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Sample records for bacteriophage lysin plyc

  1. Effect of bacteriophage lysin on lysogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Balaji Subramanyam; Vanaja Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of phage lysin on the growth of lysogens. Methods: Sputum specimens processed by modified Petroff's method were respectively treated with phagebiotics in combination with lysin and lysin alone. The specimens were incubated at 37℃ for 4 days. At the end of day 1, 2, 3 and day 4, the specimens were streaked on blood agar plates and incubated at 37℃ for 18-24 hours. The growth of normal flora observed after day 1 was considered as lysogens.Results:When specimens treated with lysin alone, lysogen formation was avoided and normal flora was controlled. Conclusions: Lysin may have no effect on the growth of lysogens. Sputum specimens treated with phagebiotics-lysin showed the growth of lysogens.

  2. Use of a bacteriophage lysin to identify a novel target for antimicrobial development.

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    Raymond Schuch

    Full Text Available We identified an essential cell wall biosynthetic enzyme in Bacillus anthracis and an inhibitor thereof to which the organism did not spontaneously evolve measurable resistance. This work is based on the exquisite binding specificity of bacteriophage-encoded cell wall-hydrolytic lysins, which have evolved to recognize critical receptors within the bacterial cell wall. Focusing on the B. anthracis-specific PlyG lysin, we first identified its unique cell wall receptor and cognate biosynthetic pathway. Within this pathway, one biosynthetic enzyme, 2-epimerase, was required for both PlyG receptor expression and bacterial growth. The 2-epimerase was used to design a small-molecule inhibitor, epimerox. Epimerox prevented growth of several Gram-positive pathogens and rescued mice challenged with lethal doses of B. anthracis. Importantly, resistance to epimerox was not detected (<10(-11 frequency in B. anthracis and S. aureus. These results describe the use of phage lysins to identify promising lead molecules with reduced resistance potential for antimicrobial development.

  3. Progress in research on bacteriophage lysins%噬菌体裂解酶的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张瑞安; 刘军; 冯书章

    2012-01-01

    噬菌体裂解酶是噬菌体在感染细菌后期表达的一类细胞壁水解酶,具有酶活性和底物特异性.多数噬菌体具有编码3种细胞壁水解酶即溶菌酶、酰胺酶和内肽酶的基因.本文综述了噬菌体裂解酶重组及其应用的研究,并探讨了近年来重组裂解酶的研究进展.%Bacteriophage lysins are cell wall lytic enzymes expressed in the late phase of bacterial infection,with enzyme activity and substrate specificity. Most of bacteriophages contain the genes encoding three kinds of cell wall lytic enzymes,i.e. lysozyme,N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase and endopeptidases. This paper reviews the recombination and application of bacteriophage lysins as well as the progress in research on recombinant lysins in recent years.

  4. Application of bacteriophages and their lysins for detection and control of foodborne pathogens%噬菌体及其裂解酶在食源性致病菌检测和控制中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江艳华; 姚琳; 王鹏; 翟毓秀; 王联珠

    2011-01-01

    微生物致病菌引起的食源性疾病在全世界频频发生,对人类健康造成严重危害,尤其是致病菌耐药性的出现使常规治疗陷入困境.噬菌体及其编码的裂解酶的发现及应用,为食源性致病菌的检测及生物防治开辟了新的途径.综述噬菌体及其裂解酶在构建食源性致病菌的快速检测方法和生物防治方面的应用.%The outbreaks of foodbome disease caused by foodborne pathogens are happened frequently and have a hazardous impact on public health, especially the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens which may cause the failure of regular antimicrobial therapy. The discovery and application of bacteriophages and their lysins opened up a new path for detection and biocontrol of foodborne pathogens. This review intends to briefly summarize the application of bacteriophages and their lysins for constructing the rapid detection methods and biocontrol of foodborne pathogens.

  5. 噬菌体及其裂解酶控制金黄色葡萄球菌的研究进展%Research progress on the control of Staphylococcus aureus using bacteriophage and lysin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李慧一; 曹风雅; 胡澜也; 佘凯芩; 崔泽林

    2013-01-01

    近70年来,由于抗生素的广泛使用,耐药金黄色葡萄球菌不断出现。美国1999~2005年因感染耐甲氧西林金黄色葡萄球菌(MRSA)而入院的患者增加1倍多,其中诊断为败血症的患者增加81.2%。因此,寻找控制耐药菌的新对策十分迫切。目前有望替代抗生素的控菌手段有抗菌肽、噬菌体等。其中,噬菌体的发现早于抗生素,后因抗生素的普及而被忽视。如今,耐药菌株的流行使噬菌体治疗再次受到关注。本文就应用噬菌体及其裂解酶控制金黄色葡萄球菌的研究进展进行综述。%In recent years , the wide use of antibiotics leads to the increase in drug-resistant bacteria . In America ,methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA )-related hospitalizations were doubled from 1999 to 2005 ,and MRSA-related hospitalizations with confirmed septicemia increased 81 .2% .Therefore ,it is urgent to seek novel countermeasures ,such as antibacterial peptides and bacteriophages to control drug-resistant bacteria .Despite the bacteriophage being discovered earlier than antibiotics ,it was ignored owing to popularity of antibiotics .But now bacteriophages have come back into view as a result of increase in drug-resistant bacteria . Here , the research progress on bacteriophage and lysin in control of Staphylococcus aureus is reviewed .

  6. 噬菌体裂解酶的抗菌特性%Bacteriophage lysins:progress and perspective-A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王琰; 陆承平

    2009-01-01

    Phage endolysin targets the integrate cell wall and attack bonds in the peptidoglycan, resulting in degradation of bacteria. It features two or three domain structures, involving one or two catalytic domains and one binding domain. Endolysin is a promising antibiotic agent against gram-positive bacteria pathogen, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus . Compared to antibiotics, it is more specific and tested bacteria show no resistance to lysin. Therefore, it's a feasible measure for solving drug resistant problem. Beyond this, it is highly active and rapid lysis efficiency and has synergy effect when used together or with other antibiotics. Antibody against endolysin will not neutralize its activity. So endolysin treatment may be a new approach for preventing and controlling of bacteria pathogen.%噬菌体裂解酶是一类细胞壁水解酶,可水解肽聚糖,造成细菌的破裂.裂解酶一般具有两到三个结构域,参与对底物的催化和结合.作为一种新型的杀菌制剂,裂解酶已被越来越多地应用于化脓链球菌、肺炎链球菌、金黄色葡萄球菌等革兰氏阳性细菌病的治疗.与抗生素治疗相比,裂解酶不易使细菌产生抗性且作用相对专一,这可能是解决现在日趋严重的细菌耐药性的一种可行方法.另外,裂解酶还具有高效性,作用协同性,且自身抗体不削弱其作用等优势,使之成为未来预防、控制致病菌一种可能的新途径.

  7. Bacteriophages and bacteriophage-derived endolysins as potential therapeutics to combat Gram-positive spore forming bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakonieczna, A; Cooper, C J; Gryko, R

    2015-09-01

    Since their discovery in 1915, bacteriophages have been routinely used within Eastern Europe to treat a variety of bacterial infections. Although initially ignored by the West due to the success of antibiotics, increasing levels and diversity of antibiotic resistance is driving a renaissance for bacteriophage-derived therapy, which is in part due to the highly specific nature of bacteriophages as well as their relative abundance. This review focuses on the bacteriophages and derived lysins of relevant Gram-positive spore formers within the Bacillus cereus group and Clostridium genus that could have applications within the medical, food and environmental sectors.

  8. Campylobacter bacteriophages and bacteriophage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connerton, P L; Timms, A R; Connerton, I F

    2011-08-01

    Members of the genus Campylobacter are frequently responsible for human enteric disease with occasionally very serious outcomes. Much of this disease burden is thought to arise from consumption of contaminated poultry products. More than 80% of poultry in the UK harbour Campylobacter as a part of their intestinal flora. To address this unacceptably high prevalence, various interventions have been suggested and evaluated. Among these is the novel approach of using Campylobacter-specific bacteriophages, which are natural predators of the pathogen. To optimize their use as therapeutic agents, it is important to have a comprehensive understanding of the bacteriophages that infect Campylobacter, and how they can affect their host bacteria. This review will focus on many aspects of Campylobacter-specific bacteriophages including: their first isolation in the 1960s, their use in bacteriophage typing schemes, their isolation from the different biological sources and genomic characterization. As well as their use as therapeutic agents to reduce Campylobacter in poultry their future potential, including their use in bio-sanitization of food, will be explored. The evolutionary consequences of naturally occurring bacteriophage infection that have come to light through investigations of bacteriophages in the poultry ecosystem will also be discussed.

  9. Creative lysins: Listeria and the engineering of antimicrobial enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tassell, Maxwell L; Angela Daum, M; Kim, Jun-Seob; Miller, Michael J

    2016-02-01

    Cell wall lytic enzymes have been of increasing interest as antimicrobials for targeting Gram-positive spoilage and pathogenic bacteria, largely due to the development of strains resistant to antibiotics and bacteriophage therapy. Such lysins show considerable promise against Listeria monocytogenes, a primary concern in food-processing environments, but there is room for improvement via protein engineering. Advances in antilisterial applications could benefit from recent developments in lysin biotechnology that have largely targeted other organisms. Herein we present various considerations for the future development of lysins, including environmental factors, cell physiology concerns, and dynamics of protein architecture. Our goal is to review key developments in lysin biotechnology to provide a contextual framework for the current models of lysin-cell interactions and highlight key considerations for the characterization and design of novel lytic enzymes.

  10. Chlamydia bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwa-Dominiak, Joanna; Suszyńska, Ewa; Pawlikowska, Małgorzata; Deptuła, Wiesław

    2013-11-01

    Phages are called "good viruses" due to their ability to infect and kill pathogenic bacteria. Chlamydia are small, Gram-negative (G-) microbes that can be dangerous to human and animals. In humans, these bacteria are etiological agents of diseases such as psittacosis or respiratory tract diseases, while in animals, the infection may result in enteritis in cattle and chronic bowel diseases, as well as miscarriages in sheep. The first-known representative of chlamydiaphages was Chp1. It was discovered in Chlamydia psittaci isolates. Since then, four more species of chlamydiaphages have been identified [Chp2, Chp3, φCPG1 φCPAR39 (φCpn1) and Chp4]. All of them were shown to infect Chlamydia species. This paper described all known chlamydiaphages. They were characterised in terms of origin, host range, and their molecular structure. The review concerns the characterisation of bacteriophages that infects pathogenic and dangerous bacteria with unusual, intracellular life cycles that are pathogenic. In the era of antibiotic resistance, it is difficult to cure chlamydophilosis. Those bacteriophages can be an alternative to antibiotics, but before this happens, we need to get to know chlamydiaphages better. PMID:23903989

  11. Probing China's Lysine Market

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The lysine sector in China developed further in 2006. Both the capacity and the output hit new highs and China had a major impact on the global lysine market. The import amount of lysine satisfied only a very small portion of the domestic market's demand.

  12. Bacteriophages Infecting Propionibacterium acnes

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    Holger Brüggemann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Viruses specifically infecting bacteria, or bacteriophages, are the most common biological entity in the biosphere. As such, they greatly influence bacteria, both in terms of enhancing their virulence and in terms of killing them. Since the first identification of bacteriophages in the beginning of the 20th century, researchers have been fascinated by these microorganisms and their ability to eradicate bacteria. In this review, we will cover the history of the Propionibacterium acnes bacteriophage research and point out how bacteriophage research has been an important part of the research on P. acnes itself. We will further discuss recent findings from phage genome sequencing and the identification of phage sequence signatures in clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs. Finally, the potential to use P. acnes bacteriophages as a therapeutic strategy to combat P. acnes-associated diseases will be discussed.

  13. Bacteriophages infecting Propionibacterium acnes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggemann, Holger; Lood, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Viruses specifically infecting bacteria, or bacteriophages, are the most common biological entity in the biosphere. As such, they greatly influence bacteria, both in terms of enhancing their virulence and in terms of killing them. Since the first identification of bacteriophages in the beginning of the 20th century, researchers have been fascinated by these microorganisms and their ability to eradicate bacteria. In this review, we will cover the history of the Propionibacterium acnes bacteriophage research and point out how bacteriophage research has been an important part of the research on P. acnes itself. We will further discuss recent findings from phage genome sequencing and the identification of phage sequence signatures in clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). Finally, the potential to use P. acnes bacteriophages as a therapeutic strategy to combat P. acnes-associated diseases will be discussed.

  14. Models for the directed evolution of bacterial allelopathy: bacteriophage lysins

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    James J. Bull

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Microbes produce a variety of compounds that are used to kill or suppress other species. Traditional antibiotics have their origins in these natural products, as do many types of compounds being pursued today in the quest for new antibacterial drugs. When a potential toxin can be encoded by and exported from a species that is not harmed, the opportunity exists to use directed evolution to improve the toxin’s ability to kill other species—allelopathy. In contrast to the typical application of directed evolution, this case requires the co-culture of at least two species or strains, a host that is unharmed by the toxin plus the intended target of the toxin. We develop mathematical and computational models of this directed evolution process. Two contexts are considered, one with the toxin encoded on a plasmid and the other with the toxin encoded in a phage. The plasmid system appears to be more promising than the phage system. Crucial to both designs is the ability to co-culture two species/strains (host and target such that the host is greatly outgrown by the target species except when the target species is killed. The results suggest that, if these initial conditions can be satisfied, directed evolution is feasible for the plasmid-based system. Screening with a plasmid-based system may also enable rapid improvement of a toxin.

  15. Bacteriophages and Biofilms

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    David R. Harper

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are an extremely common adaptation, allowing bacteria to colonize hostile environments. They present unique problems for antibiotics and biocides, both due to the nature of the extracellular matrix and to the presence within the biofilm of metabolically inactive persister cells. Such chemicals can be highly effective against planktonic bacterial cells, while being essentially ineffective against biofilms. By contrast, bacteriophages seem to have a greater ability to target this common form of bacterial growth. The high numbers of bacteria present within biofilms actually facilitate the action of bacteriophages by allowing rapid and efficient infection of the host and consequent amplification of the bacteriophage. Bacteriophages also have a number of properties that make biofilms susceptible to their action. They are known to produce (or to be able to induce enzymes that degrade the extracellular matrix. They are also able to infect persister cells, remaining dormant within them, but re-activating when they become metabolically active. Some cultured biofilms also seem better able to support the replication of bacteriophages than comparable planktonic systems. It is perhaps unsurprising that bacteriophages, as the natural predators of bacteria, have the ability to target this common form of bacterial life.

  16. Bacteriophages and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budynek, Paulina; Dabrowska, Krystyna; Skaradziński, Grzegorz; Górski, Andrzej

    2010-05-01

    Bacteriophages can be used effectively to cure bacterial infections. They are known to be active against bacteria but inactive against eukaryotic cells. Nevertheless, novel observations suggest that phages are not neutral for higher organisms. They can affect physiological and immunological processes which may be crucial to their expected positive effects in therapies. Bacteriophages are a very differentiated group of viruses and at least some of them can influence cancer processes. Phages may also affect the immunological system. In general, they activate the immunological response, for example cytokine secretion. They can also switch the tumor microenvironment to one advantageous for anticancer treatment. On the other hand, bacteriophages are used as a platform for foreign peptides that may induce anticancer effects. As bacterial debris can interfere with bacteriophage activity, phage purification is significant for the final effect of a phage preparation. In this review, results of the influence of bacteriophages on cancer processes are presented which have implications for the perspective application of phage therapy in patients with cancer and the general understanding of the role of bacteriophages in the human organism.

  17. Lysine methylation: beyond histones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Zhang; Hong Wen; Xiaobing Shi

    2012-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of histone proteins,such as acetylation,methylation,phosphorylation,and ubiquitylation,play essential roles in regulating chromatin dynamics.Combinations of different modifications on the histone proteins,termed 'histone code' in many cases,extend the information potential of the genetic code by regulating DNA at the epigenetic level.Many PTMs occur on non-histone proteins as well as histones,regulating protein-protein interactions,stability,localization,and/or enzymatic activities of proteins involved in diverse cellular processes.Although protein phosphorylation,ubiquitylation,and acetylation have been extensively studied,only a few proteins other than histones have been reported that can be modified by lysine methylation.This review summarizes the current progress on lysine methylation of nonhistone proteins,and we propose that lysine methylation,like phosphorylation and acetylation,is a common PTM that regulates proteins in diverse cellular processes.

  18. Bacteriophage therapy against Enterobacteriaceae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youqiang; Xu; Yong; Liu; Yang; Liu; Jiangsen; Pei; Su; Yao; Chi; Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The Enterobacteriaceae are a class of gram-negative facultative anaerobic rods, which can cause a variety of diseases, such as bacteremia, septic arthritis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, lower respiratory tract infections, skin and soft-tissue infections, urinary tract infections, intra-abdominal infections and ophthalmic infections, in humans, poultry, animals and fish. Disease caused by Enterobacteriaceae cause the deaths of millions of people every year, resulting in enormous economic loss. Drug treatment is a useful and efficient way to control Enterobacteriaceae infections. However, with the abuse of antibiotics, drug resistance has been found in growing number of Enterobacteriaceae infections and, as such, there is an urgent need to find new methods of control. Bacteriophage therapy is an efficient alternative to antibiotics as it employs a different antibacterial mechanism. This paper summarizes the history of bacteriophage therapy, its bacteriallytic mechanisms, and the studies that have focused on Enterobacteriaceae and bacteriophage therapy.

  19. Hyperexpansion of RNA Bacteriophage Diversity

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    Krishnamurthy, Siddharth R.; Janowski, Andrew B.; Zhao, Guoyan; Barouch, Dan; Wang, David

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophage modulation of microbial populations impacts critical processes in ocean, soil, and animal ecosystems. However, the role of bacteriophages with RNA genomes (RNA bacteriophages) in these processes is poorly understood, in part because of the limited number of known RNA bacteriophage species. Here, we identify partial genome sequences of 122 RNA bacteriophage phylotypes that are highly divergent from each other and from previously described RNA bacteriophages. These novel RNA bacteriophage sequences were present in samples collected from a range of ecological niches worldwide, including invertebrates and extreme microbial sediment, demonstrating that they are more widely distributed than previously recognized. Genomic analyses of these novel bacteriophages yielded multiple novel genome organizations. Furthermore, one RNA bacteriophage was detected in the transcriptome of a pure culture of Streptomyces avermitilis, suggesting for the first time that the known tropism of RNA bacteriophages may include gram-positive bacteria. Finally, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR)-based screening for two specific RNA bacteriophages in stool samples from a longitudinal cohort of macaques suggested that they are generally acutely present rather than persistent. PMID:27010970

  20. Hyperexpansion of RNA Bacteriophage Diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth R Krishnamurthy

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophage modulation of microbial populations impacts critical processes in ocean, soil, and animal ecosystems. However, the role of bacteriophages with RNA genomes (RNA bacteriophages in these processes is poorly understood, in part because of the limited number of known RNA bacteriophage species. Here, we identify partial genome sequences of 122 RNA bacteriophage phylotypes that are highly divergent from each other and from previously described RNA bacteriophages. These novel RNA bacteriophage sequences were present in samples collected from a range of ecological niches worldwide, including invertebrates and extreme microbial sediment, demonstrating that they are more widely distributed than previously recognized. Genomic analyses of these novel bacteriophages yielded multiple novel genome organizations. Furthermore, one RNA bacteriophage was detected in the transcriptome of a pure culture of Streptomyces avermitilis, suggesting for the first time that the known tropism of RNA bacteriophages may include gram-positive bacteria. Finally, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR-based screening for two specific RNA bacteriophages in stool samples from a longitudinal cohort of macaques suggested that they are generally acutely present rather than persistent.

  1. Hyperexpansion of RNA Bacteriophage Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Siddharth R; Janowski, Andrew B; Zhao, Guoyan; Barouch, Dan; Wang, David

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophage modulation of microbial populations impacts critical processes in ocean, soil, and animal ecosystems. However, the role of bacteriophages with RNA genomes (RNA bacteriophages) in these processes is poorly understood, in part because of the limited number of known RNA bacteriophage species. Here, we identify partial genome sequences of 122 RNA bacteriophage phylotypes that are highly divergent from each other and from previously described RNA bacteriophages. These novel RNA bacteriophage sequences were present in samples collected from a range of ecological niches worldwide, including invertebrates and extreme microbial sediment, demonstrating that they are more widely distributed than previously recognized. Genomic analyses of these novel bacteriophages yielded multiple novel genome organizations. Furthermore, one RNA bacteriophage was detected in the transcriptome of a pure culture of Streptomyces avermitilis, suggesting for the first time that the known tropism of RNA bacteriophages may include gram-positive bacteria. Finally, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR)-based screening for two specific RNA bacteriophages in stool samples from a longitudinal cohort of macaques suggested that they are generally acutely present rather than persistent.

  2. Chlamydial plasmids and bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlikowska-Warych, Małgorzata; Śliwa-Dominiak, Joanna; Deptuła, Wiesław

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia are absolute pathogens of humans and animals; despite being rather well recognised, they are still open for discovery. One such discovery is the occurrence of extrachromosomal carriers of genetic information. In prokaryotes, such carriers include plasmids and bacteriophages, which are present only among some Chlamydia species. Plasmids were found exclusively in Chlamydia (C.) trachomatis, C. psittaci, C. pneumoniae, C. suis, C. felis, C. muridarum and C. caviae. In prokaryotic organisms, plasmids usually code for genes that facilitate survival of the bacteria in the environment (although they are not essential). In chlamydia, their role has not been definitely recognised, apart from the fact that they participate in the synthesis of glycogen and encode proteins responsible for their virulence. Furthermore, in C. suis it was evidenced that the plasmid is integrated in a genomic island and contains the tetracycline-resistance gene. Bacteriophages specific for chlamydia (chlamydiaphages) were detected only in six species: C. psittaci, C. abortus, C. felis, C. caviae C. pecorum and C. pneumoniae. These chlamydiaphages cause inhibition of the developmental cycle, and delay transformation of reticulate bodies (RBs) into elementary bodies (EBs), thus reducing the possibility of infecting other cells in time. Plasmids and bacteriophages can be used in the diagnostics of chlamydioses; although especially in the case of plasmids, they are already used for detection of chlamydial infections. In addition, bacteriophages could be used as therapeutic agents to replace antibiotics, potentially addressing the problem of increasing antibiotic-resistance among chlamydia.

  3. Synthesis of Lysine Methyltransferase Inhibitors

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    Tao eYe

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting Lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery.

  4. Antibacterial activity of a newly developed peptide-modified lysin against Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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    Hang eYang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The global emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR bacteria is a growing threat to public health worldwide. Natural bacteriophage lysins are promising alternatives in the treatment of infections caused by Gram-positive pathogens, but not Gram-negative ones, like Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, due to the barriers posed by their outer membranes. Recently, modifying a natural lysin with an antimicrobial peptide was found able to break the barriers, and to kill Gram-negative pathogens. Herein, a new peptide-modified lysin (PlyA was constructed by fusing the cecropin A peptide residues 1–8 (KWKLFKKI with the OBPgp279 lysin and its antibacterial activity was studied. PlyA showed good and broad antibacterial activities against logarithmic phase A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa, but much reduced activities against the cells in stationary phase. Addition of outer membrane permeabilizers (EDTA and citric acid could enhance the antibacterial activity of PlyA against stationary phase cells. Finally, no antibacterial activity of PlyA could be observed in some bio-matrices, such as culture media, milk, and sera. In conclusion, we reported here a novel peptide-modified lysin with significant antibacterial activity against both logarithmic (without OMPs and stationary phase (with OMPs A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa cells in buffer, but further optimization is needed to achieve broad activity in diverse bio-matrices.

  5. Bacteriophages of methanotrophic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyutikow, F.M. (All-Union Research Inst. for Genetics and Selection of Industrial Microorganisms, Moscow, USSR); Bespalova, I.A.; Rebentish, B.A.; Aleksandrushkina, N.N.; Krivisky, A.S.

    1980-10-01

    Bacteriophages of methanotrophic bacteria have been found in 16 out of 88 studied samples (underground waters, pond water, soil, gas and oil installation waters, fermentor cultural fluids, bacterial paste, and rumen of cattle) taken in different geographic zones of the Soviet Union. Altogether, 23 phage strains were isolated. By fine structure, the phages were divided into two types (with very short or long noncontractile tails); by host range and serological properties, they fell into three types. All phages had guanine- and cytosine-rich double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid consisting of common nitrogen bases. By all of the above-mentioned properties, all phages within each of the groups were completely identical to one another, but differed from phages of other groups.

  6. Genetically modified bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagona, Antonia P; Grigonyte, Aurelija M; MacDonald, Paul R; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2016-04-18

    Phages or bacteriophages, viruses that infect and replicate inside bacteria, are the most abundant microorganisms on earth. The realization that antibiotic resistance poses a substantial risk to the world's health and global economy is revitalizing phage therapy as a potential solution. The increasing ease by which phage genomes can be modified, owing to the influx of new technologies, has led to an expansion of their natural capabilities, and a reduced dependence on phage isolation from environmental sources. This review will discuss the way synthetic biology has accelerated the construction of genetically modified phages and will describe the wide range of their applications. It will further provide insight into the societal and economic benefits that derive from the use of recombinant phages in various sectors, from health to biodetection, biocontrol and the food industry.

  7. Genetically modified bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagona, Antonia P; Grigonyte, Aurelija M; MacDonald, Paul R; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2016-04-18

    Phages or bacteriophages, viruses that infect and replicate inside bacteria, are the most abundant microorganisms on earth. The realization that antibiotic resistance poses a substantial risk to the world's health and global economy is revitalizing phage therapy as a potential solution. The increasing ease by which phage genomes can be modified, owing to the influx of new technologies, has led to an expansion of their natural capabilities, and a reduced dependence on phage isolation from environmental sources. This review will discuss the way synthetic biology has accelerated the construction of genetically modified phages and will describe the wide range of their applications. It will further provide insight into the societal and economic benefits that derive from the use of recombinant phages in various sectors, from health to biodetection, biocontrol and the food industry. PMID:26906932

  8. Expansion of the Lysine Acylation Landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Christian A.

    2012-01-01

    Leaving marks: The number of known posttranslational modifications for lysine has been expanded considerably. In addition to acetylation of side-chain amino functionalities of lysine residues in proteins, crotonylation, succinylation, and malonylation have now been identified as posttranslational...

  9. Characterization of bacteriophages virulent for Clostridium perfringens and identification of phage lytic enzymes as alternatives to antibiotics for potential control of the bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Bruce S

    2013-02-01

    There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control bacterial pathogens as alternatives to currently used antibiotics. Clostridium perfringens is a gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human foodborne disease as well as non-foodborne human, animal, and avian diseases. Countries that have complied with the ban on antimicrobial growth promoters in feeds have reported increased incidences of C. perfringens-associated diseases in poultry. To address these issues, new antimicrobial agents, putative lysins encoded by the genomes of bacteriophages, are being identified in our laboratory. Poultry intestinal material, soil, sewage, and poultry processing drainage water were screened for virulent bacteriophages that could lyse C. perfringens and produce clear plaques in spot assays. Bacteriophages were isolated that had long noncontractile tails, members of the family Siphoviridae, and with short noncontractile tails, members of the family Podoviridae. Several bacteriophage genes were identified that encoded N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidases, lysozyme-endopeptidases, and a zinc carboxypeptidase domain that has not been previously reported in viral genomes. Putative phage lysin genes (ply) were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant lysins were amidases capable of lysing both parental phage host strains of C. perfringens as well as other strains of the bacterium in spot and turbidity reduction assays, but did not lyse any clostridia beyond the species. Consequently, bacteriophage gene products could eventually be used to target bacterial pathogens, such as C. perfringens via a species-specific strategy, to control animal and human diseases without having deleterious effects on beneficial probiotic bacteria. PMID:23300321

  10. Virulence reduction in Bacteriophage resistant bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela eLeón

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages can influence the abundance, diversity and evolution of bacterial communities. Several bacteriophages have been reported to add virulence factors to their host and to increase bacterial virulence. However, lytic bacteriophages can also exert a selective pressure allowing the proliferation of strains with reduced virulence. This reduction can be explained because bacteriophages use structures present on the bacterial surface as receptors, which can be virulence factors in different bacterial species. Therefore, strains with modifications in these receptors will be resistant to bacteriophage infection and may also exhibit reduced virulence. This mini-review summarizes the reports on bacteriophage-resistant strains with reductions in virulence, and it discusses the potential consequences in phage therapy and in the use of bacteriophages to select attenuated strains for vaccines.

  11. STUDIES ON THE BACTERIOPHAGE OF D'HERELLE : IV. CONCERNING THE ONENESS OF THE BACTERIOPHAGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfenbrenner, J J; Korb, C

    1925-11-30

    Lytic filtrates, active against Bacillus dysenterioe Shiga, Bacillus coli, Bacillus pestis cavioe, and staphylococcus respectively, proved to be differently affected by changes in hydrogen ion concentration. Anti-staphylococcus lysin was the least resistant of the four, showing deterioration in 3 hours at 7 degrees C. beyond the zone of hydrogen ion concentration limited by C(H) = 6.3 x 10(-5) and C(H) = 1.6 x 10(-9). Under the same conditions, the zone of resistance of anti-coli filtrate lay between C(H) = 2.7 x 10(-3) and C(H) = 2.5 x 10(-11), and that of anti-Shiga between C(H) = 1-7 x 10(-4) and C(H) = 1-3 x 10(-11). Anti-pestis cavioe filtrate was most resistant of the four, retaining its full activity in the zone from C(H) = 1 x 10(-3) to C(H) = 3.5 x 10(-12). The fact that these differences in individual resistance persisted, notwithstanding the repeated passage of lytic filtrates through cultures of bacteria other than those against which they were primarily active, seems to offer evidence in favor of a multiplicity of bacteriophages.

  12. Primary structure and functional analysis of the lysis genes of Lactobacillus gasseri bacteriophage phi adh.

    OpenAIRE

    Henrich, B; Binishofer, B; Bläsi, U

    1995-01-01

    The lysis genes of the Lactobacillus gasseri bacteriophage phi adh were isolated by complementation of a lambda Sam mutation in Escherichia coli. Nucleotide sequencing of a 1,735-bp DNA fragment revealed two adjacent coding regions of 342 bp (hol) and 951 bp (lys) in the same reading frame which appear to belong to a common transcriptional unit. Proteins corresponding to the predicted gene products, holin (12.9 kDa) and lysin (34.7 kDa), were identified by in vitro and in vivo expression of t...

  13. Bacteriophages: back to the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Listeria monocytogenes-specific bacteriophage cocktail (ListShield™) was evaluated for its activity against a nalidixic acid-resistant L. monocytogenes (Lm-NalR) isolate on fresh-cut spinach stored under modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) at various temperatures. Pieces (~2x2 cm2) of fresh spinac...

  14. Bacteriophage endolysins as novel antimicrobials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endolysins are enzymes used by bacteriophages at the end of their replication cycle to degrade the peptidoglycan of the bacterial host from within, resulting in cell lysis and release of progeny virions. Due to the absence of an outer membrane in the Gram-positive bacterial cell wall, endolysins can...

  15. Nanoscale bacteriophage biosensors beyond phage display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee JW

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Jong-Wook Lee,1 Jangwon Song,1,2 Mintai P Hwang,1 Kwan Hyi Lee1,2 1Center for Biomaterials, Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, Korea; 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Seoul, Korea Abstract: Bacteriophages are traditionally used for the development of phage display technology. Recently, their nanosized dimensions and ease with which genetic modifications can be made to their structure and function have put them in the spotlight towards their use in a variety of biosensors. In particular, the expression of any protein or peptide on the extraluminal surface of bacteriophages is possible by genetically engineering the genome. In addition, the relatively short replication time of bacteriophages offers researchers the ability to generate mass quantities of any given bacteriophage-based biosensor. Coupled with the emergence of various biomarkers in the clinic as a means to determine pathophysiological states, the development of current and novel technologies for their detection and quantification is imperative. In this review, we categorize bacteriophages by their morphology into M13-based filamentous bacteriophages and T4- or T7-based icosahedral bacteriophages, and examine how such advantages are utilized across a variety of biosensors. In essence, we take a comprehensive approach towards recent trends in bacteriophage-based biosensor applications and discuss their outlook with regards to the field of biotechnology. Keywords: biosensing, M13 bacteriophage, T4 bacteriophage, bacterial detection, Escherichia coli, SPR sensor

  16. Complete Genome Sequences of Five Bacteriophages That Infect Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollivar, David W; Bernardoni, Brooke; Bockman, Matthew R; Miller, Brenda M; Russell, Daniel A; Delesalle, Veronique A; Krukonis, Gregory P; Hatfull, Graham F; Cross, Madeline R; Szewczyk, Marlena M; Eppurath, Atul

    2016-05-26

    Five bacteriophages that infect the Rhodobacter capsulatus strain YW1 were isolated from stream water near Bloomington, Illinois, USA. Two distinct genome types are represented in the newly isolated bacteriophages. These genomes are different from other bacteriophage genomes previously described.

  17. Primary structure and functional analysis of the lysis genes of Lactobacillus gasseri bacteriophage phi adh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, B; Binishofer, B; Bläsi, U

    1995-01-01

    The lysis genes of the Lactobacillus gasseri bacteriophage phi adh were isolated by complementation of a lambda Sam mutation in Escherichia coli. Nucleotide sequencing of a 1,735-bp DNA fragment revealed two adjacent coding regions of 342 bp (hol) and 951 bp (lys) in the same reading frame which appear to belong to a common transcriptional unit. Proteins corresponding to the predicted gene products, holin (12.9 kDa) and lysin (34.7 kDa), were identified by in vitro and in vivo expression of the cloned genes. The phi adh holin is a membrane-bound protein with structural similarity to lysis proteins of other phage, known to be required for the transit of murein hydrolases through the cytoplasmic membrane. The phi adh lysin shows homology with mureinolytic enzymes encoded by the Lactobacillus bulgaricus phage mv4, the Streptococcus pneumoniae phage Cp-1, Cp-7, and Cp-9, and the Lactococcus lactis phage phi LC3. Significant homology with the N termini of known muramidases suggests that phi adh lysin acts by a similar catalytic mechanism. In E. coli, the phi adh lysin seems to be associated with the total membrane fraction, from which it can be extracted with lauryl sarcosinate. Either one of the phi adh lysis proteins provoked lysis of E. coli when expressed along with holins or lysins of phage lambda or Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29. Concomitant expression of the combined holin and lysin functions of phi adh in E. coli, however, did not result in efficient cell lysis. PMID:7836307

  18. Primary structure and functional analysis of the lysis genes of Lactobacillus gasseri bacteriophage phi adh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, B; Binishofer, B; Bläsi, U

    1995-02-01

    The lysis genes of the Lactobacillus gasseri bacteriophage phi adh were isolated by complementation of a lambda Sam mutation in Escherichia coli. Nucleotide sequencing of a 1,735-bp DNA fragment revealed two adjacent coding regions of 342 bp (hol) and 951 bp (lys) in the same reading frame which appear to belong to a common transcriptional unit. Proteins corresponding to the predicted gene products, holin (12.9 kDa) and lysin (34.7 kDa), were identified by in vitro and in vivo expression of the cloned genes. The phi adh holin is a membrane-bound protein with structural similarity to lysis proteins of other phage, known to be required for the transit of murein hydrolases through the cytoplasmic membrane. The phi adh lysin shows homology with mureinolytic enzymes encoded by the Lactobacillus bulgaricus phage mv4, the Streptococcus pneumoniae phage Cp-1, Cp-7, and Cp-9, and the Lactococcus lactis phage phi LC3. Significant homology with the N termini of known muramidases suggests that phi adh lysin acts by a similar catalytic mechanism. In E. coli, the phi adh lysin seems to be associated with the total membrane fraction, from which it can be extracted with lauryl sarcosinate. Either one of the phi adh lysis proteins provoked lysis of E. coli when expressed along with holins or lysins of phage lambda or Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29. Concomitant expression of the combined holin and lysin functions of phi adh in E. coli, however, did not result in efficient cell lysis. PMID:7836307

  19. Hemoglobin Labeled by Radioactive Lysine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, W. F.; Yuile, C. L.; DeLaVergne, L.; Miller, L. L.; Whipple, G. H.

    1949-12-08

    This paper reports on the utilization of tagged epsilon carbon of DL-lysine by a dog both anemic and hypoproteinemic due to repeated bleeding plus a diet low in protein. The experiment extended over period of 234 days, a time sufficient to indicate an erythrocyte life span of at least 115 days based upon the rate of replacement of labeled red cell proteins. The proteins of broken down red cells seem not to be used with any great preference for the synthesis of new hemoglobin.

  20. Bacteriophage Procurement for Therapeutic Purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Żaczek, Maciej; Łobocka, Małgorzata; Łusiak-Szelachowska, Marzanna; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages), discovered 100 years ago, are able to infect and destroy only bacterial cells. In the current crisis of antibiotic efficacy, phage therapy is considered as a supplementary or even alternative therapeutic approach. Evolution of multidrug-resistant and pandrug-resistant bacterial strains poses a real threat, so it is extremely important to have the possibility to isolate new phages for therapeutic purposes. Our phage laboratory and therapy center has extensive experience with phage isolation, characterization, and therapeutic application. In this article we present current progress in bacteriophages isolation and use for therapeutic purposes, our experience in this field and its practical implications for phage therapy. We attempt to summarize the state of the art: properties of phages, the methods for their isolation, criteria of phage selection for therapeutic purposes and limitations of their use. Perspectives for the use of genetically engineered phages to specifically target bacterial virulence-associated genes are also briefly presented. PMID:27570518

  1. Bacteriophage biocontrol of foodborne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, Mustafa; Annapure, Uday S

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that only infect bacterial cells. Phages are categorized based on the type of their life cycle, the lytic cycle cause lysis of the bacterium with the release of multiple phage particles where as in lysogenic phase the phage DNA is incorporated into the bacterial genome. Lysogeny does not result in lysis of the host. Lytic phages have several potential applications in the food industry as biocontrol agents, biopreservatives and as tools for detecting pathogens. They have also been proposed as alternatives to antibiotics in animal health. Two unique features of phage relevant for food safety are that they are harmless to mammalian cells and high host specificity, keeping the natural microbiota undisturbed. However, the recent approval of bacteriophages as food additives has opened the discussion about 'edible viruses'. This article reviews in detail the application of phages for the control of foodborne pathogens in a process known as "biocontrol". PMID:27570260

  2. PENILAIAN PENGARUH PENAMBAHAN LYSINE PADA NASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignatius Tarwotjo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Pengaruh penambahan lysine pada mutu protein nasi dilakukan pada tikus putih dengan mengukur Protein Efficiency Ratio. Nasi dan Nasi dengan sayur beserta laukpauk, seperti dikonsumsi oleh kebanyakan keluarga di Indonesia, yang berasnya lebih dulu ditambahi butiran premix berisi lysine, thiamine dan riboflavin ternaya menghasilkan Protein Efficiency Ratio lebih tinggi dari pada yang tidak ditambahi.

  3. Use of Bacteriophages to control bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytic bacteriophages can provide a natural method and an effective alternative to antibiotics to reduce bacterial pathogens in animals, foods, and other environments. Bacteriophages (phages) are viruses which infect bacterial cells and eventually kill them through lysis, and represent the most abun...

  4. Programming Bacteriophages by Swapping Their Specificity Determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goren, Moran G; Yosef, Ido; Qimron, Udi

    2015-12-01

    Bacteriophages, bacteria's natural enemies, may serve as potent antibacterial agents. Their specificity for certain bacterial sub-species limits their effectiveness, but allows selective targeting of bacteria. Lu and colleagues present a platform for such targeting through alteration of bacteriophages' host specificity by swapping specificity domains in their host-recognition ligand.

  5. Nanoscale bacteriophage biosensors beyond phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Wook; Song, Jangwon; Hwang, Mintai P; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophages are traditionally used for the development of phage display technology. Recently, their nanosized dimensions and ease with which genetic modifications can be made to their structure and function have put them in the spotlight towards their use in a variety of biosensors. In particular, the expression of any protein or peptide on the extraluminal surface of bacteriophages is possible by genetically engineering the genome. In addition, the relatively short replication time of bacteriophages offers researchers the ability to generate mass quantities of any given bacteriophage-based biosensor. Coupled with the emergence of various biomarkers in the clinic as a means to determine pathophysiological states, the development of current and novel technologies for their detection and quantification is imperative. In this review, we categorize bacteriophages by their morphology into M13-based filamentous bacteriophages and T4- or T7-based icosahedral bacteriophages, and examine how such advantages are utilized across a variety of biosensors. In essence, we take a comprehensive approach towards recent trends in bacteriophage-based biosensor applications and discuss their outlook with regards to the field of biotechnology.

  6. Engineering a Lysine-ON Riboswitch for Metabolic Control of Lysine Production in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li-Bang; Zeng, An-Ping

    2015-12-18

    Riboswitches are natural RNA elements that regulate gene expression by binding a ligand. Here, we demonstrate the possibility of altering a natural lysine-OFF riboswitch from Eschericia coli (ECRS) to a synthetic lysine-ON riboswitch and using it for metabolic control. To this end, a lysine-ON riboswitch library was constructed using tetA-based dual genetic selection. After screening the library, the functionality of the selected lysine-ON riboswitches was examined using a report gene, lacZ. Selected lysine-ON riboswitches were introduced into the lysE gene (encoding a lysine transport protein) of Corynebacterium glutamicum and used to achieve dynamic control of lysine transport in a recombinant lysine-producing strain, C. glutamicum LPECRS, which bears a deregulated aspartokinase and a lysine-OFF riboswitch for dynamic control of the enzyme citrate synthase. Batch fermentation results of the strains showed that the C. glutamicum LPECRS strain with an additional lysine-ON riboswitch for the control of lysE achieved a 21% increase in the yield of lysine compared to that of the C. glutamicum LPECRS strain and even a 89% increase in yield compared to that of the strain with deregulated aspartokinase. This work provides a useful approach to generate lysine-ON riboswitches for C. glutamicum metabolic engineering and demonstrates for the first time a synergetic effect of lysine-ON and -OFF riboswitches for improving lysine production in this industrially important microorganism. The approach can be used to dynamically control other genes and can be applied to other microorganisms. PMID:26300047

  7. Two bacteriophages of Clostridium difficile.

    OpenAIRE

    Mahony, D E; Bell, P D; Easterbrook, K. B.

    1985-01-01

    Two temperate bacteriophages of differing morphology and host range were isolated by screening 94 isolates of Clostridium difficile. Phage 41 had a 300-nm flexible tail, whereas phage 56 had a shorter tail with a contractile sheath. Electron microscopy of phage 56 lysates exposed to elevated magnesium concentrations showed small virus-like particles which were 21 nm in diameter. The addition of MgCl2 to semisolid agar overlays enhanced both the titer and plaque size of phage 56. Phage 56 was ...

  8. The Progress in Bacteriophage Lysins%噬菌体裂解酶研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓静; 方宏清; 付学奇; 陈惠鹏

    2005-01-01

    噬菌体裂解酶是双链DNA噬菌体所特有的细胞壁水解酶.研究表明,所有噬菌体裂解酶在结构上具有相似性,即含有2个结构域:比较保守的N端催化区和差异较大的C端特异性结合区.裂解酶的高亲和性与种属特异的细胞壁糖基有关,而后者常常是细菌存活的必要成分.所以,细菌难以产生对裂解酶的抗性.本文简要综述噬菌体裂解酶的研究进展.

  9. Propagating the missing bacteriophages: a large bacteriophage in a new class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardies Stephen C

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The number of successful propagations/isolations of soil-borne bacteriophages is small in comparison to the number of bacteriophages observed by microscopy (great plaque count anomaly. As one resolution of the great plaque count anomaly, we use propagation in ultra-dilute agarose gels to isolate a Bacillus thuringiensis bacteriophage with a large head (95 nm in diameter, tail (486 × 26 nm, corkscrew-like tail fibers (187 × 10 nm and genome (221 Kb that cannot be detected by the usual procedures of microbiology. This new bacteriophage, called 0305φ8-36 (first number is month/year of isolation; remaining two numbers identify the host and bacteriophage, has a high dependence of plaque size on the concentration of a supporting agarose gel. Bacteriophage 0305φ8-36 does not propagate in the traditional gels used for bacteriophage plaque formation and also does not produce visible lysis of liquid cultures. Bacteriophage 0305φ8-36 aggregates and, during de novo isolation from the environment, is likely to be invisible to procedures of physical detection that use either filtration or centrifugal pelleting to remove bacteria. Bacteriophage 0305φ8-36 is in a new genomic class, based on genes for both structural components and DNA packaging ATPase. Thus, knowledge of environmental virus diversity is expanded with prospect of greater future expansion.

  10. Immunocompatibility of Bacteriophages as Nanomedicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tranum Kaur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophage-based medical research provides the opportunity to develop targeted nanomedicines with heightened efficiency and safety profiles. Filamentous phages also can and have been formulated as targeted drug-delivery nanomedicines, and phage may also serve as promising alternatives/complements to antibiotics. Over the past decade the use of phage for both the prophylaxis and the treatment of bacterial infection, has gained special significance in view of a dramatic rise in the prevalence of antibiotic resistance bacterial strains. Two potential medical applications of phages are the treatment of bacterial infections and their use as immunizing agents in diagnosis and monitoring patients with immunodeficiencies. Recently, phages have been employed as gene-delivery vectors (phage nanomedicine, for nearly half a century as tools in genetic research, for about two decades as tools for the discovery of specific target-binding proteins and peptides, and for almost a decade as tools for vaccine development. As phage applications to human therapeutic development grow at an exponential rate, it will become essential to evaluate host immune responses to initial and repetitive challenges by therapeutic phage in order to develop phage therapies that offer suitable utility. This paper examines and discusses phage nanomedicine applications and the immunomodulatory effects of bacteriophage exposure and treatment modalities.

  11. A Method to determine lysine acetylation stoichiometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Wu, Si; Sydor, Michael A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Weitz, Karl K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Hixson, Kim K.; Kim, Jong Seo; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles

    2014-07-21

    A major bottleneck to fully understanding the functional aspects of lysine acetylation is the lack of stoichiometry information. Here we describe a mass spectrometry method using a combination of isotope labeling and detection of a diagnostic fragment ion to determine the stoichiometry of lysine acetylation on proteins globally. Using this technique, we determined the modification occupancy on hundreds of acetylated peptides from cell lysates and cross-validated the measurements via immunoblotting.

  12. Lysine requirement of growing male Pekin ducks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bons, A; Timmler, R; Jeroch, H

    2002-12-01

    1. One growth experiment and one balance test were conducted to study the response to increasing levels of dietary lysine supplementation in male Pekin ducks with special reference to the growth periods from 1 to 3 weeks and 4 to 7 weeks of age. 2. Two different low-lysine diets were used as basal diets in both periods. The basal lysine levels were 7.6 g/kg (d 1 to 21) and 6.2 g/kg (d 22 to 49) and the ranges in lysine concentration were 7.6 to 12.6 g/kg (d 1 to 21) and 6.2 to 11.2 g/kg (d 22 to 49). 3. Growth performance, feed conversion efficiency and meat yield increased (P < 0.05) with increasing lysine concentration (requirement defined as 95% of the asymptote). 4. It is concluded that the dietary lysine concentration should be 0.93 g/MJ nitrogen corrected apparent metabolisable energy (AMEN) (11.7 g/kg) for the starter period (until d 21) and 0.75 g/MJ AMEN (10.0 g/kg) for the grower period (from d 22 onwards).

  13. Bacteriophages of Leuconostoc, Oenococcus, and Weissella

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kot, Witold; Neve, Horst; Heller, Knut J;

    2014-01-01

    can be classified as either Ln. mesenteroides or Ln. pseudomesenteroides. They are important flavor producers in dairy fermentations and they initiate nearly all vegetable fermentations. Therefore, bacteriophages attacking Leuconostoc strains may negatively influence the production process....... Bacteriophages attacking Leuconostoc strains were first reported in 1946. Since then, the majority of described Leuconostoc phages was isolated from either dairy products or fermented vegetable products. Both lytic and temperate phages of Leuconostoc were reported. Most of Leuconostoc phages examined using...

  14. Characterization and purification of bacteriophages using chromatofocusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorson, Kurt; Shen, Hong; Lute, Scott; Pérez, Jessica Soto; Frey, Douglas D

    2008-10-17

    The technique of chromatofocusing was applied to the characterization and purification of three bacteriophages that are routinely used for testing virus filters: phiX174, PR772, and PP7. Chemically well-defined eluent buffers were used, instead of the more commonly used chromatofocusing polyampholyte buffers. Chromatographic column packings were selected to minimize band broadening by confining bacteriophage adsorption solely to the exterior particle surface. Under the conditions used it was determined that bacteriophages could be made to focus into narrow bands in a retained pH gradient with recoveries of live phage that ranged from 15 to nearly 100% as determined by a plaque-forming assay. Retention times and apparent isoelectric point data were obtained for samples consisting either of purified bacteriophage, or samples consisting of crude preparations of bacteriophages containing host cell impurities. Isoelectric point estimates were obtained using modified, previously described models. The results obtained suggest that chromatofocusing is a simple and rapid method for obtaining approximate isoelectric points for bacteriophages and probably other types of viruses. It is also likely a useful method for purifying these materials.

  15. Lysine-Rich Proteins in High-Lysine Hordeum Vulgare Grain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingversen, J.; Køie, B.

    1973-01-01

    The salt-soluble proteins in barley grain selected for high-lysine content (Hiproly, CI 7115 and the mutants 29 and 86) and of a control (Carlsberg II) with normal lysine content, contain identical major proteins as determined by MW and electrophoretic mobility. The concentration of a protein gro...

  16. Pathogen detection using engineered bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smartt, Abby E; Xu, Tingting; Jegier, Patricia; Carswell, Jessica J; Blount, Samuel A; Sayler, Gary S; Ripp, Steven

    2012-04-01

    Bacteriophages, or phages, are bacterial viruses that can infect a broad or narrow range of host organisms. Knowing the host range of a phage allows it to be exploited in targeting various pathogens. Applying phages for the identification of microorganisms related to food and waterborne pathogens and pathogens of clinical significance to humans and animals has a long history, and there has to some extent been a recent revival in these applications as phages have become more extensively integrated into novel detection, identification, and monitoring technologies. Biotechnological and genetic engineering strategies applied to phages are responsible for some of these new methods, but even natural unmodified phages are widely applicable when paired with appropriate innovative detector platforms. This review highlights the use of phages as pathogen detector interfaces to provide the reader with an up-to-date inventory of phage-based biodetection strategies.

  17. Host receptors for bacteriophage adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertozzi Silva, Juliano; Storms, Zachary; Sauvageau, Dominic

    2016-02-01

    The adsorption of bacteriophages (phages) onto host cells is, in all but a few rare cases, a sine qua non condition for the onset of the infection process. Understanding the mechanisms involved and the factors affecting it is, thus, crucial for the investigation of host-phage interactions. This review provides a survey of the phage host receptors involved in recognition and adsorption and their interactions during attachment. Comprehension of the whole infection process, starting with the adsorption step, can enable and accelerate our understanding of phage ecology and the development of phage-based technologies. To assist in this effort, we have established an open-access resource--the Phage Receptor Database (PhReD)--to serve as a repository for information on known and newly identified phage receptors. PMID:26755501

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis Bacteriophage BMBtp2

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Zhaoxia; Peng, Donghai; Wang, Yueying; Zhu, Lei; Ruan, Lifang; Sun, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is an insect pathogen which has been widely used for biocontrol. During B. thuringiensis fermentation, lysogenic bacteriophages cause severe losses of yield. Here, we announce the complete genome sequence of a bacteriophage, BMBtp2, which is induced from B. thuringiensis strain YBT-1765, which may be helpful to clarify the mechanism involved in bacteriophage contamination.

  19. 21 CFR 866.2050 - Staphylococcal typing bacteriophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staphylococcal typing bacteriophage. 866.2050 Section 866.2050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Staphylococcal typing bacteriophage. (a) Identification. A staphylococcal typing bacteriophage is a...

  20. Evolution of Lysine Biosynthesis in the Phylum Deinococcus-Thermus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromi Nishida

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermus thermophilus biosynthesizes lysine through the α-aminoadipate (AAA pathway: this observation was the first discovery of lysine biosynthesis through the AAA pathway in archaea and bacteria. Genes homologous to the T. thermophilus lysine biosynthetic genes are widely distributed in bacteria of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum. Our phylogenetic analyses strongly suggest that a common ancestor of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum had the ancestral genes for bacterial lysine biosynthesis through the AAA pathway. In addition, our findings suggest that the ancestor lacked genes for lysine biosynthesis through the diaminopimelate (DAP pathway. Interestingly, Deinococcus proteolyticus does not have the genes for lysine biosynthesis through the AAA pathway but does have the genes for lysine biosynthesis through the DAP pathway. Phylogenetic analyses of D. proteolyticus lysine biosynthetic genes showed that the key gene cluster for the DAP pathway was transferred horizontally from a phylogenetically distant organism.

  1. Bacteriophage-Based Pathogen Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripp, Steven

    Considered the most abundant organism on Earth, at a population approaching 1031, bacteriophage, or phage for short, mediate interactions with myriad bacterial hosts that has for decades been exploited in phage typing schemes for signature identification of clinical, food-borne, and water-borne pathogens. With over 5,000 phage being morphologically characterized and grouped as to susceptible host, there exists an enormous cache of bacterial-specific sensors that has more recently been incorporated into novel bio-recognition assays with heightened sensitivity, specificity, and speed. These assays take many forms, ranging from straightforward visualization of labeled phage as they attach to their specific bacterial hosts to reporter phage that genetically deposit trackable signals within their bacterial hosts to the detection of progeny phage or other uniquely identifiable elements released from infected host cells. A comprehensive review of these and other phage-based detection assays, as directed towards the detection and monitoring of bacterial pathogens, will be provided in this chapter.

  2. Photodynamic Inactivation of Mammalian Viruses and Bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Costa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic inactivation (PDI has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process.

  3. Photodynamic inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Liliana; Faustino, Maria Amparo F; Neves, Maria Graça P M S; Cunha, Angela; Almeida, Adelaide

    2012-07-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i) summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii) discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process.

  4. Optimization of lysine metabolism in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytter, Jakob Vang

    , and increased NADPH availability is therefore a potential way to enhance lysine production. The generation of NADPH is mainly located in the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Using the genome scale model the phosphoglucoisomerase enzyme (PGI) has been identified as a possible bottleneck in the metabolism, which...

  5. Antiviral effect of cationic compounds on bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Huong eChatain-Ly

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The antiviral activity of several cationic compounds - cetytrimethylammonium (CTAB, chitosan, nisin and lysozyme - was investigated on the bacteriophage c2 (DNA head and non-contractile tail infecting Lactococcus strains and the bacteriophage MS2 (F-specific RNA infecting E.coli. Firstly, these activities were evaluated in a phosphate buffer pH 7- 10 mM. The CTAB had a virucidal effect on the Lactococcus bacteriophages, but not on the MS2. After 1 min of contact with 0.125 mM CTAB, the c2 population was reduced from 6 log(pfu/mL to 1,5 log(pfu/mL and completely deactivated at 1 mM. On the contrary, chitosan inhibited the MS2 more than it did the bacteriophages c2. No antiviral effect was observed for the nisin or the lysozyme on bacteriophages after 1 min of treatment. A 1 and 2.5 log reduction was respectively observed for nisin and lysozyme when the treatment time increased (5 or 10 min. These results showed that the antiviral effect depended both on the virus and structure of the antimicrobial compounds. The antiviral activity of these compounds was also evaluated in different physico-chemical conditions and in complex matrices. The antiviral activity of CTAB was impaired in acid pH and with an increase of the ionic strength. These results might be explained by the electrostatic interactions between cationic compounds and negatively charged particles such as bacteriophages or other compounds in a matrix. Milk proved to be protective suggesting the components of food could interfere with antimicrobial compounds.

  6. Weight gain, feed conversion efficiency and plasma free lysine as response criteria in evaluating supplements of lysine plus threonine and lysine plus tryptophan to deficient diets for rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydrych, Z; Heger, J

    1986-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted on growing male SPF-rats to compare weight gain, feed conversion efficiency and plasma free lysine concentration as response criteria in evaluating adequacy of lysine plus threonine and lysine plus tryptophan supplements to the deficient diets. Two basal semisynthetic diets were prepared limiting in lysine and threonine (Expt. 1) and lysine and tryptophan (Expt. 2). The addition of graded supplements to the basal diets of L-lysine X HCl alone (0.2; 0.4; 0.6; 0.8 and 1.0% of diet) induced imbalance of amino acids resulting in low level of daily weight gain and feed conversion efficiency. Plasma free lysine concentration started to grow linearly from the first supplement of L-lysine X HCl. If rats were fed the diets containing identical supplements of L-lysine X HCl in combination with two supplements of L-threonine (0.2 and 0.4% of diet, Expt. 1) or L-tryptophan (0.05 and 0.1% of diet, Expt. 2), plasma free lysine started to increase before supplements of amino acids were adequate to support maximum weight gain and feed conversion efficiency. this difference in response seems to be caused by different feeding regiment during the growth period of the experiments (ad libitum) and training period prior to blood sampling (feeding twice daily). PMID:3098208

  7. 噬菌体在细菌性疾病诊断和治疗中的应用%Review of application of bacteriophage in the diagnosis and therapy for bacteria infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏胜兵; 马红霞; 徐凤宇

    2011-01-01

    从重组噬菌体法、生物扩增法、噬菌体触发的离子级联感应技术及耐药性检测4个方面阐述了噬菌体在病原菌检测中的作用;从细菌分型的角度阐述了噬菌体在病原菌分型中的应用;从活噬菌体、裂解酶、药物载体3个方面陈述了噬菌体在细菌性疾病治疗方法中的研究进展,并分析了噬菌体在应用中的优缺点,展望了今后的研究和应用前景.%This article reviews four kinds of detection technology for pathogen,including recombinant bacteriophage method, PhaB method, sensing of phage-triggered ion cascade technology, detection of the drug resistance. Meanwhile, the application of bacteriophage in typing bacteria was illustrated. Furthermore, the research advance in three means for treating bacterial diseases using bacteriophage was also summarized in this paper,including viable bacteriophage, lysin, drug carrier. The advantages and disadvantages of these three kinds of application were also elucidated. The prospective application and studies on bacteriophage were also proposed here.

  8. Naturally occurrisng and induced genotypes of high lysine sorghum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of a high lysine genotype of grain sorghum from a natural population and the identification of a high lysine mutant in a mutagenized population is described. Chemical, genetic and other biological characteristics of the two differently derived high lysine germ plasm types are described. Preliminary results suggest that the protein quality of both sources of high lysine sorghum germ plasm is the same. The factors influencing the biological value of the sorghum grain are discussed briefly, including not only lysine content but also tannin content. A discussion of prolamine protein inheritance in grain is presented with some suggestions for research. (author)

  9. A stochastic model for bacteriophage therapies

    CERN Document Server

    Bardina, Xavier; Rovira, Carles; Tindel, Samy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we analyze a system modeling bacteriophage treatments for infections in a noisy context. In the small noise regime, we show that after a reasonable amount of time the system is close to a sane equilibrium (which is a relevant biologic information) with high probability. Mathematically speaking, our study hinges on concentration techniques for delayed stochastic differential equations.

  10. Bacteriophages as surface and ground water tracers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Rossi

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages are increasingly used as tracers for quantitative analysis in both hydrology and hydrogeology. The biological particles are neither toxic nor pathogenic for other living organisms as they penetrate only a specific bacterial host. They have many advantages over classical fluorescent tracers and offer the additional possibility of multi-point injection for tracer tests. Several years of research make them suitable for quantitative transport analysis and flow boundary delineation in both surface and ground waters, including karst, fractured and porous media aquifers. This article presents the effective application of bacteriophages based on their use in differing Swiss hydrological environments and compares their behaviour to conventional coloured dye or salt-type tracers. In surface water and karst aquifers, bacteriophages travel at about the same speed as the typically referenced fluorescent tracers (uranine, sulphurhodamine G extra. In aquifers of interstitial porosity, however, they appear to migrate more rapidly than fluorescent tracers, albeit with a significant reduction in their numbers within the porous media. This faster travel time implies that a modified rationale is needed for defining some ground water protection area boundaries. Further developments of other bacteriophages and their documentation as tracer methods should result in an accurate and efficient tracer tool that will be a proven alternative to conventional fluorescent dyes.

  11. ADSORPTION OF BACTERIOPHAGES ON CLAY MINERALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theability to predict the fate of microorganisms in soil is dependent on an understanding of the process of their sorption on soil and subsurface materials. Presently, we have focused on studying the thermodynamics of sorption of bacteriophages (T-2, MS-2, and

  12. Comparative genomics of Shiga toxin encoding bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Darren L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stx bacteriophages are responsible for driving the dissemination of Stx toxin genes (stx across their bacterial host range. Lysogens carrying Stx phages can cause severe, life-threatening disease and Stx toxin is an integral virulence factor. The Stx-bacteriophage vB_EcoP-24B, commonly referred to as Ф24B, is capable of multiply infecting a single bacterial host cell at a high frequency, with secondary infection increasing the rate at which subsequent bacteriophage infections can occur. This is biologically unusual, therefore determining the genomic content and context of Ф24B compared to other lambdoid Stx phages is important to understanding the factors controlling this phenomenon and determining whether they occur in other Stx phages. Results The genome of the Stx2 encoding phage, Ф24B was sequenced and annotated. The genomic organisation and general features are similar to other sequenced Stx bacteriophages induced from Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC, however Ф24B possesses significant regions of heterogeneity, with implications for phage biology and behaviour. The Ф24B genome was compared to other sequenced Stx phages and the archetypal lambdoid phage, lambda, using the Circos genome comparison tool and a PCR-based multi-loci comparison system. Conclusions The data support the hypothesis that Stx phages are mosaic, and recombination events between the host, phages and their remnants within the same infected bacterial cell will continue to drive the evolution of Stx phage variants and the subsequent dissemination of shigatoxigenic potential.

  13. Bacteriophages as surface and ground water tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, P.; Dörfliger, N.; Kennedy, K.; Müller, I.; Aragno, M.

    Bacteriophages are increasingly used as tracers for quantitative analysis in both hydrology and hydrogeology. The biological particles are neither toxic nor pathogenic for other living organisms as they penetrate only a specific bacterial host. They have many advantages over classical fluorescent tracers and offer the additional possibility of multi-point injection for tracer tests. Several years of research make them suitable for quantitative transport analysis and flow boundary delineation in both surface and ground waters, including karst, fractured and porous media aquifers. This article presents the effective application of bacteriophages based on their use in differing Swiss hydrological environments and compares their behaviour to conventional coloured dye or salt-type tracers. In surface water and karst aquifers, bacteriophages travel at about the same speed as the typically referenced fluorescent tracers (uranine, sulphurhodamine G extra). In aquifers of interstitial porosity, however, they appear to migrate more rapidly than fluorescent tracers, albeit with a significant reduction in their numbers within the porous media. This faster travel time implies that a modified rationale is needed for defining some ground water protection area boundaries. Further developments of other bacteriophages and their documentation as tracer methods should result in an accurate and efficient tracer tool that will be a proven alternative to conventional fluorescent dyes.

  14. An Undergraduate Laboratory Activity Demonstrating Bacteriophage Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E. Allen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophage are among the most diverse and numerous microbes inhabiting our planet. Yet many laboratory activities fail to engage students in meaningful exploration of their diversity, unique characteristics, and abundance. In this curriculum activity students use a standard plaque assay to enumerate bacteriophage particles from a natural sample and use the scientific method to address questions about host specificity and diversity. A raw primary sewage sample is enriched for bacteriophage using hosts in the family Enterobacteriaceae. Students hypothesize about host specificity and use quantitative data (serial dilution and plaque assay to test their hypotheses. Combined class data also help them answer questions about phage diversity. The exercise was field tested with a class of 47 students using pre- and posttests. For all learning outcomes posttest scores were higher than pretest scores at or below p = 0.01. Average individualized learning gain (G was also calculated for each learning outcome. Students’ use of scientific language in reference to bacteriophage and host interaction significantly improved (p = 0.002; G = 0.50. Improved means of expression helped students construct better hypotheses on phage host specificity (G = 0.31, p = 0.01 and to explain the plaque assay method (G = 0.33, p = 0.002. At the end of the exercise students also demonstrated improved knowledge and understanding of phage specificity as related to phage therapy in humans (p < 0.001; G = 51.

  15. STUDIES ON THE PURIFICATION OF BACTERIOPHAGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmanson, G; Bronfenbrenner, J

    1939-11-20

    A simple method of concentrating and purifying bacteriophage has been described. The procedure consisted essentially in collecting the active agent on a reinforced collodion membrane of a porosity that would just retain all the active agent and permit extraneous material to pass through. Advantage was taken of the fact that B. coli will proliferate and regenerate bacteriophage in a completely diffusible synthetic medium with ammonia as the only source of nitrogen, which permitted the purification of the bacteriophage by copious washing. The material thus obtained was concentrated by suction and after thorough washing possessed all the activity of the original filtrate. It was labile, losing its activity in a few days on standing, and was quickly and completely inactivated upon drying. This material contained approximately 15 per cent of nitrogen and with 2 or 3 mg. samples of inactive dry residue it was possible to obtain positive protein color tests. The concentrated and purified bacteriophage has about 10(-14) mg. of nitrogen, or 6 x 10(-17) gm. of protein per unit of lytic activity. Assuming that each unit of activity represents a molecule, the calculated maximum average molecular weight would be approximately 36,000,000, and on the assumption of a spherical shape of particles and a density of 1.3, the calculated radius would be about 22 millimicra. By measurement of the diffusion rate, the average radius of particle of the fraction of the purified bacteriophage which diffuses most readily through a porous plate was found to be of the order of magnitude of 9 millimicra, or of a calculated molecular weight of 2,250,000. Furthermore, when this purified bacteriophage was fractionated by forcing it through a thin collodion membrane, which permits the passage of only the smaller particles, it was possible to demonstrate in the ultrafiltrate active particles of about 2 millimicra in radius, and of a calculated molecular weight of 25,000. It was of interest to apply

  16. Expression of lysine-rich protein gene and analysis of lysine content in transgenic wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Chaomin; CHEN Xü qing; LIANG Rongqi; YANG Fengping; ZHANG Liquan; ZHANG Xiaodong; CHEN Tianyou; S. S. M. Sun

    2004-01-01

    Expression vector pBPC102, which carries winged bean lysine-rich protein (wblrp) gene and dihydropicolinate synthase (DHDPS) gene, was transferred into hexaploid winter wheat cv. Jinghua No.1, Jing411, You899 and Yangnong15 explants of immature inflorescence and immature embryos by particle bombardment. More than 100 transgenic plants were obtained under the selection of s-(2-aminoethyl)-L-cysteine (AEC). Confirmed transgenic plants of T0 and T1 generation by PCR and PCR-Southern blotting analyses showed successful integration of wblrp gene into wheat genome. Analysis of transgenic plant lines of T2 by Northern dot-blotting showed good expression of wblrp gene in offspring seed. The content of free lysine in leaves, contents of bound lysine and total proteins in seeds of T2 transgenic wheat lines were determined and analyzed. Among 34 tested transgenic lines, levels of free lysine content in leaves of 9 transgenic lines are 2~3times higher than un-trans- formed wild-type cultivars. Among 17 analyzed transgenic lines, bound lysine content of 4 transgenic lines is more than 10% higher than that of wild-type cultivars. Our research suggests that introducing wblrp gene into wheat is an effective way to improve its nutrition quality.

  17. Lysine fortification: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellett, Peter L; Ghosh, Shibani

    2004-06-01

    Fortification with lysine to improve the protein value of human diets that are heavily based on cereals has received support from the results of these recent studies [1,2]. Support also comes from examination of average food and nutrient availability data derived from food balance sheets. Whereas nutritional status is influenced by the nutrient content of foods consumed in relation to need, the requirements for protein and amino acids are influenced by many additional factors [10, 12, 14, 28, 29]. These include age, sex, body size, physical activity, growth, pregnancy and lactation, infection, and the efficiency of nutrient utilization. Even if the immune response was influenced by the added lysine, adequate water and basic sanitation would remain essential. Acute and chronic undernutrition and most micronutrient deficiencies primarily affect poor and deprived people who do not have access to food of adequate nutritional value, live in unsanitary environments without access to clean water and basic services, and lack access to appropriate education and information [30]. A further variable is the possible interaction between protein and food energy availability [31]. This could affect the protein value of diets when food energy is limiting to a significant degree. Thus, the additional effects of food energy deficiency on protein utilization could well be superimposed on the very poorest. The improvement of dietary diversity must be the long-term aim, with dietary fortification considered only a short-term solution. The former should take place as wealth improves and the gaps between rich and poor diminish. Although such changes are taking place, they are highly uneven. Over the last several decades, increases have occurred in the availability of food energy, total protein, and animal protein for both developed and developing countries. However, for the very poorest developing countries over the same period, changes have been almost nonexistent, and the values for

  18. Evolution and the complexity of bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serwer Philip

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genomes of both long-genome (> 200 Kb bacteriophages and long-genome eukaryotic viruses have cellular gene homologs whose selective advantage is not explained. These homologs add genomic and possibly biochemical complexity. Understanding their significance requires a definition of complexity that is more biochemically oriented than past empirically based definitions. Hypothesis Initially, I propose two biochemistry-oriented definitions of complexity: either decreased randomness or increased encoded information that does not serve immediate needs. Then, I make the assumption that these two definitions are equivalent. This assumption and recent data lead to the following four-part hypothesis that explains the presence of cellular gene homologs in long bacteriophage genomes and also provides a pathway for complexity increases in prokaryotic cells: (1 Prokaryotes underwent evolutionary increases in biochemical complexity after the eukaryote/prokaryote splits. (2 Some of the complexity increases occurred via multi-step, weak selection that was both protected from strong selection and accelerated by embedding evolving cellular genes in the genomes of bacteriophages and, presumably, also archaeal viruses (first tier selection. (3 The mechanisms for retaining cellular genes in viral genomes evolved under additional, longer-term selection that was stronger (second tier selection. (4 The second tier selection was based on increased access by prokaryotic cells to improved biochemical systems. This access was achieved when DNA transfer moved to prokaryotic cells both the more evolved genes and their more competitive and complex biochemical systems. Testing the hypothesis I propose testing this hypothesis by controlled evolution in microbial communities to (1 determine the effects of deleting individual cellular gene homologs on the growth and evolution of long genome bacteriophages and hosts, (2 find the environmental conditions that

  19. Antimicrobial activity of chicken NK-lysin against Eimeria sporozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yeong H; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Siragusa, Gregory R; Bannerman, Douglas D; Lillehoj, Erik P

    2008-06-01

    NK-lysin is an antimicrobial and antitumor polypeptide that is considered to play an important role in innate immunity. Chicken NK-lysin is a member of the saposin-like protein family and exhibits potent antitumor cell activity. To evaluate the antimicrobial properties of chicken NK-lysin, we examined its ability to reduce the viability of various bacterial strains and two species of Eimeria parasites. Culture supernatants from COS7 cells transfected with a chicken NK-lysin cDNA and His-tagged purified NK-lysin from the transfected cells both showed high cytotoxic activity against Eimeria acervulina and Eimeria maxima sporozoites. In contrast, no bactericidal activity was observed. Further studies using synthetic peptides derived from NK-lysin may be useful for pharmaceutical and agricultural uses in the food animal industry.

  20. Lysine Fluxes across the Jejunal Epithelium in Lysinuric Protein Intolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Desjeux, J-F.; Rajantie, J.; Simell, O.; Dumontier, A-M.; Perheentupa, J

    1980-01-01

    Lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI) is one of a group of genetic diseases in which intestinal absorption of the diamino acids lysine, arginine, and ornithine is impaired. In LPI, the clinical symptoms are more severe than in the kindred disorders. The mechanism of lysine absorption was, therefore, investigated in vitro on peroral jejunal biopsy specimens in seven patients with LPI and 27 controls. The lysine concentration ratio between cell compartment and medium was significantly higher in t...

  1. An update on histone lysine methylation in plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Yu; Zhongyuan Bu; Wen-Hui Shen; Aiwu Dong

    2009-01-01

    Histone methylation plays crucial roles in epigenetic regulation.The SET domain proteins are now recognized as generally having methyltransferase activity targeted to specific lysine residues of histones.The enzymes and their specific histone lysine methylation have enormous impacts on the regulation of chromatin structure and function.In this review,we discuss recent advances made on histone lysine methylations and their diverse functions in plant growth and development.

  2. Application of bacteriophages in sensor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltomaa, Riikka; López-Perolio, Irene; Benito-Peña, Elena; Barderas, Rodrigo; Moreno-Bondi, María Cruz

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophage-based bioassays are a promising alternative to traditional antibody-based immunoassays. Bacteriophages, shortened to phages, can be easily conjugated or genetically engineered. Phages are robust, ubiquitous in nature, and harmless to humans. Notably, phages do not usually require inoculation and killing of animals; and thus, the production of phages is simple and economical. In recent years, phage-based biosensors have been developed featuring excellent robustness, sensitivity, and selectivity in combination with the ease of integration into transduction devices. This review provides a critical overview of phage-based bioassays and biosensors developed in the last few years using different interrogation methods such as colorimetric, enzymatic, fluorescence, surface plasmon resonance, quartz crystal microbalance, magnetoelastic, Raman, or electrochemical techniques.

  3. Detection of bacteria with bioluminescent reporter bacteriophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpp, Jochen; Loessner, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that exclusively infect bacteria. They are ideally suited for the development of highly specific diagnostic assay systems. Bioluminescent reporter bacteriophages are designed and constructed by integration of a luciferase gene in the virus genome. Relying on the host specificity of the phage, the system enables rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of bacterial pathogens. A bioluminescent reporter phage assay is superior to any other molecular detection method, because gene expression and light emission are dependent on an active metabolism of the bacterial cell, and only viable cells will yield a signal. In this chapter we introduce the concept of creating reporter phages, discuss their advantages and disadvantages, and illustrate the advances made in developing such systems for different Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens. The application of bioluminescent reporter phages for the detection of foodborne pathogens is emphasized.

  4. Protein lysine acetylation in bacteria: Current state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouidir, Tassadit; Kentache, Takfarinas; Hardouin, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of proteins are key events in cellular metabolism and physiology regulation. Lysine acetylation is one of the best studied protein modifications in eukaryotes, but, until recently, ignored in bacteria. However, proteomic advances have highlighted the diversity of bacterial lysine-acetylated proteins. The current data support the implication of lysine acetylation in various metabolic pathways, adaptation and virulence. In this review, we present a broad overview of the current knowledge of lysine acetylation in bacteria. We emphasize particularly the significant contribution of proteomics in this field. PMID:26390373

  5. Bacteriophages as recognition and identification agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teodorescu, M.C.; Gaspar, A.

    1987-04-23

    Bacteriophages are employed as agents for recognition and identification of molecules and cellular materials, using their ability to recognize their bacterial host, by coating them with antibodies or by selecting them to perform in a manner analogous to antibodies. Visibility for identification is effected by incorporating a fluorescent agent, a radioisotope, a metal, an enzyme, or other staining material. The method of this invention may be utilized in selected clinical procedures, and is adaptable to use in an assay kit.

  6. Going viral: designing bioactive surfaces with bacteriophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinidoust, Zeinab; Olsson, Adam L J; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2014-12-01

    Bacteriophage-functionalized bioactive surfaces are functional materials that can be used as antimicrobial surfaces in medical applications (e.g., indwelling medical devices or wound dressings) or as biosensors for bacterial capture and detection. Despite offering immense potential, designing efficient phage-functionalized bioactive surfaces is hampered by a number of challenges. This review offers an overview of the current state of knowledge in this field and presents a critical perspective of the technological promises and challenges.

  7. A new look at bacteriophage phylogenomics

    OpenAIRE

    Nóbrega, Franklin; Pinto, Graça; Azeredo, Joana; Kluskens, Leon

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophages or phages are viruses that only infect bacteria. The International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses classified these viruses in accordance with the morphology of their free virion particles and type and size of their genome. This system fails on the classification of several phages, which have their genome already sequenced. It also requires a morphological analysis by transmission electron microscopy, which is very expensive and time consuming [1]. In 2002 Rohwe...

  8. Genomic impact of CRISPR immunization against bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrangou, Rodolphe; Coûté-Monvoisin, Anne-Claire; Stahl, Buffy; Chavichvily, Isabelle; Damange, Florian; Romero, Dennis A; Boyaval, Patrick; Fremaux, Christophe; Horvath, Philippe

    2013-12-01

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) together with CAS (RISPR-associated) genes form the CRISPR-Cas immune system, which provides sequence-specific adaptive immunity against foreign genetic elements in bacteria and archaea. Immunity is acquired by the integration of short stretches of invasive DNA as novel 'spacers' into CRISPR loci. Subsequently, these immune markers are transcribed and generate small non-coding interfering RNAs that specifically guide nucleases for sequence-specific cleavage of complementary sequences. Among the four CRISPR-Cas systems present in Streptococcus thermophilus, CRISPR1 and CRISPR3 have the ability to readily acquire new spacers following bacteriophage or plasmid exposure. In order to investigate the impact of building CRISPR-encoded immunity on the host chromosome, we determined the genome sequence of a BIM (bacteriophage-insensitive mutant) derived from the DGCC7710 model organism, after four consecutive rounds of bacteriophage challenge. As expected, active CRISPR loci evolved via polarized addition of several novel spacers following exposure to bacteriophages. Although analysis of the draft genome sequence revealed a variety of SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and INDELs (insertions/deletions), most of the in silico differences were not validated by Sanger re-sequencing. In addition, two SNPs and two small INDELs were identified and tracked in the intermediate variants. Overall, building CRISPR-encoded immunity does not significantly affect the genome, which allows the maintenance of important functional properties in isogenic CRISPR mutants. This is critical for the development and formulation of sustainable and robust next-generation starter cultures with increased industrial lifespans.

  9. Isolation of Arthrobacter Bacteriophage from Soil †

    OpenAIRE

    Germida, James J.; Casida, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    Soil was percolated with water and various nutrient solutions, and then the percolates were analyzed for bacteriophages which produced plaques on various Arthrobacter strains. The water percolates did not contain detectable phage. In contrast, phages for A. globiformis strains ATCC 8010 and 4336, and for several recent Arthrobacter species soil isolates, were easily detected in nutrient broth, soil extract, and cation-complete medium percolates. These percolates did not contain phage that pro...

  10. Use of bacteriophages to control biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Sillankorva, Sanna

    2009-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Engenharia Química e Biológica After several years of abandonment, the use of bacteriophages (phages) for killing bacteria has withdrawn recent attention and reappraisal. This has led to a vast phage research, in varied fields, with impressive outcomes and currently several studies are ongoing with animals, horticulture and agriculture products, and even with humans. Despite this enthusiasm, there is a lack of research conserning phage utilization to red...

  11. Genetically modified bacteriophages in applied microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárdy, P; Pantůček, R; Benešík, M; Doškař, J

    2016-09-01

    Bacteriophages represent a simple viral model of basic research with many possibilities for practical application. Due to their ability to infect and kill bacteria, their potential in the treatment of bacterial infection has been examined since their discovery. With advances in molecular biology and gene engineering, the phage application spectrum has been expanded to various medical and biotechnological fields. The construction of bacteriophages with an extended host range or longer viability in the mammalian bloodstream enhances their potential as an alternative to conventional antibiotic treatment. Insertion of active depolymerase genes to their genomes can enforce the biofilm disposal. They can also be engineered to transfer various compounds to the eukaryotic organisms and the bacterial culture, applicable for the vaccine, drug or gene delivery. Phage recombinant lytic enzymes can be applied as enzybiotics in medicine as well as in biotechnology for pathogen detection or programmed cell death in bacterial expression strains. Besides, modified bacteriophages with high specificity can be applied as bioprobes in detection tools to estimate the presence of pathogens in food industry, or utilized in the control of food-borne pathogens as part of the constructed phage-based biosorbents.

  12. Genetically modified bacteriophages in applied microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárdy, P; Pantůček, R; Benešík, M; Doškař, J

    2016-09-01

    Bacteriophages represent a simple viral model of basic research with many possibilities for practical application. Due to their ability to infect and kill bacteria, their potential in the treatment of bacterial infection has been examined since their discovery. With advances in molecular biology and gene engineering, the phage application spectrum has been expanded to various medical and biotechnological fields. The construction of bacteriophages with an extended host range or longer viability in the mammalian bloodstream enhances their potential as an alternative to conventional antibiotic treatment. Insertion of active depolymerase genes to their genomes can enforce the biofilm disposal. They can also be engineered to transfer various compounds to the eukaryotic organisms and the bacterial culture, applicable for the vaccine, drug or gene delivery. Phage recombinant lytic enzymes can be applied as enzybiotics in medicine as well as in biotechnology for pathogen detection or programmed cell death in bacterial expression strains. Besides, modified bacteriophages with high specificity can be applied as bioprobes in detection tools to estimate the presence of pathogens in food industry, or utilized in the control of food-borne pathogens as part of the constructed phage-based biosorbents. PMID:27321680

  13. Call for a dedicated European legal framework for bacteriophage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeken, Gilbert; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Lavigne, Rob; Jennes, Serge; De Vos, Daniel; Casteels, Minne; Huys, Isabelle

    2014-04-01

    The worldwide emergence of antibiotic resistances and the drying up of the antibiotic pipeline have spurred a search for alternative or complementary antibacterial therapies. Bacteriophages are bacterial viruses that have been used for almost a century to combat bacterial infections, particularly in Poland and the former Soviet Union. The antibiotic crisis has triggered a renewed clinical and agricultural interest in bacteriophages. This, combined with new scientific insights, has pushed bacteriophages to the forefront of the search for new approaches to fighting bacterial infections. But before bacteriophage therapy can be introduced into clinical practice in the European Union, several challenges must be overcome. One of these is the conceptualization and classification of bacteriophage therapy itself and the extent to which it constitutes a human medicinal product regulated under the European Human Code for Medicines (Directive 2001/83/EC). Can therapeutic products containing natural bacteriophages be categorized under the current European regulatory framework, or should this framework be adapted? Various actors in the field have discussed the need for an adapted (or entirely new) regulatory framework for the reintroduction of bacteriophage therapy in Europe. This led to the identification of several characteristics specific to natural bacteriophages that should be taken into consideration by regulators when evaluating bacteriophage therapy. One important consideration is whether bacteriophage therapy development occurs on an industrial scale or a hospital-based, patient-specific scale. More suitable regulatory standards may create opportunities to improve insights into this promising therapeutic approach. In light of this, we argue for the creation of a new, dedicated European regulatory framework for bacteriophage therapy. PMID:24500660

  14. Isolation and characterization of bacteriophages of Salmonella enterica serovar Pullorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, H; Zhang, H; Wang, R

    2011-10-01

    In this study, 2 bacteriophages of Salmonella Pullorum were isolated using an enrichment protocol and the double agar layer method. They were named PSPu-95 and PSPu-4-116, respectively, against clinical isolates of Salmonella Pullorum SPu-95 and SPu-116. The host ranges of the 2 bacteriophages were determined by performing spot tests with 20 bacteria strains. Both bacteriophages had wide host ranges. Bacteriophage PSPu-95 had a lytic effect on 17 of the 20 isolates (85%), and PSPu-4-116 produced a lytic effect on 14 isolates (70%) and was the only bacteriophage that produced a clear plaque on enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the bacteriophages belonged to the order Caudovirales. Bacteriophage PSPu-95 was a member of the family Siphoviridae, but bacteriophage PSPu-4-116 belonged to the family Myoviridae. Both had a double-stranded DNA, which was digested with HindIII or EcoRI, that was estimated to be 58.3 kbp (PSPu-95) and 45.2 kbp (PSPu-4-116) by 1% agar electrophoresis. One-step growth kinetics showed that the latent periods were all less than 20 min, and the burst size was 77.5 pfu/cell for PSPu-95 and 86 pfu/cell for PSPu-4-116. The bacteriophages were able to survive in a pH range between 4 and 10, and they were able to survive in a treatment of 70°C for 60 min. The characterizations of these 2 bacteriophages were helpful in establishing a basis for adopting the most effective bacteriophage to control bacteria in the poultry industry.

  15. Bacteriophage P70: unique morphology and unrelatedness to other Listeria bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmuki, Martina M; Erne, Doris; Loessner, Martin J; Klumpp, Jochen

    2012-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important food-borne pathogen, and its bacteriophages find many uses in detection and biocontrol of its host. The novel broad-host-range virulent phage P70 has a unique morphology with an elongated capsid. Its genome sequence was determined by a hybrid sequencing strategy employing Sanger and PacBio techniques. The P70 genome contains 67,170 bp and 119 open reading frames (ORFs). Our analyses suggest that P70 represents an archetype of virus unrelated to other known Listeria bacteriophages.

  16. Molecular and structural insight into lysine selection on substrate and ubiquitin lysine 48 by the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suryadinata, Randy; Holien, Jessica K; Yang, George;

    2013-01-01

    the native salt-bridge interactions in Ub and Cdc34, resulting in misplacement of Sic1 lysine 50 in the Cdc34 catalytic cleft. During polyubiquitination, Cdc34 showed a strong preference for Ub lysine 48 (K48), with lower activity towards lysine 11 (K11) and lysine 63 (K63). Mutating the -2, -1, +1 and +2...

  17. Experience of the Eliava Institute in bacteriophage therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mzia; Kutateladze

    2015-01-01

    <正>The rapid propagation of multidrug resistant bacterial strains is leading to renewed interest in bacteriophage therapy.With challenges in the treatment of bacterial infections,it is essential for people worldwide to understand how alternative approaches,such as bacteriophages,could be used to combat antibiotic resistant bacteria.The Eliava Institute

  18. Sequence and comparative analysis of Leuconostoc dairy bacteriophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kot, Witold; Hansen, Lars Henrik; Neve, Horst;

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophages attacking Leuconostoc species may significantly influence the quality of the final product. There is however limited knowledge of this group of phages in the literature. We have determined the complete genome sequences of nine Leuconostoc bacteriophages virulent to either Leuconostoc...

  19. Bacteriophages: The viruses for all seasons of molecular biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karam Jim D

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bacteriophage research continues to break new ground in our understanding of the basic molecular mechanisms of gene action and biological structure. The abundance of bacteriophages in nature and the diversity of their genomes are two reasons why phage research brims with excitement. The pages of Virology Journal will reflect the excitement of the "New Phage Biology."

  20. File list: Oth.Unc.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Unc.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Unclassified ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Unc.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Oth.Unc.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Unc.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Unclassified ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Unc.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.Unc.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Unc.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Unclassified ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Unc.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.Plc.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Plc.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Placenta http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Plc.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.Pan.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Pan.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Pancreas http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Pan.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Oth.Pan.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available Oth.Pan.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Pancreas http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Pan.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.Pan.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available Oth.Pan.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Pancreas http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Pan.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  7. POSSIBILITES OF BACTERIOPHAGES APPLICATION IN SURGERY AND TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.I. Gabrielyan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The review of the modern data about bacteriophages and to their application to surgery is presented. Interest to bacteriophages is closely connected with an urgency of a problem of postoperative infectious complications and to resistance increase nosocomial species microbes to antibiotics. Successful demonstrative application of bacteriophages on experimental models for a reduction of is conditional-pathogenic microbes in biofilms, for treatment septicemia at the animals, caused resistance species P. aeruginosa, Klebsiella spp., Staphylococcus and other microbes is described. Positive results on application of bacteriophages in surgery are received at treatment of the infected wounds, peritonitis, infectious complications after liver and kidney transplantation. New mechanisms of action of bacteriophages, including their influence on transplantology immunity are resulted. Use of phages as alternatives of treatment and preventive maintenance of a superinfection at imunocomprometive patients is perspective. 

  8. The effects of bacteriophage and nanoparticles on microbial processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Austin L.

    There are approximately 1031 tailed phages in the biosphere, making them the most abundant organism. Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. Due to the large diversity and abundance, no two bacteriophages that have been isolated are genetically the same. Phage products have potential in disease therapy to solve bacteria-related problems, such as infections resulting from resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus. A bacteriophage capable of infecting methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was isolated from bovine hair. The bacteriophage, named JB phage, was characterized using purification, amplification, cesium chloride banding, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. JB phage and nanoparticles were used in various in vitro and in vivo models to test their effects on microbial processes. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy studies revealed strong interactions between JB phage and nanoparticles, which resulted in increased bacteriophage infectivity. JB phage and nanoparticle cocktails were used as a therapeutic to treat skin and systemic infections in mice caused by MRSA.

  9. [THE IDENTIFICATION AND DIFFERENTIATION OF BACTERIOPHAGES OF HUMAN PATHOGENIC VIBRIO].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaevskaia, N E; Kudriakova, T A; Makedonova, L D; Kachkina, G V

    2015-04-01

    The issue of identification and differentiation of large group of bacteriophages of human pathogenic vibrio is still unresolved. In research and practical applied purposes it is important to consider characteristics of bacteriophages for establishing similarity and differences between them. The actual study was carried out to analyze specimens of DNA-containing bacteriophages of pathogenic vibrio. The overwhelming majority of them characterized by complicated type of symmetry--phages with double-helical DNA and also phages with mono-helical DNA structure discovered recently in vibrio. For the first time, the general framework of identification and differentiation of bacteriophages of pathogenic vibrio was developed. This achievement increases possibility to establish species assignment of phages and to compare with phages registered in the database. "The collection of bacteriophages and test-strains of human pathogenic vibrio" (No2010620549 of 24.09.210).

  10. Digestible lysine levels in diets supplemented with ractopamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelar de Oliveira Souza

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In order evaluate digestible lysine levels in diets supplemented with 20 ppm of ractopamine on the performance and carcass traits, 64 barrows with high genetic potential at finishing phase were allotted in a completely randomized block design with four digestible lysine levels (0.80, 0.90, 1.00, and 1.10%, eight replicates and two pigs per experimental unit. Initial body weight and pigs' kinship were used as criteria in the blocks formation. Diets were mainly composed of corn and soybean meal supplemented with minerals, vitamins and amino acids to meet pigs' nutritional requirements at the finishing phase, except for digestible lysine. No effect of digestible lysine levels was observed in animal performance. The digestible lysine intake increased linearly by increasing the levels of digestible lysine in the diets. Carcass traits were not influenced by the dietary levels of digestible lysine. The level of 0.80% of digestible lysine in diets supplemented with 20 ppm ractopamine meets the nutritional requirements of castrated male pigs during the finishing phase.

  11. Dual Genetic Encoding of Acetyl-lysine and Non-deacetylatable Thioacetyl-lysine Mediated by Flexizyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Hai; Reynolds, Noah M; Fan, Chenguang; Englert, Markus; Hoyer, Denton; Miller, Scott J; Söll, Dieter

    2016-03-14

    Acetylation of lysine residues is an important post-translational protein modification. Lysine acetylation in histones and its crosstalk with other post-translational modifications in histone and non-histone proteins are crucial to DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcriptional regulation. We incorporated acetyl-lysine (AcK) and the non-hydrolyzable thioacetyl-lysine (ThioAcK) into full-length proteins in vitro, mediated by flexizyme. ThioAcK and AcK were site-specifically incorporated at different lysine positions into human histone H3, either individually or in pairs. We demonstrate that the thioacetyl group in histone H3 could not be removed by the histone deacetylase sirtuin type 1. This method provides a powerful tool to study protein acetylation and its role in crosstalk between post-translational modifications. PMID:26914285

  12. M13 Bacteriophage Based Protein Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Hun

    Despite significant progress in biotechnology and biosensing, early detection and disease diagnosis remains a critical issue for improving patient survival rates and well-being. Many of the typical detection schemes currently used possess issues such as low sensitivity and accuracy and are also time consuming to run and expensive. In addition, multiplexed detection remains difficult to achieve. Therefore, developing advanced approaches for reliable, simple, quantitative analysis of multiple markers in solution that also are highly sensitive are still in demand. In recent years, much of the research has primarily focused on improving two key components of biosensors: the bio-recognition agent (bio-receptor) and the transducer. Particular bio-receptors that have been used include antibodies, aptamers, molecular imprinted polymers, and small affinity peptides. In terms of transducing agents, nanomaterials have been considered as attractive candidates due to their inherent nanoscale size, durability and unique chemical and physical properties. The key focus of this thesis is the design of a protein detection and identification system that is based on chemically engineered M13 bacteriophage coupled with nanomaterials. The first chapter provides an introduction of biosensors and M13 bacteriophage in general, where the advantages of each are provided. In chapter 2, an efficient and enzyme-free sensor is demonstrated from modified M13 bacteriophage to generate highly sensitive colorimetric signals from gold nanocrystals. In chapter 3, DNA conjugated M13 were used to enable facile and rapid detection of antigens in solution that also provides modalities for identification. Lastly, high DNA loadings per phage was achieved via hydrozone chemistry and these were applied in conjunction with Raman active DNA-gold/silver core/shell nanoparticles toward highly sensitive SERS sensing.

  13. Ecological study of bacteriophages of Vibrio natriegens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachary, A.

    1978-03-01

    Effects of temperature and anaerobic conditions on the replication of two bacteriophages, nt-1 and nt-6, of the estuarine bacterium Vibrio natriegens were studied. Reduction in temperature resulted in longer latent periods and reduced burst sizes for both phages. Replication under anaerobic conditions resulted in longer latent periods; however, phage nt-6 had a reduced burst size, whereas phage nt-1 had an increased burst size, resulting in a rate of phage production nearly equal to that observed under aerobic conditions. Therefore the distribution of the phages in marsh areas could be influenced by temperature and anaerobiosis.

  14. Bacteriophage biosensors for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokulova, Irina; Olsen, Eric; Vodyanoy, Vitaly

    2014-03-01

    An increasing number of disease-causing bacteria are resistant to one or more anti-bacterial drugs utilized for therapy. Early and speedy detection of these pathogens is therefore very important. Traditional pathogen detection techniques, that include microbiological and biochemical assays are long and labor-intensive, while antibody or DNA-based methods require substantial sample preparation and purification. Biosensors based on bacteriophages have demonstrated remarkable potential to surmount these restrictions and to offer rapid, efficient and sensitive detection technique for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  15. Bacteriophages and Their Role in Food Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanna M. Sillankorva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The interest for natural antimicrobial compounds has increased due to alterations in consumer positions towards the use of chemical preservatives in foodstuff and food processing surfaces. Bacteriophages fit in the class of natural antimicrobial and their effectiveness in controlling bacterial pathogens in agro-food industry has led to the development of different phage products already approved by USFDA and USDA. The majority of these products are to be used in farm animals or animal products such as carcasses, meats and also in agricultural and horticultural products. Treatment with specific phages in the food industry can prevent the decay of products and the spread of bacterial diseases and ultimately promote safe environments in animal and plant food production, processing, and handling. This is an overview of recent work carried out with phages as tools to promote food safety, starting with a general introduction describing the prevalence of foodborne pathogens and bacteriophages and a more detailed discussion on the use of phage therapy to prevent and treat experimentally induced infections of animals against the most common foodborne pathogens, the use of phages as biocontrol agents in foods, and also their use as biosanitizers of food contact surfaces.

  16. Bacteriophage recombination systems and biotechnical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafissi, Nafiseh; Slavcev, Roderick

    2014-04-01

    Bacteriophage recombination systems have been widely used in biotechnology for modifying prokaryotic species, for creating transgenic animals and plants, and more recently, for human cell gene manipulation. In contrast to homologous recombination, which benefits from the endogenous recombination machinery of the cell, site-specific recombination requires an exogenous source of recombinase in mammalian cells. The mechanism of bacteriophage evolution and their coexistence with bacterial cells has become a point of interest ever since bacterial viruses' life cycles were first explored. Phage recombinases have already been exploited as valuable genetic tools and new phage enzymes, and their potential application to genetic engineering and genome manipulation, vectorology, and generation of new transgene delivery vectors, and cell therapy are attractive areas of research that continue to be investigated. The significance and role of phage recombination systems in biotechnology is reviewed in this paper, with specific focus on homologous and site-specific recombination conferred by the coli phages, λ, and N15, the integrase from the Streptomyces phage, ΦC31, the recombination system of phage P1, and the recently characterized recombination functions of Yersinia phage, PY54. Key steps of the molecular mechanisms involving phage recombination functions and their application to molecular engineering, our novel exploitations of the PY54-derived recombination system, and its application to the development of new DNA vectors are discussed.

  17. Understanding Bacteriophage Specificity in Natural Microbial Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britt Koskella

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Studying the coevolutionary dynamics between bacteria and the bacteriophage viruses that infect them is critical to understanding both microbial diversity and ecosystem functioning. Phages can play a key role in shaping bacterial population dynamics and can significantly alter both intra- and inter-specific competition among bacterial hosts. Predicting how phages might influence community stability and apparent competition, however, requires an understanding of how bacteria-phage interaction networks evolve as a function of host diversity and community dynamics. Here, we first review the progress that has been made in understanding phage specificity, including the use of experimental evolution, we then introduce a new dataset on natural bacteriophages collected from the phyllosphere of horse chestnut trees, and finally we highlight that bacterial sensitivity to phage is rarely a binary trait and that this variation should be taken into account and reported. We emphasize that there is currently insufficient evidence to make broad generalizations about phage host range in natural populations, the limits of phage adaptation to novel hosts, or the implications of phage specificity in shaping microbial communities. However, the combination of experimental and genomic approaches with the study of natural communities will allow new insight to the evolution and impact of phage specificity within complex bacterial communities.

  18. Bacteriophage recombination systems and biotechnical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafissi, Nafiseh; Slavcev, Roderick

    2014-04-01

    Bacteriophage recombination systems have been widely used in biotechnology for modifying prokaryotic species, for creating transgenic animals and plants, and more recently, for human cell gene manipulation. In contrast to homologous recombination, which benefits from the endogenous recombination machinery of the cell, site-specific recombination requires an exogenous source of recombinase in mammalian cells. The mechanism of bacteriophage evolution and their coexistence with bacterial cells has become a point of interest ever since bacterial viruses' life cycles were first explored. Phage recombinases have already been exploited as valuable genetic tools and new phage enzymes, and their potential application to genetic engineering and genome manipulation, vectorology, and generation of new transgene delivery vectors, and cell therapy are attractive areas of research that continue to be investigated. The significance and role of phage recombination systems in biotechnology is reviewed in this paper, with specific focus on homologous and site-specific recombination conferred by the coli phages, λ, and N15, the integrase from the Streptomyces phage, ΦC31, the recombination system of phage P1, and the recently characterized recombination functions of Yersinia phage, PY54. Key steps of the molecular mechanisms involving phage recombination functions and their application to molecular engineering, our novel exploitations of the PY54-derived recombination system, and its application to the development of new DNA vectors are discussed. PMID:24442504

  19. HDAC inhibitors induce global changes in histone lysine and arginine methylation and alter expression of lysine demethylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillico, Ryan; Sobral, Marina Gomez; Stesco, Nicholas; Lakowski, Ted M

    2016-02-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are cancer treatments that inhibit the removal of the epigenetic modification acetyllysine on histones, resulting in altered gene expression. Such changes in expression may influence other histone epigenetic modifications. We describe a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to quantify lysine acetylation and methylation and arginine methylation on histones extracted from cultured cells treated with HDAC inhibitors. The HDAC inhibitors vorinostat, mocetinostat and entinostat induced 400-600% hyperacetylation in HEK 293 and K562 cells. All HDAC inhibitors decreased histone methylarginines in HEK 293 cells but entinostat produced dose dependent reductions in asymmetric dimethylarginine, not observed in K562 cells. Vorinostat produced increases in histone lysine methylation and decreased expression of some lysine demethylases (KDM), measured by quantitative PCR. Entinostat had variable effects on lysine methylation and decreased expression of some KDM while increasing expression of others. Mocetinostat produced dose dependent increases in histone lysine methylation by LC-MS/MS. This was corroborated with a multiplex colorimetric assay showing increases in histone H3 lysine 4, 9, 27, 36 and 79 methylation. Increases in lysine methylation were correlated with dose dependent decreases in the expression of seven KDM. Mocetinostat functions as an HDAC inhibitor and a de facto KDM inhibitor.

  20. Combined use of Bacteriophage K and a novel Bacteriophage to reduce Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alves, D.R.; Gaudion, A.; Bean, J.E.;

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are major causes of impairment of wound healing and patient morbidity. One of the most common and aggressive wound pathogens is Staphylococcus aureus, displaying a large repertoire of virulence factors and commonly reduced susceptibility to antibiotics, such as the spread of methicillin-......-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Bacteriophages are obligate parasites of bacteria. They multiply intracellularly and lyse their bacterial host, releasing their progeny. We isolated a novel phage, DRA88, which has a ...

  1. Bacteria vs. Bacteriophages: Parallel Evolution of Immune Arsenals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabbir, Muhammad A B; Hao, Haihong; Shabbir, Muhammad Z; Wu, Qin; Sattar, Adeel; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages are the most common entities on earth and represent a constant challenge to bacterial populations. To fend off bacteriophage infection, bacteria evolved immune systems to avert phage adsorption and block invader DNA entry. They developed restriction-modification systems and mechanisms to abort infection and interfere with virion assembly, as well as newly recognized clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR). In response to bacterial immune systems, bacteriophages synchronously evolved resistance mechanisms, such as the anti-CRISPR systems to counterattack bacterial CRISPR-cas systems, in a continuing evolutionary arms race between virus and host. In turn, it is fundamental to the survival of the bacterial cell to evolve a system to combat bacteriophage immune strategies.

  2. Bacteria vs. bacteriophages: parallel evolution of immune arsenals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Abu Bakr Shabbir

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages are the most common entities on earth and represent a constant challenge to bacterial populations. To fend off bacteriophage infection, bacteria evolved immune systems to avert phage adsorption and block invader DNA entry. They developed restriction-modification systems and mechanisms to abort infection and interfere with virion assembly, as well as newly recognized clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR. In response to bacterial immune systems, bacteriophages synchronously evolved resistance mechanisms, such as the anti-CRISPR systems to counterattack bacterial CRISPR-cas systems, in a continuing evolutionary arms race between virus and host. In turn, it is fundamental to the survival of the bacterial cell to evolve a system to combat bacteriophage immune strategies.

  3. Antimicrobial bacteriophage-derived proteins and therapeutic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotics have the remarkable power to control bacterial infections. Unfortunately, widespread use, whether regarded as prudent or not, has favored the emergence and persistence of antibiotic resistant strains of human pathogenic bacteria, resulting in a global health threat. Bacteriophages (pha...

  4. Digestible lysine levels in diets for laying Japanese quails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleverson Luís Nascimento Ribeiro

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to estimate the digestible lysine requirement of Japanese quails in the egg-laying phase. A total of 336 female Japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica of average initial age of 207 days were distributed in a completely randomized experimental design, composed of 6 treatments (lysine levels with 7 replicates and 8 birds per experimental unit, with duration of 84 days. Experimental diets were formulated from a basal diet, with corn and soybean meal, with 2.800 kcal ME/kg and 203.70 g/kg crude protein, showing levels of 9.50; 10.00; 10.50; 11.00; 11.50; and 12.00 g/kg digestible lysine; diets remained isoprotein and isocaloric. The following variables were studied: feed intake (FI; lysine intake (LI; egg production per bird per day (EPBD; egg production per bird housed (EPBH; production of marketable eggs (PME; egg weight (EW; egg mass (EM; utilization efficiency of lysine for egg mass production (UELEM; feed conversion per mass (FCEM; feed conversion per dozen eggs (FCDZ; bird availability (BA; percentages of yolk (Y, albumen (A and shell (S; specific egg weight (SW; nitrogen ingested (NI; nitrogen excreted (NE; and nitrogen balance (NB. Significant effect was only observed for LI, EW, EM, UELEM, FCEM, Y, A and SW. The digestible lysine level estimated in diets for laying Japanese quails is 11.20 g digestible lysine/kg diet, corresponding to an average daily intake of 272.23 mg lysine.

  5. Pharmacologic, Pharmacodynamic, and Pharmacokinetic Considerations with Intravenous Ibuprofen Lysine

    OpenAIRE

    Capparelli, Edmund V.

    2007-01-01

    Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is a common complication in preterm infants. An intravenous (IV) cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor is the pharmacotherapy of choice. Concerns over adverse effects associated with the traditional treatment, IV indomethacin, have led to the investigation of other COX inhibitors to assist closure of PDA. IV ibuprofen lysine is a COX inhibitor that demonstrates similar efficacy to indomethacin with few adverse effects. In addition, IV ibuprofen lysine does not cause re...

  6. Current advance in the topological structure and function of holin encoded by bacteriophage Lambda-A review%λ噬茵体穿孔素(holin)蛋白触发裂菌的分子机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史一博; 孙建和

    2012-01-01

    穿孔素-裂解酶二元裂解系统是双链DNA噬菌体普遍采用的裂菌模式,以λ噬菌体为例,系统地揭示了噬菌体穿孔素的结构与功能.λ噬菌体的S基因的特征是呈双起始基序( dual-start motif),编码穿孔素(holin) S105和抗穿孔素(antiholin) S107,通过二者不同水平的表达及相互作用,触发裂菌过程.作者综述了λ噬菌体穿孔素的膜拓扑结构和成孔机制的最新研究进展,并展望了穿孔素的研究热点和应用前景.%The holin-lysin two-step lysis system widely exists in double stranded DNA bacteriophages for the release of progeny bacteriophage from an infected bacterial cell at the final stage of phage infection. Lambda bacteriophage is a prototype for studying holin. The S gene in Lambda bacteriophage has a dual-start motif and encodes holin S105 and antiholin S107. Here, we reviewed the progress in topological structure of holin from Lambda bacteriophage and its formation of membrane lethal holes. We also discussed the potential of the holin in the control of bacterial infection.

  7. Bacteriophages, revitalized after 100 years in the shadow of antibiotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongping; Wei

    2015-01-01

    <正>The year 2015 marks 100 years since Dr.Frederick Twort discovered the"filterable lytic factor",which was later independently discovered and named "bacteriophage" by Dr.Felix d’Herelle.On this memorable centennial,it is exciting to see a special issue published by Virologica Sinica on Phages and Therapy.In this issue,readers will not only fi nd that bacteriophage research is a

  8. Bacteriophage-based nanoprobes for rapid bacteria separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juhong; Duncan, Bradley; Wang, Ziyuan; Wang, Li-Sheng; Rotello, Vincent M.; Nugen, Sam R.

    2015-10-01

    The lack of practical methods for bacterial separation remains a hindrance for the low-cost and successful development of rapid detection methods from complex samples. Antibody-tagged magnetic particles are commonly used to pull analytes from a liquid sample. While this method is well-established, improvements in capture efficiencies would result in an increase of the overall detection assay performance. Bacteriophages represent a low-cost and more consistent biorecognition element as compared to antibodies. We have developed nanoscale bacteriophage-tagged magnetic probes, where T7 bacteriophages were bound to magnetic nanoparticles. The nanoprobe allowed the specific recognition and attachment to E. coli cells. The phage magnetic nanprobes were directly compared to antibody-conjugated magnetic nanoprobes. The capture efficiencies of bacteriophages and antibodies on nanoparticles for the separation of E. coli K12 at varying concentrations were determined. The results indicated a similar bacteria capture efficiency between the two nanoprobes.The lack of practical methods for bacterial separation remains a hindrance for the low-cost and successful development of rapid detection methods from complex samples. Antibody-tagged magnetic particles are commonly used to pull analytes from a liquid sample. While this method is well-established, improvements in capture efficiencies would result in an increase of the overall detection assay performance. Bacteriophages represent a low-cost and more consistent biorecognition element as compared to antibodies. We have developed nanoscale bacteriophage-tagged magnetic probes, where T7 bacteriophages were bound to magnetic nanoparticles. The nanoprobe allowed the specific recognition and attachment to E. coli cells. The phage magnetic nanprobes were directly compared to antibody-conjugated magnetic nanoprobes. The capture efficiencies of bacteriophages and antibodies on nanoparticles for the separation of E. coli K12 at varying

  9. Targeting Antibacterial Agents by Using Drug-Carrying Filamentous Bacteriophages

    OpenAIRE

    Yacoby, Iftach; Shamis, Marina; Bar, Hagit; Shabat, Doron; Benhar, Itai

    2006-01-01

    Bacteriophages have been used for more than a century for (unconventional) therapy of bacterial infections, for half a century as tools in genetic research, for 2 decades as tools for discovery of specific target-binding proteins, and for nearly a decade as tools for vaccination or as gene delivery vehicles. Here we present a novel application of filamentous bacteriophages (phages) as targeted drug carriers for the eradication of (pathogenic) bacteria. The phages are genetically modified to d...

  10. Alternative bacteriophage life cycles: the carrier state of Campylobacter jejuni

    OpenAIRE

    Siringan, Patcharin; Connerton, Phillippa L.; Cummmings, Nicola J.; Connerton, Ian F.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the genus Campylobacter are frequently responsible for human enteric disease, often through consumption of contaminated poultry products. Bacteriophages are viruses that have the potential to control pathogenic bacteria, but understanding their complex life cycles is key to their successful exploitation. Treatment of Campylobacter jejuni biofilms with bacteriophages led to the discovery that phages had established a relationship with their hosts typical of the carrier state life cy...

  11. Engineered bacteriophage targeting gene networks as adjuvants for antibiotic therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Timothy K.; Collins, James J.

    2009-01-01

    Antimicrobial drug development is increasingly lagging behind the evolution of antibiotic resistance, and as a result, there is a pressing need for new antibacterial therapies that can be readily designed and implemented. In this work, we engineered bacteriophage to overexpress proteins and attack gene networks that are not directly targeted by antibiotics. We show that suppressing the SOS network in Escherichia coli with engineered bacteriophage enhances killing by quinolones by several orde...

  12. Targeting protein lysine methylation and demethylation in cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunlong He; Ilia Korboukh; Jian Jin; Jing Huang

    2012-01-01

    During the last decade,we saw an explosion of studies investigating the role of lysine methylation/demethylation of histones and non-histone proteins,such as p53,NF-kappaB,and E2F1.These ‘Ying-Yang' post-translational modifications are important to fine-tuning the activity of these proteins. Lysine methylation and demethylation are catalyzed by protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs) and protein lysine demethylases (PKDMs).PKMTs,PKDMs,and their substrates have been shown to play important roles in cancers.Although the underlying mechanisms of tumorigenesis are still largely unknown,growing evidence is starting to link aberrant regulation of methylation to tumorigenesis.This review focuses on summarizing the recent progress in understanding of the function of protein lysine methylation,and in the discovery of small molecule inhibitors for PKMTs and PKDMs.We also discuss the potential and the caveats of targeting protein lysine methylation for the treatment of cancer.

  13. Biofortification of rice with lysine using endogenous histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, H W; Liu, Q; Sun, S S M

    2015-02-01

    Rice is the most consumed cereal grain in the world, but deficient in the essential amino acid lysine. Therefore, people in developing countries with limited food diversity who rely on rice as their major food source may suffer from malnutrition. Biofortification of stable crops by genetic engineering provides a fast and sustainable method to solve this problem. In this study, two endogenous rice lysine-rich histone proteins, RLRH1 and RLRH2, were over-expressed in rice seeds to achieve lysine biofortification. Their protein sequences passed an allergic sequence-based homology test. Their accumulations in rice seeds were raised to a moderate level by the use of a modified rice glutelin 1 promoter with lowered expression strength to avoid the occurrence of physiological abnormalities like unfolded protein response. The expressed proteins were further targeted to protein storage vacuoles for stable storage using a glutelin 1 signal peptide. The lysine content in the transgenic rice seeds was enhanced by up to 35 %, while other essential amino acids remained balanced, meeting the nutritional standards of the World Health Organization. No obvious unfolded protein response was detected. Different degrees of chalkiness, however, were detected in the transgenic seeds, and were positively correlated with both the levels of accumulated protein and lysine enhancement. This study offered a solution to the lysine deficiency in rice, while at the same time addressing concerns about food safety and physiological abnormalities in biofortified crops. PMID:25512028

  14. Biofortification of rice with lysine using endogenous histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, H W; Liu, Q; Sun, S S M

    2015-02-01

    Rice is the most consumed cereal grain in the world, but deficient in the essential amino acid lysine. Therefore, people in developing countries with limited food diversity who rely on rice as their major food source may suffer from malnutrition. Biofortification of stable crops by genetic engineering provides a fast and sustainable method to solve this problem. In this study, two endogenous rice lysine-rich histone proteins, RLRH1 and RLRH2, were over-expressed in rice seeds to achieve lysine biofortification. Their protein sequences passed an allergic sequence-based homology test. Their accumulations in rice seeds were raised to a moderate level by the use of a modified rice glutelin 1 promoter with lowered expression strength to avoid the occurrence of physiological abnormalities like unfolded protein response. The expressed proteins were further targeted to protein storage vacuoles for stable storage using a glutelin 1 signal peptide. The lysine content in the transgenic rice seeds was enhanced by up to 35 %, while other essential amino acids remained balanced, meeting the nutritional standards of the World Health Organization. No obvious unfolded protein response was detected. Different degrees of chalkiness, however, were detected in the transgenic seeds, and were positively correlated with both the levels of accumulated protein and lysine enhancement. This study offered a solution to the lysine deficiency in rice, while at the same time addressing concerns about food safety and physiological abnormalities in biofortified crops.

  15. Selective cleavage enhanced by acetylating the side chain of lysine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Leixiaomeng; Chen, Tingting; Xue, Gaiqing; Zu, Lily; Fang, Weihai

    2013-01-01

    Selective cleavage is of great interest in mass spectrometry studies as it can help sequence identification by promoting simple fragmentation pattern of peptides and proteins. In this work, the collision-induced dissociation of peptides containing internal lysine and acetylated lysine residues were studied. The experimental and computational results revealed that multiple fragmentation pathways coexisted when the lysine residue was two amino acid residues away from N-terminal of the peptide. After acetylation of the lysine side-chain, b(n)+ ions were the most abundant primary fragment products and the Lys(Ac)-Gly amide bond became the dominant cleavage site via an oxazolone pathway. Acetylating the side-chain of lysine promoted the selective cleavage of Lys-Xxx amide bond and generated much more information of the peptide backbone sequence. The results re-evaluate the selective cleavage due to the lysine basic side-chain and provide information for studying the post-translational modification of proteins and other bio-molecules containing Lys residues. PMID:23303756

  16. Bacteriophages as Bactericides in Plant Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksa Obradović

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Control of plant pathogenic bacteria is a serious problem in production of many agricultural crops. High multiplication rate, adaptability and life inside plant tissue make bacteria unsuitable and inaccessible for most of control measures. Consequently, the list of bactericides available for plant protection is very short. Lately, biological control measures have been intensively studied as a potential solution of the problem. Investigation of bacteriophages,viruses that attack bacteria, is a fast-expanding area of research in plant protection. Several experiments have shown that they can be used as a very efficient tool for control of plant pathogenic bacteria. The fact that they are widespread natural bacterial enemies, simple for cultivation and management, host-specific, suitable for integration with other control practices, human and environment friendly, provide a great advantage for the application of phages over other bactericides.

  17. Bacteriophage T7 DNA polymerase — Sequenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin eZhu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available An ideal DNA polymerase for chain-terminating DNA sequencing should possess the following features: 1 incorporate dideoxy- and other modified nucleotides at an efficiency similar to that of the cognate deoxynucleotides; 2 high processivity; 3 high fidelity in the absence of proofreading/exonuclease activity; and 4 production of clear and uniform signals for detection. The DNA polymerase encoded by bacteriophage T7 is naturally endowed with or can be engineered to have all these characteristics. The chemically or genetically modified enzyme (Sequenase expedited significantly the development of DNA sequencing technology. This article reviews the history of studies on T7 DNA polymerase with emphasis on the serial key steps leading to its use in DNA sequencing. Lessons from the study and development of T7 DNA polymerase have and will continue to enlighten the characterization of novel DNA polymerases from newly discovered microbes and their modification for use in biotechnology.

  18. Bacteriophage endolysins: applications for food safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelcher, Mathias; Loessner, Martin J

    2016-02-01

    Bacteriophage endolysins (peptidoglycan hydrolases) have emerged as a new class of antimicrobial agents useful for controlling bacterial infection or other unwanted contaminations in various fields, particularly in the light of the worldwide increasing frequency of drug-resistant pathogens. This review summarizes and discusses recent developments regarding the use of endolysins for food safety. Besides the use of native and engineered endolysins for controlling bacterial contamination at different points within the food production chain, this also includes the application of high-affinity endolysin-derived cell wall binding domains for rapid detection of pathogenic bacteria. Novel approaches to extend the lytic action of endolysins towards Gram-negative cells will also be highlighted.

  19. Why Be Temperate: Lessons from Bacteriophage λ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandon, Sylvain

    2016-05-01

    Many pathogens have evolved the ability to induce latent infections of their hosts. The bacteriophage λ is a classical model for exploring the regulation and the evolution of latency. Here, I review recent experimental studies on phage λ that identify specific conditions promoting the evolution of lysogenic life cycles. In addition, I present specific adaptations of phage λ that allow this virus to react plastically to variations in the environment and to reactivate its lytic life cycle. All of these different examples are discussed in the light of evolutionary epidemiology theory to disentangle the different evolutionary forces acting on temperate phages. Understanding phage λ adaptations yield important insights into the evolution of latency in other microbes, including several life-threatening human pathogens. PMID:26946976

  20. Topological dispositions of lysine α380 and lysine γ486 in the acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The locations have been determined, with respect to the plasma membrane, of lysine α380 and lysine γ486 in the α subunit and the γ subunit, respectively, of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica. Immunoadsorbents were constructed that recognize the carboxy terminus of the peptide GVKYIAE released by proteolytic digestion from positions 378-384 in the amino acid sequence of the α subunit of the acetylcholine receptor and the carboxy terminus of the peptide KYVP released by proteolytic digestion from positions 486-489 in the amino acid sequence of the γ subunit. They were used to isolate these peptides from proteolytic digests of polypeptides from the acetylcholine receptor. Sealed vesicles containing the native acetylcholine receptor were labeled with pyridoxal phosphate and sodium [3H]-borohydride. The effect of saponin on the incorporation of pyridoxamine phosphate into lysine α380 and lysine γ486 from the acetylcholine receptor in these vesicles was assessed with the immunoadsorbents. The conclusions that follow from these results are that lysine α380 is on the inside surface of a vesicle and lysine γ486 is on the outside surface. Because a majority (85%) of the total binding sites for α-bungarotoxin bind the toxin in the absence of saponin, the majority of the vesicles are right side out with the inside of the vesicle corresponding to the cytoplasmic surface and the outside of the vesicle corresponding to the extracytoplasmic, synaptic surface. Because lysine α380 and lysine γ486 lie on opposite sides of the membrane, a membrane-spanning segment must be located between the two positions occupied by these two amino acids in the common sequence of a polypeptide of the acetylcholine receptor

  1. Topological dispositions of lysine. alpha. 380 and lysine. gamma. 486 in the acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, B.P. (Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla (USA))

    1991-04-23

    The locations have been determined, with respect to the plasma membrane, of lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 in the {alpha} subunit and the {gamma} subunit, respectively, of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica. Immunoadsorbents were constructed that recognize the carboxy terminus of the peptide GVKYIAE released by proteolytic digestion from positions 378-384 in the amino acid sequence of the {alpha} subunit of the acetylcholine receptor and the carboxy terminus of the peptide KYVP released by proteolytic digestion from positions 486-489 in the amino acid sequence of the {gamma} subunit. They were used to isolate these peptides from proteolytic digests of polypeptides from the acetylcholine receptor. Sealed vesicles containing the native acetylcholine receptor were labeled with pyridoxal phosphate and sodium ({sup 3}H)-borohydride. The effect of saponin on the incorporation of pyridoxamine phosphate into lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 from the acetylcholine receptor in these vesicles was assessed with the immunoadsorbents. The conclusions that follow from these results are that lysine {alpha}380 is on the inside surface of a vesicle and lysine {gamma}486 is on the outside surface. Because a majority (85%) of the total binding sites for {alpha}-bungarotoxin bind the toxin in the absence of saponin, the majority of the vesicles are right side out with the inside of the vesicle corresponding to the cytoplasmic surface and the outside of the vesicle corresponding to the extracytoplasmic, synaptic surface. Because lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 lie on opposite sides of the membrane, a membrane-spanning segment must be located between the two positions occupied by these two amino acids in the common sequence of a polypeptide of the acetylcholine receptor.

  2. Bacteriophages of Leuconostoc, Oenococcus and Weissella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold P. Kot

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Leuconostoc (Ln., Weissella and Oenococcus form a group of related genera of lactic acid bacteria, which once all shared the name Leuconostoc. They are associated with plants, fermented vegetable products, raw milk, dairy products, meat and fish. Most of industrially relevant Leuconostoc strains can be classified as either Ln. mesenteroides or Ln. pseudomesenteroides. They are important flavor producers in dairy fermentations and they initiate nearly all vegetable fermentations. Therefore bacteriophages attacking Leuconostoc strains may negatively influence the production process. Bacteriophages attacking Leuconostoc strains were first reported in 1946. Since then, the majority of described Leuconostoc phages was isolated from either dairy products or fermented vegetable products. Both lytic and temperate phages of Leuconostoc were reported. Most of Leuconostoc phages examined using electron microscopy belong to the Siphoviridae family and differ in morphological details. Hybridization and comparative genomic studies of Leuconostoc phages suggest that they can be divided into several groups, however overall diversity of Leuconostoc phages is much lower as compared to e.g. lactococcal phages. Several fully sequenced genomes of Leuconostoc phages have been deposited in public databases. Lytic phages of Leuconostoc can be divided into two host species-specific groups with similarly organized genomes that shared very low nucleotide similarity. Phages of dairy Leuconostoc have rather limited host-ranges. The receptor binding proteins of two lytic Ln. pseudomesenteroides phages have been identified. Molecular tools for detection of dairy Leuconostoc phages have been developed. The rather limited data on phages of Oenococcus and Weissella show that i lysogeny seems to be abundant in Oenococcus strains, and ii several phages infecting Weissella cibaria are also able to productively infect strains of other Weissella species and even strains of the genus

  3. Montmorillonite-induced Bacteriophage φ6 Disassembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusiak, A.; Gottlieb, P.; Katz, A.; Alimova, A.; Steiner, J. C.; Block, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    It is estimated that there are 1031 virus particles on Earth making viruses an order of magnitude more prevalent in number than prokaryotes with the vast majority of viruses being bacteriophages. Clays are a major component of soils and aquatic sediments and can react with RNA, proteins and bacterial biofilms. The clays in soils serve as an important moderator between phage and their host bacteria, helping to preserve the evolutionary balance. Studies on the effects of clays on viral infectivity have given somewhat contradictory results; possibly a consequence of clay-virus interactions being dependent on the unique structure of particular viruses. In this work, the interaction between montmorillonite and the bacteriophage φ6 is investigated. φ6 is a member of the cystovirus family that infects Pseudomonas syringe, a common plant pathogen. As a member of the cystovirus family with an enveloped structure, φ6 serves as a model for reoviruses, a human pathogen. Experiments were conducted with φ6 suspended in dilute, purified homoionic commercial-grade montmorillonite over a range of virus:clay ratios. At a 1:100000 virus:clay ratio, the clay reduced viral infectivity by 99%. The minimum clay to virus ratio which results in a measurable reduction of P. syringae infection is 1:1. Electron microscopy demonstrates that mixed suspensions of smectite and virus co-aggregate to form flocs encompassing virions within the smectite. Both free viral particles as well as those imbedded in the flocs are seen in the micrographs to be missing the envelope- leaving only the nucleocapsid (NC) intact; indicating that smectite inactivates the virus by envelope disassembly. These results have strong implications in the evolution of both the φ6 virus and its P. syringae host cells. TEM of aggregate showing several disassembled NCs.

  4. A Hypothesis for Bacteriophage DNA Packaging Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Serwer

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The hypothesis is presented that bacteriophage DNA packaging motors have a cycle comprised of bind/release thermal ratcheting with release-associated DNA pushing via ATP-dependent protein folding. The proposed protein folding occurs in crystallographically observed peptide segments that project into an axial channel of a protein 12-mer (connector that serves, together with a coaxial ATPase multimer, as the entry portal. The proposed cycle begins when reverse thermal motion causes the connector’s peptide segments to signal the ATPase multimer to bind both ATP and the DNA molecule, thereby producing a dwell phase recently demonstrated by single-molecule procedures. The connector-associated peptide segments activate by transfer of energy from ATP during the dwell. The proposed function of connector/ATPase symmetry mismatches is to reduce thermal noise-induced signaling errors. After a dwell, ATP is cleaved and the DNA molecule released. The activated peptide segments push the released DNA molecule, thereby producing a burst phase recently shown to consist of four mini-bursts. The constraint of four mini-bursts is met by proposing that each mini-burst occurs via pushing by three of the 12 subunits of the connector. If all four mini-bursts occur, the cycle repeats. If the mini-bursts are not completed, a second cycle is superimposed on the first cycle. The existence of the second cycle is based on data recently obtained with bacteriophage T3. When both cycles stall, energy is diverted to expose the DNA molecule to maturation cleavage.

  5. The isolation and characterization of Campylobacter jejuni bacteriophages from free range and indoor poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Jane; Barton, Mary D; Heuzenroeder, Michael W

    2013-02-22

    Six hundred and sixty one samples - primarily fresh chicken faeces - were processed to isolate wild type Campylobacter jejuni bacteriophages, via overlay agar methods using C. jejuni NCTC 12662. The aims of this study were to isolate and purify bacteriophages and then test for their ability to lyse field strains of C. jejuni in vitro. Of all samples processed, 130 were positive for bacteriophages. A distinct difference was observed between samples from different poultry enterprises. No bacteriophages could be isolated from indoor broilers. The majority of bacteriophages were isolated from free range poultry - both broilers and egg layers. Bacteriophages were purified and then selected for characterization based on their ability to produce clear lysis on plaque assay, as opposed to turbid plaques. Two hundred and forty one C. jejuni field isolates were tested for sensitivity to the bacteriophages. Lysis was graded subjectively and any minimal lysis was excluded. Using this system, 59.0% of the C. jejuni isolates showed significant sensitivity to at least one bacteriophage. The sensitivity to individual bacteriophages ranged from 10.0% to 32.5% of the C. jejuni isolates. Five bacteriophages were examined by electron microscopy and determined to belong to the Myoviridae family. The physical size, predicted genetic composition and genome size of the bacteriophages correlated well with other reported Campylobacter bacteriophages. The reasons for the observed difference between indoor broilers and free range poultry is unknown, but are postulated to be due to differences in the Campylobacter population in birds under different rearing conditions.

  6. ß-Lysine discrimination by lysyl-tRNA synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilreath, Marla S; Roy, Hervé; Bullwinkle, Tammy J;

    2011-01-01

    Elongation factor P is modified with (R)-ß-lysine by the lysyl-tRNA synthetase (LysRS) paralog PoxA. PoxA specificity is orthogonal to LysRS, despite their high similarity. To investigate a- and ß-lysine recognition by LysRS and PoxA, amino acid replacements were made in the LysRS active site gui...... enantiomers of ß-lysine were substrates for tRNA aminoacylation by LysRS, which, together with the relaxed specificity of the A233S variant, suggest a possible means to develop systems for in vivo co-translational insertion of ß-amino acids.......Elongation factor P is modified with (R)-ß-lysine by the lysyl-tRNA synthetase (LysRS) paralog PoxA. PoxA specificity is orthogonal to LysRS, despite their high similarity. To investigate a- and ß-lysine recognition by LysRS and PoxA, amino acid replacements were made in the LysRS active site...

  7. Oligo-lysine Induced Formation of Silica Particles in Neutral Silicate Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Oligo-(lysine)n (n = 1-4) containing different numbers of lysine residues was used to induce the condensation of silicic acid to form silica particles in neutral silicate solution. It was found that the condensation rate and the formation of silica particles are dependent on the number of lysine residues in an oligo-lysine. Oligo-lysine with more lysine residues can link more silicic acid together to form a matrix that promotes the effective aggregation of the condensed silica pieces to form large silica particles.

  8. Targeting Lysine Deacetylases (KDACs in Parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    Full Text Available Due to an increasing problem of drug resistance among almost all parasites species ranging from protists to worms, there is an urgent need to explore new drug targets and their inhibitors to provide new and effective parasitic therapeutics. In this regard, there is growing interest in exploring known drug leads of human epigenetic enzymes as potential starting points to develop novel treatments for parasitic diseases. This approach of repurposing (starting with validated targets and inhibitors is quite attractive since it has the potential to reduce the expense of drug development and accelerate the process of developing novel drug candidates for parasite control. Lysine deacetylases (KDACs are among the most studied epigenetic drug targets of humans, and a broad range of small-molecule inhibitors for these enzymes have been reported. In this work, we identify the KDAC protein families in representative species across important classes of parasites, screen a compound library of 23 hydroxamate- or benzamide-based small molecules KDAC inhibitors, and report their activities against a range of parasitic species, including the pathogen of malaria (Plasmodium falciparum, kinetoplastids (Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania donovani, and nematodes (Brugia malayi, Dirofilaria immitis and Haemonchus contortus. Compound activity against parasites is compared to that observed against the mammalian cell line (L929 mouse fibroblast in order to determine potential parasite-versus-host selectivity. The compounds showed nanomolar to sub-nanomolar potency against various parasites, and some selectivity was observed within the small panel of compounds tested. The possible binding modes of the active compounds at the different protein target sites within different species were explored by docking to homology models to help guide the discovery of more selective, parasite-specific inhibitors. This current work supports previous studies that explored the use of KDAC

  9. Targeting Lysine Deacetylases (KDACs) in Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Rosa, Bruce A; Nare, Bakela; Powell, Kerrie; Valente, Sergio; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Marshall, Garland R; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2015-01-01

    Due to an increasing problem of drug resistance among almost all parasites species ranging from protists to worms, there is an urgent need to explore new drug targets and their inhibitors to provide new and effective parasitic therapeutics. In this regard, there is growing interest in exploring known drug leads of human epigenetic enzymes as potential starting points to develop novel treatments for parasitic diseases. This approach of repurposing (starting with validated targets and inhibitors) is quite attractive since it has the potential to reduce the expense of drug development and accelerate the process of developing novel drug candidates for parasite control. Lysine deacetylases (KDACs) are among the most studied epigenetic drug targets of humans, and a broad range of small-molecule inhibitors for these enzymes have been reported. In this work, we identify the KDAC protein families in representative species across important classes of parasites, screen a compound library of 23 hydroxamate- or benzamide-based small molecules KDAC inhibitors, and report their activities against a range of parasitic species, including the pathogen of malaria (Plasmodium falciparum), kinetoplastids (Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania donovani), and nematodes (Brugia malayi, Dirofilaria immitis and Haemonchus contortus). Compound activity against parasites is compared to that observed against the mammalian cell line (L929 mouse fibroblast) in order to determine potential parasite-versus-host selectivity). The compounds showed nanomolar to sub-nanomolar potency against various parasites, and some selectivity was observed within the small panel of compounds tested. The possible binding modes of the active compounds at the different protein target sites within different species were explored by docking to homology models to help guide the discovery of more selective, parasite-specific inhibitors. This current work supports previous studies that explored the use of KDAC inhibitors in

  10. Seed-Specific Expression of a Lysine-Rich Protein Gene, GhLRP, from Cotton Significantly Increases the Lysine Content in Maize Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yue

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Maize seed storage proteins are a major source of human and livestock consumption. However, these proteins have poor nutritional value, because they are deficient in lysine and tryptophan. Much research has been done to elevate the lysine content by reducing zein content or regulating the activities of key enzymes in lysine metabolism. Using the naturally lysine-rich protein genes, sb401 and SBgLR, from potato, we previously increased the lysine and protein contents of maize seeds. Here, we examined another natural lysine-rich protein gene, GhLRP, from cotton, which increased the lysine content of transgenic maize seeds at levels varying from 16.2% to 65.0% relative to the wild-type. The total protein content was not distinctly different, except in the six transgenic lines. The lipid and starch levels did not differ substantially in Gossypium hirsutum L. lysine-rich protein (GhLRP transgenic kernels when compared to wild-type. The agronomic characteristics of all the transgenic maize were also normal. GhLRP is a high-lysine protein candidate gene for increasing the lysine content of maize. This study provided a valuable model system for improving maize lysine content.

  11. Bacteriophage therapy for safeguarding animal and human health: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Ruchi; Dhama, Kuldeep; Kumar, Amit; Rahal, Anu; Kapoor, Sanjay

    2014-02-01

    Since the discovery of bacteriophages at the beginning of the 19th century their contribution to bacterial evolution and ecology and use in a variety of applications in biotechnology and medicine has been recognized and understood. Bacteriophages are natural bacterial killers, proven as best biocontrol agents due to their ability to lyse host bacterial cells specifically thereby helping in disease prevention and control. The requirement of such therapeutic approach is straight away required in view of the global emergence of Multidrug Resistant (MDR) strains of bacteria and rapidly developing resistance to antibiotics in both animals and humans along with increasing food safety concerns including of residual antibiotic toxicities. Phage typing is a popular tool to differentiate bacterial isolates and to identify and characterize outbreak-associated strains of Salmonella, Campylobacter, Escherichia and Listeria. Numerous methods viz. plaque morphology, ultracentrifugation in the density gradient of CsCl2, and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) have been found to be effective in detection of various phages. Bacteriophages have been isolated and recovered from samples of animal waste products of different livestock farms. High titer cocktails of broad spectrum lytic bacteriophages are usually used for clinical trial for assessing their therapeutic efficacy against antibiotic unresponsive infections in different animals. Bacteriophage therapy also helps to fight various bacterial infections of poultry viz. colibacillosis, salmonellosis and listeriosis. Moreover, the utility of phages concerning biosafety has raised the importance to explore and popularize the therapeutic dimension of this promising novel therapy which forms the topic of discussion of the present review.

  12. Bacteriophages as an alternative strategy for fighting biofilm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasion, Sylwia; Kwiatek, Magdalena; Gryko, Romuald; Mizak, Lidia; Malm, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The ability of microbes to form biofilms is an important element of their pathogenicity, and biofilm formation is a serious challenge for today's medicine. Fighting the clinical complications associated with biofilm formation is very difficult and linked to a high risk of failure, especially in a time of increasing bacterial resistance to antibiotics. Bacterial species most commonly isolated from biofilms include coagulase-negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. The frequent failure of antibiotic therapy led researchers to look for alternative methods and experiment with the use of antibacterial factors with a mechanism of action different from that of antibiotics. Experimental studies with bacteriophages and mixtures thereof, expressing lytic properties against numerous biofilm-forming bacterial species showed that bacteriophages may both prevent biofilm formation and contribute to eradication of biofilm bacteria. A specific role is played here by phage depolymerases, which facilitate the degradation of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and thus the permeation of bacteriophages into deeper biofilm layers and lysis of the susceptible bacterial cells. Much hope is placed in genetic modifications of bacteriophages that would allow the equipping bacteriophages with the function of depolymerase synthesis. The use of phage cocktails prevents the development of phage-resistant bacteria.

  13. Alternative bacteriophage life cycles: the carrier state of Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siringan, Patcharin; Connerton, Phillippa L; Cummings, Nicola J; Connerton, Ian F

    2014-01-01

    Members of the genus Campylobacter are frequently responsible for human enteric disease, often through consumption of contaminated poultry products. Bacteriophages are viruses that have the potential to control pathogenic bacteria, but understanding their complex life cycles is key to their successful exploitation. Treatment of Campylobacter jejuni biofilms with bacteriophages led to the discovery that phages had established a relationship with their hosts typical of the carrier state life cycle (CSLC), where bacteria and bacteriophages remain associated in equilibrium. Significant phenotypic changes include improved aerotolerance under nutrient-limited conditions that would confer an advantage to survive in extra-intestinal environments, but a lack in motility eliminated their ability to colonize chickens. Under these circumstances, phages can remain associated with a compatible host and continue to produce free virions to prospect for new hosts. Moreover, we demonstrate that CSLC host bacteria can act as expendable vehicles for the delivery of bacteriophages to new host bacteria within pre-colonized chickens. The CSLC represents an important phase in the ecology of Campylobacter bacteriophage. PMID:24671947

  14. Sequence variability of Campylobacter temperate bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng Lai-King

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prophages integrated within the chromosomes of Campylobacter jejuni isolates have been demonstrated very recently. Prior work with Campylobacter temperate bacteriophages, as well as evidence from prophages in other enteric bacteria, suggests these prophages might have a role in the biology and virulence of the organism. However, very little is known about the genetic variability of Campylobacter prophages which, if present, could lead to differential phenotypes in isolates carrying the phages versus those that do not. As a first step in the characterization of C. jejuni prophages, we investigated the distribution of prophage DNA within a C. jejuni population assessed the DNA and protein sequence variability within a subset of the putative prophages found. Results Southern blotting of C. jejuni DNA using probes from genes within the three putative prophages of the C. jejuni sequenced strain RM 1221 demonstrated the presence of at least one prophage gene in a large proportion (27/35 of isolates tested. Of these, 15 were positive for 5 or more of the 7 Campylobacter Mu-like phage 1 (CMLP 1, also designated Campylobacter jejuni integrated element 1, or CJIE 1 genes tested. Twelve of these putative prophages were chosen for further analysis. DNA sequencing of a 9,000 to 11,000 nucleotide region of each prophage demonstrated a close homology with CMLP 1 in both gene order and nucleotide sequence. Structural and sequence variability, including short insertions, deletions, and allele replacements, were found within the prophage genomes, some of which would alter the protein products of the ORFs involved. No insertions of novel genes were detected within the sequenced regions. The 12 prophages and RM 1221 had a % G+C very similar to C. jejuni sequenced strains, as well as promoter regions characteristic of C. jejuni. None of the putative prophages were successfully induced and propagated, so it is not known if they were functional or

  15. Improvement of escherichia coli for lysine overproduction through mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacterial isolates of Escherichia coli were obtained from the irrigation channel water. One of the isolates designated SW30 NIAB produced glutamic acid in cane molasses medium and was selected for further improvement for lysine overproduction. The cells of this strain were treated with a dose of 100 u/ g/ml of NTG(N-methyl-N-nitro-N-Nitrosoguanidine), for 90 minutes. From the cell population (3x108 cells/ml) exposed to NTG, only 1-2 percent cells survived and produced colonies. Independent colonies, 100 of them that survived the dose, were secured and subcultured. These were further screened against AEC (S-(2-aminoethyl)-L-cysteine) resistance on minimal agar medium MM-12. Among these 100 colonies, 10 proved resistant to AEC at a dose of 1000 ug/ml, and out of 10, three were lysine producers and produced 0.1-0.5 gm/ltr of lysine in L-6 medium. (author)

  16. Lysine fluxes across the jejunal epithelium in lysinuric protein intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjeux, J F; Simell, R O; Dumontier, A M; Perheentupa, J

    1980-06-01

    Lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI) is one of a group of genetic diseases in which intestinal absorption of the diamino acids lysine, arginine, and ornithine is impaired. In LPI, the clinical symptoms are more severe than in the kindred disorders. The mechanism of lysine absorption was, therefore, investigated in vitro on peroral jejunal biopsy specimens in seven patients with LPI and 27 controls. The lysine concentration ratio between cell compartment and medium was significantly higher in the LPI group (mean+/-SEM, 7.17+/-0.60) than in the controls (5.44+/-0.51). This was also true for the intracellular Na concentration (LPI, 73.6+/-10.8 mM; controls 42.3+/-3.7 mM). The rate of unidirectional influx of lysine across the luminal membrane was Na dependent and was the same in the two groups. In the absence of an electrochemical gradient, net transepithelial lysine secretion was observed in LPI. This was entirely the result of a 60% reduction of the unidirectional flux from mucosa to serosa. Calculation of unidirectional fluxes revealed the most striking difference at the basolateral membrane, where the flux from cells to serosa was reduced by 62% and the corresponding permeability coefficient reduced by 71%. A progressive reduction in short-circuit current appeared in the epithelia of all four patients with LPI tested after addition of 3 mM lysine. Thus, LPI appears to be the first disease in which a genetically determined transport defect has been demonstrated at the basolateral membrane. PMID:6773985

  17. Mapping the tail fiber as the receptor binding protein responsible for differential host specificity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophages PaP1 and JG004.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Le

    Full Text Available The first step in bacteriophage infection is recognition and binding to the host receptor, which is mediated by the phage receptor binding protein (RBP. Different RBPs can lead to differential host specificity. In many bacteriophages, such as Escherichia coli and Lactococcal phages, RBPs have been identified as the tail fiber or protruding baseplate proteins. However, the tail fiber-dependent host specificity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa phages has not been well studied. This study aimed to identify and investigate the binding specificity of the RBP of P. aeruginosa phages PaP1 and JG004. These two phages share high DNA sequence homology but exhibit different host specificities. A spontaneous mutant phage was isolated and exhibited broader host range compared with the parental phage JG004. Sequencing of its putative tail fiber and baseplate region indicated a single point mutation in ORF84 (a putative tail fiber gene, which resulted in the replacement of a positively charged lysine (K by an uncharged asparagine (N. We further demonstrated that the replacement of the tail fiber gene (ORF69 of PaP1 with the corresponding gene from phage JG004 resulted in a recombinant phage that displayed altered host specificity. Our study revealed the tail fiber-dependent host specificity in P. aeruginosa phages and provided an effective tool for its alteration. These contributions may have potential value in phage therapy.

  18. Advance of Bacteriophages as Therapeutic Agents in Bacterial Infection%噬茵体制剂治疗细菌感染的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张娜; 李书光; 陈金龙; 王金良; 沈志强

    2011-01-01

    Bacteriophage are bacterial parasites,and the use of phage as therapeutics to treat bacterial infection effectually, particularly in an era where antibiotic resistance has become so problematic. Bacteriophagic therapy will educt positive effect in bacterial infection with further research of phage. The progress in research on antisepticize mechanism, advantage as therapeutics , research of treatment bacterial infection and research of phage lysins were reviewed in this article.%噬菌体是一类细菌依赖性病毒,可有效地治疗细菌性感染,尤其是大量耐药菌株的出现使抗生素对细菌病的治疗越来越棘手,噬菌体疗法将对细菌病的控制起更加积极的作用.作者就噬菌体抗菌机理、治疗优势、噬菌体治疗细菌感染的研究及噬菌体裂解素的研究进展进行综述.

  19. Bacteriophage based probes for pathogen detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit; Arutyunov, Denis; Szymanski, Christine M; Evoy, Stephane

    2012-08-01

    Rapid and specific detection of pathogenic bacteria is important for the proper treatment, containment and prevention of human, animal and plant diseases. Identifying unique biological probes to achieve a high degree of specificity and minimize false positives has therefore garnered much interest in recent years. Bacteriophages are obligate intracellular parasites that subvert bacterial cell resources for their own multiplication and production of disseminative new virions, which repeat the cycle by binding specifically to the host surface receptors and injecting genetic material into the bacterial cells. The precision of host recognition in phages is imparted by the receptor binding proteins (RBPs) that are often located in the tail-spike or tail fiber protein assemblies of the virions. Phage host recognition specificity has been traditionally exploited for bacterial typing using laborious and time consuming bacterial growth assays. At the same time this feature makes phage virions or RBPs an excellent choice for the development of probes capable of selectively capturing bacteria on solid surfaces with subsequent quick and automatic detection of the binding event. This review focuses on the description of pathogen detection approaches based on immobilized phage virions as well as pure recombinant RBPs. Specific advantages of RBP-based molecular probes are also discussed.

  20. Interplay Between Bacteriophages and Restriction-Modification Systems in Enterococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pristas Peter

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The complete genomes of Enterococcus faecalis bacteriophages were analyzed for tetranucleotide words avoidance. Very similar tetranucleotide composition was found in all tested genomes with strong underrepresentation of palindromic GATC and GGCC words. This avoidance could be explained as a protection mechanism against host restriction-modification systems as a clear correlation was found between avoidance of palindromic words and the specificity of E. faecalis restriction and modification systems. No similar avoidance of tetranucleotide words was observed for non-palindromic words. A weak correlation was observed between avoidance of tetranucleotide palindromes in bacteriophage genomes and the possession of phage encoded DNA methyltransferases confirming the interrelation between bacteriophage genomes composition and restriction and modification systems in enterococci

  1. A quorum-sensing-induced bacteriophage defense mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyland-Kroghsbo, Nina Molin; Mærkedahl, Rasmus Baadsgaard; Svenningsen, Sine

    2013-01-01

    One of the key determinants of the size, composition, structure, and development of a microbial community is the predation pressure by bacteriophages. Accordingly, bacteria have evolved a battery of antiphage defense strategies. Since maintaining constantly elevated defenses is costly, we...... understanding of the factors that naturally shape microbial communities is required. One of the key factors in this context is the interactions between bacteria and the most abundant biological entities on Earth, namely, the bacteriophages that prey on bacteria. This proof-of-principle study shows that quorum...... sensing plays an important role in determining the susceptibility of E. coli to infection by bacteriophages ¿ and ¿. On the basis of our findings in the classical Escherichia coli-¿ model system, we suggest that quorum sensing may serve as a general strategy to protect bacteria specifically under...

  2. Structural aspects of the solvation shell of lysine and acetylated lysine: A Car-Parrinello and classical molecular dynamics investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, V.; Raugei, S.

    2009-12-01

    Lysine acetylation is a post-translational modification, which modulates the affinity of protein-protein and/or protein-DNA complexes. Its crucial role as a switch in signaling pathways highlights the relevance of charged chemical groups in determining the interactions between water and biomolecules. A great effort has been recently devoted to assess the reliability of classical molecular dynamics simulations in describing the solvation properties of charged moieties. In the spirit of these investigations, we performed classical and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations on lysine and acetylated-lysine in aqueous solution. A comparative analysis between the two computational schemes is presented with a focus on the first solvation shell of the charged groups. An accurate structural analysis unveils subtle, yet statistically significant, differences which are discussed in connection to the significant electronic density charge transfer occurring between the solute and the surrounding water molecules.

  3. Structural aspects of the solvation shell of lysine and acetylated lysine: A Car-Parrinello and classical molecular dynamics investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysine acetylation is a post-translational modification, which modulates the affinity of protein-protein and/or protein-DNA complexes. Its crucial role as a switch in signaling pathways highlights the relevance of charged chemical groups in determining the interactions between water and biomolecules. A great effort has been recently devoted to assess the reliability of classical molecular dynamics simulations in describing the solvation properties of charged moieties. In the spirit of these investigations, we performed classical and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations on lysine and acetylated-lysine in aqueous solution. A comparative analysis between the two computational schemes is presented with a focus on the first solvation shell of the charged groups. An accurate structural analysis unveils subtle, yet statistically significant, differences which are discussed in connection to the significant electronic density charge transfer occurring between the solute and the surrounding water molecules.

  4. Bacteriophages as potential treatment option for antibiotic resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Robert; van der Westhuizen, Wouter; Lee, Ji-Yun; Coetsee, Elke; Boucher, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    The world is facing an ever-increasing problem with antibiotic resistant bacteria and we are rapidly heading for a post-antibiotic era. There is an urgent need to investigate alterative treatment options while there are still a few antibiotics left. Bacteriophages are viruses that specifically target bacteria. Before the development of antibiotics, some efforts were made to use bacteriophages as a treatment option, but most of this research stopped soon after the discovery of antibiotics. There are two different replication options which bacteriophages employ. These are the lytic and lysogenic life cycles. Both these life cycles have potential as treatment options. There are various advantages and disadvantages to the use of bacteriophages as treatment options. The main advantage is the specificity of bacteriophages and treatments can be designed to specifically target pathogenic bacteria while not negatively affecting the normal microbiota. There are various advantages to this. However, the high level of specificity also creates potential problems, the main being the requirement of highly specific diagnostic procedures. Another potential problem with phage therapy includes the development of immunity and limitations with the registration of phage therapy options. The latter is driving research toward the expression of phage genes which break the bacterial cell wall, which could then be used as a treatment option. Various aspects of phage therapy have been investigated in studies undertaken by our research group. We have investigated specificity of phages to various avian pathogenic E. coli isolates. Furthermore, the exciting NanoSAM technology has been employed to investigate bacteriophage replication and aspects of this will be discussed.

  5. Bacteriophages as potential treatment option for antibiotic resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Robert; van der Westhuizen, Wouter; Lee, Ji-Yun; Coetsee, Elke; Boucher, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    The world is facing an ever-increasing problem with antibiotic resistant bacteria and we are rapidly heading for a post-antibiotic era. There is an urgent need to investigate alterative treatment options while there are still a few antibiotics left. Bacteriophages are viruses that specifically target bacteria. Before the development of antibiotics, some efforts were made to use bacteriophages as a treatment option, but most of this research stopped soon after the discovery of antibiotics. There are two different replication options which bacteriophages employ. These are the lytic and lysogenic life cycles. Both these life cycles have potential as treatment options. There are various advantages and disadvantages to the use of bacteriophages as treatment options. The main advantage is the specificity of bacteriophages and treatments can be designed to specifically target pathogenic bacteria while not negatively affecting the normal microbiota. There are various advantages to this. However, the high level of specificity also creates potential problems, the main being the requirement of highly specific diagnostic procedures. Another potential problem with phage therapy includes the development of immunity and limitations with the registration of phage therapy options. The latter is driving research toward the expression of phage genes which break the bacterial cell wall, which could then be used as a treatment option. Various aspects of phage therapy have been investigated in studies undertaken by our research group. We have investigated specificity of phages to various avian pathogenic E. coli isolates. Furthermore, the exciting NanoSAM technology has been employed to investigate bacteriophage replication and aspects of this will be discussed. PMID:24619620

  6. Bacteriophages of Soft Rot Enterobacteriaceae-a minireview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajkowski, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Soft rot Enterobacteriaceae (Pectobacterium spp. and Dickeya spp., formerly pectinolytic Erwinia spp.) are ubiquitous necrotrophic bacterial pathogens that infect a large number of different plant species worldwide, including economically important crops. Despite the fact that these bacteria have been studied for more than 50 years, little is known of their corresponding predators: bacteriophages, both lytic and lysogenic. The aim of this minireview is to critically summarize recent ecological, biological and molecular research on bacteriophages infecting Pectobacterium spp. and Dickeya spp. with the main focus on current and future perspectives in that field.

  7. Engineered enzymatically active bacteriophages and methods of uses thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, James J (Newton, MA); Kobayashi, Hideki (Yokohama, JP); Kearn, Mads (Ottawa, CA); Araki, Michihiro (Minatoku, JP); Friedland, Ari (Boston, MA); Lu, Timothy Kuan-Ta (Palo Alto, CA)

    2012-05-22

    The present invention provides engineered bacteriophages that express at least one biofilm degrading enzyme on their surface and uses thereof for degrading bacterial biofilms. The invention also provides genetically engineered bacteriophages expressing the biofilm degrading enzymes and proteins necessary for the phage to replicate in different naturally occurring biofilm producing bacteria. The phages of the invention allow a method of biofilm degradation by the use of one or only a few administration of the phage because the system using these phages is self perpetuating, and capable of degrading biofilm even when the concentration of bacteria within the biofilm is low.

  8. Molecular and chemical engineering of bacteriophages for potential medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodyra, Katarzyna; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2015-04-01

    Recent progress in molecular engineering has contributed to the great progress of medicine. However, there are still difficult problems constituting a challenge for molecular biology and biotechnology, e.g. new generation of anticancer agents, alternative biosensors or vaccines. As a biotechnological tool, bacteriophages (phages) offer a promising alternative to traditional approaches. They can be applied as anticancer agents, novel platforms in vaccine design, or as target carriers in drug discovery. Phages also offer solutions for modern cell imaging, biosensor construction or food pathogen detection. Here we present a review of bacteriophage research as a dynamically developing field with promising prospects for further development of medicine and biotechnology.

  9. Salmonella and Campylobacter: Antimicrobial resistance and bacteriophage control in poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Ar'Quette; Hashem, Fawzy; Parveen, Salina

    2016-02-01

    Salmonella and Campylobacter are major causes of foodborne related illness and are traditionally associated with consuming undercooked poultry and/or consuming products that have been cross contaminated with raw poultry. Many of the isolated Salmonella and Campylobacter that can cause disease have displayed antimicrobial resistance phenotypes. Although poultry producers have reduced on-the-farm overuse of antimicrobials, antimicrobial resistant Salmonella and Campylobacter strains still persist. One method of bio-control, that is producing promising results, is the use of lytic bacteriophages. This review will highlight the current emergence and persistence of antimicrobial resistant Salmonella and Campylobacter recovered from poultry as well as bacteriophage research interventions and limitations.

  10. Mechanism of bacteriophage conversion of lipase activity in Staphylococcus aureus.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, C Y; Iandolo, J J

    1985-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus PS54 harbors two temperate bacteriophages and manifests no lipase activity on egg yolk agar. Curing of one of the resident prophages (L54a) restores lipase activity. To study the mechanism of bacteriophage conversion, the prophage was cured, and the gene encoding lipase activity was cloned into pBR322 in Escherichia coli on a 2.9-kilobase DNA fragment of the chromosome. The fragment was subcloned into a shuttle vector and subsequently transformed into S. aureus and Bacil...

  11. Environmental augmentation with bacteriophage prevents colibacillosis in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gohary, F A; Huff, W E; Huff, G R; Rath, N C; Zhou, Z Y; Donoghue, A M

    2014-11-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that kill bacteria. They are plentiful in nature; are safe, having no known activity to human or animal cells; and are an attractive alternative to antibiotics. The objectives of this research were to establish an experimental model of colibacillosis induced by indirect exposure to Escherichia coli and to determine if bacteriophage could protect the birds from developing colibacillosis. In study 1 there were 6 treatments with 2 replicate pens of 25 birds. The treatments were control warm brooded; control cold stressed; litter inoculated with E. coli, warm brooded; litter inoculated with E. coli, cold stressed; seeder birds (5 per pen) challenged with E. coli, warm brooded; and seeder birds (5 per pen), cold stressed. The study concluded when the birds were 3 wk of age. Body weights at 1, 2, and 3 wk of age were significantly decreased (P ≤ 0.05) by cold stress, decreased at 1 and 2 wk of age by both the litter and seeder bird treatments compared with the control treatment and by the seeder bird treatment at 3 wk of age. Study 2 consisted of 8 treatments with 2 replicate pens of 20 birds per treatment. The treatments were control, warm brooded; control, cold stressed; litter inoculated with E. coli, cold stressed; and seeder birds (5/pen) challenged with E. coli, cold stressed with and without bacteriophage treatment. In the bacteriophage treatments the bacteriophages were sprayed on the litter. The study was concluded at 3 wk of age. Body weights at 1 wk of age were significantly (P ≤ 0.05) decreased from the control treatment by the seeder bird treatment and were significantly (P ≤ 0.05) higher in all the bacteriophage treatments compared with their matched untreated treatments, except in the control cold stressed treatment. Mortality was significantly (P ≤ 0.05) decreased by bacteriophage in the litter challenged treatment. These data suggest that augmentation of the environment with bacteriophage is a practical and efficacious

  12. Selection and Characterization of a Lysine Yielding Mutant of Corynebacterium glutamicum - a Soil Isolate from Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Habib-ur-Rehman§٭, Abdul Hameed and Safia Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    L-lysine is the second limiting amino acid for poultry and supplemented in broiler feed for optimal performance. Lysine can be produced by inducing mutation in glutamate producing bacteria. The study was conducted to enhance lysine production from a local strain of Corynebacterium glutamicum. The bacterium was mutated by exposure to UV. Mutants resistant to s-2-aminoethyle L-cystein (AEC) and showing auxotrophy for L-homoserine were screened for lysine production qualitatively and quantitativ...

  13. Norovirus and FRNA bacteriophage determined by RT-qPCR and infectious FRNA bacteriophage in wastewater and oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, John; Keaveney, Sinéad; Rajko-Nenow, Paulina; O'Flaherty, Vincent; Doré, William

    2013-09-15

    Norovirus (NoV), the leading cause of adult non-bacterial gastroenteritis can be commonly detected in wastewater but the extent of NoV removal provided by wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is unclear. We monitored a newly commissioned WWTP with UV disinfection on a weekly basis over a six month period for NoV using RT-qPCR and for FRNA bacteriophage GA using both RT-qPCR (total concentration) and a plaque assay (infectious concentration). Mean concentrations of NoV GI and GII in influent wastewater were reduced by 0.25 and 0.41 log10 genome copies 100 ml(-1), respectively by the WWTP. The mean concentration of total FRNA bacteriophage GA was reduced by 0.35 log genome copies 100 ml(-1) compared to a reduction of infectious FRNA bacteriophage GA of 2.13 log PFU 100 ml(-1). A significant difference between concentrations of infectious and total FRNA bacteriophage GA was observed in treated, but not in untreated wastewaters. We conclude that RT-qPCR in isolation underestimates the reduction of infectious virus during wastewater treatment. We further compared the concentrations of infectious virus in combined sewer overflow (CSO) and UV treated effluents using FRNA bacteriophage GA. A greater percentage (98%) of infectious virus is released in CSO discharges than UV treated effluent (44%). Following a CSO discharge, concentrations of NoV GII and infectious FRNA bacteriophage GA in oysters from less than the limit of detection to 3150 genome copies 100 g(-1) and 1050 PFU 100 g(-1) respectively.

  14. File list: His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Oth.Adp.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: His.Lng.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation L...ung SRX099891 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Lng.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Gon.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation G...onad http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Gon.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...ancreas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Plc.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Plc.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...lacenta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Plc.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.Gon.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Gonad SRX1060...566,SRX1060567,SRX1060557 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pl...uripotent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pl...uripotent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...lood http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Pan.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pa...ncreas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Pan.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Bon.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...one http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bon.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Utr.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Utr.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ut...erus http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Utr.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation L...ung SRX099891 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation K...idney http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...luripotent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Kid.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Kid.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation K...idney http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Kid.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Bl...ood http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Pan.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pa...ncreas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Pan.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.EmF.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.EmF.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Embryonic fib...roblast http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.EmF.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Lng.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Lu...ng http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Lng.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Dig.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Di...gestive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Dig.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...ancreas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation A...ll cell types SRX099891 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Unc.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation U...nclassified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Unc.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Myo.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Mu...scle http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Myo.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Neu.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation N...eural http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ep...idermis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...lood http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Utr.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Utr.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation U...terus http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Utr.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Oth.Gon.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Gonad SRX1060...566,SRX1060567,SRX1060557 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation L...iver http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Myo.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation M...uscle http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Myo.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Bld.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...lood http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Lu...ng http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Kid.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Kid.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ki...dney http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Kid.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Bl...ood http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.CDV.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ca...rdiovascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.CDV.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Emb.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Em...bryo http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Emb.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Utr.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Utr.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ut...erus http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Utr.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Bon.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Bo...ne http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bon.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation D...igestive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...reast http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Al...l cell types SRX099894,SRX099897 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Gon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation G...onad http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Gon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ne...ural http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Brs.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...reast http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Brs.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.Dig.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Dig.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Digestive tra...ct http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Dig.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Li...ver http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Liv.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Li...ver http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...rostate http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ki...dney http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.Dig.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Dig.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Digestive tra...ct http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Dig.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.CDV.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ca...rdiovascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.CDV.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Brs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Br...east http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Al...l cell types SRX099897,SRX099894 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Bl...ood http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Plc.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Plc.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...lacenta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Plc.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Emb.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Em...bryo http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Emb.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Kid.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Kid.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation K...idney http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Kid.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Bo...ne http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Epd.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation E...pidermis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ot...hers http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. Contribution of protozoa to lysine synthesis in the in vitro rumen microbial ecosystem.

    OpenAIRE

    Onodera, R

    1986-01-01

    Isotopic tracer experiments were conducted in vitro to determine contribution of protozoa toward the biosynthesis of lysine in the rumen microbial ecosystem. The presence of protozoa in a rumen microbial suspension always increased lysine synthesis from aspartate. Rumen contents from a faunated goat produced a higher amount of lysine than did those from a defaunated one.

  8. The growing landscape of lysine acetylation links metabolism and cell signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choudhary, Chuna Ram; Weinert, Brian Tate; Nishida, Yuya;

    2014-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a conserved protein post-translational modification that links acetyl-coenzyme A metabolism and cellular signalling. Recent advances in the identification and quantification of lysine acetylation by mass spectrometry have increased our understanding of lysine acetylation, im...

  9. File list: His.Dig.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation D...igestive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Dig.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pr...ostate http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pr...ostate http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Oth.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ot...hers http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Spl.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Spl.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Sp...leen http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Spl.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Oth.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation O...thers http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Oth.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Lu...ng http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pa...ncreas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ep...idermis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Utr.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Utr.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ut...erus http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Utr.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Spl.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Spl.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Sp...leen http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Spl.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Liv.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Li...ver http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation O...thers http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Emb.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Em...bryo http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Emb.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation E...pidermis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ep...idermis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pa...ncreas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Gon.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Go...nad SRX099894,SRX099897 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Gon.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation A...ll cell types SRX099891 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Un...classified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...lood http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation N...eural http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Spl.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Spl.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Sp...leen http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Spl.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.PSC.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...luripotent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation N...eural http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pl...acenta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...one http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...lacenta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...luripotent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Utr.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Utr.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation U...terus http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Utr.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.NoD.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.NoD.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine No descriptio...n http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.NoD.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.NoD.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.NoD.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine No descriptio...n http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.NoD.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Oth.NoD.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.NoD.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine No descriptio...n http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.NoD.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.NoD.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.NoD.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine No descriptio...n http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.NoD.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Prs.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Prost...ate http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Prs.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Myo.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Muscl...e http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Myo.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Unclas...sified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Prosta...te http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Epide...rmis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Lung h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Pancre...as http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.CDV.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Cardio...vascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.CDV.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Epider...mis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Adipoc...yte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Prosta...te http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Blood... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Oth.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Others... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Lng.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Lung h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Lng.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.ALL.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation All ce...ll types SRX099893,SRX099896 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.ALL.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Epide...rmis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Neura...l http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Plc.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Plc.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Placen...ta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Plc.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Plurip...otent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Liv.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Liver ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Pancr...eas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Breast... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation All c...ell types SRX099890 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Bld.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Blood ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Liver ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Emb.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Embryo... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Emb.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Gon.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Gonad... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Gon.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Unclas...sified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Utr.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Utr.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Uterus... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Utr.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation All c...ell types SRX099890 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Blood ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Blood... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Pluri...potent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.PSC.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Plurip...otent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Adipo...cyte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Prs.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Prosta...te http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Prs.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Neu.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Neural... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.CDV.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Cardi...ovascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Gon.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Gonad ...SRX099893,SRX099896 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Gon.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Bone ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Dig.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Digest...ive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Dig.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Blood... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Uncla...ssified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Utr.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Utr.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Uteru...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Utr.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Liver ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Dig.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Diges...tive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Dig.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.ALL.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation All ce...ll types SRX099893,SRX099896 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.ALL.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Lung h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Liv.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Liver ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Blood ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Blood ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Pan.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Pancr...eas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Pan.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Epider...mis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Pancr...eas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Others... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Plurip...otent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Neura...l http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation All ce...ll types SRX099893,SRX099896 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Placen...ta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Place...nta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Prs.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Prost...ate http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Prs.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Bon.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Bone h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bon.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Oth.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Others... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Kidney... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Myo.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Muscle... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Myo.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Lung ...SRX099890 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Pan.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Pancr...eas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Pan.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Uncla...ssified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.CDV.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Cardi...ovascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Dig.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Diges...tive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Dig.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Unc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Unclas...sified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Unc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Prost...ate http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Bon.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Bone h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bon.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Adp.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Adipo...cyte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Utr.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Utr.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Uteru...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Utr.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Unc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Uncla...ssified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Unc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Oth.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Others... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Adp.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Adipoc...yte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Adp.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Gon.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Gonad ...SRX099893,SRX099896 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Gon.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Digest...ive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Adipo...cyte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Dig.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Diges...tive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Dig.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Neural... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Brs.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Breast... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Neural... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Myo.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Muscle... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Myo.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Lng.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Lung h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Lng.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.CDV.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Cardio...vascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.CDV.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Bone h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Diges...tive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Epider...mis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Breas...t http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Other...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. Acetylation site specificities of lysine deacetylase inhibitors in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schölz, Christian; Weinert, Brian Tate; Wagner, Sebastian A;

    2015-01-01

    Lysine deacetylases inhibitors (KDACIs) are used in basic research, and many are being investigated in clinical trials for treatment of cancer and other diseases. However, their specificities in cells are incompletely characterized. Here we used quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) to obtain acety...

  17. Predicting post-translational lysine acetylation using support vector machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gnad, Florian; Ren, Shubin; Choudhary, Chunaram;

    2010-01-01

    spectrometry to identify 3600 lysine acetylation sites on 1750 human proteins covering most of the previously annotated sites and providing the most comprehensive acetylome so far. This dataset should provide an excellent source to train support vector machines (SVMs) allowing the high accuracy in silico...

  18. Identification and functional characterization of lysine methyltransferases of Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borbolla-Vázquez, Jessica; Orozco, Esther; Medina-Gómez, Christian; Martínez-Higuera, Aarón; Javier-Reyna, Rosario; Chávez, Bibiana; Betanzos, Abigail; Rodríguez, Mario A

    2016-07-01

    Lysine methylation of histones, a posttranslational modification catalyzed by lysine methyltransferases (HKMTs), plays an important role in the epigenetic regulation of transcription. Lysine methylation of non-histone proteins also impacts the biological function of proteins. Previously it has been shown that lysine methylation of histones of Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan parasite that infects 50 million people worldwide each year and causing up to 100,000 deaths annually, is implicated in the epigenetic machinery of this microorganism. However, the identification and characterization of HKMTs in this parasite had not yet been determined. In this work we identified four HKMTs in E. histolytica (EhHKMT1 to EhHKMT4) that are expressed by trophozoites. Enzymatic assays indicated that all of them are able to transfer methyl groups to commercial histones. EhHKMT1, EhHKMT2 and EhHKMT4 were detected in nucleus and cytoplasm of trophozoites. In addition EhHKMT2 and EhHKMT4 were located in vesicles containing ingested cells during phagocytosis, and they co-immunoprecipitated with EhADH, a protein involved in the phagocytosis of this parasite. Results suggest that E. histolytica uses its HKMTs to regulate transcription by epigenetic mechanisms, and at least two of them could also be implicated in methylation of proteins that participate in phagocytosis. PMID:27062489

  19. Lysine metabolism in antisense C-hordein barley grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Daiana; Rizzi, Vanessa; Gaziola, Salete A;

    2015-01-01

    The grain proteins of barley are deficient in lysine and threonine due to their low concentrations in the major storage protein class, the hordeins, especially in the C-hordein subgroup. Previously produced antisense C-hordein transgenic barley lines have an improved amino acid composition, with ...

  20. Novel bacteriophages containing a genome of another bacteriophage within their genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maud M Swanson

    Full Text Available A novel bacteriophage infecting Staphylococus pasteuri was isolated during a screen for phages in Antarctic soils. The phage named SpaA1 is morphologically similar to phages of the family Siphoviridae. The 42,784 bp genome of SpaA1 is a linear, double-stranded DNA molecule with 3' protruding cohesive ends. The SpaA1 genome encompasses 63 predicted protein-coding genes which cluster within three regions of the genome, each of apparently different origin, in a mosaic pattern. In two of these regions, the gene sets resemble those in prophages of Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki str. T03a001 (genes involved in DNA replication/transcription, cell entry and exit and B. cereus AH676 (additional regulatory and recombination genes, respectively. The third region represents an almost complete genome (except for the short terminal segments of a distinct bacteriophage, MZTP02. Nearly the same gene module was identified in prophages of B. thuringiensis serovar monterrey BGSC 4AJ1 and B. cereus Rock4-2. These findings suggest that MZTP02 can be shuttled between genomes of other bacteriophages and prophages, leading to the formation of chimeric genomes. The presence of a complete phage genome in the genome of other phages apparently has not been described previously and might represent a 'fast track' route of virus evolution and horizontal gene transfer. Another phage (BceA1 nearly identical in sequence to SpaA1, and also including the almost complete MZTP02 genome within its own genome, was isolated from a bacterium of the B. cereus/B. thuringiensis group. Remarkably, both SpaA1 and BceA1 phages can infect B. cereus and B. thuringiensis, but only one of them, SpaA1, can infect S. pasteuri. This finding is best compatible with a scenario in which MZTP02 was originally contained in BceA1 infecting Bacillus spp, the common hosts for these two phages, followed by emergence of SpaA1 infecting S. pasteuri.

  1. Immobilization of Active Bacteriophages on Polyhydroxyalkanoate Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chanchan; Sauvageau, Dominic; Elias, Anastasia

    2016-01-20

    A rapid, efficient technique for the attachment of bacteriophages (phages) onto polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) surfaces has been developed and compared to three reported methods for phage immobilization. Polymer surfaces were modified to facilitate phage attachment using (1) plasma treatment alone, (2) plasma treatment followed by activation by 1-ethyl-3-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide (sulfo-NHS), (3) plasma-initiated acrylic acid grafting, or (4) plasma-initiated acrylic acid grafting with activation by EDC and sulfo-NHS. The impact of each method on the surface chemistry of PHA was investigated using contact angle analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Each of the four treatments was shown to result in both increased hydrophilicity and in the modification of the surface functional groups. Modified surfaces were immersed in suspensions of phage T4 for immobilization. The highest level of phage binding was observed for the surfaces modified by plasma treatment alone. The change in chemical bond states observed for surfaces that underwent plasma treatment is suspected to be the cause of the increased binding of active phages. Plasma-treated surfaces were further analyzed through phage-staining and fluorescence microscopy to assess the surface density of immobilized phages and their capacity to capture hosts. The infective capability of attached phages was confirmed by exposing the phage-immobilized surfaces to the host bacteria Escherichia coli in both plaque and infection dynamic assays. Plasma-treated surfaces with immobilized phages displayed higher infectivity than surfaces treated with other methods; in fact, the equivalent initial multiplicity of infection was 2 orders of magnitude greater than with other methods. Control samples - prepared by immersing polymer surfaces in phage suspensions (without prior plasma treatment) - did not show any bacterial growth inhibition, suggesting they did not bind

  2. Effects of bacteriophage traits on plaque formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannoly Sherin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The appearance of plaques on a bacterial lawn is one of the enduring imageries in modern day biology. The seeming simplicity of a plaque has invited many hypotheses and models in trying to describe and explain the details of its formation. However, until now, there has been no systematic experimental exploration on how different bacteriophage (phage traits may influence the formation of a plaque. In this study, we constructed a series of isogenic λ phages that differ in their adsorption rate, lysis timing, or morphology so that we can determine the effects if these changes on three plaque properties: size, progeny productivity, and phage concentration within plaques. Results We found that the adsorption rate has a diminishing, but negative impact on all three plaque measurements. Interestingly, there exists a concave relationship between the lysis time and plaque size, resulting in an apparent optimal lysis time that maximizes the plaque size. Although suggestive in appearance, we did not detect a significant effect of lysis time on plaque productivity. Nonetheless, the combined effects of plaque size and productivity resulted in an apparent convex relationship between the lysis time and phage concentration within plaques. Lastly, we found that virion morphology also affected plaque size. We compared our results to the available models on plaque size and productivity. For the models in their current forms, a few of them can capture the qualitative aspects of our results, but not consistently in both plaque properties. Conclusions By using a collection of isogenic phage strains, we were able to investigate the effects of individual phage traits on plaque size, plaque productivity, and average phage concentration in a plaque while holding all other traits constant. The controlled nature of our study allowed us to test several model predictions on plaque size and plaque productivity. It seems that a more realistic theoretical

  3. Proton Affinity of Isomeric Dipeptides Containing Lysine and Non-Proteinogenic Lysine Homologues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batoon, Patrick; Ren, Jianhua

    2016-08-18

    Conformational effects on the proton affinity of oligopeptides have been studied using six alanine (A)-based acetylated dipeptides containing a basic probe that is placed closest to either the C- or the N-terminus. The basic probe includes Lysine (Lys) and two nonproteinogenic Lys-homologues, ornithine (Orn) and 2,3-diaminopropionic acid (Dap). The proton affinities of the peptides have been determined using the extended Cooks kinetic method in a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Computational studies have been carried out to search for the lowest energy conformers and to calculate theoretical proton affinities as well as various molecular properties using the density functional theory. The dipeptides containing a C-terminal probe, ALys, AOrn, and ADap, were determined to have a higher proton affinity by 1-4 kcal/mol than the corresponding dipeptides containing an N-terminal probe, LysA, OrnA, and DapA. For either the C-probe peptides or the N-probe peptides, the proton affinity reduces systematically as the side-chain of the probe residue is shortened. The difference in the proton affinities between isomeric peptides is largely associated with the variation of the conformations. The peptides with higher values of the proton affinity adopt a relatively compact conformation such that the protonated peptides can be stabilized through more efficient internal solvation. PMID:27459294

  4. The biology of lysine acetylation integrates transcriptional programming and metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujtaba Shiraz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The biochemical landscape of lysine acetylation has expanded from a small number of proteins in the nucleus to a multitude of proteins in the cytoplasm. Since the first report confirming acetylation of the tumor suppressor protein p53 by a lysine acetyltransferase (KAT, there has been a surge in the identification of new, non-histone targets of KATs. Added to the known substrates of KATs are metabolic enzymes, cytoskeletal proteins, molecular chaperones, ribosomal proteins and nuclear import factors. Emerging studies demonstrate that no fewer than 2000 proteins in any particular cell type may undergo lysine acetylation. As described in this review, our analyses of cellular acetylated proteins using DAVID 6.7 bioinformatics resources have facilitated organization of acetylated proteins into functional clusters integral to cell signaling, the stress response, proteolysis, apoptosis, metabolism, and neuronal development. In addition, these clusters also depict association of acetylated proteins with human diseases. These findings not only support lysine acetylation as a widespread cellular phenomenon, but also impel questions to clarify the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms governing target selectivity by KATs. Present challenges are to understand the molecular basis for the overlapping roles of KAT-containing co-activators, to differentiate between global versus dynamic acetylation marks, and to elucidate the physiological roles of acetylated proteins in biochemical pathways. In addition to discussing the cellular 'acetylome', a focus of this work is to present the widespread and dynamic nature of lysine acetylation and highlight the nexus that exists between epigenetic-directed transcriptional regulation and metabolism.

  5. In vitro degradation of lysine by ruminal fluid-based fermentations and by Fusobacterium necrophorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwakeel, E A; Amachawadi, R G; Nour, A M; Nasser, M E A; Nagaraja, T G; Titgemeyer, E C

    2013-01-01

    The objective of these studies was to characterize some factors affecting lysine degradation by mixed ruminal bacteria and by ruminal Fusobacterium necrophorum. Mixed ruminal bacteria degraded lysine, and addition of pure cultures of F. necrophorum did not increase lysine degradation. Addition of acetic or propionic acid strikingly reduced NH(3) production from lysine by mixed ruminal bacteria at pH 6, but not at pH 7. Although typical ruminal environments with acidic pH and normal concentrations of volatile fatty acids might inhibit lysine degradation by F. necrophorum, ruminal fluid contained enough bacteria with a lysine-degrading capacity to ferment 50 mM lysine in vitro. Of 7 strains of ruminal F. necrophorum tested, all grew on both lactate and lysine as the primary energy source. Both subspecies of ruminal F. necrophorum (necrophorum and funduliforme) used lysine as a primary C and energy source. Lysine and glutamic acid were effectively fermented by F. necrophorum, but alanine and tryptophan were not, and histidine and methionine were fermented only to a minor extent. The end products of lactate fermentation by F. necrophorum were propionate and acetate, and those of lysine degradation were butyrate and acetate. Fermentation of glutamic acid by F. necrophorum yielded acetate and butyrate in a ratio near to 2:1. The minimum inhibitory concentration of tylosin for F. necrophorum was not dependent on whether bacteria were grown with lactate or lysine, but F. necrophorum was more susceptible to monensin when grown on lysine than on lactate. Although F. necrophorum is generally resistant to monensin, the ionophore may reduce lysine degradation by F. necrophorum in the rumen. The essential oil components limonene, at 20 or 100 μg/mL, and thymol, at 100 μg/mL, inhibited F. necrophorum growth, whereas eugenol, guaiacol, and vanillin had no effect. Our findings may lead to ways to minimize ruminal lysine degradation and thus increase its availability to the animal

  6. Radioprotective effect of local administration of lysine-vasopressin and triglycyl-lysine-vasopressin on the rectal mucosa in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjelkengren, G. [Depts. of Experimental Medicine, Oncology and Pathology, MalmoeUniv. Hospital (Sweden); Aronsen, K.F. [Depts. of Experimental Medicine, Oncology and Pathology, MalmoeUniv. Hospital (Sweden); Augustsson, N.E. [Depts. of Experimental Medicine, Oncology and Pathology, MalmoeUniv. Hospital (Sweden); Borgstroem, S. [Depts. of Experimental Medicine, Oncology and Pathology, MalmoeUniv. Hospital (Sweden); Lindstroem [Depts. of Experimental Medicine, Oncology and Pathology, MalmoeUniv. Hospital (Sweden); Nylander, G. [Depts. of Experimental Medicine, Oncology and Pathology, MalmoeUniv. Hospital (Sweden)

    1995-12-31

    Reactions from the rectal mucosa often give rise to troublesome side-effects during and after radiotherapy in the pelvic region. Local vasoconsriction in the rectal mucosa will cause an ischemia which will decrease the sensitivity of the mucosal cells to radiation and thereby these side-effects can be reduced. Triglycyl-lysine-vasopressin applied rectally in 1% Blanose solution gave in the present study significant radioprotection of the rectal mucosa in the doses of 0.8, 1.6, and 3.2 mg. These doses are, however, very high. Triglycyl-lysine-vasopressin in 1.2% Natrosol solution in a dose of 128 {mu}g did not show any certain protective effects. However lysine-vasopressin in 1.2% Natrosol solution in a dose of 16 {mu}g gave significant radioprotection of the rectal mucosa. This dose level has in a previous study not given any significant effects on the systemic circulation. Lysine-vasopressin in Natrosol solution seems to be a suitable combination for further studies. (orig.).

  7. STUDIES ON THE BACTERIOPHAGE OF D'HERELLE : VII. ON THE PARTICULATE NATURE OF BACTERIOPHAGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfenbrenner, J

    1927-04-30

    When filtrates of lysed cultures (bacteriophage) are subjected to prolonged dialysis under osmotic pressure against water, the presence of the lytic agent can be detected outside the membrane only during the first few days. The residue remaining inside the membrane contains the bulk of the original lytic agent, and yet it is no longer capable of diffusing into the outer solution. The interruption of diffusion is shown not to be due to any alteration in the permeability of the membrane. Moreover, the residue fails to diffuse through a fresh membrane of similar permeability, while the dialyzed portion of the phage passes quantitatively through a new membrane. When ultrafiltration under pressure was substituted for dialysis, the residue on the filter could be washed repeatedly with water without giving off into the filtrate any more active agent. However, if broth was substituted for water, a renewed diffusion of the active agent resulted. These results are interpreted as indicating that the colloidal particles present in the lytic filtrates (and apparently endowed with properties of bacteriophage) do not represent autonomous units of the active agent, but merely serve as a vehicle on which the agent is adsorbed. The vary in size within limits wide enough to permit fractionation by means of ultrafiltration. When the coarser particles retained by the ultrafilter are washed with broth, some of the active agent is detached from its coarse vehicle particles. The agent, now more highly dispersed, is capable of passing the filter which held it back previously. Preparation of a simple ultrafilter used in these experiments is given in detail.

  8. More Is Better: Selecting for Broad Host Range Bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Alexa; Ward, Samantha; Hyman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. In this perspective, we discuss several aspects of a characteristic feature of bacteriophages, their host range. Each phage has its own particular host range, the range of bacteria that it can infect. While some phages can only infect one or a few bacterial strains, other phages can infect many species or even bacteria from different genera. Different methods for determining host range may give different results, reflecting the multiple mechanisms bacteria have to resist phage infection and reflecting the different steps of infection each method depends on. This makes defining host range difficult. Another difficulty in describing host range arises from the inconsistent use of the words "narrow" and especially "broad" when describing the breadth of the host range. Nearly all bacteriophages have been isolated using a single host strain of bacteria. While this procedure is fairly standard, it may more likely produce narrow rather than broad host range phage. Our results and those of others suggest that using multiple host strains during isolation can more reliably produce broader host range phages. This challenges the common belief that most bacteriophages have a narrow host range. We highlight the implications of this for several areas that are affected by host range including horizontal gene transfer and phage therapy. PMID:27660623

  9. Bacteriophage for prophylaxis and therapy in cattle, poultry, and pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The successful use of virulent (lytic) bacteriophages (phages) in preventing and treating neonatal enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infections in calves, lambs and pigs has prompted investigation of other applications phage therapy in food animals. While results have been very variable, some indica...

  10. Genome Sequences of Gordonia terrae Bacteriophages Phinally and Vivi2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Welkin H; Anderson, Kaitlyn C; Arora, Charu; Bortz, Michael E; Burnet, George; Conover, David H; D'Incau, Gina M; Ghobrial, Jonathan A; Jonas, Audrey L; Migdal, Emily J; Rote, Nicole L; German, Brian A; McDonnell, Jill E; Mezghani, Nadia; Schafer, Claire E; Thompson, Paige K; Ulbrich, Megan C; Yu, Victor J; Furbee, Emily C; Grubb, Sarah R; Warner, Marcie H; Montgomery, Matthew T; Garlena, Rebecca A; Russell, Daniel A; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Hatfull, Graham F

    2016-08-18

    Bacteriophages Phinally and Vivi2 were isolated from soil from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, using host Gordonia terrae 3612. The Phinally and Vivi2 genomes are 59,265 bp and 59,337 bp, respectively, and share sequence similarity with each other and with GTE6. Fewer than 25% of the 87 to 89 putative genes have predictable functions.

  11. Bacteriophages Limit the Existence Conditions for Conjugative Plasmids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, A. Jamie; Dytham, Calvin; Pitchford, Jonathan W.; Truman, Julie; Spiers, Andrew; Paterson, Steve; Brockhurst, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteriophages are a major cause of bacterial mortality and impose strong selection on natural bacterial populations, yet their effects on the dynamics of conjugative plasmids have rarely been tested. We combined experimental evolution, mathematical modeling, and individual-based simulations to explain how the ecological and population genetics effects of bacteriophages upon bacteria interact to determine the dynamics of conjugative plasmids and their persistence. The ecological effects of bacteriophages on bacteria are predicted to limit the existence conditions for conjugative plasmids, preventing persistence under weak selection for plasmid accessory traits. Experiments showed that phages drove faster extinction of plasmids in environments where the plasmid conferred no benefit, but they also revealed more complex effects of phages on plasmid dynamics under these conditions, specifically, the temporary maintenance of plasmids at fixation followed by rapid loss. We hypothesized that the population genetic effects of bacteriophages, specifically, selection for phage resistance mutations, may have caused this. Further mathematical modeling and individual-based simulations supported our hypothesis, showing that conjugative plasmids may hitchhike with phage resistance mutations in the bacterial chromosome. PMID:26037122

  12. More Is Better: Selecting for Broad Host Range Bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Alexa; Ward, Samantha; Hyman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. In this perspective, we discuss several aspects of a characteristic feature of bacteriophages, their host range. Each phage has its own particular host range, the range of bacteria that it can infect. While some phages can only infect one or a few bacterial strains, other phages can infect many species or even bacteria from different genera. Different methods for determining host range may give different results, reflecting the multiple mechanisms bacteria have to resist phage infection and reflecting the different steps of infection each method depends on. This makes defining host range difficult. Another difficulty in describing host range arises from the inconsistent use of the words "narrow" and especially "broad" when describing the breadth of the host range. Nearly all bacteriophages have been isolated using a single host strain of bacteria. While this procedure is fairly standard, it may more likely produce narrow rather than broad host range phage. Our results and those of others suggest that using multiple host strains during isolation can more reliably produce broader host range phages. This challenges the common belief that most bacteriophages have a narrow host range. We highlight the implications of this for several areas that are affected by host range including horizontal gene transfer and phage therapy.

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis Bacteriophage Smudge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Jessica L; Breslin, Eileen; Schuhmacher, Zachary; Himelright, Madison; Berluti, Cassandra; Boyd, Charles; Carson, Rachel; Del Gallo, Elle; Giessler, Caris; Gilliam, Benjamin; Heatherly, Catherine; Nevin, Julius; Nguyen, Bryan; Nguyen, Justin; Parada, Jocelyn; Sutterfield, Blake; Tukruni, Muruj; Temple, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Smudge, a bacteriophage enriched from soil using Bacillus thuringiensis DSM-350 as the host, had its complete genome sequenced. Smudge is a myovirus with a genome consisting of 292 genes and was identified as belonging to the C1 cluster of Bacillus phages. PMID:27540049

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis Bacteriophage Smudge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Jessica L.; Breslin, Eileen; Schuhmacher, Zachary; Himelright, Madison; Berluti, Cassandra; Boyd, Charles; Carson, Rachel; Del Gallo, Elle; Giessler, Caris; Gilliam, Benjamin; Heatherly, Catherine; Nevin, Julius; Nguyen, Bryan; Nguyen, Justin; Parada, Jocelyn; Sutterfield, Blake; Tukruni, Muruj

    2016-01-01

    Smudge, a bacteriophage enriched from soil using Bacillus thuringiensis DSM-350 as the host, had its complete genome sequenced. Smudge is a myovirus with a genome consisting of 292 genes and was identified as belonging to the C1 cluster of Bacillus phages. PMID:27540049

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis Bacteriophage Smudge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Jessica L; Breslin, Eileen; Schuhmacher, Zachary; Himelright, Madison; Berluti, Cassandra; Boyd, Charles; Carson, Rachel; Del Gallo, Elle; Giessler, Caris; Gilliam, Benjamin; Heatherly, Catherine; Nevin, Julius; Nguyen, Bryan; Nguyen, Justin; Parada, Jocelyn; Sutterfield, Blake; Tukruni, Muruj; Temple, Louise

    2016-08-18

    Smudge, a bacteriophage enriched from soil using Bacillus thuringiensis DSM-350 as the host, had its complete genome sequenced. Smudge is a myovirus with a genome consisting of 292 genes and was identified as belonging to the C1 cluster of Bacillus phages.

  16. Role of osmotic and hydrostatic pressures in bacteriophage genome ejection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemay, S.G.; Panja, D.; Molineux, I.J.

    2013-01-01

    A critical step in the bacteriophage life cycle is genome ejection into host bacteria. The ejection process for double-stranded DNA phages has been studied thoroughly in vitro, where after triggering with the cellular receptor the genome ejects into a buffer. The experimental data have been interpre

  17. More Is Better: Selecting for Broad Host Range Bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Alexa; Ward, Samantha; Hyman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. In this perspective, we discuss several aspects of a characteristic feature of bacteriophages, their host range. Each phage has its own particular host range, the range of bacteria that it can infect. While some phages can only infect one or a few bacterial strains, other phages can infect many species or even bacteria from different genera. Different methods for determining host range may give different results, reflecting the multiple mechanisms bacteria have to resist phage infection and reflecting the different steps of infection each method depends on. This makes defining host range difficult. Another difficulty in describing host range arises from the inconsistent use of the words “narrow” and especially “broad” when describing the breadth of the host range. Nearly all bacteriophages have been isolated using a single host strain of bacteria. While this procedure is fairly standard, it may more likely produce narrow rather than broad host range phage. Our results and those of others suggest that using multiple host strains during isolation can more reliably produce broader host range phages. This challenges the common belief that most bacteriophages have a narrow host range. We highlight the implications of this for several areas that are affected by host range including horizontal gene transfer and phage therapy. PMID:27660623

  18. Multiple roles of genome-attached bacteriophage terminal proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; Salas, Margarita, E-mail: msalas@cbm.csic.es

    2014-11-15

    Protein-primed replication constitutes a generalized mechanism to initiate DNA or RNA synthesis in linear genomes, including viruses, gram-positive bacteria, linear plasmids and mobile elements. By this mechanism a specific amino acid primes replication and becomes covalently linked to the genome ends. Despite the fact that TPs lack sequence homology, they share a similar structural arrangement, with the priming residue in the C-terminal half of the protein and an accumulation of positively charged residues at the N-terminal end. In addition, various bacteriophage TPs have been shown to have DNA-binding capacity that targets TPs and their attached genomes to the host nucleoid. Furthermore, a number of bacteriophage TPs from different viral families and with diverse hosts also contain putative nuclear localization signals and localize in the eukaryotic nucleus, which could lead to the transport of the attached DNA. This suggests a possible role of bacteriophage TPs in prokaryote-to-eukaryote horizontal gene transfer. - Highlights: • Protein-primed genome replication constitutes a strategy to initiate DNA or RNA synthesis in linear genomes. • Bacteriophage terminal proteins (TPs) are covalently attached to viral genomes by their primary function priming DNA replication. • TPs are also DNA-binding proteins and target phage genomes to the host nucleoid. • TPs can also localize in the eukaryotic nucleus and may have a role in phage-mediated interkingdom gene transfer.

  19. Effect of gamma irradiation on bacteriophages used as viral indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebri, Sihem; Hmaied, Fatma; Jofre, Juan; MariemYahya; Mendez, Javier; Barkallah, Insaf; Hamdi, Moktar

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to examine the susceptibility of indicator bacteriophages towards γ-radiation to evaluate their appropriateness as viral indicators for water quality control. The effects of γ-radiation on naturally occurring somatic coliphages, F-specific coliphages and Escherichia coli were examined in raw sewage and sewage sludge. As well, the effects of radiation on bacteriophages ΦX174 and MS2, and E. coli all grown in the laboratory and seeded in distilled water, autoclaved raw sewage and a 1% peptone solution were evaluated. The inactivation of E. coli was fairly similar in all matrices. In contrast, inactivation of bacteriophages was significantly greater in distilled water than in the other matrices. These results showed the great influence of the matrix characteristics on virus inactivation. Somatic coliphages in raw sewage and sewage sludge and ΦX174 in autoclaved sewage were inactivated similarly and were far more resistant than F-specific coliphages, MS2 and E. coli. As well, F-specific RNA bacteriophages in raw sewage and sewage sludge and MS2 in autoclaved sewage were inactivated similarly and were more resistant than E. coli. In contrast, MS2 was more susceptible to γ-radiation than E. coli in distilled water. Our results showed that ΦX174 is a suitable indicator for estimating virus inactivation by γ-irradiation and corroborate the use of somatic coliphages to survey the viral quality of treated water and sludges.

  20. Multiple roles of genome-attached bacteriophage terminal proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein-primed replication constitutes a generalized mechanism to initiate DNA or RNA synthesis in linear genomes, including viruses, gram-positive bacteria, linear plasmids and mobile elements. By this mechanism a specific amino acid primes replication and becomes covalently linked to the genome ends. Despite the fact that TPs lack sequence homology, they share a similar structural arrangement, with the priming residue in the C-terminal half of the protein and an accumulation of positively charged residues at the N-terminal end. In addition, various bacteriophage TPs have been shown to have DNA-binding capacity that targets TPs and their attached genomes to the host nucleoid. Furthermore, a number of bacteriophage TPs from different viral families and with diverse hosts also contain putative nuclear localization signals and localize in the eukaryotic nucleus, which could lead to the transport of the attached DNA. This suggests a possible role of bacteriophage TPs in prokaryote-to-eukaryote horizontal gene transfer. - Highlights: • Protein-primed genome replication constitutes a strategy to initiate DNA or RNA synthesis in linear genomes. • Bacteriophage terminal proteins (TPs) are covalently attached to viral genomes by their primary function priming DNA replication. • TPs are also DNA-binding proteins and target phage genomes to the host nucleoid. • TPs can also localize in the eukaryotic nucleus and may have a role in phage-mediated interkingdom gene transfer

  1. Acute lysine supplementation does not improve hepatic or peripheral insulin sensitivity in older, overweight individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Il-Young; Williams, Rick H.; Schutzler, Scott E; Lasley, Cosby J; Bodenner, Donald L; Wolfe, Robert R.; Coker, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Context Lysine supplementation may have a positive influence on the regulation of glucose metabolism but it has not been tested in the geriatric population. Objective: We evaluated the impact of acute lysine supplementation using three randomized experimental scenarios: 1) oral glucose alone (control), 2) oral glucose and low-dose lysine (2 grams), and oral glucose and high dose lysine (5 grams) lysine in 7 older (66 ± 1 years/age), overweight/obese (BMI = 28 ± 2 kg/m2) individuals. Methods W...

  2. Innate and adaptive immunity in bacteria: mechanisms of programmed genetic variation to fight bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikard, David; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2012-02-01

    Bacteria are constantly challenged by bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria), the most abundant microorganism on earth. Bacteria have evolved a variety of immunity mechanisms to resist bacteriophage infection. In response, bacteriophages can evolve counter-resistance mechanisms and launch a 'virus versus host' evolutionary arms race. In this context, rapid evolution is fundamental for the survival of the bacterial cell. Programmed genetic variation mechanisms at loci involved in immunity against bacteriophages generate diversity at a much faster rate than random point mutation and enable bacteria to quickly adapt and repel infection. Diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs) and phase variation mechanisms enhance the generic (innate) immune response against bacteriophages. On the other hand, the integration of small bacteriophage sequences in CRISPR loci provide bacteria with a virus-specific and sequence-specific adaptive immune response. Therefore, although using different molecular mechanisms, both prokaryotes and higher organisms rely on programmed genetic variation to increase genetic diversity and fight rapidly evolving infectious agents.

  3. Novel Bacteroides host strains for detection of human- and animal-specific bacteriophages in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicki, Melanie; Auckenthaler, Adrian; Felleisen, Richard; Tanner, Marcel; Baumgartner, Andreas

    2011-03-01

    Bacteriophages active against specific Bacteroides host strains were shown to be suitable for detection of human faecal pollution. However, the practical application of this finding is limited because some specific host strains were restricted to certain geographic regions. In this study, novel Bacteroides host strains were isolated that discriminate human and animal faecal pollution in Switzerland. Two strains specific for bacteriophages present in human faecal contamination and three strains specific for bacteriophages indicating animal faecal contamination were evaluated. Bacteriophages infecting human strains were exclusively found in human wastewater, whereas animal strains detected bacteriophages only in animal waste. The newly isolated host strains could be used to determine the source of surface and spring water faecal contamination in field situations. Applying the newly isolated host Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron ARABA 84 for detection of bacteriophages allowed the detection of human faecal contamination in spring water.

  4. Coacervate-like microspheres from lysine-rich proteinoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlfing, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Microspheres form isothermally from lysine-rich proteinoid when the ionic strength of the solution is increased with NaCl or other salts. Studies with different monovalent anions and with polymers of different amino acid composition indicate that charge neutralization and hydrophobic bonding contribute to microsphere formation. The particles also form in sea water, especially if heated or made slightly alkaline. The microspheres differ from those made from acidic proteinoid but resemble coacervate droplets in some ways (isothermal formation, limited stability, stabilization by quinone, uptake of dyes). Because the constituent lysine-rich proteinoid is of simulated prebiotic origin, the study is interpreted to add emphasis to and suggest an evolutionary continuity for coacervation phenomena.

  5. Natural Polyphenols Inhibit Lysine-Specific Demethylase-1 in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulla, Arian; Zhao, Xiaoping; Yang, Fajun

    2013-01-01

    Natural polyphenols, such as resveratrol, have beneficial functions on major human diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Besides acting as antioxidants, some of these polyphenols can also target proteins to modulate specific biological pathways. The lysine-specific histone demethylase LSD1 plays important roles in cell growth, differentiation and nutrient metabolism. Here, we studied the effect of natural polyphenols resveratrol, curcumin, quercetin and analogs on LSD...

  6. Simultaneous loss of bacteriophage receptor and coaggregation mediator activities in Actinomyces viscosus MG-1.

    OpenAIRE

    Tylenda, C A; Enriquez, E.; Kolenbrander, P. E.; Delisle, A L

    1985-01-01

    Actinomyces bacteriophages were used as tools to study coaggregation between actinomyces and streptococci. Four bacteriophage isolates, phages AV-1, AV-2, AV-3, and 1281, bound to coaggregation group A Actinomyces viscosus and to group E A. naeslundii. No binding to groups B, C, D, or F was observed. Only A. viscosus MG-1 was capable of supporting a productive infection by these phages. Spontaneously occurring bacteriophage-resistant mutants of A. viscosus MG-1 were isolated and were shown to...

  7. Template reporter bacteriophage platform and multiple bacterial detection assays based thereon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodridge, Lawrence (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The invention is a method for the development of assays for the simultaneous detection of multiple bacteria. A bacteria of interest is selected. A host bacteria containing plasmid DNA from a T even bacteriophage that infects the bacteria of interest is infected with T4 reporter bacteriophage. After infection, the progeny bacteriophage are plating onto the bacteria of interest. The invention also includes single-tube, fast and sensitive assays which utilize the novel method.

  8. The effect of bacteriophages T4 and HAP1 on in vitro melanoma migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boratyński Janusz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The antibacterial activity of bacteriophages has been described rather well. However, knowledge about the direct interactions of bacteriophages with mammalian organisms and their other, i.e. non-antibacterial, activities in mammalian systems is quite scarce. It must be emphasised that bacteriophages are natural parasites of bacteria, which in turn are parasites or symbionts of mammals (including humans. Bacteriophages are constantly present in mammalian bodies and the environment in great amounts. On the other hand, the perspective of the possible use of bacteriophage preparations for antibacterial therapies in cancer patients generates a substantial need to investigate the effects of phages on cancer processes. Results In these studies the migration of human and mouse melanoma on fibronectin was inhibited by purified T4 and HAP1 bacteriophage preparations. The migration of human melanoma was also inhibited by the HAP1 phage preparation on matrigel. No response of either melanoma cell line to lipopolysaccharide was observed. Therefore the effect of the phage preparations cannot be attributed to lipopolysaccharide. No differences in the effects of T4 and HAP1 on melanoma migration were observed. Conclusion We believe that these observations are of importance for any further attempts to use bacteriophage preparations in antibacterial treatment. The risk of antibiotic-resistant hospital infections strongly affects cancer patients and these results suggest the possibility of beneficial phage treatment. We also believe that they will contribute to the general understanding of bacteriophage biology, as bacteriophages, extremely ubiquitous entities, are in permanent contact with human organisms.

  9. Methods for generation of reporter phages and immobilization of active bacteriophages on a polymer surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applegate, Bruce Michael (Inventor); Perry, Lynda Louise (Inventor); Morgan, Mark Thomas (Inventor); Kothapalli, Aparna (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Novel reporter bacteriophages are provided. Provided are compositions and methods that allow bacteriophages that are used for specific detection or killing of E. coli 0157:H7 to be propagated in nonpathogenic E. coli, thereby eliminating the safety and security risks of propagation in E. coli 0157:H7. Provided are compositions and methods for attaching active bacteriophages to the surface of a polymer in order to kill target bacteria with which the phage comes into contact. Provided are modified bacteriophages immobilized to a surface, which capture E. coli 0157:H7 and cause the captured cells to emit light or fluorescence, allowing detection of the bacteria in a sample.

  10. Digestible Lysine on Live Performance of Chicken Type Naked Neck During the Starter Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RG de Oliveira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The poultry market has changed due to a higher consumer interest on products with differentiated organoleptic characteristics, making of free-range broiler production a promising activity. This experiment was conducted to determine the digestible lysine requirements of Redbro Cou Nu male and female chickens during the starter phase (one to 21 days of age. Six hundred and thirty Redbro Cou Nu broilers were distributed into 30 pens (21 chickens/pen according to a randomized complete design in a 5 x 2 factorial arrangement, consisting of five levels of digestible lysine and two sexes, with three replicates (pens per treatments. Diets with increasing digestible lysine levels (8.1, 9.5, 10.9, 12.3 and 13.7 g of digestible lysine per kg of diet were offered ad libitum. The following performance traits were evaluated at the end of the experiment (d 21: feed intake, lysine intake, body weight gain, and feed conversion ratio. No interaction between dietary lysine level and sex was observed for the evaluated traits. The effect of sex was only detected on body weight gain, while effects of dietary lysine level were only detected on the feed intake. Males presented higher body weight gain than females. Lysine intake and body weight gain increased, and feed conversion ratio decreased as the level of dietary lysine increased. The best feed conversion ratio was obtained when birds were fed 12.95 g of digestible lysine per kg of diet.

  11. Insights into Bacteriophage Application in Controlling Vibrio Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letchumanan, Vengadesh; Chan, Kok-Gan; Pusparajah, Priyia; Saokaew, Surasak; Duangjai, Acharaporn; Goh, Bey-Hing; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Lee, Learn-Han

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infections from various organisms including Vibrio sp. pose a serious hazard to humans in many forms from clinical infection to affecting the yield of agriculture and aquaculture via infection of livestock. Vibrio sp. is one of the main foodborne pathogens causing human infection and is also a common cause of losses in the aquaculture industry. Prophylactic and therapeutic usage of antibiotics has become the mainstay of managing this problem, however, this in turn led to the emergence of multidrug resistant strains of bacteria in the environment; which has raised awareness of the critical need for alternative non-antibiotic based methods of preventing and treating bacterial infections. Bacteriophages - viruses that infect and result in the death of bacteria - are currently of great interest as a highly viable alternative to antibiotics. This article provides an insight into bacteriophage application in controlling Vibrio species as well underlining the advantages and drawbacks of phage therapy. PMID:27486446

  12. Bacteriophages as Weapons Against Bacterial Biofilms in the Food Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Diana; Rodríguez-Rubio, Lorena; Martínez, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Ana; García, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Microbiological contamination in the food industry is often attributed to the presence of biofilms in processing plants. Bacterial biofilms are complex communities of bacteria attached to a surface and surrounded by an extracellular polymeric material. Their extreme resistance to cleaning and disinfecting processes is related to a unique organization, which implies a differential bacterial growth and gene expression inside the biofilm. The impact of biofilms on health, and the economic consequences, has promoted the development of different approaches to control or remove biofilm formation. Recently, successful results in phage therapy have boosted new research in bacteriophages and phage lytic proteins for biofilm eradication. In this regard, this review examines the environmental factors that determine biofilm development in food-processing equipment. In addition, future perspectives for the use of bacteriophage-derived tools as disinfectants are discussed. PMID:27375566

  13. Bacteriophages as Weapons Against Bacterial Biofilms in the Food Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Diana; Rodríguez-Rubio, Lorena; Martínez, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Ana; García, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Microbiological contamination in the food industry is often attributed to the presence of biofilms in processing plants. Bacterial biofilms are complex communities of bacteria attached to a surface and surrounded by an extracellular polymeric material. Their extreme resistance to cleaning and disinfecting processes is related to a unique organization, which implies a differential bacterial growth and gene expression inside the biofilm. The impact of biofilms on health, and the economic consequences, has promoted the development of different approaches to control or remove biofilm formation. Recently, successful results in phage therapy have boosted new research in bacteriophages and phage lytic proteins for biofilm eradication. In this regard, this review examines the environmental factors that determine biofilm development in food-processing equipment. In addition, future perspectives for the use of bacteriophage-derived tools as disinfectants are discussed.

  14. Characterization of newly isolated lytic bacteriophages active against Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia Merabishvili

    Full Text Available Based on genotyping and host range, two newly isolated lytic bacteriophages, myovirus vB_AbaM_Acibel004 and podovirus vB_AbaP_Acibel007, active against Acinetobacter baumannii clinical strains, were selected from a new phage library for further characterization. The complete genomes of the two phages were analyzed. Both phages are characterized by broad host range and essential features of potential therapeutic phages, such as short latent period (27 and 21 min, respectively, high burst size (125 and 145, respectively, stability of activity in liquid culture and low frequency of occurrence of phage-resistant mutant bacterial cells. Genomic analysis showed that while Acibel004 represents a novel bacteriophage with resemblance to some unclassified Pseudomonas aeruginosa phages, Acibel007 belongs to the well-characterized genus of the Phikmvlikevirus. The newly isolated phages can serve as potential candidates for phage cocktails to control A. baumannii infections.

  15. Bacteriophages and their implications on future biotechnology: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haq Irshad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recently it has been recognized that bacteriophages, the natural predators of bacteria can be used efficiently in modern biotechnology. They have been proposed as alternatives to antibiotics for many antibiotic resistant bacterial strains. Phages can be used as biocontrol agents in agriculture and petroleum industry. Moreover phages are used as vehicles for vaccines both DNA and protein, for the detection of pathogenic bacterial strain, as display system for many proteins and antibodies. Bacteriophages are diverse group of viruses which are easily manipulated and therefore they have potential uses in biotechnology, research, and therapeutics. The aim of this review article is to enable the wide range of researchers, scientists, and biotechnologist who are putting phages into practice, to accelerate the progress and development in the field of biotechnology.

  16. Effect of HZE particles and space hadrons on bacteriophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iurov, S.S.; Akoev, I.G.; Leonteva, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of particle radiation of the type encountered in space flight on bacteriophages are investigated. Survival and mutagenesis were followed in dry film cultures or liquid suspensions of T4Br(+) bacteriophage exposed to high-energy (HZE) particles during orbital flight, to alpha particles and accelerator-generated hardrons in the laboratory, and to high-energy cosmic rays at mountain altitudes. The HZE particles and high-energy hadrons are found to have a greater relative biological efficiency than standard gamma radiation, while exhibiting a highly inhomogeneous spatial structure in the observed biological and genetic effects. In addition, the genetic lesions observed are specific to the type of radiation exposure, consisting primarily of deletions and multiple lesions of low revertability, with mode of action depending on the linear energy transfer. 18 references.

  17. Effect of HZE particles and space hadrons on bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurov, S. S.; Akoev, I. G.; Leont'eva, G. A.

    The effect of high energy (HZE) particles and high energy hadrons on T4Br+ bacteriophage was analyzed. The experiments were done in orbital flight, on high mountains, on an accelerator, and with an alpha particle source. We studied the survival rate of the bacteriophage, the mutation frequency, the mutation spectrum and the revertability under the action of chemical mutagens with a known mechanism of action on DNA. It was found that the biological efficiency of HZE particles and high energy hadrons is greater than that of γ radiation. The spectra of mutations produced by these mutations and the mechanisms of their action are also different. These effects were local, because of the mode of interaction of the radiant energy with biological objects, and depended on the linear energy transfer (LET). The modes have now been experimentally defined.

  18. BACTERIOPHAGE ENDOLYSINS AND THEIR USE IN BIOTECHNOLOGICAL PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Tišáková

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophage endolysins are peptidoglycan hydrolases, produced in the lytic system of bacteriophage in order to lyse host peptidoglycan from within and release virions into the environment. Phages infecting Gram-positive bacteria express endolysin genes with the characteristic modular structure, consisting of at least two functional domains: N-terminal enzymatically active domain (EAD and C-terminal cell wall binding domain (CBD. CBDs specifically recognize ligands and bind to the bacterial cell wall, whereas EAD catalyze lysis of the peptidoglycan bonds. The reveal of endolysin modular structure leads to new opportunities for domain swapping, construction of chimeras and production of specifically engineered recombinant endolysins and their functional domains with the diverse biotechnological applications from without, such as in detection, elimination and biocontrol of pathogens, or as anti-bacterials in experimental therapy.

  19. Bacteriophage exclusion, a new defense system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrangou, Rodolphe; van der Oost, John

    2015-01-01

    The ability to withstand viral predation is critical for survival of most microbes. Accordingly, a plethora of phage resistance systems has been identified in bacterial genomes (Labrie et al, 2010), including restriction-modification systems (R-M) (Tock & Dryden, 2005), abortive infection (Abi) (Chopin et al, 2005), Argonaute-based interference (Swarts et al, 2014), as well as clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and associated protein (Cas) adaptive immune system (CRISPR-Cas) (Barrangou & Marraffini, 2014; Van der Oost et al, 2014). Predictably, the dark matter of bacterial genomes contains a wealth of genetic gold. A study published in this issue of The EMBO Journal by Goldfarb et al (2015) unveils bacteriophage exclusion (BREX) as a novel, widespread bacteriophage resistance system that provides innate immunity against virulent and temperate phage in bacteria. PMID:25502457

  20. The nucleotide sequence of the bacteriophage T5 ltf gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliman, A V; Kulshin, V E; Shlyapnikov, M G; Ksenzenko, V N; Kryukov, V M

    1995-06-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the bacteriophage T5 Bg/II-BamHI fragment (4,835 bp in length) known to carry a gene encoding the LTF protein which forms the phage L-shaped tail fibers was determined. It was shown to contain an open reading frame for 1,396 amino acid residues that corresponds to a protein of 147.8 kDa. The coding region of ltf gene is preceded by a typical Shine-Dalgarno sequence. Downstream from the ltf gene there is a strong transcription terminator. Data bank analysis of the LTF protein sequence reveals 55.1% identity to the hypothetical protein ORF 401 of bacteriophage lambda in a segment of 118 amino acids overlap. PMID:7789514

  1. A method for the detection of bacteriophages from ocean water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moebus, K.

    1980-03-01

    A method for the isolation of bacteriophages from ocean water is described. It precludes sample storage before starting phage-enrichment cultures and provides for the use of 3 sub-samples enriched with organic nutrients after 1, 2 and 3 days of incubation. The method was used with samples collected from 6 m below the surface at 48 stations between the European continental shelf and the Sargasso Sea. With 213 among 931 bacterial isolates about 250 strains of bacteriophages were detected by two methods of different sensitivity. From 14 samples taken east of the Azores 115 host bacteria have been found versus only 98 from 34 samples collected at westerly stations. The employment of more than one sub-sample per station as well as the use of more sensitive phage-detection procedures was found to be more advantageous the lower the concentration of cultivatable bacteria in a sample.

  2. Insights into bacteriophage application in controlling Vibrio species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vengadesh Letchumanan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections from various organisms including Vibrio sp. pose a serious hazard to humans in many forms from clinical infection to affecting the yield of agriculture and aquaculture via infection of livestock. Vibrio sp. is one of the main foodborne pathogens causing human infection and is also a common cause of losses in the aquaculture industry. Prophylactic and therapeutic usage of antibiotics has become the mainstay of managing this problem, however this in turn led to the emergence of multidrug resistant strains of bacteria in the environment; which has raised awareness of the critical need for alternative non antibiotic based methods of preventing and treating bacterial infections. Bacteriophages - viruses that infect and result in the death of bacteria – are currently of great interest as a highly viable alternative to antibiotics. This article provides an insight into bacteriophage application in controlling Vibrio species as well underlining the advantages and drawbacks of phage therapy.

  3. Characterization of newly isolated lytic bacteriophages active against Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merabishvili, Maia; Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Kropinski, Andrew M; Mast, Jan; De Vos, Daniel; Verbeken, Gilbert; Noben, Jean-Paul; Lavigne, Rob; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Pirnay, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Based on genotyping and host range, two newly isolated lytic bacteriophages, myovirus vB_AbaM_Acibel004 and podovirus vB_AbaP_Acibel007, active against Acinetobacter baumannii clinical strains, were selected from a new phage library for further characterization. The complete genomes of the two phages were analyzed. Both phages are characterized by broad host range and essential features of potential therapeutic phages, such as short latent period (27 and 21 min, respectively), high burst size (125 and 145, respectively), stability of activity in liquid culture and low frequency of occurrence of phage-resistant mutant bacterial cells. Genomic analysis showed that while Acibel004 represents a novel bacteriophage with resemblance to some unclassified Pseudomonas aeruginosa phages, Acibel007 belongs to the well-characterized genus of the Phikmvlikevirus. The newly isolated phages can serve as potential candidates for phage cocktails to control A. baumannii infections.

  4. Sequence and comparative analysis of Leuconostoc dairy bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kot, Witold; Hansen, Lars H; Neve, Horst; Hammer, Karin; Jacobsen, Susanne; Pedersen, Per D; Sørensen, Søren J; Heller, Knut J; Vogensen, Finn K

    2014-04-17

    Bacteriophages attacking Leuconostoc species may significantly influence the quality of the final product. There is however limited knowledge of this group of phages in the literature. We have determined the complete genome sequences of nine Leuconostoc bacteriophages virulent to either Leuconostoc mesenteroides or Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides strains. The phages have dsDNA genomes with sizes ranging from 25.7 to 28.4 kb. Comparative genomics analysis helped classify the 9 phages into two classes, which correlates with the host species. High percentage of similarity within the classes on both nucleotide and protein levels was observed. Genome comparison also revealed very high conservation of the overall genomic organization between the classes. The genes were organized in functional modules responsible for replication, packaging, head and tail morphogenesis, cell lysis and regulation and modification, respectively. No lysogeny modules were detected. To our knowledge this report provides the first comparative genomic work done on Leuconostoc dairy phages.

  5. Insights into Bacteriophage Application in Controlling Vibrio Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letchumanan, Vengadesh; Chan, Kok-Gan; Pusparajah, Priyia; Saokaew, Surasak; Duangjai, Acharaporn; Goh, Bey-Hing; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Lee, Learn-Han

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infections from various organisms including Vibrio sp. pose a serious hazard to humans in many forms from clinical infection to affecting the yield of agriculture and aquaculture via infection of livestock. Vibrio sp. is one of the main foodborne pathogens causing human infection and is also a common cause of losses in the aquaculture industry. Prophylactic and therapeutic usage of antibiotics has become the mainstay of managing this problem, however, this in turn led to the emergence of multidrug resistant strains of bacteria in the environment; which has raised awareness of the critical need for alternative non-antibiotic based methods of preventing and treating bacterial infections. Bacteriophages – viruses that infect and result in the death of bacteria – are currently of great interest as a highly viable alternative to antibiotics. This article provides an insight into bacteriophage application in controlling Vibrio species as well underlining the advantages and drawbacks of phage therapy. PMID:27486446

  6. Choline-containing bacteriophage receptors in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, R. (Rafael); Garcia, E.; Garcia, P.; Ronda, C; Tomasz, A.

    1982-01-01

    Choline-containing teichoic acid seems to be essential for the adsorption of bacteriophage Dp-1 to pneumococci. This conclusion is based on the following observations: In contrast to pneumococci grown in choline-containing medium, cells grown in medium containing ethanolamine or other submethylated aminoalcohols instead of choline were found to be resistant to infection by Dp-1. Live choline-grown bacteria and heat- or UV-inactivated cells and purified cell walls prepared from these cells wer...

  7. Bacteriophages : an underestimated role in human and animal health ?

    OpenAIRE

    Marianne eDe Paepe; Marion eLeclerc; Tinsley, Colin R.; Marie-Agnès ePetit

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomic approaches applied to viruses have highlighted their prevalence in almost all microbial ecosystems investigated. In all ecosystems, notably those associated with humans or animals, the viral fraction is dominated by bacteriophages. Whether they contribute to dysbiosis, i.e. the departure from microbiota composition in symbiosis at equilibrium and entry into a state favoring human or animal disease is unknown at present. This review summarizes what has been learnt on phages associa...

  8. Isolation of Actinomyces bacteriophage from human dental plaque.

    OpenAIRE

    Tylenda, C A; Calvert, C.; Kolenbrander, P. E.; Tylenda, A

    1985-01-01

    Human dental plaque samples were screened for the presence of bacteriophage for Actinomyces viscosus and Streptococcus sanguis. None of the 336 samples yielded phage for S. sanguis, but 10 contained virulent actinomyces phage. A high host cell specificity was observed in that one phage isolate infected only A. viscosus T14V, eight phage isolates infected only A. viscosus MG-1, and one infected both strains. None was capable of productively infecting various other actinomyces strains that repr...

  9. Genetic analysis of bacteriophages from clinical and environmental samples

    OpenAIRE

    Knapik, Kamila Z.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophages, viruses infecting bacteria, are uniformly present in any location where there are high numbers of bacteria, both in the external environment and the human body. Knowledge of their diversity is limited by the difficulty to culture the host species and by the lack of the universal marker gene present in all viruses. Metagenomics is a powerful tool that can be used to analyse viral communities in their natural environments. The aim of this study was to investigate diverse populat...

  10. Identification of mutations conferring 5-azacytidine resistance in bacteriophage

    OpenAIRE

    Arribas, María; Cabanillas, Laura; Lázaro, Ester

    2011-01-01

    RNA virus replication takes place at a very high error rate, and additional increases in this parameter can produce the extinction of virus infectivity. Nevertheless, RNA viruses can adapt to conditions of increased mutagenesis, which demonstrates that selection of beneficial mutations is also possible at higher-than-standard error rates. In this study we have analysed the evolutionary behaviour of bacteriophage Qβ populations when replication proceeds in the presence of the mutagenic nucleos...

  11. P. fluorescens biofilm control using bacteriophage ΦS1

    OpenAIRE

    Sillankorva, Sanna; Oliveira, Rosário; Vieira, M. J.; Sutherland, Ian W.; Azeredo, Joana

    2004-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilms contribute to the spoilage of dairy industry products due to the proteolytic activity of some Pseudomonas fluorescens strains. The eradication of these biofilms is difficult using the traditional chemical biocides due to the low removal action of these agents. Additionally chemical control leaves inactivated cells attached to the surface that tends to provide an ideal environment for further bacterial adhesion and growth. Bacteriophages can be seen as good alt...

  12. Ecology of Anti-Biofilm Agents I: Antibiotics versus Bacteriophages

    OpenAIRE

    Abedon, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages, the viruses that infect bacteria, have for decades been successfully used to combat antibiotic-resistant, chronic bacterial infections, many of which are likely biofilm associated. Antibiotics as anti-biofilm agents can, by contrast, be inefficacious against even genetically sensitive targets. Such deficiencies in usefulness may result from antibiotics, as naturally occurring compounds, not serving their producers, in nature, as stand-alone disruptors of mature biofilms. Anti-...

  13. Bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides as a marker for microbial source tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jofre, Joan; Blanch, Anicet R; Lucena, Francisco; Muniesa, Maite

    2014-05-15

    Bacteriophages infecting certain strains of Bacteroides are amid the numerous procedures proposed for tracking the source of faecal pollution. These bacteriophages fulfil reasonably well most of the requirements identified as appropriate for a suitable marker of faecal sources. Thus, different host strains are available that detect bacteriophages preferably in water contaminated with faecal wastes corresponding to different animal species. For phages found preferably in human faecal wastes, which are the ones that have been more extensively studied, the amounts of phages found in waters contaminated with human fecal samples is reasonably high; these amounts are invariable through the time; their resistance to natural and anthropogenic stressors is comparable to that of other relatively resistant indicator of faecal pollution such us coliphages; the abundance ratios of somatic coliphages and bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron GA17 are unvarying in recent and aged contamination; and standardised detection methods exist. These methods are easy, cost effective and provide data susceptible of numerical analysis. In contrast, there are some uncertainties regarding their geographical stability, and consequently suitable hosts need to be isolated for different geographical areas. However, a feasible method has been described to isolate suitable hosts in a given geographical area. In summary, phages infecting Bacteroides are a marker of faecal sources that in our opinion merits being included in the "toolbox" for microbial source tracking. However, further research is still needed in order to make clear some uncertainties regarding some of their characteristics and behaviour, to compare their suitability to the one of emerging methods such us targeting Bacteroidetes by qPCR assays; or settling molecular methods for their determination.

  14. Homology modeling, substrate docking, and molecular simulation studies of mycobacteriophage Che12 lysin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadhali, Shainaba A; Hassan, Sameer; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth; Ranganathan, Uma Devi; Kumar, Vanaja

    2016-08-01

    Mycobacteriophages produce lysins that break down the host cell wall at the end of lytic cycle to release their progenies. The ability to lyse mycobacterial cells makes the lysins significant. Mycobacteriophage Che12 is the first reported temperate phage capable of infecting and lysogenising Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Gp11 of Che12 was found to have Chitinase domain that serves as endolysin (lysin A) for Che12. Structure of gp11 was modeled and evaluated using Ramachandran plot in which 98 % of the residues are in the favored and allowed regions. Che12 lysin A was predicted to act on NAG-NAM-NAG molecules in the peptidoglycan of cell wall. The tautomers of NAG-NAM-NAG molecule were generated and docked with lysin A. The stability and binding affinity of lysin A - NAG-NAM-NAG tautomers were studied using molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:27411553

  15. Isolation of Lactic Acid Bacteria Bacteriophages from Dairy Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnaz Shokrani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds: Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis is one of the most important microorganisms used in dairy industry for production of fermented milk products. Bacteriophages which attack  L. lactis are a serious threat to the dairy industry because of their negative effects on fermentation processes. Methods: Samples of raw milk were examined for the presence of lactococcal bacteriophages. Samples were centrifuged and then filtered through 0.45µm pore size filters. The filtrates were added to early-exponential cultures of Lactococcus lactis subspp. Lactis (PTCC 1336. Overlay method was used to detect the formation of plaques. After isolation and concentration of phages, serial dilutions of phage stock were used to determine titer of phage in concentrated sample. Electron Microscopy was used for observation and characterization of structural details of bacteriophages. Results: Two phages were isolated; one of them had a hexagonal head of 45×30 nm in diameter and a flexible non-contractile tail of 70nm long which belonged to Siphoviridae. The other had a short tail and a hexagonal head of 53×60 nm in diameter which was a member of Podoviridae family. Conclusion: In this study, for the first time, two phages were isolated from milk. This does not reduce the significance of phage control in different stages of the production. The spread of the phages in the production plant can be very harmful.

  16. Temperate bacteriophages collected by outer membrane vesicles in Komagataeibacter intermedius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharina, Alla; Podolich, Olga; Faidiuk, Iuliia; Zaika, Sergiy; Haidak, Andriy; Kukharenko, Olga; Zaets, Iryna; Tovkach, Fedor; Reva, Oleg; Kremenskoy, Maxim; Kozyrovska, Natalia

    2015-04-01

    The acetic acid bacteria have mainly relevance for bacterial cellulose production and fermented bio-products manufacture. The purpose of this study was to identify temperate bacteriophages in a cellulose-producing bacterial strain Komagataeibacter intermedius IMBG180. Prophages from K. intermedius IMBG180 were induced with mitomycin C and nalidixic acid. Transmission electron microscopy analysis exhibited tailed bacteriophages belonging to Myoviridae. A PCR assay targeting the capsid gene of the myoviruses proved phylogenetic position of induced phages. Nalidixic acid was poor inducer of prophages, however, it induced the OMV-like particles release. Size of OMVs depended on an antibiotic applied for phage induction and varied in the range of 30-80 and 120-200 nm. Inside some of them, tails of phages have been visible. Under conditions, inducing prophages, OMVs acted as the collectors of formed phage particles, using outer membrane receptors for phage detection (in this case, outer membrane siderophore receptor), and fulfilled therefore "a cleaning," as well as defensive functions, preventing bacteriophage spread outside population. This is the first description of myoviruses affiliated to K. intermedius, as well as outer membrane vesicles interaction with phages within this host.

  17. Bacteriophages and medical oncology: targeted gene therapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Karimi, Marzieh; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2014-08-01

    Targeted gene therapy of cancer is of paramount importance in medical oncology. Bacteriophages, viruses that specifically infect bacterial cells, offer a variety of potential applications in biomedicine. Their genetic flexibility to go under a variety of surface modifications serves as a basis for phage display methodology. These surface manipulations allow bacteriophages to be exploited for targeted delivery of therapeutic genes. Moreover, the excellent safety profile of these viruses paves the way for their potential use as cancer gene therapy platforms. The merge of phage display and combinatorial technology has led to the emergence of phage libraries turning phage display into a high throughput technology. Random peptide libraries, as one of the most frequently used phage libraries, provide a rich source of clinically useful peptide ligands. Peptides are known as a promising category of pharmaceutical agents in medical oncology that present advantages such as inexpensive synthesis, efficient tissue penetration and the lack of immunogenicity. Phage peptide libraries can be screened, through biopanning, against various targets including cancer cells and tissues that results in obtaining cancer-homing ligands. Cancer-specific peptides isolated from phage libraries show huge promise to be utilized for targeting of various gene therapy vectors towards malignant cells. Beyond doubt, bacteriophages will play a more impressive role in the future of medical oncology.

  18. Bacteriophages and medical oncology: targeted gene therapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Karimi, Marzieh; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2014-08-01

    Targeted gene therapy of cancer is of paramount importance in medical oncology. Bacteriophages, viruses that specifically infect bacterial cells, offer a variety of potential applications in biomedicine. Their genetic flexibility to go under a variety of surface modifications serves as a basis for phage display methodology. These surface manipulations allow bacteriophages to be exploited for targeted delivery of therapeutic genes. Moreover, the excellent safety profile of these viruses paves the way for their potential use as cancer gene therapy platforms. The merge of phage display and combinatorial technology has led to the emergence of phage libraries turning phage display into a high throughput technology. Random peptide libraries, as one of the most frequently used phage libraries, provide a rich source of clinically useful peptide ligands. Peptides are known as a promising category of pharmaceutical agents in medical oncology that present advantages such as inexpensive synthesis, efficient tissue penetration and the lack of immunogenicity. Phage peptide libraries can be screened, through biopanning, against various targets including cancer cells and tissues that results in obtaining cancer-homing ligands. Cancer-specific peptides isolated from phage libraries show huge promise to be utilized for targeting of various gene therapy vectors towards malignant cells. Beyond doubt, bacteriophages will play a more impressive role in the future of medical oncology. PMID:25012686

  19. MetaPhinder—Identifying Bacteriophage Sequences in Metagenomic Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroel, Julia; Lund, Ole; Voldby Larsen, Mette; Nielsen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages are the most abundant biological entity on the planet, but at the same time do not account for much of the genetic material isolated from most environments due to their small genome sizes. They also show great genetic diversity and mosaic genomes making it challenging to analyze and understand them. Here we present MetaPhinder, a method to identify assembled genomic fragments (i.e.contigs) of phage origin in metagenomic data sets. The method is based on a comparison to a database of whole genome bacteriophage sequences, integrating hits to multiple genomes to accomodate for the mosaic genome structure of many bacteriophages. The method is demonstrated to out-perform both BLAST methods based on single hits and methods based on k-mer comparisons. MetaPhinder is available as a web service at the Center for Genomic Epidemiology https://cge.cbs.dtu.dk/services/MetaPhinder/, while the source code can be downloaded from https://bitbucket.org/genomicepidemiology/metaphinder or https://github.com/vanessajurtz/MetaPhinder. PMID:27684958

  20. Alternatives to antibiotics: utilization of bacteriophage to treat colibacillosis and prevent foodborne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, W E; Huff, G R; Rath, N C; Balog, J M; Donoghue, A M

    2005-04-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect and kill bacteria. Bacteriophage do not infect animal and plant cells, which makes them a potentially safe alternative to antibiotics. We have been conducting research on the efficacy of bacteriophage to prevent and treat colibacillosis in poultry. Bacteriophages that were lytic to a non-motile, serotype 02 isolate of Escherichia coli were isolated from municipal wastewater treatment plants and poultry processing plants. This E. coli isolate is pathogenic to poultry, causing severe respiratory and systemic infections. Two bacteriophage isolates were selected for use in studies designed to determine the efficacy of these bacteriophage to prevent and treat severe colibacillosis in poultry. Colibacillosis was induced by injecting 6 x 10(4) cfu of E. coli into the thoracic air sac when birds were 1 wk of age. Initial studies demonstrated that mortality was significantly reduced from 85 to 35% when the challenge culture was mixed with equal titers of bacteriophage, and the birds were completely protected when the challenge culture was mixed with 10 pfu of bacteriophage. In subsequent studies, we have shown that an aerosol spray of bacteriophage given to birds prior to this E. coli challenge could significantly reduce mortality even when given 3 d prior to the E. coli challenge. Our research on treating colibacillosis in poultry has demonstrated that an intramuscular injection of bacteriophage given 24 or 48 h after the birds were challenged rescued the birds from this severe E. coli infection. We have demonstrated that bacteriophage can be used to prevent and treat colibacillosis in poultry and may provide an effective alternative to antibiotic use in animal production. PMID:15844825

  1. Identification and Characterization of a Highly Conserved Crenarchaeal Protein Lysine Methyltransferase with Broad Substrate Specificity

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Yindi; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Wang, Qian; Luo, Yuanming; Huang, Li

    2012-01-01

    Protein lysine methylation occurs extensively in the Crenarchaeota, a major kingdom in the Archaea. However, the enzymes responsible for this type of posttranslational modification have not been found. Here we report the identification and characterization of the first crenarchaeal protein lysine methyltransferase, designated aKMT, from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus islandicus. The enzyme was capable of transferring methyl groups to selected lysine residues in a substrate prot...

  2. Conformational Studies of ε- CBz- L- Lysine and L- Valine Block Copolypeptides

    OpenAIRE

    Ajay Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Conformational studies of ε-CBz-L-lysine and L-valine block copoylpeptides using x- ray diffraction and CD spectra are described. The block copolypeptides contain valine block in the center and on both side of the valine are ε-CBz-L-lysine blocks. The conformation of the copolypeptides changes with increases in the chain length of ε- CBz-L- lysine blocks. When length of ε- CBZ- L- lysine blocks is 9, the block copolypeptide has exclusive beta sheet structure. With the increase in chain length...

  3. Mass spectrometric analysis of lysine ubiquitylation reveals promiscuity at site level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Jannie M R; Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Bekker-Jensen, Simon;

    2011-01-01

    The covalent attachment of ubiquitin to proteins regulates numerous processes in eukaryotic cells. Here we report the identification of 753 unique lysine ubiquitylation sites on 471 proteins using higher-energy collisional dissociation on the LTQ Orbitrap Velos. In total 5756 putative ubiquitin...... substrates were identified. Lysine residues targeted by the ubiquitin-ligase system show no unique sequence feature. Surface accessible lysine residues located in ordered secondary regions, surrounded by smaller and positively charged amino acids are preferred sites of ubiquitylation. Lysine ubiquitylation...

  4. Pasteurella haemolytica bacteriophage: identification, partial characterization, and relationship of temperate bacteriophages from isolates of Pasteurella haemolytica (biotype A, serotype 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, A.B.; Renshaw, H.W.; Sneed, L.W.

    1985-05-01

    Pasteurella haemolytica (biotype A, serotype 1) isolates (n = 15) from the upper respiratory tract of clinically normal cattle, as well as from lung lesions from cases of fatal bovine pasteurellosis, were examined for the presence of bacteriophage after irradiation with UV light. Treatment of all P haemolytica isolates with UV irradiation resulted in lysis of bacteria due to the induction of vegetative development of bacteriophages. The extent of growth inhibition and bacterial lysis in irradiated cultures was UV dose-dependent. Bacterial cultures exposed to UV light for 20 s reached peak culture density between 60 and 70 minutes after irradiation; thereafter, culture density declined rapidly, so that by 120 minutes, it was approximately 60% of the original value. When examined ultrastructurally, lytic cultures from each isolate revealed bacteriophages with an overall length of approximately 200 nm and that appeared to have a head with icosahedral symmetry and a contractile tail. Cell-free filtrate from each noninduced bacterial isolate was inoculated onto the other bacterial isolates in a cross-culture sensitivity assay for the presence of phages lytic for the host bacterial isolates. Zones of lysis (plaques) did not develop when bacterial lawns grown from the different isolates were inoculated with filtrates from the heterologous isolates.

  5. Isolation and characterization of a lytic bacteriophage φKp-lyy15 of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinyin; Lu; Hongyan; Shi; Zhe; Zhang; Fang; Han; Jinghua; Li; Yanbo; Sun

    2015-01-01

    <正>Dear Editor,Bacteriophages(phages)are viruses that specifically infect and kill bacteria.They are ubiquitous throughout all environments that bacteria inhabit.Following their discovery by F.W.Twort in 1915 and F.d’Herele in 1917,bacteriophages were recognized as potential agents to treat bacterial diseases and phage therapy has been used

  6. Detection of bacteriophage-infected cells of Lactococcus lactis using flow cytometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Ole; Cuesta-Dominguez, Álvaro; Albrektsen, Bjarne;

    2007-01-01

    Bacteriophage infection in dairy fermentation constitutes a serious problem worldwide. We have studied bacteriophage infection in Lactococcus lactis by using the flow cytometer. The first effect of the infection of the bacterium is a change from cells in chains toward single cells. We interpret...

  7. Polymer-based delivery systems for support and delivery of bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alyssa Marie

    One of the most urgent problems in the fields of medicine and agriculture is the decreasing effectiveness of antibiotics. Once a miracle drug, antibiotics have recently become associated with the creation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The main limitations of these treatments include lack of both adaptability and specificity. To overcome these shortcomings of current antibiotic treatments, there has been a renewed interest in bacteriophage research. Bacteriophages are naturally-occurring viruses that lyse bacteria. They are highly specific, with each bacteriophage type lysing a narrow range of bacteria strains. Bacteriophages are also ubiquitous biological entities, populating environments where bacterial growth is supported. Just as humans are exposed to bacteria in their daily lives, we are exposed to bacteriophages as well. To use bacteriophages in practical applications, they must be delivered to the site of an infection in a controlled-release system. Two systems were studied to observe their support of bacteriophage lytic activity, as well as investigate the possibility of controlling bacteriophage release rates. First, hydrogels were studied, using crosslinking and blending techniques to achieve a range of release profiles. Second, polyanhydride microparticles were studied, evaluating release rates as a function of monomer chemistries.

  8. [The bacteriophages Yersinia pseudotuberculosis: the detection in strains of different O-serovars and their identification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makedonova, L D; Kudriakova, T A; Kachkina, G V; Gaevskaia, N E

    2013-08-01

    The sample included five indicator pseudotuberculosis strains. The application of these strains permitted to isolate out of 161 strains of Y. pseudotuberculosis 9 bacteriophages identical by their morphologic and serologic characteristics but having individual particularities in their lytic activity. The test on sensitivity to bacteriophages can be used in laboratory diagnostic to differentiate the strains of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis.

  9. Biocontrol of Escherichia coli O157:H7 using a bacteriophage cocktail in laboratory media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteriophages are natural enemies of bacteria, and therefore, logical candidates to evaluate as antibacterial agents for the control of foodborne pathogens. The effect of a bacteriophage treatment on the prevention of E. coli O157:H7 growth was investigated in Tryptic Soy Broth (TSB) laboratory med...

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of a Myoviridae Bacteriophage Infecting Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, Rubina; Orsini, Massimiliano; Bolletti Censi, Sergio; Borriello, Giorgia; Galiero, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    The bacteriophage 118970_sal3 was isolated from water buffalo feces in southern Italy, exhibiting lytic activity against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. This bacteriophage belongs to the Myoviridae family and has a 39,464-bp double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) genome containing 53 coding sequences (CDSs). PMID:27688333

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of a Lytic Siphoviridae Bacteriophage Infecting Several Serovars of Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, Rubina; Lombardi, Serena; Iodice, Maria Grazia; Riccardi, Marita Georgia; Orsini, Massimiliano; Bolletti Censi, Sergio; Galiero, Giorgio; Borriello, Giorgia

    2016-01-01

    The bacteriophage 100268_sal2 was isolated from water buffalo feces in southern Italy, exhibiting lytic activity against several subspecies of Salmonella enterica This bacteriophage belongs to the Siphoviridae family and has a 125,114-bp double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) genome containing 188 coding sequences (CDSs). PMID:27688334

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of a Myoviridae Bacteriophage Infecting Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, Rubina; Orsini, Massimiliano; Bolletti Censi, Sergio; Galiero, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    The bacteriophage 118970_sal3 was isolated from water buffalo feces in southern Italy, exhibiting lytic activity against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. This bacteriophage belongs to the Myoviridae family and has a 39,464-bp double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) genome containing 53 coding sequences (CDSs). PMID:27688333

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of a Lytic Siphoviridae Bacteriophage Infecting Several Serovars of Salmonella enterica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, Rubina; Lombardi, Serena; Iodice, Maria Grazia; Riccardi, Marita Georgia; Orsini, Massimiliano; Bolletti Censi, Sergio; Galiero, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    The bacteriophage 100268_sal2 was isolated from water buffalo feces in southern Italy, exhibiting lytic activity against several subspecies of Salmonella enterica. This bacteriophage belongs to the Siphoviridae family and has a 125,114-bp double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) genome containing 188 coding sequences (CDSs). PMID:27688334

  14. Removal of MS2, Qβ and GA bacteriophages during drinking water treatment at pilot scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudaud, Nicolas; Machinal, Claire; David, Fabienne; Fréval-Le Bourdonnec, Armelle; Jossent, Jérôme; Bakanga, Fanny; Arnal, Charlotte; Jaffrezic, Marie Pierre; Oberti, Sandrine; Gantzer, Christophe

    2012-05-15

    The removal of MS2, Qβ and GA, F-specific RNA bacteriophages, potential surrogates for pathogenic waterborne viruses, was investigated during a conventional drinking water treatment at pilot scale by using river water, artificially and independently spiked with these bacteriophages. The objective of this work is to develop a standard system for assessing the effectiveness of drinking water plants with respect to the removal of MS2, Qβ and GA bacteriophages by a conventional pre-treatment process (coagulation-flocculation-settling-sand filtration) followed or not by an ultrafiltration (UF) membrane (complete treatment process). The specific performances of three UF membranes alone were assessed by using (i) pre-treated water and (ii) 0.1 mM sterile phosphate buffer solution (PBS), spiked with bacteriophages. These UF membranes tested in this work were designed for drinking water treatment market and were also selected for research purpose. The hypothesis serving as base for this study was that the interfacial properties for these three bacteriophages, in terms of electrostatic charge and the degree of hydrophobicity, could induce variations in the removal performances achieved by drinking water treatments. The comparison of the results showed a similar behaviour for both MS2 and Qβ surrogates whereas it was particularly atypical for the GA surrogate. The infectious character of MS2 and Qβ bacteriophages was mostly removed after clarification followed by sand filtration processes (more than a 4.8-log reduction) while genomic copies were removed at more than a 4.0-log after the complete treatment process. On the contrary, GA bacteriophage was only slightly removed by clarification followed by sand filtration, with less than 1.7-log and 1.2-log reduction, respectively. After the complete treatment process achieved, GA bacteriophage was removed with less than 2.2-log and 1.6-log reduction, respectively. The effectiveness of the three UF membranes tested in terms of

  15. Screening and identification of receptor antagonist for shiga toxin from random peptides displayed on filamentous bacteriophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩照中; 苏国富; 黄翠芬

    1999-01-01

    The bacteriophage clones which can bind with shiga toxin B subunit (StxB) and inhibit cytotoxicity of shiga toxin were obtained by using antibody capturing method from a 15-mer random peptide library displayed on the surface of bacteriophage fd. Among them, one peptide encoded by the random DNA region of a selected bacteriophage (A12) was synthesized and tested in vitro and in vivo, where the peptide competed with the receptor of shiga toxin to bind StxB, and inhibited the cytotoxicity and enterotoxicity of shiga toxin. The peptide can also block other apparently unrelated StxB binding bacteriophage (A3), which suggests that there are overlapping StxB interaction sites for those ligands with different sequences. The results provide a demonstration of bacteriophage display to screen peptide ligands for a small and/or unable biotinylated molecule by antibodies-capturing strategy, and take the lead for the development of receptor antagonists for shiga toxin.

  16. Adsorption of T4 bacteriophages on planar indium tin oxide surface via controlled surface tailoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liana, Ayu Ekajayanthi; Chia, Ed Win; Marquis, Christopher P; Gunawan, Cindy; Gooding, J Justin; Amal, Rose

    2016-04-15

    The work investigates the influence of surface physicochemical properties of planar indium tin oxide (ITO) as a model substrate on T4 bacteriophage adsorption. A comparative T4 bacteriophage adsorption study shows a significant difference in bacteriophage adsorption observed on chemically modified planar ITO when compared to similarly modified particulate ITO, which infers that trends observed in virus-particle interaction studies are not necessarily transferrable to predict virus-planar surface adsorption behaviour. We also found that ITO surfaces modified with methyl groups, (resulting in increased surface roughness and hydrophobicity) remained capable of adsorbing T4 bacteriophage. The adsorption of T4 onto bare, amine and carboxylic functionalised planar ITO suggests the presence of a unique binding behaviour involving specific functional groups on planar ITO surface beyond the non-specific electrostatic interactions that dominate phage to particle interactions. The paper demonstrates the significance of physicochemical properties of surfaces on bacteriophage-surface interactions.

  17. Bacteriophages as anti-infective agents: recent developments and regulatory challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Brendan F

    2012-05-01

    The biennial meeting on 'Exploiting Bacteriophages for Bioscience, Biotechnology and Medicine', held in London, UK, on 20 January 2012, and chaired by George Salmond (University of Cambridge, UK) hosted over 50 participants representing 13 countries. The highly multidisciplinary meeting covered a diverse range of topics, reflecting the current expansion of interest in this field, including the use of bacteriophages as the source of biochemical reagents for molecular biology, bacteriophages for the treatment of human and animal diseases, bacteriophage-based diagnostics and therapeutic delivery technologies and necessity for, and regulatory challenges associated with, robust clinical trials of phage-based therapeutics. This report focuses on a number of presentations from the meeting relating to cutting-edge research on bacteriophages as anti-infective agents.

  18. Selection and Characterization of a Lysine Yielding Mutant of Corynebacterium glutamicum - a Soil Isolate from Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib-ur-Rehman§٭, Abdul Hameed and Safia Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available L-lysine is the second limiting amino acid for poultry and supplemented in broiler feed for optimal performance. Lysine can be produced by inducing mutation in glutamate producing bacteria. The study was conducted to enhance lysine production from a local strain of Corynebacterium glutamicum. The bacterium was mutated by exposure to UV. Mutants resistant to s-2-aminoethyle L-cystein (AEC and showing auxotrophy for L-homoserine were screened for lysine production qualitatively and quantitatively. A mutant showing highest production of lysine (8.2 mg/mL was selected for optimization of physical and nutritional parameters for maximum production of lysine in shake flask. An initial pH 7.6, 30˚C temperature, 300 rpm and 60 h incubation time were the optimized values of physical requirements. Cane molasses and corn starch hydrolysate were required at 15% (w/v in the fermentation media which provided around 9% total sugars to produce maximum lysine (17 to 18 mg/mL. When amonium sulphate was used at 3.5% (w/v level in molasses or corn starch hydrolysate based fermentation media, production of lysine slightly increased above 18 mg/mL. It is concluded that industrial by products like cane molasses, corn steep liquor, and corn starch hydrolysate can be used as carbon and organic nitrogen sources in fermentation medium for scale up process of lysine production and this lysine enriched broth may be used in broiler feed later. However, more potent lysine producing mutant and additional in vivo trials would be required to commercialize this product.

  19. Lysine Acetylation Facilitates Spontaneous DNA Dynamics in the Nucleosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongseong; Lee, Jaehyoun; Lee, Tae-Hee

    2015-12-01

    The nucleosome, comprising a histone protein core wrapped around by DNA, is the fundamental packing unit of DNA in cells. Lysine acetylation at the histone core elevates DNA accessibility in the nucleosome, the mechanism of which remains largely unknown. By employing our recently developed hybrid single molecule approach, here we report how the structural dynamics of DNA in the nucleosome is altered upon acetylation at histone H3 lysine 56 (H3K56) that is critical for elevated DNA accessibility. Our results indicate that H3K56 acetylation facilitates the structural dynamics of the DNA at the nucleosome termini that spontaneously and repeatedly open and close on a ms time scale. The results support a molecular mechanism of histone acetylation in catalyzing DNA unpacking whose efficiency is ultimately limited by the spontaneous DNA dynamics at the nucleosome temini. This study provides the first and unique experimental evidence revealing a role of protein chemical modification in directly regulating the kinetic stability of the DNA packing unit.

  20. New lysine-acetylated proteins screened by immunoaffinity and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The lack of selective extraction specific for lysine-acetylated proteins has been a major problem in the field of acetylation biology,though acetylation plays a key role in many biological processes.In this paper,we report for the first time the proteomic screening of lysine-acetylated proteins from a mouse liver tissue,by a new approach of immunoaffinity purification of lysine-acetylated peptides combined with nano-HPLC/MS/MS analysis.We have found 20 lysine-acetylated proteins with 21 lysine-acetylated sites,among which 12 lysine-acetylated proteins and 16 lysine-acetylated sites have never been reported before.Notably,three acetyltransferases harboring in mitochondrion are newly discovered acetyltransferases responsible for the acetylation of nonhistone proteins.We have explored the significant patterns of residue preference by the hierarchical clustering analysis of amino acid residues surrounding acetylation sites,which could be helpful to the prediction of new sites of lysine acetylation.Our findings provide more candidates for studying the important roles played by acetylation in diverse cellular pathways and related human diseases.

  1. Lysine acetylation targets protein complexes and co-regulates major cellular functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choudhary, Chuna Ram; Kumar, Chanchal; Gnad, Florian;

    2009-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a reversible posttranslational modification of proteins and plays a key role in regulating gene expression. Technological limitations have so far prevented a global analysis of lysine acetylation's cellular roles. We used high-resolution mass spectrometry to identify 3600 ly...

  2. Effect of Selected Plant Extracts and D- and L-Lysine on the Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lurling, M.; Van Oosterhout, F.

    2014-01-01

    We tested extracts from Fructus mume, Salvia miltiorrhiza and Moringa oleifera as well as L-lysine and D-Lysine as curative measures to rapidly suppress the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa NIVA-CYA 43. We tested these compounds under similar conditions to facilitate comparisons. We hypothesize

  3. The putative oncogene GASC1 demethylates tri- and dimethylated lysine 9 on histone H3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cloos, Paul A C; Christensen, Jesper; Agger, Karl;

    2006-01-01

    Methylation of lysine and arginine residues on histone tails affects chromatin structure and gene transcription. Tri- and dimethylation of lysine 9 on histone H3 (H3K9me3/me2) is required for the binding of the repressive protein HP1 and is associated with heterochromatin formation and transcript...

  4. Proteomic analysis of lysine acetylation sites in rat tissues reveals organ specificity and subcellular patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Alicia; Hansen, Kasper Lage; Weinert, Brian Tate;

    2012-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a major posttranslational modification involved in a broad array of physiological functions. Here, we provide an organ-wide map of lysine acetylation sites from 16 rat tissues analyzed by high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry. We quantify 15,474 modification sites on 4,54...

  5. Lysine Rich Proteins in the Salt-Soluble Protein Fraction of Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingversen, J.; Køie, B.

    1973-01-01

    Fractionation of the protein complex from Emir barley showed that the salt-soluble fraction accounts for 44% of the total lysine content but only for 2.......Fractionation of the protein complex from Emir barley showed that the salt-soluble fraction accounts for 44% of the total lysine content but only for 2....

  6. Fortification of lysine for improving protein quality in multiple-fortified quick cooking rice : Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wongmetinee, T.; Boonstra, A.; Zimmermann, M.B.; Chavasit, V.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies in Thailand indicated that rice-based complementary foods of breast-fed infants normally provided inadequate iron and calcium. Quick-cooking rice fortified with different nutrients was therefore developed. The idea of lysine fortification was based on the fact that lysine is a limit

  7. Differential lysine acetylation profiles of Erwinia amylovora strains revealed by proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protein lysine acetylation (LysAc) in bacteria has recently been demonstrated to be widespread in E. coli and Salmonella and to broadly regulate bacterial physiology and metabolism. However, LysAc in plant pathogenic bacteria is largely unknown. Here we report the lysine acetylome of Erwinia amylovo...

  8. A systematic evaluation of the compatibility of histones containing methyl-lysine analogues with biochemical reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangshuai Jia; Weixiang Wang; Hong Li; Zhuo Mao; Gaihong Cai; Jian Sun; Hui Wu; Mo Xu; Peng Yang; Wen Yuan; She Chen; Bing Zhu

    2009-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, Histone lysine methylation has receoved a great deal of attention from the chromatin field over the past 10 years. To date, histone lysine methylations have been demonstrated to play pivotal roles in nearly all biological processes involving chromatin, including replication, transcription, DNA repair etc.

  9. UV ability to destroy poliovirus end FRNA specific bacteriophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baron, J.; Joret, J.C.; Lesavre, J.; Perrot, J.Y.

    1996-01-01

    In France, the use of ultraviolet radiation to disinfect secondary effluents is only in its initial stage. The aim of this study was to examine the ability of UV to destroy Poliovirus Type 1 and FRNA specific bacteriophages (laboratory MS2 phages and indigenous phages). Concentrated viral solutions were mixed with secondary effluents artificially enriched with suspended solids and then irradiated at various UV dose in a collimated beam. Bacteriological analysis of Escherichia coli and enterococci were performed at the same time. UV were very efficient to kill Poliovirus : Inactivation of 3 and 5 log units were observed respectively at UV doses of 20 and 40 mW/cm{sup 2}. The Poliovirus disinfection rate was almost the same than Escherichia coli. Enterococci were more resistant than E. coli. Inactivation of MS2 bacteriophages was significantly correlated to UV dose following the relationship MS2 Inactivation = 0.047{sup *} Dose + 0,396. At UV dose of 20 mWs/cm{sup 2}, MS2 phages were 2.3 times more resistant to UV than Poliovirus, i.e. they need UV dose 2,3 times greater to be disinfected at the same level. A review of the literature has also shown that viruses more resistant to UV treatment have never been reported. All this would tend to confirm the interest of this group of virus as indicators of the disinfection efficiency of UV, which could indicate, on site, the inactivation of pathogenic viruses. Inactivation rates obtained for FRNA phages proved the good virucidal activity of UV. The inactivation of indigenous FRNA bacteriophages was not correlated with E. coli inactivation. On the other hand, it was correlated with enterococci inactivation. (Author). 23 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Proteome-wide analysis of lysine acetylation suggests its broad regulatory scope in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Peter; Wagner, Sebastian Alexander; Weinert, Brian Tate;

    2012-01-01

    Post-translational modification of proteins by lysine acetylation plays important regulatory roles in living cells. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used unicellular eukaryotic model organism in biomedical research. S. cerevisiae contains several evolutionary conserved lysin...

  11. Incorporation of nitrogen-15 from lysine and wheat in the eggs and bodies of laying hens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the experiment three hens were used, each receiving 15N-labelled wheat or lysine for four days. The hens received the same rations, but unlabelled, for a further four days. They were then killed. In the eggs and carcass 48% of the applied 15N-excess was found in the wheat test, and 73% in the lysine test. The 15N incorporated in the various body fractions and eggs, as percentage of intake, showed distinct variations in the samples. The percentage of lysine 15N-excess compared with total 15N-excess was 78% in the eggs, 72% in the liver, and 66% in the muscles (lysine test). With the lysine test a 15N at.% excess was found in all amino acids in the yolk, egg-white and follicles, with the highest values in the non-essential amino acids. (author)

  12. Bacteriophages : an underestimated role in human and animal health ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne eDe Paepe

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Metagenomic approaches applied to viruses have highlighted their prevalence in almost all microbial ecosystems investigated. In all ecosystems, notably those associated with humans or animals, the viral fraction is dominated by bacteriophages. Whether they contribute to dysbiosis, i.e. the departure from microbiota composition in symbiosis at equilibrium and entry into a state favoring human or animal disease is unknown at present. This review summarizes what has been learnt on phages associated with human and animal microbiota, and focuses on examples illustrating the several ways by which phages may contribute to a shift to pathogenesis, either by modifying population equilibrium, by horizontal transfer, or by modulating immunity.

  13. Back to the future: bacteriophages as promising therapeutic tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo-Calap, P; Georgel, P; Bahram, S

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophages (phages), natural predators of bacteria, are becoming increasingly attractive in medical and pharmaceutical applications. After their discovery almost a century ago, they have been particularly instrumental in the comprehension of basic molecular biology and genetics processes. The more recent emergence of multi-drug-resistant bacteria requires novel therapeutic strategies, and phages are being (re)considered as promising potential antibacterial tools. Furthermore, phages are also used for other purposes, e.g. vaccine production, gene/drug carriers, bacterial detection and typing. These new alternative approaches using phages are of major interest and have allowed unexpected developments, from the decipherment of fundamental biological processes to potential clinical applications.

  14. The role of temperate bacteriophages in bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Emily V; Winstanley, Craig; Fothergill, Joanne L; James, Chloe E

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. There are an estimated 10(31) phage on the planet, making them the most abundant form of life. We are rapidly approaching the centenary of their identification, and yet still have only a limited understanding of their role in the ecology and evolution of bacterial populations. Temperate prophage carriage is often associated with increased bacterial virulence. The rise in use of technologies, such as genome sequencing and transcriptomics, has highlighted more subtle ways in which prophages contribute to pathogenicity. This review discusses the current knowledge of the multifaceted effects that phage can exert on their hosts and how this may contribute to bacterial adaptation during infection.

  15. Molecular Characterization of a Bacteriophage (Chp2) from Chlamydia psittaci

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, B. L.; Everson, J. S.; Fane, B.; Giannikopoulou, P.; Vretou, E.; Lambden, P R; Clarke, I N

    2000-01-01

    Comparisons of the proteome of abortifacient Chlamydia psittaci isolates from sheep by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis identified a novel abundant protein with a molecular mass of 61.4 kDa and an isoelectric point of 6.41. C-terminal sequence analysis of this protein yielded a short peptide sequence that had an identical match to the viral coat protein (VP1) of the avian chlamydiaphage Chp1. Electron microscope studies revealed the presence of a 25-nm-diameter bacteriophage (Chp2) with no...

  16. Re-initiation repair in bacteriophage T4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation of bacteriophage T4 with ultraviolet light induces the formation of pyrimidine dimers in its DNA. These dimers hamper replication of DNA and, to a lesser extent, transcription of DNA after its infection of bacteria. A number of pathways enable phage T4 to multiply dimer-containing DNA. One of these pathways has been named replication repair and is described in this thesis. The properties of two phage strains, unable to perform replication repair, have been studied to obtain a picture of the repair process. The mutations in these strains that affect replication repair have been located on the genomic map of T4. (Auth.)

  17. Application of bacteriophages in post-harvest control of human pathogenic and food spoiling bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Pulido, Rubén; Grande Burgos, Maria José; Gálvez, Antonio; Lucas López, Rosario

    2016-10-01

    Bacteriophages have attracted great attention for application in food biopreservation. Lytic bacteriophages specific for human pathogenic bacteria can be isolated from natural sources such as animal feces or industrial wastes where the target bacteria inhabit. Lytic bacteriophages have been tested in different food systems for inactivation of main food-borne pathogens including Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, Shigella spp., Campylobacter jejuni and Cronobacter sakazkii, and also for control of spoilage bacteria. Application of lytic bacteriophages could selectively control host populations of concern without interfering with the remaining food microbiota. Bacteriophages could also be applied for inactivation of bacteria attached to food contact surfaces or grown as biofilms. Bacteriophages may receive a generally recognized as safe status based on their lack of toxicity and other detrimental effects to human health. Phage preparations specific for L. monocytogenes, E. coli O157:H7 and S. enterica serotypes have been commercialized and approved for application in foods or as part of surface decontamination protocols. Phage endolysins have a broader host specificity compared to lytic bacteriophages. Cloned endolysins could be used as natural preservatives, singly or in combination with other antimicrobials such as bacteriocins. PMID:26042353

  18. Isolation and Characterization of Bacteriophages Against Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Causing Bacterial Canker Disease in Kiwifruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ji-Gang; Lim, Jeong-A; Song, Yu-Rim; Heu, Sunggi; Kim, Gyoung Hee; Koh, Young Jin; Oh, Chang-Sik

    2016-02-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae causes bacterial canker disease in kiwifruit. Owing to the prohibition of agricultural antibiotic use in major kiwifruit-cultivating countries, alternative methods need to be developed to manage this disease. Bacteriophages are viruses that specifically infect target bacteria and have recently been reconsidered as potential biological control agents for bacterial pathogens owing to their specificity in terms of host range. In this study, we isolated bacteriophages against P. syringae pv. actinidiae from soils collected from kiwifruit orchards in Korea and selected seven bacteriophages for further characterization based on restriction enzyme digestion patterns of genomic DNA. Among the studied bacteriophages, two belong to the Myoviridae family and three belong to the Podoviridae family, based on morphology observed by transmission electron microscopy. The host range of the selected bacteriophages was confirmed using 18 strains of P. syringae pv. actinidiae, including the Psa2 and Psa3 groups, and some were also effective against other P. syringae pathovars. Lytic activity of the selected bacteriophages was sustained in vitro until 80 h, and their activity remained stable up to 50°C, at pH 11, and under UV-B light. These results indicate that the isolated bacteriophages are specific to P. syringae species and are resistant to various environmental factors, implying their potential use in control of bacterial canker disease in kiwifruits.

  19. Bacteriophages to reduce gut carriage of antibiotic resistant uropathogens with low impact on microbiota composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galtier, Matthieu; De Sordi, Luisa; Maura, Damien; Arachchi, Harindra; Volant, Stevenn; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Debarbieux, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the leading cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs) worldwide, causing over 150 million clinical cases annually. There is currently no specific treatment addressing the asymptomatic carriage in the gut of UPEC before they initiate UTIs. This study investigates the efficacy of virulent bacteriophages to decrease carriage of gut pathogens. Three virulent bacteriophages infecting an antibiotic-resistant UPEC strain were isolated and characterized both in vitro and in vivo. A new experimental murine model of gut carriage of E. coli was elaborated and the impact of virulent bacteriophages on colonization levels and microbiota diversity was assessed. A single dose of a cocktail of the three bacteriophages led to a sharp decrease in E. coli levels throughout the gut. We also observed that microbiota diversity was much less affected by bacteriophages than by antibiotics. Therefore, virulent bacteriophages can efficiently target UPEC strains residing in the gut, with potentially profound public health and economic impacts. These results open a new area with the possibility to manipulate specifically the microbiota using virulent bacteriophages, which could have broad applications in many gut-related disorders/diseases and beyond.

  20. Application of bacteriophages in post-harvest control of human pathogenic and food spoiling bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Pulido, Rubén; Grande Burgos, Maria José; Gálvez, Antonio; Lucas López, Rosario

    2016-10-01

    Bacteriophages have attracted great attention for application in food biopreservation. Lytic bacteriophages specific for human pathogenic bacteria can be isolated from natural sources such as animal feces or industrial wastes where the target bacteria inhabit. Lytic bacteriophages have been tested in different food systems for inactivation of main food-borne pathogens including Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, Shigella spp., Campylobacter jejuni and Cronobacter sakazkii, and also for control of spoilage bacteria. Application of lytic bacteriophages could selectively control host populations of concern without interfering with the remaining food microbiota. Bacteriophages could also be applied for inactivation of bacteria attached to food contact surfaces or grown as biofilms. Bacteriophages may receive a generally recognized as safe status based on their lack of toxicity and other detrimental effects to human health. Phage preparations specific for L. monocytogenes, E. coli O157:H7 and S. enterica serotypes have been commercialized and approved for application in foods or as part of surface decontamination protocols. Phage endolysins have a broader host specificity compared to lytic bacteriophages. Cloned endolysins could be used as natural preservatives, singly or in combination with other antimicrobials such as bacteriocins.

  1. Pulmonary bacteriophage therapy on Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis strains: first steps towards treatment and prevention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Morello

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant bacteria are the cause of an increasing number of deadly pulmonary infections. Because there is currently a paucity of novel antibiotics, phage therapy--the use of specific viruses that infect bacteria--is now more frequently being considered as a potential treatment for bacterial infections. Using a mouse lung-infection model caused by a multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mucoid strain isolated from a cystic fibrosis patient, we evaluated bacteriophage treatments. New bacteriophages were isolated from environmental samples and characterized. Bacteria and bacteriophages were applied intranasally to the immunocompetent mice. Survival was monitored and bronchoalveolar fluids were analysed. Quantification of bacteria, bacteriophages, pro-inflammatory and cytotoxicity markers, as well as histology and immunohistochemistry analyses were performed. A curative treatment (one single dose administrated 2 h after the onset of the infection allowed over 95% survival. A four-day preventive treatment (one single dose resulted in a 100% survival. All of the parameters measured correlated with the efficacy of both curative and preventive bacteriophage treatments. We also showed that in vitro optimization of a bacteriophage towards a clinical strain improved both its efficacy on in vivo treatments and its host range on a panel of 20 P. aeruginosa cystic fibrosis strains. This work provides an incentive to develop clinical studies on pulmonary bacteriophage therapy to combat multidrug-resistant lung infections.

  2. Virulent bacteriophages can target O104:H4 enteroaggregative Escherichia coli in the mouse intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maura, Damien; Galtier, Matthieu; Le Bouguénec, Chantal; Debarbieux, Laurent

    2012-12-01

    In vivo bacteriophage targeting of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) was assessed using a mouse intestinal model of colonization with the O104:H4 55989Str strain and a cocktail of three virulent bacteriophages. The colonization model was shown to mimic asymptomatic intestinal carriage found in humans. The addition of the cocktail to drinking water for 24 h strongly decreased ileal and weakly decreased fecal 55989Str concentrations in a dose-dependent manner. These decreases in ileal and fecal bacterial concentrations were only transient, since 55989Str concentrations returned to their original levels 3 days later. These transient decreases were independent of the mouse microbiota, as similar results were obtained with axenic mice. We studied the infectivity of each bacteriophage in the ileal and fecal environments and found that 55989Str bacteria in the mouse ileum were permissive to all three bacteriophages, whereas those in the feces were permissive to only one bacteriophage. Our results provide the first demonstration that bacterial permissivity to infection with virulent bacteriophages is not uniform throughout the gut; this highlights the need for a detailed characterization of the interactions between bacteria and bacteriophages in vivo for the further development of phage therapy targeting intestinal pathogens found in the gut of asymptomatic human carriers.

  3. Bacteriophage transport through a fining-upwards sedimentary sequence: laboratory experiments and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Raymond; Cornaton, Fabien; Hunkeler, Daniel; Rossi, Pierre

    2004-10-01

    A column containing four concentric layers of progressively finer-grained glass beads (graded column) was used to study the transport of the bacteriophage T7 in water flowing parallel to layering through a fining-upwards (FU) sedimentary structure. By passing a pulse of T7, and a conservative solute tracer upwards through a column packed with a single bead size (uniform column), the capacity of each bead type to attenuate the bacteriophage was determined. Solute and bacteriophage responses were modelled using an analytical solution to the advection-dispersion equation, with first-order kinetic deposition simulating bacteriophage attenuation. Resulting deposition constants for different flow velocities indicated that filtration theory-determined values differed from experimentally determined values by less than 10%. In contrast, the responses of solute and bacteriophage tracers passing upwards through graded columns could not be reproduced with a single analytical solution. However, a flux-weighted summation of four one-dimensional advective-dispersive analytical terms approximated solute breakthrough curves. The prolonged tailing observed in the resulting curve resembled that typically generated from field-based tracer test data, reflecting the potential importance of textural heterogeneity in the transport of dissolved substances in groundwater. Moreover, bacteriophage deposition terms, determined from filtration theory, reproduced the T7 breakthrough curve once desorption and inactivation on grain surfaces were incorporated. To evaluate the effect of FU sequences on mass transport processes in more detail, bacteriophage passage through sequences resembling those sampled from a FU bed in a fluvioglacial gravel pit were carried out using an analogous approach to that employed in the laboratory. Both solute and bacteriophage breakthrough responses resembled those generated from field-based test data and in the graded column experiments. Comparisons with the results

  4. File list: His.NoD.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: His.NoD.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: His.EmF.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: His.NoD.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. Some aspects of the mechanism of bacteriophage function. Final progress report. [Mechanisms of inactivation of bacteriophages by ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freifelder, D.

    1977-06-12

    Data are summarized from a ten-year study on the radiobiology of phages. The results showed that: phages are inactivated principally by damage to DNA; DNA damage is of two types, base damage and double-strand breakage; double-strand breakage may be lethal because of interruption within a gene, however in phage systems the damage is more fundamental in that only a single DNA fragment is injected into the host; E. coli phage T4 is relatively resistant to inactivation by x-rays; and the rate of production of strand breaks and base damage is nearly the same in bacteriophage and bacteria.

  19. Lysine methylation regulates the pRb tumour suppressor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, S; Khaire, N; Inche, A; Carr, S; La Thangue, N B

    2010-04-22

    The pRb tumour suppressor protein has a central role in coordinating early cell cycle progression. An important level of control imposed on pRb occurs through post-translational modification, for example, phosphorylation. We describe here a new level of regulation on pRb, mediated through the targeted methylation of lysine residues, by the methyltransferase Set7/9. Set7/9 methylates the C-terminal region of pRb, both in vitro and in cells, and methylated pRb interacts with heterochromatin protein HP1. pRb methylation is required for pRb-dependent cell cycle arrest and transcriptional repression, as well as pRb-dependent differentiation. Our results indicate that methylation can influence the properties of pRb, and raise the interesting possibility that methylation modulates pRb tumour suppressor activity.

  20. Effects of lysine:calorie ratio on growth performance of 10- to 25-kilogram pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J W; Tokach, M D; Nelssen, J L; Goodband, R D

    1999-11-01

    Crossbred barrows (n = 336 Newsham Hybrids) initially 9.9 kg and 31+/-2 d of age were used to evaluate the effects of energy density and lysine:calorie ratio on growth performance. Pigs were allotted by initial weight in a 3 x 4 factorial arrangement of treatments in a randomized complete block design with six replicate pens per treatment. Each pen had four or five pigs with an equal number of pigs per pen within replicate. Pigs were fed increasing dietary energy densities (3.25, 3.38, and 3.51 Mcal ME/kg) and lysine:calorie ratios (3.00, 3.45, 3.90, and 4.35 g lysine/Mcal ME). Energy density was changed by levels of choice white grease (0, 3, and 6%), and lysine:calorie ratio was changed by altering the corn:soybean meal ratio. Over the 21-d trial, an energy density x lysine:calorie ratio interaction was observed for ADG (P < .05). Pigs fed diets containing 3.25 or 3.51 Mcal ME/kg had increasing ADG with increasing lysine:calorie ratio, whereas ADG of pigs fed 3.38 Mcal ME/kg was not affected by lysine:calorie ratio. Feed efficiency (gain:feed ratio) increased and ADFI decreased as lysine:calorie ratio increased (linear, P < .01) and as energy density increased (quadratic, P < .01 and .10, respectively). On d 21, two pigs per pen were scanned ultrasonically for backfat depth. An energy density x lysine:calorie ratio interaction (P < .06) was observed. Pigs fed diets containing 3.25 and 3.38 Mcal ME/kg had decreasing fat depth as lysine:calorie ratio increased; however, backfat depth was not affected by lysine:calorie ratio and was greatest for pigs fed 3.51 Mcal ME/kg. These results suggest that 10- to 25-kg pigs fed diets containing 3.38 Mcal ME/kg had maximum feed efficiency and that they required at least 4.35 g lysine/Mcal ME. However, pigs fed 3.51 Mcal ME/kg had increased fat depth regardless of calorie:lysine ratio.