WorldWideScience

Sample records for bacterial-derived toll-like receptor

  1. FSL-1, a bacterial-derived toll-like receptor 2/6 agonist, enhances resistance to experimental HSV-2 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pyles Richard B

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2 is a leading cause of genital ulceration that can predispose individuals to an increased risk of acquiring other sexually transmitted infections. There are no approved HSV-2 vaccines and current suppressive therapies require daily compound administration that does not prevent all recurrences. A promising experimental strategy is the use of toll-like receptor (TLR agonists to induce an innate immune response that provides resistance to HSV-2 infection. Previous studies showed that anti-herpetic activity varied based on origin of the agonists and activation of different TLR indicating that activity likely occurs through elaboration of a specific innate immune response. To test the hypothesis, we evaluated the ability of a bacterial-derived TLR2/6 agonist (FSL-1 to increase resistance to experimental genital HSV-2 infection. Methods Vaginal application of FSL-1 at selected doses and times was evaluated to identify potential increased resistance to genital HSV-2 infection in the mouse model. The FSL-1 induced cytokine profile was quantified using kinetically collected vaginal lavages. Additionally, cytokine elaboration and organ weights were evaluated after single or multiple FSL-1 doses to establish a preliminary safety profile. Human vaginal EC cultures were used to confirm the mouse model outcomes. Results The results showed that vaginally-applied FSL-1 created an environment resistant to a 25-fold higher HSV-2 challenge dose. Mechanistically, vaginal FSL-1 application led to transient elaboration of cytokines linked to anti-herpetic innate immune responses. No gross local or peripheral immunotoxicity was observed even after multiple dosing. FSL-1 also created an anti-herpetic environment in cultures of human vaginal epithelial cells (EC. Conclusion The results showed, for the first time, that the bacterial-derived TLR2/6 agonist FSL-1 induced significant resistance to HSV-2 infection when

  2. Toll-like receptors in neonatal sepsis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hare, Fiona M

    2013-06-01

    Toll-like receptors are vital transmembrane receptors that initiate the innate immune response to many micro-organisms. The discovery of these receptors has improved our understanding of host-pathogen interactions, and these receptors play an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple neonatal conditions such as sepsis and brain injury. Toll-like receptors, especially TLRs 2 and 4, are associated with necrotizing enterocolitis, periventricular leukomalacia and sepsis.

  3. Toll-like receptors in skin

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Lloyd S.

    2008-01-01

    The skin not only plays an important role as a physical barrier between the host and the environment, but also plays a key immunologic role in sensing and responding to invading pathogens from the environment. Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which are expressed by many different types of cells in human skin, have been found to be important pattern recognition receptors that are involved in recognizing components of microbial pathogens and initiating and instructing cutaneous immune responses. Thi...

  4. Toll-like receptor 4 in atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hongli; Sun, Baogui

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is key regulators of both innate and adaptive immune responses. TLR4 recognizes pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and activates the inflammatory cells. The function of TLR4 in atherosclerosis has been investigated in mouse knockout studies and epidemiological studies of human TLR4 polymorphisms. These studies have shown that TLR4 function affects the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. This article reviews the biological functions a...

  5. DMPD: Toll-like receptor 3: a link between toll-like receptor, interferon and viruses. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15031527 Toll-like receptor 3: a link between toll-like receptor, interferon and virus... (.csml) Show Toll-like receptor 3: a link between toll-like receptor, interferon and viruses. PubmedID 1503...1527 Title Toll-like receptor 3: a link between toll-like receptor, interferon and virus

  6. Toll-like receptors in neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, Trevor

    2009-01-01

    with neurodegeneration. Accompanying roles for infection and inflammation, involvement in clinical neurodegenerative disorders, and heterogeneity of glial response are discussed. A "strength of signal" hypothesis is advanced in an attempt to reconcile evolutionarily selected and therefore likely beneficial effects......Innate pattern recognition receptors are implicated in first-line defense against pathogens but also participate in maintenance of tissue homeostasis and response to injury. This chapter reviews the role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in neuronal and glial responses that are associated...

  7. Toll-Like Receptors and Myocardial Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Feng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs are a member of the innate immune system. TLRs detect invading pathogens through the pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs recognition and play an essential role in the host defense. TLRs can also sense a large number of endogenous molecules with the damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs that are produced under various injurious conditions. Animal studies of the last decade have demonstrated that TLR signaling contributes to the pathogenesis of the critical cardiac conditions, where myocardial inflammation plays a prominent role, such as ischemic myocardial injury, myocarditis, and septic cardiomyopathy. This paper reviews the animal data on (1 TLRs, TLR ligands, and the signal transduction system and (2 the important role of TLR signaling in these critical cardiac conditions.

  8. Toll-like Receptors and Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu eZhao

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men after lung cancer. Immune responses clearly play a critical role in the tumorigenesis and in the efficacy of radiation therapy and chemotherapy in prostate cancer; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. Toll-like receptors (TLRs are a well-known family of pattern recognition receptors that play a key role in host immune system. Recent studies demonstrate that there are links between TLRs and cancer; however, the function and biological importance of TLRs in prostate cancer seems complex. To elucidate the role of TLRs and innate immunity in prostate cancer might provide us with a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of this disease. Moreover, utilizing the agonists or antagonists of TLRs might represent a promising new strategy against prostate cancer. In this review, we summarize recent advances on the studies of association between TLR signaling and prostate cancer, TLR polymorphisms and prostate cancer risk, and provide some insights about TLRs as potential targets for prostate cancer immunotherapy.

  9. Toll-like receptors of deuterostome invertebrates

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    Honoo eSatake

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Defensive systems against pathogens are responsible not only for survival or lifetime of an individual but also for the evolution of a species. Innate immunity is expected to be more important for invertebrates than mammals, given that adaptive immunity has not been acquired in the former. Toll-like receptors (TLRs have been shown to play a crucial role in host defense of pathogenic microbes in innate immunity of mammals. Recent genome-wide analyses have suggested that TLR or their related genes are conserved in invertebrates. In particular, numerous TLR-related gene candidates were detected in deuterostome invertebrates including a sea urchin (222 TLR-related gene candidates and amphioxus (72 TLR-related gene candidates. Molecular phylogenetic analysis verified that most of sea urchin or amphioxus TLR candidates are paralogous, suggesting that these organisms expanded TLR-related genes in a species-specific manner. In contrast, another deuterostome invertebrate, an ascidian, Ciona intestinalis, was found to possess only two TLR genes. Moreover, Ciona TLRs, Ci-TLR1 and -2, were shown to possess hybrid functionality of mammalian TLRs. Such functionality of Ci-TLRs could not be predicted by sequence comparison with vertebrate TLRs, indicating the confounding evolutionary lineages of deuterostome invertebrate TLRs or their candidates. In this review article, we present recent advances in studies of TLRs or their candidates of deuterostome invertebrates, and provide insight into an evolutionary process of TLRs.

  10. Toll-like receptor 2 or toll-like receptor 4 deficiency does not modify lupus in MRLlpr mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon J Freeley

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease with a high morbidity and nephritis is a common manifestation. Previous studies in murine lupus models have suggest a role for Toll-like receptor 2 and 4. We examined the role of these molecules in MRL lpr mice which is one of the most established and robust murine models. We compared disease parameters in Toll-like receptor 2 or Toll-like receptor 4 deficient mice with their littermate controls. We found no difference in the severity of glomerulonephritis as assessed by histology, serum creatinine and albuminuria when Toll-like receptor 2 or Toll-like receptor 4 deficient MRLlpr mice were compared with Toll-like receptor sufficient controls. We also found similar levels of anti-dsDNA and anti-ssDNA antibodies. These results show that Toll-like receptor 2 and Toll-like receptor 4 do not play a significant role in MRLlpr mice, and therefore they may not be important in human lupus.

  11. Toll-like receptor 1 polymorphisms increase susceptibility to candidemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, T.S.; Johnson, M.D.; Scott, W.K.; Vosse, E. van de; Velez Edwards, D.R.; Smith, P.B.; Alexander, B.D.; Yang, J.C.; Kremer, D.; Laird, G.M.; Oosting, M.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Dissel, J.T. van; Walsh, T.J.; Perfect, J.R.; Kullberg, B.J.; Netea, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Candidemia is a severe invasive fungal infection with high mortality. Recognition of Candida species is mediated through pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs). This study assessed whether genetic variation in TLR signaling influences susceptibility to

  12. DMPD: Toll like receptors and autoimmunity: a critical appraisal. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17959357 Toll like receptors and autoimmunity: a critical appraisal. Papadimitraki ...ml) Show Toll like receptors and autoimmunity: a critical appraisal. PubmedID 17959357 Title Toll like receptors and auto

  13. Differing effects of exogenous or endogenous cathelicidin on macrophage toll-like receptor signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro da Silva, Fabiano; Gallo, Richard L; Nizet, Victor

    2009-01-01

    Cathelicidins are mammalian defense peptides with direct antimicrobial activity and the potential to exert other immunomodulatory effects during the innate immune response. One such function of human cathelicidin is direct binding and inhibition of bacterially derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a ligand of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) . Here, we show that physiological concentrations of exogenous murine cathelicidin blunt activation of p38 and ERK mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and d...

  14. Functional consequences of toll-like receptor 4 polymorphisms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferwerda, B.; McCall, M.B.B.; Verheijen, K.; Kullberg, B.J.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Netea, M.G.

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is an important pathogen recognition receptor that recognizes mainly lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram-negative bacteria, but also structures from fungal and mycobacterial pathogens, as well as endogenous ligands. Two nonsynonymous polymorphisms of TLR4, Asp299Gly and

  15. The role of Toll-like receptors in skin diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Bacharewicz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system has the ability to recognize pathogens through Toll-like receptors (TLRs, which are transmembrane glycoproteins on the cell surface. These receptors present on the surface of immunological cells – macrophages, dendritic cells, mast cells and some populations of lymphocytes – play an important role in the defense against bacterial, viral and fungal infections. The connection of a Toll-like receptor with the microbial cell component known as pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP induces intracellular mechanisms leading to the synthesis of proinflammatory cytokines. Depending on the kind of the recognized ligand, TLRs are classified into subfamilies. So far, 13 TLRs have been described in mice and 11 in humans. These receptors may be expressed extracellularly (TLRs 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 10, 11 or intracellularly, located in endosomes (TLRs 3, 7, 8, 9. Recent studies also indicate their role in the development of many dermatoses. Occurrence of these receptors has been found on the surface of epidermal and dermal cells: keratinocytes, Langerhans cells, fibroblasts, endo-thelial cells, melanocytes and adipocytes. This paper presents the structure and function of Toll-like receptors and their role in the pathogenesis of some infectious skin diseases, autoimmune and allergic dermatoses as well as skin neoplasms. The knowledge about the role of Toll-like receptors in the development of skin diseases creates the possibility to use them in treatment in the future.

  16. DMPD: Translational mini-review series on Toll-like receptors: networks regulated byToll-like receptors mediate innate and adaptive immunity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17223959 Translational mini-review series on Toll-like receptors: networks regulate...ol. 2007 Feb;147(2):199-207. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Translational mini-review series on Toll-like receptors: network... immunity. PubmedID 17223959 Title Translational mini-review series on Toll-like receptors: networks regulat

  17. Molecular dissection of the chicken Toll-like receptor repertoire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keestra, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are host immune sensors that continuously search for the presence of microbial pathogens. TLRs play a key role in the innate defense against pathogens and the development of adaptive immunity, and are important determinants of the susceptibility to infections. The

  18. Toll-like receptors in brain development and homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter H; Holm, Thomas Hellesøe; Owens, Trevor

    2007-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are best known as initiators of the innate immune response to pathogens. Recent reports now reveal intriguing roles for TLRs in the central nervous system (CNS). These include the regulation of neuroinflammation and of neurite outgrowth. The archetypal Toll protein in D...

  19. Toll-like receptor polymorphisms in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornblit, Brian; Enevold, Christian; Wang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    To assess the impact of the genetic variation in toll-like receptors (TLRs) on outcome after allogeneic myeloablative conditioning hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), we investigated 29 single nucleotide polymorphisms across 10 TLRs in 816 patients and donors. Only donor genotype of TLR8 rs...

  20. Evidence for adaptation of porcine Toll-like receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darfour-Oduro, Kwame A.; Megens, Hendrik Jan; Roca, Alfred; Groenen, Martien A.M.; Schook, Lawrence B.

    2016-01-01

    Naturally endemic infectious diseases provide selective pressures for pig populations. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) represent the first line of immune defense against pathogens and are likely to play a crucial adaptive role for pig populations. This study was done to determine whether wild and

  1. Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) expression on polymorphonuclear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To establish a foundation for further researches on the improvement of polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes (PMN) functions in dairy cow during perinatal period, the counting of PMN, as well as the mRNA and protein expression of toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) on PMN was studied during this critical period.

  2. Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) expression on polymorphonuclear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reading 5

    To establish a foundation for further researches on the improvement of polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes (PMN) functions in dairy cow during perinatal period, the counting of PMN, as well as the. mRNA and protein expression of toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) on PMN was studied during this critical period.

  3. DMPD: The Toll-like receptors: analysis by forward genetic methods. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16001129 The Toll-like receptors: analysis by forward genetic methods. Beutler B. I...mmunogenetics. 2005 Jul;57(6):385-92. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The Toll-like receptors: analysis by forwar...d genetic methods. PubmedID 16001129 Title The Toll-like receptors: analysis by forward genetic meth

  4. DMPD: Toll-like receptors regulation of viral infection and disease. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18280610 Toll-like receptors regulation of viral infection and disease. Thompson JM...how Toll-like receptors regulation of viral infection and disease. PubmedID 18280610 Title Toll-like recepto...rs regulation of viral infection and disease. Authors Thompson JM, Iwasaki A. Pub

  5. DMPD: Endogenous ligands of Toll-like receptors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15178705 Endogenous ligands of Toll-like receptors. Tsan MF, Gao B. J Leukoc Biol. ...2004 Sep;76(3):514-9. Epub 2004 Jun 3. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Endogenous ligands of Toll-like re...ceptors. PubmedID 15178705 Title Endogenous ligands of Toll-like receptors. Authors Tsan MF, Gao B. Publicat

  6. DMPD: Toll-like receptor signal transduction. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17934330 Toll-like receptor signal transduction. Krishnan J, Selvarajoo K, Tsuchiya... M, Lee G, Choi S. Exp Mol Med. 2007 Aug 31;39(4):421-38. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Toll-like receptor sign...al transduction. PubmedID 17934330 Title Toll-like receptor signal transduction. Authors Krishnan J,

  7. Toll-like receptor signaling and stages of addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, Fulton T; Walter, T Jordan; Coleman, Leon G; Vetreno, Ryan P

    2017-05-01

    Athina Markou and her colleagues discovered persistent changes in adult behavior following adolescent exposure to ethanol or nicotine consistent with increased risk for developing addiction. Building on Dr. Markou's important work and that of others in the field, researchers at the Bowles Center for Alcohol Studies have found that persistent changes in behavior following adolescent stress or alcohol exposure may be linked to induction of immune signaling in brain. This study aims to illuminate the critical interrelationship of the innate immune system (e.g., toll-like receptors [TLRs], high-mobility group box 1 [HMGB1]) in the neurobiology of addiction. This study reviews the relevant research regarding the relationship between the innate immune system and addiction. Emerging evidence indicates that TLRs in brain, particularly those on microglia, respond to endogenous innate immune agonists such as HMGB1 and microRNAs (miRNAs). Multiple TLRs, HMGB1, and miRNAs are induced in the brain by stress, alcohol, and other drugs of abuse and are increased in the postmortem human alcoholic brain. Enhanced TLR-innate immune signaling in brain leads to epigenetic modifications, alterations in synaptic plasticity, and loss of neuronal cell populations, which contribute to cognitive and emotive dysfunctions. Addiction involves progressive stages of drug binges and intoxication, withdrawal-negative affect, and ultimately compulsive drug use and abuse. Toll-like receptor signaling within cortical-limbic circuits is modified by alcohol and stress in a manner consistent with promoting progression through the stages of addiction.

  8. DMPD: Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15379975 Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor... Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. PubmedID 15379975 Title Signa...l transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. Authors

  9. Novel drugs targeting Toll-like receptors for antiviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mira C; Shirey, Kari Ann; Pletneva, Lioubov M; Boukhvalova, Marina S; Garzino-Demo, Alfredo; Vogel, Stefanie N; Blanco, Jorge Cg

    2014-09-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are sentinel receptors of the host innate immune system that recognize conserved 'pathogen-associated molecular patterns' of invading microbes, including viruses. The activation of TLRs establishes antiviral innate immune responses and coordinates the development of long-lasting adaptive immunity in order to control viral pathogenesis. However, microbe-induced damage to host tissues may release 'danger-associated molecular patterns' that also activate TLRs, leading to an overexuberant inflammatory response and, ultimately, to tissue damage. Thus, TLRs have proven to be promising targets as therapeutics for the treatment of viral infections that result in inflammatory damage or as adjuvants in order to enhance the efficacy of vaccines. Here, we explore recent advances in TLR biology with a focus on novel drugs that target TLRs (agonists and antagonists) for antiviral therapy.

  10. Toll-like receptors as therapeutic targets in cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Greene, Catherine M

    2008-12-01

    Background: Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern recognition receptors that act as a first-line of defence in the innate immune response by recognising and responding to conserved molecular patterns in microbial factors and endogenous danger signals. Cystic fibrosis (CF)-affected airways represent a milieu potentially rich in TLR agonists and the chronic inflammatory phenotype evident in CF airway epithelial cells is probably due in large part to activation of TLRs. Objective\\/methods: To examine the prospects of developing novel therapies for CF by targeting TLRs. We outline the expression and function of TLRs and explore the therapeutic potential of naturally-occurring and synthetic TLR inhibitors for CF. Results\\/conclusion: Modulation of TLRs has therapeutic potential for the inflammatory lung manifestations of CF.

  11. Toll-like Receptors and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Lu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is one relapsing and lifelong disease that affects millions of patients worldwide. Increasing evidence has recently highlighted immune-system dysfunction, especially toll-like receptors (TLRs-mediated innate immune dysfunction, as central players in the pathogenesis of IBD. TLRs and TLR-activated signaling pathways are involved not only in the pathogenesis but also in the efficacy of treatment of IBD. By understanding these molecular mechanisms, we might develop a strategy for relieving the experience of long-lasting suffering of those patients and improving their quality of life. The purpose of this review article is to summarize the potential mechanisms of TLR signaling pathways in IBD and the novel potential therapeutic strategies against IBD.

  12. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Deficiency Impairs Motor Coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian-Wei; Li, Yi-Fei; Wang, Zhao-Tao; Jia, Wei-Qiang; Xu, Ru-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellum plays an essential role in balance and motor coordination. Purkinje cells (PCs) are the sole output neurons of the cerebellar cortex and are critical for the execution of its functions, including motor coordination. Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 is involved in the innate immune response and is abundantly expressed in the central nervous system; however, little is known about its role in cerebellum-related motor functions. To address this question, we evaluated motor behavior in TLR4 deficient mice. We found that TLR4(-∕-) mice showed impaired motor coordination. Morphological analyses revealed that TLR4 deficiency was associated with a reduction in the thickness of the molecular layer of the cerebellum. TLR4 was highly expressed in PCs but not in Bergmann glia or cerebellar granule cells; however, loss of TLR4 decreased the number of PCs. These findings suggest a novel role for TLR4 in cerebellum-related motor coordination through maintenance of the PC population.

  13. Current Views of Toll-Like Receptor Signaling Pathways

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    Masahiro Yamamoto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available On microbial invasion, the host immediately evokes innate immune responses. Recent studies have demonstrated that Toll-like receptors (TLRs play crucial roles in innate responses that lead not only to the clearance of pathogens but also to the efficient establishment of acquired immunity by directly detecting molecules from microbes. In terms of intracellular TLR-mediated signaling pathways, cytoplasmic adaptor molecules containing Toll/IL-1R (TIR domains play important roles in inflammatory immune responses through the production of proinflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide, and type I interferon, and upregulation of costimulatory molecules. In this paper, we will describe our current understanding of the relationship between TLRs and their ligands derived from pathogens such as viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. Moreover, we will review the historical and current literature to describe the mechanisms behind TLR-mediated activation of innate immune responses.

  14. Toll-like receptors as targets for immune disorders.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keogh, Brian

    2012-02-01

    Since the identification of the first Toll-like receptor (TLR) in humans in 1997, understanding of the molecular basis for innate immunity has increased significantly. The TLR family and downstream signalling pathways have been extensively characterised, There is now significant evidence suggesting a role for TLRs in human inflammatory and immune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, allergy\\/asthma and atherosclerosis. Various approaches have been taken to identify novel therapeutic agents targeting TLRs including biologics, small molecules and nucleic acid-based drugs. Several are now being evaluated in the clinic and showing promise against various diseases. This review paper outlines the recent advances in the understanding of TLR biology and highlights novel TLR agonists and antagonists in development for the treatment of immune diseases.

  15. The role of Toll-like receptors in pain control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parissa Sezari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Toll like (family of receptors TLR are expressed primarily by immune cells and are known to be part of innate immune system. In the past decade involvement of TLRs in several physiologic and pathologic pathways has been proved. Pain transmission via glial activation is one of such interesting fields. Both pathological pain states and treatment have also been shown to be related to TLR-related pathways. Opioid agonists are found to possess TLR4 agonistic effects and glial activity. Targeting TLRs could be a novel method for treatment of neuropathic pain. Moreover attenuation of glial activation by the aim of selective TLR antagonistic drugs, may become a preferred way of separating the beneficial (analgesia and unwanted effects of opioids, improving their safety and efficacy.

  16. The Role of Toll Like Receptors in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Amirchaghmaghi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available For many years, the innate immunity was of less interest than the adaptive immunity because it was perceived to have secondary importance in the functionality of the immune system. During the past decades, with the advancement of knowledge about innate immune system, interest in innate immunity has grown dramatically and thus its function has been extensively studied. Innate immunity plays fundamental roles in the initiation and induction of adaptive immune responses. It consists of several cells and receptors including natural killer (NK cells, macrophages (MQs, dendritic cells (DCs and pattern recognition receptors (PRRs. Two decades ago, Toll like receptors (TLRs family was known as one of the important PRRs with unique functions especially in protection against invading pathogens. Since the female reproductive tract has access to the outside environment and has a unique interaction with different pathogens whether invading microorganisms or normal flora, allogenic sperm and semi allogenic fetus, it has an essential need for effective immune responses. It has therefore been suggested that TLRs may play important roles in the immune regulation of the female reproductive tract. In addition, it has been demonstrated that immune disturbance may be responsible for some adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preeclampsia (PE, recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR. Our focus in this review is to show the importance of TLRs in pregnancy with emphasis on the expression of these receptors in different tissues related to pregnancy.

  17. Microbial Hijacking of Complement–Toll-like Receptor Crosstalk*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Krauss, Jennifer L.; Domon, Hisanori; Hosur, Kavita B.; Liang, Shuang; Magotti, Paola; Triantafilou, Martha; Triantafilou, Kathy; Lambris, John D.; Hajishengallis, George

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that complement and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) crosstalk to coordinate innate immunity. We report a novel immune subversion mechanism involving microbial exploitation of the ability of complement and TLRs for communication. Porphyromonas gingivalis, a major oral and systemic pathogen expressing complement C5 convertase-like activity, was shown to synergize with C5a for cAMP elevation resulting in macrophage immunosuppression and enhanced pathogen survival in vitro and in vivo. The cAMP synergy strictly required TLR2 signaling and a pertussis toxin- and thapsigargin-sensitive C5a receptor pathway, whereas protein kinase A and glycogen synthase kinase-3β acted as downstream effectors. Antagonistic blockade of the C5a receptor abrogated this evasive strategy and may thus have important therapeutic implications in periodontitis and atherosclerosis, where P. gingivalis is implicated. This first demonstration of complement-TLR crosstalk for immunosuppressive cAMP signaling indicates that pathogens may not simply undermine complement and/or TLRs as separate entities, but may also exploit their crosstalk pathways. PMID:20159852

  18. Toll-like receptors and their role in animal reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannaki, T R; Shanmugam, M; Verma, P C

    2011-05-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are evolutionarily conserved innate immune receptors that recognize pathogen specific molecular pattern (PAMPs) in an efficient, non-self-reactive manner and initiate specific immune signaling that culminates in triggering antigen-specific adaptive responses. Different TLR genes in domestic animal species have been characterized and accumulating evidence from recent studies indicates an extended role for TLR signaling in reproductive physiology. In females, TLRs have been implicated in the regulation of ovulation, fertilization, gestation and parturition, as well as in pathological conditions such as endometritis and mastitis. In males, TLRs play a role in steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis. Use of TLR agonists has also been shown to be effective in the treatment of certain reproductive tract infections. Moreover, gene polymorphisms in TLRs have been associated with mastitis providing evidence that TLRs can potentially be exploited as markers in future breeding programs. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive treatise on role of TLRs in male and female reproductive physiology and associated pathology in domestic livestock. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Toll-Like Receptors, Inflammation, and Calcific Aortic Valve Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen García-Rodríguez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation, the primary response of innate immunity, is essential to initiate the calcification process underlying calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD, the most prevalent valvulopathy in Western countries. The pathogenesis of CAVD is multifactorial and includes inflammation, hemodynamic factors, fibrosis, and active calcification. In the development of CAVD, both innate and adaptive immune responses are activated, and accumulating evidences show the central role of inflammation in the initiation and propagation phases of the disease, being the function of Toll-like receptors (TLR particularly relevant. These receptors act as sentinels of the innate immune system by recognizing pattern molecules from both pathogens and host-derived molecules released after tissue damage. TLR mediate inflammation via NF-κB routes within and beyond the immune system, and play a crucial role in the control of infection and the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. This review outlines the current notions about the association between TLR signaling and the ensuing development of inflammation and fibrocalcific remodeling in the pathogenesis of CAVD. Recent data provide new insights into the inflammatory and osteogenic responses underlying the disease and further support the hypothesis that inflammation plays a mechanistic role in the initiation and progression of CAVD. These findings make TLR signaling a potential target for therapeutic intervention in CAVD.

  20. Toll-like Receptor 1 Polymorphisms Increase Susceptibility to Candidemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantinga, Theo S.; Johnson, Melissa D.; Scott, William K.; van de Vosse, Esther; Velez Edwards, Digna R.; Smith, P. Brian; Alexander, Barbara D.; Yang, John C.; Kremer, Dennis; Laird, Gregory M.; Oosting, Marije; Joosten, Leo A. B.; van der Meer, Jos W. M.; van Dissel, Jaap T.; Walsh, Thomas J.; Perfect, John R.; Kullberg, Bart Jan

    2012-01-01

    (See the editorial commentary by Bagni and Whitby, on pages 873–4.) Background. Candidemia is a severe invasive fungal infection with high mortality. Recognition of Candida species is mediated through pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs). This study assessed whether genetic variation in TLR signaling influences susceptibility to candidemia. Methods. Thirteen mostly nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding TLRs and signaling adaptors MyD88 and Mal/TIRAP were genotyped in 338 patients (237 white, 93 African American, 8 other race) with candidemia and 351 noninfected controls (263 white, 88 African American). The SNPs significant in univariate analysis were further analyzed with multivariable logistic regression to determine association with clinical outcomes. Functional consequences of these polymorphisms were assessed via in vitro stimulation assays. Results. Analyses of TLR SNPs revealed that 3 TLR1 SNPs (R80T, S248N, I602S) were significantly associated with candidemia susceptibility in whites. This association was not found in African Americans, likely due to lower power in this smaller study population. Furthermore, these TLR1 polymorphisms displayed impaired cytokine release by primary monocytes. No associations with susceptibility to candidemia were observed for SNPs in TLR2, TLR4, TLR6, TLR9, MyD88, or TIRAP. Conclusions. Nonsynonymous SNPs in TLR1 are associated with impaired TLR1 function, decreased cytokine responses, and predisposition to candidemia in whites. PMID:22301633

  1. Toll-like receptor signaling in primary immune deficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglione, Paul J.; Simchoni, Noa; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize common microbial or host-derived macromolecules and have important roles in early activation of the immune system. Patients with primary immune deficiencies (PIDs) affecting TLR signaling can elucidate the importance of these proteins to the human immune system. Defects in interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK)-4 and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) lead to susceptibility to infections with bacteria, while mutations in nuclear factor-κB essential modulator (NEMO) and other downstream mediators generally induce broader susceptibility to bacteria, viruses, and fungi. In contrast, TLR3 signaling defects are specific for susceptibility to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) encephalitis. Other PIDs induce functional alterations of TLR signaling pathways, such as common variable immunodeficiency in which plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC) defects enhance defective responses of B cells to shared TLR agonists. Dampening of TLR responses is seen for TLRs 2 and 4 in chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) and X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). Enhanced TLR responses, meanwhile, are seen for TLRs 5 and 9 in CGD, TLRs 4, 7/8, and 9 in XLA, TLRs 2 and 4 in hyper IgE syndrome, and for most TLRs in adenosine deaminase deficiency. PMID:25930993

  2. The Role of Toll Like Receptors in Hematopoietic Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darlene Monlish

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs are a family of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs that shape the innate immune system by identifying pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPS and host-derived damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPS. TLRs are widely expressed on both immune cells and non-immune cells, including hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, effector immune cell populations, and endothelial cells. In addition to their well-known role in the innate immune response to acute infection or injury, accumulating evidence supports a role for TLRs in the development of hematopoietic and other malignancies. Several hematopoietic disorders, including lymphoproliferative disorders and myelodysplastic syndromes, which possess a high risk of transformation to leukemia, have been linked to aberrant TLR signaling. Furthermore, activation of TLRs leads to the induction of a number of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, which can promote tumorigenesis by driving cell proliferation and migration and providing a favorable microenvironment for tumor cells. Beyond hematopoietic malignancies, the upregulation of a number of TLRs has been linked to promoting tumor cell survival, proliferation, and metastasis in a variety of cancers, including those of the colon, breast, and lung. This review focuses on the contribution of TLRs to hematopoietic malignancies, highlighting the known direct and indirect effects of TLR signaling on tumor cells and their microenvironment. In addition, the utility of TLR agonists and antagonists as potential therapeutics in the treatment of hematopoietic malignancies is discussed.

  3. Expressions of toll-like receptors 2 and 4, and relative cellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the expressions of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IFN-γ (IFN- gamma), interleukin 2 (IL-2), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and interleukin 10 (IL-10) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients with tuberculosis (TB) infection. Methods: Two groups of ...

  4. Toll-like receptor 4 limits transmission of Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Rolin

    Full Text Available Transmission of pathogens has been notoriously difficult to study under laboratory conditions leaving knowledge gaps regarding how bacterial factors and host immune components affect the spread of infections between hosts. We describe the development of a mouse model of transmission of a natural pathogen, Bordetella bronchiseptica, and its use to assess the impact of host immune functions. Although B. bronchiseptica transmits poorly between wild-type mice and mice lacking other immune components, it transmits efficiently between mice deficient in Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4. TLR4-mutant mice were more susceptible to initial colonization, and poorly controlled pathogen growth and shedding. Heavy neutrophil infiltration distinguished TLR4-deficient responses, and neutrophil depletion did not affect respiratory CFU load, but decreased bacterial shedding. The effect of TLR4 response on transmission may explain the extensive variation in TLR4 agonist potency observed among closely related subspecies of Bordetella. This transmission model will enable mechanistic studies of how pathogens spread from one host to another, the defining feature of infectious disease.

  5. Toll-Like Receptor 5 Signaling in Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine M. Ivison

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bacterial flagellin triggers inflammation in mammalian cells via Toll-like receptor (TLR 5. Release of the chemokine IL-8 in response to flagellin involves NF-κB, p38 MAP kinase, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K. However, PI3K has been reported to be either pro- or anti-inflammatory in different model systems. We hypothesized that this could be due to different activities of the p110α and β isoforms of PI3K. Results. PI3K and Akt were rapidly activated in Caco-2 colon carcinoma cells by flagellin. Using a plasmid-based shRNA delivery system and novel p110 isoform-specific inhibitors, we found that flagellin-induced IL-8 production was dependent on both p110α and p110β. However in the mouse, inhibition of p110β but not p110α reduced the increase of serum IL-6 levels induced by intraperitoneal injection of flagellin. Conclusions. These data demonstrate that the p110α and β isoforms of class IA PI3K are both required for the proinflammatory response to flagellin.

  6. Obesity, Inflammation, Toll-Like Receptor 4 and Fatty Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Macedo Rogero

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Obesity leads to an inflammatory condition that is directly involved in the etiology of cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and certain types of cancer. The classic inflammatory response is an acute reaction to infections or to tissue injuries, and it tends to move towards resolution and homeostasis. However, the inflammatory process that was observed in individuals affected by obesity and metabolic syndrome differs from the classical inflammatory response in certain respects. This inflammatory process manifests itself systemically and it is characterized by a chronic low-intensity reaction. The toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 signaling pathway is acknowledged as one of the main triggers of the obesity-induced inflammatory response. The aim of the present review is to describe the role that is played by the TLR4 signaling pathway in the inflammatory response and its modulation by saturated and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Studies indicate that saturated fatty acids can induce inflammation by activating the TLR4 signaling pathway. Conversely, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, exert anti-inflammatory actions through the attenuation of the activation of the TLR4 signaling pathway by either lipopolysaccharides or saturated fatty acids.

  7. Toll-Like Receptor 9 Agonists for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Melisi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The immune system has acquired increasing importance as a key player in cancer maintenance and growth. Thus, modulating anti-tumor immune mediators has become an attractive strategy for cancer treatment. Toll-like receptors (TLRs have gradually emerged as potential targets of newer immunotherapies. TLR-9 is preferentially expressed on endosome membranes of B-cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC and is known for its ability to stimulate specific immune reactions through the activation of inflammation-like innate responses. Several synthetic CpG oligonucleotides (ODNs have been developed as TLR-9 agonists with the aim of enhancing cancer immune surveillance. In many preclinical models, CpG ODNs were found to suppress tumor growth and proliferation both in monotherapy and in addition to chemotherapies or target therapies. TLR-9 agonists have been also tested in several clinical trials in patients with solid tumors. These agents showed good tolerability and usually met activity endpoints in early phase trials. However, they have not yet been demonstrated to significantly impact survival, neither as single agent treatments, nor in combination with chemotherapies or cancer vaccines. Further investigations in larger prospective studies are required.

  8. Toll-Like Receptor 9 Agonists for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melisi, Davide; Frizziero, Melissa; Tamburrino, Anna; Zanotto, Marco; Carbone, Carmine; Piro, Geny; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2014-08-04

    The immune system has acquired increasing importance as a key player in cancer maintenance and growth. Thus, modulating anti-tumor immune mediators has become an attractive strategy for cancer treatment. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have gradually emerged as potential targets of newer immunotherapies. TLR-9 is preferentially expressed on endosome membranes of B-cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) and is known for its ability to stimulate specific immune reactions through the activation of inflammation-like innate responses. Several synthetic CpG oligonucleotides (ODNs) have been developed as TLR-9 agonists with the aim of enhancing cancer immune surveillance. In many preclinical models, CpG ODNs were found to suppress tumor growth and proliferation both in monotherapy and in addition to chemotherapies or target therapies. TLR-9 agonists have been also tested in several clinical trials in patients with solid tumors. These agents showed good tolerability and usually met activity endpoints in early phase trials. However, they have not yet been demonstrated to significantly impact survival, neither as single agent treatments, nor in combination with chemotherapies or cancer vaccines. Further investigations in larger prospective studies are required.

  9. Toll-like receptors participate in Naegleria fowleri recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Castillo, Moisés; Santos-Argumedo, Leopoldo; Galván-Moroyoqui, José Manuel; Serrano-Luna, Jesús; Shibayama, Mineko

    2018-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a protozoan that invades the central nervous system and causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. It has been reported that N. fowleri induces an important inflammatory response during the infection. In the present study, we evaluated the roles of Toll-like receptors in the recognition of N. fowleri trophozoites by human mucoepithelial cells, analyzing the expression and production of innate immune response mediators. After amoebic interactions with NCI-H292 cells, the expression and production levels of IL-8, TNF-α, IL-1β, and human beta defensin-2 were evaluated by RT-PCR, ELISA, immunofluorescence, and dot blot assays, respectively. To determine whether the canonical signaling pathways were engaged, we used different inhibitors, namely, IMG-2005 for MyD88 and BAY 11-7085 for the nuclear factor NFkB. Our results showed that the expression and production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines and beta defensin-2 were induced by N. fowleri mainly through the canonical TLR4 pathway in a time-dependent manner.

  10. Toll-like receptors as targets for allergen immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryan, Zahra; Rezaei, Nima

    2015-12-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are novel and promising targets for allergen immunotherapy. Bench studies suggest that TLR agonists reduce Th2 responses and ameliorate airway hyper-responsiveness. In addition, clinical trials are at initial phases to evaluate the safety and efficacy of TLR agonists for the allergen immunotherapy of patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma. (Figure is included in full-text article.) To date, two allergy vaccine-containing TLR agonists have been investigated in clinical trials; Pollinex Quattro and AIC. The former contains monophosphoryl lipid, a TLR4 agonist and the latter contains, CpG motifs activating the TLR9 cascade. Preseasonal subcutaneous injection of both of these allergy vaccines has been safe and efficacious in control of nasal symptoms of patients with allergic rhinitis. CRX-675 (a TLR4 agonist), AZD8848 (a TLR7 agonist), VTX-1463 (a TLR8 agonist) and 1018 ISS and QbG10 (TLR9 agonists) are currently in clinical development for allergic rhinitis and asthma. TLR agonists herald promising results for allergen immunotherapy of patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma. Future research should be directed at utilizing these agents for immunotherapy of food allergy (for instance, peanut allergy) as well.

  11. Activation of Toll-like receptors in meconium aspiration syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, V; Basu, S; Yadav, S S; Narayan, G; Bhatia, B D; Kumar, A

    2018-02-01

    Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) is a common cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Incomplete understanding of the pathogenesis of MAS has hindered the development of specific therapies. We hypothesized that activation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) might play a role in the pathogenesis of MAS. The present study evaluated the expression of TLR 1, 4, 7, 8 and 9 in neonates with MAS. The study included 39 neonates with MAS and 17 healthy gestational age-matched neonates as controls. Neonates with maternal chorioamnionitis, perinatal asphyxia, sepsis and congenital malformations were excluded. Good-quality total RNA from umbilical cord blood was reverse transcribed to prepare cDNA using Bio-Rad reverse transcription kit. This cDNA was used to study the expression status of TLR 1, 4, 7, 8 and 9 by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Compared with controls, TLR1 and TLR4 were highly expressed, TLR9 was moderately expressed, TLR7 was weakly expressed and TLR8 expression was neutral in neonates with MAS. Within the MAS group, no difference in TLR expression was observed with respect to consistency of meconium, severity of the disease, oxygenation index and outcome. There is activation of TLRs in neonates with MAS. We speculate that these TLRs probably act as endogenous ligands for various components of meconium that initiate the inflammatory cascade of MAS and contribute to its pathogenesis.

  12. Toll-like receptor 4 genetic diversity among pig populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, S; Capra, E; Torremorell, M; Dolzan, M; Davoli, R; Haley, C S; Giuffra, E

    2009-06-01

    The transmembrane glycoprotein encoded by the Toll-like receptor 4 gene (TLR4) acts as the transducing subunit of the lipopolysaccharide receptor complex of mammals, which is a major sensor of infections by Gram-negative bacteria. As variation in TLR4 may alter host immune response to lipopolysaccharide, the association between TLR4 polymorphisms and immune traits of the respiratory and gut systems has important implications for livestock. Here, a sequence dataset from 259 animals belonging to commercial and traditional European pig populations, consisting of 4305 bp of TLR4, including the full transcribed region, a portion of intron 2 and the putative promoter region, was used to explore genetic variation segregating at the TLR4 locus. We identified 34 single nucleotide polymorphisms, 17 in the coding sequence and 17 in the non-coding region. Five non-synonymous mutations clustered within, or in close proximity to, the hypervariable domain of exon 3. In agreement with studies in other mammals, a major exon 3 haplotype segregated at high frequency in the whole sample of 259 pigs, while variants carrying non-synonymous substitutions showed frequencies ranging between 0.6% and 8.7%. Although results on exon 3 provided suggestive evidence for purifying selection occurring at the porcine TLR4 gene, the analysis of both coding and non-coding regions highlighted the fact that demographic factors strongly influence the tests of departure from neutrality. The phylogenetic analysis of TLR4 identified three clusters of variation (ancestral, Asian, European), supporting the evidence of Asian introgression in European main breeds and the well documented history of pig breed domestication previously identified by mtDNA analysis.

  13. Platelets Toll-like receptor-4 in Crohns disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Werner; Novacek, Gottfried; Vogelsang, Harald; Papay, Pavol; Primas, Christian; Eser, Alexander; Panzer, Simon

    2017-02-01

    Platelets are activated in Crohn's disease (CD) and interplay with leukocytes. Engagement of Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4), which is expressed in human platelets, may be involved in crosstalks between platelets and leukocytes leading to their mutual activation for host defense. Human neutrophil peptides (HNPs), lipoprotein binding peptides, and sCD14 were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in 42 patients with active CD, in 43 patients with CD in remission, and in 30 healthy individuals. Neutrophil-platelet aggregates and binding of the TLR-4 monoclonal antibody to platelets were determined by flow cytometry. Levels of HNPs were higher in patients with CD than in controls (P = 0.0003 vs. active CD and P = 0.01 vs. CD in remission). Likewise, neutrophils with adhering platelets were higher in patients with active CD than in controls (P = 0.004). Binding of the TLR-4 antibody in patients with active CD was similar to that in controls, while patients in remission had significantly higher binding capacities (P = 0.59 and P = 0.003). Incubation of plasma from patients with active disease or patients in remission with platelets from healthy controls confirmed lower binding of the TLR-4 antibody in the presence of plasma from active diseased patients compared to controls (P = 0.039), possibly due to high levels of lipopolysaccharides, as suggested by high levels of sCD14 and lipoprotein binding protein. Our study indicates involvement of platelet TLR-4 in enhancing the secretion of antimicrobial peptides from neutrophils. While platelet aggregation can be due to a variety of mechanisms in inflammatory disease, the mutual activation of platelets and neutrophils may augment host defense. © 2016 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  14. HIV-1 activates macrophages independent of Toll-like receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph N Brown

    Full Text Available Macrophages provide an interface between innate and adaptive immunity and are important long-lived reservoirs for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 (HIV-1. Multiple genetic networks involved in regulating signal transduction cascades and immune responses in macrophages are coordinately modulated by HIV-1 infection.To evaluate complex interrelated processes and to assemble an integrated view of activated signaling networks, a systems biology strategy was applied to genomic and proteomic responses by primary human macrophages over the course of HIV-1 infection. Macrophage responses, including cell cycle, calcium, apoptosis, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK, and cytokines/chemokines, to HIV-1 were temporally regulated, in the absence of cell proliferation. In contrast, Toll-like receptor (TLR pathways remained unaltered by HIV-1, although TLRs 3, 4, 7, and 8 were expressed and responded to ligand stimulation in macrophages. HIV-1 failed to activate phosphorylation of IRAK-1 or IRF-3, modulate intracellular protein levels of Mx1, an interferon-stimulated gene, or stimulate secretion of TNF, IL-1beta, or IL-6. Activation of pathways other than TLR was inadequate to stimulate, via cross-talk mechanisms through molecular hubs, the production of proinflammatory cytokines typical of a TLR response. HIV-1 sensitized macrophage responses to TLR ligands, and the magnitude of viral priming was related to virus replication.HIV-1 induced a primed, proinflammatory state, M1(HIV, which increased the responsiveness of macrophages to TLR ligands. HIV-1 might passively evade pattern recognition, actively inhibit or suppress recognition and signaling, or require dynamic interactions between macrophages and other cells, such as lymphocytes or endothelial cells. HIV-1 evasion of TLR recognition and simultaneous priming of macrophages may represent a strategy for viral survival, contribute to immune pathogenesis, and provide important targets for therapeutic

  15. Up-regulation of Toll-like receptors 2, 3 and 4 in allergic rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uddman Rolf

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toll-like receptors enable the host to recognize a large number of pathogen-associated molecular patterns such as bacterial lipopolysaccharide, viral RNA, CpG-containing DNA and flagellin. Toll-like receptors have also been shown to play a pivotal role in both innate and adaptive immune responses. The role of Toll-like receptors as a primary part of our microbe defense system has been shown in several studies, but their possible function as mediators in allergy and asthma remains to be established. The present study was designed to examine the expression of Toll-like receptors 2, 3 and 4 in the nasal mucosa of patients with intermittent allergic rhinitis, focusing on changes induced by exposure to pollen. Methods 27 healthy controls and 42 patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis volunteered for the study. Nasal biopsies were obtained before and during pollen season as well as before and after allergen challenge. The seasonal material was used for mRNA quantification of Toll-like receptors 2, 3 and 4 with real-time polymerase chain reaction, whereas specimens achieved in conjunction with allergen challenge were used for immunohistochemical localization and quantification of corresponding proteins. Results mRNA and protein representing Toll-like receptors 2, 3 and 4 could be demonstrated in all specimens. An increase in protein expression for all three receptors could be seen following allergen challenge, whereas a significant increase of mRNA only could be obtained for Toll-like receptor 3 during pollen season. Conclusion The up-regulation of Toll-like receptors 2, 3 and 4 in the nasal mucosa of patients with symptomatic allergic rhinitis supports the idea of a role for Toll-like receptors in allergic airway inflammation.

  16. DMPD: Innate recognition of lipopolysaccharide by Toll-like receptor 4-MD-2. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15051069 Innate recognition of lipopolysaccharide by Toll-like receptor 4-MD-2. Miyake K. Trends Microbiol...de by Toll-like receptor 4-MD-2. Authors Miyake K. Publication Trends Microbiol.

  17. Toll-Like Receptor Pathway as Mediator of Bisphosphonate Effects in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    receptors TLR4, TLR5 and TLR9 on the gastric epithelium in Helicobacter pylori infection. Clin Exp Immunol 136, 521-526. 10. Leifer, C.A., Kennedy...AD Award Number: W81XWH-04-1-0600 TITLE: Toll -Like Receptor Pathway’as Mediator of Bisphosphonate Effects in Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...2004 - 14 Jun 2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Toll -Like Receptor Pathway as Mediator of Bisphosphonate Effects in Breast Cancer 5b

  18. DMPD: The negative regulation of Toll-like receptor and associated pathways. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17621314 The negative regulation of Toll-like receptor and associated pathways. Lan...) Show The negative regulation of Toll-like receptor and associated pathways. PubmedID 17621314 Title The ne...gative regulation of Toll-like receptor and associated pathways. Authors Lang T,

  19. DMPD: Toll-like receptors are key participants in innate immune responses. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18064347 Toll-like receptors are key participants in innate immune responses. Aranc...Epub 2007 Nov 21. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Toll-like receptors are key participants in innate immu...ne responses. PubmedID 18064347 Title Toll-like receptors are key participants in

  20. DMPD: The role of Toll-like receptors and Nod proteins in bacterial infection. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15476921 The role of Toll-like receptors and Nod proteins in bacterial infection. P...of Toll-like receptors and Nod proteins in bacterial infection. PubmedID 15476921 Title The role of Toll-like receptors and Nod prote...ins in bacterial infection. Authors Philpott DJ, Girardi

  1. DMPD: Innate immunity and toll-like receptors: clinical implications of basic scienceresearch. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15069387 Innate immunity and toll-like receptors: clinical implications of basic science...te immunity and toll-like receptors: clinical implications of basic scienceresearch. PubmedID 15069387 Title... Innate immunity and toll-like receptors: clinical implications of basic sciencer

  2. DMPD: Toll-like receptors: paving the path to T cell-driven autoimmunity? [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17888644 Toll-like receptors: paving the path to T cell-driven autoimmunity? Marsla... Toll-like receptors: paving the path to T cell-driven autoimmunity? PubmedID 17888644 Title Toll-like recep...tors: paving the path to T cell-driven autoimmunity? Authors Marsland BJ, Kopf M.

  3. Ligand specificities of Toll-like receptors in fish: indicatiaons from infection studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pietretti, D.; Wiegertjes, G.

    2014-01-01

    Toll like receptors (TLRs) are present in many different fish families from several different orders, including cyprinid, salmonid, perciform, pleuronectiform and gadiform representatives, with at least some conserved properties among these species. However, low conservation of the leucine-rich

  4. Ligands, cell-based models, and readouts required for Toll-like receptor action.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dellacasagrande, Jerome

    2012-02-01

    This chapter details the tools that are available to study Toll-like receptor (TLR) biology in vitro. This includes ligands, host cells, and readouts. The use of modified TLRs to circumvent some technical problems is also discussed.

  5. DMPD: Role of Toll-like receptor responses for sepsis pathogenesis. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18086373 Role of Toll-like receptor responses for sepsis pathogenesis. Weighardt H, Holzmann B. Immunobiolog... responses for sepsis pathogenesis. Authors Weighardt H, Holzmann B. Publication Immunobiology

  6. Combating Drug Abuse by Targeting Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0345 PROJECT TITLE: Combating drug abuse by targeting toll-like receptor 4 (TLR) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Linda...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER not applicable Combating drug abuse by targeting toll-like receptor 4 (TLR) 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0345 5c. PROGRAM...naltrexone; drug abuse ; glial activation; therapeutic approach to treating drug abuse ; opioids; cocaine 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION

  7. Differing effects of exogenous or endogenous cathelicidin on macrophage toll-like receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro da Silva, Fabiano; Gallo, Richard L; Nizet, Victor

    2009-01-01

    Cathelicidins are mammalian defense peptides with direct antimicrobial activity and the potential to exert other immunomodulatory effects during the innate immune response. One such function of human cathelicidin is direct binding and inhibition of bacterially derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a ligand of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) . Here, we show that physiological concentrations of exogenous murine cathelicidin blunt activation of p38 and ERK mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and decrease tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) release in murine macrophages exposed to LPS, but also other TLR agonists such as lipoteichoic acid and flagellin. In this context, CRAMP is capable of aborting MyD88 synthesis and MyD88/IRAK (interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase)-4 association in the stimulated macrophages. Exogenous CRAMP can reverse diminished MAPK activation associated with LPS tolerance. By analyzing macrophages from CRAMP(-/-) mice, we find their endogenous production of cathelicidin does not inhibit LPS MAPK and cytokine activation, rather CRAMP(-/-) cells show slightly diminished responses. CRAMP deficiency does not render mice more susceptible to lethal LPS challenge. These studies indicate the immunomodulatory effects of cathelicidin on macrophage TLR response may vary both on the exogenous vs endogenous origin of peptide and the prior activation state of the cell.

  8. Toll-like receptor 3 blockade in rhinovirus-induced experimental asthma exacerbations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silkoff, Philip E; Flavin, Susan; Gordon, Robert

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) commonly precipitate asthma exacerbations. Toll-like receptor 3, an innate pattern recognition receptor, is triggered by HRV, driving inflammation that can worsen asthma. OBJECTIVE: We sought to evaluate an inhibitory mAb to Toll-like receptor 3, CNTO3157......: In summary, CNTO3157 was ineffective in attenuating the effect of HRV-16 challenge on lung function, asthma control, and symptoms in asthmatic patients but suppressed cold symptoms in healthy subjects. Other approaches, including blockade of multiple pathways or antiviral agents, need to be sought...

  9. Activation of toll-like receptors and dendritic cells by a broad range of bacterial molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boele, L.C.L.; Bajramovic, J.J.; Vries, A.M.M.B.C. de; Voskamp-Visser, I.A.I.; Kaman, W.E.; Kleij, D. van der

    2009-01-01

    Activation of pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) by pathogens leads to activation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC), which orchestrate the development of the adaptive immune response. To create an overview of the effects of a broad range of pathogenic bacteria,

  10. Study of toll-like receptor 7 expression and interferon α in Egyptian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatitis C virus is considered to be one of the most important devastating causes of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatic cellular carcinoma. Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) is a pathogen-recognition receptor that is expressed on innate immune cells. It recognizes viral RNA which induces its activation with a ...

  11. Toll-like receptors and chronic inflammation in rheumatic diseases: new developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, L.A.B.; Abdollahi-Roodsaz, S.; Dinarello, C.A.; O'Neill, L.; Netea, M.G.

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, new developments have been reported on the role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in chronic inflammation in rheumatic diseases. The inhibitory function of TLR10 has been demonstrated. Receptors that enhance the function of TLRs, and several TLR inhibitors, have been identified.

  12. Role of toll like receptors in bacterial and viral diseases – A systemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Toll like receptors are key-receptors of the innate immune system, but their role against bacterial and viral infections are yet to be understood. Aim: The present study is aimed to investigate the diversity and frequency distribution of 10 TLR genes among typhoid fever and HIV+ patients. In this study, 44 samples ...

  13. Role of toll like receptors in bacterial and viral diseases – A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Avishek Das

    2017-05-20

    May 20, 2017 ... Background: Toll like receptors are key-receptors of the innate immune system, but their role against bacterial and viral infections are yet to be understood. Aim: The present study is aimed to investigate the diversity and frequency distribution of 10 TLR genes among typhoid fever and HIV+ patients. In this ...

  14. Activation of toll-like receptors 2 and 4 by gram-negative periodontal bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kikkert, R.; Laine, M. L.; Aarden, L. A.; van Winkelhoff, A. J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Periodontitis is a chronic infectious disease associated with a gram-negative subgingival microflora. Bacterial components stimulate, among other receptors, Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and/or TLR4. Accumulating evidence indicates that both qualitatively and quantitatively distinct

  15. Synthesis and evaluation of peptide and nucleic acid based Toll-like receptor ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weterings, Josephus Johannes

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are receptors that continuously scour their direct surroundings for pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) of bacterial, viral or fungal origin. TLRs can be found at cells that play a role in the immune system. Binding of the TLR with its corresponding ligand

  16. Toll-like receptors and NOD-like receptors in rheumatic diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCormack, William J

    2012-02-01

    The past 10 years have seen the description of families of receptors that drive proinflammatory cytokine production in infection and tissue injury. Two major classes have been examined in the context of inflammatory joint disease--the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and NOD-like receptors (NLRs). TLRs such as TLR2 and TLR4 are being implicated in the pathology of rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, lyme arthritis and osteoarthritis. Nalp3 has been identified as a key NLR for IL-1beta production and has been shown to have a particular role in gout. These findings present new therapeutic opportunities, possibly allowing for the replacement of biologics with small molecule inhibitors.

  17. Toll-like receptors 4 and 9 expression in systemic lupus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toll-like receptors 4 and 9 expression in systemic lupus erythematosus and dermatomyositis: Relation to clinical status and disease activity. ... Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder affecting almost all organs and tissues. Dermatomyositis (DM) is a chronic muscle disorder that leads to muscle ...

  18. The Janus face of Bartonella quintana recognition by Toll-like receptors (TLRs): a review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matera, G.; Liberto, M.C.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Vinci, M.; Quirino, A.; Pulicari, M.C.; Kullberg, B.J.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Netea, M.G.; Foca, A.

    2008-01-01

    Bartonella quintana (B. quintana) is a facultative, intracellular bacterium, which causes trench fever, chronic bacteraemia and bacillary angiomatosis. Little is known about the recognition of B. quintana by the innate immune system. In this review, we address the impact of Toll-like receptors

  19. Bartonella quintana lipopolysaccharide is a natural antagonist of Toll-like receptor 4.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popa, C.; Abdollahi-Roodsaz, S.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Takahashi, N.; Sprong, T.; Matera, G.; Liberto, M.C.; Foca, A.; Deuren, M. van; Kullberg, B.J.; Berg, W.B. van den; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Netea, M.G.

    2007-01-01

    Bartonella quintana is a gram-negative microorganism that causes trench fever and chronic bacteremia. B. quintana lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was unable to induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines in human monocytes. Interestingly, B. quintana LPS is a potent antagonist of Toll-like receptor

  20. The Role of Toll-Like Receptor 2 in Inflammation and Fibrosis during Progressive Renal Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemans, Jaklien C.; Butter, Loes M.; Pulskens, Wilco P. C.; Teske, Gwendoline J. D.; Claessen, Nike; van der Poll, Tom; Florquin, Sandrine

    2009-01-01

    Tissue fibrosis and chronic inflammation are common causes of progressive organ damage, including progressive renal disease, leading to loss of physiological functions. Recently, it was shown that Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) is expressed in the kidney and activated by endogenous danger signals. The

  1. Toll-like receptor and associated regulators in pneumonia and sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, D.C.

    2015-01-01

    Humanity struggles against micro-organism invasion on a daily basis. Innate immunity is part of the first line of defense when it comes to preventing infection, signaling a perceived health threat and eliminating microbes before they can cause harm. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and other pattern

  2. Differential Toll-Like Receptor-Signalling of Burkholderia pseudomallei Lipopolysaccharide in Murine and Human Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weehuizen, Tassili A. F.; Prior, Joann L.; van der Vaart, Thomas W.; Ngugi, Sarah A.; Nepogodiev, Sergey A.; Field, Robert A.; Kager, Liesbeth M.; van 't Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F.; Wiersinga, W. Joost

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei causes melioidosis and is a CDC category B bioterrorism agent. Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 impairs host defense during pulmonary B.pseudomallei infection while TLR4 only has limited impact. We investigated the role of TLRs in

  3. First evidence of independent pseudogenization of Toll-like receptor 5 in passerine birds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bainová, H.; Králová, Tereza; Bryjová, Anna; Albrecht, Tomáš; Bryja, Josef; Vinkler, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 1 (2014), s. 151-155 ISSN 0145-305X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP505/10/1871 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Birds * Expression * Innate immunity * Toll-like receptor 5 * Pseudogene * Flagellin Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.815, year: 2014

  4. Study of toll-like receptor 7 expression and interferon α in Egyptian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tahany A. Abdel-Raouf

    2014-08-28

    com (H.M. Abdella). Peer review under responsibility of Ain Shams University. ..... interferon-alpha. Egypt J Immunol 2013;20(1):13–22. [28] Chang. Toll-like receptors: target of hepatitis c virus: A Disser- tation. University of ...

  5. Structure-based drug design approach to target toll-like receptor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways are the first line of defence against many microbial organisms. The question of how TLRs recognize endogenous ligands remains controversial. Several studies have shown that TLRs are implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus ...

  6. Toll-like receptors in the pathogenesis of human B cell malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isaza-Correa, Johana M.; Liang, Zheng; van den Berg, Anke; Diepstra, Arjan; Visser, Lydia

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important players in B-cell activation, maturation and memory and may be involved in the pathogenesis of B-cell lymphomas. Accumulating studies show differential expression in this heterogeneous group of cancers. Stimulation with TLR specific ligands, or agonists of

  7. Toll-like receptor signalling on Tregs: to suppress or not to suppress?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maren, W.W.C. van; Jacobs, J.F.M.; Vries, I.J.M. de; Nierkens, S.; Adema, G.J.

    2008-01-01

    To balance self-tolerance and immunity against pathogens or tumours, the immune system depends on both activation mechanisms and down-regulatory mechanisms. Immunologists have long been focusing on activation mechanisms, and a major breakthrough was the identification of the Toll-like receptor (TLR)

  8. Stimulation of the innate immune system of carp: role of Toll-like receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pietretti, D.

    2013-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs), named after the Toll gene identified in fruit flies, are a family of evolutionary conserved proteins that play a key role in the innate immune system. TLRs are found inside or on the surface of immune cells of virtually all-living animals and recognize integral parts

  9. Adaptive evolution of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the family Suidae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darfour-Oduro, K.A.; Megens, H.J.W.C.; Roca, A.L.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Schook, L.B.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the family Suidae have diverged over extended evolutionary periods in diverse environments, suggesting that adaptation in response to endemic infectious agents may have occurred. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) comprise a multigene family that acts as the first line of defense against

  10. Hepatocyte Toll-like receptor 4 regulates obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic low-grade inflammation is a hallmark of obesity and thought to contribute to the development of obesity-related insulin resistance. Toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4) is a key mediator of pro-inflammatory responses. Mice lacking Tlr4s are protected from diet-induced insulin resistance and inflammat...

  11. Mitochondrial DNA and Toll-Like Receptor-9 Are Associated With Mortality in Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krychtiuk, Konstantin A; Ruhittel, Sarah; Hohensinner, Philipp J; Koller, Lorenz; Kaun, Christoph; Lenz, Max; Bauer, Benedikt; Wutzlhofer, Lisa; Draxler, Dominik F; Maurer, Gerald; Huber, Kurt; Wojta, Johann; Heinz, Gottfried; Niessner, Alexander; Speidl, Walter S

    2015-12-01

    Despite underlying pathologies leading to ICU admittance are heterogeneous, many patients develop a systemic inflammatory response syndrome often in the absence of microbial pathogens. Mitochondrial DNA that shows similarities to bacterial DNA may be released after tissue damage and activates the innate immune system by binding to toll-like receptor-9 on immune cells. The aim of this study was to analyze whether levels of mitochondrial DNA are associated with 30-day survival and whether this predictive value is modified by the expression of its receptor toll-like receptor-9. Single-center, prospective, observational study. A tertiary ICU in a university hospital. Two hundred twenty-eight consecutive patients admitted to a medical ICU between August 2012 and August 2013. None. Blood was taken within 24 hours after ICU admission, and the levels of circulating mitochondrial DNA were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Toll-like receptor-9 expression in monocytes was measured by flow cytometry. Median acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score was 20, and 30-day mortality was 25%. Median mitochondrial DNA levels at admission were significantly higher in nonsurvivors when compared with survivors (26.9, interquartile range = 11.2-60.6 ng/mL vs 19.7, interquartile range = 9.5-34.8 ng/mL; p mitochondrial DNA in the highest quartile (mitochondrial DNA > 38.2 ng/mL) had a 2.6-fold higher risk (p Mitochondrial DNA improved the c-statistic of acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score (p mitochondrial DNA levels (odds ratio, 2.7; p mitochondrial DNA was not associated with mortality in patients with low toll-like receptor-9 expression (odds ratio, 1.1; p = 0.98). Circulating levels of mitochondrial DNA at ICU admission predict mortality in critically ill patients. This association was in particular present in patients with elevated toll-like receptor-9 expression.

  12. DMPD: Toll-like receptors: novel pharmacological targets for the treatment ofneurological diseases. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17974478 Toll-like receptors: novel pharmacological targets for the treatment ofneurological dise...png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Toll-like receptors: novel pharmacological targets for the treatment ofneurological dise...ical targets for the treatment ofneurological diseases. Authors Marsh BJ, Stenzel-Poore MP. Publication Curr

  13. DMPD: Toll-like receptor (TLR)-based networks regulate neutrophilic inflammation inrespiratory disease. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18031251 Toll-like receptor (TLR)-based networks regulate neutrophilic inflammation inrespiratory dise...l) (.csml) Show Toll-like receptor (TLR)-based networks regulate neutrophilic inflammation inrespiratory dise...utrophilic inflammation inrespiratory disease. Authors Sabroe I, Whyte MK. Publication Biochem Soc Trans. 20

  14. DMPD: Toll-like receptors, Notch ligands, and cytokines drive the chronicity of lunginflammation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18073395 Toll-like receptors, Notch ligands, and cytokines drive the chronicity of ...2007 Dec;4(8):635-41. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Toll-like receptors, Notch ligands, and cytokines d...ors, Notch ligands, and cytokines drive the chronicity of lunginflammation. Authors Raymond T, Schaller M, H

  15. Toll-like receptors and their crosstalk with other innate receptors in infection and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Taro; Akira, Shizuo

    2011-05-27

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are germline-encoded pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that play a central role in host cell recognition and responses to microbial pathogens. TLR-mediated recognition of components derived from a wide range of pathogens and their role in the subsequent initiation of innate immune responses is widely accepted; however, the recent discovery of non-TLR PRRs, such as C-type lectin receptors, NOD-like receptors, and RIG-I-like receptors, suggests that many aspects of innate immunity are more sophisticated and complex. In this review, we will focus on the role played by TLRs in mounting protective immune responses against infection and their crosstalk with other PRRs with respect to pathogen recognition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Origin of Toll-like receptor-mediated innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzok, Stefan M; Hoa, Ngo T; Bonizzoni, Mariangela; Luna, Coralia; Huang, Yaming; Malacrida, Anna R; Zheng, Liangbiao

    2004-04-01

    Toll-related receptors (TLR) have been found in four animal phyla: Nematoda, Arthropoda, Echinodermata, and Chordata. No TLR has been identified thus far in acoelomates. TLR genes play a pivotal role in the innate immunity in both fruit fly and mammals. The prevailing view is that TLR-mediated immunity is ancient. The two pseudocoelomate TLRs, one each from Caenorhabditis elegans and Strongyloides stercoralis, were distinct from the coelomate ones. Further, the only TLR gene (Tol-1) in Ca. elegans did not appear to play a role in innate immunity. We argue that TLR-mediated innate immunity developed only in the coelomates, after they split from pseudocoelomates and acoelomates. We hypothesize that the function of TLR-mediated immunity is to prevent microbial infection in the body cavity present only in the coelomates. Phylogenetic analysis showed that almost all arthropod TLRs form a separate cluster from the mammalian counterparts. We further hypothesize that TLR-mediated immunity developed independently in the protostomia and deuterostomia coelomates.

  17. Interaction between Cannabinoid System and Toll-Like Receptors Controls Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen L. McCoy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of the endocannabinoid system consisting of cannabinoid receptors, endogenous ligands, and biosynthetic and metabolizing enzymes, interest has been renewed in investigating the promise of cannabinoids as therapeutic agents. Abundant evidence indicates that cannabinoids modulate immune responses. An inflammatory response is triggered when innate immune cells receive a danger signal provided by pathogen- or damage-associated molecular patterns engaging pattern-recognition receptors. Toll-like receptor family members are prominent pattern-recognition receptors expressed on innate immune cells. Cannabinoids suppress Toll-like receptor-mediated inflammatory responses. However, the relationship between the endocannabinoid system and innate immune system may not be one-sided. Innate immune cells express cannabinoid receptors and produce endogenous cannabinoids. Hence, innate immune cells may play a role in regulating endocannabinoid homeostasis, and, in turn, the endocannabinoid system modulates local inflammatory responses. Studies designed to probe the interaction between the innate immune system and the endocannabinoid system may identify new potential molecular targets in developing therapeutic strategies for chronic inflammatory diseases. This review discusses the endocannabinoid system and Toll-like receptor family and evaluates the interaction between them.

  18. Differential expression of toll-like receptors in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brint, Elizabeth K

    2011-02-01

    The pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is poorly understood. One contributory factor may be low-grade mucosal inflammation, perhaps initiated by the microbiota. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a family of pathogen-recognition receptors of the innate immune system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential involvement of TLRs in IBS to further understand the involvement of the innate immune system in this complex disorder.

  19. Enhanced Toll-like receptor responses in the absence of signaling adaptor DAP12.

    OpenAIRE

    Hamerman, Jessica A; Tchao, Nadia K; Lowell, Clifford A; Lanier, Lewis L

    2005-01-01

    DAP12 is a signaling adaptor containing an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) that pairs with receptors on myeloid cells and natural killer cells. We examine here the responses of mice lacking DAP12 to stimulation through Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Unexpectedly, DAP12-deficient macrophages produced higher concentrations of inflammatory cytokines in response to a variety of pathogenic stimuli. Additionally, macrophages deficient in spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), which signal...

  20. Exploitation of the Toll-like receptor system in cancer: a doubled-edged sword?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, S D

    2012-02-03

    The toll-like receptor (TLR) system constitutes a pylogenetically ancient, evolutionary conserved, archetypal pattern recognition system, which underpins pathogen recognition by and activation of the immune system. Toll-like receptor agonists have long been used as immunoadjuvants in anti cancer immunotherapy. However, TLRs are increasingly implicated in human disease pathogenesis and an expanding body of both clinical and experimental evidence suggests that the neoplastic process may subvert TLR signalling pathways to advance cancer progression. Recent discoveries in the TLR system open a multitude of potential therapeutic avenues. Extrapolation of such TLR system manipulations to a clinical oncological setting demands care to prevent potentially deleterious activation of TLR-mediated survival pathways. Thus, the TLR system is a double-edge sword, which needs to be carefully wielded in the setting of neoplastic disease.

  1. Toll-like receptor activation in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Georg; Lech, Maciej; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2017-12-01

    The pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis is complex but no longer enigmatic. Much progress has been made to on the polygenetic origin of lupus in identifying gene variants that permit the loss of tolerance against nuclear autoantigens. Along the same line in about 50% of lupus patients additional genetic weaknesses promote immune complex glomerulonephritis and filtration barrier dysfunction. Here we briefly summarize the pathogenesis of SLE with a focus on loss of tolerance and the role of toll-like receptors in the "pseudo"-antiviral immunity concept of systemic lupus. In addition, we discuss the local role of Toll-like receptors in intrarenal inflammation and kidney remodeling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evolution of toll-like receptors in the context of terrestrial ungulates and cetaceans diversification

    OpenAIRE

    Ishengoma, Edson; Agaba, Morris

    2017-01-01

    Background Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are the frontline actors in the innate immune response to various pathogens and are expected to be targets of natural selection in species adapted to habitats with contrasting pathogen burdens. The recent publication of genome sequences of giraffe and okapi together afforded the opportunity to examine the evolution of selected TLRs in broad range of terrestrial ungulates and cetaceans during their complex habitat diversification. Through direct sequence c...

  3. The role of toll-like receptors (TLRs) in urinary tract infections (UTIs)

    OpenAIRE

    Behzadi, Elham; Behzadi, Payam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) are caused by different types of microbial agents such as uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) and Candida albicans. The presence of strong physical barriers may prevent the breach of pathogens into the urinary tract. However, sometimes the pathogenic microorganisms may pass through the barriers and stimulate the innate and adaptive responses. Among a variety of innate immune responses, Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs) are one of the most unique and int...

  4. Acute kidney injury: a conspiracy of Toll-like receptor 4 on endothelia, leukocytes, and tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Christopher Y; Winterberg, Pamela D; Chen, Jianlin; Hartono, John R

    2012-10-01

    Ischemic acute kidney injury (AKI) contributes to considerable morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients and can contribute to rejection during kidney transplantation. Maladaptive immune responses can exacerbate injury, and targeting these responses holds promise as therapy for AKI. In the last decade, a number of molecules and receptors were identified in the innate immune response to ischemia-reperfusion injury. This review primarily focuses on one pathway that leads to maladaptive inflammation: toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and one of its ligands, high mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1). The temporal-spatial roles and potential therapeutics targeting this particular receptor-ligand interaction are also explored.

  5. DMPD: Toll-like receptors: from the discovery of NFkappaB to new insights intotranscriptional regulations in innate immunity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16930560 Toll-like receptors: from the discovery of NFkappaB to new insights intotr...2-13. Epub 2006 Aug 22. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Toll-like receptors: from the discovery of NFkappaB to new insight...6930560 Title Toll-like receptors: from the discovery of NFkappaB to new insights intotranscriptional regula

  6. DMPD: Inhibition of toll-like receptor and cytokine signaling--a unifying theme inischemic tolerance. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15545925 Inhibition of toll-like receptor and cytokine signaling--a unifying theme ...png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Inhibition of toll-like receptor and cytokine signaling--a unifying theme i...nischemic tolerance. PubmedID 15545925 Title Inhibition of toll-like receptor and cytokine sign

  7. DMPD: Crosstalk among Jak-STAT, Toll-like receptor, and ITAM-dependent pathways inmacrophage activation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17502339 Crosstalk among Jak-STAT, Toll-like receptor, and ITAM-dependent pathways ...May 14. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Crosstalk among Jak-STAT, Toll-like receptor, and ITAM-dependent pathways...T, Toll-like receptor, and ITAM-dependent pathways inmacrophage activation. Authors Hu X, Chen J, Wang L, Iv

  8. The ectodomain of Toll-like receptor 9 is cleaved to generate a functional receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, Sarah E; Lee, Bettina L; Lau, Laura; Wickliffe, Katherine E; Shi, Guo-Ping; Chapman, Harold A; Barton, Gregory M

    2008-12-04

    Mammalian Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 3, 7, 8 and 9 initiate immune responses to infection by recognizing microbial nucleic acids; however, these responses come at the cost of potential autoimmunity owing to inappropriate recognition of self nucleic acids. The localization of TLR9 and TLR7 to intracellular compartments seems to have a role in facilitating responses to viral nucleic acids while maintaining tolerance to self nucleic acids, yet the cell biology regulating the transport and localization of these receptors remains poorly understood. Here we define the route by which TLR9 and TLR7 exit the endoplasmic reticulum and travel to endolysosomes in mouse macrophages and dendritic cells. The ectodomains of TLR9 and TLR7 are cleaved in the endolysosome, such that no full-length protein is detectable in the compartment where ligand is recognized. Notably, although both the full-length and cleaved forms of TLR9 are capable of binding ligand, only the processed form recruits MyD88 on activation, indicating that this truncated receptor, rather than the full-length form, is functional. Furthermore, conditions that prevent receptor proteolysis, including forced TLR9 surface localization, render the receptor non-functional. We propose that ectodomain cleavage represents a strategy to restrict receptor activation to endolysosomal compartments and prevent TLRs from responding to self nucleic acids.

  9. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Decoy, TOY, Attenuates Gram-Negative Bacterial Sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Keehoon; Lee, Jung-Eun; Kim, Hak-Zoo; Kim, Ho Min; Park, Beom Seok; Hwang, Seong-Ik; Lee, Jie-Oh; Kim, Sun Chang; Koh, Gou Young

    2009-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane glycolipid, induces sepsis through its interaction with myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2) and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). To block interaction between LPS/MD-2 complex and TLR4, we designed and generated soluble fusion proteins capable of binding MD-2, dubbed TLR4 decoy receptor (TOY) using 'the Hybrid leucine-rich repeats (LRR) technique'. TOY contains the MD-2 binding ectodomain of TLR4, the LRR motif of hagfish va...

  10. Human mast cell activation through Fc receptors and Toll-like receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimichi Okayama

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells express high-affinity IgE receptors (FcεRI on their surface and can be activated to secrete a variety of biologically active mediators by cross-linking of receptor-bound IgE. Recent studies in animal models indicate that mouse mast cells may play a protective role in host defense against bacteria through the production of tumor necrosis factor-α, mainly as a result of Toll-like receptor (TLR 4- or CD48-mediated activation. Moreover, several recent observations in animal models have indicated that mast cells may also play a pivotal role in coordinating the early phases of autoimmune diseases, particularly those involving auto-antibodies. We recently identified functional TLR4 and FcγRI on human mast cells, in which their expression had been upregulated by interferon-γ. We compared each of the receptor-mediated gene expression profiles with the FcεRI-mediated gene expression profile using high-density oligonucleotide probe arrays and discovered that human mast cells may modulate the immune system in a receptor-specific manner.

  11. Reading the viral signature by Toll-like receptors and other pattern recognition receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogensen, Trine H; Paludan, Søren R

    2005-03-01

    Successful host defense against viral infections relies on early production of type I interferon (IFN) and subsequent activation of a cellular cytotoxic response. The acute IFN and inflammatory response against virus infections is mediated by cellular pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) that recognize specific molecular structures on viral particles or products of viral replication. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) constitute a class of membrane-bound PRRs capable of detecting microbial infections. While TLR2 and TLR4, which were first identified to recognize Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, respectively, sense specific viral proteins on the cell surface, TLRs 3, 7, 8, and 9 serve as receptors for viral nucleic acids in endosomic compartments. In addition to TLRs, cells express cytoplasmic PRRs such as the RNA helicase retinoic acid inducible gene I and the kinase double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase R, both of which sense dsRNA, a characteristic signature of viral replication, and initiate a protective cellular response. Here we review the recent progress in our understanding of PRRs and viral infections and discuss the molecular and cellular responses evoked by virus-activated PRRs. Finally, we look into what is currently known about the role of PRRs in viral infections in vivo.

  12. Sleep deprivation and divergent toll-like receptor-4 activation of cellular inflammation in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Judith E; Carrillo, Carmen; Olmstead, Richard; Witarama, Tuff; Breen, Elizabeth C; Yokomizo, Megumi; Seeman, Teresa; Irwin, Michael R

    2015-02-01

    Sleep disturbance and aging are associated with increases in inflammation, as well as increased risk of infectious disease. However, there is limited understanding of the role of sleep loss on age-related differences in immune responses. This study examines the effects of sleep deprivation on toll-like receptor activation of monocytic inflammation in younger compared to older adults. Community-dwelling adults (n = 70) who were categorized as younger (25-39 y old, n = 21) and older (60-84 y old, n = 49) participants, underwent a sleep laboratory-based experimental partial sleep deprivation (PSD) protocol including adaptation, an uninterrupted night of sleep, sleep deprivation (sleep restricted to 03:00-07:00), and recovery. Blood samples were obtained each morning to measure toll-like receptor-4 activation of monocyte intracellular production of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Partial sleep deprivation induced a significant increase in the production of IL-6 and/or TNF-α that persisted after a night of recovery sleep (F(2,121.2) = 3.8, P sleep loss, such that younger adults had an increase in inflammatory cytokine production that was not present in older adults (F(2,121.2) = 4.0, P sleep loss. Whereas sleep loss increases cellular inflammation in younger adults and may contribute to inflammatory disorders, blunted toll-like receptor activation in older adults may increase the risk of infectious disease seen with aging. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  13. Toll-like receptor-4 mediates cigarette smoke-induced cytokine production by human macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Kimpe Sjef J

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major risk factor for the development of COPD is cigarette smoking. Smoking causes activation of resident cells and the recruitment of inflammatory cells into the lungs, which leads to release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemotactic factors, oxygen radicals and proteases. In the present study evidence is found for a new cellular mechanism that refers to a link between smoking and inflammation in lungs. Methods Employing human monocyte-derived macrophages, different techniques including FACS analysis, Cytometric Bead Array Assay and ELISA were achieved to evaluate the effects of CS on pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion including IL-8. Then, Toll-like receptor neutralization was performed to study the involvement of Toll-like receptor-4 in IL-8 production. Finally, signaling pathways in macrophages after exposure to CS medium were investigated performing ELISA and Western analysis. Results We demonstrate that especially human monocytes are sensitive to produce IL-8 upon cigarette smoke stimulation compared to lymphocytes or neutrophils. Moreover, monocyte-derived macrophages produce high amounts of the cytokine. The IL-8 production is dependent on Toll-like receptor 4 stimulation and LPS is not involved. Further research resolved the cellular mechanism by which cigarette smoke induces cytokine production in monocyte-derived macrophages. Cigarette smoke causes subsequently a concentration-dependent phosphorylation of IRAK and degradation of TRAF6. Moreover, IκBα was phosphorylated which suggests involvement of NF-κB. In addition, NFκB -inhibitor blocked cigarette smoke-induced IL-8 production. Conclusion These findings link cigarette smoke to inflammation and lead to new insights/therapeutic strategies in the pathogenesis of lung emphysema.

  14. Virtual Screening Approaches towards the Discovery of Toll-Like Receptor Modulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Pérez-Regidor

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to summarize the latest efforts performed in the search for novel chemical entities such as Toll-like receptor (TLR modulators by means of virtual screening techniques. This is an emergent research field with only very recent (and successful contributions. Identification of drug-like molecules with potential therapeutic applications for the treatment of a variety of TLR-regulated diseases has attracted considerable interest due to the clinical potential. Additionally, the virtual screening databases and computational tools employed have been overviewed in a descriptive way, widening the scope for researchers interested in the field.

  15. Burn Enhances Toll-Like Receptor Induced Responses by Circulating Leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-30

    induced alterations in toll-like receptor- mediated responses by bronchoalveolar lavage cells. Cytokine 2011; 55: 396-401. [14] Huber NL, Bailey SR...Materials and methods Animals C57BL/6 male mice (18 to 22 gm; 8 to 10 wk, Charles River Laboratories, Wilmington, MA) Int J Clin Exp Med...responses by circulating leukocytes is unknown. To study this, C57BL/6 mice were subjected to burn (3rd degree, 25% TBSA) or sham procedure and 1-7 days

  16. Toll-Like Receptor-2 Mediates Diet and/or Pathogen Associated Atherosclerosis: Proteomic Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Madan, Monika; Amar, Salomon

    2008-01-01

    Accumulating evidence implicates a fundamental link between the immune system and atherosclerosis. Toll-like receptors are principal sensors of the innate immune system. Here we report an assessment of the role of the TLR2 pathway in atherosclerosis associated with a high-fat diet and/or bacteria in ApoE(+/-) mice.To explore the role of TLR2 in inflammation- and infection-associated atherosclerosis, 10 week-old ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(+/+), ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(+/-) and ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(-/-) mice were fed eit...

  17. Toll Like Receptors 4 and 2 Expression in the Bronchial Mucosa of Patients with Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Peter Hauber

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis (CF is a lung disease characterized by chronic infection with Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus. Recently, toll-like receptor (TLR 4 has been shown to be responsible for the lipopolysaccharide (LPS-mediated immune response. While TLR2 mediates responses driven by bacterial lipoproteins and peptidoglycans from Gram-positive bacteria, LPS derived from P aeruginosa may stimulate the immune response in the airways of patients with CF via activation of TLR4.

  18. Toll-like receptors and cancer: MYD88 mutation and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Q Wang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs expressed on immune cells are crucial for the early detection of invading pathogens, in initiating early innate immune response and in orchestrating the adaptive immune response. PRRs are activated by specific pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs that are present in pathogenic microbes or nucleic acids of viruses or bacteria. However, inappropriate activation of these PRRs, such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs, due to genetic lesions or chronic inflammation has been demonstrated to be a major cause of many haematological malignancies. Gain-of-function mutations in the TLR adaptor protein MYD88 found in 39% of the activated B cell type of diffuse large B cell lymphomas (ABC-DLBCL and almost 100% of Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia (WM further highlight the involvement of TLRs in these malignancies. MYD88 mutations result in the chronic activation of TLR signalling pathways, thus the constitutive activation of the transcription factor NFκB to promote cell survival and proliferation. These recent insights into TLR pathway driven malignancies warrant the need for a better understanding of TLRs in cancers and the development of novel anti-cancer therapies targeting TLRs. This review focuses on Toll-like receptors function and signalling in normal or inflammatory conditions, and how mutations can also hijack the TLR signalling pathways to give rise to cancer. Lastly, we discuss how potential therapeutic agents could be used to restore normal responses to TLRs and have long lasting anti-tumour effects.

  19. Toll-like receptor signaling: a perspective to develop vaccine against leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rakesh K; Srivastava, Ankita; Singh, Nisha

    2012-09-06

    The toll-like receptors (TLRs) are the sentinel factor of the innate immunity, which are essential for host defense. These receptors detect the presence of conserved molecular patterns of potentially pathogenic microorganisms and contribute in both, cellular as well as humoral immune responses. Leishmania is an intracellular pathogen that silently invades host immune system. After phagocytosis, it divides and proliferates in the harmful environment of host macrophages by down-regulating its vital effector functions. In leishmaniasis, the outcome of the infection basically relies on the skewed balance between Th1/Th2 immune responses. Lots of work have been done and on progress but still characterization of either preventive or prophylactic candidate antigen/s is far from satisfactory. How does Leishmania regulate host innate immune system? Still it is unanswered. TLRs play very important role during inflammatory process of various diseases such as cancer, bacterial and viral infections but TLR signaling is comparatively less explained in leishmanial infection. In the context to Th1/Th2 dichotomy, identification of leishmanial antigens that modulate toll-like receptor signaling will certainly help in the development of future vaccine. This review will initially describe global properties of TLRs, and later will discuss their role in the pathogenesis of leishmaniasis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Regulation of B cell functions by Toll-like receptors and complement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremlitzka, Mariann; Mácsik-Valent, Bernadett; Erdei, Anna

    2016-10-01

    B cell functions triggered by the clonally-rearranged antigen-specific B cell receptor (BCR) are regulated by several germ-line encoded receptors - including Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and complement receptors (CRs). Simultaneous or sequential engagement of these structures expressed either on the cell membrane or intracellularly, may fundamentally alter and fine tune activation, antibody and cytokine production of B cells. Here we review the expression and function of TLRs and various C3 fragment binding CRs on B cells, emphasizing their role in different human B cell subsets under physiological and pathological conditions. Studies underlining the importance of the crosstalk between TLRs and CRs in regulating B cell functions are also highlighted. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [Significance of Toll-like receptors in the pathophysiology of surgical sepsis].

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Romics, Laszlo Jr

    2012-02-03

    The discovery of Toll-like receptors has substantially changed our knowledge of pathogen recognition. 11 Toll-like receptors have so far been described in humans. These recognize distinct pathogen associated molecular patterns, as well as endogenous ligands and small molecular synthetic compounds. TLRs have a multifunctional role in pathogen-triggered immune responses and represent an important connection between the "innate" and "adaptive" immunity. The role of the TLRs in the recognition of pathogens renders them a key figure in the activation of the immune response during surgical sepsis. However, emerging evidence points to a fundamental role in tumorigenesis, transplantation, wound healing, atherogenesis and inflammatory bowel disease. The aim hence was to review experimental data pertaining to the activation of TLR signalling pathways in conditions associated with surgical sepsis. A systematic review of the literature was undertaken by searching the MEDLINE database for the period 1966-2004 without language restriction. The paper also analyses the possible therapeutic utilization of the TLR signalling pathways in surgical sepsis.

  2. Mannose-Binding Lectin and Toll-Like Receptor Polymorphisms and Chagas Disease in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulantay, Inés; Danquah, Ina; Hamann, Lutz; Schumann, Ralf R.; Apt, Werner; Mockenhaupt, Frank P.

    2012-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) polymorphisms may influence susceptibility and manifestation of Trypanosoma cruzi infection. In northern Chile, we examined 61 asymptomatic patients with chronic Chagas disease (CD), 64 patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC), and 45 healthy individuals. Low-producer MBL2*B genotypes were more common in CD patients (48%) than healthy individuals (31%; adjusted odds ratio = 2.3, 95% confidence interval = 1.01–5.4, P = 0.047) but did not differ with manifestation. In contrast, the heterozygous Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-deficiency genotype D299G/T399I occurred more frequently in asymptomatic (14.8%) than CCC patients (3.1%; P = 0.02). TLR1-I602S, TLR2-R753Q, TLR6-S249P, and MAL/TIRAP-S180L did not associate with CD or CCC. These findings support the complement system to be involved in defense against Trypanosoma cruzi infection and indicate that curbed TLR4 activation might be beneficial in preventing CCC. PMID:22302853

  3. Anti-tumor Activity of Toll-Like Receptor 7 Agonists

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    Huju Chi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs are a class of pattern recognition receptors that play a bridging role in innate immunity and adaptive immunity. The activated TLRs not only induce inflammatory responses, but also elicit the development of antigen specific immunity. TLR7, a member of TLR family, is an intracellular receptor expressed on the membrane of endosomes. TLR7 can be triggered not only by ssRNA during viral infections, but also by immune modifiers that share a similar structure to nucleosides. Its powerful immune stimulatory action can be potentially used in the anti-tumor therapy. This article reviewed the anti-tumor activity and mechanism of TLR7 agonists that are frequently applied in preclinical and clinical investigations, and mainly focused on small synthetic molecules, including imiquimod, resiquimod, gardiquimod, and 852A, etc.

  4. Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Type 2 Impairs Macrophage Responsiveness to Toll-Like Receptor Ligation with the Exception of Toll-Like Receptor 7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G Schaut

    Full Text Available Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV is a member of the Flaviviridae family. BVDV isolates are classified into two biotypes based on the development of cytopathic (cp or non-cytopathic (ncp effects in epithelial cell culture. BVDV isolates are further separated into species, BVDV1 and 2, based on genetic differences. Symptoms of BVDV infection range from subclinical to severe, depending on strain virulence, and may involve multiple organ systems and induction of a generalized immunosuppression. During BVDV-induced immune suppression, macrophages, critical to innate immunity, may have altered pathogen recognition receptor (PRR signaling, including signaling through toll-like receptors (TLRs. Comparison of BVDV 2 strains with different biotypes and virulence levels is valuable to determining if there are differences in host macrophage cellular responses between viral phenotypes. The current study demonstrates that cytopathic (cp, noncytopathic (ncp, high (hv or low virulence (lv BVDV2 infection of bovine monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMΦ result in differential expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines compared to uninfected MDMΦ. A hallmark of cp BVDV2 infection is IL-6 production. In response to TLR2 or 4 ligation, as might be observed during secondary bacterial infection, cytokine secretion was markedly decreased in BVDV2-infected MDMΦ, compared to non-infected MDMΦ. Macrophages were hyporesponsive to viral TLR3 or TLR8 ligation. However, TLR7 stimulation of BVDV2-infected MDMΦ induced cytokine secretion, unlike results observed for other TLRs. Together, these data suggest that BVDV2 infection modulated mRNA responses and induced a suppression of proinflammatory cytokine protein responses to TLR ligation in MDMΦ with the exception of TLR7 ligation. It is likely that there are distinct differences in TLR pathways modulated following BVDV2 infection, which have implications for macrophage responses to secondary infections.

  5. Acute kidney injury: what part do toll-like receptors play?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallés PG

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Patricia G Vallés,1,2 Andrea Gil Lorenzo,2 Victoria Bocanegra,2 Roberto Vallés3 1Área de Fisiopatología, Departamento de Patología, Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza, Argentina; 2National Council of Scientific and Technical Research of Argentina, Buenos Aires, Argentina; 3Instituto de Inmunología Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza, Argentina Abstract: The innate immune system plays an important role as a first response to tissue injury. This first response is carried out via germline-encoded receptors. Toll-like receptors (TLRs are the first identified and best studied family of pattern recognition receptors. TLRs are expressed on a variety of cell types, including epithelial cells, endothelia, dendritic cells, monocytes/macrophages, and B- and T-cells. TLRs initiate innate immune responses and concurrently shape the subsequent adaptive immune response. They are sensors of both pathogens, through the exogenous pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs, and tissue injury, through the endogenous danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs. TLR signaling is critical in defending against invading microorganisms; however, sustained receptor activation is also implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. Ischemic kidney injury involves early TLR-driven immunopathology, and the resolution of inflammation is needed for rapid regeneration of injured tubule cells. Notably, the activation of TLRs also has been implicated in epithelial repair. This review focuses on the role of TLRs and their endogenous ligands within the inflammatory response of acute kidney injury. Keywords: toll-like receptors, pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs, danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs, ischemic kidney injury

  6. Dynamic evolution of toll-like receptor multigene families in echinoderms

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    Katherine M Buckley

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The genome of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, was the first to be sequenced from a long-lived large invertebrate. Analysis of this genome uncovered a surprisingly complex immune system in which the moderately sized sets of pattern recognition receptors that form the core of vertebrate innate immunity are encoded in large multigene families. The sea urchin genome contains 253 Toll-like receptor (TLR genes, more than 200 Nod-like receptors and 1095 scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domains, a ten-fold expansion relative to vertebrates. Given their stereotypic structure and simple intron-exon architecture, the TLRs are the most tractable of these families for more detailed analysis. An immune defense role for these receptors is suggested by their sequence diversity and expression in immunologically active tissues, including phagocytes. This complexity of the sea urchin TLR multigene families largely derives from expansions that are independent of those in vertebrates and protostomes, although a small family of TLRs with structure similar to that of Drosophila Toll likely originated in an ancient eumetazoan ancestor. Several other invertebrate deuterostome genomes have been sequenced, including the cephalochordate, Branchiostoma floridae and the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus, as well as partial sequences from two other sea urchin species. Here, we present an analysis of the invertebrate deuterostome TLRs with emphasis on the echinoderms. Representatives of most of the S. purpuratus TLR subfamilies and homologs of the protostome-like sequences are found in L. variegatus. The phylogeny of these genes within sea urchins highlights lineage-specific expansions at higher resolution than is evident at the phylum level. These analyses identify quickly evolving TLR subfamilies that are likely to have novel functions and other, more stable, subfamilies that may function similarly to those of vertebrates.

  7. Immunomodulation by Gut Microbiota: Role of Toll-Like Receptor Expressed by T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariagrazia Valentini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A close relationship exists between gut microbiota and immune responses. An imbalance of this relationship can determine local and systemic immune diseases. In fact the immune system plays an essential role in maintaining the homeostasis with the microbiota that normally resides in the gut, while, at the same time, the gut microbiota influences the immune system, modulating number and function of effector and regulatory T cells. To achieve this aim, mutual regulation between immune system and microbiota is achieved through several mechanisms, including the engagement of toll-like receptors (TLRs, pathogen-specific receptors expressed on numerous cell types. TLRs are able to recognize ligands from commensal or pathogen microbiota to maintain the tolerance or trigger the immune response. In this review, we summarize the latest evidences about the role of TLRs expressed in adaptive T cells, to understand how the immune system promotes intestinal homeostasis, fights invasion by pathogens, and is modulated by the intestinal microbiota.

  8. Toll-Like Receptor 2 as a Regulator of Oral Tolerance in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew C. Tunis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Food allergy, other adverse immune responses to foods, inflammatory bowel disease, and eosinophilic esophagitis have become increasingly common in the last 30 years. It has been proposed in the “hygiene hypothesis” that dysregulated immune responses to environmental microbial stimuli may modify the balance between tolerance and sensitization in some patients. Of the pattern recognition receptors that respond to microbial signals, toll-like receptors (TLRs represent the most investigated group. The relationship between allergy and TLR activation is currently at the frontier of immunology research. Although TLR2 is abundant in the mucosal environment, little is known about the complex relationship between bystander TLR2 activation by the commensal microflora and the processing of oral antigens. This review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of the relationship between TLR2 and oral tolerance, with an emphasis on regulatory T cells, eosinophils, B cells, IgA, intestinal regulation, and commensal microbes.

  9. Immunomodulation by Gut Microbiota: Role of Toll-Like Receptor Expressed by T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Mariagrazia; Piermattei, Alessia; Di Sante, Gabriele; Delogu, Giovanni; Ria, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    A close relationship exists between gut microbiota and immune responses. An imbalance of this relationship can determine local and systemic immune diseases. In fact the immune system plays an essential role in maintaining the homeostasis with the microbiota that normally resides in the gut, while, at the same time, the gut microbiota influences the immune system, modulating number and function of effector and regulatory T cells. To achieve this aim, mutual regulation between immune system and microbiota is achieved through several mechanisms, including the engagement of toll-like receptors (TLRs), pathogen-specific receptors expressed on numerous cell types. TLRs are able to recognize ligands from commensal or pathogen microbiota to maintain the tolerance or trigger the immune response. In this review, we summarize the latest evidences about the role of TLRs expressed in adaptive T cells, to understand how the immune system promotes intestinal homeostasis, fights invasion by pathogens, and is modulated by the intestinal microbiota. PMID:25147831

  10. The evolutionary characteristics and structural biology of Gallus toll-like receptor 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongping; Wang, Hai; Jiang, Wuqi; Lian, Zhengxing

    2017-12-27

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are an important part of the innate immune system, acting as a first line of defense against many invading pathogens. The ligand known to bind Gallus toll-like receptor 21 (gTLR21) is the unmethylated cytosine phosphate guanine dideoxy nucleotide motif; however, the evolutionary characteristics and structural biology of gTLR21 are poorly elaborated. Our results suggest that gTLR21 is phylogenetically and evolutionarily related to the TLR11 family and is perhaps a close ortholog of the Mus TLR13. Structural biology of homology modeling of the gTLR21 ectodomain structure suggests that it has no Z-loop like that seen in Mus TLR9. The cytosolic toll-IL-1 receptor region of gTLR21 contains a central 4-stranded parallel β-sheet (βA-βD) surrounded by 5 α-helices (αA-αE) on both sides, a highly conserved structure also seen in other TLRs. Molecular docking analysis reveals that the gTLR21 ectodomain has the potential to distinguish between different ligands. Homodimer analysis results also suggest that Phe842 and Pro844 of the BB loop and Cys876 of the αC helix in gTLR21 are conserved in other cytosolic toll-IL-1 receptor domains of other TLRs and may contribute to the docking of homodimers. Our study on the evolutionary characteristics and structural biology of gTLR21 reveals that the molecule may have a broader role to play in innate immune system; however, further experimental validation is required to confirm our findings. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Molecular Recognition Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Simple Methods to Investigate MicroRNA Induction in Response to Toll-Like Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Victoria G; McCoy, Claire E

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe simple methods to investigate microRNA (miRNA) induction in response to lipopolysaccharide, the ligand for Toll-Like Receptor-4 activation. In brief, we demonstrate how to investigate global miRNA induction and/or repression in bone marrow-derived macrophages using TaqMan MicroRNA Arrays, followed by methods to measure individual miRNAs and target mRNA expression. Moreover, we explain step-by-step instructions on how to modulate endogenous miRNA expression through the use of miRNA inhibitors and mimics as well as highlight how miRNA modulation can be used to confirm mRNA targeting via Luciferase reporter assay. Moreover, these methods can be applied to whichever cell type and cellular function under investigation.

  12. Does Toll-like receptor 3 play a biological role in virus infections?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelmann, Kurt H.; Richardson-Burns, Sarah; Alexopoulou, Lena; Tyler, Kenneth L.; Flavell, Richard A.; Oldstone, Michael B.A.

    2004-01-01

    The Toll-like receptor (TLR) family functions to recognize conserved microbial and viral structures with the purpose of activating signal pathways to instigate immune responses against infections by these organisms. For example, in vitro studies reveal that the TLR3 ligand is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), a product of viral infections. From this observation, it has been proposed that TLR3 is likely an important first signal for virus infections. We approached this issue by investigating the role of TLR3 in four different infectious viral models (lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV), and reovirus) and in TLR3 genetically deficient ( -/- ) mice. Our results indicate that TLR3 is not universally required for the generation of effective antiviral responses because the absence of TLR3 does not alter either viral pathogenesis or impair host's generation of adaptive antiviral responses to these viruses

  13. The complement system and toll-like receptors as integrated players in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovland, Anders; Jonasson, Lena; Garred, Peter

    2015-01-01

    of innate immunity. The complement system and toll-like receptors (TLRs), and the crosstalk between them, may be of particular interest both with respect to pathogenesis and as therapeutic targets in atherosclerosis. Animal studies indicate that inhibition of C3a and C5a reduces atherosclerosis. In humans...... modified LDL-cholesterol activate complement and TLRs leading to downstream inflammation, and histopathological studies indicate that the innate immune system is present in atherosclerotic lesions. Moreover, clinical studies have demonstrated that both complement and TLRs are upregulated in atherosclerotic......Despite recent medical advances, atherosclerosis is a global burden accounting for numerous deaths and hospital admissions. Immune-mediated inflammation is a major component of the atherosclerotic process, but earlier research focus on adaptive immunity has gradually switched towards the role...

  14. Expression of Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 in gingivitis and chronic periodontitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is the major cause of adult tooth loss and is commonly characterized by a chronic inflammation caused by infection by oral bacteria. Members of Toll-like receptor (TLR family recognize conserved microbial structures, such as bacterial lipopolysaccharides, and activate signaling pathways that result in immune responses against microbial infections. The aim of the present study was to assess the mRNA expression of TLR-2 and TLR-4 in gingivitis and chronic periodontitis. Gingival tissue samples were collected from patients with chronic periodontitis, gingivitis, and healthy controls. Total RNA was extracted and RT-PCR was done for TLR-2 and TLR-4. The results showed that TLR-2 was significantly increased in gingivitis compared to TLR-4 expression and decreased in chronic periodontitis.

  15. Regulation of Toll-like receptors-dependent inflammatory response 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Kowalczyk

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs are a pivotal part of our innate immune response. They recognize a wide variety of pathogens and instigate an immune response, thus facilitating the removal of the disease-causing agent. Due to the intense nature of this response its strict control is of keyimportance, as a prolonged inflammatory signal leads to carcinogenesis and autoimmune disorders. The signaling cascade initiated by the activated TLR is complex and consists of multiple stages. It involves a variety of adaptor proteins, protein kinases and effector transcription factors. The number of stages in this process enables many possible checkpoints and ways of regulation. Signal modulation involves differentiated expression of TLRs, splicing variants of their adaptorproteins, enzymes modifying proteins engaged in the cascade and many more. This review focuses on endogenous factors responsible for controlling the TLR-dependent inflammatory response as well as on pharmacological therapies designed for regulating the innate immune response.  

  16. Increased Expression of Toll-Like Receptors by Monocytes and Natural Killer Cells in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tadema, Henko; Abdulahad, Wayel H.; Stegeman, Coen A.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.; Heeringa, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a family of receptors that sense pathogen associated patterns such as bacterial cell wall proteins. Bacterial infections are associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV). Here, we assessed the expression of

  17. Toll-like receptor 4 decoy, TOY, attenuates gram-negative bacterial sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keehoon Jung

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, the Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane glycolipid, induces sepsis through its interaction with myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2 and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4. To block interaction between LPS/MD-2 complex and TLR4, we designed and generated soluble fusion proteins capable of binding MD-2, dubbed TLR4 decoy receptor (TOY using 'the Hybrid leucine-rich repeats (LRR technique'. TOY contains the MD-2 binding ectodomain of TLR4, the LRR motif of hagfish variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR, and the Fc domain of IgG1 to make it soluble, productive, and functional. TOY exhibited strong binding to MD-2, but not to the extracellular matrix (ECM, resulting in a favorable pharmacokinetic profile in vivo. TOY significantly extended the lifespan, when administered in either preventive or therapeutic manners, in both the LPS- and cecal ligation/puncture-induced sepsis models in mice. TOY markedly attenuated LPS-triggered NF-kappaB activation, secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, and thrombus formation in multiple organs. Taken together, the targeting strategy for sequestration of LPS/MD-2 complex using the decoy receptor TOY is effective in treating LPS- and bacteria-induced sepsis; furthermore, the strategy used in TOY development can be applied to the generation of other novel decoy receptor proteins.

  18. Evolution of toll-like receptors in the context of terrestrial ungulates and cetaceans diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishengoma, Edson; Agaba, Morris

    2017-02-16

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are the frontline actors in the innate immune response to various pathogens and are expected to be targets of natural selection in species adapted to habitats with contrasting pathogen burdens. The recent publication of genome sequences of giraffe and okapi together afforded the opportunity to examine the evolution of selected TLRs in broad range of terrestrial ungulates and cetaceans during their complex habitat diversification. Through direct sequence comparisons and standard evolutionary approaches, the extent of nucleotide and protein sequence diversity in seven Toll-like receptors (TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR5, TLR7, TLR9 and TLR10) between giraffe and closely related species was determined. In addition, comparison of the patterning of key TLR motifs and domains between giraffe and related species was performed. The quantification of selection pressure and divergence on TLRs among terrestrial ungulates and cetaceans was also performed. Sequence analysis shows that giraffe has 94-99% nucleotide identity with okapi and cattle for all TLRs analyzed. Variations in the number of Leucine-rich repeats were observed in some of TLRs between giraffe, okapi and cattle. Patterning of key TLR domains did not reveal any significant differences in the domain architecture among giraffe, okapi and cattle. Molecular evolutionary analysis for selection pressure identifies positive selection on key sites for all TLRs examined suggesting that pervasive evolutionary pressure has taken place during the evolution of terrestrial ungulates and cetaceans. Analysis of positively selected sites showed some site to be part of Leucine-rich motifs suggesting functional relevance in species-specific recognition of pathogen associated molecular patterns. Notably, clade analysis reveals significant selection divergence between terrestrial ungulates and cetaceans in viral sensing TLR3. Mapping of giraffe TLR3 key substitutions to the structure of the receptor indicates that

  19. Toll-like receptor-2 deficiency enhances non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brady Kristen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously we reported that mice deficient in toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4 signalling were protected from diet-induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. Another member of the toll-like receptor family, TLR-2, has been shown to play a role in lipid trafficking via uptake of diacylated lipoproteins. However, a role for TLR-2 in NASH has not been elucidated. The objectives of the current study were to examine the influence of dietary fat quality and TLR-2 on NASH pathogenesis. Methods Steatohepatitis was induced in male Db, C57BL/6 and TLR-2-/- mice by feeding an L-amino acid-defined diet that was deficient in methionine and choline (MCDD. Mice fed the base diet supplemented with methionine and choline (control diet; CD were used as controls. To determine the role of fat quality, MCDD was enriched with polyunsaturated corn oil (PUFA or coconut oil that is comprised mostly of saturated fat (SAFA; the total amount of each fat was 112.9 g/kg of diet. After 8 weeks of feeding CD or MCDD, hepatic steatosis, inflammation and necrosis were evaluated in histological sections. Total RNA was extracted from frozen liver samples and mRNA expression of TNFα, collagen α1, IL-10, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ, TLR-4, and CD14, was analyzed via real-time PCR. Protein levels of TLR-2 were analyzed by western blot. Results Panlobular macrovessicular steatosis and diffuse leukocyte infiltration were noted in PUFA-fed Db mice. Histological scores demonstrated significantly less steatosis, inflammation and necrosis in SAFA-fed mice of all mouse strains. However, compared to wild type mice, hepatocellular damage was notably more severe in TLR-2-/- mice. Consistent with histological findings, mRNA expression of TNFα was elevated by approximately 3-fold in TLR-2-/- mice; PPAR-γ expression was blunted in this strain compared to wild type. Expression of the matrix protein collagen αI was also significantly higher in TLR-2

  20. The innate immune system, toll-like receptors and dermal wound healing: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portou, M J; Baker, D; Abraham, D; Tsui, J

    2015-08-01

    Wound healing is a complex physiological process comprised of discrete but inter-related and overlapping stages, requiring exact timing and regulation to successfully progress, yet occurs spontaneously in response to injury. It is characterised by four phases, coagulation, inflammation, proliferation and remodelling. Each phase is predominated by particular cell types, cytokines and chemokines. The innate immune system represents the first line of defence against invading microorganisms. It is entirely encoded with the genome, and comprised of a cellular response with specificity provided by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as toll-like receptors (TLRs). TLRs are activated by exogenous microbial pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), initiating an immune response through the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and further specialist immune cell recruitment. TLRs are also activated by endogenous molecular patterns termed damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). These ligands, usually shielded from the immune system, act as alarm signals alerting the immune system to damage and facilitate the normal wound healing process. TLRs are expressed by cells essential to wound healing such as keratinocytes and fibroblasts, however the specific role of TLRs in this process remains controversial. This article reviews the current knowledge on the potential role of TLRs in dermal wound healing where inflammation arising from pathogenic activation of these receptors appears to play a role in chronic ulceration associated with diabetes, scar hypertrophy and skin fibrosis. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Design and development of benzoxazole derivatives with toll-like receptor 9 antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Swarnali; Mukherjee, Ayan; Paul, Barnali; Rahaman, Oindrila; Roy, Shounak; Maithri, Gundaram; Ramya, Bandaru; Pal, Sourav; Ganguly, Dipyaman; Talukdar, Arindam

    2017-07-07

    Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) is a major therapeutic target for numerous inflammatory disorders. Development of small molecule inhibitors for TLR9 remains largely empirical due to lack of structural understanding of potential TLR9 antagonism by small molecules and due to the unusual topology of the ligand binding surface of the receptor. To develop a structural model for rational design of small molecule TLR9 antagonists, an enhanced homology model of human TLR9 (hTLR9) was constructed. Binding mode analysis of a series of molecules having characteristic molecular geometry, flexibility and basicity was conducted based on crystal structure of the inhibitory DNA (iDNA) bound to horse and bovine TLR9. Interaction with specific amino acid residues in four leucine rich repeat (LRR) regions of TLR9 was identified to be critical for antagonism by small molecules. The biological validation of TLR9 antagonism and its correlation with probe-receptor interactions led to a reliable model that could be used for development of novel small molecules with potent TLR9 antagonism (IC 50 30-100 nM) with excellent selectivity against TLR7. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Toll-like receptor mediated activation is possibly involved in immunoregulating properties of cow's milk hydrolysates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M B Gea Kiewiet

    Full Text Available Immunomodulating proteins and peptides are formed during the hydrolysis of cow's milk proteins. These proteins are potential ingredients in functional foods used for the management of a range of immune related problems, both in infants and adults. However, the mechanism behind these effects is unknown. We hypothesize that the interaction of peptides with Toll-like receptors (TLRs can induce immune effects, since these receptors are known to sample many dietary molecules in the intestine in order to regulate immune effects. To investigate this, we compared the immune effects and TLR activation and inhibition by whey and casein hydrolysates with different hydrolysis levels. We first measured cytokine production in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with either whey, casein, or their hydrolysates. IL-10 and TNFα were induced by whey hydrolysates (decreasing with increasing hydrolysis level, but not by casein hydrolysates. Next, the activation of TLR 2, 3, 5 and 9 receptors were observed by intact and mildly hydrolysed whey proteins only and not by casein hydrolysates in TLR reporter cell lines. Many casein hydrolysates inhibited TLR signaling (mainly TLR 5 and 9. These results demonstrate that the effects of cow's milk proteins on the immune system are protein type and hydrolysis dependent. TLR signaling is suggested as a possible mechanism for differences in effect. This knowledge contributes to a better understanding of the immune effects of hydrolysates and the design of infant formula, and nutrition in general, with specific immunoregulatory effects.

  3. Expression of functional toll-like receptor-2 and -4 on alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Lynne; Medford, Andrew R L; Uppington, Kay M; Robertson, John; Witherden, Ian R; Tetley, Teresa D; Millar, Ann B

    2004-08-01

    The recognition of potentially harmful microorganisms involves the specific recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and the family of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) is known to play a central role in this process. TLR-4 is the major recognition receptor for lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of gram-negative bacterial cell walls, whereas TLR-2 responds to bacterial products from gram-positive organisms. Although resident alveolar macrophages are the first line of defense against microbial attack, it is now understood that the alveolar epithelium also plays a pivotal role in the innate immunity of the lung. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether human primary type II alveolar epithelial cells (ATII) express functional TLR-2 and TLR-4 and how they may be regulated by inflammatory mediators. We have used reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and flow cytometry to determine basal and inducible expression on ATII. We have used highly purified preparations of the gram-positive bacterial product lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and LPS to look at the functional consequences of TLR-2 and TLR-4 ligation, respectively, in terms of interleukin-8 release. We have shown that human primary ATII cells express mRNA and protein for both TLR-2 and TLR-4, which can be modulated by incubation with LPS and tumor necrosis factor. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that these receptors are functional. This suggests that ATII have the potential to contribute significantly to the host defense of the human alveolus against bacteria.

  4. Soluble toll like receptor 2 (TLR-2) is increased in saliva of children with dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Alyssa; Blackburn, Corinne; Chin, Judith; Srinivasan, Mythily

    2014-08-31

    Dental caries is the most common microbial disease affecting mankind. Caries risk assessment methods, identification of biomarkers and vaccine development strategies are being emphasized to control the incidence of the largely preventable disease. Pattern recognition receptors such as the toll like receptors (TLR) have been implicated as modulators of host-microbial interactions. Soluble TLR-2 and its co-receptor, CD14 identified in saliva can bind the cell wall components of cariogenic bacteria and modulate the disease process. The objective of this study is to determine the potential of salivary sTLR-2 and sCD14 as biomarkers of caries activity and indirect measures of the cariogenic bacterial burden. Unstimulated whole saliva was collected from twenty caries free and twenty caries active children between the ages of 5 and 13 years. The concentration of sCD14 and sTLR-2 together with that of the cytokine IL-8 reported to be increased in dental caries was assessed by the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. While the level of sCD14 and that of IL-8 was equivocal between the two groups, the sTLR-2 concentration in caries active saliva was significantly higher than that in caries free saliva. The sTLR-2 in saliva could serve as a potential biomarker for caries activity.

  5. Immune Cell Toll-like Receptor 4 Mediates the Development of Obesity- and Endotoxemia-Associated Adipose Tissue Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle K. Vila

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue fibrosis development blocks adipocyte hypertrophy and favors ectopic lipid accumulation. Here, we show that adipose tissue fibrosis is associated with obesity and insulin resistance in humans and mice. Kinetic studies in C3H mice fed a high-fat diet show activation of macrophages and progression of fibrosis along with adipocyte metabolic dysfunction and death. Adipose tissue fibrosis is attenuated by macrophage depletion. Impairment of Toll-like receptor 4 signaling protects mice from obesity-induced fibrosis. The presence of a functional Toll-like receptor 4 on adipose tissue hematopoietic cells is necessary for the initiation of adipose tissue fibrosis. Continuous low-dose infusion of the Toll-like receptor 4 ligand, lipopolysaccharide, promotes adipose tissue fibrosis. Ex vivo, lipopolysaccharide-mediated induction of fibrosis is prevented by antibodies against the profibrotic factor TGFβ1. Together, these results indicate that obesity and endotoxemia favor the development of adipose tissue fibrosis, a condition associated with insulin resistance, through immune cell Toll-like receptor 4.

  6. Immune cell Toll-like receptor 4 mediates the development of obesity- and endotoxemia-associated adipose tissue fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, Isabelle K; Badin, Pierre-Marie; Marques, Marie-Adeline; Monbrun, Laurent; Lefort, Corinne; Mir, Lucile; Louche, Katie; Bourlier, Virginie; Roussel, Balbine; Gui, Philippe; Grober, Jacques; Štich, Vladimír; Rossmeislová, Lenka; Zakaroff-Girard, Alexia; Bouloumié, Anne; Viguerie, Nathalie; Moro, Cedric; Tavernier, Geneviève; Langin, Dominique

    2014-05-22

    Adipose tissue fibrosis development blocks adipocyte hypertrophy and favors ectopic lipid accumulation. Here, we show that adipose tissue fibrosis is associated with obesity and insulin resistance in humans and mice. Kinetic studies in C3H mice fed a high-fat diet show activation of macrophages and progression of fibrosis along with adipocyte metabolic dysfunction and death. Adipose tissue fibrosis is attenuated by macrophage depletion. Impairment of Toll-like receptor 4 signaling protects mice from obesity-induced fibrosis. The presence of a functional Toll-like receptor 4 on adipose tissue hematopoietic cells is necessary for the initiation of adipose tissue fibrosis. Continuous low-dose infusion of the Toll-like receptor 4 ligand, lipopolysaccharide, promotes adipose tissue fibrosis. Ex vivo, lipopolysaccharide-mediated induction of fibrosis is prevented by antibodies against the profibrotic factor TGFβ1. Together, these results indicate that obesity and endotoxemia favor the development of adipose tissue fibrosis, a condition associated with insulin resistance, through immune cell Toll-like receptor 4. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. IL-10 and toll-like receptor-4 polymorphisms and the in vivo and ex vivo response to endotoxin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schippers, Emile F.; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van Voorden, Sjaak; Martina, Cerithsa A. E.; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; le Cessie, Saskia; van Dissel, Jaap T.

    2005-01-01

    To determine to what extent lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-10 production capacity is determined by polymorphisms in toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and the IL-10 promoter region, we measured in vivo IL-10 and TNF-alpha production in patients undergoing elective cardiopulmonary bypass surgery, a major

  8. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the Toll-like receptor pathway increase susceptibility to infections in severely injured trauma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W.G.A. Bronkhorst (Maarten); N.D.A. Boyé (Nicole); M.A.Z. Lomax (Miranda); R. Vossen (Rolf); J. Bakker (Jan); P. Patka (Peter); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Sepsis and subsequent multiple-organ failure are the predominant causes of late mortality in trauma patients. Susceptibility and response to infection is, in part, heritable. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Toll-like receptor (TLR) and cluster of differentiation 14

  9. Renal expression of Toll-like receptor 2 and 4 : Dynamics in human allograft injury and comparison to rodents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stribos, Elisabeth G. D.; van Werkhoven, Maaike B.; Poppelaars, Felix; van Goor, Harry; Olinga, Peter; van Son, Willem J.; Damman, Jeffrey; Seelen, Marcus

    Activation of the innate immunity through Toll-like receptors (TLRs) has been postulated to play an important role in the pathophysiology of renal allograft dysfunction. TLR2 and TLR4 dynamics in different human post-transplant pathological entities has never been studied. Therefore, we evaluated

  10. Renal expression of Toll-like receptor 2 and 4: dynamics in human allograft injury and comparison to rodents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stribos, Elisabeth G. D.; van Werkhoven, Maaike B.; Poppelaars, Felix; van Goor, Harry; Olinga, Peter; van Son, Willem J.; Damman, Jeffrey; Seelen, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the innate immunity through Toll-like receptors (TLRs) has been postulated to play an important role in the pathophysiology of renal allograft dysfunction. TLR2 and TLR4 dynamics in different human post-transplant pathological entities has never been studied. Therefore, we evaluated

  11. Host defence during Klebsiella pneumonia relies on haematopoietic-expressed Toll-like receptors 4 and 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieland, C. W.; van Lieshout, M. H. P.; Hoogendijk, A. J.; van der Poll, T.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the relative roles of Toll-like receptor (TLR)2 and TLR4 were investigated independently and together. Moreover, we studied the role of haematopoietic compartment in anti-Klebsiella host defence. We infected TLR2 and TLR4 single-, and TLR2×4 double knockout (KO) animals with different

  12. DMPD: Proximal effects of Toll-like receptor activation in dendritic cells. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17142025 Proximal effects of Toll-like receptor activation in dendritic cells. Watts C, Zaru R, Prescott...lls. Authors Watts C, Zaru R, Prescott AR, Wallin RP, West MA. Publication Curr Opin Immunol. 2007 Feb;19(1)

  13. GENES, IN ADDITION TO TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR 2, PLAY A ROLE IN ANTIBACTERIAL DEFENSE TO STREPTOCOCCAL PNEUMONIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streptococcus infection in human populations continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. To evaluate the effect of genetic background and toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) on antibacterial defense to streptococcal infection, eight genetically diverse strains of mic...

  14. Toll-like receptors and microbial exposure : gene-gene and gene-environment interaction in the development of atopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijmerink, N. E.; Kerkhof, M.; Bottema, R. W. B.; Gerritsen, J.; Stelma, F. F.; Thijs, C.; van Schayck, C. P.; Smit, H. A.; Brunekreef, B.; Postma, D. S.; Koppelman, G. H.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental and genetic factors contribute to atopy development. High microbial exposure may confer a protective effect on atopy. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) bind microbial products and are important in activating the immune system. To assess whether interactions between microbial exposures and

  15. Toll-like receptors and microbial exposure: gene-gene and gene-environment interaction in the development of atopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijmerink, N.E.; Kerkhof, M. van de; Bottema, R.W.; Gerritsen, J.; Stelma, F.F.; Thijs, C.; Schayck, C.P. van; Smit, H.A.; Brunekreef, B.; Postma, D.S.; Koppelman, G.H.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental and genetic factors contribute to atopy development. High microbial exposure may confer a protective effect on atopy. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) bind microbial products and are important in activating the immune system. To assess whether interactions between microbial exposures and

  16. Role of Toll-like receptors in systemic Candida albicans infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisa Gil, Maria; Murciano, Celia; Yáñez, Alberto; Gozalbo, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) constitute a family of pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) that recognize molecular signatures of microbial pathogens and function as sensors for infection. Recognition of Candida albicans by TLRs on mature immune cells, such as phagocytic cells, activates intracellular signalling pathways that trigger production of proinflammatory cytokines which are critical for innate host defence and orchestrate the adaptive response. TLR2, and TLR4 in a minor extent, recognize cell wall-associated ligands; endosomal TLR9 and TLR7 recognize DNA and RNA respectively. Interaction of C. albicans with TLRs is a complex process, as TLRs may collaborate with other PRRs and expression of surface-associated fungal ligands depends on the strain and the morphotype (yeasts or hyphae), thus defining the final induced adaptive response (Th1/Th2/Th17). TLRs are also expressed on hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) where they may play a role in modulating hematopoiesis; engagement of TLR2 induces, upon recognition of C. albicans, the differentiation of HSPCs towards specific subsets of mature myeloid cells. This has opened a new perspective for anti-Candida immunointervention.

  17. The active contribution of Toll-like receptors to allergic airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Keqiang; Xiang, Yi; Yao, Xiaohong; Liu, Ying; Gong, Wanghua; Yoshimura, Teizo; Wang, Ji Ming

    2011-10-01

    Epithelia lining the respiratory tract represent a major portal of entry for microorganisms and allergens and are equipped with innate and adaptive immune signaling receptors for host protection. These include Toll-like receptors (TLRs) that recognize microbial components and evoke diverse responses in cells of the respiratory system. TLR stimulation by microorganism-derived molecules activates antigen presenting cells, control T helper (Th) 1, Th2, and Th17 immune cell differentiation, cytokine production by mast cells, and activation of eosinophils. It is clear that TLR are involved in the pathophysiology of allergic airway diseases such as asthma. Dendritic cells (DCs), a kind of antigen presenting cells, which play a key role in the induction of allergic airway inflammation, are privileged targets for pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). During the allergic responses, engagement of TLRs on DCs determines the Th2 polarization of the T cells. TLR signaling in mast cells increases the release of IL-5, and TLR activation of airway epithelial cells forces the generation of proallergic Th2 type of cytokines. Although these responses aim to protect the host, they may also result in inflammatory tissue damage in the airway. Under certain conditions, stimulation of TLRs, in particular, TLR9, may reduce Th2-dependent allergic inflammation by induction of Th1 responses. Therefore, understanding the complex regulatory roles of TLRs in the pathogenesis of allergic airway inflammation should facilitate the development of preventive and therapeutic measures for asthmatic patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. HMGB1 promotes neutrophil extracellular trap formation through interactions with Toll-like receptor 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadie, Jean-Marc; Bae, Hong-Beom; Jiang, Shaoning; Park, Dae Won; Bell, Celeste P.; Yang, Huan; Pittet, Jean-Francois; Tracey, Kevin; Thannickal, Victor J.; Abraham, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Although neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) form to prevent dissemination of pathogenic microorganisms, excessive release of DNA and DNA-associated proteins can also perpetuate sterile inflammation. In this study, we found that the danger-associated molecular pattern protein high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) can induce NET formation. NET formation was found after exposure of wild-type and receptor for advanced glycation end products-deficient neutrophil to HMGB1, whereas deficiency of Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 diminished the ability of neutrophils to produce NETs. Incubation of neutrophils with HMGB1 significantly increased the amount of DNA and histone 3 released as well as intracellular histone 3 citrullination, a signaling event that precedes chromatin decondensation. In vivo, neutrophils isolated from bronchoalveolar lavages of mice exposed to LPS and HMGB1 showed consistently greater ability to produce NETs compared with pulmonary neutrophils from mice that received LPS alone. In contrast, mice treated with LPS and neutralizing antibody to HMGB1 had decreased amounts of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and macrophage inflammatory protein 2, as well as of free DNA and histone 3 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. Airway neutrophils from LPS-exposed mice that had been treated with anti-HMGB1 antibodies showed decreased citrullination of histone 3. These results demonstrate that interactions between HMGB1 and TLR4 enhance the formation of NETs and provide a novel mechanism through which HMGB1 may contribute to the severity of neutrophil-associated inflammatory conditions. PMID:23316068

  19. Pattern Recognition via the Toll-Like Receptor System in the Human Female Genital Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaei Nasu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The mucosal surface of the female genital tract is a complex biosystem, which provides a barrier against the outside world and participates in both innate and acquired immune defense systems. This mucosal compartment has adapted to a dynamic, non-sterile environment challenged by a variety of antigenic/inflammatory stimuli associated with sexual intercourse and endogenous vaginal microbiota. Rapid innate immune defenses against microbial infection usually involve the recognition of invading pathogens by specific pattern-recognition receptors recently attributed to the family of Toll-like receptors (TLRs. TLRs recognize conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs synthesized by microorganisms including bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses as well as endogenous ligands associated with cell damage. Members of the TLR family, which includes 10 human TLRs identified to date, recognize distinct PAMPs produced by various bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens. The available literature regarding the innate immune system of the female genital tract during human reproductive processes was reviewed in order to identify studies specifically related to the expression and function of TLRs under normal as well as pathological conditions. Increased understanding of these molecules may provide insight into site-specific immunoregulatory mechanisms in the female reproductive tract.

  20. Role of Toll-like receptors in immune activation and tolerance in the liver

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    Nobuhiro eNakamoto

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Liver has a unique vascular system receiving the majority of the blood supply from the gastrointestinal tract through the portal vein and faces continuous exposure to foreign pathogens and commensal bacterial products. These gut-derived antigens stimulate liver cells and result in a distinctive immune response via a family of pattern recognition receptors, the Toll-like receptors (TLRs. TLRs are expressed on Kupffer cells, dendritic cells, hepatic stellate cells, endothelial cells, and hepatocytes in the liver. The crosstalk between gut-derived antigens and TLRs on immune cells trigger a distinctive set of mechanisms to induce immunity, contributing to various acute and chronic liver diseases including liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Accumulating evidence has shown that TLRs stimulation by foreign antigens induces the production of immunoactivating and immunoregulatory cytokines. Furthermore, the immunoregulatory arm of TLR stimulation can also controls excessive tissue damage. With this knowledge at hand, it is important to clarify the dual role of disease-specific TLRs as activators and regulators, especially in the liver. We will review the current understanding of TLR signaling and subsequent immune activation and tolerance by the innate immune system in the liver.

  1. Maternal endotoxin-induced fetal growth restriction in rats: Fetal responses in toll-like receptor

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    Banun Kusumawardani

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Porphyromonas gingivalis as a major etiology of periodontal disease can produce virulence factor, lipopolysaccharide/LPS, which is expected to play a role in the intrauterine fetal growth. Trophoblast at the maternal-fetal interface actively participates in response to infection through the expression of a family of natural immune receptors, toll-like receptor (TLR. Purpose: the aims of study were to identify endotoxin concentration in maternal blood serum of Porphyromonas gingivalis-infected pregnant rats, to characterize the TLR-4 expression in trophoblast cells, and to determine its effect on fetal growth. Methods: Female rats were infected with live-Porphyromonas gingivalis at concentration of 2 x 109 cells/ml into subgingival sulcus area of the maxillary first molar before and/or during pregnancy. They were sacrified on 14th and 20th gestational day. Fetuses were evaluated for weight and length. Endotoxin was detected by limulus amebocyte lysate assay in the maternal blood serum. The TLR-4 expression in trophoblast cells was detected by immunohistochemistry. Andrographolide suppresses TRIF-dependent signaling of toll-like receptors by targeting TBK1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ah-Yeon; Shim, Hyun-Jin; Shin, Hyeon-Myeong; Lee, Yoo Jung; Nam, Hyeonjeong; Kim, Su Yeon; Youn, Hyung-Sun

    2018-04-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a crucial role in danger recognition and induction of innate immune response against bacterial and viral infections. The TLR adaptor molecule, toll-interleukin-1 receptor domain-containing adapter inducing interferon-β (TRIF), facilitates TLR3 and TLR4 signaling, leading to the activation of the transcription factor, NF-κB and interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). Andrographolide, the active component of Andrographis paniculata, exerts anti-inflammatory effects; however, the principal molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of andrographolide in TLR signaling pathways. Andrographolide suppressed NF-κB activation as well as COX-2 expression induced by TLR3 or TLR4 agonists. Andrographolide also suppressed the activation of IRF3 and the expression of interferon inducible protein-10 (IP-10) induced by TLR3 or TLR4 agonists. Andrographolide attenuated ligand-independent activation of IRF3 following overexpression of TRIF, TBK1, or IRF3. Furthermore, andrographolide inhibited TBK1 kinase activity in vitro. These results indicate that andrographolide modulates the TRIF-dependent pathway of TLRs by targeting TBK1 and represents a potential new anti-inflammatory candidate. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Macroscopic law of conservation revealed in the population dynamics of Toll-like receptor signaling

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    Selvarajoo Kumar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stimulating the receptors of a single cell generates stochastic intracellular signaling. The fluctuating response has been attributed to the low abundance of signaling molecules and the spatio-temporal effects of diffusion and crowding. At population level, however, cells are able to execute well-defined deterministic biological processes such as growth, division, differentiation and immune response. These data reflect biology as a system possessing microscopic and macroscopic dynamics. This commentary discusses the average population response of the Toll-like receptor (TLR 3 and 4 signaling. Without requiring detailed experimental data, linear response equations together with the fundamental law of information conservation have been used to decipher novel network features such as unknown intermediates, processes and cross-talk mechanisms. For single cell response, however, such simplicity seems far from reality. Thus, as observed in any other complex systems, biology can be considered to possess order and disorder, inheriting a mixture of predictable population level and unpredictable single cell outcomes.

  3. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in aquatic animals: signaling pathways, expressions and immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauta, Pradipta R; Samanta, Mrinal; Dash, Hirak R; Nayak, Bismita; Das, Surajit

    2014-01-01

    The innate system's recognition of non-self and danger signals is mediated by a limited number of germ-line encoded pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that recognize pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are single, non-catalytic, membrane-spanning PRRs present in invertebrates and vertebrates. They act by specifically recognizing PAMPs of a variety of microbes and activate signaling cascades to induce innate immunity. A large number of TLRs have been identified in various aquatic animals of phyla Cnidaria, Annelida, Mollusca, Arthropoda, Echinodermata and Chordata. TLRs of aquatic and warm-blooded higher animals exhibit some distinctive features due to their diverse evolutionary lineages. However, majority of them share conserve signaling pathways in pathogen recognition and innate immunity. Functional analysis of novel TLRs in aquatic animals is very important in understanding the comparative immunology between warm-blooded and aquatic animals. In additions to innate immunity, recent reports have highlighted the additional roles of TLRs in adaptive immunity. Therefore, vaccines against many critical diseases of aquatic animals may be made more effective by supplementing TLR activators which will stimulate dendritic cells. This article describes updated information of TLRs in aquatic animals and their structural and functional relationship with warm-blooded animals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Discovery of toll-like receptor 13 exists in the teleost fish: Miiuy croaker (Perciformes, Sciaenidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanjin; Bi, Xueyi; Chu, Qing; Xu, Tianjun

    2016-08-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an indispensable role in the immune response for pathogen recognition and triggering not only innate immunity but also adaptive immunity. Here we report the TLR13 homologue, one member of TLRs, in Perciformes (especially Sciaenidae). And we used the miiuy croaker as represented species for further functional experiments. Former study reported the TLR13 only expressed in murine, and we are the first to report the teleost TLR13 (mmiTLR13). MmiTLR13 expressed highly in immune defense related tissues, such as the liver, spleen, and kidney, and Vibrio anguillarum or poly(I:C) infection showed the immune response of mmiTLR13. Further luciferase reporter assays showed the ability for activation of ISRE luciferase reporter, but it failed to active NF-κB. And further gene silence by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) confirmed the results. Immunofluorescence of mmiTLR13 presents the cytoplasmic distribution in Hela cell. In addition, the Toll/interleukin 1 receptor (TIR) domain of mammal TLR5 exhibits high identity with TLR13, which indicated the high homology between TLR5 and TLR13. These findings will lay the fundamental cornerstone for further research of teleost TLR13 and expand the horizon for better understand the teleost TLRs system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A comparative review of Toll-like receptor 4 expression and functionality in different animal species

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    Céline eVAURE

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs belong to the pattern recognition receptor (PRR family, a key component of the innate immune system. TLRs detect invading pathogens and initiate an immediate immune response to them, followed by a long-lasting adaptive immune response. Activation of TLRs leads to the synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and the expression of co-stimulatory molecules. TLR4 specifically recognizes bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, along with several other components of pathogens and endogenous molecules produced during abnormal situations, such as tissue damage. Evolution across species can lead to substantial diversity in the TLR4’s affinity and specificity to its ligands, the TLR4 gene and cellular expression patterns and tissue distribution. Consequently, TLR4 functions vary across different species. In recent years, the use of synthetic TLR agonists as adjuvants has emerged as a realistic therapeutic goal, notably for the development of vaccines against poorly immunogenic targets. Given that an adjuvanted vaccine must be assessed in pre-clinical animal models before being tested in humans, the extent to which an animal model represents and predicts the human condition is of particular importance. This review focuses on the current knowledge on the critical points of divergence between human and the mammalian species commonly used in vaccine research and development (non-human primate, mouse, rat, rabbit, swine and dog, in terms of molecular, cellular and functional properties of TLR4.

  6. Toll-Like Receptor 9 Promotes Cardiac Inflammation and Heart Failure during Polymicrobial Sepsis

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    Ralph Lohner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Aim was to elucidate the role of toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9 in cardiac inflammation and septic heart failure in a murine model of polymicrobial sepsis. Methods. Sepsis was induced via colon ascendens stent peritonitis (CASP in C57BL/6 wild-type (WT and TLR9-deficient (TLR9-D mice. Bacterial load in the peritoneal cavity and cardiac expression of inflammatory mediators were determined at 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 h. Eighteen hours after CASP cardiac function was monitored in vivo. Sarcomere length of isolated cardiomyocytes was measured at 0.5 to 10 Hz after incubation with heat-inactivated bacteria. Results. CASP led to continuous release of bacteria into the peritoneal cavity, an increase of cytokines, and differential regulation of receptors of innate immunity in the heart. Eighteen hours after CASP WT mice developed septic heart failure characterised by reduction of end-systolic pressure, stroke volume, cardiac output, and parameters of contractility. This coincided with reduced cardiomyocyte sarcomere shortening. TLR9 deficiency resulted in significant reduction of cardiac inflammation and a sustained heart function. This was consistent with reduced mortality in TLR9-D compared to WT mice. Conclusions. In polymicrobial sepsis TLR9 signalling is pivotal to cardiac inflammation and septic heart failure.

  7. Interplay Between Exosomes, microRNAs and Toll-Like Receptors in Brain Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschon, Vera; Takada, Silvia Honda; Ikebara, Juliane Midori; Sousa, Erica; Raeisossadati, Reza; Ulrich, Henning; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes, microvesicles and apoptotic bodies, participate in intercellular communication, and particularly, in paracrine and endocrine signalling. The EVs and their specific contents have been considered hallmarks of different diseases. It has been recently discovered that EVs can co-transport nucleic acids such as DNAs, ribosomal RNAs, circular RNAs (circRNAs), long noncoding RNAs (lnRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs). miRNAs are important regulators of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level, although they may also play other roles. Recent evidence supports the hypothesis that miRNAs can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) under certain circumstances. TLRs belong to a multigene family of immune system receptors and have been recently described in the nervous system. In the immune system, TLRs are important for the recognition of the invading microorganisms, whereas in the nervous system, they recognise endogenous ligands released by undifferentiated or necrotic/injured cells. In the neuronal disease field, TLRs activity has been associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), stroke, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Herein, we reviewed the current knowledge of the relationship between miRNA release by EVs and the inflammation signalling triggered by TLRs in neighbouring cells or during long-distance cell-to-cell communication. We highlight novel aspects of this communication mechanism, offering a valuable insight into such pathways in health and disease.

  8. Toll-Like Receptor-2 and -4 Expression by Maternal Neutrophils in Preterm Labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prearo Moço, Natália; Camargo Batista, Renata Aparecida; Fernandes Martin, Laura; de Oliveira, Leandro Gustavo; Garcia de Lima Parada, Cristina Maria; Alarcão Dias-Melicio, Luciane; de Assis Golim, Marjorie; Guimarães da Silva, Márcia

    2018-01-01

    The inflammatory response in preterm parturition is regulated by the innate immune system. Toll-like receptors (TLR)-2 and TLR-4 are innate immune receptors that recognize the microorganisms most frequently involved in amniotic cavity infections, which are associated with activating the inflammatory response at the maternal-fetal interface during preterm labor. This study aimed to evaluate the expression of TLR-2 and TLR-4 in maternal neutrophils in preterm labor. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the Obstetrics Care Unit of Botucatu Medical School, UNESP, Brazil. The preterm group was composed of 20 pregnant women who presented preterm labor and preterm delivery. The control group was composed of 20 nonlaboring pregnant women matched to the preterm group by gestational age. Neutrophils were isolated from peripheral blood and TLR expressions were performed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and flow cytometry. Gene expressions of TLR-2 and TLR-4 in neutrophils from the preterm group were statistically higher than expressions in neutrophils from the matched control group. The percentage of TLR-4+ neutrophils was higher in the preterm group than the matched control group, while the percentage of TLR-2+ neutrophils did not differ between groups. TLR-4 expression in maternal neutrophils is associated with spontaneous preterm labor. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Experimental models of acute infection and Toll-like receptor driven septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferstl, Ruth; Spiller, Stephan; Fichte, Sylvia; Dreher, Stefan; Kirschning, Carsten J

    2009-01-01

    Mainly Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections, but also other infections such as with fungal or viral pathogens, can cause the life-threatening clinical condition of septic shock. Transgression of the host immune response from a local level limited to the pathogen's place of entry to the systemic level is recognised as a major mode of action leading to sepsis. This view has been established upon demonstration of the capacity of specific pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) to elicit symptoms of septic shock upon systemic administration. Immune stimulatory PAMPs are agonists of soluble, cytoplasmic, as well as/or cell membrane-anchored and/or -spanning pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs). However, reflection of pathogen-host crosstalk triggering sepsis pathogenesis upon an infection by a host response to challenge with an isolated PAMP is incomplete. Therefore, an experimental model more reflective of pathogen-host interaction requires experimental host confrontation with a specific pathogen in its viable form resulting in a collective stimulation of a variety of specific PRRs. This chapter describes methods to analyse innate pathogen sensing by the host on both a cellular and systemic level.

  10. Fusobacterium nucleatum induces cytokine production through Toll-like-receptor-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quah, S Y; Bergenholtz, G; Tan, K S

    2014-06-01

    To determine whether Fusobacterium nucleatum's ability to invade cells allows the bacteria to activate pro-inflammatory response through cytosolic pattern recognition receptors, independent of surface Toll-like receptors (TLRs). HEK293T cells, which lack endogenous TLRs, and overexpressing dominant negative myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88DN) protein, were infected with F. nucleatum and the production of interleukin-8 (IL-8) was determined. The necessity for intracellular invasion of the bacteria for cytokine production was also investigated by blocking bacterial invasion with cytochalasin D. The roles of NFĸB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-1 (NOD-1) signalling pathways in F. nucleatum-induced IL-8 secretion were determined. Fusobacterium nucleatum-infected HEK293T cells produced IL-8 independent of the MYD88 signalling. This response was inhibited by preventing F. nucleatum invasion into HEK293T cells. p38 MAPK but not the NFĸB signalling pathway was required for F. nucleatum-mediated IL-8 production. HEK293T cells expressed NOD-1 but not NOD-2. Yet, inhibition of NOD-1 signalling did not affect F. nucleatum-induced IL-8 secretion. Fusobacterium nucleatum invasion led to cytokine production, which is mediated by the p38 MAPK signalling but independent of TLRs, NOD-1, NOD-2 and NFĸB signalling. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Toll-like receptors in the brain of mice following infection with Acanthamoeba spp.

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    Wojtkowiak-Giera, Agnieszka; Derda, Monika; Kolasa-Wołosiuk, Agnieszka; Hadaś, Edward; Kosik-Bogacka, Danuta; Solarczyk, Piotr; Jagodziński, Paweł P; Wandurska-Nowak, Elżbieta

    2016-11-01

    The Toll-like receptors (TLRs) of the innate immune system play an important role in the recognition of pathogens such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. In this study, we examined the changes in the level of expression of TLR2 and TLR4 mRNA and protein in the brains of mice infected with Acanthamoeba spp. The Acanthamoeba strains were isolated from a patient with Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) (Ac55) and Malta Lake (Ac43). In the brain isolated from mice at 2 days post-infection (dpi) with Acanthamoeba strains Ac55 and Ac43, mRNAs for TLR2 and TLR4 were significantly more strongly expressed in comparison with the uninfected mice. In Acanthamoeba-infected mice, TLR2 and TLR4 expression was detected in neurons, glial cells, and endothelial cells within the neocortex. These receptors showed more intense expression in ependymocytes of the choroid plexus of infected mice at 2 dpi. Increased levels of TLR2 and TLR4 mRNA expression in infected mice suggest the involvement of these TLRs in the recognition of Acanthamoeba spp. pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs).

  12. Toll-like receptor 4 expression and cytokine responses in the human urinary tract mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsson, Patrik; Hang, Long; Wullt, Björn; Irjala, Heikki; Svanborg, Catharina

    2004-06-01

    Mucosal pathogens trigger a local innate host response by activating epithelial cells. Bacterial adherence and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling have been implicated as key events in this process. This study addressed the molecular basis of the epithelial response to gram-negative infection in the human urinary tract. Mucosal biopsies were obtained from kidneys, ureters, and bladders of patients undergoing urinary tract surgery, and epithelial TLR4 and CD14 expression was examined by immunohistochemistry. TLR4 was detected in epithelial cells lining the entire urinary tract and in the renal tubular epithelium. CD14, in contrast, was completely absent from the epithelial tissue. The response of the epithelial cells to infection was studied by in vitro challenge of the biopsies with uropathogenic Escherichia coli bacteria. A rapid cytokine response was observed, with production of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, and IL-8 but not of IL-4 or gamma interferon. Adhering, P- or type 1-fimbriated E. coli activated IL-6 and IL-8 production more efficiently than the nonfimbriated control, as shown by cellular staining and analysis of secreted cytokines. The results demonstrate that human uroepithelial cells possess the molecular machinery needed to respond to uropathogenic E. coli. This includes recognition receptors for fimbriae and TLR4 for transmembrane signaling. We speculate that the lack of membrane-bound CD14 allows the epithelium to regulate its sensitivity to lipopolysaccharide and to discriminate between more-virulent and less-virulent strains.

  13. Chandipura Virus infection in mice: the role of toll like receptor 4 in pathogenesis

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    Anukumar Balakrishnan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The susceptibility of mice and humans to Chandipura virus infection is age-dependent. Upon experimental infection, mice secrete significant amounts of proinflammatory cytokines. Similarly, children who recover from natural infection with the virus show significant amounts of TNF-α production, suggesting that innate immunity plays a major role in the response to Chandipura virus. Toll-like receptors (TLR are key host molecules involved in innate immune responses in infections. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the role of TLR in the response to Chandipura virus infection. Methods The mouse monocyte-macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7, and C3H/HeJ mice were used as models. Micro array techniques were used to identify the type of TLR involved in the response to infection. The results were validated by examining TLR expression using flow cytometry and by measuring the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide (NO in the culture supernatants using bead assays and the Griess method, respectively. The pathogenic role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 was studied in a TLR4 mutant strain of mice -C3H/HeJ and the results compared with those from wild-type mice- C3H/CaJ. The pathogenic effects of NO were studied by treating experimentally infected mice with the NO inhibitor, aminoguanidine (AG. Results The micro array results showed that TLR4 was regulated after Chandipura virus infection. At high multiplicities of infection (10 MOI, RAW cells up- regulated cell surface expression of TLR4 and secreted significant amounts of TNF-α, MCP-1, IL-10 and IL-12 and NO. The survival rate of C3H/HeJ mice was higher than those of wild-type C3H/CaJ mice. The survived C3H/HeJ mice secreted significant quantity of MCP-1 and IFN-γ cytokines and cleared virus from brain. Similarly, the survival rate of AG-treated mice was higher than those of the untreated controls. Conclusions Chandipura virus regulates TLR4, which leads to the

  14. Effect of smoking on the genetic makeup of toll-like receptors 2 and 6

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    Kohailan M

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Muhammad Kohailan,1 Mohammad Alanazi,1 Mahmoud Rouabhia,2 Abdullah Alamri,1 Narasimha Reddy Parine,1 Abdullah Alhadheq,1 Santhosh Basavarajappa,3 Abdul Aziz Abdullah Al-Kheraif,3 Abdelhabib Semlali1 1Genome Research Chair, Department of Biochemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 2Département de Stomatologie, Faculté de Médecine Dentaire, Groupe de Recherche en Écologie Buccale, Université Laval, Québec City, QC, Canada; 3Dental Biomaterial Research Chair, Department of Dental Health, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Background: Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for lung cancer, asthma, and oral cancer, and is central to the altered innate immune responsiveness to infection. Many hypotheses have provided evidence that cigarette smoking induces more genetic changes in genes involved in the development of many cigarette-related diseases. This alteration may be from single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in innate immunity genes, especially the toll-like receptors (TLRs.Objective: In this study, the genotype frequencies of TLR2 and TLR6 in smoking and nonsmoking population were examined.Methods: Saliva samples were collected from 177 smokers and 126 nonsmokers. The SNPs used were rs3804100 (1350 T/C, Ser450Ser and rs3804099 (597 T/C, Asn199Asn for TLR2 and rs3796508 (979 G/A, Val327Met and rs5743810 (745 T/C, Ser249Pro for TLR6.Results: Results showed that TLR2 rs3804100 has a significant effect in short-term smokers (OR =2.63; P=0.04, and this effect is not observed in long-term smokers (>5 years of smoking. Therefore, this early mutation may be repaired by the DNA repair system. For TLR2 rs3804099, the variation in genotype frequencies between the smokers and control patients was due to a late mutation, and its protective role appears only in long-term smokers (OR =0.40, P=0.018. In TLR6 rs5743810, the TT genotype is significantly

  15. Dynamic evolution of toll-like receptor multigene families in echinoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Katherine M; Rast, Jonathan P

    2012-01-01

    The genome sequence of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, a large and long-lived invertebrate, provides a new perspective on animal immunity. Analysis of this genome uncovered a highly complex immune system in which the gene families that encode homologs of the pattern recognition receptors that form the core of vertebrate innate immunity are encoded in large multigene families. The sea urchin genome contains 253 Toll-like receptor (TLR) sequences, more than 200 Nod-like receptors and 1095 scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domains, a 10-fold expansion relative to vertebrates. Given their stereotypic protein structure and simple intron-exon architecture, the TLRs are the most tractable of these families for more detailed analysis. A role for these receptors in immune defense is suggested by their similarity to TLRs in other organisms, sequence diversity, and expression in immunologically active tissues, including phagocytes. The complexity of the sea urchin TLR multigene families is largely derived from expansions independent of those in vertebrates and protostomes, although a small family of TLRs with structure similar to that of Drosophila Toll can be traced to an ancient eumetazoan ancestor. Several other echinoderm sequences are now available, including Lytechinus variegatus, as well as partial sequences from two other sea urchin species. Here, we present an analysis of the invertebrate deuterostome TLRs with emphasis on the echinoderms. Representatives of most of the S. purpuratus TLR subfamilies and homologs of the mccTLR sequences are found in L. variegatus, although the L. variegatus TLR gene family is notably smaller (68 TLR sequences). The phylogeny of these genes within sea urchins highlights lineage-specific expansions at higher resolution than is evident at the phylum level. These analyses identify quickly evolving TLR subfamilies that are likely to have novel immune recognition functions and other, more stable, subfamilies that may

  16. DMPD: TICAM-1 and TICAM-2: toll-like receptor adapters that participate in inductionof type 1 interferons. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15618008 TICAM-1 and TICAM-2: toll-like receptor adapters that participate in induc... Mar;37(3):524-9. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show TICAM-1 and TICAM-2: toll-like receptor adapters that p...articipate in inductionof type 1 interferons. PubmedID 15618008 Title TICAM-1 and TIC

  17. Toll-like receptors are part of the innate immune defense system of sponges (demospongiae: Porifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Matthias; Korzhev, Michael; Perovic-Ottstadt, Sanja; Luthringer, Bérengère; Brandt, David; Klein, Stefanie; Müller, Werner E G

    2007-03-01

    During evolution and with the emergence of multicellular animals, the need arose to ward off foreign organisms that threaten the integrity of the animal body. Among many different receptors that participate in the recognition of microbial invaders, toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an essential role in mediating the innate immune response. After binding distinct microbial components, TLRs activate intracellular signaling cascades that result in an induced expression of diverse antimicrobial molecules. Because sponges (phylum Porifera) are filter feeders, they are abundantly exposed to microorganisms that represent a potential threat. Here, we describe the identification, cloning, and deduced protein sequence from 3 major elements of the poriferan innate response (to bacterial lipopeptides): the TLR, the IL-1 receptor-associated kinase-4-like protein (IRAK-4l), and a novel effector caspase from the demosponge Suberites domuncula. Each molecule shares significant sequence similarity with its homologues in higher Metazoa. Sequence homologies were found in particular within the family-specific domains toll/interleukin-1 receptor/resistance (TLR family), Ser/Thr/Tyr kinase domain (IRAK family), and CASc (caspase family). In addition, in situ hybridization and immunohistological analyses revealed an abundance of SDTLR (TLR) transcripts in epithelial layers of the sponge surface (exopinacoderm and endopinacoderm). Furthermore, it is shown that both SDTLR and SDIRAK-4 like (IRAK) are expressed constitutively, regardless of treatment with synthetic triacyl lipopeptide Pam(3)Cys-Ser-(Lys)(4). In contrast, SDCASL (caspase) expression is highly Pam(3)Cys-Ser-(Lys)(4) inducible. However, blocking of the lipopeptide with recombinant TLR prior to its application completely prevented the induced expression of this poriferan caspase. These results underscore that the phylogenetically oldest extant metazoan phylum is provided already with the signaling pathways of the antimicrobial

  18. H1 antihistamines in allergic rhinitis: The molecular pathways of interleukin and toll - like receptor systems

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    Jonny Karunia Fajar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The complex interaction between inflammatory mediators in allergic rhinitis (AR is determined by the role of genetic polymorphisms, including interleukin (IL and toll-like receptor (TLR genes. This study aimed to discuss the effects of H1-antihistamines on IL and TLR systems. Several ILs involved in AR pathogenesis are: IL-4 (rs2243250, rs1800925, rs1801275, rs2227284, rs2070874, IL-6 (rs1800795, rs1800797, IL-10 (rs1800871, rs1800872, IL-12R (rs438421, IL-13 (rs1800925, rs20541, IL-17 (rs3819024, IL-18 (rs360721, rs360718, rs360717, rs187238, IL-23R (rs7517847, and IL-27 (rs153109, rs17855750. In the IL system, histamines stimulate the IL production in Type 2 helper T (Th2 cells through protein kinase A (PKA, janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT pathway, and the activation of H1-histamine receptor and histidine decarboxylase (HDC genes. On contrary, antihistamines down-regulate the H1-histamine receptor gene expression through the transcription suppression of HDC and IL genes and suppress histamine basal signaling through the inverse agonistic activity. TLRs involved in AR pathogenesis are TLR2 (rs4696480, rs3804099, rs5743708, TLR4 (rs4986790, TLR6 (rs2381289, TLR7 (rs179008, rs5935438, TRL8 (rs2407992, rs5741883, rs17256081, rs4830805, rs3788935, rs178998, and TLR10 (rs11466651. In the TLR system, histamines trigger the TLR expression by stimulating interferon-γ (IFN-γ to up-regulate mast cells and by stimulating receptor-interacting protein (RIP to activate IκB kinase-β. Contrastingly, antihistamines suppress TIR-domain-containing adaptor protein inducing IFN-β (TRIF and RIP protein and thus inhibit the expression of TLR. In addition, several studies indicated that H1-antihistamines inhibit the IL and TLR systems indirectly.

  19. Intra-uterine Growth Restriction Downregulates the Hepatic Toll Like Receptor-4 Expression and Function

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    Ozlem Equils

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Maternal starvation is a significant cause of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR in the world and increases the risk of infection in the neonate. We examined the effect of maternal starvation on Toll like receptor (TLR4 expression in hepatic, splenic and intestinal tissues obtained from the adult IUGR offspring of prenatal calorie restricted rats. The hepatic TLR4 protein concentration was undetectable in the IUGR rats that had restricted milk intake during the suckling period (SM/SP; n = 4, p < 0.05 as compared to the normal growth controls (CM/CP; n=4, and access to ad lib milk intake during the sucking period partially corrected the hepatic TLR4 expression (SM/CP; n = 4. IUGR had no effect on the splenic (n = 4 or intestinal (n = 4 TLR4 mRNA levels. In the liver, IUGR led to a 20% increase in baseline tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α mRNA expression ( p < 0.03 and a 70% increase in interleukin-1β (IL-1β mRNA expression ( p < 0.008 as compared to the control rats (CM/CP; n = 7. LPS-induced hepatic TNF-α release was significantly higher in SM/SP as compared to CM/CP. We propose that IUGR dysregulates TLR4 expression and function in the offspring, which may help explain the increased risk of Gram-negative sepsis and inflammatory diseases in this population.

  1. Differential expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in healthy and infected canine endometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotimanukul, S; Sirivaidyapong, S

    2011-10-01

    This study provides the first report into immunohistochemical localization of Toll-like receptor (TLR) in the canine reproductive tract. TLR4 was investigated in endometrium during the estrous cycle and in pyometra. Pyometra is the most important pathological condition of the uterus due to bacterial infection in dogs. To protect against invading pathogens, the female reproductive tract has evolved immune mechanisms. TLRs are the cellular components of the afferent arm of the innate immune system. The expression of TLR4 was significantly higher in the endometrial stroma compared to the endometrial surface epithelium and glandular epithelium in proestrus. The glandular epithelium and stroma at the diestrous stage expressed TLR4 significantly higher than surface epithelium. Furthermore, when compared to other healthy groups, the glandular epithelium at diestrus also higher expressed TLR4 than other stages. The expression of TLR4 in the surface epithelium was higher in dogs with pyometra compared with all other groups. And, the surface epithelium of dogs suffering from pyometra also expressed TLR4 more intensely than the glandular epithelium. The innate immunity of infected canine endometrium response to bacterial infection is intensely extremely increased by the expression of TLR4. Furthermore, the different levels of TLR4 expression seems related to physiological changes in distinct cell types of endometrium, leukocytes populations, cytokines and sex hormones. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Placental Trophoblast Responses to Porphyromonas gingivalis Mediated by Toll-like Receptor-2 and -4

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    Banun Kusumawardani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Trophoblast participates in preventing allorecognition and controlling pathogens that compromise fetal wellbeing. Toll-like receptors recognize conserved sequences on the pathogens surface and trigger effector cell functions. Porphyromonas gingivalis is thought to spread to the umbilical cord and cause fetal growth restriction. Objective: To characterize expression and function of TLR-2 and TLR-4 in trophoblast cells from Porphyromonas gingivalisinfected pregnant rats. Methods: Live Porphyromonas gingivalis were challenged into the maxillary first molar subgingival sulcus of female rats before and/or during pregnancy and sacrified on gestational day (GD 14 and 20. Porphyromonas gingivalis was detected by API-ZYM system in the maternal blood of the retro-orbital venous plexus and the umbilical cord. TLR-2 and TLR-4 expressions in trophoblast cells was detected by immunohistochemistry. Results: Porphyromonas gingivalis was first detected in the maternal blood and finally spread to the umbilical cord. Syncytiotrophoblast, spongitrophoblast and trophoblastic giant cell in treated groups had significantly higher expression of TLR-2 and TLR-4 than control group (p<0.05. Conclusion: Syncytiotrophoblast, spongitrophoblast and trophoblastic giant cell are able to recognize Porphyromonas gingivalis through TLR-2 and TLR-4 expression. The ligation of TLR-2 and TLR-4 promoted cytokine production and induced trophoblast cell death. These findings strengthen links between periodontal disease and fetal growth restriction.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v20i2.150

  3. Expression of Toll-Like Receptor 4 in Glomerular Endothelial Cells under Diabetic Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takata, Shunsuke; Sawa, Yoshihiko; Uchiyama, Takanobu; Ishikawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic conditions promote glomerulosclerosis by mesangial cells but the mechanisms are not fully elucidated. The present study evaluated the expression of toll-like receptor 4 in glomerular endothelial cells in the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetic mouse (ICR-STZ) and the type 2 diabetic KK/TaJcl mouse which were fed a high fat diet feed (KK/Ta-HF). In the ICR-STZ and KK/Ta-HF almost glomeruli were immunostained with anti-TLR4 but there was no glomerulus immunostained by ani-TLR4 in the control ICR and KK/Ta. Laser-scanning confocal microscopy showed that the TLR4-positive region did not coincide with the podoplanin-positive region but coincide with the PECAM-1- and VE-cadherin-positive regions in the glomeruli of the ICR-STZ and KK/Ta-HF. The in situ hybridization showed that almost signals for TLR4 mRNA were present in the glomerulus of the ICR-STZ and KK/Ta-HF to a stronger extent than in the control ICR and KK/Ta. These suggest that glomerular endothelial cells usually express the TLR4 gene and hyperglycemia in the diabetic condition induces the TLR4 protein expression in the glomerular capillary endothelial cells. Cytokine productions through the TLR signaling pathway in glomerular endothelial cells may allow mesangial cells to produce extracellular matrix proteins in the diabetic milieu

  4. Role of human Toll-like receptors in naturally occurring influenza A infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nelson; Wong, Chun Kwok; Hui, David S C; Lee, Sharon K W; Wong, Rity Y K; Ngai, Karry L K; Chan, Martin C W; Chu, Yi Jun; Ho, Amy W Y; Lui, Grace C Y; Wong, Bonnie C K; Wong, Sunny H; Yip, Shea Ping; Chan, Paul K S

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the roles of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in naturally occurring influenza. A prospective, case - control study was conducted. Adults hospitalized with virologically confirmed influenza A infections (onset respiratory/cardiovascular complications. There were increased cellular expressions of TLR9, TLR8, TLR3, and TLR7 during influenza; TLR2 and TLR4 were suppressed. Results were similar for both virus strains. Higher TLR expression levels at presentation significantly correlated with lower viral loads (Spearman's rho: -0.46 to -0.69 for TLR9, TLR8, and TLR3; P-values <0.05). Multivariate regression models (adjusted for age, comorbidity, disease severity, time from onset) confirmed their independent associations. Increased signaling molecules (phospho-MAPKs, IκB) and inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, sTNFR-1, CCL2/MCP-1; CXCL10/IP-10, IFN-γ) correlated with increased TLR expression. RLRs were upregulated simultaneously. PBMCs of patients with influenza showed significant, dynamic changes in their cytokine responses upon TLR stimulation, compared with controls. Our results suggest that TLRs play an important role in early, innate viral inhibition in naturally occurring influenza. Inflammatory cytokine responses are concomitantly induced. These findings support investigation of TLR targeting as a novel intervention approach for prophylaxis against influenza. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The complement system and toll-like receptors as integrated players in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovland, Anders; Jonasson, Lena; Garred, Peter; Yndestad, Arne; Aukrust, Pål; Lappegård, Knut T; Espevik, Terje; Mollnes, Tom E

    2015-08-01

    Despite recent medical advances, atherosclerosis is a global burden accounting for numerous deaths and hospital admissions. Immune-mediated inflammation is a major component of the atherosclerotic process, but earlier research focus on adaptive immunity has gradually switched towards the role of innate immunity. The complement system and toll-like receptors (TLRs), and the crosstalk between them, may be of particular interest both with respect to pathogenesis and as therapeutic targets in atherosclerosis. Animal studies indicate that inhibition of C3a and C5a reduces atherosclerosis. In humans modified LDL-cholesterol activate complement and TLRs leading to downstream inflammation, and histopathological studies indicate that the innate immune system is present in atherosclerotic lesions. Moreover, clinical studies have demonstrated that both complement and TLRs are upregulated in atherosclerotic diseases, although interventional trials have this far been disappointing. However, based on recent research showing an intimate interplay between complement and TLRs we propose a model in which combined inhibition of both complement and TLRs may represent a potent anti-inflammatory therapeutic approach to reduce atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Therapeutic implications of toll-like receptors in peripheral neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Krishan K; Saini, Jyoti; Mahajan, Kanika; Singh, Dhyanendra; Jayswal, Dinkar P; Mishra, Srishti; Bishayee, Anupam; Sethi, Gautam; Kunnumakkara, Ajaikumar B

    2017-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a state of chronic pain arising after peripheral or central nerve injury. These injuries can be mediated through the activation of various cells (astrocytes, microglia and Schwann cells), as well as the dissolution of distal axons. Recent studies have suggested that after nerve injury, Toll-like receptors (TLRs) involved in Wallerian degeneration and generation of neuropathic pain. Furthermore, these TLRs are responsible for the stimulation of astrocytes and microglia that can cause induction of the proinflammatory mediators and cytokines in the spinal cord, thereby leading to the generation and maintenance of neuropathic pain. Indeed considering the prevalence of neuropathic pain and suffering of the affected patients, insights into the diverse mechanism(s) of activation of TLR signaling cascades may open novel avenues for the management of this chronic condition. Moreover, existing therapies like antidepressants, anticonvulsants, opiates and other analgesic are not sufficiently effective in reducing the pain. In this review, we present substantial evidences highlighting the diverse roles of TLRs and their signaling pathways involved in the progression of neuropathic pain. Furthermore, an elaborate discussion on various existing treatment regimens and future targets involving TLRs has also been included. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Diversity in the Toll-Like Receptor Genes of the African Penguin (Spheniscus demersus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Desiré Lee; Vermaak, Elaine; Roelofse, Marli; Kotze, Antoinette

    2016-01-01

    The African penguin, Spheniscus demersus, is listed as Endangered by the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species due to the drastic reduction in population numbers over the last 20 years. To date, the only studies on immunogenetic variation in penguins have been conducted on the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes. It was shown in humans that up to half of the genetic variability in immune responses to pathogens are located in non-MHC genes. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are now increasingly being studied in a variety of taxa as a broader approach to determine functional genetic diversity. In this study, we confirm low genetic diversity in the innate immune region of African penguins similar to that observed in New Zealand robin that has undergone several severe population bottlenecks. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) diversity across TLRs varied between ex situ and in situ penguins with the number of non-synonymous alterations in ex situ populations (n = 14) being reduced in comparison to in situ populations (n = 16). Maintaining adaptive diversity is of vital importance in the assurance populations as these animals may potentially be used in the future for re-introductions. Therefore, this study provides essential data on immune gene diversity in penguins and will assist in providing an additional monitoring tool for African penguin in the wild, as well as to monitor diversity in ex situ populations and to ensure that diversity found in the in situ populations are captured in the assurance populations.

  8. Polymorphisms of toll-like receptor 2 and 4 genes in Chagas disease

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    German Zafra

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to test the possible implication of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 and TLR4 gene polymorphisms in determining the susceptibility to Chagas' disease. Genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism in 475 individuals from Colombia, 143 seropositive with chagasic cardiomyopathy, 132 seropositive asymptomatic and 200 seronegative. The TLR2 arginine to glutamine substitution at residue 753(Arg753Gln polymorphism was absent in the groups analyzed. The TLR4 Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile polymorphisms are in linkage disequilibrium and we observed a very low frequency of these polymorphisms in our study population (2.6% and 1.8% respectively. The overall TLR2 and TLR4 alleles and genotype distribution in seronegative and seropositive were not significantly different. We compared the frequencies between asymptomatic patients and those with chagasic cardiomyopathy and we did not observe any significant differences in the distribution of alleles or genotypes. In summary, this study corroborates the low frequency of TLR2 and TLR4 polymorphisms observed in other populations and suggest that these do not play an important role in Chagas' disease. The validation of these findings in independent cohorts is needed to firmly establish a role for TLR2 and TLR4 variants in Chagas' disease.

  9. Allergenicity resulting from functional mimicry of a Toll-like receptor complex protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trompette, Aurelien; Divanovic, Senad; Visintin, Alberto; Blanchard, Carine; Hegde, Rashmi S; Madan, Rajat; Thorne, Peter S; Wills-Karp, Marsha; Gioannini, Theresa L; Weiss, Jerry P; Karp, Christopher L

    2009-01-29

    Aeroallergy results from maladaptive immune responses to ubiquitous, otherwise innocuous environmental proteins. Although the proteins targeted by aeroallergic responses represent a tiny fraction of the airborne proteins humans are exposed to, allergenicity is a quite public phenomenon-the same proteins typically behave as aeroallergens across the human population. Why particular proteins tend to act as allergens in susceptible hosts is a fundamental mechanistic question that remains largely unanswered. The main house-dust-mite allergen, Der p 2, has structural homology with MD-2 (also known as LY96), the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding component of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 signalling complex. Here we show that Der p 2 also has functional homology, facilitating signalling through direct interactions with the TLR4 complex, and reconstituting LPS-driven TLR4 signalling in the absence of MD-2. Mirroring this, airway sensitization and challenge with Der p 2 led to experimental allergic asthma in wild type and MD-2-deficient, but not TLR4-deficient, mice. Our results indicate that Der p 2 tends to be targeted by adaptive immune responses because of its auto-adjuvant properties. The fact that other members of the MD-2-like lipid-binding family are allergens, and that most defined major allergens are thought to be lipid-binding proteins, suggests that intrinsic adjuvant activity by such proteins and their accompanying lipid cargo may have some generality as a mechanism underlying the phenomenon of allergenicity.

  10. The role of Toll-like receptor 2 in inflammation and fibrosis during progressive renal injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaklien C Leemans

    Full Text Available Tissue fibrosis and chronic inflammation are common causes of progressive organ damage, including progressive renal disease, leading to loss of physiological functions. Recently, it was shown that Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 is expressed in the kidney and activated by endogenous danger signals. The expression and function of TLR2 during renal fibrosis and chronic inflammation has however not yet been elucidated. Therefore, we studied TLR2 expression in human and murine progressive renal diseases and explored its role by inducing obstructive nephropathy in TLR2(-/- or TLR2(+/+ mice. We found that TLR2 is markedly upregulated on tubular and tubulointerstitial cells in patients with chronic renal injury. In mice with obstructive nephropathy, renal injury was associated with a marked upregulation and change in distribution of TLR2 and upregulation of murine TLR2 danger ligands Gp96, biglycan, and HMGB1. Notably, TLR2 enhanced inflammation as reflected by a significantly reduced influx of neutrophils and production of chemokines and TGF-beta in kidneys of TLR2(-/- mice compared with TLR2(+/+ animals. Although, the obstructed kidneys of TLR2(-/- mice had less interstitial myofibroblasts in the later phase of obstructive nephropathy, tubular injury and renal matrix accumulation was similar in both mouse strains. Together, these data demonstrate that TLR2 can initiate renal inflammation during progressive renal injury and that the absence of TLR2 does not affect the development of chronic renal injury and fibrosis.

  11. Cloning of canine Toll-like receptor 7 gene and its expression in dog tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okui, Yasuhumi; Kano, Rui; Maruyama, Haruhiko; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko

    2008-01-15

    Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) is activated by single strand RNA and imidazoquinoline compounds, and induces interferon production. In this study, canine TLR7 cDNA was cloned and sequenced. The full-length cDNA of canine TLR7 gene was 3419bp, encoding 1032 amino acids. The similarities of canine TLR7 with human and mouse TLR7 were 84 and 80% at the nucleotide sequence level, and 86 and 79% at amino acid sequence level, respectively. Further, the expression of TLR7 mRNA was investigated in canine normal tissues by semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis. The common expression level of TLR7 mRNA in tissues from three dogs examined was in large intestine, lung, pancreas, small intestine and skin, though the expression level in each tissue was varied among these healthy dogs. In other tissues (kidney, liver, lymph node, spleen, adrenal gland, and PBMCs), the level of TLR7 mRNA expression was different in individuals.

  12. Differential Toll-Like Receptor-Signalling of Burkholderia pseudomallei Lipopolysaccharide in Murine and Human Models.

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    Tassili A F Weehuizen

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei causes melioidosis and is a CDC category B bioterrorism agent. Toll-like receptor (TLR-2 impairs host defense during pulmonary B.pseudomallei infection while TLR4 only has limited impact. We investigated the role of TLRs in B.pseudomallei-lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced inflammation. Purified B.pseudomallei-LPS activated only TLR2-transfected-HEK-cells during short stimulation but both HEK-TLR2 and HEK-TLR4-cells after 24 h. In human blood, an additive effect of TLR2 on TLR4-mediated signalling induced by B.pseudomallei-LPS was observed. In contrast, murine peritoneal macrophages recognized B.pseudomallei-LPS solely through TLR4. Intranasal inoculation of B.pseudomallei-LPS showed that both TLR4-knockout(-/- and TLR2x4-/-, but not TLR2-/- mice, displayed diminished cytokine responses and neutrophil influx compared to wild-type controls. These data suggest that B.pseudomallei-LPS signalling occurs solely through murine TLR4, while in human models TLR2 plays an additional role, highlighting important differences between specificity of human and murine models that may have important consequences for B.pseudomallei-LPS sensing by TLRs and subsequent susceptibility to melioidosis.

  13. Differential Toll-Like Receptor-Signalling of Burkholderia pseudomallei Lipopolysaccharide in Murine and Human Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weehuizen, Tassili A F; Prior, Joann L; van der Vaart, Thomas W; Ngugi, Sarah A; Nepogodiev, Sergey A; Field, Robert A; Kager, Liesbeth M; van 't Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F; Wiersinga, W Joost

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei causes melioidosis and is a CDC category B bioterrorism agent. Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 impairs host defense during pulmonary B.pseudomallei infection while TLR4 only has limited impact. We investigated the role of TLRs in B.pseudomallei-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced inflammation. Purified B.pseudomallei-LPS activated only TLR2-transfected-HEK-cells during short stimulation but both HEK-TLR2 and HEK-TLR4-cells after 24 h. In human blood, an additive effect of TLR2 on TLR4-mediated signalling induced by B.pseudomallei-LPS was observed. In contrast, murine peritoneal macrophages recognized B.pseudomallei-LPS solely through TLR4. Intranasal inoculation of B.pseudomallei-LPS showed that both TLR4-knockout(-/-) and TLR2x4-/-, but not TLR2-/- mice, displayed diminished cytokine responses and neutrophil influx compared to wild-type controls. These data suggest that B.pseudomallei-LPS signalling occurs solely through murine TLR4, while in human models TLR2 plays an additional role, highlighting important differences between specificity of human and murine models that may have important consequences for B.pseudomallei-LPS sensing by TLRs and subsequent susceptibility to melioidosis.

  14. Burn-induced alterations in toll-like receptor-mediated responses by bronchoalveolar lavage cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppeltz, Richard F; Rani, Meenakshi; Zhang, Qiong; Schwacha, Martin G

    2011-09-01

    Burn is associated with profound inflammation and activation of the innate immune system in multiple organ beds, including the lung. Similarly, toll-like receptors (TLR) are associated with innate immune activation. Nonetheless, it is unclear what impact burn has on TLR-induced inflammatory responses in the lung. Male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to burn (3rd degree, 25% TBSA) or sham procedure and 1, 3 or 7 days thereafter, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was collected and cells were isolated and cultured in vitro with specific TLR agonists as follows: Zymosan (TLR-2), LPS (TLR-4) and CpG-ODN (TLR-9). Supernatants were collected 48 h later and assayed for inflammatory cytokine levels (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17, TNF-α, KC, MCP-1, MIP-1α, MIP-1β and RANTES) by Bioplex. BAL fluid from sham and burn mice did not contain detectable cytokine levels. BAL cells, irrespective of injury, were responsive to TLR-2 and TLR-4 activation. Seven days after burn, TLR-2 and TLR-4 mediated responses by BAL cells were enhanced as evidenced by increased production of IL-6, IL-17, TNF-α, MCP-1, MIP-1β and RANTES. Burn-induced changes in TLR-2 and TLR-4 reactivity may contribute to the development of post-burn complications, such as acute lung injury (ALI) and adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Expression of antimicrobial peptides and toll-like receptors is increased in tinea and pityriasis versicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasch, J; Mörig, A; Neumann, B; Proksch, E

    2014-03-01

    In superficial tinea and pityriasis versicolor, the causative fungi are for the most part confined to the stratum corneum which is barely reached by leukocytes. Therefore, a role of non-cellular components in the epidermal antifungal defence was suggested. To investigate the presence of such factors in these infections, the expression of human beta defensins 2 and 3 (hBD-2, hBD-3), RNase 7, psoriasin, toll-like receptors 2, 4 and 9 (TLR2, TLR4 and TLR9) and dectin 2 was analysed by use of immunostainings in skin biopsies. We found that hBD2, hBD3, psoriasin, RNase7, TLR2 and TLR4 were significantly more often expressed in distinct layers of lesional epidermis as compared with uninfected epidermis. In both infections but not in normal skin, hBD2 and hBD3 were commonly expressed within the stratum corneum and in the stratum granulosum. Similarly, psoriasin was seen more often in the upper skin layers of both infections as compared with normal skin. No significant differences between normal and infected skin were found for the expression of TLR9 and dectin 2. Our findings clearly show the expression of specific antimicrobial proteins and defence-related ligands in superficial tinea as well as in pityriasis versicolor, suggesting that these factors contribute to fungal containment. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Interaction between gut microbiota and toll-like receptor: from immunity to metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiu, Jensen H C; Dorweiler, Bernhard; Woo, Connie W

    2017-01-01

    The human gut contains trillions of commensal bacteria, and similar to pathogenic bacteria, the gut microbes and their products can be recognized by toll-like receptors (TLRs). It is well acknowledged that the interaction between gut microbiota and the local TLRs help to maintain the homeostasis of intestinal immunity. High-fat intake or obesity can weaken gut integrity leading to the penetration of gut microbiota or their bacterial products into the circulation, leading to the activation of TLRs on immune cells and subsequently low-grade systemic inflammation in host. Metabolic cells including hepatocytes and adipocytes also express TLRs. Although they are able to produce and secrete inflammatory molecules, the effectiveness remains low compared with the immune cells embedded in the liver and adipose tissue. The interaction of TLRs in these metabolic cells or organs with gut microbiota remains unclear, but a few studies have suggested that the functions of these TLRs are related to metabolism. Alteration of the gut microbiota is associated with body weight change and adiposity in human, and the interaction between the commensal gut microbiota and TLRs may possibly involve both metabolic and immunological regulation. In this review, we will summarize the current findings on the relationship between TLRs and gut microbiota with a focus on metabolic regulation and discuss how such interaction participates in host metabolism.

  17. Hypothermia Reduces Toll-Like Receptor 3-Activated Microglial Interferon-β and Nitric Oxide Production

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    Tomohiro Matsui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic hypothermia protects neurons after injury to the central nervous system (CNS. Microglia express toll-like receptors (TLRs that play significant roles in the pathogenesis of sterile CNS injury. To elucidate the possible mechanisms involved in the neuroprotective effect of therapeutic hypothermia, we examined the effects of hypothermic culture on TLR3-activated microglial release of interferon (IFN-β and nitric oxide (NO, which are known to be associated with neuronal cell death. When rat or mouse microglia were cultured under conditions of hypothermia (33°C and normothermia (37°C with a TLR3 agonist, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid, the production of IFN-β and NO in TLR3-activated microglia at 48 h was decreased by hypothermia compared with that by normothermia. In addition, exposure to recombinant IFN-β and sodium nitroprusside, an NO donor, caused death of rat neuronal pheochromocytoma PC12 cells in a concentration-dependent manner after 24 h. Taken together, these results suggest that the attenuation of microglial production of IFN-β and NO by therapeutic hypothermia leads to the inhibition of neuronal cell death.

  18. Genomics in cardiovascular diseases: analysis of the importance of the toll-like receptor signaling pathway

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    Bustamante J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available J Bustamante,1 E Tamayo,2 J Herreros3,41Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Hospital Universitario La Princesa, Madrid, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Hospital Clinico Universitario de Valladolid, Valladolid, 3Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Hospital Universitario Valdecilla, Santander, 4Biomedical Engineering Institute of Santander, Santander, SpainAbstract: The development of techniques for genomics study makes it possible for us to further our knowledge about the physiopathology of various immunological or infectious diseases. These techniques improve our understanding of the development and evolution of such diseases, including those of cardiovascular origin, whilst they help to bring about the design of new therapeutic strategies. We are reviewing the genetic alterations of immunity in said field, and focusing on the signaling pathway of toll-like receptors because not only does this play a decisive role in response to microorganisms, it is also heavily involved in modulating the inflammatory response to tissue damage, a side effect of numerous cardiovascular diseases. These alterations in tissue homeostasis are present under a wide range of circumstances, such as reperfusion ischemia (myocardial infarction phenomena, arteriosclerosis, or valvulopathy.Keywords: genome-wide association study, single-nucleotide polymorphism, innate immune system, ischemic/reperfusion, myocardial infarction

  19. Characterization of promoter sequence of toll-like receptor genes in Vechur cattle

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    R. Lakshmi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To analyze the promoter sequence of toll-like receptor (TLR genes in Vechur cattle, an indigenous breed of Kerala with the sequence of Bos taurus and access the differences that could be attributed to innate immune responses against bovine mastitis. Materials and Methods: Blood samples were collected from Jugular vein of Vechur cattle, maintained at Vechur cattle conservation center of Kerala Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, using an acid-citrate-dextrose anticoagulant. The genomic DNA was extracted, and polymerase chain reaction was carried out to amplify the promoter region of TLRs. The amplified product of TLR2, 4, and 9 promoter regions was sequenced by Sanger enzymatic DNA sequencing technique. Results: The sequence of promoter region of TLR2 of Vechur cattle with the B. taurus sequence present in GenBank showed 98% similarity and revealed variants for four sequence motifs. The sequence of the promoter region of TLR4 of Vechur cattle revealed 99% similarity with that of B. taurus sequence but not reveals significant variant in motifregions. However, two heterozygous loci were observed from the chromatogram. Promoter sequence of TLR9 gene also showed 99% similarity to B. taurus sequence and revealed variants for four sequence motifs. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that significant variation in the promoter of TLR2 and 9 genes in Vechur cattle breed and may potentially link the influence the innate immunity response against mastitis diseases.

  20. Toll-like receptor 7 controls the anti-retroviral germinal center response.

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    Edward P Browne

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of vaccines that can enhance immunity to viral pathogens is an important goal. However, the innate molecular pathways that regulate the strength and quality of the immune response remain largely uncharacterized. To define the role of Toll-like receptor (TLR signaling in control of a model retroviral pathogen, Friend virus (FV, I generated mice in which the TLR signaling adapter Myd88 was selectively deleted in dendritic cell (DC or in B cell lineages. Deletion of Myd88 in DCs had little effect on immune control of FV, while B cell specific deletion of Myd88 caused a dramatic increase in viral infectious centers and a significantly reduced antibody response, indicating that B cell-intrinsic TLR signaling plays a crucial role, while TLR signaling in DCs is less important. I then identified the single-stranded RNA sensing protein TLR7 as being required for antibody-mediated control of FV by analyzing mice deficient in TLR7. Remarkably, B cells in infected TLR7-deficient mice upregulated CD69 and CD86 early in infection, but failed to develop into germinal center B cells. CD4 T cell responses were also attenuated in the absence of TLR7, but CD8 responses were TLR7 independent, suggesting the existence of additional pathways for detection of retroviral particles. Together these results demonstrate that the vertebrate immune system detects retroviruses in vivo via TLR7 and that this pathway regulates a key checkpoint controlling development of germinal center B cells.

  1. Methemoglobin Is an Endogenous Toll-Like Receptor 4 Ligand—Relevance to Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

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    Min Seong Kwon

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuroinflammation is a well-recognized consequence of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH, and may be responsible for important complications of SAH. Signaling by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4-mediated nuclear factor κB (NFκB in microglia plays a critical role in neuronal damage after SAH. Three molecules derived from erythrocyte breakdown have been postulated to be endogenous TLR4 ligands: methemoglobin (metHgb, heme and hemin. However, poor water solubility of heme and hemin, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS contamination have confounded our understanding of these molecules as endogenous TLR4 ligands. We used a 5-step process to obtain highly purified LPS-free metHgb, as confirmed by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance mass spectrometry and by the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay. Using this preparation, we show that metHgb is a TLR4 ligand at physiologically relevant concentrations. metHgb caused time- and dose-dependent secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα, from microglial and macrophage cell lines, with secretion inhibited by siRNA directed against TLR4, by the TLR4-specific inhibitors, Rs-LPS and TAK-242, and by anti-CD14 antibodies. Injection of purified LPS-free metHgb into the rat subarachnoid space induced microglial activation and TNFα upregulation. Together, our findings support the hypothesis that, following SAH, metHgb in the subarachnoid space can promote widespread TLR4-mediated neuroinflammation.

  2. The Potential Interplay of Adipokines with Toll-Like Receptors in the Development of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

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    Shen-Nien Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs are not only crucial to the initiation of the immune system, but also play a key role in several human inflammatory diseases. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is among those human cancers, which arise from sites of chronic inflammation. Therefore, a number of studies have explored the potential contribution of TLRs to HCC occurrence, which is initiated by exposure to chronic hepatic inflammation of different etiologies (including ethanol, and chronic B and C viral infections. Recent epidemiological data have shown the association of obesity and HCC development. Given the fact that adipose tissues can produce a variety of inflammation-related adipokines, obesity has been characterized as a state of chronic inflammation. Adipokines are therefore considered as important mediators linking inflammation to several metabolic diseases, including cancers. More recently, many experts have also shown the bridging role of TLRs between inflammation and metabolism. Hopefully, to retrieve the potential interaction between TLRs and adipokines in carcinogenesis of HCC will shed a new light on the therapeutic alternative for HCC. In this paper, the authors first review the respective roles of TLRs and adipokines, discuss their mutual interaction in chronic inflammation, and finally anticipate further investigations of this interaction in HCC development.

  3. Rice Bran Feruloylated Oligosaccharides Activate Dendritic Cells via Toll-Like Receptor 2 and 4 Signaling

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    Chi Chen Lin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the effects of feruloylated oligosaccharides (FOs of rice bran on murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs and the potential pathway through which the effects are mediated. We found that FOs induced phenotypic maturation of DCs, as shown by the increased expression of CD40, CD80/CD86 and MHC-I/II molecules. FOs efficiently induced maturation of DCs generated from C3H/HeN or C57BL/6 mice with normal toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4 or TLR-2 but not DCs from mice with mutated TLR4 or TLR2. The mechanism of action of FOs may be mediated by increased phosphorylation of ERK, p38 and JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs and increased NF-kB activity, which are important signaling molecules downstream of TLR-4 and TLR-2. These data suggest that FOs induce DCs maturation through TLR-4 and/or TLR-2 and that FOs might have potential efficacy against tumor or virus infection or represent a candidate-adjuvant approach for application in immunotherapy and vaccination.

  4. Toll-like receptor 3-activated macrophages confer anti-HCV activity to hepatocytes through exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu; Wang, Xu; Sun, Li; Zhou, Li; Ma, Tong-Cui; Song, Li; Wu, Jian-Guo; Li, Jie-Liang; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2016-12-01

    Exosomes are a class of cell-released small vesicles that mediate intercellular communication by delivering functional factors to recipient cells. During hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, the interaction between liver resident macrophages and hepatocytes is a key component in liver innate immunity. In this study, we explored the role of exosomes in the delivery of innate anti-HCV factors to hepatocytes from macrophages. We showed that supernatant from TLR3-activated macrophage cultures could efficiently inhibit HCV replication in Huh7 cells. This macrophage-mediated anti-HCV activity was through exosomes because inhibiting exosomes could abrogate the action of macrophages. Further analyses demonstrated that TLR3-activated macrophages release exosomes that contain anti-HCV microRNA (miRNA)-29 family members. Inhibiting miRNA29 could restore HCV replication. These findings suggest a novel antiviral mechanism in liver innate immunity against HCV infection and provide insights to support further studies on developing exosome-based delivery system for disease treatment.-Zhou, Y., Wang, X., Sun, L., Zhou, L., Ma, T.-C., Song, L., Wu, J.-G., Li, J.-L., Ho, W.-Z. Toll-like receptor 3-activated macrophages confer anti-HCV activity to hepatocytes through exosomes. © FASEB.

  5. Coevolution of the Toll-Like Receptor 4 Complex with Calgranulins and Lipopolysaccharide

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    Andrea N. Loes

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 induces inflammation in response to both pathogen- and host-derived molecules. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS recognition by TLR4 has been shown to occur across the amniotes, but endogenous signaling through TLR4 has not been validated outside of placental mammals. To determine whether endogenous danger signaling is also shared across amniotes, we studied the evolution of TLR4-activation by the calgranulin proteins (S100A8, S100A9, and S100A12, a clade of host molecules that potently activate TLR4 in placental mammals. We performed phylogenetic and syntenic analysis and found MRP-126—a gene in birds and reptiles—is likely orthologous to the mammalian calgranulins. We then used an ex vivo TLR4 activation assay to establish that calgranulin pro-inflammatory activity is not specific to placental mammals, but is also exhibited by representative marsupial and sauropsid species. This activity is strongly dependent on the cofactors CD14 and MD-2 for all species studied, suggesting a conserved mode of activation across the amniotes. Ortholog complementation experiments between the calgranulins, TLR4, CD14, and MD-2 revealed extensive lineage specific-coevolution and multi-way interactions between components that are necessary for the activation of NF-κB signaling by calgranulins and LPS. Our work demonstrates that calgranulin activation of TLR4 evolved at least ~320 million years ago and has been conserved in the amniote innate immune system.

  6. The emerging role of toll-like receptor pathways in surgical diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Romics, Laszlo Jr

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: To outline the emerging significance of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways in surgical diseases. DATA SOURCES: A systematic review of the literature was undertaken by searching the MEDLINE database for the period 1966 to 2005 without language restriction. STUDY SELECTION: Original or review articles that described experimental data on the activation of TLR signaling pathways in surgically relevant diseases were selected for inclusion in this review. DATA EXTRACTION: Data were obtained from peer-reviewed articles and references. DATA SYNTHESIS: The role of TLRs in the recognition of pathogens renders them a key figure in the activation of both innate and adaptive immune responses during sepsis. However, emerging evidence points to fundamentally important roles in ulcerative colitis, Crohn disease, and Helicobacter pylori infection in the gastrointestinal tract and in the development of atherosclerotic plaques in the cardiovascular system. Furthermore, recent studies suggest that the regulation of the TLR pathway fulfills a central role in anticancer immunotherapy and in organ rejection after transplantation. CONCLUSION: Given the clinical significance of TLR pathways, the targeting of individual molecular components is likely to offer a broad range of future therapeutic modalities.

  7. Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 in ischemic stroke: outcome and therapeutic values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brea, David; Blanco, Miguel; Ramos-Cabrer, Pedro; Moldes, Octavio; Arias, Susana; Pérez-Mato, María; Leira, Rogelio; Sobrino, Tomás; Castillo, José

    2011-06-01

    Stroke triggers an intense inflammatory response that could be a consequence of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) activation. However, the clinical significance and the therapeutic possibilities of TLR in stroke is not completely clear. In this study, we analyze the association between the expression of TLR2 and TLR4, inflammatory molecules and endogenous ligands, and clinical outcome of ischemic stroke patients, and we test the potential of TLR2/TLR4 and their endogenous ligands as therapeutic targets. For this purpose, we included 110 patients with ischemic stroke finding that TLR2 and TLR4 are independently associated to poor outcome and correlated with higher serum levels of interleukin (IL)1β, IL6, tumor necrosis factor α, and VCAM1, and that TLR4 was independently associated to lesion volume. In addition, we have developed an in vitro model to test the potential therapeutic value of blocking TLR2/TLR4 or their endogenous ligands. Cultured cells (monocytes and human umbilical vein endothelial cells) were treated with serum from ischemic stroke patients, showing a strong inflammatory response that was blocked when TLR2/4 or cellular fibronectin (cFN) or HSP60 were blocked. In conclusion, TLR2 and TLR4 are associated to outcome in stroke patients and TLR2/4 or their endogenous ligands, cFN/HSP60 could be new therapeutic targets for ischemic stroke.

  8. Toll like receptor 2 and 4 polymorphisms in malaria endemic populations of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Prerna; Pradhan, Sabyasachi; Sharma, Divya; Adak, Tridibes

    2013-02-01

    Toll like receptors (TLRs) play a pivotal role in recognizing the invading malaria parasite Plasmodium, thus genetic makeup of the exposed population can be of utmost importance for its predisposition to malaria. In this study 264 malaria patients from seven different eco epidemiological regions of India were genotyped for TLR2 and TLR4 polymorphisms using DNA sequencing methods. No variation was observed at residue positions 677 and 753 in TLR2 whereas residue positions 299 and 399 in TLR4 were highly polymorphic. The GC haplotype (Asp299Gly/Thr399Thr) was observed at the highest frequency in populations of East Singhbhum, Vizianagaram and North Goa and absent in Kolkata, Dakshin Kannada and Nicobar district. All polymorphisms were in Hardy Weinberg equilibrium. Populations of Kolkata, Nicobar district, Sundergarh and Dakshin Kannada were observed to be closely related. TLR2 polymorphism was absent in the Indian population and an overall heterogeneous pattern of TLR4 polymorphism can be attributed to genetic drift. However it can be inferred that GC haplotype is under the process of natural selection in the Indian population and one of the factors contributing to its selection could be predominance of Plasmodium falciparum in these regions. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR 7 GENE Gln11Leu MISSENSEMUTATION AND SUSCEPTIBILITY TO PSORIASIS

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    E. S. Galimova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor (TLR are responsible for recognizing various molecular patterns associated with pathogens. Their expression have been detected in skin cells such as keratinocytes and melanocytes. Numerous experimental studies demonstrate the key role of TLRs in the pathogenesis of immune diseases, including psoriasis. The objective of this study is to analyze the associations of polymorphisms in TLR7 gene and the risk of psoriasis development. DNA samples were collected from 138 patients with psoriasis and 317 healthy controls. Genotyping of rs179003, rs179008, rs179020, rs850632, rs12013728 polymorphic loci in TLR7 gene was performed using the SNPlex™method (AB, USA. SNP in the TLR7 gene rs179008 (Gln11Leu was associated with psoriasis in entire psoriasis, late onset and sporadic subgroups (Рс = 0.0065, OR = 1.95; Рс = 0.0004, OR = 2.50; Рс = 0.0078, OR = 2.2, respectively. In conclusion, this study is the first to identify genetic variants of the TLR7 gene significantly associated with psoriasis. 

  10. Natural Modulators of Endosomal Toll-Like Receptor-Mediated Psoriatic Skin Inflammation

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    Chao-Yang Lai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that can be initiated by excessive activation of endosomal toll-like receptors (TLRs, particularly TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9. Therefore, inhibitors of endosomal TLR activation are being investigated for their ability to treat this disease. The currently approved biological drugs adalimumab, etanercept, infliximab, ustekinumab, ixekizumab, and secukizumab are antibodies against effector cytokines that participate in the initiation and development of psoriasis. Several immune modulatory oligonucleotides and small molecular weight compounds, including IMO-3100, IMO-8400, and CPG-52364, that block the interaction between endosomal TLRs and their ligands are under clinical investigation for their effectiveness in the treatment of psoriasis. In addition, several chemical compounds, including AS-2444697, PF-05387252, PF-05388169, PF-06650833, ML120B, and PHA-408, can inhibit TLR signaling. Although these compounds have demonstrated anti-inflammatory activity in animal models, their therapeutic potential for the treatment of psoriasis has not yet been tested. Recent studies demonstrated that natural compounds derived from plants, fungi, and bacteria, including mustard seed, Antrodia cinnamomea extract, curcumin, resveratrol, thiostrepton, azithromycin, and andrographolide, inhibited psoriasis-like inflammation induced by the TLR7 agonist imiquimod in animal models. These natural modulators employ different mechanisms to inhibit endosomal TLR activation and are administered via different routes. Therefore, they represent candidate psoriasis drugs and might lead to the development of new treatment options.

  11. In vitro inflammation inhibition model based on semi-continuous toll-like receptor biosensing.

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    Jin-Woo Jeon

    Full Text Available A chemical inhibition model of inflammation is proposed by semi-continuous monitoring the density of toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1 expressed on mammalian cells following bacterial infection to investigate an in vivo-mimicked drug screening system. The inflammation was induced by adding bacterial lysate (e.g., Pseudomonas aeruginosa to a mammalian cell culture (e.g., A549 cell line. The TLR1 density on the same cells was immunochemically monitored up to three cycles under optimized cyclic bacterial stimulation-and-restoration conditions. The assay was carried out by adopting a cell-compatible immunoanalytical procedure and signal generation method. Signal intensity relative to the background control obtained without stimulation was employed to plot the standard curve for inflammation. To suppress the inflammatory response, sodium salicylate, which inhibits nuclear factor-κB activity, was used to prepare the standard curve for anti-inflammation. Such measurement of differential TLR densities was used as a biosensing approach discriminating the anti-inflammatory substance from the non-effector, which was simulated by using caffeic acid phenethyl ester and acetaminophen as the two components, respectively. As the same cells exposed to repetitive bacterial stimulation were semi-continuously monitored, the efficacy and toxicity of the inhibitors may further be determined regarding persistency against time. Therefore, this semi-continuous biosensing model could be appropriate as a substitute for animal-based experimentation during drug screening prior to pre-clinical tests.

  12. Targeting the Toll of Drug Abuse: The Translational Potential of Toll-Like Receptor 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachtell, Ryan; Hutchinson, Mark R; Wang, Xiaohui; Rice, Kenner C; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R

    2015-01-01

    There is growing recognition that glial proinflammatory activation importantly contributes to the rewarding and reinforcing effects of a variety of drugs of abuse, including cocaine, methamphetamine, opioids, and alcohol. It has recently been proposed that glia are recognizing, and becoming activated by, such drugs as a CNS immunological response to these agents being xenobiotics; that is, substances foreign to the brain. Activation of glia, primarily microglia, by various drugs of abuse occurs via toll like receptor 4 (TLR4). The detection of such xenobiotics by TLR4 results in the release of glial neuroexcitatory and neurotoxic substances. These glial products of TLR4 activation enhance neuronal excitability within brain reward circuitry, thereby enhancing their rewarding and reinforcing effects. Indeed, selective pharmacological blockade of TLR4 activation, such as with the non-opioid TLR4 antagonist (+)-naltrexone, suppresses a number of indices of drug reward/reinforcement. These include: conditioned place preference, self-administration, drugprimed reinstatement, incubation of craving, and elevations of nucleus accumbens shell dopamine. Notably, TLR4 blockade fails to alter self-administration of food, indicative of a selective effect on drugs of abuse. Genetic disruption of TLR4 signaling recapitulates the effects of pharmacological TLR4 blockade, providing converging lines of evidence of a central importance of TLR4. Taken together, multiple lines of evidence converge to raise TLR4 as a promising therapeutic target for drug abuse.

  13. Toll-like receptor 4 promotes fibrosis in bleomycin-induced lung injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X X; Jiang, D Y; Huang, X X; Guo, S L; Yuan, W; Dai, H P

    2015-12-21

    The specific role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis of mice, a model of human idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, has not been characterized. We injected bleomycin intratracheally into TLR4 knockout (TLR4(-/-)) and wild-type (WT) mice. Twenty-one days after injection, mice were sacrificed and their lungs were harvested for pathological, hydroxyproline, mRNA expression, and collagen I analyses. Body weight changes and mortality were observed. Light microscopy showed that lung fibrosis was minimal in TLR4(-/-) compared to that in WT mice on day 21 after bleomycin instillation. The Ashcroft score was significantly lower in TLR4(-/-) than in WT mice (3.667 ± 0.730 vs 4.945 ± 0.880, P bleomycin injection (0.281 ± 0.022 vs 0.371 ± 0.047, P bleomycin-treated TLR4(-/-) mice expressed significantly lower type I collagen mRNA levels (mesenchymal marker; 11.069 ± 2.627 vs 4.589 ± 1.440, P Bleomycin-treated TLR4(-/-) mice had a significantly lower mortality rate on day 21 than WT mice (33 vs 75%, P 0.05). Thus, bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis is TLR4-dependent and TLR4 promoted fibrosis in bleomycin-challenged mice.

  14. Neonatal BCG vaccination influences cytokine responses to Toll-like receptor ligands and heterologous antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyne, B; Donath, S; Germano, S; Gardiner, K; Casalaz, D; Robins-Browne, R M; Amenyogbe, N; Messina, N L; Netea, M G; Flanagan, K L; Kollmann, T; Curtis, N

    2018-02-03

    Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination is associated with a reduction in all-cause infant mortality in high-mortality settings. The underlying mechanisms remain uncertain but long-term modulation of the innate immune response (trained immunity) may be involved. Whole blood, collected 7 days post randomisation from 212 neonates enrolled in a randomised trial of neonatal BCG vaccination, was stimulated with killed pathogens and Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands to interrogate cytokine responses. BCG-vaccinated infants had increased production of IL-6 in unstimulated samples and decreased production of IL-1ra, IL-6, and IL-10 and the chemokines MIP-1α, MIP-1β, MCP-1 following stimulation with peptidoglycan (TLR2) and R848 (TLR7/8). BCG-vaccinated infants also had decreased MCP-1 responses following stimulation with heterologous pathogens. Sex and maternal BCG vaccination status interacted with neonatal BCG vaccination. Neonatal BCG vaccination influences cytokine responses to TLR ligands and heterologous pathogens. This effect is characterised by decreased anti-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses in the context of higher levels of IL-6 in unstimulated samples. This supports the hypothesis that BCG vaccination modulates the innate immune system. Further research is warranted to determine if there is an association between these findings and the beneficial non-specific (heterologous) effects of BCG vaccine on all-cause mortality.

  15. The expression of Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs) in testicular cancer: A case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapouri, Farnaz; Saeidi, Shaghayegh; Ashrafi Kakhki, Sara; Pouyan, Omid; Amirchaghmaghi, Elham; Aflatoonian, Reza

    2013-11-01

    It has been suggested that malfunction of immune system may causes testicular cancer. Recently, our understanding of innate immune system has been expanded, by discovery of "Toll-Like Receptors" (TLRs). Some studies have shown that polymorphisms of TLR2 and 4 may affect on the risk of cancer. Also, the role of TLRs 3 and 9 have been shown in apoptosis and metastasis of cancer cells in animal models. Little information is available about the influence of innate immunity on testicular malignancy. Therefore, expression of TLRs 2, 3, 4 and 9 as main components of innate immunity has been investigated in this study. In this case control study, TLRs gene expression was examined by RT-PCR in normal testis and testicular cancer tissues. Real time quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) analysis was used to compare the relative expression of TLRs between the samples. mRNAs of TLR 2, 3, 4 and 9 were expressed in all normal and cancer samples. Q-PCR reveals that cancer samples had stronger expression of these genes compared with normal ones. It seems that the different TLRs expression in testicular cancer cells may contribute to extensive signaling pathways involved in carcinogenesis.

  16. Bioinformatics analysis of the structural and evolutionary characteristics for toll-like receptor 15

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    Jinlan Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs play important role in the innate immune system. TLR15 is reported to have a unique role in defense against pathogens, but its structural and evolution characterizations are still poorly understood. In this study, we identified 57 completed TLR15 genes from avian and reptilian genomes. TLR15 clustered into an individual clade and was closely related to family 1 on the phylogenetic tree. Unlike the TLRs in family 1 with the broken asparagine ladders in the middle, TLR15 ectodomain had an intact asparagine ladder that is critical to maintain the overall shape of ectodomain. The conservation analysis found that TLR15 ectodomain had a highly evolutionarily conserved region on the convex surface of LRR11 module, which is probably involved in TLR15 activation process. Furthermore, the protein–protein docking analysis indicated that TLR15 TIR domains have the potential to form homodimers, the predicted interaction interface of TIR dimer was formed mainly by residues from the BB-loops and αC-helixes. Although TLR15 mainly underwent purifying selection, we detected 27 sites under positive selection for TLR15, 24 of which are located on its ectodomain. Our observations suggest the structural features of TLR15 which may be relevant to its function, but which requires further experimental validation.

  17. Expression of toll-like receptor genes in leukocytes of patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao-Hui; Hwang, Chung-Feng; Yang, Ming-Yu; Lin, Pai-Mei; Chuang, Jiin-Haur

    2015-12-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SNNHL) is a disease entity that could be caused by multiple etiologies in which the innate immunity status of the patients might be involved. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR) genes in peripheral blood leukocytes of SNNHL patients. Basic research. We examined the expression of six TLR genes in the peripheral blood leukocytes of SNNHL patients and normal controls using real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. We found significantly higher expression of TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9 genes in SNNHL patients as compared with normal controls (P hearing loss compared with those with less severe hearing loss (P hearing thresholds of the affected ear (P < 0.05). Our study implies a role for TLRs in SNNHL. The expression of TLR2 in particular correlates with the severity of the disease. N/A. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. Novel Toll-like receptor-4 deficiency attenuates trastuzumab (Herceptin induced cardiac injury in mice

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    Yousif Nasser

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac inflammation and generation of oxidative stress are known to contribute to trastuzumab (herceptin induced cardiac toxicity. Toll-like receptors (TLRs are a part of the innate immune system and are involved in cardiac stress reactions. Since TLR4 might play a relevant role in cardiac inflammatory signaling, we investigated whether or not TLR4 is involved in trastuzumab induced cardiotoxicity. Methods Seven days after a single injection of herceptin (2 mg/kg; i.p., left ventricular pressure volume loops were measured in HeN compotent (TLR4+/+ and HeJ mutant (TLR4-/- treated with trastuzumab and control mice. Immunofluorescent staining for monocyte infiltration and analyses of plasma by (ELISAs for different chemokines including: MCP-1and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, Western immunoblotting assay for ICAM-1, and used troponin I for cardiac injury marker. Results Trastuzumab injection resulted in an impairment of left ventricular function in TLR-4 competent (HeN, in contrast TLR4-/- trastuzumab mice showed improved left ventricular function EF%, CO; p -/-; p -/-, marked reduction of myocardial troponin-I levels in TLR4-deficient mice. Data are presented as means ± SE; n = 8 in each group p Conclusions Treatment with trastuzumab induces an inflammatory response that contributes to myocardial tissue TLR4 mediates chemokine expression (TNF-α, MCP-1and ICAM-1, so in experimental animals TLR4 deficiency improves left ventricular function and attenuates pathophysiological key mechanisms in trastuzumab induced cardiomyopathy.

  19. Expression of Toll-Like Receptors on Breast Tumors: Taking a Toll on Tumor Microenvironment

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    Debika Bhattacharya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer remains a major cause of death in women in the developed world. As Toll-like receptors (TLRs are widely expressed on tumor cells and play important roles in the initiation and progression of cancer, they may thus serve as important targets and have an effective perspective on breast cancer treatment. Expression of TLRs on breast cancer cells and mononuclear inflammatory cells can promote inflammation and cell survival in the tumor microenvironment. Inflammation and cancer are related. It is well known that persistent inflammatory conditions can induce cancer formation, due to production of cytokines and chemokines, which play a crucial role in promoting angiogenesis, metastasis, and subversion of adaptive immunity. TLR signaling in tumor cells can mediate tumor cell immune escape and tumor progression, and it is regarded as one of the mechanisms for chronic inflammation in tumorigenesis and progression. This paper delineates the expression of various TLRs in promotion of inflammation and development of mammary tumors. Understanding the mechanisms through which TLRs on breast cancer cells and inflammatory cells regulate growth, survival, and metastatic progression can make them potential targets for breast cancer therapy.

  20. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of peafowl (Pavo cristatus) Toll-like receptor 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, H; Zhang, M; Gao, W; Wu, L; Li, G

    2018-01-01

    In order to clone the peafowl (Pavo cristatus) Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) gene and study its biological function, the peafowl TLR7 coding sequences (CDS) were amplified by PCR of cDNA from the whole spleen of peafowl. The full-length sequence of the peafowl TLR7 gene CDS is 3,141 bp and encodes a 1,046-amino acid protein with a classic TLR composition of 16 leucine-rich repeats (LRR). Insertions of amino acids were found at position 15 of LRR2, LRR5, LRR7, LRR9, LRR11, LRR12, LRR14, and LRR15; and position 10 of LRR11. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that the peafowl TLR7 gene was highly expressed in lymphoid tissues of the spleen, bursa, bone marrow, lung, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). HEK293T cells were transfected with a peafowl TLR7 plasmid, and functional analysis showed that peafowl TLR7 could respond to R848, leading to activation of NF-κB. Following R848 stimulation or Newcastle disease virus infection of peafowl PBMC, the levels of IL-1β, IFN-γ, CCLi2, and TGF-β4 mRNA, assessed by quantitative real-time PCR, increased significantly. Triggering peafowl TLR7 results in upregulation of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, suggesting that peafowl TLR7 plays an important role in the innate immune response. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  1. Role of toll-like receptor 4 in the inflammation reaction surrounding silicone prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auquit-Auckbur, Isabelle; Caillot, Frédérique; Arnoult, Christophe; Menard, Jean-François; Drouot, Laurent; Courville, Philippe; Tron, François; Musette, Philippe

    2011-05-01

    The inflammation which occurs around the silicone prosthesis is a complex process that can provoke the failure of the device and compromise the health of the implanted patient. Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which are transmembrane proteins, are now known to act in the innate immune response and in endogenous inflammation. The aim of our study was to assess the role of TLR4 in the foreign body reaction to a silicone shell prosthesis. Disks of shell silicone prosthesis were implanted in the subcutaneous tissue of C57BL6-TLR4-/- and C57BL6-WT mice. At day 14, inflammatory cell infiltrate and vessel sections around the prosthesis were less numerous in TLR4-/- than in WT mice. A histomorphometric analysis showed that the capsule around the implant was 1.96-fold less thick in depleted TLR4 than in wild-type mice. In addition, vascular endothelial growth factor and transforming growth factor 1 were underexpressed in the surrounding tissue of the prosthesis in TLR4-/- mice. Our study suggests, from this foreign body response model against silicone in mice, that TLR4 plays a key role in the reaction process around silicone implants. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Reduced cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in Toll-like receptor 4 deficient mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Canxiang; Yang Qingwu; Lv Fenglin; Cui Jie; Fu Huabin; Wang Jingzhou

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory reaction plays an important role in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury, however, its mechanism is still unclear. Our study aims to explore the function of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the process of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion. We made middle cerebral artery ischemia-reperfusion model in mice with line embolism method. Compared with C3H/OuJ mice, scores of cerebral water content, cerebral infarct size and neurologic impairment in C3H/Hej mice were obviously lower after 6 h ischemia and 24 h reperfusion. Light microscopic and electron microscopic results showed that cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in C3H/Hej mice was less serious than that in C3H/OuJ mice. TNF-α and IL-6 contents in C3H/HeJ mice were obviously lower than that in C3H/OuJ mice with ELISA. The results showed that TLR4 participates in the process of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury probably through decrease of inflammatory cytokines. TLR4 may become a new target for prevention of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Our study suggests that TLR4 is one of the mechanisms of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury besides its important role in innate immunity

  3. The role of toll-like receptors (TLRs) in urinary tract infections (UTIs).

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    Behzadi, Elham; Behzadi, Payam

    2016-01-01

    Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) are caused by different types of microbial agents such as uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) and Candida albicans. The presence of strong physical barriers may prevent the breach of pathogens into the urinary tract. However, sometimes the pathogenic microorganisms may pass through the barriers and stimulate the innate and adaptive responses. Among a variety of innate immune responses, Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs) are one of the most unique and interesting molecules regarding UTIs. Thus, the authors have focused their attention on the role of TLRs in urinary tract defense against pathogenic microbial agents such as UPEC and C.albicans through this literature review. Several papers regarding UTIs and TLRs including original and review articles were searched by PubMed and Google Scholar. They were studied and the most important aspects in association with the role of TLRs in UTIs were extracted. Additionally, this paper was prepared using the experience of the authors. The TLRs 2, 4 and 5 are the most functional molecules that contribute to urinary tract defense system and UTIs. It is incredible that TLRs are able to detect and recognize different parts of microbial components relating to the same pathogen. Besides, the flexibility of the TLR molecules may lead to identification of different types of microorganisms with different signaling pathways. Our knowledge associated with TLRs and their activities against microbial causative agents of UTIs may help us to prevent, control and treat UTIs at a higher quality level.

  4. Toll-like receptors in the inflammatory response during open and laparoscopic colectomy for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimogiannis, Konstantinos E; Tellis, Constantinos C; Tselepis, Alexandros D; Pappas-Gogos, George K; Tsimoyiannis, Evangelos C; Basdanis, George

    2012-02-01

    Surgical interventions activate a cascade of reactions that result in an aseptic inflammatory reaction. This inflammatory response initiates the organism's innate immunity. Laparoscopic surgery reduces the trauma, and patients benefit from diminished surgical trauma and maintained immune function. Cytokine levels and C-reactive protein (CRP) are related to the magnitude of surgical trauma and surgical stress. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 2 and 4 are the first sensor-recognition receptors of the invading pathogens for the innate immune response. This study aimed to compare the inflammatory response and then the stress response during laparoscopic and open colectomy for cancer by calculating TLR-2 and TLR-4 as the first sensor-recognition receptors together with interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP). A total 40 patients with colorectal cancer were randomized in two groups: group A (open colectomy, n = 20) and group B (laparoscopic colectomy, n = 20). An epidural catheter was placed in all patients 1 h preoperatively. Rupivocaine was administered perioperatively and 48 h postoperatively. Blood samples were taken for calculation of IL-6, TNF-α, hsCRP, TLR-2, and TLR-4 preoperatively and 5 min after deflation of pneumoperitoneum (group B) or 5 min after division of the colon (group A), then 6 and 24 h postoperatively. The mean operative time was 115 for group A and 142 min for group B. The mean blood loss was respectively 240 and 105 ml (P tinder for further study to investigate the long-term results of laparoscopic colectomy versus open colectomy for colorectal cancer.

  5. Potentiation and tolerance of toll-like receptor priming in human endothelial cells

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    KOCH, STEPHEN R.; LAMB, FRED S.; HELLMAN, JUDITH; SHERWOOD, EDWARD R.; STARK, RYAN J.

    2016-01-01

    Repeated challenge of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) alters the response to subsequent LPS exposures via modulation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Whether activation of other TLRs can modulate TLR4 responses, and vice versa, remains unclear. Specifically with regards to endothelial cells, a key component of innate immunity, the impact of TLR cross-modulation is unknown. We postulated that TLR2 priming (via Pam3Csk4) would inhibit TLR4-mediated responses while TLR3 priming (via Poly I:C) would enhance subsequent TLR4-inflammatory signaling. We studied human umbilical vein endothelial cells and neonatal dermal microvascular (HMVECs) endothelial cells. Cells were primed with a combination of Poly I:C (10 μg/ml), Pam3Csk4 (10 μg/ml), or LPS (100 ng/ml), then washed and allowed to rest. They were then rechallenged with either Poly I:C, Pam3Csk4 or LPS. Endothelial cells showed significant tolerance to repeated LPS challenge. Priming with Pam3Csk4 also reduced the response to secondary LPS challenge in both cell types, despite a reduced proinflammatory response to Pam3Csk4 in HMVECs compared to human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Poly I:C priming enhanced inflammatory and interferon producing signals upon Poly I:C or LPS rechallenge, respectively. Poly I:C priming also induced interferon regulatory factor 7, leading to enhancement of interferon production. Finally, both Poly I:C and LPS priming induced significant changes in receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 1 activity. Pharmacological inhibition of receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 1 or interferon regulatory factor 7 reduced the potentiated phenotype of TLR3 priming on TLR4 rechallenge. These results demonstrate that in human endothelial cells, prior activation of TLRs can have a significant impact on subsequent exposures and may contribute to the severity of the host response. PMID:27567430

  6. Accelerated Calvarial Healing in Mice Lacking Toll-Like Receptor 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Gilbert, James R.; Cray, James J.; Kubala, Adam A.; Shaw, Melissa A.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Cooper, Gregory M.

    2012-01-01

    The bone and immune systems are closely interconnected. The immediate inflammatory response after fracture is known to trigger a healing cascade which plays an important role in bone repair. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is a member of a highly conserved receptor family and is a critical activator of the innate immune response after tissue injury. TLR4 signaling has been shown to regulate the systemic inflammatory response induced by exposed bone components during long-bone fracture. Here we tested the hypothesis that TLR4 activation affects the healing of calvarial defects. A 1.8 mm diameter calvarial defect was created in wild-type (WT) and TLR4 knockout (TLR4−/−) mice. Bone healing was tested using radiographic, histologic and gene expression analyses. Radiographic and histomorphometric analyses revealed that calvarial healing was accelerated in TLR4−/− mice. More bone was observed in TLR4−/− mice compared to WT mice at postoperative days 7 and 14, although comparable healing was achieved in both groups by day 21. Bone remodeling was detected in both groups on postoperative day 28. In TLR4−/− mice compared to WT mice, gene expression analysis revealed that higher expression levels of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α,TGF-β1, TGF-β3, PDGF and RANKL and lower expression level of RANK were detected at earlier time points (≤ postoperative 4 days); while higher expression levels of IL-1β and lower expression levels of VEGF, RANK, RANKL and OPG were detected at late time points (> postoperative 4 days). This study provides evidence of accelerated bone healing in TLR4−/− mice with earlier and higher expression of inflammatory cytokines and with increased osteoclastic activity. Further work is required to determine if this is due to inflammation driven by TLR4 activation. PMID:23071670

  7. Accelerated calvarial healing in mice lacking Toll-like receptor 4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wang

    Full Text Available The bone and immune systems are closely interconnected. The immediate inflammatory response after fracture is known to trigger a healing cascade which plays an important role in bone repair. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 is a member of a highly conserved receptor family and is a critical activator of the innate immune response after tissue injury. TLR4 signaling has been shown to regulate the systemic inflammatory response induced by exposed bone components during long-bone fracture. Here we tested the hypothesis that TLR4 activation affects the healing of calvarial defects. A 1.8 mm diameter calvarial defect was created in wild-type (WT and TLR4 knockout (TLR4(-/- mice. Bone healing was tested using radiographic, histologic and gene expression analyses. Radiographic and histomorphometric analyses revealed that calvarial healing was accelerated in TLR4(-/- mice. More bone was observed in TLR4(-/- mice compared to WT mice at postoperative days 7 and 14, although comparable healing was achieved in both groups by day 21. Bone remodeling was detected in both groups on postoperative day 28. In TLR4(-/- mice compared to WT mice, gene expression analysis revealed that higher expression levels of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α,TGF-β1, TGF-β3, PDGF and RANKL and lower expression level of RANK were detected at earlier time points (≤ postoperative 4 days; while higher expression levels of IL-1β and lower expression levels of VEGF, RANK, RANKL and OPG were detected at late time points (> postoperative 4 days. This study provides evidence of accelerated bone healing in TLR4(-/- mice with earlier and higher expression of inflammatory cytokines and with increased osteoclastic activity. Further work is required to determine if this is due to inflammation driven by TLR4 activation.

  8. Essential role of Toll-like receptor 2 in macrophage activation by glycogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakutani, Ryo; Adachi, Yoshiyuki; Takata, Hiroki; Kuriki, Takashi; Ohno, Naohito

    2012-01-01

    We prepared enzymatically synthesized glycogen (ESG) with the same characteristics as natural glycogen and investigated whether the macrophage-stimulating activity of glycogen was related to Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which are important receptors for innate immunity. ESG induced no nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activity in TLR4/MD-2/CD14-expressed human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) reporter cells, whereas this polysaccharide did activate peritoneal exude cells (PECs) derived from TLR4-deficient mice at the same level as those from wild-type (WT) mice. Similarly, ESG did not activate HEK293 cells expressing TLR3, 5, 7, 8 or 9, suggesting that these TLRs were irrelevant to the activity of ESG. In contrast, ESG enhanced the NF-κB activity of TLR2-expressed HEK293 reporter cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, the cell-stimulating activity of ESG was remarkably lower for PECs from TLR2-deficient mice compared with those from WT mice. The activity of ESG completely disappeared after treatment with a glycogen-degrading enzyme, indicating that the activity derived from ESG itself and not from contamination with canonical TLR2 ligands such as bacterial lipopeptides. Moreover, it was clarified by ELISA that ESG was directly bound to TLR2. Taken together, these results demonstrated that TLR2 directly recognizes glycogen and that the recognition activates immunocytes such as macrophages to enhance the production of nitric oxide and inflammatory cytokines. In addition, it was suggested that TLR2 could be involved in the glycogen activity in vivo. We propose that glycogen act as an activator to potentiate the host defense through TLR2 on the macrophage.

  9. Targeting Toll-like receptor 4 prevents cobalt-mediated inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Helen; Mawdesley, Amy Elizabeth; Holland, James Patrick; Kirby, John Andrew; Deehan, David John; Tyson-Capper, Alison Jane

    2016-02-16

    Cobalt-chrome alloy is a widely used biomaterial in joint replacements, dental implants and spinal rods. Although it is an effective and biocompatible material, adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD) have arisen in a minority of patients, particularly in those with metal-on-metal bearing hip replacements. There is currently no treatment for ARMD and once progressive, early revision surgery of the implant is necessary. Therapeutic agents to prevent, halt or reverse ARMD would therefore be advantageous. Cobalt ions activate Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), an innate immune receptor responsible for inflammatory responses to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) resulting in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. We hypothesised that anti-TLR4 neutralising antibodies, reported to inhibit TLR4-mediated inflammation, could prevent the inflammatory response to cobalt ions in an in vitro macrophage cell culture model. This study shows that a monoclonal anti-TLR4 antibody inhibited cobalt-mediated increases in pro-inflammatory IL8, CCL20 and IL1A expression, as well as IL-8 secretion. In contrast, a polyclonal antibody did not prevent the effect of cobalt ions on either IL-8 or IL1A expression, although it did have a small effect on the CCL20 response. Interestingly, both antibodies inhibited cobalt-mediated neutrophil migration although the greater effect was observed with the monoclonal antibody. In summary our data shows that a monoclonal anti-TLR4 antibody can inhibit cobalt-mediated inflammatory responses while a polyclonal antibody only inhibits the effect of specific cytokines. Anti-TLR4 antibodies have therapeutic potential in ARMD although careful antibody design is required to ensure that the LPS response is preserved.

  10. Polymorphisms and expression of toll-like receptors in autoimmune thyroid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Naoya; Katsumata, Yuka; Watanabe, Mikio; Ishido, Naoko; Manabe, Yu; Watanabe, Ayano; Masutani, Ryota; Hidaka, Yoh; Iwatani, Yoshinori

    2017-05-01

    Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's disease (HD) are autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs). Prognosis of AITDs varies in each patient. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern-recognition receptors that activate signaling pathways involved in the production of proinflammatory cytokines. UNC93B1 is a transcription factor of TLR7 and TLR9. In this study, we examined the association of TLR expression and TLR and UNC93B1 polymorphisms with the development and prognosis of AITDs. The ratio of intracellular TLR7 (iTLR7) and iTLR9 intensities in B cells was lower in patients with GD in remission than in patients with intractable GD (p = 0.0007). The frequency of G allele of TLR7 rs3853839 G/C polymorphism was significantly higher in male patients with GD and intractable GD than in control subjects (p = 0.0062 and 0.0173, respectively). The frequencies of T allele of TLR9 rs187084 C/T polymorphism and C allele of TLR9 rs352140 C/T polymorphism were significantly higher in patients with intractable GD who had GG genotype of TLR7 rs3853839 polymorphism, which is associated with higher TLR7 expression, than in patients with GD in remission (p = 0.0334 and 0.0023, respectively). The frequencies of AA genotype and A allele of UNC93B1 rs308328 polymorphism were significantly higher in patients with GD than in patients with HD (p = 0.0406 and 0.0316, respectively). These results suggested that the ratio of iTLR7 and iTLR9 intensities was associated with the development and intractability of GD and that TLR7 and UNC93B1 polymorphisms were associated with the development of GD.

  11. Characterization of chicken thrombocyte responses to Toll-like receptor ligands.

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    Michael St Paul

    Full Text Available Thrombocytes are the avian equivalent to mammalian platelets. In addition to their hemostatic effects, mammalian platelets rely in part on pattern recognition receptors, such as the Toll-like receptors (TLR, to detect the presence of pathogens and signal the release of certain cytokines. Ligands for TLRs include lipopolysaccharide (LPS, which is bound by TLR4, as well as unmethylated CpG DNA motifs, which are bound by TLR9 in mammals and TLR21 in chickens. Similar to mammalian platelets, avian thrombocytes have been shown to express TLR4 and secrete some pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to LPS treatment. However, the full extent of the contributions made by thrombocytes to host immunity has yet to be elucidated. Importantly, the mechanisms by which TLR stimulation may modulate thrombocyte effector functions have not been well characterized. As such, the objective of the present study was to gain further insight into the immunological role of thrombocytes by analyzing their responses to treatment with ligands for TLR4 and TLR21. To this end, we quantified the relative expression of several immune system genes at 1, 3, 8 and 18 hours post-treatment using real-time RT-PCR. Furthermore, production of nitric oxide and phagocytic activity of thrombocytes was measured after their activation with TLR ligands. We found that thrombocytes constitutively express transcripts for both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, in addition to those associated with anti-viral responses and antigen presentation. Moreover, we found that both LPS and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN induced robust pro-inflammatory responses in thrombocytes, as characterized by more than 100 fold increase in interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 transcripts, while only LPS enhanced nitric oxide production and phagocytic capabilities. Future studies may be aimed at examining the responses of thrombocytes to other TLR ligands.

  12. Fungal pathogens-a sweet and sour treat for toll-like receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Christelle; Kuchler, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Hundred-thousands of fungal species are present in our environment, including normal colonizers that constitute part of the human microbiota. The homeostasis of host-fungus interactions encompasses efficient fungal sensing, tolerance at mucosal surfaces, as well as antifungal defenses. Decrease in host immune fitness or increase in fungal burden may favor pathologies, ranging from superficial mucocutaneous diseases to invasive life-threatening fungal infections. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are essential players in this balance, due to their ability to control both inflammatory and anti-inflammatory processes upon recognition of fungal-specific pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Certain members of the TLR family participate to the initial recognition of fungal PAMPs on the cell surface, as well as inside phagosomes of innate immune cells. Active signaling cascades in phagocytes ultimately enable fungus clearance and the release of cytokines that shape and instruct other innate immune cells and the adaptive immune system. Some TLRs cooperate with other pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) (e.g., C-type lectins and Galectins), thus allowing for a tailored immune response. The spatio-temporal and physiological contributions of individual TLRs in fungal infections remains ill-defined, although in humans, TLR gene polymorphisms have been linked to increased susceptibility to fungal infections. This review focuses entirely on the role of TLRs that control the host susceptibility to environmental fungi (e.g., Aspergillus, Cryptoccocus, and Coccidoides), as well as to the most frequent human fungal pathogens represented by the commensal Candida species. The emerging roles of TLRs in modulating host tolerance to fungi, and the strategies that evolved in some of these fungi to evade or use TLR recognition to their advantage will also be discussed, as well as their potential suitability as targets in vaccine therapies.

  13. Tenascin C upregulates interleukin-6 expression in human cardiac myofibroblasts via toll-like receptor 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Azhar; Spary, Emma J; Manfield, Iain W; Ruhmann, Michaela; Zuliani-Alvarez, Lorena; Gamboa-Esteves, Filomena O; Porter, Karen E; Drinkhill, Mark J; Midwood, Kim S; Turner, Neil A

    2016-05-26

    To investigate the effect of Tenascin C (TNC) on the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases in human cardiac myofibroblasts (CMF). CMF were isolated and cultured from patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Cultured cells were treated with either TNC (0.1 μmol/L, 24 h) or a recombinant protein corresponding to different domains of the TNC protein; fibrinogen-like globe (FBG) and fibronectin type III-like repeats (TNIII 5-7) (both 1 μmol/L, 24 h). The expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines; interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, TNFα and the matrix metalloproteinases; MMPs (MMP1, 2, 3, 9, 10, MT1-MMP) was assessed using real time RT-PCR and western blot analysis. TNC increased both IL-6 and MMP3 (P < 0.01) mRNA levels in cultured human CMF but had no significant effect on the other markers studied. The increase in IL-6 mRNA expression was mirrored by an increase in protein secretion as assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (P < 0.01). Treating CMF with the recombinant protein FBG increased IL-6 mRNA and protein (P < 0.01) whereas the recombinant protein TNIII 5-7 had no effect. Neither FBG nor TNIII 5-7 had any significant effect on MMP3 expression. The expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in human CMF was confirmed by real time RT-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. Pre-incubation of cells with TLR4 neutralising antisera attenuated the effect of both TNC and FBG on IL-6 mRNA and protein expression. TNC up-regulates IL-6 expression in human CMF, an effect mediated through the FBG domain of TNC and via the TLR4 receptor.

  14. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Is Essential in the Development of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

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    Chao-Han Lai

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor (TLR family plays a key role in innate immunity and various inflammatory responses. TLR4, one of the well-characterized pattern-recognition receptors, can be activated by endogenous damage-associated molecular pattern molecules such as high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 to sustain sterile inflammation. Evidence suggested that blockade of TLR4 signaling may confer protection against abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. Herein we aimed to obtain further insight into the mechanism by which TLR4 might promote aneurysm formation. Characterization of the CaCl2-induced AAA model in mice revealed that upregulation of TLR4 expression, localized predominantly to vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs, was followed by a late decline during a 28-day period of AAA development. In vitro, TLR4 expression was increased in VSMCs treated with HMGB1. Knockdown of TLR4 by siRNA attenuated HMGB1-enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokines, specifically interleukin-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, and matrix-degrading matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 from VSMCs. In vivo, two different strains of TLR4-deficient (C57BL/10ScNJ and C3H/HeJ mice were resistant to CaCl2-induced AAA formation compared to their respective controls (C57BL/10ScSnJ and C3H/HeN. Knockout of TLR4 reduced interleukin-6 and MCP-1 levels and HMGB1 expression, attenuated macrophage accumulation, and eventually suppressed MMP production, elastin destruction and VSMC loss. Finally, human AAA exhibited higher TLR4 expression that was localized to VSMCs. These data suggest that TLR4 signaling contributes to AAA formation by promoting a proinflammatory status of VSMCs and by inducing proteinase release from VSMCs during aneurysm initiation and development.

  15. Toll-like receptor responses to Peste des petits ruminants virus in goats and water buffalo.

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    Sakthivel Dhanasekaran

    Full Text Available Ovine rinderpest or goat plague is an economically important and contagious viral disease of sheep and goats, caused by the Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV. Differences in susceptibility to goat plague among different breeds and water buffalo exist. The host innate immune system discriminates between pathogen associated molecular patterns and self antigens through surveillance receptors known as Toll like receptors (TLR. We investigated the role of TLR and cytokines in differential susceptibility of goat breeds and water buffalo to PPRV. We examined the replication of PPRV in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of Indian domestic goats and water buffalo and demonstrated that the levels of TLR3 and TLR7 and downstream signalling molecules correlation with susceptibility vs resistance. Naturally susceptible goat breeds, Barbari and Tellichery, had dampened innate immune responses to PPRV and increased viral loads with lower basal expression levels of TLR 3/7. Upon stimulation of PBMC with synthetic TLR3 and TLR7 agonists or PPRV, the levels of proinflammatory cytokines were found to be significantly higher while immunosuppressive interleukin (IL 10 levels were lower in PPRV resistant Kanni and Salem Black breeds and water buffalo at transcriptional level, correlating with reduced viralloads in infected PBMC. Water buffalo produced higher levels of interferon (IFN α in comparison with goats at transcriptional and translational levels. Pre-treatment of Vero cells with human IFNα resulted in reduction of PPRV replication, confirming the role of IFNα in limiting PPRV replication. Treatment with IRS66, a TLR7 antagonist, resulted in the reduction of IFNα levels, with increased PPRV replication confirming the role of TLR7. Single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of TLR7 of these goat breeds did not show any marked nucleotide differences that might account for susceptibility vs resistance to PPRV. Analyzing other host genetic factors

  16. Colorectal irradiation induced immune response: 'toll like receptors' therapeutic manipulation

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    Lacave-Lapalun, Jean-Victor

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of the abdomino-pelvic sphere to ionizing radiation is associated with a high incidence of complications. Radiation therapy may cause short and / or long-term harmful effects. In the most severe cases and in the absence of heavy treatments, the appearance of ulcers may induce the death of patients. Clinical trials are being conducted with Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) to cure theses complications. Others studies indicate that the injection of bacterial motifs limits the radiotoxicity in the intestine. They stimulate receptors (Toll-Like- Receptors (TLR)) located on the surface of epithelial and intestinal immune cells. The first aim of this doctoral work is to characterize the effects of TLR stimulation on immunity and tissue repair using a model of localized colorectal irradiation at 20 Gy (acute effects of radiotherapy) on a rat. The thesis then aims to potentiate the effects of the MSC treatment when adding TLR ligands upon localized colorectal irradiation at 27 Gy (accidental complications). This work, using a 20 Gy exposure, show that TLR stimulation improves homeostasis (normalization of T cells, induction of regulatory T cells (Treg) and macrophages 'anti-inflammatory' M2). On the 27 Gy colorectal model, the injection of TLR ligand before CSM transplant improves the immune climate by reducing pro-inflammatory cytokines and inducting Treg and M2 cells. These modulations could contribute to improving the implantation and effectiveness of CSM. The observations have all shown that the stimulation of immunity is an approach to minimize radiation-induced lesions. (author) [fr

  17. Differential expression of interleukin-1/Toll-like receptor signaling regulators in microscopic and ulcerative colitis.

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    Günaltay, Sezin; Nyhlin, Nils; Kumawat, Ashok Kumar; Tysk, Curt; Bohr, Johan; Hultgren, Olof; Hultgren Hörnquist, Elisabeth

    2014-09-14

    To investigate Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling regulators in microscopic and ulcerative colitis patients. Total RNA and microRNA were isolated from fresh frozen colonic biopsies of non-inflamed controls and patients with active or in-remission collagenous colitis (CC), lymphocytic colitis (LC), or ulcerative colitis (UC). We compared expressions of interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK)-2, IRAK-M, interleukin (IL)-37, microRNA (miR)-146a, miR-155, and miR-21 using quantitative real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. IRAK-M expression was increased in LC patients with active disease in histopathological remission (LC-HR; P = 0.02) and UC patients (P = 0.01), but no differences in IRAK-2 expression were detected compared to controls. miR-146a, -155 and -21 expressions were increased in LC-HR (P = 0.04, 0.07, and 0.004) and UC (P = 0.02, 0.04 and 0.03) patients. miR-146a and miR-21 expressions were significantly enhanced in UC patients compared to UC remission (UC-R; P = 0.01 and 0.04). Likewise, active CC patients showed significantly increased expression of miR-155 (P = 0.003) and miR-21 (P = 0.006). IL-37 expression was decreased in both CC (P = 0.03) and LC (P = 0.04) patients with a similar trend in UC patients but not statistically significant, whilst it was increased in UC-R patients compared to controls (P = 0.02) and active UC (P = 0.001). The identification of differentially expressed miRNAs, IL-37, and IRAK-M suggests different pathophysiologic mechanisms in various disease stages in LC, CC, and UC.

  18. Dynamic Arginine Methylation of Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Receptor-associated Factor 6 Regulates Toll-like Receptor Signaling.

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    Tikhanovich, Irina; Kuravi, Sudhakiranmayi; Artigues, Antonio; Villar, Maria T; Dorko, Kenneth; Nawabi, Atta; Roberts, Benjamin; Weinman, Steven A

    2015-09-04

    Arginine methylation is a common post-translational modification, but its role in regulating protein function is poorly understood. This study demonstrates that, TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), an E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in innate immune signaling, is regulated by reversible arginine methylation in a range of primary and cultured cells. Under basal conditions, TRAF6 is methylated by the methyltransferase PRMT1, and this inhibits its ubiquitin ligase activity, reducing activation of toll-like receptor signaling. In response to toll-like receptor ligands, TRAF6 is demethylated by the Jumonji domain protein JMJD6. Demethylation is required for maximal activation of NF-κB. Loss of JMJD6 leads to reduced response, and loss of PRMT1 leads to basal pathway activation with subsequent desensitization to ligands. In human primary cells, variations in the PRMT1/JMJD6 ratio significantly correlate with TRAF6 methylation, basal activation of NF-κB, and magnitude of response to LPS. Reversible arginine methylation of TRAF6 by the opposing effects of PRMT1 and JMJD6 is, therefore, a novel mechanism for regulation of innate immune pathways. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Bovine lactoferrin counteracts Toll-like receptor mediated activation signals in antigen presenting cells.

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    Patrizia Puddu

    Full Text Available Lactoferrin (LF, a key element in mammalian immune system, plays pivotal roles in host defence against infection and excessive inflammation. Its protective effects range from direct antimicrobial activities against a large panel of microbes, including bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites, to antinflammatory and anticancer activities. In this study, we show that monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MD-DCs generated in the presence of bovine LF (bLF fail to undergo activation by up-modulating CD83, co-stimulatory and major histocompatibility complex molecules, and cytokine/chemokine secretion. Moreover, these cells are weak activators of T cell proliferation and retain antigen uptake activity. Consistent with an impaired maturation, bLF-MD-DC primed T lymphocytes exhibit a functional unresponsiveness characterized by reduced expression of CD154 and impaired expression of IFN-γ and IL-2. The observed imunosuppressive effects correlate with an increased expression of molecules with negative regulatory functions (i.e. immunoglobulin-like transcript 3 and programmed death ligand 1, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, and suppressor of cytokine signaling-3. Interestingly, bLF-MD-DCs produce IL-6 and exhibit constitutive signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation. Conversely, bLF exposure of already differentiated MD-DCs completely fails to induce IL-6, and partially inhibits Toll-like receptor (TLR agonist-induced activation. Cell-specific differences in bLF internalization likely account for the distinct response elicited by bLF in monocytes versus immature DCs, providing a mechanistic base for its multiple effects. These results indicate that bLF exerts a potent anti-inflammatory activity by skewing monocyte differentiation into DCs with impaired capacity to undergo activation and to promote Th1 responses. Overall, these bLF-mediated effects may represent a strategy to block excessive DC activation upon TLR-induced inflammation, adding

  20. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling Pathway Mediates Inhalant Organic Dust-Induced Bone Loss.

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    Elizabeth Staab

    Full Text Available Agriculture workers have increased rates of airway and skeletal disease. Inhalant exposure to agricultural organic dust extract (ODE induces bone deterioration in mice; yet, mechanisms underlying lung-bone crosstalk remain unclear. Because Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 and TLR4 are important in mediating the airway consequences of ODE, this study investigated their role in regulating bone responses. First, swine facility ODE stimulated wild-type (WT bone marrow macrophages to form osteoclasts, and this finding was inhibited in TLR4 knock-out (KO, but not TLR2 KO cells. Next, using an established intranasal inhalation exposure model, WT, TLR2 KO and TLR4 KO mice were treated daily with ODE or saline for 3 weeks. ODE-induced airway neutrophil influx and cytokine/chemokine release were similarly reduced in TLR2 and TLR4 KO animals as compared to WT mice. Utilizing micro-computed tomography (CT, analysis of tibia showed loss of bone mineral density, volume and deterioration of bone micro-architecture and mechanical strength induced by ODE in WT mice were significantly reduced in TLR4 but not TLR2 KO animals. Bone marrow osteoclast precursor cell populations were analyzed by flow cytometry from exposed animals. In WT animals, exposure to inhalant ODE increased osteoclast precursor cell populations as compared to saline, an effect that was reduced in TLR4 but not TLR2 KO mice. These results show that TLR2 and TLR4 pathways mediate ODE-induced airway inflammation, but bone deterioration consequences following inhalant ODE treatment is strongly dependent upon TLR4. Thus, the TLR4 signaling pathway appears critical in regulating the lung-bone inflammatory axis to microbial component-enriched organic dust exposures.

  1. The promotion of nephropathy byPorphyromonas gingivalislipopolysaccharide via toll-like receptors.

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    Kajiwara, Koichiro; Takata, Shunsuke; To, Thao T; Takara, Kenyo; Hatakeyama, Yuji; Tamaoki, Sachio; Darveau, Richard Peters; Ishikawa, Hiroyuki; Sawa, Yoshihiko

    2017-01-01

    Recently, we reported that toll-like receptor (TLR)2 and TLR4 localized on the glomerular endothelium in the glomeruli of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetic mice and high fat diet feed-induced type 2 diabetic mice, and that periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis LPS (Pg-LPS) administration lowered the survival rate of diabetic mice. The present study aims to examine the effect of TLR4 blocking on the suppression of Pg-LPS-induced diabetic nephropathy. The survival rate and morphological/biochemical features for streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice with Pg-LPS and TLR4 blocker eritoran administration were investigated by reporter gene assay, urine and blood analysis, immunohistochemistry, and real time-PCR. All of the diabetic mice administered Pg-LPS were euthanized within the survival period of almost all of the diabetic mice. The blood urea nitrogen and creatinine, expression of TLR2 and TGF-b, and type 1 collagen accumulation, in the diabetic mice increased significantly with the Pg-LPS administration. In spite of the limited TLR4 activation with Pg-LPS, the TLR4 blocker eritoran decreased blood urea nitrogen and creatinine, and raised the survival rate of the Pg-LPS-administered diabetic mice slightly. The high expression levels of TLR2, TGF-b, and type 1 collagen in Pg-LPS-administered diabetic mice decreased with eritoran. Nuclear STAT3 which enhances TLR2 expression was detected in the TLR2-expressing glomeruli of diabetic mice. The TLR2 and STAT3 gene expression increased by the Pg-LPS administration but decreased with eritoran. These may suggest that Pg-LPS-induced diabetic nephropathy is mainly dependent on TLR2 signaling on glomerular endothelial cells, and that TLR4 blocker eritoran may play a role to slow the progress of diabetic nephropathy.

  2. Chronic exposure to indoxacarb and pulmonary expression of toll-like receptor-9 in mice

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    Sandeep Kaur

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Chronic exposure to indoxacarb and pulmonary expression of toll-like receptor 9 (TLR-9 in mice. Materials and Methods: In this study, healthy male Swiss albino mice (n=30 aging 8-10 weeks were used to evaluate TLR-9 expression in lungs of mice following indoxacarb exposure with and without lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Indoxacarb was administered orally dissolved in groundnut oil at 4 and 2 mg/kg/day for 90 days. On day 91, five animals from each group were challenged with LPS/normal saline solution at 80 μg/animal. The lung tissues were processed for real time and immunohistochemical studies. Results: LPS resulted increase in fold change m-RNA expression level of TLR-9 as compare to control, while indoxacarb (4 mg/kg alone and in combination with LPS resulted 16.21-fold change and 29.4-fold change increase in expression of TLR-9 m-RNA, respectively, as compared to control. Similarly, indoxacarb (2 mg/kg alone or in combination with LPS also altered TLR-9 expression. Further at protein level control group showed minimal expression of TLR-9 in lungs as compare to other groups, however, LPS group showed intense positive staining in bronchial epithelium as well as in alveolar septal cells. Indoxacarb at both doses individually showed strong immuno-positive reaction as compare to control, however when combined with LPS resulted intense staining in airway epithelium as compare to control. Conclusion: Chronic oral administration of indoxacarb for 90 days (4 and 2 mg/kg alters expression of TLR-9 at m-RNA and protein level and co-exposure with LPS exhibited synergistic effect.

  3. Peroxidized unsaturated fatty acids stimulate Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in endothelial cells.

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    Mutoh, Akiko; Ueda, Shinichiro

    2013-05-30

    Although unsaturated fatty acids are assumed to be protective against inflammatory disorders that include a pathway involving Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation, they might actually be toxic because of their high susceptibility to lipid peroxidation. Here we studied the effects of peroxidized unsaturated fatty acids on the TLR4-nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathway in endothelial cells. Confluent cultured endothelial cells from bovine aorta were incubated for 1h with fatty acids integrated into phosphatidylcholine vesicles. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or phosphatidylcholine vesicles without fatty acids were also applied as a positive control or a control for fatty acid groups, respectively. Activation of TLR4 and downstream signaling was assessed by membrane fractionation and Western blotting or immunofluorescent staining. In the same way as LPS, application of sufficiently peroxidized unsaturated fatty acids like oleic acid or docosahexaenoic acid, acutely caused TLR4 translocation to caveolae/raft membranes, leading to activation of NF-κB signaling in endothelial cells. In contrast, saturated fatty acids did not show such effects. Applying well-peroxidized unsaturated fatty acids, but not saturated fatty acids, acutely activates the TLR4/NF-κB pathway. Peroxidation of unsaturated fatty acid is essential for the acute activation of TLR4 by the fatty acids that follow the same pathway as the activation by LPS. Unsaturated fatty acids have been assumed to be protective against inflammatory disorders, and drugs containing unsaturated fatty acids are now developed and provided. Our result suggests that, for inflammatory disorders involving TLR4 signaling, using unsaturated fatty acids as anti-inflammatory drugs may cause contrary effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Toll-Like Receptor 3 Contributes to Wallerian Degeneration after Peripheral Nerve Injury.

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    Lee, Hyunkyoung; Baek, Jiyeon; Min, Hyunjung; Cho, Ik-Hyun; Yu, Seong-Woo; Lee, Sung Joong

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that Schwann cells play an important role in Wallerian degeneration after peripheral nerve injury. Previously, we reported that toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) is expressed on Schwann cells, implicating its role in Schwann cell activation during Wallerian degeneration. In this study, we tested this possibility using TLR3 knock-out mice. Sciatic nerve-crush injury was induced in wild-type and TLR3 knock-out mice. Histological sections of the sciatic nerve were analyzed for Wallerian degeneration on days 3 and 7 after injury. The level of macrophage infiltration was measured by real-time RT-PCR, flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. The macrophage-recruiting chemokine gene expressions in the injured nerve were determined by real-time RT-PCR. In TLR3 knock-out mice, the nerve injury-induced axonal degeneration and subsequent axonal debris clearance were reduced compared to in wild-type mice. In addition, nerve injury-induced macrophage infiltration into injury sites was attenuated in TLR3 knock-out mice and was accompanied by reduced expression of macrophage-recruiting chemokines such as CC-chemokine ligands (CCL)2/MCP-1, CCL4/MIP-1β and CCL5/RANTES. These macrophage-recruiting chemokines were induced in primary Schwann cells upon TLR3 stimulation. Finally, intraneural injection of polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid, a synthetic TLR3 agonist, induced macrophage infiltration into the sciatic nerve in vivo. These data show that TLR3 signaling contributes to Wallerian degeneration after peripheral nerve injury by affecting Schwann cell activation and macrophage recruitment to injured nerves. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Alternaria inhibits double-stranded RNA-induced cytokine production through Toll-like receptor 3.

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    Wada, Kota; Kobayashi, Takao; Matsuwaki, Yoshinori; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Kita, Hirohito

    2013-01-01

    Fungi may be involved in asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from CRS patients produce interleukin (IL)-5, IL-13 and interferon (IFN)-γ in the presence of Alternaria. In addition, Alternaria produces potent Th2-like adjuvant effects in the airway. Therefore, we hypothesized that Alternaria may inhibit Th1-type defense mechanisms against virus infection. Dendritic cells (DCs) were generated from mouse bone marrow. The functional responses were assessed by expression of cell surface molecules by FACS (MHC class II, CD40, CD80, CD86 and OX40L). Production of IL-6, chemokine CXCL10 (IP-10), chemokine CXCL11 (I-TAC) and IFN-β was measured by ELISA. Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) mRNA and protein expression was detected by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot. Alternaria and polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) enhanced cell surface expression of MHC class II, CD40, CD80, CD86 and OX40L, and IL-6 production in a concentration-dependent manner. However, Alternaria significantly inhibited production of IP-10, I-TAC and IFN-β, induced by viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) mimic poly I:C. TLR3 mRNA expression and protein production by poly I:C were significantly inhibited by Alternaria. These reactions are likely caused by heat-stable factor(s) in Alternaria extract with >100 kDa molecular mass. These findings suggest that the fungus Alternaria may inhibit production of IFN-β and other cytokines by DCs by suppressing TLR3 expression. These results indicate that Alternaria may inhibit host innate immunity against virus infection. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Herpes simplex virus induces neural oxidative damage via microglial cell Toll-like receptor-2

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    Little Morgan R

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Using a murine model of herpes simplex virus (HSV-1 encephalitis, our laboratory has determined that induction of proinflammatory mediators in response to viral infection is largely mediated through a Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2-dependent mechanism. Published studies have shown that, like other inflammatory mediators, reactive oxygen species (ROS are generated during viral brain infection. It is increasingly clear that ROS are responsible for facilitating secondary tissue damage during central nervous system infection and may contribute to neurotoxicity associated with herpes encephalitis. Methods Purified microglial cell and mixed neural cell cultures were prepared from C57B/6 and TLR2-/- mice. Intracellular ROS production in cultured murine microglia was measured via 2', 7'-Dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA oxidation. An assay for 8-isoprostane, a marker of lipid peroxidation, was utilized to measure free radical-associated cellular damage. Mixed neural cultures obtained from β-actin promoter-luciferase transgenic mice were used to detect neurotoxicity induced by HSV-infected microglia. Results Stimulation with HSV-1 elevated intracellular ROS in wild-type microglial cell cultures, while TLR2-/- microglia displayed delayed and attenuated ROS production following viral infection. HSV-infected TLR2-/- microglia produced less neuronal oxidative damage to mixed neural cell cultures in comparison to HSV-infected wild-type microglia. Further, HSV-infected TLR2-/- microglia were found to be less cytotoxic to cultured neurons compared to HSV-infected wild-type microglia. These effects were associated with decreased activation of p38 MAPK and p42/p44 ERK in TLR2-/- mice. Conclusions These studies demonstrate the importance of microglial cell TLR2 in inducing oxidative stress and neuronal damage in response to viral infection.

  7. Toll-like receptor 4 expression in the epithelium of inflammatory periapical lesions. An immunohistochemical study

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    R. Leonardi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLR are essential for the innate immune response against invading pathogens and have been described in immunocompetent cells of areas affected by periapical disease. Besides initiating the inflammatory response, they also directly regulate epithelial cell proliferation and survival in a variety of settings. This study evaluates the in situ expression of TLR4 in periapical granulomas (PG and radicular cysts, focusing on the epithelial compartment. Twenty-one periapical cysts (PC and 10 PG were analyzed; 7 dentigerous non-inflamed follicular cyst (DC served as control. TLR4 expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry. TLR4 immunoreaction products were detected in the epithelium of all specimens, with a higher percentage of immunostained cells in PG. Although TLR4 overexpression was detected in both PG and PC, there were differences that seemed to be related to the nature of the lesion, since in PG all epithelial cells of strands, islands and trabeculae were strongly immunoreactive for TLR4, whereas in PC only some areas of the basal and suprabasal epithelial layers were immunostained. This staining pattern is consistent with the action of TLR4: in PG it could promote formation of epithelial cell rests of Malassez and in epithelial strands and islands the enhancement of cell survival, proliferation and migration, whereas in PC TLR4 could protect the lining epithelium from extensive apoptosis. These findings go some way towards answering the intriguing question of why many epithelial strands or islands in PG and the lining epithelium of apical cysts regress after non-surgical endodontic therapy, and suggest that TLR4 plays a key role in the pathobiology of the inflammatory process related to periapical disease.

  8. Intracellular expression of toll-like receptor 4 in neuroblastoma cells and their unresponsiveness to lipopolysaccharide

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    Mori Isamu

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently it has been reported that, toll-like receptors (TLRs are expressed on a series of tumor cells, such as colon cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, melanoma and lung cancer. Although some cancer cells like melanoma cells are known to respond to lipopolysaccharide (LPS via TLR4, not all cancer cells are positive for TLR4. There is little information on the expression and function of TLR4 in neuroblastoma cells. In this study, we investigated the expression of TLR4 in human neuroblastoma NB-1 cell line. Methods Expression and localization of TLR4 were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and flow cytometric analysis, respectively. Activation of nuclear factor (NF-κB by LPS was detected by degradation of IκB-α and NF-κB luciferase assay. Activation and expression of mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase and interferon regulatory factor (IRF-3 was detected by immunoblot analysis. Results Human NB-1 neuroblastoma cells expressed intracellular form of TLR4, but not the cell surface form. Further, NB-1 cells express CD14, MD2 and MyD88, which are required for LPS response. However, LPS did not significantly induce NF-κB activation in NB-1 cells although it slightly degraded IκB-α. NB-1 cells expressed no IRF-3, which plays a pivotal role on the MyD88-independent pathway of LPS signaling. Collectively, NB-1 cells are capable to avoid their response to LPS. Conclusion Although human NB-1 neuroblastoma cells possessed all the molecules required for LPS response, they did not respond to LPS. It might be responsible for intracellular expression of TLR4 or lack of IRF-3.

  9. Association of bovine Toll-like receptor 4 with tick infestation rates and blood histamine concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, G; Yu, M; Cui, Q-W; Zhou, X; Zhang, J-C; Li, H-X; Qu, K-X; Wang, G-L; Huang, B-Z

    2013-02-28

    We investigated a possible association between bovine Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and resistance to tick infestation in 103 cattle, including BMY cattle (1/2 Brahman, 1/4 Murray Grey, and 1/4 Yunnan Yellow cattle), Brahman, and Red Angus grazing on improved pasture. The tick infestation weight and number of Rhipicephalus microplus and the blood histamine concentration were measured and compared with those of 32 Chinese Holsteins and 30 Simmentals. A 228-bp fragment was amplified and sequenced to analyze the polymorphisms of the TLR4 gene. After SSCP and sequencing analysis, 4 SNPs, i.e., 535(A>C), 546(T>C), 605(T>A), and 618(G>C), were identified, corresponding to GenBank accession Nos. AY297041 and NW_003104150; the latter two SNPs caused Leu→Gln and Gln→His substitutions, respectively. Genotype AA was completely predominant in the Chinese Holstein and Simmental; genotypes AA and AB were detected in Red Angus, while genotypes AA, AB, BB, and BC were detected in Brahman and in BMY cattle. A negative correlation was identified between blood histamine concentration and number of tick infestation; in BMY cattle this negative association was significant. The tick infestation in cattle with genotype BB was significantly lower than in those with genotype AA. Blood histamine concentration in cattle with genotype BB was significantly higher than in those with genotype AA. The TLR4 gene mutation could affect the blood histamine level and activate the immune reaction after tick infestation. Allele B has potential as a molecular marker for tick-resistance originated from Zebu cattle for use in cattle breeding programs.

  10. Toll-like receptor 3 expression and function in childhood idiopathic nephrotic syndrome.

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    Jamin, A; Dehoux, L; Dossier, C; Fila, M; Heming, N; Monteiro, R C; Deschênes, G

    2015-12-01

    The efficacy of steroids and immunosuppressive treatments in idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS) hints at the implication of immune cells in the pathophysiology of the disease. Toll-like receptor (TLR) dysfunctions are involved in many kidney diseases of immune origin, but remain little described in INS. We investigated the expression and function of TLRs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of INS children, including 28 in relapse, 23 in remission and 40 controls. No child had any sign of infection, but a higher Epstein-Barr virus viral load was measured in the PBMC of relapsing patients. TLR-3 expression was increased in B cells only during INS remission. There was a negative correlation between proteinuria and TLR-3 expression in total and the main subsets of PBMC from INS patients. The expression of TLR-8 was also increased in both CD4(+) T cells and B cells in INS remission. There was a negative correlation between proteinuria and TLR-8 expression in total PBMC, CD4(+) T cells and B cells of INS patients. Nevertheless, TLR-3 and TLR-8 expression was normalized in all PBMC subsets in an additional group of 15 INS patients in remission with B cell repletion after rituximab therapy. Paradoxically, interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 3 transactivation was increased in PBMC of all INS patients. In-vitro secretion of IFN-α and interleukin 6 were increased spontaneously in PBMC of INS remission patients, whereas PBMC from all INS patients displayed an impaired IFN-α secretion after TLR-3 stimulation. Thus, TLR-3 pathway dysfunctions may be closely involved in INS pathogenesis. © 2015 British Society for Immunology.

  11. Episodic positive selection in the evolution of avian toll-like receptor innate immunity genes.

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    Grueber, Catherine E; Wallis, Graham P; Jamieson, Ian G

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a family of conserved pattern-recognition molecules responsible for initiating innate and acquired immune responses. Because they play a key role in host defence, these genes have received increasing interest in the evolutionary and population genetics literature, as their variation represents a potential target of adaptive evolution. However, the role of pathogen-mediated selection (i.e. episodic positive selection) in the evolution of these genes remains poorly known and has not been examined outside of mammals. A recent increase in the number of bird species for which TLR sequences are available has enabled us to examine the selective processes that have influenced evolution of the 10 known avian TLR genes. Specifically, we tested for episodic positive selection to identify codons that experience purifying selection for the majority of their evolution, interspersed with bursts of positive selection that may occur only in restricted lineages. We included up to 23 species per gene (mean = 16.0) and observed that, although purifying selection was evident, an average of 4.5% of codons experienced episodic positive selection across all loci. For four genes in which sequence coverage traversed both the extracellular leucine-rich repeat region (LRR) and transmembrane/intracellular domains of the proteins, increased positive selection was observed at the extracellular domain, consistent with theoretical predictions. Our results provide evidence that episodic positive selection has played an important role in the evolution of most avian TLRs, consistent with the role of these loci in pathogen recognition and a mechanism of host-pathogen coevolution.

  12. Diverse Toll-like receptors mediate cytokine production by Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Se-Ra; Kim, Dong-Jae; Han, Seung-Hyun; Kang, Min-Jung; Lee, Jun-Young; Jeong, Yu-Jin; Lee, Sang-Jin; Kim, Tae-Hyoun; Ahn, Sang-Gun; Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Park, Jong-Hwan

    2014-05-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) orchestrate a repertoire of immune responses in macrophages against various pathogens. Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans are two important periodontal pathogens. In the present study, we investigated TLR signaling regulating cytokine production of macrophages in response to F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans. TLR2 and TLR4 are redundant in the production of cytokines (interleukin-6 [IL-6] and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) in F. nucleatum- and A. actinomycetemcomitans-infected macrophages. The production of cytokines by macrophages in response to F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans infection was impaired in MyD88-deficient macrophages. Moreover, cytokine concentrations were lower in MyD88-deficient macrophages than in TLR2/TLR4 (TLR2/4) double-deficient cells. An endosomal TLR inhibitor, chloroquine, reduced cytokine production in TLR2/4-deficient macrophages in response to F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans, and DNA from F. nucleatum or A. actinomycetemcomitans induced IL-6 production in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs), which was abolished by chloroquine. Western blot analysis revealed that TLR2/4 and MyD88 were required for optimal activation of NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in macrophages in response to F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans, with different kinetics. An inhibitor assay showed that NF-κB and all MAPKs (p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase [ERK], and Jun N-terminal protein kinase [JNK]) mediate F. nucleatum-induced production of cytokines in macrophages, whereas NF-κB and p38, but not ERK and JNK, are involved in A. actinomycetemcomitans-mediated cytokine production. These findings suggest that multiple TLRs may participate in the cytokine production of macrophages against periodontal bacteria.

  13. Age-dependent maturation of Toll-like receptor-mediated cytokine responses in Gambian infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Burl

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The global burden of neonatal and infant mortality due to infection is staggering, particularly in resource-poor settings. Early childhood vaccination is one of the major interventions that can reduce this burden, but there are specific limitations to inducing effective immunity in early life, including impaired neonatal leukocyte production of Th1-polarizing cytokines to many stimuli. Characterizing the ontogeny of Toll-like receptor (TLR-mediated innate immune responses in infants may shed light on susceptibility to infection in this vulnerable age group, and provide insights into TLR agonists as candidate adjuvants for improved neonatal vaccines. As little is known about the leukocyte responses of infants in resource-poor settings, we characterized production of Th1-, Th2-, and anti-inflammatory-cytokines in response to agonists of TLRs 1-9 in whole blood from 120 Gambian infants ranging from newborns (cord blood to 12 months of age. Most of the TLR agonists induced TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 in cord blood. The greatest TNFα responses were observed for TLR4, -5, and -8 agonists, the highest being the thiazoloquinoline CLO75 (TLR7/8 that also uniquely induced cord blood IFNγ production. For most agonists, TLR-mediated TNFα and IFNγ responses increased from birth to 1 month of age. TLR8 agonists also induced the greatest production of the Th1-polarizing cytokines TNFα and IFNγ throughout the first year of life, although the relative responses to the single TLR8 agonist and the combined TLR7/8 agonist changed with age. In contrast, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 responses to most agonists were robust at birth and remained stable through 12 months of age. These observations provide fresh insights into the ontogeny of innate immunity in African children, and may inform development of age-specific adjuvanted vaccine formulations important for global health.

  14. Induction of bacterial lipoprotein tolerance is associated with suppression of toll-like receptor 2 expression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wang, Jiang Huai

    2012-02-03

    Tolerance to bacterial cell wall components including lipopolysaccharide (LPS) may represent an essential regulatory mechanism during bacterial infection. Two members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, TLR2 and TLR4, recognize the specific pattern of bacterial cell wall components. TLR4 has been found to be responsible for LPS tolerance. However, the role of TLR2 in bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) tolerance and LPS tolerance is unclear. Pretreatment of human THP-1 monocytic cells with a synthetic bacterial lipopeptide induced tolerance to a second BLP challenge with diminished tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 production, termed BLP tolerance. Furthermore, BLP-tolerized THP-1 cells no longer responded to LPS stimulation, indicating a cross-tolerance to LPS. Induction of BLP tolerance was CD14-independent, as THP-1 cells that lack membrane-bound CD14 developed tolerance both in serum-free conditions and in the presence of a specific CD14 blocking monoclonal antibody (MEM-18). Pre-exposure of THP-1 cells to BLP suppressed mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation and nuclear factor-kappaB activation in response to subsequent BLP and LPS stimulation, which is comparable with that found in LPS-tolerized cells, indicating that BLP tolerance and LPS tolerance may share similar intracellular pathways. However, BLP strongly enhanced TLR2 expression in non-tolerized THP-1 cells, whereas LPS stimulation had no effect. Furthermore, a specific TLR2 blocking monoclonal antibody (2392) attenuated BLP-induced, but not LPS-induced, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 production, indicating BLP rather than LPS as a ligand for TLR2 engagement and activation. More importantly, pretreatment of THP-1 cells with BLP strongly inhibited TLR2 activation in response to subsequent BLP stimulation. In contrast, LPS tolerance did not prevent BLP-induced TLR2 overexpression. These results demonstrate that BLP tolerance develops through down-regulation of TLR2

  15. Microglia are required for astroglial toll-like receptor 4 response and for optimal TLR2 and TLR3 response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Thomas H; Draeby, Dina; Owens, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    Within the central nervous system, astrocytes and microglia are the primary responders to endogenous ligands released upon injury and stress, as well as to infectious pathogens. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are implicated in recognition of both types of stimulus. Whether astrocytes respond as stron......Within the central nervous system, astrocytes and microglia are the primary responders to endogenous ligands released upon injury and stress, as well as to infectious pathogens. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are implicated in recognition of both types of stimulus. Whether astrocytes respond...... astrocytes from mixed glial cultures and measured their response to TLR agonists. Our results show that the response of astrocytes to TLR2 and TLR3 agonists is greatly enhanced by, and response to TLR4 agonists is completely dependent on, the presence of functional microglia. In the case of the TLR4 response...

  16. Genetic Polymorphism of Toll-like Receptor 4 — Predictor of Susceptibility to Recurrent Course of Chronic Pyelonephritis in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.A. Kryuchko

    2013-10-01

    Methods. We examined a group of children aged 1–15 years with chronic pyelonephritis in the active stage (n = 60. Control group consisted of 95 apparently healthy people. Results. There were revealed significantly higher prevalence of Toll-like receptor 4 Asp299Gly gene polymorphism among children with chronic pyelonephritis (n = 60, identified a statistically significant correlation of mutant genotypes Asp299Gly, Gly299Gly with manifestation of the disease before the age of 3, and frequent episodes of acute respiratory viral infections, torpid urinary syndrome, unstable remission and increased secretion of interleukin-6 (p < 0.001. Thus, genetically determined Toll-like receptor 4 Asp299Gly gene polymorphism is a marker of high risk of early manifestation of chronic inflammation in the kidney interstitium and prolonged recurrent clinical course of the disease in children.

  17. More than complementing Tolls: Complement–Toll-like receptor synergy and crosstalk in innate immunity and inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Hajishengallis, George; Lambris, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Complement and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play key roles in the host immune response and are swiftly activated by infection or other types of immunological stress. This review focuses on the capacity of complement and TLRs to engage in signaling crosstalk, ostensibly to coordinate immune and inflammatory responses through synergistic or antagonistic (regulatory) interactions. However, over-activation or dysregulation of either system may lead – often synergistically – to exaggerated inflammat...

  18. Signatures of positive selection in Toll-like receptor (TLR genes in mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areal Helena

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toll-like receptors (TLRs are a major class of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs expressed in the cell surface or membrane compartments of immune and non-immune cells. TLRs are encoded by a multigene family and represent the first line of defense against pathogens by detecting foreigner microbial molecular motifs, the pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs. TLRs are also important by triggering the adaptive immunity in vertebrates. They are characterized by the presence of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs in the ectodomain, which are associated with the PAMPs recognition. The direct recognition of different pathogens by TLRs might result in different evolutionary adaptations important to understand the dynamics of the host-pathogen interplay. Ten mammal TLR genes, viral (TLR3, 7, 8, 9 and non-viral (TLR1-6, 10, were selected to identify signatures of positive selection that might have been imposed by interacting pathogens and to clarify if viral and non-viral TLRs might display different patterns of molecular evolution. Results By using Maximum Likelihood approaches, evidence of positive selection was found in all the TLRs studied. The number of positively selected codons (PSC ranged between 2-26 codons (0.25%-2.65% with the non-viral TLR4 as the receptor with higher percentage of positively selected codons (2.65%, followed by the viral TLR8 (2.50%. The results indicated that viral and non-viral TLRs are similarly under positive selection. Almost all TLRs have at least one PSC located in the LRR ectodomain which underlies the importance of the pathogen recognition by this region. Conclusions Our results are not in line with previous studies on primates and birds that identified more codons under positive selection in non-viral TLRs. This might be explained by the fact that both primates and birds are homogeneous groups probably being affected by only a restricted number of related viruses with equivalent motifs to be

  19. Effects of human Toll-like receptor 1 polymorphisms on ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uciechowski Peter

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advanced age results in crucial alterations of the innate and adaptive immune system leading to functional defects resulting in infection and chronic diseases. Toll-like receptors (TLR recognize pathogenic structures and are important in the immune response to infections and vaccination. However, the role of TLR single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP is poorly understood in the setting of human ageing. This study investigated the impact of the TLR1 SNPs A743G and T1805G on ageing in different age groups from two European populations. Results The TLR1 genotypes 743AA/1805GG (TLR1neg are associated with a TLR1 negative phenotype, impaired function and susceptibility to tuberculosis. Carriers of heterozygous 743AG/1805TG and homozygous 743GG/1805TT genotypes (TLR1pos have a TLR1 positive phenotype. By comparing healthy young and old German donors, the old group showed a tendency to carry more TLR1neg and less homozygous TLR1pos genotypes. Anti-inflammatory Interleukin (IL-1 receptor antagonist (Ra was significantly elevated in supernatants of mononuclear cells from old German subjects with a TLR1pos genotype in contrast to those with the 743AA genotype. Healthy old individuals and nonagenarians from Italy displayed significantly higher frequencies of TLR1pos genotypes than the old group from Germany. The data show that tumor-necrosis-factor (TNFα, CXCL8 and CCL2 levels were higher in old donors from Germany than in plasma levels from old Italian donors. TNFα and CCL2 levels were significantly raised in old German individuals compared to Italian nonagenarians. German and Italian donors with the TLR1neg genotype basically produced more CCL2 than older European donors with TLR1pos genotypes. Conclusion The higher frequency of the TLR1pos genotype in elderly Italian subjects may result from different ethnic populations. Lower inflammatory mediator release of aged Italian individuals is probably due to different background in

  20. Changes in the expression of the Toll-like receptor system in the aging rat kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Yue; Shao, Feng; Bai, Xue-Yuan; Cai, Guangyan; Lv, Yang; Chen, Xiangmei

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of kidney aging are not yet clear. Studies have shown that immunological inflammation is related to kidney aging. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are one of the receptor types of the body's innate immune system. The function of the TLR system and the mechanisms by which it functions in renal aging remain unclear. In the present study, we, for the first time, systematically investigated the role of the TLR system and the inflammation responses activated by TLRs during kidney aging. We used western blot and immunohistochemistry to systematically analyze the changes in the expression and activation of the endogenous TLR ligands HSP70 and HMGB1, the TLRs (TLR1-TLR11), their downstream signaling pathway molecules MyD88 and Phospho-IRF-3, and the NF-κB signaling pathway molecules Phospho-IKKβ, Phospho-IκBα (NF-κB inhibition factor α), NF-κBp65, and Phospho-NF-κBp65 (activated NF-κB p65) in the kidneys of 3 months old (youth group), 12 months old (middle age group), and 24 months old (elderly group) rats. We used RT-qPCR to detect the mRNA expression changes of the proinflammatory cytokines CCL3, CCL4, CCL5, CD80, TNF-α, and IL-12b in the rat renal tissues of the various age groups. We found that during kidney aging, the HSP70 and HMGB1 expression levels were significantly increased, and the expression levels of TLR1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 11 and their downstream signaling pathway molecules MyD88 and Phospho-IRF-3 were markedly elevated. Further studies have shown that in the aging kidneys, the expression levels of the NF-κB signaling pathway molecules Phospho-IKKβ, Phospho-IκBα, NF-κBp65, and Phospho-NF-κBp65 were obviously increased, and those of the proinflammatory cytokines CCL3, CCL4, CCL5, CD80, TNF-α, and IL-12b were significantly upregulated. These results showed that the TLR system might play an important role during the kidney aging process maybe by activating the NF-κB signaling pathway and promoting the high expression of inflammation

  1. DMPD: Adipose tissue as an immunological organ: Toll-like receptors, C1q/TNFs andCTRPs. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17681884 Adipose tissue as an immunological organ: Toll-like receptors, C1q/TNFs an...dCTRPs. Schaffler A, Scholmerich J, Salzberger B. Trends Immunol. 2007 Sep;28(9):393-9. Epub 2007 Aug 2. (.p...ng) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Adipose tissue as an immunological organ: Toll-like receptors, C1q/TNFs andC...TRPs. PubmedID 17681884 Title Adipose tissue as an immunological organ: Toll-like... receptors, C1q/TNFs andCTRPs. Authors Schaffler A, Scholmerich J, Salzberger B. Publication Trends Immunol.

  2. Gingival Toll-like receptor and cytokine messenger RNA levels in equine periodontitis and oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, R; Lappin, D F; Dixon, P M; Bennett, D; Riggio, M P

    2017-05-01

    Equine periodontitis is a common and painful condition. However, the disease often goes unnoticed by owners and is thus a major welfare concern. The aetiopathogenesis of the condition remains poorly understood and has been investigated in few studies. The innate immune system is known to play an important role in human periodontitis, but its role in equine periodontitis has not been examined. To quantify the messenger (m)RNA levels of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and cytokines in gingival tissue from orally healthy horses and those affected by periodontitis. Observational study. Gingival tissue samples were taken post-mortem from 13 horses with no clinical signs of oral disease and 20 horses with periodontitis. mRNA levels of TLR2, TLR4 and TLR9 and cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, IL-17 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) were determined using quantitative real-time PCR. The statistical significance of results was assessed using appropriate t tests. mRNA levels of all TLRs and cytokines were upregulated in equine periodontitis. Significant increases in mRNA levels of TLR2, TLR9, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12 (P≤0.05) and IFN-γ (P≤0.01) were observed for both unweighted and age-weighted analyses of diseased gingival tissue samples compared with healthy gingival samples. In comparisons of samples of periodontitis lesions with healthy gingival control samples from the same horse, significant increases in mRNA levels of TLR4, TLR9, IL-10, IFN-γ (P≤0.05), TLR2, IL-1β and IL-12p35 (P≤0.01) were observed. This study has provided an initial insight into the involvement of the immune system in equine periodontitis. Increased mRNA levels of TLR2, TLR4 and TLR9 indicate substantial microbial challenge in diseased gingival tissue. A mixed Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokine response is produced in equine periodontitis. Further studies are required to more fully characterise the role of the innate immune system in this disease. © 2016

  3. Toll-like receptor-2 mediates diet and/or pathogen associated atherosclerosis: proteomic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Monika; Amar, Salomon

    2008-09-12

    Accumulating evidence implicates a fundamental link between the immune system and atherosclerosis. Toll-like receptors are principal sensors of the innate immune system. Here we report an assessment of the role of the TLR2 pathway in atherosclerosis associated with a high-fat diet and/or bacteria in ApoE(+/-) mice. To explore the role of TLR2 in inflammation- and infection-associated atherosclerosis, 10 week-old ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(+/+), ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(+/-) and ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(-/-) mice were fed either a high fat diet or a regular chow diet. All mice were inoculated intravenously, once per week for 24 consecutive weeks, with 50 microl live Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g) (10(7) CFU) or vehicle (normal saline). Animals were euthanized 24 weeks after the first inoculation. ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(+/+) mice showed a significant increase in atheromatous lesions in proximal aorta and aortic tree compared to ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(+/-) and ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(-/-) mice for all diet conditions. They also displayed profound changes in plaque composition, as evidenced by increased macrophage infiltration and apoptosis, increased lipid content, and decreased smooth muscle cell mass, all reflecting an unstable plaque phenotype. SAA levels from ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(+/+) mice were significantly higher than from ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(+/-) and ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(-/-) mice. Serum cytokine analysis revealed increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(+/+) mice compared to ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(+/-) and TLR2(-/-) mice, irrespective of diet or bacterial challenge. ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(+/+) mice injected weekly for 24 weeks with FSL-1 (a TLR2 agonist) also demonstrated significant increases in atherosclerotic lesions, SAA and serum cytokine levels compared to ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(-/-) mice under same treatment condition. Finally, mass-spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) of aortic samples analyzed by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis differential display, identified 6 proteins upregulated greater than 2-fold in ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(+/+) mice

  4. Toll-like receptor-2 mediates diet and/or pathogen associated atherosclerosis: proteomic findings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Madan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence implicates a fundamental link between the immune system and atherosclerosis. Toll-like receptors are principal sensors of the innate immune system. Here we report an assessment of the role of the TLR2 pathway in atherosclerosis associated with a high-fat diet and/or bacteria in ApoE(+/- mice.To explore the role of TLR2 in inflammation- and infection-associated atherosclerosis, 10 week-old ApoE(+/--TLR2(+/+, ApoE(+/--TLR2(+/- and ApoE(+/--TLR2(-/- mice were fed either a high fat diet or a regular chow diet. All mice were inoculated intravenously, once per week for 24 consecutive weeks, with 50 microl live Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g (10(7 CFU or vehicle (normal saline. Animals were euthanized 24 weeks after the first inoculation. ApoE(+/--TLR2(+/+ mice showed a significant increase in atheromatous lesions in proximal aorta and aortic tree compared to ApoE(+/--TLR2(+/- and ApoE(+/--TLR2(-/- mice for all diet conditions. They also displayed profound changes in plaque composition, as evidenced by increased macrophage infiltration and apoptosis, increased lipid content, and decreased smooth muscle cell mass, all reflecting an unstable plaque phenotype. SAA levels from ApoE(+/--TLR2(+/+ mice were significantly higher than from ApoE(+/--TLR2(+/- and ApoE(+/--TLR2(-/- mice. Serum cytokine analysis revealed increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in ApoE(+/--TLR2(+/+ mice compared to ApoE(+/--TLR2(+/- and TLR2(-/- mice, irrespective of diet or bacterial challenge. ApoE(+/--TLR2(+/+ mice injected weekly for 24 weeks with FSL-1 (a TLR2 agonist also demonstrated significant increases in atherosclerotic lesions, SAA and serum cytokine levels compared to ApoE(+/--TLR2(-/- mice under same treatment condition. Finally, mass-spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS of aortic samples analyzed by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis differential display, identified 6 proteins upregulated greater than 2-fold in ApoE(+/--TLR2(+/+ mice fed the high fat

  5. Molecular evolution of the toll-like receptor multigene family in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaide, Miguel; Edwards, Scott V

    2011-05-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are membrane-bound sensors of the innate immune system that recognize invariant and distinctive molecular features of invading microbes and are also essential for initiating adaptive immunity in vertebrates. The genetic variation at TLR genes has been directly related to differential pathogen outcomes in humans and livestock. Nonetheless, new insights about the impact of TLRs polymorphism on the evolutionary ecology of infectious diseases can be gained through the investigation of additional vertebrate groups not yet investigated in detail. In this study, we have conducted the first characterization of the entire TLR multigene family (N = 10 genes) in non-model avian species. Using primers targeting conserved coding regions, we aimed at amplifying large segments of the extracellular domains (275-435 aa) involved in pathogen recognition across seven phylogenetically diverse bird species. Our analyses suggest avian TLRs are dominated by stabilizing selection, suggesting that slow rates of nonsynonymous substitution help preserve biological function. Overall, mean values of ω (= d(n)/d(s)) at each TLR locus ranged from 0.196 to 0.517. However, we also found patterns of positive selection acting on specific amino acid sites that could be linked to species-specific differences in pathogen-associated molecular pattern recognition. Only 39 of 2,875 (∼1.35%) of the codons analyzed exhibited significant patterns of positive selection. At least one half of these positively selected codons can be mapped to putative ligand-binding regions, as suggested by crystallographic structures of TLRs and their ligands and mutagenic analyses. We also surveyed TLR polymorphism in wild populations of two bird species, the Lesser Kestrel Falco naumanni and the House Finch Carpodacus mexicanus. In general, avian TLRs displayed low to moderate single nucleotide polymorphism levels and an excess of silent nucleotide substitutions, but also conspicuous instances of

  6. [Changes and clinical significance of Toll-like receptor 2 and 4 expression in neonatal infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-ping; Chen, Chao; Yang, Yi

    2007-02-01

    Neonates are vulnerable to various infections because of their immature immune responses. Toll-like receptors could induce immune responses, both the innate and the acquired immune responses. The aim of the present study was to investigate the changes of TLR2 and TLR4 in neonatal infections, and to determine their roles in anti-infection immune reaction. A total of 200 infants were divided into six groups: sepsis group (n = 21), bacterial pneumonia group (n = 70), bacterial meningitis group (n = 17), urinary tract infection group (n = 38), congenital syphilis group (n = 11) and non-infection group (n = 48). The TLR mRNA was determined by RT-PCR. The protein expression of TLR and the percentage of TLR positive cells were evaluated through flow cytometric analysis. 1. The TLR2 mRNA expression increased significantly in the sepsis group (6.14 +/- 0.80), most significantly in the Gram positive sepsis group (6.43 +/- 0.74). TLR2 mRNA expression was also significantly higher in the bacterial pneumonia group (5.49 +/- 0.62), the bacterial meningitis group (5.61 +/- 0.60) and the congenital syphilis group (5.89 +/- 0.38). TLR2 protein expression was the highest in the sepsis group and significantly increased in the bacterial pneumonia group, bacterial meningitis group and the congenital syphilis groups as well, all were higher than the TLR2 protein expression of the non-infectious group (1.27 +/- 0.75). The TLR2 protein expression in the Gram positive bacterial sepsis group was 2.54 +/- 0.68, that of Gram negative bacterial sepsis group was 1.25 +/- 0.51 (P gestational age and the mRNA expression, the protein expression and the percentage of TLR2 and TLR4 positive cells among all these groups did not show any statistical significance. The mRNA and the protein expression of TLR2 and the mRNA expression of TLR2 increased significantly in the studied neonatal infection groups, especially in the severe sepsis groups. The mRNA expression of TLR2 increased mainly in the Gram

  7. Downstream Toll-like receptor signaling mediates adaptor-specific cytokine expression following focal cerebral ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolanle Famakin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deletion of some Toll-like receptors (TLRs affords protection against cerebral ischemia, but disruption of their known major downstream adaptors does not. To determine whether compensation in the production of downstream effectors by one pathway when the other is disrupted can explain these findings, we examined cytokine/chemokine expression and inflammatory infiltrates in wild-type (WT, MyD88−/− and TRIF-mutant mice following permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO. Methods Cytokine/chemokine expression was measured with a 25-plex bead array in the serum and brains of all three groups of mice at baseline (no surgery/naïve and at 3 hours and 24 hours following pMCAO. Brain inflammatory and neutrophil infiltrates were examined 24 hours following pMCAO. Results IL-6, keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF and IL-10 were significantly decreased in MyD88−/− mice compared to WT mice following pMCAO. Significantly, decreased levels of the neutrophil chemoattractants KC and G-CSF corresponded with a trend toward fewer neutrophils in the brains of MyD88−/− mice. IP-10 was significantly decreased when either pathway was disrupted. MIP-1α was significantly decreased in TRIF-mutant mice, consistent with TRIF-dependent production. MyD88−/− mice showed elevations of a number of Th2 cytokines, such as IL-13, at baseline, which became significantly decreased following pMCAO. Conclusions Both MyD88 and TRIF mediate pathway-specific cytokine production following focal cerebral ischemia. Our results also suggest a compensatory Th2-type skew at baseline in MyD88−/− mice and a paradoxical switch to a Th1 phenotype following focal cerebral ischemia. The MyD88 pathway directs the expression of neutrophil chemoattractants following cerebral ischemia.

  8. Complement receptor 3 and Toll-like receptor 4 act sequentially in uptake and intracellular killing of unopsonized Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by human neutrophils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bruggen, Robin; Zweers, Debby; van Diepen, Angela; van Dissel, Jaap T.; Roos, Dirk; Verhoeven, Arthur J.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2007-01-01

    The uptake and subsequent killing of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by human neutrophils was studied. In particular, two pattern recognition receptors, complement receptor 3 (CR3) and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), were found to be essential for the efficient uptake and activation,

  9. Evolutionary redesign of the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) Toll-like receptor repertoire by gene losses and expansions

    OpenAIRE

    Solbakken, Monica H.; T?rresen, Ole K.; Nederbragt, Alexander J.; Seppola, Marit; Gregers, Tone F.; Jakobsen, Kjetill S.; Jentoft, Sissel

    2016-01-01

    Published version. Source at http://doi.org/10.1038/srep25211. License CC BY 4.0. Genome sequencing of the teleost Atlantic cod demonstrated loss of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II, an extreme gene expansion of MHC class I and gene expansions and losses in the innate pattern recognition receptor (PRR) family of Toll-like receptors (TLR). In a comparative genomic setting, using an improved version of the genome, we characterize PRRs in Atlantic cod with emphasis on TL...

  10. DMPD: Critical role of toll-like receptors and nucleotide oligomerisation domain inthe regulation of health and disease. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available and nucleotide oligomerisation domain inthe regulation of health and disease. Pu...bmedID 17535871 Title Critical role of toll-like receptors and nucleotide oligomerisation domain inthe regulation of health...17535871 Critical role of toll-like receptors and nucleotide oligomerisation domain inthe regulation of heal...th and disease. Mitchell JA, Paul-Clark MJ, Clarke GW, McMaster SK, Cartwright N. J

  11. Neuroexcitatory effects of morphine-3-glucuronide are dependent on Toll-like receptor 4 signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Due Michael R

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple adverse events are associated with the use of morphine for the treatment of chronic non-cancer pain, including opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH. Mechanisms of OIH are independent of opioid tolerance and may involve the morphine metabolite morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G. M3G exhibits limited affinity for opioid receptors and no analgesic effect. Previous reports suggest that M3G can act via the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4/myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2 heterodimer in the central nervous system to elicit pain. Methods Immunoblot and immunocytochemistry methods were used to characterize the protein expression of TLR4 present in lumbar dorsal root ganglion (DRG. Using in vitro intracellular calcium and current clamp techniques, we determined whether TLR4 activation as elicited by the prototypical agonists of TLR4, lipopolysaccharide (LPS and M3G, contributed to changes in intracellular calcium and increased excitation. Rodents were also injected with M3G to determine the degree to which M3G-induced tactile hyperalgesia could be diminished using either a small molecule inhibitor of the MD-2/TLR4 complex in rats or TLR4 knockout mice. Whole cell voltage-clamp recordings were made from small- and medium-diameter DRG neurons (25 μm  Results We observed that TLR4 immunoreactivity was present in peptidergic and non-peptidergic sensory neurons in the DRG. Non-neuronal cells in the DRG lacked evidence of TLR4 expression. Approximately 15% of assayed small- and medium-diameter sensory neurons exhibited a change in intracellular calcium following LPS administration. Both nociceptive and non-nociceptive neurons were observed to respond, and approximately 40% of these cells were capsaicin-insensitive. Increased excitability observed in sensory neurons following LPS or M3G could be eliminated using Compound 15, a small molecule inhibitor of the TLR4/MD-2 complex. Likewise, systemic injection of M3G induced rapid tactile, but

  12. Microbial patterns signaling via Toll-like receptors 2 and 5 contribute to epithelial repair, growth and survival.

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    Renat Shaykhiev

    Full Text Available Epithelial cells (ECs continuously interact with microorganisms and detect their presence via different pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs including Toll-like receptors (TLRs. Ligation of epithelial TLRs by pathogens is usually associated with the induction of pro-inflammatory mediators and antimicrobial factors. In this study, using human airway ECs as a model, we found that detection of microbial patterns via epithelial TLRs directly regulates tissue homeostasis. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus and microbial patterns signaling via TLR2 and TLR5 induce a set of non-immune epithelial responses including cell migration, wound repair, proliferation, and survival of primary and cancerous ECs. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA gene targeting, receptor-tyrosine kinase microarray and inhibition studies, we determined that TLR and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mediate the stimulating effect of microbial patterns on epithelial repair. Microbial patterns signaling via Toll-like receptors 2 and 5 contribute to epithelial repair, growth and survival. This effect is independent of hematopoietic and other cells as well as inflammatory cytokines suggesting that epithelia are able to regulate their integrity in an autonomous non-inflammatory manner by sensing microbes directly via TLRs.

  13. Effects of Air Pollutants on Innate Immunity: The Role of Toll-like receptors and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interactions between exposure to ambient air pollutants and respiratory pathogens have been shown to modify respiratory immune responses. Emerging data suggest key roles for toll-like receptor (TLR) and NOD-like receptor (NLR) signaling in pathogen-induced immune responses. Simil...

  14. TOLL-LIKE RECEPTORS IN FAT BODY AND SALIVARY GLAND TISSUES IN THE CATTLE TICK Rhipicephalus microplus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Rita da Fonseca Rezende

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Rezende S.deF., Fontenele M.R., Masuda C.A., de Oliveira P.L., Araujo H.M.M., Bittencourt V.R.E.P. & Leite M.de S. Toll-like receptors in fat body and salivary gland tissues in the cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus. [Receptores Toll-like em corpo gorduroso e glândula salivar do carrapato bovino Rhipicephalus microplus]. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 38(supl. 3:47-53, 2016. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Veterinárias, Anexo 1, Instituto de Veterinária, Universidade Federal Rural do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, BR 465, KM 47, Seropédica, RJ 23890-000, Brasil. E-mail: milaneleite@ufrrj.br Toll-like receptors (TLRs play an important role in the recognition of pathogen components and subsequent activation of the innate immune response, which then leads to development of immune responses. In arthropods the fat body and salivary glands are important organs in the defense system against invading pathogens. In this study, we identified for the first time the presence of TLRs in fat body and salivary gland tissues of cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus. Our results show that the expression of TLRs in fat body tissue are not found in all cells, but is specific to some cell types, in salivary glands TLRs protein expression occur in acini structure. We suggest that immune pathways are active in both fat body and salivary glands in the tick. The potential use of TLRs as a target for vaccine formulations against is discussed.

  15. Toll-like receptor 9 plays a key role in the autonomic cardiac and baroreflex control of arterial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Fernanda Luciano; Silva, Luiz Eduardo V; Hott, Sara Cristina; Bomfim, Gisele F; da Silva, Carlos Alberto Aguiar; Fazan, Rubens; Resstel, Leonardo B M; Tostes, Rita C; Carneiro, Fernando S

    2015-04-15

    The crosstalk between the immune and the autonomic nervous system may impact the cardiovascular function. Toll-like receptors are components of the innate immune system and play developmental and physiological roles. Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) is involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases, such as hypertension and heart failure. Since such diseases are commonly accompanied by autonomic imbalance and lower baroreflex sensitivity, we hypothesized that TLR9 modulates cardiac autonomic and baroreflex control of arterial pressure (AP). Toll-like receptor 9 knockout (TLR9 KO) and wild-type (WT) mice were implanted with catheters into carotid artery and jugular vein and allowed to recover for 3 days. After basal recording of AP, mice received methyl-atropine or propranolol. AP and pulse interval (PI) variability were evaluated in the time and frequency domain (spectral analysis), as well as by multiscale entropy. Spontaneous baroreflex was studied by sequence technique. Behavioral and cardiovascular responses to fear-conditioning stress were also evaluated. AP was similar between groups, but TLR9 KO mice exhibited lower basal heart rate (HR). AP variability was not different, but PI variability was increased in TLR9 KO mice. The total entropy was higher in TLR9 KO mice. Moreover, baroreflex function was found higher in TLR9 KO mice. Atropine-induced tachycardia was increased in TLR9 KO mice, whereas the propranolol-induced bradycardia was similar to WT mice. TLR9 KO mice exhibit increased behavioral and decreased tachycardia responses to fear-conditioning stress. In conclusion, our findings suggest that TLR9 may negatively modulate cardiac vagal tone and baroreflex in mice. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Expression of Toll-like receptor 9 and response to bacterial CpG oligodeoxynucleotides in human intestinal epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, G; Andresen, Lars; Matthiessen, M W

    2005-01-01

    Recognition of repeat CpG motifs, which are common in bacterial, but not in mammalian, DNA, through Toll-like receptor (TLR)9 is an integral part of the innate immune system. As the role of TLR9 in the human gut is unknown, we determined the spectrum of TLR9 expression in normal and inflamed colon...... in vitro despite spontaneous TLR9 gene expression. This suggests that the human epithelium is able to avoid inappropriate immune responses to luminal bacterial products through modulation of the TLR9 pathway....

  17. Autoinmunidad y receptores tipo Toll = Autoimmunity and toll-like receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ossa Giraldo, Ana Claudia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available La respuesta inmune innata está conformada por un conjunto de mecanismos que permiten reconocer los componentes propios del organismo y diferenciarlos de los microorganismos invasores para generar una primera línea de defensa. Este reconocimiento está mediado por diferentes receptores presentes en la superficie y en el interior de células inmunes y no inmunes; entre ellos se encuentran los siguientes: receptores tipo Toll (RTT, receptores de lectinas tipo C, receptores tipo GIR (genes inducibles por ácido retinoico y receptores tipo Nod y NALP, que reconocen patrones moleculares asociados a microorganismos (PMAM. Gracias a esta capacidad de discriminación, adquirida evolutivamente por la inmunidad innata, se ha aceptado tradicionalmente que los procesos autoinmunes no están relacionados con esta sino con la inmunidad adquirida. Sin embargo, varios estudios han demostrado que esa teoría no es totalmente cierta y que algunos mecanismos efectores de la inmunidad innata participan en la generación de las enfermedades autoinmunes o en la potenciación de su fisiopatología. En esta revisión se estudia la contribución de la inmunidad innata a la autoinmunidad con énfasis en el papel de los receptores tipo Toll.

  18. Mesenchymal stem cells cannot affect mRNA expression of toll-like receptors in different tissues during sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrazza, Leonardo; Pereira, Talita Carneiro Brandão; Abujamra, Ana Lucia; Nunes, Fernanda Bordignon; Bogo, Maurício Reis; de Oliveira, Jarbas Rodrigues

    2017-07-01

    Experimental animal models and human clinical studies support a crucial role for TLRs in infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to test the ability of MSCs, which have immunomodulatory effects, of altering the mRNA expression of toll-like receptors during a experimental model of sepsis in different tissues. Three experimental groups (male C57BL/6 mice) were formed for the test: control group, untreated septic group and septic group treated with MSCs (1 × 10 6 cells/animal). Lungs, cortex, kidney, liver and colon tissue were dissected after 12 h of sepsis induction and TLR2/3/4/9 mRNA were evaluated by RT-qPCR. We observed a decrease of TLR2 and 9 mRNA expression in the liver of the sepsis group, while TLR3 was decreased in the lung and liver. No change was found between the sepsis group and the sepsis + MSC group. In this model of experimental sepsis the MSCs were unable to modify the mRNA expression of the different toll-like receptors evaluated.

  19. Response of macrophage Toll-like receptor 4 to a Sporothrix schenckii lipid extract during experimental sporotrichosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassá, Micheli F; Saturi, Ana E T; Souza, Lucas F; de Abreu Ribeiro, Livia C; da Graça Sgarbi, Diana B; Carlos, Iracilda Z

    2009-01-01

    Toll-like receptors have been implicated in the recognition of various pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, protozoa and fungi. However, no information is available about Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) participation in Sporothrix schenckii recognition and the consequent triggering of the immune response to this fungal pathogen. Following activation of TLRs by ligands of microbial origin, several responses are provoked, including reactions in immune cells that may lead them to produce signalling factors that trigger inflammation. The present study was designed to elucidate the role of TLR4 during the host response to S. schenckii. TLR4-deficient (C3H/HeJ) and control mice (C3H/HePas) were infected with S. schenckii yeast cells and immune response was assessed over 10 weeks by assaying production of pro-inflammatory mediator (nitric oxide and tumour necrosis factor-α) and anti-inflammatory cytokine (interleukin-10) by peritoneal macrophages and their correlation with apoptosis in peritoneal exudate cells. We found that both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators are reduced in TLR4-deficient mice, suggesting the involvement of this receptor in the recognition of this infectious agent. Translocation into the nucleus of nuclear transcription factor, nuclear factor-κB, was also evaluated and showed higher levels in TLR-4 normal mice, consistent with the results found for cytokine production. We are showing here, for the first time, the involvement of TLR4 in S. schenckii recognition. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the activation of peritoneal macrophages in response to S. schenckii lipid extracts has different responses in these two mouse strains which differ in TLR4 expression, suggesting an important role for TLR4 in governing the functions of macrophages in this fungal infection. PMID:19740386

  20. Toll-Like Receptors Expression and Signaling in Glia Cells in Neuro-Amyloidogenic Diseases: Towards Future Therapeutic Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorit Trudler

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs are known to be expressed by innate immune response cells and to play a critical role in their activation against foreign pathogens. It was recently suggested that TLRs have an important role in the crosstalk between neurons and glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS. TLR signaling was reported to be associated with a yin-yang effect in the CNS. While TLR signaling was linked to neurogenesis, it was also found to be involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. This paper will focus on TLR signaling in glial cells in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, prion diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease. Understanding the pattern of TLR signaling in the glial cells may lead to the identification of new targets for therapeutic application.

  1. Toll-Like Receptors and Cytokines as Surrogate Biomarkers for Evaluating Vaginal Immune Response following Microbicide Administration

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    Sadhana M. Gupta

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Topical microbicides are intended for frequent use by women in reproductive age. Hence, it is essential to evaluate their impact on mucosal immune function in the vagina. In the present study, we evaluated nisin, a naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide (AMP, for its efficacy as an intravaginal microbicide. Its effect on the vaginal immune function was determined by localizing Toll-like receptors (TLRs-3, 9 and cytokines (IL-4, 6 , 10 and TNF-α in the rabbit cervicovaginal epithelium following intravaginal administration of high dose of nisin gel for 14 consecutive days. The results revealed no alteration in the expression of TLRs and cytokines at both protein and mRNA levels. However, in SDS gel-treated group, the levels were significantly upregulated with the induction of NF-κB signalling cascade. Thus, TLRs and cytokines appear as sensitive indicators for screening immunotoxic potential of candidate microbicides.

  2. Microglia-Secreted Galectin-3 Acts as a Toll-like Receptor 4 Ligand and Contributes to Microglial Activation

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    Miguel Angel Burguillos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory response induced by microglia plays a critical role in the demise of neuronal populations in neuroinflammatory diseases. Although the role of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 in microglia’s inflammatory response is fully acknowledged, little is known about endogenous ligands that trigger TLR4 activation. Here, we report that galectin-3 (Gal3 released by microglia acts as an endogenous paracrine TLR4 ligand. Gal3-TLR4 interaction was further confirmed in a murine neuroinflammatory model (intranigral lipopolysaccharide [LPS] injection and in human stroke subjects. Depletion of Gal3 exerted neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects following global brain ischemia and in the neuroinflammatory LPS model. These results suggest that Gal3-dependent-TLR4 activation could contribute to sustained microglia activation, prolonging the inflammatory response in the brain.

  3. Crucial role for human Toll-like receptor 4 in the development of contact allergy to nickel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Marc; Raghavan, Badrinarayanan; Müller, Verena; Vogl, Thomas; Fejer, György; Tchaptchet, Sandrine; Keck, Simone; Kalis, Christoph; Nielsen, Peter J; Galanos, Chris; Roth, Johannes; Skerra, Arne; Martin, Stefan F; Freudenberg, Marina A; Goebeler, Matthias

    2010-09-01

    Allergies to nickel (Ni(2+)) are the most frequent cause of contact hypersensitivity (CHS) in industrialized countries. The efficient development of CHS requires both a T lymphocyte-specific signal and a proinflammatory signal. Here we show that Ni(2+) triggered an inflammatory response by directly activating human Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Ni(2+)-induced TLR4 activation was species-specific, as mouse TLR4 could not generate this response. Studies with mutant TLR4 proteins revealed that the non-conserved histidines 456 and 458 of human TLR4 are required for activation by Ni(2+) but not by the natural ligand lipopolysaccharide. Accordingly, transgenic expression of human TLR4 in TLR4-deficient mice allowed efficient sensitization to Ni(2+) and elicitation of CHS. Our data implicate site-specific human TLR4 inhibition as a potential strategy for therapeutic intervention in CHS that would not affect vital immune responses.

  4. Toll-like receptors: a novel target for therapeutic intervention in intestinal and hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileiou, Ioanna; Kostopanagiotou, Georgia; Katsargyris, Athanasios; Klonaris, Chris; Perrea, Despina; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2010-08-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are transmembrane proteins that act mainly as sensors of microbes, orchestrating an organism's defense against infections, while they sense also host tissue injury by recognizing products of dying cells. Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) represents one of these tissue damage states in which TLR-mediated mechanisms might be implicated. The most recent data on TLR signaling and the latest knowledge regarding the involvement of TLRs in the pathogenesis and progression of intestinal and hepatic IRI are presented. The potential effectiveness of TLR-modulating therapy in intestinal and liver IRI is also analyzed. A comprehensive summary of the data suggesting TLR involvement in intestinal and hepatic IRI. Knowledge required for developing TLR modulation strategies against intestinal and hepatic IRI. TLRS play a significant role in both intestinal and hepatic IRI pathophysiology. Better understanding of TLR involvement in such processes may enable the invention of novel TLR-based therapies for IRI in the intestine and liver.

  5. More than complementing Tolls: Complement–Toll-like receptor synergy and crosstalk in innate immunity and inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajishengallis, George; Lambris, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Complement and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play key roles in the host immune response and are swiftly activated by infection or other types of immunological stress. This review focuses on the capacity of complement and TLRs to engage in signaling crosstalk, ostensibly to coordinate immune and inflammatory responses through synergistic or antagonistic (regulatory) interactions. However, over-activation or dysregulation of either system may lead – often synergistically – to exaggerated inflammation and host tissue injury. Intriguingly, moreover, certain pathogens can manipulate complement-TLR crosstalk pathways in ways that undermine host immunity and favor their persistence. In the setting of polymicrobial inflammatory disease, subversion of complement-TLR crosstalk by keystone pathogens can promote dysbiosis. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying complement-TLR crosstalk pathways can, therefore, be used productively for tailored therapeutic approaches, such as, to enhance host immunity, mitigate destructive inflammation, or counteract microbial subversion of the host response. PMID:27782328

  6. Toll-like receptor 7 agonist induces hypoplasia of the biliary system in a neonatal mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hsien Huang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Purpose: Viral infections and innate immunity signaling, especially Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7 have been implicated in the pathogenesis of biliary atresia (BA. Administration of rhesus rotavirus-type A to newborn Balb/c mice produces inflammatory obstruction of bile ducts, which resembles human BA. However, whether activation of TLR7 signaling plays a role in neonatal hepatobiliary injury remains to be investigated. Methods: TLR7 agonist, imiquimod (R837, was intraperitoneally administered to Balb/c mice within 24 hours of birth and then every other day. Morphological and histological injuries of liver and gallbladder were examined at 2 weeks. Hepatic messenger RNA expression of TLR7 signaling was studied. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase 2′-deoxyuridine 5′-triphosphate nick end labeling staining was used to delineate hepatobiliary apoptosis upon TLR7 stimulation. Results: TLR7 agonist, imiquimod, induced hypoplasia of the biliary system of neonatal Balb/c mice both in atrophic gallbladder and in paucity of intrahepatic bile ducts. There was significantly higher hepatic expression of TLR7 and downstream innate immunity-mediated interferon regulatory factor 7, interferon-α, and tumor necrosis factor-α. In addition, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase 2′-deoxyuridine 5′-triphosphate nick end labeling-positive cells in the liver were increased after injections of TLR7 agonist. Conclusion: The results demonstrate that TLR7 activation may trigger innate immunity pathways and induce apoptosis and hypoplasia of neonatal biliary trees in Balb/c mice. The novel findings give an implication of pathogenesis of infantile cholestasis, such as BA. Keywords: animal model, Balb/c mice, biliary atresia, infantile cholestasis, innate immunity, toll-like receptor 7

  7. T-cell activation is enhanced by targeting IL-10 cytokine production in toll-like receptor- stimulated macrophages

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    Walk RM

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Ryan M Walk,1,2 Steven T Elliott,2 Felix C Blanco,2 Jason A Snyder,2 Ashley M Jacobi,3 Scott D Rose,3 Mark A Behlke,3 Aliasger K Salem,4 Stanislav Vukmanovic,2 Anthony D Sandler21Department of Surgery, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA; 2Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA; 3Integrated DNA Technologies, Coralville, IA, USA; 4Division of Pharmaceutics, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USAAbstract: Toll-like receptor (TLR agonists represent potentially useful cancer vaccine adjuvants in their ability to stimulate antigen-presenting cells (APCs and subsequently amplify the cytotoxic T-cell response. The purpose of this study was to characterize APC responses to TLR activation and to determine the subsequent effect on lymphocyte activation. We exposed murine primary bone marrow-derived macrophages to increasing concentrations of agonists to TLRs 2, 3, 4, and 9. This resulted in a dose-dependent increase in production of not only tumor necrosis factor–alpha (TNF-α, a surrogate marker of the proinflammatory response, but also interleukin 10 (IL-10, a well-described inhibitory cytokine. Importantly, IL-10 secretion was not induced by low concentrations of TLR agonists that readily produced TNF-α. We subsequently stimulated lymphocytes with anti-CD3 antibody in the presence of media from macrophages activated with higher doses of TLR agonists and observed suppression of interferon gamma release. Use of both IL-10 knockout macrophages and IL-10 small-interfering RNA (siRNA ablated this suppressive effect. Finally, IL-10 siRNA was successfully used to suppress CpG-induced IL-10 production in vivo. We conclude that TLR-mediated APC stimulation can induce a paradoxical inhibitory effect on T-cell activation mediated by IL-10.Keywords: toll-like receptors, innate immunity, IL-10

  8. Toll-like receptor 2 pathway drives streptococcal cell wall-induced joint inflammation: critical role of myeloid differentiation factor 88.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, L.A.B.; Koenders, M.I.; Smeets, R.L.L.; Heuvelmans-Jacobs, M.; Helsen, M.M.A.; Takeda, K.; Akira, S.; Lubberts, G.J.H.; Loo, F.A.J. van de; Berg, W.B. van den

    2003-01-01

    The IL-1R/Toll-like receptor (TLR) superfamily of receptors has a key role in innate immunity and inflammation. In this study, we report that streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced joint inflammation is predominantly dependent on TLR-2 signaling, since TLR-2-deficient mice were unable to develop

  9. Cross Talk between inhibitory immunoreceptor Tyrosine-Based Activation Motif-Signaling and Toll-Like Receptor Pathways in Macrophages and Dendritic Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hirsch, Ivan; Janovec, Václav; Stranska, R.; Bendriss-Vermare, N.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, Apr 7 (2017), č. článku 394. ISSN 1664-3224 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : plasmacytoid dendritic cell * conventional dendritic cells * macrophage * toll-like receptors * regulatory receptors Subject RIV: EC - Immunology OBOR OECD: Immunology Impact factor: 6.429, year: 2016 http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fimmu.2017.00394/full

  10. Genetic variants in toll-like receptors are not associated with rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility or anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coenen, Marieke J H; Enevold, Christian; Barrera, Pilar

    2010-01-01

    Several studies point to a role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We investigated if genetic variants in TLR genes are associated with RA and response to tumour necrosis factor blocking (anti-TNF) medication.......Several studies point to a role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We investigated if genetic variants in TLR genes are associated with RA and response to tumour necrosis factor blocking (anti-TNF) medication....

  11. Characterization of Toll-like receptors in primary lung epithelial cells: strong impact of the TLR3 ligand poly(I:C on the regulation of Toll-like receptors, adaptor proteins and inflammatory response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weith Andreas

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial and viral exacerbations play a crucial role in a variety of lung diseases including COPD or asthma. Since the lung epithelium is a major source of various inflammatory mediators that affect the immune response, we analyzed the inflammatory reaction of primary lung epithelial cells to different microbial molecules that are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLR. Methods The effects of TLR ligands on primary small airway epithelial cells were analyzed in detail with respect to cytokine, chemokine and matrix metalloproteinase secretion. In addition, the regulation of the expression of TLRs and their adaptor proteins in small airway epithelial cells was investigated. Results Our data demonstrate that poly(I:C, a synthetic analog of viral dsRNA, mediated the strongest proinflammatory effects among the tested ligands, including an increased secretion of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, GM-CSF, GRO-α, TARC, MCP-1, MIP-3α, RANTES, IFN-β, IP-10 and ITAC as well as an increased release of MMP-1, MMP-8, MMP-9, MMP-10 and MMP-13. Furthermore, our data show that poly(I:C as well as type-1 and type-2 cytokines have a pronounced effect on the expression of TLRs and molecules involved in TLR signaling in small airway epithelial cells. Poly(I:C induced an elevated expression of TLR1, TLR2 and TLR3 and increased the gene expression of the general TLR adaptor MyD88 and IRAK-2. Simultaneously, poly(I:C decreased the expression of TLR5, TLR6 and TOLLIP. Conclusion Poly(I:C, an analog of viral dsRNA and a TLR3 ligand, triggers a strong inflammatory response in small airway epithelial cells that is likely to contribute to viral exacerbations of pulmonary diseases like asthma or COPD. The pronounced effects of poly(I:C on the expression of Toll-like receptors and molecules involved in TLR signaling is assumed to influence the immune response of the lung epithelium to viral and bacterial infections. Likewise, the regulation of TLR expression by type

  12. Induction of IgG3 to LPS via Toll-like receptor 4 co-stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J Quintana

    Full Text Available B-cells integrate antigen-specific signals transduced via the B-cell receptor (BCR and antigen non-specific co-stimulatory signals provided by cytokines and CD40 ligation in order to produce IgG antibodies. Toll-like receptors (TLRs also provide co-stimulation, but the requirement for TLRs to generate T-cell independent and T-cell dependent antigen specific antibody responses is debated. Little is known about the role of B-cell expressed TLRs in inducing antigen-specific antibodies to antigens that also activate TLR signaling. We found that mice lacking functional TLR4 or its adaptor molecule MyD88 harbored significantly less IgG3 natural antibodies to LPS, and required higher amounts of LPS to induce anti-LPS IgG3. In vitro, BCR and TLR4 signaling synergized, lowering the threshold for production of T-cell independent IgG3 and IL-10. Moreover, BCR and TLR4 directly associate through the transmembrane domain of TLR4. Thus, in vivo, BCR/TLR synergism could facilitate the induction of IgG3 antibodies against microbial antigens that engage both innate and adaptive B-cell receptors. Vaccines might exploit BCR/TLR synergism to rapidly induce antigen-specific antibodies before significant T-cell responses arise.

  13. Toll-like receptor 4 mutant and null mice retain morphine-induced tolerance, hyperalgesia, and physical dependence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Alexandra Mattioli

    Full Text Available The innate immune system modulates opioid-induced effects within the central nervous system and one target that has received considerable attention is the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4. Here, we examined the contribution of TLR4 in the development of morphine tolerance, hyperalgesia, and physical dependence in two inbred mouse strains: C3H/HeJ mice which have a dominant negative point mutation in the Tlr4 gene rendering the receptor non-functional, and B10ScNJ mice which are TLR4 null mutants. We found that neither acute antinociceptive response to a single dose of morphine, nor the development of analgesic tolerance to repeated morphine treatment, was affected by TLR4 genotype. Likewise, opioid induced hyperalgesia and opioid physical dependence (assessed by naloxone precipitated withdrawal were not altered in TLR4 mutant or null mice. We also examined the behavioural consequence of two stereoisomers of naloxone: (- naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist, and (+ naloxone, a purported antagonist of TLR4. Both stereoisomers of naloxone suppressed opioid induced hyperalgesia in wild-type control, TLR4 mutant, and TLR4 null mice. Collectively, our data suggest that TLR4 is not required for opioid-induced analgesic tolerance, hyperalgesia, or physical dependence.

  14. Acanthamoeba infection in lungs of mice expressed by toll-like receptors (TLR2 and TLR4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derda, Monika; Wojtkowiak-Giera, Agnieszka; Kolasa-Wołosiuk, Agnieszka; Kosik-Bogacka, Danuta; Hadaś, Edward; Jagodziński, Paweł P; Wandurska-Nowak, Elżbieta

    2016-06-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a key role in the innate immune responses to a variety of pathogens including parasites. TLRs are among the most highly conserved in the evolution of the receptor family, localized mainly on cells of the immune system and on other cells such as lung cells. The aim of this study was to determine for the first time the expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in the lung of Acanthamoeba spp. infected mice using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. The Acanthamoeba spp. were isolated from a patient with Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) (strain Ac 55) and from environmental samples of water from Malta Lake (Poznań, Poland - strain Ac 43). We observed a significantly increased level of expression of TLR2 as well as TLR4 mRNA from 2 to 30 days post Acanthamoeba infection (dpi) in the lungs of mice infected with Ac55 (KP120880) and Ac43 (KP120879) strains. According to our observations, increased TLR2 and TLR4 expression in the pneumocytes, interstitial cells and epithelial cells of the bronchial tree may suggest an important role of these receptors in protective immunity against Acanthamoeba infection in the lung. Moreover, increased levels of TLR2 and TLR4 mRNA expression in infected Acanthamoeba mice may suggest the involvement of these TLRs in the recognition of this amoeba pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Functional Toll-like receptor 4 expressed in lactotrophs mediates LPS-induced proliferation in experimental pituitary hyperplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabatino, María Eugenia; Sosa, Liliana del Valle; Petiti, Juan Pablo; Mukdsi, Jorge Humberto [Centro de Microscopía Electrónica, Instituto de Investigaciones en Ciencias de la Salud (INICSA-CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Av. Enrique Barros y Enfermera Gordillo, Ciudad Universitaria, CP 5000, Córdoba (Argentina); Mascanfroni, Iván Darío; Pellizas, Claudia Gabriela [Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquímica Clínica e Inmunología (CIBICI-CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Av. Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, CP 5000, Córdoba (Argentina); Gutiérrez, Silvina; Torres, Alicia Inés [Centro de Microscopía Electrónica, Instituto de Investigaciones en Ciencias de la Salud (INICSA-CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Av. Enrique Barros y Enfermera Gordillo, Ciudad Universitaria, CP 5000, Córdoba (Argentina); De Paul, Ana Lucía, E-mail: adepaul@cmefcm.uncor.edu [Centro de Microscopía Electrónica, Instituto de Investigaciones en Ciencias de la Salud (INICSA-CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Av. Enrique Barros y Enfermera Gordillo, Ciudad Universitaria, CP 5000, Córdoba (Argentina)

    2013-11-15

    Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been characterized for its ability to recognize bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Considering that infections or inflammatory processes might contribute to the progression of pituitary tumors, we analyzed the TLR4 functional role by evaluating the LPS effect on lactotroph proliferation in primary cultures from experimental pituitary tumors, and examined the involvement of PI3K-Akt and NF-κB activation in this effect. In addition, the role of 17β-estradiol as a possible modulator of LPS-induced PRL cell proliferation was further investigated. In estrogen-induced hyperplasic pituitaries, LPS triggered lactotroph cell proliferation. However, endotoxin failed to increase the number of lactotrophs taking up BrdU in normal pituitaries. Moreover, incubation with anti-TLR4 antibody significantly reduced LPS-induced lactotroph proliferation, suggesting a functional role of this receptor. As a sign of TLR4 activation, an LPS challenge increased IL-6 release in normal and tumoral cells. By flow cytometry, TLR4 baseline expression was revealed at the plasma membrane of tumoral lactotrophs, without changes noted in the percentage of double PRL/TLR4 positive cells after LPS stimulus. Increases in TLR4 intracellular expression were detected as well as rises in CD14, p-Akt and NF-κB after an LPS challenge, as assessed by western blotting. The TLR4/PRL and PRL/NF-κB co-localization was also corroborated by immunofluorescence and the involvement of PI3K/Akt signaling in lactotroph proliferation and IL-6 release was revealed through the PI3K inhibitor Ly-294002. In addition, 17β-estradiol attenuated the LPS-evoked increase in tumoral lactotroph proliferation and IL-6 release. Collectively these results demonstrate the presence of functional TLR4 in lactotrophs from estrogen-induced hyperplasic pituitaries, which responded to the proliferative stimulation and IL-6 release induced by LPS through TLR4/CD14, with a contribution of the PI3K

  16. Functional Toll-like receptor 4 expressed in lactotrophs mediates LPS-induced proliferation in experimental pituitary hyperplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabatino, María Eugenia; Sosa, Liliana del Valle; Petiti, Juan Pablo; Mukdsi, Jorge Humberto; Mascanfroni, Iván Darío; Pellizas, Claudia Gabriela; Gutiérrez, Silvina; Torres, Alicia Inés; De Paul, Ana Lucía

    2013-01-01

    Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been characterized for its ability to recognize bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Considering that infections or inflammatory processes might contribute to the progression of pituitary tumors, we analyzed the TLR4 functional role by evaluating the LPS effect on lactotroph proliferation in primary cultures from experimental pituitary tumors, and examined the involvement of PI3K-Akt and NF-κB activation in this effect. In addition, the role of 17β-estradiol as a possible modulator of LPS-induced PRL cell proliferation was further investigated. In estrogen-induced hyperplasic pituitaries, LPS triggered lactotroph cell proliferation. However, endotoxin failed to increase the number of lactotrophs taking up BrdU in normal pituitaries. Moreover, incubation with anti-TLR4 antibody significantly reduced LPS-induced lactotroph proliferation, suggesting a functional role of this receptor. As a sign of TLR4 activation, an LPS challenge increased IL-6 release in normal and tumoral cells. By flow cytometry, TLR4 baseline expression was revealed at the plasma membrane of tumoral lactotrophs, without changes noted in the percentage of double PRL/TLR4 positive cells after LPS stimulus. Increases in TLR4 intracellular expression were detected as well as rises in CD14, p-Akt and NF-κB after an LPS challenge, as assessed by western blotting. The TLR4/PRL and PRL/NF-κB co-localization was also corroborated by immunofluorescence and the involvement of PI3K/Akt signaling in lactotroph proliferation and IL-6 release was revealed through the PI3K inhibitor Ly-294002. In addition, 17β-estradiol attenuated the LPS-evoked increase in tumoral lactotroph proliferation and IL-6 release. Collectively these results demonstrate the presence of functional TLR4 in lactotrophs from estrogen-induced hyperplasic pituitaries, which responded to the proliferative stimulation and IL-6 release induced by LPS through TLR4/CD14, with a contribution of the PI3K

  17. Toll like receptor-2 regulates production of glial-derived neurotrophic factors in murine intestinal smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Paola; Gobbo, Serena; Caputi, Valentina; Spagnol, Lisa; Schirato, Giulia; Pasqualin, Matteo; Levorato, Elia; Palù, Giorgio; Giron, Maria Cecilia; Castagliuolo, Ignazio

    2015-09-01

    Gut microbiota-innate immunity axis is emerging as a key player to guarantee the structural and functional integrity of the enteric nervous system (ENS). Alterations in the composition of the gut microbiota, derangement in signaling of innate immune receptors such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs), and modifications in the neurochemical coding of the ENS have been associated with a variety of gastrointestinal disorders. Indeed, TLR2 activation by microbial products controls the ENS structure and regulates intestinal neuromuscular function. However, the cellular populations and the molecular mechanisms shaping the plasticity of enteric neurons in response to gut microbes are largely unexplored. In this study, smooth muscle cells (SMCs), enteric glial cells (EGCs) and macrophages/dendritic cells (MΦ/DCs) were isolated and cultured from the ileal longitudinal muscle layer of wild-type (WT) and Toll-like receptor-2 deficient (TLR2(-/-)) mice. Quantification of mRNA levels of neurotrophins at baseline and following stimulation with TLR ligands was performed by RT-PCR. To determine the role of neurotrophins in supporting the neuronal phenotype, we performed co-culture experiments of enteric neurons with the conditioned media of cells isolated from the longitudinal muscle layer of WT or TLR2(-/-) mice. The neuronal phenotype was investigated evaluating the expression of βIII-tubulin, HuC/D, and nNOS by immunocytochemistry. As detected by semi-quantitative RT-PCR, SMCs expressed mRNA coding TLR1-9. Among the tested cell populations, un-stimulated SMCs were the most prominent sources of neurotrophins. Stimulation with TLR2, TLR4, TLR5 and TLR9 ligands further increased Gdnf, Ngf, Bdnf and Lif mRNA levels in SMCs. Enteric neurons isolated from TLR2(-/-) mice exhibited smaller ganglia, fewer HuC/D(+ve) and nNOS(+ve) neurons and shorter βIII-tubulin axonal networks as compared to neurons cultured from WT mice. The co-culture with the conditioned media from WT-SMCs but not with

  18. Toll-Like Receptor 2 Activation by beta 2 -> 1-Fructans Protects Barrier Function of T84 Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells in a Chain Length-Dependent Manner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogt, Leonie M.; Meyer, Diederick; Pullens, Gerdie; Faas, Marijke M.; Venema, Koen; Ramasamy, Uttara; Schols, Henk A.; de Vos, Paul

    Dietary fiber intake is associated with lower incidence and mortality from disease, but the underlying mechanisms of these protective effects are unclear. We hypothesized that beta 2 -> 1-fructan dietary fibers confer protection on intestinal epithelial cell barrier function via Toll-like receptor 2

  19. Endothelial cells are main producers of interleukin 8 through toll-like receptor 2 and 4 signaling during bacterial infection in leukopenic cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, CSMO; Vellenga, E; Daenen, SMGJ; Kamps, WA; de Bont, ESJM

    Cancer patients who are leukopenic due to chemotherapy are susceptible to bacterial infections. Normally, clinical conditions during bacterial infections are caused by pathogen-associated molecular patterns, which are components that bind to Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 (TLR-2) and TLR-4 on

  20. Genetic variants in toll-like receptors are not associated with rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility or anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coenen, Marieke J H; Enevold, Christian; Barrera, Pilar

    2010-01-01

    Several studies point to a role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We investigated if genetic variants in TLR genes are associated with RA and response to tumour necrosis factor blocking (anti-TNF) medication....

  1. Crosstalk between Complement and Toll-like Receptor Activation in Relation to Donor Brain Death and Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, Jeffrey; Daha, Mohamed R.; van Son, Willem J.; Leuvenink, Henri G.; Ploeg, Rutger J.; Seelen, Marc A.

    Two central pathways of innate immunity, complement and Toll-like receptors (TLRs), play an important role in the pathogenesis of renal injury inherent to kidney transplantation. Recent findings indicate close crosstalk between complement and TLR signaling pathways. It is suggested that mitogen

  2. TNF-alpha promoter, Nod2 and toll-like receptor-4 polymorphisms and the in vivo and ex vivo response to endotoxin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schippers, Emile F.; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van Voorden, Sjaak; Martina, Cerithsa A. E.; le Cessie, Saskia; van Dissel, Jaap T.

    2004-01-01

    Humans exhibit substantial inter-individual differences in TNF-alpha production upon endotoxin stimulation. To determine to what extent the lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-alpha production capacity in vivo and ex vivo is determined by polymorphisms in toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), the TNF-alpha

  3. Transition metal sensing by Toll-like receptor-4: next to nickel, cobalt and palladium are potent human dendritic cell stimulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rachmawati, D.; Bontkes, H.J.; Verstege, M.I.; Muris, J.; von Blomberg, B.M.E.; Scheper, R.J.; van Hoogstraten, I.M.W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Nickel was recently identified as a potent activator of dendritic cells through ligating with human Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4. Objectives Here, we studied an extended panel of transition metals neighbouring nickel in the periodic table of elements, for their capacity to activate human

  4. Toll-like receptor 2 and 4 genes influence susceptibility to adverse effects of traffic-related air pollution on childhood asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhof, M.; Postma, D. S.; Brunekreef, B.; Reijmerink, N. E.; Wijga, A. H.; de Jongste, J. C.; Gehring, U.; Koppelman, G. H.

    Background Epidemiological studies have reported adverse effects of ambient air pollution on the prevalence of asthma. Laboratory studies have suggested that innate immune responses are involved. Objective A study was undertaken to determine whether the Toll-like receptor 2 and 4 genes (TLR2 and

  5. DMPD: Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of CpG DNA withToll-like receptor 9. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14751759 Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of CpG DNA withTo...;16(1):17-22. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of... CpG DNA withToll-like receptor 9. PubmedID 14751759 Title Signal transduction pathways

  6. Expression and function of toll-like receptor 8 and Tollip in colonic epithelial cells from patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenholdt, Casper; Andresen, Lars; Pedersen, Gitte

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Growing evidence indicates that innate immunity, including toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling, plays a role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This may also apply in the case of TLR-8, which has recently been shown to reverse the immunosuppressive function of regulatory T cells...

  7. Increased expression of toll-like receptor 4 and inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-6 in particular, in islets from a mouse model of obesity and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Mette; Buschard, Karsten; Hansen, Ann Maria Kruse

    2013-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has received much attention in the recent years due to its role in development of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Its expression is elevated in fat and muscle from insulin-resistant mice. Several cells of the pancreatic islets, including β-cells and res...

  8. GLA-SE, a Synthetic Toll-like Receptor 4 Agonist, Enhances T-Cell Responses to Influenza Vaccine in Older Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behzad, Hayedeh; Huckriede, Anke L. W.; Haynes, Laura; Gentleman, Beth; Coyle, Krysta; Wilschut, Jan C.; Kollmann, Tobias R.; Reed, Steven G.; McElhaney, Janet E.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The decline in influenza vaccine efficacy in older adults is associated with a limited ability of current split-virus vaccines (SVVs) to stimulate cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses required for clinical protection against influenza. Methods. The Toll-like receptor 4 agonist

  9. Absence of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling Results in Delayed Yersinia enterocolitica YopP-Induced Cell Death of Dendritic Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gröbner, S.; Schulz, S.; Adkins, Irena; Gunst, D. S. J.; Waibel, M.; Wesselborg, S.; Borgmann, S.; Autenrieth, I. B.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 1 (2007), s. 512-517 ISSN 0019-9567 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : yersinia enterocolitica * toll-like receptor 4 * dendritic cells Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.996, year: 2007

  10. Are Toll-Like Receptors and Decoy Receptors Involved in the Immunopathogenesis of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Lupus-Like Syndromes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliana Guggino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we focus our attention on the role of two families of receptors, Toll-like receptors (TLR and decoy receptors (DcR involved in the generation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and lupus-like syndromes in human and mouse models. To date, these molecules were described in several autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, antiphospholipids syndrome, bowel inflammation, and SLE. Here, we summarize the findings of recent investigations on TLR and DcR and their role in the immunopathogenesis of the SLE.

  11. Retinal photoreceptor expresses toll-like receptors (TLRs and elicits innate responses following TLR ligand and bacterial challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Kumar Singh

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs play an important role in host defense against microbial pathogens. Our previous studies have shown that TLRs are expressed on various retinal cells (Microglia and Müller glia and orchestrate retinal innate responses in bacterial endophthalmitis. In this study, we used a well-characterized mouse cone photoreceptor cell line (661W; and demonstrated that these cells express all known TLRs. Although the stimulation of 661W cells with TLR ligands (Pam3Cys, PolyI:C, LPS, Flagellin, Poly DT, and ODN did not alter TLR expression, downstream TLR-signaling pathways (NF-κB, p38, and ERK are activated. Moreover, TLR-activated 661W cells secreted significant amounts of inflammatory mediators (IL-6, IL-1β, MIP-2, and KC in their culture supernatant, as assessed by ELISA. A similar trend was observed in 661W cells challenged with live bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus. Interestingly, the neutralization of TLR2, a major receptor for S. aureus recognition, did not significantly attenuate bacterial-induced inflammatory mediators, suggesting the existence of TLR2-independent mechanisms in photoreceptor cells. Together, these results indicate that photoreceptors constitutively express functional TLRs and possess the ability to initiate innate responses following pathogen challenge, implicating their role in retinal innate immunity.

  12. Altered Toll-Like Receptor-4 Response to Lipopolysaccharides in Infants Exposed to HIV-1 and Its Preventive Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anicet Christel Maloupazoa Siawaya

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Pathogen sensing and recognition through pattern recognition receptors, and subsequent production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, is the cornerstone of the innate immune system. Despite the fact that HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU infants are prone to serious bacterial infections, no study has focused on the functionality of their bacteria recognition system. This is the first study to investigate baseline levels of three critically important immune response molecules in this population: complement component (C-3, toll-like receptor (TLR-4, and C-reactive protein (CRP. We enrolled 16 HEU and 6 HIV-unexposed (HU infants. TLR4 function was investigated by stimulating whole blood with increasing concentrations of TLR4-agonist ultrapure lipopolysaccharides. TLR4/TLR4-agonist dose response were assessed by measuring IL-6 secretion. Complement C3 and CRP were measured by photo spectrometry. Data showed no significant differences in baseline concentration of CRP between HEU and HU infants. Complement C3 was significantly higher in HEU infants than HU infants. TLR4 anergy was observed in 7 of 12 HEU infants, whereas the rest of HEU infants (n = 4 and the control HU infants tested (n = 3 showed responsive TLR4. None of the HEU infants investigated in this study had severe infections in the year after their birth. In conclusion, TLR4 anergy can occur in HEU infants without necessarily translating to increased vulnerability to infectious diseases.

  13. Respiratory Influenza A Virus Infection Triggers Local and Systemic Natural Killer Cell Activation via Toll-Like Receptor 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemann-Koniszewski, Sabine; Behrens, Sarah; Boehme, Julia D.; Hochnadel, Inga; Riese, Peggy; Guzmán, Carlos A.; Kröger, Andrea; Schreiber, Jens; Gunzer, Matthias; Bruder, Dunja

    2018-01-01

    The innate immune system senses influenza A virus (IAV) through different pathogen-recognition receptors including Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7). Downstream of viral recognition natural killer (NK) cells are activated as part of the anti-IAV immune response. Despite the known decisive role of TLR7 for NK cell activation by therapeutic immunostimulatory RNAs, the contribution of TLR7 to the NK cell response following IAV infection has not been addressed. We have analyzed lung cytokine responses as well as the activation, interferon (IFN)-γ production, and cytotoxicity of lung and splenic NK cells following sublethal respiratory IAV infection in wild-type and TLR7ko mice. Early airway IFN-γ levels as well as the induction of lung NK cell CD69 expression and IFN-γ production in response to IAV infection were significantly attenuated in TLR7-deficient hosts. Strikingly, respiratory IAV infection also primed splenic NK cells for IFN-γ production, degranulation, and target cell lysis, all of which were fully dependent on TLR7. At the same time, lung type I IFN levels were significantly reduced in TLR7ko mice early following IAV infection, displaying a potential upstream mechanism of the attenuated NK cell activation observed. Taken together, our data clearly demonstrate a specific role for TLR7 signaling in local and systemic NK cell activation following respiratory IAV infection despite the presence of redundant innate IAV-recognition pathways. PMID:29497422

  14. Toll-like receptor activation enhances cell-mediated immunity induced by an antibody vaccine targeting human dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger Marc A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previously, we have successfully targeted the mannose receptor (MR expressed on monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs using a fully human MR-specific antibody, B11, as a vehicle to deliver whole protein tumor antigens such as the human chorionic gonadotropin hormone (hCGβ. Since MRs play a role in bridging innate immunity with adaptive immunity we have explored several toll-like receptor (TLR-specific ligands that may synergize with MR targeting and be applicable as adjuvants in the clinic. We demonstrate that antigen-specific helper and cytolytic T cells from both healthy donors and cancer patients were effectively primed with B11-hCGβ-treated autologous DCs when a combination of one or several TLR ligands is used. Specifically, concomitant signaling of DCs via TLR3 with dsRNA (poly I:C and DC TLR 7/8 with Resiquimod (R-848, respectively, elicited efficient antigen presentation-mediated by MR-targeting. We demonstrate that MR and TLRs contribute towards maturation and activation of DCs by a mechanism that may be driven by a combination of adjuvant and antibody vaccines that specifically deliver antigenic targets to DCs.

  15. Engagement of Platelet Toll-Like Receptor 9 by Novel Endogenous Ligands Promotes Platelet Hyper-Reactivity and Thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Soumya; Ma, Yi; Hong, Li; Gao, Detao; West, Xiaoxia Z.; Salomon, Robert G.; Byzova, Tatiana V.; Podrez, Eugene A.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale A prothrombotic state and increased platelet reactivity are common in pathophysiological conditions associated with oxidative stress and infections. Such conditions are associated with an appearance of altered-self ligands in circulation that can be recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLR). Platelets express a number of TLR, including TLR9, however, the role of TLR in platelet function and thrombosis is poorly understood. Objective To investigate the biological activities of carboxy(alkylpyrrole) protein adducts (CAPs), an altered self-ligand generated in oxidative stress, on platelet function and thrombosis. Methods and Results In this study we show that CAPs represent novel unconventional ligands for TLR9. Furthermore, using human and murine platelets, we demonstrate that CAPs promote platelet activation, granule secretion, and aggregation in vitro and thrombosis in vivo via the TLR9/MyD88 pathway. Platelet activation by TLR9 ligands induces IRAK1 and AKT phosphorylation, and is Src kinase dependent. Physiological platelet agonists act synergistically with TLR9 ligands by inducing TLR9 expression on the platelet surface. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that platelet TLR9 is a functional platelet receptor that links oxidative stress, innate immunity, and thrombosis. PMID:23071157

  16. Comparison of Cellular Uptake and Inflammatory Response via Toll-Like Receptor 4 to Lipopolysaccharide and Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiyoshi Taniguchi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune response is the earliest cellular response to infectious agents and mediates the interactions between microbes and cells. Toll-like receptors (TLRs play an important role in these interactions. We have already shown that TLRs are involved with the uptake of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs and promote inflammatory responses. In this paper, we compared role of cellular uptake and inflammatory response via TLR 4 to lipopolysaccharide (LPS and TiO2 NPs. In the case of LPS, LPS binds to LPS binding protein (LBP and CD 14, and then this complex binds to TLR 4. In the case of TiO2 NPs, the necessity of LBP and CD 14 to induce the inflammatory response and for uptake by cells was investigated using over-expression, antibody blocking, and siRNA knockdown experiments. Our results suggested that for cellular uptake of TiO2 NPs, TLR 4 did not form a complex with LBP and CD 14. In the TiO2 NP-mediated inflammatory response, TLR 4 acted as the signaling receptor without protein complex of LPS, LBP and CD 14. The results suggested that character of TiO2 NPs might be similar to the complex of LPS, LBP and CD 14. These results are important for development of safer nanomaterials.

  17. Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3 plays a major role in the formation of rabies virus Negri Bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Ménager

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Human neurons express the innate immune response receptor, Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3. TLR3 levels are increased in pathological conditions such as brain virus infection. Here, we further investigated the production, cellular localisation, and function of neuronal TLR3 during neuronotropic rabies virus (RABV infection in human neuronal cells. Following RABV infection, TLR3 is not only present in endosomes, as observed in the absence of infection, but also in detergent-resistant perinuclear inclusion bodies. As well as TLR3, these inclusion bodies contain the viral genome and viral proteins (N and P, but not G. The size and composition of inclusion bodies and the absence of a surrounding membrane, as shown by electron microscopy, suggest they correspond to the previously described Negri Bodies (NBs. NBs are not formed in the absence of TLR3, and TLR3(-/- mice -- in which brain tissue was less severely infected -- had a better survival rate than WT mice. These observations demonstrate that TLR3 is a major molecule involved in the spatial arrangement of RABV-induced NBs and viral replication. This study shows how viruses can exploit cellular proteins and compartmentalisation for their own benefit.

  18. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of Toll-like receptor 4 decrease the risk of development of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Minmin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 is a key innate immunity receptor that initiates an inflammatory response. Growing evidence suggests that mutation of TLR4 gene may play a role in the development of cancers. This study aimed to investigate the temporal relationship of single nucleotide polymorphisms of TLR4 and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma, a single center-based case-control study was conducted. METHODS: A systematic genetic analysis of sequence variants of TLR4 by evaluating ten single-nucleotide polymorphisms was performed from 216 hepatocellular carcinoma cases and 228 controls. RESULTS: Six single nucleotide polymorphisms of the TLR4 in the 5'-untranslated region and intron were associated with risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. Individuals carrying the heterozygous genotypes for the rs10759930, rs2737190, rs10116253, rs1927914, rs12377632 and rs1927911 had significantly decreased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (adjusted odds ratio [OR], from 0.527 to 0.578, P<0.01 comparing with those carrying wild-type homozygous genotypes. In haplotype analysis, one haplotype (GCCCTTAG of TLR4 was associated significantly with decrease of the occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (OR, 0.556, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.407-0.758, P = 0.000. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, these results suggested that the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma was associated with TLR4 sequence variation. TLR4 single nucleotide polymorphisms may play an important protective role in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  19. Protective Role of Toll-like Receptor 3-Induced Type I Interferon in Murine Coronavirus Infection of Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Navas-Martin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like Receptors (TLRs sense viral infections and induce production of type I interferons (IFNs, other cytokines, and chemokines. Viral recognition by TLRs and other pattern recognition receptors (PRRs has been proven to be cell-type specific. Triggering of TLRs with selected ligands can be beneficial against some viral infections. Macrophages are antigen-presenting cells that express TLRs and have a key role in the innate and adaptive immunity against viruses. Coronaviruses (CoVs are single-stranded, positive-sense RNA viruses that cause acute and chronic infections and can productively infect macrophages. Investigation of the interplay between CoVs and PRRs is in its infancy. We assessed the effect of triggering TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, and TLR7 with selected ligands on the susceptibility of the J774A.1 macrophage cell line to infection with murine coronavirus (mouse hepatitis virus, [MHV]. Stimulation of TLR2, TLR4, or TLR7 did not affect MHV production. In contrast, pre-stimulation of TLR3 with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C hindered MHV infection through induction of IFN-β in macrophages. We demonstrate that activation of TLR3 with the synthetic ligand poly I:C mediates antiviral immunity that diminishes (MHV-A59 or suppresses (MHV-JHM, MHV-3 virus production in macrophages.

  20. The Toll-like receptor 5 ligand flagellin promotes asthma by priming allergic responses to indoor allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rhonda H; Maruoka, Shuichiro; Whitehead, Gregory S; Foley, Julie F; Flake, Gordon P; Sever, Michelle L; Zeldin, Darryl C; Kraft, Monica; Garantziotis, Stavros; Nakano, Hideki; Cook, Donald N

    2012-11-01

    Allergic asthma is a complex disease characterized by eosinophilic pulmonary inflammation, mucus production and reversible airway obstruction. Exposure to indoor allergens is a risk factor for asthma, but this disease is also associated with high household levels of total and particularly Gram-negative bacteria. The ability of bacterial products to act as adjuvants suggests they might promote asthma by priming allergic sensitization to inhaled allergens. In support of this idea, house dust extracts (HDEs) can activate antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro and promote allergic sensitization to inhaled innocuous proteins in vivo. It is unknown which microbial products provide most of the adjuvant activity in HDEs. A screen for adjuvant activity of microbial products revealed that the bacterial protein flagellin (FLA) stimulated strong allergic airway responses to an innocuous inhaled protein, ovalbumin (OVA). Moreover, Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5), the mammalian receptor for FLA, was required for priming strong allergic responses to natural indoor allergens present in HDEs. In addition, individuals with asthma have higher serum levels of FLA-specific antibodies as compared to nonasthmatic individuals. Together, these findings suggest that household FLA promotes the development of allergic asthma by TLR5-dependent priming of allergic responses to indoor allergens.

  1. Expressions of toll-like receptors 2 and 4, and relative cellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    infection can damage the human immune system, and cause potential TB to become active. TB. HIV with TB ... on the surface of dendritic cells. They are a group of very important pattern recognition receptors of immunity, which can ..... Calcium Homeostasis. Plos One 2015; 10(7): e0131767. 24. Qin X, Yao J, Yang F, Nie J, ...

  2. The TRIPS (Toll-like receptors in immuno-inflammatory pathogenesis) Hypothesis: a novel postulate to understand schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Debnath, Monojit

    2013-07-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that immune activation and/or immuno-inflammatory reactions during neurodevelopment apparently contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of schizophrenia. One of the important environmental factors that is known to trigger immune activation/inflammatory responses during early pregnancy is prenatal infection. Recent understanding from animal studies suggests that prenatal infection induced maternal immune activation (MIA)/inflammation in congruence with oxidative/nitrosative stress can lead to neurodevelopmental damage and behavioral abnormalities in the offspring. Although the underlying precise mechanistic processes of MIA/inflammation are yet to be completely elucidated, it is being increasingly recognized that Toll-like receptors (TLRs) that form the first line of defense against invading microorganisms could participate in the prenatal infection induced immune insults. Interestingly, some of the TLRs, especially TLR3 and TLR4 that modulate neurodevelopment, neuronal survival and neuronal plasticity by regulating the neuro-immune cross-talk in the developing and adult brain could also be affected by prenatal infection. Importantly, sustained activation of TLR3/TLR4 due to environmental factors including infection and stress has been found to generate excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS)/reactive nitrogen species (RNS) as well as pro-inflammatory mediators during embryogenesis, which result into neuronal damage by necrosis/apoptosis. In recent times, ROS/RNS and immuno-inflammatory mediators are being increasingly linked to progressive brain changes in schizophrenia. Although a significant role of TLR3/TLR4 in neurodegeneration is gaining certainty, their importance in establishing a causal link between prenatal infection and immuno-inflammatory, oxidative and nitrosative stress (IO&NS) responses and influence on adult presentation of schizophrenia is yet to be ascertained. We review here the current knowledge generated from

  3. Toll-like receptor 4 promotes angiogenesis in pancreatic cancer via PI3K/AKT signaling

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    Sun, Yunliang; Wu, Congshan [Department of Gastroenterology, Lianyungang Ganyu People’s Hospital, Ganyu, Jiangsu (China); Ma, Jianxia, E-mail: yz_mjx@163.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Huadong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Yang, Yu [Department of Gastroenterology, Huadong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Man, Xiaohua; Wu, Hongyu; Li, Shude [Department of Gastroenterology, Changhai Hospital, The Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China)

    2016-10-01

    Deregulation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is closely associated with the progression of various types of cancers, but its role in pancreatic carcinogenesis is unclear. This study aimed to investigate the role of TLR4 in the angiogenesis of pancreatic cancer and the underlying molecular mechanisms. The culture supernatant (conditioned medium) of PANC-1 cells after appropriate treatment was used for the treatment of HUVECs. The proliferation, migration and tube formation of HUVECs were assessed by MTT, Transwell and Matrigel, respectively. In pancreatic cancer tissues, TLR4, VEGF and CD31 were upregulated as determined by immunohistochemistry and the expression of TLR4 and VEGF was positively correlated with microvessel density as detected by CD31 staining. Activation of TLR4 signaling by LPS in PANC-1 cells resulted in increased VEGF and phosphorylation of AKT, which were abolished by TLR4 silencing with siRNA and PI3K/AKT signaling inhibitor LY294002. The conditioned medium from PANC-1 cells treated with LY294002 or transfected with TRL4 siRNA reduced the proliferation, migration and tube formation of HUVECs. In contrast, the conditioned medium from PANC-1 cells treated with LPS stimulated the proliferation, migration and tube formation of HUVECs, which was however significantly inhibited by pretreatment of PANC-1 cells with LY294002 or transfection with TRL4 siRNA. Our findings suggest TLR4 may promote angiogenesis in pancreatic cancer by activating the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway to induce VEGF expression.

  4. Expression of Toll-Like Receptor 2 in Glomerular Endothelial Cells and Promotion of Diabetic Nephropathy by Porphyromonas gingivalis Lipopolysaccharide

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    Hatakeyama, Yuji; Ishikawa, Hiroyuki; Tsuruga, Eichi

    2014-01-01

    The toll-like receptor (TLR) has been suggested as a candidate cause for diabetic nephropathy. Recently, we have reported the TLR4 expression in diabetic mouse glomerular endothelium. The study here investigates the effects of the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) which is a ligand for TLR2 and TLR4 in diabetic nephropathy. In laser-scanning microscopy of glomeruli of streptozotocin- and a high fat diet feed-induced type I and type II diabetic mice, TLR2 localized on the glomerular endothelium and proximal tubule epithelium. The TLR2 mRNA was detected in diabetic mouse glomeruli by in situ hybridization and in real-time PCR of the renal cortex, the TLR2 mRNA amounts were larger in diabetic mice than in non-diabetic mice. All diabetic mice subjected to repeated LPS administrations died within the survival period of all of the diabetic mice not administered LPS and of all of the non-diabetic LPS-administered mice. The LPS administration promoted the production of urinary protein, the accumulation of type I collagen in the glomeruli, and the increases in IL-6, TNF-α, and TGF-β in the renal cortex of the glomeruli of the diabetic mice. It is thought that blood TLR ligands like Porphyromonas gingivalis LPS induce the glomerular endothelium to produce cytokines which aid glomerulosclerosis. Periodontitis may promote diabetic nephropathy. PMID:24835775

  5. A role for Toll-like receptor mediated signals in neutrophils in the pathogenesis of the anti-phospholipid syndrome.

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    Gerd Gladigau

    Full Text Available The anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS is characterized by recurrent thrombosis and occurrence of anti-phospholipid antibodies (aPL. aPL are necessary, but not sufficient for the clinical manifestations of APS. Growing evidence suggests a role of innate immune cells, in particular polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN and Toll-like receptors (TLR to be additionally involved. aPL activate endothelial cells and monocytes through a TLR4-dependent signalling pathway. Whether this is also relevant for PMN in a similar way is currently not known. To address this issue, we used purified PMN from healthy donors and stimulated them in the presence or absence of human monoclonal aPL and the TLR4 agonist LPS monitoring neutrophil effector functions, namely the oxidative burst, phagocytosis, L-Selectin shedding and IL-8 production. aPL alone were only able to induce minor activation of PMN effector functions at high concentrations. However, in the additional presence of LPS the activation threshold was markedly lower indicating a synergistic activation pathway of aPL and TLR in PMN. In summary, our results indicate that PMN effector functions are directly activated by aPL and boosted by the additional presence of microbial products. This highlights a role for PMN as important innate immune effector cells that contribute to the pathophysiology of APS.

  6. [The effect of Toll-like receptor 4 in nicotine suppressing the osteogenic potential of periodontal ligament stem cells].

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    Luan, Yan; Deqin, Yang

    2017-08-01

    Objective To explore the impact of nicotine on proliferation and osteogenic capability of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), and the role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in nicotine, suppressing the osteogenic capability of PDLSCs. Methods PDLSCs were cultured in vitro, and the flow cytometer was used to identify the surface antigen markers of PDLSCs. WST-1 was used to detect the proliferation ability of PDLSCs, which were stimulated by different concentrations of nicotine. Alizarin red staining was used to observe the formation of mineralized nodules after PDLSCs stimulation with different concentrations of nicotine. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot were used to detect the change in osteogenic potential of PDLSCs stimulated by nicotine, after TAK-242, and with the inhibitor of TLR4. Results PDLSCs expressed mesenchymal stem cell-associated markers CD90 and CD105. When the concentration of nicotine was 10⁻⁴ mol·L⁻¹, the PDLSC proliferation could be suppressed after 3 d compared with the control group (Pnicotine suppressed the PDLSCs (PNicotine suppresses the proliferation and osteogenic capability of PDLSCs, which may be regulated by TLR4.

  7. Propofol inhibits hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced human gastric epithelial cell injury by suppressing the Toll-like receptor 4 pathway

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    Jiao-Li Zhang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the role of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 pathway in normal human gastric epithelial (GES-1 cells under hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R in vitro, and the effect of propofol on injured GES-1 cells as well as its possible mechanism. Before H/R induction, GES-1 cells were preconditioned with fat emulsion, propofol, or epigallocatechin gallate. Then cell viability, cell apoptosis, and related molecules in the cells were analyzed under experimental conditions. We found that propofol 50 μmol/L markedly inhibited the H/R injury under hypoxia 1.5 h/reoxygenation 2 hours by promoting GES-1 cell viability and decreasing cell apoptosis. The TLR4 signal may be involved in the protective effect of propofol against H/R injury. The malondialdehyde contents and superoxide dismutase activities were recovered under propofol preconditioning. In summary, propofol preconditioning may exert a protective effect on H/R injury in GES-1 cells and the mechanism may be via inhibition of the activated TLR4 signal under H/R conditions.

  8. CBLB502, an agonist of Toll-like receptor 5, has antioxidant and scavenging free radicals activities in vitro.

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    Li, Weiguang; Ge, Changhui; Yang, Liu; Wang, Ruixue; Lu, Yiming; Gao, Yan; Li, Zhihui; Wu, Yonghong; Zheng, Xiaofei; Wang, Zhaoyan; Zhang, Chenggang

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial protein flagellin is the known agonist of Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5). It has been reported that CBLB502, a novel agonist of TLR5 derived from Salmonella flagellin, could reduce radiation toxicity in mouse and primate models, protect mice from dermatitis and oral mucositis caused by radiation, inhibit acute renal ischemic failure, and inhibit the growth of A549 lung cancer cell. The property of CBLB502 is able to bind to TLR5 and activates NF-κB signaling. In this study, we investigated the antioxidant potential and free radicals scavenging properties of CBLB502 in vitro. Interestingly, we found that CBLB502 has a direct and distinct antioxidant capacity and can efficiently scavenge a variety of free radicals, including superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical, and ABTS cation (ABTS(+)). Through wave scanning and kinetic evaluation of scavenging ABTS(+), we found that the ABTS(+) scavenging process of CBLB502 is relatively slow, and the ABTS(+) scavenging activity of CBLB502 has a consistently kinetics characteristics. In conclusion, our results suggested that CBLB502 has antioxidant and scavenging free radicals activities in vitro. It is implied that CBLB502 might partially promote the beneficial protective effect through its scavenging free radicals. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Toll-Like Receptor-4 Mediated Inflammation Is Involved in the Cardiometabolic Alterations Induced by Intermittent Hypoxia

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    Laureline Poulain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Intermittent hypoxia (IH is a major component of sleep apnea syndrome as its cardiometabolic complications have been mainly attributed to IH. The pathophysiology is still poorly understood but there are some similarities with the obesity-associated cardiometabolic complications. As the latter results from inflammation involving toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4 signaling, we assessed this pathway in the cardiometabolic consequences of IH. Methods. Lean adult male TLR4-deficient (TLR4−/− mice and their controls (C57BL/6 mice were exposed to either IH (FiO2 21-5%, 1 min cycle, 8 h/day or air (normoxic mice for 4 weeks. Animals were assessed at 1-week exposure for insulin tolerance test and after 4-week exposure for morphological and inflammatory changes of the epididymal fat and thoracic aorta. Results. IH induced insulin resistance, morphological and inflammatory changes of the epididymal fat (smaller pads and adipocytes, higher release of TNF-α and IL-6 and aorta (larger intima-media thickness and higher NFκB-p50 activity. All these alterations were prevented by TLR4 deletion. Conclusion. IH induces metabolic and vascular alterations that involve TLR4 mediated inflammation. These results confirm the important role of inflammation in the cardiometabolic consequences of IH and suggest that targeting TLR4/NFκB pathway could represent a further therapeutic option for sleep apnea patients.

  10. Full-length cDNA cloning of Toll-like receptor 4 in dogs and cats.

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    Asahina, Yuka; Yoshioka, Noriyuki; Kano, Rui; Moritomo, Tadaaki; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko

    2003-12-15

    In the present study, full length of canine and feline Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) cDNAs were sequenced, and the expression of canine and feline TLR4 mRNAs in dog and cat tissues were investigated. The full-length cDNA of TLR4 of dog and cat was 2709 bp encoding 637 amino acids and 3113 bp encoding 833 amino acids, respectively. The similarity of canine and feline TLR4 were 83.6% at the nucleotide sequence level and 77.6% at the amino acid sequence level. At the amino acid sequence level, canine and feline TLR4 showed sequence similarities of approximately 62-78% with those of Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Bos taurus and Equus caballus, respectively. Southern hybridization analyses with TLR4 cDNA probes gave one distinct band in BamHI, EcoRI and HindIII digests of genomic DNA from dogs and cats, respectively, indicating the likely presence of a single TLR4 gene in each species. By RT-PCR analysis, mRNA of canine TLR4 was expressed highly in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL), moderately in spleen, stomach and small intestine, at low levels in liver, with no expression in kidney, large intestine and skin. On the other hand, mRNA of feline TLR4 was expressed highly in lung, bladder and PBL, moderately in kidney, liver, spleen and large intestine and at low levels in pancreas and small intestine.

  11. TOLL-LIKE RECEPTORS (TLR 2 AND 4 EXPRESSION OF KERATINOCYTES FROM PATIENTS WITH LOCALIZED AND DISSEMINATED DERMATOPHYTOSIS

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    Cristiane Beatriz de Oliveira

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available There are few studies on the role of innate immune response in dermatophytosis. An investigation was conducted to define the involvement of Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs 2 and 4 in localized (LD and disseminated (DD dermatophytosis due to T. rubrum. Fifteen newly diagnosed patients, eight patients with LD and seven with DD, defined by involvement of at least three body segments were used in this study. Controls comprised twenty skin samples from healthy individuals undergoing plastic surgery. TLR2 and TLR4 were quantified in skin lesions by immunohistochemistry. A reduced expression of TLR4 in the lower and upper epidermis of both LD and DD patients was found compared to controls; TLR2 expression was preserved in the upper and lower epidermis of all three groups. As TLR4 signaling induces the production of inflammatory cytokines and neutrophils recruitment, its reduced expression likely contributed to the lack of resolution of the infection and the consequent chronic nature of the dermatophytosis. As TLR2 expression acts to limit the inflammatory process and preserves the epidermal structure, its preserved expression may also contribute to the persistent infection and limited inflammation that are characteristic of dermatophytic infections.

  12. Acute phase serum amyloid A induces proinflammatory cytokines and mineralization via toll-like receptor 4 in mesenchymal stem cells.

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    Ebert, Regina; Benisch, Peggy; Krug, Melanie; Zeck, Sabine; Meißner-Weigl, Jutta; Steinert, Andre; Rauner, Martina; Hofbauer, Lorenz; Jakob, Franz

    2015-07-01

    The role of serum amyloid A (SAA) proteins, which are ligands for toll-like receptors, was analyzed in human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and their osteogenic offspring with a focus on senescence, differentiation and mineralization. In vitro aged hMSC developed a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), resulting in enhanced SAA1/2, TLR2/4 and proinflammatory cytokine (IL6, IL8, IL1β, CXCL1, CXCL2) expression before entering replicative senescence. Recombinant human SAA1 (rhSAA1) induced SASP-related genes and proteins in MSC, which could be abolished by cotreatment with the TLR4-inhibitor CLI-095. The same pattern of SASP-resembling genes was stimulated upon induction of osteogenic differentiation, which is accompanied by autocrine SAA1/2 expression. In this context additional rhSAA1 enhanced the SASP-like phenotype, accelerated the proinflammatory phase of osteogenic differentiation and enhanced mineralization. Autocrine/paracrine and rhSAA1 via TLR4 stimulate a proinflammatory phenotype that is both part of the early phase of osteogenic differentiation and the development of senescence. This signaling cascade is tightly involved in bone formation and mineralization, but may also propagate pathological extraosseous calcification conditions such as calcifying inflammation and atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Toll-Like Receptor-2 Ligand Peptidoglycan Upregulates Expression and Ubiquitin Ligase Activity of CHIP through JNK Pathway

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    Yan Meng

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peptidoglycan (PGN is a component of cell wall in Gram-positive bacteria that stimulates inflammatory responses through Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2. The carboxyl terminus of constitutive heat shock cognate 70 (HSC70-interacting protein (CHIP, also known as Stub1 is a U-box-type E3 ubiquitin ligase, which plays an important role in protein quality control and inflammation through ubquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation. However, it is unclear whether TLR2 agonist PGN regulates the expression and activation of CHIP. Methods/Results: In this study, we showed that PGN significantly up-regulated the expression of CHIP in both mRNA and protein levels in RAW264.7 cells in a time-dependant manner, and the expression of CHIP induced by PGN was abolished in TLR2 knockout macrophages. No significant change in CHIP was observed after lipopolysaccharide (LPS, TLR4 agonist and cytosine-phosphorous-guanine oligonucleotide (CpG ODN, TLR9 agonist treatment. Moreover, PGN markedly induced the expression and activity of CHIP in macrophages, whereas this effect was attenuated by SP600125, a selective inhibitor of JNK. Conclusion: Our study for the first time demonstrates that TLR2 activation enhances the expression and activity of CHIP through JNK signaling pathway.

  14. How the Intricate Interaction among Toll-Like Receptors, Microbiota, and Intestinal Immunity Can Influence Gastrointestinal Pathology

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    Simona Frosali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The gut is able to maintain tolerance to microbial and food antigens. The intestine minimizes the number of harmful bacteria by shaping the microbiota through a symbiotic relationship. In healthy human intestine, a constant homeostasis is maintained by the perfect regulation of microbial load and the immune response generated against it. Failure of this balance may result in various pathological conditions. Innate immune sensors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs, may be considered an interface among intestinal epithelial barrier, microbiota, and immune system. TLRs pathway, activated by pathogens, is involved in the pathogenesis of several infectious and inflammatory diseases. The alteration of the homeostasis between physiologic and pathogenic bacteria of intestinal flora causes a condition called dysbiosis. The breakdown of homeostasis by dysbiosis may increase susceptibility to inflammatory bowel diseases. It is evident that environment, genetics, and host immunity form a highly interactive regulatory triad that controls TLR function. Imbalanced relationships within this triad may promote aberrant TLR signaling, critically contributing to acute and chronic intestinal inflammatory processes, such as in IBD, colitis, and colorectal cancer. The study of interactions between different components of the immune systems and intestinal microbiota will open new horizons in the knowledge of gut inflammation.

  15. Isolation of murine peritoneal macrophages to carry out gene expression analysis upon Toll-like receptors stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layoun, Antonio; Samba, Macha; Santos, Manuela M

    2015-04-29

    During infection and inflammation, circulating monocytes leave the bloodstream and migrate into tissues, where they differentiate into macrophages. Macrophages express surface Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which recognize molecular patterns conserved through evolution in a wide range of microorganisms. TLRs play a central role in macrophage activation which is usually associated with gene expression alteration. Macrophages are critical in many diseases and have emerged as attractive targets for therapy. In the following protocol, we describe a procedure to isolate murine peritoneal macrophages using Brewer's thioglycollate medium. The latter will boost monocyte migration into the peritoneum, accordingly this will raise macrophage yield by 10-fold. Several studies have been carried out using bone marrow, spleen or peritoneal derived macrophages. However, peritoneal macrophages were shown to be more mature upon isolation and are more stable in their functionality and phenotype. Thus, macrophages isolated from murine peritoneal cavity present an important cell population that can serve in different immunological and metabolic studies. Once isolated, macrophages were stimulated with different TLR ligands and consequently gene expression was evaluated.

  16. Toll-like receptor 2 signaling protects mice from tumor development in a mouse model of colitis-induced cancer.

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    Emily L Lowe

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a disorder of chronic inflammation with increased susceptibility to colorectal cancer. The etiology of IBD is unclear but thought to result from a dysregulated adaptive and innate immune response to microbial products in a genetically susceptible host. Toll-like receptor (TLR signaling induced by intestinal commensal bacteria plays a crucial role in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, innate immunity and the enhancement of intestinal epithelial cell (IEC integrity. However, the role of TLR2 in the development of colorectal cancer has not been studied. We utilized the AOM-DSS model for colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC in wild type (WT and TLR2(-/- mice. Colons harvested from WT and TLR2(-/- mice were used for histopathology, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and cytokine analysis. Mice deficient in TLR2 developed significantly more and larger colorectal tumors than their WT controls. We provide evidence that colonic epithelium of TLR2(-/- mice have altered immune responses and dysregulated proliferation under steady-state conditions and during colitis, which lead to inflammatory growth signals and predisposition to accelerated neoplastic growth. At the earliest time-points assessed, TLR2(-/- colons exhibited a significant increase in aberrant crypt foci (ACF, resulting in tumors that developed earlier and grew larger. In addition, the intestinal microenvironment revealed significantly higher levels of IL-6 and IL-17A concomitant with increased phospho-STAT3 within ACF. These observations indicate that in colitis, TLR2 plays a protective role against the development of CAC.

  17. Curcumin Protects against Atherosclerosis in Apolipoprotein E-Knockout Mice by Inhibiting Toll-like Receptor 4 Expression.

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    Zhang, Shanshan; Zou, Jun; Li, Peiyang; Zheng, Xiumei; Feng, Dan

    2018-01-17

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been reported to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, the current study aimed to investigate whether curcumin suppresses atherosclerosis development in ApoE-knockout (ApoE -/- ) mice by inhibiting TLR4 expression. ApoE -/- mice were fed a high-fat diet supplemented with or without curcumin (0.1% w/w) for 16 weeks. Curcumin supplementation significantly reduced TLR4 expression and macrophage infiltration in atherosclerotic plaques. Curcumin also reduced aortic interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity, and plasma IL-1β, TNF-α, soluble VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 levels. In addition, aortic sinus sections revealed that curcumin treatment reduced the extent of atherosclerotic lesions and inhibited atherosclerosis development. In vitro, curcumin inhibited NF-κB activation in macrophages and reduced TLR4 expression induced by lipopolysaccharide. Our results indicate that curcumin protects against atherosclerosis at least partially by inhibiting TLR4 expression and its related inflammatory reaction.

  18. Differential modulation of avian β-defensin and Toll-like receptor expression in chickens infected with infectious bronchitis virus.

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    Xu, Yang; Zhang, Tingting; Xu, Qianqian; Han, Zongxi; Liang, Shuling; Shao, Yuhao; Ma, Deying; Liu, Shengwang

    2015-11-01

    The host innate immune response either clears invading viruses or allows the adaptive immune system to establish an effective antiviral response. In this study, both pathogenic (passage 3, P3) and attenuated (P110) infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) strains were used to study the immune responses of chicken to IBV infection. Expression of avian β-defensins (AvBDs) and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in 16 tissues of chicken were compared at 7 days PI. The results showed that P3 infection upregulated the expression of AvBDs, including AvBD2, 4, 5, 6, 9, and 12, while P110 infection downregulated the expression of AvBDs, including AvBD3, 4, 5, 6, and 9 in most tissues. Meanwhile, the expression level of several TLRs showed a general trend of upregulation in the tissues of P3-infected chickens, while they were downregulated in the tissues of P110-infected chickens. The result suggested that compared with the P110 strain, the P3 strain induced a more pronounced host innate immune response. Furthermore, we observed that recombinant AvBDs (including 2, 6, and 12) demonstrated obvious anti-viral activity against IBV in vitro. Our findings contribute to the proposal that IBV infection induces an increase in the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of some AvBDs and TLRs, which suggests that AvBDs may play significant roles in the resistance of chickens to IBV replication.

  19. Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in neurons of trigeminal ganglion contributes to nociception induced by acute pulpitis in rats.

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    Lin, Jia-Ji; Du, Yi; Cai, Wen-Ke; Kuang, Rong; Chang, Ting; Zhang, Zhuo; Yang, Yong-Xiang; Sun, Chao; Li, Zhu-Yi; Kuang, Fang

    2015-07-30

    Pain caused by acute pulpitis (AP) is a common symptom in clinical settings. However, its underlying mechanisms have largely remained unknown. Using AP model, we demonstrated that dental injury caused severe pulp inflammation with up-regulated serum IL-1β. Assessment from head-withdrawal reflex thresholds (HWTs) and open-field test demonstrated nociceptive response at 1 day post injury. A consistent up-regulation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) ipsilateral to the injured pulp was found; and downstream signaling components of TLR4, including MyD88, TRIF and NF-κB, and cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β, were also increased. Retrograde labeling indicated that most TLR4 positve neuron in the TG innnervated the pulp and TLR4 immunoreactivity was mainly in the medium and small neurons. Double labeling showed that the TLR4 expressing neurons in the ipsilateral TG were TRPV1 and CGRP positive, but IB4 negative. Furthermore, blocking TLR4 by eritoran (TLR4 antagonist) in TGs of the AP model significantly down-regulated MyD88, TRIF, NF-κB, TNF-α and IL-1β production and behavior of nociceptive response. Our findings suggest that TLR4 signaling in TG cells, particularly the peptidergic TRPV1 neurons, plays a key role in AP-induced nociception, and indicate that TLR4 signaling could be a potential therapeutic target for orofacial pain.

  20. Polymeric structure and host Toll-like receptor 4 dictate immunogenicity of NY-ESO-1 antigen in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanan; Tian, Xiaoli; Leitner, Wolfgang W; Aldridge, Michael E; Zheng, Junying; Yu, Zhiya; Restifo, Nicholas P; Weiss, Richard; Scheiblhofer, Sandra; Xie, Chong; Sun, Ren; Cheng, Genhong; Zeng, Gang

    2011-10-28

    In search of intrinsic factors that contribute to the distinctively strong immunogenicity of a non-mutated cancer/testis antigen, we found that NY-ESO-1 forms polymeric structures through disulfide bonds. NY-ESO-1 binding to immature dendritic cells was dependent on its polymeric structure and involved Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) on the surface of immature dendritic cells in mouse and human. Gene gun-delivered plasmid encoding the wild-type NY-ESO-1 readily induced T cell-dependent antibody (Ab) responses in wild-type C57BL/10 mice but not TLR4-knock-out C57BL/10ScNJ mice. Disrupting polymeric structures of NY-ESO-1 by cysteine-to-serine (Cys-to-Ser) substitutions lead to diminished immunogenicity and altered TLR4-dependence in the induced Ab response. To demonstrate its adjuvant effect, NY-ESO-1 was fused with a major mugwort pollen allergen Art v 1 and a tumor-associated antigen, carbonic anhydrase 9. Plasmid DNA vaccines encoding the fusion genes generated robust immune responses against otherwise non-immunogenic targets in mice. Polymeric structure and TLR4 may play important roles in rendering NY-ESO-1 immunogenic and thus serve as a potent molecular adjuvant. NY-ESO-1 thus represents the first example of a cancer/testis antigen that is a also damage-associated molecular pattern.

  1. Polymeric Structure and Host Toll-like Receptor 4 Dictate Immunogenicity of NY-ESO-1 Antigen in Vivo*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanan; Tian, Xiaoli; Leitner, Wolfgang W.; Aldridge, Michael E.; Zheng, Junying; Yu, Zhiya; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Weiss, Richard; Scheiblhofer, Sandra; Xie, Chong; Sun, Ren; Cheng, Genhong; Zeng, Gang

    2011-01-01

    In search of intrinsic factors that contribute to the distinctively strong immunogenicity of a non-mutated cancer/testis antigen, we found that NY-ESO-1 forms polymeric structures through disulfide bonds. NY-ESO-1 binding to immature dendritic cells was dependent on its polymeric structure and involved Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) on the surface of immature dendritic cells in mouse and human. Gene gun-delivered plasmid encoding the wild-type NY-ESO-1 readily induced T cell-dependent antibody (Ab) responses in wild-type C57BL/10 mice but not TLR4-knock-out C57BL/10ScNJ mice. Disrupting polymeric structures of NY-ESO-1 by cysteine-to-serine (Cys-to-Ser) substitutions lead to diminished immunogenicity and altered TLR4-dependence in the induced Ab response. To demonstrate its adjuvant effect, NY-ESO-1 was fused with a major mugwort pollen allergen Art v 1 and a tumor-associated antigen, carbonic anhydrase 9. Plasmid DNA vaccines encoding the fusion genes generated robust immune responses against otherwise non-immunogenic targets in mice. Polymeric structure and TLR4 may play important roles in rendering NY-ESO-1 immunogenic and thus serve as a potent molecular adjuvant. NY-ESO-1 thus represents the first example of a cancer/testis antigen that is a also damage-associated molecular pattern. PMID:21900253

  2. Satellite glial cells in human trigeminal ganglia have a broad expression of functional Toll-like receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitterreiter, Johanna G; Ouwendijk, Werner J D; van Velzen, Monique; van Nierop, Gijsbert P; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Verjans, Georges M G M

    2017-07-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) orchestrate immune responses to a wide variety of danger- and pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Compared to the central nervous system (CNS), expression profile and function of TLRs in the human peripheral nervous system (PNS) are ill-defined. We analyzed TLR expression of satellite glial cells (SGCs) and microglia, glial cells predominantly involved in local immune responses in ganglia of the human PNS and normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) of the CNS, respectively. Ex vivo flow cytometry analysis of cell suspensions obtained from human cadaveric trigeminal ganglia (TG) and NAWM showed that both SGCs and microglia expressed TLR1-5, TLR7, and TLR9, although expression levels varied between these cell types. Immunohistochemistry confirmed expression of TLR1-TLR4 and TLR9 by SGCs in situ. Stimulation of TG- and NAWM-derived cell suspensions with ligands of TLR1-TLR6, but not TLR7 and TLR9, induced interleukin 6 (IL-6) secretion. We identified CD45 LOW CD14 POS SGCs and microglia, but not CD45 HIGH leukocytes and CD45 NEG cells as the main source of IL-6 and TNF-α upon stimulation with TLR3 and TLR5 ligands. In conclusion, human TG-resident SGCs express a broad panel of functional TLRs, suggesting their role in initiating and orchestrating inflammation to pathogens in human sensory ganglia. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Respiratory epithelial cells require Toll-like receptor 4 for induction of Human β-defensin 2 by Lipopolysaccharide

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    McElvaney Noel

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The respiratory epithelium is a major portal of entry for pathogens and employs innate defense mechanisms to prevent colonization and infection. Induced expression of human β-defensin 2 (HBD2 represents a direct response by the epithelium to potential infection. Here we provide evidence for the critical role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced HBD2 expression by human A549 epithelial cells. Methods Using RTPCR, fluorescence microscopy, ELISA and luciferase reporter gene assays we quantified interleukin-8, TLR4 and HBD2 expression in unstimulated or agonist-treated A549 and/or HEK293 cells. We also assessed the effect of over expressing wild type and/or mutant TLR4, MyD88 and/or Mal transgenes on LPS-induced HBD2 expression in these cells. Results We demonstrate that A549 cells express TLR4 on their surface and respond directly to Pseudomonas LPS with increased HBD2 gene and protein expression. These effects are blocked by a TLR4 neutralizing antibody or functionally inactive TLR4, MyD88 and/or Mal transgenes. We further implicate TLR4 in LPS-induced HBD2 production by demonstrating HBD2 expression in LPS non-responsive HEK293 cells transfected with a TLR4 expression plasmid. Conclusion This data defines an additional role for TLR4 in the host defense in the lung.

  4. MR imaging and T2 measurements in peripheral nerve repair with activation of Toll-like receptor 4 of neurotmesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Fang; Lu, Liejing; Li, Haojiang; Wen, Xuehua; Shen, Jun [Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2014-05-15

    To investigate the role of MR imaging in neurotmesis combined with surgical repair and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation. Forty-eight rats received subepineurial microinjection of the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS, n = 24) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS, n = 24) immediately after surgical repair of the transected sciatic nerve. Sequential fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging and quantitative T2 measurements were obtained at 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after surgery, with histologic assessments performed at regular intervals. T2 relaxation times and histological quantification of the distal stumps were measured and compared. The distal stumps of transected nerves treated with LPS or PBS both showed persistent enlargement and hyperintense signal. T2 values of the distal stumps showed a rapid rise to peak level followed by a rapid decline pattern in nerves treated with LPS, while exhibiting a slow rise to peak value followed by a slow decline in nerves treated with PBS. Nerves treated with LPS exhibited more prominent macrophage recruitment, faster myelin debris clearance and more pronounced nerve regeneration. Nerves treated with TLR4 activation had a characteristic pattern of T2 value change over time. Longitudinal T2 measurements can be used to detect the enhanced repair effect associated with TLR4 activation in the surgical repair of neurotmesis. (orig.)

  5. Toll-like receptor 2 participates in the response to lung injury in a murine model of pulmonary contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoth, J Jason; Hudson, William P; Brownlee, Noel A; Yoza, Barbara K; Hiltbold, Elizabeth M; Meredith, J Wayne; McCall, Charles E

    2007-10-01

    Blunt chest trauma resulting in pulmonary contusion with an accompanying acute inflammatory response is a common but poorly understood injury. We report that Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 participates in the inflammatory response to lung injury. To show this, we use a model of pulmonary contusion in the mouse that is similar to that observed clinically in humans based on histologic, morphologic, and biochemical criteria of acute lung injury. The inflammatory response to pulmonary contusion in our mouse model is characterized by pulmonary edema, neutrophil transepithelial migration, and increased expression of the innate immunity proinflammatory cytokines IL 1beta and IL 6, the adhesion intracellular adhesion molecule 1, and chemokine (CXC motif) ligand 1. Compared with wild-type animals, contused Tlr2(-/-) mice have significantly reduced pulmonary edema and neutrophilia. These findings are associated with decreased levels of circulating chemokine (CXC motif) ligand 1. In contrast, systemic IL 6 levels remain elevated in the TLR2-deficient phenotype. These results show that TLR2 has a primary role in the neutrophil response to acute lung injury. We suggest that an unidentified noninfectious ligand generated by pulmonary contusion acts via TLR2 to generate inflammatory responses.

  6. Genomic evidence of gene duplication and adaptive evolution of Toll like receptors (TLR2 and TLR4) in reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Shuai; Zhong, Huaming; Wu, Xiaoyang; Wei, Qinguo; Zhang, Huanxin; Chen, Jun; Chen, Yao; Tang, Xuexi; Zhang, Honghai

    2018-04-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) encoded by the TLR multigene family play an important role in initial pathogen recognition in vertebrates. Among the TLRs, TLR2 and TLR4 may be of particular importance to reptiles. In order to study the evolutionary patterns and structural characteristics of TLRs, we explored the available genomes of several representative members of reptiles. 25 TLR2 genes and 19 TLR4 genes from reptiles were obtained in this study. Phylogenetic results showed that the TLR2 gene duplication occurred in several species. Evolutionary analysis by at least two methods identified 30 and 13 common positively selected codons in TLR2 and TLR4, respectively. Most positively selected sites of TLR2 and TLR4 were located in the Leucine-rich repeat (LRRs). Branch model analysis showed that TLR2 genes were under different evolutionary forces in reptiles, while the TLR4 genes showed no significant selection pressure. The different evolutionary adaptation of TLR2 and TLR4 among the reptiles might be due to their different function in recognizing bacteria. Overall, we explored the structure and evolution of TLR2 and TLR4 genes in reptiles for the first time. Our study revealed valuable information regarding TLR2 and TLR4 in reptiles, and provided novel insights into the conservation concern of natural populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Intramyocellular ceramides and skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration are partially regulated by Toll-like receptor 4 during hindlimb unloading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Oh Sung; Nelson, Daniel S; Barrows, Katherine M; O'Connell, Ryan M; Drummond, Micah J

    2016-11-01

    Physical inactivity and disuse result in skeletal muscle metabolic disruption, including insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction. The role of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway in contributing to metabolic decline with muscle disuse is unknown. Therefore, our goal was to determine whether TLR4 is an underlying mechanism of insulin resistance, mitochondrial dysfunction, and skeletal muscle ceramide accumulation following muscle disuse in mice. To address this hypothesis, we subjected (n = 6-8/group) male WT and TLR4 -/- mice to 2 wk of hindlimb unloading (HU), while a second group of mice served as ambulatory wild-type controls (WT CON, TLR4 -/- CON). Mice were assessed for insulin resistance [homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), glucose tolerance], and hindlimb muscles (soleus and gastrocnemius) were used to assess muscle sphingolipid abundance, mitochondrial respiration [respiratory control ratio (RCR)], and NF-κB signaling. The primary finding was that HU resulted in insulin resistance, increased total ceramides, specifically Cer18:0 and Cer20:0, and decreased skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration. Importantly, TLR4 -/- HU mice were protected from insulin resistance and altered NF-κB signaling and were partly resistant to muscle atrophy, ceramide accumulation, and decreased RCR. Skeletal muscle ceramides and RCR were correlated with insulin resistance. We conclude that TLR4 is an upstream regulator of insulin sensitivity, while partly upregulating muscle ceramides and worsening mitochondrial respiration during 2 wk of HU.

  8. Toll-Like Receptor 4 in Bone Marrow-Derived Cells Contributes to the Progression of Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy (DR is a major microvascular complication in diabetics, and its mechanism is not fully understood. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of the inflammatory state during DR, and the deletion of TLR4 eventually alleviates the diabetic inflammatory state. To further elucidate the mechanism of DR, we used bone marrow transplantation to establish reciprocal chimeric animals of TLR4 mutant mice and TLR4 WT mice combined with diabetes mellitus (DM induction by streptozotocin (STZ treatment to identify the role of TLR4 in different cell types in the development of the proinflammatory state during DR. TLR4 mutation did not block the occurrence of high blood glucose after STZ injection compared with WT mice but did alleviate the progression of DR and alter the expression of the small vessel proliferation-related genes, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, and hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α. Grafting bone marrow-derived cells from TLR4 WT mice into TLR4 mutant mice increased the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and MIP-2 and increased the damage to the retina. Similarly, VEGF and HIF-1α expression were restored by the bone marrow transplantation. These findings identify an essential role for TLR4 in bone marrow-derived cells contributing to the progression of DR.

  9. Toll-like receptor 4 mediates fat, sugar, and umami taste preference and food intake and body weight regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camandola, Simonetta; Mattson, Mark P

    2017-07-01

    Immune and inflammatory pathways play important roles in the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders. This study investigated the role of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in orosensory detection of dietary lipids and sugars. Taste preferences of TLR4 knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) male mice under a standard and a high-fat, high-sugar diet were assessed with two-bottle tests. Gene expression of taste signaling molecules was analyzed in the tongue epithelium. The role of TLR4 in food intake and weight gain was investigated in TLR4 KO and WT mice fed a high-fat and high-sugar diet for 12 weeks. Compared to WT mice, TLR4 KO mice showed reduced preference for lipids, sugars, and umami in a two-bottle preference test. The altered taste perception was associated with decreased levels of key taste regulatory molecules in the tongue epithelium. TLR4 KO mice on a high-fat and high-sugar diet consumed less food and drink, resulting in diminished weight gain. TLR4 signaling promotes ingestion of sugar and fat by a mechanism involving increased preference for such obesogenic foods. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  10. Pneumococcal DNA-binding proteins released through autolysis induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines via toll-like receptor 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Kosuke; Domon, Hisanori; Maekawa, Tomoki; Oda, Masataka; Hiyoshi, Takumi; Tamura, Hikaru; Yonezawa, Daisuke; Arai, Yoshiaki; Yokoji, Mai; Tabeta, Koichi; Habuka, Rie; Saitoh, Akihiko; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Kawabata, Shigetada; Terao, Yutaka

    2018-03-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of bacterial pneumonia. Our previous study suggested that S. pneumoniae autolysis-dependently releases intracellular pneumolysin, which subsequently leads to lung injury. In this study, we hypothesized that pneumococcal autolysis induces the leakage of additional intracellular molecules that could increase the pathogenicity of S. pneumoniae. Liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry analysis identified that chaperone protein DnaK, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) were released with pneumococcal DNA by autolysis. We demonstrated that recombinant (r) DnaK, rEF-Tu, and rGAPDH induced significantly higher levels of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor production in peritoneal macrophages and THP-1-derived macrophage-like cells via toll-like receptor 4. Furthermore, the DNA-binding activity of these proteins was confirmed by surface plasmon resonance assay. We demonstrated that pneumococcal DnaK, EF-Tu, and GAPDH induced the production of proinflammatory cytokines in macrophages, and might cause host tissue damage and affect the development of pneumococcal diseases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Toll-like receptor ligands induce human T cell activation and death, a model for HIV pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Funderburg

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, heightened systemic translocation of microbial products was found in persons with chronic HIV infection and this was linked to immune activation and CD4(+ T cell homeostasis.We examined here the effects of microbial Toll-like receptor (TLR ligands on T cell activation in vitro.We show that exposure to TLR ligands results in activation of memory and effector CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells. After exposure to each of 8 different ligands that activate TLRs 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, and 9, CD8(+ T cells are activated and gain expression of the C type lectin CD69 that may promote their retention in lymphoid tissues. In contrast, CD4(+ T cells rarely increase CD69 expression but instead enter cell cycle. Despite activation and cell cycle entry, CD4(+ T cells divide poorly and instead, disproportionately undergo activation-induced cell death. Systemic exposure to TLR agonists may therefore increase immune activation, effector cell sequestration in lymphoid tissues and T cell turnover. These events may contribute to the pathogenesis of immune dysfunction and CD4+ T cell losses in chronic infection with the human immunodeficiency virus.

  12. mRNA-Mediated Gene Supplementation of Toll-Like Receptors as Treatment Strategy for Asthma In Vivo.

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    Franziska Zeyer

    Full Text Available Asthma is the most common chronic disease in childhood. Although several therapeutic options are currently available to control the symptoms, many drugs have significant side effects and asthma remains an incurable disease. Microbial exposure in early life reduces the risk of asthma and several studies have suggested protective effects of Toll-like receptor (TLR activation. We showed previously that modified mRNA provides a safe and efficient therapeutic tool for in vivo gene supplementation. Since current asthma drugs do not take patient specific immune and TLR backgrounds into consideration, treatment with tailored mRNA could be an attractive approach to account for the patient's individual asthma phenotype. Therefore, we investigated the effect of a preventative treatment with combinations of Tlr1, Tlr2 and Tlr6 mRNA in a House Dust Mite-induced mouse model of asthma. We used chemically modified mRNA which is-in contrast to conventional viral vectors-non-integrating and highly efficient in gene transfer. In our study, we found that treatment with either Tlr1/2 mRNA or Tlr2/6 mRNA, but not Tlr2 mRNA alone, resulted in better lung function as well as reduced airway inflammation in vivo. The present results point to a potentially protective effect of TLR heterodimers in asthma pathogenesis.

  13. Possible Role for Toll-Like Receptors in Interaction of Fasciola hepatica Excretory/Secretory Products with Bovine Macrophages▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Robin J.; Mulcahy, Grace

    2008-01-01

    Alternative activation of macrophages (Mφ) during helminth infection is a characteristic feature of the host immune response. Alternatively activated macrophages (AAMφ) are distinguished from others by high arginase 1 (Arg-1) activity, low nitric oxide (NO), and high interleukin 10 (IL-10) production. In murine models, these cells have been shown to possess anti-inflammatory properties. They have also been implicated in exacerbating a subsequent infection with a secondary pathogen. In this study we used cattle experimentally infected with Fasciola hepatica to monitor the kinetics of IL-4 and IL-10 over the course of infection. Using naïve Mφ in vitro, we examined the effects of exposure to F. hepatica excretory/secretory products (FhepES) alone or in combination with IL-4. Our results suggest that FhepES may work in combination with IL-4 to produce AAMφ. The effects of FhepES on the subsequent responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and purified protein derivative from Mycobacterium bovis (PPD-B), which are bovine Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR2 antagonists, respectively, were also examined. We found that Mφ stimulated with FhepES together with LPS or PPD-B have reduced NO or gamma interferon production, respectively. The ability of FhepES to produce AAMφ was found to be heat labile and partially dependent on glycan residues. A possible role for TLR recognition is discussed. PMID:18070895

  14. Role of toll-like receptors 3, 4 and 7 in cellular uptake and response to titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Chen, Koki Kanehira and Akiyoshi Taniguchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Innate immune response is believed to be among the earliest provisional cellular responses, and mediates the interactions between microbes and cells. Toll-like receptors (TLRs are critical to these interactions. We hypothesize that TLRs also play an important role in interactions between nanoparticles (NPs and cells, although little information has been reported concerning such an interaction. In this study, we investigated the role of TLR3, TLR4 and TLR7 in cellular uptake of titanium dioxide NP (TiO2 NP agglomerates and the resulting inflammatory responses to these NPs. Our data indicate that TLR4 is involved in the uptake of TiO2 NPs and promotes the associated inflammatory responses. The data also suggest that TLR3, which has a subcellular location distinct from that of TLR4, inhibits the denaturation of cellular protein caused by TiO2 NPs. In contrast, the unique cellular localization of TLR7 has middle-ground functional roles in cellular response after TiO2 NP exposure. These findings are important for understanding the molecular interaction mechanisms between NPs and cells.

  15. Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) mediates intracellular signalling in human keratinocytes in response to Malassezia furfur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroni, Adone; Orlando, Manuela; Donnarumma, Giovanna; Farro, Pietro; Iovene, Maria Rosaria; Tufano, Maria Antonietta; Buommino, Elisabetta

    2006-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are crucial players in the innate immune response to microbial invaders. The lipophilic yeast Malassezia furfur has been implicated in the triggering of scalp lesions in psoriasis. The aim of the present study was to assess the role of TLRs in the defence against M. furfur infection. The expression of the myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) gene, which is involved in the signalling pathway of many TLRs, was also analysed. In addition, a possible correlation of antimicrobial peptides of the beta-defensin family to TLRs was tested. Human keratinocytes infected with M. furfur and a variety of M. furfur-positive psoriatic skin biopsies were analysed by RT-PCR, for TLRs, MyD88, human beta-defensin 2 (HBD-2), HBD-3 and interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA expression. When keratinocytes were infected with M. furfur, an up-regulation for TLR2, MyD88, HBD-2, HBD-3 and IL-8 mRNA was demonstrated, compared to the untreated cells. The same results were obtained when psoriatic skin biopsies were analysed. The M. furfur-induced increase in HBD-2 and IL-8 gene expression is inhibited by anti-TLR2 neutralising antibodies, suggesting that TLR2 is involved in the M. furfur-induced expression of these molecules. These findings suggest the importance of TLRs in skin protection against fungi and the importance of keratinocytes as a component of innate immunity.

  16. Role of Cytokines and Toll-Like Receptors in the Immunopathogenesis of Guillain-Barré Syndrome

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    Kishan Kumar Nyati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS is an autoimmune disease of the peripheral nervous system, mostly triggered by an aberrant immune response to an infectious pathogen. Although several infections have been implicated in the pathogenesis of GBS, not all such infected individuals develop this disease. Moreover, infection with a single agent might also lead to different subtypes of GBS emphasizing the role of host factors in the development of GBS. The host factors regulate a broad range of inflammatory processes that are involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases including GBS. Evidences suggest that systemically and locally released cytokines and their involvement in immune-mediated demyelination and axonal damage of peripheral nerves are important in the pathogenesis of GBS. Toll-like receptors (TLRs link innate and adaptive immunity through transcription of several proinflammatory cytokines. TLR genes may increase susceptibility to microbial infections; an attenuated immune response towards antigen and downregulation of cytokines occurs due to mutation in the gene. Herein, we discuss the crucial role of host factors such as cytokines and TLRs that activate the immune response and are involved in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  17. Mycobacterium avium MAV2052 protein induces apoptosis in murine macrophage cells through Toll-like receptor 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang-In; Choi, Han-Gyu; Son, Yeo-Jin; Whang, Jake; Kim, Kwangwook; Jeon, Heat Sal; Park, Hye-Soo; Back, Yong Woo; Choi, Seunga; Kim, Seong-Woo; Choi, Chul Hee; Kim, Hwa-Jung

    2016-04-01

    Mycobacterium avium and its sonic extracts induce apoptosis in macrophages. However, little is known about the M. avium components regulating macrophage apoptosis. In this study, using multidimensional fractionation, we identified MAV2052 protein, which induced macrophage apoptosis in M. avium culture filtrates. The recombinant MAV2052 induced macrophage apoptosis in a caspase-dependent manner. The loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm), mitochondrial translocation of Bax, and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria were observed in macrophages treated with MAV2052. Further, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was required for the apoptosis induced by MAV2052. In addition, ROS and mitogen-activated protein kinases were involved in MAV2052-mediated TNF-α and IL-6 production. ROS-mediated activation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1)-JNK pathway was a major signaling pathway for MAV2052-induced apoptosis. Moreover, MAV2052 bound to Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 molecule and MAV2052-induced ROS production, ΔΨm loss, and apoptosis were all significantly reduced in TLR4(-/-) macrophages. Altogether, our results suggest that MAV2052 induces apoptotic cell death through TLR4 dependent ROS production and JNK pathway in murine macrophages.

  18. Monocytic Cell Activation by Nonendotoxic Glycoprotein from Prevotella intermedia ATCC 25611 Is Mediated by Toll-Like Receptor 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Shunji; Yang, Shuhua; Iki, Koichi; Hatakeyama, Junko; Tamai, Riyoko; Takeuchi, Osamu; Akashi, Sachiko; Espevik, Terje; Akira, Shizuo; Takada, Haruhiko

    2001-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) preparations from gram-negative black-pigmented bacteria such as Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia activate cells from non-LPS-responsive C3H/HeJ mice, but it is still unclear whether this activity is due to the unique structure of LPS or to a minor component(s) responsible for the activity in the preparation. A nonendotoxic glycoprotein with bioactivity against cells from C3H/HeJ mice was purified from a hot phenol-water extract of P. intermedia ATCC 25611 and designated Prevotella glycoprotein (PGP). Treatment of human monocytic THP-1 cells with 22-oxyacalcitriol (OCT) induced maturation and marked expression of CD14 on the cells, but the cells constitutively expressed Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR4 on the cells irrespective of the treatment. PGP induced a high level of interleukin-8 production at doses of 100 ng/ml and higher in OCT-treated THP-1 cells compared with Salmonella LPS, and the production was significantly inhibited by anti-CD14 and anti-TLR2 but not anti-TLR4 antibodies. Consistent with this, TLR2-deficient murine macrophages did not respond to PGP. It was also shown that PGP activity on the THP-1 cells was LPS-binding protein dependent and was inhibited by a synthetic lipid A precursor IVA. These results indicate that PGP activates monocytic cells in a CD14- and TLR2-dependent manner. PMID:11447173

  19. Expression of von Willebrand factor, pulmonary intravascular macrophages, and Toll-like receptors in lungs of septic foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Jacqueline M E; Quanstrom, Leah M; Robinson, Alex R; Wobeser, Bruce; Anderson, Stacy L; Singh, Baljit

    2017-03-30

    Sepsis causes significant mortality in neonatal foals; however, there is little data describing the cellular and molecular pathways of lung inflammation in septic foals. This study was conducted to characterize lung inflammation in septic foals. Lung tissue sections from control (n = 6) and septic (n = 17) foals were compared using histology and immunohistology. Blinded pathologic scoring of hematoxylin and eosin stained samples revealed increased features of lung inflammation such as thickened alveolar septa and sequestered inflammatory cells in septic foals. Septic foal lungs showed increased expression of von Willebrand factor in blood vessels, demonstrating vascular inflammation. Use of MAC387 antibody to detect calprotectin as a reflection of mononuclear cell infiltration revealed a significant increase in their numbers in alveolar septa of lungs from septic foals compared to those from control foals. The mononuclear cells appeared to be mature macrophages and were located in the septal capillaries, suggesting they were pulmonary intravascular macrophages (PIMs). Finally, lungs from septic foals showed increased expression of Toll-like receptor 4 and 9 in mononuclear cells relative to the control. Taken together, this study is the first to show the expression of inflammatory molecules and an increase in PIMs in lungs from foals that died from sepsis.

  20. Amniotic fluid soluble Toll-like receptor 4 in pregnancies complicated by preterm prelabor rupture of the membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacerovsky, Marian; Andrys, Ctirad; Hornychova, Helena; Pliskova, Lenka; Lancz, Kinga; Musilova, Ivana; Drahosova, Marcela; Bolehovska, Radka; Tambor, Vojtech; Jacobsson, Bo

    2012-07-01

    To determine amniotic fluid soluble Toll-like receptor 4 (sTLR4) levels in women with preterm prelabor rupture of the membranes according to the presence of microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity and histological chorioamnionitis and its relation to neonatal outcome. One hundred two women with singleton pregnancies with a gestational age between 24 + 0 and 36 + 6 weeks were included in a prospective cohort study. Amniocenteses were performed, and the concentrations of sTLR4 in the amniotic fluid were determined using sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique. Women with the presence of microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity had higher sTLR4 levels [median 54.2 ng/mL, interquartile range (IQR) 10.15-289.9] than those without this condition (median 18.1 ng/mL, IQR 8.1-29.9; p = 0.001). Women with the presence of histological chorioamnionitis had a higher sTLR4 level (median 28.0 ng/mL, IQR 11.15-178.1) compared with women without histological chorioamnionitis (median 13.0 ng/mL, IQR 7.8-28.7; p = 0.003). A mixed linear model was used to adjust for confounders. The difference was found only between women with and without microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity in this model. Microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity was associated with higher amniotic fluid sTLR4 levels independent of confounders.

  1. More than complementing Tolls: complement-Toll-like receptor synergy and crosstalk in innate immunity and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajishengallis, George; Lambris, John D

    2016-11-01

    Complement and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play key roles in the host immune response and are swiftly activated by infection or other types of immunological stress. This review focuses on the capacity of complement and TLRs to engage in signaling crosstalk, ostensibly to coordinate immune and inflammatory responses through synergistic or antagonistic (regulatory) interactions. However, overactivation or dysregulation of either system may lead-often synergistically-to exaggerated inflammation and host tissue injury. Intriguingly, moreover, certain pathogens can manipulate complement-TLR crosstalk pathways in ways that undermine host immunity and favor their persistence. In the setting of polymicrobial inflammatory disease, subversion of complement-TLR crosstalk by keystone pathogens can promote dysbiosis. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying complement-TLR crosstalk pathways can, therefore, be used productively for tailored therapeutic approaches, such as, to enhance host immunity, mitigate destructive inflammation, or counteract microbial subversion of the host response. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Fusobacterium nucleatum Potentiates Intestinal Tumorigenesis in Mice via a Toll-Like Receptor 4/p21-Activated Kinase 1 Cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yaxin; Wu, Jiao; Chen, Ting; Li, Qing; Peng, Wei; Li, Huan; Tang, Xiaowei; Fu, Xiangsheng

    2018-03-05

    The underlying pathogenic mechanism of Fusobacterium nucleatum in the carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer has been poorly understood. Using C57BL/6-Apc Min/+ mice, we investigated gut microbial structures with F. nucleatum, antibiotics, and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) antagonist TAK-242 treatment. In addition, we measured intestinal tumor formation and the expression of TLR4, p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1), phosphorylated-PAK1 (p-PAK1), phosphorylated-β-catenin S675 (p-β-catenin S675), and cyclin D1 in mice with different treatments. Fusobacterium nucleatum and antibiotics treatment altered gut microbial structures in mice. In addition, F. nucleatum invaded into the intestinal mucosa in large amounts but were less abundant in the feces of F. nucleatum-fed mice. The average number and size of intestinal tumors in F. nucleatum groups was significantly increased compared to control groups in Apc Min/+ mice (P nucleatum groups compared to the control groups (P nucleatum groups (P nucleatum groups (P Fusobacterium nucleatum potentiates intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc Min/+ mice via a TLR4/p-PAK1/p-β-catenin S675 cascade. Fusobacterium nucleatum-induced intestinal tumorigenesis can be inhibited by TAK-242, implicating TLR4 as a potential target for the prevention and therapy of F. nucleatum-related colorectal cancer.

  3. Association between Toll-like receptor 9 gene polymorphisms and risk of bacterial meningitis in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X H; Shi, H P; Li, F J

    2016-07-25

    We determined whether two common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Toll-like receptor 9 gene (TLR9) (TLR9+2848 rs352140 and TLR9-1237 rs5743836) influenced susceptibility to bacterial meningitis in a Chinese population. The study comprised 126 patients with bacterial meningitis and 252 control subjects, all of whom were recruited from the Tuberculosis Hospital of Shanxi Province. Genotyping of TLR9+2848 rs352140 and TLR9-1237 rs5743836 was performed by polymerase chain reaction coupled with restriction fragment length polymorphism. Using logistic regression analysis, we found that individuals with the AA genotype were associated with an increased risk of bacterial meningitis compared with those with the GG genotype (OR = 0.43, 95%CI = 0.19-0.95; P = 0.03). In a recessive model, the AA genotype was correlated with an elevated risk of bacterial meningitis compared with the GG+GA genotype (OR = 0.49, 95%CI = 0.22-0.99; P = 0.04). However, no significant differences were observed in the association between the TLR9-1237 rs5743836 polymorphism and the risk of bacterial meningitis in the codominant, dominant, or recessive models. In conclusion, the results of our study suggest an association between the TLR9+2848 polymorphism and a reduced risk of bacterial meningitis in the codominant and recessive models.

  4. Toll-Like Receptor Mediated Modulation of T Cell Response by Commensal Intestinal Microbiota as a Trigger for Autoimmune Arthritis

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    Rebecca Rogier

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In autoimmune diseases, a disturbance of the balance between T helper 17 (Th17 and regulatory T cells (Tregs is often observed. This disturbed balance is also the case in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Genetic predisposition to RA confers the presence of several polymorphisms mainly regulating activation of T lymphocytes. However, the presence of susceptibility factors is neither necessary nor sufficient to explain the disease development, emphasizing the importance of environmental factors. Multiple studies have shown that commensal gut microbiota is of great influence on immune homeostasis and can trigger the development of autoimmune diseases by favoring induction of Th17 cells over Tregs. However the mechanism by which intestinal microbiota influences the Th cell balance is not completely understood. Here we review the current evidence supporting the involvement of commensal intestinal microbiota in rheumatoid arthritis, along with a potential role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs in modulating the relevant Th cell responses to trigger autoimmunity. A better understanding of TLR triggering by intestinal microbiota and subsequent T cell activation might offer new perspectives for manipulating the T cell response in RA patients and may lead to the discovery of new therapeutic targets or even preventive measures.

  5. Influence of Artemisia annua L. on toll-like receptor expression in brain of mice infected with Acanthamoeba sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtkowiak-Giera, Agnieszka; Derda, Monika; Kosik-Bogacka, Danuta; Kolasa-Wołosiuk, Agnieszka; Solarczyk, Piotr; Cholewiński, Marcin; Wandurska-Nowak, Elżbieta; Jagodziński, Paweł P; Hadaś, Edward

    2018-02-01

    The treatment of acanthamoebiasis is a still a problem. Our previous studies showed that the application of extracts from Artemisia annua L. significantly prolonged the survival of mice infected by Acanthamoeba. This plant has medicinal properties in the treatment of human parasitic diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of A. annua on expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 2 and 4 in brain of mice with Acanthamoeba infection. Mice were infected with Acanthamoeba sp. strain Ac309 (KY203908) by intranasal inoculation without and after application of A. annua extract. The administration of extract from A. annua significantly reduced the level of expression of TLR2 and modified the level of expression of TLR4. A. annua extract is a natural substance that is well tolerated in animals and may be considered as a combination therapy in treatment of acanthamoebiasis. Our study suggested that A. annua extract may be used as an alternative therapeutic tool. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Toll-Like Receptor Transcriptome in the HPV-Positive Cervical Cancer Microenvironment

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    Correne A. DeCarlo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The human papillomavirus (HPV directly infects cervical keratinocytes and interferes with TLR signalling. To shed light on the effect of HPV on upstream receptors, we evaluated TLRs 1–9 gene expression in HPV-negative normal and HPV-positive pre-malignant and malignant ex vivo cervical tissue. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed separately for epithelial and stromal tissue compartments. Differences in gene expression were analyzed by the Jonckheere-Terpstra trend test or the Student's t-test for pairwise comparison. Laser capture microdissection revealed an increase in TLR3 and a decrease in TLR1 mRNA levels in dysplastic and carcinoma epithelium, respectively. In the stroma, a trend of increasing TLR 1, 2, 5, 6, and 9 mRNA levels with disease severity was found. These findings implicate the involvement of TLR3 and TLR1 in early and late cervical carcinogenesis, respectively, suggesting that stromal upregulation of TLRs may play a role in cervical disease progression.

  7. Leprosy and the adaptation of human toll-like receptor 1.

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    Sunny H Wong

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is an infectious disease caused by the obligate intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae and remains endemic in many parts of the world. Despite several major studies on susceptibility to leprosy, few genomic loci have been replicated independently. We have conducted an association analysis of more than 1,500 individuals from different case-control and family studies, and observed consistent associations between genetic variants in both TLR1 and the HLA-DRB1/DQA1 regions with susceptibility to leprosy (TLR1 I602S, case-control P = 5.7 x 10(-8, OR = 0.31, 95% CI = 0.20-0.48, and HLA-DQA1 rs1071630, case-control P = 4.9 x 10(-14, OR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.35-0.54. The effect sizes of these associations suggest that TLR1 and HLA-DRB1/DQA1 are major susceptibility genes in susceptibility to leprosy. Further population differentiation analysis shows that the TLR1 locus is extremely differentiated. The protective dysfunctional 602S allele is rare in Africa but expands to become the dominant allele among individuals of European descent. This supports the hypothesis that this locus may be under selection from mycobacteria or other pathogens that are recognized by TLR1 and its co-receptors. These observations provide insight into the long standing host-pathogen relationship between human and mycobacteria and highlight the key role of the TLR pathway in infectious diseases.

  8. Dietary Fiber Pectin Directly Blocks Toll-Like Receptor 2–1 and Prevents Doxorubicin-Induced Ileitis

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    Neha M. Sahasrabudhe

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Dietary carbohydrate fibers are known to prevent immunological diseases common in Western countries such as allergy and asthma but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Until now beneficial effects of dietary fibers are mainly attributed to fermentation products of the fibers such as anti-inflammatory short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs. Here, we found and present a new mechanism by which dietary fibers can be anti-inflammatory: a commonly consumed fiber, pectin, blocks innate immune receptors. We show that pectin binds and inhibits, toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 and specifically inhibits the proinflammatory TLR2–TLR1 pathway while the tolerogenic TLR2–TLR6 pathway remains unaltered. This effect is most pronounced with pectins having a low degree of methyl esterification (DM. Low-DM pectin interacts with TLR2 through electrostatic forces between non-esterified galacturonic acids on the pectin and positive charges on the TLR2 ectodomain, as confirmed by testing pectin binding on mutated TLR2. The anti-inflammatory effect of low-DM pectins was first studied in human dendritic cells and mouse macrophages in vitro and was subsequently tested in vivo in TLR2-dependent ileitis in a mouse model. In these mice, ileitis was prevented by pectin administration. Protective effects were shown to be TLR2–TLR1 dependent and independent of the SCFAs produced by the gut microbiota. These data suggest that low-DM pectins as a source of dietary fiber can reduce inflammation through direct interaction with TLR2–TLR1 receptors.

  9. Pulmonary Epithelial Toll-like Receptor 4 Activation leads to Lung Injury in Neonatal Necrotizing Enterocolitis1

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    Jia, Hongpeng; Sodhi, Chhinder P.; Yamaguchi, Yukihiro; Lu, Peng; Martin, Laura Y.; Good, Misty; Zhou, Qinjie; Sung, Jungeun; Fulton, William B.; Nino, Diego F.; Prindle, Thomas; Ozolek, John A.; Hackam, David J.

    2016-01-01

    We seek to define the mechanisms leading to the development of lung disease in the setting of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a life-threatening gastrointestinal disease of premature infants characterized by the sudden onset of intestinal necrosis. NEC development in mice requires activation of the lipopolysaccharide receptor toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) on the intestinal epithelium, through its effects on modulating epithelial injury and repair. Although NEC-associated lung injury is more severe than the lung injury that occurs in premature infants without NEC, the mechanisms leading to its development remain unknown. We now show that the TLR4 expression in the lung gradually increases during postnatal development, and that mice and humans with NEC-associated lung inflammation express higher levels of pulmonary TLR4 than age-matched controls. NEC in wild-type newborn mice resulted in significant pulmonary injury that was prevented by deletion of TLR4 from the pulmonary epithelium, indicating a role for pulmonary TLR4 in lung injury development. Mechanistically, intestinal epithelial TLR4 activation induced high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) release from the intestine which activated pulmonary epithelial TLR4, leading to the induction of the neutrophil recruiting C-X-C motif chemokine-5 (CXCL5) and the influx of pro-inflammatory neutrophils to the lung. Strikingly, the aerosolized administration of a novel carbohydrate TLR4 inhibitor prevented CXCL5 upregulation and blocked NEC-induced lung injury in mice. These findings illustrate the critical role of pulmonary TLR4 in the development of NEC-associated lung injury, and suggest that inhibition of this innate immune receptor in the neonatal lung may prevent this devastating complication of NEC. PMID:27307558

  10. Lack of Toll-like receptor 2 results in higher mortality of bacterial meningitis by impaired host resistance.

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    Böhland, Martin; Kress, Eugenia; Stope, Matthias B; Pufe, Thomas; Tauber, Simone C; Brandenburg, Lars-Ove

    2016-10-15

    Bacterial meningitis is - despite therapeutical progress during the last decades - still characterized by high mortality and severe permanent neurogical sequelae. The brain is protected from penetrating pathogens by both the blood-brain barrier and the innate immune system. Invading pathogens are recognized by so-called pattern recognition receptors including the Toll-like receptors (TLR) which are expressed by glial immune cells in the central nervous system. Among these, TLR2 is responsible for the detection of Gram-positive bacteria such as the meningitis-causing pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. Here, we used TLR2-deficient mice to investigate the effects on mortality, bacterial growth and inflammation in a mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis. Our results revealed a significantly increased mortality rate and higher bacterial burden in TLR2-deficient mice with pneumococcal meningitis. Furthermore, infected TLR2-deficient mice suffered from a significantly increased pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) or CCL3 chemokine expression and decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines and antimicrobial peptides. In contrast, glial cell activation assessed by glial cell marker expression was comparable to wildtype mice. Taken together, the results suggest that TLR2 is essential for an efficient immune response against Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis since lack of the receptor led to a worse outcome by higher mortality due to increased bacterial burden, weakened innate immune response and reduced expression of antimicrobial peptides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Intestinal Serotonin Transporter Inhibition by Toll-Like Receptor 2 Activation. A Feedback Modulation.

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    Eva Latorre

    Full Text Available TLR2 is a microbiota recognition receptor that has been described to contribute to intestinal homeostasis and to ameliorate inflammatory intestinal injury. In this context, serotonin (5-HT has shown to be an essential intestinal physiological neuromodulator that is also involved in intestinal inflammatory diseases. Since the interaction between TLR2 activation and the intestinal serotoninergic system remains non-investigated, our main aim was to analyze the effect of TLR2 on intestinal serotonin transporter (SERT activity and expression and the intracellular pathways involved. Caco-2/TC7 cells were used to analyze SERT and TLR2 molecular expression and SERT activity by measuring 5-HT uptake. The results showed that apical TLR2 activation inhibits SERT activity in Caco-2/TC7 cells mainly by reducing SERT protein level either in the plasma membrane, after short-term TLR2 activation or in both the plasma membrane and cell lysate, after long-term activation. cAMP/PKA pathway appears to mediate short-term inhibitory effect of TLR2 on SERT; however, p38 MAPK pathway has been shown to be involved in both short- and long-term TLR2 effect. Reciprocally, 5-HT long-term treatment yielded TLR2 down regulation in Caco-2/TC7 cells. Finally, results from in vivo showed an augmented intestinal SERT expression in mice Tlr2-/-, thus confirming our inhibitory effect of TLR2 on intestinal SERT in vitro. The present work infers that TLR2 may act in intestinal pathophysiology, not only by its inherent innate immune role, but also by regulating the intestinal serotoninergic system.

  12. Comprehensive logic based analyses of Toll-like receptor 4 signal transduction pathway.

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    Mahesh Kumar Padwal

    Full Text Available Among the 13 TLRs in the vertebrate systems, only TLR4 utilizes both Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88 and Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR-domain-containing adapter interferon-β-inducing Factor (TRIF adaptors to transduce signals triggering host-protective immune responses. Earlier studies on the pathway combined various experimental data in the form of one comprehensive map of TLR signaling. But in the absence of adequate kinetic parameters quantitative mathematical models that reveal emerging systems level properties and dynamic inter-regulation among the kinases/phosphatases of the TLR4 network are not yet available. So, here we used reaction stoichiometry-based and parameter independent logical modeling formalism to build the TLR4 signaling network model that captured the feedback regulations, interdependencies between signaling kinases and phosphatases and the outcome of simulated infections. The analyses of the TLR4 signaling network revealed 360 feedback loops, 157 negative and 203 positive; of which, 334 loops had the phosphatase PP1 as an essential component. The network elements' interdependency (positive or negative dependencies in perturbation conditions such as the phosphatase knockout conditions revealed interdependencies between the dual-specific phosphatases MKP-1 and MKP-3 and the kinases in MAPK modules and the role of PP2A in the auto-regulation of Calmodulin kinase-II. Our simulations under the specific kinase or phosphatase gene-deficiency or inhibition conditions corroborated with several previously reported experimental data. The simulations to mimic Yersinia pestis and E. coli infections identified the key perturbation in the network and potential drug targets. Thus, our analyses of TLR4 signaling highlights the role of phosphatases as key regulatory factors in determining the global interdependencies among the network elements; uncovers novel signaling connections; identifies potential drug targets for

  13. Expression of Toll-like receptors on peripheral blood white cells in acute otitis media.

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    Trzpis, Krzysztof; Kasprzycka, Edwina; Skotnicka, Bożena; Hassmann-Poznańska, Elżbieta; Wysocka, Jolanta

    2014-01-01

    From 10 to 15% of children suffer from recurrent acute otitis media (AOM). An association between polymorphism in TLRs and their co-receptor CD14 with otitis media proneness has been described in children. Moreover, the experiments on animal models have shown that TLRs and their signaling molecules are critical for timely resolution of bacterial otitis. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of TLR1, TLR2 and TLR4 on lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes in peripheral blood in children with recurrent or persistent AOM. The study was performed on a group of 25 children hospitalized for recurrent AOM, failures of previous treatments and/or acute mastoiditis. The results were compared to the control group of healthy children at the same age. The expression of TLRs on peripheral blood white cells was measured by flow cytometric analysis. The results were expressed as mean fluorescence intensity (MFI). The statistical analysis was performed using the Mann-Whitney U test. The highest expression of TLR was found on monocytes, the lowest on lymphocytes in both groups of children (AOM and the control one). The expression of TLR1 was the lowest and expression of TLR4 was the highest on all examined cells. The expression of all examined TLRs on monocytes was significantly higher in the AOM group. Peripheral blood monocytes are characterized by increased expression of TLRs in the course of recurrent AOM. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification of polymorphisms in the Toll-like receptor gene and the association with allergic rhinitis.

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    Kang, Inhong; Oh, Yeon-Kyun; Lee, Sang Heon; Jung, Ha Min; Chae, Soo-Cheon; Lee, Jae Hoon

    2010-03-01

    The TLRs gene encodes the principal innate immunity receptor in humans. The TLR2 Arg753Gln and Arg677Trp polymorphisms have been associated with a reduced response of monocytes and cell lines to challenge with mycobacteria. The TLR4 Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile polymorphisms have been associated with a reduction in the inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide in humans. It has been suggested that TLR2 and TLR4 polymorphisms may be associated with allergic responses; thus, we hypothesized that TLR2 and TLR4 polymorphisms may modify the relative risk for development of allergic rhinitis. The Taqman assay and high-resolution melt (HRM) were used for genotyping. We analyzed two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; 597T>C and 1350T>C) in the TLR2 gene and 1 SNP (4216G>C) in the TLR4 gene. We compared the genotype of these SNPs in patients with allergic rhinitis and controls without allergic rhinitis. We also estimated the haplotype frequencies between the two groups. The genotype and allele frequencies of the 597T>C and 1350T>C SNPs in the TLR2 gene were not significantly different between the patients with allergic rhinitis and controls (P > 0.05). The genotype and allele frequencies of 4216G>C in the TLR4 gene were not significantly different between the patients with allergic rhinitis and controls (P > 0.05). Haplotype analysis of the following two different (597)-(1350) major haplotypes (frequency >0.05) were present in the TLR2 gene: T-C and C-C. The C-C haplotype was positively associated with allergic rhinitis (P = 0.048). Our study suggests that the TLR2 gene polymorphisms might be susceptible to the development of allergic rhinitis. Further functional studies of TLR2 genetics in light of the associations with allergic rhinitis inflammation would help clarify the role of TLR2 genetics in clinical evaluations.

  15. Differential regulation of toll-like receptor-2, toll-like receptor-4, CD16 and human leucocyte antigen-DR on peripheral blood monocytes during mild and severe dengue fever

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    Azeredo, Elzinandes L; Neves-Souza, Patrícia C; Alvarenga, Allan R; Reis, Sônia R N I; Torrentes-Carvalho, Amanda; Zagne, Sonia-Maris O; Nogueira, Rita M R; Oliveira-Pinto, Luzia M; Kubelka, Claire F

    2010-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF), a public health problem in tropical countries, may present severe clinical manifestations as result of increased vascular permeability and coagulation disorders. Dengue virus (DENV), detected in peripheral monocytes during acute disease and in in vitro infection, leads to cytokine production, indicating that virus–target cell interactions are relevant to pathogenesis. Here we investigated the in vitro and in vivo activation of human peripheral monocytes after DENV infection. The numbers of CD14+ monocytes expressing the adhesion molecule intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) were significantly increased during acute DF. A reduced number of CD14+ human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR+ monocytes was observed in patients with severe dengue when compared to those with mild dengue and controls; CD14+ monocytes expressing toll-like receptor (TLR)2 and TLR4 were increased in peripheral blood from dengue patients with mild disease, but in vitro DENV-2 infection up-regulated only TLR2. Increased numbers of CD14+ CD16+ activated monocytes were found after in vitro and in vivo DENV-2 infection. The CD14high CD16+ monocyte subset was significantly expanded in mild dengue, but not in severe dengue. Increased plasma levels of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin (IL)-18 in dengue patients were inversely associated with CD14high CD16+, indicating that these cells might be involved in controlling exacerbated inflammatory responses, probably by IL-10 production. We showed here, for the first time, phenotypic changes on peripheral monocytes that were characteristic of cell activation. A sequential monocyte-activation model is proposed in which DENV infection triggers TLR2/4 expression and inflammatory cytokine production, leading eventually to haemorrhagic manifestations, thrombocytopenia, coagulation disorders, plasmatic leakage and shock development, but may also produce factors that act in order to control both intense

  16. Hypoxic stress up-regulates the expression of Toll-like receptor 4 in macrophages via hypoxia-inducible factor.

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    Kim, So Young; Choi, Yong Jun; Joung, Sun Myung; Lee, Byung Ho; Jung, Yi-Sook; Lee, Joo Young

    2010-04-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are germline-encoded innate immune receptors that recognize invading micro-organisms and induce immune and inflammatory responses. Deregulation of TLRs is known to be closely linked to various immune disorders and inflammatory diseases. Cells at sites of inflammation are exposed to hypoxic stress, which further aggravates inflammatory processes. We have examined if hypoxic stress modulates the TLR activity of macrophages. Hypoxia and CoCl(2) (a hypoxia mimetic) enhanced the expression of TLR4 messenger RNA and protein in macrophages (RAW264.7 cells), whereas the messenger RNA of other TLRs was not increased. To determine the underlying mechanism, we investigated the role of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) in the regulation of TLR4 expression. Knockdown of HIF-1alpha expression by small interfering RNA inhibited hypoxia-induced and CoCl(2)-induced TLR4 expression in macrophages, while over-expression of HIF-1alpha potentiated TLR4 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that HIF-1alpha binds to the TLR4 promoter region under hypoxic conditions. In addition, deletion or mutation of a putative HIF-1-binding motif in the TLR4 promoter greatly attenuated HIF-1alpha-induced TLR4 promoter reporter expression. Up-regulation of TLR4 expression by hypoxic stress enhanced the response of macrophages to lipopolysaccharide, resulting in increased expression of cyclooxygenase-2, interleukin-6, regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted, and interferon-inducible protein-10. These results demonstrate that TLR4 expression in macrophages is up-regulated via HIF-1 in response to hypoxic stress, suggesting that hypoxic stress at sites of inflammation enhances susceptibility to subsequent infection and inflammatory signals by up-regulating TLR4.

  17. Bacille Calmette-Guerin can induce cellular apoptosis of urothelial cancer directly through toll-like receptor 7 activation

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    Dah-Shyong Yu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy using bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG instillation is the mainstay treatment modality for superficial urothelial cancer (UC through toll-like receptor (TLR activation of cognitive immune response. We investigated the roles of TLR7 in the activation of apoptosis in UC cells after BCG treatment. The in vitro cytotoxicity effect of BCG on UC cells was measured by a modified 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazo-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium assay. Expressions of TLR7 mRNA and protein in native UC cells prior to and after BCG treatment were analyzed using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot methods. Phagocytotic processes after BCG treatment in UC cells were observed microscopically using a specific immunostain, subsequent cellular apoptosis-related signals induced by TLR7 were analyzed by western blot. Low-grade UC cells, TSGH8301, showed significant cellular death (4.23-fold higher than the high-grade UC cells T24 and J82 when treated with BCG and the BCG cytotoxicity was displayed in a dose–time-dependent manner. TSGH8301 cells had the highest content of TLR7 mRNA, 7.2- and 4.5-fold higher than that of T24 and J82 cells, respectively. TLR7 protein expression was also significantly increased in TSGH8301 cells. Phagocytosis-related markers, including beclin 1, ATG2, and LC3, were increased when TSGH8301 cells were treated by BCG. Interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinases 2 and 4 were also increased markedly in TSGH8301 cells. On the contrary, cellular apoptosis of TSGH8301 cells decreased by 34% when TLR7 activation was suppressed by the TLR antagonist IRS661 after BCG treatment. Our findings suggest that well differentiated TCC cells have higher expression of TLR7 and BCG can drive cellular death of TCC cells directly via TLR7 activation and related apoptotic pathway.

  18. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Inhibition Improves Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Health in Isoproterenol-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy in Rats

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    Parmeshwar B. Katare

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundInflammation remains a crucial factor for progression of cardiac diseases and cardiac hypertrophy remains an important cause of cardiac failure over all age groups. As a key regulator of inflammation, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 plays an important role in pathogenesis of cardiac diseases. Being an important regulator of innate immunity, the precise pathway of TLR4-mediated cardiac complications is yet to be established. Therefore, the primary objective of the present study was to find the role of TLR4 in cardiac hypertrophy and the molecular mechanism thereof.MethodsCardiac hypertrophy was induced with administration of isoproterenol (5 mg/kg/day, sc. TLR4 receptor inhibitor RS-LPS (lipopolysaccharide from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides; 5 μg/day and agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS (from Escherichia coli; 3.12 μg/day were administered through osmotic pump along with isoproterenol. Cardiac hypertrophy as well as oxidative stress and mitochondrial parameters were evaluated.ResultsCardiac hypertrophy was confirmed with increased heart weight/body weight ratio as well as assessment of hypertrophic markers in heart. There was a marked increase in the TLR4 expression and oxidative stress along with mitochondrial dysfunction in ISO group. TLR4 inhibition significantly decreased heart weight/body weight ratio and ANP, collagen, and β-MHC expression and restored the disturbed cellular antioxidant flux. The mitochondrial perturbations that were observed in hypertrophy heart was normalized after administration of TLR4 inhibitor but not with the agonist. TLR4 agonism further exaggerated the oxidative stress in heart and hence accelerated the disease development and progression.ConclusionOur data show that increased TLR4 ligand pool in cardiac hypertrophy may exaggerate the disease progression. However, inhibition of TLR4 attenuated cardiac hypertrophy through reduced cardiac redox imbalance and mitochondrial

  19. Origin and consequences of brain Toll-like receptor 4 pathway stimulation in an experimental model of depression

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    Madrigal José LM

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a pressing need to identify novel pathophysiological pathways relevant to depression that can help to reveal targets for the development of new medications. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4 has a regulatory role in the brain's response to stress. Psychological stress may compromise the intestinal barrier, and increased gastrointestinal permeability with translocation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS from Gram-negative bacteria may play a role in the pathophysiology of major depression. Methods Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to chronic mild stress (CMS or CMS+intestinal antibiotic decontamination (CMS+ATB protocols. Levels of components of the TLR-4 signaling pathway, of LPS and of different inflammatory, oxidative/nitrosative and anti-inflammatory mediators were measured by RT-PCR, western blot and/or ELISA in brain prefrontal cortex. Behavioral despair was studied using Porsolt's test. Results CMS increased levels of TLR-4 and its co-receptor MD-2 in brain as well as LPS and LPS-binding protein in plasma. In addition, CMS also increased interleukin (IL-1β, COX-2, PGE2 and lipid peroxidation levels and reduced levels of the anti-inflammatory prostaglandin 15d-PGJ2 in brain tissue. Intestinal decontamination reduced brain levels of the pro-inflammatory parameters and increased 15d-PGJ2, however this did not affect depressive-like behavior induced by CMS. Conclusions Our results suggest that LPS from bacterial translocation is responsible, at least in part, for the TLR-4 activation found in brain after CMS, which leads to release of inflammatory mediators in the CNS. The use of Gram-negative antibiotics offers a potential therapeutic approach for the adjuvant treatment of depression.

  20. Toll-like receptor 3 is critical for coxsackievirus B4-induced type 1 diabetes in female NOD mice.

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    McCall, Kelly D; Thuma, Jean R; Courreges, Maria C; Benencia, Fabian; James, Calvin B L; Malgor, Ramiro; Kantake, Noriko; Mudd, William; Denlinger, Nathan; Nolan, Bret; Wen, Li; Schwartz, Frank L

    2015-02-01

    Group B coxsackieviruses (CVBs) are involved in triggering some cases of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). However, the molecular mechanism(s) responsible for this remain elusive. Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), a receptor that recognizes viral double-stranded RNA, is hypothesized to play a role in virus-induced T1DM, although this hypothesis is yet to be substantiated. The objective of this study was to directly investigate the role of TLR3 in CVB-triggered T1DM in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, a mouse model of human T1DM that is widely used to study both spontaneous autoimmune and viral-induced T1DM. As such, we infected female wild-type (TLR3(+/+)) and TLR3 knockout (TLR3(-/-)) NOD mice with CVB4 and compared the incidence of diabetes in CVB4-infected mice with that of uninfected counterparts. We also evaluated the islets of uninfected and CVB4-infected wild-type and TLR3 knockout NOD mice by immunohistochemistry and insulitis scoring. TLR3 knockout mice were markedly protected from CVB4-induced diabetes compared with CVB4-infected wild-type mice. CVB4-induced T-lymphocyte-mediated insulitis was also significantly less severe in TLR3 knockout mice compared with wild-type mice. No differences in insulitis were observed between uninfected animals, either wild-type or TLR3 knockout mice. These data demonstrate for the first time that TLR3 is 1) critical for CVB4-induced T1DM, and 2) modulates CVB4-induced insulitis in genetically prone NOD mice.

  1. Toll-like receptor 9 agonist IMO cooperates with cetuximab in K-ras mutant colorectal and pancreatic cancers.

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    Rosa, Roberta; Melisi, Davide; Damiano, Vincenzo; Bianco, Roberto; Garofalo, Sonia; Gelardi, Teresa; Agrawal, Sudhir; Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Scarpa, Aldo; Bardelli, Alberto; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2011-10-15

    K-Ras somatic mutations are a strong predictive biomarker for resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors in patients with colorectal and pancreatic cancer. We previously showed that the novel Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) agonist immunomodulatory oligonucleotide (IMO) has a strong in vivo activity in colorectal cancer models by interfering with EGFR-related signaling and synergizing with the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab. In the present study, we investigated, both in vitro and in vivo, the antitumor effect of IMO alone or in combination with cetuximab in subcutaneous colon and orthotopic pancreatic cancer models harboring K-Ras mutations and resistance to EGFR inhibitors. We showed that IMO was able to significantly restore the sensitivity of K-Ras mutant cancer cells to cetuximab, producing a marked inhibition of cell survival and a complete suppression of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, when used in combination with cetuximab. IMO interfered with EGFR-dependent signaling, modulating the functional interaction between TLR9 and EGFR. In vivo, IMO plus cetuximab combination caused a potent and long-lasting cooperative antitumor activity in LS174T colorectal cancer and in orthotopic AsPC1 pancreatic cancer. The capability of IMO to restore cetuximab sensitivity was further confirmed by using K-Ras mutant colorectal cancer cell models obtained through homologous recombination technology. We showed that IMO markedly inhibits growth of K-Ras mutant colon and pancreatic cancers in vitro and in nude mice and cooperates with cetuximab via multiple mechanisms of action. Therefore, we propose IMO plus cetuximab as a therapeutic strategy for K-Ras wild-type as well for K-Ras mutant, cetuximab-resistant colorectal and pancreatic cancers. ©2011 AACR.

  2. Toll-like receptor 3 activation impairs excitability and synaptic activity via TRIF signalling in immature rat and human neurons.

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    Ritchie, Louise; Tate, Rothwell; Chamberlain, Luke H; Robertson, Graham; Zagnoni, Michele; Sposito, Teresa; Wray, Selina; Wright, John A; Bryant, Clare E; Gay, Nicholas J; Bushell, Trevor J

    2018-03-02

    Toll like receptor 3 (TLR3) belongs to a family of pattern recognition receptors that recognise molecules found on pathogens referred to as pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Its involvement in innate immunity is well known but despite its presence in the central nervous system (CNS), our knowledge of its function is limited. Here, we have investigated whether TLR3 activation modulates synaptic activity in primary hippocampal cultures and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons. Synaptically driven spontaneous action potential (AP) firing was significantly reduced by the TLR3 specific activator, poly I:C, in a concentration-dependent manner following both short (5 min) and long exposures (1h) in rat hippocampal cultures. Notably, the consequence of TLR3 activation on neuronal function was reproduced in iPSC-derived cortical neurons, with poly I:C (25 μg/ml, 1h) significantly inhibiting sAP firing. We examined the mechanisms underlying these effects, with poly I:C significantly reducing peak sodium current, an effect dependent on the MyD88-independent TRIF dependent pathway. Furthermore, poly I:C (25 μg/ml, 1h) resulted in a significant reduction in miniature excitatory postsynaptic potential (mEPSC) frequency and amplitude and significantly reduced surface AMPAR expression. These novel findings reveal that TLR3 activation inhibits neuronal excitability and synaptic activity through multiple mechanisms, with this being observed in both rat and human iPSC-derived neurons. These data might provide further insight into how TLR3 activation may contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders following maternal infection and in patients with increased susceptibility to herpes simplex encephalitis. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Use of Toll-Like Receptor Agonists to Induce Ectopic Lymphoid Structures in Myasthenia Gravis Mouse Models

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    Robinet, Marieke; Villeret, Bérengère; Maillard, Solène; Cron, Mélanie A.; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Le Panse, Rozen

    2017-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease mediated by autoantibodies against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) at the neuromuscular junction. MG symptoms are characterized by muscle weaknesses. The thymus of MG patients is very often abnormal and possesses all the characteristics of tertiary lymphoid organs such as neoangiogenesis processes, overexpression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and infiltration of B lymphocytes leading to ectopic germinal center (GC) development. We previously demonstrated that injections of mice with polyinosinic–polycytidylic acid [Poly(I:C)], a synthetic double-stranded RNA mimicking viral infection, induce thymic changes and trigger MG symptoms. Upon Poly(I:C) injections, we observed increased thymic expressions of α-AChR, interferon-β and chemokines such as CXCL13 and CCL21 leading to B-cell recruitment. However, these changes were only transient. In order to develop an experimental MG model associated with thymic GCs, we used Poly(I:C) in the classical experimental autoimmune MG model induced by immunizations with purified AChR emulsified in complete Freund’s adjuvant. We observed that Poly(I:C) strongly favored the development of MG as almost all mice displayed MG symptoms. Nevertheless, we did not observe any ectopic GC development. We next challenged mice with Poly(I:C) together with other toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists known to be involved in GC development and that are overexpressed in MG thymuses. Imiquimod and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides that activate TLR7 and TLR9, respectively, did not induce thymic changes. In contrast, lipopolysaccharide that activates TLR4 potentiated Poly(I:C) effects and induced a significant expression of CXCL13 mRNA in the thymus associated with a higher recruitment of B cells that induced over time thymic B-lymphoid structures. Altogether, these data suggest that tertiary lymphoid genesis in MG thymus could result from a combined activation of TLR signaling pathways. PMID

  4. Toll-like receptor 4 regulates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation and lactation insufficiency in a mouse model of mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Danielle J; Hutchinson, Mark R; Ingman, Wendy V

    2014-05-01

    Lactation mastitis is a debilitating inflammatory breast disease in postpartum women. Disease severity is associated with markers of inflammation rather than bacterial load, suggesting that immune-signaling pathways activated in the host are important in the disease pathology. The role of the innate pattern recognition receptor toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in progression and resolution of mastitislike disease was investigated in a mouse model. Lipopolysaccharide in Matrigel (10 μg/10 μl) was administered into the teat canal of lactating Tlr4 null mutant and wild-type mice to induce a localized area of inflammation. Mastitis induction resulted in a marked influx of RB6-positive neutrophils and F4/80-positive macrophages, which was higher in Tlr4(-/-) mice compared to wild-type mice. Tlr4 null mutation resulted in an altered immune-signaling fingerprint following induction of mastitis, with attenuated serum cytokines, including CXCL1, CCL2, interleukin 1 beta, and tumor necrosis factor alpha compared to wild-type mice. In both genotypes, the localized area of inflammation had resolved after 7 days, and milk protein was evident. However, the mammary glands of wild-type mice exhibited reduced capacity for milk production, with decreased percent area populated with glandular epithelium and decreased abundance of nuclear phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 compared to Tlr4 null mice. This study demonstrates that inflammatory pathways activated in the host are critically important in mastitis disease progression and suggests that lactation insufficiency associated with mastitis may be a consequence of TLR4-mediated inflammation, rather than the bacterial infection itself.

  5. Toll-like receptor 2 expression is decreased on alveolar macrophages in cigarette smokers and COPD patients

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    Zabel Peter

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backround Cigarette smoke exposure including biologically active lipopolysaccharide (LPS in the particulate phase of cigarette smoke induces activation of alveolar macrophages (AM and alveolar epithelial cells leading to production of inflammatory mediators. This represents a crucial mechanism in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Respiratory pathogens are a major cause of exacerbations leading to recurrent cycles of injury and repair. The interaction between pathogen-associated molecular patterns and the host is mediated by pattern recognition receptors (PRR's. In the present study we characterized the expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR- 2, TLR4 and CD14 on human AM compared to autologous monocytes obtained from patients with COPD, healthy smokers and non-smokers. Methods The study population consisted of 14 COPD patients without evidence for acute exacerbation, 10 healthy smokers and 17 healthy non-smokers stratified according to age. The expression of TLR2, TLR4 and CD14 surface molecules on human AM compared to autologous monocytes was assessed ex vivo using FACS analysis. In situ hybridization was performed on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL cells by application of the new developed HOPE-fixative. Results The expression of TLR2, TLR4 and CD14 on AM from COPD patients, smokers and non-smokers was reduced as compared to autologous monocytes. Comparing AM we detected a reduced expression of TLR2 in COPD patients and smokers. In addition TLR2 mRNA and protein expression was increased after LPS stimulation on non-smokers AM in contrast to smokers and COPD patients. Conclusion Our data suggest a smoke related change in the phenotype of AM's and the cellular response to microbial stimulation which may be associated with impairment of host defenses in the lower respiratory tract.

  6. Opposing roles of Toll-like receptor and cytosolic DNA-STING signaling pathways for Staphylococcus aureus cutaneous host defense.

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    Philip O Scumpia

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Successful host defense against pathogens requires innate immune recognition of the correct pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs by pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs to trigger the appropriate gene program tailored to the pathogen. While many PRR pathways contribute to the innate immune response to specific pathogens, the relative importance of each pathway for the complete transcriptional program elicited has not been examined in detail. Herein, we used RNA-sequencing with wildtype and mutant macrophages to delineate the innate immune pathways contributing to the early transcriptional response to Staphylococcus aureus, a ubiquitous microorganism that can activate a wide variety of PRRs. Unexpectedly, two PRR pathways-the Toll-like receptor (TLR and Stimulator of Interferon Gene (STING pathways-were identified as dominant regulators of approximately 95% of the genes that were potently induced within the first four hours of macrophage infection with live S. aureus. TLR signaling predominantly activated a pro-inflammatory program while STING signaling activated an antiviral/type I interferon response with live but not killed S. aureus. This STING response was largely dependent on the cytosolic DNA sensor cyclic guanosine-adenosine synthase (cGAS. Using a cutaneous infection model, we found that the TLR and STING pathways played opposite roles in host defense to S. aureus. TLR signaling was required for host defense, with its absence reducing interleukin (IL-1β production and neutrophil recruitment, resulting in increased bacterial growth. In contrast, absence of STING signaling had the opposite effect, enhancing the ability to restrict the infection. These results provide novel insights into the complex interplay of innate immune signaling pathways triggered by S. aureus and uncover opposing roles of TLR and STING in cutaneous host defense to S. aureus.

  7. Silencing of renal DNaseI in murine lupus nephritis imposes exposure of large chromatin fragments and activation of Toll like receptors and the Clec4e

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    Thiyagarajan, Dhivya; Fismen, Silje; Seredkina, Natalya

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that transformation of mild lupus nephritis into end-stage disease is imposed by silencing of renal DNaseI gene expression in (NZBxNZW)F1 mice. Down-regulation of DNaseI results in reduced chromatin fragmentation, and in deposition of extracellular chromatin-IgG complexes...... Toll like receptors and the necrosis-related Clec4e receptor in murine and human lupus nephritis. Furthermore, analyses where performed to determine if matrix metalloproteases are up-regulated as a consequence of chromatin-mediated Toll like receptors/Clec4e stimulation. Mouse and human mRNA expression...... but less pronounced in patients with lupus nephritis treated with immunosuppresants. In conclusion, silencing of renal DNaseI gene expression initiates a cascade of inflammatory signals leading to progression of both murine and human lupus nephritis. Principal component analyses biplot of data from murine...

  8. The role of MAPK in CD4{sup +} T cells toll-like receptor 9-mediated signaling following HHV-6 infection

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    Chi, Jing [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu Province (China); Wang, Fang [Department of Laboratory Medicine, the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu Province (China); Li, Lingyun [Department of Developmental Genetics, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu Province (China); Feng, Dongju [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu Province (China); Qin, Jian [College of Foreign Languages, Hehai University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu Province (China); Xie, Fangyi; Zhou, Feng; Chen, Yun; Wang, Jinfeng [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu Province (China); Yao, Kun, E-mail: yaokun@njmu.edu.cn [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2012-01-05

    Human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) is an important immunosuppressive and immunomodulatory virus that primarily infects immune cells (mainly CD4{sup +} T cells) and strongly suppresses the proliferation of infected cells. Toll-like receptors are pattern-recognition receptors essential for the development of an appropriate innate immune defense against infection. To understand the role of CD4{sup +} T cells in the innate response to HHV-6 infection and the involvement of TLRs, we used an in vitro infection model and observed that the infection of CD4{sup +} T cells resulted in the activation of JNK/SAPK via up-regulation of toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). Associated with JNK activation, annexin V-PI staining indicated that HHV-6A was a strong inducer of apoptosis. Apoptotic response associated cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-{alpha} also induced by HHV-6A infection.

  9. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Gene Polymorphism C1196T in Polish Women with Postmenopausal Osteoporosis - Preliminary Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaleta, Beata; Walicka, Magdalena; Sawicka, Ada; Bogołowska-Stieblich, Agata; Górski, Andrzej; Łukaszkiewicz, Jacek; Marcinowska-Suchowierska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis is a systemic bone disease characterized by low bone mass after menopause. Bone remodeling is regulated by a number of factors, including the immune system. Toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4) are expressed on bone cells and modify the immune response. TLR4 gene polymorphism may take part in the development of chronic inflammation in women after menopause, which is the cause of severe bone resorption. To examine the frequency of TLR4 C1196T genotypes in postmenopausal osteoporotic and non-osteoporotic Polish women and to investigate the possible relationship between C1196T polymorphism, bone mineral density (BMD) and the incidence of osteoporotic fractures in this group of patients. The study involved 40 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis and 63 healthy postmenopausal non-osteoporotic women. BMD measurements were performed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood. Genotyping was performed by real-time PCR using LightSNiP tests with SimpleProbe probes. Melting curve analysis of PCR amplicons enabled the identification of individual C1196T genotypes. C1196T genotype frequencies in the osteoporotic group were 88% for CC and 12% for CT. In the control group, respectively 86% and 14%. We did not observe the TT genotype. There was no association of C1196T genotypes and BMD nor the incidence of fractures but there was a correlation between genotypes and body height (p=0.035, r=0.415). Homozygous subjects for the C-allele had a lower body height with respect to heterozygous subjects. It is unlikely that TLR4 C1196T polymorphism is related to bone mineral density and fracture incidence in Polish osteoporotic women after menopause. However, our data suggests that the C allele may be associated with lower body height in this group. Due to the small number of participants, our observations should be considered as preliminary. Larger studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  10. Oestrous cycle-related changes in production of Toll-like receptors and prostaglandins in the canine endometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, E; Henriques, S; Brito, S; Ferreira-Dias, G; Lopes-da-Costa, L; Mateus, L

    2012-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the following events in the canine endometrium over the course of the oestrous cycle: (i) the transcriptional profiles of genes encoding the Toll-like receptors (TLR1-TLR7 and TLR9); (ii) the transcription and protein expression levels of TLR2 and TLR4; (iii) the gene transcription profile of prostaglandin synthesis enzymes (PTGS2, PGES and PGFS); (iv) the response pattern of PGF(2α) and PGE(2) following exposure of endometrial explants to LPS and LTA. TLR1-TLR7 and TLR9 genes were transcribed in the endometrium of bitches throughout the oestrous cycle, which indicates that TLR-mediated immune surveillance is an important component of the defence mechanisms within the uterus. Canine endometrial mRNA and protein expression of TLR2 and TLR4 was up-regulated at the late dioestrus and anoestrus and was the lowest in the follicular phase and early dioestrus. The decreased mRNA and protein levels observed at early dioestrus may favour implantation, but may also be linked to the high prevalence of pyometra at this stage of the oestrous cycle. After LPS and LTA stimulation, endometrial explants produced more PGF(2α) than PGE(2), which may be related to the early demise of the corpus luteum observed in vivo in canine pyometra cases. Overall, these results indicate that TLRs are involved in the activation of the inflammatory response associated with pyometra in the bitch. TLRs may therefore be therapeutic targets for the control of uterine bacterial infections in the bitch and potentially in other species. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Toll-Like Receptor 5 Agonist Entolimod Mitigates Lethal Acute Radiation Syndrome in Non-Human Primates.

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    Vadim I Krivokrysenko

    Full Text Available There are currently no approved medical radiation countermeasures (MRC to reduce the lethality of high-dose total body ionizing irradiation expected in nuclear emergencies. An ideal MRC would be effective even when administered well after radiation exposure and would counteract the effects of irradiation on the hematopoietic system and gastrointestinal tract that contribute to its lethality. Entolimod is a Toll-like receptor 5 agonist with demonstrated radioprotective/mitigative activity in rodents and radioprotective activity in non-human primates. Here, we report data from several exploratory studies conducted in lethally irradiated non-human primates (rhesus macaques treated with a single intramuscular injection of entolimod (in the absence of intensive individualized supportive care administered in a mitigative regimen, 1-48 hours after irradiation. Following exposure to LD50-70/40 of radiation, injection of efficacious doses of entolimod administered as late as 25 hours thereafter reduced the risk of mortality 2-3-fold, providing a statistically significant (P<0.01 absolute survival advantage of 40-60% compared to vehicle treatment. Similar magnitude of survival improvement was also achieved with drug delivered 48 hours after irradiation. Improved survival was accompanied by predominantly significant (P<0.05 effects of entolimod administration on accelerated morphological recovery of hematopoietic and immune system organs, decreased severity and duration of thrombocytopenia, anemia and neutropenia, and increased clonogenic potential of the bone marrow compared to control irradiated animals. Entolimod treatment also led to reduced apoptosis and accelerated crypt regeneration in the gastrointestinal tract. Together, these data indicate that entolimod is a highly promising potential life-saving treatment for victims of radiation disasters.

  12. Differential cell reaction upon Toll-like receptor 4 and 9 activation in human alveolar and lung interstitial macrophages

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    Meyerhans Andreas

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigations on pulmonary macrophages (MΦ mostly focus on alveolar MΦ (AM as a well-defined cell population. Characteristics of MΦ in the interstitium, referred to as lung interstitial MΦ (IM, are rather ill-defined. In this study we therefore aimed to elucidate differences between AM and IM obtained from human lung tissue. Methods Human AM and IM were isolated from human non-tumor lung tissue from patients undergoing lung resection. Cell morphology was visualized using either light, electron or confocal microscopy. Phagocytic activity was analyzed by flow cytometry as well as confocal microscopy. Surface marker expression was measured by flow cytometry. Toll-like receptor (TLR expression patterns as well as cytokine expression upon TLR4 or TLR9 stimulation were assessed by real time RT-PCR and cytokine protein production was measured using a fluorescent bead-based immunoassay. Results IM were found to be smaller and morphologically more heterogeneous than AM, whereas phagocytic activity was similar in both cell types. HLA-DR expression was markedly higher in IM compared to AM. Although analysis of TLR expression profiles revealed no differences between the two cell populations, AM and IM clearly varied in cell reaction upon activation. Both MΦ populations were markedly activated by LPS as well as DNA isolated from attenuated mycobacterial strains (M. bovis H37Ra and BCG. Whereas AM expressed higher amounts of inflammatory cytokines upon activation, IM were more efficient in producing immunoregulatory cytokines, such as IL10, IL1ra, and IL6. Conclusion AM appear to be more effective as a non-specific first line of defence against inhaled pathogens, whereas IM show a more pronounced regulatory function. These dissimilarities should be taken into consideration in future studies on the role of human lung MΦ in the inflammatory response.

  13. Expression of toll-like receptors in the pancreas of recent-onset fulminant type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, Saeko; Imagawa, Akihisa; Tauriainen, Sisko; Iino, Morio; Oikarinen, Maarit; Abiru, Hitoshi; Tamaki, Keiji; Seino, Hiroaki; Nishi, Katsuhiro; Takase, Izumi; Okada, Yoshikatsu; Uno, Sae; Murase-Mishiba, Yuko; Terasaki, Jungo; Makino, Hideichi; Shimomura, Iichiro; Hyöty, Heikki; Hanafusa, Toshiaki

    2010-01-01

    Fulminant type 1 diabetes, established in 2000, is defined as a novel subtype of diabetes mellitus that results from remarkably acute and almost complete destruction of pancreatic beta cells at the disease onset. In this study, we aimed to clarify the pathogenesis of fulminant type 1 diabetes with special reference to insulitis and viral infection. We examined pancreatic autopsy samples from three patients who had died soon after the onset of disease and analyzed these by immunohistochemistry and in situ-hybridization. The results were that both beta and alpha cell areas were significantly decreased in comparison with those of normal controls. Mean beta cell area of the patients just after the onset was only 0.00256 % while that of normal control was 1.745 %. Macrophages and T cells-but no natural killer cells-had infiltrated the islets and the exocrine pancreas. Although both of them had massively infiltrated, macrophages dominated islet infiltration and were detected in 92.6 % of the patients' islets. Toll-like receptor (TLR) 3, a sensor of viral components, was detected in 84.7+/- 7.0 % of T cells and 62.7+/- 32.3 % of macrophages (mean+/- SD) in all three patients. TLR7 and TLR9 were also detected in the pancreas of all three patients. Enterovirus RNA was detected in beta-cell positive islets in one of the three patients by in situ-hybridization. In conclusion, our results suggest that macrophage-dominated insulitis rather than T cell autoimmunity contributes to beta cell destruction in fulminant type 1 diabetes.

  14. Expression of Toll-like receptors and their detection of nuclear self-antigen leading to immune activation in JSLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgley, Angela; Thorbinson, Colin; Beresford, Michael W

    2012-05-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) essential in the functioning of the immune system have been implicated in the development of autoimmunity. TLR3, 7, 8 and 9 are capable of recognizing nucleic autoantigens typical of SLE. Their expression correlates positively with disease activity in adult-onset SLE. This study aimed to determine the role of TLRs in JSLE and whether apoptotic neutrophils are a source of nuclear autoantigen being detected through TLR3, 7, 8 and 9, leading to an inflammatory response. TLR3, 7, 8 and 9 mRNA and protein expression were measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in JSLE patients compared with JIA and non-inflammatory controls. Activation of the TLRs by JSLE serum-induced apoptotic neutrophils was detected by measuring IFN-α mRNA and protein expression, and confirmed using myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) and TIR domain-containing adapter-inducing IFN-β (TRIF) inhibitors. JSLE patients have increased TLR3, 8 and 9 mRNA and protein expression compared with controls (P < 0.05). Incubation of PBMCs with apoptotic neutrophils demonstrated a dose-response relationship for IFN-α mRNA expression. Inhibition of TLR signalling by blocking MyD88 and TRIF signalling decreased IFN-α mRNA expression in PBMCs incubated with apoptotic neutrophils (P < 0.05). This study demonstrated significantly increased TLR expression in JSLE compared with controls. Our data indicate that apoptotic neutrophils trigger TLR activation through their presentation of autoantigens. The role of TLRs in this inflammatory response was demonstrated by a dose-response relationship to apoptotic neutrophil concentration and confirmed by a decrease in IFN-α production after inhibition of TLR signalling.

  15. Toll-like receptor 2 -196 to -174 del polymorphism influences the susceptibility of Han Chinese people to Alzheimer's disease

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    Mao Cai-Xia

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 represents a reasonable functional and positional candidate gene for Alzheimer's disease (AD as it is located under the linkage region of AD on chromosome 4q, and functionally is involved in the microglia-mediated inflammatory response and amyloid-β clearance. The -196 to -174 del polymorphism affects the TLR2 gene and alters its promoter activity. Methods We recruited 800 unrelated Northern Han Chinese individuals comprising 400 late-onset AD (LOAD patients and 400 healthy controls matched for gender and age. The -196 to -174 del polymorphism in the TLR2 gene was genotyped using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR method. Results There were significant differences in genotype (P = 0.026 and allele (P = 0.009 frequencies of the -196 to -174 del polymorphism between LOAD patients and controls. The del allele was associated with an increased risk of LOAD (OR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.07-1.60, Power = 84.9%. When these data were stratified by apolipoprotein E (ApoE ε4 status, the observed association was confined to ApoE ε4 non-carriers. Logistic regression analysis suggested an association of LOAD with the polymorphism in a recessive model (OR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.13-2.39, Bonferroni corrected P = 0.03. Conclusions Our data suggest that the -196 to -174 del/del genotype of TLR2 may increase risk of LOAD in a Northern Han Chinese population.

  16. Toll-like receptor -1, -2, and -6 polymorphisms and pulmonary tuberculosis susceptibility: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Yuxiang Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A large number of studies have investigated whether polymorphisms in the Toll-like receptor (TLR genes are implicated in susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB in different populations. However, the results are inconsistent and inconclusive. METHODS: A literature search was conducted using the PubMed, EMBASE, Medline (Ovid, ISI Web of Knowledge and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI. A meta-analysis on the associations between the TLR1 G1805T, TLR2 T597C, T1350C, G2258A, and TLR6 C745T polymorphisms and TB risk was carried out by comparison using different genetic models. RESULTS: In total, 16 studies from 14 articles were included in this review. In meta-analysis, significant associations were observed between the TLR2 2258AA (AA vs. AG+AG, OR 5.82, 95% CI 1.30-26.16, P = 0.02 and TLR6 745TT (TT vs. CT+CC, OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.39-0.97, P = 0.04 polymorphisms and TB risk. In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, Africans and American Hispanic subjects with the TLR1 1805T allele had an increased susceptibility, whereas Asian and European subjects with the TLR2 2258A allele had an increased susceptibility to TB. CONCLUSIONS: The meta-analysis indicated that TLR2 G2258A is associated with increased TB risk, especially in Asians and Europeans. TLR1 G1805T is associated with increased TB in Africans and American Hispanics. TLR6 C745T is associated with decreased TB risk. Our systematic review and meta-analysis reported an interesting preliminary conclusion, but this must be validated by future large-scale and functional studies in different populations.

  17. Aminobisphosphonates and Toll-like receptor ligands: recruiting Vγ9Vδ2 T cells for the treatment of hematologic malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyan, S; Wesch, D; Kabelitz, D

    2011-01-01

    Gamma delta (γδ) T cells are intrinsically important for preventing the development and progression of hematologic cancers. These innate T cells are particularly suited for the application of cancer therapy due to the fact they: 1) recognize transformed cells independent of antigen processing or presentation by classical MHC molecules, and 2) embody the anti-tumour effector functions of both NK cells and cytotoxic T cells. It was serendipitously discovered that aminobisphosphonates (ABP), a class of drugs used as adjuvant cancer therapy for the treatment of malignant osteolytic bone disease, have the unexpected side-effect of potently activating the antitumour effector functions of human peripheral γδ T cells. Such beneficial therapeutic synergisms are rare, and no time has been wasted to determine how to best harness the anti-cancer potential of γδ T cells and ABP. Despite promising experimental results, the full clinical potential of this immunotherapeutic strategy has been hampered by the subversive strategies employed by cancer cells to obstruct activation of anti-tumour immune responses. These include the promotion of regulatory T cells (Tregs) that maintain tumour tolerance and the corruption of dendritic cell (DC) function and maturation. Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists have a long history of breaking free of tumour-induced immune-suppression by resetting DC function and abrogating Treg induced tolerance. This review presents data to support the notion that TLR signalling may perfectly complement the anti-tumour synergy of ABP and activated γδ T cells, and this combined innate artillery could provide the necessary ammunition to topple malignancy's stronghold on the immune system.

  18. Curcumin attenuates morphine antinociceptive tolerance through suppressing up-regulation of spinal Toll-like receptor 4 in rats

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    Fei GAO

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effects of curcumin (Cur on activation of spinal Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 and on the chronic antinociceptive tolerance of morphine. Methods Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats with successful intrathecal catheterization were randomly divided into four groups (n=15: saline (NS group; morphine (MOR group; curcumin (Cur group and morphine plus curcumin (MOR+Cur group. A morphine tolerance model of rats was induced by intrathecal injection of morphine 15μg, once a day for 7 consecutive days in MOR and MOR+Cur group; 100μg curcumin was administered intrathecally once a day for 7 consecutive days in Cur and MOR+Cur group, 10μl saline was administered intrathecally once a day for 7 consecutive days in NS group. The effect of curcumin intrathecal catheterization on morphine antinociceptive tolerance was explored by the tail flick latency (TFL method and mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT, and then the maximum possible potential effect (MPE was calculated. The immunofluorescence staining method was applied to detect the effect of curcumin on the activation of lumbar spinal microglia. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to evaluate the effect of curcumin on the expression of mRNA and protein of spinal TLR4. Results The %MPE TFL and %MPE MWT increased significantly in MOR+Cur group than in MOR group (P0.05. The lumbar spinal microglia increased markedly and the expressions of polyclonal antibody IBA-1 and TLR4 were significantly up-regulated in MOR group than in NS group (P0.05. Conclusion Curcumin may attenuate chronic morphine antinociceptive tolerance through inhibiting spinal TLR4 up-regulation. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.12.06

  19. miR210 modulates respiratory burst in Apostichopus japonicus coelomocytes via targeting Toll-like receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenghua; Zhao, Mengru; Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Weiwei; Zhao, Xuelin; Duan, Xuemei; Xu, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Immune responses of species in Echinodermata remains mysterious due to the lack of efforts made in the study of host defense mechanism in these species. More researches start focusing on this ancient immune system with the recognition the economic values of several species in this phylum, especially sea cucumbers. Here, we reported a study in the innate immunity of a sea cucumber species (Apostichopus japonicus) in response to infection of Vibrio splendidus. A novel differential expressed miRNA (miR-210) from the diseased sea cucumber coelomocytes was identified in our study. This miRNA molecule modulates Toll-like receptor gene (AjToll) expression via binding 3'UTR region from 906 nt to 930 nt. Upon the challenge of V. splendidus, coelomocytes in A. japonicas demonstrated a upregulation of AjToll but a downregulation of miR-210. Transfection of miR-210 agomirs in coelomocytes significantly depressed the expression of AjToll in cells. As a result of AjToll expression inhibition by miR-210, the AjToll downstream molecules involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) were also altered in vivo. This ROS pathway alternation was consistent with that caused by knockdown of AjToll through small inference RNA (siRNA). Taken together, the results of this study demonstrated a novel immune regulatory pathway via miRN-210 in A. japonica, which provides basic knowledge in exploring innate immunity of Echinodermata, and also can be reference in disease control in sea cucumber culture industry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Primary sensory neurons regulate Toll-like receptor-4-dependent activity of glial cells in dorsal root ganglia.

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    Tse, K-H; Chow, K B S; Leung, W K; Wong, Y H; Wise, H

    2014-10-24

    Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) has been identified in primary sensory neurons, both in vivo and in vitro, but is reportedly absent from satellite glial cells (SGCs). Herein we reveal that, in rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG), SGCs do express TLR4 but this expression is inhibited by direct contact with neurons. Thus, TLR4 mRNA and protein is strongly up-regulated in isolated DRG glial cells in the absence of neurons. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increased cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) mRNA expression with greater efficacy in DRG glial cell cultures than in mixed DRG cell cultures containing TLR4-positive neurons. Using an insert co-culture system, we have shown that neuronal inhibition of glial cell TLR4 is likely to be dependent on cell-cell contact rather than diffusible factors from neurons. LPS stimulated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production from DRG glial cells in a TLR4- and COX-2-dependent manner. In addition, exogenous PGE2 potentiated LPS-stimulated COX-2 mRNA while inhibiting TNFα mRNA expression by DRG cells, suggestive of a complex regulatory system to control inflammation within the DRG. In addition to LPS, conditioned medium from heat-shocked DRG neurons also increased COX-2 mRNA expression in DRG glial cells in a partially TLR4-dependent manner. We therefore hypothesize that neuronal suppression of glial TLR4 activity is a protective mechanism to prevent uncontrolled inflammation within the DRG. Under conditions where DRG neuronal viability is compromised, DRG glial cells become responsive to PAMPs (pathogen-associated molecular patterns) and DAMPs (danger-associated molecular patterns) and generate a range of classical inflammatory responses. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Growth performance, reproductive traits and offspring survivability of genetically modified rams overexpressing toll-like receptor 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yu-Chang; Han, Hong-Bing; Song, Xu-Ting; Deng, Shou-Long; Liu, Yu-Feng; Lu, Ming-Hai; Zhang, Yun-Hai; Qi, Mei-Yu; He, Hai-Juan; Wang, Su-Mei; Liu, Guo-Shi; Li, Wu; Lian, Zheng-Xing

    2017-07-01

    Genetic modification provides a means to enhancing disease resistance in animals. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a member of the TLR family, is critical for the recognition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/endotoxin from Gram-negative bacteria by host immune cells, which initiates cell activation and subsequently triggers a proinflammatory response to the invading pathogens. In this study, the first generation of genetically modified (GM) sheep overexpressing TLR4 was produced by microinjection for better disease resistance. Compared with wild-type (WT) rams, the GM rams have similar growth performance, basic semen quality and spermatozoon ultrastructure. The offspring birth rates after cervical artificial insemination were also similar between GM (90.32%) and WT (92.38%) rams. Overall, the presence and expression of the TLR4 transgene in the genome did not appear to interfere with normal semen production, reproductive traits and the ability of transgene transmission to offspring. The expression levels of TLR4, tumor necrosis factor and interferon gamma genes in monocyte/macrophages from GM sheep were significantly higher than that from WT sheep at early stages after LPS stimulation. The GM offspring born from the founder transgenic ram inseminated ewes had similar survival rate with WT offspring (88.89% vs 84.86%) at weaning. The TLR4 transgene showed no deleterious effects on growth performance, reproductive traits and offspring survivability of GM rams. Therefore, the GM sheep overexpressing TLR4 provide a powerful experimental model for analyzing function of TLR4 in vivo during infection and inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Roles of Toll-like Receptor 7 and 8 in Prevention of Intrauterine Transmission of Hepatitis B Virus

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    Ting Tian

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Approximately 5% of newborns were infected by hepatitis B virus (HBV via intrauterine transmission, but most of the infants born to HBV-positive mothers are protected from infection. However, the mechanisms by which intrauterine transmission is avoided remain elusive, and the roles of toll-like receptors (TLRs have been proposed. The aims of this study were to clarify if TLR 7 and 8 are involved in the prevention of intrauterine transmission of HBV. Methods: Real time polymerase-chain reaction (PCR was used to determine the expression of TLRs and cytokines in placenta and trophoblasts. The expression of MyD88 was interfered with small interfering RNA (siRNA in trophoblasts. An in intro model mimicking trophoblast barrier was established to evaluate the effect of MyD88 siRNA on HBV transmission across trophoblast barrier. Results: There were significant differences in placental expression of TLR7 (F=3.263, P=0.048 and TLR8 (F=3.257, P=0.048 among control (HBV-negative women, non-infected group (HBV-positive women whose infants were not infected and infected group (HBV-positive women whose infants were infected. The expression of TLR7 was significantly higher in non-infected group than infected group (P=0.039 and control (P=0.043. There was a significant difference in TLR8 expression between non-infected group and control (P=0.014, and the difference was close to but not significant (P=0.074 between non-infected and infected groups. Exposure of trophoblast to HBV significantly induced the expression of TLR7 (PConclusions: TLR7 and TLR8 on trophoblastic cells play an important role in the prevention of intrauterine HBV transmission by inhibiting HBV translocation across trophoblast.

  3. Toll-like receptor 2 promotes neurogenesis from the dentate gyrus after photothrombotic cerebral ischemia in mice.

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    Seong, Kyung-Joo; Kim, Hyeong-Jun; Cai, Bangrong; Kook, Min-Suk; Jung, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Won-Jae

    2018-03-01

    The subgranular zone (SGZ) of hippocampal dentate gyrus (HDG) is a primary site of adult neurogenesis. Toll-like receptors (TLRs), are involved in neural system development of Drosophila and innate immune response of mammals. TLR2 is expressed abundantly in neurogenic niches such as adult mammalian hippocampus. It regulates adult hippocampal neurogenesis. However, the role of TLR2 in adult neurogenesis is not well studied in global or focal cerebral ischemia. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the role of TLR2 in adult neurogenesis after photochemically induced cerebral ischemia. At 7 days after photothrombotic ischemic injury, the number of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cells was increased in both TLR2 knock-out (KO) mice and wild-type (WT) mice. However, the increment rate of BrdU-positive cells was lower in TLR2 KO mice compared to that in WT mice. The number of doublecortin (DCX) and neuronal nuclei (NeuN)-positive cells in HDG was decreased after photothrombotic ischemia in TLR2 KO mice compared to that in WT mice. The survival rate of cells in HDG was decreased in TLR2 KO mice compared to that in WT mice. In contrast, the number of cleaved-caspase 3 (apoptotic marker) and the number of GFAP (glia marker)/BrdU double-positive cells in TLR2 KO mice were higher than that in WT mice. These results suggest that TLR2 can promote adult neurogenesis from neural stem cell of hippocampal dentate gyrus through increasing proliferation, differentiation, and survival from neural stem cells after ischemic injury of the brain.

  4. Orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) toll-like receptor 22: molecular characterization, expression pattern and pertinent signaling pathways.

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    Ding, Xu; Lu, Dan-qi; Hou, Qing-hua; Li, Shui-sheng; Liu, Xiao-chun; Zhang, Yong; Lin, Hao-ran

    2012-09-01

    The toll-like receptors (TLRs) are an important gene family in host innate immunologic surveillance. The TLR22 gene is an essential member of the TLRs that is only found in aquatic animals and has been detected in some bony fish. Here, a TLR22 homolog, EcTLR22, was characterized in the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) via homology cloning. The 3321 bp full-length cDNA sequence of EcTLR22 was obtained, which included an open reading frame of 2880 bp encoding a putative peptide of 960 amino acids containing three highly typical domains with the characteristics of TLR family members. The deduced amino acid sequence of EcTLR22 showed a relatively high similarity to flounder TLR22. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the orange-spotted grouper TLR22 sequence was clustered with those of Perciforme, such as flounder and croaker. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed broad expression of EcTLR22, with relatively high expression detected in the head kidney, trunk kidney, spleen, peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) and heart of orange-spotted grouper. After injection with Vibrio alginolyticus, there was significant up-regulation of the expression of EcTLR22 in the spleen. In evaluating unstimulated/stimulated head kidney leukocytes and spleen leukocytes, a significant increase in EcTLR22 mRNA expression was detected, which implied a sensitive immune response. Furthermore, four important molecules for signal transduction, MyD88, TRIF, TNF-α and IRF3, were chosen to analyze the role of the EcTLR22 signaling pathway in anti-pathogen responses. Upon LPS or Poly I:C challenge, expression of the four genes was induced, with an increasing tendency detected in head kidney leukocytes, suggesting that the four genes might work with EcTLR22 in host defense against pathogenic microbes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Whole genome sequencing of an African American family highlights toll like receptor 6 variants in Kawasaki disease susceptibility.

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    Jihoon Kim

    Full Text Available Kawasaki disease (KD is the most common acquired pediatric heart disease. We analyzed Whole Genome Sequences (WGS from a 6-member African American family in which KD affected two of four children. We sought rare, potentially causative genotypes by sequentially applying the following WGS filters: sequence quality scores, inheritance model (recessive homozygous and compound heterozygous, predicted deleteriousness, allele frequency, genes in KD-associated pathways or with significant associations in published KD genome-wide association studies (GWAS, and with differential expression in KD blood transcriptomes. Biologically plausible genotypes were identified in twelve variants in six genes in the two affected children. The affected siblings were compound heterozygous for the rare variants p.Leu194Pro and p.Arg247Lys in Toll-like receptor 6 (TLR6, which affect TLR6 signaling. The affected children were also homozygous for three common, linked (r2 = 1 intronic single nucleotide variants (SNVs in TLR6 (rs56245262, rs56083757 and rs7669329, that have previously shown association with KD in cohorts of European descent. Using transcriptome data from pre-treatment whole blood of KD subjects (n = 146, expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL analyses were performed. Subjects homozygous for the intronic risk allele (A allele of TLR6 rs56245262 had differential expression of Interleukin-6 (IL-6 as a function of genotype (p = 0.0007 and a higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate at diagnosis. TLR6 plays an important role in pathogen-associated molecular pattern recognition, and sequence variations may affect binding affinities that in turn influence KD susceptibility. This integrative genomic approach illustrates how the analysis of WGS in multiplex families with a complex genetic disease allows examination of both the common disease-common variant and common disease-rare variant hypotheses.

  6. Toll-like receptor-2 agonist-allergen coupling efficiently redirects Th2 cell responses and inhibits allergic airway eosinophilia.

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    Krishnaswamy, Jayendra Kumar; Jirmo, Adan Chari; Baru, Abdul Mannan; Ebensen, Thomas; Guzmán, Carlos A; Sparwasser, Tim; Behrens, Georg M N

    2012-12-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists beneficially modulate allergic airway inflammation. However, the efficiency of TLR agonists varies considerably, and their exact cellular mechanisms (especially of TLR 2/6 agonists) are incompletely understood. We investigated at a cellular level whether the administration of the pharmacologically improved TLR2/6 agonist S-[2,3-bispalmitoyiloxy-(2R)-propyl]-R-cysteinyl-amido-monomethoxy polyethylene glycol (BPP) conjugated to antigenic peptide (BPP-OVA) could divert an existing Th2 response and influence airway eosinophilia. The effects of BPP-OVA on airway inflammation were assessed in a classic murine sensitization/challenge model and an adoptive transfer model, which involved the adoptive transfer of in vitro differentiated ovalbumin (OVA)-specific Th2 cells. Functional T-cell stimulation by lung dendritic cells (DCs) was determined both in vitro and in vivo, combined with a cytokine secretion analysis. A single mucosal application of BPP-OVA efficiently delivered antigen, led to TLR2-mediated DC activation, and resulted in OVA-specific T-cell proliferation via lung DCs in vivo. In alternative models of allergic airway disease, a single administration of BPP-OVA before OVA challenge (but not BPP alone) significantly reduced airway eosinophilia, most likely through altered antigen-specific T-cell stimulation via DCs. Analyses of adoptively transferred Th2-biased cells after BPP-OVA administration in vivo suggested that BPP-OVA guides antigen-specific Th2 cells to produce significantly higher amounts of IFN-γ upon allergen challenge. In conclusion, our data show for the first time that a single mucosal administration of a TLR 2/6 agonist-allergen conjugate can provoke IFN-γ responses in Th2-biased cells and alleviate allergic airway inflammation.

  7. Whole-blood gene expression profiling in ankylosing spondylitis shows upregulation of toll-like receptor 4 and 5.

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    Assassi, Shervin; Reveille, John D; Arnett, Frank C; Weisman, Michael H; Ward, Michael M; Agarwal, Sandeep K; Gourh, Pravitt; Bhula, Jiten; Sharif, Roozbeh; Sampat, Keeran; Mayes, Maureen D; Tan, Filemon K

    2011-01-01

    to identify differentially expressed genes in peripheral blood cells (PBC) of patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) relative to healthy controls and controls with systemic inflammation. we investigated PBC samples of 16 patients with AS and 14 matched controls, in addition to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and systemic sclerosis (SSc) samples utilizing Illumina Human Ref-8 BeadChips. Candidate genes were confirmed using quantitative PCR. Subsequently, these genes were also validated in a separate sample of 27 patients with AS [before and after anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) treatment] and 27 matched controls. we identified 83 differentially expressed transcripts between AS patients and controls. This gene list was filtered through the lists of differentially expressed transcripts in SLE and SSc, which resulted in identification of 52 uniquely dysregulated transcripts in AS. Many of the differentially expressed genes belonged to Toll-like receptor (TLR) and related pathways. TLR4 and TLR5 were the only dysregulated TLR subtypes among AS patients. We confirmed the overexpression of TLR4 and TLR5 in AS patients in comparison to controls (p = 0.012 and p = 0.006, respectively) and SLE (p = 0.002, p = 0.008) using quantitative PCR in the same sample. Similarly, TLR4 (p = 0.007) and TLR5 (p = 0.012) were significantly upregulated among the AS patients before anti-TNF treatment in the confirmatory sample. TLR4 (p = 0.002) and TLR5 (p = 0.025) decreased significantly after anti-TNF treatment. PBC gene expression profiling in AS shows an upregulation of TLR4 and TLR5. This supports the importance of TLR subtypes in the pathogenesis of AS that are responsible for the immune response to Gram-negative bacteria.

  8. Transcript Profiling of Toll-Like Receptor mRNAs in Selected Tissues of Mink (Neovison vison).

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    Tong, Mingwei; Yi, Li; Cheng, Yuening; Zhang, Miao; Cao, Zhigang; Wang, Jianke; Zhao, Hang; Lin, Peng; Yang, Yong; Cheng, Shipeng

    2016-12-28

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) can recognize conserved molecular patterns and initiate a wide range of innate and adaptive immune responses against invading infectious agents. The aim of this study was to assess the transcript profile of mink TLRs (mTLRs) in mink peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and a range of tissues, and to explore the potential role of mTLRs in the antiviral immune response process. The results indicated that the mTLR partial nucleotide sequences had a high degree of nucleotide identity with ferret sequences (95-98%). Phylogenetic analysis showed that mammalian TLRs grouped into five TLR families, with a closer relationship of the mTLRs with those of ferret than the other mammalian sequences. Moreover, all the mTLRs were ubiquitously expressed in lymphoid organs (spleen and lymph nodes) and PBMCs. Interestingly, the mTLR expression patterns in lung, uterus, and heart showed quite a lot of similarity. Another remarkable observation was the wide expression of mTLR1-3 mRNAs in all tissues. Among the analyzed tissues, skeletal muscle was revealed to being the lowest repertoire of mTLR expression. Additionally, mink PBMCs exposed to the canine distemper virus revealed significant upregulation of mTLR2, mTLR4, mTLR7, and mTLR8 mRNAs, indicating that mTLRs have a role in innate immunity in the mink. Collectively, our results are the first to establish the basic expression patterns of mTLRs and the relationship between mTLRs and a virus, which will contribute to better understanding of the evolution and the functions of mTLRs in the innate immune system in minks.

  9. Development of effective tumor immunotherapy using a novel dendritic cell-targeting Toll-like receptor ligand.

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    Nadeeka H De Silva

    Full Text Available Although dendritic cell (DC-based immunotherapy shows little toxicity, improvements should be necessary to obtain satisfactory clinical outcome. Using interferon-gamma injection along with DCs, we previously obtained significant clinical responses against small or early stage malignant tumors in dogs. However, improvement was necessary to be effective to largely developed or metastatic tumors. To obtain effective methods applicable to those tumors, we herein used a DC-targeting Toll-like receptor ligand, h11c, and examined the therapeutic effects in murine subcutaneous and visceral tumor models and also in the clinical treatment of canine cancers. In murine experiments, most and significant inhibition of tumor growth and extended survival was observed in the group treated with the combination of h11c-activated DCs in combination with interferon-gamma and a cyclooxygenase2 inhibitor. Both monocytic and granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells were significantly reduced by the combined treatment. Following the successful results in mice, the combined treatment was examined against canine cancers, which spontaneously generated like as those in human. The combined treatment elicited significant clinical responses against a nonepithelial malignant tumor and a malignant fibrous histiocytoma. The treatment was also successful against a bone-metastasis of squamous cell carcinoma. In the successful cases, the marked increase of tumor-responding T cells and decrease of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells was observed in their peripheral blood. Although the combined treatment permitted the growth of lung cancer of renal carcinoma-metastasis, the marked elevated and long-term maintaining of the tumor-responding T cells was observed in the patient dog. Overall, the combined treatment gave rise to emphatic amelioration in DC-based cancer therapy.

  10. Curcumin Modulates Macrophage Polarization Through the Inhibition of the Toll-Like Receptor 4 Expression and its Signaling Pathways

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    Yaoyao Zhou

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Curcumin, the active ingredient in curcuma rhizomes, has a wide range of therapeutic effects. However, its atheroprotective activity in human acute monocytic leukemia THP-1 cells remains unclear. We investigated the activity and molecular mechanism of action of curcumin in polarized macrophages. Methods: Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA-treated THP-1 cells were differentiated to macrophages, which were further polarized to M1 cells by lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 1 µg/ml and interferon (IFN-γ (20 ng/ml and treated with varying curcumin concentrations. [3H]thymidine (3H-TdR incorporation assays were utilized to measure curcumin-induced growth inhibition. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a, interleukin (IL-6, and IL-12B (p40 were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Macrophage polarization and its mechanism were evaluated by flow cytometry and western blot. Additionally, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 small interfering RNA and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK inhibitors were used to further confirm the molecular mechanism of curcumin on macrophage polarization. Results: Curcumin dose-dependently inhibited M1 macrophage polarization and the production of TNF-a, IL-6, and IL-12B (p40. It also decreased TLR4 expression, which regulates M1 macrophage polarization. Furthermore, curcumin significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of ERK, JNK, p38, and nuclear factor (NF-γB. In contrast, SiTLR4 in combination with p-JNK, p-ERK, and p-p38 inhibition reduced the effect of curcumin on polarization. Conclusions: Curcumin can modulate macrophage polarization through TLR4-mediated signaling pathway inhibition, indicating that its effect on macrophage polarization is related to its anti-inflammatory and atheroprotective effects. Our data suggest that curcumin could be used as a therapeutic agent in atherosclerosis.

  11. Blockade of Toll-like receptor 2 prevents spontaneous cytokine release from rheumatoid arthritis ex vivo synovial explant cultures

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nic An Ultaigh, Sinead

    2011-02-23

    Abstract Introduction The aim of this study was to examine the effect of blocking Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial cells. Methods RA synovial tissue biopsies, obtained under direct visualization at arthroscopy, were established as synovial explant cultures ex vivo or snap frozen for immunohistology. Mononuclear cell cultures were isolated from peripheral blood and synovial fluid of RA patients. Cultures were incubated with the TLR1\\/2 ligand, Pam3CSK4 (200 ng, 1 and 10 μg\\/ml), an anti-TLR2 antibody (OPN301, 1 μg\\/ml) or an immunoglobulin G (IgG) (1 μg\\/ml) matched control. The comparative effect of OPN301 and adalimumab (anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha) on spontaneous release of proinflammatory cytokines from RA synovial explants was determined using quantitative cytokine MSD multiplex assays or ELISA. OPN301 penetration into RA synovial tissue explants cultures was assessed by immunohistology. Results Pam3CSK4 significantly upregulated interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 in RA peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), RA synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs) and RA synovial explant cultures (P < 0.05). OPN301 significantly decreased Pam3CSK4-induced cytokine production of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-1β, IL-6, interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-8 compared to IgG control in RA PBMCs and SFMCs cultures (all P < 0.05). OPN301 penetration of RA synovial tissue cultures was detected in the lining layer and perivascular regions. OPN301 significantly decreased spontaneous cytokine production of TNF-α, IL-1β, IFN-γ and IL-8 from RA synovial tissue explant cultures (all P < 0.05). Importantly, the inhibitory effect of OPN on spontaneous cytokine secretion was comparable to inhibition by anti-TNFα monoclonal antibody adalimumab. Conclusions These findings further support targeting TLR2 as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of RA.

  12. Association of toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway with steroid-induced femoral head osteonecrosis in rats.

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    Tian, Lei; Zhou, Dong-Sheng; Wang, Kun-Zheng; Zhang, Wei; Shi, Zhi-Bin; Fan, Li-Hong; Sun, Shui

    2014-10-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is frequently observed in patients treated with excessive corticosteroids. However, the pathogenesis of corticosteroid-induced osteonecrosis remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway in steroid-induced femoral head osteonecrosis in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intramuscularly with 20 mg/kg methylprednisolone (MP) for 8 weeks, twice per week. The animals were sacrificed at 2, 4 and 8 weeks after the last MP injection, respectively, and then allocated to the 2-, 4- and 8-week model groups (n=24 each). Rats in the control group (n=12) were not given any treatment. Histopathological analysis was performed and the concentration of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) in plasma was determined. The activation of osteoclasts in the femoral head was assessed by TRAP staining. The expression of TLR4, MyD88, TRAF6 and NF-κB p65 that are involved in TLR4 signaling, and MCP-1 production were detected by using real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blotting. The results showed that the osteonecrosis in the femoral head was clearly observed and the concentration of TRAP in the plasma was increased in the model rats. The femoral head tissues in MP-treated rats were positive for TRAP and the intensity of TRAP staining was greater in MP-treated rats than in control rats. As compared with the control group, the mRNA expression of TLR4 signaling-related factors was enhanced significantly at 4 and 8 weeks, and the protein levels of these factors increased significantly with time. It was concluded that MP could induce the femoral head osteonecrosis in rats, which was associated with osteoclast activation via the TLR4 signaling pathway. These findings suggest that TLR4 signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of steroid-induced osteonecrosis.

  13. Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein Induces Inflammatory Responses in Cultured Human Mast Cells Via Toll-Like Receptor 4

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    Zhe Meng

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL is a powerful atherogen. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 has a pathophysiological role in regulating inflammatory responses and atherosclerosis. Mast cells can infiltrate into the atheromatous plaque and secrete various pro-inflammatory cytokines, which significantly amplify the atherogenic processes and promote plaque vulnerability. Small interfering RNA (siRNA is an effective method to silence the target genes. We evaluated whether ox-LDL-induced inflammation depended in part on the activation of TLR4-dependent signaling pathways in a cultured human mast cell line (HMC-1. Method: HMC-1 cells were cultured, and treated with ox-LDL, TLR4-specific siRNA, or inhibitors of phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB, a critical mediator of inflammation. The expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a and interleukin 6 (IL-6 was measured subsequently. Results: Ox-LDL increased the expression of TLR4 and secretion of MCP-1, TNF-a and IL-6. Moreover, ox-LDL stimulated the translocation of NF-κB, from the cytoplasm to nucleus. Additionally, phosphorylation of MAPK was greatly increased. These ox-LDL-induced alterations were significantly attenuated by pretreatment with TLR4-specific siRNA. Conclusion: Ox-LDL induced inflammatory responses in cultured HMC-1 cells including NF-κB nuclear translocation and phosphorylation of MAPKs, a process mediated in part by TLR4.

  14. High glucose induces inflammatory cytokine through protein kinase C-induced toll-like receptor 2 pathway in gingival fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Shao-Yun; Wei, Cong-Cong; Shang, Ting-Ting; Lian, Qi; Wu, Chen-Xuan; Deng, Jia-Yin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► High glucose significantly induced TLR2 expression in gingival fibroblasts. ► High glucose increased NF-κB p65 nuclear activity, IL-1β and TNF-α levels. ► PKC-α/δ-TLR2 pathway is involved in periodontal inflammation under high glucose. -- Abstract: Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a key role in innate immune response and inflammation, especially in periodontitis. Meanwhile, hyperglycemia can induce inflammation in diabetes complications. However, the activity of TLRs in periodontitis complicated with hyperglycemia is still unclear. In the present study, high glucose (25 mmol/l) significantly induced TLR2 expression in gingival fibroblasts (p < 0.05). Also, high glucose increased nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 nuclear activity, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-lβ (IL-1β) levels. Protein kinase C (PKC)-α and δ knockdown with siRNA significantly decreased TLR2 and NF-κB p65 expression (p < 0.05), whereas inhibition of PKC-β had no effect on TLR2 and NF-κB p65 under high glucose (p < 0.05). Additional studies revealed that TLR2 knockdown significantly abrogated high-glucose-induced NF-κB expression and inflammatory cytokine secretion. Collectively, these data suggest that high glucose stimulates TNF-α and IL-1β secretion via inducing TLR2 through PKC-α and PKC-δ in human gingival fibroblasts.

  15. Viral double-strand RNA-binding proteins can enhance innate immune signaling by toll-like Receptor 3.

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    Yvonne Lai

    Full Text Available Toll-like Receptor 3 (TLR3 detects double-stranded (ds RNAs to activate innate immune responses. While poly(I:C is an excellent agonist for TLR3 in several cell lines and in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, viral dsRNAs tend to be poor agonists, leading to the hypothesis that additional factor(s are likely required to allow TLR3 to respond to viral dsRNAs. TLR3 signaling was examined in a lung epithelial cell line by quantifying cytokine production and in human embryonic kidney cells by quantifying luciferase reporter levels. Recombinant 1b hepatitis C virus polymerase was found to enhance TLR3 signaling in the lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells when added to the media along with either poly(I:C or viral dsRNAs. The polymerase from the genotype 2a JFH-1 HCV was a poor enhancer of TLR3 signaling until it was mutated to favor a conformation that could bind better to a partially duplexed RNA. The 1b polymerase also co-localizes with TLR3 in endosomes. RNA-binding capsid proteins (CPs from two positive-strand RNA viruses and the hepadenavirus hepatitis B virus (HBV were also potent enhancers of TLR3 signaling by poly(I:C or viral dsRNAs. A truncated version of the HBV CP that lacked an arginine-rich RNA-binding domain was unable to enhance TLR3 signaling. These results demonstrate that several viral RNA-binding proteins can enhance the dsRNA-dependent innate immune response initiated by TLR3.

  16. Dynamic Toll-like receptor expression predicts outcome of sclerotherapy for lymphatic malformations with OK-432 in children.

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    Reismann, Marc; Ghaffarpour, Nader; Luvall, Ethel; Jirmo, Adan C; Winqvist, Ola; Radtke, Josephine; Wester, Tomas; Claesson, Gösta

    2014-03-01

    Sclerotherapy with OK-432 is recommended as a first-line treatment for lymphatic malformations. However, 40% of patients show poor response, defined by involution to OK-432 effect is highly dependent on the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4-dependent expression of TLR7 in antigen-presenting cells. We hypothesized that the ability for TLR expression in monocytes after treatment with the TLR4-ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS) can be used to predict successful OK-432 treatment. Blood was taken from children with low responder (LR, n = 6) and high responder (HR, n = 5) of previous OK-432 treatment. Monocytes were stimulated with LPS for 20 h. TLR expression was analyzed with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (mean fluorescence intensity). The level of significance was P ≤ 0.05. The mean age of patients in the HR group was 1.4 ± 0.9 y and in the LR group 2.8 ± 2.9 y (P = 0.31). The mean TLR4 upregulation after LPS stimulation in the HR group was significantly higher than in the LR group (factor 3.6 versus factor 1 compared with nonstimulated controls; P = 0.037). The mean TLR7 expression did not show significant differences between the groups. Dynamic TLR4 expression represents most probably a predictive parameter for the treatment of lymphatic malformations with OK-432 and should be further investigated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Campylobacter jejuni induces acute enterocolitis in gnotobiotic IL-10-/- mice via Toll-like-receptor-2 and -4 signaling.

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    Lea-Maxie Haag

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of foodborne bacterial enterocolitis worldwide. Investigation of immunopathology is hampered by a lack of suitable vertebrate models. We have recently shown that gnotobiotic mice as well as conventional IL-10(-/- animals are susceptible to C. jejuni infection and develop intestinal immune responses. However, clinical symptoms of C. jejuni infection were rather subtle and did not reflect acute bloody diarrhea seen in human campylobacteriosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to overcome these limitations we generated gnotobiotic IL-10(-/- mice by quintuple antibiotic treatment starting right after weaning. The early treatment was essential to prevent these animals from chronic colitis. Following oral infection C. jejuni colonized the gastrointestinal tract at high levels and induced acute enterocolitis within 7 days as indicated by bloody diarrhea and pronounced histopathological changes of the colonic mucosa. Immunopathology was further characterized by increased numbers of apoptotic cells, regulatory T-cells, T- and B-lymphocytes as well as elevated TNF-α, IFN-γ, and MCP-1 concentrations in the inflamed colon. The induction of enterocolitis was specific for C. jejuni given that control animals infected with a commensal E. coli strain did not display any signs of disease. Most strikingly, intestinal immunopathology was ameliorated in mice lacking Toll-like-receptors-2 or -4 indicating that C. jejuni lipoproteins and lipooligosaccharide are essential for induction and progression of immunopathology. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Gnotobiotic IL-10(-/- mice develop acute enterocolitis following C. jejuni infection mimicking severe episodes of human campylobacteriosis and are thus well suited to further dissect mechanisms underlying Campylobacter infections in vivo.

  18. Toll-like receptor 2 has a prominent but nonessential role in innate immunity to Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia.

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    Skerrett, Shawn J; Braff, Marissa H; Liggitt, H Denny; Rubens, Craig E

    2017-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important cause of acute bacterial pneumonia. Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) recognizes multiple components of the bacterial cell wall and activates innate immune responses to gram-positive bacteria. We hypothesized that TLR2 would have an important role in pulmonary host defense against S. aureus TLR null (TLR2 -/- ) mice and wild type (WT) C57BL/6 controls were challenged with aerosolized S. aureus at a range of inocula for kinetic studies of cytokine and antimicrobial peptide expression, lung inflammation, bacterial killing by alveolar macrophages, and bacterial clearance. Survival was measured after intranasal infection. Pulmonary induction of most pro-inflammatory cytokines was significantly blunted in TLR2 -/- mice 4 and 24 h after infection in comparison with WT controls. Bronchoalveolar concentrations of cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide also were reduced in TLR2 -/- mice. Lung inflammation, measured by enumeration of bronchoalveolar neutrophils and scoring of histological sections, was significantly blunted in TLR2 -/- mice. Phagocytosis of S. aureus by alveolar macrophages in vivo after low-dose infection was unimpaired, but viability of ingested bacteria was significantly greater in TLR2 -/- mice. Bacterial clearance from the lungs was slightly impaired in TLR2 -/- mice after low-dose infection only; bacterial elimination from the lungs was slightly accelerated in the TLR2 -/- mice after high-dose infection. Survival after high-dose intranasal challenge was 50-60% in both groups. TLR2 has a significant role in early innate immune responses to S. aureus in the lungs but is not required for bacterial clearance and survival from S. aureus pneumonia. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  19. Activation of the Innate Immune System by Treponema denticola Periplasmic Flagella through Toll-Like Receptor 2.

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    Ruby, John; Martin, Michael; Passineau, Michael J; Godovikova, Valentina; Fenno, J Christopher; Wu, Hui

    2018-01-01

    Treponema denticola is an indigenous oral spirochete that inhabits the gingival sulcus or periodontal pocket. Increased numbers of oral treponemes within this environment are associated with localized periodontal inflammation, and they are also part of an anaerobic polymicrobial consortium responsible for endodontic infections. Previous studies have indicated that T. denticola stimulates the innate immune system through Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2); however, the pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) responsible for T. denticola activation of the innate immune system are currently not well defined. In this study, we investigated the role played by T. denticola periplasmic flagella (PF), unique motility organelles of spirochetes, in stimulating an innate immune response. Wild-type T. denticola stimulated the production of the cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, and IL-12 by monocytes from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, while its isogenic nonmotile mutant lacking PF resulted in significantly diminished cytokine stimulation. In addition, highly purified PF were able to dose dependently stimulate cytokine TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-12 production in human monocytes. Wild-type T. denticola and the purified PF triggered activation of NF-κB through TLR2, as determined using a variety of TLR-transfected human embryonic 293 cell lines, while the PF-deficient mutants lacked the ability to stimulate, and the complemented PF-positive T. denticola strain restored the activation. These findings suggest that T. denticola stimulates the innate immune system in a TLR2-dependent fashion and that PF are a key bacterial component involved in this process. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. Effect of baicalin on toll-like receptor 4-mediated ischemia/reperfusion inflammatory responses in alcoholic fatty liver condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seok-Joo; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2012-01-01

    Alcoholic fatty liver is susceptible to secondary stresses such as ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Baicalin is an active component extracted from Scutellaria baicalensis, which is widely used in herbal preparations for treatment of hepatic diseases and inflammatory disorders. This study evaluated the potential beneficial effect of baicalin on I/R injury in alcoholic fatty liver. Rats were fed an alcohol liquid diet or a control isocaloric diet for 5 weeks, and then subjected to 60 min of hepatic ischemia and 5 h of reperfusion. Baicalin (200 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally administered 24 and 1 h before ischemia. After reperfusion, baicalin attenuated the increases in serum alanine aminotransferase activity, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in alcoholic fatty liver. The increased levels of TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA expression and inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 protein and mRNA expressions increased after reperfusion, which were higher in ethanol-fed animals, were attenuated by baicalin. In ethanol-fed animals, baicalin attenuated the increases in toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation factor 88 protein expressions and the nuclear translocation of NF-κB after reperfusion. In conclusion, our findings suggest that baicalin ameliorates I/R-induced hepatocellular damage by suppressing TLR4-mediated inflammatory responses in alcoholic fatty liver. -- Highlights: ► Baicalin attenuates hepatic I/R-induced inflammation in alcoholic fatty liver. ► Baicalin downregulates TLR4, MyD88 expression during I/R in alcoholic fatty liver. ► Baicalin attenuates NF-κB nuclear translocation during I/R in alcoholic fatty liver.

  1. Inhibitory effects of dynorphin 3-14 on the lipopolysaccharide-induced toll-like receptor 4 signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahiman, Siti Sarah Fazalul; Morgan, Michael; Gray, Paul; Shaw, Paul Nicholas; Cabot, Peter John

    2017-04-01

    Dynorphin 1-17 (DYN 1-17) is biotransformed rapidly to a range of fragments in rodent inflamed tissue with dynorphin 3-14 (DYN 3-14) being the most stable and prevalent. DYN 1-17 has been shown previously to be involved in the regulation of inflammatory response following tissue injury, in which the biotransformation fragments of DYN 1-17 may possess similar features. This study investigated the effects of DYN 3-14 on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nuclear factor-kappaB/p65 (NF-κB/p65) nuclear translocation and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in differentiated THP-1 cells. Treatment with DYN 3-14 (10nM) resulted in 35% inhibition of the LPS-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB/p65. Furthermore, DYN 3-14 modulated both IL-1β and TNF-α release; inhibiting IL-1β and paradoxically augmenting TNF-α release in a concentration-independent manner. A number of opioids have been implicated in the modulation of the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), highlighting the complexity of their immunomodulatory effects. To determine whether DYN 3-14 modulates TLR4, HEK-Blue™ - hTLR4 cells were stimulated with LPS in the presence of DYN 3-14. DYN 3-14 (10μM) inhibited TLR4 activation in a concentration-dependent fashion by suppressing the LPS signals around 300-fold lower than LPS-RS, a potent TLR4 antagonist. These findings indicate that DYN 3-14 is a potential TLR4 antagonist that alters cellular signaling in response to LPS and cytokine release, implicating a role for biotransformed endogenous opioid peptides in immunomodulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Toll-like receptor 9 mediates paraquat-induced acute lung injury: an in vitro and in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Haitao; Wu, Na; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Lichun; Hu, Xiao; Chen, Zhiguang; Zhao, Min

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of Toll-like receptor 9 in paraquat-induced acute lung injury (ALI). For in vivo study,C57BL mice were randomly assigned into the vehicle control group, paraquat group, paraquat + TLR9 antagonist (ODN2088) group, and TLR9 antagonist (ODN2088) group (n=36 per group). After paraquat 30mg/kg ip for 2, 24 and 48h, serum samples and lung tissues were collected to evaluate ALI and TLR9 signaling by lung injury score, protein levels of TLR9, MyD88, p-IRAK4, p-p65, and serum TNF-α and IL-1β levels. As for in vitro research A549 cells were randomly divided into the control group, paraquat group, paraquat + TLR9 siRNA group, and TLR9 siRNA group. After paraquat treatment for 24h, the cells and supernatant were collected to measureTLR9, TNF-α, IL-1 mRNA expression, and detect activation of NF-κB, caspase-3. In vivo, the lung injury score, the TLR9, MyD88, p-IRAK4 and p-p65 protein levels, and cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β levels in paraquat group were significantly higher than that in the control group;TLR9 blocker ODN2088 pretreatment attenuated lung injury, inhibited MyD88 and NF-κB activation, and reduced TNF-α and IL-1β in serum. In vitro result shows that the gene silencing of TLR9 reduced the mRNA expression of TLR9, TNF-α and IL-1, inhibited NF-κB and caspase-3 activation, attenuated cell apoptosis. TLR9 mediates paraquat-induced ALI, antagonizing TLR9 or silencing TLR9gene may attenuate paraquat-induced ALI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Expression Profiles of Toll-Like Receptors in the Differentiation of an Infection with Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato Spirochetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, Slawomir; Ziółko, Ewa; Kimsa-Dudek, Magdalena; Solarz, Krzysztof; Mazurek, Urszula; Wierzgoń, Aleksander; Kokot, Teresa; Muc-Wierzgoń, Małgorzata

    2017-04-01

    The similarity of Lyme borreliosis to other diseases and its complex pathogenesis present diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties. The changes that occur at the cellular and molecular levels after a Borrelia sp. infection still remain poorly understood. Therefore, the present study focused on the expression of TLR and TLR-signaling genes in human dermal fibroblasts in the differentiation of an infection with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato spirochetes. Normal human dermal fibroblasts were cultured with the spirochetes of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, Borrelia afzelii and Borrelia garinii. Total RNA was extracted from the cells using TRIzol reagent. The analysis of the expression profiles of TLRs and TLR-related genes was performed using commercially available oligonucleotide microarrays of HG-U133A. The GeneSpring 12.0 platform and significance analysis of microarrays were used for the statistical analysis of microarray data. The analyses using the oligonucleotide microarray and QRT-PCR techniques permitted to identify the genes encoding TLR4 and TLR6 as specific for infection with B. afzelii and B. burgdorferi sensu stricto. In turn, TLR3 was only characteristic for an infection with B. burgdorferi sensu stricto. There were no changes in the TLR gene expression after infection with B. garinii. Our findings confirm that Borrelia has a major effect on fibroblast gene expression. Further characterization of changes in gene expression may lead to valuable insights into the role of the toll-like receptor in the pathogenesis of Lyme disease and may provide guidelines for the development of diagnostic markers for an infection with a particular Borrelia genospecies. Moreover, this will help to identify better treatment strategies for Lyme disease.

  4. Polymorphisms of toll-like receptors 2 and 9 and severity and prognosis of bacterial meningitis in Chinese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pingping; Zhang, Nan; Liu, Linlin; Zheng, Kai; Zhu, Liang; Zhu, Junping; Cao, Lina; Jiang, Yiyuan; Liu, Gang; He, Qiushui

    2017-02-16

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a crucial role in innate immunity, protecting the host from bacterial pathogens. We investigated whether bacterial meningitis (BM) in children was associated with gene polymorphisms in TLR2 (rs3804099), TLR3 (rs3775291 and rs3775290) and TLR9 (rs352139 and rs352140). Blood samples were taken from 218 child patients with confirmed BM and 330 healthy adult controls (HC) and polymorphisms of these genes were analyzed by PCR-based sequencing. For TLR2 rs3804099, frequencies of the minor allele C were markedly higher in patients with severe BM (defined as CSF glucose concentration ≤ 1.5 mmol/L and seizures) than those without (43.5% and 40.1% vs. 30.1% and 29.1%, p = 0.008 and p = 0.016, respectively). For TLR9 rs352139, patients who carried genotype AA and minor allele A developed seizures less often than those without (OR = 0.289, p = 0.003 and OR = 0.568, p = 0.004, respectively). However, for TLR9 rs352140, patients who carried genotype TT and minor allele T developed seizures more often than those without (OR = 3.385, p = 0.004 and OR = 1.767, p = 0.004, respectively). Our finding suggested that genetic variations in TLR2 and TLR9 are associated with severity and prognosis of bacterial meningitis in Chinese children. However, the results should be interpreted with caution since the number of subjects included was limited.

  5. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG increases Toll-like receptor 3 gene expression in murine small intestine ex vivo and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki-Yoshida, A; Saito, S; Fukiya, S; Aoki, R; Takayama, Y; Suzuki, C; Sonoyama, K

    2016-06-01

    Administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) has been reported to be therapeutically effective against acute secretory diarrhoea resulting from the structural and functional intestinal mucosal lesions induced by rotavirus infection; however, the underlying mechanisms remain to be completely elucidated. Because Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) plays a key role in the innate immune responses following the recognition of rotavirus, the present study examined whether LGG influences TLR3 gene expression in murine small intestine ex vivo and in vivo. We employed cultured intestinal organoids derived from small intestinal crypts as an ex vivo tissue model. LGG supplementation increased TLR3 mRNA levels in the intestinal organoids, as estimated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Likewise, single and 7-day consecutive daily administrations of LGG increased TLR3 mRNA levels in the small intestine of C57BL/6N mice. The mRNA levels of other TLRs were not substantially altered both ex vivo and in vivo. In addition, LGG supplementation increased the mRNA levels of an antiviral type 1 interferon, interferon-α (IFN-α), and a neutrophil chemokine, CXCL1, upon stimulation with a synthetic TLR3 ligand, poly(I:C) in the intestinal organoids. LGG administration did not alter IFN-α and CXCL1 mRNA levels in the small intestine in vivo. Supplementation of other bacterial strains, Bifidobacterium bifidum and Lactobacillus paracasei, failed to increase TLR3 and poly(I:C)-stimulated CXCL1 mRNA levels ex vivo. We propose that upregulation of TLR3 gene expression may play a pivotal role in the therapeutic efficacy of LGG against rotavirus-associated diarrhoea. In addition, we demonstrated that intestinal organoids may be a promising ex vivo tissue model for investigating host-pathogen interactions and the antiviral action of probiotics in the intestinal epithelium.

  6. High glucose induces inflammatory cytokine through protein kinase C-induced toll-like receptor 2 pathway in gingival fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Shao-Yun, E-mail: jiangshaoyun@yahoo.com [School of Dentistry, Tianjin Medical University, 12 Qi Xiang Tai Street, Heping District, Tianjin 300070 (China); Wei, Cong-Cong; Shang, Ting-Ting; Lian, Qi; Wu, Chen-Xuan [School of Dentistry, Tianjin Medical University, 12 Qi Xiang Tai Street, Heping District, Tianjin 300070 (China); Deng, Jia-Yin, E-mail: yazhou2991@126.com [School of Dentistry, Tianjin Medical University, 12 Qi Xiang Tai Street, Heping District, Tianjin 300070 (China)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High glucose significantly induced TLR2 expression in gingival fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High glucose increased NF-{kappa}B p65 nuclear activity, IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha} levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PKC-{alpha}/{delta}-TLR2 pathway is involved in periodontal inflammation under high glucose. -- Abstract: Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a key role in innate immune response and inflammation, especially in periodontitis. Meanwhile, hyperglycemia can induce inflammation in diabetes complications. However, the activity of TLRs in periodontitis complicated with hyperglycemia is still unclear. In the present study, high glucose (25 mmol/l) significantly induced TLR2 expression in gingival fibroblasts (p < 0.05). Also, high glucose increased nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) p65 nuclear activity, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-l{beta} (IL-1{beta}) levels. Protein kinase C (PKC)-{alpha} and {delta} knockdown with siRNA significantly decreased TLR2 and NF-{kappa}B p65 expression (p < 0.05), whereas inhibition of PKC-{beta} had no effect on TLR2 and NF-{kappa}B p65 under high glucose (p < 0.05). Additional studies revealed that TLR2 knockdown significantly abrogated high-glucose-induced NF-{kappa}B expression and inflammatory cytokine secretion. Collectively, these data suggest that high glucose stimulates TNF-{alpha} and IL-1{beta} secretion via inducing TLR2 through PKC-{alpha} and PKC-{delta} in human gingival fibroblasts.

  7. The Toll-like receptor gene family is integrated into human DNA damage and p53 networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Menendez

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the functions that the p53 tumor suppressor plays in human biology have been greatly extended beyond "guardian of the genome." Our studies of promoter response element sequences targeted by the p53 master regulatory transcription factor suggest a general role for this DNA damage and stress-responsive regulator in the control of human Toll-like receptor (TLR gene expression. The TLR gene family mediates innate immunity to a wide variety of pathogenic threats through recognition of conserved pathogen-associated molecular motifs. Using primary human immune cells, we have examined expression of the entire TLR gene family following exposure to anti-cancer agents that induce the p53 network. Expression of all TLR genes, TLR1 to TLR10, in blood lymphocytes and alveolar macrophages from healthy volunteers can be induced by DNA metabolic stressors. However, there is considerable inter-individual variability. Most of the TLR genes respond to p53 via canonical as well as noncanonical promoter binding sites. Importantly, the integration of the TLR gene family into the p53 network is unique to primates, a recurrent theme raised for other gene families in our previous studies. Furthermore, a polymorphism in a TLR8 response element provides the first human example of a p53 target sequence specifically responsible for endogenous gene induction. These findings-demonstrating that the human innate immune system, including downstream induction of cytokines, can be modulated by DNA metabolic stress-have many implications for health and disease, as well as for understanding the evolution of damage and p53 responsive networks.

  8. Damage-associated molecular pattern activated Toll-like receptor 4 signalling modulates blood pressure in L-NAME-induced hypertension

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sollinger, D.; Eissler, R.; Lorenz, S.; Strand, S.; Chmielewski, S.; Aoqui, C.; Schmaderer, Ch.; Bluyssen, H.; Zicha, Josef; Witzke, O.; Scherer, E.; Lutz, J.; Heemann, U.; Baumann, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 3 (2014), s. 464-472 ISSN 0008-6363 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0336 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : innate immunity * Toll-like receptors * reactive oxygen species * vascular contractility Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 5.940, year: 2014

  9. Expression profile of toll-like receptor 2 mRNA in selected tissues of shark (Chiloscyllium sp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandhakumar, C; Lavanya, V; Pradheepa, G; Tirumurugaan, K G; Raj, G Dhinakar; Raja, A; Pazhanivel, N; Balachandran, C

    2012-11-01

    Sharks are a species of delight for immunologists from the evolutionary perspective since it is considered as the first species to have evolved the adaptive immune responses in addition to the innate immune system. One of the components of the highly conserved innate immune system is the toll-like receptors (TLR) which has a conserved overall protein structure throughout deuterostome evolution. There is no report that demonstrates the expression of these receptors in sharks. In this study we successfully amplified a 270 bp amplicon using a degenerate primer design strategy that corresponded to the Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) domain of TLR2 (GenBank ID: JF792813). BLAST analysis revealed a maximum nucleotide identity of 87% and 76% with the TLR2 of higher mammals and teleost fishes respectively. Domain prediction revealed a TIR structure between 1 and 87 amino acids that had a maximum identity of 58% and 76% with TLR2 - TIR protein of teleost fishes and higher mammals respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a closer clustering of the shark TIR sequence with those from human, cattle, goat, sheep and chicken than with other fish species. Basal expression levels of the TLR2-TIR mRNA were found to be significantly higher in kidneys followed by fins, spleen and intestinal spiral valve (ISV). In tissues such as spleen and kidney the expression of the TLR2-TIR mRNA could be localized to lymphoid and macrophages like cells and tubular epithelial cells respectively. In-vivo exposure of sharks to peptidoglycan (TLR 2 ligand) resulted in 9 folds higher expression of TLR2-TIR mRNA in gills followed by 5 folds in the fins. However, when inoculated with a TLR ligand pool, the expression levels significantly increased to 12 fold in skin followed by epigonal, kidneys and ISV. These findings not only support the presence of the TLRs in sharks but also their induction upon exposure to specific ligands. Further studies are needed to identify their numbers, their ligand specificity

  10. Regulation of Toll-like receptor 4-mediated immune responses through Pasteurella multocida toxin-induced G protein signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hildebrand Dagmar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipopolysaccharide (LPS-triggered Toll-like receptor (TLR 4-signalling belongs to the key innate defence mechanisms upon infection with Gram-negative bacteria and triggers the subsequent activation of adaptive immunity. There is an active crosstalk between TLR4-mediated and other signalling cascades to secure an effective immune response, but also to prevent excessive inflammation. Many pathogens induce signalling cascades via secreted factors that interfere with TLR signalling to modify and presumably escape the host response. In this context heterotrimeric G proteins and their coupled receptors have been recognized as major cellular targets. Toxigenic strains of Gram-negative Pasteurella multocida produce a toxin (PMT that constitutively activates the heterotrimeric G proteins Gαq, Gα13 and Gαi independently of G protein-coupled receptors through deamidation. PMT is known to induce signalling events involved in cell proliferation, cell survival and cytoskeleton rearrangement. Results Here we show that the activation of heterotrimeric G proteins through PMT suppresses LPS-stimulated IL-12p40 production and eventually impairs the T cell-activating ability of LPS-treated monocytes. This inhibition of TLR4-induced IL-12p40 expression is mediated by Gαi-triggered signalling as well as by Gβγ-dependent activation of PI3kinase and JNK. Taken together we propose the following model: LPS stimulates TLR4-mediated activation of the NFĸB-pathway and thereby the production of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-12p40. PMT inhibits the production of IL-12p40 by Gαi-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase and cAMP accumulation and by Gβγ-mediated activation of PI3kinase and JNK activation. Conclusions On the basis of the experiments with PMT this study gives an example of a pathogen-induced interaction between G protein-mediated and TLR4-triggered signalling and illustrates how a bacterial toxin is able to interfere with the host’s immune

  11. The toll-like receptor 2 agonist Pam3CSK4 is neuroprotective after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stivers, Nicole S; Pelisch, Nicolas; Orem, Ben C; Williams, Joshua; Nally, Jacqueline M; Stirling, David P

    2017-08-01

    Microglia/macrophage activation and recruitment following spinal cord injury (SCI) is associated with both detrimental and reparative functions. Stimulation of the innate immune receptor Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2) has shown to be beneficial following SCI, and it increases axonal regeneration following optic nerve crush. However, the mechanism(s) remain unclear. As microglia express high levels of TLR2, we hypothesized that modulating the microglial response to injury using a specific TLR2 agonist, Pam3CSK4, would prevent secondary-mediated white matter degeneration following SCI. To test this hypothesis, we documented acute changes in microglia, axons, and oligodendroglia over time using two-photon excitation and an ex vivo laser-induced SCI (LiSCI) model. We utilized double transgenic mice that express GFP in either microglia or oligodendroglia, and YFP in axons, and we applied the lipophilic fluorescent dye (Nile Red) to visualize myelin. We found that treatment with Pam3CSK4 initiated one hour after injury induced a significant increase in the extent and timing of the microglial response to injury compared to vehicle controls. This enhanced response was observed 2 to 4h following SCI and was most prominent in areas closer to the ablation site. In addition, Pam3CSK4 treatment significantly reduced axonal dieback rostral and caudal to the ablation at 6h post-SCI. This protective effect of Pam3CSK4 was also mirrored when assessing secondary bystander axonal damage (i.e., axons spared by the primary injury that then succumb to secondary degeneration), and when assessing the survival of oligodendroglia. Following these imaging experiments, custom microarray analysis of the ex vivo spinal cord preparations revealed that Pam3CSK4-treatment induced an alternative (mixed M1:M2) microglial activation profile. In summary, our data suggest that by providing a second "sterile" activation signal to microglia through TLR2/TLR1 signaling, the microglial response to injury can

  12. Role of toll-like receptor 4 in acute neutrophilic lung inflammation induced by intratracheal bacterial products in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakako Yamada

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Wakako Yamada1, Sadatomo Tasaka1, Hidefumi Koh1, Mie Shimizu1, Yuko Ogawa1, Naoki Hasegawa1, Taku Miyasho2, Kazuhiro Yamaguchi1, Akitoshi Ishizaka11Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan; 2Laboratory of Veterinary Biochemistry, School of Veterinary Medicine, Rakuno Gakuen University, Ebetsu, JapanBackground: Toll-like receptors (TLRs represent a conserved family of innate immune recognition receptors. Among TLRs, TLR4 is important for the recognition of Gram-negative bacteria, whereas TLR2 recognizes cell wall constituents of Gram-positive microorganisms, such as peptidoglycan (PGN.Methods: To evaluate the role of TLR4 in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury induced by Escherichia coli endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS or PGN, we compared inflammatory cell accumulation in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid and lung pathology between C3H/HeJ (TLR4 mutant and wild-type C3H/HeN mice. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in plasma and BAL fluid and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB translocation in the lung were also evaluated.Results: In C3H/HeJ mice, LPS-induced neutrophil emigration was significantly decreased compared with C3H/HeN mice, whereas PGN-induced neutrophil emigration did not differ. Differential cell count in BAL fluid revealed comparable neutrophil recruitment in the alveolar space. In TLR4 mutant mice, LPS-induced upregulation of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, KC, and CXCL10 in plasma and BAL fluid was attenuate, which was not different after PGN. NF-κB translocation in the lung was significantly decreased in C3H/HeJ compared with C3H/HeN mice, whereas PGN-induced NF-κB translocation was not different.Conclusion: These results suggest that TLR4 mediates inflammatory cascade induced by Gram-negative bacteria that is locally administered.Keywords: rodent, TLR4, endotoxin, neutrophils, NF-κB

  13. MicroRNA-3148 modulates allelic expression of toll-like receptor 7 variant associated with systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Yun Deng

    Full Text Available We previously reported that the G allele of rs3853839 at 3'untranslated region (UTR of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7 was associated with elevated transcript expression and increased risk for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE in 9,274 Eastern Asians [P = 6.5×10(-10, odds ratio (OR (95%CI = 1.27 (1.17-1.36]. Here, we conducted trans-ancestral fine-mapping in 13,339 subjects including European Americans, African Americans, and Amerindian/Hispanics and confirmed rs3853839 as the only variant within the TLR7-TLR8 region exhibiting consistent and independent association with SLE (Pmeta = 7.5×10(-11, OR = 1.24 [1.18-1.34]. The risk G allele was associated with significantly increased levels of TLR7 mRNA and protein in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs and elevated luciferase activity of reporter gene in transfected cells. TLR7 3'UTR sequence bearing the non-risk C allele of rs3853839 matches a predicted binding site of microRNA-3148 (miR-3148, suggesting that this microRNA may regulate TLR7 expression. Indeed, miR-3148 levels were inversely correlated with TLR7 transcript levels in PBMCs from SLE patients and controls (R(2 = 0.255, P = 0.001. Overexpression of miR-3148 in HEK-293 cells led to significant dose-dependent decrease in luciferase activity for construct driven by TLR7 3'UTR segment bearing the C allele (P = 0.0003. Compared with the G-allele construct, the C-allele construct showed greater than two-fold reduction of luciferase activity in the presence of miR-3148. Reduced modulation by miR-3148 conferred slower degradation of the risk G-allele containing TLR7 transcripts, resulting in elevated levels of gene products. These data establish rs3853839 of TLR7 as a shared risk variant of SLE in 22,613 subjects of Asian, EA, AA, and Amerindian/Hispanic ancestries (Pmeta  = 2.0×10(-19, OR = 1.25 [1.20-1.32], which confers allelic effect on transcript turnover via differential binding to the epigenetic

  14. Plasmodium yoelii blood-stage primes macrophage-mediated innate immune response through modulation of toll-like receptor signalling

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    Fu Yong

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toll-like receptors (TLRs signalling is reported to be primed by the infection of human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. However, little is known about the regulation of macrophages TLR signalling by the infection of lethal or non-lethal strain of rodent malaria parasites. Methods BALB/c mice were infected with non-lethal strain Plasmodium yoelii 17XNL or lethal strain P. yoelii 17XL. Peritoneal macrophages were isolated to study its immune response to pRBC lysate, and TLRs (TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9 agonists, and the expression of TLRs and intracellular signalling molecules were also investigated by flow cytometry and semi-quantitive RT-PCR. Results The reactivity of peritoneal macrophages from the mice infected with lethal strain P. y 17XL or non-lethal strain P. y 17XNL were enhanced to pRBC lysate, and TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9 agonists at one, three and five days post-infection. Of all the tested TLRs, only TLR2 was up-regulated on peritoneal macrophages of mice infected with either strain. However, transcription of intracellular signalling molecules MyD88, IRAK-1, and TRAF-6 was significantly up-regulated in peritoneal macrophages from mice infected either with P. yoelii 17XL or P. yoelii 17XNL at one, three and five days post-infection. However, the enhanced TLRs response of macrophage from P. yoelii 17XNL-infected mice persisted for a much longer time than that from P. yoelii 17XL-infected mice. Conclusion Both P. yoelii 17XL and 17XNL strains could enhance the response of peritoneal macrophages to pRBC lysate and TLR agonists, through up-regulating the expression of TLR2 and intracellular signalling molecules MyD88, IRAK-1, and TRAF-6. In addition, prolonged high response of macrophage from P. yoelii 17XNL-infected mice might be associated with the more efficiently controlling of P. yoelii 17XNL growth in mice at early stage.

  15. Toll-like receptor and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression during prolonged hyperinsulinaemia in horses: implications for laminitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laat, M A; Clement, C K; McGowan, C M; Sillence, M N; Pollitt, C C; Lacombe, V A

    2014-01-15

    Equine laminitis, a disease of the lamellar structure of the horse's hoof, can be incited by numerous factors that include inflammatory and metabolic aetiologies. However, the role of inflammation in hyperinsulinaemic laminitis has not been adequately defined. Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation results in up-regulation of inflammatory pathways and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and may be a pathogenic factor in laminitis. The aim of this study was to determine whether TLR4 expression and subsequent pro-inflammatory cytokine production is increased in lamellae and skeletal muscle during equine hyperinsulinaemia. Standardbred horses were treated with either a prolonged, euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp (p-EHC) or a prolonged, glucose infusion (p-GI), which induced marked and moderate hyperinsulinaemia, respectively. Age-matched control horses were treated simultaneously with a balanced electrolyte solution. Treated horses developed clinical (p-EHC) or subclinical (p-GI) laminitis, whereas controls did not. Skeletal muscle and lamellar protein extracts were analysed by Western blotting for TLR4, IL-6, TNF-α and suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 (SOCS3) expression. Lamellar protein expression of TLR4 and TNF-α, but not IL-6, was increased by the p-EHC, compared to control horses. A significant positive correlation was found between lamellar TLR4 and SOCS3. Skeletal muscle protein expression of TLR4 signalling parameters did not differ between control and p-EHC-treated horses. Similarly, the p-GI did not result in up-regulation of lamellar protein expression of any parameter. The results suggest that insulin-sensitive tissues may not accurately reflect lamellar pathology during hyperinsulinaemia. While TLR4 is present in the lamellae, its activation appears unlikely to contribute significantly to the developmental pathogenesis of hyperinsulinaemic laminitis. However

  16. Association of Toll-like receptor 2 gene polymorphisms with lung function in workers in swine operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhiwei; Dosman, James A; Rennie, Donna C; Schwartz, David A; Yang, Ivana V; Beach, Jeremy; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan

    2013-01-01

    Workers in swine operations are exposed to indoor dusts and gases and are at increased risk of respiratory problems. Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 recognizes ligands from gram-positive bacteria, whereas TLR4 responds to endotoxin from gram-negative bacteria. To investigate the effects of TLR2 and TLR4 polymorphisms on lung function in workers from swine operations and nonfarming rural dwellers. A total of 374 full-time workers from large swine operations and 411 nonfarming rural dwellers from Saskatchewan were included. Information on demography, lifestyle, and occupation, lung function measurements, and blood samples for genotyping were obtained from the participants. Multiple regression analysis and Bonferroni correction were used in the statistical analysis. Workers with TLR2-16933T/A polymorphism (AA) had significantly greater mean values of lung function than workers with wild-type genotypes (AT+TT) after controlling for potential confounders (forced expiratory volume in 1 second, 3.7 vs 3.5 L; P=.009; forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75%, 3.7 vs 3.3 L; P=.003; predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second; 100.3% vs 95.6%; P=.005; forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75%, 92.4% vs 83.4%; P=.009). These results were also observed for TLR2Arg677Trp polymorphism among the workers. No such significant differences were observed among nonfarming rural dwellers. For Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile polymorphisms in the TLR4 gene, no significant differences were observed in the mean lung function values between the polymorphic and wild-type groups in both workers and rural dwellers. Our study is the first, to our knowledge, to report protective effects of TLR2 polymorphisms on lung function among workers in swine operations and raises the possibility that TLR2 polymorphisms are protective of airway disease in individuals exposed to gram-positive organisms in the inhaled airborne dust. Copyright © 2013 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by

  17. Polymorphisms in Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 genes and their expression in chronic suppurative otitis media.

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    Jotic, Ana; Jesic, Snezana; Zivkovic, Maja; Tomanovic, Nada; Kuveljic, Jovana; Stankovic, Aleksandra

    2015-12-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have a prominent role in inducing innate immune response. It has been suggested that regulation of TLRs is involved in the pathogenesis of chronic otitis media. TLR 2 and TLR 4 polymorphisms were connected with susceptibility to acute otitis and chronic otitis with effusion. The objective of this study was to establish expression of TLR 2 and 4 on middle ear mucosa in different types of chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM), and the influence of gene polymorphisms TLR 2 Arg753Gln and TLR 4 Thr399Ile and Asp299Gly to susceptibility to CSOM. Middle ear mucosa and full blood samples were obtained from 85 patients with chronic suppurative otitis media with and without cholesteatoma. Control group for mucosal TLR expression consisted of 71 samples of middle ear mucosa taken from patients with otosclerosis, and control group for DNA polymorphism consisted of 100 full blood samples in healthy subjects. DNA polymorphism detection was done with restriction fragment length polymorphism in RT PCR. Expression of TLR 2 and 4 was determined with immunohistochemical staining. TLR 2 and TLR 4 expression on the middle ear mucosa was not influenced by age of the patients with chronic otitis media. Incidence of TLR 2 Arg753Gln polymorphism was significantly higher in patients with chronic otitis media, compared to control group. Significant association between TLR 2 Arg753Gln polymorphism and different types of mucosal changes in patients with chronic otitis media was established. TLR 2 and 4 expression on experimental group mucosa was significantly different compared to control group, where there was no expression (p=0.000). Strong dependence of TLR 2 and TLR 4 expression on middle ear mucosa with different mucosal changes and immunohistochemical activity after staining was detected. Certain polymorphisms in TLR genes could be indicative for susceptibility to chronic otitis media. Expression of TLR 2 and 4 on middle ear mucosa was more dependable on

  18. Toll-like receptor 2 mediates ischemia-reperfusion injury of the small intestine in adult mice.

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    Toshio Watanabe

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 recognizes conserved molecular patterns associated with both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, and detects some endogenous ligands. Previous studies demonstrated that in ischemia-reperfusion (I/R injury of the small intestine, the TLR2-dependent signaling exerted preventive effects on the damage in young mice, but did not have a significant effect in neonatal mice. We investigated the role of TLR2 in adult ischemia-reperfusion injury in the small intestine. Wild-type and TLR2 knockout mice at 16 weeks of age were subjected to intestinal I/R injury. Some wild-type mice received anti-Ly-6G antibodies to deplete circulating neutrophils. In wild-type mice, I/R induced severe small intestinal injury characterized by infiltration by inflammatory cells, disruption of the mucosal epithelium, and mucosal bleeding. Compared to wild-type mice, TLR2 knockout mice exhibited less severe mucosal injury induced by I/R, with a 35%, 33%, and 43% reduction in histological grading score and luminal concentration of hemoglobin, and the numbers of apoptotic epithelial cells, respectively. The I/R increased the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO, a marker of neutrophil infiltration, and the levels of mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 in the small intestine of the wild-type mice by 3.3-, 3.2-, and 13.0-fold, respectively. TLR2 deficiency significantly inhibited the I/R-induced increase in MPO activity and the expression of mRNAs for TNF-α and ICAM-1, but did not affect the expression of COX-2 mRNA. I/R also enhanced TLR2 mRNA expression by 2.9-fold. TLR2 proteins were found to be expressed in the epithelial cells, inflammatory cells, and endothelial cells. Neutrophil depletion prevented intestinal I/R injury in wild-type mice. These findings suggest that TLR2 may mediate I/R injury of the small intestine in adult mice via induction of inflammatory

  19. Crucial role of Toll-like receptors in the zinc/nickel-induced inflammatory response in vascular endothelial cells

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    Tsou, Tsui-Chun, E-mail: tctsou@nhri.org.tw [Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Miaoli 350, Taiwan (China); Liou, Saou-Hsing; Yeh, Szu-Ching; Tsai, Feng-Yuan [Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Miaoli 350, Taiwan (China); Chao, How-Ran [Emerging Compounds Research Center, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, National Pingtung University and Science and Technology, Neipu, Pingtung 912, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-15

    Our previous studies indicated that zinc induced inflammatory response in both vascular endothelial cells and promonocytes. Here, we asked if other metals could cause the similar effect on vascular endothelial cells and tried to determine its underlying mechanism. Following screening of fifteen metals, zinc and nickel were identified with a marked proinflammatory effect, as determined by ICAM-1 and IL-8 induction, on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Inhibiting protein expression of myeloid differentiation primary response protein-88 (MyD88), a Toll-like receptor (TLR) adaptor acting as a TLR-signaling transducer, significantly attenuated the zinc/nickel-induced inflammatory response, suggesting the critical roles of TLRs in the inflammatory response. Blockage of TLR-4 signaling by CLI-095, a TLR-4 inhibitor, completely inhibited the nickel-induced ICAM-1 and IL-8 expression and NFκB activation. The same CLI-095 treatment significantly blocked the zinc-induced IL-8 expression, however with no significant effect on the ICAM-1 expression and a minor inhibitory effect on the NFκB activation. The finding demonstrated the differential role of TLR-4 in regulation of the zinc/nickel-induced inflammatory response, where TLR-4 played a dominant role in NFκB activation by nickel, but not by zinc. Moreover, inhibition of NFκB by adenovirus-mediated IκBα expression and Bay 11-7025, an inhibitor of cytokine-induced IκB-α phosphorylation, significantly attenuated the zinc/nickel-induced inflammatory responses, indicating the critical of NFκB in the process. The study demonstrates the crucial role of TLRs in the zinc/nickel-induced inflammatory response in vascular endothelial cells and herein deciphers a potential important difference in NFκB activation via TLRs. The study provides a molecular basis for linkage between zinc/nickel exposure and pathogenesis of the metal-related inflammatory vascular disease. - Highlights: • Both zinc and nickel cause

  20. Toll-like receptor 4-dependent upregulation of cytokines in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ling

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aβ deposits in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD are closely associated with innate immune responses such as activated microglia and increased cytokines. Accumulating evidence supports the hypothesis that innate immune/inflammatory responses play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of AD: either beneficial or harmful effects on the AD progression. The molecular mechanisms by which the innate immune system modulates the AD progression are not well understood. Toll-like receptors (TLRs are first-line molecules for initiating the innate immune responses. When activated through TLR signaling, microglia respond to pathogens and damaged host cells by secreting chemokines and cytokines and express the co-stimulatory molecules needed for protective immune responses to pathogens and efficient clearance of damaged tissues. We previously demonstrated that an AD mouse model homozygous for a destructive mutation of TLR4 has increases in diffuse and fibrillar Aβ deposits as well as buffer-soluble and insoluble Aβ in the brain as compared with a TLR4 wild-type AD mouse model. Here, we investigated the roles of TLR4 in Aβ-induced upregulation of cytokines and chemokines, Aβ-induced activation of microglia and astrocytes and Aβ-induced immigration of leukocytes. Methods Using the same model, levels of cytokines and chemokines in the brain were determined by multiplex cytokine/chemokine array. Activation of microglia and astrocytes and immigration of leukocytes were determined by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry followed by densitometry and morphometry, respectively. Results Levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-1β, IL-10 and IL-17 in the brains of TLR4 wild-type AD mice were significantly higher than those in TLR4 wild-type non-transgenic littermates. Such increases in cytokines were not found in TLR4 mutant AD mice as compared with TLR4 mutant non-transgenic littermates. Although expression

  1. Hypoxia attenuates inflammatory mediators production induced by Acanthamoeba via Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in human corneal epithelial cells

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    Pan, Hong [Department of Ophthalmology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 107, Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); The Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Public Health, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 107, Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Wu, Xinyi, E-mail: xywu8868@163.com [Department of Ophthalmology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 107, Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia attenuates Acanthamoeba-induced the production of IL-8 and IFN-{beta}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia inhibits TLR4 expression in a time-dependent manner in HCECs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia inhibits Acanthamoeba-induced the activation of NF-{kappa}B and ERK1/2 in HCECs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia decreases Acanthamoeba-induced inflammatory response via TLR4 signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LPS-induced the secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 is abated by hypoxia via TLR4 signaling. -- Abstract: Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is a vision-threatening corneal infection that is intimately associated with contact lens use which leads to hypoxic conditions on the corneal surface. However, the effect of hypoxia on the Acanthamoeba-induced host inflammatory response of corneal epithelial cells has not been studied. In the present study, we investigated the effect of hypoxia on the Acanthamoeba-induced production of inflammatory mediators interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) in human corneal epithelial cells and then evaluated its effects on the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling, including TLR4 and myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88) (MyD88) expression as well as the activation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-{kappa}B) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). We then studied the effect of hypoxia on a TLR4-specific inflammatory response triggered by the TLR4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our data showed that hypoxia significantly decreased the production of IL-8 and IFN-{beta}. Furthermore, hypoxia attenuated Acanthamoeba-triggered TLR4 expression as well as the activation of NF-{kappa}B and ERK1/2, indicating that hypoxia abated Acanthamoeba-induced inflammatory responses by affecting TLR4 signaling. Hypoxia also inhibited LPS-induced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion, myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88

  2. Hypoxia attenuates inflammatory mediators production induced by Acanthamoeba via Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in human corneal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Hong; Wu, Xinyi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Hypoxia attenuates Acanthamoeba-induced the production of IL-8 and IFN-β. ► Hypoxia inhibits TLR4 expression in a time-dependent manner in HCECs. ► Hypoxia inhibits Acanthamoeba-induced the activation of NF-κB and ERK1/2 in HCECs. ► Hypoxia decreases Acanthamoeba-induced inflammatory response via TLR4 signaling. ► LPS-induced the secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 is abated by hypoxia via TLR4 signaling. -- Abstract: Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is a vision-threatening corneal infection that is intimately associated with contact lens use which leads to hypoxic conditions on the corneal surface. However, the effect of hypoxia on the Acanthamoeba-induced host inflammatory response of corneal epithelial cells has not been studied. In the present study, we investigated the effect of hypoxia on the Acanthamoeba-induced production of inflammatory mediators interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interferon-β (IFN-β) in human corneal epithelial cells and then evaluated its effects on the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling, including TLR4 and myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88) (MyD88) expression as well as the activation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). We then studied the effect of hypoxia on a TLR4-specific inflammatory response triggered by the TLR4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our data showed that hypoxia significantly decreased the production of IL-8 and IFN-β. Furthermore, hypoxia attenuated Acanthamoeba-triggered TLR4 expression as well as the activation of NF-κB and ERK1/2, indicating that hypoxia abated Acanthamoeba-induced inflammatory responses by affecting TLR4 signaling. Hypoxia also inhibited LPS-induced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion, myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88) MyD88 expression and NF-κB activation, confirming that hypoxia suppressed the LPS-induced inflammatory response by affecting TLR4 signaling. In conclusion

  3. Toll-like receptor 3 signalling up-regulates expression of the HIV co-receptor G-protein coupled receptor 15 on human CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Kiene

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many HIV-2 and SIV isolates, as well as some HIV-1 strains, can use the orphan 7-transmembrane receptor GPR15 as co-receptor for efficient entry into host cells. GPR15 is expressed on central memory and effector memory CD4(+ T cells in healthy individuals and a subset of these cells is susceptible to HIV-1 and SIV infection. However, it has not been determined whether GPR15 expression is altered in the context of HIV-1 infection. RESULTS: Here, we show that GPR15 expression in CD4(+ T cells is markedly up-regulated in some HIV-1 infected individuals compared to the rest of the infected patients and to healthy controls. Infection of the PM1 T cell line with primary HIV-1 isolates was found to up-regulate GPR15 expression on the infected cells, indicating that viral components can induce GPR15 expression. Up-regulation of GPR15 expression on CD4(+ T cells was induced by activation of Toll-like receptor 3 signalling via TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF and was more prominent on gut-homing compared to lymph node-homing CD4(+ T cells. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that infection-induced up-regulation of GPR15 expression could increase susceptibility of CD4(+ T cells to HIV infection and target cell availability in the gut in some infected individuals.

  4. Subversion of Toll-like receptor signaling by a unique family of bacterial Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain-containing proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirl, Christine; Wieser, Andreas; Yadav, Manisha; Duerr, Susanne; Schubert, Sören; Fischer, Hans; Stappert, Dominik; Wantia, Nina; Rodriguez, Nuria; Wagner, Hermann; Svanborg, Catharina; Miethke, Thomas

    2008-04-01

    Pathogenic microbes have evolved sophisticated molecular strategies to subvert host defenses. Here we show that virulent bacteria interfere directly with Toll-like receptor (TLR) function by secreting inhibitory homologs of the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain. Genes encoding TIR domain containing-proteins (Tcps) were identified in Escherichia coli CFT073 (TcpC) and Brucella melitensis (TcpB). We found that TcpC is common in the most virulent uropathogenic E. coli strains and promotes bacterial survival and kidney pathology in vivo. In silico analysis predicted significant tertiary structure homology to the TIR domain of human TLR1, and we show that the Tcps impede TLR signaling through the myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) adaptor protein, owing to direct binding of Tcps to MyD88. Tcps represent a new class of virulence factors that act by inhibiting TLR- and MyD88-specific signaling, thus suppressing innate immunity and increasing virulence.

  5. Autoimmune Regulator Expression in DC2.4 Cells Regulates the NF-κB Signaling and Cytokine Expression of the Toll-Like Receptor 3 Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jitong; Niu, Kunwei; Fu, Haiying; Li, Haijun; Li, Yi; Yang, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Autoimmune regulator (Aire) mutations result in autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy (APECED), which manifests as multi-organ autoimmunity and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC). Indendritic cells (DCs), pattern recognition receptors (PRR), such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs), are closely involved in the recognition of various pathogens, activating the intercellular signaling pathway, followed by the activation of transcription factors and the expression of downstream genes, which take part in mediating the immune response and maintaining immune tolerance. In this study, we found that Aire up-regulated TLR3 expression and modulated the downstream cytokine expression and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) of the TLR3 signaling pathway.

  6. A novel toll-like receptor 9 agonist cooperates with trastuzumab in trastuzumab-resistant breast tumors through multiple mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Vincenzo; Garofalo, Sonia; Rosa, Roberta; Bianco, Roberto; Caputo, Rosa; Gelardi, Teresa; Merola, Gerardina; Racioppi, Luigi; Garbi, Corrado; Kandimalla, Ekambar R; Agrawal, Sudhir; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2009-11-15

    Resistance to anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody trastuzumab is a relevant issue in breast cancer patients. Among the mechanisms implicated in trastuzumab resistance, increasing evidence supports a role of tumor microenvironment. We previously found that a novel toll-like receptor 9 agonist, referred to as immune modulatory oligonucleotide (IMO) and currently under clinical investigation, acts through epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and shows direct antiangiogenic effects by cooperating with anti-EGFR or anti-VEGF drugs, thus interfering with cancer cells and microenvironment. In this study, we used KPL-4 and JIMT-1 trastuzumab-resistant breast cancer cells to evaluate the combination IMO plus trastuzumab as a therapeutic option for trastuzumab-resistant breast cancers. IMO inhibits KPL-4 and JIMT-1 xenografts growth and potentiates trastuzumab antitumor effect, with complete suppression of tumor growth, potent enhancement of trastuzumab-mediated antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and strong inhibition of EGFR/HER2-related signaling. In KPL-4 xenografts, IMO alone interferes with HER signal transduction, whereas trastuzumab is ineffective. IMO induces an HER-dependent signal inhibition also in vitro by modulating a functional interaction between toll-like receptor 9 and HER receptors occurring at membrane level. Finally, IMO plus trastuzumab produces a cooperative antiangiogenic effect related to suppression of endothelial HER-related signaling. We showed a cooperative effect of IMO plus trastuzumab in trastuzumab-resistant breast cancers due to IMO direct antitumor and antiangiogenic activity and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity enhancement. Moreover, we provided first evidence of a toll-like receptor 9/HER interaction at membrane level as novel mechanism of action. Altogether, we propose IMO plus trastuzumab as an effective strategy in trastuzumab-resistant breast cancers.

  7. A temporal gate for viral enhancers to co-opt Toll-like-receptor transcriptional activation pathways upon acute infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai A Kropp

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Viral engagement with macrophages activates Toll-Like-Receptors (TLRs and viruses must contend with the ensuing inflammatory responses to successfully complete their replication cycle. To date, known counter-strategies involve the use of viral-encoded proteins that often employ mimicry mechanisms to block or redirect the host response to benefit the virus. Whether viral regulatory DNA sequences provide an opportunistic strategy by which viral enhancer elements functionally mimic innate immune enhancers is unknown. Here we find that host innate immune genes and the prototypical viral enhancer of cytomegalovirus (CMV have comparable expression kinetics, and positively respond to common TLR agonists. In macrophages but not fibroblasts we show that activation of NFκB at immediate-early times of infection is independent of virion-associated protein, M45. We find upon virus infection or transfection of viral genomic DNA the TLR-agonist treatment results in significant enhancement of the virus transcription-replication cycle. In macrophage time-course infection experiments we demonstrate that TLR-agonist stimulation of the viral enhancer and replication cycle is strictly delimited by a temporal gate with a determined half-maximal time for enhancer-activation of 6 h; after which TLR-activation blocks the viral transcription-replication cycle. By performing a systematic siRNA screen of 149 innate immune regulatory factors we identify not only anticipated anti-viral and pro-viral contributions but also new factors involved in the CMV transcription-replication cycle. We identify a central convergent NFκB-SP1-RXR-IRF axis downstream of TLR-signalling. Activation of the RXR component potentiated direct and indirect TLR-induced activation of CMV transcription-replication cycle; whereas chromatin binding experiments using wild-type and enhancer-deletion virus revealed IRF3 and 5 as new pro-viral host transcription factor interactions with the CMV enhancer in

  8. Cross talk between AT1 receptors and Toll-like receptor 4 in microglia contributes to angiotensin II-derived ROS production in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancardi, Vinicia Campana; Stranahan, Alexis M; Krause, Eric G; de Kloet, Annette D; Stern, Javier E

    2016-02-01

    ANG II is thought to increase sympathetic outflow by increasing oxidative stress and promoting local inflammation in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus. However, the relative contributions of inflammation and oxidative stress to sympathetic drive remain poorly understood, and the underlying cellular and molecular targets have yet to be examined. ANG II has been shown to enhance Toll-like receptor (TLR)4-mediated signaling on microglia. Thus, in the present study, we aimed to determine whether ANG II-mediated activation of microglial TLR4 signaling is a key molecular target initiating local oxidative stress in the PVN. We found TLR4 and ANG II type 1 (AT1) receptor mRNA expression in hypothalamic microglia, providing molecular evidence for the potential interaction between these two receptors. In hypothalamic slices, ANG II induced microglial activation within the PVN (∼65% increase, P receptors and TLR4 in mediating ANG II-dependent microglial activation and oxidative stress within the PVN. More broadly, our results support a functional interaction between the central renin-angiotensin system and innate immunity in the regulation of neurohumoral outflows from the PVN. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Toll-like receptor-4 as a predictor of clinical outcomes of estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer in Saudi women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semlali A

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abdelhabib Semlali,1 Maroua Jalouli,2 Narasimha Reddy Parine,1 Abdullah Al Amri,1 Maha Arafah,3 Abdulrahman Al Naeem,4 Sanaa Abdullah Ajaj,5 Mahmoud Rouabhia,6 Mohammad Saud Alanazi1 1Genome Research Chair, Department of Biochemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 2Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec, L’Hôtel-Dieu de Québec, Department of Molecular Biology, Medical Biochemistry and Pathology, Université Laval, Quebec, QC, Canada; 3College of Medicine, King Saud University, 4Department of Women’s Imaging, King Fahad Medical City, 5Department of Family Medicine, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 6Groupe de Recherche en Écologie Buccale, Department of Stomatology, Faculty of Dentistry, Université Laval, Quebec, QC, Canada Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate the association of the common polymorphisms of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4 with breast cancer development in the Saudi Arabian population. Four TLR-4 polymorphisms (rs2770150, rs10759931, rs10759932, and rs4986790 were studied using 127 breast cancer patients and 117 controls. Relative expression of TLR-4 protein in the breast tumor and the matched normal breast tissues was determined in a large cohort of 70 clinical breast samples in a tissue micro-array format by immunohistochemistry using a specific anti-TLR-4 antibody. Our results demonstrated an increase in TLR-4 expression in estrogen receptor (ER-, postmenopausal breast cancer patients compared to normal. We also demonstrated that the G allele of single-nucleotide polymorphism rs10759931 was found to be significantly higher in frequency among patients (36.3% compared to the control group (26.7%, suggesting that this polymorphism is strongly associated with the development of breast cancer in this ethnic population. In addition, the TLR-4 polymorphism rs2770150 was shown to be highly correlated with breast cancer in patients over 48 years

  10. Recruitment of Cbl-b to B cell antigen receptor couples antigen recognition to Toll-like receptor 9 activation in late endosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Veselits

    Full Text Available Casitas B-lineage lymphoma-b (Cbl-b is a ubiquitin ligase (E3 that modulates signaling by tagging molecules for degradation. It is a complex protein with multiple domains and binding partners that are not involved in ubiquitinating substrates. Herein, we demonstrate that Cbl-b, but not c-Cbl, is recruited to the clustered B cell antigen receptor (BCR and that Cbl-b is required for entry of endocytosed BCRs into late endosomes. The E3 activity of Cbl-b is not necessary for BCR endocytic trafficking. Rather, the ubiquitin associated (UBA domain is required. Furthermore, the Cbl-b UBA domain is sufficient to confer the receptor trafficking functions of Cbl-b on c-Cbl. Cbl-b is also required for entry of the Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9 into late endosomes and for the in vitro activation of TLR9 by BCR-captured ligands. These data indicate that Cbl-b acts as a scaffolding molecule to coordinate the delivery of the BCR and TLR9 into subcellular compartments required for productively delivering BCR-captured ligands to TLR9.

  11. Lipids Derived from Virulent Francisella tularensis Broadly Inhibit Pulmonary Inflammation via Toll-Like Receptor 2 and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Deborah D.; Ireland, Robin; Alinger, Joshua B.; Small, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen that causes an acute lethal respiratory disease in humans. The heightened virulence of the pathogen is linked to its unique ability to inhibit Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated inflammatory responses. The bacterial component and mechanism of this inhibition are unknown. Here we show that lipids isolated from virulent but not attenuated strains of F. tularensis are not detected by host cells, inhibit production of proinflammatory cytokines by primary macrophages in response to known TLR ligands, and suppress neutrophil recruitment in vivo. We further show that lipid-mediated inhibition of inflammation is dependent on TLR2, MyD88, and the nuclear hormone and fatty acid receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). Pathogen lipid-mediated interference with inflammatory responses through the engagement of TLR2 and PPARα represents a novel manipulation of host signaling pathways consistent with the ability of highly virulent F. tularensis to efficiently evade host immune responses. PMID:23925884

  12. Pre-treatment with Toll-like receptor 4 antagonist inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced preterm uterine contractility, cytokines, and prostaglandins in rhesus monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams Waldorf, Kristina M.; Persing, David; Novy, Miles J.; Sadowsky, Drew W.; Gravett, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    Intra-uterine infection, which occurs in the majority of early preterm births, triggers an immune response culminating in preterm labor. We hypothesized that blockade of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced immune responses by a Toll-like receptor 4 antagonist (TLR4A) would prevent elevations in amniotic fluid (AF) cytokines, prostaglandins, and uterine contractility. Chronically catheterized rhesus monkeys at 128-147 days gestation received intra-amniotic infusions of either: 1) saline (n=6), 2) LPS (0.15-10μg; n=4), or 3) TLR4A pre-treatment with LPS (10 μg) one hour later (n=4). AF cytokines, prostaglandins, and uterine contractility were compared using oneway ANOVA with Bonferroni-adjusted pairwise comparisons. Compared to saline controls, LPS induced significant elevations in AF IL-8, TNF-α, PGE2, PGF2α, and uterine contractility (p<0.05). In contrast, TLR4A pre-treatment inhibited LPS-induced uterine activity and was associated with significantly lower AF IL-8, TNF-α, PGE2, and PGF2α versus LPS alone (p<0.05). Toll-like receptor antagonists, together with antibiotics, may delay or prevent infection-associated preterm birth. PMID:18187405

  13. Ocean acidification weakens the immune response of blood clam through hampering the NF-kappa β and toll-like receptor pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Saixi; Shi, Wei; Guo, Cheng; Zhao, Xinguo; Han, Yu; Peng, Chao; Chai, Xueliang; Liu, Guangxu

    2016-07-01

    The impact of pCO2 driven ocean acidification on marine bivalve immunity remains poorly understood. To date, this impact has only been investigated in a few bivalve species and the underlying molecular mechanism remains unknown. In the present study, the effects of the realistic future ocean pCO2 levels (pH at 8.1, 7.8, and 7.4) on the total number of haemocyte cells (THC), phagocytosis status, blood cell types composition, and expression levels of twelve genes from the NF-kappa β signaling and toll-like receptor pathways of a typical bottom burrowing bivalve, blood clam (Tegillarca granosa), were investigated. The results obtained showed that while both THC number and phagocytosis frequency were significantly reduced, the percentage of red and basophil granulocytes were significantly decreased and increased, respectively, upon exposure to elevated pCO2. In addition, exposure to pCO2 acidified seawater generally led to a significant down-regulation in the inducer and key response genes of NF-kappa β signaling and toll-like receptor pathways. The results of the present study revealed that ocean acidification may hamper immune responses of the bivalve T. granosa which subsequently render individuals more susceptible to pathogens attacks such as those from virus and bacteria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Toll-like receptor 4 is involved in the cell cycle modulation and required for effective human cytomegalovirus infection in THP-1 macrophages

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    Arcangeletti, Maria-Cristina, E-mail: mariacristina.arcangeletti@unipr.it [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Germini, Diego; Rodighiero, Isabella [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Mirandola, Prisco [Department of Biomedical, Biotechnological and Translational Sciences, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); De Conto, Flora; Medici, Maria-Cristina [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Gatti, Rita [Department of Biomedical, Biotechnological and Translational Sciences, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Chezzi, Carlo; Calderaro, Adriana [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Parma, Parma (Italy)

    2013-05-25

    Suitable host cell metabolic conditions are fundamental for the effective development of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) lytic cycle. Indeed, several studies have demonstrated the ability of this virus to interfere with cell cycle regulation, mainly by blocking proliferating cells in G1 or G1/S. In the present study, we demonstrate that HCMV deregulates the cell cycle of THP-1 macrophages (a cell line irreversibly arrested in G0) by pushing them into S and G2 phases. Moreover, we show that HCMV infection of THP-1 macrophages leads to Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation. Since various studies have indicated TLR4 to be involved in promoting cell proliferation, here we investigate the possible role of TLR4 in the observed HCMV-induced cell cycle perturbation. Our data strongly support TLR4 as a mediator of HCMV-triggered cell cycle activation in THP-1 macrophages favouring, in turn, the development of an efficient viral lytic cycle. - Highlights: ► We studied HCMV infection impact on THP-1 macrophage cell cycle. ► We analysed the role played by Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 upon HCMV infection. ► HCMV pushes THP-1 macrophages (i.e. resting cells) to re-enter the cell cycle. ► TLR4 pathway inhibition strongly affects the effectiveness of HCMV replication. ► TLR4 pathway inhibition significantly decreases HCMV-induced cell cycle re-entry.

  15. Astragalus mongholicus regulate the Toll-like-receptor 4 meditated signal transduction of dendritic cells to restrain stomach cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ye; Li, Xueliang; Li, Hongxia; Lu, Qing; Sun, Guoping; Chen, Hongjing

    2014-01-01

    According to the traditional view, we depend on three methods to treat tumors; surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, these methods have its own limitations in application. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is one of the oldest healing systems. Astragalus mongholicus (AMs) that is the common herbal medicine, the biggest part of TCM, have been proved to be effective in treating cancers from lots of clinical cases. However, we have not fully understood the anti-tumor mechanism of AMs, and this has lead to some doubt for some Western-Medicine scholars and restricts its wide use. The main objective of this research is to discuss the effect and mechanism of AMs to human stomach cancer. To observe the effect and mechanism of tumor treatment by AMs, we have done the research from three major aspects, the influence of DCs, the inhibition of tumor in vitro as well as the animal studies in vivo after treatment. First, we culture the mouse dendritic cells (DCs) from bone marrow of mouse hind legs according to the method using Interleukin-4(IL-4) and Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), which refer to the way established by Inaba (Inaba K, 1992). And then we investigate the growth-rate of the DCs co-cultured with AMs injection. We analyze the expression of the Toll-like-receptor 4 (TLR4), with SYBR-Green I Real-time PCR and the I-kappa-B-alpha (IκB-α) with Western-Blot, the main regulatory protein to control nuclear factor NFκB-p65 nuclear translocation. Second, we choose the human gastric cancer cell lines MKN 45 as the target cell, which was co-cultured with DCs, T cells from spleen of mouse and AMs injection, and use MTT assay to judge the amount of cell lines and Immnunoflurescene to analyze the expression of anti-active caspase 3 pAb anti-PARP P85 fragment pAb, the mark of apoptosis of cells. Third, we have conducted the animal studies beside the basic experiment in vitro. The nude mouse developed stomach cancer, due to intra

  16. Inhibition of Toll-like receptor 2-mediated interleukin-8 production in Cystic Fibrosis airway epithelial cells via the alpha7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Greene, Catherine M

    2010-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disorder characterised by chronic inflammation of the airways. The lung manifestations of CF include colonization with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus leading to neutrophil-dominated airway inflammation and tissue damage. Inflammation in the CF lung is initiated by microbial components which activate the innate immune response via Toll-like receptors (TLRs), increasing airway epithelial cell production of proinflammatory mediators such as the neutrophil chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8). Thus modulation of TLR function represents a therapeutic approach for CF. Nicotine is a naturally occurring plant alkaloid. Although it is negatively associated with cigarette smoking and cardiovascular damage, nicotine also has anti-inflammatory properties. Here we investigate the inhibitory capacity of nicotine against TLR2- and TLR4-induced IL-8 production by CFTE29o- airway epithelial cells, determine the role of alpha7-nAChR (nicotinic acetylcholine receptor) in these events, and provide data to support the potential use of safe nicotine analogues as anti-inflammatories for CF.

  17. Cross-talk between toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR(2) ) is involved in vascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, M; Vellecco, V; Harrington, L; Brancaleone, V; Roviezzo, F; Mattace Raso, G; Ianaro, A; Lungarella, G; De Palma, R; Meli, R; Cirino, G

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) and toll-like receptors (TLRs) are involved in innate immune responses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible cross-talk between PAR(2) and TLR4 in vessels in physiological condition and how it varies following stimulation of TLR4 by using in vivo and ex vivo models. Thoracic aortas were harvested from both naïve and endotoxaemic rats for in vitro studies. Arterial blood pressure was monitored in anaesthetized rats in vivo. LPS was used as a TLR4 agonist while PAR(2) activating peptide (AP) was used as a PAR(2) agonist. Aortas harvested from TLR4(-/-) mice were also used to characterize the PAR(2) response. PAR(2) , but not TLR4, expression was enhanced in aortas of endotoxaemic rats. PAR(2) AP-induced vasorelaxation was increased in aortic rings of LPS-treated rats. TLR4 inhibitors, curcumine and resveratrol, reduced PAR(2) AP-induced vasorelaxation and PAR(2) AP-induced hypotension in both naïve and endotoxaemic rats. Finally, in aortic rings from TLR4(-/-) mice, the expression of PAR(2) was reduced and the PAR(2) AP-induced vasodilatation impaired compared with those from wild-type mice and both resveratrol and curcumine were ineffective. Cross-talk between PAR(2) and TLR4 contributes to vascular homeostasis. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  18. Cross-talk between toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is involved in vascular function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, M; Vellecco, V; Harrington, L; Brancaleone, V; Roviezzo, F; Mattace Raso, G; Ianaro, A; Lungarella, G; De Palma, R; Meli, R; Cirino, G

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) and toll-like receptors (TLRs) are involved in innate immune responses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible cross-talk between PAR2 and TLR4 in vessels in physiological condition and how it varies following stimulation of TLR4 by using in vivo and ex vivo models. Experimental Approach Thoracic aortas were harvested from both naïve and endotoxaemic rats for in vitro studies. Arterial blood pressure was monitored in anaesthetized rats in vivo. LPS was used as a TLR4 agonist while PAR2 activating peptide (AP) was used as a PAR2 agonist. Aortas harvested from TLR4–/– mice were also used to characterize the PAR2 response. Key Results PAR2, but not TLR4, expression was enhanced in aortas of endotoxaemic rats. PAR2AP-induced vasorelaxation was increased in aortic rings of LPS-treated rats. TLR4 inhibitors, curcumine and resveratrol, reduced PAR2AP-induced vasorelaxation and PAR2AP-induced hypotension in both naïve and endotoxaemic rats. Finally, in aortic rings from TLR4–/– mice, the expression of PAR2 was reduced and the PAR2AP-induced vasodilatation impaired compared with those from wild-type mice and both resveratrol and curcumine were ineffective. Conclusions and Implications Cross-talk between PAR2 and TLR4 contributes to vascular homeostasis. PMID:22957757

  19. High-mobility group box 1 inhibits gastric ulcer healing through Toll-like receptor 4 and receptor for advanced glycation end products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Nadatani

    Full Text Available High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 was initially discovered as a nuclear protein that interacts with DNA as a chromatin-associated non-histone protein to stabilize nucleosomes and to regulate the transcription of many genes in the nucleus. Once leaked or actively secreted into the extracellular environment, HMGB1 activates inflammatory pathways by stimulating multiple receptors, including Toll-like receptor (TLR 2, TLR4, and receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE, leading to tissue injury. Although HMGB1's ability to induce inflammation has been well documented, no studies have examined the role of HMGB1 in wound healing in the gastrointestinal field. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of HMGB1 and its receptors in the healing of gastric ulcers. We also investigated which receptor among TLR2, TLR4, or RAGE mediates HMGB1's effects on ulcer healing. Gastric ulcers were induced by serosal application of acetic acid in mice, and gastric tissues were processed for further evaluation. The induction of ulcer increased the immunohistochemical staining of cytoplasmic HMGB1 and elevated serum HMGB1 levels. Ulcer size, myeloperoxidase (MPO activity, and the expression of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα mRNA peaked on day 4. Intraperitoneal administration of HMGB1 delayed ulcer healing and elevated MPO activity and TNFα expression. In contrast, administration of anti-HMGB1 antibody promoted ulcer healing and reduced MPO activity and TNFα expression. TLR4 and RAGE deficiency enhanced ulcer healing and reduced the level of TNFα, whereas ulcer healing in TLR2 knockout (KO mice was similar to that in wild-type mice. In TLR4 KO and RAGE KO mice, exogenous HMGB1 did not affect ulcer healing and TNFα expression. Thus, we showed that HMGB1 is a complicating factor in the gastric ulcer healing process, which acts through TLR4 and RAGE to induce excessive inflammatory responses.

  20. TGFβ activated kinase 1 (TAK1 at the crossroad of B cell receptor and Toll-like receptor 9 signaling pathways in human B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dániel Szili

    Full Text Available B cell development and activation are regulated by combined signals mediated by the B cell receptor (BCR, receptors for the B-cell activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF-R and the innate receptor, Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9. However, the underlying mechanisms by which these signals cooperate in human B cells remain unclear. Our aim was to elucidate the key signaling molecules at the crossroads of BCR, BAFF-R and TLR9 mediated pathways and to follow the functional consequences of costimulation.Therefore we stimulated purified human B cells by combinations of anti-Ig, B-cell activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF and the TLR9 agonist, CpG oligodeoxynucleotide. Phosphorylation status of various signaling molecules, B cell proliferation, cytokine secretion, plasma blast generation and the frequency of IgG producing cells were investigated. We have found that BCR induced signals cooperate with BAFF-R- and TLR9-mediated signals at different levels of cell activation. BCR and BAFF- as well as TLR9 and BAFF-mediated signals cooperate at NFκB activation, while BCR and TLR9 synergistically costimulate mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs, ERK, JNK and p38. We show here for the first time that the MAP3K7 (TGF beta activated kinase, TAK1 is responsible for the synergistic costimulation of B cells by BCR and TLR9, resulting in an enhanced cell proliferation, plasma blast generation, cytokine and antibody production. Specific inhibitor of TAK1 as well as knocking down TAK1 by siRNA abrogates the synergistic signals. We conclude that TAK1 is a key regulator of receptor crosstalk between BCR and TLR9, thus plays a critical role in B cell development and activation.

  1. The expression of Toll-like receptor 4, 7 and co-receptors in neurochemical sub-populations of rat trigeminal ganglion sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helley, M P; Abate, W; Jackson, S K; Bennett, J H; Thompson, S W N

    2015-12-03

    The recent discovery that mammalian nociceptors express Toll-like receptors (TLRs) has raised the possibility that these cells directly detect and respond to pathogens with implications for either direct nociceptor activation or sensitization. A range of neuronal TLRs have been identified, however a detailed description regarding the distribution of expression of these receptors within sub-populations of sensory neurons is lacking. There is also some debate as to the composition of the TLR4 receptor complex on sensory neurons. Here we use a range of techniques to quantify the expression of TLR4, TLR7 and some associated molecules within neurochemically-identified sub-populations of trigeminal (TG) and dorsal root (DRG) ganglion sensory neurons. We also detail the pattern of expression and co-expression of two isoforms of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase (LPCAT), a phospholipid remodeling enzyme previously shown to be involved in the lipopolysaccharide-dependent TLR4 response in monocytes, within sensory ganglia. Immunohistochemistry shows that both TLR4 and TLR7 preferentially co-localize with transient receptor potential vallinoid 1 (TRPV1) and purinergic receptor P2X ligand-gated ion channel 3 (P2X3), markers of nociceptor populations, within both TG and DRG. A gene expression profile shows that TG sensory neurons express a range of TLR-associated molecules. LPCAT1 is expressed by a proportion of both nociceptors and non-nociceptive neurons. LPCAT2 immunostaining is absent from neuronal profiles within both TG and DRG and is confined to non-neuronal cell types under naïve conditions. Together, our results show that nociceptors express the molecular machinery required to directly respond to pathogenic challenge independently from the innate immune system. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. High-Mobility Group Box 1 Inhibits Gastric Ulcer Healing through Toll-Like Receptor 4 and Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadatani, Yuji; Watanabe, Toshio; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Ohkawa, Fumikazu; Takeda, Shogo; Higashimori, Akira; Sogawa, Mitsue; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Shiba, Masatsugu; Watanabe, Kenji; Tominaga, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Takeuchi, Koji; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) was initially discovered as a nuclear protein that interacts with DNA as a chromatin-associated non-histone protein to stabilize nucleosomes and to regulate the transcription of many genes in the nucleus. Once leaked or actively secreted into the extracellular environment, HMGB1 activates inflammatory pathways by stimulating multiple receptors, including Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, TLR4, and receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), leading to tissue injury. Although HMGB1’s ability to induce inflammation has been well documented, no studies have examined the role of HMGB1 in wound healing in the gastrointestinal field. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of HMGB1 and its receptors in the healing of gastric ulcers. We also investigated which receptor among TLR2, TLR4, or RAGE mediates HMGB1’s effects on ulcer healing. Gastric ulcers were induced by serosal application of acetic acid in mice, and gastric tissues were processed for further evaluation. The induction of ulcer increased the immunohistochemical staining of cytoplasmic HMGB1 and elevated serum HMGB1 levels. Ulcer size, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and the expression of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) mRNA peaked on day 4. Intraperitoneal administration of HMGB1 delayed ulcer healing and elevated MPO activity and TNFα expression. In contrast, administration of anti-HMGB1 antibody promoted ulcer healing and reduced MPO activity and TNFα expression. TLR4 and RAGE deficiency enhanced ulcer healing and reduced the level of TNFα, whereas ulcer healing in TLR2 knockout (KO) mice was similar to that in wild-type mice. In TLR4 KO and RAGE KO mice, exogenous HMGB1 did not affect ulcer healing and TNFα expression. Thus, we showed that HMGB1 is a complicating factor in the gastric ulcer healing process, which acts through TLR4 and RAGE to induce excessive inflammatory responses. PMID:24244627

  3. Autoimmune Regulator Expression in DC2.4 Cells Regulates the NF-κB Signaling and Cytokine Expression of the Toll-Like Receptor 3 Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitong Sun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune regulator (Aire mutations result in autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy (APECED, which manifests as multi-organ autoimmunity and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC. Indendritic cells (DCs, pattern recognition receptors (PRR, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs, are closely involved in the recognition of various pathogens, activating the intercellular signaling pathway, followed by the activation of transcription factors and the expression of downstream genes, which take part in mediating the immune response and maintaining immune tolerance. In this study, we found that Aire up-regulated TLR3 expression and modulated the downstream cytokine expression and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB of the TLR3 signaling pathway.

  4. Two Neisseria meningitidis strains with different ability to stimulate toll-like receptor 4 through the MyD88-independent pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, T.H.; Paludan, Søren Riis; Kilian, Mogens

    2006-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis causes acute severe diseases, including sepsis and meningitis, and more benign manifestations such as chronic meningococcemia or colonization of the upper respiratory tract. The inflammatory response, which contributes to the pathogenesis of meningococcal disease......, is initiated by pattern recognition receptors, among which Toll-like receptors (TLR)s have been ascribed a particularly important role. We have previously demonstrated that N. meningitidis induce proinflammatory cytokine expression through TLR2 and TLR4. Here we characterize the molecular basis...... for differential activation of the inflammatory response by two N. meningitidis strains. This difference was due to differential ability to activate signal transduction through TLR4, as HEK293 cells expressing TLR4 produced significantly different levels of interleukin-8 in response to these strains. At the level...

  5. Moraxella catarrhalis activates murine macrophages through multiple toll like receptors and has reduced clearance in lungs from TLR4 mutant mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdaus Hassan

    Full Text Available Moraxella catarrhalis is a gram negative bacterium and a leading causative agent of otitis media (OM in children. Several recent reports have provided strong evidence for an association between toll like receptors and OM. It has been found that both Streptococcus pneumoniae and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae activate host protective immune responses through toll like receptors (TLRs, however, the precise mechanism by which Moraxella catarrhalis initiates the host immune response is currently unknown. In this report, using murine macrophages generated from a series of knock-out mice, we have demonstrated that M. catarrhalis lipooligosaccharide (LOS and either heat killed or live bacteria are recognized by one or more TLRs. LOS activates the host immune response through a membrane bound CD14-TLR4 complex, while both heat killed and live M.cat require recognition by multiple toll like receptors such as TLR2, TLR4 and TLR9 without the requirement of CD14. We have also shown that M.cat stimuli are capable of triggering the host innate immune response by both MyD88- and TRIF- dependent signaling pathways. We further showed that M.cat induced activation of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK is essential in order to achieve optimal secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α. We finally showed that TLR4 mutant C3H/HeJ mice produce significantly lower levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 in vivo, An increased bacterial loads at 12 and 24 hours (P<0.001 in their lungs upon challenge with live M.cat in an aerosol chamber compared to wild-type (WT control mice. These data suggest that TLRs are crucial for an effective innate immune response induced by M.cat. The results of these studies contribute to an increased understanding of molecular mechanism and possible novel treatment strategies for diseases caused by M.cat by specifically targeting TLRs and their signaling pathways.

  6. Rotavirus Activates Lymphocytes from Non-Obese Diabetic Mice by Triggering Toll-Like Receptor 7 Signaling and Interferon Production in Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pane, Jessica A.; Webster, Nicole L.; Coulson, Barbara S.

    2014-01-01

    It has been proposed that rotavirus infection promotes the progression of genetically-predisposed children to type 1 diabetes, a chronic autoimmune disease marked by infiltration of activated lymphocytes into pancreatic islets. Non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice provide a model for the human disease. Infection of adult NOD mice with rhesus monkey rotavirus (RRV) accelerates diabetes onset, without evidence of pancreatic infection. Rather, RRV spreads to the pancreatic and mesenteric lymph nodes where its association with antigen-presenting cells, including dendritic cells, induces cellular maturation. RRV infection increases levels of the class I major histocompatibility complex on B cells and proinflammatory cytokine expression by T cells at these sites. In autoimmunity-resistant mice and human mononuclear cells from blood, rotavirus-exposed plasmacytoid dendritic cells contribute to bystander polyclonal B cell activation through type I interferon expression. Here we tested the hypothesis that rotavirus induces bystander activation of lymphocytes from NOD mice by provoking dendritic cell activation and proinflammatory cytokine secretion. NOD mouse splenocytes were stimulated with rotavirus and assessed for activation by flow cytometry. This stimulation activated antigen-presenting cells and B cells independently of virus strain and replicative ability. Instead, activation depended on virus dose and was prevented by blockade of virus decapsidation, inhibition of endosomal acidification and interference with signaling through Toll-like receptor 7 and the type I interferon receptor. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells were more efficiently activated than conventional dendritic cells by RRV, and contributed to the activation of B and T cells, including islet-autoreactive CD8+ T cells. Thus, a double-stranded RNA virus can induce Toll-like receptor 7 signaling, resulting in lymphocyte activation. Our findings suggest that bystander activation mediated by type I interferon

  7. Rotavirus activates lymphocytes from non-obese diabetic mice by triggering toll-like receptor 7 signaling and interferon production in plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Pane

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that rotavirus infection promotes the progression of genetically-predisposed children to type 1 diabetes, a chronic autoimmune disease marked by infiltration of activated lymphocytes into pancreatic islets. Non-obese diabetic (NOD mice provide a model for the human disease. Infection of adult NOD mice with rhesus monkey rotavirus (RRV accelerates diabetes onset, without evidence of pancreatic infection. Rather, RRV spreads to the pancreatic and mesenteric lymph nodes where its association with antigen-presenting cells, including dendritic cells, induces cellular maturation. RRV infection increases levels of the class I major histocompatibility complex on B cells and proinflammatory cytokine expression by T cells at these sites. In autoimmunity-resistant mice and human mononuclear cells from blood, rotavirus-exposed plasmacytoid dendritic cells contribute to bystander polyclonal B cell activation through type I interferon expression. Here we tested the hypothesis that rotavirus induces bystander activation of lymphocytes from NOD mice by provoking dendritic cell activation and proinflammatory cytokine secretion. NOD mouse splenocytes were stimulated with rotavirus and assessed for activation by flow cytometry. This stimulation activated antigen-presenting cells and B cells independently of virus strain and replicative ability. Instead, activation depended on virus dose and was prevented by blockade of virus decapsidation, inhibition of endosomal acidification and interference with signaling through Toll-like receptor 7 and the type I interferon receptor. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells were more efficiently activated than conventional dendritic cells by RRV, and contributed to the activation of B and T cells, including islet-autoreactive CD8+ T cells. Thus, a double-stranded RNA virus can induce Toll-like receptor 7 signaling, resulting in lymphocyte activation. Our findings suggest that bystander activation mediated by type I

  8. Class A scavenger receptor 1 (MSR1 restricts hepatitis C virus replication by mediating toll-like receptor 3 recognition of viral RNAs produced in neighboring cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromichi Dansako

    Full Text Available Persistent infections with hepatitis C virus (HCV may result in life-threatening liver disease, including cirrhosis and cancer, and impose an important burden on human health. Understanding how the virus is capable of achieving persistence in the majority of those infected is thus an important goal. Although HCV has evolved multiple mechanisms to disrupt and block cellular signaling pathways involved in the induction of interferon (IFN responses, IFN-stimulated gene (ISG expression is typically prominent in the HCV-infected liver. Here, we show that Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3 expressed within uninfected hepatocytes is capable of sensing infection in adjacent cells, initiating a local antiviral response that partially restricts HCV replication. We demonstrate that this is dependent upon the expression of class A scavenger receptor type 1 (MSR1. MSR1 binds extracellular dsRNA, mediating its endocytosis and transport toward the endosome where it is engaged by TLR3, thereby triggering IFN responses in both infected and uninfected cells. RNAi-mediated knockdown of MSR1 expression blocks TLR3 sensing of HCV in infected hepatocyte cultures, leading to increased cellular permissiveness to virus infection. Exogenous expression of Myc-MSR1 restores TLR3 signaling in MSR1-depleted cells with subsequent induction of an antiviral state. A series of conserved basic residues within the carboxy-terminus of the collagen superfamily domain of MSR1 are required for binding and transport of dsRNA, and likely facilitate acidification-dependent release of dsRNA at the site of TLR3 expression in the endosome. Our findings reveal MSR1 to be a critical component of a TLR3-mediated pattern recognition receptor response that exerts an antiviral state in both infected and uninfected hepatocytes, thereby limiting the impact of HCV proteins that disrupt IFN signaling in infected cells and restricting the spread of HCV within the liver.

  9. Inhibition of toll-like receptor 3-4 with ethanolic extract of propolis on innate immunity in diabetes mellitus mice (Mus musculus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pristiwanto, Bambang; Soewondo, A.; Sumitro, Sutiman B.; Rifa'i, Muhaimin

    2017-05-01

    One of the most significant problems today is to treat the effects of metabolic diseases, such as diabetes. Thus, this study evaluated the ability of an ethanolic extract of propolis (EEP) to reduce inflammation in diabetes treatment. The used mice with STZ-induced diabetes mellitus (SID) and the expression of Toll-Like Receptor 3-4 was analyzed in their innate immunity cells. The SID mice had a higher TLR 3-4 expression compared with the healthy control group. Treatment of EEP in SID using three different doses significantly decreased the number of B cells with TLR 3-4 expression. This suggesting that EEP treatment decreases TLR3 & TLR4 expression on innate immunity (especially B cells) from over expression in SID which can affect the acute inflammatory and aggravate the diabetes condition. Even relatively low doses of propolis extract can decrease TLR3 and TLR4 expressed by B cell.

  10. Polymorphisms in the Toll-Like Receptor and the IL-23/IL-17 Pathways Were Associated with Susceptibility to Inflammatory Bowel Disease in a Danish Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bank, Steffen; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Burisch, Johan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), result from the combined effects of susceptibility genes and environmental factors. Previous studies have shown that polymorphisms in the Toll-like receptor (TLR), the apoptosis, the IL-23/IL-17...... and the interferon gamma (IFNG) pathways are associated with risk of both CD and UC. METHODS: Using a candidate gene approach, 21 functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 15 genes were assessed in a clinical homogeneous group of severely diseased ethnic Danish patients consisting of 624 patients with CD...... of TLR1 and TLR5 was associated with increased risk of both CD and UC and CD, respectively. This supports that the host microbial composition or environmental factors in the gut are involved in risk of IBD. Furthermore, genetically determined high activity of the IL-23/IL-17 pathway was associated...

  11. Toll-like receptor-induced granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor secretion is impaired in Crohn's disease by nucleotide oligomerization domain 2-dependent and -independent pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brosbøl-Ravnborg, A; Hvas, C L; Agnholt, J

    2008-01-01

    and display an impaired NOD2-dependent down-regulation of TNF-alpha secretion. The defect in GM-CSF secretion suggests a hitherto unknown role of NOD2 in the pathogenesis of CD and is consistent with the hypothesis that impaired GM-CSF secretion in part constitutes a NOD2-dependent disease risk factor......., nucleotide oligomerization domain 2) are associated with Crohn's disease (CD). We investigated the impact of NOD2 polymorphisms on cytokine secretion and proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in response to Toll-like receptor (TLR) and NOD2 ligands. Based on NOD2 SNP analyses, 41 CD...... patients and 12 healthy controls were studied. PBMCs were stimulated with NOD2 and TLR ligands. After 18 h culture supernatants were measured using multiplex assays for the presence of human cytokines granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin (IL)-1 beta and tumour necrosis...

  12. Toll-like receptor-induced granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor secretion is impaired in Crohn's disease by nucleotide oligomerization domain 2-dependent and -independent pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnborg, Anne Brosbøl-; Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Agnholt, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    and display an impaired NOD2-dependent down-regulation of TNF-alpha secretion. The defect in GM-CSF secretion suggests a hitherto unknown role of NOD2 in the pathogenesis of CD and is consistent with the hypothesis that impaired GM-CSF secretion in part constitutes a NOD2-dependent disease risk factor......., nucleotide oligomerization domain 2) are associated with Crohn's disease (CD). We investigated the impact of NOD2 polymorphisms on cytokine secretion and proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in response to Toll-like receptor (TLR) and NOD2 ligands. Based on NOD2 SNP analyses, 41 CD...... patients and 12 healthy controls were studied. PBMCs were stimulated with NOD2 and TLR ligands. After 18 h culture supernatants were measured using multiplex assays for the presence of human cytokines granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin (IL)-1beta and tumour necrosis...

  13. Susceptibility to paratuberculosis infection in cattle is associated withsingle nucleotide polymorphisms in Toll-like receptor 2 which modulate immune responses against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koets, A; Santema, W; Oostenriik, D

    2010-01-01

    40 and IL1β when stimulated with Map compared to cells derived from TLR2-1903 CT and CC genotypes. Also, T cell proliferative responses to mycobacterial antigens were higher in animals with a TLR2-1903 TT genotype. In conclusion, we have found a significant association between SNP TLR2-1903 T......Paratuberculosis is a chronic intestinal infection in ruminants, caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map). To study the role of host genetics in disease susceptibility, the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) gene, selected based on its potential role in immunity to mycobacterial...... paratuberculosis-infected animals and 12 age-matched healthy herd mates revealed 21 different SNP. The TLR2-1903 T/C SNP was significantly associated with resistance to Map. This and four additional TLR2 SNP were studied in a subsequent observational field study with 553 cows from farms with paratuberculosis...

  14. Mycotoxin binder improves growth rate in piglets associated with reduction of toll-like receptor-4 and increase of tight junction protein gene expression in gut mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linghong Jin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deoxynivalenol (DON is a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium species in the field, commonly found in cereal grains, which negatively affects performances and health of animals. Mycotoxin binders are supposed to reduce the toxicity of mycotoxins. Method The effect of a mycotoxin binder (containing acid-activated bentonite, clinoptilolite, yeast cell walls and organic acids on growth performance and gut health was studied. Hundred and twenty weaning piglets were allocated to 4 treatments, with 5 pens of 6 piglets each, arranged in a 2 × 2 factorial design: control diet; control diet with 1 kg/t binder; control diet with DON; and control diet with DON and 1 kg/t binder. From d0–14, the diet of DON-challenged groups was artificially contaminated with a mixture of DON (2.6 mg/kg, 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (0.1 mg/kg and 15-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (0.3 mg/kg, after which the total contamination level was reduced to 1 mg/kg, until d37. On d14, one pig from each pen was euthanized and distal small intestinal mucosa samples were collected for the assessment of intestinal permeability, and gene expression of tight junction proteins, toll-like receptor 4, inflammatory cytokines and intestinal alkaline phosphatase. Results After 37 d, there were no differences in growth performance between control and DON-challenged groups (P > 0.05. Nevertheless, groups that received diets with binder had a significantly higher average daily gain (ADG and average daily feed intake (ADFI for the first 14 d as well as for the whole period, compared to groups without binder (P ≤ 0.05. Groups with binder in the diet also exhibited lower expression of toll-like receptor 4 in distal small intestinal mucosa at d14, compared to groups without binder (P ≤ 0.05. Interestingly, comparing the two DON treatments, piglets fed DON and binder had significantly higher ADFI and ADG compared to those with only DON for the first 14-d (P ≤ 0.05. Addition of

  15. Toll-like receptor induced pro-interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 in monocytes are lower in healthy infants compared to adults.

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    Daniel H Libraty

    Full Text Available Infants have long been known to have higher infectious diseases morbidity and mortality and suboptimal vaccination responses compared to older children and adults. A variety of differences in innate and adaptive immune responses have been described between these two groups. We compared Toll-like receptor (TLR-induced production of pro-interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α between 2-month-old infants and adults. TLR 7/8-induced production of pro-IL-1β and IL-6 in monocytes was lower in 2-month-old infants compared to adults. There was no difference in TLR 7/8-induced production of TNF-α. Lower TLR-induced production of pro-IL-1β and IL-6 in innate immune cells during early infancy likely contributes to suboptimal vaccine responses and infectious diseases susceptibility.

  16. Betulinic acid and fluvastatin exhibits synergistic effect on toll-like receptor-4 mediated anti-atherogenic mechanism in type II collagen induced arthritis.

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    Mathew, Limi Elizabeth; Rajagopal, Vrinda; A, Helen

    2017-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major problem during rheumatoid arthritis which leads to morbidity and mortality in arthritic patients. So the present study emphasizes combinatorial effect of Betulinic acid, a triterpenoid and fluvastatin, an HMG CoA reductase inhibitor on atherogenesis during arthritis. Arthritis was induced by bovine type II collagen dissolved in 0.01M acetic acid at a concentration of 4mg/mL and emulsified in equal volume of incomplete Freund's adjuvant. Betulinic acid (2mg/kg) and fluvastatin (5mg/kg) alone and in combination was administered orally from day 14 to 60. At the end of 60days, tissues and blood were isolated for evaluation of biochemical parameters. Treatment with betulinic acid and fluvastatin showed significant (p<0.05) reduction in Arthritic index, Rheumatoid factor, C-reactive protein (CRP), total lipids and anti-CCP (cyclic citrullinated peptide) antibody. Anti-inflammatory enzyme activities and oxidative stress were significantly decreased in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells by the administration of both betulinic acid and fluvastatin than alone treatments. Combination therapy was found to be a potential enhancer of the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 whereas it significantly blocked the expression of Toll-like receptors-2 and 4, inflammatory markers such as interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, Interferon-γ, cell adhesion molecules and nuclear translocation of NF-kappa B in aorta than drug alone treated groups. So the present study summarizes a combination therapy of betulinic acid and fluvastatin that reduces the risk of both rheumatoid arthritis and CVD by modulating the expression of various inflammatory mediators through Toll-like receptors-4-NF-κB downstream signaling pathway, atherogenic index and oxidative stress in collagen induced arthritis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Spirulina lipopolysaccharides inhibit tumor growth in a Toll-like receptor 4-dependent manner by altering the cytokine milieu from interleukin-17/interleukin-23 to interferon-γ.

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    Okuyama, Hiromi; Tominaga, Akira; Fukuoka, Satoshi; Taguchi, Takahiro; Kusumoto, Yutaka; Ono, Shiro

    2017-02-01

    Th17 cells and the cytokine they produce, interleukin (IL)-17, play an important role in tumor progression in humans and in mice. IL-6 and IL-23 are critical cytokines for the differentiation and propagation of Th17 cells, respectively. Bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are known to stimulate immune cells to produce such inflammatory cytokines. Contrary to Escherichia coli (E. coli) LPS, LPS from Spirulina has low toxicity and barely induces in vivo production of IL-6 and IL-23 in mice. We examined the antitumor effects of Spirulina LPS compared to E. coli LPS in an MH134 hepatoma model. Administration of Spirulina LPS suppressed tumor growth in C3H/HeN mice, but not in Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mutant C3H/HeJ mice, by reducing serum levels of IL-17 and IL-23, while increasing interferon (IFN)-γ levels. The antitumor activity and IFN-γ production were mediated by T cells. Moreover, in vitro experiments showed that Spirulina LPS impaired the antigen-presenting function that supports the generation of IL-17-producing cells in a toll-like receptor (TLR)4-dependent manner. Of note, injection of anti-IL-17 antibody in tumor-bearing C3H/HeN mice in the absence of Spirulina LPS markedly suppressed tumor growth and augmented IFN-γ responses. Thus, our results support the notion that IFN-γ and IL-17/IL-23 mutually regulate Th17 and Th1 responses in tumor-bearing hosts, and Spirulina LPS modulates the balance of the IFN-γ-IL-17/IL-23 axis towards IFN-γ production, which leads to tumor inhibition. Furthermore, Spirulina LPS effectively inhibited the spontaneous development of mammary tumors. This study has important implications for the exploitation of TLR-based immunomodulators for cancer immunotherapy.

  18. Toll-like receptor 7/8 agonists stimulate plasmacytoid dendritic cells to initiate TH17-deviated acute contact dermatitis in human subjects.

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    Garzorz-Stark, Natalie; Lauffer, Felix; Krause, Linda; Thomas, Jenny; Atenhan, Anne; Franz, Regina; Roenneberg, Sophie; Boehner, Alexander; Jargosch, Manja; Batra, Richa; Mueller, Nikola S; Haak, Stefan; Groß, Christina; Groß, Olaf; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Theis, Fabian J; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B; Biedermann, Tilo; Eyerich, Stefanie; Eyerich, Kilian

    2018-04-01

    A standardized human model to study early pathogenic events in patients with psoriasis is missing. Activation of Toll-like receptor 7/8 by means of topical application of imiquimod is the most commonly used mouse model of psoriasis. We sought to investigate the potential of a human imiquimod patch test model to resemble human psoriasis. Imiquimod (Aldara 5% cream; 3M Pharmaceuticals, St Paul, Minn) was applied twice a week to the backs of volunteers (n = 18), and development of skin lesions was monitored over a period of 4 weeks. Consecutive biopsy specimens were taken for whole-genome expression analysis, histology, and T-cell isolation. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) were isolated from whole blood, stimulated with Toll-like receptor 7 agonist, and analyzed by means of extracellular flux analysis and real-time PCR. We demonstrate that imiquimod induces a monomorphic and self-limited inflammatory response in healthy subjects, as well as patients with psoriasis or eczema. The clinical and histologic phenotype, as well as the transcriptome, of imiquimod-induced inflammation in human skin resembles acute contact dermatitis rather than psoriasis. Nevertheless, the imiquimod model mimics the hallmarks of psoriasis. In contrast to classical contact dermatitis, in which myeloid dendritic cells sense haptens, pDCs are primary sensors of imiquimod. They respond with production of proinflammatory and T H 17-skewing cytokines, resulting in a T H 17 immune response with IL-23 as a key driver. In a proof-of-concept setting systemic treatment with ustekinumab diminished imiquimod-induced inflammation. In human subjects imiquimod induces contact dermatitis with the distinctive feature that pDCs are the primary sensors, leading to an IL-23/T H 17 deviation. Despite these shortcomings, the human imiquimod model might be useful to investigate early pathogenic events and prove molecular concepts in patients with psoriasis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier

  19. Porphyromonas gulae Activates Unprimed and Gamma Interferon-Primed Macrophages via the Pattern Recognition Receptors Toll-Like Receptor 2 (TLR2), TLR4, and NOD2.

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    Holden, James A; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M; Lenzo, Jason C; Orth, Rebecca K H; Mansell, Ashley; Reynolds, Eric C

    2017-09-01

    Porphyromonas gulae is an anaerobic, Gram-negative coccobacillus that has been associated with periodontal disease in companion animals. The aims of this study were to analyze the ligation of pattern recognition receptors by P. gulae and the subsequent activation of macrophages. Exposure of HEK cells transfected with Toll-like receptors (TLRs) or NOD-like receptors to P. gulae resulted in the ligation of TLR2, TLR4, and NOD2. The effects of this engagement of receptors were investigated by measuring the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO), CD86 expression, and inflammatory cytokine production by wild-type, TLR2 -/- , and TLR4 -/- macrophages. The addition of P. gulae to unprimed and gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-primed (M1 phenotype) macrophages significantly increased the surface expression of CD86, but only M1 macrophages produced nitric oxide. P. gulae- induced expression of CD86 on unprimed macrophages was dependent on both TLR2 and TLR4, but CD86 expression and NO production in M1 macrophages were only TLR2 dependent. P. gulae induced an increase in secretion of interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12p70, IL-13, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), and macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α) by M1 macrophages compared to that by unprimed controls. Among these cytokines, secretion of IL-6 and TNF-α by M1 macrophages was dependent on either TLR2 or TLR4. Our data indicate that TLR2 and TLR4 are important for P. gulae activation of unprimed macrophages and that activation and effector functions induced in M1 macrophages by P. gulae are mainly dependent on TLR2. In conclusion, P. gulae induces a strong TLR2-dependent inflammatory M1 macrophage response which may be important in establishing the chronic inflammation associated with periodontal disease in companion animals. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. Porphyromonas gulae Activates Unprimed and Gamma Interferon-Primed Macrophages via the Pattern Recognition Receptors Toll-Like Receptor 2 (TLR2), TLR4, and NOD2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, James A.; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M.; Lenzo, Jason C.; Orth, Rebecca K. H.; Mansell, Ashley

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Porphyromonas gulae is an anaerobic, Gram-negative coccobacillus that has been associated with periodontal disease in companion animals. The aims of this study were to analyze the ligation of pattern recognition receptors by P. gulae and the subsequent activation of macrophages. Exposure of HEK cells transfected with Toll-like receptors (TLRs) or NOD-like receptors to P. gulae resulted in the ligation of TLR2, TLR4, and NOD2. The effects of this engagement of receptors were investigated by measuring the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO), CD86 expression, and inflammatory cytokine production by wild-type, TLR2−/−, and TLR4−/− macrophages. The addition of P. gulae to unprimed and gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-primed (M1 phenotype) macrophages significantly increased the surface expression of CD86, but only M1 macrophages produced nitric oxide. P. gulae-induced expression of CD86 on unprimed macrophages was dependent on both TLR2 and TLR4, but CD86 expression and NO production in M1 macrophages were only TLR2 dependent. P. gulae induced an increase in secretion of interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12p70, IL-13, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), and macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α) by M1 macrophages compared to that by unprimed controls. Among these cytokines, secretion of IL-6 and TNF-α by M1 macrophages was dependent on either TLR2 or TLR4. Our data indicate that TLR2 and TLR4 are important for P. gulae activation of unprimed macrophages and that activation and effector functions induced in M1 macrophages by P. gulae are mainly dependent on TLR2. In conclusion, P. gulae induces a strong TLR2-dependent inflammatory M1 macrophage response which may be important in establishing the chronic inflammation associated with periodontal disease in companion animals. PMID:28630066

  1. Synergic activation of toll-like receptor (TLR 2/6 and 9 in response to Ureaplasma parvum & urealyticum in human amniotic epithelial cells.

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    Martha Triantafilou

    Full Text Available Ureaplasma species are the most frequently isolated microorganisms inside the amniotic cavity and have been associated with spontaneous abortion, chorioamnionitis, premature rupture of the membranes (PROM, preterm labour (PL pneumonia in neonates and bronchopulmonary dysplasia in neonates. The mechanisms by which Ureaplasmas cause such diseases remain unclear, but it is believed that inappropriate induction of inflammatory responses is involved, triggered by the innate immune system. As part of its mechanism of activation, the innate immune system employs germ-lined encoded receptors, called pattern recognition receptors (PRRs in order to "sense" pathogens. One such family of PRRs are the Toll like receptor family (TLR. In the current study we aimed to elucidate the role of TLRs in Ureaplasma-induced inflammation in human amniotic epithelial cells. Using silencing, as well as human embryonic kidney (HEK transfected cell lines, we demonstrate that TLR2, TLR6 and TLR9 are involved in the inflammatory responses against Ureaplasma parvum and urealyticum serovars. Ureaplasma lipoproteins, such as Multiple Banded antigen (MBA, trigger responses via TLR2/TLR6, whereas the whole bacterium is required for TLR9 activation. No major differences were observed between the different serovars. Cell activation by Ureaplasma parvum and urealyticum seem to require lipid raft function and formation of heterotypic receptor complexes comprising of TLR2 and TLR6 on the cell surface and TLR9 intracellularly.

  2. Comparative Geometrical Analysis of Leucine-Rich Repeat Structures in the Nod-Like and Toll-Like Receptors in Vertebrate Innate Immunity

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    Norio Matsushima

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The NOD-like receptors (NLRs and Toll-like receptors (TLRs are pattern recognition receptors that are involved in the innate, pathogen pattern recognition system. The TLR and NLR receptors contain leucine-rich repeats (LRRs that are responsible for ligand interactions. In LRRs short β-strands stack parallel and then the LRRs form a super helical arrangement of repeating structural units (called a coil of solenoids. The structures of the LRR domains of NLRC4, NLRP1, and NLRX1 in NLRs and of TLR1-5, TLR6, TLR8, TLR9 in TLRs have been determined. Here we report nine geometrical parameters that characterize the LRR domains; these include four helical parameters from HELFIT analysis. These nine parameters characterize well the LRR structures in NLRs and TLRs; the LRRs of NLR adopts a right-handed helix. In contrast, the TLR LRRs adopt either a left-handed helix or are nearly flat; RP105 and CD14 also adopt a left-handed helix. This geometrical analysis subdivides TLRs into four groups consisting of TLR3/TLR8/TLR9, TLR1/TLR2/TRR6, TLR4, and TLR5; these correspond to the phylogenetic tree based on amino acid sequences. In the TLRs an ascending lateral surface that consists of loops connecting the β-strand at the C-terminal side is involved in protein, protein/ligand interactions, but not the descending lateral surface on the opposite side.

  3. HMGB1 Contributes to the Expression of P-Glycoprotein in Mouse Epileptic Brain through Toll-Like Receptor 4 and Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products.

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    Yan Chen

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the role of high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1 in the seizure-induced P-glycoprotein (P-gp overexpression and the underlying mechanism. Kainic acid (KA-induced mouse seizure model was used for in vivo experiments. Male C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: normal saline control (NS group, KA-induced epileptic seizure (EP group, and EP group pretreated with HMGB1 (EP+HMGB1 group or BoxA (HMGB1 antagonist, EP+BoxA group. Compared to the NS group, increased levels of HMGB1 and P-gp in the brain were observed in the EP group. Injection of HMGB1 before the induction of KA further increased the expression of P-gp while pre-treatment with BoxA abolished this up-regulation. Next, the regulatory role of HMGB1 and its potential involved signal pathways were investigated in mouse microvascular endothelial bEnd.3 cells in vitro. Cells were treated with HMGB1, HMGB1 plus lipopolysaccharide from Rhodobacter sphaeroides (LPS-RS [toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 antagonist], HMGB1 plus FPS-ZM1 [receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE inhibitor], HMGB1 plus SN50 [nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB inhibitor], or vehicle. Treatment with HMGB1 increased the expression levels of P-gp, TLR4, RAGE and the activation of NF-κB in bEnd.3 cells. These effects were inhibited by the pre-treatment with either LPS-RS or FPS-ZM1, and were abolished by the pre-treatment of SN50 or a combination treatment of both LPS-RS and FPS-ZM1. Luciferase reporter assays showed that exogenous expression of NF-κB p65 increased the promoter activity of multidrug resistance 1a (P-gp-encoding gene in endothelial cells. These data indicate that HMGB1 contributes to the overexpression of P-gp in mouse epileptic brain tissues via activation of TLR4/RAGE receptors and the downstream transcription factor NF-κB in brain microvascular endothelial cells.

  4. Receptores tipo Toll, patogénesis y respuesta inmune a Helicobacter pylori Toll-like receptors, pathogenesis and immune response to Helicobacter pylori

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    Norma Angélica Sánchez-Zauco

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori coloniza el epitelio gástrico y la mayoría de las personas infectadas es asintomática, de 10 al 20% desarrolla gastritis atrófica, úlcera péptica, y menos de 3% genera cáncer gástrico. Estas patologías están determinadas por la relación entre los factores de virulencia de la bacteria y los factores del hospedero como predisposición genética y respuesta inmune. La inmunidad innata, representada principalmente por los receptores tipo Toll y tipo Nod, reconocen a sus ligandos específicos y activan factores de transcripción como NF-kB, AP-1, CREB-1, induciendo la producción de citocinas inflamatorias como IL-8, IL-12, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-18 y TNF-α, e IL-10. La inflamación crónica favorece los cambios de morfología gástrica, evita la apoptosis y favorece la angiogénesis, ocasionando lesiones neoplásicas y cáncer. El objetivo de esta revisión es analizar los mecanismos propuestos a la fecha de la respuesta inmune innata y adaptativa, involucrados en la infección por H. pylori, y se puntualiza en los mecanismos de eliminación o persistencia de la infección.Helicobacter pylori colonize the gastric epithelial, most infected people are asymptomatic, 10 to 20% develop atrophic gastritis, peptic ulcer and less than 3% gastric cancer. These diseases are determined by the relationship between virulence factors of bacteria, host factors such as, genetic predisposition, and immune response. The innate immune response mainly represented by Toll-like receptors and Nod-like receptors that recognize their specific ligands, activate transcription factors as NF-kB, AP-1, CREB-1, inducing production of inflammatory cytokines such as IL -8, IL-12, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-18, TNF-α and IL-10. Chronic inflammation promotes gastric morphological changes, prevents apoptosis and allows angiogenesis generating neoplasic lesions and cancer. The aim of this review is to analyze the mechanisms proposed to date of the innate and adaptative

  5. Humoral Responses Elicited by Adenovirus Displaying Epitopes Are Induced Independently of the Infection Process and Shaped by the Toll-Like Receptor/MyD88 Pathway

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    Aleksandra Anchim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of serotype 5 adenovirus (Ad-derived vectors in vaccination is confronted to preexisting anti-Ad immunity. Epitope display on Ad capsid is currently being investigated as an alternative approach of vaccination. The present study seeks to better understand virus- and host-related factors controlling the efficacy of this new vaccination approach. In contrast to an Ad vector expressing ovalbumin as a transgene, Ad displaying an ovalbumin-derived B-cell epitope inserted into the fiber protein was able to elicit antibody responses in both Ad-naive and Ad-immune mice. Moreover, introduction of a set of mutations abrogating Ad interaction with its