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Sample records for bacterial triphosphate tunnel

  1. Bacterial adenosine triphosphate as a measure of urinary tract infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.

    1971-01-01

    Procedure detects and counts bacteria present in urine samples. Method also determines bacterial levels in other aqueous body fluids including lymph fluid, plasma, blood, spinal fluid, saliva and mucous.

  2. Chunnel vision: Export and efflux through bacterial channel-tunnels

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Christian; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2000-01-01

    The Escherichia coli TolC protein is central to toxin export and drug efflux across the inner and outer cell membranes and the intervening periplasmic space. The crystal structure has revealed that TolC assembles into a remarkable α-helical trans-periplasmic cylinder (tunnel) embedded in the outer membrane by a contiguous β-barrel (channel), so providing a large duct open to the outside environment. The channel-tunnel structure is conserved in TolC homologues throughout Gram-negative bacteria...

  3. Laboratory procedures manual for the firefly luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.; Curtis, C. A.; Knust, E. A.; Nibley, D. A.; Vance, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    A manual on the procedures and instruments developed for the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) luciferase assay is presented. Data cover, laboratory maintenance, maintenance of bacterial cultures, bacteria measurement, reagents, luciferase procedures, and determination of microbal susceptibility to antibiotics.

  4. Optical Aptasensors for Adenosine Triphosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Stella; Lim, Hui Si; Ma, Qian; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acids are among the most researched and applied biomolecules. Their diverse two- and three-dimensional structures in conjunction with their robust chemistry and ease of manipulation provide a rare opportunity for sensor applications. Moreover, their high biocompatibility has seen them being used in the construction of in vivo assays. Various nucleic acid-based devices have been extensively studied as either the principal element in discrete molecule-like sensors or as the main component in the fabrication of sensing devices. The use of aptamers in sensors - aptasensors, in particular, has led to improvements in sensitivity, selectivity, and multiplexing capacity for a wide verity of analytes like proteins, nucleic acids, as well as small biomolecules such as glucose and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). This article reviews the progress in the use of aptamers as the principal component in sensors for optical detection of ATP with an emphasis on sensing mechanism, performance, and applications with some discussion on challenges and perspectives. PMID:27446501

  5. Adenosine triphosphate inhibition of yeast trehalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panek, A D

    1969-09-01

    Yeast trehalase has been found to be inhibited non-competitively by adenosine triphosphate. Such a biological control could explain the accumulation of trehalose during the stationary phase of the growth curve. PMID:5370287

  6. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040 Section 864.7040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Adenosine triphosphate release assay. (a) Identification. An adenosine triphosphate release assay is...

  7. Double manganese(III) cesium triphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Double triphosphates have been identified in research on interactions in the P2O5-M2O3-Cs2O-H2O system, where M(III) = Al, Ga, Cr, Fe, at 570-770K, which have the M(III)Cs2 - P3O10 composition; here we report the identification of a new phase made under analogous conditions in a system containing Mn(III) together with some of its physicochemical properties. The product was analyzed for phosphorus by a colorimetric method, for manganese by titration with EDTA, and for cesium by atomic absorption. The x-ray phase analysis was performed with a DRON-3.0 diffractometer. The IR spectra were recorded. Thermogravimetry indicates that the product is MnCs2P3O10·H2O

  8. Behavior and stability of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) during chlorine disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nescerecka, Alina; Juhna, Talis; Hammes, Frederik

    2016-09-15

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analysis is a cultivation-independent alternative method for the determination of bacterial viability in both chlorinated and non-chlorinated water. Here we investigated the behavior and stability of ATP during chlorination in detail. Different sodium hypochlorite doses (0-22.4 mg-Cl2 L(-1); 5 min exposure) were applied to an Escherichia coli pure culture suspended in filtered river water. We observed decreasing intracellular ATP with increasing chlorine concentrations, but extracellular ATP concentrations only increased when the chlorine dose exceeded 0.35 mg L(-1). The release of ATP from chlorine-damaged bacteria coincided with severe membrane damage detected with flow cytometry (FCM). The stability of extracellular ATP was subsequently studied in different water matrixes, and we found that extracellular ATP was stable in sterile deionized water and also in chlorinated water until extremely high chlorine doses (≤11.2 mg-Cl2 L(-1); 5 min exposure). In contrast, ATP decreased relatively slowly (k = 0.145 h(-1)) in 0.1 μm filtered river water, presumably due to degradation by either extracellular enzymes or the fraction of bacteria that were able to pass through the filter. Extracellular ATP decreased considerably faster (k = 0.368 h(-1)) during batch growth of a river water bacterial community. A series of growth potential tests showed that extracellular ATP molecules were utilized as a phosphorus source during bacteria proliferation. From the combined data we conclude that ATP released from bacteria at high chlorine doses could promote bacteria regrowth, contributing to biological instability in drinking water distribution systems. PMID:27295623

  9. Identification of an Alternative Nucleoside Triphosphate: 5′-Deoxyadenosylcobinamide Phosphate Nucleotidyltransferase in Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum ΔH

    OpenAIRE

    Michael G Thomas; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.

    2000-01-01

    Computer analysis of the archaeal genome databases failed to identify orthologues of all of the bacterial cobamide biosynthetic enzymes. Of particular interest was the lack of an orthologue of the bifunctional nucleoside triphosphate (NTP):5′-deoxyadenosylcobinamide kinase/GTP:adenosylcobinamide-phosphate guanylyltransferase enzyme (CobU in Salmonella enterica). This paper reports the identification of an archaeal gene encoding a new nucleotidyltransferase, which is proposed to be the nonorth...

  10. An Effector of Hemoglobin Structure: The Guanosine 3', 5'-Triphosphate

    OpenAIRE

    Rezaei-Zarchi, Saeed; Imani, Saber; Soufian, Safieh; Panahi, Yunes; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Arefi, Mohammad Reza

    2012-01-01

    The effect of guanosine 3', 5'-triphosphate (GTP) on the hemoglobin structure was studied by UV-visible, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies, and cyclic voltammetry. UV-visible absorption spectra showed an increase in absorbance in the regions of 420 nm and 280 nm. Fluorescence spectra showed that the Trp fluorescence intensity increased upon excitation at 280 nm, when guanosine 3', 5'-triphosphate concentration was increased in hemoglobin solution. Along with the increase...

  11. A rapid method for the determination of microbial susceptibility using the firefly luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellend, H.; Tuttle, S. A.; Barza, M.; Weinstein, L.; Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W.

    1975-01-01

    Luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was optimized for pure bacteria in broth in order to evaluate if changes in bacterial ATP content could be used as a rapid measure of antibiotic effect on microorganisms. Broth cultures of log phase bacteria were incubated at 310 K (37 C) for 2.5 hours at antimicrobial concentrations which resulted in the best discrimination between sensitive and resistant strains. Eighty-seven strains of 11 bacterial species were studied for their susceptibility to 12 commonly used antimicrobial agents: ampicillin, Penicillin G, nafcillin, carbenicillin, cephalothin, tetracycline, erythromycin, clindamycin, gentamicin, nitrofurantoin, colistin, and chloramplenicol. The major advantage of the ATP system over existing methods of rapid microbial susceptibility testing is that the assay can be made specific for bacterial ATP.

  12. Modified Nucleoside Triphosphates for in-vitro Selection Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iribarren, Adolfo; Dellafiore, María; Montserrat, Javier

    2016-05-01

    The development of SELEX (Selective Enhancement of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) provides a powerful tool for the search of functional oligonucleotides with the ability to bind ligands with high affinity and selectivity (aptamers) and for the discovery of nucleic acid sequences with diverse enzymatic activities (ribozymes and DNAzymes). This technique has been extensively applied to the selection of natural DNA or RNA molecules but, in order to improve chemical and structural diversity as well as for particular applications where further chemical or biological stability is necessary, the extension of this strategy to modified oligonucleotides is desirable. Taking into account these needs, this review intends to collect the research carried out during the past years, focusing mainly on the use of modified nucleotides in SELEX and the development of mutant enzymes for broadening nucleoside triphosphates acceptance. In addition, comments regarding the synthesis of modified nucleoside triphosphate will be briefly discussed.

  13. Synthesis and Enzymatic Incorporation of Modified Deoxyuridine Triphosphates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkai Liu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available To expand the chemical functionality of DNAzymes and aptamers, several new modified deoxyuridine triphosphates have been synthesized. An important precursor that enables this aim is 5-aminomethyl dUTP, whereby the pendent amine serves as a handle for further synthetic functionalization. Five functional groups were conjugated to 5-aminomethyl dUTP. Incorporation assays were performed on several templates that demand 2–5 sequential incorporation events using several commercially available DNA polymerases. It was found that Vent (exo- DNA polymerase efficiently incorporates all five modified dUTPs. In addition, all nucleoside triphosphates were capable of supporting a double-stranded exponential PCR amplification. Modified PCR amplicons were PCR amplified into unmodified DNA and sequenced to verify that genetic information was conserved through incorporation, amplification, and reamplification. Overall these modified dUTPs represent new candidate substrates for use in selections using modified nucleotide libraries.

  14. Polyadenylation inhibition by the triphosphates of deoxyadenosine analogues

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lisa S.; Plunkett, William; Gandhi, Varsha

    2008-01-01

    The nucleotide substrate specificity of yeast poly(A) polymerase (yPAP) was examined with various ATP analogues of clinical relevance. The triphosphate derivatives of cladribine (2-Cl-dATP), clofarabine (Cl-F-ara-ATP), fludarabine (F-ara-ATP), and related derivatives were incubated with yPAP and 32P-radiolabeled RNA oligonucleotide primers in the absence of ATP to assay polyadenylation. While 2-Cl-ATP resulted in primer elongation, ara-ATP and F-ara-ATP were poor substrates for yPAP. In contr...

  15. Phosphorus-33-labeled nucleotide 5'-triphosphates: Applications in DNA analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthesis of [γ-33P] adenosine 5'-triphosphate and [α-33P]2'-deoxyadenosine 5'-triphosphate was accomplished in a way similar to the preparation of 32P-labeled nucleotides. These nucleotides were then used in a variety of molecular biological applications. The techniques of DNA sequencing and nucleic acid hybridization were used to evaluate potential applications for 33P labeled nucleotides. The 33P nucleotides were compared with the 32P and 35S nucleotide equivalents for the ability to serve as substrates for various enzymes used to label DNA, T4-bacteriophage polynucleotide kinase, E. coli DNA polymerase, and T7 DNA polymerase. The products of there reactions were either separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (DNA sequencing) or used as hybridization probes on a nylon membrane. The isotopically labeled DNA was detected by autoradiography on X-ray film. The film was evaluated for relative sensitivity of the film versus time for each isotope and the sharpness or resolution of the exposed bands on the film

  16. Semisimple tunnels

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Sangbum

    2010-01-01

    A knot in the 3-sphere in (1,1)-position (that is, in 1-bridge position with respect to a Heegaard torus) can be described by an element of the braid group of two points in the torus. Our main results tell how to translate between a braid group element and the sequence of slope invariants of the upper tunnel (or lower tunnel) associated to the corresponding (1,1)-position. This enables us to calculate the slope invariants of the four tunnels of the (-2,3,7)-pretzel knot, and to verify previous calculations of the slope invariants for all tunnels of 2-bridge knots and (1,1)-tunnels of torus knots. We also characterize a class of (1,1)-positions that we call toroidal, in terms of the slope invariants of the associated upper tunnel. Finally, we develop a general algorithm to calculate the slope invariants of the associated tunnels, given a braid description. We have implemented the algorithm and other results as software, and we give some sample computations.

  17. Autophagy occurs within an hour of adenosine triphosphate treatment after nerve cell damage:the neuroprotective effects of adenosine triphosphate against apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Na Lu; Baoying Wang; Xiaohui Deng; Honggang Zhao; Yong Wang; Dongliang Li

    2014-01-01

    After hypoxia, ischemia, or inlfammatory injuries to the central nervous system, the damaged cells release a large amount of adenosine triphosphate, which may cause secondary neuronal death. Autophagy is a form of cell death that also has neuroprotective effects. Cell Counting Kit assay, monodansylcadaverine staining, lfow cytometry, western blotting, and real-time PCR were used to determine the effects of exogenous adenosine triphosphate treatment at different concentrations (2, 4, 6, 8, 10 mmol/L) over time (1, 2, 3, and 6 hours) on the apoptosis and autophagy of SH-SY5Y cells. High concentrations of extracellular adenosine triphosphate induced autophagy and apoptosis of SH-SY5Y cells. The enhanced autophagy ifrst appeared, and peaked at 1 hour after treatment with adenosine triphosphate. Cell apoptosis peaked at 3 hours, and persisted through 6 hours. With prolonged exposure to the adenosine triphosphate treatment, the fraction of apoptotic cells increased. These data suggest that the SH-SY5Y neural cells initiated autophagy against apoptosis within an hour of adenosine triphosphate treatment to protect themselves against injury.

  18. Crystal Structure of a Legionella pneumophila Ecto -Triphosphate Diphosphohydrolase, A Structural and Functional Homolog of the Eukaryotic NTPDases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivian, Julian P.; Riedmaier, Patrice; Ge, Honghua; Le Nours, Jérôme; Sansom, Fiona M.; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Byres, Emma; Dias, Manisha; Schmidberger, Jason W.; Cowan, Peter J.; d' Apice, Anthony J.F.; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Beddoe, Travis (Monash); (Melbourne)

    2010-04-19

    Many pathogenic bacteria have sophisticated mechanisms to interfere with the mammalian immune response. These include the disruption of host extracellular ATP levels that, in humans, is tightly regulated by the nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase family (NTPDases). NTPDases are found almost exclusively in eukaryotes, the notable exception being their presence in some pathogenic prokaryotes. To address the function of bacterial NTPDases, we describe the structures of an NTPDase from the pathogen Legionella pneumophila (Lpg1905/Lp1NTPDase) in its apo state and in complex with the ATP analog AMPPNP and the subtype-specific NTPDase inhibitor ARL 67156. Lp1NTPDase is structurally and catalytically related to eukaryotic NTPDases and the structure provides a basis for NTPDase-specific inhibition. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the activity of Lp1NTPDase correlates directly with intracellular replication of Legionella within macrophages. Collectively, these findings provide insight into the mechanism of this enzyme and highlight its role in host-pathogen interactions.

  19. Bacterial gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infectious diarrhea - bacterial gastroenteritis; Acute gastroenteritis; Gastroenteritis - bacterial ... Bacterial gastroenteritis can affect 1 person or a group of people who all ate the same food. It is ...

  20. Inhibition of mammalian RNA polymerase by 5,6-dichlororibofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) and DRB triphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, C; Hausen, P

    1978-01-01

    DRB triphosphate inhibits activity of isolated RNA polymerase B, and, to a lesser extent, that of polymerase A. The same holds true for transcription in isolated nuclei. It does not act as an initiation inhibitor. In all cases, high concentrations of DRB triphosphate are required. Cells do not phosphorylate DRB to a measurable extent. hn RNA resistant to DRB is initiated with both ATP and GTP in the presence of the drug. These experiments render the hypothesis unlikely that DRB triphosphate in the cell specifically interferes with the initiation reaction of polymerase B. PMID:704359

  1. Identification of an alternative nucleoside triphosphate: 5'-deoxyadenosylcobinamide phosphate nucleotidyltransferase in Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum delta H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, M G; Escalante-Semerena, J C

    2000-08-01

    Computer analysis of the archaeal genome databases failed to identify orthologues of all of the bacterial cobamide biosynthetic enzymes. Of particular interest was the lack of an orthologue of the bifunctional nucleoside triphosphate (NTP):5'-deoxyadenosylcobinamide kinase/GTP:adenosylcobinamide-phosphate guanylyltransferase enzyme (CobU in Salmonella enterica). This paper reports the identification of an archaeal gene encoding a new nucleotidyltransferase, which is proposed to be the nonorthologous replacement of the S. enterica cobU gene. The gene encoding this nucleotidyltransferase was identified using comparative genome analysis of the sequenced archaeal genomes. Orthologues of the gene encoding this activity are limited at present to members of the domain Archaea. The corresponding ORF open reading frame from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum Delta H (MTH1152; referred to as cobY) was amplified and cloned, and the CobY protein was expressed and purified from Escherichia coli as a hexahistidine-tagged fusion protein. This enzyme had GTP:adenosylcobinamide-phosphate guanylyltransferase activity but did not have the NTP:AdoCbi kinase activity associated with the CobU enzyme of S. enterica. NTP:adenosylcobinamide kinase activity was not detected in M. thermoautotrophicum Delta H cell extract, suggesting that this organism may not have this activity. The cobY gene complemented a cobU mutant of S. enterica grown under anaerobic conditions where growth of the cell depended on de novo adenosylcobalamin biosynthesis. cobY, however, failed to restore adenosylcobalamin biosynthesis in cobU mutants grown under aerobic conditions where de novo synthesis of this coenzyme was blocked, and growth of the cell depended on the assimilation of exogenous cobinamide. These data strongly support the proposal that the relevant cobinamide intermediates during de novo adenosylcobalamin biosynthesis are adenosylcobinamide-phosphate and adenosylcobinamide-GDP, not adenosylcobinamide

  2. Small scale synthesis of nucleoside mono-, di-, and triphosphates on Controlled Pore Glass (CPG)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Liboska, Radek; Zborníková, Eva; Rosenberg, Ivan

    Lyon : Université de Lyon, 2010, s. 335-335. [International Roundtable on Nucleosides, Nucleotides and Nucleic Acids. IRT 2010. Lyon (FR), 29.08.2010-03.09.2010] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200520801; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06061 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : triphosphate synthesis * nucleoside triphosphate * solid phase synthesis Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry http://irt2010.univ-lyon1.fr

  3. Association of Thymidylate Synthase Gene Polymorphisms with Stavudine Triphosphate Intracellular Levels and Lipodystrophy▿

    OpenAIRE

    Domingo, Pere (Domingo Pedrol); Cabeza, M. Carmen; Pruvost, Alain; Torres, Ferran; Salazar, Juliana; del Mar Gutierrez, M.; Mateo, M. Gracia; Fontanet, Angels; Fernandez, Irene; Domingo, Joan C.; Villarroya, Francesc; Vidal, Francesc; Baiget, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    The antiviral activity and toxicity of stavudine (d4T) depend on its triphosphate metabolite, stavudine triphosphate (d4T-TP). Therefore, modifications in intracellular levels of d4T-TP may change the toxicity profile of stavudine. d4T-TP intracellular levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were determined with a prominence liquid chromatograph connected to a triple-quadruple mass spectrometer. Polymorphisms in the thymidylate synthase (TS), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), ...

  4. Adenosine triphosphate inhibits melatonin synthesis in the rat pineal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Teodoro, Luis Henrique; Dargenio-Garcia, Letícia; Petrilli-Lapa, Camila Lopes; Souza, Ewerton da Silva; Fernandes, Pedro A C M; Markus, Regina P; Ferreira, Zulma S

    2016-03-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is released onto the pinealocyte, along with noradrenaline, from sympathetic neurons and triggers P2Y1 receptors that enhance β-adrenergic-induced N-acetylserotonin (NAS) synthesis. Nevertheless, the biotransformation of NAS into melatonin, which occurs due to the subsequent methylation by acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase (ASMT; EC 2.1.1.4), has not yet been evaluated in the presence of purinergic stimulation. We therefore evaluated the effects of purinergic signaling on melatonin synthesis induced by β-adrenergic stimulation. ATP increased NAS levels, but, surprisingly, inhibited melatonin synthesis in an inverse, concentration-dependent manner. Our results demonstrate that enhanced NAS levels, which depend on phospholipase C (PLC) activity (but not the induction of gene transcription), are a post-translational effect. By contrast, melatonin reduction is related to an ASMT inhibition of expression at both the gene transcription and protein levels. These results were independent of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB) translocation. Neither the P2Y1 receptor activation nor the PLC-mediated pathway was involved in the decrease in melatonin, indicating that ATP regulates pineal metabolism through different mechanisms. Taken together, our data demonstrate that purinergic signaling differentially modulates NAS and melatonin synthesis and point to a regulatory role for ATP as a cotransmitter in the control of ASMT, the rate-limiting enzyme in melatonin synthesis. The endogenous production of melatonin regulates defense responses; therefore, understanding the mechanisms involving ASMT regulation might provide novel insights into the development and progression of neurological disorders since melatonin presents anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, and neurogenic effects. PMID:26732366

  5. Classical Tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Cohn, A G; Rabinowitz, Mario

    2003-01-01

    A classical representation of an extended body over barriers of height greater than the energy of the incident body is shown to have many features in common with quantum tunneling as the center-of-mass literally goes through the barrier. It is even classically possible to penetrate any finite barrier with a body of arbitrarily low energy if the body is sufficiently long. A distribution of body lengths around the de Broglie wavelength leads to reasonable agreement with the quantum transmission coefficient.

  6. Classical Tunneling

    OpenAIRE

    Cohn, Arthur; Rabinowitz, Mario

    2003-01-01

    A classical representation of an extended body over barriers of height greater than the energy of the incident body is shown to have many features in common with quantum tunneling as the center-of-mass literally goes through the barrier. It is even classically possible to penetrate any finite barrier with a body of arbitrarily low energy if the body is sufficiently long. A distribution of body lengths around the de Broglie wavelength leads to reasonable agreement with the quantum transmission...

  7. Soliton tunneling

    OpenAIRE

    Kälbermann, G.

    1997-01-01

    We present a numerical simulation of the scattering of a topological soliton off finite size attractive impurities, repulsive impurities and a combination of both. The attractive and attractive-repulsive cases show similar features to those found for $\\delta$ function type of impurities. For the repulsive case, corresponding to a finite width barrier, the soliton behaves completely classically. No tunneling occurs for sub-barrier kinetic energies despite the extended nature of the soliton.

  8. Carpal Tunnel Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... carried out for the condition of carpal tunnel syndrome. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is a neuropathy where the median nerve gets ... of the hand. The surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome consists of a release of the transverse carpal ...

  9. Effect of calcium triphosphate cement on proximal humeral fracture osteosynthesis: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Jim; Feerick, Emer; McGarry, Patrick; FitzPatrick, David; Mullett, Hannan

    2013-08-01

    PURPOSE. To measure the effect of void-filling calcium triphosphate cement on the loads at the implant-bone interface of a proximal humeral fracture osteosynthesis using a finite element analysis. METHODS. Finite element models of a 3-part proximal humeral fracture fixed with a plate with and without calcium triphosphate cement augmentation were generated from a quantitative computed tomography dataset of an intact proximal humerus. Material properties were assigned to bone fragments using published expressions relating Young's modulus to local Hounsfield number. Boundary conditions were then applied to the model to replicate the physiological loads. The effect of void-filling calcium triphosphate cement was analysed. RESULTS. When the void was filled with calcium triphosphate cement, the pressure gradient of the bone surrounding the screws in the medial fracture fragment decreased 97% from up to 21.41 to 0.66 MPa. Peak pressure of the fracture planes decreased 95% from 6.10 to 0.30 MPa and occurred along the medial aspect. The mean stress in the screw locking mechanisms decreased 78% from 71.23 to 15.92 MPa. The angled proximal metaphyseal screw had the highest stress. CONCLUSION. Augmentation with calcium triphosphate cement improves initial stability and reduces stress on the implant-bone interface. PMID:24014777

  10. Tunneling technologies for the collider ring tunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Texas site chosen for the Superconducting Super Collider has been studied, and it has been determined that proven, conventional technology and accepted engineering practice are suitable for constructing the collider tunnels. The Texas National Research Laboratory Commission report recommended that two types of tunneling machines be used for construction of the tunnels: a conventional hard rock tunnel boring machine (TBM) for the Austin chalk and a double shielded, rotary TBM for the Taylor marl. Since the tunneling machines usually set the pace for the project, efficient planning, operation, and coordination of the tunneling system components will be critical to the schedule and cost of the project. During design, tunneling rate prediction should be refined by focusing on the development of an effective tunneling system and evaluating its capacity to meet or exceed the required schedules. 8 refs., 13 figs

  11. Adenosine Triphosphate Stimulates Aquifex aeolicus MutL Endonuclease Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Jerome Mauris; Thomas C Evans

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human PMS2 (hPMS2) homologues act to nick 5' and 3' to misincorporated nucleotides during mismatch repair in organisms that lack MutH. Mn(++) was previously found to stimulate the endonuclease activity of these homologues. ATP was required for the nicking activity of hPMS2 and yPMS1, but was reported to inhibit bacterial MutL proteins from Thermus thermophilus and Aquifex aeolicus that displayed homology to hPMS2. Mutational analysis has identified the DQHA(X)(2)E(X)(4)E motif pre...

  12. Increased deoxythymidine triphosphate levels is a feature of relative cognitive decline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Claus Desler; Frederiksen, Jane H; Olsen, Maria Nathalie Angleys;

    2015-01-01

    PBMC content of deoxythymidine-triphosphate (dTTP) (20%), but not mitochondrial bioenergetics parameters measured in this study or mitochondrial ROS. Levels of dTTP in PBMCs are indicators of relative cognitive change suggesting a role of deoxyribonucleotides in the etiology of AD....

  13. Guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase 1 promoter deletion causes dopa-responsive dystonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theuns, Jessie; Crosiers, David; Debaene, Luc; Nuytemans, Karen; Meeus, Bram; Sleegers, Kristel; Goossens, Dirk; Corsmit, Ellen; Elinck, Ellen; Peeters, Karin; Mattheijssens, Maria; Pickut, Barbara; Del-Favero, Jurgen; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Deyn, Peter Paul; Cras, Patrick; Van Broeckhoven, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Background: Autosomal dominant dopa-responsive dystonia (AD-DRD) is caused by a biochemical defect primarily resulting from guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase 1 gene (GCH1) mutations. Few families have been reported without mutations in GCH1. Methods: Genome-wide linkage analysis and positional c

  14. Leishmania infantum ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-2 is an apyrase involved in macrophage infection and expressed in infected dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael De Souza Vasconcellos

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Visceral leishmaniasis is an important tropical disease, and Leishmania infantum chagasi (synonym of Leishmania infantum is the main pathogenic agent of visceral leishmaniasis in the New World. Recently, ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (E-NTPDases were identified as enablers of infection and virulence factors in many pathogens. Two putative E-NTPDases (∼70 kDa and ∼45 kDa have been found in the L. infantum genome. Here, we studied the ∼45 kDa E-NTPDase from L. infantum chagasi to describe its natural occurrence, biochemical characteristics and influence on macrophage infection.We used live L. infantum chagasi to demonstrate its natural ecto-nucleotidase activity. We then isolated, cloned and expressed recombinant rLicNTPDase-2 in bacterial system. The recombinant rLicNTPDase-2 hydrolyzed a wide variety of triphosphate and diphosphate nucleotides (GTP> GDP  =  UDP> ADP> UTP  =  ATP in the presence of calcium or magnesium. In addition, rLicNTPDase-2 showed stable activity over a pH range of 6.0 to 9.0 and was partially inhibited by ARL67156 and suramin. Microscopic analyses revealed the presence of this protein on cell surfaces, vesicles, flagellae, flagellar pockets, kinetoplasts, mitochondria and nuclei. The blockade of E-NTPDases using antibodies and competition led to lower levels of parasite adhesion and infection of macrophages. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry showed the expression of E-NTPDases in amastigotes in the lymph nodes of naturally infected dogs from an area of endemic visceral leishmaniasis.In this work, we cloned, expressed and characterized the NTPDase-2 from L. infantum chagasi and demonstrated that it functions as a genuine enzyme from the E-NTPDase/CD39 family. We showed that E-NTPDases are present on the surface of promastigotes and in other intracellular locations. We showed, for the first time, the broad expression of LicNTPDases in naturally infected dogs. Additionally, the blockade of

  15. Adenosine triphosphate stimulates Aquifex aeolicus MutL endonuclease activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome Mauris

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human PMS2 (hPMS2 homologues act to nick 5' and 3' to misincorporated nucleotides during mismatch repair in organisms that lack MutH. Mn(++ was previously found to stimulate the endonuclease activity of these homologues. ATP was required for the nicking activity of hPMS2 and yPMS1, but was reported to inhibit bacterial MutL proteins from Thermus thermophilus and Aquifex aeolicus that displayed homology to hPMS2. Mutational analysis has identified the DQHA(X(2E(X(4E motif present in the C-terminus of PMS2 homologues as important for endonuclease activity. METHODOLOGIES/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined the effect ATP had on the Mn(++ induced nicking of supercoiled pBR322 by full-length and mutant A. aeolicus MutL (Aae MutL proteins. Assays were single time point, enzyme titration experiments or reaction time courses. The maximum velocity for MutL nicking was determined to be 1.6+/-0.08x10(-5 s(-1 and 4.2+/-0.3x10(-5 s(-1 in the absence and presence of ATP, respectively. AMPPNP stimulated the nicking activity to a similar extent as ATP. A truncated Aae MutL protein composed of only the C-terminal 123 amino acid residues was found to nick supercoiled DNA. Furthermore, mutations in the conserved C-terminal DQHA(X(2E(X(4E and CPHGRP motifs were shown to abolish Aae MutL endonuclease activity. CONCLUSIONS: ATP stimulated the Mn(++ induced endonuclease activity of Aae MutL. Experiments utilizing AMPPNP implied that the stimulation did not require ATP hydrolysis. A mutation in the DQHA(X(2E(X(4E motif of Aae MutL further supported the role of this region in endonclease activity. For the first time, to our knowledge, we demonstrate that changing the histidine residue in the conserved CPHGRP motif abolishes endonucleolytic activity of a hPMS2 homologue. Finally, the C-terminal 123 amino acid residues of Aae MutL were sufficient to display Mn(++ induced nicking activity.

  16. Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) is a continuous flow wind-tunnel facility capable of speeds up to Mach 1.2 at stagnation pressures up to one atmosphere. The TDT...

  17. Carpal Tunnel Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that is putting pressure on the median nerve. This is the procedure of carpal tunnel syndrome release, ... for the condition of carpal tunnel syndrome. At this point in time, we have the patient under ...

  18. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Median nerve dysfunction; Median nerve entrapment ... Calandruccio JH. Carpal tunnel syndrome, ulnar tunnel syndrome, and stenosing tenosynovitis. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2013: ...

  19. Cubital Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Symptom Picker Hand and Arm Conditions Carpal Tunnel Ganglion Cysts Trigger Finger Arthritis Base of the Thumb See ... Symptom Picker Hand and Arm Conditions Carpal Tunnel Ganglion Cysts Trigger Finger Arthritis Base of the Thumb See ...

  20. Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) is a blow-down, non-vitiated (clean air) free-jet wind tunnel capable of testing large-scale, propulsion systems at Mach 5, 6,...

  1. Radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter in palliation of malignant ascites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the safety and effectiveness of radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter in palliation of malignant ascites. Between July 2005 and June 2009, 41 tunneled peritoneal catheters were placed under ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic guidance in 40 patients (mean age, 55 years; 22 women) who had symptomatic malignant ascites. No procedure related mortality was observed. Major complication occurred in one patient (2.5%) in the form of serious bacterial peritonitis that necessitated catheter removal. Minor complications such as minor bacterial peritonitis, catheter dislodgement, tunnel infection, and catheter blockage occurred in 11 patients (27.5%). The mean duration of survival after catheter placement was 11.8 weeks. All patients expired of their primary malignancies in the follow-up. Radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter is safe and effective in palliation of symptomatic malignant ascites.

  2. Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We review the giant tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in ferromagnetic-insulator-ferromagnetic junctions discovered in recent years, which is the magnetoresistance (MR) associated with the spin-dependent tunneling between two ferromagnetic metal films separated by an insulating thin tunnel barrier. The theoretical and experimental results including junction conductance, magnetoresistance and their temperature and bias dependences are described.

  3. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase from Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajaj, Mamta [School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Manter Hall, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0304 (United States); Moriyama, Hideaki, E-mail: hmoriyama2@unl.edu [Department of Chemistry, e-Toxicology and Biotechnology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Hamilton Hall, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0304 (United States); School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Manter Hall, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0304 (United States)

    2007-05-01

    The first crystallization of deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase from plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, has been performed. An additive, taurine, was effective in producing the single crystal. The deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase gene from Arabidopsis thaliana was expressed and the gene product was purified. Crystallization was performed by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 298 K using 2 M ammonium sulfate as the precipitant. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.2 Å resolution using Cu Kα radiation. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 69.90, b = 70.86 Å, c = 75.55 Å. Assuming the presence of a trimer in the asymmetric unit, the solvent content was 30%, with a V{sub M} of 1.8 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}.

  4. PC-1 Nucleoside Triphosphate Pyrophosphohydrolase Deficiency in Idiopathic Infantile Arterial Calcification

    OpenAIRE

    Rutsch, Frank; Vaingankar, Sucheta; Johnson, Kristen; Goldfine, Ira; Maddux, Betty; Schauerte, Petra; Kalhoff, Hermann; Sano, Kimihiko; Boisvert, William A.; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Terkeltaub, Robert

    2001-01-01

    Inogranic pyrophosphate (PPi) inhibits hydroxyapatite deposition, and mice deficient in the PPi-generating nucleoside triphosphate pyrophosphohydrolase (NTPPPH) Plasma cell membrane glycoprotein-1 (PC-1) develop peri-articular and arterial calcification in early life. In idiopathic infantile arterial calcification (IIAC), hydroxyapatite deposition and smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation occur, sometimes associated with peri-articular calcification. Thus, we assessed PC-1 expression and PPi...

  5. Possible regulation of the Salmonella typhimurium histidine operon by adenosine triphosphate phosphoribosyltransferase: large metabolic effects.

    OpenAIRE

    Goitein, R K; Parsons, S. M.

    1980-01-01

    An effort to find growth conditions leading to conditional regulation of the histidine operon of Salmonella typhimurium by the allosteric first enzyme of the pathway, adenosine triphosphate phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.17), is reported. A strain deleting the enzyme, TR3343, behaved simply and predictably under all growth conditions, whereas histidine auxotrophs containing active enzyme behaved in complicated ways dependent upon the location of the histidine pathway lesion. hisE strains...

  6. Proton tunneling in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, J.

    1998-10-01

    The tunneling rate of the proton and its isotopes between interstitial sites in solids is studied theoretically. The phonons and/or the electrons in the solid have two effects on the tunneling phenomenon. First, they suppress the transfer integral between two neighbouring states. Second, they give rise to a finite lifetime of the proton state. Usually the second effect is large and the tunneling probability per unit time (tunneling rate) can be defined. In some cases, however, a coherent tunneling is expected and actually observed. (author)

  7. Middle tunnels by splitting

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Sangbum

    2011-01-01

    For a genus-1 1-bridge knot in the 3-sphere, that is, a (1,1)-knot, a middle tunnel is a tunnel that is not an upper or lower tunnel for some (1,1)-position. Most torus knots have a middle tunnel, and non-torus-knot examples were obtained by Goda, Hayashi, and Ishihara. We generalize their construction and calculate the slope invariants for the resulting middle tunnels. In particular, we obtain the slope sequence of the original example of Goda, Hayashi, and Ishihara.

  8. Regulation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels suppresses the toxic effects of amyloid-beta peptide (25-35)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Kong; Maowen Ba; Hui Liang; Peng Shao; Tianxia Yu; Ying Wang

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we treated PC12 cells with 0-20 μM amyloid-β peptide (25-35) for 24 hours to induce cytotoxicity, and found that 5-20 μM amyloid-β peptide (25-35) decreased PC12 cell viability, but adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel activator diazoxide suppressed the decrease reactive oxygen species levels. These protective effects were reversed by the selective mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel blocker 5-hydroxydecanoate. An inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, Nω-nitro-L-arginine, also protected PC12 cells from intracellular reactive oxygen species levels. However, the H2O2-degrading enzyme catalase could that the increases in both mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxygen species levels adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels and nitric oxide. Regulation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels suppresses PC12 cell cytotoxicity induced by amyloid-β

  9. Tunnel magnetoresistance in alumina, magnesia and composite tunnel barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Schebaum, Oliver; Drewello, Volker; Auge, Alexander; Reiss, Günter; Münzenberg, Markus; Schuhmann, Henning; Seibt, Michael; Thomas, Andy

    2010-01-01

    Using magnetron sputtering, we have prepared Co-Fe-B/tunnel barrier/Co-Fe-B magnetic tunnel junctions with tunnel barriers consisting of alumina, magnesia, and magnesia-alumina bilayer systems. The highest tunnel magnetoresistance ratios we found were 73% for alumina and 323% for magnesia-based tunnel junctions. Additionally, tunnel junctions with a unified layer stack were prepared for the three different barriers. In these systems, the tunnel magnetoresistance ratios at optimum annealing te...

  10. Complex tunneling dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, C.-D. [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: cdyang@mail.ncku.edu.tw

    2007-04-15

    Tunneling dynamics and tunneling trajectories are modeled exactly by complex-extended Hamilton-Jacobi formulation in this paper. It is found that the wave-like properties of tunneling particles, such as reflection, refraction, and transmission resonance, can be identified and explained in terms of particle's motion in complex space with the tunneling time defined as the usual sense of classical time. Following the complex trajectories determined by the complex Hamilton equations of motion, we can connect classical trajectories smoothly with tunneling trajectories using position and velocity continuity at the interface of the media, locate the particle's position at any instant, and find the time spent by a particle within the potential. A microscopic tunneling model is also developed to explain the probabilistic nature why a particle with the same incident conditions sometimes transmits the potential and sometimes is reflected from the potential.

  11. Resonance Enhanced Tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, S; Matsumoto, Sh.

    2000-01-01

    Time evolution of tunneling in thermal medium is examined using the real-time semiclassical formalism previously developed. Effect of anharmonic terms in the potential well is shown to give a new mechanism of resonance enhanced tunneling. If the friction from environment is small enough, this mechanism may give a very large enhancement for the tunneling rate. The case of the asymmetric wine bottle potential is worked out in detail.

  12. Microsystem Aeromechanics Wind Tunnel

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Microsystem Aeromechanics Wind Tunnel advances the study of fundamental flow physics relevant to micro air vehicle (MAV) flight and assesses vehicle performance...

  13. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 586. Related Content STDs during Pregnancy Fact Sheet Pregnancy and HIV, Viral Hepatitis, and STD Prevention Pelvic Inflammatory Disease ( ... Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) Chlamydia Gonorrhea Genital Herpes Hepatitis HIV/AIDS & STDs Human Papillomavirus ... STDs See Also Pregnancy Reproductive ...

  14. Bacterial Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Bacterial Meningitis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... serious disease. Laboratory Methods for the Diagnosis of Meningitis This manual summarizes laboratory methods used to isolate, ...

  15. Prostatitis - bacterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Any bacteria that can cause a urinary tract infection can cause acute bacterial prostatitis. Infections spread through sexual contact can cause prostatitis. These include chlamydia and gonorrhea . Sexually transmitted ...

  16. Bacterial Conjunctivitis

    OpenAIRE

    Köhle, Ülkü; Kükner, Şahap

    2003-01-01

    Conjunctivitis is an infection of the conjunctiva, generally characterized by irritation, itching, foreign body sensation, tearing and discharge. Bacterial conjunctivitis may be distinguished from other types of conjunctivitis by the presence of yellow–white mucopurulent discharge. It is the most common form of ocular infection all around the world. Staphylococcus species are the most common bacterial pathogenes, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus i...

  17. Fluorescent Structural DNA Nanoballs Functionalized With Phosphate-Linked Nucleotide Triphosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jon P.; Reynolds, Bambi L.; Baum, Kristin; Williams, John G.

    2010-01-01

    Highly labeled DNA nanoballs functionalized with phosphate-linked nucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs) were developed as a source of dNTPs for DNA polymerase. The particles were prepared by strand-displacement polymerization from a self-complementary circular template. Imaged by atomic force microscopy, these functionalized particles appear as condensed fuzzy balls with diameters between 50–150 nm. They emit a bright fluorescent signal, detected in 2 msec exposures with a signal-to-noise of 25 when imaged using a TIR fluorescence microscope. PMID:20158249

  18. Chloride permeability of rat brain membrane vesicles correlates with thiamine triphosphate content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettendorff, L; Hennuy, B; De Clerck, A; Wins, P

    1994-07-25

    Incubation of rat brain homogenates with thiamine or thiamine diphosphate (TDP) leads to a synthesis of thiamine triphosphate (TTP). In membrane vesicles subsequently prepared from the homogenates, increased TTP content correlates with increased 36Cl- uptake. A hyperbolic relationship was obtained with a K0.5 of 0.27 nmol TTP/mg protein. In crude mitochondrial fractions from the brains of animals previously treated with thiamine or sulbutiamine, a positive correlation between 36Cl- uptake and TTP content was found. These results, together with other results previously obtained with the patch-clamp technique, suggest that TTP is an activator of chloride channels having a large unit conductance. PMID:7953714

  19. Tunnel modeling with BIM tools

    OpenAIRE

    Saje, Samo

    2014-01-01

    Graduation thesis deals with the process of tunnel modeling with the use of BIM tools and shows the development of libraries and families for tunnels for Revit software environment. In the first part of the thesis the process of design and construction of tunnels is presented, various tunnel construction methods and typical structure of road tunnels are described with an emphasis on the new Austrian method (NATM). The tunnel design process is broken down into individual phases, while the ...

  20. Carpal Tunnel Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... carpal tunnel syndrome. At this point in time, we have the patient under anesthesia. We have the hand prepped. Great. And then, the ... the carpal tunnel, and it’s the ligament that we incise to release the carpal canal. The carpal ...

  1. Coherent revival of tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Liang-Yan; Rabitz, Herschel

    2015-07-01

    We introduce a tunneling effect by a driving field, referred to as coherent revival of tunneling (CRT), corresponding to complete tunneling (transmission coefficient =1 ) that is revived from the circumstance of total reflection (transmission coefficient ≈0 ) through application of an appropriate perpendicular high-frequency ac field. To illustrate CRT, we simulate electron transport through fish-bone-like quantum-dot arrays by using single-particle Green's functions along with Floquet theory, and we explore the corresponding current-field amplitude characteristics as well as current-polarization characteristics. In regard to the two characteristics, we show that CRT exhibits entirely different features than coherent destruction of tunneling and photon-assisted tunneling. We also discuss two practical conditions for experimental realization of CRT.

  2. Tunnel fire dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ingason, Haukur; Lönnermark, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This book covers a wide range of issues in fire safety engineering in tunnels, describes the phenomena related to tunnel fire dynamics, presents state-of-the-art research, and gives detailed solutions to these major issues. Examples for calculations are provided. The aim is to significantly improve the understanding of fire safety engineering in tunnels. Chapters on fuel and ventilation control, combustion products, gas temperatures, heat fluxes, smoke stratification, visibility, tenability, design fire curves, heat release, fire suppression and detection, CFD modeling, and scaling techniques all equip readers to create their own fire safety plans for tunnels. This book should be purchased by any engineer or public official with responsibility for tunnels. It would also be of interest to many fire protection engineers as an application of evolving technical principles of fire safety.

  3. Bacterial carbonatogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several series of experiments in the laboratory as well as in natural conditions teach that the production of carbonate particles by heterotrophic bacteria follows different ways. The 'passive' carbonatogenesis is generated by modifications of the medium that lead to the accumulation of carbonate and bicarbonate ions and to the precipitation of solid particles. The 'active' carbonatogenesis is independent of the metabolic pathways. The carbonate particles are produced by ionic exchanges through the cell membrane following still poorly known mechanisms. Carbonatogenesis appears to be the response of heterotrophic bacterial communities to an enrichment of the milieu in organic matter. The active carbonatogenesis seems to start first. It is followed by the passive one which induces the growth of initially produced particles. The yield of heterotrophic bacterial carbonatogenesis and the amounts of solid carbonates production by bacteria are potentially very high as compared to autotrophic or chemical sedimentation from marine, paralic or continental waters. Furthermore, the bacterial processes are environmentally very ubiquitous; they just require organic matter enrichment. Thus, apart from purely evaporite and autotrophic ones, all Ca and/or Mg carbonates must be considered as from heterotrophic bacterial origin. By the way, the carbon of carbonates comes from primary organic matter. Such considerations ask questions about some interpretations from isotopic data on carbonates. Finally, bacterial heterotrophic carbonatogenesis appears as a fundamental phase in the relationships between atmosphere and lithosphere and in the geo-biological evolution of Earth. (author)

  4. The aeolian wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    The aeolian wind tunnel is a special case of a larger subset of the wind tunnel family which is designed to simulate the atmospheric surface layer winds to small scale (a member of this larger subset is usually called an atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel or environmental wind tunnel). The atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel is designed to simulate, as closely as possible, the mean velocity and turbulence that occur naturally in the atmospheric boundary layer (defined as the lowest portion of the atmosphere, of the order of 500 m, in which the winds are most greatly affected by surface roughness and topography). The aeolian wind tunnel is used for two purposes: to simulate the physics of the saltation process and to model at small scale the erosional and depositional processes associated with topographic surface features. For purposes of studying aeolian effects on the surface of Mars and Venus as well as on Earth, the aeolian wind tunnel continues to prove to be a useful tool for estimating wind speeds necessary to move small particles on the three planets as well as to determine the effects of topography on the evolution of aeolian features such as wind streaks and dune patterns.

  5. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    parameters, which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to...... tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion is...... the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental...

  6. Bacterial lipases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    1994-01-01

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation, mea

  7. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial ecology is concerned with the interactions between bacteria and their biological and nonbiological environments and with the role of bacteria in biogeochemical element cycling. Many fundamental properties of bacteria are consequences of their small size. Thus, they can efficiently exploit...

  8. Spin Tunneling in Conducting Oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Bratkovsky, Alexander

    1997-01-01

    Direct tunneling in ferromagnetic junctions is compared with impurity-assisted, surface state assisted, and inelastic contributions to a tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR). Theoretically calculated direct tunneling in iron group systems leads to about a 30% change in resistance, which is close to experimentally observed values. It is shown that the larger observed values of the TMR might be a result of tunneling involving surface polarized states. We find that tunneling via resonant defect sta...

  9. Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and nerves. One of these structures is the posterior tibial nerve, which is the focus of tarsal tunnel ... syndrome is a compression, or squeezing, on the posterior tibial nerve that produces symptoms anywhere along the path ...

  10. Carpal Tunnel Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of carpal tunnel syndrome. At this point in time, we have the patient under anesthesia. We have ... and is not visible over a period of time. You can barely see a surgical scar. My ...

  11. Water Tunnel Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s High-Pressure Water Tunnel Facility in Pittsburgh, PA, re-creates the conditions found 3,000 meters beneath the ocean’s surface, allowing scientists to study...

  12. INCAS TRISONIC WIND TUNNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin MUNTEANU

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The 1.2 m x 1.2 m Trisonic Blowdown Wind Tunnel is the largest of the experimental facilities at the National Institute for Aerospace Research - I.N.C.A.S. "Elie Carafoli", Bucharest, Romania. The tunnel has been designed by the Canadian company DSMA (now AIOLOS and since its commissioning in 1978 has performed high speed aerodynamic tests for more than 120 projects of aircraft, missiles and other objects among which the twin jet fighter IAR-93, the jet trainer IAR-99, the MIG-21 Lancer, the Polish jet fighter YRYDA and others. In the last years the wind tunnel has been used mostly for experimental research in European projects such as UFAST. The high flow quality parameters and the wide range of testing capabilities ensure the competitivity of the tunnel at an international level.

  13. Carpal Tunnel Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tunnel pass the tendons and the nerves. So, right beneath this ligament is going to be the ... and it’s actually beneath this bridge of skin right in here. So, I’ve incised this ligament ...

  14. Carpal Tunnel Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the lining of the tendons that will sometimes increase in size, giving rise to the increased pressure --. ... incriminating structure in carpal tunnel syndrome. As it increases in size, the pressures within the carpal canal ...

  15. Wind Tunnel Testing Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NASA Ames Research Center is pleased to offer the services of our premier wind tunnel facilities that have a broad range of proven testing capabilities to customers...

  16. Tunnelling in organic superconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Bolech, C. J.; Giamarchi, T.

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of deciding on the symmetry of the superconducting phase in the organic superconductors (Bechgaard salts), using tunnelling experiments. We first briefly review the properties of organic superconductors, and the possibility to have unconventional (triplet) superconductivity in these systems. We then present a simple scheme for computing the full current-voltage characteristics for tunnelling experiments within the framework of the non-equilibrium Keldysh Green funct...

  17. On tunneling across horizons

    OpenAIRE

    Vanzo, Luciano

    2011-01-01

    The tunneling method for stationary black holes in the Hamilton-Jacobi variant is reconsidered in the light of various critiques that have been moved against. It is shown that once the tunneling trajectories have been correctly identified the method isfree from internal inconsistencies, it is manifestly covariant, it allows for the extension to spinning particles and it can even be used without solving the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. These conclusions borrow support on a simple analytic continu...

  18. Temperature stratification in tunnels

    OpenAIRE

    Nyman, Hans; Ingason, Haukur

    2012-01-01

    An investigation of previously established correlations between gas temperature distribution and smoke stratification in mines has been carried out for tunnel applications. The investigated correlations are based on excess gas temperature ratios and Froude number scaling. This paper describes a comparison between two large scale tests carried out in a road tunnel and two well defined model scale tests. In each of the tests, a longitudinal flow was maintained. The temperature data obtained at ...

  19. Adenosine triphosphate concentration in relation to microbial biomass in aquatic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, H.W. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Analyses of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) extracted from a sediment community of an aquatic ecosystem by the sulfuric acid method are complicated by inhibitions from inorganic and organic compounds. Inhibitions by inorganic compounds are reversible while those by organic compounds are irreversible. The primary inhibition by organic compounds results by complexing with acid-soluble fulvic acids which will prevent the detection of as much as 80% of the ATP present in a sample by the luciferin-luciferase reaction. Analytical techniques were developed to partially circumvent such interferences. Biomass interpretations from ATP concentrations in aquatic systems are complicated by the diversity of the microbiota and by the variability in the carbon to ATP ratio caused by environmental conditions. However, when levels of ATP are considered as a physiological condition of a sedimentary community, this data provides a means to interpret community metabolism not available hitherto.

  20. Interaction of Divalent Metal Ions with the Adenosine Triphosphate Measured Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The interaction of adenosine triphosphate with divalent metal ions is important in biochemical functions. The effects of pH and metal ions Mg2+, Ca2+, Zn2+, Mn2+, and Co2+ on the chemical shift of the phosphate group of ATP have been studied using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The chemical shift of the β-phosphate of ATP is the most sensitive to pH. Ca2+ and Mg2+ bind with the α- and β-phosphate groups of ATP. Zn2+ binds to the adenosine ring hydrogen as well as to phosphate. The paramagnetic ions Mn2+ and Co2+ do not cause chemical shifts of the phosphate or proton peak. Mn2+ and Co2+ broaden the resonance peak only.

  1. Gravity Tunnel Drag

    CERN Document Server

    Concannon, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The time it takes to fall down a tunnel through the center of the Earth to the other side takes approximately 42 minutes, but only when given several simplifying assumptions: a uniform density Earth; a gravitational field that varies linearly with radial position; a non-rotating Earth; a tunnel evacuated of air; and zero friction along the sides of the tunnel. Though several papers have singularly relaxed the first three assumptions, in this paper we relax the final two assumptions and analyze the motion of a body experiencing these types of drag forces in the tunnel. Under such drag forces, we calculate the motion of a transport vehicle through a tunnel of the Earth under uniform density, under constant gravitational acceleration, and finally under the more realistic Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM) density data. We find the density profile corresponding to a constant gravitational acceleration better models the motion through the tunnel compared to the PREM density profile, and the uniform density m...

  2. Tunnelling of a molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A quantum-mechanical description of tunnelling is presented for a one-dimensional system with internal oscillator degrees of freedom. The 'charged diatomic molecule' is frustrated on encountering a barrier potential by its centre of charge not being coincident with its centre of mass, resulting in transitions amongst internal states. In an adiabatic limit, the tunnelling of semiclassical coherent-like oscillator states is shown to exhibit the Hartman and Bueuttiker-Landauer times tH and tBL, with the time dependence of the coherent state parameter for the tunnelled state given by α(t) = α e-iω(t+Δt) , Δt = tH - itBL. A perturbation formalism is developed, whereby the exact transfer matrix can be expanded to any desired accuracy in a suitable limit. An 'intrinsic' time, based on the oscillator transition rate during tunnelling, transmission or reflection, is introduced. In simple situations the resulting intrinsic tunnelling time is shown to vanish to lowest order. In the general case a particular (nonzero) parametrisation is inferred, and its properties discussed in comparison with the literature on tunnelling times for both wavepackets and internal clocks. Copyright (1998) CSIRO Australia

  3. Numerical wind tunnels

    CERN Document Server

    Souza, Paulo Victor Santos

    2015-01-01

    Flow of viscous fluids are not usually discussed in detail in general and basic courses of physics. This is due in part to the fact that the Navier-Stokes equation has analytical solution only for a few restricted cases, while more sophisticated problems can only be solved by numerical methods. In this text, we present a computer simulation of wind tunnel, i.e., we present a set of programs to solve the Navier-Stokes equation for an arbitrary object inserted in a wind tunnel. The tunnel enables us to visualize the formation of vortices behind object, the so-called von K\\'arm\\'an vortices, and calculate the drag force on the object. We believe that this numerical wind tunnel can support the teacher and allow a more elaborate discussion of viscous flow. The potential of the tunnel is exemplified by the study of the drag on a simplified model of wing whose angle of attack can be controlled. A link to download the programs that make up the tunnel appears at the end.

  4. The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels with TunnelSim and TunnelSys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Thomas J.; Galica, Carol A.; Vila, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels is a Web-based, on-line textbook that explains and demonstrates the history, physics, and mathematics involved with wind tunnels and wind tunnel testing. The Web site contains several interactive computer programs to demonstrate scientific principles. TunnelSim is an interactive, educational computer program that demonstrates basic wind tunnel design and operation. TunnelSim is a Java (Sun Microsystems Inc.) applet that solves the continuity and Bernoulli equations to determine the velocity and pressure throughout a tunnel design. TunnelSys is a group of Java applications that mimic wind tunnel testing techniques. Using TunnelSys, a team of students designs, tests, and post-processes the data for a virtual, low speed, and aircraft wing.

  5. A sensitive LC-MS/MS method for quantifying clofarabine triphosphate concentrations in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Xiaowei; Lu, Youming; Zhong, Dafang; Zhang, Yifan; Chen, Xiaoyan

    2014-08-01

    Clofarabine triphosphate is an intracellular active metabolite of clofarabine. In the present study, we developed and validated a rapid, sensitive, and selective liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method (LC-MS/MS) for quantifying clofarabine triphosphate concentrations in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). PBMCs were isolated from blood using the Ficoll gradient centrifugation method. Chromatographic separation was performed on a CN column using an isocratic mobile phase comprising acetonitrile/5mM ammonium acetate with 0.001% ammonium hydroxide (20/80, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.60 mL/min. Detection was carried out by MS/MS in the multiple reaction monitoring mode using a negative electrospray ionization interface. The method was validated in concentration ranges of 1.25-100 ng/10(7) cells with acceptable accuracy and precision using 50 μL of cell extract. Clofarabine triphosphate was stable in a series of stability studies with bench-top, auto-sampler, and repeated freeze-thaw cycles. The validated method was successfully used to measure the concentrations of clofarabine triphosphate in PBMCs from cancer patients treated with clofarabine. PMID:24529342

  6. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE ATP (ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATE) CONTENT OF SUBSURFACE MATERIAL AND THE RATE OF BIODEGRADATION OF ALKYLBENZENES AND CHLOROBENZENE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The rate of biotransformation of toluene in unconsolidated subsurface material from sites at Lula, Oklahoma, USA and Conroe, Texas, USA was compared to the ATP (adenosine triphosphate) content of these materials. The rate of toluene degradation decreased with decreasing ATP conte...

  7. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Herrero, Daniel; Andreu Domingo, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the main cause of vaginal dysbacteriosis in the women during the reproductive age. It is an entity in which many studies have focused for years and which is still open for discussion topics. This is due to the diversity of microorganisms that cause it and therefore, its difficult treatment. Bacterial vaginosis is probably the result of vaginal colonization by complex bacterial communities, many of them non-cultivable and with interdependent metabolism where anaerobic populations most likely play an important role in its pathogenesis. The main symptoms are an increase of vaginal discharge and the unpleasant smell of it. It can lead to serious consequences for women, such as an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus and upper genital tract and pregnancy complications. Gram stain is the gold standard for microbiological diagnosis of BV, but can also be diagnosed using the Amsel clinical criteria. It should not be considered a sexually transmitted disease but it is highly related to sex. Recurrence is the main problem of medical treatment. Apart from BV, there are other dysbacteriosis less characterized like aerobic vaginitis of which further studies are coming slowly but are achieving more attention and consensus among specialists. PMID:27474242

  8. Detection of adenosine triphosphate through polymerization-induced aggregation of actin-conjugated gold/silver nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yu-Ju; Shiang, Yen-Chun; Chen, Li-Yi; Hsu, Chia-Lun; Huang, Chih-Ching; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2013-11-01

    We have developed a simple and selective nanosensor for the optical detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) using globular actin-conjugated gold/silver nanorods (G-actin-Au/Ag NRs). By simply mixing G-actin and Au/Ag NRs (length ˜56 nm and diameter ˜12 nm), G-actin-Au/Ag NRs were prepared which were stable in physiological solutions (25 mM Tris-HCl, 150 mM NaCl, 5.0 mM KCl, 3.0 mM MgCl2 and 1.0 mM CaCl2; pH 7.4). Introduction of ATP into the G-actin-Au/Ag NR solutions in the presence of excess G-actin induced the formation of filamentous actin-conjugated Au/Ag NR aggregates through ATP-induced polymerization of G-actin. When compared to G-actin-modified spherical Au nanoparticles having a size of 13 nm or 56 nm, G-actin-Au/Ag NRs provided better sensitivity for ATP, mainly because the longitudinal surface plasmon absorbance of the Au/Ag NR has a more sensitive response to aggregation. This G-actin-Au/Ag NR probe provided high sensitivity (limit of detection 25 nM) for ATP with remarkable selectivity (>10-fold) over other adenine nucleotides (adenosine, adenosine monophosphate and adenosine diphosphate) and nucleoside triphosphates (guanosine triphosphate, cytidine triphosphate and uridine triphosphate). It also allowed the determination of ATP concentrations in plasma samples without conducting tedious sample pretreatments; the only necessary step was simple dilution. Our experimental results are in good agreement with those obtained from a commercial luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence assay. Our simple, sensitive and selective approach appears to have a practical potential for the clinical diagnosis of diseases (e.g. cystic fibrosis) associated with changes in ATP concentrations.

  9. Shot Noise in Magnetic Tunnel Junctions: Evidence for Sequential Tunneling

    OpenAIRE

    Guerrero, R.; Aliev, F. G.; Tserkovnyak, Y.; Santos, T. S.; Moodera, J.S.

    2006-01-01

    We report the experimental observation of sub-Poissonian shot noise in single magnetic tunnel junctions, indicating the importance of tunneling via impurity levels inside the tunnel barrier. For junctions with weak zero-bias anomaly in conductance, the Fano factor (normalized shot noise) depends on the magnetic configuration being enhanced for antiparallel alignment of the ferromagnetic electrodes. We propose a model of sequential tunneling through nonmagnetic and paramagnetic impurity levels...

  10. Interaction between groundwater and TBM (Tunnel Boring Machine) excavated tunnels

    OpenAIRE

    Font Capó, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    A number of problems, e.g. sudden inflows are encountered during tunneling under the piezometric level, especially when the excavation crosses high transmissivity areas. These inflows may drag materials when the tunnel crosses low competent layers, resulting in subsidence, chimney formation and collapses. Moreover, inflows can lead to a decrease in head level because of aquifer drainage. Tunnels can be drilled by a tunnel boring machine (TBM) to minimize inflows and groundwater impacts, restr...

  11. Tunneling Through Black Rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Liu

    2007-01-01

    Hawking radiation of black ring solutions to 5-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory is analyzed by use of the Parikh-Wilczek tunneling method. To get the correct tunneling amplitude and emission rate, we adopt and develop the Angheben-Nadalini-Vanzo-Zerbini covariant approach to cover the effects of rotation and electronic discharge all at once, and the effect of back reaction is also taken into account. This constitutes a unified approach to the tunneling problem. Provided the first law of thermodynamics for black rings holds, the emission rate is proportional to the exponential of the change of Bekenstein-Hawking entropy. Explicit calculation for black ring temperatures agrees exactly with the results obtained via the classical surface gravity method and the quasi-local formalism.

  12. Tunneling with negative tension

    CERN Document Server

    Marvel, Kate

    2008-01-01

    We describe a new family of thin-wall instantons, with negative tension bubble walls, that mediate tunneling between Minkowski or de Sitter vacua. Some of these instantons can have exponentially enhanced tunneling rates, and would dominate the Euclidean path integral, representing a severe non-perturbative instability in any theory which supports them. We give two constructions of these instantons in theories which are perturbatively stable, but violate the null energy condition. One construction uses a scalar field theory with higher-derivative kinetic term, and is similar to the Coleman-de Luccia positive tension instanton. The other construction employs a negative-tension boundary arising from Z_2 orbifolding: it resembles a "bubble of nothing" which nucleates and grows, consuming the surrounding de Sitter or Minkowski spacetime. We explain how the spectral flow for fluctutations about the thin-wall tunneling solutions automatically protects causality, for both positive and negative tension instantons. We ...

  13. Den Trygge Tunnel

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Claus Bach; Hertz, Thea Stine Lund; Loose, Mikkel Thybo; Carlsson, Katrine; Høg, Lasse Noe; Andersen, Ea Leighton

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Pedestrian tunnels in Denmark has for a long time just been something that is solely there to transport the pedestrians away and in safety from car or train traffic, from one point to another, and it still is in many cases. There has been no focus on making it an experience in itself, actively including the pedestrians, which could promote comfort, pleasure and a feeling of safety when using the tunnels. They are left as they were build; creepy, dark, humid, wet and often vandali...

  14. Tunneling in Axion Monodromy

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Jon; Shiu, Gary; Soler, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The Coleman formula for vacuum decay and bubble nucleation has been used to estimate the tunneling rate in models of axion monodromy in recent literature. However, several of Coleman's original assumptions do not hold for such models. Here we derive a new estimate with this in mind using a similar Euclidean procedure. We find that there are significant regions of parameter space for which the tunneling rate in axion monodromy is not well approximated by the Coleman formula. However, there is also a regime relevant to large field inflation in which both estimates parametrically agree. We also briefly comment on the applications of our results to the relaxion scenario.

  15. Programmable ferroelectric tunnel memristor

    OpenAIRE

    Andy eQuindeau; Dietrich eHesse; Marin eAlexe

    2014-01-01

    We report an analogously programmable memristor based on genuine electronic resistive switching combining ferroelectric switching and electron tunneling. The tunnel current through an 8 unit cell thick epitaxial Pb(Zr[0.2]Ti[0.8])O[3] film sandwiched between La[0.7]Sr[0.3]MnO[3] and cobalt electrodes obeys the Kolmogorov-Avrami-Ishibashi model for bidimensional growth with a characteristic switching time in the order of 10^-7 seconds. The analytical description of switching kinetics allows us...

  16. INCAS SUBSONIC WIND TUNNEL

    OpenAIRE

    Corneliu STOICA; Corneliu OPREAN; Florin MUNTEANU

    2009-01-01

    The INCAS Subsonic Wind Tunnel is a closed circuit, continuous, atmospheric pressure facility with a maximum speed of 110 m/s. The test section is octagonal ,of 2.5 m wide, 2.0 m high and 4 m long. The tunnel is powered by a 1200 kW, air cooled variable speed DC motor which drives a 12 blade, 3.5 m diameter fan and is equipped with a six component pyramidal type external mechanical balance with a 700 Kgf maximum lift capacity.The angle of attack range is between -45º and +45º while the yaw an...

  17. Gap anisotropy and tunneling currents. [MPS3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarides, N.; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    1996-01-01

    The tunneling Hamiltonian formalism is applied to calculate the tunnelingcurrents through a small superconducting tunnel junction. The formalism isextended to nonconstant tunneling matrix elements. The electrodes of thejunction are assumed to......The tunneling Hamiltonian formalism is applied to calculate the tunnelingcurrents through a small superconducting tunnel junction. The formalism isextended to nonconstant tunneling matrix elements. The electrodes of thejunction are assumed to...

  18. Bacterial hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lauga, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass, and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micron scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically-complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, we review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  19. Hybrid integrated biological-solid-state system powered with adenosine triphosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseman, Jared M.; Lin, Jianxun; Ramakrishnan, Siddharth; Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2015-12-01

    There is enormous potential in combining the capabilities of the biological and the solid state to create hybrid engineered systems. While there have been recent efforts to harness power from naturally occurring potentials in living systems in plants and animals to power complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor integrated circuits, here we report the first successful effort to isolate the energetics of an electrogenic ion pump in an engineered in vitro environment to power such an artificial system. An integrated circuit is powered by adenosine triphosphate through the action of Na+/K+ adenosine triphosphatases in an integrated in vitro lipid bilayer membrane. The ion pumps (active in the membrane at numbers exceeding 2 × 106 mm-2) are able to sustain a short-circuit current of 32.6 pA mm-2 and an open-circuit voltage of 78 mV, providing for a maximum power transfer of 1.27 pW mm-2 from a single bilayer. Two series-stacked bilayers provide a voltage sufficient to operate an integrated circuit with a conversion efficiency of chemical to electrical energy of 14.9%.

  20. Measurement and interpretation of microbial adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) in aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammes, Frederik; Goldschmidt, Felix; Vital, Marius; Wang, Yingying; Egli, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    There is a widespread need for cultivation-free methods to quantify viability of natural microbial communities in aquatic environments. Adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) is the energy currency of all living cells, and therefore a useful indicator of viability. A luminescence-based ATP kit/protocol was optimised in order to detect ATP concentrations as low as 0.0001 nM with a standard deviation of water samples from a variety of aquatic environments (drinking water, groundwater, bottled water, river water, lake water and wastewater effluent) were analysed for extracellular ATP and microbial ATP in comparison with flow-cytometric (FCM) parameters. Microbial ATP concentrations ranged between 3% and 97% of total ATP concentrations, and correlated well (R(2)=0.8) with the concentrations of intact microbial cells (after staining with propidium iodide). From this correlation, we calculated an average ATP-per-cell value of 1.75x10(-10)nmol/cell. An even better correlation (R(2)=0.88) was observed between intact biovolume (derived from FCM scatter data) and microbial ATP concentrations, and an average ATP-per-biovolume value of 2.95x10(-9)nmol/microm(3) was calculated. These results support the use of ATP analysis for both routine monitoring and research purposes, and contribute towards a better interpretation of ATP data. PMID:20605621

  1. Rates of [3H]thymidine incorporation into thymidine triphosphate vs nuclear matrix DNA in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies in vitro have indicated the possible existence of more than one thymidine pool accessible to DNA replication forks. To investigate this possibility in vivo, the incorporation of [3H]thymidine (3H-Thd) into matrix DNA and soluble thymidine triphosphate (TTP) was examined in regenerating rat liver. Nuclear matrix-attached DNA, although only 2% of total nuclear DNA, represents the most newly replicated DNA in eukaryotic cells, thereby providing a very sensitive means of examining precursor incorporation kinetics. Partially hepatectomized rats were injected with 200 μC 3H-Thd via the hepatic portal vein. After various pulse times, matrix DNA and/or soluble TTP were extracted and their specific activities determined. After only 1 min, the labeling of matrix DNA had already reached a maximum. Matrix DNA contained 27% of the label at 2 min, 11% at 5 min, and only 5% at 10 min with respect to total DNA. Contrary to the kinetics found for matrix DNA, 3H-Thd incorporation into TTP was still increasing at early pulse times and had not peaked even after a 10 min pulse. Five min after injection, TTP specific activity was 3050 dpm/nmole and was 7030 dpm/nmole after 10 min. Since the peak specific activity for [3H]-Thd incorporation into matrix DNA precedes that for [3H]-Thd into TTP, there may be channeling of exogenous thymidine directly to the site of DNA synthesis bypassing existing nucleotide pools

  2. E-NTPDase (ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase) of Leishmania amazonensis inhibits macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Rodrigo Saar; de Carvalho, Luana Cristina Faria; de Souza Vasconcellos, Raphael; Fietto, Juliana Lopes Rangel; Afonso, Luís Carlos Crocco

    2015-04-01

    Leishmania amazonensis, the causal agent of diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis, is known for its ability to modulate the host immune response. Because a relationship between ectonucleotidase activity and the ability of Leishmania to generate injury in C57BL/6 mice has been demonstrated, in this study we evaluated the involvement of ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (E-NTPDase) activity of L. amazonensis in the process of infection of J774-macrophages. Our results show that high-activity parasites show increased survival rate in LPS/IFN-γ-activated cells, by inhibiting the host-cell NO production. Conversely, inhibition of E-NTPDase activity reduces the parasite survival rates, an effect associated with increased macrophage NO production. E-NTPDase activity generates substrate for the production of extracellular adenosine, which binds to A2B receptors and reduces IL-12 and TNF-α produced by activated macrophages, thus inhibiting NO production. These results indicate that E-NTPDase activity is important for survival of L. amazonensis within macrophages, showing the role of the enzyme in modulating macrophage response and lower NO production, which ultimately favors infection. Our results point to a new mechanism of L. amazonensis infection that may pave the way for the development of new treatments for this neglected disease. PMID:25554487

  3. Detection of adenosine 5'-triphosphate by fluorescence variation of oligonucleotide-templated silver nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jennifer Daneen; Cang, Jinshun; Chen, Ying-Chieh; Chen, Wei-Yu; Ou, Chung-Mao; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2014-08-15

    Oligonucleotide-templated Ag nanoclusters (DNA-Ag NCs) prepared from AgNO3 using an oligonucleotide (5'-TAACCCCTAACCCCT-3') as a template and NaBH4 as a reducing agent have been used for sensing of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). The fluorescence intensity and emission wavelength of DNA-Ag NCs are dependent on the pH value and ATP concentration. At pH 3.0 and 11.0, ATP shows greater effects on fluorescence of the DNA-Ag NCs. Upon increasing ATP concentration from 10 to 50μM, their emission wavelength at pH 3.0 shifts from 525 to 585nm. At pH 11.0, their fluorescence intensity (510nm) increases upon increasing ATP concentration. The circular dichroism (CD), electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), absorption, and fluorescence results indicate that ATP and pH affect the interactions between DNAs and Ag atoms, resulting in changes in their fluorescence. The DNA-Ag NCs allow detection of ATP over a concentration range of 0.1-10μM, with a limit of detection 33nM. Practicality of the DNA-Ag NCs probe has been validated with the determination of ATP concentrations in the lysate of MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells. PMID:24657647

  4. Protective effect of deoxynucleotide triphosphates on DNA damage in different mammalian cells exposed to -radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmaghraby, T

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA is generally considered to be the most critical cellular target when considering the lethal, carcinogenic and mutagenic effects of drugs, radiation and environmental chemicals. So the study aim to the determination the damaging effect of -radiation on DNA and the protective effect of deoxynucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs. The study includes three cell types, lymphocytes, kidney cells of African gree monkey (Vero and hepatocellular carcinoma of human (HePG2 exposed to 1-5 Gy of -radiation and by using fluorometric analysis of DNA unwinding (FADU method, DNA damage was measured after radiation. The cells were divided into two groups: The first received 5x10-5 dNTPs from 0-30 minutes after radiation, while the second group was not supplemented with deoxynucleotides. Clonogenic survival for vero and HePG2 cell lines was measured. The results revealed that the increase of irradiation dose precipitates an increase of DNA strand breaks. The slope curve of initial DNA damage and mean inactivation dose (D differ between vero and HepG2 cell line by a factor of up 3.5 and 2, respectively. dNTPs have clear ameliorating effect on DNA damage. FADU method can play an important role in the choice of a suitable treatment (radiation or drugs and its dosage according to measurement of DNA damages in selective malignant tissues. Moreover, using dNTPs mixture can reduce the side effect of these treatment especially after experimentally on live mammals (mice .

  5. Bond cleavages of adenosine 5'-triphosphate induced by monochromatic soft X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate which type of bond is likely to be cleaved by soft X-ray exposure to an adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), we observed spectral changes in X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) around nitrogen and oxygen K-edge of an ATP film by soft X-ray irradiation. Experiments were performed at a synchrotron soft X-ray beamline at SPring-8, Japan. The XANES spectra around the nitrogen and oxygen .K-edge slightly varied by exposure to 560 eV soft X-rays. These changes are originated from the cleavage of C-N bonds between a sugar and a nucleobase site and of C-O, P-O or O-H bond of sugar and phosphate site. From the comparison between the change in XANES intensity of σ* peak at nitrogen and that at oxygen K-edges, it is inferred that the C-O, P-O or O-H bond of sugar and phosphate is much efficiently cleaved than the C-N of N-glycoside bond by the exposure of 560 eV soft X-ray to ATP film.

  6. Adenosine Triphosphate stimulates differentiation and mineralization in human osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutarelli, Alessandro; Marini, Mario; Tancredi, Virginia; D'Arcangelo, Giovanna; Murdocca, Michela; Frank, Claudio; Tarantino, Umberto

    2016-05-01

    In the last years adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and subsequent purinergic system activation through P2 receptors were investigated highlighting their pivotal role in bone tissue biology. In osteoblasts ATP can regulate several activities like cell proliferation, cell death, cell differentiation and matrix mineralization. Since controversial results exist, in this study we analyzed the ATP effects on differentiation and mineralization in human osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells. We showed for the first time the altered functional activity of ATP receptors. Despite that, we found that ATP can reduce cell proliferation and stimulate osteogenic differentiation mainly in the early stages of in vitro maturation as evidenced by the enhanced expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and Osteocalcin (OC) genes and by the increased ALP activity. Moreover, we found that ATP can affect mineralization in a biphasic manner, at low concentrations ATP always increases mineral deposition while at high concentrations it always reduces mineral deposition. In conclusion, we show the osteogenic effect of ATP on both early and late stage activities like differentiation and mineralization, for the first time in human osteoblastic cells. PMID:27189526

  7. Leptin suppresses adenosine triphosphate-induced impairment of spinal cord astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baoman; Qi, Shuang; Sun, Guangfeng; Yang, Li; Han, Jidong; Zhu, Yue; Xia, Maosheng

    2016-10-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes long-term disability and has no clinically effective treatment. After SCI, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) may be released from neuronal cells and astrocytes in large amounts. Our previous studies have shown that the extracellular release of ATP increases the phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2 ) and triggers the rapid release of arachidonic acid (AA) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) via the stimulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the downstream phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2. Leptin, a glycoprotein, induces the activation of the Janus kinase (JAK2)/signal transducers and activators of transcription-3 (Stat3) pathway via the leptin receptor. In this study, we found that 1) prolonged leptin treatment suppressed the ATP-stimulated release of AA and PGE2 from cultured spinal cord astrocytes; 2) leptin elevated the expression of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) via the JAK2/Stat3 signaling pathway; 3) Cav-1 blocked the interaction between Src and EGFR, thereby inhibiting the phosphorylation of EGFR and cPLA2 and attenuating the release of AA or PGE2; 4) pretreatment with leptin decreased ;he level of apoptosis and the release of interleukin-6 from cocultured neurons and astrocytes; and 5) leptin improved the recovery of locomotion in mice after SCI. Our results highlight leptin as a promising therapeutic agent for SCI. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27316329

  8. The clinical value of adenosine triphosphate stress myocardial perfusion tomography for detecting coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the clinical value of adenosine triphosphate stress myocardial perfusion tomography imaging (ATP-MPI) in detection of coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods: There were 278 patients underwent ATP-MPI, 51 patients of them also underwent coronary angiography (CAG). Seventy-three patients underwent stress-rest myocardial perfusion tomography imaging with multi-stage submaximal exercise test (ST-MPI) and CAG serving as control group. Results: 1) Side effects: there were 11 different symptoms and atrioventricular conduction block (10 patients), sinoatrial conduction block (2 patients) occurred during ATP stress. Allopathy or interruption of ATP stress did not happen. 2) The sensitivity and specificity of ATP-MPI in detection of CAD were 97.1% and 82.4%, respectively, and those in detection of ≥50% narrowing coronary artery were 91.0% and 94.7%, respectively. 3) In patients without myocardial infarction, the sensitivity and specificity of ATP-MPI in detection of myocardial ischemia were comparable to those of ST-MPI. Conclusion: ATP-MPI is an accurate, safe modality and is comparable to ST-MPI in the detection of CAD

  9. Enhancement of antibody production against rabies virus by uridine 5'-triphosphate in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, Yoshimi; Sakai, Yusuke; Ochiai, Kenji; Umemura, Takashi; Sunden, Yuji

    2014-03-01

    Extracellular nucleotides such as adenosine 5'-triphospate (ATP) and uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP) interact with P2 purinergic receptors on the surface of phagocytic cells and induce various physiological reactions. In this study, the production of antibody in mice immunized with an inactivated rabies vaccine containing these nucleotides was investigated. Injection of inactivated rabies vaccine with UTP, but not with ATP, induced significantly higher serum antibody production in mice. The enhancement of antibody production by UTP was inhibited by an anti-P2Y4 receptor antibody. In an air pouch experiment, UTP treatment increased the number of monocytes and macrophages infiltrating the pouch and up-regulated the gene expression of IL-4 and IL-13 in the regional lymph nodes. These results suggested that UTP admixed with rabies vaccine activates Th2 cells and induces a humoral immune response. Furthermore, the survival rate of mice immunized with a rabies vaccine admixed with UTP before rabies virus challenge was slightly higher than that of control mice. In conclusion, UTP can act as a vaccine adjuvant to enhance antibody production against the rabies virus in mice. PMID:24309427

  10. Carpal tunnel release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Bo; Sørensen, A I; Crone, K L;

    2013-01-01

    A single-blind, randomized, controlled trial was done to compare the results of carpal tunnel release using classic incision, short incision, or endoscopic technique. In total, 90 consecutive cases were included. Follow-up was 24 weeks. We found a significantly shorter sick leave in the endoscopic...

  11. Tunnelling with wormhole creation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansoldi, S. [National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN) (Italy); Tanaka, T., E-mail: tanaka@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kyoto University, Department of Physics (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    The description of quantum tunnelling in the presence of gravity shows subtleties in some cases. We discuss wormhole production in the context of the spherically symmetric thin-shell approximation. By presenting a fully consistent treatment based on canonical quantization, we solve a controversy present in the literature.

  12. Tunnelling with wormhole creation

    OpenAIRE

    Ansoldi, Stefano; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    The description of quantum tunnelling in the presence of gravity shows subtleties in some cases. Here we discuss wormhole production in the context of the spherically symmetric thin-shell approximation. By presenting a fully consistent treatment based on canonical quantization, we solve a controversy present in literature.

  13. Environmental Wind Tunnels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jaňour, Zbyněk; Jurčáková, Klára

    New York : Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2013 - (Chaplin, S.), s. 105-124 ISBN 978-1-62618-396-4 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OC 113 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : wind tunnel * air pollution * atmospheric boundary layer Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  14. Tunneling path toward spintronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phenomenon of quantum tunneling, which was discovered almost a century ago, has led to many subsequent discoveries. One such discovery, spin polarized tunneling, was made 40 years ago by Robert Meservey and Paul Tedrow (Tedrow and Meservey 1971 Phys. Rev. Lett. 26 192), and it has resulted in many fundamental observations and opened up an entirely new field of study. Until the mid-1990s, this field developed at a steady, low rate, after which a huge increase in activity suddenly occurred as a result of the unraveling of successful spin tunneling between two ferromagnets. In the past 15 years, several thousands of papers related to spin polarized tunneling and transport have been published, making this topic one of the hottest areas in condensed matter physics from both fundamental science and applications viewpoints. Many review papers and book chapters have been written in the past decade on this subject. This paper is not exhaustive by any means; rather, the emphases are on recent progress, technological developments and informing the reader about the current direction in which this topic is moving.

  15. INCAS SUBSONIC WIND TUNNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corneliu STOICA

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The INCAS Subsonic Wind Tunnel is a closed circuit, continuous, atmospheric pressure facility with a maximum speed of 110 m/s. The test section is octagonal ,of 2.5 m wide, 2.0 m high and 4 m long. The tunnel is powered by a 1200 kW, air cooled variable speed DC motor which drives a 12 blade, 3.5 m diameter fan and is equipped with a six component pyramidal type external mechanical balance with a 700 Kgf maximum lift capacity.The angle of attack range is between -45º and +45º while the yaw angle range is between -140º and +216º .The data acquisition system has been modified recently to allow the recording of all test data on a PC - type computer using LABVIEW and a PXI – type chassis containing specialized data acquisition modules.The tunnel is equipped with a variable frequency electrical supply system for powered models and a 10 bar compressed air supply for pneumatic flow control applications.In the recent years the subsonic wind tunnel has been intensively used for tests within several European projects (AVERT, CESAR and others.

  16. HPLC–MS/MS method for the intracellular determination of ribavirin monophosphate and ribavirin triphosphate in CEMss cells

    OpenAIRE

    Meléndez, Margarita; Rosario, Osvaldo; Zayas, Beatriz; Rodríguez, José F.

    2009-01-01

    A sensitive and specific method using high performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC–MS/MS) for the determination of ribavirin monophosphate (RBV-MP) and ribavirin triphosphate (RBV-TP) in cells has been developed and validated. In this method, ribavirin phosphorylated metabolites were extracted and separated by anion exchange solid phase extraction (SPE). The RBV-MP and RBV-TP fractions were dephosphorylated using acid phosphatase and further purified by phenyl boronat...

  17. Effects of Adding Adenosine Triphosphate to Semen Diluter on Quality of Spermatozoa of Fat-Tailed Sheep

    OpenAIRE

    E Pramono; TR Tagama

    2008-01-01

    The research aimed to investigate the effects of adding different levels of Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) to semen diluter on quality of sperms of fat-tailed sheep. Treatments consisted of 5, 10 and 15 mg of ATP addition into semen diluter (Egg Yolk Sodium Citric). Results showed that treatments have no significant effects on spermatozoa motility, significant effects on spermatozoa viability, and high significant effects on spermatozoa mortality. On average, sperm motility for control was 79....

  18. Diastolic Dysfunction Induced by a High-Fat Diet Is Associated with Mitochondrial Abnormality and Adenosine Triphosphate Levels in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Ki-Woon; Kim, Ok-Soon; Chin, Jung Yeon; Kim, Won Ho; Park, Sang Hyun; Choi, Yu Jeong; Shin, Jong Ho; Jung, Kyung Tae; Lim, Do-Seon; Lee, Seong-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity is well-known as a risk factor for heart failure, including diastolic dysfunction. However, this mechanism in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese rats remain controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether cardiac dysfunction develops when rats are fed with a HFD for 10 weeks; additionally, we sought to investigate the association between mitochondrial abnormalities, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels and cardiac dysfunction. Methods We examined myocardia...

  19. An efficient construction of functionalized DNA by cross-coupling reactions of nucleoside triphosphates followed by primer extension or PCR

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hocek, Michal; Čapek, Petr; Cahová, Hana; Vrábel, Milan; Gloeckner, Ch.; Marx, A.; Fojta, Miroslav; Havran, Luděk

    Dublin : University Cillege Dublin, 2007. s. 200. [European Symposium on Organic Chemistry /15./. 08.07.2007-13.07.2007, Dublin] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA MŠk 1M0508; GA ČR GA203/05/0043 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : cross-coupling reactions * nucleoside triphosphates Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  20. Assays To Detect the Formation of Triphosphates of Unnatural Nucleotides: Application to Escherichia coli Nucleoside Diphosphate Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Mariko F; Shaw, Ryan W; Moses, Jennifer D; Kim, Hyo-Joong; Kim, Myong-Jung; Kim, Myong-Sang; Hoshika, Shuichi; Karalkar, Nilesh; Benner, Steven A

    2016-03-18

    One frontier in synthetic biology seeks to move artificially expanded genetic information systems (AEGIS) into natural living cells and to arrange the metabolism of those cells to allow them to replicate plasmids built from these unnatural genetic systems. In addition to requiring polymerases that replicate AEGIS oligonucleotides, such cells require metabolic pathways that biosynthesize the triphosphates of AEGIS nucleosides, the substrates for those polymerases. Such pathways generally require nucleoside and nucleotide kinases to phosphorylate AEGIS nucleosides and nucleotides on the path to these triphosphates. Thus, constructing such pathways focuses on engineering natural nucleoside and nucleotide kinases, which often do not accept the unnatural AEGIS biosynthetic intermediates. This, in turn, requires assays that allow the enzyme engineer to follow the kinase reaction, assays that are easily confused by ATPase and other spurious activities that might arise through "site-directed damage" of the natural kinases being engineered. This article introduces three assays that can detect the formation of both natural and unnatural deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, assessing their value as polymerase substrates at the same time as monitoring the progress of kinase engineering. Here, we focus on two complementary AEGIS nucleoside diphosphates, 6-amino-5-nitro-3-(1'-β-D-2'-deoxyribofuranosyl)-2(1H)-pyridone and 2-amino-8-(1'-β-D-2'-deoxyribofuranosyl)-imidazo[1,2-a]-1,3,5-triazin-4(8H)-one. These assays provide new ways to detect the formation of unnatural deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in vitro and to confirm their incorporation into DNA. Thus, these assays can be used with other unnatural nucleotides. PMID:26829203

  1. Monitoring pilot projects on bored tunnelling: the Second Heinenoord Tunnel and the Botlek Rail Tunnel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, K.J.; De Boer, F.; Admiraal, J.B.M.; Van Jaarsveld, E.P.

    1999-01-01

    Two pilot projects for bored tunnelling in soft soil have been undertaken in the Netherlands. The monitoring was commissioned under the authority of the Centre for Underground Construction (COB). A description of the research related to the Second Heinenoord Tunnel and the Botlek Rail Tunnel will be

  2. A sensitive aptasensor for colorimetric detection of adenosine triphosphate based on the protective effect of ATP-aptamer complexes on unmodified gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Yuan; Qi, Liang; Lv, Xiao-Jun; Lai, Ting; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Zhi-Qi

    2016-04-15

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is the most direct source of energy in organisms. This study is the first to demonstrate that ATP-aptamer complexes provide greater protection for unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) against salt-induced aggregation than either aptamer or ATP alone. This protective effect was confirmed using transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, Zeta potential measurement, and fluorescence polarization techniques. Utilizing controlled particle aggregation/dispersion as a gauge, a sensitive and selective aptasensor for colorimetric detection of ATP was developed using ATP-binding aptamers as the identification element and unmodified AuNPs as the probe. This aptasensor exhibited a good linear relationship between the absorbance and the logarithm concentration of ATP within a 50-1000 nM range. ATP analogs such as guanosine triphosphate, uridine triphosphate and cytidine triphosphate resulted in little or no interference in the determination of ATP. PMID:26638040

  3. Correlations between total cell concentration, total adenosine tri-phosphate concentration and heterotrophic plate counts during microbial monitoring of drinking water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hammes

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The general microbial quality of drinking water is normally monitored by heterotrophic plate counts (HPC. This method has been used for more than 100 years and is recommended in drinking water guidelines. However, the HPC method is handicapped because it is time-consuming and restricted to culturable bacteria. Recently, rapid and accurate detection methods have emerged, such as adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP measurements to assess microbial activity in drinking water, and flow cytometry (FCM to determine the total cell concentration (TCC. It is necessary and important for drinking water quality control to understand the relationships among the conventional and new methods. In the current study, all three methods were applied to 200 drinking water samples obtained from two local buildings connected to the same distribution system. Samples were taken both on normal working days and weekends, and the correlations between the different microbiological parameters were determined. TCC in the samples ranged from 0.37–5.61×105 cells/ml, and two clusters, the so-called high (HNA and low (LNA nucleic acid bacterial groups, were clearly distinguished. The results showed that the rapid determination methods (i.e., FCM and ATP correlated well (R2=0.69, but only a weak correlation (R2=0.31 was observed between the rapid methods and conventional HPC data. With respect to drinking water monitoring, both FCM and ATP measurements were confirmed to be useful and complimentary parameters for rapid assessing of drinking water microbial quality.

  4. Regulation of the intersubunit ammonia tunnel in Mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine-dependent NAD[superscript +] synthetase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuenchor, Watchalee; Doukov, Tzanko I.; Resto, Melissa; Chang, Andrew; Gerratana, Barbara (SSRL); (Maryland)

    2012-08-31

    Glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase is an essential enzyme and a validated drug target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (mtuNadE). It catalyses the ATP-dependent formation of NAD{sup +} from NaAD{sup +} (nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide) at the synthetase active site and glutamine hydrolysis at the glutaminase active site. An ammonia tunnel 40 {angstrom} (1 {angstrom} = 0.1 nm) long allows transfer of ammonia from one active site to the other. The enzyme displays stringent kinetic synergism; however, its regulatory mechanism is unclear. In the present paper, we report the structures of the inactive glutaminase C176A variant in an apo form and in three synthetase-ligand complexes with substrates (NaAD{sup +}/ATP), substrate analogue {l_brace}NaAD{sup +}/AMP-CPP (adenosine 5'-[{alpha},{beta}-methylene]triphosphate){r_brace} and intermediate analogues (NaAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi), as well as the structure of wild-type mtuNadE in a product complex (NAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi/glutamate). This series of structures provides snapshots of the ammonia tunnel during the catalytic cycle supported also by kinetics and mutagenesis studies. Three major constriction sites are observed in the tunnel: (i) at the entrance near the glutaminase active site; (ii) in the middle of the tunnel; and (iii) at the end near the synthetase active site. Variation in the number and radius of the tunnel constrictions is apparent in the crystal structures and is related to ligand binding at the synthetase domain. These results provide new insight into the regulation of ammonia transport in the intermolecular tunnel of mtuNadE.

  5. Adenosine 5′-Triphosphate Flux Through the North Inlet Marsh System †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrzanowski, Thomas H.; Stevenson, L. Harold; Kjerfve, Bjorn

    1979-01-01

    The distribution, fluctuation, and short-term transport of total microbial biomass (measured as adenosine 5′-triphosphate [ATP]) was investigated in a large salt marsh creek. Hourly samples were collected synoptically for 25 h from 10 boats positioned across the 320-m width of the creek. Samples were collected from three depths ranging from 0.2 to 8.0 m. Hourly data obtained from each station were graphed, plotting depth against ATP. Subsequently, interpolated ATP values were generated for every one-tenth depth from the surface to the bottom with the use of an 11-point proportional divider. A total of 2,750 values were generated, and a mean value of 0.865 mg of ATP per m3 was determined. Maximum levels of ATP were found at high tide and minimal values were found at low tide. The distribution of ATP concentrations was found to be complex, with no suggestion of vertical stratification; however, horizontal divisions were apparent. ATP values corrected for direction of flow or velocity indicated two ebb-directed channels; however, when considered in total, there was a net import of ATP through the interface. The total import of ATP for this 25-h sampling period was calculated to be 3.58 kg, corresponding to a net transport of 39.8 mg of ATP per s through the cross section. Results suggest that detailed characterization of a creek transect in terms of ATP or any similar parameter requires the simultaneous measurements of both the concentration of the parameter in question and the velocity at the time and point from which the sample was taken. PMID:16345382

  6. 2-Deoxy adenosine triphosphate improves contraction in human end-stage heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussavi-Harami, Farid; Razumova, Maria V.; Racca, Alice W.; Cheng, Yuanhua; Stempien-Otero, April; Regnier, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We are developing a novel treatment for heart failure by increasing myocardial 2 deoxy-ATP (dATP). Our studies in rodent models have shown that substitution of dATP for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as the energy substrate in vitro or elevation of dATP in vivo increases myocardial contraction and that small increases in the native dATP pool of heart muscle are sufficient to improve cardiac function. Here we report, for the first time, the effect of dATP on human adult cardiac muscle contraction. We measured the contractile properties of chemically-demembranated multicellular ventricular wall preparations and isolated myofibrils from human subjects with end-stage heart failure. Isometric force was increased at both saturating and physiologic Ca2+ concentrations with dATP compared to ATP. This resulted in an increase in the Ca2+ sensitivity of force (pCa50) by 0.06 pCa units. The rate of force redevelopment (kTR) in demembranated wall muscle was also increased, as was the rate of contractile activation (kACT) in isolated myofibrils, indicating increased cross-bridge binding and cycling compared with ATP in failing human myocardium. These data suggest dATP could increase dP/dT and end systolic pressure in failing human myocardium. Importantly, even though the magnitude and rate of force development was increased, there was no increase in the time to 50% and 90% myofibril relaxation. These data, along with our previous studies in rodent models shows the promise of elevating myocardial dATP to enhance contraction and restore cardiac pump function. These data also support further pre-clinical evaluation of this new approach for treating heart failure. PMID:25498214

  7. CaMKII Regulation of Cardiac Ryanodine Receptors and Inositol Triphosphate Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel eCamors

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ryanodine receptors (RyRs and inositol triphosphate receptors (InsP3Rs are structurally related intracellular calcium release channels that participate in multiple primary or secondary amplified Ca2+ signals, triggering muscle contraction and oscillatory Ca2+ waves, or activating transcription factors. In the heart, RyRs play an indisputable role in the process of excitation-contraction coupling as the main pathway for Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR, and a less prominent role in the process of excitation-transcription coupling. Conversely, InsP3Rs are believed to contribute in subtle ways, only, to contraction of the heart, and in more important ways to regulation of transcription factors. Because uncontrolled activity of either RyRs or InsP3Rs may elicit life-threatening arrhythmogenic and/or remodeling Ca2+ signals, regulation of their activity is of paramount importance for normal cardiac function. Due to their structural similarity, many regulatory factors, accessory proteins, and posttranslational processes are equivalent for RyRs and InsP3Rs. Here we discuss regulation of RyRs and InsP3Rs by CaMKII phosphorylation, but touch on other kinases whenever appropriate. CaMKII is emerging as a powerful modulator of RyR and InsP3R activity but interestingly, some of the complexities and controversies surrounding phosphorylation of RyRs also apply to InsP3Rs, and a clear-cut effect of CaMKII on either channel eludes investigators for now. Nevertheless, some effects of CaMKII on global cellular activity, such as SR Ca2+ leak or force-frequency potentiation, appear clear now, and this constrains the limits of the controversies and permits a more tractable approach to elucidate the effects of phosphorylation at the single channel level.

  8. Adenosine-5'-triphosphate release by Mannheimia haemolytica, lipopolysaccharide, and interleukin-1 stimulated bovine pulmonary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddick, Michael; Patel, Rakhi; Lower, Amanda; Highlander, Sarah; Ackermann, Mark; McClenahan, David

    2012-09-15

    Mannheimia haemolytica, one of the agents associated with bovine respiratory disease complex, can cause severe lung pathology including the leakage of vascular products into the airways and alveoli. Previous work by this laboratory has demonstrated that bovine lung endothelial and epithelial cells undergo dramatic permeability increases when exposed to adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP). Therefore, we wanted to determine if ATP levels were elevated in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from calves experimentally infected with M. haemolytica. In addition, cultured bovine pulmonary epithelial (BPE) cells were stimulated with heat-killed and live M. haemolytica bacteria, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and zymosan activated plasma (ZAP) to determine whether they might release extracellular ATP during in vitro infection. Calves experimentally exposed to M. haemolytica had an approximately 2-fold higher level of ATP in their BAL samples compared to control. BPE cells exposed to increasing numbers of heat-killed or live M. haemolytica had significantly increased levels of ATP release as compared to time-matched controls. Finally, BPE cells treated with several concentrations of LPS and IL-1 had increases in ATP release as compared to time-matched controls. This increase appeared to be a result of active ATP secretion by the cells, as cell viability was similar between treated and non-treated cells. Neither ZAP nor LTA induced any ATP release by the cells. In conclusion, ATP levels are elevated in lung secretions from calves infected with M. haemolytica. In addition, lung epithelial cells can actively release ATP when exposed to heat-killed or live M. haemolytica, LPS or IL-1. PMID:22771196

  9. Coxsackievirus cloverleaf RNA containing a 5' triphosphate triggers an antiviral response via RIG-I activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Feng

    Full Text Available Upon viral infections, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and stimulate an antiviral state associated with the production of type I interferons (IFNs and inflammatory markers. Type I IFNs play crucial roles in innate antiviral responses by inducing expression of interferon-stimulated genes and by activating components of the adaptive immune system. Although pegylated IFNs have been used to treat hepatitis B and C virus infections for decades, they exert substantial side effects that limit their use. Current efforts are directed toward the use of PRR agonists as an alternative approach to elicit host antiviral responses in a manner similar to that achieved in a natural infection. RIG-I is a cytosolic PRR that recognizes 5' triphosphate (5'ppp-containing RNA ligands. Due to its ubiquitous expression profile, induction of the RIG-I pathway provides a promising platform for the development of novel antiviral agents and vaccine adjuvants. In this study, we investigated whether structured RNA elements in the genome of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3, a picornavirus that is recognized by MDA5 during infection, could activate RIG-I when supplied with 5'ppp. We show here that a 5'ppp-containing cloverleaf (CL RNA structure is a potent RIG-I inducer that elicits an extensive antiviral response that includes induction of classical interferon-stimulated genes, as well as type III IFNs and proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. In addition, we show that prophylactic treatment with CVB3 CL provides protection against various viral infections including dengue virus, vesicular stomatitis virus and enterovirus 71, demonstrating the antiviral efficacy of this RNA ligand.

  10. Coxsackievirus cloverleaf RNA containing a 5' triphosphate triggers an antiviral response via RIG-I activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qian; Langereis, Martijn A; Olagnier, David; Chiang, Cindy; van de Winkel, Roel; van Essen, Peter; Zoll, Jan; Hiscott, John; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2014-01-01

    Upon viral infections, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and stimulate an antiviral state associated with the production of type I interferons (IFNs) and inflammatory markers. Type I IFNs play crucial roles in innate antiviral responses by inducing expression of interferon-stimulated genes and by activating components of the adaptive immune system. Although pegylated IFNs have been used to treat hepatitis B and C virus infections for decades, they exert substantial side effects that limit their use. Current efforts are directed toward the use of PRR agonists as an alternative approach to elicit host antiviral responses in a manner similar to that achieved in a natural infection. RIG-I is a cytosolic PRR that recognizes 5' triphosphate (5'ppp)-containing RNA ligands. Due to its ubiquitous expression profile, induction of the RIG-I pathway provides a promising platform for the development of novel antiviral agents and vaccine adjuvants. In this study, we investigated whether structured RNA elements in the genome of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), a picornavirus that is recognized by MDA5 during infection, could activate RIG-I when supplied with 5'ppp. We show here that a 5'ppp-containing cloverleaf (CL) RNA structure is a potent RIG-I inducer that elicits an extensive antiviral response that includes induction of classical interferon-stimulated genes, as well as type III IFNs and proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. In addition, we show that prophylactic treatment with CVB3 CL provides protection against various viral infections including dengue virus, vesicular stomatitis virus and enterovirus 71, demonstrating the antiviral efficacy of this RNA ligand. PMID:24759703

  11. Adsorption of nucleotides on biomimetic apatite: The case of adenosine 5‧ triphosphate (ATP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, Khaled; El-Feki, Hafed; Marsan, Olivier; Drouet, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    ATP is a well-known energy supplier in cells. The idea to associate ATP to pharmaceutical formulations/biotechnological devices to promote cells activity by potentially modulating their microenvironment thus appears as an appealing novel approach. Since biomimetic nanocrystalline apatites have shown great promise for biomedical applications (bone regeneration, cells diagnostics/therapeutics, …), thanks to a high surface reactivity and an intrinsically high biocompatibility, the present contribution was aimed at exploring ATP/apatite interactions. ATP adsorption on a synthetic carbonated nanocrystalline apatite preliminarily characterized (by XRD, FTIR, Raman, TG-DTA and SEM-EDX) was investigated in detail, pointing out a good agreement with Sips isothermal features. Adsorption characteristics were compared to those previously obtained on monophosphate nucleotides (AMP, CMP), unveiling some specificities. ATP was found to adsorb effectively onto biomimetic apatite: despite smaller values of the affinity constant KS and the exponential factor m, larger adsorbed amounts were reached for ATP as compared to AMP for any given concentration in solution. m ATP/apatite adsorption process is mostly guided by direct surface bonding rather than through stabilizing intermolecular interactions. Although standard ΔGads ° was estimated to only -4 kJ/mol, the large value of Nmax led to significantly negative effective ΔGads values down to -33 kJ/mol, reflecting the spontaneous character of adsorption process. Vibrational spectroscopy data (FTIR and Raman) pointed out spectral modifications upon adsorption, confirming chemical-like interactions where both the triphosphate group of ATP and its nucleic base were involved. The present study is intended to serve as a basis for future research works involving ATP and apatite nanocrystals/nanoparticles in view of biomedical applications (e.g. bone tissue engineering, intracellular drug delivery, …).

  12. Amperometric biosensor system for simultaneous determination of adenosine-5'-triphosphate and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucherenko, Ivan S; Didukh, Daria Yu; Soldatkin, Oleksandr O; Soldatkin, Alexei P

    2014-06-01

    The majority of biosensors for adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) determination are based on cascades of enzymatic reactions; therefore, they are sensitive to glucose or glycerol (depending on the enzymatic system) as well as to ATP. The presence of unknown concentrations of these substances in the sample greatly complicates the determination of ATP. To overcome this disadvantage of known biosensors, we developed a biosensor system consisting of two biosensors: the first one is based on glucose oxidase and is intended for measuring glucose concentration, and the second one is based on glucose oxidase and hexokinase and is sensitive toward both glucose and ATP. Using glucose concentration measured by the first biosensor, we can analyze the total response to glucose and ATP obtained by the second biosensor. Platinum disc electrodes were used as amperometric transducers. The polyphenilenediamine membrane was deposited onto the surface of platinum electrodes to avoid the response to electroactive substances. The effect of glucose concentration on biosensor determination of ATP was studied. The reproducibility of biosensor responses to glucose and ATP during a day was tested (relative standard deviation, RSD, of responses to glucose was 3-6% and to ATP was 8-12%) as well as storage stability of the biosensors (no decrease of glucose responses and 43% drop of ATP responses during 50 days). The measurements of ATP and glucose in pharmaceutical vials (including mixtures of ATP and glucose) were carried out. It was shown that the developed biosensor system can be used for simultaneous analysis of glucose and ATP concentrations in water solutions. PMID:24810180

  13. On tunneling across horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanzo, L.

    2011-07-01

    The tunneling method for stationary black holes in the Hamilton-Jacobi variant is reconsidered in the light of some critiques that have been moved against. It is shown that once the tunneling trajectories have been correctly identified the method is free from internal inconsistencies, it is manifestly covariant, it allows for the extension to spinning particles and it can even be used without solving the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. These conclusions borrow support on a simple analytic continuation of the classical action of a pointlike particle, made possible by the unique assumption that it should be analytic in the complexified Schwarzschild or Kerr-Newman space-time. A more general version of the Parikh-Wilczek method will also be proposed along these lines.

  14. Magnetic flux tube tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present numerical simulations of the collision and subsequent interaction of orthogonal magnetic flux tubes. The simulations were carried out using a parallelized spectral algorithm for compressible magnetohydrodynamics. It is found that, under a wide range of conditions, the flux tubes can open-quotes tunnelclose quotes through each other, a behavior not previously seen in studies of either vortex tube or magnetic flux tube interactions. Two conditions must be satisfied for tunneling to occur: the magnetic field must be highly twisted with a field line pitch >1, and the Lundquist number must be somewhat large, ≥2880. An examination of magnetic field lines suggests that tunneling is due to a double-reconnection mechanism. Initially orthogonal field lines reconnect at two specific locations, exchange interacting sections, and open-quotes passclose quotes through each other. The implications of these results for solar and space plasmas are discussed. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  15. Possibility of hyperbolic tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traversable wormholes are primarily useful as 'gedanken experiments' and as a theoretician's probe of the foundations of general relativity. In this work, we analyze the possibility of having tunnels in a hyperbolic spacetime. We obtain exact solutions of static and pseudo-spherically symmetric spacetime tunnels by adding exotic matter to a vacuum solution referred to as a degenerate solution of class A. The physical properties and characteristics of these intriguing solutions are explored, and through the mathematics of embedding it is shown that particular constraints are placed on the shape function, that differ significantly from the Morris-Thorne wormhole. In particular, it is shown that the energy density is always negative, and the radial pressure is positive, at the throat, contrary to the Morris-Thorne counterpart. Specific solutions are also presented by considering several equations of state, and by imposing restricted choices for the shape function or the redshift function.

  16. Programmable ferroelectric tunnel memristor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy eQuindeau

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We report an analogously programmable memristor based on genuine electronic resistive switching combining ferroelectric switching and electron tunneling. The tunnel current through an 8 unit cell thick epitaxial Pb(Zr[0.2]Ti[0.8]O[3] film sandwiched between La[0.7]Sr[0.3]MnO[3] and cobalt electrodes obeys the Kolmogorov-Avrami-Ishibashi model for bidimensional growth with a characteristic switching time in the order of 10^-7 seconds. The analytical description of switching kinetics allows us to develop a characteristic transfer function that has only one parameter viz. the characteristic switching time and fully predicts the resistive states of this type of memristor.

  17. Tunnel boring machine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that characterization of Yucca Mountain for a potential repository requires construction of an underground Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). Mechanical excavating methods have been proposed for construction of the ESF as they offer a number of advantages over drilling and blasting at the Yucca Mountain site, including; less ground disturbance and therefore a potential for less adverse effects on the integrity of the site, creation of a more stable excavation cross section requiring less ground support, and an inherently safer and cleaner working environment. The tunnel boring machine (TBM) provides a proven technology for excavating the welded and unwelded Yucca Mountain tuffs. The access ramps and main underground tunnels form the largest part of the ESF underground construction work, and have been designed for excavation by TBM

  18. Fire Size in Tunnels

    OpenAIRE

    Carvel, Ricky O

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, a number of high profile accidental fires have occurred in several road and rail tunnels throughout the world. Many of these fires grew rapidly to catastrophic size and claimed many lives. The processes involved in the rapid growth and extremely severe of these fires are not adequately understood as yet. The introduction to this thesis reviews a number of these accidental fires and describes much of the previous experimental research which has brought about the...

  19. The beam dump tunnels

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    In these images workers are digging the tunnels that will be used to dump the counter-circulating beams. Travelling just a fraction under the speed of light, the beams at the LHC will each carry the energy of an aircraft carrier travelling at 12 knots. In order to dispose of these beams safely, a beam dump is used to extract the beam and diffuse it before it collides with a radiation shielded graphite target.

  20. Small Icing Wind Tunnel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horák, V.; Hoření, Bohumír; Rozehnal, D.; Svoboda, E.

    Brno: University of Defence, 2007, s. 91-98. ISBN 978-80-7231-238-2. [ICMT'07, The international conference on military technologies. Brno (CZ), 02.05.2007-04.05.2007] R&D Projects: GA MPO FT-TA/026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : aircraft icing * icing wind tunnel * ice accretion Subject RIV: JR - Other Machinery

  1. Resonant Tunneling Spin Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    The resonant tunneling spin pump is a proposed semiconductor device that would generate spin-polarized electron currents. The resonant tunneling spin pump would be a purely electrical device in the sense that it would not contain any magnetic material and would not rely on an applied magnetic field. Also, unlike prior sources of spin-polarized electron currents, the proposed device would not depend on a source of circularly polarized light. The proposed semiconductor electron-spin filters would exploit the Rashba effect, which can induce energy splitting in what would otherwise be degenerate quantum states, caused by a spin-orbit interaction in conjunction with a structural-inversion asymmetry in the presence of interfacial electric fields in a semiconductor heterostructure. The magnitude of the energy split is proportional to the electron wave number. Theoretical studies have suggested the possibility of devices in which electron energy states would be split by the Rashba effect and spin-polarized currents would be extracted by resonant quantum-mechanical tunneling.

  2. Tunnelling from black holes and tunnelling into white holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Bhramar; Ghosh, A.; Mitra, P.

    2008-03-01

    Hawking radiation is nowadays being understood as tunnelling through black hole horizons. Here, the extension of the Hamilton-Jacobi approach to tunnelling for non-rotating and rotating black holes in different non-singular coordinate systems not only confirms this quantum emission from black holes but also reveals the new phenomenon of absorption into white holes by quantum mechanical tunnelling. The rôle of a boundary condition of total absorption or emission is also clarified.

  3. Fluctuation Dominated Josephson Tunneling with a Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Naaman, O.; Teizer, W.; Dynes, R. C.

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate Josephson tunneling in vacuum tunnel junctions formed between a superconducting scanning tunneling microscope tip and a Pb film, for junction resistances in the range 50-300 k$\\Omega$. We show that the superconducting phase dynamics is dominated by thermal fluctuations, and that the Josephson current appears as a peak centered at small finite voltages. In the presence of microwave fields (f=15.0 GHz) the peak decreases in magnitude and shifts to higher voltages with increasing ...

  4. Sensitive, Rapid Detection of Bacterial Spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Roger G.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Chen, Fei; Pickett, Molly; Matsuyama, Asahi

    2009-01-01

    A method of sensitive detection of bacterial spores within delays of no more than a few hours has been developed to provide an alternative to a prior three-day NASA standard culture-based assay. A capability for relatively rapid detection of bacterial spores would be beneficial for many endeavors, a few examples being agriculture, medicine, public health, defense against biowarfare, water supply, sanitation, hygiene, and the food-packaging and medical-equipment industries. The method involves the use of a commercial rapid microbial detection system (RMDS) that utilizes a combination of membrane filtration, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence chemistry, and analysis of luminescence images detected by a charge-coupled-device camera. This RMDS has been demonstrated to be highly sensitive in enumerating microbes (it can detect as little as one colony-forming unit per sample) and has been found to yield data in excellent correlation with those of culture-based methods. What makes the present method necessary is that the specific RMDS and the original protocols for its use are not designed for discriminating between bacterial spores and other microbes. In this method, a heat-shock procedure is added prior to an incubation procedure that is specified in the original RMDS protocols. In this heat-shock procedure (which was also described in a prior NASA Tech Briefs article on enumerating sporeforming bacteria), a sample is exposed to a temperature of 80 C for 15 minutes. Spores can survive the heat shock, but nonspore- forming bacteria and spore-forming bacteria that are not in spore form cannot survive. Therefore, any colonies that grow during incubation after the heat shock are deemed to have originated as spores.

  5. Quantum tunneling in thermal medium

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Sh.; Yoshimura, M.

    2000-01-01

    Time evolution of tunneling phenomena in medium is studied using a standard model of environment interaction. A semiclassical formula valid at low, but finite temperatures is derived in the form of integral transform for the reduced Wigner function, and the tunneling probability in thermal medium is calculated for a general tunneling potential of one dimensional system. Effect of dissipation, its time evolution in particular, depends on the behavior of the potential far beyond the barrier.

  6. Managerial Ownership Influencing Tunnelling Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agung Juliarto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the extent and the determinants of tunnelling behaviour in five ASEAN countries (i.e. Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. Related party transactions (RPTs in the form of loans to related parties are used as the proxy for tunnelling. With 200 firm-year observations over the period 2006-2009, this study finds a positive association between managerial ownership and the extent of tunnelling.The other important findings are that business environment (BE, foreign ownership, and independent directors are ineffective governance mechanisms to rein in tunnelling behaviour. This suggests that regulators need to evolve more effective governance mechanisms.

  7. Probing the ATP Site of GRP78 with Nucleotide Triphosphate Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun; Lu, Hua; Pizarro, Juan C.; Park, Hee-Won

    2016-01-01

    GRP78, a member of the ER stress protein family, can relocate to the surface of cancer cells, playing key roles in promoting cell proliferation and metastasis. GRP78 consists of two major functional domains: the ATPase and protein/peptide-binding domains. The protein/peptide-binding domain of cell-surface GRP78 has served as a novel functional receptor for delivering cytotoxic agents (e.g., a apoptosis-inducing peptide or taxol) across the cell membrane. Here, we report our study on the ATPase domain of GRP78 (GRP78ATPase), whose potential as a transmembrane delivery system of cytotoxic agents (e.g., ATP-based nucleotide triphosphate analogs) remains unexploited. As the binding of ligands (ATP analogs) to a receptor (GRP78ATPase) is a pre-requisite for internalization, we determined the binding affinities and modes of GRP78ATPase for ADP, ATP and several ATP analogs using surface plasmon resonance and x-ray crystallography. The tested ATP analogs contain one of the following modifications: the nitrogen at the adenine ring 7-position to a carbon atom (7-deazaATP), the oxygen at the β-γ bridge position to a carbon atom (AMPPCP), or the removal of the 2’-OH group (2’-deoxyATP). We found that 7-deazaATP displays an affinity and a binding mode that resemble those of ATP regardless of magnesium ion (Mg++) concentration, suggesting that GRP78 is tolerant to modifications at the 7-position. By comparison, AMPPCP’s binding affinity was lower than ATP and Mg++-dependent, as the removal of Mg++ nearly abolished binding to GRP78ATPase. The AMPPCP-Mg++ structure showed evidence for the critical role of Mg++ in AMPPCP binding affinity, suggesting that while GRP78 is sensitive to modifications at the β-γ bridge position, these can be tolerated in the presence of Mg++. Furthermore, 2’-deoxyATP’s binding affinity was significantly lower than those for all other nucleotides tested, even in the presence of Mg++. The 2’-deoxyATP structure showed the conformation of the

  8. Probing the ATP Site of GRP78 with Nucleotide Triphosphate Analogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J Hughes

    Full Text Available GRP78, a member of the ER stress protein family, can relocate to the surface of cancer cells, playing key roles in promoting cell proliferation and metastasis. GRP78 consists of two major functional domains: the ATPase and protein/peptide-binding domains. The protein/peptide-binding domain of cell-surface GRP78 has served as a novel functional receptor for delivering cytotoxic agents (e.g., a apoptosis-inducing peptide or taxol across the cell membrane. Here, we report our study on the ATPase domain of GRP78 (GRP78ATPase, whose potential as a transmembrane delivery system of cytotoxic agents (e.g., ATP-based nucleotide triphosphate analogs remains unexploited. As the binding of ligands (ATP analogs to a receptor (GRP78ATPase is a pre-requisite for internalization, we determined the binding affinities and modes of GRP78ATPase for ADP, ATP and several ATP analogs using surface plasmon resonance and x-ray crystallography. The tested ATP analogs contain one of the following modifications: the nitrogen at the adenine ring 7-position to a carbon atom (7-deazaATP, the oxygen at the β-γ bridge position to a carbon atom (AMPPCP, or the removal of the 2'-OH group (2'-deoxyATP. We found that 7-deazaATP displays an affinity and a binding mode that resemble those of ATP regardless of magnesium ion (Mg++ concentration, suggesting that GRP78 is tolerant to modifications at the 7-position. By comparison, AMPPCP's binding affinity was lower than ATP and Mg++-dependent, as the removal of Mg++ nearly abolished binding to GRP78ATPase. The AMPPCP-Mg++ structure showed evidence for the critical role of Mg++ in AMPPCP binding affinity, suggesting that while GRP78 is sensitive to modifications at the β-γ bridge position, these can be tolerated in the presence of Mg++. Furthermore, 2'-deoxyATP's binding affinity was significantly lower than those for all other nucleotides tested, even in the presence of Mg++. The 2'-deoxyATP structure showed the conformation of the

  9. Probing the ATP Site of GRP78 with Nucleotide Triphosphate Analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Scott J; Antoshchenko, Tetyana; Chen, Yun; Lu, Hua; Pizarro, Juan C; Park, Hee-Won

    2016-01-01

    GRP78, a member of the ER stress protein family, can relocate to the surface of cancer cells, playing key roles in promoting cell proliferation and metastasis. GRP78 consists of two major functional domains: the ATPase and protein/peptide-binding domains. The protein/peptide-binding domain of cell-surface GRP78 has served as a novel functional receptor for delivering cytotoxic agents (e.g., a apoptosis-inducing peptide or taxol) across the cell membrane. Here, we report our study on the ATPase domain of GRP78 (GRP78ATPase), whose potential as a transmembrane delivery system of cytotoxic agents (e.g., ATP-based nucleotide triphosphate analogs) remains unexploited. As the binding of ligands (ATP analogs) to a receptor (GRP78ATPase) is a pre-requisite for internalization, we determined the binding affinities and modes of GRP78ATPase for ADP, ATP and several ATP analogs using surface plasmon resonance and x-ray crystallography. The tested ATP analogs contain one of the following modifications: the nitrogen at the adenine ring 7-position to a carbon atom (7-deazaATP), the oxygen at the β-γ bridge position to a carbon atom (AMPPCP), or the removal of the 2'-OH group (2'-deoxyATP). We found that 7-deazaATP displays an affinity and a binding mode that resemble those of ATP regardless of magnesium ion (Mg++) concentration, suggesting that GRP78 is tolerant to modifications at the 7-position. By comparison, AMPPCP's binding affinity was lower than ATP and Mg++-dependent, as the removal of Mg++ nearly abolished binding to GRP78ATPase. The AMPPCP-Mg++ structure showed evidence for the critical role of Mg++ in AMPPCP binding affinity, suggesting that while GRP78 is sensitive to modifications at the β-γ bridge position, these can be tolerated in the presence of Mg++. Furthermore, 2'-deoxyATP's binding affinity was significantly lower than those for all other nucleotides tested, even in the presence of Mg++. The 2'-deoxyATP structure showed the conformation of the bound

  10. Molecular structure of tetraaqua adenosine 5'-triphosphate aluminium(III) complex: A study involving Raman spectroscopy, theoretical DFT and potentiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenório, Thaís; Silva, Andréa M.; Ramos, Joanna Maria; Buarque, Camilla D.; Felcman, Judith

    2013-03-01

    The Alzheimer's disease is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases that affect elderly population, due to the formation of β-amyloid protein aggregate and several symptoms, especially progressive cognitive decline. The result is a decrease in capture of glucose by cells leading to obliteration, meddling in the Krebs cycle, the principal biochemical route to the energy production leading to a decline in the levels of adenosine 5'-triphosphate. Aluminium(III) is connected to Alzheimer's and its ion provides raise fluidity of the plasma membrane, decrease cell viability and aggregation of amyloid plaques. Studies reveal that AlATP complex promotes the formation of reactive fibrils of β-amyloid protein and independent amyloidogenic peptides, suggesting the action of the complex as a chaperone in the role pathogenic process. In this research, one of complexes formed by Al(III) and adenosine 5'-triphosphate in aqueous solution is analyzed by potentiometry, Raman spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. The value of the log KAlATP found was 9.21 ± 0.01 and adenosine 5'-triphosphate should act as a bidentate ligand in the complex. Raman spectroscopy and potentiometry indicate that donor atoms are the oxygen of the phosphate β and the oxygen of the phosphate γ, the terminal phosphates. Computational calculations using Density Functional Theory, with hybrid functions B3LYP and 6-311++G(d,p) basis set regarding water solvent effects, have confirmed the results. Frontier molecular orbitals, electrostatic potential contour surface, electrostatic potential mapped and Mulliken charges of the title molecule were also investigated.

  11. Thermovoltages in vacuum tunneling investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, D. H.; Rettenberger, Armin; Grand, Jean Yves; Läuger, K.; Leiderer, Paul; Dransfeld, Klaus; Möller, Rolf

    1995-01-01

    By heating the tunneling tip of a scanning tunneling microscope the thermoelectric properties of a variable vacuum barrier have been investigated. The lateral variation of the observed thermovoltage will be discussed for polycrystalline gold, stepped surfaces of silver, as well as for copper islands on silver.

  12. Cross-linked polymeric nanogel formulations of 5'-triphosphates of nucleoside analogues: role of the cellular membrane in drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradov, Serguei V; Kohli, Ekta; Zeman, Arin D

    2005-01-01

    Activation of cytotoxic nucleoside analogues in vivo depends primarily on their cell-specific phosphorylation. Anticancer chemotherapy using nucleoside analogues may be significantly enhanced by intracellular administration of active phosphorylated drugs. However, the cellular transport of anionic compounds is very ineffective and restricted by many drug efflux transporters. Recently developed cationic nanogel carriers can encapsulate large amounts of nucleoside 5'-triphosphates that form polyionic complexes with protonated amino groups on the polyethylenimine backbone of the nanogels. In this paper, the 5'-triphosphate of an antiviral nucleoside analogue, 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT), was efficiently synthesized and its complexes with nanogels were obtained and evaluated as potential cytotoxic drug formulations for treatment of human breast carcinoma cells. A selective phosphorylating reagent, tris-imidazolylphosphate, was used to convert AZT into the nucleoside analogue 5'-triphosphate using a one-pot procedure. The corresponding 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate (AZTTP) was isolated with high yield (75%). Nanogels encapsulated up to 30% of AZTTP by weight by mixing solutions of the carrier and the drug. The AZTTP/nanogel formulation showed enhanced cytotoxicity in two breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, demonstrating IC50 values 130-200 times lower than those values for AZT alone. The exact mechanism of drug release from nanogels remains unclear. One mechanism could involve interaction with negatively charged counterions. A high affinity of nanogels to isolated cellular membranes has been observed, especially for nanogels made of amphiphilic block copolymer, Pluronic P85. Cellular trafficking of nanogel particles, contrasted by polyethylenimine-coordinated copper(II) ions, was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which revealed membranotropic properties of nanogels. A substantial release of encapsulated drug was

  13. Utilization of adenosine triphosphate in rat mast cells during histamine release induced by the ionophore A23187

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Torben

    1979-01-01

    The role of endogenous adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in histamine release from rat mast cells induced by the ionophore A23187 in vitro has been studied. 2 The amount of histamine released by calcium from rat mast cells primed with the ionophore A23187 was dependent on the ATP content of the mast...... The observations are consistent with the view that energy requiring processes are involved in ionophore-induced histamine release from rat mast cells although part of the ATP reduction in the aerobic experiments may be due to an uncoupling effect of calcium on the oxidative phosphorylation....

  14. Adenosine triphosphate levels during anaphylactic histamine release in rat mast cells in vitro. Effects of glycolytic and respiratory inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Torben

    1979-01-01

    The adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content of rat mast cells was studied during and after anaphylactic histamine release. The almost identical time course of ATP decrease from mast cells treated with either glycolytic or respiratory inhibitors supports the view that the ATP depletion was largely...... related to the histamine release process and not to an uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation by an increased concentration of cytosol Ca2+. The ATP content of the cells was not restored within the 2 h of observation. No inhibition of lactate production from mast cells exposed to antigen in the presence...

  15. Traversal time for tunnelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We give here a simple approach to study the traversal time for tunnelling. We make use of the WKB wave functions to evaluate the velocity field of particles in the barrier region and obtain an expression for traversal time given by ∫dx[m/2(V(x)-E)]sup(1/2). This coincides with the expression given by recent approaches which determine traversal time by studying transmission of particles through a time-modulated rectangular barrier and by studying the extent of Larmor precession of particles through a rectangular barrier in the presence of a magnetic field. (author)

  16. Tunnel face stability and ground settlement in pressurized shield tunnelling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏艺; 汪国锋; 周庆宏

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of the stability of large-diameter circular tunnels and ground settlement during tunnelling by a pressurized shield was presented. An innovative three-dimensional translational multi-block failure mechanism was proposed to determine the face support pressure of large-shield tunnelling. Compared with the currently available mechanisms, the proposed mechanism has two unique features: (1) the supporting pressure applied to the tunnel face is assumed to have a non-uniform rather than uniform distribution, and (2) the method takes into account the entire circular excavation face instead of merely an inscribed ellipse. Based on the discrete element method, a numerical simulation of the Shanghai Yangtze River Tunnel was carried out using the Particle Flow Code in two dimensions. The immediate ground movement during excavation, as well as the behaviour of the excavation face, the shield movement, and the excavated area, was considered before modelling the excavation process.

  17. A virtual detector approach to tunnel ionization and tunneling times

    CERN Document Server

    Teeny, Nicolas; Bauke, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    Tunneling times in atomic ionization is studied theoretically by a virtual detector approach. A virtual detector is a hypothetical device that allows to monitor the wave-function's density with spatial and temporal resolution during the ionization process. With this theoretical approach, it becomes possible to define unique moments when the electron enters and leaves with highest probability the classically forbidden region from first principles and a tunneling time can be specified unambiguously. It is shown that neither the moment when the electron enters the tunneling barrier nor when it leaves the tunneling barrier coincide with the moment when the external electric field reaches its maximum. Under the tunneling barrier as well as at the exit the electron has a nonzero velocity in electric field direction. This nonzero exit velocity has to be incorporated when the free motion of the electron is modeled by classical equations of motion.

  18. Tunneling Ionization of Diatomic Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Jens Søren Sieg

    2016-01-01

    of tunneling ionizaion of molecules is presented and the results of numerical calculations are shown. One perhaps surprising result is, that the frequently used Born-Oppenheimer approximation breaks down for weak fields when describing tunneling ionization. An analytic theory applicable in the weak...

  19. The Langley Wind Tunnel Enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, John W., Jr.; Kumar, Ajay; Kegelman, Jerome T.

    1998-01-01

    After 4 years of existence, the Langley WTE is alive and growing. Significant improvements in the operation of wind tunnels have been demonstrated and substantial further improvements are expected when we are able to truly address and integrate all the processes affecting the wind tunnel testing cycle.

  20. Tunnel electroresistance through organic ferroelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, B. B.; Wang, J. L.; Fusil, S.; Liu, Y.; Zhao, X. L.; Sun, S.; Shen, H.; Lin, T.; Sun, J. L.; Duan, C. G.; Bibes, M.; Barthélémy, A.; Dkhil, B.; Garcia, V.; Meng, X. J.; Chu, J. H.

    2016-05-01

    Organic electronics is emerging for large-area applications such as photovoltaic cells, rollable displays or electronic paper. Its future development and integration will require a simple, low-power organic memory, that can be written, erased and readout electrically. Here we demonstrate a non-volatile memory in which the ferroelectric polarisation state of an organic tunnel barrier encodes the stored information and sets the readout tunnel current. We use high-sensitivity piezoresponse force microscopy to show that films as thin as one or two layers of ferroelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride) remain switchable with low voltages. Submicron junctions based on these films display tunnel electroresistance reaching 1,000% at room temperature that is driven by ferroelectric switching and explained by electrostatic effects in a direct tunnelling regime. Our findings provide a path to develop low-cost, large-scale arrays of organic ferroelectric tunnel junctions on silicon or flexible substrates.

  1. Tunnel electroresistance through organic ferroelectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, B B; Wang, J L; Fusil, S; Liu, Y; Zhao, X L; Sun, S; Shen, H; Lin, T; Sun, J L; Duan, C G; Bibes, M; Barthélémy, A; Dkhil, B; Garcia, V; Meng, X J; Chu, J H

    2016-01-01

    Organic electronics is emerging for large-area applications such as photovoltaic cells, rollable displays or electronic paper. Its future development and integration will require a simple, low-power organic memory, that can be written, erased and readout electrically. Here we demonstrate a non-volatile memory in which the ferroelectric polarisation state of an organic tunnel barrier encodes the stored information and sets the readout tunnel current. We use high-sensitivity piezoresponse force microscopy to show that films as thin as one or two layers of ferroelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride) remain switchable with low voltages. Submicron junctions based on these films display tunnel electroresistance reaching 1,000% at room temperature that is driven by ferroelectric switching and explained by electrostatic effects in a direct tunnelling regime. Our findings provide a path to develop low-cost, large-scale arrays of organic ferroelectric tunnel junctions on silicon or flexible substrates. PMID:27143121

  2. Characterization of nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase activity in Trichomonas gallinae and the influence of penicillin and streptomycin in extracellular nucleotide hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Fernanda Pires; de Brum Vieira, Patrícia; Wiltuschnig, Renata C M; Tasca, Tiana; De Carli, Geraldo Attilio; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2008-06-01

    Here we described an nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase) activity in living trophozoites of Trichomonas gallinae. The enzyme hydrolyzes a variety of purine and pyrimidine nucleoside di- and triphosphates in an optimum pH range of 6.0-8.0. This enzyme activity was activated by high concentrations of divalent cations, such as calcium and magnesium. Contaminant activities were ruled out because the enzyme was not inhibited by classical inhibitors of ATPases (ouabain, 5.0 mM sodium azide, oligomycin) and alkaline phosphatases (levamisole). A significant inhibition of ATP hydrolysis (38%) was observed in the presence of 20 mM sodium azide. Sodium orthovanadate inhibited ATP and ADP hydrolysis (24% and 78%), respectively. The apparent K(M) (Michaelis constant) values were 667.62+/-13 microM for ATP and 125+/-5.3 microM for ADP. V(max) (maximum velocity) values were 0.44+/-0.007 nmol Pi min(-1) per 10(6) trichomonads and 0.91+/-0.12 nmol Pi min(-1) per 10(6) trichomonads for ATP and ADP, respectively. Moreover, we showed a marked decrease in ATP, ADP and AMP hydrolysis when the parasites were grown in the presence of penicillin and streptomycin. The existence of an NTPDase activity in T. gallinae may be involved in pathogenicity, protecting the parasite from the cytolytic effects of the extracellular nucleotides. PMID:18422631

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray structural analysis of nucleoside triphosphate hydrolases from Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recombinant nucleoside triphosphate hydrolases from N. caninum and T. gondii have been purified and crystallized for X-ray structure analysis. The nucleoside triphosphate hydrolases that are produced by Neospora caninum (NcNTPase) and Toxoplasma gondii (TgNTPase-I) have a different physiological function from the ubiquitous ecto-ATPases. The recombinant enzymes were crystallized at 293 K using polyethylene glycol 3350 as a precipitant and X-ray diffraction data sets were collected for NcNTPase (to 2.8 Å resolution) and TgNTPase-I (to 3.1 Å resolution) at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. The crystals of NcNTPase and TgNTPase-I belonged to the orthorhombic space group I222 (unit-cell parameters a = 93.6, b = 140.8, c = 301.1 Å) and the monoclinic space group P21 (unit-cell parameters a = 87.1, b = 123.5, c = 120.2 Å, β = 96.6°), respectively, with two NcNTPase (VM = 3.7 Å3 Da−1) and four TgNTPase-I (VM = 2.7 Å3 Da−1) molecules per asymmetric unit. SAD phasing trials using a data set (λ = 0.97904 Å) collected from a crystal of selenomethionylated NcNTPase gave an initial electron-density map of sufficient quality to build a molecular model of NcNTPase

  4. Area and shape changes of the carpal tunnel in response to tunnel pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zong-Ming; Masters, Tamara L.; Mondello, Tracy A.

    2011-01-01

    Carpal tunnel mechanics is relevant to our understanding of median nerve compression in the tunnel. The compliant characteristics of the tunnel strongly influence its mechanical environment. We investigated the distensibility of the carpal tunnel in response to tunnel pressure. A custom balloon device was designed to apply controlled pressure. Tunnel cross sections were obtained using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to derive the relationship between carpal tunnel pressure and morphological ...

  5. Bacterial Nail Infection (Paronychia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of nail infection is often caused by a bacterial infection but may also be caused by herpes, a ... to a type of yeast called Candida , or bacterial infection, and this may lead to abnormal nail growth. ...

  6. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach that....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will...

  7. Tunnelling microscopy of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selci, Stefano; Cricenti, Antonio

    1991-01-01

    Uncoated DNA molecules marked with an activated tris (1-aziridinyl) phosphine oxide (TAPO) solution were deposited on gold substrates and imaged in air with a high resolution Scanning Tunnelling Microscope (STM). The STM operated simultaneously in the constant-current and gap-modulated mode. Highly reproducible STM images have been obtained and interpreted in terms of expected DNA structure. The main periodicity, regularly presented in molecules several hundred Ångstrom long, ranges from 25 Å to 35 Å with an average diameter of 22 Å. Higher resolution images of the minor groove have revealed the phosphate groups along the DNA backbones. Constant-current images of TAPO deposited on gold show a crystalline structure of rows of molecules with a side-by-side spacing of 3 Å.

  8. Tunneling times with covariant measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Kiukas, J; Werner, R F; 10.1007/s10701-009-9275-z

    2009-01-01

    We consider the time delay of massive, non-relativistic, one-dimensional particles due to a tunneling potential. In this setting the well-known Hartman effect asserts that often the sub-ensemble of particles going through the tunnel seems to cross the tunnel region instantaneously. An obstacle to the utilization of this effect for getting faster signals is the exponential damping by the tunnel, so there seems to be a trade-off between speedup and intensity. In this paper we prove that this trade-off is never in favor of faster signals: the probability for a signal to reach its destination before some deadline is always reduced by the tunnel, for arbitrary incoming states, arbitrary positive and compactly supported tunnel potentials, and arbitrary detectors. More specifically, we show this for several different ways to define ``the same incoming state'' and ''the same detector'' when comparing the settings with and without tunnel potential. The arrival time measurements are expressed in the time-covariant appr...

  9. Mars Surface Tunnel Element Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Michelle A.; Jefferies, Sharon; Howe, A. Scott; Howard, Robert; Mary, Natalie; Watson, Judith; Lewis, Ruthan

    2016-01-01

    When the first human visitors on Mars prepare to return to Earth, they will have to comply with stringent planetary protection requirements. Apollo Program experience warns that opening an EVA hatch directly to the surface will bring dust into the ascent vehicle. To prevent inadvertent return of potential Martian contaminants to Earth, careful consideration must be given to the way in which crew ingress their Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV). For architectures involving more than one surface element-such as an ascent vehicle and a pressurized rover or surface habitat-a retractable tunnel that eliminates extravehicular activity (EVA) ingress is an attractive solution. Beyond addressing the immediate MAV access issue, a reusable tunnel may be useful for other surface applications, such as rover to habitat transfer, once its primary mission is complete. A National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) team is studying the optimal balance between surface tunnel functionality, mass, and stowed volume as part of the Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC). The study team began by identifying the minimum set of functional requirements needed for the tunnel to perform its primary mission, as this would presumably be the simplest design, with the lowest mass and volume. This Minimum Functional Tunnel then becomes a baseline against which various tunnel design concepts and potential alternatives can be traded, and aids in assessing the mass penalty of increased functionality. Preliminary analysis indicates that the mass of a single-mission tunnel is about 237 kg, not including mass growth allowance.

  10. Tunneling spectroscopy of novel superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent discoveries of exciting new superconductors have led to further exciting speculations about novel mechanisms and/or pairing. Tunneling spectroscopy can again play an important role in establishing the applicability of these ideas to specific superconductors. In addition to the traditional role of verifying in detail the electron-phonon coupling through α2F, in many cases the magnitude of the gap compared to the BCS prediction or the crystalline gap anisotropy can reveal direct information about novel mechanisms and/or pairing. Since many of these new materials have only been available as bulk samples, or bulk single-crystal studies are desired, the technique of vacuum tunneling spectroscopy, pioneered by Poppe (1981) for superconductors, is most appropriate. However, thick, nonconducting surface layers are often found which prevent true vacuum tunneling. For these samples, mechanical contact of the tunneling tip is required to break through the surface layer to the superconductor below. The resulting point-contact tunneling can, however, emulate many of the results of true tunneling through a vacuum or insulator. In this paper, they shall briefly review relevant tunneling techniques and some recent experiments on magnetic, organic, heavy fermion and high-T/sub c/ oxide superconductors. Connections are made to theoretical ideas, especially regarding novel mechanisms and/or pairing

  11. Optical Detection of Tunneling Ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoef, Aart J.; Mitrofanov, Alexander V.; Serebryannikov, Evgenii E.; Kartashov, Daniil V.; Zheltikov, Aleksei M.; Baltuška, Andrius

    2010-04-01

    We have experimentally detected optical harmonics that are generated due to a tunneling-ionization-induced modulation of the electron density. The optical signature of electron tunneling can be isolated from concomitant optical responses by using a noncollinear pump-probe setup. Whereas previously demonstrated tools for attosecond metrology of gases, plasmas, and surfaces rely on direct detection of charged particles, detection of the background-free time-resolved optical signal, which uniquely originates from electron tunneling, offers an interesting alternative that is especially suited for systems in which free electrons cannot be directly measured.

  12. Optical Detection of Tunneling Ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have experimentally detected optical harmonics that are generated due to a tunneling-ionization-induced modulation of the electron density. The optical signature of electron tunneling can be isolated from concomitant optical responses by using a noncollinear pump-probe setup. Whereas previously demonstrated tools for attosecond metrology of gases, plasmas, and surfaces rely on direct detection of charged particles, detection of the background-free time-resolved optical signal, which uniquely originates from electron tunneling, offers an interesting alternative that is especially suited for systems in which free electrons cannot be directly measured.

  13. Tunneling inhibition for subwavelength light

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Changming; Ye, Fangwei; Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Chen, Xianfeng; Torner, Lluis

    2013-01-01

    We show that light tunneling inhibition may take place in suitable dynamically modulated waveguide arrays for light spots whose features are remarkably smaller than the wavelength of light. We found that tunneling between neighboring waveguides can be suppressed for specific frequencies of the out-of-phase refractive index modulation, affording undistorted propagation of the input subwavelength light spots over hundreds of Rayleigh lengths. Tunneling inhibition turns out to be effective only when the waveguide separation in the array is above a critical threshold. Inclusion of a weak focusing nonlinearity is shown to improve localization. We analyze the phenomenon in purely dielectric structures and also in arrays containing periodically spaced metallic layers.

  14. Resonant torus-assisted tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Chang-Hwan; Yu, Hyeon-Hye; Kim, Chil-Min

    2016-01-01

    We report a new type of dynamical tunneling, which is mediated by a resonant torus, i.e., a nonisolated periodic orbit. To elucidate the phenomenon, we take an open elliptic cavity and show that a pair of resonances localized on two classically disconnected tori tunnel through a resonant torus when they interact with each other. This so-called resonant torus-assisted tunneling is verified by using Husimi functions, corresponding actions, Husimi function distributions, and the standard deviations of the actions. PMID:26871067

  15. Tunneling of atoms, nuclei and molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Bertulani, C A

    2015-01-01

    This is a brief review of few relevant topics on tunneling of composite particles and how the coupling to intrinsic and external degrees of freedom affects tunneling probabilities. I discuss the phenomena of resonant tunneling, different barriers seen by subsystems, damping of resonant tunneling by level bunching and continuum effects due to particle dissociation.

  16. Tunneling progress on the Yucca Mountain Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current status of tunneling progress on the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) is presented in this paper. The Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), a key part of the YMP, has been long in development and construction is ongoing. This is a progress report on the tunneling aspects of the ESF as of January 1, 1996. For purposes of discussion in this summary, the tunneling has progressed in four general phases. The paper describes: tunneling in jointed rock under low stress; tunneling through the Bow Ridge Fault and soft rock; tunneling through the Imbricate Fault Zone; and Tunneling into the candidate repository formation

  17. Predicting Tunneling-Induced Ground Movement

    OpenAIRE

    Laefer, Debra F.; Kim, Wan

    2004-01-01

    Cost-effective and permissible tunneling can occur only if ground movement prediction is refined to accommodate changes in both the urban environment and tunneling technology. As cities age, tunnels are being installed closer to existing structures and in increasingly complicated belowground conditions. The reality of stacked tunnels, abandoned facilities, and more extensive use of underground space raises the question of whether relationships derived for single open-shield tunnels in free-fi...

  18. Analytic Solutions of Elastic Tunneling Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Strack, O.E.

    2002-01-01

    The complex variable method for solving two dimensional linearly elastic problems is used to obtain several fundamental analytical solutions of tunneling problems. The method is used to derive the general mathematical representation of problems involving resultant forces on holes in a half-plane. Such problems are encountered in geomechanics during the excavation of tunnels. When tunnels are excavated the removal of the weighted material inside the tunnel causes the ground under the tunnel to...

  19. Self-Organizing Tunnel Peers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Tunneling is an important approach in IPv6 transition techniques. The tunnel broker model provides a way to build virtual IPv6 networks without manual configuration.However, neither it adapts performance variation on the IPv4 infrastructure,nor it is a scalable solution for a wide-area IPv6 networking environment. In this paper, a self-organizing tunnel peer (SOTP)model is presented. Tunnel peers are clustered in the SOTP system so that optimization is scalable. Four primitive operations related to cluster construction - arrest,release,division and death - endow the system with the nature of self-organization.Occurrence and behavior of the operations are decided by criteria on the IPv4 end-to-end performance; hence measurement is an indispensable component of the system. The metabolism of cluster relaxes the requirement to accuracy of measurement and optimization.

  20. Electron tunneling in proteins program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagras, Muhammad A; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A

    2016-06-01

    We developed a unique integrated software package (called Electron Tunneling in Proteins Program or ETP) which provides an environment with different capabilities such as tunneling current calculation, semi-empirical quantum mechanical calculation, and molecular modeling simulation for calculation and analysis of electron transfer reactions in proteins. ETP program is developed as a cross-platform client-server program in which all the different calculations are conducted at the server side while only the client terminal displays the resulting calculation outputs in the different supported representations. ETP program is integrated with a set of well-known computational software packages including Gaussian, BALLVIEW, Dowser, pKip, and APBS. In addition, ETP program supports various visualization methods for the tunneling calculation results that assist in a more comprehensive understanding of the tunneling process. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990540

  1. Free Surface Water Tunnel (FSWT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The Free Surface Water Tunnel consists of the intake plenum, the test section and the exit plenum. The intake plenum starts with a perforated pipe that...

  2. Flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayda, Edward A. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Chao, David D. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

    2008-04-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  3. Tunnel construction for a desertron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tunnel in this model of construction is 3-1/2 feet wide by 5 feet high. It is assumed that the tunnel contains a rail system and guidance system for: (1) An enclosed car used for transport of 2 people and some tools. (2) A magnet mover. This robot could pick up a magnet and transport it at about 10 miles per hour. (3) An alignment robot. The alignment robot would intercept E.M. waves (microwaves, lasers) to determine its position in the tunnel. Then workers could come along inside the tunnel hoop and nail it together and to the floor. The trench would then be back-filled with a 1 foot berm on top. A rail system would be installed and a support stand for the magnet

  4. Quantum tunneling through graphene nanorings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Zhenhua; Zhang, Z Z; Chang Kai [SKLSM, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 912, 100083 Beijing (China); Peeters, F M, E-mail: kchang@red.semi.ac.cn [Department of Physics, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2010-05-07

    We investigate theoretically quantum transport through graphene nanorings in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field. Our theoretical results demonstrate that the graphene nanorings behave like a resonant tunneling device, contrary to the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations found in conventional semiconductor rings. The resonant tunneling can be tuned by the Fermi energy, the size of the central part of the graphene nanorings and the external magnetic field.

  5. Quantum tunneling through graphene nanorings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate theoretically quantum transport through graphene nanorings in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field. Our theoretical results demonstrate that the graphene nanorings behave like a resonant tunneling device, contrary to the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations found in conventional semiconductor rings. The resonant tunneling can be tuned by the Fermi energy, the size of the central part of the graphene nanorings and the external magnetic field.

  6. Quantum tunneling through graphene nanorings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenhua; Zhang, Z. Z.; Chang, Kai; Peeters, F. M.

    2010-05-01

    We investigate theoretically quantum transport through graphene nanorings in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field. Our theoretical results demonstrate that the graphene nanorings behave like a resonant tunneling device, contrary to the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations found in conventional semiconductor rings. The resonant tunneling can be tuned by the Fermi energy, the size of the central part of the graphene nanorings and the external magnetic field.

  7. Vision Therapy Procedures for Tunneling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey H. Getzell, OD

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Tunneling is a form of an exclusive concentration and is a common spatial adaptation. Treatment strategies for tunneling and the overall visual process will be addressed. Strategies include diaphragmatic breathing, syntonics, and vision therapy activities that stress working in real space with lenses and prisms. Objectives, observations, expected responses, modifications, and questions for the patient are discussed for each vision therapy activity.

  8. Wildlife Tunnel Enhances Population Viability

    OpenAIRE

    Michael McCarthy; Dean Heinze; Rodney van der Ree; Ian Mansergh

    2009-01-01

    Roads and traffic are pervasive components of landscapes throughout the world: they cause wildlife mortality, disrupt animal movements, and increase the risk of extinction. Expensive engineering solutions, such as overpasses and tunnels, are increasingly being adopted to mitigate these effects. Although some species readily use such structures, their success in preventing population extinction remains unknown. Here, we use population viability modeling to assess the effectiveness of tunnels f...

  9. Direct, coherent and incoherent intermediate state tunneling and scanning tunnel microscopy (STM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theory and experiment in tunneling are still qualitative in nature, which hold true also for the latest developments in direct-, resonant-, coherent- and incoherent-tunneling. Those tunnel processes have recently branched out of the field of ''solid state tunnel junctions'' into the fields of scanning tunnel microscopy (STM), single electron tunneling (SET) and semiconducting resonant tunnel structures (RTS). All these fields have promoted the understanding of tunneling in different ways reaching from the effect of coherence, of incoherence and of charging in tunneling, to spin flip or inelastic effects. STM allows not only the accurate measurements of the tunnel current and its voltage dependence but, more importantly, the easy quantification via the (quantum) tunnel channel conductance and the distance dependence. This new degree of freedom entering exponentially the tunnel current allows an unique identification of individual tunnel channels and their quantification. In STM measurements large tunnel currents are observed for large distances d > 1 nm explainable by intermediate state tunneling. Direct tunneling with its reduced tunnel time and reduced off-site Coulomb charging bridges distances below 1 nm, only. The effective charge transfer process with its larger off-site and on-site charging at intermediate states dominates tunnel transfer in STM, biology and chemistry over distances in the nm-range. Intermediates state tunneling becomes variable range hopping conduction for distances larger than d > 2 nm, for larger densities of intermediate states n1(ε) and for larger temperatures T or voltages U, still allowing high resolution imaging

  10. Enzymatic Recognition of 2′‐Modified Ribonucleoside 5′‐Triphosphates: Towards the Evolution of Versatile Aptamers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Lasse Holm; Rothnagel, Joseph A.; Veedu, Rakesh N.

    2012-01-01

    applications involving antisense, RNAi, aptamer, and ribozyme‐based technologies. Since their invention in the early 1990s, aptamers have emerged as a very promising class of therapeutics, with one drug entering the market for the treatment of age‐related macular degeneration. To combat the limitations of...... aptamers containing naturally occurring nucleotides, chemically modified nucleotides have to be used. In order to apply modified nucleotides in aptamer drug development, their enzyme‐recognition capabilities must be understood. For this purpose, several modified nucleoside 5′‐triphosphates were synthesized...... and investigated as substrates for various enzymes. Herein, we review studies on the enzyme‐recognition of various 2′‐sugar‐modified NTPs that were carried out with a view to their effective utilization in SELEX processes to generate versatile aptamers....

  11. Computer modeling of mutant P32T homo- and heterodimers of human inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase hITPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure of the dimer enzyme human inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase (hITPA) is considered to identify the enzyme conformation changes causing the inactivation effect of the P32T mutation. A nanosecond molecular dynamics (MD) analysis is performed; mean square deviations are calculated of the structures of the wild-type and mutant homodimers and the heterodimer. A 3 ns modeling shows a greater displacement of atoms in mutant protomers. During MD modeling, the strongest changes are observed in the loop between α2 and β2 (res. 28-33), which includes P32T, the loop between β5 and β6, and the C-terminal amino acid residues. The loop between α2 and β2 has two conformations characterized by different positions of the Phe31 aromatic group. The distance between Cys33 (Cα) and Phe31 (Cz) for wild-type and mutant protomers was ~ 9 and 5.5 Å, respectively. These conformations were stable.

  12. An efficient method for the construction of functionalized DNA bearing amino acid groups through cross-coupling reactions of nucleoside triphosphates followed by primer extension or PCR

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čapek, Petr; Cahová, Hana; Pohl, Radek; Hocek, Michal; Gloeckner, Ch.; Marx, A.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 21 (2007), s. 6196-6203. ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA ČR GA203/05/0043 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : nucleoside triphosphates * cross-coupling * DNA Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.330, year: 2007

  13. Sterol transporter adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter G8, gallstones, and biliary cancer in 62,000 individuals from the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Stefan; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Gallstone disease, a risk factor for biliary cancer, has a strong heritable component, but the underlying genes are largely unknown. To test the hypothesis that ABCG8 (adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter G8) Asp19His (D19H) genotype predicted risk of gallstones and biliary cancer ...

  14. 7-Aryl-7-deazaadenine 2 '-Deoxyribonucleoside Triphosphates (dNTPs): Better Substrates for DNA Polymerases than dATP in Competitive Incorporations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kielkowski, Pavel; Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Hocek, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 29 (2014), s. 7552-7555. ISSN 1433-7851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP206/12/G151 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : DNA * enzymes * kinetics * nucleoside triphosphates * nucleotides Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 11.261, year: 2014

  15. Plaque retention by self-ligating vs elastomeric orthodontic brackets: quantitative comparison of oral bacteria and detection with adenosine triphosphate-driven bioluminescence.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pellegrini, P.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Finlayson, T.; McLeod, J.; Covell, D.A.; Maier, T.; Machida, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Enamel decalcification is a common problem in orthodontics. The objectives of this randomized clinical study were to enumerate and compare plaque bacteria surrounding 2 bracket types, self-ligating (SL) vs elastomeric ligating (E), and to determine whether adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-

  16. Synthesis of Base-Modified 2 '-Deoxyribonucleoside Triphosphates and Their Use in Enzymatic Synthesis of Modified DNA for Applications in Bioanalysis and Chemical Biology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hocek, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 21 (2014), s. 9914-9921. ISSN 0022-3263 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP206/12/G151; GA ČR GA14-04289S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : cross-coupling reactions * modified nucleoside triphosphates * nucleic acids Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.721, year: 2014

  17. Adenosine 5 '-triphosphate (ATP) supplements are not orally bioavailable: a randomized, placebo-controlled cross-over trial in healthy humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, I.C.W.; Coolen, E.J.C.M.; Bours, M.J.L.; Huyghebaert, N.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Bast, A.; Dagnelie, P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Nutritional supplements designed to increase adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) concentrations are commonly used by athletes as ergogenic aids. ATP is the primary source of energy for the cells, and supplementation may enhance the ability to maintain high ATP turnover during high-intensity

  18. Scanning Tunneling Optical Resonance Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila; Wilt, Dave; Raffaelle, Ryne; Gennett, Tom; Tin, Padetha; Lau, Janice; Castro, Stephanie; Jenkins, Philip; Scheiman, Dave

    2003-01-01

    Scanning tunneling optical resonance microscopy (STORM) is a method, now undergoing development, for measuring optoelectronic properties of materials and devices on the nanoscale by means of a combination of (1) traditional scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) with (2) tunable laser spectroscopy. In STORM, an STM tip probing a semiconductor is illuminated with modulated light at a wavelength in the visible-to-near-infrared range and the resulting photoenhancement of the tunneling current is measured as a function of the illuminating wavelength. The photoenhancement of tunneling current occurs when the laser photon energy is sufficient to excite charge carriers into the conduction band of the semiconductor. Figure 1 schematically depicts a proposed STORM apparatus. The light for illuminating the semiconductor specimen at the STM would be generated by a ring laser that would be tunable across the wavelength range of interest. The laser beam would be chopped by an achromatic liquid-crystal modulator. A polarization-maintaining optical fiber would couple the light to the tip/sample junction of a commercial STM. An STM can be operated in one of two modes: constant height or constant current. A STORM apparatus would be operated in the constant-current mode, in which the height of the tip relative to the specimen would be varied in order to keep the tunneling current constant. In this mode, a feedback control circuit adjusts the voltage applied to a piezoelectric actuator in the STM that adjusts the height of the STM tip to keep the tunneling current constant. The exponential relationship between the tunneling current and tip-to-sample distance makes it relatively easy to implement this mode of operation. The choice of method by which the photoenhanced portion of the tunneling current would be measured depends on choice of the frequency at which the input illumination would be modulated (chopped). If the frequency of modulation were low enough (typically < 10 Hz) that the

  19. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    -vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial......Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate...... filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge...

  20. Demonstrating Bacterial Flagella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, John R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes an effective laboratory method for demonstrating bacterial flagella that utilizes the Proteus mirabilis organism and a special harvesting technique. Includes safety considerations for the laboratory exercise. (MDH)

  1. National Wind Tunnel Complex (NWTC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The National Wind Tunnel Complex (NWTC) Final Report summarizes the work carried out by a unique Government/Industry partnership during the period of June 1994 through May 1996. The objective of this partnership was to plan, design, build and activate 'world class' wind tunnel facilities for the development of future-generation commercial and military aircraft. The basis of this effort was a set of performance goals defined by the National Facilities Study (NFS) Task Group on Aeronautical Research and Development Facilities which established two critical measures of improved wind tunnel performance; namely, higher Reynolds number capability and greater productivity. Initial activities focused upon two high-performance tunnels (low-speed and transonic). This effort was later descoped to a single multipurpose tunnel. Beginning in June 1994, the NWTC Project Office defined specific performance requirements, planned site evaluation activities, performed a series of technical/cost trade studies, and completed preliminary engineering to support a proposed conceptual design. Due to budget uncertainties within the Federal government, the NWTC project office was directed to conduct an orderly closure following the Systems Design Review in March 1996. This report provides a top-level status of the project at that time. Additional details of all work performed have been archived and are available for future reference.

  2. TunnelVision: LHC Tunnel Photogrammetry System for Structural Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Fallas, William

    2014-01-01

    In this document an algorithm to detect deformations in the LHC Tunnel of CERN is presented. It is based on two images, one represents the ideal state of the tunnel and the other one the actual state. To find the differences between both, the algorithm is divided in three steps. First, an image enhancement is applied to make easier the detection. Second, two different approaches to reduce noise are applied to one or both images. And third, it is defined a group of characteristics about the type of deformation desired to detect. Finally, the conclusions show the effectiveness of the algorithm in the experimental results.

  3. Shuffling bacterial metabolomes

    OpenAIRE

    Thomason, Brendan; Read, Timothy D.

    2006-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has a far more significant role than gene duplication in bacterial evolution. This has recently been illustrated by work demonstrating the importance of HGT in the emergence of bacterial metabolic networks, with horizontally acquired genes being placed in peripheral pathways at the outer branches of the networks.

  4. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection. PMID:27096872

  5. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach that ...... become valuable weapons for preventing pathogen contamination and fighting infectious diseases in the future....

  6. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim N. Mak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs. IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection.

  7. Computational multiqubit tunnelling in programmable quantum annealers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boixo, Sergio; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Shabani, Alireza; Isakov, Sergei V.; Dykman, Mark; Denchev, Vasil S.; Amin, Mohammad H.; Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Mohseni, Masoud; Neven, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon in which a quantum state traverses energy barriers higher than the energy of the state itself. Quantum tunnelling has been hypothesized as an advantageous physical resource for optimization in quantum annealing. However, computational multiqubit tunnelling has not yet been observed, and a theory of co-tunnelling under high- and low-frequency noises is lacking. Here we show that 8-qubit tunnelling plays a computational role in a currently available programmable quantum annealer. We devise a probe for tunnelling, a computational primitive where classical paths are trapped in a false minimum. In support of the design of quantum annealers we develop a nonperturbative theory of open quantum dynamics under realistic noise characteristics. This theory accurately predicts the rate of many-body dissipative quantum tunnelling subject to the polaron effect. Furthermore, we experimentally demonstrate that quantum tunnelling outperforms thermal hopping along classical paths for problems with up to 200 qubits containing the computational primitive.

  8. Tunneling field effect transistor technology

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Mansun

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a single-source reference to the state-of-the art in tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs). Readers will learn the TFETs physics from advanced atomistic simulations, the TFETs fabrication process and the important roles that TFETs will play in enabling integrated circuit designs for power efficiency. · Provides comprehensive reference to tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs); · Covers all aspects of TFETs, from device process to modeling and applications; · Enables design of power-efficient integrated circuits, with low power consumption TFETs.

  9. Fermion Tunneling from Dynamical Horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Di Criscienzo, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    The instability against emission of fermionic particles by the trapping horizon of an evolving black hole is analyzed using the Hamilton-Jacobi tunneling method. This method automatically selects one special expression for the surface gravity of a changing horizon. The results also apply to point masses embedded in an expanding universe. As a bonus of the tunneling method, we gain the insight that the surface gravity still defines a temperature parameter as long as the evolution is sufficiently slow that the black hole pass through a sequence of quasi-equilibrium states, and that black holes should be semi-classically unstable even in a hypothetical world without bosonic fields.

  10. Spin tunnelling in mesoscopic systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anupam Garg

    2001-02-01

    We study spin tunnelling in molecular magnets as an instance of a mesoscopic phenomenon, with special emphasis on the molecule Fe8. We show that the tunnel splitting between various pairs of Zeeman levels in this molecule oscillates as a function of applied magnetic field, vanishing completely at special points in the space of magnetic fields, known as diabolical points. This phenomena is explained in terms of two approaches, one based on spin-coherent-state path integrals, and the other on a generalization of the phase integral (or WKB) method to difference equations. Explicit formulas for the diabolical points are obtained for a model Hamiltonian.

  11. Quantum Cosmology for Tunneling Universes

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Sang Pyo

    2004-01-01

    In a quantum cosmological model consisting of a Euclidean region and a Lorentzian region, Hartle-Hawking's no-bounary wave function, and Linde's wave function and Vilenkin's tunneling wave function are briefly described and compared with each other. We put a particular emphasis on semiclassical gravity from quantum cosmology and compare it with the conventional quantum field theory in curved spacetimes. Finally, we discuss the recent debate on catastrophic particle production in the tunneling universe between Rubakov and Vilenkin within the semiclassical gravity.

  12. Insights into the molecular mechanism of inhibition and drug resistance for HIV-1 RT with carbovir triphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Adrian S; Yang, Zhenjun; Shi, Junxing; Hobbs, Ann; Schinazi, Raymond F; Chu, Chung K; Anderson, Karen S

    2002-04-23

    Abacavir (1592U89, or Ziagen) is a powerful and selective inhibitor of HIV-1 viral replication that has been approved by the FDA for treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Abacavir is metabolized to the active compound carbovir triphosphate (CBVTP). This compound is a guanosine analogue containing a 2',3'-unsaturation in its planar carbocyclic deoxyribose ring that acts on HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT(WT)) as a molecular target, resulting in chain termination of DNA synthesis. A single amino acid change from methionine 184 to valine in HIV-1 RT (RT(M184V)) has been observed clinically in response to abacavir treatment. The ability of the natural substrate, dGTP, or CBVTP to be utilized during DNA- and RNA-directed polymerization by RT(WT) and RT(M184V) was defined by pre-steady-state kinetic parameters. In the case of RT(WT), CBVTP was found to be a surprisingly poor substrate relative to dGTP. In both DNA- and RNA-directed polymerization, a decrease in the efficiency of CBVTP utilization with respect to dGTP was found with RT(M184V), suggesting that this mutation confers resistance at the level of CBVMP incorporation. The relatively low incorporation efficiency for RT(WT) was unanticipated considering earlier studies showing that the triphosphate form of a thymidine nucleoside analogue containing a planar 2',3'-unsaturated ribose ring, D4TTP, was incorporated with high efficiency relative to the natural substrate, dTTP. The difference may be related to the isosteric replacement of oxygen in the deoxyribose ring with carbon. This hypothesis was tested by synthesizing and evaluating D4GTP (the planar 2',3'-unsaturated deoxyribose guanosine analogue that is complementary to D4TTP). In contrast to CBVTP, D4GTP was found to be an excellent substrate for RT(WT) and no resistance was conferred by the M184V mutation, thus providing novel insight into structure-activity relationships for nucleoside-based inhibitors. In this work, we illustrate how an

  13. Observation of spin-polarized tunneling by scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) in ferromagnet-vacuum-ferromagnet junction was studied by using an STM setup. After in situ cleaning of both of two ferromagnetic electrodes, up to 20% of TMR was observed. Such a signal was not observed for air gap nor nonmagnetic electrode. This technique is suitable for basic research of the TMR effect

  14. Palladium Electrodes for Molecular Tunnel Junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Shuai; Sen, Suman; Zhang, Peiming; Gyarfas, Brett; Ashcroft, Brian; Lefkowitz, Steven; Peng, Hongbo; Lindsay, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Gold has been the metal of choice for research on molecular tunneling junctions, but it is incompatible with CMOS fabrication because it forms deep level traps in silicon. Palladium electrodes do not contaminate silicon, and also give higher tunnel current signals in the molecular tunnel junctions we have studied. The result is cleaner signals in a recognition-tunneling junction that recognizes the four natural DNA bases as well as 5-methyl cytosine, with no spurious background signals. More ...

  15. Dynamic Analysis of Esfahan Metro Tunnels

    OpenAIRE

    Bagherzadeh, A.; Ferdowsi, B.

    2009-01-01

    This study discusses the modeling of Esfahan metro tunnels subjected to earthquake and interaction of tunnels. In critical structures like subway tunnels, performing a time history dynamic analysis is the only acceptable method for determining the seismic-induced forces. For sites with no recorded earthquake ground motion, artificially generated accelerograms to represent the real earthquake records has been suggested by many experts. This study addressed the modeling of metro tunnels s...

  16. Fiber coupled ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Keil, Ulrich Dieter Felix; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1997-01-01

    We report on a scanning tunneling microscope with a photoconductive gate in the tunneling current circuit. The tunneling tip is attached to a coplanar transmission line with an integrated photoconductive switch. The switch is illuminated through a fiber which is rigidly attached to the switch substrate. By using a firmly attached fiber we achieve an excellent reproducibility and unconstrained positioning of the tip. We observe a transient signal with 2.9 ps pulse width in tunneling mode and 5...

  17. Tunneling Processes in Optically Excited Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiu-Ping; WEI Hua-Rong; XU Li-Ping; GONG Jian-Ping; YAN Wei-Xian

    2011-01-01

    The single-electron tunneling processes in optically excited coupled quantum dots can be divided into two parts: the electron and the hole parts, which are analytically obtained in the framework of the Keldysh formalism. The tunneling process is selective tunneling, which results in dark tunneling states. The tunneling currents are co-determined by the resonance energies and probability distributions of the particular quantum channels defined by the electron-hole complex resonant states.%The single-electron tunneling processes in optically excited coupled quantum dots can be divided into two parts:the electron and the hole parts,which are analytically obtained in the framework of the Keldysh formalism.The tunneling process is selective tunneling,which results in dark tunneling states.The tunneling currents are co-determined by the resonance energies and probability distributions of the particular quantum channels defined by the electron-hole complex resonant states.Probing the fine-energy structure of the exciton complexes[1-10] in an optically excited quantum dot is an important way of exploring new mechanisms in nanostructures.Single electron tunneling (SET) devices consisting of a central quantum dot (QD) and a tunneling coupled source and drain have become important optoelectronic nano-devices.[11,12

  18. Fiber coupled ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, Ulrich Dieter Felix; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1997-01-01

    We report on a scanning tunneling microscope with a photoconductive gate in the tunneling current circuit. The tunneling tip is attached to a coplanar transmission line with an integrated photoconductive switch. The switch is illuminated through a fiber which is rigidly attached to the switch...

  19. Barrier properties of HTSC tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was found that the overall shape of the normal state tunnel conductance of metal oxides with low Fermi energies is very sensitive to the barrier height and thickness. It was shown that this curve can differ considerably from the usual tunnel characteristics known from the tunnel spectroscopy of conventional metal

  20. Tunnel Face Stability & New CPT Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broere, W.

    2001-01-01

    Nearly all tunnels bored in soft soils have encountered problems with the stability of the tunnel face. In several cases these problems led to an extended stand-still of the boring process. A better understanding of the face stability, and of the soil conditions around the tunnel boring machine, can

  1. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson tunnel junctions and Coulomb blockade in single small tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments investigating the process of macroscopic quantum tunneling in a moderately-damped, resistively shunted, Josephson junction are described, followed by a discussion of experiments performed on very small capacitance normal-metal tunnel junctions. The experiments on the resistively-shunted Josephson junction were designed to investigate a quantum process, that of the tunneling of the Josephson phase variable under a potential barrier, in a system in which dissipation plays a major role in the dynamics of motion. All the parameters of the junction were measured using the classical phenomena of thermal activation and resonant activation. Theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental results, showing good agreement with no adjustable parameters; the tunneling rate in the moderately damped (Q ∼ 1) junction is seen to be reduced by a factor of 300 from that predicted for an undamped junction. The phase is seen to be a good quantum-mechanical variable. The experiments on small capacitance tunnel junctions extend the measurements on the larger-area Josephson junctions from the region in which the phase variable has a fairly well-defined value, i.e. its wavefunction has a narrow width, to the region where its value is almost completely unknown. The charge on the junction becomes well-defined and is predicted to quantize the current through the junction, giving rise to the Coulomb blockade at low bias. I present the first clear observation of the Coulomb blockade in single junctions. The electrical environment of the tunnel junction, however, strongly affects the behavior of the junction: higher resistance leads are observed to greatly sharpen the Coulomb blockade over that seen with lower resistance leads. I present theoretical descriptions of how the environment influences the junctions; comparisons with the experimental results are in reasonable agreement

  2. Inelastic scattering in resonant tunneling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wingreen, Ned S.; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Wilkins, John W.

    1989-01-01

    The exact resonant-tunneling transmission probability for an electron interacting with phonons is presented in the limit that the elastic coupling to the leads is independent of energy. The phonons produce transmission sidebands but do not affect the integrated transmission probability or the...

  3. Josephson tunnel junction microwave attenuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koshelets, V. P.; Shitov, S. V.; Shchukin, A. V.;

    1993-01-01

    A new element for superconducting electronic circuitry-a variable attenuator-has been proposed, designed, and successfully tested. The principle of operation is based on the change in the microwave impedance of a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) Josephson tunnel junction when dc biased...

  4. Mars Surface Tunnel Element Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Michelle A.; Mary, Natalie; Howe, A. Scott; Jeffries, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    How Mars surface crews get into their ascent vehicle has profound implications for Mars surface architecture. To meet planetary protection protocols, the architecture has get Intravehicular Activity (IVA)-suited crew into a Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) without having to step outside into the Mars environment. Pushing EVA suit don/doff and EVA operations to an element that remains on the surface also helps to minimize MAV cabin volume, which in turn can reduce MAV cabin mass. Because the MAV will require at least seven kilograms of propellant to ascend each kilogram of cabin mass, minimal MAV mass is desired. For architectures involving more than one surface element-such as an ascent vehicle and a pressurized rover or surface habitat-a retractable tunnel is an attractive solution. Beyond addressing the immediate MAV access issue, a reusable tunnel may be useful for other surface applications once its primary mission is complete. A National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) team is studying the optimal balance between surface tunnel functionality, mass, and stowed volume as part of the Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC). The "Minimum Functional Tunnel" is a conceptual design that performs a single function. Having established this baseline configuration, the next step is to trade design options, evaluate other applications, and explore alternative solutions.

  5. Wormhole creation by quantum tunnelling

    CERN Document Server

    Battarra, Lorenzo; Lehners, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    We study the process of quantum tunnelling in self-interacting scalar field theories with non-minimal coupling to gravity. In these theories gravitational instantons can develop a neck -- a feature prohibited in theories with minimal coupling, and describing the nucleation of geometries containing a wormhole. We also clarify the relationship of neck geometries to violations of the null energy condition.

  6. Quantum Tunneling in Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Majhi, Bibhas Ranjan

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is focussed towards the applications of the quantum tunneling mechanism to study black holes. Here we give a general frame work of the existing tunneling mechanism, both the radial null geodesic and Hamilton Jacobi methods. On the radial null geodesic method side, we study the modifications to the tunneling rate, Hawking temperature and the Bekenstein- Hawking area law by including the back reaction as well as non-commutative effects in the space-time. A reformulation of the Hamilton-Jacobi (HJ) method is first introduced. Based on this, a close connection between the quantum tunneling and the gravitational anomaly mechanisms to discuss Hawking effect, is put forwarded. An interesting advantage of this reformulated HJ method is that one can get directly the emission spectrum from the event horizon of the black hole, which was missing in the earlier literature. Also, the quantization of the entropy and area of a black hole is discussed in this method. Another part of the thesis is the introduction ...

  7. Earth Pressure on Tunnel Crown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars

    Two different analyses have been carried out in order to find the vertical earth pressure, or overburden pressure, at the crown of a tunnel going through a dike. Firstly, a hand calculation is performed using a simple dispersion of the stresses over depth. Secondly, the finite‐element program...

  8. Apparent tunneling in chemical reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Billing, G. D.

    2000-01-01

    A necessary condition for tunneling in a chemical reaction is that the probability of crossing a barrier is non-zero, when the energy of the reactants is below the potential energy of the barrier. Due to the non-classical nature (i.e, momentum uncertainty) of vibrational states this is, however...

  9. Introduction to scanning tunneling microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C Julian

    2008-01-01

    The scanning tunneling and the atomic force microscope, both capable of imaging individual atoms, were crowned with the Physics Nobel Prize in 1986, and are the cornerstones of nanotechnology today. This is a thoroughly updated version of this 'bible' in the field.

  10. Apparent tunneling in chemical reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Billing, G. D.

    A necessary condition for tunneling in a chemical reaction is that the probability of crossing a barrier is non-zero, when the energy of the reactants is below the potential energy of the barrier. Due to the non-classical nature (i.e, momentum uncertainty) of vibrational states this is, however...

  11. Quantum Tunneling and Back Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Rabin; Majhi, Bibhas Ranjan

    2007-01-01

    We give a correction to the tunneling probability by taking into account the back reaction effect to the metric of the black hole spacetime. We then show how this gives rise to the modifications in the semiclassical black hole entropy and Hawking temperature. Finally, we reproduce the familiar logarithmic correction to the Bekenstein-Hawking area law.

  12. Installation in the SPS tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The SPS tunnel is 6910 m in circumference and has a cross section of 4 m inner diameter. It is situated at an elevation of 400 m above sea level at a depth below the surface varying between 23 and 65 m. Its walls are lined with a concrete shell of about 30 cm thickness. See also 7410043X

  13. Time tunnels meet warped passages

    CERN Multimedia

    Kushner, David

    2006-01-01

    "Just in time for its 40th anniversary, the classic sci-fi television show "The time tunnel" is out on DVD. The conceit is something every engineer can relate to: a pulled plug. Scientists in an underground lab are working on a secret government experiment in time travel. (1 page)

  14. Calcium and adenosine triphosphate control of cellular pathology: asparaginase-induced pancreatitis elicited via protease-activated receptor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shuang; Gerasimenko, Julia V; Tsugorka, Tatiana; Gryshchenko, Oleksiy; Samarasinghe, Sujith; Petersen, Ole H; Gerasimenko, Oleg V

    2016-08-01

    Exocytotic secretion of digestive enzymes from pancreatic acinar cells is elicited by physiological cytosolic Ca(2+) signals, occurring as repetitive short-lasting spikes largely confined to the secretory granule region, that stimulate mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. By contrast, sustained global cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations decrease ATP levels and cause necrosis, leading to the disease acute pancreatitis (AP). Toxic Ca(2+) signals can be evoked by products of alcohol and fatty acids as well as bile acids. Here, we have investigated the mechanism by which l-asparaginase evokes AP. Asparaginase is an essential element in the successful treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, the most common type of cancer affecting children, but AP is a side-effect occurring in about 5-10% of cases. Like other pancreatitis-inducing agents, asparaginase evoked intracellular Ca(2+) release followed by Ca(2+) entry and also substantially reduced Ca(2+) extrusion because of decreased intracellular ATP levels. The toxic Ca(2+) signals caused extensive necrosis. The asparaginase-induced pathology depended on protease-activated receptor 2 and its inhibition prevented the toxic Ca(2+) signals and necrosis. We tested the effects of inhibiting the Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) entry by the Ca(2+) channel inhibitor GSK-7975A. This markedly reduced asparaginase-induced Ca(2+) entry and also protected effectively against the development of necrosis.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377732

  15. Hydrolysis of Guanosine Triphosphate (GTP) by the Ras·GAP Protein Complex: Reaction Mechanism and Kinetic Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrenova, Maria G; Grigorenko, Bella L; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B; Nemukhin, Alexander V

    2015-10-01

    Molecular mechanisms of the hydrolysis of guanosine triphosphate (GTP) to guanosine diphosphate (GDP) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) by the Ras·GAP protein complex are fully investigated by using modern modeling tools. The previously hypothesized stages of the cleavage of the phosphorus-oxygen bond in GTP and the formation of the imide form of catalytic Gln61 from Ras upon creation of Pi are confirmed by using the higher-level quantum-based calculations. The steps of the enzyme regeneration are modeled for the first time, providing a comprehensive description of the catalytic cycle. It is found that for the reaction Ras·GAP·GTP·H2O → Ras·GAP·GDP·Pi, the highest barriers correspond to the process of regeneration of the active site but not to the process of substrate cleavage. The specific shape of the energy profile is responsible for an interesting kinetic mechanism of the GTP hydrolysis. The analysis of the process using the first-passage approach and consideration of kinetic equations suggest that the overall reaction rate is a result of the balance between relatively fast transitions and low probability of states from which these transitions are taking place. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with available experimental observations on GTP hydrolysis rates. PMID:26374425

  16. Campylobacter jejuni adenosine triphosphate phosphoribosyltransferase is an active hexamer that is allosterically controlled by the twisting of a regulatory tail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelstädt, Gerd; Moggré, Gert-Jan; Panjikar, Santosh; Nazmi, Ali Reza; Parker, Emily J

    2016-08-01

    Adenosine triphosphate phosphoribosyltransferase (ATP-PRT) catalyzes the first committed step of the histidine biosynthesis in plants and microorganisms. Here, we present the functional and structural characterization of the ATP-PRT from the pathogenic ε-proteobacteria Campylobacter jejuni (CjeATP-PRT). This enzyme is a member of the long form (HisGL ) ATP-PRT and is allosterically inhibited by histidine, which binds to a remote regulatory domain, and competitively inhibited by AMP. In the crystalline form, CjeATP-PRT was found to adopt two distinctly different hexameric conformations, with an open homohexameric structure observed in the presence of substrate ATP, and a more compact closed form present when inhibitor histidine is bound. CjeATP-PRT was observed to adopt only a hexameric quaternary structure in solution, contradicting previous hypotheses favoring an allosteric mechanism driven by an oligomer equilibrium. Instead, this study supports the conclusion that the ATP-PRT long form hexamer is the active species; the tightening of this structure in response to remote histidine binding results in an inhibited enzyme. PMID:27191057

  17. Diagnostic value of adenosine-triphosphate radionuclide ventriculography in coronary artery disease. Comparison with conventional exercise stress method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of adenosine-triphosphate (ATP) on hemodynamics and left ventricular (LV) function, and to examine the value of ATP radionuclide-ventriculography (RNVG) for detecting coronary artery disease (CAD) in comparison with standard exercise RNVG. Thirty-eight consecutive patients with suspected CAD underwent ATP (0.18 mg/Kg/min) RNVG and symptom-limited exercise RNVG. Coronary angiography revealed 27 patients with CAD (Group S) and 11 without CAD (Group N). In group S, exercise induced an increase in LV end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) and LV end-systolic volume (LVESV), and a decrease in LV ejection fraction (LVEF). In contrast, ATP infusion caused LVESV to decrease in both groups, improving LVEF. Only 14 of 39 segments whose wall motion was deteriorated by exercise showed worsening regional wall motion during ATP infusion. The sensitivity and specificity of ATP RNVG for detecting CAD were 22. 2% and 100%, while those of exercise RNVG were 77.8% and 81.8%, respectively. Although ATP induced a depression of peak filling rate in group S as compared with group N, the deterioration of systolic function was not apparent with this method. ATP RNVG was not adequate for detecting CAD because of its lower sensitivity compared with exercise RNVG. (author)

  18. Serine-324 of myosin's heavy chain is photoaffinity-labeled by 3'(2')-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)adenosine triphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A portion of the active site of rabbit skeletal myosin near the ribose ring of ATP can be labeled by the photoaffinity analogue 3'(2')-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)adenosine triphosphate (Bz2ATP). The specificity of the photolabeling was assured by first trapping [14C]Bz2ATP at the active site by use of thiol cross-linking agents. Five radioactive peptides were isolated by high-performance liquid chromatography after extensive trypsin and subtilisin digestion of photolabeled myosin subfragment 1. Four of these peptides were sequenced by Edman techniques, and all originated from a region with the sequence Gly-Glu-Ile-Thr-Val-Pro-Ser-Ile-Asp-Asp-Gln, which corresponds to rabbit myosin heavy chain residues 312-328. The fifth labeled peptide had an amino acid composition appropriate for residues 312-328. Amino acid composition, radiochemical analysis, and sequence data indicate that Ser-324 is the major amino acid residue photolabeled by Bz2ATP. Spectrophotometric evidence indicates that the benzophenone carbonyl group has inserted into a C-H bond from either the α- or β-carbon of serine. These results place Ser-324 at a distance of 6-7 angstrom from the 3'(2') ribose oxygens of ATP bound at the active site of myosin

  19. Biochemistry of terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase. Identification and unity of ribo- and deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate binding site in terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase is the only DNA polymerase that is strongly inhibited in the presence of ATP. We have labeled calf terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase with [32P]ATP in order to identify its binding site in terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase. The specificity of ATP cross-linking to terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase is shown by the competitive inhibition of the overall cross-linking reaction by deoxynucleoside triphosphates, as well as the ATP analogs Ap4A and Ap5A. Tryptic peptide mapping of [32P]ATP-labeled enzyme revealed a peptide fraction that contained the majority of cross-linked ATP. The properties, chromatographic characteristics, amino acid composition, and sequence analysis of this peptide fraction were identical with those found associated with dTTP cross-linked terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase peptide. The involvement of the same 2 cysteine residues in the crosslinking of both nucleotides further confirmed the unity of the ATP and dTTP binding domain that contains residues 224-237 in the primary amino acid sequence of calf terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase

  20. Biochemistry of terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase. Affinity labeling and identification of the deoxynucleoside triphosphate binding domain of terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the technique of UV-mediated cross-linking of nucleotides to their acceptor sites, we have labeled calf terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase (TdT) with [32P]dTTP. The specificity of dTTP cross-linking at the substrate binding site in TdT is demonstrated by the competitive inhibition of the cross-linking reaction by other deoxynucleoside triphosphates, and ATP and its analogues, requiring concentrations consistent with their kinetic constants. Tryptic peptide mapping of the [32P]dTTP-labeled enzyme showed the presence of a single radioactive peptide fraction that contained the site of dTTP cross-linking. The amino acid composition and sequence analysis of the radioactive peptide fraction revealed it to contain two tryptic peptides, spanning residues 221-231 and 234-249. Since these two peptides were covalently linked to dTTP, the region encompassed by them constitutes a substrate binding domain in TdT. Further proteolytic digestion of the tryptic peptide-dTTP complex, using V8 protease, yielded a smaller peptide, and its analysis narrowed the substrate binding domain to 14 amino acids corresponding to residues 224-237 in the primary amino acid sequence of TdT. Furthermore, 2 cysteine residues, Cys-227 and Cys-234, within this domain were found to be involved in the cross-linking of dTTP, suggesting their participation in the process of substrate binding in TdT

  1. Light-driven artificial enzymes for selective oxidation of guanosine triphosphate using water-soluble POSS network polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jong-Hwan; Tanaka, Kazuo; Chujo, Yoshiki

    2014-09-01

    The light-driven artificial enzymes were constructed to realize unnatural reactions concerning bio-significant molecules. In this manuscript, the guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-selective oxidation is reported using the network polymers composed of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS). We synthesized the water-soluble POSS network polymer containing the naphthyridine ligands to capture GTP inside the networks and the ruthenium complexes to oxidize the captured GTP under light irradiation. Initially, the binding affinities of the guanosine nucleosides to the naphthyridine ligand inside the POSS network polymer were evaluated from the emission quenching experiments. Accordingly, it was observed that the naphthyridine ligand can form the stable complex only with GTP (K(a) = 5.5 × 10(6) M(-1)). These results indicate that only GTP can be captured by the network polymer. Next, the photo-catalytic activity of the ruthenium complex-modified POSS network polymer was investigated. Finally, it was revealed that the network polymer can decompose GTP efficiently under light irradiation. This is the first example, to the best of our knowledge, to offer not only the GTP-selective host polymers but also the light-driven artificial enzyme for GTP oxidation. PMID:25026217

  2. Influence of Thromboxane A2 on the Regulation of Adenosine Triphosphate-Sensitive Potassium Channels in Mouse Ventricular Myocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, In Seok; Cho, Hwa Jin; Cho, Jeong Gwan; Kim, Sang Hyung; Na, Kook Joo

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels play an important role in myocardial protection. We examined the effects of thromboxane A2 on the regulation of KATP channel activity in single ventricular myocytes. Subjects and Methods Single ventricular myocytes were isolated from the hearts of adult Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice by enzymatic digestion. Single channel activity was recorded by excised inside-out and cell-attached patch clamp configurations at −60 mV holding potential during the perfusion of an ATP-free K-5 solution. Results In the excised inside-out patches, the thromboxane A2 analog, U46619, decreased the KATP channel activity in a dose-dependent manner; however, the thromboxane A2 receptor antagonist, SQ29548, did not significantly attenuate the inhibitory effect of U46619. In the cell-attached patches, U46619 inhibited dinitrophenol (DNP)-induced KATP channel activity in a dose-dependent manner, and SQ29548 attenuated the inhibitory effects of U46619 on DNP-induced KATP channel activity. Conclusion Thromboxane A2 may inhibit KATP channel activity, and may have a harmful effect on ischemic myocardium. PMID:27482267

  3. Calcium and adenosine triphosphate control of cellular pathology: asparaginase-induced pancreatitis elicited via protease-activated receptor 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shuang; Gerasimenko, Julia V.; Tsugorka, Tatiana; Gryshchenko, Oleksiy; Samarasinghe, Sujith; Gerasimenko, Oleg V.

    2016-01-01

    Exocytotic secretion of digestive enzymes from pancreatic acinar cells is elicited by physiological cytosolic Ca2+ signals, occurring as repetitive short-lasting spikes largely confined to the secretory granule region, that stimulate mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. By contrast, sustained global cytosolic Ca2+ elevations decrease ATP levels and cause necrosis, leading to the disease acute pancreatitis (AP). Toxic Ca2+ signals can be evoked by products of alcohol and fatty acids as well as bile acids. Here, we have investigated the mechanism by which l-asparaginase evokes AP. Asparaginase is an essential element in the successful treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, the most common type of cancer affecting children, but AP is a side-effect occurring in about 5–10% of cases. Like other pancreatitis-inducing agents, asparaginase evoked intracellular Ca2+ release followed by Ca2+ entry and also substantially reduced Ca2+ extrusion because of decreased intracellular ATP levels. The toxic Ca2+ signals caused extensive necrosis. The asparaginase-induced pathology depended on protease-activated receptor 2 and its inhibition prevented the toxic Ca2+ signals and necrosis. We tested the effects of inhibiting the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ entry by the Ca2+ channel inhibitor GSK-7975A. This markedly reduced asparaginase-induced Ca2+ entry and also protected effectively against the development of necrosis. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377732

  4. Clinical characteristics in patients showing ischemic electrocardiographic changes during adenosine triphosphate loading single-photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although ischemic electrocardiographic (ECG) changes during dipyridamole or adenosine infusion have been reported as a marker for severe coronary artery disease (CAD), few studies have focused on ST-segment changes with adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-loading myocardial single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Between January 2003 and August 2008, 4650 consecutive patients underwent ATP-loading SPECT. After 1412 patients with left bundle branch block, pacemaker rhythm, or previous coronary revascularization were excluded, 16 out of 3238 patients (0.5%) showed ischemic ST-segment depression during ATP-loading myocardial SPECT. They were aged 67±11 years; 10 were men and 6 women. Of these patients, 8 demonstrated perfusion abnormalities, whereas the remaining 8 showed normal myocardial perfusion imaging. In 6 of the 8 patients with abnormal SPECT, coronary angiography was performed, revealing left main trunk disease in 1 patient, 3-vessel disease in 4, 1-vessel disease with proximal left ascending artery occlusion in 1, and an insignificant lesion in 1. By contrast, no major cardiac event was observed in the 8 patients with normal SPECT during follow-up for an average of 2 years. The prevalence of ischemic ST-segment changes during ATP loading is very rare. However, this finding should be taken into account since almost half of the patients, particularly those with perfusion abnormalities, may have severe CAD which requires coronary revascularization. (author)

  5. Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase 1): localization and in vitro inhibition of promastigotes growth by polyclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcino, Gabriane Nascimento; Carvalho-Campos, Cristiane; Maia, Ana Carolina Ribeiro Gomes; Detoni, Michelle Lima; Faria-Pinto, Priscila; Coimbra, Elaine Soares; Marques, Marcos José; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Juliano, Luiz; Diniz, Vanessa Álvaro; Corte-Real, Suzana; Vasconcelos, Eveline Gomes

    2012-10-01

    Nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase) activity was recently characterized in Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis promastigotes (Lb), and an antigenic conserved domain (r82-121) from the specific NTPDase 1 isoform was identified. In this work, mouse polyclonal antibodies produced against two synthetic peptides derived from this domain (LbB1LJ, r82-103; LbB2LJ, r102-121) were used. The anti-LbB1LJ or anti-LbB2LJ antibodies were immobilized on protein A-sepharose and immunoprecipitated the NTPDase 1 of 48 kDa and depleted approximately 40% of the phosphohydrolytic activity from detergent-homogenized Lb preparation. Ultrastructural immunocytochemical microscopy identified the NTPDase 1 on the parasite surface and in its subcellular cytoplasmic vesicles, mitochondria, kinetoplast and nucleus. The ATPase and ADPase activities of detergent-homogenized Lb preparation were partially inhibited by anti-LbB1LJ antibody (43-79%), which was more effective than that inhibition (18-47%) by anti-LbB2LJ antibody. In addition, the immune serum anti-LbB1LJ (67%) or anti-LbB2LJ (33%) was cytotoxic, significantly reducing the promastigotes growth in vitro. The results appoint the conserved domain from the L. braziliensis NTPDase as an important target for inhibitor design and the potential application of these biomolecules in experimental protocols of disease control. PMID:22921497

  6. Directional control of WAVE2 membrane targeting by EB1 and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazuhide; Tanaka, Tacu; Suzuki, Katsuo

    2010-03-01

    Membrane targeting of WAVE2 along microtubules is mediated by a motor protein kinesin and requires Pak1, a downstream effector of Rac1. However, the mechanism by which WAVE2 targeting to the leading edge is directionally controlled remains largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that EB1, a microtubule plus-end-binding protein, constitutively associates with stathmin, a microtubule-destabilizing protein, in human breast cancer cells. Stimulation of the cells with insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) induced Pak1-dependent binding of the EB1-stathmin complex to microtubules that bear WAVE2 and colocalization of the complex with WAVE2 at the leading edge. Depletion of EB1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) abrogated the IGF-I-induced WAVE2 targeting and stathmin binding to microtubules. On the other hand, chemotaxis chamber assays indicated that the IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) was locally activated in the region facing toward IGF-I. In addition, IGF-I caused phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase)-dependent production of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3) near activated IGF-IR and WAVE2 colocalization with it. Collectively, WAVE2-membrane targeting is directionally controlled by binding of the EB1-stathmin complex to WAVE2-bearing microtubules and by the interaction between WAVE2 and PIP3 produced near IGF-IR that is locally activated by IGF-I. PMID:19925864

  7. Light emission in tunneling processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce a new method for mapping and analyzing (with atomic resolution) molecules adsorbed on surfaces. This method relies on the detection of fluorescence from molecules, electronically excited by inelastic tunneling in STM. It may combines the excellent spatial resolution of STM together with the specificity of fluorescence as an analytical tool. We propose to overcome this problem by choosing 'transparent conductors' (such as Indium Tin Oxides-lTO) as the STM substrate. ITO, characterized by a large optical gap, will not quench electronically excited molecules. We have tested our idea to enhance the quantum efficiency of molecular emission on surfaces by using transparent conductors in the tunneling junction. We have constructed large area tunnel-junctions by using the squeezable tunnel-Junction technique. The principle of this technique is to squeeze together smooth flat surfaces separated by a thin spacer. By applying a controlled force, junctions with surface area of thousands of square angstroms are made. We have recorded light emission from bare tunneling surfaces and from surfaces coated with molecules (DCA, DCM and COUMARINE), as a function of the bias voltage in the range of 0-5 volts. Typical tunneling currents are 50 nano ampere. Our main findings are: The bare ITO surface emits light at biasing voltages larger than 4.0 eV which corresponds to electron-hole excitation over the optical gap of ITO. ITO surfaces coated with chromophore molecules have shown enhanced light emission at a voltage bias which corresponds to the allowed excitations energies in the chromophore. A voltage bias of 2-5 V yielded light emission of 5 * 103 photon/μC. The corresponding metallic surfaces, bare or coated with a chromophore did not show any emission. In order to test the possibility of using this effect for imaging purposes we have replaced one electrode of junction with an ITO coated glass tip of 180 μm radius. such a tip yield an upper limit of tunneling area of

  8. Effects of oral adenosine-5′-triphosphate supplementation on athletic performance, skeletal muscle hypertrophy and recovery in resistance-trained men

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Jacob M.; Joy, Jordan M; Lowery, Ryan P; Roberts, Michael D; Lockwood, Christopher M; Manninen, Anssi H; Fuller, John C; De Souza, Eduardo O; Baier, Shawn M; Wilson, Stephanie MC; Rathmacher, John A

    2013-01-01

    Background Currently, there is a lack of studies examining the effects of adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP) supplementation utilizing a long-term, periodized resistance-training program (RT) in resistance-trained populations. Therefore, we investigated the effects of 12 weeks of 400 mg per day of oral ATP on muscular adaptations in trained individuals. We also sought to determine the effects of ATP on muscle protein breakdown, cortisol, and performance during an overreaching cycle. Methods The ...

  9. Application of Adenosine Triphosphate Affinity Probe and Scheduled Multiple-Reaction Monitoring Analysis for Profiling Global Kinome in Human Cells in Response to Arsenite Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Lei; Xiao, Yongsheng; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylation of cellular components catalyzed by kinases plays important roles in cell signaling and proliferation. Quantitative assessment of perturbation in global kinome may provide crucial knowledge for elucidating the mechanisms underlying the cytotoxic effects of environmental toxicants. Here, we utilized an adenosine triphosphate (ATP) affinity probe coupled with stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) to assess quantitatively the arsenite-induced alteration o...

  10. The enzymatic preparation of [α-32P]nucleoside triphosphates, cyclic [32P]AMP, and cyclic [32P]GMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method has been developed for the enzymatic preparation of α-32P-labelled ribo- and deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, cyclic [32P]AMP, and cyclic [32P]GMP of high specific radioactivity and in high yield from 32Psub(i). The method also enables the preparation of [γ-32P]ATP, [γ-32P]GTP, [γ-32P]ITP, and [γ-32P]-dATP of very high specific activity and in high yield. (Auth.)

  11. Adenosine 5 '-triphosphate (ATP) supplements are not orally bioavailable: a randomized, placebo-controlled cross-over trial in healthy humans

    OpenAIRE

    Arts Ilja CW; Coolen Erik JCM; Bours Martijn JL; Huyghebaert Nathalie; Stuart Martien A; Bast Aalt; Dagnelie Pieter C

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Nutritional supplements designed to increase adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) concentrations are commonly used by athletes as ergogenic aids. ATP is the primary source of energy for the cells, and supplementation may enhance the ability to maintain high ATP turnover during high-intensity exercise. Oral ATP supplements have beneficial effects in some but not all studies examining physical performance. One of the remaining questions is whether orally administered ATP is bioav...

  12. Bacterial Wound Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  13. Bacterial Meningitis in Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study of 80 infantile patients (ages 30-365 days; 47 male, 33 female with culture-proven bacterial meningitis seen over a 16 year period (1986-2001 is reported from Taiwan.

  14. Calibrating bacterial evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Ochman, Howard; Elwyn, Susannah; Moran, Nancy A

    1999-01-01

    Attempts to calibrate bacterial evolution have relied on the assumption that rates of molecular sequence divergence in bacteria are similar to those of higher eukaryotes, or to those of the few bacterial taxa for which ancestors can be reliably dated from ecological or geological evidence. Despite similarities in the substitution rates estimated for some lineages, comparisons of the relative rates of evolution at different classes of nucleotide sites indicate no basis for their universal appl...

  15. Photon Aided and Inhibited Tunneling of Photons

    CERN Document Server

    liu, xuele

    2013-01-01

    In the light of the interest in the transport of single photons in arrays of waveguides, fiber couplers, photonic crystals, etc., we consider the quantum mechanical process of the tunneling of photons through evanescently or otherwise coupled structures. We specifically examine the issue of tunneling between two structures when one structure already contains few photons. We demonstrate the possibility of both photon aided and inhibited tunneling of photons. The Bosonic nature of photons enhances the tunneling probability. We also show how the multiphoton tunneling probability can be either enhanced or inhibited due to the presence of photons. We find similar results for the higher order tunneling. Finally, we show that the presence of a squeezed field changes the nature of tunneling considerably.

  16. An Entropic Formulation of Tunneling Time

    CERN Document Server

    Demir, Durmus A

    2015-01-01

    Quantum tunneling governs numerous phenomena in biology, chemistry, physics and technology. Tunneling time, formulated in various different forms due to the absence of a time operator in quantum theory, has been measured recently in experiments based on the attoclock in ultrafast laser ionization of Helium atoms [A.~Landsman {\\it et al.}, Optica {\\bf 1}, 343 (2014)]. The experiment performs a refined measurement with which no tunneling time formula in the literature exhibits adequate congruence. Here we show that, entropic considerations lead to a real tunneling time which shows remarkable agreement with the experimental data and stays always subluminal. Indeed, with phase space volume setting the number of microstates for a single evanescing particle in a state of definite momentum consistent with energy conservation, one is naturally led to a statistical description for quantum tunneling in which thermal energy sets the tunneling time. This entropic tunneling time is rather general and might also be extende...

  17. Iterated splitting and the Tunnel Classification Conjecture

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Sangbum

    2011-01-01

    For a genus-1 1-bridge knot in the 3-sphere, that is, a (1,1)-knot, a middle tunnel is a tunnel that is not an upper or lower tunnel for some (1,1)-position. Most torus knots have a middle tunnel, and non-torus-knot examples were obtained by Goda, Hayashi, and Ishihara. In a previous paper, we generalized their construction and calculated the slope invariants for the resulting examples. We give an interated version of the construction that produces many more examples, and calculate their slope invariants. If one starts with the trivial knot, the iterated construction produces the 2-bridge knots, giving a new calculation of the slope invariants of their tunnels. Together with other information, the examples suggest a general classification conjecture for all tunnels of all tunnel number 1 knots.

  18. Heat Transfer in Underground Rail Tunnels

    CERN Document Server

    Sadokierski, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    The transfer of heat between the air and surrounding soil in underground tunnels ins investigated, as part of the analysis of environmental conditions in underground rail systems. Using standard turbulent modelling assumptions, flow profiles are obtained in both open tunnels and in the annulus between a tunnel wall and a moving train, from which the heat transfer coefficient between the air and tunnel wall is computed. The radial conduction of heat through the surrounding soil resulting from changes in the temperature of air in the tunnel are determined. An impulse change and an oscillating tunnel air temperature are considered separately. The correlations between fluctuations in heat transfer coefficient and air temperature are found to increase the mean soil temperature. Finally, a model for the coupled evolution of the air and surrounding soil temperature along a tunnel of finite length is given.

  19. Resonant tunnel magnetoresistance in a double magnetic tunnel junction

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur

    2011-08-09

    We present quasi-classical approach to calculate a spin-dependent current and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in double magnetic tunnel junctions (DMTJ) FML/I/FMW/I/FMR, where the magnetization of the middle ferromagnetic metal layer FMW can be aligned parallel or antiparallel with respect to the fixed magnetizations of the left FML and right FMR ferromagnetic electrodes. The transmission coefficients for components of the spin-dependent current, and TMR are calculated as a function of the applied voltage. As a result, we found a high resonant TMR. Thus, DMTJ can serve as highly effective magnetic nanosensor for biological applications, or as magnetic memory cells by switching the magnetization of the inner ferromagnetic layer FMW.© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011.

  20. In-Tunnel Blast Pressure Empirical Formulas for Detonations External, Internal and at the Tunnel Entrance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiudi; ZHENG Yingren

    2006-01-01

    In order to define the loading on protective doors of an underground tunnel,the exact knowledge of the blast propagation through tunnels is needed.Thirty-three scale high-explosive tests are conducted to obtain in-tunnel blast pressure for detonations external,internal and at the tunnel entrance.The cross section of the concrete model tunnel is 0.67 m2.Explosive charges of TNT,ranging in mass from 400 g to 4 600 g,are detonated at various positions along the central axis of the model tunnel.Blast gages are flush-installed in the interior surface of the tunnel to record side-on blast pressure as it propagates down the tunnel.The engineering empirical formulas for predicting blast peak pressure are evaluated,and are found to be reasonably accurate for in-tunnel pressure prediction.

  1. Fermion tunneling from dynamical horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Criscienzo, R.; Vanzo, L.

    2008-06-01

    The instability against emission of fermionic particles by the trapping horizon of an evolving black hole is analyzed and confirmed using the Hamilton-Jacobi tunneling method. This method automatically selects one special expression for the surface gravity of a changing horizon. The results also apply to point masses embedded in an expanding universe. As a bonus of the tunneling method, we gain the insight that the surface gravity still defines a temperature parameter as long as the evolution is sufficiently slow that the black-hole pass through a sequence of quasi-equilibrium states, and that black holes should be semi-classically unstable even in a hypothetical world without bosonic fields.

  2. Tunneling of a coupled system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider tunneling through a potential barrier V(x) in the presence of a coupling term W(x,y). Let H(y) be the internal Hamiltonian associated with the coordinate y and let E0(x) be the ground state energy of the operator H(x;y) = H(y) + W(x,y) in which x is a parameter. Our result for the tunneling probability (in the WKB approximation) is P = exp(2i ∫ k0(x)dx) where, at energy E, k0(x) = [E-E0(x)-V(x)]sup(1/2)/(h/2π) is the local wave number in the presence of coupling. (orig.)

  3. Wildlife Tunnel Enhances Population Viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael McCarthy

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Roads and traffic are pervasive components of landscapes throughout the world: they cause wildlife mortality, disrupt animal movements, and increase the risk of extinction. Expensive engineering solutions, such as overpasses and tunnels, are increasingly being adopted to mitigate these effects. Although some species readily use such structures, their success in preventing population extinction remains unknown. Here, we use population viability modeling to assess the effectiveness of tunnels for the endangered Mountain Pygmy-possum (Burramys parvus in Australia. The underpasses reduced, but did not completely remove, the negative effects of a road. The expected minimum population size of a “reconnected” population remained 15% lower than that of a comparable “undivided” population. We propose that the extent to which the risk of extinction decreases should be adopted as a measure of effectiveness of mitigation measures and that the use of population modeling become routine in these evaluations.

  4. Seismic scanning tunneling macroscope - Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.

    2012-09-01

    We propose a seismic scanning tunneling macroscope (SSTM) that can detect the presence of sub-wavelength scatterers in the near-field of either the source or the receivers. Analytic formulas for the time reverse mirror (TRM) profile associated with a single scatterer model show that the spatial resolution limit to be, unlike the Abbe limit of λ/2, independent of wavelength and linearly proportional to the source-scatterer separation as long as the point scatterer is in the near-field region; if the sub-wavelength scatterer is a spherical impedance discontinuity then the resolution will also be limited by the radius of the sphere. Therefore, superresolution imaging can be achieved as the scatterer approaches the source. This is analogous to an optical scanning tunneling microscope that has sub-wavelength resolution. Scaled to seismic frequencies, it is theoretically possible to extract 100 Hz information from 20 Hz data by imaging of near-field seismic energy.

  5. Single-contact tunneling thermometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-02-23

    A single-contact tunneling thermometry circuit includes a tunnel junction formed between two objects. Junction temperature gradient information is determined based on a mathematical relationship between a target alternating voltage applied across the junction and the junction temperature gradient. Total voltage measured across the junction indicates the magnitude of the target alternating voltage. A thermal gradient is induced across the junction. A reference thermovoltage is measured when zero alternating voltage is applied across the junction. An increasing alternating voltage is applied while measuring a thermovoltage component and a DC rectification voltage component created by the applied alternating voltage. The target alternating voltage is reached when the thermovoltage is nullified or doubled by the DC rectification voltage depending on the sign of the reference thermovoltage. Thermoelectric current and current measurements may be utilized in place of the thermovoltage and voltage measurements. The system may be automated with a feedback loop.

  6. Selected elevation in quantum tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Granot, E

    2001-01-01

    The tunneling through an opaque barrier with a strong oscillating component is investigated. It is shown, that in the strong perturbations regime (in contrast to the weak one), higher perturbations rate does not necessarily improve the activation. In fact, in this regime two rival factors play a role, and as a consequence, this tunneling system behaves like a sensitive frequency-shifter device: for most incident particles' energies activation occurs and the particles are energetically elevated, while for specific energies activation is depressed and the transmission is very low. This effect is unique to the strong perturbation regime, and it is totally absent in the weak perturbation case. Moreover, it cannot be deduced even in the adiabatic regime. It is conjectured that this mechanism can be used as a frequency-dependent transistor, in which the device's transmission is governed by the external field frequency.

  7. Tunneling decay of false kinks

    CERN Document Server

    Dupuis, Éric; MacKenzie, Richard; Marleau, Luc; Paranjape, M B; Ung, Y

    2015-01-01

    We consider the decay of "false kinks," that is, kinks formed in a scalar field theory with a pair of degenerate symmetry-breaking false vacua in 1+1 dimensions. The true vacuum is symmetric. A second scalar field and a peculiar potential are added in order for the kink to be classically stable. We find an expression for the decay rate of a false kink. As with any tunneling event, the rate is proportional to $\\exp(-S_E)$ where $S_E$ is the Euclidean action of the bounce describing the tunneling event. This factor varies wildly depending on the parameters of the model. Of interest is the fact that for certain parameters $S_E$ can get arbitrarily small, implying that the kink is only barely stable. Thus, while the false vacuum itself may be very long-lived, the presence of kinks can give rise to rapid vacuum decay.

  8. 31P MR spectroscopy of the liver showing dose dependent adenosine triphosphate decreases after radiation induced hepatic injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the relationship between ATP level changes detected by hepatic 31P MRS with the pathologic changes of liver in rabbits and to investigate the diagnostic value of ATP level changes in acute hepatic radiation injury. Methods: A total of 30 rabbits received different radiation doses (ranging from 5,10,20 Gy) to establish acute hepatic injury models. Blood hepatic function tests, 31P MRS and pathological examinations were carded out 24 h after irradiation. The degree of injury was evaluated according to hepatocyte pathology. Ten healthy rabbits served as controls. The MR examination was performed on a 1.5 T imager using a 1H-31P surface coil with 2D chemical shift imaging technique. The relative quantities of phosphomonoesters (PME), phosphodiesters (PDE), inorganic phosphate (Pi) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were measured. Analysis of variance was used to compare the results of 31P MRS and histopathology under various acute hepatic radiation injuries, and SNK was used further to conduct comparison between each other if there was significant difference. Results: The ATP relative quantification in control (n=10), mild (n=12), moderate (n=11), and severe (n=7) injury groups according to pathological grading were 1.83±0.33, 1.58±0.25, 1.32±0.07 and 1.02±0.18, with significant differences among them (F=22.878, P<0.01), and it decreased progressively with the increased degree of injury. The PDE index showed no significant trend for the evaluation of hepatic radiation injury. The area under the peak of β-ATP decreased with the increased severity of radiation injury. Conclusions: The relative quantification of hepatic ATP levels can reflect the pathological severity of acute hepatic radiation injury. The decreasing hepatic ATP levels may be used as biomarker of acute liver injury following radiation. (authors)

  9. Analysis of the Endogenous Deoxynucleoside Triphosphate Pool in HIV-Positive and -Negative Individuals Receiving Tenofovir-Emtricitabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinhui; Castillo-Mancilla, Jose R; Seifert, Sharon M; McAllister, Kevin B; Zheng, Jia-Hua; Bushman, Lane R; MaWhinney, Samantha; Anderson, Peter L

    2016-09-01

    Tenofovir (TFV) disoproxil fumarate (TDF) and emtricitabine (FTC), two nucleos(t)ide analogs (NA), are coformulated as an anti-HIV combination tablet for treatment and preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP). TDF/FTC may have effects on the deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pool due to their similar structures and similar metabolic pathways. We carried out a comprehensive clinical study to characterize the effects of TDF/FTC on the endogenous dNTP pool, from baseline to 30 days of TDF/FTC therapy, in both treatment-naive HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals. dATP, dCTP, dGTP, and TTP were quantified in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) with a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methodology. Forty individuals (19 HIV-positive) were enrolled and underwent a baseline visit and then received TDF/FTC for at least 30 days. Longitudinal measurements were analyzed using mixed-model segmented linear regression analysis. The dNTPs were reduced by 14% to 37% relative to the baseline level within 3 days in both HIV-negative and HIV-positive individuals (P ≤ 0.003). These reductions persisted to various degrees at day 30. These findings indicate that dNTP pools are influenced by TDF/FTC therapy. This may alter cellular homeostasis and could increase the antiviral effect through a more favorable analog/dNTP ratio. Further work is needed to elucidate mechanisms, to evaluate the clinical significance of these findings, and to further probe differences between HIV-negative and HIV-positive individuals. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under identifier NCT01040091.). PMID:27353267

  10. Magnetic nanoformulation of azidothymidine 5’-triphosphate for targeted delivery across the blood–brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainulabedin M Saiyed

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Zainulabedin M Saiyed, Nimisha H Gandhi, Madhavan PN Nair1Department of Immunology, College of Medicine, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USAAbstract: Despite significant advances in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, the prevalence of neuroAIDS remains high. This is mainly attributed to inability of antiretroviral therapy (ART to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB, thus resulting in insufficient drug concentration within the brain. Therefore, development of an active drug targeting system is an attractive strategy to increase the efficacy and delivery of ART to the brain. We report herein development of magnetic azidothymidine 5’-triphosphate (AZTTP liposomal nanoformulation and its ability to transmigrate across an in vitro BBB model by application of an external magnetic field. We hypothesize that this magnetically guided nanoformulation can transverse the BBB by direct transport or via monocyte-mediated transport. Magnetic AZTTP liposomes were prepared using a mixture of phosphatidyl choline and cholesterol. The average size of prepared liposomes was about 150 nm with maximum drug and magnetite loading efficiency of 54.5% and 45.3%, respectively. Further, magnetic AZTTP liposomes were checked for transmigration across an in vitro BBB model using direct or monocyte-mediated transport by application of an external magnetic field. The results show that apparent permeability of magnetic AZTTP liposomes was 3-fold higher than free AZTTP. Also, the magnetic AZTTP liposomes were efficiently taken up by monocytes and these magnetic monocytes showed enhanced transendothelial migration compared to normal/non-magnetic monocytes in presence of an external magnetic field. Thus, we anticipate that the developed magnetic nanoformulation can be used for targeting active nucleotide analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors to the brain by application of an external magnetic force and thereby eliminate the brain HIV reservoir and help

  11. Inhibition of DNA replication, DNA repair synthesis, and DNA polymerases α and δ by butylphenyl deoxyguanosine triphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semiconservative DNA replication in growing mammalian cells and ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA repair synthesis in nongrowing mammalian cells are mediated by one or both of the aphidicolin-sensitive DNA polymerases, α and/or δ. They have studied the inhibition of replication and repair synthesis in permeable human cells by N2 (p-n-butylphenyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine-5'-triphosphate (BuPh dGTP), an agent which inhibits polymerase α strongly and polymerase δ weakly. Both processes are inhibited by BuPh-dGTP in competition with dGTP. The K/sub i/'s are, for replication, 2-3 μM and, for repair synthesis, 3-4 μM, consistent with the involvement of the same DNA polymerase in both processes. Inhibition of isolated human polymerase α by BuPh-dGTP is also competitive with dGTP, but the K/sub i/ is approximately 10 nM, several hundred-fold lower than the K/sub i/'s of replication and repair synthesis. Isolated polymerase δ is inhibited by BuPh-dGTP at doses similar to those which inhibit replication and repair synthesis, however, attempts to determine the K/sub i/ of polymerase δ were hampered by the finding that the dependence of δ activity on deoxyribunucleotide concentration is parabolic at low doses. This behavior differs from the behavior of polymerase α and of cellular DNA replication and repair synthesis, all of which show a simple, hyperbolic relationship between activity and deoxyribonucleotide concentration. Thus, inhibition of DNA replication and UV induced DNA repair synthesis by BuPh dGTP is quantitatively similar to DNA polymerase δ, but some other characteristics of the cellular processes are more similar to those of polymerase α

  12. Molecular Basis for the Selective Inhibition of Respiratory Syncytial Virus RNA Polymerase by 2'-Fluoro-4'-Chloromethyl-Cytidine Triphosphate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome Deval

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV causes severe lower respiratory tract infections, yet no vaccines or effective therapeutics are available. ALS-8176 is a first-in-class nucleoside analog prodrug effective in RSV-infected adult volunteers, and currently under evaluation in hospitalized infants. Here, we report the mechanism of inhibition and selectivity of ALS-8176 and its parent ALS-8112. ALS-8176 inhibited RSV replication in non-human primates, while ALS-8112 inhibited all strains of RSV in vitro and was specific for paramyxoviruses and rhabdoviruses. The antiviral effect of ALS-8112 was mediated by the intracellular formation of its 5'-triphosphate metabolite (ALS-8112-TP inhibiting the viral RNA polymerase. ALS-8112 selected for resistance-associated mutations within the region of the L gene of RSV encoding the RNA polymerase. In biochemical assays, ALS-8112-TP was efficiently recognized by the recombinant RSV polymerase complex, causing chain termination of RNA synthesis. ALS-8112-TP did not inhibit polymerases from host or viruses unrelated to RSV such as hepatitis C virus (HCV, whereas structurally related molecules displayed dual RSV/HCV inhibition. The combination of molecular modeling and enzymatic analysis showed that both the 2'F and the 4'ClCH2 groups contributed to the selectivity of ALS-8112-TP. The lack of antiviral effect of ALS-8112-TP against HCV polymerase was caused by Asn291 that is well-conserved within positive-strand RNA viruses. This represents the first comparative study employing recombinant RSV and HCV polymerases to define the selectivity of clinically relevant nucleotide analogs. Understanding nucleotide selectivity towards distant viral RNA polymerases could not only be used to repurpose existing drugs against new viral infections, but also to design novel molecules.

  13. Comparison of myocardial blood flow induced by adenosine triphosphate and dipyridamole in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myocardial perfusion imaging with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has been used increasingly to diagnose coronary artery disease (CAD) and assess risk for this disease. This study compared absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve index (MFR) with ATP and dipyridamole (DIP) in patients with CAD. MBF was quantified by 15O-H2O PET in 21 patients with CAD (17 male, 4 female), aged 55 to 81 years. MBF was measured at rest, during intravenous injection of ATP (0.16 mg/kg/min), and again after DIP infusion (0.56 mg/kg). Regions of interest were drawn in nonischemic and ischemic segments based on findings from thallium-201 (201Tl) scintigraphy and coronary angiography (CAG). Absolute MBF values and indexes of MFR were calculated in nonischemic and ischemic segments. Intravenous injection of ATP and DIP significantly increased MBF in nonischemic (2.4±0.9 and 2.1±0.8 ml/g/min, respectively; p<0.01, for both) and in ischemic segments (1.3±0.4 and 1.5±0.4 ml/g/min, respectively; p<0.01, for both). There was a significant difference in MBF values between ATP and DIP in nonischemic segments (p<0.05), which was not observed in ischemic segments. In nonischemic segments, ATP produced higher MFR than DIP (2.1±0.8 and 1.8±0.7, respectively; p<0.05), while no significant difference was observed in ischemic segments (1.5±0.6 and 1.7±0.3, respectively). ATP produced a greater hyperemia than DIP between the ischemic and nonischemic myocardium in patients with CAD. ATP is as effective as DIP for the diagnosis of CAD. (author)

  14. Observing remnants by fermions' tunneling

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Deyou; Wu, Houwen; Yang, Haitang

    2013-01-01

    The standard Hawking formula predicts the complete evaporation of black holes. In this paper, we introduce effects of quantum gravity into fermions' tunneling from Reissner-Nordstrom and Kerr black holes. The quantum gravity effects slow down the increase of Hawking temperatures. This property naturally leads to a residue mass in black hole evaporation. The corrected temperatures are affected by the quantum numbers of emitted fermions. Meanwhile, the temperature of the Kerr black hole is a fu...

  15. Laser tunneling from aligned molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Smeenk, C T L; Sokolov, A V; Spanner, M; Lee, K F; Staudte, A; Villeneuve, D M; Corkum, P B

    2013-01-01

    We study multi-photon ionization from N_2, O_2 and benzene using circularly polarized light. By examining molecular frame photo-electron angular distributions, we illustrate how multi-photon ionization acts a momentum-selective probe of the local electron density in the Dyson orbitals for these molecules. We find good agreement with calculations based on a tunneling model and including saturation effects.

  16. Tunnel magnetoresistance of polymeric chains

    OpenAIRE

    Walczak, Kamil

    2004-01-01

    Coherent spin-dependent electronic transport is investigated in a molecular junction made of polymeric chain attached to ferromagnetic electrodes (Ni and Co, respectively). Molecular system is described by a simple Huckel model, while the coupling to the electrodes is treated through the use of a broad-band theory. The current flowing through the device is calculated within non-equilibrium Green's function approach. It is shown that tunnel magnetoresistance of molecular junction can be quite ...

  17. Dissipative Effect and Tunneling Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samyadeb Bhattacharya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The quantum Langevin equation has been studied for dissipative system using the approach of Ford et al. Here, we have considered the inverted harmonic oscillator potential and calculated the effect of dissipation on tunneling time, group delay, and the self-interference term. A critical value of the friction coefficient has been determined for which the self-interference term vanishes. This approach sheds new light on understanding the ion transport at nanoscale.

  18. Quantum tunneling and trace anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compute the corrections, using the tunneling formalism based on a quantum WKB approach, to the Hawking temperature and Bekenstein-Hawking entropy for the Schwarzschild black hole. The results are related to the trace anomaly and are shown to be equivalent to findings inferred from Hawking's original calculation based on path integrals using zeta function regularization. Finally, exploiting the corrected temperature and periodicity arguments we also find the modification to the original Schwarzschild metric which captures the effect of quantum corrections.

  19. Quantum Tunneling Beyond Semiclassical Approximation

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Rabin; Majhi, Bibhas Ranjan

    2008-01-01

    Hawking radiation as tunneling by Hamilton-Jacobi method beyond semiclassical approximation is analysed. We compute all quantum corrections in the single particle action revealing that these are proportional to the usual semiclassical contribution. We show that a simple choice of the proportionality constants reproduces the one loop back reaction effect in the spacetime, found by conformal field theory methods, which modifies the Hawking temperature of the black hole. Using the law of black h...

  20. Variable Density Turbulence Tunnel Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bewley, Gregory P; Sinhuber, Michael; Xu, Haitao; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2014-01-01

    The Variable Density Turbulence Tunnel (VDTT) at the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization in G\\"ottingen, Germany produces very high turbulence levels at moderate flow velocities, low power consumption and adjustable kinematic viscosity. To reach the highest Reynolds number, the tunnel can be filled and pressurized up to 15 bar with the dense gas sulfur hexafluoride (SF$_6$). The Reynolds number can be varied by changing the pressure or flow rate of the gas or by using different non-flammable gases including air. Turbulence is generated at the upstream ends of two measurement sections with grids, and the evolution of this turbulence is observed as it moves down the length of the sections. We describe the instrumentation presently in operation, which consists of the tunnel itself, classical grid turbulence generators, and state-of-the-art nano-fabricated hot-wire anemometers provided by Princeton University [Vallikivi et al. (2011) Exp. Fluids 51, 1521]. We report measurements of the charact...

  1. Tunneling beyond the Fermilab site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An accelerator that crosses the Fermilab site boundary must have a minimum effect on the surrounding environment and the people residing in the area. Unobstructed public access should be allowed above the ring except in relatively few areas such as the injection, dump, and experimental regions. The accelerator should be a benign and unobtrusive neighbor not only when it is completed but also in the construction period. For these reasons underground tunneling for all or most of the ring seems attractive. In this note we look into some questions raised by tunneling beyond the Fermilab site. Most of our discussion is of general applicability. However, we will use as examples two specific ring configurations. The examples have not been optimized from the point of view of physics output or accelerator technology but are just specific examples which allow us to study questions of tunneling. One is a ring of 5 km radius (5 TeV) tangent to the Tevatron and entirely east of the Fox River and fed by a beam from the Tevatron which crosses under the river. We assume that each of these machines will have 100 beam fills per year and we scale the maximum intensities with the accelerator radii. Thus we assume that there will be 1.0 E14 protons in each beam of the 20 TeV machine and 2.5 E13 for the 5 TeV machine

  2. Confocal Annular Josephson Tunnel Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The physics of Josephson tunnel junctions drastically depends on their geometrical configurations and here we show that also tiny geometrical details play a determinant role. More specifically, we develop the theory of short and long annular Josephson tunnel junctions delimited by two confocal ellipses. The behavior of a circular annular Josephson tunnel junction is then seen to be simply a special case of the above result. For junctions having a normalized perimeter less than one, the threshold curves in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field of arbitrary orientations are derived and computed even in the case with trapped Josephson vortices. For longer junctions, a numerical analysis is carried out after the derivation of the appropriate motion equation for the Josephson phase. We found that the system is modeled by a modified and perturbed sine-Gordon equation with a space-dependent effective Josephson penetration length inversely proportional to the local junction width. Both the fluxon statics and dynamics are deeply affected by the non-uniform annulus width. Static zero-field multiple-fluxon solutions exist even in the presence of a large bias current. The tangential velocity of a traveling fluxon is not determined by the balance between the driving and drag forces due to the dissipative losses. Furthermore, the fluxon motion is characterized by a strong radial inward acceleration which causes electromagnetic radiation concentrated at the ellipse equatorial points.

  3. Confocal Annular Josephson Tunnel Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    The physics of Josephson tunnel junctions drastically depends on their geometrical configurations and here we show that also tiny geometrical details play a determinant role. More specifically, we develop the theory of short and long annular Josephson tunnel junctions delimited by two confocal ellipses. The behavior of a circular annular Josephson tunnel junction is then seen to be simply a special case of the above result. For junctions having a normalized perimeter less than one, the threshold curves in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field of arbitrary orientations are derived and computed even in the case with trapped Josephson vortices. For longer junctions, a numerical analysis is carried out after the derivation of the appropriate motion equation for the Josephson phase. We found that the system is modeled by a modified and perturbed sine-Gordon equation with a space-dependent effective Josephson penetration length inversely proportional to the local junction width. Both the fluxon statics and dynamics are deeply affected by the non-uniform annulus width. Static zero-field multiple-fluxon solutions exist even in the presence of a large bias current. The tangential velocity of a traveling fluxon is not determined by the balance between the driving and drag forces due to the dissipative losses. Furthermore, the fluxon motion is characterized by a strong radial inward acceleration which causes electromagnetic radiation concentrated at the ellipse equatorial points.

  4. Autonomous Robotic Inspection in Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protopapadakis, E.; Stentoumis, C.; Doulamis, N.; Doulamis, A.; Loupos, K.; Makantasis, K.; Kopsiaftis, G.; Amditis, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an automatic robotic inspector for tunnel assessment is presented. The proposed platform is able to autonomously navigate within the civil infrastructures, grab stereo images and process/analyse them, in order to identify defect types. At first, there is the crack detection via deep learning approaches. Then, a detailed 3D model of the cracked area is created, utilizing photogrammetric methods. Finally, a laser profiling of the tunnel's lining, for a narrow region close to detected crack is performed; allowing for the deduction of potential deformations. The robotic platform consists of an autonomous mobile vehicle; a crane arm, guided by the computer vision-based crack detector, carrying ultrasound sensors, the stereo cameras and the laser scanner. Visual inspection is based on convolutional neural networks, which support the creation of high-level discriminative features for complex non-linear pattern classification. Then, real-time 3D information is accurately calculated and the crack position and orientation is passed to the robotic platform. The entire system has been evaluated in railway and road tunnels, i.e. in Egnatia Highway and London underground infrastructure.

  5. Tunneling decay of false vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Bum-Hoon; MacKenzie, Richard; Paranjape, M B; Yajnik, U A; Yeom, Dong-han

    2013-01-01

    We consider the decay of vortices trapped in the false vacuum of a theory of scalar electrodynamics in 2+1 dimensions. The potential is inspired by models with intermediate symmetry breaking to a metastable vacuum that completely breaks a U(1) symmetry, while in the true vacuum the symmetry is unbroken. The false vacuum is unstable through the formation of true vacuum bubbles; however, the rate of decay can be extremely long. On the other hand, the false vacuum can contain metastable vortex solutions. These vortices contain the true vacuum inside in addition to a unit of magnetic flux and the appropriate topologically nontrivial false vacuum outside. We numerically establish the existence of vortex solutions which are classically stable; however, they can decay via tunneling. In general terms, they tunnel to a configuration which is a large, thin-walled vortex configuration that is now classically unstable to the expansion of its radius. We compute an estimate for the tunneling amplitude in the semi-classical...

  6. Bacterial meningitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To demonstrate the epidemiology, clinical manifestations and bacteriological profile of bacterial meningitis in children beyond the neonatal period in our hospital. This was a retrospective descriptive study conducted at Prince Rashid Hospital in Irbid, Jordan. The medical records of 50 children with the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis during 4 years period, were reviewed. The main cause of infection was streptococcus pneumoniae, followed by Haemophilus influenza and Niesseria meningitides. Mortality was higher in infants and meningococcal infection, while complications were more encountered in cases of streptococcus pneumoniae. Cerebrospinal fluid culture was positive in 11 cases and Latex agglutination test in 39. There is a significant reduction of the numbers of bacterial meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenza type B species. (author)

  7. Tunnel widening in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clatworthy, M G; Annear, P; Bulow, J U;

    1999-01-01

    We report a prospective series evaluating the incidence and degree of tunnel widening in a well-matched series of patients receiving a hamstring or patella tendon graft for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency. We correlated tunnel widening with clinical factors, knee scores, KT-1000 and...... similar endoscopic procedure and accelerated postoperative rehabilitation. Tunnel widening was determined using standardized anteroposterior (AP) and lateral X-rays adjusted for magnification. A limited series of MRIs was performed to validate these measurements. There was a significant difference in the...... degree of tunnel widening between the two groups. The mean increase in femoral tunnel area in the hamstring group was 100.4% compared with a decrease of 25% in the patella tendon group (P = <0.0001). In the tibial tunnel the mean increase in the hamstring group was 73.9% compared with a decrease of 2...

  8. Micromachined Tunneling Displacement Transducers for Physical Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, T. W.; Kaiser, W. J.; Podosek, J. A.; Rockstad, H. K.; Reynolds, J. K.; Vote, E. C.

    1993-01-01

    We have designed and constructed a series of tunneling sensors which take advantage of the extreme position sensitivity of electron tunneling. In these sensors, a tunneling displacement transducer, based on scanning tunneling microscopy principles, is used to detect the signal-induced motion of a sensor element. Through the use of high-resonant frequency mechanical elements for the transducer, sensors may be constructed which offer wide bandwidth, and are robust and easily operated. Silicon micromachining may be used to fabricate the transducer elements, allowing integration of sensor and control electronics. Examples of tunneling accelerometers and infrared detectors will be discussed. In each case, the use of the tunneling transducer allows miniaturization of the sensor as well as enhancement of the sensor performance.

  9. Tunnel design considering stress release effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van-hung DAO

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In tunnel design, the determination of installation time and the stiffness of supporting structures is very important to the tunnel stability. This study used the convergence-confinement method to determine the stress and displacement of the tunnel while considering the counter-pressure curve of the ground base, the stress release effect, and the interaction between the tunnel lining and the rock surrounding the tunnel chamber. The results allowed for the determination of the installation time, distribution and strength of supporting structures. This method was applied to the intake tunnel in the Ban Ve Hydroelectric Power Plant, in Nghe An Province, Vietnam. The results show that when a suitable displacement u0¬ ranging from 0.086 5 m to 0.091 9 m occurrs, we can install supporting structures that satisfy the stability and economical requirements.

  10. Investigation into scanning tunnelling luminescence microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Manson-Smith, S K

    2001-01-01

    This work reports on the development of a scanning tunnelling luminescence (STL) microscope and its application to the study of Ill-nitride semiconductor materials used in the production of light emitting devices. STL microscopy is a technique which uses the high resolution topographic imaging capabilities of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) to generate high resolution luminescence images. The STM tunnelling current acts as a highly localised source of electrons (or holes) which generates luminescence in certain materials. Light generated at the STM tunnelling junction is collected concurrently with the height variation of the tunnelling probe as it is scanned across a sample surface, producing simultaneous topographic and luminescence images. Due to the very localised excitation source, high resolution luminescence images can be obtained. Spectroscopic resolution can be obtained by using filters. Additionally, the variation of luminescence intensity with tunnel current and with bias voltage can provi...

  11. Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Slobodanka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis is a common, complex clinical syndrome characterized by alterations in the normal vaginal flora. When symptomatic, it is associated with a malodorous vaginal discharge and on occasion vaginal burning or itching. Under normal conditions, lactobacilli constitute 95% of the bacteria in the vagina. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with severe reduction or absence of the normal H2O2­producing lactobacilli and overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria and Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Mycoplasma hominis and Mobiluncus species. Most types of infectious disease are diagnosed by culture, by isolating an antigen or RNA/DNA from the microbe, or by serodiagnosis to determine the presence of antibodies to the microbe. Therefore, demonstration of the presence of an infectious agent is often a necessary criterion for the diagnosis of the disease. This is not the case for bacterial vaginosis, since the ultimate cause of the disease is not yet known. There are a variety of methods for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis but no method can at present be regarded as the best. Diagnosing bacterial vaginosis has long been based on the clinical criteria of Amsel, whereby three of four defined criteria must be satisfied. Nugent’s scoring system has been further developed and includes validation of the categories of observable bacteria structures. Up­to­date molecular tests are introduced, and better understanding of vaginal microbiome, a clear definition for bacterial vaginosis, and short­term and long­term fluctuations in vaginal microflora will help to better define molecular tests within the broader clinical context.

  12. Interfering with bacterial gossip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael

    2011-01-01

    defense. Antibiotics exhibit a rather limited effect on biofilms. Furthermore, antibiotics have an ‘inherent obsolescence’ because they select for development of resistance. Bacterial infections with origin in bacterial biofilms have become a serious threat in developed countries. Pseudomonas aeruginosa......, resistance and QS inhibition as future antimicrobial targets, in particular those that would work to minimize selection pressures for the development of resistant bacteria.......Biofilm resilience poses major challenges to the development of novel antimicrobial agents. Biofilm bacteria can be considered small groups of “Special Forces” capable of infiltrating the host and destroying important components of the cellular defense system with the aim of crippling the host...

  13. Emissions of noxious supstances in road tunnel

    OpenAIRE

    Kenda, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    Construction of tunnels, galleries, bridging objects and other underground engineers constructions is the most exacting work at low buildings. Tunnel seems to be very simple building but there must be interdisciplinary interweaving of entire civil engineering knowledge of geology, mining, architectures, ecology and of other in all phases of planning, building and maintenance of underground constructions. Tunnel is only one of the objects on a road. Careful planning of traffic only throu...

  14. Quantum tunneling and field electron emission theories

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Shi-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Quantum tunneling is an essential issue in quantum physics. Especially, the rapid development of nanotechnology in recent years promises a lot of applications in condensed matter physics, surface science and nanodevices, which are growing interests in fundamental issues, computational techniques and potential applications of quantum tunneling. The book involves two relevant topics. One is quantum tunneling theory in condensed matter physics, including the basic concepts and methods, especially for recent developments in mesoscopic physics and computational formulation. The second part is the f

  15. Carpal tunnel syndrome caused by cysticercosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma S; Sharma Nalini; Yeolekar M

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) due to compression of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel, caused by cysticercosis. Nerve conduction studies revealed severe CTS. Magnetic resonance imaging suggested an inflammatory mass compressing the median nerve in carpal tunnel. The histological diagnosis was consistent with cysticercosis. The case resolved with conservative treatment. Such solitary presentation of entrapment median neuropathy as CTS caused by cysticercosis is extr...

  16. Radio-frequency scanning tunnelling microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Kemiktarak, U.; Ndukum, T.; Schwab, K. C.; Ekinci, K. L.

    2007-01-01

    The scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) relies on localized electron tunnelling between a sharp probe tip and a conducting sample to attain atomic-scale spatial resolution. In the 25-year period since its invention, the STM has helped uncover a wealth of phenomena in diverse physical systems -— ranging from semiconductors to superconductors to atomic and molecular nanosystems. A severe limitation in scanning tunnelling microscopy is the low temporal resolution, originating from the diminishe...

  17. Tunnel magnetoresistance and interfacial electronic state

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue, J; Itoh, H.

    2002-01-01

    We study the relation between tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) and interfacial electronic states modified by magnetic impurities introduced at the interface of the ferromagnetic tunnel junctions, by making use of the periodic Anderson model and the linear response theory. It is indicated that the TMR ratio is strongly reduced depending on the position of the $d$-levels of impurities, based on reduction in the spin-dependent $s$-electron tunneling in the majority spin state. The results are comp...

  18. Tunnel Probabilistic Structural Analysis Using the FORM

    OpenAIRE

    Yousef Mirzaeian; Kourosh Shahriar; Mostafa Sharifzadeh

    2015-01-01

    In this paper tunnel probabilistic structural analysis (TuPSA) was performed using the first order reliability method (FORM). In TuPSA, a tunnel performance function is defined according to the boundary between the structural stability and instability. Then the performance function is transformed from original space into the standard normal variable space to obtain the design point, reliability index, and also the probability of tunnel failure. In this method, it is possible to consider the d...

  19. Unconventional scanning tunneling conductance spectra for graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Saha, K.; Paul, I.; Sengupta, K.

    2009-01-01

    We compute the tunneling conductance of graphene as measured by a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) with a normal/superconducting tip. We demonstrate that for undoped graphene with zero Fermi energy, the first derivative of the tunneling conductance with respect to the applied voltage is proportional to the density of states of the STM tip. We also show that the shape of the STM spectra for graphene doped with impurities depends qualitatively on the position of the impurity atom in the grap...

  20. Theory of tunneling transport in periodic chains

    OpenAIRE

    Prodan, Emil; Car, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    We present an extended discussion of a recently proposed theoretical approach for off-resonance tunneling transport. The proofs and the arguments are explained at length and simple analogies and illustrations are used where possible. The result is an analytic formula for the asymptotic tunneling conductance which involves the overlap of three well defined physical quantities. We argue that the formula can be used to gain fresh insight into the tunneling transport characteristics of various sy...

  1. Time Correlation in Tunneling of Photons

    OpenAIRE

    Hrasko, Peter

    2000-01-01

    I propose to consider photon tunneling as a space-time correlation phenomenon between the emission and absorption of a photon on the two sides of a barrier. Standard technics based on an appropriate counting rate formula may then be applied to derive the tunneling time distribution without any {\\em ad hoc} definition of this quantity. General formulae are worked out for a potential model using Wigner-Weisskopf method. For a homogeneous square barrier in the limit of zero tunneling probability...

  2. Air pollution measurements in traffic tunnels.

    OpenAIRE

    De Fré, R; Bruynseraede, P; Kretzschmar, J G

    1994-01-01

    Air pollution measurements during April 1991 are reported from the Craeybeckx highway tunnel in Antwerp, Belgium. The tunnel was used daily by an average of 45,000 vehicles, of which 60% were gasoline fueled passenger cars, 20% diesel cars, and 20% trucks. Of the gasoline cars, only 3% had three-way catalysts. Tunnel air concentrations of nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, nonmethane hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, an...

  3. Resonant Tunneling in the Quantum Hydrodynamic Model

    OpenAIRE

    Carl L. Gardner

    1995-01-01

    The phenomenon of resonant tunneling is simulated and analyzed in the quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model for semiconductor devices. Simulations of a parabolic well resonant tunneling diode at 77 K are presented which show multiple regions of negative differential resistance (NDR) in the current-voltage curve. These are the first simulations of the QHD equations to show multiple regions of NDR.Resonant tunneling (and NDR) depend on the quantum interference of electron wavefunctions and therefore...

  4. Climatic wind tunnel for wind engineering tasks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuznetsov, Sergeii; Pospíšil, Stanislav; Král, Radomil

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 112, 2-B (2015), s. 303-316. ISSN 1897-628X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12892S Keywords : climatic tunnel * wind tunnel * atmospheric boundary layer * flow resistance * wind tunnel contraction Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering https://suw.biblos.pk.edu.pl/resources/i5/i6/i6/i7/i6/r56676/KuznetsovS_ClimaticWind.pdf

  5. Wind-Tunnel/Flight Correlation, 1981

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckinney, L. W. (Editor); Baals, D. D. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Wind-tunnel/flight correlation activities are reviewed to assure maximum effectiveness of the early experimental programs of the National Transonic Facility (NTF). Topics included a status report of the NTF, the role of tunnel-to-tunnel correlation, a review of past flight correlation research and the resulting data base, the correlation potential of future flight vehicles, and an assessment of the role of computational fluid dynamics.

  6. Joberget tunnel - Analysis of stability and support design for tunneling in soil

    OpenAIRE

    Langåker, Margrete Oie

    2014-01-01

    The Norwegian Public Roads Administration (NPRA) is planning a construction of a new road tunnel, Joberget tunnel in the Granvin Municipality of western Norway. Approximately 80 m from the southwestern entrance of the tunnel will be excavated, partly in soil and partly in rock. Soil tunneling will be performed in this section instead of excavation of large open cuts, to avoid difficult work conditions, landslide hazards and severe landscape interventions. Sweco Norge AS in cooperation with th...

  7. Femtosecond tunneling response of surface plasmon polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, Ulrich Dieter Felix; Ha, Taekjip; Jensen, Jacob Riis;

    1998-01-01

    We obtain femtosecond (200 fs) time resolution using a scanning tunneling microscope on surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) generated by two 100 fs laser beams in total internal reflection geometry. The tunneling gap dependence of the signal clearly indicates the tunneling origin of the signal and...... suggests that nanometer spatial resolution can be obtained together with femtosecond temporal resolution. This fast response, in contrast to the picosecond decay time of SPPs revealed by differential reflectivity measurements, can be attributed to a coherent superposition of SPPs rectified at the tunneling...

  8. Palladium electrodes for molecular tunnel junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shuai; Sen, Suman; Zhang, Peiming; Gyarfas, Brett; Ashcroft, Brian; Lefkowitz, Steven; Peng, Hongbo; Lindsay, Stuart

    2012-10-26

    Gold has been the metal of choice for research on molecular tunneling junctions, but it is incompatible with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor fabrication because it forms deep level traps in silicon. Palladium electrodes do not contaminate silicon, and also give higher tunnel current signals in the molecular tunnel junctions that we have studied. The result is cleaner signals in a recognition-tunneling junction that recognizes the four natural DNA bases as well as 5-methyl cytosine, with no spurious background signals. More than 75% of all the recorded signal peaks indicate the base correctly. PMID:23037952

  9. Palladium electrodes for molecular tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold has been the metal of choice for research on molecular tunneling junctions, but it is incompatible with complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor fabrication because it forms deep level traps in silicon. Palladium electrodes do not contaminate silicon, and also give higher tunnel current signals in the molecular tunnel junctions that we have studied. The result is cleaner signals in a recognition-tunneling junction that recognizes the four natural DNA bases as well as 5-methyl cytosine, with no spurious background signals. More than 75% of all the recorded signal peaks indicate the base correctly. (paper)

  10. Tunneling Ionization Time Resolved by Backpropagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Hongcheng; Saalmann, Ulf; Rost, Jan-Michael

    2016-07-01

    We determine the ionization time in tunneling ionization by an elliptically polarized light pulse relative to its maximum. This is achieved by a full quantum propagation of the electron wave function forward in time, followed by a classical backpropagation to identify tunneling parameters, in particular, the fraction of electrons that has tunneled out. We find that the ionization time is close to zero for single active electrons in helium and in hydrogen if the fraction of tunneled electrons is large. We expect our analysis to be essential to quantify ionization times for correlated electron motion.

  11. Tunneling with dissipation in open quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the general form of the master equation for open quantum systems the tunneling is considered. Using the path integral technique a simple closed form expression for the tunneling rate through a parabolic barrier is obtained. The tunneling in the open quantum systems strongly depends on the coupling with environment. We found the cases when the dissipation prohibits tunneling through the barrier but decreases the crossing of the barrier for the energies above the barrier. As a particular application, the case of decay from the metastable state is considered

  12. Construction begins on LHC transfer tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    Engineers begin work on one of the transfer tunnels that will provide pre-accelerated proton beams from the SPS to the LHC, CERN's new particle accelerator. While this work is being done, beams are still being accelerated in the current LEP accelerator to study as much of the outer reaches of physics as it can before closure in 2000 to make way for the LHC. Because of this, the tunnel is being built from an access shaft towards the smaller SPS pre-accelerator before the tunnel is extended to the large soon-to-be LHC tunnel.

  13. Electronic tunneling currents at optical frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, S. M.; Fan, B.; Gustafson, T. K.

    1975-01-01

    Rectification characteristics of nonsuperconducting metal-barrier-metal junctions as deduced from electronic tunneling theory have been observed experimentally for optical frequency irradiation of the junction.

  14. Tunneling into high-Tc superconductors: methods of fabricating tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the preprint we shell review some experimental results on electron tunneling into high-Tc superconductors. Pros and cons of various methods of fabricating the tunnel junctions with metal oxide compound as a base electrode are discussed. The data obtained by different groups are examined in terms of the tunneling criterion. 66 refs.; 13 figs

  15. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Donald L.; Ramachandra, Muralidhara

    1993-01-01

    A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

  16. Bacterial Skin Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or scraped, the injury should be washed with soap and water and covered with a sterile bandage. Petrolatum may be applied to open areas to keep the tissue moist and to try to prevent bacterial invasion. Doctors recommend that people do not use ...

  17. Bacterial microflora of nectarines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microflora of fruit surfaces has been the best source of antagonists against fungi causing postharvest decays of fruit. However, there is little information on microflora colonizing surfaces of fruits other than grapes, apples, and citrus fruit. We characterized bacterial microflora on nectarine f...

  18. More about tunnelling times and superluminal tunnelling (Hartmann effect)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aims of the present paper are: i) presenting and analysing the results of various numerical calculations on the penetration and return times Pen>, Ret>, during tunnelling inside a rectangular potential barrier, for various penetration depths xf; ii) putting forth and discussing suitable definitions, besides of the mean values, also of the variances (or dispersions) DτT and DτR for the time durations of transmission and reflection processes; iii)mentioning, moreover, that our definition T> for the average transmission time results to constitute an improvement of the ordinary dwell- time formula; iv) commenting, at last, on the basis of the new numerical results, upon some recent criticism by C.R. Leavens. The paper stresses that numerical evaluations confirm that the approach implied, and implies, the existence of the Hartmann effect: an effect that in these days (due to the theoretical connections between tunnelling and evanescent-wave propagation) is receiving - at Cologne, Berkeley, Florence and Vienna - indirect, but quite interesting, experimental verification

  19. Giant electrode effect on tunnelling electroresistance in ferroelectric tunnel junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Rohit; Petraru, Adrian; Meuffels, Paul; Vavra, Ondrej; Ziegler, Martin; Kim, Seong Keun; Jeong, Doo Seok; Pertsev, Nikolay A; Kohlstedt, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Among recently discovered ferroelectricity-related phenomena, the tunnelling electroresistance (TER) effect in ferroelectric tunnel junctions (FTJs) has been attracting rapidly increasing attention owing to the emerging possibilities of non-volatile memory, logic and neuromorphic computing applications of these quantum nanostructures. Despite recent advances in experimental and theoretical studies of FTJs, many questions concerning their electrical behaviour still remain open. In particular, the role of ferroelectric/electrode interfaces and the separation of the ferroelectric-driven TER effect from electrochemical ('redox'-based) resistance-switching effects have to be clarified. Here we report the results of a comprehensive study of epitaxial junctions comprising BaTiO(3) barrier, La(0.7)Sr(0.3)MnO(3) bottom electrode and Au or Cu top electrodes. Our results demonstrate a giant electrode effect on the TER of these asymmetric FTJs. The revealed phenomena are attributed to the microscopic interfacial effect of ferroelectric origin, which is supported by the observation of redox-based resistance switching at much higher voltages. PMID:25399545

  20. Electron transfer pathway analysis in bacterial photosynthetic reaction center

    CERN Document Server

    Kitoh-Nishioka, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    A new computational scheme to analyze electron transfer (ET) pathways in large biomolecules is presented with applications to ETs in bacterial photosynthetic reaction center. It consists of a linear combination of fragment molecular orbitals and an electron tunneling current analysis, which enables an efficient first-principles analysis of ET pathways in large biomolecules. The scheme has been applied to the ET from menaquinone to ubiquinone via nonheme iron complex in bacterial photosynthetic reaction center. It has revealed that not only the central Fe$^{2+}$ ion but also particular histidine ligands are involved in the ET pathways in such a way to mitigate perturbations that can be caused by metal ion substitution and depletion, which elucidates the experimentally observed insensitivity of the ET rate to these perturbations.

  1. Sequencing, functional expression and characterization of rat NTPDase6, a nucleoside diphosphatase and novel member of the ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, N; Fengler, S; Ebeling, C; Servos, J; Zimmermann, H

    2000-11-01

    We have isolated and characterized the cDNA encoding nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 6 (NTPDase6), a novel member of the ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase family. The rat-brain-derived cDNA has an open reading frame of 1365 bp encoding a protein of 455 amino acid residues, a calculated molecular mass of 49971 Da and a predicted N-terminal hydrophobic sequence. It shares 86% sequence identity with the human CD39L2 sequence and 48% and 51% identity respectively with sequences of the two related human and murine nucleoside diphosphatases (CD39L4, NTPDase5/ER-UDPase). The mRNA was expressed in all tissues investigated, revealing two major transcripts with differing abundances. PCR analysis suggests a single open reading frame. A Myc-His-tagged NTPDase6 was expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and PC12 cells for immunological analysis and protein isolation. The protein was contained in membrane fractions of transfected CHO cells and occurred in a soluble form in the cell culture supernatants. NTPDase6 preferentially hydrolysed nucleoside 5'-diphosphates. With different substrates the order of activity was GDP>IDP>UDP,CDP>ADP. Nucleoside 5'-triphosphates were hydrolysed only to a minor extent and no hydrolysis of nucleoside 5'-monophosphates was observed. The enzyme was strongly and equally activated by Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) and had a K(m) for GDP of 211 microM. The immunohistochemical analysis of transfected CHO and PC12 cells suggests that NTPDase6 is associated with the Golgi apparatus and to a small extent also with the plasma membrane. The enzyme might support glycosylation reactions in the Golgi apparatus and, when released from cells, might catalyse the hydrolysis of extracellular nucleotides. PMID:11042118

  2. Quantum tunnelling in condensed media

    CERN Document Server

    Kagan, Yu

    1992-01-01

    The essays in this book deal with of the problem of quantum tunnelling and related behavior of a microscopic or macroscopic system, which interacts strongly with an ""environment"" - this being some form of condensed matter. The ""system"" in question need not be physically distinct from its environment, but could, for example, be one particular degree of freedom on which attention is focussed, as in the case of the Josephson junction studied in several of the papers. This general problem has been studied in many hundreds, if not thousands, of articles in the literature, in contexts as diverse

  3. Quantum Tunneling Beyond Semiclassical Approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Rabin

    2008-01-01

    Hawking radiation as tunneling by Hamilton-Jacobi method beyond semiclassical approximation is analysed. We compute all quantum corrections in the single particle action revealing that these are proportional to the usual semiclassical contribution. We show that a simple choice of the proportionality constants reproduces the one loop back reaction effect in the spacetime, found by conformal field theory methods, which modifies the Hawking temperature of the black hole. Using the law of black hole mechanics we give the corrections to the Bekenstein-Hawking area law following from the modified Hawking temperature. Some examples are explicitly worked out.

  4. Quantum tunneling beyond semiclassical approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rabin; Ranjan Majhi, Bibhas

    2008-06-01

    Hawking radiation as tunneling by Hamilton-Jacobi method beyond semiclassical approximation is analysed. We compute all quantum corrections in the single particle action revealing that these are proportional to the usual semiclassical contribution. We show that a simple choice of the proportionality constants reproduces the one loop back reaction effect in the spacetime, found by conformal field theory methods, which modifies the Hawking temperature of the black hole. Using the law of black hole mechanics we give the corrections to the Bekenstein-Hawking area law following from the modified Hawking temperature. Some examples are explicitly worked out.

  5. Fermion Tunneling Beyond Semiclassical Approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Majhi, Bibhas Ranjan

    2008-01-01

    Applying the Hamilton-Jacobi method beyond the semiclassical approximation prescribed in \\cite{Majhi3} for the scalar particle, Hawking radiation as tunneling of Dirac particle through an event horizon is analysed. We show that, as before, all quantum corrections in the single particle action are proportional to the usual semiclassical contribution. We also compute the modifications to the Hawking temperature and Bekenstein-Hawking entropy for the Schwarzschild black hole. Finally, the coefficient of the logarithmic correction to entropy is shown to be related with the trace anomaly.

  6. Fermion tunneling beyond semiclassical approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majhi, Bibhas Ranjan

    2009-02-01

    Applying the Hamilton-Jacobi method beyond the semiclassical approximation prescribed in R. Banerjee and B. R. Majhi, J. High Energy Phys.JHEPFG1029-8479 06 (2008) 09510.1088/1126-6708/2008/06/095 for the scalar particle, Hawking radiation as tunneling of the Dirac particle through an event horizon is analyzed. We show that, as before, all quantum corrections in the single particle action are proportional to the usual semiclassical contribution. We also compute the modifications to the Hawking temperature and Bekenstein-Hawking entropy for the Schwarzschild black hole. Finally, the coefficient of the logarithmic correction to entropy is shown to be related with the trace anomaly.

  7. Tunneling without barriers with gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Kanno, Sugumi; Sasaki, Misao; Soda, Jiro

    2012-01-01

    We consider the vacuum decay of the flat Minkowski space to an anti-de Sitter space. We find a one-parameter family of potentials that allow exact, analytical instanton solutions describing tunneling without barriers in the presence of gravity. In the absence of gravity such instantons were found and discussed by Lee and Weinberg more than a quarter of a century ago. The bounce action is also analytically computed. We discuss possible implications of these new instantons to cosmology in the c...

  8. Chemically driven electron tunnelling pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Goychuk, I

    2006-01-01

    The simplest mechanism for molecular electron pumps is discussed which is based on nonadiabatic electron tunnelling and nonequilibrium conformational fluctuations. Such fluctuations can be induced, e.g. by random binding of negatively charged ATP molecules to the electron-transferring molecular complex, their subsequent hydrolysis and the products dissociation. The pumping rate can be controlled by the ATP concentration in solution. Depending on the model parameters there may exist a critical ATP concentration for the pump to function. Alternatively, nonequilibrium fluctuations can be induced by externally applied stochastic electric fields. For realistically chosen parameters, the mechanism is shown to be robust and highly efficient.

  9. Dihydrothymidine and thymidine glycol triphosphates as substrates for DNA polymerases: differential recognition of thymine C5-C6 bond saturation and sequence specificity of incorporation.

    OpenAIRE

    Ide, H; Wallace, S. S.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of dihydrothymidine (DHdTTP) and thymidine glycol (dTTP-GLY) 5'-triphosphates to serve as substrates for different DNA polymerases was investigated. DHdTTP but not dTTP-GLY was used as a substrate by E. coli DNA polymerase I (Pol I). Within the detection limit of the assay used, neither T4 DNA polymerase nor avian myeloblastosis virus (AMV) reverse transcriptase used DHdTTP or dTTP-GLY as substrates. The ability of DHdTTP and dTTP-GLY to undergo enzyme-catalyzed turnover to the mo...

  10. Preferential binding of Escherichia coli RecF protein to gapped DNA in the presence of adenosine (gamma-thio) triphosphate.

    OpenAIRE

    Hegde, S P; Rajagopalan, M; Madiraju, M V

    1996-01-01

    Escherichia coli RecF protein binds, but does not hydrolyze, ATP. To determine the role that ATP binding to RecF plays in RecF protein-mediated DNA binding, we have determined the interaction between RecF protein and single-stranded (ss)DNA, double-stranded (ds)DNA, and dsDNA containing ssDNA regions (gapped [g]DNA) either alone or in various combinations both in the presence and in the absence of adenosine (gamma-thio) triphosphate, gamma-S-ATP, a nonhydrolyzable ATP analog. Protein-DNA comp...

  11. Heme uptake in bacterial pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Contreras, Heidi; Chim, Nicholas; Credali, Alfredo; Goulding, Celia W.

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for the survival of organisms. Bacterial pathogens possess specialized pathways to acquire heme from their human hosts. In this review, we present recent structural and biochemical data that provide mechanistic insights into several bacterial heme uptake pathways, encompassing the sequestration of heme from human hemoproteins to secreted or membrane-associated bacterial proteins, the transport of heme across bacterial membranes, and the degradation of heme within...

  12. Spin-polarized Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy of Molecular Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we fabricate molecular magnetic tunnel junctions and demonstrate that inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy technique can be utilized to inspect such junctions to investigate the existence of desired molecular species in the device area. Tunneling magnetoresistance measurements have been carried out and spin-dependent tunneling transport has been observed. Bias-dependence of the tunneling resistance has also been detected. IETS measurements at different magnetic field suggested that the TMR bias-dependence was likely caused by the inelastic scattering due to the molecular vibrations

  13. Evolutionary transitions in bacterial symbiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sachs, Joel L.; Skophammer, Ryan G.; Regus, John U.

    2011-01-01

    Diverse bacterial lineages form beneficial infections with eukaryotic hosts. The origins, evolution, and breakdown of these mutualisms represent important evolutionary transitions. To examine these key events, we synthesize data from diverse interactions between bacteria and eukaryote hosts. Five evolutionary transitions are investigated, including the origins of bacterial associations with eukaryotes, the origins and subsequent stable maintenance of bacterial mutualism with hosts, the captur...

  14. Computational Wind Tunnel: A Design Tool for Rotorcraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rotorcraft engineers traditionally use the wind tunnel to evaluate and finalize designs. Insufficient correlation between wind tunnel results and flight tests, have...

  15. Transport of dangerous goods through road tunnels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, N O; Lacroix, Didier; Amundsen, F.H.;

    1999-01-01

    A paper which describes the work of an OECD research group. The group has suggested a grouping of dangerous materials, a quantitative risk assessment model and a decision support model which should allow tunnel operators to determine if a given material should be allowed throug a given tunnel...

  16. Road tunnels safety according to European legislation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedor KÁLLAY

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with safety of European road tunnels in accordance with actual European legislation. Standards and recommendations of European Commission, PIARC and other professional bodies of the European Union define minimal technological requirements for equipment and operation of the tunnels in scope of Trans-European Road Network.

  17. Flow-Based Detection of DNS Tunnels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Ellens; P. Żuraniewski; A. Sperotto; H. Schotanus; M. Mandjes; E. Meeuwissen

    2013-01-01

    DNS tunnels allow circumventing access and security policies in firewalled networks. Such a security breach can be misused for activities like free web browsing, but also for command & control traffic or cyber espionage, thus motivating the search for effective automated DNS tunnel detection techniq

  18. 75 FR 42643 - National Tunnel Inspection Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-22

    ... Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) The FHWA issued an ANPRM on November 18, 2008, at 73 FR... vulnerability to the tunnel operating environment and mean time to failure. The ACEC commented that inspection... Federal Highway Administration 23 CFR Part 650 RIN 2125-AF24 National Tunnel Inspection Standards...

  19. Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory : tunnel boring

    CERN Multimedia

    SSC Media Production

    1999-01-01

    This film will take you down into the tunnel, show you the technology involved in boring the tunnel, and show what the SSC fmeans to the U.S. in terms of scientific discovery, innovative collaborations with industry and stimulating the job base nation-wide.

  20. Hawking temperature and higher order tunnelling calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Bhramar

    2009-01-01

    Hawking radiation has recently been explained in terms of tunnelling across the black hole horizon in a Hamilton-Jacobi framework. Higher order calculations using both usual and non-singular coordinates are found to change the tunnelling amplitude, but this change is not a simple alteration of the Hawking temperature.

  1. A Supermagnetic Tunnel Full of Subatomic Action

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Last year, before the gigantic hadron supercollider at CERN research facility was installed underground, a photographer captured this picture of a 1,950 metric ton tunnel containing giant magnets that will be placed in a tunnel and kept at near-zero temperatures.

  2. Chronic Synovitis after Open Carpal Tunnel Decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Justin; Chan, Patrick; Rahdon, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Open carpal tunnel decompression is a common procedure with potential long-term complications such as scar tenderness, pillar pain and neuroma. We present the case of a 65 year-old male with chronic lipomatous hypertrophy of the wrist and chronic flexor tenosynovitis after open carpal tunnel release for its rarity and severity of symptoms that required further surgery. PMID:27454645

  3. 49 CFR 177.810 - Vehicular tunnels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vehicular tunnels. 177.810 Section 177.810 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Information and Regulations § 177.810 Vehicular tunnels. Except as regards Class 7 (radioactive)...

  4. Scanning tunneling microscopy of dye thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Rhodamine 6G films on a metal and a semiconductor substrates were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectral ellipsometry techniques. Scanning tunneling microscopy of dye on a metal substrate allowed obtaining interlayer surface profile with atomic spatial resolution 0.08 nm

  5. Flow-based detection of DNS tunnels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellens, W.; Zuraniewski, P.W.; Sperotto, A.; Schotanus, H.A.; Mandjes, M.; Meeuwissen, H.B.

    2013-01-01

    DNS tunnels allow circumventing access and security policies in firewalled networks. Such a security breach can be misused for activities like free web browsing, but also for command & control traffic or cyber espionage, thus motivating the search for effective automated DNS tunnel detection techniq

  6. Tunnel number one, genus one fibered knots

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Kenneth L.; Johnson, Jesse E.; Klodginski, Elizabeth A.

    2006-01-01

    We determine the genus one fibered knots in lens spaces that have tunnel number one. We also show that every tunnel number one, once-punctured torus bundle is the result of Dehn filling a component of the Whitehead link in the 3-sphere.

  7. Flapping around in a wind tunnel

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitriadis, Grigorios

    2015-01-01

    Aerodynamic investigations of animal flight have usually concentrated on static conditions. These are good enough to analyse gliding flight but not other types of flight, such as cruise (migrations), take-off and landing or manoeuvres. In this work we present wind tunnel experiments on geese flying in a wind tunnel and unsteady aerodynamic simulations of these flights, based on the Vortex Lattice Method.

  8. Ac electronic tunneling at optical frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, S. M.; Fan, B.; Gustafson, T. K.

    1974-01-01

    Rectification characteristics of non-superconducting metal-barrier-metal junctions deduced from electronic tunneling have been observed experimentally for optical frequency irradiation of the junction. The results provide verification of optical frequency Fermi level modulation and electronic tunneling current modulation.

  9. Gauge independence of tunneling rates

    CERN Document Server

    Plascencia, Alexis D

    2015-01-01

    Despite the gauge dependence of the effective action at zero and finite temperature, it is shown that it leads to tunneling and nucleation rates that remain independent of the choice of gauge-fixing. Taking as a starting point the path integral that defines the transition amplitude from a false vacuum to itself, a careful treatment of the boundary conditions and the gauge-fixing allows to show that decay rates are exactly determined by the effective action evaluated at a generalized bounce configuration. The latter is a solution to the quantum equations of motion, with boundary conditions fixed by the false vacuum. The resulting tunneling rate is gauge-independent, as the Nielsen identities imply that the explicit gauge dependence in the effective action is exactly cancelled by the gauge dependence of the solution. This holds for any election of gauge-fixing that leads to an invertible Faddeev-Popov matrix. The result is nonperturbative and model-independent, and also clarifies how to incorporate radiative co...

  10. Critical issues concerning tunnel ventilation in the super conducting super collider ring tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the author discusses the problem of designing a ventilation system for the SSC Collider Ring Tunnel. The history of ventilation of tunnels is briefly reviewed and the types of systems used for ventilation of rail, transit and highway tunnels are described in detail. Next, the ventilation system prepared for the Collider Ring Tunnel in the RTK conceptual conventional design report is described. The author questions this design from a safety and practical standpoint. He offers several other solutions which provided a more powerful system for emergencies. One supplies fresh outside air uniformly along the tunnel length. All suggested systems increase costs over the RTK proposed system. The possible problem of troublesome condensation forming on equipment in the tunnel and tunnel walls in hot, humid weather is also a major concern. 5 figs

  11. Effects of diesel exhaust on the microbiota within a tuffaceous tunnel system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The abundance and distribution of microbiota that may be impacted by diesel and diesel exhaust were investigated from three depths into the walls and invert (floor) of U12n tunnel at Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site, a potential geological analog of Yucca Mountain. Enumerations included total cell counts, and numbers of aerobic heterotrophic, sulfate-reducing, nitrate-reducing, and diesel-degrading bacteria. Additionally, the disappearance of total petroleum hydrocarbons was determined in microcosms containing subsurface materials that were amended with diesel fuel. Results revealed that microbes capable of utilizing diesel and diesel combustion products were present in the subsurface in both the walls and the invert of the tunnel. The abundance of specific bacterial types in the tunnel invert, a perturbed environment, was greater than that observed in the tunnel wall. Few trends of microbial distribution either into the tunnel wall or the invert were noted with the exception of aerobic heterotrophic abundance which increased with depth into the wall and decreased with depth into the invert. No correlation between microbiota and a specific introduced chemical species have yet been determined. The potential for microbial contamination of the tunnel wall during sampling was determined to be negligible by the use of fluorescently labeled latex spheres (1μm in dia.) as tracers. Results indicate that additional investigations might be needed to examine the microbiota and their possible impacts on the geology and geochemistry of the subsurface, both indigenous microbiota and those microorganisms that will likely be introduced by anthropogenic activity associated with the construction of a high-level waste repository

  12. Effects of diesel exhaust on the microbiota within a tuffaceous tunnel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haldeman, D.L.; Lagadinos, T.; Amy, P.S. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Hersman, L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Meike, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The abundance and distribution of microbiota that may be impacted by diesel and diesel exhaust were investigated from three depths into the walls and invert (floor) of U12n tunnel at Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site, a potential geological analog of Yucca Mountain. Enumerations included total cell counts, and numbers of aerobic heterotrophic, sulfate-reducing, nitrate-reducing, and diesel-degrading bacteria. Additionally, the disappearance of total petroleum hydrocarbons was determined in microcosms containing subsurface materials that were amended with diesel fuel. Results revealed that microbes capable of utilizing diesel and diesel combustion products were present in the subsurface in both the walls and the invert of the tunnel. The abundance of specific bacterial types in the tunnel invert, a perturbed environment, was greater than that observed in the tunnel wall. Few trends of microbial distribution either into the tunnel wall or the invert were noted with the exception of aerobic heterotrophic abundance which increased with depth into the wall and decreased with depth into the invert. No correlation between microbiota and a specific introduced chemical species have yet been determined. The potential for microbial contamination of the tunnel wall during sampling was determined to be negligible by the use of fluorescently labeled latex spheres (1{mu}m in dia.) as tracers. Results indicate that additional investigations might be needed to examine the microbiota and their possible impacts on the geology and geochemistry of the subsurface, both indigenous microbiota and those microorganisms that will likely be introduced by anthropogenic activity associated with the construction of a high-level waste repository.

  13. Characterization of magnetic tunnel junction test pads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Kjær, Daniel; Nielsen, Peter Folmer;

    2015-01-01

    We show experimentally as well as theoretically that patterned magnetic tunnel junctions can be characterized using the current-in-plane tunneling (CIPT) method, and the key parameters, the resistance-area product (RA) and the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR), can be determined. The CIPT method...... square tunnel junction pads with varying sizes and analyze the measured data using both the original and the modified CIPT model. Thus, we determine in which sample size range the modified CIPT model is needed to ensure validity of the extracted sample parameters, RA and TMR. In addition, measurements as...... a function of position on a square tunnel junction pad are used to investigate the sensitivity of the measurement results to probe misalignment....

  14. [Bacterial diseases of rape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharova, O M; Mel'nychuk, M D; Dankevych, L A; Patyka, V P

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial destruction of the culture was described and its agents identified in the spring and winter rape crops. Typical symptoms are the following: browning of stem tissue and its mucilagization, chlorosis of leaves, yellowing and beginning of soft rot in the place of leaf stalks affixion to stems, loss of pigmentation (violet). Pathogenic properties of the collection strains and morphological, cultural, physiological, and biochemical properties of the agents of rape's bacterial diseases isolated by the authors have been investigated. It was found that all the isolates selected by the authors are highly or moderately aggressive towards different varieties of rape. According to the complex of phenotypic properties 44% of the total number of isolates selected by the authors are related to representatives of the genus Pseudomonas, 37% - to Xanthomonas and 19% - to Pectobacterium. PMID:23293826

  15. Bacterial proteases and virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frees, Dorte; Brøndsted, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

    Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for variety of purposes during the infection process. In the cytosol, the main proteolytic players are the conserved Clp and Lon proteases that directly contribute to virulence through the timely degradation of virulence regulators and indirectly by providing...... tolerance to adverse conditions such as those experienced in the host. In the membrane, HtrA performs similar functions whereas the extracellular proteases, in close contact with host components, pave the way for spreading infections by degrading host matrix components or interfering with host cell...... cell. These extracellular proteases are activated in complex cascades involving auto-processing and proteolytic maturation. Thus, proteolysis has been adopted by bacterial pathogens at multiple levels to ensure the success of the pathogen in contact with the human host....

  16. Snow and ice blocking of tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lia, Leif

    1998-12-31

    Hydroelectric power development in cold regions causes much concern about operational reliability and dam safety. This thesis studies the temperature distribution in tunnels by means of air temperature measurements in six tunnel spillways and five diversion tunnels. The measurements lasted for two consecutive winters. The air through flow tunnel is used as it causes cooling of both rock and water. In open spillway tunnels, frost reaches the entire tunnel. In spillway tunnels with walls, the frost zones reach about 100 m from the downstream end. In mildly-inclined diversion tunnels, a frost free zone is located in the middle of the tunnel and snow and ice problems were only observed in the inlet and outlet. Severe aufeis is accumulation is observed in the frost zones. The heat transfer from rock to air, water and ice is calculated and used in a prediction model for the calculation of aufeis build-up together with local field observation data. The water penetration of snow plugs is also calculated, based on the heat balance. It takes 20 to 50 days for water to enter the blocked tunnel. The empirical values are 30 to 60 days, but only 1 day if the temperature of the snow pack is 0{sup o}C. Sensitivity analyses are carried out for temperature variations in rock, snow, water and ice. Systematic field observation shows that it is important for hydropower companies to know about the effects of snow and ice blocking in an area. A risk analysis of dam safety is presented for a real case. Finally, the thesis proposes solutions which can reduce the snow and ice problems. 79 refs., 63 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. Supramolecular bacterial systems

    OpenAIRE

    Sankaran, Shrikrishnan

    2015-01-01

    For nearly over a decade, a wide variety of dynamic and responsive supramolecular architectures have been investigated and developed to address biological systems. Since the non-covalent interactions between individual molecular components in such architectures are similar to the interactions found in living systems, it was possible to integrate chemically-synthesized and naturally-occurring components to create platforms with interesting bioactive properties. Bacterial cells and recombinant ...

  18. Bacterial transformation of terpenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on the bacterial transformation of terpenoids published in the literature in the past decade are analyzed. Possible pathways for chemo-, regio- and stereoselective modifications of terpenoids are discussed. Considerable attention is given to new technological approaches to the synthesis of terpenoid derivatives suitable for the use in the perfume and food industry and promising as drugs and chiral intermediates for fine organic synthesis. The bibliography includes 246 references

  19. Fluorometric determination of 2'-beta-fluoro-2',3'-dideoxyadenosine 5'-triphosphate, the active metabolite of a new anti-human immunodeficiency virus drug, in human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, F; Kelley, J A; Zhang, H; Malinowski, N; Kavlick, M F; Lietzau, J; Welles, L; Yarchoan, R; Ford, H

    2001-01-01

    A sensitive precolumn derivatization method has been developed to measure the 5'-triphosphate of 2'-beta-fluoro-2',3'-dideoxyadenosine (F-ddA, lodenosine), a new anti-HIV drug, in human lymphocytes by HPLC using fluorescence detection. Reaction of chloroacetaldehyde with F-ddA triphosphate in extracts from human lymphocytes produces a highly fluorescent etheno adduct. This derivative is then separated and quantitated by reverse-phase paired-ion chromatography. Degradation of natural nucleic acid ribosides, such as ATP, using periodate oxidation simplifies the chromatogram and minimizes interference with detection of the target analyte. This method, modeled using cultured MOLT-4 T-lymphocytes, achieves a linear detector response for peak area measurements over the range 2.5 to 22.5 pmol (50-450 nM using 50 microl sample). Analyte recovery is greater than 90%, and the method achieves a limit of detection and limit of quantitation of 1.4 and 2.5 pmol per HPLC injection (50 microl sample containing cellular extract from 2.5 x 10(6) cells), respectively. Application of this method to measure F-ddATP in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV-infected patients treated with F-ddA at 3.2 mg/kg twice daily for 22 days shows F-ddATP levels which range from 1.5 to 3.5 pmol/10(6) cells. PMID:11141306

  20. Pharmacogenetic research progress of inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase%三磷酸肌苷焦磷酸酶药理遗传学的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李兴军

    2013-01-01

    嘌呤类药物主要用于治疗自身免疫性疾病、器官移植、急性淋巴细胞白血病等,其不良反应的发生率为15% ~28%,严重影响了药物在临床中的应用.三磷酸肌苷焦磷酸酶(inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase,ITPA)存在个体间的差异,ITPA缺陷的患者在应用嘌呤类药物时会发生一定的不良反应,因此,有必要了解ITPA对嘌呤类药物临床应用的影响,该文综述了ⅡPA的药理遗传学方面的研究进展.%Purine drugs are for the treatment of autoimmune diseases,organ transplantation,acute lymphoblastic leukemia.The adverse reaction rate is 15% ~ 28%,which impacts on the clinical application in recent years.Studies have shown that inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase (ITPA) are different between individuals,and there are adverse reactions in patients with defects of ITPA when purine drugs are used.This paper reviewes the ITPA pharmacogenetic research progresses.

  1. Simple, Fast and Selective Detection of Adenosine Triphosphate at Physiological pH Using Unmodified Gold Nanoparticles as Colorimetric Probes and Metal Ions as Cross-Linkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Pang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a simple, fast and selective colorimetric assay of adenosine triphosphate (ATP using unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs as probes and metal ions as cross-linkers. ATP can be assembled onto the surface of AuNPs through interaction between the electron-rich nitrogen atoms and the electron-deficient surface of AuNPs. Accordingly, Cu2+ ions induce a change in the color and UV/Vis absorbance of AuNPs by coordinating to the triphosphate groups and a ring nitrogen of ATP. A detection limit of 50 nM was achieved, which is comparable to or lower than that achievable by the currently used electrochemical, spectroscopic or chromatographic methods. The theoretical simplicity and high selectivity reported herein demonstrated that AuNPs-based colorimetric assay could be applied in a wide variety of fields by rationally designing the surface chemistry of AuNPs. In addition, our results indicate that ATP-modified AuNPs are less stable in Cu2+, Cd2+ or Zn2+-containing solutions due to the formation of the corresponding dimeric metal-ATP complexes.

  2. Quantitative assessment of the use of modified nucleoside triphosphates in expression profiling: differential effects on signal intensities and impacts on expression ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorris David

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The power of DNA microarrays derives from their ability to monitor the expression levels of many genes in parallel. One of the limitations of such powerful analytical tools is the inability to detect certain transcripts in the target sample because of artifacts caused by background noise or poor hybridization kinetics. The use of base-modified analogs of nucleoside triphosphates has been shown to increase complementary duplex stability in other applications, and here we attempted to enhance microarray hybridization signal across a wide range of sequences and expression levels by incorporating these nucleotides into labeled cRNA targets. Results RNA samples containing 2-aminoadenosine showed increases in signal intensity for a majority of the sequences. These results were similar, and additive, to those seen with an increase in the hybridization time. In contrast, 5-methyluridine and 5-methylcytidine decreased signal intensities. Hybridization specificity, as assessed by mismatch controls, was dependent on both target sequence and extent of substitution with the modified nucleotide. Concurrent incorporation of modified and unmodified ATP in a 1:1 ratio resulted in significantly greater numbers of above-threshold ratio calls across tissues, while preserving ratio integrity and reproducibility. Conclusions Incorporation of 2-aminoadenosine triphosphate into cRNA targets is a promising method for increasing signal detection in microarrays. Furthermore, this approach can be optimized to minimize impact on yield of amplified material and to increase the number of expression changes that can be detected.

  3. Flow Cytometric Assessment of Bacterial Abundance in Soils, Sediments and Sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frossard, Aline; Hammes, Frederik; Gessner, Mark O.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial abundance is a fundamental measure in microbiology, but its assessment is often tedious, especially for soil, and sediment samples. To overcome this limitation, we adopted a time-efficient flow-cytometric (FCM) counting method involving cell detachment and separation from matrix particles by centrifugation in tubes receiving sample suspensions and Histodenz® solution. We used this approach to assess bacterial abundances in diverse soils (natural and agricultural), sediments (streams and lakes) and sludge from sand-filters in a drinking water treatment plant and compared the results to bacterial abundances determined by two established methods, epifluorescence microscopy (EM) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) quantification. Cell abundances determined by FCM and EM correlated fairly well, although absolute cell abundances were generally lower when determined by FCM. FCM also showed significant relations with cell counts converted from ATP concentrations, although estimates derived from ATP determinations were typically higher, indicating the presence of ATP sources other than bacteria. Soil and sediment organic matter (OM) content influenced the goodness of fit between counts obtained with EM and FCM. In particular, bacterial abundance determined by FCM in samples containing less than 10% OM, such as stream sediment, was particularly well correlated with the cell counts assessed by EM. Overall, these results suggest that FCM following cell detachment and purification is a useful approach to increase sample throughput for determining bacterial abundances in soils, sediments and sludge. However, notable scatter and only partial concordance among the FCM and reference methods suggests that protocols require further improvement for assessments requiring high precision, especially when OM contents in samples are high. PMID:27379043

  4. Quantitative risk assessment modeling for nonhomogeneous urban road tunnels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qiang; Qu, Xiaobo; Wang, Xinchang; Yuanita, Vivi; Wong, Siew Chee

    2011-03-01

    Urban road tunnels provide an increasingly cost-effective engineering solution, especially in compact cities like Singapore. For some urban road tunnels, tunnel characteristics such as tunnel configurations, geometries, provisions of tunnel electrical and mechanical systems, traffic volumes, etc. may vary from one section to another. These urban road tunnels that have characterized nonuniform parameters are referred to as nonhomogeneous urban road tunnels. In this study, a novel quantitative risk assessment (QRA) model is proposed for nonhomogeneous urban road tunnels because the existing QRA models for road tunnels are inapplicable to assess the risks in these road tunnels. This model uses a tunnel segmentation principle whereby a nonhomogeneous urban road tunnel is divided into various homogenous sections. Individual risk for road tunnel sections as well as the integrated risk indices for the entire road tunnel is defined. The article then proceeds to develop a new QRA model for each of the homogeneous sections. Compared to the existing QRA models for road tunnels, this section-based model incorporates one additional top event-toxic gases due to traffic congestion-and employs the Poisson regression method to estimate the vehicle accident frequencies of tunnel sections. This article further illustrates an aggregated QRA model for nonhomogeneous urban tunnels by integrating the section-based QRA models. Finally, a case study in Singapore is carried out. PMID:21029142

  5. Simulation of Stress Distribution around Tunnels and Interaction between Tunnels Using an Elasto-plastic Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muya M S; He Bo; Wang Jingtao; Li Guocheng

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a computer simulation of stress distribution around tunnels and interaction between tunnels using an elasto-plastic model. A finite element method using ANSYS software has been used for the analyses of one and two tunnels at different overburden depths with different separating distances between the tunnels. The results of numerical analyses indicate that stress distribution and stress concentration around the tunnels vary with the overburden depths. It is found that the coefficients of stress concentration for elasto-plastic medium are smaller than those for elastic one by 1.9%. Furthermore, the interaction between the two tunnels rapidly decreases with the increase of separation distance between them. In addition, for quantitatively describing the interaction between the two tunnels, a critical separation distance is introduced. The critical separation distances between the two tunnels at different overburden depths are 8 m, 12 m, and 14 m respectively. This fact is very important and essential for the design of mining tunnels and to ensure safety in tunnel engineering.

  6. Area and shape changes of the carpal tunnel in response to tunnel pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zong-Ming; Masters, Tamara L; Mondello, Tracy A

    2011-12-01

    Carpal tunnel mechanics is relevant to our understanding of median nerve compression in the tunnel. The compliant characteristics of the tunnel strongly influence its mechanical environment. We investigated the distensibility of the carpal tunnel in response to tunnel pressure. A custom balloon device was designed to apply controlled pressure. Tunnel cross sections were obtained using magnetic resonance imaging to derive the relationship between carpal tunnel pressure and morphological parameters at the hook of hamate. The results showed that the cross-sectional area (CSA) at the level of the hook of hamate increased, on average, by 9.2% and 14.8% at 100 and 200 mmHg, respectively. The increased CSA was attained by a shape change of the cross section, displaying increased circularity. The increase in CSA was mainly attributable to the increase of area in the carpal arch region formed by the transverse carpal ligament. The narrowing of the carpal arch width was associated with an increase in the carpal arch. We concluded that the carpal tunnel is compliant to accommodate physiological variations of the carpal tunnel pressure, and that the increase in tunnel CSA is achieved by increasing the circularity of the cross section. PMID:21608024

  7. Giant tunneling magnetoresistance in silicene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yu, E-mail: ywang@semi.ac.cn [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming, 650500 Yunnan (China); Lou, Yiyi [Yiyuan Student Community, Center of Student Community Education and Management, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming, 650500 Yunnan (China)

    2013-11-14

    We have theoretically studied ballistic electron transport in silicene under the manipulation of a pair of ferromagnetic gate. Transport properties like transmission and conductance have been calculated by the standard transfer matrix method for parallel and antiparallel magnetization configurations. It is demonstrated here that, due to the stray field-induced wave-vector filtering effect, remarkable difference in configuration-dependent transport gives rise to a giant tunneling magnetoresistance. In combination with the peculiar buckled structure of silicene and its electric tunable energy gap, the receiving magnetoresistance can be efficiently modulated by the externally-tunable stray field, electrostatic potential, and staggered sublattice potential, providing some flexible strategies to construct silicene-based nanoelectronic device.

  8. Tunnel effect wave energy detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Waltman, Steven B. (Inventor); Kenny, Thomas W. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for measuring gravitational and inertial forces, magnetic fields, or wave or radiant energy acting on an object or fluid in space provide an electric tunneling current through a gap between an electrode and that object or fluid in space and vary that gap with any selected one of such forces, magnetic fields, or wave or radiant energy acting on that object or fluid. These methods and apparatus sense a corresponding variation in an electric property of that gap and determine the latter force, magnetic fields, or wave or radiant energy in response to that corresponding variation, and thereby sense or measure such parameters as acceleration, position, particle mass, velocity, magnetic field strength, presence or direction, or wave or radiant energy intensity, presence or direction.

  9. Theory of dissociative tunneling ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Svensmark, Jens; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2016-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the dissociative tunneling ionization process. Analytic expressions for the nuclear kinetic energy distribution of the ionization rates are derived. A particularly simple expression for the spectrum is found by using the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation in conjunction with the reflection principle. These spectra are compared to exact non-BO ab initio spectra obtained through model calculations with a quantum mechanical treatment of both the electronic and nuclear degrees freedom. In the regime where the BO approximation is applicable imaging of the BO nuclear wave function is demonstrated to be possible through reverse use of the reflection principle, when accounting appropriately for the electronic ionization rate. A qualitative difference between the exact and BO wave functions in the asymptotic region of large electronic distances is shown. Additionally the behavior of the wave function across the turning line is seen to be reminiscent of light refraction. For weak fiel...

  10. WT - WIND TUNNEL PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viterna, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    WT was developed to calculate fan rotor power requirements and output thrust for a closed loop wind tunnel. The program uses blade element theory to calculate aerodynamic forces along the blade using airfoil lift and drag characteristics at an appropriate blade aspect ratio. A tip loss model is also used which reduces the lift coefficient to zero for the outer three percent of the blade radius. The application of momentum theory is not used to determine the axial velocity at the rotor plane. Unlike a propeller, the wind tunnel rotor is prevented from producing an increase in velocity in the slipstream. Instead, velocities at the rotor plane are used as input. Other input for WT includes rotational speed, rotor geometry, and airfoil characteristics. Inputs for rotor blade geometry include blade radius, hub radius, number of blades, and pitch angle. Airfoil aerodynamic inputs include angle at zero lift coefficient, positive stall angle, drag coefficient at zero lift coefficient, and drag coefficient at stall. WT is written in APL2 using IBM's APL2 interpreter for IBM PC series and compatible computers running MS-DOS. WT requires a CGA or better color monitor for display. It also requires 640K of RAM and MS-DOS v3.1 or later for execution. Both an MS-DOS executable and the source code are provided on the distribution medium. The standard distribution medium for WT is a 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette in PKZIP format. The utility to unarchive the files, PKUNZIP, is also included. WT was developed in 1991. APL2 and IBM PC are registered trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation. MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation. PKUNZIP is a registered trademark of PKWare, Inc.

  11. Simulation of people's evacuation in tunnel fire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The simulation model Tunev(tunnel evacuation) was developed for people's evacuation in tunnel fire. It contains simple database of the people's behavioral reaction and structure characteristic parameters of tunnel fireproofing. The model can be used to calculate the total evacuation time in various scenes when fire occurs in the different locations of the tunnel. Combined with fire simulation soft ware CFD- POENICS3.5, Tunev model can be used to calculate the fire danger coming time; by comparing with these two kinds of time, it can be used to assess the safety of the evacuation, and the evacuation process also have a dynamic demo. The simulation results show that the Tunev model can be used to predict the reliability of safe evacuation for people in tunnel fire and provide references for people's safe escape scheme. Some relevant concepts of the model were described and an evacuation simulation of a typical tunnel case, i.e. Xuefeng Mountain Tunnel was performed by using this model. And the model's validation and actual application were also described.

  12. Rudolf Hermann, wind tunnels and aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Charles A.; Coleman, Anne M.

    2008-04-01

    Rudolf Hermann was born on December 15, 1904 in Leipzig, Germany. He studied at the University of Leipzig and at the Aachen Institute of Technology. His involvement with wind tunnels began in 1934 when Professor Carl Wieselsberger engaged him to work at Aachen on the development of a supersonic wind tunnel. On January 6, 1936, Dr. Wernher von Braun visited Dr. Hermann to arrange for use of the Aachen supersonic wind tunnel for Army problems. On April 1, 1937, Dr. Hermann became Director of the Supersonic Wind Tunnel at the Army installation at Peenemunde. Results from the Aachen and Peenemunde wind tunnels were crucial in achieving aerodynamic stability for the A-4 rocket, later designated as the V-2. Plans to build a Mach 10 'hypersonic' wind tunnel facility at Kochel were accelerated after the Allied air raid on Peenemunde on August 17, 1943. Dr. Hermann was director of the new facility. Ignoring destruction orders from Hitler as WWII approached an end in Europe, Dr. Hermann and his associates hid documents and preserved wind tunnel components that were acquired by the advancing American forces. Dr. Hermann became a consultant to the Air Force at its Wright Field in November 1945. In 1951, he was named professor of Aeronautical Engineering at the University of Minnesota. In 1962, Dr. Hermann became the first Director of the Research Institute at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), a position he held until he retired in 1970.

  13. Investigation into scanning tunnelling luminescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work reports on the development of a scanning tunnelling luminescence (STL) microscope and its application to the study of Ill-nitride semiconductor materials used in the production of light emitting devices. STL microscopy is a technique which uses the high resolution topographic imaging capabilities of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) to generate high resolution luminescence images. The STM tunnelling current acts as a highly localised source of electrons (or holes) which generates luminescence in certain materials. Light generated at the STM tunnelling junction is collected concurrently with the height variation of the tunnelling probe as it is scanned across a sample surface, producing simultaneous topographic and luminescence images. Due to the very localised excitation source, high resolution luminescence images can be obtained. Spectroscopic resolution can be obtained by using filters. Additionally, the variation of luminescence intensity with tunnel current and with bias voltage can provide information on recombination processes and material properties. The design and construction of a scanning tunnelling luminescence microscope is described in detail. Operating under ambient conditions, the microscope has several novel features, including a new type of miniature inertial slider-based approach motor, large solid-angle light collection optical arrangement and a tip-height regulation system which requires the minimum of operator input. (author)

  14. Homoepitaxial graphene tunnel barriers for spin transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Adam L.; van't Erve, Olaf M. J.; Robinson, Jeremy T.; Whitener, Keith E.; Jonker, Berend T.

    2016-05-01

    Tunnel barriers are key elements for both charge-and spin-based electronics, offering devices with reduced power consumption and new paradigms for information processing. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, interface stability, and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Graphene is the perfect tunnel barrier. It is an insulator out-of-plane, possesses a defect-free, linear habit, and is impervious to interdiffusion. Nonetheless, true tunneling between two stacked graphene layers is not possible in environmental conditions usable for electronics applications. However, two stacked graphene layers can be decoupled using chemical functionalization. Here, we demonstrate that hydrogenation or fluorination of graphene can be used to create a tunnel barrier. We demonstrate successful tunneling by measuring non-linear IV curves and a weakly temperature dependent zero-bias resistance. We demonstrate lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures, and determine spin lifetimes with the non-local Hanle effect. We compare the results for hydrogenated and fluorinated tunnel and we discuss the possibility that ferromagnetic moments in the hydrogenated graphene tunnel barrier affect the spin transport of our devices.

  15. The Thames Tideway Tunnel (3/3)

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Lecture 3: Insight into a pioneering project at the cutting edge of engineering: the upgrade to London’s failing sewerage system. With a growing population and heavier rainfall, the River Thames is regularly polluted in breach of European Directive requirements. Two new storage and transfer tunnels will run up to 85m deep under the river and will intercept and divert sewer overflows to a treatment facility in east London. The challenges faced by constructing a tunnel project of this size under the river and through London’s historic urban environment will set a new UK record for this type of tunnelling.

  16. Thermal stability of tunneling spin polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a study of the thermal stability of tunneling spin polarization in Al/AlOx/ferromagnet junctions based on the spin-polarized tunneling technique, in which the Zeeman-split superconducting density of states in the Al electrode is used as a detector for the spin polarization. Thermal robustness of the polarization, which is of key importance for the performance of magnetic tunnel junction devices, is demonstrated for post-deposition anneal temperatures up to 500oC with Co and Co90Fe10 top electrodes, independent of the presence of an FeMn layer on top of the ferromagnet

  17. Integrated tunneling sensor for nanoelectromechanical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadewasser, S.; Abadal, G.; Barniol, N.; Dohn, Søren; Boisen, Anja

    2006-01-01

    Transducers based on quantum mechanical tunneling provide an extremely sensitive sensor principle, especially for nanoelectromechanical systems. For proper operation a gap between the electrodes of below 1 nm is essential, requiring the use of structures with a mobile electrode. At such small...... distances, attractive van der Waals and capillary forces become sizable, possibly resulting in snap-in of the electrodes. The authors present a comprehensive analysis and evaluation of the interplay between the involved forces and identify requirements for the design of tunneling sensors. Based on this...... analysis, a tunneling sensor is fabricated by Si micromachining technology and its proper operation is demonstrated. (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics....

  18. Scanning Tunneling Microscope For Use In Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Phillip B.

    1993-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscope with subangstrom resolution developed to study surface structures. Although instrument used in air, designed especially for use in vacuum. Scanning head is assembly of small, mostly rigid components made of low-outgassing materials. Includes coarse-positioning mechanical-translation stage, on which specimen mounted by use of standard mounting stub. Tunneling tip mounted on piezoelectric fine-positioning tube. Application of suitable voltages to electrodes on piezoelectric tube controls scan of tunneling tip across surface of specimen. Electronic subsystem generates scanning voltages and collects data.

  19. HYDRAULIC RESEARCH OF AERATORS ON TUNNEL SPILLWAYS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RUAN Shi-ping; WU Jian-hua; WU Wei-wei; XI Ru-ze

    2007-01-01

    The selection of the configuration and size of an aerator was of importance for a tunnel spillway under the conditions of high speed flows. Experimental investigations were conducted on the effects of entrained air on the tunnel spillway in the Goupitan Project, based on the criterion of gravity similarity and the condition of aerated flow velocity of over 6 m/s, with physical models. The configurations of the aerators were presented of a larger bottom air concentration, to protect the tunnel spillway from cavitation as well as to see no water fills in the grooves.

  20. Advancing Test Capabilities at NASA Wind Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James

    2015-01-01

    NASA maintains twelve major wind tunnels at three field centers capable of providing flows at 0.1 M 10 and unit Reynolds numbers up to 45106m. The maintenance and enhancement of these facilities is handled through a unified management structure under NASAs Aeronautics and Evaluation and Test Capability (AETC) project. The AETC facilities are; the 11x11 transonic and 9x7 supersonic wind tunnels at NASA Ames; the 10x10 and 8x6 supersonic wind tunnels, 9x15 low speed tunnel, Icing Research Tunnel, and Propulsion Simulator Laboratory, all at NASA Glenn; and the National Transonic Facility, Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, LAL aerothermodynamics laboratory, 8 High Temperature Tunnel, and 14x22 low speed tunnel, all at NASA Langley. This presentation describes the primary AETC facilities and their current capabilities, as well as improvements which are planned over the next five years. These improvements fall into three categories. The first are operations and maintenance improvements designed to increase the efficiency and reliability of the wind tunnels. These include new (possibly composite) fan blades at several facilities, new temperature control systems, and new and much more capable facility data systems. The second category of improvements are facility capability advancements. These include significant improvements to optical access in wind tunnel test sections at Ames, improvements to test section acoustics at Glenn and Langley, the development of a Supercooled Large Droplet capability for icing research, and the development of an icing capability for large engine testing. The final category of improvements consists of test technology enhancements which provide value across multiple facilities. These include projects to increase balance accuracy, provide NIST-traceable calibration characterization for wind tunnels, and to advance optical instruments for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) validation. Taken as a whole, these individual projects provide significant

  1. Application of Important Factors in Tunnel Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siamak Bagherian

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this thesis is to improve the quality of the basis for making decisions about tender prices and budgets for tunnel projects by developing a model for the estimation of construction time and cost. The planning and constructing of extensions to existing road and railway networks is an ongoing mission of transport infrastructure development. For functional, aesthetic or environmental reasons, a large number of these extensions are planned as tunnels. In the planning and procurement phases of tunnel projects, numerous decisions have to be made in relation to the tender price and project budget.

  2. Quantum limit in resonant vacuum tunneling transducers

    CERN Document Server

    Onofrio, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    We propose an electromechanical transducer based on a resonant-tunneling configuration that, with respect to the standard tunneling transducers, allows larger tunneling currents while using the same bias voltage. The increased current leads to an increase of the shot noise and an increase of the momentum noise which determine the quantum limit in the system under monitoring. Experiments with micromachined masses at 4.2 K could show dominance of the momentum noise over the Brownian noise, allowing observation of the quantum-mechanical noise at the mesoscopic scale.

  3. Pressure-morphology relationship of a released carpal tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Hee; Marquardt, Tamara L; Gabra, Joseph N; Shen, Zhilei Liu; Evans, Peter J; Seitz, William H; Li, Zong-Ming

    2013-04-01

    We investigated morphological changes of a released carpal tunnel in response to variations of carpal tunnel pressure. Pressure within the carpal tunnel is known to be elevated in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and dependent on wrist posture. Previously, increased carpal tunnel pressure was shown to affect the morphology of the carpal tunnel with an intact transverse carpal ligament (TCL). However, the pressure-morphology relationship of the carpal tunnel after release of the TCL has not been investigated. Carpal tunnel release (CTR) was performed endoscopically on cadaveric hands and the carpal tunnel pressure was dynamically increased from 10 to 120 mmHg. Simultaneously, carpal tunnel cross-sectional images were captured by an ultrasound system, and pressure measurements were recorded by a pressure transducer. Carpal tunnel pressure significantly affected carpal arch area (p 62 mm(2) at 120 mmHg. Carpal arch height, length, and width also significantly changed with carpal tunnel pressure (p < 0.05). As carpal tunnel pressure increased, carpal arch height and length increased, but the carpal arch width decreased. Analyses of the pressure-morphology relationship for a released carpal tunnel revealed a nine times greater compliance than that previously reported for a carpal tunnel with an intact TCL. This change of structural properties as a result of transecting the TCL helps explain the reduction of carpal tunnel pressure and relief of symptoms for patients after CTR surgery. PMID:23184493

  4. Tunnel defects in dentin bridges: their formation following direct pulp capping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, C F; Sübay, R K; Ostro, E; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, S H

    1996-01-01

    This study was conducted to observe the formation and nature of tunnel defects in dentin bridges, assess the nature of the associated soft tissue elements, and note the relationship of pulp inflammation and necrosis associated with these defects. A total of 235 teeth with class 5 cavity preparation exposures were randomly distributed throughout the dentitions of 14 adult rhesus monkeys. Each pulp was exposed and left open to the oral microflora at one of four time intervals, flushed with saline, debrided, capped with one of two hard-set calcium hydroxide medicaments [Ca(OH)2 (Dycal or Life)] and restored with a dispersed-phase amalgam alloy. Observation times were 14 days, 5 weeks, and 1 and 2 years. A total of 192 dentin bridges formed against the Ca(OH)2 medicaments Life or Dycal in 235 pulp-capped teeth. Considering all four capping periods, 89% of all dentin bridges contained tunnel defects (172 of 192). Forty-one percent (78) of the 192 dentin bridges were associated with recurring pulp inflammation or necrosis and were always associated with the presence of inflammatory cells and stained bacterial profiles. This study demonstrates that a statistically significant number of dentin bridges contain multiple tunnel defects, most of which appear to remain patent. These patent tunnels fail to provide a hermetic seal to the underlying pulp against recurring infection due to microleakage. Most Ca(OH)2 medicaments have been reported to disintegrate and wash out after 6 months, leaving a void underneath the restoration and thereby a pathway for bacterial infection. This study reemphasizes the need to employ biologically relevant measures that will provide a long-term clinical seal against microleakage following direct pulp capping with Ca(OH)2 medicaments alone. PMID:8957909

  5. Room-temperature tunnel magnetoresistance and spin-polarized tunneling through an organic semiconductor barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, T S; Lee, J S; Migdal, P; Lekshmi, I C; Satpati, B; Moodera, J S

    2007-01-01

    Electron spin-polarized tunneling is observed through an ultrathin layer of the molecular organic semiconductor tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminum (Alq3). Significant tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) was measured in a Co/Al2O3/Alq3/NiFe magnetic tunnel junction at room temperature, which increased when cooled to low temperatures. Tunneling characteristics, such as the current-voltage behavior and temperature and bias dependence of the TMR, show the good quality of the organic tunnel barrier. Spin polarization (P) of the tunnel current through the Alq3 layer, directly measured using superconducting Al as the spin detector, shows that minimizing formation of an interfacial dipole layer between the metal electrode and organic barrier significantly improves spin transport. PMID:17358495

  6. The Interaction Between Shield, Ground and Tunnel Support in TBM Tunnelling Through Squeezing Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramoni, M.; Anagnostou, G.

    2011-01-01

    When planning a TBM drive in squeezing ground, the tunnelling engineer faces a complex problem involving a number of conflicting factors. In this respect, numerical analyses represent a helpful decision aid as they provide a quantitative assessment of the effects of key parameters. The present paper investigates the interaction between the shield, ground and tunnel support by means of computational analysis. Emphasis is placed on the boundary condition, which is applied to model the interface between the ground and the shield or tunnel support. The paper also discusses two cases, which illustrate different methodical approaches applied to the assessment of a TBM drive in squeezing ground. The first case history—the Uluabat Tunnel (Turkey)—mainly involves the investigation of TBM design measures aimed at reducing the risk of shield jamming. The second case history—the Faido Section of the Gotthard Base Tunnel (Switzerland)—deals with different types of tunnel support installed behind a gripper TBM.

  7. Bacterial Degradation of Pesticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Berith Elkær

    This PhD project was carried out as part of the Microbial Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Water Resources (MIRESOWA) project, funded by the Danish Council for Strategic Research (grant number 2104-08-0012). The environment is contaminated with various xenobiotic compounds e.g. pesticides......D student, to construct fungal-bacterial consortia in order to potentially stimulate pesticide degradation thereby increasing the chance of successful bioaugmentation. The results of the project are reported in three article manuscripts, included in this thesis. In manuscript I, the mineralization of 2...

  8. Bacterial mitotic machineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Kenn; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Ebersbach, Gitte; Kruse, Torben; Nordström, Kurt

    2004-01-01

    Here, we review recent progress that yields fundamental new insight into the molecular mechanisms behind plasmid and chromosome segregation in prokaryotic cells. In particular, we describe how prokaryotic actin homologs form mitotic machineries that segregate DNA before cell division. Thus, the P......M protein of plasmid R1 forms F actin-like filaments that separate and move plasmid DNA from mid-cell to the cell poles. Evidence from three different laboratories indicate that the morphogenetic MreB protein may be involved in segregation of the bacterial chromosome....

  9. Bacterial terpene cyclases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickschat, Jeroen S

    2016-01-01

    Covering: up to 2015. This review summarises the accumulated knowledge about characterised bacterial terpene cyclases. The structures of identified products and of crystallised enzymes are included, and the obtained insights into enzyme mechanisms are discussed. After a summary of mono-, sesqui- and diterpene cyclases the special cases of the geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol synthases that are both particularly widespread in bacteria will be presented. A total number of 63 enzymes that have been characterised so far is presented, with 132 cited references. PMID:26563452

  10. Role of Inelastic Tunneling through the Barrier in Scanning Tunneling Microscope Experiments on Cuprates

    OpenAIRE

    Pilgram, S.; T. M. Rice; Sigrist, M.

    2006-01-01

    The tunneling path between the CuO2-layers in cuprate superconductors and a scanning tunneling microscope tip passes through a barrier made from other oxide layers. This opens up the possibility that inelastic processes in the barrier contribute to the tunneling spectra. Such processes cause one or possibly more peaks in the second derivative current-voltage spectra displaced by phonon energies from the density of states singularity associated with superconductivity. Calculations of inelastic...

  11. Spin-polarized current and tunnel magnetoresistance in heterogeneous single-barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukhov, D. A.

    2016-06-01

    Current in heterogeneous tunnel junctions is studied in the framework of the parabolic conduction-band model. The developed model of the electron tunneling takes explicitly into account the difference of effective masses between ferromagnetic and insulating layers and between conduction subbands. Calculations for Fe/MgO/Fe-like structures have shown the essential impact of effective mass differences in regions (constituents) of the structure on the tunnel magnetoresistance of the junction.

  12. Quantum dot resonant tunneling diode single photon detector with aluminum oxide aperture defined tunneling area

    OpenAIRE

    Li, H W; Kardynal, Beata; Ellis, D. J. P.; Shields, A.J.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2008-01-01

    Quantum dot resonant tunneling diode single photon detector with independently defined absorption and sensing areas is demonstrated. The device, in which the tunneling is constricted to an aperture in an insulating layer in the emitter, shows electrical characteristics typical of high quality resonant tunneling diodes. A single photon detection efficiency of 2.1%+/- 0.1% at 685 nm was measured corresponding to an internal quantum efficiency of 14%. The devices are simple to fabricate, robust,...

  13. Tunnel Waterproofing with Membranes Waterproofing at Senoko Cabele Tunnel in comparison with International Standards

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stefan Hotz

    2004-01-01

    Waterproofing of tunnels is and has always been a challenge, worldwide: Changing Geology with hardly predictable water inflow, limited space underground and only very little intervention opportunities once the tunnel is completed. This paper elaborates such challenges and focuses on the waterproofing solutions of mined tunnels with membranes. Different standards and approaches for the waterproofing system. In Singapore, a membrane waterproofing system is used for the shafts and adits at Senoko Cable Tunnel. The paper project specific waterproofing challenges and emphasizes on solution for them.

  14. TBM tunnelling through unfavourable ground conditions : a case study, SSDS tunnel F, Hong Kong

    OpenAIRE

    Lokusethu Hewage Don, Danuska Hasitha

    2013-01-01

    A study of the Strategic Sewage Disposal Scheme (SSDS) Stage 1 Tunnel F in Hong Kong was carried out as it is a great example of deep sub-sea hard rock TBM tunnelling through unfavourable, fault-affected ground conditions with heavy water inflows. The main objective of this study was to document events that took place during Tunnel F excavation and collate geological and geotechnical data related to the excavation, to aid future tunnel designers and contractors to assess the risk involved wit...

  15. Quantum size effects on spin-tunneling time in a magnetic resonant tunneling diode

    OpenAIRE

    Saffarzadeh, Alireza; Daqiq, Reza

    2009-01-01

    We study theoretically the quantum size effects of a magnetic resonant tunneling diode (RTD) with a (Zn,Mn)Se dilute magnetic semiconductor layer on the spin-tunneling time and the spin polarization of the electrons. The results show that the spin-tunneling times may oscillate and a great difference between the tunneling time of the electrons with opposite spin directions can be obtained depending on the system parameters. We also study the effect of structural asymmetry which is related to t...

  16. Bacterial contamination of enteral diets.

    OpenAIRE

    de Leeuw, I H; Vandewoude, M F

    1986-01-01

    Enteral feeding solutions can be contaminated by bacterial micro-organisms already present in the ingredients, or introduced during preparation or transport, or in the hospital ward. During jejunostomy feeding without pump or filter, ascending bacterial invasion of the feeding bag is possible. In patients with lowered immune response contaminated feedings can cause serious septic clinical problems. The progressive loss of the nutritional value of the enteral feeding solution by bacterial cont...

  17. Transport powered by bacterial turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser, Andreas; Peshkov, Anton; Sokolov, Andrey; ten Hagen, Borge; Löwen, Hartmut; Aranson, Igor S.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that collective turbulent-like motion in a bacterial bath can power and steer directed transport of mesoscopic carriers through the suspension. In our experiments and simulations, a microwedge-like "bulldozer" draws energy from a bacterial bath of varied density. We obtain that a maximal transport speed is achieved in the turbulent state of the bacterial suspension. This apparent rectification of random motion of bacteria is caused by polar ordered bacteria inside the cusp regi...

  18. Distribution of tunnelling times for quantum electron transport

    OpenAIRE

    Rudge, Samuel; Kosov, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In electron transport, the tunnelling time is the time taken for an electron to tunnel out of a system after it has tunnelled in. We define the tunnelling time distribution for quantum processes in a dissipative environment and develop a practical approach for calculating it, where the environment is described by the general Markovian master equation. We illustrate the theory by using the rate equation to compute the tunnelling time distribution for electron transport through a molecular junc...

  19. Quantum Tunnelling to the Origin and Evolution of Life

    OpenAIRE

    Trixler, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon which becomes relevant at the nanoscale and below. It is a paradox from the classical point of view as it enables elementary particles and atoms to permeate an energetic barrier without the need for sufficient energy to overcome it. Tunnelling might seem to be an exotic process only important for special physical effects and applications such as the Tunnel Diode, Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy (electron tunnelling) or Near-field Optical Microscopy operating ...

  20. Hi-tech Tunnel Sets World Record

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A sport utility vehicle takes the new direct route from Xi’an, capital city of northwest China’s Shaanxi Province, to Zhashui County through the Zhongnanshan Tunnel, which opened on January 21.With a total investment of nearly 3.2 billion yuan, the four-lane highway is the world’s longest double-tube tunnel, stretching 18.02 km.As a major part of the province’s expressway network, the tunnel connects Xi’an with southwest Shaanxi through the Qinling Mountains, shortening the previous three-hour trip to 40 minutes.The highway tunnel is also planned as part of a national highway linking north China’s Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region and south China’s Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region.

  1. TBM tunneling on the Yucca Mountain Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) is a scientific endeavor to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain for the first long-term, high-level nuclear waste repository in the United States. The current status of this long-term project from the construction perspective is described. A key element is construction of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Tunnel, which is being excavated with a 7.6 m (25 ft) diameter tunnel boring machine (TBM). Development of the ESF may include the excavation of over 15 km (9.3 mi) of tunnel varying in size from 3.0 to 7.6 m (10 to 25 ft). Prior to construction, extensive constructability reviews were an interactive part of the final design. The intent was to establish a constructable design that met the long-term stability requirements for radiological safety of a future repository, while maintaining flexibility for the scientific investigations and acceptable tunneling productivity

  2. Dynamical quenching of tunneling in molecular magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that a single molecular magnet placed in a rapidly oscillating magnetic field displays the phenomenon of quenching of tunneling processes. The results open a way to manipulate the quantum states of molecular magnets by means of radiation in the terahertz range. Our analysis separates the time evolution into slow and fast components thereby obtaining an effective theory for the slow dynamics. This effective theory presents quenching of the tunnel effect, in particular, stands out its difference with the so-called coherent destruction of tunneling. We support our prediction with numerical evidence based on an exact solution of Schrödinger's equation. - Highlights: • Single molecular magnets under rapidly oscillating magnetic fields is studied. • It is shown that this system displays the quenching of tunneling processes. • Our findings provide a control of quantum molecular magnets via terahertz radiation

  3. Program Analyzes Performance Of A Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viterna, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    WT computer program developed to calculate rotor power required by, and output thrust produced by, fan in closed-loop wind tunnel. Uses blade-element theory to calculate aerodynamic forces along each blade of fan. Written in APL2.

  4. Some Connections between Quantum Tunneling and Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Norbury, J W

    1998-01-01

    The Wheeler-DeWitt equation in the minisuperspace approximation is studied in four different models. Under certain circumstances each model leads to a tunneling potential and under the same circumstances the classical version of each model leads to inflation.

  5. Many-electron tunneling in atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Zon, B A

    1999-01-01

    A theoretical derivation is given for the formula describing N-electron ionization of atom by a dc field and laser radiation in tunneling regime. Numerical examples are presented for noble gases atoms.

  6. Dynamical quenching of tunneling in molecular magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    José Santander, María, E-mail: maria.jose.noemi@gmail.com [Recursos Educativos Quántica, Santiago (Chile); Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile and CEDENNA, Avda. Ecuador 3493, Santiago (Chile); Nunez, Alvaro S., E-mail: alnunez@dfi.uchile.cl [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 487-3, Santiago (Chile); Roldán-Molina, A. [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Avenida Universidad 330, Curauma, Valparaíso (Chile); Troncoso, Roberto E., E-mail: r.troncoso.c@gmail.com [Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y la Nanotecnología, CEDENNA, Avda. Ecuador 3493, Santiago 9170124 (Chile); Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Avenida España 1680, Valparaíso (Chile)

    2015-12-15

    It is shown that a single molecular magnet placed in a rapidly oscillating magnetic field displays the phenomenon of quenching of tunneling processes. The results open a way to manipulate the quantum states of molecular magnets by means of radiation in the terahertz range. Our analysis separates the time evolution into slow and fast components thereby obtaining an effective theory for the slow dynamics. This effective theory presents quenching of the tunnel effect, in particular, stands out its difference with the so-called coherent destruction of tunneling. We support our prediction with numerical evidence based on an exact solution of Schrödinger's equation. - Highlights: • Single molecular magnets under rapidly oscillating magnetic fields is studied. • It is shown that this system displays the quenching of tunneling processes. • Our findings provide a control of quantum molecular magnets via terahertz radiation.

  7. LEP sees the end of the tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    After 14 months, which have seen the removal of 30,000 tonnes of material from the tunnel, the LEP dismantling operation has now been completed. LHC installation, which will be subject to new safety rules, can go ahead.

  8. Unknotting tunnels in hyperbolic 3-manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Colin

    2012-01-01

    An unknotting tunnel in a 3-manifold with boundary is a properly embedded arc, the complement of an open neighborhood of which is a handlebody. A geodesic with endpoints on the cusp boundary of a hyperbolic 3-manifold and perpendicular to the cusp boundary is called a vertical geodesic. Given a vertical geodesic in a hyperbolic 3-manifold M, we find sufficient conditions for it to be an unknotting tunnel. In particular, if the vertical geodesic corresponds to a 4-bracelet, 5-bracelet or 6-bracelet in the universal cover and has short enough length, it must be an unknotting tunnel. Furthermore, we consider a vertical geodesic that satisfies the elder sibling property, which means that in the universal cover, every horoball except the one centered at infinity is connected to a larger horoball by a lift of the vertical geodesic. Such a vertical geodesic with length less than ln(2) is then shown to be an unknotting tunnel.

  9. Dielectric Sensors Based on Electromagnetic Energy Tunneling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Siddiqui

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We show that metallic wires embedded in narrow waveguide bends and channels demonstrate resonance behavior at specific frequencies. The electromagnetic energy at these resonances tunnels through the narrow waveguide channels with almost no propagation losses. Under the tunneling behavior, high-intensity electromagnetic fields are produced in the vicinity of the metallic wires. These intense field resonances can be exploited to build highly sensitive dielectric sensors. The sensor operation is explained with the help of full-wave simulations. A practical setup consisting of a 3D waveguide bend is presented to experimentally observe the tunneling phenomenon. The tunneling frequency is predicted by determining the input impedance minima through a variational formula based on the Green function of a probe-excited parallel plate waveguide.

  10. Tunneling rate in double quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filikhin, Igor; Matinyan, Sergei; Vlahovic, Branislav

    2014-03-01

    We study spectral properties of electron tunneling in double quantum dots (DQDs) (and double quantum wells (DQWs)) and their relation to the geometry. In particular we compare the tunneling in DQW with chaotic and regular geometry, taking into account recent evidence about regularization of the tunneling rate when the QW geometry is chaotic. Our calculations do not support this assumption. We confirm high influence of the QW geometry boundaries on the rate fluctuation along the spectrum. The factors of the effective mass anisotropy and violation of the symmetry of DQD and DQW are also considered. Generally, we found that the small violation of the symmetry drastically affects tunneling. This work is supported by the NSF (HRD-0833184) and NASA (NNX09AV07A).

  11. Electron tunneling across a tunable potential barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an experiment where the elementary quantum electron tunneling process should be affected by an independent gate voltage parameter. We have realized nanotransistors where the source and drain electrodes are created by electromigration inducing a nanometer sized gap acting as a tunnel barrier. The barrier potential shape is in first approximation considered trapezoidal. The application of a voltage to the gate electrode close to the barrier region can in principle affect the barrier shape. Simulations of the source drain tunnel current as a function of the gate voltage predict modulations as large as one hundred percent. The difficulty of observing the predicted behaviour in our samples might be due to the peculiar geometry of the realized tunnel junction.

  12. Low Speed Wind Tunnel Facility (LSWTF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: This facility consists of a large-scale, low-speed open-loop induction wind tunnel which has been modified to house a linear turbine cascade. A 125-hp...

  13. Teelt van vruchtgewassen in lage tunnels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, van C.A.P.; Geven, C.G.M.

    1994-01-01

    Een aantal warmteminnende vruchtgewassen zijn beproefd in lage tunnels en vergeleken met onbedekte teelt en met kasteelt. Het betrof aubergine, paprika, peper en diverse typen meloen. Daar is courgette als vergelijkend gewas aan toegevoegd

  14. Proton tunnelling in intermolecular hydrogen bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsewill, A.J. [Nottingham Univ. (United Kingdom); Johnson, M.R. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France); Trommsdorff, H.P. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 38 (France)

    1997-04-01

    The wavefunctions of particles extend beyond the classically accessible regions of potential energy-surfaces (PES). A manifestation of this partial delocalization is the quantum-mechanical tunneling effect which enables a particle to escape from a metastable potential-well. Tunnelling is most important for the lightest atoms, so that the determination of its contribution to proton transfer, one of the most fundamental chemical reactions, is an important issue. QENS and NMR techniques have been employed to study the motion of protons in the hydrogen bond of benzoic-acid crystals, a system which has emerged as a particularly suitable model since proton transfer occurs in a near symmetric double-well potential. The influence of quantum tunnelling was revealed and investigated in these experiments. This work provides an experimental benchmark for theoretical descriptions of translational proton-tunnelling. (author). 7 refs.

  15. 7 x 10 Foot Wind Tunnel

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This wind tunnel is used for basic and applied research in aeromechanics on advanced and unique technology rotorcraft. It supports research on advanced concepts and...

  16. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anastasios Koulaouzidis; Shivaram Bhat; Athar A Saeed

    2009-01-01

    Since its initial description in 1964, research has transformed spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) from a feared disease (with reported mortality of 90%) to a treatable complication of decompensated cirrhosis,albeit with steady prevalence and a high recurrence rate. Bacterial translocation, the key mechanism in the pathogenesis of SBP, is only possible because of the concurrent failure of defensive mechanisms in cirrhosis.Variants of SBP should be treated. Leucocyte esterase reagent strips have managed to shorten the 'tap-toshot' time, while future studies should look into their combined use with ascitic fluid pH. Third generation cephalosporins are the antibiotic of choice because they have a number of advantages. Renal dysfunction has been shown to be an independent predictor of mortality in patients with SBP. Albumin is felt to reduce the risk of renal impairment by improving effective intravascular volume, and by helping to bind proinflammatory molecules. Following a single episode of SBP, patients should have long-term antibiotic prophylaxis and be considered for liver transplantation.

  17. Adult bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C N; Samuelsson, I S; Galle, M;

    2004-01-01

    Episodes of adult bacterial meningitis (ABM) at a Danish hospital in 1991-2000 were identified from the databases of the Department of Clinical Microbiology, and compared with data from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish National Notification System. Reduced penicillin susceptibi......Episodes of adult bacterial meningitis (ABM) at a Danish hospital in 1991-2000 were identified from the databases of the Department of Clinical Microbiology, and compared with data from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish National Notification System. Reduced penicillin...... susceptibility occurred in 21 (23%) of 92 cases of known aetiology, compared to an estimated 6% in nationally notified cases (p <0.001). Ceftriaxone plus penicillin as empirical treatment was appropriate in 97% of ABM cases in the study population, and in 99.6% of nationally notified cases. The notification rate...... was 75% for penicillin-susceptible episodes, and 24% for penicillin-non-susceptible episodes (p <0.001). Cases involving staphylococci, Pseudomonas spp. and Enterobacteriaceae were under-reported. Among 51 ABM cases with no identified risk factors, nine of 11 cases with penicillin...

  18. [Endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornut, P-L; Chiquet, C

    2011-01-01

    Endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis, also called metastatic bacterial endophthalmitis, remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. It is a rare and potentially sight-threatening ocular infection that occurs when bacteria reach the eye via the bloodstream, cross the blood-ocular barrier, and multiply within the eye. It usually affects immunocompromised patients and those suffering from diabetes mellitus, malignancy, or cardiac disease, but has also been reported after invasive procedures or in previously healthy people. In most cases, the ocular symptoms occur after the diagnosis of septicemia or systemic infection. Ocular symptoms include decreased vision, redness, discharge, pain, and floaters. The ocular inflammatory signs may be anterior and/or posterior. Bilateral involvement occurs in nearly 25% of cases. A wide range of microorganisms are involved, with differences in their frequency according to geography as well as the patient's age and past medical history, because of variations in the predisposing conditions and the source of the sepsis. The majority of patients are initially misdiagnosed, and ophthalmologists should be aware of this because prompt local and general management is required to save the eye and/or the patient's life. PMID:21145128

  19. Two-Dimensional Low-Turbulence Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1938-01-01

    Manometer for the Two-Dimensional Low-Turbulence Tunnel. The Two-Dimensional Low-Turbulence Tunnel was originally called the Refrigeration or 'Ice' tunnel because it was intended to support research on aircraft icing. The tunnel was built of wood, lined with sheet steel, and heavily insulated on the outside. Refrigeration equipment was installed to generate icing conditions inside the test section. The NACA sent out a questionnaire to airline operators, asking them to detail the specific kinds of icing problems they encountered in flight. The replies became the basis for a comprehensive research program begun in 1938 when the tunnel commenced operation. Research quickly focused on the concept of using exhaust heat to prevent ice from forming on the wing's leading edge. This project was led by Lewis Rodert, who later would win the Collier Trophy for his work on deicing. By 1940, aircraft icing research had shifted to the new Ames Research Laboratory, and the Ice tunnel was refitted with screens and honeycomb. Researchers were trying to eliminate all turbulence in the test section. From TN 1283: 'The Langley two-dimensional low-turbulence pressure tunnel is a single-return closed-throat tunnel.... The tunnel is constructed of heavy steel plate so that the pressure of the air may be varied from approximately full vacuum to 10 atmospheres absolute, thereby giving a wide range of air densities. Reciprocating compressors with a capacity of 1200 cubic feet of free air per minute provide compressed air. Since the tunnel shell has a volume of about 83,000 cubic feet, a compression rate of approximately one atmosphere per hour is obtained. ... The test section is rectangular in shape, 3 feet wide, 7 1/2 feet high, and 7 1/2 feet long. ... The over-all size of the wind-tunnel shell is about 146 feet long and 58 feet wide with a maximum diameter of 26 feet. The test section and entrance and exit cones are surrounded by a 22-foot diameter section of the shell to provide a space

  20. Tunneling magnetoresistive heads for magnetic data storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Sining

    2007-01-01

    Spintronics is emerging to be a new form of nanotechnologies, which utilizes not only the charge but also spin degree of freedom of electrons. Spin-dependent tunneling transport is one of the many kinds of physical phenomena involving spintronics, which has already found industrial applications. In this paper, we first provide a brief review on the basic physics and materials for magnetic tunnel junctions, followed more importantly by a detailed coverage on the application of magnetic tunneling devices in magnetic data storage. The use of tunneling magnetoresistive reading heads has helped to maintain a fast growth of areal density, which is one of the key advantages of hard disk drives as compared to solid-state memories. This review is focused on the first commercial tunneling magnetoresistive heads in the industry at an areal density of 80 approximately 100 Gbit/in2 for both laptop and desktop Seagate hard disk drive products using longitudinal media. The first generation tunneling magnetoresistive products utilized a bottom stack of tunnel junctions and an abutted hard bias design. The output signal amplitude of these heads was 3 times larger than that of comparable giant magnetoresistive devices, resulting in a 0.6 decade bit error rate gain over the latter. This has enabled high component and drive yields. Due to the improved thermal dissipation of vertical geometry, the tunneling magnetoresistive head runs cooler with a better lifetime performance, and has demonstrated similar electrical-static-discharge robustness as the giant magnetoresistive devices. It has also demonstrated equivalent or better process and wafer yields compared to the latter. The tunneling magnetoresistive heads are proven to be a mature and capable reader technology. Using the same head design in conjunction with perpendicular recording media, an areal density of 274 Gbit/in2 has been demonstrated, and advanced tunneling magnetoresistive heads can reach 311 Gbit/in2. Today, the

  1. Periodic growth of bacterial colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Yoshihiro; Ikeda, Takemasa; Shimada, Hirotoshi; Hiramatsu, Fumiko; Kobayashi, Naoki; Wakita, Jun-ichi; Itoh, Hiroto; Kurosu, Sayuri; Nakatsuchi, Michio; Matsuyama, Tohey; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    2005-06-01

    The formation of concentric ring colonies by bacterial species Bacillus subtilis and Proteus mirabilis has been investigated experimentally, focusing our attention on the dependence of local cell density upon the bacterial motility. It has been confirmed that these concentric ring colonies reflect the periodic change of the bacterial motility between motile cell state and immotile cell state. We conclude that this periodic change is macroscopically determined neither by biological factors (i.e., biological clock) nor by chemical factors (chemotaxis as inhibitor). And our experimental results strongly suggest that the essential factor for the change of the bacterial motility during concentric ring formation is the local cell density.

  2. Numerical simulation in tunneling - recent developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents recent findings of the Austrian joint research initiative 'Numerical Simulation in Tunneling'. The five year initiative, which was supported by the Austrian research fund, was started in 1997 with the main aim of developing and improving methods for the computer analysis of tunnels. The Problem areas that were looked at were: data acquisition and generation of input data, modeling strategies, visualization, material behavior and effects of water and air pressure. Only some topics are discussed here, others are presented in the mini-symposium Computational Methods in Tunneling. The topics that will be presented are: automatic acquisition of geological data (research performed at the institutes of rock mechanics and tunneling and the Institute for computer graphics and vision): a new system was developed that allows to create digital 3-D images of the tunnel face that can be interpreted by a geologist on a computer graphics work station. Some preliminary interpretation may be made by the software so that the work by the geologist is reduced. The interpreted data is used to generate the Input for numerical simulation models. Modeling strategies at the tunnel site (research performed at Institute of rock mechanics and tunneling): the feasibility of using three-dimensional modeling on site in order to interpret observation and measurements or to decide necessary support measures due to the occurrence of unforeseen geological features was investigated. The conclusion is, that if approached in an intelligent way three-dimensional modeling is feasible at the tunnel site and brings advantages. Visualization (research performed at the institute for structural analysis): numerical models of ten create a large amount of data, whose interpretation is difficult without advanced visualization techniques. The prototype of an advanced 3-D visualization system using virtual reality and a head-mounted display is presented. Refs. 2 (author)

  3. Quantization of Time in Dynamic Barrier Tunnelling

    OpenAIRE

    Davison, Sydney G.; Davison, Timothy S.

    2016-01-01

    In the B\\"uttiker-Landauer perturbation approach to electron tunnelling, through a time-modulated rectilinear potential barrier, the Tien-Gordon identity was invoked, together with its infinite energy spectrum. Here, an exact treatment is presented which is based on the temporal wave-function matching procedure, that led to a finite energy spectrum. In seeking the condition governing the time evolution of the tunnelling process, the Euler formula provided the crucial ingredient for time quant...

  4. Andreev reflection and Klein tunneling in graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Beenakker, C. W. J.

    2007-01-01

    This is a colloquium-style introduction to two electronic processes in a carbon monolayer (graphene), each having an analogue in relativistic quantum mechanics. Both processes couple electron-like and hole-like states, through the action of either a superconducting pair potential or an electrostatic potential. The first process, Andreev reflection, is the electron-to-hole conversion at the interface with a superconductor. The second process, Klein tunneling, is the tunneling through a p-n jun...

  5. Tribocorrosion challenges in tunnel boring machinery (TBM)

    OpenAIRE

    Espallargas Alvarez, Nuria

    2015-01-01

    Tunnel Boring Machines (TBM) are used to bore tunnels, a specific area of interest for TBMs is their cutter heads, which is a massive steel structure with hardened steel disc cutters attached. The disc cutters can encounter all types of geology (i.e. from soft clays, slits, sands etc., to soft rock and extremely hard rock) and environments (i.e. dry, wet, seawater or chemical additives). These geologies and environments cause the disc cutters to be continuously exposed to degra...

  6. Geology of Pletovarje motorway tunnel (Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Čarman

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Styrian motorway crosses the Pletovarje ridge through the tunnel having the same name. It intersects the mosteastern extension of the Southern Karavanke tectonic unit. Considering geological conditions, the tunnel couldbe divided into three sections: the inner Donat / Dona~ka fault zone composed of tectonic lenses of differentlithostratigraphic units (of paleozoic, triassic and tertiary age, massive dolomite (lower triassic and Smrekovecseries of oligocene age. Main faults have east – west direction and are subvertical.

  7. Theoretical Analysis of Reinforcement Tunnel Lining Corrosion

    OpenAIRE

    ZhiQiang Zhangand; Yousif A. Mansoor; Fan Hong Wei

    2013-01-01

    The main cause of ageing damage in reinforced concrete structures is reinforcement corrosion. Damage can be detected visually as coincident cracks along the reinforcement bar, which are significant of both reduction of the re-bar, cross-section and loss of bond strength for reinforced concrete. The reinforced concrete is one of the most widely used engineering materials as final lining of tunnels. The corrosion is common durability problems that have significant effect on the tunnel performan...

  8. Projection operator method for collective tunneling transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collective tunneling transitions take place in the case that a system has two nearly degenerate ground states with a slight energy splitting, which provides the time scale of the tunneling. The Liouville equation determines the evolution of the density matrix, while the Schroedinger equation determines that of a state. The Liouville equation seems to be more powerful for calculating accurately the energy splitting of two nearly degenerate eigenstates. However, no method to exactly solve the Liouville eigenvalue equation has been established. The usual projection operator method for the Liouville equation is not feasible. We analytically solve the Liouville evolution equation for nuclear collective tunneling from one Hartree minimum to another, proposing a simple and solvable model Hamiltonian for the transition. We derive an analytical expression for the splitting of energy eigenvalues from a spectral function of the Liouville evolution using a half-projected operator method. A full-order analytical expression for the energy splitting is obtained. We define the collective tunneling path of a microscopic Hamiltonian for collective tunneling, projecting the nuclear ground states onto n-particle n-hole state spaces. It is argued that the collective tunneling path sector of a microscopic Hamiltonian can be transformed into the present solvable model Hamiltonian. (author)

  9. Radio-frequency scanning tunnelling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemiktarak, U; Ndukum, T; Schwab, K C; Ekinci, K L

    2007-11-01

    The scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) relies on localized electron tunnelling between a sharp probe tip and a conducting sample to attain atomic-scale spatial resolution. In the 25-year period since its invention, the STM has helped uncover a wealth of phenomena in diverse physical systems--ranging from semiconductors to superconductors to atomic and molecular nanosystems. A severe limitation in scanning tunnelling microscopy is the low temporal resolution, originating from the diminished high-frequency response of the tunnel current readout circuitry. Here we overcome this limitation by measuring the reflection from a resonant inductor-capacitor circuit in which the tunnel junction is embedded, and demonstrate electronic bandwidths as high as 10 MHz. This approximately 100-fold bandwidth improvement on the state of the art translates into fast surface topography as well as delicate measurements in mesoscopic electronics and mechanics. Broadband noise measurements across the tunnel junction using this radio-frequency STM have allowed us to perform thermometry at the nanometre scale. Furthermore, we have detected high-frequency mechanical motion with a sensitivity approaching approximately 15 fm Hz(-1/2). This sensitivity is on par with the highest available from nanoscale optical and electrical displacement detection techniques, and the radio-frequency STM is expected to be capable of quantum-limited position measurements. PMID:17972882

  10. Macroscopic and Fluorescent Discrimination of Adenosine Triphosphate via Selective Metallo-hydrogel Formation: A Visual, Practical, and Reliable Rehearsal toward Cellular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Weiwei; Liu, Cong; Yu, Fabiao; Liu, Yaoqi; Li, Zhenhua; Chen, Lingxin; Bao, Xiaoling; Tu, Tao

    2016-08-17

    With use of simple terpyridine zinc nitrate complexes, intriguing visual recognition of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) via selective coordination assembly leading to two-component metallo-hydrogel formation has been realized. With intensive fluorescent study and density functional theory calculations, it may be inferred, besides the selective metal-ligand interaction between Zn center and phosphate groups, the intramolecular π-stacking between the planar nucleobases of ATP and the metal-hybrid aromatic ring of pincer complex strongly affected the geometry of the coordinated adducts and possible molecular self-assembly process, which constitute a completely new sensing strategy in comparison with the conventional approaches. Furthermore, in light of extreme sensitivity of pincer zinc complexes toward ATP at micromolar scale (1.85 μM) and remarkable fluorescent enhancement (ca. 44-fold) upon ATP addition, the feasibility of the low cytotoxicity pincer zinc complexes in monitoring ATP in HeLa cells has been fulfilled with confocal fluorescence microscopy. PMID:27420773

  11. Theoretical vibrational spectroscopy of intermediates and the reaction mechanism of the guanosine triphosphate hydrolysis by the protein complex Ras-GAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrenova, Maria G; Grigorenko, Bella L; Nemukhin, Alexander V

    2016-09-01

    The structures and vibrational spectra of the reacting species upon guanosine triphosphate (GTP) hydrolysis to guanosine diphosphate and inorganic phosphate (Pi) trapped inside the protein complex Ras-GAP were analyzed following the results of QM/MM simulations. The frequencies of the phosphate vibrations referring to the reactants and to Pi were compared to those observed in the experimental FTIR studies. A good correlation between the theoretical and experimental vibrational data provides a strong support to the reaction mechanism of GTP hydrolysis by the Ras-GAP enzyme system revealed by the recent QM/MM modeling. Evolution of the vibrational bands associated with the inorganic phosphate Pi during the elementary stages of GTP hydrolysis is predicted. PMID:27214270

  12. Dielectric spectra broadening as a signature for dipole-matrix interaction. III. Water in adenosine monophosphate/adenosine-5'-triphosphate solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzenko, Alexander; Levy, Evgeniya; Shendrik, Andrey; Talary, Mark S; Caduff, Andreas; Feldman, Yuri

    2012-11-21

    In this, the third part of our series on the dielectric spectrum symmetrical broadening of water, we consider the nucleotide aqueous solutions. Where in Parts I [E. Levy et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 114502 (2012)] and II [E. Levy et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 114503 (2012)], the dipole-dipole or ion-dipole interaction had a dominant feature, now the interplay between these two types of dipole-matrix interactions will be considered. We present the results of high frequency dielectric measurements of different concentrations of adenosine monophosphate/adenosine-5'-triphosphate aqueous solutions. We observed the Cole-Cole broadening of the main relaxation peak of the solvent in the solutions. Moreover, depending on the nucleotide concentration, we observed both types of dipole-matrix interaction. The 3D trajectory approach (described in detail in Part I) is applied in order to highlight the differences between the two types of interaction. PMID:23181321

  13. Effects of 5 Thio-D-Glucose on cellular adenosine triphosphate levels and deoxyribonucleic acid rejoining in hypoxic and aerobic Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels were measured in both hypoxic and aerobic cultures of V79 Chinese hamster cells treated with 5-thio-D-glucose (5-SH-D-Glc). This glucose analog, a known inhibitor of D-glucose transport and metabolism, reduced ATP in cell cultures allowed to become hypoxic by cell metabolism, but not in aerobic cultures treated similarly. Cells depleted of ATP were unable to rejoin x-ray induced deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) strand breaks as measured by the alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation technique. The inference for radiation therapy is that inhibition of glucose metabolism selectively depletes energy reserves in hypoxic cells, rendering these cells more radiosensitive and leading to a more effective tumor treatment

  14. Theoretical vibrational spectroscopy of intermediates and the reaction mechanism of the guanosine triphosphate hydrolysis by the protein complex Ras-GAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrenova, Maria G.; Grigorenko, Bella L.; Nemukhin, Alexander V.

    2016-09-01

    The structures and vibrational spectra of the reacting species upon guanosine triphosphate (GTP) hydrolysis to guanosine diphosphate and inorganic phosphate (Pi) trapped inside the protein complex Ras-GAP were analyzed following the results of QM/MM simulations. The frequencies of the phosphate vibrations referring to the reactants and to Pi were compared to those observed in the experimental FTIR studies. A good correlation between the theoretical and experimental vibrational data provides a strong support to the reaction mechanism of GTP hydrolysis by the Ras-GAP enzyme system revealed by the recent QM/MM modeling. Evolution of the vibrational bands associated with the inorganic phosphate Pi during the elementary stages of GTP hydrolysis is predicted.

  15. Theory of dissociative tunneling ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensmark, Jens; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2016-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of the dissociative tunneling ionization process. Analytic expressions for the nuclear kinetic energy distribution of the ionization rates are derived. A particularly simple expression for the spectrum is found by using the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation in conjunction with the reflection principle. These spectra are compared to exact non-BO ab initio spectra obtained through model calculations with a quantum mechanical treatment of both the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom. In the regime where the BO approximation is applicable, imaging of the BO nuclear wave function is demonstrated to be possible through reverse use of the reflection principle, when accounting appropriately for the electronic ionization rate. A qualitative difference between the exact and BO wave functions in the asymptotic region of large electronic distances is shown. Additionally, the behavior of the wave function across the turning line is seen to be reminiscent of light refraction. For weak fields, where the BO approximation does not apply, the weak-field asymptotic theory describes the spectrum accurately.

  16. Heterotrimeric guanosine triphosphate-binding protein-coupled modulatory actions of motilin on K+ channels and postsynaptic γ-aminobutyric acid receptors in mouse medial vestibular nuclear neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todaka, Hiroshi; Tatsukawa, Tetsuya; Hashikawa, Tsutomu; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Shibuki, Katsuei; Nagao, Soichi

    2013-02-01

    Some central nervous system neurons express receptors of gastrointestinal hormones, but their pharmacological actions are not well known. Previous anatomical and unit recording studies suggest that a group of cerebellar Purkinje cells express motilin receptors, and motilin depresses the spike discharges of vestibular nuclear neurons that receive direct cerebellar inhibition in rats or rabbits. Here, by the slice-patch recording method, we examined the pharmacological actions of motilin on the mouse medial vestibular nuclear neurons (MVNs), which play an important role in the control of ocular reflexes. A small number of MVNs, as well as cerebellar floccular Purkinje cells, were labeled with an anti-motilin receptor antibody. Bath application of motilin (0.1 μm) decreased the discharge frequency of spontaneous action potentials in a group of MVNs in a dose-dependent manner (K(d) , 0.03 μm). The motilin action on spontaneous action potentials was blocked by apamin (100 nm), a blocker of small-conductance Ca(2+) -activated K(+) channels. Furthermore, motilin enhanced the amplitudes of inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) and miniature IPSCs, but did not affect the frequencies of miniature IPSCs. Intracellular application of pertussis toxin (PTx) (0.5 μg/μL) or guanosine triphosphate-γ-S (1 mm) depressed the motilin actions on both action potentials and IPSCs. Only 30% of MVNs examined on slices obtained from wild-type mice, but none of the GABAergic MVNs that were studied on slices obtained from vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid transporter-Venus transgenic mice, showed such a motilin response on action potentials and IPSCs. These findings suggest that motilin could modulate small-conductance Ca(2+) -activated K(+) channels and postsynaptic γ-aminobutyric acid receptors through heterotrimeric guanosine triphosphate-binding protein-coupled receptor in a group of glutamatergic MVNs. PMID:23136934

  17. Some Caves in tunnels in Dinaric karst of Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garasic, Mladen; Garasic, Davor

    2016-04-01

    In the last 50 years during the construction of almost all the tunnels in the Croatian Dinaric Karst thousands of caves have been encountered that represented the major problems during the construction works. Geological features (fissures, folding, faults, etc.) are described in this contribution, together with the hydrogeological conditions (rapid changes in groundwater levels). Special engineering geological exploration and survey of each cave, together with the stabilization of the tunnel ceiling, and groundwater protection actions according to basic engineering geological parameters are also presented. In karst tunneling in Croatia over 150 caves longer than 500 m have been investigated. Several caves are over 300 m deep (St. Ilija tunnel in Biokovo Mt), and 10 are longer than 1000 m (St.Rok tunnel, HE Senj and HE Velebit tunnels in Velebit Mt, Ucka tunnel in Ucka Mt, Mala kapela tunnel in Kapela Mt, caverns in HE Plat tunnel etc). Different solutions were chosen to cross the caves depending on the size and purpose of the tunnels (road, rail, pedestrian tunnel, or hydrotechnical tunnels). This is presentations of interesting examples of ceiling stabilization in big cave chambers, construction of bridges inside tunnels, deviations of tunnels, filling caves, grouting, etc. A complex type of karstification has been found in the cavern at the contact between the Palaeozoic clastic impervious formations and the Mesozoic complex of dolomitic limestones in the Vrata Tunnel and at the contact with flysch in the Učka Tunnel. However, karstification advancing in all directions at a similar rate is quite rare. The need to have the roadway and/or tunnel above water from a spring is the biggest possible engineering-geological, hydrogeological and civil engineering challenge. Significant examples are those above the Jadro spring (Mravinci tunnel) in flysch materials or above the Zvir spring in Rijeka (Katarina tunnel), and in fractured Mesozoic carbonates. Today in Croatian

  18. Study on calculation of rock pressure for ultra-shallow tunnel in poor surrounding rock and its tunneling procedure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojun Zhou; Jinghe Wang; Bentao Lin

    2014-01-01

    A computational method of rock pressure applied to an ultra-shallow tunnel is presented by key block theory, and its mathematical formula is proposed according to a mechanical tunnel model with super-shallow depth. Theoretical analysis shows that the tunnel is subject to asymmetric rock pressure due to oblique topography. The rock pressure applied to the tunnel crown and sidewall is closely related to the surrounding rock bulk density, tunnel size, depth and angle of oblique ground slope. The rock pressure applied to the tunnel crown is much greater than that to the sidewalls, and the load applied to the left side-wall is also greater than that to the right sidewall. Mean-while, the safety of the lining for an ultra-shallow tunnel in strata with inclined surface is affected by rock pressure and tunnel support parameters. Steel pipe grouting from ground surface is used to consolidate the unfavorable surrounding rock before tunnel excavation, and the reinforcing scope is proposed according to the analysis of the asymmetric load induced by tunnel excavation in weak rock with inclined ground surface. The tunneling procedure of bench cut method with pipe roof protection is still discussed and carried out in this paper according to the special geological condition. The method and tunneling procedure have been successfully utilized to design and drive a real expressway tunnel. The practice in building the super-shallow tunnel has proved the feasibility of the calculation method and tunneling procedure presented in this paper.

  19. [Small intestine bacterial overgrowth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung Ki, E L; Roduit, J; Delarive, J; Guyot, J; Michetti, P; Dorta, G

    2010-01-27

    Small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition characterised by nutrient malabsorption and excessive bacteria in the small intestine. It typically presents with diarrhea, flatulence and a syndrome of malabsorption (steatorrhea, macrocytic anemia). However, it may be asymptomatic in the eldery. A high index of suspicion is necessary in order to differentiate SIBO from other similar presenting disorders such as coeliac disease, lactose intolerance or the irritable bowel syndrome. A search for predisposing factor is thus necessary. These factors may be anatomical (stenosis, blind loop), or functional (intestinal hypomotility, achlorydria). The hydrogen breath test is the most frequently used diagnostic test although it lacks standardisation. The treatment of SIBO consists of eliminating predisposing factors and broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. PMID:20214190

  20. Studying bacterial multispecies biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Henriette Lyng; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; Burmølle, Mette

    2016-01-01

    The high prevalence and significance of multispecies biofilms have now been demonstrated in various bacterial habitats with medical, industrial, and ecological relevance. It is highly evident that several species of bacteria coexist and interact in biofilms, which highlights the need for evaluating...... the approaches used to study these complex communities. This review focuses on the establishment of multispecies biofilms in vitro, interspecies interactions in microhabitats, and how to select communities for evaluation. Studies have used different experimental approaches; here we evaluate the...... benefits and drawbacks of varying the degree of complexity. This review aims to facilitate multispecies biofilm research in order to expand the current limited knowledge on interspecies interactions. Recent technological advances have enabled total diversity analysis of highly complex and diverse microbial...

  1. A Tunnel Compress Scheme for Multi-Tunneling in PMIPv6-based Nested NEMO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youn-Hee Han

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In nested NEMO, a multi-tunneling causes a pinball routing problem. Several solutions proposed tosolve the pinball routing problem in NEMO BSP cannot be used at PMIPv6-based NEMO due todifferent environment such as no route optimization with CN. We propose a tunnel compress scheme formulti-tunneling in PMIPv6-based NEMO. The scheme consists of two parts: the first part is an interdomainor wired Internet part. The other is an intra part of nested mobile networks. In the inter-domainpart, single IP-in-IP tunnel is created by connecting an innermost entry point with an outermost exitpoint in original multi-tunnels. As the same way used in the inter-domain part, single IP-in-IP tunnel iscreated from the outermost exit point and an innermost exit point in original multi-tunnels. In theproposed scheme, IP-in-IP encapsulated packets are forwarded using host-based routing withoutmodifying the outer header. The information to compress multi-tunnels is piggybacked at the PMIPv6signaling.

  2. Static and dynamic aspects of spin tunnelling in crystalline magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single-crystal magnetic tunnel junctions employing bcc (100) Fe electrodes and MgO(100) insulating barrier are elaborated by molecular beam epitaxy. The magneto-transport properties are investigated in two extreme regimes. First, for extremely small MgO thickness, we show that the equilibrium tunnel transport in Fe/MgO/Fe systems leads to antiferromagnetic interactions, mediated by the tunnelling of the minority spin interfacial resonance state. Second, for large MgO barrier thickness, the tunnel transport validates specific spin filtering effects in terms of symmetry of the electronic Bloch function and symmetry-dependent wavefunction attenuation in the single-crystal barrier. Within this framework, we present giant tunnel magnetoresistive effects at room temperature (125-160%). Moreover, we illustrate that the interfacial chemical and electronic structure plays a crucial role in the spin filtering. We point out imperfect filtering effects and a strong implication of the minority surface state of Fe on the low voltage variation of tunnel magnetoresistance. The insertion of carbon impurities at the Fe/MgO interface changes radically the voltage response of the tunnel magnetoresistance and activates a resonant tunnelling mechanism via the interfacial resonance state

  3. Quantum dot resonant tunneling diode single photon detector with aluminum oxide aperture defined tunneling area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, H.W.; Kardynal, Beata; Ellis, D.J.P.;

    2008-01-01

    Quantum dot resonant tunneling diode single photon detector with independently defined absorption and sensing areas is demonstrated. The device, in which the tunneling is constricted to an aperture in an insulating layer in the emitter, shows electrical characteristics typical of high quality res...

  4. Tunnelling in Soft Soil: Tunnel Boring Machine Operation and Soil Response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Festa, D.; Broere, W.; Bosch, J.W.

    2013-01-01

    Constructing tunnels in soft soil with the use of Tunnel Boring Machines may induce settlements including soil movements ahead of the face, soil relaxation into the tail void, possible heave due to grouting, long lasting consolidation processes, and potentially several other mechanisms. A considerab

  5. European Tunnelling Review Quality, Environment and Safety Focus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bill Weburn

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of tunnelling projects with some of the themes covered by the Chengdu Tunnelling Conference.(a) Environmental issues and tunnels under high groundwater pressure (Hallandsis Rail Tunnel, Sweden)(b) Fire -fighting and tunnel safety on long highway tunnels (Socatop Tunnel, West Paris)(c) Mechanised tunnelling below the world's largest airport (Heathrow T5) of a quality that avoids disruption to its operation.Each of these overviews show an enhanced performance in regard to project specific events or objectives. Particularly in tunnelling, project owners expect more than just a facility delivered on time for their money: they expect an all round performance respecting deadlines, budget, environmental protection, safety, quality and community harmony. Funding agencies do not always have the same agenda as project owners, acknowledging peripheral selection criteria but often demanding that the lowest bidder be awarded work. All round performance requires all round project selection criteria.

  6. IL-36γ is secreted in microparticles and exosomes by lung macrophages in response to bacteria and bacterial components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, Melissa A; Singer, Benjamin H; Newstead, Michael W; Zeng, Xianying; Moore, Thomas A; White, Eric S; Kunkel, Steven L; Peters-Golden, Marc; Standiford, Theodore J

    2016-08-01

    Interleukin-36 is a family of novel interleukin-1-like proinflammatory cytokines that are highly expressed in epithelial tissues and several myeloid-derived cell types. Like those of classic interleukin-1 cytokines, the secretion mechanisms of interleukin-36 are not well understood. Interleukin-36γ secretion in dermal epithelial cells requires adenosine 5'-triphosphate, which suggests a nonclassical mechanism of secretion. In this study, murine pulmonary macrophages and human alveolar macrophages were treated with recombinant pathogen-associated molecular patterns (intact bacteria: Klebsiella pneumoniae or Streptococcus pneumoniae). Cell lysates were analyzed for messenger ribonucleic acid by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and conditioned medium was analyzed for interleukin-36γ by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, with or without sonication. In addition, conditioned medium was ultracentrifuged at 25,000 g and 100,000 g, to isolate microparticles and exosomes, respectively, and interleukin-36γ protein was assessed in each fraction by Western blot analysis. Interleukin-36γ mRNA was induced in both murine and human lung macrophages by a variety of pathogen-associated molecular patterns, as well as heat-killed and live Klebsiella pneumoniae and Streptococcus pneumoniae, and induction occurred in a myeloid differentiation response gene 88-dependent manner. Secretion of interleukin-36γ protein was enhanced by adenosine 5'-triphosphate. Furthermore, extracellular interleukin-36γ protein detection was markedly enhanced by sonication to disrupt membrane-bound structures. Interleukin-36γ protein was detected by Western blot in microparticles and exosome fractions isolated by ultracentrifugation. Interleukin-36γ was induced and secreted from lung macrophages in response to Gram-negative and -positive bacterial stimulation. The results suggest that interleukin-36γ is secreted in a non-Golgi-dependent manner by lung macrophages in response to Gram

  7. Molecular approaches for bacterial azoreductases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montira Leelakriangsak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Azo dyes are the dominant types of synthetic dyes, widely used in textiles, foods, leather, printing, tattooing, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries. Many microorganisms are able to decolorize azo dyes, and there is increasing interest in biological waste treatment methods. Bacterial azoreductases can cleave azo linkages (-N=N- in azo dyes, forming aromatic amines. This review mainly focuses on employing molecular approaches, including gene manipulation and recombinant strains, to study bacterial azoreductases. The construction of the recombinant protein by cloning and the overexpression of azoreductase is described. The mechanisms and function of bacterial azoreductases can be studied by other molecular techniques discussed in this review, such as RT-PCR, southern blot analysis, western blot analysis, zymography, and muta-genesis in order to understand bacterial azoreductase properties, function and application. In addition, understanding the regulation of azoreductase gene expression will lead to the systematic use of gene manipulation in bacterial strains for new strategies in future waste remediation technologies.

  8. The Cause of Shallow Tunnel Collapse and Simulation Analysis of Consolidation for a Collapsed Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shucai Li

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to ensure the safety of the shallow tunnels construction, it is very important to find the reasons of the collapse. During Fujiachong tunnel construction, collapse of the section Yk25 + 547~Yk25 + 552. Distributions of cracked surrounding rock, rainfall, geological forecast were discussed for reason of tunnel collapse. According to in-situ construction condition, reinforced support program was applied to the surrounding rock consolidation of the tunnel. In order to assess consolidation effect, a cross-sections of collapse zone measurement was increased and simulation analysis was applied to the section. The results of in-situ measurement and simulation results show that tunneling collapse zone was consolidated by reinforced support program successfully.

  9. Computational Simulation of Semispan Wings in Wind Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Mike; Rizk, Yehia

    1998-01-01

    The computational modelling of experiments, with the end aim of providing sufficiently accurate simulations to assess and improve turbulence models is described. Solid wall tunnels are the only tunnels in which the boundary conditions can, in principle, be known exactly. The modelling of the tunnel walls for transonic flows requires the accurate modelling of the viscous displacement effects on the tunnel walls. This paper describes the modelling of semispan wing experiments in solid wall tunnels, with the tunnel walls modelled as inviscid walls, and with all 4 walls modelled viscously. The effect of the viscous effects is discussed, as well as the feasibility of modelling these effects in an inviscid, apriori manner.

  10. Modelling of interband transitions in GaAs tunnel diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louarn, K.; Fontaine, C.; Arnoult, A.; Olivié, F.; Lacoste, G.; Piquemal, F.; Bounouh, A.; Almuneau, G.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an improved model for non-local band-to-band tunneling carrier transport is presented and compared to experimental measurement from GaAs tunnel junctions devices. By carefully taking into account the coupling between the conduction band and the light holes valence band, the model is able to predict, with realistic material parameters, the amplitude of the current density throughout the whole tunneling regime. The model suggests that elastic band-to-band tunneling instead of trap-assisted-tunneling is the predominant mechanism in GaAs tunnel junctions, which is of great interest for better understanding and improving III–V multi-junction solar cells.

  11. Channel selective tunnelling through a nanographene assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, H S; Feng, X; Müllen, K; Chandrasekhar, N; Durkan, C

    2012-03-01

    We report selective tunnelling through a nanographene intermolecular tunnel junction achieved via scanning tunnelling microscope tip functionalization with hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene (HBC) molecules. This leads to an offset in the alignment between the energy levels of the tip and the molecular assembly, resulting in the imaging of a variety of distinct charge density patterns in the HBC assembly, not attainable using a bare metallic tip. Different tunnelling channels can be selected by the application of an electric field in the tunnelling junction, which changes the condition of the HBC on the tip. Density functional theory-based calculations relate the imaged HBC patterns to the calculated molecular orbitals at certain energy levels. These patterns bear a close resemblance to the π-orbital states of the HBC molecule calculated at the relevant energy levels, mainly below the Fermi energy of HBC. This correlation demonstrates the ability of an HBC functionalized tip as regards accessing an energy range that is restricted to the usual operating bias range around the Fermi energy with a normal metallic tip at room temperature. Apart from relating to molecular orbitals, some patterns could also be described in association with the Clar aromatic sextet formula. Our observations may help pave the way towards the possibility of controlling charge transport between organic interfaces. PMID:22322294

  12. Tunnel Ventilation Control Using Reinforcement Learning Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Baeksuk; Kim, Dongnam; Hong, Daehie; Park, Jooyoung; Chung, Jin Taek; Kim, Tae-Hyung

    The main purpose of tunnel ventilation system is to maintain CO pollutant concentration and VI (visibility index) under an adequate level to provide drivers with comfortable and safe driving environment. Moreover, it is necessary to minimize power consumption used to operate ventilation system. To achieve the objectives, the control algorithm used in this research is reinforcement learning (RL) method. RL is a goal-directed learning of a mapping from situations to actions without relying on exemplary supervision or complete models of the environment. The goal of RL is to maximize a reward which is an evaluative feedback from the environment. In the process of constructing the reward of the tunnel ventilation system, two objectives listed above are included, that is, maintaining an adequate level of pollutants and minimizing power consumption. RL algorithm based on actor-critic architecture and gradient-following algorithm is adopted to the tunnel ventilation system. The simulations results performed with real data collected from existing tunnel ventilation system and real experimental verification are provided in this paper. It is confirmed that with the suggested controller, the pollutant level inside the tunnel was well maintained under allowable limit and the performance of energy consumption was improved compared to conventional control scheme.

  13. Graphene-based magnetic tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobas, Enrique

    2013-03-01

    Graphene's in-plane transport has been widely researched and has yielded extraordinary carrier mobilities of 105 cm2/Vs and spin diffusion lengths of exceeding 100 μm. These properties bode well for graphene in future electronics and spintronics technologies. Its out-of-plane transport has been far less studied, although its parent material, graphite, shows a large conductance anisotropy. Recent calculations show graphene's interaction with close-packed ferromagnetic metal surfaces should produce highly spin-polarized transport out-of-plane, an enabling breakthrough for spintronics technology. In this work, we fabricate and measure FM/graphene/FM magnetic tunnel junctions using CVD-grown single-layer graphene. The resulting juctions show non-linear current-voltage characteristics and a very weak temperature dependence consistent with charge tunneling transport. Furthermore, we study spin transport across the junction as a function of bias voltage and temperature. The tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) peaks at two percent for single-layer graphene junctions and exhibits the expected bias asymmetry and a temperature dependence that fits well with established spin-polarized tunneling models. Results of mutli-layer graphene tunnel junctions will also be discussed.

  14. Particle detection with superconducting tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Institute of Experimental Nuclear Physics of the University of Karlsruhe (TH) and at the Institute for Nuclear Physics of the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe we started to produce superconducting tunnel junctions and to investigate them for their suitability as particle detectors. The required facilities for the production of tunnel junctions and the experimental equipments to carry out experiments with them were erected. Experiments are presented in which radiations of different kinds of particles could successfully be measured with the tunnel junctions produced. At first we succeeded in detectioning light pulses of a laser. In experiments with alpha-particles of an energy of 4,6 MeV the alpha-particles were detected with an energy resolution of 1,1%, and it was shown in specific experiments that the phonons originating from the deposition of energy by an alpha-particle in the substrate can be detected with superconducting tunnel junctions at the surface. On that occasion it turned out that the signals could be separated with respect to their point of origin (tunnel junction, contact leads, substrate). Finally X-rays with an energy of 6 keV were detected with an energy resolution of 8% in a test arrangement that makes use of the so-called trapping effect to read out a larger absorber volume. (orig.)

  15. Evolution of Bacterial Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchernookov, Martin; Nemenman, Ilya

    2013-03-01

    While active, controlled cellular suicide (autolysis) in bacteria is commonly observed, it has been hard to argue that autolysis can be beneficial to an individual who commits it. We propose a theoretical model that predicts that bacterial autolysis is evolutionarily advantageous to an individualand would fixate in physically structured environments for stationary phase colonies. We perform spatially resolved agent-based simulations of the model, which predict that lower mixing in the environment results in fixation of a higher autolysis rate from a single mutated cell, regardless of the colony's genetic diversity. We argue that quorum sensing will fixate as well, even if initially rare, if it is coupled to controlling the autolysis rate. The model does not predict a strong additional competitive advantage for cells where autolysis is controlled by quorum sensing systems that distinguish self from nonself. These predictions are broadly supported by recent experimental results in B. subtilisand S. pneumoniae. Research partially supported by the James S McDonnell Foundation grant No. 220020321 and by HFSP grant No. RGY0084/2011.

  16. Electromagnetism of Bacterial Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainiwaer, Ailiyasi

    2011-10-01

    There has been increasing concern from the public about personal health due to the significant rise in the daily use of electrical devices such as cell phones, radios, computers, GPS, video games and television. All of these devices create electromagnetic (EM) fields, which are simply magnetic and electric fields surrounding the appliances that simultaneously affect the human bio-system. Although these can affect the human system, obstacles can easily shield or weaken the electrical fields; however, magnetic fields cannot be weakened and can pass through walls, human bodies and most other objects. The present study was conducted to examine the possible effects of bacteria when exposed to magnetic fields. The results indicate that a strong causal relationship is not clear, since different magnetic fields affect the bacteria differently, with some causing an increase in bacterial cells, and others causing a decrease in the same cells. This phenomenon has yet to be explained, but the current study attempts to offer a mathematical explanation for this occurrence. The researchers added cultures to the magnetic fields to examine any effects to ion transportation. Researchers discovered ions such as potassium and sodium are affected by the magnetic field. A formula is presented in the analysis section to explain this effect.

  17. The rare bacterial biosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrós-Alió, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    All communities are dominated by a few species that account for most of the biomass and carbon cycling. On the other hand, a large number of species are represented by only a few individuals. In the case of bacteria, these rare species were until recently invisible. Owing to their low numbers, conventional molecular techniques could not retrieve them. Isolation in pure culture was the only way to identify some of them, but current culturing techniques are unable to isolate most of the bacteria in nature. The recent development of fast and cheap high-throughput sequencing has begun to allow access to the rare species. In the case of bacteria, the exploration of this rare biosphere has several points of interest. First, it will eventually produce a reasonable estimate of the total number of bacterial taxa in the oceans; right now, we do not even know the right order of magnitude. Second, it will answer the question of whether "everything is everywhere." Third, it will require hypothesizing and testing the ecological mechanisms that allow subsistence of many species in low numbers. And fourth, it will open an avenue of research into the immense reserve of genes with potential applications hidden in the rare biosphere. PMID:22457983

  18. Transport Powered by Bacterial Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Peshkov, Anton; Sokolov, Andrey; ten Hagen, Borge; Löwen, Hartmut; Aranson, Igor S.

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate that collective turbulentlike motion in a bacterial bath can power and steer the directed transport of mesoscopic carriers through the suspension. In our experiments and simulations, a microwedgelike "bulldozer" draws energy from a bacterial bath of varied density. We obtain that an optimal transport speed is achieved in the turbulent state of the bacterial suspension. This apparent rectification of random motion of bacteria is caused by polar ordered bacteria inside the cusp region of the carrier, which is shielded from the outside turbulent fluctuations.

  19. Transport powered by bacterial turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Peshkov, Anton; Sokolov, Andrey; ten Hagen, Borge; Löwen, Hartmut; Aranson, Igor S

    2014-04-18

    We demonstrate that collective turbulentlike motion in a bacterial bath can power and steer the directed transport of mesoscopic carriers through the suspension. In our experiments and simulations, a microwedgelike "bulldozer" draws energy from a bacterial bath of varied density. We obtain that an optimal transport speed is achieved in the turbulent state of the bacterial suspension. This apparent rectification of random motion of bacteria is caused by polar ordered bacteria inside the cusp region of the carrier, which is shielded from the outside turbulent fluctuations. PMID:24785075

  20. Fire safety assessment of tunnel structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gkoumas, Konstantinos; Giuliani, Luisa; Petrini, Francesco;

    2011-01-01

    Tunnels and underground structures are becoming more and more essential these days, when installing new transportation infrastructures in congested areas as well as when raising the qualities within the existing urbanizations. The realization of such structures calls for specific measures regarding...... durability provisions, commitment to environmental aspects, issues of sustainability and safety assurance, for their whole lifecycle. The design for safety of tunnel infrastructures is a multifaceted process, since there are many aspects that need to be accounted for, regarding different aspects (e.......g. structural and non structural, organizational, human behavior). This is even more truth for the fire safety design of such structures. Fire safety in tunnels is challenging because of the particular environment, bearing in mind also that a fire can occur in different phases of the tunnel’s lifecycle. Plans...

  1. Electronic thermometry in tunable tunnel junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-03-15

    A tunable tunnel junction thermometry circuit includes a variable width tunnel junction between a test object and a probe. The junction width is varied and a change in thermovoltage across the junction with respect to the change in distance across the junction is determined. Also, a change in biased current with respect to a change in distance across the junction is determined. A temperature gradient across the junction is determined based on a mathematical relationship between the temperature gradient, the change in thermovoltage with respect to distance and the change in biased current with respect to distance. Thermovoltage may be measured by nullifying a thermoelectric tunneling current with an applied voltage supply level. A piezoelectric actuator may modulate the probe, and thus the junction width, to vary thermovoltage and biased current across the junction. Lock-in amplifiers measure the derivatives of the thermovoltage and biased current modulated by varying junction width.

  2. Measuring quantum systems with tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We present a formalism that allows to describe a quantum system modulating the transmission of a tunnel junction. The tunnel junction acts as an environment for the quantum system. Contrary to the conventional approach to open quantum systems we retain a degree of freedom of the environment, the charge passed through the junction, after averaging over the bath degrees of freedom, employing a projection operator technique. The resulting object characterizing the joint dynamics of the system and the charge is the charge specific density matrix. We derive a master equation describing the time evolution of the charge specific density matrix. We consider two examples of quantum systems coupled to the junction: a spin and a harmonic oscillator. In the spin case we are able to analyze a quantum measurement process in detail. For the oscillator we investigate the noise in the tunnel junction induced by the coupling. (author)

  3. Phonon tunneling through a double barrier system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villegas, Diosdado [Departamento de Física, Universidad Central “Marta Abreu” de Las Villas, CP 54830, Santa Clara, Villa Clara (Cuba); Instituto de Física, Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, 18 Sur y San Claudio, Edif. 110A, Ciudad Universitaria, 72570 Puebla (Mexico); León-Pérez, Fernando de [Centro Universitario de la Defensa de Zaragoza, Ctra. de Huesca s/n, E-50090 Zaragoza (Spain); Pérez-Álvarez, R. [Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, CP 62209 Cuernavaca (Mexico); Arriaga, J., E-mail: arriaga@ifuap.buap.mx [Instituto de Física, Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, 18 Sur y San Claudio, Edif. 110A, Ciudad Universitaria, 72570 Puebla (Mexico)

    2015-04-15

    The tunneling of optical and acoustic phonons at normal incidence on a double-barrier is studied in this paper. Transmission coefficients and resonance conditions are derived theoretically under the assumption that the long-wavelength approximation is valid. It is shown that the behavior of the transmission coefficients for the symmetric double barrier has a Lorentzian form close to resonant frequencies and that Breit–Wigner's formula have a general validity in one-dimensional phonon tunneling. Authors also study the so-called generalized Hartman effect in the tunneling of long-wavelength phonons and show that this effect is a numerical artifact resulting from taking the opaque limit before exploring the variation with a finite barrier width. This study could be useful for the design of acoustic devices.

  4. Positioning systems for underground tunnel environments

    CERN Document Server

    Leite Pereira, Fernando; Theis, Christian

    In the last years the world has witnessed a remarkable change in the computing concept by entering the mobile era. Incredibly powerful smartphones have proliferated at stunning pace and tablet computers are capable of running demanding applications and meet new business requirements. Being wireless, localization has become crucial not only to serve individuals but also help companies in industrial and safety processes. In the context of the Radiation Protection group at CERN, automatic localization, besides allowing to find people, would help improving the radiation surveys performed regularly along the accelerator tunnels. The research presented in this thesis attempts to answer questions relatively to the viability of localization in a harsh conditions tunnel: “Is localization in a very long tunnel possible, meeting its restrictions and without incurring prohibitive costs and infrastructure?”, “Can one achieve meter-level accuracy with GSM deployed over leaky-feeder?”, “Is it possible to prototype...

  5. Thermal stratified wind tunnel in IHI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability of the atmospheric boundary layer is based on the Richardson number. A large temperature gradient or a very low wind speed is required to achieve strong stability in a wind tunnel. A thermal stratified boundary layer wind tunnel has been developed. This wind tunnel is designed to achieve a large temperature gradient by cooling the floor of the test section with liquid nitrogen. The floor temperature ranges from - 185degC to room temperature. The space heating unit has 10 horizontal stories. Each of them is controlled independently. The test section gets the temperature of 70degC at 2 m/s wind speed. Three kinds of stable conditions and a neutral condition are provided for concentration measurement. In the stable condition, both lateral and vertical plume widths are narrower than under neutral condition. (author)

  6. Multidimensional Quantum Tunneling in the Schwinger Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Dumlu, Cesim K

    2015-01-01

    We study the Schwinger effect, in which the external field having a spatio-temporal profile creates electron-positron pairs via multidimensional quantum tunneling. Our treatment is based on Gutzwiller's trace formula for the QED effective action, whose imaginary part is represented by a sum over complex wordlines. The worldlines are multi-periodic, and the periods of motion collectively depend on the strength of spatial and temporal inhomogeneity. We argue that Hamilton's characteristic function that leads to the correct tunneling amplitude must explicitly depend on both periods, and is represented by an average over the internal cycles of motion. We use this averaging method to calculate the pair production rate in an exponentially damped sinusoidal field, where we find that the initial conditions for each family of periodic trajectories lie on a curve in the momentum plane. The ratio of the periods, which may also be referred as the topological index, stays uniform on each curve. Calculation of tunneling am...

  7. Spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent experimental progress in spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy (SP-STM) - a magnetically sensitive imaging technique with ultra-high resolution - is reviewed. The basics of spin-polarized electron tunnelling are introduced as they have been investigated in planar tunnel junctions for different electrode materials, i.e. superconductors, optically excited GaAs, and ferromagnets. It is shown that ferromagnets and antiferromagnets are suitable tip materials for the realization of SP-STM. Possible tip designs and modes of operations are discussed for both classes of materials. The results of recent spatially resolved measurements as performed with different magnetic probe tips and using different modes of operation are reviewed and discussed in terms of applicability to surfaces, thin films, and nanoparticles. The limits of spatial resolution, and the impact of an external magnetic field on the imaging process

  8. Scanning Tunneling Spectroscope Use in Electrocatalysis Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turid Knutsen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the electrocatalytic properties of an electrode and its ability to transfer electrons between the electrode and a metallic tip in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM is investigated. The alkaline oxygen evolution reaction (OER was used as a test reaction with four different metallic glasses, Ni78Si8B14, Ni70Mo20Si5B5, Ni58Co20Si10B12, and Ni25Co50Si15B10, as electrodes. The electrocatalytic properties of the electrodes were determined. The electrode surfaces were then investigated with an STM. A clear relationship between the catalytic activity of an electrode toward the OER and its tunneling characteristics was found. The use of a scanning tunneling spectroscope (STS in electrocatalytic testing may increase the efficiency of the optimization of electrochemical processes.

  9. Silicon spintronics with ferromagnetic tunnel devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In silicon spintronics, the unique qualities of ferromagnetic materials are combined with those of silicon, aiming at creating an alternative, energy-efficient information technology in which digital data are represented by the orientation of the electron spin. Here we review the cornerstones of silicon spintronics, namely the creation, detection and manipulation of spin polarization in silicon. Ferromagnetic tunnel contacts are the key elements and provide a robust and viable approach to induce and probe spins in silicon, at room temperature. We describe the basic physics of spin tunneling into silicon, the spin-transport devices, the materials aspects and engineering of the magnetic tunnel contacts, and discuss important quantities such as the magnitude of the spin accumulation and the spin lifetime in the silicon. We highlight key experimental achievements and recent progress in the development of a spin-based information technology. (topical review)

  10. Numerical studies of electron tunnelling in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diffusion equation, derived from Fick's second law, with an added exponential sink term to simulate electron tunnelling, is integrated numerically to determine the rate of electron decay at times greater than 1 ps. The effect of a Coulomb interaction with a charged scavenger is examined and the steady-state rate constant shown to approximate closely to that obtained by combining the separate effects of tunnelling and charge-affected diffusion, which can be expressed analytically. Diffusion in the presence of a charge-induced dipole interaction is investigated for the case of scavenging of localised electrons in alkanes. The rate constant is shown to be dominated by random diffusion and tunnelling and the bias induced by the interaction is of little consequence. The sensitivity of the rate constant to changes in the pre-exponential factor in the sink term is shown to be most favourable at short times. (author)

  11. Vibration Compensation for Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Meng-chao; FU Xing; WEI Xiao-lei; HU Xiao-tang

    2003-01-01

    The influence of vibration is already one of main obstacles for improving the nano measuring accuracy.The techniques of anti-vibration,vibration isolation and vibration compensation become an important branch in nano measuring field.Starting with the research of sensitivity to vibration of scanning tunneling microscope(STM),the theory,techniques and realization methods of nano vibration sensor based on tunnel effect are initially investigated,followed by developing the experimental devices.The experiments of the vibration detection and vibration compensation are carried out.The experimental results show that vibration sensor based on tunnel effect is characterized by high sensitivity,good frequency characteristic and the same vibratory response characteristic consistent with STM.

  12. Quantum tunneling from paths in complex time

    CERN Document Server

    Bramberger, Sebastian F; Lehners, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    We study quantum mechanical tunneling using complex solutions of the classical field equations. Simple visualization techniques allow us to unify and generalize previous treatments, and straightforwardly show the connection to the standard approach using Euclidean instanton solutions. We demonstrate that the negative modes of solutions along various contours in the complex time plane reveal which paths contribute to tunneling and which do not, and we provide a criterion for identifying the negative modes. Central to our approach is the solution of the background and perturbation equations not only along a single path, but over an extended region of the complex time plane. Our approach allows for a fully continuous and coherent treatment of classical evolution interspersed by quantum tunneling events, and is applicable in situations where singularities are present and also where Euclidean solutions might not exist.

  13. SKB - PNC. Development of tunnel radar antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunnel antennas for the RAMAC borehole radar system have been developed and tested in the field. The antennas are of the loaded dipole type and the receiver and transmitter electronics have been rebuilt to screen them from the antennas. A series of measurements has demonstrated that the radar pulse is short and well shaped and relatively free from ringing, even compared with the existing borehole antennas. Two antenna sets were tested: one centered at 60 MHz and another above 100 MHz. Both produced excellent radar pictures when tested in tunnels in Stripa mine. The antennas have been designed to be easy to carry, since the signal quality often depends on the way the antenna is held relative to electric conductors in the tunnels. (au) (46 figs., 57 refs.)

  14. Vibration analysis of wind tunnel support

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张旭; 张家泰; 董国庆; 张国友; 刘德富

    2004-01-01

    In order to enable a wind tunnel support to have a high enough natural frequency to prevent experiencing mechanical resonance and excessive vibration displacement, five kinds of wind tunnel support structures have been simulated and analyzed individually under five different load conditions by means of a nonlinear finite element numerical method. With natural frequency and three directions vibration displacement given, simulation and analyses indicated that additional supports is more beneficial than heightening the rigidity of steel reinforced concrete in support pillars and adopting steel wrappers on the pillars to increase natural frequency of support structure. Increasing the rigidity of steel reinforced concrete, adopting steel wrappers and providing additional supports are all helpful in reducing three directions vibration Max displacement. and additional supports are comparatively more effective. Therefore, a structure scheme with steel reinforced concrete support pillars,steel wrappers and additional supports should be adopted in practical wind tunnel support construction.

  15. Coupling quantum tunneling with cavity photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofolini, Peter; Christmann, Gabriel; Tsintzos, Simeon I; Deligeorgis, George; Konstantinidis, George; Hatzopoulos, Zacharias; Savvidis, Pavlos G; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2012-05-11

    Tunneling of electrons through a potential barrier is fundamental to chemical reactions, electronic transport in semiconductors and superconductors, magnetism, and devices such as terahertz oscillators. Whereas tunneling is typically controlled by electric fields, a completely different approach is to bind electrons into bosonic quasiparticles with a photonic component. Quasiparticles made of such light-matter microcavity polaritons have recently been demonstrated to Bose-condense into superfluids, whereas spatially separated Coulomb-bound electrons and holes possess strong dipole interactions. We use tunneling polaritons to connect these two realms, producing bosonic quasiparticles with static dipole moments. Our resulting three-state system yields dark polaritons analogous to those in atomic systems or optical waveguides, thereby offering new possibilities for electromagnetically induced transparency, room-temperature condensation, and adiabatic photon-to-electron transfer. PMID:22491095

  16. The Tunnel Boring Machine Advancements in Horizontal and Up-Hill Tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Fuoco

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Nowadays high levels of experience have been acquired in the excavation of horizontal tunnels using TBM, especially as far as tunnels with small diameters (about 4 m wide are concerned. Less experience has been acquired in the excavation of tunnels under difficult alignment conditions, as in the case of steeply inclined excavations (up-hill tunnels. Approach: This study presented the results of studies which compare the production data collected for tunnels excavated with TBM in "normal" conditions (horizontal tunnel, with those derived from steeply inclined excavations (up-hill tunnels. Results: From an examination of the results obtained in the studied cases a net difference appears evident in terms of productivity between horizontal and up-hill excavations. Conclusion: Such net difference between horizontal and up-hill excavation productions can be attributed to the greater burdens of times necessary for the supply of materials and personnel, the regripping operations with fall preventer systems and, in general, the greater difficulties of carrying out ordinary and extraordinary maintenance of the machines in particularly difficult altrimetric conditions.

  17. Carbonaceous aerosols in an urban tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancelet, Travis; Davy, Perry K.; Trompetter, William J.; Markwitz, Andreas; Weatherburn, David C.

    2011-08-01

    Particulate matter in the Mount Victoria Tunnel, an urban road tunnel 623 m in length with an average traffic volume of 2070-2300 vehicles per hour located in Wellington, New Zealand, was studied to gain an understanding of carbonaceous species emitted from motor vehicles. The average PM 2.5 concentration during peak hours in the tunnel was found to be 67.6 ± 19.4 μg m -3. Analysis of carbonaceous species present (OC, EC, TC) was performed by both the NIOSH and IMPROVE thermal/optical protocols and carbonaceous species were found to make up 63-73% of the total PM in the tunnel. Comparison of TC concentrations obtained from each protocol revealed that no significant difference was present between the two protocols. Black carbon (BC), also used as a measure of EC, was determined using light reflection and BC values did not differ significantly from EC concentrations determined using the NIOSH and IMPROVE protocols. TC was also determined using EA/IRMS and it was found that TC concentrations from EA/IRMS directly correlated with TC results obtained using the NIOSH protocol. Stable isotope analysis of the PM 2.5 yielded δ 13C values from -24.7 to -28.3‰, typical of motor vehicles. Analysis of particle-phase PAHs by thermal desorption GC/MS revealed an average total PAH concentration of 70.0 ± 4.1 ng m -3 and PAHs were found to contribute 0.10% of total PM 2.5 in the tunnel. PAH emissions in the tunnel were found to be enriched in low molecular weight PAHs, indicative of emissions from diesel-fueled vehicles. Analysis of individual particle composition and morphology revealed that most particles were carbonaceous species that formed large, amorphous agglomerates made up of smaller spherules.

  18. Carpal tunnel syndrome: an unusual presentation of brachial hypertrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Shenoy, K T; Saha, P. K.; Ravindran, M

    1980-01-01

    A patient with carpal tunnel syndrome in association with congenital hypertrophy of right upper limb is described. The median nerve also showed hypertrophy. The symptoms were relieved by decompression of the carpal tunnel.

  19. Application Of Artificial Intelligence To Wind Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ching F.; Steinle, Frank W., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Report discusses potential use of artificial-intelligence systems to manage wind-tunnel test facilities at Ames Research Center. One of goals of program to obtain experimental data of better quality and otherwise generally increase productivity of facilities. Another goal to increase efficiency and expertise of current personnel and to retain expertise of former personnel. Third goal to increase effectiveness of management through more efficient use of accumulated data. System used to improve schedules of operation and maintenance of tunnels and other equipment, assignment of personnel, distribution of electrical power, and analysis of costs and productivity. Several commercial artificial-intelligence computer programs discussed as possible candidates for use.

  20. Dihydroazulene photoswitch operating in sequential tunneling regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broman, Søren Lindbæk; Lara-Avila, Samuel; Thisted, Christine Lindbjerg;

    2012-01-01

    to electrodes so that the electron transport goes by sequential tunneling. To assure weak coupling, the DHA switching kernel is modified by incorporating p-MeSC6H4 end-groups. Molecules are prepared by Suzuki cross-couplings on suitable halogenated derivatives of DHA. The synthesis presents an...... VHF. One derivative, incorporating a p-MeSC6H4 anchoring group in one end, has been placed in a silver nanogap. Conductance measurements justify that transport through both DHA (high resistivity) and VHF (low resistivity) forms goes by sequential tunneling. The switching is fairly reversible and...

  1. Fire Resistant Panels for the Tunnel Linings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gravit Marina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Presents the results of studies of innovative materials in the field of experimental and theoretical research fire resistance fireproof panels Pyro-Safe Aestuver T. Owing to the assembly simplicity, materials cheapness, high ecological standard, recycling, reuse potential, are benefit. Research work is running to improve the knowledge about fireproof panels Pyro-Safe Aestuver T for tunnel lining, its basic performance, its long term behavior and in particular also its fire proof for example when used for the lining of road tunnels.

  2. Wind Tunnel Measurements at LM Wind Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck

    2012-01-01

    This section presents the results obtained during the experimental campaign that was conducted in the wind tunnel at LM Wind Power in Lunderskov from August 16th to 26th, 2010. The goal of this study is to validate the so-called TNO trailing edge noise model through measurements of the boundary...... layer turbulence characteristics and the far-field noise generated by the acoustic scattering of the turbulent boundary layer vorticies as they convect past the trailing edge. This campaign was conducted with a NACA0015 airfoil section that was placed in the wind tunnel section. It is equipped with high...

  3. Phonoemissive Spin Tunneling in Molecular Nanomagnets

    OpenAIRE

    Garg, Anupam

    2011-01-01

    A new mechanism is proposed for the magnetization reversal of molecular nanomagnets such as \\Fe8. In this process the spin tunnels from the lowest state near one easy direction to the first excited state near the opposite easy direction, and subsequently decays to the second easy direction with the emission of a phonon, or it first emits a phonon and then tunnels to the final state. This mechanism is the simplest imaginable one that allows magnetization relaxation in the presence of a longitu...

  4. Quantum time scales in alpha tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Kelkar, N G; Nowakowski, M

    2008-01-01

    The theoretical treatment of alpha decay by Gamow is revisited by investigating the quantum time scales in tunneling. The time spent by an alpha particle in front of the barrier and traversing it before escape is evaluated using microscopic alpha nucleus potentials. The half-life of a nucleus is shown to correspond to the time spent by the alpha knocking in front of the barrier. Calculations for medium and super heavy nuclei show that from a multitude of available tunneling time definitions, the transmission dwell time gives the bulk of the lifetime of the decaying state, in most cases.

  5. Traceable long range scanning tunneling microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Dimensionally correct and directly traceable measurement is not feasible with conventional scanning tunneling microscopy (STMs) due to severe hysteresis and non-linearity of the commonly applied piezo tube scanners and the very short range.By integrating a custom made probing system based on tunneling current measurement into a commercially available and laser-interferometrically position controlled positioning system, an STM with a principal measuring range of 25 mm×25 mm×5 mm and traceable position measurement has been set-up and tested.

  6. A study for the KAERI research tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major goal of the R and D on the KAERI Research Tunnel in 1997 are 1) concept development of the KAERI research tunnel and its major units 2) computer simulation of facilities 3) study on thermo-hydro mechanical coupling in the vicinity of a waste repository 4) effect of excavated distrubed zone. In addition supplementary site investigation to understand the distribution of stresses in the site was done along with long term monitoring of the water table. (author). 44 refs., 16 tabs., 36 figs

  7. Generalized Bessel functions in tunnelling ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Reiss, H R

    2003-01-01

    We develop two new approximations for the generalized Bessel function that frequently arises in the analytical treatment of strong-field processes, especially in non-perturbative multiphoton ionization theories. Both these new forms are applicable to the tunnelling environment in atomic ionization, and are analytically much simpler than the currently used low-frequency asymptotic approximation for the generalized Bessel function. The second of the new forms is an approximation to the first, and it is the second new form that exhibits the well-known tunnelling exponential.

  8. Spintronics: manganite-based magnetic tunnel structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A topical and highly promising aspect of the field of spintronics is the physics involved in the flow of a spin-polarized current through magnetic tunnel structures. This review focuses on manganite-based structures, which are appealing for their high Curie temperature, highly spin-polarized conduction electrons, high chemical stability, and well-developed fabrication technology. Particular emphasis is placed on some novel approaches to studying the tunnel structures, including the use of planar geometry and the application of combined external factors (microwave and optical radiation) to investigate spin-polarized transport. (reviews of topical problems)

  9. Dielectric Engineered Tunnel Field-Effect Transistor

    OpenAIRE

    Ilatikhameneh, Hesameddin; Tarek A. Ameen; Klimeck, Gerhard; Appenzeller, Joerg; Rahman, Rajib

    2015-01-01

    The dielectric engineered tunnel field-effect transistor (DE-TFET) as a high performance steep transistor is proposed. In this device, a combination of high-k and low-k dielectrics results in a high electric field at the tunnel junction. As a result a record ON-current of about 1000 uA/um and a subthreshold swing (SS) below 20mV/dec are predicted for WTe2 DE-TFET. The proposed TFET works based on a homojunction channel and electrically doped contacts both of which are immune to interface stat...

  10. Reliability assessment of tunneling flow charts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When driving horizontal workings of different kinds it is typical to reserve excessive redundant equipment. However, the lack of resources (facilities, people) and poor management don't ensure goal achievement [3]. The paper presents reliability assessment method of tunneling with the help of mathematical modeling. The mathematical model is developed on the basis of factual data of tunneling conditions and no-failure operation probabilities of the flow chart elements are estimated. The method of reliability assessment allows identifying organizational, technological and technical elements of the reserves to increases drive efficiency and improve feasibility characteristics

  11. Vibration measurement and modal analysis for tunneller

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Min; WU Miao; WEI Ren-zhi

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the method of vibration measurement and modal analysis for AM~50 Tunneller machine is presented. When the machine was used for cutting man-made coal bed and real coal bed, the vibration of the machine was measured and the results of signal analysis show that the vibration characteristics under the two kinds of working situations are similar. The modal model of the machine is established, and then, the intrinsic vibration characteristics of AM50 tunneller are investigated by means of the method of experimental modal analysis. The vibration response simulation under a set of loading spectra measured is carried out by force response simulation software.

  12. Reliability assessment of tunneling flow charts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antropova, N. A.; Krets, V. G.; Luk'yanov, V. G.; Baranova, A. V.

    2015-02-01

    When driving horizontal workings of different kinds it is typical to reserve excessive redundant equipment. However, the lack of resources (facilities, people) and poor management don't ensure goal achievement [3]. The paper presents reliability assessment method of tunneling with the help of mathematical modeling. The mathematical model is developed on the basis of factual data of tunneling conditions and no-failure operation probabilities of the flow chart elements are estimated. The method of reliability assessment allows identifying organizational, technological and technical elements of the reserves to increases drive efficiency and improve feasibility characteristics.

  13. Probing Klein tunnelling through quantum quenches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the interplay between an inhomogeneous quantum quench of the external potential in a system of relativistic fermions in one-dimension and the well-known Klein tunneling. We find that the large time evolution is characterized by particle production at a constant rate which we derive analytically. The produced particles can be physically interpreted according to a semiclassical picture and the state reached in the long time limit can be classified as a non-equilibrium-steady-state. Such a quantum quench can be used in order to observe macroscopic effects of Klein tunneling in transport, with potential implementations with current experimental setups. (paper)

  14. A Tunnel Compress Scheme for Multi-Tunneling in PMIPv6-based Nested NEMO

    OpenAIRE

    Youn-Hee Han; Hyo-Beom Lee; Min-Soo Woo; Sung-Gi Min

    2010-01-01

    In nested NEMO, a multi-tunneling causes a pinball routing problem. Several solutions proposed tosolve the pinball routing problem in NEMO BSP cannot be used at PMIPv6-based NEMO due todifferent environment such as no route optimization with CN. We propose a tunnel compress scheme formulti-tunneling in PMIPv6-based NEMO. The scheme consists of two parts: the first part is an interdomainor wired Internet part. The other is an intra part of nested mobile networks. In the inter-domainpart, singl...

  15. Spin-polarized tunneling in MgO-based tunnel junctions with superconducting electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schebaum, Oliver; Fabretti, Savio; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.; Thomas, Andy

    2012-03-01

    We prepared magnetic tunnel junctions with one ferromagnetic and one superconducting Al-Si electrode. Pure cobalt electrodes were compared with a Co-Fe-B alloy and the Heusler compound Co2FeAl. The polarization of the tunneling electrons was determined using the Maki-Fulde model and is discussed along with the spin-orbit scattering and the total pair-breaking parameters. The junctions were post-annealed at different temperatures to investigate the symmetry filtering mechanism responsible for the giant tunneling magnetoresistance ratios in Co-Fe-B/MgO/Co-Fe-B junctions.

  16. Doka formwork system SL-1 for tunneling. Example: Šentvid tunnel

    OpenAIRE

    Pogačar, Boris

    2006-01-01

    The present work focuses on formwork system SL-1, which was developed by the company Doka - die Schalungstechniker for forming of tunnels and special structures. Formwork in general is presented, along with the methods of tunneling, which are in use today. Doka formwork system SL-1 and its typical parts are described in detail. The use of this formwork system is represented on the example of a cavern in Šentvid tunnel. Discussed are two possible shapes of the cavern: the form of three resembl...

  17. Bacterial flora of sturgeon fingerling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study on microbial populations is a suitable tool to understand and apply control methods to improve the sanitary level of production in fish breeding and rearing centers, ensure health of sturgeon fingerlings at the time of their release into the rivers and also in the conversation and restoration of these valuable stocks in the Caspian Sea, Iran. A laboratory research based on Austin methods (Austin, B., Austin, D.A. 1993) was conducted for bacterial study on 3 sturgeon species naming A. persicus, A. stellatus and A. nudiventris during different growth stages. Bacterial flora of Acinetobacter, Moraxella, Aeromonas, Vibrio, Edwardsiella, Staphylococcus, Proteus, Yersinia, Pseudomonas and Plesiomonas were determined. The factors which may induce changes in bacterial populations during different stages of fife are the followings: quality of water in rearing ponds, different conditions for growth stages, suitable time for colonization of bacterial flora in rearing pond, water temperature increase in fingerlings size and feeding condition. (author)

  18. Bacterial Communities: Interactions to Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbendieck, Reed M.; Vargas-Bautista, Carol; Straight, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    In the environment, bacteria live in complex multispecies communities. These communities span in scale from small, multicellular aggregates to billions or trillions of cells within the gastrointestinal tract of animals. The dynamics of bacterial communities are determined by pairwise interactions that occur between different species in the community. Though interactions occur between a few cells at a time, the outcomes of these interchanges have ramifications that ripple through many orders of magnitude, and ultimately affect the macroscopic world including the health of host organisms. In this review we cover how bacterial competition influences the structures of bacterial communities. We also emphasize methods and insights garnered from culture-dependent pairwise interaction studies, metagenomic analyses, and modeling experiments. Finally, we argue that the integration of multiple approaches will be instrumental to future understanding of the underlying dynamics of bacterial communities. PMID:27551280

  19. The effect of the tortoise coordinates on the tunnel effect

    CERN Document Server

    Gui-hua, T; Wang, S; Gui-hua, Tian; Zheng, Zhao; Wang, Shi-kun

    2006-01-01

    The tunnel process of the quantum wave from the light cone is carefully discussed. They are applied in the massive quantum particles from the Schwarzschild black hole in the Kruskal metric. The tortoise coordinates prevent one from understanding the tunnel process, and are investigated with care. Furthermore, the massive particles could come out of the black hole either by the Hawking radiation or by the tunnel effect; the tunnel effect might give more information about the black hole.

  20. Diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. Ultrasound versus electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D; van Holsbeeck, M T; Janevski, P K; Ganos, D L; Ditmars, D M; Darian, V B

    1999-07-01

    This article presents a new technique for diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome using ultrasound. The ultrasound characteristics of the normal and abnormal median nerve are discussed in relation to carpal tunnel syndrome. The development of ultrasound as a new diagnostic modality for carpal tunnel syndrome is presented in a three-part study correlating the ultrasound measurements of the median nerve and electromyogram of the median nerve. A new algorithm for evaluating patients with carpal tunnel syndrome is presented. PMID:10442084