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Sample records for bacteriocin-like immunity protein

  1. The structure of pyogenecin immunity protein, a novel bacteriocin-like immunity protein from streptococcus pyogenes.

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    Chang, C.; Coggill, P.; Bateman, A.; Finn, R.; Cymborowski, M.; Otwinowski, Z.; Minor, W.; Volkart, L.; Joachimiak, A.; Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst.; Univ. of Virginia; UT Southwestern Medical Center

    2009-12-17

    Many Gram-positive lactic acid bacteria (LAB) produce anti-bacterial peptides and small proteins called bacteriocins, which enable them to compete against other bacteria in the environment. These peptides fall structurally into three different classes, I, II, III, with class IIa being pediocin-like single entities and class IIb being two-peptide bacteriocins. Self-protective cognate immunity proteins are usually co-transcribed with these toxins. Several examples of cognates for IIa have already been solved structurally. Streptococcus pyogenes, closely related to LAB, is one of the most common human pathogens, so knowledge of how it competes against other LAB species is likely to prove invaluable. We have solved the crystal structure of the gene-product of locus Spy-2152 from S. pyogenes, (PDB: 2fu2), and found it to comprise an anti-parallel four-helix bundle that is structurally similar to other bacteriocin immunity proteins. Sequence analyses indicate this protein to be a possible immunity protein protective against class IIa or IIb bacteriocins. However, given that S. pyogenes appears to lack any IIa pediocin-like proteins but does possess class IIb bacteriocins, we suggest this protein confers immunity to IIb-like peptides. Combined structural, genomic and proteomic analyses have allowed the identification and in silico characterization of a new putative immunity protein from S. pyogenes, possibly the first structure of an immunity protein protective against potential class IIb two-peptide bacteriocins. We have named the two pairs of putative bacteriocins found in S. pyogenes pyogenecin 1, 2, 3 and 4.

  2. Description of two Enterococcus strains isolated from traditional Peruvian artisanal-produced cheeses with a bacteriocin-like inhibitory activity

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    Aguilar Galvez A.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to isolate and to characterize strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB with bacteriocin-like inhibitory activity from 27 traditional cheeses artisanal-produced obtained from different Peruvian regions. Twenty Gram+ and catalasenegative strains among 2,277 isolates exhibited bacteriocin-like inhibitory activity against Listeria monocytogenes CWBIB2232 as target strain. No change in inhibitory activity was observed after organic acid neutralization and treatment with catalase of the cell-free supernatant (CFS. The proteinic nature of the antimicrobial activity was confirmed for the twenty LAB strains by proteolytic digestion of the CFS. Two strains, CWBI-B1431 and CWBI-B1430, with the best antimicrobial activity were selected for further researches. These strains were taxonomically identified by phenotypic and genotypic analyses as Enterococcus mundtii (CWBI-B1431 and Enterococcus faecium (CWBI-B1430. The two strains were sensitive to vancomycin (MIC 2 μg.ml-1 and showed absence of haemolysis.

  3. Characterization of a bacteriocin-like substance produced from a novel isolated strain of Bacillus subtilis SLYY-3

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    Li, Junfeng; Li, Hongfang; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Duan, Xiaohui; Liu, Jie

    2014-12-01

    In the present research, the strain SLYY-3 was isolated from sediments of Jiaozhou Bay, Qingdao, China. The strain SLYY-3, which produced a bacteriocin-like substance (BLS), was characterized to be a strain of Bacillus subtillis by biochemical profiling and 16S rDNA sequence analysis. It is the first time to report that Bacillus subtilis from Jiaozhou Bay sediments could produce a BLS. The BLS of B. subtillis SLYY-3 exhibited strong inhibitory activity against gram-positive bacteria (including Staphylococcus aureus and B. subtillis) and some fungi (including Penicillium glaucum, Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus). The antimicrobial activity was detected from culture in the exponential growth phase and reached its maximum when culture entered into stationary growth phase. It was thermo-tolerant even when being kept at 100°C for 60 min without losing any activity and stable over a wide pH range from 1.0 to 12.0 while being inactivated by proteolytic enzyme and trypsin, indicating the proteinaceous nature of the BLS. The BLS was purified by precipitation with hydrochloric acid (HCl) and gel filteration (Sephadex G-100). SDS-PAGE analysis of the extracellular peptides of SLYY-3 revealed a bacteriocin-like protein with a molecular mass of 66 kDa. Altogether, these characteristics indicate the potential of the BLS for food industry as a protection against pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms.

  4. Diverse Ecological Strategies Are Encoded by Streptococcus pneumoniae Bacteriocin-Like Peptides.

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    Miller, Eric L; Abrudan, Monica I; Roberts, Ian S; Rozen, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is commonly carried asymptomatically in the human nasopharynx. Due to high rates of cocolonization with other pneumococcus strains, intraspecific competitive interactions partly determine the carriage duration of strains and thereby their potential to cause disease. These interactions may be mediated by bacteriocins, such as the type IIb bacteriocins encoded by the blp (bacteriocin-like peptide) locus. To understand blp diversity and evolution, we undertook a bioinformatic analysis of 4,418 pneumococcal genomes, including 168 newly sequenced genomes. We describe immense variation at all levels of genomic organization: Gene presence/absence, gene order, and allelic diversity. If we make the extreme and naive hypothesis that assumes all genes in this operon can assort randomly, this variation could lead to 10(15) distinct bacteriocin-related phenotypes, each potentially representing a unique ecological strategy; however, we provide several explanations for why this extreme is not realized. Although rarefaction analysis indicates that the number of unique strategies is not saturated, even after sampling thousands of genomes, we show that the variation is neither unbounded nor random. We delimit three bacteriocin groups, which contain group-specific bacteriocins, immunity genes, and blp operon gene order, and argue that this organization places a constraint on realized ecological strategies. We additionally show that ecological strategy diversity is significantly constrained by pneumococcal phylogeny and clonal structure. By examining patterns of association between alleles within the blp operon, we show that bacteriocin genes, which were believed to function in pairs, can be found with a broad diversity of partner alleles and immunity genes; this overall lack of allelic fidelity likely contributes to the fluid structure of this operon. Our results clarify the diversity of antagonistic ecological strategies in the

  5. Production of bacteriocin-like substances by lactic acid bacteria isolated from regional ovine cheese

    OpenAIRE

    Cássia Regina Nespolo; Adriano Brandelli

    2010-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from ovine milk and cheeses manufactured in the South Region of Brazil. Among 112 bacterial isolates investigated, 59 were chosen through a screening for LAB. Among these 59 strains of LAB, 21% showed antimicrobial, proteolytic and lipolytic activities. Based on this screening, Lactobacillus plantarum LCN 17 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus LCN 43 were selected and tested for the production of bacteriocin-like substances (BLS). The BLS produced by both isol...

  6. PRELIMINARY DETECTION OF BACTERIOCIN-LIKE INHIBITORY SUBSTANCES PRODUCED BY ENTEROCOCCUS SPECIESISOLATED FROM DIFFERENT SOURCES

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    Snehal P Nemade and M Musaddiq

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Some lactic acid bacteria and particularly species belonging to the genus Enetrococcus are known to produce bacteriocin like inhibitory substance (BLIS. Usually they are small cationic peptide with bactericidal activity. The antimicrobial peptide produced by bacteria that deserve considerable interest for their use as natural and non-toxic food preservatives. The use of bacteriocin is among the new approaches as it has major potential in preservatives. Broad spectrum activities against prominent pathogens make it an issue of medical interest. The ability to produce such a biocompound may play role in providing an ecological advantage on non-bacteriocin producer species. 34 strains of Enterococci were isolated from different sources. These strains were identified to species: E. faecalis and E. faecium. Direct antimicrobial activity against indicator strain S. aureus was detected in 34 of the tested isolates. From these, only 7 displayed strong inhibitory activity against this indicator strain. The antimicrobial activity was altered after treatment with trypsin, α-chymotrypsin, papain which confirms the proteinaceous nature of the inhibition. This fact suggests that bacteriocin-like substance produced by Enterococcus strains may find application as biopreservatives in food products. Hence, the focus here is put on bacteriocin like substance screened by Enterococcus species isolated from different sources

  7. Inhibition of propionibacterium acnes by bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLIS) produced by Streptococcus salivarius.

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    Bowe, Whitney P; Filip, Jennifer C; DiRienzo, Joseph M; Volgina, Alla; Margolis, David J

    2006-10-01

    We report the in vitro inhibition of Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) by a bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance (BLIS-like substance) produced by Streptococcus salivarius (S. salivarius). Bacteriocins are proteinaceous substances produced by bacteria that are capable of inhibiting the growth of similar bacterial strains. Unlike classical antibiotics, they have a relatively narrow spectrum of killing activity, resulting in a reduction in the intensity of selection for resistance. These findings suggest that BLIS may potentially be used for its anti-P. acnes activity in the treatment of acne. PMID:17039652

  8. In vitro evaluation of bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances produced by lactic acid bacteria isolated during traditional Sicilian cheese making

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    Giusi Macaluso

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriocins are antimicrobial proteins produced by bacteria that inhibit the growth of other bacteria with a bactericidal or bacteriostatic mode of action. Many lactic acid bacteria (LAB produce a high diversity of different bacteriocins. Bacteriocinogenic LAB are generally recognised as safe (GRAS and useful to control the frequent development of pathogens and spoilage microorganisms. For this reason they are commonly used as starter cultures in food fermentations. In this study, the authors describe the results of a screening on 699 LAB isolated from wooden vat surfaces, raw milk and traditional Sicilian cheeses, for the production of bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances, by comparing two alternative methods. The antagonistic activity of LAB and its proteinaceous nature were evaluated using the spot-on-the-lawn and the well-diffusion assay (WDA and the sensitivity to proteolytic (proteinase K, protease B and trypsin, amylolytic (α-amylase and lipolytic (lipase enzymes. The indicator strains used were: Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella enteritidis. A total of 223 strains (belonging to the species Enterococcus spp., Lactobacillus spp., Pediococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., Leuconostoc spp. and Lactococcus lactis were found to inhibit the growth of Listeria monocytogenes by using the spot-on-the-lawn method; only 37 of these were confirmed by using the WDA. The direct addition of bacteriocin-producing cultures into dairy products can be a more practical and economic option for the improvement of the safety and quality of the final product.

  9. Production of bacteriocin-like substances by lactic acid bacteria isolated from regional ovine cheese

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    Cássia Regina Nespolo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB were isolated from ovine milk and cheeses manufactured in the South Region of Brazil. Among 112 bacterial isolates investigated, 59 were chosen through a screening for LAB. Among these 59 strains of LAB, 21% showed antimicrobial, proteolytic and lipolytic activities. Based on this screening, Lactobacillus plantarum LCN 17 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus LCN 43 were selected and tested for the production of bacteriocin-like substances (BLS. The BLS produced by both isolates showed antimicrobial activity against Listeria monocytogenes, whereas that produced by L. plantarum LCN 17 presented higher stability to different temperature, pH and enzyme treatments. These strains present potential for production of BLS, and for use as starter cultures.

  10. Antibacterial activity of bacteriocin-like substance P34 on Listeria monocytogenes in chicken sausage

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    Voltaire Sant'Anna

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of the bacteriocin-like substance (BLS P34 against Listeria monocytogenes was investigated in chicken sausage. The BLS was applied to chicken sausages (256 AU g-1 previously inoculated with a suspension of 10² cfu g-1 of L. monocytogenes. BLS P34 inhibited the indicator microorganism in situ in all incubation times for up to 10 days at 5 °C. The effectiveness of BLS P34 was increased when it was added in combination with nisin. The bacteriocin was also tested in natural eatable natural bovine wrapping (salty semi-dried tripe against the same indicator microorganism, also showing inhibitory capability in vitro. BLS P34 showed potential to control L. monocytogenes in refrigerated meat products.

  11. Identification of a new Bacillus licheniformis strain producing a bacteriocin-like substance.

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    Guo, Yaoqi; Yu, Zhanqiao; Xie, Jianhua; Zhang, Rijun

    2012-06-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance has spurred a great number of studies for development of new antimicrobials in the past decade. The purpose of this study was to screen environmental samples for Bacillus strains producing potent antimicrobial agents. A new strain, which showed strong antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella enterica ser. Pullorum, was isolated from soil and designated as B116. This new isolate was identified as Bacillus licheniformis by morphological, biochemical and genetic analyses. The production of bacteriocin-like substance (BLS) started at early exponential phase and achieved highest level at early stationary phase. The BLS was precipitated by ammonium sulfate and its molecular mass was determined as ∼4 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Culture supernatant of the new isolate exhibited antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Micrococcus luteus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella spp. The BLS was resistant to heat, acid and alkaline treatment. Activity of the BLS was totally lost after digestion by pronase and partially lost after digestion by papain and lipase. The new isolate and relevant BLS are potentially useful in food and feed applications. PMID:22752909

  12. Purification and characterization of bacteriocin like substance produced from bacillus lentus with perspective of a new biopreservative for food preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular weight of bacteriocin like substance (BLIS) of a new strain of Bacillus lentus 121 was found to be approximately 11 kDa. Purification of BLIS was attained by single step gel exclusion chromatography. BLIS was characterized by studying the inhibitory spectrum. It was active at broad pH range, high temperature and high NaCl concentration and showed sensitivity to proteolytic enzymes like trypsin, alpha-chymotrypsin and papain, the characters desirable for food preservation. BLIS extended the shelf stability of milk upto 21 days as a biopreservative. (author)

  13. POTENTIAL IN VITRO ANTI-HELICOBACTER ACTIVITY OF BACTERIOCIN AND BACTERIOCIN-LIKE COMPOUNDS PRODUCED BY LACTOBACILLI

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    Mohammed A. Ramadan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The study was designed for screening of the potential activity of lactic acid bacteria against Helicobacter pylori and other enteropathogenic organisms. A total of 40 samples including natural cow milk and fresh infant stools were tested for the presence of lactic acid bacteria. Of these samples, 73 lactic acid bacterial isolates were recovered on MRS agar medium using the streak-plate method. Isolates inducing probiotic effect were tested under microaerophilic conditions against standard cultures of H. pylori, Esherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis. The data obtained showed that five isolates of lactic acid bacteria were able to produce bacteriocin or bacteriocin-like compounds. Sequencing of 16S rRNA gene revealed that five isolates belonged to Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus plantarum in addition to other lactic acid bacteria. The most effective isolate (LAB1 showed a marked large inhibition zone against H. pylori. The bacteriocin or bacteriocin like compound(s produced by lactobacilli were further analyzed and characterized. We can conclude that probiotics might be useful in the prophylaxis or as co-therapy for treatment of H. pylori infections.

  14. The streptococcal inhibitor of complement (SIC) protects Streptococcus pyogenes from bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance (BLIS) from Streptococcus salivarius.

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    Minami, Masaaki; Ohmori, Daisuke; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Isaka, Masanori; Kawamura, Yoshiaki; Ohta, Michio; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2009-09-01

    Streptococcus salivarius inhibits the growth of Streptococcus pyogenes in vitro. Streptococcus pyogenes has various virulence factors, including the streptococcus inhibitor of complement (SIC). Although SIC inhibits the activity of the peptides LL-37 and NAP1, the relationship between SIC and the bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance (BLIS) has not been elucidated. Here, we evaluated whether S. salivarius BLIS affects S. pyogenes SIC. We created three deltasic mutant strains from three S. pyogenes strains and performed deferred antagonism assays. The test strains were BLIS-positive S. salivarius JCM5707 and BLIS-negative S. salivarius NCU12. Deferred antagonism assays with JCM5707 showed that the inhibitory zones in the three deltasic mutant strains were wider than those in the three wild-type strains. Streptococcus pyogenes was cultured in BLIS-containing broth and the change in SIC in the supernatant was assessed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). The 2-DE analysis of S. pyogenes exoproteins with the JCM5707 supernatant showed reduced SIC compared with those without the JCM5707 supernatant. Changes in sic mRNA levels affected by S. salivarius BLIS were evaluated by a reverse transcriptase-PCR. The sic mRNA level was affected more by the BLIS-positive S. salivarius than by the BLIS-negative strain. Our result indicates that SIC plays a role in the inhibition of S. salivarius BLIS. PMID:19594623

  15. Production and characterization of a bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance produced by indigenous soil associated pseudomonas putida mas-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacteriocins have been the subject of extensive research globally due to wide range applications. The aim of this research was to investigate the production of bacteriocin(s) or bacteriocin like inhibitory substance(s) by Pseudomonas putida MAS-1 strain. The bacteriocin produced (Putidacin MAS-1) was found bioactive against clinical Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis strains. Bioactivity was observed by stab and overlay assay and multiwell antagonistic activity assay. Putidacin MAS-1 was sensitive beyond 70 degree C but stable at wide pH range (3 to 8). Bioactivity of putidacin MAS-1 was lost after treatment with trypsin and protease while partially lost after Proteinase K treatment. Treatment with ethanol, methanol, chloroform, acetone Tween 20 and Tween 80 showed partial decrease in bioactivity. SDS had stimulatory effect on putidacin MAS-1 bioactivity. EDTA however, showed no effect on the bacteriocin bioactivity. It was partially purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation. SDS-PAGE showed that Putidacin MAS-1 had 15 kDa molecular weight. (author)

  16. Aqueous two-phase flotation for primary recovery of bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance (BLIS) from Pediococcus acidilactici Kp10.

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    Md Sidek, Nurul Lyana; Tan, Joo Shun; Abbasiliasi, Sahar; Wong, Fadzlie Wong Faizal; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Ariff, Arbakariya B

    2016-08-01

    An aqueous two-phase flotation (ATPF) system based on polyethylene glycol (PEG) and sodium citrate (NaNO3C6H5O7·2H2O) was considered for primary recovery of bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance (BLIS) from Pediococcus acidilactici Kp10. The effects of ATPF parameters namely phase composition, tie-line length (TLL), volume ratio between the two phases (VR), amount of crude load (CL), pH, nitrogen gas flow rate (FR) and flotation time (FT) on the performance of recovery were evaluated. BLIS was mainly concentrated into the upper PEG-rich phase in all systems tested so far. The optimum conditions for BLIS purification, which composed of PEG 8000/sodium citrate, were: TLL of 42.6, VR of 0.4, CL of 22% (w/w), pH 7, average FT of 30min and FR of 20mL/min. BLIS was partially purified up to 5.9-fold with a separation efficiency of 99% under this optimal conditions. A maximum yield of BLIS activity of about 70.3% was recovered in the PEG phase. The BLIS from the top phase was successfully recovered with a single band in SDS-gel with molecular weight of about 10-15kDa. ATPF was found to be an effective technique for the recovery of BLIS from the fermentation broth of P. acidilactici Kp10. PMID:27262666

  17. [Immune stimulative potency of milk proteins].

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    Ambroziak, Adam; Cichosz, Grazyna

    2014-02-01

    Milk proteins are characterized by the highest immune stimulative potency from among all the proteins present in human diet. Whey proteins and numerous growth factors that regulate insulin secretion, differentiation of intestine epithelium cells, and also tissue restoration, are priceless in stimulation the immune system. Lactoferrin shows the most comprehensive pro-health properties: antioxidative, anticancer, immune stimulative and even chemopreventive. Also peptides and amino acids formed from casein and whey proteins possess immune stimulative activity. The most valuable proteins, i.e. lactoferrin, immune globulins, lactoperoxidase and lisozyme, together with bioactive peptides, are resistant to pepsin and trypsin activity. This is why they maintain their exceptional biological activity within human organism. Properly high consumption of milk proteins conditions correct function of immune system, especially at children and elderly persons. PMID:24720113

  18. Isolation and identification of Enterococcus faecium from seafoods: antimicrobial resistance and production of bacteriocin-like substances.

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    Valenzuela, Antonio Sánchez; Benomar, Nabil; Abriouel, Hikmate; Cañamero, Magdalena Martínez; Gálvez, Antonio

    2010-10-01

    A collection of isolates from uncooked seafoods (molluscs, fish, and fish fillets) were identified as Enterococcus faecium species and studied in further detail. Isolates were clustered in well-defined genomic groups according to food origin after ERIC-PCR analysis. Four isolates (FR 1-2, FB 1-3-B, FB 3-1, FTA 1-2) decarboxylated lysine, ornithine, and tyrosine. Isolate FR 1-2 also decarboxylated histidine. Most isolates were sensitive to antibiotics of clinical use, but resistance was detected more frequently towards nitrofurantoin (50%), erythromycin (33.33%) or rifampicin (33.33%) to quinupristin/dalfopristin (12.5%). Resistance to beta-lactams or vancomycin was not detected. The enterococcal antigen A was the presumed virulence trait detected most frequently. None of isolates carried haemolysin/cytolysin genes. Twelve isolates produced anti-listerial activity. Among them, seven isolates also produced bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances against other enterococci, and one isolate was also able to inhibit Staphylococcus aureus. Three isolates only were active against Listeria monocytogenes, and two only were active against enterococci. One bacteriocinogenic isolate carried the enterocin A structural gene, but genes corresponding to other enterocins (EntB, EntP, EntQ, Ent1071, EntL50A/EntL50B, and Ent31) were not detected. Bacteriocin-producing enterococci lacking undesirable traits (such as antibiotic resistance or biogenic amine production) or their produced bacteriocins could be potential candidates to aid in preservation of seafoods and other food products as well. PMID:20688238

  19. Protein trafficking during plant innate immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Ming Wang; Peng-Qiang Liu; Yong-Ju Xu; Shunyuan Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Plants have evolved a sophisticated immune system to fight against pathogenic microbes. Upon detection of pathogen invasion by immune receptors, the immune system is turned on, resulting in production of antimicrobial molecules including pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. Conceivably, an efficient immune response depends on the capacity of the plant cell’s protein/membrane trafficking network to deploy the right defense-associated molecules in the right place at the right time. Recent research in this area shows that while the abundance of cell surface immune receptors is regulated by endocytosis, many intracellular immune receptors, when activated, are partitioned between the cytoplasm and the nucleus for induction of defense genes and activation of programmed cell death, respectively. Vesicle transport is an essential process for secretion of PR proteins to the apoplastic space and targeting of defense-related proteins to the plasma membrane or other endomembrane compartments. In this review, we discuss the various aspects of protein trafficking during plant immunity, with a focus on the immunity proteins on the move and the major compo-nents of the trafficking machineries engaged.

  20. In Vitro Detection And Characterization Of Bacteriocin-Like Inhibitory Activity Of Lactic Acid Bacteria (Lab) Isolated From Senegalese Local Food Products

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    Diop, Mb.; Dubois Dauphin, Robin; Dortu, C.; Destain, Jacqueline; Tine, E.; Thonart, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in Senegalese local food products was determined to be 109 CFU/g in millet flour and milk products, and 103 CFU/g in seafood products. These food products are generally preserved by spontaneous fermentation (without addition of starters). Of 220 lactic acid bacteria strains randomly selected from such products, 12 isolates capable of producing bacteriocin-like substances (bac+) were detected. Based on the use of API 50 CH test kits and 16S rDNA seq...

  1. Identification and partial characterization of a bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance (BLIS) from Lb. Bulgaricus K41 isolated from indigenous yogurts.

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    Zaeim, Davood; Soleimanian-Zad, Sabihe; Sheikh-Zeinoddin, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Forty-two strains of Lactobacillus bulgaricus isolated from locally made yogurts were examined and compared for bacteriocin producing ability using spot on lawn assay which improved by taking photo and image processing. Lb. bulgaricus K41 exhibited the highest inhibition level against indicators. K41 Bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance is sensitive to proteolytic enzymes (proteinase K, pepsin, and trypsin) but α-amylase makes slight reduction in its activity and it is resistant to lipase. This antibacterial peptide is extremely heat-stable (121 °C for 15 min) and remains active over a wide pH range (pH = 2 to 10); also nonionic detergents (Tween-20, Tween-80, and Triton X100) showed no effect on its activity. The inhibitory spectrum is against Gram-positive bacteria (except Staphylococcus aureus) with extremely antilisterial activity and it is almost ineffective against Gram-negative bacteria. The mode of its action was identified as bactericidal against Listeria monocytogenes. The properties of K41 bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance add to its safety as a biopreservative produced by a generally recognized as safe (GRAS) bacterium suggesting it can be used in hurdle technology for ready-to-eat foods as one of the main sources of Listeria contaminations. PMID:24279356

  2. Functional Classification of Immune Regulatory Proteins

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    Rubinstein, Rotem [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Ramagopal, Udupi A. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Nathenson, Stanley G. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Almo, Steven C. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Fiser, Andras [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Members of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) control innate and adaptive immunity and are prime targets for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases, and malignancies. We describe a computational method, termed the Brotherhood algorithm, which utilizes intermediate sequence information to classify proteins into functionally related families. This approach identifies functional relationships within the IgSF and predicts additional receptor-ligand interactions. As a specific example, we examine the nectin/nectin-like family of cell adhesion and signaling proteins and propose receptor-ligand interactions within this family. We were guided by the Brotherhood approach and present the high-resolution structural characterization of a homophilic interaction involving the class-I MHC-restricted T-cell-associated molecule, which we now classify as a nectin-like family member. The Brotherhood algorithm is likely to have a significant impact on structural immunology by identifying those proteins and complexes for which structural characterization will be particularly informative.

  3. In vivo protein synthesis determinations in human immune cells

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    Januszkiewicz, Anna

    2005-01-01

    Intact immune responses are essential for defeating severe infections in individual patients. Insufficient function of the immune system contributes to a poor prognosis in these patients, in particular the ICU patients. Nevertheless, the immune system function is not easily monitored and evaluated. The ongoing metabolic activity of immune competent cells is reflected by their in vivo protein synthesis rate. The aim of this thesis was to apply in vivo protein synthesis measur...

  4. The unfolded protein response in immunity and inflammation.

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    Grootjans, Joep; Kaser, Arthur; Kaufman, Randal J; Blumberg, Richard S

    2016-08-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a highly conserved pathway that allows the cell to manage endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress that is imposed by the secretory demands associated with environmental forces. In this role, the UPR has increasingly been shown to have crucial functions in immunity and inflammation. In this Review, we discuss the importance of the UPR in the development, differentiation, function and survival of immune cells in meeting the needs of an immune response. In addition, we review current insights into how the UPR is involved in complex chronic inflammatory diseases and, through its role in immune regulation, antitumour responses. PMID:27346803

  5. Inducible immune proteins in the dampwood termite Zootermopsis angusticollis

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    Rosengaus, Rebeca B.; Cornelisse, Tara; Guschanski, Katerina; Traniello, James F. A.

    2007-01-01

    Dampwood termites, Zootermopsis angusticollis (Isoptera: Termopsidae), mount an immune response to resist microbial infection. Here we report on results of a novel analysis that allowed us to electrophoretically assess changes in hemolymph proteins in the same individual before and after exposure to a pathogen. We demonstrate that contact with a sublethal concentration of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae (Deuteromycotina:Hypomycetes) induces the production of protective proteins in nymphs, pseudergates (false workers), and soldiers. Termites exposed to an immunizing dosage of fungal conidia consistently showed an enhancement of constitutive proteins (62-85 kDa) in the hemolymph as well as an induction of novel proteins (28-48 kDa) relative to preimmunization levels. No significant differences in protein banding patterns relative to baseline levels in control and naïve termites were observed. Incubating excised and eluted induced proteins produced by immunized pseudergates or immunized soldiers with conidia significantly reduced the germination of the fungus. The fungistatic effect of eluted proteins differed significantly among five colonies examined. Our results show that the upregulation of protective proteins in the hemolymph underscores the in vivo immune response we previously recorded in Z. angusticollis.

  6. The immune response to sand fly salivary proteins and its influence on Leishmania immunity

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    Regis eGomes

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease transmitted by bites of phlebotomine sand flies. During Leishmania transmission, sand fly saliva is co-inoculated with parasites into the skin of the mammalian host. Sand fly saliva consists of roughly thirty different salivary proteins, many with known roles linked to blood feeding facilitation. Apart from the anti-hemostatic capacity of saliva, several sand fly salivary proteins have been shown to be immunogenic upon multiple contacts with a mammalian host. Immunization with single immunogenic salivary proteins or exposure to uninfected bites can produce protective immune responses against leishmaniasis. These sand fly salivary proteins induce cellular immune responses and/or antibodies. Antibodies to saliva are not required for protection in a mouse model against leishmaniasis. A strong body of evidence points to the role for saliva-specific T cells producing IFN-γ in the form of a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction at the bite site as the main protective response. Herein, we review immunity to sand fly salivary proteins in the context of its vector-parasite-host combinations and vaccine potential, as well as some recent advances to shed light on the mechanism of how an immune response to sand fly saliva protects against leishmaniasis.

  7. Characterization of the immune response of domestic fowl following immunization with proteins extracted from Dermanyssus gallinae.

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    Harrington, David; Din, Hatem Mohi El; Guy, Jonathan; Robinson, Karen; Sparagano, Olivier

    2009-03-23

    Dermanyssus gallinae is the most significant ectoparasite of European poultry egg laying production systems due to high costs of control and associated production losses as well as adverse effects on bird welfare. In this study, soluble proteins were extracted from unfed D. gallinae (DGE) using a urea-based detergent and ultra-filtration, passed through a 0.22 microm filter and blended aseptically with adjuvant. One group of laying hens was immunized with DGE and adjuvant (Montanide ISA 50 V) whilst another group (Control) received physiological saline and adjuvant. All birds were immunized on two occasions, 21 days apart. Antibody response to immunization was determined by ELISA and western blotting using immunoglobulins (Igs) extracted from egg yolk. DGE immunization of hens resulted in a significant (P<0.05) IgY response compared to controls, although there was no significant difference in IgM response between treatments. A number of proteins were identified by western blotting using IgY antibodies from DGE immunized birds, most prominently at 40 and 230kDa. Analysis of proteins from approximately corresponding bands on SDS-PAGE confirmed the identity of tropomyosin, whilst other proteins showed high sequence homology with myosin and actin from other arachnid and insect species. Immunization of hens with DGE resulted in a 50.6% increase in mite mortality (P<0.001) 17h after feeding when tested by an in vitro mite feeding model. Data in this study demonstrate that somatic antigens from D. gallinae can be used to stimulate a protective immune response in laying hens. Further work is needed to identify other proteins of interest that could confer higher protection against D. gallinae, as well as optimization of the vaccination and in vitro testing protocol. PMID:19091480

  8. WAP domain proteins as modulators of mucosal immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Thomas S; Roghanian, Ali; Simpson, Alexander John; Sallenave, Jean-Michel

    2011-10-01

    WAP (whey acidic protein) is an important whey protein present in milk of mammals. This protein has characteristic domains, rich in cysteine residues, called 4-DSC (four-disulfide core domain). Other proteins, mainly present at mucosal surfaces, have been shown to also possess these characteristic WAP-4-DSC domains. The present review will focus on two WAP-4-DSC containing proteins, namely SLPI (secretory leucocyte protease inhibitor) and trappin-2/elafin. Although first described as antiproteases able to inhibit in particular host neutrophil proteases [NE (neutrophil elastase), cathepsin-G and proteinase-3] and as such, able to limit maladaptive tissue damage during inflammation, it has become apparent that these molecules have a variety of other functions (direct antimicrobial activity, bacterial opsonization, induction of adaptive immune responses, promotion of tissue repair, etc.). After providing information about the 'classical' antiproteasic role of these molecules, we will discuss the evidence pertaining to their pleiotropic functions in inflammation and immunity. PMID:21936824

  9. Bacteriocin-like activity of oral Fusobacterium nucleatum isolated from human and non-human primates Atividade semelhante a bacteriocina de Fusobacterium nucleatum orais isolados de primatas humanos e não-humanos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elerson Gaetti-Jardim Júnior

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Fusobacterium nucleatum is indigenous of the human oral cavity and has been involved in different infectious processes. The production of bacteriocin-like substances may be important in regulation of bacterial microbiota in oral cavity. The ability to produce bacteriocin-like substances by 80 oral F. nucleatum isolates obtained from periodontal patients, healthy individuals and Cebus apella monkeys, was examinated. 17.5% of all tested isolates showed auto-antagonism and 78.8% iso- or hetero-antagonism. No isolate from monkey was capable to produce auto-inhibition. In this study, the antagonistic substances production was variable in all tested isolates. Most of the F. nucleatum showed antagonistic activity against tested reference strains. These data suggest a possible participation of these substances on the oral microbial ecology in humans and animals. However, the role of bacteriocins in regulating dental plaque microbiota in vivo is discussed.Fusobacterium nucleatum é indígena da cavidade oral humana e tem sido envolvido em diferentes processos infecciosos. A produção de substâncias semelhantes a bacteriocinas pode ser importante na regulação da microbiota bacteriana da cavidade oral. A capacidade de produzir substâncias tipo bacteriocina de 80 isolados de F. nucleatum orais, obtidos de pacientes com doença periodontal, indivíduos sadios e macaco Cebus apella, foi avaliada. 17,5% de todos os isolados mostrou auto-antagonismo e 78,8% iso- ou hetero-antagonismo. Nenhum isolado de macaco foi capaz de produzir auto-inibição. Neste estudo, a produção de substâncias antagonístas foi variável em todos os isolados testados. A maioria dos F. nucleatum mostrou atividade antagonísta para as cepas de referência testadas. Esses dados sugerem a possível participação dessas substâncias sobre a ecologia microbiana em humanos e animais. Entretanto, o papel das bacteriocinas na regulação da microbiota da placa dental in vivo

  10. Human immune cell targeting of protein nanoparticles - caveospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Joshua J; Yuen, Daniel; Rae, James; Johnston, Angus P R; Parton, Robert G; Kent, Stephen J; De Rose, Robert

    2016-04-14

    Nanotechnology has the power to transform vaccine and drug delivery through protection of payloads from both metabolism and off-target effects, while facilitating specific delivery of cargo to immune cells. However, evaluation of immune cell nanoparticle targeting is conventionally restricted to monocultured cell line models. We generated human caveolin-1 nanoparticles, termed caveospheres, which were efficiently functionalized with monoclonal antibodies. Using this platform, we investigated CD4+ T cell and CD20+ B cell targeting within physiological mixtures of primary human blood immune cells using flow cytometry, imaging flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Antibody-functionalization enhanced caveosphere binding to targeted immune cells (6.6 to 43.9-fold) within mixed populations and in the presence of protein-containing fluids. Moreover, targeting caveospheres to CCR5 enabled caveosphere internalization by non-phagocytic CD4+ T cells-an important therapeutic target for HIV treatment. This efficient and flexible system of immune cell-targeted caveosphere nanoparticles holds promise for the development of advanced immunotherapeutics and vaccines. PMID:27031090

  11. Human immune cell targeting of protein nanoparticles - caveospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Joshua J.; Yuen, Daniel; Rae, James; Johnston, Angus P. R.; Parton, Robert G.; Kent, Stephen J.; de Rose, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Nanotechnology has the power to transform vaccine and drug delivery through protection of payloads from both metabolism and off-target effects, while facilitating specific delivery of cargo to immune cells. However, evaluation of immune cell nanoparticle targeting is conventionally restricted to monocultured cell line models. We generated human caveolin-1 nanoparticles, termed caveospheres, which were efficiently functionalized with monoclonal antibodies. Using this platform, we investigated CD4+ T cell and CD20+ B cell targeting within physiological mixtures of primary human blood immune cells using flow cytometry, imaging flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Antibody-functionalization enhanced caveosphere binding to targeted immune cells (6.6 to 43.9-fold) within mixed populations and in the presence of protein-containing fluids. Moreover, targeting caveospheres to CCR5 enabled caveosphere internalization by non-phagocytic CD4+ T cells--an important therapeutic target for HIV treatment. This efficient and flexible system of immune cell-targeted caveosphere nanoparticles holds promise for the development of advanced immunotherapeutics and vaccines.

  12. Mechanism Suggests How HIV Protein Disrupts Immune Cell Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Janardhan Ajit; Swigut Tomek; Hill Brian; Myers Michael P; Skowronski Jacek

    2004-01-01

    The infectious cycle of primate lentiviruses is intimately linked to interactions between cells of the immune system. Nef, a potent virulence factor, alters cellular environments to increase lentiviral replication in the host, yet the mechanisms underlying these effects have remained elusive. Since Nef likely functions as an adaptor protein, we exploited a proteomic approach to directly identify molecules that Nef targets to subvert the signaling machinery in T cells. We purified to near homo...

  13. Immunity to Heat Shock Proteins and Pregnancy Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Witkin

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins are among the first proteins produced by the zygote after fertilization. In addition, the maternal decidua also expresses heat shock proteins during the early stages of pregnancy. Autoimmunity to heat shock proteins is not typically evident in healthy women of reproductive age. However, a chronic microbial infection, such as an asymptomatic Chlamydia trachomatis upper genital tract infection, results in prolonged exposure of the immune system to the microbial 60 kDa heat shock protein (hsp60. This may result in immunity to conserved hsp60 epitopes and subsequent autoimmunity to self hsp60. Women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF who never realized they had a chlamydial infection but who were positive for cervical antichlamydial immunoglobulin A (IgA antibodies had a much lower pregnancy rate than did women who were negative for these antibodies. Furthermore, cervical IgA antibodies to the chlamydial hsp60, as well as to a synthetic peptide corresponding to an hsp60 epitope present in both the chlamydial and human hsp60, also correlated with IVF failure. In vitro incubation of newly fertilized human embryos in medium containing maternal serum was shown to be deleterious to embryo development if the sera was positive for antibodies reactive with human hsp60. In another study, the ability of human hsp60 to elicit a lymphocyte proliferative response (cell-mediated immunity correlated with a history of spontaneous early stage pregnancy loss. Thus, autoimmunity to hsp60 might increase susceptibility to early stage pregnancy loss. Infect. Dis. Obstet. Gynecol. 7:35–38, 1999.

  14. Immune responses to Mycoplasma bovis proteins formulated with different adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prysliak, Tracy; Perez-Casal, Jose

    2016-06-01

    Most vaccines for protection against Mycoplasma bovis disease are made of bacterins, and they offer varying degrees of protection. Our focus is on the development of a subunit-based protective vaccine, and to that end, we have identified 10 novel vaccine candidates. After formulation of these candidates with TriAdj, an experimental tri-component novel vaccine adjuvant developed at VIDO-InterVac, we measured humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in vaccinated animals. In addition, we compared the immune responses after formulation with TriAdj with the responses measured in animals vaccinated with a mix of a commercial adjuvant (Emulsigen™) and 2 of the components of the TriAdj, namely polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) and the cationic innate defense regulator (IDR) peptide 1002 (VQRWLIVWRIRK). In this latter trial, we detected significant IgG1 humoral immune responses to 8 out of 10 M. bovis proteins, and IgG2 responses to 7 out of 10 proteins. Thus, we concluded that the commercial adjuvant formulated with poly I:C and the IDR peptide 1002 is the best formulation for the experimental vaccine. PMID:27105454

  15. Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008254 Prokaryotic expression and immunogenicity of Fba,a novel fibronectin-binding protein of group A streptococcus.MA Cuiqing(马翠柳),et al.Dept Immunol,Basic Med Coll,Hebei Med Univ,Shijiazhuang 050017.Chin J Infect Dis 2008;26(3):146-150.Objective To express the novel fibronectin-binding protein Fba ofgroupAstreptococcus(GAS)and analyze its immunogenicity,so to evaluate the immune responses to GAS infection.Methods fbagene was amplified by

  16. Associations between transcriptional changes and protein phenotypes provide insights into immune regulation in corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuess, Lauren E; Pinzόn C, Jorge H; Weil, Ernesto; Mydlarz, Laura D

    2016-09-01

    Disease outbreaks in marine ecosystems have driven worldwide declines of numerous taxa, including corals. Some corals, such as Orbicella faveolata, are particularly susceptible to disease. To explore the mechanisms contributing to susceptibility, colonies of O. faveolata were exposed to immune challenge with lipopolysaccharides. RNA sequencing and protein activity assays were used to characterize the response of corals to immune challenge. Differential expression analyses identified 17 immune-related transcripts that varied in expression post-immune challenge. Network analyses revealed several groups of transcripts correlated to immune protein activity. Several transcripts, which were annotated as positive regulators of immunity were included in these groups, and some were downregulated following immune challenge. Correlations between expression of these transcripts and protein activity results further supported the role of these transcripts in positive regulation of immunity. The observed pattern of gene expression and protein activity may elucidate the processes contributing to the disease susceptibility of species like O. faveolata. PMID:27109903

  17. ETRAP (efficient trapping and purification) of target protein polyclonal antibodies from GST-protein immune sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crimmins, Dan L; Brada, Nancy A; Lockwood, Christina M; Griest, Terry A; Waldemer, Rachel J; Cervinski, Mark A; Ohlendorf, Matthew F; McQuillan, Jay J; Ladenson, Jack H

    2010-12-01

    Recombinant GST (glutathione transferase) proteins are widely used as immunogens to generate polyclonal antibodies. Advantages of using GST proteins include: commercially available cloning vectors, vast literature for protein expression in Escherichia coli, the ease of protein purification, immunogen can be used as an ELISA standard and GST can be removed in some systems. However, there are disadvantages: GST oligomerization, inclusion body formation and target protein insolubility after GST removal. Perhaps the most detrimental is the significant generation of anti-GST antibodies by the host animal. A two-column procedure using a glutathione-GST column and a glutathione-(GST-protein) column can yield affinity-purified anti-(GST-protein) polyclonal antibody. Several passes over the first column are often required, though, to completely extract the anti-GST antibodies from the immune sera. We reasoned that knowledge of the target protein linear epitope(s) would allow construction of a peptide affinity resin for a single-pass 'one and done' purification termed ETRAP (efficient trapping and purification). In the present paper, we describe our efforts and present data on rabbits and sheep immunized with GST proteins having target protein molecular masses of ~8, 21 and 33 kDa. The titre and purity of the target antibodies using the ETRAP protocol were comparable to the more laborious multi-column purifications but with a considerable saving in time. PMID:21054278

  18. SAPOSIN-LIKE PROTEINS IN ANTI-INFECTIOUS IMMUNE RESPONSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Yeremeev

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Besides the multiple hydrolytic enzymes, lysosomes are equipped with proteins apt to activate sphyngo-lipids — saposins (SAP. SAP belong to a broad and diverse family of moderate-size (~80 AA saposin-like proteins (SAPLIP containing specific domains with three disulfid e bonds bridging six cysteine residues. The diversity of SAPLIPS is likely explained by their involvement in distinct phases of engulfed bacteria digesting. Functionally similar SAPLIP were identified in a wide range of species — from amoeba to mammals, including humans. Saposins per se form a subfamily with six members: saposins A-D and the protein GM2 which possesses activatory functions. SAP do not have enzymatic activity, are heat-stable and protease resistant. The major in vivo function of SAP is released via participation in sphyngolipid catabolism and membrane digestion. In addition, complex association of SAP with membrane bi-layer and CD1 glycolipids is essential for loading lipid antigens onto antigen-presenting CD1 molecules for subsequent activation of lipid-specific T-cells. Of particular interest is participation of SAP in cross-presentation of bacterial antigens to CD8+ T-cells. A broad spectrum of SAP and SAPLIP involvement in the reactions of innate and adaptive immunity indicates their evolutionary conserved role in host defense.

  19. The immunization-induced antibody response to the Anaplasma marginale major surface protein 2 and its association with protective immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many vector-borne pathogens evade clearance via rapid variation in immunogenic surface expressed proteins. In the case of A. marginale, the generation of major surface protein 2 (Msp2) variants allows for immune escape and long-term pathogen persistence. In the experiments reported here, we pose t...

  20. Immunization with Brucella VirB proteins reduces organ colonization in mice through a Th1-type immune response and elicits a similar immune response in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Cora N; Wanke, María Magdalena; Estein, Silvia M; Delpino, M Victoria; Monachesi, Norma E; Comercio, Elida A; Fossati, Carlos A; Baldi, Pablo C

    2015-03-01

    VirB proteins from Brucella spp. constitute the type IV secretion system, a key virulence factor mediating the intracellular survival of these bacteria. Here, we assessed whether a Th1-type immune response against VirB proteins may protect mice from Brucella infection and whether this response can be induced in the dog, a natural host for Brucella. Splenocytes from mice immunized with VirB7 or VirB9 responded to their respective antigens with significant and specific production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), whereas interleukin-4 (IL-4) was not detected. Thirty days after an intraperitoneal challenge with live Brucella abortus, the spleen load of bacteria was almost 1 log lower in mice immunized with VirB proteins than in unvaccinated animals. As colonization reduction seemed to correlate with a Th1-type immune response against VirB proteins, we decided to assess whether such a response could be elicited in the dog. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from dogs immunized with VirB proteins (three subcutaneous doses in QuilA adjuvant) produced significantly higher levels of IFN-γ than cells from control animals upon in vitro stimulation with VirB proteins. A skin test to assess specific delayed-type hypersensitivity was positive in 4 out of 5 dogs immunized with either VirB7 or VirB9. As both proteins are predicted to locate in the outer membrane of Brucella organisms, the ability of anti-VirB antibodies to mediate complement-dependent bacteriolysis of B. canis was assessed in vitro. Sera from dogs immunized with either VirB7 or VirB9, but not from those receiving phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), produced significant bacteriolysis. These results suggest that VirB-specific responses that reduce organ colonization by Brucella in mice can be also elicited in dogs. PMID:25540276

  1. Using viromes to predict novel immune proteins in non-model organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yan Wei; Silva, Genivaldo Gueiros Z.; Nelson, Craig E.; Haas, Andreas F.; Kelly, Linda Wegley; Edwards, Robert A.; Rohwer, Forest L.

    2016-01-01

    Immunity is mostly studied in a few model organisms, leaving the majority of immune systems on the planet unexplored. To characterize the immune systems of non-model organisms alternative approaches are required. Viruses manipulate host cell biology through the expression of proteins that modulate the immune response. We hypothesized that metagenomic sequencing of viral communities would be useful to identify both known and unknown host immune proteins. To test this hypothesis, a mock human virome was generated and compared to the human proteome using tBLASTn, resulting in 36 proteins known to be involved in immunity. This same pipeline was then applied to reef-building coral, a non-model organism that currently lacks traditional molecular tools like transgenic animals, gene-editing capabilities, and in vitro cell cultures. Viromes isolated from corals and compared with the predicted coral proteome resulted in 2503 coral proteins, including many proteins involved with pathogen sensing and apoptosis. There were also 159 coral proteins predicted to be involved with coral immunity but currently lacking any functional annotation. The pipeline described here provides a novel method to rapidly predict host immune components that can be applied to virtually any system with the potential to discover novel immune proteins. PMID:27581878

  2. Protection against keratoconjunctivitis shigellosa induced by immunization with outer membrane proteins of Shigella spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Adamus, G.; Mulczyk, M; Witkowska, D; Romanowska, E

    1980-01-01

    Active immunization of guinea pigs and rabbits with outer membrane proteins (OMP) isolated from Shigella flexneri 3a and Shigella sonnei phase I protected the animals against keratoconjunctivitis shigellosa induced with the homologous or heterologous strain. Protection was also achieved in rabbits after passive immunization with anti-OMP immune serum. Active immunization with lipopolysaccharide of S. flexneri 3a did not protect rabbits against keratoconjunctivitis shigellosa.

  3. Immunization routes in cattle impact the levels and neutralizing capacity of antibodies induced against S. aureus immune evasion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerhout, Eveline; Vrieling, Manouk; Benedictus, Lindert; Daemen, Ineke; Ravesloot, Lars; Rutten, Victor; Nuijten, Piet; van Strijp, Jos; Koets, Ad; Eisenberg, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines against S. aureus bovine mastitis are scarce and show limited protection only. All currently available vaccines are applied via the parenteral (usually intramuscular) route. It is unknown, however, whether this route is the most suitable to specifically increase intramammary immunity to combat S. aureus at the site of infection. Hence, in the present study, immunization via mucosal (intranasal; IN), intramuscular (triangle of the neck; IM), intramammary (IMM) and subcutaneous (suspensory ligament; SC) routes were analyzed for their effects on the quantity of the antibody responses in serum and milk as well as the neutralizing capacity of the antibodies within serum. The experimental vaccine comprised the recombinant S. aureus immune evasion proteins extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb) and the leukotoxin subunit LukM in an oil-in-water adjuvant combined with a hydrogel and alginate. The highest titer increases for both Efb and LukM specific IgG1 and IgG2 antibody levels in serum and milk were observed following SC/SC immunizations. Furthermore, the harmful effects of Efb and leukotoxin LukMF' on host-defense were neutralized by serum antibodies in a route-dependent manner. SC/SC immunization resulted in a significant increase in the neutralizing capacity of serum antibodies towards Efb and LukMF', shown by increased phagocytosis of S. aureus and increased viability of bovine leukocytes. Therefore, a SC immunization route should be considered when aiming to optimize humoral immunity against S. aureus mastitis in cattle. PMID:26411347

  4. Surfactant Protein A Enhances Constitutive Immune Functions of Clathrin Heavy Chain and Clathrin Adaptor Protein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulakakis, Christina; Steinhäuser, Christine; Biedziak, Dominika; Freundt, Katja; Reiling, Norbert; Stamme, Cordula

    2016-07-01

    NF-κB transcription factors are key regulators of pulmonary inflammatory disorders and repair. Constitutive lung cell type- and microenvironment-specific NF-κB/inhibitor κBα (IκB-α) regulation, however, is poorly understood. Surfactant protein (SP)-A provides both a critical homeostatic and lung defense control, in part by immune instruction of alveolar macrophages (AMs) via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The central endocytic proteins, clathrin heavy chain (CHC) and the clathrin adaptor protein (AP) complex AP2, have pivotal alternative roles in cellular homeostasis that are endocytosis independent. Here, we dissect endocytic from alternative functions of CHC, the α-subunit of AP2, and dynamin in basal and SP-A-modified LPS signaling of macrophages. As revealed by pharmacological inhibition and RNA interference in primary AMs and RAW264.7 macrophages, respectively, CHC and α-adaptin, but not dynamin, prevent IκB-α degradation and TNF-α release, independent of their canonical role in membrane trafficking. Kinetics studies employing confocal microscopy, Western analysis, and immunomagnetic sorting revealed that SP-A transiently enhances the basal protein expression of CHC and α-adaptin, depending on early activation of protein kinase CK2 (former casein kinase II) and Akt1 in primary AMs from rats, SP-A(+/+), and SP-A(-/-) mice, as well as in vivo when intratracheally administered to SP-A(+/+) mice. Constitutive immunomodulation by SP-A, but not SP-A-mediated inhibition of LPS-induced NF-κB activity and TNF-α release, requires CHC, α-adaptin, and dynamin. Our data demonstrate that endocytic proteins constitutively restrict NF-κB activity in macrophages and provide evidence that SP-A enhances the immune regulatory capacity of these proteins, revealing a previously unknown pathway of microenvironment-specific NF-κB regulation in the lung. PMID:26771574

  5. Sublingual immunization with a live attenuated influenza a virus lacking the nonstructural protein 1 induces broad protective immunity in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Jung Park

    Full Text Available The nonstructural protein 1 (NS1 of influenza A virus (IAV enables the virus to disarm the host cell type 1 IFN defense system. Mutation or deletion of the NS1 gene leads to attenuation of the virus and enhances host antiviral response making such live-attenuated influenza viruses attractive vaccine candidates. Sublingual (SL immunization with live influenza virus has been found to be safe and effective for inducing protective immune responses in mucosal and systemic compartments. Here we demonstrate that SL immunization with NS1 deleted IAV (DeltaNS1 H1N1 or DeltaNS1 H5N1 induced protection against challenge with homologous as well as heterosubtypic influenza viruses. Protection was comparable with that induced by intranasal (IN immunization and was associated with high levels of virus-specific antibodies (Abs. SL immunization with DeltaNS1 virus induced broad Ab responses in mucosal and systemic compartments and stimulated immune cells in mucosa-associated and systemic lymphoid organs. Thus, SL immunization with DeltaNS1 offers a novel potential vaccination strategy for the control of influenza outbreaks including pandemics.

  6. Fanconi Anemia Proteins Function in Mitophagy and Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumpter, Rhea; Sirasanagandla, Shyam; Fernández, Álvaro F; Wei, Yongjie; Dong, Xiaonan; Franco, Luis; Zou, Zhongju; Marchal, Christophe; Lee, Ming Yeh; Clapp, D Wade; Hanenberg, Helmut; Levine, Beth

    2016-05-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway genes are important tumor suppressors whose best-characterized function is repair of damaged nuclear DNA. Here, we describe an essential role for FA genes in two forms of selective autophagy. Genetic deletion of Fancc blocks the autophagic clearance of viruses (virophagy) and increases susceptibility to lethal viral encephalitis. Fanconi anemia complementation group C (FANCC) protein interacts with Parkin, is required in vitro and in vivo for clearance of damaged mitochondria, and decreases mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and inflammasome activation. The mitophagy function of FANCC is genetically distinct from its role in genomic DNA damage repair. Moreover, additional genes in the FA pathway, including FANCA, FANCF, FANCL, FANCD2, BRCA1, and BRCA2, are required for mitophagy. Thus, members of the FA pathway represent a previously undescribed class of selective autophagy genes that function in immunity and organellar homeostasis. These findings have implications for understanding the pathogenesis of FA and cancers associated with mutations in FA genes. PMID:27133164

  7. Immunization with chlamydial plasmid protein pORF5 DNA vaccine induces protective immunity against genital chlamydial infection in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    To validate the immune protective efficacy of pORF5 DNA vaccine and to analyze potential mechanisms related to this protection. In this study, pORF5 DNA vaccine was constructed and evaluated for its protective immunity in a mouse model of genital chlamydial infection. Groups of BALB/c mice were immunized intranasally with pORF5 DNA vaccine. Humoral and cell mediated immune responses were evaluated. The clearance ability of chlamydial challenge from the genital tract and the chlamy- dia-induced upper genital tract gross pathology and histopathological characterization were also de- tected. The results showed that the total and the IgG2a anti-pORF5 antibody levels in serum were sig- nificantly elevated after pcDNA3.1-pORF5 vaccination, as were the total antibody and IgA levels in vaginal fluids. pcDNA3.1-pORF5 induced a significantly high level of Th1 response as measured by robust gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Minimal IL-4 was produced by immune T cells in response to the re-stimulation with pORF5 protein or the inactive elementary body in vitro. pcDNA3.1-pORF5-vacci- nated mice displayed significantly reduced bacterial shedding upon a chlamydial challenge and an accelerated resolution of infection. 100% of pcDNA3.1-pORF5 vaccinated mice successfully resolved the infection by day 24. pcDNA3.1-pORF5-immunized mice also exhibited protection against patho- logical consequences of chlamydial infection. The stimulated index was significantly higher than that of mice immunized with pcDNA3.1 and PBS (P<0.05). Together, these results demonstrated that immu- nization with pORF5 DNA vaccine is a promising approach for eliciting a protective immunity against a genital chlamydial challenge.

  8. Immune response in mice to ingested soya protein: antibody production, oral tolerance and maternal transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hanne Risager; Pedersen, Susanne Brix; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2004-01-01

    While allergic reactions to soya are increasingly investigated, the normal immune response to ingested soya is scarcely described. In the present study, we wanted to characterise the soya-specific immune response in healthy mice ingesting soya protein. Mice fed a soya-containing diet (F0) and mic...

  9. Quality of colostral passive immunity and pattern of serum protein fluctuation in newborn calves

    OpenAIRE

    Pauletti Patricia; Machado Neto Raul; Packer Irineu Umberto; d'Arce Raul Dantas; Bessi Rosana

    2003-01-01

    Immunity acquired by newborn animals is known as passive immunity, and for ruminants, antibody acquisition depends on the ingestion and absorption of adequate amounts of immunoglobulins from colostrum. This study relates different initial levels of acquired passive protection and serum total protein (TP) and immunoglobulin G (IgG). Serum immunoglobulin concentration and total protein were evaluated for female Holstein calves in the first sixty days of life. Animals were separated into three g...

  10. Trace Levels of Innate Immune Response Modulating Impurities (IIRMIs) Synergize to Break Tolerance to Therapeutic Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Verthelyi, Daniela; Wang, Vivian

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutic proteins such as monoclonal antibodies, replacement enzymes and toxins have significantly improved the therapeutic options for multiple diseases, including cancer and inflammatory diseases as well as enzyme deficiencies and inborn errors of metabolism. However, immune responses to these products are frequent and can seriously impact their safety and efficacy. Of the many factors that can impact protein immunogenicity, this study focuses on the role of innate immune response modula...

  11. Fully effective contraception in male and female guinea pigs immunized with the sperm protein PH-20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primakoff, P; Lathrop, W; Woolman, L; Cowan, A; Myles, D

    1988-10-01

    Immunization of male and female animals with extracts of whole sperm cells is known to cause infertility. Also, men and women who spontaneously produce antisperm antibodies are infertile but otherwise healthy. Although the critical sperm antigens are unknown, these observations have led to the proposal that sperm proteins might be useful in the development of a contraceptive vaccine. The guinea pig sperm surface protein PH-20 is essential in sperm adhesion to the extracellular coat (zona pellucida) of the egg, a necessary initial step in fertilization. Here, we report that 100% effective contraception was obtained in male and female guinea pigs immunized with PH-20. Antisera from immunized females had high titres, specifically recognized PH-20 in sperm extracts, and blocked sperm adhesion to the egg zona pellucida in vitro. The contraceptive effect was long-lasting and reversible: immunized females, mated at intervals of six to fifteen months after immunization, progressively regained fertility. PMID:3419530

  12. Rapid evolution of immune proteins in social insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viljakainen, Lumi; Evans, Jay D; Hasselmann, Martin; Rueppell, Olav; Tingek, Salim; Pamilo, Pekka

    2009-08-01

    The existence of behavioral traits connected to defense against pathogens manifests the importance of pathogens in the evolution of social insects. However, very little is known about how pathogen pressure has affected the molecular evolution of genes involved in their innate immune system. We have studied the sequence evolution of several immune genes in ants and honeybees. The results show high rates of evolution in both ants and honeybees as measured by the ratio of amino acid changes to silent nucleotide changes, the ratio being clearly higher than in Drosophila immune genes or in nonimmunity genes of bees. This conforms to our expectations based on high pathogen pressure in social insects. The codon-based likelihood method found clear evidence of positive selection only in one ant gene, even though positive selection has earlier been found in both ant and termite immune genes. There is now indication that selection on the amino acid composition of the immune-related genes has been an important part in the fight against pathogens by social insects. However, we cannot distinguish in all the cases whether the high observed d(N)/d(S) ratio results from positive selection within a restricted part of the studied genes or from relaxation of purifying selection associated with effective measures of behaviorally based colony-level defenses. PMID:19387012

  13. Helminth Protein Vaccine Induced Follicular T Helper Cell for Enhancement of Humoral Immunity against Schistosoma japonicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyao Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein vaccines combined with adjuvants have been widely used to induce immune responses, especially the humoral immune response, against molecular targets including parasites. Follicular T helper (Tfh cells are the specialized providers of B-cell help, however, the induction of Tfh cells in protein vaccination has been rarely studied. Here, we report that the Schistosoma japonicum recombinant protein (SjGST-32 combined with tacrolimus (FK506 augmented the induction of Tfh cells, which expressed the canonical markers CXCR5, BCL6, and IL-21, and enhanced the humoral immune responses in BALB/c mice. Furthermore, the expression of IL-21R on germinal center (GC B cells and memory B cells increased in immunized mice, which indicated that IL-21 from the induced Tfh cells interacted with IL-21R for activation of B cells and maintenance of long-lived humoral immunity. Our results suggest that helminth protein vaccine combined with FK506 induces Tfh cell for stimulating humoral immune responses and inducing long-lived humoral immunity.

  14. Protein-Carbohydrate Interactions as Part of Plant Defense and Animal Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristof De Schutter

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The immune system consists of a complex network of cells and molecules that interact with each other to initiate the host defense system. Many of these interactions involve specific carbohydrate structures and proteins that specifically recognize and bind them, in particular lectins. It is well established that lectin-carbohydrate interactions play a major role in the immune system, in that they mediate and regulate several interactions that are part of the immune response. Despite obvious differences between the immune system in animals and plants, there are also striking similarities. In both cases, lectins can play a role as pattern recognition receptors, recognizing the pathogens and initiating the stress response. Although plants do not possess an adaptive immune system, they are able to imprint a stress memory, a mechanism in which lectins can be involved. This review will focus on the role of lectins in the immune system of animals and plants.

  15. Low cost delivery of proteins bioencapsulated in plant cells to human non-immune or immune modulatory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yuhong; Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Hoffman, Brad E; Kamesh, Aditya; Jones, Noah T; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2016-02-01

    Targeted oral delivery of GFP fused with a GM1 receptor binding protein (CTB) or human cell penetrating peptide (PTD) or dendritic cell peptide (DCpep) was investigated. Presence of GFP(+) intact plant cells between villi of ileum confirm their protection in the digestive system from acids/enzymes. Efficient delivery of GFP to gut-epithelial cells by PTD or CTB and to M cells by all these fusion tags confirm uptake of GFP in the small intestine. PTD fusion delivered GFP more efficiently to most tissues or organs than the other two tags. GFP was efficiently delivered to the liver by all fusion tags, likely through the gut-liver axis. In confocal imaging studies of human cell lines using purified GFP fused with different tags, GFP signal of DCpep-GFP was only detected within dendritic cells. PTD-GFP was only detected within kidney or pancreatic cells but not in immune modulatory cells (macrophages, dendritic, T, B, or mast cells). In contrast, CTB-GFP was detected in all tested cell types, confirming ubiquitous presence of GM1 receptors. Such low-cost oral delivery of protein drugs to sera, immune system or non-immune cells should dramatically lower their cost by elimination of prohibitively expensive fermentation, protein purification cold storage/transportation and increase patient compliance. PMID:26706477

  16. PreImplantation factor (PIF*) regulates systemic immunity and targets protective regulatory and cytoskeleton proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnea, Eytan R; Hayrabedyan, Soren; Todorova, Krassimira; Almogi-Hazan, Osnat; Or, Reuven; Guingab, Joy; McElhinney, James; Fernandez, Nelson; Barder, Timothy

    2016-07-01

    Secreted by viable embryos, PIF is expressed by the placenta and found in maternal circulation. It promotes implantation and trophoblast invasion, achieving systemic immune homeostasis. Synthetic PIF successfully transposes endogenous PIF features to non-pregnant immune and transplant models. PIF affects innate and activated PBMC cytokines and genes expression. We report that PIF targets similar proteins in CD14+, CD4+ and CD8+ cells instigating integrated immune regulation. PIF-affinity chromatography followed by mass-spectrometry, pathway and heatmap analysis reveals that SET-apoptosis inhibitor, vimentin, myosin-9 and calmodulin are pivotal for immune regulation. PIF acts on macrophages down-stream of LPS (lipopolysaccharide-bacterial antigen) CD14/TLR4/MD2 complex, targeting myosin-9, thymosin-α1 and 14-3-3eta. PIF mainly targets platelet aggregation in CD4+, and skeletal proteins in CD8+ cells. Pathway analysis demonstrates that PIF targets and regulates SET, tubulin, actin-b, and S100 genes expression. PIF targets systemic immunity and has a short circulating half-life. Collectively, PIF targets identified; protective, immune regulatory and cytoskeleton proteins reveal mechanisms involved in the observed efficacy against immune disorders. PMID:26944449

  17. Comparative Proteomics Identifies Host Immune System Proteins Affected by Infection with Mycobacterium bovis

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Vladimir; Villar, Margarita; Queirós, João; Vicente, Joaquín; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Díez-Delgado, Iratxe; Contreras, Marinela; Alves, Paulo C.; Alberdi, Pilar; Gortázar, Christian; de la Fuente, José

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacteria of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) greatly impact human and animal health worldwide. The mycobacterial life cycle is complex, and the mechanisms resulting in pathogen infection and survival in host cells are not fully understood. Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa) are natural reservoir hosts for MTBC and a model for mycobacterial infection and tuberculosis (TB). In the wild boar TB model, mycobacterial infection affects the expression of innate and adaptive immune response genes in mandibular lymph nodes and oropharyngeal tonsils, and biomarkers have been proposed as correlates with resistance to natural infection. However, the mechanisms used by mycobacteria to manipulate host immune response are not fully characterized. Our hypothesis is that the immune system proteins under-represented in infected animals, when compared to uninfected controls, are used by mycobacteria to guarantee pathogen infection and transmission. To address this hypothesis, a comparative proteomics approach was used to compare host response between uninfected (TB-) and M. bovis-infected young (TB+) and adult animals with different infection status [TB lesions localized in the head (TB+) or affecting multiple organs (TB++)]. The results identified host immune system proteins that play an important role in host response to mycobacteria. Calcium binding protein A9, Heme peroxidase, Lactotransferrin, Cathelicidin and Peptidoglycan-recognition protein were under-represented in TB+ animals when compared to uninfected TB- controls, but protein levels were higher as infection progressed in TB++ animals when compared to TB- and/or TB+ adult wild boar. MHCI was the only protein over-represented in TB+ adult wild boar when compared to uninfected TB- controls. The results reported here suggest that M. bovis manipulates host immune response by reducing the production of immune system proteins. However, as infection progresses, wild boar immune response recovers to limit pathogen

  18. INVOLVEMENT OF PEPTIDOGLYCAN RECOGNITION PROTEIN L6 IN ACTIVATION OF IMMUNE DEFICIENCY PATHWAY IN THE IMMUNE RESPONSIVE SILKWORM CELLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiromitsu; Sagisaka, Aki

    2016-06-01

    The immune deficiency (Imd) signaling pathway is activated by Gram-negative bacteria for producing antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). In Drosophila melanogaster, the activation of this pathway is initiated by the recognition of Gram-negative bacteria by peptidoglycan (PGN) recognition proteins (PGRPs), PGRP-LC and PGRP-LE. In this study, we found that the Imd pathway is involved in enhancing the promoter activity of AMP gene in response to Gram-negative bacteria or diaminopimelic (DAP) type PGNs derived from Gram-negative bacteria in an immune responsive silkworm cell line, Bm-NIAS-aff3. Using gene knockdown experiments, we further demonstrated that silkworm PGRP L6 (BmPGRP-L6) is involved in the activation of E. coli or E. coli-PGN mediated AMP promoter activation. Domain analysis revealed that BmPGRP-L6 contained a conserved PGRP domain, transmembrane domain, and RIP homotypic interaction motif like motif but lacked signal peptide sequences. BmPGRP-L6 overexpression enhances AMP promoter activity through the Imd pathway. BmPGRP-L6 binds to DAP-type PGNs, although it also binds to lysine-type PGNs that activate another immune signal pathway, the Toll pathway in Drosophila. These results indicate that BmPGRP-L6 is a key PGRP for activating the Imd pathway in immune responsive silkworm cells. PMID:26991439

  19. Production of bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLIS by Streptococcus salivarius strains isolated from the tongue and throat of children with and without sore throat Produção de substâncias inibidoras semelhantes à bacteriocina por cepas de Streptococcus salivarius, isoladas da língua e garganta de crianças com e sem dor de garganta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Fantinato

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus salivarius strains, isolated from children with and without sore throat, were tested for bacteriocin production against Streptococcus pyogenes. S. salivarius strains producing bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLIS against S. pyogenes were more frequently found in children without sore throat. These results suggest that these children may be protected against sore throat by the presence of BLIS-positive S. salivarius strains.Cepas de Streptococcus salivarius, isoladas de crianças com e sem dor de garganta, foram testadas quanto à produção de bacteriocina contra Streptococcus pyogenes. Os resultados mostraram que as crianças que não tinham dor de garganta possuiam, na boca, cepas de bactérias produtoras de substâncias inibidoras semelhantes à bacteriocina contra S. pyogenes.

  20. Identification of Brucella abortus virulence proteins that modulate the host immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yufei; Chen, Zeliang; Qiu, Yefeng; Ke, Yuehua; Xu, Jie; Yuan, Xitong; Li, Xianbo; Fu, Simei; Cui, Mingquan; Xie, Yongfei; Du, Xinying; Wang, Zhoujia; Huang, Liuyu

    2012-01-01

    Brucellosis is an important zoonotic disease of almost worldwide distribution. One significant immune phenomenon of this disease is the ability of the pathogen to hide and survive in the host, establishing long lasting chronic infections. Brucella was found to have the ability to actively modulate the host immune response in order to establish chronic infections, but the mechanism by which the pathogen achieves this remains largely unknown. In our screening for protective antigens of Brucella abortus, 3 proteins (BAB1_0597, BAB1_0917, and BAB2_0431) were found to induce significantly higher levels of gamma interferon (IFNγ) in splenocytes of PBS immunized mice than those immunized with S19. This finding strongly implied that these three proteins inhibit the production of IFNγ. Previous studies have shown that LPS, PrpA, and Btp1/TcpB are three important immunomodulatory molecules with the capacity to interfere with host immune response. They have been shown to have the ability to inhibit the secretion of IFNγ, or to increase the production of IL-10. Due to the role of these proteins in virulence and immunomodulation, they likely offer significant potential as live, attenuated Brucella vaccine candidates. Understanding the mechanisms by which these proteins modulate the host immune responses will deepen our knowledge of Brucella virulence and provide important information on the development of new vaccines against Brucellosis. PMID:22743689

  1. Comparisons of Allergenic and Metazoan Parasite Proteins: Allergy the Price of Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Tyagi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Allergic reactions can be considered as maladaptive IgE immune responses towards environmental antigens. Intriguingly, these mechanisms are observed to be very similar to those implicated in the acquisition of an important degree of immunity against metazoan parasites (helminths and arthropods in mammalian hosts. Based on the hypothesis that IgE-mediated immune responses evolved in mammals to provide extra protection against metazoan parasites rather than to cause allergy, we predict that the environmental allergens will share key properties with the metazoan parasite antigens that are specifically targeted by IgE in infected human populations. We seek to test this prediction by examining if significant similarity exists between molecular features of allergens and helminth proteins that induce an IgE response in the human host. By employing various computational approaches, 2712 unique protein molecules that are known IgE antigens were searched against a dataset of proteins from helminths and parasitic arthropods, resulting in a comprehensive list of 2445 parasite proteins that show significant similarity through sequence and structure with allergenic proteins. Nearly half of these parasite proteins from 31 species fall within the 10 most abundant allergenic protein domain families (EF-hand, Tropomyosin, CAP, Profilin, Lipocalin, Trypsin-like serine protease, Cupin, BetV1, Expansin and Prolamin. We identified epitopic-like regions in 206 parasite proteins and present the first example of a plant protein (BetV1 that is the commonest allergen in pollen in a worm, and confirming it as the target of IgE in schistosomiasis infected humans. The identification of significant similarity, inclusive of the epitopic regions, between allergens and helminth proteins against which IgE is an observed marker of protective immunity explains the 'off-target' effects of the IgE-mediated immune system in allergy. All these findings can impact the discovery and

  2. Comparisons of Allergenic and Metazoan Parasite Proteins: Allergy the Price of Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Nidhi; Farnell, Edward J; Fitzsimmons, Colin M; Ryan, Stephanie; Tukahebwa, Edridah; Maizels, Rick M; Dunne, David W; Thornton, Janet M; Furnham, Nicholas

    2015-10-01

    Allergic reactions can be considered as maladaptive IgE immune responses towards environmental antigens. Intriguingly, these mechanisms are observed to be very similar to those implicated in the acquisition of an important degree of immunity against metazoan parasites (helminths and arthropods) in mammalian hosts. Based on the hypothesis that IgE-mediated immune responses evolved in mammals to provide extra protection against metazoan parasites rather than to cause allergy, we predict that the environmental allergens will share key properties with the metazoan parasite antigens that are specifically targeted by IgE in infected human populations. We seek to test this prediction by examining if significant similarity exists between molecular features of allergens and helminth proteins that induce an IgE response in the human host. By employing various computational approaches, 2712 unique protein molecules that are known IgE antigens were searched against a dataset of proteins from helminths and parasitic arthropods, resulting in a comprehensive list of 2445 parasite proteins that show significant similarity through sequence and structure with allergenic proteins. Nearly half of these parasite proteins from 31 species fall within the 10 most abundant allergenic protein domain families (EF-hand, Tropomyosin, CAP, Profilin, Lipocalin, Trypsin-like serine protease, Cupin, BetV1, Expansin and Prolamin). We identified epitopic-like regions in 206 parasite proteins and present the first example of a plant protein (BetV1) that is the commonest allergen in pollen in a worm, and confirming it as the target of IgE in schistosomiasis infected humans. The identification of significant similarity, inclusive of the epitopic regions, between allergens and helminth proteins against which IgE is an observed marker of protective immunity explains the 'off-target' effects of the IgE-mediated immune system in allergy. All these findings can impact the discovery and design of molecules

  3. Salivary Defense Proteins: Their Network and Role in Innate and Acquired Oral Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Fábián

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available There are numerous defense proteins present in the saliva. Although some of these molecules are present in rather low concentrations, their effects are additive and/or synergistic, resulting in an efficient molecular defense network of the oral cavity. Moreover, local concentrations of these proteins near the mucosal surfaces (mucosal transudate, periodontal sulcus (gingival crevicular fluid and oral wounds and ulcers (transudate may be much greater, and in many cases reinforced by immune and/or inflammatory reactions of the oral mucosa. Some defense proteins, like salivary immunoglobulins and salivary chaperokine HSP70/HSPAs (70 kDa heat shock proteins, are involved in both innate and acquired immunity. Cationic peptides and other defense proteins like lysozyme, bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI, BPI-like proteins, PLUNC (palate lung and nasal epithelial clone proteins, salivary amylase, cystatins, prolin-rich proteins, mucins, peroxidases, statherin and others are primarily responsible for innate immunity. In this paper, this complex system and function of the salivary defense proteins will be reviewed.

  4. Cross-Protection against Challenge with Puumala Virus after Immunization with Nucleocapsid Proteins from Different Hantaviruses

    OpenAIRE

    de Carvalho Nicacio, Cristina; Gonzalez Della Valle, Marcelo; Padula, Paula; Björling, Ewa; Plyusnin, Alexander; Lundkvist, Åke

    2002-01-01

    Hantaviruses are rodent-borne agents that cause hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome or hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in humans. The nucleocapsid protein (N) is relatively conserved among hantaviruses and highly immunogenic in both laboratory animals and humans, and it has been shown to induce efficient protective immunity in animal models. To investigate the ability of recombinant N (rN) from different hantaviruses to elicit cross-protection, we immunized bank voles with rN from Puumala (PU...

  5. Role of macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha in T-cell-mediated immunity to viral infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas N; Nansen, Anneline; Christensen, Jan P; Thomsen, Allan R

    2003-01-01

    The immune response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in mice lacking macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) was evaluated. Generation of virus-specific effector T cells is unimpaired in MIP-1alpha-deficient mice. Furthermore, MIP-1alpha is not required for T-cell-mediated virus...... control or virus-induced T-cell-dependent inflammation. Thus, MIP-1alpha is not mandatory for T-cell-mediated antiviral immunity....

  6. Immune-Relevant and Antioxidant Activities of Vitellogenin and Yolk Proteins in Fish

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Sun; Shicui Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Vitellogenin (Vtg), the major egg yolk precursor protein, is traditionally thought to provide protein- and lipid-rich nutrients for developing embryos and larvae. However, the roles of Vtg as well as its derived yolk proteins lipovitellin (Lv) and phosvitin (Pv) extend beyond nutritional functions. Accumulating data have demonstrated that Vtg, Lv and Pv participate in host innate immune defense with multifaceted functions. They can all act as multivalent pattern recognition receptors capable ...

  7. Stress Proteins and Initiation of Immune Response: Chaperokine activity of Hsp72

    OpenAIRE

    Asea, Alexzander

    2005-01-01

    From its original description as solely an intracellular molecular chaperone, heat shock proteins have now been shown to function as initiators of the host's immune response. Although the exact mechanism by which intracellular heat shock proteins leave cells is still incompletely understood, recent work from several labs suggest that heat shock proteins are released by both passive (necrotic) and active (physiological) mechanisms. Binding to specific surface receptors is a prerequisite for th...

  8. Recombinant Flagellin-Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Cap Fusion Protein Promotes Protective Immune Responses in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chunyan; Zhu, Shanshan; Wei, Li; Yan, Xu; Wang, Jing; Quan, Rong; She, Ruiping; Hu, Fengjiao; Liu, Jue

    2015-01-01

    The Cap protein of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) that serves as a major host-protective immunogen was used to develop recombinant vaccines for control of PCV2-associated diseases. Growing research data have demonstrated the high effectiveness of flagellin as an adjuvant for humoral and cellular immune responses. Here, a recombinant protein was designed by fusing a modified version of bacterial flagellin to PCV2 Cap protein and expressed in a baculovirus system. When administered without ad...

  9. Maternal immunization with pneumococcal surface protein A protects against pneumococcal infections among derived offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masamitsu Kono

    Full Text Available Pathogen-specific antibody plays an important role in protection against pneumococcal carriage and infections. However, neonates and infants exhibit impaired innate and adaptive immune responses, which result in their high susceptibility to pneumococci. To protect neonates and infants against pneumococcal infection it is important to elicit specific protective immune responses at very young ages. In this study, we investigated the protective immunity against pneumococcal carriage, pneumonia, and sepsis induced by maternal immunization with pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA. Mother mice were intranasally immunized with recombinant PspA (rPspA and cholera toxin B subunit (CTB prior to being mated. Anti-PspA specific IgG, predominantly IgG1, was present at a high level in the serum and milk of immunized mothers and in the sera of their pups. The pneumococcal densities in washed nasal tissues and in lung homogenate were significantly reduced in pups delivered from and/or breast-fed by PspA-immunized mothers. Survival after fatal systemic infections with various types of pneumococci was significantly extended in the pups, which had received anti-PspA antibody via the placenta or through their milk. The current findings strongly suggest that maternal immunization with PspA is an attractive strategy against pneumococcal infections during early childhood.

  10. Effect of low dose radiation on Bcl-2 protein expressions in mouse immune system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: In the present study the authors observed the effect of dose radiation (LDR) on the Bcl-2 protein expressions in mouse immune system. Methods: Immunohistochemistry and image analysis were used. Results: These results showed that Bcl-2 protein had a basic expression in the sham-irradiated group. As the time passed, the expressions of Bcl-2 protein gradually increased following whole-body irradiation with 75 mGy X-rays. It reached the peak value at 12-24 hours, and then returned to the basic level at 72 hours. Conclusion: These findings reveal the molecular mechanisms of the J-shape dose response curve occurring in apoptosis in the immune organs and the enhancement of the immune function after LDR

  11. Caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 signaling in innate immunity and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Susanne; Ruland, Jürgen

    2013-06-01

    Caspase recruitment domain-containing protein (Card)9 is a nonredundant adapter protein that functions in the innate immune system in the assembly of multifunctional signaling complexes. Together with B cell lymphoma (Bcl)10 and the paracaspase, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein (Malt)1, Card9 links spleen-tyrosine kinase (Syk)-coupled C-type lectin receptors to inflammatory responses. Card9 signaling also responds to intracellular danger sensors, such as retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs) and nucleotide-oligomerization domain (Nod)2. Card9 complexes are engaged upon fungal, bacterial, or viral recognition, and they are essential for host protection. Moreover, Card9 polymorphisms are commonly associated with human inflammatory diseases. Here, we discuss the molecular regulation and the physiological functions of Card9 in host defense and immune homeostasis, and provide a framework for the therapeutic targeting of Card9 signaling in immune-mediated diseases. PMID:23523010

  12. Protective immunity induced by recombinant protein CPSIT_p8 of Chlamydia psittaci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Mingxing; Wen, Yating; Ran, Ou; Chen, Liesong; Wang, Chuan; Li, Li; Xie, Yafeng; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Chaoqun; Wu, Yimou

    2016-07-01

    Chlamydia psittaci is a zoonotic pathogen with a broad host range that can lead to severe respiratory and systemic disease in humans. Currently, an effective commercial vaccine against C. psittaci infection is not available. The chlamydial plasmid is an important virulence factor and encodes plasmid proteins that play important roles in chlamydial infection and the corresponding immune response. In this study, we assessed the efficacy of vaccination with plasmid proteins at preventing C. psittaci lung infection in a murine model. BALB/c mice were immunized intraperitoneally, three times at 2-week intervals, with purified recombinant CPSIT_p8 protein and then infected with C. psittaci. Immunization significantly decreased chlamydial load in the lungs of infected mice, resulted in a lower level of IFN-γ, and reduced the extent of inflammation. In vivo or in vitro neutralization of C. psittaci with sera collected from immunized mice did not reduce the amount of viable C. psittaci in the lungs of mice, indicating that CPSIT_p8-specific antibodies do not have neutralizing capacity. Furthermore, confocal fluorescence microscopy using a mouse anti-CPSIT_p8 antibody revealed that CPSIT_p8 was localized inside the inclusion of C. psittaci 6BC-infected cells. Our results demonstrate that CPSIT_p8 protein induces significant protective immunity against challenge with C. psittaci in mice and represents a promising new vaccine candidate for the prevention of C. psittaci infection. PMID:27052378

  13. Epitopes expressed in different adenovirus capsid proteins induce different levels of epitope-specific immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Anja; Joh, Ju H; Hackett, Neil R; Roelvink, Peter W; Bruder, Joseph T; Wickham, Thomas J; Kovesdi, Imre; Crystal, Ronald G; Worgall, Stefan

    2006-06-01

    On the basis of the concept that the capsid proteins of adenovirus (Ad) gene transfer vectors can be genetically manipulated to enhance the immunogenicity of Ad-based vaccines, the present study compared the antiantigen immunogenicity of Ad vectors with a common epitope of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein of the influenza A virus incorporated into the outer Ad capsid protein hexon, penton base, fiber knob, or protein IX. Incorporation of the same epitope into the different capsid proteins provided insights into the correlation between epitope position and antiepitope immunity. Following immunization of three different strains of mice (C57BL/6, BALB/c, and CBA) with either an equal number of Ad particles (resulting in a different total HA copy number) or different Ad particle numbers (to achieve the same HA copy number), the highest primary (immunoglobulin M [IgM]) and secondary (IgG) anti-HA humoral and cellular CD4 gamma interferon and interleukin-4 responses against HA were always achieved with the Ad vector carrying the HA epitope in fiber knob. These observations suggest that the immune response against an epitope inserted into Ad capsid proteins is not necessarily dependent on the capsid protein number and imply that the choice of incorporation site in Ad capsid proteins in their use as vaccines needs to be compared in vivo. PMID:16699033

  14. Immunity of replicating Mu to self-integration: a novel mechanism employing MuB protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Jun

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We describe a new immunity mechanism that protects actively replicating/transposing Mu from self-integration. We show that this mechanism is distinct from the established cis-immunity mechanism, which operates by removal of MuB protein from DNA adjacent to Mu ends. MuB normally promotes integration into DNA to which it is bound, hence its removal prevents use of this DNA as target. Contrary to what might be expected from a cis-immunity mechanism, strong binding of MuB was observed throughout the Mu genome. We also show that the cis-immunity mechanism is apparently functional outside Mu ends, but that the level of protection offered by this mechanism is insufficient to explain the protection seen inside Mu. Thus, both strong binding of MuB inside and poor immunity outside Mu testify to a mechanism of immunity distinct from cis-immunity, which we call 'Mu genome immunity'. MuB has the potential to coat the Mu genome and prevent auto-integration as previously observed in vitro on synthetic A/T-only DNA, where strong MuB binding occluded the entire bound region from Mu insertions. The existence of two rival immunity mechanisms within and outside the Mu genome, both employing MuB, suggests that the replicating Mu genome must be segregated into an independent chromosomal domain. We propose a model for how formation of a 'Mu domain' may be aided by specific Mu sequences and nucleoid-associated proteins, promoting polymerization of MuB on the genome to form a barrier against self-integration.

  15. Possible association between phages, Hoc protein, and the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowska, K; Switała-Jeleń, K; Opolski, A; Górski, A

    2006-02-01

    Mammals have become "an environment" for enterobacterial phage life cycles. Therefore it could be expected that bacteriophages adapt to them. This adaptation must comprise bacteriophage proteins. Gp Hoc seems to have significance neither for phage particle structure nor for phage antibacterial activity. It is evidently not necessary for the "typical" antibacterial actions of bacteriophages. But the rules of evolution make it improbable that gp Hoc really has no function, and non-essential genes of T4-type phages are probably important for phages' adaptation to their particular lifestyle. More interesting is the eukaryotic origin of gp Hoc: a resemblance to immunoglobulin-like proteins that reflects their evolutionary relation. Substantial differences in biological activity between T4 and a mutant that lacks gp Hoc were observed in a mammalian system. Hoc protein seems to be one of the molecules predicted to interact with mammalian organisms and/or modulate these interactions. PMID:16195787

  16. DMPD: Regulation of innate immunity by suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)proteins. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18406369 Regulation of innate immunity by suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)pr...svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Regulation of innate immunity by suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)proteins. ...PubmedID 18406369 Title Regulation of innate immunity by suppressor of cytokine s

  17. Immune response in mice to ingested soya protein: antibody production, oral tolerance and maternal transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Hanne R; Brix, Susanne; Frøkiaer, Hanne

    2004-05-01

    While allergic reactions to soya are increasingly investigated, the normal immune response to ingested soya is scarcely described. In the present study, we wanted to characterise the soya-specific immune response in healthy mice ingesting soya protein. Mice fed a soya-containing diet (F0) and mice of the first (F1) and second (F2) offspring generation bred on a soya protein-free diet were used either directly or were transferred between the soya-containing and soya protein-free diet during pregnancy or neonatal life. The mice were compared as to levels of naturally occurring specific antibodies analysed by ELISA, and to the presence of oral tolerance detected as a suppressed antibody and cell-proliferation response upon immunisation with soya protein. F0 mice generated soya-specific antibodies, while oral tolerance to the same soya proteins was also clearly induced. When F0 dams were transferred to soya protein-free feed before mating, the F1 and F2 offspring generations showed no significantly different response, indicating that soya-specific immune components were not maternally transmitted. However, the ingestion of dietary soya protein by F1 mice during late pregnancy and lactation caused a lasting antibody response in the offspring, but in this case in the absence of oral tolerance. This indicates that, under certain conditions, factors involved in spontaneous antibody production can be transmitted from mother to offspring. Understanding the immune response to soya protein ingested under healthy conditions is important in the assessment of adverse effects of soya protein and in the use of animal allergy models. The present results add to this understanding. PMID:15137924

  18. Antibody study in canine distemper virus nucleocapsid protein gene-immunized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, B; Li, X Y; Zhu, T; Yuan, L; Hu, J P; Chen, J; Gao, W; Ren, W Z

    2015-01-01

    The gene for the nucleocapsid (N) protein of canine distemper virus was cloned into the pMD-18T vector, and positive recombinant plasmids were obtained by enzyme digestion and sequencing. After digestion by both EcoRI and KpnI, the plasmid was directionally cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA; the positive clone pcDNA-N was screened by electrophoresis and then transfected into COS-7 cells. Immunofluorescence analysis results showed that the canine distemper virus N protein was expressed in the cytoplasm of transfected COS-7 cells. After emulsification in Freund's adjuvant, the recombinant plasmid pcDNA-N was injected into the abdominal cavity of 8-week-old BABL/c mice, with the pcDNA original vector used as a negative control. Mice were immunized 3 times every 2 weeks. The blood of immunized mice was drawn 2 weeks after completing the immunizations to measure titer levels. The antibody titer in the pcDNA-N test was 10(1.62 ± 0.164), while in the control group this value was 10(0.52 ± 0.56), indicating that specific humoral immunity was induced in canine distemper virus nucleocapsid protein-immunized mice. PMID:25966074

  19. Surfactant Protein-D Is Essential for Immunity to Helminth Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumaiyya Thawer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary epithelial cell responses can enhance type 2 immunity and contribute to control of nematode infections. An important epithelial product is the collectin Surfactant Protein D (SP-D. We found that SP-D concentrations increased in the lung following Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection; this increase was dependent on key components of the type 2 immune response. We carried out loss and gain of function studies of SP-D to establish if SP-D was required for optimal immunity to the parasite. N. brasiliensis infection of SP-D-/- mice resulted in profound impairment of host innate immunity and ability to resolve infection. Raising pulmonary SP-D levels prior to infection enhanced parasite expulsion and type 2 immune responses, including increased numbers of IL-13 producing type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2, elevated expression of markers of alternative activation by alveolar macrophages (alvM and increased production of the type 2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13. Adoptive transfer of alvM from SP-D-treated parasite infected mice into naïve recipients enhanced immunity to N. brasiliensis. Protection was associated with selective binding by the SP-D carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD to L4 parasites to enhance their killing by alvM. These findings are the first demonstration that the collectin SP-D is an essential component of host innate immunity to helminths.

  20. Transfer of Immunity from Mother to Offspring Is Mediated via Egg-Yolk Protein Vitellogenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmela, Heli; Amdam, Gro V; Freitak, Dalial

    2015-07-01

    Insect immune systems can recognize specific pathogens and prime offspring immunity. High specificity of immune priming can be achieved when insect females transfer immune elicitors into developing oocytes. The molecular mechanism behind this transfer has been a mystery. Here, we establish that the egg-yolk protein vitellogenin is the carrier of immune elicitors. Using the honey bee, Apis mellifera, model system, we demonstrate with microscopy and western blotting that vitellogenin binds to bacteria, both Paenibacillus larvae--the gram-positive bacterium causing American foulbrood disease--and to Escherichia coli that represents gram-negative bacteria. Next, we verify that vitellogenin binds to pathogen-associated molecular patterns; lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan and zymosan, using surface plasmon resonance. We document that vitellogenin is required for transport of cell-wall pieces of E. coli into eggs by imaging tissue sections. These experiments identify vitellogenin, which is distributed widely in oviparous species, as the carrier of immune-priming signals. This work reveals a molecular explanation for trans-generational immunity in insects and a previously undescribed role for vitellogenin. PMID:26230630

  1. Genetic control of immune responses to influenza A matrix 2 protein (M2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misplon, Julia A; Lo, Chia-Yun; Gabbard, Jon D; Tompkins, S Mark; Epstein, Suzanne L

    2010-08-16

    Vaccines should protect genetically diverse populations. Therefore we tested the candidate "universal" influenza A matrix protein 2 (M2) vaccine in multiple mouse strains. Mice were primed with M2 DNA and boosted with M2 recombinant adenovirus (rAd). C57BL/6 (B6) mice developed no antibody or T-cell response to M2, while BALB/c responded strongly. CBA responses were intermediate. Both MHC and background genes influenced responsiveness. To improve low responses we immunized with adjuvanted peptide-carrier conjugates, or co-immunized with nucleoprotein (NP), which can augment T-cell help. The conjugate vaccine enhanced some outcomes but not others. Co-immunizing with NP improved outcomes over either NP or M2 immunizations alone. These results have implications for vaccination of genetically diverse populations. PMID:20600476

  2. Expression, Purification, and Functional Characterization of Atypical Xenocin, Its Immunity Protein, and Their Domains from Xenorhabdus nematophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Singh Rathore

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Xenorhabdus nematophila, a gram-negative bacterium belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae is a natural symbiont of a soil nematode from the family Steinernematidae. In this study cloning, expression, and purification of broad range iron regulated multidomain bacteriocin called xenocin from X. nematophila (66 kDa, encoded by xcinA gene and its multidomain immunity protein (42 kDa, encoded by ximB gene have been done. xcinA-ximB (N′ terminal 270 bp, translocation, and translocation-receptor domain of xcinA, ximB, and its hemolysin domain were cloned, expressed, and purified by single step Ni-NTA chromatography under native conditions. In the functional characterization, neutralization of xcinA toxicity by immunity domain of ximB gene was determined by endogenous assay. Exogenous toxic assays results showed that only the purified recombinant xenocin-immunity domain (10 kDa protein complex had toxic activity. Atypical cognate immunity protein (42 kDa of xenocin was fusion of immunity domain (10 kDa and hemolysin domain (32 kDa. In silico analysis of immunity protein revealed its similarity with hemolysin and purine NTPase like proteins. Hemolytic activity was not observed in immunity protein or in its various domains; however, full-length immunity protein lacking Walker motif showed ATPase activity. Finally, using circular dichroism performed secondary structural analyses of all the recombinant proteins/protein complexes.

  3. Protection from Group B Streptococcal Infection in Neonatal Mice by Maternal Immunization with Recombinant Sip Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Denis; Rioux, Stéphane; Gagnon, Edith; Boyer, Martine; Hamel, Josée; Charland, Nathalie; Brodeur, Bernard R

    2002-01-01

    The protective potential of antibodies directed against group B streptococcus (GBS) Sip surface protein was determined by using the mouse neonatal infection model. Rabbit Sip-specific antibodies administered passively to pregnant mice protected their pups against a GBS lethal challenge. In addition, active immunization with purified recombinant Sip protein of female CD-1 mice induced the production of specific antibodies that also confer protection to the newborn pups against GBS strains of s...

  4. Mechanisms of Host-Pathogen Protein Complex Formation and Bacterial Immune Evasion of Streptococcus suis Protein Fhb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xueqin; Liu, Peng; Gan, Shuzhen; Zhang, Chunmao; Zheng, Yuling; Jiang, Yongqiang; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-08-12

    Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (S. suis 2)-induced sepsis and meningitis are often accompanied by bacteremia. The evasion of polymorphonuclear leukocyte-mediated phagocytic clearance is central to the establishment of bacteremia caused by S. suis 2 and is facilitated by the ability of factor H (FH)-binding protein (Fhb) to bind FH on the bacterial surface, thereby impeding alternative pathway complement activation and phagocytic clearance. Here, C3b/C3d was found to bind to Fhb, along with FH, forming a large immune complex. The formation of this immune complex was mediated by domain II of Fhb via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, which, to our knowledge, is a new type of interaction. Interestingly, Fhb was found to be associated with the cell envelope and also present in the culture supernatant, where secreted Fhb inhibited complement activation via interactions with domain II, thereby enhancing antiphagocytic clearance by polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Thus, Fhb is a multifunctional bacterial protein, which binds host complement component C3 as well as FH and interferes with innate immune recognition in a secret protein manner. S. suis 2 therefore appears to have developed a new strategy to combat host innate immunity and enhance survival in host blood. PMID:27342778

  5. Protective immunity induced in Aotus monkeys by recombinant SERA proteins of Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inselburg, J; Bzik, D J; Li, W B; Green, K M; Kansopon, J; Hahm, B K; Bathurst, I C; Barr, P J; Rossan, R N

    1991-04-01

    We describe the vaccination of Panamanian monkeys (Aotus sp.) with two recombinant blood stage antigens that each contain a portion of the N-terminal region of the SERA (serine repeat antigen) protein of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. We immunized with either a 262-amino-acid SERA fragment (SERA I) that contains amino acids 24 to 285 of the 989-amino-acid protein or a 483-amino-acid SERA fragment (SERA N) that contains amino acids 24 to 506 as part of a fusion protein with human gamma interferon. The recombinant proteins were shown to stimulate protective immunity when administered with complete and incomplete Freund adjuvant. Four of six immunized monkeys challenged by intravenous inoculation with blood stage P. falciparum developed parasitemias that were reduced by at least 1,000-fold. Two of six immunized monkeys developed parasitemias which were comparable to the lowest parasitemia in one of four controls and were 50- to 1,000-fold lower than in the other three controls. PMID:1900809

  6. Protection against yellow fever in monkeys by immunization with yellow fever virus nonstructural protein NS1.

    OpenAIRE

    Schlesinger, J J; Brandriss, M. W.; Cropp, C.B.; Monath, T. P.

    1986-01-01

    Immunization of monkeys with yellow fever virus-specified nonstructural protein NS1 resulted in protection against fatal hepatitis as well as marked reduction in the magnitude of viremia after subcutaneous challenge with yellow fever virus. The results may be relevant to the design of possible subunit or recombinant flavivirus vaccines.

  7. Tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 1 and immunity to hepatitis B virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marie C Lin; Nikki P Lee; Ning Zheng; Pai-Hao Yang; Oscar G Wong; Hsiang-Fu Kung; Chee-Kin Hui; John M Luk; George Ka-Kit Lau

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To compare the gene expression profile in a pair of HBV-infected twins.METHODS: The gene expression profile was compared in a pair of HBV-infected twins.RESULTS: The twins displayed different disease outcomes. One acquired natural immunity against HBV,whereas the other became a chronic HBV carrier. Eightyeight and forty-six genes were found to be up- or downregulated in their PBMCs, respectively. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 1 (TNF-αIP1) that expressed at a higher level in the HBV-immune twins was identified and four pairs of siblings with HBV immunity by RTPCR. However, upon HBV core antigen stimulation,TNF-αIP1 was downregulated in PBMCs from subjects with immunity, whereas it was slightly upregulated in HBV carriers. Bioinformatics analysis revealed a K+channel tetramerization domain in TNF-αIP1 that shares a significant homology with some human, mouse, and C elegan proteins.CONCLUSION: TNF-αIP1 may play a role in the innate immunity against HBV.

  8. Study on DNA Immunization by Recombinants Encoding Japanese Encephalitis Virus prME and E Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯国和; 赵桂珍; 窦晓光; 乔光彦; 周子文

    2003-01-01

    To study the expression characteristic of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) prME and E proteins and the efficacy of DNA immunization by different recombinant plasmids containing JEV prME (2001 bp) and E (1500 bp) genes, tworecombinants ( pJME and pJE) containing JEV prME and E genes fused with FLAG were constructed and then transfected into HepG2 and COS-1 cells by lipnsome fusion. The expression feature of FLAG-prME (about 72 kDa) and FLAG-E (about 54 kDa) proteins in transfected cells were analyzed by Western blot and two antibody systems (anti-FLAG and anti-E).BALB/c mice were immunized with 100 μg of two kinds of recombinants by intramuscular injection, and JEV JaGAr-01strains ( 105 PFU/100 μl)were given to BALB/c mice by intraperioneal injection 3 wk after twice DNA immunization by a lethal virus challenge. BALB/c mice were observed for 21 days after challenge. 80% plaque reduction neutralization test was performed to titrate neutralization antibody before and after viral challenge. It was found that the expression of proteins associated with pJME and pJE was determined in transfected cells with anti-FLAG and a new protein of 11 kDa was detected inHepG2 and COS-1 cells transfected with pJME. Only E (53 kDa) protein was identified as transfected with pJME using antiE. Higher level of neutralization antibodies and the efficacy of protective immunity were induced with pJME immunization,and were similar to those induced by inactivated Japanese encephalitis vaccine, but were better than those induced with pJE.It concludes that the expression level from prM to E proteins of JEV is different in vitro, and the in vitro expression efficiency of pJME was better than that of piE. FLAG-prME protein expressed by pJME could be cleaved by peptidase from host.The efficacy of DNA immunization is correlated to the expression characterization of related proteins expressed in vitro.

  9. Stealth Proteins: In Silico Identification of a Novel Protein Family Rendering Bacterial Pathogens Invisible to Host Immune Defense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available There are a variety of bacterial defense strategies to survive in a hostile environment. Generation of extracellular polysaccharides has proved to be a simple but effective strategy against the host's innate immune system. A comparative genomics approach led us to identify a new protein family termed Stealth, most likely involved in the synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides. This protein family is characterized by a series of domains conserved across phylogeny from bacteria to eukaryotes. In bacteria, Stealth (previously characterized as SacB, XcbA, or WefC is encoded by subsets of strains mainly colonizing multicellular organisms, with evidence for a protective effect against the host innate immune defense. More specifically, integrating all the available information about Stealth proteins in bacteria, we propose that Stealth is a D-hexose-1-phosphoryl transferase involved in the synthesis of polysaccharides. In the animal kingdom, Stealth is strongly conserved across evolution from social amoebas to simple and complex multicellular organisms, such as Dictyostelium discoideum, hydra, and human. Based on the occurrence of Stealth in most Eukaryotes and a subset of Prokaryotes together with its potential role in extracellular polysaccharide synthesis, we propose that metazoan Stealth functions to regulate the innate immune system. Moreover, there is good reason to speculate that the acquisition and spread of Stealth could be responsible for future epidemic outbreaks of infectious diseases caused by a large variety of eubacterial pathogens. Our in silico identification of a homologous protein in the human host will help to elucidate the causes of Stealth-dependent virulence. At a more basic level, the characterization of the molecular and cellular function of Stealth proteins may shed light on fundamental mechanisms of innate immune defense against microbial invasion.

  10. Stealth proteins: in silico identification of a novel protein family rendering bacterial pathogens invisible to host immune defense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Sperisen

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available There are a variety of bacterial defense strategies to survive in a hostile environment. Generation of extracellular polysaccharides has proved to be a simple but effective strategy against the host's innate immune system. A comparative genomics approach led us to identify a new protein family termed Stealth, most likely involved in the synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides. This protein family is characterized by a series of domains conserved across phylogeny from bacteria to eukaryotes. In bacteria, Stealth (previously characterized as SacB, XcbA, or WefC is encoded by subsets of strains mainly colonizing multicellular organisms, with evidence for a protective effect against the host innate immune defense. More specifically, integrating all the available information about Stealth proteins in bacteria, we propose that Stealth is a D-hexose-1-phosphoryl transferase involved in the synthesis of polysaccharides. In the animal kingdom, Stealth is strongly conserved across evolution from social amoebas to simple and complex multicellular organisms, such as Dictyostelium discoideum, hydra, and human. Based on the occurrence of Stealth in most Eukaryotes and a subset of Prokaryotes together with its potential role in extracellular polysaccharide synthesis, we propose that metazoan Stealth functions to regulate the innate immune system. Moreover, there is good reason to speculate that the acquisition and spread of Stealth could be responsible for future epidemic outbreaks of infectious diseases caused by a large variety of eubacterial pathogens. Our in silico identification of a homologous protein in the human host will help to elucidate the causes of Stealth-dependent virulence. At a more basic level, the characterization of the molecular and cellular function of Stealth proteins may shed light on fundamental mechanisms of innate immune defense against microbial invasion.

  11. Effects of inadequate maternal dietary protein:carbohydrate ratios during pregnancy on offspring immunity in pigs

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    Tuchscherer Margret

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inadequate nutrition in utero may retard foetal growth and alter physiological development of offspring. This study investigated the effects of low and high protein diets fed to primiparous German Landrace sows throughout pregnancy on the immune function of their offspring at different ages. Sows were fed diets with adequate (AP, 12.1%; n = 13, low (LP, 6.5%; n = 15, or high (HP, 30%; n = 14 protein content, made isoenergetic by varying carbohydrate levels. Cortisol, total protein and immunoglobulin (IgG, IgM, IgA concentrations were measured in the blood of sows over the course of pregnancy. Cortisol, total protein, immunoglobulins, lymphocyte proliferation, immune cell counts, and cytokines were assessed in the blood of offspring at baseline and under challenging conditions (weaning; lipopolysaccharide (LPS administration. Results In sows, the LP diet increased cortisol (P P P P + cell percentage and the CD4+/CD8+ ratio increased after weaning (P P = 0.09 and HP (P P  Conclusions Our results indicate that both low and high protein:carbohydrate ratios in the diet of pregnant sows can induce short-term as well as long-lasting effects on immune competence in piglets that may have serious consequences for host defence against bacterial pathogens.

  12. Immune Reactivity of Brucella Melitensis–Vaccinated Rabbit Serum with Recombinant Omp31 and Dnak Proteins

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    Mahmood Jeddi-Tehrani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Brucella melitensis infection is still a major health problem for human and cattle in developing countries and the Middle East.Materials and Methods: In this study, in order to screen immunogenic candidate antigens for the development of a Brucella subunit vaccine, a cytoplasmic protein (DnaK and an outer membrane protein (Omp31 of B. melitensis were cloned, expressed in E.coli BL21 and then purified using Ni-NTA agarose. Immunized serum was prepared from a rabbit inoculated with attenuated B. melitensis.Results and Conclusion: It was proved that immunized serum contains antibodies against recombinant Omp31 (rOmp31 and DnaK (rDnaK by Western blot and ELISA assays. The results may suggest the importance of these proteins as subunit vaccines against B. melitensis as well as targets for immunotherapy.

  13. Passive Immunization by Recombinant Ferric Enterobactin Protein (FepA from Escherichia Coli O157

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    Seyed Mehdi Larrie-Baghal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC O157:H7 has been recognized as a major food borne pathogen responsible for frequent hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome in humans. Cattle are important reservoirs of E. coli O157:H7, in which the organism colonizes the intestinal tract and is shed in the feces.Objective: Vaccination of cattle has significant potential as a pre-harvest intervention strategy for E. coli O157:H7. The aim of this study was to evaluate active and passive immunization against E. coli O157:H7 using a recombinant protein.Materials and Methods: The recombinant FepA protein induced by IPTG was purified by nickel affinity chromatography. Antibody titre was determined by ELISA in FepA immunized rabbits sera. Sera collected from vaccinated animals were used for bacterial challenge in passive immunization studies.Results: The results demonstrate that passive immunization with serum raised against FepA protects rabbits from subsequent infection.Conclusion: Significant recognition by the antibody of ferric enterobactin binding protein may lead to its application in the restriction of Enterobacteriaceae propagation.

  14. Protective immunity induced in Aotus monkeys by recombinant SERA proteins of Plasmodium falciparum.

    OpenAIRE

    Inselburg, J; Bzik, D J; Li, W B; Green, K M; Kansopon, J; Hahm, B K; Bathurst, I C; Barr, P J; Rossan, R N

    1991-01-01

    We describe the vaccination of Panamanian monkeys (Aotus sp.) with two recombinant blood stage antigens that each contain a portion of the N-terminal region of the SERA (serine repeat antigen) protein of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. We immunized with either a 262-amino-acid SERA fragment (SERA I) that contains amino acids 24 to 285 of the 989-amino-acid protein or a 483-amino-acid SERA fragment (SERA N) that contains amino acids 24 to 506 as part of a fusion protein with human ...

  15. Partially Protective Immunity Induced by a 20 kDa Protein Secreted by Trichinella spiralis Stichocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo Bi

    Full Text Available Trichinella spiralis infection induces protective immunity against re-infection in animal models. Identification of the antigens eliciting acquired immunity during infection is important for vaccine development against Trichinella infection and immunodiagnosis.The T. spiralis adult cDNA library was immunoscreened with sera from pigs experimentally infected with 20,000 infective T. spiralis larvae. Total 43 positive clones encoding for 28 proteins were identified; one of the immunodominant proteins was 20 kDa Ts-ES-1 secreted by Trichinella stichocytes and existing in the excretory/secretory (ES products of T. spiralis adult and muscle larval worms. Ts-ES-1 contains 172 amino acids with a typical signal peptide in the first 20 amino acids. The expression of Ts-ES-1 was detected in both the adult and muscle larval stages at the mRNA and protein expression levels. Mice immunized with recombinant Ts-ES-1 (rTs-ES-1 formulated with ISA50v2 adjuvant exhibited a significant worm reduction in both the adult worm (27% and muscle larvae burden (42.1% after a challenge with T. spiralis compared to the adjuvant control group (p<0.01. The rTs-ES-1-induced protection was associated with a high level of specific anti-Ts-ES-1 IgG antibodies and a Th1/Th2 mixed immune response.The newly identified rTs-ES-1 is an immunodominant protein secreted by Trichinella stichocytes during natural infection and enables to the induction of partial protective immunity in vaccinated mice against Trichinella infection. Therefore, rTs-ES-1 is a potential candidate for vaccine development against trichinellosis.

  16. Purification and Immunity Analysis of Recombinant 6His- HPT Protein Expressed in E.coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI-CHEN YANG; ZHEN ZHU; XIAO-GUANG YANG

    2003-01-01

    Objective To obtain HPT protein (Hygromycin B Phosphotransferase), a kind of plantselective maker gene product expressed from E. coli and to prepare the polyclonal antibody (pAbs)against it. Methods HPT cDNA fragment was obtained by PCR and was inserted into theprokaryotic expressing vector pBV222. Then the constructed recombinant plasmid pBV222-HPT wastransfered into E. coli DH5α for HPT expression. The recombinant expressing system was confirmedby restriction endonuclease digestion, DNA sequencing and protein expression. E. coli cells were lysedby sonication and detergent dissolution. After cell membrane was extracted, the inclusion bodies weredenatured by 8 mol/L Urea and purified with metal chelate affinity chromatography on Ni-NTAagarose under denaturing condition. The purified 6His-HPT was characterized by SDS-PAGE, andused to immunize rabbit. The titer and specificity of antisera were detected by ELISA and Westernblot respecitively. Results Analysis of DNA sequence and restricted enzymes showed that thesequence of PBV222-HPT plasmid was correct. The amount of recombinant HPT expressed in E. coliaccounted for 30% of total cellular proteins. From 1 liter of fermentative bacteria about 22 milligramsof pure recombinant HPT was isolated with purity above 95%. The recombinant HPT protein couldproduce high titer antiserum in rabbits and show good immunity activity. Western blot showedspecific binding reaction between the antiserum to the purified 6His-HPT protein and their expressedproducts (plants protein and bacterial protein). Conclusion HPT protein can be expressed andpurified from E. coli by a relatively simple method, which has high immunity activity.

  17. Systemic Immunization with Papillomavirus L1 Protein Completely Prevents the Development of Viral Mucosal Papillomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzich, Joann A.; Ghim, Shin-Je; Palmer-Hill, Frances J.; White, Wendy I.; Tamura, James K.; Bell, Judith A.; Newsome, Joseph A.; Bennett Jenson, A.; Schlegel, Richard

    1995-12-01

    Infection of mucosal epithelium by papillomaviruses is responsible for the induction of genital and oral warts and plays a critical role in the development of human cervical and oropharyngeal cancer. We have employed a canine model to develop a systemic vaccine that completely protects against experimentally induced oral mucosal papillomas. The major capsid protein, L1, of canine oral papillomavirus (COPV) was expressed in Sf9 insect cells in native conformation. L1 protein, which self-assembled into virus-like particles, was purified on CsCl gradients and injected intradermally into the foot pad of beagles. Vaccinated animals developed circulating antibodies against COPV and became completely resistant to experimental challenge with COPV. Successful immunization was strictly dependent upon native L1 protein conformation and L1 type. Partial protection was achieved with as little as 0.125 ng of L1 protein, and adjuvants appeared useful for prolonging the host immune response. Serum immunoglobulins passively transferred from COPV L1-immunized beagles to naive beagles conferred protection from experimental infection with COPV. Our results indicate the feasibility of developing a human vaccine to prevent mucosal papillomas, which can progress to malignancy.

  18. A new paradigm: innate immune sensing of viruses via the Unfolded Protein Response

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    JudithASmith

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The immune system depends upon combinations of signals to mount appropriate responses: pathogen specific signals in the context of co-stimulatory “danger” signals drive immune strength and accuracy. Viral infections trigger anti-viral type I interferon (IFN responses by stimulating endosomal and cytosolic pattern recognition receptors (PRRs. However, viruses have also evolved many strategies to counteract IFN responses. Are there intracellular danger signals that enhance immune responses to viruses? During infection, viruses place a heavy demand on the protein folding machinery of the host endoplasmic reticulum (ER. To survive ER stress, host cells mount an Unfolded Protein Response (UPR to decrease ER protein load and enhance protein-folding capacity. Viruses also directly elicit the UPR to enhance their replication. Increasing evidence supports an intersection between the host UPR and inflammation, in particular the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and type I IFN. The UPR directly activates pro-inflammatory cytokine transcription factors and dramatically enhances cytokine production in response to viral PRR engagement. Additionally, viral PRR engagement may stimulate specific pathways within the UPR to enhance cytokine production. Through these mechanisms, viral detection via the UPR and inflammatory cytokine production are intertwined. Consequently, the UPR response is perfectly poised to act as an infection-triggered “danger” signal. The UPR may serve as an internal “co-stimulatory” signal that 1 provides specificity and 2 critically augments responses to overcome viral subterfuge. Further work is needed to test this hypothesis during viral infections.

  19. Immunity against heterosubtypic influenza virus induced by adenovirus and MVA expressing nucleoprotein and matrix protein-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambe, Teresa; Carey, John B; Li, Yuanyuan; Spencer, Alexandra J; van Laarhoven, Arjan; Mullarkey, Caitlin E; Vrdoljak, Anto; Moore, Anne C; Gilbert, Sarah C

    2013-01-01

    Alternate prime/boost vaccination regimens employing recombinant replication-deficient adenovirus or MVA, expressing Influenza A virus nucleoprotein and matrix protein 1, induced antigen-specific T cell responses in intradermally (ID) vaccinated mice; with the strongest responses resulting from Ad/MVA immunization. In BALB/C mice the immunodominant response was shifted from the previously identified immunodominant epitope to a novel epitope when the antigen was derived from A/Panama/2007/1999 rather than A/PR/8. Alternate immunization routes did not affect the magnitude of antigen-specific systemic IFN-γ response, but higher CD8(+) T-cell IFN-γ immune responses were seen in the bronchoalveolar lavage following intransal (IN) boosting after intramuscular (IM) priming, whilst higher splenic antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell IFN-γ was seen following IM boosting. Partial protection against heterologous influenza virus challenge was achieved following either IM/IM or IM/IN but not ID/ID immunization. These data may be of relevance for the design of optimal immunization regimens for human influenza vaccines, especially for influenza-naïve infants. PMID:23485942

  20. Special issue of clinical pharmacology: advances and applications in new protein therapeutics modulating tumor immunity

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    Frankel AE

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Arthur E Frankel Department of Internal Medicine, Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA Until recent decades, the role of the immune system in harnessing tumor growth was based on anecdotal observations of increased cancers in immune-compromised patients, the benefits of graft-versus-leukemia in allogeneic stem cell transplants, and the limited but reproducible anticancer activity of several lymphokines, including interferon and interleukin (IL-2. Vaccine studies and infusions of "activated" lymphocytes yielded variable clinical responses and disease control. An improved understanding of the molecular and cell mechanisms of the innate and adaptive immune system in cancer-bearing animals and the discovery of an immune-suppressive tumor microenvironment then led to development and testing of a battery of new drug and cell-based approaches to trigger antitumor immunity. This issue of Clinical Pharmacology: Advances and Applications highlights some of the new protein-based compounds that are radically changing the cancer therapeutic landscape. The purpose of this collection of reviews is to inform the readership regarding the importance of the seismic change in cancer therapeutics and stimulate efforts to find novel niches and combinations of agents similar to recent advances in the application of cancer pathway inhibitors.

  1. Virus-Heat Shock Protein Interaction and a Novel Axis for Innate Antiviral Immunity

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    Michael Oglesbee

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Virus infections induce heat shock proteins that in turn enhance virus gene expression, a phenomenon that is particularly well characterized for the major inducible 70 kDa heat shock protein (hsp70. However, hsp70 is also readily induced by fever, a phylogenetically conserved response to microbial infections, and when released from cells, hsp70 can stimulate innate immune responses through toll like receptors 2 and 4 (TLR2 and 4. This review examines how the virus-hsp70 relationship can lead to host protective innate antiviral immunity, and the importance of hsp70 dependent stimulation of virus gene expression in this host response. Beginning with the well-characterized measles virus-hsp70 relationship and the mouse model of neuronal infection in brain, we examine data indicating that the innate immune response is not driven by intracellular sensors of pathogen associated molecular patterns, but rather by extracellular ligands signaling through TLR2 and 4. Specifically, we address the relationship between virus gene expression, extracellular release of hsp70 (as a damage associated molecular pattern, and hsp70-mediated induction of antigen presentation and type 1 interferons in uninfected macrophages as a novel axis of antiviral immunity. New data are discussed that examines the more broad relevance of this protective mechanism using vesicular stomatitis virus, and a review of the literature is presented that supports the probable relevance to both RNA and DNA viruses and for infections both within and outside of the central nervous system.

  2. The role of STIM and ORAI proteins in phagocytic immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaurex, Nicolas; Nunes, Paula

    2016-04-01

    Phagocytic cells, such as neutrophils, macrophages, and dendritic cells, migrate to sites of infection or damage and are integral to innate immunity through two main mechanisms. The first is to directly neutralize foreign agents and damaged or infected cells by secreting toxic substances or ingesting them through phagocytosis. The second is to alert the adaptive immune system through the secretion of cytokines and the presentation of the ingested materials as antigens, inducing T cell maturation into helper, cytotoxic, or regulatory phenotypes. While calcium signaling has been implicated in numerous phagocyte functions, including differentiation, maturation, migration, secretion, and phagocytosis, the molecular components that mediate these Ca(2+)signals have been elusive. The discovery of the STIM and ORAI proteins has allowed researchers to begin clarifying the mechanisms and physiological impact of store-operated Ca(2+)entry, the major pathway for generating calcium signals in innate immune cells. Here, we review evidence from cell lines and mouse models linking STIM and ORAI proteins to the control of specific innate immune functions of neutrophils, macrophages, and dendritic cells. PMID:26764049

  3. Oral and parenteral immunization of chickens (Gallus gallus) against West Nile virus with recombinant envelope protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassbinder-Orth, C. A.; Hofmeister, E.K.; Weeks-Levy, C.; Karasov, W.H.

    2009-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) causes morbidity and mortality in humans, horses, and in more than 315 bird species in North America. Currently approved WNV vaccines are designed for parenteral administration and, as yet, no effective oral WNV vaccines have been developed. WNV envelope (E) protein is a highly antigenic protein that elicits the majority of virus-neutralizing antibodies during a WNV immune response. Leghorn chickens were given three vaccinations (each 2 wk apart) of E protein orally (20 ??g or 100 ??g/dose), of E protein intramuscularly (IM, 20 ??g/dose), or of adjuvant only (control group) followed by a WNV challenge. Viremias were measured post-WNV infection, and three new enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were developed for quantifying IgM, IgY, and IgA-mediated immune response of birds following WNV infection. WNV viremia levels were significantly lower in the IM group than in both oral groups and the control group. Total WNV E protein-specific IgY production was significantly greater, and WNV nonstructural 1-specific IgY was significantly less, in the IM group compared to all other treatment groups. The results of this study indicate that IM vaccination of chickens with E protein is protective against WNV infection and results in a significantly different antibody production profile as compared to both orally vaccinated and nonvaccinated birds. ?? 2009 American Association of Avian Pathologists.

  4. Immunization against Rumen Methanogenesis by Vaccination with a New Recombinant Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Litai; Huang, Xiaofeng; Xue, Bai; Peng, Quanhui; Wang, Zhisheng; Yan, Tianhai; Wang, Lizhi

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination through recombinant proteins against rumen methanogenesis provides a mitigation approach to reduce enteric methane (CH4) emissions in ruminants. The objective of present study was to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of a new vaccine candidate protein (EhaF) on methanogenesis and microbial population in the rumen of goats. We amplified the gene mru 1407 encoding protein EhaF using fresh rumen fluid samples of mature goats and successfully expressed recombinant protein (EhaF) in Escherichia coli Rosetta. This product was evaluated using 12 mature goats with half for control and other half injected with 400ug/goat the purified recombinant protein in day 1 and two subsequent booster immunizations in day 35 and 49. All measurements were undertaken from 63 to 68 days after the initial vaccination, with CH4 emissions determined using respiration calorimeter chambers. The results showed that the vaccination caused intensive immune responses in serum and saliva, although it had no significant effect on total enteric CH4 emissions and methanogen population in the rumen, when compared with the control goats. However, the vaccination altered the composition of rumen bacteria, especially the abundance of main phylum Firmicutes and genus Prevotella. The results indicate that protein EhaF might not be an effective vaccine to reduce enteric CH4 emissions but our vaccine have potential to influence the rumen ecosystem of goats. PMID:26445479

  5. The Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Pathway: Role in Immune Evasion by Trypanosomatids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares-Silva, Mercedes; Diniz, Flavia F; Gomes, Gabriela N; Bahia, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi are the causative agents of leishmaniasis and Chagas disease, respectively, two neglected tropical diseases that affect about 25 million people worldwide. These parasites belong to the family Trypanosomatidae, and are both obligate intracellular parasites that manipulate host signaling pathways and the innate immune system to establish infection. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are serine and threonine protein kinases that are highly conserved in eukaryotes, and are involved in signal transduction pathways that modulate physiological and pathophysiological cell responses. This mini-review highlights existing knowledge concerning the mechanisms that Leishmania spp. and T. cruzi have evolved to target the host's MAPK signaling pathways and highjack the immune response, and, in this manner, promote parasite maintenance in the host. PMID:26941717

  6. Determinants of antigenicity and specificity in immune response for protein sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Cheng

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Target specific antibodies are pivotal for the design of vaccines, immunodiagnostic tests, studies on proteomics for cancer biomarker discovery, identification of protein-DNA and other interactions, and small and large biochemical assays. Therefore, it is important to understand the properties of protein sequences that are important for antigenicity and to identify small peptide epitopes and large regions in the linear sequence of the proteins whose utilization result in specific antibodies. Results Our analysis using protein properties suggested that sequence composition combined with evolutionary information and predicted secondary structure, as well as solvent accessibility is sufficient to predict successful peptide epitopes. The antigenicity and the specificity in immune response were also found to depend on the epitope length. We trained the B-Cell Epitope Oracle (BEOracle, a support vector machine (SVM classifier, for the identification of continuous B-Cell epitopes with these protein properties as learning features. The BEOracle achieved an F1-measure of 81.37% on a large validation set. The BEOracle classifier outperformed the classical methods based on propensity and sophisticated methods like BCPred and Bepipred for B-Cell epitope prediction. The BEOracle classifier also identified peptides for the ChIP-grade antibodies from the modENCODE/ENCODE projects with 96.88% accuracy. High BEOracle score for peptides showed some correlation with the antibody intensity on Immunofluorescence studies done on fly embryos. Finally, a second SVM classifier, the B-Cell Region Oracle (BROracle was trained with the BEOracle scores as features to predict the performance of antibodies generated with large protein regions with high accuracy. The BROracle classifier achieved accuracies of 75.26-63.88% on a validation set with immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry, protein arrays and western blot results from Protein Atlas database

  7. Cloned alpha and beta C-protein antigens of group B streptococci elicit protective immunity.

    OpenAIRE

    Michel, J L; Madoff, L C; Kling, D E; Kasper, D L; Ausubel, F M

    1991-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococci [GBS]) is the leading cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis in the United States. The surface-associated C proteins of GBS play a role in immunity, but their number, size, structure, function, and virulence properties have not been well characterized. A recombinant library of DNA fragments from GBS strain A909 (type Ia/C) was prepared in the plasmid pUX12, a specially constructed Escherichia coli expression vector. The library was screened with...

  8. Production of Antibodies against Multipass Membrane Proteins Expressed in Human Tumor Cells Using Dendritic Cell Immunization

    OpenAIRE

    Takahiko Tamura; Joe Chiba

    2009-01-01

    Antibody mediated therapeutic strategies against human malignant tumors have been widely authorized and clinically applied to cancer patients. In order to develop methods to generate antibodies reactive to the extracellular domains of multipass plasma membrane proteins specifically expressed in malignant tumors, we examined the use of dendritic cells (DCs) for immunization. DCs were transduced with genes encoding the human six transmembrane epithelial antigen of prostate 1 (STEAP1), STEAP4, a...

  9. Pyrosequence analysis of expressed sequence tags for Manduca sexta hemolymph proteins involved in immune responses

    OpenAIRE

    Zou, Zhen; Najar, Fares; Wang, Yang; Roe, Bruce; Jiang, Haobo

    2008-01-01

    The tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta is widely used as a model organism to investigate the biochemical basis of insect physiological processes but little transcriptome information is available. To get a broad view of the larval hemolymph proteins, particularly those related to immunity, we synthesized and sequenced cDNA fragments from a mixture of eight total RNA samples: fat body and hemocytes from larvae injected with killed bacteria, fat body, hemocytes, integument and trachea from naïve lar...

  10. Immune-Relevant and Antioxidant Activities of Vitellogenin and Yolk Proteins in Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chen; Zhang, Shicui

    2015-10-01

    Vitellogenin (Vtg), the major egg yolk precursor protein, is traditionally thought to provide protein- and lipid-rich nutrients for developing embryos and larvae. However, the roles of Vtg as well as its derived yolk proteins lipovitellin (Lv) and phosvitin (Pv) extend beyond nutritional functions. Accumulating data have demonstrated that Vtg, Lv and Pv participate in host innate immune defense with multifaceted functions. They can all act as multivalent pattern recognition receptors capable of identifying invading microbes. Vtg and Pv can also act as immune effectors capable of killing bacteria and virus. Moreover, Vtg and Lv are shown to possess phagocytosis-promoting activity as opsonins. In addition to these immune-relevant functions, Vtg and Pv are found to have antioxidant activity, which is able to protect the host from oxidant stress. These non-nutritional functions clearly deepen our understanding of the physiological roles of the molecules, and at the same time, provide a sound basis for potential application of the molecules in human health. PMID:26506386

  11. Immune-Relevant and Antioxidant Activities of Vitellogenin and Yolk Proteins in Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Sun

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Vitellogenin (Vtg, the major egg yolk precursor protein, is traditionally thought to provide protein- and lipid-rich nutrients for developing embryos and larvae. However, the roles of Vtg as well as its derived yolk proteins lipovitellin (Lv and phosvitin (Pv extend beyond nutritional functions. Accumulating data have demonstrated that Vtg, Lv and Pv participate in host innate immune defense with multifaceted functions. They can all act as multivalent pattern recognition receptors capable of identifying invading microbes. Vtg and Pv can also act as immune effectors capable of killing bacteria and virus. Moreover, Vtg and Lv are shown to possess phagocytosis-promoting activity as opsonins. In addition to these immune-relevant functions, Vtg and Pv are found to have antioxidant activity, which is able to protect the host from oxidant stress. These non-nutritional functions clearly deepen our understanding of the physiological roles of the molecules, and at the same time, provide a sound basis for potential application of the molecules in human health.

  12. Beneficial Immune Effects of Myeloid-Related Proteins in Kidney Transplant Rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekers, N V; Bajema, I M; Mallat, M J K; Petersen, B; Anholts, J D H; Swings, G M J S; van Miert, P P M C; Kerkhoff, C; Roth, J; Popp, D; van Groningen, M C; Baeten, D; Goemaere, N; Kraaij, M D; Zandbergen, M; Heidt, S; van Kooten, C; de Fijter, J W; Claas, F H J; Eikmans, M

    2016-05-01

    Acute rejection is a risk factor for inferior long-term kidney transplant survival. Although T cell immunity is considered the main effector in clinical acute rejection, the role of myeloid cells is less clear. Expression of S100 calcium-binding protein A8 (S100A8) and S100A9 was evaluated in 303 biopsies before and after transplantation from 190 patients. In two independent cohorts of patients with acute rejection (n = 98 and n = 11; mostly cellular rejections), high expression of S100 calcium-binding protein A8 (S100A8) and A9 (S100A9) was related to improved graft outcome. Mechanisms of action of the S100 molecules were investigated. In the graft and peripheral blood cells, S100A8 and S100A9 expression correlated with myeloid-derived suppressor markers. In line with this finding, recombinant S100A8 and S100A9 proteins inhibited maturation and the allogeneic T cell stimulatory capacity of dendritic cells. S100A9 enhanced the production of reactive oxygen species by macrophages, which suppressed T cell activity at low concentrations in the form of hydrogen peroxide. Intragraft S100A8 and S100A9 expression linked to reduced expression of T cell immunity and tissue injury markers and higher expression of immune regulatory molecules. This study sheds new light on the importance of myeloid cell subsets in directing the outcome of T cell-mediated acute rejection. PMID:26607974

  13. Merozoite surface proteins in red blood cell invasion, immunity and vaccines against malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeson, James G; Drew, Damien R; Boyle, Michelle J; Feng, Gaoqian; Fowkes, Freya J I; Richards, Jack S

    2016-05-01

    Malaria accounts for an enormous burden of disease globally, with Plasmodium falciparum accounting for the majority of malaria, and P. vivax being a second important cause, especially in Asia, the Americas and the Pacific. During infection with Plasmodium spp., the merozoite form of the parasite invades red blood cells and replicates inside them. It is during the blood-stage of infection that malaria disease occurs and, therefore, understanding merozoite invasion, host immune responses to merozoite surface antigens, and targeting merozoite surface proteins and invasion ligands by novel vaccines and therapeutics have been important areas of research. Merozoite invasion involves multiple interactions and events, and substantial processing of merozoite surface proteins occurs before, during and after invasion. The merozoite surface is highly complex, presenting a multitude of antigens to the immune system. This complexity has proved challenging to our efforts to understand merozoite invasion and malaria immunity, and to developing merozoite antigens as malaria vaccines. In recent years, there has been major progress in this field, and several merozoite surface proteins show strong potential as malaria vaccines. Our current knowledge on this topic is reviewed, highlighting recent advances and research priorities. PMID:26833236

  14. Analysis of Thioester-Containing Proteins during the Innate Immune Response of Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Bou Aoun, Richard; Hetru, Charles; Troxler, Laurent; Doucet, Daniel; Ferrandon, Dominique; Matt, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Thioester-containing proteins (TEPs) are conserved proteins among insects that are thought to be involved in innate immunity. In Drosophila, the Tep family is composed of 6 genes named Tep1–Tep6. In this study, we investigated the phylogeny, expression pattern and roles of these genes in the host defense of Drosophila. Protostomian Tep genes are clustered in 3 distinct branches, 1 of which is specific to mosquitoes. Most D. melanogaster Tep genes are expressed in hemocytes, can be induced in ...

  15. Identification of a Protein Subset of the Anthrax Spore Immunome in Humans Immunized with the Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed Preparation

    OpenAIRE

    Kudva, Indira T.; Griffin, Robert W.; Garren, Jeonifer M.; Calderwood, Stephen B.; John, Manohar

    2005-01-01

    We identified spore targets of Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed (AVA)-induced immunity in humans by screening recombinant clones of a previously generated, limited genomic Bacillus anthracis Sterne (pXO1+, pXO2−) expression library of putative spore surface (spore-associated [SA]) proteins with pooled sera from human adults immunized with AVA (immune sera), the anthrax vaccine currently approved for use by humans in the United States. We identified 69 clones that reacted specifically with pooled immu...

  16. Dengue-2 Structural Proteins Associate with Human Proteins to Produce a Coagulation and Innate Immune Response Biased Interactome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares Luis RB

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue virus infection is a public health threat to hundreds of millions of individuals in the tropical regions of the globe. Although Dengue infection usually manifests itself in its mildest, though often debilitating clinical form, dengue fever, life-threatening complications commonly arise in the form of hemorrhagic shock and encephalitis. The etiological basis for the virus-induced pathology in general, and the different clinical manifestations in particular, are not well understood. We reasoned that a detailed knowledge of the global biological processes affected by virus entry into a cell might help shed new light on this long-standing problem. Methods A bacterial two-hybrid screen using DENV2 structural proteins as bait was performed, and the results were used to feed a manually curated, global dengue-human protein interaction network. Gene ontology and pathway enrichment, along with network topology and microarray meta-analysis, were used to generate hypothesis regarding dengue disease biology. Results Combining bioinformatic tools with two-hybrid technology, we screened human cDNA libraries to catalogue proteins physically interacting with the DENV2 virus structural proteins, Env, cap and PrM. We identified 31 interacting human proteins representing distinct biological processes that are closely related to the major clinical diagnostic feature of dengue infection: haemostatic imbalance. In addition, we found dengue-binding human proteins involved with additional key aspects, previously described as fundamental for virus entry into cells and the innate immune response to infection. Construction of a DENV2-human global protein interaction network revealed interesting biological properties suggested by simple network topology analysis. Conclusions Our experimental strategy revealed that dengue structural proteins interact with human protein targets involved in the maintenance of blood coagulation and innate anti

  17. Recombinant Flagellin-Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Cap Fusion Protein Promotes Protective Immune Responses in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunyan; Zhu, Shanshan; Wei, Li; Yan, Xu; Wang, Jing; Quan, Rong; She, Ruiping; Hu, Fengjiao; Liu, Jue

    2015-01-01

    The Cap protein of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) that serves as a major host-protective immunogen was used to develop recombinant vaccines for control of PCV2-associated diseases. Growing research data have demonstrated the high effectiveness of flagellin as an adjuvant for humoral and cellular immune responses. Here, a recombinant protein was designed by fusing a modified version of bacterial flagellin to PCV2 Cap protein and expressed in a baculovirus system. When administered without adjuvant to BALB/c mice, the flagellin-Cap fusion protein elicited stronger PCV2-specific IgG antibody response, higher neutralizing antibody levels, milder histopathological changes and lower viremia, as well as higher secretion of cytokines such as TNF-α and IFN-γ that conferred better protection against virus challenge than those in the recombinant Cap alone-inoculated mice. These results suggest that the recombinant Cap protein when fused to flagellin could elicit better humoral and cellular immune responses against PCV2 infection in a mouse model, thereby acting as an attractive candidate vaccine for control of the PCV2-associated diseases. PMID:26070075

  18. Recombinant Flagellin-Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Cap Fusion Protein Promotes Protective Immune Responses in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyan Zhang

    Full Text Available The Cap protein of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2 that serves as a major host-protective immunogen was used to develop recombinant vaccines for control of PCV2-associated diseases. Growing research data have demonstrated the high effectiveness of flagellin as an adjuvant for humoral and cellular immune responses. Here, a recombinant protein was designed by fusing a modified version of bacterial flagellin to PCV2 Cap protein and expressed in a baculovirus system. When administered without adjuvant to BALB/c mice, the flagellin-Cap fusion protein elicited stronger PCV2-specific IgG antibody response, higher neutralizing antibody levels, milder histopathological changes and lower viremia, as well as higher secretion of cytokines such as TNF-α and IFN-γ that conferred better protection against virus challenge than those in the recombinant Cap alone-inoculated mice. These results suggest that the recombinant Cap protein when fused to flagellin could elicit better humoral and cellular immune responses against PCV2 infection in a mouse model, thereby acting as an attractive candidate vaccine for control of the PCV2-associated diseases.

  19. Transgenic carrot expressing fusion protein comprising M. tuberculosis antigens induces immune response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permyakova, Natalia V; Zagorskaya, Alla A; Belavin, Pavel A; Uvarova, Elena A; Nosareva, Olesya V; Nesterov, Andrey E; Novikovskaya, Anna A; Zav'yalov, Evgeniy L; Moshkin, Mikhail P; Deineko, Elena V

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of the major infectious diseases, which continues to pose a major global health problem. Transgenic plants may serve as bioreactors to produce heterologous proteins including antibodies, antigens, and hormones. In the present study, a genetic construct has been designed that comprises the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes cfp10, esat6 and dIFN gene, which encode deltaferon, a recombinant analog of the human γ-interferon designed for expression in plant tissues. This construct was transferred to the carrot (Daucus carota L.) genome by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. This study demonstrates that the fusion protein CFP10-ESAT6-dIFN is synthesized in the transgenic carrot storage roots. The protein is able to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in laboratory animals (mice) when administered either orally or by injection. It should be emphasized that M. tuberculosis antigens contained in the fusion protein have no cytotoxic effect on peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PMID:25949997

  20. Transgenic Carrot Expressing Fusion Protein Comprising M. tuberculosis Antigens Induces Immune Response in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia V. Permyakova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis remains one of the major infectious diseases, which continues to pose a major global health problem. Transgenic plants may serve as bioreactors to produce heterologous proteins including antibodies, antigens, and hormones. In the present study, a genetic construct has been designed that comprises the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes cfp10, esat6 and dIFN gene, which encode deltaferon, a recombinant analog of the human γ-interferon designed for expression in plant tissues. This construct was transferred to the carrot (Daucus carota L. genome by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. This study demonstrates that the fusion protein CFP10-ESAT6-dIFN is synthesized in the transgenic carrot storage roots. The protein is able to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in laboratory animals (mice when administered either orally or by injection. It should be emphasized that M. tuberculosis antigens contained in the fusion protein have no cytotoxic effect on peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  1. Sand fly salivary proteins induce strong cellular immunity in a natural reservoir of visceral leishmaniasis with adverse consequences for Leishmania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Nicolas; Gomes, Regis; Teixeira, Clarissa; Cheng, Lily; Laughinghouse, Andre; Ward, Jerrold M; Elnaiem, Dia-Eldin; Fischer, Laurent; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Kamhawi, Shaden

    2009-05-01

    Immunity to a sand fly salivary protein protects against visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in hamsters. This protection was associated with the development of cellular immunity in the form of a delayed-type hypersensitivity response and the presence of IFN-gamma at the site of sand fly bites. To date, there are no data available regarding the cellular immune response to sand fly saliva in dogs, the main reservoirs of VL in Latin America, and its role in protection from this fatal disease. Two of 35 salivary proteins from the vector sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis, identified using a novel approach termed reverse antigen screening, elicited strong cellular immunity in dogs. Immunization with either molecule induced high IgG(2) antibody levels and significant IFN-gamma production following in vitro stimulation of PBMC with salivary gland homogenate (SGH). Upon challenge with uninfected or infected flies, immunized dogs developed a cellular response at the bite site characterized by lymphocytic infiltration and IFN-gamma and IL-12 expression. Additionally, SGH-stimulated lymphocytes from immunized dogs efficiently killed Leishmania infantum chagasi within autologous macrophages. Certain sand fly salivary proteins are potent immunogens obligatorily co-deposited with Leishmania parasites during transmission. Their inclusion in an anti-Leishmania vaccine would exploit anti-saliva immunity following an infective sand fly bite and set the stage for a protective anti-Leishmania immune response. PMID:19461875

  2. Sand fly salivary proteins induce strong cellular immunity in a natural reservoir of visceral leishmaniasis with adverse consequences for Leishmania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Collin

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunity to a sand fly salivary protein protects against visceral leishmaniasis (VL in hamsters. This protection was associated with the development of cellular immunity in the form of a delayed-type hypersensitivity response and the presence of IFN-gamma at the site of sand fly bites. To date, there are no data available regarding the cellular immune response to sand fly saliva in dogs, the main reservoirs of VL in Latin America, and its role in protection from this fatal disease. Two of 35 salivary proteins from the vector sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis, identified using a novel approach termed reverse antigen screening, elicited strong cellular immunity in dogs. Immunization with either molecule induced high IgG(2 antibody levels and significant IFN-gamma production following in vitro stimulation of PBMC with salivary gland homogenate (SGH. Upon challenge with uninfected or infected flies, immunized dogs developed a cellular response at the bite site characterized by lymphocytic infiltration and IFN-gamma and IL-12 expression. Additionally, SGH-stimulated lymphocytes from immunized dogs efficiently killed Leishmania infantum chagasi within autologous macrophages. Certain sand fly salivary proteins are potent immunogens obligatorily co-deposited with Leishmania parasites during transmission. Their inclusion in an anti-Leishmania vaccine would exploit anti-saliva immunity following an infective sand fly bite and set the stage for a protective anti-Leishmania immune response.

  3. Co-expression of Interleukin-15 Enhances the Protective Immune Responses Induced by Immunization with a Murine Malaria MVA-Based Vaccine Encoding the Circumsporozoite Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Parra

    Full Text Available Malaria remains a major global public health problem with an estimated 200 million cases detected in 2012. Although the most advanced candidate malaria vaccine (RTS,S has shown promise in clinical trials, its modest efficacy and durability have created uncertainty about the impact of RTS,S immunization (when used alone on global malaria transmission. Here we describe the development and characterization of a novel modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA-based malaria vaccine which co-expresses the Plasmodium yoelii circumsporozoite protein (CSP and IL-15. Vaccination/challenge studies showed that C57BL/6 mice immunized with the MVA-CSP/IL15 vaccine were protected significantly better against a P. yoelii 17XNL sporozoite challenge than either mice immunized with an MVA vaccine expressing only CSP or naïve controls. Importantly, the levels of total anti-CSP IgG were elevated about 100-fold for the MVA-CSP/IL15 immunized group compared to mice immunized with the MVA-CSP construct that does not express IL-15. Among the IgG subtypes, the IL-15 expressing MVA-CSP vaccine induced levels of IgG1 (8 fold and IgG2b (80 fold higher than the MVA-CSP construct. The significantly enhanced humoral responses and protection detected after immunization with the MVA-CSP/IL15 vaccine suggest that this IL-15 expressing MVA construct could be considered in the development of future malaria immunization strategies.

  4. Co-expression of Interleukin-15 Enhances the Protective Immune Responses Induced by Immunization with a Murine Malaria MVA-Based Vaccine Encoding the Circumsporozoite Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Marcela; Liu, Xia; Derrick, Steven C; Yang, Amy; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Zheng, Hong; Thao Pham, Phuong; Sedegah, Martha; Belmonte, Arnel; Litilit, Dianne D; Waldmann, Thomas A; Kumar, Sanjai; Morris, Sheldon L; Perera, Liyanage P

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains a major global public health problem with an estimated 200 million cases detected in 2012. Although the most advanced candidate malaria vaccine (RTS,S) has shown promise in clinical trials, its modest efficacy and durability have created uncertainty about the impact of RTS,S immunization (when used alone) on global malaria transmission. Here we describe the development and characterization of a novel modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA)-based malaria vaccine which co-expresses the Plasmodium yoelii circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and IL-15. Vaccination/challenge studies showed that C57BL/6 mice immunized with the MVA-CSP/IL15 vaccine were protected significantly better against a P. yoelii 17XNL sporozoite challenge than either mice immunized with an MVA vaccine expressing only CSP or naïve controls. Importantly, the levels of total anti-CSP IgG were elevated about 100-fold for the MVA-CSP/IL15 immunized group compared to mice immunized with the MVA-CSP construct that does not express IL-15. Among the IgG subtypes, the IL-15 expressing MVA-CSP vaccine induced levels of IgG1 (8 fold) and IgG2b (80 fold) higher than the MVA-CSP construct. The significantly enhanced humoral responses and protection detected after immunization with the MVA-CSP/IL15 vaccine suggest that this IL-15 expressing MVA construct could be considered in the development of future malaria immunization strategies. PMID:26505634

  5. Co-expression of Interleukin-15 Enhances the Protective Immune Responses Induced by Immunization with a Murine Malaria MVA-Based Vaccine Encoding the Circumsporozoite Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Marcela; Liu, Xia; Derrick, Steven C.; Yang, Amy; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Zheng, Hong; Thao Pham, Phuong; Sedegah, Martha; Belmonte, Arnel; Litilit, Dianne D.; Waldmann, Thomas A.; Kumar, Sanjai; Morris, Sheldon L.; Perera, Liyanage P.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains a major global public health problem with an estimated 200 million cases detected in 2012. Although the most advanced candidate malaria vaccine (RTS,S) has shown promise in clinical trials, its modest efficacy and durability have created uncertainty about the impact of RTS,S immunization (when used alone) on global malaria transmission. Here we describe the development and characterization of a novel modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA)–based malaria vaccine which co-expresses the Plasmodium yoelii circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and IL-15. Vaccination/challenge studies showed that C57BL/6 mice immunized with the MVA-CSP/IL15 vaccine were protected significantly better against a P. yoelii 17XNL sporozoite challenge than either mice immunized with an MVA vaccine expressing only CSP or naïve controls. Importantly, the levels of total anti-CSP IgG were elevated about 100-fold for the MVA-CSP/IL15 immunized group compared to mice immunized with the MVA-CSP construct that does not express IL-15. Among the IgG subtypes, the IL-15 expressing MVA-CSP vaccine induced levels of IgG1 (8 fold) and IgG2b (80 fold) higher than the MVA-CSP construct. The significantly enhanced humoral responses and protection detected after immunization with the MVA-CSP/IL15 vaccine suggest that this IL-15 expressing MVA construct could be considered in the development of future malaria immunization strategies. PMID:26505634

  6. HLA-associated immune escape pathways in HIV-1 subtype B Gag, Pol and Nef proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabrina L Brumme

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the extensive genetic diversity of HIV-1, viral evolution in response to immune selective pressures follows broadly predictable mutational patterns. Sites and pathways of Human Leukocyte-Antigen (HLA-associated polymorphisms in HIV-1 have been identified through the analysis of population-level data, but the full extent of immune escape pathways remains incompletely characterized. Here, in the largest analysis of HIV-1 subtype B sequences undertaken to date, we identify HLA-associated polymorphisms in the three HIV-1 proteins most commonly considered in cellular-based vaccine strategies. Results are organized into protein-wide escape maps illustrating the sites and pathways of HLA-driven viral evolution. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HLA-associated polymorphisms were identified in HIV-1 Gag, Pol and Nef in a multicenter cohort of >1500 chronically subtype-B infected, treatment-naïve individuals from established cohorts in Canada, the USA and Western Australia. At q< or =0.05, 282 codons commonly mutating under HLA-associated immune pressures were identified in these three proteins. The greatest density of associations was observed in Nef (where close to 40% of codons exhibited a significant HLA association, followed by Gag then Pol (where approximately 15-20% of codons exhibited HLA associations, confirming the extensive impact of immune selection on HIV evolution and diversity. Analysis of HIV codon covariation patterns identified over 2000 codon-codon interactions at q< or =0.05, illustrating the dense and complex networks of linked escape and secondary/compensatory mutations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The immune escape maps and associated data are intended to serve as a user-friendly guide to the locations of common escape mutations and covarying codons in HIV-1 subtype B, and as a resource facilitating the systematic identification and classification of immune escape mutations. These resources should facilitate

  7. Similar Ability of FbaA with M Protein to Elicit Protective Immunity Against Group A Streptococcus Challenge in Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cuiqing Ma; Caihong Li; Xiurong Wang; Ruihong Zeng; Xiaolin Yin; Huidong Feng; Lin Wei

    2009-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS), an important human pathogen, can cause various kinds of infections including superficial infections and potentially lethal infections, and the search for an effective vaccine to prevent GAS infections has been ongoing for many years. This paper compares the immunogenicity and immunoprotection of FbaA (an Fn-binding protein expressed on the surface of GAS) with that of M protein, the best immunogen of GAS. Assay for immune response showed that FbaA, similar to M protein, could induce protein-specific high IgG titer in BALB/c mice. Furthermore, following GAS challenge, the mice immunized with FbaA showed the same protective rate as those with M protein. These results indicate that FbaA is similar in ability to M protein in inducing protective immunity against GAS challenge in mice.

  8. Segmental pairs of giant insect cells discharge presumptive immune proteins at each larval molt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, James B; Bee, Charles M; Miller, Lou Ann; Imai, Brian S; Yau, Peter M

    2016-05-15

    A pair of massive secretory cells exists within each thoracic and the nine abdominal segments of Manduca larvae. Each of these cells is nestled between the dorsal integument and underlying muscles. Contents of large vacuoles in these cells are abruptly discharged at each molt and have always been considered to contribute to shedding and/or formation of cuticle. Peanut agglutinin is a specific lectin label for these secretory vacuoles; vacuoles label intensely immediately before each molt as vacuoles attain their maximal size. Contents of vacuoles are restored after each molt and throughout most of each intermolt. During the molt cycle these cells secrete contents of their vacuoles into the interior hemocoel rather than onto the exterior cuticle. Vacuoles discharge via a distinctive mechanism involving partitioning of contents into numerous vesicles that move to the cell surface. Dermal secretory cells were dissected from larvae before and after the 4th-5th instar molt. Proteins from pre-molt and post-molt secretory cells were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis to establish which proteins are discharged at the molt. While secreted proteins are novel, all have presumptive roles in immune responses. Dermal secretory cells may represent a new, unsuspected component of the innate immune system that release their proteins during the vulnerable molting period of an insect's life. PMID:27039264

  9. A comparative approach expands the protein-protein interaction node of the immune receptor XA21 in wheat and rice

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Baoju; Ruan, Randy; Cantu, Dario; Wang, Xiaodong; Ji, Wanquan; Ronald, Pamela C; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The rice (Oryza sativa) OsXA21 receptor kinase is a well-studied immune receptor that initiates a signal transduction pathway leading to resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. Two homologs of OsXA21 were identified in wheat (Triticum aestivum): TaXA21-like1 located in a syntenic region with OsXA21, and TaXA21-like2 located in a non-syntenic region. Proteins encoded by these two wheat genes interact with four wheat orthologs of known OsXA21 interactors. In this study, we screened a wheat...

  10. Human metapneumovirus M2-2 protein inhibits innate immune response in monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junping Ren

    Full Text Available Human metapneumovirus (hMPV is a leading cause of lower respiratory infection in young children, the elderly and immunocompromised patients. Repeated hMPV infections occur throughout life. However, immune evasion mechanisms of hMPV infection are largely unknown. Recently, our group has demonstrated that hMPV M2-2 protein, an important virulence factor, contributes to immune evasion in airway epithelial cells by targeting the mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS. Whether M2-2 regulates the innate immunity in human dendritic cells (DC, an important family of immune cells controlling antigen presenting, is currently unknown. We found that human DC infected with a virus lacking M2-2 protein expression (rhMPV-ΔM2-2 produced higher levels of cytokines, chemokines and IFNs, compared to cells infected with wild-type virus (rhMPV-WT, suggesting that M2-2 protein inhibits innate immunity in human DC. In parallel, we found that myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88, an essential adaptor for Toll-like receptors (TLRs, plays a critical role in inducing immune response of human DC, as downregulation of MyD88 by siRNA blocked the induction of immune regulatory molecules by hMPV. Since M2-2 is a cytoplasmic protein, we investigated whether M2-2 interferes with MyD88-mediated antiviral signaling. We found that indeed M2-2 protein associated with MyD88 and inhibited MyD88-dependent gene transcription. In this study, we also identified the domains of M2-2 responsible for its immune inhibitory function in human DC. In summary, our results demonstrate that M2-2 contributes to hMPV immune evasion by inhibiting MyD88-dependent cellular responses in human DC.

  11. A novel immune-tolerable and permeable lectin-like protein from mushroom Agaricus bisporus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismaya, Wangsa T; Yunita; Efthyani, Alida; Lai, Xuelei; Retnoningrum, Debbie S; Rachmawati, Heni; Dijkstra, Bauke W; Tjandrawinata, Raymond R

    2016-05-13

    A lectin like protein designated as LSMT is recently discovered in Agaricus bisporus. The protein adopts very similar structure to Ricin-B like lectin from Clitocybe nebularis (CNL) and HA-33 from Clostridium botulinum (HA-33), which both recognize sugar molecules that decorate the surface of the epithelial cells of the intestine. A preliminary study in silico pointed out potential capability of LSMT to perform such biological activity. Following that hypothesis, we demonstrated that LSMT is indeed capable of penetrating out from a dialysis tube of the mice intestine origin. Furthermore, the protein appeared not to evoke the immune response upon introduction into mice, unlike its structural homologs. This is the first report on the biological implication of LSMT that might lead to its application. PMID:27060548

  12. S-layer protein mediates the stimulatory effect of Lactobacillus helveticus MIMLh5 on innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverniti, Valentina; Stuknyte, Milda; Minuzzo, Mario; Arioli, Stefania; De Noni, Ivano; Scabiosi, Christian; Cordova, Zuzet Martinez; Junttila, Ilkka; Hämäläinen, Sanna; Turpeinen, Hannu; Mora, Diego; Karp, Matti; Pesu, Marko; Guglielmetti, Simone

    2013-02-01

    The ability to positively affect host health through the modulation of the immune response is a feature of increasing importance in measuring the probiotic potential of a bacterial strain. However, the identities of the bacterial cell components involved in cross talk with immune cells remain elusive. In this study, we characterized the dairy strain Lactobacillus helveticus MIMLh5 and its surface-layer protein (SlpA) using in vitro and ex vivo analyses. We found that MIMLh5 and SlpA exert anti-inflammatory effects by reducing the activation of NF-κB on the intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cell line. On the contrary, MIMLh5 and SlpA act as stimulators of the innate immune system by triggering the expression of proinflammatory factors tumor necrosis factor alpha and COX-2 in the human macrophage cell line U937 via recognition through Toll-like receptor 2. In the same experiments, SlpA protein did not affect the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10. A similar response was observed following stimulation of macrophages isolated from mouse bone marrow or the peritoneal cavity. These results suggest that SlpA plays a major role in mediating bacterial immune-stimulating activity, which could help to induce the host's defenses against and responses toward infections. This study supports the concept that the viability of bacterial cells is not always essential to exert immunomodulatory effects, thus permitting the development of safer therapies for the treatment of specific diseases according to a paraprobiotic intervention. PMID:23220964

  13. Murine immune responses to a Plasmodium vivax-derived chimeric recombinant protein expressed in Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Nam-Jun

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To develop a plant-based vaccine against Plasmodium vivax, two P. vivax candidate proteins were chosen. First, the merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1, a major asexual blood stage antigen that is currently considered a strong vaccine candidate. Second, the circumsporozoite protein (CSP, a component of sporozoites that contains a B-cell epitope. Methods A synthetic chimeric recombinant 516 bp gene encoding containing PvMSP-1, a Pro-Gly linker motif, and PvCSP was synthesized; the gene, named MLC, encoded a total of 172 amino acids. The recombinant gene was modified with regard to codon usage to optimize gene expression in Brassica napus. The Ti plasmid inducible gene transfer system was used for MLC chimeric recombinant gene expression in B. napus. Gene expression was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, beta-glucuronidase reporter gene (GUS assay, and Western blot. Results The MLC chimeric recombinant protein expressed in B. napus had a molecular weight of approximately 25 kDa. It exhibited a clinical sensitivity of 84.21% (n = 38 and a clinical specificity of 100% (n = 24 as assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Oral immunization of BALB/c mice with MLC chimeric recombinant protein successfully induced antigen-specific IgG1 production. Additionally, the Th1-related cytokines IL-12 (p40, TNF, and IFN-γ were significantly increased in the spleens of the BALB/c mice. Conclusions The chimeric MLC recombinant protein produced in B. napus has potential as both as an antigen for diagnosis and as a valuable vaccine candidate for oral immunization against vivax malaria.

  14. Increased titers of neutralizing antibodies after immunization with both envelope proteins of the porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denner Joachim

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite enormous difficulties to induce antibodies neutralizing HIV-1, especially broadly neutralizing antibodies directed against the conserved membrane proximal external region (MPER of the transmembrane envelope protein, such antibodies can be easily induced in the case of gammaretroviruses, among them the porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs. In addition to neutralizing antibodies directed against the transmembrane envelope protein p15E, neutralizing antibodies were also induced by immunization with the surface envelope protein gp70. PERVs represent a special risk for xenotransplantation using pig tissues or organs since they are integrated in the genome of all pigs and infect human cells and a vaccine may protect from transmission to the recipient. To investigate the effect of simultaneous immunization with both proteins in detail, a study was performed in hamsters. Gp70 and p15E of PERV were produced in E. coli, purified and used for immunization. All animals developed binding antibodies against the antigens used for immunization. Sera from animals immunized with p15E recognized epitopes in the MPER and the fusion peptide proximal region (FPPR of p15E. One MPER epitope showed a sequence homology to an epitope in the MPER of gp41 of HIV-1 recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies found in HIV infected individuals. Neutralizing antibodies were detected in all sera. Most importantly, sera from animals immunized with gp70 had a higher neutralizing activity when compared with the sera from animals immunized with p15E and sera from animals immunized with gp70 together with p15E had a higher neutralizing activity compared with sera from animals immunized with each antigen alone. These immunization studies are important for the development of vaccines against other retroviruses including the human immunodeficiency virus HIV-1.

  15. Immunization with synthetic peptides containing epitopes of the class 1 outer-membrane protein of Neisseria meningitidis: production of bactericidal antibodies on immunization with a cyclic peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulides, M; McGuinness, B T; Heckels, J E

    1993-08-01

    The class 1 outer-membrane protein of Neisseria meningitidis is the target for subtype-specific, bactericidal monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The epitopes recognized by these antibodies have been mapped previously to linear peptides corresponding to the sequences thought to be exposed at the apices of surface-exposed loops of the protein. In this work several synthetic peptides containing the subtype Pl.16b epitope have been synthetized with the aim of inducing a polyclonal immune response resembling the reactivity of the mAbs. Initially, peptides of 9 and 15 amino acid residues were synthesized and used for immunization after coupling to a carrier protein. The reactivity of the resulting antisera, with synthetic linear decapeptides, resembled that seen in previous epitope mapping experiments with the protective mAbs. However, despite the induction of antibodies having the desired specificity, the antisera reacted poorly with the native protein in outer membranes, and were non-bactericidal. A 36mer peptide, consisting of the entire surface-exposed loop 4 of the class 1 protein was then synthesized and used for immunization as (i) free peptide, (ii) peptide coupled to carrier and (iii) peptide subjected to cyclization, in an attempt to restrict it to conformations that might more closely resemble the native loop structure. In contrast to antisera raised against linear peptides, antibodies raised by immunization with the 36mer cyclic peptide, did not react with linear peptides recognized by the mAbs, but instead appeared to recognize conformational determinants. This antiserum promoted complement-mediated bactericidal killing of the homologous meningococcal strain, demonstrating the potential of synthetic peptide immunogens for inducing a protective immune response against group B meningococci. PMID:7691983

  16. Response to Hepatocarcinoma Hca-F of Mice Immunized with Heat Shock Protein 70 from Elemene Combo Tumor Cell Vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lianying Guo; Guangxia Shi; Zhihong Gao; Jie Shen; Rong Xing; Zhenchao Qian

    2006-01-01

    To analyze immune response to murine hepatocarcinoma Hca-F of mice immunized with heat shock protein 70(HSP70) derived from elemene combo tumor cell vaccine (EC-TCV) of Hca-F, HSP70 was isolated from EC-TCV by ADP affinity chromatography. Mice were immunized with HSP70 intraperitoneally three times and spleen cells were sampled. For cells, their proliferation and cytotoxicity against Hca-F were measured with MTT assay and their phenotypes were analyzed with flow cytometry. Spleen cells of immunized mice with HSP70 exhibited more potent cytotoxicity against Hca-F and proliferation than that of normal control mice, but less potent than that of mice immunized with EC-TCV. Among three groups, the percent of γδ T lymphocytes in the mice immunized with HSP70 (35.5%) was the highest compared with 6.25% in normal mice, and 28.4% in the mice immunized with EC-TCV. Immunization of HSP70 derived from EC-TCV could elicit potent immune response to Hca-F. HSP70 is one of elements inducing anti-tumor immune responses against Hca-F. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2006;3(4):291-295.

  17. Rotavirus nonstructural protein 1 antagonizes innate immune response by interacting with retinoic acid inducible gene I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Lan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nonstructural protein 1 (NSP1 of rotavirus has been reported to block interferon (IFN signaling by mediating proteasome-dependent degradation of IFN-regulatory factors (IRFs and (or the β-transducin repeat containing protein (β-TrCP. However, in addition to these targets, NSP1 may subvert innate immune responses via other mechanisms. Results The NSP1 of rotavirus OSU strain as well as the IRF3 binding domain truncated NSP1 of rotavirus SA11 strain are unable to degrade IRFs, but can still inhibit host IFN response, indicating that NSP1 may target alternative host factor(s other than IRFs. Overexpression of NSP1 can block IFN-β promoter activation induced by the retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I, but does not inhibit IFN-β activation induced by the mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS, indicating that NSP1 may target RIG-I. Immunoprecipitation experiments show that NSP1 interacts with RIG-I independent of IRF3 binding domain. In addition, NSP1 induces down-regulation of RIG-I in a proteasome-independent way. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that inhibition of RIG-I mediated type I IFN responses by NSP1 may contribute to the immune evasion of rotavirus.

  18. Immune recognition of Onchocerca volvulus proteins in the human host and animal models of onchocerciasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchang, T K; Ajonina-Ekoti, I; Ndjonka, D; Eisenbarth, A; Achukwi, M D; Renz, A; Brattig, N W; Liebau, E; Breloer, M

    2015-05-01

    Onchocerca volvulus is a tissue-dwelling, vector-borne nematode parasite of humans and is the causative agent of onchocerciasis or river blindness. Natural infections of BALB/c mice with Litomosoides sigmodontis and of cattle with Onchocerca ochengi were used as models to study the immune responses to O. volvulus-derived recombinant proteins (OvALT-2, OvNLT-1, Ov103 and Ov7). The humoral immune response of O. volvulus-infected humans against OvALT-2, OvNLT-1 and Ov7 revealed pronounced immunoglobulin G (IgG) titres which were, however, significantly lower than against the lysate of O. volvulus adult female worms. Sera derived from patients displaying the hyperreactive form of onchocerciasis showed a uniform trend of higher IgG reactivity both to the single proteins and the O. volvulus lysate. Sera derived from L. sigmodontis-infected mice and from calves exposed to O. ochengi transmission in a hyperendemic area also contained IgM and IgG1 specific for O. volvulus-derived recombinant proteins. These results strongly suggest that L. sigmodontis-specific and O. ochengi-specific immunoglobulins elicited during natural infection of mice and cattle cross-reacted with O. volvulus-derived recombinant antigens. Monitoring O. ochengi-infected calves over a 26-month period, provided a comprehensive kinetic of the humoral response to infection that was strictly correlated with parasite load and occurrence of microfilariae. PMID:24721822

  19. Regulation of immune responses to protein therapeutics by transplacental induction of T cell tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nimesh; Culina, Slobodan; Meslier, Yann; Dimitrov, Jordan; Arnoult, Christophe; Delignat, Sandrine; Gangadharan, Bagirath; Lecerf, Maxime; Justesen, Sune; Gouilleux-Gruart, Valérie; Salomon, Benoit L; Scott, David W; Kaveri, Srinivas V; Mallone, Roberto; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien

    2015-02-18

    Central tolerance plays a key role in modulating immune responses to self and exogenous antigens. The absence of self-antigen expression, as in patients with genetic deficiencies, prevents the development of antigen-specific immune tolerance. Hence, a substantial number of patients develop neutralizing antibodies to the corresponding protein therapeutics after replacement treatment. In this context, the administration of missing antigens during fetal development, a key period for self-tolerance establishment, should confer early and long-lasting antigen-specific tolerance. To this end, we exploited the physiological pathway of the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) through which maternal immunoglobulins are transplacentally transferred to fetuses. We demonstrate that Fc-fused antigens administered to pregnant mice reach fetal lymphoid organs in an FcRn-dependent manner, accumulate in antigen-presenting cells of myeloid origin, and promote the generation of both thymic and peripheral antigen-specific regulatory T cells. This strategy was successfully pursued in a mouse model of hemophilia A, where maternofetal transfer of the Fc-fused immunodominant domains of coagulation factor VIII conferred antigen-specific tolerance. Transplacental tolerance induction with Fc-fused proteins may thus prove valuable to prevent alloimmunization after replacement protein therapy for congenital deficiencies. PMID:25696000

  20. A novel elicitor protein from Phytophthora parasitica induces plant basal immunity and systemic acquired resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yi-Hsuan; Yan, Hao-Zhi; Liou, Ruey-Fen

    2015-02-01

    The interaction between Phytophthora pathogens and host plants involves the exchange of complex molecular signals from both sides. Recent studies of Phytophthora have led to the identification of various apoplastic elicitors known to trigger plant immunity. Here, we provide evidence that the protein encoded by OPEL of Phytophthora parasitica is a novel elicitor. Homologues of OPEL were identified only in oomycetes, but not in fungi and other organisms. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that OPEL is expressed throughout the development of P. parasitica and is especially highly induced after plant infection. Infiltration of OPEL recombinant protein from Escherichia coli into leaves of Nicotiana tabacum (cv. Samsun NN) resulted in cell death, callose deposition, the production of reactive oxygen species and induced expression of pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity markers and salicylic acid-responsive defence genes. Moreover, the infiltration conferred systemic resistance against a broad spectrum of pathogens, including Tobacco mosaic virus, the bacteria wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum and P. parasitica. In addition to the signal peptide, OPEL contains three conserved domains: a thaumatin-like domain, a glycine-rich protein domain and a glycosyl hydrolase (GH) domain. Intriguingly, mutation of a putative laminarinase active site motif in the predicted GH domain abolished its elicitor activity, which suggests enzymatic activity of OPEL in triggering the defence response. PMID:24965864

  1. Unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling regulates arsenic trioxide-mediated macrophage innate immune function disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic exposure is known to disrupt innate immune functions in humans and in experimental animals. In this study, we provide a mechanism by which arsenic trioxide (ATO) disrupts macrophage functions. ATO treatment of murine macrophage cells diminished internalization of FITC-labeled latex beads, impaired clearance of phagocytosed fluorescent bacteria and reduced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These impairments in macrophage functions are associated with ATO-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway characterized by the enhancement in proteins such as GRP78, p-PERK, p-eIF2α, ATF4 and CHOP. The expression of these proteins is altered both at transcriptional and translational levels. Pretreatment with chemical chaperon, 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) attenuated the ATO-induced activation in UPR signaling and afforded protection against ATO-induced disruption of macrophage functions. This treatment also reduced ATO-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Interestingly, treatment with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prior to ATO exposure, not only reduced ROS production and UPR signaling but also improved macrophage functions. These data demonstrate that UPR signaling and ROS generation are interdependent and are involved in the arsenic-induced pathobiology of macrophage. These data also provide a novel strategy to block the ATO-dependent impairment in innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Inorganic arsenic to humans and experimental animals disrupt innate immune responses. • The mechanism underlying arsenic impaired macrophage functions involves UPR signaling. • Chemical chaperon attenuates arsenic-mediated macrophage function impairment. • Antioxidant, NAC blocks impairment in arsenic-treated macrophage functions

  2. Unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling regulates arsenic trioxide-mediated macrophage innate immune function disruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Li, Changzhao; Chaudhary, Sandeep C. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Ballestas, Mary E. [Department of Pediatrics Infectious Disease, Children' s of Alabama, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL (United States); Elmets, Craig A. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Robbins, David J. [Department of Surgery, Molecular Oncology Program, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami (United States); Matalon, Sadis [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Deshane, Jessy S. [Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Afaq, Farrukh [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Bickers, David R. [Department of Dermatology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York (United States); Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic exposure is known to disrupt innate immune functions in humans and in experimental animals. In this study, we provide a mechanism by which arsenic trioxide (ATO) disrupts macrophage functions. ATO treatment of murine macrophage cells diminished internalization of FITC-labeled latex beads, impaired clearance of phagocytosed fluorescent bacteria and reduced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These impairments in macrophage functions are associated with ATO-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway characterized by the enhancement in proteins such as GRP78, p-PERK, p-eIF2α, ATF4 and CHOP. The expression of these proteins is altered both at transcriptional and translational levels. Pretreatment with chemical chaperon, 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) attenuated the ATO-induced activation in UPR signaling and afforded protection against ATO-induced disruption of macrophage functions. This treatment also reduced ATO-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Interestingly, treatment with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prior to ATO exposure, not only reduced ROS production and UPR signaling but also improved macrophage functions. These data demonstrate that UPR signaling and ROS generation are interdependent and are involved in the arsenic-induced pathobiology of macrophage. These data also provide a novel strategy to block the ATO-dependent impairment in innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Inorganic arsenic to humans and experimental animals disrupt innate immune responses. • The mechanism underlying arsenic impaired macrophage functions involves UPR signaling. • Chemical chaperon attenuates arsenic-mediated macrophage function impairment. • Antioxidant, NAC blocks impairment in arsenic-treated macrophage functions.

  3. Complex structure of type VI peptidoglycan muramidase effector and a cognate immunity protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure of the Tse3–Tsi3 complex associated with the bacterial type VI secretion system of P. aeruginosa has been solved and refined at 1.9 Å resolution. The structural basis of the recognition of the muramidase effector and its inactivation by its cognate immunity protein is revealed. The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a bacterial protein-export machine that is capable of delivering virulence effectors between Gram-negative bacteria. The T6SS of Pseudomonas aeruginosa transports two lytic enzymes, Tse1 and Tse3, to degrade cell-wall peptidoglycan in the periplasm of rival bacteria that are competing for niches via amidase and muramidase activities, respectively. Two cognate immunity proteins, Tsi1 and Tsi3, are produced by the bacterium to inactivate the two antibacterial effectors, thereby protecting its siblings from self-intoxication. Recently, Tse1–Tsi1 has been structurally characterized. Here, the structure of the Tse3–Tsi3 complex is reported at 1.9 Å resolution. The results reveal that Tse3 contains a C-terminal catalytic domain that adopts a soluble lytic transglycosylase (SLT) fold in which three calcium-binding sites were surprisingly observed close to the catalytic Glu residue. The electrostatic properties of the substrate-binding groove are also distinctive from those of known structures with a similar fold. All of these features imply that a unique catalytic mechanism is utilized by Tse3 in cleaving glycosidic bonds. Tsi3 comprises a single domain showing a β-sandwich architecture that is reminiscent of the immunoglobulin fold. Three loops of Tsi3 insert deeply into the groove of Tse3 and completely occlude its active site, which forms the structural basis of Tse3 inactivation. This work is the first crystallographic report describing the three-dimensional structure of the Tse3–Tsi3 effector–immunity pair

  4. Leptospiral proteins recognized during the humoral immune response to leptospirosis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, H; Croda, J; Flannery, B; Mazel, M; Matsunaga, J; Galvão Reis, M; Levett, P N; Ko, A I; Haake, D A

    2001-08-01

    Leptospirosis is an emerging zoonosis caused by pathogenic spirochetes belonging to the genus Leptospira. An understanding of leptospiral protein expression regulation is needed to develop new immunoprotective and serodiagnostic strategies. We used the humoral immune response during human leptospirosis as a reporter of protein antigens expressed during infection. Qualitative and quantitative immunoblot analysis was performed using sera from 105 patients from Brazil and Barbados. Sera from patients with other diseases and healthy individuals were evaluated as controls. Seven proteins, p76, p62, p48, p45, p41, p37, and p32, were identified as targets of the humoral response during natural infection. In both acute and convalescent phases of illness, antibodies to lipopolysaccharide were predominantly immunoglobulin M (IgM) while antibodies to proteins were exclusively IgG. Anti-p32 reactivity had the greatest sensitivity and specificity: positive reactions were observed in 37 and 84% of acute- and convalescent-phase sera, respectively, while only 5% of community control individuals demonstrated positive reactions. Six immunodominant antigens were expressed by all pathogenic leptospiral strains tested; only p37 was inconsistently expressed. Two-dimensional immunoblots identified four of the seven infection-associated antigens as being previously characterized proteins: LipL32 (the major outer membrane lipoprotein), LipL41 (a surface-exposed outer membrane lipoprotein), and heat shock proteins GroEL and DnaK. Fractionation studies demonstrated LipL32 and LipL41 reactivity in the outer membrane fraction and GroEL and DnaK in the cytoplasmic fraction, while p37 appeared to be a soluble periplasmic protein. Most of the other immunodominant proteins, including p48 and p45, were localized to the inner membrane. These findings indicate that leptospiral proteins recognized during natural infection are potentially useful for serodiagnosis and may serve as targets for vaccine

  5. Immunization with purified protein antigens from Streptococcus mutans against dental caries in rhesus monkeys.

    OpenAIRE

    Lehner, T; Russell, M W; Caldwell, J.; Smith, R.

    1981-01-01

    Protein antigens I, I/II, II, and III were prepared from Streptococcus mutans (serotype c). Their immunogenicities and protective effects against dental caries were investigated in 40 rhesus monkeys kept entirely on a human-type diet, containing about 15% sucrose. Antigens I, I/II and, to a lesser extent, antigen II induced significant reductions in dental caries, as compared with sham-immunized monkeys. This was achieved with 1 or 2 doses of antigen, the first of which was administered with ...

  6. Effect of Whey Protein Isolate on Oxidative Stress, Exercise Performance, and Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Shute, Max

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a whey protein isolate (WPI), a reported glutathione (GSH) booster, on exercise performance, immune function, and antioxidant status during weight maintenance and energy restriction in humans. Twenty well-trained, college age, male cyclists performed a cycling exercise test for 45 min, the first 7 min at 70% of VO2peak and the remaining 38 min at 55% VO2peak immediately followed by a performance test set at 90% VO2peak until exhau...

  7. Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins in regulation of inflammation and innate immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Rune B; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads

    2011-01-01

    as important regulators of innate immune signaling downstream of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) and NOD2 receptors, and the retinoic acid-inducible gene (RIG)-I receptor. Recent evidence suggests that c......IAP1, cIAP2, and XIAP facilitate ubiquitin-dependent signaling activated by these PRRs and mediate activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) transcription factors as well as the MAP kinases p38 and JNK. Here, we review the current understanding of IAP-mediated PRR signaling and how IAP proteins...

  8. Potential of high resolution protein mapping as a method of monitoring the human immune system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immunology traditionally deals with complex cellular systems and heterogeneous mixtures of effector molecules (primarily antibodies). Some sense has emerged from this chaos through the use of functional assays. Such an approach however naturally leaves a great deal undiscovered since the assays are simple and the assayed objects are complex. In this chapter some experimental approaches to immunological problems are described using high-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis, a method that can resolve thousands of proteins and can thus begin to treat immunological entities at their appropriate level of complexity. In addition, the possible application of this work to the problem of monitoring events in the individual human immune system are discussed

  9. Effect of extrusion processing on immune activation properties of hazelnut protein in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Tina; Para, Radhakrishna; Gonipeta, Babu; Reitmeyer, Mike; He, Yingli; Srkalovic, Ines; Ng, Perry K W; Gangur, Venu

    2016-09-01

    Although food processing can alter food allergenicity, the impact of extrusion processing on in vivo hazelnut allergenicity is unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that extrusion processing will alter the immune activation properties of hazelnut protein (HNP) in mice. Soluble extrusion-processed HNP (EHNP) was prepared and evaluated for immune response using an established transdermal sensitization mouse model. Mice were sensitized with identical amounts of EHNP versus raw HNP. After confirming systemic IgE, IgG1 and IgG2a antibody responses, oral hypersensitivity reaction was quantified by hypothermia shock response (HSR). Mechanism was studied by measuring mucosal mast cell (MMC) degranulation. Compared to raw HNP, the EHNP elicited slower but similar IgE antibody (Ab) response, lower IgG1 but higher IgG2a Ab response. The EHNP exhibited significantly lower oral HSR as well as MMC degranulation capacity. These results demonstrate that the extrusion technology can be used to produce soluble HNP with altered immune activation properties. PMID:27251648

  10. Outer Surface Protein A Protects Lyme Disease Spirochetes from Acquired Host Immunity in the Tick Vector▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battisti, James M.; Bono, James L.; Rosa, Patricia A.; Schrumpf, Merry E.; Schwan, Tom G.; Policastro, Paul F.

    2008-01-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi alters the expression of outer surface protein (osp) genes as the bacterium cycles between ticks and mammals. OspA is produced as borreliae enter the tick vector and remains a major surface antigen during midgut colonization. To elucidate the role of OspA in the vector, we created an insertional deletion of ospA in strain B31-A3. The ospA mutant infects mice when it is injected intradermally and is acquired by larval ticks fed on these mice, where it persists through the molt to the nymph stage. Bacterial survival rates in artificially infected tick larvae fed on naïve mice were compared with those in the vector fed on immune mice. The ospA mutant proliferates in larvae if it is exposed to blood from naïve mice, but it declines in density after larval feeding if the blood is from immune mice. When uninfected larvae are fed on B-cell-deficient mice infected with the ospA mutant, larvae show borrelial densities and persistence that are significantly greater than those fed on infected, immunocompetent mice. We conclude that OspA serves a critical antibody-shielding role during vector blood meal uptake from immune hosts and is not required for persistence in the tick vector. PMID:18779341

  11. Staphylococcus aureus infection induces protein A-mediated immune evasion in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Noel T; Kim, Hwan Keun; Falugi, Fabiana; Huang, Min; Dulac, John; Henry Dunand, Carole; Zheng, Nai-Ying; Kaur, Kaval; Andrews, Sarah F; Huang, Yunping; DeDent, Andrea; Frank, Karen M; Charnot-Katsikas, Angella; Schneewind, Olaf; Wilson, Patrick C

    2014-11-17

    Staphylococcus aureus bacterial infection commonly results in chronic or recurrent disease, suggesting that humoral memory responses are hampered. Understanding how S. aureus subverts the immune response is critical for the rescue of host natural humoral immunity and vaccine development. S. aureus expresses the virulence factor Protein A (SpA) on all clinical isolates, and SpA has been shown in mice to expand and ablate variable heavy 3 (VH3) idiotype B cells. The effects of SpA during natural infection, however, have not been addressed. Acutely activated B cells, or plasmablasts (PBs), were analyzed to dissect the ongoing immune response to infection through the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The B cells that were activated by infection had a highly limited response. When screened against multiple S. aureus antigens, only high-affinity binding to SpA was observed. Consistently, PBs underwent affinity maturation, but their B cell receptors demonstrated significant bias toward the VH3 idiotype. These data suggest that the superantigenic activity of SpA leads to immunodominance, limiting host responses to other S. aureus virulence factors that would be necessary for protection and memory formation. PMID:25348152

  12. Isolation and partial purification of antimicrobial peptides/proteins from dung beetle, Onthophagus taurus immune hemolymph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antimicrobial peptides are important in the first line of the host defense system of all insect species. In the present study antimicrobial peptide(s) were isolated from the hemolymph of the dung beetle Onthophagus taurus. Both non induced and immune induced hemolymphs were tested for their antimicrobial activity against different bacterial strains and C. albicans. Induction was done by injecting E. coli into the abdominal cavity of the O. taurus. The non induced hemolymph did not show activity against any of the tested fungal and bacterial strains where as induced hemolymph showed activity against all tested bacterial strains but no activity against C. albicans. The induced hemolymph was subjected to non reducing SDS-PAGE and UV wavelength scan was performed to detect the presence of peptides. The immune induced hemolymph was purified by gel filtration chromatography to separate the proteins responsible for the antibacterial activity. The fractions within the peak were tested against those bacteria which previously showed sensitivity to the crude immune induced hemolymph. All fractions were found to be active against all tested bacteria with difference in zone of inhibition. The peptides are active against prokaryotes and not against eukaryotes. These properties reveal its unique characteristics and therapeutic application. (author)

  13. HPV16 E2 protein promotes innate immunity by modulating immunosuppressive status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunthamala, Nuchsupha; Pientong, Chamsai; Ohno, Tatsukuni; Zhang, Chenyang; Bhingare, Arundhati; Kondo, Yuta; Azuma, Miyuki; Ekalaksananan, Tipaya

    2014-04-18

    The balance between active immune responses against human papillomavirus (HPV) and HPV-induced immune escape regulates viral clearance and carcinogenesis. To understand the role of the early viral protein HPV16 E2 in host innate immune responses, the HPV16 E2-transfected murine squamous cell carcinoma cell line SCCVII (SCC/E2) was generated and anti-tumor responses in T-cell-depleted mice were evaluated. Tumor growth of SCC/E2 was markedly reduced. Cytotoxicity against the NK-sensitive targets YAC-1 and SCCVII was clearly enhanced in SCC/E2-inoculated mice. Despite the comparable ratio of NK cells, the proportion of CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) was significantly decreased in SCC/E2-inoculated mice. The transcription of MDSC-related mediators such as inducible nitric oxide synthase, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, and heme oxygenase-1 was significantly impaired in the SCC/E2-inoculated tumor tissues on day 3. Our results suggest that HPV16 E2 promotes anti-tumor innate effector function by modulating immunoregulatory events mediated by MDSCs and their mediators. This report describes a new role for HPV16 E2 as a local immunomodulator at infected sites. PMID:24657154

  14. ISOLATION AND PARTIAL PURIFICATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL PEPTIDES/PROTEINS FROM DUNG BEETLE, ONTHOPHAGUS TAURUS IMMUNE HEMOLYMPH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasanth Patil H.B

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides are important in the first line of the host defense system of all insect species. In the present study antimicrobial peptide(s were isolated from the hemolymph of the dung beetle Onthophagus taurus. Both non induced and immune induced hemolymphs were tested for their antimicrobial activity against different bacterial strains and C. albicans. Induction was done by injecting E. coli into the abdominal cavity of the O. taurus. The non induced hemolymph did not show activity against any of the tested fungal and bacterial strains where as induced hemolymph showed activity against all tested bacterial strains but no activity against C. albicans. The induced hemolymph was subjected to non reducing SDS-PAGE and UV wavelength scan was performed to detect the presence of peptides. The immune induced hemolymph was purified by gel filtration chromatography to separate the proteins responsible for the antibacterial activity. The fractions within the peak were tested against those bacteria which previously showed sensitivity to the crude immune induced hemolymph. All fractions were found to be active against all tested bacteria with difference in zone of inhibition. The peptides are active against prokaryotes & not against eukaryotes. These properties reveal its unique characteristics and therapeutic application.

  15. Integration of decoy domains derived from protein targets of pathogen effectors into plant immune receptors is widespread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroj, Thomas; Chanclud, Emilie; Michel-Romiti, Corinne; Grand, Xavier; Morel, Jean-Benoit

    2016-04-01

    Plant immune receptors of the class of nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich repeat domain (NLR) proteins can contain additional domains besides canonical NB-ARC (nucleotide-binding adaptor shared by APAF-1, R proteins, and CED-4 (NB-ARC)) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains. Recent research suggests that these additional domains act as integrated decoys recognizing effectors from pathogens. Proteins homologous to integrated decoys are suspected to be effector targets and involved in disease or resistance. Here, we scrutinized 31 entire plant genomes to identify putative integrated decoy domains in NLR proteins using the Interpro search. The involvement of the Zinc Finger-BED type (ZBED) protein containing a putative decoy domain, called BED, in rice (Oryza sativa) resistance was investigated by evaluating susceptibility to the blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae in rice over-expression and knock-out mutants. This analysis showed that all plants tested had integrated various atypical protein domains into their NLR proteins (on average 3.5% of all NLR proteins). We also demonstrated that modifying the expression of the ZBED gene modified disease susceptibility. This study suggests that integration of decoy domains in NLR immune receptors is widespread and frequent in plants. The integrated decoy model is therefore a powerful concept to identify new proteins involved in disease resistance. Further in-depth examination of additional domains in NLR proteins promises to unravel many new proteins of the plant immune system. PMID:26848538

  16. Immunization routes in cattle impact the levels and neutralizing capacity of antibodies induced against S. aureus immune evasion proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Boerhout, Eveline; Vrieling, Manouk; Benedictus, Lindert; Daemen, Ineke; Ravesloot, Lars; Rutten, Victor; Nuijten, Piet; Van Strijp, Jos; Koets, Ad; Eisenberg, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines against S. aureus bovine mastitis are scarce and show limited protection only. All currently available vaccines are applied via the parenteral (usually intramuscular) route. It is unknown, however, whether this route is the most suitable to specifically increase intramammary immunity to combat S. aureus at the site of infection. Hence, in the present study, immunization via mucosal (intranasal; IN), intramuscular (triangle of the neck; IM), intramammary (IMM) and subcutaneous (suspen...

  17. Immunization with Heat Shock Protein A and γ-Glutamyl Transpeptidase Induces Reduction on the Helicobacter pylori Colonization in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Zhang

    Full Text Available The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a successful colonizer of the stomach. H. pylori infection strongly correlates with the development and progression of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric malignances. Vaccination is a promising strategy for preventing H. pylori infection. In this study, we evaluated the candidate antigens heat shock protein A (HspA and H. pylori γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT for their effectiveness in development of subunit vaccines against H. pylori infection. rHspA, rGGT, and rHspA-GGT, a fusion protein based on HspA and GGT, were constructed and separately expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Mice were then immunized intranasally with these proteins, with or without adjuvant. Immunized mice exhibited reduced bacterial colonization in stomach. The highest reduction in bacterial colonization was seen in mice immunized with the fusion protein rHspA-GGT when paired with the mucosal adjuvant LTB. Protection against H. pylori colonization was mediated by a strong systemic and localized humoral immune response, as well as a balanced Th1/Th2 cytokine response. In addition, immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed that rHspA-GGT specific rabbit antibodies were able to directly bind H. pylori in vitro. These results suggest antibodies are essential to the protective immunity associated with rHspA-GGT immunization. In summary, our results suggest HspA and GGT are promising vaccine candidates for protection against H. pylori infection.

  18. Increasing the immune activity of exosomes: the effect of miRNA-depleted exosome proteins on activating dendritic cell/cytokine-induced killer cells against pancreatic cancer* #

    OpenAIRE

    Que, Ri-sheng; Lin, Cheng; Ding, Guo-ping; WU, ZHENG-RONG; Cao, Li-ping

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tumor-derived exosomes were considered to be potential candidates for tumor vaccines because they are abundant in immune-regulating proteins, whereas tumor exosomal miRNAs may induce immune tolerance, thereby having an opposite immune function. Objective: This study was designed to separate exosomal protein and depleted exosomal microRNAs (miRNAs), increasing the immune activity of exosomes for activating dendritic cell/cytokine-induced killer cells (DC/CIKs) against pancreatic ca...

  19. Evolutionary origin of peptidoglycan recognition proteins in vertebrate innate immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsujino Fumi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Innate immunity is the ancient defense system of multicellular organisms against microbial infection. The basis of this first line of defense resides in the recognition of unique motifs conserved in microorganisms, and absent in the host. Peptidoglycans, structural components of bacterial cell walls, are recognized by Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins (PGRPs. PGRPs are present in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Although some evidence for similarities and differences in function and structure between them has been found, their evolutionary history and phylogenetic relationship have remained unclear. Such studies have been severely hampered by the great extent of sequence divergence among vertebrate and invertebrate PGRPs. Here we investigate the birth and death processes of PGRPs to elucidate their origin and diversity. Results We found that (i four rounds of gene duplication and a single domain duplication have generated the major variety of present vertebrate PGRPs, while in invertebrates more than ten times the number of duplications are required to explain the repertoire of present PGRPs, and (ii the death of genes in vertebrates appears to be almost null whereas in invertebrates it is frequent. Conclusion These results suggest that the emergence of new PGRP genes may have an impact on the availability of the repertoire and its function against pathogens. These striking differences in PGRP evolution of vertebrates and invertebrates should reflect the differences in the role of their innate immunity. Insights on the origin of PGRP genes will pave the way to understand the evolution of the interaction between host and pathogens and to lead to the development of new treatments for immune diseases that involve proteins related to the recognition of self and non-self.

  20. Role of protein tyrosine phosphatases in regulating the immune system: implications for chronic intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalinger, Marianne R; McCole, Declan F; Rogler, Gerhard; Scharl, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Current hypothesis suggests that genetic, immunological, and bacterial factors contribute essentially to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Variations within the gene loci encoding protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) have been associated with the onset of inflammatory bowel disease. PTPs modulate the activity of their substrates by dephosphorylation of tyrosine residues and are critical for the regulation of fundamental cellular signaling processes. Evidence emerges that expression levels of PTPN2, PTPN11, and PTPN22 are altered in actively inflamed intestinal tissue. PTPN2 seems to be critical for protecting intestinal epithelial barrier function, regulating innate and adaptive immune responses and finally for maintaining intestinal homeostasis. These observations have been confirmed in PTPN2 knockout mice in vivo. Those animals are clearly more susceptible to intestinal and systemic inflammation and feature alterations in innate and adaptive immune responses. PTPN22 controls inflammatory signaling in lymphocytes and mononuclear cells resulting in aberrant cytokine secretion pattern and autophagosome formation. PTPN22 deficiency in vivo results in more severe colitis demonstrating the relevance of PTPN22 for intestinal homeostasis in vivo. Of note, loss of PTPN22 promotes mitogen-activated protein kinase-induced cytokine secretion but limits secretion of nuclear factor κB-associated cytokines and autophagy in mononuclear cells. Loss of PTPN11 is also associated with increased colitis severity in vivo. In summary, dysfunction of those PTPs results in aberrant and uncontrolled immune responses that result in chronic inflammatory conditions. This way, it becomes more and more evident that dysfunction of PTPs displays an important factor in the pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation, in particular inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25581833

  1. B and T cell immunity in patients with lysinuric protein intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukkarinen, M; Parto, K; Ruuskanen, O; Vainio, O; Käyhty, H; Olander, R M; Simell, O

    1999-06-01

    Lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI) is characterized by defective cellular transport of the dibasic amino acids, secondary dysfunction of the urea cycle, aversion to dietary protein, failure to thrive, hepatosplenomegaly and osteoporosis. Because several patients have suffered from recurrent respiratory infections and/or severe generalized varicella, and a few have developed systemic lupus, vasculitis or other autoimmune diseases, we have now evaluated the function of patients' immune systems. Serum concentrations of one to three IgG subclasses were decreased in 10 of the 12 patients studied. Antibody titres against diphtheria, tetanus and Haemophilus influenzae (Hib) were below the detection limit of the assay in four, three and eight of the 11 patients examined, respectively. (Re)vaccination of these 11 patients led to satisfactory responses against tetanus, but two patients still failed to develop measurable antibodies against diphtheria, two against Hib and six against one or more of the three serotypes of 23-valent pneumococcus vaccine. The proportions of T cells of all lymphocytes and the proliferative responses of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells were normal. In conclusion, humoral immune responses in some patients with LPI are defective and these patients may benefit from intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. PMID:10361230

  2. RESPON IMMUN SEL INTERLEUKIN -4 (IL-4 PADA IKAN KERAPU TIKUS (Cromileptes altivelis YANG DIPAPAR PROTEIN IMUNOGENIK VIBRIO HARVEYI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uun Yanuhar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk melihat ekspresi molekul sel interleukin-4 (IL-4 pada ikan kerapu tikus (Cromileptes altivelis yang dipapar oleh protein imunogenik Vibrio harveyi sebagai salah satu reson immune seluler. Metode yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah metode eksperimen yaitu mengadakan percobaan untuk melihat suatu hasil. Prosedur penelitian meliputi isolasi protein imunogenik Vibrio harveyi, elektroforesis SDS-PAGe protein Vibrio harveyi, separasi protein dan pemotongan pita protein, elektroelusi dan dialisa, uji klinis protein imunogenik Vibrio harveyi, dan selanjutnya pemeriksaan imunositokimia untuk melihat ekspresi sel imun (sel IL-4 dengan menggunakan pelabelan secondary antibodi anti IL-4 conjugate biotin . Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa pita protein imunogenik Vibrio harveyi yang ditemukan bersifat imunogenik adalah berat molekul 51,16 kDa, dan hasil uji invivo secara injeksi intraperitoneal pada ikan kerapu tikus (Cromileptes altivelis uji dengan dosis 31,6 ug protein/150 g berat ikan kerapu. Ikan kerapu uji in vivo dari hasil perlakuan yang telah dipapar dengan protein imunogenik V. harveyi 51,16 kDa menunjukkan bahwa respon imun seluler dari sel immune IL-4 yang dideteksi dengan metode imunositokimia dengan menggunakan pelabelan secondary antibody anti IL-4 conjugate biotin pada sel secara invivo ditunjukkan oleh warna coklat keemi V. harveyi 51,kDa sebagai Kesimpulan penelitian ini adalah bahwa ikan kerapu yang dipapar protein imunogenik berat molekul 51,16 kDa secara in vivo mampu membangkitkan respon immune seluler yakni terbentuknya respon sel IL-4, pada ikan sel immune IL-4 berperan sebagai pertahanan sistem immune seluler terhadap serangan infeksi pathogen. Kata Kunci: Cromileptes altivelis, Immunosikimia, Sel interleukin-4 (IL-4 , Vibrio harveyi 

  3. Identification of Vibrio harveyi proteins involved in the specific immune response of Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis, Kaup).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, A; Mancera, J M; Martínez-Manzanares, E; Moriñigo, M A; Arijo, S

    2015-11-01

    Senegalese sole cultures are frequently affected by Vibrio harveyi disease outbreaks. Vaccines in aquaculture are one of the most successful methods of preventing fish pathologies; however, these vaccines are usually composed of inactivated whole cells containing a wide pool of antigens, and some do not induce any protection against pathogens. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify immunogenic proteins of V. harveyi involved in the specific antibody production by Senegalese sole. S. senegalensis specimens were immunized, by intraperitoneal injection, with V. harveyi bacterin supplemented with inactivated extracellular polymeric substances (ECP) and Freund incomplete adjuvant to obtain polyclonal antiserum. One month later, specimens were re-inoculated with the same antigens. Sera from immunized fish were collected two months post first immunization. Strong specific immune response to V. harveyi antigens was detected by ELISA using bacterin (limit dilutions of sera were 1:64000), ECP (1:4000) and outer membrane proteins (OMP) (1:4000) as antigens. Presence of immunogenic proteins in V. harveyi ECP and OMP were determined by 2D-PAGE. For Western Blot analysis some gels were transferred onto nitrocellulose membranes and incubated with sera from S. senegalensis specimens immunized against V. harveyi. 2D-PAGE and Western Blot showed at least five reactive proteins in the ECP and two in the OMP fraction. The spots that clearly reacted with the sole antiserum were excised from stained gel, and analyzed by mass spectrometry (MALDI/TOFTOF). A database search was then performed, using MASCOT as the search method. According to the results, the five ECP spots were identified as Maltoporine, protein homologous to Metal dependent phosphohydrolase, two porins isoforms of V. harveyi and a protein homologous to the cell division protein FtsH. Reactive proteins in the OMP fraction were identified as the protein 3-hydroxyisobutyrate dehydrogenase and a protein homologous to acid

  4. Adjuvant requirement for successful immunization with recombinant derivatives of Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein-1 delivered via the intranasal route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Y Bargieri

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, we generated two bacterial recombinant proteins expressing 89 amino acids of the C-terminal domain of the Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein-1 and the hexa-histidine tag (His6MSP1(19. One of these recombinant proteins contained also the amino acid sequence of the universal pan allelic T-cell epitope (His6MSP1(19-PADRE. In the present study, we evaluated the immunogenic properties of these antigens when administered via the intra-nasal route in the presence of distinct adjuvant formulations. We found that C57BL/6 mice immunized with either recombinant proteins in the presence of the adjuvants cholera toxin (CT or the Escherichia coli heat labile toxin (LT developed high and long lasting titers of specific serum antibodies. The induced immune responses reached maximum levels after three immunizing doses with a prevailing IgG1 subclass response. In contrast, mice immunized by intranasal route with His6MSP1(19-PADRE in the presence of the synthetic oligonucleotides adjuvant CpG ODN 1826 developed lower antibody titers but when combined to CT, CpG addition resulted in enhanced IgG responses characterized by lower IgG1 levels. Considering the limitations of antigens formulations that can be used in humans, mucosal adjuvants can be a reliable alternative for the development of new strategies of immunization using recombinant proteins of P. vivax.

  5. Immunization with Recombinant Prion Protein Leads to Partial Protection in a Murine Model of TSEs through a Novel Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantinos Xanthopoulos; Rosa Lagoudaki; Anastasia Kontana; Christos Kyratsous; Christos Panagiotidis; Nikolaos Grigoriadis; Minas Yiangou; Theodoros Sklaviadis

    2013-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are neurodegenerative diseases, which despite fervent research remain incurable. Immunization approaches have shown great potential at providing protection, however tolerance effects hamper active immunization protocols. In this study we evaluated the antigenic potential of various forms of recombinant murine prion protein and estimated their protective efficacy in a mouse model of prion diseases. One of the forms tested provided a significant elongat...

  6. LPS-Binding Protein and IL-6 Mark Paradoxical Tuberculosis Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome in HIV Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Goovaerts, Odin; Jennes, Wim; Massinga-Loembé, Marguerite; Ceulemans, Ann; Worodria, William; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Colebunders, Robert; Kestens, Luc; ,

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) remains a poorly understood complication in HIV-TB co-infected patients initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART). The role of the innate immune system in TB-IRIS is becoming increasingly apparent, however the potential involvement in TB-IRIS of a leaky gut and proteins that interfere with TLR stimulation by binding PAMPs has not been investigated before. Here we aimed to investigate the innate nature of th...

  7. Functions of innate and acquired immune system are reduced in domestic pigeons (Columba livia domestica) given a low protein diet

    OpenAIRE

    Mabuchi, Yuko; Frankel, Theresa L.

    2016-01-01

    Racing pigeons are exposed to and act as carriers of diseases. Dietary protein requirement for their maintenance has not been determined experimentally despite their being domesticated for over 7000 years. A maintenance nitrogen (protein) requirement (MNR) for pigeons was determined in a balance study using diets containing 6, 10 and 14% crude protein (CP). Then, the effects of feeding the diets were investigated to determine whether they were adequate to sustain innate and acquired immune fu...

  8. Sand fly salivary proteins induce strong cellular immunity in a natural reservoir of visceral leishmaniasis with adverse consequences for Leishmania.

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolas Collin; Regis Gomes; Clarissa Teixeira; Lily Cheng; Andre Laughinghouse; Ward, Jerrold M.; Dia-Eldin Elnaiem; Laurent Fischer; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Shaden Kamhawi

    2009-01-01

    Immunity to a sand fly salivary protein protects against visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in hamsters. This protection was associated with the development of cellular immunity in the form of a delayed-type hypersensitivity response and the presence of IFN-gamma at the site of sand fly bites. To date, there are no data available regarding the cellular immune response to sand fly saliva in dogs, the main reservoirs of VL in Latin America, and its role in protection from this fatal disease. Two of 35...

  9. Antitumor immunity induced by DNA vaccine encoding alpha-fetoprotein/heat shock protein 70

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Ping Wang; Guo-Zhen Liu; Ai-Li Song; Hai-Yan Li; Yu Liu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To construct a DNA vaccine encoding human alphafetoprotein (hAFP)/heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), and to study its ability to induce specific CTL response and its protective effect against AFP-expressing tumor.METHODS: A DNA vaccine was constructed by combining hAFP gene with HSP70 gene. SP2/0 cells were stably transfected with pBBS212-hAFP and pBBS212-hAFP/HSP70eukaryotic expression vectors. Mice were primed and boosted with DNA vaccine hAFP/HSP70 by intramuscular injection, whereas plasmid with hAFP or HSP70 was used as controls. ELISPOT and ELISA were used to detect IFN-γ-producing splenocytes and the level of serum anti-AFP antibody from immunized mice respectively. In vivo tumor challenge was measured to assess the immune effect of the DNA vaccine.RESULTS: By DNA vaccine immunization, the results of ELISPOT and ELISA showed that the number of IFN-γ-producing splenocytes and the level of serum anti-AFP antibody were significantly higher in rhAFP/HSP70 group than in hAFP and empty plasmid groups (95.50±10.90IFN-γ spots/106 cells vs 23.60±11.80 IFN-γ spots/106 cells,7.17±4.24 IFN-γ spots/106 cells, P<0.01; 126.50±8.22 μg/mL vs 51.72±3.40 μg/mL, 5.83±3.79 μg/mL, P<0.01). The tumor volume in rhAFP/HSP70 group was significantly smaller than that in pBBS212-hAFP and empty plasmid groups (37.41±7.34 mm3 vs381.13±15.48 mm3, 817.51±16.25 mm3,P<0.01).CONCLUSION: Sequential immunization with a recombinant DNA vaccine encoding AFP and heat shock protein70 could generate effective AFP-specific T cell responses and induce definite antitumor effects on AFP-producing tumors, which may be suitable for some clinical testing as a vaccine for HCC.

  10. The human metapneumovirus matrix protein stimulates the inflammatory immune response in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Bagnaud-Baule

    Full Text Available Each year, during winter months, human Metapneumovirus (hMPV is associated with epidemics of bronchiolitis resulting in the hospitalization of many infants. Bronchiolitis is an acute illness of the lower respiratory tract with a consequent inflammation of the bronchioles. The rapid onset of inflammation suggests the innate immune response may have a role to play in the pathogenesis of this hMPV infection. Since, the matrix protein is one of the most abundant proteins in the Paramyxoviridae family virion, we hypothesized that the inflammatory modulation observed in hMPV infected patients may be partly associated with the matrix protein (M-hMPV response. By western blot analysis, we detected a soluble form of M-hMPV released from hMPV infected cell as well as from M-hMPV transfected HEK 293T cells suggesting that M-hMPV may be directly in contact with antigen presenting cells (APCs during the course of infection. Moreover, flow cytometry and confocal microscopy allowed determining that M-hMPV was taken up by dendritic cells (moDCs and macrophages inducing their activation. Furthermore, these moDCs enter into a maturation process inducing the secretion of a broad range of inflammatory cytokines when exposed to M-hMPV. Additionally, M-hMPV activated DCs were shown to stimulate IL-2 and IFN-γ production by allogeneic T lymphocytes. This M-hMPV-mediated activation and antigen presentation of APCs may in part explain the marked inflammatory immune response observed in pathology induced by hMPV in patients.

  11. Protective value of immune responses developed in goats vaccinated with insoluble proteins from Sarcoptes Scabiei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simson Tarigan

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines developed from certain membrane proteins lining the lumen of arthropod’s gut have been demonstrated effective in the control of some arthropod ectoparasites. A similar approach could also be applied to Sarcoptes scabiei since this parasite also ingests its host immunoglobulins. To evaluate immune protection of the membrane proteins, insoluble mite proteins were fractionated by successive treatment in the solutions of 1.14 M NaCl, 2% SB 3-14 Zwitterion detergent, 6 M urea, 6 M guanidine-HCl and 5% SDS. Five groups of goats (6 or 7 goats per group were immunised respectively with the protein fractions. Vaccination was performed 6 times, each with a dosage of 250 μg proteins, and 3 week intervals between vaccination. Group 6 (7 goats received PBS and adjuvant only, and served as an unvaccinated control. One week after the last vaccination, all goats were challenged with 2000 live mites on the auricles. The development of lesions were examined at 1 day, 2 days, and then every week from week 1 to 8. All animals were bled and weighed every week, and at the end of the experiment, skin scrapings were collected to determine the mite burden. Antibody responses induced by vaccination and challenge were examined by ELISA and Western blotting. This experiment showed that vaccination with the insoluble-protein fractions resulted in the development of high level of specific antibodies but the responses did not have any protective value. The severity of lesions and mite burden in the vaccinated animals were not different from those in the unvaccinated control.

  12. Immunization routes in cattle impact the levels and neutralizing capacity of antibodies induced against S. aureus immune evasion proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerhout, Eveline; Vrieling, Manouk; Benedictus, Lindert; Daemen, Ineke; Ravesloot, Lars; Rutten, Victor; Nuijten, Piet; Van Strijp, Jos; Koets, Ad; Eisenberg, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines against S. aureus bovine mastitis are scarce and show limited protection only. All currently available vaccines are applied via the parenteral (usually intramuscular) route. It is unknown, however, whether this route is the most suitable to specifically increase intramammary immunity to com

  13. Immunization routes in cattle impact the levels and neutralizing capacity of antibodies induced against S. aureus immune evasion proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerhout, Eveline; Vrieling, Manouk; Benedictus, Lindert; Daemen, Ineke; Ravesloot, Lars; Rutten, Victor; Nuijten, Piet; Strijp, Van Jos; Koets, Ad; Eisenberg, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines against S. aureus bovine mastitis are scarce and show limited protection only. All currently available vaccines are applied via the parenteral (usually intramuscular) route. It is unknown, however, whether this route is the most suitable to specifically increase intramammary immunity to

  14. Secretion of Rhoptry and Dense Granule Effector Proteins by Nonreplicating Toxoplasma gondii Uracil Auxotrophs Controls the Development of Antitumor Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Barbara A; Sanders, Kiah L; Rommereim, Leah M; Guevara, Rebekah B; Bzik, David J

    2016-07-01

    Nonreplicating type I uracil auxotrophic mutants of Toxoplasma gondii possess a potent ability to activate therapeutic immunity to established solid tumors by reversing immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment. Here we engineered targeted deletions of parasite secreted effector proteins using a genetically tractable Δku80 vaccine strain to show that the secretion of specific rhoptry (ROP) and dense granule (GRA) proteins by uracil auxotrophic mutants of T. gondii in conjunction with host cell invasion activates antitumor immunity through host responses involving CD8α+ dendritic cells, the IL-12/interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) TH1 axis, as well as CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Deletion of parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM) associated proteins ROP5, ROP17, ROP18, ROP35 or ROP38, intravacuolar network associated dense granule proteins GRA2 or GRA12, and GRA24 which traffics past the PVM to the host cell nucleus severely abrogated the antitumor response. In contrast, deletion of other secreted effector molecules such as GRA15, GRA16, or ROP16 that manipulate host cell signaling and transcriptional pathways, or deletion of PVM associated ROP21 or GRA3 molecules did not affect the antitumor activity. Association of ROP18 with the PVM was found to be essential for the development of the antitumor responses. Surprisingly, the ROP18 kinase activity required for resistance to IFN-γ activated host innate immunity related GTPases and virulence was not essential for the antitumor response. These data show that PVM functions of parasite secreted effector molecules, including ROP18, manipulate host cell responses through ROP18 kinase virulence independent mechanisms to activate potent antitumor responses. Our results demonstrate that PVM associated rhoptry effector proteins secreted prior to host cell invasion and dense granule effector proteins localized to the intravacuolar network and host nucleus that are secreted after host cell invasion coordinately control the

  15. The alternative complement pathway control protein H binds to immune complexes and serves their detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During solubilization of immune complexes C3b becomes fixed to the immunoglobulin part and serves as a receptor for the alternative complement pathway control protein H. The H-C3b immune complex interaction can be made detectable using 4% polyethyleneglycol to separate free from bound 125I-H. Tetanus toxoid (Te)/anti-Te complexes kept soluble with fresh serum and containing 125 IU of specific antibody bound 18% of 125I-H; when fresh serum was chelated with 10 mM EDTA, 125I-H binding was only 5%. On sucrose density gradients, the H-binding material sedimented in the range of 12 to 30 S. In 36 serum samples from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and in 12 serum samples from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 125I-H binding was significantly elevated to 9.5 +/- 4.7% (mean +/- 1 SD) and 13.3 +/- 5.6%, respectively, while 125I-H binding by 36 normal human sera was 4 +/- 2%. RA samples (17/36, 47%) and SLE samples (9/12, 75%) had H-binding values increased by more than 2 SD above the normal mean. The serum samples were also assessed for conglutinin- and C1q-binding activities; a significant correlation between H and C1q binding was observed (P less than 0.001); there was no correlation between H and conglutinin binding. Although binding to immune complexes through its interaction with C3b, H clearly detects a population of complexes other than conglutinin, thus expanding the possibilities of further characterizing pathological complexes

  16. Evasion of antiviral innate immunity by Theiler's virus L* protein through direct inhibition of RNase L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Sorgeloos

    Full Text Available Theiler's virus is a neurotropic picornavirus responsible for chronic infections of the central nervous system. The establishment of a persistent infection and the subsequent demyelinating disease triggered by the virus depend on the expression of L*, a viral accessory protein encoded by an alternative open reading frame of the virus. We discovered that L* potently inhibits the interferon-inducible OAS/RNase L pathway. The antagonism of RNase L by L* was particularly prominent in macrophages where baseline oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS and RNase L expression levels are elevated, but was detectable in fibroblasts after IFN pretreatment. L* mutations significantly affected Theiler's virus replication in primary macrophages derived from wild-type but not from RNase L-deficient mice. L* counteracted the OAS/RNase L pathway through direct interaction with the ankyrin domain of RNase L, resulting in the inhibition of this enzyme. Interestingly, RNase L inhibition was species-specific as Theiler's virus L* protein blocked murine RNase L but not human RNase L or RNase L of other mammals or birds. Direct RNase L inhibition by L* and species specificity were confirmed in an in vitro assay performed with purified proteins. These results demonstrate a novel viral mechanism to elude the antiviral OAS/RNase L pathway. By targeting the effector enzyme of this antiviral pathway, L* potently inhibits RNase L, underscoring the importance of this enzyme in innate immunity against Theiler's virus.

  17. Co-administration of non-carrier nanoparticles boosts antigen immune response without requiring protein conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Nani; Chuan, Yap P; Seth, Arjun; Cordoba, Yoann; Lua, Linda H L; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2014-06-17

    Nanotechnology promises a revolution in medicine including through new vaccine approaches. The use of nanoparticles in vaccination has, to date, focused on attaching antigen directly to or within nanoparticle structures to enhance antigen uptake by immune cells. Here we question whether antigen incorporation with the nanoparticle is actually necessary to boost vaccine effectiveness. We show that the immunogenicity of a sub-unit protein antigen was significantly boosted by formulation with silica nanoparticles even without specific conjugation of antigen to the nanoparticle. We further show that this effect was observed only for virus-sized nanoparticles (50 nm) but not for larger (1,000 nm) particles, demonstrating a pronounced effect of nanoparticle size. This non-attachment approach has potential to radically simplify the development and application of nanoparticle-based formulations, leading to safer and simpler nanoparticle applications in vaccine development. PMID:24793947

  18. Induced prion protein controls immune-activated retroviruses in the mouse spleen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Lötscher

    Full Text Available The prion protein (PrP is crucially involved in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE, but neither its exact role in disease nor its physiological function are known. Here we show for mice, using histological, immunochemical and PCR-based methods, that stimulation of innate resistance was followed by appearance of numerous endogenous retroviruses and ensuing PrP up-regulation in germinal centers of the spleen. Subsequently, the activated retroviruses disappeared in a PrP-dependent manner. Our results reveal the regular involvement of endogenous retroviruses in murine immune responses and provide evidence for an essential function of PrP in the control of the retroviral activity. The interaction between PrP and ubiquitous endogenous retroviruses may allow new interpretations of TSE pathophysiology and explain the evolutionary conservation of PrP.

  19. Structural analysis of proteins in the immune system and structural genomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The immune system combats invading microorganisms, such as viruses and bacteria, by neutralizing them directly or by killing infected cells. Antibodies, in the humoral system, have enormous genetic diversity that can be harnessed for high affinity recognition of a universe of antigens. In the cellular system, T cell receptors (TCR) have equivalent genetic diversity but bind their antigens with relatively low affinity to allow kinetic control of signaling events. The molecular basis of antigen recognition was initiated over 25 years ago due to the availability of soluble antibodies from multiple myelomas of mouse and human origin. Since then, over 100 structures of antibodies against small haptens, peptides, carbohydrates, and proteins have illustrated how this diversity can be sculpted onto a constant structural framework and has led to an understanding of antibody-antigen interactions, conformational changes in ligand recognition, design of therapeutics, and in the use of antibodies as catalysts. Structural studies of the cellular immune system have been more intractable, and only in the past decade or so have the crystal structures of MHC molecules and, more recently, T cell receptors (TCR) become available. Antigens are presented to the TCR as peptide fragments by MHC class I, and class II, or as lipids or glycolipids by non-classical MHC molecules, such as CDl. The crystal structures of single peptide-MHC complexes have illustrated how a myriad of peptide antigens can fit into the same MHC binding groove. In the past five years, T cell structures and TCR- MHC-peptide complexes have shown how agonist, partial agonist, and antagonist ligands (altered peptide ligands) interact with the TCR. These immune recognition systems have contributed a wealth of data to our understanding of ligand-receptor interactions, protein engineering, induced fit, glycoproteins, cell surface receptors and signal transduction. The JCSG (www.jcsg.org) has been formed to

  20. Recombinant outer membrane protein C of Aeromonas hydrophila elicits mixed immune response and generates agglutinating antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sunita Kumari; Meena, Jitendra Kumar; Sharma, Mahima; Dixit, Aparna

    2016-08-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is a gram-negative fish pathogenic bacterium, also responsible for causing opportunistic pathological conditions in humans. It causes a number of diseases in fish due to which the fish industry incurs huge economic losses annually. Due to problems of antibiotic resistance, and the rapidity with which the infection spreads among fishes, vaccination remains the most effective strategy to combat this infection in fish populations. Among various virulence factors associated with bacterial virulence, outer membrane proteins have been widely evaluated for their vaccine potential owing to their surface exposure and related role in pathogenicity. In the present study, we have investigated the immunogenic potential of a non-specific porin, outer membrane protein C (OmpC) whose expression is regulated by the two-component regulatory system and plays a major role in the survival of A. hydrophila under different osmolaric conditions. The full-length gene (~1 kb) encoding OmpC of A. hydrophila was cloned, characterized and expressed in E. coli. High yield (~112 mg/L at shake flask level) of the recombinant OmpC (rOmpC) (~40 kDa) of A. hydrophila was obtained upon purification from inclusion bodies using Ni(2+)-NTA affinity chromatography. Immunization with purified rOmpC in murine model generated high endpoint (>1:40,000) titers. IgG isotyping, ELISA and ELISPOT assay indicated mixed immune response with a TH2 bias. Also, the anti-rOmpC antibodies were able to agglutinate A. hydrophila in vitro and exhibited specific cross-reactivity with different Aeromonas strains, which will facilitate easy detection of different Aeromonas isolates in infected samples. Taken together, these data clearly indicate that rOmpC could serve as an effective vaccine against different strains of Aeromonas, a highly heterogenous group of bacteria. PMID:27328672

  1. Purification of heat shock protein 70-associated tumor peptides and their antitumor immunity to hepatoma in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dai-Xiong Chen; Yan-Rong Su; Gen-Ze Shao; Zhen-Chao Qian

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To purify the heat shock protein (HSP) 70-associated tumor peptides and to observe its non-MHC-I molecule restrictive antitumor effect.METHODS: By ConA-sepharose affinity chromatography,ADP-agarose affinity chromatography, and DEAE anion exchange chromatography, we were able to purify HSP70-associated peptides from mouse hepatoma (HCaF) cells treated in heat shock at 42 ℃ . Specific active immunization and adoptive cellular immunization assay were adopted to observe the immunoprotective effect elicited by HSP70-associated peptide complexes isolated from HcaF.RESULTS: The finally purified HSP-associated peptides had a very high purity and specificity found by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Mice immunized with HSP70-associated peptide complexes purified from HCaF cells were protected from HCaF living cell challenge. This effect was dose dependent.Adoptive immunization of immune spleen cells of mice immunized with HSP70-associated peptide complexes could elicit immunity against HCaF challenge, and the tumor-free mice could resist repeated challenges. This effect could be continuously enhanced by repeated challenge with HCaF living cells. The tumor-free mice could tolerate the challenge for as high as l×107 HCaF cells. The mice immunized once with spleen cells pulsed with HSP70-associated peptide complexes in vitro could also result in a certain adoptive immunity against HCaF.CONCLUSION: High purity and specificity of HSP70-associated peptides could be achieved from tumor cells by the low-pressure affinity chromatography method used in this study. HSP70-associated peptide complexes derived from the HCaF can elicit non-MHC-I molecule restrictive immunoprotective effect against HCaF. This effect can be transferred by adoptive immunization to mice and enhanced by repeated challenge with HCaF live cells.

  2. Induction of Boosted Immune Response in Mice by Leptospiral Surface Proteins Expressed in Fusion with DnaK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina V. Atzingen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is an important global disease of human and veterinary concern. Caused by pathogenic Leptospira, the illness was recently classified as an emerging infectious disease. Currently available veterinarian vaccines do not induce long-term protection against infection and do not provide cross-protective immunity. Several studies have suggested the use of DnaK as an antigen in vaccine formulation, due to an exceptional degree of immunogenicity. We focused on four surface proteins: rLIC10368 (Lsa21, rLIC10494, rLIC12690 (Lp95, and rLIC12730, previously shown to be involved in host-pathogen interactions. Our goal was to evaluate the immunogenicity of the proteins genetically fused with DnaK in animal model. The chosen genes were amplified by PCR methodology and cloned into pAE, an E. coli vector. The recombinant proteins were expressed alone or in fusion with DnaK at the N-terminus. Our results demonstrate that leptospiral proteins fused with DnaK have elicited an enhanced immune response in mice when compared to the effect promoted by the individual proteins. The boosted immune effect was demonstrated by the production of total IgG, lymphocyte proliferation, and significant amounts of IL-10 in supernatant of splenocyte cell cultures. We believe that this approach could be employed in vaccines to enhance presentation of antigens of Leptospira to professional immune cells.

  3. Studies on Mucosal Immunity Induced by Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus Nucleocapsid Protein Recombinant Lactobacillus casei in Mice and Sow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Gui-hua; HOU Xi-lin; YU Li-yun; LIU Jian-kui; WEI Chun-hua

    2009-01-01

    Mucosal immunity plays an important role in protecting pigs against transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) infection. To elicit mucosal immune response against TGEV, we developed a surface antigen display system using the poly-γ-glutamate synthetase A (pgsA) protein of Bacillus subtilis as an anchoring matrix to express recombinant fusion proteins of pgsA and nucleocapsid protein of TGEV in Lactobacillus casei. Surface location of fusion protein was verified by ELISA and indirect immunofluorescence test. Oral and intranasal inoculations of pregnant sow and mice with recombinant L. casei resulted in high levels of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and secretory immunogiobulin A (sIgA) against recombinant N protein as demonstrated by ELISA. More importantly, the level of specific slgA in colostrum significantly increased compared with that of IgG. The serum lgG levels of the piglets increased after suckling coiostrum produced by sows was previously inoculated with recombinant L. casei. These results indicate that immunization with recombinant L. casei expressing TGEV N protein on its surface elicited high levels of specific slgA and circulating lgG against TGEV N protein.

  4. Protective immunity induced by 67 K outer membrane protein of phase I Coxiella burnetii in mice and guinea pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 67 K outer membrane protein (OMP) isolated from phase I Coxiella burnetii QiYi strain was purified with monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) coupled to CNBr-Sepharose 4B. Chemical analyses of the 67 K protein showed that it contained seventeen kids of amino acids and no lipopolysaccharides. The immunogenicity and protectivity of the 67 K protein against C. burnetii was evaluated in mice and guinea pigs bi in vitro lymphocyte proliferation assay, delayed-type skin test, antibody conversion rate, and immunization and challenge tests. Intraperitoneal injection of the 67 K protein resulted in antibody production against phase I and II whole cell antigens. The anti-67 K antibody conversion rate was found to be 100% in mice and guinea pigs as well. Lymphocytes were responses in vitro to specific antigen. In addition, delayed-type hypersensitivity appeared two weeks after immunization with the 67 K protein. Moreover, 199% of mice and guinea pigs inoculated with the 67 K protein were protected against a challenge with 103 ID50 virulent C. burnetii. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that the 67 K OMP elicits in vivo and in vitro both B cell-mediated and T cell-mediated immunity in mice and guinea pigs. Thus the 67 K protein is a candidate for an effective subunit vaccine against Q fever. (author)

  5. Multi-species protein similarity clustering reveals novel expanded immune gene families in the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Ian C; Modak, Tejashree H; Lane, Chris E; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta

    2016-06-01

    Comparative genomics research in non-model species has highlighted how invertebrate hosts possess complex diversified repertoires of immune molecules. The levels of diversification in particular immune gene families appear to differ between invertebrate lineages and even between species within lineages, reflecting differences not only in evolutionary histories, but also in life histories, environmental niches, and pathogen exposures. The goal of this research was to identify immune-related gene families experiencing high levels of diversification in eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica. Families containing 1) transcripts differentially expressed in eastern oysters in response to bacterial challenge and 2) a larger number of transcripts compared to other species included those coding for the C1q and C-type lectin domain containing proteins (C1qDC and CTLDC), GTPase of the immune-associated proteins (GIMAP), scavenger receptors (SR), fibrinogen-C domain containing proteins (also known as FREPs), dopamine beta-hydrolase (DBH), interferon-inducible 44 (IFI44), serine protease inhibitors, apextrin, and dermatopontin. Phylogenetic analysis of two of the families significantly expanded in bivalves, IFI44 and GIMAP, showed a patchy distribution within both protostomes and deuterostomes, suggesting multiple independent losses and lineage-specific expansions. Increased availability of genomic information for a broader range of non-model species broadly distributed through vertebrate and invertebrate phyla will likely lead to improved knowledge on mechanisms of immune-gene diversification. PMID:27033806

  6. The Study on The ImmuneResponse Induced by Expressing Recombinant Plasmid of Dengue Virus Type 2 NS3 Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The PSV · NS3, an expressing recombinant plasmid of dengue virus type 2 NS3 protein, was in Jected directly into the quadriceps of Balb/C mice to explore whether it could inducing immune response. The splenic T cell subsets of two groups was analysed by flow cytometry. It was found that the percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells of experimental group were significantly higher than those of the control group. The titer of IgG antibody was as high as 1:S 120 in experimental group, but it couldn't be detected in control group by ELISA. The western blot further proved that the IgG antibody was specific for NS3 protein. Those results Suggested that inoculation Balb/C mice with PSV · NS3 could inducing immune response, and the NS3 protein might be used as the candidate protein of DNA vaccine of dengue virus.

  7. Evaluation of immune effect of recombinant fusion protein targeting the prostate stem cell antigen based on PSCA and HSP70

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei DONG

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the immune effect and antitumor activity of recombinant prostate stem cell protein (PSCA and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70 in a murine model of prostate cancer. Methods Twenty-five healthy male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into 5 groups (5 each: PSCA, HSP, PSCA+HSP, PSCA-HSP and control group. Mice in the first 4 groups were vaccinated with the corresponding proteins, and those in control group were faked with injection of phosphate buffer saline (PBS. After immunization with recombinant proteins, the PSCA-specific cellular immune responses were monitored with ELISPOT, intracellular cytokine staining assay, and flow cytometry, and ELISA assay was used to detect humoral immune responses. The tumor growth and survival of vaccined mice were observed. Results ELISPOT revealed that the mice in PSCA-HSP group generated much more IFN-γ spot-forming cells than those in other groups (P<0.05, and they could generate strong anti-PSCA antibody response. Results of flow cytometry showed that the number of CD8+/IFN-γ+ T cells was significantly higher in PSCAHSP group than that in other groups (P<0.05. ELISA results revealed that all the mice in PSCA, PSCA+HSP and PSCA-HSP group were induced to generate the PSCA-specific humoral immune response, and no statistical difference was found on the antibody levels among the three groups. Animal experiment showed that PSCA-HSP could inhibit the growth of PSCA-expressing tumors and prolong the survival time of vaccinated mice. Conclusion HSP70 is a chaperone with significant effect for protein vaccines, and the recombinant fusion protein PSCA-HSP70 could be of potential value for prostate cancer treatment. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.09.08

  8. Immunization with recombinant prion protein leads to partial protection in a murine model of TSEs through a novel mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthopoulos, Konstantinos; Lagoudaki, Rosa; Kontana, Anastasia; Kyratsous, Christos; Panagiotidis, Christos; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos; Yiangou, Minas; Sklaviadis, Theodoros

    2013-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are neurodegenerative diseases, which despite fervent research remain incurable. Immunization approaches have shown great potential at providing protection, however tolerance effects hamper active immunization protocols. In this study we evaluated the antigenic potential of various forms of recombinant murine prion protein and estimated their protective efficacy in a mouse model of prion diseases. One of the forms tested provided a significant elongation of survival interval. The elongation was mediated via an acute depletion of mature follicular dendritic cells, which are associated with propagation of the prion infectious agent in the periphery and in part to the development of humoral immunity against prion protein. This unprecedented result could offer new strategies for protection against transmissible encephalopathies as well as other diseases associated with follicular dendritic cells. PMID:23554984

  9. Immunization with recombinant prion protein leads to partial protection in a murine model of TSEs through a novel mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Xanthopoulos

    Full Text Available Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are neurodegenerative diseases, which despite fervent research remain incurable. Immunization approaches have shown great potential at providing protection, however tolerance effects hamper active immunization protocols. In this study we evaluated the antigenic potential of various forms of recombinant murine prion protein and estimated their protective efficacy in a mouse model of prion diseases. One of the forms tested provided a significant elongation of survival interval. The elongation was mediated via an acute depletion of mature follicular dendritic cells, which are associated with propagation of the prion infectious agent in the periphery and in part to the development of humoral immunity against prion protein. This unprecedented result could offer new strategies for protection against transmissible encephalopathies as well as other diseases associated with follicular dendritic cells.

  10. Immunization with recombinant enterovirus 71 viral capsid protein 1 fragment stimulated antibody responses in hamsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch’ng Wei-Choong

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enterovirus 71 (EV71 causes severe neurological diseases resulting in high mortality in young children worldwide. Development of an effective vaccine against EV71 infection is hampered by the lack of appropriate animal models for efficacy testing of candidate vaccines. Previously, we have successfully tested the immunogenicity and protectiveness of a candidate EV71 vaccine, containing recombinant Newcastle disease virus capsids that display an EV71 VP1 fragment (NPt-VP11-100 protein, in a mouse model of EV71 infection. A drawback of this system is its limited window of EV71 susceptibility period, 2 weeks after birth, leading to restricted options in the evaluation of optimal dosing regimens. To address this issue, we have assessed the NPt-VP11-100 candidate vaccine in a hamster system, which offers a 4-week susceptibility period to EV71 infection. Results obtained showed that the NPt-VP11-100 candidate vaccine stimulated excellent humoral immune response in the hamsters. Despite the high level of antibody production, they failed to neutralize EV71 viruses or protect vaccinated hamsters in viral challenge studies. Nevertheless, these findings have contributed towards a better understanding of the NPt-VP11-100 recombinant protein as a candidate vaccine in an alternative animal model system.

  11. A Borrelia burgdorferi Surface-Exposed Transmembrane Protein Lacking Detectable Immune Responses Supports Pathogen Persistence and Constitutes a Vaccine Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Faith; Kaur, Simarjot; Smith, Alexis A; Yang, Xiuli; Wilder, Cara N; Sharma, Kavita; Buyuktanir, Ozlem; Pal, Utpal

    2016-06-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi harbors a limited set of transmembrane surface proteins, most of which constitute key targets of humoral immune responses. Here we show that BB0405, a conserved membrane-spanning protein of unknown function, fails to evoke detectable antibody responses despite its extracellular exposure. bb0405 is a member of an operon and ubiquitously expressed throughout the rodent-tick infection cycle. The gene product serves an essential function in vivo, as bb0405-deletion mutants are unable to transmit from ticks and establish infection in mammalian hosts. Despite the lack of BB0405-specific immunoglobulin M or immunoglobulin G antibodies during natural infection, mice immunized with a recombinant version of the protein elicited high-titer and remarkably long-lasting antibody responses, conferring significant host protection against tick-borne infection. Taken together, these studies highlight the essential role of an apparently immune-invisible borrelial transmembrane protein in facilitating infection and its usefulness as a target of protective host immunity blocking the transmission of B. burgdorferi. PMID:26747708

  12. Combined immunity of DNA vector and recombinant vaccinia virus expressing Gag proteins of equine infectious anemia virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Chunming; ZHANG Xiaoyan; WANG Shuhui; LIU Ying; DUAN Danli; SHEN Rongxian; SHAO Yiming

    2004-01-01

    In order to develop a new vaccine candidate for equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), gag gene of Chinese donkey leukocyte attenuated strain (EIAV DLV) and its parental virulent strain (EIAV LN) were inserted respectively into the TK region of the Tiantan strain (VV) of vaccinia virus by homologous recombination and the positive clone was confirmed by blue plaque assay. Protein expression was examined by Western blot. Prime and prime-boost procedures were used to immunize mice with two DNA vectors and two recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing EIAV Gag proteins. The results showed that the specific lysis of CTL responses in the DNA+rVV groups was stronger than those in the DNA groups, amounting to 31%. Although the levels of specific antibodies were not significantly different, we could conclude that the recombinant vaccinia virus could boost the cellular responses following DNA vector priming. There was no detectable difference between the immune responses induced by DLV and LN Gag proteins. This data demonstrates that the combined immunity of DNA vector and recombinant vaccinia virus expressing EIAV gag proteins, utilizing the prime-boost procedure, can drive immunized mice to produce powerful cellular responses. These results lay an important foundation for the development of a new EIAV genetic engineering vaccine.

  13. Immunity Elicited by an Experimental Vaccine Based on Recombinant Flagellin-Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Cap Fusion Protein in Piglets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Wei, Li; Quan, Rong; Yang, Jiayu; Yan, Xu; Li, Zixuan; She, Ruiping; Hu, Fengjiao; Liu, Jue

    2016-01-01

    In a recent study, we reported that a recombinant protein from fusion expression of flagellin to porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) Cap induced robust humoral and cell-mediated immunity that afforded full protection for PCV2 infection using BALB/c mice. Here, we further evaluated the immunogenicity and protection of the recombinant protein using specific pathogen free (SPF) pigs. Twenty-five 3-week-old piglets without passively acquired immunity were divided into 5 groups. All piglets except negative controls were challenged with a virulent PCV2 at 21 days after booster vaccination and necropsied at 21 days post-challenge. Vaccination of piglets with the recombinant protein without adjuvant induced strong humoral and cellular immune responses as observed by high levels of PCV2-specific IgG antibodies and neutralizing antibodies, as well as frequencies of PCV2-specific IFN-γ-secreting cells that conferred good protection against PCV2 challenge, with significant reduced PCV2 viremia, mild lesions, low PCV2 antigen-positive cells, as well as improved body weight gain, comparable to piglets vaccinated with a commercial PCV2 subunit vaccine. These results further demonstrated that the recombinant flagellin-Cap fusion protein is capable of inducing solid protective humoral and cellular immunity when administered to pigs, thereby becoming an effective PCV2 vaccine candidate for control of PCV2 infection. PMID:26848967

  14. Protein rib: a novel group B streptococcal cell surface protein that confers protective immunity and is expressed by most strains causing invasive infections

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    The group B Streptococcus, an important cause of invasive infections in the neonate, is classified into four major serotypes (Ia, Ib, II, and III) based on the structure of the polysaccharide capsule. Since the capsule is a known virulence factor, it has been extensively studied, in particular in type III strains, which cause the majority of invasive infections. Two cell surface proteins, alpha and beta, have also been studied in detail since they confer protective immunity, but these protein...

  15. Immunization strategy against cervical cancer involving an alphavirus vector expressing high levels of a stable fusion protein of human papillomavirus 16 E6 and E7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daemen, T; Regts, J; Holtrop, M; Wilschut, J

    2002-01-01

    We are developing immunization strategies against cervical carcinoma and premalignant disease, based on the use of recombinant Semliki Forest virus (SFV) encoding the onco-proteins E6 and E7 from high-risk human papilloma viruses (HPV). Thus far, protein-based, as well as genetic immunization studie

  16. Pyrosequence analysis of expressed sequence tags for Manduca sexta hemolymph proteins involved in immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhen; Najar, Fares; Wang, Yang; Roe, Bruce; Jiang, Haobo

    2008-06-01

    The tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta is widely used as a model organism to investigate the biochemical basis of insect physiological processes but little transcriptome information is available. To get a broad view of the larval hemolymph proteins, particularly those related to immunity, we synthesized and sequenced cDNA fragments from a mixture of eight total RNA samples: fat body and hemocytes from larvae injected with killed bacteria, fat body, hemocytes, integument and trachea from naïve larvae, and fat body and hemocytes from wandering larvae. Using massively parallel pyrosequencing, we obtained 95,458 M. sexta expressed sequence tags (ESTs) at an average size of 185bp per read. A majority of the sequences (69,429 reads) could be assembled into 7231 contigs with an average size of 300bp, 1178 of which had significant similarity with Drosophila genes from various functional groups. Only approximately 8% (606) of the contigs matched known M. sexta cDNA sequences, representing 186 of the 375 unique NCBI entries. The remaining 6625 contigs represented newly discovered cDNA segments from this well studied biochemical model insect. A search of the 7231 contigs using Tribolium castaneum, Drosophila melanogaster, and Bombyx mori immunity-related sequences revealed 424 cDNA contigs with significant similarity (E-value <1 x 10(-5)). These included 218 previously unknown M. sexta sequences coding for putative defense molecules such as pattern recognition receptors, serine proteinases, serpins, Spätzle, Toll-like receptors, intracellular signaling molecules, and antimicrobial peptides. PMID:18510979

  17. Serological characterization of guinea pigs infected with H3N2 human influenza or immunized with hemagglutinin protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bushnell Ruth V

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent and previous studies have shown that guinea pigs can be infected with, and transmit, human influenza viruses. Therefore guinea pig may be a useful animal model for better understanding influenza infection and assessing vaccine strategies. To more fully characterize the model, antibody responses following either infection/re-infection with human influenza A/Wyoming/03/2003 H3N2 or immunization with its homologous recombinant hemagglutinin (HA protein were studied. Results Serological samples were collected and tested for anti-HA immunoglobulin by ELISA, antiviral antibodies by hemagglutination inhibition (HI, and recognition of linear epitopes by peptide scanning (PepScan. Animals inoculated with infectious virus demonstrated pronounced viral replication and subsequent serological conversion. Animals either immunized with the homologous HA antigen or infected, showed a relatively rapid rise in antibody titers to the HA glycoprotein in ELISA assays. Antiviral antibodies, measured by HI assay, were detectable after the second inoculation. PepScan data identified both previously recognized and newly defined linear epitopes. Conclusions Infection and/or recombinant HA immunization of guinea pigs with H3N2 Wyoming influenza virus resulted in a relatively rapid production of viral-specific antibody thus demonstrating the strong immunogenicity of the major viral structural proteins in this animal model for influenza infection. The sensitivity of the immune response supports the utility of the guinea pig as a useful animal model of influenza infection and immunization.

  18. Immune responses of a chimaeric protein vaccine containing Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae antigens and LTB against experimental M. hyopneumoniae infection in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchioro, Silvana B; Sácristan, Rubén Del Pozo; Michiels, Annelies; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Conceição, Fabricio R; Dellagostin, Odir A; Maes, Dominiek

    2014-08-01

    A recombinant chimaeric protein containing three Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae antigens (C-terminal portion of P97, heat shock protein P42, and NrdF) fused to an adjuvant, the B subunit of heat-labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli (LTB), was used to immunize pigs against enzootic pneumonia. The systemic and local immune responses, as well as the efficacy of the chimaeric protein in inducing protection against experimental M. hyopneumoniae infection were evaluated. In total, 60 male piglets, purchased from a M. hyopneumoniae-free herd, at 4 weeks of age were randomly allocated to six different experimental groups of 10 animals each: recombinant chimaeric protein by intramuscular (IM) (1) or intranasal (IN) (2) administration, commercial bacterin by IM administration (3), and the adjuvant LTB by IM (4, control group A) or IN (5, control group B) administration. All groups were immunized at 24 and 38 days of age and challenged at 52 days of age. The sixth group that was not challenged was used as the negative control (IN [n=5] or IM [n=5] administration of the LTB adjuvant). Compared with the non-challenged group, administration of the chimaeric protein induced significant (Phyopneumoniae infection in pigs. This lack of effectiveness points towards the need for further studies to improve the efficacy of this subunit-based vaccine approach. PMID:24909331

  19. A small molecule inhibitor for ATPase activity of Hsp70 and Hsc70 enhances the immune response to protein antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Kyung-Hwa; Zhang, Haiying; Lee, Bo Ryeong; Kwon, Young-Guen; Ha, Sang-Jun; Shin, Injae

    2015-12-01

    The ATPase activities of Hsp70 and Hsc70 are known to be responsible for regulation of various biological processes. However, little is known about the roles of Hsp70 and Hsc70 in modulation of immune responses to antigens. In the present study, we investigated the effect of apoptozole (Az), a small molecule inhibitor of Hsp70 and Hsc70, on immune responses to protein antigens. The results show that mice administered with both protein antigen and Az produce more antibodies than those treated with antigen alone, showing that Az enhances immune responses to administered antigens. Treatment of mice with Az elicits production of antibodies with a high IgG2c/IgG1 ratio and stimulates the release of Th1 and Th2-type cytokines, suggesting that Az activates the Th1 and Th2 immune responses. The observations made in the present study suggest that inhibition of Hsp70 and Hsc70 activities could be a novel strategy designing small molecule-based adjuvants in protein vaccines.

  20. Functions of innate and acquired immune system are reduced in domestic pigeons (Columba livia domestica) given a low protein diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabuchi, Yuko; Frankel, Theresa L

    2016-03-01

    Racing pigeons are exposed to and act as carriers of diseases. Dietary protein requirement for their maintenance has not been determined experimentally despite their being domesticated for over 7000 years. A maintenance nitrogen (protein) requirement (MNR) for pigeons was determined in a balance study using diets containing 6, 10 and 14% crude protein (CP). Then, the effects of feeding the diets were investigated to determine whether they were adequate to sustain innate and acquired immune functions. Nitrogen intake from the 6% CP diet was sufficient to maintain nitrogen balance and body weight in pigeons. However, the immune functions of phagocytosis, oxidative burst and lymphocyte proliferation in pigeons fed this diet were reduced compared with those fed 10 and 14% CP diets. Pigeons given the 6 and 10% CP diets had lower antibody titres following inoculation against Newcastle disease (ND) than those on the 14% CP diet. A confounding factor found on autopsy was the presence of intestinal parasites in some of the pigeons given the 6 and 10% CP diets; however, none of the pigeons used to measure MNR or acquired immunity to ND were infested with parasites. In conclusion, neither the 6 nor 10% CP diets adequately sustained acquired immune function of pigeons. PMID:27069640

  1. Immunization and chemical conjugation of Bm95 obtained from Pichia pastoris enhances the immune response against vaccinal protein and Neisseria meningitidis capsular polysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez-Valle M

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Manuel Rodriguez-Valle,1 Leonardo Canan-Hadden,2 Olivia Niebla2 1Animal Biotechnology Division, 2Analytical Division, Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Havana, Cuba Abstract: The ectoparasite Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus causes severe economic losses to the cattle industry in tropical and subtropical regions, and transmits endoparasites, such as Babesia bovis. The glycoprotein Bm95 is homologous to Bm86, a surface membrane protein of gut epithelial cells in R. microplus, and has been shown to efficiently control this ectoparasite in regions of the Americas. The immunostimulant properties of Bm86 have already been demonstrated after its coinjection with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg and the infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus. This study evaluated the carrier and immunostimulant properties of Bm95 using low immunogenic Neisseria meningitidis capsular C polysaccharide (Men CpS and HBsAg. We produced two polysaccharide-Bm95 conjugates by carbodiimide (MenCpSBm-c and reductive amination (MenCpSBm-ra methods. These conjugates were characterized and evaluated in mice. Antibody titers against Men CpS were significantly higher in mice immunized with MenCpSBm-ra (2,350±250, P<0.01 than in those immunized with MenCpSBm-c (250±75 or Men CpS (570±104. The study data indicate effective immunological memory after booster inoculation in mice immunized with MenCpSBm-ra. Additionally, significant humoral immunity against HBsAg was documented in mice coimmunized via the intranasal route with recombinant Bm95 (11,400±345 and HBsAg (128,000±250 compared with mice immunized only with HBsAg (400±40 or Bm95 (5,461±150, P<0.01. In conclusion, the immunostimulatory properties of recombinant Bm95 make it a useful element for developing safer conjugated vaccines against bacterial pathogens and for evaluation against ticks and tick-borne diseases in the context of a polyvalent veterinary vaccine. Keywords: glycoconjugate, Bm86

  2. A method for rapid determination of IgG-containing circulating immune complexes using polyethyleneglycol and radioactively labeled protein A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple method for rapid determination of IgG-containing circulating immune complexes by commercially available reagents was developed. In this method, serum is incubated with 2.5% polyethyleneglycol. After washing, the precipitate is incubated with radioactively labeled protein A, which binds to IgG in the immune complex. After a further washing, the radioactivity bound is measured. Artificially formed complexes of heat-aggregated human IgG are diluted and a reference curve is constructed. This method is compared to the solid phase Csub(1q) binding method. (Auth.)

  3. Evaluation of immune effect of recombinant fusion protein targeting the prostate stem cell antigen based on PSCA and HSP70

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Lei; Liu, Juan; Ma, Hong-Yu; Shou-zhen QUAN; Jian-xiao LV; Ying LI; Zhu, Mei-Cai

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the immune effect and antitumor activity of recombinant prostate stem cell protein (PSCA) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in a murine model of prostate cancer. Methods Twenty-five healthy male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into 5 groups (5 each): PSCA, HSP, PSCA+HSP, PSCA-HSP and control group. Mice in the first 4 groups were vaccinated with the corresponding proteins, and those in control group were faked with injection of phosphate buffer saline (PBS). After immu...

  4. Bacteroides fragilis type VI secretion systems use novel effector and immunity proteins to antagonize human gut Bacteroidales species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzidaki-Livanis, Maria; Geva-Zatorsky, Naama; Comstock, Laurie E

    2016-03-29

    Type VI secretion systems (T6SSs) are multiprotein complexes best studied in Gram-negative pathogens where they have been shown to inhibit or kill prokaryotic or eukaryotic cells and are often important for virulence. We recently showed that T6SS loci are also widespread in symbiotic human gut bacteria of the order Bacteroidales, and that these T6SS loci segregate into three distinct genetic architectures (GA). GA1 and GA2 loci are present on conserved integrative conjugative elements (ICE) and are transferred and shared among diverse human gut Bacteroidales species. GA3 loci are not contained on conserved ICE and are confined toBacteroides fragilis Unlike GA1 and GA2 T6SS loci, most GA3 loci do not encode identifiable effector and immunity proteins. Here, we studied GA3 T6SSs and show that they antagonize most human gut Bacteroidales strains analyzed, except forB. fragilisstrains with the same T6SS locus. A combination of mutation analyses,trans-protection analyses, and in vitro competition assays, allowed us to identify novel effector and immunity proteins of GA3 loci. These proteins are not orthologous to known proteins, do not contain identified motifs, and most have numerous predicted transmembrane domains. Because the genes encoding effector and immunity proteins are contained in two variable regions of GA3 loci, GA3 T6SSs of the speciesB. fragilisare likely the source of numerous novel effector and immunity proteins. Importantly, we show that the GA3 T6SS of strain 638R is functional in the mammalian gut and provides a competitive advantage to this organism. PMID:26951680

  5. Immunization of mice by Hollow Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles as carriers of Porcine Circovirus Type 2 ORF2 Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Hui-Chen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgroud Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2 is a primary etiological agent of post-weaning multi-systemic wasting syndrome (PMWS, which is a disease of increasing importance to the pig industry worldwide. Hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNs have gained increasing interest for use in vaccines. Methods To study the potential of HMSNs for use as a protein delivery system or vaccine carriers. HMSNs were synthesized by a sol–gel/emulsion(oil-in-water/ethanol method, purified PCV2 GST-ORF2-E protein was loaded into HMSNs, and the resulting HMSN/protein mixture was injected into mice. The uptake and release profiles of protein by HMSNs in vitro were investigated. PCV2 GST-ORF2-E specific antibodies and secretion of IFN-γ were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, spleen lymphocyte proliferation was measured by the MTS method, and the percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ were determined by flow cytometry. Results HMSNs were found to yield better binding capacities and delivery profiles of proteins; the specific immune response induced by PCV2 GST-ORF2-E was maintained for a relatively long period of time after immunization with the HMSN/protein complex. Conclusion The findings suggest that HMSNs are good protein carriers and have high potential for use in future applications in therapeutic drug delivery.

  6. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma flocculare differential domains from orthologous surface proteins induce distinct cellular immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Fernanda Munhoz Dos Anjos; Virginio, Veridiana Gomes; Martello, Carolina Lumertz; Paes, Jéssica Andrade; Borges, Thiago J; Jaeger, Natália; Bonorino, Cristina; Ferreira, Henrique Bunselmeyer

    2016-07-15

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma flocculare are two genetically close species found in the swine respiratory tract. Despite their similarities, while M. hyopneumoniae is the causative agent of porcine enzootic pneumonia, M. flocculare is a commensal bacterium. Genomic and transcriptional comparative analyses so far failed to explain the difference in pathogenicity between these two species. We then hypothesized that such difference might be, at least in part, explained by amino acid sequence and immunological or functional differences between ortholog surface proteins. In line with that, it was verified that approximately 85% of the ortholog surface proteins from M. hyopneumoniae 7448 and M. flocculare present one or more differential domains. To experimentally assess possible immunological implications of this kind of difference, the extracellular differential domains from one pair of orthologous surface proteins (MHP7448_0612, from M. hyopneumoniae, and MF_00357, from M. flocculare) were expressed in E. coli and used to immunize mice. The recombinant polypeptides (rMHP61267-169 and rMF35767-196, respectively) induced distinct cellular immune responses. While, rMHP61267-169 induced both Th1 and Th2 responses, rMF35767-196 induced just an early pro-inflammatory response. These results indicate that immunological properties determined by differential domains in orthologous surface protein might play a role in pathogenicity, contributing to elicit specific and differential immune responses against each species. PMID:27283856

  7. Protective immunity provided by HLA-A2 epitopes for fusion and hemagglutinin proteins of measles virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural infection and vaccination with a live-attenuated measles virus (MV) induce CD8+ T-cell-mediated immune responses that may play a central role in controlling MV infection. In this study, we show that newly identified human HLA-A2 epitopes from MV hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins induced protective immunity in HLA-A2 transgenic mice challenged with recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing F or H protein. HLA-A2 epitopes were predicted and synthesized. Five and four peptides from H and F, respectively, bound to HLA-A2 molecules in a T2-binding assay, and four from H and two from F could induce peptide-specific CD8+ T cell responses in HLA-A2 transgenic mice. Further experiments proved that three peptides from H (H9-567, H10-250, and H10-516) and one from F protein (F9-57) were endogenously processed and presented on HLA-A2 molecules. All peptides tested in this study are common to 5 different strains of MV including Edmonston. In both A2Kb and HHD-2 mice, the identified peptide epitopes induced protective immunity against recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing H or F. Because F and H proteins induce neutralizing antibodies, they are major components of new vaccine strategies, and therefore data from this study will contribute to the development of new vaccines against MV infection

  8. Immunization with a 22-kDa outer membrane protein elicits protective immunity to multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    OpenAIRE

    Weiwei Huang; Yufeng Yao; Shijie Wang; Ye Xia; Xu Yang; Qiong Long; Wenjia Sun; Cunbao Liu; Yang Li; Xiaojie Chu; Hongmei Bai; Yueting Yao; Yanbing Ma

    2016-01-01

    A. baumannii infections are becoming more and more serious health issues with rapid emerging of multidrug and extremely drug resistant strains, and therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of nonantibiotic-based intervention strategies. This study aimed at identifying whether an outer membrane protein with molecular weight of about 22 kDa (Omp22) holds the potentials to be an efficient vaccine candidate and combat A. baumannii infection. Omp22 which has a molecule length of 217 ...

  9. Profiling Carbohydrate-Receptor Interaction with Recombinant Innate Immunity Receptor-Fc Fusion Proteins*

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Tsui-Ling; Cheng, Shih-Chin; Yang, Wen-Bin; Chin, See-Wen; Bo-hua CHEN; Huang, Ming-Ting; Hsieh, Shie-Liang; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2009-01-01

    The recognition of bacteria, viruses, fungi, and other microbes is controlled by host immune cells, which are equipped with many innate immunity receptors, such as Toll-like receptors, C-type lectin receptors, and immunoglobulin-like receptors. Our studies indicate that the immune modulating properties of many herbal drugs, for instance, the medicinal fungus Reishi (Ganoderma lucidum) and Cordyceps sinensis, could be attributed to their polysaccharide components. These polysaccharides specifi...

  10. Comparisons of Allergenic and Metazoan Parasite Proteins: Allergy the Price of Immunity.

    OpenAIRE

    Tyagi, N.; Farnell, EJ; Fitzsimmons, CM; Ryan, S.; Tukahebwa, E; Maizels, RM; Dunne, DW; Thornton, JM; Furnham, N

    2015-01-01

    Allergic reactions can be considered as maladaptive IgE immune responses towards environmental antigens. Intriguingly, these mechanisms are observed to be very similar to those implicated in the acquisition of an important degree of immunity against metazoan parasites (helminths and arthropods) in mammalian hosts. Based on the hypothesis that IgE-mediated immune responses evolved in mammals to provide extra protection against metazoan parasites rather than to cause allergy, we predict that th...

  11. Comparisons of Allergenic and Metazoan Parasite Proteins:Allergy the Price of Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Tyagi, Nidhi; Farnell, Edward J.; Fitzsimmons, Colin M.; Ryan, Stephanie; Tukahebwa, Edridah; Rick M Maizels; Dunne, David W.; Thornton, Janet M.; Furnham, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Allergic reactions can be considered as maladaptive IgE immune responses towards environmental antigens. Intriguingly, these mechanisms are observed to be very similar to those implicated in the acquisition of an important degree of immunity against metazoan parasites (helminths and arthropods) in mammalian hosts. Based on the hypothesis that IgE-mediated immune responses evolved in mammals to provide extra protection against metazoan parasites rather than to cause allergy, we predict that th...

  12. Maternal Immunization with Pneumococcal Surface Protein A Protects against Pneumococcal Infections among Derived Offspring

    OpenAIRE

    Masamitsu Kono; Muneki Hotomi; Hollingshead, Susan K.; Briles, David E.; Noboru Yamanaka

    2011-01-01

    Pathogen-specific antibody plays an important role in protection against pneumococcal carriage and infections. However, neonates and infants exhibit impaired innate and adaptive immune responses, which result in their high susceptibility to pneumococci. To protect neonates and infants against pneumococcal infection it is important to elicit specific protective immune responses at very young ages. In this study, we investigated the protective immunity against pneumococcal carriage, pneumonia, ...

  13. Immune cell types involved in early uptake and transport of recombinant mouse prion protein in Peyer's patches of calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lwin, Sein; Inoshima, Yasuo; Atoji, Yasuro; Ueno, Hiroshi; Ishiguro, Naotaka

    2009-12-01

    We have previously reported the early uptake and transport of foreign particles into Peyer's patches (PPs) of newborn and 2-month-old calves and shown that the peak uptake of particles occurs 6 h after inoculation, in addition to site- and size-related effects on particle uptake. We now report the distribution of immune cells within PPs of the distal ileum in newborn and 2-month-old calves inoculated with carbon black. The types of immune cells involved in the early uptake and transport of recombinant mouse prion protein (rMPrP) within PPs of newborn calf were investigated by using monoclonal antibodies CD11c, CD14, CD68, CD172a, and CD21. CD11c(+), CD14(+), CD68(+), CD172a(+), and CD21(+) immune cells were widely distributed in four tissue compartments (villi, dome, interfollicular region, and follicles) of PPs in the distal ileum of newborn and 2-month-old calves, whereas CD11c(+), CD14(+), CD172a(+), and CD21(+) immune cells were more prominently distributed in the dome areas of newborn calves than in 2-month-old calves. Moreover, CD11c(+) and CD14(+) dendritic cells, CD172a(+) and CD68(+) macrophages, and CD21(+) follicular dendritic cells containing rMPrP were primarily observed in the dome and inner follicular regions. The deposition of rMPrP within CD11c(+), CD14(+), CD172a(+), and CD68(+) cells, but not CD21(+) cells, was detected in villous regions. rMPrP-positive immune cells within the interfollicular regions included only CD11c(+) and CD172(+) cells. Although the particles used in this investigation do not include the infectious prion protein, PrP(Sc), our experimental setup provides a useful model for studying immune cells involved in the early uptake and transport of PrP(Sc). PMID:19834742

  14. Echinoderm immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L Courtney; Ghosh, Julie; Buckley, Katherine M; Clow, Lori A; Dheilly, Nolwenn M; Haug, Tor; Henson, John H; Li, Chun; Lun, Cheng Man; Majeske, Audrey J; Matranga, Valeria; Nair, Sham V; Rast, Jonathan P; Raftos, David A; Roth, Mattias; Sacchi, Sandro; Schrankel, Catherine S; Stensvåg, Klara

    2010-01-01

    A survey for immune genes in the genome for the purple sea urchin has shown that the immune system is complex and sophisticated. By inference, immune responses of all echinoderms maybe similar. The immune system is mediated by several types of coelomocytes that are also useful as sensors of environmental stresses. There are a number of large gene families in the purple sea urchin genome that function in immunity and of which at least one appears to employ novel approaches for sequence diversification. Echinoderms have a simpler complement system, a large set of lectin genes and a number of antimicrobial peptides. Profiling the immune genes expressed by coelomocytes and the proteins in the coelomic fluid provide detailed information about immune functions in the sea urchin. The importance of echinoderms in maintaining marine ecosystem stability and the disastrous effects of their removal due to disease will require future collaborations between ecologists and immunologists working towards understanding and preserving marine habitats. PMID:21528703

  15. Neural Network Enhanced Structure Determination of Osteoporosis, Immune System, and Radiation Repair Proteins Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation will utilize self learning neural network technology to determine the structure of osteoporosis, immune system disease, and excess radiation...

  16. G-protein coupled receptor signaling architecture of mammalian immune cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Polouliakh

    Full Text Available A series of recent studies on large-scale networks of signaling and metabolic systems revealed that a certain network structure often called "bow-tie network" are observed. In signaling systems, bow-tie network takes a form with diverse and redundant inputs and outputs connected via a small numbers of core molecules. While arguments have been made that such network architecture enhances robustness and evolvability of biological systems, its functional role at a cellular level remains obscure. A hypothesis was proposed that such a network function as a stimuli-reaction classifier where dynamics of core molecules dictate downstream transcriptional activities, hence physiological responses against stimuli. In this study, we examined whether such hypothesis can be verified using experimental data from Alliance for Cellular Signaling (AfCS that comprehensively measured GPCR related ligands response for B-cell and macrophage. In a GPCR signaling system, cAMP and Ca2+ act as core molecules. Stimuli-response for 32 ligands to B-Cells and 23 ligands to macrophages has been measured. We found that ligands with correlated changes of cAMP and Ca2+ tend to cluster closely together within the hyperspaces of both cell types and they induced genes involved in the same cellular processes. It was found that ligands inducing cAMP synthesis activate genes involved in cell growth and proliferation; cAMP and Ca2+ molecules that increased together form a feedback loop and induce immune cells to migrate and adhere together. In contrast, ligands without a core molecules response are scattered throughout the hyperspace and do not share clusters. G-protein coupling receptors together with immune response specific receptors were found in cAMP and Ca2+ activated clusters. Analyses have been done on the original software applicable for discovering 'bow-tie' network architectures within the complex network of intracellular signaling where ab initio clustering has been

  17. IgG immune responses to different proteins of Helicobacter Pylori as defined by immunoblot assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raeiszadeh M

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori is an etiologic factor for chronic gastritis and peptic ulcers. Serological testing of H.pylori infection is common in Iran, as other parts of the world. There are geographical variations in the humoral immune response to various H. pylori strains in different parts of the worl. We studied the immunogenic proteins of H.pylori by means of an Immunoblot assay with antigens of H.pylori strains isolated in Iran. Sera of 64 patients suffering from dyspepsia were analyzed to determine antibodlies which were good marker of infection and the antibody patterns associated with peptic ulcer.54 out of 64 dyspeptic patients were infected by H. pylori based on positive culture or positive results of both rapid urease test and direct examination. 14 out of fity-four had peptic ulcers and the rest were catagoriied as patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia. Some of them had multiple erosions in the gut or deodenum. Tweny –two major bands were identified by immunoblot. Of these, IgG antibodies against 10 protients, and they produced immunoreative bands at 14, 16, 22, 26, 32 , 32, 44, 87, 92, 120 Kda. Antibody patterns were not identical in the patients. The presence of at least one band at 14, 16, 22, 26, 32, 35Kda was the best marker of infection(sensitivity, 90% and specificity, 80% Major serological cross reactions were found at moderate molecular weight bands (50, 52, 54, 60, 66 KDa. The presence of at least one band at 14, 16, 22, 26, 32, 35Kda was the best marker of infection (sensitivity, 90% and specificity, 80%. Major serological crossreactions were found at moderate molerate molecular weight bands (50, 52, 54, 60, 66 KDa. The presence of antibodies to 120 Kda protein (Cag A and 87 Kda Protein (Vac A were not associated with the presence of peptic ulcers. These were in contradiction to results obtained across Europe and U.S but in agreement with Asian studies. However the presence of at least one band at either 32 or 35 Kda was

  18. Production and release of antimicrobial and immune defense proteins by mammary epithelial cells following Streptococcus uberis infection of sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addis, Maria Filippa; Pisanu, Salvatore; Marogna, Gavino; Cubeddu, Tiziana; Pagnozzi, Daniela; Cacciotto, Carla; Campesi, Franca; Schianchi, Giuseppe; Rocca, Stefano; Uzzau, Sergio

    2013-09-01

    Investigating the innate immune response mediators released in milk has manifold implications, spanning from elucidation of the role played by mammary epithelial cells (MECs) in fighting microbial infections to the discovery of novel diagnostic markers for monitoring udder health in dairy animals. Here, we investigated the mammary gland response following a two-step experimental infection of lactating sheep with the mastitis-associated bacterium Streptococcus uberis. The establishment of infection was confirmed both clinically and by molecular methods, including PCR and fluorescent in situ hybridization of mammary tissues. Proteomic investigation of the milk fat globule (MFG), a complex vesicle released by lactating MECs, enabled detection of enrichment of several proteins involved in inflammation, chemotaxis of immune cells, and antimicrobial defense, including cathelicidins and calprotectin (S100A8/S100A9), in infected animals, suggesting the consistent involvement of MECs in the innate immune response to pathogens. The ability of MECs to produce and release antimicrobial and immune defense proteins was then demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and confocal immunomicroscopy of cathelicidin and the calprotectin subunit S100A9 on mammary tissues. The time course of their release in milk was also assessed by Western immunoblotting along the course of the experimental infection, revealing the rapid increase of these proteins in the MFG fraction in response to the presence of bacteria. Our results support an active role of MECs in the innate immune response of the mammary gland and provide new potential for the development of novel and more sensitive tools for monitoring mastitis in dairy animals. PMID:23774600

  19. The Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae recombinant heat shock protein P42 induces an immune response in pigs under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Sérgio; de Oliveira, Natasha Rodrigues; Marchioro, Silvana Beutinger; Fisch, Andressa; Gomes, Charles Klazer; Hartleben, Cláudia Pinho; Conceição, Fabricio Rochedo; Dellagostin, Odir Antonio

    2014-09-01

    Enzootic pneumonia (EP), resulting from Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae infection is one of the most prevalent diseases in pigs and is a major cause of economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. EP is often controlled by vaccination with inactivated, adjuvanted whole-cell bacterin. However, these bacterins provide only partial protection and do not prevent M. hyopneumoniae colonization. Attempts to develop vaccines that are more efficient have made use of the recombinant DNA technology. The objective of this study was to assess the potential of recombinant M. hyopneumoniae heat shock protein P42 in vaccine preparations against EP, using piglets housed under field conditions in a M. hyopneumoniae-positive farm. The cellular and humoral immune responses were elicited after a single intramuscular inoculation of rP42 in an oil-based adjuvant, or in conjunction with whole-cell vaccine preparation. The production of INF-γ and IL-10 cytokines was quantified in the supernatant of the cultured mononuclear cells. The rP42 emulsified in oil-based adjuvant was able to trigger a strong humoral immune response. Further, it induced a cellular immune response, accompanied by the production of antibodies that reacted with the native M. hyopneumoniae protein. The rP42 mediated induction of cellular and humoral immune response in the host suggests that rP42 emulsified in an oil-based adjuvant holds promise as an effective recombinant subunit vaccine against EP. PMID:25082621

  20. Involvement of platelet-tumor cell interaction in immune evasion. Potential role of podocalyxin-like protein 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SusanaLarrucea

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Besides their essential role in hemostasis and thrombosis, platelets are involved in the onset of cancer metastasis by interacting with tumor cells. Platelets release secretory factors that promote tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Furthermore, the formation of platelet-tumor cell aggregates in the bloodstream provides cancer cells with an immune escape mechanism by protecting circulating malignant cells from immune-mediated lysis by natural killer (NK cells. Platelet-tumor cell interaction is accomplished by specific adhesion molecules, including integrins, selectins, and their ligands. Podocalyxin-like protein 1 (PCLP1 is a selectin ligand protein which overexpression has been associated with several aggressive cancers. PCLP1 expression enhances cell adherence to platelets in an integrin-dependent process and through the interaction with P-selectin expressed on activated platelets. However, the involvement of PCLP1-induced tumor-platelet interaction in tumor immune evasion still remains unexplored. The identification of selectin ligands involved in the interaction of platelets with tumor cells may provide help for the development of effective therapies to restrain cancer cell dissemination. This article summarizes the current knowledge on molecules that participate in platelet-tumor cell interaction as well as discusses the potential role of PCLP1 as a molecule implicated in tumor immune evasion.

  1. In silico interaction of methyl isocyanate with immune protein responsible for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection using molecular docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Rahul; Yasir, Mohammad; Tripathi, Manish; Singh, Pushpendra

    2016-01-01

    This article reports in silico analysis of methyl isocyanate (MIC) on different key immune proteins against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The analysis shows that MIC is released in the Bhopal gas tragedy in 1984, which is highly toxic and extremely hazardous to human health. In this study, we have selected immune proteins to perform molecular docking with the help of Autodock 4.0. Results show that the CD40 ligand and alpha5beta1 integrin have higher inhibition compared to plasminogen activator urokinase, human glutathione synthetase, mitogen-activated protein kinase (P38 MAPK 14), surfactant protein-B, -D (SP-D), and pulmonary SP-D. MIC interacted with His-125, Try-146 residue of CD40 ligand and Ala-149, and Arg-152 residue of alpha5beta1 integrin and affects the proteins functioning by binding on their active sites. These inhibitory conformations were energetically and statistically favored and supported the evidence from wet laboratory experiments reported in the literature. We can conclude that MIC directly or indirectly affects these proteins, which shows that survivals of the disaster suffer from the diseases like tuberculosis infection and lung cancer. PMID:24081639

  2. DMBT1 encodes a protein involved in the immune defense and in epithelial differentiation and is highly unstable in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollenhauer, J; Herbertz, S; Holmskov, U;

    2000-01-01

    that is involved in the respiratory immune defense. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that DMBT1 is produced by both tumor-associated macrophages and tumor cells and that it is deregulated in glioblastoma multiforme in comparison to normal brain tissue. Our data further suggest that the proteins...... CRP-ductin and hensin, both of which have been implicated in epithelial differentiation, are the DMBT1 orthologs in mice and rabbits, respectively. These findings and the spatial and temporal distribution of DMBT1 in fetal and adult epithelia suggest that DMBT1 further plays a role in epithelial...... during tumorigenesis. Thus, DMBT1 is a gene that is highly unstable in cancer and encodes for a protein with at least two different functions, one in the immune defense and a second one in epithelial differentiation....

  3. The Nanoscience of Polyvalent Binding by Proteins in the Immune Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorup-Jensen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that the successful use of nanometer-scaled material, such as nanoparticles, as medicines is often challenged by the host immune system. Mechanisms of the innate immunity seem to provide a swift response to administration of particulate nanomedicines, which may cl...

  4. Glycosylation of Candida albicans cell wall proteins is critical for induction of innate immune responses and apoptosis of epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Wagener, Jeanette; Weindl, Günther; de Groot, Piet W. J.; de Boer, Albert D.; Kaesler, Susanne; Thavaraj, Selvam; Bader, Oliver; Mailänder-Sanchez, Daniela; Borelli, Claudia; Weig, Michael; Biedermann, Tilo; Naglik, Julian R.; Korting, Hans Christian; Schaller, Martin

    2012-01-01

    C. albicans is one of the most common fungal pathogen of humans, causing local and superficial mucosal infections in immunocompromised individuals. Given that the key structure mediating host-C. albicans interactions is the fungal cell wall, we aimed to identify features of the cell wall inducing epithelial responses and be associated with fungal pathogenesis. We demonstrate here the importance of cell wall protein glycosylation in epithelial immune activation with a predominant role for the ...

  5. Immunization of cattle with synthetic peptides derived from the Boophilus microplus gut protein (Bm86).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patarroyo, J H; Portela, R W; De Castro, R O; Pimentel, J Couto; Guzman, F; Patarroyo, M E; Vargas, M I; Prates, A A; Mendes, M A Dias

    2002-09-25

    Three synthetic peptides (SBm4912, SBm7462 and SBm19733), derived from the Bm86 glycoprotein from Boophilus microplus gut, were constructed and used to immunize cattle from a tick-free area. The immunized animals received three subcutaneous doses of the peptides, with saponin as adjuvant, at 30-day intervals. The immune response was evaluated by IgG elicited against the peptides by the detection of anti-Bm86 specific antibodies in situ and by Western blotting analysis. After tick challenge, reduction in the number, weight and oviposition capacity of engorged females was observed in the tick population that had fed on immunized animals. The results pointed a high efficacy (81.05%) for the SBm7462 synthetic peptide in relation to the others (p<0.01), demonstrating the efficiency of the immune response elicited by synthetic peptides to control the cattle tick B. microplus. PMID:12127414

  6. Loss of Arabidopsis thaliana Dynamin-Related Protein 2B reveals separation of innate immune signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Smith

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Vesicular trafficking has emerged as an important means by which eukaryotes modulate responses to microbial pathogens, likely by contributing to the correct localization and levels of host components necessary for effective immunity. However, considering the complexity of membrane trafficking in plants, relatively few vesicular trafficking components with functions in plant immunity are known. Here we demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana Dynamin-Related Protein 2B (DRP2B, which has been previously implicated in constitutive clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME, functions in responses to flg22 (the active peptide derivative of bacterial flagellin and immunity against flagellated bacteria Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pto DC3000. Consistent with a role of DRP2B in Pattern-Triggered Immunity (PTI, drp2b null mutant plants also showed increased susceptibility to Pto DC3000 hrcC-, which lacks a functional Type 3 Secretion System, thus is unable to deliver effectors into host cells to suppress PTI. Importantly, analysis of drp2b mutant plants revealed three distinct branches of the flg22-signaling network that differed in their requirement for RESPIRATORY BURST OXIDASE HOMOLOGUE D (RBOHD, the NADPH oxidase responsible for flg22-induced apoplastic reactive oxygen species production. Furthermore, in drp2b, normal MAPK signaling and increased immune responses via the RbohD/Ca2+-branch were not sufficient for promoting robust PR1 mRNA expression nor immunity against Pto DC3000 and Pto DC3000 hrcC-. Based on live-cell imaging studies, flg22-elicited internalization of the plant flagellin-receptor, FLAGELLIN SENSING 2 (FLS2, was found to be partially dependent on DRP2B, but not the closely related protein DRP2A, thus providing genetic evidence for a component, implicated in CME, in ligand-induced endocytosis of FLS2. Reduced trafficking of FLS2 in response to flg22 may contribute in part to the non-canonical combination of immune signaling defects

  7. A role for plasma cell targeting agents in immune tolerance induction in autoimmune disease and antibody responses to therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, A S; Pariser, A R; Diamond, B; Yao, L; Turka, L A; Lacana, E; Kishnani, P S

    2016-04-01

    Antibody responses to life saving therapeutic protein products, such as enzyme replacement therapies (ERT) in the setting of lysosomal storage diseases, have nullified product efficacy and caused clinical deterioration and death despite treatment with immune-suppressive therapies. Moreover, in some autoimmune diseases, pathology is mediated by a robust antibody response to endogenous proteins such as is the case in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, mediated by antibodies to Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF). In this work, we make the case that in such settings, when the antibody response is high titered, sustained, and refractory to immune suppressive treatments, the antibody response is mediated by long-lived plasma cells which are relatively unperturbed by immune suppressants including rituximab. However, long-lived plasma cells can be targeted by proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib. Recent reports of successful reversal of antibody responses with bortezomib in the settings of ERT and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP) argue that the safety and efficacy of such plasma cell targeting agents should be evaluated in larger scale clinical trials to delineate the risks and benefits of such therapies in the settings of antibody-mediated adverse effects to therapeutic proteins and autoantibody mediated pathology. PMID:26928739

  8. Innate immunity of surfactant proteins A and D in urinary tract infection with uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fengqi; Ding, Guohua; Zhang, Zhiyong; Gatto, Louis A; Hawgood, Samuel; Poulain, Francis R; Cooney, Robert N; Wang, Guirong

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effects of surfactant proteins A and D (SP-A and SP-D, respectively) in urinary tract infection (UTI), SP-A and SP-D double knockout (SP-A/D KO) and wild type (WT) C57BL/6 female mice were infected with uropathogenic Escherichia coli by intravesical inoculation. Compared with WT mice SP-A/D KO mice showed increased susceptibility to UTI, as evidenced by higher bacterial CFU, more infiltrating neutrophils and severe pathological changes. Keratinocyte-derived chemokine increased in the kidney of WT mice but not in SP-A/D KO mice 24 h post-infection. Compared with control, the level of IL-17 was elevated in the kidney of infected WT and SP-A/D KO mice and the level of IL-17 was higher in the infected SP-A/D KO mice than in infected WT mice 24 and 48 h post-infection. The basal level of p38 MAPK phosphorylation in SP-A/D KO mice was higher than in WT mice. The phosphorylated p38 level was elevated in the kidney of WT mice post infection but not in SP-A/D KO mice. Furthermore, in vitro growth of uropathogenic E. coli was inhibited by SP-A and SP-D. We conclude that SP-A and SP-D function as mediators of innate immunity by inhibiting bacterial growth and modulating renal inflammation in part by regulating p38 MAPK-related pathway in murine UTI. PMID:26511057

  9. PfEMP1 – A Parasite Protein Family of Key Importance in Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Immunity and Pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Lars; Jensen, Anja T R

    2015-01-01

    membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family of high-molecular weight and highly variable antigens appears to be the most prominent. In this chapter, we aim to provide a systematic overview of the current knowledge about these proteins, their structure, their function, how they are presented on the erythrocyte...... surface, and how the var genes encoding them are regulated. The role of PfEMP1 in the pathogenesis of malaria, PfEMP1-specific immune responses, and the prospect of PfEMP1-specific vaccination against malaria are also covered briefly....

  10. Immune Response to Recombinant Capsid Proteins of Adenovirus in Humans: Antifiber and Anti-Penton Base Antibodies Have a Synergistic Effect on Neutralizing Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Gahéry-Ségard, Hanne; Farace, Françoise; Godfrin, Dominique; Gaston, Jesintha; Lengagne, Renée; Tursz, Thomas; Boulanger, Pierre; Guillet, Jean-Gérard

    1998-01-01

    Replication-deficient adenovirus used in humans for gene therapy induces a strong immune response to the vector, resulting in transient recombinant protein expression and the blocking of gene transfer upon a second administration. Therefore, in this study we examined in detail the capsid-specific humoral immune response in sera of patients with lung cancer who had been given one dose of a replication-defective adenovirus. We analyzed the immune response to the three major components of the vi...

  11. Towards development of novel immunization strategies against leishmaniasis using PLGA nanoparticles loaded with kinetoplastid membrane protein-11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos DM

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Diego M Santos1, Marcia W Carneiro1, Tatiana R de Moura1, Kiyoshi Fukutani1, Jorge Clarencio1, Manuel Soto2, Socorro Espuelas3,4, Claudia Brodskyn1,5, Aldina Barral1,5, Manoel Barral-Netto1,5, Camila I de Oliveira1,51Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz, FIOCRUZ, Salvador, BA, Brazil; 2Centro de Biología Molecular Severo Ochoa, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Departamento de Biologia Molecular, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid; 3Departamento de Farmacia y Tecnología Farmacéutica, 4Instituto de Salud Tropical, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain; 5Instituto de Investigação em Imunologia, Salvador, BA, BrazilBackground: Vaccine development has been a priority in the fight against leishmaniases, which are vector-borne diseases caused by Leishmania protozoa. Among the different immunization strategies employed to date is inoculation of plasmid DNA coding for parasite antigens, which has a demonstrated ability to induce humoral and cellular immune responses. In this sense, inoculation of plasmid DNA encoding Leishmania kinetoplasmid membrane protein-11 (KMP-11 was able to confer protection against visceral leishmaniasis. However, recently the use of antigen delivery systems such as poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles has also proven effective for eliciting protective immune responses.Methods: In the present work, we tested two immunization strategies with the goal of obtaining protection, in terms of lesion development and parasite load, against cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. braziliensis. One strategy involved immunization with plasmid DNA encoding L. infantum chagasi KMP-11. Alternatively, mice were primed with PLGA nanoparticles loaded with the recombinant plasmid DNA and boosted using PLGA nanoparticles loaded with recombinant KMP-11.Results: Both immunization strategies elicited detectable cellular immune responses with the presence of both proinflammatory and anti

  12. An unbiased nuclear proteomics approach reveals novel nuclear protein components that participates in MAMP-triggered immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakih, Zainab; Ahmed, Md Bulbul; Letanneur, Claire; Germain, Hugo

    2016-06-01

    (MAMP)-triggered immunity (MTI) is the first layer of molecular defense encountered by pathogens. Genetic screens have contributed to our knowledge of MTI, but are limited to phenotype-causing mutations. Here we attempt to identify novel factors involved in the early event leading to plant MTI by comparing the nuclear proteomes of two Arabidopsis genotypes treated with chitosan. Our approach revealed that following chitosan treatment, cerk1 plants had many nuclear accumulating proteins in common, but also some unique ones, when compared with Col-0 plants. Analysis of the identified proteins revealed a nuclear accumulation of DNA-modifying enzymes, RNA-binding proteins and ribosomal proteins. Our results demonstrate that nuclear proteomic is a valid, phenotype-independent approach to uncover factor involved in cellular processes. PMID:27177187

  13. Effect of dietary supplementation with a formulated nutrient mixture together with whey-based protein on immune response of young and old mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aging is associated with dysregulation of the immune response. Nutrient supplementation has been shown to help maintain a healthy immune system during aging. In this study we fed young (4-5 mo) and old (23-24 mo) C57BL/6 mice, a diet supplemented with a formulated nutrient mixture and whey proteins ...

  14. Elicitation of strong immune responses by a DNA vaccine expressing a secreted form of hepatitis C virus envelope protein E2 in murine and porcine animal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yiping; Kang, H.N.; Babiuk, L.A.;

    2006-01-01

    . RESULTS: Intradermal injection of E2 DNA vaccine induced strong Th1-like immune responses in mice. In piglets, E2 DNA vaccine elicited moderate and more balanced immune responses. A DNA vaccine prime and protein boost vaccination, strategy induced significantly higher E2-specific antibody levels and...

  15. Analysis of Globodera rostochiensis effectors reveals conserved functions of SPRYSEC proteins in suppressing and eliciting plant immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Shawkat; Magne, Maxime; Chen, Shiyan; Obradovic, Natasa; Jamshaid, Lubna; Wang, Xiaohong; Bélair, Guy; Moffett, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Potato cyst nematodes (PCNs), including Globodera rostochiensis (Woll.), are important pests of potato. Plant parasitic nematodes produce multiple effector proteins, secreted from their stylets, to successfully infect their hosts. These include proteins delivered to the apoplast and to the host cytoplasm. A number of effectors from G. rostochiensis predicted to be delivered to the host cytoplasm have been identified, including several belonging to the secreted SPRY domain (SPRYSEC) family. SPRYSEC proteins are unique to members of the genus Globodera and have been implicated in both the induction and the repression of host defense responses. We have tested the properties of six different G. rostochiensis SPRYSEC proteins by expressing them in Nicotiana benthamiana and N. tabacum. We have found that all SPRYSEC proteins tested are able to suppress defense responses induced by NB-LRR proteins as well as cell death induced by elicitors, suggesting that defense repression is a common characteristic of members of this effector protein family. At the same time, GrSPRYSEC-15 elicited a defense responses in N. tabacum, which was found to be resistant to a virus expressing GrSPRYSEC-15. These results suggest that SPRYSEC proteins may possess characteristics that allow them to be recognized by the plant immune system. PMID:26322064

  16. Analysis of Globodera rostochiensis effectors reveals conserved functions of SPRYSEC proteins in suppressing and eliciting plant immune responses

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Shawkat

    2015-08-11

    Potato cyst nematodes (PCNs), including Globodera rostochiensis (Woll.), are important pests of potato. Plant parasitic nematodes produce multiple effector proteins, secreted from their stylets, to successfully infect their hosts. These include proteins delivered to the apoplast and to the host cytoplasm. A number of effectors from G. rostochiensis predicted to be delivered to the host cytoplasm have been identified, including several belonging to the secreted SPRY domain (SPRYSEC) family. SPRYSEC proteins are unique to members of the genus Globodera and have been implicated in both the induction and the repression of host defense responses. We have tested the properties of six different G. rostochiensis SPRYSEC proteins by expressing them in Nicotiana benthamiana and N. tabacum. We have found that all SPRYSEC proteins tested are able to suppress defense responses induced by NB-LRR proteins as well as cell death induced by elicitors, suggesting that defense repression is a common characteristic of members of this effector protein family. At the same time, GrSPRYSEC-15 elicited a defense responses in N. tabacum, which was found to be resistant to a virus expressing GrSPRYSEC-15. These results suggest that SPRYSEC proteins may possess characteristics that allow them to be recognized by the plant immune system.

  17. NF-κB/Rel Proteins and the Humoral Immune Responses of Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Ganesan, Sandhya; Aggarwal, Kamna; Paquette, Nicholas; Silverman, Neal

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB)/Rel transcription factors form an integral part of innate immune defenses and are conserved throughout the animal kingdom. Studying the function, mechanism of activation and regulation of these factors is crucial for understanding host responses to microbial infections. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has proved to be a valuable model system to study these evolutionarily conserved NF-κB mediated immune responses. Drosophila combats pathogens through humoral and...

  18. Identification of Brucella abortus virulence proteins that modulate the host immune response

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yufei; Chen, Zeliang; Qiu, Yefeng; Ke, Yuehua; Xu, Jie; Yuan, Xitong; Li, Xianbo; Fu, Simei; Cui, Mingquan; Xie, Yongfei; Du, Xinying; Wang, Zhoujia; Huang, Liuyu

    2012-01-01

    Brucellosis is an important zoonotic disease of almost worldwide distribution. One significant immune phenomenon of this disease is the ability of the pathogen to hide and survive in the host, establishing long lasting chronic infections. Brucella was found to have the ability to actively modulate the host immune response in order to establish chronic infections, but the mechanism by which the pathogen achieves this remains largely unknown. In our screening for protective antigens of Brucella...

  19. The Salmonella Effector Protein SopA Modulates Innate Immune Responses by Targeting TRIM E3 Ligase Family Members.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Kamanova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella Typhimurium stimulates inflammatory responses in the intestinal epithelium, which are essential for its ability to replicate within the intestinal tract. Stimulation of these responses is strictly dependent on the activity of a type III secretion system encoded within its pathogenicity island 1, which through the delivery of effector proteins, triggers signaling pathways leading to inflammation. One of these effectors is SopA, a HECT-type E3 ligase, which is required for the efficient stimulation of inflammation in an animal model of Salmonella Typhimurium infection. We show here that SopA contributes to the stimulation of innate immune responses by targeting two host E3 ubiquitin ligases, TRIM56 and TRIM65. We also found that TRIM65 interacts with the innate immune receptor MDA5 enhancing its ability to stimulate interferon-β signaling. Therefore, by targeting TRIM56 and TRIM65, SopA can stimulate signaling through two innate immune receptors, RIG-I and MDA5. These findings describe a Salmonella mechanism to modulate inflammatory responses by directly targeting innate immune signaling mechanisms.

  20. Effects of fish protein hydrolysate on growth performance and humoral immune response in large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea R.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-gang TANG; Tian-xing WU; Zhan-yu ZHAO; Xiao-dong PAN

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effects of fish protein hydrolysate (FPH) on growth performance and humoral immune response of the large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea R.). One thousand and two hundred large yellow croakers [initial average weight: (162.75±23.85) g] were divided into four groups and reared in floating sea cages (3 m×3 m×3 m). The animals were fed with 4 diets: basal diet only (control) or diets supplemented with 5%, 10% and 15% (w/w) FPH. The results show that dietary FPH levels significantly influenced the growth and immunity of the large yellow croaker. Compared with the control group, total weight gain (TWG) in all treatment groups, relative weight gain (RWG) and specific growth rate (SGR) in fish fed with diets supplemerited with 10% and 15% FPH were significantly increased (P<0.05). Similar results were observed in immune parameters [lysozyme activity, serum complements, immunoglobulin M (IgM)]. Lysozyme activity, complement C4 and IgM were also significantly increased (P<0.05) in fish fed with diets supplemented with 10% and 15% FPH, while complement C3 level was significantly increased (P<0.05) in all treatment groups. In general, with the supplementation of FPH, particularly at dose of 10%,the growth performance and immunity of the large yellow croaker can be improved effectively.

  1. Dengue-1 envelope protein domain III along with PELC and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides synergistically enhances immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Yi Chiang

    Full Text Available The major weaknesses of subunit vaccines are their low immunogenicity and poor efficacy. Adjuvants can help to overcome some of these inherent defects with subunit vaccines. Here, we evaluated the efficacy of the newly developed water-in-oil-in-water multiphase emulsion system, termed PELC, in potentiating the protective capacity of dengue-1 envelope protein domain III. Unlike aluminum phosphate, dengue-1 envelope protein domain III formulated with PELC plus CpG oligodeoxynucleotides induced neutralizing antibodies against dengue-1 virus and increased the splenocyte secretion of IFN-γ after in vitro re-stimulation. The induced antibodies contained both the IgG1 and IgG2a subclasses. A rapid anamnestic neutralizing antibody response against a live dengue virus challenge was elicited at week 26 after the first immunization. These results demonstrate that PELC plus CpG oligodeoxynucleotides broaden the dengue-1 envelope protein domain III-specific immune responses. PELC plus CpG oligodeoxynucleotides is a promising adjuvant for recombinant protein based vaccination against dengue virus.

  2. Evaluation of recombinant P23 protein as a vaccine for passive immunization of newborn calves against Cryptosporidium parvum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, N; Shayan, P; Mokhber-Dezfouli, M R; Ebrahimzadeh, E; Lotfollahzadeh, S; Rostami, A; Amininia, N; Ragh, M J

    2016-05-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is a zoonotic protozoan disease that affects the gastrointestinal tract of animals and humans. Diarrhoea as the most important indication of the infection leads to high economic losses in livestock industries and is a life threatening infection in immunocompromised individuals. In the absence of the effective drugs, vaccine has an effective role in the prevention of infection. For this purpose we developed a vaccine utilizing recombinant P23 protein and immunized pregnant cows four times from 70 days to parturition every 2 weeks. After parturition, each calf received his dam colostrum and challenged with 1 × 10(7) Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts at 12 h of age. Results showed that in contrast with the control group, the antibody titre in the sera and first milking colostra of the immunized cows significantly increased and calves fed hyperimmune colostrum did not show cryptosporidiosis signs. Moreover, enriched colostrum not only reduced significantly the amount of oocyst excretion but also delayed its onset. Our study showed that recombinant P23 protein could be used for passive immunization of newborn calves against Cryptosporidium parvum. PMID:27012710

  3. Dietary supplementation with Lactobacilli improves emergency granulopoiesis in protein-malnourished mice and enhances respiratory innate immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matias Herrera

    Full Text Available This work studied the effect of protein malnutrition on the hemato-immune response to the respiratory challenge with Streptococcus pneumoniae and evaluated whether the dietary recovery with a probiotic strain has a beneficial effect in that response. Three important conclusions can be inferred from the results presented in this work: a protein-malnutrition significantly impairs the emergency myelopoiesis induced by the generation of the innate immune response against pneumococcal infection; b repletion of malnourished mice with treatments including nasally or orally administered Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505 are able to significantly accelerate the recovery of granulopoiesis and improve innate immunity and; c the immunological mechanisms involved in the protective effect of immunobiotics vary according to the route of administration. The study demonstrated that dietary recovery of malnourished mice with oral or nasal administration of L. rhamnosus CRL1505 improves emergency granulopoiesis and that CXCR4/CXCR12 signaling would be involved in this effect. Then, the results summarized here are a starting point for future research and open up broad prospects for future applications of probiotics in the recovery of immunocompromised malnourished hosts.

  4. IRE1/bZIP60-mediated unfolded protein response plays distinct roles in plant immunity and abiotic stress responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian A Moreno

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER-mediated protein secretion and quality control have been shown to play an important role in immune responses in both animals and plants. In mammals, the ER membrane-located IRE1 kinase/endoribonuclease, a key regulator of unfolded protein response (UPR, is required for plasma cell development to accommodate massive secretion of immunoglobulins. Plant cells can secrete the so-called pathogenesis-related (PR proteins with antimicrobial activities upon pathogen challenge. However, whether IRE1 plays any role in plant immunity is not known. Arabidopsis thaliana has two copies of IRE1, IRE1a and IRE1b. Here, we show that both IRE1a and IRE1b are transcriptionally induced during chemically-induced ER stress, bacterial pathogen infection and treatment with the immune signal salicylic acid (SA. However, we found that IRE1a plays a predominant role in the secretion of PR proteins upon SA treatment. Consequently, the ire1a mutant plants show enhanced susceptibility to a bacterial pathogen and are deficient in establishing systemic acquired resistance (SAR, whereas ire1b is unaffected in these responses. We further demonstrate that the immune deficiency in ire1a is due to a defect in SA- and pathogen-triggered, IRE1-mediated cytoplasmic splicing of the bZIP60 mRNA, which encodes a transcription factor involved in the expression of UPR-responsive genes. Consistently, IRE1a is preferentially required for bZIP60 splicing upon pathogen infection, while IRE1b plays a major role in bZIP60 processing upon Tunicamycin (Tm-induced stress. We also show that SA-dependent induction of UPR-responsive genes is altered in the bzip60 mutant resulting in a moderate susceptibility to a bacterial pathogen. These results indicate that the IRE1/bZIP60 branch of UPR is a part of the plant response to pathogens for which the two Arabidopsis IRE1 isoforms play only partially overlapping roles and that IRE1 has both bZIP60-dependent and bZIP60-independent

  5. Chapter 11 Unexpected Turns and Twists in Structure/Function of PR-Proteins that Connect Energy Metabolism and Immunity

    KAUST Repository

    Narasimhan, Meena L.

    2009-01-01

    Innate immunity in plants is manifested by a complex array of antimicrobial processes that includes induction of sets of pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. The availability of genomic data has made clear that each PR-protein family in a species is represented by several genes. Microarray data in public databases show that in most families, including the PR-5 family surveyed here, the expression of only few family members is defense associated. Genetic studies show that depending on their nutrient acquisition strategy, pathogens induce distinct but overlapping sets of PR genes, suggesting a connection to energy or resource allocation. PR-5 proteins have a clearly recognizable structure that is referred to as the thaumatin (THN) domain, which can be overlapped with mammalian Complement 1q-tumor necrosis factor (C1q-TNF) domains such as that of the mammalian hormone adiponectin. The occurrence of THN domain proteins is widespread. Similarities between THN domain proteins and mammalian C1q-TNF family proteins include their ligands and their subcellular locations. Osmotin (tobacco PR-5c) regulates energy balance signaling in mammalian cells by interaction with adiponectin receptors by a pathway that shares components with plant energy and stress signaling pathways. These data suggest additional roles for PR-5 proteins, as scaffolds and/or in signaling, particularly in regulating energy balance. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Proteins Encoded in Genomic Regions Associated with Immune-Mediated Disease Physically Interact and Suggest Underlying Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Hansen, Kasper Lage; Raychaudhuri, Soumya;

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have defined over 150 genomic regions unequivocally containing variation predisposing to immune-mediated disease. Inferring disease biology from these observations, however, hinges on our ability to discover the molecular processes being perturbed by these...... that the RA and CD networks have predictive power by demonstrating that proteins in these networks, not encoded in the confirmed list of disease associated loci, are significantly enriched for association to the phenotypes in question in extended GWAS analysis. Finally, we test our method in 3 non-immune...... risk variants. It has previously been observed that different genes harboring causal mutations for the same Mendelian disease often physically interact. We sought to evaluate the degree to which this is true of genes within strongly associated loci in complex disease. Using sets of loci defined in...

  7. The use of 125I-labelled protein A for the detection of humoral immunity of gross murine leukaemia virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A solid-phase radioimmunoassay utilising binding of 125I-labelled protein A to antibodies bound to virus adsorbed onto microtitre plates was shown to be suitable for detection of humoral immunity to Gross murine leukaemia virus (MuLV). The specificity of the reaction was shown by the fact that only homologous or closely related viruses effectively inhibited binding of antibodies to adsorbed virus. With this method a low level of spontaneous humoral immunity was demonstrated in sera from AKR/Crc mice, a strain with high concentrations of endogenous virus, whereas little or no anti-viral activity was found in CBA/H-T6Crc, a subline that does not appear to express MuLV. (Auth.)

  8. Genetic Immunization of BALB/c mice with a Plasmid Bearing the Gene Coding for a Hybrid Merozoite Surface Protein 1-Hepatitis B Virus Surface Protein Fusion Protects Mice against Lethal Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi PC1 Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Wunderlich, Gerhard; Moura, Ivan C.; del Portillo, Hernando A

    2000-01-01

    The genetic immunization of rodents with a plasmid coding for a Plasmodium chabaudi merozoite surface protein 1 (C terminus)-hepatitis B virus surface fusion protein (pPcMSP119-HBs) provided protection of mice against subsequent lethal challenge with P. chabaudi chabaudi PC1-infected red blood cells. The percentage of survivor mice was higher in DNA-immunized mice than in animals immunized with a recombinant rPcMSP119– glutathione S-transferase fusion protein administered in Freund adjuvant. ...

  9. Surface Analyses and Immune Reactivities of Major Cell Wall-Associated Proteins of Group A Streptococcus

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, Jason N; Ramirez, Ruben D.; Currie, Bart J.; Cordwell, Stuart J.; Djordjevic, Steven P.; Mark J Walker

    2005-01-01

    A proteomic analysis was undertaken to identify cell wall-associated proteins of Streptococcus pyogenes. Seventy-four distinct cell wall-associated proteins were identified, 66 of which were novel. Thirty-three proteins were immunoreactive with pooled S. pyogenes-reactive human antisera. Biotinylation of the GAS cell surface identified 23 cell wall-associated proteins that are surface exposed.

  10. Proteins of Leishmania (Viannia shawi confer protection associated with Th1 immune response and memory generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passero Luiz Felipe D

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leishmania (Viannia shawi parasite was first characterized in 1989. Recently the protective effects of soluble leishmanial antigen (SLA from L. (V. shawi promastigotes were demonstrated using BALB/c mice, the susceptibility model for this parasite. In order to identify protective fractions, SLA was fractionated by reverse phase HPLC and five antigenic fractions were obtained. Methods F1 fraction was purified from L. (V. shawi parasite extract by reverse phase HPLC. BALB/c mice were immunized once a week for two consecutive weeks by subcutaneous routes in the rump, using 25 μg of F1. After 1 and 16 weeks of last immunization, groups were challenged in the footpad with L. (V. shawi promastigotes. After 2 months, those same mice were sacrificed and parasite burden, cellular and humoral immune responses were evaluated. Results The F1 fraction induced a high degree of protection associated with an increase in IFN-γ, a decrease in IL-4, increased cell proliferation and activation of CD8+T lymphocytes. Long-term protection was acquired in F1-immunized mice, associated with increased CD4+ central memory T lymphocytes and activation of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. In addition, F1-immunized groups showed an increase in IgG2a levels. Conclusions The inductor capability of antigens to generate memory lymphocytes that can proliferate and secrete beneficial cytokines upon infection could be an important factor in the development of vaccine candidates against American Tegumentary Leishmaniasis.

  11. Immunization with FSHβ fusion protein antigen prevents bone loss in a rat ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •A GST-FSH fusion protein was successfully expressed in E. coli. •Immunization with GST-FSH antigen can raise high-titer anti-FSH polyclonal sera. •Anti-FSH polyclonal sera can neutralize osteoclastogenic effect of FSH in vitro. •FSH immunization can prevent bone loss in a rat osteoporosis model. -- Abstract: Osteoporosis, a metabolic bone disease, threatens postmenopausal women globally. Hormone replacement therapy (HTR), especially estrogen replacement therapy (ERT), is used widely in the clinic because it has been generally accepted that postmenopausal osteoporosis is caused by estrogen deficiency. However, hypogonadal α and β estrogen receptor null mice were only mildly osteopenic, and mice with either receptor deleted had normal bone mass, indicating that estrogen may not be the only mediator that induces osteoporosis. Recently, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), the serum concentration of which increases from the very beginning of menopause, has been found to play a key role in postmenopausal osteoporosis by promoting osteoclastogenesis. In this article, we confirmed that exogenous FSH can enhance osteoclast differentiation in vitro and that this effect can be neutralized by either an anti-FSH monoclonal antibody or anti-FSH polyclonal sera raised by immunizing animals with a recombinant GST-FSHβ fusion protein antigen. Moreover, immunizing ovariectomized rats with the GST-FSHβ antigen does significantly prevent trabecular bone loss and thereby enhance the bone strength, indicating that a FSH-based vaccine may be a promising therapeutic strategy to slow down bone loss in postmenopausal women

  12. Partial protective effect of intranasal immunization with recombinant Toxoplasma gondii rhoptry protein 17 against toxoplasmosis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Long Wang

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite that infects a variety of mammals, including humans. An effective vaccine for this parasite is therefore needed. In this study, RH strain T. gondii rhoptry protein 17 was expressed in bacteria as a fusion with glutathione S-transferase (GST and the recombinant proteins (rTgROP17 were purified via GST-affinity chromatography. BALB/c mice were nasally immunised with rTgROP17, and induction of immune responses and protection against chronic and lethal T. gondii infections were investigated. The results revealed that mice immunised with rTgROP17 produced high levels of specific anti-rTgROP17 IgGs and a mixed IgG1/IgG2a response of IgG2a predominance. The systemic immune response was associated with increased production of Th1 (IFN-γand IL-2 and Th2 (IL-4 cytokines, and enhanced lymphoproliferation (stimulation index, SI in the mice immunised with rTgROP17. Strong mucosal immune responses with increased secretion of TgROP17-specific secretory IgA (SIgA in nasal, vaginal and intestinal washes were also observed in these mice. The vaccinated mice displayed apparent protection against chronic RH strain infection as evidenced by their lower liver and brain parasite burdens (59.17% and 49.08%, respectively than those of the controls. The vaccinated mice also exhibited significant protection against lethal infection of the virulent RH strain (survival increased by 50% compared to the controls. Our data demonstrate that rTgROP17 can trigger strong systemic and mucosal immune responses against T. gondii and that ROP17 is a promising candidate vaccine for toxoplasmosis.

  13. Immunization with FSHβ fusion protein antigen prevents bone loss in a rat ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Wenxin; Yan, Xingrong; Du, Huicong; Cui, Jihong; Li, Liwen, E-mail: liven@nwu.edu.cn; Chen, Fulin, E-mail: chenfl@nwu.edu.cn

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •A GST-FSH fusion protein was successfully expressed in E. coli. •Immunization with GST-FSH antigen can raise high-titer anti-FSH polyclonal sera. •Anti-FSH polyclonal sera can neutralize osteoclastogenic effect of FSH in vitro. •FSH immunization can prevent bone loss in a rat osteoporosis model. -- Abstract: Osteoporosis, a metabolic bone disease, threatens postmenopausal women globally. Hormone replacement therapy (HTR), especially estrogen replacement therapy (ERT), is used widely in the clinic because it has been generally accepted that postmenopausal osteoporosis is caused by estrogen deficiency. However, hypogonadal α and β estrogen receptor null mice were only mildly osteopenic, and mice with either receptor deleted had normal bone mass, indicating that estrogen may not be the only mediator that induces osteoporosis. Recently, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), the serum concentration of which increases from the very beginning of menopause, has been found to play a key role in postmenopausal osteoporosis by promoting osteoclastogenesis. In this article, we confirmed that exogenous FSH can enhance osteoclast differentiation in vitro and that this effect can be neutralized by either an anti-FSH monoclonal antibody or anti-FSH polyclonal sera raised by immunizing animals with a recombinant GST-FSHβ fusion protein antigen. Moreover, immunizing ovariectomized rats with the GST-FSHβ antigen does significantly prevent trabecular bone loss and thereby enhance the bone strength, indicating that a FSH-based vaccine may be a promising therapeutic strategy to slow down bone loss in postmenopausal women.

  14. Staphylococcal Protein A Promotes Colonization and Immune Evasion of the Epidemic Healthcare-Associated MRSA ST239

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xufen; Qin, Juanxiu; Li, Tianming; Dai, Yingxin; Wang, Yanan; Liu, Qian; He, Lei; Lu, Huiying; Gao, Qianqian; Lin, Yong; Li, Min

    2016-01-01

    The highly successful epidemic of healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA) ST239 is a growing concern worldwide, due to its progressive adaptation to the highly selective environment of the healthcare system. HA-MRSA ST239 display the reduced virulence and successfully colonize in hospital settings, while the emergent community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) maintain full virulence and cause infections in the community environment. Our aim was to investigate what enables S. aureus ST239 to be highly adaptive under hospital circumstances and gradually progress to a series of widespread invasive infections. We found that spa expression of HA-MRSA ST239 is much higher than that of CA-SA ST398. And we discovered that the highly production of staphylococcal protein A (SpA), having no concern with spa gene structure, enhances nasal colonization and cell adhesion in ST239. S. aureus ST239 defends against the adaptive immune response by resisting phagocytosis and inducing apoptosis of B cells through expression of surface-anchored and released protein A, facilitating its dissemination within the circulatory system to other organs. Protein A also plays another key role in subverting the host immune response through its ability to induce early shedding of TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) from phagocytic cells. The increased levels of soluble TNFR1 present during experimental S. aureus ST239 infection may neutralize circulating TNF-α and impair the host inflammatory response. Protein A is also a virulence factor, as tested in our bacteremia model in mice, contributing to the durative tissue damage of abscess formation sites in ST239 infection. These functions of protein A eventually benefit to widespread infections of S. aureus ST239. We draw the conclusion that Staphylococcal Protein A may be a crucial determinant in the colonization and immune evasion of ST239 infections, contributing to persistent spread in the hospital settings. These results

  15. Polymorphism in liver-stage malaria vaccine candidate proteins: immune evasion and implications for vaccine design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Katie L; Wilson, Kirsty L; Plebanski, Magdalena

    2016-03-01

    The pre-erythrocytic stage of infection by malaria parasites represents a key target for vaccines that aim to eradicate malaria. Two important broad immune evasion strategies that can interfere with vaccine efficacy include the induction of dendritic cell (DC) dysfunction and regulatory T cells (Tregs) by blood-stage malaria parasites, leading to inefficient priming of T cells targeting liver-stage infections. The parasite also uses 'surgical strike' strategies, whereby polymorphism in pre-erythrocytic antigens can interfere with host immunity. Specifically, we review how even single amino acid changes in T cell epitopes can lead to loss of binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC), lack of cross-reactivity, or antagonism and immune interference, where simultaneous or sequential stimulation with related variants of the same T cell epitope can cause T cell anergy or the conversion of effector to immunosuppressive T cell phenotypes. PMID:26610026

  16. C-reactive protein, Rheumatoid factor and circulatory immune complex as markers for monitoring treatment of infective endocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of serum C-reactive protein (CRP), rheumatoid factor (RF) and circulatory immune complex (CIC) determinations in monitoring the outcome of infective endocarditis (IE). Methodology: In this prospective analytic descriptive study CRP, RF and CIC were measured on admission and 4 weeks after initiation of standard antibiotic regimen in 30 hospitalized patients with IE in an educational hospital between 2006 and 2007 in Ahvaz a city south west Iran . Duke criteria were used for diagnosis of IE. CRP and RF were examined using quantitative neflometry (Binding site kit, UK) and CIC was detected by semi quantitative immune diffusion (Baharafshan SIRD kit, Iran). Data were evaluated using statistical analyses in SPSS (version 12, USA) software for windows. Results: The fall in serum C-reactive protein or RF was significant (P=0.05). Only two of the 30 patients, who had elevated CRP, RF and CIC week four failed to response and one needed cardiac surgery. Conclusions: The C-reactive protein proved to be a good tool for monitoring the treatment of IE. Also RF proved useful in the assessment of patients with IE, but the value of CIC was negligible. (author)

  17. Multidimensional protein fractionation using ProteomeLab PF 2D™ for profiling amyotrophic lateral sclerosis immunity: A preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosley R Lee

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ProteomeLab™ PF 2D platform is a relatively new approach to global protein profiling. Herein, it was used for investigation of plasma proteome changes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS patients before and during immunization with glatiramer acetate (GA in a clinical trial. Results The experimental design included immunoaffinity depletion of 12 most abundant proteins from plasma samples with the ProteomeLab™ IgY-12 LC10 column kit as first dimension separation, also referred to as immuno-partitioning. Second and third dimension separations of the enriched proteome were performed on the PF 2D platform utilizing 2D isoelectric focusing and RP-HPLC with the resulting fractions collected for analysis. 1D gel electrophoresis was added as a fourth dimension when sufficient protein was available. Protein identification from collected fractions was performed using nano-LC-MS/MS approach. Analysis of differences in the resulting two-dimensional maps of fractions obtained from the PF 2D and the ability to identify proteins from these fractions allowed sensitivity threshold measurements. Masked proteins in the PF 2D fractions are discussed. Conclusion We offer some insight into the strengths and limitations of this emerging proteomic platform.

  18. Intradermal Immunization of Leishmania donovani Centrin Knock-Out Parasites in Combination with Salivary Protein LJM19 from Sand Fly Vector Induces a Durable Protective Immune Response in Hamsters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiuza, Jacqueline Araújo; Dey, Ranadhir; Davenport, Dwann; Abdeladhim, Maha; Meneses, Claudio; Oliveira, Fabiano; Kamhawi, Shaden; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Nakhasi, Hira L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a neglected tropical disease and is fatal if untreated. There is no vaccine available against leishmaniasis. The majority of patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) or VL develop a long-term protective immunity after cure from infection, which indicates that development of an effective vaccine against leishmaniasis is possible. Such protection may also be achieved by immunization with live attenuated parasites that do not cause disease. We have previously reported a protective response in mice, hamsters and dogs with Leishmania donovani centrin gene knock-out parasites (LdCen-/-), a live attenuated parasite with a cell division specific centrin1 gene deletion. In this study we have explored the effects of salivary protein LJM19 as an adjuvant and intradermal (ID) route of immunization on the efficacy of LdCen-/- parasites as a vaccine against virulent L. donovani. Methodology/Principal Findings To explore the potential of a combination of LdCen-/- parasites and salivary protein LJM19 as vaccine antigens, LdCen-/- ID immunization followed by ID challenge with virulent L. donovani were performed in hamsters in a 9-month follow up study. We determined parasite burden (serial dilution), antibody production (ELISA) and cytokine expression (qPCR) in these animals. Compared to controls, animals immunized with LdCen-/- + LJM19 induced a strong antibody response, a reduction in spleen and liver parasite burden and a higher expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines after immunization and one month post-challenge. Additionally, a low parasite load in lymph nodes, spleen and liver, and a non-inflamed spleen was observed in immunized animals 9 months after the challenge infection. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that an ID vaccination using LdCen-/-parasites in combination with sand fly salivary protein LJM19 has the capability to confer long lasting protection against visceral leishmaniasis that is comparable to intravenous or

  19. Intramammary Immunization of Pregnant Mice with Staphylococcal Protein A Reduces the Post-Challenge Mammary Gland Bacterial Load but Not Pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jully Gogoi-Tiwari

    Full Text Available Protein A, encoded by the spa gene, is one of the major immune evading MSCRAMM of S. aureus, demonstrated to be prevalent in a significant percentage of clinical bovine mastitis isolates in Australia. Given its' reported significance in biofilm formation and the superior performance of S. aureus biofilm versus planktonic vaccine in the mouse mastitis model, it was of interest to determine the immunogenicity and protective potential of Protein A as a potential vaccine candidate against bovine mastitis using the mouse mastitis model. Pregnant Balb/c mice were immunised with Protein A emulsified in an alum-based adjuvant by subcutaneous (s/c or intramammary (i/mam routes. While humoral immune response of mice post-immunization were determined using indirect ELISA, cell-mediated immune response was assessed by estimation of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ produced by protein A-stimulated splenocyte supernatants. Protective potential of Protein A against experimental mastitis was determined by challenge of immunized versus sham-vaccinated mice by i/mam route, based upon manifestation of clinical symptoms, total bacterial load and histopathological damage to mammary glands. Significantly (p<0.05 higher levels of IgG1 isotype were produced in mice immunized by the s/c route. In contrast, significantly higher levels of the antibody isotype IgG2a were produced in mice immunized by the i/mam route (p<0.05. There was significant reduction (p<0.05 in bacterial loads of the mammary glands of mice immunized by Protein A regardless of the route of immunization, with medium level of clinical symptoms observed up to day 3 post-challenge. However, Protein A vaccine failed to protect immunized mice post-challenge with biofilm producing encapsulated S. aureus via i/mam route, regardless of the route of immunization, as measured by the level of mammary tissue damage. It was concluded that, Protein A in its' native state was apparently not a suitable candidate for inclusion

  20. Pediocin-like antimicrobial peptides (class IIa bacteriocins) and their immunity proteins: biosynthesis, structure, and mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fimland, Gunnar; Johnsen, Line; Dalhus, Bjørn; Nissen-Meyer, Jon

    2005-11-01

    Pediocin-like antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) form a group of lactic acid bacteria produced, cationic membrane-permeabilizing peptides with 37 to 48 residues. Upon exposure to membrane-mimicking entities, their hydrophilic, cationic, and highly conserved N-terminal region forms a three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet supported by a conserved disulfide bridge. This N-terminal beta-sheet region is followed by a central amphiphilic alpha-helix and this in most (if not all) of these peptides is followed by a rather extended C-terminal tail that folds back onto the central alpha-helix, thereby creating a hairpin-like structure in the C-terminal half. There is a flexible hinge between the beta-sheet N-terminal region and the hairpin C-terminal region and one thus obtains two domains that may move relative to each other. The cationic N-terminal beta-sheet domain mediates binding of the pediocin-like AMPs to the target-cell surface through electrostatic interactions, while the more hydrophobic and amphiphilic C-terminal hairpin domain penetrates into the hydrophobic part of the target-cell membrane, thereby mediating leakage through the membrane. The hinge provides the structural flexibility that enables the C-terminal hairpin domain to dip into the hydrophobic part of the membrane. Despite extensive sequence similarities, these AMPs differ markedly in their target-cell specificity, and results obtained with hybrid AMPs indicate that the membrane-penetrating hairpin-like C-terminal domain is the major specificity determinant. Bacteria that produce pediocin-like AMPs also produce a 11-kDa cognate immunity protein that protects the producer. The immunity proteins are well-structured, 4-helix bundle cytosolic proteins. They show a high degree of specificity in that they largely recognize and confer immunity only to their cognate AMP and in some cases to a few AMPs that are closely related to their cognate AMP. The C-terminal half of the immunity proteins contains a domain that

  1. Reduction of Factor VIII Inhibitor Titers During Immune Tolerance Induction With Recombinant Factor VIII-Fc Fusion Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groomes, Charles L; Gianferante, David M; Crouch, Gary D; Parekh, Dina S; Scott, David W; Lieuw, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    The development of inhibitors toward factor VIII (FVIII) is a common and serious complication of hemophilia A (HA) therapy. Patients with hemophilia who develop inhibitors often undergo time- and resource-intensive immune tolerance induction (ITI) protocols. We report a 15-month-old male with severe HA and a high-titer inhibitor that occurred while receiving prophylactic treatment with recombinant FVIII (rFVIII), in whom significant inhibitor titer reduction was achieved with thrice weekly infusions of a new, prolonged half-life rFVIII-Fc fusion protein product (trade name Eloctate). Further studies are warranted to explore the potential of Eloctate in ITI protocols. PMID:26739399

  2. Topical CpG Adjuvantation of a Protein-Based Vaccine Induces Protective Immunity to Listeria monocytogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Wing Ki; Wee, Kathleen; Tobias R Kollmann; Dutz, Jan P

    2014-01-01

    Robust CD8+ T cell responses are essential for immune protection against intracellular pathogens. Using parenteral administration of ovalbumin (OVA) protein as a model antigen, the effect of the Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) agonist, CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) 1826, as an adjuvant delivered either topically, subcutaneously, or intramuscularly on antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses in a mouse model was evaluated. Topical CpG adjuvant increased the frequency of OVA-specific CD8+ T cells in...

  3. Over-expression, purification and immune responses to Aeromonas hydrophila AL09-73 flagellar proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeromonas hydrophila is ubiquitous in aquatic environments worldwide and causes many diseases in fish as well as human. Recent outbreaks of aeromonad diseases in channel catfish prompted us to investigate catfish immune responses during infection of A. hydrophila. In this communication, we report ...

  4. Control of the pattern-recognition receptor EFR by an ER protein complex in plant immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nekrasov, Vladimir; Li, Jing; Batoux, Martine; Roux, Milena; Chu, Zhao-Hui; Lacombe, Severine; Rougon, Alejandra; Bittel, Pascal; Kiss-Papp, Marta; Chinchilla, Delphine; van Esse, H Peter; Jorda, Lucia; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Nicaise, Valerie; Thomma, Bart P H J; Molina, Antonio; Jones, Jonathan D G; Zipfel, Cyril

    2009-01-01

    In plant innate immunity, the surface-exposed leucine-rich repeat receptor kinases EFR and FLS2 mediate recognition of the bacterial pathogen-associated molecular patterns EF-Tu and flagellin, respectively. We identified the Arabidopsis stromal-derived factor-2 (SDF2) as being required for EFR...

  5. Inactivation of colicin Y by intramembrane helix–helix interaction with its immunity protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šmajs, D.; Doležalová, M.; Macek, Pavel; Žídek, L.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 275, č. 21 (2008), s. 5325-5331. ISSN 1742-464X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : colicin immunity * colicin y * helix-helix interaction Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.139, year: 2008

  6. Circulating immune complexes, immunoglobulin G, salivary proteins and salivary immunoglobulin A in patients with Sjögren's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadži-Mihailović Miloš

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sjögren's syndrome (SS is a chronic autoimmune disorder, with its major clinical manifestations resulting from changes in exocrine glands. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate serum concentrations of circulating immune complexes (CIC and immunoglobulin G (IgG, and salivary proteins (SP and salivary immunoglobulin A (sIgA in 40 patients with SS, and to correlate these values among themselves, as well as with the unstimulated salivary flow rate (USFR and the duration of disease. Methods. The total of 40 patients were included in this research. CIC was determined using the solution of polyethylene glycol and IgG with the standard procedure of radial immunodiffusion. SP was investigated by the method of Lowry and sIgA was separated from the whole saliva using the method of immune chromatography. Results. The values of most of the studied parameters exceeded the normal range in a high degree: CIC 72.5%, IgG 70%, SP 80%. The concentrations of CIC were significantly higher in the patients with the duration of disease less than 10 years. With the decrease of USFR, the concentration of sIgA and IgG were increased with statistical significance. Conclusion The increased prevalence of abnormal values of CIC, IgG and SP indicate that the patients with SS have developed a higher level of immune reactivity. These results could be useful in diagnosis and disease activity monitoring.

  7. In vivo protection against Tityus serrulatus scorpion toxins by immunization of mice with a non-toxic protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira-Ferreira, A M; Kalapothakis, E; Diniz, C R; Chávez-Olórtegui, C

    1998-02-01

    The possibility of inducing a humoral immune response able to produce neutralizing antibodies against the lethal effects of scorpion toxins was evaluated in the mouse model. A non-toxic protein (TsNTxP) was purified from the venom of the Brazilian scorpion Tityus serrulatus by combining gel filtration, ion exchange and reverse phase HPLC chromatographic steps. After four injections of TsNTxP the mice developed an IgG response. The anti-TsNTxP antibodies had a comparable high cross-reactivity for the crude venom, toxic fraction (toxic fraction of venom that represents most of the toxicity of the crude venom -- TsTFG50) and TsIV, a representative alpha-type toxin of T. serrulatus, and moderate binding capacity for TsVII, a representative beta-type toxin. In vitro neutralization assays indicated that preincubation of a lethal dose of the toxic fraction with immune serum strongly reduced its toxicity. In vivo protection assays showed that mice immunized with TsNTxP resisted a challenge of 10 LD50 (s.c.) of the toxic fraction of T. serrulatus venom. PMID:9620580

  8. An immunotherapeutic treatment against flea allergy dermatitis in cats by co-immunization of DNA and protein vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jin; Ding, Zheng; Meng, Fengxia; Liu, Qiyong; Ng, Terry; Hu, Yanxin; Zhao, Gan; Zhai, Bing; Chu, Hsien-Jue; Wang, Bin

    2010-02-23

    Flea allergy dermatitis (FAD) is considered a harmful and persistent allergic disease in cats, dogs and humans. Effective and safe antigen-specific treatments are lacking. Previously we reported that the simultaneous co-immunization with a DNA vaccine and its cognate coded protein antigen could induce antigen-specific iTreg cells (inducible Treg cells); demonstrating its potential to protect animals from FAD in a murine model. Its clinical efficacy however, remains to be demonstrated. In this report, we clinically tested this protocol to treat established FAD in cats following flea infestations. We present data showing a profound therapeutic improvement of dermatitis in these FAD cats following two co-immunizations, not only in relieving clinical symptoms, but also the amelioration of the allergic responses, including antigen-induced wheal formation, elevated T cell proliferation, infiltration of lymphocytes and migration of mast cells to the sites. This study demonstrates that a co-immunization approach as described can be used to treat flea-induced allergic disease in animals, thus implicating its potential for a practical clinical application. PMID:20188255

  9. Structural and Nonstructural Viral Proteins Are Targets of T-Helper Immune Response against Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, Elena; Barriga, Alejandro; Barnea, Eilon; Mir, Carmen; Gebe, John A; Admon, Arie; López, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Proper antiviral humoral and cellular immune responses require previous recognition of viral antigenic peptides that are bound to HLA class II molecules, which are exposed on the surface of antigen-presenting cells. The helper immune response is critical for the control and the clearance of human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) infection, a virus with severe health risk in infected pediatric, immunocompromised, and elderly populations. In this study, using a mass spectrometry analysis of complex HLA class II-bound peptide pools that were isolated from large amounts of HRSV-infected cells, 19 naturally processed HLA-DR ligands, most of them included in a complex nested set of peptides, were identified. Both the immunoprevalence and the immunodominance of the HLA class II response to HRSV were focused on one nonstructural (NS1) and two structural (matrix and mainly fusion) proteins of the infective virus. These findings have clear implications for analysis of the helper immune response as well as for antiviral vaccine design. PMID:27090790

  10. Elicitation of strong immune responses by a DNA vaccine expressing a secreted form of hepatitis C virus envelope protein E2 in murine and porcine animal models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Ping Li; Hye Na Kang; Lorne A Babiuk; Qiang Liu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the immunogenicity of a hepatitis C virus (HCV) E2 DNA vaccine alone or with a protein vaccine boost in murine and porcine animal models.METHODS: A DNA vaccine expressing a secreted form of HCV E2 protein was constructed and used to vaccinate mice and piglets with or without boosting with a recombinant E2 protein vaccine formulated with CpG ODN and 10% Emulsigen. The immunogenicity of HCV E2 vaccines was analyzed by ELISA for antibody responses, MTT assay for lymphocyte proliferation,ELISPOT for the number of interferon-γ secreting cells,and cytotoxic T lymphocyte assays.RESULTS: Intradermal injection of E2 DNA vaccine induced strong Th1-like immune responses in mice. In piglets, E2 DNA vaccine elicited moderate and more balanced immune responses. A DNA vaccine prime and protein boost vaccination strategy induced significantly higher E2-specific antibody levels and shifted the immune response towards Th2-like ones in piglets.CONCLUSION: A DNA vaccine expressing a secreted form of HCV E2 protein elicited E2-specific immune responses in mice and piglets. Recombinant E2 protein vaccination following DNA immunization significantly increased the antibody response in piglets. These HCV E2 vaccines may represent promising hepatitis C vaccine candidates for further investigations.

  11. Mucosal Immunization with Surface-Displayed Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Spike Protein on Lactobacillus casei Induces Neutralizing Antibodies in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jong-Soo; Poo, Haryoung; Han, Dong P.; Hong, Seung-Pyo; Kim, Kwang; Cho, Michael W.; Kim, Eun; Sung, Moon-Hee; Kim, Chul-Joong

    2006-01-01

    Induction of mucosal immunity may be important for preventing SARS-CoV infections. For safe and effective delivery of viral antigens to the mucosal immune system, we have developed a novel surface antigen display system for lactic acid bacteria using the poly-γ-glutamic acid synthetase A protein (PgsA) of Bacillus subtilis as an anchoring matrix. Recombinant fusion proteins comprised of PgsA and the Spike (S) protein segments SA (residues 2 to 114) and SB (residues 264 to 596) were stably exp...

  12. Detection of influenza virus by means of immune sera to MP and RNP inner proteins in solid phase radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid phase radioimmunoassay (SPRIA) was shown suitable for detection of influenza virus in various biological materials using immune sera to membrane protein and ribonucleoprotein (RNP) isolated from strain A/USSR/90/77. Either serum was able to detect influenza A viruses with different hemagglutinins (H1,H3,H7) and did not react with influenza B viruses. SPRIA detected 0.3 ng viral protein per 1 ml, i.e., its sensitivity was 20 times higher than that of the hemagglutination test. Neither serum revealed the virus in the extract from choroallantoic membrane of infected chicken embryos. Competitive radioimmunoassay showed that the antigenic specificity of A/PR/8/34 virus RNP differed from that of A/USSR/90/77 virus RNP. (author)

  13. Evidence of a humoral immune response against the prokaryotic expressed N-terminal autoprotease (Npro) protein of bovine viral diarrhoea virus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Niranjan Mishra; Katherukamem Rajukumar; Shruti Shrikant Pitale; Anil Prakash; Ram Kumar Nema; Sthita Pragnya Behera; Shiv Chandra Dubey

    2010-03-01

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is an economically important pathogen of cattle and sheep belonging to the genus Pestivirus of the family Flaviviridae. Although the BVDV non-structural N-terminal protease (Npro) acts as an interferon antagonist and subverts the host innate immunity, little is known about its immunogenicity. Hence, we expressed a recombinant BVDV Npro–His fusion protein (28 kDa) in E. coli and determined the humoral immune response generated by it in rabbits. The antigenicity of the Npro protein was confirmed by western blot using anti-BVDV hyperimmune cattle, sheep and goat serum, and anti-Npro rabbit serum. When rabbits were immunized with the Npro protein, a humoral immune response was evident by 4 weeks and persisted till 10 weeks post immunization as detected by ELISA and western blot. Despite Npro-specific antibodies remaining undetectable in 80 serum samples from BVDV-infected sheep and goats, BVDV hyperimmune sera along with some of the field cattle, sheep and goat sera with high BVDV neutralizing antibody titres were found positive for Npro antibodies. Our results provide evidence that despite the low immunogenicity of the BVDV Npro protein, a humoral immune response is induced in cattle, sheep and goats only with repeated BVDV exposure.

  14. Glucose Availability and AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Link Energy Metabolism and Innate Immunity in the Bovine Endometrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Matthew L.; Cronin, James G.; Noleto, Pablo G.; Sheldon, I. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Defences against the bacteria that usually infect the endometrium of postpartum cattle are impaired when there is metabolic energy stress, leading to endometritis and infertility. The endometrial response to bacteria depends on innate immunity, with recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns stimulating inflammation, characterised by secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. How metabolic stress impacts tissue responses to pathogens is unclear, but integration of energy metabolism and innate immunity means that stressing one system might affect the other. Here we tested the hypothesis that homeostatic pathways integrate energy metabolism and innate immunity in bovine endometrial tissue. Glucose deprivation reduced the secretion of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 from ex vivo organ cultures of bovine endometrium challenged with the pathogen-associated molecular patterns lipopolysaccharide and bacterial lipopeptide. Endometrial inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide were also reduced by small molecules that activate or inhibit the intracellular sensor of energy, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). However, inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin, which is a more global metabolic sensor than AMPK, had little effect on inflammation. Similarly, endometrial inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide were not affected by insulin-like growth factor-1, which is an endocrine regulator of metabolism. Interestingly, the inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide increased endometrial glucose consumption and induced the Warburg effect, which could exacerbate deficits in glucose availability in the tissue. In conclusion, metabolic energy stress perturbed inflammatory responses to pathogen-associated molecular patterns in bovine endometrial tissue, and the most fundamental regulators of cellular energy, glucose availability and AMPK, had the greatest impact on innate immunity. PMID:26974839

  15. Glucose Availability and AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Link Energy Metabolism and Innate Immunity in the Bovine Endometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Matthew L; Cronin, James G; Noleto, Pablo G; Sheldon, I Martin

    2016-01-01

    Defences against the bacteria that usually infect the endometrium of postpartum cattle are impaired when there is metabolic energy stress, leading to endometritis and infertility. The endometrial response to bacteria depends on innate immunity, with recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns stimulating inflammation, characterised by secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. How metabolic stress impacts tissue responses to pathogens is unclear, but integration of energy metabolism and innate immunity means that stressing one system might affect the other. Here we tested the hypothesis that homeostatic pathways integrate energy metabolism and innate immunity in bovine endometrial tissue. Glucose deprivation reduced the secretion of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 from ex vivo organ cultures of bovine endometrium challenged with the pathogen-associated molecular patterns lipopolysaccharide and bacterial lipopeptide. Endometrial inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide were also reduced by small molecules that activate or inhibit the intracellular sensor of energy, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). However, inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin, which is a more global metabolic sensor than AMPK, had little effect on inflammation. Similarly, endometrial inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide were not affected by insulin-like growth factor-1, which is an endocrine regulator of metabolism. Interestingly, the inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide increased endometrial glucose consumption and induced the Warburg effect, which could exacerbate deficits in glucose availability in the tissue. In conclusion, metabolic energy stress perturbed inflammatory responses to pathogen-associated molecular patterns in bovine endometrial tissue, and the most fundamental regulators of cellular energy, glucose availability and AMPK, had the greatest impact on innate immunity. PMID:26974839

  16. Local and systemic immune responses induced by a recombinant chimeric protein containing Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae antigens fused to the B subunit of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin LTB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchioro, Silvana Beutinger; Fisch, Andressa; Gomes, Charles K; Jorge, Sérgio; Galli, Vanessa; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Maes, Dominiek; Dellagostin, Odir; Conceição, Fabricio R

    2014-09-17

    A multi-antigen chimera composed of three antigens of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (R1, P42, and NrdF) and the mucosal adjuvant Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB) was constructed, and its antigenic and immunogenic properties were evaluated in mice and pigs. In addition, we compared the effect of the fusion and co-administration of these proteins in mice. Antibodies against each subunit recognized the chimeric protein. Intranasal and intramuscular immunization of mice with the chimeric protein significantly increased IgG and IgA levels in the serum and tracheobronchial lavages, respectively, against some of the antigens present in the chimeric. Swine immunized with the chimeric protein developed an immune response against all M. hyopneumoniae antigens present in the fusion with a statistically significant difference (Phyopneumoniae infection. PMID:25091529

  17. 热休克蛋白与肿瘤免疫%The correlation between heat shock protein and tumor immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王小平; 胥冰; 马晓军; 晁旭; 李哲

    2015-01-01

    The heat shock protein( HSP)is a highly conserved group of cellular proteins and is up-regulated under stress conditions. It functions as molecular chaperone and biochemical regulator to mediate cell growth,apoptosis,pro-tein homeostasis and cellular targets of peptides. Aside from their response to heat shock and chemical or physical stress stimuli,HSPs have been reported to be over-expressed in a wide range of human tumors. It has been confirmed that heat shock proteins could combine with tumor peptides,present the antigen to the immune cells through lympho-cyte receptor and elicit specific anti-tumor immunity via CTLs. As novel vaccines,heat shock proteins have a wide therapeutic prospect in biotherapy.%热休克蛋白( heat shock protein,HSP)是一类在生物进化中高度保守、广泛存在于原核及真核生物中的蛋白质。近年热休克蛋白在免疫中的作用已成为当前研究的热点之一。已证实其能与肿瘤细胞内多肽分子结合,通过抗原提呈细胞上的受体,将抗原肽传递给细胞毒T细胞诱导特异性抗肿瘤免疫应答。热休克蛋白肽复合物作为一种疫苗,在生物治疗方面拥有广阔的治疗前景,值得深入研究。

  18. Sulfhydryl-based tumor antigen-carrier protein conjugates stimulate superior antitumor immunity against B cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betting, David J; Kafi, Kamran; Abdollahi-Fard, Alireza; Hurvitz, Sara A; Timmerman, John M

    2008-09-15

    Therapeutic vaccination of B cell lymphoma patients with tumor-specific Ig (idiotype, or Id) chemically coupled to the immunogenic foreign carrier protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) using glutaraldehyde has shown promising results in early clinical trials, and phase III trials are underway. However, glutaraldehyde Id-KLH vaccines fail to elicit anti-Id immune and clinical responses in many patients, possibly because glutaraldehyde reacts with lysine, cysteine, tyrosine, and histidine residues, damaging critical immunogenic epitopes. A sulfhydryl-based tumor Ag-carrier protein conjugation system using maleimide chemistry was used to enhance the efficacy of Id-KLH vaccines. Maleimide Id-KLH conjugates eradicated A20 lymphoma from most tumor-bearing mice, whereas glutaraldehyde Id-KLH had little efficacy. Maleimide Id-KLH elicited tumor-specific IgG Abs and T cells, with CD8(+) T cells being the major effectors of antilymphoma immunity. Maleimide Id-KLH vaccines also demonstrated superior efficacy in 38C13 and BCL-1 lymphoma models, where Abs were shown to be critical for protection. Importantly, standard glutaraldehyde Id-KLH conjugation procedures could result in "overconjugation" of the tumor Ag, leading to decreased efficacy, whereas the heterobifunctional maleimide-based conjugation yielded potent vaccine product regardless of conjugation duration. Under lysosomal processing conditions, the Id-carrier protein linkage was cleavable only after maleimide conjugation. Maleimide KLH conjugation was easily performed with human Igs analogous to those used in Id-KLH clinical trials. These data support the evaluation of sulfhydryl-based Id-KLH vaccines in lymphoma clinical trials and possibly the use of tumor Ag-carrier protein vaccines for other cancers. PMID:18768870

  19. Immunization of mice with recombinant protein CobB or AsnC confers protection against Brucella abortus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simei Fu

    Full Text Available Due to drawbacks of live attenuated vaccines, much more attention has been focused on screening of Brucella protective antigens as subunit vaccine candidates. Brucella is a facultative intracellular bacterium and cell mediated immunity plays essential roles for protection against Brucella infection. Identification of Brucella antigens that present T-cell epitopes to the host could enable development of such vaccines. In this study, 45 proven or putative pathogenesis-associated factors of Brucella were selected according to currently available data. After expressed and purified, 35 proteins were qualified for analysis of their abilities to stimulate T-cell responses in vitro. Then, an in vitro gamma interferon (IFN-γ assay was used to identify potential T-cell antigens from B. abortus. In total, 7 individual proteins that stimulated strong IFN-γ responses in splenocytes from mice immunized with B. abortus live vaccine S19 were identified. The protective efficiencies of these 7 recombinant proteins were further evaluated. Mice given BAB1_1316 (CobB or BAB1_1688 (AsnC plus adjuvant could provide protection against virulent B. abortus infection, similarly with the known protective antigen Cu-Zn SOD and the license vaccine S19. In addition, CobB and AsnC could induce strong antibodies responses in BALB/c mice. Altogether, the present study showed that CobB or AsnC protein could be useful antigen candidates for the development of subunit vaccines against brucellosis with adequate immunogenicity and protection efficacy.

  20. Immunization of mice with recombinant protein CobB or AsnC confers protection against Brucella abortus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Simei; Xu, Jie; Li, Xianbo; Xie, Yongfei; Qiu, Yefeng; Du, Xinying; Yu, Shuang; Bai, Yaoxia; Chen, Yanfen; Wang, Tongkun; Wang, Zhoujia; Yu, Yaqing; Peng, Guangneng; Huang, Kehe; Huang, Liuyu; Wang, Yufei; Chen, Zeliang

    2012-01-01

    Due to drawbacks of live attenuated vaccines, much more attention has been focused on screening of Brucella protective antigens as subunit vaccine candidates. Brucella is a facultative intracellular bacterium and cell mediated immunity plays essential roles for protection against Brucella infection. Identification of Brucella antigens that present T-cell epitopes to the host could enable development of such vaccines. In this study, 45 proven or putative pathogenesis-associated factors of Brucella were selected according to currently available data. After expressed and purified, 35 proteins were qualified for analysis of their abilities to stimulate T-cell responses in vitro. Then, an in vitro gamma interferon (IFN-γ) assay was used to identify potential T-cell antigens from B. abortus. In total, 7 individual proteins that stimulated strong IFN-γ responses in splenocytes from mice immunized with B. abortus live vaccine S19 were identified. The protective efficiencies of these 7 recombinant proteins were further evaluated. Mice given BAB1_1316 (CobB) or BAB1_1688 (AsnC) plus adjuvant could provide protection against virulent B. abortus infection, similarly with the known protective antigen Cu-Zn SOD and the license vaccine S19. In addition, CobB and AsnC could induce strong antibodies responses in BALB/c mice. Altogether, the present study showed that CobB or AsnC protein could be useful antigen candidates for the development of subunit vaccines against brucellosis with adequate immunogenicity and protection efficacy. PMID:22383953

  1. Absorption of PCB126 by upper airways impairs G protein-coupled receptor-mediated immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Ana Lúcia B.; Cruz, Wesley S.; Loiola, Rodrigo A.; Drewes, Carine C.; Dörr, Fabiane; Figueiredo, Natália G.; Pinto, Ernani; Farsky, Sandra H. P.

    2015-10-01

    PCB126 is a dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) environmental pollutant with a significant impact on human health, as it bioaccumulates and causes severe toxicity. PCB126-induced immune toxicity has been described, although the mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. In this study, an in vivo protocol of PCB126 intoxication into male Wistar rats by intranasal route was used, which has not yet been described. The intoxication was characterised by PCB126 accumulation in the lungs and liver, and enhanced aryl hydrocarbon receptor expression in the liver, lungs, kidneys, and adipose tissues. Moreover, an innate immune deficiency was characterised by impairment of adhesion receptors on blood leukocytes and by reduced blood neutrophil locomotion and oxidative burst activation elicited by ex vivo G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation. Specificity of PCB126 actions on the GPCR pathway was shown by normal burst oxidative activation evoked by Toll-like receptor 4 and protein kinase C direct activation. Moreover, in vivo PCB180 intoxication did not alter adhesion receptors on blood leukocytes either blood neutrophil locomotion, and only partially reduced the GPCR-induced burst oxidative activation on neutrophils. Therefore, a novel mechanism of in vivo PCB126 toxicity is described which impairs a pivotal inflammatory pathway to the host defence against infections.

  2. SEC14 phospholipid transfer protein is involved in lipid signaling-mediated plant immune responses in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Kiba

    Full Text Available We previously identified a gene related to the SEC14-gene phospholipid transfer protein superfamily that is induced in Nicotiana benthamiana (NbSEC14 in response to infection with Ralstonia solanacearum. We here report that NbSEC14 plays a role in plant immune responses via phospholipid-turnover. NbSEC14-silencing compromised expression of defense-related PR-4 and accumulation of jasmonic acid (JA and its derivative JA-Ile. Transient expression of NbSEC14 induced PR-4 gene expression. Activities of diacylglycerol kinase, phospholipase C and D, and the synthesis of diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid elicited by avirulent R. solanacearum were reduced in NbSEC14-silenced plants. Accumulation of signaling lipids and activation of diacylglycerol kinase and phospholipases were enhanced by transient expression of NbSEC14. These results suggest that the NbSEC14 protein plays a role at the interface between lipid signaling-metabolism and plant innate immune responses.

  3. The calcium-dependent protein kinase CPK28 buffers plant immunity and regulates BIK1 turnover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monaghan, Jacqueline; Matschi, Susanne; Shorinola, Oluwaseyi;

    2014-01-01

    plasma-membrane-associated cytoplasmic kinase BIK1, an important convergent substrate of multiple pattern recognition receptor (PRR) complexes. We find that BIK1 is rate limiting in PTI signaling and that it is continuously turned over to maintain cellular homeostasis. We further show that CPK28...... contributes to BIK1 turnover. Our results suggest a negative regulatory mechanism that continually buffers immune signaling by controlling the turnover of this key signaling kinase....

  4. Modulation of apoptosis and immune signaling pathways by the Hantaan virus nucleocapsid protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herein, we show a direct relationship between the Hantaan virus (HTNV) nucleocapsid (N) protein and the modulation of apoptosis. We observed an increase in caspase-7 and -8, but not -9 in cells expressing HTNV N protein mutants lacking amino acids 270-330. Similar results were observed for the New World hantavirus, Andes virus. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) was sequestered in the cytoplasm after tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) stimulation in cells expressing HTNV N protein. Further, TNFR stimulated cells expressing HTNV N protein inhibited caspase activation. In contrast, cells expressing N protein truncations lacking the region from amino acids 270-330 were unable to inhibit nuclear import of NF-κB and the mutants also triggered caspase activity. These results suggest that the HTNV circumvents host antiviral signaling and apoptotic response mediated by the TNFR pathway through host interactions with the N protein.

  5. Heat Shock Proteins: A Review of the Molecular Chaperones for Plant Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Chang-Jin; Seo, Young-Su

    2015-01-01

    As sessile organisms, plants are exposed to persistently changing stresses and have to be able to interpret and respond to them. The stresses, drought, salinity, chemicals, cold and hot temperatures, and various pathogen attacks have interconnected effects on plants, resulting in the disruption of protein homeostasis. Maintenance of proteins in their functional native conformations and preventing aggregation of non-native proteins are important for cell survival under stress. Heat shock prote...

  6. EFFECT OF SEASON AND DIETARY PROTEIN LEVEL ON IMMUNE RESPONSE OF THREE EXOTIC BROILER STRAINS IN SUDAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huwaida E.E. MALIK

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the effect of the season (summer versus winter and dietary protein level (high versus low using three broiler strains (Ross, Cobb and Hubbard on immunity; heterophil/lymphocyte ratio and haemagglutination against sheep red blood cells (SRBC. Three hundred and sixty, one-day-old unsexed broiler chicks were used in this study during the summer and winter seasons, 120 from each of Ross strain, Cobb strain and Hubbard strain. Two experiments were executed in a complete randomize design (factorial arrangement 3x2x2. Each strain was divided into two groups, with six replicates (10 chicks per replicate. Group A of each strain was fed on a starter diet containing 23% crude protein for the first four weeks of age, then replaced by a finisher diet containing 21% crude protein. Group B was fed on a starter diet containing 21% crude protein replaced by a finisher diet containing 19% crude protein. Both diet were iso caloric. The results showed that the heterophil/lymphocyte ratio (H/L ratio increased significantly (P<0.05 during the summer in both Hubbard and Ross strains, but it was not significantly affected by the season in Cobb strain. The total antibody titers against SRBC were decreased during the summer season in the three strains. The level of dietary protein showed no significant effect on H/L ratio in the three strains. Decreasing dietary protein level decreased the total antibody titers against SRBC in both Ross and Hubbard strains. Whereas, it does not affect the total antibody titers against SRBC in Cobb strain.

  7. Dominant-Negative Proteins in Herpesviruses – From Assigning Gene Function to Intracellular Immunization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Ruzsics

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Investigating and assigning gene functions of herpesviruses is a process, which profits from consistent technical innovation. Cloning of bacterial artificial chromosomes encoding herpesvirus genomes permits nearly unlimited possibilities in the construction of genetically modified viruses. Targeted or randomized screening approaches allow rapid identification of essential viral proteins. Nevertheless, mapping of essential genes reveals only limited insight into function. The usage of dominant-negative (DN proteins has been the tool of choice to dissect functions of proteins during the viral life cycle. DN proteins also facilitate the analysis of host-virus interactions. Finally, DNs serve as starting-point for design of new antiviral strategies.

  8. A novel subunit vaccine co-expressing GM-CSF and PCV2b Cap protein enhances protective immunity against porcine circovirus type 2 in piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huawei; Qian, Ping; Peng, Bo; Shi, Lin; Chen, Huanchun; Li, Xiangmin

    2015-05-15

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) causes porcine circovirus-associated disease. Capsid (Cap) protein of PCV2 is the principal immunogenic protein that induces neutralizing antibodies and protective immunity. GM-CSF is an immune adjuvant that enhances responses to vaccines. In this study, recombinant baculoviruses Ac-Cap and Ac-Cap-GM-CSF expressing the Cap protein alone and co-expressing the Cap protein and porcine GM-CSF, respectively, were constructed successfully. The target proteins were analyzed by western blotting and IFA. Further, these proteins were confirmed by electron microscopy, which showed that Cap proteins could self-assemble into virus-like particles having diameters of 17-25nm. Animal experiments showed that pigs immunized with Cap-GM-CSF subunit vaccine showed significantly higher levels of PCV2-specific antibodies and neutralizing antibodies than pigs immunized with the Cap subunit vaccine and a commercial vaccine (Ingelvac CircoFLEX; PPigs receiving the Cap-GM-CSF subunit vaccine showed significantly higher average daily weight gain after wild-type PCV2 challenge than pigs receiving the other three vaccines (Ppigs. Thus, the novel Cap-GM-CSF subunit vaccine has the potential to be used as an effective and safe vaccine candidate against PCV2 infection. PMID:25863115

  9. Acyclovir Therapy Reduces the CD4+ T Cell Response against the Immunodominant pp65 Protein from Cytomegalovirus in Immune Competent Individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Pachnio

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus (CMV infects the majority of the global population and leads to the development of a strong virus-specific immune response. The CMV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell immune response can comprise between 10 and 50% of the T cell pool within peripheral blood and there is concern that this may impair immunity to other pathogens. Elderly individuals with the highest magnitude of CMV-specific immune response have been demonstrated to be at increased risk of mortality and there is increasing interest in interventions that may serve to moderate this. Acyclovir is an anti-viral drug with activity against a range of herpes viruses and is used as long term treatment to suppress reactivation of herpes simplex virus. We studied the immune response to CMV in patients who were taking acyclovir to assess if therapy could be used to suppress the CMV-specific immune response. The T cell reactivity against the immunodominant late viral protein pp65 was reduced by 53% in people who were taking acyclovir. This effect was seen within one year of therapy and was observed primarily within the CD4+ response. Acyclovir treatment only modestly influenced the immune response to the IE-1 target protein. These data show that low dose acyclovir treatment has the potential to modulate components of the T cell response to CMV antigen proteins and indicate that anti-viral drugs should be further investigated as a means to reduce the magnitude of CMV-specific immune response and potentially improve overall immune function.

  10. Use of serum C-reactive protein as an early marker of inflammatory activity in canine type II immune-mediated polyarthritis: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kristensen Annemarie T; Jessen Lisbeth; Houser Geoffrey A; Jensen Asger; Kjelgaard-Hansen Mads

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Monitoring systemic inflammatory activity during steroid therapy of canine immune-mediated polyarthritis (IMPA) is difficult and mainly relies on clinical signs. Case presentation Canine serum C-reactive protein (CRP) was measured serially and blinded during a 27-week follow-up period of a case of Anaplasma phagocytophilia induced type II immune-mediated polyarthritis. Conclusion WBC was, as expected, observed not to reflect the inflammatory activity during steroid treatme...

  11. Maternal immunization of mice with group B streptococcal type III polysaccharide-beta C protein conjugate elicits protective antibody to multiple serotypes.

    OpenAIRE

    Madoff, L C; Paoletti, L C; Tai, J Y; Kasper, D L

    1994-01-01

    Group B streptococcal infection is a major cause of neonatal mortality. Antibody to the capsular polysaccharide protects against invasive neonatal disease, but immunization with capsular polysaccharides fails to elicit protective antibody in many recipients. Conjugation of the polysaccharide to tetanus toxoid has been shown to increase immune response to the polysaccharide. In animal models, C proteins of group B streptococci are also protective determinants. We examined the ability of the be...

  12. The impact of RGS and other G-protein regulatory proteins on Gαi-mediated signaling in immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehrl, John H

    2016-08-15

    Leukocyte chemoattractant receptors are members of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Signaling downstream of these receptors directs the localization, positioning and homeostatic trafficking of leukocytes; as well as their recruitment to, and their retention at, inflammatory sites. Ligand induced changes in the molecular conformation of chemoattractant receptors results in the engagement of heterotrimeric G-proteins, which promotes α subunits to undergo GTP/GDP exchange. This results in the functional release of βγ subunits from the heterotrimers, thereby activating downstream effector molecules, which initiate leukocyte polarization, gradient sensing, and directional migration. Pertussis toxin ADP ribosylates Gαi subunits and prevents chemoattractant receptors from triggering Gαi nucleotide exchange. The use of pertussis toxin revealed the essential importance of Gαi subunit nucleotide exchange for chemoattractant receptor signaling. More recent studies have identified a range of regulatory mechanisms that target these receptors and their associated heterotrimeric G-proteins, thereby helping to control the magnitude, kinetics, and duration of signaling. A failure in these regulatory pathways can lead to impaired receptor signaling and immunopathology. The analysis of mice with targeted deletions of Gαi isoforms as well as some of these G-protein regulatory proteins is providing insights into their roles in chemoattractant receptor signaling. PMID:27071343

  13. A heat shock protein 90 β isoform involved in immune response to bacteria challenge and heat shock from Miichthys miiuy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Tao; Gao, Yunhang; Wang, Rixin; Xu, Tianjun

    2013-08-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is highly conserved molecular chaperone that plays a critical role in cellular stress response. In this study, we reported the identification and functional analysis of a heat shock protein 90 gene from miiuy croaker (designated Mimi-HSP90). Mimi-HSP90 contained five conserved HSP90 protein family signatures and shared 89.6%-99.5% similarity with other known HSP90 β isoform. Homology analysis and structure comparison further indicated that Mimi-HSP90 should be β isoform member of the HSP90 family. The molecular evolutionary analysis showed that HSP90 was under an overall strong purifying select pressure among fish species. Mimi-HSP90 gene was constitutively expressed in ten examined tissues, and the expression level of liver was higher than in other tissues. The expression level of Mimi-HSP90 gene under bacterial infection and heat shock were analyzed by real-time quantitative RT-PCR, resulted in significant changes in liver, spleen, and kidney tissues. The purified recombinant pET-HSP90 protein was used to produce the polyclonal antibody in mice. The specificity of the antibody was determined by Western blot analysis. All results suggested that Mimi-HSP90 was involved in thermal stress and immune response in miiuy croaker. PMID:23684810

  14. Multiple myeloma cell lines and primary tumors proteoma: protein biosynthesis and immune system as potential therapeutic targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotti, Diego Robles; Evangelista, Adriane Feijó; Braga, Walter Moisés Tobias; de Lourdes Chauffaille, Maria; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes; Colleoni, Gisele Wally Braga

    2015-01-01

    Despite great advance in multiple myeloma (MM) treatment since 2000s, it is still an incurable disease and novel therapies are welcome. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore MM plasma cells' (MM-PC) proteome, in comparison with their normal counterparts (derived from palatine tonsils of normal donors, ND-PC), in order to find potential therapeutic targets expressed on the surface of these cells. We also aimed to evaluate the proteome of MM cell lines with different genetic alterations, to confirm findings obtained with primary tumor cells. Bone marrow (BM) samples from eight new cases of MM and palatine tonsils from seven unmatched controls were submitted to PC separation and, in addition to two MM cell lines (U266, RPMI-8226), were submitted to protein extraction for mass spectrometry analyses. A total of 81 proteins were differentially expressed between MM-PC and ND-PC - 72 upregulated and nine downregulated; U266 vs. RPMI 8226 cell lines presented 61 differentially expressed proteins - 51 upregulated and 10 downregulated. On primary tumors, bioinformatics analyses highlighted upregulation of protein biosynthesis machinery, as well as downregulation of immune response components, such as MHC class I and II, and complement receptors. We also provided comprehensive information about U266 and RPMI-8226 cell lines' proteome and could confirm some patients' findings. PMID:26807199

  15. Phosphorylation of mouse immunity-related GTPase (IRG resistance proteins is an evasion strategy for virulent Toxoplasma gondii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Steinfeldt

    Full Text Available Virulence of complex pathogens in mammals is generally determined by multiple components of the pathogen interacting with the functional complexity and multiple layering of the mammalian immune system. It is most unusual for the resistance of a mammalian host to be overcome by the defeat of a single defence mechanism. In this study we uncover and analyse just such a case at the molecular level, involving the widespread intracellular protozoan pathogen Toxoplasma gondii and one of its most important natural hosts, the house mouse (Mus musculus. Natural polymorphism in virulence of Eurasian T. gondii strains for mice has been correlated in genetic screens with the expression of polymorphic rhoptry kinases (ROP kinases secreted into the host cell during infection. We show that the molecular targets of the virulent allelic form of ROP18 kinase are members of a family of cellular GTPases, the interferon-inducible IRG (immunity-related GTPase proteins, known from earlier work to be essential resistance factors in mice against avirulent strains of T. gondii. Virulent T. gondii strain ROP18 kinase phosphorylates several mouse IRG proteins. We show that the parasite kinase phosphorylates host Irga6 at two threonines in the nucleotide-binding domain, biochemically inactivating the GTPase and inhibiting its accumulation and action at the T. gondii parasitophorous vacuole membrane. Our analysis identifies the conformationally active switch I region of the GTP-binding site as an Achilles' heel of the IRG protein pathogen-resistance mechanism. The polymorphism of ROP18 in natural T. gondii populations indicates the existence of a dynamic, rapidly evolving ecological relationship between parasite virulence factors and host resistance factors. This system should be unusually fruitful for analysis at both ecological and molecular levels since both T. gondii and the mouse are widespread and abundant in the wild and are well-established model species with

  16. How to Make a Non-Antigenic Protein (Auto) Antigenic: Molecular Complementarity Alters Antigen Processing and Activates Adaptive-Innate Immunity Synergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root-Bernstein, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Evidence is reviewed that complementary proteins and peptides form complexes with increased antigenicity and/or autoimmunogenicity. Five case studies are highlighted: 1) diphtheria toxin-antitoxin (antibody), which induces immunity to the normally non-antigenic toxin, and autoimmune neuritis; 2) tryptophan peptide of myelin basic protein and muramyl dipeptide ("adjuvant peptide"), which form a complex that induces experimental allergic encephalomyelitis; 3) an insulin and glucagon complex that is far more antigenic than either component individually; 4) various causes of experimental autoimmune myocarditis such as C protein in combination with its antibody, or coxsackie B virus in combination with the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor; 5) influenza A virus haemagglutinin with the outer membrane protein of the Haemophilus influenzae, which increases antigenicity. Several mechanisms cooperate to alter immunogenicity. Complexation alters antigen processing, protecting the components against proteolysis, altering fragmentation and presenting novel antigens to the immune system. Complementary antigens induce complementary adaptive immune responses (complementary antibodies and/or T cell receptors) that produce circulating immune complexes (CIC). CIC stimulate innate immunity. Concurrently, complementary antigens stimulate multiple Toll-like receptors that synergize to over-produce cytokines, which further stimulate adaptive immunity. Thus innate and adaptive immunity form a positive feedback loop. If components of the complex mimic a host protein, then autoimmunity may result. Enhanced antigenicity for production of improved vaccines and/or therapeutic autoimmunity (e.g., against cancer cells) might be achieved by using information from antibody or TCR recognition sites to complement an antigen; by panning for complements in randomized peptide libraries; or using antisense peptide strategies to design complements. PMID:26179268

  17. Genetic and Functional Studies on the Conserved IRG (Immunity-related GTPase) Protein IRGC (CINEMA)

    OpenAIRE

    Rohde, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    The Immunity-related GTPases (IRG), also known as p47 GTPases, are important factors mediating resistance against different intracellular pathogens. In the mouse there are at least 23 different IRG genes. Most of them are located in clusters on chromosome 11 and 18, but one family member, Irgc (CINEMA), is an isolated gene on chromosome 7. Humans, in contrast, possess only one full-length IRG gene called IRGC, which is an orthologue of the isolated mouse gene Irgc, and one truncated gene call...

  18. The hnRNP-Q Protein LIF2 Participates in the Plant Immune Response

    OpenAIRE

    Le Roux, Clémentine; Del Prete, Stefania; Boutet-Mercey, Stephanie; Perreau, Francois; Balague, Claudine; Roby, Dominique; Fagard, Mathilde; Gaudin, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotes have evolved complex defense pathways to combat invading pathogens. Here, we investigated the role of the Arabidopsis thaliana heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP-Q) LIF2 in the plant innate immune response. We show that LIF2 loss-of-function in A. thaliana leads to changes in the basal expression of the salicylic acid (SA)- and jasmonic acid (JA)- dependent defense marker genes PR1 and PDF1.2, respectively. Whereas the expression of genes involved in SA and JA biosynthe...

  19. Cancer associated aberrant protein o-glycosylation can modify antigen processing and immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Caroline B; Petersen, Cecilie; Lavrsen, Kirstine;

    2012-01-01

    response to a cancer related tumor antigen, Balb/c or B6.Cg(CB)-Tg(HLA-A/H2-D)2Enge/J (HLA-A2 transgenic) mice were immunized with a non-glycosylated or GalNAc-glycosylated MUC1 derived peptide followed by comparison of T cell proliferation, IFN-¿ release, and antibody induction. Gal...... abolished MUC1 specific CD8+ T cell responses in HLA-A2 transgenic mice. GalNAc glycosylation of MUC1 antigen therefore facilitates uptake, MHC class II presentation, and antibody response but might block the antigen presentation to CD8+ T cells....

  20. Outer Membrane Proteins of Brucella abortus Vaccinal and Field Strains and their Immune Response in Buffaloes

    OpenAIRE

    Rukhshanda Munir*, M. Afzal1, M. Hussain2, S. M. S. Naqvi3 and A. Khanum3

    2010-01-01

    Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of three strains of B. abortus i.e. S19, RB51 and a local field isolate of biotype 1 were isolated through disrupting cells to generate membranes by centrifugation and sodium lauryl sarcosinate solubilisation of inner membrane proteins. Distinct OMP profiles of each strain were seen on SDS-PAGE. SDS-PAGE analysis of S19 and field isolate revealed eight protein bands in each strain. The OMPs of S19 had molecular masses 89.0, 73.0, 53.7, 49.0, 38.0, 27.0, 22.3, a...

  1. Community Immunity (Herd Immunity)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Read more information on enabling JavaScript. Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area ​Community Immunity ("Herd" ... population is immunized, protecting most community members. The principle of community immunity applies to control of a ...

  2. Effect of partial supplementation of sun-dried Azolla as a protein source on the immunity and antioxidant status of commercial broilers

    OpenAIRE

    Biswal Chichilichi; Mohanty, G. P.; Mishra, S. K.; Pradhan, C. R.; Behura, N. C.; Das, A.; K. Behera

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of partial supplementation of sun-dried Azolla as a protein source on the immunity of commercial broilers in coastal Odisha. Materials and Methods: A 180 day-old broiler chicks were distributed in six dietary treatments viz. C1: Basal diet, C2: Basal diet + enzyme, T1: Basal diet +5% protein from Azolla, T2: Basal diet + 5% protein from Azolla + enzyme, T3: Basal diet +10% protein from Azolla, and T4: Basal diet + 10% protein from Az...

  3. Characterization of a novel maitake (Grifola frondosa) protein that activates natural killer and dendritic cells and enhances antitumor immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Yao-Wei; Kuan, Yen-Chou; Wang, Jia-Lin; Sheu, Fuu

    2013-10-16

    Grifola frondosa, also known as maitake, is a culinary mushroom with immune-enhancing and antitumor effects. Numerous studies have investigated the activity of maitake polysaccharide extracts, but studies of maitake proteins are scarce. In this study, we purified and characterized a new G. frondosa protein, GFP, from maitake fruiting bodies. GFP is a nonglucan heterodimeric 83 kDa protein that consists of two 41 kDa subunits. GFP induced interferon-γ secretion by murine splenocytes and natural killer cells and activated the maturation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) via a TLR4-dependent mechanism. GFP-treated BMDCs promoted a Th1 response and exhibited significant antitumor activity when transferred into tumor-bearing mice. In conclusion, we are the first to reveal the critical role of GFP in modulating the immune response and to link the immune-enhancing effects of maitake to its antitumor activities. PMID:24020458

  4. Effect of partial supplementation of sun-dried Azolla as a protein source on the immunity and antioxidant status of commercial broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswal Chichilichi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of partial supplementation of sun-dried Azolla as a protein source on the immunity of commercial broilers in coastal Odisha. Materials and Methods: A 180 day-old broiler chicks were distributed in six dietary treatments viz. C1: Basal diet, C2: Basal diet + enzyme, T1: Basal diet +5% protein from Azolla, T2: Basal diet + 5% protein from Azolla + enzyme, T3: Basal diet +10% protein from Azolla, and T4: Basal diet + 10% protein from Azolla + enzyme. Cutaneous basophilc hypersensitivity (CBH and humoral immunity response were determined at the 38th day of age. At 42nd day, the weight of lymphoid organs, an antioxidant enzyme, and lipid peroxidation activity were determined. Results: The CBH response did not differ significantly among the treated groups, but the sheep red blood cells response was significantly higher in T4. The weight of lymphoid organs or immune organs of all the treated groups did not differ significantly (p>0.05. The erythrocyte catalase level of T4 group was found to be significantly higher than rest of the treated groups except T3. Conclusion: It may be concluded that supplementation of Azolla at 10% of dietary protein requirement along with enzyme supplementation in an isonitrogenous diet showed a better immune response in broilers.

  5. Transcriptome analysis to identify genes for peptides and proteins involved in immunity and reproduction from male accessory glands and ejaculatory duct of Bactrocera dorsalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dong; Tian, Chuan-Bei; Liu, Shi-Huo; Wang, Tao; Smagghe, Guy; Jia, Fu-Xian; Dou, Wei; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2016-06-01

    In the male reproductive system of insects, the male accessory glands and ejaculatory duct (MAG/ED) are important organs and their primary function is to enhance the fertility of spermatozoa. Proteins secreted by the MAG/ED are also known to induce post-mating changes and immunity responses in the female insect. To understand the gene expression profile in the MAG/ED of the oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), that is an important pest in fruits, we performed an Illumina-based deep sequencing of mRNA. This yielded 54,577,630 clean reads corresponding to 4.91Gb total nucleotides that were assembled and clustered to 30,669 unigenes (average 645bp). Among them, 20,419 unigenes were functionally annotated to known proteins/peptides in Gene Orthology, Clusters of Orthologous Groups, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway databases. Typically, many genes were involved in immunity and these included microbial recognition proteins and antimicrobial peptides. Subsequently, the inducible expression of these immunity-related genes was confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis when insects were challenged with immunity-inducible factors, suggesting their function in guaranteeing fertilization success. Besides, we identified some important reproductive genes such as juvenile hormone- and ecdysteroid-related genes in this de novo assembly. In conclusion, this transcriptomic sequencing of B. dorsalis MAG/ED provides insights to facilitate further functional research of reproduction, immunity and molecular evolution of reproductive proteins in this important agricultural pest. PMID:26297881

  6. Immunization with Polyamine Transport Protein PotD Protects Mice against Systemic Infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, P.; Swiatlo, E.

    2006-01-01

    The human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae contains genes for a putative polyamine ABC transporter which are organized in an operon and designated potABCD. Polyamine transport protein D (PotD) is an extracellular protein which binds polyamines and possibly other structurally related molecules. PotD has been shown to contribute to virulence in both a murine sepsis model and a pneumonia model with capsular type 3 pneumococci. The protective efficacy of recombinant PotD was evaluated by active ...

  7. Construction of prokaryotic expression system of TGF-β1 epitope gene and identification of recombinant fusion protein immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Hong Guo; Zhi-Ming Hao; Jin-Yan Luo; Jun-Hong Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To insert the constructed TGF-β1the el loop of C-terminus of truncated hepatitis B core antigen to increase TGF-β1expression system and to identify immunity of the expressed recombinant protein in order to exploit the possibility for obtaining anti- TGF-β1METHODS: The TGF-β1mature TGF-β1TGF-32) was amplified by polymerase chain reaction from the recombinant pGEM-7z/TGF-β1HBcAg gene fragments (encoding HBcAg from 1-71 and 89-144 amino acid residues) were amplified from PYTA1-HBcAg vector. The recombinant vector pGEMEX-1 was used to insert HBcAg1-71, TGF-β1into restrictive endonuclease enzyme and ligated with T4ligase. The fusion gene fragments HBcAg1-71-TGF-β1HBcAg89-144 were recloned to pET28a(+) and the DNA sequence was confirmed by the dideoxy chain termination method. The recombinant vector pET28a (+)/CTC was transformed and expressed in E.. Coli BL21 (DE3)under induction of IPTG. After purification with Ni+2-NTA agarose resins, the antigenicity of purified protein was detected by ELISA and Western blot and visualized under electron microscope.RESULTS: Enzyme digestion analysis and sequencing showed that TGF-β1loop of C-terminus of truncated hepatitis B core antigen.SDS-PAGE analysis showed that relative molecular mass(Mr) of the expressed product by pET28a (+)/CTC was Mr 24 600.The output of the target recombinant protein was approximately 34.8% of the total bacterial protein,mainly presented in the form of inclusion body. Western blotting and ELISA demonstrated that the fusion protein could combine with anti-TGF-β1not with anti-HBcAg. The purity of protein was about 90% and the protein was in the form of self-assembling particles visualized under electron microscope. This fusion protein had good anti-TGF-β1could be used as anti-TGF-β1CONCLUSION: A recombinant prokaryotic expression system with high expression efficiency of the target TGF- epitope gene was successfully established.The fusion protein is in the form of self-assembling particles

  8. Immune responses to HBsAg conjugated to protein D of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiudong Su

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B vaccine that contains an aluminum hydroxide adjuvant induces apoptotic death of Hepa 1-6 cells. Difficult-to-degrade chemical additives in vaccines effectively enhance vaccine immunogenicity, but also affect the host tissue. Identification of bio-molecules that are readily degraded and compatible in vivo as an adjuvant is important for vaccine research. The hapten-carrier effect suggests that stimulation of helper T (Th cells by carrier adjuvants is feasible. Protein D (PD of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae covalently conjugated to some polysaccharide vaccines has been confirmed to convert T-cell independent (TI antigens into T-cell dependent (TD antigens, and elicit strong T-cell responses ultimately. Herein, we would substitube PD for aluminum hydroxide adjuvant in Hepatitis B vaccine.Truncated PD (amino acids 20-364 was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by (NH42SO4 precipitation and DEAE chromatography. After evaluation of antigenicity by western blotting, PD was covalently conjugated to yeast-derived recombinant HBsAg by cross-linking with glutaraldehyde. Intramuscular immunization with the conjugate induced higher level of HBsAg-specific antibody than did HBsAg alone (p < 0.05, and was comparable to commercial Hepatitis B vaccine. During the surveillance period (days 35-105, anti-HBs titers were hold high. Moreover, the conjugated vaccine enhanced Th1 immune responses, while Th2 responses were also activated and induced an antibody response, as determined by IFN-γ ELISPOT and IgG1/IgG2a ratio assays.Recombinant truncated PD covalently conjugated to HBsAg antigen enhanced the immunogenicity of the antigen in mice simultaneously by humoral and cellular immune response, which would facilitate therapeutic hepatitis B vaccines.

  9. Innate immune response, intestinal morphology and microbiota changes in Senegalese sole fed plant protein diets with probiotics or autolysed yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, S; Medina, A; Pires, M A; Moriñigo, M A; Sansuwan, K; Fernandes, J M O; Valente, L M P; Ozório, R O A

    2016-08-01

    The effects of using plant ingredients in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) diet on immune competence and intestine morphology and microbial ecology are still controversial. Probiotics or immunostimulants can potentially alter the intestinal microbiota in a way that protects fish against pathogens. The current study aimed to examine the intestine histology and microbiota and humoral innate immune response in juvenile sole fed diets with low (35 %) or high (72 %) content of plant protein (PP) ingredients supplemented with a multispecies probiotic bacteria or autolysed yeast. Fish fed the probiotic diet had lower growth performance. Lysozyme and complement activities were significantly higher in fish fed PP72 diets than in their counterparts fed PP35 diets after 17 and 38 days of feeding. At 2 days of feeding, fish fed unsupplemented PP72 showed larger intestine section area and longer villus than fish fed unsupplemented PP35. At 17 days of feeding, fish fed unsupplemented PP72 showed more goblet cells than the other dietary groups, except the group fed yeast supplemented PP35 diet. High dietary PP level, acutely stimulate fish innate immune defence of the fish after 2 and 17 days of feeding. However, this effect does not occur after 73 days of feeding, suggesting a habituation to dietary treatments and/or immunosuppression, with a reduction in the number of the goblet cells. Fish fed for 38 days with diets supplemented with autolysed yeast showed longer intestinal villus. The predominant bacteria found in sole intestine were Vibrio sp. and dietary probiotic supplementation caused a reduction in Vibrio content, regardless of the PP level. PMID:27183997

  10. Quantification of uncoupling protein 2 reveals its main expression in immune cells and selective up-regulation during T-cell proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Rupprecht

    Full Text Available Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2 is an inner mitochondrial membrane protein. Although the protein was discovered in 1997, its function and even its tissue distribution are still under debate. Here we present a quantitative analysis of mRNA and protein expression in various mice tissues, revealing that UCP2 is mainly expressed in organs and cells associated with the immune system. Although the UCP2 gene is present in the brain, as demonstrated using quantitative RT-PCR, the protein was not detectable in neurons under physiological conditions. Instead, we could detect UCP2 in microglia, which act in the immune defense of the central nervous system. In lymphocytes, activation led to a ten-fold increase of UCP2 protein expression simultaneously to the increase in levels of other mitochondrial proteins, whereas lymphocyte re-stimulation resulted in the selective increase of UCP2. The highest detected level of UCP2 expression in stimulated T-cells (0.54 ng/(µg total cellular protein was approximately 200 times lower than the level of UCP1 in brown adipose tissue from room temperature acclimated mice. Both the UCP2 expression pattern and the time course of up-regulation in stimulated T-cells imply UCP2's involvement in the immune response, probably by controlling the metabolism during cell proliferation.

  11. Correlation of antispermatozoal antibody with infertility in immunized female rabbits using 14C-protein A in a filter radioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meaningful detection of antisperm antibody in immunologically infertile females has been confounded by the many methods of assay that exist. With many of these methods there is poor correlation of assay results with infertility. In this report, female rabbits were rendered partially or completely infertile by immunization with sperm fractions. A filter radioassay for antisperm antibody was developed that consists of incubating 10(7) sperm with sperm from immunized rabbits and 14C-Protein A, a long-lived and versatile indirect radiolabel for many antibodies of the IgG class. The spermatozoa are washed by rapid vacuum filtration on polycarbonate membrane filters instead of by time-consuming centrifugation. The filters with the collected spermatozoa are then counted in a liquid scintillation counter. Sera from female rabbits isoimmunized with sperm antigens show a highly significant correlation (r = -0.904; p less than 0.001) between assay results and infertility as measured by the percentage of eggs that underwent cleavage after artificial insemination

  12. Immunity conferred by an experimental vaccine based on the recombinant PCV2 Cap protein expressed in Trichoplusia ni-larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Martín, Eva; Gómez-Sebastián, Silvia; Argilaguet, Jordi M; Sibila, Marina; Fort, María; Nofrarías, Miquel; Kurtz, Sherry; Escribano, José M; Segalés, Joaquim; Rodríguez, Fernando

    2010-03-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) vaccination has been recently included as a measure to control postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) in the field. Aiming to obtain a more affordable vaccine to be extensively implemented in the field, a highly efficient non-fermentative expression platform based on Trichoplusia ni (T. ni) larvae was used to produce a baculovirus-derived recombinant PCV2 Cap protein (rCap) for vaccine purposes. Vaccination of pigs with rCap induced solid protection against PCV2 experimental infection, inhibiting both the viremia and the viral shedding very efficiently. The protection afforded by the rCap vaccine strongly correlated with the induction of specific humoral immune responses, even in the presence of PCV2-specific maternal immunity, although cellular responses also seemed to play a partial role. In summary, we have shown that rCap expressed in T. ni larvae could be a cost-effective PCV2 vaccine candidate to be tested under field conditions. PMID:20056179

  13. Sublingual vaccination with sonicated Salmonella proteins and mucosal adjuvant induces mucosal and systemic immunity and protects mice from lethal enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ching-Feng; Wu, Tzee-Chung; Wu, Chia-Chao; Lee, Chin-Cheng; Lo, Wen-Tsung; Hwang, Kwei-Shuai; Hsu, Mu-Ling; Peng, Ho-Jen

    2011-07-01

    Salmonella enteritidis is one of the most common pathogens of enteritis. Most experimental vaccines against Salmonella infection have been applied through injections. This is a new trial to explore the effect of sublingual administration of Salmonella vaccines on systemic and mucosal immunity. Adult BALB/c mice were sublingually vaccinated with sonicated Salmonella proteins (SSP) alone, or plus adjuvant CpG DNA (CpG) or cholera toxin (CT). They were boosted 2 weeks later. Saliva specific secretory IgA (SIgA) antibody responses were significantly stimulated in the mice vaccinated with SSP only or together with CpG or CT. Whereas the mice sublingually vaccinated with SSP and CpG had higher spleen cell IFN-γ production and serum specific IgG2a antibody responses, those receiving SSP and CT showed enhanced spleen cell IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6 production, and serum specific IgG1 antibody responses. After oral challenge with live S. enteritidis, the same strain of the source of SSP, immune protection in those sublingually vaccinated with SSP and CpG or CT was found to prevent intestinal necrosis and to render a higher survival rate. In conclusion, sublingual vaccination together with mucosal adjuvant CpG or CT is a simple but effective way against enteric bacterial pathogens. PMID:21635554

  14. Potential role of lncRNA cyp2c91-protein interactions on diseases of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suravajhala, Prashanth; Kogelman, Lisette J A; Mazzoni, Gianluca; Kadarmideen, Haja N

    2015-01-01

    With unprecedented increase in next generation sequencing technologies, there has been a persistent interest on transcript profiles of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and protein-coding genes forming an interaction network. Apart from protein-protein interaction (PPI), gene network models such as Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (WGCNA) are used to functionally annotate lncRNAs in identifying their potential disease associations. To address this, studies have led to characterizing transcript structures and understanding expression profiles mediating regulatory roles. In the current exploratory analysis, we show how a lncRNA - cyp2c91 contributes to the transcriptional regulation localized to cytoplasm thereby making refractory environment for transcription. By applying network methods and pathway analyses on genes related to a disease such as obesity and systemic lupus erythematosus, we show that we can gain deeper insight in biological processes such as the perturbances in immune system, and get a better understanding of the systems biology of diseases. PMID:26284111

  15. Potential role of lncRNA cyp2c91-protein interactions on diseases of the immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth eSuravajhala

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available With unprecedented increase in next generation sequencing (NGS technologies, there has been a persistent interest on transcript profiles of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs and protein-coding genes forming an interaction network. Apart from protein-protein interaction (PPI, gene network models such as Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis are used to functionally annotate lncRNAs in identifying their potential disease associations. To address this, studies have led to characterizing transcript structures and understanding expression profiles mediating regulatory roles. In the current exploratory analysis, we show how a lncRNA - cyp2c91 contributes to the transcriptional regulation localized to cytoplasm thereby making refractory environment for transcription. By applying network methods and pathway analyses on genes related to a disease such as obesity and systemic lupus erythematosus, we show that we can gain deeper insight in biological processes such as the perturbances in immune system, and get a better understanding of the systems biology of diseases.

  16. Correlating Flavivirus virulence and levels of intrinsic disorder in shell proteins: protective roles vs. immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Gerard Kian-Meng; Dunker, A Keith; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-05-24

    Computational analyses revealed correlations between the intrinsic disorder propensity of shell proteins and case fatality rates (CFRs) among Flaviviruses and within at least two Flavivirus species, such as tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) and dengue virus (DENV). The shell proteins analyzed in this study are capsid (C) and membrane (PrM, Pr, and M) proteins. The highest correlations can be found when regression analyses were conducted using Pr (Flavivirus: r(2) = 0.78, p fever virus (YFV), which is the most virulent virus in the sample, has the highest PID levels, whereas the second most virulent TBEV FE subtype has the second highest PID score due to its C protein, and the least virulent West Nile virus (WNV) has the least disordered C protein. This knowledge can be used while working on the development and identification of attenuated strains for vaccine. Curiously, unlike Flaviviruses, a disordered outer shell was described for hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and human simplex virus 2 (HSV-2), which currently have no effective vaccine. PMID:27102744

  17. Immune complex modulation by plasma proteins. With special reference to the complement system and autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, G

    1989-01-01

    The complement (C) system consists of two activation pathways, the classical and the alternative, which may both be activated by immune complexes (IC). C activation products become attached to the IC during activation leading to profound changes in the properties of the complexes. The common...... of IC in the circulation or tissues, this activation may lead to chronic inflammatory disease. This thesis reviews certain aspects of the interactions between IC and C. The earlier work describes our development of an assay for measuring the C activity in patient sera by its ability to solubilize...... were performed to characterize the reaction. The CMS assay, showed that serum from patients with SLE and other systemic persistent inflammatory diseases and infections exhibited a reduced capacity to solubilize IC. The CMS values correlated inversely to the disease activity in SLE patients. It was also...

  18. The WAP protein Trappin-2/Elafin: a handyman in the regulation of inflammatory and immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, Thomas; Solhonne, Brigitte; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; Garcia-Verdugo, Ignacio

    2012-08-01

    Trappin-2/Elafin is a potent serine protease inhibitor which prevents excessive damage under inflammatory status. This "alarm-antiprotease" is locally expressed by epithelial cells and immune cells such as macrophages and γδ T cells. It has also been proven to modulate a wide range of parameters that are critical for the inflammation process like modulating the NFκB pathway, cytokine secretion and cell recruitment. In addition, Trappin-2/Elafin was shown to possess anti-microbial properties against different classes of pathogens including viruses, fungi and bacteria. Studies also linked Trappin-2/Elafin to either susceptibility or protection against inflammatory disease and infections, even though the mechanisms remains poorly understood. This review will discuss some of the pleiotropic effects displayed by Trappin-2/Elafin, and the properties that could be used to prevent infection or to protect against inflammation. PMID:22634606

  19. Three wall-associated kinases required for rice basal immunity form protein complexes in the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayrol, Bastien; Delteil, Amandine; Gobbato, Enrico; Kroj, Thomas; Morel, Jean-Benoit

    2016-04-01

    Receptor-like kinases (RLKs) play key roles in disease resistance, in particular basal immunity. They recognize patterns produced by the pathogen invasion and often work as complexes in the plasma membrane. Among these RLKs, there is increasing evidence in several plant species of the key role of Wall-associated kinases (WAKs) in disease resistance. We recently showed using rice (Oryza sativa) loss-of-function mutants of three transcriptionaly co-regulated OsWAK genes that individual OsWAKs are positively required for quantitative resistance to the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae. This finding was unexpected since WAK genes belong to large gene families where functional redundancy is expected. Here we provide evidence that this may be due to complex physical interaction between OsWAK proteins. PMID:26853099

  20. Heat-shock protein 70 expression in shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis during thermal and immune-challenged stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Zhenyu; JIAO Chuanzhen; XIANG Jianhai

    2004-01-01

    Using western immunoblotting, we obtained heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) induction data and distribution in different tissues from shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis during thermal and immune-challenged stresses. This is probably the first report of the effects of various stressors on the expression of HSP70 in shrimp. HSP70 was prominently induced in hepatopancreas and gills, but not in muscle, eyestalk and hemolymph, when the shrimp were exposed to heat shock and Vibrio anguillavium-challenged stresses. Cold shock and WSSV treatment had no significant effects on the levels of HSP70 expression in all tissues examined. HSP70 induction was greatest after 2 h exposure to heat shock stress, which was elevated after acute heat shock exposure of 10℃ above ambient temperature.

  1. Scanning the cell surface proteome of cancer cells and identification of metastasis-associated proteins using a subtractive immunization strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Nicolaj; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2009-01-01

    and technologically challenging, and no ideal method is currently available. Here, we describe a strategy that allows scanning of the entire cell surface and identification of molecules that exhibit altered expression between two cell types. Concurrently, this method gives rise to valuable reagents...... for further characterization of the identified proteins. The strategy is based on subtractive immunization of mice, and we used the two isogenic cell lines, NM-2C5 and M-4A4, derived from the MDA-MB-435 cancer cell line, as a model system. Although the two cell lines are equally tumorigenic, only M-4A...... neuroendocrine tumors while exhibiting no or very weak reactivity with normal tissues. mAb 15C7 stained a variety of cancers as well as some normal lymphoid organs and was subsequently identified to react with HLA-DR-beta. A third mAb, 31D7, that also specifically recognized HLA-DR-beta was capable of inhibiting...

  2. The hnRNP-Q protein LIF2 participates in the plant immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Clémentine; Del Prete, Stefania; Boutet-Mercey, Stéphanie; Perreau, François; Balagué, Claudine; Roby, Dominique; Fagard, Mathilde; Gaudin, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotes have evolved complex defense pathways to combat invading pathogens. Here, we investigated the role of the Arabidopsis thaliana heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP-Q) LIF2 in the plant innate immune response. We show that LIF2 loss-of-function in A. thaliana leads to changes in the basal expression of the salicylic acid (SA)- and jasmonic acid (JA)- dependent defense marker genes PR1 and PDF1.2, respectively. Whereas the expression of genes involved in SA and JA biosynthesis and signaling was also affected in the lif2-1 mutant, no change in SA and JA hormonal contents was detected. In addition, the composition of glucosinolates, a class of defense-related secondary metabolites, was altered in the lif2-1 mutant in the absence of pathogen challenge. The lif2-1 mutant exhibited reduced susceptibility to the hemi-biotrophic pathogen Pseudomonas syringae and the necrotrophic ascomycete Botrytis cinerea. Furthermore, the lif2-1 sid2-2 double mutant was less susceptible than the wild type to P. syringae infection, suggesting that the lif2 response to pathogens was independent of SA accumulation. Together, our data suggest that lif2-1 exhibits a basal primed defense state, resulting from complex deregulation of gene expression, which leads to increased resistance to pathogens with various infection strategies. Therefore, LIF2 may function as a suppressor of cell-autonomous immunity. Similar to its human homolog, NSAP1/SYNCRIP, a trans-acting factor involved in both cellular processes and the viral life cycle, LIF2 may regulate the conflicting aspects of development and defense programs, suggesting that a conserved evolutionary trade-off between growth and defense pathways exists in eukaryotes. PMID:24914891

  3. C-reactive protein collaborates with plasma lectins to boost immune response against bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ng, PM; Le Saux, A; Lee, CM; Tan, NS; Lu, J; Thiel, Steffen; Ho, B; Ding, JL

    2007-01-01

    Although human C-reactive protein (CRP) becomes upregulated during septicemia, its role remains unclear, since purified CRP showed no binding to many common pathogens. Contrary to previous findings, we show that purified human CRP (hCRP) binds to Salmonella enterica, and that binding is enhanced in...... the presence of plasma factors. In the horseshoe crab, Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda, CRP is a major hemolymph protein. Incubation of hemolymph with a range of bacteria resulted in CRP binding to all the bacteria tested. Lipopolysaccharide-affinity chromatography of the hemolymph co-purified CRP......, galactose-binding protein (GBP) and carcinolectin-5 (CL5). Yeast two-hybrid and pull-down assays suggested that these pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) form pathogen recognition complexes. We show the conservation of PRR crosstalk in humans, whereby hCRP interacts with ficolin (CL5 homologue). This...

  4. Immunization with the Chlamydia trachomatis mouse pneumonitis major outer membrane protein by use of CpG oligodeoxynucleotides as an adjuvant induces a protective immune response against an intranasal chlamydial challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sukumar; Davis, Heather L; Peterson, Ellena M; de la Maza, Luis M

    2002-09-01

    Recently, we have shown that a vaccine consisting of a purified preparation of the Chlamydia trachomatis mouse pneumonitis (MoPn) major outer membrane protein (MOMP) and Freund's adjuvant can protect mice against a genital challenge. Here, we wanted to determine if CpG motifs could be used as an immune modulator to the MOMP to induce protection in mice against an intranasal (i.n.) challenge. One-week-old BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly and subcutaneously either once or three times at 2-week intervals with MOMP and CpG suspended in aluminum hydroxide (alum). Negative controls received ovalbumin, CpG, and alum. Positive controls were immunized i.n. with C. trachomatis MoPn elementary bodies (EB). Six weeks after the last immunization, mice were challenged i.n. with 10(4) inclusion-forming units (IFU) of the C. trachomatis MoPn serovar. Mice that received MOMP, CpG, and alum had a strong immune response, as shown by a high titer of serum antibodies to Chlamydia and significant lymphoproliferation of T-cells following stimulation with C. trachomatis EB. After the i.n. challenge mice immunized with MOMP, CpG, and alum showed significantly less body weight loss than the corresponding control mice immunized with ovalbumin, CpG, and alum. Ten days after the challenge the animals were euthanized, their lungs were weighed, and the numbers of IFU in the lungs were determined. The average weight of the lungs of the mice immunized with MOMP, CpG, and alum was significantly less than average weight of the lungs of the mice immunized with ovalbumin, CpG, and alum. Also, the average number of IFU recovered per mouse immunized with MOMP, CpG, and alum was significantly less than the average number of IFU per mouse detected in the mice inoculated with ovalbumin, CpG, and alum. In conclusion, our data show that CpG sequences can be used as an effective adjuvant with the C. trachomatis MoPn MOMP to elicit a protective immune response in mice against a chlamydial respiratory

  5. Immunization of mice with recombinant mosquito salivary protein D7 enhances mortality from subsequent West Nile virus infection via mosquito bite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystle L Reagan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mosquito salivary proteins (MSPs modulate the host immune response, leading to enhancement of arboviral infections. Identification of proteins in saliva responsible for immunomodulation and counteracting their effects on host immune response is a potential strategy to protect against arboviral disease. We selected a member of the D7 protein family, which are among the most abundant and immunogenic in mosquito saliva, as a vaccine candidate with the aim of neutralizing effects on the mammalian immune response normally elicited by mosquito saliva components during arbovirus transmission. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified D7 salivary proteins of Culex tarsalis, a West Nile virus (WNV vector in North America, and expressed 36 kDa recombinant D7 (rD7 protein for use as a vaccine. Vaccinated mice exhibited enhanced interferon-γ and decreased interleukin-10 expression after uninfected mosquito bite; however, we found unexpectedly that rD7 vaccination resulted in enhanced pathogenesis from mosquito-transmitted WNV infection. Passive transfer of vaccinated mice sera to naïve mice also resulted in increased mortality rates from subsequent mosquito-transmitted WNV infection, implicating the humoral immune response to the vaccine in enhancement of viral pathogenesis. Vaccinated mice showed decreases in interferon-γ and increases in splenocytes producing the regulatory cytokine IL-10 after WNV infection by mosquito bite. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Vector saliva vaccines have successfully protected against other blood-feeding arthropod-transmitted diseases. Nevertheless, the rD7 salivary protein vaccine was not a good candidate for protection against WNV disease since immunized mice infected via an infected mosquito bite exhibited enhanced mortality. Selection of salivary protein vaccines on the bases of abundance and immunogenicity does not predict efficacy.

  6. An Eimeria vaccine candidate based on Eimeria tenella immune mapped protein 1 and the TLR-5 agonist Salmonella typhimurium FliC flagellin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Guangwen; Qin, Mei [National Animal Protozoa Laboratory and College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Liu, Xianyong [National Animal Protozoa Laboratory and College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Key Laboratory of Zoonosis, China Ministry of Agriculture and College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Suo, Jingxia; Tang, Xinming; Tao, Geru [National Animal Protozoa Laboratory and College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Han, Qian [Department of Biochemistry, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Suo, Xun [National Animal Protozoa Laboratory and College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Key Laboratory of Zoonosis, China Ministry of Agriculture and College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Wu, Wenxue, E-mail: labboard@126.com [National Animal Protozoa Laboratory and College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Key Laboratory of Zoonosis, China Ministry of Agriculture and College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China)

    2013-10-25

    Highlights: •We found a new protective protein – (IMPI) in Eimeria tenella. •EtIMP1-flagellin fusion protein is an effective immunogen against Eimeria infection. •Flagellin can be as an apicomplexan parasite vaccine adjuvant in chickens. -- Abstract: Immune mapped protein-1 (IMP1) is a new protective protein in apicomplexan parasites, and exits in Eimeria tenella. But its structure and immunogenicity in E. tenella are still unknown. In this study, IMPI in E. tenella was predicted to be a membrane protein. To evaluate immunogenicity of IMPI in E. tenella, a chimeric subunit vaccine consisting of E. tenella IMP1 (EtIMP1) and a molecular adjuvant (a truncated flagellin, FliC) was constructed and over-expressed in Escherichia coli and its efficacy against E. tenella infection was evaluated. Three-week-old AA broiler chickens were vaccinated with the recombinant EtIMP1-truncated FliC without adjuvant or EtIMP1 with Freund’s Complete Adjuvant. Immunization of chickens with the recombinant EtIMP1-truncated FliC fusion protein resulted in stronger cellular immune responses than immunization with only recombinant EtIMP1 with adjuvant. The clinical effect of the EtIMP1-truncated FliC without adjuvant was also greater than that of the EtIMP1 with adjuvant, which was evidenced by the differences between the two groups in body weight gain, oocyst output and caecal lesions of E. tenella-challenged chickens. The results suggested that the EtIMP1-flagellin fusion protein can be used as an effective immunogen in the development of subunit vaccines against Eimeria infection. This is the first demonstration of antigen-specific protective immunity against avian coccidiosis using a recombinant flagellin as an apicomplexan parasite vaccine adjuvant in chickens.

  7. An Eimeria vaccine candidate based on Eimeria tenella immune mapped protein 1 and the TLR-5 agonist Salmonella typhimurium FliC flagellin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •We found a new protective protein – (IMPI) in Eimeria tenella. •EtIMP1-flagellin fusion protein is an effective immunogen against Eimeria infection. •Flagellin can be as an apicomplexan parasite vaccine adjuvant in chickens. -- Abstract: Immune mapped protein-1 (IMP1) is a new protective protein in apicomplexan parasites, and exits in Eimeria tenella. But its structure and immunogenicity in E. tenella are still unknown. In this study, IMPI in E. tenella was predicted to be a membrane protein. To evaluate immunogenicity of IMPI in E. tenella, a chimeric subunit vaccine consisting of E. tenella IMP1 (EtIMP1) and a molecular adjuvant (a truncated flagellin, FliC) was constructed and over-expressed in Escherichia coli and its efficacy against E. tenella infection was evaluated. Three-week-old AA broiler chickens were vaccinated with the recombinant EtIMP1-truncated FliC without adjuvant or EtIMP1 with Freund’s Complete Adjuvant. Immunization of chickens with the recombinant EtIMP1-truncated FliC fusion protein resulted in stronger cellular immune responses than immunization with only recombinant EtIMP1 with adjuvant. The clinical effect of the EtIMP1-truncated FliC without adjuvant was also greater than that of the EtIMP1 with adjuvant, which was evidenced by the differences between the two groups in body weight gain, oocyst output and caecal lesions of E. tenella-challenged chickens. The results suggested that the EtIMP1-flagellin fusion protein can be used as an effective immunogen in the development of subunit vaccines against Eimeria infection. This is the first demonstration of antigen-specific protective immunity against avian coccidiosis using a recombinant flagellin as an apicomplexan parasite vaccine adjuvant in chickens

  8. SEPPA 2.0—more refined server to predict spatial epitope considering species of immune host and subcellular localization of protein antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Tao; Qiu, Tianyi; Zhang, Qingchen; Tang, Kailin; Fan, Yangyang; Qiu, Jingxuan; Wu, Dingfeng; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Yanan; Gao, Jun; Zhu, Ruixin; Cao, Zhiwei

    2014-01-01

    Spatial Epitope Prediction server for Protein Antigens (SEPPA) has received lots of feedback since being published in 2009. In this improved version, relative ASA preference of unit patch and consolidated amino acid index were added as further classification parameters in addition to unit-triangle propensity and clustering coefficient which were previously reported. Then logistic regression model was adopted instead of the previous simple additive one. Most importantly, subcellular localization of protein antigen and species of immune host were fully taken account to improve prediction. The result shows that AUC of 0.745 (5-fold cross-validation) is almost the baseline performance with no differentiation like all the other tools. Specifying subcellular localization of protein antigen and species of immune host will generally push the AUC up. Secretory protein immunized to mouse can push AUC to 0.823. In this version, the false positive rate has been largely decreased as well. As the first method which has considered the subcellular localization of protein antigen and species of immune host, SEPPA 2.0 shows obvious advantages over the other popular servers like SEPPA, PEPITO, DiscoTope-2, B-pred, Bpredictor and Epitopia in supporting more specific biological needs. SEPPA 2.0 can be accessed at http://badd.tongji.edu.cn/seppa/. Batch query is also supported. PMID:24838566

  9. Humoral immune response to plasmid protein pgp3 in patients with Chlamydia trachomatis infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Comanducci, M; Manetti, R; L. Bini; Santucci, A.; Pallini, V.; Cevenini, R; Sueur, J M; Orfila, J.; Ratti, G

    1994-01-01

    We identified, by two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis and microsequencing, a protein of Chlamydia trachomatis elementary bodies which corresponds to the polypeptide (pgp3) encoded by open reading frame 3 (ORF3). Amino acid analysis showed that the first residue (Gly) found in the native protein is the one encoded by the second ORF3 codon, implying a typical bacterial removal of the first Met residue. Relatively large amounts of recombinant pgp3 (r-pgp3) in a stable, water-soluble form we...

  10. Immune responses to plasmid DNA encoding the hepatitis C virus core protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Lagging, L M; K. Meyer; Hoft, D; Houghton, M.; Belshe, R B; Ray, R.

    1995-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major causative agent of parenterally transmitted non-A, non-B hepatitis. The genomic region encoding the virion-associated core protein is relatively conserved among HCV strains. To generate a DNA vaccine capable of expressing the HCV core protein, the genomic region encoding amino acid residues 1 to 191 of the HCV-1 strain was amplified and cloned into an eukaryotic expression vector. Intramuscular inoculation of recombinant plasmid DNA into BALB/c mice (H-2d) g...

  11. A long-lasting protective immunity against chronic toxoplasmosis in mice induced by recombinant rhoptry proteins encapsulated in poly (lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Zhang, Nian-Zhang; Wang, Meng; Dong, Hu; Feng, Sheng-Yong; Guo, Hui-Chen; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-11-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infection in humans and animals is a worldwide zoonosis. Prevention and control of toxoplasmosis based on vaccination is one of the promising strategies. In the present study, recombinant T. gondii rhoptry proteins 38 and 18 (TgROP38 and TgROP18) were encapsulated into poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) (1:1), respectively, to obtain the stable water-in-oil-in-water double emulsion. Female Kunming mice were then immunized with the protein vaccines twice at a 2-week interval. Eight weeks after the second immunization, 10 mice from each group were challenged with T. gondii PRU strain (genotype II). The entrapment rates of PLG-rROP38 and PLG-rROP18 ranged from 65.5 to 77.7% and 58.1 to 72.3%, respectively. Immunization of mice with rROP38 and rROP18 proteins encapsulated into PLG microparticles elicited strongly humoral and cell-mediated responses against T. gondii, associated with relatively high levels of total IgG, IgG2a isotype, and IFN-γ, as well as the mixed Th1/Th2 immunity responses. Immunization with various protein vaccines induced significant reduction of the brain cysts after chronic infection with the T. gondii PRU strain, and the most effective protection was achieved in the PLG-rROP38-rROP18-immunized mice, with a cyst reduction of 81.3%. The findings of the present study indicated that recombinant rhoptry antigens encapsulated in PLG could maintain the protein immunogenicity in an extended period and elicit effective protection against chronic T. gondii infection, which has implications for the development of long-lasting vaccines against chronic toxoplasmosis in animals. PMID:26243574

  12. The Non-structural Protein 5 and Matrix Protein Are Antigenic Targets of T Cell Immunity to Genotype 1 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtar, Helen; Pedrera, Miriam; Frossard, Jean-Pierre; Biffar, Lucia; Hammer, Sabine E; Kvisgaard, Lise K; Larsen, Lars E; Stewart, Graham R; Somavarapu, Satyanarayana; Steinbach, Falko; Graham, Simon P

    2016-01-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is the cause of one of the most economically important diseases affecting swine worldwide. Efforts to develop a next-generation vaccine have largely focused on envelope glycoproteins to target virus-neutralizing antibody responses. However, these approaches have failed to demonstrate the necessary efficacy to progress toward market. T cells are crucial to the control of many viruses through cytolysis and cytokine secretion. Since control of PRRSV infection is not dependent on the development of neutralizing antibodies, it has been proposed that T cell-mediated immunity plays a key role. Therefore, we hypothesized that conserved T cell antigens represent prime candidates for the development a novel PRRS vaccine. Antigens were identified by screening a proteome-wide synthetic peptide library with T cells from cohorts of pigs rendered immune by experimental infections with a closely related (subtype 1) or divergent (subtype 3) PRRSV-1 strain. Dominant T cell IFN-γ responses were directed against the non-structural protein 5 (NSP5), and to a lesser extent, the matrix (M) protein. The majority of NSP5-specific CD8 T cells and M-specific CD4 T cells expressed a putative effector memory phenotype and were polyfunctional as assessed by coexpression of TNF-α and mobilization of the cytotoxic degranulation marker CD107a. Both antigens were generally well conserved among strains of both PRRSV genotypes. Thus, M and NSP5 represent attractive vaccine candidate T cell antigens, which should be evaluated further in the context of PRRSV vaccine development. PMID:26909080

  13. Structurally well-defined macrophage activating factor derived from vitamin D3-binding protein has a potent adjuvant activity for immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, N; Naraparaju, V R

    1998-06-01

    Freund's adjuvant produced severe inflammation that augments development of antibodies. Thus, mixed administration of antigens with adjuvant was not required as long as inflammation was induced in the hosts. Since macrophage activation for phagocytosis and antigen processing is the first step of antibody development, inflammation-primed macrophage activation plays a major role in immune development. Therefore, macrophage activating factor should act as an adjuvant for immunization. The inflammation-primed macrophage activation process is the major macrophage activating cascade that requires participation of serum vitamin D3-binding protein (DBP; human DBP is known as Gc protein) and glycosidases of B and T lymphocytes. Stepwise incubation of Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase efficiently generated the most potent macrophage activating factor (designated GcMAF) we have ever encountered. Administration of GcMAF (20 or 100 pg/mouse) resulted in stimulation of the progenitor cells for extensive mitogenesis and activation of macrophages. Administration of GcMAF (100 pg/mouse) along with immunization of mice with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) produced a large number of anti-SRBC antibody secreting splenic cells in 2-4 days. Thus, GcMAF has a potent adjuvant activity for immunization. Although malignant tumours are poorly immunogenic, 4 days after GcMAF-primed immunization of mice with heat-killed Ehrlich ascites tumour cells, the ascites tumour was no longer transplantable in these mice. PMID:9682967

  14. A prime-boost immunization with Tc52 N-terminal domain DNA and the recombinant protein expressed in Pichia pastoris protects against Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Marina N; Sánchez Alberti, Andrés; Morales, Celina; Cazorla, Silvia I; Malchiodi, Emilio L

    2016-06-14

    We have previously reported that the N-terminal domain of the antigen Tc52 (NTc52) is the section of the protein that confers the strongest protection against Trypanosoma cruzi infection. To improve vaccine efficacy, we conducted here a prime-boost strategy (NTc52PB) by inoculating two doses of pcDNA3.1 encoding the NTc52 DNA carried by attenuated Salmonella (SNTc52), followed by two doses of recombinant NTc52 expressed in Picchia pastoris plus ODN-CpG as adjuvant. This strategy was comparatively analyzed with the following protocols: (1) two doses of NTc52+ODN-CpG by intranasal route followed by two doses of NTc52+ODN-CpG by intradermal route (NTc52CpG); (2) four doses of SNTc52; and (3) a control group with four doses of Salmonella carrying the empty plasmid. All immunized groups developed a predominant Th1 cellular immune response but with important differences in antibody development and protection against infection. Thus, immunization with just SNTc52 induces a strong specific cellular response, a specific systemic antibody response that is weak yet functional (considering lysis of trypomastigotes and inhibition of cell invasion), and IgA mucosal immunity, protecting in both the acute and chronic stages of infection. The group that received only recombinant protein (NTc52CpG) developed a strong antibody immune response but weaker cellular immunity than the other groups, and the protection against infection was clear in the acute phase of infection but not in chronicity. The prime-boost strategy, which combines DNA and protein vaccine and both mucosal and systemic immunizations routes, was the best assayed protocol, inducing strong cellular and humoral responses as well as specific mucosal IgA, thus conferring better protection in the acute and chronic stages of infection. PMID:27177947

  15. Immunization of Aotus monkeys with Plasmodium falciparum blood-stage recombinant proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    S Herrera; Herrera, M. A.; Perlaza, B L; Burki, Y; Caspers, P; Döbeli, H; Rotmann, D; Certa, U

    1990-01-01

    The current spread of multidrug-resistant malaria demands rapid vaccine development against the major pathogen Plasmodium falciparum. The high quantities of protein required for a worldwide vaccination campaign select recombinant DNA technology as a practical approach for large-scale antigen production. We describe the vaccination of Aotus monkeys with two recombinant blood-stage antigens (recombinant p41 and 190N) that were considered as vaccine candidates because parasite-derived antigen pr...

  16. Oral Immunization with a Recombinant Malaria Protein Induces Conformational Antibodies and Protects Mice against Lethal Malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lina; Kedzierski, Lukasz; Wesselingh, Steven L.; Coppel, Ross L.

    2003-01-01

    The increasing death toll from malaria, due to the decreasing effectiveness of current prophylactic and therapeutic regimens, has sparked a search for alternative methods of control, such as vaccines. Although several single proteins have shown some promise as subunit vaccines against sexual blood stages in experimental systems, it is clear that multicomponent vaccines are required. Many logistic difficulties make such an approach prohibitively expensive. In an effort to try to overcome some ...

  17. Mapping the peptide and protein immune response in the larvae of the fleshfly Sarcophaga bullata

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ciencialová, Alice; Neubauerová, T.; Šanda, Miloslav; Šindelka, Radek; Cvačka, Josef; Voburka, Zdeněk; Buděšínský, Miloš; Kašička, Václav; Sázelová, Petra; Šolínová, Veronika; Macková, M.; Koutek, Bohumír; Jiráček, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 6 (2008), s. 670-682. ISSN 1075-2617 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/05/0832; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/05/2539; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06077 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Sarcophaga bullata * antimicrobial activity * sapecin * odorant-binding protein Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.654, year: 2008

  18. Membrane protein nanoclustering as a functional unit of immune cells : from nanoscopy to single molecule dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Torreño Piña, Juan Andrés

    2015-01-01

    State-of-the-art biophysical techniques featuring high temporal and spatial resolution have allowed for the first time the direct visualization of individual transmembrane proteins on the cell membrane. These techniques have revealed that a large amount of molecular components of the cell membrane do not organize in a random manner but they rather grouped together forming so-called clusters at the nanoscale. Moreover, the lateral behavior of these clusters shows a great dependence on the comp...

  19. Outer Membrane Proteins of Brucella abortus Vaccinal and Field Strains and their Immune Response in Buffaloes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rukhshanda Munir*, M. Afzal1, M. Hussain2, S. M. S. Naqvi3 and A. Khanum3

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Outer membrane proteins (OMPs of three strains of B. abortus i.e. S19, RB51 and a local field isolate of biotype 1 were isolated through disrupting cells to generate membranes by centrifugation and sodium lauryl sarcosinate solubilisation of inner membrane proteins. Distinct OMP profiles of each strain were seen on SDS-PAGE. SDS-PAGE analysis of S19 and field isolate revealed eight protein bands in each strain. The OMPs of S19 had molecular masses 89.0, 73.0, 53.7, 49.0, 38.0, 27.0, 22.3, and 17.7 kDa, while field isolate had OMPs of 151.3, 89.0, 75.8, 67.6, 37.0, 27.0, 24.0 and 19.0 kDa. B. abortus RB51 yielded 11 OMP bands ranging from 12.5 to 107.1 kDa, with 34.2, 15.8 and 12.5 kDa as additional OMPs. Western immunoblot analysis using antisera raised against all three strains in buffaloes indicated an almost similar pattern of immuno-reactive OMPs in S19 and field strain. Two OMPs of molecular weight 37-38 and 19 kDa were immuno-reactive in all strains in buffaloes. There is possibility of use of these OMPs in a recombinant vaccine for B. abortus. A distinct protein of molecular weight of 151.3 kDa was identified in field strain but not in both vaccine strains of B. abortus. Use of this OMP in a diagnostic assay may differentiate between vaccinated and infected animals.

  20. Immune targeting of fibroblast activation protein triggers recognition of multipotent bone marrow stromal cells and cachexia

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Eric; Chinnasamy, Dhanalakshmi; Yu, Zhiya; Morgan, Richard A.; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Restifo, Nicholas P; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a candidate universal target antigen because it has been reported to be selectively expressed in nearly all solid tumors by a subset of immunosuppressive tumor stromal fibroblasts. We verified that 18/18 human tumors of various histologies contained pronounced stromal elements staining strongly for FAP, and hypothesized that targeting tumor stroma with FAP-reactive T cells would inhibit tumor growth in cancer-bearing hosts. T cells genetically engineered...

  1. The role for protein tyrosine phosphatases in regulating the immune system: implications for chronic intestinal inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Spalinger, Marianne R.; MCCOLE, DECLAN F.; Rogler, Gerhard; Scharl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Current hypothesis suggests that genetic, immunological and bacterial factors contribute essentially to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Variations within the gene loci encoding protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) have been associated with the onset of IBD. PTPs modulate the activity of their substrates by dephosphorylation of tyrosine residues and are critical for the regulation of fundamental cellular signalling processes.Evidence emerges that expression levels of PTPN...

  2. Role of protein tyrosine phosphatases in regulating the immune system: implications for chronic intestinal inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Spalinger, Marianne R.; MCCOLE, DECLAN F.; Rogler, Gerhard; Scharl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Current hypothesis suggests that genetic, immunological, and bacterial factors contribute essentially to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Variations within the gene loci encoding protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) have been associated with the onset of inflammatory bowel disease. PTPs modulate the activity of their substrates by dephosphorylation of tyrosine residues and are critical for the regulation of fundamental cellular signaling processes. Evidence emerges that express...

  3. Syk Kinase-Coupled C-type Lectin Receptors Engage Protein Kinase C-δ to Elicit Card9 Adaptor-Mediated Innate Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Strasser, Dominikus; Neumann, Konstantin; Bergmann, Hanna; Marakalala, Mohlopheni J.; Guler, Reto; Rojowska, Anna; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Brombacher, Frank; Urlaub, Henning; Baier, Gottfried; Brown, Gordon D.; Leitges, Michael; Ruland, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Summary C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) that couple with the kinase Syk are major pattern recognition receptors for the activation of innate immunity and host defense. CLRs recognize fungi and other forms of microbial or sterile danger, and they induce inflammatory responses through the adaptor protein Card9. The mechanisms relaying CLR proximal signals to the core Card9 module are unknown. Here we demonstrated that protein kinase C-δ (PKCδ) was activated upon Dectin-1-Syk signaling, mediated ...

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum chaperone glucose regulated protein 170-Pokemon complexes elicit a robust antitumor immune response in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bangqing; Xian, Ronghua; Wu, Xianqu; Jing, Junjie; Chen, Kangning; Liu, Guojun; Zhou, Zhenhua

    2012-07-01

    Previous evidence suggested that the stress protein grp170 can function as a highly efficient molecular chaperone, binding to large protein substrates and acting as a potent vaccine against specific tumors when purified from the same tumor. In addition, Pokemon can be found in almost all malignant tumor cells and is regarded to be a promising candidate for the treatment of tumors. However, the potential of the grp170-Pokemon chaperone complex has not been well described. In the present study, the natural chaperone complex between grp170 and the Pokemon was formed by heat shock, and its immunogenicity was detected by ELISPOT and (51)Cr-release assays in vitro and by tumor bearing models in vivo. Our results demonstrated that the grp170-Pokemon chaperone complex could elicit T cell responses as determined by ELISPOT and (51)Cr-release assays. In addition, immunized C57BL/6 mice were challenged with subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of Lewis cancer cells to induce primary tumors. Treatment of mice with the grp170-Pokemon chaperone complex also significantly inhibited tumor growth and prolonged the life span of tumor-bearing mice. Our results indicated that the grp170-Pokemon chaperone complex might represent a powerful approach to tumor immunotherapy and have significant potential for clinical application. PMID:22317751

  5. Protein energy malnutrition during vaccination has limited influence on vaccine efficacy but abolishes immunity if administered during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Truc; Agger, Else Marie; Cassidy, Joseph P;

    2015-01-01

    Protein energy malnutrition (PEM) increases susceptibility to infectious diseases, including tuberculosis (TB), but it is not clear how PEM influences vaccine-promoted immunity to TB. We demonstrate that PEM during low-level steady-state TB infection in a mouse model results in rapid relapse of M...

  6. Apoplastic Venom Allergen-like Proteins of Cyst Nematodes Modulate the Activation of Basal Plant Innate Immunity by Cell Surface Receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano Torres, J.L.; Wilbers, R.H.P.; Warmerdam, S.; Finkers-Tomczak, A.M.; Diaz Granados Muñoz, A.; Schaik, van C.C.; Helder, J.; Bakker, J.; Goverse, A.; Schots, A.; Smant, G.

    2014-01-01

    Despite causing considerable damage to host tissue during the onset of parasitism, nematodes establish remarkably persistent infections in both animals and plants. It is thought that an elaborate repertoire of effector proteins in nematode secretions suppresses damage-triggered immune responses of t

  7. LPS-binding protein and IL-6 mark paradoxical tuberculosis immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in HIV patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odin Goovaerts

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS remains a poorly understood complication in HIV-TB co-infected patients initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART. The role of the innate immune system in TB-IRIS is becoming increasingly apparent, however the potential involvement in TB-IRIS of a leaky gut and proteins that interfere with TLR stimulation by binding PAMPs has not been investigated before. Here we aimed to investigate the innate nature of the cytokine response in TB-IRIS and to identify novel potential biomarkers. METHODS: From a large prospective cohort of HIV-TB co-infected patients receiving TB treatment, we compared 40 patients who developed TB-IRIS during the first month of ART with 40 patients matched for age, sex and baseline CD4 count who did not. We analyzed plasma levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS-binding protein (LBP, LPS, sCD14, endotoxin-core antibody, intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP and 18 pro-and anti-inflammatory cytokines before and during ART. RESULTS: We observed lower baseline levels of IL-6 (p = 0.041, GCSF (p = 0.036 and LBP (p = 0.016 in TB-IRIS patients. At IRIS event, we detected higher levels of LBP, IL-1RA, IL-4, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, G-CSF (p ≤ 0.032 and lower I-FABP levels (p = 0.013 compared to HIV-TB co-infected controls. Only IL-6 showed an independent effect in multivariate models containing significant cytokines from pre-ART (p = 0.039 and during TB-IRIS (p = 0.034. CONCLUSION: We report pre-ART IL-6 and LBP levels as well as IL-6, LBP and I-FABP levels during IRIS-event as potential biomarkers in TB-IRIS. Our results show no evidence of the possible contribution of a leaky gut to TB-IRIS and indicate that IL-6 holds a distinct role in the disturbed innate cytokine profile before and during TB-IRIS. Future clinical studies should investigate the importance and clinical relevance of these markers for the diagnosis and treatment of TB-IRIS.

  8. Identification of immune genes and proteins involved in the response of bovine mammary tissue to Staphylococcus aureus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuocolo Tony

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mastitis in dairy cattle results from infection of mammary tissue by a range of micro-organisms but principally coliform bacteria and Gram positive bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus. The former species are often acquired by environmental contamination while S. aureus is particularly problematic due to its resistance to antibiotic treatments and ability to reside within mammary tissue in a chronic, subclinical state. The transcriptional responses within bovine mammary epithelial tissue subjected to intramammary challenge with S. aureus are poorly characterised, particularly at the earliest stages of infection. Moreover, the effect of infection on the presence of bioactive innate immune proteins in milk is also unclear. The nature of these responses may determine the susceptibility of the tissue and its ability to resolve the infection. Results Transcriptional profiling was employed to measure changes in gene expression occurring in bovine mammary tissues sampled from three dairy cows after brief and graded intramammary challenges with S. aureus. These limited challenges had no significant effect on the expression pattern of the gene encoding β-casein but caused coordinated up-regulation of a number of cytokines and chemokines involved in pro-inflammatory responses. In addition, the enhanced expression of two genes, S100 calcium-binding protein A12 (S100A12 and Pentraxin-3 (PTX3 corresponded with significantly increased levels of their proteins in milk from infected udders. Both genes were shown to be expressed by mammary epithelial cells grown in culture after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide. There was also a strong correlation between somatic cell count, a widely used measure of mastitis, and the level of S100A12 in milk from a herd of dairy cows. Recombinant S100A12 inhibited growth of Escherichia coli in vitro and recombinant PTX3 bound to E. coli as well as C1q, a subunit of the first component of the complement

  9. Enhanced immune responses against Japanese encephalitis virus using recombinant adenoviruses coexpressing Japanese encephalitis virus envelope and porcine interleukin-6 proteins in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hanyang; Wu, Rui; Liu, Kai; Yuan, Lei; Huang, Xiaobo; Wen, Yiping; Ma, Xiaoping; Yan, Qigui; Zhao, Qin; Wen, Xintian; Cao, Sanjie

    2016-08-15

    Japanese encephalitis is a reproductive disorder caused by Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) in swine. Previous studies have demonstrated that recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) may be a potential vaccine candidate because it can express JEV envelope epitopes and induce immune responses against JEV. Still, it will be necessary to develop an adjuvant that can enhance both humoral and cellular immune responses to the recombinant antigen delivered by non-replicating Ad5. In this study, we investigated the systemic immune responses of BALB/c mice immunized with recombinant adenovirus expressing JEV envelope epitopes in combination with porcine interleukin-6 (rAdE-IL-6).The rAdE-IL-6 immunized group had the highest titers of anti-JEV antibody as detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), as well as the highest levels of neutralizing antibody (1:75) as detected by a serum neutralization test. Similarly, higher concentrations of interferon-gamma (834.7pg/ml) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) (229.7pg/ml) were detected in the rAdE-IL-6 group using an ELISA assay. These data indicate that immunized BALB/c induce a strong cellular response against rAdE-IL-6. Furthermore, after challenge with the virulent JEV SCYA201201 strain, the rAdE-IL-6 group generated an immune protective response 70% greater than that of the control group, indicating that rAdE-IL-6 induced a protective immune response against JEV challenge in mice. The results from this study demonstrated that IL-6 is a strong adjuvant that can enhance both humoral and cellular immune responses in mice. Furthermore, a recombinant adenovirus coexpressing JEV envelope epitopes and porcine IL-6 protein may be an effective vaccine in animals. PMID:27235810

  10. Molecular Characterization and Immune Protection of a New Conserved Hypothetical Protein of Eimeria tenella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Qi; Huang, Bing; Dong, Hui; Zhao, Qiping; Zhu, Shunhai; Liang, Siting; Li, Sha; Yang, Sihan; Han, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    The genome sequences of Eimeria tenella have been sequenced, but >70% of these genes are currently categorized as having an unknown function or annotated as conserved hypothetical proteins, and few of them have been studied. In the present study, a conserved hypothetical protein gene of E. tenella, designated EtCHP559, was cloned using rapid amplification of cDNA 5'-ends (5'RACE) based on the expressed sequence tag (EST). The 1746-bp full-length cDNA of EtCHP559 contained a 1224-bp open reading frame (ORF) that encoded a 407-amino acid polypeptide with the predicted molecular weight of 46.04 kDa. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that EtCHP559 was expressed at higher levels in sporozoites than in the other developmental stages (unsporulated oocysts, sporulated oocysts and second generation merozoites). The ORF was inserted into pCold-TF to produce recombinant EtCHP559. Using western blotting, the recombinant protein was successfully recognized by rabbit serum against E. tenella sporozoites. Immunolocalization by using EtCHP559 antibody showed that EtCHP559 was mainly distributed on the parasite surface in free sporozoites and became concentrated in the anterior region after sporozoites were incubated in complete medium. The EtCHP559 became uniformly dispersed in immature and mature schizonts. Inhibition of EtCHP559 function using anti-rEtCHP559 polyclonal antibody reduced the ability of E. tenella sporozoites to invade host cells by >70%. Animal challenge experiments demonstrated that the recombinant EtCHP559 significantly increased the average body weight gain, reduced the oocyst outputs, alleviated cecal lesions of the infected chickens, and resulted in anticoccidial index >160 against E. tenella. These results suggest that EtCHP559 plays an important role in sporozoite invasion and could be an effective candidate for the development of a new vaccine against E. tenella. PMID:27309852

  11. Immunization with DISC1 protein in an animal model of ADHD influences behavior and excitatory amino acids in prefrontal cortex and striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruocco, L A; Treno, C; Gironi Carnevale, U A; Arra, C; Boatto, G; Pagano, C; Tino, A; Nieddu, M; Michel, M; Prikulis, I; Carboni, E; de Souza Silva, M A; Huston, J P; Sadile, A G; Korth, C

    2015-03-01

    The Disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene is involved in vulnerability to neuropsychiatric disorders. Naples high-excitability (NHE) rat model neuropsychiatric problems characterized by an unbalanced mesocortical dopamine system. Here, we assessed behavioral and neurochemical effects of immunization against multimeric rat DISC1 protein in adult NHE rats, an animal model of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and their Random-Bred (NRB) controls. Males of both lines received subcutaneous injections of vehicle (PB), adjuvant only (AD) or recombinant rat DISC1 protein purified from E. coli, suspended in AD (anti-DISC1) at age of 30, 45 and 60 postnatal days (pnd). At 75 pnd, the rats were exposed to a Làt maze and 2 days later to an Olton eight-arm radial maze, and horizontal (HA) and vertical activities (VA) were monitored. Non-selective (NSA) and selective spatial attention (SSA) were monitored in the Làt and in the Olton maze by duration of rearings and working memory, respectively. Post mortem neurochemistry in the prefrontal cortex (PFc), dorsal (DS) and ventral (VS) striatum of L-Glutamate, L-Aspartate and L-Leucine was performed. All immunized rats showed a clear humoral IgM (but not IgG) immune response against the immunogen, indicating that immunological self-tolerance to DISC1 can be overcome by immunization. NHE rats exhibited a higher unspecific IgM response to adjuvant, indicating an immunological abnormality. The sole anti-DISC1 immunization-specific behavioral in the NHE rats was an increased horizontal activity in the Làt maze. Adjuvant treatment increased vertical activity in both lines, but in the NRB controls it increased rearing and decreased horizontal activity. Liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis of soluble or membrane-trapped neurotransmitters aspartate, glutamate and leucine revealed increased soluble aspartate levels in the ventral striatum of NRB controls after anti-DISC1 immunization. Immune activation by

  12. Humoral and cellular immune responses to synthetic peptides of the Leishmania donovani kinetoplastid membrane protein-11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A T; Gasim, S; Ismail, A;

    1998-01-01

    Native kinetoplastid membrane protein-11 (KMP-11), purified from crude extracts of Leishmania donovani parasites, activates T cells from individuals who have recovered from visceral leishmaniasis. In this work we used three 38-mer peptides spanning the amino acid sequence of the L. donovani KMP-11......-11 peptides was detected in plasma from Sudanese patients suffering from Leishmania major infections and in plasma from Sudanese and Danish patients infected with Plasmodium falciparum. In lymphoproliferative assays, 10 of 17 PBMC isolates from donors previously infected with L. donovani showed...

  13. Humoral and cellular immune responses to glucose regulated protein 78 - a novel Leishmania donovani antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anja T R; Ismail, Ahmed; Gaafar, Ameera;

    2002-01-01

    The recently cloned glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78) of Leishmania donovani has been suggested as a new and promising Leishmania vaccine candidate. We assessed antibody and T-cell reactivity to GRP78 in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and in lymphoproliferative assays. Serological...... evaluation of plasma samples obtained in Sudan revealed that 89% of patients with visceral leishmaniasis (VL), 78% with post kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL), and 85% with cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) had antibody reactivity to this Leishmania antigen. Plasma from healthy Sudanese individuals living...

  14. Killing machines: three pore-forming proteins of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Ryan; de Armas, Lesley; Shiratsuchi, Motoaki; Podack, Eckhard R

    2013-12-01

    The evolution of early multicellular eukaryotes 400-500 million years ago required a defensive strategy against microbial invasion. Pore-forming proteins containing the membrane-attack-complex-perforin (MACPF) domain were selected as the most efficient means to destroy bacteria or virally infected cells. The mechanism of pore formation by the MACPF domain is distinctive in that pore formation is purely physical and unspecific. The MACPF domain polymerizes, refolds, and inserts itself into bilayer membranes or bacterial outer cell walls. The displacement of surface lipid/carbohydrate molecules by the polymerizing MACPF domain creates clusters of large, water-filled holes that destabilize the barrier function and provide access for additional anti-bacterial or anti-viral effectors to sensitive sites that complete the destruction of the invader via enzymatic or chemical attack. The highly efficient mechanism of anti-microbial defense by a combined physical and chemical strategy using pore-forming MACPF-proteins has been retargeted during evolution of vertebrates and mammals for three purposes: (1) to kill extracellular bacteria C9/polyC9 evolved in conjunction with complement, (2) to kill virus infected and cancer cells perforin-1/polyperforin-1 CTL evolved targeted by NK and CTL, and (3) to kill intracellular bacteria transmembrane perforin-2/putative polyperforin-2 evolved targeted by phagocytic and nonphagocytic cells. Our laboratory has been involved in the discovery and description of each of the three pore-formers that will be reviewed here. PMID:24293008

  15. The role of G protein gene GNB3 C825T Polymorphism in HIV-1 acquisition, progression and immune activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juno Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The GNB3 C825T polymorphism is associated with increased G protein-mediated signal transduction, SDF-1α-mediated lymphocyte chemotaxis, accelerated HIV-1 progression, and altered responses to antiretroviral therapy among Caucasian subjects. The GNB3 825T allele is highly prevalent in African populations, and as such any impact on HIV-1 acquisition or progression rates could have a dramatic impact. This study examines the association of the 825T polymorphism with HIV-1 acquisition, disease progression and immune activation in two African cohorts. GNB3 825 genotyping was performed for enrolees in both a commercial sex worker cohort and a perinatal HIV transmission (PHT cohort in Nairobi, Kenya. Ex vivo immune activation was quantified by flow cytometry, and plasma chemokine levels were assessed by cytokine bead array. Results GNB3 genotype was not associated with sexual or vertical HIV-1 acquisition within these cohorts. Within the Pumwani cohort, GNB3 genotype did not affect HIV-1 disease progression among seroconverters or among HIV-1-positive individuals after adjustment for baseline CD4 count. Maternal CD4 decline and viral load increase in the PHT cohort did not differ between genotypes. Multi-parametric flow cytometry assessment of T cell activation (CD69, HLA-DR, CD38 and Treg frequency (CD25+FOXP3+ found no differences between genotype groups. Plasma SDF-1α, MIP-1β and TRAIL levels quantified by cytokine bead array were also similar between groups. Conclusions In contrast to previous reports, we were unable to provide evidence to suggest that the GNB3 C825T polymorphism affects HIV-1 acquisition or disease progression within African populations. Ex vivo immune activation and plasma chemokine levels were similarly unaffected by GNB3 genotype in both HIV-1-negative and HIV-1-positive individuals. The paucity of studies investigating the impact of GNB3 polymorphism among African populations and the lack of mechanistic

  16. A single immunization with a recombinant canine adenovirus expressing the rabies virus G protein confers protective immunity against rabies in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabies vaccines based on live attenuated rabies viruses or recombinant pox viruses expressing the rabies virus (RV) glycoprotein (G) hold the greatest promise of safety and efficacy, particularly for oral immunization of wildlife. However, while these vaccines induce protective immunity in foxes, they are less effective in other animals, and safety concerns have been raised for some of these vaccines. Because canine adenovirus 2 (CAV2) is licensed for use as a live vaccine for dogs and has an excellent efficacy and safety record, we used this virus as an expression vector for the RVG. The recombinant CAV2-RV G produces virus titers similar to those produced by wild-type CAV2, indicating that the RVG gene does not affect virus replication. Comparison of RVG expressed by CAV2-RV G with that of vaccinia-RV G recombinant virus (V-RG) revealed similar amounts of RV G on the cell surface. A single intramuscular or intranasal immunization of mice with CAV2-RVG induced protective immunity in a dose-dependent manner, with no clinical signs or discomfort from the virus infection regardless of the route of administration or the amount of virus

  17. Immune proteins and other biochemical constituents of peripheral lymph in patients with malignancy and postirradiation lymphedema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentrations of immunoglobulins and complement proteins were studied in a group of 33 patients with localized tumors and lymphoproliferative disorders. Generally, low levels have been found, in many cases below the lowest limit of the control group. The reductions in concentration were more pronounced in patients with lympho-proliferative disorders than with solid tumors. The most reduced were lgM, Clg and total complement hemolytic activity. In a group of 8 patients with lymphedema of lower extremity complicating therapy for uterine cancer an increase of IgM and IgA and decrease in hemolytic activity were found. This indicates the existence of a chronic inflammatory process typical for tissues deprived in lymphatic outflow. (orig.)

  18. Antibody-coated protein A-bearing Staphylococcus aureus: a versatile and stable immune reagent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human β2-microglobulin antigen-antibody system was used as a model to illustrate the versatility of a microradioimmunoassay technique using protein A-bearing Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I strain (SACI) bacteria as a non-specific immunoadsorbent in place of a second antibody. Experimental conditions are described for a sensitive microassay which makes it possible to process large numbers of samples more rapidly and with minimum handling. Furthermore, SACI coated with specific antibodies by mixing with unfractionated antisera are a versatile reagent not only for radioimmunoassays but also for use as molecular probes to characterize cell surface antigens. Antibody-coated SACI could be lyophilized and proved extremely stable in storage thus providing a unique advantage for use in binding inhibition assays and as versatile reagent for clinical and investigative immunology. (Auth.)

  19. The respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein formulated with a novel combination adjuvant induces balanced immune responses in lambs with maternal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, R; Latimer, L; Gerdts, V; Potter, A; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, S

    2015-03-10

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes severe respiratory illness in infants. There are no licensed vaccines to prevent RSV infection. The neonate receives short-term protection from maternally derived antibodies, which, however, can also interfere with the active response to vaccination. A RSV vaccine consisting of a truncated version of the fusion protein formulated with polyI:C, innate defense regulator peptide and polyphosphazene (ΔF/TriAdj), was evaluated in two to three week-old lambs. When delivered intrapulmonary, ΔF/TriAdj elicited IgA production in the lung in addition to a robust systemic response similar to that induced by intramuscular immunization. To investigate potential interference by maternal antibodies, pregnant ewes were vaccinated with ΔF/TriAdj. Lambs born to RSV F-immune or non-immune ewes were then given three vaccinations with ΔF/TriAdj at 3 days, 4 weeks and 8 weeks post-birth. Lambs immunized intramuscularly with ΔF/TriAdj vaccine developed high-affinity ΔF-specific serum IgG and virus neutralizing antibodies, and displayed an increase in the frequency of IFN-γ-secreting cells by in vitro restimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Maternal antibodies did not interfere with the development of an immune response to ΔF/TriAdj in the newborn lambs. These results indicate that immunization of neonates with ΔF/TriAdj is effective even in the face of maternal antibodies. PMID:25637860

  20. A novel fusion protein domain III-capsid from dengue-2, in a highly aggregated form, induces a functional immune response and protection in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the immunogenicity of domain III from the Envelope protein of dengue virus as well as the proven protective capacity of the capsid antigen, we have designed a novel domain III-capsid chimeric protein with the goal of obtaining a molecule potentially able to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immunity (CMI). After expression of the recombinant gene in Escherichia coli, the domain III moiety retained its antigenicity as evaluated with anti-dengue sera. In order to explore alternatives for modulating the immunogenicity of the protein, it was mixed with oligodeoxynucleotides in order to obtain particulated aggregates and then immunologically evaluated in mice in comparison with non-aggregated controls. Although the humoral immune response induced by both forms of the protein was equivalent, the aggregated variant resulted in a much stronger CMI as measured by in vitro IFN-γ secretion and protection experiments, mediated by CD4+ and CD8+ cells. The present work provides additional evidence in support for a crucial role of CMI in protection against dengue virus and describes a novel vaccine candidate against the disease based on a recombinant protein that can stimulate both arms of the acquired immune system.

  1. Different immunity elicited by recombinant H5N1 hemagglutinin proteins containing pauci-mannose, high-mannose, or complex type N-glycans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Chang Lin

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses can result in poultry and occasionally in human mortality. A safe and effective H5N1 vaccine is urgently needed to reduce the pandemic potential. Hemagglutinin (HA, a major envelope protein accounting for approximately 80% of spikes in influenza virus, is often used as a major antigen for subunit vaccine development. In this study, we conducted a systematic study of the immune response against influenza virus infection following immunization with recombinant HA proteins expressed in insect (Sf9 cells, insect cells that contain exogenous genes for elaborating N-linked glycans (Mimic and mammalian cells (CHO. While the antibody titers are higher with the insect cell derived HA proteins, the neutralization and HA inhibition titers are much higher with the mammalian cell produced HA proteins. Recombinant HA proteins containing tri- or tetra-antennary complex, terminally sialylated and asialyated-galactose type N-glycans induced better protective immunity in mice to lethal challenge. The results are highly relevant to issues that should be considered in the production of fragment vaccines.

  2. Native and recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 envelope proteins induce human immune T-lymphocyte responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torseth, J W; Cohen, G H; Eisenberg, R J; Berman, P W; Lasky, L A; Cerini, C P; Heilman, C J; Kerwar, S; Merigan, T C

    1987-05-01

    The abilities of whole herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) antigen (HSV-ag) and purified HSV-1 native and recombinant envelope proteins to stimulate in vitro T-lymphocyte responses were compared in patients with recurrent herpes labialis. Immunochemically purified preparations of native glycoproteins B, C, and D (ngB, ngC, ngD) from cultured HSV-1 as well as expressed recombinant plasmid preparations of gD (rgD-1t, rgD-45K) elicited lymphocyte proliferation (LT) and production of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) only in seropositive individuals. The IFN-gamma induced by rgD-1t correlated with the time to the next herpetic lesion in 19 volunteers followed to recurrence (r = 0.69, P less than 0.008), although the magnitude and frequency of LT and IFN-gamma responses were lower with either recombinant or native purified antigens than with the whole-virus antigen. Combinations of ngB plus ngD or ngB plus ngC plus ngD stimulated more IFN-gamma, equivalent to whole-virus-antigen responses. Recombinant-derived human IL-2 also specifically increased LT and IFN-gamma responses in antigen-driven cultures. ngD stimulated IL-2 and LT responses similar to those of whole-virus antigen and higher than those of ngC. HSV-ag and ngB induced significantly higher titers of total IFN than could be accounted for by IFN-gamma; this was not seen for the other antigens, which induced only IFN-gamma. HSV-ag-driven Leu 2a-, plastic-nonadherent blood cells, unlike whole peripheral blood mononuclear cells, showed evidence of an increase and then a decline in the frequency of HSV-responsive cells after a lesion recurrence. These studies suggest that HSV-1 envelope proteins are capable of stimulating an immune T-helper-cell response which is associated with the prevention of human herpes simplex lesion recurrence. Although the whole virus probably contains additional important antigens, increasing concentrations or combinations of certain purified glycoproteins or the

  3. Nonstructural protein (NS1) of human parvovirus B19 stimulates host innate immunity and blunts the exogenous type I interferon signaling in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianqin; Chen, Xu; Ye, Haiyan; Yao, Min; Li, Shilin; Chen, Limin

    2016-08-15

    B19 virus is a non-enveloped DNA virus and belongs to the family of parvoviridae. There are two large open reading frames (ORFs), nonstructural protein (NS1) and two capsid proteins (VP1 and VP2). Host innate immune responses form the first line of defense against many pathogen invasion. How B19 virus, especially its encoded viral proteins interacts with host innate immune system remains unknown. In this study we aim to investigate the effect of NS1 on the host innate immune response and exogenous type I IFN signaling. Here we found that the type I IFN can be stimulated by NS1. Interestingly, NS1 also plays an important role in inhibiting the exogenous type I IFN signaling at p-STAT1, ISRE and ISGs levels. We concluded that NS1 may play pivotal role in evading the host immune surveillance. Our data shed novel light on the pathogenesis of B19 viral infection and virus evasion strategies. PMID:27270128

  4. A suicidal DNA vaccine expressing the fusion protein of peste des petits ruminants virus induces both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Yue, Xiaolin; Jin, Hongyan; Liu, Guangqing; Pan, Ling; Wang, Guijun; Guo, Hao; Li, Gang; Li, Yongdong

    2015-12-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), a highly contagious disease induced by PPR virus (PPRV), affects sheep and goats. PPRV fusion (F) protein is important for the induction of immune responses against PPRV. We constructed a Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon-vectored DNA vaccine ("suicidal DNA vaccine") and evaluated its immunogenicity in BALB/c mice. The F gene of PPRV was cloned and inserted into the SFV replicon-based vector pSCA1. The antigenicity of the resultant plasmid pSCA1/F was identified by indirect immunofluorescence and western blotting. BALB/c mice were then intramuscularly injected with pSCA1/F three times at 14-d intervals. Specific antibodies and virus-neutralizing antibodies against PPRV were quantified by indirect ELISA and microneutralization tests, respectively. Cell-mediated immune responses were examined by cytokine and lymphocyte proliferation assays. The pSCA1/F expressed F protein in vitro and induced specific and neutralizing antibody production, and lymphocyte proliferation in mice. Mice vaccinated with pSCA1/F had increased IL-2 and IL-10 levels after 24-h post first immunization. IFN-γ and TNF-α levels increased from that time point and gradually decreased thereafter. Thus, the Semliki Forest virus replicon-vectored DNA vaccine expressing the F protein of PPRV induced both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mice. This could be considered as a novel strategy for vaccine development against PPR. PMID:26343487

  5. Use of serum C-reactive protein as an early marker of inflammatory activity in canine type II immune-mediated polyarthritis: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristensen Annemarie T

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monitoring systemic inflammatory activity during steroid therapy of canine immune-mediated polyarthritis (IMPA is difficult and mainly relies on clinical signs. Case presentation Canine serum C-reactive protein (CRP was measured serially and blinded during a 27-week follow-up period of a case of Anaplasma phagocytophilia induced type II immune-mediated polyarthritis. Conclusion WBC was, as expected, observed not to reflect the inflammatory activity during steroid treatment in a clinical useful manner, whereas, CRP is suggested a valuable unbiased marker of inflammatory activity during steroid treatment in this case.

  6. Use of serum C-reactive protein as an early marker of inflammatory activity in canine type II immune-mediated polyarthritis: case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads; Jensen, Asger Lundorff; Houser, Geoffrey A; Jessen, Lisbeth Rem; Kristensen, Annemarie T

    2006-01-01

    Background Monitoring systemic inflammatory activity during steroid therapy of canine immune-mediated polyarthritis (IMPA) is difficult and mainly relies on clinical signs. Case presentation Canine serum C-reactive protein (CRP) was measured serially and blinded during a 27-week follow-up period of a case of Anaplasma phagocytophilia induced type II immune-mediated polyarthritis. Conclusion WBC was, as expected, observed not to reflect the inflammatory activity during steroid treatment in a clinical useful manner, whereas, CRP is suggested a valuable unbiased marker of inflammatory activity during steroid treatment in this case. PMID:16987405

  7. A Two-Component DNA-Prime/Protein-Boost Vaccination Strategy for Eliciting Long-Term, Protective T Cell Immunity against Trypanosoma cruzi

    OpenAIRE

    Shivali Gupta; Garg, Nisha J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the long-term efficacy of a two-component subunit vaccine against Trypanosoma cruzi infection. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with TcG2/TcG4 vaccine delivered by a DNA-prime/Protein-boost (D/P) approach and challenged with T. cruzi at 120 or 180 days post-vaccination (dpv). We examined whether vaccine-primed T cell immunity was capable of rapid expansion and intercepting the infecting T. cruzi. Our data showed that D/P vaccine elicited CD4+ (30-38%) and CD8+ (22-42%) ...

  8. Cauliflower mosaic virus protein P6 inhibits signaling responses to salicylic acid and regulates innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Love

    Full Text Available Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV encodes a multifunctional protein P6 that is required for translation of the 35S RNA and also acts as a suppressor of RNA silencing. Here we demonstrate that P6 additionally acts as a pathogenicity effector of an unique and novel type, modifying NPR1 (a key regulator of salicylic acid (SA- and jasmonic acid (JA-dependent signaling and inhibiting SA-dependent defence responses We find that that transgene-mediated expression of P6 in Arabidopsis and transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana has profound effects on defence signaling, suppressing expression of representative SA-responsive genes and increasing expression of representative JA-responsive genes. Relative to wild-type Arabidopsis P6-expressing transgenics had greatly reduced expression of PR-1 following SA-treatment, infection by CaMV or inoculation with an avirulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst. Similarly transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana of P6 (including a mutant form defective in translational transactivation activity suppressed PR-1a transcript accumulation in response to Agrobacterium infiltration and following SA-treatment. As well as suppressing the expression of representative SA-regulated genes, P6-transgenic Arabidopsis showed greatly enhanced susceptibility to both virulent and avirulent Pst (titres elevated 10 to 30-fold compared to non-transgenic controls but reduced susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. Necrosis following SA-treatment or inoculation with avirulent Pst was reduced and delayed in P6-transgenics. NPR1 an important regulator of SA/JA crosstalk, was more highly expressed in the presence of P6 and introduction of the P6 transgene into a transgenic line expressing an NPR1:GFP fusion resulted in greatly increased fluorescence in nuclei even in the absence of SA. Thus in the presence of P6 an inactive form of NPR1 is mislocalized in the nucleus even in uninduced plants

  9. Robust immunity and heterologous protection against influenza in mice elicited by a novel recombinant NP-M2e fusion protein expressed in E. coli.

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    Wenling Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The 23-amino acid extracellular domain of matrix 2 protein (M2e and the internal nucleoprotein (NP of influenza are highly conserved among viruses and thus are promising candidate antigens for the development of a universal influenza vaccine. Various M2e- or NP-based DNA or viral vector vaccines have been shown to have high immunogenicity; however, high cost, complicated immunization procedures, and vector-specific antibody responses have restricted their applications. Immunization with an NP-M2e fusion protein expressed in Escherichia coli may represent an alternative strategy for the development of a universal influenza vaccine. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: cDNA encoding M2e was fused to the 3' end of NP cDNA from influenza virus A/Beijing/30/95 (H3N2. The fusion protein (NM2e was expressed in E. coli and isolated with 90% purity. Mice were immunized with recombinant NM2e protein along with aluminum hydroxide gel and/or CpG as adjuvant. NM2e plus aluminum hydroxide gel almost completely protected the mice against a lethal (20 LD(50 challenge of heterologous influenza virus A/PR/8/34. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The NM2e fusion protein expressed in E. coli was highly immunogenic in mice. Immunization with NM2e formulated with aluminum hydroxide gel protected mice against a lethal dose of a heterologous influenza virus. Vaccination with recombinant NM2e fusion protein is a promising strategy for the development of a universal influenza vaccine.

  10. A Fractal Immune Network

    OpenAIRE

    Bentley, Peter J.; Timmis, Jon

    2004-01-01

    Proteins are the driving force in development (embryogenesis) and the immune system. Here we describe how a model of proteins designed for evolutionary development in computers can be combined with a model of immune systems. Full details of a prototype system are provided, and preliminary experiments presented. Results show that evolution is able to adjust the mapping between input data and antigens and cause useful changes to the subnetworks formed by the immune algorithm.

  11. Regulation of Exacerbated Immune Responses in Human Peripheral Blood Cells by Hydrolysed Egg White Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Ojalvo, Daniel; Molina, Elena; López-Fandiño, Rosina

    2016-01-01

    The anti-allergic potential of egg white protein hydrolysates (from ovalbumin, lysozyme and ovomucoid) was evaluated as their ability to hinder cytokine and IgE production by Th2-skewed human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), as well as the release of pro-inflammatory factors and generation of reactive oxygen species from Th1-stimulated peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs). The binding to IgE of egg allergic patients was determined and the peptides present in the hydrolysates were identified. The hydrolysates with alcalase down-regulated the production of Th2-biased cytokines and the secretion of IgE to the culture media of Th2-skewed PBMCs, and they significantly neutralized oxidative stress in PBLs. The hydrolysates of ovalbumin and ovomucoid with pepsin helped to re-establish the Th1/Th2 balance in Th2-biased PBMCs, while they also inhibited the release of pro-inflammatory mediators and reduced oxidative stress in PBLs treated with inflammatory stimuli. The hydrolysates with alcalase, in addition to equilibrating Th2 differentiation, exhibited a low IgE-binding. Therefore, they would elicit mild allergic reactions while retaining T cell-stimulating abilities, which might correlate with an anti-allergic benefit. PMID:27007699

  12. Regulation of Exacerbated Immune Responses in Human Peripheral Blood Cells by Hydrolysed Egg White Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lozano-Ojalvo

    Full Text Available The anti-allergic potential of egg white protein hydrolysates (from ovalbumin, lysozyme and ovomucoid was evaluated as their ability to hinder cytokine and IgE production by Th2-skewed human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, as well as the release of pro-inflammatory factors and generation of reactive oxygen species from Th1-stimulated peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs. The binding to IgE of egg allergic patients was determined and the peptides present in the hydrolysates were identified. The hydrolysates with alcalase down-regulated the production of Th2-biased cytokines and the secretion of IgE to the culture media of Th2-skewed PBMCs, and they significantly neutralized oxidative stress in PBLs. The hydrolysates of ovalbumin and ovomucoid with pepsin helped to re-establish the Th1/Th2 balance in Th2-biased PBMCs, while they also inhibited the release of pro-inflammatory mediators and reduced oxidative stress in PBLs treated with inflammatory stimuli. The hydrolysates with alcalase, in addition to equilibrating Th2 differentiation, exhibited a low IgE-binding. Therefore, they would elicit mild allergic reactions while retaining T cell-stimulating abilities, which might correlate with an anti-allergic benefit.

  13. Immune targeting of fibroblast activation protein triggers recognition of multipotent bone marrow stromal cells and cachexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnasamy, Dhanalakshmi; Yu, Zhiya; Morgan, Richard A.; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a candidate universal target antigen because it has been reported to be selectively expressed in nearly all solid tumors by a subset of immunosuppressive tumor stromal fibroblasts. We verified that 18/18 human tumors of various histologies contained pronounced stromal elements staining strongly for FAP, and hypothesized that targeting tumor stroma with FAP-reactive T cells would inhibit tumor growth in cancer-bearing hosts. T cells genetically engineered with FAP-reactive chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) specifically degranulated and produced effector cytokines upon stimulation with FAP or FAP-expressing cell lines. However, adoptive transfer of FAP-reactive T cells into mice bearing a variety of subcutaneous tumors mediated limited antitumor effects and induced significant cachexia and lethal bone toxicities in two mouse strains. We found that FAP was robustly expressed on PDGFR-α+, Sca-1+ multipotent bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in mice, as well as on well-characterized, clinical-grade multipotent human BMSCs. Accordingly, both mouse and human multipotent BMSCs were recognized by FAP-reactive T cells. The lethal bone toxicity and cachexia observed after cell-based immunotherapy targeting FAP cautions against its use as a universal target. Moreover, the expression of FAP by multipotent BMSCs may point toward the cellular origins of tumor stromal fibroblasts. PMID:23712432

  14. Immunization against Clostridium perfringens cells elicits protection against Clostridium tetani in mouse model: identification of cross-reactive proteins using proteomic methodologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Lokendra

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clostridium tetani and Clostridium perfringens are among the medically important clostridial pathogens causing diseases in man and animals. Several homologous open reading frames (ORFs have been identified in the genomes of the two pathogens by comparative genomic analysis. We tested a likelihood of extensive sharing of common epitopes between homologous proteins of these two medically important pathogens and the possibility of cross-protection using active immunization. Results Eight predominant cross-reactive spots were identified by mass spectrometry and had hits in the C. tetani E88 proteome with significant MOWSE scores. Most of the cross-reactive proteins of C. tetani shared 65–78% sequence similarity with their closest homologues in C. perfringens ATCC13124. Electron transfer flavoprotein beta-subunit (CT3 was the most abundant protein (43.3%, followed by methylaspartate ammonia-lyase (36.8% and 2-phosphoglycerate dehydratase (35.6%. All the proteins were predicted to be cytoplasmic by PSORT protein localization algorithm. Active immunization with C. perfringens whole cells elicited cross-protective immunity against C. tetani infection in a mouse model. Conclusion Most of the dominant cross-reactive proteins of C. tetani belonged to the cluster of orthologous group (COG functional category, either of posttranslational modification, protein turnover, and chaperones (O or energy production and conversion (C. The homologs of the identified proteins have been shown to play role in pathogenesis in other Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria. Our findings provide basis for the search of potential vaccine candidates with broader coverage, encompassing more than one pathogenic clostridial species.

  15. Incorporation of single dinitrophenyl-modified proteins in to the 30S subunit of Escherichia coli ribosomes by total reconstitution for localization by immune electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ribosome is a structurally defined organelle whose function is central to the existence of all organisms. It is the unique site of protein biosynthesis in all cells. A detailed understanding of ribosome structure is essential in understanding the process of translation. This thesis represents a new approach to the systematic localization of individual proteins contained in the small subunit of Escherichia coli ribosomes using immunoelectron microscopy. All 30S proteins were purified using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and eight isolated proteins (S12,S21,S14,S19,S18,S17,S16 and S13) were derivatized with 2,4-[3,5-3H]dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB). The extent of modification of these proteins was estimated by both radioactivity and integrated peak areas, using dual wavelength monitoring at 214nm to detect protein and 360nm (to detect dinitrophenyl groups). Each dinitrophenylated protein was introduced in place of the corresponding unmodified protein into totally reconstituted 30S subunits. Antibodies raised against the DNP-hapten bound effectively to such reconstituted subunits and did not cause dissociation of the modified protein from the subunit. Electron microscopy of the immune complexes was used to localize the modified protein on the subunit surface. Incorporation of any of the DNP-modified proteins, with the exception of DNP-S18, does not interfere with the functionality of the ribosome as measure by the binding of Phe-tRNAPhe or the synthesis of poly(Phe) in a poly(U)-dependent manner. Results show that unmodified protein competes with DNP-protein and that DNP-protein can function, as its native counterpart, in stimulating uptake of specific proteins during reconstitution. This data provides evidence that each DNP-protein occupies the same position in 30S subunits as does the corresponding unmodified protein

  16. Co-expression of Interleukin-15 Enhances the Protective Immune Responses Induced by Immunization with a Murine Malaria MVA-Based Vaccine Encoding the Circumsporozoite Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Parra, Marcela; Liu, Xia; Derrick, Steven C.; Yang, Amy; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Zheng, Hong; Thao Pham, Phuong; Sedegah, Martha; Belmonte, Arnel; Litilit, Dianne D.; Waldmann, Thomas A.; Kumar, Sanjai; Morris, Sheldon L.; Perera, Liyanage P.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains a major global public health problem with an estimated 200 million cases detected in 2012. Although the most advanced candidate malaria vaccine (RTS,S) has shown promise in clinical trials, its modest efficacy and durability have created uncertainty about the impact of RTS,S immunization (when used alone) on global malaria transmission. Here we describe the development and characterization of a novel modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA)–based malaria vaccine which co-expresses...

  17. Identification by Mass Spectrometry and Immune Response Analysis of Guinea Pig Cytomegalovirus (GPCMV Pentameric Complex Proteins GP129, 131 and 133

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine S. Gnanandarajah

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Development of a vaccine against congenital infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a major public health priority. A potential vaccine target receiving considerable recent attention is the pentameric complex (PC of HCMV proteins consisting of gL, gH, UL128, UL130, and UL131, since some antibodies against these target proteins are capable of potently neutralizing virus at epithelial and endothelial cell surfaces. Recently, homologous proteins have been described for guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV, consisting of gH, gL, and the GPCMV proteins GP129, GP131, and GP133. To investigate these proteins as potential vaccine targets, expression of GP129-GP133 transcripts was confirmed by reverse-transcriptase PCR. Mass spectrometry combined with western blot assays demonstrated the presence of GP129, GP131, and GP133 proteins in virus particles. Recombinant proteins corresponding to these PC proteins were generated in baculovirus, and as GST fusion proteins. Recombinant proteins were noted to be immunoreactive with convalescent sera from infected animals, suggesting that these proteins are recognized in the humoral immune response to GPCMV infection. These analyses support the study of PC-based recombinant vaccines in the GPCMV congenital infection model.

  18. Non-lethal heat shock increased Hsp70 and immune protein transcripts but not Vibrio tolerance in the white-leg shrimp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Hong Loc

    Full Text Available Non-lethal heat shock boosts bacterial and viral disease tolerance in shrimp, possibly due to increases in endogenous heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 and/or immune proteins. To further understand the mechanisms protecting shrimp against infection, Hsp70 and the mRNAs encoding the immune-related proteins prophenoloxidase (proPO, peroxinectin, penaeidin, crustin and hemocyanin were studied in post-larvae of the white-leg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei, following a non-lethal heat shock. As indicated by RT-qPCR, a 30 min abrupt heat shock increased Hsp70 mRNA in comparison to non-heated animals. Immunoprobing of western blots and quantification by ELISA revealed that Hsp70 production after heat shock was correlated with enhanced Hsp70 mRNA. proPO and hemocyanin mRNA levels were augmented, whereas peroxinectin and crustin mRNA levels were unchanged following non-lethal heat shock. Penaeidin mRNA was decreased by all heat shock treatments. Thirty min abrupt heat shock failed to improve survival of post-larvae in a standardized challenge test with Vibrio harveyi, indicating that under the conditions of this study, L. vannamei tolerance to Vibrio infection was influenced neither by Hsp70 accumulation nor the changes in the immune-related proteins, observations dissimilar to other shrimp species examined.

  19. A Fusion Protein Based on the Second Subunit of Hemagglutinin of Influenza A/H2N2 Viruses Provides Cross Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, L. A.; Sergeeva, M. V.; Shuklina, M. A.; Shaldzhyan, A. A.; Potapchuk, M. V.; Korotkov, A. V.; Tsybalova, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    Conserved fragments of the second subunit of hemagglutinin (HA2) are of great interest for the design of vaccine constructs that can provide protective immunity against influenza A viruses of different subtypes. A recombinant fusion protein, FlgMH, was constructed on the basis of flagellin and a highly conserved HA2 fragment (35–107) of influenza viruses of the subtype A/H2N2, containing B cell, CD4+ T cell, and CD8+ T cell epitopes. The native conformation of the HA2 fragment was partially preserved upon its attachment to the C-terminus of flagellin within the recombinant fusion protein FlgMH. FlgMH was shown to stimulate a mixed Th1/Th2 response of cross-reactive antibodies, which bind to influenza viruses of the first phylogenetic group (H1, H2, H5), to the target sequence as well as the induction of specific cytotoxic T cells (CD3+CD8+IFNγ+). Immunization with the recombinant protein protected animals from a lethal influenza infection. The developed FlgMH protein is a promising agent that may be included in an influenza vaccine with a wide spectrum of action which will be able to stimulate the T and B cell immune responses. PMID:27437146

  20. Humoral immune responses induced by anti-idiotypic antibody fusion protein of 6B11scFv/hGM-CSF in BALB/c mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Background We have previously developed and characterized a monoclonal anti-idiotype antibody, designated 6B11, which mimics an ovarian carcinoma associated antigen OC166-9 and whose corresponding monoclonal antibody is COC166-9 (Ab1). In this study, we evaluate the humoral immune responses induced by the fusion protein 6B11 single-chain variable fragment (scFv)/human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) and 6B11scFv in BALB/c mice. Methods The fusion protein 6B11scFv/hGM-CSF was constructed by fusing a recombinant single-chain variable fragment of 6B11scFv to GM-CSF. BALB/c mice were administrated by 6B11scFv/hGM-CSF and 6B11scFv, respectively. Results The fusion protein 6B11scFv/hGM-CSF retained binding to the anti-mouse F(ab)2' and was also biologically active as measured by proliferation of human GM-CSF dependent cell TF1 in vitro. After immunization with the 6B11scFv/hGM-CSF and 6B11ScFv, BALB/c mice showed significantly enhanced Ab3 antibody responses to 6B11scFv/hGM-CSF compared with the 6B11scFv alone. The level of Ab3 was the highest after the first week and maintained for five weeks after the last immunization. Another booster was given when the Ab3 titer descended, and it would reach to the high level in a week. Conclusion The fusion protein 6B11scFv/hGM-CSF can induce humoral immunity against ovarian carcinoma in vivo. We also provide the theoretical foundation for the application of the fusion protein 6B11scFv/hGM-CSF for active immunotherapy of ovarian cancer.

  1. A single immunization with a rhabdovirus-based vector expressing severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) S protein results in the production of high levels of SARS-CoV-neutralizing antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Faber, Milosz; Lamirande, Elaine W.; Roberts, Anjeanette; Rice, Amy B.; Koprowski, Hilary; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Schnell, Matthias J.

    2005-01-01

    Foreign viral proteins expressed by rabies virus (RV) have been shown to induce potent humoral and cellular immune responses in immunized animals. In addition, highly attenuated and, therefore, very safe RV-based vectors have been constructed. Here, an RV-based vaccine vehicle was utilized as a novel vaccine against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). For this approach, the SARS-CoV nucleocapsid protein (N) or envelope spike protein (S) genes were cloned between the RV g...

  2. Protein-Energy Malnutrition (PEM) is Believed to Lead to an Increased Susceptibility to Infection, or cause Impaired Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Mellova Amir Masrizal

    2003-01-01

    Infection, occurring with malnutrition, is a major cause of morbidity in all age groups and is responsible for two-thirds of all death under 5 yr of age in developing countries. Many cells of the immune system are known to depend for their function on metabolic pathways that employ various nutrients as critical factors. The most consistent changes in immune competence in PEM are in cell-mediated immunity, the bactericidal function of neutrophils, the complement system, the secretory immunoglo...

  3. The surfactant protein C mutation A116D alters cellular processing, stress tolerance, surfactant lipid composition, and immune cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarbock Ralf

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surfactant protein C (SP-C is important for the function of pulmonary surfactant. Heterozygous mutations in SFTPC, the gene encoding SP-C, cause sporadic and familial interstitial lung disease (ILD in children and adults. Mutations mapping to the BRICHOS domain located within the SP-C proprotein result in perinuclear aggregation of the proprotein. In this study, we investigated the effects of the mutation A116D in the BRICHOS domain of SP-C on cellular homeostasis. We also evaluated the ability of drugs currently used in ILD therapy to counteract these effects. Methods SP-CA116D was expressed in MLE-12 alveolar epithelial cells. We assessed in vitro the consequences for cellular homeostasis, immune response and effects of azathioprine, hydroxychloroquine, methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Results Stable expression of SP-CA116D in MLE-12 alveolar epithelial cells resulted in increased intracellular accumulation of proSP-C processing intermediates. SP-CA116D expression further led to reduced cell viability and increased levels of the chaperones Hsp90, Hsp70, calreticulin and calnexin. Lipid analysis revealed decreased intracellular levels of phosphatidylcholine (PC and increased lyso-PC levels. Treatment with methylprednisolone or hydroxychloroquine partially restored these lipid alterations. Furthermore, SP-CA116D cells secreted soluble factors into the medium that modulated surface expression of CCR2 or CXCR1 receptors on CD4+ lymphocytes and neutrophils, suggesting a direct paracrine effect of SP-CA116D on neighboring cells in the alveolar space. Conclusions We show that the A116D mutation leads to impaired processing of proSP-C in alveolar epithelial cells, alters cell viability and lipid composition, and also activates cells of the immune system. In addition, we show that some of the effects of the mutation on cellular homeostasis can be antagonized by application of pharmaceuticals commonly applied in ILD therapy

  4. Optimisation of prime-boost immunization in mice using novel protein-based and recombinant vaccinia (Tiantan-based HBV vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A therapeutic vaccine for chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection that enhances virus-specific cellular immune responses is urgently needed. The "prime-boost" regimen is a widely used vaccine strategy against many persistence infections. However, few reports have addressed this strategy applying for HBV therapeutic vaccine development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To develop an effective HBV therapeutic vaccine, we constructed a recombinant vaccinia virus (Tiantan containing the S+PreS1 fusion antigen (RVJSS1 combined with the HBV particle-like subunit vaccine HBVSS1 to explore the most effective prime-boost regimen against HBV. The immune responses to different prime-boost regimens were assessed in C57BL/C mice by ELISA, ELISpot assay and Intracellular cytokine staining analysis. Among the combinations tested, an HBV protein particle vaccine priming and recombinant vaccinia virus boosting strategy accelerated specific seroconversion and produced high antibody (anti-PreS1, anti-S antibody titres as well as the strongest multi-antigen (PreS1, and S-specific cellular immune response. HBSS1 protein prime/RVJSS1 boost immunization was also generated more significant level of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses for Th1 cytokines (TNF-α and IFN-γ. CONCLUSIONS: The HBSS1 protein-vaccine prime plus RVJSS1 vector boost elicits specific antibody as well as CD4 and CD8 cells secreting Th1-like cytokines, and these immune responses may be important parameters for the future HBV therapeutic vaccines.

  5. Proteomics and insect immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Shi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Insect innate immunity is both a model for vertebrate immunity as well as a key system that impactsmedically important pathogens that are transmitted by insects. Recent developments in proteomics andprotein identification techniques combined with the completion of genome sequences for Anophelesgambiae and Drosophila melanogaster provided the tools for examining insect immunity at a new level ofmolecular detail. Application of proteomics to insect immunity resulted in predictions of new roles inimmunity for proteins already known in other contexts (e.g. ferritin, transferrin, Chi-lectins and helped totarget specific members of multi-gene families that respond to different pathogens (e.g. serine proteases,thioester proteins. In addition, proteomics studies verify that post-translational modifications play a keyrole in insect immunity since many of the identified proteins are modified in some way. These studiescomplement recent work on insect transcriptomes and provide new directions for further investigation ofinnate immunity.

  6. Immune Responses in Pigs Induced by Recombinant DNA Vaccine Co-Expressing Swine IL-18 and Membrane Protein of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Ding

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, two DNA vaccines, which express the membrane (M protein of porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus (PRRSV (pEGFP-M and co-express both M and swine IL-18 (pEGFP-IL18-M, were constructed and their abilities to induce humoral and cellular responses in piglets were comparatively evaluated. Experimental results showed that both recombinant DNA vaccines could not elicit neutralizing antibodies in the immunized piglets. However, both DNA vaccines elicited Th1-biased cellular immune responses. Notably, pigs immunized with the plasmid pEGFP-IL18-M developed significantly higher levels of IFN-γ and IL-2 production response and stronger specific T-lymphocyte proliferation response than the pigs inoculated with the plasmids pEGFP-M and pEGFP-IL18 (P < 0.05. These results illustrated that co-expression of M and IL-18 proteins could significantly improve the potency of DNA vaccination on the activation of vaccine-induced virus-specific cell-mediated immune responses in pigs, which may be used as a strategy to develop a new generation of vaccines against highly pathogenic PRRSV.

  7. Coupling Peptide Antigens to Virus-Like Particles or to Protein Carriers Influences the Th1/Th2 Polarity of the Resulting Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rattanaruji Pomwised

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We have conjugated the S9 peptide, a mimic of the group B streptococcal type III capsular polysaccharide, to different carriers in an effort to elicit an optimal immune response. As carriers, we utilized the soluble protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin and virus-like particles (VLPs from two plant viruses, Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus and Cowpea Mosaic Virus. We have found that coupling the peptide to the soluble protein elicits a Th2 immune response, as evidenced by the production of the peptide-specific IgG1 antibody and IL-4/IL-10 production in response to antigen stimulation, whereas the peptide conjugated to VLPs elicited a Th1 response (IgG2a, IFN-γ. Because the VLPs used as carriers package RNA during the assembly process, we hypothesize that this effect may result from the presence of nucleic acid in the immunogen, which affects the Th1/Th2 polarity of the response.

  8. Assessing brain immune activation in psychiatric disorders: clinical and preclinical PET imaging studies of the 18-kDa translocator protein

    OpenAIRE

    van der Doef, Thalia F; Doorduin, Janine; Berckel, Bart Nm; Cervenka, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence from different lines of research suggests an involvement of the immune system in the pathophysiology of several psychiatric disorders. During recent years, a series of positron emission tomography (PET) studies have been published using radioligands for the translocator protein (TSPO) to study microglia activation in schizophrenia, bipolar I disorder, major depression, autism spectrum disorder, and drug abuse. The results have been somewhat conflicting, which could be du...

  9. Conjugation of Polysaccharide 6B from Streptococcus pneumoniae with Pneumococcal Surface Protein A: PspA Conformation and Its Effect on the Immune Response

    OpenAIRE

    Perciani, Catia T.; Barazzone, Giovana C.; Goulart, Cibelly; Carvalho, Eneas; Cabrera-Crespo, Joaquin; Gonçalves, Viviane M.; Luciana C. C. Leite; Tanizaki, Martha M.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the substantial beneficial effects of incorporating the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) into immunization programs, serotype replacement has been observed after its widespread use. As there are many serotypes currently documented, the use of a conjugate vaccine relying on protective pneumococcal proteins as active carriers is a promising alternative to expand PCV coverage. In this study, capsular polysaccharide serotype 6B (PS6B) and recombinant pneumococcal surface pro...

  10. Oral Immunization with Recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis Expressing the Outer Membrane Protein 26-Kilodalton Antigen Confers Prophylactic Protection against Helicobacter pylori Infection ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Lü, Lin; Zeng, Han-qing; Wang, Pi-Long; Shen, Wei; Xiang, Ting-xiu; Mei, Zhe-chuan

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is prevalent worldwide and results in chronic gastritis, which may lead to gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and gastric cancer. We have previously reported that oral immunization with recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis expressing the H. pylori outer membrane protein 26-kilodalton (Omp26) antigen affords therapeutic protection against H. pylori infection in mice. In the present study, we investigated the prophylactic effects of this vaccine cand...

  11. Life history, immune function, and intestinal helminths: Trade-offs among immunoglobulin E, C-reactive protein, and growth in an Amazonian population

    OpenAIRE

    Blackwell, AD; Snodgrass, JJ; Madimenos, FC; Sugiyama, LS

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. Infection with helminths is associated with shifts in host immunity, including increased production of immunoglobulin E (IgE) and reduced inflammation. Given limited energy budgets, these shifts may involve changes in energy allocation toward competing demands. Here we test for potential trade-offs between growth, IgE, and the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP). Methods. Dried blood spots and anthropometrics were collected from 162 Shuar forager-horticulturalists from a ...

  12. Inoculation of Plasmids Encoding Japanese Encephalitis Virus PrM-E Proteins with Colloidal Gold Elicits a Protective Immune Response in BALB/c Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Zijiang; Wakita, Takaji; Yasui, Kotaro

    2003-01-01

    We established a simple and effective method for DNA immunization against Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection with plasmids encoding the viral PrM and E proteins and colloidal gold. Inoculation of plasmids mixed with colloidal gold induced the production of specific anti-JEV antibodies and a protective response against JEV challenge in BALB/c mice. When we compared the efficacy of different inoculation routes, the intravenous and intradermal inoculation routes were found to elicit str...

  13. Hepatitis C virus core, NS3, NS4B and NS5A are the major immunogenic proteins in humoral immunity in chronic HCV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lappalainen Maija

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The viral genome of hepatitis C virus constitutes a 9.6-kb single-stranded positive-sense RNA which encodes altogether 11 viral proteins. In order to study the humoral immune responses against different HCV proteins in patients suffering from chronic HCV infection, we produced three structural (core, E1 and E2 and six nonstructural proteins (NS2, NS3, NS4A, NS4B, NS5A and NS5B in Sf9 insect cells by using the baculovirus expression system. Results The recombinant HCV core, E1, E2, NS2, NS3, NS4A, NS4B, NS5A and NS5B proteins were purified and used in Western blot analysis to determine antibody responses against individual HCV protein in 68 HCV RNA and antibody positive human sera that were obtained from patients suffering from genotype 1, 2, 3 or 4 infection. These sera were also analysed with INNO-LIA Score test for HCV antibodies against core, NS3, NS4AB and NS5A, and the results were similar to the ones obtained by Western blot method. Based on our Western blot analyses we found that the major immunogenic HCV antigens were the core, NS4B, NS3 and NS5A proteins which were recognized in 97%, 86%, 68% and 53% of patient sera, respectively. There were no major genotype specific differences in antibody responses to individual HCV proteins. A common feature within the studied sera was that all except two sera recognized the core protein in high titers, whereas none of the sera recognized NS2 protein and only three sera (from genotype 3 recognised NS5B. Conclusion The data shows significant variation in the specificity in humoral immunity in chronic HCV patients.

  14. The terminal portion of leptospiral immunoglobulin-like protein LigA confers protective immunity against lethal infection in the hamster model of leptospirosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Everton F; Medeiros, Marco A; McBride, Alan J A; Matsunaga, Jim; Esteves, Gabriela S; Ramos, João G R; Santos, Cleiton S; Croda, Júlio; Homma, Akira; Dellagostin, Odir A; Haake, David A; Reis, Mitermayer G; Ko, Albert I

    2007-08-14

    Subunit vaccines are a potential intervention strategy against leptospirosis, which is a major public health problem in developing countries and a veterinary disease in livestock and companion animals worldwide. Leptospiral immunoglobulin-like (Lig) proteins are a family of surface-exposed determinants that have Ig-like repeat domains found in virulence factors such as intimin and invasin. We expressed fragments of the repeat domain regions of LigA and LigB from Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni. Immunization of Golden Syrian hamsters with Lig fragments in Freund's adjuvant induced robust antibody responses against recombinant protein and native protein, as detected by ELISA and immunoblot, respectively. A single fragment, LigANI, which corresponds to the six carboxy-terminal Ig-like repeat domains of the LigA molecule, conferred immunoprotection against mortality (67-100%, P<0.05) in hamsters which received a lethal inoculum of L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni. However, immunization with this fragment did not confer sterilizing immunity. These findings indicate that the carboxy-terminal portion of LigA is an immunoprotective domain and may serve as a vaccine candidate for human and veterinary leptospirosis. PMID:17629368

  15. Photosystem II Repair and Plant Immunity: Lessons Learned from Arabidopsis Mutant Lacking the THYLAKOID LUMEN PROTEIN 18.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvi, Sari; Isojärvi, Janne; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Mamedov, Fikret; Suorsa, Marjaana; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts play an important role in the cellular sensing of abiotic and biotic stress. Signals originating from photosynthetic light reactions, in the form of redox and pH changes, accumulation of reactive oxygen and electrophile species or stromal metabolites are of key importance in chloroplast retrograde signaling. These signals initiate plant acclimation responses to both abiotic and biotic stresses. To reveal the molecular responses activated by rapid fluctuations in growth light intensity, gene expression analysis was performed with Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and the tlp18.3 mutant plants, the latter showing a stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light conditions (Biochem. J, 406, 415-425). Expression pattern of genes encoding components of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain did not differ between fluctuating and constant light conditions, neither in wild type nor in tlp18.3 plants, and the composition of the thylakoid membrane protein complexes likewise remained unchanged. Nevertheless, the fluctuating light conditions repressed in wild-type plants a broad spectrum of genes involved in immune responses, which likely resulted from shade-avoidance responses and their intermixing with hormonal signaling. On the contrary, in the tlp18.3 mutant plants there was an imperfect repression of defense-related transcripts upon growth under fluctuating light, possibly by signals originating from minor malfunction of the photosystem II (PSII) repair cycle, which directly or indirectly modulated the transcript abundances of genes related to light perception via phytochromes. Consequently, a strong allocation of resources to defense reactions in the tlp18.3 mutant plants presumably results in the stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light. PMID:27064270

  16. Induction of humoral and cellular immune responses against the HIV-1 envelope protein using γ-retroviral virus-like particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purcell Damian FJ

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study evaluates the immunogenicity of the HIV envelope protein (env in mice presented either attached to γ-retroviral virus-like-particles (VLPs, associated with cell-derived microsomes or as solubilized recombinant protein (gp160. The magnitude and polyfunctionality of the cellular immune response was enhanced when delivering HIV env in the VLP or microsome form compared to recombinant gp160. Humoral responses measured by antibody titres were comparable across the groups and low levels of antibody neutralization were observed. Lastly, we identified stronger IgG2a class switching in the two particle-delivered antigen vaccinations modalities compared to recombinant gp160.

  17. A Synthetic E7 Gene of Human Papillomavirus Type 16 That Yields Enhanced Expression of the Protein in Mammalian Cells and Is Useful for DNA Immunization Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid-Arregui, Angel; Juárez, Victoria; Hausen, Harald zur

    2003-01-01

    A synthetic E7 gene of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 was generated that consists entirely of preferred human codons. Expression analysis of the synthetic E7 gene in human and animal cells showed levels of E7 protein 20- to 100-fold higher than those obtained with wild-type E7. Enhanced expression of E7 protein resulted from highly efficient translation, as well as increased stability of the E7 mRNA due to its codon optimization. Higher levels of E7 protein in cells transfected with synthetic E7 correlated with significant loss of cell viability in various human cell lines. In contrast, lower E7 protein expression driven by the wild-type gene resulted in a slight induction of cell proliferation. Furthermore, mice inoculated with plasmids expressing the synthetic E7 gene produced significantly higher levels of E7 antibodies than littermates injected with wild-type E7, suggesting that synthetic E7 may be useful for DNA immunization studies and the development of genetic vaccines against HPV-16. In view of these results, we hypothesize that HPVs may have retained a pattern of G + C content and codon usage distinct from that of their host cells in response to selective pressure. Thus, the nonhuman codon bias may have been conserved by HPVs to prevent compromising viability of the host cells by excessive viral early protein expression, as well as to evade the immune system. PMID:12663798

  18. Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Immune System KidsHealth > For Teens > Immune System Print A A ... put us out of commission. What the Immune System Does The immune (pronounced: ih-MYOON) system, which ...

  19. Comparative Immunization in BALB/c Mice with Recombinant Replication-Defective Adenovirus Vector and DNA Plasmid Expressing a SARS-CoV Nucleocapsid Protein Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunling Ma; Kun Yao; Feng Zhou; Minsheng Zhu

    2006-01-01

    In order to investigate immunogenicity in the induction of humoral and cellular immune responses, severe acute respiratory syndrome associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-N gene recombinant replication-defective adenoviral vector, rAd-N, was generated and immunized BALB/c mice in a pcDNA3.1-N prime-rAd-N boost regimen. After humoral and cellular immune response detection, different levels of SARS-CoV N protein specific antibodies and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion are shown compared to controls. The humoral immune response was induced more effectively by the DNA priming and recombinant adenovirus boosting regimen. There is a significant difference between heterogeneous and homologous vaccinations. The heterogeneous combinations were all higher than those of the homologous combinations in the induction of anti-N antibody response. Among the three heterogeneous combinations, pcDNA3.1-N/pcDNA3.1-N/pcDNA3.1-N/rAd-N induced the strongest antibody response. In the induction of IFN-γ production, the homologous combination of rAd-N/rAd-N/rAd-N/rAd- N was significantly stronger than that of pcDNA3.1-N/pcDNA3. 1-N/pcDNA3.1-N/pcDNA3.1-N, but was relatively weaker than the heterogeneous combination of pcDAN3.1-N/pcDAN3.1-N/pcDAN3.1-N/rAd-N. This combination was a most efficient immunization regimen in induction of SARS-CoV-N-specific (IFN-γ) secretion just as the antibody response. These results suggest that DNA immunization followed by recombinant adenovirus boosting could be used as a potential SARS-CoV vaccine.

  20. Protein-Energy Malnutrition (PEM is Believed to Lead to an Increased Susceptibility to Infection, or cause Impaired Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mellova Amir Masrizal

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Infection, occurring with malnutrition, is a major cause of morbidity in all age groups and is responsible for two-thirds of all death under 5 yr of age in developing countries. Many cells of the immune system are known to depend for their function on metabolic pathways that employ various nutrients as critical factors. The most consistent changes in immune competence in PEM are in cell-mediated immunity, the bactericidal function of neutrophils, the complement system, the secretory immunoglobin A, and antibody response.

  1. Despite sequence homologies to gluten, salivary proline-rich proteins do not elicit immune responses central to the pathogenesis of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Na; Leffler, Daniel A; Kelly, Ciaran P; Hansen, Joshua; Marietta, Eric V; Murray, Joseph A; Schuppan, Detlef; Helmerhorst, Eva J

    2015-12-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an inflammatory disorder triggered by ingested gluten, causing immune-mediated damage to the small-intestinal mucosa. Gluten proteins are strikingly similar in amino acid composition and sequence to proline-rich proteins (PRPs) in human saliva. On the basis of this feature and their shared destination in the gastrointestinal tract, we hypothesized that salivary PRPs may modulate gluten-mediated immune responses in CD. Parotid salivary secretions were collected from CD patients, refractory CD patients, non-CD patients with functional gastrointestinal complaints, and healthy controls. Structural similarities of PRPs with gluten were probed with anti-gliadin antibodies. Immune responses to PRPs were investigated toward CD patient-derived peripheral blood mononuclear cells and in a humanized transgenic HLA-DQ2/DQ8 mouse model for CD. Anti-gliadin antibodies weakly cross-reacted with the abundant salivary amylase but not with PRPs. Likewise, the R5 antibody, recognizing potential antigenic gluten epitopes, showed negligible reactivity to salivary proteins from all groups. Inflammatory responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were provoked by gliadins whereas responses to PRPs were similar to control levels, and PRPs did not compete with gliadins in immune stimulation. In vivo, PRP peptides were well tolerated and nonimmunogenic in the transgenic HLA-DQ2/DQ8 mouse model. Collectively, although structurally similar to dietary gluten, salivary PRPs were nonimmunogenic in CD patients and in a transgenic HLA-DQ2/DQ8 mouse model for CD. It is possible that salivary PRPs play a role in tolerance induction to gluten early in life. Deciphering the structural basis for the lack of immunogenicity of salivary PRPs may further our understanding of the toxicity of gluten. PMID:26505973

  2. Immunization with Recombinant Adenoviral Vectors Expressing HCV Core or F Proteins Leads to T Cells with Reduced Effector Molecules Granzyme B and IFN-γ: A Potential New Strategy for Immune Evasion in HCV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samrat, Subodh Kumar; Vedi, Satish; Singh, Shakti; Li, Wen; Kumar, Rakesh; Agrawal, Babita

    2015-01-01

    Multispecific, broad, and potent T cell responses have been correlated with viral clearance in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, the majority of infected patients develop chronic infection, suggesting that natural infection mostly leads to development of inefficient T cell immunity. Multiple mechanisms of immune modulation and evasion have been shown in HCV infection through various investigations. This study examined the generation and modulation of T cell responses against core and frameshift (F) proteins of HCV. A single immunization of mice with replication incompetent recombinant adenovirus vectors encoding for F or core antigens induces poor T cell responses and leads to generation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells with low granzyme B (GrB) expression. These T cells have impaired GrB enzyme activity and are unable to kill peptide loaded target cells. The low intracellular expression of GrB is not due to degranulation of cytotoxic granules containing cytotoxic T cells. Addition of exogenous IL-2 in in vitro cultures leads to partial recovery of GrB production, whereas immunization with the Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist poly I:C leads to complete restoration of GrB expression in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Thus, a possible new strategy of T cell modulation is recognized wherein effector T cells are caused to be dysfunctional by HCV-derived antigens F or core, and strategies are also delineated to overcome this dysfunction. These studies are important in the investigation of prophylactic vaccine and immunotherapy strategies for HCV infection. PMID:26133045

  3. Protein Nutrition of Southern Plains Small Mammals: Immune Response to Variation in Maternal and Offspring Dietary Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maternal nutrition during pregnancy and postnatal offspring nutrition may influence offspring traits. We investigated the effects of maternal and postweaning offspring dietary nitrogen on immune function and hematology in two species of rodent: the hispid cotton rat (Sigmodon his...

  4. Immune Response to Recombinant Capsid Proteins of Adenovirus in Humans: Antifiber and Anti-Penton Base Antibodies Have a Synergistic Effect on Neutralizing Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahéry-Ségard, Hanne; Farace, Françoise; Godfrin, Dominique; Gaston, Jesintha; Lengagne, Renée; Tursz, Thomas; Boulanger, Pierre; Guillet, Jean-Gérard

    1998-01-01

    Replication-deficient adenovirus used in humans for gene therapy induces a strong immune response to the vector, resulting in transient recombinant protein expression and the blocking of gene transfer upon a second administration. Therefore, in this study we examined in detail the capsid-specific humoral immune response in sera of patients with lung cancer who had been given one dose of a replication-defective adenovirus. We analyzed the immune response to the three major components of the viral capsid, hexon (Hx), penton base (Pb), and fiber (Fi). A longitudinal study of the humoral response assayed on adenovirus particle-coated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay plates showed that patients had preexisting immunity to adenovirus prior to the administration of adenovirus–β-gal. The level of the response increased in three patients after adenovirus administration and remained at a maximum after three months. One patient had a strong immune response to adenovirus prior to treatment, and this response was unaffected by adenovirus administration. Sera collected from the patients were assayed for recognition of each individual viral capsid protein to determine more precisely the molecular basis of the humoral immune response. Clear differences existed in the humoral response to the three major components of the viral capsid in serum from humans. Sequential appearance of these antibodies was observed: anti-Fi antibodies appeared first, followed by anti-Pb antibodies and then by anti-Hx antibodies. Moreover, anti-Fi antibodies preferentially recognized the native trimeric form of Fi protein, suggesting that they recognized conformational epitopes. Our results showed that sera with no neutralizing activity contained only anti-Fi antibodies. In contrast, neutralizing activity was only obtained with sera containing anti-Fi and anti-Pb antibodies. More importantly, we showed that anti-native Fi and anti-Pb antibodies had a synergistic effect on neutralization. The

  5. Targeting immune effector molecules to human tumor cells through genetic delivery of 5T4-specific scFv fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kevin A; Ryan, Matthew G; Stern, Peter L; Shaw, David M; Embleton, M Jim; Kingsman, Susan M; Carroll, Miles W

    2002-11-01

    Although several clinical trials have shown beneficial effects by targeting tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) with monoclonal antibodies, a number of issues, including poor penetration of the tumor mass and human antimouse antibody responses, remain. The use of recombinant single-chain Fv (scFv) fragments has the potential to address these and other issues while allowing the addition of different effector functions. To develop therapeutic strategies that recruit both humoral and cellular arms of the immune response, we have constructed chimeric proteins linking either the human IgG1 Fc domain or the extracellular domain of murine B7.1 to a scFv specific for the oncofetal glycoprotein, 5T4. This TAA is expressed by a wide variety of carcinomas and is associated with metastasis and poorer clinical outcome. We have engineered retroviral constructs that produce fusion proteins able to interact simultaneously with both 5T4-positive cells and with the receptor/ligands of the immune effector moieties. Genetic delivery through a murine leukemia virus vector to 5T4-positive tumor cells results in the secreted scFv fusion protein binding to the cell surface. Furthermore, the scFv-HIgG1 fusion protein is able to direct lysis of 5T4-expressing human tumor cell lines through antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity, indicating its potential as a gene therapy for human cancers. PMID:12386827

  6. Quality of colostral passive immunity and pattern of serum protein fluctuation in newborn calves Qualidade da imunidade passiva colostral e perfil de variação de proteínas séricas em bezerros neonatos

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Pauletti; Raul Machado Neto; Irineu Umberto Packer; Raul Dantas D'Arce; Rosana Bessi

    2003-01-01

    Immunity acquired by newborn animals is known as passive immunity, and for ruminants, antibody acquisition depends on the ingestion and absorption of adequate amounts of immunoglobulins from colostrum. This study relates different initial levels of acquired passive protection and serum total protein (TP) and immunoglobulin G (IgG). Serum immunoglobulin concentration and total protein were evaluated for female Holstein calves in the first sixty days of life. Animals were separated into three g...

  7. T cell responses to repeat and non-repeat regions of the circumsporozoite protein detected in volunteers immunized with Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites

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    Elizabeth Nardin

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of malarial vaccine based on the circumsporozoite (CS protein, a majuor surface antigen of the sporozoite stage of the malaria parasite, requires the identification of T and B cell epitopes for inclusion in recombinant or synthetic vaccine candidates. We have investigated the specificity and function of a series of T cell clones, derived from volunteers immunized with Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites in an effort to identify relevant epitopes in the immune response to the pre-erythrocytic stages of the parasite. CD4+ T cell clones were obtained wich specifically recognized a repetitive epitope located in the 5'repeat region of the CS protein. This epitope, when conjugated to the 3'repeat region in a synthetic MAPs construct, induced high titers of antisporozoite antibodies in C57B1 mice. A second T cell epitope, which mapped to aa 326-345 of the carboxy terminal, was recognized by lytic, as well as non-lytic, CD4+ T cells derived from the sporozoite-immunized volunteers. The demonstration of CD4+ CTL in the volunteers, and the recent studies inthe rodent model (Renia et al., 1991; Tsuji et al., 1990, suggested that CS-specific CD4+ T cells, in addition to their indirect role as helper cells in the induction of antibody and CD8 + effector cells, may also play a direct role in protection against sporozoite challenge by targeting EEF within the liver.

  8. Immunization and chemical conjugation of Bm95 obtained from Pichia pastoris enhances the immune response against vaccinal protein and Neisseria meningitidis capsular polysaccharide

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez Valle, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Manuel Rodriguez-Valle,1 Leonardo Canan-Hadden,2 Olivia Niebla2 1Animal Biotechnology Division, 2Analytical Division, Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Havana, Cuba Abstract: The ectoparasite Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus causes severe economic losses to the cattle industry in tropical and subtropical regions, and transmits endoparasites, such as Babesia bovis. The glycoprotein Bm95 is homologous to Bm86, a surface membrane protein of gut epithelial cells in R. microplu...

  9. Enhanced mucosal immune responses induced by a combined candidate mucosal vaccine based on Hepatitis A virus and Hepatitis E virus structural proteins linked to tuftsin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Gao

    Full Text Available Hepatitis A virus (HAV and Hepatitis E virus (HEV are the most common causes of infectious hepatitis. These viruses are spread largely by the fecal-oral route and lead to clinically important disease in developing countries. To evaluate the potential of targeting hepatitis A and E infection simultaneously, a combined mucosal candidate vaccine was developed with the partial open reading frame 2 (ORF2 sequence (aa 368-607 of HEV (HE-ORF2 and partial virus protein 1 (VP1 sequence (aa 1-198 of HAV (HA-VP1, which included the viral neutralization epitopes. Tuftsin is an immunostimulatory peptide which can enhance the immunogenicity of a protein by targeting it to macrophages and dendritic cells. Here, we developed a novel combined protein vaccine by conjugating tuftsin to HE-ORF2 and HA-VP1 and used synthetic CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs as the adjuvant. Subsequent experiments in BALB/c mice demonstrated that tuftsin enhanced the serum-specific IgG and IgA antibodies against HEV and HAV at the intestinal, vaginal and pulmonary interface when delivered intranasally. Moreover, mice from the intranasally immunized tuftsin group (HE-ORF2-tuftsin + HA-VP1-tuftsin + CpG showed higher levels of IFN-γ-secreting splenocytes (Th1 response and ratio of CD4+/CD8+ T cells than those of the no-tuftsin group (HE-ORF2 + HA-VP1 + CpG. Thus, the tuftsin group generated stronger humoral and cellular immune responses compared with the no-tuftsin group. Moreover, enhanced responses to the combined protein vaccine were obtained by intranasal immunization compared with intramuscular injection. By integrating HE-ORF2, HA-VP1 and tuftsin in a vaccine, this study validated an important concept for further development of a combined mucosal vaccine against hepatitis A and E infection.

  10. Booster immunization with a partially purified citrus tristeza virus (CTV) preparation after priming with recombinant CTV coat protein enhances the binding capacity of capture antibodies by ELISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Joseph, M; Filatov, V; Gofman, R; Guang, Y; Hadjinicolis, A; Mawassi, M; Gootwine, E; Weisman, Y; Malkinson, M

    1997-08-01

    Groups of rabbits and young lambs were immunized subcutaneously and intramuscularly with a recombinant citrus tristeza virus (CTV) coat protein (rCTV-CP) antigen. Three weeks after primary immunization the animals were divided into two groups that were boosted either with rCTV-CP or with a partially purified preparation of CTV particles (ppCTV). Twelve and 15 days after the last injection, the animals were bled and the binding capacity of the antisera for CTV detection was examined for capture antibodies by the indirect ELISA. Considerably higher ELISA titers were obtained from animals that were boosted with ppCTV than with rCP. Boosting with partially purified native antigens after priming with recombinant antigens is expected to extend the applicability of the antisera for detecting other structural and non-structural viral antigens by trapping ELISA. PMID:9274814

  11. LC-MS/MS analysis of visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue proteomes in young goats with focus on innate immunity and inflammation related proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Restelli, Laura; Codrea, Marius Cosmin; Savoini, Giovanni;

    2014-01-01

    protein and gene expression patterns. In ruminants, fat tissues play important biological roles not only for animal health, but also for quality and gain in meat and milk production. Yet very few studies have explored the ruminant adipose tissue proteomes. The aim of our study was to compare subcutaneous...... and visceral adipose tissues of goat, focusing on proteins involved in immune and inflammatory response. A 2-D LC-MS/MS approach followed by cluster analysis shows a clear distinction between subcutaneous and visceral fat tissue proteomes, and qualitative RT-PCR based analysis of 30 potential...... adipokines further confirmed the individual expression patterns of 26 of these, including 7 whose mRNA expression was observed for the first time in adipose tissues. This study provides a first description of adipose tissue proteomes in goat, and presents observations on novel proteins related to metabolic...

  12. Extensive changes in innate immune gene expression in obese Göttingen minipigs do not lead to changes in concentrations of circulating cytokines and acute phase proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højbøge, Tina Rødgaard; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Moesgaard, S. G.;

    2014-01-01

    been studied in Göttingen minipigs. Therefore, we studied the expression of innate immune genes in liver and adipose tissues as well as serum concentrations of cytokines and acute phase proteins in obese vs. lean Göttingen minipigs. In the liver, of 35 investigated genes, the expression of nine was...... receptor antagonist (up-regulated) with interleukin 1 receptor antagonist being the most highly regulated gene in both VAT and RPAT. Looking at patterns of expression across the three types of adipose tissues, obesity was associated with an increased number of acute phase proteins differentially expressed...... between adipose tissues and a decreased tissue-specific expression of cytokines and chemokines. In contrast to obese humans, no changes in serum concentrations of haptoglobin, C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin 6 were found in obese Göttingen minipigs....

  13. Enhancement of humoral immune responses. I. Potentiating influence of purified protein derivative on the invitro immune response of spleen cells sensitized to Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscoplat, C C; Setcavage, T M; Thoen, C O; Kim, Y B

    1976-01-01

    Addition of purified protein derivate (PPD) to suspension cultures of spleen cells from swine sensitized to Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium resulted in marked enhancement of antisheep erythrocyte plaque-forming cells after stimulation with sheep erythrocytes. The enhancing effect appeared early in the response and was specific for the sensitizing antigen. The enhancing effect was dependent upon the presence of both sheep erythrocytes and PPD in the culture system. PPD had no effect in the absence of sheep erythrocytes. Addition of PPD to cells from nonsensitized animals did not produce any enhancing effect. PMID:797671

  14. A novel ubiquitin-protein ligase E3 functions as a modulator of immune response against lipopolysaccharide in Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qi; Wang, Hao; Jiang, Shuai; Wang, Lingling; Xin, Lusheng; Liu, Conghui; Jia, Zhihao; Song, Linsheng; Zhu, Beiwei

    2016-07-01

    Ubiquitination is an important post-translational protein modification and plays a crucial role in various processes such as cell cycle, signal transduction, and transcriptional regulation. In the present study, a novel ubiquitin (Ub)-protein ligase E3 (designed as CgE3Rv1) was identified from Crassostrea gigas, and its ubiquitination regulation in the immune response against lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation was investigated. The open reading frame of CgE3Rv1 gene was of 1455 bp encoding a polypeptide of 484 amino acids with the predicted molecular mass of 54.89 kDa. There were two transmembrane regions and a RING-variant (RINGv) domain identified in CgE3Rv1. CgE3Rv1 shared similar C4HC3 zinc-finger-like motif with those RINGv domain Ub-protein ligases E3s identified from vertebrates and invertebrates, and it was closely clustered with the membrane-associated RING-CH2 (MARCH2) Ub-protein ligases E3s in the phylogenetic tree. The mRNA transcript of CgE3Rv1 was highest expressed in gonads and hemolymph (p < 0.05), and its mRNA expression level in hemocytes was significantly increased at 6 h (p < 0.01) after the stimulation of LPS, while the up-regulated mRNA expression was significantly decreased (p < 0.01) after acetylcholine stimulation. No significant changes of CgE3Rv1 expression were observed after peptidoglycan or mannan stimulation. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization assays revealed that CgE3Rv1 protein and mRNA were dominantly distributed in the gonad. In the hemocytes, CgE3Rv1 was mainly located around the nucleus, and slightly distributed in the cytoplasm and on the cell membrane. Recombinant CgE3Rv1 RINGv domain protein (rCgE3Rv1-RINGv) was confirmed to activate the Ub reaction system in vitro with the aid of Ub-activating enzyme E1 and Ub-conjugating enzyme E2. These results demonstrated that CgE3Rv1 was an Ub-protein ligase E3, which was involved in the immune response against LPS and the interaction with cell surface signal

  15. Impact of a probiotic fermented milk in the gut ecosystem and in the systemic immunity using a non-severe protein-energy-malnutrition model in mice

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    Carmuega Esteban

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malnutrition affects the immune response, causing a decrease of defence mechanisms and making the host more susceptible to infections. Probiotics can reconstitute the intestinal mucosa and stimulate local and systemic immunity. The aim of this work was evaluate the effects of a probiotic fermented milk as a complement of a re-nutrition diet, on the recovery of the intestinal barrier, and mucosal and systemic immune functions in a murine model of non-severe protein-energy-malnutrition. Its potential protection against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium infection was also analyzed. Methods Mice were undernourished and divided into 3 groups according to the dietary supplement received during re-nutrition (milk, probiotic fermented milk or its bacterial free supernatant and compared to well-nourished and malnourished mice. They were sacrificed previous to the re-nutrition and 5 days post re-nutrition. The phagocytic activity of macrophages from spleen and peritoneum and the changes in the intestinal histology and microbiota were evaluated. Different immune cell populations and cytokine productions were analyzed in the small intestine tissues. The effect of the re-nutrition supplements on the systemic immunity using OVA antigen and against an infection with S. Typhimurium was also studied. Results Probiotic fermented milk was the most effective re-nutrition diet that improved the intestinal microbiota. Its administration also increased the number of IgA+ cells, macrophages and dendritic cells. The production of different cytokine (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12 by these cells and the phagocytic activity in peritoneum and spleen was also increased. This re-nutrition diet also stimulated the systemic immune response against OVA antigen which was diminished after the malnutrition period and also improved the host response against S. Typhimurium, decreasing the spread of pathogenic bacteria to the liver and the spleen. The

  16. Pilot Study on the Use of DNA Priming Immunization to Enhance Y. pestis LcrV-Specific B Cell Responses Elicited by a Recombinant LcrV Protein Vaccine

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    Wei Li

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that DNA immunization is powerful in eliciting antigen-specific antibody responses in both animal and human studies. However, there is limited information on the mechanism of this effect. In particular, it is not known whether DNA immunization can also enhance the development of antigen-specific B cell development. In this report, a pilot study was conducted using plague LcrV immunogen as a model system to determine whether DNA immunization is able to enhance LcrV-specific B cell development in mice. Plague is an acute and often fatal infectious disease caused by Yersinia pestis (Y. pestis. Humoral immune responses provide critical protective immunity against plague. Previously, we demonstrated that a DNA vaccine expressing LcrV antigen can protect mice from lethal mucosal challenge. In the current study, we further evaluated whether the use of a DNA priming immunization is able to enhance the immunogenicity of a recombinant LcrV protein vaccine, and in particular, the development of LcrV-specific B cells. Our data indicate that DNA immunization was able to elicit high-level LcrV antibody responses when used alone or as part of a prime-boost immunization approach. Most significantly, DNA immunization was also able to increase the levels of LcrV-specific B cell development. The finding that DNA immunization can enhance antigen-specific B cell responses is highly significant and will help guide similar studies in other model antigen systems.

  17. Evaluation of a Native Preparation of HCV Core Protein (2-122 For Potential Applications in Immunization, Diagnosis and Mab Production

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    MR Aghasadeghi

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV is a worldwide problem. Among HCV proteins, core antigen (Ag, besides its importance for diagnostic application is a prime candidate for component of a vaccine. Herein, we report results of studies on production of the hydrophilic domain of core Ag (2-122 in native conformation by an arabinose induction system in E.coli and the primary characterization of this recombinant protein for applications in diagnosis, immunization and mAb production. Recombinant core (r-Core was able to detect anti-core antibodies in HCV positive serum samples in a dilution rate of 1/3200. It was also capable to elicit a potent anti-HCV humoral immune response in BALB/c mice. Finally, we established two stable clones of hybridoma which shown to produce specific and sensitive mAbs against the core protein. HCV core was able to elicit a broad range of antibody specificities depending on the immunogen conformation. Therefore, it may be possible to get new mAbs with higher affinities towards native conformation of core Ag.

  18. The role of Montanide ISA 70 as an adjuvant in immune responses against Leishmania major induced by thiol-specific antioxidant-based protein vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabazzadeh Tehrani, Narges; Mahdavi, Mehdi; Maleki, Fatemeh; Zarrati, Somayeh; Tabatabaie, Fatemeh

    2016-09-01

    Leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease caused by several species of the genus Leishmania. Montanide ISA 70 is an adjuvant composed of a natural metabolizable oil and a very refined emulsifier from the manide monooleate family. The TSA (thiol-specific antioxidant) is a important antigen of Leishmania major. The purpose of this work was protein-vaccine efficacy as an protection and excellent candidate in the presence Montanide. The expression of recombinant protein was confirmed with SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate) page and Western bloting. 48 BALB/c mice were divided into four groups (TSA/Freund,TSA/Alum + BCG, TSA/Montanide and PBS groups) and immunized with 20 μg of vaccine subcutaneously three times intervals on days 0, 14 and 28. The mice were challenged with parasite 21 days after final immunization. The lymphocyte proliferation was evaluated with Brdu method. Cytokines and also total antibody and subclasses were evaluated with ELISA method. The vaccine formulated with the recombinant TSA protein with Montanide induced lymphocytes proliferation cytokines and total antibody and subclasses as compared with the control group. PMID:27605780

  19. Dietary supplementation with dried chicory root triggers changes in the blood serum proteins engaged in the clotting process and the innate immune response in growing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepczynski, A; Herosimczyk, A; Ozgo, M; Skomial, J; Taciak, M; Barszcz, M; Berezecka, N

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize the systemic immune and metabolic alterations in the blood serum of growing pigs in response to a dietary supplementation with 4% of dried chicory roots. This was achieved by examining the influence of the experimental diet on serum protein changes especially these related with immunology and lipid metabolism. Serum proteins with the isoelectric point ranging from pH 3.0 to 10.0 were separated using high resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis. As a result, we found that experimental diet triggered significant changes in 37 protein spots. Of these, 14 were up-regulated, whereas 23 showed down-regulation. Of 37 significantly altered protein spots, 24 were successfully identified, representing 14 distinct gene products. Implementation of the dried chicory roots into the diet of growing pigs caused a significant down-regulation of apolipoprotein C-II complement component C6, C-reactive protein, CD14 antigen, C4b binding protein α and β chains, and fibrinogen. Piglets fed experimental diet had similar IgA, IgG and IgM concentrations, although the level of IgM tended to be lower compared to the control group. It is concluded that diet supplemented with 4% of dried chicory root may exert anti-inflammatory properties and affect lipid metabolism in growing pigs. PMID:25716964

  20. Identification of antigens specific to non-tuberculous mycobacteria: the Mce family of proteins as a target of T cell immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M Checkley

    Full Text Available The lack of an effective TB vaccine hinders current efforts in combating the TB pandemic. One theory as to why BCG is less protective in tropical countries is that exposure to non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM reduces BCG efficacy. There are currently several new TB vaccines in clinical trials, and NTM exposure may also be relevant in this context. NTM exposure cannot be accurately evaluated in the absence of specific antigens; those which are known to be present in NTM and absent from M. tuberculosis and BCG. We therefore used a bioinformatic pipeline to define proteins which are present in common NTM and absent from the M. tuberculosis complex, using protein BLAST, TBLASTN and a short sequence protein BLAST to ensure the specificity of this process. We then assessed immune responses to these proteins, in healthy South Africans and in patients from the United Kingdom and United States with documented exposure to NTM. Low level responses were detected to a cluster of proteins from the mammalian cell entry family, and to a cluster of hypothetical proteins, using ex vivo ELISpot and a 6 day proliferation assay. These early findings may provide a basis for characterising exposure to NTM at a population level, which has applications in the field of TB vaccine design as well as in the development of diagnostic tests.

  1. Generation of mice deficient in RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) and characterization of its role in innate immune responses and cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Atsushi [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Core Research for Evolution Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Ogawa, Masahiro [Laboratory of Immune Regulation, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Yanai, Hideyuki [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Core Research for Evolution Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Naka, Daiji [ZOEGENE Corp., 1000 Kamoshida-cho, Aoba-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 227-0033 (Japan); Goto, Ayana; Ao, Tomoka [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Tanno, Yuji [Laboratory of Chromosome Dynamics, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Takeda, Kiyoshi [Laboratory of Immune Regulation, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Watanabe, Yoshinori [Laboratory of Chromosome Dynamics, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Honda, Kenya [Laboratory of Immune Regulation, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Taniguchi, Tadatsugu, E-mail: tada@m.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Core Research for Evolution Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} We identified RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) as CpG-B DNA-binding protein. {yields} RBM3 translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and co-localized with CpG-B DNA. {yields} We newly generated Rbm3-deficient (Rbm3{sup -/-}) mice. {yields} DNA-mediated cytokine gene induction was normally occured in Rbm3{sup -/-} cells. {yields}Rbm3{sup -/-} MEFs showed poorer proliferation rate and increased number of G2-phase cells. -- Abstract: The activation of innate immune responses is critical to host defense against microbial infections, wherein nucleic acid-sensing pattern recognition receptors recognize DNA or RNA from viruses or bacteria and activate downstream signaling pathways. In a search for new DNA-sensing molecules that regulate innate immune responses, we identified RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3), whose role has been implicated in the regulation of cell growth. In this study, we generated Rbm3-deficient (Rbm3{sup -/-}) mice to study the role of RBM3 in immune responses and cell growth. Despite evidence for its interaction with immunogenic DNA in a cell, no overt phenotypic abnormalities were found in cells from Rbm3{sup -/-} mice for the DNA-mediated induction of cytokine genes. Interestingly, however, Rbm3{sup -/-} mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) showed poorer proliferation rates as compared to control MEFs. Further cell cycle analysis revealed that Rbm3{sup -/-} MEFs have markedly increased number of G2-phase cells, suggesting a hitherto unknown role of RBM3 in the G2-phase control. Thus, these mutant mice and cells may provide new tools with which to study the mechanisms underlying the regulation of cell cycle and oncogenesis.

  2. Generation of mice deficient in RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) and characterization of its role in innate immune responses and cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We identified RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) as CpG-B DNA-binding protein. → RBM3 translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and co-localized with CpG-B DNA. → We newly generated Rbm3-deficient (Rbm3-/-) mice. → DNA-mediated cytokine gene induction was normally occured in Rbm3-/- cells. →Rbm3-/- MEFs showed poorer proliferation rate and increased number of G2-phase cells. -- Abstract: The activation of innate immune responses is critical to host defense against microbial infections, wherein nucleic acid-sensing pattern recognition receptors recognize DNA or RNA from viruses or bacteria and activate downstream signaling pathways. In a search for new DNA-sensing molecules that regulate innate immune responses, we identified RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3), whose role has been implicated in the regulation of cell growth. In this study, we generated Rbm3-deficient (Rbm3-/-) mice to study the role of RBM3 in immune responses and cell growth. Despite evidence for its interaction with immunogenic DNA in a cell, no overt phenotypic abnormalities were found in cells from Rbm3-/- mice for the DNA-mediated induction of cytokine genes. Interestingly, however, Rbm3-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) showed poorer proliferation rates as compared to control MEFs. Further cell cycle analysis revealed that Rbm3-/- MEFs have markedly increased number of G2-phase cells, suggesting a hitherto unknown role of RBM3 in the G2-phase control. Thus, these mutant mice and cells may provide new tools with which to study the mechanisms underlying the regulation of cell cycle and oncogenesis.

  3. Bacteria modulate the CD8+ T cell epitope repertoire of host cytosol-exposed proteins to manipulate the host immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaakov Maman

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The main adaptive immune response to bacteria is mediated by B cells and CD4+ T-cells. However, some bacterial proteins reach the cytosol of host cells and are exposed to the host CD8+ T-cells response. Both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria can translocate proteins to the cytosol through type III and IV secretion and ESX-1 systems, respectively. The translocated proteins are often essential for the bacterium survival. Once injected, these proteins can be degraded and presented on MHC-I molecules to CD8+ T-cells. The CD8+ T-cells, in turn, can induce cell death and destroy the bacteria's habitat. In viruses, escape mutations arise to avoid this detection. The accumulation of escape mutations in bacteria has never been systematically studied. We show for the first time that such mutations are systematically present in most bacteria tested. We combine multiple bioinformatic algorithms to compute CD8+ T-cell epitope libraries of bacteria with secretion systems that translocate proteins to the host cytosol. In all bacteria tested, proteins not translocated to the cytosol show no escape mutations in their CD8+ T-cell epitopes. However, proteins translocated to the cytosol show clear escape mutations and have low epitope densities for most tested HLA alleles. The low epitope densities suggest that bacteria, like viruses, are evolutionarily selected to ensure their survival in the presence of CD8+ T-cells. In contrast with most other translocated proteins examined, Pseudomonas aeruginosa's ExoU, which ultimately induces host cell death, was found to have high epitope density. This finding suggests a novel mechanism for the manipulation of CD8+ T-cells by pathogens. The ExoU effector may have evolved to maintain high epitope density enabling it to efficiently induce CD8+ T-cell mediated cell death. These results were tested using multiple epitope prediction algorithms, and were found to be consistent for most proteins tested.

  4. Expression of innate immune genes, proteins and microRNAs in lung tissue and leukocytes of pigs infected with influenza virus

    OpenAIRE

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Cirera, Susanna; Vasby, Ditte; Podolska, Agnieszka; Breum, Solvej Østergaard; Dürrwald, Ralf; Schlegel, Michael; Peter M H Heegaard

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed at providing a better understanding of the involvement of innate immune factors including microRNA (miRNA) in the local and systemic host response to influenza virus infection. Twenty pigs were challenged by influenza A virus subtype H1N2. Expression of miRNA, mRNA and proteins were quantified at different time points after challenge (24h, 72h, and 14days post infection (pi)). Gene expression was quantified using 48.48 Dynamic Arrays (Fluidigm Corporation, CA, USA) combining ...

  5. IMPIPS: The Immune Protection-Inducing Protein Structure Concept in the Search for Steric-Electron and Topochemical Principles for Complete Fully-Protective Chemically Synthesised Vaccine Development

    OpenAIRE

    Manuel Elkin Patarroyo; Adriana Bermúdez; Martha Patricia Alba; Magnolia Vanegas; Armando Moreno-Vranich; Luis Antonio Poloche; Manuel Alfonso Patarroyo

    2015-01-01

    Determining immune protection-inducing protein structures (IMPIPS) involves defining the stereo-electron and topochemical characteristics which are essential in MHC-p-TCR complex formation. Modified high activity binding peptides (mHABP) were thus synthesised to produce a large panel of IMPIPS measuring 26.5 ±3.5Å between the farthest atoms fitting into Pockets 1 to 9 of HLA-DRβ1* structures. They displayed a polyproline II-like (PPIIL) structure with their backbone O and N atoms orientated t...

  6. Superior Immune Response to Protein-Conjugate versus Free Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Dransfield, Mark T.; Nahm, Moon H.; Han, MeiLan K.; Harnden, Sarah; Criner, Gerard J.; Fernando J Martinez; Scanlon, Paul D.; Woodruff, Prescott G.; Washko, George R.; Connett, John E.; Anthonisen, Nicholas R.; Bailey, William C.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Debate exists about the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of antibodies produced by the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The 7-valent diphtheria-conjugated pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PCV7) induces a more robust immune response than PPSV23 in healthy elderly adults.

  7. 70-kDa heat shock protein coated magnetic nanocarriers as a nanovaccine for induction of anti-tumor immune response in experimental glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevtsov, Maxim A; Nikolaev, Boris P; Yakovleva, Liudmila Y; Parr, Marina A; Marchenko, Yaroslav Y; Eliseev, Igor; Yudenko, Anna; Dobrodumov, Anatolii V; Zlobina, Olga; Zhakhov, Alexander; Ischenko, Alexander M; Pitkin, Emil; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2015-12-28

    Nanovaccines based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) provide a novel approach to induce the humoral and cell-based immune system to fight cancer. Herein, we increased the immunostimulatory capacity of SPIONs by coating them with recombinant heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) which is known to chaperone antigenic peptides. After binding, Hsp70-SPIONs deliver immunogenic peptides from tumor lysates to dendritiс cells (DCs) and thus stimulate a tumor-specific, CD8+ cytotoxic T cell response. We could show that binding activity of Hsp70-SPIONs to the substrate-binding domain (SBD) is highly dependent on the ATPase activity of its nucleotide-binding domain NBD), as shown by (31)P NMR spectroscopy. Immunization of C6 glioma-bearing rats with DCs pulsed with Hsp70-SPIONs and tumor lysates resulted in a delayed tumor progression (as measured by MRI) and an increased overall survival. In parallel an increased IFNγ secretion were detected in the serum of these animals and immunohistological analysis of subsequent cryosections of the glioma revealed an enhanced infiltration of memory CD45RO+ and cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. Taken together the study demonstrates that magnetic nanocarriers such as SPIONs coated with Hsp70 can be applied as a platform for boosting anti-cancer immune responses. PMID:26522072

  8. Immune escape mutants of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 selected using polyclonal sera: identification of key amino acids in the HA protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Sitaras

    Full Text Available Evolution of Avian Influenza (AI viruses--especially of the Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI H5N1 subtype--is a major issue for the poultry industry. HPAI H5N1 epidemics are associated with huge economic losses and are sometimes connected to human morbidity and mortality. Vaccination (either as a preventive measure or as a means to control outbreaks is an approach that splits the scientific community, due to the risk of it being a potential driving force in HPAI evolution through the selection of mutants able to escape vaccination-induced immunity. It is therefore essential to study how mutations are selected due to immune pressure. To this effect, we performed an in vitro selection of mutants from HPAI A/turkey/Turkey/1/05 (H5N1, using immune pressure from homologous polyclonal sera. After 42 rounds of selection, we identified 5 amino acid substitutions in the Haemagglutinin (HA protein, most of which were located in areas of antigenic importance and suspected to be prone to selection pressure. We report that most of the mutations took place early in the selection process. Finally, our antigenic cartography studies showed that the antigenic distance between the selected isolates and their parent strain increased with passage number.

  9. Activation of an immune-regulatory macrophage response and inhibition of lung inflammation in a mouse model of COPD using heat-shock protein alpha B-crystallin-loaded PLGA microparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noort, Johannes M.; Bsibsi, Malika; Nacken, Peter J.; Gerritsen, Wouter H.; Amor, Sandra; Holtman, Inge R.; Boddeke, Erik; van Ark, Ingrid; Leusink-Muis, Thea; Folkerts, Gert; Hennink, Wim E.; Amidi, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    As an extracellular protein, the small heat-shock protein alpha B-crystallin (HSPB5) has anti-inflammatory effects in several mouse models of inflammation. Here, we show that these effects are associated with the ability of HSPB5 to activate an immune-regulatory response in macrophages via endosomal

  10. Construction of prokaryotic expression system of ureB gene from a clinical Helicobacter pylori strain and identification of the recombinant protein immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-Fei Mao; Jie Yan

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To clone ureB gene from a clinical isolate ofHelicobacter pyloriand construct a prokaryotic expression system of the gene and identify immunity of the expressed recombinant protein.METHODS: ureB gene from a clinical H pyloristrain Y06 was amplified by the high fidelity polymerase chain reaction technique. The target DNA fragment amplified from ureB gene was sequenced after T-A cloning. Prokaryotic recombinant expression vector pET32a inserted with ureB gene (pET32a-ureB) was constructed. The expression of recombinant UreB protein (rUreB) in E. coliBL21DE3 induced by isopropylthio-β-D-galactoside (IPTG) at different concentrations was examined by SDS-PAGE. Western blot using commercial antibodies against whole cell of Hpylori and an immunodiffusion assay using a self-prepared rabbit anti-rUreB antibody were applied to determine immunity of the target recombinant protein. ELISA was used to detect the antibody against rUreB in sera of 125 Hpyloriinfected patients and to examine rUreB expression in 109 Hpylori isolates.RESULTS: In comparison with the reported corresponding sequences, the nucleotide sequence homology of the cloned ureBgene was from 96.88-97.82% while the homology of its putative amino acid sequence was as high as 99.65-99.82%.The rUreB output expressed by pET32a-ureB-BL21DE3 was approximate 30% of the total bacterial proteins. rUreB specifically combined with the commercial antibodies against whole cell of H pyloriand strongly induced rabbits to produce antibody with a 1:8 immunodiffusion titer after the animals were immunized with the recombinant protein.Serum samples from all H pyloriinfected patients were positive for UreB antibody and UreB expression were detectable in all tested H pyloriisolates.CONCLUSION: A prokaryotic expression system with high expression efficiency of H pylori ureB gene was successfully established. The expressed rUreB showed qualified immunoreactivity and antigenicity. High frequencies of UreB expression in different H

  11. Co-expression of Ubiquitin gene and capsid protein gene enhances the potency of DNA immunization of PCV2 in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Yanjun

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recombinant plasmid that co-expressed ubiquitin and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2 virus capsid protein (Cap, denoted as pc-Ub-Cap, and a plasmid encoding PCV2 virus Cap alone, denoted as pc-Cap, were transfected into 293T cells. Indirect immunofluorescence (IIF and confocal microscopy were performed to measure the cellular expression of Cap. Three groups of mice were then vaccinated once every three weeks for a total of three doses with pc-Ub-Cap, pc-Cap or the empty vector pCAGGS, followed by challenging all mice intraperitoneally with 0.5 mL 106.5 TCID50/mL PCV2. To characterize the protective immune response against PCV2 infection in mice, assays of antibody titer (including different IgG isotypes, flow cytometric analysis (FCM, lymphocyte proliferation, cytokine production and viremia were evaluated. The results showed that pc-Ub-Cap and pc-Cap were efficiently expressed in 293T cells. However, pc-Ub-Cap-vaccinated animals had a significantly higher level of Cap-specific antibody and induced a stronger Th1 type cellular immune response than did pc-Cap-vaccinated animals, suggesting that ubiquitin conjugation improved both the cellular and humoral immune responses. Additionally, viral replication in blood was lower in the pc-Ub-Cap-vaccinated group than in the pc-Cap and empty vector groups, suggesting that the protective immunity induced by pc-Ub-Cap is superior to that induced by pc-Cap.

  12. AFCo1, a meningococcal B-derived cochleate adjuvant, strongly enhances antibody and T-cell immunity against Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 4 and 5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez Oliver

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whilst a large number of malaria antigens are being tested as candidate malaria vaccines, a major barrier to the development of an effective vaccine is the lack of a suitable human adjuvant capable of inducing a strong and long lasting immune response. In this study, the ability of AFCo1, a potent T and B cell adjuvant based on cochleate structures derived from meningococcal B outer membrane proteoliposomes (MBOMP, to boost the immune response against two Plasmodium falciparum antigens, merozoite surface protein 4 (MSP4 and 5 (MSP5, was evaluated. Methods Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA, which is able to confer protection against malaria in animal MSP4/5 vaccine challenge models, was used as positive control adjuvant. MSP4 and 5-specific IgG, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH, T-cell proliferation, and cytokine production were evaluated in parallel in mice immunized three times intramuscularly with MSP4 or MSP5 incorporated into AFCo1, synthetic cochleate structures, CFA or phosphate buffered saline. Results AFCo1 significantly enhanced the IgG and T-cell response against MSP4 and MSP5, with a potency equivalent to CFA, with the response being characterized by both IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes, increased interferon gamma production and a strong DTH response, consistent with the ability of AFCo1 to induce Th1-like immune responses. Conclusion Given the proven safety of MBOMP, which is already in use in a licensed human vaccine, AFCo1 could assist the development of human malaria vaccines that require a potent and safe adjuvant.

  13. Effect of cholinomimetics and adrenomimetics on proliferation of mouse B lymphocytes during primary immune response to protein antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ado, A.D.; Dontsov, V.I.; Gol' dshtein, M.M.

    1985-12-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study the effect of neurotransmitters on proliferation of B lymphocytes induced by specific antigen. Experiments were carried out on female mice. To estimate proliferative activity, lymphocytes enriched with B cells were incubated in medium 199 for 2 h at 37 degrees C in a dose of 2.10/sup 6/-5.10/sup 6/ cells with 2 microCi of /sup 3/H-(methyl)-thymidine. The effect of acetylcholine on incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine into B lymphocytes of mice immunized with different doses of antigen during culture is shown. Discordance of effects of adrenalin and acetylcholine on incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine into B lymphocytes of mice immunized with different doses of ovalbumin is also shown.

  14. Beneficial effects of the naturally occurring flavonoid silibinin on the prostate cancer microenvironment: role of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and immune cell recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Harold; Deep, Gagan; Kumar, Sushil; Jain, Anil K; Agarwal, Chapla; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    Tumor microenvironment plays an essential role in prostate carcinogenesis and offers novel opportunities to prevent and treat prostate cancer (PCA). Here, we investigated the ability of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) to promote PCA progression, and silibinin efficacy to target this response. We collected conditioned media from CAFs treated with vehicle or silibinin, and labeled as control conditioned media (CCM) or silibinin-treatment conditioned media (SBCM), respectively. Next, we characterized the effect of CCM and SBCM treatment in several PCA cell lines (RWPE-1, WPE-1 NA-22, WPE-1 NB-14 and PC3). Result showed that compared with SBCM, CCM significantly reduces E-cadherin expression and increases invasiveness and clonogenicity in PCA cells. Further molecular studies identified monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) as the key component of CCM that promotes PCA invasiveness, whereas silibinin treatment strongly reduced MCP-1 expression in CAFs by inhibiting the DNA-binding activity of MCP-1 transcriptional regulators-nuclear factor-kappaB and AP-1. In vivo, silibinin feeding (200mg/kg body weight) strongly reduced TRAMPC1 allografts growth (by 68%) in syngeneic C57Bl/6 mice. TRAMPC1 tumor analysis showed that silibinin reduced MCP-1 and CAFs' biomarkers (fibroblast activation protein, α-smooth muscle actin, transforming growth factor beta 2, vimentin etc.) and significantly modulated the recruitment of immune cells in the tumor microenvironment. Similar inhibitory effects of silibinin on MCP-1 and immune cells recruitment were also observed in TRAMP PCA tissues with reported silibinin efficacy. Overall, our data suggest that silibinin can target CAF-mediated invasiveness in PCA by inhibiting MCP-1 secretion. This, in turn, was associated with a reduction in immune cell recruitment in vivo along with a marked reduction in tumor growth. PMID:27207648

  15. Molecular and functional characterization of peptidoglycan-recognition protein SC2 (PGRP-SC2) from Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) involved in the immune response to Streptococcus agalactiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zhen; Chen, Shannan; Hou, Jing; Huo, Huijun; Zhang, Xiaolin; Ruan, Baiye; Laghari, Zubair Ahmed; Li, Li; Lu, Yishan; Nie, Pin

    2016-07-01

    PGRP-SC2, the member of PGRP family, plays an important role in regulation of innate immune response. In this paper, a PGRP-SC2 gene of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus (designated as On-PGRP-SC2) was cloned and its expression pattern under the infection of Streptococcus agalactiae was investigated. Sequence analysis showed main structural features required for amidase activity were detected in the deduced amino acid sequence of On-PGRP-SC2. In healthy tilapia, the On-PGRP-SC2 transcripts could be detected in all the examined tissues, with the most abundant expression in the muscle. When infected with S. agalactiae, there was a clear time-dependent expression pattern of On-PGRP-SC2 in the spleen, head kidney and brain. The assays for the amidase activity suggested that recombinant On-PGRP-SC2 protein had a Zn(2+)-dependent PGN-degrading activity. Moreover, our works showed that recombinant On-PGRP-SC2 protein could significantly reduce bacterial load in target organs attacked by S. agalactiae. These findings indicated that On-PGRP-SC2 may play important roles in the immune response to S. agalactiae in Nile tilapia. PMID:27033804

  16. DNA immunization: ubiquitination of a viral protein enhances cytotoxic T-lymphocyte induction and antiviral protection but abrogates antibody induction.

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, F.; Zhang, J.; Whitton, J L

    1997-01-01

    DNA immunization can induce cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), antibodies, and protection against microbial challenge. The underlying mechanisms remain obscure and must be understood to permit rational manipulation and optimization of the technique. We set out to enhance the intracellular degradation of a viral antigen, with the intent of improving antigen entry into, and presentation by, the class I major histocompatibility complex pathway. We achieved this goal by cotranslational ubiquitination...

  17. Immunization of Mice with Recombinant Protein CobB or AsnC Confers Protection against Brucella abortus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Simei Fu; Jie Xu; Xianbo Li; Yongfei Xie; Yefeng Qiu; Xinying Du; Shuang Yu; Yaoxia Bai; Yanfen Chen; Tongkun Wang; Zhoujia Wang; Yaqing Yu; Guangneng Peng; Kehe Huang; Liuyu Huang

    2012-01-01

    Due to drawbacks of live attenuated vaccines, much more attention has been focused on screening of Brucella protective antigens as subunit vaccine candidates. Brucella is a facultative intracellular bacterium and cell mediated immunity plays essential roles for protection against Brucella infection. Identification of Brucella antigens that present T-cell epitopes to the host could enable development of such vaccines. In this study, 45 proven or putative pathogenesis-associated factors of Bruc...

  18. Immune reactivity of sera obtained from brucellosis patients and vaccinated-rabbits to a fusion protein from Brucella melitensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Amani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Brucella spp. are facultative intracellular pathogens which can stay alive and multiply in professional and nonprofessional phagocytes. Immunity against Brucella melitensis involves antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells activation and humoral immune responses. Due to negative aspects of live attenuated vaccines, much attention has been focused on finding Brucella-protective antigens to introduce them as potential subunit vaccine candidates. Materials and Methods: A chimeric gene encoding trigger factor (TF, Omp3148-74 and BP2687-111 fragments (TOB from B. melitensis was successfully cloned, expressed in Escherichia coliBL21-DE3 and purified by Ni-NTA agarose column. Antibodies to recombinant TOB (rTOB have been investigated in Brucella-infected human sera and a pool serum prepared from B. melitensis-vaccinated rabbits. Results: Our results showed that the immunized rabbit pool serum strongly reacted with rTOB. In addition, antibodies against rTOB were detectable in 76.5% of sera obtained from infected patients. Conclusion: These findings suggest that rTOB may provide a potential immunogenic candidate which could be considered in future vaccine studies.

  19. Induction of Broad and Potent Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Immune Responses in Rhesus Macaques by Priming with a DNA Vaccine and Boosting with Protein-Adsorbed Polylactide Coglycolide Microparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Otten, Gillis; Schaefer, Mary; Greer, Catherine; Calderon-Cacia, Maria; Coit, Doris; Kazzaz, Jina; Medina-Selby, Angelica; Selby, Mark; Singh, Manmohan; Ugozzoli, Mildred; zur Megede, Jan; Barnett, Susan W.; O'Hagan, Derek; Donnelly, John; Ulmer, Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Several vaccine technologies were evaluated for their abilities to induce anti-human immunodeficiency virus Gag immune responses in rhesus macaques. While no vaccine alone was able to induce broad and strong immune responses, these were achieved by priming with Gag DNA and boosting with Gag protein adsorbed to polylactide coglycolide microparticles. This regimen elicited strong antibodies, helper T cells, and cytotoxic T lymphocytes and thus holds promise as an effective vaccination scheme.

  20. Hepatic acute-phase proteins control innate immune responses during infection by promoting myeloid-derived suppressor cell function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sander, L.E.; Sackett, S.D.; Dierssen, U.; Beraza, N.; Linke, R.; Müller, M.R.; Blander, J.M.; Tacke, F.; Trautwein, C.

    2010-01-01

    Acute-phase proteins (APPs) are an evolutionarily conserved family of proteins produced mainly in the liver in response to infection and inflammation. Despite vast pro- and antiinflammatory properties ascribed to individual APPs, their collective function during infections remains poorly defined. Us

  1. Protein source and quality in therapeutic foods affect the immune response and outcome in severe acute malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protein is a vital component of therapeutic foods designed to treat severe acute malnutrition (SAM) in children; however there are still unknowns about the quality and quantity of the proteins to use in these foods. This review examines two recent studies investigating several different qualities an...

  2. Type I J-domain NbMIP1 proteins are required for both Tobacco mosaic virus infection and plant innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumei Du

    Full Text Available Tm-2² is a coiled coil-nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat resistance protein that confers durable extreme resistance against Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV and Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV by recognizing the viral movement protein (MP. Here we report that the Nicotiana benthamiana J-domain MIP1 proteins (NbMIP1s associate with tobamovirus MP, Tm-2² and SGT1. Silencing of NbMIP1s reduced TMV movement and compromised Tm-2²-mediated resistance against TMV and ToMV. Furthermore, silencing of NbMIP1s reduced the steady-state protein levels of ToMV MP and Tm-2². Moreover, NbMIP1s are required for plant resistance induced by other R genes and the nonhost pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst DC3000. In addition, we found that SGT1 associates with Tm-2² and is required for Tm-2²-mediated resistance against TMV. These results suggest that NbMIP1s function as co-chaperones during virus infection and plant immunity.

  3. Plasmin cleaves fibrinogen and the human complement proteins C3b and C5 in the presence of Leptospira interrogans proteins: A new role of LigA and LigB in invasion and complement immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiblanco-Valencia, Mónica Marcela; Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Pagotto, Ana Helena; de Toledo Serrano, Solange Maria; Abreu, Patricia Antonia Estima; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Isaac, Lourdes

    2016-05-01

    Plasminogen is a single-chain glycoprotein found in human plasma as the inactive precursor of plasmin. When converted to proteolytically active plasmin, plasmin(ogen) regulates both complement and coagulation cascades, thus representing an important target for pathogenic microorganisms. Leptospira interrogans binds plasminogen, which is converted to active plasmin. Leptospiral immunoglobulin-like (Lig) proteins are surface exposed molecules that interact with extracellular matrix components and complement regulators, including proteins of the FH family and C4BP. In this work, we demonstrate that these multifunctional molecules also bind plasminogen through both N- and C-terminal domains. These interactions are dependent on lysine residues and are affected by ionic strength. Competition assays suggest that plasminogen does not share binding sites with C4BP or FH on Lig proteins at physiological molar ratios. Plasminogen bound to Lig proteins is converted to proteolytic active plasmin in the presence of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). Lig-bound plasmin is able to cleave the physiological substrates fibrinogen and the complement proteins C3b and C5. Taken together, our data point to a new role of LigA and LigB in leptospiral invasion and complement immune evasion. Plasmin(ogen) acquisition by these versatile proteins may contribute to Leptospira infection, favoring bacterial survival and dissemination inside the host. PMID:26822552

  4. High mobility group box-1 protein inhibits regulatory T cell immune activity in liver failure in patients with chronic hepatitis B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu-WenWang; Hui Chen; Zuo-Jiong Gong

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Liver failure in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients is a severe, life-threatening condition. Intestinal endotoxemia plays a significant role in the progress to liver failure. High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein is involved in the process of endotoxemia. Regulatory T (Treg) cells maintain immune tolerance and contribute to the immunological hyporesponsiveness against HBV infection. However, the roles of HMGB1 and Treg cells in the pathogenesis of liver failure in CHB patients, and whether HMGB1 affects the immune activity of Treg cells are poorly known at present, and so were explored in this study. METHODS: The levels of HMGB1 expression were detected by ELISA, real-time RT-PCR, and Western blotting, and the percentage of CD4+CD25+CD127low Treg cells among CD4+cells was detected by flow cytometry in liver failure patients with chronic HBV infection, CHB patients, and healthy controls. Then, CD4+CD25+CD127low Treg cells isolated from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from CHB patients were stimulated with HMGB1 at different concentrations or at various intervals. The effect of HMGB1 on the immune activity of Treg cells was assessed by a suppression assay of the allogeneic mixed lymphocyte response. The levels of forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) expression in Treg cells treated with HMGB1 were detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting. RESULTS: A higher level of HMGB1 expression and a lower percentage of Treg cells within the population of CD4+ cells were found in liver failure patients than in CHB patients (82.6±20.1 μg/L vs. 34.2±13.7 μg/L; 4.55±1.34% vs. 9.52± 3.89%, respectively). The immune activity of Treg cells was significantly weakened and the levels of Foxp3 expression were reduced in a dose- or time-dependent manner when Treg cells were stimulated with HMGB1 in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: The high level of HMGB1 and the low percentage of Treg cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of liver failure in patients with chronic HBV infection

  5. Effects of protein hydrolysates supplementation in low fish meal diets on growth performance, innate immunity and disease resistance of red sea bream Pagrus major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Sanaz; Rahimnejad, Samad; Herault, Mikaël; Fournier, Vincent; Lee, Cho-Rong; Dio Bui, Hien Thi; Jeong, Jun-Bum; Lee, Kyeong-Jun

    2015-08-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the supplemental effects of three different types of protein hydrolysates in a low fish meal (FM) diet on growth performance, feed utilization, intestinal morphology, innate immunity and disease resistance of juvenile red sea bream. A FM-based diet was used as a high fish meal diet (HFM) and a low fish meal (LFM) diet was prepared by replacing 50% of FM by soy protein concentrate. Three other diets were prepared by supplementing shrimp, tilapia or krill hydrolysate to the LFM diet (designated as SH, TH and KH, respectively). Triplicate groups of fish (4.9 ± 0.1 g) were fed one of the test diets to apparent satiation twice daily for 13 weeks and then challenged by Edwardsiella tarda. At the end of the feeding trial, significantly (P HFM and hydrolysate treated groups compared to those fed the LFM diet. Significant improvements in feed conversion and protein efficiency ratios were obtained in fish fed the hydrolysates compared to those fed the LFM diet. Significant enhancement in digestibility of protein was found in fish fed SH and KH diets and dry matter digestibility was increased in the group fed SH diet in comparison to LFM group. Fish fed the LFM diet showed significantly higher glucose level than all the other treatments. Whole-body and dorsal muscle compositions were not significantly influenced by dietary treatments. Histological analysis revealed significant reductions in goblet cell numbers and enterocyte length in the proximal intestine of fish fed the LFM diet. Superoxide dismutase activity and total immunoglobulin level were significantly increased in fish fed the diets containing protein hydrolysates compared to the LFM group. Also, significantly higher lysozyme and antiprotease activities were found in fish fed the hydrolysates and HFM diets compared to those offered LFM diet. Fish fed the LFM diet exhibited the lowest disease resistance against E. tarda and dietary inclusion of the hydrolysates resulted in

  6. Heterologous expression of Schistosoma japanicum signal protein 14-3-3 in Pichia pastoris and the subsequent immune response in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meijuan ZHENG; Jilong SHEN; Yuanhong XU; Qingli LUO

    2008-01-01

    Schistosomiasis japonica, a zoonosis caused by Schistosomajaponicum, is endemic to the Philippines and China. Several vaccine candidates have been identified and tested in different animal models, but it is still unclear which will be optimal for testing in the field. Therefore, new antigens and strategies are necessary for vaccine development against schistosomiasis japonica. The Sj14-3-3 gene was amplified and subcloned into the expression vector pPICZα-B and transformed into P. pastoris X-33 by electroporation. Three transformants were induced with methanol. The cultural supernatant was collected and tested by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. The pro-tein of rSj14-3-3 was prepared and purified and BALB/c mice were immunized which was followed by a challen-ging infection. The immuno-protection was then evalu-ated. The Sj14-3-3 gene was expressed and secreted into the medium and its molecular weight was about 35000 as determined by SDS-PAGE. Western blotting showed that the protein had a high specificity against mouse-anti-Sj14-3-3 monoclonal antibody and rSj14-3-3 had a promising immune reactivity. The results of the immuno-protective experiments revealed that the worm reduction was 26.0%, 32.2%, and 36.8%, respectively. The number of eggs in liver tissue was reduced by 36.8%, 43.2%, and 46.1%, respectively. The recombinant Sj14-3-3 of eukaryotic expression in Pichia pastoris was successfully harvested. The molecular vaccine of Sj14-3-3 could partially induce resistance to the infection with S. japonicum in BALB/c mice. The recombinant protein Sj14-3-3 has promising immunological potentials for further approach to the dia-gnosis and development of molecular vaccine.

  7. Dengue virus envelope protein domain I/II hinge determines long-lived serotype-specific dengue immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, William B; de Alwis, Ruklanthi; Yount, Boyd L; Royal, Scott R; Huynh, Jeremy P; Smith, Scott A; Crowe, James E; Doranz, Benjamin J; Kahle, Kristen M; Pfaff, Jennifer M; White, Laura J; Sariol, Carlos A; de Silva, Aravinda M; Baric, Ralph S

    2014-02-01

    The four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes, DENV-1, -2, -3, and -4, are endemic throughout tropical and subtropical regions of the world, with an estimated 390 million acute infections annually. Infection confers long-term protective immunity against the infecting serotype, but secondary infection with a different serotype carries a greater risk of potentially fatal severe dengue disease, including dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. The single most effective measure to control this threat to global health is a tetravalent DENV vaccine. To date, attempts to develop a protective vaccine have progressed slowly, partly because the targets of type-specific human neutralizing antibodies (NAbs), which are critical for long-term protection, remain poorly defined, impeding our understanding of natural immunity and hindering effective vaccine development. Here, we show that the envelope glycoprotein domain I/II hinge of DENV-3 and DENV-4 is the primary target of the long-term type-specific NAb response in humans. Transplantation of a DENV-4 hinge into a recombinant DENV-3 virus showed that the hinge determines the serotype-specific neutralizing potency of primary human and nonhuman primate DENV immune sera and that the hinge region both induces NAbs and is targeted by protective NAbs in rhesus macaques. These results suggest that the success of live dengue vaccines may depend on their ability to stimulate NAbs that target the envelope glycoprotein domain I/II hinge region. More broadly, this study shows that complex conformational antibody epitopes can be transplanted between live viruses, opening up similar possibilities for improving the breadth and specificity of vaccines for influenza, HIV, hepatitis C virus, and other clinically important viral pathogens. PMID:24385585

  8. Alternative interactions between the Tn7 transposase and the Tn7 target DNA binding protein regulate target immunity and transposition

    OpenAIRE

    Skelding, Zachary; Queen-Baker, Jennie; Craig, Nancy L

    2003-01-01

    The Tn7 transposon avoids inserting into a target DNA that contains a pre-existing copy of Tn7. This phenomenon, known as ‘target immunity’, is established when TnsB, a Tn7 transposase subunit, binds to Tn7 sequences in the target DNA and mediates displacement of TnsC, a critical transposase activator, from the DNA. Paradoxically, TnsB–TnsC interactions are also required to promote transposon insertion. We have probed Tn7 target immunity by isolating TnsB mutants that mediate more frequent in...

  9. Maternal serum protein profile and immune response protein subunits as markers for non-invasive prenatal diagnosis of trisomy 21, 18, and 13

    KAUST Repository

    Narasimhan, Kothandaraman

    2013-02-01

    Objectives: To use proteomics to identify and characterize proteins in maternal serum from patients at high-risk for fetal trisomy 21, trisomy 18, and trisomy 13 on the basis of ultrasound and maternal serum triple tests. Methods: We performed a comprehensive proteomic analysis on 23 trisomy cases and 85 normal cases during the early second trimester of pregnancy. Protein profiling along with conventional sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis/Tandem mass spectrometry analysis was carried out to characterize proteins associated with each trisomy condition and later validated using Western blot. Results: Protein profiling approach using surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass (SELDI-TOF/MS) spectrometry resulted in the identification of 37 unique hydrophobic proteomic features for three trisomy conditions. Using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization - Time of Flight/Time of Flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) and western blot, glyco proteins such as alpha-1-antitrypsin, apolipoprotein E, apolipoprotein H, and serum carrier protein transthyretin were identified as potential maternal serum markers for fetal trisomy condition. The identified proteins showed differential expression at the subunit level. Conclusions: Maternal serum protein profiling using proteomics may allow non-invasive diagnostic testing for the most common trisomies and may complement ultrasound-based methods to more accurately determine pregnancies with fetal aneuploidies. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Effect of 5-Aza-2’-deoxycytidine on immune-associated proteins in exosomes from hepatoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao-Wa; Sanren

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of 5-Aza-2’-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-CdR) on heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), human leucocyte antigen-Ⅰ (HLA-Ⅰ) and NY-ESO-1 proteins in exosomes produced by hepatoma cells, HepG2 and Hep3B. METHODS: Exosomes derived from HepG2 and Hep3B cells treated with or without 5-aza-CdR were isolated and purified by ultrafiltration centrifugation and sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. The number of exosomes was counted under electron microscope. Concentration of proteins in exosomes was measured...

  11. The extradomain A of fibronectin (EDA) combined with poly(I:C) enhances the immune response to HIV-1 p24 protein and the protection against recombinant Listeria monocytogenes-Gag infection in the mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Román, Beatriz; De Andrés, Ximena; Muñoz, Pilar-María; Obregón, Patricia; Asensio, Aaron-C; Garrido, Victoria; Mansilla, Cristina; Arribillaga, Laura; Lasarte, Juan-José; De Andrés, Damián; Amorena, Beatriz; Grilló, María-Jesús

    2012-03-28

    The development of effective vaccines against HIV-1 infection constitutes one of the major challenges in viral immunology. One of the protein candidates in vaccination against this virus is p24, since it is a conserved HIV antigen that has cytotoxic and helper T cell epitopes as well as B cell epitopes that may jointly confer enhanced protection against infection when used in immunization-challenge approaches. In this context, the adjuvant effect of EDA (used as EDAp24 fusion protein) and poly(I:C), as agonists of TLR4 and TLR3, respectively, was assessed in p24 immunizations using a recombinant Listeria monocytogenes HIV-1 Gag proteins (Lm-Gag, where p24 is the major antigen) for challenge in mice. Immunization with EDAp24 fusion protein together with poly(I:C) adjuvant induced a specific p24 IFN-γ production (Th1 profile) as well as protection against a Lm-Gag challenge, suggesting an additive or synergistic effect between both adjuvants. The combination of EDA (as a fusion protein with the antigen, which may favor antigen targeting to dendritic cells through TLR4) and poly(I:C) could thus be a good adjuvant candidate to enhance the immune response against HIV-1 proteins and its use may open new ways in vaccine investigations on this virus. PMID:22326778

  12. Changes over lactation in breast milk serum proteins involved in the maturation of immune and digestive system of the infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lina; de Waard, Marita; Verheijen, Hester; Boeren, Sjef; Hageman, Jos A; van Hooijdonk, Toon; Vervoort, Jacques; van Goudoever, Johannes B; Hettinga, Kasper

    2016-06-01

    Here we provide data from shot-gun proteomics, using filtered-aided sample preparation (FASP), dimethyl labeling and LC-MS/MS, to quantify the changes in the repertoire of human milk proteins over lactation. Milk serum proteins were analyzed at week 1, 2, 3 4, 8, 16, and 24 in milk from four individual mothers. A total of 247 proteins were identified, of which 200 proteins were quantified. The data supplied in this article supports the accompanying publication (Zhang et al., 2006) [1]. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (Vizcaíno et al., 2016) [2] via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD003465. PMID:26977438

  13. Unlipidated outer membrane protein Omp16 (U-Omp16 from Brucella spp. as nasal adjuvant induces a Th1 immune response and modulates the Th2 allergic response to cow's milk proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés E Ibañez

    Full Text Available The discovery of novel mucosal adjuvants will help to develop new formulations to control infectious and allergic diseases. In this work we demonstrate that U-Omp16 from Brucella spp. delivered by the nasal route (i.n. induced an inflammatory immune response in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL and lung tissues. Nasal co-administration of U-Omp16 with the model antigen (Ag ovalbumin (OVA increased the amount of Ag in lung tissues and induced OVA-specific systemic IgG and T helper (Th 1 immune responses. The usefulness of U-Omp16 was also assessed in a mouse model of food allergy. U-Omp16 i.n. administration during sensitization ameliorated the hypersensitivity responses of sensitized mice upon oral exposure to Cow's Milk Protein (CMP, decreased clinical signs, reduced anti-CMP IgE serum antibodies and modulated the Th2 response in favor of Th1 immunity. Thus, U-Omp16 could be used as a broad Th1 mucosal adjuvant for different Ag formulations.

  14. The Non-structural Protein 5 and Matrix Protein Are Antigenic Targets of T Cell Immunity to Genotype 1 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mokhtar, Helen; Pedrera, Miriam; Frossard, Jean-Pierre;

    2016-01-01

    . However, these approaches have failed to demonstrate the necessary efficacy to progress toward market. T cells are crucial to the control of many viruses through cytolysis and cytokine secretion. Since control of PRRSV infection is not dependent on the development of neutralizing antibodies, it has been...... proposed that T cell-mediated immunity plays a key role. Therefore, we hypothesized that conserved T cell antigens represent prime candidates for the development a novel PRRS vaccine. Antigens were identified by screening a proteome-wide synthetic peptide library with T cells from cohorts of pigs rendered...

  15. Feeling manipulated: cytomegalovirus immune manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sparer Tim E

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract No one likes to feel like they have been manipulated, but in the case of cytomegalovirus (CMV immune manipulation, we do not really have much choice. Whether you call it CMV immune modulation, manipulation, or evasion, the bottom line is that CMV alters the immune response in such a way to allow the establishment of latency with lifelong shedding. With millions of years of coevolution within their hosts, CMVs, like other herpesviruses, encode numerous proteins that can broadly influence the magnitude and quality of both innate and adaptive immune responses. These viral proteins include both homologues of host proteins, such as MHC class I or chemokine homologues, and proteins with little similarity to any other known proteins, such as the chemokine binding protein. Although a strong immune response is launched against CMV, these virally encoded proteins can interfere with the host's ability to efficiently recognize and clear virus, while others induce or alter specific immune responses to benefit viral replication or spread within the host. Modulation of host immunity allows survival of both the virus and the host. One way of describing it would be a kind of "mutually assured survival" (as opposed to MAD, Mutually Assured Destruction. Evaluation of this relationship provides important insights into the life cycle of CMV as well as a greater understanding of the complexity of the immune response to pathogens in general.

  16. Immunogenicity when utilizing adenovirus serotype 4 and 5 vaccines expressing circumsporozoite protein in naïve and Adenovirus (Ad5 immune mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuldt Nathaniel J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Induction of potent long lasting effector T cell responses against liver stage malaria antigens strongly correlates with protection from malaria. While Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 based malaria vaccine platforms have the ability to induce potent effector T cell responses against transgenes, high rates of pre-existing Ad5 immunity in malaria endemic regions has prompted study of alternative Ad serotype based malaria vaccines as replacements for Ad5 based malaria vaccines. The research described in this article examines the utility of alternative serotype adenovirus serotype 4 (Ad4 expressing a sporozoite surface protein (circumsporozoite protein (CSP (Ad4-CSP to induce immune responses against CSP. The immunogenicity of Ad4-CSP was also tested in homologous and heterologous prime boost vaccinations in both Ad5 naïve and Ad5 immune backgrounds as compared to use of Ad5-CSP. Results In Ad5 naïve animals, use of Ad4-CSP priming vaccinations followed by boosting with Ad5-CSP (Ad4-CSP/Ad5-CSP maximally increased the numbers of CSP specific cytokine secreting cytotoxic T cells relative to repeated use of Ad5-CSP. The Ad4-CSP/Ad5-CSP regimen also induced equivalent levels of CSP specific cell killing as did homologous prime-boost vaccinations with Ad5-CSP, despite stimulating lower numbers of CSP specific cytotoxic T cells. Priming with Ad4-CSP followed by a homologous boost resulted in significantly less CSP specific humoral responses than any other vaccination regimen tested in Ad naïve animals. In Ad5 immune animals, addition of Ad4-CSP in homologous or heterologous prime boost resulted in inductions of higher CSP specific responses than animals repeatedly vaccinated with Ad5-CSP alone. However, the observed responses were well below those observed in similarly treated Ad naïve mice. Conclusions While the Ad4-CSP/Ad5-CSP and Ad5-CSP/Ad5-CSP vaccination regimens resulted in equivalent CSP specific killing in Ad naïve animals

  17. Potential role of lncRNA cyp2c91-protein interactions on diseases of the immune system

    OpenAIRE

    Suravajhala, Prashanth; Kogelman, Lisette J. A.; Mazzoni, Gianluca; Kadarmideen, Haja N

    2015-01-01

    With unprecedented increase in next generation sequencing technologies, there has been a persistent interest on transcript profiles of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and protein-coding genes forming an interaction network. Apart from protein–protein interaction (PPI), gene network models such as Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (WGCNA) are used to functionally annotate lncRNAs in identifying their potential disease associations. To address this, studies have led to characterizing ...

  18. Hepatic acute-phase proteins control innate immune responses during infection by promoting myeloid-derived suppressor cell function

    OpenAIRE

    Sander, L.E.; Sackett, S.D.; Dierssen, U.; Beraza, N.; Linke, R.; Müller, M.R.; Blander, J.M.; Tacke, F; Trautwein, C

    2010-01-01

    Acute-phase proteins (APPs) are an evolutionarily conserved family of proteins produced mainly in the liver in response to infection and inflammation. Despite vast pro- and antiinflammatory properties ascribed to individual APPs, their collective function during infections remains poorly defined. Using a mouse model of polymicrobial sepsis, we show that abrogation of APP production by hepatocyte-specific gp130 deletion, the signaling receptor shared by IL-6 family cytokines, strongly increase...

  19. Elucidating essential roles of oomycee effector proteins in immune suppression and in targeting hormonal pathways in the host plant.

    OpenAIRE

    Deb, Devdutta

    2013-01-01

    Effector proteins are exported to the interior of host cells by numerous plant pathogens. Effector proteins have been well characterized in bacteria. However, the mechanisms through which these effectors promote virulence are largely unknown. Bioinformatic analysis of genome sequences from oomycete pathogens Phytophthora sojae, P. ramorum, P. infestans and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa) have led to the identification of a large number of candidate effector genes. These effector genes ha...

  20. The mRNA and Proteins Expression Levels Analysis of TC-1 Cells Immune Response to H9N2 Avian Influenza Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiyuan; Li, Ning; Meng, Dan; Hao, Mengchan; Wei, Liangmeng; Chai, Tongjie

    2016-01-01

    Since 1994, the H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV) has spread widely in mainland China, causing great economic losses to the poultry industry there. Subsequently, it was found that the H9N2 AIV had the ability to infect mammals, which gave rise to great panic. In order to investigate the immune response of a host infected with H9N2 AIV, TC-1 cells were set as a model in this research. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods were used to study the expression changes of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), inflammatory cytokines, and chemokines in AIV-infected TC-1 cells. Our research found that TC-1 cells had similar susceptibility to both CK/SD/w3 (A/Chicken/Shandong/W3/2012) and CK/SD/w4 (A/Chicken/Shandong/W4/2012) H9N2 isolates, while the CK/SD/w3 isolate had a stronger capability of replication in the TC-1 cells. At the same time, the expression of PRRs (melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5, MDA-5), cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6], and chemokines [regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) and interferon-γ-induced protein-10 kDa (IP-10)] were significantly up-regulated. These results indicated that MDA-5, IL-1β, IL-6, RANTES, and IP-10 might play important roles in the host immune response to H9N2 AIV infection. This study provided useful information for further understanding the interaction between H9N2 virus infection and host immunity, and had certain guiding significance for the prevention and treatment of this disease.

  1. Enhancement of fibroblast activation protein α-based vaccines and adenovirus boost immunity by cyclophosphamide through inhibiting IL-10 expression in 4T1 tumor bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Qiu; Geng, Fei; Zhang, Fang-Fang; Liu, Chen-Lu; Xu, Ping; Lu, Zhen-Zhen; Zhang, Hai-Hong; Kong, Wei; Yu, Xiang-Hui

    2016-08-31

    Fibroblast activation protein α (FAPα) is expressed in cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) of more than 90% of malignant epithelia carcinomas. CAFs are the main type of cells in the tumor microenvironment which offer nutrition and protection to the tumor and regulate immunosuppression. To eliminate CAFs, a vaccine targeting FAPα may be used with a heterologous prime-boost strategy to enhance the FAPα-specific cellular immunity. Here, a FAP vaccine using a recombinant adenovirus (rAd) vector was constructed as well as a DNA vaccine reported in our previous work. Although the DNA prime-rAd boost strategy enhanced FAPα-specific immune responses, improvement of anti-tumor immunity effects was not observed. Examination of immunosuppressive factors revealed that high expression of the IL-10 cytokine was considered the main cause of the failure of the prime-boost strategy. However, heterologous vaccination in combination with a low-dose of cyclophosphamide (CY), which was reported to reduce IL-10 production and promote a shift from immunosuppression to immunopotentiation, resulted in enhanced effects in terms of numbers of effector T cells and tumor growth inhibition rates, compared to the CY alone or DNA alone group. Tumor growth was inhibited markedly when the prime-boost strategy was combined with CY in both the prophylactic and therapeutic settings and the survival time of 4T1 tumor bearing mice was also prolonged significantly. With the reduction of IL-10, enhancement of the anti-tumor effect by the prime-boost strategy was observed. These results suggest that FAPα-targeted rAd boosting in combination with CY is an attractive approach to overcoming immunosuppression in cancer vaccines. PMID:27498213

  2. Glomerular expression of myxovirus resistance protein 1 in human mesangial cells: possible activation of innate immunity in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shojiro; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu; Tsuruga, Kazushi; Aizawa, Tomomi; Ito, Tatsuya; Matsumiya, Tomoh; Yoshida, Hidemi; Joh, Kensuke; Ito, Etsuro; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Since viral infections activate type I interferon (IFN) pathways and cause subsequent release of IFN-dependent proinflammatory chemokines and cytokines, the innate immune system plays an important role in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis (LN). It has been reported that human myxovirus resistance protein 1 (Mx1), a type I IFN-dependent transcript, acts against a wide range of RNA viruses. Although the expression of Mx1 in biopsy specimens obtained from patients with dermatomyositis and cutaneous lupus has been described, the expression of Mx1 in human mesangial cells (MCs) has remained largely unknown. We treated normal human MCs in culture with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly IC), an authentic double-stranded RNA, and analyzed the expression of Mx1 by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. To elucidate the poly IC-signalling pathway, we subjected the cells to RNA interference against IFN-β. We also conducted an immunofluorescence study to examine mesangial Mx1 expression in biopsy specimens from patients with LN. Poly IC-induced Mx1 expression in MCs are shown both time- and dose-dependently, and RNA interference against IFN-β inhibited poly IC-induced Mx1 expression. Intense glomerular Mx1 expression was observed in biopsy specimens from patients with LN, whereas negative staining occurred in specimens from patients with IgA nephropathy or purpura nephritis. These preliminary observations support, at least in part, the theory of innate immune system activation in the pathogenesis of LN. PMID:24674141

  3. Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin Induction Is Mediated by the Major Whey Proteins α-Lactalbumin and β-Lactoglobulin through the NF-κB Pathway in Immune Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jae-Min; Park, Young W; Yoon, Sun Young; Son, Ji Yoon; Jeong, Seok Geun; Park, Beom-Young; Kim, Jae Wha; Nam, Myoung Soo

    2015-12-23

    α-Lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin are two major whey proteins that specifically bind immunoglobulin E and are suspected as major allergens causing cow's milk allergy (CMA). Recent studies have shown that thymic stromal lymphopoietin is a critical factor linking at the interface of the body and environment to the T-helper 2 response. However, it is not known whether thymic stromal lymphopoietin expression is changed by α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin in immune cells. Using RT-PCR and ELISA, the present study was conducted to examine if intravenous injection of α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin increased pro-inflammatory cytokines, T-helper 2 cytokines, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin expression in several immune cells, including macrophages, mast cells, and keratinocytes. Results showed that α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin induced thymic stromal lymphopoietin, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α expression. It was concluded that the allergenicity of α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin may be attributed to thymic stromal lymphopoietin induction, T-helper 2 cytokines, and pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:26618482

  4. Correlation of antispermatozoal antibody with infertility in immunized female rabbits using /sup 14/C-protein A in a filter radioassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eng, L.A.; Metz, C.B.

    1986-09-01

    The meaningful detection of antisperm antibody in immunologically infertile females has been confounded by the many methods of assay that exist. With many of these methods there is poor correlation of assay results with infertility. In this report, female rabbits were rendered partially or completely infertile by immunization with sperm fractions. A filter radioassay for antisperm antibody was developed that consists of incubating 10(7) sperm with sperm from immunized rabbits and /sup 14/C-Protein A, a long-lived and versatile indirect radiolabel for many antibodies of the IgG class. The spermatozoa are washed by rapid vacuum filtration on polycarbonate membrane filters instead of by time-consuming centrifugation. The filters with the collected spermatozoa are then counted in a liquid scintillation counter. Sera from female rabbits isoimmunized with sperm antigens show a highly significant correlation (r = -0.904; p less than 0.001) between assay results and infertility as measured by the percentage of eggs that underwent cleavage after artificial insemination.

  5. Borrelia recurrentis employs a novel multifunctional surface protein with anti-complement, anti-opsonic and invasive potential to escape innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Grosskinsky

    Full Text Available Borrelia recurrentis, the etiologic agent of louse-borne relapsing fever in humans, has evolved strategies, including antigenic variation, to evade immune defence, thereby causing severe diseases with high mortality rates. Here we identify for the first time a multifunctional surface lipoprotein of B. recurrentis, termed HcpA, and demonstrate that it binds human complement regulators, Factor H, CFHR-1, and simultaneously, the host protease plasminogen. Cell surface bound factor H was found to retain its activity and to confer resistance to complement attack. Moreover, ectopic expression of HcpA in a B. burgdorferi B313 strain, deficient in Factor H binding proteins, protected the transformed spirochetes from complement-mediated killing. Furthermore, HcpA-bound plasminogen/plasmin endows B. recurrentis with the potential to resist opsonization and to degrade extracellular matrix components. Together, the present study underscores the high virulence potential of B. recurrentis. The elucidation of the molecular basis underlying the versatile strategies of B. recurrentis to escape innate immunity and to persist in human tissues, including the brain, may help to understand the pathological processes underlying louse-borne relapsing fever.

  6. Glycan masking of hemagglutinin for adenovirus vector and recombinant protein immunizations elicits broadly neutralizing antibodies against H5N1 avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Chang; Liu, Wen-Chun; Jan, Jia-Tsrong; Wu, Suh-Chin

    2014-01-01

    The highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus, a known trigger of diseases in poultry and humans, is perceived as a serious threat to public health. There is a clear need for a broadly protective H5N1 vaccine or vaccines for inducing neutralizing antibodies against multiple clades/subclades. We constructed single, double, and triple mutants of glycan-masked hemagglutiinin (HA) antigens at residues 83, 127 and 138 (i.e., g83, g127, g138, g83+g127, g127+g138, g83+g138 and g83+g127+g138), and then obtained their corresponding HA-expressing adenovirus vectors and recombinant HA proteins using a prime-boost immunization strategy. Our results indicate that the glycan-masked g127+g138 double mutant induced more potent HA-inhibition, virus neutralization antibodies, cross-clade protection against heterologous H5N1 clades, correlated with the enhanced bindings to the receptor binding sites and the highly conserved stem region of HA. The immune refocusing stem-specific antibodies elicited by the glycan-masked H5HA g127+g138 and g83+g127+g138 mutants overlapped with broadly neutralizing epitopes of the CR6261 monoclonal antibody that neutralizes most group 1 subtypes. These findings may provide useful information in the development of a broadly protective H5N1 influenza vaccine. PMID:24671139

  7. Effects of different levels of protein supplements in the diet of early-weaned yaks on growth performance, intestinal development, and immune response to tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the effects of different levels of crude protein (CP supplements to the diet of early-weaned yaks on their growth performance, intestinal development, and immune response. Forty 3-month-old weaned yaks were selected and assigned to four dietary groups (Control, 17, 19 and 21% CP. Dietary CP supplements had a significant effect on average daily gain (ADG, crypt depth (CD (duodenum, jejunum and ileum, villous height (VH (duodenum, jejunum and ileum and CD/VH (jejunum and ileum. Average daily gain, CD (duodenum, jejunum and ileum and VH (ileum showed quadratic increases as the dietary CP increased, whereas CD/VH (jejunum and ileum ratios showed quadratic decreases. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN, glucose (GLU, immunoglobulin G (IgG, IgM, interleukin-1 (IL-1, IL-2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, and interferon (IFN-γ concentrations increased significantly, whereas albumin (ALB, alanine aminotransferase (ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST decreased significantly with dietary CP supplements. Dietary CP supplements significantly increased the concentrations of IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ and the nuclear factor of activated T cell transcription factor (NFAT for gene expression. As the dietary CP supplements increased, IL-6, IFN-γ and NF-AT gene expression showed quadratic increases. These results showed that the appropriate dietary CP supplementation improved the growth performance and intestinal development of earlyweaned yaks and thus that the CP supplements were beneficial and enhanced the humoral immunity response of yaks.

  8. Nonsense mutation at Tyr-4046 in the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit of severe combined immune deficiency mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Ryoko; Fujimori, Akira; Hamatani, Kiyohiro; Mita, Kazuei; Saito, Toshiyuki; Mori, Masahiko; Fukumura, Ryutaro; Morimyo, Mitsuoki; Muto, Masahiro; Itoh, Masahiro; Tatsumi, Kouichi; Abe, Masumi

    1997-01-01

    The severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mouse was reported as an animal model for human immune deficiency. Through the course of several studies, the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) gene came to be considered a candidate for the SCID-responsible gene. We isolated an ORF of the murine DNA-PKcs gene from SCID mice and their parent strain C.B-17 mice and determined the DNA sequences. The ORF of the murine DNA-PKcs gene contained 4128-aa residues and had 78.9% homology with the human DNA-PKcs gene. A particularly important finding is that a T to A transversion results in the substitution of termination codon in SCID mice for the Tyr-4046 in C.B-17 mice. No other mutation was detected in the ORF of the gene. The generality of this transversion was confirmed using four individual SCID and wild-type mice. The substitution took place in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase domain, and the mutated gene encodes the truncated products missing 83 residues of wild-type DNA-PKcs products. Furthermore, the quantity of DNA-PKcs transcript in wild-type and SCID cells was almost equal. These observations indicate that the DNA-PKcs gene is the SCID-responsible gene itself and that the detected mutation leads to the SCID aberration. PMID:9122213

  9. IMPIPS: The Immune Protection-Inducing Protein Structure Concept in the Search for Steric-Electron and Topochemical Principles for Complete Fully-Protective Chemically Synthesised Vaccine Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin; Bermúdez, Adriana; Alba, Martha Patricia; Vanegas, Magnolia; Moreno-Vranich, Armando; Poloche, Luis Antonio; Patarroyo, Manuel Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Determining immune protection-inducing protein structures (IMPIPS) involves defining the stereo-electron and topochemical characteristics which are essential in MHC-p-TCR complex formation. Modified high activity binding peptides (mHABP) were thus synthesised to produce a large panel of IMPIPS measuring 26.5 ±3.5Å between the farthest atoms fitting into Pockets 1 to 9 of HLA-DRβ1* structures. They displayed a polyproline II-like (PPIIL) structure with their backbone O and N atoms orientated to establish H-bonds with specific residues from HLA-DRβ1*-peptide binding regions (PBR). Residues having specific charge and gauche+ orientation regarding p3χ1, p5χ2, and p7χ1 angles determined appropriate rotamer orientation for perfectly fitting into the TCR to induce an appropriate immune response. Immunological assays in Aotus monkeys involving IMPIPS mixtures led to promising results; taken together with the aforementioned physicochemical principles, non-interfering, long-lasting, protection-inducing, multi-epitope, multistage, minimal subunit-based chemically-synthesised peptides can be designed against diseases scourging humankind. PMID:25879751

  10. IMPIPS: the immune protection-inducing protein structure concept in the search for steric-electron and topochemical principles for complete fully-protective chemically synthesised vaccine development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Elkin Patarroyo

    Full Text Available Determining immune protection-inducing protein structures (IMPIPS involves defining the stereo-electron and topochemical characteristics which are essential in MHC-p-TCR complex formation. Modified high activity binding peptides (mHABP were thus synthesised to produce a large panel of IMPIPS measuring 26.5 ±3.5Å between the farthest atoms fitting into Pockets 1 to 9 of HLA-DRβ1* structures. They displayed a polyproline II-like (PPIIL structure with their backbone O and N atoms orientated to establish H-bonds with specific residues from HLA-DRβ1*-peptide binding regions (PBR. Residues having specific charge and gauche+ orientation regarding p3χ1, p5χ2, and p7χ1 angles determined appropriate rotamer orientation for perfectly fitting into the TCR to induce an appropriate immune response. Immunological assays in Aotus monkeys involving IMPIPS mixtures led to promising results; taken together with the aforementioned physicochemical principles, non-interfering, long-lasting, protection-inducing, multi-epitope, multistage, minimal subunit-based chemically-synthesised peptides can be designed against diseases scourging humankind.

  11. A Teleost Bactericidal Permeability-Increasing Protein Kills Gram-Negative Bacteria, Modulates Innate Immune Response, and Enhances Resistance against Bacterial and Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuan-Yuan; Sun, Li

    2016-01-01

    Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) is an important factor of innate immunity that in mammals is known to take part in the clearance of invading Gram-negative bacteria. In teleost, the function of BPI is unknown. In the present work, we studied the function of tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis) BPI, CsBPI. We found that CsBPI was produced extracellularly by peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL). Recombinant CsBPI (rCsBPI) was able to bind to a number of Gram-negative bacteria but not Gram-positive bacteria. Binding to bacteria led to bacterial death through membrane permeabilization and structural destruction, and the bound bacteria were more readily taken up by PBL. In vivo, rCsBPI augmented the expression of a wide arrange of genes involved in antibacterial and antiviral immunity. Furthermore, rCsBPI enhanced the resistance of tongue sole against bacterial as well as viral infection. These results indicate for the first time that a teleost BPI possesses immunoregulatory effect and plays a significant role in antibacterial and antiviral defense. PMID:27105425

  12. Purif ied Protein Fraction of Garlic Extract Modulates Cellular Immune Response against Breast Transplanted Tumors in BALB/c Mice Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Zare Mehrjardi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Garlic (Allium sativum has anti-inflammatory, anti-mutagenesis, and immunomodulatory properties that modulate anti-tumor immunity and inhibit tumor growth. In this study we have examined the effect of a protein fraction isolated from fresh garlic on anti-tumor response and intra-tumor lymphocyte infiltration.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study a protein fraction was purified from fresh garlic bulbs using ultra-filtration, followed by chromatofocusing, and SDS-PAGE analysis. Anti-tumor activity was assessed by intra-tumor injection of the protein fraction and garlic extract, itself, into groups of 5 mice each. The percentage of peripheral blood and intra-tumor CD4+ and CD8+ cells were assessed by flow cytometry. Unpaired student’s t test using the SPSS program was applied for all statistical analyses.Results: Garlic extract included different type of proteins with different molecular weight. One of protein’s fraction was immunomodeulator and was composed of three single polypeptides, with molecular masses of ~10-13 kDa and different isoelectric points (pI. These molecules augmented the delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH response compared to the control group. Intra-tumor injection of the fraction provoked a significant increase in the CD8+ subpopulation of T-lymphocytes, as well as a decrease in tumor size. The fraction increased peripheral blood CD8+ T-lymphocytes in treated animals.Conclusion: The data confirms that protein fractions purified from fresh garlic bulbs augment CD8+ T-cell infiltration into the tumor site, inhibiting tumor growth more efficiently than garlic extract. These fi ndings provide a basis for further investigations on the purified polypeptide as a useful candidate for immunomodulation and tumor treatment.

  13. Effects of various feed supplements containing fish protein hydrolysate or fish processing by-products on the innate immune functions of juvenile coho salmon (oncorhynchus kisutch)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, A.L.; Pascho, R.J.; Alcorn, S.W.; Fairgrieve, W.T.; Shearer, K.D.; Roley, D.

    2003-01-01

    Immunomodulators administered to fish in the diet have been shown in some cases to enhance innate immune defense mechanisms. Recent studies have suggested that polypeptide fractions found in fish protein hydrolysates may stimulate factors in fish important for disease resistance. For the current study, groups of coho salmon were reared on practical feeds that contained either fish meal (Control diet), fish meal supplemented with cooked fish by-products, or fish meal supplemented with hydrolyzed fish protein alone, or with hydrolyzed fish protein and processed fish bones. For each diet group, three replicate tanks of fish were fed the experimental diets for 6 weeks. Morphometric measurements, and serologic and cellular assays were used to evaluate the general health and immunocompetence of fish in the various feed groups. Whereas the experimental diets had no effect on the morphometric and cellular measurements, fish fed cooked by-products had increased leucocrit levels and lower hematocrit levels than fish from the other feed groups. Innate cellular responses were increased in all feed groups after feeding the four experimental diets compared with pre-feed results. Subgroups of fish from each diet group were also challenged with Vibrio anguillarum (ca. 7.71 ?? 105 bacteria ml-1) at 15??C by immersion. No differences were found in survival among the various feed groups.

  14. Crystallization of Spätzle, a cystine-knot protein involved in embryonic development and innate immunity in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystallization of the cystine-knot protein Spätzle occurred following serendipitous limited degradation of the pro-Spätzle propeptide during the crystallization experiment. The Spätzle protein is involved in both the definition of the dorsal–ventral axis during embryonic development and in the adult innate immune response. The disulfide-linked dimeric cystine-knot protein has been expressed as a proprotein in inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli and refolded in vitro by rapid dilution. Initial orthorhombic crystals that diffracted to 7 Å resolution were obtained after three months by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Optimization of the crystallization conditions resulted in orthorhombic crystals (space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 53.0, b = 59.2, c = 62.5 Å) that diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution in-house. The small volume of the asymmetric unit indicated that it was not possible for the crystals to contain the complete pro-Spätzle dimer. Mass spectrometry, N-terminal sequencing and Western-blot analysis revealed that the crystals contained the C-terminal disulfide-linked cystine-knot dimer. Comparison of various crystallization experiments indicated that degradation of the N-terminal prodomain was dependent on the buffer conditions

  15. Application of 125I-labelled soluble proteins in the histoautoradiographic detection of antigen and antibodies in the spleen of rabbits during primary immune response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An autoradiographic method for detecting soluble antigen (chicken serum albumin, CSA) and specific antibodies in the spleen of rabbits during a primary immune response is described. The method consists of incubating sections from the spleen with 125I-labelled IgG2 anti CSA (for demonstration of antigen) or with 125I-labelled antigen (for demonstration of specific antibodies). This treatment of histological sections combines the advantages and principles of the immunofluorescence technique with the possibility of evaluating the exact localization of the proteins by light microscopy in preparations stained with haematoxylin or methyl green-pyronin. The sensitivity of detection is very high: both antigen and antibodies could be demonstrated in the spleen follicles for as long as 42 days after the primary intravenous injection

  16. Involvement of T- and B-lymphocytes in the immune response to the protein exotoxin and the lipopolysaccharide antigens of Vibrio cholerae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The immune response at the level of individual immunocytes to the somatic lipopolysaccharide antigen derived from whole Vibrio cholerae and to the purified protein exotoxin from this organism were studied in terms of the role of T- and B-lymphocytes. By adoptive cell transfer studies with irradiated recipient mice, it was shown that normal spleen cells from normal syngeneic mice could readily transfer the capability of responding to both types of cholera antigens. However, when the spleen cells were depleted of T-cells with anti-theta serum and complement, antibody responsiveness to the LPS antigen, but not the exotoxin, could be achieved in recipients. Furthermore, by appropriate transfer of either bone marrow, thymus, or thymus-marrow cell mixtures to irradiated mice, it was shown that the response to the cholera somatic antigen was relatively independent of thymus cells, whereas the response to exotoxin required ''helper'' T-cells

  17. Comparison of the immunogenicity and protection against bovine tuberculosis following immunization by BCG-priming and boosting with adenovirus or protein based vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, G; Whelan, A; Clifford, D; Salguero, F J; Xing, Z; Gilbert, S; McShane, H; Hewinson, R G; Vordermeier, M; Villarreal-Ramos, B

    2014-03-01

    There is a requirement for vaccines or vaccination strategies that confer better protection against TB than the current live attenuated Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine for use in cattle. Boosting with recombinant viral vectors expressing mycobacterial proteins, such as Ag85A, has shown a degree of promise as a strategy for improving on the protection afforded by BCG. Experiments in small animal models have indicated that broadening the immune response to include mycobacterial antigens other than Ag85A, such as Rv0288, induced by boosting with Ad5 constructs has a direct effect on the protection afforded against TB. Here, we compared the immunogenicity and protection against challenge with M. bovis afforded by boosting BCG-vaccinated cattle with a human type 5 (Ad5)-based vaccine expressing the mycobacterial antigens Ag85A (Ad5-85A); or Ag85A, Rv0251, Rv0287 and Rv0288 (Ad5-TBF); or with protein TBF emulsified in adjuvant (Adj-TBF). Boosting with TBF broaden the immune response. The kinetics of Ad5-TBF and Adj-TBF were shown to be different, with effector T cell responses from the latter developing more slowly but being more durable than those induced by Ad5-TBF. No increase in protection compared to BCG alone was afforded by Ad5-TBF or Adj-TBF by gross pathology or bacteriology. Using histopathology, as a novel parameter of protection, we show that boosting BCG vaccinated cattle with Ad5-85A induced significantly better protection than BCG alone. PMID:24269321

  18. Cloning, expression and protective immunity evaluation of the full-length cDNA encoding succinate dehydrogenase iron-sulfur protein of Schistosoma japonicum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU JunLong; WANG ShiPing; LI WenKai; DAI Gan; XU ShaoRui; HE Zhuo; PENG XianChu; ZHOU SongHua; LIU XueQin

    2007-01-01

    1071-bp fragment was obtained from the Schistosoma japonicum (Chinese strain) adult cDNA library after the 3' and 5' ends of the incomplete expression sequence tag (EST) of succinate dehydrogenase iron-sulfur protein of Schistosoma japonicum (SjSDISP) were amplified by the anchored PCR with 2pairs of primers designed according to the EST of SjSDISP and the sequence of multiclone sites of the library vector. Sequence analysis indicated that the fragment was a full-length cDNA with a complete open reading frame (ORF), encoding 278 amino acid residues. The fragment was cloned into prokaryotic expression vector pQE30, and subsequently sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coll.SDS-PAGE and Western-blot analyses showed that the recombinant protein was about 32 kD and could be recognized by the polyclonal antisera from rabbits immunized with Schistosoma japonicum adult worm antigen. Compared with the FCA controls, mice vaccinated with rSjSDISP (test) or rSjGST (positive control) all revealed high levels of specific antibody and significant reduction in worm burden, liver eggs per gram (LEPG), fecal eggs per gram (FEPG) and intrauterine eggs. These results suggest that SjSDISP may be a novel and partially protective vaccine candidate against schistosomiasis. In contrast to the worm burden reduction rate, the higher degree of egg reduction rate in the test group also suggested that SjSDISP vaccine may primarily play a role in anti-embryonation or anti-fecundity immunity.

  19. Chemotherapy Modulates Intestinal Immune Gene Expression Including Surfactant Protein-D and Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 in Piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathe, Mathias; Thomassen, Mads; Shen, René L.; Pontoppidan, Peter E L; Husby, Steffen; Müller, Klaus; Kruse, Torben A.; Sangild, Per T.

    BUCY and DOX piglets. Selected genes of potential biological significance with a similar change in expression across the treatments were controlled by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Key innate defense molecules, including surfactant protein-D and deleted in malignant brain tumors 1, were among...

  20. Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus tegument protein ORF75 is essential for viral lytic replication and plays a critical role in the antagonization of ND10-instituted intrinsic immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Full

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear domain 10 (ND10 components are restriction factors that inhibit herpesviral replication. Effector proteins of different herpesviruses can antagonize this restriction by a variety of strategies, including degradation or relocalization of ND10 proteins. We investigated the interplay of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV infection and cellular defense by nuclear domain 10 (ND10 components. Knock-down experiments in primary human cells show that KSHV-infection is restricted by the ND10 components PML and Sp100, but not by ATRX. After KSHV infection, ATRX is efficiently depleted and Daxx is dispersed from ND10, indicating that these two ND10 components can be antagonized by KSHV. We then identified the ORF75 tegument protein of KSHV as the viral factor that induces the disappearance of ATRX and relocalization of Daxx. ORF75 belongs to a viral protein family (viral FGARATs that has homologous proteins in all gamma-herpesviruses. Isolated expression of ORF75 in primary cells induces a relocalization of PML and dispersal of Sp100, indicating that this viral effector protein is able to influence multiple ND10 components. Moreover, by constructing a KSHV mutant harboring a stop codon at the beginning of ORF75, we could demonstrate that ORF75 is absolutely essential for viral replication and the initiation of viral immediate-early gene expression. Using recombinant viruses either carrying Flag- or YFP-tagged variants of ORF75, we could further corroborate the role of ORF75 in the antagonization of ND10-mediated intrinsic immunity, and show that it is independent of the PML antagonist vIRF3. Members of the viral FGARAT family target different ND10 components, suggesting that the ND10 targets of viral FGARAT proteins have diversified during evolution. We assume that overcoming ND10 intrinsic defense constitutes a critical event in the replication of all herpesviruses; on the other hand, restriction of herpesviral replication by ND10

  1. Immune Cells in Blood Recognize Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI scientists have developed a novel strategy for identifying immune cells circulating in the blood that recognize specific proteins on tumor cells, a finding they believe may have potential implications for immune-based therapies.

  2. Non-immune binding of human protein Fv to immunoglobulins from various mammalian and non-mammalian species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvet, J P; Pires, R; Charlemagne, J; Pillot, J; Iscaki, S

    1991-10-01

    Reactivity of the secretory protein Fv with immunoglobulins (Ig) from various species of vertebrates was investigated. Binding was observed throughout all taxonomic classes: mammalian, avian, reptilian, amphibian and fish. Contrasting with this wide spectrum, no significant binding was found with most mammalian ungulates, such as horse (Perissodactyl), cow, sheep and goat (Artiodactyls). Nevertheless, disruption of the hydrogen bonds of Ig allowed these non-reactive molecules to bind. Such a conserved reactivity during evolution, and our previous data on the effect of the cleavage of the intra-chain disulphide bonds, suggest that protein Fv recognizes a discontinuous framework structure involving both the FR1 and FR3 regions in the variable domain of the heavy chain of Ig. PMID:1925412

  3. Endolysosomal trafficking of viral G protein-coupled receptor functions in innate immunity and control of viral oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaonan; Cheng, Adam; Zou, Zhongju; Yang, Yih-Sheng; Sumpter, Rhea M; Huang, Chou-Long; Bhagat, Govind; Virgin, Herbert W; Lira, Sergio A; Levine, Beth

    2016-03-15

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system degrades viral oncoproteins and other microbial virulence factors; however, the role of endolysosomal degradation pathways in these processes is unclear. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent of Kaposi's sarcoma, and a constitutively active viral G protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR) contributes to the pathogenesis of KSHV-induced tumors. We report that a recently discovered autophagy-related protein, Beclin 2, interacts with KSHV GPCR, facilitates its endolysosomal degradation, and inhibits vGPCR-driven oncogenic signaling. Furthermore, monoallelic loss of Becn2 in mice accelerates the progression of vGPCR-induced lesions that resemble human Kaposi's sarcoma. Taken together, these findings indicate that Beclin 2 is a host antiviral molecule that protects against the pathogenic effects of KSHV GPCR by facilitating its endolysosomal degradation. More broadly, our data suggest a role for host endolysosomal trafficking pathways in regulating viral pathogenesis and oncogenic signaling. PMID:26929373

  4. Enhanced humoral response in pregnant mice immunized with liposome encapsulated recombinant neutralizing epitope protein of Hepatitis- E virus

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Shivali Shirish; Arankalle, Vidya Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Background Pregnant women from developing countries are at high-risk of hepatitis E-associated high mortality and constitute priority population for vaccination. So far, candidate vaccines have not been evaluated during pregnancy. We evaluated our vaccine candidate, recombinant Neutralizing Epitope protein (rNEp) encapsulated in liposomes, in pregnant mice. Methods A single dose (10 μg) of the formulation was administered intramuscularly on day 7 of pregnancy. Titres of serum IgG antibodies t...

  5. Transcriptomic analysis of host immune and cell death responses associated with the influenza A virus PB1-F2 protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Ronan Le Goffic; Olivier Leymarie; Christophe Chevalier; Emmanuelle Rebours; Bruno Da Costa; Jasmina Vidic; Delphyne Descamps; Jean-Michel Sallenave; Michel Rauch; Michel Samson; Bernard Delmas

    2011-01-01

    Airway inflammation plays a major role in the pathogenesis of influenza viruses and can lead to a fatal outcome. One of the challenging objectives in the field of influenza research is the identification of the molecular bases associated to the immunopathological disorders developed during infection. While its precise function in the virus cycle is still unclear, the viral protein PB1-F2 is proposed to exert a deleterious activity within the infected host. Using an engineered recombinant viru...

  6. Oral Immunization of BALB/c Mice with Giardia duodenalis Recombinant Cyst Wall Protein Inhibits Shedding of Cysts

    OpenAIRE

    Larocque, R; Nakagaki, K.; Lee, P.; Abdul-Wahid, A.; Faubert, G M

    2003-01-01

    The process of encystation is a key step in the Giardia duodenalis life cycle that allows this intestinal protozoan to survive between hosts during person-to-person, animal-to-person, waterborne, or food-borne transmission. The release of cysts from infected persons and animals is the main contributing factor to contamination of the environment. Genes coding for cyst wall proteins (CWPs), which could be used for developing a transmission-blocking vaccine, have been cloned. Since the immunogen...

  7. Immunization of mice by Hollow Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles as carriers of Porcine Circovirus Type 2 ORF2 Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Guo Hui-Chen; Feng Xiao-Ming; Sun Shi-Qi; Wei Yan-Quan; Sun De-Hui; Liu Xiang-Tao; Liu Zai-Xin; Luo Jian-Xiong; Yin Hong

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Backgroud Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is a primary etiological agent of post-weaning multi-systemic wasting syndrome (PMWS), which is a disease of increasing importance to the pig industry worldwide. Hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNs) have gained increasing interest for use in vaccines. Methods To study the potential of HMSNs for use as a protein delivery system or vaccine carriers. HMSNs were synthesized by a sol–gel/emulsion(oil-in-water/ethanol) method, purified P...

  8. Schistosoma mansoni heat shock protein 70 elicits an early humoral immune response in S. mansoni infected baboons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herminia Y Kanamura

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available A study was undertaken to search for DNA recombinant Schistosoma mansoni proteins responsible for eliciting an antibody response from the host at a very early phase after infection. A S. mansoni adult worm cDNA expression library was screened using pooled sera from baboons with four weeks of infection. Based on their specific reactivity with the S. mansoni infected sera and no reactivity when tested against the pre-infection sera from the same baboons, four clones were selected for further studies. Sequence analysis revealed that they were homologous to the S. mansoni heat shock protein 70 (hsp70. The insert sizes of the four selected clones varied from 1150 to 2006 bp. The preliminary characterization for antibody reactivity against a panel of baboon sera showed that the longest clone was the most reactive, eight out of eight acute and three out of four chronic sera reacting positively to this clone. The shortest clone was the least reactive. Our results suggest that the S. mansoni hsp70 elicits an early and strong antibody response in baboons and that antibodies to this protein can be detected in chronically infected animals. Therefore S. mansoni hsp70 may be a valid target for immunodiagnosis. However further studies are needed to identify the portion of the hsp70 that best fits the requirements for a valuable diagnostic antigen.

  9. Comparison of immune responses against foot-and-mouth disease virus induced by fusion proteins using the swine IgG heavy chain constant region or β-galactosidase as a carrier of immunogenic epitopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previously, we demonstrated that a fusion protein (Gal-FMDV) consisting of β-galactosidase and an immunogenic peptide, amino acids (141-160)-(21-40)-(141-160), of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) VP1 protein induced protective immune responses in guinea pigs and swine. We now designed a new potential recombinant protein vaccine against FMDV in swine. The immunogenic peptide, amino acids (141-160)-(21-40)-(141-160) from the VP1 protein of serotype O FMDV, was fused to the carboxy terminus of a swine immunoglobulin G single heavy chain constant region and expressed in Escherichia coli. The expressed fusion protein (IgG-FMDV) was purified and emulsified with oil adjuvant. Vaccination twice at an interval of 3 weeks with the emulsified IgG-FMDV fusion protein induced an FMDV-specific spleen proliferative T-cell response in guinea pigs and elicited high levels of neutralizing antibody in guinea pigs and swine. All of the immunized animals were efficiently protected against FMDV challenge. There was no significant difference between IgG-FMDV and Gal-FMDV in eliciting immunity after vaccination twice in swine. However, when evaluating the efficacy of a single inoculation of the fusion proteins, we found that IgG-FMDV could elicit a protective immune response in swine, while Gal-FMDV only elicited a weak neutralizing activity and could not protect the swine against FMDV challenge. Our results suggest that the IgG-FMDV fusion protein is a promising vaccine candidate for FMD in swine

  10. Humoral immune response against lipopolysaccharide and cytoplasmic proteins of Brucella abortus in cattle vaccinated with B. abortus S19 or experimentally infected with Yersinia enterocolitica serotype 0:9.

    OpenAIRE

    Baldi, P C; Giambartolomei, G H; Goldbaum, F A; Abdón, L F; C.A. Velikovsky; Kittelberger, R; Fossati, C A

    1996-01-01

    The humoral immune responses against three different antigens of Brucella abortus were monitored by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in cattle vaccinated with B. abortus S19 or experimentally infected with Yersinia enterocolitica serotype 0:9. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM responses against (i) B. abortus lipopolysaccharide (LPS), (ii) total cytoplasmic proteins depleted of LPS (LPS-free CYT), and (iii) B. abortus 18-kDa cytoplasmic protein were measured. Vaccinated animals and Yersinia-inf...

  11. A heterodimeric complex of the LRR proteins LRIM1 and APL1C regulates complement-like immunity in Anopheles gambiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, Richard H.G.; Steinert, Stefanie; Chelliah, Yogarany; Volohonsky, Gloria; Levashina, Elena A.; Deisenhofer, Johann (CNRS-UMR); (UTSMC)

    2012-01-20

    The leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins LRIM1 and APL1C control the function of the complement-like protein TEP1 in Anopheles mosquitoes. The molecular structure of LRIM1 and APL1C and the basis of their interaction with TEP1 represent a new type of innate immune complex. The LRIM1/APL1C complex specifically binds and solubilizes a cleaved form of TEP1 without an intact thioester bond. The LRIM1 and APL1C LRR domains have a large radius of curvature, glycosylated concave face, and a novel C-terminal capping motif. The LRIM1/APL1C complex is a heterodimer with a single intermolecular disulfide bond. The structure of the LRIM1/APL1C heterodimer reveals an interface between the two LRR domains and an extensive C-terminal coiled-coil domain. We propose that a cleaved form of TEP1 may act as a convertase for activation of other TEP1 molecules and that the LRIM1/APL1C heterodimer regulates formation of this TEP1 convertase.

  12. Should routine laboratories stop doing screening serum protein electrophoresis and replace it with screening immune-fixation electrophoresis? No quick fixes: Counterpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joel D; Raines, Geoffrey; Schneider, Hans G

    2016-06-01

    Monoclonal gammopathies are characterised by the production of a monoclonal immunoglobulin or free light chains by an abnormal plasma cell or B-cell clone and may indicate malignancy or a precursor (MGUS). There is currently no consensus on the initial test or combination of tests to be performed in suspected monoclonal gammopathies but serum protein electrophoresis and urine protein electrophoresis are commonly requested as initial investigations. If abnormal, immunofixation electrophoresis is then performed to confirm the presence of paraprotein and to determine its heavy and light chain type. Recently, some groups have developed simplified "screening" IFE methods for use in parallel to SPEP for the detection monoclonal gammopathies. We argue here that screening IFE may be of benefit in clinical laboratories using SPEP with poor resolution in the β-region, assisting in the detection of mainly IgA paraprotein, but may be of less benefit in laboratories utilising higher resolution gels. Further it may increase the detection of trace bands of questionable clinical significance, representing transient phenomena in infectious and auto-immune conditions or very low risk MGUS. The increased detection of these bands using screening IFE would require further patient follow up, possibly causing unnecessary patient anxiety and additional follow up healthcare costs. PMID:26677889

  13. PAS-1, a protein affinity purified from Ascaris suum worms, maintains the ability to modulate the immune response to a bystander antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiro, Telma M; Enobe, Cristina S; Araújo, Cláudia A; Macedo, Mahasti S; Macedo-Soares, Maria Fernanda

    2006-04-01

    Helminth infections and parasite components have potent immunomodulatory effects on a host's immune system. In the present study, we investigated the effect of PAS-1, a protein component of Ascaris suum adult worms recognized by a monoclonal antibody (MAIP-1), on humoral and cell-mediated responses to a bystander antigen (ovalbumin [OVA]). MAIP-1 recognized only one of the three polypeptide chains of PAS-1, but neutralized the suppressive effect of the whole worm extract on OVA-specific antibody production. PAS-1 inhibited antibody production against a T-cell-dependent, but not a T-cell-independent, antigen in a dose-dependent way. IgM, IgG1, IgG2b, and also IgE and anaphylactic IgG1 levels were downregulated. In addition, PAS-1 inhibited OVA-specific delayed type hypersensitivity reactions in the footpad of mice, showing a potent immunosuppressive activity on both Th1 and Th2 responses that seems to be mediated by the induction of large amounts of IL-10 and IL-4. Indeed, PAS-1-specific spleen cells secreted sevenfold more IL-10 and threefold more IL-4 than OVA-specific cells in response to in vitro restimulation with the respective antigens. In conclusion, we showed that PAS-1, a single protein component from A. suum, maintains all its immunosuppressive properties. PMID:16519731

  14. CARD8 gene encoding a protein of innate immunity is expressed in human atherosclerosis and associated with markers of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramel, Geena Varghese; Folkersen, Lasse; Strawbridge, Rona J; Elmabsout, Ali Ateia; Särndahl, Eva; Lundman, Pia; Jansson, Jan-Håkan; Hansson, Göran K; Sirsjö, Allan; Fransén, Karin

    2013-10-01

    Inflammation is a key factor in the development of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. It is promoted through the inflammasome, a molecular machine that produces IL (interleukin)-1β in response to cholesterol crystal accumulation in macrophages. The CARD8 (caspase recruitment domain 8) protein modulates this process by suppressing caspase 1 and the transcription factor NF-κB (nuclear factor κB). The expression of CARD8 mRNA was examined in atherosclerotic vascular tissue and the impact on MI (myocardial infarction) of a polymorphism in the CARD8 gene determined. CARD8 mRNA was analysed by microarray of human atherosclerotic tissue and compared with transplant donor arterial tissue. Microarray analysis was performed for proximal genes associated with the rs2043211 locus in plaque. The CARD8 rs2043211 polymorphism was analysed by genotyping of two Swedish MI cohorts, FIA (First Myocardial Infarction in Northern Sweden) and SCARF (Stockholm Coronary Atherosclerosis Risk Factor). The CRP (C-reactive protein) level was measured in both cohorts, but the levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-18, TNF (tumour necrosis factor) and MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein) were measured in sera available from the SCARF cohort. CARD8 mRNA was highly expressed in atherosclerotic plaques compared with the expression in transplant donor vessel (P<0.00001). The minor allele was associated with lower expression of CARD8 in the plaques, suggesting that CARD8 may promote inflammation. Carriers of the minor allele of the rs2043211 polymorphism also displayed lower circulating CRP and lower levels of the pro-atherosclerotic chemokine MCP-1. However, no significant association could be detected between this polymorphism and MI in the two cohorts. Genetic alterations in the CARD8 gene therefore seem to be of limited importance for the development of MI. PMID:23611467

  15. Bm86 antigen induces a protective immune response against Boophilus microplus following DNA and protein vaccination in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rose, R; McKenna, R V; Cobon, G; Tennent, J; Zakrzewski, H; Gale, K; Wood, P R; Scheerlinck, J P; Willadsen, P

    1999-11-30

    Vaccination of sheep with a plasmid bearing the full length gene for the tick antigen Bm86 either alone or co-administered with plasmid carrying the ovine genes for the cytokines, granulocyte and macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or interleukin (IL)-1beta induced a relatively low level of protection against subsequent tick infestation. This tick damage reached statistical significance only for the groups which were vaccinated with plasmid encoding for Bm86, co-administered with plasmid encoding for ovine GM-CSF. Antibody titres measured against Bm86 were also low in all groups injected with the Bm86 DNA vaccine. Antibody production and anti-tick effect were significantly less than that achieved by two vaccinations with recombinant Bm86 protein. In all cases only a low level of antigen-specific stimulation of peripheral blood lymphocytes was recorded, as measured either by the incorporation of tritiated thymidine or the release of IFN-gamma. Injection of DNA encoding for Bm86, either alone or with co-administered cytokine genes, did however prime for a strong subsequent antibody response following a single injection of recombinant Bm86 protein in adjuvant. Antibody production nevertheless appeared to be slightly less effective than following two vaccinations with recombinant protein. The persistence of antibody following vaccination was the same regardless of the method of primary sensitization. In all cases the half-life of the antibody response was approximately 40-50 days indicating that, in contrast to results reported in mice, DNA vaccination in sheep did not result in sustained antibody production. PMID:10587297

  16. The surfactant protein C mutation A116D alters cellular processing, stress tolerance, surfactant lipid composition, and immune cell activation

    OpenAIRE

    Zarbock Ralf; Woischnik Markus; Sparr Christiane; Thurm Tobias; Kern Sunčana; Kaltenborn Eva; Hector Andreas; Hartl Dominik; Liebisch Gerhard; Schmitz Gerd; Griese Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Surfactant protein C (SP-C) is important for the function of pulmonary surfactant. Heterozygous mutations in SFTPC, the gene encoding SP-C, cause sporadic and familial interstitial lung disease (ILD) in children and adults. Mutations mapping to the BRICHOS domain located within the SP-C proprotein result in perinuclear aggregation of the proprotein. In this study, we investigated the effects of the mutation A116D in the BRICHOS domain of SP-C on cellular homeostasis. We al...

  17. Haemophilus influenzae Type f Hijacks Vitronectin Using Protein H To Resist Host Innate Immunity and Adhere to Pulmonary Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jubair, Tamim; Mukherjee, Oindrilla; Oosterhuis, Sharon; Singh, Birendra; Su, Yu-Ching; Fleury, Christophe; Blom, Anna M; Törnroth-Horsefield, Susanna; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2015-12-15

    The incidence of invasive Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) disease has significantly decreased since the introduction of an efficient vaccine against Hib. However, in contrast to Hib, infections caused by H. influenzae serotype f (Hif) are emerging. We recently did a whole genome sequencing of an invasive Hif isolate, and reported that Hif interacts with factor H by expressing protein H (PH). In this study, upon screening with various human complement regulators, we revealed that PH is also a receptor for vitronectin (Vn), an abundant plasma protein that regulates the terminal pathway of the human complement system in addition to being a component of the extracellular matrix. Bacterial Vn binding was significantly reduced when the lph gene encoding PH was deleted in an invasive Hif isolate. The dissociation constant (KD) of the interaction between recombinant PH and Vn was 2.2 μM, as revealed by Biolayer interferometry. We found that PH has different regions for simultaneous interaction with both Vn and factor H, and that it recognized the C-terminal part of Vn (aa 352-362). Importantly, PH-dependent Vn binding resulted in better survival of the wild-type Hif or PH-expressing Escherichia coli when exposed to human serum. Finally, we observed that PH mediated an increased bacterial adherence to alveolar epithelial cells in the presence of Vn. In conclusion, our study reveals that PH most likely plays an important role in Hif pathogenesis by increasing serum resistance and adhesion to the airways. PMID:26538390

  18. Dengue serotype cross-reactive, anti-E protein antibodies confound specific immune memory for one year after infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Xiu eToh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus has four serotypes and is endemic globally in tropical countries. Neither a specific treatment nor an approved vaccine is available, and correlates of protection are not established. The standard neutralization assay cannot differentiate between serotype-specific and serotype cross-reactive antibodies in patients early after infection, leading to an overestimation of the long-term serotype-specific protection of an antibody response. It is known that the cross-reactive response in patients is temporary but few studies have assessed kinetics and potential changes in serum antibody specificity over time. To better define the specificity of polyclonal antibodies during disease and after recovery, longitudinal samples from patients with primary or secondary DENV-2 infection were collected over a period of one year. We found that serotype cross-reactive antibodies peaked three weeks after infection and subsided within one year. Since secondary patients rapidly produced antibodies specific for the virus envelope (E protein, an E-specific ELISA was superior compared to a virus particle-specific ELISA to identify patients with secondary infections. Dengue infection triggered a massive activation and mobilization of both naïve and memory B cells possibly from lymphoid organs into the blood, providing an explanation for the surge of circulating plasmablasts and the increase in cross-reactive E protein-specific antibodies.

  19. Regulation of Innate Immune Responses by Bovine Herpesvirus 1