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Sample records for bacterial transmembrane histidine

  1. Discovery of inhibitors of bacterial histidine kinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velikova, N.R.

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of Inhibitors of Bacterial Histidine Kinases

    Summary

    The thesis is on novel antibacterial drug discovery (http://youtu.be/NRMWOGgeysM). Using structure-based and fragment-based dru

  2. New Class of Competitive Inhibitor of Bacterial Histidine Kinases

    OpenAIRE

    Gilmour, Raymond; Foster, J. Estelle; Sheng, Qin; McClain, Jonathan R.; Riley, Anna; Sun, Pei-Ming; Ng, Wai-Leung; Yan, Dalai; Nicas, Thalia I.; Henry, Kenneth; Winkler, Malcolm E.

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial histidine kinases have been proposed as targets for the discovery of new antibiotics, yet few specific inhibitors of bacterial histidine kinases have been reported. We report here a novel thienopyridine (TEP) compound that inhibits bacterial histidine kinases competitively with respect to ATP but does not comparably inhibit mammalian serine/threonine kinases. Although it partitions into membranes and does not inhibit the growth of bacterial or mammalian cells, TEP could serve as a s...

  3. Expression and characterization of the integral membrane domain of bacterial histidine kinase SCO3062 for structural studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacterial histidine kinases play an important role in the response to external stimuli. Structural studies of the histidine kinase transmembrane domain are challenging due to difficulties in protein expression and sample preparation. After carrying out expression screening of a series of histidine kinases, we investigated sample preparation methods for obtaining high quality samples of the periplasmic and transmembrane domain (PTD) of the bacterial histidine kinase SCO3062. Various sample conditions were tested for their ability to give homogeneous NMR spectra of the SCO3062 PTD with well-resolved resonances. Circular dichroism and 3D 15N-edited NOESY spectrum results demonstrate that the SCO3062 PTD is predominantly α-helical. This method should be applicable to the NMR analysis of other transmembrane proteins

  4. Expression and characterization of the integral membrane domain of bacterial histidine kinase SCO3062 for structural studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Kwon Joo; Kwak, Su-Nam; Kim, Hyun Jung; Cheong, Chaejoon; Kim, Myung Hee; Jeon, Young Ho

    2008-11-14

    Bacterial histidine kinases play an important role in the response to external stimuli. Structural studies of the histidine kinase transmembrane domain are challenging due to difficulties in protein expression and sample preparation. After carrying out expression screening of a series of histidine kinases, we investigated sample preparation methods for obtaining high quality samples of the periplasmic and transmembrane domain (PTD) of the bacterial histidine kinase SCO3062. Various sample conditions were tested for their ability to give homogeneous NMR spectra of the SCO3062 PTD with well-resolved resonances. Circular dichroism and 3D (15)N-edited NOESY spectrum results demonstrate that the SCO3062 PTD is predominantly alpha-helical. This method should be applicable to the NMR analysis of other transmembrane proteins. PMID:18789898

  5. Assembly of the transmembrane domain of E. coli PhoQ histidine kinase: implications for signal transduction from molecular simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lemmin

    Full Text Available The PhoQP two-component system is a signaling complex essential for bacterial virulence and cationic antimicrobial peptide resistance. PhoQ is the histidine kinase chemoreceptor of this tandem machine and assembles in a homodimer conformation spanning the bacterial inner membrane. Currently, a full understanding of the PhoQ signal transduction is hindered by the lack of a complete atomistic structure. In this study, an atomistic model of the key transmembrane (TM domain is assembled by using molecular simulations, guided by experimental cross-linking data. The formation of a polar pocket involving Asn202 in the lumen of the tetrameric TM bundle is crucial for the assembly and solvation of the domain. Moreover, a concerted displacement of the TM helices at the periplasmic side is found to modulate a rotation at the cytoplasmic end, supporting the transduction of the chemical signal through a combination of scissoring and rotational movement of the TM helices.

  6. New insight into transmembrane topology of Staphylococcus aureus histidine kinase AgrC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lina; Quan, Chunshan; Xiong, Wen; Qu, Xiaojing; Fan, Shengdi; Hu, Wenzhong

    2014-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus accessory gene regulator (agr) locus controls the expression of virulence factors through a classical two-component signal transduction system that consists of a receptor histidine protein kinase AgrC and a cytoplasmic response regulator AgrA. An autoinducing peptide (AIP) encoded by agr locus activates AgrC, which transduces extracellular signals into the cytoplasm. Despite extensive investigations to identify AgrC-AIP interaction sites, precise signal recognition mechanisms remain unknown. This study aims to clarify the membrane topology of AgrC by applying the green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion technique and the substituted cysteine accessibility method (SCAM). However, our findings were inconsistent with profile obtained previously by alkaline phosphatase. We report the topology of AgrC shows seven transmembrane segments, a periplasmic N-terminus, and a cytoplasmic C-terminus. PMID:24361366

  7. Transmembrane transport of peptidoglycan precursors across model and bacterial membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Vincent; Sijbrandi, Robert; Kol, Matthijs; Swiezewska, Ewa; de Kruijff, Ben; Breukink, Eefjan

    2007-05-01

    Translocation of the peptidoglycan precursor Lipid II across the cytoplasmic membrane is a key step in bacterial cell wall synthesis, but hardly understood. Using NBD-labelled Lipid II, we showed by fluorescence and TLC assays that Lipid II transport does not occur spontaneously and is not induced by the presence of single spanning helical transmembrane peptides that facilitate transbilayer movement of membrane phospholipids. MurG catalysed synthesis of Lipid II from Lipid I in lipid vesicles also did not result in membrane translocation of Lipid II. These findings demonstrate that a specialized protein machinery is needed for transmembrane movement of Lipid II. In line with this, we could demonstrate Lipid II translocation in isolated Escherichia coli inner membrane vesicles and this transport could be uncoupled from the synthesis of Lipid II at low temperatures. The transport process appeared to be independent from an energy source (ATP or proton motive force). Additionally, our studies indicate that translocation of Lipid II is coupled to transglycosylation activity on the periplasmic side of the inner membrane. PMID:17501931

  8. Bacterial assay to study plant sensor histidine kinases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Spíchal, Lukáš

    New York City : Humana Press, 2011 - (Dissmeyer, N.; Schnittger, A.), s. 139-147 ISBN 978-1-61779-263-2. - (Methods in Molecular Biology. 779) R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/08/1649; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06034 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Cytokinins * histidine kinases * CRE1/AHK4 Subject RIV: EF - Botanics http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21837564

  9. Identification of novel bacterial histidine biosynthesis inhibitors using docking, ensemble rescoring, and whole-cell assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Signe Teuber; Liu, J.; Estiu, G.;

    2010-01-01

    . aureus histidine biosynthesis pathway, which is predicted to be essential for bacterial biomass productions. Virtual screening of a library of similar to 10(6) compounds identified 49 potential inhibitors of three enzymes of this pathway. Eighteen representative compounds were directly tested on three S....... aureus-and two Escherichia coli strains in standard disk inhibition assays. Thirteen compounds are inhibitors of some or all of the S. aureus strains, while 14 compounds weakly inhibit growth in one or both E. coli strains. The high hit rate obtained from a fast virtual screen demonstrates the...

  10. Transmembrane transport of peptidoglycan precursors across model and bacterial membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, V.; Sijbrandi, R.; Kol, M.A.; Swiezewska, E.; de Kruijff, B.; Breukink, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    Translocation of the peptidoglycan precursor Lipid II across the cytoplasmic membrane is a key step in bacterial cell wall synthesis, but hardly understood. Using NBD-labelled Lipid II, we showed by fluorescence and TLC assays that Lipid II transport does not occur spontaneously and is not induced b

  11. Generation of a Proton Motive Force by Histidine Decarboxylation and Electrogenic Histidine/Histamine Antiport in Lactobacillus buchneri

    OpenAIRE

    Molenaar, Douwe; Bosscher, Jaap S.; Brink, Bart ten; Arnold J M Driessen; Konings, Wil N.

    1993-01-01

    Lactobaciflus buchneri ST2A vigorously decarboxylates histidine to the biogenic amine histamine, which is excreted into the medium. Cells grown in the presence of histidine generate both a transmembrane pH gradient, inside alkaline, and an electrical potential (Δψ), inside negative, upon addition of histidine. Studies of the mechanism of histidine uptake and histamine excretion in membrane vesicles and proteoliposomes devoid of cytosolic histidine decarboxylase activity demonstrate that histi...

  12. Generation of a proton motive force by histidine decarboxylation and electrogenic histidine/histamine antiport in Lactobacillus buchneri.

    OpenAIRE

    Molenaar, D; Bosscher, J S; ten Brink, B.; Driessen, A J; Konings, W N

    1993-01-01

    Lactobacillus buchneri ST2A vigorously decarboxylates histidine to the biogenic amine histamine, which is excreted into the medium. Cells grown in the presence of histidine generate both a transmembrane pH gradient, inside alkaline, and an electrical potential (delta psi), inside negative, upon addition of histidine. Studies of the mechanism of histidine uptake and histamine excretion in membrane vesicles and proteoliposomes devoid of cytosolic histidine decarboxylase activity demonstrate tha...

  13. Bacterial Overgrowth in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Null Mouse Small Intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Norkina, Oxana; Burnett, Tim G.; De Lisle, Robert C

    2004-01-01

    We recently reported the inflammation of the cystic fibrosis (CF) mouse small intestine, and we hypothesized bacterial overgrowth as a possible cause. Quantitative PCR of bacterial 16S genomic DNA in the CF mouse small intestine revealed an increase of greater than 40-fold compared to controls. Sequencing of 16S PCR products and Gram staining showed that the majority of bacteria in the CF mouse intestine were gram negative. Bacteria were observed to colonize the mucus that accumulates in the ...

  14. GENERATION OF A PROTON MOTIVE FORCE BY HISTIDINE DECARBOXYLATION AND ELECTROGENIC HISTIDINE HISTAMINE ANTIPORT IN LACTOBACILLUS-BUCHNERI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOLENAAR, D; BOSSCHER, JS; TENBRINK, B; DRIESSEN, AJM; KONINGS, WN

    1993-01-01

    Lactobacillus buchneri ST2A vigorously decarboxylates histidine to the biogenic amine histamine, which is excreted into the medium. Cells grown in the presence of histidine generate both a transmembrane pH gradient, inside alkaline, and an electrical potential (DELTApsi), inside negative, upon addit

  15. Generation of a Proton Motive Force by Histidine Decarboxylation and Electrogenic Histidine/Histamine Antiport in Lactobacillus buchneri

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, Douwe; Bosscher, Jaap S.; Brink, Bart ten; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Konings, Wil N.

    1993-01-01

    Lactobaciflus buchneri ST2A vigorously decarboxylates histidine to the biogenic amine histamine, which is excreted into the medium. Cells grown in the presence of histidine generate both a transmembrane pH gradient, inside alkaline, and an electrical potential (Δψ), inside negative, upon addition of

  16. CREST - a large and diverse superfamily of putative transmembrane hydrolases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson Eric N

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of membrane-spanning proteins possess enzymatic activity and catalyze important reactions involving proteins, lipids or other substrates located within or near lipid bilayers. Alkaline ceramidases are seven-transmembrane proteins that hydrolyze the amide bond in ceramide to form sphingosine. Recently, a group of putative transmembrane receptors called progestin and adipoQ receptors (PAQRs were found to be distantly related to alkaline ceramidases, raising the possibility that they may also function as membrane enzymes. Results Using sensitive similarity search methods, we identified statistically significant sequence similarities among several transmembrane protein families including alkaline ceramidases and PAQRs. They were unified into a large and diverse superfamily of putative membrane-bound hydrolases called CREST (alkaline ceramidase, PAQR receptor, Per1, SID-1 and TMEM8. The CREST superfamily embraces a plethora of cellular functions and biochemical activities, including putative lipid-modifying enzymes such as ceramidases and the Per1 family of putative phospholipases involved in lipid remodeling of GPI-anchored proteins, putative hormone receptors, bacterial hemolysins, the TMEM8 family of putative tumor suppressors, and the SID-1 family of putative double-stranded RNA transporters involved in RNA interference. Extensive similarity searches and clustering analysis also revealed several groups of proteins with unknown function in the CREST superfamily. Members of the CREST superfamily share seven predicted core transmembrane segments with several conserved sequence motifs. Conclusions Universal conservation of a set of histidine and aspartate residues across all groups in the CREST superfamily, coupled with independent discoveries of hydrolase activities in alkaline ceramidases and the Per1 family as well as results from previous mutational studies of Per1, suggests that the majority of CREST members are

  17. Recombinant Expression Screening of P. aeruginosa Bacterial Inner Membrane Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffery Constance J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transmembrane proteins (TM proteins make up 25% of all proteins and play key roles in many diseases and normal physiological processes. However, much less is known about their structures and molecular mechanisms than for soluble proteins. Problems in expression, solubilization, purification, and crystallization cause bottlenecks in the characterization of TM proteins. This project addressed the need for improved methods for obtaining sufficient amounts of TM proteins for determining their structures and molecular mechanisms. Results Plasmid clones were obtained that encode eighty-seven transmembrane proteins with varying physical characteristics, for example, the number of predicted transmembrane helices, molecular weight, and grand average hydrophobicity (GRAVY. All the target proteins were from P. aeruginosa, a gram negative bacterial opportunistic pathogen that causes serious lung infections in people with cystic fibrosis. The relative expression levels of the transmembrane proteins were measured under several culture growth conditions. The use of E. coli strains, a T7 promoter, and a 6-histidine C-terminal affinity tag resulted in the expression of 61 out of 87 test proteins (70%. In this study, proteins with a higher grand average hydrophobicity and more transmembrane helices were expressed less well than less hydrophobic proteins with fewer transmembrane helices. Conclusions In this study, factors related to overall hydrophobicity and the number of predicted transmembrane helices correlated with the relative expression levels of the target proteins. Identifying physical characteristics that correlate with protein expression might aid in selecting the "low hanging fruit", or proteins that can be expressed to sufficient levels using an E. coli expression system. The use of other expression strategies or host species might be needed for sufficient levels of expression of transmembrane proteins with other physical

  18. Bacterial expression, purification, and model membrane reconstitution of the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the human APP binding protein LR11/SorLA for NMR studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingsheng; Gill, Richard L; Zhu, Qin; Tian, Fang

    2011-06-01

    LR11 (SorLA) is a recently identified neuronal protein that interacts with amyloid precursor protein (APP), a central player in the pathology of the Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is a neurodegenerative disease and the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. Current estimates suggest that as many as 5.3 million Americans are living with AD. Recent investigations have uncovered the pathophysiological relevance of APP intracellular trafficking in AD. LR11 is of particular importance due to its role in regulating APP transport and processing. LR11 is a type I transmembrane protein and belongs to a novel family of Vps10p receptors. Using a new expression vector, pMTTH (MBP-MCS1 (multiple cloning site)-Thrombin protease cleavage site-MCS2-TEV protease cleavage site-MCS3-His(6)), we successfully expressed, purified and reconstituted the LR11 transmembrane (TM) and cytoplasmic (CT) domains into bicelles and detergent micelles for NMR structural studies. This new construct allowed us to overcome several obstacles during sample preparation. MBP fused LR11TM and LR11TMCT proteins are preferably expressed at high levels in Escherichia coli membrane, making a refolding of the protein unnecessary. The C-terminal His-tag allows for easy separation of the target protein from the truncated products from the C-terminus, and provides a convenient route for screening detergents to produce high quality 2D (1)H-(15)N TROSY spectra. Thrombin protease cleavage is compatible with most of the commonly used detergents, including a direct cleavage at the E. coli membrane surface. This new MBP construct may provide an effective route for the preparation of small proteins with TM domains. PMID:21320603

  19. HISTIDINE BIOTRANSFORMATION MEDIATED BY L-HISTIDINE-AMMONIA-LYASE

    OpenAIRE

    Borisova, G.; Bessonova, O.

    2013-01-01

    Kinetics of the metabolism of the heterocyclic amino acid histidine exposed to the L-histidine ammonia-lyase enzyme has been investigated and the technology of extraction of histidine biotransformation products (urocanic acid and ammonia) from casein hydrolyzates enabling the subsequent use of these hydrolyzates as a milk protein concentrate for the production of specialized dietary products for the nutrition of histidinemia patients has been developed.

  20. Carboplatin binding to histidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An X-ray crystal structure showing the binding of purely carboplatin to histidine in a model protein has finally been obtained. This required extensive crystallization trials and various novel crystal structure analyses. Carboplatin is a second-generation platinum anticancer agent used for the treatment of a variety of cancers. Previous X-ray crystallographic studies of carboplatin binding to histidine (in hen egg-white lysozyme; HEWL) showed the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin owing to the high NaCl concentration used in the crystallization conditions. HEWL co-crystallizations with carboplatin in NaBr conditions have now been carried out to confirm whether carboplatin converts to the bromine form and whether this takes place in a similar way to the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin observed previously in NaCl conditions. Here, it is reported that a partial chemical transformation takes place but to a transplatin form. Thus, to attempt to resolve purely carboplatin binding at histidine, this study utilized co-crystallization of HEWL with carboplatin without NaCl to eliminate the partial chemical conversion of carboplatin. Tetragonal HEWL crystals co-crystallized with carboplatin were successfully obtained in four different conditions, each at a different pH value. The structural results obtained show carboplatin bound to either one or both of the N atoms of His15 of HEWL, and this particular variation was dependent on the concentration of anions in the crystallization mixture and the elapsed time, as well as the pH used. The structural details of the bound carboplatin molecule also differed between them. Overall, the most detailed crystal structure showed the majority of the carboplatin atoms bound to the platinum centre; however, the four-carbon ring structure of the cyclobutanedicarboxylate moiety (CBDC) remained elusive. The potential impact of the results for the administration of carboplatin as an anticancer agent are described

  1. Carboplatin binding to histidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanley, Simon W. M. [University of Manchester, Brunswick Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Diederichs, Kay [University of Konstanz, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M. J. [Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Levy, Colin [University of Manchester, 131 Princess Street, Manchester M1 7DN (United Kingdom); Schreurs, Antoine M. M. [Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Helliwell, John R., E-mail: john.helliwell@manchester.ac.uk [University of Manchester, Brunswick Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-29

    An X-ray crystal structure showing the binding of purely carboplatin to histidine in a model protein has finally been obtained. This required extensive crystallization trials and various novel crystal structure analyses. Carboplatin is a second-generation platinum anticancer agent used for the treatment of a variety of cancers. Previous X-ray crystallographic studies of carboplatin binding to histidine (in hen egg-white lysozyme; HEWL) showed the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin owing to the high NaCl concentration used in the crystallization conditions. HEWL co-crystallizations with carboplatin in NaBr conditions have now been carried out to confirm whether carboplatin converts to the bromine form and whether this takes place in a similar way to the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin observed previously in NaCl conditions. Here, it is reported that a partial chemical transformation takes place but to a transplatin form. Thus, to attempt to resolve purely carboplatin binding at histidine, this study utilized co-crystallization of HEWL with carboplatin without NaCl to eliminate the partial chemical conversion of carboplatin. Tetragonal HEWL crystals co-crystallized with carboplatin were successfully obtained in four different conditions, each at a different pH value. The structural results obtained show carboplatin bound to either one or both of the N atoms of His15 of HEWL, and this particular variation was dependent on the concentration of anions in the crystallization mixture and the elapsed time, as well as the pH used. The structural details of the bound carboplatin molecule also differed between them. Overall, the most detailed crystal structure showed the majority of the carboplatin atoms bound to the platinum centre; however, the four-carbon ring structure of the cyclobutanedicarboxylate moiety (CBDC) remained elusive. The potential impact of the results for the administration of carboplatin as an anticancer agent are described.

  2. Identification of two domains and distal histidine ligands to the four haems in the bacterial c-type cytochrome NapC; the prototype connector between quinol/quinone and periplasmic oxido-reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartron, Michaël L; Roldán, M Dolores; Ferguson, Stuart J; Berks, Ben C; Richardson, David J

    2002-12-01

    NapC is a tetra-haem member of a family of bacterial membrane-anchored multi-haem c -type cytochromes implicated in electron transfer between membrane quinols and periplasmic enzymes. The water-soluble tetra-haem fragment of Paracoccus pantotrophus NapC has been expressed as a periplasmic protein (NapC(sol)) in Paracoccus denitrificans, P. pantotrophus and Escherichia coli. Site-specific mutagenesis of NapC(sol), combined with spectroscopic studies, suggests that each haem iron centre has bis -histidinyl co-ordination. Four proximal ligands arise from each of four Cys-Xaa-Xaa-Cys-His haem-binding motifs; candidates for the four distal ligands are His(81), His(99), His(174) and His(194). NapC(H81A), NapC(H99A), NapC(H174A) and NapC(H194A) mutants (with alanine substituted for each of the four candidate residues) have all been purified from E. coli. In each case, one of the haems has become high-spin, as judged by the presence of a broad absorption band between 620 nm and 650 nm for the oxidized cytochrome; this feature is absent for wild-type protein and presumably arises because of the absence of the distal histidine ligand from one of the haems. NapC(H81A) and NapC(H174A) are less well expressed in E. coli than NapC(H99A) and NapC(H194A) and cannot be detected when expressed in P. denitrificans or P. pantotrophus. In vitro and in vivo complementation studies demonstrate that the soluble periplasmic NapC can mediate electron transfer from quinols to the periplasmic nitrate reductase. This capacity was retained in vitro with the NapC(H99A) and NapC(H194A) mutants but was lost in vivo. A model for the structural organization of NapC(sol) into two domains, each containing a di-haem pair, is proposed. In this model, each haem pair obtains one distal haem ligand from its own domain and a second from the other domain. The suggestion of two domains is supported by observations that the 24 kDa NapC(sol) cleaves to yield a 12 kDa haem-staining band. Determination of the

  3. Prebiotic synthesis of histidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, C.; Yang, L.; Miller, S. L.; Oro, J.

    1990-01-01

    The prebiotic formation of histidine (His) has been accomplished experimentally by the reaction of erythrose with formamidine followed by a Strecker synthesis. In the first step of this reaction sequence, the formation of imidazole-4-acetaldehyde took place by the condensation of erythrose and formamidine, two compounds that are known to be formed under prebiotic conditions. In a second step, the imidazole-4-acetaldehyde was converted to His, without isolation of the reaction products by adding HCN and ammonia to the reaction mixture. LC, HPLC, thermospray liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and tandem mass spectrometry were used to identify the product, which was obtained in a yield of 3.5% based on the ratio of His/erythrose. This is a new chemical synthesis of one of the basic amino acids which had not been synthesized prebiotically until now.

  4. Histidine Decarboxylase in Enterobacteriaceae Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Wauters, Georges; Avesani, Véronique; Charlier, Jacqueline; Janssens, Michèle; Delmée, Michel

    2004-01-01

    With a modification of Taylor's decarboxylation broth, histidine decarboxylase was detected in Enterobacter aerogenes, Morganella morganii, Raoultella ornithinolytica, and some strains of Citrobacter youngae and Raoultella planticola. This method provides a useful confirmatory test for identification of E. aerogenes strains.

  5. Visualizing autophosphorylation in histidine kinases

    OpenAIRE

    Casino, Patricia; Miguel-Romero, Laura; Marina, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the most widespread regulatory mechanism in signal transduction. Autophosphorylation in a dimeric sensor histidine kinase is the first step in two-component signalling, the predominant signal-transduction device in bacteria. Despite being the most abundant sensor kinases in nature, the molecular bases of the histidine kinase autophosphorylation mechanism are still unknown. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that autophosphorylation can occur in two dir...

  6. L-histidine utilization in Aspergillus nidulans.

    OpenAIRE

    Polkinghorne, M A; Hynes, M J

    1982-01-01

    Histidase activity rather than uptake of L-histidine is the limiting factor for the utilization of histidine as the sole nitrogen source for Aspergillus nidulans. Histidine cannot act as the sole carbon source, and evidence is presented indicating that this is attributable to an inability to convert histidine to L-glutamate in vivo. It has been shown that this fungus lacks an active urocanase enzyme and that histidine is quantitatively converted to urocanate, which accumulates in the extracel...

  7. Gene inactivation in Lactococcus lactis: histidine biosynthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Delorme, C; Godon, J J; Ehrlich, S D; Renault, P

    1993-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis strains from dairy and nondairy sources were tested for the ability to grow in the absence of histidine. Among 60 dairy strains tested, 56 required histidine, whereas only 1 of 11 nondairy strains had this requirement. Moreover, 10 of the 56 auxotrophic strains were able to grow in the presence of histidinol (Hol+), the immediate histidine precursor. This indicates that adaptation to milk often results in histidine auxotrophy. The histidine operon was detected by Southern h...

  8. Ethylene Controls Autophosphorylation of the Histidine Kinase Domain in Ethylene Receptor ETR1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan Voet-van-Vormizeele; Georg Groth

    2008-01-01

    Perception of the phytohormone ethylene is accomplished by a small family of integral membrane receptors.In Arabidopsis,five ethylene receptor proteins are known,including ethylene resistant 1 (ETR1).The hydrophobic aminoterminal domain of these receptors contains the ethylene-binding site while the carboxyl-terminal part consists of a histidine kinase domain and a response regulator domain,which are well known elements found in bacterial two-component signaling.The soluble membrane-extrinsic carboxyl-terminal part of the receptor,which is likely to play an important role in signal transduction,showed intrinsic kinase activity when expressed and purified on its own.However,a correlation between signal input and autokinase activity was not established in these studies,as receptors were missing the transmembrane amino-terminal sensor domain.Thus,it is still unclear whether autophosphorylation occurs in response to perception of the ethylene signal.Here,we report on autophosphorylation studies of purified full-length ETR1.Autokinase activity of the purified receptor is controlled by ethylene or by ethylene agonists like the π-acceptor compound cyanide.In fact,both signal molecules were able to completely turn off the intrinsic kinase activity.Furthermore,the observed inhibition of autophosphorylation in ETR1 by both molecules could be prevented when the ethylene antagonist 1-methyl-cyclopropene (MCP) was applied.

  9. In vivo synthesis of histidine by a cloned histidine ammonia-lyase in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Fuchs, R L; Kane, J F

    1985-01-01

    Histidine ammonia-lyase catalyzes the first step in histidine catabolism, the deamination of histidine to urocanate and ammonia. In vitro experiments have shown that histidine ammonia-lyase also can catalyze the reverse (amination) reaction, histidine synthesis, relatively efficiently under extreme reaction conditions (4 M NH4OH, pH 10). An Escherichia coli hisB deletion strain was transformed with a pBR322 derivative plasmid (pCB101) containing the entire Klebsiella aerogenes histidine utili...

  10. Thermodynamics of solution of histidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The enthalpies of solution of L-histidine in water at 288.15-318.15 K and 0.003-0.15 mol kg-1 were measured. The enthalpies of solution were found to be independent of the solute molality up to ∼0.1 mol kg-1. Standard enthalpies and heat capacities of solution were computed. Free energies and entropies of solution have been estimated in the temperature range studied using literature solubility data and the results of the present study. The temperature increase was found to result in a pronounced rise of the L-histidine solubility due to the significant increase of the TΔS values. The characteristic temperatures for the thermodynamic properties of histidine aqueous solutions were estimated

  11. Histidine-Containing Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids containing histidine moieties are provided. These compounds have applications including diagnostics, research and potential therapeutics.......Peptide nucleic acids containing histidine moieties are provided. These compounds have applications including diagnostics, research and potential therapeutics....

  12. Determinants of homodimerization specificity in histidine kinases

    OpenAIRE

    Ashenberg, Orr; Rozen-Gagnon, Kathryn; Laub, Michael T; Keating, Amy E.

    2011-01-01

    Two-component signal transduction pathways consisting of a histidine kinase and a response regulator are used by prokaryotes to respond to diverse environmental and intracellular stimuli. Most species encode numerous paralogous histidine kinases that exhibit significant structural similarity. Yet in almost all known examples, histidine kinases are thought to function as homodimers. We investigated the molecular basis of dimerization specificity, focusing on the model histidine kinase EnvZ and...

  13. 21 CFR 582.5361 - Histidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Histidine. 582.5361 Section 582.5361 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5361 Histidine. (a) Product. Histidine (L- and DL-forms). (b) Conditions of use....

  14. 2-Fluoro-l-histidine

    OpenAIRE

    Andra, Kiran K.; Bullinger, John C.; Bann, James G; Eichhorn, David M.

    2010-01-01

    The title compound, C6H8FN3O2, an analog of histidine, shows a reduced side-chain pKa (ca 1). The title structure exhibits a shortening of the bond between the proximal ring N atom and the F-substituted ring C atom, indicating an increase in π-bond character due to an inductive effect of fluorine.

  15. 2-Fluoro-l-histidine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran K. Andra

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C6H8FN3O2, an analog of histidine, shows a reduced side-chain pKa (ca 1. The title structure exhibits a shortening of the bond between the proximal ring N atom and the F-substituted ring C atom, indicating an increase in π-bond character due to an inductive effect of fluorine.

  16. Phosphorylation on histidine is accompanied by localized structural changes in the phosphocarrier protein, HPr from Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, B. E.; Rajagopal, P.; Klevit, R. E.

    1997-01-01

    The histidine-containing protein (HPr) of bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) serves a central role in a series of phosphotransfer reactions used for the translocation of sugars across cell membranes. These studies report the high-definition solution structures of both the unphosphorylated and histidine phosphorylated (P-His) forms of HPr from Bacillus subtilis. Consistent with previous NMR studies, local conformational adjustments occur upon phosphorylation of...

  17. Transmembrane heme delivery systems

    OpenAIRE

    Goldman, Barry S; Beck, David L.; Monika, Elizabeth M.; Kranz, Robert G.

    1998-01-01

    Heme proteins play pivotal roles in a wealth of biological processes. Despite this, the molecular mechanisms by which heme traverses bilayer membranes for use in biosynthetic reactions are unknown. The biosynthesis of c-type cytochromes requires that heme is transported to the bacterial periplasm or mitochondrial intermembrane space where it is covalently ligated to two reduced cysteinyl residues of the apocytochrome. Results herein suggest that a family of integral membrane proteins in proka...

  18. OsHT, a Rice Gene Encoding for a Plasma-Membrane Localized Histidine Transporter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Di LIU; Wei GONG; Yong BAI; Jing-Chu LUO; Yu-Xian ZHU

    2005-01-01

    Using a degenerative probe designed according to the most conservative region of a known Lys- and His-specific amino acid transporter (LHT1) from Arabidopsis, we isolated a full-length cDNA named OsHT (histidine transporter of Oryza sativa L.) by screening the rice cDNA library. The cDNA is 1.3kb in length and the open reading frame encodes for a 441 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 49 kDa. Multiple sequence alignments showed that OsHT shares a high degree of sequence conservation at the deduced amino acid level with the Arabidopsis LHT1 and six putative lysine and histidine transporters. Computational analysis indicated that OsHT is an integral membrane protein with 11 putative transmembrane helices. This was confirmed by the transient expression assay because the OsHT-GFP fusion protein was, indeed, localized mainly in the plasma membrane of onion epidermal cells. Functional complementation experiments demonstrated that OsHT was able to work as a histidine transporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that OsHT is a gene that encodes for a histidine transporter from rice.This is the first time that an LHT-type amino acid transporter gene has been cloned from higher plants other than A rabidopsis.

  19. Hydrophobic pulses predict transmembrane helix irregularities and channel transmembrane units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claustres Mireille

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few high-resolution structures of integral membranes proteins are available, as crystallization of such proteins needs yet to overcome too many technical limitations. Nevertheless, prediction of their transmembrane (TM structure by bioinformatics tools provides interesting insights on the topology of these proteins. Methods We describe here how to extract new information from the analysis of hydrophobicity variations or hydrophobic pulses (HPulses in the sequence of integral membrane proteins using the Hydrophobic Pulse Predictor, a new tool we developed for this purpose. To analyze the primary sequence of 70 integral membrane proteins we defined two levels of analysis: G1-HPulses for sliding windows of n = 2 to 6 and G2-HPulses for sliding windows of n = 12 to 16. Results The G2-HPulse analysis of 541 transmembrane helices allowed the definition of the new concept of transmembrane unit (TMU that groups together transmembrane helices and segments with potential adjacent structures. In addition, the G1-HPulse analysis identified helix irregularities that corresponded to kinks, partial helices or unannotated structural events. These irregularities could represent key dynamic elements that are alternatively activated depending on the channel status as illustrated by the crystal structures of the lactose permease in different conformations. Conclusions Our results open a new way in the understanding of transmembrane secondary structures: hydrophobicity through hydrophobic pulses strongly impacts on such embedded structures and is not confined to define the transmembrane status of amino acids.

  20. Osmotic stress-dependent serine phosphorylation of the histidine kinase homologue DokA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oehme Felix

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two-component systems consisting of histidine kinases and their corresponding receivers are widespread in bacterial signal transduction. In the past few years, genes coding for homologues of two-component systems were also discovered in eukaryotic organisms. DokA, a homologue of bacterial histidine kinases, is an element of the osmoregulatory pathway in the amoeba Dictyostelium. The work described here addresses the question whether DokA is phosphorylated in vivo in response to osmotic stress. Results We have endogenously overexpressed individual domains of DokA to investigate post-translational modification of the protein in response to osmotic shock in vivo. Dictyostelium cells were labeled with [32P]-orthophosphate, exposed to osmotic stress and DokA fragments were subsequently isolated by immunoprecipitation. Thus, a stress-dependent phosphorylation could be demonstrated, with the site of phosphorylation being located in the kinase domain. We demonstrate biochemically that the phosphorylated amino acid is serine, and by mutational analysis that the phosphorylation reaction is not due to an autophosphorylation of DokA. Furthermore, mutation of the conserved histidine did not affect the osmostress-dependent phosphorylation reaction. Conclusions A stimulus-dependent serine phosphorylation of a eukaryotic histidine kinase homologue was demonstrated for the first time in vivo. That implies that DokA, although showing typical structural features of a bacterial two-component system, might be part of a eukaryotic signal transduction pathway that involves serine/threonine kinases.

  1. Disordered regions in transmembrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tusnády, Gábor E; Dobson, László; Tompa, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The functions of transmembrane proteins in living cells are widespread; they range from various transport processes to energy production, from cell-cell adhesion to communication. Structurally, they are highly ordered in their membrane-spanning regions, but may contain disordered regions in the cytosolic and extra-cytosolic parts. In this study, we have investigated the disordered regions in transmembrane proteins by a stringent definition of disordered residues on the currently available largest experimental dataset, and show a significant correlation between the spatial distributions of positively charged residues and disordered regions. This finding suggests a new role of disordered regions in transmembrane proteins by providing structural flexibility for stabilizing interactions with negatively charged head groups of the lipid molecules. We also find a preference of structural disorder in the terminal--as opposed to loop--regions in transmembrane proteins, and survey the respective functions involved in recruiting other proteins or mediating allosteric signaling effects. Finally, we critically compare disorder prediction methods on our transmembrane protein set. While there are no major differences between these methods using the usual statistics, such as per residue accuracies, Matthew's correlation coefficients, etc.; substantial differences can be found regarding the spatial distribution of the predicted disordered regions. We conclude that a predictor optimized for transmembrane proteins would be of high value to the field of structural disorder. PMID:26275590

  2. The stability of the three transmembrane and the four transmembrane human vitamin K epoxide reductase models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sangwook

    2016-04-01

    The three transmembrane and the four transmembrane helix models are suggested for human vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR). In this study, we investigate the stability of the human three transmembrane/four transmembrane VKOR models by employing a coarse-grained normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics simulation. Based on the analysis of the mobility of each transmembrane domain, we suggest that the three transmembrane human VKOR model is more stable than the four transmembrane human VKOR model.

  3. Histidine in Continuum Electrostatics Protonation State Calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Couch, Vernon; Stuchebruckhov, Alexei

    2011-01-01

    A modification to the standard continuum electrostatics approach to calculate protein pKas which allows for the decoupling of histidine tautomers within a two state model is presented. Histidine with four intrinsically coupled protonation states cannot be easily incorporated into a two state formalism because the interaction between the two protonatable sites of the imidazole ring is not purely electrostatic. The presented treatment, based on a single approximation of the interrelation betwee...

  4. The structure and dynamic properties of the complete histidine phosphotransfer domain of the chemotaxis specific histidine autokinase CheA from Thermotoga maritima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vu, Anh; Hamel, Damon J.; Zhou Hongjun; Dahlquist, Frederick W., E-mail: dahlquist@chem.ucsb.edu [University of California Santa Barbara, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States)

    2011-09-15

    The bacterial histidine autokinase CheA contains a histidine phosphotransfer (Hpt) domain that accepts a phosphate from the catalytic domain and donates the phosphate to either target response regulator protein, CheY or CheB. The Hpt domain forms a helix-bundle structure with a conserved four-helix bundle motif and a variable fifth helix. Observation of two nearly equally populated conformations in the crystal structure of a Hpt domain fragment of CheA from Thermotoga maritima containing only the first four helices suggests more mobility in a tightly packed helix bundle structure than previously thought. In order to examine how the structures of Hpt domain homologs may differ from each other particularly in the conformation of the last helix, and whether an alternative conformation exists in the intact Hpt domain in solution, we have solved a high-resolution, solution structure of the CheA Hpt from T. maritima and characterized the backbone dynamics of this protein. The structure contains a four-helix bundle characteristic of histidine phosphotransfer domains. The position and orientation of the fifth helix resembles those in known Hpt domain crystal and solution structures in other histidine kinases. The alternative conformation that was reported in the crystal structure of the CheA Hpt from T. maritima missing the fifth helix is not detected in the solution structure, suggesting a role for the fifth helix in providing stabilizing forces to the overall structure.

  5. The structure and dynamic properties of the complete histidine phosphotransfer domain of the chemotaxis specific histidine autokinase CheA from Thermotoga maritima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bacterial histidine autokinase CheA contains a histidine phosphotransfer (Hpt) domain that accepts a phosphate from the catalytic domain and donates the phosphate to either target response regulator protein, CheY or CheB. The Hpt domain forms a helix-bundle structure with a conserved four-helix bundle motif and a variable fifth helix. Observation of two nearly equally populated conformations in the crystal structure of a Hpt domain fragment of CheA from Thermotoga maritima containing only the first four helices suggests more mobility in a tightly packed helix bundle structure than previously thought. In order to examine how the structures of Hpt domain homologs may differ from each other particularly in the conformation of the last helix, and whether an alternative conformation exists in the intact Hpt domain in solution, we have solved a high-resolution, solution structure of the CheA Hpt from T. maritima and characterized the backbone dynamics of this protein. The structure contains a four-helix bundle characteristic of histidine phosphotransfer domains. The position and orientation of the fifth helix resembles those in known Hpt domain crystal and solution structures in other histidine kinases. The alternative conformation that was reported in the crystal structure of the CheA Hpt from T. maritima missing the fifth helix is not detected in the solution structure, suggesting a role for the fifth helix in providing stabilizing forces to the overall structure.

  6. Computational design of a Zn2+ receptor that controls bacterial gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, M. A.; Looger, L. L.; Hellinga, H. W.

    2003-09-01

    The control of cellular physiology and gene expression in response to extracellular signals is a basic property of living systems. We have constructed a synthetic bacterial signal transduction pathway in which gene expression is controlled by extracellular Zn2+. In this system a computationally designed Zn2+-binding periplasmic receptor senses the extracellular solute and triggers a two-component signal transduction pathway via a chimeric transmembrane protein, resulting in transcriptional up-regulation of a -galactosidase reporter gene. The Zn2+-binding site in the designed receptor is based on a four-coordinate, tetrahedral primary coordination sphere consisting of histidines and glutamates. In addition, mutations were introduced in a secondary coordination sphere to satisfy the residual hydrogen-bonding potential of the histidines coordinated to the metal. The importance of the secondary shell interactions is demonstrated by their effect on metal affinity and selectivity, as well as protein stability. Three designed protein sequences, comprising two distinct metal-binding positions, were all shown to bind Zn2+ and to function in the cell-based assay, indicating the generality of the design methodology. These experiments demonstrate that biological systems can be manipulated with computationally designed proteins that have drastically altered ligand-binding specificities, thereby extending the repertoire of genetic control by extracellular signals.

  7. Prebiotic synthesis of histidyl-histidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, C.; Mills, T.; Oro, J.

    1990-01-01

    Histidyl-histidine (His-His) has been synthesized in a yield of up to 14.4% under plausible prebiotic conditions using histidine (His), cyanamide, and 4-amino-5-imidazole carboxamide. A trace amount of His trimer was also detected. Because the imidazole group of His is involved in a number of important enzymatic reactions, and His-His has been shown to catalyze the prebiotic synthesis of glycyl-glycine, we expect this work will stimulate further studies on the catalytic activities of simple His-containing peptides in prebiotic reactions.

  8. Attractive Interactions between Side Chains of Histidine-Histidine and Histidine-Arginine-Based Cationic Dipeptides in Water

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heyda, Jan; Mason, P. E.; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 114, č. 26 (2010), s. 8744-8749. ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA ČR GA203/08/0114 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : molecular dynamics * histidine * ion pairing Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.603, year: 2010

  9. The multiple roles of histidine in protein interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Si-Ming; Du, Qi-Shi; Meng, Jian-Zong; Pang, Zong-Wen; Huang, Ri-Bo

    2013-01-01

    Background Among the 20 natural amino acids histidine is the most active and versatile member that plays the multiple roles in protein interactions, often the key residue in enzyme catalytic reactions. A theoretical and comprehensive study on the structural features and interaction properties of histidine is certainly helpful. Results Four interaction types of histidine are quantitatively calculated, including: (1) Cation-π interactions, in which the histidine acts as the aromatic π-motif in ...

  10. Incorporation of copper histidine complexes into a zeolite Y matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesu, J.G.; Baute, D.; Tromp, H.J.; Faassen, E.E.H. van; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2003-01-01

    Preformed copper-histidine complexes were loaded into zeolite Y by ion exchange. The zeolite was found to contain a mixture of two different encaged complexes: a mono-histidine complex (A) and a bis-histidine complex (B). The initial copper concentration affects the composition of this mixture, with

  11. Evaluation of interaction between histidine binding Cu2+ ion and histidine by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Min; Lee, Haeng-Ja; Kim, Woo-Sik; Sano, Masato; Muramatsu, Hiroshi; Chang, Sang-Mok

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a direct interaction force measurement between histidine molecules using AFM force-distance curve measurement. AFM force-distance curves between the histidine-modified cantilever and substrate in the different conditions with or without intercalating Cu2+ ion were measured and interpreted via Gaussian curve fitting analyses. The adhesion force between histidine molecules was shown to be 110 pN under the presence of Cu2+. The result was compareable to the measured adhesion force about 0 pN, which was measured by the removal of Cu2+ ion with the addition of EDTA. The result indicated the direct histidine-histidie interaction was difficult without the role of the bridigible ionic component. From the results, the possibility of direct measurement on chemical affinities between biomolecules was suggested by using AFM force-distance curve analyses. Especially, the current approach showed the possible affinity measurement techniques that elucidate the role of bridge ions. PMID:22966539

  12. Structural insights into ChpT, an essential dimeric histidine phosphotransferase regulating the cell cycle in Caulobacter crescentus

    OpenAIRE

    Fioravanti, Antonella; Clantin, Bernard; Dewitte, Frédérique; Lens, Zoé; Verger, Alexis; Biondi, Emanuele G; Villeret, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Two-component and phosphorelay signal-transduction proteins are crucial for bacterial cell-cycle regulation in Caulobacter crescentus. ChpT is an essential histidine phosphotransferase that controls the activity of the master cell-cycle regulator CtrA by phosphorylation. Here, the 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of ChpT is reported. ChpT is a homodimer and adopts the domain architecture of the intracellular part of class I histidine kinases. Each subunit consists of two distinct domains: a...

  13. Histidine Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry for Probing the Microenvironment of Histidine Residues in Dihydrofolate Reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Miyagi, Masaru; Wan, Qun; Ahmad, Md. Faiz; Gokulrangan, Giridharan; Tomechko, Sara E.; Bennett, Brad; Dealwis, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Background Histidine Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (His-HDX-MS) determines the HDX rates at the imidazole C2-hydrogen of histidine residues. This method provides not only the HDX rates but also the pK a values of histidine imidazole rings. His-HDX-MS was used to probe the microenvironment of histidine residues of E. coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), an enzyme proposed to undergo multiple conformational changes during catalysis. Methodology/Principal Findings Using His-HDX-M...

  14. Histidine Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry for Probing the Microenvironment of Histidine Residues in Dihydrofolate Reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Masaru Miyagi; Qun Wan; Md. Faiz Ahmad; Giridharan Gokulrangan; Tomechko, Sara E; Brad Bennett; Chris Dealwis

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Histidine Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (His-HDX-MS) determines the HDX rates at the imidazole C(2)-hydrogen of histidine residues. This method provides not only the HDX rates but also the pK(a) values of histidine imidazole rings. His-HDX-MS was used to probe the microenvironment of histidine residues of E. coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), an enzyme proposed to undergo multiple conformational changes during catalysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using His-...

  15. The Quorum-Sensing Hybrid Histidine Kinase LuxN of Vibrio harveyi Contains a Periplasmically Located N Terminus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kirsten; Odenbach, Tina; Timmen, Melanie

    2007-01-01

    Hydropathy profile analyses of the amino acid sequence of the quorum-sensing hybrid histidine kinase LuxN of Vibrio harveyi predict a periplasmic location of the N terminus. To test this, two-hybrid proteins consisting of LuxN and an N-terminally fused maltose-binding protein with or without a leader sequence were analyzed with regard to the enzymatic activities of LuxN, protease accessibility, and complementation of an Escherichia coli malE mutant. The results strongly support a periplasmic location of the N terminus, implying that LuxN is anchored with nine transmembrane domains in the cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:17259316

  16. Structure-based discovery of inhibitors of the YycG histidine kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, X.; Zhang, J.; Xu, B.;

    2006-01-01

    inhibitors of YycG histidine kinase thus are of potential value as leads for developing new antibiotics against infecting staphylococci. The structure-based virtual screening (SBVS) technology can be widely used in screening potential inhibitors of other bacterial TCSs, since it is more rapid and efficacious...... resistance to many conventional antibiotics and often results in chronic infection. It has an urgent need to design novel antibiotics against staphylococci infections, especially those can kill cells embedded in biofilm. RESULTS: In this report, a series of novel inhibitors of the histidine kinase (HK) Yyc......G protein of S. epidermidis were discovered first using structure-based virtual screening (SBVS) from a small molecular lead-compound library, followed by experimental validation. Of the 76 candidates derived by SBVS targeting of the homolog model of the YycG HATPase_c domain of S. epidermidis, seven...

  17. An Autonomously Reciprocating Transmembrane Nanoactuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Matthew A; Cockroft, Scott L

    2016-01-22

    Biological molecular machines operate far from equilibrium by coupling chemical potential to repeated cycles of dissipative nanomechanical motion. This principle has been exploited in supramolecular systems that exhibit true machine behavior in solution and on surfaces. However, designed membrane-spanning assemblies developed to date have been limited to simple switches or stochastic shuttles, and true machine behavior has remained elusive. Herein, we present a transmembrane nanoactuator that turns over chemical fuel to drive autonomous reciprocating (back-and-forth) nanomechanical motion. Ratcheted reciprocating motion of a DNA/PEG copolymer threaded through a single α-hemolysin pore was induced by a combination of DNA strand displacement processes and enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Ion-current recordings revealed saw-tooth patterns, indicating that the assemblies operated in autonomous, asymmetric cycles of conformational change at rates of up to one cycle per minute. PMID:26661295

  18. Complex formation of platelet thrombospondin with histidine-rich glycoprotein.

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, L L; Nachman, R L; Harpel, P C

    1984-01-01

    Thrombospondin and histidine-rich glycoprotein are two proteins with diverse biological activities which have been associated with human platelets and other cell systems. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we have demonstrated that purified human platelet thrombospondin formed a complex with purified human plasma histidine-rich glycoprotein. The formation of the thrombospondin-histidine-rich glycoprotein complex was specific, concentration dependent, and saturable. Significant bindin...

  19. Stabilization of a histidine-producing strain of Serratia marcescens.

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiura, M; Kisumi, M

    1984-01-01

    A decrease in histidine productivity was observed during subculture of a histidine-producing strain of Serratia marcescens. The decrease was accompanied by an increase in the number of wild-type revertants. Adenine accelerated the growth of producing strain HT-2892 to nearly equal that of revertants, and histidine production was stable because the depletion of ATP in strain HT-2892 was restored by adenine. To increase the intracellular ATP content, mutants resistant to 6-methylpurine, an anta...

  20. Crystallographic characterization of a multidomain histidine protein kinase from an essential two-component regulatory system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multidomain cytoplasmic portion of the histidine protein kinase from an essential two-component signal transduction system has been crystallized and X-ray data have been collected to 2.8 Å resolution. YycGF is a highly conserved two-component signal transduction system that is specific to low-G+C Gram-positive bacteria, including many important human pathogens. It has been recognized as a crucial regulatory system for cell-wall metabolism. YycG, the histidine protein kinase of this system, is a multidomain transmembrane protein. The truncated cytoplasmic portion of YycG from Bacillus subtilis encompassing the PAS domain, the dimerization domain and the catalytic domain was expressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray data were collected to 2.8 Å resolution with a completeness of 98.2% and an overall Rmerge of 5.6%. The crystals belonged to space group P61 or P65, with unit-cell parameters a = 135.0, c = 133.0 Å. The selenomethionine-substituted version of the protein was crystallized and X-ray data were collected to 3.6 Å resolution for subsequent MAD phasing

  1. Tagging the expressed protein with 6 histidines: rapid cloning of an amplicon with three options.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manika Indrajit Singh

    Full Text Available We report the designing of three expression vectors that can be used for rapid cloning of any blunt-end DNA segment. Only a single set of oligonucleotides are required to perform the amplification of the target DNA and its cloning in all three vectors simultaneously. The DNA thus cloned can express a protein either with or without a hexa-histidine tag depending upon the vector used. The expression occurs from T7 promoter when transformed into E. coli BL21(DE3. Two of the three plasmids have been designed to provide the expressed protein with either N- or C-terminus 6 histidine amino acids in tandem. The third plasmid, however, does not add any tag to the expressed protein. The cloning is achieved quickly with the requirement of phosphorylation of PCR product without any restriction digestion. Additionally, the generated clones can be confirmed with a single step PCR reaction carried out from bacterial colonies (generally termed as "colony PCR". We show the cloning, expression and purification of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP as proof-of-concept. Additionally, we also show the cloning and expression of four sigma factors from Mycobacterium tuberculosis further demonstrating the utility of the designed plasmids. We strongly believe that the vectors and the strategy that we have developed will facilitate the rapid cloning and expression of any gene in E. coli BL21(DE3 with or without a hexa-histidine tag.

  2. Tagging the expressed protein with 6 histidines: rapid cloning of an amplicon with three options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manika Indrajit; Jain, Vikas

    2013-01-01

    We report the designing of three expression vectors that can be used for rapid cloning of any blunt-end DNA segment. Only a single set of oligonucleotides are required to perform the amplification of the target DNA and its cloning in all three vectors simultaneously. The DNA thus cloned can express a protein either with or without a hexa-histidine tag depending upon the vector used. The expression occurs from T7 promoter when transformed into E. coli BL21(DE3). Two of the three plasmids have been designed to provide the expressed protein with either N- or C-terminus 6 histidine amino acids in tandem. The third plasmid, however, does not add any tag to the expressed protein. The cloning is achieved quickly with the requirement of phosphorylation of PCR product without any restriction digestion. Additionally, the generated clones can be confirmed with a single step PCR reaction carried out from bacterial colonies (generally termed as "colony PCR"). We show the cloning, expression and purification of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) as proof-of-concept. Additionally, we also show the cloning and expression of four sigma factors from Mycobacterium tuberculosis further demonstrating the utility of the designed plasmids. We strongly believe that the vectors and the strategy that we have developed will facilitate the rapid cloning and expression of any gene in E. coli BL21(DE3) with or without a hexa-histidine tag. PMID:23691118

  3. Essential histidine pairs indicate conserved haem binding in epsilonproteobacterial cytochrome c haem lyases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Melanie; Scheithauer, Juliane; Kranz, Robert G.; Simon, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial cytochrome c maturation occurs at the outside of the cytoplasmic membrane, requires transport of haem b across the membrane, and depends on membrane-bound cytochrome c haem lyase (CCHL), an enzyme that catalyses covalent attachment of haem b to apocytochrome c. Epsilonproteobacteria such as Wolinella succinogenes use the cytochrome c biogenesis system II and contain unusually large CCHL proteins of about 900 amino acid residues that appear to be fusions of the CcsB and CcsA proteins found in other bacteria. CcsBA-type CCHLs have been proposed to act as haem transporters that contain two haem b coordination sites located at different sides of the membrane and formed by histidine pairs. W. succinogenes cells contain three CcsBA-type CCHL isoenzymes (NrfI, CcsA1 and CcsA2) that are known to differ in their specificity for apocytochromes and apparently recognize different haem c binding motifs such as CX2CH (by CcsA2), CX2CK (by NrfI) and CX15CH (by CcsA1). In this study, conserved histidine residues were individually replaced by alanine in each of the W. succinogenes CCHLs. Characterization of NrfI and CcsA1 variants in W. succinogenes demonstrated that a set of four histidines is essential for maturing the dedicated multihaem cytochromes c NrfA and MccA, respectively. The function of W. succinogenes CcsA2 variants produced in Escherichia coli was also found to depend on each of these four conserved histidine residues. The presence of imidazole in the growth medium of both W. succinogenes and E. coli rescued the cytochrome c biogenesis activity of most histidine variants, albeit to different extents, thereby implying the presence of two functionally distinct histidine pairs in each CCHL. The data support a model in which two conserved haem b binding sites are involved in haem transport catalysed by CcsBA-type CCHLs. PMID:20705660

  4. Biophysical Aspects of Transmembrane Signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Damjanovich, Sandor

    2005-01-01

    Transmembrane signaling is one of the most significant cell biological events in the life and death of cells in general and lymphocytes in particular. Until recently biochemists and biophysicists were not accustomed to thinking of these processes from the side of a high number of complex biochemical events and an equally high number of physical changes at molecular and cellular levels at the same time. Both types of researchers were convinced that their findings are the most decisive, having higher importance than the findings of the other scientist population. Both casts were wrong. Life, even at cellular level, has a number of interacting physical and biochemical mechanisms, which finally build up the creation of an "excited" cell that will respond to particular signals from the outer or inner world. This book handles both aspects of the signalling events, and in some cases tries to unify our concepts and help understand the signals that govern the life and death of our cells. Not only the understanding, bu...

  5. Cooperative Transmembrane Penetration of Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haizhen; Ji, Qiuju; Huang, Changjin; Zhang, Sulin; Yuan, Bing; Yang, Kai; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2015-01-01

    Physical penetration of lipid bilayer membranes presents an alternative pathway for cellular delivery of nanoparticles (NPs) besides endocytosis. NPs delivered through this pathway could reach the cytoplasm, thereby opening the possibility of organelle-specific targeting. Herein we perform dissipative particle dynamics simulations to elucidate the transmembrane penetration mechanisms of multiple NPs. Our simulations demonstrate that NPs’ translocation proceeds in a cooperative manner, where the interplay of the quantity and surface chemistry of the NPs regulates the translocation efficiency. For NPs with hydrophilic surfaces, the increase of particle quantity facilitates penetration, while for NPs with partly or totally hydrophobic surfaces, the opposite highly possibly holds. Moreover, a set of interesting cooperative ways, such as aggregation, aggregation-dispersion, and aggregation-dispersion-reaggregation of the NPs, are observed during the penetration process. We find that the penetration behaviors of multiple NPs are mostly dominated by the changes of the NP-membrane force components in the membrane plane direction, in addition to that in the penetration direction, suggesting a different interaction mechanism between the multiple NPs and the membrane compared with the one-NP case. These results provide a fundamental understanding in the underlying mechanisms of cooperative penetration of NPs, and shed light on the NP-based drug and gene delivery. PMID:26013284

  6. pH-Sensitive Poly(histidine methacrylamide).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huifeng; Wu, Haiyan; Lee, Chen-Jung; Lei, Xia; Zhe, Jiang; Xu, Fujian; Cheng, Fang; Cheng, Gang

    2016-06-28

    This research reports a synthetic amino acid based zwitterionic poly(histidine methacrylamide) (PHisMA), which possesses switchability among zwitterionic, anionic, and cationic states, pH-dependent antifouling properties, and chelation capability to multivalent metal ions. The PHisMA polymer brush surface shows good antifouling properties to resist protein adsorption and bacterial attachment in its zwitterionic state at pH 5. This study also demonstrates that the solution acidity significantly affects the mechanical properties of PHisMA hydrogels. PHisMA hydrogels show higher viscoelastic properties and lower swelling ratios in the zwitterionic state at pH 4 and pH 5, compared to higher or lower pH conditions. It was discovered that PHisMA can chelate multivalent metal ions, such as Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+) and Fe(3+). This study provides us a better understanding of structure-property relationships of switchable zwitterionic polymers. PHisMA can potentially be adapted for a broad range of applications including wound care, water treatment, bioseparation, coating, drug and gene delivery carriers, etc. PMID:27310924

  7. Bacterial tactic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, J P

    1999-01-01

    Many, if not most, bacterial species swim. The synthesis and operation of the flagellum, the most complex organelle of a bacterium, takes a significant percentage of cellular energy, particularly in the nutrient limited environments in which many motile species are found. It is obvious that motility accords cells a survival advantage over non-motile mutants under normal, poorly mixed conditions and is an important determinant in the development of many associations between bacteria and other organisms, whether as pathogens or symbionts and in colonization of niches and the development of biofilms. This survival advantage is the result of sensory control of swimming behaviour. Although too small to sense a gradient along the length of the cell, and unable to swim great distances because of buffetting by Brownian motion and the curvature resulting from a rotating flagellum, bacteria can bias their random swimming direction towards a more favourable environment. The favourable environment will vary from species to species and there is now evidence that in many species this can change depending on the current physiological growth state of the cell. In general, bacteria sense changes in a range of nutrients and toxins, compounds altering electron transport, acceptors or donors into the electron transport chain, pH, temperature and even the magnetic field of the Earth. The sensory signals are balanced, and may be balanced with other sensory pathways such as quorum sensing, to identify the optimum current environment. The central sensory pathway in this process is common to most bacteria and most effectors. The environmental change is sensed by a sensory protein. In most species examined this is a transmembrane protein, sensing the external environment, but there is increasing evidence for additional cytoplasmic receptors in many species. All receptors, whether sensing sugars, amino acids or oxygen, share a cytoplasmic signalling domain that controls the activity of a

  8. STAC--A New Domain Associated with Transmembrane Solute Transport and Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korycinski, Mateusz; Albrecht, Reinhard; Ursinus, Astrid; Hartmann, Marcus D; Coles, Murray; Martin, Jörg; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Lupas, Andrei N

    2015-10-01

    Transmembrane receptors are integral components of sensory pathways in prokaryotes. These receptors share a common dimeric architecture, consisting in its basic form of an N-terminal extracellular sensor, transmembrane helices, and an intracellular effector. As an exception, we have identified an archaeal receptor family--exemplified by Af1503 from Archaeoglobus fulgidus--that is C-terminally shortened, lacking a recognizable effector module. Instead, a HAMP domain forms the sole extension for signal transduction in the cytosol. Here, we examine the gene environment of Af1503-like receptors and find a frequent association with transmembrane transport proteins. Furthermore, we identify and define a closely associated new protein domain family, which we characterize structurally using Af1502 from A. fulgidus. Members of this family are found both as stand-alone proteins and as domains within extant receptors. In general, the latter appear as connectors between the solute carrier 5 (SLC5)-like transmembrane domains and two-component signal transduction (TCST) domains. This is seen, for example, in the histidine kinase CbrA, which is a global regulator of metabolism, virulence, and antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonads. We propose that this newly identified domain family mediates signal transduction in systems regulating transport processes and name it STAC, for SLC and TCST-Associated Component. PMID:26321252

  9. Gamma-radiolysis of aqueous solution of histidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dependence of Gi(-M) values of histidine on the concentration of irradiated 104-101 M solutions, pH and the presence of O2, N2O and sec-butyl alcohol was investigated. In oxygen-free medium the maximum radiation sensitivity of histidine was found at pH 5-8; in oxygenated solutions it was shifted to the 6-11 pH range. The formation of radiation products was also studied. The course of radiation decomposition of histidine depends on the presence of oxygen and on the pH of irradiated solution. (orig.)

  10. Assembly of transmembrane proteins on oil-water interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunker, Peter; Landry, Corey; Chong, Shaorong; Weitz, David

    2015-03-01

    Transmembrane proteins are difficult to handle by aqueous solution-based biochemical and biophysical approaches, due to the hydrophobicity of transmembrane helices. Detergents can solubilize transmembrane proteins; however, surfactant coated transmembrane proteins are not always functional, and purifying detergent coated proteins in a micellar solution can be difficult. Motivated by this problem, we study the self-assembly of transmembrane proteins on oil-water interfaces. We found that the large water-oil interface of oil drops prevents nascent transmembrane proteins from forming non-functional aggregates. The oil provides a hydrophobic environment for the transmembrane helix, allowing the ectodomain to fold into its natural structure and orientation. Further, modifying the strength or valency of hydrophobic interactions between transmembrane proteins results in the self-assembly of spatially clustered, active proteins on the oil-water interface. Thus, hydrophobic interactions can facilitate, rather than inhibit, the assembly of transmembrane proteins.

  11. Histidine biosynthesis, its regulation and biotechnological application in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    OpenAIRE

    Kulis-Horn, Robert K; Persicke, Marcus; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2013-01-01

    l-Histidine biosynthesis is an ancient metabolic pathway present in bacteria, archaea, lower eukaryotes, and plants. For decades l-histidine biosynthesis has been studied mainly in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, revealing fundamental regulatory processes in bacteria. Furthermore, in the last 15 years this pathway has been also investigated intensively in the industrial amino acid-producing bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum, revealing similarities to E. coli and S. typhimurium...

  12. Apparent connection between histidine, recombination, and repair in neurospora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two mutants of Neurospora crassa, uvs-3 and mei-3, share four properties--uv sensitivity, inhibition by histidine, meiotic blockage when homozygous, and increased duplication instability (due to mitotic crossing over, to deletions or to both). The present paper shows that a third nonallelic mutant, uvs-6, exhibits the same four properties. Also, the instability of duplications in the absence of any uv-sensitive mutant is increased by the presence of histidine in the growth medium

  13. Site-specific mutagenesis of histidine residues in the lac permease of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Padan, E; Sarkar, H K; Viitanen, P V; Poonian, M S; Kaback, H R

    1985-01-01

    The lacY gene of Escherichia coli, which encodes the lac permease, has been modified by oligonucleotide-directed, site-specific mutagenesis such that each of the four histidine residues in the molecule is replaced with an arginine residue. Replacement of histidine-35 and histidine-39 with arginine has no apparent effect on permease activity. In contrast, replacement of either histidine-205 or histidine-322 by arginine causes a dramatic loss of transport activity, although the cells contain a ...

  14. The identification of histidine ligands to cytochrome a in cytochrome c oxidase

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Craig T.; Scholes, Charles P.; Chan, Sunney I.

    1985-01-01

    A histidine auxotroph of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used to metabolically incorporate [1,3-15N2] histidine into yeast cytochrome c oxidase. Electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy of cytochrome a in the [15N]histidine-substituted enzyme reveals an ENDOR signal which can be assigned to hyperfine coupling of a histidine 15N with the low-spin heme, thereby unambiguously identifying histidine as an axial ligand to this cytochrome. Comparison of this result with similar ENDOR...

  15. Autoradiography of 3H-α-fluoromethyl histidine in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium-α-fluoromethyl histidine (3H-α-FMH), designed as a Kcat-inhibitor of mammalian histidine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.22), was administered intravenously in male and pregnant female mice of the NMRI strain and the distribution of tritium in the body recorded by whole-body and microautoradiography. The results showed penetration of radioactivity into most tissues within 5 min. after the injection. After 4 hrs the highest levels of radioactivity were present in the intestinal content and in the kidneys. In the pregnant animal there was also a high labelling of the foetal tissues. When whole-body sections were washed in TCA prior to the autoradiographic exposure to retain only protein-bound radioactivity, a distinct labelling pattern was seen in the kidneys of the pregnant female mice ebut not in those of the male mice. Microautoradiography of the kidneys showed that the cells involved were located within the proximal convoluted tubuli. In several mouse strains, including the NMRI, the activity of kidney histidine decarboxylase is low in the males but high in females during a transient period of pregnancy. Incorporation of tritium into kidney protein after treatment with 3H-α-FMH, was correlated to a loss in histidine decarboxylase activity. The isotopic labelling was confined mainly to a component which cofractionated with histidine decarboxylase in polyacrylamidegel electrophoresis (PAGE) under nondenaturing conditions. Our data indicate that the cells described above represent the location of kidney histidine decarboxylase. (author)

  16. Virus-encoded 7 transmembrane receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølleskov-Jensen, Ann-Sofie; Oliveira, MarthaTrindade; Farrell, Helen Elizabeth; Davis-Poynter, Nick

    Herpesviruses are an ancient group which have exploited gene capture of multiple cellular modulators of the immune response. Viral homologues of 7 transmembrane receptors (v7TMRs) are a consistent feature of beta- and gammaherpesviruses; the majority of the v7TMRs are homologous to cellular chemo...

  17. Virus-Encoded 7 Transmembrane Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølleskov-Jensen, Ann-Sofie; Oliveira, MarthaTrindade; Farrell, Helen Elizabeth;

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses are an ancient group which have exploited gene capture of multiple cellular modulators of the immune response. Viral homologues of 7 transmembrane receptors (v7TMRs) are a consistent feature of beta- and gammaherpesviruses; the majority of the v7TMRs are homologous to cellular chemo...

  18. Crystallization of a newly discovered histidine acid phosphatase from Francisella tularensis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A histidine acid phosphatase from the CDC Category A pathogen F. tularensis has been crystallized in space group P41212, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.96, c = 210.78 Å. A 1.75 Å resolution data set was collected at Advanced Light Source beamline 4.2.2. Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious bacterial pathogen that is considered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to be a potential bioterrorism weapon. Here, the crystallization of a 37.2 kDa phosphatase encoded by the genome of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica live vaccine strain is reported. This enzyme shares 41% amino-acid sequence identity with Legionella pneumophila major acid phosphatase and contains the RHGXRXP motif that is characteristic of the histidine acid phosphatase family. Large diffraction-quality crystals were grown in the presence of Tacsimate, HEPES and PEG 3350. The crystals belong to space group P41212, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.96, c = 210.78 Å. The asymmetric unit is predicted to contain one protein molecule, with a solvent content of 53%. A 1.75 Å resolution native data set was recorded at beamline 4.2.2 of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source. Molecular-replacement trials using the human prostatic acid phosphatase structure as the search model (28% amino-acid sequence identity) did not produce a satisfactory solution. Therefore, the structure of F. tularensis histidine acid phosphatase will be determined by multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative

  19. Carbonic anhydrase activators: gold nanoparticles coated with derivatized histamine, histidine, and carnosine show enhanced activatory effects on several mammalian isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saada, Mohamed-Chiheb; Montero, Jean-Louis; Vullo, Daniela; Scozzafava, Andrea; Winum, Jean-Yves; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2011-03-10

    Lipoic acid moieties were attached to amine or amino acids showing activating properties against the zinc enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1). The obtained lipoic acid conjugates of histamine, L-histidine methyl ester, and L-carnosine methyl ester were attached to gold nanoparticles (NPs) by reaction with Au(III) salts in reducing conditions. The CA activators (CAAs)-coated NPs showed low nanomolar activation (K(A)s of 1-9 nM) of relevant cytosolic, membrane-bound, mitochondrial, and transmembrane CA isoforms, such as CA I, II, IV, VA, VII, and XIV. These NPs also effectively activated CAs ex vivo, in whole blood experiments, with an increase of 200-280% of the CA activity. This is the first example of enzyme activation with nanoparticles and may lead to biomedical applications for conditions in which the CA activity is diminished, such as aging, Alzheimer's disease, or CA deficiency syndrome. PMID:21291238

  20. Bacterial gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infectious diarrhea - bacterial gastroenteritis; Acute gastroenteritis; Gastroenteritis - bacterial ... Bacterial gastroenteritis can affect 1 person or a group of people who all ate the same food. It is ...

  1. A census of membrane-bound and intracellular signal transduction proteins in bacteria: Bacterial IQ, extroverts and introverts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galperin Michael Y

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of complete microbial genomes showed that intracellular parasites and other microorganisms that inhabit stable ecological niches encode relatively primitive signaling systems, whereas environmental microorganisms typically have sophisticated systems of environmental sensing and signal transduction. Results This paper presents results of a comprehensive census of signal transduction proteins – histidine kinases, methyl-accepting chemotaxis receptors, Ser/Thr/Tyr protein kinases, adenylate and diguanylate cyclases and c-di-GMP phosphodiesterases – encoded in 167 bacterial and archaeal genomes, sequenced by the end of 2004. The data have been manually checked to avoid false-negative and false-positive hits that commonly arise during large-scale automated analyses and compared against other available resources. The census data show uneven distribution of most signaling proteins among bacterial and archaeal phyla. The total number of signal transduction proteins grows approximately as a square of genome size. While histidine kinases are found in representatives of all phyla and are distributed according to the power law, other signal transducers are abundant in certain phylogenetic groups but virtually absent in others. Conclusion The complexity of signaling systems differs even among closely related organisms. Still, it usually can be correlated with the phylogenetic position of the organism, its lifestyle, and typical environmental challenges it encounters. The number of encoded signal transducers (or their fraction in the total protein set can be used as a measure of the organism's ability to adapt to diverse conditions, the 'bacterial IQ', while the ratio of transmembrane receptors to intracellular sensors can be used to define whether the organism is an 'extrovert', actively sensing the environmental parameters, or an 'introvert', more concerned about its internal homeostasis. Some of the microorganisms with the

  2. Synergistic transmembrane alignment of the antimicrobial heterodimer PGLa/magainin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremouilhac, Pierre; Strandberg, Erik; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Ulrich, Anne S

    2006-10-27

    The antimicrobial activity of amphipathic alpha-helical peptides is usually attributed to the formation of pores in bacterial membranes, but direct structural information about such a membrane-bound state is sparse. Solid state (2)H-NMR has previously shown that the antimicrobial peptide PGLa undergoes a concentration-dependent realignment from a surface-bound S-state to a tilted T-state. The corresponding change in helix tilt angle from 98 to 125 degrees was interpreted as the formation of PGLa/magainin heterodimers residing on the bilayer surface. Under no conditions so far, has an upright membrane-inserted I-state been observed in which a transmembrane helix alignment would be expected. Here, we have demonstrated that PGLa is able to assume such an I-state in a 1:1 mixture with magainin 2 at a peptide-to-lipid ratio as low as 1:100 in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine/dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol model membranes. This (2)H-NMR analysis is based on seven orientational constraints from Ala-3,3,3-d(3) substituted in a non-perturbing manner for four native Ala residues as well as two Ile and one Gly. The observed helix tilt of 158 degrees is rationalized by the formation of heterodimers. This structurally synergistic effect between the two related peptides from the skin of Xenopus laevis correlates very well with their known functional synergistic mode of action. To our knowledge, this example of PGLa is the first case where an alpha-helical antimicrobial peptide is directly shown to assume a transmembrane state that is compatible with the postulated toroidal wormhole pore structure. PMID:16877761

  3. The H-loop in the Second Nucleotide-binding Domain of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator is Required for Efficient Chloride Channel Closing

    OpenAIRE

    Kloch, Monika; Milewski, Michał; Nurowska, Ewa; Dworakowska, Beata; Cutting, Garry R; Dołowy, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride channel. The recent model of CFTR gating predicts that the ATP binding to both nucleotide-binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2) of CFTR is required for the opening of the channel, while the ATP hydrolysis at NBD2 induces subsequent channel closing. In most ABC proteins, efficient hydrolysis of ATP requires the presence of the invariant histidine res...

  4. Crystallizing Transmembrane Peptides in Lipidic Mesophases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Höfer, Nicole; Aragão, David; Caffrey, Martin (Trinity)

    2011-09-28

    Structure determination of membrane proteins by crystallographic means has been facilitated by crystallization in lipidic mesophases. It has been suggested, however, that this so-called in meso method, as originally implemented, would not apply to small protein targets having {le}4 transmembrane crossings. In our study, the hypothesis that the inherent flexibility of the mesophase would enable crystallogenesis of small proteins was tested using a transmembrane pentadecapeptide, linear gramicidin, which produced structure-grade crystals. This result suggests that the in meso method should be considered as a viable means for high-resolution structure determination of integral membrane peptides, many of which are predicted to be coded for in the human genome.

  5. Ion fluxes through nanopores and transmembrane channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordin, J. R.; Diehl, A.; Barbosa, M. C.; Levin, Y.

    2012-03-01

    We introduce an implicit solvent Molecular Dynamics approach for calculating ionic fluxes through narrow nanopores and transmembrane channels. The method relies on a dual-control-volume grand-canonical molecular dynamics (DCV-GCMD) simulation and the analytical solution for the electrostatic potential inside a cylindrical nanopore recently obtained by Levin [Europhys. Lett.EULEEJ0295-507510.1209/epl/i2006-10240-4 76, 163 (2006)]. The theory is used to calculate the ionic fluxes through an artificial transmembrane channel which mimics the antibacterial gramicidin A channel. Both current-voltage and current-concentration relations are calculated under various experimental conditions. We show that our results are comparable to the characteristics associated to the gramicidin A pore, especially the existence of two binding sites inside the pore and the observed saturation in the current-concentration profiles.

  6. Expression of Recombinant pET22b-LysK-Cysteine/Histidine-Dependent Amidohydrolase/Peptidase Bacteriophage Therapeutic Protein in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3)

    OpenAIRE

    Kashani, Hamed Haddad; Moniri, Rezvan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Bacteriophage-encoded endolysins are a group of enzymes that act by digesting the peptidoglycan of bacterial cell walls. LysK has been reported to lyse live staphylococcal cultures. LysK proteins containing only the cysteine/histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP) domain has the capability to show lytic activity against live clinical staphylococcal isolates, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The aim of this study was to clone and express LysK...

  7. Effect of Abiotic Stresses on Histidine kinases Gene Expression in Zea mays L. cv. SC. 704

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javadmanesh, Susan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available UV-B radiation and osmotic stress (like drought and salinity have a significant effect on physiology, morphology, biochemistry and molecular biology. To cope with such stimuli, plants must be able to effectively sense, respond to and adapt to changes in their biological activities. Hence, signal transduction pathways play important role in response to environmental stimuli. In this study, the expression of three Histidine Kinases including ZmHK1, ZmHK2 and ZmHK3a was studied in maize plants exposed to 8 days drought, salinity and UV-B stresses applying transcript approach. The semi-quantitative RT-PCR analyses of ZmHKs showed up-regulation of ZmHK1 and ZmHK3 agenes after 8 days exposure to applied stresses except salinity in leaves, although, their regulation was more prominent during drought stress. Astonishingly, exposure to these stresses showed down-regulation of all genes in maize roots. However, the ZmHK1 behavior was quite different from two other homologues and showed up-regulation in combined stresses. We suggest that ZmHK1 and ZmHK3a, as cytokinin transmembrane receptors, sense osmolarity changes in cells caused by dehydration. Our data supports the involvement of ZmHK homologues under these stresses in maize and provides a gene expression dynamics during the stress which will be valuable for further studies of the molecular mechanisms of stress tolerance in maize.

  8. Evidence of histidine phosphorylation in isocitrate lyase from Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escherichia coli isocitrate lyase can be phosphorylated in vitro in an ATP-dependent reaction. Partially purified extracts were incubated with γ-32P-ATP and analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by a Western blot and autoradiography. Radioactivity was associated with the lyase only when blotting was performed under alkaline conditions. This suggests that phosphate groups are attached to the lyase via an acid-labile P-N bond rather than a more stable P-O bond. Treatment of the lyase with diethyl pyrocarbonate, a histidine modifying agent, blocks incorporation of 32P-phosphate. Treatment with phosphoramidate, a histidine phosphorylating agent, alters the isoelectric point of the lyase suggesting that the enzyme can be phosphorylated at histidine residues. Loss of catalytic activity after treatment with potato acid phosphatase indicates that isocitrate lyase activity may be modulated by phosphorylation

  9. Detoxications in peripatus. Sulphate, phosphate and histidine conjugations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, T W; McNaught, R W; Smith, J N

    1970-06-01

    Phenols were detoxified in the Onycophoran Peripatoides novaezealandiae by conjugation with sulphuric acid and phosphoric acid, but no evidence for a glycoside detoxication could be found. [(14)C]Benzoic acid was metabolized in 24h to N(2)-benzoyl-l-histidine, which was identified by electrophoresis, chromatography and dilution analysis. Similar conjugates were formed with p-aminobenzoic acid and p-nitrobenzoic acid. In longer-duration experiments further unidentified metabolites were formed, two of which appeared to result from the further metabolism of the histidine conjugate. PMID:5472152

  10. Surf1, associated with Leigh syndrome in humans, is a heme-binding protein in bacterial oxidase biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundschuh, Freya A; Hannappel, Achim; Anderka, Oliver; Ludwig, Bernd

    2009-09-18

    Biogenesis of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (COX) relies on a large number of assembly factors, among them the transmembrane protein Surf1. The loss of human Surf1 function is associated with Leigh syndrome, a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by severe COX deficiency. In the bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans, two homologous proteins, Surf1c and Surf1q, were identified, which we characterize in the present study. When coexpressed in Escherichia coli together with enzymes for heme a synthesis, the bacterial Surf1 proteins bind heme a in vivo. Using redox difference spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry, the binding of the heme cofactor to purified apo-Surf1c and apo-Surf1q is quantified: Each of the Paracoccus proteins binds heme a in a 1:1 stoichiometry and with Kd values in the submicromolar range. In addition, we identify a conserved histidine as a residue crucial for heme binding. Contrary to most earlier concepts, these data support a direct role of Surf1 in heme a cofactor insertion into COX subunit I by providing a protein-bound heme a pool. PMID:19625251

  11. Use of a Semisynthetic Epitope to Probe Histidine Kinase Activity and Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Carlson, Hans K.; Plate, Lars; Price, Mark S.; Allen, Jasmina J.; Shokat, Kevan M.; Marletta, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Histidine-aspartic acid phosphotransfer pathways are central components of prokaryotic signal transduction pathways, and are also found in many eukaryotes. Tools to study histidine kinases, however, are currently quite limited. In this paper, we present a new tool to study histidine-aspartic acid phosphotransfer pathways. We show that many histidine kinases will accept ATPγS as a substrate to form a stable thiophosphohistidine, even when they do not form stable phosphohistidines using the nat...

  12. Highly Efficient Synthesis of Novel Poly-aza Bis-histidines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Cheng-He; Juan F. Miravet; LIU Qiang; M. Isabel Burguete; Santiago V. Luis

    2003-01-01

    @@ A series of novel poly-aza bis-histidines with much potential in medicinal, bioinorganic, bioorganic, biomimetic and supramolecular chemistry were synthesized conveniently, efficiently and readily in excellent yields from commercial histidine. The low temperature in the reaction of the protected histidine with poly-aza diamine 5 is key condition for the selective preparation of target compounds with high yields.

  13. 21 CFR 862.1375 - Histidine test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Histidine test system. 862.1375 Section 862.1375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  14. Intermolecular Phosphoryl Transfer Between Serine and Histidine Residues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Qian SU; Ming Yu NIU; Shu Xia CAO; Jian Chen ZHANG; Yu Fen ZHAO

    2004-01-01

    A novel intermolecular phosphoryl transfer from O-trimethylsilyl-N-(O, O-diisopropyl) phosphoryl serine trimethylsilyl ester to N, N'-bis(trimethylsilyl) histidine trimethylsilyl ester was studied through electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). It was proposed that the transfer reaction went through penta-coordinated phosphorus intermediate.

  15. Serum histidine in rheumatoid arthritis: a family study

    OpenAIRE

    J Kirkham; Lowe, J.; Bird, H. A.; Wright, V

    1981-01-01

    We have compared free serum histidine in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, their blood relatives, and their non-blood relatives. The hypohistidinaemia of rheumatoid arthritis is acquired with the disease and does not provide a biochemical marker of those at risk.

  16. Safety, absorption, and antioxidant effects of chromium histidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supplemental chromium has been shown to be involved in the alleviation of the metabolic syndrome, glucose intolerance, polycystic ovary syndrome, depression, excess body fat, and gestational, steroid-induced, and type 2 diabetes. Chromium amino acid complexes that contained histidine displayed cons...

  17. L-histidine enhances learning in stressed zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.P.V. Cofiel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of the histaminergic precursor L-histidine and the H3 receptor antagonist thioperamide on the learning process of zebrafish submitted or not to confinement stress. On each of the 5 consecutive days of experiment (D1, D2, D3, D4, D5, animals had to associate an interruption of the aquarium air supply with food offering. Non-stressed zebrafish received an intraperitoneal injection of 100 mg/kg L-histidine, 10 mg/kg thioperamide or saline after training. Stressed animals received drug treatment and then were submitted to confinement stress for 1 h before the learning procedure. Time to approach the feeder was measured (in seconds and was considered to be indicative of learning. A decrease in time to approach the feeder was observed in the saline-treated group (D1 = 141.92 ± 13.57; D3 = 55 ± 13.54, indicating learning. A delay in learning of stressed animals treated with saline was observed (D1 = 217.5 ± 25.66. L-histidine facilitated learning in stressed (D1 = 118.68 ± 13.9; D2 = 45.88 ± 8.2 and non-stressed (D1 = 151.11 ± 19.20; D5 = 62 ± 14.68 animals. Thioperamide inhibited learning in non-stressed (D1 = 110.38 ± 9.49; D4 = 58.79 ± 16.83 and stressed animals (D1 = 167.3 ± 26.39; D5 = 172.15 ± 27.35. L-histidine prevented the increase in blood glucose after one session of confinement (L-histidine = 65.88 ± 4.50; control = 53 ± 3.50 mg/dL. These results suggest that the histaminergic system enhances learning and modulates stress responses in zebrafish.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of L-histidine capped silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L-histidine capped Ag nanoparticles have been synthesized by a hydrothermal method. Spherical Ag nanoparticles with average diameter ranging from 9 to 21 nm can be obtained by tuning the reaction pH and the reactant ratio. The topography, surface and internal structures of the histidine capped Ag nanoparticles have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), dynamic light scattering, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and UV–vis absorption spectroscopy. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) results revealed that the Ag colloid in present study have a structure that the imidazole moiety of histidine is bound on the Ag surface and COO− group is exposed outward. The as-synthesized Ag colloidal solution was very stable and can be stored at room temperature at least one month. In addition, it was found that the solution color of Ag colloid can change from yellow to reddish-brown by addition of the NiCl2 solution, which may have potential application for Ni2+ detection. - Highlights: ► L-histidine capped Ag nanoparticles have been synthesized by a hydrothermal method. ► Ag nanoparticles have been characterized by TEM, AFM, DLS, XPS, XRD, SERS. ► The size of Ag nanoparticles depend on pH condition and the ratios of the reactants. ► A possible structural mode of histidine on surface of Ag nanoparticle was proposed. ► UV absorption and solution color of Ag colloid is sensitive to the addition of Ni2+

  19. Bacterial mutagenicity assays: test methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatehouse, David

    2012-01-01

    The most widely used assays for detecting chemically induced gene mutations are those employing bacteria. The plate incorporation assay using various Salmonella typhimurium LT2 and E. coli WP2 strains is a short-term bacterial reverse mutation assay specifically designed to detect a wide range of chemical substances capable of causing DNA damage leading to gene mutations. The test is used worldwide as an initial screen to determine the mutagenic potential of new chemicals and drugs.The test uses several strains of S. typhimurium which carry different mutations in various genes of the histidine operon, and E. coli which carry the same AT base pair at the critical mutation site within the trpE gene. These mutations act as hot spots for mutagens that cause DNA damage via different mechanisms. When these auxotrophic bacterial strains are grown on a minimal media agar plates containing a trace of the required amino-acid (histidine or tryptophan), only those bacteria that revert to amino-acid independence (His(+) or Tryp(+)) will grow to form visible colonies. The number of spontaneously induced revertant colonies per plate is relatively constant. However, when a mutagen is added to the plate, the number of revertant colonies per plate is increased, usually in a dose-related manner.This chapter provides detailed procedures for performing the test in the presence and absence of a metabolic activation system (S9-mix), including advice on specific assay variations and any technical problems. PMID:22147566

  20. Preparation of 2'-13C-L-Histidine Starting from 13C-Thiocyanate: Synthetic Access to Any Site-Directed Stable Isotope Enriched L-Histidine

    OpenAIRE

    Sarra Talab; Kamal Khalifa Taha; Johan Lugtenburg

    2014-01-01

    1-Benzyl-2-(methylthio)-imidazole-5-ketone is obtained in a few simple steps starting from thiocyanate and glycine amide (glycin). Subsequent treatment with diethyl phosphorocyanidate and functional group manipulations gives 1-benzyl-5-chloromethyl-imidazolium chloride. This compound is converted under mild O’Donnell conditions into the corresponding L-histidine derivative. After deprotection L-histidine is obtained in good yield and 99% enantiomeric excess. 2'-13C-L-Histidine has been obtai...

  1. Protonation of Individual Histidine Residues Is Not Required for the pH-Dependent Entry of West Nile Virus: Evaluation of the “Histidine Switch” Hypothesis▿

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Steevenson; Poddar, Subhajit; Lin, Tsai-Yu; Pierson, Theodore C.

    2009-01-01

    Histidine residues have been hypothesized to function as sensors of environmental pH that can trigger the activity of viral fusion proteins. We investigated a requirement for histidine residues in the envelope (E) protein of West Nile virus during pH-dependent entry into cells. Each histidine was individually replaced with a nonionizable amino acid and tested functionally. In each instance, mutants capable of orchestrating pH-dependent infection were identified. These results do not support a...

  2. Comparison of fractal dimension and Shannon entropy in myocytes from rats treated with histidine-tryptophan-glutamate and histidine-tryptophan cetoglutarate

    OpenAIRE

    de Oliveira, Marcos Aurélio Barboza; Brandi, Antônio Carlos; dos Santos, Carlos Alberto; Botelho, Paulo Henrique Husseni; Cortez, José Luís Lasso; de Godoy, Moacir Fernandes; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Solutions that cause elective cardiac arrest are constantly evolving, but the ideal compound has not yet been found. The authors compare a new cardioplegic solution with histidine-tryptophan-glutamate (Group 2) and other one with histidine-tryptophan-cetoglutarate (Group 1) in a model of isolated rat heart. Objective To quantify the fractal dimension and Shannon entropy in rat myocytes subjected to cardioplegia solution using histidine-tryptophan with glutamate in an experimental...

  3. Ligand Exchange Between Penta-Coordinated Phosphoryl Serine and Histidine Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹书霞; 牛明玉; 苏玉倩; 廖新成; 卢奎; 赵玉芬

    2003-01-01

    With the assistance of HPLC-ESI-MS/MS, the self-assembly products of serine and histidine penta-coordinated phosphorus compound were separated and identified. The expectative product was seryl-histidine dipeptide, but it was found that there was almost equimolar amount of histidyl-histidine dipeptide as well as seryl-histidine dipeptide. The mechanism was speculated that there was iigand exchange between penta-coordinated phosphoryl serine and histidine in the reaction process. As a result,two types of dipeptide were produced.

  4. Evolution of vertebrate interferon inducible transmembrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hickford Danielle

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferon inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITMs have diverse roles, including the control of cell proliferation, promotion of homotypic cell adhesion, protection against viral infection, promotion of bone matrix maturation and mineralisation, and mediating germ cell development. Most IFITMs have been well characterised in human and mouse but little published data exists for other animals. This study characterised IFITMs in two distantly related marsupial species, the Australian tammar wallaby and the South American grey short-tailed opossum, and analysed the phylogeny of the IFITM family in vertebrates. Results Five IFITM paralogues were identified in both the tammar and opossum. As in eutherians, most marsupial IFITM genes exist within a cluster, contain two exons and encode proteins with two transmembrane domains. Only two IFITM genes, IFITM5 and IFITM10, have orthologues in both marsupials and eutherians. IFITM5 arose in bony fish and IFITM10 in tetrapods. The bone-specific expression of IFITM5 appears to be restricted to therian mammals, suggesting that its specialised role in bone production is a recent adaptation specific to mammals. IFITM10 is the most highly conserved IFITM, sharing at least 85% amino acid identity between birds, reptiles and mammals and suggesting an important role for this presently uncharacterised protein. Conclusions Like eutherians, marsupials also have multiple IFITM genes that exist in a gene cluster. The differing expression patterns for many of the paralogues, together with poor sequence conservation between species, suggests that IFITM genes have acquired many different roles during vertebrate evolution.

  5. Molecular insight in the purification of immunoglobulin by pseudobiospecific ligand l-histidine and histidyl moieties in histidine ligand affinity chromatography (HLAC) by molecular docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savane, Tushar S; Kumar, Sanjit; Janakiraman, Vignesh Narasimhan; Kamalanathan, Agamudi S; Vijayalakshmi, Mookambeswaran A

    2016-05-15

    Pseudobiospecific ligand l-histidine is an inexpensive, highly stable, non-toxic ligand explored successfully over the last twenty years for the purification of immunoglobulins in immobilised histidine ligand affinity chromatography. It is of great interest to know the molecular recognition sites of IgG to immobilized l-histidine. Here, we have used an in silico approach to explore the molecular recognition of l-histidine by IgG. We have assessed the feasible binding modes of histidine and its moieties at different sites of IgG and considered only those binding conformations which are exhibited via the imidazole ring NH group or any other OH donating group apart from the ones which are terminally conjugated with the support matrix. We categorised binding site into two categories; category I: inner binding groove and category II: surface binding groove and observed that the hinge region of IgG has most favourable binding pocket for l-histidine and histidyl moieties. Ser and Tyr residues on the hinge region make several significant interactions with l-histidine and histidyl moieties. In case of Fc region of IgG, l-histidine and histidyl moieties closely resemble the binding modes of Protein A, biomimetic ligand 22/8 and B domain of SpA to IgG. In addition to these we have also observed a significant binding site for l-histidine and histidyl moieties at Fab region of IgG. PMID:26476866

  6. A non-catalytic histidine residue influences the function of the metalloprotease of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Brian M; Bitar, Alan Pavinski; Marquis, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    Mpl, a thermolysin-like metalloprotease, and PC-PLC, a phospholipase C, are synthesized as proenzymes by the intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. During intracellular growth, L. monocytogenes is temporarily confined in a membrane-bound vacuole whose acidification leads to Mpl autolysis and Mpl-mediated cleavage of the PC-PLC N-terminal propeptide. Mpl maturation also leads to the secretion of both Mpl and PC-PLC across the bacterial cell wall. Previously, we identified negatively charged and uncharged amino acid residues within the N terminus of the PC-PLC propeptide that influence the ability of Mpl to mediate the maturation of PC-PLC, suggesting that these residues promote the interaction of the PC-PLC propeptide with Mpl. In the present study, we identified a non-catalytic histidine residue (H226) that influences Mpl secretion across the cell wall and its ability to process PC-PLC. Our results suggest that a positive charge at position 226 is required for Mpl functions other than autolysis. Based on the charge requirement at this position, we hypothesize that this residue contributes to the interaction of Mpl with the PC-PLC propeptide. PMID:24140648

  7. A study of bacterial gene regulatory mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sabine

    GRNs this thesis also provided the first evidence of the sensor histidine kinase VC1831 being an additional player in the Vibrio cholerae quorum sensing (QS) GRN. Bacteria use a process of cell-cell communication called QS which enable the bacterial cells to collectively control their gene expression...... using small signaling molecules called autoinducers, thereby coordinating group behavior. At the heart of the V. cholerae QS response lie four small RNA (sRNA) molecules called the quorum regulatory RNAs (Qrr). This PhD thesis provides evidence that the sensor histidine kinase VC1831 is regulated by the...... Qrr sRNAs. It is further shown that VC1831 feeds back to activate the expression the Qrrs, presumably via phosphorylation of LuxU. Thus, VC1831, which responds to an unknown ligand, is a new player in the V. cholerae QS response. Prior to this report, the two autoinducer sensors CqsS and LuxQ were the...

  8. Chiral Interactions of Histidine in a Hydrated Vermiculite

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, Donald G; Skipper, Neal T; Smalley, Martin V; Wilkinson, Michael A; Demé, Bruno; Heenan, R K

    2010-01-01

    Recent work suggests a link between chiral asymmetry in the amino acid iso-valine extracted from the Murchison meteorite and the extent of hydrous alteration. We present the results of neutron scattering experiments on an exchanged, 1-dimensionally ordered n-propyl ammonium vermiculite clay. The vermiculite gel has a (001) d-spacing of order 5nm at the temperature and concentration of the experiments and the d-spacing responds sensitively to changes in concentration, temperature and electronic environment. The data show that isothermal addition of D-histidine or L-histidine solutions produces shifts in the d-spacing that are different for each enantiomer. This chiral specificity is of interest for the question of whether clays could have played an important role in the origin of biohomochirality.

  9. Low-temperature Raman spectra of L-histidine crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a Raman spectroscopy investigation of the vibrational properties of l-histidine crystals at low temperatures. The temperature dependence of the spectra show discontinuities at 165 K, which we identify with modifications in the bonds associated to both the NH3+ and CO2 − motifs indicative of a conformational phase transition that changes the intermolecular bonds. Additional evidence of such a phase transition is provided by differential scanning calorimetry measurements, which identified an enthalpic anomaly at ∼165 K. (author)

  10. Low-temperature Raman spectra of L-histidine crystal

    CERN Document Server

    De Sousa, G P; Filho, J Mendes; Melo, F E A; Lima, C L

    2013-01-01

    We present a Raman spectroscopy investigation of the vibrational properties of L-histidine crystals at low temperatures. The temperature dependence of the spectra show discontinuities at 165 K, which we identify with modifications in the bonds associated to both the NH3+ and CO2- motifs indicative of a conformational phase transition that changes the intermolecular bonds. Additional evidence of such a phase transition was provided by differential scanning calorimetry measurements, which identified an enthalpic anomaly at ~165 K.

  11. Influence of histidine on zinc transport into rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The brain of rats injected intravenously with 65Zn-His or 65ZnCl2 was subjected to autoradiography to study the role of histidine on zinc transport into the brain. One hour after injection, the radioactivity from 65Zn-His was largely concentrated in the choroid plexus in the ventricles. Six days after injection, the radioactivity from 65Zn-His was relatively concentrated in the hippocampal CA3 and dentate gyrus and the amygdala. The relative distribution of 65Zn-His in the brain was similar to that of 65ZnCl2 group at both 1 h and 6 days, suggesting that histidine may participate in zinc uptake in the brain. On the other hand, the clearance of the 65Zn-His group from the blood was higher than that of the 65ZnCl2 group. Brain uptake of the former was lower than that of the latter both 1 h and 6 days after injection. These results suggest that zinc uptake in the brain is influenced by histidine levels in the bloodstream. (author)

  12. Structural, vibrational and theoretical studies of L-histidine bromide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, A. Ben; Feki, H.; Abid, Y.; Boughzala, H.; Mlayah, A.

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents the results of our calculations of the geometric parameters, vibrational spectra and hyperpolarizability of a non linear optical material, L-histidine bromide. Due to the lack of sufficiently precise information on the geometric structure available in literature, theoretical calculations were preceded by re-determination of the crystal X-ray structure. Single crystals of L-histidine bromide have been grown by slow evaporation of an aqueous solution at room temperature. The compound crystallizes in the non-Centro symmetric space group P2 12 12 1 of the orthorhombic system. Raman spectra have been recorded in the range [200-3500 cm -1]. All observed vibrational bands have been discussed and assigned to normal mode or to combinations and overtones on the basis of our calculations. The optimized geometric bond lengths and bond angles obtained by using HF and DFT (B3LYP and BLYP) show good agreement with the experimental data. Comparison between the measured and the calculated vibrational frequencies indicate that B3LYP is superior to the scaled HF approach for molecular vibrational problems. To investigate microscopic second order non linear optical properties of L-histidine bromide, the electric dipole μ, the polarizability α and the hyperpolarizability β were computed using DFT//B3LYP/6-31G(d) method. According to our calculations, the title compound exhibits non-zero β value revealing microscopic second order NLO behaviour.

  13. A synergistic effect between cholesterol and tryptophan-flanked transmembrane helices modulates membrane curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duyl, Bianca Y; Meeldijk, Hans; Verkleij, Arie J; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Chupin, Vladimir; de Kruijff, Ben; Killian, J Antoinette

    2005-03-22

    The aim of this study was to gain insight into the structural consequences of hydrophobic mismatch for membrane proteins in lipid bilayers that contain cholesterol. For this purpose, tryptophan-flanked peptides, designed to mimic transmembrane segments of membrane proteins, were incorporated in model membranes of unsaturated phosphatidylcholine bilayers of varying thickness and containing varying amounts of cholesterol. Analysis of the lipid organization by (31)P NMR and cryo-TEM demonstrated the formation of an isotropic phase, most likely representing a cubic phase, which occurred exclusively in mixtures containing lipids with relatively long acyl chains. Formation of this phase was inhibited by incorporation of lysophosphatidylcholine. These results indicate that the isotropic phase is formed as a consequence of negative hydrophobic mismatch and that its formation is related to a negative membrane curvature. When either peptide or cholesterol was omitted from the mixture, isotropic-phase formation did not occur, not even when the concentrations of these compounds were significantly increased. This suggests that formation of the isotropic phase is the result of a synergistic effect between the peptides and cholesterol. Interestingly, isotropic-phase formation was not observed when the tryptophans in the peptide were replaced by either lysines or histidines. We propose a model for the mechanism of this synergistic effect, in which its dependence on the flanking residues is explained by preferential interactions between cholesterol and tryptophan residues. PMID:15766283

  14. Modulation of heparin cofactor II activity by histidine-rich glycoprotein and platelet factor 4.

    OpenAIRE

    Tollefsen, D M; Pestka, C A

    1985-01-01

    Heparin cofactor II is a plasma protein that inhibits thrombin rapidly in the presence of either heparin or dermatan sulfate. We have determined the effects of two glycosaminoglycan-binding proteins, i.e., histidine-rich glycoprotein and platelet factor 4, on these reactions. Inhibition of thrombin by heparin cofactor II and heparin was completely prevented by purified histidine-rich glycoprotein at the ratio of 13 micrograms histidine-rich glycoprotein/microgram heparin. In contrast, histidi...

  15. Crystal structure of the histidine-containing phosphotransfer protein ZmHP2 from maize

    OpenAIRE

    Sugawara, Hajime; Kawano, Yoshiaki; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Yamaya, Tomoyuki; Kamiya, Nobuo; Sakakibara, Hitoshi

    2005-01-01

    In higher plants, histidine-aspartate phosphorelays (two-component system) are involved in hormone signaling and stress responses. In these systems, histidine-containing phosphotransfer (HPt) proteins mediate the signal transmission from sensory histidine kinases to response regulators, including integration of several signaling pathways or branching into different pathways. We have determined the crystal structure of a maize HPt protein, ZmHP2, at 2.2 Å resolution. ZmHP2 has six α-helices wi...

  16. Exogenous addition of histidine reduces copper availability in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Daisuke Watanabe; Rie Kikushima; Miho Aitoku; Akira Nishimura; Iwao Ohtsu; Ryo Nasuno; Hiroshi Takag

    2014-01-01

    The basic amino acid histidine inhibited yeast cell growth more severely than lysine and arginine. Overexpression of CTR1, which encodes a high-affinity copper transporter on the plasma membrane, or addition of copper to the medium alleviated this cytotoxicity. However, the intracellular level of copper ions was not decreased in the presence of excess histidine. These results indicate that histidine cytotoxicity is associated with low copper availability inside cells, not with impaired copper...

  17. Histidine 21 is at the NAD+ binding site of diphtheria toxin.

    OpenAIRE

    Papini, E; Schiavo, G; Sandoná, D.; Rappuoli, R; C. Montecucco

    1989-01-01

    Treatment of fragment A chain of diphtheria toxin (DT-A) with diethylpyrocarbonate modifies His-21, the single histidine residue present in the chain, without alteration of other residues. Parallel to histidine modification, NAD+ binding and the NAD-glycohydrolase and ADP-ribosyltransferase activities of DT-A are lost. Both NAD+ and adenosine are very effective in protecting DT-A from histidine modification and in preserving its biological properties, while adenine is ineffective. Reversal of...

  18. Revisiting histidine-dependent acid phosphatases: a distinct group of tyrosine phosphatases

    OpenAIRE

    Veeramani, Suresh; Lee, Ming-Shyue; Lin, Ming-Fong

    2009-01-01

    Although classical protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) superfamily members are cysteine-dependent, emerging evidence shows that many acid phosphatases (AcPs) function as histidine-dependent PTPs in vivo. These AcPs dephosphorylate phospho-tyrosine substrates intracellularly and could have roles in development and disease. In contrast to cysteine-dependent PTPs, they utilize histidine, rather than cysteine, for substrate dephosphorylation. Structural analyses reveal that active site histidine, ...

  19. Possible regulation of the Salmonella typhimurium histidine operon by adenosine triphosphate phosphoribosyltransferase: large metabolic effects.

    OpenAIRE

    Goitein, R K; Parsons, S. M.

    1980-01-01

    An effort to find growth conditions leading to conditional regulation of the histidine operon of Salmonella typhimurium by the allosteric first enzyme of the pathway, adenosine triphosphate phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.17), is reported. A strain deleting the enzyme, TR3343, behaved simply and predictably under all growth conditions, whereas histidine auxotrophs containing active enzyme behaved in complicated ways dependent upon the location of the histidine pathway lesion. hisE strains...

  20. Control of phospholipid flip-flop by transmembrane peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaihara, Masanori; Nakao, Hiroyuki; Yokoyama, Hirokazu [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Endo, Hitoshi [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Ishihama, Yasushi [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Handa, Tetsurou [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Suzuka University of Medical Science, 3500-3 Minami-Tamagaki-cho, Suzuka, Mie 513-8670 (Japan); Nakano, Minoru, E-mail: mnakano@pha.u-toyama.ac.jp [Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan)

    2013-06-20

    Highlights: ► Phospholipid flip-flop in transmembrane peptide-containing vesicles was investigated. ► Peptides that contained polar residues in the center of the transmembrane region promoted phospholipid flip-flop. ► A bioinformatics approach revealed the presence of polar residues in the transmembrane region of ER membrane proteins. ► Polar residues in ER membrane proteins possibly provide flippase-like activity. - Abstract: We designed three types of transmembrane model peptides whose sequence originates from a frequently used model peptide KALP23, and we investigated their effects on phospholipid flip-flop. Time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering and a dithionite fluorescent quenching assay demonstrated that TMP-L, which has a fully hydrophobic transmembrane region, did not enhance phospholipid flip-flop, whereas TMP-K and TMP-E, which have Lys and Glu, respectively, in the center of their transmembrane regions, enhanced phospholipid flip-flop. Introduction of polar residues in the membrane-spanning helices is considered to produce a locally polar region and enable the lipid head group to interact with the polar side-chain inside the bilayers, thereby reducing the activation energy for the flip-flop. A bioinformatics approach revealed that acidic and basic residues account for 4.5% of the central region of the transmembrane domain in human ER membrane proteins. Therefore, polar residues in ER membrane proteins are considered to provide flippase-like activity.

  1. Control of phospholipid flip-flop by transmembrane peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Phospholipid flip-flop in transmembrane peptide-containing vesicles was investigated. ► Peptides that contained polar residues in the center of the transmembrane region promoted phospholipid flip-flop. ► A bioinformatics approach revealed the presence of polar residues in the transmembrane region of ER membrane proteins. ► Polar residues in ER membrane proteins possibly provide flippase-like activity. - Abstract: We designed three types of transmembrane model peptides whose sequence originates from a frequently used model peptide KALP23, and we investigated their effects on phospholipid flip-flop. Time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering and a dithionite fluorescent quenching assay demonstrated that TMP-L, which has a fully hydrophobic transmembrane region, did not enhance phospholipid flip-flop, whereas TMP-K and TMP-E, which have Lys and Glu, respectively, in the center of their transmembrane regions, enhanced phospholipid flip-flop. Introduction of polar residues in the membrane-spanning helices is considered to produce a locally polar region and enable the lipid head group to interact with the polar side-chain inside the bilayers, thereby reducing the activation energy for the flip-flop. A bioinformatics approach revealed that acidic and basic residues account for 4.5% of the central region of the transmembrane domain in human ER membrane proteins. Therefore, polar residues in ER membrane proteins are considered to provide flippase-like activity

  2. A Cyclic di-GMP-binding Adaptor Protein Interacts with Histidine Kinase to Regulate Two-component Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Linghui; Venkataramani, Prabhadevi; Ding, Yichen; Liu, Yang; Deng, Yinyue; Yong, Grace Lisi; Xin, Lingyi; Ye, Ruijuan; Zhang, Lianhui; Yang, Liang; Liang, Zhao-Xun

    2016-07-29

    The bacterial messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) binds to a diverse range of effectors to exert its biological effect. Despite the fact that free-standing PilZ proteins are by far the most prevalent c-di-GMP effectors known to date, their physiological function and mechanism of action remain largely unknown. Here we report that the free-standing PilZ protein PA2799 from the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa interacts directly with the hybrid histidine kinase SagS. We show that PA2799 (named as HapZ: histidine kinase associated PilZ) binds directly to the phosphoreceiver (REC) domain of SagS, and that the SagS-HapZ interaction is further enhanced at elevated c-di-GMP concentration. We demonstrate that binding of HapZ to SagS inhibits the phosphotransfer between SagS and the downstream protein HptB in a c-di-GMP-dependent manner. In accordance with the role of SagS as a motile-sessile switch and biofilm growth factor, we show that HapZ impacts surface attachment and biofilm formation most likely by regulating the expression of a large number of genes. The observations suggest a previously unknown mechanism whereby c-di-GMP mediates two-component signaling through a PilZ adaptor protein. PMID:27231351

  3. Mechanism of Oxidation of L-Histidine by Heptavalent Manganese in Alkaline Medium

    OpenAIRE

    Jose, Timy P.; Nandibewoor, Sharanappa T.; Suresh M. Tuwar

    2005-01-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of L-histidine by manganese(VII) in aqueous alkaline medium at a constant ionic strength of 0.05 mol dm-3 was studied spectrophotometrically. The reaction between permanganate and L-histidine in alkaline medium exhibits 2:1 stoichiometry (KMnO4: L-histidine). The reaction is of first order in [KMnO4], less than unit order in [L-histidine] and [alkali]. Decrease in the dielectric constant of the medium decreases the rate of reaction. Effect of added products and ionic...

  4. Kinetic investigations into the possible cause of low serum histidine in rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Sitton, N G; Dixon, J S; Astbury, C; Francis, R J; Bird, H. A.; Wright, V

    1988-01-01

    To investigate the cause of low serum histidine in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) single oral and intravenous doses of L-histidine were administered to patients with active RA, and to an equal number of age and sex matched control subjects. In the first study 13 patients and their controls received a 100 mg kg-1 dose of L-histidine as an aqueous slurry. Significant differences were seen in body weight, predose baseline serum histidine concentration, Cmax, t1/2, and area under curve, AUC0-infinity....

  5. Flow Injection Analysis of Histidine with Enhanced Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence of Luminol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A simple and sensitive flow injection method is presented for the determination of histidine based on its enhancement of electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) of luminol. After optimization of the experimental parameters, the working range for histidine was in 1.0 x 10-6 to 1.0 x 10 -3 mol/L with a detection limit (S/N = 3) of 0.56 μmol/L. The relative standard deviation was 1.6% for 11 measurements of 5 x 10 -5 mol/L histidine solution. The proposed method has been successfully applied to the determination of histidine in real pharmaceutical preparation.

  6. Isolation and nucleotide sequence of a mouse histidine tRNA gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Han, J. H.; Harding, J D

    1982-01-01

    We have sequenced a 1307 base pair mouse genomic DNA fragment which contains a histidine tRNA gene. The sequence of the putative mouse histidine tRNA differs from the published sequence of sheep liver histidine tRNA by a single base change in the D-loop. It does not contain an unpaired 5' terminal G residue, as reported for Drosophila and sheep histidine tRNAs. The gene does not contain introns. The 3' flanking region contains a typical RNA polymerase III termination site of 6 consecutive T r...

  7. Studies on the Interactions between Potassium oxalato oxodiperoxovanadate and Histidine by NMR and MS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Multi-nuclear NMR and ESI-MS have been applied to study the interactions between oxalato-oxodiperoxovanadate and histidine in neutral solution. Coordination between the complex and histidine was monitored by 51V NMR. A pair of new isomers produced via vanadium atom binding separately to N1 and N3 of the imidazole ring of histidine was characterized by several spectroscopic methods. Experimental results show that the structure activity relationship of peroxovanadium complexes bearing organic ligands may be related to the specific recognition between peroxovanadium and histidine residue of tyrosine phosphatase.

  8. Histidyl-histidine catalysis of glycine condensation in fluctuating clay environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D. H.; Erickson, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Histidyl-histidine is a remarkably effective catalyst of peptide bond formation in the reaction of glycine in a fluctuating (hot-dry, cold-wet) clay environment. It has shown turnover numbers (molecules of glycine incorporated in oligoglycines per molecule of catalyst) as high as 18 in a single cycle and as high as 52 overall. A number of other dipeptides were tested, as well as monomeric histidine, N-acetyl histidine, and imidazole, none of which showed turnover numbers greater than one. Histidyl-histidine is a model for a prebiotic protoenzyme, and implications for the development of a simple translation mechanism are discussed.

  9. Systematic Mutational Analysis of Histidine Kinase Genes in the Nosocomial Pathogen Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Identifies BfmAK System Control of Biofilm Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liu; Wang, Fang-Fang; Ren, Bao-Zhen; Liu, Wei; Liu, Zhong; Qian, Wei

    2016-04-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Stenotrophomonas maltophilialives in diverse ecological niches. As a result of its formidable capabilities of forming biofilm and its resistance to multiple antibiotic agents, the bacterium is also a nosocomial pathogen of serious threat to the health of patients whose immune systems are suppressed or compromised. Besides the histidine kinase RpfC, the two-component signal transduction system (TCS), which is the canonical regulatory machinery used by most bacterial pathogens, has never been experimentally investigated inS. maltophilia Here, we annotated 62 putative histidine kinase genes in the S. maltophilia genome and successfully obtained 51 mutants by systematical insertional inactivation. Phenotypic characterization identified a series of mutants with deficiencies in bacterial growth, swimming motility, and biofilm development. A TCS, named here BfmA-BfmK (Smlt4209-Smlt4208), was genetically confirmed to regulate biofilm formation inS. maltophilia Together with interacting partner prediction and chromatin immunoprecipitation screens, six candidate promoter regions bound by BfmA in vivo were identified. We demonstrated that, among them, BfmA acts as a transcription factor that binds directly to the promoter regions of bfmA-bfmK and Smlt0800(acoT), a gene encoding an acyl coenzyme A thioesterase that is associated with biofilm development, and positively controls their transcription. Genome-scale mutational analyses of histidine kinase genes and functional dissection of BfmK-BfmA regulation in biofilm provide genetic information to support more in-depth studies on cellular signaling inS. maltophilia, in the context of developing novel approaches to fight this important bacterial pathogen. PMID:26873318

  10. Charged histidine affects alpha-helix stability at all positions in the helix by interacting with the backbone charges.

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, K M; Baldwin, R L

    1993-01-01

    To determine whether a charged histidine side chain affects alpha-helix stability only when histidine is close to one end of the helix or also when it is in the central region, we substitute a single histidine residue at many positions in two reference peptides and measure helix stability and histidine pKa. The position of a charged histidine residue has a major effect on helix stability in 0.01 M NaCl: the helix content of a 17-residue peptide is 24% when histidine is at position 3 compared ...

  11. Thermokinetics of the Formation Reaction of Zinc Histidine Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO,Sheng-Li(高胜利); CHEN,San-Ping(陈三平); HU,Rong-Zu(胡荣祖); SHI,Qi-Zhen(史启祯)

    2002-01-01

    The enthalpy change of reaction of zinc chloride with L-α-histidine in the temperature range of 25-50 ℃ has been determined by a microcalorimeter. On the basis of experimental and calculated results, three thermodynamics parameters (the activation enthalpy, the activation entropy, the activation free energy), the rate constant and three kinetic parameters (the activation energy, the pre-exponential constant and the reaction order) of the reaction, and the standard enthalpy of formarion of Zn(His)2+ (aq.) are obtained. The results showed that the title reaction easily took place at the studied temperature.

  12. Prebiotic synthesis of imidazole-4-acetaldehyde and histidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chun; Oro, J.; Yang, Lily; Miller, Stanley L.

    1987-01-01

    The prebiotic synthesis of imidazole-4-acetaldehyde and imidazole-4-glycol from erythrose and formamidine has been demonstrated as well as the prebiotic synthesis of imidazole-4-ethanol and imidazole-4-glycol from erythrose, formaldehyde, and ammonia. The maximum yields of imidazole-4-acetaldehyde, imidazole-4-ethanol, and imidazole-4-glycol obtained in these reactions are 1.6, 5.4, and 6.8 percent respectively, based on the erythrose. Imidazole-4-acetaldehyde would have been converted to histidine on the primitive earth by a Strecker synthesis, and several prebiotic reactions would convert imidazole-4-glycol and imidazole-4-ethanol to imidazole-4-acetaldehyde.

  13. Function, structure, and mechanism in bacterial photosensory LOV proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Herrou, Julien; Crosson, Sean

    2011-01-01

    LOV domains are protein photosensors conserved in bacteria, archaea, plants and fungi that detect blue light via a flavin cofactor. In the bacterial kingdom, LOV domains are present in both chemotrophic and phototrophic species, where they are found N-terminally of signaling and regulatory domains such as sensor histidine kinases, diguanylate cyclases/phosphodiesterases, DNA-binding domains, and σ factor regulators. In this review, we describe the current state of knowledge on the function of...

  14. Linking bacterial type I toxins with their actions

    OpenAIRE

    Brielle, Régine; Pinel-Marie, Marie-Laure; Felden, Brice

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial type I toxin–antitoxin systems consist of stable toxin-encoding mRNAs whose expression is counteracted by unstable RNA antitoxins. Accumulating evidence suggests that these players belong to broad regulatory networks influencing overall bacterial physiology. The majority of known transmembrane type I toxic peptides have conserved structural characteristics. However, recent studies demonstrated that their mechanisms of toxicity are diverse and complex. To better assess the current st...

  15. Are Aquaporins the Missing Transmembrane Osmosensors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, A E; Shachar-Hill, Y

    2015-08-01

    Regulation of cell volume is central to homeostasis. It is assumed to begin with the detection of a change in water potential across the bounding membrane, but it is not clear how this is accomplished. While examples of general osmoreceptors (which sense osmotic pressure in one phase) and stretch-activated ion channels (which require swelling of a cell or organelle) are known, effective volume regulation requires true transmembrane osmosensors (TMOs) which directly detect a water potential difference spanning a membrane. At present, no TMO molecule has been unambiguously identified, and clear evidence for mammalian TMOs is notably lacking. In this paper, we set out a theory of TMOs which requires a water channel spanning the membrane that excludes the major osmotic solutes, responds directly without the need for any other process such as swelling, and signals to other molecules associated with the magnitude of changing osmotic differences. The most likely molecules that are fit for this purpose and which are also ubiquitous in eukaryotic cells are aquaporins (AQPs). We review experimental evidence from several systems which indicates that AQPs are essential elements in regulation and may be functioning as TMOs; i.e. the first step in an osmosensing sequence that signals osmotic imbalance in a cell or organelle. We extend this concept to several systems of current interest in which the cellular involvement of AQPs as simple water channels is puzzling or counter-intuitive. We suggest that, apart from regulatory volume changes in cells, AQPs may also be acting as TMOs in red cells, secretory granules and microorganisms. PMID:25791748

  16. TSSOM:Transmembrane Segments Prediction by Self—Organizing Map

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUQi; ZHUYisheng; WANGBaohua; LIYixue

    2003-01-01

    A novel method ealled TSSOM(Transmembrane segments prediction by self-organizing map)is presented in the paper.The main idea of the method lies in the application of self-organizing feature map together with special visualization techniques to classify the multivariate "time" series of transmembrane proteins into flve classes.Through the analysis of resulting trajectories on the map,frequent patterns of transmembrane segments are detected and even some kind of "new"knowledge about membrane insertion mechanism is acquired.The discovered patterns and the knowledge are then used to predict transmembrane segments for auery sequence.The prediction results not only show that the method is powerful,but also prove that the patterns and the knowledge about the interaction bwtween the patterns are effective and acceptable.

  17. Evaluation of immobilized metal affinity chromatography kits for the purification of histidine-tagged recombinant CagA protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakus, Cebrail; Uslu, Merve; Yazici, Duygu; Salih, Barik A

    2016-05-15

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) technique is used for fast and reliable purification of histidine(His)-tagged recombinant proteins. The technique provides purification under native and denaturing conditions. The aim of this study is to evaluate three commercially available IMAC kits (Thermo Scientific, GE Healthcare and Qiagen) for the purification of a 6xHis-tagged recombinant CagA (cytotoxin-associated gene A) protein from IPTG-induced Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) culture. The kits were tested according to the manufacturer instructions and the protein was purified with only GE Healthcare and Qiagen kits under denaturing conditions. 1% (w/v) SDS was used as denaturing agent in PBS instead of extraction reagent of Thermo Scientific kit to lyse bacterial cells from 100ml culture. The 6xHis-tagged recombinant protein was purified by the three kits equally. PMID:26657801

  18. The role of palmitoylation and transmembrane domain in sorting of transmembrane adaptor proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chum, Tomáš; Glatzová, Daniela; Kvíčalová, Zuzana; Malínský, Jan; Brdička, Tomáš; Cebecauer, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane proteins synthesised at the endoplasmic reticulum are delivered to the cell surface via sorting pathways. Hydrophobic mismatch theory based on the length of the transmembrane domain (TMD) dominates discussion about determinants required for protein sorting to the plasma membrane. Transmembrane adaptor proteins (TRAP) are involved in signalling events which take place at the plasma membrane. Members of this protein family have TMDs of varying length. We were interested in whether palmitoylation or other motifs contribute to the effective sorting of TRAP proteins. We found that palmitoylation is essential for some, but not all, TRAP proteins independent of their TMD length. We also provide evidence that palmitoylation and proximal sequences can modulate sorting of artificial proteins with TMDs of suboptimal length. Our observations point to a unique character of each TMD defined by its primary amino acid sequence and its impact on membrane protein localisation. We conclude that, in addition to the TMD length, secondary sorting determinants such as palmitoylation or flanking sequences have evolved for the localisation of membrane proteins. PMID:26585312

  19. Vanadate inhibition of fungal phyA and bacterial appA2 histidine acid phosphatases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fungal PhyA protein, which was first identified as an acid optimum phosphomonoesterase (EC 3.1.3.8), could also serve as a vanadate haloperoxidase (EC 1.11.1.10) provided the acid phosphatase activity is shutdown by vanadate. To understand how vanadate inhibits both phytate and pNPP degrading ac...

  20. The Transmembrane Adaptor Protein SIT Inhibits TCR-Mediated Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Arndt, Börge; Krieger, Tina; Kalinski, Thomas; Thielitz, Anja; Reinhold, Dirk; Roessner, Albert; Schraven, Burkhart; Simeoni, Luca

    2011-01-01

    Transmembrane adaptor proteins (TRAPs) organize signaling complexes at the plasma membrane, and thus function as critical linkers and integrators of signaling cascades downstream of antigen receptors. We have previously shown that the transmembrane adaptor protein SIT regulates the threshold for thymocyte selection. Moreover, T cells from SIT-deficient mice are hyperresponsive to CD3 stimulation and undergo enhanced lymphopenia-induced homeostatic proliferation, thus indicating that SIT inhib...

  1. Substrate specificity of rhomboid intramembrane proteases is governed by helix-breaking residues in the substrate transmembrane domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Sinisa; Freeman, Matthew

    2003-06-01

    Rhomboid intramembrane proteases initiate cell signaling during Drosophila development and Providencia bacterial growth by cleaving transmembrane ligand precursors. We have determined how specificity is achieved: Drosophila Rhomboid-1 is a site-specific protease that recognizes its substrate Spitz by a small region of the Spitz transmembrane domain (TMD). This substrate motif is necessary and sufficient for cleavage and is composed of residues known to disrupt helices. Rhomboids from diverse organisms including bacteria and vertebrates recognize the same substrate motif, suggesting that they use a universal targeting strategy. We used this information to search for other rhomboid substrates and identified a family of adhesion proteins from the human parasite Toxoplasma gondii, the TMDs of which were efficient substrates for rhomboid proteases. Intramembrane cleavage of these proteins is required for host cell invasion. These results provide an explanation of how rhomboid proteases achieve specificity, and allow some rhomboid substrates to be predicted from sequence information. PMID:12820957

  2. Histidine Residue 94 Is Involved in pH Sensing by Histidine Kinase ArsS of Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanie Müller; Monika Götz; Dagmar Beier

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The ArsRS two-component system is the master regulator of acid adaptation in the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. Low pH is supposed to trigger the autophosphorylation of the histidine kinase ArsS and the subsequent transfer of the phosphoryl group to its cognate response regulator ArsR which then acts as an activator or repressor of pH-responsive genes. Orthologs of the ArsRS two-component system are also present in H. pylori's close relatives H. hepaticus, Campylobact...

  3. Histidine residue 94 is involved in pH sensing by histidine kinase ArsS of Helicobacter pylori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Müller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ArsRS two-component system is the master regulator of acid adaptation in the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. Low pH is supposed to trigger the autophosphorylation of the histidine kinase ArsS and the subsequent transfer of the phosphoryl group to its cognate response regulator ArsR which then acts as an activator or repressor of pH-responsive genes. Orthologs of the ArsRS two-component system are also present in H. pylori's close relatives H. hepaticus, Campylobacter jejuni and Wolinella succinogenes which are non-gastric colonizers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to investigate the mechanism of acid perception by ArsS, derivatives of H. pylori 26695 expressing ArsS proteins with substitutions of the histidine residues present in its periplasmic input domain were constructed. Analysis of pH-responsive transcription of selected ArsRS target genes in these mutants revealed that H94 is relevant for pH sensing, however, our data indicate that protonatable amino acids other than histidine contribute substantially to acid perception by ArsS. By the construction and analysis of H. pylori mutants carrying arsS allels from the related epsilon-proteobacteria we demonstrate that WS1818 of W. succinogenes efficiently responds to acidic pH. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show that H94 in the input domain of ArsS is crucial for acid perception in H. pylori 26695. In addition our data suggest that ArsS is able to adopt different conformations depending on the degree of protonation of acidic amino acids in the input domain. This might result in different activation states of the histidine kinase allowing a gradual transcriptional response to low pH conditions. Although retaining considerable similarity to ArsS the orthologous proteins of H. hepaticus and C. jejuni may have evolved to sensors of a different environmental stimulus in accordance with the non gastric habitat of these bacteria.

  4. Virulence Effects and Signaling Partners Modulated by Brucella melitensis Light-sensing Histidine Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourley, Christopher R.

    The facultative intracellular pathogen Brucella melitensis utilizes diverse virulence factors. A Brucella light sensing histidine kinase can influence in vitro virulence of the bacteria during intracellular infection. First, we demonstrated that the B. melitensis light sensing kinase (BM-LOV-HK) affects virulence in an IRF-1-/- mouse model of infection. Infection with a Δ BM-LOV-HK strain resulted in less bacterial colonization of IRF-1-/- spleens and extended survivorship compared to mice infected with wild type B. melitensis 16M. Second, using PCR arrays, we observed less expression of innate and adaptive immune system activation markers in ΔBM-LOV-HK infected mouse spleens than wild type B. melitensis 16M infected mouse spleens 6 days after infection. Third, we demonstrated by microarray analysis of B. melitensis that deletion of BM-LOV-HK alters bacterial gene expression. Downregulation of genes involved in control of the general stress response system included the alternative sigma factor RpoE1 and its anti-anti sigma factor PhyR. Conversely, genes involved in flagella production, quorum sensing, and the type IV secretion system (VirB operon) were upregulated in the Δ BM-LOV-HK strain compared to the wild type B. melitensis 16M. Analysis of genes differentially regulated in Δ BM-LOV-HK versus the wild type strain indicated an overlap of 110 genes with data from previous quorum sensing regulator studies of Δ vjbR and/ΔblxR(babR) strains. Also, several predicted RpoE1 binding sites located upstream of genes were differentially regulated in the ΔBM-LOV-HK strain. Our results suggest BM-LOV-HK is important for in vivo Brucella virulence, and reveals that BM-LOV-HK directly or indirect regulates members of the Brucella quorum sensing, type IV secretion, and general stress systems.

  5. Distal histidine conformational flexibility in dehaloperoxidase from Amphitrite ornata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zuxu; de Serrano, Vesna; Betts, Laurie; Franzen, Stefan; (NCSU); (UNC)

    2009-01-28

    The enzyme dehaloperoxidase (DHP) from the terebellid polychaete Amphitrite ornata is a heme protein which has a globin fold but can function as both a hemoglobin and a peroxidase. As a peroxidase, DHP is capable of converting 2,4,6-trihalophenols to the corresponding 2,6-dihaloquinones in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. As a hemoglobin, DHP cycles between the oxy and deoxy states as it reversibly binds oxygen for storage. Here, it is reported that the distal histidine, His55, exhibits conformational flexibility in the deoxy form and is consequently observed in two solvent-exposed conformations more than 9.5 {angstrom} away from the heme. These conformations are analogous to the open conformation of sperm whale myoglobin. The heme iron in deoxy ferrous DHP is five-coordinate and has an out-of-plane displacement of 0.25 {angstrom} from the heme plane. The observation of five-coordinate heme iron with His55 in a remote solvent-exposed conformation is consistent with the hypothesis that His55 interacts with heme iron ligands through hydrogen bonding in the closed conformation. Since His55 is also displaced by the binding of 4-iodophenol in an internal pocket, these results provide new insight into the correlation between heme iron ligation, molecular binding in the distal pocket and the conformation of the distal histidine in DHP.

  6. Segmental helical motions and dynamical asymmetry modulate histidine kinase autophosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel E Mechaly

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Histidine kinases (HKs are dimeric receptors that participate in most adaptive responses to environmental changes in prokaryotes. Although it is well established that stimulus perception triggers autophosphorylation in many HKs, little is known on how the input signal propagates through the HAMP domain to control the transient interaction between the histidine-containing and ATP-binding domains during the catalytic reaction. Here we report crystal structures of the full cytoplasmic region of CpxA, a prototypical HK involved in Escherichia coli response to envelope stress. The structural ensemble, which includes the Michaelis complex, unveils HK activation as a highly dynamic process, in which HAMP modulates the segmental mobility of the central HK α-helices to promote a strong conformational and dynamical asymmetry that characterizes the kinase-active state. A mechanical model based on our structural and biochemical data provides insights into HAMP-mediated signal transduction, the autophosphorylation reaction mechanism, and the symmetry-dependent control of HK kinase/phosphatase functional states.

  7. Loss of fragile histidine triad protein in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Po Zhao; Xin Song; Yuan-Yuan Nin; Ya-Li Lu; Xiang-Hong Li

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene protein, Fhit, which is recently thought to be a candidate tumor suppressor. Abnormal expression of fragile histidine triad has been found in a variety of human cancers,but little is known about its expression in human hepatocellular carcinogenesis and evolution.METHODS: Sections of 83 primary human hepatocellular carcionoma with corresponding para-neoplastic liver tissue and 10 normal liver tissue were evaluated immunohistochemically for Fhit protein expression.RESULTS: All normal liver tissue and para-neoplastic liver tissue showed a strong expression of Fhit, whereas 50 of 83(65.0 %) carcinomas showed a marked loss or absence of Fhit expression. The differences of Fhit expression between carcinoma and normal or para-neoplastic liver tissue werehighly significant (P=0.000). The proportion of carcinomas with reduced Fhit expression showed an increasing trend (a) with decreasing differentiation or higher histological grade (P=0.219); (b) in tumors with higher clinical stage Ⅲ and ⅣV (91.3 %, P=0.000), compared with tumors with lower stage Ⅰ and Ⅱ (27.6 %); and (c) in cancers with bigger tumor size (>50 mm) (75.0 %, P=0.017), compared withsmaller tumor size (≤ 50 mm). CONCLUSION: FHIT inactivation seems to be both an earlyand a later event, associated with carcinogenesis andprogression to more aggressive hepatocellular carcinomas.Thus, evaluation of Fhit expression by immunohistochemistryin hepatocellular carcinoma may provide important diagnosticand prognostic information in clinical application.

  8. Preparation of 2'-13C-L-Histidine Starting from 13C-Thiocyanate: Synthetic Access to Any Site-Directed Stable Isotope Enriched L-Histidine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarra Talab

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 1-Benzyl-2-(methylthio-imidazole-5-ketone is obtained in a few simple steps starting from thiocyanate and glycine amide (glycin. Subsequent treatment with diethyl phosphorocyanidate and functional group manipulations gives 1-benzyl-5-chloromethyl-imidazolium chloride. This compound is converted under mild O’Donnell conditions into the corresponding L-histidine derivative. After deprotection L-histidine is obtained in good yield and 99% enantiomeric excess. 2'-13C-L-Histidine has been obtained via this new scheme with high (99% 13C incorporation starting with commercially available 13C- thiocyanate. This synthetic scheme allows access to any isotopomer of L-histidine and many other biologically important imidazole derivatives.

  9. Histidine biosynthesis plays a crucial role in metal homeostasis and virulence of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietl, Anna-Maria; Amich, Jorge; Leal, Sixto; Beckmann, Nicola; Binder, Ulrike; Beilhack, Andreas; Pearlman, Eric; Haas, Hubertus

    2016-05-18

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most prevalent airborne fungal pathogen causing invasive fungal infections in immunosuppressed individuals. The histidine biosynthetic pathway is found in bacteria, archaebacteria, lower eukaryotes, and plants, but is absent in mammals. Here we demonstrate that deletion of the gene encoding imidazoleglycerol-phosphate dehydratase (HisB) in A. fumigatus causes (i) histidine auxotrophy, (ii) decreased resistance to both starvation and excess of various heavy metals, including iron, copper and zinc, which play a pivotal role in antimicrobial host defense, (iii) attenuation of pathogenicity in 4 virulence models: murine pulmonary infection, murine systemic infection, murine corneal infection, and wax moth larvae. In agreement with the in vivo importance of histidine biosynthesis, the HisB inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole reduced the virulence of the A. fumigatus wild type and histidine supplementation partially rescued virulence of the histidine-auxotrophic mutant in the wax moth model. Taken together, this study reveals limited histidine availability in diverse A. fumigatus host niches, a crucial role for histidine in metal homeostasis, and the histidine biosynthetic pathway as being an attractive target for development of novel antifungal therapy approaches. PMID:26854126

  10. Synthesis and catalytic activity of histidine-based NHC ruthenium complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Monney, Angèle; Venkatachalam, Galmari; Albrecht, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Main-chain C,N-protected histidine has been successfully alkylated at both side-chain nitrogens. The corresponding histidinium salt was metallated with ruthenium(II) by a transmetalation procedure, thus providing histidine-derived NHC ruthenium complexes. These bio-inspired comsxsxsplexes show appreciable activity in the catalytic transfer hydrogenation of ketones. peer-reviewed

  11. Histidine is the axial ligand to cytochrome alpha 3 in cytochrome c oxidase

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Tom H.; Chan, Sunney I.

    1981-01-01

    The nitric oxide-bound complexes of reduced yeast cytochrome c oxidase incorporated with [1,3-15N2]histidine have been investigated by EPR spectroscopy. The results of this study have allowed the unambiguous identification of histidine as the endogenous axial ligand to cytochrome alpha 3.

  12. Histidine side-chain dynamics and protonation monitored by C-13 CPMG NMR relaxation dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hass, M. A. S.; Yilmaz, A.; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager;

    2009-01-01

    The use of C-13 NMR relaxation dispersion experiments to monitor micro-millisecond fluctuations in the protonation states of histidine residues in proteins is investigated. To illustrate the approach, measurements on three specifically C-13 labeled histidine residues in plastocyanin (PCu) from...... Anabaena variabilis (A.v.) are presented. Significant Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion is observed for C-13(epsilon 1) nuclei in the histidine imidazole rings of A.v. PCu. The chemical shift changes obtained from the CPMG dispersion data are in good agreement with those obtained from...... states or other kinds of conformational changes of histidine side chains or their environment. Advantages and shortcomings of using the C-13(epsilon 1) dispersion experiments in combination with chemical shift titration experiments to obtain information on exchange dynamics of the histidine side chains...

  13. Structural Insights into the HWE Histidine Kinase Family: The Brucella Blue Light-Activated Histidine Kinase Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Jimena; Arrar, Mehrnoosh; Sycz, Gabriela; Cerutti, María Laura; Berguer, Paula M; Paris, Gastón; Estrín, Darío Ariel; Martí, Marcelo Adrián; Klinke, Sebastián; Goldbaum, Fernando Alberto

    2016-03-27

    In response to light, as part of a two-component system, the Brucella blue light-activated histidine kinase (LOV-HK) increases its autophosphorylation, modulating the virulence of this microorganism. The Brucella histidine kinase (HK) domain belongs to the HWE family, for which there is no structural information. The HWE family is exclusively present in proteobacteria and usually coupled to a wide diversity of light sensor domains. This work reports the crystal structure of the Brucella HK domain, which presents two different dimeric assemblies in the asymmetric unit: one similar to the already described canonical parallel homodimers (C) and the other, an antiparallel non-canonical (NC) dimer, each with distinct relative subdomain orientations and dimerization interfaces. Contrary to these crystallographic structures and unlike other HKs, in solution, the Brucella HK domain is monomeric and still active, showing an astonishing instability of the dimeric interface. Despite this instability, using cross-linking experiments, we show that the C dimer is the functionally relevant species. Mutational analysis demonstrates that the autophosphorylation activity occurs in cis. The different relative subdomain orientations observed for the NC and C states highlight the large conformational flexibility of the HK domain. Through the analysis of these alternative conformations by means of molecular dynamics simulations, we also propose a catalytic mechanism for Brucella LOV-HK. PMID:26851072

  14. 2D IR Spectroscopy of Histidine: Probing Side-Chain Structure and Dynamics via Backbone Amide Vibrations

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Ayanjeet; Tucker, Matthew J.; Gai, Feng

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that histidine is involved in many biological functions due to the structural versatility of its side chain. However, probing the conformational transitions of histidine in proteins, especially those occurring on an ultrafast time scale, is difficult. Herein we show, using a histidine dipeptide as a model, that it is possible to probe the tautomer and protonation status of a histidine residue by measuring the two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectrum of its amide I vibrationa...

  15. Specially-Made Lipid-Based Assemblies for Improving Transmembrane Gene Delivery: Comparison of Basic Amino Acid Residue Rich Periphery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qian; Yue, Dong; Nie, Yu; Xu, Xianghui; He, Yiyan; Zhang, Shiyong; Wagner, Ernst; Gu, Zhongwei

    2016-06-01

    Cationic lipid based assemblies provide a promising platform for effective gene condensation into nanosized particles, and the peripheral properties of the assemblies are vital for complexation and interaction with physical barriers. Here, we report three cationic twin head lipids, and each of them contains a dioleoyl-glutamate hydrophobic tail and a twin polar head of lysine, arginine, or histidine. Such lipids were proven to self-assemble in aqueous solution with well-defined nanostructures and residual amino-, guanidine-, or imidazole-rich periphery, showing strong buffering capacity and good liquidity. The assemblies with arginine (RL) or lysine (KL) periphery exhibited positive charges (∼+35 mV) and complete condensation of pDNA into nanosized complexes (∼120 nm). In contrast, assemblies composed of histidine-rich lipids (HL) showed relatively low cationic electric potential (∼+10 mV) and poor DNA binding ability. As expected, the designed RL assemblies with guanidine-rich periphery enhanced the in vitro gene transfection up to 190-fold as compared with the golden standard PEI25k and Lipofectamine 2000, especially in the presence of serum. Meanwhile, interaction with cell and endo/lysosome membrane also revealed the superiority of RL complexes, that the guanidine-rich surface efficiently promoted transmembrane process in cellular internalization and endosomal disruption. More importantly, RL complexes also succeeded beyond others in vivo with significantly (∼7-fold) enhanced expression in HepG2 tumor xenografts in mice, as well as stronger green fluorescence protein imaging in isolated tumors and tumor frozen sections. PMID:27097286

  16. Branched signal wiring of an essential bacterial cell-cycle phosphotransfer protein

    OpenAIRE

    Blair, Jimmy A.; Xu, Qingping; Childers, W. Seth; Mathews, Irimpan I.; Kern, Justin W.; Eckart, Michael; Deacon, Ashley M.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2013-01-01

    Vital to bacterial survival is the faithful propagation of cellular signals, and in Caulobacter crescentus ChpT is an essential mediator within the cell cycle circuit. ChpT functions as a histidine-containing phosphotransfer protein (HPt) that shuttles a phosphoryl group from the receiver domain of CckA, the upstream hybrid histidine kinase (HK), to one of two downstream response regulators (RRs)—CtrA or CpdR—that controls cell cycle progression. To understand how ChpT interacts with multiple...

  17. Improved gene transfer with histidine-functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevet, David; Hocine, Ouahiba; Delalande, Anthony; Raehm, Laurence; Charnay, Clarence; Midoux, Patrick; Durand, Jean-Olivier; Pichon, Chantal

    2014-08-25

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) were functionalized with aminopropyltriethoxysilane (MSN-NH2) then L-histidine (MSN-His) for pDNA delivery in cells and in vivo. The complexation of pDNA with MSN-NH2 and MSN-His was first studied with gel shift assay. pDNA complexed with MSN-His was better protected from DNase degradation than with MSN-NH2. An improvement of the transfection efficiency in cells was observed with MSN-His/pDNA compared to MSN-NH2/pDNA, which could be explained by a better internalization of MSN-His. The improvement of the transfection efficiency with MSN-His was also observed for gene transfer in Achilles tendons in vivo. PMID:24853464

  18. Solid-State NMR Investigation of the Conformation, Proton Conduction, and Hydration of the Influenza B Virus M2 Transmembrane Proton Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jonathan K; Tietze, Daniel; Lee, Myungwoon; Wang, Jun; Hong, Mei

    2016-07-01

    Together with the influenza A virus, influenza B virus causes seasonal flu epidemics. The M2 protein of influenza B (BM2) forms a tetrameric proton-conducting channel that is important for the virus lifecycle. BM2 shares little sequence homology with AM2, except for a conserved HxxxW motif in the transmembrane (TM) domain. Unlike AM2, no antiviral drugs have been developed to block the BM2 channel. To elucidate the proton-conduction mechanism of BM2 and to facilitate the development of BM2 inhibitors, we have employed solid-state NMR spectroscopy to investigate the conformation, dynamics, and hydration of the BM2 TM domain in lipid bilayers. BM2 adopts an α-helical conformation in lipid membranes. At physiological temperature and low pH, the proton-selective residue, His19, shows relatively narrow (15)N chemical exchange peaks for the imidazole nitrogens, indicating fast proton shuttling that interconverts cationic and neutral histidines. Importantly, pH-dependent (15)N chemical shifts indicate that His19 retains the neutral population to much lower pH than His37 in AM2, indicating larger acid-dissociation constants or lower pKa's. We attribute these dynamical and equilibrium differences to the presence of a second titratable histidine, His27, which may increase the proton-dissociation rate of His19. Two-dimensional (1)H-(13)C correlation spectra probing water (1)H polarization transfer to the peptide indicates that the BM2 channel becomes much more hydrated at low pH than at high pH, particularly at Ser12, indicating that the pore-facing serine residues in BM2 mediate proton relay to the proton-selective histidine. PMID:27286559

  19. Histidine promotes the loading of nickel and zinc, but not of cadmium, into the xylem in Noccaea caerulescens

    OpenAIRE

    Kozhevnikova, Anna D; Seregin, Ilya V.; Verweij, Rudo; Schat, Henk

    2014-01-01

    Histidine is known to be involved in Ni hyperaccumulation. Recently, histidine-dependent xylem loading of Ni and Zn has been demonstrated in the Zn/Ni/Cd hyperaccumulator, Noccaea caerulescens. Here we tested the hypothesis whether Cd xylem loading is histidine-dependent, too. In contrast to that of Ni and Zn, the xylem loading of Cd was not affected by exogenous histidine. Histidine accumulation in root cells appears to facilitate the radial transport of Ni and Zn, but not Cd, across the roo...

  20. Histidine-imbalanced diets stimulate hepatic histidase gene expression in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, N; Beristain, L; Bourges, H; Tovar, A R

    1999-11-01

    A high protein concentration in the diet induces the gene expression of several amino acid degrading enzymes such as histidase (Hal) in rats. It is important to understand whether the amino acid pattern of the dietary protein affects the gene expression of these enzymes. The purpose of the present work was to study the effect of a histidine-imbalanced diet on the activity and mRNA concentration of rat hepatic histidase. Seven groups of six rats were fed one of the following diets: 1) 6% casein (basal), 2) 20% casein, 3) 35% casein, 4) an imbalance diet containing 6% casein plus a mixture of indispensable amino acids (IAA) equivalent to a 20% casein diet without histidine (I-20), 5) 6% casein plus a mixture of IAA equivalent to a 35% casein diet without histidine (I-35), 6) a corrected diet containing 6% casein plus IAA including histidine equivalent to a 20% casein diet, 7) a corrected diet containing 6% casein plus IAA including histidine equivalent to a 35% casein diet. Serum histidine concentration was inversely proportional to the protein content of the diet, and it was significantly higher in rats fed the corrected diets compared to their respective imbalanced diet groups. Hal activity increased as the protein content of the diet increased. Greater histidine imbalance resulted in lower food intake and higher Hal activity. Rats fed histidine-corrected diets had lower activity than their respective imbalanced groups. Differences in Hal activity were associated with differences in the concentration of Hal mRNA. These results indicate that rats fed a histidine-imbalanced diet exhibit reduced food intake and weight gain and increased Hal gene expression as a consequence of an increased amino acid catabolism. PMID:10539772

  1. Identification of the catalytic histidine residue participating in the charge-relay system of carboxypeptidase Y.

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, G.; Ueno, H; Hayashi, R.; Liao, T. H.

    1995-01-01

    The essential histidine residue of carboxypeptidase Y (CPY) was modified by a site-specific reagent, a chloromethylketone derivative of benzyloxycarbonyl-L-phenylalanine. The single modified histidine residue was converted to N tau-carboxy-methyl histidine (cmHis) upon performic acid oxidation. A peptide containing cmHis was isolated from the tryptic-thermolytic digest. Based on the amino acid composition and sequence analysis, the peptide is shown to be Val-Phe-Asp-Gly-Gly-cmHis-MetO2-Val-Pr...

  2. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 586. Related Content STDs during Pregnancy Fact Sheet Pregnancy and HIV, Viral Hepatitis, and STD Prevention Pelvic Inflammatory Disease ( ... Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) Chlamydia Gonorrhea Genital Herpes Hepatitis HIV/AIDS & STDs Human Papillomavirus ... STDs See Also Pregnancy Reproductive ...

  3. Bacterial Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Bacterial Meningitis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... serious disease. Laboratory Methods for the Diagnosis of Meningitis This manual summarizes laboratory methods used to isolate, ...

  4. Prostatitis - bacterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Any bacteria that can cause a urinary tract infection can cause acute bacterial prostatitis. Infections spread through sexual contact can cause prostatitis. These include chlamydia and gonorrhea . Sexually transmitted ...

  5. Bacterial Conjunctivitis

    OpenAIRE

    Köhle, Ülkü; Kükner, Şahap

    2003-01-01

    Conjunctivitis is an infection of the conjunctiva, generally characterized by irritation, itching, foreign body sensation, tearing and discharge. Bacterial conjunctivitis may be distinguished from other types of conjunctivitis by the presence of yellow–white mucopurulent discharge. It is the most common form of ocular infection all around the world. Staphylococcus species are the most common bacterial pathogenes, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus i...

  6. Crystal Structures of Trypanosoma cruzi UDP-Galactopyranose Mutase Implicate Flexibility of the Histidine Loop in Enzyme Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhatwalia, Richa; Singh, Harkewal; Oppenheimer, Michelle; Sobrado, Pablo; Tanner, John J. (Virginia Tech); (UMC)

    2012-11-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Here we report crystal structures of the galactofuranose biosynthetic enzyme UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM) from T. cruzi, which are the first structures of this enzyme from a protozoan parasite. UGM is an attractive target for drug design because galactofuranose is absent in humans but is an essential component of key glycoproteins and glycolipids in trypanosomatids. Analysis of the enzyme-UDP noncovalent interactions and sequence alignments suggests that substrate recognition is exquisitely conserved among eukaryotic UGMs and distinct from that of bacterial UGMs. This observation has implications for inhibitor design. Activation of the enzyme via reduction of the FAD induces profound conformational changes, including a 2.3 {angstrom} movement of the histidine loop (Gly60-Gly61-His62), rotation and protonation of the imidazole of His62, and cooperative movement of residues located on the si face of the FAD. Interestingly, these changes are substantially different from those described for Aspergillus fumigatus UGM, which is 45% identical to T. cruzi UGM. The importance of Gly61 and His62 for enzymatic activity was studied with the site-directed mutant enzymes G61A, G61P, and H62A. These mutations lower the catalytic efficiency by factors of 10-50, primarily by decreasing k{sub cat}. Considered together, the structural, kinetic, and sequence data suggest that the middle Gly of the histidine loop imparts flexibility that is essential for activation of eukaryotic UGMs. Our results provide new information about UGM biochemistry and suggest a unified strategy for designing inhibitors of UGMs from the eukaryotic pathogens.

  7. Cloning, Expression, and Purification of Histidine-Tagged Escherichia coli Dihydrodipicolinate Reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigoso, Yvonne D; Evans, Russell C; Karsten, William E; Chooback, Lilian

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme dihydrodipicolinate reductase (DHDPR) is a component of the lysine biosynthetic pathway in bacteria and higher plants. DHDPR catalyzes the NAD(P)H dependent reduction of 2,3-dihydrodipicolinate to the cyclic imine L-2,3,4,5,-tetrahydropicolinic acid. The dapB gene that encodes dihydrodipicolinate reductase has previously been cloned, but the expression of the enzyme is low and the purification is time consuming. Therefore the E. coli dapB gene was cloned into the pET16b vector to improve the protein expression and simplify the purification. The dapB gene sequence was utilized to design forward and reverse oligonucleotide primers that were used to PCR the gene from Escherichia coli genomic DNA. The primers were designed with NdeI or BamHI restriction sites on the 5'and 3' terminus respectively. The PCR product was sequenced to confirm the identity of dapB. The gene was cloned into the expression vector pET16b through NdeI and BamHI restriction endonuclease sites. The resulting plasmid containing dapB was transformed into the bacterial strain BL21 (DE3). The transformed cells were utilized to grow and express the histidine-tagged reductase and the protein was purified using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. SDS/PAGE gel analysis has shown that the protein was 95% pure and has approximate subunit molecular weight of 28 kDa. The protein purification is completed in one day and 3 liters of culture produced approximately 40-50 mgs of protein, an improvement on the previous protein expression and multistep purification. PMID:26815040

  8. Cloning, Expression, and Purification of Histidine-Tagged Escherichia coli Dihydrodipicolinate Reductase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne D Trigoso

    Full Text Available The enzyme dihydrodipicolinate reductase (DHDPR is a component of the lysine biosynthetic pathway in bacteria and higher plants. DHDPR catalyzes the NAD(PH dependent reduction of 2,3-dihydrodipicolinate to the cyclic imine L-2,3,4,5,-tetrahydropicolinic acid. The dapB gene that encodes dihydrodipicolinate reductase has previously been cloned, but the expression of the enzyme is low and the purification is time consuming. Therefore the E. coli dapB gene was cloned into the pET16b vector to improve the protein expression and simplify the purification. The dapB gene sequence was utilized to design forward and reverse oligonucleotide primers that were used to PCR the gene from Escherichia coli genomic DNA. The primers were designed with NdeI or BamHI restriction sites on the 5'and 3' terminus respectively. The PCR product was sequenced to confirm the identity of dapB. The gene was cloned into the expression vector pET16b through NdeI and BamHI restriction endonuclease sites. The resulting plasmid containing dapB was transformed into the bacterial strain BL21 (DE3. The transformed cells were utilized to grow and express the histidine-tagged reductase and the protein was purified using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. SDS/PAGE gel analysis has shown that the protein was 95% pure and has approximate subunit molecular weight of 28 kDa. The protein purification is completed in one day and 3 liters of culture produced approximately 40-50 mgs of protein, an improvement on the previous protein expression and multistep purification.

  9. Pulse radiolysis study of imidazole and histidine in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reaction rate constants of e-/sub aq/ and OH radicals with imidazole (ImH), N-methylimidazole (MeIm), histidine, and N-methylhistidine were determined. The k(e-/sub aq/ + S) values were strongly dependent on the state of protonation of the ''pyridine'' nitrogen in these molecules, with rates of approximately 5 x 109 M-1 sec-1 at pH approximately 6.0 and (approximately 1-2) x 107 M-1 sec-1 at pH approximately 10.0. The k(OH + S) values show only small but significant changes with pH with rates of approximately 5 x 109 M-1 sec-1 at pH 4 to 5 and approximately 9.0 x 109 M-1 sec-1 at pH 9 to 10. The transient absorption spectra of the e-/sub aq/ and OH radical adducts to these molecules were observed. For e-/sub aq/ addition to imidazole at pH approximately 5.0, the ImH2. radical suggested to be formed has maxima at 300 and 360 nm and epsilon300 5.6 x 103 M-1 cm-1; the MeImH. radical has maxima at 310 and 360 nm with epsilon360 6.1 x 103 M-1 cm-1. The OH radical adducts to ImH2+ and ImH have maxima at 295 and 400 nm and at 310 and 390 nm, respectively. A pK/sub a/(radical) = 6.1 is observed for the equilibrium OH.ImH2+ reversible OH.ImH + H+, which is close to pK/sub a/ = 7.1 for loss of a proton from the ''pyridine'' nitrogen of imidazole. The results from the OH radical adduct to N-methylimidazole support this assignment. Similar results wereobtained for histidine and N-methylhistidine. The decay kinetics of the free-radical intermediates were determined. (U.S.)

  10. Transcriptome atlas of eight liver cell types uncovers effects of histidine catabolites on rat liver regeneration

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C. F. Chang; J. Y. Fan; F. C. Zhang; J. Ma; C. S. Xu

    2010-12-01

    Eight liver cell types were isolated using the methods of Percoll density gradient centrifugation and immunomagnetic beads to explore effects of histidine catabolites on rat liver regeneration. Rat Genome 230 2.0 Array was used to detect the expression profiles of genes associated with metabolism of histidine and its catabolites for the above-mentioned eight liver cell types, and bioinformatic and systems biology approaches were employed to analyse the relationship between above genes and rat liver regeneration. The results showed that the urocanic acid (UA) was degraded from histidine in Kupffer cells, acts on Kupffer cells itself and dendritic cells to generate immune suppression by autocrine and paracrine modes. Hepatocytes, biliary epithelia cells, oval cells and dendritic cells can convert histidine to histamine, which can promote sinusoidal endothelial cells proliferation by GsM pathway, and promote the proliferation of hepatocytes and biliary epithelia cells by GqM pathway.

  11. Resonance Raman spectroscopy with chemical state selectivity on histidine and acetamide using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on ultraviolet resonance Raman scattering experiments carried out on two model substances: histidine and acetamide using a UV synchrotron radiation source. In the case of aqueous histidine solution each protonated state of histidine tautomers was selectively excited by tuning the incident wavelength and the vibrational state of each protonated state was studied. We also demonstrated that the local pH condition of histidine can be identified directly from the spectra above pH 9. In the case of acetamide, the resonance Raman bands of acetamide with a stronger hydrogen bond at the NH2 site and weaker hydrogen bond at the C=O site were selectively observed. These findings will extend the selectivity and sensitivity of RR spectroscopy that is helpful to understanding protein functionality. (author)

  12. Deuterium-labeling method for the assignment of histidine nuclear magentic resonance peaks of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tritium labelling method involving differential tritium exchange at the C-2 H position of histidines and 1H NMR of differentially deuterated proteins can be a general method for the assignment of the histidine NMR peaks. In the present report this method is modified by replacing the tritium with deuterium, which eliminates ambiguities arising from the tritium isotope effect. In the deuterium labelling method, differentially deuterated proteins are cleaved by trypsin into smaller peptides each containing a single histidine residue, which are separated by chromatography. The method was applied to the Bence Hones dimer Ak which contains two histidine residues in the constant domain of each of the light chains. The decay of the NMR peaks with time allowed the assignment of one peak to His189 and the other to His198

  13. BSA-conjugated zinc oxide nanoparticles as luminescent probes for the determination of histidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dudu; Liang, Qiaowen; Chen, Zhi

    2016-06-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles doped with bovine serum albumin were used to determine histidine in aqueous solutions using a fluorescence spectroscopic technique. The results showed that histidine effectively quenched the fluorescence of the modified ZnO nanoparticles, whereas other amino acids did not significantly affect the light emission, thereby allowing selective and sensitive histidine detection in amino acid mixtures. Under optimal conditions (pH 7.0, 25 °C, 10 min preincubation), the detection limit for histidine was ~ 9.87 × 10(-7) mol/L. The high value of the determined quenching rate constant Kq (3.30 × 10(13)  L/mol/s) was consistent with a static quenching mechanism. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26577609

  14. Thermodynamic and kinetic stability of zwitterionic histidine: Effects of gas phase hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Sik; Kim, Ju-Young; Han, Yuna; Shim, Hyun-Jin; Lee, Sungyul

    2015-09-01

    We present calculations for histidine-(H2O)n (n = 0-6) to examine the effects of micro-hydrating water molecules on the relative stability of the zwitterionic vs. canonical forms of histidine. We calculate the structures and Gibbs free energies of the conformers at wB97XD/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. We find that six water molecules are required to produce the thermodynamically stable histidine zwitterion. By calculating the barriers of canonical ↔ zwitterionic transformation, we predict that both the most stable canonical and zwitterionic forms of histidine-(H2O)6 may be observed in low temperature gas phase environment.

  15. Crystallographic characterization of a multidomain histidine protein kinase from an essential two-component regulatory system

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Haiyan; Tang, Liang

    2009-01-01

    The multidomain cytoplasmic portion of the histidine protein kinase from an essential two-component signal transduction system has been crystallized and X-ray data have been collected to 2.8 Å resolution.

  16. Catalysis of peptide bond formation by histidyl-histidine in a fluctuating clay environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D. H.; Erickson, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The condensation of glycine to form oligoglycines during wet-dry fluctuations on clay surfaces was enhanced up to threefold or greater by small amounts of histidyl-histidine. In addition, higher relative yields of the longer oligomers were produced. Other specific dipeptides tested gave no enhancement, and imidazole, histidine, and N-acetylhistidine gave only slight enhancements. Histidyl-histidine apparently acts as a true catalyst (in the sense of repeatedly catalyzing the reaction), since up to 52 nmol of additional glycine were incorporated into oligoglycine for each nmol of catalyst added. This is the first known instance of a peptide or similar molecule demonstrating a catalytic turnover number greater than unity in a prebiotic oligomer synthesis reaction, and suggests that histidyl-histidine is a model for a primitive prebiotic proto-enzyme. Catalysis of peptide bond synthesis by a molecule which is itself a peptide implies that related systems may be capable of exhibiting autocatalytic growth.

  17. Computational approaches to detect allosteric pathways in transmembrane molecular machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Michino, Mayako; LeVine, Michael V; Weinstein, Harel; Shi, Lei

    2016-07-01

    Many of the functions of transmembrane proteins involved in signal processing and transduction across the cell membrane are determined by allosteric couplings that propagate the functional effects well beyond the original site of activation. Data gathered from breakthroughs in biochemistry, crystallography, and single molecule fluorescence have established a rich basis of information for the study of molecular mechanisms in the allosteric couplings of such transmembrane proteins. The mechanistic details of these couplings, many of which have therapeutic implications, however, have only become accessible in synergy with molecular modeling and simulations. Here, we review some recent computational approaches that analyze allosteric coupling networks (ACNs) in transmembrane proteins, and in particular the recently developed Protein Interaction Analyzer (PIA) designed to study ACNs in the structural ensembles sampled by molecular dynamics simulations. The power of these computational approaches in interrogating the functional mechanisms of transmembrane proteins is illustrated with selected examples of recent experimental and computational studies pursued synergistically in the investigation of secondary active transporters and GPCRs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov. PMID:26806157

  18. A hidden Markov model for prediction transmembrane helices in proteinsequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnhammer, Erik L.L.; von Heijne, Gunnar; Krogh, Anders Stærmose

    1998-01-01

    constraints involved. Models were estimated both by maximum likelihood and a discriminative method, and a method for reassignment of the membrane helix boundaries were developed. In a cross validated test on single sequences, our transmembrane HMM, TMHMM, correctly predicts the entire topology for 77% of the...

  19. Promiscuous Seven Transmembrane Receptors Sensing L-α-amino Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smajilovic, Sanela; Wellendorph, Petrine; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2014-01-01

    A number of nutrient sensing seven trans-membrane (7TM) receptors have been identified and characterized over the past few years. While the sensing mechanisms to carbohydrates and free fatty acids are well understood, the molecular basis of amino acid sensing has recently come to the limelight. T...

  20. Modelling of a transmembrane evaporation module for desalination of seawater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guijt, Caroliene M.; Rácz, Imre G.; Heuven, van Jan Willem; Reith, Tom; Haan, de André B.

    1999-01-01

    Transmembrane evaporation (often called membrane distillation) carried out in a countercurrent flow module, in which incoming cold seawater is heated by the condensing product water flow, is a promising technology for low-cost seawater desalination. This paper presents a model for preliminary design

  1. Histidine provides long-term neuroprotection after cerebral ischemia through promoting astrocyte migration

    OpenAIRE

    Ru-jia Liao; Lei Jiang; Rong-rong Wang; Hua-wei Zhao; Ying Chen; Ya Li; Lu Wang; Li-Yong Jie; Yu-dong Zhou; Xiang-nan Zhang; Zhong Chen; Wei-wei Hu

    2015-01-01

    The formation of glial scar impedes the neurogenesis and neural functional recovery following cerebral ischemia. Histamine showed neuroprotection at early stage after cerebral ischemia, however, its long-term effect, especially on glial scar formation, hasn’t been characterized. With various administration regimens constructed for histidine, a precursor of histamine, we found that histidine treatment at a high dose at early stage and a low dose at late stage demonstrated the most remarkable l...

  2. Influence of Histidine-Containing Tags on the Biodistribution of ADAPT Scaffold Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindbo, Sarah; Garousi, Javad; Åstrand, Mikael; Honarvar, Hadis; Orlova, Anna; Hober, Sophia; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2016-03-16

    Engineered scaffold proteins (ESP) are high-affinity binders that can be used as probes for radionuclide imaging. Histidine-containing tags enable both efficient purification of ESP and radiolabeling with (99m)Tc(CO)3. Earlier studies demonstrated that the use of a histidine-glutamate-histidine-glutamate-histidine-glutamate (HE)3-tag instead of the commonly used hexahistidine (H6)-tag reduces hepatic uptake of radiolabeled ESP and short peptides. Here, we investigated the influence of histidine-containing tags on the biodistribution of a novel type of ESP, ADAPTs. A series of anti-HER2 ADAPT probes having H6- or (HE)3-tags in the N-termini were prepared. The constructs, (HE)3-ADAPT6 and H6-ADAPT6, were labeled with two different nuclides, (99m)Tc or (111)In. The labeling with (99m)Tc(CO)3 utilized the histidine-containing tags, while (111)In was attached through a maleimido derivative of DOTA conjugated to the N-terminus. For (111)In-labeled ADAPTs, the use of (HE)3 provided a significantly (p < 0.05) lower hepatic uptake at 1 h after injection, but there was no significant difference in hepatic uptake of (111)In-(HE)3-ADAPT6 and H6-ADAPT6 at later time points. Interestingly, in the case of (99m)Tc, (99m)Tc(CO)3-H6-ADAPT6 provided significantly (p < 0.05) lower uptake in a number of normal tissues and was more suitable as an imaging probe. Thus, the influence of histidine-containing tags on the biodistribution of the novel ADAPT scaffold proteins was different compared to its influence on other ESPs studied so far. Apparently, the effect of a histidine-containing tag on the biodistribution is highly dependent on the scaffold composition of the ESP. PMID:26781756

  3. Ultraviolet-induced reversion to prototrophy in histidine-requiring Escherichia coli B/r

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of ultraviolet irradiation on the conversion from histidine requirement to histidine independence in a fully repair efficient strain of E. coli B/r has been studied at both logarithmic and stationary phases of growth. Dimers were removed by PR in liquid suspension as well as on an agar surface. The mutants for the cells in the two growth phases were different in nature; the way in which PR was performed significantly influenced the number of mutants obtained. (Auth.)

  4. Proton transfer in histidine-tryptophan heterodimers embedded in helium droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We used cold helium droplets as nano-scale reactors to form and ionize, by electron bombardment and charge transfer, aromatic amino acid heterodimers of histidine with tryptophan, methyl-tryptophan, and indole. The molecular interaction occurring through an N–H ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ N hydrogen bond leads to a proton transfer from the indole group of tryptophan to the imidazole group of histidine in a radical cationic environment

  5. Full-length structure of a monomeric histidine kinase reveals basis for sensory regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Rivera-Cancel, Giomar; Ko, Wen-huang; Tomchick, Diana R.; Correa, Fernando; Gardner, Kevin H

    2014-01-01

    All organisms regulate biological processes in response to changes in their environment. Bacteria often achieve this control via two-component signal transduction pathways, which use histidine kinases to perceive environmental signals and relay this information to downstream effectors. Despite substantial efforts, key aspects of the mechanisms by which histidine kinases are activated by these signals remain poorly understood. In this paper, we present structural and functional data that shed ...

  6. Oral administration of vitamin C and histidine attenuate cyclophosphamide-induced hemorrhagic cystitis in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Abbas Farshid; Esmaeal Tamaddonfard; Sepideh Ranjbar

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Cyclophosphamide (CP), a widely used antineoplastic drug causes hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) mainly via induction of oxidative stress. Both vitamin C and histidine have antioxidant properties. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of oral (p.o.) administration of vitamin C and histidine on the CP-induced HC in rats. Materials and Methods: The animals were divided into two major groups I and II with four subgroups (a, b, c, and d) in each. Groups I and II were treated...

  7. Effect of peptide histidine isoleucine on water and electrolyte transport in the human jejunum.

    OpenAIRE

    Moriarty, K J; Hegarty, J E; Tatemoto, K; Mutt, V; Christofides, N D; Bloom, S R; Wood, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Peptide histidine isoleucine, a 27 amino acid peptide with close amino acid sequence homology to vasoactive intestinal peptide and secretin, is distributed throughout the mammalian intestinal tract, where it has been localised to intramural neurones. An intestinal perfusion technique has been used to study the effect of intravenous peptide histidine isoleucine (44.5 pmol/kg/min) on water and electrolyte transport from a plasma like electrolyte solution in human jejunum in vivo. Peptide histid...

  8. Histidine biosynthesis plays a crucial role in metal homeostasis and virulence of Aspergillus fumigatus

    OpenAIRE

    Dietl, Anna-Maria; Amich, Jorge; Leal, Sixto; Beckmann, Nicola; Binder, Ulrike; Beilhack, Andreas; Pearlman, Eric; Haas, Hubertus

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aspergillus fumigatus is the most prevalent airborne fungal pathogen causing invasive fungal infections in immunosuppressed individuals. The histidine biosynthetic pathway is found in bacteria, archaebacteria, lower eukaryotes, and plants, but is absent in mammals. Here we demonstrate that deletion of the gene encoding imidazoleglycerol-phosphate dehydratase (HisB) in A. fumigatus causes (i) histidine auxotrophy, (ii) decreased resistance to both starvation and excess of various heav...

  9. Proton transfer in histidine-tryptophan heterodimers embedded in helium droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellina, Bruno; Merthe, Daniel J.; Kresin, Vitaly V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 (United States)

    2015-03-21

    We used cold helium droplets as nano-scale reactors to form and ionize, by electron bombardment and charge transfer, aromatic amino acid heterodimers of histidine with tryptophan, methyl-tryptophan, and indole. The molecular interaction occurring through an N–H ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ N hydrogen bond leads to a proton transfer from the indole group of tryptophan to the imidazole group of histidine in a radical cationic environment.

  10. Proton transfer in histidine-tryptophan heterodimers embedded in helium droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Bellina, Bruno; Kresin, Vitaly V

    2015-01-01

    We used cold helium droplets as nano-scale reactors to form and ionize, by electron bombardment and charge transfer, aromatic amino acid heterodimers of histidine with tryptophan, methyl-tryptophan, and indole. The molecular interaction occurring through an N-H...N hydrogen bond leads to a proton transfer from the indole group of tryptophan to the imidazole group of histidine in a radical cationic environment.

  11. Proton transfer in histidine-tryptophan heterodimers embedded in helium droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellina, Bruno; Merthe, Daniel J.; Kresin, Vitaly V.

    2015-03-01

    We used cold helium droplets as nano-scale reactors to form and ionize, by electron bombardment and charge transfer, aromatic amino acid heterodimers of histidine with tryptophan, methyl-tryptophan, and indole. The molecular interaction occurring through an N-H ṡ ṡ ṡ N hydrogen bond leads to a proton transfer from the indole group of tryptophan to the imidazole group of histidine in a radical cationic environment.

  12. Unusual peroxidase activity of a myoglobin mutant with two distal histidines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Wei Guo; Dun Wan; Li Fu Liao; Ying Wu Lin

    2012-01-01

    By retaining the native distal His64 in sperm whale myoglobin (Mb),a second distal histidine was engineered in Mb by mutating Leu29 to His29.The resultant mutant of L29H Mb exhibits an unusual enhanced peroxidase activity with a positive cooperativity in comparison to that of wild type Mb.The new enzyme with two cooperative distal histidines has not been found in native peroxidase,which emphasizes a creation of the rational protein design.

  13. Dietary histidine supplementation prevents cataract development in adult Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., in seawater

    OpenAIRE

    Waagbø, Rune; Tröße, Christiane; Koppe, Wolfgang; Fontanillas, Ramon; Breck, Olav

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the cataract preventive effect of dietary histidine regimes in adult Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) in seawater, both through manipulating the dietary histidine level and feeding period. Mean body weight of individually tagged Atlantic salmon at the start of the experiment was 1662 (SD 333) g. Low prevalence of mild cataracts were recorded in the beginning of June. Three fishmeal and fish oil-based extruded diets (crude protein: 375 g...

  14. Enhanced histamine production through the induction of histidine decarboxylase expression by phorbol ester in Jurkat cells

    OpenAIRE

    NAGASHIMA, YUSUKE; Kako, Koichiro; KIM, JUN-DAL; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Histamine (HA), a mediator of inflammation, type I allergic responses and neurotransmission, is synthesized from L-histidine, the reaction of which is catalyzed by histidine decarboxylase (HDC). HDC has been reported to be induced by various stimuli, not only in mast cells and basophils, but also in T lymphocytes and macrophages. Although its mRNA has been shown to be increased in Jurkat cells when treated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA), little is known concerning the induced prod...

  15. Histamine and histidine effects on the transport of dopamine in the rat brain synaptosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of histamine (HA) on dopamine (DA) transport in rat brain synaptosomes has been studied. The exogenous HA inhibited the veratridine-evoked DA release, but had no effect on the DA uptake. A drop of DA uptake to synaptosomes under the conditions favoring histamine synthesis from histidine was connected with histidine itself, but not with the formed histamine. (author). 20 refs, 5 figs

  16. Histidine-catalyzed synthesis of cyclic carbonates in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The coupling reaction of carbon dioxide with epoxides was investigated using naturally occurring α-amino acids as the catalyst in supercritical carbon dioxide and it was found that L-histidine is the most active catalyst.In the presence of 0.8 mol% of L-histidine at 130°C under 8 MPa of CO2,the reaction of carbon dioxide with epoxides proceeded smoothly,affording corresponding cyclic carbonates in good to excellent yields.

  17. Regulatory mutation that controls nif expression and histidine transport in Azospirillum brasilense.

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, M.; Levy, E; Geller, T

    1986-01-01

    Mutagenesis of Azospirillum brasilense with nitrosoguanidine and selection on ethylenediamine yielded prototrophs which fixed nitrogen in the presence of ammonia. Nitrogenase activity in mutant strains exceeded that of the wild type three- to sixfold. The same mutants were also constitutive for histidine transport. Enzyme activities involved in ammonia assimilation were not affected by the mutation. The data suggest that the mutation occurred at a site which regulates nif and histidine transp...

  18. L-histidine inhibits production of lysophosphatidic acid by the tumor-associated cytokine, autotaxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiffmann Elliott

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autotaxin (ATX, NPP-2, originally purified as a potent tumor cell motility factor, is now known to be the long-sought plasma lysophospholipase D (LPLD. The integrity of the enzymatic active site, including three crucial histidine moieties, is required for motility stimulation, as well as LPLD and 5'nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE activities. Except for relatively non-specific chelation agents, there are no known inhibitors of the ATX LPLD activity. Results We show that millimolar concentrations of L-histidine inhibit ATX-stimulated but not LPA-stimulated motility in two tumor cell lines, as well as inhibiting enzymatic activities. Inhibition is reversed by 20-fold lower concentrations of zinc salt. L-histidine has no significant effect on the Km of LPLD, but reduces the Vmax by greater than 50%, acting as a non-competitive inhibitor. Several histidine analogs also inhibit the LPLD activity of ATX; however, none has greater potency than L-histidine and all decrease cell viability or adhesion. Conclusion L-histidine inhibition of LPLD is not a simple stoichiometric chelation of metal ions but is more likely a complex interaction with a variety of moieties, including the metal cation, at or near the active site. The inhibitory effect of L-histidine requires all three major functional groups of histidine: the alpha amino group, the alpha carboxyl group, and the metal-binding imidazole side chain. Because of LPA's involvement in pathological processes, regulation of its formation by ATX may give insight into possible novel therapeutic approaches.

  19. Bacterial carbonatogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several series of experiments in the laboratory as well as in natural conditions teach that the production of carbonate particles by heterotrophic bacteria follows different ways. The 'passive' carbonatogenesis is generated by modifications of the medium that lead to the accumulation of carbonate and bicarbonate ions and to the precipitation of solid particles. The 'active' carbonatogenesis is independent of the metabolic pathways. The carbonate particles are produced by ionic exchanges through the cell membrane following still poorly known mechanisms. Carbonatogenesis appears to be the response of heterotrophic bacterial communities to an enrichment of the milieu in organic matter. The active carbonatogenesis seems to start first. It is followed by the passive one which induces the growth of initially produced particles. The yield of heterotrophic bacterial carbonatogenesis and the amounts of solid carbonates production by bacteria are potentially very high as compared to autotrophic or chemical sedimentation from marine, paralic or continental waters. Furthermore, the bacterial processes are environmentally very ubiquitous; they just require organic matter enrichment. Thus, apart from purely evaporite and autotrophic ones, all Ca and/or Mg carbonates must be considered as from heterotrophic bacterial origin. By the way, the carbon of carbonates comes from primary organic matter. Such considerations ask questions about some interpretations from isotopic data on carbonates. Finally, bacterial heterotrophic carbonatogenesis appears as a fundamental phase in the relationships between atmosphere and lithosphere and in the geo-biological evolution of Earth. (author)

  20. Serine/threonine/tyrosine phosphorylation regulates DNA binding of bacterial transcriptional regulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalantari, Aida; Derouiche, Abderahmane; Shi, Lei; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of bacterial transcriptional regulators (TRs) belonging to the family of two-component systems (TCSs) is a well-established mechanism for regulating gene expression. Recent evidence points to the fact that reversible phosphorylation of bacterial TRs on other types of....... Here, we present an overview of different classes of bacterial TR phosphorylated and regulated by serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases. Particular attention is given to examples when serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases interact with TCSs, phosphorylating either the histidine kinases or the response...... regulators. We argue that these promiscuous kinases connect several signal transduction pathways and serve the role of signal integration....

  1. Expression and functional analysis of genes encoding cytokinin receptor-like histidine kinase in maize (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Yanhong; Guo, Baojian; Kabir, Muhammad Rezaul; Yao, Yingyin; Peng, Huiru; Xie, Chaojie; Zhang, Yirong; Sun, Qixin; Ni, Zhongfu

    2014-08-01

    Cytokinin signaling is vital for plant growth and development which function via the two-component system (TCS). As one of the key component of TCS, transmembrane histidine kinases (HK) are encoded by a small gene family in plants. In this study, we focused on expression and functional analysis of cytokinin receptor-like HK genes (ZmHK) in maize. Firstly, bioinformatics analysis revealed that seven cloned ZmHK genes have different expression patterns during maize development. Secondly, ectopic expression by CaMV35S promoter in Arabidopsis further revealed that functional differentiation exists among these seven members. Among them, the ZmHK1a2-OX transgenic line has the lowest germination rate in the dark, ZmHK1-OX and ZmHK2a2-OX can delay leaf senescence, and seed size of ZmHK1-OX, ZmHK1a2-OX, ZmHK2-OX, ZmHK3b-OX and ZmHK2a2-OX was obviously reduced as compared to wild type. Additionally, ZmHK genes play opposite roles in shoot and root development; all ZmHK-OX transgenic lines display obvious shorter root length and reduced number of lateral roots, but enhanced shoot development compared with the wild type. Most notably, Arabidopsis response regulator ARR5 gene was up-regulated in ZmHK1-OX, ZmHK1a2-OX, ZmHK2-OX, ZmHK3b-OX and ZmHK2a2-OX as compared to wild type. Although the causal link between ZmHK genes and cytokinin signaling pathway is still an area to be further elucidated, these findings reflected that the diversification of ZmHK genes expression patterns and functions occurred in the course of maize evolution, indicating that some ZmHK genes might play different roles during maize development. PMID:24585212

  2. Neuroprotective actions of a histidine analogue in models of ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Sung-Chun; Arumugam, Thiruma V; Cutler, Roy G; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Magnus, Tim; Chan, Sic L; Mughal, Mohamed R; Telljohann, Richard S; Nassar, Matthew; Ouyang, Xin; Calderan, Andrea; Ruzza, Paolo; Guiotto, Andrea; Mattson, Mark P

    2007-05-01

    Histidine is a naturally occurring amino acid with antioxidant properties, which is present in low amounts in tissues throughout the body. We recently synthesized and characterized histidine analogues related to the natural dipeptide carnosine, which selectively scavenge the toxic lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE). We now report that the histidine analogue histidyl hydrazide is effective in reducing brain damage and improving functional outcome in a mouse model of focal ischemic stroke when administered intravenously at a dose of 20 mg/kg, either 30 min before or 60 min and 3 h after the onset of middle cerebral artery occlusion. The histidine analogue also protected cultured rat primary neurons against death induced by HNE, chemical hypoxia, glucose deprivation, and combined oxygen and glucose deprivation. The histidine analogue prevented neuronal apoptosis as indicated by decreased production of cleaved caspase-3 protein. These findings suggest a therapeutic potential for HNE-scavenging histidine analogues in the treatment of stroke and related neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:17254011

  3. Histidine kinase activity in nuclei of Physarum polycephalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclei of the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum, contain a kinase that specifically phosphorylates the 1-nitrogen of histidine-75 of histone H4, in vitro. Phosphohistidine is alkali stable and acid labile. Similar alkali stable phosphorylation has been observed with beef heart extracts and S-100 extracts from S. cerevisiae. The activity may be similar to that previously reported by R.A. Smith and his colleagues in several mammalian tissues. They have begun a search for nuclear proteins that contain phosphohistidine. Cultures of Physarum were grown in the presence of 32P-phosphate using several different labeling protocols. Labeled nuclear proteins were fractionated on a Superose-12 column. Alkali stable phosphate label eluted close to the position of histone H1, although it was not on H1 itself. No alkali stable phosphate eluted at the position of histone H4, which was obtained in high yield by this procedure. The absence of alkali-stable phosphorylation of histone H4 was confirmed by gel electrophoresis of the crude nuclear proteins. The fraction containing alkali-stable phosphate was shown to contain phosphohistidine by amino acid analysis of a total alkaline hydrolysate. They conclude that Physarum nuclei possess at least one protein that contains phosphohistidine in vivo and that histone H4 does not contain phosphohistidine in this system

  4. Reaction of superoxide radicals with copper(II)-histidine complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the catalytic effect of Cu(II)-histidine complexes upon the disproportionation of superoxide radicals shows that only one complex, (CuHist2H)3+, of six which are known to exist catalyzes the disproportionation in the pH range between 1 and 10. The corresponding second-order rate constant, k79 = (3.4 +- 0.9) 108 M-1 s-1, is pH independent between 2 and 7. The kinetic results are interpreted by two alternative mechanisms. One is similar to the currently accepted mechanism for superoxide dismutase catalysis; the other is based on the assumption that a transient superoxide complex of (CuHist2H)3+ for superoxide dismutase catalysis; the other is based on the assumption that a transient superoxide complex of (CuHist2H)3+ is formed. The latter assumption is discussed in terms of present knowledge of the structural properties of the copper complexes. 4 figures, 1 table

  5. ADSORPTION CHARACTERISTICS OF L-HISTIDINE ON ACTIVE CARBON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Adsorption properties of L-histidine on active carbon were studied in the paper, which are affected by the main parameters, such as the quantity percent of active carbon, pH value of the solution, the time of adsorption equilibrium and adsorption temperature. The results indicate that adsorption equilibrium time of L-his on active carbon is about 80 minutes. With the increasing of the quantity percent of active carbon, the adsorbance of L-his decreases sharply, and increases lighter after that. When the quantity percent of active carbon is 10%, the adsorbance reaches the minimum.pH value of solution and extraction temperature have great affection on the adsorption. When the pH value is higher or lower than the pI of L-his, the adsorbance is small, even zero. It is proven that the experimental equilibrium data which are obtained under the conditions of 80 ℃and pH=1.0, are fitted with the Freundlich equation: q=2.5914c0.8097. The results can provide certain references in L-his adsorption process of industrial operation.

  6. Modulation of brain opioid receptors by zinc and histidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of zinc and several trace elements was studied on the binding of the opioid receptor antagonist [3H]-naloxone and the agonists [3H]-DAGO, [3H]-DSTLE, and [3H]-EKC, specific for the mu, delta and kappa receptors, respectively, in several areas of the rat brain. Physiological concentrations of zinc were inhibitory to the binding of naloxone, DAGO, and EKC, whereas delta receptors were insensitive to this inhibition. Copper, cadmium, and mercury also inhibited the binding of all the ligands studied to their receptors. Histidine was most effective in preventing the inhibitory effects of zinc and copper, whereas it was less effective on cadmium, and without any effect on the inhibit was less effective on cadmium, and without any effect on the inhibition caused by mercury. Its metabolites histamine and imidazoleacetic acid, and also citrate were ineffective. Magnesium and manganese were stimulatory to opioid receptor binding, whereas cobalt and nickel had dual effects. Concentrations of zinc less that its IC50 totally prevented the stimulatory effects of magnesium and manganese on the mu and delta receptors on which zinc alone had no effects. The reducing reagents dithiothreitol and B-mercaptoethanol partially protected against zinc inhibition, and the oxidizing reagent dithiobisnitrobenzoic acid even potentiated the inhibitory effects of zinc on DSTLE and DAGO binding, although to different extents

  7. Modulation of brain opioid receptors by zinc and histidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanissian, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of zinc and several trace elements was studied on the binding of the opioid receptor antagonist ({sup 3}H)-naloxone and the agonists ({sup 3}H)-DAGO, ({sup 3}H)-DSTLE, and ({sup 3}H)-EKC, specific for the mu, delta and kappa receptors, respectively, in several areas of the rat brain. Physiological concentrations of zinc were inhibitory to the binding of naloxone, DAGO, and EKC, whereas delta receptors were insensitive to this inhibition. Copper, cadmium, and mercury also inhibited the binding of all the ligands studied to their receptors. Histidine was most effective in preventing the inhibitory effects of zinc and copper, whereas it was less effective on cadmium, and without any effect on the inhibit was less effective on cadmium, and without any effect on the inhibition caused by mercury. Its metabolites histamine and imidazoleacetic acid, and also citrate were ineffective. Magnesium and manganese were stimulatory to opioid receptor binding, whereas cobalt and nickel had dual effects. Concentrations of zinc less that its IC{sub 50} totally prevented the stimulatory effects of magnesium and manganese on the mu and delta receptors on which zinc alone had no effects. The reducing reagents dithiothreitol and B-mercaptoethanol partially protected against zinc inhibition, and the oxidizing reagent dithiobisnitrobenzoic acid even potentiated the inhibitory effects of zinc on DSTLE and DAGO binding, although to different extents.

  8. Localization of histidine decarboxylase mRNA in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, D A; Wang, Y M; Zahnow, C A; Joseph, D R; Millhorn, D E

    1990-08-01

    The recent cloning of a cDNA encoding fetal rat liver histidine decarboxylase (HDC), the synthesizing enzyme for histamine, allows the study of the central histaminergic system at the molecular level. To this end, Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses were used to determine the regional and cellular distribution of neurons which express HDC mRNA in rat brain. Three hybridizing species which migrate as 1.6-, 2.6-, and 3.5-kb RNA were identified with Northern blots. The major (2.6 kb) and minor (3.5 kb) species, characteristic of HDC mRNA in fetal liver, were expressed at high levels in diencephalon and at just detectable levels in hippocampus, but not in other brain regions. In contrast, the 1.6-kb species was present in all brain regions examined except the olfactory bulb. Cells which contain HDC mRNA were found by in situ hybridization in the hypothalamus; HDC mRNA-containing cells were not detected in other areas, including the hippocampus. Hypothalamic neurons which express HDC mRNA were localized to all aspects of the tuberomammillary nucleus, a result consistent with previous immunohistochemical findings. PMID:19912749

  9. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    parameters, which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to...... tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion is...... the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental...

  10. Bacterial lipases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    1994-01-01

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation, mea

  11. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial ecology is concerned with the interactions between bacteria and their biological and nonbiological environments and with the role of bacteria in biogeochemical element cycling. Many fundamental properties of bacteria are consequences of their small size. Thus, they can efficiently exploit...

  12. Monitoring the Hydrolysis of p-Nitrophenyl Acetate Catalyzed by Seryl-histidine with Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN,Jing(陈晶); ZHANG,Yun(张韵); CAO,Xiao-Yu(曹晓宇); WANG,Jin(王津); CHEN,Yi(陈益); ZHAO,Yu-Fen(赵玉芬)

    2002-01-01

    The hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl acetate (p-NPA) catalyzed by seryl- histidine or histidine has been monitored by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in the presence of the internal calibration, 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid ammonium salt (ANS). The half-life of p-NPA in the presence of 10 mmol.L-1 seryl- histidine or histidine at25 ℃ was 370 min and70 min respectively. With the occurrence of acetyl seryl- histidine and acetyl histidine in the reaction, and the fact that p-NPA was stable in the presence of 10 mmol. L- 1 serine, an imidazolysis mechanism has been proposed, which is in accordance with the reported work.

  13. Monitoring the Hydrolysis of p—Nitrophenyl Acetate Catalyzed by Seryl—histidine with Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈益; 赵玉芬; 陈晶; 张韵; 曹晓宇; 王津

    2002-01-01

    The hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl acetate(p-NPA)catalyzed by seryl-histidine or histidine has been monitored by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in the presence of the internal calibration,8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid ammonium salt (ANS).The half-life of p-NPA in the presence of 10 mmol·L-1 seryl-histidine or histidine at 25℃ was 370min and 70min respectively.With the occurrence of acetyl seryl-histidine and acetyl histidine in the reaction,and the fact that p-NPA was stable in the presence of 10mmol·L-1 serine,an imidazolysis mechanism has been proposed,Which is in accordance with the reported work.

  14. N-H···N Hydrogen Bonds Involving Histidine Imidazole Nitrogen Atoms: A New Structural Role for Histidine Residues in Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Deepak, R N V; Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2016-07-12

    The amino acid histidine can play a significant role in the structure and function of proteins. Its various functions include enzyme catalysis, metal binding activity, and involvement in cation-π, π-π, salt-bridge, and other types of noncovalent interactions. Although histidine's imidazole nitrogens (Nδ and Nε) are known to participate in hydrogen bond (HB) interactions as an acceptor or a donor, a systematic study of N-H···N HBs with the Nδ/Nε atom as the acceptor has not been conducted. In this study, we have examined two data sets of ultra-high-resolution (data set I) and very high-resolution (data set II) protein structures and identified 28 and 4017 examples of HBs of the N-H···Nδ/Nε type from both data sets involving histidine imidazole nitrogen as the acceptor. In nearly 70% of them, the main-chain N-H bond is the HB donor, and a majority of the examples are from the N-H group separated by two residues (Ni+2-Hi+2) from histidine. Quantum chemical calculations using model compounds were performed with imidazole and N-methylacetamide, and they assumed conformations from 19 examples from data set I with N-H···Nδ/Nε HBs. Basis set superposition error-corrected interaction energies varied from -5.0 to -6.78 kcal/mol. We also found that the imidazole nitrogen of 9% of histidine residues forming N-H···Nδ/Nε interactions in data set II participate in bifurcated HBs. Natural bond orbital analyses of model compounds indicate that the strength of each HB is mutually influenced by the other. Histidine residues involved in Ni+2-Hi+2···Nδi/Nεi HBs are frequently observed in a specific N-terminal capping position giving rise to a novel helix-capping motif. Along with their predominant occurrence in loop segments, we propose a new structural role for histidines in protein structures. PMID:27305350

  15. Infrared Spectroscopy of Hydrogen-Bonded Clusters of Protonated Histidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Makoto; Kasahara, Yasutoshi; Ishikawa, Haruki

    2015-06-01

    Histidine(His), one of the essential amino acids, is involved in active sites in many enzyme proteins, and known to play fundamental roles in human body. Thus, to gain detailed information about intermolecular interactions of His as well as its structure is very important. In the present study, we have recorded IR spectra of hydrogen-bonded clusters of protonated His (HisH^+) in the gas phase to discuss the relation between the molecular structure and intermolecular interaction of HisH^+. Clusters of HisH^+-(MeOH)_n (n = 1, 2) were generated by an electrospray ionization of the MeOH solution of L-His hydrochloride monohydrate. IR photodissociation spectra of HisH^+-(MeOH)1,2 were recorded. By comparing with the results of the DFT calculations, we determined the structures of these clusters. In the case of n = 1 cluster, MeOH is bonded to the imidazole ring as a proton acceptor. The most of vibrational bands observed were well explained by this isomer. However, a free NH stretch band of the imidazole ring was also observed in the spectrum. This indicates an existence of an isomer in which MeOH is bounded to the carboxyl group of HisH^+. Furthermore, it is found that a protonated position of His is influenced by a hydrogen bonding position of MeOH. In the case of n = 2 cluster, one MeOH molecule is bonded to the amino group, while the other MeOH molecule is separately bonded to the carboxyl group in the most stable isomer. However, there is a possibility that other conformers also exist in our experimental condition. The details of the experimental and theoretical results will be presented in the paper.

  16. Rigidity of transmembrane proteins determines their cluster shape

    CERN Document Server

    Jafarinia, Hamidreza; Jalali, Mir Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation in cell membrane is vital for majority of biological functions. Recent experimental results suggest that transmembrane domains of proteins such as $\\alpha$-helices and $\\beta$-sheets have different structural rigidity. We use molecular dynamics simulation of a coarse-grained model of protein-embedded lipid membranes to investigate the mechanisms of protein clustering. For a variety of protein concentrations, our simulations in thermal equilibrium conditions reveal that the structural rigidity of transmembrane domains dramatically affects interactions and changes the shape of the cluster. We have observed stable large aggregates even in the absence of hydrophobic mismatch which has been previously proposed as the mechanism of protein aggregation. According to our results, semi-flexible proteins aggregate to form two-dimensional clusters while rigid proteins, by contrast, form one-dimensional string-like structures. By assuming two probable scenarios for the formation of a two-dimensional tr...

  17. Functional Role of Histidine in the Conserved His-x-Asp Motif in the Catalytic Core of Protein Kinases

    OpenAIRE

    Lun Zhang; Jian-Chuan Wang; Li Hou; Peng-Rong Cao; Li Wu; Qian-Sen Zhang; Huai-Yu Yang; Yi Zang; Jian-Ping Ding; Jia Li

    2015-01-01

    The His-x-Asp (HxD) motif is one of the most conserved structural components of the catalytic core of protein kinases; however, the functional role of the conserved histidine is unclear. Here we report that replacement of the HxD-histidine with Arginine or Phenylalanine in Aurora A abolishes both the catalytic activity and auto-phosphorylation, whereas the Histidine-to-tyrosine impairs the catalytic activity without affecting its auto-phosphorylation. Comparisons of the crystal structures of ...

  18. D-histidine utilization in Salmonella typhimurium is controlled by the leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp).

    OpenAIRE

    Hecht, K; Zhang, S.; Klopotowski, T; Ames, G F

    1996-01-01

    A new class of D-histidine-utilizing mutants which carry mutations in the gene encoding the leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) has been identified in Salmonella typhimurium. The lrp mutations arise as suppressors of mutations in the genes encoding the histidine permease which drastically decrease the level of histidine transport activity. However, the suppressor effect is not exerted by elevating the level of the permease. Rather, the properties of the suppressor mutants are consiste...

  19. Mechanics of torque generation in the bacterial flagellar motor

    CERN Document Server

    Mandadapu, Kranthi K; Berry, Richard M; Oster, George

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) is responsible for driving bacterial locomotion and chemotaxis, fundamental processes in pathogenesis and biofilm formation. In the BFM, torque is generated at the interface between transmembrane proteins (stators) and a rotor. It is well-established that the passage of ions down a transmembrane gradient through the stator complex provides the energy needed for torque generation. However, the physics involved in this energy conversion remain poorly understood. Here we propose a mechanically specific model for torque generation in the BFM. In particular, we identify two fundamental forces involved in torque generation: electrostatic and steric. We propose that electrostatic forces serve to position the stator, while steric forces comprise the actual 'power stroke'. Specifically, we predict that ion-induced conformational changes about a proline 'hinge' residue in an $\\alpha$-helix of the stator are directly responsible for generating the power stroke. Our model predictions f...

  20. Teaching old receptors new tricks: biasing seven-transmembrane receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Rajagopal, Sudarshan; Rajagopal, Keshava; Lefkowitz, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs; also known as G protein-coupled receptors) are the largest class of receptors in the human genome and are common targets for therapeutics. Originally identified as mediators of 7TMR desensitization, β-arrestins (arrestin 2 and arrestin 3) are now recognized as true adaptor proteins that transduce signals to multiple effector pathways. Signalling that is mediated by β-arrestins has distinct biochemical and functional consequences from those mediated by G p...

  1. Detecting pore-lining regions in transmembrane protein sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nugent Timothy

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha-helical transmembrane channel and transporter proteins play vital roles in a diverse range of essential biological processes and are crucial in facilitating the passage of ions and molecules across the lipid bilayer. However, the experimental difficulties associated with obtaining high quality crystals has led to their significant under-representation in structural databases. Computational methods that can identify structural features from sequence alone are therefore of high importance. Results We present a method capable of automatically identifying pore-lining regions in transmembrane proteins from sequence information alone, which can then be used to determine the pore stoichiometry. By labelling pore-lining residues in crystal structures using geometric criteria, we have trained a support vector machine classifier to predict the likelihood of a transmembrane helix being involved in pore formation. Results from testing this approach under stringent cross-validation indicate that prediction accuracy of 72% is possible, while a support vector regression model is able to predict the number of subunits participating in the pore with 62% accuracy. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first tool capable of identifying pore-lining regions in proteins and we present the results of applying it to a data set of sequences with available crystal structures. Our method provides a way to characterise pores in transmembrane proteins and may even provide a starting point for discovering novel routes of therapeutic intervention in a number of important diseases. This software is freely available as source code from: http://bioinf.cs.ucl.ac.uk/downloads/memsat-svm/.

  2. A transmembrane inner nuclear membrane protein in the mitotic spindle

    OpenAIRE

    Figueroa, Ricardo; Gudise, Santhosh; Larsson, Veronica; Hallberg, Einar

    2010-01-01

    We have recently characterized a novel transmembrane protein of the inner nuclear membrane of mammalian cells. The protein has two very interesting features. First, despite being an integral membrane protein it is able to concentrate in the membranes colocalizing with the mitotic spindle in metaphase and anaphase. Hence, the protein was named Samp1, Spindle associated membrane protein 1. Secondly, it displays a functional connection to centrosomes. This article discusses various aspects of Sa...

  3. Surfactantlipid biosynthesis: Regulation of transmembrane transport of palmitate

    OpenAIRE

    Guthmann, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Considering the mechanisms by which antenatal maturation of lung can be induced, the role of long chain fatty acids as precursors of surfactant lipid synthesis has not been thoroughly investigated. To specifically increase surfactant synthesis during the fetal and/or neonatal period we studied the regulation of de novo phosphatidyl synthesis in type II pneumocytes. First, we characterised the transmembrane transport of palmitate, a long chain fatty acid prevalent in surfactant lipids, with...

  4. Transmembrane Helix Assembly by Max-Min Ant System Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujaree, Kanon; Kitjaruwankul, Sunan; Boonamnaj, Panisak; Supunyabut, Chirayut; Sompornpisut, Pornthep

    2015-12-01

    Because of the rapid progress in biochemical and structural studies of membrane proteins, considerable attention has been given on developing efficient computational methods for solving low-to-medium resolution structures using sparse structural data. In this study, we demonstrate a novel algorithm, max-min ant system (MMAS), designed to find an assembly of α-helical transmembrane proteins using a rigid helix arrangement guided by distance constraints. The new algorithm generates a large variety with finite number of orientations of transmembrane helix bundle and finds the solution that is matched with the provided distance constraints based on the behavior of ants to search for the shortest possible path between their nest and the food source. To demonstrate the efficiency of the novel search algorithm, MMAS is applied to determine the transmembrane packing of KcsA and MscL ion channels from a limited distance information extracted from the crystal structures, and the packing of KvAP voltage sensor domain using a set of 10 experimentally determined constraints, and the results are compared with those of two popular used stochastic methods, simulated annealing Monte Carlo method and genetic algorithm. PMID:26058409

  5. Channel-Forming Bacterial Toxins in Biosensing and Macromolecule Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Gurnev, Philip A.; Nestorovich, Ekaterina M

    2014-01-01

    To intoxicate cells, pore-forming bacterial toxins are evolved to allow for the transmembrane traffic of different substrates, ranging from small inorganic ions to cell-specific polypeptides. Recent developments in single-channel electrical recordings, X-ray crystallography, protein engineering, and computational methods have generated a large body of knowledge about the basic principles of channel-mediated molecular transport. These discoveries provide a robust framework for expansion of t...

  6. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Herrero, Daniel; Andreu Domingo, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the main cause of vaginal dysbacteriosis in the women during the reproductive age. It is an entity in which many studies have focused for years and which is still open for discussion topics. This is due to the diversity of microorganisms that cause it and therefore, its difficult treatment. Bacterial vaginosis is probably the result of vaginal colonization by complex bacterial communities, many of them non-cultivable and with interdependent metabolism where anaerobic populations most likely play an important role in its pathogenesis. The main symptoms are an increase of vaginal discharge and the unpleasant smell of it. It can lead to serious consequences for women, such as an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus and upper genital tract and pregnancy complications. Gram stain is the gold standard for microbiological diagnosis of BV, but can also be diagnosed using the Amsel clinical criteria. It should not be considered a sexually transmitted disease but it is highly related to sex. Recurrence is the main problem of medical treatment. Apart from BV, there are other dysbacteriosis less characterized like aerobic vaginitis of which further studies are coming slowly but are achieving more attention and consensus among specialists. PMID:27474242

  7. Histidine phosphorylation relieves copper inhibition in the mammalian potassium channel KCa3.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shekhar; Panda, Saswati; Li, Zhai; Fuhs, Stephen R; Hunter, Tony; Thiele, Dennis J; Hubbard, Stevan R; Skolnik, Edward Y

    2016-01-01

    KCa2.1, KCa2.2, KCa2.3 and KCa3.1 constitute a family of mammalian small- to intermediate-conductance potassium channels that are activated by calcium-calmodulin. KCa3.1 is unique among these four channels in that activation requires, in addition to calcium, phosphorylation of a single histidine residue (His358) in the cytoplasmic region, by nucleoside diphosphate kinase-B (NDPK-B). The mechanism by which KCa3.1 is activated by histidine phosphorylation is unknown. Histidine phosphorylation is well characterized in prokaryotes but poorly understood in eukaryotes. Here, we demonstrate that phosphorylation of His358 activates KCa3.1 by antagonizing copper-mediated inhibition of the channel. Furthermore, we show that activated CD4(+) T cells deficient in intracellular copper exhibit increased KCa3.1 histidine phosphorylation and channel activity, leading to increased calcium flux and cytokine production. These findings reveal a novel regulatory mechanism for a mammalian potassium channel and for T-cell activation, and highlight a unique feature of histidine versus serine/threonine and tyrosine as a regulatory phosphorylation site. PMID:27542194

  8. Histidine side-chain dynamics and protonation monitored by 13C CPMG NMR relaxation dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of 13C NMR relaxation dispersion experiments to monitor micro-millisecond fluctuations in the protonation states of histidine residues in proteins is investigated. To illustrate the approach, measurements on three specifically 13C labeled histidine residues in plastocyanin (PCu) from Anabaena variabilis (A.v.) are presented. Significant Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion is observed for 13Cε1 nuclei in the histidine imidazole rings of A.v. PCu. The chemical shift changes obtained from the CPMG dispersion data are in good agreement with those obtained from the chemical shift titration experiments, and the CPMG derived exchange rates agree with those obtained previously from 15N backbone relaxation measurements. Compared to measurements of backbone nuclei, 13Cε1 dispersion provides a more direct method to monitor interchanging protonation states or other kinds of conformational changes of histidine side chains or their environment. Advantages and shortcomings of using the 13Cε1 dispersion experiments in combination with chemical shift titration experiments to obtain information on exchange dynamics of the histidine side chains are discussed

  9. Reduction of Cu(II) complexes of histidine and histidyl peptides. A pulse radiolysis study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reduction mechanism of Cu(II) complexes of histidine and histidyl peptides was investigated using the pulse radiolysis method. The hydrated electron, used as a reducing agent, was found to react with the complexes by a bimolecular process. In the Cu(II)-histidine and Cu(II)-glycyl-histidine complexes at pH 11, the reaction with the e/sub aq//sup -/ is direct with the Cu(II) ion and no secondary reactions were found to occur up to 5 msec after the pulse. In the Cu(II)-glycyl-histidine complex at pH 6.5 and Cu(II)-β-alanyl-histidine at pH 7.5, the decay of the electron was followed by the appearance of a transient absorption band centered at 360 nm. This band is assigned to the adduct of an electron in the imidazole ring of the histidyl peptides. The radical ion is formed by the direct reaction of the e/sub aq//sup -/ with the liganded histidyl residue. The Im decays via a first order process at the same rate at which the Cu(II) ion is reduced. CO2- reduces all the complexes studied via a bimolecular reaction. It is suggested that this is a direct reaction of the CO2-with the metal ion. An attempt to correlate these reaction steps to the reactivity of the reductants and to the structure of the complexes is made

  10. Conformationally Constrained Histidines in the Design of Peptidomimetics: Strategies for the χ-Space Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Mollica

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A successful design of peptidomimetics must come to terms with χ-space control. The incorporation of χ-space constrained amino acids into bioactive peptides renders the χ1 and χ2 torsional angles of pharmacophore amino acids critical for activity and selectivity as with other relevant structural features of the template. This review describes histidine analogues characterized by replacement of native α and/or β-hydrogen atoms with alkyl substituents as well as analogues with α, β-didehydro unsaturation or Cα-Cβ cyclopropane insertion (ACC derivatives. Attention is also dedicated to the relevant field of β-aminoacid chemistry by describing the synthesis of β2- and β3-models (β-hHis. Structural modifications leading to cyclic imino derivatives such as spinacine, aza-histidine and analogues with shortening or elongation of the native side chain (nor-histidine and homo-histidine, respectively are also described. Examples of the use of the described analogues to replace native histidine in bioactive peptides are also given.

  11. Histidine side-chain dynamics and protonation monitored by {sup 13}C CPMG NMR relaxation dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hass, Mathias A. S. [Leiden University, Institute of Chemistry (Netherlands); Yilmaz, Ali [University of Copenhagen, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Denmark); Christensen, Hans E. M. [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Chemistry (Denmark); Led, Jens J. [University of Copenhagen, Department of Chemistry (Denmark)], E-mail: led@kiku.dk

    2009-08-15

    The use of {sup 13}C NMR relaxation dispersion experiments to monitor micro-millisecond fluctuations in the protonation states of histidine residues in proteins is investigated. To illustrate the approach, measurements on three specifically {sup 13}C labeled histidine residues in plastocyanin (PCu) from Anabaena variabilis (A.v.) are presented. Significant Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion is observed for {sup 13}C{sup {epsilon}}{sup 1} nuclei in the histidine imidazole rings of A.v. PCu. The chemical shift changes obtained from the CPMG dispersion data are in good agreement with those obtained from the chemical shift titration experiments, and the CPMG derived exchange rates agree with those obtained previously from {sup 15}N backbone relaxation measurements. Compared to measurements of backbone nuclei, {sup 13}C{sup {epsilon}}{sup 1} dispersion provides a more direct method to monitor interchanging protonation states or other kinds of conformational changes of histidine side chains or their environment. Advantages and shortcomings of using the {sup 13}C{sup {epsilon}}{sup 1} dispersion experiments in combination with chemical shift titration experiments to obtain information on exchange dynamics of the histidine side chains are discussed.

  12. Ypq3p-dependent histidine uptake by the vacuolar membrane vesicles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, Kunio; Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Ikeda, Koichi; Sekito, Takayuki; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2016-06-01

    The vacuolar membrane proteins Ypq1p, Ypq2p, and Ypq3p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are known as the members of the PQ-loop protein family. We found that the ATP-dependent uptake activities of arginine and histidine by the vacuolar membrane vesicles were decreased by ypq2Δ and ypq3Δ mutations, respectively. YPQ1 and AVT1, which are involved in the vacuolar uptake of lysine/arginine and histidine, respectively, were deleted in addition to ypq2Δ and ypq3Δ. The vacuolar membrane vesicles isolated from the resulting quadruple deletion mutant ypq1Δypq2Δypq3Δavt1Δ completely lost the uptake activity of basic amino acids, and that of histidine, but not lysine and arginine, was evidently enhanced by overexpressing YPQ3 in the mutant. These results suggest that Ypq3p is specifically involved in the vacuolar uptake of histidine in S. cerevisiae. The cellular level of Ypq3p-HA(3) was enhanced by depletion of histidine from culture medium, suggesting that it is regulated by the substrate. PMID:26928127

  13. Pulmonary bacterial pathogens in cystic fibrosis patients and antibiotic therapy: a tool for the health workers

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common and best known genetic disease involving a defect in transepithelial Cl- transport by mutations in the CF gene on chromosome 7, which codes for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR). The most serious symptoms are observed in the lungs, augmenting the risk of bacterial infection. The objective of this review was to describe the bacterial pathogens colonizing patients with cystic fibrosis. A systematic search was conducted usin...

  14. Bacterial expression of human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase: solubility, activity, purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, K; Mole, D J; Binnie, M; Homer, N Z M; Zheng, X; Yard, B A; Iredale, J P; Auer, M; Webster, S P

    2014-03-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is an enzyme central to the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism. KMO has been implicated as a therapeutic target in several disease states, including Huntington's disease. Recombinant human KMO protein production is challenging due to the presence of transmembrane domains, which localise KMO to the outer mitochondrial membrane and render KMO insoluble in many in vitro expression systems. Efficient bacterial expression of human KMO would accelerate drug development of KMO inhibitors but until now this has not been achieved. Here we report the first successful bacterial (Escherichia coli) expression of active FLAG™-tagged human KMO enzyme expressed in the soluble fraction and progress towards its purification. PMID:24316190

  15. High constitutive activity of a virus-encoded seven transmembrane receptor in the absence of the conserved DRY motif (Asp-Arg-Tyr) in transmembrane helix 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M; Kledal, Thomas N; Schwartz, Thue W

    2005-01-01

    The highly conserved Arg in the so-called DRY motif (Asp-Arg-Tyr) at the intracellular end of transmembrane helix 3 is in general considered as an essential residue for G protein coupling in rhodopsin-like seven transmembrane (7TM) receptors. In the open reading frame 74 (ORF74) receptor encoded by...

  16. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of human histidine decarboxylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human histidine decarboxylase was crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Diffraction data were collected to 1.8 Å resolution. The core domain of a human histidine decarboxylase mutant was purified and cocrystallized with the inhibitor l-histidine methyl ester. Using synchrotron radiation, a data set was collected from a single crystal at 100 K to 1.8 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 215.16, b = 112.72, c = 171.39 Å, β = 110.3°. Molecular replacement was carried out using the structure of aromatic l-amino-acid decarboxylase as a search model. The crystal contained three dimers per asymmetric unit, with a Matthews coefficient (VM) of 3.01 Å3 Da−1 and an estimated solvent content of 59.1%

  17. Thermodynamics of the formation of copper(II) complexes with L-histidine in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorboletova, G. G.; Metlin, A. A.

    2015-02-01

    The heat effects from the reaction between L-histidine solutions and Cu(NO3)2 solutions at 298.15 K in the 0.2 to 1.0 (KNO3) range of ionic strength are measured by means of direct calorimetry. The experimental data is treated with allowance for the simultaneous proceeding of several processes. The heat effects of the formation of complexes Cu(His)+, Cu(His)2, CuHHis2+, CuH(His){2/+} and CuH2(His){2/2+} are calculated from calorimetric measurements. The standard enthalpies of formation for complexes of L-histidine with Cu2+ ions are obtained via extrapolation to zero ionic strength. The relationship between the thermodynamic characteristics of the formation of complexes of copper(II) with L-histidine and their structure is determined.

  18. Standard enthalpies of formation of solid complexes of RE nitrates with histidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combustion energies have been determined for fifteen solid complexes of rare-earth nitrate with histidine.The standard enthalpies of combustion, Δc,coorHθ, and standard enthalpies of formation, Δf,coorHθ, have been calculated for these complexes. The relationship of Δf,coorHθ with the atomic numbers of the elements in the lanthanide series has been examined. The results show that a certain amount of covalence is present in the chemical bond between the rare-earth cations and histidine. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  19. Neighbor-directed histidine N(τ) alkylation. A route to imidazolium-containing phosphopeptide macrocycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Wen-Jian [National Cancer Inst., Frederick, MD (United States); Park, Jung-Eun [National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States); Grant, Robert [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Lai, Christopher C. [National Cancer Inst., Frederick, MD (United States); Kelley, James A. [National Cancer Inst., Frederick, MD (United States); Yaffe, Michael B. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Lee, Kyung S. [National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States); Burke, Terrence R. [National Cancer Inst., Frederick, MD (United States)

    2015-07-07

    Our recently discovered, selective, on-resin route to N(τ)-alkylated imidazolium-containing histidine residues affords new strategies for peptide mimetic design. In this, we demonstrate the use of this chemistry to prepare a series of macrocyclic phosphopeptides, in which imidazolium groups serve as ring-forming junctions. These cationic moieties subsequently serve to charge-mask the phosphoamino acid group that directed their formation. Furthermore, neighbor-directed histidine N(τ)-alkylation opens the door to new families of phosphopeptidomimetics for use in a range of chemical biology contexts.

  20. Kinetics of histidine sorption and desorption on Fumasep® FTCM cation-exchange membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maigurova, N. I.; Eliseeva, T. V.; Lantsuzskaya, E. V.; Sholokhova, A. Yu.

    2015-05-01

    The sorption of the basic amino acid histidine by Fumasep® FTCM membranes in different ionic forms is investigated over a wide range of solution concentrations. It is established that sorption limited by the stage of external diffusion. The time required for equilibrium to be established in the membrane-amino acid solution system is found to grow from 4 to 9 h when the initial concentration of the solution is reduced. The reversibility of histidine sorption is demonstrated, and the conditions of effective desorption are determined.

  1. Association of Rare Loss-Of-Function Alleles in HAL, Serum Histidine: Levels and Incident Coronary Heart Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Yu (Bing); A.H. Li (Alexander H.); D. Muzny (Donna); N. Veeraraghavan (Narayanan); P.S. de Vries (Paul); J.C. Bis (Joshua); S. Musani (Solomon); D. Alexander (Danny); A.C. Morrison (Alanna); O.H. Franco (Oscar); A.G. Uitterlinden (Andre G.); A. Hofman (Albert); A. Dehghan (Abbas); J.G. Wilson (James); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); R. Gibbs (Richard); P. Wei (Peng); E. Boerwinkle (Eric)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground-Histidine is a semiessential amino acid with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Few data are available on the associations between genetic variants, histidine levels, and incident coronary heart disease (CHD) in a population-based sample. Methods and Results-By cond

  2. The histidine kinases CYTOKININ-INDEPENDENT1 and ARABIDOPSIS HISTIDINE KINASE2 and 3 regulate vascular tissue development in Arabidopsis shoots

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hejátko, J.; Ryu, H.; Kim, G.-T.; Dobešová, R.; Choi, S.; Choi, S.M.; Souček, Přemysl; Horák, J.; Pekárová, B.; Palme, K.; Brzobohatý, Břetislav; Hwang, I.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 7 (2009), s. 2008-2021. ISSN 1040-4651 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) LN00A081; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06034; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA600380507 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : cytokinin-independent1 * histidine kinase2 and 3 * Arabidopsis Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 9.293, year: 2009

  3. Ergothioneine, histidine, and two naturally occurring histidine dipeptides as radioprotectors against gamma-irradiation inactivation of bacteriophages T4 and P22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacteriophages P22, T4+, and T4os (osmotic shock-resistant mutant with altered capsids) were diluted in 0.85% NaCl and exposed to gamma irradiation (2.79 Gy/min) at room temperature (24 degrees C). T4+ was more sensitive to inactivation than was P22, and the T4os mutant was even more sensitive than T4+. Catalase exhibited a strong protective effect and superoxide dismutase a weaker protection, indicating that H2O2 or some product derived therefrom was predominant in causing inactivation of plaque formation. Low but significant (0.1-0.3 mM) reduced glutathione (GSH) enhanced phage inactivation, but a higher (1 mM) GSH concentration protected. A similar effect was found for the polyamine, spermidine. In contrast, 0.1 mM L-ergothioneine (2-thiol-L-histidine betaine) exhibited strong protection and 1 mM afforded essentially complete protection. L-Ergothioneine is present in millimolar concentrations in some fungi and is conserved up to millimolar concentrations in critical tissues when consumed by man. L-Histidine and two histidine-containing dipeptides, carnosine and anserine, protected at a concentration of 1 mM, a level at which they are present in striated muscles of various animals

  4. Ergothioneine, histidine, and two naturally occurring histidine dipeptides as radioprotectors against gamma-irradiation inactivation of bacteriophages T4 and P22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, P.E.; Hartman, Z.; Citardi, M.J.

    1988-05-01

    Bacteriophages P22, T4+, and T4os (osmotic shock-resistant mutant with altered capsids) were diluted in 0.85% NaCl and exposed to gamma irradiation (2.79 Gy/min) at room temperature (24 degrees C). T4+ was more sensitive to inactivation than was P22, and the T4os mutant was even more sensitive than T4+. Catalase exhibited a strong protective effect and superoxide dismutase a weaker protection, indicating that H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ or some product derived therefrom was predominant in causing inactivation of plaque formation. Low but significant (0.1-0.3 mM) reduced glutathione (GSH) enhanced phage inactivation, but a higher (1 mM) GSH concentration protected. A similar effect was found for the polyamine, spermidine. In contrast, 0.1 mM L-ergothioneine (2-thiol-L-histidine betaine) exhibited strong protection and 1 mM afforded essentially complete protection. L-Ergothioneine is present in millimolar concentrations in some fungi and is conserved up to millimolar concentrations in critical tissues when consumed by man. L-Histidine and two histidine-containing dipeptides, carnosine and anserine, protected at a concentration of 1 mM, a level at which they are present in striated muscles of various animals.

  5. Membrane-spanning domain of bovine foamy virus transmembrane protein having cytotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Yonggang; YU Hong; WANG Jinzhong; CHEN Qimin; GENG Yunqi

    2006-01-01

    Foamy viruses (FVs) have broad cellular tropism infecting vertebrates from fish to human being,which indicates that Env protein has a high capability for membrane fusion.Conservative features in all FV transmembrane (TM) proteins include a region of hydrophobic domain called membrane-spanning domain (MSD),which contains several stretches of hydrophobic amino acids.To investigate whether these features were associated with the cytotoxicity effect of TM on Escherichia coli,a series of mutants were constructed and expressed in the E.coli BL21 (DE3) using pET-32a (+) as expressing vector.The results showed that only TM3 without MSD was expressed in E.coli,whereas the other two containing full or part of the MSD (TM1 and TM2) could not be expressed.Furthermore,the bacterial amount and living bacteria analysis revealed that the cytotoxicity of TM was dependent on its MSD,especially on the stretches of hydrophobic amino acids.Western blotting analysis showed that TM3 protein was purified with affinity purification.

  6. Specific Resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection in Zebrafish Is Mediated by the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phennicie, Ryan T.; Sullivan, Matthew J.; Singer, John T.; Yoder, Jeffrey A.; Kim, Carol H.

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease caused by recessive mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene and is associated with prevalent and chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections. Despite numerous studies that have sought to elucidate the role of CFTR in the innate immune response, the links between CFTR, innate immunity, and P. aeruginosa infection remain unclear. The present work highlights the zebrafish as a powerful model organism for human infectious disease, particularly infection by P. aeruginosa. Zebrafish embryos with reduced expression of the cftr gene (Cftr morphants) exhibited reduced respiratory burst response and directed neutrophil migration, supporting a connection between cftr and the innate immune response. Cftr morphants were infected with P. aeruginosa or other bacterial species that are commonly associated with infections in CF patients, including Burkholderia cenocepacia, Haemophilus influenzae, and Staphylococcus aureus. Intriguingly, the bacterial burden of P. aeruginosa was found to be significantly higher in zebrafish Cftr morphants than in controls, but this phenomenon was not observed with the other bacterial species. Bacterial burden in Cftr morphants infected with a P. aeruginosa ΔLasR mutant, a quorum sensing-deficient strain, was comparable to that in control fish, indicating that the regulation of virulence factors through LasR is required for enhancement of infection in the absence of Cftr. The zebrafish system provides a multitude of advantages for studying the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa and for understanding the role that innate immune cells, such as neutrophils, play in the host response to acute bacterial infections commonly associated with cystic fibrosis. PMID:20732993

  7. Possible involvement of phospholipase A2 and cyclooxygenase in stimulatory action of L-histidine on protein synthesis in L6 myotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Yagasaki, Kazumi; Hatano, Naoko; Fujii, Motoki; Miura, Yutaka; Funabiki, Ryuhei

    2002-01-01

    Effects of L-histidine and related compounds on protein synthesiswere studied in cultured L6 myotubes. L-Histidine specifically stimulated protein synthesis, whereas D-histidine, histamine, L-arginine and L-lysine did not. Inhibitors of phospholipase A2, phospholipase C and cyclooxygenase intercepted the stimulatory action of L-histidine on protein synthesis, while inhibitors of protein kinase C and 5-lipoxygenase did not. These results suggest an involvement of phospholipase A2 and cyclooxyg...

  8. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator is an Epithelial Cell Receptor for Clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pier, Gerald B.; Grout, Martha; Zaidi, Tanweer S.

    1997-10-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride ion channel, but its relationship to the primary clinical manifestation of CF, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pulmonary infection, is unclear. We report that CFTR is a cellular receptor for binding, endocytosing, and clearing P. aeruginosa from the normal lung. Murine cells expressing recombinant human wild-type CFTR ingested 30-100 times as many P. aeruginosa as cells lacking CFTR or expressing mutant Δ F508 CFTR protein. Purified CFTR inhibited ingestion of P. aeruginosa by human airway epithelial cells. The first extracellular domain of CFTR specifically bound to P. aeruginosa and a synthetic peptide of this region inhibited P. aeruginosa internalization in vivo, leading to increased bacterial lung burdens. CFTR clears P. aeruginosa from the lung, indicating a direct connection between mutations in CFTR and the clinical consequences of CF.

  9. Rigidity of transmembrane proteins determines their cluster shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarinia, Hamidreza; Khoshnood, Atefeh; Jalali, Mir Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation in cell membrane is vital for the majority of biological functions. Recent experimental results suggest that transmembrane domains of proteins such as α -helices and β -sheets have different structural rigidities. We use molecular dynamics simulation of a coarse-grained model of protein-embedded lipid membranes to investigate the mechanisms of protein clustering. For a variety of protein concentrations, our simulations under thermal equilibrium conditions reveal that the structural rigidity of transmembrane domains dramatically affects interactions and changes the shape of the cluster. We have observed stable large aggregates even in the absence of hydrophobic mismatch, which has been previously proposed as the mechanism of protein aggregation. According to our results, semiflexible proteins aggregate to form two-dimensional clusters, while rigid proteins, by contrast, form one-dimensional string-like structures. By assuming two probable scenarios for the formation of a two-dimensional triangular structure, we calculate the lipid density around protein clusters and find that the difference in lipid distribution around rigid and semiflexible proteins determines the one- or two-dimensional nature of aggregates. It is found that lipids move faster around semiflexible proteins than rigid ones. The aggregation mechanism suggested in this paper can be tested by current state-of-the-art experimental facilities.

  10. Stability analysis of the inverse transmembrane potential problem in electrocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Martin; Mardal, Kent-André; Nielsen, Bjørn Fredrik

    2010-10-01

    In this paper we study some mathematical properties of an inverse problem arising in connection with electrocardiograms (ECGs). More specifically, we analyze the possibility for recovering the transmembrane potential in the heart from ECG recordings, a challenge currently investigated by a growing number of groups. Our approach is based on the bidomain model for the electrical activity in the myocardium, and leads to a parameter identification problem for elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs). It turns out that this challenge can be split into two subproblems: the task of recovering the potential at the heart surface from body surface recordings; the problem of computing the transmembrane potential inside the heart from the potential determined at the heart surface. Problem (1), which can be formulated as the Cauchy problem for an elliptic PDE, has been extensively studied and is well known to be severely ill-posed. The main purpose of this paper is to prove that problem (2) is stable and well posed if a suitable prior is available. Moreover, our theoretical findings are illuminated by a series of numerical experiments. Finally, we discuss some aspects of uniqueness related to the anisotropy in the heart.

  11. Retromer-Mediated Trafficking of Transmembrane Receptors and Transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stine C. Klinger

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Transport between the endoplasmatic reticulum, the Golgi-network, the endo-lysosomal system and the cell surface can be categorized as anterograde or retrograde, describing traffic that goes forward or backward, respectively. Traffic going from the plasma membrane to endosomes and lysosomes or the trans-Golgi network (TGN constitutes the major retrograde transport routes. Several transmembrane proteins undergo retrograde transport as part of a recycling mechanism that contributes to reutilization and maintenance of a steady-state protein localization. In addition, some receptors are hijacked by exotoxins and used for entry and intracellular transport. The physiological relevance of retrograde transport cannot be overstated. Retrograde trafficking of the amyloid precursor protein determines the distribution between organelles, and hence the possibility of cleavage by γ-secretase. Right balancing of the pathways is critical for protection against Alzheimer’s disease. During embryonic development, retrograde transport of Wntless to the TGN is essential for the following release of Wnt from the plasma membrane. Furthermore, overexpression of Wntless has been linked to oncogenesis. Here, we review relevant aspects of the retrograde trafficking of mammalian transmembrane receptors and transporters, with focus on the retromer-mediated transport between endosomes and the TGN.

  12. Retromer-Mediated Trafficking of Transmembrane Receptors and Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Stine C; Siupka, Piotr; Nielsen, Morten S

    2015-01-01

    Transport between the endoplasmatic reticulum, the Golgi-network, the endo-lysosomal system and the cell surface can be categorized as anterograde or retrograde, describing traffic that goes forward or backward, respectively. Traffic going from the plasma membrane to endosomes and lysosomes or the trans-Golgi network (TGN) constitutes the major retrograde transport routes. Several transmembrane proteins undergo retrograde transport as part of a recycling mechanism that contributes to reutilization and maintenance of a steady-state protein localization. In addition, some receptors are hijacked by exotoxins and used for entry and intracellular transport. The physiological relevance of retrograde transport cannot be overstated. Retrograde trafficking of the amyloid precursor protein determines the distribution between organelles, and hence the possibility of cleavage by γ-secretase. Right balancing of the pathways is critical for protection against Alzheimer's disease. During embryonic development, retrograde transport of Wntless to the TGN is essential for the following release of Wnt from the plasma membrane. Furthermore, overexpression of Wntless has been linked to oncogenesis. Here, we review relevant aspects of the retrograde trafficking of mammalian transmembrane receptors and transporters, with focus on the retromer-mediated transport between endosomes and the TGN. PMID:26154780

  13. Transmembrane proteins--Mining the cattle tick transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Sabine A; Stutzer, Christian; Bosman, Anna-Mari; Maritz-Olivier, Christine

    2015-09-01

    Managing the spread and load of pathogen-transmitting ticks is an important task worldwide. The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, not only impacts the economy through losses in dairy and meat production, but also raises concerns for human health in regards to the potential of certain transmitted pathogens becoming zoonotic. However, novel strategies to control R. microplus are hindered by lack of understanding tick biology and the discovery of suitable vaccine or acaricide targets. The importance of transmembrane proteins as vaccine targets are well known, as is the case in tick vaccines with Bm86 as antigen. In this study, we describe the localization and functional annotation of 878 putative transmembrane proteins. Thirty proteins could be confirmed in the R. microplus gut using LC-MS/MS analysis and their roles in tick biology are discussed. To the best of our knowledge, 19 targets have not been reported before in any proteomics study in various tick species and the possibility of using the identified proteins as targets for tick control are discussed. Although tissue expression of identified putative proteins through expansive proteomics is necessary, this study demonstrates the possibility of using bioinformatics for the identification of targets for further evaluation in tick control strategies. PMID:26096851

  14. Structure and function of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Morales

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is a lethal autosomal recessive genetic disease caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR. Mutations in the CFTR gene may result in a defective processing of its protein and alter the function and regulation of this channel. Mutations are associated with different symptoms, including pancreatic insufficiency, bile duct obstruction, infertility in males, high sweat Cl-, intestinal obstruction, nasal polyp formation, chronic sinusitis, mucus dehydration, and chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus lung infection, responsible for 90% of the mortality of CF patients. The gene responsible for the cellular defect in CF was cloned in 1989 and its protein product CFTR is activated by an increase of intracellular cAMP. The CFTR contains two membrane domains, each with six transmembrane domain segments, two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs, and a cytoplasmic domain. In this review we discuss the studies that have correlated the role of each CFTR domain in the protein function as a chloride channel and as a regulator of the outwardly rectifying Cl- channels (ORCCs.

  15. Bioenergetics and mitochondrial transmembrane potential during differentiation of cultured osteoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, S. V.; Ataullakhanov, F. I.; Globus, R. K.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between osteoblast differentiation and bioenergetics, cultured primary osteoblasts from fetal rat calvaria were grown in medium supplemented with ascorbate to induce differentiation. Before ascorbate treatment, the rate of glucose consumption was 320 nmol. h(-1). 10(6) cells(-1), respiration was 40 nmol. h(-1). 10(6) cells(-1), and the ratio of lactate production to glucose consumption was approximately 2, indicating that glycolysis was the main energy source for immature osteoblasts. Ascorbate treatment for 14 days led to a fourfold increase in respiration, a threefold increase in ATP production, and a fivefold increase in ATP content compared with that shown in immature cells. Confocal imaging of mitochondria stained with a transmembrane potential-sensitive vital dye showed that mature cells possessed abundant amounts of high-transmembrane-potential mitochondria, which were concentrated near the culture medium-facing surface. Acute treatment of mature osteoblasts with metabolic inhibitors showed that the rate of glycolysis rose to maintain the cellular energy supply constant. Thus progressive differentiation coincided with changes in cellular metabolism and mitochondrial activity, which are likely to play key roles in osteoblast function.

  16. Bacterial hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lauga, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass, and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micron scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically-complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, we review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  17. Fe2+-Tetracycline-Mediated Cleavage of the Tn10 Tetracycline Efflux Protein TetA Reveals a Substrate Binding Site near Glutamine 225 in Transmembrane Helix 7

    OpenAIRE

    McMurry, Laura M.; Aldema-Ramos, Mila L.; Levy, Stuart B.

    2002-01-01

    TetA specified by Tn10 is a class B member of a group of related bacterial transport proteins of 12 transmembrane alpha helices that mediate resistance to the antibiotic tetracycline. A tetracycline-divalent metal cation complex is expelled from the cell in exchange for a entering proton. The site(s) where tetracycline binds to this export pump is not known. We found that, when chelated to tetracycline, Fe2+ cleaved the backbone of TetA predominantly at a single position, glutamine 225 in tra...

  18. Helix bundle loops determine whether histidine kinases autophosphorylate in cis or in trans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashenberg, Orr; Keating, Amy E; Laub, Michael T

    2013-04-12

    Bacteria frequently use two-component signal transduction pathways to sense and respond to environmental and intracellular stimuli. Upon receipt of a stimulus, a homodimeric sensor histidine kinase autophosphorylates and then transfers its phosphoryl group to a cognate response regulator. The autophosphorylation of histidine kinases has been reported to occur both in cis and in trans, but the molecular determinants dictating which mechanism is employed are unknown. Based on structural considerations, one model posits that the handedness of a loop at the base of the helical dimerization domain plays a critical role. Here, we tested this model by replacing the loop from Escherichia coli EnvZ, which autophosphorylates in trans, with the loop from three PhoR orthologs that autophosphorylate in cis. These chimeric kinases autophosphorylated in cis, indicating that this small loop is sufficient to determine autophosphorylation mechanism. Further, we report that the mechanism of autophosphorylation is conserved in orthologous sets of histidine kinases despite highly dissimilar loop sequences. These findings suggest that histidine kinases are under selective pressure to maintain their mode of autophosphorylation, but they can do so with a wide range of sequences. PMID:23333741

  19. Nuclear localization of the dehydrin OpsDHN1 is determined by histidine-rich motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Sánchez, Itzell E; Maruri-López, Israel; Ferrando, Alejandro; Carbonell, Juan; Graether, Steffen P; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan F

    2015-01-01

    The cactus OpsDHN1 dehydrin belongs to a large family of disordered and highly hydrophilic proteins known as Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins, which accumulate during the late stages of embryogenesis and in response to abiotic stresses. Herein, we present the in vivo OpsDHN1 subcellular localization by N-terminal GFP translational fusion; our results revealed a cytoplasmic and nuclear localization of the GFP::OpsDHN1 protein in Nicotiana benthamiana epidermal cells. In addition, dimer assembly of OpsDHN1 in planta using a Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) approach was demonstrated. In order to understand the in vivo role of the histidine-rich motif, the OpsDHN1-ΔHis version was produced and assayed for its subcellular localization and dimer capability by GFP fusion and BiFC assays, respectively. We found that deletion of the OpsDHN1 histidine-rich motif restricted its localization to cytoplasm, but did not affect dimer formation. In addition, the deletion of the S-segment in the OpsDHN1 protein affected its nuclear localization. Our data suggest that the deletion of histidine-rich motif and S-segment show similar effects, preventing OpsDHN1 from getting into the nucleus. Based on these results, the histidine-rich motif is proposed as a targeting element for OpsDHN1 nuclear localization. PMID:26442018

  20. Nuclear localization of the dehydrin OpsDHN1 is determined by histidine-rich motif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itzell Euridice Hernández-Sánchez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The cactus OpsDHN1 dehydrin belongs to a large family of disordered and highly hydrophilic proteins known as Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA proteins, which accumulate during the late stages of embryogenesis and in response to abiotic stresses. Herein, we present the in vivo OpsDHN1 subcellular localization by N-terminal GFP translational fusion; our results revealed a cytoplasmic and nuclear localization of the GFP::OpsDHN1 protein in Nicotiana benthamiana epidermal cells. In addition, dimer assembly of OpsDHN1 in planta using a Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC approach was demonstrated. In order to understand the in vivo role of the histidine-rich motif, the OpsDHN1-ΔHis version was produced and assayed for its subcellular localization and dimer capability by GFP fusion and BiFC assays, respectively. We found that deletion of the OpsDHN1 histidine-rich motif restricted its localization to cytoplasm, but did not affect dimer formation. In addition, the deletion of the S-segment in the OpsDHN1 protein affected its nuclear localization. Our data suggest that the deletion of histidine-rich motif and S-segment show similar effects, preventing OpsDHN1 from getting into the nucleus. Based on these results, the histidine rich motif is proposed as a targeting element for OpsDHN1 nuclear localization.

  1. Crystallization of a newly discovered histidine acid phosphatase from Francisella tularensis

    OpenAIRE

    Felts, Richard L.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Calcutt, Michael J.; Tanner, John J.

    2005-01-01

    A histidine acid phosphatase from the CDC Category A pathogen F. tularensis has been crystallized in space group P41212, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.96, c = 210.78 Å. A 1.75 Å resolution data set was collected at Advanced Light Source beamline 4.2.2.

  2. The electronic structure and adsorption geometry of L-histidine on Cu(110)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feyer, V.; Plekan, O.; Skála, T.; Cháb, Vladimír; Matolín, V.; Prince, K. C.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 43 (2008), 13655-13660. ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : structure of histidine * NEXAFS * XPS Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.189, year: 2008

  3. A chemiluminescence assay for L-histidine based on controlled DNAzyme catalytic reactions on magnetic microparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a chemiluminescence (CL) assay for L-histidine that is based on the use of DNAzyme covalently immobilized on 1.5-μm sized magnetic beads. On addition of a substrate labeled with a CL reagent, the DNAzyme and substrate form a stable duplex by allosteric synergetic stabilization of each duplex. If L-histidine is added to this system, self-cleavage of the substrate occurs through catalytic reaction and results in the formation of two fragments which dissociate from the beads. After removal of the magnetic beads, the labeled fragments can be detected by CL whose intensity is linearly related to the concentration of L-histidine in the 1.0 to 1,000 nM range. The detection limit is 0.3 nM, and the RSD is 3.4 % at a 50 nM level (n = 9). The method has been successfully applied to the determination of L-histidine in spiked human serum samples and holds promise as a widely applicable general platform for DNAzyme-based CL detection of small organic molecules and of metal ions. (author)

  4. Binary diffusion coefficients of L-histidine methyl ester dihydrochloride in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Mutual diffusion coefficients of L-histidine methyl ester dihydrochloride in aqueous solutions. • Influence of the thermodynamic and kinetic factors on the variation of the mutual diffusion coefficients. • Estimation of the hydrodynamic radius of L-histidine methyl ester dihydrochloride. - Abstract: The Taylor dispersion technique has been used for measuring mutual diffusion coefficients of L-histidine methyl ester as its dihydrochloride at T = 298.15 K and finite concentrations from (0.001 to 0.100) mol · dm−3. On the basis of experimental mutual diffusion coefficients, the hydrodynamic radii, Rh, the diffusion coefficient at infinite dilution D0 and the dependence of thermodynamic factors, FT, on the concentration, have been estimated using the Onsager–Fuoss equation. Further insight on the diffusion has been obtained from 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations, which suggest that the L-histidine methyl ester is present as its dication in acidic solution in a fully extended conformation, with considerable charge delocalization over the imidazolium ring. These experimental and computational results allow us to have a better understanding of the thermodynamic and kinetic behavior of this amino acid derivative in aqueous solutions

  5. Platinum(II) complexes with steroidal esters of L-methionine and L-histidine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kvasnica, Miroslav; Swaczynová, Jana; Kohout, Ladislav

    Ghent : Ghent University, 2008. s. 43. [BOSS 11. Belgian Organic Synthesis Symposium /11./. 13.07.2008-18.07.2008, Ghent] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200200651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : platinum * L-methionine * L- histidine * cytotoxicity Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  6. Isotope effect studies of the pyruvate-dependent histidine decarboxylase from Lactobacillus 30a

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decarboxylation of histidine by the pyruvate-dependent histidine decarboxylase of Lactobacillus 30 a shows a carbon isotope effect k12/k13 = 1.0334 +/- 0.0005 and a nitrogen isotope effect k14/k15 = 0.9799 +/- 0.0006 at pH 4.8, 370C. The carbon isotope effect is slightly increased by deuteriation of the substrate and slightly decreased in D2O. The observed nitrogen isotope effect indicates that the imine nitrogen in the substrate-Schiff base intermediate complex is ordinarily protonated, and the pH dependence of the carbon isotope effect indicates that both protonated and unprotonated forms of this intermediate are capable of undergoing decarboxylation. As with the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent enzyme, Schiff base formation and decarboxylation are jointly rate-limiting, with the intermediate histidine-pyruvate Schiff base showing a decarboxylation/Schiff base hydrolysis ratio of 0.5-1.0 at pH 4.8. The decarboxylation transition state is more reactant-like for the pyruvate-dependent enzyme than for the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent enzyme. These studies find no particular energetic or catalytic advantage to the use of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate over covalently bound pyruvate in catalysis of the decarboxylation of histidine

  7. Proton NMR spectroscopy of the active site histidine of α-lytic proteinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A histidine auxotroph of Lysobacter enzymogenes (ATC 29847) was grown on media containing either isotopically labeled [90% 13Cesup(epsilon)]L- or [90%15Nsup(delta), 90% 15Nsup(epsilon)]D,L-histidine. The enzyme, α-lytic proteinase (EC 3.4.21.12), was isolated from these cultures as well as from cultures of wild-type bacteria grown on unlabeled medium. 1H NMR spectra at 360 MHz were obtained with all 3 purified enzymes. Presence of the adjacent 15N labels broadened the histidine Csup(epsilon)-H peak by about a factor of 2 by unresolved scalar coupling. Presence of a direcly bonded 13C led to disappearance of the histidine Csup(epsilon)-H peak by a combination of scalar coupling and dipolar broadening. These effects should be useful for the cross-assignment of 1H NMR peaks of 13C and 15N enriched proteins. The 13C and 15N labeled proteins were found to undergo the reversible a-b conformational transition which changes the pKsub(a)' of His57 from 6.5-5.9. (Auth.)

  8. Conformation Switching in Gas-Phase Complexes of Histidine with Alkaline Earth Ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunbar, R. C.; Hopkinson, A. C.; Oomens, J.; Siu, C. K.; Siu, K. W. M.; Steill, J. D.; Verkerk, U. H.; Zhao, J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy of gas-phase doubly charged alkaline earth complexes of histidine reveals a transition from dominance of the zwitterion (salt bridge, SB) conformation with Ba2+ to substantial presence of the canonical (charge-solvated, CS) conformation with Ca2+. T

  9. Diversity of tri-functional histidine biosynthesis gene (his) in cereal Phaeosphaeria species

    Science.gov (United States)

    The full length genomic sequences of tri-functional histidine biosynthesis (his) gene were obtained and compared from cereal Phaeosphaeria species by PCR amplification. The his gene coding sequence in wheat-biotype P. nodorum (PN-w) was 2697 bp in size. The his genes in barley-biotype P. nodorum (PN...

  10. Highly Efficient Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production of Flower-like Cadmium Sulfide Decorated by Histidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qizhao; Lian, Juhong; Li, Jiajia; Wang, Rongfang; Huang, Haohao; Su, Bitao; Lei, Ziqiang

    2015-09-01

    Morphology-controlled synthesis of CdS can significantly enhance the efficiency of its photocatalytic hydrogen production. In this study, a novel three-dimensional (3D) flower-like CdS is synthesized via a facile template-free hydrothermal process using Cd(NO3)2•4H2O and thiourea as precursors and L-Histidine as a chelating agent. The morphology, crystal phase, and photoelectrochemical performance of the flower-like CdS and pure CdS nanocrystals are carefully investigated via various characterizations. Superior photocatalytic activity relative to that of pure CdS is observed on the flower-like CdS photocatalyst under visible light irradiation, which is nearly 13 times of pure CdS. On the basis of the results from SEM studies and our analysis, a growth mechanism of flower-like CdS is proposed by capturing the shape evolution. The imidazole ring of L-Histidine captures the Cd ions from the solution, and prevents the growth of the CdS nanoparticles. Furthermore, the photocatalytic contrast experiments illustrate that the as-synthesized flower-like CdS with L-Histidine is more stable than CdS without L-Histidine in the hydrogen generation.

  11. Profiling histidine dipeptides in plasma and urine after ingesting beef, chicken or chicken broth in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive carbonyl species (RCS), oxidation products of polyunsaturated fatty acids, protein & sugars, play a role in the etiology of certain chronic diseases. Our previous studies revealed that histidine-dipeptides such as carnosine and anserine detoxify cytotoxic carbonyls such as 4-hydroxy-trans-...

  12. Effects of La3+ on H+ Transmembrane Gradient and Membrane Potential in Rice Seedling Roots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑海雷; 张春光; 赵中秋; 马建华; 李利

    2002-01-01

    The effects of LaCl3 on membrane potential and transmembrane proton gradient for rice (Oryza sativa) seedling roots were studied. Highly purified plasma membrane was isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning method. Both the gradient of transmembrane proton and membrane potential were stimulated by certain low concentration of LaCl3 and depressed by high concentration of LaCl3. The optimal concentration of La3+ is around 40~60 μmolL-1 for transmembrane proton gradient and membrane potential. It shows that La3+ can influence the generations and maintenances of membrane potential and transmembrane proton gradient in rice seedling roots.

  13. Further characterization of the interaction of histidine-rich glycoprotein with heparin: evidence for the binding of two molecules of histidine-rich glycoprotein by high molecular weight heparin and for the involvement of histidine residues in heparin binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabbit histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG, 94 kDa) binds heparin with high affinity (apparent K/sub d/ 60-110 nM). Eosin Y (1 equiv) bound to HRG was used as a reporter group to monitor associations of HRG with heparins of molecular mass 10, 17.5, and 30 kDa. The stoichiometries of the heparin- [125I] HRG complexes were determined by fluorescence and absorbance measurements as well as by analytical ultracentrifugation. Two types of complex form: complexes of 1 heparin: 1 HRG and of 1 heparin:2 HRG. The 1:2 complex formation requires a minimum heparin chain length since 17.5-kDa but not 10-kDa heparin binds two HRG molecules. The formation of the 1:2 complexes of the larger heparin fractions is enhanced by divalent copper or zinc (1-10 equiv) bound to HRG. However, metal is not required for complex formation since all sizes of heparin examined interact tightly with HRG in the presence of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. Between 0.1 and 0.3 M ionic strength, both 1:1 and 1:2 complexes of heparin with HRG are progressively destabilized. No heparin-HRG complex is found at ionic strengths of 0.5 M. Between pH 8.5 and pH 6.5 both 1:2 and 1:1 complexes are found with 17.5-kDa heparin, but at pH 5.5 only 1:1 complexes are formed. The heparin-HRG interaction is progressively decreased by modification of the histidine residues of HRG, whereas modification of 22 of the 33 lysine residues of HRG has little effect. Supporting the role of histidine in heparin binding, a histidine-proline-glycine-rich peptide (molecular mass 28 kDa) derived from HRG and intact HRG binds to heparin-Sepharose at pH 6.8, but only HRG binds to the affinity medium at pH 7.4

  14. Antioxidant status of turkey breast meat and blood after feeding a diet enriched with histidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopec, W; Wiliczkiewicz, A; Jamroz, D; Biazik, E; Pudlo, A; Hikawczuk, T; Skiba, T; Korzeniowska, M

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of 1) spray dried blood cells rich in histidine and 2) pure histidine added to feed on the antioxidant status and concentration of carnosine related components in the blood and breast meat of female turkeys. The experiment was performed on 168 Big7 turkey females randomly assigned to 3 dietary treatments: control; control with the addition of 0.18% L-histidine (His); and control with the addition of spray dried blood cells (SDBC). Birds were raised for 103 d on a floor with sawdust litter, with drinking water and feed ad libitum. The antioxidant status of blood plasma and breast muscle was analyzed by ferric reducing ability (FRAP) and by 2,2-Azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals scavenging ability. The activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) was analyzed in the blood and breast meat, with the content of carnosine and anserine quantified by HPLC. Proximate analysis as well as amino acid profiling were carried out for the feed and breast muscles. Growth performance parameters also were calculated. Histidine supplementation of the turkey diet resulted in increased DPPH radical scavenging capacity in the breast muscles and blood, but did not result in higher histidine dipeptide concentrations. The enzymatic antioxidant system of turkey blood was affected by the diet with SDBC. In the plasma, the SDBC addition increased both SOD and GPx activity, and decreased GPx activity in the erythrocytes. Feeding turkeys with an SDBC containing diet increased BW and the content of isoleucine and valine in breast muscles. PMID:26574038

  15. Muscle histidine-containing dipeptides are elevated by glucose intolerance in both rodents and men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne Stegen

    Full Text Available Muscle carnosine and its methylated form anserine are histidine-containing dipeptides. Both dipeptides have the ability to quench reactive carbonyl species and previous studies have shown that endogenous tissue levels are decreased in chronic diseases, such as diabetes.Rodent study: Skeletal muscles of rats and mice were collected from 4 different diet-intervention studies, aiming to induce various degrees of glucose intolerance: 45% high-fat feeding (male rats, 60% high-fat feeding (male rats, cafeteria feeding (male rats, 70% high-fat feeding (female mice. Body weight, glucose-tolerance and muscle histidine-containing dipeptides were assessed. Human study: Muscle biopsies were taken from m. vastus lateralis in 35 males (9 lean, 8 obese, 9 prediabetic and 9 newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients and muscle carnosine and gene expression of muscle fiber type markers were measured.Diet interventions in rodents (cafeteria and 70% high-fat feeding induced increases in body weight, glucose intolerance and levels of histidine-containing dipeptides in muscle. In humans, obese, prediabetic and diabetic men had increased muscle carnosine content compared to the lean (+21% (p>0.1, +30% (p<0.05 and +39% (p<0.05, respectively. The gene expression of fast-oxidative type 2A myosin heavy chain was increased in the prediabetic (1.8-fold, p<0.05 and tended to increase in the diabetic men (1.6-fold, p = 0.07, compared to healthy lean subjects.Muscle histidine-containing dipeptides increases with progressive glucose intolerance, in male individuals (cross-sectional. In addition, high-fat diet-induced glucose intolerance was associated with increased muscle histidine-containing dipeptides in female mice (interventional. Increased muscle carnosine content might reflect fiber type composition and/or act as a compensatory mechanism aimed at preventing cell damage in states of impaired glucose tolerance.

  16. Electron transfer pathway analysis in bacterial photosynthetic reaction center

    CERN Document Server

    Kitoh-Nishioka, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    A new computational scheme to analyze electron transfer (ET) pathways in large biomolecules is presented with applications to ETs in bacterial photosynthetic reaction center. It consists of a linear combination of fragment molecular orbitals and an electron tunneling current analysis, which enables an efficient first-principles analysis of ET pathways in large biomolecules. The scheme has been applied to the ET from menaquinone to ubiquinone via nonheme iron complex in bacterial photosynthetic reaction center. It has revealed that not only the central Fe$^{2+}$ ion but also particular histidine ligands are involved in the ET pathways in such a way to mitigate perturbations that can be caused by metal ion substitution and depletion, which elucidates the experimentally observed insensitivity of the ET rate to these perturbations.

  17. Cell-free expression of the APP transmembrane fragments with Alzheimer's disease mutations using algal amino acid mixture for structural NMR studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocharova, Olga V; Urban, Anatoly S; Nadezhdin, Kirill D; Bocharov, Eduard V; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2016-07-01

    Structural investigations need ready supply of the isotope labeled proteins with inserted mutations n the quantities sufficient for the heteronuclear NMR. Though cell-free expression system has been widely used in the past years, high startup cost and complex compound composition prevent many researches from the developing this technique, especially for membrane protein production. Here we demonstrate the utility of a robust, cost-optimized cell-free expression technique for production of the physiologically important transmembrane fragment of amyloid precursor protein, APP686-726, containing Alzheimer's disease mutations in the juxtamembrane (E693G, Arctic form) and the transmembrane parts (V717G, London form, or L723P, Australian form). The protein cost was optimized by varying the FM/RM ratio as well as the amino acid concentration. We obtained the wild-type and mutant transmembrane fragments in the pellet mode of continuous exchange cell-free system consuming only commercial algal mixture of the (13)C,(15)N-labeled amino acids. Scaling up analytical tests, we achieved milligram quantity yields of isotope labeled wild-type and mutant APP686-726 for structural studies by high resolution NMR spectroscopy in membrane mimicking environment. The described approach has from 5 to 23-fold cost advantage over the bacterial expression methods described earlier and 1.5 times exceeds our previous result obtained with the longer APP671-726WT fragment. PMID:27071311

  18. Assignment of histidine resonances in the 1H NMR (500 MHz) spectrum of subtilisin BPN' using site-directed mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spin-echo pulse sequence has been used to resolve the six histidine C-2H protons in the 500-MHz NMR spectrum of subtilisin BPN'. Five of these residues have been substituted by site-directed mutagenesis, and this has enabled a complete assignment of these protons to be obtained. Analysis of the pH titration curves of these signals has provided microscopic pKa's for the six histidines in this enzyme. The pKa's of the histidine residues in subtilisin BPN' have been compared with the values obtained for the histidines in the homologous enzyme from Bacillus licheniformis (subtilisin Carlsberg). Four of the five conserved histidines titrate with essentially identical pKa's in the two enzymes. It therefore appears that the assignments made for these residues in subtilisin BPN' can be transferred to subtilisin Carlsberg. On the basis of these assignments, the one histidine that titrates with a substantially different pKa in the two enzymes can be assigned to histidine-238. This difference in pKa has been attributed to a Trp to Lys substitution at position 241 in subtilisin Carlsberg

  19. Glycosylation and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glick Mary Catherine

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR has been known for the past 11 years to be a membrane glycoprotein with chloride channel activity. Only recently has the glycosylation of CFTR been examined in detail, by O'Riordan et al in Glycobiology. Using cells that overexpress wild-type (wtCFTR, the presence of polylactosamine was noted on the fully glycosylated form of CFTR. In the present commentary the results of that work are discussed in relation to the glycosylation phenotype of cystic fibrosis (CF, and the cellular localization and processing of ΔF508 CFTR. The significance of the glycosylation will be known when endogenous CFTR from primary human tissue is examined.

  20. Photometric recording of transmembrane potential in outer hair cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Oghalai, John S.; Saggau, Peter; Rabbitt, Richard D.; Brownell, William E.

    2006-06-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) are polarized epithelial cells that have mechanoelectrical transduction channels within their apical stereocilia and produce electromotile force along their lateral wall. Phase shifts, or time delays, in the transmembrane voltage occurring at different axial locations along the cell may contribute to our understanding of how these cells operate at auditory frequencies. We developed a method to optically measure the phase of the OHC transmembrane potential using the voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) di-8-ANEPPS. The exit aperture of a fibre-optic light source was driven in two dimensions so that a 24 µm spot of excitation light could be positioned along the length of the OHC. We used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in the current-clamp mode to stimulate the OHC at the base. The photometric response and the voltage response were monitored with a photodetector and patch-clamp amplifier, respectively. The photometric response was used to measure the regional changes in the membrane potential in response to maintained (dc) and sinusoidal (ac) current stimuli applied at the base of the cell. We used a neutral density filter to lower the excitation light intensity and reduce phototoxicity. A sensitive detector and lock-in amplifier were used to measure the small ac VSD signal. This permitted measurements of the ac photometric response below the noise floor of the static fluorescence. The amplitude and phase components of the photometric response were recorded for stimuli up to 800 Hz. VSD data at 400-800 Hz show the presence of a small phase delay between the stimulus voltage at the base of the cell and the local membrane potential measured along the lateral wall. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that OHCs exhibit inhomogeneous membrane potentials that vary with position in analogy with the voltage in nerve axons.

  1. Transmembrane protein topology prediction using support vector machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nugent Timothy

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha-helical transmembrane (TM proteins are involved in a wide range of important biological processes such as cell signaling, transport of membrane-impermeable molecules, cell-cell communication, cell recognition and cell adhesion. Many are also prime drug targets, and it has been estimated that more than half of all drugs currently on the market target membrane proteins. However, due to the experimental difficulties involved in obtaining high quality crystals, this class of protein is severely under-represented in structural databases. In the absence of structural data, sequence-based prediction methods allow TM protein topology to be investigated. Results We present a support vector machine-based (SVM TM protein topology predictor that integrates both signal peptide and re-entrant helix prediction, benchmarked with full cross-validation on a novel data set of 131 sequences with known crystal structures. The method achieves topology prediction accuracy of 89%, while signal peptides and re-entrant helices are predicted with 93% and 44% accuracy respectively. An additional SVM trained to discriminate between globular and TM proteins detected zero false positives, with a low false negative rate of 0.4%. We present the results of applying these tools to a number of complete genomes. Source code, data sets and a web server are freely available from http://bioinf.cs.ucl.ac.uk/psipred/. Conclusion The high accuracy of TM topology prediction which includes detection of both signal peptides and re-entrant helices, combined with the ability to effectively discriminate between TM and globular proteins, make this method ideally suited to whole genome annotation of alpha-helical transmembrane proteins.

  2. A Mechanistic Investigation of the Enhanced Cleavage at Histidine in the Gas-Phase Dissociation of Protonated Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Tsaprailis, George; Nair, Hari; Zhong, Wenqing; Kuppannan, Krishnamoorthy; Futrell, Jean H.; Wysocki, Vicki H

    2004-01-01

    Enhanced gas-phase cleavage of peptides adjacent to histidine was investigated. The peptides examined were angiotensins III (RVYIHPF) and IV (VYIHPF) as well as synthetic peptide analogs with altered key residues ((R)VYI-X-Z-F; X=F or H and Z=A, P or Sar) or a fixed charge Φ3P+CH2C(O)-VYIHPF. While all singly protonated peptide ions containing both histidine and arginine fragment non-selectively, the doubly protonated peptide ions with arginine and histidine, and the singly protonated peptide...

  3. Structure of a bacterial homologue of vitamin K epoxide reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Weikai; Schulman, Sol; Dutton, Rachel J.; Boyd, Dana; Beckwith, Jon; Rapoport, Tom A. (Harvard-Med); (HHMI)

    2010-03-19

    Vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) generates vitamin K hydroquinone to sustain {gamma}-carboxylation of many blood coagulation factors. Here, we report the 3.6 {angstrom} crystal structure of a bacterial homologue of VKOR from Synechococcus sp. The structure shows VKOR in complex with its naturally fused redox partner, a thioredoxin-like domain, and corresponds to an arrested state of electron transfer. The catalytic core of VKOR is a four transmembrane helix bundle that surrounds a quinone, connected through an additional transmembrane segment with the periplasmic thioredoxin-like domain. We propose a pathway for how VKOR uses electrons from cysteines of newly synthesized proteins to reduce a quinone, a mechanism confirmed by in vitro reconstitution of vitamin K-dependent disulphide bridge formation. Our results have implications for the mechanism of the mammalian VKOR and explain how mutations can cause resistance to the VKOR inhibitor warfarin, the most commonly used oral anticoagulant.

  4. Putative histidine kinase inhibitors with antibacterial effect against multi-drug resistant clinical isolates identified by in vitro and in silico screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikova, Nadya; Fulle, Simone; Manso, Ana Sousa; Mechkarska, Milena; Finn, Paul; Conlon, J Michael; Oggioni, Marco Rinaldo; Wells, Jerry M; Marina, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Novel antibacterials are urgently needed to address the growing problem of bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics. Two-component systems (TCS) are widely used by bacteria to regulate gene expression in response to various environmental stimuli and physiological stress and have been previously proposed as promising antibacterial targets. TCS consist of a sensor histidine kinase (HK) and an effector response regulator. The HK component contains a highly conserved ATP-binding site that is considered to be a promising target for broad-spectrum antibacterial drugs. Here, we describe the identification of putative HK autophosphorylation inhibitors following two independent experimental approaches: in vitro fragment-based screen via differential scanning fluorimetry and in silico structure-based screening, each followed up by the exploration of analogue compounds as identified by ligand-based similarity searches. Nine of the tested compounds showed antibacterial effect against multi-drug resistant clinical isolates of bacterial pathogens and include three novel scaffolds, which have not been explored so far in other antibacterial compounds. Overall, putative HK autophosphorylation inhibitors were found that together provide a promising starting point for further optimization as antibacterials. PMID:27173778

  5. Controlling bacterial infections by inhibiting proton-dependent processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneti, Galoz; Meir, Ohad; Mor, Amram

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is recognized as one of the greatest threats in modern healthcare, taking a staggering toll worldwide. New approaches for controlling bacterial infections must be designed, eventually combining multiple strategies for complimentary therapies. This review explores an old/new paradigm for multi-targeted antibacterial therapy, focused at disturbing bacterial cytoplasmic membrane functions at sub minimal inhibitory concentrations, namely through superficial physical alterations of the bilayer, thereby perturbing transmembrane signals transduction. Such a paradigm may have the advantage of fighting the infection while avoiding many of the known resistance mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert. PMID:26522076

  6. Magnetotactic Bacterial Cages as Safe and Smart Gene Delivery Vehicles

    KAUST Repository

    Alsaiari, Shahad K.

    2016-07-27

    In spite of the huge advances in the area of synthetic carriers, their efficiency still poorly compares to natural vectors. Herein, we report the use of unmodified magnetotactic bacteria as a guidable delivery vehicle for DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). High cargo loading is established under anaerobic conditions (bacteria is alive) through endocytosis where AuNPs are employed as transmembrane proteins mimics (facilitate endocytosis) as well as imaging agents to verify and quantify loading and release. The naturally bio-mineralized magnetosomes, within the bacteria, induce heat generation inside bacteria through magnetic hyperthermia. Most importantly after exposing the system to air (bacteria is dead) the cell wall stays intact providing an efficient bacterial vessel. Upon incubation with THP-1 cells, the magnetotactic bacterial cages (MBCs) adhere to the cell wall and are directly engulfed through the phagocytic activity of these cells. Applying magnetic hyperthermia leads to the dissociation of the bacterial microcarrier and eventual release of cargo.

  7. Structural Studies on the Extracellular Domain of Sensor Histidine Kinase YycG from Staphylococcus aureus and Its Functional Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Truc; Choi, Jongkeun; Lee, Sangho; Yeo, Kwon Joo; Cheong, Hae-Kap; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2016-07-31

    Bacterial two-component signal transduction systems are used to adapt to fluctuations in the environment. YycG, a key two-component histidine kinase in Staphylococcus aureus, plays an essential role in cell viability and regulates cell wall metabolism, biofilm formation, virulence, and antibiotic resistance. For these reasons, YycG is considered a compelling target for the development of novel antibiotics. However, to date, the signaling mechanism of YycG and its stimulus are poorly understood mainly because of a lack of structural information on YycG. To address this deficiency, we determined the crystal structure of the extracellular domain of S. aureus YycG (YycGex) at 2.0-Å resolution. The crystal structure indicated two subunits with an extracellular Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) topology packed into a dimer with interloop interactions. Disulfide scanning using cysteine-substituted mutants revealed that YycGex possessed dimeric interfaces not only in the loop but also in the helix α1. Cross-linking studies using intact YycG demonstrated that it was capable of forming high molecular weight oligomers on the cell membrane. Furthermore, we also observed that two auxiliary proteins of YycG, YycH and YycI, cooperatively interfered with the multimerization of YycG. From these results, we propose that signaling through YycG is regulated by multimerization and binding of YycH and YycI. These structural studies, combined with biochemical analyses, provide a better understanding of the signaling mechanism of YycG, which is necessary for developing novel antibacterial drugs targeting S. aureus. PMID:27389096

  8. THE COMBINATION PREDICTION OF TRANSMEMBRANE REGIONS BASED ON DEMPSTER-SHAFER THEORY OF EVIDENCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Xinyang; Xu Peida; Deng Yong

    2012-01-01

    Transmembrane proteins are some special and important proteins in cells.Because of their importance and specificity,the prediction of the transmembrane regions has very important theoretical and practical significance.At present,the prediction methods are mainly based on the physicochemical property and statistic analysis of amino acids.However,these methods are suitable for some environments but inapplicable for other environments.In this paper,the multi-sources information fusion theory has been introduced to predict the transmembrane regions.The proposed method is test on a data set of transmembrane proteins.The results show that the proposed method has the ability of predicting the transmembrane regions as a good performance and powerful tool.

  9. Study of complexing of neodymium (3) with L-histidine by electron spin resonance and electron spectroscopic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nd(3) complexing with L-histidine in aqueous solution is studied by the paramagnetic resonance and electron spectroscopy methods. It has been found that neodymium forms molecular complexes with L-histidine in aqueous solutions at pH<=6.2, at higher pH values -chelate complexes with deprotonated ligand form. Data are given on structure, composition and stability of Nd chelate complexes, obtained with electron absorption spectra of series of solutions with stable pH (7.24) value and various Nd and histidine (from 1:1 to 1:8) ratios, as well as with Nd:histidine=1:4 ratio and various pH (from 6.2 to 8.0) values

  10. Piezoelectric coefficients of L-histidine hydrochloride monohydrate obtained by synchrotron x-ray Renninger scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method for determining piezoelectric coefficients based on synchrotron radiation x-ray multiple diffraction (Avanci et al 1998 Phys. Rev. Lett. 81 5426) has been used in the case of a single crystal of the amino acid L-histidine·HCl·H2O. The method relates the E-induced strain with the angular shift in the multiple diffraction peak position. Thus, it allowed us to determine all three (d14 = 2.25(9) x 10-10 C N-1, d25 = 4.1(5) x 10-11 C N-1 and d36 = 2.3(2) x 10-10 C N-1) piezoelectric coefficients of L-histidine·HCl·H2O, using the (10 0 0) and (0 0 4) primary reflections

  11. Lyophilized histidine investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and cryogenics: Deprotonation in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyophilized histidine samples were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Lyophilized samples were prepared from aqueous solutions at a pH in the range between ∼1.5 and ∼10, and with no further addition of electrolyte. The use of cryogenics allowed the determination of protonated to unprotonated molar ratios of sites in L-histidine, which correlates well with the dissociation constants of the residual amino acid sites. When cryogenics was not used deprotonation of the lyophilized samples occurred, where the degree and the total concentration of deprotonated sites correlates well with the formation constants and the decrease in Cl concentration, respectively. This later relation clearly indicates a correlation between deprotonation and the desorption of HCl from lyophilized samples

  12. Enhanced chemiluminescence CdSe quantum dots by histidine and tryptophan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Morteza; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Jarrahi, Afsaneh; Vaezi, Zahra; Mizani, Farhang; Faridbod, Farnoush

    2014-11-01

    The enhancing effect of histidine and tryptophan on chemiluminescence (CL) of CdSe quantum dots (QDs)-H2O2 system was studied. This reaction is based on the catalytic effect of amino acids, causing a significant increase in the light emission, as a result of the reaction of quantum dots (QDs) with hydrogen peroxide. In the optimum conditions, this method was satisfactorily described by linear calibration curve in the range of 0.66-35.5 μM and 0.83-35.1 μM for histidine and tryptophan, respectively. The effect of various parameters such as concentration of CdSe QDs, concentration of H2O2 and concentration of imidazole on the intensity of CL system were studied. The main experimental advantage of the proposed method is it's selective to two amino acids compared with other amino acids.

  13. Increased adsorption of histidine-tagged proteins onto tissue culture polystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Maria; Hansen, Thomas Steen; Lind, Johan Ulrik;

    2012-01-01

    In this study we compare histidine-tagged and native proteins with regards to adsorption properties. We observe significantly increased adsorption of proteins with an incorporated polyhistidine amino acid motif (HIS-tag) onto tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) compared to similar proteins without...... and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), as well as adsorption performed at different pH and ionic strength indicates that the high adsorption is caused by electrostatic interaction between negatively charged carboxylate groups on the TCPS surface and positively charged histidine residues in the proteins. Pre......-adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) does not decrease the adsorption of HIS-tagged proteins onto TCPS. Our findings identify a potential problem in using HIS-tagged signalling molecule in assays with cells cultured on TCPS, since the concentration of the molecule in solution might be affected and this could...

  14. Fine-structure map of the histidine transport genes in Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, G F; Noel, K D; Taber, H; Spudich, E N; Nikaido, K; Afong, J

    1977-03-01

    Afine-structure genetic map of the histidine transport region of the Salmonella typhimurium chromosome was constructed. Twenty-five deletion mutants were isolated and used for dividing the hisJ and hisP genes into 8 and 13 regions respectively. A total of 308 mutations, spontaneous and mutagen induced, have been placed in these regions by deletion mapping. The histidine transport operon is presumed to be constituted of genes dhuA, hisJ, and hisP, and the regulation of the hosP and hisJ genes by dhuA is discussed. The orientation of this operon relative to purF has been established by three-point crosses as being: purF duhA hisJ hisP. PMID:321422

  15. Standard thermodynamic functions of Co2+ complexation with glycine and L-histidine in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorboletova, G. G.; Metlin, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    The enthalpies of the reactions between solutions of Co(NO3)2 and solutions of glycine (Gly) and L-histidine (His) are determined via direct calorimetry at different pH values and metal: ligand ratios using KNO3 as a background electrolyte ( T = 298.15 K, I = 0.2-1.0). The enthalpy changes upon the formation of cobalt glycinate complexes and Co2+ mixed-ligand complex, viz., glycine-L-histidine, were calculated. The standard thermodynamic parameters (Δr H°, Δr G°, Δr S°) of complexation are determined. The CoGlyHis complex is shown to be stable toward decomposition into homogeneous complexes.

  16. Proton Mobility in b2 Ion Formation and Fragmentation Reactions of Histidine-Containing Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Carissa R.; Abutokaikah, Maha T.; Harrison, Alex G.; Bythell, Benjamin J.

    2016-03-01

    A detailed energy-resolved study of the fragmentation reactions of protonated histidine-containing peptides and their b2 ions has been undertaken. Density functional theory calculations were utilized to predict how the fragmentation reactions occur so that we might discern why the mass spectra demonstrated particular energy dependencies. We compare our results to the current literature and to synthetic b2 ion standards. We show that the position of the His residue does affect the identity of the subsequent b2 ion (diketopiperazine versus oxazolone versus lactam) and that energy-resolved CID can distinguish these isomeric products based on their fragmentation energetics. The histidine side chain facilitates every major transformation except trans-cis isomerization of the first amide bond, a necessary prerequisite to diketopiperazine b2 ion formation. Despite this lack of catalyzation, trans-cis isomerization is predicted to be facile. Concomitantly, the subsequent amide bond cleavage reaction is rate-limiting.

  17. Crystal Structure of a Nickel(Ⅱ) Complex with Asymmetric L-Histidine Ligand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Yi; CHE Yun-Xia; ZHENG Ji-Min

    2006-01-01

    A novel nickel(Ⅱ) complex with L-histidine has been synthesized and solved by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis at physiological pH. The title complex (C7H16NiN4O6S, Mr= 343.01) crystallizes in monoclinic, space group P21 with a = 7.2194(7), b = 7.5968(7), c =12.2797(11) (A), β = 93.3110(10)°, V = 672.35(11) (A)3, Z = 2, Dc= 1.694 g/cm3, F(000) = 356,μ(MoKα) = 1.626 mm-1, T = 293(2) K, the final R = 0.0184 and wR = 0.0426 for 2207 observed reflections with I > 2σ(Ⅰ). The complex provides insights into a possible structural arrangement between nickel (Ⅱ) and L-histidine which may be physiologically important and abundantly present in biological systems.

  18. Density Functional Theory Study on the Histidine-assisted Mechanism of Arylamine N-Acetyltransferase Acetylation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Qing-An; GAO Shan-Min; JIN Yue-Qing; CHEN Xin; SUN Xiao-Min; YANG Chuan-Lu

    2008-01-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs, EC 2.3.1.5) catalyze the N-acetylation of primary arylamines, and play a key role in the biotransformation and metabolism of drugs, carcinogens, etc.In this paper, three possible reaction mechanisms are investigated and the results indicate that if the acetyl group directly transfers from the donor to the acceptor, the high activation energies will make it hard to obtain the target products.When using histidine to mediate the acetylation process, these energies will drop in the 15~45 kJ/mol range.If the histidine residue is protonated, the corresponding energies will be decreased by about 35~87 kJ/mol.The calculations predict an enzymatic acetylation mechanism that undergoes a thiolate-imidazolium pair, which agrees with the experimental results very well.

  19. Inhibitory activity of Filipendula ulmaria constituents on recombinant human histidine decarboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Yoko; Kikuzaki, Hiroe; Azuma, Toshiaki; Ye, Yuan; Sakaue, Motoyoshi; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Komori, Hirohumi; Ueno, Hiroshi

    2013-06-01

    Histidine decarboxylase (HDC) catalyses the formation of histamine, a bioactive amine. Agents that control HDC activity are beneficial for treating histamine-mediated symptoms, such as allergies and stomach ulceration. We searched for inhibitors of HDC from the ethyl acetate extract of the petal of Filipendula ulmaria, also called meadowsweet. Rugosin D, rugosin A, rugosin A methyl ester (a novel compound), and tellimagrandin II were the main components; these 4 ellagitannins exhibited a non-competitive type of inhibition, with K(i) values of approximately 0.35-1 μM. These K(i) values are nearly equal to that of histidine methyl ester (K(i)=0.46 μM), an existing substrate analogue inhibitor. Our results show that food products contain potent HDC inhibitors and that these active food constituents might be useful for designing clinically available HDC inhibitors. PMID:23411280

  20. Structural, vibrational and ab initio studies of L-histidine oxalate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammak, T.; Fourati, N.; Abid, Y.; Boughzala, H.; Mlayah, A.; Minot, C.

    2007-04-01

    Single crystals of L-histidine oxalate were obtained by slow evaporation of an aqueous solution at room temperature. The grown crystals have been subjected to X-ray diffraction (XRD), Infrared, and Raman spectroscopy. The title compound crystallises in the non-centrosymmetric space group P2 12 12 1, the crystal cohesion is achieved by relatively strong hydrogen bonds, so that the NH 3 groups show significant distortion with respect to the tetrahedral symmetry. Raman and infrared spectra of the title compound were recorded in the frequency range 300-3200 and 400-4000 cm -1, respectively. To obtain a reliable assignment of the observed spectral lines , we have calculated the geometry and the frequencies of the vibrational modes of histidine cation and the oxalate anion using the semi empirical PM3 method.

  1. Thiamin Pyrimidine Biosynthesis in Candida albicans: A Remarkable Reaction between Histidine and Pyridoxal Phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Rung-Yi; Huang, Siyu; Fenwick, Michael K.; Hazra, Amrita; Zhang, Yang; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Philmus, Benjamin; Kinsland, Cynthia; Sanders, Jennie Mansell; Ealick, Steven E.; Begley, Tadhg P. (Cornell); (TAM)

    2012-06-26

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, thiamin pyrimidine is formed from histidine and pyridoxal phosphate (PLP). The origin of all of the pyrimidine atoms has been previously determined using labeling studies and suggests that the pyrimidine is formed using remarkable chemistry that is without chemical or biochemical precedent. Here we report the overexpression of the closely related Candida albicans pyrimidine synthase (THI5p) and the reconstitution and preliminary characterization of the enzymatic activity. A structure of the C. albicans THI5p shows PLP bound at the active site via an imine with Lys62 and His66 in close proximity to the PLP. Our data suggest that His66 of the THI5 protein is the histidine source for pyrimidine formation and that the pyrimidine synthase is a single-turnover enzyme.

  2. Primary structure and subcellular localization of the knob-associated histidine-rich protein of Plasmodium falciparum.

    OpenAIRE

    Pologe, L G; Pavlovec, A; Shio, H; Ravetch, J V

    1987-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes bind to venular endothelial cells by means of electron-dense deformations (knobs) on the parasitized erythrocyte surface. The primary structure of a parasite-derived histidine-rich protein associated with the knob structure was deduced from cDNA sequence analysis. The 634 amino acid sequence is rich in lysine and histidine and contains three distinct, tandemly repeated domains. Indirect immunofluorescence, using affinity-purified monospecific antibo...

  3. Comparison of single-strand breaks in the DNA of rat thymocytes induced by irradiated histidine and γ rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single-strand breaks in the DNA of rat thymocytes induced by γ rays and irradiated histidine were studied using alkaline sucrose gradient centrifugation. γ-ray-induced DNA breaks were found to be random in nature with their number increasing linearly with increasing dose. These breaks were produced with an efficiency estimated to be 84.5 eV per break and were rejoined partially during postirradiation incubation. Treatment of the cells at 20C with irradiated histidine, however, produced the appearance of two distinct peaks of smaller DNA. The molecular weights of these species of DNA were estimated to be 3 to 4 x 108 and 6 x 107 daltons, respectively, compared to 6 x 108 daltons in untreated cells. Increasing the radiation dose given the histidine resulted in an increase in the proportion of the 6 x 107 daltons DNA species but failed to decrease further the molecular size. Posttreatment of γ-irradiated cells with irradiated histidine at 20C induced further breaks in the DNA. This phenomenon was not observed, however, when the radiation dosage exceeded 30 krad. Rejoining of induced breaks was not observed during incubation at 370C of irradiated histidine-treated cells. Treatment of the cells with three sulfhydryl-binding reagents produced results similar to those produced by irradiated histidine. Moreover, both irradiated histidine and sulfhydryl agents apparently inhibited the rejoining of γ-ray-induced DNA strand breaks. It is concluded that irradiated histidine and sulfhydryl-binding agents induce specific DNA breakage, possibly the dissociation of large DNA molecules into certain subunits. The possible involvement of sulfhydryl groups in the structure of cellular DNA of high molecular weight is discussed

  4. Doped zinc sulfide quantum dots based phosphorescence turn-off/on probe for detecting histidine in biological fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A turn-on phosphorescence quantum dots probe for histidine is fabricated. • High sensitivity, good selectivity and low interference are achieved. • Histidine in urine samples can be easily detected by the phosphorescence probe. - Abstract: We report a turn-on phosphorescence probe for detection of histidine based on Co2+-adsorbed N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) capped Mn: ZnS quantum dots (QDs) which is directly synthesized by the hydrothermal method. The phosphorescence of NAC-Mn: ZnS QDs is effectively quenched by Co2+ attributing to the adsorption of Co2+ onto the surface of QDs with a concomitant in suppressing the recombination process of hole and electron of QDs. The phosphorescence of Co2+-adsorbed NAC-Mn: ZnS QDs can be recovered by binding of Co2+ with histidine. The quenching and regeneration of the phosphorescence of NAC-Mn: ZnS QDs have been studied in detail. The as-prepared QDs-based probe is applied to determine histidine with a linear range of 1.25–30 μM and a detection limit of 0.74 μM. The relative standard deviation for eleven repeat detections of 20 μM histidine is 0.65%. Co2+-adsorbed NAC-Mn: ZnS QDs show high sensitivity and good selectivity to histidine over other amino acids, metal ions and co-existing substances. The proposed QDs probe has been successfully applied to determination of histidine in human urine samples with good recoveries of 98.5–103%

  5. Doped zinc sulfide quantum dots based phosphorescence turn-off/on probe for detecting histidine in biological fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bian, Wei [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); School of Basic Medical Science, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Wang, Fang [School of Basic Medical Science, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Wei, Yanli; Wang, Li; Liu, Qiaoling; Dong, Wenjuan [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Shuang, Shaomin, E-mail: smshuang@sxu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Choi, Martin M.F., E-mail: mmfchoi@gmail.com [Partner State Key Laboratory of Environmental and Biological Analysis, and Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, 224 Waterloo Road, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2015-01-26

    Highlights: • A turn-on phosphorescence quantum dots probe for histidine is fabricated. • High sensitivity, good selectivity and low interference are achieved. • Histidine in urine samples can be easily detected by the phosphorescence probe. - Abstract: We report a turn-on phosphorescence probe for detection of histidine based on Co{sup 2+}-adsorbed N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) capped Mn: ZnS quantum dots (QDs) which is directly synthesized by the hydrothermal method. The phosphorescence of NAC-Mn: ZnS QDs is effectively quenched by Co{sup 2+} attributing to the adsorption of Co{sup 2+} onto the surface of QDs with a concomitant in suppressing the recombination process of hole and electron of QDs. The phosphorescence of Co{sup 2+}-adsorbed NAC-Mn: ZnS QDs can be recovered by binding of Co{sup 2+} with histidine. The quenching and regeneration of the phosphorescence of NAC-Mn: ZnS QDs have been studied in detail. The as-prepared QDs-based probe is applied to determine histidine with a linear range of 1.25–30 μM and a detection limit of 0.74 μM. The relative standard deviation for eleven repeat detections of 20 μM histidine is 0.65%. Co{sup 2+}-adsorbed NAC-Mn: ZnS QDs show high sensitivity and good selectivity to histidine over other amino acids, metal ions and co-existing substances. The proposed QDs probe has been successfully applied to determination of histidine in human urine samples with good recoveries of 98.5–103%.

  6. Relationships of Dietary Histidine and Obesity in Northern Chinese Adults, an Internet-Based Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Chuan Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies have demonstrated that histidine supplementation significantly ameliorates inflammation and oxidative stress in obese women and high-fat diet-induced obese rats. However, the effects of dietary histidine on general population are not known. The objective of this Internet-based cross-sectional study was to evaluate the associations between dietary histidine and prevalence of overweight/obesity and abdominal obesity in northern Chinese population. A total of 2376 participants were randomly recruited and asked to finish our Internet-based dietary questionnaire for the Chinese (IDQC. Afterwards, 88 overweight/obese participants were randomly selected to explore the possible mechanism. Compared with healthy controls, dietary histidine was significantly lower in overweight (p < 0.05 and obese (p < 0.01 participants of both sexes. Dietary histidine was inversely associated with body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC and blood pressure in overall population and stronger associations were observed in women and overweight/obese participants. Higher dietary histidine was associated with lower prevalence of overweight/obesity and abdominal obesity, especially in women. Further studies indicated that higher dietary histidine was associated with lower fasting blood glucose (FBG, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, 2-h postprandial glucose (2 h-PG, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β, interleukin-6 (IL-6, C-reactive protein (CRP, malonaldehyde (MDA and vaspin and higher glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px, superoxide dismutase (SOD and adiponectin of overweight/obese individuals of both sexes. In conclusion, higher dietary histidine is inversely associated with energy intake, status of insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress in overweight/obese participants and lower prevalence of overweight/obesity in northern Chinese adults.

  7. Enthalpies of Solution of Complexes of Rare Earth Nitrate with L-α-Histidine in Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洋; 房艳; 高胜利; 陈三平; 史启祯

    2002-01-01

    The enthalpies of solution in water of complexes of RE(NO3)3 (RE=La~Nd, Sm~Lu, Y) with L-α-Histidine (His) were measured at 298.15 K. The standard enthalpies of formation of RE(His)3+(aq) were calculated. The "tetrad effect" regularity was observed from the curve, which is the enthalpies of solution plotted against the atomic numbers of the elements in lanthanide series.

  8. A combinatorial histidine scanning library approach to engineer highly pH-dependent protein switches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murtaugh, Megan L.; Fanning, Sean W.; Sharma, Tressa M.; Terry, Alexandra M.; Horn, James R. (NIU)

    2012-09-05

    There is growing interest in the development of protein switches, which are proteins whose function, such as binding a target molecule, can be modulated through environmental triggers. Efforts to engineer highly pH sensitive protein-protein interactions typically rely on the rational introduction of ionizable groups in the protein interface. Such experiments are typically time intensive and often sacrifice the protein's affinity at the permissive pH. The underlying thermodynamics of proton-linkage dictate that the presence of multiple ionizable groups, which undergo a pK{sub a} change on protein binding, are necessary to result in highly pH-dependent binding. To test this hypothesis, a novel combinatorial histidine library was developed where every possible combination of histidine and wild-type residue is sampled throughout the interface of a model anti-RNase A single domain VHH antibody. Antibodies were coselected for high-affinity binding and pH-sensitivity using an in vitro, dual-function selection strategy. The resulting antibodies retained near wild-type affinity yet became highly sensitive to small decreases in pH, drastically decreasing their binding affinity, due to the incorporation of multiple histidine groups. Several trends were observed, such as histidine 'hot-spots,' which will help enhance the development of pH switch proteins as well as increase our understanding of the role of ionizable residues in protein interfaces. Overall, the combinatorial approach is rapid, general, and robust and should be capable of producing highly pH-sensitive protein affinity reagents for a number of different applications.

  9. Electronic and protein structural dynamics of a photosensory LOV histidine kinase †

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandre, Maxime T.A.; Purcell, Erin B.; van Grondelle, Rienk; Robert, Bruno; Kennis, John T. M.; Crosson, Sean

    2010-01-01

    The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus encodes a two-component signalling protein, LovK, that contains an N-terminal photosensory LOV domain coupled to a C-terminal histidine kinase. LovK binds a flavin cofactor, undergoes a reversible photocycle, and displays regulated ATPase and autophosphorylation activity in response to visible light. Femtosecond to nanosecond visible absorption spectroscopy demonstrates congruence between full-length LovK and isolated LOV domains in the mechanism and kinet...

  10. Growth and characterization of L-histidine nitrate single crystal, a promising semiorganic NLO material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulk single crystal, L-histidine nitrate (LHN), was obtained by the temperature-lowering method. The solubility curve of LHN was measured in distilled water. The LHN crystal was characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, FT-IR spectra, thermal analyses, UV-vis spectra, microhardness and optical property. The transmission spectra of LHN crystal show lower UV cutoff wavelength lies at 320 nm. SHG intensity of LHN crystal is 1.5 times greater than that of KDP

  11. The putative sensor histidine kinase CKI1 is involved in female gametophyte development in Arabidopsis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hejátko, Jan; Pernisová, M.; Eneva, T.; Palme, K.; Brzobohatý, Břetislav

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 269, č. 4 (2003), s. 443-453. ISSN 1617-4615 R&D Projects: GA MŠk VS96096; GA MŠk LN00A081 Grant ostatní: INCO-Copernicus(XE) ERB3512-PL966135; QLRT(XE) 2000-0020 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : female gametophyte development * two-component signaling * sensor histidine kinase Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.240, year: 2003

  12. τ-regioselective addition of (-)-Nα -tert-butoxycarbonyl-L-histidine methyl ester to diethyl fumarate

    OpenAIRE

    López-Larrubia, Pilar; García-Amo, María; Mayoral, Elena P.; Robert J. Gillies; Cerdán, Sebastián; Ballesteros, Paloma

    2004-01-01

    Addition of (-)-Nα-tert-butoxycarbonyl-L-histidine methyl ester to diethyl fumarate regioselectively yielded diethyl 2-[4-(2-methoxycarbonyl-2-tert-butoxycarbonylaminoethyl) imidazol-1-yl] succinate as a 1:1 mixture of diastereomers. These compounds were identified by NMR using (Eu(fod)3 as a stereospecific shift reagent, but were impossible to separate and characterise independently. Neutral hydrolysis of the mixture yielded the corresponding deprotected diastereomeric N τ-(2-ethoxycarbonyl-...

  13. Thermokinetics of Liquid-Liquid Reaction of Dy(NO3)3 with Histidine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李仲谨; 陈三平; 房艳; 高胜利

    2003-01-01

    The thermokinetics of liquid-liquid reaction of dysprosium nitrate with histidine were studied using a microcalorimeter. On the basis of experimental and calculated results, three thermodynamic parameters (the activation enthalpy, the activation entropy and the activation free energy), the rate constant, three kinetic parameters (the activation energy, the pre-exponential constant and the reaction order) were obtained. On the basis of thermodynamics and kinetics, the formation reaction of the complex was discussed.

  14. A Histidine Switch in Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Triggers Paramyxovirus-Cell Membrane Fusion▿

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnan, Anuja; Santosh K Verma; Mani, Prashant; Gupta, Rahul; Kundu, Suman; Sarkar, Debi P

    2008-01-01

    Most paramyxovirus fusion proteins require coexpression of and activation by a homotypic attachment protein, hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), to promote membrane fusion. However, the molecular mechanism of the activation remains unknown. We previously showed that the incorporation of a monohistidylated lipid into F-virosome (Sendai viral envelope containing only fusion protein) enhanced its fusion to hepatocytes, suggesting that the histidine residue in the lipid accelerated membrane fusion....

  15. A conserved dimorphism-regulating histidine kinase controls the dimorphic switching in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Alison F A; Navarro, Marina V; Castilho, Daniele G; Calado, Juliana C P; Conceição, Palloma M; Batista, Wagner L

    2016-08-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and P. lutzii, thermally dimorphic fungi, are the causative agents of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). Paracoccidioides infection occurs when conidia or mycelium fragments are inhaled by the host, which causes the Paracoccidioides cells to transition to the yeast form. The development of disease requires conidia inside the host alveoli to differentiate into yeast cells in a temperature-dependent manner. We describe the presence of a two-component signal transduction system in P. brasiliensis, which we investigated by expression analysis of a hypothetical protein gene (PADG_07579) that showed high similarity with the dimorphism-regulating histidine kinase (DRK1) gene of Blastomyces dermatitidis and Histoplasma capsulatum This gene was sensitive to environmental redox changes, which was demonstrated by a dose-dependent decrease in transcript levels after peroxide stimulation and a subtler decrease in transcript levels after NO stimulation. Furthermore, the higher PbDRK1 levels after treatment with increasing NaCl concentrations suggest that this histidine kinase can play a role as osmosensing. In the mycelium-yeast (M→Y) transition, PbDRK1 mRNA expression increased 14-fold after 24 h incubation at 37°C, consistent with similar observations in other virulent fungi. These results demonstrate that the PbDRK1 gene is differentially expressed during the dimorphic M→Y transition. Finally, when P. brasiliensis mycelium cells were exposed to a histidine kinase inhibitor and incubated at 37°C, there was a delay in the dimorphic M→Y transition, suggesting that histidine kinases could be targets of interest for PCM therapy. PMID:27268997

  16. Detoxification of aldehydes by histidine-containing dipeptides: from chemistry to clinical implications

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Zhengzhi; Baba, Shahid P.; Sweeney, Brooke R.; Barski, Oleg A.

    2013-01-01

    Aldehydes are generated by oxidized lipids and carbohydrates at increased levels under conditions of metabolic imbalance and oxidative stress during atherosclerosis, myocardial and cerebral ischemia, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases and trauma. In most tissues, aldehydes are detoxified by oxidoreductases that catalyze the oxidation or the reduction of aldehydes or enzymatic and nonenzymatic conjugation with low molecular weight thiols and amines, such as glutathione and histidine dipeptid...

  17. Anti-diabetic potential of chromium histidinate in diabetic retinopathy rats

    OpenAIRE

    Ulas, Mustafa; Orhan, Cemal; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Ozercan, Ibrahim Hanifi; Sahin, Nurhan; Gencoglu, Hasan; Komorowski, James R; Sahin, Kazim

    2015-01-01

    Background Chromium (Cr) is commonly used as a complementary medicine for diabetes mellitus. Several studies suggest that Cr intakes may improve glucose metabolism and decrease oxidative stress. Therefore, we aimed to assess the effects of chromium histidinate (CrHis) supplementation using a range of reliable biomarkers of oxidative damage and histopathological changes in rats with diabetic retinopathy. Methods Diabetes was induced with streptozotocin [(STZ), 55 mg/kg] by intraperitoneal inje...

  18. The histidine-rich proteins in prokaryotes and their biological significance

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Feijuan; 黄飞娟

    2013-01-01

    Special stretches of sequence with low complexity, highly rich in one certain residue, such as glutamine, asparagines, glutamic acid and histidine, to fulfill certain unique functions, are defined as single-residue-rich sequence (SRRs). Increasing SRRs containing proteins have recently been characterized and some of them have been indentified to be associated with immune system diseases or neuro-degenerative. A systematic and comprehensive analysis on the relationship between the occurrence o...

  19. Linear short histidine and cysteine modified arginine peptides constitute a potential class of DNA delivery agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Anita; Shukla, Vasundhara; Khanduri, Richa; Dabral, Spoorti; Singh, Harpal; Ganguli, Munia

    2014-03-01

    The success of gene therapy relies on the development of safe and efficient multifunctional carriers of nucleic acids that can overcome extra- and intracellular barriers, protect the nucleic acid and mediate its release at the desired site allowing gene expression. Peptides bear unique properties that are indispensable for any carrier, e.g., they can mediate DNA condensation, cellular targeting, membrane translocation, endosomal escape and nuclear localization. In an effort to design a multifunctional peptide, we have modified an arginine homopeptide R16 by replacement of seven arginines with histidines and addition of one cysteine at each end respectively to impart endosomal escape property while maintaining the DNA condensation and release balance. Addition of histidines imparts endosomal escape property to arginine homopeptide, but their arrangement with respect to arginines is more critical in controlling DNA condensation, release and transfection efficiency. Intriguingly, R5H7R4 peptide where charge/arginine is distributed in blocks is preferred for strong condensation while more efficient transfection is seen in the variants R9H7 and H4R9H3, which exhibit weak condensation and strong release. Addition of cysteine to each of these peptides further fine-tuned the condensation-release balance without application of any oxidative procedure unlike other similar systems reported in the literature. This resulted in a large increase in the transfection efficiency in all of the histidine modified peptides irrespective of the arginine and histidine positions. This series of multifunctional peptides shows comparable transfection efficiency to commercially available transfection reagent Lipofectamine 2000 at low charge ratios, with simple preparative procedure and exhibits much less toxicity. PMID:24476132

  20. Evolution of the Structure and Chromosomal Distribution of Histidine Biosynthetic Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fani, Renato; Mori, Elena; Tamburini, Elena; Lazcano, Antonio

    1998-10-01

    A database of more than 100 histidine biosynthetic genes from different organisms belonging to the three primary domains has been analyzed, including those found in the now completely sequenced genomes of Haemophilus influenzae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Synechocystis sp., Methanococcus jannaschii, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The ubiquity of his genes suggests that it is a highly conserved pathway that was probably already present in the last common ancestor of all extant life. The chromosomal distribution of the his genes shows that the enterobacterial histidine operon structure is not the only possible organization, and that there is a diversity of gene arrays for the his pathway. Analysis of the available sequences shows that gene fusions (like those involved in the origin of the Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium hisIE and hisB gene structures) are not universal. In contrast, the elongation event that led to the extant hisA gene from two homologous ancestral modules, as well as the subsequent paralogous duplication that originated hisF, appear to be irreversible and are conserved in all known organisms. The available evidence supports the hypothesis that histidine biosynthesis was assembled by a gene recruitment process.

  1. One-electron oxidation of iron(II) complexes of tryptophan and histidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron(II) complexes of tryptophan and histidine, as models of some metallo-enzymes, have been oxidised by Br2sup(.-) in the pH range 7-11. For the tryptophan complex, the rate of oxidation is controlled by the ligand through the formation of metal-complexed TrpHsup(.+). This species may either undergo intramolecular transfer at rates > 1.7 x 106 s-1 resulting in oxidation of Fesup(II), or may deprotonate at a rate dependent of pH to yield the Fesup(II)-complexed Trpsup(.). The bimolecular rate constants for oxidation of Fesup(II)(aq) and Fesup(II)/tryptophan complexes by both uncomplexed TrpHsup(.+) and Trpsup(.) have also been determined. For histidine complexes, the Fesup(II)-imidazole centre was found to be more reactive than either histidine or Fesup(II)(aq) to Br2sup(.-). Again, oxidation of Fesup(II) is believed to be the likely outcome of the reaction. (author)

  2. The Role of Histidine-Proline-Rich Glycoprotein as Zinc Chaperone for Skeletal Muscle AMP Deaminase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ranieri-Raggi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Metallochaperones function as intracellular shuttles for metal ions. At present, no evidence for the existence of any eukaryotic zinc-chaperone has been provided although metallochaperones could be critical for the physiological functions of Zn2+ metalloenzymes. We propose that the complex formed in skeletal muscle by the Zn2+ metalloenzyme AMP deaminase (AMPD and the metal binding protein histidine-proline-rich glycoprotein (HPRG acts in this manner. HPRG is a major plasma protein. Recent investigations have reported that skeletal muscle cells do not synthesize HPRG but instead actively internalize plasma HPRG. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS performed on fresh preparations of rabbit skeletal muscle AMPD provided evidence for a dinuclear zinc site in the enzyme compatible with a (μ-aqua(μ-carboxylatodizinc(II core with two histidine residues at each metal site. XAS on HPRG isolated from the AMPD complex showed that zinc is bound to the protein in a dinuclear cluster where each Zn2+ ion is coordinated by three histidine and one heavier ligand, likely sulfur from cysteine. We describe the existence in mammalian HPRG of a specific zinc binding site distinct from the His-Pro-rich region. The participation of HPRG in the assembly and maintenance of skeletal muscle AMPD by acting as a zinc chaperone is also demonstrated.

  3. Thermokinetic Study on the Complexation Reaction of the First-Row Transitional Metal Chlorides with Histidine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN,San-Ping(陈三平); GAO,Sheng-Li(高胜利); SHI,Qi-Zhen(史启祯)

    2004-01-01

    The enthalpy change of the complexation reactions of the first-row transitional metal chlorides including CrCl3,MnCl2, FeCl2, CoCl2, NiCl2 and CuCl2 with L-α-histidine in water were determined by a microcalorimeter at 298.15-323.15 K. The standard enthalpy of formation of Cr(His)3+2 (aq) and M(His)2+2 (aq) (M=Mn, Fe, Co,Ni and Cu) were calculated. Based on the thermodynamic and kinetic equations of the reactions, three thermodynamic parameters (the activation enthalpy, the activation entropy, the activation free energy), the rate constants, and three kinetic parameters (the apparent activation energy, the pre-exponential constant and the reaction order) are obtained. The solid complexes of CrCl3, MnCl2, FeCl2, CoCl2, NiCl2 and CuCl2 with histidine were prepared and acterized by IR as well. The results showed that, with the atomic number increasing, three thermodynamic parameters, △G≠(-), △H≠(-) and △S≠(-) of the complexation reaction of these metal chlorides with L-α-histidine in water present an analogy regularity.

  4. Theoretical study of the adsorption of histidine amino acid on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, S. J.; Makinistian, L.; Albanesi, E.

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated how the interactions between biomolecules and graphene play a crucial role in the characterization and functionalization of biosensors. In this paper we present a theoretical study of the adsorption of histidine on graphene using density functional theory (DFT). In order to evaluate the relevance of including the carboxyl (-COOH) and amino (-NH2) groups in the calculations, we considered i) the histidine complete (i.e., with its carboxyl and its amino groups included), and ii) the histidine’s imidazole ring alone. We calculated the density of states for the two systems before and after adsorption. Furthermore, we compared the results of three approximations of the exchange and correlation interactions: local density (LDA), the generalized gradients by Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof (GGA-PBE), and one including van der Waals forces (DFT-D2). We found that the adsorption energy calculated by DFT-D2 is higher than the other two: Eads-DFT-D2 >E ads-LDA >E ads-GGA . We report the existence of charge transfer from graphene to the molecule when the adsorption occurs; this charge transfer turns up to be greater for the complete histidine than for the imidazole ring alone. Our results revealed that including the carboxyl and amino groups generates a shift in the states of imidazole ring towards EF .

  5. Vibrational spectra and non linear optical proprieties of L-histidine oxalate: DFT studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, A. Ben; Elleuch, N.; Feki, H.; Abid, Y.; Minot, C.

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents the results of our calculations on the geometric parameters, vibrational spectra and hyperpolarizability of a nonlinear optical material L-histidine oxalate. Due to the lack of sufficiently precise information on geometric structure in literature, theoretical calculations were preceded by re-determination of the crystal X-ray structure. Single crystal of L-histidine oxalate has been growing by slow evaporation of an aqueous solution at room temperature. The compound crystallizes in the non-Centro symmetric space group P2 12 12 1 of orthorhombic system. The FT-IR and Raman spectra of L-histidine oxalate were recorded and analyzed. The vibrational wave numbers were examined theoretical with the aid of Gaussian98 package of programs using the DFT//B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory. The data obtained from vibrational wave number calculations are used to assign vibrational bands obtained in IR and Raman spectroscopy of the studied compound. The geometrical parameters of the title compound are in agreement with the values of similar structures. To investigate microscopic second order non-linear optical NLO behaviour of the examined complex, the electric dipole μtot, the polarizability αtot and the hyperpolarizability βtot were computed using DFT//B3LYP/6-31G(d) method. According to our calculation, the title compound exhibits non-zero βtot value revealing microscopic second order NLO behaviour.

  6. Validation of a microfluorimetric method for quantitation of L-Histidine in peripheral blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Histidinemia is a rare inherited metabolic disorder characterized by deficient histidase enzyme, which results in elevated histidine levels in blood, urine and cerebrospinal fluid and, sometimes, hyperalaninemia. Histidinemia clinical picture varies from mental retardation and speech disorders to absence of any symptoms. This disease can be diagnosed by histidine-level-in-blood-quantitating tests using different analytical methods such as spectrofluorimetry and High Pressure Liquid Chromatography. An analytical method using SUMA Technology was developed and validated at our laboratory to determine L-Histidine in blood: serum and dried blood spot (adult and neonatal) so as to use it in Histidinemia screening in children with speech disorders. This paper presents selectivity, linearity, accuracy and precision data. The calibration curve showed linearity ranging 1-12 mg/dL or 64.5-774 μM, and correlation coefficient (r) and determination coefficient (r2) higher than 0.99 for each biological matrix studied were obtained. Accuracy (repeatability and intermediate accuracy assays) was demonstrated, variation coefficients lower than 20 % being obtained. Accuracy was assessed by determining absolute recovery percentage. Assay recoveries were 97.83 -105.50 % (serum), 93-121.50 % (adult spot dried blood) and 86.50-104.50 % (neonatal spot dried blood)

  7. A rapid and ultrasensitive SERRS assay for histidine and tyrosine based on azo coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Huimin; Wang, Yue; Yu, Zhi; Cong, Qian; Han, Xiao Xia; Zhao, Bing

    2016-10-01

    A simple and highly sensitive surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS)-based approach coupled with azo coupling reaction has been put forward for quantitative analysis of histidine and tyrosine. The SERRS-based assay is simple and rapid by mixing the azo reaction products with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) for measurements within 2min. The limits of detection (LODs) of the method are as low as 4.33×10(-11) and 8.80×10(-11)M for histidine and tyrosine, respectively. Moreover, the SERRS fingerprint information specific to corresponding amino acids guarantees the selective detection for the target histidine and tyrosine. The results from serum indicated the potential application of the proposed approach into biological samples. Compared with the methods ever reported, the main advantages of this methodology are simpleness, rapidity without time-consuming separation or pretreatment steps, high sensitivity, selectivity and the potential for determination of other molecules containing imidazole or phenol groups. PMID:27474300

  8. Label-free liquid crystal biosensor for L-histidine: A DNAzyme-based platform for small molecule assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shuzhen; Ding, Huazhi; Wu, Yan; Wu, Zhaoyang; Shen, Guoli; Yu, Ruqin

    2016-05-15

    We have developed a novel DNAzyme-based liquid crystal (LC) biosensor with high sensitivity for L-histidine, which is based on L-histidine-mediated formation of DNA duplexes by cleaving DNAzyme using L-histidine, resulting in a remarkable optical signal. Firstly, an optimal amount of capture probe is bound to the glass slide, which changes the surface topology as little as possible and shows a zero-background for the sensing system. When the DNAzyme molecule is cleaved by the target, L-histidine, a partial substrate strand is produced, which in turn can hybridize with the capture probe, forming a DNA duplex. The DNA duplexes induce LC molecules to undergo a homeotropic-to-tiled transition, obtaining a remarkable optical signal. The results show that the DNAzyme-based LC biosensor is highly sensitive to L-histidine with a detection limit of 50nM. Compared with previously reported multi-step amplified methods, this newly designed assay system for L-histidine has no amplified procedures with comparable sensitivity. This method is an unprecedented example of DNAzyme-based LC biosensor for small molecules, which has potential to offer a DNAzyme-based LC model used in various targets. PMID:26765528

  9. NMR studies of transmembrane electron transport in human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Electron transport systems exist in the plasma membranes of all cells. These systems appear to play a role in cell growth and proliferation, intracellular signalling, hormone responses, apoptotic events, cell defence and perhaps most importantly they enable the cell to respond to changes in the redox state of both the intra- and extracellular environments. Previously, 13C NMR has been used to study transmembrane electron transport in human erythrocytes, specifically the reduction of extracellular 13C-ferricyanide. NMR is a particularly useful tool for studying such systems as changes in the metabolic state of the cell can be observed concomitantly with extracellular reductase activity. We investigated the oxidation of extracellular NADH by human erythrocytes using 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopy. Recent results for glucose-starved human erythrocytes indicate that, under these conditions, extracellular NADH can be oxidised at the plasma membrane with the electron transfer across the membrane resulting in reduction of intracellular NAD+. The activity is inhibited by known trans-plasma membrane electron transport inhibitors (capsaicin and atebrin) and is unaffected by inhibition of the erythrocyte Band 3 anion transporter. These results suggest that electron import from extracellular NADH allows the cell to re-establish a reducing environment after the normal redox balance is disturbed

  10. Expression of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator in Rat Ovary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei JIN; Ruiling TANG

    2008-01-01

    Summary: The protein expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-activated Cl- channel, in ovarian stimulated premature female rat ovary during a cycle of follicle development and corpus luteum formation was investigated. Animals were injected with 10 U pregnant Mare's serum gonadotropin (PMSG) and subsequently 10U hCG 48h later. Time-dependent immunohistochemistry and Western blotting experiments were performed before and 24, 48, 72h after hCG treatment. The immnnohistochemistry revealed that administration of PMSG stimulated the CFTR expression in theeal cell layer and granulosa cell layer of mature follicles 48 h post injection, coincident with the PMSG-induced peak in follicular estradiol. However, the expression of CFTR in the granuiose lutein cell layer and theeal lutein cell layer was time-dependently reduced following hCG injection, in accordance with the gradually increased progestogen level during luteum corpus formation. Western blotting analysis demonstrated that rat ovarian tissue expressed the special CFTR band at 170kD. It is concluded that cAMP-dependent Cl- channels are involved in regulation of follicle development and luteum formation.

  11. Role of GxxxG Motifs in Transmembrane Domain Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teese, Mark G; Langosch, Dieter

    2015-08-25

    Transmembrane (TM) helices of integral membrane proteins can facilitate strong and specific noncovalent protein-protein interactions. Mutagenesis and structural analyses have revealed numerous examples in which the interaction between TM helices of single-pass membrane proteins is dependent on a GxxxG or (small)xxx(small) motif. It is therefore tempting to use the presence of these simple motifs as an indicator of TM helix interactions. In this Current Topic review, we point out that these motifs are quite common, with more than 50% of single-pass TM domains containing a (small)xxx(small) motif. However, the actual interaction strength of motif-containing helices depends strongly on sequence context and membrane properties. In addition, recent studies have revealed several GxxxG-containing TM domains that interact via alternative interfaces involving hydrophobic, polar, aromatic, or even ionizable residues that do not form recognizable motifs. In multipass membrane proteins, GxxxG motifs can be important for protein folding, and not just oligomerization. Our current knowledge thus suggests that the presence of a GxxxG motif alone is a weak predictor of protein dimerization in the membrane. PMID:26244771

  12. Transmembrane channel-like (tmc) gene regulates Drosophila larval locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yanmeng; Wang, Yuping; Zhang, Wei; Meltzer, Shan; Zanini, Damiano; Yu, Yue; Li, Jiefu; Cheng, Tong; Guo, Zhenhao; Wang, Qingxiu; Jacobs, Julie S; Sharma, Yashoda; Eberl, Daniel F; Göpfert, Martin C; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung; Wang, Zuoren

    2016-06-28

    Drosophila larval locomotion, which entails rhythmic body contractions, is controlled by sensory feedback from proprioceptors. The molecular mechanisms mediating this feedback are little understood. By using genetic knock-in and immunostaining, we found that the Drosophila melanogaster transmembrane channel-like (tmc) gene is expressed in the larval class I and class II dendritic arborization (da) neurons and bipolar dendrite (bd) neurons, both of which are known to provide sensory feedback for larval locomotion. Larvae with knockdown or loss of tmc function displayed reduced crawling speeds, increased head cast frequencies, and enhanced backward locomotion. Expressing Drosophila TMC or mammalian TMC1 and/or TMC2 in the tmc-positive neurons rescued these mutant phenotypes. Bending of the larval body activated the tmc-positive neurons, and in tmc mutants this bending response was impaired. This implicates TMC's roles in Drosophila proprioception and the sensory control of larval locomotion. It also provides evidence for a functional conservation between Drosophila and mammalian TMCs. PMID:27298354

  13. 1H NMR studies of insulin: histidine residues, metal binding, and dissociation in alkaline solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shifts of the H2 histidine B5 and B10 resonances of 2-Zn insulin hexamer were followed in 2H2O by 1H NMR spectroscopy at 270 MHz from pH 9.85 to 7. The two resonances present at high pH, previously assigned to H2 histidine B5 and B10 residues, moved slightly downfield and split into four resonances at pH 8.95 and also at pH 7. By use of a paramagnetic broadening probe (Mn2+) and the addition of Zn2+ to metal-free insulin, it was deduced that the four resonances arose from histidines B10 and B5 in two different magnetic environments, probably either bound to Zn2+ or not bound to Zn2+. The pK' values of the B5 and B10 histidines were determined in 60% 2H2O-40% dioxan, in which insulin was soluble throughout the pH range, to be 7.1 and 6.8, respectively at 37 degrees C. Studies at higher pH indicated that at a concentration level suitable for 1H NMR (approximately 1 mM) at 37 degrees C in 2H2O the 2-Zn hexamer was largely dissociated to dimer at pH 10.3 and to monomer at pH 10.8. Addition of paramagnetic shift probe Ni2+ to metal-free insulin caused changes to the spectrum similar to those produced on addition of diamagnetic Zn2+. Addition of Co2+ gave a different result, but there was no paramagnetic shift of the H2 histidine B10 resonance, probably because of rapid exchange at the binding site. Addition of Cd2+ and of Cd2+ and Ca2+ produced changes that were similar to each other but were different from those observed on addition of Zn2+, probably due to the binding of Cd2+ and Ca2+ at glutamate B13

  14. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanoparticle modulated turn-on fluorescent probes for histidine detection and its imaging in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaohua; Zhao, Tingbi; Nie, Zhou; Miao, Zhuang; Liu, Yang; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2016-01-01

    In this work, nitrogen-doped carbon nanoparticle (N-CNP) modulated turn-on fluorescent probes were developed for rapid and selective detection of histidine. The as synthesized N-CNPs exhibited high fluorescence quantum yield and excellent biocompatibility. The fluorescence of N-CNPs can be quenched selectively by Cu(ii) ions with high efficiency, and restored by the addition of histidine owing to the competitive binding of Cu(ii) ions and histidine that removes Cu(ii) ions from the surface of the N-CNPs. Under the optimal conditions, a linear relationship between the increased fluorescence intensity of N-CNP/Cu(ii) ion conjugates and the concentration of histidine was established in the range from 0.5 to 60 μM. The detection limit was as low as 150 nM (signal-to-noise ratio of 3). In addition, the as-prepared N-CNP/Cu(ii) ion nanoprobes showed excellent biocompatibility and were applied for a histidine imaging assay in living cells, which presented great potential in the bio-labeling assay and clinical diagnostic applications.In this work, nitrogen-doped carbon nanoparticle (N-CNP) modulated turn-on fluorescent probes were developed for rapid and selective detection of histidine. The as synthesized N-CNPs exhibited high fluorescence quantum yield and excellent biocompatibility. The fluorescence of N-CNPs can be quenched selectively by Cu(ii) ions with high efficiency, and restored by the addition of histidine owing to the competitive binding of Cu(ii) ions and histidine that removes Cu(ii) ions from the surface of the N-CNPs. Under the optimal conditions, a linear relationship between the increased fluorescence intensity of N-CNP/Cu(ii) ion conjugates and the concentration of histidine was established in the range from 0.5 to 60 μM. The detection limit was as low as 150 nM (signal-to-noise ratio of 3). In addition, the as-prepared N-CNP/Cu(ii) ion nanoprobes showed excellent biocompatibility and were applied for a histidine imaging assay in living cells, which

  15. Structure, function, and evolution of bacterial ATP-binding cassette systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, A.L.; Dassa, E.; Orelle, C.; Chen, J. (Purdue)

    2010-07-27

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) systems constitute one of the largest superfamilies of paralogous sequences. All ABC systems share a highly conserved ATP-hydrolyzing domain or protein (the ABC; also referred to as a nucleotide-binding domain [NBD]) that is unequivocally characterized by three short sequence motifs (Fig. 1): these are the Walker A and Walker B motifs, indicative of the presence of a nucleotide-binding site, and the signature motif, unique to ABC proteins, located upstream of the Walker B motif (426). Other motifs diagnostic of ABC proteins are also indicated in Fig. 1. The biological significance of these motifs is discussed in Structure, Function, and Dynamics of the ABC. ABC systems are widespread among living organisms and have been detected in all genera of the three kingdoms of life, with remarkable conservation in the primary sequence of the cassette and in the organization of the constitutive domains or subunits (203, 420). ABC systems couple the energy of ATP hydrolysis to an impressively large variety of essential biological phenomena, comprising not only transmembrane (TM) transport, for which they are best known, but also several non-transport-related processes, such as translation elongation (62) and DNA repair (174). Although ABC systems deserve much attention because they are involved in severe human inherited diseases (107), they were first discovered and characterized in detail in prokaryotes, as early as the 1970s (13, 148, 238, 468). The most extensively analyzed systems were the high-affinity histidine and maltose uptake systems of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli. Over 2 decades ago, after the completion of the nucleotide sequences encoding these transporters in the respective laboratories of Giovanna Ames and Maurice Hofnung, Hiroshi Nikaido and colleagues noticed that the two systems displayed a global similarity in the nature of their components and, moreover, that the primary sequences of MalK and

  16. Chemical synthesis of transmembrane peptide and its application for research on the transmembrane-juxtamembrane region of membrane protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takeshi

    2016-11-01

    Membrane proteins possess one or more hydrophobic regions that span the membrane and interact with the lipids that constitute the membrane. The interactions between the transmembrane (TM) region and lipids affect the structure and function of these membrane proteins. Molecular characterization of synthetic TM peptides in lipid bilayers helps to understand how the TM region participates in the formation of the structure and in the function of membrane proteins. The use of synthetic peptides enables site-specific labeling and modification and allows for designing of an artificial TM sequence. Research involving such samples has resulted in significant increase in the knowledge of the mechanisms that govern membrane biology. In this review, the chemical synthesis of TM peptides has been discussed. The preparation of synthetic TM peptides is still not trivial; however, the accumulated knowledge summarized here should provide a basis for preparing samples for spectroscopic analyses. The application of synthetic TM peptides for gaining insights into the mechanism of signal transduction by receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) has also been discussed. RTK is a single TM protein and is one of the difficult targets in structural biology as crystallization of the full-length receptor has not been successful. This review describes the structural characterization of the synthetic TM-juxtamembrane sequence and proposes a possible scheme for the structural changes in this region for the activation of ErbBs, the epidermal growth factor receptor family. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 613-621, 2016. PMID:26573237

  17. Role of L-Histidine in Preventing the Toxicological effects Induced by Chromium or Nickel Metals in Male Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many heavy metals including chromium and nickel are widely distributed evolving occupational and environmental exposure risks which may result in adverse health effects. Some antioxidantal amino acids such as L-histidine can ameliorate the toxic effects of these metals. In this study, forty male albino rats were divided into 5 groups, the first group served as control. On the base of body weight, the second group of rats was supplemented with 10 mg/kg hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), dissolved in water for two months. The third group of rats was supplemented with 20 mg/kg nickel as NiCl2 dissolved in water for two months. The fourth group of rats was supplemented with 10 mg/kg chromium hexavalent Cr(VI) in water and fed on 2.5% L-histidine in diet for two months. The fifth group of rats was supplemented with 20 mg/kg nickel as NiCl2 in water and fed on 2.5% L-histidine in diet for two months. The protective effect of L-histidine was monitored by studying the haematological indices and some biochemical aspects in serum such as iron (Fe), copper (Cu), zinc(Zn), kidney function (urea, creatinine and creatinine clearance), albumin, total protein and globulin and also thyroid function; triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were evaluated. Spleen tissues were dissected for histopathological examination. The results showed that significant decrease in RBCs, blood hemoglobin, Ht%, MCV, MCH and MCHC were observed, while platelets count was increased significantly after supplementation the rats with chromium and nickel in toxic dose. White blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes were decreased significantly in chromium group and increased significantly in nickel group. Neutrophils were increased non-significantly and basophils were decreased only in nickel group. Monocytes and eosinophils were increased in chromium and nickel groups, and the pronounced increase was observed in nickel group. L-histidine

  18. Bacterial Nail Infection (Paronychia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of nail infection is often caused by a bacterial infection but may also be caused by herpes, a ... to a type of yeast called Candida , or bacterial infection, and this may lead to abnormal nail growth. ...

  19. Structure and function of transmembrane segment XII in osmosensor and osmoprotectant transporter ProP of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Culham, Doreen E; Vernikovska, Yaroslava I; Keates, Robert A B; Boggs, Joan M; Wood, Janet M

    2007-05-15

    Escherichia coli transporter ProP acts as both an osmosensor and an osmoregulator. As medium osmolality rises, ProP is activated and mediates H+-coupled uptake of osmolytes like proline. A homology model of ProP with 12-transmembrane (TM) helices and cytoplasmic termini was created, and the protein's topology was substantiated experimentally. Residues 468-497, at the end of the C-terminal domain and linked to TM XII, form an intermolecular, homodimeric alpha-helical coiled-coil that tunes the transporter's response to osmolality. We aim to further define the structure and function of ProP residues Q415-E440, predicted to include TM XII. Each residue was replaced with cysteine (Cys) in a histidine-tagged, Cys-less ProP variant (ProP*). Cys at positions 415-418 and 438-440 were most reactive with Oregon Green Maleimide (OGM), suggesting that residues 419 through 437 are in the membrane. Except for V429-I433, reactivity of those Cys varied with helical periodicity. Cys predicted to face the interior of ProP were more reactive than Cys predicted to face the lipid. The former may be exposed to hydrated polar residues in the protein interior, particularly on the periplasmic side. Intermolecular cross-links formed when ProP* variants with Cys at positions 419, 420, 422, and 439 were treated with DTME. Thus TM XII can participate, along its entire length, in the dimer interface of ProP. Cys substitution E440C rendered ProP* inactive. All other variants retained more than 30% of the proline uptake activity of ProP* at high osmolality. Most variants with Cys substitutions in the periplasmic half of TM XII activated at lower osmolalities than ProP*. Variants with Cys substitutions on one face of the cytoplasmic half of TM XII required a higher osmolality to activate. They included elements of a GXXXG motif that are predicted to form the interface of TM XII with TM VII. These studies define the position of ProP TM XII within the membrane, further support the predicted

  20. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach that....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will...

  1. Functional characterization of transmembrane adenylyl cyclases from the honeybee brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfanz, Sabine; Ehling, Petra; Wachten, Sebastian; Jordan, Nadine; Erber, Joachim; Mujagic, Samir; Baumann, Arnd

    2012-06-01

    The second messenger cAMP has a pivotal role in animals' physiology and behavior. Intracellular concentrations of cAMP are balanced by cAMP-synthesizing adenylyl cyclases (ACs) and cAMP-cleaving phosphodiesterases. Knowledge about ACs in the honeybee (Apis mellifera) is rather limited and only an ortholog of the vertebrate AC3 isoform has been functionally characterized, so far. Employing bioinformatics and functional expression we characterized two additional honeybee genes encoding membrane-bound (tm)ACs. The proteins were designated AmAC2t and AmAC8. Unlike the common structure of tmACs, AmAC2t lacks the first transmembrane domain. Despite this unusual topography, AmAC2t-activity could be stimulated by norepinephrine and NKH477 with EC(50s) of 0.07 μM and 3 μM. Both ligands stimulated AmAC8 with EC(50s) of 0.24 μM and 3.1 μM. In brain cryosections, intensive staining of mushroom bodies was observed with specific antibodies against AmAC8, an expression pattern highly reminiscent of the Drosophila rutabaga AC. In a current release of the honeybee genome database we identified three additional tmAC- and one soluble AC-encoding gene. These results suggest that (1) the AC-gene family in honeybees is comparably large as in other species, and (2) based on the restricted expression of AmAC8 in mushroom bodies, this enzyme might serve important functions in honeybee behavior. PMID:22426196

  2. [Polymethoxylated flavonoids activate cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huan-Huan; Fang, Fang; Yu, Bo; Luan, Jian; Jiang, Yu; Yang, Hong

    2015-04-25

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-dependent chloride channel, plays key roles in fluid secretion in serous epithelial cells. Previously, we identified two polymethoxylated flavonoids, 3',4',5,5',6,7-hexamethoxyflavone (HMF) and 5-hydroxy-6,7,3',4'-tetramethoxyflavone (HTF) which could potentiate CFTR chloride channel activities. The present study was aimed to investigate the potentiation effects of HMF and HTF on CFTR Cl(-) channel activities by using a cell-based fluorescence assay and the short circuit Ussing chamber assay. The results of cell-based fluorescence assay showed that both HMF and HTF could dose-dependently potentiate CFTR Cl(-) channel activities in rapid and reversible ways, and the activations could be reversed by the CFTR blocker CFTRinh-172. Notably, HMF showed the highest affinity (EC50 = 2 μmol/L) to CFTR protein among the flavonoid CFTR activators identified so far. The activation of CFTR by HMF or HTF was forskolin (FSK) dependent. Both compounds showed additive effect with FSK and 3-Isobutyl-1-methylx (IBMX) in the activation of CFTR, while had no additive effect with genistein (GEN). In ex vivo studies, HMF and HTF could stimulate transepithelial Cl(-) secretion in rat colonic mucosa and enhance fluid secretion in mouse trachea submucosal glands. These results suggest that HMF and HTF may potentiate CFTR Cl(-) channel activities through both elevation of cAMP level and binding to CFTR protein pathways. The results provide new clues in elucidating structure and activity relationship of flavonoid CFTR activators. HMF might be developed as a new drug in the therapy of CFTR-related diseases such as bronchiectasis and habitual constipation. PMID:25896054

  3. L-histidine augments the response to 1-deamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin in Brattleboro homozygous (di/di) rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Charnogursky, G; Moses, A M; Coulson, R.; Bernstein, M; Carvounis, C P

    1990-01-01

    Studies in vitro have shown that L-histidine increases the hydroosmotic response to vasopressin. We examined whether this phenomenon occurs also in vivo. Homozygous Brattleboro rats (di/di) were fed a regular diet (0.5% histidine) or a diet enriched with histidine and received 1 ng of 1-deamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin (dDAVP) daily. Addition of histidine (1% by weight) increased post-dDAVP urine osmolality to a level higher than that of control (502 +/- 62 vs. 316 +/- 36 mosmol/kg, P less th...

  4. Free energy barrier for melittin reorientation from a membrane-bound state to a transmembrane state

    OpenAIRE

    Irudayam, Sheeba J.; Pobandt, Tobias; Berkowitz, Max L.

    2013-01-01

    An important step in a phospholipid membrane pore formation by melittin antimicrobial peptide is a reorientation of the peptide from a surface into a transmembrane conformation. In this work we perform umbrella sampling simulations to calculate the potential of mean force (PMF) for the reorientation of melittin from a surface-bound state to a transmembrane state and provide a molecular level insight into understanding peptide and lipid properties that influence the existence of the free energ...

  5. Neutron Diffraction Studies of Fluid Bilayers with Transmembrane Proteins: Structural Consequences of the Achondroplasia Mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Xue; Mihailescu, Mihaela; Hristova, Kalina

    2006-01-01

    Achondroplasia, the most common form of human dwarfism, is due to a G380R mutation in the transmembrane domain of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) in >97% of the studied cases. While the molecular mechanism of pathology induction is under debate, the structural consequences of the mutation have not been studied. Here we use neutron diffraction to determine the disposition of FGFR3 transmembrane domain in fluid lipid bilayers, and investigate whether the G380R mutation affects the t...

  6. Transmembrane Protein Diffusion in Gel-Supported Dual-Leaflet Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Chih-Ying; Hill, Reghan J.

    2014-01-01

    Tools to measure transmembrane-protein diffusion in lipid bilayer membranes have advanced in recent decades, providing a need for predictive theoretical models that account for interleaflet leaflet friction on tracer mobility. Here we address the fully three-dimensional flows driven by a (nonprotruding) transmembrane protein embedded in a dual-leaflet membrane that is supported above and below by soft porous supports (e.g., hydrogel or extracellular matrix), each of which has a prescribed per...

  7. TMRPres2D: high quality visual representation of transmembrane protein models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyropoulos, Ioannis C; Liakopoulos, Theodore D; Bagos, Pantelis G; Hamodrakas, Stavros J

    2004-11-22

    The 'TransMembrane protein Re-Presentation in 2-Dimensions' (TMRPres2D) tool, automates the creation of uniform, two-dimensional, high analysis graphical images/models of alpha-helical or beta-barrel transmembrane proteins. Protein sequence data and structural information may be acquired from public protein knowledge bases, emanate from prediction algorithms, or even be defined by the user. Several important biological and physical sequence attributes can be embedded in the graphical representation. PMID:15201184

  8. Transmembrane Protease Serine 4 Promotes Thyroid Cancer Proliferation via CREB Phosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Hongyu; Liang, Weiwei; LIU, JUAN; Wei, Guohong; Li, Hai; Xiu, Lingling; Xiao, Haipeng; Li, Yanbing

    2015-01-01

    Background: Transmembrane protease serine 4 (TMPRSS4), one of the type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs), is elevated in various cancers and is associated with multiple malignant phenotypes. However, the expression pattern and biologic significance of TMPRSS4 in thyroid cancer are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the expression of TMPRSS4 in thyroid cancer and assessed the pro-proliferative role of TMPRSS4 in thyroid cancer.

  9. Bacterial expression of human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase: Solubility, activity, purification ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, K; Mole, D J; Binnie, M; Homer, N Z M; Zheng, X.; B.A. Yard; Iredale, J P; Auer, M.; Webster, S.P.

    2014-01-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is an enzyme central to the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism. KMO has been implicated as a therapeutic target in several disease states, including Huntington’s disease. Recombinant human KMO protein production is challenging due to the presence of transmembrane domains, which localise KMO to the outer mitochondrial membrane and render KMO insoluble in many in vitro expression systems. Efficient bacterial expression of human KMO would accelerate drug...

  10. Bacterial expression of human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase:Solubility, activity, purification

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, K; Mole, D J; Binnie, M; Homer, N Z M; Zheng, X.; B.A. Yard; Iredale, J P; Auer, M.; Webster, S.P.

    2014-01-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is an enzyme central to the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism. KMO has been implicated as a therapeutic target in several disease states, including Huntington's disease. Recombinant human KMO protein production is challenging due to the presence of transmembrane domains, which localise KMO to the outer mitochondrial membrane and render KMO insoluble in many in vitro expression systems. Efficient bacterial expression of human KMO would accelerate drug...

  11. Crystal studies, vibrational spectra and non-linear optical properties of L-histidine chloride monohydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, A. Ben; Feki, H.; Abid, Y.; Boughzala, H.; Minot, C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of our calculations on the geometric parameters, vibrational spectra and hyperpolarizability of a non-linear optical material L-histidine chloride monohydrate. Due to the lack of sufficiently precise information on geometric parameters available in literature, theoretical calculations were preceded by re-determination of the crystal X-ray structure. Single crystal of L-histidine chloride monohydrate has been growing by slow evaporation of an aqueous solution at room temperature. The compound crystallizes in the non-Centro-symmetric space group P2 12 12 1 of orthorhombic system. IR spectrum has been recorded in the range [400-4000 cm -1]. All the experimental vibrational bands have been discussed and assigned to normal mode or to combinations on the basis of our calculations. The optimized geometric bond lengths and bond angles obtained by using DFT//B3LYP/6-31G (d) method show a good agreement with the experimental data. The calculated vibrational spectra are in well agreement with the experimental one. To investigate microscopic second-order non-linear optical NLO behavior of the examined complex, the electric dipole μ, the polarizability α and the hyperpolarizability β were computed using DFT//B3LYP/6-31G (d) method. The time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) was employed to descript the molecular electron structure of the title compound using the B3LYP/6-31G (d) method. According to our calculations, L-histidine chloride monohydrate exhibits non-zero β value revealing microscopic second-order NLO behavior.

  12. Silver adducts of four-branched histidine rich peptides exhibit synergistic antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Qixin; Woodle, Martin C; Liu, Yijia; Mixson, A James

    2016-09-01

    Previously, a four branched histidine-lysine rich peptide, H3K4b, was shown to demonstrate selective antifungal activity with minimal antibacterial activity. Due to the potential breakdown from proteases, H3K4b was further evaluated in the current study by varying the D- and l-amino acid content in its branches. Whereas analogues of H3K4b that selectively replaced l-amino acids (H3k4b, h3K4b) had improved antifungal activity, the all d-amino acid analogue, h3k4b, had reduced activity, suggesting that partial breakdown of the peptide may be necessary. Moreover, because histidines form coordination bonds with the silver ion, we examined whether silver adducts can be formed with these branched histidine-lysine peptides, which may improve antifungal activity. For Candida albicans, the silver adduct of h3K4b or H3k4b reduced the MIC compared to peptide and silver ions alone by 4- and 5-fold, respectively. For Aspergillus fumigatus, the silver adducts showed even greater enhancement of activity. Although the silver adducts of H3k4b or h3K4b showed synergistic activity, the silver adduct with the all l-amino acid H3K4b surprisingly showed the greatest synergistic and growth inhibition of A. fumigatus: the silver adduct of H3K4b reduced the MIC compared to the peptide and silver ions alone by 30- and 26-fold, respectively. Consistent with these antifungal efficacy results, marked increases in free oxygen radicals were produced with the H3K4b and silver combination. These studies suggest that there is a balance between stability and breakdown for optimal antifungal activity of the peptide alone and for the peptide-silver adduct. PMID:27387239

  13. Proton affinity of the histidine-tryptophan cluster motif from the influenza A virus from ab initio molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bankura, Arindam; Klein, Michael L.; Carnevale, Vincenzo, E-mail: vincenzo.carnevale@temple.edu

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: • The estimated pK{sub a} is in agreement with the experimental one. • The affinity for protons is similar to that of a histidine residue in aqueous solution. • The electrostatic environment is responsible for the stabilization of the charged imidazolium moiety. - Abstract: Ab initio molecular dynamics calculations have been used to compare and contrast the deprotonation reaction of a histidine residue in aqueous solution with the situation arising in a histidine-tryptophan cluster. The latter is used as a model of the proton storage unit present in the pore of the M2 proton conducting ion channel. We compute potentials of mean force for the dissociation of a proton from the Nδ and N∊ positions of the imidazole group to estimate the pK{sub a}s. Anticipating our results, we will see that the estimated pK{sub a} for the first protonation event of the M2 channel is in good agreement with experimental estimates. Surprisingly, despite the fact that the histidine is partially desolvated in the M2 channel, the affinity for protons is similar to that of a histidine in aqueous solution. Importantly, the electrostatic environment provided by the indoles is responsible for the stabilization of the charged imidazolium.

  14. Proton affinity of the histidine-tryptophan cluster motif from the influenza A virus from ab initio molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The estimated pKa is in agreement with the experimental one. • The affinity for protons is similar to that of a histidine residue in aqueous solution. • The electrostatic environment is responsible for the stabilization of the charged imidazolium moiety. - Abstract: Ab initio molecular dynamics calculations have been used to compare and contrast the deprotonation reaction of a histidine residue in aqueous solution with the situation arising in a histidine-tryptophan cluster. The latter is used as a model of the proton storage unit present in the pore of the M2 proton conducting ion channel. We compute potentials of mean force for the dissociation of a proton from the Nδ and N∊ positions of the imidazole group to estimate the pKas. Anticipating our results, we will see that the estimated pKa for the first protonation event of the M2 channel is in good agreement with experimental estimates. Surprisingly, despite the fact that the histidine is partially desolvated in the M2 channel, the affinity for protons is similar to that of a histidine in aqueous solution. Importantly, the electrostatic environment provided by the indoles is responsible for the stabilization of the charged imidazolium

  15. Volumetric, ultrasonic, and viscometric behaviour of l-histidine in aqueous-glucose solutions at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → The study reports interactions of l-histidine with carbohydrates in aqueous media. → Provides data to estimate physicochemical properties of proteins in these media. → Provides better understanding biological phenomena involving l-histidine. → Correlates physicochemical properties of l-histidine with its behavior in solution. - Abstract: Densities, ρ, ultrasonic speeds, u, and viscosities, η, of aqueous-glucose (5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% of glucose, w/w in water) and of solutions of l-histidine in aqueous-glucose solvents were measured at T = (293.15, 298.15, 303.15, 308.15, 313.15, and 318.15) K. From these experimental data, apparent molar volume, Vφ, limiting apparent molar volume, Vφ0 and the slope, Sv, apparent molar compressibility, Ks,φ, limiting apparent molar compressibility, Ks,φ0 and the slope, Sk, transfer volume, Vφ,tr0, transfer compressibility, Ks,φ,tr0, Falkenhagen coefficient, A, Jones-Dole coefficient, B, and temperature derivative of B-coefficient, dB/dT were calculated. The results are interpreted in terms of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions in these systems. It has been observed that there exist strong solute-solvent interactions in these systems, which increase with increase in glucose concentration. It has also been observed that l-histidine act as structure-maker in aqueous-glucose solvents.

  16. Relationships of Dietary Histidine and Obesity in Northern Chinese Adults, an Internet-Based Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Chuan; Li, Chun-Long; Qi, Jia-Yue; Huang, Li-Na; Shi, Dan; Du, Shan-Shan; Liu, Li-Yan; Feng, Ren-Nan; Sun, Chang-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that histidine supplementation significantly ameliorates inflammation and oxidative stress in obese women and high-fat diet-induced obese rats. However, the effects of dietary histidine on general population are not known. The objective of this Internet-based cross-sectional study was to evaluate the associations between dietary histidine and prevalence of overweight/obesity and abdominal obesity in northern Chinese population. A total of 2376 participants were randomly recruited and asked to finish our Internet-based dietary questionnaire for the Chinese (IDQC). Afterwards, 88 overweight/obese participants were randomly selected to explore the possible mechanism. Compared with healthy controls, dietary histidine was significantly lower in overweight (p glucose (FBG), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), 2-h postprandial glucose (2 h-PG), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), malonaldehyde (MDA) and vaspin and higher glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and adiponectin of overweight/obese individuals of both sexes. In conclusion, higher dietary histidine is inversely associated with energy intake, status of insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress in overweight/obese participants and lower prevalence of overweight/obesity in northern Chinese adults. PMID:27409634

  17. Ultraviolet spectrophotometric characterization of copper(II) complexes with imidazole N-methyl derivatives of ?-histidine in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenesti, Enrico; Berto, Silvia; Daniele, Pier Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    In this study we considered π-methyl- L-histidine (π-methis) and τ-methyl- L-histidine (τ-methis) as ligands for copper(II) ion, in order to clarify, by means of ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy in aqueous solution ( T=25 °C, I=0.1 M), some aspects of the co-ordination mode with respect to other ligands of a previous study in which copper(II) complexes of L-histidine, N-acetyl- L-histidine, histamine, L-histidine methyl ester or carnosine were investigated. Particularly, UV spectra (300-400 nm) were recorded on solutions at various pH values, containing each binary system Cu-L; afterwards, an UV absorption spectrum for single complexes was calculated, taking into account the chemical model previously assessed, in order to fulfil a correct spectrum-structure correlation. The problem related to the eventual superimposition of the CT shoulder (≈330 nm) to copper(II) of OH - and imidazole pyridine nitrogen groups were now solved by means of a comparison of the UV spectra of dimer species formed by both π-methis or τ-methis. Finally, copper(II) complex formation with 2,2'-bipyridine was taken into account to compare the behaviour of pyridine (from 2,2'-bipyridine) and pyridine imidazole nitrogens (from π-methis or τ-methis) with respect to the UV charge transfer process to copper(II) ion.

  18. A Thermochemical Study on Complex Nickel(Ⅲ)L—α—Histidine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAOSheng-li; CHENSan-ping; HURong-zu; SHIQi-zhen

    2003-01-01

    The formation enthalpy ofcomplex nickel(Ⅱ)-histidine(His)in water was determined by means of microcalorimetry in the temperature range of 298.15-323.15K.The standard enthalpy of the formation of Ni(His)22+ (aq) was calculated.On the basis of the experimental and the calculated results,three thermodynamic parameters(the activation enthaly,the activation entropy and the activation free energy),the rate constants,three kinetic parameters(the apparent activation energy,the pre-exponential constant and the reaction order)of the formation reaction of the title complex were obtained.

  19. A Thermochemical Study on Complex Nickel(Ⅱ) L-α-Histidine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The formation enthalpy of complex nickel(Ⅱ)-histidine(His) in water was determined by means of microcalorimetry in the temperature range of 298.15-323.15 K. The standard enthalpy of the formation of Ni(His)2+2(aq) was calculated. On the basis of the experimental and the calculated results, three thermodynamic parameters(the activation enthalpy, the activation entropy and the activation free energy), the rate constants, three kinetic parameters(the apparent activation energy, the pre-exponential constant and the reaction order) of the formation reaction of the title complex were obtained.

  20. Highly Efficient Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production of Flower-like Cadmium Sulfide Decorated by Histidine

    OpenAIRE

    Qizhao Wang; Juhong Lian; Jiajia Li; Rongfang Wang; Haohao Huang; Bitao Su; Ziqiang Lei

    2015-01-01

    Morphology-controlled synthesis of CdS can significantly enhance the efficiency of its photocatalytic hydrogen production. In this study, a novel three-dimensional (3D) flower-like CdS is synthesized via a facile template-free hydrothermal process using Cd(NO3)2•4H2O and thiourea as precursors and L-Histidine as a chelating agent. The morphology, crystal phase, and photoelectrochemical performance of the flower-like CdS and pure CdS nanocrystals are carefully investigated via various characte...

  1. Growth and characterization of L-histidine cadmium chloride monohydrate a semiorganic nonlinear optical crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, J.; Ilayabarathi, P.; Maadeswaran, P.; Mohamed Kutty, P.; Pari, S.

    2012-04-01

    L-histidine cadmium chloride monohydrate (LHCCM), a semiorganic nonlinear optical material was grown from aqueous solution by slow solvent evaporation method at room temperature. The LHCCM crystals were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction analysis. The presence of functional groups was identified through fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis confirms that the crystal is stable up to 277 °C. The dielectric constant was studied as a function of frequency for various temperatures. The mechanical properties of the grown crystals have been studied using Vickers microhardness tester. The second harmonic generation behavior of LHCCM crystal was tested by modified Kurtz-Perry powder technique.

  2. Histidine kinases mediate differentiation, stress response, and pathogenicity in Magnaporthe oryzae

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob, Stefan; Foster, Andrew J.; Yemelin, Alexander; Thines, Eckhard

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is a functional characterization of 10 putative histidine kinases (HIKs)-encoding genes in the phytopathogenic fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. Two HIKs were found to be required for pathogenicity in the fungus. It was found that the mutant strains ΔMohik5 and ΔMohik8 show abnormal conidial morphology and furthermore ΔMohik5 is unable to form appressoria. Both HIKs MoHik5p and MoHik8p appear to be essential for pathogenicity since the mutants fail to infect rice plants. MoSln1...

  3. Myxococcus xanthus sasS encodes a sensor histidine kinase required for early developmental gene expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, C.; Kaplan, H B

    1997-01-01

    Initiation of Myxococcus xanthus multicellular development requires integration of information concerning the cells' nutrient status and density. A gain-of-function mutation, sasB7, that bypasses both the starvation and high cell density requirements for developmental expression of the 4521 reporter gene, maps to the sasS gene. The wild-type sasS gene was cloned and sequenced. This gene is predicted to encode a sensor histidine protein kinase that appears to be a key element in the transducti...

  4. Effects of grain, fructose, and histidine feeding on endotoxin and oxidative stress measures in dairy heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golder, H M; Lean, I J; Rabiee, A R; King, R; Celi, P

    2013-01-01

    Ruminal endotoxin and plasma oxidative stress biomarker concentrations were studied in dairy heifers challenged with grain, fructose, and histidine in a partial factorial study. Holstein-Friesian heifers [n=30; average body weight (BW) of 359.3±47.3 kg] were randomly allocated to 5 treatment groups: (1) control (no grain); (2) grain [crushed triticale at 1.2% of BW dry matter intake (DMI)]; (3) grain (0.8% of BW DMI) + fructose (0.4% of BW DMI); (4) grain (1.2% of BW DMI) + histidine (6g/head); and (5) grain (0.8% of BW DMI) + fructose (0.4% of BW DMI) + histidine (6 g/head). Rumen samples were collected by stomach tube 5, 65, 115, 165, and 215 min after diet consumption and blood samples at 5 and 215 min after consumption. Rumen fluid was analyzed for endotoxin concentrations. Plasma was analyzed for concentrations of the following oxidative stress biomarkers: reactive oxygen metabolites (dROM), biological antioxidant potential (BAP), advanced oxidation protein products, and ceruloplasmin, and activity of glutathione peroxidase. Dietary treatment had no effect on concentrations of endotoxin or oxidative stress biomarkers. We observed no interactions of treatment by time. Ruminal concentrations of endotoxin decreased during the sampling period from 1.12×10(5) ± 0.06 to 0.92×10(5) endotoxin units/mL ± 0.05 (5 and 215 min after diet consumption, respectively). Concentrations of dROM and the oxidative stress index (dROM/BAP × 100) increased over the sampling period, from 108.7 to 123.5 Carratelli units (Carr U), and from 4.1 to 4.8, respectively. Ceruloplasmin concentrations markedly declined 5 min after the consumption of diets, from 190 to 90 mg/L over the 215-min sampling period. Overall, a single feeding challenge for dairy cattle with grain, fructose, and histidine, and combinations thereof, may not be sufficient to induce marked changes in endotoxin or oxidative stress biomarker concentrations. PMID:24119801

  5. Tagging the Expressed Protein with 6 Histidines: Rapid Cloning of an Amplicon with Three Options

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Manika Indrajit; Jain, Vikas

    2013-01-01

    We report the designing of three expression vectors that can be used for rapid cloning of any blunt-end DNA segment. Only a single set of oligonucleotides are required to perform the amplification of the target DNA and its cloning in all three vectors simultaneously. The DNA thus cloned can express a protein either with or without a hexa-histidine tag depending upon the vector used. The expression occurs from T7 promoter when transformed into E. coli BL21(DE3). Two of the three plasmids have ...

  6. Linking bacterial type I toxins with their actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brielle, Régine; Pinel-Marie, Marie-Laure; Felden, Brice

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial type I toxin-antitoxin systems consist of stable toxin-encoding mRNAs whose expression is counteracted by unstable RNA antitoxins. Accumulating evidence suggests that these players belong to broad regulatory networks influencing overall bacterial physiology. The majority of known transmembrane type I toxic peptides have conserved structural characteristics. However, recent studies demonstrated that their mechanisms of toxicity are diverse and complex. To better assess the current state of the art, type I toxins can be grouped into two classes according to their location and mechanisms of action: membrane-associated toxins acting by pore formation and/or by nucleoid condensation; and cytosolic toxins inducing nucleic acid cleavage. This classification will evolve as a result of future investigations. PMID:26874964

  7. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for insulin-like growth factor-I using six-histidine tag fused proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fusion proteins of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and six-histidine tag (IGF-I-6H, 6H-IGF-I-6H) were cloned, expressed, purified and renatured, with their immunoreaction properties and biological activities intact. The binding kinetics between these fusion proteins and anti-IGF-I antibody or anti-6H antibody were studied using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) modes, which proved feasible in the measurement of human serum samples, were used to detect IGF-I with the help of the six-histidine tagged proteins. Furthermore, combining the production technique of the six-histidine tagged fusion protein with the competitive sandwich ELISA mode, using an enzyme labeled anti-6H antibody as a tracer, can be a universal immunochemical method to quantitate other polypeptides or proteins

  8. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator and H+ Permeability in Regulation of Golgi pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machen TE

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews experiments from this lab that have tested the hypothesis that pH of the Golgi (pH(G of cystic fibrosis (CF airway epithelial cells is alkaline compared to normal, that this altered pH affects sialyltransferase and other Golgi enzymes controlling biochemical composition of the plasma membrane and that altered surface biochemistry increases bacterial binding. We generated a plasmid encoding a modified green fluorescence protein-sialyltransferase (GFP-ST chimera protein that was pH-sensitive and localized to the Golgi when transfected into HeLa cells and also CF and normal or cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator- (CFTR-corrected airway epithelial cells. Digital imaging microscopy of these Golgi-localized probes showed that there was no correlation between pH(G (6.4-7.0 and the presence of CFTR, whether cells were in HCO(3(-/CO(2-containing or in HCO(3(-/CO(2-free solutions. Activation of CFTR by raising cell [cAMP] had no effect on pH(G. Thus, CFTR seemed not to be involved in controlling pH(G. Experiments on HeLa cells using an avidin-sialyltransferase chimera in combination with a pH-sensitive fluorescent biotin indicated that even in cells that do not express CFTR, Cl(- and K(+ conductances of the Golgi and other organelle membranes were large and that pH(G was controlled solely by the H(+ v-ATPase countered by a H(+ leak. A mathematical model was applied to these and other published data to calculate passive H(+ permeability (P(H+ of the Golgi, endoplasmic reticulum, trans-Golgi network, recycling endosomes and secrety granules from a variety of cells. An organelle's acidity was inversely correlated to its calculated P(H+. We conclude that the CFTR plays a minor role in organelle pH regulation because other (Cl(- and K(+ channels are present in sufficient numbers to shunt voltages generated during H(+ pumping. Acidity of the Golgi (and perhaps other organelles appears to be determined by the activity of H

  9. NMR-based approach to measure the free energy of transmembrane helix-helix interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineev, Konstantin S; Lesovoy, Dmitry M; Usmanova, Dinara R; Goncharuk, Sergey A; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Bocharov, Eduard V; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the energetic parameters of transmembrane helix-helix interactions is necessary for the establishment of a structure-energy relationship for α-helical membrane domains. A number of techniques have been developed to measure the free energies of dimerization and oligomerization of transmembrane α-helices, and all of these have their advantages and drawbacks. In this study we propose a methodology to determine the magnitudes of the free energy of interactions between transmembrane helices in detergent micelles. The suggested approach employs solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to determine the population of the oligomeric states of the transmembrane domains and introduces a new formalism to describe the oligomerization equilibrium, which is based on the assumption that both the dimerization of the transmembrane domains and the dissociation of the dimer can occur only upon the collision of detergent micelles. The technique has three major advantages compared with other existing approaches: it may be used to analyze both weak and relatively strong dimerization/oligomerization processes, it works well for the analysis of complex equilibria, e.g. when monomer, dimer and high-order oligomer populations are simultaneously present in the solution, and it can simultaneously yield both structural and energetic characteristics of the helix-helix interaction under study. The proposed methodology was applied to investigate the oligomerization process of transmembrane domains of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) and vascular endothelium growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), and allowed the measurement of the free energy of dimerization of both of these objects. In addition the proposed method was able to describe the multi-state oligomerization process of the VEGFR2 transmembrane domain. PMID:24036227

  10. Murein lytic enzyme TgaA of Bifidobacterium bifidum MIMBb75 modulates dendritic cell maturation through its cysteine- and histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP) amidase domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmetti, Simone; Zanoni, Ivan; Balzaretti, Silvia; Miriani, Matteo; Taverniti, Valentina; De Noni, Ivano; Presti, Ilaria; Stuknyte, Milda; Scarafoni, Alessio; Arioli, Stefania; Iametti, Stefania; Bonomi, Francesco; Mora, Diego; Karp, Matti; Granucci, Francesca

    2014-09-01

    Bifidobacteria are Gram-positive inhabitants of the human gastrointestinal tract that have evolved close interaction with their host and especially with the host's immune system. The molecular mechanisms underlying such interactions, however, are largely unidentified. In this study, we investigated the immunomodulatory potential of Bifidobacterium bifidum MIMBb75, a bacterium of human intestinal origin commercially used as a probiotic. Particularly, we focused our attention on TgaA, a protein expressed on the outer surface of MIMBb75's cells and homologous to other known bacterial immunoactive proteins. TgaA is a peptidoglycan lytic enzyme containing two active domains: lytic murein transglycosylase (LT) and cysteine- and histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP). We ran immunological experiments stimulating dendritic cells (DCs) with the B. bifidum MIMBb75 and TgaA, with the result that both the bacterium and the protein activated DCs and triggered interleukin-2 (IL-2) production. In addition, we observed that the heterologous expression of TgaA in Bifidobacterium longum transferred to the bacterium the ability to induce IL-2. Subsequently, immunological experiments performed using two purified recombinant proteins corresponding to the single domains LT and CHAP demonstrated that the CHAP domain is the immune-reactive region of TgaA. Finally, we also showed that TgaA-dependent activation of DCs requires the protein CD14, marginally involves TRIF, and is independent of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and MyD88. In conclusion, our study suggests that the bacterial CHAP domain is a novel microbe-associated molecular pattern actively participating in the cross talk mechanisms between bifidobacteria and the host's immune system. PMID:24814791

  11. Histidine enhances carbamazepine action against seizures and improves spatial memory deficits induced by chronic transauricular kindling in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing LI; Chun-lei JIN; Li-sha XU; Zheng-bin ZHU-GE; Li-xia YANG; Lu-ying LIU; Zhong CHEN

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether histidine can enhance the anticonvulsant efficacy of carbamazepine (CBZ) and simultaneously improve the spatial memory impairment induced by transauricular kindled seizures in Sprague-Dawley rats. Methods:Chronic transauricular kindling was induced by repeated application of initially subconvulsive electrical stimulation through ear-clip electrodes once every 24 h until the occurrence of 3 consecutive clonic-tonic seizures. An 8-arm radial maze (4 arms baited) was used to measure spatial memory, and histamine and γ-aminobutyric acid levels were measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results: Chronic transauricular kindling produced a significant impairment of spatial memory and a marked decrease in histamine content in the hypothalamus, the brainstem, and the hippocampus. Injection of histidine (1000 mg/kg or 1500 mg/kg, ip) significantly inhibited transauricular kindled seizures. Injection of histidine at lower doses (200 mg/kg or 500 mg/kg, ip) had no appreciable anticonvulsant effect when administered alone, whereas it significantly potentiated the protective effects of CBZ against kindled seizures. CBZ had no meliorative effect on memory deficit, but, in contrast, histidine (200 mg/kg or 500 mg/kg, ip) alone or co-administered with CBZ significantly ameliorated the memory deficits induced by the seizures. Conclusion: Chronic transauricular kindling is a very useful animal model for evaluating memory deficits associated with epilepsy, and histidine has both a potentiate effect on the anticonvulsant efficacy of CBZ and an ameliorative effect on the spatial memory deficits induced in this model. Histidine at a specific dosage range might serve as a beneficial adjuvant for the clinical treatment of epilepsy, especially when accompanied by impaired spatial memory.

  12. Immobilized poly-L-histidine for chelation of metal cations and metal oxyanions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biohomopolymer poly-L-histidine (PLHis) was immobilized onto controlled pore glass (CPG) and its metal binding capabilities evaluated through the use of a flow injection-flame atomic absorption system. The metal binding capability of PLHis-CPG was determined through the analysis of the generated breakthrough curves. The polymer likely coordinates cationic metals through the imidazole side chain (pKa∼6) present on each histidine residue with both strong and weak binding sites for Cu2+, Cd2+, Co2+, and Ni2+. Weak to minimal binding was observed for Mn2+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, and Cr3+. The bound metals are quantitatively released from the column with an acid strip. It has also been shown that the protonated imidazole side chain present in acidic solutions is capable of binding metal oxyanions such as chromates, arsenates, and selenites; although oxyanion binding currently exhibits interferences from competing anions in solution, such as sulfate and nitrate. The interference in oxyanion binding is less severe in the presence of chloride, phosphate, and acetate. PLHis-CPG exhibits a capacity of ∼30 μmol Cu2+/g CPG in neutral to basic conditions, and a capacity of ∼70 μmol Cr(VI)/g CPG, ∼4 μmol As(V)/g CPG, and ∼4 μmol Se(IV)/g CPG in acidic conditions

  13. A Photochromic Histidine Kinase Rhodopsin (HKR1) That Is Bimodally Switched by Ultraviolet and Blue Light*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Meike; Mathes, Tilo; Bruun, Sara; Fudim, Roman; Hagedorn, Rolf; Tran Nguyen, Tra My; Kateriya, Suneel; Kennis, John T. M.; Hildebrandt, Peter; Hegemann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Rhodopsins are light-activated chromoproteins that mediate signaling processes via transducer proteins or promote active or passive ion transport as ion pumps or directly light-activated channels. Here, we provide spectroscopic characterization of a rhodopsin from the Chlamydomonas eyespot. It belongs to a recently discovered but so far uncharacterized family of histidine kinase rhodopsins (HKRs). These are modular proteins consisting of rhodopsin, a histidine kinase, a response regulator, and in some cases an effector domain such as an adenylyl or guanylyl cyclase, all encoded in a single protein as a two-component system. The recombinant rhodopsin fragment, Rh, of HKR1 is a UVA receptor (λmax = 380 nm) that is photoconverted by UV light into a stable blue light-absorbing meta state Rh-Bl (λmax = 490 nm). Rh-Bl is converted back to Rh-UV by blue light. Raman spectroscopy revealed that the Rh-UV chromophore is in an unusual 13-cis,15-anti configuration, which explains why the chromophore is deprotonated. The excited state lifetime of Rh-UV is exceptionally stable, probably caused by a relatively unpolar retinal binding pocket, converting into the photoproduct within about 100 ps, whereas the blue form reacts 100 times faster. We propose that the photochromic HKR1 plays a role in the adaptation of behavioral responses in the presence of UVA light. PMID:23027869

  14. N-acetyl-l-histidine, a Prominent Biomolecule in Brain and Eye of Poikilothermic Vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baslow, Morris H.; Guilfoyle, David N.

    2015-01-01

    N-acetyl-l-histidine (NAH) is a prominent biomolecule in brain, retina and lens of poikilothermic vertebrates. In fish lens, NAH exhibits an unusual compartmentalized metabolism. It is synthesized from l-histidine (His) and acetyl Co-enzyme A. However, NAH cannot be catabolized by lens cells. For its hydrolysis, NAH is exported to ocular fluid where a specific acylase cleaves His which is then actively taken up by lens and re-synthesized into NAH. This energy-dependent cycling suggested a pump mechanism operating at the lens/ocular fluid interface. Additional studies led to the hypothesis that NAH functioned as a molecular water pump (MWP) to maintain a highly dehydrated lens and avoid cataract formation. In this process, each NAH molecule released to ocular fluid down its gradient carries with it 33 molecules of bound water, effectively transporting the water against a water gradient. In ocular fluid the bound water is released for removal from the eye by the action of NAH acylase. In this paper, we demonstrate for the first time the identification of NAH in fish brain using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and describe recent evidence supporting the NAH MWP hypothesis. Using MRS, we also document a phylogenetic transition in brain metabolism between poikilothermic and homeothermic vertebrates. PMID:25919898

  15. Signal transduction in endothelial cells by the angiogenesis inhibitor histidine-rich glycoprotein targets focal adhesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) is an abundant heparin-binding plasma protein. We have shown that a fragment released from the central histidine/proline-rich (His/Pro-rich) domain of HRGP blocks endothelial cell migration in vitro and vascularization and growth of murine fibrosarcoma in vivo. The minimal active HRGP domain exerting the anti-angiogenic effect was recently narrowed down to a 35 amino acid peptide, HRGP330, derived from the His/Pro-rich domain of HRGP. By use of a signal transduction antibody array representing 400 different signal transduction molecules, we now show that HRGP and the synthetic peptide HRGP330 specifically induce tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and its downstream substrate paxillin in endothelial cells. HRGP/HRGP330 treatment of endothelial cells induced disruption of actin stress fibers, a process reversed by treatment of cells with the FAK inhibitor geldanamycin. In addition, VEGF-mediated endothelial cell tubular morphogenesis in a three-dimensional collagen matrix was inhibited by HRGP and HRGP330. In contrast, VEGF-induced proliferation was not affected by HRGP or HRGP330, demonstrating the central role of cell migration during tube formation. In conclusion, our data show that HRGP targets focal adhesions in endothelial cells, thereby disrupting the cytoskeletal organization and the ability of endothelial cells to assemble into vessel structures

  16. Active site histidine in spinach ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase modified by diethyl pyrocarbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    [3H] Diethyl pyrocarbonate was synthesized from [3H] ethanol prepared by the reduction of acetaldehyde by NaB3H4. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) from spinach was inactivated with this reagent at pH 7.0 the presence of 20 mM Mg2+, and tryptic peptides that contained modified histidine residues were isolated by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Labeling of the enzyme was conducted in the presence and absence of the competitive inhibitor sedoheptulose 1,7-bisphosphate. The amount of one peptide that was heavily labeled in the absence of this compound was reduced 10-fold in its presence. The labeled residue was histidine-298. This result, in combination with earlier experiments, suggests that His-298 in spinach RuBisCO is located in the active site domain and is essential to enzyme activity. This region of the primary structure is strongly conserved in seven other ribulosebisphosphate carboxylases from divergent sources

  17. Two histidine residues are essential for ribonuclease T1 activity as is the case for ribonuclease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribonuclease T1 (RNase T1, EC 3.1.27.3) is a guanosine-specific ribonuclease that cleaves the 3',5'-phosphodiester linkage of single-stranded RNA. It is assumed that the reaction is generated by concerted acid-base catalysis between residues Glu-58 and His-92 or His-40. From the results of chemical modification and NMR studies, it appeared that the residue Glu-58 was indispensable for nucleolytic activity. However, the authors have recently demonstrated that Glu-58 is an important but not an essential residue for catalytic activity, using the methods of genetic engineering to change Glu-58 to Gln-58 etc. In the present paper, the authors report that mutants of RNase T1 with residue Ala-40 or Ala-92 have almost no activity, while mutants that contain Ala-58 retain considerable activity. These results show that the two histidine residues, His-40 and His-92, but not Glu-58, are indispensable for the catalytic activity of the enzyme. They propose a revised reaction mechanism in which two histidine residues play a major role, as they do in the case of RNase A

  18. Isotope effect studies of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent histidine decarboxylase from Morganella morganii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent histidine decarboxylase from Morganella morganii shows a nitrogen isotope effect k14/k15 = 0.9770 +/- 0.0021, a carbon isotope effect k12/k13 = 1.0308 +/- 0.0006, and a carbon isotope effect for L-[α-2H]histidine of 1.0333 +/- 0.0001 at pH 6.3, 370C. These results indicate that the overall decarboxylation rate is limited jointly by the rate of Schiff base interchange and by the rate of decarboxylation. Although the observed isotope effects are quite different from those for the analogous glutamate decarboxylase from Escherichia coli, the intrinsic isotope effects for the two enzymes are essentially the same. The difference in observed isotope effects occurs because of a roughly twofold difference in the partitioning of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-substrate Schiff base between decarboxylation and Schiff base interchange. The observed nitrogen isotope effect requires that the imine nitrogen in this Schiff base is protonated. Comparison of carbon isotope effects for deuteriated and undeuteriated substrates reveals that the deuterium isotope effect on the decarboxylation step is about 1.20; thus, in the transition state for the decarboxylation step, the carbon-carbon bond is about two-thirds broken

  19. Preparation of silica coated cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles for the purification of histidine-tagged proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aygar, Gülfem; Kaya, Murat; Özkan, Necati; Kocabıyık, Semra; Volkan, Mürvet

    2015-12-01

    Surface modified cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles containing Ni-NTA affinity group were synthesized and used for the separation of histidine tag proteins from the complex matrices through the use of imidazole side chains of histidine molecules. Firstly, CoFe2O4 nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution were prepared in an aqueous solution using the controlled co-precipitation method. In order to obtain small CoFe2O4 agglomerates, oleic acid and sodium chloride were used as dispersants. The CoFe2O4 particles were coated with silica and subsequently the surface of these silica coated particles (SiO2-CoFe2O4) was modified by amine (NH2) groups in order to add further functional groups on the silica shell. Then, carboxyl (-COOH) functional groups were added to the SiO2-CoFe2O4 magnetic nanoparticles through the NH2 groups. After that Nα,Nα-Bis(carboxymethyl)-L-lysine hydrate (NTA) was attached to carboxyl ends of the structure. Finally, the surface modified nanoparticles were labeled with nickel (Ni) (II) ions. Furthermore, the modified SiO2-CoFe2O4 magnetic nanoparticles were utilized as a new system that allows purification of the N-terminal His-tagged recombinant small heat shock protein, Tpv-sHSP 14.3.

  20. Enhanced histamine production through the induction of histidine decarboxylase expression by phorbol ester in Jurkat cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Yusuke; Kako, Koichiro; Kim, Jun-Dal; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi

    2012-11-01

    Histamine (HA), a mediator of inflammation, type I allergic responses and neurotransmission, is synthesized from L-histidine, the reaction of which is catalyzed by histidine decarboxylase (HDC). HDC has been reported to be induced by various stimuli, not only in mast cells and basophils, but also in T lymphocytes and macrophages. Although its mRNA has been shown to be increased in Jurkat cells when treated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA), little is known concerning the induced production of HA by HDC. The present study quantified the trace amounts of intracellular HA using ultra-high liquid chromatography in combination with the 6-aminoquinoline carbamate-derivatization technique. To test whether the cellular level of HA is elevated by the induction of HDC in Jurkat cells treated with TPA, the peak corresponding to authentic HA in the cell lysate was fractioned and its molecular weight determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization quadrupole ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The results of this study show that the HA level is increased by the induction of HDC expression by TPA in Jurkat cells. Therefore, this method is useful in elucidating the physiological significance of HA production. PMID:22940786

  1. Selective colorimetric sensing of histidine in aqueous solutions using cysteine modified silver nanoparticles in the presence of Hg2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cysteine modified Ag nanoparticles were prepared in aqueous solution, via one-pot protocol, which were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis). The nanoparticles provided a simple and rapid strategy to detect histidine (His) visually with the help of Hg2+ ions in solution. The colorimetric sensor allows a rapidly quantitative assay of histidine down to the concentration of 3 x 10-5 M. The mechanism by which Hg2+ ions can bind with both the cysteine modified Ag nanoparticles and His molecule through cooperative metal-ligand interactions is discussed.

  2. Study of mixed ligand complexes of Cd(II) with glycine and L-histidine by polarographic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mixed ligand complexes of Cd(II) with glycine as a primary ligand and L-histidine as secondary ligand were studied polarographically. The stability constants were determined by the method of DeFord and Hume extended by Schaap and McMasters. All the mixed complexes of the type MXY, MX, Y and MXY2 (where M = Cd (II), X = L-histidine (his), Y = glycine (gly)), undergo a two electron reduction at dropping mercury electrode and the reductions were fully diffusion controlled. (author)

  3. Interaction of thorium (IV) and dioxouranium (VI) with histidine, cysteine and guanosine-binary and ternary complexes in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interaction of thorium(IV) and dioxouranium(VI) with guanosine and aminoacids, viz., histidine and cysteine in a 1:1 and 1:1:1 ratios has been investigated at 35 degC. Stabilities of various systems are evaluated by computer program. The pH profile of various species have also been generated in order to identify the stable species at biological pH. The results suggest involvement of N(7) in guanosine, ring nitrogen and thio group in histidine and cysteine respectively along with carboxylate group in metal coordination. (author)

  4. Function of conserved histidine-243 in phosphatase activity of EnvZ, the sensor for porin osmoregulation in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Hsing, W; Silhavy, T J

    1997-01-01

    EnvZ and OmpR are the sensor and response regulator proteins of a two-component system that controls the porin regulon of Escherichia coli in response to osmolarity. Three enzymatic activities are associated with EnvZ: autokinase, OmpR kinase, and OmpR-phosphate (OmpR-P) phosphatase. Conserved histidine-243 is critical for both autokinase and OmpR kinase activities. To investigate its involvement in OmpR-P phosphatase activity, histidine-243 was mutated to several other amino acids and the ph...

  5. In vivo and in vitro detection of the leader RNA of the histidine operon of Escherichia coli K-12.

    OpenAIRE

    Frunzio, R; Bruni, C B; Blasi, F.

    1981-01-01

    The DNA of the attenuator region of the histidine operon of Escherichia coli has been transcribed in a purified in vitro system and found to synthesize two major RNA transcripts. The first one, 180 nucleotides long, has been identified as the histidine-specific leader RNA. It contains the coding sequence for the leader peptide [Di Nocera, P. P., Blasi, F., Di Lauro, R., Frunzio, R. & Bruni, C. B. (1978) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 75, 4276-4280] and is terminated at the attenuator site. Termin...

  6. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    -vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial......Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate...... filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge...

  7. Synthesis of selectively multi-labelled histidine with stable isotopes for study of histidinaemia by G.L.C.-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a simple and inexpensive method for the syntheses of L-[3,3,5'-2H3,1'-15N]histidine for use as a biological internal standard and DL-:2,3,3,5'-2H4,1'3' -15N2:histidine as an analytical internal standard. (author)

  8. Demonstrating Bacterial Flagella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, John R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes an effective laboratory method for demonstrating bacterial flagella that utilizes the Proteus mirabilis organism and a special harvesting technique. Includes safety considerations for the laboratory exercise. (MDH)

  9. Effects of crossflow velocity and transmembrane pressure on microfiltration of oil-in-water emulsions

    CERN Document Server

    Darvishzadeh, Tohid

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses the issue of oil removal from water using hydrophilic porous membranes. The effective separation of oil-in-water dispersions involves high flux of water through the membrane and, at the same time, high rejection rate of the oil phase. The effects of transmembrane pressure and crossflow velocity on rejection of oil droplets and thin oil films by pores of different cross-section are investigated numerically by solving the Navier-Stokes equation. We found that in the absence of crossflow, the critical transmembrane pressure, which is required for the oil droplet entry into a circular pore of a given surface hydrophilicity, agrees well with analytical predictions based on the Young-Laplace equation. With increasing crossflow velocity, the shape of the oil droplet is strongly deformed near the pore entrance and the critical pressure of permeation increases. We determined numerically the phase diagram for the droplet rejection, permeation, and breakup depending of the transmembrane pressure and...

  10. Shuffling bacterial metabolomes

    OpenAIRE

    Thomason, Brendan; Read, Timothy D.

    2006-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has a far more significant role than gene duplication in bacterial evolution. This has recently been illustrated by work demonstrating the importance of HGT in the emergence of bacterial metabolic networks, with horizontally acquired genes being placed in peripheral pathways at the outer branches of the networks.

  11. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection. PMID:27096872

  12. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach that ...... become valuable weapons for preventing pathogen contamination and fighting infectious diseases in the future....

  13. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim N. Mak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs. IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection.

  14. Re-introduction of transmembrane serine residues reduce the minimum pore diameter of channelrhodopsin-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Richards

    Full Text Available Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2 is a microbial-type rhodopsin found in the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Under physiological conditions, ChR2 is an inwardly rectifying cation channel that permeates a wide range of mono- and divalent cations. Although this protein shares a high sequence homology with other microbial-type rhodopsins, which are ion pumps, ChR2 is an ion channel. A sequence alignment of ChR2 with bacteriorhodopsin, a proton pump, reveals that ChR2 lacks specific motifs and residues, such as serine and threonine, known to contribute to non-covalent interactions within transmembrane domains. We hypothesized that reintroduction of the eight transmembrane serine residues present in bacteriorhodopsin, but not in ChR2, will restrict the conformational flexibility and reduce the pore diameter of ChR2. In this work, eight single serine mutations were created at homologous positions in ChR2. Additionally, an endogenous transmembrane serine was replaced with alanine. We measured kinetics, changes in reversal potential, and permeability ratios in different alkali metal solutions using two-electrode voltage clamp. Applying excluded volume theory, we calculated the minimum pore diameter of ChR2 constructs. An analysis of the results from our experiments show that reintroducing serine residues into the transmembrane domain of ChR2 can restrict the minimum pore diameter through inter- and intrahelical hydrogen bonds while the removal of a transmembrane serine results in a larger pore diameter. Therefore, multiple positions along the intracellular side of the transmembrane domains contribute to the cation permeability of ChR2.

  15. Structural and dynamic study of the transmembrane domain of the amyloid precursor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadezhdin, K D; Bocharova, O V; Bocharov, E V; Arseniev, A S

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease affects people all over the world, regardless of nationality, gender or social status. An adequate study of the disease requires essential understanding of the molecular fundamentals of the pathogenesis. The amyloid β-peptide, which forms amyloid plaques in the brain of people with Alzheimer's disease, is the product of sequential cleavage of a single-span membrane amyloid precursor protein (APP). More than half of the APP mutations found to be associated with familial forms of Alzheimer's disease are located in its transmembrane domain. The pathogenic mutations presumably affect the structural-dynamic properties of the APP transmembrane domain by changing its conformational stability and/or lateral dimerization. In the present study, the structure and dynamics of the recombinant peptide corresponding to the APP fragment, Gln686-Lys726, which comprises the APP transmembrane domain with an adjacent N-terminal juxtamembrane sequence, were determined in the membrane mimetic environment composed of detergent micelles using NMR spectroscopy. The structure obtained in dodecylphosphocholine micelles consists of two α-helices: a short surface-associated juxtamembrane helix (Lys687-Asp694) and a long transmembrane helix (Gly700-Leu723), both connected via a mobile loop region. A minor bend of the transmembrane α-helix is observed near the paired residues Gly708-Gly709. A cholesterol-binding hydrophobic cavity is apparently formed under the loop region, where the juxtamembrane α-helix comes into contact with the membrane surface near the N-terminus of the transmembrane α-helix. PMID:22649674

  16. TMM@: a web application for the analysis of transmembrane helix mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonassen Inge

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To understand the mechanism by which a protein transmits a signal through the cell membrane, an understanding of the flexibility of its transmembrane (TM region is essential. Normal Mode Analysis (NMA has become the method of choice to investigate the slowest motions in macromolecular systems. It has been widely used to study transmembrane channels and pumps. It relies on the hypothesis that the vibrational normal modes having the lowest frequencies (also named soft modes describe the largest movements in a protein and are the ones that are functionally relevant. In particular NMA can be used to study dynamics of TM regions, but no tool making this approach available for non-experts, has been available so far. Results We developed the web-application TMM@ (TransMembrane α-helical Mobility analyzer. It uses NMA to characterize the propensity of transmembrane α-helices to be displaced. Starting from a structure file at the PDB format, the server computes the normal modes of the protein and identifies which helices in the bundle are the most mobile. Each analysis is performed independently from the others and results can be visualized using only a web browser. No additional plug-in or software is required. For users who would like to further analyze the output data with their favourite software, raw results can also be downloaded. Conclusion We built a novel and unique tool, TMM@, to study the mobility of transmembrane α-helices. The tool can be applied to for example membrane transporters and provides biologists studying transmembrane proteins with an approach to investigate which α-helices are likely to undergo the largest displacements, and hence which helices are most likely to be involved in the transportation of molecules in and out of the cell.

  17. Identification of essential histidine residues involved in heme binding and Hemozoin formation in heme detoxification protein from Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Keisuke; Ishikawa, Haruto; Aono, Shigetoshi; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2014-01-01

    Malaria parasites digest hemoglobin within a food vacuole to supply amino acids, releasing the toxic product heme. During the detoxification, toxic free heme is converted into an insoluble crystalline form called hemozoin (Hz). Heme detoxification protein (HDP) in Plasmodium falciparum is one of the most potent of the hemozoin-producing enzymes. However, the reaction mechanisms of HDP are poorly understood. We identified the active site residues in HDP using a combination of Hz formation assay and spectroscopic characterization of mutant proteins. Replacement of the critical histidine residues His122, His172, His175, and His197 resulted in a reduction in the Hz formation activity to approximately 50% of the wild-type protein. Spectroscopic characterization of histidine-substituted mutants revealed that His122 binds heme and that His172 and His175 form a part of another heme-binding site. Our results show that the histidine residues could be present in the individual active sites and could be ligated to each heme. The interaction between heme and the histidine residues would serve as a molecular tether, allowing the proper positioning of two hemes to enable heme dimer formation. The heme dimer would act as a seed for the crystal growth of Hz in P. falciparum. PMID:25138161

  18. Implication of citrate, malate and histidine in the accumulation and transport of nickel in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum and Brassica juncea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amari, Taoufik; Lutts, Stanley; Taamali, Manel; Lucchini, Giorgio; Sacchi, Gian Attilio; Abdelly, Chedly; Ghnaya, Tahar

    2016-04-01

    Citrate, malate and histidine have been involved in many processes including metal tolerance and accumulation in plants. These molecules have been frequently reported to be the potential nickel chelators, which most likely facilitate metal transport through xylem. In this context, we assess here, the relationship between organics acids and histidine content and nickel accumulation in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum and Brassica juncea grown in hydroponic media added with 25, 50 and 100 µM NiCl2. Results showed that M. crystallinum is relatively more tolerant to Ni toxicity than B. juncea. For both species, xylem transport rate of Ni increased with increasing Ni supply. A positive correlation was established between nickel and citrate concentrations in the xylem sap. In the shoot of B. juncea, citric and malic acids concentrations were significantly higher than in the shoot of M. crystallinum. Also, the shoots and roots of B. juncea accumulated much more histidine. In contrast, a higher root citrate concentration was observed in M. crystallinum. These findings suggest a specific involvement of malic and citric acid in Ni translocation and accumulation in M. crystallinum and B. juncea. The high citrate and histidine accumulation especially at 100µM NiCl2, in the roots of M. crystallinum might be among the important factors associated with the tolerance of this halophyte to toxic Ni levels. PMID:26745003

  19. Differentiation of Histidine Tautomeric States using 15N Selectively Filtered 13C Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yimin; Cross, Timothy A.; Fu, Riqiang

    2014-01-01

    The histidine imidazole ring in proteins usually contains a mixture of three possible tautomeric states (two neutral - τ and π states and a charged state) at physiological pHs. Differentiating the tautomeric states is critical for understanding how the histidine residue participates in many structurally and functionally important proteins. In this work, one dimensional 15N selectively filtered 13C solid-state NMR spectroscopy is proposed to differentiate histidine tautomeric states and to identify all 13C resonances of the individual imidazole rings in a mixture of tautomeric states. When 15N selective 180° pulses are applied to the protonated or non-protonated nitrogen region, the 13C sites that are bonded to the non-protonated or protonated nitrogen sites can be identified, respectively. A sample of 13C,15N labeled histidine powder lyophilized from a solution at pH 6.3 has been used to illustrate the usefulness of this scheme by uniquely assigning resonances of the neutral τ and charged states from the mixture. PMID:25026459

  20. Platinum(II) complexes with steroidal esters of L-methionine and L-histidine: Synthesis, characterization and cytotoxic activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kvasnica, Miroslav; Swaczynová, Jana; Kohout, Ladislav

    Vilnius : Vilnius University, 2008. s. 107. ISBN 978-9955-33-265-7. [BOS 2008. International Conference on Organic Synthesis. 29.06.2008-02.07.2008, Vilnius] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200200651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : platinum * L-methionine * L- histidine * cytotoxicity Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  1. Stimulus-secretion coupling of arginine-induced insulin release: Comparison with histidine-induced insulin release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L-Histidine, when tested at a 10-mM concentration, caused a rapid and sustained stimulation of insulin release from rat islets exposed to either D-glucose (7.0 or 8.3 mM) or L-leucine (10.0 mM). The stimulation of insulin release could not be ascribed to an increase in oxygen uptake, to the generation of histamine from L-histidine, or to its participation in a transglutaminase-catalyzed reaction. Like other cationic amino acids, however, L-histidine rapidly accumulated in islet cells, increased 86Rb outflow from prelabeled islets perifused in the presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+, and stimulated the entry of Ca2+ into islet cells. Yet, the amount of exogenous L-histidine present in the islet cells with a positively charged side chain was estimated to be below the threshold value required for stimulation of insulin release by fully ionized cationic amino acids, such as L-arginine. Hence, the present findings argue against the view that the insulinotropic action of cationic amino acids is solely attributable to the accumulation of these positively charged molecules inside the islet B cell with subsequent depolarization of the plasma membrane

  2. Structural and Functional Aspects of the Sensor Histidine Kinase PrrB from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nowak, E.; Panjikar, S.; Morth, J.P.;

    2006-01-01

    We describe the solution structures of two- and three-domain constructs of the sensor histidine kinase PrrB from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which allow us to locate the HAMP linker relative to the ATP binding and dimerization domains. We show that the three-domain construct is active both for...

  3. Thermochemical study of the processes of complexation of cobalt(II) ions with L-histidine in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorboletova, G. G.; Metlin, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    Thermal effects of the complexation of cobalt(II) ions with L-histidine at 298.15 K and several values of the ionic strength against the background of KNO3 are determined by means of direct calorimetry. The standard thermodynamic characteristics of the reactions of complexation in the aqueous solution have been calculated.

  4. Identification of a crucial histidine involved in metal transport activity in the Arabidopsis cation/H(+) exchanger CAX1

    Science.gov (United States)

    In plants, yeast and bacteria, cation/H(+) exchangers (CAXs), have been shown to translocate Ca(2+) and other metals. The best characterized of these related transporters is the plant vacuolar-localized CAX1. We used site-directed mutagenesis to assess the impact of altering the seven histidine re...

  5. Platinum(II) complexes with steroidal esters of L-methionine and L-histidine: Synthesis, characterization and cytotoxic activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kvasnica, Miroslav; Buděšínský, Miloš; Swaczynová, Jana; Pouzar, Vladimír; Kohout, Ladislav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 7 (2008), s. 3704-3713. ISSN 0968-0896 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200200651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : steroids * platinum * L-histidin * L-methionin Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.075, year: 2008

  6. Chromium III histidinate exposure modulates antioxidant gene expression in HaCaT human keratinocytes exposed to oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    While the toxicity of hexavalent chromium is well established, trivalent Cr (Cr(III)) is an essential nutrient involved in insulin and glucose homeostasis. Recently, antioxidant effects of chromium (III) histidinate (Cr(III)His) were reported in HaCaT human keratinocytes exposed to oxidative stress...

  7. Channel-Forming Bacterial Toxins in Biosensing and Macromolecule Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip A. Gurnev

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available To intoxicate cells, pore-forming bacterial toxins are evolved to allow for the transmembrane traffic of different substrates, ranging from small inorganic ions to cell-specific polypeptides. Recent developments in single-channel electrical recordings, X-ray crystallography, protein engineering, and computational methods have generated a large body of knowledge about the basic principles of channel-mediated molecular transport. These discoveries provide a robust framework for expansion of the described principles and methods toward use of biological nanopores in the growing field of nanobiotechnology. This article, written for a special volume on “Intracellular Traffic and Transport of Bacterial Protein Toxins”, reviews the current state of applications of pore-forming bacterial toxins in small- and macromolecule-sensing, targeted cancer therapy, and drug delivery. We discuss the electrophysiological studies that explore molecular details of channel-facilitated protein and polymer transport across cellular membranes using both natural and foreign substrates. The review focuses on the structurally and functionally different bacterial toxins: gramicidin A of Bacillus brevis, α-hemolysin of Staphylococcus aureus, and binary toxin of Bacillus anthracis, which have found their “second life” in a variety of developing medical and technological applications.

  8. Intrinsic potential of cell membranes: opposite effects of lipid transmembrane asymmetry and asymmetric salt ion distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurtovenko, Andrey A; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2009-01-01

    Using atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we consider the intrinsic cell membrane potential that is found to originate from a subtle interplay between lipid transmembrane asymmetry and the asymmetric distribution of monovalent salt ions on the two sides of the cell membrane. It turns out...... that both the asymmetric distribution of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) lipids across a membrane and the asymmetric distribution of NaCl and KCl induce nonzero drops in the transmembrane potential. However, these potential drops are opposite in sign. As the PC leaflet faces...

  9. Mapping the Structural Requirements in the CB1 Cannabinoid Receptor Transmembrane Helix II for Signal Transduction

    OpenAIRE

    Kapur, Ankur; Samaniego, Patrick; Thakur, Ganesh A.; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Abood, Mary E.

    2008-01-01

    Amino acid residues in the transmembrane domains of the CB1 receptor are important for ligand recognition and signal transduction. We used site-directed mutagenesis to identify the role of two novel and adjacent residues in the transmembrane helix II domain, Ile2.62 and Asp2.63. We investigated the role of the conserved, negatively charged aspartate at position 2.63 in cannabinoid receptor (CB1) function by substituting it with asparagine (D2.63N) and glutamate (D2.63E). In addition, the effe...

  10. Effects of several chinese crude drugs on 45Ca transmembrane influx in vascular smooth muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of several Chinese crude drugs including Crocus sativus, Carthamus tinctorius and Ginkgo biloba on Ca2+ transmembrane influx in rat aorta rings were studied. Resting 45Ca uptake was not markedly altered by these drugs, whereas the 45Ca influxes evoked by norepinephrine (1.2 μmol/L) and KCl (100 mmol/L) in rat aorta rings were significantly inhibited by Crocus and Carthamus in a concentration-dependent manner, not by Ginkgo. The results indicate that extracellular Ca2+ transmembrane influx through receptor-operated Ca2+ channels and potential-dependent Ca2+ channels can be blocked by Crocus and Carthamus

  11. Histidine-containing peptide catalysts developed by a facile library screening method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagawa, Kengo; Sakai, Nobutaka; Kudo, Kazuaki

    2015-02-01

    Although peptide catalysts have a high potential for the use as organocatalysts, the optimization of peptide sequences is laborious and time-consuming. To address this issue, a facile screening method for finding efficient aminocatalysts from a peptide library has been developed. In the screening for the Michael addition of a malonate to an enal, a dye-labeled product is immobilized on resin-bound peptides through reductive amination to visualize active catalysts. This procedure allows for the monitoring of the reactivity of entire peptides without modifying the resin beads beforehand. Peptides containing histidine at an appropriate position were identified by this method. A novel function of the histidyl residue, which enhances the binding of a substrate to the catalyst by capturing an iminium intermediate, was indicated. PMID:25521645

  12. Synthesis, radiolabeling, biodistribution and fluorescent imaging of histidine-coupled hematoporphyrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Hematoporphyrin (Hp) and hematoporphyrin derivatives (HpDs) have been widely used as photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy (PDT). Radiolabeling of HpDs is helpful for preclinical and clinical studies of PDT. Methods: The histidine-coupled hematoporphyrin (His-Hp) was synthesized and radiolabeled with [99mTc(CO)3(H2O)3]+. Biodistribution of the radioligand and fluorescent imaging of His-Hp in mice bearing S180 tumor were investigated. Results: [99mTc(CO)3]+-labeled His-Hp was electrically neutral, hydrophilic and stable. The biodistribution of the radioligand in S180 tumor-bearing mice was similar with that of nonlabeled HpD in the literature. The uptake of His-Hp in tumors and livers was confirmed by fluorescent imaging. Conclusions: The complex [99mTc(CO)3]+–His-Hp might be suitable for in vivo dose evaluation of HpD in PDT.

  13. Ultrasensitive iodide detection based on the resonance light scattering of histidine-stabilized gold nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a novel resonance light scattering (RLS) assay for the sensitive and selective determination of iodide. It is based on the use of histidine-stabilized gold nanoclusters (His-AuNCs) which undergo fusion and aggregation in the presence of iodide. The resulting enhancement in the intensity of RLS is proportional to the concentration of iodide in the 0.01 to 8.0 μM range, and the detection limit is as low as 1.8 nM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. This “turn-on” method is highly selective for iodide and not interfered by other ions commonly present. It was applied to the determination of iodide in (spiked) real water samples. (author)

  14. Nitrogen K-edge soft X-ray natural circular dichroism of histidine thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report preliminary natural circular dichroism (NCD) spectra of amino acids, Land D-histidine, thin films in the nitrogen K-edge energy region. NCD peaks were observed at 399.9 eV and were assigned to the 1s → π* transition of the nitrogen atoms in imidazole ring. Imidazole ring is positioned at the side chain distant from the asymmetric carbon. This result suggests that NCD spectroscopy in the soft X-ray region can selectively pick up the information on local structure around specific atoms, regardless of the position of atoms in molecules. It is interesting in view of application of NCD spectroscopy in the soft X-ray region to investigation of protein structures.

  15. Raman Spectroscopic Studies on L-histidine, aniline Doped Triglycine Sulphate Single Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benial, A. Milton Franklin; Ramakrishnan, V.; Parameswari, A.

    2015-02-01

    Single crystals of triglycine sulphate (TGS) doped with L-histidine and aniline were studied by Raman Spectroscopy. The structure and symmetry of molecules, the nature of bonding and the effect of crystalline field on molecular vibrations were studied for pure and doped TGS. The characteristic group frequencies were identified and analysed for H2SO4 and glycine. The skeletal motion, lattice vibrational peaks were observed in the low wavenumber region. The site symmetry effect and the correlation field effect were studied from the splitting of vibrational bands. The observed Raman shift towards higher wave number region reveals that the symmetry reduction in doped TGS crystals. The broadening of Raman spectral line showed that a decrease in the hardness value for the doped crystals. Comparative studies of the Raman Spectra of pure TGS and doped TGS were also carried out.

  16. Histidine-rich stabilized polyplexes for cMet-directed tumor-targeted gene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Petra; Lächelt, Ulrich; Herrmann, Annika; Mickler, Frauke Martina; Döblinger, Markus; He, Dongsheng; Krhač Levačić, Ana; Morys, Stephan; Bräuchle, Christoph; Wagner, Ernst

    2015-03-01

    Overexpression of the hepatocyte growth factor receptor/c-Met proto oncogene on the surface of a variety of tumor cells gives an opportunity to specifically target cancerous tissues. Herein, we report the first use of c-Met as receptor for non-viral tumor-targeted gene delivery. Sequence-defined oligomers comprising the c-Met binding peptide ligand cMBP2 for targeting, a monodisperse polyethylene glycol (PEG) for polyplex surface shielding, and various cationic (oligoethanamino) amide cores containing terminal cysteines for redox-sensitive polyplex stabilization, were assembled by solid-phase supported syntheses. The resulting oligomers exhibited a greatly enhanced cellular uptake and gene transfer over non-targeted control sequences, confirming the efficacy and target-specificity of the formed polyplexes. Implementation of endosomal escape-promoting histidines in the cationic core was required for gene expression without additional endosomolytic agent. The histidine-enriched polyplexes demonstrated stability in serum as well as receptor-specific gene transfer in vivo upon intratumoral injection. The co-formulation with an analogous PEG-free cationic oligomer led to a further compaction of pDNA polyplexes with an obvious change of shape as demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy. Such compaction was critically required for efficient intravenous gene delivery which resulted in greatly enhanced, cMBP2 ligand-dependent gene expression in the distant tumor.Overexpression of the hepatocyte growth factor receptor/c-Met proto oncogene on the surface of a variety of tumor cells gives an opportunity to specifically target cancerous tissues. Herein, we report the first use of c-Met as receptor for non-viral tumor-targeted gene delivery. Sequence-defined oligomers comprising the c-Met binding peptide ligand cMBP2 for targeting, a monodisperse polyethylene glycol (PEG) for polyplex surface shielding, and various cationic (oligoethanamino) amide cores containing

  17. Using Poly-L-Histidine Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode to Trace Hydroquinone in the Sewage Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A sensitive voltammetric method for trace measurements of hydroquinone in the sewage water is described. The poly-L-histidine is prepared to modify the glassy carbon electrode in order to improve the electrochemical catalysis of interesting substances such as hydroquinone. The influence of the base solution, pH value, and scanning speed on the tracing of hydroquinone is discussed, and the experimental procedures and conditions are optimized. The laboratory results show that it is possible to construct a linear calibration curve between the peak current of hydroquinone on modified electrode and its concentration at the level of 0.00001 mol/L. The potential limitation of the method is suggested by a linear peaking shift model as well. The method was successfully applied to the determination of hydroquinone in the actual sample of industrial waste water.

  18. Growth and characterization of a new nonlinear optical L-histidine acetate single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, J.; Aruna, S.; Anuradha, A.; Premanand, D.; Vetha Potheher, I.; Thamizharasan, K.; Sagayaraj, P.

    2007-05-01

    Bulk single crystals of L-histidine acetate dihydrate (LHA), a new organic nonlinear material was successfully grown from aqueous solution for the first time by slow evaporation method. The solubility of LHA was determined in water and good optical quality single crystal of dimensions up to 21 × 13 × 9 mm 3 was obtained. The grown crystals were characterized by X-ray diffraction, FTIR, UV-Vis-NIR, microhardness and DTA/TGA studies. The SHG efficiency is found to be higher than that of KDP crystal. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the crystal were studied as function of frequency and the results are discussed. Photoconductivity studies of LHA reveal its positive photoconducting nature.

  19. Growth and characterization of a pure and doped nonlinear optical L-histidine acetate single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen Kumar, P.; Manivannan, V.; Tamilselvan, S.; Senthil, S.; Antony Raj, Victor; Sagayaraj, P.; Madhavan, J.

    2008-05-01

    Single crystals of pure, Cu 2+and Mg 2+ doped L-histidine acetate (LHA) were grown successfully by slow evaporation technique. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out for the pure and doped grown crystals. Absorption of these grown crystals was analyzed using UV-vis-NIR studies, and it was found that these crystals possess minimum absorption from 200 nm to 1500 nm. The pure and doped crystals are characterized by Fourier transform Raman (FT-Raman), thermal and photoconductivity studies. Vickers microhardness tests were carried out for the pure and doped crystals and the mechanical strengths were found. The dielectric constant and the dielectric loss with frequency were also studied.

  20. The nucleotide sequence of histidine tRNA gamma of Drosophila melanogaster.

    OpenAIRE

    Altwegg, M.; Kubli, E

    1980-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of D. melanogaster histidine tRNA gamma was determined to be: pG-G-C-C-G-U-G-A-U-C-G-U-C-psi-A-G-D-G-G-D-D-A-G-G-A-C-C-C-C-A-C-G-psi-U-G-U-G- m1G-C-C-G-U-G-G-U-A-A-C-C-m5C-A-G-G-U-psi-C-G-m1A-A-U-C-C-U-G-G-U-C-A-C-G-G-m5C -A-C-C-AOH. An additional unpaired G is found at the 5' end, and the T in the TpsiC loop is replaced by a U.

  1. Mechanisms of High Temperature Resistance of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803: An Impact of Histidine Kinase 34

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Červený

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is a widely used model cyanobacterium for studying responses and acclimation to different abiotic stresses. Changes in transcriptome, proteome, lipidome, and photosynthesis in response to short term heat stress are well studied in this organism, and histidine kinase 34 (Hik34 is shown to play an important role in mediating such response. Corresponding data on long term responses, however, are fragmentary and vary depending on parameters of experiments and methods of data collection, and thus are hard to compare. In order to elucidate how the early stress responses help cells to sustain long-term heat stress, as well as the role of Hik34 in prolonged acclimation, we examined the resistance to long-term heat stress of wild-type and ΔHik34 mutant of Synechocystis. In this work, we were able to precisely control the long term experimental conditions by cultivating Synechocystis in automated photobioreactors, measuring selected physiological parameters within a time range of minutes. In addition, morphological and ultrastructural changes in cells were analyzed and western blotting of individual proteins was used to study the heat stress-affected protein expression. We have shown that the majority of wild type cell population was able to recover after 24 h of cultivation at 44 °C. In contrast, while ΔHik34 mutant cells were resistant to heat stress within its first hours, they could not recover after 24 h long high temperature treatment. We demonstrated that the early induction of HspA expression and maintenance of high amount of other HSPs throughout the heat incubation is critical for successful adaptation to long-term stress. In addition, it appears that histidine kinase Hik34 is an essential component for the long term high temperature resistance.

  2. Unusual chemical properties of N-terminal histidine residues of glucagon and vasoactive intestinal peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An N-terminal histidine residue of a protein or peptide has two functional groups, viz., an alpha-amino group and an imidazole group. A new procedure, based on the competitive labeling approach described by Duggleby and Kaplan has been developed by which the chemical reactivity of each functional group in such a residue can be determined as a function of pH. Only very small amounts of material are required, which makes it possible to determine the chemical properties in dilute solution or in proteins and polypeptides that can be obtained in only minute quantities. With this approach, the reactivity of the alpha-amino group of histidylglycine toward 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene gave an apparent pK /sub a/ value of 7.64 +/- 0.07 at 37 degrees C, in good agreement with a value of 7.69 +/- 0.02 obtained by acid-base titration. However, the reactivity of the imidazole function gave an apparent pK /sub a/ value of 7.16 +/- 0.07 as compared to the pK /sub a/ value of 5.85 +/- 0.01 obtained by acid-base titration. Similarly, in glucagon and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), apparent pKa values of 7.60 +/- 0.04 and 7.88 +/- 0.18, respectively, were obtained for the alpha-amino of their N-terminal histidine, and pKa values of 7.43 +/- 0.09 and 7.59 +/- 0.18 were obtained for the imidazole function

  3. Affinity labeling and characterization of the active site histidine of glucosephosphate isomerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate was found to act as a specific affinity label for the active center of glucosephosphate isomerase. The inactivation process followed pseudo-first order kinetics, was irreversible, and exhibited rate saturation kinetics with minimal half-lives of inactivation of 4.5 and 6.3 min for the enzyme isolated from human placenta and rabbit muscle, respectively. The pH dependence of the inactivation process closely paralleled the pH dependence of the overall catalytic process with pK/sub a/ values at pH 6.4 and 9.0. The stoichiometry of labeling of either enzyme, as determined with N-bromo[14C2]acetylethanolamine phosphate, was 1 eq of the affinity label/subunit of enzyme. After acid hydrolysis and amino acid analysis of the radioactive affinity-labeled human enzyme, only radioactive 3-carboxymethyl histidine was found. In the case of the rabbit enzyme, the only radioactive derivative obtained was 1-carboxymethyl histidine. Active site tryptic peptides were isolated by solvent extraction, thin layer peptide fingerprinting, and ion exchange chromatography before and after removal of the phosphate from the active site peptide. Amino acid analysis of the labeled peptides from the two species were very similar. Using high sensitivity methods for sequence analysis, the primary structure of the active site was established as Val-Leu-His-Ala-Glu-Asn-Val-Asp (Gly,Thr,Ser) Glu-Ile (Thr-Gly-His-Lys-Glx)-Tyr-Phe. Apparent sequence homology between the catalytic center of glucosephosphate isomerase and triosephosphate isomerase suggest that the two enzymes may have evolved from a common ancestral gene

  4. Nickel hydroxide nanocrystals-modified glassy carbon electrodes for sensitive L-histidine detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Hourglass-like Ni(OH)2 was prepared via a simple and facile route in solution. •The sensor has a detection limit of 80 nM. •The sensor shows much better catalytic performance compared with bulk material. •The sensor shows a great potential for practicable applications. -- Abstract: Hourglass-like nickel hydroxide nanostructure was synthesized via a simple and facile route in solution. The as-prepared nickel hydroxide nanocrystals were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electronmicroscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for the morphology study. The TEM experimental data indicate that the growth of hourglass-like nanocrystal is along the c axis of β-Ni(OH)2. The composites had a good electron transferring and biocompatibility. The L-histidine biosensor was fabricated by drop casting the Ni(OH)2/ethanol solution (2.5 g L−1) on the surface of the glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The prepared biosensor shows better catalytic performance compared with bulk material or other similar materials, with the detection limit of 80 nM and the linear range from 0.1 μM to 0.5 mM (R2 = 0.993) in a 0.1 M NaOH solution. The effects of electroactive interferents at the test conditions can be negligible which showed an excellent selectivity of the biosensor. The proposed method was also successfully applied for the determination of L-histidine in human blood serum sample. High sensitivity, excellent selectivity and ease of preparation make this sensor promising for the applications in the development of detecting some other amino acids and proteins

  5. A new strategy for the on-column exopeptidase cleavage of poly-histidine tagged proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Wen-Hui K; Chase, Howard A

    2011-10-15

    This paper describes a new strategy, which aims to make on-column poly-histidine tag removal more useful in the production of recombinant proteins by improving the yield and efficiency of on-column exopeptidase cleavage. This involves improvement of the on-column cleavage condition by using imidazole concentrations in the range of 100-500 mM in the cleavage buffer. At 300 mM imidazole, maximum on-column cleavage yield (in excess of 99%) was achieved in 3h of incubation. However, as a result of the increased imidazole concentration, this new strategy of on-column cleavage results in some residual uncleaved poly-histidine tagged proteins (~0.1%) and the production of cleaved dipeptides, both of which need to be further removed in a subsequent step. A method involving the recirculation of recovered proteins and peptides through the immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) column (same-column recirculation) was found to be superior to subtractive IMAC for the purpose of contaminant clearance. Recovery of the detagged target proteins was achieved using 10 column volumes of recovery buffer, which had the effect of diluting the imidazole concentration to a suitably low level for contaminant removal by same-column recirculation. This strategy was also applicable at a higher adsorbent loading of 10 mg protein/mL adsorbent with an optimal ratio of 200 mU of DAPase per mg of adsorbed tagged maltose binding protein (MBP), giving a cleavage yield of 99.1% in 3 h. Finally, on-column cleavage conditions including the effect of protease concentration and incubation time on the new strategy have been investigated and comparisons are made for different tag removal strategies. PMID:21925974

  6. Volumetric, ultrasonic, and viscometric behaviour of l-histidine in aqueous-glucose solutions at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nain, Anil Kumar, E-mail: ak_nain@yahoo.co.i [Department of Chemistry, Dyal Singh College, University of Delhi, New Delhi 110 003 (India); Pal, Renu [Department of Chemistry, Dyal Singh College, University of Delhi, New Delhi 110 003 (India); Sharma, Rakesh Kumar [Department of Chemistry, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007 (India)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: The study reports interactions of l-histidine with carbohydrates in aqueous media. Provides data to estimate physicochemical properties of proteins in these media. Provides better understanding biological phenomena involving l-histidine. Correlates physicochemical properties of l-histidine with its behavior in solution. - Abstract: Densities, {rho}, ultrasonic speeds, u, and viscosities, {eta}, of aqueous-glucose (5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% of glucose, w/w in water) and of solutions of l-histidine in aqueous-glucose solvents were measured at T = (293.15, 298.15, 303.15, 308.15, 313.15, and 318.15) K. From these experimental data, apparent molar volume, V{sub {phi},} limiting apparent molar volume, V{sub {phi}}{sup 0} and the slope, S{sub v}, apparent molar compressibility, K{sub s,{phi},} limiting apparent molar compressibility, K{sub s,{phi}}{sup 0} and the slope, S{sub k}, transfer volume, V{sub {phi},tr}{sup 0}, transfer compressibility, K{sub s,{phi},tr}{sup 0}, Falkenhagen coefficient, A, Jones-Dole coefficient, B, and temperature derivative of B-coefficient, dB/dT were calculated. The results are interpreted in terms of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions in these systems. It has been observed that there exist strong solute-solvent interactions in these systems, which increase with increase in glucose concentration. It has also been observed that l-histidine act as structure-maker in aqueous-glucose solvents.

  7. Effects of MgO evolution on the critical current density in bulk MgB2 containing histidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Histidine is an effective dopant for improving the critical current density. •The dominating pinning effects are provided by nano-scale MgO pinning centers. •MgO performed stronger pinning effects than defects caused by C substitution. •We clarified how to select the amino acid for doping. -- Abstract: Glycine, an amino acid with the simplest composition, was introduced into MgB2 systems, making great contribution to the enhancement of critical current density in our previous study. Aiming at investigating the effects of histidine, another amino acid with more complicated structure and lower decomposition temperature than glycine, on the superconducting properties of MgB2, samples of MgB2 + x wt.% histidine (with x = 0, 2, 3, 5, and 8) were sintered at 800 °C after mechanical mixing. The best critical current density was obtained in the sample with 2 wt.% histidine addition, owing to the small-sized MgO and C substitution. The sample showed a significant increase in critical current density under high field compared with pure MgB2, and this property maintained at a relatively high level under low field as well. However, the growth and agglomeration of MgO with the increasing amount of histidine should be responsible for the tendency of the decrease in the connectivity and critical current density versus doping content. Finally, the conditions that the used amino acid should meet were investigated as a guide for effective amino acid doping

  8. Effects of MgO evolution on the critical current density in bulk MgB{sub 2} containing histidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Qi; Liu, Yongchang, E-mail: licmtju@163.com; Ma, Zongqing; Yu, Liming

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: •Histidine is an effective dopant for improving the critical current density. •The dominating pinning effects are provided by nano-scale MgO pinning centers. •MgO performed stronger pinning effects than defects caused by C substitution. •We clarified how to select the amino acid for doping. -- Abstract: Glycine, an amino acid with the simplest composition, was introduced into MgB{sub 2} systems, making great contribution to the enhancement of critical current density in our previous study. Aiming at investigating the effects of histidine, another amino acid with more complicated structure and lower decomposition temperature than glycine, on the superconducting properties of MgB{sub 2}, samples of MgB{sub 2} + x wt.% histidine (with x = 0, 2, 3, 5, and 8) were sintered at 800 °C after mechanical mixing. The best critical current density was obtained in the sample with 2 wt.% histidine addition, owing to the small-sized MgO and C substitution. The sample showed a significant increase in critical current density under high field compared with pure MgB{sub 2}, and this property maintained at a relatively high level under low field as well. However, the growth and agglomeration of MgO with the increasing amount of histidine should be responsible for the tendency of the decrease in the connectivity and critical current density versus doping content. Finally, the conditions that the used amino acid should meet were investigated as a guide for effective amino acid doping.

  9. A novel protective function for cytokinin in the light stress response is mediated by the Arabidopsis histidine kinase2 and Arabidopsis histidine kinase3 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortleven, Anne; Nitschke, Silvia; Klaumünzer, Marion; Abdelgawad, Hamada; Asard, Han; Grimm, Bernhard; Riefler, Michael; Schmülling, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Cytokinins are plant hormones that regulate diverse processes in plant development and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants with a reduced cytokinin status (i.e. cytokinin receptor mutants and transgenic cytokinin-deficient plants) are more susceptible to light stress compared with wild-type plants. This was reflected by a stronger photoinhibition after 24 h of high light (approximately 1,000 µmol m(-2) s(-1)), as shown by the decline in maximum quantum efficiency of photosystem II photochemistry. Photosystem II, especially the D1 protein, is highly sensitive to the detrimental impact of light. Therefore, photoinhibition is always observed when the rate of photodamage exceeds the rate of D1 repair. We demonstrate that in plants with a reduced cytokinin status, the D1 protein level was strongly decreased upon light stress. Inhibition of the D1 repair cycle by lincomycin treatment indicated that these plants experience stronger photodamage. The efficiency of photoprotective mechanisms, such as nonenzymatic and enzymatic scavenging systems, was decreased in plants with a reduced cytokinin status, which could be a cause for the increased photodamage and subsequent D1 degradation. Additionally, slow and incomplete recovery in these plants after light stress indicated insufficient D1 repair. Mutant analysis revealed that the protective function of cytokinin during light stress depends on the Arabidopsis histidine KINASE2 (AHK2) and AHK3 receptors and the type B Arabidopsis response regulator1 (ARR1) and ARR12. We conclude that proper cytokinin signaling and regulation of specific target genes are necessary to protect leaves efficiently from light stress. PMID:24424319

  10. X-ray Ray Studies on Crystalline Complexes Involving Amino Acids and Peptides. XXIV. Different Ionization States and Novel Aggregation Patterns in the Complexes of Succinic Acid with DL- and L-Histidine

    OpenAIRE

    Prasad, Sridhar G; Vijayan, M.

    1993-01-01

    Diffusion of acetonitrile into an aqueous solution of DL-histidine and succinic acid in 1:3 molar proportions results in the crystals of DL-histidine hemisuccinate dihydrate [triclinic, P, a = 7.654(1), b = 8.723(1), c = 9.260(1)A , \\alpha = 77.23(1), \\beta = 72.37(1) and \\gamma = 82.32 (1)]. The replacement of DL-histidine by L-histidine in the crystallization experiment under identical conditions leads to crystals of L-histidine semisuccinate trihydrate [orthorhombic, P212121, a = 7.030 (1)...

  11. Histidine and other amino acids in blood and urine after administration of Bretschneider solution (HTK) for cardioplegic arrest in patients: effects on N-metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teloh, Johanna K; Dohle, Daniel-Sebastian; Petersen, Miriam; Verhaegh, Rabea; Waack, Indra N; Roehrborn, Friederike; Jakob, Heinz; de Groot, Herbert

    2016-06-01

    Bretschneider (histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate, HTK) solution employed for induction of cardioplegic arrest possesses a high histidine concentration (198 mM). Due to the large volume administered, massive amounts of histidine are incorporated. The aim of the study was to evaluate alterations in amino acid and nitrogen metabolism originating from histidine degradation. Between 07/2014 and 10/2014, a total of 29 consecutive patients scheduled for elective isolated coronary artery bypass grafting with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) were enrolled in this prospective observational study. The patients received 1.6 L cardioplegic Bretschneider solution on average. Blood gas and urine samples obtained were analyzed for amino acid as well as urea and ammonium concentrations. After CPB initiation, plasma histidine concentration greatly increased to 21,000 µM to reach 8000 µM at the end. Within the operative period, plasma concentrations of aspartate, glutamate, asparagine, alanine, and glutamine increased variable in magnitude. During the same time, urinary analysis revealed histidine excretion of 19,500 µmol in total and marked elevations in glutamate and glutamine excretion. The absolute amounts of urea and ammonium excreted additionally were 3 mmol and 8 mmol, respectively. Already during CPB, distinct amounts of the histidine administered are metabolized, mainly to other amino acids, but only small amounts to urea and ammonia. Thus, the impact of the histidine incorporated on acid-base status in the intraoperative phase is minor. On the other hand, intraoperative provision of several amino acids arising from histidine metabolism might mitigate postaggression syndrome. PMID:26922473

  12. Molecular dynamics study of the solvation of an alpha-helical transmembrane peptide by DMSO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duarte, A.M.; Mierlo, van C.P.M.; Hemminga, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    10-ns molecular dynamics study of the solvation of a hydrophobic transmembrane helical peptide in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is presented. The objective is to analyze how this aprotic polar solvent is able to solvate three groups of amino acid residues (i.e., polar, apolar, and charged) that are loca

  13. Order parameters of a transmembrane helix in a fluid Bilayer: case study of a WALP peptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holt, A.; Rougier, L.; Réat, V.; Jolibois, F.; Saurel, O.; Czaplicki, J.; Killian, J.A.; Milon, A.

    2010-01-01

    A new solid-state NMR-based strategy is established for the precise and efficient analysis of orientation and dynamics of transmembrane peptides in fluid bilayers. For this purpose, several dynamically averaged anisotropic constraints, including 13C and 15N chemical shift anisotropies and 13C-15N di

  14. The trans-membrane potential of biological membranes in computer simulation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Melcr, Josef; Timr, Štěpán; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 44, Suppl 1 (2015), S170. ISSN 0175-7571. [EBSA European Biophysics Congress /10./. 18.07.2015-22.07.2015, Dresden] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : molecular dynamics * trans-membrane potential Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  15. Advantages of combined transmembrane topology and signal peptide prediction--the Phobius web server

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Käll, Lukas; Krogh, Anders; Sonnhammer, Erik L L

    When using conventional transmembrane topology and signal peptide predictors, such as TMHMM and SignalP, there is a substantial overlap between these two types of predictions. Applying these methods to five complete proteomes, we found that 30-65% of all predicted signal peptides and 25-35% of al...

  16. Critical Role of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulation(CFTR)in Female Reproduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hsiao Chang CHAN

    2003-01-01

    @@ Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP-activated Cl- channel, mutations of which are responsible for defective Cl- and/or HCO-3 secretions seen in cystic fibrosis (CF), a common lethal genetic disease affecting most exocrine glands/organs, including the lungs, intestine, pancreas and reproductive tracts of both sexes.

  17. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5900 Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a...

  18. The transmembrane region is responsible for targeting of adaptor protein LAX into "heavy rafts''

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrdinka, Matouš; Otáhal, Pavel; Hořejší, Václav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 5 (2012), e36330. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GEMEM/09/E011; GA MŠk 1M0506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : LAX * transmembrane domain * DRM Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2012

  19. Exploiting hydrophobicity for efficient production of transmembrane helices for structure determination by NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugge, Katrine Østergaard; Steinocher, Helena; Brooks, Andrew J.;

    2015-01-01

    -labeled protein. In this work, we have exploited the hydrophobic nature of membrane proteins to develop a simple and efficient production scheme for isotope-labeled single-pass transmembrane domains (TMDs) with or without intrinsically disordered regions. We have evaluated the applicability and limitations...... of single-pass TMDs, which are difficult to solve by other means....

  20. Intact transmembrane isoforms of the neural cell adhesion molecule are released from the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, M; Krog, L; Edvardsen, K;

    1993-01-01

    density-gradient centrifugation it was shown that shed transmembrane NCAM-B was present in fractions of high, as well as low, density, indicating that a fraction of the shed NCAM is associated with minor plasma membrane fragments. Finally, it was shown that isolated soluble NCAM inhibited cell binding to......-s1 and NCAM-s2 and the function of soluble NCAM forms were investigated. It was shown that all three soluble forms could be released from brain membranes with M(r) values identical to the three major membrane-associated forms: the large transmembrane 190,000-M(r) form (NCAM-A), the smaller...... intact soluble form from membranes of cells transfected with this isoform. Thus, NCAM-s1 and NCAM-s2 probably represent intact released transmembrane NCAM-A and NCAM-B. The soluble transmembrane forms are likely to exist in vivo, as NCAM-s1 and NCAM-s2 were readily demonstrated in cerebrospinal fluid. By...

  1. Transmembrane adaptor molecules: a new category of lymphoid-cell markers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tedoldi, S.; Paterson, J.C.; Hansmann, M.-L.; Natkunam, Y.; Rüdiger, T.; Angelisová, Pavla; Du, M.Q.; Roberton, H.; Roncador, G.; Sanchez, L.; Pozzobon, M.; Masir, N.; Barry, R.; Pileri, S.; Mason, D.Y.; Marafioti, T.; Hořejší, Václav

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 1 (2006), s. 213-221. ISSN 0006-4971 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : transmembrane adaptors * PAG * LIME Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 10.370, year: 2006

  2. An Environmentally Benign System for Synthesis of β-Hydroxylketones: L-Histidine Asymmetrically Catalyzed Direct Aldol Reactions in Aqueous Micelle and Water-like Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Yi-Yuan; PENG Shu-Jun; DING Qiu-Ping; WANG Qi; CHENG Jin-Pei

    2007-01-01

    The first histidine catalyzed direct aldol reactions of ketones with nitrobenzaldehydes in water and in poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) were reported. It reveals that histidine is a good aldol catalyst for synthesis of β-hydroxylketones in water and in PEG, giving good to excellent yields of the respective products. Better enantioand regioselectivity were achieved using low molecular weight PEG as the media. The results show that histidine and PEG-200 or -300 may constitute a promising environmentally benign system for asymmetric synthesis of β-hydroxylketones.

  3. pH dependence of 15N NMR shifts and coupling constants in aqueous imidazole and 1-methylimidazole. Comments on estimation of tautomeric equilibrium constants for aqueous histidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    15N, 1H and 13C NMR spectra for [15N2]imidazole and [15N2]-1-methylimidazole in aqueous solution as functions of pH provide shift and coupling-constant information useful in characterizing the protonated and unprotonated forms of these compounds and as background for determining N binding to other species, such as metal ions. When combined with similar data for the imidazole-ring atoms in histidine, these data give more reliable estimates of tautomeric equilibrium constants for the amphionic and anionic forms of histidine than possible from the histidine data alone

  4. Bacterial Wound Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  5. Bacterial Meningitis in Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study of 80 infantile patients (ages 30-365 days; 47 male, 33 female with culture-proven bacterial meningitis seen over a 16 year period (1986-2001 is reported from Taiwan.

  6. Genetic Conservation in gp36 Transmembrane Sequences of Indian HIV Type 2 Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Sushama; Tripathy, Srikanth; Kulkarni, Smita; Chaturbhuj, Devidas; Ghare, Rucha; Bhattacharya, Jayanta; Paranjape, Ramesh

    2011-12-01

    HIV-2 group A is predominant in different parts of the world, especially Africa, Portugal, Spain, France, the United Kingdom, the United States, Korea, and India. Among the Asian countries, India accounts for about 95% of all HIV-2 infections. The prevalence of HIV-2 has been reported from various states of India such as Maharashtra, Goa, Tamil Nadu, West Bengal, and Uttar Pradesh. In the present study, we analyzed transmembrane region (gp36) sequences of 10 HIV-2 group A Indian strains, isolated from Indian HIV-2-seropositive individuals. HIV Blast analysis for the 1.0-Kb region of the gp36 transmembrane region has shown that all these sequences belong to HIV-2 group A. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the sequences cluster with HIV-2 group A sequences of Cameroon and Senegal. The epitope found at position 645-656 (YELQKLNSWDVF), previously reported as a broadly neutralizing determinant, was very well conserved in all 10 study sequences. The percentage similarity between Indian and South African HIV-2 group A gp36 sequences was 90% (range 86-100, SD 2.8) and with other nonsubtype A clades was 84% (range 77-100, SD 6.06) indicating overall less variability among the reported HIV-2 sequences. Similarly, the consensus amino acid sequences of the envelope transmembrane region of HIV-1 (gp41) and HIV-2 (gp36) is quite synonymous, indicating 87% similarity; however, limited information is available about the gp36 transmembrane region of the prevalent HIV 2 group A Indian strain. The rate of synonymous substitutions reported in the gp105 region was significantly higher, suggesting lower virulence of HIV-2, which does translate into a lower rate of evolution, while the dN/dS ratio for the gp36 transmembrane region was less than one, indicating its conservation and significance (p<0.05) in structural and functional constraints. PMID:21453135

  7. Species-specific activity of HIV-1 Vpu and positive selection of tetherin transmembrane domain variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W McNatt

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Tetherin/BST-2/CD317 is a recently identified antiviral protein that blocks the release of nascent retrovirus, and other virus, particles from infected cells. An HIV-1 accessory protein, Vpu, acts as an antagonist of tetherin. Here, we show that positive selection is evident in primate tetherin sequences and that HIV-1 Vpu appears to have specifically adapted to antagonize variants of tetherin found in humans and chimpanzees. Tetherin variants found in rhesus macaques (rh, African green monkeys (agm and mice were able to inhibit HIV-1 particle release, but were resistant to antagonism by HIV-1 Vpu. Notably, reciprocal exchange of transmembrane domains between human and monkey tetherins conferred sensitivity and resistance to Vpu, identifying this protein domain as a critical determinant of Vpu function. Indeed, differences between hu-tetherin and rh-tetherin at several positions in the transmembrane domain affected sensitivity to antagonism by Vpu. Two alterations in the hu-tetherin transmembrane domain, that correspond to differences found in rh- and agm-tetherin proteins, were sufficient to render hu-tetherin completely resistant to HIV-1 Vpu. Interestingly, transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain sequences in primate tetherins exhibit variation at numerous codons that is likely the result of positive selection, and some of these changes coincide with determinants of HIV-1 Vpu sensitivity. Overall, these data indicate that tetherin could impose a barrier to viral zoonosis as a consequence of positive selection that has been driven by ancient viral antagonists, and that the HIV-1 Vpu protein has specialized to target the transmembrane domains found in human/chimpanzee tetherin proteins.

  8. Electrochemical Platform for the Detection of Transmembrane Proteins Reconstituted into Liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacek, Jan; Zatloukalova, Martina; Geleticova, Jaroslava; Kubala, Martin; Modriansky, Martin; Fekete, Ladislav; Masek, Josef; Hubatka, Frantisek; Turanek, Jaroslav

    2016-04-19

    The development of new methods and strategies for the investigation of membrane proteins is limited by poor solubility of these proteins in an aqueous environment and hindered by a number of other problems linked to the instability of the proteins outside lipid bilayers. Therefore, current research focuses on an analysis of membrane proteins incorporated into model lipid membrane, most frequently liposomes. In this work, we introduce a new electrochemical methodology for the analysis of transmembrane proteins reconstituted into a liposomal system. The proposed analytical approach is based on proteoliposomal sample adsorption on the surface of working electrodes followed by analysis of the anodic and cathodic signals of the reconstituted proteins. It works based on the fact that proteins are electroactive species, in contrast to the lipid components of the membranes under the given experimental conditions. Electroanalytical experiments were performed with two transmembrane proteins; the Na(+)/K(+)ATPase that contains transmembrane as well as large extramembraneous segments and the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1, which is a transmembrane protein essentially lacking extramembraneous segments. Electrochemical analyses of proteoliposomes were compared with analyses of both proteins solubilized with detergents (C12E8 and octyl-PoE) and supported by the following complementary methods: microscopy techniques, protein activity testing, molecular model visualizations, and immunochemical identification of both proteins. The label-free electrochemical platform presented here enables studies of reconstituted transmembrane proteins at the nanomolar level. Our results may contribute to the development of new electrochemical sensors and microarray systems applicable within the field of poorly water-soluble proteins. PMID:26980181

  9. Calibrating bacterial evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Ochman, Howard; Elwyn, Susannah; Moran, Nancy A

    1999-01-01

    Attempts to calibrate bacterial evolution have relied on the assumption that rates of molecular sequence divergence in bacteria are similar to those of higher eukaryotes, or to those of the few bacterial taxa for which ancestors can be reliably dated from ecological or geological evidence. Despite similarities in the substitution rates estimated for some lineages, comparisons of the relative rates of evolution at different classes of nucleotide sites indicate no basis for their universal appl...

  10. A non-catalytic histidine residue influences the function of the metalloprotease of Listeria monocytogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Forster, Brian M.; Bitar, Alan Pavinski; Marquis, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    Mpl, a thermolysin-like metalloprotease, and PC-PLC, a phospholipase C, are synthesized as proenzymes by the intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. During intracellular growth, L. monocytogenes is temporarily confined in a membrane-bound vacuole whose acidification leads to Mpl autolysis and Mpl-mediated cleavage of the PC-PLC N-terminal propeptide. Mpl maturation also leads to the secretion of both Mpl and PC-PLC across the bacterial cell wall. Previously, we identified neg...

  11. Fructose Degradation in the Haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii Involves a Bacterial Type Phosphoenolpyruvate-Dependent Phosphotransferase System, Fructose-1-Phosphate Kinase, and Class II Fructose-1,6-Bisphosphate Aldolase

    OpenAIRE

    Pickl, Andreas; Johnsen, Ulrike; Schönheit, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii utilizes fructose as a sole carbon and energy source. Genes and enzymes involved in fructose uptake and degradation were identified by transcriptional analyses, deletion mutant experiments, and enzyme characterization. During growth on fructose, the gene cluster HVO_1495 to HVO_1499, encoding homologs of the five bacterial phosphotransferase system (PTS) components enzyme IIB (EIIB), enzyme I (EI), histidine protein (HPr), EIIA, and EIIC, was highly ...

  12. Cadmium-induced crystallization of proteins: II. Crystallization of the Salmonella typhimurium histidine-binding protein in complex with L-histidine, L-arginine, or L-lysine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trakhanov, S; Kreimer, D I; Parkin, S; Ames, G F; Rupp, B

    1998-03-01

    To further investigate favorable effects of divalent cations on the formation of protein crystals, three complexes of Salmonella typhimurium histidine-binding protein were crystallized with varying concentrations of cadmium salts. For each of the three histidine-binding protein complexes, cadmium cations were found to promote or improve crystallization. The optimal cadmium concentration is ligand specific and falls within a narrow concentration range. In each case, crystals grown in the presence of cadmium diffract to better than 2.0 angstroms resolution and belong to the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1). From our results and from the analysis of cadmium sites in well-refined protein structures, we propose that cadmium addition provides a generally useful technique to modify crystal morphology and to improve diffraction quality. PMID:9541391

  13. Structure of bacterial respiratory complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrisford, John M; Baradaran, Rozbeh; Sazanov, Leonid A

    2016-07-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) plays a central role in cellular energy production, coupling electron transfer between NADH and quinone to proton translocation. It is the largest protein assembly of respiratory chains and one of the most elaborate redox membrane proteins known. Bacterial enzyme is about half the size of mitochondrial and thus provides its important "minimal" model. Dysfunction of mitochondrial complex I is implicated in many human neurodegenerative diseases. The L-shaped complex consists of a hydrophilic arm, where electron transfer occurs, and a membrane arm, where proton translocation takes place. We have solved the crystal structures of the hydrophilic domain of complex I from Thermus thermophilus, the membrane domain from Escherichia coli and recently of the intact, entire complex I from T. thermophilus (536 kDa, 16 subunits, 9 iron-sulphur clusters, 64 transmembrane helices). The 95Å long electron transfer pathway through the enzyme proceeds from the primary electron acceptor flavin mononucleotide through seven conserved Fe-S clusters to the unusual elongated quinone-binding site at the interface with the membrane domain. Four putative proton translocation channels are found in the membrane domain, all linked by the central flexible axis containing charged residues. The redox energy of electron transfer is coupled to proton translocation by the as yet undefined mechanism proposed to involve long-range conformational changes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt. PMID:26807915

  14. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR allelic variants relate to shifts in faecal microbiota of cystic fibrosis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Schippa

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In this study we investigated the effects of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR gene variants on the composition of faecal microbiota, in patients affected by Cystic Fibrosis (CF. CFTR mutations (F508del is the most common lead to a decreased secretion of chloride/water, and to mucus sticky secretions, in pancreas, respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. Intestinal manifestations are underestimated in CF, leading to ileum meconium at birth, or small bowel bacterial overgrowth in adult age. METHODS: Thirty-six CF patients, fasting and under no-antibiotic treatment, were CFTR genotyped on both alleles. Faecal samples were subjected to molecular microbial profiling through Temporal Temperature Gradient Electrophoresis and species-specific PCR. Ecological parameters and multivariate algorithms were employed to find out if CFTR variants could be related to the microbiota structure. RESULTS: Patients were classified by two different criteria: 1 presence/absence of F508del mutation; 2 disease severity in heterozygous and homozygous F508del patients. We found that homozygous-F508del and severe CF patients exhibited an enhanced dysbiotic faecal microbiota composition, even within the CF cohort itself, with higher biodiversity and evenness. We also found, by species-specific PCR, that potentially harmful species (Escherichia coli and Eubacterium biforme were abundant in homozygous-F508del and severe CF patients, while beneficial species (Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Bifidobacterium spp., and Eubacterium limosum were reduced. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report that establishes a link among CFTR variants and shifts in faecal microbiota, opening the way to studies that perceive CF as a 'systemic disease', linking the lung and the gut in a joined axis.

  15. Overexpression of Antimicrobial, Anticancer, and Transmembrane Peptides in Escherichia coli through a Calmodulin-Peptide Fusion System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Hiroaki; Nguyen, Leonard T; Gopal, Ramamourthy; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Vogel, Hans J

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, the increasing number of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has become a serious health concern. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an important component of the innate immune system of most organisms. A better understanding of their structures and mechanisms of action would lead to the design of more potent and safer AMPs as alternatives for current antibiotics. For detailed investigations, effective recombinant production which allows the facile modification of the amino acid sequence, the introduction of unnatural amino acids, and labeling with stable isotopes for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies is desired. Several expression strategies have been introduced in previous reports; however, their effectiveness has been limited to a select few AMPs. Here, we have studied calmodulin (CaM) as a more universal carrier protein to express many types of AMPs in E. coli. We have discovered that the unique architecture of CaM, consisting of two independent target binding domains with malleable methionine-rich interaction surfaces, can accommodate numerous amino acid sequences containing basic and hydrophobic residues. This effectively masks the toxic antimicrobial activities of many amphipathic AMPs and protects them from degradation during expression and purification. Here, we demonstrate the expression of various AMPs using a CaM-fusion expression system, including melittin, fowlicidin-1, tritrpticin, indolicidin, puroindoline A peptide, magainin II F5W, lactoferrampin B, MIP3α51-70, and human β-defensin 3 (HBD-3), the latter requiring three disulfide bonds for proper folding. In addition, our approach was extended to the transmembrane domain of the cell adhesion protein l-selectin. We propose the use of the CaM-fusion system as a universal approach to express many cationic amphipathic peptides that are normally toxic and would kill the bacterial host cells. PMID:27502305

  16. PheVI:09 (Phe6.44) as a sliding microswitch in seven-transmembrane (7TM) G protein-coupled receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin-Hansen, Louise; Holst, Birgitte; Frimurer, Thomas M;

    2012-01-01

    In seven-transmembrane (7TM), G protein-coupled receptors, highly conserved residues function as microswitches, which alternate between different conformations and interaction partners in an extended allosteric interface between the transmembrane segments performing the large scale conformational...

  17. Metabolic profiling of plasma amino acids shows that histidine increases following the consumption of pork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samman S

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Samir Samman,1 Ben Crossett,2 Miles Somers,1 Kirstine J Bell,1 Nicole T Lai,1,3 David R Sullivan,3 Peter Petocz4 1Discipline of Nutrition and Metabolism, 2Discipline of Proteomics and Biotechnology, School of Molecular Bioscience, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 4Department of Statistics, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Amino acid (AA status is determined by factors including nutrition, metabolic rate, and interactions between the metabolism of AA, carbohydrates, and lipids. Analysis of the plasma AA profile, together with markers of glucose and lipid metabolism, will shed light on metabolic regulation. The objectives of this study were to investigate the acute responses to the consumption of meals containing either pork (PM or chicken (CM, and to identify relationships between plasma AA and markers of glycemic and lipemic control. A secondary aim was to explore AA predictors of plasma zinc concentrations. Ten healthy adults participated in a postprandial study on two separate occasions. In a randomized cross-over design, participants consumed PM or CM. The concentrations of 21 AA, glucose, insulin, triglycerides, nonesterified fatty acids, and zinc were determined over 5 hours postprandially. The meal composition did not influence glucose, insulin, triglyceride, nonesterified fatty acid, or zinc concentrations. Plasma histidine was higher following the consumption of PM (P=0.014, with consistently higher changes observed after 60 minutes (P<0.001. Greater percentage increases were noted at limited time points for valine and leucine + isoleucine in those who consumed CM compared to PM. In linear regression, some AAs emerged as predictors of the metabolic responses, irrespective of the meal that was consumed. The present study demonstrates that a single meal of PM or CM produces a differential profile of AA in the

  18. Oxidative Stress Tolerance by Calcium and Histidine in Two Tomato Cultivars Under Nickel Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozafari H.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigated calcium (Ca and L-histidine (His interaction on nickel (Ni-induced oxidative stress tolerance in two tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Mill. cultivars including Cal-J N3 and Petoearly CH. CaCl2 (0 and 300 µM and L-histidine (0 and 300 µM effects on the oxidative responses in these cultivars cultured were compared in the hydroponic media under Ni stress (NiSO4; 0,150 and 300 µM. The activities of antioxidative enzymes including catalase (CAT, guaiacol peroxidase (GPX, ascorbate peroxidase (APX, superoxide dismutase (SOD and total content of proteins, malondialdehyde (MDA, other aldehydes, H2O2, Ca2+, Ni2+, ascorbate (ASC, dehydroascorbate (DHA and electrolytes leakage (EL were determined. The obtained results indicated that the application of Ca and His generally reduced oxidative markers such as the contents of EL, H2O2, MDA and activity of CAT as well as the Ni2+content of root and shoot organs under nickel toxicity, while application of Ni treatment without Ca+His increased these oxidative parameters and accumulation of Ni2+, compared to the control. Applying Ni without Ca and His has resulted in reduction of GPX, APX and SOD activities as well as concentrations of root and shoot Ca2+and ASC in the two mentioned cultivars. Application of Ca and His lead to the elevated contents of Ca2+ and ASC, increased activities of GPX, APX and SOD as well as inhibition of Ni2+ accumulation differently in both cultivars. Ca and His also alleviated the adverse effects of Ni stress on the selected investigated parameters especially in Petoearly CH cultivar. Thus, interaction of Ca and His appeared to improve adaptive responses to Ni stress leading to decreasing Ni-induced oxidative stress in the tomato plants. Therefore, our results suggest that Ca+His alleviated nickel-induced oxidative stress by uptake and inhibition of translocation of Ni2+ plus Ni chelating mechanism improvement in the tomato cultivars.

  19. Synthesis of novel chitosan resin possessing histidine moiety and its application to the determination of trace silver by ICP-AES coupled with triplet automated-pretreatment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel chitosan resin, cross-linked chitosan functionalized with histidine moiety (histidine-type chitosan resin), was synthesized for the collection and concentration of trace silver in aquatic samples. A triplet automated-pretreatment system (Triplet Auto-Pret System) installed mini-columns packed with the synthesized histidine-type chitosan resin was coupled with an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) for a rapid and sensitive analysis. Adsorption behavior of 50 elements on the histidine-type chitosan resin was examined. A trace amount of Ag(I) was shown a good adsorption in wide pH regions (pH 5-9), and Ag(I) adsorbed was readily recovered with 1 M nitric acid solution. The limit of detection (3σ) for silver was 0.03 μg L-1. The system was successfully applied to river water and dipped water in silver coated container.

  20. Phytoremediation of mixed-contaminated soil using the hyperaccumulator plant Alyssum lesbiacum: evidence of histidine as a measure of phytoextractable nickel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Andrew C; Bell, Thomas; Heywood, Chloe A; Smith, J A C; Thompson, Ian P

    2007-05-01

    In this study we examine the effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on the ability of the hyperaccumulator plant Alyssum lesbiacum to phytoextract nickel from co-contaminated soil. Planted and unplanted mesocosms containing the contaminated soils were repeatedly amended with sorbitan trioleate, salicylic acid and histidine in various combinations to enhance the degradation of two PAHs (phenanthrene and chrysene) and increase nickel phytoextraction. Plant growth was negatively affected by PAHs; however, there was no significant effect on the phytoextraction of Ni per unit biomass of shoot. Exogenous histidine did not increase nickel phytoextraction, but the histidine-extractable fraction of soil nickel showed a high correlation with phytoextractable nickel. These results indicate that Alyssum lesbiacum might be effective in phytoextracting nickel from marginally PAH-contaminated soils. In addition, we provide evidence for the broader applicability of histidine for quantifying and predicting Ni phytoavailability in soils. PMID:17084494

  1. Self-assembled luminescent CdSe-ZnS quantum dot bioconjugates prepared using engineered poly-histidine terminated proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a simple and versatile approach for the conjugation of luminescent CdSe-ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) to proteins through coordination of engineered C-terminal oligohistidine sequences. Several histidine tail containing proteins were self-assembled onto the QD surface using this method. A recombinant antibody specific for the high explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) was conjugated to QDs through a carboxy terminal histidine tail and the bioconjugate used to detect TNT by competitive immunoassay. TNT was detected over the range of 10 μg/ml down to 41 ng/ml using the scFv conjugated to QDs. These results open up the possibility to conjugate luminescent QDs to a whole range of proteins to form QD bioconjugates that can be effectively used in bio-oriented applications, such as sensing, imaging, immunoassay and other diagnostics

  2. Preparation of Tc-carbonyl complexes of tryptophan and histidine and biodistribution in mice bearing S180 tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tc-carbonyl complexes of tryptophan and histidine were synthesized by two-step method. The yielded complexes were found by paper electrophoresis to be electrically neutral in three buffer solutions (pH = 4.7, 7.4, 9.2). Their possible structures were postulated based on ab initio MO calculations. The biodistribution in mice bearing S180 tumor demonstrated that the Tc-carbonyl complex of histidine showed good stability in vivo and quick clearance, selectively accumulated in tumor. The tumor/muscle ratio attained 3 to 4. However, the complex of tryptophan showed poor stability in vivo and slow clearance, and retained for a long time in organs and tissues. It also accumulated in tumor to some extent. The tumor.muscle ratio attained 2 to 3. The labelling of proteins and polypeptides with the Tc(I)-carbonyl complex was also discussed

  3. Application of DEPBT on the Synthesis of the Protected Dipeptides Containing Histidine with Unprotected Imidazole Group by Solution Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈鸿雁; 田桂玲; 朱文江; 哈莎; 叶蕴华

    2003-01-01

    3- (Diethoxyphosphoryloxy)- 1,2,3-benzotriazln-4 (3H)-one (DE-PBT) was an organophosphorus coupling reagent developed by our group. It was an effective coupling reagent for the synthesis of protected peptides containing Tyr, Ser and Thr with unprotected hydroxy group on their side chain. The further study of the synthesis of a series of protected dipeptides containing hisfidine with unprotected imidazole group using DEPBT is reported. During the synthetic procedure, the imidazole group of histidine did not need to be protected. When the carboxyl components were N-protected aromatic amino acids or basic amino acids, the yields were relatively high (63%--81%). However,when the carboxyl components were N-protected acidic amino acids, the yields were relatively low (47%--48%). The results expanded the application of DEPBT on the synthesis of bioactive peptides containing histidine.

  4. Expression of genes encoding multi-transmembrane proteins in specific primate taste cell populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan D Moyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Using fungiform (FG and circumvallate (CV taste buds isolated by laser capture microdissection and analyzed using gene arrays, we previously constructed a comprehensive database of gene expression in primates, which revealed over 2,300 taste bud-associated genes. Bioinformatics analyses identified hundreds of genes predicted to encode multi-transmembrane domain proteins with no previous association with taste function. A first step in elucidating the roles these gene products play in gustation is to identify the specific taste cell types in which they are expressed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using double label in situ hybridization analyses, we identified seven new genes expressed in specific taste cell types, including sweet, bitter, and umami cells (TRPM5-positive, sour cells (PKD2L1-positive, as well as other taste cell populations. Transmembrane protein 44 (TMEM44, a protein with seven predicted transmembrane domains with no homology to GPCRs, is expressed in a TRPM5-negative and PKD2L1-negative population that is enriched in the bottom portion of taste buds and may represent developmentally immature taste cells. Calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1, a component of a novel calcium channel, along with family members CALHM2 and CALHM3; multiple C2 domains; transmembrane 1 (MCTP1, a calcium-binding transmembrane protein; and anoctamin 7 (ANO7, a member of the recently identified calcium-gated chloride channel family, are all expressed in TRPM5 cells. These proteins may modulate and effect calcium signalling stemming from sweet, bitter, and umami receptor activation. Synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2B (SV2B, a regulator of synaptic vesicle exocytosis, is expressed in PKD2L1 cells, suggesting that this taste cell population transmits tastant information to gustatory afferent nerve fibers via exocytic neurotransmitter release. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Identification of genes encoding multi-transmembrane domain proteins

  5. Chiral recognition of proteins having L-histidine residues on the surface with lanthanide ion complex incorporated-molecularly imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, lanthanide ion complex incorporated molecularly imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles were synthesized. A combination of three novel approaches was applied for the purpose. First, lanthanide ions [Terbium(III)] were complexed with N-methacryloyl-L-histidine (MAH), polymerizable derivative of L-histidine amino acid, in order to incorporate the complex directly into the polymeric backbone. At the second stage, L-histidine molecules imprinted nanoparticles were utilized instead of whole protein imprinting in order to avoid whole drawbacks such as fragility, complexity, denaturation tendency, and conformation dependency. At the third stage following the first two steps mentioned above, imprinted L-histidine was coordinated with cupric ions [Cu(II)] to conduct the study under mild conditions. Then, molecularly imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles synthesized were used for L-histidine adsorption from aqueous solution to optimize conditions for adsorption and fluorimetric detection. Finally, usability of nanoparticles was investigated for chiral biorecognition using stereoisomer, D-histidine, racemic mixture, D,L-histidine, proteins with surface L-histidine residue, lysozyme, cytochrome C, or without ribonuclease A. The results revealed that the proposed polymerization strategy could make significant contribution to the solution of chronic problems of fluorescent component introduction into polymers. Additionally, the fluorescent nanoparticles reported here could be used for selective separation and fluorescent monitoring purposes. Highlights: • Lanthanide ion complex incorporated molecularly imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles • Direct incorporation of the fluorescent complex into polymeric backbone. • Imprinting by assistance of cupric ion coordination into nanoparticles • Evaluation of the chiral biorecognition ability of nanoparticles • Simultaneous selective separation and fluorescent monitoring

  6. Chiral recognition of proteins having L-histidine residues on the surface with lanthanide ion complex incorporated-molecularly imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uzun, Lokman, E-mail: lokman@hacettepe.edu.tr [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, 06381, Ankara (Turkey); Uzek, Recep; Şenel, Serap [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, 06381, Ankara (Turkey); Say, Ridvan [Anadolu University, Department of Chemistry, 26470, Eskisehir (Turkey); Denizli, Adil [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, 06381, Ankara (Turkey)

    2013-08-01

    In this study, lanthanide ion complex incorporated molecularly imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles were synthesized. A combination of three novel approaches was applied for the purpose. First, lanthanide ions [Terbium(III)] were complexed with N-methacryloyl-L-histidine (MAH), polymerizable derivative of L-histidine amino acid, in order to incorporate the complex directly into the polymeric backbone. At the second stage, L-histidine molecules imprinted nanoparticles were utilized instead of whole protein imprinting in order to avoid whole drawbacks such as fragility, complexity, denaturation tendency, and conformation dependency. At the third stage following the first two steps mentioned above, imprinted L-histidine was coordinated with cupric ions [Cu(II)] to conduct the study under mild conditions. Then, molecularly imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles synthesized were used for L-histidine adsorption from aqueous solution to optimize conditions for adsorption and fluorimetric detection. Finally, usability of nanoparticles was investigated for chiral biorecognition using stereoisomer, D-histidine, racemic mixture, D,L-histidine, proteins with surface L-histidine residue, lysozyme, cytochrome C, or without ribonuclease A. The results revealed that the proposed polymerization strategy could make significant contribution to the solution of chronic problems of fluorescent component introduction into polymers. Additionally, the fluorescent nanoparticles reported here could be used for selective separation and fluorescent monitoring purposes. Highlights: • Lanthanide ion complex incorporated molecularly imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles • Direct incorporation of the fluorescent complex into polymeric backbone. • Imprinting by assistance of cupric ion coordination into nanoparticles • Evaluation of the chiral biorecognition ability of nanoparticles • Simultaneous selective separation and fluorescent monitoring.

  7. Mechanisms of cataract development in adult Atlantic salmon growers relative to dietary histidine and plant feed ingredients

    OpenAIRE

    Tröße, Christiane

    2010-01-01

    Cataracts are defined as opacities of the eye lens and can be caused by a large number of risk factors. In aquaculture, cataracts in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) represent an ethical problem and can cause economical losses. A series of studies have shown the cataract mitigating effect of dietary histidine (His) levels above the currently recommended minimum requirement in Atlantic salmon smolt and that dietary His levels are reflected in the concentrations of the His...

  8. Improved acid stress survival of Lactococcus lactis expressing the histidine decarboxylation pathway of Streptococcus thermophilus CHCC1524.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trip, Hein; Mulder, Niels L; Lolkema, Juke S

    2012-03-30

    Degradative amino acid decarboxylation pathways in bacteria generate secondary metabolic energy and provide resistance against acid stress. The histidine decarboxylation pathway of Streptococcus thermophilus CHCC1524 was functionally expressed in the heterologous host Lactococcus lactis NZ9000, and the benefits of the newly acquired pathway for the host were analyzed. During growth in M17 medium in the pH range of 5-6.5, a small positive effect was observed on the biomass yield in batch culture, whereas no growth rate enhancement was evident. In contrast, a strong benefit for the engineered L. lactis strain was observed in acid stress survival. In the presence of histidine, the pathway enabled cells to survive at pH values as low as 3 for at least 2 h, conditions under which the host cells were rapidly dying. The flux through the histidine decarboxylation pathway in cells grown at physiological pH was under strict control of the electrochemical proton gradient (pmf) across the membrane. Ionophores that dissipated the membrane potential (ΔΨ) and/or the pH gradient (ΔpH) strongly increased the flux, whereas the presence of glucose almost completely inhibited the flux. Control of the pmf over the flux was exerted by both ΔΨ and ΔpH and was distributed over the transporter HdcP and the decarboxylase HdcA. The control allowed for a synergistic effect between the histidine decarboxylation and glycolytic pathways in acid stress survival. In a narrow pH range around 2.5 the synergism resulted in a 10-fold higher survival rate. PMID:22351775

  9. CHPA, a Cysteine- and Histidine-Rich-Domain-Containing Protein, Contributes to Maintenance of the Diploid State in Aspergillus nidulans

    OpenAIRE

    Sadanandom, Ari; Findlay, Kim; Doonan, John H.; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Shirasu, Ken

    2004-01-01

    The alternation of eukaryotic life cycles between haploid and diploid phases is crucial for maintaining genetic diversity. In some organisms, the growth and development of haploid and diploid phases are nearly identical, and one might suppose that all genes required for one phase are likely to be critical for the other phase. Here, we show that targeted disruption of the chpA (cysteine- and histidine-rich-domain- [CHORD]-containing protein A) gene in haploid Aspergillus nidulans strains gives...

  10. Effects of grain, fructose, and histidine on ruminal pH and fermentation products during an induced subacute acidosis protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golder, H M; Celi, P; Rabiee, A R; Heuer, C; Bramley, E; Miller, D W; King, R; Lean, I J

    2012-04-01

    The effects of grain, fructose, and histidine on ruminal pH and fermentation products were studied in dairy cattle during an induced subacute acidosis protocol. Thirty Holstein heifers were randomly allocated to 5 treatment groups: (1) control (no grain); (2) grain [fed at a crushed triticale dry matter intake (DMI) of 1.2% of body weight (BW)]; (3) grain (0.8% of BW DMI)+fructose (0.4% of BW DMI); (4) grain (1.2% of BW DMI)+histidine (6 g/head); and (5) grain (0.8% of BW DMI)+fructose (0.4% of BW DMI)+histidine (6 g/head) in a partial factorial arrangement. Heifers were fed 1 kg of grain daily with ad libitum access to ryegrass silage and alfalfa hay for 10 d. Feed was withheld for 14 h before challenge day, on which heifers were fed 200 g of alfalfa hay and then the treatment diets immediately thereafter. Rumen samples were collected 5 min after diet ingestion, 60 min later, and at 3 subsequent 50-min intervals. Grain decreased ruminal pH and increased ammonia, total volatile fatty acid (VFA), acetate, butyrate, propionate, and valerate concentrations compared with controls. The addition of grain had no effect on ruminal D- and L-lactate concentrations. Fructose markedly decreased ruminal pH and markedly increased D- and L-lactate concentrations. Fructose increased total VFA and butyrate and decreased valerate concentrations. Although histidine did not have a marked effect on ruminal fermentation, increased concentrations of histamine were observed following feeding. This study demonstrates that the substitution of some grain for fructose can lower ruminal pH and increase VFA and lactate concentrations, warranting further investigation into the role of sugars on the risk of acidosis in dairy cattle. PMID:22459843

  11. Insight into the sporulation phosphorelay: Crystal structure of the sensor domain of Bacillus subtilis histidine kinase, KinD

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, R.; Gu, M; Wilton, R.; Babnigg, G; Kim, Y.; Pokkuluri, P. R.; Szurmant, H.; Joachimiak, A.; Schiffer, M.

    2013-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis KinD signal-transducing histidine kinase is a part of the sporulation phosphorelay known to regulate important developmental decisions such as sporulation and biofilm formation. We have determined crystal structures of the extracytoplasmic sensing domain of KinD, which was copurified and crystallized with a pyruvate ligand. The structure of a ligand-binding site mutant was also determined; it was copurified and crystallized with an acetate ligand. The structure of the Ki...

  12. Secretion of a malarial histidine-rich protein (Pf HRP II) from Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, R.J.; Uni, S.; Aikawa, M.; Aley, S.B.; Leech, J.H.; Lew, A.M.; Wellems, T.E.; Rener, J.; Taylor, D.W.

    1986-10-01

    Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IRBCs) synthesis several histidine-rich proteins (HRPs) that accumulate high levels of (/sup 3/H)histidine but very low levels of amino acids such as (/sup 3/H)isoleucine or (/sup 35/S)methionine. The authors prepared a monoclonal antibody which reacts specifically with one of these HRPs (Pf HRP II) and studied the location and synthesis of this protein during the parasite's intracellular growth. With the knob-positive Malayan Camp strain of P. falciparum, the monoclonal antibody identified a multiplet of protein of protein bands with major species at M/sub r/ 72,000 and 69,000. Pf HRP II synthesis began with immature parasites (rings) and continued through the trophozoite stage. The M/sub r/ 72,000 band of Pf HRP II, but not the faster moving bands of the multiplet, was recovered as a water-soluble protein from the culture supernatant of intact IRBCs. Approximately 50% of the total (/sup 3/H)histidine radioactivity incorporated into the M/sub r/ 72,000 band was extracellular between 2 and 24 h of culture. Immunofluorescence and cryothin-section immunoelectron microscopy localized Pf HRP II to several cell compartments including the parasite cytoplasm, as concentrated packets in the host erythrocyte cytoplasm and at the IRBC membrane. The results provide evidence for an intracellular route of transport for a secreted malarial protein from the parasite through several membranes and the host cell cytoplasm.

  13. Protonation states of histidine and other key residues in deoxy normal human adult hemoglobin by neutron protein crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using neutron diffraction analysis, the protonation states of 35 of 38 histidine residues were determined for the deoxy form of normal human adult hemoglobin. Distal and buried histidines may contribute to the increased affinity of the deoxy state for hydrogen ions and its decreased affinity for oxygen compared with the oxygenated form. The protonation states of the histidine residues key to the function of deoxy (T-state) human hemoglobin have been investigated using neutron protein crystallography. These residues can reversibly bind protons, thereby regulating the oxygen affinity of hemoglobin. By examining the OMIT Fo − Fc and 2Fo − Fc neutron scattering maps, the protonation states of 35 of the 38 His residues were directly determined. The remaining three residues were found to be disordered. Surprisingly, seven pairs of His residues from equivalent α or β chains, αHis20, αHis50, αHis58, αHis89, βHis63, βHis143 and βHis146, have different protonation states. The protonation of distal His residues in the α1β1 heterodimer and the protonation of αHis103 in both subunits demonstrates that these residues may participate in buffering hydrogen ions and may influence the oxygen binding. The observed protonation states of His residues are compared with their ΔpKa between the deoxy and oxy states. Examination of inter-subunit interfaces provided evidence for interactions that are essential for the stability of the deoxy tertiary structure

  14. Triple-Resonance Methods for Complete Resonance Assignment of Aromatic Protons and Directly Bound Heteronuclei in Histidine and Tryptophan Residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A set of three experiments is described which correlate aromatic resonances of histidine and tryptophan residues with amide resonances in 13C/15N-labelled proteins. Provided that backbone 1H and 15N positions of the sequentially following residues are known, this results in sequence-specific assignment of histidine chemical shifts. In the reverse situation, these residues can be located in the 1H-15N correlation map to facilitate backbone assignments. It may be chosen between selective versions for either of the two amino acid types or simultaneous detection of both with complete discrimination against phenylalanine or tyrosine residues in each case. The linkages between δ-proton/carbon and the remaining aromatic as well as backbone resonances do not rely on through-space interactions, which may be ambiguous, but exclusively employ one-bond scalar couplings for magnetization transfer instead. Knowledge of these aromatic chemical shifts is the prerequisite for the analysis of NOESY spectra, the study of protein-ligand interactions involving histidine and tryptophan residues and the monitoring of imidazole protonation states during pH titrations. The new methods are demonstrated with five different proteins with molecular weights ranging from 11 to 28 kDa

  15. Nitrogen-15 NMR spectroscopy of the catalytic-triad histidine of a serine protease in peptide boronic acid inhibitor complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    15N NMR spectroscopy was used to examine the active-site histidyl residue of α-lytic protease in peptide boronic acid inhibitor complexes. Two distinct types of complexes were observed: (1) Boronic acids that are analogues of substrates form complexes in which the active-site imidazole ring is protonated and both imidazole N-H protons are strongly hydrogen bonded. (2) Boronic acids that are not substrate analogues form complexes in which Nε2 of the active-site histidine is covalently bonded to the boron atom of the inhibitor. The proton bound to Nδ1 of the histidine in these histidine-boronate adducts remains strongly hydrogen bonded, presumably to the active-site aspartate. In both types of complexes the N-H protons of His-57 exchange unusually slowly as evidenced by the room temperature visibility of the low-field 1H resonances and the 15N-H spin couplings. These results indicate that occupancy of the specificity subsites may be required to fully form the transition-state binding site. The significance of these findings for understanding inhibitor binding and the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases is discussed

  16. Secretion of a malarial histidine-rich protein (Pf HRP II) from Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IRBCs) synthesis several histidine-rich proteins (HRPs) that accumulate high levels of [3H]histidine but very low levels of amino acids such as [3H]isoleucine or [35S]methionine. The authors prepared a monoclonal antibody which reacts specifically with one of these HRPs (Pf HRP II) and studied the location and synthesis of this protein during the parasite's intracellular growth. With the knob-positive Malayan Camp strain of P. falciparum, the monoclonal antibody identified a multiplet of protein of protein bands with major species at M/sub r/ 72,000 and 69,000. Pf HRP II synthesis began with immature parasites (rings) and continued through the trophozoite stage. The M/sub r/ 72,000 band of Pf HRP II, but not the faster moving bands of the multiplet, was recovered as a water-soluble protein from the culture supernatant of intact IRBCs. Approximately 50% of the total [3H]histidine radioactivity incorporated into the M/sub r/ 72,000 band was extracellular between 2 and 24 h of culture. Immunofluorescence and cryothin-section immunoelectron microscopy localized Pf HRP II to several cell compartments including the parasite cytoplasm, as concentrated packets in the host erythrocyte cytoplasm and at the IRBC membrane. The results provide evidence for an intracellular route of transport for a secreted malarial protein from the parasite through several membranes and the host cell cytoplasm

  17. Fluorescence-based selective sensing of 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene using histidine-stabilized ZnS nanospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, histidine-stabilized ZnS nanospheres have been used as a fluorescent probe for the selective detection of 1,2,4 –trihydroxybenzene (1,2,4 –THB). 1,2,4 –THB quenches the fluorescence of ZnS nanospheres in the 0.2–1.0 μM concentration range. Two other isomers of the analyte (namely, 1,2,3 –THB and 1,3,5 –THB) do not quench the fluorescence of the ZnS nanospheres in the above mentioned concentration range. A charge transfer complex is formed between 1,2,4 –THB and the histidine molecules surrounding the ZnS nanospheres. Due to its electron-rich character, 1,2,4 –THB acts as an electron donor while histidine acts as an electron acceptor. The limit of detection (LOD) of 1,2,4 –THB using this method is 0.28 μM. This fluorescence-based method has the potential to be used for the detection of 1,2,4 –THB in biological samples since the experiments have been carried out in an aqueous medium at pH 7.2. (papers)

  18. Accumulation of chromium by Commelina communis L. grown in solution with different concentrations of Cr and L-histidine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐世荣; 席磊

    2002-01-01

    Hydroponic experiments conducted to examine the chromiun uptake by C. communis in the presence of different Cr concentrations (Cr6+ 100 and 200 mg/L, respectively) and free histidine supplementation (0.5 and 1.0 mol/L) showed that shoot and root growth of C. communis decreased greatly with increasing Cr concentrations in the medium; and that the species was a typical excluder since it accumulated high concentrations of Cr in roots but comparatively low concentrations in shoots. Chromium in shoots and roots of Cr24 -supplied plants ranged from 329-1880 and 3788-4240 mg/kg DW, respectively, while those of Cr24 -histidine-supplied plants ranged from 478 to 629 mg/kg and 4157-4303 mg/kg DW, respectively. With Cr present in the hydroponic solution, C. communis accumulated more Cr in its tissues. Increasing histidine application to the solution significantly increased chromium accumulation in the plant tissues but could not alter the accumulation pattern of plants although it induced a higher concentration of Cr in its shoots and roots. These features suggested that C. communis may serve as an alternative species in a constructed wetland for phytoextraction treatment of Cr-containing wastewater and for phytostabilization of Cr mining spoils.

  19. Histidine-rich glycoprotein does not interfere with interactions between antithrombin III and heparin-like compounds on vascular endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of histidine-rich glycoprotein in controlling heparin-like compounds on the endothelial cell surface is still unclear. The effects of this heparin-neutralizing protein on the interaction between antithrombin III and cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells were examined. Displacement of 125I-labeled antithrombin III specifically bound to endothelial cells by unlabeled histidine-rich glycoprotein was much less potent than that by unlabeled antithrombin III. One hundred-fold molar excess of histidine-rich glycoprotein displaced specific 125I-antithrombin III binding only by 20%. Furthermore, the endothelial cell-mediated acceleration of thrombin inactivation by antithrombin III was diminished by protamine sulfate, but was not affected by histidine-rich glycoprotein even at a histidine-rich glycoprotein/antithrombin III molar ratio of approximately 7:1. These data indicate that histidine-rich glycoprotein does not interfere with the interaction of endothelial cell heparin-like compounds with antithrombin III. Thus, it may not play an important role in the modulation of anticoagulant activity of endothelial cells in vivo, suggesting that the commonly accepted view of the probable function of this protein is erroneous

  20. Cu(2+) modulated silver nanoclusters as an on-off-on fluorescence probe for the selective detection of L-histidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xuyue; Yao, Tianming; Zhu, Ying; Shi, Shuo

    2015-04-15

    In the present study, a new strategy based on Cu(2+) mediated DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-Ag NCs) was developed, as a label-free, on-off-on fluorescent probe for the detection of l-histidine. Eight synthesized DNA oligonucleotides (D1-D8) were experimentally tested, and D5-Ag NCs was finally selected for l-histidine detection due to its best fluorescent properties. The fluorescence emission of D5-Ag NCs could be quenched by Cu(2+) via electron or energy transfer. Upon addition of l-histidine, the chelation between Cu(2+) and the imidazole group of l-histidine leads to Cu(2+) liberation from D5-Ag NCs, and subsequently results in a dramatic fluorescence enhancement of the probe. The method displayed a good selectivity toward l-histidine over all the other amino acids, with a linear relationship in the range of 0.20-80μM, and a limit of detection (LOD) of 4.3nM. The strategy was also successfully applied to detect l-histidine in diluted human urine, exhibiting great opportunities for practical application in biological system. PMID:25460889

  1. Recyclable decoration of amine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles with Ni(2+) for determination of histidine by photochemical vapor generation atomic spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuan; Wang, Qi; Zheng, Chengbin; Wu, Li; Hou, Xiandeng; Lv, Yi

    2014-01-01

    It is critically important to accurately determine histidine since it is an indicator for many diseases when at an abnormal level. Here, an inexpensive and simple method using an amine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle-based Ni(2+)-histidine affinity pair system was developed for highly sensitive and selective detection of histidine in human urine by photochemical vapor generation atomic spectrometry. Ni(2+) was first bound to the amine groups of the amine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles and then liberated to solution via the highly specific interaction between the histidine and Ni(2+) in the presence of histidine. The liberated histidine-Ni(2+) complex was exposed to UV irradiation in the presence of formic acid to form gaseous nickel tetracarbonyl, which was separated from the sample matrix and determined by atomic absorption/fluorescence spectrometry. Compared to other methods, this approach promises high sensitivity, simplicity in design, and convenient operation. The need for organic solvents, enzymatic reactions, separation processes, chemical modification, expensive instrumentations, and sophisticated and complicated pretreatment is minimized with this strategy. A limit of detection of 1 nM was obtained and provided tens-to-hundreds of fold improvements over that achieved with conventional methods. The protocol was evaluated by analysis of several urine samples with good recoveries and showed great potential for practical application. PMID:24286112

  2. A study by nitrogen-15 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the state of histidine in the catalytic triad of α-lytic protease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ionization behaviour of the histidine of the catalytic triad of α-lytic protease using N-15 NMR spectroscopy is studied. This technique is especially informative about the protonation, hydrogen-bond formation, and tautomeric equilibrium of imidazole rings. The efficient and specific incorporation of N-15 labelled histidine into α-lytic protease was achieved by inducing and isolating an auxotroph of myxobacter 495 for which histidine is an essential amino acid. The results show that histidine of the catalytic triad of α-lytic protease appears to have a base strength which is essentially normal for an imidazole derivative but, in the pH range where the enzymatic activity is high, the histidine tautomer is favoured with the hydrogen located on N3 (π), as the result of hydrogen bonding to the asparate anion and possible the serine hydroxyl. Thus, the N-15 NMR shifts support the general geometry postulated for the ''charge-relay'' mechanism but not the idea of an unusually weakly basic histidine or an unusually strongly basic asparate carboxylate anion. (A.G.)

  3. Histidine-rich glycoprotein can prevent development of mouse experimental glioblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kärrlander

    Full Text Available Extensive angiogenesis, formation of new capillaries from pre-existing blood vessels, is an important feature of malignant glioma. Several antiangiogenic drugs targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF or its receptors are currently in clinical trials as therapy for high-grade glioma and bevacizumab was recently approved by the FDA for treatment of recurrent glioblastoma. However, the modest efficacy of these drugs and emerging problems with anti-VEGF treatment resistance welcome the development of alternative antiangiogenic therapies. One potential candidate is histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG, a plasma protein with antiangiogenic properties that can inhibit endothelial cell adhesion and migration. We have used the RCAS/TV-A mouse model for gliomas to investigate the effect of HRG on brain tumor development. Tumors were induced with platelet-derived growth factor-B (PDGF-B, in the presence or absence of HRG. We found that HRG had little effect on tumor incidence but could significantly inhibit the development of malignant glioma and completely prevent the occurrence of grade IV tumors (glioblastoma.

  4. The nuclear bile acid receptor FXR controls the liver derived tumor suppressor histidine-rich glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuschle, Ulrich; Birkel, Manfred; Hambruch, Eva; Hornberger, Martin; Kinzel, Olaf; Perović-Ottstadt, Sanja; Schulz, Andreas; Hahn, Ulrike; Burnet, Michael; Kremoser, Claus

    2015-06-01

    The nuclear bile acid receptor Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is strongly expressed in liver and intestine, controls bile acid and lipid homeostasis and exerts tumor-protective functions in liver and intestine. Histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) is an abundant plasma protein produced by the liver with the proposed function as a pattern recognition molecule involved in the clearance of immune complexes, necrotic cells and pathogens, the modulation of angiogenesis, the normalization of deranged endothelial vessel structure in tumors and tumor suppression. FXR recognition sequences were identified within a human HRG promoter fragment that mediated FXR/FXR-agonist dependent reporter gene activity in vitro. We show that HRG is a novel transcriptional target gene of FXR in human hepatoma cells, human upcyte® primary hepatocytes and 3D human liver microtissues in vitro and in mouse liver in vivo. Prolonged administration of the potent nonsteroidal FXR agonist PX20606 increases HRG levels in mouse plasma. Finally, daily oral administration of this FXR agonist for seven days resulted in a significant increase of HRG levels in the plasma of healthy human male volunteers during a clinical Phase I safety study. HRG might serve as a surrogate marker indicative of liver-specific FXR activation in future human clinical studies. Furthermore, potent FXR agonists might be beneficial in serious health conditions where HRG is reduced, for example, in hepatocellular carcinoma but also other solid cancers, liver failure, sepsis and pre-eclampsia. PMID:25363753

  5. Acute hyponatremia after cardioplegia by histidine-tryptophane-ketoglutarate – a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindner Gregor

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte disorder in hospitalized patients and is known to be associated with increased mortality. The administration of antegrade single-shot, up to two liters, histidine-tryptophane-ketoglutarate (HTK solution for adequate electromechanical cardiac arrest and myocardial preservation during minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR is a standard procedure. We aimed to determine the impact of HTK infusion on electrolyte and acid–base balance. Methods In this retrospective analysis we reviewed data on patient characteristics, type of surgery, arterial blood gas analysis during surgery and intra-/postoperative laboratory results of patients receiving surgery for MIAVR at a large tertiary care university hospital. Results A total of 25 patients were included in the study. All patients were normonatremic at start of surgery. All patients developed hyponatremia after administration of HTK solution with a significant drop of serum sodium of 15 mmol/L (p  Conclusions Acute hyponatremia during cardioplegia with HTK solution is isotonic and should probably not be corrected without presence of hypotonicity as confirmed by measurement of serum osmolality.

  6. Identification of the active site histidine in Staphylococcus hyicus lipase using chemical modification and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boots, J W; van Dongen, W D; Verheij, H M; de Haas, G H; Haverkamp, J; Slotboom, A J

    1995-04-01

    Staphylococcus hyicus lipase is a serine hydrolase. In order to identify the active site histidine of S. hyicus lipase we have chemically modified S. hyicus lipase with 1-bromo-octan-2-one. The enzyme is rapidly inactivated by this inhibitor with a half-time of 578 s at pH 6.5 and 30 degrees C. Addition of the enzyme's cofactor calcium increases the inactivation rate approx. 2-fold. When n-hexadecylphosphocholine, a non-hydrolysable substrate analogue, is added the inactivation rate decreases about 3-fold, suggesting that a residue in the active site of S. hyicus lipase is involved in the inactivation reaction. Inactivation of S. hyicus lipase with 14C-labelled 1-bromo-octan-2-one shows that 1.4 moles of inhibitor per mole of lipase are incorporated. The results of an electrospray mass spectrometric study of the inactivated enzyme are consistent with this finding. In order to identify the modified residue, both the inactivated and the unmodified lipase were digested with cyanogen bromide followed by trypsin. The resulting peptides were analysed using HPLC and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. The results allow the modified residue to be assigned to the peptide Gly597-Lys612. Collision induced dissociation mass spectrometry allowed the modified residue to be identified as His-600. From these results we conclude that this residue forms part of the catalytic triad of S. hyicus lipase. PMID:7711054

  7. Histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate for pancreas allograft preservation: the Indiana University experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridell, J A; Mangus, R S; Powelson, J A

    2010-05-01

    Histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate solution (HTK) has been scrutinized for use in pancreas transplantation. A recent case series and a United Network for Organ Sharing data base review have suggested an increased incidence of allograft pancreatitis and graft loss with HTK compared to the University of Wisconsin solution (UW). Conversely, a recent randomized, controlled study failed to show any significant difference between HTK and UW for pancreas allograft preservation. This study was a retrospective review of all pancreas transplants performed at Indiana University between 2003 and 2009 comparing preservation with HTK or UW. Data included recipient and donor demographics, 7-day, 90-day and 1-year graft survival, peak 30-day serum amylase and lipase, HbA1c and C-peptide levels. Of the 308 pancreas transplants, 84% used HTK and 16% UW. There were more SPK compared to pancreas after kidney and pancreas transplant alone in the HTK group. Donor and recipient demographics were similar. There was no significant difference in 7-day, 90-day or 1-year graft survival, 30-day peak serum amylase and lipase, HbA1c or C-peptide. No clinically significant difference between HTK and UW for pancreas allograft preservation was identified. Specifically, in the context of low-to-moderate flush volume and short cold ischemia time (

  8. Multivalent dendritic polyglycerolamine with arginine and histidine end groups for efficient siRNA transfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Sheikhi Mehrabadi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The success of siRNA-based therapeutics highly depends on a safe and efficient delivery of siRNA into the cytosol. In this study, we post-modified the primary amines on dendritic polyglycerolamine (dPG-NH2 with different ratios of two relevant amino acids, namely, arginine (Arg and histidine (His. To investigate the effects from introducing Arg and His to dPG, the resulting polyplexes of amino acid functionalized dPG-NH2s (AAdPGs/siRNA were evaluated regarding cytotoxicity, transfection efficiency, and cellular uptake. Among AAdPGs, an optimal vector with (1:3 Arg to His ratio, showed efficient siRNA transfection with minimal cytotoxicity (cell viability ≥ 90% in NIH 3T3 cells line. We also demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of dPG-NH2 decreased as a result of amino acid functionalization. While the incorporation of both cationic (Arg and pH-responsive residues (His are important for safe and efficient siRNA transfection, this study indicates that AAdPGs containing higher degrees of His display lower cytotoxicity and more efficient endosomal escape.

  9. Induction of histidine decarboxylase in mouse tissues by mitogens in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Y

    1983-12-15

    Various types of mitogenic substances, such as a Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), concanavalin A (Con A), pokeweed mitogen, polyI:polyC (a synthetic double-stranded RNA) and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (a component of croton oil), induced histidine decarboxylase (HDC) in the liver, spleen and lung of mice at 4.5 hr after injection. Other inflammatory agents without mitogenic activity, such as zymosan, carrageenan, glycogen, D-galactosamine and N-acetyl-muramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine, did not induce the enzyme. Both LPS (a B-cell mitogen) and Con A (a T-cell mitogen) induced HDC also in nude mice that lack T-cells, indicating that T-cells are not required for HDC induction by mitogens. C3H/HeJ mice, which are LPS-low responder mice in various immunological tests, were quite a bit less responsive to LPS also in the HDC induction. These results show that mitogens with different properties can induce HDC as a common characteristic. On the basis of these results, the possible participation of macrophages in the process of HDC induction by mitogens was discussed. PMID:6661256

  10. Radiation damage in single crystal L-histidine as studied by low-temperature thermoluminescence techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-irradiation of single crystal L-Histidine at 10 K produces TL glow peaks at 38, 72, 84, 122, 162, 204, and 245 K. The 85 K peak is the most intense one and is characterized by a thermal activation energy of 0.073 eV and frequency factor of 1.1 x 103 s-1. Moreover, it is readily photobleachable, whereas the other glow peaks are not, and is tentatively correlated with the thermal decay of a carboxyl anion radical. Computer simulation of the Randall-Wilkins first-order TL expression provided a check on the experimentally derived parameters characterizing the 38 and 84 K peaks. The initial-rise method did not produce accurate parameters for the 38 K peak; however, computer simulation yielded an activation energy of 0.022 eV and a frequency factor of 20 s-1 which were in agreement with the experimental shape of the glow curve. This TL peak is attributed to the thermal destruction of an imidazole cation radical. Emission spectra measurements of the 84 K luminescence (other peaks were of insufficient intensity) indicated that TL results from thermal release of electrons and their subsequent de-excitation to the ground state via the singlet and triplet manifolds. At sufficiently high temperatures (approx. equal to 78 K) one only observes singlet state emission due to intersystem crossing. (orig.)

  11. Visual detection of arginine, histidine and lysine using quercetin-functionalized gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the use of quercetin-functionalized gold nanoparticles (QC-AuNPs) as a colorimetric probe for the amino acids arginine (Arg), histidine (His) and lysine (Lys). The method is based on the aggregation of the QC-AuNPs that is caused by these amino acids and leads to a visually detectable color change from red to blue. The absorption maxima shift from 525 nm to 702, 693, and 745 nm, respectively. Aggregations are confirmed by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopic techniques (TEM). The effects of the QC concentration, temperature and reaction time for the preparation of QC-Au NPs were tested. Other amino acids do not interfere. Under the optimal conditions, linear relationships exist between the absorption ratios at 702/525 nm (for Arg), 693/525 nm (for His), and 745/525 nm (for Lys) over the concentrations ranges from 2.5–1,250 μM (Arg) and 1–1,000 μM (His and Lys), respectively. The respective limits of detection are 0.04, 0.03, and 0.02 μM. The method provides a useful tool for the rapid visual and instrumental determination of the three amino acids. (author)

  12. Facile and high-efficient immobilization of histidine-tagged multimeric protein G on magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiho; Chang, Jeong Ho

    2014-12-01

    This work reports the high-efficient and one-step immobilization of multimeric protein G on magnetic nanoparticles. The histidine-tagged (His-tag) recombinant multimeric protein G was overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 by the repeated linking of protein G monomers with a flexible linker. High-efficient immobilization on magnetic nanoparticles was demonstrated by two different preparation methods through the amino-silane and chloro-silane functionalization on silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles. Three kinds of multimeric protein G such as His-tag monomer, dimer, and trimer were tested for immobilization efficiency. For these tests, bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay was employed to determine the amount of immobilized His-tag multimeric protein G. The result showed that the immobilization efficiency of the His-tag multimeric protein G of the monomer, dimer, and trimer was increased with the use of chloro-silane-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles in the range of 98% to 99%, rather than the use of amino-silane-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles in the range of 55% to 77%, respectively.

  13. Biomimetic synthesis of coexistence of vaterite-calcite phases controlled by histidine-grafted-chitosan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhangxu; Xin, Meihua; Li, Mingchun; Xu, Jianpeng; Li, Xianxue; Chen, Xiaodong

    2014-10-01

    Biomimetic synthesis vaterite is promising in improving the application of calcium carbonate and providing a novel method for controlling synthesis other biomaterials. For the first time, the histidine-grafted-chitosan (NHCS) is used as an organic matrix to biomimetic synthesis of calcium carbonate. Effect of the pH value on the morphology and polymorph is investigated. The products are characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). The results show that the sole rhombohedral calcite phase can form in absence of NHCS, whereas the coexistence of vaterite-calcite phases is gained in the presence of NHCS. At pH=8.0, the content of vaterite reaches 93.7 wt%, but it drops to 62.2 wt% at pH 6.5. In addition, a possible mechanism is proposed to explain the formation of coexistence of vaterite-calcite phases in the study. The result indicates that NHCS is an effective template and pH responsive for biomimetic synthesis of vaterite, and offers a novel method for controlling synthesis of other biomaterials.

  14. The effect of a specific histidine-rich glycoprotein polymorphism on male infertility and semen parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Karin E; Nordqvist, Sarah; Kårehed, Karin; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger; Åkerud, Helena

    2016-08-01

    In women, there is evidence that a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) named HRG C633T is relevant for a number of fertility outcomes including recurrent miscarriage, ovarian response and pregnancy outcome after IVF. This case-control study was designed to investigate whether the HRG C633T SNP is important for male infertility and pregnancy rate following IVF. Cases were 139 infertile couples and controls were 196 pregnant couples. The 335 couples all contributed with one blood sample per partner. Genomic DNA was extracted and genotyping was performed using a TaqMan® SNP Genotyping Assay. Information on pregnancy rate and semen parameters was derived from medical records. Infertile couples in which the male partner was a homozygous carrier of the HRG C633T SNP had significantly lower (P < 0.01) pregnancy rate following IVF in comparison with couples where the male partner was a heterozygous HRG C633T SNP carrier. Male homozygous HRG 633T SNP carriers had overall lower total sperm count, sperm concentration, motility score and yield after preparation. In conclusion, once infertility is established the HRG C633T SNP seems to be important for male infertility and pregnancy rate following IVF. PMID:27210772

  15. Loss of fragile histidine triad protein expression in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Mei Xu; Chuan-Hu Qiao

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of fragile histidine triad (FHIT) protein in 64 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), and its relation with clinicopathological data.METHODS: Rabbit-anti-FHIT antibody was used to detect FHIT protein expression in 64 formalin-fixed,paraffin-embedded tissue specimens of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) by citrate-microwave-streptavidin (SP)-HRP immunohistochemical method.RESULTS: The positive FHIT protein expression was 22.79% ± 16.16%, 42.14% ± 16.82% in active and remittent phases of UC, 36.07% ± 19.23% in CD, and 57.05% ± 8.86% in normal colon mucosa. Statistically significant differences in FHIT protein expression were observed between the active and remittent phases of UC, between the active phase of UC and normal colon mucosa, as well as between the remittent phase of UC and normal colon mucosa, and between CD and normal colon mucosa.CONCLUSION: Our results show that FHIT protein expression is completely absent or reduced in IBD,suggesting that the FHIT gene might be associated with the oncogenesis and progression of IBD, an early event from inflammatory conditions to carcinoma in IBD.

  16. Solution Growth of a Novel Nonlinear Optical Material: L-Histidine Tetrafluoroborate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, M. D.; Choi, J.; Wang, W. S.; Bhat, K.; Lal, R. B.; Shields, Angela D.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Frazier, Donald O.

    1998-01-01

    Single crystals of L-Histidine tetrafluoroborate (L-HFB), a semiorganic nonlinear optical (NLO) material have been successfully grown by the temperature lowering and evaporation methods in our laboratory. Solubility curves of L-HFB have been determined in different solvents, such as water, ethanol and acetone. The solubility of L-HFB is very low in acetone, and ethanol, therefore, it is not feasible to grow L-HFB single crystals using these solvents. Good quality single crystals of a novel nonlinear optical material L-HFB have been grown from aqueous solution. Effects of seed orientation on morphologies of L-HFB crystals were studied. The advantages and disadvantage of both the evaporation and the temperature lowering techniques are compared. The single crystals in size 20 x 20 x 10 cubic mm were grown with deionized water as solvent in two weeks with an approximate growth rate of 1.4mm/day. The transmission range for these crystals has been found to be from 250 nm to 1500 nm.

  17. Urinary Concentrations of Hydroxyproline and 3 Methyl Histidine in Postpartum Cow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The urinary concentrations of hydroxyproline (HYPRO)and 3-methyl histidine (3-MEH1S ) were de termined in 16 Chinese-Holstein cows. The objectives of the experiment were to find out thhe relationship between collagen and myosin ddegradation and uterine involution in the postpartum cow. The results in the experiment showed that the mean concentrations of HYPRO and 3-MEHIS were 138.92±22.99 and 37.09 ± 3.90 nmol · mL-1 ,respectively ,for the cows during the days between 60~90 postpartum ,and for the covs immediately after calving the concentrations of HYPRO and 3-MEHIS reduced from 284.30 and 65.I8 nmol · mL-1 on the day one after calving to the normal level of 109.18 and 33.51 nmol · mL-1 on the day 50 post partum ,respectively. There was a good correlation between the urinary concentrations of both HYPRO and 3 -MEHIS and the diameters of the involuting uterus ( r =0.79).

  18. Histidine-Rich Oligopeptides To Lessen Copper-Mediated Amyloid-β Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Ana B; Terol-Ordaz, Laia; Espargaró, Alba; Vázquez, Guillem; Nicolás, Ernesto; Sabaté, Raimon; Gamez, Patrick

    2016-05-17

    Brain copper imbalance plays an important role in amyloid-β aggregation, tau hyperphosphorylation, and neurotoxicity observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, the administration of biocompatible metal-binding agents may offer a potential therapeutic solution to target mislocalized copper ions and restore metallostasis. Histidine-containing peptides and proteins are excellent metal binders and are found in many natural systems. The design of short peptides showing optimal binding properties represents a promising approach to capture and redistribute mislocalized metal ions, mainly due to their biocompatibility, ease of synthesis, and the possibility of fine-tuning their metal-binding affinities in order to suppress unwanted competitive binding with copper-containing proteins. In the present study, three peptides, namely HWH, HK(C) H, and HAH, have been designed with the objective of reducing copper toxicity in AD. These tripeptides form highly stable albumin-like complexes, showing higher affinity for Cu(II) than that of Aβ(1-40). Furthermore, HWH, HK(C) H, and HAH act as very efficient inhibitors of copper-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and prevent the copper-induced overproduction of toxic oligomers in the initial steps of amyloid aggregation in the presence of Cu(II) ions. These tripeptides, and more generally small peptides including the sequence His-Xaa-His at the N-terminus, may therefore be considered as promising motifs for the future development of new and efficient anti-Alzheimer drugs. PMID:27071336

  19. Glucocorticoid hormones downregulate histidine decarboxylase mRNA and enzyme activity in rat lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnow, C A; Panula, P; Yamatodani, A; Millhorn, D E

    1998-08-01

    Histidine decarboxylase (HDC) is the primary enzyme regulating histamine biosynthesis. Histamine contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory disorders such as asthma. Because glucocorticoids are effective in the treatment of asthma, we examined the effects of 6 h of exogenously administered dexamethasone (0.5-3,000 microg/kg ip), corticosterone (0.2-200 mg/kg ip), or endogenously elevated corticosterone (via exposure of rats to 10% oxygen) on HDC expression in the rat lung. HDC transcripts were decreased approximately 73% with dexamethasone treatment, 57% with corticosterone treatment, and 50% with exposure to 10% oxygen. Likewise, HDC enzyme activity was decreased 80% by treatment with dexamethasone and corticosterone and 60% by exposure to 10% oxygen. Adrenalectomy prevented the decreases in HDC mRNA and enzyme activity observed in rats exposed to 10% oxygen, suggesting that the adrenal gland is necessary for the mediation of hypoxic effects on HDC gene expression. These results demonstrate that corticosteroids initiate a process that leads to the decrease of HDC mRNA levels and enzyme activity in rat lung. PMID:9700103

  20. Bacterial meningitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To demonstrate the epidemiology, clinical manifestations and bacteriological profile of bacterial meningitis in children beyond the neonatal period in our hospital. This was a retrospective descriptive study conducted at Prince Rashid Hospital in Irbid, Jordan. The medical records of 50 children with the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis during 4 years period, were reviewed. The main cause of infection was streptococcus pneumoniae, followed by Haemophilus influenza and Niesseria meningitides. Mortality was higher in infants and meningococcal infection, while complications were more encountered in cases of streptococcus pneumoniae. Cerebrospinal fluid culture was positive in 11 cases and Latex agglutination test in 39. There is a significant reduction of the numbers of bacterial meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenza type B species. (author)