their similarities in morphology, behaviour in water environments and resistance to disinfectant treatments. The somatic coliphages, male-specific RNA coliphages (FRNA coliphages) and the bacteriophages of Bacteroides are the groups recognised as most suitable for water and shellfish testing. In this review, we discuss the rationale and supporting evidence for the application of bacteriophages as surrogates for human enteric viruses in shellfish under a variety of conditions. There is some evidence to support the validity of using bacteriophage levels to indicate viral risk in shellfish in highly contaminated sites and following adverse sewage events. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. MetaPhinder-Identifying Bacteriophage Sequences in Metagenomic Data Sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurtz, Vanessa Isabell; Villarroel, Julia; Lund, Ole

    2016-01-01

    and understand them. Here we present MetaPhinder, a method to identify assembled genomic fragments (i.e. contigs) of phage origin in metage-nomic data sets. The method is based on a comparison to a database of whole genome bacteriophage sequences, integrating hits to multiple genomes to accomodate for the mosaic...

  14. Use of bacteriophages in controlling E. coli in leafy vegetables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteriophages are viruses that can infect and lys (kill) bacteria. These viruses are not harmful to humans and are present in the environment and many foods. Enterohemmorhagic E. coli (EHEC), like E. coli O157:H7, have been associated with contaminated bagged leafy green commodities. Outbreaks o...

  15. Natural mummification of the human gut preserves bacteriophage DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Fornaciari, Gino; Luciani, Stefania; Dowd, Scot E; Toranzos, Gary A; Marota, Isolina; Cano, Raul J

    2016-01-01

    The natural mummification process of the human gut represents a unique opportunity to study the resulting microbial community structure and composition. While results are providing insights into the preservation of bacteria, fungi, pathogenic eukaryotes and eukaryotic viruses, no studies have demonstrated that the process of natural mummification also results in the preservation of bacteriophage DNA. We characterized the gut microbiome of three pre-Columbian Andean mummies, namely FI3, FI9 and FI12, and found sequences homologous to viruses. From the sequences attributable to viruses, 50.4% (mummy FI3), 1.0% (mummy FI9) and 84.4% (mummy FI12) were homologous to bacteriophages. Sequences corresponding to the Siphoviridae, Myoviridae, Podoviridae and Microviridae families were identified. Predicted putative bacterial hosts corresponded mainly to the Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, and included Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Clostridium, Escherichia, Vibrio, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas and Yersinia. Predicted functional categories associated with bacteriophages showed a representation of structural, replication, integration and entry and lysis genes. The present study suggests that the natural mummification of the human gut results in the preservation of bacteriophage DNA, representing an opportunity to elucidate the ancient phageome and to hypothesize possible mechanisms of preservation. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. BACTERIOPHAGE TRANSPORT IN SANDY SOIL AND FRACTURED TUFF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteriophage transport was investigated in laboratory column experiments using sandy soil, a controlled field study in a sandy wash, and laboratory experiments using fractured rock. In the soil columns, the phage MS-2 exhibited significant dispersion and was excluded from 35 to ...

  17. Design of thermolabile bacteriophage repressor mutants by comparative molecular modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, A; vandenBurg, B; Karsens, H; Venema, G; Kok, J; Burg, Bertus van den

    1997-01-01

    Comparative molecular modeling was performed with repressor protein Rro of the temperate Lactococcus lactis bacteriophage r1t using the known 3D-structures of related repressors in order to obtain thermolabile derivatives of Rro. Rro residues presumed to stabilize a nonhomologous but structurally

  18. Role of osmotic and hydrostatic pressures in bacteriophage genome ejection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemay, Serge Joseph Guy; Panja, D.; Molineux, I.

    2013-01-01

    A critical step in the bacteriophage life cycle is genome ejection into host bacteria. The ejection process for double-stranded DNA phages has been studied thoroughly in vitro, where after triggering with the cellular receptor the genome ejects into a buffer. The experimental data have been

  19. [Bacteriophages in the battle against multidrug resistant bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, J.W.M. van der; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C.

    2018-01-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. They are highly specific for a bacterial species. The so-called 'lytic phages' can lyse bacteria when they infect them; these phages can be used to treat bacterial infections. Despite a century of experience with phage therapy, the evidence for

  20. Multiple roles of genome-attached bacteriophage terminal proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; Salas, Margarita, E-mail: msalas@cbm.csic.es

    2014-11-15

    Protein-primed replication constitutes a generalized mechanism to initiate DNA or RNA synthesis in linear genomes, including viruses, gram-positive bacteria, linear plasmids and mobile elements. By this mechanism a specific amino acid primes replication and becomes covalently linked to the genome ends. Despite the fact that TPs lack sequence homology, they share a similar structural arrangement, with the priming residue in the C-terminal half of the protein and an accumulation of positively charged residues at the N-terminal end. In addition, various bacteriophage TPs have been shown to have DNA-binding capacity that targets TPs and their attached genomes to the host nucleoid. Furthermore, a number of bacteriophage TPs from different viral families and with diverse hosts also contain putative nuclear localization signals and localize in the eukaryotic nucleus, which could lead to the transport of the attached DNA. This suggests a possible role of bacteriophage TPs in prokaryote-to-eukaryote horizontal gene transfer. - Highlights: • Protein-primed genome replication constitutes a strategy to initiate DNA or RNA synthesis in linear genomes. • Bacteriophage terminal proteins (TPs) are covalently attached to viral genomes by their primary function priming DNA replication. • TPs are also DNA-binding proteins and target phage genomes to the host nucleoid. • TPs can also localize in the eukaryotic nucleus and may have a role in phage-mediated interkingdom gene transfer.

  1. Specific Inhibitors of HIV Capsid Assembly Binding to the C-Terminal Domain of the Capsid Protein: Evaluation of 2-Arylquinazolines as Potential Antiviral Compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machara, A.; Lux, V.; Kožíšek, Milan; Grantz Šašková, Klára; Štěpánek, O.; Kotora, M.; Parkan, Kamil; Pávová, Marcela; Glass, B.; Sehr, P.; Lewis, J.; Müller, B.; Kräusslich, H. G.; Konvalinka, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 2 (2016), s. 545-558 ISSN 0022-2623 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-19561S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 201095 - HIV ACE Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : HIV-1 assembly * capsid * high-throughput screening * AlphaScreen assay Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 6.259, year: 2016

  2. Theatrical distribution and P2P movie piracy: a survey of P2P networks in Hungary using transactional data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodó, B.; Lakatos, Z.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines what appears to be the most important factor shaping file sharing: the failure of traditional cultural markets to efficiently supply the demand in the online environment. Its findings are based on tracking the traffic of movies on three Hungarian P2P networks. This dataset is

  3. Procedures to characterize and study P2Z/P2X7 purinoceptor: flow cytometry as a promising practical, reliable tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihei Oscar Kenji

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The expression of P2Z/P2X7 purinoceptor in different cell types is well established. This receptor is a member of the ionotropic P2X receptor family, which is composed by seven cloned receptor subtypes (P2X1 - P2X7. Interestingly, the P2Z/P2X7 has a unique feature of being linked to a non-selective pore which allows the passage of molecules up to 900 Da depending on the cell type. Early studies of P2Z/P2X7 purinoceptor were exclusively based on classical pharmacological studies but the recent tools of molecular biology have enriched the analysis of the receptor expression. The majority of assays and techniques chosen so far to study the expression of P2Z/P2X7 receptor explore directly or indirectly the effects of the opening of P2Z/P2X7 linked pore. In this review we describe the main techniques used to study the expression and functionality of P2Z/P2X7 receptor. Additionally, the increasing need and importance of a multifunctional analysis of P2Z/P2X7 expression based on flow cytometry technology is discussed, as well as the adoption of a more complete analysis of P2Z/P2X7 expression involving different techniques.

  4. Supporting seamless mobility for P2P live streaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunsam; Kim, Sangjin; Lee, Choonhwa

    2014-01-01

    With advent of various mobile devices with powerful networking and computing capabilities, the users' demand to enjoy live video streaming services such as IPTV with mobile devices has been increasing rapidly. However, it is challenging to get over the degradation of service quality due to data loss caused by the handover. Although many handover schemes were proposed at protocol layers below the application layer, they inherently suffer from data loss while the network is being disconnected during the handover. We therefore propose an efficient application-layer handover scheme to support seamless mobility for P2P live streaming. By simulation experiments, we show that the P2P live streaming system with our proposed handover scheme can improve the playback continuity significantly compared to that without our scheme.

  5. Supporting Seamless Mobility for P2P Live Streaming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunsam Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With advent of various mobile devices with powerful networking and computing capabilities, the users' demand to enjoy live video streaming services such as IPTV with mobile devices has been increasing rapidly. However, it is challenging to get over the degradation of service quality due to data loss caused by the handover. Although many handover schemes were proposed at protocol layers below the application layer, they inherently suffer from data loss while the network is being disconnected during the handover. We therefore propose an efficient application-layer handover scheme to support seamless mobility for P2P live streaming. By simulation experiments, we show that the P2P live streaming system with our proposed handover scheme can improve the playback continuity significantly compared to that without our scheme.

  6. Efficient Content Distribution in P2P and Cloud Service

    OpenAIRE

    E. Priya; A. Samydurai; T. Amitha

    2014-01-01

    Increasing the performance of cloud downloading service in a peer-peer network by efficient mode selection method. Using P2P to download video content often faces challenges like high bandwidth requirement, dealing with a huge number of peer requests, resulting in inefficient system performance. The latest premium service to have been developed is the cloud downloading. In this service, cloud storage is used to store the video content. The server is used to cache the user interested video con...

  7. Pure P2P mediation system: A mappings discovery approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    selma, El yahyaoui El idrissi; Zellou, Ahmed; Idri, Ali

    2015-02-01

    The information integration systems consist in offering a uniform interface to provide access to a set of autonomous and distributed information sources. The most important advantage of this system is that it allows users to specify what they want, rather than thinking about how to get the responses. The works realized in this area have particular leads to two major classes of integration systems: the mediation systems based on the paradigm mediator / adapter and peer to peer systems (P2P). The combination of both systems has led to a third type; is the mediation P2P systems. The P2P systems are large-scale systems, self-organized and distributed. They allow the resource management in a completely decentralized way. However, the integration of structured information sources, heterogeneous and distributed proves to be a complex problem. The objective of this work is to propose an approach to resolve conflicts and establish a mapping between the heterogeneous elements. This approach is based on clustering; the latter is to group similar Peers that share common information in the same subnet. Thus, to facilitate the heterogeneity, we introduced three additional layers of our hierarchy of peers: internal schema, external schema and Schema directory peer. We used linguistic techniques, and precisely the name correspondence technique, that is based on the similarity of names to propose a correspondence.

  8. An Overlapping Structured P2P for REIK Overlay Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjun; Song, Jingjing; Yu, Jiguo

    REIK is based on a ring which embedded an inverse Kautz digraph, to enable multi-path P2P routing. It has the constant degree and the logarithmic diameter DHT scheme with constant congestion and Byzantine fault tolerance. However, REIK did not consider the interconnection of many independent smaller networks. In this paper, we propose a new approach to build overlay network, OLS-REIK which is an overlapping structured P2P for REIK overlay network. It is a more flexible interconnecting different REIK network. Peers can belong to several rings, allowing this interconnection. By connecting smaller structured overlay networks in an unstructured way, it provides a cost effective alternative to hierarchical structured P2P systems requiring costly merging. Routing of lookup messages is performed as in REIK within one ring, but a peer belonging to several rings forwards the request to the different rings it belongs to. Furthermore a small number of across point is enough to ensure a high exhaustiveness level.

  9. Four Escherichia coli O157:H7 phages: a new bacteriophage genus and taxonomic classification of T1-like phages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan D Niu

    Full Text Available The T1-like bacteriophages vB_EcoS_AHP24, AHS24, AHP42 and AKS96 of the family Siphoviridae were shown to lyse common phage types of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 (STEC O157:H7, but not non-O157 E. coli. All contained circularly permuted genomes of 45.7-46.8 kb (43.8-44 mol% G+C encoding 74-81 open reading frames and 1 arginyl-tRNA. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the structural proteins were identical among the four phages. Further proteomic analysis identified seven structural proteins responsible for tail fiber, tail tape measure protein, major capsid, portal protein as well as major and minor tail proteins. Bioinformatic analyses on the proteins revealed that genomes of AHP24, AHS24, AHP42 and AKS96 did not encode for bacterial virulence factors, integration-related proteins or antibiotic resistance determinants. All four phages were highly lytic to STEC O157:H7 with considerable potential as biocontrol agents. Comparative genomic, proteomic and phylogenetic analysis suggested that the four phages along with 17 T1-like phage genomes from database of National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI can be assigned into a proposed subfamily "Tunavirinae" with further classification into five genera, namely "Tlslikevirus" (TLS, FSL SP-126, "Kp36likevirus" (KP36, F20, Tunalikevirus (T1, ADB-2 and Shf1, "Rtplikevirus" (RTP, vB_EcoS_ACG-M12 and "Jk06likevirus" (JK06, vB_EcoS_Rogue1, AHP24, AHS24, AHP42, AKS96, phiJLA23, phiKP26, phiEB49. The fact that the viruses related to JK06 have been isolated independently in Israel (JK06 (GenBank Assession #, NC_007291, Canada (vB_EcoS_Rogue1, AHP24, AHS24, AHP42, AKS96 and Mexico (phiKP26, phiJLA23 (between 2005 and 2011 indicates that these similar phages are widely distributed, and that horizontal gene transfer does not always prevent the characterization of bacteriophage evolution. With this new scheme, any new discovered phages with same type

  10. Facilitating the use of alternative capsid control methods towards sustainable production of organic cocoa in Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayenor, G.K.; Huis, van A.; Obeng-Ofori, D.; Padi, B.; Röling, N.G.

    2007-01-01

    Cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) is an important foreign exchange earner for Ghana. However, production is constrained by a high incidence of pests and diseases. Based on farmers' needs, this study focused on the control of capsids, mainly Sahlbergella singularis Haglund and Distantiella theobroma

  11. Probing the biophysical interplay between a viral genome and its capsid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijder, J.; Uetrecht, C.; Rose, R. J.; Sanchez-Eugenia, R.; Marti, G. A.; Agirre, J.; Guérin, D. M. A.; Wuite, G. J. L.; Heck, A. J. R.; Roos, W. H.

    2013-06-01

    The interaction between a viral capsid and its genome governs crucial steps in the life cycle of a virus, such as assembly and genome uncoating. Tuning cargo-capsid interactions is also essential for successful design and cargo delivery in engineered viral systems. Here we investigate the interplay between cargo and capsid for the picorna-like Triatoma virus using a combined native mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy approach. We propose a topology and assembly model in which heterotrimeric pentons that consist of five copies of structural proteins VP1, VP2 and VP3 are the free principal units of assembly. The interpenton contacts are established primarily by VP2. The dual role of the genome is first to stabilize the densely packed virion and, second, on an increase in pH to trigger uncoating by relaxing the stabilizing interactions with the capsid. Uncoating occurs through a labile intermediate state of the virion that reversibly disassembles into pentons with the concomitant release of protein VP4.

  12. Production of foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid proteins by the TEV protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckette, Michael; Smith, Justin D; Gabbert, Lindsay; Schutta, Christopher; Barrera, José; Clark, Benjamin A; Neilan, John G; Rasmussen, Max

    2018-03-23

    Protective immunity to viral pathogens often includes production of neutralizing antibodies to virus capsid proteins. Many viruses produce capsid proteins by expressing a precursor polyprotein and related protease from a single open reading frame. The foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) expresses a 3C protease (3Cpro) that cleaves a P1 polyprotein intermediate into individual capsid proteins, but the FMDV 3Cpro also degrades many host cell proteins and reduces the viability of host cells, including subunit vaccine production cells. To overcome the limitations of using the a wild-type 3Cpro in FMDV subunit vaccine expression systems, we altered the protease restriction sequences within a FMDV P1 polyprotein to enable production of FMDV capsid proteins by the Tobacco Etch Virus NIa protease (TEVpro). Separate TEVpro and modified FMDV P1 proteins were produced from a single open reading frame by an intervening FMDV 2A sequence. The modified FMDV P1 polyprotein was successfully processed by the TEVpro in both mammalian and bacterial cells. More broadly, this method of polyprotein production and processing may be adapted to other recombinant expression systems, especially plant-based expression. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Expression and purification of capsid proteins of Aichi virus and in vitro reassembly of empty virion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smola, Miroslav; Dubánková, Anna; Šilhán, Jan; Bouřa, Evžen

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 284, Suppl 1 (2017), s. 107 ISSN 1742-464X. [FEBS Congress /42./ From Molecules to Cells and Back. 10.09.2017-14.09.2017, Jerusalem] R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ15-21030Y; GA MŠk LO1302 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Aichi virus * capsid proteins Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  14. Nanofluidic Devices with Two Pores in Series for Resistive-Pulse Sensing of Single Virus Capsids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Zachary D.; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Rodrigues de Sousa Nunes, Pedro André

    2011-01-01

    We report fabrication and characterization of nanochannel devices with two nanopores in series for resistive-pulse sensing of hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids. The nanochannel and two pores are patterned by electron beam lithography between two microchannels and etched by reactive ion etching...

  15. Detection of late intermediates in virus capsid assembly by charge detection mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Elizabeth E; Keifer, David Z; Selzer, Lisa; Lee, Lye Siang; Contino, Nathan C; Wang, Joseph C-Y; Zlotnick, Adam; Jarrold, Martin F

    2014-03-05

    The assembly of hundreds of identical proteins into an icosahedral virus capsid is a remarkable feat of molecular engineering. How this occurs is poorly understood. Key intermediates have been anticipated at the end of the assembly reaction, but it has not been possible to detect them. In this work we have used charge detection mass spectrometry to identify trapped intermediates from late in the assembly of the hepatitis B virus T = 4 capsid, a complex of 120 protein dimers. Prominent intermediates are found with 104/105, 110/111, and 117/118 dimers. Cryo-EM observations indicate the intermediates are incomplete capsids and, hence, on the assembly pathway. On the basis of their stability and kinetic accessibility we have proposed plausible structures. The prominent trapped intermediate with 104 dimers is attributed to an icosahedron missing two neighboring facets, the 111-dimer species is assigned to an icosahedron missing a single facet, and the intermediate with 117 dimers is assigned to a capsid missing a ring of three dimers in the center of a facet.

  16. Scaffold expulsion and genome packaging trigger stabilization of herpes simplex virus capsids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, W.H.; Radtke, K.; Kniesmeijer, E.G.R.; Geertsema, H.J.; Sodeik, B.; Wuite, G.J.L.

    2009-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) capsids undergo extensive structural changes during maturation and DNA packaging. As a result, they become more stable and competent for nuclear egress. To further elucidate this stabilization process, we used biochemical and nanoindentation approaches to analyze

  17. Scaffold expulsion and genome packaging trigger stabilization of Herpes Simplex Virus capsids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, W.H.; Radtke, K.; Kniesmeijer, E.; Geertsema, H.J.; Sodeik, B.; Wuite, G.J.L.

    2009-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) capsids undergo extensive structural changes during maturation and DNA packaging. As a result, they become more stable and competent for nuclear egress. To further elucidate this stabilization process, we used biochemical and nanoindentation approaches to analyze

  18. Exploring the role of genome and structural ions in preventing viral capsid collapse during dehydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-González, Natalia; Guérin Darvas, Sofía M.; Durana, Aritz; Marti, Gerardo A.; Guérin, Diego M. A.; de Pablo, Pedro J.

    2018-03-01

    Even though viruses evolve mainly in liquid milieu, their horizontal transmission routes often include episodes of dry environment. Along their life cycle, some insect viruses, such as viruses from the Dicistroviridae family, withstand dehydrated conditions with presently unknown consequences to their structural stability. Here, we use atomic force microscopy to monitor the structural changes of viral particles of Triatoma virus (TrV) after desiccation. Our results demonstrate that TrV capsids preserve their genome inside, conserving their height after exposure to dehydrating conditions, which is in stark contrast with other viruses that expel their genome when desiccated. Moreover, empty capsids (without genome) resulted in collapsed particles after desiccation. We also explored the role of structural ions in the dehydration process of the virions (capsid containing genome) by chelating the accessible cations from the external solvent milieu. We observed that ion suppression helps to keep the virus height upon desiccation. Our results show that under drying conditions, the genome of TrV prevents the capsid from collapsing during dehydration, while the structural ions are responsible for promoting solvent exchange through the virion wall.

  19. T4 bacteriophage conjugated magnetic particles for E. coli capturing: Influence of bacteriophage loading, temperature and tryptone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liana, Ayu Ekajayanthi; Marquis, Christopher P; Gunawan, Cindy; Gooding, J Justin; Amal, Rose

    2017-03-01

    This work demonstrates the use of bacteriophage conjugated magnetic particles (Fe 3 O 4 ) for the rapid capturing and isolation of Escherichia coli. The investigation of T4 bacteriophage adsorption to silane functionalised Fe 3 O 4 with amine (NH 2 ), carboxylic (COOH) and methyl (CH 3 ) surface functional groups reveals the domination of net electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions in governing bacteriophage adsorption. The bare Fe 3 O 4 and Fe 3 O 4 -NH 2 with high T4 loading captured 3-fold more E. coli (∼70% capturing efficiency) compared to the low loading T4 on Fe 3 O 4 -COOH, suggesting the significance of T4 loading in E. coli capturing efficiency. Importantly, it is further revealed that E. coli capture is highly dependent on the incubation temperature and the presence of tryptone in the media. Effective E. coli capturing only occurs at 37°C in tryptone-containing media with the absence of either conditions resulted in poor bacteria capture. The incubation temperature dictates the capturing ability of Fe 3 O 4 /T4, whereby T4 and E. coli need to establish an irreversible binding that occurred at 37°C. The presence of tryptophan-rich tryptone in the suspending media was also critical, as shown by a 3-fold increase in E. coli capture efficiency of Fe 3 O 4 /T4 in tryptone-containing media compared to that in tryptone-free media. This highlights for the first time that successful bacteria capturing requires not only an optimum tailoring of the particle's surface physicochemical properties for favourable bacteriophage loading, but also an in-depth understanding of how factors, such as temperature and solution chemistry influence the subsequent bacteriophage-bacteria interactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Functional Carboxy-Terminal Fluorescent Protein Fusion to Pseudorabies Virus Small Capsid Protein VP26.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Ian B; Jean, Jolie; Esteves, Andrew D; Tanneti, Nikhila S; Scherer, Julian; Enquist, Lynn W

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescent protein fusions to herpesvirus capsids have proven to be a valuable method to study virus particle transport in living cells. Fluorescent protein fusions to the amino terminus of small capsid protein VP26 are the most widely used method to visualize pseudorabies virus (PRV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV) particles in living cells. However, these fusion proteins do not incorporate to full occupancy and have modest effects on virus replication and pathogenesis. Recent cryoelectron microscopy studies have revealed that herpesvirus small capsid proteins bind to capsids via their amino terminus, whereas the carboxy terminus is unstructured and therefore may better tolerate fluorescent protein fusions. Here, we describe a new recombinant PRV expressing a carboxy-terminal VP26-mCherry fusion. Compared to previously characterized viruses expressing amino-terminal fusions, this virus expresses more VP26 fusion protein in infected cells and incorporates more VP26 fusion protein into virus particles, and individual virus particles exhibit brighter red fluorescence. We performed single-particle tracking of fluorescent virus particles in primary neurons to measure anterograde and retrograde axonal transport, demonstrating the usefulness of this novel VP26-mCherry fusion for the study of viral intracellular transport. IMPORTANCE Alphaherpesviruses are among the very few viruses that are adapted to invade the mammalian nervous system. Intracellular transport of virus particles in neurons is important, as this process underlies both mild peripheral nervous system infection and severe spread to the central nervous system. VP26, the small capsid protein of HSV and PRV, was one of the first herpesvirus proteins to be fused to a fluorescent protein. Since then, these capsid-tagged virus mutants have become a powerful tool to visualize and track individual virus particles. Improved capsid tags will facilitate fluorescence microscopy studies of virus particle intracellular

  1. Protruding Features of Viral Capsids Are Clustered on Icosahedral Great Circles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P Wilson

    Full Text Available Spherical viruses are remarkably well characterized by the Triangulation (T number developed by Casper and Klug. The T-number specifies how many viral capsid proteins are required to cover the virus, as well as how they are further subdivided into pentamer and hexamer subunits. The T-number however does not constrain the orientations of these proteins within the subunits or dictate where the proteins should place their protruding features. These protrusions often take the form of loops, spires and helices, and are significant because they aid in stability of the capsid as well as recognition by the host organism. Until now there has be no overall understanding of the placement of protrusions for spherical viruses, other than they have icosahedral symmetry. We constructed a set of gauge points based upon the work affine extensions of Keef and Twarock, which have fixed relative angular locations with which to measure the locations of these features. This work adds a new element to our understanding of the geometric arrangement of spherical viral capsid proteins; chiefly that the locations of protruding features are not found stochastically distributed in an icosahedral manner across the viral surface, but instead these features are found only in specific locations along the 15 icosahedral great circles. We have found that this result holds true as the T number and viral capsids size increases, suggesting an underlying geometric constraint on their locations. This is in spite of the fact that the constraints on the pentamers and hexamer orientations change as a function of T-number, as you need to accommodate more hexamers in the same solid angle between pentamers. The existence of this angular constraint of viral capsids suggests that there is a fitness or energetic benefit to the virus placing its protrusions in this manner. This discovery may have profound impacts on identifying and eliminating viral pathogens, understanding evolutionary

  2. Structural organization of pregenomic RNA and the carboxy-terminal domain of the capsid protein of hepatitis B virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph C-Y Wang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Hepatitis B Virus (HBV double-stranded DNA genome is reverse transcribed from its RNA pregenome (pgRNA within the virus core (or capsid. Phosphorylation of the arginine-rich carboxy-terminal domain (CTD of the HBV capsid protein (Cp183 is essential for pgRNA encapsidation and reverse transcription. However, the structure of the CTD remains poorly defined. Here we report sub-nanometer resolution cryo-EM structures of in vitro assembled empty and pgRNA-filled Cp183 capsids in unphosphorylated and phosphorylation-mimic states. In empty capsids, we found unexpected evidence of surface accessible CTD density partially occluding pores in the capsid surface. We also observed that CTD organization changed substantively as a function of phosphorylation. In RNA-filled capsids, unphosphorylated CTDs favored thick ropes of RNA, while the phosphorylation-mimic favored a mesh of thin, high-density strands suggestive of single stranded RNA. These results demonstrate that the CTD can regulate nucleic acid structure, supporting the hypothesis that the HBV capsid has a functional role as a nucleic acid chaperone.

  3. Molecular Characterization of a Clostridium difficile Bacteriophage and Its Cloned Biologically Active Endolysin▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Melinda J.; Narbad, Arjan; Gasson, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is increasing in both frequency and severity, with the emergence of new highly virulent strains highlighting the need for more rapid and effective methods of control. Here, we show that bacteriophage endolysin can be used to inhibit and kill C. difficile. The genome sequence of a novel bacteriophage that is active against C. difficile was determined, and the bacteriophage endolysin gene was subcloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The partially purified end...

  4. The isolation and characterization of Campylobacter jejuni bacteriophages from free range and indoor poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Jane; Barton, Mary D; Heuzenroeder, Michael W

    2013-02-22

    Six hundred and sixty one samples - primarily fresh chicken faeces - were processed to isolate wild type Campylobacter jejuni bacteriophages, via overlay agar methods using C. jejuni NCTC 12662. The aims of this study were to isolate and purify bacteriophages and then test for their ability to lyse field strains of C. jejuni in vitro. Of all samples processed, 130 were positive for bacteriophages. A distinct difference was observed between samples from different poultry enterprises. No bacteriophages could be isolated from indoor broilers. The majority of bacteriophages were isolated from free range poultry - both broilers and egg layers. Bacteriophages were purified and then selected for characterization based on their ability to produce clear lysis on plaque assay, as opposed to turbid plaques. Two hundred and forty one C. jejuni field isolates were tested for sensitivity to the bacteriophages. Lysis was graded subjectively and any minimal lysis was excluded. Using this system, 59.0% of the C. jejuni isolates showed significant sensitivity to at least one bacteriophage. The sensitivity to individual bacteriophages ranged from 10.0% to 32.5% of the C. jejuni isolates. Five bacteriophages were examined by electron microscopy and determined to belong to the Myoviridae family. The physical size, predicted genetic composition and genome size of the bacteriophages correlated well with other reported Campylobacter bacteriophages. The reasons for the observed difference between indoor broilers and free range poultry is unknown, but are postulated to be due to differences in the Campylobacter population in birds under different rearing conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The Dual Role of an ESCRT-0 Component HGS in HBV Transcription and Naked Capsid Secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shu-Fan; Tsai, Ming-Lin; Huang, Jyun-Yuan; Chang, Ya-Shu; Shih, Chiaho

    2015-01-01

    The Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT) is an important cellular machinery for the sorting and trafficking of ubiquitinated cargos. It is also known that ESCRT is required for the egress of a number of viruses. To investigate the relationship between ESCRT and hepatitis B virus (HBV), we conducted an siRNA screening of ESCRT components for their potential effect on HBV replication and virion release. We identified a number of ESCRT factors required for HBV replication, and focused our study here on HGS (HRS, hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate) in the ESCRT-0 complex. Aberrant levels of HGS suppressed HBV transcription, replication and virion secretion. Hydrodynamic delivery of HGS in a mouse model significantly suppressed viral replication in the liver and virion secretion in the serum. Surprisingly, overexpression of HGS stimulated the release of HBV naked capsids, irrespective of their viral RNA, DNA, or empty contents. Mutant core protein (HBc 1–147) containing no arginine-rich domain (ARD) failed to secrete empty virions with or without HGS. In contrast, empty naked capsids of HBc 1–147 could still be promoted for secretion by HGS. HGS exerted a strong positive effect on the secretion of naked capsids, at the expense of a reduced level of virions. The association between HGS and HBc appears to be ubiquitin-independent. Furthermore, HBc is preferentially co-localized with HGS near the cell periphery, instead of near the punctate endosomes in the cytoplasm. In summary, our work demonstrated the importance of an optimum level of HGS in HBV propagation. In addition to an effect on HBV transcription, HGS can diminish the pool size of intracellular nucleocapsids with ongoing genome maturation, probably in part by promoting the secretion of naked capsids. The secretion routes of HBV virions and naked capsids can be clearly distinguished based on the pleiotropic effect of HGS involved in the ESCRT-0 complex. PMID

  6. The Dual Role of an ESCRT-0 Component HGS in HBV Transcription and Naked Capsid Secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Fan Chou

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT is an important cellular machinery for the sorting and trafficking of ubiquitinated cargos. It is also known that ESCRT is required for the egress of a number of viruses. To investigate the relationship between ESCRT and hepatitis B virus (HBV, we conducted an siRNA screening of ESCRT components for their potential effect on HBV replication and virion release. We identified a number of ESCRT factors required for HBV replication, and focused our study here on HGS (HRS, hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate in the ESCRT-0 complex. Aberrant levels of HGS suppressed HBV transcription, replication and virion secretion. Hydrodynamic delivery of HGS in a mouse model significantly suppressed viral replication in the liver and virion secretion in the serum. Surprisingly, overexpression of HGS stimulated the release of HBV naked capsids, irrespective of their viral RNA, DNA, or empty contents. Mutant core protein (HBc 1-147 containing no arginine-rich domain (ARD failed to secrete empty virions with or without HGS. In contrast, empty naked capsids of HBc 1-147 could still be promoted for secretion by HGS. HGS exerted a strong positive effect on the secretion of naked capsids, at the expense of a reduced level of virions. The association between HGS and HBc appears to be ubiquitin-independent. Furthermore, HBc is preferentially co-localized with HGS near the cell periphery, instead of near the punctate endosomes in the cytoplasm. In summary, our work demonstrated the importance of an optimum level of HGS in HBV propagation. In addition to an effect on HBV transcription, HGS can diminish the pool size of intracellular nucleocapsids with ongoing genome maturation, probably in part by promoting the secretion of naked capsids. The secretion routes of HBV virions and naked capsids can be clearly distinguished based on the pleiotropic effect of HGS involved in the ESCRT-0 complex.

  7. Electrostatic potential of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 and rhesus macaque simian immunodeficiency virus capsid proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna eBozek

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus isolated from a macaque monkey (SIVmac are assumed to have originated from simian immunodeficiency virus isolated from sooty mangabey (SIVsm. Despite their close similarity in genome structure, HIV-2 and SIVmac show different sensitivities to TRIM5α, a host restriction factor against retroviruses. The replication of HIV-2 strains is potently restricted by rhesus (Rh monkey TRIM5α, while that of SIVmac strain 239 (SIVmac239 is not. Viral capsid protein is the determinant of this differential sensitivity to TRIM5α, as the HIV-2 mutant carrying SIVmac239 capsid protein evaded Rh TRIM5α-mediated restriction. However, the molecular determinants of this restriction mechanism are unknown. Electrostatic potential on the protein-binding site is one of the properties regulating protein-protein interactions. In this study, we investigated the electrostatic potential on the interaction surface of capsid protein of HIV-2 strain GH123 and SIVmac239. Although HIV-2 GH123 and SIVmac239 capsid proteins share more than 87% amino acid identity, we observed a large difference between the two molecules with the HIV-2 GH123 molecule having predominantly positive and SIVmac239 predominantly negative electrostatic potential on the surface of the loop between α-helices 4 and 5 (L4/5. As L4/5 is one of the major determinants of Rh TRIM5α sensitivity of these viruses, the present results suggest that the binding site of the Rh TRIM5α may show complementarity to the HIV-2 GH123 capsid surface charge distribution.

  8. Importin α1 is required for nuclear import of herpes simplex virus proteins and capsid assembly in fibroblasts and neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Fenja; Rother, Franziska; Rudolph, Kathrin; Prank, Ute; Binz, Anne; Hügel, Stefanie; Hartmann, Enno; Bader, Michael; Bauerfeind, Rudolf; Sodeik, Beate

    2018-01-01

    Herpesviruses are large DNA viruses which depend on many nuclear functions, and therefore on host transport factors to ensure specific nuclear import of viral and host components. While some import cargoes bind directly to certain transport factors, most recruit importin β1 via importin α. We identified importin α1 in a small targeted siRNA screen to be important for herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) gene expression. Production of infectious virions was delayed in the absence of importin α1, but not in cells lacking importin α3 or importin α4. While nuclear targeting of the incoming capsids, of the HSV-1 transcription activator VP16, and of the viral genomes were not affected, the nuclear import of the HSV-1 proteins ICP4 and ICP0, required for efficient viral transcription, and of ICP8 and pUL42, necessary for DNA replication, were reduced. Furthermore, quantitative electron microscopy showed that fibroblasts lacking importin α1 contained overall fewer nuclear capsids, but an increased proportion of mature nuclear capsids indicating that capsid formation and capsid egress into the cytoplasm were impaired. In neurons, importin α1 was also not required for nuclear targeting of incoming capsids, but for nuclear import of ICP4 and for the formation of nuclear capsid assembly compartments. Our data suggest that importin α1 is specifically required for the nuclear localization of several important HSV1 proteins, capsid assembly, and capsid egress into the cytoplasm, and may become rate limiting in situ upon infection at low multiplicity or in terminally differentiated cells such as neurons. PMID:29304174

  9. Newly Isolated Bacteriophages from the Podoviridae, Siphoviridae, and Myoviridae Families Have Variable Effects on Putative Novel Dickeya spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alič, Špela; Naglič, Tina; Tušek-Žnidarič, Magda; Ravnikar, Maja; Rački, Nejc; Peterka, Matjaž; Dreo, Tanja

    2017-01-01

    Soft rot pathogenic bacteria from the genus Dickeya cause severe economic losses in orchid nurseries worldwide, and there is no effective control currently available. In the last decade, the genus Dickeya has undergone multiple changes as multiple new taxa have been described, and just recently a new putative Dickeya species was reported. This study reports the isolation of three bacteriophages active against putative novel Dickeya spp. isolates from commercially produced infected orchids that show variable host-range profiles. Bacteriophages were isolated through enrichment from Dickeya-infected orchid tissue. Convective interaction media monolith chromatography was used to isolate bacteriophages from wastewaters, demonstrating its suitability for the isolation of infective bacteriophages from natural sources. Based on bacteriophage morphology, all isolated bacteriophages were classified as being in the order Caudovirales, belonging to three different families, Podoviridae, Myoviridae, and Siphoviridae. The presence of three different groups of bacteriophages was confirmed by analyzing the bacteriophage specificity of bacterial hosts, restriction fragment length polymorphism and plaque morphology. Bacteriophage BF25/12, the first reported Podoviridae bacteriophage effective against Dickeya spp., was selected for further characterization. Its genome sequence determined by next-generation sequencing showed limited similarity to other characterized Podoviridae bacteriophages. Interactions among the bacteriophages and Dickeya spp. were examined using transmission electron microscopy, which revealed degradation of electron-dense granules in response to bacteriophage infection in some Dickeya strains. The temperature stability of the chosen Podoviridae bacteriophage monitored over 1 year showed a substantial decrease in the survival of bacteriophages stored at -20°C over longer periods. It showed susceptibility to low pH and UV radiation but was stable in neutral and

  10. Detecting P2P Botnet in Software Defined Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang-Chiuan Su

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Software Defined Network separates the control plane from network equipment and has great advantage in network management as compared with traditional approaches. With this paradigm, the security issues persist to exist and could become even worse because of the flexibility on handling the packets. In this paper we propose an effective framework by integrating SDN and machine learning to detect and categorize P2P network traffics. This work provides experimental evidence showing that our approach can automatically analyze network traffic and flexibly change flow entries in OpenFlow switches through the SDN controller. This can effectively help the network administrators manage related security problems.

  11. Characterization of Paenibacillus larvae bacteriophages and their genomic relationships to firmicute bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Bryan D; Grose, Julianne H; Breakwell, Donald P; Burnett, Sandra H

    2014-08-30

    Paenibacillus larvae is a Firmicute bacterium that causes American Foulbrood, a lethal disease in honeybees and is a major source of global agricultural losses. Although P. larvae phages were isolated prior to 2013, no full genome sequences of P. larvae bacteriophages were published or analyzed. This report includes an in-depth analysis of the structure, genomes, and relatedness of P. larvae myoviruses Abouo, Davis, Emery, Jimmer1, Jimmer2, and siphovirus phiIBB_Pl23 to each other and to other known phages. P. larvae phages Abouo, Davies, Emery, Jimmer1, and Jimmer2 are myoviruses with ~50 kbp genomes. The six P. larvae phages form three distinct groups by dotplot analysis. An annotated linear genome map of these six phages displays important identifiable genes and demonstrates the relationship between phages. Sixty phage assembly or structural protein genes and 133 regulatory or other non-structural protein genes were identifiable among the six P. larvae phages. Jimmer1, Jimmer2, and Davies formed stable lysogens resistant to superinfection by genetically similar phages. The correlation between tape measure protein gene length and phage tail length allowed identification of co-isolated phages Emery and Abouo in electron micrographs. A Phamerator database was assembled with the P. larvae phage genomes and 107 genomes of Firmicute-infecting phages, including 71 Bacillus phages. Phamerator identified conserved domains in 1,501 of 6,181 phamilies (only 24.3%) encoded by genes in the database and revealed that P. larvae phage genomes shared at least one phamily with 72 of the 107 other phages. The phamily relationship of large terminase proteins was used to indicate putative DNA packaging strategies. Analyses from CoreGenes, Phamerator, and electron micrograph measurements indicated Jimmer1, Jimmer2, Abouo and Davies were related to phages phiC2, EJ-1, KC5a, and AQ113, which are small-genome myoviruses that infect Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, and Clostridium

  12. Development of a novel and highly efficient method of isolating bacteriophages from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weili; Li, Chao; Qiu, Zhi-Gang; Jin, Min; Wang, Jing-Feng; Yang, Dong; Xiao, Zhong-Hai; Yuan, Zhao-Kang; Li, Jun-Wen; Xu, Qun-Ying; Shen, Zhi-Qiang

    2017-08-01

    Bacteriophages are widely used to the treatment of drug-resistant bacteria and the improvement of food safety through bacterial lysis. However, the limited investigations on bacteriophage restrict their further application. In this study, a novel and highly efficient method was developed for isolating bacteriophage from water based on the electropositive silica gel particles (ESPs) method. To optimize the ESPs method, we evaluated the eluent type, flow rate, pH, temperature, and inoculation concentration of bacteriophage using bacteriophage f2. The quantitative detection reported that the recovery of the ESPs method reached over 90%. The qualitative detection demonstrated that the ESPs method effectively isolated 70% of extremely low-concentration bacteriophage (10 0 PFU/100L). Based on the host bacteria composed of 33 standard strains and 10 isolated strains, the bacteriophages in 18 water samples collected from the three sites in the Tianjin Haihe River Basin were isolated by the ESPs and traditional methods. Results showed that the ESPs method was significantly superior to the traditional method. The ESPs method isolated 32 strains of bacteriophage, whereas the traditional method isolated 15 strains. The sample isolation efficiency and bacteriophage isolation efficiency of the ESPs method were 3.28 and 2.13 times higher than those of the traditional method. The developed ESPs method was characterized by high isolation efficiency, efficient handling of large water sample size and low requirement on water quality. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Methods for generation of reporter phages and immobilization of active bacteriophages on a polymer surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applegate, Bruce Michael (Inventor); Perry, Lynda Louise (Inventor); Morgan, Mark Thomas (Inventor); Kothapalli, Aparna (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Novel reporter bacteriophages are provided. Provided are compositions and methods that allow bacteriophages that are used for specific detection or killing of E. coli 0157:H7 to be propagated in nonpathogenic E. coli, thereby eliminating the safety and security risks of propagation in E. coli 0157:H7. Provided are compositions and methods for attaching active bacteriophages to the surface of a polymer in order to kill target bacteria with which the phage comes into contact. Provided are modified bacteriophages immobilized to a surface, which capture E. coli 0157:H7 and cause the captured cells to emit light or fluorescence, allowing detection of the bacteria in a sample.

  14. The effect of bacteriophages T4 and HAP1 on in vitro melanoma migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boratyński Janusz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The antibacterial activity of bacteriophages has been described rather well. However, knowledge about the direct interactions of bacteriophages with mammalian organisms and their other, i.e. non-antibacterial, activities in mammalian systems is quite scarce. It must be emphasised that bacteriophages are natural parasites of bacteria, which in turn are parasites or symbionts of mammals (including humans. Bacteriophages are constantly present in mammalian bodies and the environment in great amounts. On the other hand, the perspective of the possible use of bacteriophage preparations for antibacterial therapies in cancer patients generates a substantial need to investigate the effects of phages on cancer processes. Results In these studies the migration of human and mouse melanoma on fibronectin was inhibited by purified T4 and HAP1 bacteriophage preparations. The migration of human melanoma was also inhibited by the HAP1 phage preparation on matrigel. No response of either melanoma cell line to lipopolysaccharide was observed. Therefore the effect of the phage preparations cannot be attributed to lipopolysaccharide. No differences in the effects of T4 and HAP1 on melanoma migration were observed. Conclusion We believe that these observations are of importance for any further attempts to use bacteriophage preparations in antibacterial treatment. The risk of antibiotic-resistant hospital infections strongly affects cancer patients and these results suggest the possibility of beneficial phage treatment. We also believe that they will contribute to the general understanding of bacteriophage biology, as bacteriophages, extremely ubiquitous entities, are in permanent contact with human organisms.

  15. The effect of bacteriophages T4 and HAP1 on in vitro melanoma migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowska, Krystyna; Skaradziński, Grzegorz; Jończyk, Paulina; Kurzepa, Aneta; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Owczarek, Barbara; Zaczek, Maciej; Switała-Jeleń, Kinga; Boratyński, Janusz; Poźniak, Gryzelda; Maciejewska, Magdalena; Górski, Andrzej

    2009-01-20

    The antibacterial activity of bacteriophages has been described rather well. However, knowledge about the direct interactions of bacteriophages with mammalian organisms and their other, i.e. non-antibacterial, activities in mammalian systems is quite scarce. It must be emphasised that bacteriophages are natural parasites of bacteria, which in turn are parasites or symbionts of mammals (including humans). Bacteriophages are constantly present in mammalian bodies and the environment in great amounts. On the other hand, the perspective of the possible use of bacteriophage preparations for antibacterial therapies in cancer patients generates a substantial need to investigate the effects of phages on cancer processes. In these studies the migration of human and mouse melanoma on fibronectin was inhibited by purified T4 and HAP1 bacteriophage preparations. The migration of human melanoma was also inhibited by the HAP1 phage preparation on matrigel. No response of either melanoma cell line to lipopolysaccharide was observed. Therefore the effect of the phage preparations cannot be attributed to lipopolysaccharide. No differences in the effects of T4 and HAP1 on melanoma migration were observed. We believe that these observations are of importance for any further attempts to use bacteriophage preparations in antibacterial treatment. The risk of antibiotic-resistant hospital infections strongly affects cancer patients and these results suggest the possibility of beneficial phage treatment. We also believe that they will contribute to the general understanding of bacteriophage biology, as bacteriophages, extremely ubiquitous entities, are in permanent contact with human organisms.

  16. Bacteriophage-based synthetic biology for the study of infectious diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Timothy K.

    2014-01-01

    Since their discovery, bacteriophages have contributed enormously to our understanding of molecular biology as model systems. Furthermore, bacteriophages have provided many tools that have advanced the fields of genetic engineering and synthetic biology. Here, we discuss bacteriophage-based technologies and their application to the study of infectious diseases. New strategies for engineering genomes have the potential to accelerate the design of novel phages as therapies, diagnostics, and tools. Though almost a century has elapsed since their discovery, bacteriophages continue to have a major impact on modern biological sciences, especially with the growth of multidrug-resistant bacteria and interest in the microbiome. PMID:24997401

  17. Isolating E.Coli Bacteriophage from Raw Sewage and Determining its Selectivity to the Host Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM Imeni

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bacteriophages are viruses that infect and destroy prokaryote cells, specifically the bacteria. They act too selective, so as each bacteriophage affects only on specific type of bacteria. Due to their specific features, bacteriophages can be used as an appropriate substitute for antibiotics in infectious diseases treatment. Therefore, this study aimed to isolate E. coli-specific bacteriophage from raw sewage. Methods: Eight samples of raw sewage, each containing approximately 50 ml of raw sewage with 10 minute gap, were prepared from Zargandeh wastewater treatment plant, Tehran, Iran. The sewages were mixed with Brain-heart infusion medium (BHI as a liquid culture medium in order to let the microorganisms grow. Incubation, purification and determination of bacteria were followed repeatedly to isolate the bacteriophage. Then it was tested on E.coli (ATCC 25922, Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 19433, Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 2392, and Yersinia enterocolitica (ATCC 9610 in order to determine the bacteriophage selectivity. Results: The E.coli bacteriophages were successfully isolated from all the eight samples, that were completely able to lyse and destroy E.coli bacterial cells, though no effect was observed on other types of bacteria. Conclusion: The study findings revealed that bacteriophages act selectively. Considering the raise of antibiotic resistance in the world, bacteriophages can serve as a good substitute for antibiotics in treating infectious diseases.

  18. Recombinant Antibodies for the Detection of Bacteriophage MS2 and Ovalbumin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Connell, Kevin

    2002-01-01

    ...) genes are expressed on the surface of bacteriophage (bacterial virus) particles. We describe here the isolation of additional recombinant antibodies that bind two simulants of biothreat agents...

  19. Susceptibility of Escherichia coli isolated from uteri of postpartum dairy cows to antibiotic and environmental bacteriophages. Part I: Isolation and lytic activity estimation of bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicalho, R C; Santos, T M A; Gilbert, R O; Caixeta, L S; Teixeira, L M; Bicalho, M L S; Machado, V S

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to isolate bacteriophages from environmental samples of 2 large commercial dairy farms using Escherichia coli isolated from the uteri of postpartum Holstein dairy cows as hosts. A total of 11 bacteriophage preparations were isolated from manure systems of commercial dairy farms and characterized for in vitro antimicrobial activity. In addition, a total of 57 E. coli uterine isolates from 5 dairy cows were phylogenetically grouped by triplex PCR. Each E. coli bacterial host from the uterus was inoculated with their respective bacteriophage preparation at several different multiplicities of infections (MOI) to determine minimum inhibitory MOI. The effect of a single dose (MOI=10(2)) of bacteriophage on the growth curve of all 57 E. coli isolates was assessed using a microplate technique. Furthermore, genetic diversity within and between the different bacteriophage preparations was assessed by bacteriophage purification followed by DNA extraction, restriction, and agarose gel electrophoresis. Phylogenetic grouping based on triplex PCR showed that all isolates of E. coli belonged to phylogroup B1. Bacterial growth was completely inhibited at considerably low MOI, and the effect of a single dose (MOI=10(2)) of bacteriophage preparations on the growth curve of all 57 E. coli isolates showed that all bacteriophage preparations significantly decreased the growth rate of the isolates. Bacteriophage preparation 1230-10 had the greatest antimicrobial activity and completely inhibited the growth of 71.7% (n=57) of the isolates. The combined action of bacteriophage preparations 1230-10, 6375-10, 2540-4, and 6547-2, each at MOI=10(2), had the broadest spectrum of action and completely inhibited the growth (final optical density at 600 nm bacteriophages that were genetically distinct from each other according to the banding pattern of the fragments. The combination of several different bacteriophages can improve the spectrum of action, and the

  20. Baculovirus expression of erythrovirus V9 capsids and screening by ELISA: serologic cross-reactivity with erythrovirus B19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Erik D; Qvortrup, Klaus; Christensen, Jesper

    2002-01-01

    to categorize V9 as an acute B19-like infection. Sequencing, combined with PCR studies, have since demonstrated the need for specific and differentiated techniques when examining samples for possible B19 or V9 viremia. The antigenic properties of the V9 capsid proteins have not been characterized previously....... To address this question, V9 VP1 and VP2 open reading frames were cloned and expressed in insect cells using a baculovirus vector. Large quantities of purified recombinant V9 capsid protein were produced and electron micrographs revealed self-assembly of V9 VP1/VP2 and VP2 capsids into empty icosahedral...

  1. Subunit Folds and Maturation Pathway of a dsRNA Virus Capsid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němeček, D.; Bouřa, Evžen; Wu, W.; Cheng, N.; Plevka, P.; Qiao, J.; Mindich, L.; Heymann, J. B.; Hurley, J. H.; Steven, A. C.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 8 (2013), s. 1374-1383 ISSN 0969-2126 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : RNA bacteriophage phi-6 * minus-strand synthesis * cryoelectron microscopy * angstrom resolution * atomic-structure Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 6.794, year: 2013

  2. P2X7 receptors in satellite glial cells mediate high functional expression of P2X3 receptors in immature dorsal root ganglion neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yong

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purinergic P2X3 receptor (P2X3R expressed in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG sensory neuron and the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R expressed in the surrounding satellite glial cell (SGC are two major receptors participating in neuron-SGC communication in adult DRGs. Activation of P2X7Rs was found to tonically reduce the expression of P2X3Rs in DRGs, thus inhibiting the abnormal pain behaviors in adult rats. P2X receptors are also actively involved in sensory signaling in developing rodents. However, very little is known about the developmental change of P2X7Rs in DRGs and the interaction between P2X7Rs and P2X3Rs in those animals. We therefore examined the expression of P2X3Rs and P2X7Rs in postnatal rats and determined if P2X7R-P2X3R control exists in developing rats. Findings We immunostained DRGs of immature rats and found that P2X3Rs were expressed only in neurons and P2X7Rs were expressed only in SGCs. Western blot analyses indicated that P2X3R expression decreased while P2X7R expression increased with the age of rats. Electrophysiological studies showed that the number of DRG neurons responding to the stimulation of the P2XR agonist, α,β-meATP, was higher and the amplitudes of α,β-meATP-induced depolarizations were larger in immature DRG neurons. As a result, P2X3R-mediated flinching responses were much more pronounced in immature rats than those found in adult rats. When we reduced P2X7R expression with P2X7R-siRNA in postnatal and adult rats, P2X3R-mediated flinch responses were greatly enhanced in both rat populations. Conclusions These results show that the P2X7R expression increases as rats age. In addition, P2X7Rs in SGCs exert inhibitory control on the P2X3R expression and function in sensory neurons of immature rats, just as observed in adult rats. Regulation of P2X7R expression is likely an effective way to control P2X3R activity and manage pain relief in infants.

  3. Parameterization-based tracking for the P2 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, Iurii

    2017-08-01

    The P2 experiment in Mainz aims to determine the weak mixing angle θW at low momentum transfer by measuring the parity-violating asymmetry of elastic electronproton scattering. In order to achieve the intended precision of Δ(sin2 θW)/sin2θW = 0:13% within the planned 10 000 hours of running the experiment has to operate at the rate of 1011 detected electrons per second. Although it is not required to measure the kinematic parameters of each individual electron, every attempt is made to achieve the highest possible throughput in the track reconstruction chain. In the present work a parameterization-based track reconstruction method is described. It is a variation of track following, where the results of the computation-heavy steps, namely the propagation of a track to the further detector plane, and the fitting, are pre-calculated, and expressed in terms of parametric analytic functions. This makes the algorithm extremely fast, and well-suited for an implementation on an FPGA. The method also takes implicitly into account the actual phase space distribution of the tracks already at the stage of candidate construction. Compared to a simple algorithm, that does not use such information, this allows reducing the combinatorial background by many orders of magnitude, down to O(1) background candidate per one signal track. The method is developed specifically for the P2 experiment in Mainz, and the presented implementation is tightly coupled to the experimental conditions.

  4. Human Cytomegalovirus pUL47 Modulates Tegumentation and Capsid Accumulation at the Viral Assembly Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappadona, Ilaria; Villinger, Clarissa; Schutzius, Gabi; Mertens, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) tegument protein pUL47 is an interaction partner of pUL48 and highly conserved among herpesviruses. It is closely associated with the capsid and has an important function early in infection. Here, we report a specific role of pUL47 in the tegumentation of capsids in the cytoplasm. A newly generated mutant virus (TB-47stop), in which expression of pUL47 is blocked, exhibited a severe impairment in cell-to-cell spread and release of infectivity from infected cells. Ultrastructural analysis of TB-47stop-infected cells clearly showed cytoplasmic accumulations of nonenveloped capsids that were only partially tegumented, indicating that these capsids failed to complete tegumentation. Nevertheless, these accumulations were positive for HCMV inner tegument proteins pp150 and pUL48, suggesting that their attachment to capsids occurs independently of pUL47. Despite these morphological alterations, fully enveloped virus particles were found in the extracellular space and at the viral assembly complex (vAC) of TB-47stop-infected cells, indicating that pUL47 is not essential for the generation of virions. We confirmed findings that incorporation of pUL48 into virions is impaired in the absence of pUL47. Interestingly, pUL47 exhibited a strong nuclear localization in transfected cells, whereas it was found exclusively at the vAC in the context of virus infection. Colocalization of pUL47 and pUL48 at the vAC is consistent with their interaction. We also found a shift to a more nuclear localization of pUL47 when the expression of pUL48 was reduced. Summarizing our results, we hypothesize that pUL48 directs pUL47 to the vAC to promote tegumentation and secondary envelopment of capsids. IMPORTANCE Generation of infectious HCMV particles requires an organized and multistep process involving the action of several viral and cellular proteins as well as protein-protein interactions. A better understanding of these processes is important for

  5. Insights into bacteriophage application in controlling Vibrio species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vengadesh Letchumanan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections from various organisms including Vibrio sp. pose a serious hazard to humans in many forms from clinical infection to affecting the yield of agriculture and aquaculture via infection of livestock. Vibrio sp. is one of the main foodborne pathogens causing human infection and is also a common cause of losses in the aquaculture industry. Prophylactic and therapeutic usage of antibiotics has become the mainstay of managing this problem, however this in turn led to the emergence of multidrug resistant strains of bacteria in the environment; which has raised awareness of the critical need for alternative non antibiotic based methods of preventing and treating bacterial infections. Bacteriophages - viruses that infect and result in the death of bacteria – are currently of great interest as a highly viable alternative to antibiotics. This article provides an insight into bacteriophage application in controlling Vibrio species as well underlining the advantages and drawbacks of phage therapy.

  6. Salmonella and Campylobacter: Antimicrobial resistance and bacteriophage control in poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Ar'Quette; Hashem, Fawzy; Parveen, Salina

    2016-02-01

    Salmonella and Campylobacter are major causes of foodborne related illness and are traditionally associated with consuming undercooked poultry and/or consuming products that have been cross contaminated with raw poultry. Many of the isolated Salmonella and Campylobacter that can cause disease have displayed antimicrobial resistance phenotypes. Although poultry producers have reduced on-the-farm overuse of antimicrobials, antimicrobial resistant Salmonella and Campylobacter strains still persist. One method of bio-control, that is producing promising results, is the use of lytic bacteriophages. This review will highlight the current emergence and persistence of antimicrobial resistant Salmonella and Campylobacter recovered from poultry as well as bacteriophage research interventions and limitations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of HZE particles and space hadrons on bacteriophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iurov, S.S.; Akoev, I.G.; Leonteva, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of particle radiation of the type encountered in space flight on bacteriophages are investigated. Survival and mutagenesis were followed in dry film cultures or liquid suspensions of T4Br(+) bacteriophage exposed to high-energy (HZE) particles during orbital flight, to alpha particles and accelerator-generated hardrons in the laboratory, and to high-energy cosmic rays at mountain altitudes. The HZE particles and high-energy hadrons are found to have a greater relative biological efficiency than standard gamma radiation, while exhibiting a highly inhomogeneous spatial structure in the observed biological and genetic effects. In addition, the genetic lesions observed are specific to the type of radiation exposure, consisting primarily of deletions and multiple lesions of low revertability, with mode of action depending on the linear energy transfer. 18 references

  8. Characterization of newly isolated lytic bacteriophages active against Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merabishvili, Maia; Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Kropinski, Andrew M; Mast, Jan; De Vos, Daniel; Verbeken, Gilbert; Noben, Jean-Paul; Lavigne, Rob; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Pirnay, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Based on genotyping and host range, two newly isolated lytic bacteriophages, myovirus vB_AbaM_Acibel004 and podovirus vB_AbaP_Acibel007, active against Acinetobacter baumannii clinical strains, were selected from a new phage library for further characterization. The complete genomes of the two phages were analyzed. Both phages are characterized by broad host range and essential features of potential therapeutic phages, such as short latent period (27 and 21 min, respectively), high burst size (125 and 145, respectively), stability of activity in liquid culture and low frequency of occurrence of phage-resistant mutant bacterial cells. Genomic analysis showed that while Acibel004 represents a novel bacteriophage with resemblance to some unclassified Pseudomonas aeruginosa phages, Acibel007 belongs to the well-characterized genus of the Phikmvlikevirus. The newly isolated phages can serve as potential candidates for phage cocktails to control A. baumannii infections.

  9. Biocontrol of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum using bacteriophage PP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jeong-A; Jee, Samnyu; Lee, Dong Hwan; Roh, Eunjung; Jung, Kyusuk; Oh, Changsik; Heu, Sunggi

    2013-08-01

    Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (formerly Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora) is a plant pathogen that causes soft rot and stem rot diseases in several crops, including Chinese cabbage, potato, and tomato. To control this bacterium, we isolated a bacteriophage, PP1, with lytic activity against P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the PP1 phage belongs to the Podoviridae family of the order Caudovirales, which exhibit icosahedral heads and short non-contractile tails. PP1 phage showed high specificity for P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum, and several bacteria belonging to different species and phyla were resistant to PP1. This phage showed rapid and strong lytic activity against its host bacteria in liquid medium and was stable over a broad range of pH values. Disease caused by P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum was significantly reduced by PP1 treatment. Overall, PP1 bacteriophage effectively controls P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum.

  10. Insights into Bacteriophage Application in Controlling Vibrio Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letchumanan, Vengadesh; Chan, Kok-Gan; Pusparajah, Priyia; Saokaew, Surasak; Duangjai, Acharaporn; Goh, Bey-Hing; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Lee, Learn-Han

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infections from various organisms including Vibrio sp. pose a serious hazard to humans in many forms from clinical infection to affecting the yield of agriculture and aquaculture via infection of livestock. Vibrio sp. is one of the main foodborne pathogens causing human infection and is also a common cause of losses in the aquaculture industry. Prophylactic and therapeutic usage of antibiotics has become the mainstay of managing this problem, however, this in turn led to the emergence of multidrug resistant strains of bacteria in the environment; which has raised awareness of the critical need for alternative non-antibiotic based methods of preventing and treating bacterial infections. Bacteriophages – viruses that infect and result in the death of bacteria – are currently of great interest as a highly viable alternative to antibiotics. This article provides an insight into bacteriophage application in controlling Vibrio species as well underlining the advantages and drawbacks of phage therapy. PMID:27486446

  11. BACTERIOPHAGE ENDOLYSINS AND THEIR USE IN BIOTECHNOLOGICAL PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Tišáková

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophage endolysins are peptidoglycan hydrolases, produced in the lytic system of bacteriophage in order to lyse host peptidoglycan from within and release virions into the environment. Phages infecting Gram-positive bacteria express endolysin genes with the characteristic modular structure, consisting of at least two functional domains: N-terminal enzymatically active domain (EAD and C-terminal cell wall binding domain (CBD. CBDs specifically recognize ligands and bind to the bacterial cell wall, whereas EAD catalyze lysis of the peptidoglycan bonds. The reveal of endolysin modular structure leads to new opportunities for domain swapping, construction of chimeras and production of specifically engineered recombinant endolysins and their functional domains with the diverse biotechnological applications from without, such as in detection, elimination and biocontrol of pathogens, or as anti-bacterials in experimental therapy.

  12. Characterization of newly isolated lytic bacteriophages active against Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia Merabishvili

    Full Text Available Based on genotyping and host range, two newly isolated lytic bacteriophages, myovirus vB_AbaM_Acibel004 and podovirus vB_AbaP_Acibel007, active against Acinetobacter baumannii clinical strains, were selected from a new phage library for further characterization. The complete genomes of the two phages were analyzed. Both phages are characterized by broad host range and essential features of potential therapeutic phages, such as short latent period (27 and 21 min, respectively, high burst size (125 and 145, respectively, stability of activity in liquid culture and low frequency of occurrence of phage-resistant mutant bacterial cells. Genomic analysis showed that while Acibel004 represents a novel bacteriophage with resemblance to some unclassified Pseudomonas aeruginosa phages, Acibel007 belongs to the well-characterized genus of the Phikmvlikevirus. The newly isolated phages can serve as potential candidates for phage cocktails to control A. baumannii infections.

  13. Bacteriophage and bacteriocin typing scheme for Clostridium difficile.

    OpenAIRE

    Sell, T L; Schaberg, D R; Fekety, F R

    1983-01-01

    The study of the epidemiology of infection with Clostridium difficile would be aided by a way to type individual bacterial isolates. We therefore sought bacteriophages for use in typing. With mitomycin C exposure (3 micrograms/ml), filtrates from 10 strains of C. difficile had plaque-forming lytic activity on other C. difficile strains. Individual phage were passaged and made into high-titer stock preparations for typing. Electron microscopy revealed tailed phage particles from one such prepa...

  14. Quorum Regulated Resistance of Vibrio cholerae against Environmental Bacteriophages

    OpenAIRE

    M. Mozammel Hoque; Iftekhar Bin Naser; S. M. Nayeemul Bari; Jun Zhu; John J. Mekalanos; Shah M. Faruque

    2016-01-01

    Predation by bacteriophages can significantly influence the population structure of bacterial communities. Vibrio cholerae the causative agent of cholera epidemics interacts with numerous phages in the aquatic ecosystem, and in the intestine of cholera patients. Seasonal epidemics of cholera reportedly collapse due to predation of the pathogen by phages. However, it is not clear how sufficient number of the bacteria survive to seed the environment in the subsequent epidemic season. We found t...

  15. Bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides as a marker for microbial source tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jofre, Joan; Blanch, Anicet R; Lucena, Francisco; Muniesa, Maite

    2014-05-15

    Bacteriophages infecting certain strains of Bacteroides are amid the numerous procedures proposed for tracking the source of faecal pollution. These bacteriophages fulfil reasonably well most of the requirements identified as appropriate for a suitable marker of faecal sources. Thus, different host strains are available that detect bacteriophages preferably in water contaminated with faecal wastes corresponding to different animal species. For phages found preferably in human faecal wastes, which are the ones that have been more extensively studied, the amounts of phages found in waters contaminated with human fecal samples is reasonably high; these amounts are invariable through the time; their resistance to natural and anthropogenic stressors is comparable to that of other relatively resistant indicator of faecal pollution such us coliphages; the abundance ratios of somatic coliphages and bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron GA17 are unvarying in recent and aged contamination; and standardised detection methods exist. These methods are easy, cost effective and provide data susceptible of numerical analysis. In contrast, there are some uncertainties regarding their geographical stability, and consequently suitable hosts need to be isolated for different geographical areas. However, a feasible method has been described to isolate suitable hosts in a given geographical area. In summary, phages infecting Bacteroides are a marker of faecal sources that in our opinion merits being included in the "toolbox" for microbial source tracking. However, further research is still needed in order to make clear some uncertainties regarding some of their characteristics and behaviour, to compare their suitability to the one of emerging methods such us targeting Bacteroidetes by qPCR assays; or settling molecular methods for their determination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Lysis of lysis-inhibited bacteriophage T4-infected cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Abedon, S T

    1992-01-01

    T4 bacteriophage (phage)-infected cells show a marked increase in latent-period length, called lysis inhibition, upon adsorption of additional T4 phages (secondary adsorption). Lysis inhibition is a complex phenotype requiring the activity of at least six T4 genes. Two basic mysteries surround our understanding of the expression of lysis inhibition: (i) the mechanism of initiation (i.e., how secondary adsorption leads to the expression of lysis inhibition) and (ii) the mechanism of lysis (i.e...

  17. Bacteriophages: The Enemies of Bad Bacteria Are Our Friends!

    OpenAIRE

    Gutiérrez, Diana; Fernández, Lucía; Martínez, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Ana; García, Pilar

    2017-01-01

    Some bacteria can enter the human body and make people ill. Usually, these diseases can be cured by antibiotics, but sometimes bacteria are resistant to them, meaning that the antibiotics do not kill the bacteria. In these cases, bacteria become very dangerous. Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria but are harmless to humans. To reproduce, they get into a bacterium, where they multiply, and finally they break the bacterial cell open to release the new viruses. Therefore, bacteriopha...

  18. Bacteriophages against Serratia as Fish Spoilage Control Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Hern?ndez, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Serratia, mainly S. proteamaculans and S. fonticola, are important spoilage agents in Atlantic horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus). In order to evaluate whether bacteriophages against Serratia could delay the spoilage process, 11 viral strains active against this genus were isolated from food and best candidate was applied to fresh mackerel filets. All the phages belong to the Siphoviridae and Podoviridae families and were active at multiplicity of infection (MOI) level...

  19. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the bacteriophage CUS-3 virion reveal a conserved coat protein I-domain but a distinct tailspike receptor-binding domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parent, Kristin N., E-mail: kparent@msu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0378 (United States); Tang, Jinghua; Cardone, Giovanni [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0378 (United States); Gilcrease, Eddie B. [University of Utah School of Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Pathology, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Janssen, Mandy E.; Olson, Norman H. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0378 (United States); Casjens, Sherwood R., E-mail: sherwood.casjens@path.utah.edu [University of Utah School of Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Pathology, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Baker, Timothy S., E-mail: tsb@ucsd.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0378 (United States); University of California, San Diego, Division of Biological Sciences, La Jolla, CA, 92093 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    CUS-3 is a short-tailed, dsDNA bacteriophage that infects serotype K1 Escherichia coli. We report icosahedrally averaged and asymmetric, three-dimensional, cryo-electron microscopic reconstructions of the CUS-3 virion. Its coat protein structure adopts the “HK97-fold” shared by other tailed phages and is quite similar to that in phages P22 and Sf6 despite only weak amino acid sequence similarity. In addition, these coat proteins share a unique extra external domain (“I-domain”), suggesting that the group of P22-like phages has evolved over a very long time period without acquiring a new coat protein gene from another phage group. On the other hand, the morphology of the CUS-3 tailspike differs significantly from that of P22 or Sf6, but is similar to the tailspike of phage K1F, a member of the extremely distantly related T7 group of phages. We conclude that CUS-3 obtained its tailspike gene from a distantly related phage quite recently. - Highlights: • Asymmetric and symmetric three-dimensional reconstructions of phage CUS-3 are presented. • CUS-3 major capsid protein has a conserved I-domain, which is found in all three categories of “P22-like phage”. • CUS-3 has very different tailspike receptor binding domain from those of P22 and Sf6. • The CUS-3 tailspike likely was acquired by horizontal gene transfer.

  20. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the bacteriophage CUS-3 virion reveal a conserved coat protein I-domain but a distinct tailspike receptor-binding domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parent, Kristin N.; Tang, Jinghua; Cardone, Giovanni; Gilcrease, Eddie B.; Janssen, Mandy E.; Olson, Norman H.; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Baker, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    CUS-3 is a short-tailed, dsDNA bacteriophage that infects serotype K1 Escherichia coli. We report icosahedrally averaged and asymmetric, three-dimensional, cryo-electron microscopic reconstructions of the CUS-3 virion. Its coat protein structure adopts the “HK97-fold” shared by other tailed phages and is quite similar to that in phages P22 and Sf6 despite only weak amino acid sequence similarity. In addition, these coat proteins share a unique extra external domain (“I-domain”), suggesting that the group of P22-like phages has evolved over a very long time period without acquiring a new coat protein gene from another phage group. On the other hand, the morphology of the CUS-3 tailspike differs significantly from that of P22 or Sf6, but is similar to the tailspike of phage K1F, a member of the extremely distantly related T7 group of phages. We conclude that CUS-3 obtained its tailspike gene from a distantly related phage quite recently. - Highlights: • Asymmetric and symmetric three-dimensional reconstructions of phage CUS-3 are presented. • CUS-3 major capsid protein has a conserved I-domain, which is found in all three categories of “P22-like phage”. • CUS-3 has very different tailspike receptor binding domain from those of P22 and Sf6. • The CUS-3 tailspike likely was acquired by horizontal gene transfer

  1. Designing a nine cysteine-less DNA packaging motor from bacteriophage T4 reveals new insights into ATPase structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondabagil, Kiran; Dai, Li; Vafabakhsh, Reza; Ha, Taekjip; Draper, Bonnie; Rao, Venigalla B

    2014-11-01

    The packaging motor of bacteriophage T4 translocates DNA into the capsid at a rate of up to 2000 bp/s. Such a high rate would require coordination of motor movements at millisecond timescale. Designing a cysteine-less gp17 is essential to generate fluorescently labeled motors and measure distance changes between motor domains by FRET analyses. Here, by using sequence alignments, structural modeling, combinatorial mutagenesis, and recombinational rescue, we replaced all nine cysteines of gp17 and introduced single cysteines at defined positions. These mutant motors retained in vitro DNA packaging activity. Single mutant motors translocated DNA molecules in real time as imaged by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We discovered, unexpectedly, that a hydrophobic or nonpolar amino acid next to Walker B motif is essential for motor function, probably for efficient generation of OH(-) nucleophile. The ATPase Walker B motif, thus, may be redefined as "β-strand (4-6 hydrophobic-rich amino acids)-DE-hydrophobic/nonpolar amino acid". Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Isolation of Lactic Acid Bacteria Bacteriophages from Dairy Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnaz Shokrani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds: Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis is one of the most important microorganisms used in dairy industry for production of fermented milk products. Bacteriophages which attack  L. lactis are a serious threat to the dairy industry because of their negative effects on fermentation processes. Methods: Samples of raw milk were examined for the presence of lactococcal bacteriophages. Samples were centrifuged and then filtered through 0.45µm pore size filters. The filtrates were added to early-exponential cultures of Lactococcus lactis subspp. Lactis (PTCC 1336. Overlay method was used to detect the formation of plaques. After isolation and concentration of phages, serial dilutions of phage stock were used to determine titer of phage in concentrated sample. Electron Microscopy was used for observation and characterization of structural details of bacteriophages. Results: Two phages were isolated; one of them had a hexagonal head of 45×30 nm in diameter and a flexible non-contractile tail of 70nm long which belonged to Siphoviridae. The other had a short tail and a hexagonal head of 53×60 nm in diameter which was a member of Podoviridae family. Conclusion: In this study, for the first time, two phages were isolated from milk. This does not reduce the significance of phage control in different stages of the production. The spread of the phages in the production plant can be very harmful.

  3. Neutron and γ-irradiation of bacteriophage M13 DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.P.; Lavin, M.F.; Cohen, D.; Dytlewski, N.; Houldsworth, J.

    1990-01-01

    We describe here the use of the Van de Graaff accelerator as a source of high energy neutrons for biological irradiation. Single-stranded bacteriophage M13 DNA was chosen as the system to determine the relative biological effectiveness of monoenergetic neutrons. A Standard Neutron Irradiation Facility (SNIF) was established using a 3 MV Van de Graaff accelerator. The 2 D (d,n) 3 He nuclear reaction was used to produce neutron fluxes of 3 x 10 8 cm -2 sec -1 yielding dose rates as high as 50 Gy h -1 . A detailed description of the neutron source, neutron fluence measurement, dose calculation and calibration are included. Exposure of single-stranded bacteriophage M13 DNA to 90 Gy of neutrons reduced survival to 0.18% of the unirradiated value. Five hundred Gy of γ-rays were required for the same level of killing, and RBE was estimated at 6 based on Do values. Determination of the extent of DNA damage after exposure to cleavage using gel electrophoresis, gave RBE values of 6-8 which was very similar to that observed for bacteriophage survival. The facility described here provides a reproducible source of high energy monoenergetic neutrons and dose levels suitable for experiments designed to measure DNA damage and effects on DNA synthesis. (author)

  4. Effect of alpha particles on bacteriophage T4Br(+)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonteva, G.A.; Akoev, I.G.; Grigorev, A.E.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of heavy particle radiation, which is believed to be responsible for the high relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of space hadrons, on bacteriophages are investigated. Dry film cultures of bacteriophage T4 were irradiated with 5.3 MeV Po-210 alpha particles to doses from 5 to 60 Gray, and compared with cultures irradiated by Co-60 gamma radiation. Examination of the exponential dose-response curves for bacteriophage survival indicates an RBE of 4.68 for the alpha particles. The r-mutation frequency per 10,000 surviving phages is found to peak at 7.1 at doses between 65 and 85 Gray for gamma radiation, however it declines steadily from a level of 10.2 per 10,000 survivors with increasing dose of alpha radiation. Comparison of the mutation frequencies at the same levels of lethality and the spectra of mutations produced by the two types of radiation indicates alpha and gamma radiation to differ as well in the mechanisms of mutation production. It is concluded that the observed high RBE of space hadrons cannot be explained by the presence of high-energy particles in the secondary radiation. 13 references

  5. Co-option of bacteriophage lysozyme genes by bivalve genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Qian; Wang, Chunyang; Jin, Min; Lan, Jiangfeng; Ye, Ting; Hui, Kaimin; Tan, Jingmin; Wang, Zheng; Wyckoff, Gerald J; Wang, Wen; Han, Guan-Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotes have occasionally acquired genetic material through horizontal gene transfer (HGT). However, little is known about the evolutionary and functional significance of such acquisitions. Lysozymes are ubiquitous enzymes that degrade bacterial cell walls. Here, we provide evidence that two subclasses of bivalves (Heterodonta and Palaeoheterodonta) acquired a lysozyme gene via HGT, building on earlier findings. Phylogenetic analyses place the bivalve lysozyme genes within the clade of bacteriophage lysozyme genes, indicating that the bivalves acquired the phage-type lysozyme genes from bacteriophages, either directly or through intermediate hosts. These bivalve lysozyme genes underwent dramatic structural changes after their co-option, including intron gain and fusion with other genes. Moreover, evidence suggests that recurrent gene duplication occurred in the bivalve lysozyme genes. Finally, we show the co-opted lysozymes exhibit a capacity for antibacterial action, potentially augmenting the immune function of related bivalves. This represents an intriguing evolutionary strategy in the eukaryote-microbe arms race, in which the genetic materials of bacteriophages are co-opted by eukaryotes, and then used by eukaryotes to combat bacteria, using a shared weapon against a common enemy. © 2017 The Authors.

  6. MetaPhinder—Identifying Bacteriophage Sequences in Metagenomic Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroel, Julia; Lund, Ole; Voldby Larsen, Mette; Nielsen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages are the most abundant biological entity on the planet, but at the same time do not account for much of the genetic material isolated from most environments due to their small genome sizes. They also show great genetic diversity and mosaic genomes making it challenging to analyze and understand them. Here we present MetaPhinder, a method to identify assembled genomic fragments (i.e.contigs) of phage origin in metagenomic data sets. The method is based on a comparison to a database of whole genome bacteriophage sequences, integrating hits to multiple genomes to accomodate for the mosaic genome structure of many bacteriophages. The method is demonstrated to out-perform both BLAST methods based on single hits and methods based on k-mer comparisons. MetaPhinder is available as a web service at the Center for Genomic Epidemiology https://cge.cbs.dtu.dk/services/MetaPhinder/, while the source code can be downloaded from https://bitbucket.org/genomicepidemiology/metaphinder or https://github.com/vanessajurtz/MetaPhinder. PMID:27684958

  7. MetaPhinder-Identifying Bacteriophage Sequences in Metagenomic Data Sets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Isabell Jurtz

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages are the most abundant biological entity on the planet, but at the same time do not account for much of the genetic material isolated from most environments due to their small genome sizes. They also show great genetic diversity and mosaic genomes making it challenging to analyze and understand them. Here we present MetaPhinder, a method to identify assembled genomic fragments (i.e.contigs of phage origin in metagenomic data sets. The method is based on a comparison to a database of whole genome bacteriophage sequences, integrating hits to multiple genomes to accomodate for the mosaic genome structure of many bacteriophages. The method is demonstrated to out-perform both BLAST methods based on single hits and methods based on k-mer comparisons. MetaPhinder is available as a web service at the Center for Genomic Epidemiology https://cge.cbs.dtu.dk/services/MetaPhinder/, while the source code can be downloaded from https://bitbucket.org/genomicepidemiology/metaphinder or https://github.com/vanessajurtz/MetaPhinder.

  8. MetaPhinder-Identifying Bacteriophage Sequences in Metagenomic Data Sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurtz, Vanessa Isabell; Villarroel, Julia; Lund, Ole; Voldby Larsen, Mette; Nielsen, Morten

    Bacteriophages are the most abundant biological entity on the planet, but at the same time do not account for much of the genetic material isolated from most environments due to their small genome sizes. They also show great genetic diversity and mosaic genomes making it challenging to analyze and understand them. Here we present MetaPhinder, a method to identify assembled genomic fragments (i.e.contigs) of phage origin in metagenomic data sets. The method is based on a comparison to a database of whole genome bacteriophage sequences, integrating hits to multiple genomes to accomodate for the mosaic genome structure of many bacteriophages. The method is demonstrated to out-perform both BLAST methods based on single hits and methods based on k-mer comparisons. MetaPhinder is available as a web service at the Center for Genomic Epidemiology https://cge.cbs.dtu.dk/services/MetaPhinder/, while the source code can be downloaded from https://bitbucket.org/genomicepidemiology/metaphinder or https://github.com/vanessajurtz/MetaPhinder.

  9. Adaptive Streaming of Scalable Videos over P2PTV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef Lahbabi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a new Scalable Video Coding (SVC quality-adaptive peer-to-peer television (P2PTV system executed at the peers and at the network. The quality adaptation mechanisms are developed as follows: on one hand, the Layer Level Initialization (LLI is used for adapting the video quality with the static resources at the peers in order to avoid long startup times. On the other hand, the Layer Level Adjustment (LLA is invoked periodically to adjust the SVC layer to the fluctuation of the network conditions with the aim of predicting the possible stalls before their occurrence. Our results demonstrate that our mechanisms allow quickly adapting the video quality to various system changes while providing best Quality of Experience (QoE that matches current resources of the peer devices and instantaneous throughput available at the network state.

  10. Metavirome Sequencing of the Termite Gut Reveals the Presence of an Unexplored Bacteriophage Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhe, Chinmay V.; Husseneder, Claudia

    2018-01-01

    The Formosan subterranean termite; Coptotermes formosanus is nutritionally dependent on the complex and diverse community of bacteria and protozoa in their gut. Although, there have been many studies to decipher the taxonomic and functional diversity of bacterial communities in the guts of termites, their bacteriophages remain unstudied. We sequenced the metavirome of the guts of Formosan subterranean termite workers to study the diversity of bacteriophages and other associated viruses. Results showed that the termites harbor a virome in their gut comprised of varied and previously unknown bacteriophages. Between 87–90% of the predicted dsDNA virus genes by Metavir showed similarity to the tailed bacteriophages (Caudovirales). Many predicted genes from the virome matched to bacterial prophage regions. These data are suggestive of a virome dominated by temperate bacteriophages. We predicted the genomes of seven novel Caudovirales bacteriophages from the termite gut. Three of these predicted bacteriophage genomes were found in high proportions in all the three termite colonies tested. Two bacteriophages are predicted to infect endosymbiotic bacteria of the gut protozoa. The presence of these putative bacteriophages infecting endosymbionts of the gut protozoa, suggests a quadripartite relationship between the termites their symbiotic protozoa, endosymbiotic bacteria of the protozoa and their bacteriophages. Other than Caudovirales, ss-DNA virus related genes were also present in the termite gut. We predicted the genomes of 12 novel Microviridae phages from the termite gut and seven of those possibly represent a new proposed subfamily. Circovirus like genomes were also assembled from the termite gut at lower relative abundance. We predicted 10 novel circovirus genomes in this study. Whether these circoviruses infect the termites remains elusive at the moment. The functional and taxonomical annotations suggest that the termites may harbor a core virome comprised of

  11. Metavirome Sequencing of the Termite Gut Reveals the Presence of an Unexplored Bacteriophage Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinmay V. Tikhe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Formosan subterranean termite; Coptotermes formosanus is nutritionally dependent on the complex and diverse community of bacteria and protozoa in their gut. Although, there have been many studies to decipher the taxonomic and functional diversity of bacterial communities in the guts of termites, their bacteriophages remain unstudied. We sequenced the metavirome of the guts of Formosan subterranean termite workers to study the diversity of bacteriophages and other associated viruses. Results showed that the termites harbor a virome in their gut comprised of varied and previously unknown bacteriophages. Between 87–90% of the predicted dsDNA virus genes by Metavir showed similarity to the tailed bacteriophages (Caudovirales. Many predicted genes from the virome matched to bacterial prophage regions. These data are suggestive of a virome dominated by temperate bacteriophages. We predicted the genomes of seven novel Caudovirales bacteriophages from the termite gut. Three of these predicted bacteriophage genomes were found in high proportions in all the three termite colonies tested. Two bacteriophages are predicted to infect endosymbiotic bacteria of the gut protozoa. The presence of these putative bacteriophages infecting endosymbionts of the gut protozoa, suggests a quadripartite relationship between the termites their symbiotic protozoa, endosymbiotic bacteria of the protozoa and their bacteriophages. Other than Caudovirales, ss-DNA virus related genes were also present in the termite gut. We predicted the genomes of 12 novel Microviridae phages from the termite gut and seven of those possibly represent a new proposed subfamily. Circovirus like genomes were also assembled from the termite gut at lower relative abundance. We predicted 10 novel circovirus genomes in this study. Whether these circoviruses infect the termites remains elusive at the moment. The functional and taxonomical annotations suggest that the termites may harbor a core

  12. Metavirome Sequencing of the Termite Gut Reveals the Presence of an Unexplored Bacteriophage Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhe, Chinmay V; Husseneder, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    The Formosan subterranean termite; Coptotermes formosanus is nutritionally dependent on the complex and diverse community of bacteria and protozoa in their gut. Although, there have been many studies to decipher the taxonomic and functional diversity of bacterial communities in the guts of termites, their bacteriophages remain unstudied. We sequenced the metavirome of the guts of Formosan subterranean termite workers to study the diversity of bacteriophages and other associated viruses. Results showed that the termites harbor a virome in their gut comprised of varied and previously unknown bacteriophages. Between 87-90% of the predicted dsDNA virus genes by Metavir showed similarity to the tailed bacteriophages (Caudovirales) . Many predicted genes from the virome matched to bacterial prophage regions. These data are suggestive of a virome dominated by temperate bacteriophages. We predicted the genomes of seven novel Caudovirales bacteriophages from the termite gut. Three of these predicted bacteriophage genomes were found in high proportions in all the three termite colonies tested. Two bacteriophages are predicted to infect endosymbiotic bacteria of the gut protozoa. The presence of these putative bacteriophages infecting endosymbionts of the gut protozoa, suggests a quadripartite relationship between the termites their symbiotic protozoa, endosymbiotic bacteria of the protozoa and their bacteriophages. Other than Caudovirales, ss-DNA virus related genes were also present in the termite gut. We predicted the genomes of 12 novel Microviridae phages from the termite gut and seven of those possibly represent a new proposed subfamily. Circovirus like genomes were also assembled from the termite gut at lower relative abundance. We predicted 10 novel circovirus genomes in this study. Whether these circoviruses infect the termites remains elusive at the moment. The functional and taxonomical annotations suggest that the termites may harbor a core virome comprised of the

  13. A review of current methods using bacteriophages in live animals, food and animal products intended for human consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Ian R

    2016-11-01

    Bacteriophages are utilised in the food industry as biocontrol agents to reduce the load of bacteria, and thus reduce potential for human infection. This review focuses on current methods using bacteriophages within the food chain. Limitations of research will be discussed, and the potential for future food-based bacteriophage research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechanisms regulating expression of the HPV 31 L1 and L2 capsid proteins and pseudovirion entry

    OpenAIRE

    Hindmarsh, Patrick L; Laimins, Laimonis A

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Human papillomaviruses (HPV) infect stratified epithelia and restrict expression of late capsid genes to highly differentiated cells. In order to begin to understand the processes regulating HPV 31 infection we examined the synthesis of the HPV 31 capsid proteins, L1 and L2, using heterologous expression systems. Similar to studies in HPV 16, expression of wild type HPV 31 L1 and L2 from heterologous promoters resulted in very low levels of synthesis. In contrast, modification of the...

  15. Pasteurella haemolytica bacteriophage: identification, partial characterization, and relationship of temperate bacteriophages from isolates of Pasteurella haemolytica (biotype A, serotype 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, A.B.; Renshaw, H.W.; Sneed, L.W.

    1985-01-01

    Pasteurella haemolytica (biotype A, serotype 1) isolates (n = 15) from the upper respiratory tract of clinically normal cattle, as well as from lung lesions from cases of fatal bovine pasteurellosis, were examined for the presence of bacteriophage after irradiation with UV light. Treatment of all P haemolytica isolates with UV irradiation resulted in lysis of bacteria due to the induction of vegetative development of bacteriophages. The extent of growth inhibition and bacterial lysis in irradiated cultures was UV dose-dependent. Bacterial cultures exposed to UV light for 20 s reached peak culture density between 60 and 70 minutes after irradiation; thereafter, culture density declined rapidly, so that by 120 minutes, it was approximately 60% of the original value. When examined ultrastructurally, lytic cultures from each isolate revealed bacteriophages with an overall length of approximately 200 nm and that appeared to have a head with icosahedral symmetry and a contractile tail. Cell-free filtrate from each noninduced bacterial isolate was inoculated onto the other bacterial isolates in a cross-culture sensitivity assay for the presence of phages lytic for the host bacterial isolates. Zones of lysis (plaques) did not develop when bacterial lawns grown from the different isolates were inoculated with filtrates from the heterologous isolates

  16. High-Resolution X-Ray Structure and Functional Analysis of the Murine Norovirus 1 Capsid Protein Protruding Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taube, Stefan; Rubin, John R.; Katpally, Umesh; Smith, Thomas J.; Kendall, Ann; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Wobus, Christiane E. (Michigan); (Danforth)

    2010-07-23

    Murine noroviruses (MNV) are closely related to the human noroviruses (HuNoV), which cause the majority of nonbacterial gastroenteritis. Unlike HuNoV, MNV grow in culture and in a small-animal model that represents a tractable model to study norovirus biology. To begin a detailed investigation of molecular events that occur during norovirus binding to cells, the crystallographic structure of the murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1) capsid protein protruding (P) domain has been determined. Crystallization of the bacterially expressed protein yielded two different crystal forms (Protein Data Bank identifiers [PDB ID], 3LQ6 and 3LQE). Comparison of the structures indicated a large degree of structural mobility in loops on the surface of the P2 subdomain. Specifically, the A{prime}-B{prime} and E{prime}-F{prime} loops were found in open and closed conformations. These regions of high mobility include the known escape mutation site for the neutralizing antibody A6.2 and an attenuation mutation site, which arose after serial passaging in culture and led to a loss in lethality in STAT1{sup -/-} mice, respectively. Modeling of a Fab fragment and crystal structures of the P dimer into the cryoelectron microscopy three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction of the A6.2/MNV-1 complex indicated that the closed conformation is most likely bound to the Fab fragment and that the antibody contact is localized to the A{prime}-B{prime} and E{prime}-F{prime} loops. Therefore, we hypothesize that these loop regions and the flexibility of the P domains play important roles during MNV-1 binding to the cell surface.

  17. Capsid-Damaging Effects of UV Irradiation as Measured by Quantitative PCR Coupled with Ethidium Monoazide Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangsanont, J; Katayama, H; Kurisu, F; Furumai, H

    2014-12-01

    The damage to a viral capsid after low-pressure (LP) and medium-pressure (MP) UV irradiation was assessed, using the quantitative or quantitative reverse transcription PCR coupled with ethidium monoazide treatment (EMA-PCR). After UV irradiation, adenovirus 5 (Ad5) and poliovirus 1 (PV1) were subjected to a plaque assay, PCR, and EMA-PCR to investigate the effect of UV irradiation on viral infectivity, genome damage, and capsid damage, respectively. The effectiveness of UV wavelengths in a viral genome and capsid damage of both PV1 and Ad5 was also further investigated using a band-pass filter. It was found that an MPUV lamp was more effective than an LPUV lamp in inactivating Ad5, whereas there was no difference in the case of PV1. The results of viral reduction determined by PCR and EMA-PCR indicated that MP UV irradiation damaged Ad5 capsid. The damage to PV1 and Ad5 capsid was also not observed after LP UV irradiation. The investigation of effects of UV wavelengths suggested that UV wavelengths at 230-245 nm have greater effects on adenovirus capsid in addition to viral genome than UV wavelengths beyond 245 nm.

  18. Identification of a Broadly Cross-Reactive Epitope in the Inner Shell of the Norovirus Capsid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel I Parra

    Full Text Available Noroviruses are major pathogens associated with acute gastroenteritis. They are diverse viruses, with at least six genogroups (GI-GVI and multiple genotypes defined by differences in the major capsid protein, VP1. This diversity has challenged the development of broadly cross-reactive vaccines as well as efficient detection methods. Here, we report the characterization of a broadly cross-reactive monoclonal antibody (MAb raised against the capsid protein of a GII.3 norovirus strain. The MAb reacted with VLPs and denatured VP1 protein from GI, GII, GIV and GV noroviruses, and mapped to a linear epitope located in the inner shell domain. An alignment of all available VP1 sequences showed that the putative epitope (residues 52-56 is highly conserved across the genus Norovirus. This broadly cross-reactive MAb thus constitutes a valuable reagent for the diagnosis and study of these diverse viruses.

  19. Chronic hepatitis B infection and HBV DNA-containing capsids: Modeling and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Kalyan; Chakrabarty, Siddhartha P.

    2015-05-01

    We analyze the dynamics of chronic HBV infection taking into account both uninfected and infected hepatocytes along with the intracellular HBV DNA-containing capsids and the virions. While previous HBV models have included either the uninfected hepatocytes or the intracellular HBV DNA-containing capsids, our model accounts for both these two populations. We prove the conditions for local and global stability of both the uninfected and infected steady states in terms of the basic reproduction number. Further, we incorporate a time lag in the model to encompass the intracellular delay in the production of the infected hepatocytes and find that this delay does not affect the overall dynamics of the system. The results for the model and the delay model are finally numerically illustrated.

  20. Complete Genome Sequences ofVibrio cholerae-Specific Bacteriophages 24 and X29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandare, Sudhakar G; Warry, Andrew; Emes, Richard D; Hooton, Steven P T; Barrow, Paul A; Atterbury, Robert J

    2017-11-16

    The complete genomes of two Vibrio cholerae bacteriophages of potential interest for cholera bacteriophage (phage) therapy were sequenced and annotated. The genome size of phage 24 is 44,395 bp encoding 71 putative proteins, and that of phage X29 is 41,569 bp encoding 68 putative proteins. Copyright © 2017 Bhandare et al.

  1. Polymer-based delivery systems for support and delivery of bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alyssa Marie

    One of the most urgent problems in the fields of medicine and agriculture is the decreasing effectiveness of antibiotics. Once a miracle drug, antibiotics have recently become associated with the creation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The main limitations of these treatments include lack of both adaptability and specificity. To overcome these shortcomings of current antibiotic treatments, there has been a renewed interest in bacteriophage research. Bacteriophages are naturally-occurring viruses that lyse bacteria. They are highly specific, with each bacteriophage type lysing a narrow range of bacteria strains. Bacteriophages are also ubiquitous biological entities, populating environments where bacterial growth is supported. Just as humans are exposed to bacteria in their daily lives, we are exposed to bacteriophages as well. To use bacteriophages in practical applications, they must be delivered to the site of an infection in a controlled-release system. Two systems were studied to observe their support of bacteriophage lytic activity, as well as investigate the possibility of controlling bacteriophage release rates. First, hydrogels were studied, using crosslinking and blending techniques to achieve a range of release profiles. Second, polyanhydride microparticles were studied, evaluating release rates as a function of monomer chemistries.

  2. Ultrastructure and viral metagenome of bacteriophages from an anaerobic methane oxidizing Methylomirabilis bioreactor enrichment culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Gambelli

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available With its capacity for anaerobic methane oxidation and denitrification, the bacterium Methylomirabilis oxyfera plays an important role in natural ecosystems. Its unique physiology can be exploited for more sustainable wastewater treatment technologies. However, operational stability of full-scale bioreactors can experience setbacks due to, for example, bacteriophage blooms. By shaping microbial communities through mortality, horizontal gene transfer and metabolic reprogramming, bacteriophages are important players in most ecosystems. Here, we analysed an infected Methylomirabilis sp. bioreactor enrichment culture using (advanced electron microscopy, viral metagenomics and bioinformatics. Electron micrographs revealed four different viral morphotypes, one of which was observed to infect Methylomirabilis cells. The infected cells contained densely packed ~55 nm icosahedral bacteriophage particles with a putative internal membrane. Various stages of virion assembly were observed. Moreover, during the bacteriophage replication, the host cytoplasmic membrane appeared extremely patchy, which suggests that the bacteriophages may use host bacterial lipids to build their own putative internal membrane. The viral metagenome contained 1.87 million base pairs of assembled viral sequences, from which five putative complete viral genomes were assembled and manually annotated. Using bioinformatics analyses, we could not identify which viral genome belonged to the Methylomirabilis- infecting bacteriophage, in part because the obtained viral genome sequences were novel and unique to this reactor system. Taken together these results show that new bacteriophages can be detected in anaerobic cultivation systems and that the effect of bacteriophages on the microbial community in these systems is a topic for further study.

  3. Genotyping Staphylococcus aureus allows one to identify bacteriophages harboring unknow endolysins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background and Objectives. The search of new bacteriophage endolysins is important in view of the ability of staphylococci to acquire resistance to commonly used antibiotics. Most known genomes of Staphylococcus aureus strains contain two or more temperate bacteriophages. For example, the chromosome...

  4. Predicting bacteriophage proteins located in host cell with feature selection technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hui; Liang, Zhi-Yong; Guo, Feng-Biao; Huang, Jian; Chen, Wei; Lin, Hao

    2016-04-01

    A bacteriophage is a virus that can infect a bacterium. The fate of an infected bacterium is determined by the bacteriophage proteins located in the host cell. Thus, reliably identifying bacteriophage proteins located in the host cell is extremely important to understand their functions and discover potential anti-bacterial drugs. Thus, in this paper, a computational method was developed to recognize bacteriophage proteins located in host cells based only on their amino acid sequences. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) combined with incremental feature selection (IFS) was proposed to optimize the feature set. Using a jackknife cross-validation, our method can discriminate between bacteriophage proteins located in a host cell and the bacteriophage proteins not located in a host cell with a maximum overall accuracy of 84.2%, and can further classify bacteriophage proteins located in host cell cytoplasm and in host cell membranes with a maximum overall accuracy of 92.4%. To enhance the value of the practical applications of the method, we built a web server called PHPred (〈http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/PHPred〉). We believe that the PHPred will become a powerful tool to study bacteriophage proteins located in host cells and to guide related drug discovery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Intestinal colonization by enteroaggregative Escherichia coli supports long-term bacteriophage replication in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maura, Damien; Morello, Eric; du Merle, Laurence; Bomme, Perrine; Le Bouguénec, Chantal; Debarbieux, Laurent

    2012-08-01

    Bacteriophages have been known to be present in the gut for many years, but studies of relationships between these viruses and their hosts in the intestine are still in their infancy. We isolated three bacteriophages specific for an enteroaggregative O104:H4 Escherichia coli (EAEC) strain responsible for diarrhoeal diseases in humans. We studied the replication of these bacteriophages in vitro and in vivo in a mouse model of gut colonization. Each bacteriophage was able to replicate in vitro in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Each bacteriophage individually reduced biofilms formed on plastic pegs and a cocktail of the three bacteriophages was found to be more efficient. The cocktail was also able to infect bacterial aggregates formed on the surface of epithelial cells. In the mouse intestine, bacteriophages replicated for at least 3 weeks, provided the host was present, with no change in host levels in the faeces. This model of stable and continuous viral replication provides opportunities for studying the long-term coevolution of virulent bacteriophages with their hosts within a mammalian polymicrobial ecosystem. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. C/2013 P2 Pan STARRS - The Manx Comet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meech, Karen J.; Yang, Bin; Keane, Jacqueline; Hainaut, Olivier; Kleyna, Jan; Hsieh, Henry; Bauer, James; Wainscoat, Richard; Veres, Peter

    2014-11-01

    On Aug 4, 2013 an apparently asteroidal object was discovered by the Pan STARRS1 (PS1) survey telescope on Haleakala at magnitude 20.4 (corresponding to a nucleus radius between 1.4-2.9 km for albedos between 0.25-0.04). PS1 pre-recovery images taken on July 26 and on Aug. 3 allowed a good orbit to be determined. The orbit looks like that of a long-period comet with a semi major axis of 2720 AU and an eccentricity of 0.999. Shortly following the discovery, reports from small telescopes came in that there was low level activity associated with this object (at r = 3.45 AU), and the object was designated P/2013 P2 (Pan STARRS). The activity was not seen in images obtained with PS1, the Faulkes N telescope or the CFHT 3.6m, however the object was passing through a region of significant nebulosity. Deep images obtained on the CFHT on Aug. 8 and follow up images obtained with the Gemini North 8m telescope on Sep. 9 showed a very faint tail extending a few arcsec to PA=45 deg (inconsistent with the earlier reports). The object was observed using several facilities up until solar conjunction, and again after perihelion (Feb. 17, 2014) in March, with little increase in activity. A search of the NEOWISE archives show no detection during the cryogenic and immediate pos-cryogenic phases, so we can only place an upper limit on the nucleus size from these data. An object on a long-period comet orbit at this heliocentric distance typically should be very active, and our team hypothesized that this could either be a nearly-extinct comet or possibly inner solar system material ejected to the outer solar system during planet migration as predicted by various dynamical models. To distinguish between these scenarios, we obtained both optical and near-IR spectra of P/2013 P2 on 2014 May 7 and 21, when the object was at r=2.97 and 2.99 AU, respectively. Initial reductions show no emission lines. We will report on our spectra and imaging data, and discuss the implications for the origin

  7. Thermodynamic characterization of the peptide assembly inhibitor binding to HIV-1 capsid protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kožíšek, Milan; Durčák, Jindřich; Konvalinka, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 10, Suppl. 1 (2013), S37-S37 ISSN 1742-4690. [Frontiers of Retrovirology: Complex retorviruses, retroelements and their hosts. 16.09.2013-18.09.2013, Cambridge] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-19561S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : HIV -1 capsid protein * CAI Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology http://www.retrovirology.com/content/10/S1/P108

  8. A new series of polyhedra as blueprints for viral capsids in the family of Papovaviridae

    OpenAIRE

    Keef, T.; Twarock, R.

    2005-01-01

    In a seminal paper Caspar and Klug established a theory that provides a family of polyhedra as blueprints for the structural organisation of viral capsids. In particular, they encode the locations of the proteins in the shells that encapsulate, and hence provide protection for, the viral genome. Despite of its huge success and numerous applications in virology experimental results have provided evidence for the fact that the theory is too restrictive to describe all known viruses. Especially,...

  9. Anti-HERV-K (HML-2) capsid antibody responses in HIV elite controllers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mulder, Miguel; SenGupta, Devi; Deeks, Steven G; Martin, Jeffrey N; Pilcher, Christopher D; Hecht, Frederick M; Sacha, Jonah B; Nixon, Douglas F; Michaud, Henri-Alexandre

    2017-08-22

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) comprise approximately 8% of the human genome and while the majority are transcriptionally silent, the most recently integrated HERV, HERV-K (HML-2), remains active. During HIV infection, HERV-K (HML-2) specific mRNA transcripts and viral proteins can be detected. In this study, we aimed to understand the antibody response against HERV-K (HML-2) Gag in the context of HIV-1 infection. We developed an ELISA assay using either recombinant protein or 164 redundant "15mer" HERV-K (HML-2) Gag peptides to test sera for antibody reactivity. We identified a total of eight potential HERV-K (HML-2) Gag immunogenic domains: two on the matrix (peptides 16 and 31), one on p15 (peptide 85), three on the capsid (peptides 81, 97 and 117), one on the nucleocapsid (peptide 137) and one on the QP1 protein (peptide 157). Four epitopes (peptides 16, 31, 85 and 137) were highly immunogenic. No significant differences in antibody responses were found between HIV infected participants (n = 40) and uninfected donors (n = 40) for 6 out of the 8 epitopes tested. The antibody response against nucleocapsid (peptide 137) was significantly lower (p K (HML-2) capsid recombinant peptide in gamma interferon (IFN-γ) enzyme immunospot (Elispot) assays. We found that the HERV-K (HML-2) Gag antibody and T cell response by Elispot were significantly correlated. HIV elite controllers had a strong cellular and antibody response against HERV-K (HML-2) Gag directed mainly against the Capsid region. Collectively, these data suggest that anti-HERV-K (HML-2) antibodies targeting capsid could have an immunoprotective effect in HIV infection.

  10. Analysis of mouse polyomavirus mutants with lesions in the minor capsid proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mannová, P.; Liebl, D.; Krauzewitz, N.; Fejtová, A.; Štokrová, Jitka; Palková, Z.; Griffin, B. E.; Forstová, J.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 83, - (2002), s. 2309-2319 ISSN 0022-1317 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/00/0271 Grant - others:HHMI USA(US) 75195-540501 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915; CEZ:MSM 113100003 Keywords : polyomavirus * minor capsid proteins * mutation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.300, year: 2002

  11. Structures of foot and mouth disease virus pentamers: Insight into capsid dissociation and unexpected pentamer reassociation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayab Malik

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV belongs to the Aphthovirus genus of the Picornaviridae, a family of small, icosahedral, non-enveloped, single-stranded RNA viruses. It is a highly infectious pathogen and is one of the biggest hindrances to the international trade of animals and animal products. FMDV capsids (which are unstable below pH6.5 release their genome into the host cell from an acidic compartment, such as that of an endosome, and in the process dissociate into pentamers. Whilst other members of the family (enteroviruses have been visualized to form an expanded intermediate capsid with holes from which inner capsid proteins (VP4, N-termini (VP1 and RNA can be released, there has been no visualization of any such state for an aphthovirus, instead the capsid appears to simply dissociate into pentamers. Here we present the 8-Å resolution structure of isolated dissociated pentamers of FMDV, lacking VP4. We also found these pentamers to re-associate into a rigid, icosahedrally symmetric assembly, which enabled their structure to be solved at higher resolution (5.2 Å. In this assembly, the pentamers unexpectedly associate 'inside out', but still with their exposed hydrophobic edges buried. Stabilizing interactions occur between the HI loop of VP2 and its symmetry related partners at the icosahedral 3-fold axes, and between the BC and EF loops of VP3 with the VP2 βB-strand and the CD loop at the 2-fold axes. A relatively extensive but subtle structural rearrangement towards the periphery of the dissociated pentamer compared to that in the mature virus provides insight into the mechanism of dissociation of FMDV and the marked difference in antigenicity.

  12. The Polerovirus Minor Capsid Protein Determines Vector Specificity and Intestinal Tropism in the Aphid

    OpenAIRE

    Brault, Véronique; Périgon, Sophie; Reinbold, Catherine; Erdinger, Monique; Scheidecker, Danièle; Herrbach, Etienne; Richards, Ken; Ziegler-Graff, Véronique

    2005-01-01

    Aphid transmission of poleroviruses is highly specific, but the viral determinants governing this specificity are unknown. We used a gene exchange strategy between two poleroviruses with different vectors, Beet western yellows virus (BWYV) and Cucurbit aphid-borne yellows virus (CABYV), to analyze the role of the major and minor capsid proteins in vector specificity. Virus recombinants obtained by exchanging the sequence of the readthrough domain (RTD) between the two viruses replicated in pl...

  13. Improved adsorption of an Enterococcus faecalis bacteriophage ΦEF24C with a spontaneous point mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumpei Uchiyama

    Full Text Available Some bacterial strains of the multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus faecalis can significantly reduce the efficacy of conventional antimicrobial chemotherapy. Thus, the introduction of bacteriophage (phage therapy is expected, where a phage is used as a bioagent to destroy bacteria. E. faecalis phage ΦEF24C is known to be a good candidate for a therapeutic phage against E. faecalis. However, this therapeutic phage still produces nonuniform antimicrobial effects with different bacterial strains of the same species and this might prove detrimental to its therapeutic effects. One solution to this problem is the preparation of mutant phages with higher activity, based on a scientific rationale. This study isolated and analyzed a spontaneous mutant phage, ΦEF24C-P2, which exhibited higher infectivity against various bacterial strains when compared with phage ΦEF24C. First, the improved bactericidal effects of phage ΦEF24C-P2 were attributable to its increased adsorption rate. Moreover, genomic sequence scanning revealed that phage ΦEF24C-P2 had a point mutation in orf31. Proteomic analysis showed that ORF31 (mw, 203 kDa was present in structural components, and immunological analysis using rabbit-derived antibodies showed that it was a component of a long, flexible fine tail fiber extending from the tail end. Finally, phage ΦEF24C-P2 also showed higher bactericidal activity in human blood compared with phage ΦEF24C using the in vitro assay system. In conclusion, the therapeutic effects of phage ΦEF24C-P2 were improved by a point mutation in gene orf31, which encoded a tail fiber component.

  14. Improved Degree Search Algorithms in Unstructured P2P Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guole Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Searching and retrieving the demanded correct information is one important problem in networks; especially, designing an efficient search algorithm is a key challenge in unstructured peer-to-peer (P2P networks. Breadth-first search (BFS and depth-first search (DFS are the current two typical search methods. BFS-based algorithms show the perfect performance in the aspect of search success rate of network resources, while bringing the huge search messages. On the contrary, DFS-based algorithms reduce the search message quantity and also cause the dropping of search success ratio. To address the problem that only one of performances is excellent, we propose two memory function degree search algorithms: memory function maximum degree algorithm (MD and memory function preference degree algorithm (PD. We study their performance including the search success rate and the search message quantity in different networks, which are scale-free networks, random graph networks, and small-world networks. Simulations show that the two performances are both excellent at the same time, and the performances are improved at least 10 times.

  15. Adsorption of T4 bacteriophages on planar indium tin oxide surface via controlled surface tailoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liana, Ayu Ekajayanthi; Chia, Ed Win; Marquis, Christopher P; Gunawan, Cindy; Gooding, J Justin; Amal, Rose

    2016-04-15

    The work investigates the influence of surface physicochemical properties of planar indium tin oxide (ITO) as a model substrate on T4 bacteriophage adsorption. A comparative T4 bacteriophage adsorption study shows a significant difference in bacteriophage adsorption observed on chemically modified planar ITO when compared to similarly modified particulate ITO, which infers that trends observed in virus-particle interaction studies are not necessarily transferrable to predict virus-planar surface adsorption behaviour. We also found that ITO surfaces modified with methyl groups, (resulting in increased surface roughness and hydrophobicity) remained capable of adsorbing T4 bacteriophage. The adsorption of T4 onto bare, amine and carboxylic functionalised planar ITO suggests the presence of a unique binding behaviour involving specific functional groups on planar ITO surface beyond the non-specific electrostatic interactions that dominate phage to particle interactions. The paper demonstrates the significance of physicochemical properties of surfaces on bacteriophage-surface interactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Potential of a lytic bacteriophage to disrupt Acinetobacter baumannii biofilms in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yannan; Mi, Zhiqiang; Niu, Wenkai; An, Xiaoping; Yuan, Xin; Liu, Huiying; Wang, Yong; Feng, Yuzhong; Huang, Yong; Zhang, Xianglilan; Zhang, Zhiyi; Fan, Hang; Peng, Fan; Li, Puyuan; Tong, Yigang; Bai, Changqing

    2016-10-01

    The ability of Acinetobacter baumannii to form biofilms and develop antibiotic resistance makes it difficult to control infections caused by this bacterium. In this study, we explored the potential of a lytic bacteriophage to disrupt A. baumannii biofilms. The potential of the lytic bacteriophage to disrupt A. baumannii biofilms was assessed by performing electron microscopy, live/dead bacterial staining, crystal violet staining and by determining adenosine triphosphate release. The bacteriophage inhibited the formation of and disrupted preformed A. baumannii biofilms. Results of disinfection assay showed that the lytic bacteriophage lysed A. baumannii cells suspended in blood or grown on metal surfaces. These results suggest the potential of the lytic bacteriophage to disrupt A. baumannii biofilms.

  17. Role of heat-shock protein 90 in hepatitis E virus capsid trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zi-Zheng; Miao, Ji; Zhao, Min; Tang, Ming; Yeo, Anthony E T; Yu, Hai; Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2010-07-01

    p239 is a virus-like particle constituted from hepatitis E virus (HEV) recombinant proteins. It can be used as a surrogate for HEV and as an investigative tool to study cellular interactions because of its ability to adsorb to and penetrate HepG2 cellular membranes. Our objective was to use p239 to define the role of HEV capsid proteins during the early stages of infection. Pull-down and MALDI-TOF MS experiments identified three host-cell proteins, Grp 78/Bip, alpha-tubulin and heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90), and the latter was investigated further. Antibodies to p239 alone or HSP90 alone could detect p239 or HSP90, suggesting the formation of a complex between p239 and HSP90. In the HepG2 cell, geldanamycin (GA), an HSP90-specific inhibitor, blocked intracellular transportation of p239, but had no effect on the binding and cellular entry of p239, suggesting that HSP90 was important for HEV capsid intracellular transportation. RT-PCR results showed that the efficiency of wild-type HEV infection was inhibited significantly by GA treatment, suggesting the importance of HSP90 in virus infectivity. It was concluded that HSP90 plays a crucial role in the intracellular transportation of viral capsids in the early stage of HEV infection.

  18. Cryo-Electron Microscopy Structure of the Macrobrachium rosenbergii Nodavirus Capsid at 7 Angstroms Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kok Lian; Kueh, Chare Li; Beh, Poay Ling; Tan, Wen Siang; Bhella, David

    2017-05-18

    White tail disease in the giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii causes significant economic losses in shrimp farms and hatcheries and poses a threat to food-security in many developing countries. Outbreaks of Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV), the causative agent of white tail disease (WTD) are associated with up to 100% mortality rates. There are no interventions available to treat or prevent MrNV disease however. Here we show the structure of MrNV virus-like particles (VLPs) produced by recombinant expression of the capsid protein, using cryogenic electron microscopy. Our data show that MrNV VLPs package nucleic acids in a manner reminiscent of other known nodavirus structures. The structure of the capsid however shows striking differences from insect and fish infecting nodaviruses, which have been shown to assemble trimer-clustered T = 3 icosahedral virus particles. MrNV particles have pronounced dimeric blade-shaped spikes extending up to 6 nm from the outer surface of the capsid shell. Our structural analysis supports the assertion that MrNV may belong to a new genus of the Nodaviridae. Moreover, our study provides the first structural view of an important pathogen affecting aquaculture industries across the world.

  19. Transient Bluetongue virus serotype 8 capsid protein expression in Nicotiana benthamiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albertha R. van Zyl

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bluetongue virus (BTV causes severe disease in domestic and wild ruminants, and has recently caused several outbreaks in Europe. Current vaccines include live-attenuated and inactivated viruses; while these are effective, there is risk of reversion to virulence by mutation or reassortment with wild type viruses. Subunit or virus-like particle (VLP vaccines are safer options: VLP vaccines produced in insect cells by expression of the four BTV capsid proteins are protective against challenge; however, this is a costly production method. We investigated production of BTV VLPs in plants via Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression, an inexpensive production system very well suited to developing country use. Leaves infiltrated with recombinant pEAQ-HT vectors separately encoding the four BTV-8 capsid proteins produced more proteins than recombinant pTRA vectors. Plant expression using the pEAQ-HT vector resulted in both BTV-8 core-like particles (CLPs and VLPs; differentially controlling the concentration of infiltrated bacteria significantly influenced yield of the VLPs. In situ localisation of assembled particles was investigated by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM and it was shown that a mixed population of core-like particles (CLPs, consisting of VP3 and VP7 and VLPs were present as paracrystalline arrays in the cytoplasm of plant cells co-expressing all four capsid proteins.

  20. AAV capsid CD8+ T-cell epitopes are highly conserved across AAV serotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Hui

    Full Text Available Adeno-associated virus (AAV has become one of the most promising vectors in gene transfer in the last 10 years with successful translation to clinical trials in humans and even market approval for a first gene therapy product in Europe. Administration to humans, however, revealed that adaptive immune responses against the vector capsid can present an obstacle to sustained transgene expression due to the activation and expansion of capsid-specific T cells. The limited number of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs obtained from samples within clinical trials allows for little more than monitoring of T-cell responses. We were able to identify immunodominant major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I epitopes for common human leukocyte antigen (HLA types by using spleens isolated from subjects undergoing splenectomy for non-malignant indications as a source of large numbers of lymphocytes and restimulating them with single AAV capsid peptides in vitro. Further experiments confirmed that these epitopes are naturally processed and functionally relevant. The design of more effective and less immunogenic AAV vectors, and precise immune monitoring of vector-infused subjects, are facilitated by these findings.

  1. Solid-to-fluid DNA transition inside HSV-1 capsid close to the temperature of infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sae-Ueng, Udom; Li, Dong; Zuo, Xiaobing; Huffman, Jamie B.; Homa, Fred L.; Rau, Donald; Evilevitch, Alex

    2014-10-01

    DNA in the human Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) capsid is packaged to a tight density. This leads to tens of atmospheres of internal pressure responsible for the delivery of the herpes genome into the cell nucleus. In this study we show that, despite its liquid crystalline state inside the capsid, the DNA is fluid-like, which facilitates its ejection into the cell nucleus during infection. We found that the sliding friction between closely packaged DNA strands, caused by interstrand repulsive interactions, is reduced by the ionic environment of epithelial cells and neurons susceptible to herpes infection. However, variations in the ionic conditions corresponding to neuronal activity can restrict DNA mobility in the capsid, making it more solid-like. This can inhibit intranuclear DNA release and interfere with viral replication. In addition, the temperature of the human host (37 °C) induces a disordering transition of the encapsidated herpes genome, which reduces interstrand interactions and provides genome mobility required for infection.

  2. Structure of a Spumaretrovirus Gag Central Domain Reveals an Ancient Retroviral Capsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Neil J; Nicastro, Giuseppe; Dutta, Moumita; Pollard, Dominic J; Goldstone, David C; Sanz-Ramos, Marta; Ramos, Andres; Müllers, Erik; Stirnnagel, Kristin; Stanke, Nicole; Lindemann, Dirk; Stoye, Jonathan P; Taylor, William R; Rosenthal, Peter B; Taylor, Ian A

    2016-11-01

    The Spumaretrovirinae, or foamy viruses (FVs) are complex retroviruses that infect many species of monkey and ape. Despite little sequence homology, FV and orthoretroviral Gag proteins perform equivalent functions, including genome packaging, virion assembly, trafficking and membrane targeting. However, there is a paucity of structural information for FVs and it is unclear how disparate FV and orthoretroviral Gag molecules share the same function. To probe the functional overlap of FV and orthoretroviral Gag we have determined the structure of a central region of Gag from the Prototype FV (PFV). The structure comprises two all α-helical domains NtDCEN and CtDCEN that although they have no sequence similarity, we show they share the same core fold as the N- (NtDCA) and C-terminal domains (CtDCA) of archetypal orthoretroviral capsid protein (CA). Moreover, structural comparisons with orthoretroviral CA align PFV NtDCEN and CtDCEN with NtDCA and CtDCA respectively. Further in vitro and functional virological assays reveal that residues making inter-domain NtDCEN-CtDCEN interactions are required for PFV capsid assembly and that intact capsid is required for PFV reverse transcription. These data provide the first information that relates the Gag proteins of Spuma and Orthoretrovirinae and suggests a common ancestor for both lineages containing an ancient CA fold.

  3. Dengue virus capsid protein binds core histones and inhibits nucleosome formation in human liver cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonya M Colpitts

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is a member of the Flaviviridae and a globally (reemerging pathogen that causes serious human disease. There is no specific antiviral or vaccine for dengue virus infection. Flavivirus capsid (C is a structural protein responsible for gathering the viral RNA into a nucleocapsid that forms the core of a mature virus particle. Flaviviral replication is known to occur in the cytoplasm yet a large portion of capsid protein localizes to the nucleus during infection. The reasons for the nuclear presences of capsid are not completely understood. Here, we expressed mature DENV C in a tandem affinity purification assay to identify potential binding partners in human liver cells. DENV C targeted the four core histones, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. DENV C bound recombinant histones in solution and colocalized with histones in the nucleus and cytoplasm of liver cells during DENV infection. We show that DENV C acts as a histone mimic, forming heterodimers with core histones, binding DNA and disrupting nucleosome formation. We also demonstrate that DENV infection increases the amounts of core histones in livers cells, which may be a cellular response to C binding away the histone proteins. Infection with DENV additionally alters levels of H2A phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. The interactions of C and histones add an interesting new role for the presence of C in the nucleus during DENV infection.

  4. Dengue virus capsid protein binds core histones and inhibits nucleosome formation in human liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpitts, Tonya M; Barthel, Sebastian; Wang, Penghua; Fikrig, Erol

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a member of the Flaviviridae and a globally (re)emerging pathogen that causes serious human disease. There is no specific antiviral or vaccine for dengue virus infection. Flavivirus capsid (C) is a structural protein responsible for gathering the viral RNA into a nucleocapsid that forms the core of a mature virus particle. Flaviviral replication is known to occur in the cytoplasm yet a large portion of capsid protein localizes to the nucleus during infection. The reasons for the nuclear presences of capsid are not completely understood. Here, we expressed mature DENV C in a tandem affinity purification assay to identify potential binding partners in human liver cells. DENV C targeted the four core histones, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. DENV C bound recombinant histones in solution and colocalized with histones in the nucleus and cytoplasm of liver cells during DENV infection. We show that DENV C acts as a histone mimic, forming heterodimers with core histones, binding DNA and disrupting nucleosome formation. We also demonstrate that DENV infection increases the amounts of core histones in livers cells, which may be a cellular response to C binding away the histone proteins. Infection with DENV additionally alters levels of H2A phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. The interactions of C and histones add an interesting new role for the presence of C in the nucleus during DENV infection.

  5. Perspective on Adeno-Associated Virus Capsid Modification for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nance, Michael E; Duan, Dongsheng

    2015-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a X-linked, progressive childhood myopathy caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, one of the largest genes in the genome. It is characterized by skeletal and cardiac muscle degeneration and dysfunction leading to cardiac and/or respiratory failure. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a highly promising gene therapy vector. AAV gene therapy has resulted in unprecedented clinical success for treating several inherited diseases. However, AAV gene therapy for DMD remains a significant challenge. Hurdles for AAV-mediated DMD gene therapy include the difficulty to package the full-length dystrophin coding sequence in an AAV vector, the necessity for whole-body gene delivery, the immune response to dystrophin and AAV capsid, and the species-specific barriers to translate from animal models to human patients. Capsid engineering aims at improving viral vector properties by rational design and/or forced evolution. In this review, we discuss how to use the state-of-the-art AAV capsid engineering technologies to overcome hurdles in AAV-based DMD gene therapy.

  6. Dengue Virus Capsid Protein Binds Core Histones and Inhibits Nucleosome Formation in Human Liver Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpitts, Tonya M.; Barthel, Sebastian; Wang, Penghua; Fikrig, Erol

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a member of the Flaviviridae and a globally (re)emerging pathogen that causes serious human disease. There is no specific antiviral or vaccine for dengue virus infection. Flavivirus capsid (C) is a structural protein responsible for gathering the viral RNA into a nucleocapsid that forms the core of a mature virus particle. Flaviviral replication is known to occur in the cytoplasm yet a large portion of capsid protein localizes to the nucleus during infection. The reasons for the nuclear presences of capsid are not completely understood. Here, we expressed mature DENV C in a tandem affinity purification assay to identify potential binding partners in human liver cells. DENV C targeted the four core histones, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. DENV C bound recombinant histones in solution and colocalized with histones in the nucleus and cytoplasm of liver cells during DENV infection. We show that DENV C acts as a histone mimic, forming heterodimers with core histones, binding DNA and disrupting nucleosome formation. We also demonstrate that DENV infection increases the amounts of core histones in livers cells, which may be a cellular response to C binding away the histone proteins. Infection with DENV additionally alters levels of H2A phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. The interactions of C and histones add an interesting new role for the presence of C in the nucleus during DENV infection. PMID:21909430

  7. Mapping the AAV capsid host antibody response towards the development of second generation gene delivery vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Shan eTseng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The recombinant Adeno-associated virus (rAAV gene delivery system is entering a crucial and exciting phase with the promise of more than 20 years of intense research now realized in a number of successful human clinical trials. However, as a natural host to AAV infection, anti-AAV antibodies are prevalent in the human population. For example, ~70% of human sera samples are positive for AAV serotype 2 (AAV2. Furthermore, low levels of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies in the circulation are detrimental to the efficacy of corrective therapeutic AAV gene delivery. A key component to overcoming this obstacle is the identification of regions of the AAV capsid that participate in interactions with host immunity, especially neutralizing antibodies, to be modified for neutralization escape. Three main approaches have been utilized to map antigenic epitopes on AAV capsids. The first is directed evolution in which AAV variants are selected in the presence of monoclonal antibodies or pooled human sera. This results in AAV variants with mutations on important neutralizing epitopes. The second is epitope searching, achieved by peptide scanning, peptide insertion or site-directed mutagenesis. The third, a structure biology-based approach, utilizes cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction of AAV capsids complexed to fragment antibodies, which are generated from monoclonal antibodies, to directly visualize the epitopes. In this review, the contribution of these three approaches to the current knowledge of AAV epitopes and success in their use to create second generation vectors will be discussed.

  8. Structure of a Spumaretrovirus Gag Central Domain Reveals an Ancient Retroviral Capsid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil J Ball

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Spumaretrovirinae, or foamy viruses (FVs are complex retroviruses that infect many species of monkey and ape. Despite little sequence homology, FV and orthoretroviral Gag proteins perform equivalent functions, including genome packaging, virion assembly, trafficking and membrane targeting. However, there is a paucity of structural information for FVs and it is unclear how disparate FV and orthoretroviral Gag molecules share the same function. To probe the functional overlap of FV and orthoretroviral Gag we have determined the structure of a central region of Gag from the Prototype FV (PFV. The structure comprises two all α-helical domains NtDCEN and CtDCEN that although they have no sequence similarity, we show they share the same core fold as the N- (NtDCA and C-terminal domains (CtDCA of archetypal orthoretroviral capsid protein (CA. Moreover, structural comparisons with orthoretroviral CA align PFV NtDCEN and CtDCEN with NtDCA and CtDCA respectively. Further in vitro and functional virological assays reveal that residues making inter-domain NtDCEN-CtDCEN interactions are required for PFV capsid assembly and that intact capsid is required for PFV reverse transcription. These data provide the first information that relates the Gag proteins of Spuma and Orthoretrovirinae and suggests a common ancestor for both lineages containing an ancient CA fold.

  9. The efficacy of viral capsid inhibitors in human enterovirus infection and associated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chin; Wang, Hongtao; Shih, Shin-Ru; Chen, Tzu-Chun; Li, Mei-Ling

    2007-01-01

    Enteroviruses are members of picornavirus family which causes diverse and severe diseases in humans and animals. Clinical manifestations of enterovirus infections include fever, hand, foot, and mouth disease, and herpangina. Enteroviruses also cause potentially severe and life-threatening infections such as meningitis, encephalitis, myocarditis, polio-like syndrome, and neonatal sepsis. With the emergence of enterovirus all over the world as the major causative agent of HFMD fatalities in recent years and in the absence of any effective anti-enteroviral therapy, there is clearly a need to find a specific antiviral therapy. Steps such as viral attachment, uncoating, viral RNA replication, and protein synthesis in the replication cycle can serve as potential targets for antiviral agents. Agents targeted at viral protein 1 (VP1), a relatively conserved capsid structure mediating viral adsorption and uncoating process, is of great potential to be anti-enterovirus drugs. Recently, considerable efforts have been made in the development of antiviral compounds targeting the capsid protein of enterovirus. This review summarizes the development of small molecules targeting enteroviral capsid protein as effective antiviral therapy.

  10. Hierarchical Assembly of Plasmonic Nanostructures using Virus Capsid Scaffolds on DNA Origami Tiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Debin; Capehart, Stacy L.; Pal, Suchetan; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Lei; Schuck, P. J.; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao; Francis, Matthew B.; De Yoreo, James J.

    2014-07-07

    Plasmonic nanoarchitectures using biological scaffolds have shown the potential to attain controllable plasmonic fluorescence via precise spatial arrangement of fluorophores and plasmonic antennae. However, previous studies report a predominance of fluorescence quenching for small metal nanoparticles (less than ~60 nm) due to their small scattering cross-sections. In this work, we report the design and performance of fluorescent plasmonic structures composed of fluorophore-modified virus capsids and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) assembled on DNA origami tiles. The virus capsid creates a scaffold for control over the three dimensional arrangement of the fluorophores, whereas the DNA origami tile provides precise control over the distance between the capsid and the AuNP. Using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numerical simulations and multimodal single-particle imaging measurements, we show that the judicial design of these structures places the dye molecules near the hot spot of the AuNP. This effectively increases the fluorescence intensity in the quenching regime of the AuNP, with an enhancement factor that increases with increasing AuNP size. This strategy of using biological scaffolds to control fluorescence paves the way for exploring the parameters that determine plasmonic fluorescence. It may lead to a better understanding of the antenna effects of photon absorption and emission, enabling the construction of multicomponent plasmonic systems.

  11. Crystallization of the Nonameric Small Terminase Subunit of Bacteriophage P22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A Roy; A Bhardwaj; G Cingolani

    2011-12-31

    The packaging of viral genomes into preformed empty procapsids is powered by an ATP-dependent genome-translocating motor. This molecular machine is formed by a heterodimer consisting of large terminase (L-terminase) and small terminase (S-terminase) subunits, which is assembled into a complex of unknown stoichiometry, and a dodecameric portal protein. There is considerable confusion in the literature regarding the biologically relevant oligomeric state of terminases, which, like portal proteins, form ring-like structures. The number of subunits in a hollow oligomeric protein defines the internal diameter of the central channel and the ability to fit DNA inside. Thus, knowledge of the exact stoichiometry of terminases is critical to decipher the mechanisms of terminase-dependent DNA translocation. Here, the gene encoding bacteriophage P22 S-terminase in Escherichia coli has been overexpressed and the protein purified under native conditions. In the absence of detergents and/or denaturants that may cause disassembly of the native oligomer and formation of aberrant rings, it was found that P22 S-terminase assembles into a concentration-independent nonamer of {approx}168 kDa. Nonameric S-terminase was crystallized in two different crystal forms at neutral pH. Crystal form I belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 144.2, b = 144.2, c = 145.3 {angstrom}, and diffracted to 3.0 {angstrom} resolution. Crystal form II belonged to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 76.48, b = 100.9, c = 89.95 {angstrom}, {beta} = 93.73{sup o}, and diffracted to 1.75 {angstrom} resolution. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of crystal form II confirms that the S-terminase crystals contain a nonamer in the asymmetric unit and are suitable for high-resolution structure determination.

  12. Crystallization of the Nonameric Small Terminase Subunit of bacteriophage P22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A Roy; A Bhardwaj; G Cingoloni

    2011-12-31

    The packaging of viral genomes into preformed empty procapsids is powered by an ATP-dependent genome-translocating motor. This molecular machine is formed by a heterodimer consisting of large terminase (L-terminase) and small terminase (S-terminase) subunits, which is assembled into a complex of unknown stoichiometry, and a dodecameric portal protein. There is considerable confusion in the literature regarding the biologically relevant oligomeric state of terminases, which, like portal proteins, form ring-like structures. The number of subunits in a hollow oligomeric protein defines the internal diameter of the central channel and the ability to fit DNA inside. Thus, knowledge of the exact stoichiometry of terminases is critical to decipher the mechanisms of terminase-dependent DNA translocation. Here, the gene encoding bacteriophage P22 S-terminase in Escherichia coli has been overexpressed and the protein purified under native conditions. In the absence of detergents and/or denaturants that may cause disassembly of the native oligomer and formation of aberrant rings, it was found that P22 S-terminase assembles into a concentration-independent nonamer of {approx}168 kDa. Nonameric S-terminase was crystallized in two different crystal forms at neutral pH. Crystal form I belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 144.2, b = 144.2, c = 145.3 {angstrom}, and diffracted to 3.0 {angstrom} resolution. Crystal form II belonged to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 76.48, b = 100.9, c = 89.95 {angstrom}, {beta} = 93.73{sup o}, and diffracted to 1.75 {angstrom} resolution. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of crystal form II confirms that the S-terminase crystals contain a nonamer in the asymmetric unit and are suitable for high-resolution structure determination.

  13. Synthesis and Potency of Novel Uracil Nucleotides and Derivatives as P2Y2 and P2Y6 Receptor Agonists

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, Hyojin; Carter, Rhonda L.; Cosyn, Liesbet; Petrelli, Riccardo; de Castro, Sonia; Besada, Pedro; Zhou, Yixing; Cappellacci, Loredana; Franchetti, Palmarisa; Grifantini, Mario; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Harden, T. Kendall; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2008-01-01

    The phosphate, uracil, and ribose moieties of uracil nucleotides were varied structurally for evaluation of agonist activity at the human P2Y2, P2Y4, and P2Y6 receptors. The 2-thio modification, found previously to enhance P2Y2 receptor potency, could be combined with other favorable modifications to produce novel molecules that exhibit high potencies and receptor selectivities. Phosphonomethylene bridges introduced for stability in analogues of UDP, UTP and uracil dinucleotides markedly redu...

  14. Peripheral nerve P2 basic protein and the Guillain-Barre syndrome : In vitro demonstration of P2-specific antibody-secreting cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijten, J.A.F.M.; Jong, W.A.C. de; Demel, R.A.; Heijnen, C.J.; Ballieux, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    An immune response to the peripheral nerve basic protein P2 may be operative in the pathogenesis of the Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). A method is described for the purification of P2 of human origin. Purified P2 was used to investigate whether lymphocytes derived from peripheral blood of GBS

  15. A potential therapeutic role for P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) antagonists in the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulkumaran, Nishkantha; Unwin, Robert J; Tam, Frederick Wk

    2011-07-01

    The P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) has an important role in inflammation and immunity, but until recently, clinical application has been limited by a lack of specific antagonists. Recent studies using P2X7R knockout mice and specific receptor antagonists have shown that the P2X7R is an important therapeutic target in inflammatory diseases. We have reviewed the current literature on the role of the P2X7R in inflammatory diseases, focusing on potential therapeutic applications of selective P2X7R antagonists as anti-inflammatory agents. Particular emphasis has been placed on the potential role of P2X7R in common inflammatory diseases. The latest developments in Phase I and II clinical trials of P2X7R antagonists are covered. Recent studies using gene knockout mice and selective P2X7R antagonists suggest that P2X7R is a viable therapeutic target for inflammatory diseases. However, efficacious P2X7R antagonists for use in clinical studies are still at an early stage of development. Future challenges include: identifying potential toxicity and side effects of treatment, timing of treatment initiation and its duration in chronic inflammatory conditions, optimum dosage and development of a functional assay for P2X7R that would help to guide treatment.

  16. Double P2X2/P2X3 Purinergic Receptor Knockout Mice Do Not Taste NaCl or the Artificial Sweetener SC45647

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Meghan C.; Eschle, Benjamin K.; Barrows, Jennell; Hallock, Robert M.; Finger, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    The P2X ionotropic purinergic receptors, P2X2 and P2X3, are essential for transmission of taste information from taste buds to the gustatory nerves. Mice lacking both P2X2 and P2X3 purinergic receptors (P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/−) exhibit no taste-evoked activity in the chorda tympani and glossopharyngeal nerves when stimulated with taste stimuli from any of the 5 classical taste quality groups (salt, sweet, sour, bitter, and umami) nor do the mice show taste preferences for sweet or umami, or avoidance of bitter substances (Finger et al. 2005. ATP signaling is crucial for communication from taste buds to gustatory nerves. Science. 310[5753]:1495–1499). Here, we compare the ability of P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice and P2X2/P2X3Dbl+/+ wild-type (WT) mice to detect NaCl in brief-access tests and conditioned aversion paradigms. Brief-access testing with NaCl revealed that whereas WT mice decrease licking at 300 mM and above, the P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice do not show any change in lick rates. In conditioned aversion tests, P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice did not develop a learned aversion to NaCl or the artificial sweetener SC45647, both of which are easily avoided by conditioned WT mice. The inability of P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice to show avoidance of these taste stimuli was not due to an inability to learn the task because both WT and P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice learned to avoid a combination of SC45647 and amyl acetate (an odor cue). These data suggest that P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice are unable to respond to NaCl or SC45647 as taste stimuli, mirroring the lack of gustatory nerve responses to these substances. PMID:19833661

  17. A eukaryotic cytosolic chaperonin is associated with a high molecular weight intermediate in the assembly of hepatitis B virus capsid, a multimeric particle

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    We have established a system for assembly of hepatitis B virus capsid, a homomultimer of the viral core polypeptide, using cell-free transcription-linked translation. The mature particles that are produced are indistinguishable from authentic viral capsids by four criteria: velocity sedimentation, buoyant density, protease resistance, and electron microscopic appearance. Production of unassembled core polypeptides can be uncoupled from production of capsid particles by decreasing core mRNA co...

  18. Role of spinal P2Y6 and P2Y11 receptors in neuropathic pain in rats: possible involvement of glial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Barragán-Iglesias, Paulino; Pineda-Farias, Jorge Baruch; Cervantes-Durán, Claudia; Bravo-Hernández, Mariana; Rocha-González, Héctor Isaac; Murbartián, Janet; Granados-Soto, Vinicio

    2014-01-01

    Background The participation of spinal P2X receptors in neuropathic pain is well recognized. However, the role of P2Y receptors has been less studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of spinal P2Y6,11 receptors following peripheral nerve damage induced by spinal nerve ligation. In addition, we determined the expression of P2Y6,11 receptors in the dorsal spinal cord in presence of the selective P2Y6,11 receptors antagonists. Furthermore, we evaluated the participa...

  19. 4-Alkyloxyimino derivatives of uridine-5'-triphosphate: distal modification of potent agonists as a strategy for molecular probes of P2Y2, P2Y4, and P2Y6 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasekara, P Suresh; Barrett, Matthew O; Ball, Christopher B; Brown, Kyle A; Hammes, Eva; Balasubramanian, Ramachandran; Harden, T Kendall; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2014-05-08

    Extended N(4)-(3-arylpropyl)oxy derivatives of uridine-5'-triphosphate were synthesized and potently stimulated phospholipase C stimulation in astrocytoma cells expressing G protein-coupled human (h) P2Y receptors (P2YRs) activated by UTP (P2Y2/4R) or UDP (P2Y6R). The potent P2Y4R-selective N(4)-(3-phenylpropyl)oxy agonist was phenyl ring-substituted or replaced with terminal heterocyclic or naphthyl rings with retention of P2YR potency. This broad tolerance for steric bulk in a distal region was not observed for dinucleoside tetraphosphate agonists with both nucleobases substituted. The potent N(4)-(3-(4-methoxyphenyl)-propyl)oxy analogue 19 (EC50: P2Y2R, 47 nM; P2Y4R, 23 nM) was functionalized for chain extension using click tethering of fluorophores as prosthetic groups. The BODIPY 630/650 conjugate 28 (MRS4162) exhibited EC50 values of 70, 66, and 23 nM at the hP2Y2/4/6Rs, respectively, and specifically labeled cells expressing the P2Y6R. Thus, an extended N(4)-(3-arylpropyl)oxy group accessed a structurally permissive region on three Gq-coupled P2YRs, and potency and selectivity were modulated by distal structural changes. This freedom of substitution was utilized to design of a pan-agonist fluorescent probe of a subset of uracil nucleotide-activated hP2YRs.

  20. Action of Natural Products on P2 Receptors: A Reinvented Era for Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Alves

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Natural products contribute significantly to available drug therapies and have been a rich source for scientific investigation. In general, due to their low cost and traditional use in some cultures, they are an object of growing interest as alternatives to synthetic drugs. With several diseases such as cancer, and inflammatory and neuropathic diseases having been linked to the participation of purinergic (P2 receptors, there has been a flurry of investigations on ligands within natural products. Thirty-four different sources of these compounds have been found so far, that have shown either agonistic or antagonistic effects on P2 receptors. Of those, nine different plant sources demonstrated effects on P2X2, P2X3, P2X7, and possibly P2Y12 receptor subtypes. Microorganisms, which represent the largest group, with 26 different sources, showed effects on both receptor subtypes, ranging from P2X1 to P2X4 and P2X7, and P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y4, and P2Y6. In addition, there were seventeen animal sources that affected P2X7 and P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors. Natural products have provided some fascinating new mechanisms and sources to better understand the P2 receptor antagonism. Moreover, current investigations should clarify further pharmacological mechanisms in order to consider these products as potential new medicines.