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Sample records for bacteriocin-like peptide produced

  1. Isolation and biochemical characterisation of a bacteriocin-like substance produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens An6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayed, Hanen Ben; Maalej, Hana; Hmidet, Noomen; Nasri, Moncef

    2015-12-01

    This study focuses on the isolation and characterisation of a peptide with bacteriocin-like properties from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens An6. Incubation conditions were optimised, and the effects of the incubation period and of carbon and nitrogen sources were investigated. The produced bacteriocin was partially purified with ammonium sulphate precipitation, dialysis and ultrafiltration and was then biochemically characterised. Maximum bacteriocin production was achieved after 48h of incubation in a culture medium containing 20g/L starch and 10g/L yeast extract, with an initial pH 8.0 at 30°C under continuous agitation at 200rpm. The bacteriocin was sequentially purified and its molecular weight was determined to be 11kDa by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The bacteriocin was relatively heat-resistant and was not sensitive to acid and alkaline conditions (pH 4.0-10.0). Its inhibitory activity was sensitive to proteinase K but was resistant to the proteolytic action of alcalase, trypsin, chymotrypsin and pepsin. In conclusion, bacteriocin An6, owing its wide spectrum of activity as well as its high tolerance to acidic and alkaline pH values, temperature and proteases shows great potential for use as a food biopreservative.

  2. Characterization of a bacteriocin-like substance produced from a novel isolated strain of Bacillus subtilis SLYY-3

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    Li, Junfeng; Li, Hongfang; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Duan, Xiaohui; Liu, Jie

    2014-12-01

    In the present research, the strain SLYY-3 was isolated from sediments of Jiaozhou Bay, Qingdao, China. The strain SLYY-3, which produced a bacteriocin-like substance (BLS), was characterized to be a strain of Bacillus subtillis by biochemical profiling and 16S rDNA sequence analysis. It is the first time to report that Bacillus subtilis from Jiaozhou Bay sediments could produce a BLS. The BLS of B. subtillis SLYY-3 exhibited strong inhibitory activity against gram-positive bacteria (including Staphylococcus aureus and B. subtillis) and some fungi (including Penicillium glaucum, Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus). The antimicrobial activity was detected from culture in the exponential growth phase and reached its maximum when culture entered into stationary growth phase. It was thermo-tolerant even when being kept at 100°C for 60 min without losing any activity and stable over a wide pH range from 1.0 to 12.0 while being inactivated by proteolytic enzyme and trypsin, indicating the proteinaceous nature of the BLS. The BLS was purified by precipitation with hydrochloric acid (HCl) and gel filteration (Sephadex G-100). SDS-PAGE analysis of the extracellular peptides of SLYY-3 revealed a bacteriocin-like protein with a molecular mass of 66 kDa. Altogether, these characteristics indicate the potential of the BLS for food industry as a protection against pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms.

  3. Characterization of Bacteriocin like inhibitory substance produced by a new Strain Brevibacillus borstelensis AG1 Isolated from 'Marcha'

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    Nivedita Sharma

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, a bacterium isolated from Marcha- a herbal cake used as traditional starter culture to ferment local wine in North East India, was evaluated for bacteriocin like inhibitory substance production and was tested against six food borne/spoilage causing pathogens viz. Listeria monocytogenes MTCC 839, Bacillus subtilis MTCC 121, Clostridium perfringens MTCC 450, Staphylococcus aureus, Lactobacillus plantarum and Leuconostoc mesenteroides MTCC 107 by using bit/disc method followed by well diffusion method. The bacterial isolate was identified as Brevibacillus borstelensis on the basis of phenotypic, biochemical and molecular characteristics using 16Sr RNA gene technique. Bacteriocin like inhibitory substance produced by Brevibacillus borstelensis AG1 was purified by gel exclusion chromatography. The molecular mass of the Brevibacillus borstelensis AG1 was found to be 12 kDa. Purified bacteriocin like inhibitory substance of Brevibacillus borstelensis was further characterized by studying the effect of temperature, pH, proteolytic enzyme and stability. Bacteriocin like inhibitory substance was found to be thermostable upto 100 °C, active at neutral pH, sensitive to trypsin, and partially stable till third week of storage thus showing a bright prospective to be used as a potential food biopreservative.

  4. Characterization of Bacteriocin like inhibitory substance produced by a new Strain Brevibacillus borstelensis AG1 Isolated from 'Marcha'.

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    Sharma, Nivedita; Gupta, Anupama; Gautam, Neha

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, a bacterium isolated from Marcha- a herbal cake used as traditional starter culture to ferment local wine in North East India, was evaluated for bacteriocin like inhibitory substance production and was tested against six food borne/spoilage causing pathogens viz. Listeria monocytogenes MTCC 839, Bacillus subtilis MTCC 121, Clostridium perfringens MTCC 450, Staphylococcus aureus, Lactobacillus plantarum and Leuconostoc mesenteroides MTCC 107 by using bit/disc method followed by well diffusion method. The bacterial isolate was identified as Brevibacillus borstelensis on the basis of phenotypic, biochemical and molecular characteristics using 16Sr RNA gene technique. Bacteriocin like inhibitory substance produced by Brevibacillus borstelensis AG1 was purified by gel exclusion chromatography. The molecular mass of the Brevibacillus borstelensis AG1 was found to be 12 kDa. Purified bacteriocin like inhibitory substance of Brevibacillus borstelensis was further characterized by studying the effect of temperature, pH, proteolytic enzyme and stability. Bacteriocin like inhibitory substance was found to be thermostable upto 100 °C, active at neutral pH, sensitive to trypsin, and partially stable till third week of storage thus showing a bright prospective to be used as a potential food biopreservative.

  5. Characterization of Bacteriocin like inhibitory substance produced by a new Strain Brevibacillus borstelensis AG1 Isolated from ‘Marcha’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Nivedita; Gupta, Anupama; Gautam, Neha

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, a bacterium isolated from Marcha- a herbal cake used as traditional starter culture to ferment local wine in North East India, was evaluated for bacteriocin like inhibitory substance production and was tested against six food borne/spoilage causing pathogens viz. Listeria monocytogenes MTCC 839, Bacillus subtilis MTCC 121, Clostridium perfringens MTCC 450, Staphylococcus aureus, Lactobacillus plantarum and Leuconostoc mesenteroides MTCC 107 by using bit/disc method followed by well diffusion method. The bacterial isolate was identified as Brevibacillus borstelensis on the basis of phenotypic, biochemical and molecular characteristics using 16Sr RNA gene technique. Bacteriocin like inhibitory substance produced by Brevibacillus borstelensis AG1 was purified by gel exclusion chromatography. The molecular mass of the Brevibacillus borstelensis AG1 was found to be 12 kDa. Purified bacteriocin like inhibitory substance of Brevibacillus borstelensis was further characterized by studying the effect of temperature, pH, proteolytic enzyme and stability. Bacteriocin like inhibitory substance was found to be thermostable upto 100 °C, active at neutral pH, sensitive to trypsin, and partially stable till third week of storage thus showing a bright prospective to be used as a potential food biopreservative. PMID:25477937

  6. Diverse Ecological Strategies Are Encoded by Streptococcus pneumoniae Bacteriocin-Like Peptides.

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    Miller, Eric L; Abrudan, Monica I; Roberts, Ian S; Rozen, Daniel E

    2016-04-13

    The opportunistic pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is commonly carried asymptomatically in the human nasopharynx. Due to high rates of cocolonization with other pneumococcus strains, intraspecific competitive interactions partly determine the carriage duration of strains and thereby their potential to cause disease. These interactions may be mediated by bacteriocins, such as the type IIb bacteriocins encoded by the blp (bacteriocin-like peptide) locus. To understand blp diversity and evolution, we undertook a bioinformatic analysis of 4,418 pneumococcal genomes, including 168 newly sequenced genomes. We describe immense variation at all levels of genomic organization: Gene presence/absence, gene order, and allelic diversity. If we make the extreme and naive hypothesis that assumes all genes in this operon can assort randomly, this variation could lead to 10(15) distinct bacteriocin-related phenotypes, each potentially representing a unique ecological strategy; however, we provide several explanations for why this extreme is not realized. Although rarefaction analysis indicates that the number of unique strategies is not saturated, even after sampling thousands of genomes, we show that the variation is neither unbounded nor random. We delimit three bacteriocin groups, which contain group-specific bacteriocins, immunity genes, and blp operon gene order, and argue that this organization places a constraint on realized ecological strategies. We additionally show that ecological strategy diversity is significantly constrained by pneumococcal phylogeny and clonal structure. By examining patterns of association between alleles within the blp operon, we show that bacteriocin genes, which were believed to function in pairs, can be found with a broad diversity of partner alleles and immunity genes; this overall lack of allelic fidelity likely contributes to the fluid structure of this operon. Our results clarify the diversity of antagonistic ecological strategies in the

  7. Antimicrobial activity and partial characterization of bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances produced by Lactobacillus spp. isolated from artisanal Mexican cheese.

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    Heredia-Castro, Priscilia Y; Méndez-Romero, José I; Hernández-Mendoza, Adrián; Acedo-Félix, Evelia; González-Córdova, Aarón F; Vallejo-Cordoba, Belinda

    2015-12-01

    Lactobacillus spp. from Mexican Cocido cheese were shown to produce bacteriocin-like substances (BLS) active against Staphylococcus aureus,Listeria innocua,Escherichia coli, andSalmonella typhimurium by using the disk diffusion method. Crude extracts of Lactobacillus fermentum showed strong inhibitory activity against Staph. aureus, L. innocua, E. coli, and Salmonella cholerae. Complete inactivation of antimicrobial activity was observed after treatment of crude extracts with proteinase K, pronase, papain, trypsin, and lysozyme, confirming their proteinaceous nature. However, antimicrobial activity was partly lost for some of the crude extracts when treated with α-amylase, indicating that carbohydrate moieties were involved. The antimicrobial activity of the crude extracts was stable at 65°C for 30min over a wide pH range (2-8), and addition of potassium chloride, sodium citrate, ethanol, and butanol did not affect antibacterial activity. However, antimicrobial activity was lost after heating at 121°C for 15min, addition of methanol or Tween 80. Fourteen out of 18 Lactobacillus spp. showed antimicrobial activity against different test microorganisms, and 12 presented bacteriocin-like substances. Generation time and growth rate parameters indicated that the antimicrobial activity of crude extracts from 3 different strains was effective against the 4 indicator microorganisms. One of the crude extracts showed inhibition not only against gram-positive but also against gram-negative bacteria. Bacteriocin-like substances produced by this specific Lactobacillus strain showed potential for application as a food biopreservative.

  8. Description of two Enterococcus strains isolated from traditional Peruvian artisanal-produced cheeses with a bacteriocin-like inhibitory activity

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    Aguilar Galvez A.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to isolate and to characterize strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB with bacteriocin-like inhibitory activity from 27 traditional cheeses artisanal-produced obtained from different Peruvian regions. Twenty Gram+ and catalasenegative strains among 2,277 isolates exhibited bacteriocin-like inhibitory activity against Listeria monocytogenes CWBIB2232 as target strain. No change in inhibitory activity was observed after organic acid neutralization and treatment with catalase of the cell-free supernatant (CFS. The proteinic nature of the antimicrobial activity was confirmed for the twenty LAB strains by proteolytic digestion of the CFS. Two strains, CWBI-B1431 and CWBI-B1430, with the best antimicrobial activity were selected for further researches. These strains were taxonomically identified by phenotypic and genotypic analyses as Enterococcus mundtii (CWBI-B1431 and Enterococcus faecium (CWBI-B1430. The two strains were sensitive to vancomycin (MIC 2 μg.ml-1 and showed absence of haemolysis.

  9. In vitro evaluation of bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances produced by lactic acid bacteria isolated during traditional Sicilian cheese making

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    Giusi Macaluso

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriocins are antimicrobial proteins produced by bacteria that inhibit the growth of other bacteria with a bactericidal or bacteriostatic mode of action. Many lactic acid bacteria (LAB produce a high diversity of different bacteriocins. Bacteriocinogenic LAB are generally recognised as safe (GRAS and useful to control the frequent development of pathogens and spoilage microorganisms. For this reason they are commonly used as starter cultures in food fermentations. In this study, the authors describe the results of a screening on 699 LAB isolated from wooden vat surfaces, raw milk and traditional Sicilian cheeses, for the production of bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances, by comparing two alternative methods. The antagonistic activity of LAB and its proteinaceous nature were evaluated using the spot-on-the-lawn and the well-diffusion assay (WDA and the sensitivity to proteolytic (proteinase K, protease B and trypsin, amylolytic (α-amylase and lipolytic (lipase enzymes. The indicator strains used were: Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella enteritidis. A total of 223 strains (belonging to the species Enterococcus spp., Lactobacillus spp., Pediococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., Leuconostoc spp. and Lactococcus lactis were found to inhibit the growth of Listeria monocytogenes by using the spot-on-the-lawn method; only 37 of these were confirmed by using the WDA. The direct addition of bacteriocin-producing cultures into dairy products can be a more practical and economic option for the improvement of the safety and quality of the final product.

  10. In Vitro Evaluation of Bacteriocin-Like Inhibitory Substances Produced by Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated During Traditional Sicilian Cheese Making

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    Macaluso, Giusi; Fiorenza, Gerlando; Gaglio, Raimondo; Mancuso, Isabella

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriocins are antimicrobial proteins produced by bacteria that inhibit the growth of other bacteria with a bactericidal or bacteriostatic mode of action. Many lactic acid bacteria (LAB) produce a high diversity of different bacteriocins. Bacteriocinogenic LAB are generally recognised as safe (GRAS) and useful to control the frequent development of pathogens and spoilage microorganisms. For this reason they are commonly used as starter cultures in food fermentations. In this study, the authors describe the results of a screening on 699 LAB isolated from wooden vat surfaces, raw milk and traditional Sicilian cheeses, for the production of bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances, by comparing two alternative methods. The antagonistic activity of LAB and its proteinaceous nature were evaluated using the spot-on-the-lawn and the well-diffusion assay (WDA) and the sensitivity to proteolytic (proteinase K, protease B and trypsin), amylolytic (a-amylase) and lipolytic (lipase) enzymes. The indicator strains used were: Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella enteritidis. A total of 223 strains (belonging to the species Enterococcus spp., Lactobacillus spp., Pediococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., Leuconostoc spp. and Lactococcus lactis) were found to inhibit the growth of Listeria monocytogenes by using the spot-on-the-lawn method; only 37 of these were confirmed by using the WDA. The direct addition of bacteriocin-producing cultures into dairy products can be a more practical and economic option for the improvement of the safety and quality of the final product.

  11. 枯草芽孢杆菌MA139类细菌素抑菌活性的研究%Studies on the Antibacterial Activity of Bacteriocin-like Inhibitory Substances (BLIS) Produced from Bacillus subtilis MA139

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡婷; 陆文清

    2012-01-01

    为测定枯草芽孢杆菌MA139产生的类细菌素的抑菌活性.本试验采用管碟法对枯草芽孢杆菌MA139产生的类细菌素对多株革兰氏阳性菌、革兰氏阴性菌和真菌的抑菌活性进行测定.结果表明:类细菌素不但对芽孢杆菌属的其他菌种有抗菌活性,对病原菌和霉菌也有拮抗作用;不同指示菌对类细菌素的敏感性不一样,其中金黄色葡萄球菌对其最敏感.该类细菌素具有广谱抗菌作用,有作为畜禽饲料添加剂的潜力.%One experiment was conducted to determine the antibacterial activity of bacteriocin -like inhibitory substances (BLIS) produced from Bacillus subtilis MA139. The bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances were screened for antibacterial activity against indicator strains using agar spot assay. The results showed that they had broad spectrum of antagonistic activity against indicator strains, and Staphylococcus aureus showed greatest sensitivity to the BLIS. In conclusion, BOS from Bacillus subtilis MA139 had broad spectrum of antagonistic activity against various species of bacterial and fungal pathogens and could potentially be used as feed additives.

  12. Screening and Identification of Bacteriocin-like Substance Producing Bacillus%一株产细菌素物质芽孢杆菌的筛选和鉴定

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    李俊峰; 李红芳; 段孝辉; 宿烽; 田智刚

    2011-01-01

    One Bacillus strain named SLY—3 producing bacteriocin-like substance ( BLS) was screened from the soil polluted by oil. The G +bacteria and molds were effectively inhibited by BLS produced by strain SLY—3. With the analysis of colony morphology, physiological and biochemistry experiments and 16S rDNA gene sequence, the strain SLY—3 was identified as Bacillus subtilis. The BLS secreted by Bacillus subtilis SLY—3 has the highest inhibitory activity when it is cultured for 24 h at initial pH 7.0 and 28 ℃ .%从石油污染的土壤中筛选出一株能产生细菌素类物质的芽孢杆菌,命名为SLY-3.该菌株分泌的活性物质抑菌活性好,对细菌主要是革兰氏阳性菌、霉菌都有抑制作用.从表型、生理生化反应及16S rDNA序列比对方面进行分析,最终确定菌株SLY-3 为枯草芽孢杆菌(Bacillus subtilis).培养基初始pH为7.0,28℃振荡培养24 h后,发酵产物抑菌活性最高.

  13. Characteristics and optimization producing conditions of bacteriocin-like from Lactobacillus plantrum%植物乳酸菌类细菌素特性研究及其产生条件的优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解俊梅; 文汉

    2011-01-01

    Lactobacillus production of lactic acid bacteria bacteriocin culture conditions was optimized by single factor experiment and orthogonal and its characteristics was analyzed.The results showed that:the best vegetative growth of lactic acid bacteria was a combination of culture conditions at 30℃,initial pH6.0 with inoculum amount of 4%,seed age 12h,anaerobic conditions for 40h.Lactobacillus streptozotocin on Gram-negative bacteria and yeast inhibition optimum culture conditions for the largest combination of the temperature 28℃,initial pH7.0 with inoculum amount of 2%,seed age 10h,anaerobic conditions for 24h.Gram-positive lactic acid bacteria Streptomyces antibacterial effects had the best combination of culture conditions of temperature 28℃,initial pH 6.5 medium,inoculum 1%,seed age 6h,anaerobic conditions for 40h.Without effect of organic acids and hydrogen peroxide,the cell-free liquid culture of Lactobacillus showed high inhibitory activity against gram-positive bacterias,including Bacillus subtilis and Staphyloccocus aureus Rosenbach and gram-negative bacterias,such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimunius,but also inhibited some fungi.Therefore,the inhibitory substance produced by the lactic acid bacteria was assumed bacteriocin-like substance.Lactic acid bacteria showed it was stable to heat,active at low pH,not sensitive to proteinasea and broad antibacterial spectrum.%通过单因素实验和正交实验优化了乳酸菌产乳酸菌素的培养条件并分析了其特性。结果表明:植物性乳酸杆菌生长的最佳培养条件组合是温度30℃,培养基初始pH为6.0,接种量4%,种龄12h,厌氧条件下,培养时间40h;乳酸菌菌素对革兰氏阴性菌和酵母菌的抑菌作用最大的最佳培养条件组合是温度28℃,培养基初始pH为7.0,接种量2%,种龄10h,厌氧条件下,培养时间24h。乳酸菌菌素革兰氏阳性菌的抑菌作用最大的最佳培养条件组合是温度28℃,培养基初始pH为6.5,

  14. Evidence for production of a bacteriocin-like substance by Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, inhibitory to Staphylococcus aureus from foods.

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    Pinto, Taiz Siqueira; de Oliveira, Cybelle Pereira; da Costa, Ana Carolina Vieira; Lima, Catiana Oliveira; Barreto, Humberto Medeiros; de Souza, Evandro Leite; Siqueira-Junior, José Pinto

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed the production of a bacteriocin-like substance by Staphylococcus pseudintermedius S28, and evaluates its inhibitory effect against isolates of S. aureus from foods. All indicator isolates were sensitive to the substance produced from S. pseudintermedius S28, showing growth inhibition zones ranging from 14.2 to 28.3 mm. The inhibitory substance has no effect against the producer strain. The inhibitory substance was affected by proteolytic enzymes, while glycolytic and lipolytic enzymes had no effect, suggesting that the active substance could be considered as a bacteriocin-like substance. From these results, S. pseudintermedius S28 could be an interesting producer of a bacteriocin-like substance capable of strongly inhibiting S. aureus.

  15. Screening of marine bacteria with bacteriocin-like activities and probiotic potential for ornate spiny lobster (Panulirus ornatus) juveniles.

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    Nguyen, Van Duy; Pham, Thu Thuy; Nguyen, Thi Hai Thanh; Nguyen, Thi Thanh Xuan; Hoj, Lone

    2014-09-01

    Bacteriocins are ribosomally synthesized antimicrobial peptides, which have been found in diverse bacterial species of terrestrial origins and some from the sea. New bacteriocins with new characteristics, new origins and new applications are likely still awaiting discovery. The present study screened bacteria isolated from marine animals of interest to the aquaculture industry for antimicrobial and bacteriocin-like activities in order to uncover biodiversity of bacteriocin producers, and explore the potential application in aquaculture. In total, 24 of 100 screened isolates showed antimicrobial activities and 7 of these exerted bacteriocin-like activities. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes identified the isolates as members of the six genera Proteus, Providencia, Klebsiella, Alcaligenes, Bacillus and Enterococcus. In some cases, further analysis of housekeeping genes, rpoB for Proteus and recA for Klebsiella, as well as biochemical tests was necessary for identification to species level, and some of the Proteus isolates may represent novel species. The seven bacteriocinogenic isolates showed a wide antimicrobial spectrum against foodborne and animal pathogens, which opens the way to their potential use as marine drugs and probiotics in food, aquaculture, livestock and clinical settings. As a case study, the protective effect of shortlisted bacteriocinogenic isolates were tested in aquaculture-raised spiny lobster (Panulirus ornatus) juveniles. A single-strain (Bacillus pumilus B3.10.2B) and a three-strain (B. pumilus B3.10.2B, Bacillus cereus D9, Lactobacillus plantarum T13) probiotic preparation were added to the feed of Panulirus ornatus juveniles, which were subsequently challenged with the pathogen Vibrio owensii DY05. Juveniles in the probiotic treatments displayed increased growth and reduced feed conversion rates after 60 days, and increased survival rate after pathogen challenge relative to the control. This study represents the first evidence of bacteriocin

  16. Identification and partial characterization of a bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance (BLIS) from Lb. Bulgaricus K41 isolated from indigenous yogurts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaeim, Davood; Soleimanian-Zad, Sabihe; Sheikh-Zeinoddin, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Forty-two strains of Lactobacillus bulgaricus isolated from locally made yogurts were examined and compared for bacteriocin producing ability using spot on lawn assay which improved by taking photo and image processing. Lb. bulgaricus K41 exhibited the highest inhibition level against indicators. K41 Bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance is sensitive to proteolytic enzymes (proteinase K, pepsin, and trypsin) but α-amylase makes slight reduction in its activity and it is resistant to lipase. This antibacterial peptide is extremely heat-stable (121 °C for 15 min) and remains active over a wide pH range (pH = 2 to 10); also nonionic detergents (Tween-20, Tween-80, and Triton X100) showed no effect on its activity. The inhibitory spectrum is against Gram-positive bacteria (except Staphylococcus aureus) with extremely antilisterial activity and it is almost ineffective against Gram-negative bacteria. The mode of its action was identified as bactericidal against Listeria monocytogenes. The properties of K41 bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance add to its safety as a biopreservative produced by a generally recognized as safe (GRAS) bacterium suggesting it can be used in hurdle technology for ready-to-eat foods as one of the main sources of Listeria contaminations.

  17. Bacteriocin-like substance from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens shows remarkable inhibition of Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

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    Benitez, Lisianne Brittes; Caumo, Karin; Brandelli, Adriano; Rott, Marilise Brittes

    2011-03-01

    The effectiveness of a bacteriocin-like substance (BLS) produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens was tested against Acanthamoeba polyphaga strains, and its cytotoxic potential on Vero cells was investigated. Amebicidal activity of the purified BLS was tested by plate bioassays with concentrations ranging from 12.5 to 6,400 AU mL(-1). Damage to A. pholyphaga cells was monitored using an inverted microscope and counted in a Fuchs-Rosenthal chamber after 24, 48, and 72 h. According to the results obtained, the BLS showed remarkable amebicidal and amebostatic effect on A. polyphaga and showed no cytotoxicity on the Vero cells. These results may have great relevance in the development of new acanthamoebicidal compounds.

  18. Endocrine cells producing regulatory peptides.

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    Solcia, E; Usellini, L; Buffa, R; Rindi, G; Villani, L; Zampatti, C; Silini, E

    1987-07-15

    Recent data on the immunolocalization of regulatory peptides and related propeptide sequences in endocrine cells and tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, lung, thyroid, pituitary (ACTH and opioids), adrenals and paraganglia have been revised and discussed. Gastrin, xenopsin, cholecystokinin (CCK), somatostatin, motilin, secretin, GIP (gastric inhibitory polypeptide), neurotensin, glicentin/glucagon-37 and PYY (peptide tyrosine tyrosine) are the main products of gastrointestinal endocrine cells; glucagon, CRF (corticotropin releasing factor), somatostatin, PP (pancreatic polypeptide) and GRF (growth hormone releasing factor), in addition to insulin, are produced in pancreatic islet cells; bombesin-related peptides are the main markers of pulmonary endocrine cells; calcitonin and CGRP (calcitonin gene-related peptide) occur in thyroid and extrathyroid C cells; ACTH and endorphins in anterior and intermediate lobe pituitary cells, alpha-MSH and CLIP (corticotropin-like intermediate lobe peptide) in intermediate lobe cells; met- and leu-enkephalins and related peptides in adrenal medullary and paraganglionic cells as well as in some gut (enterochromaffin) cells; NPY (neuropeptide Y) in adrenaline-type adrenal medullary cells, etc.. Both tissue-appropriate and tissue-inappropriate regulatory peptides are produced by endocrine tumours, with inappropriate peptides mostly produced by malignant tumours.

  19. TSST-1, enterotoxin and bacteriocin-like substance production by Staphylococcus aureus isolated from foods

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    S.A. Carvalho

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The production of Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1 (TSST-1, enterotoxins and bacteriocin-like substances was evaluated in 95 strains of Staphylococcus aureus recovered from raw bovine milk (n=31 and from food samples involved in staphylococcal food poisoning (n=64. Enterotoxigenicity tests with the membrane over agar associated to optimal sensibility plate assays were performed and showed that 96.77% of strains recovered from milk and 95.31% from food samples produced enterotoxins A, B, C, D or TSST-1. Reference strains S. epidermidis, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Lactobacillus casei, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, S. aureus, Salmonella Typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis and Bacteroides fragilis were used as indicator bacteria in the antagonistic assays, the first five being sensitive to antagonistic substances. Brain heart infusion agar, in pH values ranging from 5.0 to 7.0 in aerobic atmosphere showed to be the optimum condition for antagonistic activity as evaluated with the best producer strains against the most sensitive indicator bacterium, L. monocytogenes. Sensitivity to enzymes confirmed the proteinaceous nature of these substances. Neither bacteriophage activity nor fatty acids were detected and the antagonistic activity was not due to residual chloroform. Results did not establish a positive correlation between the bacteriocinogenic profile and toxigenicity in the tested S. aureus strains.

  20. Production of bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance by Bifidobacterium lactis in skim milk supplemented with additives.

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    Martinez, Fabio Andres Castillo; Domínguez, José Manuel; Converti, Attilio; Oliveira, Ricardo Pinheiro de Souza

    2015-08-01

    Bacteriocins are natural compounds used as food biopreservatives instead of chemical preservatives. Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (Bifid. lactis) was shown to produce a bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance (BLIS) able to inhibit the growth of Listeria monocytogenes selected as an indicator microorganism. To enhance this production by the strain Bifid. lactis BL 04, skim milk (SM) was used as a fermentation medium either in the presence or in the absence of yeast extract, Tween 80 or inulin as stimulating additives, and the results in terms of bacterial growth and BLIS production were compared with those obtained in a traditional high cost complex medium such as Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS). To this purpose, all the cultivations were carried out in flasks at 200 rpm under anaerobic conditions ensured by a nitrogen flowrate of 1.0 L/min for 48 h, and BLIS production was quantified by means of a modified agar diffusion assay at low values of both temperature and concentration of List. monocytogenes. Although all these ingredients were shown to exert positive influence on BLIS production in both media, yeast extract and SM were by far the best ingredient and the best medium, respectively, allowing for a BLIS production at the late exponential phase of 2000 AU/ml.

  1. The role of environmental factors and medium composition on bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLIS) production by Enterococcus mundtii strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settanni, Luca; Valmorri, Sara; Suzzi, Giovanna; Corsetti, Aldo

    2008-08-01

    Bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLIS)-producers Enterococcus mundtii WGWT1-1A, WGW11.2, WGJ20.1, WGJ40.2 and WGK53 from raw material origin were subjected to a study for the characterization of antimicrobial compound production under several growth conditions, including different cultivation media, growth temperatures, pHs, different concentrations and sources of nitrogen compounds, carbohydrates and other nutritional factors, and in the presence of different percentages of ethanol and NaCl. The five E. mundtii strains showed different behaviors. However, in all cases, MRS and sour dough bacteria (SDB) were found as the optimal media for BLIS production. In general, the higher BLIS production was observed with pH in the range 6.0-8.0 and, except 45 degrees C, the temperature did not show a defining effect. Low or no BLIS activity was detected after growth without nitrogen sources and carbohydrates. Absence of Tween 80, triammoniun citrate, K2HPO4, MgSO4 and MnSO4 did not affect BLIS activity levels. Except for a strain (WGWT1-1A), ethanol did not play a negative role in BLIS expression, while NaCl determined decrease of BLIS activity, proportional with concentration. The above strains did not contain plasmids, hence, BLIS expression is encoded by chromosomal DNA.

  2. Antibacterial activity of bacteriocin-like substance P34 on Listeria monocytogenes in chicken sausage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant'Anna, Voltaire; Quadros, Deoni A F; Motta, Amanda S; Brandelli, Adriano

    2013-12-01

    The antimicrobial activity of the bacteriocin-like substance (BLS) P34 against Listeria monocytogenes was investigated in chicken sausage. The BLS was applied to chicken sausages (256 AU g(-1)) previously inoculated with a suspension of 10(2) cfu g(-1) of L. monocytogenes. BLS P34 inhibited the indicator microorganism in situ in all incubation times for up to 10 days at 5 °C. The effectiveness of BLS P34 was increased when it was added in combination with nisin. The bacteriocin was also tested in natural eatable natural bovine wrapping (salty semi-dried tripe) against the same indicator microorganism, also showing inhibitory capability in vitro. BLS P34 showed potential to control L. monocytogenes in refrigerated meat products.

  3. Antibacterial activity of bacteriocin-like substance P34 on Listeria monocytogenes in chicken sausage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voltaire Sant'Anna

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of the bacteriocin-like substance (BLS P34 against Listeria monocytogenes was investigated in chicken sausage. The BLS was applied to chicken sausages (256 AU g-1 previously inoculated with a suspension of 10² cfu g-1 of L. monocytogenes. BLS P34 inhibited the indicator microorganism in situ in all incubation times for up to 10 days at 5 °C. The effectiveness of BLS P34 was increased when it was added in combination with nisin. The bacteriocin was also tested in natural eatable natural bovine wrapping (salty semi-dried tripe against the same indicator microorganism, also showing inhibitory capability in vitro. BLS P34 showed potential to control L. monocytogenes in refrigerated meat products.

  4. Antibacterial activity of bacteriocin-like substance P34 on Listeria monocytogenes in chicken sausage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant’Anna, Voltaire; Quadros, Deoni A.F.; Motta, Amanda S.; Brandelli, Adriano

    2013-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of the bacteriocin-like substance (BLS) P34 against Listeria monocytogenes was investigated in chicken sausage. The BLS was applied to chicken sausages (256 AU g−1) previously inoculated with a suspension of 102 cfu g−1 of L. monocytogenes. BLS P34 inhibited the indicator microorganism in situ in all incubation times for up to 10 days at 5 °C. The effectiveness of BLS P34 was increased when it was added in combination with nisin. The bacteriocin was also tested in natural eatable natural bovine wrapping (salty semi-dried tripe) against the same indicator microorganism, also showing inhibitory capability in vitro. BLS P34 showed potential to control L. monocytogenes in refrigerated meat products. PMID:24688506

  5. The structure of pyogenecin immunity protein, a novel bacteriocin-like immunity protein from streptococcus pyogenes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C.; Coggill, P.; Bateman, A.; Finn, R.; Cymborowski, M.; Otwinowski, Z.; Minor, W.; Volkart, L.; Joachimiak, A.; Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst.; Univ. of Virginia; UT Southwestern Medical Center

    2009-12-17

    Many Gram-positive lactic acid bacteria (LAB) produce anti-bacterial peptides and small proteins called bacteriocins, which enable them to compete against other bacteria in the environment. These peptides fall structurally into three different classes, I, II, III, with class IIa being pediocin-like single entities and class IIb being two-peptide bacteriocins. Self-protective cognate immunity proteins are usually co-transcribed with these toxins. Several examples of cognates for IIa have already been solved structurally. Streptococcus pyogenes, closely related to LAB, is one of the most common human pathogens, so knowledge of how it competes against other LAB species is likely to prove invaluable. We have solved the crystal structure of the gene-product of locus Spy-2152 from S. pyogenes, (PDB: 2fu2), and found it to comprise an anti-parallel four-helix bundle that is structurally similar to other bacteriocin immunity proteins. Sequence analyses indicate this protein to be a possible immunity protein protective against class IIa or IIb bacteriocins. However, given that S. pyogenes appears to lack any IIa pediocin-like proteins but does possess class IIb bacteriocins, we suggest this protein confers immunity to IIb-like peptides. Combined structural, genomic and proteomic analyses have allowed the identification and in silico characterization of a new putative immunity protein from S. pyogenes, possibly the first structure of an immunity protein protective against potential class IIb two-peptide bacteriocins. We have named the two pairs of putative bacteriocins found in S. pyogenes pyogenecin 1, 2, 3 and 4.

  6. Isolation of Pediococcus acidilactici Kp10 with ability to secrete bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance from milk products for applications in food industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbasiliasi Sahar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lactic acid bacteria (LAB can be isolated from traditional milk products. LAB that secrete substances that inhibit pathogenic bacteria and are resistant to acid, bile, and pepsin but not vancomycin may have potential in food applications. Results LAB isolated from a range of traditional fermented products were screened for the production of bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances. A total of 222 LAB strains were isolated from fermented milk products in the form of fresh curds, dried curds, and ghara (a traditional flavor enhancer prepared from whey, and fermented cocoa bean. Eleven LAB isolates that produced antimicrobial substances were identified as Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Pediococcus acidilactici strains by biochemical methods and 16S rDNA gene sequencing. Of these, the cell-free supernatant of Kp10 (P. acidilactici most strongly inhibited Listeria monocytogenes. Further analysis identified the antimicrobial substance produced by Kp10 as proteinaceous in nature and active over a wide pH range. Kp10 (P. acidilactici was found to be catalase-negative, able to produce β-galactosidase, resistant to bile salts (0.3% and acidic conditions (pH 3, and susceptible to most antibiotics. Conclusion Traditionally prepared fermented milk products are good sources of LAB with characteristics suitable for industrial applications. The isolate Kp10 (P. acidilactici shows potential for the production of probiotic and functional foods.

  7. Anti-Listeria monocytogenes bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances from Enterococcus faecium UQ31 isolated from artisan Mexican-style cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, C; García-Almendárez, B E; Martin, S E; Regalado, C

    2005-08-01

    Artisan fresh Mexican-style cheeses are commonly made from raw milk that provides not only rich flavors, but also a diversity of associated lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains. Enterococcus faecium UQ31 was isolated from panela cheese and produced bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLIS) with a strong anti-Listeria activity. A modified pH-mediated adsorption-desorption purification process resulted in (after SDS-PAGE) two bands showing antimicrobial activities, where most of the activity corresponded to the band with an estimated molecular weight of 7.5 kDa. The BLIS produced by E. faecium UQ31 were heat resistant, stable at ambient storage conditions, and active in the pH range 5--9. The BLIS antimicrobial activities were detected during logarithmic growth phase and remained constant until the end of incubation time (19 h). These BLIS showed a wide anti-Listeria monocytogenes spectra. The E. faecium UQ31 strain or their BLIS represent a promising potential as antimicrobial food preservatives.

  8. Method of producing a peptide mixture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for industrial production of a peptide preparation having specific specifications by hydrolysis of a protein material, preferably based on whey. The method comprises several steps, which makes it easy to control the method so as to obtain a product which, e...

  9. Aqueous two-phase flotation for primary recovery of bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance (BLIS) from Pediococcus acidilactici Kp10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Md Sidek, Nurul Lyana; Tan, Joo Shun; Abbasiliasi, Sahar; Wong, Fadzlie Wong Faizal; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Ariff, Arbakariya B

    2016-08-01

    An aqueous two-phase flotation (ATPF) system based on polyethylene glycol (PEG) and sodium citrate (NaNO3C6H5O7·2H2O) was considered for primary recovery of bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance (BLIS) from Pediococcus acidilactici Kp10. The effects of ATPF parameters namely phase composition, tie-line length (TLL), volume ratio between the two phases (VR), amount of crude load (CL), pH, nitrogen gas flow rate (FR) and flotation time (FT) on the performance of recovery were evaluated. BLIS was mainly concentrated into the upper PEG-rich phase in all systems tested so far. The optimum conditions for BLIS purification, which composed of PEG 8000/sodium citrate, were: TLL of 42.6, VR of 0.4, CL of 22% (w/w), pH 7, average FT of 30min and FR of 20mL/min. BLIS was partially purified up to 5.9-fold with a separation efficiency of 99% under this optimal conditions. A maximum yield of BLIS activity of about 70.3% was recovered in the PEG phase. The BLIS from the top phase was successfully recovered with a single band in SDS-gel with molecular weight of about 10-15kDa. ATPF was found to be an effective technique for the recovery of BLIS from the fermentation broth of P. acidilactici Kp10.

  10. Bacteriocin-like activity of oral Fusobacterium nucleatum isolated from human and non-human primates Atividade semelhante a bacteriocina de Fusobacterium nucleatum orais isolados de primatas humanos e não-humanos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elerson Gaetti-Jardim Júnior

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Fusobacterium nucleatum is indigenous of the human oral cavity and has been involved in different infectious processes. The production of bacteriocin-like substances may be important in regulation of bacterial microbiota in oral cavity. The ability to produce bacteriocin-like substances by 80 oral F. nucleatum isolates obtained from periodontal patients, healthy individuals and Cebus apella monkeys, was examinated. 17.5% of all tested isolates showed auto-antagonism and 78.8% iso- or hetero-antagonism. No isolate from monkey was capable to produce auto-inhibition. In this study, the antagonistic substances production was variable in all tested isolates. Most of the F. nucleatum showed antagonistic activity against tested reference strains. These data suggest a possible participation of these substances on the oral microbial ecology in humans and animals. However, the role of bacteriocins in regulating dental plaque microbiota in vivo is discussed.Fusobacterium nucleatum é indígena da cavidade oral humana e tem sido envolvido em diferentes processos infecciosos. A produção de substâncias semelhantes a bacteriocinas pode ser importante na regulação da microbiota bacteriana da cavidade oral. A capacidade de produzir substâncias tipo bacteriocina de 80 isolados de F. nucleatum orais, obtidos de pacientes com doença periodontal, indivíduos sadios e macaco Cebus apella, foi avaliada. 17,5% de todos os isolados mostrou auto-antagonismo e 78,8% iso- ou hetero-antagonismo. Nenhum isolado de macaco foi capaz de produzir auto-inibição. Neste estudo, a produção de substâncias antagonístas foi variável em todos os isolados testados. A maioria dos F. nucleatum mostrou atividade antagonísta para as cepas de referência testadas. Esses dados sugerem a possível participação dessas substâncias sobre a ecologia microbiana em humanos e animais. Entretanto, o papel das bacteriocinas na regulação da microbiota da placa dental in vivo

  11. Novel Antifungal Peptides Produced by Leuconostoc mesenteroides DU15 Effectively Inhibit Growth of Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhialdin, Belal J; Hassan, Zaiton; Abu Bakar, Fatimah; Algboory, Hussein L; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-05-01

    The ability of Leuconostoc mesenteroides DU15 to produce antifungal peptides that inhibit growth of Aspergillus niger was evaluated under optimum growth conditions of 30 °C for 48 h. The cell-free supernatant showed inhibitory activity against A. niger. Five novel peptides were isolated with the sequences GPFPL, YVPLF, LLHGVPLP, GPFPLEMTLGPT, and TVYPFPGPL as identified by de novo sequencing using PEAKS 6 software. Peptide LLHGVPLP was the only positively charged (cationic peptides) and peptide GPFPLEMTLGPT negatively charged (anionic), whereas the rest are neutral. The identified peptides had high hydrophobicity ratio and low molecular weights with amino acids sequences ranging from 5 to 12 residues. The mode of action of these peptides is observed under the scanning electron microscope and is due to cell lysis of fungi. This work reveals the potential of peptides from L. mesenteroides DU15 as natural antifungal preservatives in inhibiting the growth of A. niger that is implicated to the spoilage during storage.

  12. Production of bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLIS by Streptococcus salivarius strains isolated from the tongue and throat of children with and without sore throat Produção de substâncias inibidoras semelhantes à bacteriocina por cepas de Streptococcus salivarius, isoladas da língua e garganta de crianças com e sem dor de garganta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Fantinato

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus salivarius strains, isolated from children with and without sore throat, were tested for bacteriocin production against Streptococcus pyogenes. S. salivarius strains producing bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLIS against S. pyogenes were more frequently found in children without sore throat. These results suggest that these children may be protected against sore throat by the presence of BLIS-positive S. salivarius strains.Cepas de Streptococcus salivarius, isoladas de crianças com e sem dor de garganta, foram testadas quanto à produção de bacteriocina contra Streptococcus pyogenes. Os resultados mostraram que as crianças que não tinham dor de garganta possuiam, na boca, cepas de bactérias produtoras de substâncias inibidoras semelhantes à bacteriocina contra S. pyogenes.

  13. Thymoproteasomes produce unique peptide motifs for positive selection of CD8(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Katsuhiro; Takada, Kensuke; Ohte, Yuki; Kondo, Hiroyuki; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Keiji; Takahama, Yousuke; Murata, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Positive selection in the thymus provides low-affinity T-cell receptor (TCR) engagement to support the development of potentially useful self-major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I)-restricted T cells. Optimal positive selection of CD8(+) T cells requires cortical thymic epithelial cells that express β5t-containing thymoproteasomes (tCPs). However, how tCPs govern positive selection is unclear. Here we show that the tCPs produce unique cleavage motifs in digested peptides and in MHC-I-associated peptides. Interestingly, MHC-I-associated peptides carrying these tCP-dependent motifs are enriched with low-affinity TCR ligands that efficiently induce the positive selection of functionally competent CD8(+) T cells in antigen-specific TCR-transgenic models. These results suggest that tCPs contribute to the positive selection of CD8(+) T cells by preferentially producing low-affinity TCR ligand peptides.

  14. The protein and peptide mediated syntheses of non-biologically-produced oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Matthew B.

    Numerous examples exist in nature of organisms which have evolved the ability to produce sophisticated structures composed of inorganic minerals. Studies of such biomineralizing organisms have suggested that specialized biomolecules are, in part, responsible for the controlled formation of these structures. The research detailed in this dissertation is focused on the use of biomolecules (i.e., peptides and proteins) to form non-biologically produced materials under mild reaction conditions (i.e., neutral pH, aqueous solutions, and room temperature). The peptides utilized in the studies detailed in this dissertation were identified through the screening of single crystal rutile TiO2 substrates or Ge powder with a phagedisplayed peptide library. Twenty-one peptides were identified which possessed an affinity for Ge. Three of these twenty one peptides were tested for germania precipitation activity. Those peptides possessing a basic isoelectric point as well as hydroxyl- and imidazole-containing amino acid residues were found to be the most effective in precipitating amorphous germania from an alkoxide precursor. The phage-displayed peptide library screening of TiO2 substrates yielded twenty peptides. Four of these peptides, which were heavily enriched in histidine and/or basic amino acid residues, were found to possess signficant titania precipitation activity. The activity of these peptides was found to correlate with the number of positive charges they carried. The sequence of the most active of the library-identified peptides was modified to yield two additional peptides. The titania precipitation activity of these designed peptides was higher than the parent peptide, with reduced pH dependence. The titania materials generated by the library-identified and designed peptides were found to be composed of amorphous titania as well as <10 nm anatase and/or monoclinic TiO2 crystallites. The production of titania and zirconia resulting from the interaction of the

  15. Isolation and characterization of antifungal peptides produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens LBM5006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, Lisianne Brittes; Velho, Renata Voltolini; Lisboa, Marcia Pagno; Medina, Luis Fernando da Costa; Brandelli, Adriano

    2010-12-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens LBM 5006 produces antagonistic activity against pathogenic bacteria and phytopathogenic fungi, including Aspergillus spp., Fusarium spp., and Bipolaris sorokiniana. PCR analysis revealed the presence of ituD, but not sfp genes, coding for iturin and surfactin, respectively. The antimicrobial substance produced by this strain was isolated by ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration chromatography and 1-butanol extraction. The ultraviolet spectrum was typical of a polypeptide and the infrared spectrum indicates the presence of peptide bonds and acyl group(s). The antimicrobial substance was resistant to proteolytic enzymes and heat treatment, and was reactive with ninhydrin. Mass spectroscopy analysis indicated that B. amyloliquefaciens LBM 5006 produces two antimicrobial peptides, with main peaks at m/z 1,058 Da and 1,464 Da, corresponding to iturin-like and fengycin-like peptides, respectively. B. amyloliquefaciens LBM 5006 showed significant activity against phytopatogenic fungi, showing potential for use as a biocontrol agent or production of antifungal preparations.

  16. Listeriolysin S, a novel peptide haemolysin associated with a subset of lineage I Listeria monocytogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D Cotter

    Full Text Available Streptolysin S (SLS is a bacteriocin-like haemolytic and cytotoxic virulence factor that plays a key role in the virulence of Group A Streptococcus (GAS, the causative agent of pharyngitis, impetigo, necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Although it has long been thought that SLS and related peptides are produced by GAS and related streptococci only, there is evidence to suggest that a number of the most notorious Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria, including Listeria monocytogenes, Clostridium botulinum and Staphylococcus aureus, produce related peptides. The distribution of the L. monocytogenes cluster is particularly noteworthy in that it is found exclusively among a subset of lineage I strains; i.e., those responsible for the majority of outbreaks of listeriosis. Expression of these genes results in the production of a haemolytic and cytotoxic factor, designated Listeriolysin S, which contributes to virulence of the pathogen as assessed by murine- and human polymorphonuclear neutrophil-based studies. Thus, in the process of establishing the existence of an extended family of SLS-like modified virulence peptides (MVPs, the genetic basis for the enhanced virulence of a proportion of lineage I L. monocytogenes may have been revealed.

  17. Antimicrobial peptides targeting Gram-negative pathogens, produced and delivered by lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volzing, Katherine; Borrero, Juan; Sadowsky, Michael J; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2013-11-15

    We present results of tests with recombinant Lactococcus lactis that produce and secrete heterologous antimicrobial peptides with activity against Gram-negative pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella . In an initial screening, the activities of numerous candidate antimicrobial peptides, made by solid state synthesis, were assessed against several indicator pathogenic E. coli and Salmonella strains. Peptides A3APO and Alyteserin were selected as top performers based on high antimicrobial activity against the pathogens tested and on significantly lower antimicrobial activity against L. lactis . Expression cassettes containing the signal peptide of the protein Usp45 fused to the codon-optimized sequence of mature A3APO and Alyteserin were cloned under the control of a nisin-inducible promoter PnisA and transformed into L. lactis IL1403. The resulting recombinant strains were induced to express and secrete both peptides. A3APO- and Alyteserin-containing supernatants from these recombinant L. lactis inhibited the growth of pathogenic E. coli and Salmonella by up to 20-fold, while maintaining the host's viability. This system may serve as a model for the production and delivery of antimicrobial peptides by lactic acid bacteria to target Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria populations.

  18. Cinacalcet for hypercalcemia caused by pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma producing parathyroid hormone-related Peptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bech, A.; Smolders, K.; Telting, D.; Boer, H. de

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current treatments for hypercalcemia caused by lung cell carcinomas producing parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTH-rp) have limited efficacy, probably because of their lack of effect on PTH-rp secretion. In this case study we explored the efficacy of the calcimimetic cinacalcet as su

  19. Purification and characterization of an antimicrobial peptide produced by Bacillus sp. strain P7

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Soto, Paulina Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    This study reports a potential novel antimicrobial peptide with narrow spectrum activity against S. aureus NCTC 7447, produced by Bacillus tequilensis. Further studies to improve AMP-P7 purification and characterization are requered to establish its potential used in medicine and industry.

  20. Screening of protease-producing marine yeasts for production of the bioactive peptides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Xiumei; CHI Zhenming; LIU Zhiqiang; YUE Lixi

    2008-01-01

    Over 400 yeast strains from seawater and sediments were obtained,but only five strains named HN2-3,N13d,N13C,Mb5 and HN3-2 among them could form clear zones around their colonies on the double plates with 2.0% casein.Peptides in the hydroly-sate produced by the proteases from strains HN2-3 and N13d had higher angiotensin Ⅰ-converting-enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory ac-tivity.The two marine yeast strains were identified to be Aureobasidium pullulans according to the results of routine yeast identifi-cation and molecular methods.After purification of the proteases from the two marine yeast strains,it was found that the optimal pH for them was both 9.0,both of them were serine alkaline protease.However,the optimal temperature for the protease from the strain HN2-3 was 52℃ while that from strain N13d was 48℃.ACE-inhibitory activity of the peptides in the hydrolysate of shrimp protein produced by the purified protease from the strain HN2-3 was the highest while antioxidant activity in the hydroly-sate of spirulina protein produced by the purified protease from the strain N13d was the highest.

  1. Reverse-phase HPLC separation of hemp seed (Cannabis sativa L.) protein hydrolysate produced peptide fractions with enhanced antioxidant capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgih, Abraham T; Udenigwe, Chibuike C; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2013-03-01

    Hemp seed protein hydrolysate (HPH) was produced through simulated gastrointestinal tract (GIT) digestion of hemp seed protein isolate followed by partial purification and separation into eight peptide fractions by reverse-phase (RP)-HPLC. The peptide fractions exhibited higher oxygen radical absorbance capacity as well as scavenging of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, superoxide and hydroxyl radicals when compared to HPH. Radical scavenging activities of the fractionated peptides increased as content of hydrophobic amino acids or elution time was increased, with the exception of hydroxyl radical scavenging that showed decreased trend. Glutathione (GSH), HPH and the RP-HPLC peptide fractions possessed low ferric ion reducing ability but all had strong (>60 %) metal chelating activities. Inhibition of linoleic acid oxidation by some of the HPH peptide fractions was higher at 1 mg/ml when compared to that observed at 0.1 mg/ml peptide concentration. Peptide separation resulted in higher concentration of some hydrophobic amino acids (especially proline, leucine and isoleucine) in the fractions (mainly F5 and F8) when compared to HPH. The elution time-dependent increased concentrations of the hydrophobic amino acids coupled with decreased levels of positively charged amino acids may have been responsible for the significantly higher (p < 0.05) antioxidant properties observed for some of the peptide fractions when compared to the unfractionated HPH. In conclusion, the antioxidant activity of HPH after simulated GIT digestion is mainly influenced by the amino acid composition of some of its peptides.

  2. Cinacalcet for Hypercalcemia Caused by Pulmonary Squamous Cell Carcinoma Producing Parathyroid Hormone-Related Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneke Bech

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Current treatments for hypercalcemia caused by lung cell carcinomas producing parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTH-rp have limited efficacy, probably because of their lack of effect on PTH-rp secretion. In this case study we explored the efficacy of the calcimimetic cinacalcet as suppressor of PTH-rp production. Patient: A 57-year-old male with severe and recurrent hypercalcemia induced by a PTH-rp-producing squamous cell lung carcinoma, stage cT4N3M1b, poorly responding to standard treatments. Results: Serum PTH-rp levels were not affected by saline, calcitonin or zoledronate. PTH-rp decreased during chemotherapy and cinacalcet monotherapy. The combination of chemotherapy plus cinacalcet was most effective in rapidly reducing serum calcium and PTH-rp. Conclusion: This case study is the first to suggest that cinacalcet may be of value in some cases of PTH-rp-dependent hypercalcemia. Corroborative evidence is needed.

  3. Cinacalcet for Hypercalcemia Caused by Pulmonary Squamous Cell Carcinoma Producing Parathyroid Hormone-Related Peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bech, Anneke; Smolders, Koen; Telting, Darryl; de Boer, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Background Current treatments for hypercalcemia caused by lung cell carcinomas producing parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTH-rp) have limited efficacy, probably because of their lack of effect on PTH-rp secretion. In this case study we explored the efficacy of the calcimimetic cinacalcet as suppressor of PTH-rp production. Patient A 57-year-old male with severe and recurrent hypercalcemia induced by a PTH-rp-producing squamous cell lung carcinoma, stage cT4N3M1b, poorly responding to standard treatments. Results Serum PTH-rp levels were not affected by saline, calcitonin or zoledronate. PTH-rp decreased during chemotherapy and cinacalcet monotherapy. The combination of chemotherapy plus cinacalcet was most effective in rapidly reducing serum calcium and PTH-rp. Conclusion This case study is the first to suggest that cinacalcet may be of value in some cases of PTH-rp-dependent hypercalcemia. Corroborative evidence is needed. PMID:22379470

  4. Producing peptide arrays for epitope mapping by intein-mediated protein ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Luo; Rush, John; Ghosh, Inca; Maunus, Jeremy R; Xu, Ming-Qun

    2004-09-01

    Peptide arrays are increasingly used to define antibody epitopes and substrate specificities of protein kinases. Their use is hampered, however, by ineffective and variable binding efficiency of peptides, which often results in low sensitivity and inconsistent results. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a novel method for making arrays of synthetic peptides on various membranes after ligating the peptide substrates to an intein-generated carrier protein. We have conducted screening for optimal carrier proteins by immunoreactivity and direct assessment of binding using a peptide derivatized at a lysine sidechain with fluorescein, CDPEK(fluorescein)DS. Ligation of a synthetic peptide antigen to a carrier protein, HhaI methylase, resulted in an improved retention of peptides and an increased sensitivity of up to 10(4)-fold in immunoassay- and epitope-scanning experiments. Denaturing the ligation products with 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) or an organic solvent (20% methanol) prior to arraying did not significantly affect the immunoreactivity of the HhaI methylase-peptide product. Because the carrier protein dominates the binding of ligation products and contains one peptide reactive site, the amount of peptide arrayed onto the membranes can be effectively normalized. This technique was utilized in the alanine scanning of hemagglutinin (HA) antigen using two monoclonal antibodies, resulting in distinguishing the different antigen epitope profiles. Furthermore, we show that this method can be used to characterize the antibodies that recognize phosphorylated peptides. This novel approach allows for synthetic peptides to be uniformly arrayed onto membranes, compatible with a variety of applications.

  5. Enterococcus faecalis strains from food, environmental, and clinical origin produce ACE-inhibitory peptides and other bioactive peptides during growth in bovine skim milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gútiez, Loreto; Gómez-Sala, Beatriz; Recio, Isidra; del Campo, Rosa; Cintas, Luis M; Herranz, Carmen; Hernández, Pablo E

    2013-08-16

    Enterococcus faecalis isolates from food and environmental origin were evaluated for their angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity (ACE-IA) after growth in bovine skim milk (BSM). Most (90% active) but not all (10% inactive) E. faecalis strains produced BSM-derived hydrolysates with high ACE-IA. Known ACE-inhibitory peptides (ACE-IP) and an antioxidant peptide were identified in the E. faecalis hydrolysates by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (RP-HPLC-MS/MS). Antimicrobial activity against Pediococcus damnosus CECT4797 and Listeria ivanovii CECT913 was also observed in the E. faecalis hydrolysates. The incidence of virulence factors in the E. faecalis strains with ACE-IA and producers of ACE-IP was variable but less virulence factors were observed in the food and environmental strains than in the clinical reference strains. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) based analysis demonstrated that food and environmental E. faecalis strains were genetically different from those of clinical origin. When evaluated, most E. faecalis strains of clinical origin also originated BSM-derived hydrolysates with high ACE-IA due to the production of ACE-IP. Accordingly, the results of this work suggest that most E. faecalis strains of food, environmental and clinical origin produce BSM-derived bioactive peptides with human health connotations and potential biotechnological applications.

  6. Genome Sequence of Geobacillus sp. Strain ZGt-1, an Antibacterial Peptide-Producing Bacterium from Hot Springs in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhalili, Rawana N; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni; Canbäck, Björn

    2015-07-23

    This paper reports the draft genome sequence of the firmicute Geobacillus sp. strain ZGt-1, an antibacterial peptide producer isolated from the Zara hot spring in Jordan. This study is the first report on genomic data from a thermophilic bacterial strain isolated in Jordan.

  7. Multiple length peptide-pheromone variants produced by Streptococcus pyogenes directly bind Rgg proteins to confer transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Chaitanya; Jimenez, Juan Cristobal; Nanavati, Dhaval; Federle, Michael J

    2014-08-08

    Streptococcus pyogenes, a human-restricted pathogen, accounts for substantial mortality related to infections worldwide. Recent studies indicate that streptococci produce and respond to several secreted peptide signaling molecules (pheromones), including those known as short hydrophobic peptides (SHPs), to regulate gene expression by a quorum-sensing mechanism. Upon transport into the bacterial cell, pheromones bind to and modulate activity of receptor proteins belonging to the Rgg family of transcription factors. Previously, we reported biofilm regulation by the Rgg2/3 quorum-sensing circuit in S. pyogenes. The aim of this study was to identify the composition of mature pheromones from cell-free culture supernatants that facilitate biofilm formation. Bioluminescent reporters were employed to detect active pheromones in culture supernatants fractionated by reverse-phase chromatography, and mass spectrometry was used to characterize their properties. Surprisingly, multiple SHPs that varied by length were detected. Synthetic peptides of each variant were tested individually using bioluminescence reporters and biofilm growth assays, and although activities differed widely among the group, peptides comprising the C-terminal eight amino acids of the full-length native peptide were most active. Direct Rgg/SHP interactions were determined using a fluorescence polarization assay that utilized FITC-labeled peptide ligands. Peptide receptor affinities were seen to be as low as 500 nm and their binding affinities directly correlated with observed bioactivity. Revelation of naturally produced pheromones along with determination of their affinity for cognate receptors are important steps forward in designing compounds whose purpose is positioned for future therapeutics aimed at treating infections through the interference of bacterial communication.

  8. Hierarchy of Specific Lipid-Peptide Interactions Produces the Activity of Cell-penetrating and Cell-permeating Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Matthew; Parente, Daniel; Gordon, Vernita; Mishra, Abhijit; Schmidt, Nathan; Yang, Lihua; Coridan, Robert; Som, Abhigyan; Tew, Gregory; Wong, Gerard

    2008-03-01

    Protein transduction domains can cross cell membranes with high efficiency, even when carrying a variety of cargos, and thus has strong biotechnological potential. The molecular mechanism of entry, however, is not well understood. We use small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and confocal microscopy to systematically study the interaction of the TAT and ANTP PTD with model membranes of variable composition. Their membrane transduction activity requires the presence of both PE and PS lipids in the membrane. Antimicrobial peptides (AMP's) are cationic amphiphiles that comprise a key component of innate immunity. Synthetic analogs of AMP's, such as the family of phenylene ethynylene antimicrobial oligomers (AMO's), recently demonstrated broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, but the underlying molecular mechanism is unknown. PE lipid greatly enhances permeating activity of AMO in these membranes, showing the importance of specific lipid composition for the activity of cell-permeating peptides. Since bacterial cell membranes are richer in PE lipids than are eukaryotic cell membranes, this may indicate a mechanism for antimicrobial specificity.

  9. Identification of the Major ACE-Inhibitory Peptides Produced by Enzymatic Hydrolysis of a Protein Concentrate from Cuttlefish Wastewater

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    Isabel Rodríguez Amado

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was the purification and identification of the major angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory peptides produced by enzymatic hydrolysis of a protein concentrate recovered from a cuttlefish industrial manufacturing effluent. This process consisted on the ultrafiltration of cuttlefish softening wastewater, with a 10 kDa cut-off membrane, followed by the hydrolysis with alcalase of the retained fraction. Alcalase produced ACE inhibitors reaching the highest activity (IC50 = 76.8 ± 15.2 μg mL−1 after 8 h of proteolysis. Sequential ultrafiltration of the 8 h hydrolysate with molecular weight cut-off (MWCO membranes of 10 and 1 kDa resulted in the increased activity of each permeate, with a final IC50 value of 58.4 ± 4.6 μg mL−1. Permeate containing peptides lower than 1 kDa was separated by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC. Four fractions (A–D with potent ACE inhibitory activity were isolated and their main peptides identified using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to an electrospray ion trap Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometer (HPLC-ESI-IT-FTICR followed by comparison with databases and de novo sequencing. The amino acid sequences of the identified peptides contained at least one hydrophobic and/or a proline together with positively charged residues in at least one of the three C-terminal positions. The IC50 values of the fractions ranged from 1.92 to 8.83 μg mL−1, however this study fails to identify which of these peptides are ultimately responsible for the potent antihypertensive activity of these fractions.

  10. Tyrosine-containing peptides are precursors of tyramine produced by Lactobacillus plantarum strain IR BL0076 isolated from wine

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    Bonnin-Jusserand Maryse

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biogenic amines are molecules with allergenic properties. They are found in fermented products and are synthesized by lactic acid bacteria through the decarboxylation of amino acids present in the food matrix. The concentration of biogenic amines in fermented foodstuffs is influenced by many environmental factors, and in particular, biogenic amine accumulation depends on the quantity of available precursors. Enological practices which lead to an enrichment in nitrogen compounds therefore favor biogenic amine production in wine. Free amino acids are the only known precursors for the synthesis of biogenic amines, and no direct link has previously been demonstrated between the use of peptides by lactic acid bacteria and biogenic amine synthesis. Results Here we demonstrate for the first time that a Lactobacillus plantarum strain isolated from a red wine can produce the biogenic amine tyramine from peptides containing tyrosine. In our conditions, most of the tyramine was produced during the late exponential growth phase, coinciding with the expression of the tyrDC and tyrP genes. The DNA sequences of tyrDC and tyrP in this strain share 98% identity with those in Lactobacillus brevis consistent with horizontal gene transfer from L. brevis to L. plantarum. Conclusion Peptides amino acids are precursors of biogenic amines for Lactobacillus plantarum strain IR BL0076.

  11. A versatile 2A peptide-based bicistronic protein expressing platform for the industrial cellulase producing fungus, Trichoderma reesei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, Venkataramanan; Schuster, Logan A.; Moore, Kyle T.; Taylor, Larry E.; Baker, John O.; Vander Wall, Todd A.; Linger, Jeffrey G.; Himmel, Michael E.; Decker, Stephen R.

    2017-02-06

    The industrial workhorse fungus, Trichoderma reesei, is typically exploited for its ability to produce cellulase enzymes, whereas use of this fungus for over-expression of other proteins (homologous and heterologous) is still very limited. Identifying transformants expressing target protein is a tedious task due to low transformation efficiency, combined with highly variable expression levels between transformants. Routine methods for identification include PCR-based analysis, western blotting, or crude activity screening, all of which are time-consuming techniques. To simplify this screening, we have adapted the 2A peptide system from the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) to T. reesei to express a readily screenable marker protein that is co-translated with a target protein. The 2A peptide sequence allows multiple independent genes to be transcribed as a single mRNA. Upon translation, the 2A peptide sequence causes a 'ribosomal skip' generating two (or more) independent gene products. When the 2A peptide is translated, the 'skip' occurs between its two C-terminal amino acids (glycine and proline), resulting in the addition of extra amino acids on the C terminus of the upstream protein and a single proline addition to the N terminus of the downstream protein. To test this approach, we have cloned two heterologous proteins on either side of a modified 2A peptide, a secreted cellobiohydrolase enzyme (Cel7A from Penicillium funiculosum) as our target protein, and an intracellular enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) as our marker protein. Using straightforward monitoring of eGFP expression, we have shown that we can efficiently monitor the expression of the target Cel7A protein.

  12. Safety Study of an Antimicrobial Peptide Lactocin 160, Produced by the Vaginal Lactobacillus rhamnosus

    OpenAIRE

    Dover, Sara E.; Aroutcheva, Alla A.; Faro, S; Chikindas, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the safety of the antimicrobial peptide, lactocin 160. Methods. Lactocin 160, a product of vaginal probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus 160 was evaluated for toxicity and irritation. An in vitro human organotypic vaginal-ectocervical tissue model (EpiVaginal) was employed for the safety testing by determining the exposure time to reduce tissue viability to 50% (ET-50). Hemolytic activity of lactocin160 was tested using 8% of human erythrocyte suspens...

  13. Safety Study of an Antimicrobial Peptide Lactocin 160, Produced by the Vaginal Lactobacillus rhamnosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara E. Dover

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the safety of the antimicrobial peptide, lactocin 160. Methods. Lactocin 160, a product of vaginal probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus 160 was evaluated for toxicity and irritation. An in vitro human organotypic vaginal-ectocervical tissue model (EpiVaginal was employed for the safety testing by determining the exposure time to reduce tissue viability to 50% (ET-50. Hemolytic activity of lactocin160 was tested using 8% of human erythrocyte suspension. Susceptibility of lactobacilli to lactocin160 was also studied. Rabbit vaginal irritation (RVI model was used for an in vivo safety evaluation. Results. The ET-50 value was 17.5 hours for lactocin 160 (4.9 hours for nonoxynol 9, N9. Hemolytic activity of lactocin 160 was 8.2% (N9 caused total hemolysis. Lactobacilli resisted to high concentrations of peptide preparation. The RVI model revealed slight vaginal irritation. An average irritation index grade was evaluated as “none.” Conclusions. Lactocin 160 showed minimal irritation and has a good potential for intravaginal application.

  14. Immobilization of Trypsin in Lignocellulosic Waste Material to Produce Peptides with Bioactive Potential from Whey Protein

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    Juliana Cristina Bassan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, trypsin (Enzyme Comission 3.4.21.4 was immobilized in a low cost, lignocellulosic support (corn cob powder—CCP with the goal of obtaining peptides with bioactive potential from cheese whey. The pretreated support was activated with glyoxyl groups, glutaraldehyde and IDA-glyoxyl. The immobilization yields of the derivatives were higher than 83%, and the retention of catalytic activity was higher than 74%. The trypsin-glyoxyl-CCP derivative was thermally stable at 65 °C, a value that was 1090-fold higher than that obtained with the free enzyme. The trypsin-IDA-glyoxyl-CCP and trypsin-glutaraldehyde-CCP derivatives had thermal stabilities that were 883- and five-fold higher, respectively, then those obtained with the free enzyme. In the batch experiments, trypsin-IDA-glyoxyl-CCP retained 91% of its activity and had a degree of hydrolysis of 12.49%, while the values for trypsin-glyoxyl-CCP were 87% and 15.46%, respectively. The stabilized derivative trypsin-glyoxyl-CCP was also tested in an upflow packed-bed reactor. The hydrodynamic characterization of this reactor was a plug flow pattern, and the kinetics of this system provided a relative activity of 3.04 ± 0.01 U·g−1 and an average degree of hydrolysis of 23%, which were suitable for the production of potentially bioactive peptides.

  15. CALCITONIN GENE-RELATED PEPTIDE INDUCES FIBROBLASTS FROM HIP PSEUDOCAPSULE TO PRODUCE CYTOKINES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) involvement in the process of aseptic loosening. Methods We isolated fibroblasts from periprosthetic pseudocapsular tissue at the time of revision hip arthroplasty performed due to aseptic loosening. Fibroblasts were incubated for 24 h in the presence of CGRP, and the levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in the media were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Results We found that the levels of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α increased in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. ConclusionThese inflammatory cytokines play an important role in the development of periprosthetic osteolysis and implant loosening. Our results suggest that CGRP may be involved in the pathogenesis of aseptic loosening.

  16. A Novel Insecticidal Peptide SLP1 Produced by Streptomyces laindensis H008 against Lipaphis erysimi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lijian; Liang, Kangkang; Duan, Bensha; Yu, Mengdi; Meng, Wei; Wang, Qinggui; Yu, Qiong

    2016-08-22

    Aphids are major insect pests for crops, causing damage by direct feeding and transmission of plant diseases. This paper was completed to discover and characterize a novel insecticidal metabolite against aphids from soil actinobacteria. An insecticidal activity assay was used to screen 180 bacterial strains from soil samples against mustard aphid, Lipaphis erysimi. The bacterial strain H008 showed the strongest activity, and it was identified by the phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and physiological traits as a novel species of genus Streptomyces (named S. laindensis H008). With the bioassay-guided method, the insecticidal extract from S. laindensis H008 was subjected to chromatographic separations. Finally, a novel insecticidal peptide was purified from Streptomyces laindensis H008 against L. erysimi, and it was determined to be S-E-P-A-Q-I-V-I-V-D-G-V-D-Y-W by TOF-MS and amino acid analysis.

  17. A Novel Insecticidal Peptide SLP1 Produced by Streptomyces laindensis H008 against Lipaphis erysimi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijian Xu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aphids are major insect pests for crops, causing damage by direct feeding and transmission of plant diseases. This paper was completed to discover and characterize a novel insecticidal metabolite against aphids from soil actinobacteria. An insecticidal activity assay was used to screen 180 bacterial strains from soil samples against mustard aphid, Lipaphis erysimi. The bacterial strain H008 showed the strongest activity, and it was identified by the phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and physiological traits as a novel species of genus Streptomyces (named S. laindensis H008. With the bioassay-guided method, the insecticidal extract from S. laindensis H008 was subjected to chromatographic separations. Finally, a novel insecticidal peptide was purified from Streptomyces laindensis H008 against L. erysimi, and it was determined to be S-E-P-A-Q-I-V-I-V-D-G-V-D-Y-W by TOF-MS and amino acid analysis.

  18. Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides of Chia (Salvia hispanica Produced by Enzymatic Hydrolysis

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    Maira Rubi Segura Campos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE-I inhibitors can have undesirable side effects, while natural inhibitors have no side effects and are potential nutraceuticals. A protein-rich fraction from chia (Salvia hispanica L. seed was hydrolyzed with an Alcalase-Flavourzyme sequential system and the hydrolysate ultrafiltered through four molecular weight cut-off membranes (1 kDa, 3 kDa, 5 kDa, and 10 kDa. ACE-I inhibitory activity was quantified in the hydrolysate and ultrafiltered fractions. The hydrolysate was extensive (DH = 51.64% and had 58.46% ACE-inhibitory activity. Inhibition ranged from 53.84% to 69.31% in the five ultrafiltered fractions and was highest in the <1 kDa fraction (69.31%. This fraction’s amino acid composition was identified and then it was purified by gel filtration chromatography and ACE-I inhibition measured in the purified fractions. Amino acid composition suggested that hydrophobic residues contributed substantially to chia peptide ACE-I inhibitory strength, probably by blocking angiotensin II production. Inhibitory activity ranged from 48.41% to 62.58% in the purified fractions, but fraction F1 (1.5–2.5 kDa exhibited the highest inhibition (IC50 = 3.97 μg/mL; 427–455 mL elution volume. The results point out the possibility of obtaining bioactive peptides from chia proteins by means of a controlled protein hydrolysis using Alcalase-Flavourzyme sequentional system.

  19. Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides of Chia (Salvia hispanica) Produced by Enzymatic Hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura Campos, Maira Rubi; Peralta González, Fanny; Chel Guerrero, Luis; Betancur Ancona, David

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE-I) inhibitors can have undesirable side effects, while natural inhibitors have no side effects and are potential nutraceuticals. A protein-rich fraction from chia (Salvia hispanica L.) seed was hydrolyzed with an Alcalase-Flavourzyme sequential system and the hydrolysate ultrafiltered through four molecular weight cut-off membranes (1 kDa, 3 kDa, 5 kDa, and 10 kDa). ACE-I inhibitory activity was quantified in the hydrolysate and ultrafiltered fractions. The hydrolysate was extensive (DH = 51.64%) and had 58.46% ACE-inhibitory activity. Inhibition ranged from 53.84% to 69.31% in the five ultrafiltered fractions and was highest in the <1 kDa fraction (69.31%). This fraction's amino acid composition was identified and then it was purified by gel filtration chromatography and ACE-I inhibition measured in the purified fractions. Amino acid composition suggested that hydrophobic residues contributed substantially to chia peptide ACE-I inhibitory strength, probably by blocking angiotensin II production. Inhibitory activity ranged from 48.41% to 62.58% in the purified fractions, but fraction F1 (1.5-2.5 kDa) exhibited the highest inhibition (IC50 = 3.97 μg/mL; 427-455 mL elution volume). The results point out the possibility of obtaining bioactive peptides from chia proteins by means of a controlled protein hydrolysis using Alcalase-Flavourzyme sequentional system.

  20. The partial characterization of the antibacterial peptide bacteriocin G2 produced by the probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum G2

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    SVETLANA L. ŠEATOVIĆ

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was the partial characterization of the antimicrobial peptide bacteriocin G2 produced by probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum G2, which was isolated from a clinical sample of a healthy person. Antimicrobial substance was secreted in the supernatant of an L. plantarum G2 culture, and showed a diverse spectrum of antimicrobial activity of all the tested strains of the genera Lactobacillus and the pathogenic bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella аbony. Isoelectric focusing revealed that bacteriocin G2 is a cationic peptide (pI about 10 with a molecular mass of 2.2 kDa according to tricine–sodium dodecyl sulphate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE. The antimicrobial activity of bacteriocin G2 was diminished by the proteolytic action of trypsin and proteinase K. Bacteriocin G2 preserved its biological activity in the temperature range 40–60 °C (15 min, which was lost at 80 °C. Bacteriocin G2 was stable in the pH range 2–9, while treatment with 1 % Tween 80 and 1 % urea resulted in increased antimicrobial activity. The probiotic strain L. plantarum G2 produces the antimicrobial substance proteinaceous in nature with bacteriocin characteristics. Bacteriocin production is one of the key properties of probiotic bacteria with clinical potential as anti-infective agents, which will increase the likelihood of its in vivo efficacy.

  1. [Isolation of peptide antibiotic virginiamycin components and selection of their producer Streptomyces virginiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvenigorodskiĭ, V I; Tiaglov, B V; Voeĭkova, T A

    2001-01-01

    A method for chromatographic separation and quantitative determination of individual components of the antibiotic virginiamycin, produced by microbiological synthesis (Streptomyces virginiae strain 147), is described. The components, M1-2 and S1-5, were isolated from fermentation broth and identified by HPTLC and HPLC (the results obtained using the two methods correlate well with each other). Conditions of culturing of the producer and compositions of nutritive media were optimized. Using UV irradiation as a mutagenic factor, the producer was selected for increased level of synthesis of the antibiotic; this was achieved by inducing mutations that impart resistance to virginiamycin and meta-fluorophenylalanine, an analog of phenylalanine.

  2. Coagulation of peptides and proteins produced by Microcystis aeruginosa: Interaction mechanisms and the effect of Fe-peptide/protein complexes formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivokonsky, Martin; Safarikova, Jana; Bubakova, Petra; Pivokonska, Lenka

    2012-11-01

    This paper focuses on elucidation of the mechanisms involved in the coagulation of peptides and proteins contained in cellular organic matter (COM) of cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa by ferric coagulant. Furthermore, coagulation inhibition due to the formation of Fe-peptide/protein surface complexes was evaluated. The results of coagulation testing imply that removability of peptides and proteins is highly dependent on pH value which determines charge characteristics of coagulation system compounds and therefore the mechanisms of interactions between them. The highest peptide/protein removal was obtained in the pH range of 4-6 owing to charge neutralization of peptide/protein negative surface by positively charged hydrolysis products of ferric coagulant. At low COM/Fe ratio (COM/Fe peptides/proteins onto ferric oxide-hydroxide particles, described as electrostatic patch model, enables the coagulation at pH 6-8. On the contrary, steric stabilization reduces coagulation at pH 6-8 if the ratio COM/Fe is high (COM/Fe >0.33). Coagulation of peptides and proteins is disturbed at pH 6-7 as a consequence of Fe-peptide/protein complexes formation. The maximum ability of peptides/proteins to form soluble complexes with Fe was found just at pH 6, when peptides/proteins bind 1.38 mmol Fe per 1 g of peptide/protein DOC. Complex forming peptides and proteins of relative molecular weights of 1, 2.8, 6, 8, 8.5, 10 and 52 kDa were isolated by affinity chromatography.

  3. Structure-Activity Analysis of Gram-positive Bacterium-producing Lasso Peptides with Anti-mycobacterial Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inokoshi, Junji; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Miyake, Midori; Shimizu, Yuji; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Lariatin A, an 18-residue lasso peptide encoded by the five-gene cluster larABCDE, displays potent and selective anti-mycobacterial activity. The structural feature is an N-terminal macrolactam ring, through which the C-terminal passed to form the rigid lariat-protoknot structure. In the present study, we established a convergent expression system by the strategy in which larA mutant gene-carrying plasmids were transformed into larA-deficient Rhodococcus jostii, and generated 36 lariatin variants of the precursor protein LarA to investigate the biosynthesis and the structure-activity relationships. The mutational analysis revealed that four amino acid residues (Gly1, Arg7, Glu8, and Trp9) in lariatin A are essential for the maturation and production in the biosynthetic machinery. Furthermore, the study on structure-activity relationships demonstrated that Tyr6, Gly11, and Asn14 are responsible for the anti-mycobacterial activity, and the residues at positions 15, 16 and 18 in lariatin A are critical for enhancing the activity. This study will not only provide a useful platform for genetically engineering Gram-positive bacterium-producing lasso peptides, but also an important foundation to rationally design more promising drug candidates for combatting tuberculosis.

  4. Biochemical characterization of an anti-Candida factor produced by Enterococcus faecalis

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    Shekh Raeesh M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because Candida albicans is resistant to several antifungal antibiotics, there is a need to identify other less toxic natural products, particularly antimicrobial proteins, peptides or bacteriocin like inhibitory substances. An attempt has been made to purify and characterise an anti-Candida compound produced by Enterococcus faecalis. Results An anti-Candida protein (ACP produced by E. faecalis active against 8 C. albicans strains was characterised and partially purified. The ACP showed a broad-spectrum activity against multidrug resistant C. albicans MTCC 183, MTCC 7315, MTCC 3958, NCIM 3557, NCIM 3471 and DI. It was completely inactivated by treatment with proteinase K and partially by pronase E. The ACP retained biological stability after heat-treatment at 90°C for 20 min, maintained activity over a pH range 6–10, and remained active after treatment with α-amylase, lipase, organic solvents, and detergents. The antimicrobial activity of the E. faecalis strain was found exclusively in the extracellular filtrate produced in the late logarithmic growth phase. The highest activity (1600 AU mL-1 against C. albicans MTCC 183 was recorded at 48 h of incubation, and activity decreased thereafter. The peptide showed very low haemagglutination and haemolytic activities against human red blood cells. The antimicrobial substance was purified by salt-fractionation and chromatography. Partially purified ACP had a molecular weight of approximately 43 KDa in Tricine-PAGE analysis. The 12 amino acid N terminal sequence was obtained by Edman degradation. The peptide was de novo sequenced by ESI-MS, and the deduced combined sequence when compared to other bacteriocins and antimicrobial peptide had no significant sequence similarity. Conclusions The inhibitory activity of the test strain is due to the synthesis of an antimicrobial protein. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the isolation of a promising non-haemolytic anti

  5. A novel bottom-up process to produce nanoparticles containing protein and peptide for suspension in hydrofluoroalkane propellants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yinhe; Yang, Zhiwen; Peng, Xinsheng; Xin, Feng; Xu, Yuehong; Feng, Min; Zhao, Chunshun; Hu, Haiyan; Wu, Chuanbin

    2011-07-15

    To overcome the disadvantages of microemulsion and nanoprecipitation methods to produce protein-containing nanoparticles, a novel bottom-up process was developed to produce nanoparticles containing the model protein lysozyme. The nanoparticles were generated by freeze-drying a solution of lysozyme, lecithin and lactose in tert-butyl alcohol (TBA)/water co-solvent system and washing off excess lecithin in lyophilizate by centrifugation. Formulation parameters such as lecithin concentration in organic phase, water content in TBA/water co-solvent, and lactose concentration in water were optimized so as to obtain desired nanoparticles with retention of the bioactivity of lysozyme. Based on the results, 24.0% (w/v) of lecithin, 37.5% (v/v) of water content, and 0.56% (w/v) of lactose concentration were selected to generate spherical nanoparticles with approximately 200 nm in mean size, 0.1 in polydispersity index (PI), and 99% retained bioactivity of lysozyme. These nanoparticles rinsed with ethanol containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), Span 85 or oleic acid (3%, w/v) could readily be dispersed in HFA 134a to form a stable suspension with good redispersibility and 98% retained bioactivity of lysozyme. The study indicates there is a potential to produce pressed metered dose inhaler (pMDI) formulations containing therapeutic protein and peptide nanoparticles.

  6. Cyanobacteria produce a high variety of hepatotoxic peptides in lichen symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasalainen, Ulla; Fewer, David P; Jokela, Jouni; Wahlsten, Matti; Sivonen, Kaarina; Rikkinen, Jouko

    2012-04-10

    Lichens are symbiotic associations between fungi and photosynthetic algae or cyanobacteria. Microcystins are potent toxins that are responsible for the poisoning of both humans and animals. These toxins are mainly associated with aquatic cyanobacterial blooms, but here we show that the cyanobacterial symbionts of terrestrial lichens from all over the world commonly produce microcystins. We screened 803 lichen specimens from five different continents for cyanobacterial toxins by amplifying a part of the gene cluster encoding the enzyme complex responsible for microcystin production and detecting toxins directly from lichen thalli. We found either the biosynthetic genes for making microcystins or the toxin itself in 12% of all analyzed lichen specimens. A plethora of different microcystins was found with over 50 chemical variants, and many of the variants detected have only rarely been reported from free-living cyanobacteria. In addition, high amounts of nodularin, up to 60 μg g(-1), were detected from some lichen thalli. This microcystin analog and potent hepatotoxin has previously been known only from the aquatic bloom-forming genus Nodularia. Our results demonstrate that the production of cyanobacterial hepatotoxins in lichen symbiosis is a global phenomenon and occurs in many different lichen lineages. The very high genetic diversity of the mcyE gene and the chemical diversity of microcystins suggest that lichen symbioses may have been an important environment for diversification of these cyanobacteria.

  7. Flow-through synthesis on Teflon-patterned paper to produce peptide arrays for cell-based assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiss, Frédérique; Matochko, Wadim L; Govindasamy, Natasha; Lin, Edith Y; Derda, Ratmir

    2014-06-16

    A simple method is described for the patterned deposition of Teflon on paper to create an integrated platform for parallel organic synthesis and cell-based assays. Solvent-repelling barriers made of Teflon-impregnated paper confine organic solvents to specific zones of the patterned array and allow for 96 parallel flow-through syntheses on paper. The confinement and flow-through mixing significantly improves the peptide yield and simplifies the automation of this synthesis. The synthesis of 100 peptides ranging from 7 to 14 amino acids in length gave over 60% purity for the majority of the peptides (>95% yield per coupling/deprotection cycle). The resulting peptide arrays were used in cell-based screening to identify 14 potent bioactive peptides that support the adhesion or proliferation of breast cancer cells in a 3D environment. In the future, this technology could be used for the screening of more complex phenotypic responses, such as cell migration or differentiation.

  8. Isolation and physico-chemical characterization of an antifungal and antibacterial peptide produced by Bacillus licheniformis A12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, A; Maqueda, M; Martínez-Bueno, M; Lebbadi, M; Valdivia, E

    1993-07-01

    An antifungal substance named peptide A12-C has been purified to homogeneity from supernatants of sporulated cultures of Bacillus licheniformis A12. It consists of a 0.77-kDa hydrophilic peptide containing two residues of Glu and one of Arg, Ala, Pro, Tyr and Orn. No fatty acids, phosphorus or carbohydrates have been detected. Peptide A12-C is active on several fungi (Microsporum canis CECT 2797, Mucor mucedo CECT 2653, M. plumbeus (CCM F 443, Sporothrix schenckii CECT 2799 and Trichophyton mentagrophytes CECT 2793) and bacteria (Bacillus megaterium, Corynebacterium glutamicum, Sarcina and Mycobacterium), although the latter are less sensitive.

  9. Low molecular weight peptides derived from sarcoplasmic proteins produced by an autochthonous starter culture in a beaker sausage model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constanza M. López

    2015-06-01

    Significance: The selection of a specific autochthonous starter culture guarantees the hygiene and typicity of fermented sausages. The identification of new peptides as well as new target proteins by means of peptidomics represents a significant step toward the elucidation of the role of microorganisms in meat proteolysis. Moreover, these peptides may be further used as biomarkers capable to certify the use of the applied autochthonous starter culture described here.

  10. Plantaricin A, a peptide pheromone produced by Lactobacillus plantarum, permeabilizes the cell membrane of both normal and cancerous lymphocytes and neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, Sverre L; Oppegård, Camilla; Ohara, Shinya; Iijima, Toshio; Naderi, Soheil; Blomhoff, Heidi K; Nissen-Meyer, Jon; Sand, Olav

    2010-07-01

    Antimicrobial peptides produced by multicellular organisms protect against pathogenic microorganisms, whereas such peptides produced by bacteria provide an ecological advantage over competitors. Certain antimicrobial peptides of metazoan origin are also toxic to eukaryotic cells, with preference for a variety of cancerous cells. Plantaricin A (PlnA) is a peptide pheromone with membrane permeabilizing strain-specific antibacterial activity, produced by Lactobacillus plantarum C11. Recently, we have reported that PlnA also permeabilizes cancerous rat pituitary cells (GH(4) cells), whereas normal rat anterior pituitary cells are resistant. To investigate if preferential effect on cancerous cells is a general feature of PlnA, we have studied effects of the peptide on normal and cancerous lymphocytes and neuronal cells. Normal human B and T cells, Reh cells (from human B cell leukemia), and Jurkat cells (from human T cell leukemia) were studied by flow cytometry to detect morphological changes (scatter) and viability (propidium iodide uptake), and by patch clamp recordings to monitor membrane conductance. Ca(2+) imaging based on a combination of fluo-4 and fura-red was used to monitor PlnA-induced membrane permeabilization in normal rat cortical neurons and glial cells, PC12 cells (from a rat adrenal chromaffin tumor), and murine N2A cells (from a spinal cord tumor). All the tested cell types were affected by 10-100 microM PlnA, whereas concentrations below 10 microM had no significant effect. We conclude that normal and cancerous lymphocytes and neuronal cells show similar sensitivity to PlnA.

  11. Two cyclic peptides produced by the endophytic fungus # 2221 from Castaniopsisfissa on the south China sea coast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Qing YIN; Jie Ming ZOU; Zhi Gang SHE; L. L. P. Vrijmoed; E. B. Gareth Jones; Yong Cheng LIN

    2005-01-01

    New cyclic peptides 1 and 2 were isolated from the endophytic fungus #2221 from Castaniopsisfissa on the south China sea coast. By 2D NMR methods and chiral HPLC technique,their structures were elucidated as cyclo (L-Val-L-Leu-L-Val-L-Leu) and cyclo(L-Leu-L-Ala-L-Leu-L-Ala), respectively.

  12. Bacteriocin like substance production by Carnobacterium piscicola in a continuous system with three culture broths. Study of antagonism against Listeria monocytogenes on vacuum packaged salmon Produção de substâncias semelhantes à bacteriocinas por C. piscicola em um sistema contínuo com três meios de cultura e seu antagonismo contra L. monocytogenes em salmão embalado a vácuo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renate P. Schöbitz

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Three culture media were studied for the bacteriocin like substance (BLS production from Carnobacterium piscicola L 103 in a batch and continuous culture system. The efficacy of the antagonistic substance against Listeria monocytogenes was tested on vacuum packaged salmon. BLS was produced in a 1.0 L bioreactor by batch and continuous culture using D-MRS, mod. D-MRS and APT as nutrient broths. Salmon fillets were inoculated with BLS (200 AU mL-1 and 800 AU mL-1 and 8.0 x 10¹ cfu cm-2 of L. monocytogenes and stored at 4ºC. The growth of L. monocytogenes was determined every 5 days during 15 days. After 12 h of batch culture the stationary growth phase of C. piscicola L 103 started, with a BLS activity of 800 AU mL-1 in D-MRS and mod. D-MRS broth, and of 400 AU mL-1 in APT broth. During continuous culture BLS activity increased to 6400 AU mL-1 in both types of MRS broths, while in APT the activity decreased to 50 AU mL-1, indicating a clear advantage of the first two culture media and also of the continuous culture system. BLS had a bacteriostatic effect on L. monocytogenes when inoculated on salmon, with counts of 6.0 x 10³ cfu cm-2 after 15 days. No significant differences were found between the two BLS activities used. In the control without BLS, L. monocytogenes counts increased to 1.0 x 10(6 cfu cm-2 after 15 days of storage.Três meios de cultura foram avaliados quanto a produção de substâncias semelhantes a bacteriocinas (SSB por Carnobacterium piscicola L 103, utilizando um sistema contínuo de cultura. A eficácia da substância antagonista contra Listeria monocytogenes foi testada em salmão embalado a vácuo. As SSB foram produzidas em bioreator de 1.0 L, em cultura contínua e em cultura estacionária, utilizando D-MRS, mod. D-MRS e APT como meios de cultivo. Filés de salmão foram inoculados com SSB (200 AU mL-1 e 800 AU mL-1 e L. monocytogenes (8.0 x 10¹ ufc cm-2 e mantidos a 4ºC. O crescimento de L. monocytogenes foi

  13. Expression and Immunogenicity of the Mycobacterial Ag85B/ESAT-6 Antigens Produced in Transgenic Plants by Elastin-Like Peptide Fusion Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doreen Manuela Floss

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explored a novel system combining plant-based production and the elastin-like peptide (ELP fusion strategy to produce vaccinal antigens against tuberculosis. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing the mycobacterial antigens Ag85B and ESAT-6 fused to ELP (TBAg-ELP were generated. Purified TBAg-ELP was obtained by the highly efficient, cost-effective, inverse transition cycling (ICT method and tested in mice. Furthermore, safety and immunogenicity of the crude tobacco leaf extracts were assessed in piglets. Antibodies recognizing mycobacterial antigens were produced in mice and piglets. A T-cell immune response able to recognize the native mycobacterial antigens was detected in mice. These findings showed that the native Ag85B and ESAT-6 mycobacterial B- and T-cell epitopes were conserved in the plant-expressed TBAg-ELP. This study presents the first results of an efficient plant-expression system, relying on the elastin-like peptide fusion strategy, to produce a safe and immunogenic mycobacterial Ag85B-ESAT-6 fusion protein as a potential vaccine candidate against tuberculosis.

  14. Insulin C-peptide test

    Science.gov (United States)

    C-peptide ... the test depends on the reason for the C-peptide measurement. Ask your health care provider if ... C-peptide is measured to tell the difference between insulin the body produces and insulin someone injects ...

  15. Bacteriocin Inducer Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel peptides produced by bacteriocin-producing bacteria stimulate the production of bacteriocins in vitro. The producer bacteria are cultured in the presence of a novel inducer bacteria and a peptide having a carboxy terminal sequence of VKGLT in order to achieve an increase in bacteriocin produc...

  16. Peptide identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  17. The cyclochlorotine mycotoxin is produced by the nonribosomal peptide synthetase CctN in Talaromyces islandicus (“Penicillium islandicum”)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schafhauser, Thomas; Kirchner, Norbert; Kulik, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Talaromyces islandicus (“Penicillium islandicum”) is a widespread foodborne mold that produces numerous secondary metabolites, among them potent mycotoxins belonging to different chemical classes. A notable metabolite is the hepatotoxic and carcinogenic pentapeptide cyclochlorotine that contains...

  18. Cytotoxic halogenated macrolides and modified peptides from the apratoxin-producing marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya bouillonii from Guam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew, Susan; Salvador, Lilibeth A; Schupp, Peter J; Paul, Valerie J; Luesch, Hendrik

    2010-09-24

    Collections of the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya bouillonii from shallow patch reefs in Apra Harbor, Guam, afforded three hitherto undescribed analogues of the glycosidic macrolide lyngbyaloside, namely, 2-epi-lyngbyaloside (1) and the regioisomeric 18E- and 18Z-lyngbyalosides C (2 and 3). Concurrently we discovered two new analogues of the cytoskeletal actin-disrupting lyngbyabellins, 27-deoxylyngbyabellin A (4) and lyngbyabellin J (5), a novel macrolide of the laingolide family, laingolide B (6), and a linear modified peptide, lyngbyapeptin D (7), along with known lyngbyabellins A and B, lyngbyapeptin A, and lyngbyaloside. The structures of 1-7 were elucidated by a combination of NMR spectroscopic and mass spectrometric analysis. Compounds 1-6 were either brominated (1-3) or chlorinated (4-6), consistent with halogenation being a hallmark of many marine natural products. All extracts derived from these L. bouillonii collections were highly cytotoxic due to the presence of apratoxin A or apratoxin C. Compounds 1-5 showed weak to moderate cytotoxicity to HT29 colorectal adenocarcinoma and HeLa cervical carcinoma cells.

  19. Association of restriction fragment length polymorphism at the atrial natriuretic peptide gene locus with aldosterone responsiveness to angiotensin in aldosterone-producing adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunny, T J; Jonsson, J R; Klemm, S A; Ballantine, D M; Stowasser, M; Gordon, R D

    1994-11-15

    Primary aldosteronism is an important, potentially curable, form of hypertension. We examined the possible association between restriction fragment length polymorphisms in the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) gene and responsiveness of aldosterone to angiotensin II in 59 patients with primary aldosteronism due to aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA). Significant differences in the allelic frequencies of the BglI, TaqI and XhoI polymorphic sites at the ANP gene locus (chromosome 1; 1p36) between angiotensin II-unresponsive and angiotensin II-responsive tumors were observed. Variation in the ANP gene between the two groups may result in altered expression of ANP within the adrenal gland, and may contribute to the biochemical regulation of aldosterone production of these two subgroups of patients with APA.

  20. Peptide-Carrier Conjugation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Paul Robert

    2015-01-01

    To produce antibodies against synthetic peptides it is necessary to couple them to a protein carrier. This chapter provides a nonspecialist overview of peptide-carrier conjugation. Furthermore, a protocol for coupling cysteine-containing peptides to bovine serum albumin is outlined....

  1. Encapsulated glucagon-like peptide-1-producing mesenchymal stem cells have a beneficial effect on failing pig hearts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wright, Elizabeth J; Farrell, Kelly A; Malik, Nadim;

    2012-01-01

    -life in vivo. The effects of prolonged GLP-1 delivery from stromal cells post-MI were evaluated in a porcine model. Human mesenchymal stem cells immortalized and engineered to produce a GLP-1 fusion protein were encapsulated in alginate (bead-GLP-1 MSC) and delivered to coronary artery branches. Control groups...... and showed decreased infarction area compared with controls. Histological analysis showed reduced inflammation and a trend toward reduced apoptosis in the infarct zone. Increased collagen but fewer myofibroblasts were observed in infarcts of the bead-GLP-1 MSC and bead-MSC groups, and significantly more...

  2. The selection of alkaline protease-producing yeasts from marine environments and evaluation of their bioactive peptide production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing; CHI Zhenming; WANG Xianghong; PENG Ying; CHI Zhe

    2009-01-01

    A total of 400 yeast strains from seawater, sediments, saltern mud, marine fish guts, and marine algae were obtained. The protease activity of the yeast cultures was estimated, after which four strains (HN3.11, N11b, YF04C and HN4.9) capable of secreting extracellular alkaline protease were isolated. The isolated strains were identified as Aureobasidium pullulans, Yarrowia lipolytica, Issatchenkia orientalis and Cryptococcus cf. aureus. The optimal pH of the protease activity produced by strains HN3.11, YF04C, and HN4.9 was 9.0, while that of the protease produced by strain N11b was 10.0. The optimal temperature for protease activity was 45°C for strains HN3.11, N11b, and YF04C, and 50°C for strain HN4.9. After digestion of shrimp (Penaeus vannamei) protein and spirulina (Arthospira platensis) protein with the four crude alkaline proteases, the filtrate from spirulina (Arthrospira platensis) powder digested by the crude alkaline protease of strain HN3.11 was found to have the highest antioxidant activity (61.4%) and the highest angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activities (68.4%). The other filtrates had much lower antioxidant activity and ACE-inhibitory activities.

  3. Characterization of putative class II bacteriocins identified from a non-bacteriocin-producing strain Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yang-Cheng; Liu, Cheng-Feng; Lin, Jhao-Fen; Li, An-Chieh; Lo, Ta-Chun; Lin, Thy-Hou

    2013-01-01

    Several putative class II bacteriocin-like genes were identified in Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334, all of which might encode peptides with a double-glycine leader. Six peptides encoded by these genes were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and then partially purified in order to test their bacteriocin activity. The results revealed that the mature LSEI_2163 peptide was a class IId bacteriocin that exhibited antimicrobial activity against some lactobacilli and several Listeria species. Similarly, mature LSEI_2386 was a putative pheromone peptide that also had significant bacteriocin activity against several Listeria species. The activities of both peptides tolerated 121°C for 30 min but not treatment with proteinase K or trypsin. The two Cys residues located at positions 4 and 24 in the mature LSEI_2163 peptide were shown by mass spectrometry to form a disulfide bridge, which was required for optimal antibacterial activity. However, replacement of one or both Cys with Ser would cause significant reduction of the antibacterial activity, the reduction being greater when only one of the Cys residues (C4S) was replaced than when both (C4S/C24S) were replaced.

  4. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae induce alterations in the intracellular pH, membrane permeability and culturability of Hanseniaspora guilliermondii cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branco, Patrícia; Monteiro Lomba Viana, Tiago; Albergaria, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae produces antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) during alcoholic fermentation that are active against several wine-related yeasts (e.g. Hanseniaspora guilliermondii) and bacteria (e.g. Oenococcus oeni). In the present study, the physiological changes induced by those AMPs...

  5. Pharmacological characterization of EN-9, a novel chimeric peptide of endomorphin-2 and neuropeptide FF that produces potent antinociceptive activity and limited tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi-Long; Li, Ning; Wang, Pei; Tang, Hong-Hai; Han, Zheng-Lan; Song, Jing-Jing; Li, Xu-Hui; Yu, Hong-Ping; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Run; Xu, Biao; Zhang, Meng-Na; Fang, Quan; Wang, Rui

    2016-09-01

    Mounting evidences indicate the functional interactions between neuropeptide FF (NPFF) and opioids, including the endogenous opioids. In the present work, EN-9, a chimeric peptide containing the functional domains of the endogenous opioid endomorphin-2 (EM-2) and NPFF, was synthesized and pharmacologically characterized. In vitro cAMP assay demonstrated that EN-9 was a multifunctional agonist of κ-opioid, NPFF1 and NPFF2 receptors. In the mouse tail-flick test, intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administration of EN-9 produced significant antinociception with an ED50 value of 13.44 nmol, which lasted longer than that of EM-2. In addition, EN-9 induced potent antinociception after both intravenous (i.v.) and subcutaneous (s.c.) injection. Furthermore, the experiments using the antagonists of opioid and NPFF receptors indicated that the central antinociception of EN-9 was mainly mediated by κ-opioid receptor, independently on NPFF receptors. Notably, the central antinociception of EN-9 was not reduced over a period of 6 days repeated i.c.v. injection. Repeated i.c.v. administration of EN-9 with the NPFF1 and NPFF2 receptors antagonist RF9 resulted in a progressive loss of analgesic potency, consistent with the development of tolerance. Moreover, central administration of EN-9 induced the place conditioning aversion only at a high dose of 60 nmol, but not at low doses. At supraspinal level, only high dose of EN-9 (60 nmol, i.c.v.) inhibited gastrointestinal transit via NPFF receptors. Similarly, systemic administration of EN-9 also inhibited gastrointestinal transit at high doses (10 and 30 mg/kg, i.v.). Taken together, the multifunctional agonist of κ-opioid and NPFF receptors EN-9 produced a potent, non-tolerance forming antinociception with limited side effects.

  6. Intracerebroventricular injection of encapsulated human mesenchymal cells producing glucagon-like peptide 1 prolongs survival in a mouse model of ALS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Knippenberg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As pharmacological therapies have largely failed so far, stem cell therapy has recently come into the focus of ALS research. Neuroprotective potential was shown for several types of stem and progenitor cells, mainly due to release of trophic factors. In the present study, we assessed the effects of intracerebroventricular injection of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 releasing mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC in mutant SOD1 (G93A transgenic mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To improve the neuroprotective effects of native MSC, they had been transfected with a plasmid vector encoding a GLP-1 fusion gene prior to the injection, as GLP-1 was shown to exhibit neuroprotective properties before. Cells were encapsulated and therefore protected against rejection. After intracerebroventricular injection of these GLP-1 MSC capsules in presymptomatic SOD1 (G93A mice, we assessed possible protective effects by survival analysis, measurement of body weight, daily monitoring and evaluation of motor performance by rotarod and footprint analyses. Motor neuron numbers in the spinal cord as well as the amount of astrocytosis, microglial activation, heat shock response and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS expression were analyzed by immunohistological methods. Treatment with GLP-1 producing MSC capsules significantly prolonged survival by 13 days, delayed symptom onset by 15 days and weight loss by 14 days and led to significant improvements in motor performance tests compared to vehicle treated controls. Histological data are mainly in favour of anti-inflammatory effects of GLP-1 producing MSC capsules with reduced detection of inflammatory markers and a significant heat shock protein increase. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Intracerebroventricular injection of GLP-1 MSC capsules shows neuroprotective potential in the SOD1 (G93A mouse model.

  7. Novel antihypertensive lactoferrin-derived peptides produced by Kluyveromyces marxianus: gastrointestinal stability profile and in vivo angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Tejedor, Aurora; Sánchez-Rivera, Laura; Castelló-Ruiz, María; Recio, Isidra; Salom, Juan B; Manzanares, Paloma

    2014-02-19

    Novel antihypertensive peptides released by Kluyveromyces marxianus from bovine lactoferrin (LF) have been identified. K. marxianus LF permeate was fractionated by semipreparative high performance liquid chromatography and 35 peptides contained in the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory fractions were identified by using an ion trap mass spectrometer. On the basis of peptide abundance and common structural features, six peptides were chemically synthesized. Four of them (DPYKLRP, PYKLRP, YKLRP, and GILRP) exerted in vitro inhibitory effects on ACE activity and effectively decreased systolic blood pressure after oral administration to spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Stability against gastrointestinal enzymes suggested that the sequence LRP could contribute to the in vivo effects of parental peptides. Finally, there were reductions in circulating ACE activity and angiotensin II level in SHRs after either DPYKLRP or LRP intake, thus confirming ACE inhibition as the in vivo mechanism for their antihypertensive effect.

  8. Hyaluronic Acid-Based Nanogels Produced by Microfluidics-Facilitated Self-Assembly Improves the Safety Profile of the Cationic Host Defense Peptide Novicidin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Water, Jorrit J; Kim, YongTae; Maltesen, Morten J

    2015-01-01

    have hampered their commercial development. To overcome these challenges a novel nanogel-based drug delivery system was designed. METHOD: The peptide novicidin was self-assembled with an octenyl succinic anhydride-modified analogue of hyaluronic acid, and this formulation was optimized using...... peptide loading of 36 ± 4%. The nanogels exhibited good colloidal stability under different ionic strength conditions and allowed complete release of the peptide over 14 days. Furthermore, self-assembly of novicidin with hyaluronic acid into nanogels significantly improved the safety profile at least five...

  9. Heterologous expressed toxic and non-toxic peptide variants of toxin CssII are capable to produce neutralizing antibodies against the venom of the scorpion Centruroides suffusus suffusus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Salgado, Kenya; Estrada, Georgina; Olvera, Alejandro; Coronas, Fredy I; Possani, Lourival D; Corzo, Gerardo

    2009-08-15

    Two toxic and one non-toxic recombinant peptide variants of the mammalian neurotoxin CssII was cloned into the expression vector pQE30 containing a 6His-tag and a Factor Xa proteolytic cleavage site. The toxic recombinant peptides rCssII, HisrCssII and the non-toxic rCssIIE15R were expressed under induction with isopropyl thiogalactoside (IPTG), isolated using chromatographic techniques and folded correctly in vitro. The three recombinant variants showed similar secondary structures as the native CssII, but only the rCssIIE15R was not toxic to mice at concentrations up to 30microg/20g mouse body weight when injected intraperitoneally. All three recombinant peptides were capable of displacing the native CssII from their receptor sites in rat brain synaptosomes, suggesting that they had similar structural and functional characteristics of the native peptides. The three recombinant variants of CssII and the native one were used as antigens for immunization of New Zealand rabbits. The antibodies present in the rabbit antisera were able to recognize the native CssII. Additionally and more importantly, the sera of the immunized rabbits were able to neutralize both the native toxin CssII and the whole soluble venom of the scorpion Centruroides suffusus suffusus. These results indicate that the recombinant peptides can be used to produce antidotes against the venom of this species of scorpion.

  10. Isolation and characterization of marine Brevibacillus sp. S-1 collected from South China Sea and a novel antitumor peptide produced by the strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanhong Zheng

    Full Text Available A Gram-positive, rod-shaped bacterium, designated as S-1, was isolated from a marine sediment sample collected from South China Sea. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that S-1 belongs to the genus Brevibacillus. A novel cytotoxic peptide was isolated from the fermentation broth of the marine-derived bacterium Brevibacillus sp. S-1, using ion-exchange chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC chromatography. The molecular weight of this peptide was determined as 1570 Da by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and its structure was proposed as a cyclic peptide elucidated by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry and de novo sequencing. 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay showed that this peptide exhibited cytotoxicity against BEL-7402 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells, RKO human colon carcinoma cells, A549 human lung carcinoma cells, U251 human glioma cells and MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cells. Additionally, SBP exhibited low cytotoxicity against HFL1 human normal fibroblast lung cells. The result suggested that the cytotoxic effect of the peptide is specific to tumor cells.

  11. Detachable strong cation exchange monolith, integrated with capillary zone electrophoresis and coupled with pH gradient elution, produces improved sensitivity and numbers of peptide identifications during bottom-up analysis of complex proteomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenbin; Yan, Xiaojing; Sun, Liangliang; Zhu, Guijie; Dovichi, Norman J

    2015-04-21

    A detachable sulfonate-silica hybrid strong cation-exchange monolith was synthesized in a fused silica capillary, and used for solid phase extraction with online pH gradient elution during capillary zone electrophoresis-tandem mass spectrometry (CZE-MS/MS) proteomic analysis. Tryptic digests were prepared in 50 mM formic acid and loaded onto the strong cation-exchange monolith. Fractions were eluted using a series of buffers with lower concentration but higher pH values than the 50 mM formic acid background electrolyte. This combination of elution and background electrolytes results in both sample stacking and formation of a dynamic pH junction and allows use of relatively large elution buffer volumes while maintaining reasonable peak efficiency and resolution. A series of five pH bumps were applied to elute E. coli tryptic peptides from the monolith, followed by analysis using CZE coupled to an LTQ-Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer; 799 protein groups and 3381 peptides were identified from 50 ng of the digest in a 2.5 h analysis, which approaches the identification rate for this organism that was obtained with an Orbitrap Fusion. We attribute the improved numbers of peptide and protein identifications to the efficient fractionation by the online pH gradient elution, which decreased the complexity of the sample in each elution step and improved the signal intensity of low abundance peptides. We also performed a comparative analysis using a nanoACQUITY UltraPerformance LCH system. Similar numbers of protein and peptide identifications were produced by the two methods. Protein identifications showed significant overlap between the two methods, whereas peptide identifications were complementary.

  12. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis of LI-F type peptides produced by Paenibacillus polymyxa JSa-9 mode of action against Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jinzhi; Gao, Peng; Zhao, Shengming; Bie, Xiaomei; Lu, Zhaoxin; Zhang, Chong; Lv, Fengxia

    2017-01-06

    LI-F type peptides (AMP-jsa9) produced by Paenibacillus polymyxa JSa-9 are a group of cyclic lipodepsipeptide antibiotics that exhibit a broad antimicrobial spectrum against Gram-positive bacteria and filamentous fungi, especially Bacillus cereus and Fusarium moniliforme. In this study, to better understand the antibacterial mechanism of AMP-jsa9 against B. cereus, the ultrastructure of AMP-jsa9-treated B. cereus cells was observed by both atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, and quantitative proteomic analysis was performed on proteins extracted from treated and untreated bacterial cells by using isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling and LC-MS/MS analysis to access differentially expressed proteins. Furthermore, multiple experiments were conducted to validate the results of the proteomic analysis, including determinations of ATP, NAD((+))H, NADP((+))H, reactive oxygen species (ROS), the activities of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and the relative expression of target genes by quantitative real-time PCR. Bacterial cells exposed to AMP-jsa9 showed irregular surfaces with bleb projections and concaves; we hypothesize that AMP-jsa9 penetrated the cell wall and was anchored on the cytoplasmic membrane and that ROS accumulated in the cell membrane after treatment with AMP-jsa9, modulating the bacterial membrane properties and increasing membrane permeability. Consequently, the blebs were formed on the cell wall by the impulsive force of the leakage of intercellular contents. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis detected a total of 1317 proteins, including 176 differentially expressed proteins (75 upregulated (fold >2) and 101 downregulated (fold <0.5)). Based on proteome analysis, the putative pathways of AMP-jsa9 action against B. cereus can be summarized as: (i) inhibition of bacterial sporulation, thiamine biosynthesis, energy metabolism, DNA transcription and translation, and cell wall biosynthesis

  13. Angiotensin-I converting enzyme inhibitory and antioxidant activity of bioactive peptides produced by enzymatic hydrolysis of skin from grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yi, Jierong; De Gobba, Cristian; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2016-01-01

    Grass carp skin pieces were homogenized in water and hydrolyzed by Alcalase®, collagenase, proteinase K, and/or trypsin at their optimum conditions. Samples were taken at various degrees of hydrolysis and were evaluated for antioxidant, antimicrobial, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory...... activities. Alcalase and collagenase completely hydrolyzed the skin with different rates, and released peptides with antioxidant and angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitory activity. These activities increased linearly with increasing degrees of hydrolysis. Subsequent incubation of the collagenase...... hydrolysates with trypsin slightly increased the antioxidant activity. Proteinase K, although only partially hydrolyzing the skin, also catalyzed the release of peptides with antioxidant and angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitory activities. These results show that skin by-products from grass carp can...

  14. Topical peptides as cosmeceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varadraj Vasant Pai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Peptides are known to have diverse biological roles, most prominently as signaling/regulatory molecules in a broad variety of physiological processes including defense, immunity, stress, growth, homeostasis and reproduction. These aspects have been used in the field of dermatology and cosmetology to produce short, stable and synthetic peptides for extracellular matrix synthesis, pigmentation, innate immunity and inflammation. The evolution of peptides over the century, which started with the discovery of penicillin, has now extended to their usage as cosmeceuticals in recent years. Cosmeceutical peptides may act as signal modulators of the extracellular matrix component, as structural peptides, carrier peptides and neurotransmitter function modulators. Transdermal delivery of peptides can be made more effective by penetration enhancers, chemical modification or encapsulation of peptides. The advantages of using peptides as cosmeceuticals include their involvement in many physiological functions of the skin, their selectivity, their lack of immunogenicity and absence of premarket regulatory requirements for their use. However, there are disadvantages: clinical evidence for efficacy is often weak, absorption may be poor due to low lipophilicity, high molecular weight and binding to other ingredients, and prices can be quite high.

  15. Evaluation of the mutagenic activity of leucinostatins, a novel class of antibiotic peptides produced by Paecilomyces marquandii, in the modul Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crebelli, R; Carere, A; Conti, G; Conti, L; Rossi, C; Tuttobello, L

    1988-10-01

    Leucinostatins A, B, C, D, E, G, H, and K were thoroughly investigated for their genotoxic activity using the modul Aspergillus nidulans as the test organism. The results of assays for gene mutation (8-azaguanine resistance and methionine suppressors), gene conversion, mitotic crossing-over and mitotic aneuploidy induction suggest that these peptide antibiotics lack significant mutagenicity and that non-genotoxic mechanism(s) underlie their cytotoxic properties.

  16. Dequenching of Cu(I)-bathocuproine disulfonate complexes for high-performance liquid chromatographic determination of phytochelatins, heavy-metal-binding peptides produced by the primitive red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirabe, Tomoo; Ito, Kyoko; Yoshimura, Etsuro

    2008-12-01

    A novel method has been devised for the determination of phytochelatins (PCs), heavy-metal-tolerant peptides produced by higher plants and algae. The method is based on the facts that fluorescence of bathocuproine disulfonate (BCS) is quenched by Cu(I) ions as a result of Cu(I)-BCS complex formation and that PCs compete with BCS for Cu(I). Detection of PCs via recovered fluorescence of BCS using the Cu(I)-BCS complex as a postcolumn reagent, following separation of peptides on an octyldecylsilane column, demonstrated a highly sensitive method for determination of PCs. PCs in the primitive red alga, Cyanidioschyzon merolae, grown in the presence or absence of added Cd(II) were successfully determined by this protocol. Unlike other methods for the determination of PCs, which rely on the SH groups in the peptides, the proposed method is unique in that detection is based on the chemical nature of PCs, which favors the formation of complexes with Cu(I). In this context, the new method yields chromatograms based on the strength of binding Cu(I) ions.

  17. The cyclochlorotine mycotoxin is produced by the nonribosomal peptide synthetase CctN in Talaromyces islandicus (“Penicillium islandicum”)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schafhauser, Thomas; Kirchner, Norbert; Kulik, Andreas;

    2016-01-01

    Talaromyces islandicus (“Penicillium islandicum”) is a widespread foodborne mold that produces numerous secondary metabolites, among them potent mycotoxins belonging to different chemical classes. A notable metabolite is the hepatotoxic and carcinogenic pentapeptide cyclochlorotine that contains ...

  18. Laserspray ionization, a new atmospheric pressure MALDI method for producing highly charged gas-phase ions of peptides and proteins directly from solid solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimpin, Sarah; Inutan, Ellen D; Herath, Thushani N; McEwen, Charles N

    2010-02-01

    The first example of a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) process producing multiply charged mass spectra nearly identical to those observed with electrospray ionization (ESI) is presented. MALDI is noted for its ability to produce singly charged ions, but in the experiments described here multiply charged ions are produced by laser ablation of analyte incorporated into a common MALDI matrix, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, using standard solvent-based sample preparation protocols. Laser ablation is known to produce matrix clusters in MALDI provided a threshold energy is achieved. We propose that these clusters (liquid droplets) are highly charged, and under conditions that produce sufficient matrix evaporation, ions are field-evaporated from the droplets similarly to ESI. Because of the multiple charging, advanced mass spectrometers with limited mass-to-charge range can be used for protein characterization. Thus, using an Orbitrap mass spectrometer, low femtomole quantities of proteins produce full-range mass spectra at 100,000 mass resolution with <5-ppm mass accuracy and with 1-s acquisition. Furthermore, the first example of protein fragmentation using electron transfer dissociation with MALDI is presented.

  19. Hypoglycemia in a dog with a leiomyoma of the gastric wall producing an insulin-like growth factor II-like peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boari, A; Barreca, A; Bestetti, G E; Minuto, F; Venturoli, M

    1995-06-01

    A 12-year-old mixed-breed male dog was referred to the Clinica Medica Veterinaria of Bologna University for recurrent episodes of seizures due to hypoglycemia with abnormally low plasma insulin levels (18 pmol/l). Resection of a large leiomyoma (780 g) of the gastric wall resulted in a permanent resolution of the hypoglycemic episodes. Insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGF-I and -II) were measured by RIA in serum before and after surgery and in tumor tissue. Results were compared to the serum concentration of 54 normal and to the tissue concentration observed in eight non-hypoglycemic dog gastric wall extracts. Before surgery, circulating immunoreactive IGF-I was 0.92 nmol/l, which is significantly lower than the control values (16.92 +/- 8.44 nmol/l, range 3.53-35.03), while IGF-II was 152 nmol/l, which is significantly higher than the control values (42.21 +/- 3.75, range 31.99-50.74). After surgery, IGF-I increased to 6.80 nmol/l while IGF-II decreased to 45.52 nmol/l. Tumor tissue IGF-II concentration was higher than normal (5.66 nmol/kg tissue as compared to a range in normal gastric wall tissue of 1.14-3.72 nmol/kg), while IGF-I was 0.08 nmol/kg tissue, which is close to the lowest normal value (range in controls, 0.08-1.18 nmol/kg). Partial characterization of IGF-II immunoreactivity extracted from tissue evidenced a molecular weight similar to that of mature IGF-II, thus excluding that peptide released by the tumor is a precursor molecule.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Isolation and identification of lactic acid bacteria produced antimicrobial peptides from Sichuan pickles%泡菜中产抗菌素的乳酸菌筛选和性能鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊华; 张国栋; 宁霞蕊; 任亚妮

    2011-01-01

    主要是对自然发酵泡菜中的乳酸菌素产生菌株分离筛选、鉴定。采用TJA培养基初步筛选9株典型菌株进行抗菌素产生菌的筛选,供试菌为金黄色葡萄球菌(Staphylococcus aureus)、枯草芽孢杆菌(Bacillus subtilis)。通过抑菌实验,综合菌株的形态学特征、生理生化特征,筛选确定了2株细菌素产生菌菌株。%The lactic acid bacteria produced antimicrobial peptides was isolated and identified from Sichuan pickles.Using TJA medium,the 9 typical strains were screened,and the antimicrobial activities were investigated upon Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subti

  1. Bacteriocins produced by wild Lactococcus lactis strains isolated from traditional, starter-free cheeses made of raw milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegría, Angel; Delgado, Susana; Roces, Clara; López, Belén; Mayo, Baltasar

    2010-09-30

    Sixty bacterial strains were encountered by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) typing in a series of 306 Lactococcus lactis isolates collected during the manufacturing and ripening stages of five traditional, starter-free cheeses made from raw milk. Among the 60 strains, 17 were shown to produce bacteriocin-like compounds in both solid and liquid media. At a genotypic level, 16 of the strains were identified by molecular methods as belonging to L. lactis subsp. lactis and one to L. lactis subsp. cremoris. Among the L. lactis subsp. lactis strains, phenotypic and genetic data determined that eleven produced either nisin A (nine strains) or nisin Z (two strains), and that five produced lactococcin 972. Variable levels of the two bacteriocins were produced by different strains. In addition, nisin was shown to be produced in inexpensive, dairy- and meat-based media, which will allow the practical application of its producing strains in industrial processes. Specific PCR and nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence analysis identified the inhibitor produced by the single L. lactis subsp. cremoris isolate as a lactococcin G-like bacteriocin. Beyond the use of bacteriocins as functional ingredients for the biopreservation of foods, the newly identified bacteriocin-producing L. lactis strains from traditional cheeses may also be useful for designing starter cultures with protective properties and/or adjunct cultures for accelerating cheese ripening.

  2. The γ-aminobutyric acid-producing ability under low pH conditions of lactic acid bacteria isolated from traditional fermented foods of Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan, with a strong ability to produce ACE-inhibitory peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin Barla

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Many traditional fermented products are onsumed in Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan, such as kaburazushi, narezushi, konkazuke, and ishiru. Various kinds of lactic acid bacteria (LAB are associated with their fermentation, however, characterization of LAB has not yet been elucidated in detail. In this study, we evaluated 53 isolates of LAB from various traditional fermented foods by taxonomic classification at the species level by analyzing the 16S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA sequences and carbohydrate assimilation abilities. We screened isolates that exhibited high angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory activities in skim milk or soy protein media and produced high γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA concentrations in culture supernatants when grown in de Man Rogosa Sharpe broth in the presence of 1% (w/v glutamic acid. The results revealed that 10 isolates, i.e., Lactobacillus buchneri (2 isolates, Lactobacillus brevis (6 isolates, and Weissella hellenica (2 isolates had a high GABA-producing ability of >500 mg/100 ml after 72 h of incubation at 35 °C. The ACE inhibitory activity of the whey cultured with milk protein by using L. brevis (3 isolates, L. buchneri (2 isolates, and W. hellenica (2 isolates was stronger than that of all whey cultured with soy protein media, and these IC50 were < 1 mg protein/ml. Three of 10 isolates had high GABA-producing activities at pH 3, suggesting that they could be powerful candidates for use in the fermentation of food materials having low pH.

  3. Matrix assisted ionization: new aromatic and nonaromatic matrix compounds producing multiply charged lipid, peptide, and protein ions in the positive and negative mode observed directly from surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Inutan, Ellen D; Wang, Beixi; Lietz, Christopher B; Green, Daniel R; Manly, Cory D; Richards, Alicia L; Marshall, Darrell D; Lingenfelter, Steven; Ren, Yue; Trimpin, Sarah

    2012-10-01

    Matrix assisted inlet ionization (MAII) is a method in which a matrix:analyte mixture produces mass spectra nearly identical to electrospray ionization without the application of a voltage or the use of a laser as is required in laserspray ionization (LSI), a subset of MAII. In MAII, the sample is introduced by, for example, tapping particles of dried matrix:analyte into the inlet of the mass spectrometer and, therefore, permits the study of conditions pertinent to the formation of multiply charged ions without the need of absorption at a laser wavelength. Crucial for the production of highly charged ions are desolvation conditions to remove matrix molecules from charged matrix:analyte clusters. Important factors affecting desolvation include heat, vacuum, collisions with gases and surfaces, and even radio frequency fields. Other parameters affecting multiply charged ion production is sample preparation, including pH and solvent composition. Here, findings from over 100 compounds found to produce multiply charged analyte ions using MAII with the inlet tube set at 450 °C are presented. Of the compounds tested, many have -OH or -NH(2) functionality, but several have neither (e.g., anthracene), nor aromaticity or conjugation. Binary matrices are shown to be applicable for LSI and solvent-free sample preparation can be applied to solubility restricted compounds, and matrix compounds too volatile to allow drying from common solvents. Our findings suggest that the physical properties of the matrix such as its morphology after evaporation of the solvent, its propensity to evaporate/sublime, and its acidity are more important than its structure and functional groups.

  4. Recent advances in solid phase peptide synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    White, P.D.

    2016-01-01

    Since its introduction by Merrifield half a century ago, solid phase peptide synthesis has evolved to become the enabling technology for the development of peptide therapeutics. Using modern methods, 100 - 1000s of peptides can be routinely synthesised in parallel for screening as leads for drug development and peptide APIs are produced in ton scale. In this talk I consider the state of art and report on recent advances to overcome remaining issues such as aspartimide formation, racemisation ...

  5. Occurrence and purification on microcystis species. Chemistry and analysis method for toxic peptides produced by cyanobacteria; Aoko/sono hassei to joka taisaku. Aoko ga seisansuru yudoku pepuchido no kagaku to bunsekiho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, K. [Meijo Univ., Nagoya (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science; Tsuji, K.; Kondo, F.

    1994-09-10

    The phenomena on a cacogenesis of the blue green algae in the lakes subjected to an eutrophication occur frequently at every places in the world, and therefore they become a serious environmental problem. Especially it is known that a part of the blue green algae produces a toxic compounds, and consequently the issues of this kind is made further complicated. One of the blue green algae occurring universally at every place in the world is the microcystis genus, and moreover it often produces the microcystin group which is a peptidic hepatic toxin. Because the microcystin was a strong hepatic toxin, the toxicity testes using the mice have been exclusively executed. However, because the constituents reached up to 50 items, and in addition a toxicity of each element is not necessarily same, it has been considered that a chemical analytical method to perform an accurate separation and a sure detection have been necessary. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is currently the most much used for an analysis of the microcystin. In order to detect the microcystin, the ultraviolet rays (UV) near 240 nm being its absorption maximum are being frequently used. However, a toxicity manifestation mechanism of the microcystin and so forth has not yet been elucidated. 24 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Production and characterization of peptide antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Hansen, Paul Robert; Houen, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are effective immunogens for generation of antibodies. However, occasionally the native protein is known but not available for antibody production. In such cases synthetic peptides derived from the native protein are good alternatives for antibody production. These peptide antibodies...... are powerful tools in experimental biology and are easily produced to any peptide of choice. A widely used approach for production of peptide antibodies is to immunize animals with a synthetic peptide coupled to a carrier protein. Very important is the selection of the synthetic peptide, where factors...... such as structure, accessibility and amino acid composition are crucial. Since small peptides tend not to be immunogenic, it may be necessary to conjugate them to carrier proteins in order to enhance immune presentation. Several strategies for conjugation of peptide-carriers applied for immunization exist...

  7. Production of peptide antisera specific for mouse and rat proinsulin C-peptide 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blume, N; Madsen, O D; Kofod, Hans;

    1990-01-01

    Mice and rats have two functional non-allelic insulin genes. By using a synthetic peptide representing a common sequence in mouse and rat C-peptide 2 as antigen, we have produced rabbit antisera specific for an epitope which is not present in mouse or rat C-peptide 1. Long-term immunization did n...

  8. Antimicrobial Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Adem Bahar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill “superbugs” emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics.

  9. An evaluation and partial characterization of a bacteriocin produced by Lactococcus lactis subsp lactis ST1 isolated from goat milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parinaz Taheri

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance producing Lactococcus lactis subsp lactis strain, ST1, isolated from goat milk of Iranian origin and with broad spectrum of activity and desirable technical properties was used for evaluating some futures of bacteriocin inhibitory activity. Cell growth and bacteriocin production studies were carried out in MRS medium incubated statically under uncontrolled pH condition. The antibacterial activity presented a primary metabolite pattern and showed a rapid decrease at the stationary phase. Microaerobiosis and capnophily growth conditions resulted in higher bacteriocin production while aerobiosis showed negative effect on both cell growth and bacteriocin production. Bacteriocin production, on the other hand, was favored in MRS broth (pH; 6.5 inoculated with 0.1 ml l-1 fresh culture when incubation was carried out at 30 °C. This indicated that the conditions resulted in higher levels of growth were frequently favoring bacteriocin production by ST1 as well. Decrease in activity, at the stationary growth phase, was much pronounced in favored growth condition. Nutrient depletion, deferent effect of low pH on bacteriocin production and/or protein degradation seemed more responsible for this phenomenon. The study also provided further data on new method for bacteriocin release from the cell wall of producer. It was clearly shown that both heating and ultrasound shock for 5 min at pH 2 could increase bacteriocin activity significantly. The release was more pronounced in the presence of 0.5% Tween80.

  10. Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrzad Sadredinamin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are extensive group of molecules that produced by variety tissues of invertebrate, plants, and animal species which play an important role in their immunity response. AMPs have different classifications such as; biosynthetic machines, biological sources, biological functions, molecular properties, covalent bonding patterns, three dimensional structures, and molecular targets.These molecules have multidimensional properties including antimicrobial activity, antiviral activity, antifungal activity, anti-parasite activity, biofilm control, antitumor activity, mitogens activity and linking innate to adaptive immunity that making them promising agents for therapeutic drugs. In spite of this advantage of AMPs, their clinical developments have some limitation for commercial development. But some of AMPs are under clinical trials for the therapeutic purpose such as diabetic foot ulcers, different bacterial infections and tissue damage. In this review, we emphasized on the source, structure, multidimensional properties, limitation and therapeutic applications of various antimicrobial peptides.

  11. Peptide arrays for screening cancer specific peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sahar; Mathews, Anu Stella; Byeon, Nara; Lavasanifar, Afsaneh; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2010-09-15

    In this paper, we describe a novel method to screen peptides for specific recognition by cancer cells. Seventy peptides were synthesized on a cellulose membrane in an array format, and a direct method to study the peptide-whole cell interaction was developed. The relative binding affinity of the cells for different peptides with respect to a lead 12-mer p160 peptide, identified by phage display, was evaluated using the CyQUANT fluorescence of the bound cells. Screening allowed identification of at least five new peptides that displayed higher affinity (up to 3-fold) for MDA-MB-435 and MCF-7 human cancer cells compared to the p160 peptide. These peptides showed very little binding to the control (noncancerous) human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Three of these peptides were synthesized separately and labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to study their uptake and interaction with the cancer and control cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry. The results confirmed the high and specific affinity of an 11-mer peptide 11 (RGDPAYQGRFL) and a 10-mer peptide 18 (WXEAAYQRFL) for the cancer cells versus HUVECs. Peptide 11 binds different receptors on target cancer cells as its sequence contains multiple recognition motifs, whereas peptide 18 binds mainly to the putative p160 receptor. The peptide array-whole cell binding assay reported here is a complementary method to phage display for further screening and optimization of cancer targeting peptides for cancer therapy and diagnosis.

  12. Antimicrobial Peptides, Infections and the Skin Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Maja-Lisa; Agner, Tove

    2016-01-01

    The skin serves as a strong barrier protecting us from invading pathogens and harmful organisms. An important part of this barrier comes from antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which are small peptides expressed abundantly in the skin. AMPs are produced in the deeper layers of the epidermis...

  13. Localization of an O-glycosylated site in the recombinant barley alpha-amylase 1 produced in yeast and correction of the amino acid sequence using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of peptide mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens S.; Søgaard, M; Svensson, B

    1994-01-01

    , and analyzed directly by MALDI-MS. Based on the three mass spectrometric peptide maps, an error in the sequence deduced from cDNA, resulting in a mass difference of 28 Da, was located to a sequence stretch of 5 amino acid residues; furthermore, a dihexose substituent was identified on Thr410. Subsequent Edman...

  14. Inhibition of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica on spinach and identification of antimicrobial substances produced by a commercial Lactic Acid Bacteria food safety intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cálix-Lara, Thelma F; Rajendran, Mahitha; Talcott, Stephen T; Smith, Stephen B; Miller, Rhonda K; Castillo, Alejandro; Sturino, Joseph M; Taylor, T Matthew

    2014-04-01

    The microbiological safety of fresh produce is of concern for the U.S. food supply. Members of the Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) have been reported to antagonize pathogens by competing for nutrients and by secretion of substances with antimicrobial activity, including organic acids, peroxides, and antimicrobial polypeptides. The objectives of this research were to: (i) determine the capacity of a commercial LAB food antimicrobial to inhibit Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica on spinach leaf surfaces, and (ii) identify antimicrobial substances produced in vitro by the LAB comprising the food antimicrobial. Pathogens were inoculated on freshly harvested spinach, followed by application of the LAB antimicrobial. Treated spinach was aerobically incubated up to 12 days at 7 °C and surviving pathogens enumerated via selective/differential plating. l-Lactic acid and a bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance (BLIS) were detected and quantified from cell-free fermentates obtained from LAB-inoculated liquid microbiological medium. Application of 8.0 log10 CFU/g LAB produced significant (p antimicrobial inhibited foodborne pathogens on spinach during refrigerated storage, likely the result of the production of metabolites with antimicrobial activity.

  15. Bioactive Peptides in Milk and Dairy Products: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Young Woo; Nam, Myoung Soo

    2015-01-01

    Functionally and physiologically active peptides are produced from several food proteins during gastrointestinal digestion and fermentation of food materials with lactic acid bacteria. Once bioactive peptides (BPs) are liberated, they exhibit a wide variety of physiological functions in the human body such as gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, immune, endocrine, and nervous systems. These functionalities of the peptides in human health and physiology include antihypertensive, antimicrobial, an...

  16. Collagen-like peptides and peptide-polymer conjugates in the design of assembled materials

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Tianzhi; Kiick, Kristi L.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in mammals, and there has been long-standing interest in understanding and controlling collagen assembly in the design of new materials. Collagen-like peptides (CLP), also known as collagen-mimetic peptides (CMP) or collagen-related peptides (CRP), have thus been widely used to elucidate collagen triple helix structure as well as to produce higher-order structures that mimic natural collagen fibers. This mini-review provides an overview of recent progress...

  17. Antimicrobial activity of bacteriocin-producing lactic acid bacteria isolated from cheeses and yogurts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The biopreservation of foods using bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated directly from foods is an innovative approach. The objectives of this study were to isolate and identify bacteriocinogenic LAB from various cheeses and yogurts and evaluate their antimicrobial effects on selected spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms in vitro as well as on a food commodity. LAB were isolated using MRS and M17 media. The agar diffusion bioassay was used to screen for bacteriocin or bacteriocin-like substances (BLS) producing LAB using Lactobacillus sakei and Listeria innocua as indicator organisms. Out of 138 LAB isolates, 28 were found to inhibit these bacteria and were identified as strains of Enterococcus faecium, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus sakei subsp. sakei using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Eight isolates were tested for antimicrobial activity at 5°C and 20°C against L. innocua, Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Erwinia carotovora, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides using the agar diffusion bioassay, and also against Penicillium expansum, Botrytis cinerea and Monilinia frucitcola using the microdilution plate method. The effect of selected LAB strains on L. innocua inoculated onto fresh-cut onions was also investigated. Twenty percent of our isolates produced BLS inhibiting the growth of L. innocua and/or Lact. sakei. Organic acids and/or H2O2 produced by LAB and not the BLS had strong antimicrobial effects on all microorganisms tested with the exception of E. coli. Ent. faecium, Strep. thermophilus and Lact. casei effectively inhibited the growth of natural microflora and L. innocua inoculated onto fresh-cut onions. Bacteriocinogenic LAB present in cheeses and yogurts may have potential to be used as biopreservatives in foods. PMID:22963659

  18. Human peptide transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen;

    2002-01-01

    Peptide transporters are epithelial solute carriers. Their functional role has been characterised in the small intestine and proximal tubules, where they are involved in absorption of dietary peptides and peptide reabsorption, respectively. Currently, two peptide transporters, PepT1 and PepT2...

  19. Separation, Purification and Biological Activity Detection of Antibacterial Peptide Produced by Streptococcus lactis%乳酸链球菌抗菌肽的分离纯化及生物活性检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    盛博文; 杨海君; 关向杰

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to separate and purify the Streptococcus lactis -antimicrobial peptides which had wide antimicrobial properties by gel filtration chromatography and HPLC. Staphyiococcus aureus (ATCC25923), Escherkkia coli (ATCC25922), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilh, Yersinia and Enterococcw fat calls were used to research the bactericidal mechanism and antibacterial spectrum of the Streptococcus lactis -antimicrobial peptide . The results showed that a species of Streptococcus /aeas-antimicrobial peptides which had killing effects on all bacterial cells except Pseudomonas aerugiiwsa was obtained by separation and purification. The microporous structure of Staphyiococcus aureus (ATCC25923) was observed by transmission electron microscopy when Ihe Streptococcus lactis -antimicrobial peptide was added. The transmission electron microscopy results showed that the Streptococcus lactis -antimicrobial peptide caused the Staphyiococcus aureus (ATCC25923) cells broken, swelling and leakage .accompanied cytoplasmic diluted, cell membrane boundaries blurred or even completely dissolved, and made them apoptosis ultimately.%通过凝胶过滤层析及制备型高效液相色谱法,从乳酸链球菌发酵液中筛选分离出了具有广谱抗菌活性的物质,利用金黄色葡萄球菌( ATCC25923)、大肠杆菌(ATCC25922)、绿脓杆菌、枯草芽孢杆菌、耶尔森菌.粪肠球菌对该活性物质的抗菌谱及杀菌机理进行了研究.结果表明:经过分离纯化,得到的较纯的活性物质为乳酸链球抗菌肽,该物质除了对绿脓杆菌没有杀伤作用, 对其他5种细菌均具有杀伤作用.透射电镜观察结果显示,金黄色葡萄球菌(ATCC25923)经抗菌肽处理后,细胞出现破损或肿胀,有部分细胞内容物外泄,并伴有细胞质稀释的现象,细胞膜界限模糊不清,细胞膜甚至完全溶解.由于细胞内容物外渗,最终导致菌体死亡.

  20. Automated solid-phase peptide synthesis to obtain therapeutic peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Mäde

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The great versatility and the inherent high affinities of peptides for their respective targets have led to tremendous progress for therapeutic applications in the last years. In order to increase the drugability of these frequently unstable and rapidly cleared molecules, chemical modifications are of great interest. Automated solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS offers a suitable technology to produce chemically engineered peptides. This review concentrates on the application of SPPS by Fmoc/t-Bu protecting-group strategy, which is most commonly used. Critical issues and suggestions for the synthesis are covered. The development of automated methods from conventional to essentially improved microwave-assisted instruments is discussed. In order to improve pharmacokinetic properties of peptides, lipidation and PEGylation are described as covalent conjugation methods, which can be applied by a combination of automated and manual synthesis approaches. The synthesis and application of SPPS is described for neuropeptide Y receptor analogs as an example for bioactive hormones. The applied strategies represent innovative and potent methods for the development of novel peptide drug candidates that can be manufactured with optimized automated synthesis technologies.

  1. Effect of antimicrobial peptide APNT-6 produced by Bacillus natto on fresh-keeping of Litopenaeus vannamei at low temperature%纳豆菌抗菌肽APNT-6对凡纳滨对虾的低温保鲜效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王东; 孙力军; 王雅玲; 刘唤明; 徐德峰; 邓楚津; 杜焕妍; 励建荣

    2012-01-01

    A new biological preservative—antimicrobial peptide APNT-6 produced by Bacillus natto NT-6 and purified by column chromatography will be applied in the fresh-keeping of Litopenaeus vannamei. Bacillus antimicrobial peptides are a series of lipopeptides substances produced by represented Bacillus strains of B. subtilis, B. amyloliquefaciens and B. natto, which include surfactin, iturin, fengycin, subtilin and so on. Numerous studies show that Bacillus antimicrobial peptides have a startling range of antimicrobial activities that can include action against most Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, fungi, enveloped viruses, and eukaryotic parasites. Recently, our research group isolated a highly antibiotic activity and largely antimicrobial spectrum strain—B. natto NT-6 from the Chinese traditional food—lobster sauce. According to the mass spectrometry (ESI /MS /CID) analysis,we know the mainly antimicrobial substances produced by this strain is Bacillus antimicrobial peptides, mainly including surfactin, fengycin, and iturin(called after APNT-6). Through oral acute toxicity in mice we found that its LDso greater than 5000 mg/kg body weight, indicating that antimicrobial peptide APNT-6 has high food safety. In this paper, the antibacterial activities of antimicrobial peptide on spoilage organisms were determined by Oxford cup assay. Then the quality changes of L vannamei during storage at (4±1) ℃ were investigated, including the pH, total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N), aerobic plate count (APC) and sensory assessment. The results showed that antimicrobial peptide APNT-6 can effectively inhibit 8 strains of spoilage organisms isolated from L. vannamei. During storage at (4±1) ℃, with the extension of storage time, the gradually increasing values of pH, TVB-N and APC of L.vannamei were observed during the 7 days storage. However, incubated 0.5 mg/mL antimicrobial peptide can effectively slow down the value increasing, which extends the shelf-life of L

  2. Peptide hormones and lipopeptides: from self-assembly to therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, J A; Burholt, S; Hamley, I W

    2017-02-01

    This review describes the properties and activities of lipopeptides and peptide hormones and how the lipidation of peptide hormones could potentially produce therapeutic agents combating some of the most prevalent diseases and conditions. The self-assembly of these types of molecules is outlined, and how this can impact on bioactivity. Peptide hormones specific to the uptake of food and produced in the gastrointestinal tract are discussed in detail. The advantages of lipidated peptide hormones over natural peptide hormones are summarised, in terms of stability and renal clearance, with potential application as therapeutic agents. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Peptide Science published by European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Transfer, composition and technological characterization of the lactic acid bacterial populations of the wooden vats used to produce traditional stretched cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scatassa, Maria Luisa; Gaglio, Raimondo; Macaluso, Giusi; Francesca, Nicola; Randazzo, Walter; Cardamone, Cinzia; Di Grigoli, Antonino; Moschetti, Giancarlo; Settanni, Luca

    2015-12-01

    The biofilms of 12 wooden vats used for the production of the traditional stretched cheeses Caciocavallo Palermitano and PDO Vastedda della valle del Belìce were investigated. Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes were never detected. Total coliforms were at low numbers with Escherichia coli found only in three vats. Coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS) were below the enumeration limit, whereas lactic acid bacteria (LAB) dominated the surfaces of all vats. In general, the dominance was showed by coccus LAB. Enterococci were estimated at high numbers, but usually between 1 and 2 Log cycles lower than other LAB. LAB populations were investigated at species and strain level and for their technological properties relevant in cheese production. Eighty-five strains were analysed by a polyphasic genetic approach and allotted into 16 species within the genera Enterococcus, Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus and Streptococcus. Enterococcus faecium was found in all wooden vats and the species most frequently isolated were Enterococcus faecalis, Lactococcus lactis, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Pediococcus acidilactici and Streptococcus thermophilus. The study of the quantitative data on acidification rate, autolysis kinetics, diacetyl production, antibacterial compound generation and proteolysis by cluster and principal component analysis led to the identification of some strains with promising dairy characteristics. Interestingly, a consistent percentage of LAB was bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLIS) producer. Thus, the microbial biofilms of the wooden vats analysed in this study might contribute actively to the stability of the final cheeses.

  4. The inhibitory spectrum of thermophilin 9 from Streptococcus thermophilus LMD-9 depends on the production of multiple peptides and the activity of BlpG(St), a thiol-disulfide oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Laetitia; Hols, Pascal

    2008-02-01

    The blp(St) cluster of Streptococcus thermophilus LMD-9 was recently shown to contain all the genetic information required for the production of bacteriocins active against other S. thermophilus strains. In this study, we further investigated the antimicrobial activity of S. thermophilus LMD-9 by testing the susceptibility of 31 bacterial species (87 strains). We showed that LMD-9 displays an inhibitory spectrum targeted toward related gram-positive bacteria, including pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes. Using deletion mutants, we investigated the contribution of the three putative bacteriocin-encoding operons blpD(St)-orf2, blpU(St)-orf3, and blpE(St)-blpF(St) (bac(St) operons) and of the blpG(St) gene, which encodes a putative modification protein, to the inhibitory spectrum and immunity of strain LMD-9. Our results present evidence that the blp(St) locus encodes a multipeptide bacteriocin system called thermophilin 9. Among the four class II bacteriocin-like peptides encoded within the bac(St) operons, BlpD(St) alone was sufficient to inhibit the growth of most thermophilin 9-sensitive species. The blpD(St) gene forms an operon with its associated immunity gene(s), and this functional bacteriocin/immunity module could easily be transferred to Lactococcus lactis. The remaining three Bac(St) peptides, BlpU(St), BlpE(St), and BlpF(St), confer poor antimicrobial activity but act as enhancers of the antagonistic activity of thermophilin 9 by an unknown mechanism. The blpG(St) gene was also shown to be specifically required for the antilisteria activity of thermophilin 9, since its deletion abolished the sensitivities of most Listeria species. By complementation of the motility deficiency of Escherichia coli dsbA, we showed that blpG(St) encodes a functional thiol-disulfide oxidase, suggesting an important role for disulfide bridges within thermophilin 9.

  5. Biologically Active and Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos E. Salas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive peptides are part of an innate response elicited by most living forms. In plants, they are produced ubiquitously in roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves, highlighting their physiological importance. While most of the bioactive peptides produced in plants possess microbicide properties, there is evidence that they are also involved in cellular signaling. Structurally, there is an overall similarity when comparing them with those derived from animal or insect sources. The biological action of bioactive peptides initiates with the binding to the target membrane followed in most cases by membrane permeabilization and rupture. Here we present an overview of what is currently known about bioactive peptides from plants, focusing on their antimicrobial activity and their role in the plant signaling network and offering perspectives on their potential application.

  6. Oral administration of a fusion protein between the cholera toxin B subunit and the 42-amino acid isoform of amyloid-β peptide produced in silkworm pupae protects against Alzheimer's disease in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si Li

    Full Text Available A key molecule in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD is a 42-amino acid isoform of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ42, which is the most toxic element of senile plaques. In this study, to develop an edible, safe, low-cost vaccine for AD, a cholera toxin B subunit (CTB-Aβ42 fusion protein was successfully expressed in silkworm pupae. We tested the silkworm pupae-derived oral vaccination containing CTB-Aβ42 in a transgenic mouse model of AD. Anti-Aβ42 antibodies were induced in these mice, leading to a decreased Aβ deposition in the brain. We also found that the oral administration of the silk worm pupae vaccine improved the memory and cognition of mice, as assessed using a water maze test. These results suggest that the new edible CTB-Aβ42 silkworm pupae-derived vaccine has potential clinical application in the prevention of AD.

  7. PeptideAtlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — PeptideAtlas is a multi-organism, publicly accessible compendium of peptides identified in a large set of tandem mass spectrometry proteomics experiments. Mass...

  8. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms.

  9. Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  10. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  11. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  12. Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  13. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  14. CART peptide in the nucleus accumbens regulates psychostimulants: Correlations between psychostimulant and CART peptide effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Job, Martin O; Kuhar, Michael J

    2017-02-16

    In this study, we reexamined the effect of Cocaine-and-Amphetamine-Regulated-Transcript (CART) peptide on psychostimulant (PS)-induced locomotor activity (LMA) in individual rats. The Methods utilized were as previously published. The PS-induced LMA was defined as the distance traveled after PS administration (intraperitoneal), and the CART peptide effect was defined as the change in the PS-induced activity after bilateral intra-NAc administration of CART peptide. The experiments included both male and female Sprague-Dawley rats, and varying the CART peptide dose and the PS dose. While the average effect of CART peptide was to inhibit PS-induced LMA, the effect of CART peptide on individual PS-treated animals was not always inhibitory and sometimes even produced an increase or no change in PS-induced LMA. Upon further analysis, we observed a linear correlation, reported for the first time, between the magnitude of PS-induced LMA and the CART peptide effect. Because CART peptide inhibits PS-induced LMA when it is large, and increases PS-induced LMA when it is small, the peptide can be considered a homeostatic regulator of dopamine (DA)-induced LMA, which supports our earlier homeostatic hypothesis.

  15. Evolution of Antimicrobial Peptides to Self-Assembled Peptides for Biomaterial Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice P. McCloskey

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Biomaterial-related infections are a persistent burden on patient health, recovery, mortality and healthcare budgets. Self-assembled antimicrobial peptides have evolved from the area of antimicrobial peptides. Peptides serve as important weapons in nature, and increasingly medicine, for combating microbial infection and biofilms. Self-assembled peptides harness a “bottom-up” approach, whereby the primary peptide sequence may be modified with natural and unnatural amino acids to produce an inherently antimicrobial hydrogel. Gelation may be tailored to occur in the presence of physiological and infective indicators (e.g. pH, enzymes and therefore allow local, targeted antimicrobial therapy at the site of infection. Peptides demonstrate inherent biocompatibility, antimicrobial activity, biodegradability and numerous functional groups. They are therefore prime candidates for the production of polymeric molecules that have the potential to be conjugated to biomaterials with precision. Non-native chemistries and functional groups are easily incorporated into the peptide backbone allowing peptide hydrogels to be tailored to specific functional requirements. This article reviews an area of increasing interest, namely self-assembled peptides and their potential therapeutic applications as innovative hydrogels and biomaterials in the prevention of biofilm-related infection.

  16. A member of the cathelicidin family of antimicrobial peptides is produced in the upper airway of the chinchilla and its mRNA expression is altered by common viral and bacterial co-pathogens of otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivary, Glen; Ray, William C; Bevins, Charles L; Munson, Robert S; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2007-03-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a component of the innate immune system, play a major role in defense of mucosal surfaces against a wide spectrum of microorganisms such as viral and bacterial co-pathogens of the polymicrobial disease otitis media (OM). To further understand the role of AMPs in OM, we cloned a cDNA encoding a cathelicidin homolog (cCRAMP) from upper respiratory tract (URT) mucosae of the chinchilla, the predominant host used to model experimental OM. Recombinant cCRAMP exhibited alpha-helical secondary structure and killed the three main bacterial pathogens of OM. In situ hybridization showed cCRAMP mRNA production in epithelium of the chinchilla Eustachian tube and RT-PCR was used to amplify cCRAMP mRNA from several other tissues of the chinchilla URT. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of chinchilla middle ear epithelial cells (CMEEs) incubated with either viral (influenza A virus, adenovirus, or RSV) or bacterial (nontypeable H. influenzae, M. catarrhalis, or S. pneumoniae) pathogens associated with OM demonstrated distinct microbe-specific patterns of altered expression. Collectively, these data showed that viruses and bacteria modulate AMP messages in the URT, which likely contributes to the disease course of OM.

  17. Bicyclic Peptide Inhibitor of Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roodbeen, Renée; Paaske, Berit; Jiang, Longguang;

    2013-01-01

    The development of protease inhibitors for pharmacological intervention has taken a new turn with the use of peptidebased inhibitors. Here, we report the rational design of bicyclic peptide inhibitors of the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), based on the established...... monocyclic peptide, upain-2. It was successfully converted to a bicyclic peptide, without loss of inhibitory properties. The aim was to produce a peptide cyclised by an amide bond with an additional stabilising across-the-ring covalent bond. We expected this bicyclic peptide to exhibit a lower entropic...... burden upon binding. Two bicyclic peptides were synthesised with affinities similar to that of upain-2, and their binding energetics were evaluated by isothermal titration calorimetry. Indeed, compared to upain-2, the bicyclic peptides showed reduced loss of entropy upon binding to uPA. We also...

  18. Polymer-Peptide Nanoparticles: Synthesis and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, He; Shu, Jessica Y.; Xu, Ting

    2010-03-01

    Conjugation of synthetic polymers to peptides offers an efficient way to produce novel supramolecular structures. Herein, we report an attempt to prepare synthetic micellar nanoparticles using amphiphilic peptide-polymer conjugates as molecular building blocks. Spherical nanoparticles were formed upon dissolution of peptides in PBS buffer through the segregation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments. Both molecular and nano- structures were thoroughly investigated by a variety of biophysical techniques, including circular dichroism (CD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), size exclusion chromatography (SEC), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The results demonstrate that structural properties of these biohybrid materials depend on both the geometry of the hydrophobic domain and the size of synthetic polymers. Given the diversity of functional peptide sequences, hydrophilic polymers and hydrophobic moieties, these materials would be expected to self-assemble into various types of nanostructures to cover a wide range of biological applications.

  19. Exploring the chemical space of quorum sensing peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynendaele, Evelien; Gevaert, Bert; Stalmans, Sofie; Verbeke, Frederick; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2015-09-01

    Quorum sensing peptides are signalling molecules that are produced by mainly gram-positive bacteria. These peptides can exert different effects, ranging from intra- and interspecies bacterial virulence to bacterial-host interactions. To better comprehend these functional differences, we explored their chemical space, bacterial species distribution and receptor-binding properties using multivariate data analyses, with information obtained from the Quorumpeps database. The quorum sensing peptides can be categorized into three main clusters, which, in turn, can be divided into several subclusters: the classification is based on characteristic chemical properties, including peptide size/compactness, hydrophilicity/lipophilicity, cyclization and the presence of (unnatural) S-containing and aromatic amino acids. Most of the bacterial species synthesize peptides located into one cluster. However, some Streptococcus, Stapylococcus, Clostridium, Bacillus and Lactobacillus species produce peptides that are distributed over more than one cluster, with the quorum sensing peptides of Bacillus subtilis even occupying the total peptide space. The AgrC, FsrC and LamC receptors are only activated by cyclic (thio)lacton or lactam quorum sensing peptides, while the lipophilic isoprenyl-modified peptides solely bind the ComP receptor in Bacillus species.

  20. Towards Identify Selective Antibacterial Peptides Based on Abstracts Meaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana I. Barbosa-Santillán

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an Identify Selective Antibacterial Peptides (ISAP approach based on abstracts meaning. Laboratories and researchers have significantly increased the report of their discoveries related to antibacterial peptides in primary publications. It is important to find antibacterial peptides that have been reported in primary publications because they can produce antibiotics of different generations that attack and destroy the bacteria. Unfortunately, researchers used heterogeneous forms of natural language to describe their discoveries (sometimes without the sequence of the peptides. Thus, we propose that learning the words meaning instead of the antibacterial peptides sequence is possible to identify and predict antibacterial peptides reported in the PubMed engine. The ISAP approach consists of two stages: training and discovering. ISAP founds that the 35% of the abstracts sample had antibacterial peptides and we tested in the updated Antimicrobial Peptide Database 2 (APD2. ISAP predicted that 45% of the abstracts had antibacterial peptides. That is, ISAP found that 810 antibacterial peptides were not classified like that, so they are not reported in APD2. As a result, this new search tool would complement the APD2 with a set of peptides that are candidates to be antibacterial. Finally, 20% of the abstracts were not semantic related to APD2.

  1. Towards Identify Selective Antibacterial Peptides Based on Abstracts Meaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa-Santillán, Liliana I.; Sánchez-Escobar, Juan J.; Calixto-Romo, M. Angeles; Barbosa-Santillán, Luis F.

    2016-01-01

    We present an Identify Selective Antibacterial Peptides (ISAP) approach based on abstracts meaning. Laboratories and researchers have significantly increased the report of their discoveries related to antibacterial peptides in primary publications. It is important to find antibacterial peptides that have been reported in primary publications because they can produce antibiotics of different generations that attack and destroy the bacteria. Unfortunately, researchers used heterogeneous forms of natural language to describe their discoveries (sometimes without the sequence of the peptides). Thus, we propose that learning the words meaning instead of the antibacterial peptides sequence is possible to identify and predict antibacterial peptides reported in the PubMed engine. The ISAP approach consists of two stages: training and discovering. ISAP founds that the 35% of the abstracts sample had antibacterial peptides and we tested in the updated Antimicrobial Peptide Database 2 (APD2). ISAP predicted that 45% of the abstracts had antibacterial peptides. That is, ISAP found that 810 antibacterial peptides were not classified like that, so they are not reported in APD2. As a result, this new search tool would complement the APD2 with a set of peptides that are candidates to be antibacterial. Finally, 20% of the abstracts were not semantic related to APD2. PMID:27366202

  2. Selection of milk-source Lactic acid bacteria producing antimicrobial peptides and cultivation for antimicrobial activity%产抗菌肽乳源乳酸菌的筛选及定向培养

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔彬; 高学军; 潘洪宝; 于微; 尹德云

    2012-01-01

    In order to obtain metabolism control methods for high expression of antimicrobial peptides of lactic acid bacteria.In this experiment, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. Bulgaricus etc. seven kinds of lactic acid bacteria were isolated and identified and cultured for antimicrobial activities. Excluding the interference of organic acids and hydrogen peroxide, the high antibacterial activities of these lactic acid bacteria were selected. The fermentation supernatant of these two kinds of lactic acid bacteria lost antimicrobial activity in the presence of trypsin. The fermentation supernatant of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus casei had inhibitory spectrum against Staphylococcus aureus and E.coli. After the series of target cultivation , the antibacterial diameter of Lactobacillus acidophilus was (23.53±0.06)mm, while without the target cultivation Lactobacillus acidophilus antibacterial diameter was (11. 63±0.15)mm, the antibacterial activity rised by 102%. After target cultivation, antibacterial diameter of Lactobacillus casei was (21. 27±0.25)mm, while without target cultivation the antibacterial diameter of Lactobacillus casei was (12. 50±0.10)mm, antimicrobial activity rised by 70.2%.%为了获得乳酸菌高效表达抗菌肽的代谢调控方法,对德氏乳杆菌保加利亚亚种等7种乳酸菌进行了产抗菌肽能力的筛选和定向培养.筛选出具有较高抑菌活性的菌株嗜酸乳杆菌和干酪乳杆菌,它们产生的抑菌物质经排除酸、过氧化氢后,仍具有抑菌活性,然而经蛋白酶处理后其抑菌活性明显下降.结果表明,两种菌发酵上清液对金黄色葡萄球菌和大肠杆菌均有抑制作用.经一系列定向培养嗜酸乳杆菌抑菌直径达到(23.53±0.06)mm,与未经定向培养的抑菌直径(11.63±0.15)mm相比抑菌活性提高了102%;经定向培养的干酪乳杆菌抑菌直径达到(21.27±0.25)mm,与未经定向培养的抑菌直径(12.50±0.10)mm相比抑

  3. Peptides and proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachovchin, W.W.; Unkefer, C.J.

    1994-12-01

    Advances in magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopy make it possible to derive detailed structural information about biomolecular structures in solution. These techniques are critically dependent on the availability of labeled compounds. For example, NMR techniques used today to derive peptide and protein structures require uniformity {sup 13}C-and {sup 15}N-labeled samples that are derived biosynthetically from (U-6-{sup 13}C) glucose. These experiments are possible now because, during the 1970s, the National Stable Isotope Resource developed algal methods for producing (U-6-{sup 13}C) glucose. If NMR techniques are to be used to study larger proteins, we will need sophisticated labelling patterns in amino acids that employ a combination of {sup 2}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N labeling. The availability of these specifically labeled amino acids requires a renewed investment in new methods for chemical synthesis of labeled amino acids. The development of new magnetic resonance or vibrational techniques to elucidate biomolecular structure will be seriously impeded if we do not see rapid progress in labeling technology. Investment in labeling chemistry is as important as investment in the development of advanced spectroscopic tools.

  4. Antimicrobial peptides in crustaceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RD Rosa

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Crustaceans are a large and diverse invertebrate animal group that mounts a complex and efficient innate immune response against a variety of microorganisms. The crustacean immune system is primarily related to cellular responses and the production and release of important immune effectors into the hemolymph. Antimicrobial proteins and/or peptides (AMPs are key components of innate immunity and are widespread in nature, from bacteria to vertebrate animals. In crustaceans, 15 distinct AMP families are currently recognized, although the great majority (14 families comes from members of the order Decapoda. Crustacean AMPs are generally cationic, gene-encoded molecules that are mainly produced by circulating immune-competent cells (hemocytes or are derived from unrelated proteins primarily involved in other biological functions. In this review, we tentatively classified the crustacean AMPs into four main groups based on their amino acid composition, structural features and multi-functionality. We also attempted to summarize the current knowledge on their implication both in an efficient response to microbial infections and in crustacean survival.

  5. Descriptors for antimicrobial peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard

    2011-01-01

    of antimicrobial drugs, and computational methods utilizing molecular descriptors can significantly accelerate the development of new peptide drug candidates. Areas covered: This paper gives a broad overview of peptide and amino-acid scale descriptors available for AMP modeling and highlights which...

  6. PNA Peptide chimerae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, T.; Næsby, M.; Wittung, P.;

    1995-01-01

    Radioactive labelling of PNA has been performed try linking a peptide segment to the PNA which is substrate for protein kinase A. The enzymatic phosphorylation proceeds in almost quantitative yields.......Radioactive labelling of PNA has been performed try linking a peptide segment to the PNA which is substrate for protein kinase A. The enzymatic phosphorylation proceeds in almost quantitative yields....

  7. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands, and generally do so more strongly than the corresponding DNA or RNA strands while exhibiting increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from...

  8. Avian host defense peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuperus, Tryntsje; Coorens, M.; van Dijk, A.; Haagsman, H.P.

    2013-01-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are important effector molecules of the innate immune system of vertebrates. These antimicrobial peptides are also present in invertebrates, plants and fungi. HDPs display broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities and fulfill an important role in the first line of defense

  9. APD: the Antimicrobial Peptide Database

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhe; Wang, Guangshun

    2004-01-01

    An antimicrobial peptide database (APD) has been established based on an extensive literature search. It contains detailed information for 525 peptides (498 antibacterial, 155 antifungal, 28 antiviral and 18 antitumor). APD provides interactive interfaces for peptide query, prediction and design. It also provides statistical data for a select group of or all the peptides in the database. Peptide information can be searched using keywords such as peptide name, ID, length, net charge, hydrophob...

  10. Peptide pheromone signaling in Streptococcus and Enterococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Laura C; Federle, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    Intercellular chemical signaling in bacteria, commonly referred to as quorum sensing (QS), relies on the production and detection of compounds known as pheromones to elicit coordinated responses among members of a community. Pheromones produced by Gram-positive bacteria are comprised of small peptides. Based on both peptide structure and sensory system architectures, Gram-positive bacterial signaling pathways may be classified into one of four groups with a defining hallmark: cyclical peptides of the Agr type, peptides that contain Gly-Gly processing motifs, sensory systems of the RNPP family, or the recently characterized Rgg-like regulatory family. The recent discovery that Rgg family members respond to peptide pheromones increases substantially the number of species in which QS is likely a key regulatory component. These pathways control a variety of fundamental behaviors including conjugation, natural competence for transformation, biofilm development, and virulence factor regulation. Overlapping QS pathways found in multiple species and pathways that utilize conserved peptide pheromones provide opportunities for interspecies communication. Here we review pheromone signaling identified in the genera Enterococcus and Streptococcus, providing examples of all four types of pathways.

  11. Antimicrobial cyclic peptides for plant disease control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Wan; Kim, Beom Seok

    2015-03-01

    Antimicrobial cyclic peptides derived from microbes bind stably with target sites, have a tolerance to hydrolysis by proteases, and a favorable degradability under field conditions, which make them an attractive proposition for use as agricultural fungicides. Antimicrobial cyclic peptides are classified according to the types of bonds within the ring structure; homodetic, heterodetic, and complex cyclic peptides, which in turn reflect diverse physicochemical features. Most antimicrobial cyclic peptides affect the integrity of the cell envelope. This is achieved through direct interaction with the cell membrane or disturbance of the cell wall and membrane component biosynthesis such as chitin, glucan, and sphingolipid. These are specific and selective targets providing reliable activity and safety for non-target organisms. Synthetic cyclic peptides produced through combinatorial chemistry offer an alternative approach to develop antimicrobials for agricultural uses. Those synthesized so far have been studied for antibacterial activity, however, the recent advancements in powerful technologies now promise to provide novel antimicrobial cyclic peptides that are yet to be discovered from natural resources.

  12. Antimicrobial Cyclic Peptides for Plant Disease Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wan Lee

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial cyclic peptides derived from microbes bind stably with target sites, have a tolerance to hydrolysis by proteases, and a favorable degradability under field conditions, which make them an attractive proposition for use as agricultural fungicides. Antimicrobial cyclic peptides are classified according to the types of bonds within the ring structure; homodetic, heterodetic, and complex cyclic peptides, which in turn reflect diverse physicochemical features. Most antimicrobial cyclic peptides affect the integrity of the cell envelope. This is achieved through direct interaction with the cell membrane or disturbance of the cell wall and membrane component biosynthesis such as chitin, glucan, and sphingolipid. These are specific and selective targets providing reliable activity and safety for non-target organisms. Synthetic cyclic peptides produced through combinatorial chemistry offer an alternative approach to develop antimicrobials for agricultural uses. Those synthesized so far have been studied for antibacterial activity, however, the recent advancements in powerful technologies now promise to provide novel antimicrobial cyclic peptides that are yet to be discovered from natural resources.

  13. Chimeric mitochondrial peptides from contiguous regular and swinger RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hervé Seligmann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous mass spectrometry analyses described human mitochondrial peptides entirely translated from swinger RNAs, RNAs where polymerization systematically exchanged nucleotides. Exchanges follow one among 23 bijective transformation rules, nine symmetric exchanges (X ↔ Y, e.g. A ↔ C and fourteen asymmetric exchanges (X → Y → Z → X, e.g. A → C → G → A, multiplying by 24 DNA's protein coding potential. Abrupt switches from regular to swinger polymerization produce chimeric RNAs. Here, human mitochondrial proteomic analyses assuming abrupt switches between regular and swinger transcriptions, detect chimeric peptides, encoded by part regular, part swinger RNA. Contiguous regular- and swinger-encoded residues within single peptides are stronger evidence for translation of swinger RNA than previously detected, entirely swinger-encoded peptides: regular parts are positive controls matched with contiguous swinger parts, increasing confidence in results. Chimeric peptides are 200× rarer than swinger peptides (3/100,000 versus 6/1000. Among 186 peptides with >8 residues for each regular and swinger parts, regular parts of eleven chimeric peptides correspond to six among the thirteen recognized, mitochondrial protein-coding genes. Chimeric peptides matching partly regular proteins are rarer and less expressed than chimeric peptides matching non-coding sequences, suggesting targeted degradation of misfolded proteins. Present results strengthen hypotheses that the short mitogenome encodes far more proteins than hitherto assumed. Entirely swinger-encoded proteins could exist.

  14. Chimeric mitochondrial peptides from contiguous regular and swinger RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Previous mass spectrometry analyses described human mitochondrial peptides entirely translated from swinger RNAs, RNAs where polymerization systematically exchanged nucleotides. Exchanges follow one among 23 bijective transformation rules, nine symmetric exchanges (X ↔ Y, e.g. A ↔ C) and fourteen asymmetric exchanges (X → Y → Z → X, e.g. A → C → G → A), multiplying by 24 DNA's protein coding potential. Abrupt switches from regular to swinger polymerization produce chimeric RNAs. Here, human mitochondrial proteomic analyses assuming abrupt switches between regular and swinger transcriptions, detect chimeric peptides, encoded by part regular, part swinger RNA. Contiguous regular- and swinger-encoded residues within single peptides are stronger evidence for translation of swinger RNA than previously detected, entirely swinger-encoded peptides: regular parts are positive controls matched with contiguous swinger parts, increasing confidence in results. Chimeric peptides are 200 × rarer than swinger peptides (3/100,000 versus 6/1000). Among 186 peptides with > 8 residues for each regular and swinger parts, regular parts of eleven chimeric peptides correspond to six among the thirteen recognized, mitochondrial protein-coding genes. Chimeric peptides matching partly regular proteins are rarer and less expressed than chimeric peptides matching non-coding sequences, suggesting targeted degradation of misfolded proteins. Present results strengthen hypotheses that the short mitogenome encodes far more proteins than hitherto assumed. Entirely swinger-encoded proteins could exist.

  15. Peptide Hormones in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F.

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal hormones are peptides released from endocrine cells and neurons in the digestive tract. More than 30 hormone genes are currently known to be expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, which makes the gut the largest hormone-producing organ in the body. Modern biology makes it feasi...

  16. An introduction to peptide nucleic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, P E; Egholm, M

    1999-01-01

    Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) is a powerful new biomolecular tool with a wide range of important applications. PNA mimics the behaviour of DNA and binds complementary nucleic acid strands. The unique chemical, physical and biological properties of PNA have been exploited to produce powerful...

  17. Preparation of Soy Peptides by Liquid Fermentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiLi; YangXiaoqun; ZhaoMouming; LiangShizhong

    2002-01-01

    Many kinds of microorganism can produce a mount of protease which subsequently hydrolysis the protein of the medium into peptides when they grow in protein containing liquid medium.In the present investigation,the conditions of preparing soybean peptides by liquid fermentation were studied,following results were obtained:(1)SPI is a nice nitrogen source and meanwhile an inducible factor of protease production;its concentration can be as high as 3%-4%.(2)Sucrose is the best carbon source;its concentration is 1%-4%.(3)Under the conditions of 28℃,initial pH6.0,inoculum size 4%,cell age 36hr and fermentation time 24hr-30hr,we can obtain soybean peptides or fermentation liquor with good flavor,its DH reaches 25%-30% and the yield rate can be as high as 75%.(4)Mass spectrograph indicate the MW of the fermentation liquid or the soybean peptides mainly distribute at about 4000Dal,these imply a promising prospect of industrial application of submerged fermentation in producing soybean peptides.

  18. Identification of NCAM-binding peptides promoting neurite outgrowth via a heterotrimeric G-protein-coupled pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Raino Kristian; Christensen, Claus; Korshunova, Irina;

    2007-01-01

    A combinatorial library of undecapeptides was produced and utilized for the isolation of peptide binding to the fibronectin type 3 modules (F3I-F3II) of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). The isolated peptides were sequenced and produced as dendrimers. Two of the peptides (denoted ENFIN2 a...

  19. Bacteriocins from Gram-Negative Bacteria: A Classification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebuffat, Sylvie

    Bacteria produce an arsenal of toxic peptides and proteins, which are termed bacteriocins and play a role in mediating the dynamics of microbial populations and communities. Bacteriocins from Gram-negative bacteria arise mainly from Enterobacteriaceae. They assemble into two main families: high molecular mass modular proteins (30-80 kDa) termed colicins and low molecular mass peptides (between 1 and 10 kDa) termed microcins. The production of colicins is mediated by the SOS response regulon, which plays a role in the response of many bacteria to DNA damages. Microcins are highly stable hydrophobic peptides that are produced under stress conditions, particularly nutrient depletion. Colicins and microcins are found essentially in Escherichia coli, but several other Gram-negative species also produce bacteriocin-like substances. This chapter presents the basis of a classification of colicins and microcins.

  20. Producing Presences

    OpenAIRE

    Mandagará, Pedro

    2008-01-01

    Resenha de MENDES, Victor K.; ROCHA, João Cezar de Castro (Eds.). Producing Presences: branching out from Gumbrecht’s work. Dartmouth, Massachusetts: University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, 2007. (Adamastor book series, 2)

  1. ANTIMICROBIAL PEPTIDES: AN EFFECTIVE ALTERNATIVE FOR ANTIBIOTIC THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KK PULICHERLA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive use of classical antibiotics has led to the growing emergence of many resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria. Evidence has suggested that cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMP’s are of greatest potential to represent a new class of antibiotics. These peptides have a good scope in current antibiotic research. During the past two decades several AMPs have been isolated from a wide variety of animals (both vertebrates and invertebrates, and plants as well as from bacteria and fungi. These are relatively small (<10kDa, cationic and amphipathic peptides of variable length, sequence and structure. These peptides exhibit broad-spectrum activity against a wide range of microorganisms including gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, protozoa, yeast, fungi and viruses. Most of these peptides are believed to act by disrupting the plasma membrane leading to the lysis of the cell. Antimicrobial peptides encompass a wide variety of structural motifs such as α -helical peptides, β -sheet peptides, looped peptides and extended peptides. Preparations enriched by a specific protein are rarely easily obtained from natural host cells. Hence, recombinant protein production is frequently the sole applicable procedure. Several fusion strategies have been developed for the expression and purification of small antimicrobial peptides (AMPs in recombinant bacterial expression systems which were produced by cloning. This article aims to review in brief the sources of antimicrobial peptides, diversity in structural features, mode of action, production strategies and insight into the current data on their antimicrobial activity followed by a brief comment on the peptides that have entered clinical trials.

  2. An efficient method for isolating antibody fragments against small peptides by antibody phage display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Zhi; Siegumfeldt, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    We generated monoclonal scFv (single chain variable fragment) antibodies from an antibody phage display library towards three small synthetic peptides derived from the sequence of s1-casein. Key difficulties for selection of scFv-phages against small peptides were addressed. Small peptides do....... The scFvs were sequenced and characterized, and specificity was characterized by ELISA. The methods developed in this study are universally applicable for antibody phage display to efficiently produce antibody fragments against small peptides....

  3. 脾氨肽口服冻干粉对小儿支原体感染肺炎伴哮喘临床效果及C反应蛋白的影响%The Clinical Effect and the Influence of CRP of Spleen Peptide Oral Ammonia Producing for Pediatric Pneumonia Mycoplasma Infection Associated with Asthma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈克娅; 冯涛

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To observe the clinical effect and the influence of c-reactive protein of ( CRP ) spleen peptide oral ammonia producing for pediatric pneumonia mycoplasma infection associated with asthma. Methods:The data of 124 children with mycoplasma pneumonia with asthma admitted in our hospital from June 2015 to June 2016 were analyzed. According to the different treatment schemes, all the children were di-vided into controll group and observe group. The control group were treated with anti-inflammatory treatment with azithromycin, and the observation group were treated with spleen peptide oral ammonia producing. The clinical effects and c-reactive protein ( CRP ) expression of two groups were compared. Results: The impro-ving effects of IgA, IgG and T lymphocyte subgroup after cure in the observation group were better than that in the control group. The difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). The level of CRP, WBC and creati-nine in the observation group were lower than the control group ( P<0.05) . Conclusion:Mycoplasma pneumo-nia infection associated with asthma role of spleen peptide oral ammonia producing heal can optimize clinical effect, reduce the children c-reactive protein (CRP) levels, it is worth promoting.%目的:研究支原体感染肺炎伴哮喘患儿行脾氨肽口服冻干粉医治对临床效果和C反应蛋白的影响.方法:前瞻性取2015年6月至2016年6月本院收治支原体感染肺炎伴哮喘124例患儿资料进行分析,按不同医治方案分两组,对照组行阿奇霉素抗炎医治,观察组行脾氨肽口服冻干粉医治,比较两组临床效果和C反应蛋白.结果:两组临床效果比较差异显著具统计意义(P<0.05);观察组医治后IgA、IgG与T淋巴细胞亚群改善效果均比对照组优,比较差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05),且C反应蛋白、白细胞与肌酐水平均比对照组低,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论:支原体感染肺炎伴哮喘患儿行

  4. Anti-antimicrobial Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Lloyd; Lamarre, Baptiste; Diu, Ting; Ravi, Jascindra; Judge, Peter J.; Temple, Adam; Carr, Matthew; Cerasoli, Eleonora; Su, Bo; Jenkinson, Howard F.; Martyna, Glenn; Crain, Jason; Watts, Anthony; Ryadnov, Maxim G.

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial or host defense peptides are innate immune regulators found in all multicellular organisms. Many of them fold into membrane-bound α-helices and function by causing cell wall disruption in microorganisms. Herein we probe the possibility and functional implications of antimicrobial antagonism mediated by complementary coiled-coil interactions between antimicrobial peptides and de novo designed antagonists: anti-antimicrobial peptides. Using sequences from native helical families such as cathelicidins, cecropins, and magainins we demonstrate that designed antagonists can co-fold with antimicrobial peptides into functionally inert helical oligomers. The properties and function of the resulting assemblies were studied in solution, membrane environments, and in bacterial culture by a combination of chiroptical and solid-state NMR spectroscopies, microscopy, bioassays, and molecular dynamics simulations. The findings offer a molecular rationale for anti-antimicrobial responses with potential implications for antimicrobial resistance. PMID:23737519

  5. Tumor penetrating peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tambet eTeesalu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC, contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular zip code of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is

  6. Immunotherapy with Allergen Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Larché Mark

    2007-01-01

    Specific allergen immunotherapy (SIT) is disease-modifying and efficacious. However, the use of whole allergen preparations is associated with frequent allergic adverse events during treatment. Many novel approaches are being designed to reduce the allergenicity of immunotherapy preparations whilst maintaining immunogenicity. One approach is the use of short synthetic peptides which representing dominant T cell epitopes of the allergen. Short peptides exhibit markedly reduced capacity to cro...

  7. Antimicrobial Peptides in Echinoderms

    OpenAIRE

    Li, C; Haug, T; K Stensvåg

    2010-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are important immune effector molecules for invertebrates, including echinoderms, which lack a vertebrate-type adaptive immune system. Here we summarize the knowledge of such peptides in echinoderms. Strongylocins are a novel family of cysteine-rich AMPs, recently identified in the sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis and S. purpuratus. Although these molecules present diverse amino acid sequences, they share an identical cysteine arrangement pattern, d...

  8. Dinosaur Peptides Suggest Mechanisms of Protein Survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    San Antonio, James D.; Schweitzer, Mary H.; Jensen, Shane T.; Kalluri, Raghu; Buckley, Michael; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O. (Harvard-Med); (IIT); (NCSU); (UPENN); (Manchester); (Orthovita)

    2011-09-16

    Eleven collagen peptide sequences recovered from chemical extracts of dinosaur bones were mapped onto molecular models of the vertebrate collagen fibril derived from extant taxa. The dinosaur peptides localized to fibril regions protected by the close packing of collagen molecules, and contained few acidic amino acids. Four peptides mapped to collagen regions crucial for cell-collagen interactions and tissue development. Dinosaur peptides were not represented in more exposed parts of the collagen fibril or regions mediating intermolecular cross-linking. Thus functionally significant regions of collagen fibrils that are physically shielded within the fibril may be preferentially preserved in fossils. These results show empirically that structure-function relationships at the molecular level could contribute to selective preservation in fossilized vertebrate remains across geological time, suggest a 'preservation motif', and bolster current concepts linking collagen structure to biological function. This non-random distribution supports the hypothesis that the peptides are produced by the extinct organisms and suggests a chemical mechanism for survival.

  9. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M. Rowzee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 is a small peptide component of the prohormone, proglucagon, that is produced in the gut. Exendin-4, a GLP-1 receptor agonist originally isolated from the saliva of H. suspectum or Gila monster, is a peptide that shares sequence and functional homology with GLP-1. Both peptides have been demonstrated to stimulate insulin secretion, inhibit glucagon secretion, promote satiety and slow gastric emptying. As such, GLP-1 and Exendin-4 have become attractive pharmaceutical targets as an adjunctive therapy for individuals with type II diabetes mellitus, with several products currently available clinically. Herein we summarize the cell biology leading to GLP-1 production and secretion from intestinal L-cells and the endocrine functions of this peptide and Exendin-4 in humans. Additionally, gene therapeutic applications of GLP-1 and Exendin-4 are discussed with a focus on recent work using the salivary gland as a gene therapy target organ for the treatment of diabetes mellitus.

  10. Natriuretic Peptides, Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.W. Rutten (Joost)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn humans, the natriuretic peptide family consists of three different types of peptides: atrial natriuretic peptide (synonym: atrial natriuretic factor), B-type natriuretic peptide (synonym: brain natriuretic peptide) and C-natriuretic peptide.1 Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was the f

  11. Natriuretic Peptides, Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Rutten, Joost

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn humans, the natriuretic peptide family consists of three different types of peptides: atrial natriuretic peptide (synonym: atrial natriuretic factor), B-type natriuretic peptide (synonym: brain natriuretic peptide) and C-natriuretic peptide.1 Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was the fi rst natriuretic peptide to be discovered and in humans ANP is predominantly formed in the cardiomyocytes of the atria.2 B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) was fi rst discovered in porcine brain hen...

  12. A Novel Method for Producing Transgenic Enzymes and Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-31

    1.48 M) .......................................................................... 9.6 c Trace elements CuSO4 5H2O...4H2O............................................................................. 1.0 CaCl2 2H2O

  13. Truncated glucagon-like peptide-1 (proglucagon 78-107 amide), an intestinal insulin-releasing peptide, has specific receptors on rat insulinoma cells (RIN 5AH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orskov, C; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1988-01-01

    We studied binding of 125I-labelled truncated-glucagon-like peptide-1 (proglucagon 78-107 amide) to a cloned rat insulin-producing cell line, RIN 5AH, in monolayer culture. Interaction of the peptide with pancreatic insulinoma cells was saturable and time dependent. Half-maximal binding was obtai......We studied binding of 125I-labelled truncated-glucagon-like peptide-1 (proglucagon 78-107 amide) to a cloned rat insulin-producing cell line, RIN 5AH, in monolayer culture. Interaction of the peptide with pancreatic insulinoma cells was saturable and time dependent. Half-maximal binding...

  14. Diversity-Oriented Peptide Stapling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Thu Phuong; Larsen, Christian Ørnbøl; Røndbjerg, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of macrocyclic constraints in peptides (peptide stapling) is an important tool within peptide medicinal chemistry for stabilising and pre-organising peptides in a desired conformation. In recent years, the copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) has emerged...... as a powerful method for peptide stapling. However, to date CuAAC stapling has not provided a simple method for obtaining peptides that are easily diversified further. In the present study, we report a new diversity-oriented peptide stapling (DOPS) methodology based on CuAAC chemistry. Stapling of peptides...... incorporating two azide-modified amino acids with 1,3,5-triethynylbenzene efficiently provides (i, i+7)- and (i, i+9)-stapled peptides with a single free alkyne positioned on the staple, that can be further conjugated or dimerised. A unique feature of the present method is that it provides easy access...

  15. Computational analysis and structure predictions of CHH-related peptides from Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraju, G Purna Chandra; Kumari, N Siva; Prasad, G L V; Naik, B Reddya; Borst, D W

    2011-03-01

    The crustaceans produce several related peptides that belong to the crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) family. While these peptides have similar amino acid sequences, they have diverse biological functions that must arise, in part, from differences in the 3D shape of these peptides. However, it is generally accepted that peptides with a high degree of sequence similarity also have a similar 3-D structure. We used the solution structure of one peptide in the crustacean hyperglycemic hormone family, the molt-inhibiting hormone of the kuruma prawn (Marsupenaeus japonicus), to predict the shape of the five known peptides related to CHH in the Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei. The high similarity of the 3-D structures of these peptides suggests a common fold for the entire family. Nevertheless, minor differences in the shape of these peptides were observed, which may be the basis for their different biological properties.

  16. Interactions of Gastrointestinal Peptides: Ghrelin and Its Anorexigenic Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Sophia Wisser

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Food intake behaviour and energy homeostasis are strongly regulated by a complex system of humoral factors and nerval structures constituting the brain-gut-axis. To date the only known peripherally produced and centrally acting peptide that stimulates food intake is ghrelin, which is mainly synthesized in the stomach. Recent data indicate that the orexigenic effect of ghrelin might be influenced by other gastrointestinal peptides such as cholecystokinin (CCK, bombesin, desacyl ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY, as well as glucagon-like peptide (GLP. Therefore, we will review on the interactions of ghrelin with several gastrointestinal factors known to be involved in appetite regulation in order to elucidate the interdependency of peripheral orexigenic and anorexigenic peptides in the control of appetite.

  17. Interactions of Gastrointestinal Peptides: Ghrelin and Its Anorexigenic Antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisser, Anna-Sophia; Habbel, Piet; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Klapp, Burghard F.; Mönnikes, Hubert; Kobelt, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Food intake behaviour and energy homeostasis are strongly regulated by a complex system of humoral factors and nerval structures constituting the brain-gut-axis. To date the only known peripherally produced and centrally acting peptide that stimulates food intake is ghrelin, which is mainly synthesized in the stomach. Recent data indicate that the orexigenic effect of ghrelin might be influenced by other gastrointestinal peptides such as cholecystokinin (CCK), bombesin, desacyl ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), as well as glucagon-like peptide (GLP). Therefore, we will review on the interactions of ghrelin with several gastrointestinal factors known to be involved in appetite regulation in order to elucidate the interdependency of peripheral orexigenic and anorexigenic peptides in the control of appetite. PMID:20798884

  18. Interactions of gastrointestinal peptides: ghrelin and its anorexigenic antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisser, Anna-Sophia; Habbel, Piet; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Klapp, Burghard F; Mönnikes, Hubert; Kobelt, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Food intake behaviour and energy homeostasis are strongly regulated by a complex system of humoral factors and nerval structures constituting the brain-gut-axis. To date the only known peripherally produced and centrally acting peptide that stimulates food intake is ghrelin, which is mainly synthesized in the stomach. Recent data indicate that the orexigenic effect of ghrelin might be influenced by other gastrointestinal peptides such as cholecystokinin (CCK), bombesin, desacyl ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), as well as glucagon-like peptide (GLP). Therefore, we will review on the interactions of ghrelin with several gastrointestinal factors known to be involved in appetite regulation in order to elucidate the interdependency of peripheral orexigenic and anorexigenic peptides in the control of appetite.

  19. A novel affinity purification method to isolate peptide specific antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Alan E; Lernmark, A; Kofod, Hans

    1990-01-01

    Site-specific, high affinity polyclonal antisera are effectively and successfully produced by immunizing rabbits with synthetic peptides. The use of these antisera in subsequent immune analysis is often limited because of non-specific binding. We describe a new and simple method to effectively...... affinity-purify anti-peptide antibodies. To test our system, rabbits were immunized with model peptides representing sequences of the putative rabbit growth hormone receptor and several HLA-DQ beta-chain molecules. Polystyrene plastic beads were coated with peptides. Immune serum was incubated...... with the beads and after a wash step the bound antibodies were eluted in 1 M acetic acid. The eluted material was composed predominantly of intact immunoglobulin as evidenced by the presence of heavy and light chain bands in SDS-PAGE. The eluted antibodies were peptide specific in ELISA and bound only to intact...

  20. Electron transfer in peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Afzal; Adhikari, Bimalendu; Martic, Sanela; Munir, Azeema; Shahzad, Suniya; Ahmad, Khurshid; Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard

    2015-02-21

    In this review, we discuss the factors that influence electron transfer in peptides. We summarize experimental results from solution and surface studies and highlight the ongoing debate on the mechanistic aspects of this fundamental reaction. Here, we provide a balanced approach that remains unbiased and does not favor one mechanistic view over another. Support for a putative hopping mechanism in which an electron transfers in a stepwise manner is contrasted with experimental results that support electron tunneling or even some form of ballistic transfer or a pathway transfer for an electron between donor and acceptor sites. In some cases, experimental evidence suggests that a change in the electron transfer mechanism occurs as a result of donor-acceptor separation. However, this common understanding of the switch between tunneling and hopping as a function of chain length is not sufficient for explaining electron transfer in peptides. Apart from chain length, several other factors such as the extent of the secondary structure, backbone conformation, dipole orientation, the presence of special amino acids, hydrogen bonding, and the dynamic properties of a peptide also influence the rate and mode of electron transfer in peptides. Electron transfer plays a key role in physical, chemical and biological systems, so its control is a fundamental task in bioelectrochemical systems, the design of peptide based sensors and molecular junctions. Therefore, this topic is at the heart of a number of biological and technological processes and thus remains of vital interest.

  1. α/β-Peptide Foldamers Targeting Intracellular Protein-Protein Interactions with Activity in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checco, James W; Lee, Erinna F; Evangelista, Marco; Sleebs, Nerida J; Rogers, Kelly; Pettikiriarachchi, Anne; Kershaw, Nadia J; Eddinger, Geoffrey A; Belair, David G; Wilson, Julia L; Eller, Chelcie H; Raines, Ronald T; Murphy, William L; Smith, Brian J; Gellman, Samuel H; Fairlie, W Douglas

    2015-09-09

    Peptides can be developed as effective antagonists of protein-protein interactions, but conventional peptides (i.e., oligomers of l-α-amino acids) suffer from significant limitations in vivo. Short half-lives due to rapid proteolytic degradation and an inability to cross cell membranes often preclude biological applications of peptides. Oligomers that contain both α- and β-amino acid residues ("α/β-peptides") manifest decreased susceptibility to proteolytic degradation, and when properly designed these unnatural oligomers can mimic the protein-recognition properties of analogous "α-peptides". This report documents an extension of the α/β-peptide approach to target intracellular protein-protein interactions. Specifically, we have generated α/β-peptides based on a "stapled" Bim BH3 α-peptide, which contains a hydrocarbon cross-link to enhance α-helix stability. We show that a stapled α/β-peptide can structurally and functionally mimic the parent stapled α-peptide in its ability to enter certain types of cells and block protein-protein interactions associated with apoptotic signaling. However, the α/β-peptide is nearly 100-fold more resistant to proteolysis than is the parent stapled α-peptide. These results show that backbone modification, a strategy that has received relatively little attention in terms of peptide engineering for biomedical applications, can be combined with more commonly deployed peripheral modifications such as side chain cross-linking to produce synergistic benefits.

  2. Monoclonal antibodies against a synthetic peptide from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinaa, L; Wulff, A M; Saermark, T

    1994-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against a synthetic peptide (aa 138-152) from HIV-1 Nef protein were produced and characterized. Three hybridoma lines producing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the synthetic peptide were generated by fusion between P3-X63 Ag8.653 myeloma cells and BALB/c splenocytes fr...

  3. Immunotherapy with Allergen Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larché Mark

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Specific allergen immunotherapy (SIT is disease-modifying and efficacious. However, the use of whole allergen preparations is associated with frequent allergic adverse events during treatment. Many novel approaches are being designed to reduce the allergenicity of immunotherapy preparations whilst maintaining immunogenicity. One approach is the use of short synthetic peptides which representing dominant T cell epitopes of the allergen. Short peptides exhibit markedly reduced capacity to cross link IgE and activate mast cells and basophils, due to lack of tertiary structure. Murine pre-clinical studies have established the feasibility of this approach and clinical studies are currently in progress in both allergic and autoimmune diseases.

  4. Therapeutic HIV Peptide Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccines aim to control chronic HIV infection and eliminate the need for lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART). Therapeutic HIV vaccine is being pursued as part of a functional cure for HIV/AIDS. We have outlined a basic protocol for inducing new T cell immunity during chronic HIV-1...... infection directed to subdominant conserved HIV-1 epitopes restricted to frequent HLA supertypes. The rationale for selecting HIV peptides and adjuvants are provided. Peptide subunit vaccines are regarded as safe due to the simplicity, quality, purity, and low toxicity. The caveat is reduced immunogenicity...

  5. β-PEPTIDES CYCLOBUTANIQUES

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis of β-amino acids, structural analogues of?-Amino acids, is an issue essential in the development of oligopeptides. A lot of work has been conducted on the behavior of β-peptide (sequence of β-amino acids) as well as peptides mixed (mixed β-and β- amino acids). As a result, the conformational preference of β-amino acids will induce the appearance of a three-dimensional structure of the oligopeptide ordered. Thus, several types of helices, sheets and elbows were observed in β-olig...

  6. Invertebrate FMRFamide related peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajniak, Kevin G

    2013-06-01

    In 1977 the neuropeptide FMRFamide was isolated from the clam, Macrocallista nimbosa. Since then several hundred FMRFamide-related peptides (FaRPs) have been isolated from invertebrate animals. Precursors to the FaRPs likely arose in the cnidarians. With the transition to a bilateral body plan FaRPs became a fixture in the invertebrate phyla. They have come to play a critical role as neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, and neurohormones. FaRPs regulate a variety of body functions including, feeding, digestion, circulation, reproduction, movement. The evolution of the molecular form and function of these omnipresent peptides will be considered.

  7. Dicyclopropylmethyl peptide backbone protectant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpino, Louis A; Nasr, Khaled; Abdel-Maksoud, Adel Ali; El-Faham, Ayman; Ionescu, Dumitru; Henklein, Peter; Wenschuh, Holger; Beyermann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Bienert, Michael

    2009-08-20

    The N-dicyclopropylmethyl (Dcpm) residue, introduced into amino acids via reaction of dicyclopropylmethanimine hydrochloride with an amino acid ester followed by sodium cyanoborohydride or triacetoxyborohydride reduction, can be used as an amide bond protectant for peptide synthesis. Examples which demonstrate the amelioration of aggregation effects include syntheses of the alanine decapeptide and the prion peptide (106-126). Avoidance of cyclization to the aminosuccinimide followed substitution of Fmoc-(Dcpm)Gly-OH for Fmoc-Gly-OH in the assembly of sequences containing the sensitive Asp-Gly unit.

  8. Origin and functional diversification of an amphibian defense peptide arsenal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Roelants

    Full Text Available The skin secretion of many amphibians contains an arsenal of bioactive molecules, including hormone-like peptides (HLPs acting as defense toxins against predators, and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs providing protection against infectious microorganisms. Several amphibian taxa seem to have independently acquired the genes to produce skin-secreted peptide arsenals, but it remains unknown how these originated from a non-defensive ancestral gene and evolved diverse defense functions against predators and pathogens. We conducted transcriptome, genome, peptidome and phylogenetic analyses to chart the full gene repertoire underlying the defense peptide arsenal of the frog Silurana tropicalis and reconstruct its evolutionary history. Our study uncovers a cluster of 13 transcriptionally active genes, together encoding up to 19 peptides, including diverse HLP homologues and AMPs. This gene cluster arose from a duplicated gastrointestinal hormone gene that attained a HLP-like defense function after major remodeling of its promoter region. Instead, new defense functions, including antimicrobial activity, arose by mutation of the precursor proteins, resulting in the proteolytic processing of secondary peptides alongside the original ones. Although gene duplication did not trigger functional innovation, it may have subsequently facilitated the convergent loss of the original function in multiple gene lineages (subfunctionalization, completing their transformation from HLP gene to AMP gene. The processing of multiple peptides from a single precursor entails a mechanism through which peptide-encoding genes may establish new functions without the need for gene duplication to avoid adaptive conflicts with older ones.

  9. Origin and functional diversification of an amphibian defense peptide arsenal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelants, Kim; Fry, Bryan G; Ye, Lumeng; Stijlemans, Benoit; Brys, Lea; Kok, Philippe; Clynen, Elke; Schoofs, Liliane; Cornelis, Pierre; Bossuyt, Franky

    2013-01-01

    The skin secretion of many amphibians contains an arsenal of bioactive molecules, including hormone-like peptides (HLPs) acting as defense toxins against predators, and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) providing protection against infectious microorganisms. Several amphibian taxa seem to have independently acquired the genes to produce skin-secreted peptide arsenals, but it remains unknown how these originated from a non-defensive ancestral gene and evolved diverse defense functions against predators and pathogens. We conducted transcriptome, genome, peptidome and phylogenetic analyses to chart the full gene repertoire underlying the defense peptide arsenal of the frog Silurana tropicalis and reconstruct its evolutionary history. Our study uncovers a cluster of 13 transcriptionally active genes, together encoding up to 19 peptides, including diverse HLP homologues and AMPs. This gene cluster arose from a duplicated gastrointestinal hormone gene that attained a HLP-like defense function after major remodeling of its promoter region. Instead, new defense functions, including antimicrobial activity, arose by mutation of the precursor proteins, resulting in the proteolytic processing of secondary peptides alongside the original ones. Although gene duplication did not trigger functional innovation, it may have subsequently facilitated the convergent loss of the original function in multiple gene lineages (subfunctionalization), completing their transformation from HLP gene to AMP gene. The processing of multiple peptides from a single precursor entails a mechanism through which peptide-encoding genes may establish new functions without the need for gene duplication to avoid adaptive conflicts with older ones.

  10. C peptides as entry inhibitors for gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egerer, Lisa; Kiem, Hans-Peter; von Laer, Dorothee

    2015-01-01

    Peptides derived from the C-terminal heptad repeat 2 region of the HIV-1 gp41 envelope glycoprotein, so-called C peptides, are very potent HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. Antiviral genes encoding either membrane-anchored (ma) or secreted (iSAVE) C peptides have been engineered and allow direct in vivo production of the therapeutic peptides by genetically modified host cells. Membrane-anchored C peptides expressed in the HIV-1 target cells by T-cell or hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy efficiently prevent virus entry into the modified cells. Such gene-protection confers a selective survival advantage and allows accumulation of the genetically modified cells. Membrane-anchored C peptides have been successfully tested in a nonhuman primate model of AIDS and were found to be safe in a phase I clinical trial in AIDS patients transplanted with autologous gene-modified T-cells. Secreted C peptides have the crucial advantage of not only protecting genetically modified cells from HIV-1 infection, but also neighboring cells, thus suppressing virus replication even if only a small fraction of cells is genetically modified. Accordingly, various cell types can be considered as potential in vivo producer cells for iSAVE-based gene therapeutics, which could even be modified by direct in vivo gene delivery in future. In conclusion, C peptide gene therapeutics may provide a strong benefit to AIDS patients and could present an effective alternative to current antiretroviral drug regimens.

  11. Antimicrobial peptides in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yanhua; Zhang, Kai; Schluesener, Hermann J

    2010-10-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an evolutionarily conserved component of the innate immune system of many species. The brain is an immunologically privileged organ but can produce a robust immune response against pathogens and cell debris, promoting rapid and efficient clearance. AMPs may be critically involved in the innate immune system of the brain. Though the mechanisms of AMPs' action in the brain still need further elucidation, many studies have shown that AMPs are multifunctional molecules in the brain. In addition to antimicrobial action, they take part in congenital and adaptive immune reactions (immunoregulation), function as signaling molecules in tissue repair, inflammation and other important processes through different mechanisms, and they might, in addition, become diagnostic markers of brain disease.

  12. Biosynthesis of cardiac natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    . An inefficient post-translational prohormone maturation will also affect the biology of the cardiac natriuretic peptide system. This review aims at summarizing the myocardial synthesis of natriuretic peptides focusing on B-type natriuretic peptide, where new data has disclosed cardiac myocytes as highly...

  13. Peptide vectors for gene delivery: from single peptides to multifunctional peptide nanocarriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raad, Markus de; Teunissen, Erik A; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2014-07-01

    The therapeutic use of nucleic acids relies on the availability of sophisticated delivery systems for targeted and intracellular delivery of these molecules. Such a gene delivery should possess essential characteristics to overcome several extracellular and intracellular barriers. Peptides offer an attractive platform for nonviral gene delivery, as several functional peptide classes exist capable of overcoming these barriers. However, none of these functional peptide classes contain all the essential characteristics required to overcome all of the barriers associated with successful gene delivery. Combining functional peptides into multifunctional peptide vectors will be pivotal for improving peptide-based gene delivery systems. By using combinatorial strategies and high-throughput screening, the identification of multifunctional peptide vectors will accelerate the optimization of peptide-based gene delivery systems.

  14. Precursor-centric genome-mining approach for lasso peptide discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimov, Mikhail O; Pelczer, István; Link, A James

    2012-09-18

    Lasso peptides are a class of ribosomally synthesized posttranslationally modified natural products found in bacteria. Currently known lasso peptides have a diverse set of pharmacologically relevant activities, including inhibition of bacterial growth, receptor antagonism, and enzyme inhibition. The biosynthesis of lasso peptides is specified by a cluster of three genes encoding a precursor protein and two enzymes. Here we develop a unique genome-mining algorithm to identify lasso peptide gene clusters in prokaryotes. Our approach involves pattern matching to a small number of conserved amino acids in precursor proteins, and thus allows for a more global survey of lasso peptide gene clusters than does homology-based genome mining. Of more than 3,000 currently sequenced prokaryotic genomes, we found 76 organisms that are putative lasso peptide producers. These organisms span nine bacterial phyla and an archaeal phylum. To provide validation of the genome-mining method, we focused on a single lasso peptide predicted to be produced by the freshwater bacterium Asticcacaulis excentricus. Heterologous expression of an engineered, minimal gene cluster in Escherichia coli led to the production of a unique lasso peptide, astexin-1. At 23 aa, astexin-1 is the largest lasso peptide isolated to date. It is also highly polar, in contrast to many lasso peptides that are primarily hydrophobic. Astexin-1 has modest antimicrobial activity against its phylogenetic relative Caulobacter crescentus. The solution structure of astexin-1 was determined revealing a unique topology that is stabilized by hydrogen bonding between segments of the peptide.

  15. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  16. Recent Advances in Chemoenzymatic Peptide Syntheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenjiro Yazawa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Chemoenzymatic peptide synthesis is the hydrolase-catalyzed stereoselective formation of peptide bonds. It is a clean and mild procedure, unlike conventional chemical synthesis, which involves complicated and laborious protection-deprotection procedures and harsh reaction conditions. The chemoenzymatic approach has been utilized for several decades because determining the optimal conditions for conventional synthesis is often time-consuming. The synthesis of poly- and oligopeptides comprising various amino acids longer than a dipeptide continues to pose a challenge owing to the lack of knowledge about enzymatic mechanisms and owing to difficulty in optimizing the pH, temperature, and other reaction conditions. These drawbacks limit the applications of the chemoenzymatic approach. Recently, a variety of enzymes and substrates produced using recombinant techniques, substrate mimetics, and optimal reaction conditions (e.g., frozen aqueous media and ionic liquids have broadened the scope of chemoenzymatic peptide syntheses. In this review, we highlight the recent advances in the chemoenzymatic syntheses of various peptides and their use in developing new materials and biomedical applications.

  17. Structural pattern matching of nonribosomal peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leclère Valérie

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonribosomal peptides (NRPs, bioactive secondary metabolites produced by many microorganisms, show a broad range of important biological activities (e.g. antibiotics, immunosuppressants, antitumor agents. NRPs are mainly composed of amino acids but their primary structure is not always linear and can contain cycles or branchings. Furthermore, there are several hundred different monomers that can be incorporated into NRPs. The NORINE database, the first resource entirely dedicated to NRPs, currently stores more than 700 NRPs annotated with their monomeric peptide structure encoded by undirected labeled graphs. This opens a way to a systematic analysis of structural patterns occurring in NRPs. Such studies can investigate the functional role of some monomeric chains, or analyse NRPs that have been computationally predicted from the synthetase protein sequence. A basic operation in such analyses is the search for a given structural pattern in the database. Results We developed an efficient method that allows for a quick search for a structural pattern in the NORINE database. The method identifies all peptides containing a pattern substructure of a given size. This amounts to solving a variant of the maximum common subgraph problem on pattern and peptide graphs, which is done by computing cliques in an appropriate compatibility graph. Conclusion The method has been incorporated into the NORINE database, available at http://bioinfo.lifl.fr/norine. Less than one second is needed to search for a pattern in the entire database.

  18. INTERNALIZATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL PEPTIDE ACIPENSIN 1 INTO HUMAN TUMOR CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Umnyakova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Search for new compounds providing delivery of drugs into infected or neoplastic cells, is an important direction of biomedical research. Cell-penetrating peptides are among those compounds, due to their ability to translocate through membranes of eukaryotic cells, serving as potential carriers of various therapeutic agents to the target cells. The aim of present work was to investigate the ability of acipensin 1, an antimicrobial peptide of innate immune system, for in vitro penetration into human tumor cells. Acipensin 1 is a cationic peptide that we have previously isolated from leukocytes of the Russian sturgeon, Acipenser gueldenstaedtii. Capability of acipensin 1 to enter the human erytroleukemia K-562 cells has been investigated for the first time. A biotechnological procedure for producing a recombinant acipensin 1 peptide has been developed. The obtained peptide was conjugated with a fluorescent probe BODIPY FL. By means of confocal microscopy, we have shown that the tagged acipensin 1 rapidly enters into K-562 cells and can be detected in the intracellular space within 5 min after its addition to the cell culture. Using flow cytometry technique, penetration kinetics of the labeled peptide into K-562 cells (at nontoxic micromolar concentrations has been studied. We have observed a rapid internalization of the peptide to the target cells, thus confirming the results of microscopic analysis, i.e, the labeled acipensin was detectable in K-562 cells as soon as wihin 2-3 seconds after its addition to the incubation medium. The maximum of fluorescence was reached within a period of approx. 45 seconds, with further “plateau” at the terms of >100 seconds following cell stimulation with the test compound. These data support the concept, that the antimicrobial peptides of innate immunity system possess the features of cell-penetrating peptides, and allow us to consider the studied sturgeon peptide a promising template for development of new

  19. Radiolabelled peptides for oncological diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laverman, Peter; Boerman, Otto C.; Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Sosabowski, Jane K. [Queen Mary University of London, Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    Radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides targeting receptors (over)expressed on tumour cells are widely under investigation for tumour diagnosis and therapy. The concept of using radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides to target receptor-expressing tissues in vivo has stimulated a large body of research in nuclear medicine. The {sup 111}In-labelled somatostatin analogue octreotide (OctreoScan trademark) is the most successful radiopeptide for tumour imaging, and was the first to be approved for diagnostic use. Based on the success of these studies, other receptor-targeting peptides such as cholecystokinin/gastrin analogues, glucagon-like peptide-1, bombesin (BN), chemokine receptor CXCR4 targeting peptides, and RGD peptides are currently under development or undergoing clinical trials. In this review, we discuss some of these peptides and their analogues, with regard to their potential for radionuclide imaging of tumours. (orig.)

  20. APD: the Antimicrobial Peptide Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Wang, Guangshun

    2004-01-01

    An antimicrobial peptide database (APD) has been established based on an extensive literature search. It contains detailed information for 525 peptides (498 antibacterial, 155 antifungal, 28 antiviral and 18 antitumor). APD provides interactive interfaces for peptide query, prediction and design. It also provides statistical data for a select group of or all the peptides in the database. Peptide information can be searched using keywords such as peptide name, ID, length, net charge, hydrophobic percentage, key residue, unique sequence motif, structure and activity. APD is a useful tool for studying the structure-function relationship of antimicrobial peptides. The database can be accessed via a web-based browser at the URL: http://aps.unmc.edu/AP/main.html.

  1. Genome mining expands the chemical diversity of the cyanobactin family to include highly modified linear peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leikoski, Niina; Liu, Liwei; Jokela, Jouni; Wahlsten, Matti; Gugger, Muriel; Calteau, Alexandra; Permi, Perttu; Kerfeld, Cheryl A; Sivonen, Kaarina; Fewer, David P

    2013-08-22

    Ribosomal peptides are produced through the posttranslational modification of short precursor peptides. Cyanobactins are a growing family of cyclic ribosomal peptides produced by cyanobacteria. However, a broad systematic survey of the genetic capacity to produce cyanobactins is lacking. Here we report the identification of 31 cyanobactin gene clusters from 126 genomes of cyanobacteria. Genome mining suggested a complex evolutionary history defined by horizontal gene transfer and rapid diversification of precursor genes. Extensive chemical analyses demonstrated that some cyanobacteria produce short linear cyanobactins with a chain length ranging from three to five amino acids. The linear peptides were N-prenylated and O-methylated on the N and C termini, respectively, and named aeruginosamide and viridisamide. These findings broaden the structural diversity of the cyanobactin family to include highly modified linear peptides with rare posttranslational modifications.

  2. Identification of multiple antimicrobial peptides from the skin of fine-spined frog, Hylarana spinulosa (Ranidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaolong; Hu, Yuhong; Xu, Shiqi; Hu, Yonghong; Meng, Hao; Guo, Chao; Liu, Yuliang; Liu, Jingze; Yu, Zhijun; Wang, Hui

    2013-12-01

    In this study, peptidomics and genomics analyses were used to study antimicrobial peptides from the skin of Hylarana spinulosa. Twenty-nine different antimicrobial peptide precursors were characterized from the skin of H. spinulosa, which produce 23 mature antimicrobial peptides belonging to 12 different families. To confirm the actual presence and characteristics of these antimicrobial peptides in the skin tissue extractions from H. spinulosa, we used two distinct methods, one was peptide purification method that combined gel filtration chromatography and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), and the other was peptidomics approach based on liquid chromatography in conjunction with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In the peptidomics approach, incomplete tryptic digestion and gas-phase fractionation (GPF) analysis were used to increase peptidome coverage and reproducibility of peptide ion selection. Multiple species of microorganisms were chosen to test and analyze the antimicrobial activities and spectrum of these antimicrobial peptides.

  3. Identification of binding peptides of the ADAM15 disintegrin domain using phage display

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jing Wu; Min-Chen Wu; Lian-Fen Zhang; Jian-Yong Lei; Lei Feng; Jian Jin

    2009-06-01

    ADAM15 plays an important role in tumour development by interacting with integrins. In this study, we investigated the target peptides of the ADAM15 disintegrin domain. First, we successfully produced the recombinant human ADAM15 disintegrin domain (RADD) that could inhibit melanoma cell adhesion by using Escherichia coli. Second, four specific binding peptides (peptides A, B, C, and D) were selected using a phage display 12-mer peptide library. The screening protocol involved 4 rounds of positive panning on RADD and 2 rounds of subtractive selection with streptavidin. By using the BLAST software and a relevant protein database, integrin v3 was found to be homologous to peptide A. Synthetic peptide A had a highly inhibitory effect on RADD–integrin v3 binding. The results demonstrate the potential application of short peptides for disrupting high-affinity ADAM–integrin interactions.

  4. Lasso Peptide Biosynthetic Protein LarB1 Binds Both Leader and Core Peptide Regions of the Precursor Protein LarA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Wai Ling; Chen, Maria Y; Maksimov, Mikhail O; Link, A James

    2016-10-26

    Lasso peptides are a member of the superclass of ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs). Like all RiPPs, lasso peptides are derived from a gene-encoded precursor protein. The biosynthesis of lasso peptides requires two enzymatic activities: proteolytic cleavage between the leader peptide and the core peptide in the precursor protein, accomplished by the B enzymes, and ATP-dependent isopeptide bond formation, accomplished by the C enzymes. In a subset of lasso peptide biosynthetic gene clusters from Gram-positive organisms, the B enzyme is split between two proteins. One such gene cluster is found in the organism Rhodococcus jostii, which produces the antimicrobial lasso peptide lariatin. The B enzyme in R. jostii is split between two open reading frames, larB1 and larB2, both of which are required for lariatin biosynthesis. While the cysteine catalytic triad is found within the LarB2 protein, LarB1 is a PqqD homologue expected to bind to the lariatin precursor LarA based on its structural homology to other RiPP leader peptide binding domains. We show that LarB1 binds to the leader peptide of the lariatin precursor protein LarA with a sub-micromolar affinity. We used photocrosslinking with the noncanonical amino acid p-azidophenylalanine and mass spectrometry to map the interaction of LarA and LarB1. This analysis shows that the LarA leader peptide interacts with a conserved motif within LarB1 and, unexpectedly, the core peptide of LarA also binds to LarB1 in several positions. A Rosetta model built from distance restraints from the photocrosslinking experiments shows that the scissile bond between the leader peptide and core peptide in LarA is in a solvent-exposed loop.

  5. Antimicrobial peptides in Echinoderms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Li

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are important immune effector molecules for invertebrates, including echinoderms, which lack a vertebrate-type adaptive immune system. Here we summarize the knowledge of such peptides in echinoderms. Strongylocins are a novel family of cysteine-rich AMPs, recently identified in the sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis and S. purpuratus. Although these molecules present diverse amino acid sequences, they share an identical cysteine arrangement pattern, dissimilar to other known AMPs. A family of heterodimeric AMPs, named centrocins, are also present in S. droebachiensis. Lysozymes and fragments of larger proteins, such as beta-thymocins, actin, histone 2A and filamin A have also been shown to display antimicrobial activities in echinoderms. Future studies on AMPs should be aimed in revealing how echinoderms use these AMPs in the immune response against microbial pathogens.

  6. Avian host defense peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuperus, Tryntsje; Coorens, Maarten; van Dijk, Albert; Haagsman, Henk P

    2013-11-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are important effector molecules of the innate immune system of vertebrates. These antimicrobial peptides are also present in invertebrates, plants and fungi. HDPs display broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities and fulfill an important role in the first line of defense of many organisms. It is becoming increasingly clear that in the animal kingdom the functions of HDPs are not confined to direct antimicrobial actions. Research in mammals has indicated that HDPs have many immunomodulatory functions and are also involved in other physiological processes ranging from development to wound healing. During the past five years our knowledge about avian HDPs has increased considerably. This review addresses our current knowledge on the evolution, regulation and biological functions of HDPs of birds.

  7. Cyanine-based probe\\tag-peptide pair fluorescence protein imaging and fluorescence protein imaging methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Cumblidge, M. Uljana; Cao, Haishi

    2013-01-15

    A molecular probe comprises two arsenic atoms and at least one cyanine based moiety. A method of producing a molecular probe includes providing a molecule having a first formula, treating the molecule with HgOAc, and subsequently transmetallizing with AsCl.sub.3. The As is liganded to ethanedithiol to produce a probe having a second formula. A method of labeling a peptide includes providing a peptide comprising a tag sequence and contacting the peptide with a biarsenical molecular probe. A complex is formed comprising the tag sequence and the molecular probe. A method of studying a peptide includes providing a mixture containing a peptide comprising a peptide tag sequence, adding a biarsenical probe to the mixture, and monitoring the fluorescence of the mixture.

  8. Design of host defence peptides for antimicrobial and immunity enhancing activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, Joseph B; Scott, Monisha G; Hancock, Robert E W

    2005-05-01

    Host defense peptides are a vital component of the innate immune systems of humans, other mammals, amphibians, and arthropods. The related cationic antimicrobial peptides are also produced by many species of bacteria and function as part of the antimicrobial arsenal to help the producing organism reduce competition for resources from sensitive species. The antimicrobial activities of many of these peptides have been extensively characterized and the structural requirements for these activities are also becoming increasingly clear. In addition to their known antimicrobial role, many host defense peptides are also involved in a plethora of immune functions in the host. In this review, we examine the role of structure in determining antimicrobial activity of certain prototypical cationic peptides and ways that bacteria have evolved to usurp these activities. We also review recent literature on what structural components are related to these immunomodulatory effects. It must be stressed however that these studies, and the area of peptide research, are still in their infancy.

  9. Peptides and Food Intake

    OpenAIRE

    Carmen Sobrino Crespo; Aranzazu Perianes Cachero; Lilian Puebla Jiménez; Vicente eBarrios; Eduardo eArilla

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the r...

  10. Chromogranin A-derived peptides are involved in innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, R; Atindehou, M; Lavaux, T; Haïkel, Y; Schneider, F; Metz-Boutigue, M-H

    2012-01-01

    New endogenous antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) derived from chromogranin A (CgA) are secreted by nervous, endocrine and immune cells during stress. They display antimicrobial activities by lytic effects at micromolar range using a pore-forming mechanism against Gram-positive bacteria, filamentous fungi and yeasts. These AMPs can also penetrate quickly into neutrophils (without lytic effects), where, similarly to "cell penetrating peptides", they interact with cytoplasmic calmodulin, and induce calcium influx via Store Operated Channels therefore triggering neutrophils activation. Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella enteritis are bacteria responsible for severe infections. We investigated here the effects of S. aureus and S. enteritis bacterial proteases on CgA-derived peptides and evaluated their antimicrobial activities. We showed that the Glu-C protease produced by S. aureus V8 induces the loss of the AMPs antibacterial activities and produces new antifungal peptides. In addition, four antimicrobial CGA-derived peptides (chromofungin, procatestatin, human/bovine catestatin) are degraded when treated with bacterial supernatants from S. aureus and S. enteritis, whereas, cateslytin, the short active form of catestatin, resists to this degradation. Finally, we demonstrate that several antimicrobial CgA-derived peptides are able to act synergistically with antibiotics against bacteria and fungi indicating their roles in innate defense.

  11. [C-peptide physiological effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpakov, A O; Granstrem, O K

    2013-02-01

    In the recent years there were numerous evidences that C-peptide, which was previously considered as a product of insulin biosynthesis, is one of the key regulators of physiological processes. C-peptide via heterotrimeric G(i/o) protein-coupled receptors activates a wide range of intracellular effector proteins and transcription factors and, thus, controls the inflammatory and neurotrophic processes, pain sensitivity, cognitive function, macro- and microcirculation, glomerular filtration. These effects of C-peptide are mainly expressed in its absolute or relative deficiency occurred in type 1 diabetes mellitus and they are less pronounced when the level of C-peptide is close to normal. Replacement therapy with C-peptide prevents many complications of type 1 diabetes, such as atherosclerosis, diabetic peripheral neuropathy, and nephropathy. C-peptide interacts with the insulin hexamer complexes and induces their dissociation and, as a result, regulates the functional activity of the insulin signaling system. At the same time, C-peptide at the concentrations above physiological may demonstrate pro-inflammatory effects on the endothelial cells and cause atherosclerotic changes in the vessels, which should be considered in the study of pathogenic mechanisms of complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus, where the level of C peptide is increased, as well as in the development of approaches for C-peptide application in clinic. This review is devoted contemporary achievements and unsolved problems in the study of C-peptide, as an important regulator of physiological and biochemical processes.

  12. DeNovoID: a web-based tool for identifying peptides from sequence and mass tags deduced from de novo peptide sequencing by mass spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halligan, Brian D; Ruotti, Victor; Twigger, Simon N; Greene, Andrew S

    2005-07-01

    One of the core activities of high-throughput proteomics is the identification of peptides from mass spectra. Some peptides can be identified using spectral matching programs like Sequest or Mascot, but many spectra do not produce high quality database matches. De novo peptide sequencing is an approach to determine partial peptide sequences for some of the unidentified spectra. A drawback of de novo peptide sequencing is that it produces a series of ordered and disordered sequence tags and mass tags rather than a complete, non-degenerate peptide amino acid sequence. This incomplete data is difficult to use in conventional search programs such as BLAST or FASTA. DeNovoID is a program that has been specifically designed to use degenerate amino acid sequence and mass data derived from MS experiments to search a peptide database. Since the algorithm employed depends on the amino acid composition of the peptide and not its sequence, DeNovoID does not have to consider all possible sequences, but rather a smaller number of compositions consistent with a spectrum. DeNovoID also uses a geometric indexing scheme that reduces the number of calculations required to determine the best peptide match in the database. DeNovoID is available at http://proteomics.mcw.edu/denovoid.

  13. One-pot chemical synthesis of small ubiquitin-like modifier protein-peptide conjugates using bis(2-sulfanylethyl)amido peptide latent thioester surrogates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boll, Emmanuelle; Drobecq, Hervé; Ollivier, Nathalie; Blanpain, Annick; Raibaut, Laurent; Desmet, Rémi; Vicogne, Jérôme; Melnyk, Oleg

    2015-02-01

    Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) post-translational modification (PTM) of proteins has a crucial role in the regulation of important cellular processes. This protocol describes the chemical synthesis of functional SUMO-peptide conjugates. The two crucial stages of this protocol are the solid-phase synthesis of peptide segments derivatized by thioester or bis(2-sulfanylethyl)amido (SEA) latent thioester functionalities and the one-pot assembly of the SUMO-peptide conjugate by a sequential native chemical ligation (NCL)/SEA native peptide ligation reaction sequence. This protocol also enables the isolation of a SUMO SEA latent thioester, which can be attached to a target peptide or protein in a subsequent step. It is compatible with 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc) chemistry, and it gives access to homogeneous, reversible and functional SUMO conjugates that are not easily produced using living systems. The synthesis of SUMO-peptide conjugates on a milligram scale takes 20 working days.

  14. The role of antimicrobial peptides in chronic inflammatory skin diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are effector molecules of the innate immune system of the skin. They present an activity against a broad spectrum of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as some fungi, parasites and enveloped viruses. Several inflammatory skin diseases including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, acne vulgaris and rosacea are characterized by a dysregulated expression of AMPs. Antimicrobial peptides are excessively produced in lesional psoriatic scales or rosacea in contrast to the atopic skin that shows lower AMP levels when compared with psoriasis. The importance of the AMPs contribution to host immunity is indisputable as alterations in the antimicrobial peptide expression have been associated with various pathologic processes. This review discusses the biology and clinical relevance of antimicrobial peptides expressed in the skin and their role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:26985172

  15. An improved method for utilization of peptide substrates for antibody characterization and enzymatic assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Inca; Sun, Luo; Evans, Thomas C; Xu, Ming-Qun

    2004-10-01

    Synthetic peptides have become an important tool in antibody production and enzyme characterization. The small size of peptides, however, has hindered their use in assays systems, such as Western blots, and as immunogens. Here, we present a facile method to improve the properties of peptides for multiple applications by ligating the peptides to intein-generated carrier proteins. The stoichiometric ligation of peptide and carrier achieved by intein-mediated protein ligation (IPL) results in the ligation product migrating as a single band on a SDS-PAGE gel. The carrier proteins, HhaI methylase (M.HhaI) and maltose-binding protein (MBP), were ligated to various peptides; the ligated carrier-peptide products gave sharp, reproducible bands when used as positive controls for antibodies raised against the same peptides during Western blot analysis. We further show that ligation of the peptide antigens to a different thioester-tagged carrier protein, paramyosin, produced immunogens for the production of antisera in rabbits or mice. Furthermore, we demonstrate the generation of a substrate for enzymatic assays by ligating a peptide containing the phosphorylation site for Abl protein tyrosine kinase to a carrier protein. This carrier-peptide protein was used as a kinase substrate that could easily be tested for phosphorylation using a phosphotyrosine antibody in Western blot analysis. These techniques do not require sophisticated equipment, reagents, or skills thereby providing a simple method for research and development.

  16. [Amphibian skin as a source of therapeutic peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiche, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    The search for new bioactive molecules that could be used in therapeutics is a major public health issue, particularly in the treatment of certain diseases such as cancer. In this context the exploration of the venom of animals (snakes, amphibians, cones, scorpions, insects...) that produce molecules of various structures and biological activities, is a very promising direction. Research in this area led to the discovery of neuropeptides, hormones, toxins, antimicrobial peptides and other extremely potent mediators. These are now used in many areas both in fundamental research and in translational research, respectively, to understand biochemical and physiological mechanisms, or to use as medical diagnostic tools and for therapeutic purposes. Pr. V. Erspamer is the first researcher to have shown, in the 1930s, that in addition to biogenic amines and alkaloids, granular glands from the skin of amphibians also produced huge amounts of peptides with various structures and biological activities. He also showed that these peptides had their counterparts, most often in the form of identical or similar peptides, in the central nervous system and the gastrointestinal tract of mammals. These observations are summarized in the form of a triangle concept of "brain-gut-skin" that states that any peptide found in a compartment should be present in the other two. In addition, abundance, ease of extraction and identification of peptides from amphibian skin make this model a means to search for their counterparts in mammals where they are present in minute quantities. This approach has two advantages: (i) at the fundamental level, the large peptide diversity, ubiquity and multiplicity of functions to which they participate, constitute a true chemical library to understand the mechanisms of recognition and signal transduction and study the physicochemical basic of the specificity; and (ii) in terms of applications, the relative simplicity of these peptides and the rise of the

  17. Structural Characterization of Peptide Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chailyan, Anna; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The role of proteins as very effective immunogens for the generation of antibodies is indisputable. Nevertheless, cases in which protein usage for antibody production is not feasible or convenient compelled the creation of a powerful alternative consisting of synthetic peptides. Synthetic peptides...... can be modified to obtain desired properties or conformation, tagged for purification, isotopically labeled for protein quantitation or conjugated to immunogens for antibody production. The antibodies that bind to these peptides represent an invaluable tool for biological research and discovery...

  18. Improving Peptide Applications Using Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are being successfully used in various fields including therapy and drug delivery. With advancement in nanotechnology and targeted delivery carrier systems, suitable modification of peptides has enabled achievement of many desirable goals over-riding some of the major disadvantages associated with the delivery of peptides in vivo. Conjugation or physical encapsulation of peptides to various nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles and solid-lipid nanoparticles, has improved their in vivo performance multi-fold. The amenability of peptides to modification in chemistry and functionalization with suitable nanocarriers are very relevant aspects in their use and have led to the use of 'smart' nanoparticles with suitable linker chemistries that favor peptide targeting or release at the desired sites, minimizing off-target effects. This review focuses on how nanotechnology has been used to improve the number of peptide applications. The paper also focuses on the chemistry behind peptide conjugation to nanocarriers, the commonly employed linker chemistries and the several improvements that have already been achieved in the areas of peptide use with the help of nanotechnology.

  19. Antitumor Peptides from Marine Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Sun

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The biodiversity of the marine environment and the associated chemical diversity constitute a practically unlimited resource of new antitumor agents in the field of the development of marine bioactive substances. In this review, the progress on studies of antitumor peptides from marine sources is provided. The biological properties and mechanisms of action of different marine peptides are described; information about their molecular diversity is also presented. Novel peptides that induce apoptosis signal pathway, affect the tubulin-microtubule equilibrium and inhibit angiogenesis are presented in association with their pharmacological properties. It is intended to provide useful information for further research in the fields of marine antitumor peptides.

  20. The Pig PeptideAtlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselager, Marianne Overgaard; Codrea, Marius; Sun, Zhi;

    2016-01-01

    underrepresented in existing repositories. We here present a significantly improved build of the Pig PeptideAtlas, which includes pig proteome data from 25 tissues and three body fluid types mapped to 7139 canonical proteins. The content of the Pig PeptideAtlas reflects actively ongoing research within...... the veterinary proteomics domain, and this article demonstrates how the expression of isoform-unique peptides can be observed across distinct tissues and body fluids. The Pig PeptideAtlas is a unique resource for use in animal proteome research, particularly biomarker discovery and for preliminary design of SRM...

  1. Solid-phase peptide synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides an introduction to and overview of peptide chemistry with a focus on solid-phase peptide synthesis. The background, the most common reagents, and some mechanisms are presented. This chapter also points to the different chapters and puts them into perspective.......This chapter provides an introduction to and overview of peptide chemistry with a focus on solid-phase peptide synthesis. The background, the most common reagents, and some mechanisms are presented. This chapter also points to the different chapters and puts them into perspective....

  2. Anticancer peptides from bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz M. Karpiński

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of death in the world. The rapid development of medicine and pharmacology allows to create new and effective anticancer drugs. Among modern anticancer drugs are bacterial proteins. Until now has been shown anticancer activity among others azurin and exotoxin A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pep27anal2 from Streptococcus pneumoniae, diphtheria toxin from Corynebacterium diphtheriae, and recently discovered Entap from Enterococcus sp. The study presents the current data regarding the properties, action and anticancer activity of listed peptides.

  3. Peptides and Food Intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  4. Optimization of the recombinant production and purification of a self-assembling peptide in Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rad-Malekshahi, Mazda; Flement, Matthias; Hennink, Wim E.; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Background: Amphiphilic peptides are important building blocks to generate nanostructured biomaterials for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. We have shown that the self-assembling peptide SA2 (Ac-AAVVLLLWEE) can be recombinantly produced in E. coli when fused to the small ubiquitin-

  5. Exploring Protein-Peptide Binding Specificity through Computational Peptide Screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnab Bhattacherjee

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The binding of short disordered peptide stretches to globular protein domains is important for a wide range of cellular processes, including signal transduction, protein transport, and immune response. The often promiscuous nature of these interactions and the conformational flexibility of the peptide chain, sometimes even when bound, make the binding specificity of this type of protein interaction a challenge to understand. Here we develop and test a Monte Carlo-based procedure for calculating protein-peptide binding thermodynamics for many sequences in a single run. The method explores both peptide sequence and conformational space simultaneously by simulating a joint probability distribution which, in particular, makes searching through peptide sequence space computationally efficient. To test our method, we apply it to 3 different peptide-binding protein domains and test its ability to capture the experimentally determined specificity profiles. Insight into the molecular underpinnings of the observed specificities is obtained by analyzing the peptide conformational ensembles of a large number of binding-competent sequences. We also explore the possibility of using our method to discover new peptide-binding pockets on protein structures.

  6. Optimization of heavy chain and light chain signal peptides for high level expression of therapeutic antibodies in CHO cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Haryadi

    Full Text Available Translocation of a nascent protein from the cytosol into the ER mediated by its signal peptide is a critical step in protein secretion. The aim of this work was to develop a platform technology to optimize the signal peptides for high level production of therapeutic antibodies in CHO cells. A database of signal peptides from a large number of human immunoglobulin (Ig heavy chain (HC and kappa light chain (LC was generated. Most of the HC signal peptides contain 19 amino acids which can be divided into three domains and the LC signal peptides contain 22 amino acids. The signal peptides were then clustered according to sequence similarity. Based on the clustering, 8 HC and 2 LC signal peptides were analyzed for their impacts on the production of 5-top selling antibody therapeutics, namely, Herceptin, Avastin, Remicade, Rituxan, and Humira. The best HC and LC signal peptides for producing these 5 antibodies were identified. The optimized signal peptides for Rituxan is 2-fold better compared to its native signal peptides which are available in the public database. Substitution of a single amino acid in the optimized HC signal peptide for Avastin reduced its production significantly. Mass spectrometry analyses revealed that all optimized signal peptides are accurately removed in the mature antibodies. The results presented in this report are particularly important for the production of these 5 antibodies as biosimilar drugs. They also have the potential to be the best signal peptides for the production of new antibodies in CHO cells.

  7. De novo peptide design and experimental validation of histone methyltransferase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smadbeck, James; Peterson, Meghan B; Zee, Barry M; Garapaty, Shivani; Mago, Aashna; Lee, Christina; Giannis, Athanassios; Trojer, Patrick; Garcia, Benjamin A; Floudas, Christodoulos A

    2014-01-01

    Histones are small proteins critical to the efficient packaging of DNA in the nucleus. DNA–protein complexes, known as nucleosomes, are formed when the DNA winds itself around the surface of the histones. The methylation of histone residues by enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) maintains gene repression over successive cell generations. Overexpression of EZH2 can silence important tumor suppressor genes leading to increased invasiveness of many types of cancers. This makes the inhibition of EZH2 an important target in the development of cancer therapeutics. We employed a three-stage computational de novo peptide design method to design inhibitory peptides of EZH2. The method consists of a sequence selection stage and two validation stages for fold specificity and approximate binding affinity. The sequence selection stage consists of an integer linear optimization model that was solved to produce a rank-ordered list of amino acid sequences with increased stability in the bound peptide-EZH2 structure. These sequences were validated through the calculation of the fold specificity and approximate binding affinity of the designed peptides. Here we report the discovery of novel EZH2 inhibitory peptides using the de novo peptide design method. The computationally discovered peptides were experimentally validated in vitro using dose titrations and mechanism of action enzymatic assays. The peptide with the highest in vitro response, SQ037, was validated in nucleo using quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics. This peptide had an IC50 of 13.5 mM, demonstrated greater potency as an inhibitor when compared to the native and K27A mutant control peptides, and demonstrated competitive inhibition versus the peptide substrate. Additionally, this peptide demonstrated high specificity to the EZH2 target in comparison to other histone methyltransferases. The validated peptides are the first computationally designed peptides that directly inhibit EZH2. These inhibitors should

  8. De novo peptide design and experimental validation of histone methyltransferase inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Smadbeck

    Full Text Available Histones are small proteins critical to the efficient packaging of DNA in the nucleus. DNA–protein complexes, known as nucleosomes, are formed when the DNA winds itself around the surface of the histones. The methylation of histone residues by enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2 maintains gene repression over successive cell generations. Overexpression of EZH2 can silence important tumor suppressor genes leading to increased invasiveness of many types of cancers. This makes the inhibition of EZH2 an important target in the development of cancer therapeutics. We employed a three-stage computational de novo peptide design method to design inhibitory peptides of EZH2. The method consists of a sequence selection stage and two validation stages for fold specificity and approximate binding affinity. The sequence selection stage consists of an integer linear optimization model that was solved to produce a rank-ordered list of amino acid sequences with increased stability in the bound peptide-EZH2 structure. These sequences were validated through the calculation of the fold specificity and approximate binding affinity of the designed peptides. Here we report the discovery of novel EZH2 inhibitory peptides using the de novo peptide design method. The computationally discovered peptides were experimentally validated in vitro using dose titrations and mechanism of action enzymatic assays. The peptide with the highest in vitro response, SQ037, was validated in nucleo using quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics. This peptide had an IC50 of 13.5 mM, demonstrated greater potency as an inhibitor when compared to the native and K27A mutant control peptides, and demonstrated competitive inhibition versus the peptide substrate. Additionally, this peptide demonstrated high specificity to the EZH2 target in comparison to other histone methyltransferases. The validated peptides are the first computationally designed peptides that directly inhibit EZH2

  9. De novo peptide design and experimental validation of histone methyltransferase inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Smadbeck

    Full Text Available Histones are small proteins critical to the efficient packaging of DNA in the nucleus. DNA-protein complexes, known as nucleosomes, are formed when the DNA winds itself around the surface of the histones. The methylation of histone residues by enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2 maintains gene repression over successive cell generations. Overexpression of EZH2 can silence important tumor suppressor genes leading to increased invasiveness of many types of cancers. This makes the inhibition of EZH2 an important target in the development of cancer therapeutics. We employed a three-stage computational de novo peptide design method to design inhibitory peptides of EZH2. The method consists of a sequence selection stage and two validation stages for fold specificity and approximate binding affinity. The sequence selection stage consists of an integer linear optimization model that was solved to produce a rank-ordered list of amino acid sequences with increased stability in the bound peptide-EZH2 structure. These sequences were validated through the calculation of the fold specificity and approximate binding affinity of the designed peptides. Here we report the discovery of novel EZH2 inhibitory peptides using the de novo peptide design method. The computationally discovered peptides were experimentally validated in vitro using dose titrations and mechanism of action enzymatic assays. The peptide with the highest in vitro response, SQ037, was validated in nucleo using quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics. This peptide had an IC50 of 13.5 [Formula: see text]M, demonstrated greater potency as an inhibitor when compared to the native and K27A mutant control peptides, and demonstrated competitive inhibition versus the peptide substrate. Additionally, this peptide demonstrated high specificity to the EZH2 target in comparison to other histone methyltransferases. The validated peptides are the first computationally designed peptides that directly

  10. A liver metalloendopeptidase which degrades the circulating hypotensive peptide hormones bradykinin and atrial natriuretic peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho K.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A new metalloendopeptidase was purified to apparent homogeneity from a homogenate of normal human liver using successive steps of chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, hydroxyapatite and Sephacryl S-200. The purified enzyme hydrolyzed the Pro7-Phe8 bond of bradykinin and the Ser25-Tyr26 bond of atrial natriuretic peptide. No cleavage was produced in other peptide hormones such as vasopressin, oxytocin or Met- and Leu-enkephalin. This enzyme activity was inhibited by 1 mM divalent cation chelators such as EDTA, EGTA and o-phenanthroline and was insensitive to 1 µM phosphoramidon and captopril, specific inhibitors of neutral endopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.11 and angiotensin-converting enzyme (EC 3.4.15.1, respectively. With Mr 85 kDa, the enzyme exhibits optimal activity at pH 7.5. The high affinity of this endopeptidase for bradykinin (Km = 10 µM and for atrial natriuretic peptide (Km = 5 µM suggests that it may play a physiological role in the inactivation of these circulating hypotensive peptide hormones.

  11. Parallel Syntheses of Peptides on Teflon-Patterned Paper Arrays (SyntArrays).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiss, Frédérique; Yang, Yang; Derda, Ratmir

    2016-01-01

    Screening of peptides to find the ligands that bind to specific targets is an important step in drug discovery. These high-throughput screens require large number of structural variants of peptides to be synthesized and tested. This chapter describes the generation of arrays of peptides on Teflon-patterned sheets of paper. First, the protocol describes the patterning of paper with a Teflon solution to produce arrays with solvophobic barriers that are able to confine organic solvents. Next, we describe the parallel syntheses of 96 peptides on Teflon-patterned arrays using the SPOT synthesis method.

  12. Ribosome evolution: Emergence of peptide synthesis machinery

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Koji Tamura

    2011-12-01

    Proteins, the main players in current biological systems, are produced on ribosomes by sequential amide bond (peptide bond) formations between amino-acid-bearing tRNAs. The ribosome is an exquisite super-complex of RNA-proteins, containing more than 50 proteins and at least 3 kinds of RNAs. The combination of a variety of side chains of amino acids (typically 20 kinds with some exceptions) confers proteins with extraordinary structure and functions. The origin of peptide bond formation and the ribosome is crucial to the understanding of life itself. In this article, a possible evolutionary pathway to peptide bond formation machinery (proto-ribosome) will be discussed, with a special focus on the RNA minihelix (primordial form of modern tRNA) as a starting molecule. Combining the present data with recent experimental data, we can infer that the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) evolved from a primitive system in the RNA world comprising tRNA-like molecules formed by duplication of minihelix-like small RNA.

  13. Endogenous opioid peptides and epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Haffmans (Judith)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractIn recent years a large number of pept:ides, many of which were originall.y characterized in non-neural tissues, have been reported to be present in the central nervous system ( CNS) . The detection of these peptides within the CNS has raised many questions regarding their source and mec

  14. Urinary Peptides in Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solaas, K. M.; Skjeldal, O.; Gardner, M. L. G.; Kase, B. F.; Reichelt, K. L.

    2002-01-01

    A study found a significantly higher level of peptides in the urine of 53 girls with Rett syndrome compared with controls. The elevation was similar to that in 35 girls with infantile autism. Levels of peptides were lower in girls with classic Rett syndrome than those with congenital Rett syndrome. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  15. Peptide Antibiotics for ESKAPE Pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thomas Thyge

    and toxicity by utilizing of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a whole animal model. This was carried out by testing of antimicrobial peptides targeting Gram-positive bacteria exemplified by the important human pathogen methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The peptide BP214 was developed from...

  16. Biosynthesis of cardiac natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac-derived peptide hormones were identified more than 25 years ago. An astonishing amount of clinical studies have established cardiac natriuretic peptides and their molecular precursors as useful markers of heart disease. In contrast to the clinical applications, the biogenesis of cardiac...

  17. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, N.D.

    1995-01-01

    Synthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps that lead to the uni

  18. New insights into the bioactivity of peptides from probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Santi M; Pati, Bikas R; Chakraborty, Ranadhir; Franco, Octavio L

    2016-06-01

    Probiotics are unique bacteria that offer several therapeutic benefits to human beings when administered in optimum amounts. Probiotics are able to produce antimicrobial substances, which stimulate the body's immune responses. Here, we review in detail the anti-infective peptides derived from probiotics and their potential immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory activities, including a major role in cross-talk between probiotics and gut microbiota under adverse conditions. Insights from the engineered cell surface of probiotics may provide novel anti-infective therapy by heterologous expression of receptor peptides of bacterial toxins. It may be possible to use antigenic peptides from viral pathogens as live vaccines. Another possibility is to generate antiviral peptides that bind directly to virus particles, while some peptides exert anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects. Some extracellular polymeric substances might serve as anti-infective peptides. These avenues of treatment have remained largely unexplored to date, despite their potential in generating powerful anti-inflammatory and anti-infective products.

  19. Peptides as catalysts in the RNA world

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Rafal; Dörr, Mark; Luisi, Pier Luigi

    peptides, which in turn shifted the equilibrium to produce even more product. In the present work we describe a prebiotically plausible system in which the SerHis dipeptide acts as catalyst for the formation of RNA oligomers from imidazole derivatives of mononucleotides. The thermodynamic shift towards...... ester. Bioorg. Med. Chem. 8(12): 2675-80. Monnard PA, Ziock H. (2008) Eutectic phase in water-ice: a self-assembled environment conducive to metal-catalyzed non-enzymatic RNA polymerization. Chem Biodivers. 5(8):1521-39. Orgel LE. (2004) Prebiotic chemistry and the origin of the RNA world. Crit. Rev...

  20. Peptide-LNA oligonucleotide conjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, I Kira; Hansen, Lykke Haastrup; Vester, Birte

    2013-01-01

    properties, peptides were introduced into oligonucleotides via a 2'-alkyne-2'-amino-LNA scaffold. Derivatives of methionine- and leucine-enkephalins were chosen as model peptides of mixed amino acid content, which were singly and doubly incorporated into LNA/DNA strands using highly efficient copper......Although peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates (POCs) are well-known for nucleic acids delivery and therapy, reports on internal attachment of peptides to oligonucleotides are limited in number. To develop a convenient route for preparation of internally labeled POCs with improved biomedical......(i)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) "click" chemistry. DNA/RNA target binding affinity and selectivity of the resulting POCs were improved in comparison to LNA/DNA mixmers and unmodified DNA controls. This clearly demonstrates that internal attachment of peptides to oligonucleotides can significantly...

  1. Intein-mediated peptide arrays for epitope mapping and kinase/phosphatase assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming-Qun; Ghosh, Inca; Kochinyan, Samvel; Sun, Luo

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic peptides are widely used for production and analysis of antibodies as well as in the study of protein modification enzymes. To circumvent the technical challenges of the existing techniques regarding peptide quantization and normalization, a new method of producing peptide arrays has been developed. This approach utilizes intein-mediated protein ligation that involves linkage of a carrier protein possessing a reactive carboxyl-terminal thioester to a peptide with an amino-terminal cysteine through a native peptide bond. Ligated protein substrates or enzyme-treated samples are arrayed on nitrocellulose membranes with a standard dot-blot apparatus and analyzed by immunoassay. This technique has improved sensitivity and reproducibility, and is suitable for various peptide-based applications. In this report, several experimental procedures including epitope mapping and the study of protein modifications were described.

  2. Characterization of antibodies to synthetic nerve growth factor (NGF) and proNGF peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebendal, T; Persson, H; Larhammar, D; Lundströmer, K; Olson, L

    1989-03-01

    Sequence data for the mature nerve growth factor (NGF) protein and its precursor are available from molecular cloning of the NGF gene in several species, including mice, humans, rats, and chickens. Hydrophilicity analysis of the predicted rat and chicken prepro-NGF was carried out to locate putative antigenic determinants. Eight peptides were selected and synthesized based on hydrophilicity profiles. Two peptides represent sequences in the rat (and mouse) pro-NGF, one peptide (our peptide P3) represents a highly conserved region of the mature NGF protein (identical in humans, mice, rats, and chickens), two peptides are specific for the mature chicken NGF, and the remaining three peptides are specific for the mature rat NGF (each with only one amino acid substitution compared with corresponding segments of the mouse NGF). For immunization, the peptides were conjugated to keyhold limpet hemocyanin and used to produce antisera in rabbits. After bleeding, peptide-specific antibodies were purified on affinity columns prepared by coupling each of the synthetic peptides. The different peptide antisera and affinity-purified antibodies then were characterized by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) and immunohistochemistry of the male mouse submandibular gland, a rich exocrine source of NGF. ELISA analysis showed that all peptide antisera bound two to four orders of magnitude better than normal rabbit serum to a coat of their proper peptide. The higher binding was retained by the purified peptide antibodies compared with normal rabbit immunoglobulin. Specific tests, in which one peptide antiserum was checked against different peptide coats in the ELISA, also showed two to four orders of magnitude higher binding of antibodies to the proper synthetic peptide. The peptide antibodies also were tested for their ability to bind to native mouse beta NGF coated to the immunoplates. Only antibodies raised to the conserved P3 peptide recognized native NGF to an extent similar to that

  3. The Role Of Milk Peptide As Antimicrobial Agent In Supporting Health Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eni Kusumaningtyas

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptide is commonly present in all species as a component of their innate immune defense against infection. Antimicrobial peptides derived from milk such as isracidin, casocidin, casecidin and other fragments with variety of amino acid sequence are released upon enzymatic hydrolysis from milk protein К-casein, α-casein, β-casein, α-lactalbumin and β- lactoglobulin. These peptides were produced by the activity of digestive or microbial protease such as trypsin, pepsin, chymosin or alcalase. The mode of action of these peptides is by interaction of their positive with negative charge of target cell membrane leading to disruption of membrane associated with physiological event such as cell division or translocation of peptide across the membrane to interact with cytoplasmic target. Modification of charged or nonpolar aliphatic residues within peptides can enhance or reduce the activities of the peptides against a number of microbial strains and it seems to be strain dependent. Several peptides act not only as an antimicrobial but also as an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, antioxidant, immunomodulator, antiinflamation, food and feed preservative. Although the commercial production of these peptides is still limited due to lack of suitable large-scale technologies, fast development of some methods for peptide production will hopefully increase the possibility for mass production.

  4. Towards Bio-inspired and Functionalized Peptide Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, S.

    2014-01-01

    Peptide-based materials constitute a class of molecules that play an important role in many biological processes and are utilized by many organisms to interact with their environment. One of the most well-known examples is spider silk, a material produced by web-spinning spiders composed of repeatin

  5. Non-peptide metabolites from the genus Bacillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdache, Ahlem; Lamarti, Ahmed; Aleu, Josefina; Collado, Isidro G

    2011-04-25

    Bacillus species produce a number of non-peptide metabolites that display a broad spectrum of activity and structurally diverse bioactive chemical structures. Biosynthetic, biological, and structural studies of these metabolites isolated from Bacillus species are reviewed. This contribution also includes a detailed study of the activity of the metabolites described, especially their role in biological control mechanisms.

  6. Purification and use of E. coli peptide deformylase for peptide deprotection in chemoenzymatic peptide synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Toma, Claudia; Sonke, Theo; Quaedflieg, Peter J.; Janssen, Dick B.

    2013-01-01

    Peptide deformylases (PDFs) catalyze the removal of the formyl group from the N-terminal methionine residue in nascent polypeptide chains in prokaryotes. Its deformylation activity makes PDF an attractive candidate for the biocatalytic deprotection of formylated peptides that are used in chemoenzyma

  7. BPDA - A Bayesian peptide detection algorithm for mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braga-Neto Ulisses

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mass spectrometry (MS is an essential analytical tool in proteomics. Many existing algorithms for peptide detection are based on isotope template matching and usually work at different charge states separately, making them ineffective to detect overlapping peptides and low abundance peptides. Results We present BPDA, a Bayesian approach for peptide detection in data produced by MS instruments with high enough resolution to baseline-resolve isotopic peaks, such as MALDI-TOF and LC-MS. We model the spectra as a mixture of candidate peptide signals, and the model is parameterized by MS physical properties. BPDA is based on a rigorous statistical framework and avoids problems, such as voting and ad-hoc thresholding, generally encountered in algorithms based on template matching. It systematically evaluates all possible combinations of possible peptide candidates to interpret a given spectrum, and iteratively finds the best fitting peptide signal in order to minimize the mean squared error of the inferred spectrum to the observed spectrum. In contrast to previous detection methods, BPDA performs deisotoping and deconvolution of mass spectra simultaneously, which enables better identification of weak peptide signals and produces higher sensitivities and more robust results. Unlike template-matching algorithms, BPDA can handle complex data where features overlap. Our experimental results indicate that BPDA performs well on simulated data and real MS data sets, for various resolutions and signal to noise ratios, and compares very favorably with commonly used commercial and open-source software, such as flexAnalysis, OpenMS, and Decon2LS, according to sensitivity and detection accuracy. Conclusion Unlike previous detection methods, which only employ isotopic distributions and work at each single charge state alone, BPDA takes into account the charge state distribution as well, thus lending information to better identify weak peptide

  8. Potential of phage-displayed peptide library technology to identify functional targeting peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumpe, Lauren RH; Mori, Toshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    Combinatorial peptide library technology is a valuable resource for drug discovery and development. Several peptide drugs developed through phage-displayed peptide library technology are presently in clinical trials and the authors envision that phage-displayed peptide library technology will assist in the discovery and development of many more. This review attempts to compile and summarize recent literature on targeting peptides developed through peptide library technology, with special emphasis on novel peptides with targeting capacity evaluated in vivo. PMID:20150977

  9. General Approach To Determine Disulfide Connectivity in Cysteine-Rich Peptides by Sequential Alkylation on Solid Phase and Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Anastasia; Eksteen, J Johannes; Isaksson, Johan; Sengee, Myagmarsuren; Hansen, Terkel; Vasskog, Terje

    2016-10-04

    Within the field of bioprospecting, disulfide-rich peptides are a promising group of compounds that has the potential to produce important leads for new pharmaceuticals. The disulfide bridges stabilize the tertiary structure of the peptides and often make them superior drug candidates to linear peptides. However, determination of disulfide connectivity in peptides with many disulfide bridges has proven to be laborious and general methods are lacking. This study presents a general approach for structure elucidation of disulfide-rich peptides. The method features sequential reduction and alkylation of a peptide on solid phase combined with sequencing of the fully alkylated peptide by tandem mass spectrometry. Subsequently, the disulfide connectivity is assigned on the basis of the determined alkylation pattern. The presented method is especially suitable for peptides that are prone to disulfide scrambling or are unstable in solution with partly reduced bridges. Additionally, the use of small amounts of peptide in the lowest nmol range makes the method ideal for structure elucidation of unknown peptides from the bioprospecting process. This study successfully demonstrates the new method for seven different peptides with two to four disulfide bridges. Two peptides with previous contradicting publications, μ-conotoxin KIIA and hepcidin-25, are included, and their disulfide connectivity is confirmed in accordance with the latest published results.

  10. Radiopharmaceutical development of radiolabelled peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fani, Melpomeni; Maecke, Helmut R. [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Receptor targeting with radiolabelled peptides has become very important in nuclear medicine and oncology in the past few years. The overexpression of many peptide receptors in numerous cancers, compared to their relatively low density in physiological organs, represents the molecular basis for in vivo imaging and targeted radionuclide therapy with radiolabelled peptide-based probes. The prototypes are analogs of somatostatin which are routinely used in the clinic. More recent developments include somatostatin analogs with a broader receptor subtype profile or with antagonistic properties. Many other peptide families such as bombesin, cholecystokinin/gastrin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)/exendin, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) etc. have been explored during the last few years and quite a number of potential radiolabelled probes have been derived from them. On the other hand, a variety of strategies and optimized protocols for efficient labelling of peptides with clinically relevant radionuclides such as {sup 99m}Tc, M{sup 3+} radiometals ({sup 111}In, {sup 86/90}Y, {sup 177}Lu, {sup 67/68}Ga), {sup 64/67}Cu, {sup 18}F or radioisotopes of iodine have been developed. The labelling approaches include direct labelling, the use of bifunctional chelators or prosthetic groups. The choice of the labelling approach is driven by the nature and the chemical properties of the radionuclide. Additionally, chemical strategies, including modification of the amino acid sequence and introduction of linkers/spacers with different characteristics, have been explored for the improvement of the overall performance of the radiopeptides, e.g. metabolic stability and pharmacokinetics. Herein, we discuss the development of peptides as radiopharmaceuticals starting from the choice of the labelling method and the conditions to the design and optimization of the peptide probe, as well as some recent developments, focusing on a selected list of peptide families, including somatostatin

  11. Peptide primary messengers in plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The peptide primary messengers regulate embryonic development,cell growth and many other activities in animal cells. But recent evidence verified that peptide primary messengers are also involved in plant defense responses, the recognition between pollen and stigma and keep the balance between cell proliferation and differentiations in shoot apical meristems. Those results suggest that plants may actually make wide use of peptide primary messengers, both in embryonic development and late life when they rally their cells to defend against pathogens and insect pests. The recent advance in those aspects is reviewed.

  12. Next generation natriuretic peptide measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunter, Ingrid; Goetze, Jens P

    2012-01-01

    Plasma measurement of natriuretic peptides is a "must" for clinical laboratories. For the next generation measurement, the unraveling of the molecular complexity of the peptides points toward a more qualitative assessment, as the posttranslational processing also changes with disease. Changes...... in the molecular heterogeneity could in itself contain valuable information of clinical status, and the time seems right for industry and dedicated researchers in the field to get together and discuss the next generation natriuretic peptide measurement. In such an environment, new strategies can be developed...

  13. New vasoactive peptides in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimer, Nina; Goetze, Jens Peter; Bendtsen, Flemming;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with cirrhosis have substantial circulatory imbalance between vasoconstrictive and vasodilating forces. The study of circulatory vasoactive peptides may provide important pathophysiological information. This study aimed to assess concentrations, organ extraction and relations...... to haemodynamic changes in the pro-peptides copeptin, proadrenomedullin and pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (proANP) in patients with cirrhosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-four cirrhotic patients and 15 controls were characterized haemodynamically during a liver vein catheterization. Copeptin, proadrenomedullin...... found no extraction of copeptin, proadrenomedullin or proANP over the liver. Copeptin correlated with portal pressure (R=0·50, P

  14. Targeting the Eph System with Peptides and Peptide Conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedl, Stefan J; Pasquale, Elena B

    2015-01-01

    Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and ephrin ligands constitute an important cell communication system that controls development, tissue homeostasis and many pathological processes. Various Eph receptors/ephrins are present in essentially all cell types and their expression is often dysregulated by injury and disease. Thus, the 14 Eph receptors are attracting increasing attention as a major class of potential drug targets. In particular, agents that bind to the extracellular ephrin-binding pocket of these receptors show promise for medical applications. This pocket comprises a broad and shallow groove surrounded by several flexible loops, which makes peptides particularly suitable to target it with high affinity and selectivity. Accordingly, a number of peptides that bind to Eph receptors with micromolar affinity have been identified using phage display and other approaches. These peptides are generally antagonists that inhibit ephrin binding and Eph receptor/ ephrin signaling, but some are agonists mimicking ephrin-induced Eph receptor activation. Importantly, some of the peptides are exquisitely selective for single Eph receptors. Most identified peptides are linear, but recently the considerable advantages of cyclic scaffolds have been recognized, particularly in light of potential optimization towards drug leads. To date, peptide improvements have yielded derivatives with low nanomolar Eph receptor binding affinity, high resistance to plasma proteases and/or long in vivo half-life, exemplifying the merits of peptides for Eph receptor targeting. Besides their modulation of Eph receptor/ephrin function, peptides can also serve to deliver conjugated imaging and therapeutic agents or various types of nanoparticles to tumors and other diseased tissues presenting target Eph receptors.

  15. Bioinformatics Tools for the Discovery of New Nonribosomal Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leclère, Valérie; Weber, Tilmann; Jacques, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    -dimensional structure of the peptides can be compared with the structural patterns of all known NRPs. The presented workflow leads to an efficient and rapid screening of genomic data generated by high throughput technologies. The exploration of such sequenced genomes may lead to the discovery of new drugs (i......This chapter helps in the use of bioinformatics tools relevant to the discovery of new nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) produced by microorganisms. The strategy described can be applied to draft or fully assembled genome sequences. It relies on the identification of the synthetase genes...

  16. Quantitative measurements of trefoil factor family peptides: possibilities and pitfalls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Mie Hessellund

    2013-01-01

    as well as in the circulation. They have been linked to both inflammatory diseases and to various types of cancer, and serum concentrations of TFF3 show a more than 47-fold increase during pregnancy. Several both commercial and in-house immunoassays exist, but a number of methodological issues remain......The trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides TFF1, TFF2, and TFF3 are produced and secreted by mucous membranes throughout the body. Their importance for the protection and repair of epithelial surfaces is well established, and the three peptides are present in various amounts in mucosal secretions...

  17. Host defense peptides and their antimicrobial-immunomodulatory duality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinstraesser, Lars; Kraneburg, Ursula; Jacobsen, Frank; Al-Benna, Sammy

    2011-03-01

    Host defence peptides (HDPs) are short cationic molecules produced by the immune systems of most multicellular organisms and play a central role as effector molecules of innate immunity. Host defence peptides have a wide range of biological activities from direct killing of invading pathogens to modulation of immunity and other biological responses of the host. HDPs have important functions in multiple, clinically relevant disease processes and their imbalanced expression is associated with pathology in different organ systems and cell types. Furthermore, HDPs are now evaluated as model molecules for the development of novel natural antibiotics and immunoregulatory compounds. This review provides an overview of HDPs focused on their antimicrobial-immunomodulatory duality.

  18. Screening of TACE Peptide Inhibitors from Phage Display Peptide Library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To obtain the recombinant tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE) ectodomain and use it as a selective molecule for the screening of TACE peptide inhibitors, the cDNA coding catalytic domain (T800) and full-length ectodomain (T1300) of TACE were amplified by RTPCR, and the expression plasmids were constructed by inserting T800 and T1300 into plasmid pET28a and pET-28c respectively. The recombinant T800 and T1300 were induced by IPTG, and SDSPAGE and Western blotting analysis results revealed that T800 and T1300 were highly expressed in the form of inclusion body. After Ni2+-NTA resin affinity chromatography, the recombinant proteins were used in the screening of TACE-binding peptides from phage display peptide library respectively. After 4 rounds of biopanning, the positive phage clones were analyzed by ELISA, competitive inhibition assay and DNA sequencing. A common amino acid sequence (TRWLVYFSRPYLVAT) was found and synthesized. The synthetic peptide could inhibit the TNF-α release from LPS-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) up to 60.3 %. FACS analysis revealed that the peptide mediated the accumulation of TNF-α on the cell surface. These results demonstrate that the TACE-binding peptide is an effective antagonist of TACE.

  19. Viral O-GalNAc peptide epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olofsson, Sigvard; Blixt, Klas Ola; Bergström, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    on a novel three-step procedure that identifies any reactive viral O-glycosyl peptide epitope with respect to (i) relevant peptide sequence, (ii) the reactive glycoform out of several possible glycopeptide isomers of that peptide sequence, and (iii) possibly tolerated carbohydrate or peptide structural...

  20. Neoglycolipidation for modulating peptide properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Witteloostuijn, Søren Blok

    The alarming increase in the prevalence of obesity and associated comorbidities such as type 2 diabetes emphasizes the urgent need for new drugs with both anorectic and antidiabetic eects. Several peptide hormones secreted from the gastrointestinal tract play an important role in the physiological...... regulation of appetite, food intake, and glucose homeostasis, and many of these peptides display a signicant potential for treatment of obesity and/or type 2 diabetes. This Ph.D. thesis describes three novel approaches for utilizing gut peptides as the starting point for developing obesity and diabetes drugs...... of food intake, which was enhanced compared to native NMU. Project II explored the design, synthesis, and characterization of neoglycolipidated analogs of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). Neoglycolipidation reduced lipophilicity and maintained or even improved in vitro potency towards the GLP-1 receptor...

  1. Cyanine-based probe\\tag-peptide pair for fluorescence protein imaging and fluorescence protein imaging methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Cumblidge, M. Uljana; Cao, Haishi

    2010-08-17

    A molecular probe comprises two arsenic atoms and at least one cyanine based moiety. A method of producing a molecular probe includes providing a molecule having a first formula, treating the molecule with HgOAc, and subsequently transmetallizing with AsCl.sub.3. The As is liganded to ethanedithiol to produce a probe having a second formula. A method of labeling a peptide includes providing a peptide comprising a tag sequence and contacting the peptide with a biarsenical molecular probe. A complex is formed comprising the tag sequence and the molecular probe. A method of studying a peptide includes providing a mixture containing a peptide comprising a peptide tag sequence, adding a biarsenical probe to the mixture, and monitoring the fluorescence of the mixture.

  2. Antimicrobial peptides in annelids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Tasiemski

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Gene encoded antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are widely distributed among living organisms including plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. They constitute important effectors of the innate immune response by exerting multiple roles as mediators of inflammation with impact on epithelial and inflammatory cells influencing diverse processes such as cytokine release, cell proliferation, angiogenesis, wound healing, chemotaxis and immune induction. In invertebrates, most of the data describe the characterization and/or the function of AMPs in the numerically and economically most representative group which are arthropods. Annelids are among the first coelomates and are therefore of special phylogenetic interest. Compared to other invertebrate groups, data on annelid’s immunity reveal heavier emphasis on the cellular than on the humoral response suggesting that immune defense of annelids seems to be principally developed as cellular immunity.This paper gives an overview of the variety of AMPs identified in the three classes of annelids, i.e. polychaetes, oligochaetes and achaetes. Their functions, when they have been studied, in the humoral or cellular response of annelids are also mentioned.

  3. Fiber formation of a synthetic spider peptide derived from Nephila clavata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, Yuji; Kontani, Ko-Ichi; Taniguchi, Rina; Saiki, Masatoshi; Yokoi, Sayoko; Yukuhiro, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Miyazawa, Mitsuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Dragline silk is a high-performance biopolymer with exceptional mechanical properties. Artificial spider dragline silk is currently prepared by a recombinant technique or chemical synthesis. However, the recombinant process is costly and large-sized synthetic peptides are needed for fiber formation. In addition, the silk fibers that are produced are much weaker than a fiber derived from a native spider. In this study, a small peptide was chemically synthesized and examined for its ability to participate in fiber formation. A short synthetic peptide derived from Nephila clavata was prepared by a solid-phase peptide method, based on a prediction using the hydrophobic parameter of each individual amino acid residue. After purification of the spider peptide, fiber formation was examined under several conditions. Fiber formation proceeded in the acidic pH range, and larger fibers were produced when organic solvents such as trifluoroethanol and acetonitrile were used at an acidic pH. Circular dichroism measurements of the spider peptide indicate that the peptide has a beta-sheet structure and that the formation of a beta-sheet structure is required for the spider peptide to undergo fiber formation.

  4. Natriuretic peptides in cardiometabolic regulation and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zois, Nora E; Bartels, Emil D; Hunter, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    decade. Dysregulation of the natriuretic peptide system has been associated with obesity, glucose intolerance, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and essential hypertension. Moreover, the natriuretic peptides have been implicated in the protection against atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and myocardial ischaemia. All...... these conditions can coexist and potentially lead to heart failure, a syndrome associated with a functional natriuretic peptide deficiency despite high circulating concentrations of immunoreactive peptides. Therefore, dysregulation of the natriuretic peptide system, a 'natriuretic handicap', might be an important...

  5. [Preparation and characterization of the recombinant protein containing immunomimetic peptide of benzo[a]pyrene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apal'ko, S V; Lunin, V G; Filipenko, M L; Matveeva, V A; Liashchuk, A M; Lavrova, N V; Sherina, E A; Aver'ianov, A V; Kostianko, M V; Glushkov, A N

    2011-01-01

    Two recombinant plasmids were constructed. The first plasmid contained the hybrid gene composed of immunomimetic peptide of benzo[a]pyrene, of the protein pIII of bacteriophage M13 and of cellulose binding domain encoding sequences. The second plasmid contained the hybrid gene composed of the signal peptide of the protein pIII of bacteriophage M13, of immunomimetic peptide of benzo[a]pyrene, of the protein pill of bacteriophage M13 and of cellulose binding domain sequences. The obtained recombinant plasmids were used in expression of chimeric protein containing immunomimetic peptide ofbenzo[a]pyrene based on strain E. coli M15. The lack of the recombinant protein expression using first plasmid was demonstrated. In the same time, it was shown that accumulation of recombinant protein contained immunomimetic peptide with signal peptide of the protein pIIIl of bacteriophage was present. This chimeric protein was produced in "mature" (without signal peptide) and "unprocessing" (with signal peptide) forms. Using the Western-blot analysis, it was shown that the "mature" form only specifically bound to the B2 monoclonal antibody against benzo[a]pyrene. Thus, we expressed, purified, and characterized the recombinant protein containing immunomimetic peptide of benzo[a]pyrene.

  6. Bioactive Peptides in Milk and Dairy Products: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young Woo; Nam, Myoung Soo

    2015-01-01

    Functionally and physiologically active peptides are produced from several food proteins during gastrointestinal digestion and fermentation of food materials with lactic acid bacteria. Once bioactive peptides (BPs) are liberated, they exhibit a wide variety of physiological functions in the human body such as gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, immune, endocrine, and nervous systems. These functionalities of the peptides in human health and physiology include antihypertensive, antimicrobial, antioxidative, antithrombotic, opioid, anti-appetizing, immunomodulatory and mineral-binding activities. Most of the bioactivities of milk proteins are latent, being absent or incomplete in the original native protein, but full activities are manifested upon proteolytic digestion to release and activate encrypted bioactive peptides from the original protein. Bioactive peptides have been identified within the amino acid sequences of native milk proteins. Due to their physiological and physico-chemical versatility, milk peptides are regarded as greatly important components for health promoting foods or pharmaceutical applications. Milk and colostrum of bovine and other dairy species are considered as the most important source of natural bioactive components. Over the past a few decades, major advances and developments have been achieved on the science, technology and commercial applications of bioactive components which are present naturally in the milk. Although the majority of published works are associated with the search of bioactive peptides in bovine milk samples, some of them are involved in the investigation of ovine or caprine milk. The advent of functional foods has been facilitated by increasing scientific knowledge about the metabolic and genomic effects of diet and specific dietary components on human health.

  7. Ribosomal Synthesis of Peptides with Multiple β-Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Tomoshige; Goto, Yuki; Suga, Hiroaki; Murakami, Hiroshi

    2016-02-17

    The compatibility of β-amino acids with ribosomal translation was studied for decades, but it has been still unclear whether the ribosome can accept various β-amino acids, and whether the ribosome can introduce multiple β-amino acids in a peptide. In the present study, by using the Escherichia coli reconstituted cell-free translation system with a reprogramed genetic code, we screened β-amino acids that give high single incorporation efficiency and used them to synthesize peptides containing multiple β-amino acids. The experiments of single β-amino acid incorporation into a peptide revealed that 13 β-amino acids are compatible with ribosomal translation. Six of the tested β-amino acids (βhGly, l-βhAla, l-βhGln, l-βhPhg, l-βhMet, and d-βhPhg) showed high incorporation efficiencies, and seven (l-βhLeu, l-βhIle, l-βhAsn, l-βhPhe, l-βhLys, d-βhAla, and d-βhLeu) showed moderate incorporation efficiencies; whereas no full-length peptide was produced using other β-amino acids (l-βhPro, l-βhTrp, and l-βhGlu). Subsequent double-incorporation experiments using β-amino acids with high single incorporation efficiency revealed that elongation of peptides with successive β-amino acids is prohibited. Efficiency of the double-incorporation of the β-amino acids was restored by the insertion of Tyr or Ile between the two β-amino acids. On the basis of these experiments, we also designed mRNA sequences of peptides, and demonstrated the ribosomal synthesis of peptides containing different types of β-amino acids at multiple positions.

  8. Peptides and Anti-peptide Antibodies for Small and Medium Scale Peptide and Anti-peptide Affinity Microarrays: Antigenic Peptide Selection, Immobilization, and Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Briones, Andrea; Soloviev, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of selection of antigenic peptides for the development of anti-peptide antibodies for use in microarray-based multiplex affinity assays and also with mass-spectrometry detection. The methods described here are mostly applicable to small to medium scale arrays. Although the same principles of peptide selection would be suitable for larger scale arrays (with 100+ features) the actual informatics software and printing methods may well be different. Because of the sheer number of proteins/peptides to be processed and analyzed dedicated software capable of processing all the proteins and an enterprise level array robotics may be necessary for larger scale efforts. This report aims to provide practical advice to those who develop or use arrays with up to ~100 different peptide or protein features.

  9. Versatile Peptide C-Terminal Functionalization via a Computationally Engineered Peptide Amidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Bian; Wijma, Hein J.; Song, Lu; Rozeboom, Henriette J.; Poloni, Claudia; Tian, Yue; Arif, Muhammad I.; Nuijens, Timo; Quaedflieg, Peter J. L. M.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Feringa, Ben L.; Janssen, Dick B.

    2016-01-01

    The properties of synthetic peptides, including potency, stability, and bioavailability, are strongly influenced by modification of the peptide chain termini. Unfortunately, generally applicable methods for selective and mild C-terminal peptide functionalization are lacking. In this work, we explore

  10. Rice Bran Protein as a Potent Source of Antimelanogenic Peptides with Tyrosinase Inhibitory Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Akihito; Tanaka, Seiya; Tanaka, Takaaki; Taniguchi, Masayuki

    2016-10-28

    Rice (Oryza sativa) is consumed as a staple food globally, and rice bran, the byproduct, is an unused biomass that is ultimately discarded as waste. Thus, in the present study, a technique for producing tyrosinase inhibitory peptides from rice bran protein (RBP) was developed. Simultaneous treatment of RBP with chymotrypsin and trypsin produced numerous peptides. Subsequently, six tyrosinase inhibitory peptides were isolated from the hydrolysate fractions in a multistep purification protocol, and their amino acid sequences were determined. Three of these peptides had a C-terminal tyrosine residue and exhibited significant inhibitory effects against tyrosinase-mediated monophenolase reactions. Furthermore, peptide CT-2 (Leu-Gln-Pro-Ser-His-Tyr) potently inhibited melanogenesis in mouse B16 melanoma cells without causing cytotoxicity, suggesting the potential of CT-2 as an agent for melanin-related skin disorder treatment. The present data indicate that RBP is a potent source of tyrosinase inhibitory peptides and that simultaneous treatment of RBP with chymotrypsin and trypsin efficiently produces these peptides.

  11. Peptides and Food Intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Sobrino Crespo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nutrients created by the digestion of food are proposed to active G protein coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells e.g. the L-cell. This stimulates the release of gut hormones. Hormones released from the gut and adipose tissue play an important rol in the regulation of food intake and energy expenditure (1.Many circulating signals, including gut hormones, can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC neurons directly, after passing across the median eminence. The ARC is adjacent to the median eminence, a circumventricular organ with fenestrated capillaries and hence an incomplete blood-brain barrier (2. The ARC of the hypothalamus is believed to play a crucial role in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. The ARC contains two populations of neurons with opposing effect on food intake (3. Medially located orexigenic neurons (i.e those stimulating appetite express neuropeptide Y (NPY and agouti-related protein (AgRP (4-5. Anorexigenic neurons (i.e. those inhibiting appetite in the lateral ARC express alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH derived from pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC and cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART (6. The balance between activities of these neuronal circuits is critical to body weight regulation.In contrast, other peripheral signals influence the hypothalamus indirectly via afferent neuronal pathway and brainstem circuits. In this context gastrointestinal’s vagal afferents are activated by mechanoreceptors and chemoreceptors, and converge in the nucleus of the tractus solitaries (NTS of the brainstem. Neuronal projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypotalamus (1, 7. Gut hormones also alter the activity of the ascending vagal pathway from the gut to the brainstem. In the cases of ghrelin and Peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY, there are evidences for both to have a direct action on the arcuate nucleus and an action via the vagus nerve a

  12. Peptides: A new class of anticancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Smolarczyk

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Peptides are a novel class of anticancer agents embracing two distinct categories: natural antibacterial peptides, which are preferentially bound by cancer cells, and chemically synthesized peptides, which bind specifically to precise molecular targets located on the surface of tumor cells. Antibacterial peptides bind to both cell and mitochondrial membranes. Some of these peptides attach to the cell membrane, resulting in its disorganization. Other antibacterial peptides penetrate cancer cells without causing cell membrane damage, but they disrupt mitochondrial membranes. Thanks to phage and aptamer libraries, it has become possible to obtain synthetic peptides blocking or activating some target proteins found in cancer cells as well as in cells forming the tumor environment. These synthetic peptides can feature anti-angiogenic properties, block enzymes indispensable for sustained tumor growth, and reduce tumor ability to metastasize. In this review the properties of peptides belonging to both categories are discussed and attempts of their application for therapeutic purposes are outlined.

  13. Exploration of the Medicinal Peptide Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevaert, Bert; Stalmans, Sofie; Wynendaele, Evelien; Taevernier, Lien; Bracke, Nathalie; D'Hondt, Matthias; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2016-01-01

    The chemical properties of peptide medicines, known as the 'medicinal peptide space' is considered a multi-dimensional subset of the global peptide space, where each dimension represents a chemical descriptor. These descriptors can be linked to biofunctional, medicinal properties to varying degrees. Knowledge of this space can increase the efficiency of the peptide-drug discovery and development process, as well as advance our understanding and classification of peptide medicines. For 245 peptide drugs, already available on the market or in clinical development, multivariate dataexploration was performed using peptide relevant physicochemical descriptors, their specific peptidedrug target and their clinical use. Our retrospective analysis indicates that clusters in the medicinal peptide space are located in a relatively narrow range of the physicochemical space: dense and empty regions were found, which can be explored for the discovery of novel peptide drugs.

  14. Perspectives and Peptides of the Next Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogden, Kim A.

    Shortly after their discovery, antimicrobial peptides from prokaryotes and eukaryotes were recognized as the next potential generation of pharmaceuticals to treat antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections and septic shock, to preserve food, or to sanitize surfaces. Initial research focused on identifying the spectrum of antimicrobial agents, determining the range of antimicrobial activities against bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens, and assessing the antimicrobial activity of synthetic peptides versus their natural counterparts. Subsequent research then focused on the mechanisms of antimicrobial peptide activity in model membrane systems not only to identify the mechanisms of antimicrobial peptide activity in microorganisms but also to discern differences in cytotoxicity for prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Recent, contemporary work now focuses on current and future efforts to construct hybrid peptides, peptide congeners, stabilized peptides, peptide conjugates, and immobilized peptides for unique and specific applications to control the growth of microorganisms in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Peptide synthesis using unprotected peptides through orthogonal coupling methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, J P; Lu, Y A; Liu, C F; Shao, J

    1995-01-01

    We describe an approach to the synthesis of peptides from segments bearing no protecting groups through an orthogonal coupling method to capture the acyl segment as a thioester that then undergoes an intramolecular acyl transfer to the amine component with formation of a peptide bond. Two orthogonal coupling methods to give the covalent ester intermediate were achieved by either a thiol-thioester exchange mediated by a trialkylphosphine and an alkylthiol or a thioesterification by C alpha-thiocarboxylic acid reacting with a beta-bromo amino acid. With this approach, unprotected segments ranging from 4 to 37 residues were coupled to aqueous solution to give free peptides up to 54 residues long with high efficiency. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8618926

  16. Peptide Vaccine: Progress and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidang Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Conventional vaccine strategies have been highly efficacious for several decades in reducing mortality and morbidity due to infectious diseases. The bane of conventional vaccines, such as those that include whole organisms or large proteins, appear to be the inclusion of unnecessary antigenic load that, not only contributes little to the protective immune response, but complicates the situation by inducing allergenic and/or reactogenic responses. Peptide vaccines are an attractive alternative strategy that relies on usage of short peptide fragments to engineer the induction of highly targeted immune responses, consequently avoiding allergenic and/or reactogenic sequences. Conversely, peptide vaccines used in isolation are often weakly immunogenic and require particulate carriers for delivery and adjuvanting. In this article, we discuss the specific advantages and considerations in targeted induction of immune responses by peptide vaccines and progresses in the development of such vaccines against various diseases. Additionally, we also discuss the development of particulate carrier strategies and the inherent challenges with regard to safety when combining such technologies with peptide vaccines.

  17. Twilight reloaded: the peptide experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichenberger, Christian X.; Pozharski, Edwin; Rupp, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    The de facto commoditization of biomolecular crystallography as a result of almost disruptive instrumentation automation and continuing improvement of software allows any sensibly trained structural biologist to conduct crystallo­graphic studies of biomolecules with reasonably valid outcomes: that is, models based on properly interpreted electron density. Robust validation has led to major mistakes in the protein part of structure models becoming rare, but some depositions of protein–peptide complex structure models, which generally carry significant interest to the scientific community, still contain erroneous models of the bound peptide ligand. Here, the protein small-molecule ligand validation tool Twilight is updated to include peptide ligands. (i) The primary technical reasons and potential human factors leading to problems in ligand structure models are presented; (ii) a new method used to score peptide-ligand models is presented; (iii) a few instructive and specific examples, including an electron-density-based analysis of peptide-ligand structures that do not contain any ligands, are discussed in detail; (iv) means to avoid such mistakes and the implications for database integrity are discussed and (v) some suggestions as to how journal editors could help to expunge errors from the Protein Data Bank are provided. PMID:28291756

  18. Bacteriocin as Weapons in the Marine Animal-Associated Bacteria Warfare: Inventory and Potential Applications as an Aquaculture Probiotic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florie Desriac

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available As the association of marine animals with bacteria has become more commonly recognized, researchers have increasingly questioned whether these animals actually produce many of the bioactive compounds originally isolated from them. Bacteriocins, ribosomally synthesized antibiotic peptides, constitute one of the most potent weapons to fight against pathogen infections. Indeed, bacteriocinogenic bacteria may prevent pathogen dissemination by occupying the same ecological niche. Bacteriocinogenic strains associated with marine animals are a relevant source for isolation of probiotics. This review draws up an inventory of the marine bacteriocinogenic strains isolated from animal-associated microbial communities, known to date. Bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLIS and fully-characterized bacteriocins are described. Finally, their applications as probiotics in aquaculture are discussed.

  19. Peptide-enhanced oral delivery of therapeutic peptides and proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Mie; Foged, Camilla; Berthelsen, Jens;

    2013-01-01

    throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, chemical stability is an inherent challenge when employing amino acid-based excipients for oral delivery, and multiple approaches have been investigated to improve this. The exact mechanisms of transepithelial translocation are discussed, and it is believed......Systemic therapy upon oral delivery of biologics, such as peptide and protein drugs is limited due to their large molecular size, their low enzymatic stability and their inability to cross the intestinal epithelium. Ways to overcome the epithelial barrier include the use of peptide-based excipients...

  20. IRMPD spectroscopy reveals a novel rearrangement reaction for modified peptides that involves elimination of the N-terminal amino acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Stipdonk, M.J.; Patterson, K.; Gibson, J.K.; Berden, G.; Oomens, J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, peptides were derivatized by reaction with salicylaldehyde to create N-terminal imines (Schiff bases). Collision-induced dissociation of the imine-modified peptides produces a complete series of b and a ions (which reveal sequence). However, an unusual pathway is also observed, one th

  1. Expression of a male accessory gland peptide of Leptinotarsa decemlineata in insect cells infected with a recombinant baculovirus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smid, H.M.; Schooneveld, H.; Deserno, M.L.L.G.; Put, B.; Vlak, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The male accessory glands (MAGs) of Leptinotarsa decemlineata produce an 8kDa peptide, designated Led-MAGP, that is recognized by monoclonal antibody MAC-18. The site of synthesis, amino acid sequence and the gene encoding this peptide have been documented (). The primary structure is homologous to

  2. In silico and in vitro studies of cytotoxic activity of different peptides derived from vesicular stomatitis virus G protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshte Ghandehari

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The results confirmed that P26 and P7 peptides might induce membrane damage and initiate apoptosis. The present study suggested that P26 and P7 peptides could be appropriate candidates for further studies as cytotoxic agents and modifications in the residue at positions 70-280 might potentially produce a more efficient VSVG protein in gene therapy.

  3. Milk peptides increase iron solubility in water but do not affect DMT-1 expression in Caco-2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    In vitro digestion of milk produces peptide fractions that enhance iron uptake by Caco-2 cells. Our objectives were to investigate whether these fractions a) exert their effect by increasing relative gene expression of DMT-1 in Caco-2 cells b) enhance iron dialyzability when added in meals. Peptid...

  4. Calcitonin gene related peptide and its functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimian M

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide (CGRP was first reported in 1982. This peptide contains 37 amino acids which could be found in Alpha and Beta forms. CGRP shows diversity both in its receptors and biological effects and up to now four different types of receptors have been reported. It can act like a neurotransmitter, local hormone and neuromodulator. They have a variety of effects on different organs such as a potent effect on vasodilation and smooth muscle relaxation. Ability of CGRP for induction of protein extravasation from blood vessels was uncertain. In this study intra-articular infusion of 10^-6 M CGRP to the rat knee joint induced significant protein extravasation into the rat knee joint space. The amount of protein was detected by modified Iawata method which could detect amount of protein between 5-500 mg/L. Higher and lower concentrations failed to induce protein extravasation. Failure in higher concentration was likely due to significant fall in blood pressure. In the presence of an arterial hypotension induced by an ? adenoreceptor antagonist, 10^-6 M of CGRP failed to produce protein extravasation. This effect of CGRP was a specific active effect and not a passive effect due to its potent vasodilation effect, as similar vasodilatory response induced by a ?-adrenoreceptor agonist failed to induce protein extravasation. There is more than 50% of sensory neurons which contain CGRP and they are spread in all over the body and joints, therefore CGRP induced protein extravasation can potentiate inflammation in different organs.

  5. Resistance to Antimicrobial Peptides in Vibrios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Destoumieux-Garzón

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Vibrios are associated with a broad diversity of hosts that produce antimicrobial peptides (AMPs as part of their defense against microbial infections. In particular, vibrios colonize epithelia, which function as protective barriers and express AMPs as a first line of chemical defense against pathogens. Recent studies have shown they can also colonize phagocytes, key components of the animal immune system. Phagocytes infiltrate infected tissues and use AMPs to kill the phagocytosed microorganisms intracellularly, or deliver their antimicrobial content extracellularly to circumvent tissue infection. We review here the mechanisms by which vibrios have evolved the capacity to evade or resist the potent antimicrobial defenses of the immune cells or tissues they colonize. Among their strategies to resist killing by AMPs, primarily vibrios use membrane remodeling mechanisms. In particular, some highly resistant strains substitute hexaacylated Lipid A with a diglycine residue to reduce their negative surface charge, thereby lowering their electrostatic interactions with cationic AMPs. As a response to envelope stress, which can be induced by membrane-active agents including AMPs, vibrios also release outer membrane vesicles to create a protective membranous shield that traps extracellular AMPs and prevents interaction of the peptides with their own membranes. Finally, once AMPs have breached the bacterial membrane barriers, vibrios use RND efflux pumps, similar to those of other species, to transport AMPs out of their cytoplasmic space.

  6. Recent development of peptide self-assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiubo Zhao; Fang Pan; Jian R. Lu

    2008-01-01

    Amino acids are the building blocks to build peptides and proteins. Recent development in peptide synthesis has however enabled us to mimic this natural process by preparing various long and short peptides possessing different conformations and biological functions. The self-assembly of short designed peptides into molecular nanostructures is becoming a growing interest in nanobiotechnology. Self-assembled peptides exhibit several attractive features for applications in tissue regeneration, drug delivery, biological surface engineering as well as in food science, cosmetic industry and antibiotics. The aim of this review is to introduce the readers to a number of representative studies on peptide self-assembly.

  7. Characterization of Synthetic Peptides by Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhala, Bala K; Mirza, Osman; Højrup, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is well suited for analysis of the identity and purity of synthetic peptides. The sequence of a synthetic peptide is most often known, so the analysis is mainly used to confirm the identity and purity of the peptide. Here, simple procedures are described for MALDI-TOF-MS an......Mass spectrometry (MS) is well suited for analysis of the identity and purity of synthetic peptides. The sequence of a synthetic peptide is most often known, so the analysis is mainly used to confirm the identity and purity of the peptide. Here, simple procedures are described for MALDI...

  8. The Two-Peptide (Class-IIb) Bacteriocins: Genetics, Biosynthesis, Structure, and Mode of Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen-Meyer, Jon; Oppegård, Camilla; Rogne, Per; Haugen, Helen Sophie; Kristiansen, Per Eugen

    The two-peptide (class-IIb) bacteriocins consist of two different peptides, both of which are required to obtain high antimicrobial activity. These bacteriocins kill target-cells by inducing membrane-leakage and they seem to display some specificity with respect to the molecules they transfer across membranes. The genes encoding the two peptides of two-peptide bacteriocins are next to each other on the same operon. In the same or a nearby operon are genes encoding (i) the immunity protein that protects the bacteriocin-producer from its own bacteriocin, (ii) a dedicated ABC-transporter that exports the bacteriocin from cells and cleaves off the N-terminal bacteriocin leader sequence, and (iii) an accessory protein whose exact function has not been fully clarified. Some two-peptide bacteriocins appear to be produced constitutively, whereas the production of other two-peptide bacteriocins is regulated through a three-component regulatory system that consists of a peptide pheromone, a membrane-associated histidine protein kinase, and response regulators. It has recently been proposed that the two peptides of (some) two-peptide bacteriocins may form a membrane-penetrating helix-helix structure involving helix-helix interacting GxxxG-motifs present in all currently characterized two-peptide bacteriocins. It has also been suggested that the helix-helix structure interacts with an integrated membrane (transport) protein, thus inducing a conformational change in the protein, which in turn causes membrane-leakage. This proposed mode-of-action is similar to that of the pediocin-like (class-IIa) bacteriocins and lactococcin A, which bind to a part of the mannose phosphotransferase permease that is embedded in the cell membrane, thereby altering the conformation of the ­permease in a manner that causes membrane-leakage and cell death.

  9. NCAM Mimetic Peptides: An Update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    pharmacological tools interfering with NCAM functions. Recent progress in our understanding of the structural basis of NCAM-mediated cell adhesion and signaling has allowed a structure-based design of NCAM mimetic peptides. Using this approach a number of peptides termed P2, P1-B, P-3-DE and P-3-G, whose...... sequences contain one or several NCAM homophilic binding sites involved in NCAM binding to itself, have been identified. By means of NMR titration analysis and molecular modeling a number of peptides derived from NCAM and targeting NCAM heterophilic ligands such as the fibroblast growth factor receptor...... in vitro and in vivo, making them attractive pharmacological tools suitable for drug development for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders and impaired memory....

  10. Antiviral active peptide from oyster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    An active peptide against herpes virus was isolated from the enzymic hydrolysate of oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and purified with the definite direction hydrolysis technique in the order of alcalase and bromelin. The hydrolysate was fractioned into four ranges of molecular weight (>10 kDa, 10-5 kDa, 5-1 kDa and <1 kDa) using ultrafiltration membranes and dialysis. The fraction of 10?5 kDa was purified using consecutive chromatographic methods including DEAE Sephadex A-25 column, Sephadex G-25 column, and high performance liquid chromatogram (HPLC) by activity-guided isolation. The antiviral effect of the obtained peptide on herpetic virus was investigated in Vero cells by observing cytopathic effect (CPE). The result shows that the peptide has high inhibitory activity on herpetic virus.

  11. Peptides and the new endocrinology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwyzer, Robert

    1982-01-01

    The discovery of regulatory peptides common to the nervous and the endocrine systems (brain, gut, and skin) has brought about a revolution in our concepts of endocrinology and neurology. We are beginning to understand some of the complex interrelationships between soma and psyche that might, someday, be important for an integrated treatment of diseases. Examples of the actions of certain peptides in the periphery and in the central nervous system are given, and their biosynthesis and molecular anatomy as carriers for information are discussed.

  12. Novel Formulations for Antimicrobial Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Carmona-Ribeiro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Peptides in general hold much promise as a major ingredient in novel supramolecular assemblies. They may become essential in vaccine design, antimicrobial chemotherapy, cancer immunotherapy, food preservation, organs transplants, design of novel materials for dentistry, formulations against diabetes and other important strategical applications. This review discusses how novel formulations may improve the therapeutic index of antimicrobial peptides by protecting their activity and improving their bioavailability. The diversity of novel formulations using lipids, liposomes, nanoparticles, polymers, micelles, etc., within the limits of nanotechnology may also provide novel applications going beyond antimicrobial chemotherapy.

  13. An enhancer peptide for membrane-disrupting antimicrobial peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Hong

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NP4P is a synthetic peptide derived from a natural, non-antimicrobial peptide fragment (pro-region of nematode cecropin P4 by substitution of all acidic amino acid residues with amides (i.e., Glu → Gln, and Asp → Asn. Results In the presence of NP4P, some membrane-disrupting antimicrobial peptides (ASABF-α, polymyxin B, and nisin killed microbes at lower concentration (e.g., 10 times lower minimum bactericidal concentration for ASABF-α against Staphylococcus aureus, whereas NP4P itself was not bactericidal and did not interfere with bacterial growth at ≤ 300 μg/mL. In contrast, the activities of antimicrobial agents with a distinct mode of action (indolicidin, ampicillin, kanamycin, and enrofloxacin were unaffected. Although the membrane-disrupting activity of NP4P was slight or undetectable, ASABF-α permeabilized S. aureus membranes with enhanced efficacy in the presence of NP4P. Conclusions NP4P selectively enhanced the bactericidal activities of membrane-disrupting antimicrobial peptides by increasing the efficacy of membrane disruption against the cytoplasmic membrane.

  14. Peptidomic identification and biological validation of neuroendocrine regulatory peptide-1 and -2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hideki; Sasaki, Kazuki; Satomi, Yoshinori; Shimbara, Takuya; Kageyama, Haruaki; Mondal, Muhtashan S; Toshinai, Koji; Date, Yukari; González, Luis J; Shioda, Seiji; Takao, Toshifumi; Nakazato, Masamitsu; Minamino, Naoto

    2007-09-07

    Recent advances in peptidomics have enabled the identification of previously uncharacterized peptides. However, sequence information alone does not allow us to identify candidates for bioactive peptides. To increase an opportunity to discover bioactive peptides, we have focused on C-terminal amidation, a post-translational modification shared by many bioactive peptides. We analyzed peptides secreted from human medullary thyroid carcinoma TT cells that produce amidated peptides, and we identified two novel amidated peptides, designated neuroendocrine regulatory peptide (NERP)-1 and NERP-2. NERPs are derived from distinct regions of the neurosecretory protein that was originally identified as a product of a nerve growth factor-responsive gene in PC12 cells. Mass spectrometric analysis of the immunoprecipitate using specific antibodies as well as reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with radioimmunoassay analysis of brain extract demonstrated the endogenous presence of NERP-1 and NERP-2 in the rat. NERPs are abundant in the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei of the rat hypothalamus and colocalized frequently with vasopressin but rarely with oxytocin. NERPs dose-dependently suppressed vasopressin release induced by intracerebroventricular injection of hypertonic NaCl or angiotensin II in vivo. NERPs also suppressed basal and angiotensin II-induced vasopressin secretion from hypothalamic explants in vitro. Bioactivity of NERPs required C-terminal amidation. Anti-NERP IgGs canceled plasma vasopressin reduction in response to water loading, indicating that NERPs could be potent endogenous suppressors of vasopressin release. These findings suggest that NERPs are novel modulators in body fluid homeostasis.

  15. Facile and selective covalent grafting of an RGD-peptide to electrospun scaffolds improves HUVEC adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettin, Monica; Zamuner, Annj; Roso, Martina; Iucci, Giovanna; Samouillan, Valerie; Danesin, Roberta; Modesti, Michele; Conconi, Maria Teresa

    2015-10-01

    The development of a biomimetic surface able to promote endothelialization is fundamental in the search for blood vessel substitutes that prevent the formation of thrombi or hyperplasia. This study aims at investigating the effect of functionalization of poly-ε-caprolactone or poly(L-lactic acid-co-ɛ-caprolactone) electrospun scaffolds with a photoreactive adhesive peptide. The designed peptide sequence contains four Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro motifs per chain and a p-azido-Phe residue at each terminus. Different peptide densities on the scaffold surface were obtained by simply modifying the peptide concentration used in pretreatment of the scaffold before UV irradiation. Scaffolds of poly-ε-caprolactone embedded with adhesive peptides were produced to assess the importance of peptide covalent grafting. Our results show that the scaffolds functionalized with photoreactive peptides enhance adhesion at 24 h with a dose-dependent effect and control the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, whereas the inclusion of adhesive peptide in the electrospun matrices by embedding does not give satisfactory results.

  16. Stitched α-helical peptides via bis ring-closing metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilinski, Gerard J; Kim, Young-Woo; Hong, Jooyeon; Kutchukian, Peter S; Crenshaw, Charisse M; Berkovitch, Shaunna S; Chang, Andrew; Ham, Sihyun; Verdine, Gregory L

    2014-09-03

    Conformationally stabilized α-helical peptides are capable of inhibiting disease-relevant intracellular or extracellular protein-protein interactions in vivo. We have previously reported that the employment of ring-closing metathesis to introduce a single all-hydrocarbon staple along one face of an α-helical peptide greatly increases α-helical content, binding affinity to a target protein, cell penetration through active transport, and resistance to proteolytic degradation. In an effort to improve upon this technology for stabilizing a peptide in a bioactive α-helical conformation, we report the discovery of an efficient and selective bis ring-closing metathesis reaction leading to peptides bearing multiple contiguous staples connected by a central spiro ring junction. Circular dichroism spectroscopy, NMR, and computational analyses have been used to investigate the conformation of these "stitched" peptides, which are shown to exhibit remarkable thermal stabilities. Likewise, trypsin proteolysis assays confirm the achievement of a structural rigidity unmatched by peptides bearing a single staple. Furthermore, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and confocal microscopy assays demonstrate that stitched peptides display superior cell penetrating ability compared to their stapled counterparts, suggesting that this technology may be useful not only in the context of enhancing the drug-like properties of α-helical peptides but also in producing potent agents for the intracellular delivery of proteins and oligonucleotides.

  17. Major Peptides from Amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus Protein Inhibit HMG-CoA Reductase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Aparecida Manólio Soares

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify the major peptides generated by the in vitro hydrolysis of Amaranthus cruentus protein and to verify the effect of these peptides on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase, a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. A protein isolate was prepared, and an enzymatic hydrolysis that simulated the in vivo digestion of the protein was performed. After hydrolysis, the peptide mixture was filtered through a 3 kDa membrane. The peptide profile of this mixture was determined by reversed phase high performance chromatography (RP-HPLC, and the peptide identification was performed by LC-ESI MS/MS. Three major peptides under 3 kDa were detected, corresponding to more than 90% of the peptides of similar size produced by enzymatic hydrolysis. The sequences identified were GGV, IVG or LVG and VGVI or VGVL. These peptides had not yet been described for amaranth protein nor are they present in known sequences of amaranth grain protein, except LVG, which can be found in amaranth α‑amylase. Their ability to inhibit the activity of HMG-CoA reductase was determined, and we found that the sequences GGV, IVG, and VGVL, significantly inhibited this enzyme, suggesting a possible hypocholesterolemic effect.

  18. Identification of peptides that bind hepatitis C virus envelope protein E2 and inhibit viral cellular entry from a phage-display peptide library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Xin; Yao, Min; Zhang, Jian-Min; Yang, Jing; Lei, Ying-Feng; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Jia, Zhan-Sheng; Ma, Li; Lan, Hai-Yun; Xu, Zhi-Kai; Yin, Wen

    2014-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope protein E2 is required for the entry of HCV into cells. Viral envelope proteins interact with cell receptors in a multistep process, which may be a promising target for the development of novel antiviral agents. In this study, a heptapeptide M13 phage-display library was screened for peptides that bind specifically to prokaryotically expressed, purified truncated HCV envelope protein E2. ELISA assay was used to quantify the binding of the peptides to HCV E2 protein. Flow cytometry, quantitative reverse-transcription PCR and western blotting were used to investigate the inhibition effect of one peptide on HCV infection in hepatoma cells (Huh7.5) in vitro. Four peptides capable of binding specifically to HCV E2 protein were obtained after three rounds of biopanning. Peptide C18 (WPWHNHR), with the highest affinity for binding HCV E2 protein, was synthesized. The results showed that peptide C18 inhibited the viral infectivity of both HCV pseudotype particles (HCVpp) harboring HCV envelope glycoproteins and cell-culture produced HCV (HCVcc). Thus, this study demonstrated that peptide C18 is a potential candidate for anti-HCV therapy as a novel viral entry inhibitor.

  19. Accessing Specific Peptide Recognition by Combinatorial Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ming

    Molecular recognition is at the basis of all processes for life, and plays a central role in many biological processes, such as protein folding, the structural organization of cells and organelles, signal transduction, and the immune response. Hence, my PhD project is entitled “Accessing Specific...... Peptide Recognition by Combinatorial Chemistry”. Molecular recognition is a specific interaction between two or more molecules through noncovalent bonding, such as hydrogen bonding, metal coordination, van der Waals forces, π−π, hydrophobic, or electrostatic interactions. The association involves kinetic....... Combinatorial chemistry was invented in 1980s based on observation of functional aspects of the adaptive immune system. It was employed for drug development and optimization in conjunction with high-throughput synthesis and screening. (chapter 2) Combinatorial chemistry is able to rapidly produce many thousands...

  20. Histidine-Containing Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids containing histidine moieties are provided. These compounds have applications including diagnostics, research and potential therapeutics.......Peptide nucleic acids containing histidine moieties are provided. These compounds have applications including diagnostics, research and potential therapeutics....

  1. The antibacterial peptide ABP-CM4: the current state of its production and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian Feng; Zhang, Jie; Xu, Xing Zhou; Han, Yang Yang; Cui, Xian Wei; Chen, Yu Qing; Zhang, Shuang Quan

    2012-06-01

    The increasing resistance of bacteria and fungi to currently available antibiotics is a major concern worldwide, leading to enormous efforts to develop new antibiotics with new modes of actions. Antibacterial peptide CM4 (ABP-CM4) is a small cationic peptide with broad-spectrum activities against bacteria, fungi, and tumor cells, which may possibly be used as a promising candidate for a new antibiotic. For pharmaceutical applications, a large quantity of antimicrobial peptides needs to be produced economically. In this communication, the progress in the structural characteristics, heterologous production, and biological evaluation of ABP-CM4 are reviewed.

  2. Dual Toxic-Peptide-Coding Staphylococcus aureus RNA under Antisense Regulation Targets Host Cells and Bacterial Rivals Unequally

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Laure Pinel-Marie

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Produced from the pathogenicity islands of Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates, stable SprG1 RNA encodes two peptides from a single internal reading frame. These two peptides accumulate at the membrane, and inducing their expression triggers S. aureus death. Replacement of the two initiation codons by termination signals reverses this toxicity. During growth, cis-antisense RNA SprF1 is expressed, preventing mortality by reducing SprG1 RNA and peptide levels. The peptides are secreted extracellularly, where they lyse human host erythrocytes, a process performed more efficiently by the longer peptide. The two peptides also inactivate Gram-negative and -positive bacteria, with the shorter peptide more effective against S. aureus rivals. Two peptides are secreted from an individual RNA containing two functional initiation codons. Thus, we present an unconventional type I toxin-antitoxin system expressed from a human pathogen producing two hemolytic and antibacterial peptides from a dual-coding RNA, negatively regulated by a dual-acting antisense RNA.

  3. Multi-frequency, multi-technique pulsed EPR investigation of the copper binding site of murine amyloid β peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Donghun; Bang, Jeong Kyu; Kim, Sun Hee

    2015-01-26

    Copper-amyloid peptides are proposed to be the cause of Alzheimer's disease, presumably by oxidative stress. However, mice do not produce amyloid plaques and thus do not suffer from Alzheimer's disease. Although much effort has been focused on the structural characterization of the copper- human amyloid peptides, little is known regarding the copper-binding mode in murine amyloid peptides. Thus, we investigated the structure of copper-murine amyloid peptides through multi-frequency, multi-technique pulsed EPR spectroscopy in conjunction with specific isotope labeling. Based on our pulsed EPR results, we found that Ala2, Glu3, His6, and His14 are directly coordinated with the copper ion in murine amyloid β peptides at pH 8.5. This is the first detailed structural characterization of the copper-binding mode in murine amyloid β peptides. This work may advance the knowledge required for developing inhibitors of Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Family of Cysteine-Rich Peptides (MgCRP-I) from Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdol, Marco; Puillandre, Nicolas; De Moro, Gianluca; Guarnaccia, Corrado; Lucafò, Marianna; Benincasa, Monica; Zlatev, Ventislav; Manfrin, Chiara; Torboli, Valentina; Giulianini, Piero Giulio; Sava, Gianni; Venier, Paola; Pallavicini, Alberto

    2015-07-21

    We report the identification of a novel gene family (named MgCRP-I) encoding short secreted cysteine-rich peptides in the Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. These peptides display a highly conserved pre-pro region and a hypervariable mature peptide comprising six invariant cysteine residues arranged in three intramolecular disulfide bridges. Although their cysteine pattern is similar to cysteines-rich neurotoxic peptides of distantly related protostomes such as cone snails and arachnids, the different organization of the disulfide bridges observed in synthetic peptides and phylogenetic analyses revealed MgCRP-I as a novel protein family. Genome- and transcriptome-wide searches for orthologous sequences in other bivalve species indicated the unique presence of this gene family in Mytilus spp. Like many antimicrobial peptides and neurotoxins, MgCRP-I peptides are produced as pre-propeptides, usually have a net positive charge and likely derive from similar evolutionary mechanisms, that is, gene duplication and positive selection within the mature peptide region; however, synthetic MgCRP-I peptides did not display significant toxicity in cultured mammalian cells, insecticidal, antimicrobial, or antifungal activities. The functional role of MgCRP-I peptides in mussel physiology still remains puzzling.

  5. Development and use of engineered peptide deformylase in chemoenzymatic peptide synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Toma, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Deze thesis beschrijft het onderzoek naar potentieel van het gebruik van het peptide deformylase (PDF) in chemo enzymatische peptide synthese. PDF is geschikt voor selective N terminale deformylatie van bepaalde N-formyl-peptides zonder gelijktijdige hydrolyse van de peptide binding. Door de uitdagi

  6. The evolution of peptide hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niall, H D

    1982-01-01

    Despite limitations in our present knowledge it is already possible to discern the main features of peptide hormone evolution, since the same mechanisms (and indeed the same hormone molecules) function in many different ways. This underlying unity of organization has its basis in the tendency of biochemical networks, once established, to survive and diversify. The most surprising recent findings in endocrinology have been the discovery of vertebrate peptide hormones in multiple sites within the same organism, and the reports, persuasive but requiring confirmation, of vertebrate hormones in primitive unicellular organisms (20, 20a). Perhaps the major challenge for the future is to define the roles and interactions of the many peptide hormones identified in brain (18). The most primitive bacteria and the human brain, though an enormous evolutionary distance apart, may have more in common than we have recognized until now. As Axelrod & Hamilton have pointed out in a recent provocative article, "The Evolution of Cooperation" (1), bacteria, though lacking a brain, are capable of adaptive behavior that can be analysed in terms of game theory. It is clear that we can learn a great deal about the whole evolutionary process from a study of the versatile and durable peptide hormones molecules.

  7. Glucagon-like peptide-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens Juul

    2006-01-01

    The incretin hormones are intestinal polypeptides that enhance postprandial insulin secretion. Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) was initially thought to regulate gastric acid secretion, whereas glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) was discovered as a result of a systematic search for intestinal...

  8. Water drives peptide conformational transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Nerukh, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    Transitions between metastable conformations of a dipeptide are investigated using classical molecular dynamics simulation with explicit water molecules. The distribution of the surrounding water at different moments before the transitions and the dynamical correlations of water with the peptide's configurational motions indicate that water is the main driving force of the conformational changes.

  9. Glucagon-like peptide-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deacon, C F; Holst, Jens Juul; Carr, R D

    1999-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease resulting in raised blood sugar which, if not satisfactorily controlled, can cause severe and often debilitating complications. Unfortunately, for many patients, the existing therapies do not give adequate control. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is...

  10. Peptides and metallic nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kogan, M.J.; Olmedo, I.; Hosta, L.; Guerrero, A.R.; Cruz Ricondo, L.J.; Albericio, F.

    2007-01-01

    In this review, we describe the contribution of peptides to the biomedical applications of metallic nanoparticles. We also discuss strategies for the preparation of peptide-nanoparticle conjugates and the synthesis of the peptides and metallic nanoparticles. An overview of the techniques used for th

  11. Double-Stranded Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, form double-stranded structures with one another and with ssDNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  12. Toxins and antimicrobial peptides: interactions with membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlamadinger, Diana E.; Gable, Jonathan E.; Kim, Judy E.

    2009-08-01

    The innate immunity to pathogenic invasion of organisms in the plant and animal kingdoms relies upon cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as the first line of defense. In addition to these natural peptide antibiotics, similar cationic peptides, such as the bee venom toxin melittin, act as nonspecific toxins. Molecular details of AMP and peptide toxin action are not known, but the universal function of these peptides to disrupt cell membranes of pathogenic bacteria (AMPs) or a diverse set of eukaryotes and prokaryotes (melittin) is widely accepted. Here, we have utilized spectroscopic techniques to elucidate peptide-membrane interactions of alpha-helical human and mouse AMPs of the cathelicidin family as well as the peptide toxin melittin. The activity of these natural peptides and their engineered analogs was studied on eukaryotic and prokaryotic membrane mimics consisting of <200-nm bilayer vesicles composed of anionic and neutral lipids as well as cholesterol. Vesicle disruption, or peptide potency, was monitored with a sensitive fluorescence leakage assay. Detailed molecular information on peptidemembrane interactions and peptide structure was further gained through vibrational spectroscopy combined with circular dichroism. Finally, steady-state fluorescence experiments yielded insight into the local environment of native or engineered tryptophan residues in melittin and human cathelicidin embedded in bilayer vesicles. Collectively, our results provide clues to the functional structures of the engineered and toxic peptides and may impact the design of synthetic antibiotic peptides that can be used against the growing number of antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  13. Activity of Cathelicidin Peptides against Chlamydia spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Manuela; Di Leo, Korinne; Benincasa, Monica; Cavrini, Francesca; Accardo, Silvia; Moroni, Alessandra; Gennaro, Renato; Cevenini, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    The in vitro activity of six cathelicidin peptides against 25 strains of Chlamydia was investigated. SMAP-29 proved to be the most active peptide, reducing the inclusion numbers of all 10 strains of Chlamydia trachomatis tested by ≥50% at 10 μg/ml. This peptide was also active against C. pneumoniae and C. felis. PMID:15728927

  14. Phytochemicals that modulate amino acid and peptide catabolism by caprine rumen microbes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Microbe-derived ionophores and macrolide antibiotics are often added to ruminant diets, and growth promotion and feed efficiency are among the benefits. One mechanism is inhibition of microbes that catabolize amino acids or peptides and produce ammonia. Plants also produce antimicrobial ...

  15. Single-molecule studies on individual peptides and peptide assemblies on surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen

    2013-10-13

    This review is intended to reflect the recent progress in single-molecule studies of individual peptides and peptide assemblies on surfaces. The structures and the mechanism of peptide assembly are discussed in detail. The contents include the following topics: structural analysis of single peptide molecules, adsorption and assembly of peptides on surfaces, folding structures of the amyloid peptides, interaction between amyloid peptides and dye or drug molecules, and modulation of peptide assemblies by small molecules. The explorations of peptide adsorption and assembly will benefit the understanding of the mechanisms for protein-protein interactions, protein-drug interactions and the pathogenesis of amyloidoses. The investigations on peptide assembly and its modulations could also provide a potential approach towards the treatment of the amyloidoses.

  16. Negative Ion In-Source Decay Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Sequencing Acidic Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillen, Chelsea L.; Wright, Patience M.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2016-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) in-source decay was studied in the negative ion mode on deprotonated peptides to determine its usefulness for obtaining extensive sequence information for acidic peptides. Eight biological acidic peptides, ranging in size from 11 to 33 residues, were studied by negative ion mode ISD (nISD). The matrices 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzamide, 1,5-diaminonaphthalene, 5-amino-1-naphthol, 3-aminoquinoline, and 9-aminoacridine were used with each peptide. Optimal fragmentation was produced with 1,5-diaminonphthalene (DAN), and extensive sequence informative fragmentation was observed for every peptide except hirudin(54-65). Cleavage at the N-Cα bond of the peptide backbone, producing c' and z' ions, was dominant for all peptides. Cleavage of the N-Cα bond N-terminal to proline residues was not observed. The formation of c and z ions is also found in electron transfer dissociation (ETD), electron capture dissociation (ECD), and positive ion mode ISD, which are considered to be radical-driven techniques. Oxidized insulin chain A, which has four highly acidic oxidized cysteine residues, had less extensive fragmentation. This peptide also exhibited the only charged localized fragmentation, with more pronounced product ion formation adjacent to the highly acidic residues. In addition, spectra were obtained by positive ion mode ISD for each protonated peptide; more sequence informative fragmentation was observed via nISD for all peptides. Three of the peptides studied had no product ion formation in ISD, but extensive sequence informative fragmentation was found in their nISD spectra. The results of this study indicate that nISD can be used to readily obtain sequence information for acidic peptides.

  17. A combined prediction strategy increases identification of peptides bound with high affinity and stability to porcine MHC class I molecules SLA-1*04:01, SLA-2*04:01, and SLA-3*04:01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Rasmussen, Michael; Harndahl, Mikkel; Nielsen, Morten; Buus, Søren; Jungersen, Gregers

    2016-02-01

    Affinity and stability of peptides bound by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules are important factors in presentation of peptides to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). In silico prediction methods of peptide-MHC binding followed by experimental analysis of peptide-MHC interactions constitute an attractive protocol to select target peptides from the vast pool of viral proteome peptides. We have earlier reported the peptide binding motif of the porcine MHC-I molecules SLA-1*04:01 and SLA-2*04:01, identified by an ELISA affinity-based positional scanning combinatorial peptide library (PSCPL) approach. Here, we report the peptide binding motif of SLA-3*04:01 and combine two prediction methods and analysis of both peptide binding affinity and stability of peptide-MHC complexes to improve rational peptide selection. Using a peptide prediction strategy combining PSCPL binding matrices and in silico prediction algorithms (NetMHCpan), peptide ligands from a repository of 8900 peptides were predicted for binding to SLA-1*04:01, SLA-2*04:01, and SLA-3*04:01 and validated by affinity and stability assays. From the pool of predicted peptides for SLA-1*04:01, SLA-2*04:01, and SLA-3*04:01, a total of 71, 28, and 38% were binders with affinities below 500 nM, respectively. Comparison of peptide-SLA binding affinity and complex stability showed that peptides of high affinity generally, but not always, produce complexes of high stability. In conclusion, we demonstrate how state-of-the-art prediction and in vitro immunology tools in combination can be used for accurate selection of peptides for MHC class I binding, hence providing an expansion of the field of peptide-MHC analysis also to include pigs as a livestock experimental model.

  18. Identification of novel helper epitope peptides of Survivin cancer-associated antigen applicable to developing helper/killer-hybrid epitope long peptide cancer vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtake, Junya; Ohkuri, Takayuki; Togashi, Yuji; Kitamura, Hidemitsu; Okuno, Kiyotaka; Nishimura, Takashi

    2014-09-01

    We identified novel helper epitope peptides of Survivin cancer antigen, which are presented to both HLA-DRB1*01:01 and DQB1*06:01. The helper epitope also contained three distinct Survivin-killer epitopes presented to HLA-A*02:01 and A*24:02. This 19 amino-acids epitope peptide (SU18) induced weak responses of Survivin-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells though it contained both helper and killer epitopes. To enhance the vaccine efficacy, we synthesized a long peptide by conjugating SU18 peptide and another DR53-restricted helper epitope peptide (SU22; 12 amino-acids) using glycine-linker. We designated this artificial 40 amino-acids long peptide containing two helper and three killer epitopes as Survivin-helper/killer-hybrid epitope long peptide (Survivin-H/K-HELP). Survivin-H/K-HELP allowed superior activation of IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) Th1 cells and CD8(+) Tc1 cells compared with the mixture of its component peptides (SU18 and SU22) in the presence of OK-432-treated monocyte-derived DC (Mo-DC). Survivin-H/K-HELP-pulsed Mo-DC pretreated with OK-432 also exhibited sustained antigen-presentation capability of stimulating Survivin-specific Th1 cells compared with Mo-DC pulsed with a mixture of SU18 and SU22 short peptides. Moreover, we demonstrated that Survivin-H/K-HELP induced a complete response in a breast cancer patient with the induction of cellular and humoral immune responses. Thus, we believe that an artificially synthesized Survivin-H/K-HELP will become an innovative cancer vaccine.

  19. Cellular recognition of synthetic peptide amphiphiles in supported bioartificial membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakalns, Teika

    The goal of this study was to demonstrate that lipidated cell adhesion peptides could form well-ordered biomimetic surfaces that were capable of influencing cellular behavior in a controlled and specific manner. The first step taken was to covalently link synthetic dialkyl tails to the amino-termini of the collagen-derived peptide IV-H1 (amino acid sequence GVKGDKGNPGWPGAP) and the well-known tripeptide Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) to produce amino-coupled peptide amphiphiles. Other spatial orientations of RGD were also generated by coupling tails to the carboxyl-terminus to give carboxyl-coupled RGD amphiphiles and to both the amino- and carboxyl-termini to give looped RGD amphiphiles. The next step taken was to let the peptide amphiphile self-assemble along with methyl ester-capped dialkyl tails into mixed films. It was found that all the peptide amphiphiles formed stable monolayers at the air-water interface in a Langmuir trough. IV-H1 amphiphiles and carboxyl-coupled and looped RGD amphiphiles deposited well as Langmuir-Blodgett mixed films on solid surfaces at all peptide concentrations, but aminocoupled RGD amphiphiles did not deposit well at high RGD concentrations. FT-IR studies of films containing RGD amphiphiles showed that amino-coupled RGD head groups formed the strongest lateral hydrogen bonds. The final step was to study cellular response to mixed films containing IV-H1 or RGD amphiphiles. The spreading of melanoma cells was influenced by both the molar concentration and spatial orientation of the amphiphilic peptides. Cells spread on IV-H1 and looped RGD films in a concentration-dependent manner, but spread indiscriminately on carboxyl-coupled RGD films and did not spread at all on well-deposited amino-coupled RGD films. The specificity of the cellular response to looped RGD amphiphiles was investigated. Control films of looped Arg-Gly-Glu (RGE) amphiphiles inhibited the adhesion and spreading of melanoma and endothelial cells, and antibody inhibition of the

  20. Straightforward approach to produce recombinant scorpion toxins-Pore blockers of potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekrasova, Oksana; Kudryashova, Ksenia; Fradkov, Arkadiy; Yakimov, Sergey; Savelieva, Maria; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail; Feofanov, Alexey

    2017-01-10

    Scorpion venom peptide blockers (KTx) of potassium channels are a valuable tool for structure-functional studies and prospective candidates for medical applications. Low yields of recombinant KTx hamper their wide application. We developed convenient and efficient bioengineering approach to a large-scale KTx production that meets increasing demands for such peptides. Maltose-binding protein was used as a carrier for cytoplasmic expression of folded disulfide-rich KTx in E. coli. TEV protease was applied for in vitro cleavage of the target peptide from the carrier. To produce KTx with retained native N-terminal sequence, the last residue of TEV protease cleavage site (CSTEV) was occupied by the native N-terminal residue of a target peptide. It was shown that decreased efficiency of hydrolysis of fusion proteins with non-canonical CSTEV can be overcome without by-product formation. Disulfide formation and folding of a target peptide occurred in cytoplasm eliminating the need for renaturation procedure in vitro. Advantages of this approach were demonstrated by producing six peptides with three disulfide bonds related to four KTx sub-families and achieving peptide yields of 12-22mg per liter of culture. The developed approach can be of general use for low-cost production of various KTx, as well as other disulfide-rich peptides and proteins.

  1. Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Brookhaven Linac Isoptope Producer (BLIP)—positioned at the forefront of research into radioisotopes used in cancer treatment and diagnosis—produces commercially...

  2. RPM peptide conjugated bioreducible polyethylenimine targeting invasive colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeong Mi; Lee, Duhwan; Kim, Jihoon; Park, Hansoo; Kim, Won Jong

    2015-05-10

    CPIEDRPMC (RPM) peptide is a peptide that specifically targets invasive colorectal cancer, which is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In this study, we exploited RPM peptide as a targeting ligand to produce a novel and efficient gene delivery system that could potentially be used to treat invasive colon cancer. In order to achieve enhanced specificity to colon cancer cells, the RPM peptide was conjugated to a bioreducible gene carrier consisting of a reducible moiety of disulfide-crosslinked low molecular weight polyethylenimine, IR820 dye, and polyethylene glycol. Here, we examined the physiochemical properties, cytotoxicity, in vitro transfection efficiency, and in vivo biodistribution of the RPM-conjugated polyplex. Our results showed that the RPM-conjugated gene carrier formed a compact polyplex with pDNA that had low toxicity. Furthermore, the RPM-conjugated polymer not only had higher cellular uptake in invasive colon cancer than the non-targeted polymer, but also showed enhanced transfection efficiency in invasive colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

  3. Visualisation and pre-processing of peptide microarray data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Marie; Valentini, Davide

    2009-01-01

    The data files produced by digitising peptide microarray images contain detailed information on the location, feature, response parameters and quality of each spot on each array. In this chapter, we will describe how such peptide microarray data can be read into the R statistical package and pre-processed in preparation for subsequent comparative or predictive analysis. We illustrate how the information in the data can be visualised using images and graphical displays that highlight the main features, enabling the quality of the data to be assessed and invalid data points to be identified and excluded. The log-ratio of the foreground to background signal is used as a response index. Negative control responses serve as a reference against which "detectable" responses can be defined, and slides incubated with only buffer and secondary antibody help identify false-positive responses from peptides. For peptides that have a detectable response on at least one subarray, and no false-positive response, we use linear mixed models to remove artefacts due to the arrays and their architecture. The resulting normalized responses provide the input data for further analysis.

  4. Solid Phase Formylation of N-Terminus Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lucia Tornesello

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Formylation of amino groups is a critical reaction involved in several biological processes including post-translational modification of histones. The addition of a formyl group (CHO to the N-terminal end of a peptide chain generates biologically active molecules. N-formyl-peptides can be produced by different methods. We performed the N-formylation of two chemotactic hexapetides, Met1-Leu2-Lys3-Leu4-Ile5-Val6 and Met1-Met2-Tyr3-Ala4-Leu5-Phe6, carrying out the reaction directly on peptidyl-resin following pre-activation of formic acid with N,N-dicyclohexylcarbodiimmide (DCC in liquid phase. The overnight incubation at 4 °C resulted in a significant increase in production yields of formylated peptides compared to the reaction performed at room temperature. The method is consistently effective, rapid, and inexpensive. Moreover, the synthetic strategy can be applied for the formylation of all primary amines at N-terminus of peptide chains or amino groups of lysine side-chains in solid phase.

  5. Molecular mechanical properties of short-sequence peptide enzyme mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tsukasa; Vo Ngo, Bao C; Xiao, Leyang; Arya, Gaurav; Heller, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    While considerable attempts have been made to recreate the high turnover rates of enzymes using synthetic enzyme mimics, most have failed and only a few have produced minimal reaction rates that can barely be considered catalytic. One particular approach we have focused on is the use of short-sequence peptides that contain key catalytic groups in close proximity. In this study, we designed six different peptides and tested their ability to mimic the catalytic mechanism of the cysteine proteases. Acetylation and deacylation by Ellman's Reagent trapping experiments showed the importance of having phenylalanine groups surrounding the catalytic sites in order to provide greater proximity between the cysteine, histidine, and aspartate amino acid R-groups. We have also carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to determine the distance between these catalytic groups and the overall mechanical flexibility of the peptides. We found strong correlations between the magnitude of fluctuations in the Cys-His distance, which determines the flexibility and interactions between the cysteine thiol and histidine imidazole groups, and the deacylation rate. We found that, in general, shorter Cys-His distance fluctuations led to a higher deacylation rate constant, implying that greater confinement of the two residues will allow a higher frequency of the acetyl exchange between the cysteine thiol and histidine imidazole R-groups. This may be the key to future design of peptide structures with molecular mechanical properties that lead to viable enzyme mimics.

  6. Peptide array-based characterization and design of ZnO-high affinity peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okochi, Mina; Sugita, Tomoya; Furusawa, Seiji; Umetsu, Mitsuo; Adschiri, Tadafumi; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2010-08-15

    Peptides with both an affinity for ZnO and the ability to generate ZnO nanoparticles have attracted attention for the self-assembly and templating of nanoscale building blocks under ambient conditions with compositional uniformity. In this study, we have analyzed the specific binding sites of the ZnO-binding peptide, EAHVMHKVAPRP, which was identified using a phage display peptide library. The peptide binding assay against ZnO nanoparticles was performed using peptides synthesized on a cellulose membrane using the spot method. Using randomized rotation of amino acids in the ZnO-binding peptide, 125 spot-synthesized peptides were assayed. The peptide binding activity against ZnO nanoparticles varied greatly. This indicates that ZnO binding does not depend on total hydrophobicity or other physical parameters of these peptides, but rather that ZnO recognizes the specific amino acid alignment of these peptides. In addition, several peptides were found to show higher binding ability compared with that of the original peptides. Identification of important binding sites in the EAHVMHKVAPRP peptide was investigated by shortened, stepwise sequence from both termini. Interestingly, two ZnO-binding sites were found as 6-mer peptides: HVMHKV and HKVAPR. The peptides identified by amino acid substitution of HKVAPR were found to show high affinity and specificity for ZnO nanoparticles.

  7. Producing Against Poverty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ypeij, Annelou

    2000-01-01

    Producing against Poverty is an anthropological research on micro-entrepreneurs in Lima, Peru. It analyses the way micro-producers accumulate capital. The anthropological approach of the book starts with an analysis of the daily lives of the micro-producers. Its gender approach makes a comparison be

  8. Brain natriuretic peptide measurement in pulmonary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Daniel; Marik, Paul E

    2011-12-01

    Serum levels of natriuretic peptides are well established as important biomarkers in patients with cardiac disease. Less attention has been placed on the role of natriuretic peptides in patients with pulmonary conditions. In several well-defined groups of patients with pulmonary disease natriuretic peptides provide the clinician with clinically valuable information. A limitation of the interpretation of natriuretic peptides in pulmonary disease is the confounding effect of concurrent conditions such as heart failure, hypoxia, sepsis and renal failure. The present paper reviews the role of natriuretic peptides for diagnosis, risk stratification and prognosis of several pulmonary disorders.

  9. Fabrication of Odor Sensor Using Peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotokebuchi, Yuta; Hayashi, Kenshi; Toko, Kiyoshi; Chen, Ronggang; Ikezaki, Hidekazu

    We report fabrication of an odor sensor using peptides. Peptides were designed to acquire the specific reception for a target odor molecule. Au surface of the sensor electrode was coated by the designed peptide using the method of self assembled monolayers (SAMs). Functionalized Au surfaces by the peptides were confirmed by ellipsometry and cyclic voltammetry. The odorants of vanillin, phenethyl alcohol and hexanol were discriminated by QCM sensor with the peptide surface. Moreover, we verified specific interaction between amino acid (Trp) and vanillin by fluorescence assay.

  10. 阳离子多肽CEMA导入棉花引起表型异常及叶绿体降解%Introduction of a Cationic Peptide, CEMA, into Cotton Caused Abnormal Phenotype and Chloroplast Degeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-long GUO; Xiao-ying LUO; Ming-yang LI; Yan PEI; Hao ZHANG

    2002-01-01

    @@ As a strategy for phytopathogen control through transgenic way, antimicrobial peptide genes have been employed over the last two decades.CEMA is a cationic antimicrobial chimeric peptide, which is produced by fusing eight amino acid residues from the antimicrobial peptide ceropin A with a modified meltin. Three transgenic cotton plants were generated by bombardment of cotton shoot tips using BioRad particle gun. The gold particles were coated with a cationic peptide, CEMA, DNA.

  11. Comparison of trapping profiles between d-peptides and glutathione in the identification of reactive metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaana E. Laine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative trapping profile of reactive metabolites arising from six structurally different compounds was tested with three different d-peptide isomers (Peptide 1, gly–tyr–pro–cys–pro–his-pro; Peptide 2, gly–tyr–pro–ala–pro–his–pro; Peptide 3, gly–tyr–arg–pro–cys–pro–his–lys–pro and glutathione (GSH using mouse and human liver microsomes as the biocatalyst. The test compounds were classified either as clinically “safe” (amlodipine, caffeine, ibuprofen, or clinically as “risky” (clozapine, nimesulide, ticlopidine; i.e., associated with severe clinical toxicity outcomes. Our working hypothesis was as follows: could the use of short different amino acid sequence containing d-peptides in adduct detection confer any add-on value to that obtained with GSH? All “risky” agents’ resulted in the formation of several GSH adducts in the incubation mixture and with at least one peptide adduct with both microsomal preparations. Amlodipine did not form any adducts with any of the trapping agents. No GSH and peptide 2 and 3 adducts were found with caffeine, but with peptide 1 one adduct with human liver microsomes was detected. Ibuprofen produced one Peptide 1-adduct with human and mouse liver microsomes but not with GSH. In conclusion, GSH still remains the gold trapping standard for reactive metabolites. However, targeted d-peptides could provide additional information about protein binding potential of electrophilic agents, but their clinical significance needs to be clarified using a wider spectrum of chemicals together with other safety estimates.

  12. Towards the MHC-peptide combinatorics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangueane, P; Sakharkar, M K; Kolatkar, P R; Ren, E C

    2001-05-01

    The exponentially increased sequence information on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles points to the existence of a high degree of polymorphism within them. To understand the functional consequences of MHC alleles, 36 nonredundant MHC-peptide complexes in the protein data bank (PDB) were examined. Induced fit molecular recognition patterns such as those in MHC-peptide complexes are governed by numerous rules. The 36 complexes were clustered into 19 subgroups based on allele specificity and peptide length. The subgroups were further analyzed for identifying common features in MHC-peptide binding pattern. The four major observations made during the investigation were: (1) the positional preference of peptide residues defined by percentage burial upon complex formation is shown for all the 19 subgroups and the burial profiles within entries in a given subgroup are found to be similar; (2) in class I specific 8- and 9-mer peptides, the fourth residue is consistently solvent exposed, however this observation is not consistent in class I specific 10-mer peptides; (3) an anchor-shift in positional preference is observed towards the C terminal as the peptide length increases in class II specific peptides; and (4) peptide backbone atoms are proportionately dominant at the MHC-peptide interface.

  13. Computer-Aided Design of Antimicrobial Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjell, Christopher D.; Hancock, Robert E.W.; Jenssen, Håvard

    2010-01-01

    chemical parameters with biological activities of the peptide, using statistical methods. In this review we will discuss two different in silico strategies of computer-aided antibacterial peptide design, a linear correlation model build as an extension of traditional principal component analysis (PCA......) and a non-linear artificial neural network model. Studies on structurally diverse peptides, have concluded that the PCA derived model are able to guide the antibacterial peptide design in a meaningful way, however requiring rather a high homology between the peptides in the test-set and the in silico...... library, to ensure a successful prediction. In contrast, the neural network model, though significantly less explored in relation to antimicrobial peptide design, has proven extremely promising, demonstrating impressive prediction success and ranking of random peptide libraries correlating well...

  14. Biology of the CAPA peptides in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predel, R; Wegener, C

    2006-11-01

    CAPA peptides have been isolated from a broad range of insect species as well as an arachnid, and can be grouped into the periviscerokinin and pyrokinin peptide families. In insects, CAPA peptides are the characteristic and most abundant neuropeptides in the abdominal neurohemal system. In many species, CAPA peptides exert potent myotropic effects on different muscles such as the heart. In others, including blood-sucking insects able to transmit serious diseases, CAPA peptides have strong diuretic or anti-diuretic effects and thus are potentially of medical importance. CAPA peptides undergo cell-type-specific sorting and packaging, and are the first insect neuropeptides shown to be differentially processed. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge on the structure, distribution, receptors and physiological actions of the CAPA peptides.

  15. The first salamander defensin antimicrobial peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Meng

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides have been widely identified from amphibian skins except salamanders. A novel antimicrobial peptide (CFBD was isolated and characterized from skin secretions of the salamander, Cynops fudingensis. The cDNA encoding CFBD precursor was cloned from the skin cDNA library of C. fudingensis. The precursor was composed of three domains: signal peptide of 17 residues, mature peptide of 41 residues and intervening propeptide of 3 residues. There are six cysteines in the sequence of mature CFBD peptide, which possibly form three disulfide-bridges. CFBD showed antimicrobial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans and Escherichia coli. This peptide could be classified into family of β-defensin based on its sequence similarity with β-defensins from other vertebrates. Evolution analysis indicated that CFBD was close to fish β-defensin. As far as we know, CFBD is the first β-defensin antimicrobial peptide from salamanders.

  16. Therapeutic uses of gastrointestinal peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfern, J S; O'Dorisio, T M

    1993-12-01

    The GI tract is one of nature's great pharmacies. Most, if not all, biologically active peptides can be found there, and it is quite likely that others remain to be discovered. Our ability to exploit this resource has expanded considerably over the past two decades. Advances in analytical techniques have allowed investigators to rapidly isolate and purify new compounds from tissue extracts. Sequencing and de novo synthesis of newly discovered peptides are now routine, and the structural modifications required to alter activity and tailor a compound to a particular use are easily made. A number of gastrointestinal peptides or their analogues for use in clinical studies are available from commercial sources (see Table 7). Somatostatin is the first gut peptide to successfully complete development and yield a pharmaceutical compound with a broad range of action. Several of the peptides discussed in this article have similar potential. TRH stands out as a candidate because of its effectiveness in the treatment of experimental spinal cord injury and a variety of shock states. Such a broad range of action in critical fields may justify the intensive development required to yield potent, long-acting, and highly specific analogues. Similarly, the antimetastatic and immunostimulant properties of the enkephalins offer promise for new therapies in the treatment of AIDS, ARC, and cancer. Studies with amylin may lead to new and more precise regimens of blood sugar control in insulin-dependent diabetics and could in turn, prevent some of the worst long-term effects of the disease. The development of effective intranasal forms of GHRH could spare children with GH-GHRH deficiency the distress of repeated injections and help to prevent excessive GH blood levels. Secretin, glucagon, or CGRP might be used one day in cardiovascular emergencies, and VIP or its analogues could prove effective in the treatment of asthma. Although preliminary results with many of these peptides are

  17. Anionic phospholipids modulate peptide insertion into membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L P; Deber, C M

    1997-05-06

    While the insertion of a hydrophobic peptide or membrane protein segment into the bilayer can be spontaneous and driven mainly by the hydrophobic effect, anionic lipids, which comprise ca. 20% of biological membranes, provide a source of electrostatic attractions for binding of proteins/peptides into membranes. To unravel the interplay of hydrophobicity and electrostatics in the binding of peptides into membranes, we designed peptides de novo which possess the typical sequence Lys-Lys-Ala-Ala-Ala-X-Ala-Ala-Ala-Ala-Ala-X-Ala-Ala-Trp-Ala-Ala-X-Ala-Al a-Ala-Lys-Lys-Lys-Lys-amide, where X residues correspond to "guest" residues which encompass a range of hydrophobicity (Leu, Ile, Gly, and Ser). Circular dichroism spectra demonstrated that peptides were partially (40-90%) random in aqueous buffer but were promoted to form 100% alpha-helical structures by anionic lipid micelles. In neutral lipid micelles, only the relatively hydrophobic peptides (X = L and I) spontaneously adopted the alpha-helical conformation, but when 25% of negatively charged lipids were mixed in to mimic the content of anionic lipids in biomembranes, the less hydrophobic (X = S and G) peptides then formed alpha-helical conformations. Consistent with these findings, fluorescence quenching by the aqueous-phase quencher iodide indicated that in anionic (dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol) vesicles, the peptide Trp residue was buried in the lipid vesicle hydrophobic core, while in neutral (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine) vesicles, only hydrophobic (X = L and I) peptides were shielded from the aqueous solution. Trp emission spectra of peptides in the presence of phospholipids doxyl-labeled at the 5-, 7-, 10-, 12-, and 16-fatty acid positions implied not only a transbilayer orientation for inserted peptides but also that mixed peptide populations (transbilayer + surface-associated) may arise. Overall results suggest that for hydrophobic peptides with segmental threshold hydrophobicity below that which

  18. Encapsulation of bioactive whey peptides in soy lecithin-derived nanoliposomes: Influence of peptide molecular weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Aishwarya; McClements, David Julian; Udenigwe, Chibuike C

    2016-12-15

    Encapsulation of peptides can be used to enhance their stability, delivery and bioavailability. This study focused on the effect of the molecular weight range of whey peptides on their encapsulation within soy lecithin-derived nanoliposomes. Peptide molecular weight did not have a major impact on encapsulation efficiency or liposome size. However, it influenced peptide distribution amongst the surface, core, and bilayer regions of the liposomes, as determined by electrical charge (ζ-potential) and FTIR analysis. The liposome ζ-potential depended on peptide molecular weight, suggesting that the peptide charged groups were in different locations relative to the liposome surfaces. FTIR analysis indicated that the least hydrophobic peptide fractions interacted more strongly with choline on the liposome surfaces. The results suggested that the peptides were unequally distributed within the liposomes, even at the same encapsulation efficiency. These findings are important for designing delivery systems for commercial production of encapsulated peptides with improved functional attributes.

  19. Taylor Dispersion Analysis as a promising tool for assessment of peptide-peptide interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgstedt, Ulrich B; Schwach, Grégoire; van de Weert, Marco

    2016-01-01

    . In this work, we show that protein-protein and peptide-peptide interactions can advantageously be investigated by measurement of the diffusion coefficient using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. Through comparison to Dynamic Light Scattering it was shown that Taylor Dispersion Analysis is well suited...... for the characterization of protein-protein interactions of solutions of α-lactalbumin and human serum albumin. The peptide-peptide interactions of three selected peptides were then investigated in a concentration range spanning from 0.5mg/ml up to 80mg/ml using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. The peptide-peptide interactions...... determination indicated that multibody interactions significantly affect the PPIs at concentration levels above 25mg/ml for the two charged peptides. Relative viscosity measurements, performed using the capillary based setup applied for Taylor Dispersion Analysis, showed that the viscosity of the peptide...

  20. Taylor Dispersion Analysis as a promising tool for assessment of peptide-peptide interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høgstedt, Ulrich B; Schwach, Grégoire; van de Weert, Marco; Østergaard, Jesper

    2016-10-10

    Protein-protein and peptide-peptide (self-)interactions are of key importance in understanding the physiochemical behavior of proteins and peptides in solution. However, due to the small size of peptide molecules, characterization of these interactions is more challenging than for proteins. In this work, we show that protein-protein and peptide-peptide interactions can advantageously be investigated by measurement of the diffusion coefficient using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. Through comparison to Dynamic Light Scattering it was shown that Taylor Dispersion Analysis is well suited for the characterization of protein-protein interactions of solutions of α-lactalbumin and human serum albumin. The peptide-peptide interactions of three selected peptides were then investigated in a concentration range spanning from 0.5mg/ml up to 80mg/ml using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. The peptide-peptide interactions determination indicated that multibody interactions significantly affect the PPIs at concentration levels above 25mg/ml for the two charged peptides. Relative viscosity measurements, performed using the capillary based setup applied for Taylor Dispersion Analysis, showed that the viscosity of the peptide solutions increased with concentration. Our results indicate that a viscosity difference between run buffer and sample in Taylor Dispersion Analysis may result in overestimation of the measured diffusion coefficient. Thus, Taylor Dispersion Analysis provides a practical, but as yet primarily qualitative, approach to assessment of the colloidal stability of both peptide and protein formulations.

  1. Characterization of Peptide Antibodies by Epitope Mapping Using Resin-Bound and Soluble Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of peptide antibodies through identification of their target epitopes is of utmost importance. Understanding antibody specificity at the amino acid level provides the key to understand the specific interaction between antibodies and their epitopes and their use as research and diagnostic tools as well as therapeutic agents. This chapter describes a straightforward strategy for mapping of continuous peptide antibody epitopes using resin-bound and soluble peptides. The approach combines three different types of peptide sets for full characterization of peptide antibodies: (1) overlapping peptides, used to locate antigenic regions; (2) truncated peptides, used to identify the minimal peptide length required for antibody binding; and (3) substituted peptides, used to identify the key residues important for antibody binding and to determine the specific contribution of key residues. For initial screening resin-bound peptides are used for epitope estimation, while soluble peptides subsequently are used for fine mapping. The combination of resin-bound peptides and soluble peptides for epitope mapping provides a time-sparing and straightforward approach for characterization of peptide antibodies.

  2. The Equine PeptideAtlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Louise; Jacobsen, Stine; Sorensen, Mette A.

    2014-01-01

    data mining resource. The advantages of the Equine PeptideAtlas are demonstrated by examples of mining the contents for information on potential and well-known equine acute phase proteins, which have extensive general interest in the veterinary clinic. The extracted information will support further......Progress in MS-based methods for veterinary research and diagnostics is lagging behind compared to the human research, and proteome data of domestic animals is still not well represented in open source data repositories. This is particularly true for the equine species. Here we present a first...... analyses, and emphasizes the value of the Equine PeptideAtlas as a resource for the design of targeted quantitative proteomic studies....

  3. [Heterogenous expression of antimicrobial peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shanshan; Hu, Guobin; Dong, Xianzhi

    2009-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a class of short proteins with a broad spectrum of antibacterial activities, are isolated from a wide variety of animals, both vertebrates and invertebrates, and plants as well as from bacteria and fungi. They are a key component of the innate immune response in most multicellular organisms. Owing to their potent, broad-spectrum antibacterial activities and uneasy developing of drug resistance, these peptides are of great clinical significance. However, preparation of AMPs at a large scale is a severe challenge to the development of the commercial products. Undoubtedly, construction of high-level biological expression systems for the production of AMPs is the key in its clinical application process. Herein, we summarize the progress in researches on heterogenous expression of AMPs in prokaryotic expression systems and eukaryotic expression systems.

  4. Characterization and Recombinant Expression of Terebrid Venom Peptide from Terebra guttata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Moon

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Venom peptides found in terebrid snails expand the toolbox of active compounds that can be applied to investigate cellular physiology and can be further developed as future therapeutics. However, unlike other predatory organisms, such as snakes, terebrids produce very small quantities of venom, making it difficult to obtain sufficient amounts for biochemical characterization. Here, we describe the first recombinant expression and characterization of terebrid peptide, teretoxin Tgu6.1, from Terebra guttata. Tgu6.1 is a novel forty-four amino acid teretoxin peptide with a VI/VII cysteine framework (C–C–CC–C–C similar to O, M and I conotoxin superfamilies. A ligation-independent cloning strategy with an ompT protease deficient strain of E. coli was employed to recombinantly produce Tgu6.1. Thioredoxin was introduced in the plasmid to combat disulfide folding and solubility issues. Specifically Histidine-6 tag and Ni-NTA affinity chromatography were applied as a purification method, and enterokinase was used as a specific cleavage protease to effectively produce high yields of folded Tgu6.1 without extra residues to the primary sequence. The recombinantly-expressed Tgu6.1 peptide was bioactive, displaying a paralytic effect when injected into a Nereis virens polychaete bioassay. The recombinant strategy described to express Tgu6.1 can be applied to produce high yields of other disulfide-rich peptides.

  5. Characterization and Recombinant Expression of Terebrid Venom Peptide from Terebra guttata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, John; Gorson, Juliette; Wright, Mary Elizabeth; Yee, Laurel; Khawaja, Samer; Shin, Hye Young; Karma, Yasmine; Musunri, Rajeeva Lochan; Yun, Michelle; Holford, Mande

    2016-03-03

    Venom peptides found in terebrid snails expand the toolbox of active compounds that can be applied to investigate cellular physiology and can be further developed as future therapeutics. However, unlike other predatory organisms, such as snakes, terebrids produce very small quantities of venom, making it difficult to obtain sufficient amounts for biochemical characterization. Here, we describe the first recombinant expression and characterization of terebrid peptide, teretoxin Tgu6.1, from Terebra guttata. Tgu6.1 is a novel forty-four amino acid teretoxin peptide with a VI/VII cysteine framework (C-C-CC-C-C) similar to O, M and I conotoxin superfamilies. A ligation-independent cloning strategy with an ompT protease deficient strain of E. coli was employed to recombinantly produce Tgu6.1. Thioredoxin was introduced in the plasmid to combat disulfide folding and solubility issues. Specifically Histidine-6 tag and Ni-NTA affinity chromatography were applied as a purification method, and enterokinase was used as a specific cleavage protease to effectively produce high yields of folded Tgu6.1 without extra residues to the primary sequence. The recombinantly-expressed Tgu6.1 peptide was bioactive, displaying a paralytic effect when injected into a Nereis virens polychaete bioassay. The recombinant strategy described to express Tgu6.1 can be applied to produce high yields of other disulfide-rich peptides.

  6. Structural and pharmacological characteristics of chimeric peptides derived from peptide E and beta-endorphin reveal the crucial role of the C-terminal YGGFL and YKKGE motifs in their analgesic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condamine, Eric; Courchay, Karine; Rego, Jean-Claude Do; Leprince, Jérôme; Mayer, Catherine; Davoust, Daniel; Costentin, Jean; Vaudry, Hubert

    2010-05-01

    Peptide E (a 25-amino acid peptide derived from proenkephalin A) and beta-endorphin (a 31-amino acid peptide derived from proopiomelanocortin) bind with high affinity to opioid receptors and share structural similarities but induce analgesic effects of very different intensity. Indeed, whereas they possess the same N-terminus Met-enkephalin message sequence linked to a helix by a flexible spacer and a C-terminal part in random coil conformation, in contrast with peptide E, beta-endorphin produces a profound analgesia. To determine the key structural elements explaining this very divergent opioid activity, we have compared the structural and pharmacological characteristics of several chimeric peptides derived from peptide E and beta-endorphin. Structures were obtained under the same experimental conditions using circular dichroism, computational estimation of helical content and/or nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and NMR-restrained molecular modeling. The hot-plate and writhing tests were used in mice to evaluate the antinociceptive effects of the peptides. Our results indicate that neither the length nor the physicochemical profile of the spacer plays a fundamental role in analgesia. On the other hand, while the functional importance of the helix cannot be excluded, the last 5 residues in the C-terminal part seem to be crucial for the expression or absence of the analgesic activity of these peptides. These data raise the question of the true function of peptides E in opioidergic systems.

  7. Peptide Membranes in Chemical Evolution*

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Simple surfactants achieve remarkable long-range order in aqueous environments. This organizing potential is seen most dramatically in biological membranes where phospholipid assemblies both define cell boundaries and provide a ubiquitous structural scaffold for controlling cellular chemistry. Here we consider simple peptides that also spontaneously assemble into exceptionally ordered scaffolds, and review early data suggesting that these structures maintain the functional diversity of protei...

  8. Antimicrobial peptides in human sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas eMartin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Nearly 100 years ago, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs were identified as an important part of innate immunity. They exist in species from bacteria to mammals and can be isolated in body fluids and on surfaces constitutively or induced by inflammation. Defensins have anti-bacterial effects against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as anti-viral and anti-yeast effects. Human neutrophil peptides (HNP 1-3 and human beta-defensins (HBDs 1-3 are some of the most important defensins in humans. Recent studies have demonstrated higher levels of HNP -1-3 and HBD-2 in sepsis. The bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI attenuates local inflammatory response and decreases systemic toxicity of endotoxins. Moreover, BPI might reflect the severity of organ dysfunction in sepsis. Elevated plasma lactoferrin is detected in patients with organ failure. HNP-1-3, lactoferrin, BPI and heparin-binding protein (HBP are increased in sepsis. Human lactoferrin peptide 1-11 (hLF 1-11 possesses antimicrobial activity and modulates inflammation. The recombinant form of lactoferrin (talactoferrin alpha, TLF has been shown to decrease mortality in critically ill patients. A phase II/III study with TLF in sepsis did not confirm this result. The growing number of multiresistant bacteria is an ongoing problem in sepsis therapy. Furthermore, antibiotics are known to promote the liberation of pro-inflammatory cell components and thus augment the severity of sepsis. Compared to antibiotics, AMPs kill bacteria but also neutralize pathogenic factors such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS. The obstacle to applying naturally occurring AMPs is their high nephro- and neurotoxicity. Therefore, the challenge is to develop peptides to treat septic patients effectively without causing harm. This overview focuses on natural and synthetic AMPs in human and experimental sepsis and their potential to provide significant improvements in the treatment of critically ill with severe

  9. Cloning, expression, and purification of a new antimicrobial peptide gene from Musca domestica larva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Zhihua; Sun, Xiaoning; Tang, Yan; Wang, Kai; Gao, Yunhang; Ma, Hongxia

    2014-10-01

    Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae), the housefly, exhibits unique immune defences and can produce antimicrobial peptides upon stimulation with bacteria. Based on the cDNA library constructed using the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method, a 198-bp antimicrobial peptide gene, which we named MDAP-2, was amplified by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) from M. domestica larvae stimulated with Salmonella pullorum (Enterobacteriaceae: Salmonella). In the present study, the full-length MDAP-2 gene was cloned and inserted into a His-tagged Escherichia coli prokaryotic expression system to enable production of the recombinant peptide. The recombinant MDAP-2 peptide was purified using Ni-NTA HisTrap FF crude column chromatography. The bacteriostatic activity of the recombinant purified MDAP-2 protein was assessed. The results indicated that MDAP-2 had in vitro antibacterial activity against all of the tested Gram- bacteria from clinical isolates, including E. coli (Enterobacteriaceae: Escherichia), one strain of S. pullorum (Enterobacteriaceae: Salmonella), and one strain of Pasteurella multocida. DNA sequencing and BLAST analysis showed that the MDAP-2 antimicrobial peptide gene was not homologous to any other antimicrobial peptide genes in GenBank. The antibacterial mechanisms of the newly discovered MDAP-2 peptide warrant further study.

  10. Recent trends in the analysis of bioactive peptides in milk and dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capriotti, Anna Laura; Cavaliere, Chiara; Piovesana, Susy; Samperi, Roberto; Laganà, Aldo

    2016-04-01

    Food-derived constituents represent important sources of several classes of bioactive compounds. Among them peptides have gained great attention in the last two decades thanks to the scientific evidence of their beneficial effects on health in addition to their established nutritional value. Several functionalities for bioactive peptides have been described, including antioxidative, antihypertensive, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, and antimicrobial activity. They are now considered as novel and potential dietary ingredients to promote human health, though in some cases they may also have detrimental effects on health. Bioactive peptides can be naturally occurring, produced in vitro by enzymatic hydrolysis, and formed in vivo during gastrointestinal digestion of proteins. Thus, the need to gain a better understanding of the positive health effects of food peptides has prompted the development of analytical strategies for their isolation, separation, and identification in complex food matrices. Dairy products and milk are potential sources of bioactive peptides: several of them possess extra-nutritional physiological functions that qualify them to be classified under the functional food label. In this trends article we briefly describe the state-of-the-art of peptidomics methods for the identification and discovery of bioactive peptides, also considering recent progress in their analysis and highlighting the difficulty in the analysis of short amino acid sequences and endogenous peptides.

  11. Characterization of peptide attachment on silicon nanowires by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurylo, Ievgen; Dupré, Mathieu; Cantel, Sonia; Enjalbal, Christine; Drobecq, Hervé; Szunerits, Sabine; Melnyk, Oleg; Boukherroub, Rabah; Coffinier, Yannick

    2017-02-27

    In this paper, we report an original method to immobilize a model peptide on silicon nanowires (SiNWs) via a photolinker attached to the SiNWs' surface. The silicon nanowires were fabricated by a metal assisted chemical etching (MACE) method. Then, direct characterization of the peptide immobilization on SiNWs was performed either by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) or by laser-desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS). XPS allowed us to follow the peptide immobilization and its photorelease by recording the variation of the signal intensities of the different elements present on the SiNW surface. Mass spectrometry was performed without the use of an organic matrix and peptide ions were produced via a photocleavage mechanism. Indeed, thanks to direct photorelease achieved upon laser irradiation, a recorded predictable peak related to the molecular peptide ion has been detected, allowing the identification of the model peptide. Additional MS/MS experiments confirmed the photodissociation site and confirmed the N-terminal immobilization of the peptide on SiNWs.

  12. Denoising peptide tandem mass spectra for spectral libraries: a Bayesian approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wenguang; Lam, Henry

    2013-07-05

    With the rapid accumulation of data from shotgun proteomics experiments, it has become feasible to build comprehensive and high-quality spectral libraries of tandem mass spectra of peptides. A spectral library condenses experimental data into a retrievable format and can be used to aid peptide identification by spectral library searching. A key step in spectral library building is spectrum denoising, which is best accomplished by merging multiple replicates of the same peptide ion into a consensus spectrum. However, this approach cannot be applied to "singleton spectra," for which only one observed spectrum is available for the peptide ion. We developed a method, based on a Bayesian classifier, for denoising peptide tandem mass spectra. The classifier accounts for relationships between peaks, and can be trained on the fly from consensus spectra and immediately applied to denoise singleton spectra, without hard-coded knowledge about peptide fragmentation. A linear regression model was also trained to predict the number of useful "signal" peaks in a spectrum, thereby obviating the need for arbitrary thresholds for peak filtering. This Bayesian approach accumulates weak evidence systematically to boost the discrimination power between signal and noise peaks, and produces readily interpretable conditional probabilities that offer valuable insights into peptide fragmentation behaviors. By cross validation, spectra denoised by this method were shown to retain more signal peaks, and have higher spectral similarities to replicates, than those filtered by intensity only.

  13. Successful adjuvant-free vaccination of BALB/c mice with mutated amyloid β peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahi Monika M

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent human clinical trial of an Alzheimer's disease (AD vaccine using amyloid beta (Aβ 1–42 plus QS-21 adjuvant produced some positive results, but was halted due to meningoencephalitis in some participants. The development of a vaccine with mutant Aβ peptides that avoids the use of an adjuvant may result in an effective and safer human vaccine. Results All peptides tested showed high antibody responses, were long-lasting, and demonstrated good memory response. Epitope mapping indicated that peptide mutation did not lead to epitope switching. Mutant peptides induced different inflammation responses as evidenced by cytokine profiles. Ig isotyping indicated that adjuvant-free vaccination with peptides drove an adequate Th2 response. All anti-sera from vaccinated mice cross-reacted with human Aβ in APP/PS1 transgenic mouse brain tissue. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that an adjuvant-free vaccine with different Aβ peptides can be an effective and safe vaccination approach against AD. This study represents the first report of adjuvant-free vaccines utilizing Aβ peptides carrying diverse mutations in the T-cell epitope. These largely positive results provide encouragement for the future of the development of human vaccinations for AD.

  14. Recent Advances in Peptide Immunomodulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerfas, Breanna L; Gao, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    With the continued rise in antibiotic-resistant bacteria, there is an immense need for the development of new therapeutic agents. Host-defense peptides (HDPs) offer a unique alternative to many of the current approved antibiotics. By targeting the host rather than the pathogen, HDPs offer several benefits over traditional small molecule drug treatments, such as a slower propensity towards resistance, broad-spectrum activity and lower risk of patients developing sepsis. However, natural peptide structures have many disadvantages as well, including susceptibility to proteolytic degradation, significant costs of synthesis and host toxicity. For this reason, much work has been done to examine peptidomimetic structures, in the hopes of finding a structure with all of the desired qualities of an antibiotic drug. Recently, this research has included synthetic constructs that mimic the behavior of HDPs but have no structural similarity to peptides. This review article focuses on the progression of this field of research, beginning with an analysis of a few prominent examples of natural HDPs and moving on to describe how the information learned by studying them have led to the current design platforms.

  15. Study on the Funcitonal Peptides in Low Salt Sufu Making

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangXiaofeng; LiLite; WangJiahuai; MasayoshiSaito; EizoTatsumi

    2002-01-01

    Sufu in this project was prepared with Actinomucor elegans (CICC-3318)as the starter and with soybean as the material.Different with the sufu with 10% salt produced by traditional process,a sufu product with 6% salt was produced in this project by reducing the salt content in salting process.To determine peptides,the water-soluble extracts obtained saparetly from frozen dried powders of soybean,tofu,pehtze pehtze and sufu ripening for 50 days were analyzed by high-pressure lipid chromatography (HPLC).Antioxidative activity and antihypertensive activity of the extract due to the peptides contained were evaluated respectively by radical scavenging ability and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACS) inhibitory activity.According to the HPLC patterns,the peptides content was nearly zero in soybean and tofu,but increassed gradually during maturing in the further process of making pehtze,salted pehtze and final product sufu,Correspondingly,the antioxidative and antihypertensive activities of the extracts strengthened with maturing.For our product,sufu with 6% salt,the antioxidative and antihypertensive activities reached peak values at about 30 d maturing,and still remained medium values in final product sufu.In comarison,the antioxidative and antihypertensive activities for the sufu with 10% salt reached peack values at 40 d maturing,but remained medium values inferior to those for the sufu with 6% salt.

  16. MIPs are ancestral ligands for the sex peptide receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Joon; Bartalska, Katarina; Audsley, Neil; Yamanaka, Naoki; Yapici, Nilay; Lee, Ju-Youn; Kim, Yong-Chul; Markovic, Milica; Isaac, Elwyn; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Dickson, Barry J

    2010-04-06

    Upon mating, females of many animal species undergo dramatic changes in their behavior. In Drosophila melanogaster, postmating behaviors are triggered by sex peptide (SP), which is produced in the male seminal fluid and transferred to female during copulation. SP modulates female behaviors via sex peptide receptor (SPR) located in a small subset of internal sensory neurons that innervate the female uterus and project to the CNS. Although required for postmating responses only in these female sensory neurons, SPR is expressed broadly in the CNS of both sexes. Moreover, SPR is also encoded in the genomes of insects that lack obvious SP orthologs. These observations suggest that SPR may have additional ligands and functions. Here, we identify myoinhibitory peptides (MIPs) as a second family of SPR ligands that is conserved across a wide range of invertebrate species. MIPs are potent agonists for Drosophila, Aedes, and Aplysia SPRs in vitro, yet are unable to trigger postmating responses in vivo. In contrast to SP, MIPs are not produced in male reproductive organs, and are not required for postmating behaviors in Drosophila females. We conclude that MIPs are evolutionarily conserved ligands for SPR, which are likely to mediate functions other than the regulation of female reproductive behaviors.

  17. Expression pattern of arenicins - the antimicrobial peptides of polychaete Arenicolamarina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arina L. Maltseva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Immune responses of invertebrate animals are mediated through innate mechanisms, among which production of antimicrobial peptides play an important role. Although evolutionary Polychaetes represent an interesting group closely related to a putative common ancestor of other coelomates, their immune mechanisms still remain scarcely investigated. Previously our group has identified arenicins - new antimicrobial peptides of the lugworm Arenicola marina, since then these peptides were thoroughly characterized in terms of their structure and inhibitory potential. In the present study we addressed the question of the physiological functions of arenicins in the lugworm body. Using molecular and immunocytochemical methods we demonstrated that arencins are expressed in the wide range of the lugworm tissues - coelomocytes, body wall, extravasal tissue and the gut. The expression of arenicins is constitutive and does not depend on stimulation of various infectious stimuli. Most intensively arenicins are produced by mature coelomocytes where they function as killing agents inside the phagolysosome. In the gut and the body wall epithelia arenicins are released from producing cells via secretion as they are found both inside the epithelial cells and in the contents of the cuticle. Collectively our study showed that arenicins are found in different body compartments responsible for providing a first line of defence against infections, which implies their important role as key components of both epithelial and systemic branches of host defence.

  18. Quorum Sensing Peptides Selectively Penetrate the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynendaele, Evelien; Verbeke, Frederick; Stalmans, Sofie; Gevaert, Bert; Janssens, Yorick; Van De Wiele, Christophe; Peremans, Kathelijne; Burvenich, Christian; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria communicate with each other by the use of signaling molecules, a process called 'quorum sensing'. One group of quorum sensing molecules includes the oligopeptides, which are mainly produced by Gram-positive bacteria. Recently, these quorum sensing peptides were found to biologically influence mammalian cells, promoting i.a. metastasis of cancer cells. Moreover, it was found that bacteria can influence different central nervous system related disorders as well, e.g. anxiety, depression and autism. Research currently focuses on the role of bacterial metabolites in this bacteria-brain interaction, with the role of the quorum sensing peptides not yet known. Here, three chemically diverse quorum sensing peptides were investigated for their brain influx (multiple time regression technique) and efflux properties in an in vivo mouse model (ICR-CD-1) to determine blood-brain transfer properties: PhrCACET1 demonstrated comparatively a very high initial influx into the mouse brain (Kin = 20.87 μl/(g×min)), while brain penetrabilities of BIP-2 and PhrANTH2 were found to be low (Kin = 2.68 μl/(g×min)) and very low (Kin = 0.18 μl/(g×min)), respectively. All three quorum sensing peptides were metabolically stable in plasma (in vitro) during the experimental time frame and no significant brain efflux was observed. Initial tissue distribution data showed remarkably high liver accumulation of BIP-2 as well. Our results thus support the potential role of some quorum sensing peptides in different neurological disorders, thereby enlarging our knowledge about the microbiome-brain axis.

  19. Study on CCR5 analogs and affinity peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yingping; Deng, Riqiang; Wu, Wenyan

    2012-03-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor of human chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a key target in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection process due to its major involvement in binding to the HIV type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp120 and facilitating virus entry into the cells. The identification of naturally occurring CCR5 mutations (especially CCR5 delta-32) has allowed us to address the CCR5 molecule as a promising target to prevent or resist HIV infection in vivo. To obtain high-affinity peptides that can be used to block CCR5, CCR5 analogs with high conformational similarity are required. In this study, two recombinant proteins named CCR5 N-Linker-E2 and CCR5 mN-E1-E2 containing the fragments of the CCR5 N-terminal, the first extracellular loop or the second extracellular loop are cloned from a full-length human CCR5 cDNA. The recombinant human CCR5 analogs with self-cleavage activity of the intein Mxe or Ssp in the vector pTwinI were then produced with a high-yield expression and purification system in Escherichia coli. Experiments of extracellular epitope-activity identification (such as immunoprecipitation and indirective/competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) confirmed the close similarity between the epitope activity of the CCR5 analogs and that of the natural CCR5, suggesting the applicability of the recombinant CCR5 analogs as antagonists of the chemokine ligands. Subsequent screening of high-affinity peptides from the phage random-peptides library acquired nine polypeptides, which could be used as CCR5 peptide antagonists. The CCR5 analogs and affinity peptides elucidated in this paper provide us with a basis for further study of the mechanism of inhibition of HIV-1 infection.

  20. The role of food intake regulating peptides in cardiovascular regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulášková, B; Maletínská, L; Zicha, J; Kuneš, J

    2016-11-15

    Obesity is a risk factor that worsens cardiovascular events leading to higher morbidity and mortality. However, the exact mechanisms of relation between obesity and cardiovascular events are unclear. Nevertheless, it has been demonstrated that pharmacological therapy for obesity has great potential to improve some cardiovascular problems. Therefore, it is important to determine the common mechanisms regulating both food intake and blood pressure. Several hormones produced by peripheral tissues work together with neuropeptides involved in the regulation of both food intake and blood pressure. Anorexigenic (food intake lowering) hormones such as leptin, glucagon-like peptide-1 and cholecystokinin cooperate with α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated peptide as well as prolactin-releasing peptide. Curiously their collective actions result in increased sympathetic activity, especially in the kidney, which could be one of the factors responsible for the blood pressure increases seen in obesity. On the other hand, orexigenic (food intake enhancing) peptides, especially ghrelin released from the stomach and acting in the brain, cooperates with orexins, neuropeptide Y, melanin-concentrating hormone and galanin, which leads to decreased sympathetic activity and blood pressure. This paradox should be intensively studied in the future. Moreover, it is important to know that the hypothalamus together with the brainstem seem to be major structures in the regulation of food intake and blood pressure. Thus, the above mentioned regions might be essential brain components in the transmission of peripheral signals to the central effects. In this short review, we summarize the current information on cardiovascular effects of food intake regulating peptides.

  1. Bradyrhizobium BclA Is a Peptide Transporter Required for Bacterial Differentiation in Symbiosis with Aeschynomene Legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guefrachi, Ibtissem; Pierre, Olivier; Timchenko, Tatiana; Alunni, Benoît; Barrière, Quentin; Czernic, Pierre; Villaécija-Aguilar, José-Antonio; Verly, Camille; Bourge, Mickaël; Fardoux, Joël; Mars, Mohamed; Kondorosi, Eva; Giraud, Eric; Mergaert, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Nodules of legume plants are highly integrated symbiotic systems shaped by millions of years of evolution. They harbor nitrogen-fixing rhizobium bacteria called bacteroids. Several legume species produce peptides called nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides in the symbiotic nodule cells which house the bacteroids. NCR peptides are related to antimicrobial peptides of innate immunity. They induce the endosymbionts into a differentiated, enlarged, and polyploid state. The bacterial symbionts, on their side, evolved functions for the response to the NCR peptides. Here, we identified the bclA gene of Bradyrhizobium sp. strains ORS278 and ORS285, which is required for the formation of differentiated and functional bacteroids in the nodules of the NCR peptide-producing Aeschynomene legumes. The BclA ABC transporter promotes the import of NCR peptides and provides protection against the antimicrobial activity of these peptides. Moreover, BclA can complement the role of the related BacA transporter of Sinorhizobium meliloti, which has a similar symbiotic function in the interaction with Medicago legumes.

  2. Boosting Farm Produce Supply

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In the wake of escalating inflation,securing farm produce supply and stablizing grain prices could help to alleviate economic pressure The Chinese Government has pledged to secure a stable supply of farm produce.According to a document released after the annual Central Rural Work Conference held on December 22-23 in Beijing,preventing short supplies of farm produce and avoiding"ex-

  3. Targeting diverse protein–protein interaction interfaces with α/β-peptides derived from the Z-domain scaffold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Checco, James W.; Kreitler, Dale F.; Thomas, Nicole C.; Belair, David G.; Rettko, Nicholas J.; Murphy, William L.; Forest, Katrina T.; Gellman, Samuel H. (UW)

    2015-04-14

    Peptide-based agents derived from well-defined scaffolds offer an alternative to antibodies for selective and high-affinity recognition of large and topologically complex protein surfaces. Here, we describe a strategy for designing oligomers containing both α- and β-amino acid residues ("α/β-peptides") that mimic several peptides derived from the three-helix bundle "Z-domain" scaffold. We show that α/β-peptides derived from a Z-domain peptide targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) can structurally and functionally mimic the binding surface of the parent peptide while exhibiting significantly decreased susceptibility to proteolysis. The tightest VEGF-binding α/β-peptide inhibits the VEGF₁₆₅-induced proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. We demonstrate the versatility of this strategy by showing how principles underlying VEGF signaling inhibitors can be rapidly extended to produce Z-domain–mimetic α/β-peptides that bind to two other protein partners, IgG and tumor necrosis factor-α. Because well-established selection techniques can identify high-affinity Z-domain derivatives from large DNA-encoded libraries, our findings should enable the design of biostable α/β-peptides that bind tightly and specifically to diverse targets of biomedical interest. Such reagents would be useful for diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  4. A Novel Trypsin Inhibitor-Like Cysteine-Rich Peptide from the Frog Lepidobatrachus laevis Containing Proteinase-Inhibiting Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Wei; Tan, Ji-Min; Du, Can-Wei; Luan, Ning; Yan, Xiu-Wen; Lai, Ren; Lu, Qiu-Min

    2015-08-01

    Various bio-active substances in amphibian skins play important roles in survival of the amphibians. Many protease inhibitor peptides have been identified from amphibian skins, which are supposed to negatively modulate the activity of proteases to avoid premature degradation or release of skin peptides, or to inhibit extracellular proteases produced by invading bacteria. However, there is no information on the proteinase inhibitors from the frog Lepidobatrachus laevis which is unique in South America. In this work, a cDNA encoding a novel trypsin inhibitor-like (TIL) cysteine-rich peptide was identified from the skin cDNA library of L. laevis. The 240-bp coding region encodes an 80-amino acid residue precursor protein containing 10 half-cysteines. By sequence comparison and signal peptide prediction, the precursor was predicted to release a 55-amino acid mature peptide with amino acid sequence, IRCPKDKIYKFCGSPCPPSCKDLTPNCIAVCKKGCFCRDGTVDNNHGKCVKKENC. The mature peptide was named LL-TIL. LL-TIL shares significant domain similarity with the peptides from the TIL supper family. Antimicrobial and trypsin-inhibitory abilities of recombinant LL-TIL were tested. Recombinant LL-TIL showed no antimicrobial activity, while it had trypsin-inhibiting activity with a Ki of 16.5178 μM. These results suggested there was TIL peptide with proteinase-inhibiting activity in the skin of frog L. laevis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of TIL peptide from frog skin.

  5. Targeting diverse protein-protein interaction interfaces with α/β-peptides derived from the Z-domain scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checco, James W; Kreitler, Dale F; Thomas, Nicole C; Belair, David G; Rettko, Nicholas J; Murphy, William L; Forest, Katrina T; Gellman, Samuel H

    2015-04-14

    Peptide-based agents derived from well-defined scaffolds offer an alternative to antibodies for selective and high-affinity recognition of large and topologically complex protein surfaces. Here, we describe a strategy for designing oligomers containing both α- and β-amino acid residues ("α/β-peptides") that mimic several peptides derived from the three-helix bundle "Z-domain" scaffold. We show that α/β-peptides derived from a Z-domain peptide targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) can structurally and functionally mimic the binding surface of the parent peptide while exhibiting significantly decreased susceptibility to proteolysis. The tightest VEGF-binding α/β-peptide inhibits the VEGF165-induced proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. We demonstrate the versatility of this strategy by showing how principles underlying VEGF signaling inhibitors can be rapidly extended to produce Z-domain-mimetic α/β-peptides that bind to two other protein partners, IgG and tumor necrosis factor-α. Because well-established selection techniques can identify high-affinity Z-domain derivatives from large DNA-encoded libraries, our findings should enable the design of biostable α/β-peptides that bind tightly and specifically to diverse targets of biomedical interest. Such reagents would be useful for diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  6. Activities of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and related peptides at the CGRP receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maton, P.N.; Pradhan, T.; Zhou, Z.C.; Gardner, J.D.; Jensen, R.T. (National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-05-01

    In guinea pig pancreatic acini rat calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) increased amylase release 2-fold, salmon calcitonin had an efficacy of only 44% of that of CGRP and (Tyr0)CGRP(28-37) and human calcitonin had no actions. (Tyr0)CGRP(28-37), but not human calcitonin, antagonized the actions of CGRP in pancreatic acini with an IC50 of 3 microM. (Tyr0)CGRP(28-37) produced a parallel rightward shift in the dose-response curve for CGRP-stimulated amylase secretion. The inhibition was specific for CGRP and was reversible. Studies with 125I-CGRP demonstrated that CGRP, salmon calcitonin and (Tyr0)CGRP, but not human calcitonin, interacted with CGRP receptors on pancreatic acini. These results indicate that various CGRP-related peptides demonstrate different relationships between their abilities to occupy the CGRP receptor and to affect biologic activity, with CGRP itself being a full agonist, salmon calcitonin a partial agonist, (Tyr0)CGRP(28-37) a competitive antagonist, and human calcitonin having no actions.

  7. Identification of novel human immunodeficiency virus type 1-inhibitory peptides based on the antimicrobial peptide database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangshun; Watson, Karen M; Peterkofsky, Alan; Buckheit, Robert W

    2010-03-01

    To identify novel anti-HIV-1 peptides based on the antimicrobial peptide database (APD; http://aps.unmc.edu/AP/main.php), we have screened 30 candidates and found 11 peptides with 50% effective concentrations (EC(50)) of 1, increases in the Arg contents of amphibian maximin H5 and dermaseptin S9 peptides and the database-derived GLK-19 peptide improved the TIs. These examples demonstrate that the APD is a rich resource and a useful tool for developing novel HIV-1-inhibitory peptides.

  8. Functional and pharmacological characterization of a VEGF mimetic peptide on reparative angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finetti, Federica; Basile, Anna; Capasso, Domenica; Di Gaetano, Sonia; Di Stasi, Rossella; Pascale, Maria; Turco, Caterina Maria; Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia; D'Andrea, Luca Domenico

    2012-08-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is the main regulator of physiological and pathological angiogenesis. Low molecular weight molecules able to stimulate angiogenesis have interesting medical application for example in regenerative medicine, but at present none has reached the clinic. We reported that a VEGF mimetic helical peptide, QK, designed on the VEGF helix sequence 17-25, is able to bind and activate the VEGF receptors, producing angiogenesis. In this study we evaluate the pharmacological properties of peptide QK with the aim to propose it as a VEGF-mimetic drug to be employed in reparative angiogenesis. We show that the peptide QK is able to recapitulate all the biological activities of VEGF in vivo and on endothelial cells. In experiments evaluating sprouting from aortic ring and vessel formation in an in vivo angiogenesis model, the peptide QK showed biological effects comparable with VEGF. At endothelial level, the peptide up-regulates VEGF receptor expression, activates intracellular pathways depending on VEGFR2, and consistently it induces endothelial cell proliferation, survival and migration. When added to angiogenic factors (VEGF and/or FGF-2), QK produces an improved biological action, which resulted in reduced apoptosis and accelerated in vitro wound healing. The VEGF-like activity of the short peptide QK, characterized by lower cost of production and easier handling compared to the native glycoprotein, suggests that it is an attractive candidate to be further developed for application in therapeutic angiogenesis.

  9. Characterization of Peptides Found in Unprocessed and Extruded Amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus Pepsin/Pancreatin Hydrolysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Montoya-Rodríguez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to characterize peptides found in unprocessed amaranth hydrolysates (UAH and extruded amaranth hydrolysates (EAH and to determine the effect of the hydrolysis time on the profile of peptides produced. Amaranth grain was extruded in a single screw extruder at 125 °C of extrusion temperature and 130 rpm of screw speed. Unprocessed and extruded amaranth flour were hydrolyzed with pepsin/pancreatin enzymes following a kinetic at 10, 25, 60, 90, 120 and 180 min for each enzyme. After 180 min of pepsin hydrolysis, aliquots were taken at each time during pancreatin hydrolysis to characterize the hydrolysates by MALDI-TOF/MS-MS. Molecular masses (MM (527, 567, 802, 984, 1295, 1545, 2034 and 2064 Da of peptides appeared consistently during hydrolysis, showing high intensity at 10 min (2064 Da, 120 min (802 Da and 180 min (567 Da in UAH. EAH showed high intensity at 10 min (2034 Da and 120 min (984, 1295 and 1545 Da. Extrusion produced more peptides with MM lower than 1000 Da immediately after 10 min of hydrolysis. Hydrolysis time impacted on the peptide profile, as longer the time lower the MM in both amaranth hydrolysates. Sequences obtained were analyzed for their biological activity at BIOPEP, showing important inhibitory activities related to chronic diseases. These peptides could be used as a food ingredient/supplement in a healthy diet to prevent the risk to develop chronic diseases.

  10. Bioprospecting open reading frames for peptide effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ling; Scott, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Recent successes in the development of small-molecule antagonists of protein-protein interactions designed based on co-crystal structures of peptides bound to their biological targets confirm that short peptides derived from interacting proteins can be high-value ligands for pharmacologic validation of targets and for identification of druggable sites. Evolved sequence space is likely to be enriched for interacting peptides, but identifying minimal peptide effectors within genomic sequence can be labor intensive. Here we describe the use of incremental truncation to diversify genetic material on the scale of open reading frames into comprehensive libraries of constituent peptides. The approach is capable of generating peptides derived from both continuous and discontinuous sequence elements, and is compatible with the expression of free linear or backbone cyclic peptides, with peptides tethered to amino- or carboxyl-terminal fusion partners or with the expression of peptides displayed within protein scaffolds (peptide aptamers). Incremental truncation affords a valuable source of molecular diversity to interrogate the druggable genome or evaluate the therapeutic potential of candidate genes.

  11. Chemical Methods for Peptide and Protein Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istvan Toth

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the invention of solid phase synthetic methods by Merrifield in 1963, the number of research groups focusing on peptide synthesis has grown exponentially. However, the original step-by-step synthesis had limitations: the purity of the final product decreased with the number of coupling steps. After the development of Boc and Fmoc protecting groups, novel amino acid protecting groups and new techniques were introduced to provide high quality and quantity peptide products. Fragment condensation was a popular method for peptide production in the 1980s, but unfortunately the rate of racemization and reaction difficulties proved less than ideal. Kent and co-workers revolutionized peptide coupling by introducing the chemoselective reaction of unprotected peptides, called native chemical ligation. Subsequently, research has focused on the development of novel ligating techniques including the famous click reaction, ligation of peptide hydrazides, and the recently reported a-ketoacid-hydroxylamine ligations with 5-oxaproline. Several companies have been formed all over the world to prepare high quality Good Manufacturing Practice peptide products on a multi-kilogram scale. This review describes the advances in peptide chemistry including the variety of synthetic peptide methods currently available and the broad application of peptides in medicinal chemistry.

  12. Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article provides an overview on the identification, activity, 3D structure, and mechanism of action of human AMPs selected from the antimicrobial peptide database. Over 100 such peptides have been identified from a variety of tissues and epithelial surfaces, including skin, eyes, ears, mouths, gut, immune, nervous and urinary systems. These peptides vary from 10 to 150 amino acids with a net charge between −3 and +20 and a hydrophobic content below 60%. The sequence diversity enables human AMPs to adopt various 3D structures and to attack pathogens by different mechanisms. While α-defensin HD-6 can self-assemble on the bacterial surface into nanonets to entangle bacteria, both HNP-1 and β-defensin hBD-3 are able to block cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. Lysozyme is well-characterized to cleave bacterial cell wall polysaccharides but can also kill bacteria by a non-catalytic mechanism. The two hydrophobic domains in the long amphipathic α-helix of human cathelicidin LL-37 lays the basis for binding and disrupting the curved anionic bacterial membrane surfaces by forming pores or via the carpet model. Furthermore, dermcidin may serve as ion channel by forming a long helix-bundle structure. In addition, the C-type lectin RegIIIα can initially recognize bacterial peptidoglycans followed by pore formation in the membrane. Finally, histatin 5 and GAPDH(2-32 can enter microbial cells to exert their effects. It appears that granulysin enters cells and kills intracellular pathogens with the aid of pore-forming perforin. This arsenal of human defense proteins not only keeps us healthy but also inspires the development of a new generation of personalized

  13. Oxidative stress can alter the antigenicity of immunodominant peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiskopf, Daniela; Schwanninger, Angelika; Weinberger, Birgit

    2010-01-01

    APCs operate frequently under oxidative stress induced by aging, tissue damage, pathogens, or inflammatory responses. Phagocytic cells produce peroxides and free-radical species that facilitate pathogen clearance and can in the case of APCs, also lead to oxidative modifications of antigenic...... molecule is not impaired. Additionally, we show that CD8(+) T cells have a decreased proliferation and IFN-gamma production when stimulated with oxidized CMVpp65(495-503) peptide. Spectratyping the antigen-binding site of the TCR of responding T cells demonstrates that the CMVpp65(495-503) and the CMVoxpp...... of antigenic peptides may affect T cell responses severely by binding T cell clones with different affinity. This may lead to an altered immune response against infectious agents as well as against tumor or autoantigens under oxidative stress conditions....

  14. Comparative analysis of human milk and infant formula derived peptides following in vitro digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, M-Y; Broadhurst, M; Liu, C-P; Gathercole, J; Cheng, W-L; Qi, X-Y; Clerens, S; Dyer, J M; Day, L; Haigh, B

    2017-04-15

    It has long been recognised that there are differences between human milk and infant formulas which lead to differences in health and nutrition for the neonate. In this study we examine and compare the peptide profile of human milk and an exemplar infant formula. The study identifies both similarities and differences in the endogenous and postdigestion peptide profiles of human milk and infant formula. This includes differences in the protein source of these peptides but also with the region within the protein producing the dominant proteins. Clustering of similar peptides around regions of high sequence identity and known bioactivity was also observed. Together the data may explain some of the functional differences between human milk and infant formula, while identifying some aspects of conserved function between bovine and human milks which contribute to the effectiveness of modern infant formula as a substitute for human milk.

  15. Boost protein expression through co-expression of LEA-like peptide in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Ikeno

    Full Text Available The boost protein expression has been done successfully by simple co-expression with a late embryogenesis abundant (LEA-like peptide in Escherichia coli. Frequently, overexpression of a recombinant protein fails to provide an adequate yield. In the study, we developed a simple and efficient system for overexpressing transgenic proteins in bacteria by co-expression with an LEA-like peptide. The design of this peptide was based on part of the primary structure of an LEA protein that is known hydrophilic protein to suppress aggregation of other protein molecules. In our system, the expression of the target protein was increased remarkably by co-expression with an LEA-like peptide consisting of only 11 amino acid residues. This could provide a practical method for producing recombinant proteins efficiently.

  16. Murine nonvolatile pheromones: isolation of exocrine-gland secreting Peptide 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Hiroko; Touhara, Kazushige

    2013-01-01

    Our search for a substance recognized by the vomeronasal neurons revealed that the extra-orbital lacrimal gland (ELG) isolated from adult male mice produced the male-specific peptide pheromone exocrine gland-secreting peptide 1 (ESP1). The following protocol reveals how ESP1 may be extracted from the ELG, purified using anion-exchange and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and analyzed by mass spectrometry. This protocol has been specifically designed for the purification of ESP1, but may be modified to isolate a variety of peptides from the exocrine glands. Peptides purified in this manner may help further define the molecular mechanisms underlying pheromone communication in the vomeronasal system.

  17. A distinct translation initiation mechanism generates cryptic peptides for immune surveillance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelley R Starck

    Full Text Available MHC class I molecules present a comprehensive mixture of peptides on the cell surface for immune surveillance. The peptides represent the intracellular protein milieu produced by translation of endogenous mRNAs. Unexpectedly, the peptides are encoded not only in conventional AUG initiated translational reading frames but also in alternative cryptic reading frames. Here, we analyzed how ribosomes recognize and use cryptic initiation codons in the mRNA. We find that translation initiation complexes assemble at non-AUG codons but differ from canonical AUG initiation in response to specific inhibitors acting within the peptidyl transferase and decoding centers of the ribosome. Thus, cryptic translation at non-AUG start codons can utilize a distinct initiation mechanism which could be differentially regulated to provide peptides for immune surveillance.

  18. Host defense skin peptides vary with color pattern in the highly polymorphic red-eyed treefrog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla Rivero Davis

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Patterns of phenotypic variation across a geographic range provide important insights into evolutionary processes underlying diversification and speciation. Most evolutionary studies use putatively neutral markers to examine evolutionary diversification. However, functional phenotypes such as gene-encoded host-defense polypeptides (HDPs could provide key insights into the processes of population differentiation, yet they are rarely included in population analyses. The red-eyed treefrog, Agalychnis callidryas (Cope, 1862, exhibits regional variation in multiple traits, including color pattern and body size across a narrow geographic range. This treefrog produces bioactive peptides exuded onto the skin surface, presumably for pathogen and predator defense. However, the geographic patterns of variation in peptides and the factors that mediate intraspecific peptide variation across the range of this species remain untested. Here, we examine the roles of phylogenetic history, geographic barriers, geographic distance, and color-pattern variation as determinants of skin peptide diversity in 54 individuals among 11 populations across Costa Rica and Panama. Each of the five distinct Agalychnis color morphs are represented in our sample. We performed peptide mass fingerprinting and compared mass spectral data from skin peptide secretions to quantify divergence in peptide profiles among individuals, both within and among regions. We used two metrics to estimate genetic variation: genetic distance estimated from microsatellites and patristic distance estimated from mtDNA haplotype diversity. Matrix correspondence tests revealed that skin peptide variation is best predicted by differences in leg color pattern across all regions. In addition, we found that flank color pattern and phylogeny also explain differences in peptide diversity. Patterns of peptide differentiation and phylogenetic topology were incongruent in two regions, indicating a possible role of

  19. CCHamide-2 is an orexigenic brain-gut peptide in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Guilin Robin; Hauser, Frank; Rewitz, Kim Furbo;

    2015-01-01

    The neuroendocrine peptides CCHamide-1 and -2, encoded by the genes ccha1 and -2, are produced by endocrine cells in the midgut and by neurons in the brain of Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we used the CRISPR/Cas9 technique to disrupt the ccha1 and -2 genes and identify mutant phenotypes with a f......The neuroendocrine peptides CCHamide-1 and -2, encoded by the genes ccha1 and -2, are produced by endocrine cells in the midgut and by neurons in the brain of Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we used the CRISPR/Cas9 technique to disrupt the ccha1 and -2 genes and identify mutant phenotypes...

  20. Unifying protein inference and peptide identification with feedback to update consistency between peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jinhong; Chen, Bolin; Wu, Fang-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    We first propose a new method to process peptide identification reports from databases search engines. Then via it we develop a method for unifying protein inference and peptide identification by adding a feedback from protein inference to peptide identification. The feedback information is a list of high-confidence proteins, which is used to update an adjacency matrix between peptides. The adjacency matrix is used in the regularization of peptide scores. Logistic regression (LR) is used to compute the probability of peptide identification with the regularized scores. Protein scores are then calculated with the LR probability of peptides. Instead of selecting the best peptide match for each MS/MS, we select multiple peptides. By testing on two datasets, the results have shown that the proposed method can robustly assign accurate probabilities to peptides, and have a higher discrimination power than PeptideProphet to distinguish correct and incorrect identified peptides. Additionally, not only can our method infer more true positive proteins but also infer less false positive proteins than ProteinProphet at the same false positive rate. The coverage of inferred proteins is also significantly increased due to the selection of multiple peptides for each MS/MS and the improvement of their scores by the feedback from the inferred proteins.

  1. Biologically produced sulfur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinjan, W.E.; Keizer, de A.; Janssen, A.J.H.

    2003-01-01

    Sulfur compound oxidizing bacteria produce sulfur as an intermediate in the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfate. Sulfur produced by these microorganisms can be stored in sulfur globules, located either inside or outside the cell. Excreted sulfur globules are colloidal particles which are stabil

  2. Antiviral cationic peptides as a strategy for innovation in global health therapeutics for dengue virus: high yield production of the biologically active recombinant plectasin peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothan, Hussin A; Mohamed, Zulqarnain; Suhaeb, Abdulrazzaq M; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abd; Yusof, Rohana

    2013-11-01

    Dengue virus infects millions of people worldwide, and there is no vaccine or anti-dengue therapeutic available. Antimicrobial peptides have been shown to possess effective antiviral activity against various viruses. One of the main limitations of developing these peptides as potent antiviral drugs is the high cost of production. In this study, high yield production of biologically active plectasin peptide was inexpensively achieved by producing tandem plectasin peptides as inclusion bodies in E. coli. Antiviral activity of the recombinant peptide towards dengue serotype-2 NS2B-NS3 protease (DENV2 NS2B-NS3pro) was assessed as a target to inhibit dengue virus replication in Vero cells. Single units of recombinant plectasin were collected after applying consecutive steps of refolding, cleaving by Factor Xa, and nickel column purification to obtain recombinant proteins of high purity. The maximal nontoxic dose (MNTD) of the recombinant peptide against Vero cells was 20 μM (100 μg/mL). The reaction velocity of DENV2 NS2B-NS3pro decreased significantly after increasing concentrations of recombinant plectasin were applied to the reaction mixture. Plectasin peptide noncompetitively inhibited DENV2 NS2B-NS3pro at Ki value of 5.03 ± 0.98 μM. The percentage of viral inhibition was more than 80% at the MNTD value of plectasin. In this study, biologically active recombinant plectasin which was able to inhibit dengue protease and viral replication in Vero cells was successfully produced in E. coli in a time- and cost- effective method. These findings are potentially important in the development of potent therapeutics against dengue infection.

  3. Effects of oxidation on copper-binding properties of Aβ1-16 peptide: a pulse radiolysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramteke, S N; Ginotra, Y P; Walke, G R; Joshi, B N; Kumbhar, A S; Rapole, S; Kulkarni, P P

    2013-12-01

    The reaction of hydroxyl radicals ((•)OH) with Aβ1-16 peptide was carried out using pulse radiolysis to understand the effect of oxidation of peptide on its copper-binding properties. This reaction produced oxidized, dimeric and trimeric Aβ1-16 peptide species. The formation of these products was established with the help of fluorescence spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The mass spectral data indicate that the major site of oxidation is at His6, while the site for dimerization is at Tyr10. Diethyl pyrocarbonate-treated Aβ1-16 peptide did not produce any trimeric species upon oxidation with (•)OH. The quantitative chemical modification studies indicated that one of the three histidine residues is covalently modified during pulse radiolysis. The copper-binding studies of the oxidized peptide revealed that it has similar copper-binding properties as the unoxidized peptide. Further, the cytotoxicity studies point out that both oxidized and unoxidized Aβ1-16 peptide are equally efficient in producing free radicals in presence of copper and ascorbate that resulted in comparable cell death.

  4. A phage display selected 7-mer peptide inhibitor of the Tannerella forsythia metalloprotease-like enzyme Karilysin can be truncated to Ser-Trp-Phe-Pro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Durand Skottrup

    Full Text Available Tannerella forsythia is a gram-negative bacteria, which is strongly associated with the development of periodontal disease. Karilysin is a newly identified metalloprotease-like enzyme, that is secreted from T. forsythia. Karilysin modulates the host immune response and is therefore considered a likely drug target. In this study peptides were selected towards the catalytic domain from Karilysin (Kly18 by phage display. The peptides were linear with low micromolar binding affinities. The two best binders (peptide14 and peptide15, shared the consensus sequence XWFPXXXGGG. A peptide15 fusion with Maltose Binding protein (MBP was produced with peptide15 fused to the N-terminus of MBP. The peptide15-MBP was expressed in E. coli and the purified fusion-protein was used to verify Kly18 specific binding. Chemically synthesised peptide15 (SWFPLRSGGG could inhibit the enzymatic activity of both Kly18 and intact Karilysin (Kly48. Furthermore, peptide15 could slow down the autoprocessing of intact Kly48 to Kly18. The WFP motif was important for inhibition and a truncation study further demonstrated that the N-terminal serine was also essential for Kly18 inhibition. The SWFP peptide had a Ki value in the low micromolar range, which was similar to the intact peptide15. In conclusion SWFP is the first reported inhibitor of Karilysin and can be used as a valuable tool in structure-function studies of Karilysin.

  5. A phage display selected 7-mer peptide inhibitor of the Tannerella forsythia metalloprotease-like enzyme Karilysin can be truncated to Ser-Trp-Phe-Pro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Sørensen, Grete; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Potempa, Jan; Riise, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a gram-negative bacteria, which is strongly associated with the development of periodontal disease. Karilysin is a newly identified metalloprotease-like enzyme, that is secreted from T. forsythia. Karilysin modulates the host immune response and is therefore considered a likely drug target. In this study peptides were selected towards the catalytic domain from Karilysin (Kly18) by phage display. The peptides were linear with low micromolar binding affinities. The two best binders (peptide14 and peptide15), shared the consensus sequence XWFPXXXGGG. A peptide15 fusion with Maltose Binding protein (MBP) was produced with peptide15 fused to the N-terminus of MBP. The peptide15-MBP was expressed in E. coli and the purified fusion-protein was used to verify Kly18 specific binding. Chemically synthesised peptide15 (SWFPLRSGGG) could inhibit the enzymatic activity of both Kly18 and intact Karilysin (Kly48). Furthermore, peptide15 could slow down the autoprocessing of intact Kly48 to Kly18. The WFP motif was important for inhibition and a truncation study further demonstrated that the N-terminal serine was also essential for Kly18 inhibition. The SWFP peptide had a Ki value in the low micromolar range, which was similar to the intact peptide15. In conclusion SWFP is the first reported inhibitor of Karilysin and can be used as a valuable tool in structure-function studies of Karilysin.

  6. Do glucagonomas always produce glucagon?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai Jacob; Challis, Benjamin; Damjanov, Ivan;

    2016-01-01

    associated with enteric overexpression of proglucagon-derived peptides are less well recognized and include gastrointestinal dysfunction and hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia. The diverse clinical manifestations associated with glucagon-expressing tumours can be explained, in part, by the repertoire...

  7. Mechanism of papain-catalyzed synthesis of oligo-tyrosine peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuhashi, Jun; Nakayama, Tsutomu; Narai-Kanayama, Asako

    2015-01-01

    Di-, tri-, and tetra-tyrosine peptides with angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory activity were synthesized by papain-catalyzed polymerization of L-tyrosine ethyl ester in aqueous media at 30 °C. Varying the reaction pH from 6.0 to 7.5 and the initial concentration of the ester substrate from 25 to 100 mM, the highest yield of oligo-tyrosine peptides (79% on a substrate basis) was produced at pH 6.5 and 75 mM, respectively. In the reaction initiated with 100 mM of the substrate, approx. 50% yield of insoluble, highly polymerized peptides accumulated. At less than 15 mM, the reaction proceeded poorly; however, from 30 mM to 120 mM a dose-dependent increase in the consumption rate of the substrate was observed with a sigmoidal curve. Meanwhile, each of the tri- and tetra-tyrosine peptides, even at approx. 5mM, was consumed effectively by papain but was not elongated to insoluble polymers. For deacylation of the acyl-papain intermediate through which a new peptide bond is made, L-tyrosine ethyl ester, even at 5mM, showed higher nucleophilic activity than di- and tri-tyrosine. These results indicate that the mechanism through which papain polymerizes L-tyrosine ethyl ester is as follows: the first interaction between papain and the ester substrate is a rate-limiting step; oligo-tyrosine peptides produced early in the reaction period are preferentially used as acyl donors, while the initial ester substrate strongly contributes as a nucleophile to the elongation of the peptide product; and the balance between hydrolytic fragmentation and further elongation of oligo-tyrosine peptides is dependent on the surrounding concentration of the ester substrate.

  8. Cell-Penetrating Recombinant Peptides for Potential Use in Agricultural Pest Control Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric T. Johnson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Several important areas of interest intersect in a class of peptides characterized by their highly cationic and partly hydrophobic structure. These molecules have been called cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs because they possess the ability to translocate across cell membranes. This ability makes these peptides attractive candidates for delivery of therapeutic compounds, especially to the interior of cells. Compounds with characteristics similar to CPPs and that, in addition, have antimicrobial properties are being investigated as antibiotics with a reduced risk of causing resistance. These CPP-like membrane-acting antimicrobial peptides (MAMPs are α-helical amphipathic peptides that interact with and perturb cell membranes to produce their antimicrobial effects. One source of MAMPs is spider venom. Because these compounds are toxic to insects, they also show promise for development as biological agents for control of insecticide-resistant agricultural pests. Spider venom is a potential source of novel insect-specific peptide toxins. One example is the small amphipathic α-helical peptide lycotoxin-1 (Lyt-1 or LCTX from the wolf spider (Lycosa carolinensis. One side of the α-helix has mostly hydrophilic and the other mainly hydrophobic amino acid residues. The positive charge of the hydrophilic side interacts with negatively charged prokaryotic membranes and the hydrophobic side associates with the membrane lipid bilayer to permeabilize it. Because the surface of the exoskeleton, or cuticle, of an insect is highly hydrophobic, to repel water and dirt, it would be expected that amphipathic compounds could permeabilize it. Mutagenized lycotoxin 1 peptides were produced and expressed in yeast cultures that were fed to fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda larvae to identify the most lethal mutants. Transgenic expression of spider venom toxins such as lycotoxin-1 in plants could provide durable insect resistance.

  9. Cell-penetrating recombinant peptides for potential use in agricultural pest control applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen R; Dowd, Patrick F; Johnson, Eric T

    2012-09-28

    Several important areas of interest intersect in a class of peptides characterized by their highly cationic and partly hydrophobic structure. These molecules have been called cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) because they possess the ability to translocate across cell membranes. This ability makes these peptides attractive candidates for delivery of therapeutic compounds, especially to the interior of cells. Compounds with characteristics similar to CPPs and that, in addition, have antimicrobial properties are being investigated as antibiotics with a reduced risk of causing resistance. These CPP-like membrane-acting antimicrobial peptides (MAMPs) are α-helical amphipathic peptides that interact with and perturb cell membranes to produce their antimicrobial effects. One source of MAMPs is spider venom. Because these compounds are toxic to insects, they also show promise for development as biological agents for control of insecticide-resistant agricultural pests. Spider venom is a potential source of novel insect-specific peptide toxins. One example is the small amphipathic α-helical peptide lycotoxin-1 (Lyt-1 or LCTX) from the wolf spider (Lycosa carolinensis). One side of the α-helix has mostly hydrophilic and the other mainly hydrophobic amino acid residues. The positive charge of the hydrophilic side interacts with negatively charged prokaryotic membranes and the hydrophobic side associates with the membrane lipid bilayer to permeabilize it. Because the surface of the exoskeleton, or cuticle, of an insect is highly hydrophobic, to repel water and dirt, it would be expected that amphipathic compounds could permeabilize it. Mutagenized lycotoxin 1 peptides were produced and expressed in yeast cultures that were fed to fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) larvae to identify the most lethal mutants. Transgenic expression of spider venom toxins such as lycotoxin-1 in plants could provide durable insect resistance.

  10. Interpreting peptide mass spectra by VEMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Rune; Lundsgaard, M.; Welinder, Karen G.;

    2003-01-01

    of peptide MS/MS spectra imported in text file format. Peaks are annotated, the monoisotopic peaks retained, and the b-and y-ion series identified in an interactive manner. The called peptide sequence is searched against a local protein database for sequence identity and peptide mass. The report compares...... the calculated and the experimental mass spectrum of the called peptide. The program package includes four accessory programs. VEMStrans creates protein databases in FASTA format from EST or cDNA sequence files. VEMSdata creates a virtual peptide database from FASTA files. VEMSdist displays the distribution...... of masses up to 5000 Da. VEMSmaldi searches singly charged peptide masses against the local database....

  11. Synthesis of peptide .alpha.-thioesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarero, Julio A.; Mitchell, Alexander R.; De Yoreo, James J.

    2008-08-19

    Disclosed herein is a new method for the solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) of C-terminal peptide .alpha. thioesters using Fmoc/t-Bu chemistry. This method is based on the use of an aryl hydrazine linker, which is totally stable to conditions required for Fmoc-SPPS. When the peptide synthesis has been completed, activation of the linker is achieved by mild oxidation. The oxidation step converts the acyl-hydrazine group into a highly reactive acyl-diazene intermediate which reacts with an .alpha.-amino acid alkylthioester (H-AA-SR) to yield the corresponding peptide .alpha.-thioester in good yield. A variety of peptide thioesters, cyclic peptides and a fully functional Src homology 3 (SH3) protein domain have been successfully prepared.

  12. One-pot, mix-and-read peptide-MHC tetramers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Leisner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes (CTL recognize complexes of peptide ligands and Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class I molecules presented at the surface of Antigen Presenting Cells (APC. Detection and isolation of CTL's are of importance for research on CTL immunity, and development of vaccines and adoptive immune therapy. Peptide-MHC tetramers have become important reagents for detection and enumeration of specific CTL's. Conventional peptide-MHC-tetramer production involves recombinant MHC production, in vitro refolding, biotinylation and tetramerization; each step followed by various biochemical steps such as chromatographic purification, concentration etc. Such cumbersome production protocols have limited dissemination and restricted availability of peptide-MHC tetramers effectively precluding large-scale screening strategies involving many different peptide-MHC tetramers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have developed an approach whereby any given tetramer specificity can be produced within 2 days with very limited effort and hands-on time. The strategy is based on the isolation of correctly oxidized, in vivo biotinylated recombinant MHC I heavy chain (HC. Such biotinylated MHC I HC molecules can be refolded in vitro, tetramerized with streptavidin, and used for specific T cell staining-all in a one-pot reaction without any intervening purification steps. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have developed an efficient "one-pot, mix-and-read" strategy for peptide-MHC tetramer generation, and demonstrated specific T cell straining comparable to a commercially available MHC-tetramer. Here, seven peptide-MHC tetramers representing four different human MHC (HLA class I proteins have been generated. The technique should be readily extendable to any binding peptide and pre-biotinylated MHC (at this time we have over 40 different pre-biotinylated HLA proteins. It is simple, robust, and versatile technique with a very broad application

  13. Mutual Amino Acid Catalysis in Salt-Induced Peptide Formation Supports this Mechanism's Role in Prebiotic Peptide Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwannachot, Yuttana; Rode, Bernd M.

    1999-10-01

    The presence of some amino acids and dipeptides under the conditions of the salt-induced peptide formation reaction (aqueous solution at 85 °C, Cu(II) and NaCl) has been found to catalyze the formation of homopeptides of other amino acids, which are otherwise produced only in traces or not at all by this reaction. The condensation of Val, Leu and Lys to form their homodipeptides can occur to a considerable extent due to catalytic effects of other amino acids and related compounds, among which glycine, histidine, diglycine and diketopiperazine exhibit the most remarkable activity. These findings also lead to a modification of the table of amino acid sequences preferentially formed by the salt-induced peptide formation (SIPF) reaction, previously used for a comparison with the sequence preferences in membrane proteins of primitive organisms

  14. Use of Galerina marginata genes and proteins for peptide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong

    2017-03-21

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptides and cyclic peptide production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Galerina species encoding peptides specifically relating to amatoxins in addition to proteins involved with processing cyclic peptide toxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for making small peptides and small cyclic peptides including peptides similar to amanitin. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for making small peptides.

  15. Use of Galerina marginata genes and proteins for peptide production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong

    2016-03-01

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptides and cyclic peptide production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Galerina species encoding peptides specifically relating to amatoxins in addition to proteins involved with processing cyclic peptide toxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for making small peptides and small cyclic peptides including peptides similar to amanitin. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for making small peptides.

  16. Current scenario of peptide-based drugs: the key roles of cationic antitumor and antiviral peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly eMulder

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs and host defense peptides (HDPs show vast potential as peptide-based drugs. Great effort has been made in order to exploit their mechanisms of action, aiming to identify their targets as well as to enhance their activity and bioavailability. In this review, we will focus on both naturally occurring and designed antiviral and antitumor cationic peptides, including those here called promiscuous, in which multiple targets are associated with a single peptide structure. Emphasis will be given to their bio-chemical features, selectivity against extra targets and molecular mechanisms. Peptides which possess antitumor activity against different cancer cell lines will be discussed, as well as peptides which inhibit virus replication, focusing on their applications for human health, animal health and agriculture, and their potential as new therapeutic drugs. Moreover, the development of production and nano-delivery systems for both classes of cationic peptides and perspectives on improving them will be considered.

  17. The Function and Development of Soybean Peptides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Caiyan; Song Junmei

    2009-01-01

    Soybean peptides are small molecules hydrolyzed soy protein,from three to six amino acid composition of the peptide mixture,in 1000Da molecular weight below.Because it has a lot of good physical and chemical properties and physiological functions,in many areas has been widely used.This paper reviews the soybean peptide physical and chemical characteristics,physiological functions,technology and applications in the food industry.

  18. A Novel Peptide from Buthus Martensii Karch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Yu CAO; Xuan XIAO; Xue Mei LIU; Xiao Tian LIANG; De Quan YU

    2004-01-01

    A novel peptide was purified and characterized from Buthus martensii Karch.The peptide,named BmK M6,is a single-chain polypeptide cross-linked by four intramolecular disulfide bridges.The molecular weight of the peptide was determined by MOLDI-TOF-MS as 7034 Da.The partial amino acid sequence of BmK M6 from N-terminal is VRDAYIAKPEN CVYECGITQDCNKLCTENG.

  19. Tulane/Xavier Vaccine Peptide Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    resin bound peptide -PEG conjugate to remove copper and uncoupled PEG. After removal from the resin, MALDI-TOF MS analysis of the product...synthesized) was used to further modify the peptide with a singly modified PEG chain bearing a terminal alkyne functionality through a copper -catalyzed azide...COVERED (From - To) 1 July 2010 – 30 June 201 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Tulane/Xavier Vaccine Peptide Program 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  20. Opioid Peptides: Potential for Drug Development

    OpenAIRE

    Aldrich, Jane V.; McLaughlin, Jay P.

    2012-01-01

    Opioid receptors are important targets for the treatment of pain and potentially for other disease states (e.g. mood disorders and drug abuse) as well. Significant recent advances have been made in identifying opioid peptide analogs that exhibit promising in vivo activity for treatment of these maladies. This review focuses on the development and evaluation of opioid peptide analogs demonstrating activity after systemic administration, and recent clinical evaluations of opioid peptides for po...

  1. Acylation of Glucagon-like peptide-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Sofie; Linderoth, Lars; Bjerregaard, Simon;

    2014-01-01

    These results show that membrane interactions play a prominent role during intestinal translocation of an acylated peptide. Acylation benefits permeation for shorter and medium chains due to increased membrane interactions, however, for longer chains insertion in the membrane becomes dominant and...... and hinders translocation, i.e. the peptides get 'stuck' in the cell membrane. Applying a transcellular absorption enhancer increases the dynamics of membrane insertion and detachment by fluidizing the membrane, thus facilitating its effects primarily on membrane associated peptides....

  2. GAMPMS: Genetic algorithm managed peptide mutant screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Thomas; McDougal, Owen M; Andersen, Tim

    2015-06-30

    The prominence of endogenous peptide ligands targeted to receptors makes peptides with the desired binding activity good molecular scaffolds for drug development. Minor modifications to a peptide's primary sequence can significantly alter its binding properties with a receptor, and screening collections of peptide mutants is a useful technique for probing the receptor-ligand binding domain. Unfortunately, the combinatorial growth of such collections can limit the number of mutations which can be explored using structure-based molecular docking techniques. Genetic algorithm managed peptide mutant screening (GAMPMS) uses a genetic algorithm to conduct a heuristic search of the peptide's mutation space for peptides with optimal binding activity, significantly reducing the computational requirements of the virtual screening. The GAMPMS procedure was implemented and used to explore the binding domain of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) α3β2-isoform with a library of 64,000 α-conotoxin (α-CTx) MII peptide mutants. To assess GAMPMS's performance, it was compared with a virtual screening procedure that used AutoDock to predict the binding affinity of each of the α-CTx MII peptide mutants with the α3β2-nAChR. The GAMPMS implementation performed AutoDock simulations for as few as 1140 of the 64,000 α-CTx MII peptide mutants and could consistently identify a set of 10 peptides with an aggregated binding energy that was at least 98% of the aggregated binding energy of the 10 top peptides from the exhaustive AutoDock screening.

  3. Insect inducible antimicrobial peptides and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzati-Tabrizi, Reyhaneh; Farrokhi, Naser; Talaei-Hassanloui, Reza; Alavi, Seyed Mehdi; Hosseininaveh, Vahid

    2013-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found as important components of the innate immune system (host defense) of all invertebrates. These peptides can be constitutively expressed or induced in response to microbial infections. Indeed, they vary in their amino acid sequences, potency and antimicrobial activity spectra. The smaller AMPs act greatly by disrupting the structure or function of microbial cell membranes. Here, the insect innate immune system with emphasis on inducible antimicrobial peptide properties against microbial invaders has been discussed.

  4. A cyclic peptidic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Baoyu; Xu, Peng; Jiang, Longguang;

    2014-01-01

    Peptides are attracting increasing interest as protease inhibitors. Here, we demonstrate a new inhibitory mechanism and a new type of exosite interactions for a phage-displayed peptide library-derived competitive inhibitor, mupain-1 (CPAYSRYLDC), of the serine protease murine urokinase...... pocket, its carbonyl group aligning improperly relative to Ser195 and the oxyanion hole, explaining why the peptide is an inhibitor rather than a substrate. Substitution of the P1 Arg with novel unnatural Arg analogues with aliphatic or aromatic ring structures led to an increased affinity, depending...... of this peptidic inhibitor, a concept different from conventional attempts at improving inhibitor affinity by reducing the entropic burden....

  5. Peptide-stabilized, fluorescent silver nanoclusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Simon; Vosch, Tom André Jos; Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    . Herein, we demonstrate how solid-phase methods can increase throughput dramatically in peptide ligand screening and in initial evaluation of fluorescence intensity and chemical stability of peptide-stabilized AgNCs (P-AgNCs). 9-Fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl (Fmoc) solid-phase peptide synthesis......Few-atom silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) can exhibit strong fluorescence; however, they require ligands to prevent aggregation into larger nanoparticles. Fluorescent AgNCs in biopolymer scaffolds have so far mainly been synthesized in solution, and peptides have only found limited use compared to DNA...

  6. Modulation of autoimmunity with artificial peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Cava, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The loss of immune tolerance to self antigens leads to the development of autoimmune responses. Since self antigens are often multiple and/or their sequences may not be known, one approach to restore immune tolerance uses synthetic artificial peptides that interfere or compete with self peptides in the networks of cellular interactions that drive the autoimmune process. This review describes the rationale behind the use of artificial peptides in autoimmunity and their mechanisms of action. Examples of use of artificial peptides in preclinical studies and in the management of human autoimmune diseases are provided. PMID:20807590

  7. Synthesis of stabilized alpha-helical peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Federico; Katz, Samuel G

    2014-01-01

    Stabilized alpha-helical (SAH) peptides are valuable laboratory tools to explore important protein-protein interactions. Whereas most peptides lose their secondary structure when isolated from the host protein, stapled peptides incorporate an all-hydrocarbon "staple" that reinforces their natural alpha-helical structure. Thus, stapled peptides retain their functional ability to bind their native protein targets and serve multiple experimental uses. First, they are useful for structural studies such as NMR or crystal structures that map and better define binding sites. Second, they can be used to identify small molecules that specifically target that interaction site. Third, stapled peptides can be used to test the importance of specific amino acid residues or posttranslational modifications to the binding. Fourth, they can serve as structurally competent bait to identify novel binding partners to specific alpha-helical motifs. In addition to markedly improved alpha-helicity, stapled peptides also display resistance to protease cleavage and enhanced cell permeability. Most importantly, they are useful for intracellular experiments that explore the functional consequences of blocking particular protein interactions. Because of their remarkable stability, stapled peptides can be applied to whole-animal, in vivo studies. Here we describe a protocol for the synthesis of a peptide that incorporates an all-hydrocarbon "staple" employing a ring-closing olefin metathesis reaction. With proper optimization, stapled peptides can be a fundamental, accurate laboratory tool in the modern chemical biologist's armory.

  8. Polycyclic Peptides: A New Type of Cavitand,

    Science.gov (United States)

    PEPTIDES, MOLECULAR STRUCTURE, MOLECULES, SYNTHESIS, ETHERS, DEXTRINS , PROTEINS, AMINO ACIDS, RESIDUES, CROSSLINKING(CHEMISTRY), DIMERS, CESIUM, CARBON, OXYGEN, NITROGEN, CAVITIES, NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE.

  9. Endomorphins and related opioid peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yoshio; Tsuda, Yuko; Bryant, Sharon D; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2002-01-01

    Opioid peptides and their G-protein-coupled receptors (delta, kappa, mu) are located in the central nervous system and peripheral tissues. The opioid system has been studied to determine the intrinsic mechanism of modulation of pain and to develop uniquely effective pain-control substances with minimal abuse potential and side effects. Two types of endogenous opioid peptides exist, one containing Try-Gly-Gly-Phe as the message domain (enkephalins, endorphins, dynorphins) and the other containing the Tyr-Pro-Phe/Trp sequence (endomorphins-1 and -2). Endomorphin-1 (Tyr-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH2), which has high mu receptor affinity (Ki = 0.36 nM) and remarkable selectivity (4000- and 15,000-fold preference over the delta and kappa receptors, respectively), was isolated from bovine and human brain. In addition, endomorphin-2 (Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH2), isolated from the same sources, exhibited high mu receptor affinity (Ki = 0.69 nM) and very high selectivity (13,000- and 7500-fold preference relative to delta and kappa receptors, respectively). Both opioids bind to mu-opioid receptors, thereby activating G-proteins, resulting in regulation of gastrointestinal motility, manifestation of antinociception, and effects on the vascular systems and memory. To develop novel analgesics with less addictive properties, evaluation of the structure-activity relationships of the endomorphins led to the design of more potent and stable analgesics. Opioidmimetics and opioid peptides containing the amino acid sequence of the message domain of endomorphins, Tyr-Pro-Phe/Trp, could exhibit unique binding activity and lead to the development of new therapeutic drugs for controlling pain.

  10. A sulfanyl-PEG derivative of relaxin-like peptide utilizable for the conjugation with KLH and the antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Hidekazu; Mita, Masatoshi

    2016-08-15

    A small peptide-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) conjugate is generally used as an antigen for producing specific antibodies. However, preparation of a disulfide-rich heterodimeric peptide-KLH conjugates is difficult. In this study, we developed a novel method for preparation of the conjugate, and applied it to the production of specific antibodies against the relaxin-like gonad-stimulating peptide (RGP) from the starfish. In this method, a sulfanyl group necessary for the conjugation with KLH was site-specifically introduced to the peptide after regioselective disulfide bond formation reactions. Using the conjugate, we could obtain specific antibodies with a high antibody titer. This method might also be useful for the production of antibodies against other heterodimeric peptides with disulfide cross-linkages, such as vertebrate relaxins.

  11. Milk peptides increase iron dialyzability in water but do not affect DMT-1 expression in Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyri, Konstantina; Tako, Elad; Miller, Dennis D; Glahn, Raymond P; Komaitis, Michael; Kapsokefalou, Maria

    2009-02-25

    In vitro digestion of milk produces peptide fractions that enhance iron uptake by Caco-2 cells. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether these fractions (a) exert their effect by increasing relative gene expression of DMT-1 in Caco-2 cells and (b) enhance iron dialyzability when added in meals. Two milk peptide fractions that solubilize iron were isolated by Sephadex G-25 gel filtration of a milk digest. These peptide fractions did not affect relative gene expression of DMT-1 when incubated with Caco-2 cells for 2 or 48 h. Dialyzability was measured after in vitro simulated gastric and pancreatic digestion. Both peptide fractions enhanced the dialyzability of iron from ferric chloride added to PIPES buffer, but had no effect on dialyzability from milk or a vegetable or fruit meal after in vitro simulated gastric and pancreatic digestion. However, dialyzability from milk was enhanced by the addition of a more concentrated lyophilized peptide fraction.

  12. Designer lipid-like peptides: a class of detergents for studying functional olfactory receptors using commercial cell-free systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Corin

    Full Text Available A crucial bottleneck in membrane protein studies, particularly G-protein coupled receptors, is the notorious difficulty of finding an optimal detergent that can solubilize them and maintain their stability and function. Here we report rapid production of 12 unique mammalian olfactory receptors using short designer lipid-like peptides as detergents. The peptides were able to solubilize and stabilize each receptor. Circular dichroism showed that the purified olfactory receptors had alpha-helical secondary structures. Microscale thermophoresis suggested that the receptors were functional and bound their odorants. Blot intensity measurements indicated that milligram quantities of each olfactory receptor could be produced with at least one peptide detergent. The peptide detergents' capability was comparable to that of the detergent Brij-35. The ability of 10 peptide detergents to functionally solubilize 12 olfactory receptors demonstrates their usefulness as a new class of detergents for olfactory receptors, and possibly other G-protein coupled receptors and membrane proteins.

  13. Acyl lipidation of a peptide: effects on activity and epidermal permeability in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, Daniel; Ross, James; Murray, Paul E; Caccetta, Rima

    2016-01-01

    Short-chain lipid conjugates can increase permeability of a small peptide across human epidermis; however, the emerging lipoaminoacid (LAA) conjugation technique is costly and can deliver mixed synthetic products of varied biological potential. LAA conjugation using a racemic mixture produces a mixture of D- and L-stereoisomers. Individual enantiomers can be produced at an extra cost. We investigated an affordable technique that produces only one synthetic product: short-chain (C7–C8) acyl lipidation. Acyl lipidation of Ala-Ala-Pro-Val, an inhibitor of human neutrophil elastase (HNE; believed to lead to abnormal tissue destruction and disease development), was investigated as an alternative to LAA conjugation. The current study aimed to assess the effects of acyl lipidation (either at the N-terminal or at the C-terminal) on neutrophil elastase activity in vitro and on transdermal delivery ex vivo. The inhibitory capacity of the acyl conjugates was compared to LAA conjugates (conjugated at the N-terminal) of the same peptide. The L-stereoisomer appears to rapidly degrade, but it represents a significantly (P<0.05) better inhibitor of HNE than the parent peptide (Ala-Ala-Pro-Val). Although the D-stereoisomer appears to permeate human epidermal skin sections in a better fashion than the L-stereoisomer, it is not a significantly better inhibitor of HNE than the parent peptide. Acyl lipidation (with a C7 lipid chain) at either end of the peptide substantially enhances the permeability of the peptide across human skin epidermis as well as significantly (P<0.005) increases its elastase inhibitory potential. Therefore, our current study indicates that acyl lipidation of a peptide is a more economical and effective alternative to LAA conjugation. PMID:27468224

  14. Atrial natriuretic peptides in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens P; Holst Hansen, Lasse; Terzic, Dijana

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of cardiac natriuretic peptides in plasma has gained a diagnostic role in the assessment of heart failure. Plasma measurement is though hampered by the marked instability of the hormones, which has led to the development of analyses that target N-terminal fragments from the prohormone....... These fragments are stable in plasma and represent surrogate markers of the actual natriuretic hormone. Post-translational processing of the precursors, however, is revealing itself to be a complex event with new information still being reported on proteolysis, covalent modifications, and amino acid...

  15. Production of bioactive soy peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Bissegger, Sonja; Crelier, Simon

    2008-01-01

    Objectif Les antioxidants synthétiques sont souvent utilisés dans l’industrie alimentaire pour empêcher le déterioration des produits. Mais ces ingrédients sont potentiellement nocifs pour la santé, des travaux de recherche sont effectués pour identifier des antioxidants d’origine naturelle. Le but de ce travail de diplôme est de produire des peptides de protéine de soja avec des propriétés antioxidantes, au moyen d’une digestion enzymatique hydrolytique. Résultats Après une digestion enzymat...

  16. Biodiscovery of Aluminum Binding Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    34Sequestration of zinc oxide by fimbrial designer chelators," Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 66(1), 10-14 (2000). [26] Hnilova, M., et al., "Peptide-directed co...et al., "Biomimetic synthesis and patterning of silver nanoparticles," Nat. Mater. 1(3), 169-172 (2002). [5] Van Dorst, B., et al., "Phage display...Biotechnol. 68(4), 505-509 (2005). [10] Lee, Y. J., et al., "Fabricating genetically engineered high-power lithium-ion batteries using multiple virus genes

  17. Peptide-Based Polymer Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aroa Duro-Castano

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Polypeptides are envisaged to achieve a major impact on a number of different relevant areas such as biomedicine and biotechnology. Acquired knowledge and the increasing interest on amino acids, peptides and proteins is establishing a large panel of these biopolymers whose physical, chemical and biological properties are ruled by their controlled sequences and composition. Polymer therapeutics has helped to establish these polypeptide-based constructs as polymeric nanomedicines for different applications, such as disease treatment and diagnostics. Herein, we provide an overview of the advantages of these systems and the main methodologies for their synthesis, highlighting the different polypeptide architectures and the current research towards clinical applications.

  18. Agricultural Producer Certificates

    Data.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County of Maryland — A Certified Agricultural Producer, or representative thereof, is an individual who wishes to sell regionally-grown products in the public right-of-way. A Certified...

  19. Synthetic peptide vaccines: palmitoylation of peptide antigens by a thioester bond increases immunogenicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beekman, N.J.C.M.; Schaaper, W.M.M.; Tesser, G.I.;

    1997-01-01

    Synthetic peptides have frequently been used to immunize animals. However, peptides less than about 20 to 30 amino acids long are poor immunogens. In general, to increase its immunogenicity, the presentation of the peptide should be improved, and molecular weight needs to be increased. Many attem...

  20. Driving engineering of novel antimicrobial peptides from simulations of peptide-micelle interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Langham, Allison A; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2006-01-01

    peptides and their interaction with membrane mimics. In this article, we discuss the promise and the challenges of widely used models and detail our recent work on peptide-micelle simulations as an attractive alternative to peptide-bilayer simulations. We detail our results with two large structural...

  1. APD2: the updated antimicrobial peptide database and its application in peptide design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangshun; Li, Xia; Wang, Zhe

    2009-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptide database (APD, http://aps.unmc.edu/AP/main.php) has been updated and expanded. It now hosts 1228 entries with 65 anticancer, 76 antiviral (53 anti-HIV), 327 antifungal and 944 antibacterial peptides. The second version of our database (APD2) allows users to search peptide families (e.g. bacteriocins, cyclotides, or defensins), peptide sources (e.g. fish, frogs or chicken), post-translationally modified peptides (e.g. amidation, oxidation, lipidation, glycosylation or d-amino acids), and peptide binding targets (e.g. membranes, proteins, DNA/RNA, LPS or sugars). Statistical analyses reveal that the frequently used amino acid residues (>10%) are Ala and Gly in bacterial peptides, Cys and Gly in plant peptides, Ala, Gly and Lys in insect peptides, and Leu, Ala, Gly and Lys in amphibian peptides. Using frequently occurring residues, we demonstrate database-aided peptide design in different ways. Among the three peptides designed, GLK-19 showed a higher activity against Escherichia coli than human LL-37.

  2. Synthetic peptide vaccines: palmitoylation of peptide antigens by an thioester bond increases immunogenicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekman, N.J.C.M.; Schaaper, W.M.M.; Tesser, G.I.; Dalsgaard, K.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Boshuizen, R.S.; Meloen, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    Synthetic peptides have frequently been used to immunize animals. However, peptides less than about 20 to 30 amino acids long are poor immunogens. In general, to increase its immunogenicity, the presentation of the peptide should be improved, and molecular weight needs to be increased. Many attempts

  3. Methods for producing diterpenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention discloses that by combining different di TPS enzymes of class I and class II different diterpenes may be produced including diterpenes not identified in nature. Surprisingly it is revealed that a di TPS enzyme of class I of one species may be combined with a di TPS enzyme...... of class II from a different species, resulting in a high diversity of diterpenes, which can be produced....

  4. Sensitivity to the two-peptide bacteriocin lactococcin G is dependent on UppP, an enzyme involved in cell-wall synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kjos, Morten; Oppegård, Camilla; Diep, Dzung B; Nes, Ingolf F; Veening, Jan-Willem; Nissen-Meyer, Jon; Kristensen, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Most bacterially produced antimicrobial peptides (bacteriocins) are thought to kill target cells by a receptor-mediated mechanism. However, for most bacteriocins the receptor is unknown. For instance, no target receptor has been identified for the two-peptide bacteriocins (class IIb), whose activity

  5. Cost-effective expression and purification of antimicrobial and host defense peptides in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bommarius, B.; Jenssen, Håvard; Elliott, M.;

    2010-01-01

    to their therapeutic application. High manufacturing costs associated with amino acid precursors have limited the delivery of inexpensive therapeutics through industrial-scale chemical synthesis. Conversely, the production of peptides in bacteria by recombinant DNA technology has been impeded by the antimicrobial...... activity of these peptides and their susceptibility to proteolytic degradation, while subsequent purification of recombinant peptides often requires multiple steps and has not been cost-effective. Here we have developed methodologies appropriate for large-scale industrial production of HDPs; in particular......, we describe (i) a method, using fusions to SUMO, for producing high yields of intact recombinant HDPs in bacteria without significant toxicity and (ii) a simplified 2-step purification method appropriate for industrial use. We have used this method to produce seven HDPs to date (IDR1, MX226, LL37...

  6. Antimicrobial peptides in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Bogaerts

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is one of the most successful model species for experimental research because of its sequenced genome, the versatile genetic toolkit and the straightforward breeding among others. In natural conditions however, this tiny worm is constantly surrounded by micro-organisms, simultaneously a source of indispensable nutrition and inevitable pathogens. Lacking an adaptive immune system, the worm solely relies on its innate immune defence to cope with its challenging life style. Hence C. elegans is an excellent model to gain more insight in innate immunity, which is remarkably preserved between invertebrate and vertebrate animals. The innate defence consists of receptors to detect potential pathogens, a complex network of signalling pathways and last but not least, effector molecules to abolish harmful microbes. In this review, we focus on the antimicrobial peptides, a vital subgroup of effector molecules. We summarise the current knowledge of the different families of C. elegans antimicrobial peptides, comprising NLPs, caenacins, ABFs, caenopores, and a recently discovered group with antifungal activity among which thaumatin-like proteins.

  7. Sequence-dependent internalization of aggregating peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couceiro, José R; Gallardo, Rodrigo; De Smet, Frederik; De Baets, Greet; Baatsen, Pieter; Annaert, Wim; Roose, Kenny; Saelens, Xavier; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic

    2015-01-02

    Recently, a number of aggregation disease polypeptides have been shown to spread from cell to cell, thereby displaying prionoid behavior. Studying aggregate internalization, however, is often hampered by the complex kinetics of the aggregation process, resulting in the concomitant uptake of aggregates of different sizes by competing mechanisms, which makes it difficult to isolate pathway-specific responses to aggregates. We designed synthetic aggregating peptides bearing different aggregation propensities with the aim of producing modes of uptake that are sufficiently distinct to differentially analyze the cellular response to internalization. We found that small acidic aggregates (≤500 nm in diameter) were taken up by nonspecific endocytosis as part of the fluid phase and traveled through the endosomal compartment to lysosomes. By contrast, bigger basic aggregates (>1 μm) were taken up through a mechanism dependent on cytoskeletal reorganization and membrane remodeling with the morphological hallmarks of phagocytosis. Importantly, the properties of these aggregates determined not only the mechanism of internalization but also the involvement of the proteostatic machinery (the assembly of interconnected networks that control the biogenesis, folding, trafficking, and degradation of proteins) in the process; whereas the internalization of small acidic aggregates is HSF1-independent, the uptake of larger basic aggregates was HSF1-dependent, requiring Hsp70. Our results show that the biophysical properties of aggregates determine both their mechanism of internalization and proteostatic response. It remains to be seen whether these differences in cellular response contribute to the particular role of specific aggregated proteins in disease.

  8. Enhanced immunostimulatory effects of DNA-encapsulated peptide hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Scott H; Li, Sandra; Howard, O M Zack; Dunlap, Micah; Trivett, Anna; Schneider, Joel P; Oppenheim, Joost J

    2015-01-01

    DNA that encodes tumor-specific antigens represents potential immunostimulatory agents. However, rapid enzymatic degradation and fragmentation of DNA during administration can result in limited vector expression and, consequently, poor efficacy. These challenges have necessitated the use of novel strategies for DNA delivery. Herein, we study the ability of cationic self-assembling peptide hydrogels to encapsulate plasmid DNA, and enhance its immunostimulatory potential in vivo. The effect of network charge on the gel's ability to retain the DNA was assessed employing three gel-forming peptides that vary systematically in formal charge. The peptide HLT2, having a formal charge of +5 at neutral pH, was optimal in encapsulating microgram quantities of DNA with little effect on its rheological properties, allowing its effective syringe delivery in vivo. The plasmid, DNA(TA), encapsulated within these gels encodes for a melanoma-specific gp100 antigen fused to the alarmin protein adjuvant HMGN1. Implantation of DNA(TA)-loaded HLT2 gels into mice resulted in an acute inflammatory response with the presence of polymorphonuclear cells, which was followed by infiltrating macrophages. These cellular infiltrates aid in the processing of encapsulated DNA, promoting increased lymphoproliferation and producing an enhanced immune response mediated by CD4+/IFNγ+ expressing Th1 cells, and complemented by the formation of gp100-specific antibodies.

  9. Peptide Conjugation via CuAAC ‘Click’ Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istvan Toth

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The copper (I-catalyzed alkyne azide 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (CuAAC or ‘click’ reaction, is a highly versatile reaction that can be performed under a variety of reaction conditions including various solvents, a wide pH and temperature range, and using different copper sources, with or without additional ligands or reducing agents. This reaction is highly selective and can be performed in the presence of other functional moieties. The flexibility and selectivity has resulted in growing interest in the application of CuAAC in various fields. In this review, we briefly describe the importance of the structural folding of peptides and proteins and how the 1,4-disubstituted triazole product of the CuAAC reaction is a suitable isoster for an amide bond. However the major focus of the review is the application of this reaction to produce peptide conjugates for tagging and targeting purpose, linkers for multifunctional biomacromolecules, and reporter ions for peptide and protein analysis.

  10. An overview of antifungal peptides derived from insect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruck, Mohammad Omer; Yusof, Faridah; Chowdhury, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    Fungi are not classified as plants or animals. They resemble plants in many ways but do not produce chlorophyll or make their own food photosynthetically like plants. Fungi are useful for the production of beer, bread, medicine, etc. More complex than viruses or bacteria; fungi can be destructive human pathogens responsible for various diseases in humans. Most people have a strong natural immunity against fungal infection. However, fungi can cause diseases when this immunity breaks down. In the last few years, fungal infection has increased strikingly and has been accompanied by a rise in the number of deaths of cancer patients, transplant recipients, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients owing to fungal infections. The growth rate of fungi is very slow and quite difficult to identify. A series of molecules with antifungal activity against different strains of fungi have been found in insects, which can be of great importance to tackle human diseases. Insects secrete such compounds, which can be peptides, as a part of their immune defense reactions. Active antifungal peptides developed by insects to rapidly eliminate infectious pathogens are considered a component of the defense munitions. This review focuses on naturally occurring antifungal peptides from insects and their challenges to be used as armaments against human diseases.

  11. Artificial transmembrane ion channels from self-assembling peptide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadiri, M. Reza; Granja, Juan R.; Buehler, Lukas K.

    1994-05-01

    NATURALLY occurring membrane channels and pores are formed from a large family of diverse proteins, peptides and organic secon-dary metabolites whose vital biological functions include control of ion flow, signal transduction, molecular transport and produc-tion of cellular toxins. But despite the availability of a large amount of biochemical information about these molecules1, the design and synthesis of artificial systems that can mimic the bio-logical function of natural compounds remains a formidable task2-12. Here we present a simple strategy for the design of artifi-cial membrane ion channels based on a self-assembled cylindrical β-sheet peptide architecture13. Our systems-essentially stacks of peptide rings-display good channel-mediated ion-transport activ-ity with rates exceeding 107 ions s-1, rivalling the performance of many naturally occurring counterparts. Such molecular assemblies should find use in the design of novel cytotoxic agents, membrane transport vehicles and drug-delivery systems.

  12. Epithelial Antimicrobial Peptides: Guardian of the Oral Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayank Hans

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gingival epithelium provides first line of defence from the microorganisms present in dental plaque. It not only provides a mechanical barrier but also has an active immune function too. Gingival epithelial cells participate in innate immunity by producing a range of antimicrobial peptides to protect the host against oral pathogens. These epithelial antimicrobial peptides (EAPs include the β-defensin family, cathelicidin (LL-37, calprotectin, and adrenomedullin. While some are constitutively expressed in gingival epithelial cells, others are induced upon exposure to microbial insults. It is likely that these EAPs have a role in determining the initiation and progression of oral diseases. EAPs are broad spectrum antimicrobials with a different but overlapping range of activity. Apart from antimicrobial activity, they participate in several other crucial roles in host tissues. Some of these, for instance, β-defensins, are chemotactic to immune cells. Others, such as calprotectin are important for wound healing and cell proliferation. Adrenomedullin, a multifunctional peptide, has its biological action in a wide range of tissues. Not only is it a potent vasodilator but also it has several endocrine effects. Knowing in detail the various bioactions of these EAPs may provide us with useful information regarding their utility as therapeutic agents.

  13. In silico designing breast cancer peptide vaccine for binding to MHC class I and II: A molecular docking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, Manijeh; Moreau, Violaine

    2016-12-01

    Antigenic peptides or cancer peptide vaccines can be directly delivered to cancer patients to produce immunologic responses against cancer cells. Specifically, designed peptides can associate with Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I or II molecules on the cell surface of antigen presenting cells activating anti-tumor effector mechanisms by triggering helper T cell (Th) or cytotoxic T cells (CTL). In general, high binding to MHCs approximately correlates with in vivo immunogenicity. Consequently, a molecular docking technique was run on a library of novel discontinuous peptides predicted by PEPOP from Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 ECD) subdomain III. This technique is expected to improve the prediction accuracy in order to identify the best MHC class I and II binder peptides. Molecular docking analysis through GOLD identified the peptide 1412 as the best MHC binder peptide to both MHC class I and II molecules used in the study. The GOLD results predicted HLA-DR4, HLA-DP2 and TCR as the most often targeted receptors by the peptide 1412. These findings, based on bioinformatics analyses, can be exploited in further experimental analyses in vaccine design and cancer therapy to find possible proper approaches providing beneficial effects.

  14. 肽类肠内营养制剂的益处%Benefits of peptide-based enteral nutrition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PamelaR.Poberts

    2001-01-01

    Theories of protein digestion have classically asserted thatproteins are completely hydrolyzed to free amino acids within the intestine before absorption occurs.Further,it has been taught that only free amino acids enter the circulation.However,current evidence indicates that hydrolyzed protein fragments(i.e.peptides)also cross the small intestine and reach peripheral tissue via the systemic circulation,Nitrogen sources for enteral nutrition are free amino acids,peptides,or intact proteins.Current experimental evidence indicates that diets which possess the capability of producing luminal peptides are superior to diets lacking this capacity.The parent protein used for enteral nutrition generates specific peptides which may dictate a variety of metabolic responses. Many small peptides derived from the diet possess bioligic activity and may also play a role in regulating physiologic processes.Dietary peptides can have specific actions either locally,on the gastrointestinal tract,or at more distant sites.These peptides may alter cellular metabolism and may act as vasoregulators,growth factors,releasing hormones,,or neurotransmitters.The concept of dietary bioactive peptides offers an explanation for varying effects of diet on physiologic responses.These concepts have spurred research efforts into the possibility of enteral administration of biogenic amines.

  15. C-peptide and diabetic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunskill, N J

    2017-01-01

    Kidney disease is a serious development in diabetes mellitus and poses an increasing clinical problem. Despite increasing incidence and prevalence of diabetic kidney disease, there have been no new therapies for this condition in the last 20 years. Mounting evidence supports a biological role for C-peptide, and findings from multiple studies now suggest that C-peptide may beneficially affect the disturbed metabolic and pathophysiological pathways leading to the development of diabetic nephropathy. Studies of C-peptide in animal models and in humans with type 1 diabetes all suggest a renoprotective effect for this peptide. In diabetic rodents, C-peptide reduces glomerular hyperfiltration and albuminuria. Cohort studies of diabetic patients with combined islet and kidney transplants suggest that maintained C-peptide secretion is protective of renal graft function. Further, in short-term studies of patients with type 1 diabetes, administration of C-peptide is also associated with a lowered hyperfiltration rate and reduced microalbuminuria. Thus, the available information suggests that type 1 diabetes should be regarded as a dual hormone deficiency disease and that clinical trials of C-peptide in diabetic nephropathy are both justified and urgently required.

  16. Protein identification by peptide mass fingerprinting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjernø, Karin

    2007-01-01

      Peptide mass fingerprinting is an effective way of identifying, e.g., gel-separated proteins, by matching experimentally obtained peptide mass data against large databases. However, several factors are known to influence the quality of the resulting matches, such as proteins contaminating...

  17. Peptidomic Identification of Serum Peptides Diagnosing Preeclampsia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaojun Wen

    Full Text Available We sought to identify serological markers capable of diagnosing preeclampsia (PE. We performed serum peptide analysis (liquid chromatography mass spectrometry of 62 unique samples from 31 PE patients and 31 healthy pregnant controls, with two-thirds used as a training set and the other third as a testing set. Differential serum peptide profiling identified 52 significant serum peptides, and a 19-peptide panel collectively discriminating PE in training sets (n = 21 PE, n = 21 control; specificity = 85.7% and sensitivity = 100% and testing sets (n = 10 PE, n = 10 control; specificity = 80% and sensitivity = 100%. The panel peptides were derived from 6 different protein precursors: 13 from fibrinogen alpha (FGA, 1 from alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT, 1 from apolipoprotein L1 (APO-L1, 1 from inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 (ITIH4, 2 from kininogen-1 (KNG1, and 1 from thymosin beta-4 (TMSB4. We concluded that serum peptides can accurately discriminate active PE. Measurement of a 19-peptide panel could be performed quickly and in a quantitative mass spectrometric platform available in clinical laboratories. This serum peptide panel quantification could provide clinical utility in predicting PE or differential diagnosis of PE from confounding chronic hypertension.

  18. New Biodegradable Peptide-based Polymer Constructs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, M.

    2009-01-01

    Peptide-based polymers are of increasing interest, since they can be applied for a variety of purposes such as drug delivery devices, scaffolds for tissue engineering and -repair, and as novel biomaterials. Peptide-based polymers are common in nature and often exhibit special characteristics. Howeve

  19. Structure and Design of Multipotent Peptide Microbicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    Project goal. ~$e goal of this project is to design novel peptide antibiotics using a naturally occurring family of peptides, known as defensins, as...coupling of taurine , glycinamide, and arginine amide. " 3. Solution Structures. in collaborative studies performed with Arthur Pardi, we have

  20. Engineered Adhesion Peptides for Improved Silicon Adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Sathish Kumar; Jebors, Said; Martin, Marta; Cloitre, Thierry; Agarwal, Vivechana; Mehdi, Ahmad; Martinez, Jean; Subra, Gilles; Gergely, Csilla

    2015-11-01

    Engineering peptides that present selective recognition and high affinity for a material is a major challenge for assembly-driven elaboration of complex systems with wide applications in the field of biomaterials, hard-tissue regeneration, and functional materials for therapeutics. Peptide-material interactions are of vital importance in natural processes but less exploited for the design of novel systems for practical applications because of our poor understanding of mechanisms underlying these interactions. Here, we present an approach based on the synthesis of several truncated peptides issued from a silicon-specific peptide recovered via phage display technology. We use the photonic response provided by porous silicon microcavities to evaluate the binding efficiency of 14 different peptide derivatives. We identify and engineer a short peptide sequence (SLVSHMQT), revealing the highest affinity for p(+)-Si. The molecular recognition behavior of the obtained peptide fragment can be revealed through mutations allowing identification of the preferential affinity of certain amino acids toward silicon. These results constitute an advance in both the engineering of peptides that reveal recognition properties for silicon and the understanding of biomolecule-material interactions.

  1. Protein identification by peptide mass fingerprinting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjernø, Karin

    2007-01-01

      Peptide mass fingerprinting is an effective way of identifying, e.g., gel-separated proteins, by matching experimentally obtained peptide mass data against large databases. However, several factors are known to influence the quality of the resulting matches, such as proteins contaminating the s...

  2. A cyclic peptidic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Baoyu; Xu, Peng; Jiang, Longguang;

    2014-01-01

    Peptides are attracting increasing interest as protease inhibitors. Here, we demonstrate a new inhibitory mechanism and a new type of exosite interactions for a phage-displayed peptide library-derived competitive inhibitor, mupain-1 (CPAYSRYLDC), of the serine protease murine urokinase...

  3. Milk proteins as precursors of bioactive peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Dziuba

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Milk proteins, a source of bioactive peptides, are the subject of numerous research studies aiming to, among others, evaluate their properties as precursors of biologically active peptides. Physiologically active peptides released from their precursors may interact with selected receptors and affect the overall condition and health of humans. By relying on the BIOPEP database of proteins and bioactive peptides, developed by the Department of Food Biochemistry at the University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn (www.uwm.edu.pl/biochemia, the profiles of potential activity of milk proteins were determined and the function of those proteins as bioactive peptide precursors was evaluated based on a quantitative criterion, i.e. the occurrence frequency of bioactive fragments (A. The study revealed that milk proteins are mainly a source of peptides with the following types of activity: antihypertensive (Amax = 0.225, immunomodulating (0.024, smooth muscle contracting (0.011, antioxidative (0.029, dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors (0.148, opioid (0.073, opioid antagonistic (0.053, bonding and transporting metals and metal ions (0.024, antibacterial and antiviral (0.024, and antithrombotic (0.029. The enzymes capable of releasing bioactive peptides from precursor proteins were determined for every type of activity. The results of the experiment indicate that milk proteins such as lactoferrin, α-lactalbumin, β-casein and κ-casein hydrolysed by trypsin can be a relatively abundant source of biologically active peptides.

  4. [Application on food preservative of antimicrobial peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongyan; Mu, Yu; Zhao, Baohua

    2009-07-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are an integral component of the innate immune system, it can counteract outer membrane pathogen such as bacteria, fungi, viruses, protozoan and so on. Owing to the sterilization and innocuity, it has the potential to be crude food preservative. In this paper the uses of antibacterial peptides in the food preservative were analyzed.

  5. Prediction of twin-arginine signal peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jannick Dyrløv; Nielsen, Henrik; Widdick, D.;

    2005-01-01

    peptides and 84% of the annotated cleavage sites of these Tat signal peptides were correctly predicted. This method generates far less false positive predictions on various datasets than using simple pattern matching. Moreover, on the same datasets TatP generates less false positive predictions than...

  6. Peptide Mass Fingerprinting of Egg White Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alty, Lisa T.; LaRiviere, Frederick J.

    2016-01-01

    Use of advanced mass spectrometry techniques in the undergraduate setting has burgeoned in the past decade. However, relatively few undergraduate experiments examine the proteomics tools of protein digestion, peptide accurate mass determination, and database searching, also known as peptide mass fingerprinting. In this experiment, biochemistry…

  7. Antimicrobial peptides in innate immune responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, O.E.; Borregaard, N.; Cole, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are ancient effector molecules in the innate immune response of eukaryotes. These peptides are important for the antimicrobial efficacy of phagocytes and for the innate immune response mounted by epithelia of humans and other mammals. AMPs are generated either by de ...

  8. Trandermal Peptides for Large Molecule Delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ A research team, led by Prof. WEN Longping from the University of Science and Technology of China under CAS,has successfully screened out a trandermal peptide, using biotechnology. The new peptide is able to deliver insulin into human body through skin, rendering an immediate therapeutic effect. The finding was published in the March 27 issue of the journal Natural Biotechnology.

  9. Peptide based diagnostics: are random-sequence peptides more useful than tiling proteome sequences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navalkar, Krupa Arun; Johnston, Stephan Albert; Stafford, Phillip

    2015-02-01

    Diagnostics using peptide ligands have been available for decades. However, their adoption in diagnostics has been limited, not because of poor sensitivity but in many cases due to diminished specificity. Numerous reports suggest that protein-based rather than peptide-based disease detection is more specific. We examined two different approaches to peptide-based diagnostics using Coccidioides (aka Valley Fever) as the disease model. Although the pathogen was discovered more than a century ago, a highly sensitive diagnostic remains unavailable. We present a case study where two different approaches to diagnosing Valley Fever were used: first, overlapping Valley Fever epitopes representing immunodominant Coccidioides antigens were tiled using a microarray format of presynthesized peptides. Second, a set of random sequence peptides identified using a 10,000 peptide immunosignaturing microarray was compared for sensitivity and specificity. The scientific hypothesis tested was that actual epitope peptides from Coccidioides would provide sufficient sensitivity and specificity as a diagnostic. Results demonstrated that random sequence peptides exhibited higher accuracy when classifying different stages of Valley Fever infection vs. epitope peptides. The epitope peptide array did provide better performance than the existing immunodiffusion array, but when directly compared to the random sequence peptides, reported lower overall accuracy. This study suggests that there are competing aspects of antibody recognition that involve conservation of pathogen sequence and aspects of mimotope recognition and amino acid substitutions. These factors may prove critical when developing the next generation of high-performance immunodiagnostics.

  10. Chitosan-Poly (I:C-PADRE Based Nanoparticles as Delivery Vehicles for Synthetic Peptide Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge F. Correia-Pinto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The safety and precision of peptide antigens has prompted the search for adjuvants capable of increasing the immune response against these intrinsically poorly immunogenic antigens. The integration of both immunostimulants and peptide antigens within nanometric delivery systems for their co-delivery to immune cells is a promising vaccination strategy. With this in mind, the potential synergistic effect of the immunostimulant poly (I:C (pIC and a T-Helper peptide (PADRE, integrated into a chitosan (CS based nanostructure, was explored. The value of this nanostructured combination of materials was assessed for a peptide antigen (1338aa derived from the HPV-16 L2 protein. These nanoparticles, produced by ionic gelation technique, exhibited a nanometric size (<300 nm, a high positive surface charge (>40 mV and high pIC association efficiency (>96%. They also showed capacity for the association of both the 1338aa and PADRE peptides. The influence of the presence of pIC and PADRE in the nanocomposition, as well as that of the peptide presentation form (encapsulated versus surface adsorbed on the antibody induction was evaluated in a preliminary in vivo study. The data obtained highlights the possibility to engineer nanoparticles through the rational combination of a number of adjuvant molecules together with the antigen.

  11. Improved machine learning method for analysis of gas phase chemistry of peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahn Natalie

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate peptide identification is important to high-throughput proteomics analyses that use mass spectrometry. Search programs compare fragmentation spectra (MS/MS of peptides from complex digests with theoretically derived spectra from a database of protein sequences. Improved discrimination is achieved with theoretical spectra that are based on simulating gas phase chemistry of the peptides, but the limited understanding of those processes affects the accuracy of predictions from theoretical spectra. Results We employed a robust data mining strategy using new feature annotation functions of MAE software, which revealed under-prediction of the frequency of occurrence in fragmentation of the second peptide bond. We applied methods of exploratory data analysis to pre-process the information in the MS/MS spectra, including data normalization and attribute selection, to reduce the attributes to a smaller, less correlated set for machine learning studies. We then compared our rule building machine learning program, DataSqueezer, with commonly used association rules and decision tree algorithms. All used machine learning algorithms produced similar results that were consistent with expected properties for a second gas phase mechanism at the second peptide bond. Conclusion The results provide compelling evidence that we have identified underlying chemical properties in the data that suggest the existence of an additional gas phase mechanism for the second peptide bond. Thus, the methods described in this study provide a valuable approach for analyses of this kind in the future.

  12. Fragmentation mechanism of UV-excited peptides in the gas phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabuga, Aleksandra V., E-mail: aleksandra.zabuga@epfl.ch; Kamrath, Michael Z.; Boyarkin, Oleg V.; Rizzo, Thomas R. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Moléculaire, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, EPFL SB ISIC LCPM, Station 6, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-10-21

    We present evidence that following near-UV excitation, protonated tyrosine- or phenylalanine–containing peptides undergo intersystem crossing to produce a triplet species. This pathway competes with direct dissociation from the excited electronic state and with dissociation from the electronic ground state subsequent to internal conversion. We employ UV-IR double-resonance photofragment spectroscopy to record conformer-specific vibrational spectra of cold peptides pre-excited to their S{sub 1} electronic state. The absorption of tunable IR light by these electronically excited peptides leads to a drastic increase in fragmentation, selectively enhancing the loss of neutral phenylalanine or tyrosine side-chain, which are not the lowest dissociation channels in the ground electronic state. The recorded IR spectra evolve upon increasing the time delay between the UV and IR pulses, reflecting the dynamics of the intersystem crossing on a timescale of ∼80 ns and <10 ns for phenylalanine- and tyrosine-containing peptides, respectively. Once in the triplet state, phenylalanine-containing peptides may live for more than 100 ms, unless they absorb IR photons and undergo dissociation by the loss of an aromatic side-chain. We discuss the mechanism of this fragmentation channel and its possible implications for photofragment spectroscopy and peptide photostability.

  13. Mineralization of Calcium Carbonate on Multifunctional Peptide Assembly Acting as Mineral Source Supplier and Template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Kazuki; Kinoshita, Takatoshi; Nagata, Kenji; Higuchi, Masahiro

    2016-09-13

    Crystal phase and morphology of biominerals may be precisely regulated by controlled nucleation and selective crystal growth through biomineralization on organic templates such as a protein. We herein propose new control factors of selective crystal growth by the biomineralization process. In this study, a designed β-sheet Ac-VHVEVS-CONH2 peptide was used as a multifunctional template that acted as mineral source supplier and having crystal phase control ability of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) during a self-supplied mineralization. The peptides formed three-dimensional nanofiber networks composed of assembled bilayer β-sheets. The assembly hydrolyzed urea molecules to one carbonate anion and two ammonium cations owing to a charge relay effect between His and Ser residues under mild conditions. CaCO3 was selectively mineralized on the peptide assembly using the generated carbonate anions on the template. Morphology of the obtained CaCO3 was fiber-like structure, similar to that of the peptide template. The mineralized CaCO3 on the peptide template had aragonite phase. This implies that CaCO3 nuclei, generated using the carbonate anions produced by the hydrolysis of urea on the surface of the peptide assembly, preferentially grew into aragonite phase, the growth axis of which aligned parallel to the direction of the β-sheet fiber axis.

  14. Chitosan-Poly (I:C)-PADRE Based Nanoparticles as Delivery Vehicles for Synthetic Peptide Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia-Pinto, Jorge F; Csaba, Noemi; Schiller, John T; Alonso, Maria J

    2015-01-01

    The safety and precision of peptide antigens has prompted the search for adjuvants capable of increasing the immune response against these intrinsically poorly immunogenic antigens. The integration of both immunostimulants and peptide antigens within nanometric delivery systems for their co-delivery to immune cells is a promising vaccination strategy. With this in mind, the potential synergistic effect of the immunostimulant poly (I:C) (pIC) and a T-Helper peptide (PADRE), integrated into a chitosan (CS) based nanostructure, was explored. The value of this nanostructured combination of materials was assessed for a peptide antigen (1338aa) derived from the HPV-16 L2 protein. These nanoparticles, produced by ionic gelation technique, exhibited a nanometric size (40 mV) and high pIC association efficiency (>96%). They also showed capacity for the association of both the 1338aa and PADRE peptides. The influence of the presence of pIC and PADRE in the nanocomposition, as well as that of the peptide presentation form (encapsulated versus surface adsorbed) on the antibody induction was evaluated in a preliminary in vivo study. The data obtained highlights the possibility to engineer nanoparticles through the rational combination of a number of adjuvant molecules together with the antigen.

  15. Fragmentation mechanism of UV-excited peptides in the gas phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabuga, Aleksandra V.; Kamrath, Michael Z.; Boyarkin, Oleg V.; Rizzo, Thomas R.

    2014-10-01

    We present evidence that following near-UV excitation, protonated tyrosine- or phenylalanine-containing peptides undergo intersystem crossing to produce a triplet species. This pathway competes with direct dissociation from the excited electronic state and with dissociation from the electronic ground state subsequent to internal conversion. We employ UV-IR double-resonance photofragment spectroscopy to record conformer-specific vibrational spectra of cold peptides pre-excited to their S1 electronic state. The absorption of tunable IR light by these electronically excited peptides leads to a drastic increase in fragmentation, selectively enhancing the loss of neutral phenylalanine or tyrosine side-chain, which are not the lowest dissociation channels in the ground electronic state. The recorded IR spectra evolve upon increasing the time delay between the UV and IR pulses, reflecting the dynamics of the intersystem crossing on a timescale of ˜80 ns and phenylalanine- and tyrosine-containing peptides, respectively. Once in the triplet state, phenylalanine-containing peptides may live for more than 100 ms, unless they absorb IR photons and undergo dissociation by the loss of an aromatic side-chain. We discuss the mechanism of this fragmentation channel and its possible implications for photofragment spectroscopy and peptide photostability.

  16. Use of Peptide Libraries for Identification and Optimization of Novel Antimicrobial Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Martin; Petkova, Asya; Gani, Jurnorain; Mikut, Ralf; Hilpert, Kai

    2017-01-01

    The increasing rates of resistance among bacteria and to a lesser extent fungi have resulted in an urgent need to find new molecules that hold therapeutic promise against multidrug-resistant strains. Antimicrobial peptides have proven very effective against a variety of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Additionally, the low levels of resistance reported towards these molecules are an attractive feature for antimicrobial drug development. Here we summarise information on diverse peptide libraries used to discover or to optimize antimicrobial peptides. Chemical synthesized peptide libraries, for example split and mix method, tea bag method, multi-pin method and cellulose spot method are discussed. In addition biological peptide library screening methods are summarized, like phage display, bacterial display, mRNA-display and ribosomal display. A few examples are given for small peptide libraries, which almost exclusively follow a rational design of peptides of interest rather than a combinatorial approach.

  17. Antioxidant activity of yoghurt peptides: Part 2 – Characterisationof peptide fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farvin, Sabeena; Baron, Caroline; Nielsen, Nina Skall;

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to elucidate previous findings showing that peptide fractions isolated from yoghurt had antioxidant effects. Therefore, peptides and free amino acids released during fermentation of milk were characterised. Yoghurt samples were stripped from sugars and lactic acid...... antioxidant activity in these fractions.......The aim of the present study was to elucidate previous findings showing that peptide fractions isolated from yoghurt had antioxidant effects. Therefore, peptides and free amino acids released during fermentation of milk were characterised. Yoghurt samples were stripped from sugars and lactic acid...... the peptides identified contained at least one proline residue. Some of the identified peptides included the hydrophobic amino acid residues Val or Leu at the N-terminus and Pro, His or Tyr in the amino acid sequence, which is characteristic of antioxidant peptides. In addition, the yoghurt contained...

  18. Role of peptide bond in the realization of biological activity of short peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavinson, V Kh; Tarnovskaya, S I; Lin'kova, N S; Chervyakova, N A; Nichik, T E; Elashkina, E V; Chalisova, N I

    2015-02-01

    We performed a comparative analysis of biological activity of Lys-Glu peptide and its amino acid constituents. It was established that Lys-Glu stimulated proliferation of splenic cells in organotypic culture, while the mixture of glutamic acid and lysine inhibited culture growth. Using the method of molecular docking, we showed that glutamic acid, lysine, and Lys-Glu peptide can interact with different DNA sequences. The energy of interaction and the most beneficial localization of glutamic acid, lysine, and Lys-Glu peptide in DNA molecule was calculated. We demonstrated the interaction of the peptide and amino acids with DNA along the minor groove. The energy of DNA interaction with the peptide is higher than with individual amino acids. The peptide bonds increase the interaction of Lys-Glu peptide with DNA, which potentiates the biological effect on cell proliferation in organotypic culture of splenic cells.

  19. Chimeric mitochondrial peptides from contiguous regular and swinger RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Hervé Seligmann

    2016-01-01

    Previous mass spectrometry analyses described human mitochondrial peptides entirely translated from swinger RNAs, RNAs where polymerization systematically exchanged nucleotides. Exchanges follow one among 23 bijective transformation rules, nine symmetric exchanges (X ↔ Y, e.g. A ↔ C) and fourteen asymmetric exchanges (X → Y → Z → X, e.g. A → C → G → A), multiplying by 24 DNA's protein coding potential. Abrupt switches from regular to swinger polymerization produce chimeric RNAs. Here, human m...

  20. Experimentally produced calf pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourlay, R N; Howard, C J; Thomas, L H; Stott, E J

    1976-03-01

    Experimental pneumonia was produced in calves by the endobronchial inoculation of pneumonic lung homogenates. Irradiated homogenates produced minimal pneumonia. Ampicillin treatment of the homogenates and the experimental calves reduced the extent of pneumonia. Treatment with tylosin tartrate prevented experimental pneumonia. These results suggest that the total pneumonia was due to organisms susceptible to tylosin tartrate and that the residual pneumonia remaining after ampicillin treatment was due to organisms susceptible to tylosin tartrate but not to ampicillin. Of the organisms isolated from the lungs, the ones in this latter category most likely to be responsible are Mycoplasma dispar and ureaplasmas (T-mycoplasmas).

  1. Investigation of relationships between barley stress peptides and beer gushing using SDS-PAGE and MS screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hégrová, Blanka; Farková, Marta; Macuchová, Simona; Havel, Josef; Preisler, Jan

    2009-12-01

    The relationship between gushing and antifungal peptides in barley and malt kernels was examined for five barley varieties produced in the Czech Republic with four conditions of infection and treatment. Proteome changes during pathogen-seed interaction were observed with SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF MS. These methods were applied as a fast screening for observing the relationship between gushing and peptides/proteins. It was found that the presence of basic peptides, presumably hordothionins and non-specific lipid transfer protein type 1, did not correlate with the degree of gushing for malt (/r/ in ), (/r/ in ), respectively, as detected by both methods.

  2. Review stapling peptides using cysteine crosslinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairlie, David P; Dantas de Araujo, Aline

    2016-11-01

    Stapled peptides are an emerging class of cyclic peptide molecules with enhanced biophysical properties such as conformational and proteolytic stability, cellular uptake and elevated binding affinity and specificity for their biological targets. Among the limited number of chemistries available for their synthesis, the cysteine-based stapling strategy has received considerable development in the last few years driven by facile access from cysteine-functionalized peptide precursors. Here we present some recent advances in peptide and protein stapling where the side-chains of cysteine residues are covalently connected with a range of different crosslinkers affording bisthioether macrocyclic peptides of varying topology and biophysical properties. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 843-852, 2016.

  3. Novel peptide-based protease inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roodbeen, Renée

    This thesis describes the design and synthesis of peptide-based serine protease inhibitors. The targeted protease, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) activates plasminogen, which plays a major role in cancer metastasis. The peptide upain-2 (S 1 ,S 12-cyclo-AcCSWRGLENHAAC-NH2) is a highly......, the disulfide bridge was replaced with amide bonds of various lengths. The novel peptides did not retain their inhibitory activity, but formed the basis for another strategy. Second, bicyclic peptides were obtained by creating head-to-tail cyclized peptides that were made bicyclic by the addition of a covalent...... increased. Finally, the effect of multivalent display of upain-2 was investigated. Several dimers of upain-2 were made and the attachment of upain-2 via the Copper-catalyzed Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition (CuAAC) onto an alkyne functionalized carbohydrate scaffold was investigated. Besides the synthesis...

  4. Design of Asymmetric Peptide Bilayer Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sha; Mehta, Anil K; Sidorov, Anton N; Orlando, Thomas M; Jiang, Zhigang; Anthony, Neil R; Lynn, David G

    2016-03-16

    Energetic insights emerging from the structural characterization of peptide cross-β assemblies have enabled the design and construction of robust asymmetric bilayer peptide membranes. Two peptides differing only in their N-terminal residue, phosphotyrosine vs lysine, coassemble as stacks of antiparallel β-sheets with precisely patterned charged lattices stabilizing the bilayer leaflet interface. Either homogeneous or mixed leaflet composition is possible, and both create nanotubes with dense negative external and positive internal solvent exposed surfaces. Cross-seeding peptide solutions with a preassembled peptide nanotube seed leads to domains of different leaflet architecture within single nanotubes. Architectural control over these cross-β assemblies, both across the bilayer membrane and along the nanotube length, provides access to highly ordered asymmetric membranes for the further construction of functional mesoscale assemblies.

  5. Harnessing supramolecular peptide nanotechnology in biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kiat Hwa; Lee, Wei Hao; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Ni, Ming

    2017-01-01

    The harnessing of peptides in biomedical applications is a recent hot topic. This arises mainly from the general biocompatibility of peptides, as well as from the ease of tunability of peptide structure to engineer desired properties. The ease of progression from laboratory testing to clinical trials is evident from the plethora of examples available. In this review, we compare and contrast how three distinct self-assembled peptide nanostructures possess different functions. We have 1) nanofibrils in biomaterials that can interact with cells, 2) nanoparticles that can traverse the bloodstream to deliver its payload and also be bioimaged, and 3) nanotubes that can serve as cross-membrane conduits and as a template for nanowire formation. Through this review, we aim to illustrate how various peptides, in their various self-assembled nanostructures, possess great promise in a wide range of biomedical applications and what more can be expected. PMID:28223805

  6. Peptide binding specificity of the chaperone calreticulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandhu, N.; Duus, K.; Jorgensen, C.S.;

    2007-01-01

    Calreticulin is a molecular chaperone with specificity for polypeptides and N-linked monoglucosylated glycans. In order to determine the specificity of polypeptide binding, the interaction of calreticulin with polypeptides was investigated using synthetic peptides of different length and composit......Calreticulin is a molecular chaperone with specificity for polypeptides and N-linked monoglucosylated glycans. In order to determine the specificity of polypeptide binding, the interaction of calreticulin with polypeptides was investigated using synthetic peptides of different length...... and composition. A large set of available synthetic peptides (n=127) was tested for binding to calreticulin and the results analysed by multivariate data analysis. The parameter that correlated best with binding was hydrophobicity while beta-turn potential disfavoured binding. Only hydrophobic peptides longer...... a peptide-binding specificity for hydrophobic sequences and delineate the fine specificity of calreticulin for hydrophobic amino acid residues....

  7. Chemical reactions directed Peptide self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasale, Dnyaneshwar B; Das, Apurba K

    2015-05-13

    Fabrication of self-assembled nanostructures is one of the important aspects in nanoscience and nanotechnology. The study of self-assembled soft materials remains an area of interest due to their potential applications in biomedicine. The versatile properties of soft materials can be tuned using a bottom up approach of small molecules. Peptide based self-assembly has significant impact in biology because of its unique features such as biocompatibility, straight peptide chain and the presence of different side chain functionality. These unique features explore peptides in various self-assembly process. In this review, we briefly introduce chemical reaction-mediated peptide self-assembly. Herein, we have emphasised enzymes, native chemical ligation and photochemical reactions in the exploration of peptide self-assembly.

  8. Antimicrobial peptides important in innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederlund, Andreas; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur H; Agerberth, Birgitta

    2011-10-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are present in all walks of life, from plants to animals, and they are considered to be endogenous antibiotics. In general, antimicrobial peptides are determinants of the composition of the microbiota and they function to fend off microbes and prevent infections. Antimicrobial peptides eliminate micro-organisms through disruption of their cell membranes. Their importance in human immunity, and in health as well as disease, has only recently been appreciated. The present review provides an introduction to the field of antimicrobial peptides in general and discusses two of the major classes of mammalian antimicrobial peptides: the defensins and the cathelicidins. The review focuses on their structures, their main modes of action and their regulation.

  9. Antimicrobial/cytolytic peptides from the venom of the North African scorpion, Androctonus amoreuxi: biochemical and functional characterization of natural peptides and a single site-substituted analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaaytah, Ammar; Zhou, Mei; Wang, Lei; Chen, Tianbao; Walker, Brian; Shaw, Chris

    2012-06-01

    The venoms of scorpions are complex cocktails of polypeptide toxins that fall into two structural categories: those that contain cysteinyl residues with associated disulfide bridges and those that do not. As the majority of lethal toxins acting upon ion channels fall into the first category, most research has been focused there. Here we report the identification and structural characterization of two novel 18-mer antimicrobial peptides from the venom of the North African scorpion, Androctonus amoreuxi. Named AamAP1 and AamAP2, both peptides are C-terminally amidated and differ in primary structure at just two sites: Leu-->Pro at position 2 and Phe-->Ile at position 17. Synthetic replicates of both peptides exhibited a broad-spectrum of antimicrobial activity against a Gram-positive bacterium (Staphylococcus aureus), a Gram-negative bacterium (Escherichia coli) and a yeast (Candida albicans), at concentrations ranging between 20 μM and 150 μM. In this concentration range, both peptides produced significant degrees of hemolysis. A synthetic replicate of AamAP1 containing a single substitution (His-->Lys) at position 8, generated a peptide (AamAP-S1) with enhanced antimicrobial potency (3-5 μM) against the three test organisms and within this concentration range, hemolytic effects were negligible. In addition, this His-->Lys variant exhibited potent growth inhibitory activity (ID(50) 25-40 μm) against several human cancer cell lines and endothelial cells that was absent in both natural peptides. Natural bioactive peptide libraries, such as those that occur in scorpion venoms, thus constitute a unique source of novel lead compounds with drug development potential whose biological properties can be readily manipulated by simple synthetic chemical means.

  10. Concentration effects on peptide elution from pendant PEO layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiangming; Ryder, Matthew P; McGuire, Joseph; Schilke, Karl F

    2014-06-01

    In earlier work, we have provided direction for development of responsive drug delivery systems based on modulation of structure and amphiphilicity of bioactive peptides entrapped within pendant polyethylene oxide (PEO) brush layers. Amphiphilicity promotes retention of the peptides within the hydrophobic inner region of the PEO brush layer. In this work, we describe the effects of peptide surface density on the conformational changes caused by peptide-peptide interactions, and show that this phenomenon substantially affects the rate and extent of peptide elution from PEO brush layers. Three cationic peptides were used in this study: the arginine-rich amphiphilic peptide WLBU2, the chemically identical but scrambled peptide S-WLBU2, and the non-amphiphilic homopolymer poly-l-arginine (PLR). Circular dichroism (CD) was used to evaluate surface density effects on the structure of these peptides at uncoated (hydrophobic) and PEO-coated silica nanoparticles. UV spectroscopy and a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) were used to quantify changes in the extent of peptide elution caused by those conformational changes. For amphiphilic peptides at sufficiently high surface density, peptide-peptide interactions result in conformational changes which compromise their resistance to elution. In contrast, elution of a non-amphiphilic peptide is substantially independent of its surface density, presumably due to the absence of peptide-peptide interactions. The results presented here provide a strategy to control the rate and extent of release of bioactive peptides from PEO layers, based on modulation of their amphiphilicity and surface density.

  11. The role of vasoactive intestinal peptide in scavenging singlet oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, B.R.; Misra, H.P. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg (United States))

    1990-02-26

    The neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), a highly basic 28 amino acid peptide, has a widespread distribution in the body. The functional specificity of this peptide not only includes its potent vasodilatory activity, but also its role in protecting lungs against acute injury, in preventing T-lymphocyte proliferation and in modulating immune function. The purpose of this study was to examine the possible antioxidant properties of VIP. The authors found that VIP up to 50 {mu}g/ml had no inhibitory effect on its reduction of cytochrome C by xanthine and xanthine oxidase, indicating that the peptide does not have significant O{sub 2} scavenging ability. However, VIP was found to inhibit, in a dose-dependent manner, the {sup 1}O{sub 2} dependent 2, 2, 6, 6 tetramethyl piperidine oxide (TEMPO) formation. {sup 1}O{sub 2} was produced by rose benzal photosensitizing system and was detected as TEMP-{sup 1}O{sub 2} adduct (TEMPO) by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic technique. The formation of TEMPO signal was strongly inhibited by {beta}-carotene, histidine as well as azide, but not by superoxide dismutase (48 {mu}g/ml), catalase (20 {mu}g/ml) and mannitol (6mM), indicating that TEMPO signal was a TEMP-{sup 1}O{sub 2} adduct. These results indicate that VIP has potent antioxidant activity and may serve as a singlet O{sub 2} scavenger, thus it may modulate the oxidative tissue injury caused by this reactive oxygen species.

  12. Host Antimicrobial Peptides in Bacterial Homeostasis and Pathogenesis of Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek R. Heimlich

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Innate immune responses function as a first line of host defense against the development of bacterial infection, and in some cases to preserve the sterility of privileged sites in the human host. Bacteria that enter these sites must counter host responses for colonization. From the host’s perspective, the innate immune system works expeditiously to minimize the bacterial threat before colonization and subsequent dysbiosis. The multifactorial nature of disease further challenges predictions of how each independent variable influences bacterial pathogenesis. From bacterial colonization to infection and through disease, the microenvironments of the host are in constant flux as bacterial and host factors contribute to changes at the host-pathogen interface, with the host attempting to eradicate bacteria and the bacteria fighting to maintain residency. A key component of this innate host response towards bacterial infection is the production of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs. As an early component of the host response, AMPs modulate bacterial load and prevent establishment of infection. Under quiescent conditions, some AMPs are constitutively expressed by the epithelium. Bacterial infection can subsequently induce production of other AMPs in an effort to maintain sterility, or to restrict colonization. As demonstrated in various studies, the absence of a single AMP can influence pathogenesis, highlighting the importance of AMP concentration in maintaining homeostasis. Yet, AMPs can increase bacterial virulence through the co-opting of the peptides or alteration of bacterial virulence gene expression. Further, bacterial factors used to subvert AMPs can modify host microenvironments and alter colonization of the residential flora that principally maintain homeostasis. Thus, the dynamic interplay between host defense peptides and bacterial factors produced to quell peptide activity play a critical role in the progression and outcome of disease.

  13. The amino acid sequences of eleven tryptic peptides of papaya mosaic virus protein by electron ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, A; Short, M N; Self, R; Parsley, K R

    1982-04-01

    Eleven of the fourteen tryptic peptides of papaya mosaic virus protein have been sequenced by electron ionization mass spectrometry using chemical and enzymic hydrolyses and mixture analysis as required. Mid-chain cleavages of N-C bonds produced secondary ion series which allowed up to 16 residues to be sequenced without further hydrolysis. Mixture analysis on hydrolysis products enabled a 24 residue tryptic peptide to be sequenced from the data recorded in a single mass spectrum.

  14. Identification of a β-glucosidase from the Mucor circinelloides genome by peptide pattern recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuhong, Huang; Busk, Peter Kamp; Grell, Morten Nedergaard

    2014-01-01

    Mucor circinelloides produces plant cell wall degrading enzymes that allow it to grow on complex polysaccharides. Although the genome of M. circinelloides has been sequenced, only few plant cell wall degrading enzymes are annotated in this species. We applied peptide pattern recognition, which...

  15. Prediction, production and characterization of post-translationally modified antimicrobial peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heel, Auke Johan

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria are rapidly becoming resistant to the currently used antibiotics therefore we need novel antibiotics, preferably with new mechanisms of action. One potential source are the so called antimicrobial peptides that are produced by many different organisms. To gain access to these pot

  16. Complementary and Overlapping Selectivity of the Two-Peptide Bacteriocins Plantaricin EF and JK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moll, Gert N.; Akker, Emile van den; Hauge, Håvard H.; Nissen-Meyer, Jon; Nes, Ingolf F.; Konings, Wil N.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Plantaricin EF and JK are both two-peptide bacteriocins produced by Lactobacillus plantarum C11. The mechanism of plantaricin EF and JK action was studied on L. plantarum 965 cells. Both plantaricins form pores in the membranes of target cells and dissipate the transmembrane electrical potential (Δψ

  17. Advances in contact printing technologies of carbohydrate, peptide and protein arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voskuhl, J.; Brinkmann, J.; Jonkheijm, P.

    2014-01-01

    Microcontact printing (μCP) techniques are powerful tools to print molecules on reactive surfaces in a covalent or non-covalent manner to produce well-defined patterns, in shape and spot morphology, of bioactive molecules such as carbohydrates, peptides and proteins. These printed biofunctional surf

  18. Endogenous human milk Peptide release is greater after preterm birth than term birth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dallas, D.C.; Smink, C.J.; Robinson, R.C.; Tian, T.; Guerrero, A.; Parker, E.A.; Smilowitz, J.T.; Hettinga, K.A.; Underwood, M.A.; Lebrilla, C.B.; German, J.B.; Barile, D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hundreds of naturally occurring milk peptides are present in term human milk. Preterm milk is produced before complete maturation of the mammary gland, which could change milk synthesis and secretion processes within the mammary gland, leading to differences in protein expression and enz

  19. CCHamide-2 is an orexigenic brain-gut peptide in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Guilin Robin; Hauser, Frank; Rewitz, Kim Furbo;

    2015-01-01

    The neuroendocrine peptides CCHamide-1 and -2, encoded by the genes ccha1 and -2, are produced by endocrine cells in the midgut and by neurons in the brain of Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we used the CRISPR/Cas9 technique to disrupt the ccha1 and -2 genes and identify mutant phenotypes with a f...

  20. Host plant peptides elicit a transcriptional response to control the Sinorhizobium meliloti cell cycle during symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penterman, Jon; Abo, Ryan P; De Nisco, Nicole J; Arnold, Markus F F; Longhi, Renato; Zanda, Matteo; Walker, Graham C

    2014-03-04

    The α-proteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti establishes a chronic intracellular infection during the symbiosis with its legume hosts. Within specialized host cells, S. meliloti differentiates into highly polyploid, enlarged nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. This differentiation is driven by host cells through the production of defensin-like peptides called "nodule-specific cysteine-rich" (NCR) peptides. Recent research has shown that synthesized NCR peptides exhibit antimicrobial activity at high concentrations but cause bacterial endoreduplication at sublethal concentrations. We leveraged synchronized S. meliloti populations to determine how treatment with a sublethal NCR peptide affects the cell cycle and physiology of bacteria at the molecular level. We found that at sublethal levels a representative NCR peptide specifically blocks cell division and antagonizes Z-ring function. Gene-expression profiling revealed that the cell division block was produced, in part, through the substantial transcriptional response elicited by sublethal NCR treatment that affected ∼15% of the genome. Expression of critical cell-cycle regulators, including ctrA, and cell division genes, including genes required for Z-ring function, were greatly attenuated in NCR-treated cells. In addition, our experiments identified important symbiosis functions and stress responses that are induced by sublethal levels of NCR peptides and other antimicrobial peptides. Several of these stress-response pathways also are found in related α-proteobacterial pathogens and might be used by S. meliloti to sense host cues during infection. Our data suggest a model in which, in addition to provoking stress responses, NCR peptides target intracellular regulatory pathways to drive S. meliloti endoreduplication and differentiation during symbiosis.

  1. Effect of variations in peptide sequence on anti-human milk fat globule membrane antibody reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, P X; Reynolds, K; Pietersz, G A; McKenzie, I F

    1991-02-01

    Monoclonal anti-mucine antibodies BC1, BC2 and BC3 produced using human milk fat globule membrane react with a synthetic peptide p1-24 (PDTRPAPGSTAPPAHGVTSAPDTR) representing the repeating amino acid sequence of the mucin core protein. The minimum epitope recognized by these three monoclonal antibodies (mAb) in p1-24 was contained in the five amino acids APDTR. To analyse the variation of position of the epitope, various modifications of the APDTR sequence were made by synthesizing peptides and testing by direct binding and inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Firstly, peptides p13-32 and C-p13-32, in which the epitope APDTR was placed in the middle instead of the C-terminal as in p1-24, were examined. These peptides had a greater reaction with mAb BC1, BC2 and BC3 compared with the reaction with p1-24. Secondly, A-p1-24 and TSA-p1-24 were made wherein two APDTR epitopes were present--these peptides were shown to bind two IgG antibody molecules. Finally, the contribution of each amino acid in the APDTR epitope was studied using the pepscan polyethylene rods, making all 20 of the amino acid substitutions in each position for SAPDTR (the minimum epitope APDTR with an adjacent amino acid S). In the 120 peptides examined there were some 'permissible' substitutions in A, D and T but not in P or R for BC1 and BC2; there were more 'permissible' substitutions for BC3; different substitution patterns were found with each antibody and some substitutions gave an increased reaction compared with the native peptide SAPDTR. The studies are of value in analysing the reaction of antibodies with epitopes expressed in breast cancer and in determining the antigenicity of synthetic peptides.

  2. Producing superhydrophobic roof tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrascosa, Luis A. M.; Facio, Dario S.; Mosquera, Maria J.

    2016-03-01

    Superhydrophobic materials can find promising applications in the field of building. However, their application has been very limited because the synthesis routes involve tedious processes, preventing large-scale application. A second drawback is related to their short-term life under outdoor conditions. A simple and low-cost synthesis route for producing superhydrophobic surfaces on building materials is developed and their effectiveness and their durability on clay roof tiles are evaluated. Specifically, an organic-inorganic hybrid gel containing silica nanoparticles is produced. The nanoparticles create a densely packed coating on the roof tile surface in which air is trapped. This roughness produces a Cassie-Baxter regime, promoting superhydrophobicity. A surfactant, n-octylamine, was also added to the starting sol to catalyze the sol-gel process and to coarsen the pore structure of the gel network, preventing cracking. The application of ultrasound obviates the need to use volatile organic compounds in the synthesis, thereby making a ‘green’ product. It was also demonstrated that a co-condensation process effective between the organic and inorganic species is crucial to obtain durable and effective coatings. After an aging test, high hydrophobicity was maintained and water absorption was completely prevented for the roof tile samples under study. However, a transition from a Cassie-Baxter to a Wenzel state regime was observed as a consequence of the increase in the distance between the roughness pitches produced by the aging of the coating.

  3. Producing CD-ROMs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyams, Peter, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This issue presents 11 articles that address issues relating to the production of CD-ROMs. Highlights include current uses of CD-ROM; standards; steps involved in producing CD-ROMs, including data capture, conversion, and tagging, product design, and indexing; authoring; selecting indexing and retrieval software; costs; multimedia CD-ROMs; and…

  4. Tea-Producer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    CHEN Shuiyue is a tea producer in Shengzhou, Zhejiang Province, the biggest tea production and export base in China. One day last September, accompanied by two staff members from the local women’s federation, I visited Chen Shuiyue’s holne. Traveling along a bumpy road, we arrived at Yingguiyan Village, in Chongren County,

  5. Untapped Resources: Biotechnological Potential of Peptides and Secondary Metabolites in Archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlesworth, James C.; Burns, Brendan P.

    2015-01-01

    Archaea are an understudied domain of life often found in “extreme” environments in terms of temperature, salinity, and a range of other factors. Archaeal proteins, such as a wide range of enzymes, have adapted to function under these extreme conditions, providing biotechnology with interesting activities to exploit. In addition to producing structural and enzymatic proteins, archaea also produce a range of small peptide molecules (such as archaeocins) and other novel secondary metabolites such as those putatively involved in cell communication (acyl homoserine lactones), which can be exploited for biotechnological purposes. Due to the wide array of metabolites produced there is a great deal of biotechnological potential from antimicrobials such as diketopiperazines and archaeocins, as well as roles in the cosmetics and food industry. In this review we will discuss the diversity of small molecules, both peptide and nonpeptide, produced by archaea and their potential biotechnological applications. PMID:26504428

  6. Encapsulation of Enzymes and Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesters, Gabrie M. H.

    A large part of formulated peptides and proteins, e.g., enzymes used as food ingredients, are formulated in a liquid form. Often, they are dissolved in water to which glycerol or sorbitol is added to reduce the water activity of the liquid, thus reducing the change of microbial growth. Still, there are reasons to formulate them in a solid form. Often, these reasons are stability, since a dry formulation is often much better than liquid formulations, and less transportation cost, since less mass is transported if one gets rid of the liquid; however, most of the times, the reason is that the product is mixed with a solid powder. Here, a liquid addition would lead to lump formation.

  7. Antimicrobial peptides of multicellular organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasloff, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Multicellular organisms live, by and large, harmoniously with microbes. The cornea of the eye of an animal is almost always free of signs of infection. The insect flourishes without lymphocytes or antibodies. A plant seed germinates successfully in the midst of soil microbes. How is this accomplished? Both animals and plants possess potent, broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptides, which they use to fend off a wide range of microbes, including bacteria, fungi, viruses and protozoa. What sorts of molecules are they? How are they employed by animals in their defence? As our need for new antibiotics becomes more pressing, could we design anti-infective drugs based on the design principles these molecules teach us?

  8. Calcitonin gene-related peptide expression is altered in pulmonary neuroendocrine cells in developing lungs of rats with congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. IJsselstijn (Hanneke); N. Hung; J.C. de Jongste (Johan); D. Tibboel (Dick); E. Cutz

    1998-01-01

    textabstractCongenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is associated with high neonatal mortality from lung hypoplasia and persistent pulmonary hypertension. Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNEC) produce calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a potent vasodilator. We previo

  9. A Peptide/MHCII conformer generated in the presence of exchange peptide is substrate for HLA-DM editing

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Ferrante; Jack Gorski

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of HLA-DM (DM) activity is still unclear. We have shown that DM-mediated peptide release from HLA-DR (DR) is dependent on the presence of exchange peptide. However, DM also promotes a small amount of peptide release in the absence of exchange peptide. Here we show that SDS-PAGE separates purified peptide/DR1 complexes (pDR1) into two conformers whose ratio is peptide K d-dependent. In the absence of exchange peptide, DM only releases peptide from the slower migrating conformer. ...

  10. Peptide synthesis in aqueous environments: the role of extreme conditions and pyrite mineral surfaces on formation and hydrolysis of peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, Eduard; Nair, Nisanth N; Wittekindt, Carsten; Marx, Dominik

    2011-06-01

    A comprehensive study of free energy landscapes and mechanisms of COS-mediated polymerization of glycine via N-carboxy anhydrides (NCAs, "Leuchs anhydrides") and peptide hydrolysis at the water-pyrite interface at extreme thermodynamic conditions is presented. Particular emphasis is set on the catalytic effects of the mineral surface including the putative role of the ubiquitous sulfur vacancy defects. It is found that the mere presence of a surface is able to change the free energetics of the elementary reaction steps. This effect can be understood in terms of a reduction of entropic contributions to the reactant state by immobilizing the reactants and/or screening them from bulk water in a purely geometric ("steric") sense. Additionally, the pyrite directly participates chemically in some of the reaction steps, thus changing the reaction mechanism qualitatively compared to the situation in bulk water. First, the adsorption of reactants on the surface can preform a product-like structure due to immobilizing and scaffolding them appropriately. Second, pyrite can act as a proton acceptor, thus replacing water in this role. Third, sulfur vacancies are found to increase the reactivity of the surface. The finding that the presence of pyrite speeds up the rate-determining step in the formation of peptides with respect to the situation in bulk solvent while stabilizing the produced peptide against hydrolysis is of particular interest to the hypothesis of prebiotic peptide formation at hydrothermal aqueous conditions. Apart from these implications, the generality of the studied organic reactions are of immediate relevance to many fields such as (bio)geochemistry, biomineralization, and environmental chemistry.

  11. Construction of a single polypeptide that matures and exports the lasso peptide microcin J25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Si Jia; Rajniak, Jakub; Cheung, Wai Ling; Link, A James

    2012-02-13

    Roped in: The lasso peptide microcin J25 (MccJ25) is matured by two enzymes and is exported by a putative ABC transporter. We probed the function of the maturation enzymes using mutagenesis. We demonstrate that fusions of the enzymes with intervening linkers can produce MccJ25. Even a 151 kDa tripartite fusion between the ABC transporter and the two enzymes is capable of producing and exporting MccJ25.

  12. Identification of a novel skin penetration enhancement peptide by phage display peptide library screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunny; Sahdev, Preety; Perumal, Omathanu; Tummala, Hemachand

    2012-05-07

    Skin is an important site for local or systemic application of drugs. However, a majority of drugs have poor permeability through the skin's topmost layer, stratum corneum (SC). The aim of this study was to identify safe and smaller peptides that could enhance the skin penetration of drug molecules. By screening phage display peptide library, we have identified a T2 peptide (LVGVFH), which enhanced the penetration of bacteriophages (~800 nm long bacterial viruses) across porcine and mouse skin. Pretreating the skin with synthetic T2 peptide at pH 4.5 resulted in significant penetration enhancement of hydrophilic drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) across skin. FTIR spectroscopy showed that the T2 peptide interacted with skin lipids to enhance the skin penetration. Pretreating the skin with T2 peptide enhanced the partitioning of small molecules with different lipophilicities (5-FU, fluorescein isothiocyanate, and rhodamine 123 hydrochloride) into skin. Fluorescence studies showed that T2 peptide enhanced the diffusion of these molecules into intercellular lipids of SC and thus enhanced the penetration into the skin. Histidine at the c-terminus of T2 peptide was identified to be critical for the skin penetration enhancement. T2 peptide interacted with skin lipids to cause skin penetration enhancement. The study identified a novel, safe, and noninvasive peptide to improve the skin penetration of drugs without chemical conjugation.

  13. Interactions of Bio-Inspired Membranes with Peptides and Peptide-Mimetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Sebastiano

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Via Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD and implicit solvent coarse-grained (CG Molecular Dynamics (MD we examine the interaction of an amphiphilic cell-penetrating peptide PMLKE and its synthetic counterpart with a bio-inspired membrane. We use the DPD technique to investigate the interaction of peptide-mimetic nanoparticles, or nanopins, with a three-component membrane. The CG MD approach is used to investigate the interaction of a cell-penetrating peptide PMLKE with single-component membrane. We observe the spontaneous binding and subsequent insertion of peptide and nanopin in the membrane by using CG MD and DPD approaches, respectively. In addition, we find that the insertion of peptide and nanopins is mainly driven by the favorable enthalpic interactions between the hydrophobic components of the peptide, or nanopin, and the membrane. Our study provides insights into the mechanism underlying the interactions of amphiphilic peptide and peptide-mimetic nanoparticles with a membrane. The result of this study can be used to guide the functional integration of peptide and peptide-mimetic nanoparticles with a cell membrane.

  14. Analysis of the endogenous peptide profile of milk: identification of 248 mainly casein-derived peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Florian; Fedorova, Maria; Ebner, Jennifer; Hoffmann, Ralf; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2013-12-06

    Milk is an excellent source of bioactive peptides. However, the composition of the native milk peptidome has only been partially elucidated. The present study applied matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) directly or after prefractionation of the milk peptides by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) or OFFGEL fractionation for the comprehensive analysis of the peptide profile of raw milk. The peptide sequences were determined by MALDI-TOF/TOF or nano-ultra-performance liquid chromatography-nanoelectrospray ionization-LTQ-Orbitrap-MS. Direct MALDI-TOF-MS analysis led to the assignment of 57 peptides. Prefractionation by both complementary methods led to the assignment of another 191 peptides. Most peptides originate from α(S1)-casein, followed by β-casein, and α(S2)-casein. κ-Casein and whey proteins seem to play only a minor role as peptide precursors. The formation of many, but not all, peptides could be explained by the activity of the endogenous peptidases, plasmin or cathepsin D, B, and G. Database searches revealed the presence of 22 peptides with established physiological function, including those with angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitory, immunomodulating, or antimicrobial activity.

  15. Identification of peptides that selectively bind to myoglobin by biopanning of phage displayed-peptide library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanaban, Guruprasath; Park, Hyekyung; Choi, Ji Suk; Cho, Yong-Woo; Kang, Woong Chol; Moon, Chan-Il; Kim, In-San; Lee, Byung-Heon

    2014-10-10

    Biopanning of phage displayed-peptide library was performed against myoglobin, a marker for the early assessment of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), to identify peptides that selectively bind to myoglobin. Using myoglobin-conjugated magnetic beads, phages that bound to myoglobin were collected and amplified for the next round of screening. A 148-fold enrichment of phage titer was observed after five rounds of screening relative to the first round. After phage binding ELISA, three phage clones were selected (3R1, 3R7 and 3R10) and the inserted peptides were chemically synthesized. The analysis of binding affinity showed that the 3R7 (CPSTLGASC) peptide had higher binding affinity (Kd=57 nM) than did the 3R1 (CNLSSSWIC) and 3R10 (CVPRLSAPC) peptide (Kd=125 nM and 293 nM, respectively). Cross binding activity to other proteins, such as bovine serum albumin, troponin I, and creatine kinase-MB, was minimal. In a peptide-antibody sandwich ELISA, the selected peptides efficiently captured myoglobin. Moreover, the concentrations of myoglobin in serum samples measured by a peptide-peptide sandwich assay were comparable to those measured by a commercial antibody-based kit. These results indicate that the identified peptides can be used for the detection of myoglobin and may be a cost effective alternative to antibodies.

  16. The novel amyloid-beta peptide aptamer inhibits intracellular amyloid-beta peptide toxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Wang; Yi Yang; Mingyue Jia; Chi Ma; Mingyu Wang; Lihe Che; Yu Yang; Jiang Wu

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid β peptide binding alcohol dehydrogenase (ABAD) decoy peptide (DP) can competitively antagonize binding of amyloid β peptide to ABAD and inhibit the cytotoxic effects of amyloid β peptide. Based on peptide aptamers, the present study inserted ABAD-DP into the disulfide bond of human thioredoxin (TRX) using molecular cloning technique to construct a fusion gene that can express the TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 aptamer. Moreover, adeno-associated virus was used to allow its stable expression. Immunofluorescent staining revealed the co-expression of the transduced fusion gene TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 and amyloid β peptide in NIH-3T3 cells, indicating that the TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 aptamer can bind amyloid β peptide within cells. In addition, cell morphology and MTT results suggested that TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 attenuated amyloid β peptide-induced SH-SY5Y cell injury and improved cell viability. These findings confirmed the possibility of constructing TRX-based peptide aptamer using ABAD-DP. Moreover, TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 inhibited the cytotoxic effect of amyloid β peptide.

  17. Producing Civil Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt, Liv Egholm; Hein Jessen, Mathias

    of the century. 2, the laws and strategies of implementing regarding the regulation of civil societal institutions (folkeoplysningsloven) since the 1970’s this paper shows how civil society in 20th century Denmark was produced both conceptually and practically and how this entailed a specific vision and version......Since the beginning of the 1990’s, civil society has attracted both scholarly and political interest as the ‘third sphere’ outside the state and the market not only a normatively privileged site of communication and ‘the public sphere’, but also as a resource for democratization processes......’ and as such dominates our way of thinking about civil society. Yet, this view hinders the understanding of how civil society is not a pre-existing or given sphere, but a sphere which is constantly produced both discursively, conceptually and practically. Through two examples; 1,the case of philanthropy in the beginning...

  18. Comprehensive peptidomic and glycomic evaluation reveals that sweet whey permeate from colostrum is a source of milk protein-derived peptides and oligosaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallas, David C.; Weinborn, Valerie; de Moura Bell, Juliana M.L.N.; Wang, Meng; Parker, Evan A.; Guerrero, Andres; Hettinga, Kasper A.; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; German, J. Bruce; Barile, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Whey permeate is a co-product obtained when cheese whey is passed through an ultrafiltration membrane to concentrate whey proteins. Whey proteins are retained by the membrane, whereas the low-molecular weight compounds such as lactose, salts, oligosaccharides and peptides pass through the membrane yielding whey permeate. Research shows that bovine milk from healthy cows contains hundreds of naturally occurring peptides – many of which are homologous with known antimicrobial and immunomodulatory peptides – and nearly 50 oligosaccharide compositions (not including structural isomers). As these endogenous peptides and oligosaccharides have low-molecular weight and whey permeate is currently an under-utilized product stream of the dairy industry, we hypothesized that whey permeate may serve as an inexpensive source of naturally occurring functional peptides and oligosaccharides. Laboratory fractionation of endogenous peptides and oligosaccharides from bovine colostrum sweet whey was expanded to pilot-scale. The membrane fractionation methodology used was similar to the methods commonly used industrially to produce whey protein concentrate and whey permeate. Pilot-scale fractionation was compared to laboratory-scale fractionation with regard to the identified peptides and oligosaccharide compositions. Results were interpreted on the basis of whether industrial whey permeate could eventually serve as a source of functional peptides and oligosaccharides. The majority (96%) of peptide sequences and the majority (96%) of oligosaccharide compositions found in the laboratory-scale process were mirrored in the pilot-scale process. Moreover, the pilot-scale process recovered an additional 33 peptides and 1 oligosaccharide not identified from the laboratory-scale extraction. Both laboratory- and pilot-scale processes yielded peptides deriving primarily from the protein β-casein. The similarity of the laboratory-and pilot-scale's resulting peptide and oligosaccharide

  19. Comprehensive peptidomic and glycomic evaluation reveals that sweet whey permeate from colostrum is a source of milk protein-derived peptides and oligosaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallas, David C; Weinborn, Valerie; de Moura Bell, Juliana M L N; Wang, Meng; Parker, Evan A; Guerrero, Andres; Hettinga, Kasper A; Lebrilla, Carlito B; German, J Bruce; Barile, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    Whey permeate is a co-product obtained when cheese whey is passed through an ultrafiltration membrane to concentrate whey proteins. Whey proteins are retained by the membrane, whereas the low-molecular weight compounds such as lactose, salts, oligosaccharides and peptides pass through the membrane yielding whey permeate. Research shows that bovine milk from healthy cows contains hundreds of naturally occurring peptides - many of which are homologous with known antimicrobial and immunomodulatory peptides - and nearly 50 oligosaccharide compositions (not including structural isomers). As these endogenous peptides and oligosaccharides have low-molecular weight and whey permeate is currently an under-utilized product stream of the dairy industry, we hypothesized that whey permeate may serve as an inexpensive source of naturally occurring functional peptides and oligosaccharides. Laboratory fractionation of endogenous peptides and oligosaccharides from bovine colostrum sweet whey was expanded to pilot-scale. The membrane fractionation methodology used was similar to the methods commonly used industrially to produce whey protein concentrate and whey permeate. Pilot-scale fractionation was compared to laboratory-scale fractionation with regard to the identified peptides and oligosaccharide compositions. Results were interpreted on the basis of whether industrial whey permeate could eventually serve as a source of functional peptides and oligosaccharides. The majority (96%) of peptide sequences and the majority (96%) of oligosaccharide compositions found in the laboratory-scale process were mirrored in the pilot-scale process. Moreover, the pilot-scale process recovered an additional 33 peptides and 1 oligosaccharide not identified from the laboratory-scale extraction. Both laboratory- and pilot-scale processes yielded peptides deriving primarily from the protein β-casein. The similarity of the laboratory-and pilot-scale's resulting peptide and oligosaccharide profiles

  20. Conus Peptides A Rich Pharmaceutical Treasure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Zhong WANG; Cheng-Wu CHI

    2004-01-01

    Marine predatory cone snails (genus Conus) with over 500 species represent what is arguably the largest single genus of marine animals alive today. All Conus are venomous and utilize a complex mixture of Conus peptides to capture their preys and for other biological purposes. Each component of Conus peptides selectively targets a specific subtype of ion channels, neurotransmitter receptors or transporters.Owing to their diversity, more than 50,000 distinct active peptides are theoretically estimated in Conus venoms. These diversified toxins are generally categorized into several superfamilies and/or families based on their characteristic arrangements of cysteine residues and pharmacological actions. Some mechanisms underlying the remarkable diversity of Conus peptides have been postulated: the distinctive gene structure, gene duplication and/or allelic selection, genus speciation, and sophisticated expression pattern and posttranslational modification of these peptides. Due to their highly pharmacological potency and target selectivity, Conus peptides have attracted extensive attention with their potentials to be developed as new research tools in neuroscience field and as novel medications in clinic for pain, epilepsy and other neuropathic disorders. Several instructive lessons for our drug development could be also learnt from these neuropharmacological "expertises". Conus peptides comprise a rich resource for neuropharmacologists, and most of them await to be explored.