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Sample records for bacterial transcriptional regulatory

  1. Structural studies of bacterial transcriptional regulatory proteins by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkman, B.F.

    1995-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to elucidate detailed structural information for peptide and protein molecules. A small peptide was designed and synthesized, and its three-dimensional structure was calculated using distance information derived from two-dimensional NMR measurements. The peptide was used to induce antibodies in mice, and the cross-reactivity of the antibodies with a related protein was analyzed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Two proteins which are involved in regulation of transcription in bacteria were also studied. The ferric uptake regulation (Fur) protein is a metal-dependent repressor which controls iron uptake in bacteria. Two- and three-dimensional NMR techniques, coupled with uniform and selective isotope labeling allowed the nearly complete assignment of the resonances of the metal-binding domain of the Fur protein. NTRC is a transcriptional enhancer binding protein whose N-terminal domain is a {open_quote}receiver domain{close_quote} in the family of {open_quote}two-component{close_quote} regulatory systems. Phosphorylation of the N-terminal domain of NTRC activates the initiation of transcription of aeries encoding proteins involved in nitrogen regulation. Three- and four-dimensional NMR spectroscopy methods have been used to complete the resonance assignments and determine the solution structure of the N-terminal receiver domain of the NTRC protein. Comparison of the solution structure of the NTRC receiver domain with the crystal structures of the homologous protein CheY reveals a very similar fold, with the only significant difference being the position of helix 4 relative to the rest of the protein. The determination of the structure of the NTRC receiver domain is the first step toward understanding a mechanism of signal transduction which is common to many bacterial regulatory systems.

  2. Elongation factor P mediates a novel post-transcriptional regulatory pathway critical for bacterial virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, S Betty; Roy, Hervé; Ibba, Michael;

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens detect and integrate multiple environmental signals to coordinate appropriate changes in gene expression including the selective expression of virulence factors, changes to metabolism and the activation of stress response systems. Mutations that abolish the ability of the path......Bacterial pathogens detect and integrate multiple environmental signals to coordinate appropriate changes in gene expression including the selective expression of virulence factors, changes to metabolism and the activation of stress response systems. Mutations that abolish the ability...... of the pathogen to respond to external cues are typically attenuating. Here we discuss our recent discovery of a novel post-transcriptional regulatory pathway critical for Salmonella virulence and stress resistance. The enzymes PoxA and YjeK coordinately attach a unique beta-amino acid onto a highly conserved...... our laboratory and others now suggests that EF-P, previously thought to be essential, instead plays an ancillary role in translation by regulating the synthesis of a relatively limited subset of proteins. Other observations suggest that the eukaryotic homolog of EF-P, eIF5A, may illicit similar...

  3. Non-transcriptional regulatory processes shape transcriptional network dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ray, J. Christian J; Tabor, Jeffrey J.; Igoshin, Oleg A.

    2011-01-01

    Information about the extra- or intracellular environment is often captured as biochemical signals propagating through regulatory networks. These signals eventually drive phenotypic changes, typically by altering gene expression programs in the cell. Reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks has given a compelling picture of bacterial physiology, but transcriptional network maps alone often fail to describe phenotypes. In many cases, the dynamical performance of transcriptional re...

  4. Non-transcriptional regulatory processes shape transcriptional network dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, J Christian J; Tabor, Jeffrey J; Igoshin, Oleg A

    2011-10-11

    Information about the extra- or intracellular environment is often captured as biochemical signals that propagate through regulatory networks. These signals eventually drive phenotypic changes, typically by altering gene expression programmes in the cell. Reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks has given a compelling picture of bacterial physiology, but transcriptional network maps alone often fail to describe phenotypes. Cellular response dynamics are ultimately determined by interactions between transcriptional and non-transcriptional networks, with dramatic implications for physiology and evolution. Here, we provide an overview of non-transcriptional interactions that can affect the performance of natural and synthetic bacterial regulatory networks.

  5. Escherichia coli transcriptional regulatory network

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    Agustino Martinez-Antonio

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli is the most well-know bacterial model about the function of its molecular components. In this review are presented several structural and functional aspects of their transcriptional regulatory network constituted by transcription factors and target genes. The network discussed here represent to 1531 genes and 3421 regulatory interactions. This network shows a power-law distribution with a few global regulators and most of genes poorly connected. 176 of genes in the network correspond to transcription factors, which form a sub-network of seven hierarchical layers where global regulators tend to be set in superior layers while local regulators are located in the lower ones. There is a small set of proteins know as nucleoid-associated proteins, which are in a high cellular concentrations and reshape the nucleoid structure to influence the running of global transcriptional programs, to this mode of regulation is named analog regulation. Specific signal effectors assist the activity of most of transcription factors in E. coli. These effectors switch and tune the activity of transcription factors. To this type of regulation, depending of environmental signals is named the digital-precise-regulation. The integration of regulatory programs have place in the promoter region of transcription units where it is common to observe co-regulation among global and local TFs as well as of TFs sensing exogenous and endogenous conditions. The mechanistic logic to understand the harmonious operation of regulatory programs in the network should consider the globalism of TFs, their signal perceived, coregulation, genome position, and cellular concentration. Finally, duplicated TFs and their horizontal transfer influence the evolvability of members of the network. The most duplicated and transferred TFs are located in the network periphery.

  6. A high-throughput method to examine protein-nucleotide interactions identifies targets of the bacterial transcriptional regulatory protein fur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chunxiao; Lopez, Carlos A; Hu, Han; Xia, Yu; Freedman, David S; Reddington, Alexander P; Daaboul, George G; Unlü, M Selim; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2014-01-01

    The Ferric uptake regulatory protein (Fur) is a transcriptional regulatory protein that functions to control gene transcription in response to iron in a number of pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we applied a label-free, quantitative and high-throughput analysis method, Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (IRIS), to rapidly characterize Fur-DNA interactions in vitro with predicted Fur binding sequences in the genome of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea. IRIS can easily be applied to examine multiple protein-protein, protein-nucleotide and nucleotide-nucleotide complexes simultaneously and demonstrated here that seventy percent of the predicted Fur boxes in promoter regions of iron-induced genes bound to Fur in vitro with a range of affinities as observed using this microarray screening technology. Combining binding data with mRNA expression levels in a gonococcal fur mutant strain allowed us to identify five new gonococcal genes under Fur-mediated direct regulation.

  7. A high-throughput method to examine protein-nucleotide interactions identifies targets of the bacterial transcriptional regulatory protein fur.

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    Chunxiao Yu

    Full Text Available The Ferric uptake regulatory protein (Fur is a transcriptional regulatory protein that functions to control gene transcription in response to iron in a number of pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we applied a label-free, quantitative and high-throughput analysis method, Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (IRIS, to rapidly characterize Fur-DNA interactions in vitro with predicted Fur binding sequences in the genome of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea. IRIS can easily be applied to examine multiple protein-protein, protein-nucleotide and nucleotide-nucleotide complexes simultaneously and demonstrated here that seventy percent of the predicted Fur boxes in promoter regions of iron-induced genes bound to Fur in vitro with a range of affinities as observed using this microarray screening technology. Combining binding data with mRNA expression levels in a gonococcal fur mutant strain allowed us to identify five new gonococcal genes under Fur-mediated direct regulation.

  8. Evolutionary rewiring and reprogramming of bacterial transcription regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wang; Fang-Fang Wang; Wei Qian

    2011-01-01

    Rewiring and reprogramming of transcriptional regulation took place during bacterial speciation. The mechanistic alterations among transcription factors, cis-regulatory elements and target genes confer bacteria novel ability to adapt to stochastic environmental changes. This process is critical to their survival, especially for bacterial pathogens subjected to accelerated evolution. In the past two decades, the investigators not only completed the sequences of numerous bacterial genomes, but also made great progress in understanding the molecular basis of evolution. Here we briefly reviewed the current knowledge on the mechanistic changes among orthologous, paralogous and xenogenic regulatory circuits, which were caused by genetic recombinations such as gene duplication, horizontal gene transfer, transposable elements and different genetic contexts. We also discussed the potential impact of this area on theoretical and applied studies of microbes.

  9. Transcription regulatory networks analysis using CAGE

    KAUST Repository

    Tegnér, Jesper N.

    2009-10-01

    Mapping out cellular networks in general and transcriptional networks in particular has proved to be a bottle-neck hampering our understanding of biological processes. Integrative approaches fusing computational and experimental technologies for decoding transcriptional networks at a high level of resolution is therefore of uttermost importance. Yet, this is challenging since the control of gene expression in eukaryotes is a complex multi-level process influenced by several epigenetic factors and the fine interplay between regulatory proteins and the promoter structure governing the combinatorial regulation of gene expression. In this chapter we review how the CAGE data can be integrated with other measurements such as expression, physical interactions and computational prediction of regulatory motifs, which together can provide a genome-wide picture of eukaryotic transcriptional regulatory networks at a new level of resolution. © 2010 by Pan Stanford Publishing Pte. Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A study of bacterial gene regulatory mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sabine

    the different regulatory mechanisms affect system dynamics. We have designed a synthetic gene regulatory network (GRN) in bacterial cells that enables us to study the dynamics of GRNs. The results presented in this PhD thesis show that model equations based on the established mechanisms of action of each...... of a particular type of regulatory mechanism. The synthetic system presented in this thesis is, to our knowledge, the first of its kind to allow a direct comparison of the dynamic behaviors of gene regulatory networks that employ different mechanisms of regulation. In addition to studying the dynamic behavior...... of GRNs this thesis also provided the first evidence of the sensor histidine kinase VC1831 being an additional player in the Vibrio cholerae quorum sensing (QS) GRN. Bacteria use a process of cell-cell communication called QS which enable the bacterial cells to collectively control their gene expression...

  11. Global analysis of photosynthesis transcriptional regulatory networks.

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    Imam, Saheed; Noguera, Daniel R; Donohue, Timothy J

    2014-12-01

    Photosynthesis is a crucial biological process that depends on the interplay of many components. This work analyzed the gene targets for 4 transcription factors: FnrL, PrrA, CrpK and MppG (RSP_2888), which are known or predicted to control photosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) identified 52 operons under direct control of FnrL, illustrating its regulatory role in photosynthesis, iron homeostasis, nitrogen metabolism and regulation of sRNA synthesis. Using global gene expression analysis combined with ChIP-seq, we mapped the regulons of PrrA, CrpK and MppG. PrrA regulates ∼34 operons encoding mainly photosynthesis and electron transport functions, while CrpK, a previously uncharacterized Crp-family protein, regulates genes involved in photosynthesis and maintenance of iron homeostasis. Furthermore, CrpK and FnrL share similar DNA binding determinants, possibly explaining our observation of the ability of CrpK to partially compensate for the growth defects of a ΔFnrL mutant. We show that the Rrf2 family protein, MppG, plays an important role in photopigment biosynthesis, as part of an incoherent feed-forward loop with PrrA. Our results reveal a previously unrealized, high degree of combinatorial regulation of photosynthetic genes and significant cross-talk between their transcriptional regulators, while illustrating previously unidentified links between photosynthesis and the maintenance of iron homeostasis.

  12. Mechanisms of post-transcriptional gene regulation in bacterial biofilms

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    Viveka eVadyvaloo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Biofilms are characterized by a dense multicellular community of microorganisms that can be formed by the attachment of bacteria to an inert surface and to each other. The development of biofilm involves the initial attachment of planktonic bacteria to a surface, followed by replication, cell-to-cell adhesion to form microcolonies, maturation and detachment. Mature biofilms are embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix composed primarily of bacterial-derived exopolysaccharides, specialized proteins, adhesins and occasionally DNA. Because the synthesis and assembly of biofilm matrix components is an exceptionally complex process, the transition between its different phases requires the coordinate expression and simultaneous regulation of many genes by complex genetic networks involving all levels of gene regulation. The finely controlled intracellular level of the chemical second messenger molecule, cyclic-di-GMP is central to the post-transcriptional mechanisms governing the switch between the motile planktonic lifestyle and the sessile biofilm forming state in many bacteria. Several other post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are known to dictate biofilm development and assembly and these include RNA-binding proteins, small non-coding RNAs, toxin-antitoxin systems, riboswitches and RNases. Post-transcriptional regulation is therefore a powerful molecular mechanism employed by bacteria to rapidly adjust to the changing environment and to fine tune gene expression to the developmental needs of the cell. In this review, we discuss post-transcriptional mechanisms that influence the biofilm developmental cycle in a variety of pathogenic bacteria.

  13. Structure and regulatory function of plant transcription factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The expression of inducible genes in plants is regulated byspecific transcription factors at the transcriptional level. A typical transcription factor usually contains a DNA-binding domain, a transcription regulation domain, a dimerization site and a nuclear localization domain. These functional domains define the characteristic, localization and regulatory role of a transcription factor. Transcription factors recognize and bind to specific cis-acting elements or interact with other proteins, and then activate or repress the transcription of target genes by their functional domains. In recent years, elucidation on the structure and function of transcription factors has become an important subject in plant molecular biology.

  14. Evolutionary tinkering with conserved components of a transcriptional regulatory network.

    OpenAIRE

    Hugo Lavoie; Hervé Hogues; Jaideep Mallick; Adnane Sellam; André Nantel; Malcolm Whiteway

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression variation between species is a major contributor to phenotypic diversity, yet the underlying flexibility of transcriptional regulatory networks remains largely unexplored. Transcription of the ribosomal regulon is a critical task for all cells; in S. cerevisiae the transcription factors Rap1, Fhl1, Ifh1, and Hmo1 form a multi-subunit complex that controls ribosomal gene expression, while in C. albicans this regulation is under the control of Tbf1 and Cbf1. Here, we analyzed, u...

  15. Bacterial Transcription as a Target for Antibacterial Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cong; Yang, Xiao; Lewis, Peter J

    2016-03-01

    Transcription, the first step of gene expression, is carried out by the enzyme RNA polymerase (RNAP) and is regulated through interaction with a series of protein transcription factors. RNAP and its associated transcription factors are highly conserved across the bacterial domain and represent excellent targets for broad-spectrum antibacterial agent discovery. Despite the numerous antibiotics on the market, there are only two series currently approved that target transcription. The determination of the three-dimensional structures of RNAP and transcription complexes at high resolution over the last 15 years has led to renewed interest in targeting this essential process for antibiotic development by utilizing rational structure-based approaches. In this review, we describe the inhibition of the bacterial transcription process with respect to structural studies of RNAP, highlight recent progress toward the discovery of novel transcription inhibitors, and suggest additional potential antibacterial targets for rational drug design.

  16. Systematic genetic analysis of transcription factors to map the fission yeast transcription-regulatory network.

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    Chua, Gordon

    2013-12-01

    Mapping transcriptional-regulatory networks requires the identification of target genes, binding specificities and signalling pathways of transcription factors. However, the characterization of each transcription factor sufficiently for deciphering such networks remains laborious. The recent availability of overexpression and deletion strains for almost all of the transcription factor genes in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe provides a valuable resource to better investigate transcription factors using systematic genetics. In the present paper, I review and discuss the utility of these strain collections combined with transcriptome profiling and genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation to identify the target genes of transcription factors.

  17. YTRP: a repository for yeast transcriptional regulatory pathways.

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    Yang, Tzu-Hsien; Wang, Chung-Ching; Wang, Yu-Chao; Wu, Wei-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory targets of transcription factors (TFs) can be identified by the TF perturbation experiments, which reveal the expression changes owing to the perturbation (deletion or overexpression) of TFs. But the identified targets of a given TF consist of both direct and indirect regulatory targets. It has been shown that most of the TFPE-identified regulatory targets are indirect, indicating that TF-gene regulation is mainly through transcriptional regulatory pathways (TRPs) consisting of intermediate TFs. Without identification of these TRPs, it is not easy to understand how a TF regulates its indirect targets. Because there is no such database depositing the potential TRPs for Saccharomyces cerevisiae now, this motivates us to construct the YTRP (Yeast Transcriptional Regulatory Pathway) database. For each TF-gene regulatory pair under different experimental conditions, all possible TRPs in two underlying networks (constructed using experimentally verified TF-gene binding pairs and TF-gene regulatory pairs from the literature) for the specified experimental conditions were automatically enumerated by TRP mining procedures developed from the graph theory. The enumerated TRPs of a TF-gene regulatory pair provide experimentally testable hypotheses for the molecular mechanisms behind a TF and its regulatory target. YTRP is available online at http://cosbi3.ee.ncku.edu.tw/YTRP/. We believe that the TRPs deposited in this database will greatly improve the usefulness of TFPE data for yeast biologists to study the regulatory mechanisms between a TF and its knocked-out targets. Database URL: http://cosbi3.ee.ncku.edu.tw/YTRP/.

  18. Controllability analysis of transcriptional regulatory networks reveals circular control patterns among transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Österlund, Tobias; Bordel, Sergio; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is the most committed type of regulation in living cells where transcription factors (TFs) control the expression of their target genes and TF expression is controlled by other TFs forming complex transcriptional regulatory networks that can be highly interconnected. Here...... we analyze the topology and organization of nine transcriptional regulatory networks for E. coli, yeast, mouse and human, and we evaluate how the structure of these networks influences two of their key properties, namely controllability and stability. We calculate the controllability for each network...... as a measure of the organization and interconnectivity of the network. We find that the number of driver nodes n(D) needed to control the whole network is 64% of the TFs in the E. coli transcriptional regulatory network in contrast to only 17% for the yeast network, 4% for the mouse network and 8...

  19. Learning Transcriptional Regulatory Relationships Using Sparse Graphical Models

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang Zhang; Wei Cheng; Jennifer Listgarten; Carl Kadie; Shunping Huang; Wei Wang; David Heckerman

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the organization and function of transcriptional regulatory networks by analyzing high-throughput gene expression profiles is a key problem in computational biology. The challenges in this work are 1) the lack of complete knowledge of the regulatory relationship between the regulators and the associated genes, 2) the potential for spurious associations due to confounding factors, and 3) the number of parameters to learn is usually larger than the number of available microarray e...

  20. Promoters, Transcripts, and Regulatory Proteins of Mungbean Yellow Mosaic Geminivirus†

    OpenAIRE

    Shivaprasad, P. V.; Akbergenov, Rashid; Trinks, Daniela; R Rajeswaran; Veluthambi, K; Hohn, Thomas; Pooggin, Mikhail M.

    2005-01-01

    Geminiviruses package circular single-stranded DNA and replicate in the nucleus via a double-stranded intermediate. This intermediate also serves as a template for bidirectional transcription by polymerase II. Here, we map promoters and transcripts and characterize regulatory proteins of Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-Vigna (MYMV), a bipartite geminivirus in the genus Begomovirus. The following new features, which might also apply to other begomoviruses, were revealed in MYMV. The leftward and ...

  1. Regulatory hotspots in the malaria parasite genome dictate transcriptional variation.

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    Joseph M Gonzales

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The determinants of transcriptional regulation in malaria parasites remain elusive. The presence of a well-characterized gene expression cascade shared by different Plasmodium falciparum strains could imply that transcriptional regulation and its natural variation do not contribute significantly to the evolution of parasite drug resistance. To clarify the role of transcriptional variation as a source of stain-specific diversity in the most deadly malaria species and to find genetic loci that dictate variations in gene expression, we examined genome-wide expression level polymorphisms (ELPs in a genetic cross between phenotypically distinct parasite clones. Significant variation in gene expression is observed through direct co-hybridizations of RNA from different P. falciparum clones. Nearly 18% of genes were regulated by a significant expression quantitative trait locus. The genetic determinants of most of these ELPs resided in hotspots that are physically distant from their targets. The most prominent regulatory locus, influencing 269 transcripts, coincided with a Chromosome 5 amplification event carrying the drug resistance gene, pfmdr1, and 13 other genes. Drug selection pressure in the Dd2 parental clone lineage led not only to a copy number change in the pfmdr1 gene but also to an increased copy number of putative neighboring regulatory factors that, in turn, broadly influence the transcriptional network. Previously unrecognized transcriptional variation, controlled by polymorphic regulatory genes and possibly master regulators within large copy number variants, contributes to sweeping phenotypic evolution in drug-resistant malaria parasites.

  2. SigmoID: a user-friendly tool for improving bacterial genome annotation through analysis of transcription control signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaichik, Yevgeny; Damienikan, Aliaksandr U

    2016-01-01

    The majority of bacterial genome annotations are currently automated and based on a 'gene by gene' approach. Regulatory signals and operon structures are rarely taken into account which often results in incomplete and even incorrect gene function assignments. Here we present SigmoID, a cross-platform (OS X, Linux and Windows) open-source application aiming at simplifying the identification of transcription regulatory sites (promoters, transcription factor binding sites and terminators) in bacterial genomes and providing assistance in correcting annotations in accordance with regulatory information. SigmoID combines a user-friendly graphical interface to well known command line tools with a genome browser for visualising regulatory elements in genomic context. Integrated access to online databases with regulatory information (RegPrecise and RegulonDB) and web-based search engines speeds up genome analysis and simplifies correction of genome annotation. We demonstrate some features of SigmoID by constructing a series of regulatory protein binding site profiles for two groups of bacteria: Soft Rot Enterobacteriaceae (Pectobacterium and Dickeya spp.) and Pseudomonas spp. Furthermore, we inferred over 900 transcription factor binding sites and alternative sigma factor promoters in the annotated genome of Pectobacterium atrosepticum. These regulatory signals control putative transcription units covering about 40% of the P. atrosepticum chromosome. Reviewing the annotation in cases where it didn't fit with regulatory information allowed us to correct product and gene names for over 300 loci.

  3. SigmoID: a user-friendly tool for improving bacterial genome annotation through analysis of transcription control signals

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    Yevgeny Nikolaichik

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The majority of bacterial genome annotations are currently automated and based on a ‘gene by gene’ approach. Regulatory signals and operon structures are rarely taken into account which often results in incomplete and even incorrect gene function assignments. Here we present SigmoID, a cross-platform (OS X, Linux and Windows open-source application aiming at simplifying the identification of transcription regulatory sites (promoters, transcription factor binding sites and terminators in bacterial genomes and providing assistance in correcting annotations in accordance with regulatory information. SigmoID combines a user-friendly graphical interface to well known command line tools with a genome browser for visualising regulatory elements in genomic context. Integrated access to online databases with regulatory information (RegPrecise and RegulonDB and web-based search engines speeds up genome analysis and simplifies correction of genome annotation. We demonstrate some features of SigmoID by constructing a series of regulatory protein binding site profiles for two groups of bacteria: Soft Rot Enterobacteriaceae (Pectobacterium and Dickeya spp. and Pseudomonas spp. Furthermore, we inferred over 900 transcription factor binding sites and alternative sigma factor promoters in the annotated genome of Pectobacterium atrosepticum. These regulatory signals control putative transcription units covering about 40% of the P. atrosepticum chromosome. Reviewing the annotation in cases where it didn’t fit with regulatory information allowed us to correct product and gene names for over 300 loci.

  4. Metabolic constraint-based refinement of transcriptional regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Sriram; Price, Nathan D

    2013-01-01

    There is a strong need for computational frameworks that integrate different biological processes and data-types to unravel cellular regulation. Current efforts to reconstruct transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs) focus primarily on proximal data such as gene co-expression and transcription factor (TF) binding. While such approaches enable rapid reconstruction of TRNs, the overwhelming combinatorics of possible networks limits identification of mechanistic regulatory interactions. Utilizing growth phenotypes and systems-level constraints to inform regulatory network reconstruction is an unmet challenge. We present our approach Gene Expression and Metabolism Integrated for Network Inference (GEMINI) that links a compendium of candidate regulatory interactions with the metabolic network to predict their systems-level effect on growth phenotypes. We then compare predictions with experimental phenotype data to select phenotype-consistent regulatory interactions. GEMINI makes use of the observation that only a small fraction of regulatory network states are compatible with a viable metabolic network, and outputs a regulatory network that is simultaneously consistent with the input genome-scale metabolic network model, gene expression data, and TF knockout phenotypes. GEMINI preferentially recalls gold-standard interactions (p-value = 10(-172)), significantly better than using gene expression alone. We applied GEMINI to create an integrated metabolic-regulatory network model for Saccharomyces cerevisiae involving 25,000 regulatory interactions controlling 1597 metabolic reactions. The model quantitatively predicts TF knockout phenotypes in new conditions (p-value = 10(-14)) and revealed potential condition-specific regulatory mechanisms. Our results suggest that a metabolic constraint-based approach can be successfully used to help reconstruct TRNs from high-throughput data, and highlights the potential of using a biochemically-detailed mechanistic framework to

  5. Characterizing disease states from topological properties of transcriptional regulatory networks

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    Kluger Harriet M

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High throughput gene expression experiments yield large amounts of data that can augment our understanding of disease processes, in addition to classifying samples. Here we present new paradigms of data Separation based on construction of transcriptional regulatory networks for normal and abnormal cells using sequence predictions, literature based data and gene expression studies. We analyzed expression datasets from a number of diseased and normal cells, including different types of acute leukemia, and breast cancer with variable clinical outcome. Results We constructed sample-specific regulatory networks to identify links between transcription factors (TFs and regulated genes that differentiate between healthy and diseased states. This approach carries the advantage of identifying key transcription factor-gene pairs with differential activity between healthy and diseased states rather than merely using gene expression profiles, thus alluding to processes that may be involved in gene deregulation. We then generalized this approach by studying simultaneous changes in functionality of multiple regulatory links pointing to a regulated gene or emanating from one TF (or changes in gene centrality defined by its in-degree or out-degree measures, respectively. We found that samples can often be separated based on these measures of gene centrality more robustly than using individual links. We examined distributions of distances (the number of links needed to traverse the path between each pair of genes in the transcriptional networks for gene subsets whose collective expression profiles could best separate each dataset into predefined groups. We found that genes that optimally classify samples are concentrated in neighborhoods in the gene regulatory networks. This suggests that genes that are deregulated in diseased states exhibit a remarkable degree of connectivity. Conclusion Transcription factor-regulated gene links and

  6. Bacterial sigma factors as targets for engineered or synthetic transcriptional control.

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    Tripathi, Lakshmi; Zhang, Yan; Lin, Zhanglin

    2014-01-01

    Sigma (σ) factors are the predominant constituents of transcription regulation in bacteria. σ Factors recruit the core RNA polymerase to recognize promoters with specific DNA sequences. Recently, engineering of transcriptional regulators has become a significant tool for strain engineering. The present review summarizes the recent advances in σ factor based engineering or synthetic design. The manipulation of σ factors presents insights into the bacterial stress tolerance and metabolite productivity. We envision more synthetic design based on σ factors that can be used to tune the regulatory network of bacteria.

  7. Bacterial sigma factors as targets for engineered or synthetic transcriptional control

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    Lakshmi eTripathi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sigma (σ factors are the predominant constituents of transcription regulation in bacteria. σ factors recruit the core RNA polymerase (RNAP to recognize promoters with specific DNA sequences. Recently engineering of transcriptional regulators has become a significant tool for strain engineering. The present review summarizes the recent advances in σ factor based engineering or synthetic design. The manipulation of σ factors presents insights into the bacterial stress tolerance and metabolite productivity. We envision more synthetic design based on σ factors that can be used to tune the regulatory network of bacteria.

  8. A stochastic differential equation model for transcriptional regulatory networks

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    Quirk Michelle D

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This work explores the quantitative characteristics of the local transcriptional regulatory network based on the availability of time dependent gene expression data sets. The dynamics of the gene expression level are fitted via a stochastic differential equation model, yielding a set of specific regulators and their contribution. Results We show that a beta sigmoid function that keeps track of temporal parameters is a novel prototype of a regulatory function, with the effect of improving the performance of the profile prediction. The stochastic differential equation model follows well the dynamic of the gene expression levels. Conclusion When adapted to biological hypotheses and combined with a promoter analysis, the method proposed here leads to improved models of the transcriptional regulatory networks.

  9. Evolution of Intra-specific Regulatory Networks in a Multipartite Bacterial Genome.

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    Marco Galardini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of the regulatory network is an important step in understanding how organisms control the expression of gene products and therefore phenotypes. Recent studies have pointed out the importance of regulatory network plasticity in bacterial adaptation and evolution. The evolution of such networks within and outside the species boundary is however still obscure. Sinorhizobium meliloti is an ideal species for such study, having three large replicons, many genomes available and a significant knowledge of its transcription factors (TF. Each replicon has a specific functional and evolutionary mark; which might also emerge from the analysis of their regulatory signatures. Here we have studied the plasticity of the regulatory network within and outside the S. meliloti species, looking for the presence of 41 TFs binding motifs in 51 strains and 5 related rhizobial species. We have detected a preference of several TFs for one of the three replicons, and the function of regulated genes was found to be in accordance with the overall replicon functional signature: house-keeping functions for the chromosome, metabolism for the chromid, symbiosis for the megaplasmid. This therefore suggests a replicon-specific wiring of the regulatory network in the S. meliloti species. At the same time a significant part of the predicted regulatory network is shared between the chromosome and the chromid, thus adding an additional layer by which the chromid integrates itself in the core genome. Furthermore, the regulatory network distance was found to be correlated with both promoter regions and accessory genome evolution inside the species, indicating that both pangenome compartments are involved in the regulatory network evolution. We also observed that genes which are not included in the species regulatory network are more likely to belong to the accessory genome, indicating that regulatory interactions should also be considered to predict gene conservation in

  10. Evolution of Intra-specific Regulatory Networks in a Multipartite Bacterial Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galardini, Marco; Brilli, Matteo; Spini, Giulia; Rossi, Matteo; Roncaglia, Bianca; Bani, Alessia; Chiancianesi, Manuela; Moretto, Marco; Engelen, Kristof; Bacci, Giovanni; Pini, Francesco; Biondi, Emanuele G; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Mengoni, Alessio

    2015-09-01

    Reconstruction of the regulatory network is an important step in understanding how organisms control the expression of gene products and therefore phenotypes. Recent studies have pointed out the importance of regulatory network plasticity in bacterial adaptation and evolution. The evolution of such networks within and outside the species boundary is however still obscure. Sinorhizobium meliloti is an ideal species for such study, having three large replicons, many genomes available and a significant knowledge of its transcription factors (TF). Each replicon has a specific functional and evolutionary mark; which might also emerge from the analysis of their regulatory signatures. Here we have studied the plasticity of the regulatory network within and outside the S. meliloti species, looking for the presence of 41 TFs binding motifs in 51 strains and 5 related rhizobial species. We have detected a preference of several TFs for one of the three replicons, and the function of regulated genes was found to be in accordance with the overall replicon functional signature: house-keeping functions for the chromosome, metabolism for the chromid, symbiosis for the megaplasmid. This therefore suggests a replicon-specific wiring of the regulatory network in the S. meliloti species. At the same time a significant part of the predicted regulatory network is shared between the chromosome and the chromid, thus adding an additional layer by which the chromid integrates itself in the core genome. Furthermore, the regulatory network distance was found to be correlated with both promoter regions and accessory genome evolution inside the species, indicating that both pangenome compartments are involved in the regulatory network evolution. We also observed that genes which are not included in the species regulatory network are more likely to belong to the accessory genome, indicating that regulatory interactions should also be considered to predict gene conservation in bacterial

  11. Controllability analysis of transcriptional regulatory networks reveals circular control patterns among transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Österlund, Tobias; Bordel, Sergio; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-05-01

    Transcriptional regulation is the most committed type of regulation in living cells where transcription factors (TFs) control the expression of their target genes and TF expression is controlled by other TFs forming complex transcriptional regulatory networks that can be highly interconnected. Here we analyze the topology and organization of nine transcriptional regulatory networks for E. coli, yeast, mouse and human, and we evaluate how the structure of these networks influences two of their key properties, namely controllability and stability. We calculate the controllability for each network as a measure of the organization and interconnectivity of the network. We find that the number of driver nodes nD needed to control the whole network is 64% of the TFs in the E. coli transcriptional regulatory network in contrast to only 17% for the yeast network, 4% for the mouse network and 8% for the human network. The high controllability (low number of drivers needed to control the system) in yeast, mouse and human is due to the presence of internal loops in their regulatory networks where the TFs regulate each other in a circular fashion. We refer to these internal loops as circular control motifs (CCM). The E. coli transcriptional regulatory network, which does not have any CCMs, shows a hierarchical structure of the transcriptional regulatory network in contrast to the eukaryal networks. The presence of CCMs also has influence on the stability of these networks, as the presence of cycles can be associated with potential unstable steady-states where even small changes in binding affinities can cause dramatic rearrangements of the state of the network.

  12. Iterative reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks: an algorithmic approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian L Barrett

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The number of complete, publicly available genome sequences is now greater than 200, and this number is expected to rapidly grow in the near future as metagenomic and environmental sequencing efforts escalate and the cost of sequencing drops. In order to make use of this data for understanding particular organisms and for discerning general principles about how organisms function, it will be necessary to reconstruct their various biochemical reaction networks. Principal among these will be transcriptional regulatory networks. Given the physical and logical complexity of these networks, the various sources of (often noisy data that can be utilized for their elucidation, the monetary costs involved, and the huge number of potential experiments approximately 10(12 that can be performed, experiment design algorithms will be necessary for synthesizing the various computational and experimental data to maximize the efficiency of regulatory network reconstruction. This paper presents an algorithm for experimental design to systematically and efficiently reconstruct transcriptional regulatory networks. It is meant to be applied iteratively in conjunction with an experimental laboratory component. The algorithm is presented here in the context of reconstructing transcriptional regulation for metabolism in Escherichia coli, and, through a retrospective analysis with previously performed experiments, we show that the produced experiment designs conform to how a human would design experiments. The algorithm is able to utilize probability estimates based on a wide range of computational and experimental sources to suggest experiments with the highest potential of discovering the greatest amount of new regulatory knowledge.

  13. CoryneRegNet: An ontology-based data warehouse of corynebacterial transcription factors and regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czaja Lisa F

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The application of DNA microarray technology in post-genomic analysis of bacterial genome sequences has allowed the generation of huge amounts of data related to regulatory networks. This data along with literature-derived knowledge on regulation of gene expression has opened the way for genome-wide reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks. These large-scale reconstructions can be converted into in silico models of bacterial cells that allow a systematic analysis of network behavior in response to changing environmental conditions. Description CoryneRegNet was designed to facilitate the genome-wide reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks of corynebacteria relevant in biotechnology and human medicine. During the import and integration process of data derived from experimental studies or literature knowledge CoryneRegNet generates links to genome annotations, to identified transcription factors and to the corresponding cis-regulatory elements. CoryneRegNet is based on a multi-layered, hierarchical and modular concept of transcriptional regulation and was implemented by using the relational database management system MySQL and an ontology-based data structure. Reconstructed regulatory networks can be visualized by using the yFiles JAVA graph library. As an application example of CoryneRegNet, we have reconstructed the global transcriptional regulation of a cellular module involved in SOS and stress response of corynebacteria. Conclusion CoryneRegNet is an ontology-based data warehouse that allows a pertinent data management of regulatory interactions along with the genome-scale reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks. These models can further be combined with metabolic networks to build integrated models of cellular function including both metabolism and its transcriptional regulation.

  14. A combination of independent transcriptional regulators shapes bacterial virulence gene expression during infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel A Shelburne

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional regulatory networks are fundamental to how microbes alter gene expression in response to environmental stimuli, thereby playing a critical role in bacterial pathogenesis. However, understanding how bacterial transcriptional regulatory networks function during host-pathogen interaction is limited. Recent studies in group A Streptococcus (GAS suggested that the transcriptional regulator catabolite control protein A (CcpA influences many of the same genes as the control of virulence (CovRS two-component gene regulatory system. To provide new information about the CcpA and CovRS networks, we compared the CcpA and CovR transcriptomes in a serotype M1 GAS strain. The transcript levels of several of the same genes encoding virulence factors and proteins involved in basic metabolic processes were affected in both DeltaccpA and DeltacovR isogenic mutant strains. Recombinant CcpA and CovR bound with high-affinity to the promoter regions of several co-regulated genes, including those encoding proteins involved in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. Compared to the wild-type parental strain, DeltaccpA and DeltacovRDeltaccpA isogenic mutant strains were significantly less virulent in a mouse myositis model. Inactivation of CcpA and CovR alone and in combination led to significant alterations in the transcript levels of several key GAS virulence factor encoding genes during infection. Importantly, the transcript level alterations in the DeltaccpA and DeltacovRDeltaccpA isogenic mutant strains observed during infection were distinct from those occurring during growth in laboratory medium. These data provide new knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms by which pathogenic bacteria respond to environmental signals to regulate virulence factor production and basic metabolic processes during infection.

  15. Promoters, Transcripts, and Regulatory Proteins of Mungbean Yellow Mosaic Geminivirus†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivaprasad, P. V.; Akbergenov, Rashid; Trinks, Daniela; Rajeswaran, R.; Veluthambi, K.; Hohn, Thomas; Pooggin, Mikhail M.

    2005-01-01

    Geminiviruses package circular single-stranded DNA and replicate in the nucleus via a double-stranded intermediate. This intermediate also serves as a template for bidirectional transcription by polymerase II. Here, we map promoters and transcripts and characterize regulatory proteins of Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-Vigna (MYMV), a bipartite geminivirus in the genus Begomovirus. The following new features, which might also apply to other begomoviruses, were revealed in MYMV. The leftward and rightward promoters on DNA-B share the transcription activator AC2-responsive region, which does not overlap the common region that is nearly identical in the two DNA components. The transcription unit for BC1 (movement protein) includes a conserved, leader-based intron. Besides negative-feedback regulation of its own leftward promoter on DNA-A, the replication protein AC1, in cooperation with AC2, synergistically transactivates the rightward promoter, which drives a dicistronic transcription unit for the coat protein AV1. AC2 and the replication enhancer AC3 are expressed from one dicistronic transcript driven by a strong promoter mapped within the upstream AC1 gene. Early and constitutive expression of AC2 is consistent with its essential dual function as an activator of viral transcription and a suppressor of silencing. PMID:15956560

  16. Promoters, transcripts, and regulatory proteins of Mungbean yellow mosaic geminivirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivaprasad, P V; Akbergenov, Rashid; Trinks, Daniela; Rajeswaran, R; Veluthambi, K; Hohn, Thomas; Pooggin, Mikhail M

    2005-07-01

    Geminiviruses package circular single-stranded DNA and replicate in the nucleus via a double-stranded intermediate. This intermediate also serves as a template for bidirectional transcription by polymerase II. Here, we map promoters and transcripts and characterize regulatory proteins of Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-Vigna (MYMV), a bipartite geminivirus in the genus Begomovirus. The following new features, which might also apply to other begomoviruses, were revealed in MYMV. The leftward and rightward promoters on DNA-B share the transcription activator AC2-responsive region, which does not overlap the common region that is nearly identical in the two DNA components. The transcription unit for BC1 (movement protein) includes a conserved, leader-based intron. Besides negative-feedback regulation of its own leftward promoter on DNA-A, the replication protein AC1, in cooperation with AC2, synergistically transactivates the rightward promoter, which drives a dicistronic transcription unit for the coat protein AV1. AC2 and the replication enhancer AC3 are expressed from one dicistronic transcript driven by a strong promoter mapped within the upstream AC1 gene. Early and constitutive expression of AC2 is consistent with its essential dual function as an activator of viral transcription and a suppressor of silencing.

  17. Uncovering Transcriptional Regulatory Networks by Sparse Bayesian Factor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Yuan(Alan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The problem of uncovering transcriptional regulation by transcription factors (TFs based on microarray data is considered. A novel Bayesian sparse correlated rectified factor model (BSCRFM is proposed that models the unknown TF protein level activity, the correlated regulations between TFs, and the sparse nature of TF-regulated genes. The model admits prior knowledge from existing database regarding TF-regulated target genes based on a sparse prior and through a developed Gibbs sampling algorithm, a context-specific transcriptional regulatory network specific to the experimental condition of the microarray data can be obtained. The proposed model and the Gibbs sampling algorithm were evaluated on the simulated systems, and results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed approach. The proposed model was then applied to the breast cancer microarray data of patients with Estrogen Receptor positive ( status and Estrogen Receptor negative ( status, respectively.

  18. Uncovering Transcriptional Regulatory Networks by Sparse Bayesian Factor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jia; Zhang, Jianqiu(Michelle); Qi, Yuan(Alan); Chen, Yidong; Huang, Yufei

    2010-12-01

    The problem of uncovering transcriptional regulation by transcription factors (TFs) based on microarray data is considered. A novel Bayesian sparse correlated rectified factor model (BSCRFM) is proposed that models the unknown TF protein level activity, the correlated regulations between TFs, and the sparse nature of TF-regulated genes. The model admits prior knowledge from existing database regarding TF-regulated target genes based on a sparse prior and through a developed Gibbs sampling algorithm, a context-specific transcriptional regulatory network specific to the experimental condition of the microarray data can be obtained. The proposed model and the Gibbs sampling algorithm were evaluated on the simulated systems, and results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed approach. The proposed model was then applied to the breast cancer microarray data of patients with Estrogen Receptor positive ([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]) status and Estrogen Receptor negative ([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]) status, respectively.

  19. Elucidating MicroRNA Regulatory Networks Using Transcriptional, Post-transcriptional, and Histone Modification Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara J.C. Gosline

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs regulate diverse biological processes by repressing mRNAs, but their modest effects on direct targets, together with their participation in larger regulatory networks, make it challenging to delineate miRNA-mediated effects. Here, we describe an approach to characterizing miRNA-regulatory networks by systematically profiling transcriptional, post-transcriptional and epigenetic activity in a pair of isogenic murine fibroblast cell lines with and without Dicer expression. By RNA sequencing (RNA-seq and CLIP (crosslinking followed by immunoprecipitation sequencing (CLIP-seq, we found that most of the changes induced by global miRNA loss occur at the level of transcription. We then introduced a network modeling approach that integrated these data with epigenetic data to identify specific miRNA-regulated transcription factors that explain the impact of miRNA perturbation on gene expression. In total, we demonstrate that combining multiple genome-wide datasets spanning diverse regulatory modes enables accurate delineation of the downstream miRNA-regulated transcriptional network and establishes a model for studying similar networks in other systems.

  20. Elucidating MicroRNA Regulatory Networks Using Transcriptional, Post-transcriptional, and Histone Modification Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosline, Sara J C; Gurtan, Allan M; JnBaptiste, Courtney K; Bosson, Andrew; Milani, Pamela; Dalin, Simona; Matthews, Bryan J; Yap, Yoon S; Sharp, Phillip A; Fraenkel, Ernest

    2016-01-12

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate diverse biological processes by repressing mRNAs, but their modest effects on direct targets, together with their participation in larger regulatory networks, make it challenging to delineate miRNA-mediated effects. Here, we describe an approach to characterizing miRNA-regulatory networks by systematically profiling transcriptional, post-transcriptional and epigenetic activity in a pair of isogenic murine fibroblast cell lines with and without Dicer expression. By RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and CLIP (crosslinking followed by immunoprecipitation) sequencing (CLIP-seq), we found that most of the changes induced by global miRNA loss occur at the level of transcription. We then introduced a network modeling approach that integrated these data with epigenetic data to identify specific miRNA-regulated transcription factors that explain the impact of miRNA perturbation on gene expression. In total, we demonstrate that combining multiple genome-wide datasets spanning diverse regulatory modes enables accurate delineation of the downstream miRNA-regulated transcriptional network and establishes a model for studying similar networks in other systems.

  1. Transcriptional regulatory programs underlying barley germination and regulatory functions of Gibberellin and abscisic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seed germination is a complex multi-stage developmental process, and mainly accomplished through concerted activities of many gene products and biological pathways that are often subjected to strict developmental regulation. Gibberellins (GA and abscisic acid (ABA are two key phytohormones regulating seed germination and seedling growth. However, transcriptional regulatory networks underlying seed germination and its associated biological pathways are largely unknown. Results The studies examined transcriptomes of barley representing six distinct and well characterized germination stages and revealed that the transcriptional regulatory program underlying barley germination was composed of early, late, and post-germination phases. Each phase was accompanied with transcriptional up-regulation of distinct biological pathways. Cell wall synthesis and regulatory components including transcription factors, signaling and post-translational modification components were specifically and transiently up-regulated in early germination phase while histone families and many metabolic pathways were up-regulated in late germination phase. Photosynthesis and seed reserve mobilization pathways were up-regulated in post-germination phase. However, stress related pathways and seed storage proteins were suppressed through the entire course of germination. A set of genes were transiently up-regulated within three hours of imbibition, and might play roles in initiating biological pathways involved in seed germination. However, highly abundant transcripts in dry barley and Arabidopsis seeds were significantly conserved. Comparison with transcriptomes of barley aleurone in response to GA and ABA identified three sets of germination responsive genes that were regulated coordinately by GA, antagonistically by ABA, and coordinately by GA but antagonistically by ABA. Major CHO metabolism, cell wall degradation and protein degradation pathways were up

  2. Transcriptional control by two leucine-responsive regulatory proteins in Halobacterium salinarum R1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarasov Valery

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Archaea combine bacterial-as well as eukaryotic-like features to regulate cellular processes. Halobacterium salinarum R1 encodes eight leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp-homologues. The function of two of them, Irp (OE3923F and lrpA1 (OE2621R, were analyzed by gene deletion and overexpression, including genome scale impacts using microarrays. Results It was shown that Lrp affects the transcription of multiple target genes, including those encoding enzymes involved in amino acid synthesis, central metabolism, transport processes and other regulators of transcription. In contrast, LrpA1 regulates transcription in a more specific manner. The aspB3 gene, coding for an aspartate transaminase, was repressed by LrpA1 in the presence of L-aspartate. Analytical DNA-affinity chromatography was adapted to high salt, and demonstrated binding of LrpA1 to its own promoter, as well as L-aspartate dependent binding to the aspB3 promoter. Conclusion The gene expression profiles of two archaeal Lrp-homologues report in detail their role in H. salinarum R1. LrpA1 and Lrp show similar functions to those already described in bacteria, but in addition they play a key role in regulatory networks, such as controlling the transcription of other regulators. In a more detailed analysis ligand dependent binding of LrpA1 was demonstrated to its target gene aspB3.

  3. The Global Regulatory Architecture of Transcription during the Caulobacter Cell Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Schrader, Jared M.; Kalogeraki, Virginia S.; Abeliuk, Eduardo; Dinh, Cong B.; Pham, James Q.; Cui, Zhongying Z.; Dill, David L.; McAdams, Harley H.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Each Caulobacter cell cycle involves differentiation and an asymmetric cell division driven by a cyclical regulatory circuit comprised of four transcription factors (TFs) and a DNA methyltransferase. Using a modified global 5′ RACE protocol, we globally mapped transcription start sites (TSSs) at base-pair resolution, measured their transcription levels at multiple times in the cell cycle, and identified their transcription factor binding sites. Out of 2726 TSSs, 586 were shown to be cell cycle-regulated and we identified 529 binding sites for the cell cycle master regulators. Twenty-three percent of the cell cycle-regulated promoters were found to be under the combinatorial control of two or more of the global regulators. Previously unknown features of the core cell cycle circuit were identified, including 107 antisense TSSs which exhibit cell cycle-control, and 241 genes with multiple TSSs whose transcription levels often exhibited different cell cycle timing. Cumulatively, this study uncovered novel new layers of transcriptional regulation mediating the bacterial cell cycle. PMID:25569173

  4. The global regulatory architecture of transcription during the Caulobacter cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Each Caulobacter cell cycle involves differentiation and an asymmetric cell division driven by a cyclical regulatory circuit comprised of four transcription factors (TFs and a DNA methyltransferase. Using a modified global 5' RACE protocol, we globally mapped transcription start sites (TSSs at base-pair resolution, measured their transcription levels at multiple times in the cell cycle, and identified their transcription factor binding sites. Out of 2726 TSSs, 586 were shown to be cell cycle-regulated and we identified 529 binding sites for the cell cycle master regulators. Twenty-three percent of the cell cycle-regulated promoters were found to be under the combinatorial control of two or more of the global regulators. Previously unknown features of the core cell cycle circuit were identified, including 107 antisense TSSs which exhibit cell cycle-control, and 241 genes with multiple TSSs whose transcription levels often exhibited different cell cycle timing. Cumulatively, this study uncovered novel new layers of transcriptional regulation mediating the bacterial cell cycle.

  5. Topology of transcriptional regulatory networks: testing and improving.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dicle Hasdemir

    Full Text Available With the increasing amount and complexity of data generated in biological experiments it is becoming necessary to enhance the performance and applicability of existing statistical data analysis methods. This enhancement is needed for the hidden biological information to be better resolved and better interpreted. Towards that aim, systematic incorporation of prior information in biological data analysis has been a challenging problem for systems biology. Several methods have been proposed to integrate data from different levels of information most notably from metabolomics, transcriptomics and proteomics and thus enhance biological interpretation. However, in order not to be misled by the dominance of incorrect prior information in the analysis, being able to discriminate between competing prior information is required. In this study, we show that discrimination between topological information in competing transcriptional regulatory network models is possible solely based on experimental data. We use network topology dependent decomposition of synthetic gene expression data to introduce both local and global discriminating measures. The measures indicate how well the gene expression data can be explained under the constraints of the model network topology and how much each regulatory connection in the model refuses to be constrained. Application of the method to the cell cycle regulatory network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae leads to the prediction of novel regulatory interactions, improving the information content of the hypothesized network model.

  6. Identification of germline transcriptional regulatory elements in Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Omar S.; Papathanos, Philippos A.; Sandler, Jeremy E.; Kennedy, Katie; Hay, Bruce A.

    2014-02-01

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti is the principal vector for the yellow fever and dengue viruses, and is also responsible for recent outbreaks of the alphavirus chikungunya. Vector control strategies utilizing engineered gene drive systems are being developed as a means of replacing wild, pathogen transmitting mosquitoes with individuals refractory to disease transmission, or bringing about population suppression. Several of these systems, including Medea, UDMEL, and site-specific nucleases, which can be used to drive genes into populations or bring about population suppression, utilize transcriptional regulatory elements that drive germline-specific expression. Here we report the identification of multiple regulatory elements able to drive gene expression specifically in the female germline, or in the male and female germline, in the mosquito Aedes aegypti. These elements can also be used as tools with which to probe the roles of specific genes in germline function and in the early embryo, through overexpression or RNA interference.

  7. Computational methods to dissect cis-regulatory transcriptional networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vibha Rani

    2007-12-01

    The formation of diverse cell types from an invariant set of genes is governed by biochemical and molecular processes that regulate gene activity. A complete understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of gene expression is the major function of genomics. Computational genomics is a rapidly emerging area for deciphering the regulation of metazoan genes as well as interpreting the results of high-throughput screening. The integration of computer science with biology has expedited molecular modelling and processing of large-scale data inputs such as microarrays, analysis of genomes, transcriptomes and proteomes. Many bioinformaticians have developed various algorithms for predicting transcriptional regulatory mechanisms from the sequence, gene expression and interaction data. This review contains compiled information of various computational methods adopted to dissect gene expression pathways.

  8. Oncogenes Activate an Autonomous Transcriptional Regulatory Circuit That Drives Glioblastoma

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    Dinesh K. Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Efforts to identify and target glioblastoma (GBM drivers have primarily focused on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs. Clinical benefits, however, have been elusive. Here, we identify an SRY-related box 2 (SOX2 transcriptional regulatory network that is independent of upstream RTKs and capable of driving glioma-initiating cells. We identified oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2 (OLIG2 and zinc-finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1, which are frequently co-expressed irrespective of driver mutations, as potential SOX2 targets. In murine glioma models, we show that different combinations of tumor suppressor and oncogene mutations can activate Sox2, Olig2, and Zeb1 expression. We demonstrate that ectopic co-expression of the three transcription factors can transform tumor-suppressor-deficient astrocytes into glioma-initiating cells in the absence of an upstream RTK oncogene. Finally, we demonstrate that the transcriptional inhibitor mithramycin downregulates SOX2 and its target genes, resulting in markedly reduced proliferation of GBM cells in vivo.

  9. Oncogenes Activate an Autonomous Transcriptional Regulatory Circuit That Drives Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dinesh K; Kollipara, Rahul K; Vemireddy, Vamsidara; Yang, Xiao-Li; Sun, Yuxiao; Regmi, Nanda; Klingler, Stefan; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Raisanen, Jack; Cho, Steve K; Sirasanagandla, Shyam; Nannepaga, Suraj; Piccirillo, Sara; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Wang, Shan; Humphries, Caroline G; Mickey, Bruce; Maher, Elizabeth A; Zheng, Hongwu; Kim, Ryung S; Kittler, Ralf; Bachoo, Robert M

    2017-01-24

    Efforts to identify and target glioblastoma (GBM) drivers have primarily focused on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). Clinical benefits, however, have been elusive. Here, we identify an SRY-related box 2 (SOX2) transcriptional regulatory network that is independent of upstream RTKs and capable of driving glioma-initiating cells. We identified oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2 (OLIG2) and zinc-finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1), which are frequently co-expressed irrespective of driver mutations, as potential SOX2 targets. In murine glioma models, we show that different combinations of tumor suppressor and oncogene mutations can activate Sox2, Olig2, and Zeb1 expression. We demonstrate that ectopic co-expression of the three transcription factors can transform tumor-suppressor-deficient astrocytes into glioma-initiating cells in the absence of an upstream RTK oncogene. Finally, we demonstrate that the transcriptional inhibitor mithramycin downregulates SOX2 and its target genes, resulting in markedly reduced proliferation of GBM cells in vivo.

  10. In silico Transcriptional Regulatory Networks Involved in Tomato Fruit Ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arhondakis, Stilianos; Bita, Craita E; Perrakis, Andreas; Manioudaki, Maria E; Krokida, Afroditi; Kaloudas, Dimitrios; Kalaitzis, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Tomato fruit ripening is a complex developmental programme partly mediated by transcriptional regulatory networks. Several transcription factors (TFs) which are members of gene families such as MADS-box and ERF were shown to play a significant role in ripening through interconnections into an intricate network. The accumulation of large datasets of expression profiles corresponding to different stages of tomato fruit ripening and the availability of bioinformatics tools for their analysis provide an opportunity to identify TFs which might regulate gene clusters with similar co-expression patterns. We identified two TFs, a SlWRKY22-like and a SlER24 transcriptional activator which were shown to regulate modules by using the LeMoNe algorithm for the analysis of our microarray datasets representing four stages of fruit ripening, breaker, turning, pink and red ripe. The WRKY22-like module comprised a subgroup of six various calcium sensing transcripts with similar to the TF expression patterns according to real time PCR validation. A promoter motif search identified a cis acting element, the W-box, recognized by WRKY TFs that was present in the promoter region of all six calcium sensing genes. Moreover, publicly available microarray datasets of similar ripening stages were also analyzed with LeMoNe resulting in TFs such as SlERF.E1, SlERF.C1, SlERF.B2, SLERF.A2, SlWRKY24, SLWRKY37, and MADS-box/TM29 which might also play an important role in regulation of ripening. These results suggest that the SlWRKY22-like might be involved in the coordinated regulation of expression of the six calcium sensing genes. Conclusively the LeMoNe tool might lead to the identification of putative TF targets for further physiological analysis as regulators of tomato fruit ripening.

  11. In silico transcriptional regulatory networks involved in tomato fruit ripening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stilianos Arhondakis

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTTomato fruit ripening is a complex developmental programme partly mediated by transcriptional regulatory networks. Several transcription factors (TFs which are members of gene families such as MADS-box and ERF were shown to play a significant role in ripening through interconnections into an intricate network. The accumulation of large datasets of expression profiles corresponding to different stages of tomato fruit ripening and the availability of bioinformatics tools for their analysis provide an opportunity to identify TFs which might regulate gene clusters with similar co-expression patterns. We identified two TFs, a SlWRKY22-like and a SlER24 transcriptional activator which were shown to regulate modules by using the LeMoNe algorithm for the analysis of our microarray datasets representing four stages of fruit ripening, breaker, turning, pink and red ripe. The WRKY22-like module comprised a subgroup of six various calcium sensing transcripts with similar to the TF expression patterns according to real time PCR validation. A promoter motif search identified a cis acting element, the W-box, recognized by WRKY TFs that was present in the promoter region of all six calcium sensing genes. Moreover, publicly available microarray datasets of similar ripening stages were also analyzed with LeMoNe resulting in TFs such as SlERF.E1, SlERF.C1, SlERF.B2, SLERF.A2, SlWRKY24, SLWRKY37 and MADS-box/TM29 which might also play an important role in regulation of ripening. These results suggest that the SlWRKY22-like might be involved in the coordinated regulation of expression of the six calcium sensing genes. Conclusively the LeMoNe tool might lead to the identification of putative TF targets for further physiological analysis as regulators of tomato fruit ripening.

  12. Identification of transcriptional regulatory networks specific to pilocytic astrocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutmann David H

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pilocytic Astrocytomas (PAs are common low-grade central nervous system malignancies for which few recurrent and specific genetic alterations have been identified. In an effort to better understand the molecular biology underlying the pathogenesis of these pediatric brain tumors, we performed higher-order transcriptional network analysis of a large gene expression dataset to identify gene regulatory pathways that are specific to this tumor type, relative to other, more aggressive glial or histologically distinct brain tumours. Methods RNA derived from frozen human PA tumours was subjected to microarray-based gene expression profiling, using Affymetrix U133Plus2 GeneChip microarrays. This data set was compared to similar data sets previously generated from non-malignant human brain tissue and other brain tumour types, after appropriate normalization. Results In this study, we examined gene expression in 66 PA tumors compared to 15 non-malignant cortical brain tissues, and identified 792 genes that demonstrated consistent differential expression between independent sets of PA and non-malignant specimens. From this entire 792 gene set, we used the previously described PAP tool to assemble a core transcriptional regulatory network composed of 6 transcription factor genes (TFs and 24 target genes, for a total of 55 interactions. A similar analysis of oligodendroglioma and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM gene expression data sets identified distinct, but overlapping, networks. Most importantly, comparison of each of the brain tumor type-specific networks revealed a network unique to PA that included repressed expression of ONECUT2, a gene frequently methylated in other tumor types, and 13 other uniquely predicted TF-gene interactions. Conclusions These results suggest specific transcriptional pathways that may operate to create the unique molecular phenotype of PA and thus opportunities for corresponding targeted therapeutic

  13. Rearrangements of the transcriptional regulatory networks of metabolic pathways in fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Lavoie, Hugo; Hogues, Hervé; Whiteway, Malcolm

    2009-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that transcriptional regulatory networks in many organisms are highly flexible. Here, we discuss the evolution of transcriptional regulatory networks governing the metabolic machinery of sequenced ascomycetes. In particular, recent work has shown that transcriptional rewiring is common in regulons controlling processes such as production of ribosome components and metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids. We note that dramatic rearrangements of the transcriptional regu...

  14. Identification of the Human Zinc Transcriptional Regulatory Element (ZTRE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coneyworth, Lisa J.; Jackson, Kelly A.; Tyson, John; Bosomworth, Helen J.; van der Hagen, Eline; Hann, Georgia M.; Ogo, Ogo A.; Swann, Daniel C.; Mathers, John C.; Valentine, Ruth A.; Ford, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Many genes with crucial roles in zinc homeostasis in mammals respond to fluctuating zinc supply through unknown mechanisms, and uncovering these mechanisms is essential to understanding the process at cellular and systemic levels. We detected zinc-dependent binding of a zinc-induced protein to a specific sequence, the zinc transcriptional regulatory element (ZTRE), in the SLC30A5 (zinc transporter ZnT5) promoter and showed that substitution of the ZTRE abrogated the repression of a reporter gene in response to zinc. We identified the ZTRE in other genes, including (through an unbiased search) the CBWD genes and (through targeted analysis) in multiple members of the SLC30 family, including SLC30A10, which is repressed by zinc. The function of the CBWD genes is currently unknown, but roles for homologs in metal homeostasis are being uncovered in bacteria. We demonstrated that CBWD genes are repressed by zinc and that substitution of the ZTRE in SLC30A10 and CBWD promoter-reporter constructs abrogates this response. Other metals did not affect expression of the transcriptional regulator, binding to the ZTRE or promoter-driven reporter gene expression. These findings provide the basis for elucidating how regulation of a network of genes through this novel mechanism contributes to zinc homeostasis and how the cell orchestrates this response. PMID:22902622

  15. Inferring the role of transcription factors in regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Borgne Michel

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression profiles obtained from multiple perturbation experiments are increasingly used to reconstruct transcriptional regulatory networks, from well studied, simple organisms up to higher eukaryotes. Admittedly, a key ingredient in developing a reconstruction method is its ability to integrate heterogeneous sources of information, as well as to comply with practical observability issues: measurements can be scarce or noisy. In this work, we show how to combine a network of genetic regulations with a set of expression profiles, in order to infer the functional effect of the regulations, as inducer or repressor. Our approach is based on a consistency rule between a network and the signs of variation given by expression arrays. Results We evaluate our approach in several settings of increasing complexity. First, we generate artificial expression data on a transcriptional network of E. coli extracted from the literature (1529 nodes and 3802 edges, and we estimate that 30% of the regulations can be annotated with about 30 profiles. We additionally prove that at most 40.8% of the network can be inferred using our approach. Second, we use this network in order to validate the predictions obtained with a compendium of real expression profiles. We describe a filtering algorithm that generates particularly reliable predictions. Finally, we apply our inference approach to S. cerevisiae transcriptional network (2419 nodes and 4344 interactions, by combining ChIP-chip data and 15 expression profiles. We are able to detect and isolate inconsistencies between the expression profiles and a significant portion of the model (15% of all the interactions. In addition, we report predictions for 14.5% of all interactions. Conclusion Our approach does not require accurate expression levels nor times series. Nevertheless, we show on both data, real and artificial, that a relatively small number of perturbation experiments are enough to determine

  16. Deciphering Fur transcriptional regulatory network highlights its complex role beyond iron metabolism in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; Latif, Haythem;

    2014-01-01

    The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays a critical role in the transcriptional regulation of iron metabolism. However, the full regulatory potential of Fur remains undefined. Here we comprehensively reconstruct the Fur transcriptional regulatory network in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 in response...

  17. FOXA and master transcription factors recruit Mediator and Cohesin to the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Michèle; Bourriquen, Gaëlle; Lamaze, Fabien C.; Côté, Maxime C.; Fournier, Éric; Joly-Beauparlant, Charles; Caron, Vicky; Gobeil, Stéphane; Droit, Arnaud; Bilodeau, Steve

    2016-10-01

    Controlling the transcriptional program is essential to maintain the identity and the biological functions of a cell. The Mediator and Cohesin complexes have been established as central cofactors controlling the transcriptional program in normal cells. However, the distribution, recruitment and importance of these complexes in cancer cells have not been fully investigated. Here we show that FOXA and master transcription factors are part of the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells and are essential to recruit M ediator and Cohesin. Indeed, Mediator and Cohesin occupied the enhancer and promoter regions of actively transcribed genes and maintained the proliferation and colony forming potential. Through integration of publically available ChIP-Seq datasets, we predicted the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of each cancer cell. Unexpectedly, for all cells investigated, the pioneer transcription factors FOXA1 and/or FOXA2 were identified in addition to cell-specific master transcription factors. Loss of both types of transcription factors phenocopied the loss of Mediator and Cohesin. Lastly, the master and pioneer transcription factors were essential to recruit Mediator and Cohesin to regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes. Our study proposes that maintenance of the cancer cell state is dependent on recruitment of Mediator and Cohesin through FOXA and master transcription factors.

  18. FOXA and master transcription factors recruit Mediator and Cohesin to the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Michèle; Bourriquen, Gaëlle; Lamaze, Fabien C.; Côté, Maxime C.; Fournier, Éric; Joly-Beauparlant, Charles; Caron, Vicky; Gobeil, Stéphane; Droit, Arnaud; Bilodeau, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the transcriptional program is essential to maintain the identity and the biological functions of a cell. The Mediator and Cohesin complexes have been established as central cofactors controlling the transcriptional program in normal cells. However, the distribution, recruitment and importance of these complexes in cancer cells have not been fully investigated. Here we show that FOXA and master transcription factors are part of the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells and are essential to recruit M ediator and Cohesin. Indeed, Mediator and Cohesin occupied the enhancer and promoter regions of actively transcribed genes and maintained the proliferation and colony forming potential. Through integration of publically available ChIP-Seq datasets, we predicted the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of each cancer cell. Unexpectedly, for all cells investigated, the pioneer transcription factors FOXA1 and/or FOXA2 were identified in addition to cell-specific master transcription factors. Loss of both types of transcription factors phenocopied the loss of Mediator and Cohesin. Lastly, the master and pioneer transcription factors were essential to recruit Mediator and Cohesin to regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes. Our study proposes that maintenance of the cancer cell state is dependent on recruitment of Mediator and Cohesin through FOXA and master transcription factors. PMID:27739523

  19. FOXA and master transcription factors recruit Mediator and Cohesin to the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Michèle; Bourriquen, Gaëlle; Lamaze, Fabien C; Côté, Maxime C; Fournier, Éric; Joly-Beauparlant, Charles; Caron, Vicky; Gobeil, Stéphane; Droit, Arnaud; Bilodeau, Steve

    2016-10-14

    Controlling the transcriptional program is essential to maintain the identity and the biological functions of a cell. The Mediator and Cohesin complexes have been established as central cofactors controlling the transcriptional program in normal cells. However, the distribution, recruitment and importance of these complexes in cancer cells have not been fully investigated. Here we show that FOXA and master transcription factors are part of the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells and are essential to recruit M ediator and Cohesin. Indeed, Mediator and Cohesin occupied the enhancer and promoter regions of actively transcribed genes and maintained the proliferation and colony forming potential. Through integration of publically available ChIP-Seq datasets, we predicted the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of each cancer cell. Unexpectedly, for all cells investigated, the pioneer transcription factors FOXA1 and/or FOXA2 were identified in addition to cell-specific master transcription factors. Loss of both types of transcription factors phenocopied the loss of Mediator and Cohesin. Lastly, the master and pioneer transcription factors were essential to recruit Mediator and Cohesin to regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes. Our study proposes that maintenance of the cancer cell state is dependent on recruitment of Mediator and Cohesin through FOXA and master transcription factors.

  20. The future of genome-scale modeling of yeast through integration of a transcriptional regulatory network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Guodong; Marras, Antonio; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    regulatory information is necessary to improve the accuracy and predictive ability of metabolic models. Here we review the strategies for the reconstruction of a transcriptional regulatory network (TRN) for yeast and the integration of such a reconstruction into a flux balance analysis-based metabolic model......Metabolism is regulated at multiple levels in response to the changes of internal or external conditions. Transcriptional regulation plays an important role in regulating many metabolic reactions by altering the concentrations of metabolic enzymes. Thus, integration of the transcriptional...... transcriptional regulatory interactions to genome-scale metabolic models in a quantitative manner....

  1. Nε-lysine acetylation of a bacterial transcription factor inhibits Its DNA-binding activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy Thao

    Full Text Available Evidence suggesting that eukaryotes and archaea use reversible N(ε-lysine (N(ε-Lys acetylation to modulate gene expression has been reported, but evidence for bacterial use of N(ε-Lys acetylation for this purpose is lacking. Here, we report data in support of the notion that bacteria can control gene expression by modulating the acetylation state of transcription factors (TFs. We screened the E. coli proteome for substrates of the bacterial Gcn5-like protein acetyltransferase (Pat. Pat acetylated four TFs, including the RcsB global regulatory protein, which controls cell division, and capsule and flagellum biosynthesis in many bacteria. Pat acetylated residue Lys180 of RcsB, and the NAD(+-dependent Sir2 (sirtuin-like protein deacetylase (CobB deacetylated acetylated RcsB (RcsB(Ac, demonstrating that N(ε-Lys acetylation of RcsB is reversible. Analysis of RcsB(Ac and variant RcsB proteins carrying substitutions at Lys180 provided biochemical and physiological evidence implicating Lys180 as a critical residue for RcsB DNA-binding activity. These findings further the likelihood that reversible N(ε-Lys acetylation of transcription factors is a mode of regulation of gene expression used by all cells.

  2. Comparative study between transcriptionally- and translationally-acting adenine riboswitches reveals key differences in riboswitch regulatory mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Lemay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many bacterial mRNAs are regulated at the transcriptional or translational level by ligand-binding elements called riboswitches. Although they both bind adenine, the adenine riboswitches of Bacillus subtilis and Vibrio vulnificus differ by controlling transcription and translation, respectively. Here, we demonstrate that, beyond the obvious difference in transcriptional and translational modulation, both adenine riboswitches exhibit different ligand binding properties and appear to operate under different regulation regimes (kinetic versus thermodynamic. While the B. subtilis pbuE riboswitch fully depends on co-transcriptional binding of adenine to function, the V. vulnificus add riboswitch can bind to adenine after transcription is completed and still perform translation regulation. Further investigation demonstrates that the rate of transcription is critical for the B. subtilis pbuE riboswitch to perform efficiently, which is in agreement with a co-transcriptional regulation. Our results suggest that the nature of gene regulation control, that is transcription or translation, may have a high importance in riboswitch regulatory mechanisms.

  3. Pleiotropy constrains the evolution of protein but not regulatory sequences in a transcription regulatory network influencing complex social behaviours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria eMolodtsova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is increasingly apparent that genes and networks that influence complex behaviour are evolutionary conserved, which is paradoxical considering that behaviour is labile over evolutionary timescales. How does adaptive change in behaviour arise if behaviour is controlled by conserved, pleiotropic, and likely evolutionary constrained genes? Pleiotropy and connectedness are known to constrain the general rate of protein evolution, prompting some to suggest that the evolution of complex traits, including behaviour, is fuelled by regulatory sequence evolution. However, we seldom have data on the strength of selection on mutations in coding and regulatory sequences, and this hinders our ability to study how pleiotropy influences coding and regulatory sequence evolution. Here we use population genomics to estimate the strength of selection on coding and regulatory mutations for a transcriptional regulatory network that influences complex behaviour of honey bees. We found that replacement mutations in highly connected transcription factors and target genes experience significantly stronger negative selection relative to weakly connected transcription factors and targets. Adaptively evolving proteins were significantly more likely to reside at the periphery of the regulatory network, while proteins with signs of negative selection were near the core of the network. Interestingly, connectedness and network structure had minimal influence on the strength of selection on putative regulatory sequences for both transcription factors and their targets. Our study indicates that adaptive evolution of complex behaviour can arise because of positive selection on protein-coding mutations in peripheral genes, and on regulatory sequence mutations in both transcription factors and their targets throughout the network.

  4. Engineering Synthetic cis-Regulatory Elements for Simultaneous Recognition of Three Transcriptional Factors in Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amores, Gerardo Ruiz; Guazzaroni, María-Eugenia; Silva-Rocha, Rafael

    2015-12-18

    Recognition of cis-regulatory elements by transcription factors (TF) at target promoters is crucial to gene regulation in bacteria. In this process, binding of TFs to their cognate sequences depends on a set of physical interactions between these proteins and specific nucleotides in the operator region. Previously, we showed that in silico optimization algorithms are able to generate short sequences that are recognized by two different TFs of Escherichia coli, namely, CRP and IHF, thus generating an AND logic gate. Here, we expanded this approach in order to engineer DNA sequences that can be simultaneously recognized by three unrelated TFs (CRP, IHF, and Fis). Using in silico optimization and experimental validation strategies, we were able to obtain a candidate promoter (Plac-CFI1) regulated by only two TFs with an AND logic, thus demonstrating a limitation in the design. Subsequently, we modified the algorithm to allow the optimization of extended sequences, and were able to design two synthetic promoters (PCFI20-1 and PCFI22-5) that were functional in vivo. Expression assays in E. coli mutant strains for each TF revealed that while CRP positively regulates the promoter activities, IHF and Fis are strong repressors of both the promoter variants. Taken together, our results demonstrate the potential of in silico strategies in bacterial synthetic promoter engineering. Furthermore, the study also shows how small modifications in cis-regulatory elements can drastically affect the final logic of the resulting promoter.

  5. Regulatory cascade and biological activity of Beauveria bassiana oosporein that limits bacterial growth after host death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yanhua; Liu, Xi; Keyhani, Nemat O; Tang, Guirong; Pei, Yan; Zhang, Wenwen; Tong, Sheng

    2017-02-28

    The regulatory network and biological functions of the fungal secondary metabolite oosporein have remained obscure. Beauveria bassiana has evolved the ability to parasitize insects and outcompete microbial challengers for assimilation of host nutrients. A novel zinc finger transcription factor, BbSmr1 (B. bassiana secondary metabolite regulator 1), was identified in a screen for oosporein overproduction. Deletion of Bbsmr1 resulted in up-regulation of the oosporein biosynthetic gene cluster (OpS genes) and constitutive oosporein production. Oosporein production was abolished in double mutants of Bbsmr1 and a second transcription factor, OpS3, within the oosporein gene cluster (ΔBbsmr1ΔOpS3), indicating that BbSmr1 acts as a negative regulator of OpS3 expression. Real-time quantitative PCR and a GFP promoter fusion construct of OpS1, the oosporein polyketide synthase, indicated that OpS1 is expressed mainly in insect cadavers at 24-48 h after death. Bacterial colony analysis in B. bassiana-infected insect hosts revealed increasing counts until host death, with a dramatic decrease (∼90%) after death that correlated with oosporein production. In vitro studies verified the inhibitory activity of oosporein against bacteria derived from insect cadavers. These results suggest that oosporein acts as an antimicrobial compound to limit microbial competition on B. bassiana-killed hosts, allowing the fungus to maximally use host nutrients to grow and sporulate on infected cadavers.

  6. A deeper look into transcription regulatory code by preferred pair distance templates for transcription factor binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.

    2011-08-18

    Motivation: Modern experimental methods provide substantial information on protein-DNA recognition. Studying arrangements of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) of interacting transcription factors (TFs) advances understanding of the transcription regulatory code. Results: We constructed binding motifs for TFs forming a complex with HIF-1α at the erythropoietin 3\\'-enhancer. Corresponding TFBSs were predicted in the segments around transcription start sites (TSSs) of all human genes. Using the genome-wide set of regulatory regions, we observed several strongly preferred distances between hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) and binding sites of a particular cofactor protein. The set of preferred distances was called as a preferred pair distance template (PPDT). PPDT dramatically depended on the TF and orientation of its binding sites relative to HRE. PPDT evaluated from the genome-wide set of regulatory sequences was used to detect significant PPDT-consistent binding site pairs in regulatory regions of hypoxia-responsive genes. We believe PPDT can help to reveal the layout of eukaryotic regulatory segments. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  7. A guide to integrating transcriptional regulatory and metabolic networks using PROM (probabilistic regulation of metabolism).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonidis, Evangelos; Chandrasekaran, Sriram; Price, Nathan D

    2013-01-01

    The integration of transcriptional regulatory and metabolic networks is a crucial step in the process of predicting metabolic behaviors that emerge from either genetic or environmental changes. Here, we present a guide to PROM (probabilistic regulation of metabolism), an automated method for the construction and simulation of integrated metabolic and transcriptional regulatory networks that enables large-scale phenotypic predictions for a wide range of model organisms.

  8. Protein modularity, cooperative binding, and hybrid regulatory states underlie transcriptional network diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Christopher R; Booth, Lauren N; Sorrells, Trevor R; Johnson, Alexander D

    2012-09-28

    We examine how different transcriptional network structures can evolve from an ancestral network. By characterizing how the ancestral mode of gene regulation for genes specific to a-type cells in yeast species evolved from an activating paradigm to a repressing one, we show that regulatory protein modularity, conversion of one cis-regulatory sequence to another, distribution of binding energy among protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, and exploitation of ancestral network features all contribute to the evolution of a novel regulatory mode. The formation of this derived mode of regulation did not disrupt the ancestral mode and thereby created a hybrid regulatory state where both means of transcription regulation (ancestral and derived) contribute to the conserved expression pattern of the network. Finally, we show how this hybrid regulatory state has resolved in different ways in different lineages to generate the diversity of regulatory network structures observed in modern species.

  9. Potential transcriptional regulatory regions exist upstream of the human ezrin gene promoter in esophageal carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuying Gao; Yanpeng Dai; Meijun Yin; Jing Ye; Gang Li; Jie Yu

    2011-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that the region -87/+ 134 of the human ezrin gene (VIL2) exhibited promoter activity in human esophageal carcinoma EC109 cells, and a further upstream region -1324/-890 positively regulated transcription.In this study, to identify the transcriptional regulatory regions upstream of the VIL2 promoter, we cloned VIL2 - 1541/- 706 segment containing the -1324/-890, and investigated its transcriptional regulatory properties via luciferase assays in transiently transfected cells.In EC109 cells, it was found that VIL2 -1541/-706 possessed promoter and enhancer activities.We also localized transcriptional regulatory regions by fusing 5′- or 3′-deletion segments of VIL2 -1541/-706 to a luciferase reporter.We found that there were three positive and one negative transcriptional regulatory regions ithin VIL2 -1541/-706 in EC109 cells.When these regions were separately located upstream of the luciferase gene without promoter, or located upstream of the VIL2 promoter or SV40 promoter directing the luciferase gene, only VIL2 -1297/-1186 exhibited considerable promoter and enhancer activities, which were lower than those of -1541/-706.In addition, transient expression of Sp1 increased ezrin expression and the transcriptional activation of VIL2 -1297/-1186.Other three regions,although exhibiting significantly positive or negative transcriptional regulation in deletion experiments, showed a weaker or absent regulation.These data suggested that more than one region upstream of the VIL2 promoter participated in VIL2 transcription, and the VIL2 -1297/-1186, probably as a key transcriptional regulatory region, regulated VIL2 transcription in company with other potential regulatory regions.

  10. Selection Shapes Transcriptional Logic and Regulatory Specialization in Genetic Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Fogelmark

    Full Text Available Living organisms need to regulate their gene expression in response to environmental signals and internal cues. This is a computational task where genes act as logic gates that connect to form transcriptional networks, which are shaped at all scales by evolution. Large-scale mutations such as gene duplications and deletions add and remove network components, whereas smaller mutations alter the connections between them. Selection determines what mutations are accepted, but its importance for shaping the resulting networks has been debated.To investigate the effects of selection in the shaping of transcriptional networks, we derive transcriptional logic from a combinatorially powerful yet tractable model of the binding between DNA and transcription factors. By evolving the resulting networks based on their ability to function as either a simple decision system or a circadian clock, we obtain information on the regulation and logic rules encoded in functional transcriptional networks. Comparisons are made between networks evolved for different functions, as well as with structurally equivalent but non-functional (neutrally evolved networks, and predictions are validated against the transcriptional network of E. coli.We find that the logic rules governing gene expression depend on the function performed by the network. Unlike the decision systems, the circadian clocks show strong cooperative binding and negative regulation, which achieves tight temporal control of gene expression. Furthermore, we find that transcription factors act preferentially as either activators or repressors, both when binding multiple sites for a single target gene and globally in the transcriptional networks. This separation into positive and negative regulators requires gene duplications, which highlights the interplay between mutation and selection in shaping the transcriptional networks.

  11. Functional states of the genome-scale Escherichia coli transcriptional regulatory system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin P Gianchandani

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A transcriptional regulatory network (TRN constitutes the collection of regulatory rules that link environmental cues to the transcription state of a cell's genome. We recently proposed a matrix formalism that quantitatively represents a system of such rules (a transcriptional regulatory system [TRS] and allows systemic characterization of TRS properties. The matrix formalism not only allows the computation of the transcription state of the genome but also the fundamental characterization of the input-output mapping that it represents. Furthermore, a key advantage of this "pseudo-stoichiometric" matrix formalism is its ability to easily integrate with existing stoichiometric matrix representations of signaling and metabolic networks. Here we demonstrate for the first time how this matrix formalism is extendable to large-scale systems by applying it to the genome-scale Escherichia coli TRS. We analyze the fundamental subspaces of the regulatory network matrix (R to describe intrinsic properties of the TRS. We further use Monte Carlo sampling to evaluate the E. coli transcription state across a subset of all possible environments, comparing our results to published gene expression data as validation. Finally, we present novel in silico findings for the E. coli TRS, including (1 a gene expression correlation matrix delineating functional motifs; (2 sets of gene ontologies for which regulatory rules governing gene transcription are poorly understood and which may direct further experimental characterization; and (3 the appearance of a distributed TRN structure, which is in stark contrast to the more hierarchical organization of metabolic networks.

  12. Functional states of the genome-scale Escherichia coli transcriptional regulatory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianchandani, Erwin P; Joyce, Andrew R; Palsson, Bernhard Ø; Papin, Jason A

    2009-06-01

    A transcriptional regulatory network (TRN) constitutes the collection of regulatory rules that link environmental cues to the transcription state of a cell's genome. We recently proposed a matrix formalism that quantitatively represents a system of such rules (a transcriptional regulatory system [TRS]) and allows systemic characterization of TRS properties. The matrix formalism not only allows the computation of the transcription state of the genome but also the fundamental characterization of the input-output mapping that it represents. Furthermore, a key advantage of this "pseudo-stoichiometric" matrix formalism is its ability to easily integrate with existing stoichiometric matrix representations of signaling and metabolic networks. Here we demonstrate for the first time how this matrix formalism is extendable to large-scale systems by applying it to the genome-scale Escherichia coli TRS. We analyze the fundamental subspaces of the regulatory network matrix (R) to describe intrinsic properties of the TRS. We further use Monte Carlo sampling to evaluate the E. coli transcription state across a subset of all possible environments, comparing our results to published gene expression data as validation. Finally, we present novel in silico findings for the E. coli TRS, including (1) a gene expression correlation matrix delineating functional motifs; (2) sets of gene ontologies for which regulatory rules governing gene transcription are poorly understood and which may direct further experimental characterization; and (3) the appearance of a distributed TRN structure, which is in stark contrast to the more hierarchical organization of metabolic networks.

  13. Bayesian non-negative factor analysis for reconstructing transcription factor mediated regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yidong

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcriptional regulation by transcription factor (TF controls the time and abundance of mRNA transcription. Due to the limitation of current proteomics technologies, large scale measurements of protein level activities of TFs is usually infeasible, making computational reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory network a difficult task. Results We proposed here a novel Bayesian non-negative factor model for TF mediated regulatory networks. Particularly, the non-negative TF activities and sample clustering effect are modeled as the factors from a Dirichlet process mixture of rectified Gaussian distributions, and the sparse regulatory coefficients are modeled as the loadings from a sparse distribution that constrains its sparsity using knowledge from database; meantime, a Gibbs sampling solution was developed to infer the underlying network structure and the unknown TF activities simultaneously. The developed approach has been applied to simulated system and breast cancer gene expression data. Result shows that, the proposed method was able to systematically uncover TF mediated transcriptional regulatory network structure, the regulatory coefficients, the TF protein level activities and the sample clustering effect. The regulation target prediction result is highly coordinated with the prior knowledge, and sample clustering result shows superior performance over previous molecular based clustering method. Conclusions The results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed approach in reconstructing transcriptional networks mediated by TFs through simulated systems and real data.

  14. Partially observed bipartite network analysis to identify predictive connections in transcriptional regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woolf Peter J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Messenger RNA expression is regulated by a complex interplay of different regulatory proteins. Unfortunately, directly measuring the individual activity of these regulatory proteins is difficult, leaving us with only the resulting gene expression pattern as a marker for the underlying regulatory network or regulator-gene associations. Furthermore, traditional methods to predict these regulator-gene associations do not define the relative importance of each association, leading to a large number of connections in the global regulatory network that, although true, are not useful. Results Here we present a Bayesian method that identifies which known transcriptional relationships in a regulatory network are consistent with a given body of static gene expression data by eliminating the non-relevant ones. The Partially Observed Bipartite Network (POBN approach developed here is tested using E. coli expression data and a transcriptional regulatory network derived from RegulonDB. When the regulatory network for E. coli was integrated with 266 E. coli gene chip observations, POBN identified 93 out of 570 connections that were either inconsistent or not adequately supported by the expression data. Conclusion POBN provides a systematic way to integrate known transcriptional networks with observed gene expression data to better identify which transcriptional pathways are likely responsible for the observed gene expression pattern.

  15. Biological data warehousing system for identifying transcriptional regulatory sites from gene expressions of microarray data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsou, Ann-Ping; Sun, Yi-Ming; Liu, Chia-Lin; Huang, Hsien-Da; Horng, Jorng-Tzong; Tsai, Meng-Feng; Liu, Baw-Juine

    2006-07-01

    Identification of transcriptional regulatory sites plays an important role in the investigation of gene regulation. For this propose, we designed and implemented a data warehouse to integrate multiple heterogeneous biological data sources with data types such as text-file, XML, image, MySQL database model, and Oracle database model. The utility of the biological data warehouse in predicting transcriptional regulatory sites of coregulated genes was explored using a synexpression group derived from a microarray study. Both of the binding sites of known transcription factors and predicted over-represented (OR) oligonucleotides were demonstrated for the gene group. The potential biological roles of both known nucleotides and one OR nucleotide were demonstrated using bioassays. Therefore, the results from the wet-lab experiments reinforce the power and utility of the data warehouse as an approach to the genome-wide search for important transcription regulatory elements that are the key to many complex biological systems.

  16. Serine/threonine/tyrosine phosphorylation regulates DNA binding of bacterial transcriptional regulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalantari, Aida; Derouiche, Abderahmane; Shi, Lei;

    2015-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of bacterial transcriptional regulators (TRs) belonging to the family of two-component systems (TCSs) is a well-established mechanism for regulating gene expression. Recent evidence points to the fact that reversible phosphorylation of bacterial TRs on other types...

  17. R-loops in bacterial transcription: their causes and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowrishankar, J; Leela, J Krishna; Anupama, K

    2013-01-01

    Nascent untranslated transcripts in bacteria are prone to generating RNA-DNA hybrids (R-loops); Rho-dependent transcription termination acts to reduce their prevalence. Here we discuss the mechanisms of R-loop formation and growth inhibition in bacteria.

  18. Multiple sigma subunits and the partitioning of bacterial transcription space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Tanja M; Gross, Carol A

    2003-01-01

    Promoter recognition in eubacteria is carried out by the initiation factor sigma, which binds RNA polymerase and initiates transcription. Cells have one housekeeping factor and a variable number of alternative sigma factors that possess different promoter-recognition properties. The cell can choose from its repertoire of sigmas to alter its transcriptional program in response to stress. Recent structural information illuminates the process of initiation and also shows that the two key sigma domains are structurally conserved, even among diverse family members. We use the sigma repertoire of Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Streptomyces coelicolor, and cyanobacteria to illustrate the different strategies utilized to organize transcriptional space using multiple sigma factors.

  19. Optimized rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) for mapping bacterial mRNA transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillett, D; Burns, B P; Neilan, B A

    2000-03-01

    A simple, efficient and sensitive RACE-based procedure was developed for the determination of unknown 5' regions from bacterial cDNA. A number of critical modifications were made to the standard RACE method, including the optimization of the RNA extraction, reverse transcription and PCR conditions. This procedure was used to accurately determine the site of transcript initiation and structure of the promoter region of the Helicobacter pylori aspartate carbamoyltransferase gene (pyrB). The technique avoids many of the difficulties associated with established bacterial transcript mapping protocols and can be performed in two days starting with less than 1 microgram of total RNA. The modifications described here have significant potential for the identification of transcript start sites of bacterial genes and non-polyadenylated eukaryotic RNA.

  20. Distinct regulatory mechanisms of eukaryotic transcriptional activation by SAGA and TFIID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaumik, Sukesh R

    2011-02-01

    A growing number of human diseases are linked to abnormal gene expression which is largely controlled at the level of transcriptional initiation. The gene-specific activator promotes the initiation of transcription through its interaction with one or more components of the transcriptional initiation machinery, hence leading to stimulated transcriptional initiation or activation. However, all activator proteins do not target the same component(s) of the transcriptional initiation machinery. Rather, they can have different target specificities, and thus, can lead to distinct mechanisms of transcriptional activation. Two such distinct mechanisms of transcriptional activation in yeast are mediated by the SAGA (Spt-Ada-Gcn5-Acetyltransferase) and TFIID (Transcription factor IID) complexes, and are termed as "SAGA-dependent" and "TFIID-dependent" transcriptional activation, respectively. SAGA is the target of the activator in case of SAGA-dependent transcriptional activation, while the targeting of TFIID by the activator leads to TFIID-dependent transcriptional activation. Both the SAGA and TFIID complexes are highly conserved from yeast to human, and play crucial roles in gene activation among eukaryotes. The regulatory mechanisms of eukaryotic transcriptional activation by SAGA and TFIID are discussed here. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled The 26S Proteasome: When degradation is just not enough!

  1. Expression pattern and transcriptional regulatory mechanism of noxa gene in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Yongyan; Lu, Xiaonan; He, Libo; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Aidi; Li, Yongming; Huang, Rong; Liao, Lanjie; Zhu, Zuoyan; Wang, Yaping

    2015-12-01

    Noxa, a pro-apoptotic protein, plays an important role in cell apoptosis. The researches about noxa gene were concentrated in mammalians, whereas the role and transcriptional regulatory mechanism of noxa in fish were still unclear. In this study, the expression pattern and transcriptional regulatory mechanism of noxa gene in grass carp were analyzed. Noxa was constitutively expressed in all the examined tissues but the relative expression level differed. After exposure to grass carp reovirus (GCRV), mRNA expression level of noxa was down-regulated at the early phase whereas up-regulated at the late phase of infection. Luciferase assays showed that the promoter region -867 ∼ +107 of noxa had high activity and the region -678 ∼ -603 was important in the response to GCRV infection. By deleting the predicted transcription factor binding sites, transcription factors FOXO1 and CEBPβ were found important for noxa in response to GCRV infection. Moreover, the noxa promoter was biotin-labeled and incubated with nuclear extracts from GCRV infected cells. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that transcription factors FOXO1 and CEBPβ were also enriched in the combined proteins. Therefore, the results suggested that transcription factors FOXO1 and CEBPβ may play an important role in the regulation of noxa. Our study would provide new insight into the transcriptional regulatory mechanism of noxa in teleost fish.

  2. Regulatory Enhancer-Core-Promoter Communication via Transcription Factors and Cofactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabidi, Muhammad A; Stark, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Gene expression is regulated by genomic enhancers that recruit transcription factors and cofactors to activate transcription from target core promoters. Over the past years, thousands of enhancers and core promoters in animal genomes have been annotated, and we have learned much about the domain structure in which regulatory genomes are organized in animals. Enhancer-core-promoter targeting occurs at several levels, including regulatory domains, DNA accessibility, and sequence-encoded core-promoter specificities that are likely mediated by different regulatory proteins. We review here current knowledge about enhancer-core-promoter targeting, regulatory communication between enhancers and core promoters, and the protein factors involved. We conclude with an outlook on open questions that we find particularly interesting and that will likely lead to additional insights in the upcoming years.

  3. Conservation and implications of eukaryote transcriptional regulatory regions across multiple species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Minghua

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing evidence shows that whole genomes of eukaryotes are almost entirely transcribed into both protein coding genes and an enormous number of non-protein-coding RNAs (ncRNAs. Therefore, revealing the underlying regulatory mechanisms of transcripts becomes imperative. However, for a complete understanding of transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, we need to identify the regions in which they are found. We will call these transcriptional regulation regions, or TRRs, which can be considered functional regions containing a cluster of regulatory elements that cooperatively recruit transcriptional factors for binding and then regulating the expression of transcripts. Results We constructed a hierarchical stochastic language (HSL model for the identification of core TRRs in yeast based on regulatory cooperation among TRR elements. The HSL model trained based on yeast achieved comparable accuracy in predicting TRRs in other species, e.g., fruit fly, human, and rice, thus demonstrating the conservation of TRRs across species. The HSL model was also used to identify the TRRs of genes, such as p53 or OsALYL1, as well as microRNAs. In addition, the ENCODE regions were examined by HSL, and TRRs were found to pervasively locate in the genomes. Conclusion Our findings indicate that 1 the HSL model can be used to accurately predict core TRRs of transcripts across species and 2 identified core TRRs by HSL are proper candidates for the further scrutiny of specific regulatory elements and mechanisms. Meanwhile, the regulatory activity taking place in the abundant numbers of ncRNAs might account for the ubiquitous presence of TRRs across the genome. In addition, we also found that the TRRs of protein coding genes and ncRNAs are similar in structure, with the latter being more conserved than the former.

  4. Deciphering the transcriptional-regulatory network of flocculation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Eun-Joo Gina; Laderoute, Amy; Chatfield-Reed, Kate; Vachon, Lianne; Karagiannis, Jim; Chua, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the transcriptional-regulatory network that governs flocculation remains poorly understood. Here, we systematically screened an array of transcription factor deletion and overexpression strains for flocculation and performed microarray expression profiling and ChIP-chip analysis to identify the flocculin target genes. We identified five transcription factors that displayed novel roles in the activation or inhibition of flocculation (Rfl1, Adn2, Adn3, Sre2, and Yox1), in addition to the previously-known Mbx2, Cbf11, and Cbf12 regulators. Overexpression of mbx2(+) and deletion of rfl1(+) resulted in strong flocculation and transcriptional upregulation of gsf2(+)/pfl1(+) and several other putative flocculin genes (pfl2(+)-pfl9(+)). Overexpression of the pfl(+) genes singly was sufficient to trigger flocculation, and enhanced flocculation was observed in several combinations of double pfl(+) overexpression. Among the pfl1(+) genes, only loss of gsf2(+) abrogated the flocculent phenotype of all the transcription factor mutants and prevented flocculation when cells were grown in inducing medium containing glycerol and ethanol as the carbon source, thereby indicating that Gsf2 is the dominant flocculin. In contrast, the mild flocculation of adn2(+) or adn3(+) overexpression was likely mediated by the transcriptional activation of cell wall-remodeling genes including gas2(+), psu1(+), and SPAC4H3.03c. We also discovered that Mbx2 and Cbf12 displayed transcriptional autoregulation, and Rfl1 repressed gsf2(+) expression in an inhibitory feed-forward loop involving mbx2(+). These results reveal that flocculation in S. pombe is regulated by a complex network of multiple transcription factors and target genes encoding flocculins and cell wall-remodeling enzymes. Moreover, comparisons between the flocculation transcriptional-regulatory networks of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. pombe indicate substantial rewiring of transcription

  5. Dissecting specific and global transcriptional regulation of bacterial gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerosa, Luca; Kochanowski, Karl; Heinemann, Matthias; Sauer, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated by specific transcriptional circuits but also by the global expression machinery as a function of growth. Simultaneous specific and global regulation thus constitutes an additional-but often neglected-layer of complexity in gene expression. Here, we develop an experiment

  6. Comparative Analysis of Regulatory Motif Discovery Tools for Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In the post-genomic era, identification of specific regulatory motifs or transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in non-coding DNA sequences, which is essential to elucidate transcriptional regulatory networks, has emerged as an obstacle that frustrates many researchers. Consequently, numerous motif discovery tools and correlated databases have been applied to solving this problem. However, these existing methods, based on different computational algorithms, show diverse motif prediction efficiency in non-coding DNA sequences. Therefore, understanding the similarities and differences of computational algorithms and enriching the motif discovery literatures are important for users to choose the most appropriate one among the online available tools. Moreover, there still lacks credible criterion to assess motif discovery tools and instructions for researchers to choose the best according to their own projects. Thus integration of the related resources might be a good approach to improve accuracy of the application. Recent studies integrate regulatory motif discovery tools with experimental methods to offer a complementary approach for researchers, and also provide a much-needed model for current researches on transcriptional regulatory networks. Here we present a comparative analysis of regulatory motif discovery tools for TFBSs.

  7. Bacterial global regulators DksA/ppGpp increase fidelity of transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roghanian, Mohammad; Zenkin, Nikolay; Yuzenkova, Yulia

    2015-02-18

    Collisions between paused transcription elongation complexes and replication forks inevitably happen, which may lead to collapse of replication fork and could be detrimental to cells. Bacterial transcription factor DksA and its cofactor alarmone ppGpp were proposed to contribute to prevention of such collisions, although the mechanism of this activity remains elusive. Here we show that DksA/ppGpp do not destabilise transcription elongation complexes or inhibit their backtracking, as was proposed earlier. Instead, we show, both in vitro and in vivo, that DksA/ppGpp increase fidelity of transcription elongation by slowing down misincorporation events. As misincorporation events cause temporary pauses, contribution to fidelity suggests the mechanism by which DksA/ppGpp contribute to prevention of collisions of transcription elongation complexes with replication forks. DksA is only the second known accessory factor, after transcription factor Gre, that increases fidelity of RNA synthesis in bacteria.

  8. The interaction between bacterial transcription factors and RNA polymerase during the transition from initiation to elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Lewis, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    There are three stages of transcription: initiation, elongation and termination, and traditionally there has been a clear distinction between the stages. The specificity factor sigma is completely released from bacterial RNA polymerase after initiation, and then recycled for another round of transcription. Elongation factors then associate with the polymerase followed by termination factors (where necessary). These factors dissociate prior to initiation of a new round of transcription. However, there is growing evidence suggesting that sigma factors can be retained in the elongation complex. The structure of bacterial RNAP in complex with an essential elongation factor NusA has recently been published, which suggested rather than competing for the major σ binding site, NusA binds to a discrete region on RNAP. A model was proposed to help explain the way in which both factors could be associated with RNAP during the transition from transcription initiation to elongation.

  9. Modeling regulatory cascades using Artificial Neural Networks: the case of transcriptional regulatory networks shaped during the yeast stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manioudaki, Maria E; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, numerous computational methods have been developed in order to infer and model biological networks. Transcriptional networks in particular have attracted significant attention due to their critical role in cell survival. The majority of network inference methods use genome-wide experimental data to search for modules of genes with coherent expression profiles and common regulators, often ignoring the multi-layer structure of transcriptional cascades. Modeling methodologies on the other hand assume a given network structure and vary significantly in their algorithmic approach, ranging from over-simplified representations (e.g., Boolean networks) to detailed -but computationally expensive-network simulations (e.g., with differential equations). In this work we use Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) to model transcriptional regulatory cascades that emerge during the stress response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and extend in three layers. We confine the structure of the ANNs to match the structure of the biological networks as determined by gene expression, DNA-protein interaction and experimental evidence provided in publicly available databases. Trained ANNs are able to predict the expression profile of 11 target genes across multiple experimental conditions with a correlation coefficient >0.7. When time-dependent interactions between upstream transcription factors (TFs) and their indirect targets are also included in the ANNs, accurate predictions are achieved for 30/34 target genes. Moreover, heterodimer formation is taken into account. We show that ANNs can be used to (1) accurately predict the expression of downstream genes in a 3-layer transcriptional cascade based on the expression of their indirect regulators and (2) infer the condition- and time-dependent activity of various TFs as well as during heterodimer formation. We show that a three-layer regulatory cascade whose structure is determined by co-expressed gene modules and their

  10. MicroRNA and transcription factor mediated regulatory network for ovarian cancer: regulatory network of ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Huanchun; Lv, Jing; Ying, Tianshu; Li, Jun; Yang, Qing; Ma, Yuan

    2013-10-01

    A better understanding on the regulatory interactions of microRNA (miRNA) target genes and transcription factor (TF) target genes in ovarian cancer may be conducive for developing early diagnosis strategy. Thus, gene expression data and miRNA expression data were downloaded from The Cancer Genome Atlas in this study. Differentially expressed genes and miRNAs were selected out with t test, and Gene Ontology enrichment analysis was performed with DAVID tools. Regulatory interactions were retrieved from miRTarBase, TRED, and TRANSFAC, and then networks for miRNA target genes and TF target genes were constructed to globally present the mechanisms. As a result, a total of 1,939 differentially expressed genes were identified, and they were enriched in 28 functions, among which cell cycle was affected to the most degree. Besides, 213 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified. Two regulatory networks for miRNA target genes and TF target genes were established and then both were combined, in which E2F transcription factor 1, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A, cyclin E1, and miR-16 were the hub genes. These genes may be potential biomarkers for ovarian cancer.

  11. TIGER: Toolbox for integrating genome-scale metabolic models, expression data, and transcriptional regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Paul A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several methods have been developed for analyzing genome-scale models of metabolism and transcriptional regulation. Many of these methods, such as Flux Balance Analysis, use constrained optimization to predict relationships between metabolic flux and the genes that encode and regulate enzyme activity. Recently, mixed integer programming has been used to encode these gene-protein-reaction (GPR relationships into a single optimization problem, but these techniques are often of limited generality and lack a tool for automating the conversion of rules to a coupled regulatory/metabolic model. Results We present TIGER, a Toolbox for Integrating Genome-scale Metabolism, Expression, and Regulation. TIGER converts a series of generalized, Boolean or multilevel rules into a set of mixed integer inequalities. The package also includes implementations of existing algorithms to integrate high-throughput expression data with genome-scale models of metabolism and transcriptional regulation. We demonstrate how TIGER automates the coupling of a genome-scale metabolic model with GPR logic and models of transcriptional regulation, thereby serving as a platform for algorithm development and large-scale metabolic analysis. Additionally, we demonstrate how TIGER's algorithms can be used to identify inconsistencies and improve existing models of transcriptional regulation with examples from the reconstructed transcriptional regulatory network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Conclusion The TIGER package provides a consistent platform for algorithm development and extending existing genome-scale metabolic models with regulatory networks and high-throughput data.

  12. HCF-1 self-association via an interdigitated Fn3 structure facilitates transcriptional regulatory complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jihye; Lammers, Fabienne; Herr, Winship; Song, Ji-Joon

    2012-10-23

    Host-cell factor 1 (HCF-1) is an unusual transcriptional regulator that undergoes a process of proteolytic maturation to generate N- (HCF-1(N)) and C- (HCF-1(C)) terminal subunits noncovalently associated via self-association sequence elements. Here, we present the crystal structure of the self-association sequence 1 (SAS1) including the adjacent C-terminal HCF-1 nuclear localization signal (NLS). SAS1 elements from each of the HCF-1(N) and HCF-1(C) subunits form an interdigitated fibronectin type 3 (Fn3) tandem repeat structure. We show that the C-terminal NLS recruited by the interdigitated SAS1 structure is required for effective formation of a transcriptional regulatory complex: the herpes simplex virus VP16-induced complex. Thus, HCF-1(N)-HCF-1(C) association via an integrated Fn3 structure permits an NLS to facilitate formation of a transcriptional regulatory complex.

  13. Transcriptional response of Musca domestica larvae to bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Tang

    Full Text Available The house fly Musca domestica, a cosmopolitan dipteran insect, is a significant vector for human and animal bacterial pathogens, but little is known about its immune response to these pathogens. To address this issue, we inoculated the larvae with a mixture of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus and profiled the transcriptome 6, 24, and 48 h thereafter. Many genes known to controlling innate immunity in insects were induced following infection, including genes encoding pattern recognition proteins (PGRPs, various components of the Toll and IMD signaling pathways and of the proPO-activating and redox systems, and multiple antimicrobial peptides. Interestingly, we also uncovered a large set of novel immune response genes including two broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptides (muscin and domesticin, which might have evolved to adapt to house-fly's unique ecological environments. Finally, genes mediating oxidative phosphorylation were repressed at 48 h post-infection, suggesting disruption of energy homeostasis and mitochondrial function at the late stages of infection. Collectively, our data reveal dynamic changes in gene expression following bacterial infection in the house fly, paving the way for future in-depth analysis of M. domestica's immune system.

  14. Reliable transfer of transcriptional gene regulatory networks between taxonomically related organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tauch Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcriptional regulation of gene activity is essential for any living organism. Transcription factors therefore recognize specific binding sites within the DNA to regulate the expression of particular target genes. The genome-scale reconstruction of the emerging regulatory networks is important for biotechnology and human medicine but cost-intensive, time-consuming, and impossible to perform for any species separately. By using bioinformatics methods one can partially transfer networks from well-studied model organisms to closely related species. However, the prediction quality is limited by the low level of evolutionary conservation of the transcription factor binding sites, even within organisms of the same genus. Results Here we present an integrated bioinformatics workflow that assures the reliability of transferred gene regulatory networks. Our approach combines three methods that can be applied on a large-scale: re-assessment of annotated binding sites, subsequent binding site prediction, and homology detection. A gene regulatory interaction is considered to be conserved if (1 the transcription factor, (2 the adjusted binding site, and (3 the target gene are conserved. The power of the approach is demonstrated by transferring gene regulations from the model organism Corynebacterium glutamicum to the human pathogens C. diphtheriae, C. jeikeium, and the biotechnologically relevant C. efficiens. For these three organisms we identified reliable transcriptional regulations for ~40% of the common transcription factors, compared to ~5% for which knowledge was available before. Conclusion Our results suggest that trustworthy genome-scale transfer of gene regulatory networks between organisms is feasible in general but still limited by the level of evolutionary conservation.

  15. Conserved rates and patterns of transcription errors across bacterial growth states and lifestyles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverse, Charles C; Ochman, Howard

    2016-03-22

    Errors that occur during transcription have received much less attention than the mutations that occur in DNA because transcription errors are not heritable and usually result in a very limited number of altered proteins. However, transcription error rates are typically several orders of magnitude higher than the mutation rate. Also, individual transcripts can be translated multiple times, so a single error can have substantial effects on the pool of proteins. Transcription errors can also contribute to cellular noise, thereby influencing cell survival under stressful conditions, such as starvation or antibiotic stress. Implementing a method that captures transcription errors genome-wide, we measured the rates and spectra of transcription errors in Escherichia coli and in endosymbionts for which mutation and/or substitution rates are greatly elevated over those of E. coli Under all tested conditions, across all species, and even for different categories of RNA sequences (mRNA and rRNAs), there were no significant differences in rates of transcription errors, which ranged from 2.3 × 10(-5) per nucleotide in mRNA of the endosymbiont Buchnera aphidicola to 5.2 × 10(-5) per nucleotide in rRNA of the endosymbiont Carsonella ruddii The similarity of transcription error rates in these bacterial endosymbionts to that in E. coli (4.63 × 10(-5) per nucleotide) is all the more surprising given that genomic erosion has resulted in the loss of transcription fidelity factors in both Buchnera and Carsonella.

  16. Ectopic expression of MYB46 identifies transcriptional regulatory genes involved in secondary wall biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jae-Heung; Kim, Won-Chan; Han, Kyung-Hwan

    2009-11-01

    MYB46 functions as a transcriptional switch that turns on the genes necessary for secondary wall biosynthesis. Elucidating the transcriptional regulatory network immediately downstream of MYB46 is crucial to our understanding of the molecular and biochemical processes involved in the biosynthesis and deposition of secondary walls in plants. To gain insights into MYB46-mediated transcriptional regulation, we first established an inducible secondary wall thickening system in Arabidopsis by expressing MYB46 under the control of dexamethasone-inducible promoter. Then, we used an ATH1 GeneChip microarray and Illumina digital gene expression system to obtain a series of transcriptome profiles with regard to the induction of secondary wall development. These analyses allowed us to identify a group of transcription factors whose expression coincided with or preceded the induction of secondary wall biosynthetic genes. A transient transcriptional activation assay was used to confirm the hierarchical relationships among the transcription factors in the network. The in vivo assay showed that MYB46 transcriptionally activates downstream target transcription factors, three of which (AtC3H14, MYB52 and MYB63) were shown to be able to activate secondary wall biosynthesis genes. AtC3H14 activated the transcription of all of the secondary wall biosynthesis genes tested, suggesting that AtC3H14 may be another master regulator of secondary wall biosynthesis. The transcription factors identified here may include direct activators of secondary wall biosynthesis genes. The present study discovered novel hierarchical relationships among the transcription factors involved in the transcriptional regulation of secondary wall biosynthesis, and generated several testable hypotheses.

  17. DMPD: Type I interferon [corrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily of transcription factors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16979567 Type I interferon [corrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily...ng) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Type I interferon [corrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily...orrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily of transcription factors. Authors Honda K

  18. Bacterial replication, transcription and translation : mechanistic insights from single-molecule biochemical studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robinson, Andrew; van Oijen, Antoine M.

    2013-01-01

    Decades of research have resulted in a remarkably detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms of bacterial DNA replication, transcription and translation. Our understanding of the kinetics and physical mechanisms that drive these processes forward has been expanded by the ability of single-mo

  19. Architecture of transcriptional regulatory circuits is knitted over the topology of bio-molecular interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen Jens

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uncovering the operating principles underlying cellular processes by using 'omics' data is often a difficult task due to the high-dimensionality of the solution space that spans all interactions among the bio-molecules under consideration. A rational way to overcome this problem is to use the topology of bio-molecular interaction networks in order to constrain the solution space. Such approaches systematically integrate the existing biological knowledge with the 'omics' data. Results Here we introduce a hypothesis-driven method that integrates bio-molecular network topology with transcriptome data, thereby allowing the identification of key biological features (Reporter Features around which transcriptional changes are significantly concentrated. We have combined transcriptome data with different biological networks in order to identify Reporter Gene Ontologies, Reporter Transcription Factors, Reporter Proteins and Reporter Complexes, and use this to decipher the logic of regulatory circuits playing a key role in yeast glucose repression and human diabetes. Conclusion Reporter Features offer the opportunity to identify regulatory hot-spots in bio-molecular interaction networks that are significantly affected between or across conditions. Results of the Reporter Feature analysis not only provide a snapshot of the transcriptional regulatory program but also are biologically easy to interpret and provide a powerful way to generate new hypotheses. Our Reporter Features analyses of yeast glucose repression and human diabetes data brings hints towards the understanding of the principles of transcriptional regulation controlling these two important and potentially closely related systems.

  20. Understanding the Role of Housekeeping and Stress-Related Genes in Transcription-Regulatory Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Allison; Kavraki, Lydia; Balázsi, Gábor

    2008-03-01

    Despite the increasing number of completely sequenced genomes, much remains to be learned about how living cells process environmental information and respond to changes in their surroundings. Accumulating evidence indicates that eukaryotic and prokaryotic genes can be classified in two distinct categories that we will call class I and class II. Class I genes are housekeeping genes, often characterized by stable, noise resistant expression levels. In contrast, class II genes are stress-related genes and often have noisy, unstable expression levels. In this work we analyze the large scale transcription-regulatory networks (TRN) of E. coli and S. cerevisiae and preliminary data on H. sapien. We find that stable, housekeeping genes (class I) are preferentially utilized as transcriptional inputs while stress related, unstable genes (class II) are utilized as transcriptional integrators. This might be the result of convergent evolution that placed the appropriate genes in the appropriate locations within transcriptional networks according to some fundamental principles that govern cellular information processing.

  1. Feed-forward transcriptional programming by nuclear receptors: regulatory principles and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasse, Sarah K; Gerber, Anthony N

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are widely targeted to treat a range of human diseases. Feed-forward loops are an ancient mechanism through which single cell organisms organize transcriptional programming and modulate gene expression dynamics, but they have not been systematically studied as a regulatory paradigm for NR-mediated transcriptional responses. Here, we provide an overview of the basic properties of feed-forward loops as predicted by mathematical models and validated experimentally in single cell organisms. We review existing evidence implicating feed-forward loops as important in controlling clinically relevant transcriptional responses to estrogens, progestins, and glucocorticoids, among other NR ligands. We propose that feed-forward transcriptional circuits are a major mechanism through which NRs integrate signals, exert temporal control over gene regulation, and compartmentalize client transcriptomes into discrete subunits. Implications for the design and function of novel selective NR ligands are discussed.

  2. Prediction of transcriptional regulatory elements for plant hormone responses based on microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamaguchi-Shinozaki Kazuko

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phytohormones organize plant development and environmental adaptation through cell-to-cell signal transduction, and their action involves transcriptional activation. Recent international efforts to establish and maintain public databases of Arabidopsis microarray data have enabled the utilization of this data in the analysis of various phytohormone responses, providing genome-wide identification of promoters targeted by phytohormones. Results We utilized such microarray data for prediction of cis-regulatory elements with an octamer-based approach. Our test prediction of a drought-responsive RD29A promoter with the aid of microarray data for response to drought, ABA and overexpression of DREB1A, a key regulator of cold and drought response, provided reasonable results that fit with the experimentally identified regulatory elements. With this succession, we expanded the prediction to various phytohormone responses, including those for abscisic acid, auxin, cytokinin, ethylene, brassinosteroid, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid, as well as for hydrogen peroxide, drought and DREB1A overexpression. Totally 622 promoters that are activated by phytohormones were subjected to the prediction. In addition, we have assigned putative functions to 53 octamers of the Regulatory Element Group (REG that have been extracted as position-dependent cis-regulatory elements with the aid of their feature of preferential appearance in the promoter region. Conclusions Our prediction of Arabidopsis cis-regulatory elements for phytohormone responses provides guidance for experimental analysis of promoters to reveal the basis of the transcriptional network of phytohormone responses.

  3. Advances in the integration of transcriptional regulatory information into genome-scale metabolic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivek-Ananth, R P; Samal, Areejit

    2016-09-01

    A major goal of systems biology is to build predictive computational models of cellular metabolism. Availability of complete genome sequences and wealth of legacy biochemical information has led to the reconstruction of genome-scale metabolic networks in the last 15 years for several organisms across the three domains of life. Due to paucity of information on kinetic parameters associated with metabolic reactions, the constraint-based modelling approach, flux balance analysis (FBA), has proved to be a vital alternative to investigate the capabilities of reconstructed metabolic networks. In parallel, advent of high-throughput technologies has led to the generation of massive amounts of omics data on transcriptional regulation comprising mRNA transcript levels and genome-wide binding profile of transcriptional regulators. A frontier area in metabolic systems biology has been the development of methods to integrate the available transcriptional regulatory information into constraint-based models of reconstructed metabolic networks in order to increase the predictive capabilities of computational models and understand the regulation of cellular metabolism. Here, we review the existing methods to integrate transcriptional regulatory information into constraint-based models of metabolic networks.

  4. Integration and diversity of the regulatory network composed of Maf and CNC families of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motohashi, Hozumi; O'Connor, Tania; Katsuoka, Fumiki; Engel, James Douglas; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2002-07-10

    Recent progress in the analysis of transcriptional regulation has revealed the presence of an exquisite functional network comprising the Maf and Cap 'n' collar (CNC) families of regulatory proteins, many of which have been isolated. Among Maf factors, large Maf proteins are important in the regulation of embryonic development and cell differentiation, whereas small Maf proteins serve as obligatory heterodimeric partner molecules for members of the CNC family. Both Maf homodimers and CNC-small Maf heterodimers bind to the Maf recognition element (MARE). Since the MARE contains a consensus TRE sequence recognized by AP-1, Jun and Fos family members may act to compete or interfere with the function of CNC-small Maf heterodimers. Overall then, the quantitative balance of transcription factors interacting with the MARE determines its transcriptional activity. Many putative MARE-dependent target genes such as those induced by antioxidants and oxidative stress are under concerted regulation by the CNC family member Nrf2, as clearly proven by mouse germline mutagenesis. Since these genes represent a vital aspect of the cellular defense mechanism against oxidative stress, Nrf2-null mutant mice are highly sensitive to xenobiotic and oxidative insults. Deciphering the molecular basis of the regulatory network composed of Maf and CNC families of transcription factors will undoubtedly lead to a new paradigm for the cooperative function of transcription factors.

  5. Transcriptional responses of Treponema denticola to other oral bacterial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Juni; McHardy, Ian H; Simanian, Emil J; Shi, Wenyuan; Lux, Renate

    2014-01-01

    an in-depth understanding of the transcriptional responses triggered by contact-dependent interactions between microorganisms inhabiting the periodontal pocket.

  6. Transcriptional responses of Treponema denticola to other oral bacterial species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juni Sarkar

    presented here provide an in-depth understanding of the transcriptional responses triggered by contact-dependent interactions between microorganisms inhabiting the periodontal pocket.

  7. Mapping and Dynamics of Regulatory DNA and Transcription Factor Networks in A. thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra M. Sullivan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of gene regulation in plants is constrained by our limited knowledge of plant cis-regulatory DNA and its dynamics. We mapped DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs in A. thaliana seedlings and used genomic footprinting to delineate ∼700,000 sites of in vivo transcription factor (TF occupancy at nucleotide resolution. We show that variation associated with 72 diverse quantitative phenotypes localizes within DHSs. TF footprints encode an extensive cis-regulatory lexicon subject to recent evolutionary pressures, and widespread TF binding within exons may have shaped codon usage patterns. The architecture of A. thaliana TF regulatory networks is strikingly similar to that of animals in spite of diverged regulatory repertoires. We analyzed regulatory landscape dynamics during heat shock and photomorphogenesis, disclosing thousands of environmentally sensitive elements and enabling mapping of key TF regulatory circuits underlying these fundamental responses. Our results provide an extensive resource for the study of A. thaliana gene regulation and functional biology.

  8. Transitions in a genetic transcriptional regulatory system under Lévy motion

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Yayun; Serdukova, Larissa; Duan, Jinqiao; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Based on a stochastic differential equation model for a single genetic regulatory system, we examine the dynamical effects of noisy fluctuations, arising in the synthesis reaction, on the evolution of the transcription factor activator in terms of its concentration. The fluctuations are modeled by Brownian motion and α-stable Lévy motion. Two deterministic quantities, the mean first exit time (MFET) and the first escape probability (FEP), are used to analyse the transitions from the low to hi...

  9. The dynamic nature and territory of transcriptional machinery in the bacterial chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Jun Jin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Our knowledge of the regulation of genes involved in bacterial growth and stress responses is extensive; however, we have only recently begun to understand how environmental cues influence the dynamic, three-dimensional distribution of RNA polymerase (RNAP in Escherichia coli on the level of single cell, using wide-field fluorescence microscopy and state-of-the-art imaging techniques. Live-cell imaging using either an agarose-embedding procedure or a microfluidic system further underscores the dynamic nature of the distribution of RNAP in response to changes in the environment. A general agreement between live-cell and fixed-cell images has validated the formaldehyde-fixing procedure, which is a technical breakthrough in the study of the cell biology of RNAP. In this review we use a systems biology perspective to summarize the advances in the cell biology of RNAP in E. coli, including the discoveries of the bacterial nucleolus, the spatial compartmentalization of the transcription machinery at the periphery of the nucleoid, and the segregation of the chromosome territories for the two major cellular functions of transcription and replication in fast-growing cells. Our understanding of the coupling of transcription and bacterial chromosome (or nucleoid structure is also summarized. Using E. coli as a simple model system, co-imaging of RNAP with DNA and other factors during growth and stress responses will continue to be a useful tool for studying bacterial growth and adaptation in changing environment.

  10. SAGA: a hybrid search algorithm for Bayesian Network structure learning of transcriptional regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adabor, Emmanuel S; Acquaah-Mensah, George K; Oduro, Francis T

    2015-02-01

    Bayesian Networks have been used for the inference of transcriptional regulatory relationships among genes, and are valuable for obtaining biological insights. However, finding optimal Bayesian Network (BN) is NP-hard. Thus, heuristic approaches have sought to effectively solve this problem. In this work, we develop a hybrid search method combining Simulated Annealing with a Greedy Algorithm (SAGA). SAGA explores most of the search space by undergoing a two-phase search: first with a Simulated Annealing search and then with a Greedy search. Three sets of background-corrected and normalized microarray datasets were used to test the algorithm. BN structure learning was also conducted using the datasets, and other established search methods as implemented in BANJO (Bayesian Network Inference with Java Objects). The Bayesian Dirichlet Equivalence (BDe) metric was used to score the networks produced with SAGA. SAGA predicted transcriptional regulatory relationships among genes in networks that evaluated to higher BDe scores with high sensitivities and specificities. Thus, the proposed method competes well with existing search algorithms for Bayesian Network structure learning of transcriptional regulatory networks.

  11. Coordination of genomic structure and transcription by the main bacterial nucleoid-associated protein HU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Michael; Farcas, Anca; Geertz, Marcel; Zhelyazkova, Petya; Brix, Klaudia; Travers, Andrew; Muskhelishvili, Georgi

    2010-01-01

    The histone-like protein HU is a highly abundant DNA architectural protein that is involved in compacting the DNA of the bacterial nucleoid and in regulating the main DNA transactions, including gene transcription. However, the coordination of the genomic structure and function by HU is poorly understood. Here, we address this question by comparing transcript patterns and spatial distributions of RNA polymerase in Escherichia coli wild-type and hupA/B mutant cells. We demonstrate that, in mutant cells, upregulated genes are preferentially clustered in a large chromosomal domain comprising the ribosomal RNA operons organized on both sides of OriC. Furthermore, we show that, in parallel to this transcription asymmetry, mutant cells are also impaired in forming the transcription foci-spatially confined aggregations of RNA polymerase molecules transcribing strong ribosomal RNA operons. Our data thus implicate HU in coordinating the global genomic structure and function by regulating the spatial distribution of RNA polymerase in the nucleoid.

  12. The DtxR protein acting as dual transcriptional regulator directs a global regulatory network involved in iron metabolism of Corynebacterium glutamicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüser Andrea T

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The knowledge about complete bacterial genome sequences opens the way to reconstruct the qualitative topology and global connectivity of transcriptional regulatory networks. Since iron is essential for a variety of cellular processes but also poses problems in biological systems due to its high toxicity, bacteria have evolved complex transcriptional regulatory networks to achieve an effective iron homeostasis. Here, we apply a combination of transcriptomics, bioinformatics, in vitro assays, and comparative genomics to decipher the regulatory network of the iron-dependent transcriptional regulator DtxR of Corynebacterium glutamicum. Results A deletion of the dtxR gene of C. glutamicum ATCC 13032 led to the mutant strain C. glutamicum IB2103 that was able to grow in minimal medium only under low-iron conditions. By performing genome-wide DNA microarray hybridizations, differentially expressed genes involved in iron metabolism of C. glutamicum were detected in the dtxR mutant. Bioinformatics analysis of the genome sequence identified a common 19-bp motif within the upstream region of 31 genes, whose differential expression in C. glutamicum IB2103 was verified by real-time reverse transcription PCR. Binding of a His-tagged DtxR protein to oligonucleotides containing the 19-bp motifs was demonstrated in vitro by DNA band shift assays. At least 64 genes encoding a variety of physiological functions in iron transport and utilization, in central carbohydrate metabolism and in transcriptional regulation are controlled directly by the DtxR protein. A comparison with the bioinformatically predicted networks of C. efficiens, C. diphtheriae and C. jeikeium identified evolutionary conserved elements of the DtxR network. Conclusion This work adds considerably to our currrent understanding of the transcriptional regulatory network of C. glutamicum genes that are controlled by DtxR. The DtxR protein has a major role in controlling the

  13. Functional organization of an Mbp enhancer exposes striking transcriptional regulatory diversity within myelinating glia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dionne, Nancy; Dib, Samar; Finsen, Bente;

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, large caliber axons are ensheathed by myelin, a glial specialization supporting axon integrity and conferring accelerated and energy-efficient action potential conduction. Myelin basic protein (MBP) is required for normal myelin elaboration with maximal mbp transcription...... regulatory element combinations were found to drive expression in oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells with a minimal 129 bp sequence conferring expression in oligodendrocytes throughout myelin elaboration, maintenance and repair. Unexpectedly, M3 derivatives conferred markedly different spatial and temporal...... expression programs thus illuminating striking transcriptional heterogeneity within post-mitotic oligodendrocytes. Finally, one M3 derivative engaged only during primary myelination, not during adult remyelination, demonstrating that transcriptional regulation in the two states is not equivalent. GLIA 2015....

  14. Genome-wide prediction of transcriptional regulatory elements of human promoters using gene expression and promoter analysis data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Seon-Young

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A complete understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of gene expression is the next important issue of genomics. Many bioinformaticians have developed methods and algorithms for predicting transcriptional regulatory mechanisms from sequence, gene expression, and binding data. However, most of these studies involved the use of yeast which has much simpler regulatory networks than human and has many genome wide binding data and gene expression data under diverse conditions. Studies of genome wide transcriptional networks of human genomes currently lag behind those of yeast. Results We report herein a new method that combines gene expression data analysis with promoter analysis to infer transcriptional regulatory elements of human genes. The Z scores from the application of gene set analysis with gene sets of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs were successfully used to represent the activity of TFBSs in a given microarray data set. A significant correlation between the Z scores of gene sets of TFBSs and individual genes across multiple conditions permitted successful identification of many known human transcriptional regulatory elements of genes as well as the prediction of numerous putative TFBSs of many genes which will constitute a good starting point for further experiments. Using Z scores of gene sets of TFBSs produced better predictions than the use of mRNA levels of a transcription factor itself, suggesting that the Z scores of gene sets of TFBSs better represent diverse mechanisms for changing the activity of transcription factors in the cell. In addition, cis-regulatory modules, combinations of co-acting TFBSs, were readily identified by our analysis. Conclusion By a strategic combination of gene set level analysis of gene expression data sets and promoter analysis, we were able to identify and predict many transcriptional regulatory elements of human genes. We conclude that this approach will aid in decoding

  15. Transcriptional activity around bacterial cell death reveals molecular biomarkers for cell viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuren Frank H

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In bacteriology, the ability to grow in selective media and to form colonies on nutrient agar plates is routinely used as a retrospective criterion for the detection of living bacteria. However, the utilization of indicators for bacterial viability-such as the presence of specific transcripts or membrane integrity-would overcome bias introduced by cultivation and reduces the time span of analysis from initiation to read out. Therefore, we investigated the correlation between transcriptional activity, membrane integrity and cultivation-based viability in the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Results We present microbiological, cytological and molecular analyses of the physiological response to lethal heat stress under accurately defined conditions through systematic sampling of bacteria from a single culture exposed to gradually increasing temperatures. We identified a coherent transcriptional program including known heat shock responses as well as the rapid expression of a small number of sporulation and competence genes, the latter only known to be active in the stationary growth phase. Conclusion The observed coordinated gene expression continued even after cell death, in other words after all bacteria permanently lost their ability to reproduce. Transcription of a very limited number of genes correlated with cell viability under the applied killing regime. The transcripts of the expressed genes in living bacteria – but silent in dead bacteria-include those of essential genes encoding chaperones of the protein folding machinery and can serve as molecular biomarkers for bacterial cell viability.

  16. Comparative analysis of the transcription-factor gene regulatory networks of E. coli and S. cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santillán Moisés

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The regulatory interactions between transcription factors (TF and regulated genes (RG in a species genome can be lumped together in a single directed graph. The TF's and RG's conform the nodes of this graph, while links are drawn whenever a transcription factor regulates a gene's expression. Projections onto TF nodes can be constructed by linking every two nodes regulating a common gene. Similarly, projections onto RG nodes can be made by linking every two regulated genes sharing at least one common regulator. Recent studies of the connectivity pattern in the transcription-factor regulatory network of many organisms have revealed some interesting properties. However, the differences between TF and RG nodes have not been widely explored. Results After analysing the RG and TF projections of the transcription-factor gene regulatory networks of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found several common characteristic as well as some noticeable differences. To better understand these differences, we compared the properties of the E. coli and S. cerevisiae RG- and TF-projected networks with those of the corresponding projections built from randomized versions of the original bipartite networks. These last results indicate that the observed differences are mostly due to the very different ratios of TF to RG counts of the E. coli and S. cerevisiae bipartite networks, rather than to their having different connectivity patterns. Conclusion Since E. coli is a prokaryotic organism while S. cerevisiae is eukaryotic, there are important differences between them concerning processing of mRNA before translation, DNA packing, amount of junk DNA, and gene regulation. From the results in this paper we conclude that the most important effect such differences have had on the development of the corresponding transcription-factor gene regulatory networks is their very different ratios of TF to RG numbers. This ratio is more than three

  17. Mutations in the CRE pocket of bacterial RNA polymerase affect multiple steps of transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petushkov, Ivan; Pupov, Danil; Bass, Irina; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey

    2015-07-13

    During transcription, the catalytic core of RNA polymerase (RNAP) must interact with the DNA template with low-sequence specificity to ensure efficient enzyme translocation and RNA extension. Unexpectedly, recent structural studies of bacterial promoter complexes revealed specific interactions between the nontemplate DNA strand at the downstream edge of the transcription bubble (CRE, core recognition element) and a protein pocket formed by core RNAP (CRE pocket). We investigated the roles of these interactions in transcription by analyzing point amino acid substitutions and deletions in Escherichia coli RNAP. The mutations affected multiple steps of transcription, including promoter recognition, RNA elongation and termination. In particular, we showed that interactions of the CRE pocket with a nontemplate guanine immediately downstream of the active center stimulate RNA-hairpin-dependent transcription pausing but not other types of pausing. Thus, conformational changes of the elongation complex induced by nascent RNA can modulate CRE effects on transcription. The results highlight the roles of specific core RNAP-DNA interactions at different steps of RNA synthesis and suggest their importance for transcription regulation in various organisms.

  18. Comparative analysis of module-based versus direct methods for reverse-engineering transcriptional regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi Anagha

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A myriad of methods to reverse-engineer transcriptional regulatory networks have been developed in recent years. Direct methods directly reconstruct a network of pairwise regulatory interactions while module-based methods predict a set of regulators for modules of coexpressed genes treated as a single unit. To date, there has been no systematic comparison of the relative strengths and weaknesses of both types of methods. Results We have compared a recently developed module-based algorithm, LeMoNe (Learning Module Networks, to a mutual information based direct algorithm, CLR (Context Likelihood of Relatedness, using benchmark expression data and databases of known transcriptional regulatory interactions for Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A global comparison using recall versus precision curves hides the topologically distinct nature of the inferred networks and is not informative about the specific subtasks for which each method is most suited. Analysis of the degree distributions and a regulator specific comparison show that CLR is 'regulator-centric', making true predictions for a higher number of regulators, while LeMoNe is 'target-centric', recovering a higher number of known targets for fewer regulators, with limited overlap in the predicted interactions between both methods. Detailed biological examples in E. coli and S. cerevisiae are used to illustrate these differences and to prove that each method is able to infer parts of the network where the other fails. Biological validation of the inferred networks cautions against over-interpreting recall and precision values computed using incomplete reference networks. Conclusion Our results indicate that module-based and direct methods retrieve largely distinct parts of the underlying transcriptional regulatory networks. The choice of algorithm should therefore be based on the particular biological problem of interest and not on global metrics which cannot be

  19. Aromatic inhibitors derived from ammonia-pretreated lignocellulose hinder bacterial ethanologenesis by activating regulatory circuits controlling inhibitor efflux and detoxification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H. Keating

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Efficient microbial conversion of lignocellulosic hydrolysates to biofuels is a key barrier to the economically viable deployment of lignocellulosic biofuels. A chief contributor to this barrier is the impact on microbial processes and energy metabolism of lignocellulose-derived inhibitors, including phenolic carboxylates, phenolic amides (for ammonia-pretreated biomass, phenolic aldehydes, and furfurals. To understand the bacterial pathways induced by inhibitors present in ammonia-pretreated biomass hydrolysates, which are less well studied than acid-pretreated biomass hydrolysates, we developed and exploited synthetic mimics of ammonia-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH. To determine regulatory responses to the inhibitors normally present in ACSH, we measured transcript and protein levels in an Escherichia coli ethanologen using RNA-seq and quantitative proteomics during fermentation to ethanol of synthetic hydrolysates containing or lacking the inhibitors. Our study identified four major regulators mediating these responses, the MarA/SoxS/Rob network, AaeR, FrmR, and YqhC. Induction of these regulons was correlated with a reduced rate of ethanol production, buildup of pyruvate, depletion of ATP and NAD(PH, and an inhibition of xylose conversion. The aromatic aldehyde inhibitor 5-hydroxymethylfurfural appeared to be reduced to its alcohol form by the ethanologen during fermentation whereas phenolic acid and amide inhibitors were not metabolized. Together, our findings establish that the major regulatory responses to lignocellulose-derived inhibitors are mediated by transcriptional rather than translational regulators, suggest that energy consumed for inhibitor efflux and detoxification may limit biofuel production, and identify a network of regulators for future synthetic biology efforts.

  20. Inferring regulatory element landscapes and transcription factor networks from cancer methylomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lijing; Shen, Hui; Laird, Peter W; Farnham, Peggy J; Berman, Benjamin P

    2015-05-21

    Recent studies indicate that DNA methylation can be used to identify transcriptional enhancers, but no systematic approach has been developed for genome-wide identification and analysis of enhancers based on DNA methylation. We describe ELMER (Enhancer Linking by Methylation/Expression Relationships), an R-based tool that uses DNA methylation to identify enhancers and correlates enhancer state with expression of nearby genes to identify transcriptional targets. Transcription factor motif analysis of enhancers is coupled with expression analysis of transcription factors to infer upstream regulators. Using ELMER, we investigated more than 2,000 tumor samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas. We identified networks regulated by known cancer drivers such as GATA3 and FOXA1 (breast cancer), SOX17 and FOXA2 (endometrial cancer), and NFE2L2, SOX2, and TP63 (squamous cell lung cancer). We also identified novel networks with prognostic associations, including RUNX1 in kidney cancer. We propose ELMER as a powerful new paradigm for understanding the cis-regulatory interface between cancer-associated transcription factors and their functional target genes.

  1. Time delay induced transition of gene switch and stochastic resonance in a genetic transcriptional regulatory model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Noise, nonlinear interactions, positive and negative feedbacks within signaling pathways, time delays, protein oligomerization, and crosstalk between different pathways are main characters in the regulatory of gene expression. However, only a single noise source or only delay time in the deterministic model is considered in the gene transcriptional regulatory system in previous researches. The combined effects of correlated noise and time delays on the gene regulatory model still remain not to be fully understood. Results The roles of time delay on gene switch and stochastic resonance are systematically explored based on a famous gene transcriptional regulatory model subject to correlated noise. Two cases, including linear time delay appearing in the degradation process (case I) and nonlinear time delay appearing in the synthesis process (case II) are considered, respectively. For case I: Our theoretical results show that time delay can induce gene switch, i.e., the TF-A monomer concentration shifts from the high concentration state to the low concentration state ("on"→"off"). With increasing the time delay, the transition from "on" to "off" state can be further accelerated. Moreover, it is found that the stochastic resonance can be enhanced by both the time delay and correlated noise intensity. However, the additive noise original from the synthesis rate restrains the stochastic resonance. It is also very interesting that a resonance bi-peaks structure appears under large additive noise intensity. The theoretical results by using small-delay time-approximation approach are consistent well with our numerical simulation. For case II: Our numerical simulation results show that time delay can also induce the gene switch, however different with case I, the TF-A monomer concentration shifts from the low concentration state to the high concentration state ("off"→"on"). With increasing time delay, the transition from "on" to "off" state can be further

  2. Redox proteins of hydroxylating bacterial dioxygenases establish a regulatory cascade that prevents gratuitous induction of tetralin biodegradation genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma-García, Laura; Sánchez-Azqueta, Ana; Medina, Milagros; Reyes-Ramírez, Francisca; Santero, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial dioxygenase systems are multicomponent enzymes that catalyze the initial degradation of many environmentally hazardous compounds. In Sphingopyxis granuli strain TFA tetralin dioxygenase hydroxylates tetralin, an organic contaminant. It consists of a ferredoxin reductase (ThnA4), a ferredoxin (ThnA3) and a oxygenase (ThnA1/ThnA2), forming a NAD(P)H–ThnA4–ThnA3–ThnA1/ThnA2 electron transport chain. ThnA3 has also a regulatory function since it prevents expression of tetralin degradation genes (thn) in the presence of non-metabolizable substrates of the catabolic pathway. This role is of physiological relevance since avoids gratuitous and wasteful production of catabolic enzymes. Our hypothesis for thn regulation implies that ThnA3 exerts its action by diverting electrons towards the regulator ThnY, an iron-sulfur flavoprotein that together with the transcriptional activator ThnR is necessary for thn gene expression. Here we analyze electron transfer among ThnA4, ThnA3 and ThnY by using stopped-flow spectrophotometry and determination of midpoint reduction potentials. Our results indicate that when accumulated in its reduced form ThnA3 is able to fully reduce ThnY. In addition, we have reproduced in vitro the regulatory circuit in the proposed physiological direction, NAD(P)H–ThnA4–ThnA3–ThnY. ThnA3 represents an unprecedented way of communication between a catabolic pathway and its regulatory system to prevent gratuitous induction. PMID:27030382

  3. Localizing potentially active post-transcriptional regulations in the Ewing's sarcoma gene regulatory network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delyon Bernard

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A wide range of techniques is now available for analyzing regulatory networks. Nonetheless, most of these techniques fail to interpret large-scale transcriptional data at the post-translational level. Results We address the question of using large-scale transcriptomic observation of a system perturbation to analyze a regulatory network which contained several types of interactions - transcriptional and post-translational. Our method consisted of post-processing the outputs of an open-source tool named BioQuali - an automatic constraint-based analysis mimicking biologist's local reasoning on a large scale. The post-processing relied on differences in the behavior of the transcriptional and post-translational levels in the network. As a case study, we analyzed a network representation of the genes and proteins controlled by an oncogene in the context of Ewing's sarcoma. The analysis allowed us to pinpoint active interactions specific to this cancer. We also identified the parts of the network which were incomplete and should be submitted for further investigation. Conclusions The proposed approach is effective for the qualitative analysis of cancer networks. It allows the integrative use of experimental data of various types in order to identify the specific information that should be considered a priority in the initial - and possibly very large - experimental dataset. Iteratively, new dataset can be introduced into the analysis to improve the network representation and make it more specific.

  4. Conservation-based prediction of the transcription regulatory region of the SCN1A gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-Sheng Long; Yi-Wu Shi; Wei-Ping Liao

    2009-01-01

    A challenge in identifying the transcription regulatory region is that the locations of eukaryotic transcriptional elements are often diverse among different genes.SCN1A,a disease-related sodium channel gene,has a complex 5'-untranslated region and diverse mRNA transcripts,which might be driven by different promoters.By cross-species sequence comparison and bioinformatics analysis,human 5'-untranslated exons were found to be conserved within the region of 200 kb upstream of the 5' flanking regions of SCN1A in higher mammals,but not in lower mammals and non-mammals.The core promoter elements (INR,DPE,and TATA) were found in the regions flanking different 5'-untranslated exons,suggesting that these sequences (from-45 to+35) might be targeted as core promoters.The nucleotide identity rate of these core promoter sequences are different,and the conservation level of the upstream region of each core promoter varies distinctly,implicating different regulatory mechanisms of the four promoters which exist in the nervous system.

  5. The use of Molecular Beacons to Directly Measure Bacterial mRNA Abundances and Transcript Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuechenmeister, Lisa J.; Anderson, Kelsi L.; Morrison, John M.; Dunman, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of mRNA turnover is a dynamic means by which bacteria regulate gene expression. Although current methodologies allow characterization of the stability of individual transcripts, procedures designed to measure alterations in transcript abundance/turnover on a high throughput scale are lacking. In the current report, we describe the development of a rapid and simplified molecular beacon-based procedure to directly measure the mRNA abundances and mRNA degradation properties of well-characterized Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity factors. This method does not require any PCR-based amplification, can monitor the abundances of multiple transcripts within a single RNA sample, and was successfully implemented into a high throughput screen of transposon mutant library members to detect isolates with altered mRNA turnover properties. It is expected that the described methodology will provide great utility in characterizing components of bacterial RNA degradation processes and can be used to directly measure the mRNA levels of virtually any bacterial transcript. PMID:18992285

  6. Differential roles of epigenetic changes and Foxp3 expression in regulatory T cell-specific transcriptional regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morikawa, Hiromasa; Ohkura, Naganari; Vandenbon, Alexis; Itoh, Masayoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Forrest, Alistair R R; Standley, Daron M; Date, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Clevers, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring regulatory T (Treg) cells, which specifically express the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), are engaged in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and homeostasis. By transcriptional start site cluster analysis, we assessed here how genome-wide patterns of DNA

  7. CARRIE web service: automated transcriptional regulatory network inference and interactive analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverty, Peter M; Frith, Martin C; Weng, Zhiping

    2004-07-01

    We present an intuitive and interactive web service for CARRIE (Computational Ascertainment of Regulatory Relationships Inferred from Expression). CARRIE is a computational method that analyzes microarray and promoter sequence data to infer a transcriptional regulatory network from the response to a specific stimulus. This service displays an interactive graph of the inferred network and provides easy access to the evidence for the involvement of each gene in the network. We provide functionality to include network data in KEGG XML (KGML) format in this graph. Our service also provides Gene Ontology annotation to aid the user in forming hypotheses about the role of each gene in the cellular response. The CARRIE web service is freely available at http://zlab.bu.edu/CARRIE-web.

  8. Evolution of Transcriptional Regulatory Networks in Pseudomonas aeruginosa During Long Time Growth in Human Hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Eva Kammer

    ) as a natural model system, the work has focused on characterising a number of mutations in global regulators that are known to provide an adaptive advantage in this specific environment. The aim has been to provide a molecular explanation of the effects of the specific mutations in relation to regulatory...... network remodelling, and to provide insight into the extent of epistasis and evolutionary dynamics of these systems. The two studies presented in this thesis specifically deal with single amino acid substitutions or deletions in the sigma factors RpoD, AlgT, and RpoN. Through in vitro techniques, we...... characterised the direct molecular effects of the sigma factors’ abilities to interact with DNA and the core RNA polymerase (RNAP). By combining this approach with in vivo transcription profile data, Chromatin Immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) data and artificial regulatory network modifications...

  9. Fanconi anemia core complex gene promoters harbor conserved transcription regulatory elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Meier

    Full Text Available The Fanconi anemia (FA gene family is a recent addition to the complex network of proteins that respond to and repair certain types of DNA damage in the human genome. Since little is known about the regulation of this novel group of genes at the DNA level, we characterized the promoters of the eight genes (FANCA, B, C, E, F, G, L and M that compose the FA core complex. The promoters of these genes show the characteristic attributes of housekeeping genes, such as a high GC content and CpG islands, a lack of TATA boxes and a low conservation. The promoters functioned in a monodirectional way and were, in their most active regions, comparable in strength to the SV40 promoter in our reporter plasmids. They were also marked by a distinctive transcriptional start site (TSS. In the 5' region of each promoter, we identified a region that was able to negatively regulate the promoter activity in HeLa and HEK 293 cells in isolation. The central and 3' regions of the promoter sequences harbor binding sites for several common and rare transcription factors, including STAT, SMAD, E2F, AP1 and YY1, which indicates that there may be cross-connections to several established regulatory pathways. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and siRNA experiments confirmed the shared regulatory responses between the prominent members of the TGF-β and JAK/STAT pathways and members of the FA core complex. Although the promoters are not well conserved, they share region and sequence specific regulatory motifs and transcription factor binding sites (TBFs, and we identified a bi-partite nature to these promoters. These results support a hypothesis based on the co-evolution of the FA core complex genes that was expanded to include their promoters.

  10. Metabolic Network Topology Reveals Transcriptional Regulatory Signatures of Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zelezniak, Aleksej; Pers, Tune Hannes; Pinho Soares, Simao Pedro;

    2010-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a disorder characterized by both insulin resistance and impaired insulin secretion. Recent transcriptomics studies related to T2DM have revealed changes in expression of a large number of metabolic genes in a variety of tissues. Identification of the molecular...... with human metabolic network reconstructions to identify key metabolic regulatory features of T2DM. These features include reporter metabolites—metabolites with significant collective transcriptional response in the associated enzyme-coding genes, and transcription factors with significant enrichment...... of binding sites in the promoter regions of these genes. In addition to metabolites from TCA cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, and lipid metabolism (known to be associated with T2DM), we identified several reporter metabolites representing novel biomarker candidates. For example, the highly connected...

  11. A regulatory framework for shoot stem cell control integrating metabolic, transcriptional, and phytohormone signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Christoph; Gaillochet, Christophe; Medzihradszky, Anna; Busch, Wolfgang; Daum, Gabor; Krebs, Melanie; Kehle, Andreas; Lohmann, Jan U

    2014-02-24

    Plants continuously maintain pluripotent stem cells embedded in specialized tissues called meristems, which drive long-term growth and organogenesis. Stem cell fate in the shoot apical meristem (SAM) is controlled by the homeodomain transcription factor WUSCHEL (WUS) expressed in the niche adjacent to the stem cells. Here, we demonstrate that the bHLH transcription factor HECATE1 (HEC1) is a target of WUS and that it contributes to SAM function by promoting stem cell proliferation, while antagonizing niche cell activity. HEC1 represses the stem cell regulators WUS and CLAVATA3 (CLV3) and, like WUS, controls genes with functions in metabolism and hormone signaling. Among the targets shared by HEC1 and WUS are phytohormone response regulators, which we show to act as mobile signals in a universal feedback system. Thus, our work sheds light on the mechanisms guiding meristem function and suggests that the underlying regulatory system is far more complex than previously anticipated.

  12. Nsite, NsiteH and NsiteM Computer Tools for Studying Tran-scription Regulatory Elements

    KAUST Repository

    Shahmuradov, Ilham A.

    2015-07-02

    Summary: Gene transcription is mostly conducted through interactions of various transcription factors and their binding sites on DNA (regulatory elements, REs). Today, we are still far from understanding the real regulatory content of promoter regions. Computer methods for identification of REs remain a widely used tool for studying and understanding transcriptional regulation mechanisms. The Nsite, NsiteH and NsiteM programs perform searches for statistically significant (non-random) motifs of known human, animal and plant one-box and composite REs in a single genomic sequence, in a pair of aligned homologous sequences and in a set of functionally related sequences, respectively.

  13. The cis-regulatory logic of the mammalian photoreceptor transcriptional network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy H-C Hsiau

    Full Text Available The photoreceptor cells of the retina are subject to a greater number of genetic diseases than any other cell type in the human body. The majority of more than 120 cloned human blindness genes are highly expressed in photoreceptors. In order to establish an integrative framework in which to understand these diseases, we have undertaken an experimental and computational analysis of the network controlled by the mammalian photoreceptor transcription factors, Crx, Nrl, and Nr2e3. Using microarray and in situ hybridization datasets we have produced a model of this network which contains over 600 genes, including numerous retinal disease loci as well as previously uncharacterized photoreceptor transcription factors. To elucidate the connectivity of this network, we devised a computational algorithm to identify the photoreceptor-specific cis-regulatory elements (CREs mediating the interactions between these transcription factors and their target genes. In vivo validation of our computational predictions resulted in the discovery of 19 novel photoreceptor-specific CREs near retinal disease genes. Examination of these CREs permitted the definition of a simple cis-regulatory grammar rule associated with high-level expression. To test the generality of this rule, we used an expanded form of it as a selection filter to evolve photoreceptor CREs from random DNA sequences in silico. When fused to fluorescent reporters, these evolved CREs drove strong, photoreceptor-specific expression in vivo. This study represents the first systematic identification and in vivo validation of CREs in a mammalian neuronal cell type and lays the groundwork for a systems biology of photoreceptor transcriptional regulation.

  14. Redefining the transcriptional regulatory dynamics of classically and alternatively activated macrophages by deepCAGE transcriptomics

    KAUST Repository

    Roy, S.

    2015-06-27

    Classically or alternatively activated macrophages (M1 and M2, respectively) play distinct and important roles for microbiocidal activity, regulation of inflammation and tissue homeostasis. Despite this, their transcriptional regulatory dynamics are poorly understood. Using promoter-level expression profiling by non-biased deepCAGE we have studied the transcriptional dynamics of classically and alternatively activated macrophages. Transcription factor (TF) binding motif activity analysis revealed four motifs, NFKB1_REL_RELA, IRF1,2, IRF7 and TBP that are commonly activated but have distinct activity dynamics in M1 and M2 activation. We observe matching changes in the expression profiles of the corresponding TFs and show that only a restricted set of TFs change expression. There is an overall drastic and transient up-regulation in M1 and a weaker and more sustainable up-regulation in M2. Novel TFs, such as Thap6, Maff, (M1) and Hivep1, Nfil3, Prdm1, (M2) among others, were suggested to be involved in the activation processes. Additionally, 52 (M1) and 67 (M2) novel differentially expressed genes and, for the first time, several differentially expressed long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) transcriptome markers were identified. In conclusion, the finding of novel motifs, TFs and protein-coding and lncRNA genes is an important step forward to fully understand the transcriptional machinery of macrophage activation.

  15. Characterizing the interplay between multiple levels of organization within bacterial sigma factor regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yu; Nagarajan, Harish; Embree, Mallory; Shieu, Wendy; Abate, Elisa; Juárez, Katy; Cho, Byung-Kwan; Elkins, James G; Nevin, Kelly P; Barrett, Christian L; Lovley, Derek R; Palsson, Bernhard O; Zengler, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria contain multiple sigma factors, each targeting diverse, but often overlapping sets of promoters, thereby forming a complex network. The layout and deployment of such a sigma factor network directly impacts global transcriptional regulation and ultimately dictates the phenotype. Here we integrate multi-omic data sets to determine the topology, the operational, and functional states of the sigma factor network in Geobacter sulfurreducens, revealing a unique network topology of interacting sigma factors. Analysis of the operational state of the sigma factor network shows a highly modular structure with σ(N) being the major regulator of energy metabolism. Surprisingly, the functional state of the network during the two most divergent growth conditions is nearly static, with sigma factor binding profiles almost invariant to environmental stimuli. This first comprehensive elucidation of the interplay between different levels of the sigma factor network organization is fundamental to characterize transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in bacteria.

  16. Characterizing the interplay betwen mulitple levels of organization within bacterial sigma factor regulatory networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Qiu [University of California, San Diego; Nagarajan, Harish [University of California, San Diego; Embree, Mallory [University of California, San Diego; Shieu, Wendy [University of California, San Diego; Abate, Elisa [University of California, San Diego; Juarez, Katy [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM); Cho, Byung-Kwan [University of California, San Diego; Elkins, James G [ORNL; Nevin, Kelly P. [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Barrett, Christian [University of California, San Diego; Lovley, Derek [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Palsson, Bernhard O. [University of California, San Diego; Zengler, Karsten [University of California, San Diego

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria contain multiple sigma factors, each targeting diverse, but often overlapping sets of promoters, thereby forming a complex network. The layout and deployment of such a sigma factor network directly impacts global transcriptional regulation and ultimately dictates the phenotype. Here we integrate multi-omic data sets to determine the topology, the operational, and functional states of the sigma factor network in Geobacter sulfurreducens, revealing a unique network topology of interacting sigma factors. Analysis of the operational state of the sigma factor network shows a highly modular structure with sN being the major regulator of energy metabolism. Surprisingly, the functional state of the network during the two most divergent growth conditions is nearly static, with sigma factor binding profiles almost invariant to environmental stimuli. This first comprehensive elucidation of the interplay between different levels of the sigma factor network organization is fundamental to characterize transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in bacteria.

  17. Regulation of the CDP-choline pathway by sterol regulatory element binding proteins involves transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, Neale D; Lagace, Thomas A

    2003-06-15

    The synthesis of phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) by the CDP-choline pathway is under the control of the rate-limiting enzyme CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CCT). Sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) have been proposed to regulate CCT at the transcriptional level, or via the synthesis of lipid activators or substrates of the CDP-choline pathway. To assess the contributions of these two mechanisms, we examined CCTalpha expression and PtdCho synthesis by the CDP-choline pathway in cholesterol and fatty acid auxotrophic CHO M19 cells inducibly expressing constitutively active nuclear forms of SREBP1a or SREBP2. Induction of either SREBP resulted in increased expression of mRNAs for sterol-regulated genes, elevated fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis (>10-50-fold) and increased PtdCho synthesis (2-fold). CCTalpha mRNA was increased 2-fold by enforced expression of SREBP1a or SREBP2. The resultant increase in CCTalpha protein and activity (2-fold) was restricted primarily to the soluble fraction of cells, and increased CCTalpha activity in vivo was not detected. Inhibition of the synthesis of fatty acids or their CoA esters by cerulenin or triacsin C respectively following SREBP induction effectively blocked the accompanying elevation in PtdCho synthesis. Thus PtdCho synthesis was driven by increased synthesis of fatty acids or a product thereof. These data show that transcriptional activation of CCTalpha is modest relative to that of other SREBP-regulated genes, and that stimulation of PtdCho synthesis by SREBPs in CHO cells is due primarily to increased fatty acid synthesis.

  18. Transcriptional network structure has little effect on the rate of regulatory evolution in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Artyom; McIntyre, Lauren M

    2012-08-01

    Studies in evolutionary developmental biology suggest that the structure of genetic pathways may bias the fixation of natural variation toward particular nodes in these pathways. In an attempt to test this trend genome wide, we integrated several previously published data sets to examine whether the position of genes in the whole-genome transcriptional network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is associated with the amount of cis-regulatory expression divergence between S. cerevisiae and its sibling species Saccharomyces paradoxus. We find little evidence for an association between connectivity and divergence in the global network that combines data from multiple conditions. However, relationships between connectivity and divergence are apparent in some of the smaller subnetworks. Despite a slight tendency for genes with more transcriptional interactions to show greater divergence, these differences explain no more than a small fraction of variation in evolutionary rates. These results suggest that the systems biology focus on large interactomes may miss some critical details of local interactions. More detailed experimental analysis will be needed to define the genetic pathways that control specific phenotypic traits and quantify the rate of regulatory changes at different points in these pathways.

  19. Medusa structure of the gene regulatory network: dominance of transcription factors in cancer subtype classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuchun; Feng, Ying; Trivedi, Niraj S; Huang, Sui

    2011-05-01

    Gene expression profiles consisting of ten thousands of transcripts are used for clustering of tissue, such as tumors, into subtypes, often without considering the underlying reason that the distinct patterns of expression arise because of constraints in the realization of gene expression profiles imposed by the gene regulatory network. The topology of this network has been suggested to consist of a regulatory core of genes represented most prominently by transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs, that influence the expression of other genes, and of a periphery of 'enslaved' effector genes that are regulated but not regulating. This 'medusa' architecture implies that the core genes are much stronger determinants of the realized gene expression profiles. To test this hypothesis, we examined the clustering of gene expression profiles into known tumor types to quantitatively demonstrate that TFs, and even more pronounced, microRNAs, are much stronger discriminators of tumor type specific gene expression patterns than a same number of randomly selected or metabolic genes. These findings lend support to the hypothesis of a medusa architecture and of the canalizing nature of regulation by microRNAs. They also reveal the degree of freedom for the expression of peripheral genes that are less stringently associated with a tissue type specific global gene expression profile.

  20. Distinct regulatory mechanisms of the human ferritin gene by hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo-Wen; Miyazawa, Masaki; Tsuji, Yoshiaki

    2014-12-01

    Cobalt chloride has been used as a hypoxia mimetic because it stabilizes hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1-α) and activates gene transcription through a hypoxia responsive element (HRE). However, differences between hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride in gene regulation remain elusive. Expression of ferritin, the major iron storage protein, is regulated at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels through DNA and RNA regulatory elements. Here we demonstrate that hypoxia and cobalt chloride regulate ferritin heavy chain (ferritin H) expression by two distinct mechanisms. Both hypoxia and cobalt chloride increased HIF1-α but a putative HRE in the human ferritin H gene was not activated. Instead, cobalt chloride but not hypoxia activated ferritin H transcription through an antioxidant responsive element (ARE), to which Nrf2 was recruited. Intriguingly, cobalt chloride downregulated ferritin H protein expression while it upregulated other ARE-regulated antioxidant genes in K562 cells. Further characterization demonstrated that cobalt chloride increased interaction between iron regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2) and iron responsive element (IRE) in the 5'UTR of ferritin H mRNA, resulting in translational block of the accumulated ferritin H mRNA. In contrast, hypoxia had marginal effect on ferritin H transcription but increased its translation through decreased IRP1-IRE interaction. These results suggest that hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride employ distinct regulatory mechanisms through the interplay between DNA and mRNA elements at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels.

  1. Transcriptional and antagonistic responses of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 to phylogenetically different bacterial competitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbeva, Paolina; Silby, Mark W; Raaijmakers, Jos M; Levy, Stuart B; Boer, Wietse de

    2011-06-01

    The ability of soil bacteria to successfully compete with a range of other microbial species is crucial for their growth and survival in the nutrient-limited soil environment. In the present work, we studied the behavior and transcriptional responses of soil-inhabiting Pseudomonas fluorescens strain Pf0-1 on nutrient-poor agar to confrontation with strains of three phylogenetically different bacterial genera, that is, Bacillus, Brevundimonas and Pedobacter. Competition for nutrients was apparent as all three bacterial genera had a negative effect on the density of P. fluorescens Pf0-1; this effect was most strong during the interaction with Bacillus. Microarray-based analyses indicated strong differences in the transcriptional responses of Pf0-1 to the different competitors. There was higher similarity in the gene expression response of P. fluorescens Pf0-1 to the Gram-negative bacteria as compared with the Gram-positive strain. The Gram-negative strains did also trigger the production of an unknown broad-spectrum antibiotic in Pf0-1. More detailed analysis indicated that expression of specific Pf0-1 genes involved in signal transduction and secondary metabolite production was strongly affected by the competitors' identity, suggesting that Pf0-1 can distinguish among different competitors and fine-tune its competitive strategies. The results presented here demonstrate that P. fluorescens Pf0-1 shows a species-specific transcriptional and metabolic response to bacterial competitors and provide new leads in the identification of specific cues in bacteria-bacteria interactions and of novel competitive strategies, antimicrobial traits and genes.

  2. Using Xenopus Embryos to Study Transcriptional and Posttranscriptional Gene Regulatory Mechanisms of Intermediate Filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Szaro, Ben G

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filament genes exhibit highly regulated, tissue-specific patterns of expression during development and in response to injury. Identifying the responsible cis-regulatory gene elements thus holds great promise for revealing insights into fundamental gene regulatory mechanisms controlling tissue differentiation and repair. Because much of this regulation occurs in response to signals from surrounding cells, characterizing them requires a model system in which their activity can be tested within the context of an intact organism conveniently. We describe methods for doing so by injecting plasmid DNAs into fertilized Xenopus embryos. A prokaryotic element for site-specific recombination and two dual HS4 insulator elements flanking the reporter gene promote penetrant, promoter-typic expression that persists through early swimming tadpole stages, permitting the observation of fluorescent reporter protein expression in live embryos. In addition to describing cloning strategies for generating these plasmids, we present methods for coinjecting test and reference plasmids to identify the best embryos for analysis, for analyzing reporter protein and RNA expression, and for characterizing the trafficking of expressed reporter RNAs from the nucleus to polysomes. Thus, this system can be used to study the activities of cis-regulatory elements of intermediate filament genes at multiple levels of transcriptional and posttranscriptional control within an intact vertebrate embryo, from early stages of embryogenesis through later stages of organogenesis and tissue differentiation.

  3. Identification of High-Impact cis-Regulatory Mutations Using Transcription Factor Specific Random Forest Models.

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    Dmitry Svetlichnyy

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer genomes contain vast amounts of somatic mutations, many of which are passenger mutations not involved in oncogenesis. Whereas driver mutations in protein-coding genes can be distinguished from passenger mutations based on their recurrence, non-coding mutations are usually not recurrent at the same position. Therefore, it is still unclear how to identify cis-regulatory driver mutations, particularly when chromatin data from the same patient is not available, thus relying only on sequence and expression information. Here we use machine-learning methods to predict functional regulatory regions using sequence information alone, and compare the predicted activity of the mutated region with the reference sequence. This way we define the Predicted Regulatory Impact of a Mutation in an Enhancer (PRIME. We find that the recently identified driver mutation in the TAL1 enhancer has a high PRIME score, representing a "gain-of-target" for MYB, whereas the highly recurrent TERT promoter mutation has a surprisingly low PRIME score. We trained Random Forest models for 45 cancer-related transcription factors, and used these to score variations in the HeLa genome and somatic mutations across more than five hundred cancer genomes. Each model predicts only a small fraction of non-coding mutations with a potential impact on the function of the encompassing regulatory region. Nevertheless, as these few candidate driver mutations are often linked to gains in chromatin activity and gene expression, they may contribute to the oncogenic program by altering the expression levels of specific oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes.

  4. Identification of direct regulatory targets of the transcription factor Sox10 based on function and conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sanghyuk

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sox10, a member of the Sry-related HMG-Box gene family, is a critical transcription factor for several important cell lineages, most notably the neural crest stem cells and the derivative peripheral glial cells and melanocytes. Thus far, only a handful of direct target genes are known for this transcription factor limiting our understanding of the biological network it governs. Results We describe identification of multiple direct regulatory target genes of Sox10 through a procedure based on function and conservation. By combining RNA interference technique and DNA microarray technology, we have identified a set of genes that show significant down-regulation upon introduction of Sox10 specific siRNA into Schwannoma cells. Subsequent comparative genomics analyses led to potential binding sites for Sox10 protein conserved across several mammalian species within the genomic region proximal to these genes. Multiple sites belonging to 4 different genes (proteolipid protein, Sox10, extracellular superoxide dismutase, and pleiotrophin were shown to directly interact with Sox10 by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. We further confirmed the direct regulation through the identified cis-element for one of the genes, extracellular superoxide dismutase, using electrophoretic mobility shift assay and reporter assay. Conclusion In sum, the process of combining differential expression profiling and comparative genomics successfully led to further defining the role of Sox10, a critical transcription factor for the development of peripheral glia. Our strategy utilizing relatively accessible techniques and tools should be applicable to studying the function of other transcription factors.

  5. Genome-wide identification of the regulatory targets of a transcription factor using biochemical characterization and computational genomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolly Emmitt R

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major challenge in computational genomics is the development of methodologies that allow accurate genome-wide prediction of the regulatory targets of a transcription factor. We present a method for target identification that combines experimental characterization of binding requirements with computational genomic analysis. Results Our method identified potential target genes of the transcription factor Ndt80, a key transcriptional regulator involved in yeast sporulation, using the combined information of binding affinity, positional distribution, and conservation of the binding sites across multiple species. We have also developed a mathematical approach to compute the false positive rate and the total number of targets in the genome based on the multiple selection criteria. Conclusion We have shown that combining biochemical characterization and computational genomic analysis leads to accurate identification of the genome-wide targets of a transcription factor. The method can be extended to other transcription factors and can complement other genomic approaches to transcriptional regulation.

  6. A genomic approach to identify regulatory nodes in the transcriptional network of systemic acquired resistance in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wang

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Many biological processes are controlled by intricate networks of transcriptional regulators. With the development of microarray technology, transcriptional changes can be examined at the whole-genome level. However, such analysis often lacks information on the hierarchical relationship between components of a given system. Systemic acquired resistance (SAR is an inducible plant defense response involving a cascade of transcriptional events induced by salicylic acid through the transcription cofactor NPR1. To identify additional regulatory nodes in the SAR network, we performed microarray analysis on Arabidopsis plants expressing the NPR1-GR (glucocorticoid receptor fusion protein. Since nuclear translocation of NPR1-GR requires dexamethasone, we were able to control NPR1-dependent transcription and identify direct transcriptional targets of NPR1. We show that NPR1 directly upregulates the expression of eight WRKY transcription factor genes. This large family of 74 transcription factors has been implicated in various defense responses, but no specific WRKY factor has been placed in the SAR network. Identification of NPR1-regulated WRKY factors allowed us to perform in-depth genetic analysis on a small number of WRKY factors and test well-defined phenotypes of single and double mutants associated with NPR1. Among these WRKY factors we found both positive and negative regulators of SAR. This genomics-directed approach unambiguously positioned five WRKY factors in the complex transcriptional regulatory network of SAR. Our work not only discovered new transcription regulatory components in the signaling network of SAR but also demonstrated that functional studies of large gene families have to take into consideration sequence similarity as well as the expression patterns of the candidates.

  7. Stochastic Resonance in a Gene Transcriptional Regulatory System with Time Delay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Chun-Hua; XIE Chong-Wei

    2008-01-01

    We study the stochastic resonance (SR) phenomenon in a time-delayed gene transcriptional regulatory system under the simultaneous action of a multiplicative noise and an additive noise and a weak periodic signal.The expression of the signal-to-noise ratio RSNR is obtained by applying the two-state theory in adiabatic limit under the condition of small delay time.The effects of delay time and intensity of the correlation between multiplicative and additive noise on RSNR are discussed.It is found that the delay time (T) enhances the SR of the system.The correlation intensity λ enhances the SR in the RSNR - D plot (D denotes the multiplicative noise intensity),but weakens the SR in the RSNR - α plot (α denotes the additive noise intensity).

  8. Regulatory Network of Transcription Factors in Response to Drought in Arabidopsis and Crops

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Li-miao; Li Wen-bin; Zhou Xin-an

    2012-01-01

    Drought is one of the most important environmental constraints limiting plant growth, development and crop yield. Many drought-inducible genes have been identified by molecular and genomic analyses in Arabidopsis, rice and other crops. To better understand reaction mechanism of plant to drought tolerance, we mainly focused on introducing the research of transcription factors (TFs) in signal transduction and regulatory network of gene expression conferring drought. A TF could bind multiple target genes to increase one or more kinds of stress tolerance. Sometimes, several TFs might act together with a target gene. So drought-tolerance genes or TFs might respond to high-salinity, cold or other stresses. The crosstalk of multiple stresses signal pathways is a crucial aspect of understanding stress signaling.

  9. PlantPAN 2.0: an update of plant promoter analysis navigator for reconstructing transcriptional regulatory networks in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Chi-Nga; Zheng, Han-Qin; Wu, Nai-Yun; Chien, Chia-Hung; Huang, Hsien-Da; Lee, Tzong-Yi; Chiang-Hsieh, Yi-Fan; Hou, Ping-Fu; Yang, Tien-Yi; Chang, Wen-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins acting as critical regulators of gene expression. The Plant Promoter Analysis Navigator (PlantPAN; http://PlantPAN2.itps.ncku.edu.tw) provides an informative resource for detecting transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs), corresponding TFs, and other important regulatory elements (CpG islands and tandem repeats) in a promoter or a set of plant promoters. Additionally, TFBSs, CpG islands, and tandem repeats in the conserve regions between similar gene promoters are also identified. The current PlantPAN release (version 2.0) contains 16 960 TFs and 1143 TF binding site matrices among 76 plant species. In addition to updating of the annotation information, adding experimentally verified TF matrices, and making improvements in the visualization of transcriptional regulatory networks, several new features and functions are incorporated. These features include: (i) comprehensive curation of TF information (response conditions, target genes, and sequence logos of binding motifs, etc.), (ii) co-expression profiles of TFs and their target genes under various conditions, (iii) protein-protein interactions among TFs and their co-factors, (iv) TF-target networks, and (v) downstream promoter elements. Furthermore, a dynamic transcriptional regulatory network under various conditions is provided in PlantPAN 2.0. The PlantPAN 2.0 is a systematic platform for plant promoter analysis and reconstructing transcriptional regulatory networks.

  10. Evaluation of phylogenetic footprint discovery for predicting bacterial cis-regulatory elements and revealing their evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Helden Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The detection of conserved motifs in promoters of orthologous genes (phylogenetic footprints has become a common strategy to predict cis-acting regulatory elements. Several software tools are routinely used to raise hypotheses about regulation. However, these tools are generally used as black boxes, with default parameters. A systematic evaluation of optimal parameters for a footprint discovery strategy can bring a sizeable improvement to the predictions. Results We evaluate the performances of a footprint discovery approach based on the detection of over-represented spaced motifs. This method is particularly suitable for (but not restricted to Bacteria, since such motifs are typically bound by factors containing a Helix-Turn-Helix domain. We evaluated footprint discovery in 368 Escherichia coli K12 genes with annotated sites, under 40 different combinations of parameters (taxonomical level, background model, organism-specific filtering, operon inference. Motifs are assessed both at the levels of correctness and significance. We further report a detailed analysis of 181 bacterial orthologs of the LexA repressor. Distinct motifs are detected at various taxonomical levels, including the 7 previously characterized taxon-specific motifs. In addition, we highlight a significantly stronger conservation of half-motifs in Actinobacteria, relative to Firmicutes, suggesting an intermediate state in specificity switching between the two Gram-positive phyla, and thereby revealing the on-going evolution of LexA auto-regulation. Conclusion The footprint discovery method proposed here shows excellent results with E. coli and can readily be extended to predict cis-acting regulatory signals and propose testable hypotheses in bacterial genomes for which nothing is known about regulation.

  11. Patterns of subnet usage reveal distinct scales of regulation in the transcriptional regulatory network of Escherichia coli.

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    Carsten Marr

    Full Text Available The set of regulatory interactions between genes, mediated by transcription factors, forms a species' transcriptional regulatory network (TRN. By comparing this network with measured gene expression data, one can identify functional properties of the TRN and gain general insight into transcriptional control. We define the subnet of a node as the subgraph consisting of all nodes topologically downstream of the node, including itself. Using a large set of microarray expression data of the bacterium Escherichia coli, we find that the gene expression in different subnets exhibits a structured pattern in response to environmental changes and genotypic mutation. Subnets with fewer changes in their expression pattern have a higher fraction of feed-forward loop motifs and a lower fraction of small RNA targets within them. Our study implies that the TRN consists of several scales of regulatory organization: (1 subnets with more varying gene expression controlled by both transcription factors and post-transcriptional RNA regulation and (2 subnets with less varying gene expression having more feed-forward loops and less post-transcriptional RNA regulation.

  12. Transcriptional Regulatory Networks Activated by PI3K and ERK Transduced Growth Signals in Human Glioblastoma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter M. Haverty; Zhi-Ping Weng; Ulla Hansen

    2005-01-01

    Determining how cells regulate their transcriptional response to extracellular signals is key to the understanding of complex eukaryotic systems. This study was initiated with the goals of furthering the study of mammalian transcriptional regulation and analyzing the relative benefits of related computational methodologies. One dataset available for such an analysis involved gene expression profiling of the early growth factor response to platelet derived growth factor (PDGF)in a human glioblastoma cell line; this study differentiated genes whose expression was regulated by signaling through the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) versus the extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) pathways. We have compared the inferred transcription factors from this previous study with additional predictions of regulatory transcription factors using two alternative promoter sequence analysis techniques. This comparative analysis, in which the algorithms predict overlapping,although not identical, sets of factors, argues for meticulous benchmarking of promoter sequence analysis methods to determine the positive and negative attributes that contribute to their varying results. Finally, we inferred transcriptional regulatory networks deriving from various signaling pathways using the CARRIE program suite. These networks not only included previously described transcriptional features of the response to growth signals, but also predicted new regulatory features for the propagation and modulation of the growth signal.

  13. Chromatin Properties of Regulatory DNA Probed by Manipulation of Transcription Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharov, Alexei A.; Nishiyama, Akira; Qian, Yong; Dudekula, Dawood B.; Longo, Dan L.; Schlessinger, David

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Transcription factors (TFs) bind to DNA and regulate the transcription of nearby genes. However, only a small fraction of TF binding sites have such regulatory effects. Here we search for the predictors of functional binding sites by carrying out a systematic computational screening of a variety of contextual factors (histone modifications, nuclear lamin-bindings, and cofactor bindings). We used regression analysis to test if contextual factors are associated with upregulation or downregulation of neighboring genes following the induction or knockdown of the 9 TFs in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Functional TF binding sites appeared to be either active (i.e., bound by P300, CHD7, mediator, cohesin, and SWI/SNF) or repressed (i.e., with H3K27me3 histone marks and bound by Polycomb factors). Active binding sites mediated the downregulation of nearby genes upon knocking down the activating TFs or inducing repressors. Repressed TF binding sites mediated the upregulation of nearby genes (e.g., poised developmental regulators) upon inducing TFs. In addition, repressed binding sites mediated repressive effects of TFs, identified by the downregulation of target genes after the induction of TFs or by the upregulation of target genes after the knockdown of TFs. The contextual factors associated with functions of DNA-bound TFs were used to improve the identification of candidate target genes regulated by TFs. PMID:24918633

  14. Sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1 (SREBF1) polymorphism and milk fatty acid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafikov, R A; Schoonmaker, J P; Korn, K T; Noack, K; Garrick, D J; Koehler, K J; Minick-Bormann, J; Reecy, J M; Spurlock, D E; Beitz, D C

    2013-04-01

    Milk is known to contain high concentrations of saturated fatty acids-such as palmitic (16:0), myristic (14:0), and lauric (12:0) acids-that can raise plasma cholesterol in humans, making their presence in milk undesirable. The main objective of our candidate gene study was to develop genetic markers that can be used to improve the healthfulness of bovine milk. The sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1 (SREBF1) known to regulate the transcription of lipogenic genes together with SREBF chaperone and insulin induced gene 1 were the candidate genes. The results showed significant association of the overall SREBF1 haplotypes with milk production and variations in lauric (12:0) and myristic (14:0) acid concentrations in milk. Haplotype H1 of SREBF1 was the most desirable to improve milk healthfulness because it was significantly associated with lower lauric (12:0) and myristic (14:0) acid concentrations compared with haplotype H3 of SREBF1, and lower lauric acid (12:0) concentration compared with haplotype H2 of SREBF1. Haplotype H1 of SREBF1, however, was significantly associated with lower milk production compared with haplotype H3 of SREBF1. We did not detect any significant associations between genetic polymorphisms in insulin induced gene 1 (INSIG1) and SREBF chaperone and milk fatty acid composition. In conclusion, genetic polymorphisms in SREBF1 can be used to develop genetic tools for the selection of animals producing milk with healthier fatty acid composition.

  15. Chromatin properties of regulatory DNA probed by manipulation of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharov, Alexei A; Nishiyama, Akira; Qian, Yong; Dudekula, Dawood B; Longo, Dan L; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S H

    2014-08-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind to DNA and regulate the transcription of nearby genes. However, only a small fraction of TF binding sites have such regulatory effects. Here we search for the predictors of functional binding sites by carrying out a systematic computational screening of a variety of contextual factors (histone modifications, nuclear lamin-bindings, and cofactor bindings). We used regression analysis to test if contextual factors are associated with upregulation or downregulation of neighboring genes following the induction or knockdown of the 9 TFs in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Functional TF binding sites appeared to be either active (i.e., bound by P300, CHD7, mediator, cohesin, and SWI/SNF) or repressed (i.e., with H3K27me3 histone marks and bound by Polycomb factors). Active binding sites mediated the downregulation of nearby genes upon knocking down the activating TFs or inducing repressors. Repressed TF binding sites mediated the upregulation of nearby genes (e.g., poised developmental regulators) upon inducing TFs. In addition, repressed binding sites mediated repressive effects of TFs, identified by the downregulation of target genes after the induction of TFs or by the upregulation of target genes after the knockdown of TFs. The contextual factors associated with functions of DNA-bound TFs were used to improve the identification of candidate target genes regulated by TFs.

  16. Cross-phosphorylation of bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine protein kinases on key regulatory residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei eShi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria possess protein serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases which resemble eukaryal kinases in their capacity to phosphorylate multiple substrates. We hypothesized that the analogy might extend further, and bacterial kinases may also undergo mutual phosphorylation and activation, which is currently considered as a hallmark of eukaryal kinase networks. In order to test this hypothesis, we explored the capacity of all members of four different classes of serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases present in the firmicute model organism Bacillus subtilis to phosphorylate each other in vitro and interact with each other in vivo. The interactomics data suggested a high degree of connectivity among all types of kinases, while phosphorylation assays revealed equally wide-spread cross-phosphorylation events. Our findings suggest that the Hanks-type kinases PrkC, PrkD and YabT exhibit the highest capacity to phosphorylate other B. subtilis kinases, while the BY-kinase PtkA and the two-component-like kinases RsbW and SpoIIAB show the highest propensity to be phosphorylated by other kinases. Analysis of phosphorylated residues on several selected recipient kinases suggests that most cross-phosphorylation events concern key regulatory residues. Therefore, cross-phosphorylation events are very likely to influence the capacity of recipient kinases to phosphorylate substrates downstream in the signal transduction cascade. We therefore conclude that bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases probably engage in a network-type behavior previously described only in eukaryal cells.

  17. Rates of gyrase supercoiling and transcription elongation control supercoil density in a bacterial chromosome.

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    Nikolay Rovinskiy

    Full Text Available Gyrase catalyzes negative supercoiling of DNA in an ATP-dependent reaction that helps condense bacterial chromosomes into a compact interwound "nucleoid." The supercoil density (σ of prokaryotic DNA occurs in two forms. Diffusible supercoil density (σ(D moves freely around the chromosome in 10 kb domains, and constrained supercoil density (σ(C results from binding abundant proteins that bend, loop, or unwind DNA at many sites. Diffusible and constrained supercoils contribute roughly equally to the total in vivo negative supercoil density of WT cells, so σ = σ(C+σ(D. Unexpectedly, Escherichia coli chromosomes have a 15% higher level of σ compared to Salmonella enterica. To decipher critical mechanisms that can change diffusible supercoil density of chromosomes, we analyzed strains of Salmonella using a 9 kb "supercoil sensor" inserted at ten positions around the genome. The sensor contains a complete Lac operon flanked by directly repeated resolvase binding sites, and the sensor can monitor both supercoil density and transcription elongation rates in WT and mutant strains. RNA transcription caused (- supercoiling to increase upstream and decrease downstream of highly expressed genes. Excess upstream supercoiling was relaxed by Topo I, and gyrase replenished downstream supercoil losses to maintain an equilibrium state. Strains with TS gyrase mutations growing at permissive temperature exhibited significant supercoil losses varying from 30% of WT levels to a total loss of σ(D at most chromosome locations. Supercoil losses were influenced by transcription because addition of rifampicin (Rif caused supercoil density to rebound throughout the chromosome. Gyrase mutants that caused dramatic supercoil losses also reduced the transcription elongation rates throughout the genome. The observed link between RNA polymerase elongation speed and gyrase turnover suggests that bacteria with fast growth rates may generate higher supercoil densities

  18. Regulatory T cell suppressive potency dictates the balance between bacterial proliferation and clearance during persistent Salmonella infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanner M Johanns

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of persistent infection is dictated by the balance between opposing immune activation and suppression signals. Herein, virulent Salmonella was used to explore the role and potential importance of Foxp3-expressing regulatory T cells in dictating the natural progression of persistent bacterial infection. Two distinct phases of persistent Salmonella infection are identified. In the first 3-4 weeks after infection, progressively increasing bacterial burden was associated with delayed effector T cell activation. Reciprocally, at later time points after infection, reductions in bacterial burden were associated with robust effector T cell activation. Using Foxp3(GFP reporter mice for ex vivo isolation of regulatory T cells, we demonstrate that the dichotomy in infection tempo between early and late time points is directly paralleled by drastic changes in Foxp3(+ Treg suppressive potency. In complementary experiments using Foxp3(DTR mice, the significance of these shifts in Treg suppressive potency on infection outcome was verified by enumerating the relative impacts of regulatory T cell ablation on bacterial burden and effector T cell activation at early and late time points during persistent Salmonella infection. Moreover, Treg expression of CTLA-4 directly paralleled changes in suppressive potency, and the relative effects of Treg ablation could be largely recapitulated by CTLA-4 in vivo blockade. Together, these results demonstrate that dynamic regulation of Treg suppressive potency dictates the course of persistent bacterial infection.

  19. Aptamers to the sigma factor mimic promoter recognition and inhibit transcription initiation by bacterial RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miropolskaya, Nataliya; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey

    2016-01-08

    Promoter recognition by bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a multi-step process involving multiple protein-DNA interactions and several structural and kinetic intermediates which remain only partially characterized. We used single-stranded DNA aptamers containing specific promoter motifs to probe the interactions of the Thermus aquaticus RNAP σ(A) subunit with the -10 promoter element in the absence of other parts of the promoter complex. The aptamer binding decreased intrinsic fluorescence of the σ subunit, likely as a result of interactions between the -10 element and conserved tryptophan residues of the σ DNA-binding region 2. By monitoring these changes, we demonstrated that DNA binding proceeds through a single rate-limiting step resulting in formation of very stable complexes. Deletion of the N-terminal domain of the σ(A) subunit increased the rate of aptamer binding while replacement of this domain with an unrelated N-terminal region 1.1 from the Escherichia coli σ(70) subunit restored the original kinetics of σ-aptamer interactions. The results demonstrate that the key step in promoter recognition can be modelled in a simple σ-aptamer system and reveal that highly divergent N-terminal domains similarly modulate the DNA-binding properties of the σ subunit. The aptamers efficiently suppressed promoter-dependent transcription initiation by the holoenzyme of RNA polymerase, suggesting that they may be used for development of novel transcription inhibitors.

  20. A two-subunit bacterial sigma-factor activates transcription in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLellan, Shawn R; Guariglia-Oropeza, Veronica; Gaballa, Ahmed; Helmann, John D

    2009-12-15

    The sigma-like factor YvrI and coregulator YvrHa activate transcription from a small set of conserved promoters in Bacillus subtilis. We report here that these two proteins independently contribute sigma-region 2 and sigma-region 4 functions to a holoenzyme-promoter DNA complex. YvrI binds RNA polymerase (RNAP) through a region 4 interaction with the beta-subunit flap domain and mediates specific promoter recognition but cannot initiate DNA melting at the -10 promoter element. Conversely, YvrHa possesses sequence similarity to a conserved core-binding motif in sigma-region 2 and binds to the N-terminal coiled-coil element in the RNAP beta'-subunit previously implicated in interaction with region 2 of sigma-factors. YvrHa plays an essential role in stabilizing the open complex and interacts specifically with the N-terminus of YvrI. Based on these results, we propose that YvrHa is situated in the transcription complex proximal to the -10 element of the promoter, whereas YvrI is responsible for -35 region recognition. This system presents an unusual example of a two-subunit bacterial sigma-factor.

  1. An integrated transcriptional regulatory circuit that reinforces the breast cancer stem cell state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polytarchou, Christos; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Struhl, Kevin

    2012-09-01

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are a highly tumorigenic cell type present as a minority population in developmentally diverse tumors and cell lines. Using a genetic screen in an inducible model of CSC formation in a breast cell line, we identify microRNAs (miRNAs) that inhibit CSC growth and are down-regulated in CSCs. Aside from the previously identified miR-200 family, these include the miR-15/16 (miR-16, miR-15b) and miR-103/107 (miR-103, miR-107) families as well as miR-145, miR-335, and miR-128b. Interestingly, these miRNAs affect common target genes that encode the Bmi1 and Suz12 components of the polycomb repressor complexes as well as the DNA-binding transcription factors Zeb1, Zeb2, and Klf4. Conversely, expression of the CSC-modulating miRNAs is inhibited by Zeb1 and Zeb2. There is an inverse relationship between the levels of CSC-regulating miRNAs and their respective targets in samples from triple-negative breast cancer patients, providing evidence for the relevance of these interactions in human cancer. In addition, combinatorial overexpression of these miRNAs progressively attenuates the growth of CSCs derived from triple-negative breast cancers. These observations suggest that CSC formation and function are reinforced by an integrated regulatory circuit of miRNAs, transcription factors, and chromatin-modifying activities that can act as a bistable switch to drive cells into either the CSC or the nonstem state within the population of cancer cells.

  2. An integrated transcriptional regulatory circuit that reinforces the breast cancer stem cell state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polytarchou, Christos; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Struhl, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are a highly tumorigenic cell type present as a minority population in developmentally diverse tumors and cell lines. Using a genetic screen in an inducible model of CSC formation in a breast cell line, we identify microRNAs (miRNAs) that inhibit CSC growth and are down-regulated in CSCs. Aside from the previously identified miR-200 family, these include the miR-15/16 (miR-16, miR-15b) and miR-103/107 (miR-103, miR-107) families as well as miR-145, miR-335, and miR-128b. Interestingly, these miRNAs affect common target genes that encode the Bmi1 and Suz12 components of the polycomb repressor complexes as well as the DNA-binding transcription factors Zeb1, Zeb2, and Klf4. Conversely, expression of the CSC-modulating miRNAs is inhibited by Zeb1 and Zeb2. There is an inverse relationship between the levels of CSC-regulating miRNAs and their respective targets in samples from triple-negative breast cancer patients, providing evidence for the relevance of these interactions in human cancer. In addition, combinatorial overexpression of these miRNAs progressively attenuates the growth of CSCs derived from triple-negative breast cancers. These observations suggest that CSC formation and function are reinforced by an integrated regulatory circuit of miRNAs, transcription factors, and chromatin-modifying activities that can act as a bistable switch to drive cells into either the CSC or the nonstem state within the population of cancer cells. PMID:22908280

  3. Regulatory Factor X (RFX)-mediated transcriptional rewiring of ciliary genes in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasecki, Brian P; Burghoorn, Jan; Swoboda, Peter

    2010-07-20

    Cilia were present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) and were retained by most organisms spanning all extant eukaryotic lineages, including organisms in the Unikonta (Amoebozoa, fungi, choanoflagellates, and animals), Archaeplastida, Excavata, Chromalveolata, and Rhizaria. In certain animals, including humans, ciliary gene regulation is mediated by Regulatory Factor X (RFX) transcription factors (TFs). RFX TFs bind X-box promoter motifs and thereby positively regulate >50 ciliary genes. Though RFX-mediated ciliary gene regulation has been studied in several bilaterian animals, little is known about the evolutionary conservation of ciliary gene regulation. Here, we explore the evolutionary relationships between RFX TFs and cilia. By sampling the genome sequences of >120 eukaryotic organisms, we show that RFX TFs are exclusively found in unikont organisms (whether ciliated or not), but are completely absent from the genome sequences of all nonunikont organisms (again, whether ciliated or not). Sampling the promoter sequences of 12 highly conserved ciliary genes from 23 diverse unikont and nonunikont organisms further revealed that phylogenetic footprints of X-box promoter motif sequences are found exclusively in ciliary genes of certain animals. Thus, there is no correlation between cilia/ciliary genes and the presence or absence of RFX TFs and X-box promoter motifs in nonanimal unikont and in nonunikont organisms. These data suggest that RFX TFs originated early in the unikont lineage, distinctly after cilia evolved. The evolutionary model that best explains these observations indicates that the transcriptional rewiring of many ciliary genes by RFX TFs occurred early in the animal lineage.

  4. A trans-acting Variant within the Transcription Factor RIM101 Interacts with Genetic Background to Determine its Regulatory Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Timothy; Richmond, Phillip A; Dowell, Robin D

    2016-01-01

    Most genetic variants associated with disease occur within regulatory regions of the genome, underscoring the importance of defining the mechanisms underlying differences in regulation of gene expression between individuals. We discovered a pair of co-regulated, divergently oriented transcripts, AQY2 and ncFRE6, that are expressed in one strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ∑1278b, but not in another, S288c. By combining classical genetics techniques with high-throughput sequencing, we identified a trans-acting single nucleotide polymorphism within the transcription factor RIM101 that causes the background-dependent expression of both transcripts. Subsequent RNA-seq experiments revealed that RIM101 regulates many more targets in S288c than in ∑1278b and that deletion of RIM101 in both backgrounds abrogates the majority of differential expression between the strains. Strikingly, only three transcripts undergo a significant change in expression after swapping RIM101 alleles between backgrounds, implying that the differences in the RIM101 allele lead to a remarkably focused transcriptional response. However, hundreds of RIM101-dependent targets undergo a subtle but consistent shift in expression in the S288c RIM101-swapped strain, but not its ∑1278b counterpart. We conclude that ∑1278b may harbor a variant(s) that buffers against widespread transcriptional dysregulation upon introduction of a non-native RIM101 allele, emphasizing the importance of accounting for genetic background when assessing the impact of a regulatory variant.

  5. Hierarchical structure and modules in the Escherichia coli transcriptional regulatory network revealed by a new top-down approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buer Jan

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular functions are coordinately carried out by groups of genes forming functional modules. Identifying such modules in the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN of organisms is important for understanding the structure and function of these fundamental cellular networks and essential for the emerging modular biology. So far, the global connectivity structure of TRN has not been well studied and consequently not applied for the identification of functional modules. Moreover, network motifs such as feed forward loop are recently proposed to be basic building blocks of TRN. However, their relationship to functional modules is not clear. Results In this work we proposed a top-down approach to identify modules in the TRN of E. coli. By studying the global connectivity structure of the regulatory network, we first revealed a five-layer hierarchical structure in which all the regulatory relationships are downward. Based on this regulatory hierarchy, we developed a new method to decompose the regulatory network into functional modules and to identify global regulators governing multiple modules. As a result, 10 global regulators and 39 modules were identified and shown to have well defined functions. We then investigated the distribution and composition of the two basic network motifs (feed forward loop and bi-fan motif in the hierarchical structure of TRN. We found that most of these network motifs include global regulators, indicating that these motifs are not basic building blocks of modules since modules should not contain global regulators. Conclusion The transcriptional regulatory network of E. coli possesses a multi-layer hierarchical modular structure without feedback regulation at transcription level. This hierarchical structure builds the basis for a new and simple decomposition method which is suitable for the identification of functional modules and global regulators in the transcriptional regulatory network of E

  6. Transcriptional regulatory network refinement and quantification through kinetic modeling, gene expression microarray data and information theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuncay Kagan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression microarray and other multiplex data hold promise for addressing the challenges of cellular complexity, refined diagnoses and the discovery of well-targeted treatments. A new approach to the construction and quantification of transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs is presented that integrates gene expression microarray data and cell modeling through information theory. Given a partial TRN and time series data, a probability density is constructed that is a functional of the time course of transcription factor (TF thermodynamic activities at the site of gene control, and is a function of mRNA degradation and transcription rate coefficients, and equilibrium constants for TF/gene binding. Results Our approach yields more physicochemical information that compliments the results of network structure delineation methods, and thereby can serve as an element of a comprehensive TRN discovery/quantification system. The most probable TF time courses and values of the aforementioned parameters are obtained by maximizing the probability obtained through entropy maximization. Observed time delays between mRNA expression and activity are accounted for implicitly since the time course of the activity of a TF is coupled by probability functional maximization, and is not assumed to be proportional to expression level of the mRNA type that translates into the TF. This allows one to investigate post-translational and TF activation mechanisms of gene regulation. Accuracy and robustness of the method are evaluated. A kinetic formulation is used to facilitate the analysis of phenomena with a strongly dynamical character while a physically-motivated regularization of the TF time course is found to overcome difficulties due to omnipresent noise and data sparsity that plague other methods of gene expression data analysis. An application to Escherichia coli is presented. Conclusion Multiplex time series data can be used for the

  7. SNP2TFBS – a database of regulatory SNPs affecting predicted transcription factor binding site affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Ambrosini, Giovanna; Bucher, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    SNP2TFBS is a computational resource intended to support researchers investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying regulatory variation in the human genome. The database essentially consists of a collection of text files providing specific annotations for human single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), namely whether they are predicted to abolish, create or change the affinity of one or several transcription factor (TF) binding sites. A SNP's effect on TF binding is estimated based on a position weight matrix (PWM) model for the binding specificity of the corresponding factor. These data files are regenerated at regular intervals by an automatic procedure that takes as input a reference genome, a comprehensive SNP catalogue and a collection of PWMs. SNP2TFBS is also accessible over a web interface, enabling users to view the information provided for an individual SNP, to extract SNPs based on various search criteria, to annotate uploaded sets of SNPs or to display statistics about the frequencies of binding sites affected by selected SNPs. Homepage: http://ccg.vital-it.ch/snp2tfbs/. PMID:27899579

  8. Dissecting the transcriptional regulatory properties of human chromosome 16 highly conserved non-coding regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Royo

    Full Text Available Non-coding DNA conservation across species has been often used as a predictor for transcriptional enhancer activity. However, only a few systematic analyses of the function of these highly conserved non-coding regions (HCNRs have been performed. Here we use zebrafish transgenic assays to perform a systematic study of 113 HCNRs from human chromosome 16. By comparing transient and stable transgenesis, we show that the first method is highly inefficient, leading to 40% of false positives and 20% of false negatives. When analyzed in stable transgenic lines, a great majority of HCNRs were active in the central nervous system, although some of them drove expression in other organs such as the eye and the excretory system. Finally, by testing a fraction of the HCNRs lacking enhancer activity for in vivo insulator activity, we find that 20% of them may contain enhancer-blocking function. Altogether our data indicate that HCNRs may contain different types of cis-regulatory activity, including enhancer, insulators as well as other not yet discovered functions.

  9. A DNA-binding-site landscape and regulatory network analysis for NAC transcription factors in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemose, Søren; Jensen, Michael Krogh; de Velde, Jan Van

    2014-01-01

    regulatory networks of 12 NAC transcription factors. Our data offer specific single-base resolution fingerprints for most TFs studied and indicate that NAC DNA-binding specificities might be predicted from their DNA-binding domain's sequence. The developed methodology, including the application...... of complementary functional genomics filters, makes it possible to translate, for each TF, protein binding microarray data into a set of high-quality target genes. With this approach, we confirm NAC target genes reported from independent in vivo analyses. We emphasize that candidate target gene sets together......Target gene identification for transcription factors is a prerequisite for the systems wide understanding of organismal behaviour. NAM-ATAF1/2-CUC2 (NAC) transcription factors are amongst the largest transcription factor families in plants, yet limited data exist from unbiased approaches to resolve...

  10. Using graphical adaptive lasso approach to construct transcription factor and microRNA's combinatorial regulatory network in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Naifang; Dai, Ding; Deng, Chao; Qian, Minping; Deng, Minghua

    2014-06-01

    Discovering the regulation of cancer-related gene is of great importance in cancer biology. Transcription factors and microRNAs are two kinds of crucial regulators in gene expression, and they compose a combinatorial regulatory network with their target genes. Revealing the structure of this network could improve the authors' understanding of gene regulation, and further explore the molecular pathway in cancer. In this article, the authors propose a novel approach graphical adaptive lasso (GALASSO) to construct the regulatory network in breast cancer. GALASSO use a Gaussian graphical model with adaptive lasso penalties to integrate the sequence information as well as gene expression profiles. The simulation study and the experimental profiles verify the accuracy of the authors' approach. The authors further reveal the structure of the regulatory network, and explore the role of feedforward loops in gene regulation. In addition, the authors discuss the combinatorial regulatory effect between transcription factors and microRNAs, and select miR-155 for detailed analysis of microRNA's role in cancer. The proposed GALASSO approach is an efficient method to construct the combinatorial regulatory network. It also provides a new way to integrate different data sources and could find more applications in meta-analysis problem.

  11. Crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima TM0439: implications for the mechanism of bacterial GntR transcription regulators with Zn2+-binding FCD domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Meiying; Cooper, David; Grossoehmerb, Nickolas; Yu, Minmin; Hung, Li-Wei; Cieslik, Murcin; Derewendaro, Urszula; Lesley, Scott; Wilson, Ian; Giedrocb, David; Derewenda, Zygmunt

    2009-06-06

    The GntR superfamily of dimeric transcription factors, with more than 6200 members encoded in bacterial genomes, are characterized by N-terminal winged helix (WH) DNA-binding domains and diverse C-terminal, regulatory domains, which provide a basis for the classification of the constituent families. The largest of these families, FadR, contains nearly 3000 proteins with all a-helical regulatory domains classified into two related Pfam families: FadR{_}C and FCD. Only two crystal structures of the FadR family members, i.e. the E. coli FadR protein and the LldR from C. glutamicum, have been described to date in literature. Here we describe the crystal structure of TM0439, a GntR regulator with an FCD domain, found in the Thermotoga maritima genome. The FCD domain is similar to that of the LldR regulator, and contains a buried metal binding site. Using atomic absorption spectroscopy and Trp fluorescence, we show that the recombinant protein contains bound Ni{sup 2+} ions, but it is able to bind Zn{sup 2+} with K{sub D} < 70 nM . We conclude that Zn{sup 2+} is the likely physiological metal, where it may perform either or both structural and regulatory roles. Finally, we compare the TM0439 structure to two other FadR family structures recently deposited by Structural Genomics consortia. The results call for a revision in the classification of the FadR family of transcription factors.

  12. The emerging regulatory potential of SCFMet30 -mediated polyubiquitination and proteolysis of the Met4 transcriptional activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekaran Srikripa

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The yeast SCFMet30 ubiquitin ligase plays a critical role in cell division by regulating the Met4 transcriptional activator of genes that control the uptake and assimilation of sulfur into methionine and S-adenosyl-methionine. The initial view on how SCFMet30 performs its function has been driven by the assumption that SCFMet30 acts exclusively as Met4 inhibitor when high levels of methionine drive an accumulation of cysteine. We revisit this model in light of the growing evidence that SCFMet30 can also activate Met4. The notion that Met4 can be inhibited or activated depending on the sulfur metabolite context is not new, but for the first time both aspects have been linked to SCFMet30, creating an interesting regulatory paradigm in which polyubiquitination and proteolysis of a single transcriptional activator can play different roles depending on context. We discuss the emerging molecular basis and the implications of this new regulatory phenomenon.

  13. ATP-dependent transcriptional activation by bacterial PspF AAA+protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Jörg; Zhang, Xiaodong; Jones, Susan; Bordes, Patricia; Buck, Martin

    2004-05-14

    Transcription activation by bacterial sigma(54)-dependent enhancer-binding proteins (EBPs) requires their tri-nucleotide hydrolysis to restructure the sigma(54) RNA polymerase (RNAP). EBPs share sequence similarity with guanine nucleotide binding-proteins and ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA) proteins, especially in the mononucleotide binding P-loop fold. Using the phage shock protein F (PspF) EBP, we identify P-loop residues responsible for nucleotide binding and hydrolysis, consistent with their roles in other P-loop NTPases. We show the refined low-resolution structure of an EBP, PspF, revealing a hexameric ring organisation characteristic of AAA proteins. Functioning of EBPs involves ATP binding, higher oligomer formation and ATP hydrolysis coupled to the restructuring of the RNAP. This is thought to be a highly coordinated multi-step process, but the nucleotide-driven mechanism of oligomerisation and ATP hydrolysis is little understood. Our kinetic and structural data strongly suggest that three PspF dimers assemble to form a hexamer upon nucleotide binding. During the ATP hydrolysis cycle, both ATP and ADP are bound to oligomeric PspF, in line with a sequential hydrolysis cycle. We identify a putative R-finger, and show its involvement in ATP hydrolysis. Substitution of this arginine residue results in nucleotide-independent formation of hexameric rings, structurally linking the putative R-finger and, by inference, a specific nucleotide interaction to the control of PspF oligomerisation.

  14. Boolean Modelling Reveals New Regulatory Connections between Transcription Factors Orchestrating the Development of the Ventral Spinal Cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovrics, Anna; Gao, Yu; Juhász, Bianka; Bock, István; Byrne, Helen M.; Dinnyés, András; Kovács, Krisztián A.

    2014-01-01

    We have assembled a network of cell-fate determining transcription factors that play a key role in the specification of the ventral neuronal subtypes of the spinal cord on the basis of published transcriptional interactions. Asynchronous Boolean modelling of the network was used to compare simulation results with reported experimental observations. Such comparison highlighted the need to include additional regulatory connections in order to obtain the fixed point attractors of the model associated with the five known progenitor cell types located in the ventral spinal cord. The revised gene regulatory network reproduced previously observed cell state switches between progenitor cells observed in knock-out animal models or in experiments where the transcription factors were overexpressed. Furthermore the network predicted the inhibition of Irx3 by Nkx2.2 and this prediction was tested experimentally. Our results provide evidence for the existence of an as yet undescribed inhibitory connection which could potentially have significance beyond the ventral spinal cord. The work presented in this paper demonstrates the strength of Boolean modelling for identifying gene regulatory networks. PMID:25398016

  15. Boolean modelling reveals new regulatory connections between transcription factors orchestrating the development of the ventral spinal cord.

    KAUST Repository

    Lovrics, Anna

    2014-11-14

    We have assembled a network of cell-fate determining transcription factors that play a key role in the specification of the ventral neuronal subtypes of the spinal cord on the basis of published transcriptional interactions. Asynchronous Boolean modelling of the network was used to compare simulation results with reported experimental observations. Such comparison highlighted the need to include additional regulatory connections in order to obtain the fixed point attractors of the model associated with the five known progenitor cell types located in the ventral spinal cord. The revised gene regulatory network reproduced previously observed cell state switches between progenitor cells observed in knock-out animal models or in experiments where the transcription factors were overexpressed. Furthermore the network predicted the inhibition of Irx3 by Nkx2.2 and this prediction was tested experimentally. Our results provide evidence for the existence of an as yet undescribed inhibitory connection which could potentially have significance beyond the ventral spinal cord. The work presented in this paper demonstrates the strength of Boolean modelling for identifying gene regulatory networks.

  16. Integrative analysis of time course microarray data and DNA sequence data via log-linear models for identifying dynamic transcriptional regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyung-Seok; Kim, Youngchul; Cho, Kwang-Hyun; Park, Taesung

    2013-01-01

    Since eukaryotic transcription is regulated by sets of Transcription Factors (TFs) having various transcriptional time delays, identification of temporal combinations of activated TFs is important to reconstruct Transcriptional Regulatory Networks (TRNs). Our methods combine time course microarray data, information on physical binding between the TFs and their targets and the regulatory sequences of genes using a log-linear model to reconstruct dynamic functional TRNs of the yeast cell cycle and human apoptosis. In conclusion, our results suggest that the proposed dynamic motif search method is more effective in reconstructing TRNs than the static motif search method.

  17. Integrative analysis of the zinc finger transcription factor Lame duck in the Drosophila myogenic gene regulatory network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busser, Brian W; Huang, Di; Rogacki, Kevin R; Lane, Elizabeth A; Shokri, Leila; Ni, Ting; Gamble, Caitlin E; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S; Zhu, Jun; Bulyk, Martha L; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Michelson, Alan M

    2012-12-11

    Contemporary high-throughput technologies permit the rapid identification of transcription factor (TF) target genes on a genome-wide scale, yet the functional significance of TFs requires knowledge of target gene expression patterns, cooperating TFs, and cis-regulatory element (CRE) structures. Here we investigated the myogenic regulatory network downstream of the Drosophila zinc finger TF Lame duck (Lmd) by combining both previously published and newly performed genomic data sets, including ChIP sequencing (ChIP-seq), genome-wide mRNA profiling, cell-specific expression patterns of putative transcriptional targets, analysis of histone mark signatures, studies of TF cooccupancy by additional mesodermal regulators, TF binding site determination using protein binding microarrays (PBMs), and machine learning of candidate CRE motif compositions. Our findings suggest that Lmd orchestrates an extensive myogenic regulatory network, a conclusion supported by the identification of Lmd-dependent genes, histone signatures of Lmd-bound genomic regions, and the relationship of these features to cell-specific gene expression patterns. The heterogeneous cooccupancy of Lmd-bound regions with additional mesodermal regulators revealed that different transcriptional inputs are used to mediate similar myogenic gene expression patterns. Machine learning further demonstrated diverse combinatorial motif patterns within tissue-specific Lmd-bound regions. PBM analysis established the complete spectrum of Lmd DNA binding specificities, and site-directed mutagenesis of Lmd and additional newly discovered motifs in known enhancers demonstrated the critical role of these TF binding sites in supporting full enhancer activity. Collectively, these findings provide insights into the transcriptional codes regulating muscle gene expression and offer a generalizable approach for similar studies in other systems.

  18. Functional role of pyruvate kinase from Lactobacillus bulgaricus in acid tolerance and identification of its transcription factor by bacterial one-hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Zhengyuan; An, Haoran; Wang, Guohong; Luo, Yunbo; Hao, Yanling

    2015-11-19

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus develops acid tolerance response when subjected to acid stress conditions, such as the induction of enzymes associated with carbohydrate metabolism. In this study, pyk gene encoding pyruvate kinase was over-expressed in heterologous host Lactococcus lactis NZ9000, and SDS-PAGE analysis revealed the successful expression of this gene in NZ9000. The survival rate of Pyk-overproducing strain was 45-fold higher than the control under acid stress condition (pH 4.0). In order to determine the transcription factor (TF) which regulates the expression of pyk by bacterial one-hybrid, we constructed a TF library including 65 TFs of L. bulgaricus. Western blotting indicated that TFs in this library could be successfully expressed in host strains. Subsequently, the promoter of pfk-pyk operon in L. bulgaricus was identified by 5'-RACE PCR. The bait plasmid pH3U3-p01 carrying the deletion fragment of pfk-pyk promoter captured catabolite control protein A (CcpA) which could regulate the expression of pyk by binding to a putative catabolite-responsive element (5'-TGTAAGCCCTAACA-3') upstream the -35 region. Real-time qPCR analysis revealed the transcription of pyk was positively regulated by CcpA. This is the first report about identifying the TF of pyk in L. bulgaricus, which will provide new insight into the regulatory network.

  19. The zinc finger protein ZNF658 regulates the transcription of genes involved in zinc homeostasis and affects ribosome biogenesis through the zinc transcriptional regulatory element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogo, Ogo A; Tyson, John; Cockell, Simon J; Howard, Alison; Valentine, Ruth A; Ford, Dianne

    2015-03-01

    We previously identified the ZTRE (zinc transcriptional regulatory element) in genes involved in zinc homeostasis and showed that it mediates transcriptional repression in response to zinc. We now report that ZNF658 acts at the ZTRE. ZNF658 was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry of a band excised after electrophoretic mobility shift assay using a ZTRE probe. The protein contains a KRAB domain and 21 zinc fingers. It has similarity with ZAP1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which regulates the response to zinc restriction, including a conserved DNA binding region we show to be functional also in ZNF658. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeted to ZNF658 abrogated the zinc-induced, ZTRE-dependent reduction in SLC30A5 (ZnT5 gene), SLC30A10 (ZnT10 gene), and CBWD transcripts in human Caco-2 cells and the ability of zinc to repress reporter gene expression from corresponding promoter-reporter constructs. Microarray analysis of the effect of reducing ZNF658 expression by siRNA uncovered a large decrease in rRNA. We find that ZTREs are clustered within the 45S rRNA precursor. We also saw effects on expression of multiple ribosomal proteins. ZNF658 thus links zinc homeostasis with ribosome biogenesis, the most active transcriptional, and hence zinc-demanding, process in the cell. ZNF658 is thus a novel transcriptional regulator that plays a fundamental role in the orchestrated cellular response to zinc availability.

  20. Identification of regulatory network topological units coordinating the genome-wide transcriptional response to glucose in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gosset Guillermo

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucose is the preferred carbon and energy source for Escherichia coli. A complex regulatory network coordinates gene expression, transport and enzyme activities in response to the presence of this sugar. To determine the extent of the cellular response to glucose, we applied an approach combining global transcriptome and regulatory network analyses. Results Transcriptome data from isogenic wild type and crp- strains grown in Luria-Bertani medium (LB or LB + 4 g/L glucose (LB+G were analyzed to identify differentially transcribed genes. We detected 180 and 200 genes displaying increased and reduced relative transcript levels in the presence of glucose, respectively. The observed expression pattern in LB was consistent with a gluconeogenic metabolic state including active transport and interconversion of small molecules and macromolecules, induction of protease-encoding genes and a partial heat shock response. In LB+G, catabolic repression was detected for transport and metabolic interconversion activities. We also detected an increased capacity for de novo synthesis of nucleotides, amino acids and proteins. Cluster analysis of a subset of genes revealed that CRP mediates catabolite repression for most of the genes displaying reduced transcript levels in LB+G, whereas Fis participates in the upregulation of genes under this condition. An analysis of the regulatory network, in terms of topological functional units, revealed 8 interconnected modules which again exposed the importance of Fis and CRP as directly responsible for the coordinated response of the cell. This effect was also seen with other not extensively connected transcription factors such as FruR and PdhR, which showed a consistent response considering media composition. Conclusion This work allowed the identification of eight interconnected regulatory network modules that includes CRP, Fis and other transcriptional factors that respond directly or indirectly to the

  1. Construction of pancreatic cancer double-factor regulatory network based on chip data on the transcriptional level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li-Li; Zhang, Tong; Liu, Bing-Rong; Liu, Tie-Fu; Tao, Na; Zhuang, Li-Wei

    2014-05-01

    Transcription factor (TF) and microRNA (miRNA) have been discovered playing crucial roles in cancer development. However, the effect of TFs and miRNAs in pancreatic cancer pathogenesis remains vague. We attempted to reveal the possible mechanism of pancreatic cancer based on transcription level. Using GSE16515 datasets downloaded from gene expression omnibus database, we first identified the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in pancreatic cancer by the limma package in R. Then the DEGs were mapped into DAVID to conduct the kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analysis. TFs and miRNAs that DEGs significantly enriched were identified by Fisher's test, and then the pancreatic cancer double-factor regulatory network was constructed. In our study, total 1117 DEGs were identified and they significantly enriched in 4 KEGG pathways. A double-factor regulatory network was established, including 29 DEGs, 24 TFs, 25 miRNAs. In the network, LAMC2, BRIP1 and miR155 were identified which may be involved in pancreatic cancer development. In conclusion, the double-factor regulatory network was found to play an important role in pancreatic cancer progression and our results shed new light on the molecular mechanism of pancreatic cancer.

  2. The phytohormone ethylene enhances bacterial cellulose production, regulates CRP/FNRKx transcription and causes differential gene expression within the cellulose synthesis operon of Komagataeibacter (Gluconacetobacter xylinus ATCC 53582

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    Richard Vincent Augimeri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Komagataeibacter (formerly Gluconacetobacter xylinus ATCC 53582 is a plant-associated model organism for bacterial cellulose (BC biosynthesis. This bacterium inhabits the carposphere where it interacts with fruit through the bi-directional transfer of phytohormones. The majority of research regarding K. xylinus has been focused on identifying and characterizing structural and regulatory factors that control BC biosynthesis, but its ecophysiology has been generally overlooked. Ethylene is a phytohormone that regulates plant development in a variety of ways, but is most commonly known for its positive role on fruit ripening. In this study, we utilized ethephon (2-chloroethylphosphonic acid to produce in situ ethylene to investigate the effects of this phytohormone on BC production and the expression of genes known to be involved in K. xylinus BC biosynthesis (bcsA, bcsB, bcsC, bcsD, cmcAx, ccpAx and bglAx. Using pellicle assays and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR, we demonstrate that ethephon-derived ethylene enhances BC directly in K. xylinus by up-regulating the expression of bcsA and bcsB, and indirectly though the up-regulation of cmcAx, ccpAx and bglAx. We confirm that IAA directly decreases BC biosynthesis by showing that IAA down-regulates bcsA expression. Similarly, we confirm that ABA indirectly influences BC biosynthesis by showing it does not affect the expression of bcs operon genes. In addition, we are the first to report the ethylene and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA induced differential expression of genes within the bacterial cellulose synthesis (bcs operon. Using bioinformatics we have identified a novel phytohormone-regulated CRP/FNRKx transcription factor and provide evidence that it influences BC biosynthesis in K. xylinus. Lastly, utilizing current and previous data, we propose a model for the phytohormone-mediated fruit-bacteria interactions that K. xylinus experiences in nature.

  3. The Phytohormone Ethylene Enhances Cellulose Production, Regulates CRP/FNRKx Transcription and Causes Differential Gene Expression within the Bacterial Cellulose Synthesis Operon of Komagataeibacter (Gluconacetobacter) xylinus ATCC 53582.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augimeri, Richard V; Strap, Janice L

    2015-01-01

    Komagataeibacter (formerly Gluconacetobacter) xylinus ATCC 53582 is a plant-associated model organism for bacterial cellulose (BC) biosynthesis. This bacterium inhabits the carposphere where it interacts with fruit through the bi-directional transfer of phytohormones. The majority of research regarding K. xylinus has been focused on identifying and characterizing structural and regulatory factors that control BC biosynthesis, but its ecophysiology has been generally overlooked. Ethylene is a phytohormone that regulates plant development in a variety of ways, but is most commonly known for its positive role on fruit ripening. In this study, we utilized ethephon (2-chloroethylphosphonic acid) to produce in situ ethylene to investigate the effects of this phytohormone on BC production and the expression of genes known to be involved in K. xylinus BC biosynthesis (bcsA, bcsB, bcsC, bcsD, cmcAx, ccpAx and bglAx). Using pellicle assays and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), we demonstrate that ethephon-derived ethylene enhances BC directly in K. xylinus by up-regulating the expression of bcsA and bcsB, and indirectly though the up-regulation of cmcAx, ccpAx, and bglAx. We confirm that IAA directly decreases BC biosynthesis by showing that IAA down-regulates bcsA expression. Similarly, we confirm that ABA indirectly influences BC biosynthesis by showing it does not affect the expression of bcs operon genes. In addition, we are the first to report the ethylene and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) induced differential expression of genes within the bacterial cellulose synthesis (bcs) operon. Using bioinformatics we have identified a novel phytohormone-regulated CRP/FNRKx transcription factor and provide evidence that it influences BC biosynthesis in K. xylinus. Lastly, utilizing current and previous data, we propose a model for the phytohormone-mediated fruit-bacteria interactions that K. xylinus experiences in nature.

  4. The Campylobacter jejuni MarR-like transcriptional regulators RrpA and RrpB both influence bacterial responses to oxidative and aerobic stresses

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    Ozan eGundogdu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The ability of the human intestinal pathogen Campylobacter jejuni to respond to oxidative stress is central to bacterial survival both in vivo during infection and in the environment. Re-annotation of the C. jejuni NCTC11168 genome revealed the presence of two MarR-type transcriptional regulators Cj1546 and Cj1556, originally annotated as hypothetical proteins, which we have designated RrpA and RrpB (regulator of response to peroxide respectively. Previously we demonstrated a role for RrpB in both oxidative and aerobic (O2 stress and that RrpB was a DNA binding protein with auto-regulatory activity, typical of MarR-type transcriptional regulators. In this study, we show that RrpA is also a DNA binding protein and that a rrpA mutant in strain 11168H exhibits increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide oxidative stress. Mutation of either rrpA or rrpB reduces catalase (KatA expression. However a rrpAB double mutant exhibits higher levels of resistance to hydrogen peroxide oxidative stress, with levels of KatA expression similar to the wild-type strain. Neither the rrpA nor rrpB mutant exhibits any significant difference in sensitivity to either cumene hydroperoxide or menadione oxidative stresses, but both mutants exhibit a reduced ability to survive aerobic (O2 stress, enhanced biofilm formation and reduced virulence in the Galleria mellonella infection model. The rrpAB double mutant exhibits wild-type levels of biofilm formation and wild-type levels of virulence in the Galleria mellonella infection model. Together these data indicate a role for both RrpA and RrpB in the C. jejuni peroxide oxidative and aerobic (O2 stress responses, enhancing bacterial survival in vivo and in the environment.

  5. Integrative bioinformatics analysis of genomic and proteomic approaches to understand the transcriptional regulatory program in coronary artery disease pathways.

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    Rajani Kanth Vangala

    Full Text Available Patients with cardiovascular disease show a panel of differentially regulated serum biomarkers indicative of modulation of several pathways from disease onset to progression. Few of these biomarkers have been proposed for multimarker risk prediction methods. However, the underlying mechanism of the expression changes and modulation of the pathways is not yet addressed in entirety. Our present work focuses on understanding the regulatory mechanisms at transcriptional level by identifying the core and specific transcription factors that regulate the coronary artery disease associated pathways. Using the principles of systems biology we integrated the genomics and proteomics data with computational tools. We selected biomarkers from 7 different pathways based on their association with the disease and assayed 24 biomarkers along with gene expression studies and built network modules which are highly regulated by 5 core regulators PPARG, EGR1, ETV1, KLF7 and ESRRA. These network modules in turn comprise of biomarkers from different pathways showing that the core regulatory transcription factors may work together in differential regulation of several pathways potentially leading to the disease. This kind of analysis can enhance the elucidation of mechanisms in the disease and give better strategies of developing multimarker module based risk predictions.

  6. Integrative bioinformatics analysis of genomic and proteomic approaches to understand the transcriptional regulatory program in coronary artery disease pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangala, Rajani Kanth; Ravindran, Vandana; Ghatge, Madan; Shanker, Jayashree; Arvind, Prathima; Bindu, Hima; Shekar, Meghala; Rao, Veena S

    2013-01-01

    Patients with cardiovascular disease show a panel of differentially regulated serum biomarkers indicative of modulation of several pathways from disease onset to progression. Few of these biomarkers have been proposed for multimarker risk prediction methods. However, the underlying mechanism of the expression changes and modulation of the pathways is not yet addressed in entirety. Our present work focuses on understanding the regulatory mechanisms at transcriptional level by identifying the core and specific transcription factors that regulate the coronary artery disease associated pathways. Using the principles of systems biology we integrated the genomics and proteomics data with computational tools. We selected biomarkers from 7 different pathways based on their association with the disease and assayed 24 biomarkers along with gene expression studies and built network modules which are highly regulated by 5 core regulators PPARG, EGR1, ETV1, KLF7 and ESRRA. These network modules in turn comprise of biomarkers from different pathways showing that the core regulatory transcription factors may work together in differential regulation of several pathways potentially leading to the disease. This kind of analysis can enhance the elucidation of mechanisms in the disease and give better strategies of developing multimarker module based risk predictions.

  7. Genome-Wide Mapping of Collier In Vivo Binding Sites Highlights Its Hierarchical Position in Different Transcription Regulatory Networks.

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    Mathilde de Taffin

    Full Text Available Collier, the single Drosophila COE (Collier/EBF/Olf-1 transcription factor, is required in several developmental processes, including head patterning and specification of muscle and neuron identity during embryogenesis. To identify direct Collier (Col targets in different cell types, we used ChIP-seq to map Col binding sites throughout the genome, at mid-embryogenesis. In vivo Col binding peaks were associated to 415 potential direct target genes. Gene Ontology analysis revealed a strong enrichment in proteins with DNA binding and/or transcription-regulatory properties. Characterization of a selection of candidates, using transgenic CRM-reporter assays, identified direct Col targets in dorso-lateral somatic muscles and specific neuron types in the central nervous system. These data brought new evidence that Col direct control of the expression of the transcription regulators apterous and eyes-absent (eya is critical to specifying neuronal identities. They also showed that cross-regulation between col and eya in muscle progenitor cells is required for specification of muscle identity, revealing a new parallel between the myogenic regulatory networks operating in Drosophila and vertebrates. Col regulation of eya, both in specific muscle and neuronal lineages, may illustrate one mechanism behind the evolutionary diversification of Col biological roles.

  8. Characterization of a putative cis-regulatory element that controls transcriptional activity of the pig uroplakin II gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Deug-Nam; Park, Mi-Ryung; Park, Jong-Yi; Cho, Ssang-Goo; Park, Chankyu; Oh, Jae-Wook; Song, Hyuk; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2011-07-01

    Uroplakin II (UPII) is a one of the integral membrane proteins synthesized as a major differentiation product of mammalian urothelium. UPII gene expression is bladder specific and differentiation dependent, but little is known about its transcription response elements and molecular mechanism. To identify the cis-regulatory elements in the pig UPII (pUPII) gene promoter region, we constructed pUPII 5' upstream region deletion mutants and demonstrated that each of the deletion mutants participates in controlling the expression of the pUPII gene in human bladder carcinoma RT4 cells. We also identified a new core promoter region and putative negative cis-regulatory element within a minimal promoter region. In addition, we showed that hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF4) can directly bind in the pUPII core promoter (5F-1) region, which plays a critical role in controlling promoter activity. Transient cotransfection experiments showed that HNF4 positively regulates pUPII gene promoter activity. Thus, the binding element and its binding protein, HNF4 transcription factor, may be involved in the mechanism that specifically regulates pUPII gene transcription.

  9. The chloroplast transcription apparatus from mustard (Sinapis alba L.). Evidence for three different transcription factors which resemble bacterial sigma factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiller, K; Eisermann, A; Link, G

    1991-05-23

    A chloroplast protein fraction with sigma-like activity [Bülow, S. & Link, G. (1988) Plant Mol. Biol. 10, 349-357], was further purified and characterized. Chromatography on heparin-Sepharose, DEAE-Sepharose and Sephacryl S-300 led to the separation of three sigma-like factors (SLF) polypeptides with Mr 67,000 (SLF67), 52,000 (SLF52) and 29,000 (SLF29). None of these polypeptides bind to DNA itself, but each one confers enhanced binding and transcriptional activity when added to Escherichia coli RNA-polymerase core enzyme and DNA fragments carrying a chloroplast promoter. SLF67, SLF52, and SLF29 differ in their ionic-strength requirements for activity. They each mediate the binding to promoters of the chloroplast genes psbA, trnQ, and rps16, with different efficiencies. It is suggested that chloroplast transcription in vivo might be controlled at least in part by these functionally distinct factors.

  10. Identifying significant genetic regulatory networks in the prostate cancer from microarray data based on transcription factor analysis and conditional independency

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    Yeh Cheng-Yu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer is a world wide leading cancer and it is characterized by its aggressive metastasis. According to the clinical heterogeneity, prostate cancer displays different stages and grades related to the aggressive metastasis disease. Although numerous studies used microarray analysis and traditional clustering method to identify the individual genes during the disease processes, the important gene regulations remain unclear. We present a computational method for inferring genetic regulatory networks from micorarray data automatically with transcription factor analysis and conditional independence testing to explore the potential significant gene regulatory networks that are correlated with cancer, tumor grade and stage in the prostate cancer. Results To deal with missing values in microarray data, we used a K-nearest-neighbors (KNN algorithm to determine the precise expression values. We applied web services technology to wrap the bioinformatics toolkits and databases to automatically extract the promoter regions of DNA sequences and predicted the transcription factors that regulate the gene expressions. We adopt the microarray datasets consists of 62 primary tumors, 41 normal prostate tissues from Stanford Microarray Database (SMD as a target dataset to evaluate our method. The predicted results showed that the possible biomarker genes related to cancer and denoted the androgen functions and processes may be in the development of the prostate cancer and promote the cell death in cell cycle. Our predicted results showed that sub-networks of genes SREBF1, STAT6 and PBX1 are strongly related to a high extent while ETS transcription factors ELK1, JUN and EGR2 are related to a low extent. Gene SLC22A3 may explain clinically the differentiation associated with the high grade cancer compared with low grade cancer. Enhancer of Zeste Homolg 2 (EZH2 regulated by RUNX1 and STAT3 is correlated to the pathological stage

  11. Comparative analysis of acute and chronic corticosteroid pharmacogenomic effects in rat liver: Transcriptional dynamics and regulatory structures

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    DuBois Debra C

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comprehensively understanding corticosteroid pharmacogenomic effects is an essential step towards an insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms for both beneficial and detrimental clinical effects. Nevertheless, even in a single tissue different methods of corticosteroid administration can induce different patterns of expression and regulatory control structures. Therefore, rich in vivo datasets of pharmacological time-series with two dosing regimens sampled from rat liver are examined for temporal patterns of changes in gene expression and their regulatory commonalities. Results The study addresses two issues, including (1 identifying significant transcriptional modules coupled with dynamic expression patterns and (2 predicting relevant common transcriptional controls to better understand the underlying mechanisms of corticosteroid adverse effects. Following the orientation of meta-analysis, an extended computational approach that explores the concept of agreement matrix from consensus clustering has been proposed with the aims of identifying gene clusters that share common expression patterns across multiple dosing regimens as well as handling challenges in the analysis of microarray data from heterogeneous sources, e.g. different platforms and time-grids in this study. Six significant transcriptional modules coupled with typical patterns of expression have been identified. Functional analysis reveals that virtually all enriched functions (gene ontologies, pathways in these modules are shown to be related to metabolic processes, implying the importance of these modules in adverse effects under the administration of corticosteroids. Relevant putative transcriptional regulators (e.g. RXRF, FKHD, SP1F are also predicted to provide another source of information towards better understanding the complexities of expression patterns and the underlying regulatory mechanisms of those modules. Conclusions We have proposed a

  12. Genetic Variants in the STMN1 Transcriptional Regulatory Region Affect Promoter Activity and Fear Behavior in English Springer Spaniels.

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    Xiaolin Ding

    Full Text Available Stathmin 1 (STMN1 is a neuronal growth-associated protein that is involved in microtubule dynamics and plays an important role in synaptic outgrowth and plasticity. Given that STMN1 affects fear behavior, we hypothesized that genetic variations in the STMN1 transcriptional regulatory region affect gene transcription activity and control fear behavior. In this study, two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, g. -327 A>G and g. -125 C>T, were identified in 317 English Springer Spaniels. A bioinformatics analysis revealed that both were loci located in the canine STMN1 putative promoter region and affected transcription factor binding. A statistical analysis revealed that the TT genotype at g.-125 C>T produced a significantly greater fear level than that of the CC genotype (P < 0.05. Furthermore, the H4H4 (GTGT haplotype combination was significantly associated with canine fear behavior (P < 0.01. Using serially truncated constructs of the STMN1 promoters and the luciferase reporter, we found that a 395 bp (-312 nt to +83 nt fragment constituted the core promoter region. The luciferase assay also revealed that the H4 (GT haplotype promoter had higher activity than that of other haplotypes. Overall, our results suggest that the two SNPs in the canine STMN1 promoter region could affect canine fear behavior by altering STMN1 transcriptional activity.

  13. A Regulatory Circuit Composed of a Transcription Factor, IscR, and a Regulatory RNA, RyhB, Controls Fe-S Cluster Delivery

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    Pierre Mandin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fe-S clusters are cofactors conserved through all domains of life. Once assembled by dedicated ISC and/or SUF scaffolds, Fe-S clusters are conveyed to their apo-targets via A-type carrier proteins (ATCs. Escherichia coli possesses four such ATCs. ErpA is the only ATC essential under aerobiosis. Recent studies reported a possible regulation of the erpA mRNA by the small RNA (sRNA RyhB, which controls the expression of many genes under iron starvation. Surprisingly, erpA has not been identified in recent transcriptomic analysis of the iron starvation response, thus bringing into question the actual physiological significance of the putative regulation of erpA by RyhB. Using an sRNA library, we show that among 26 sRNAs, only RyhB represses the expression of an erpA-lacZ translational fusion. We further demonstrate that this repression occurs during iron starvation. Using mutational analysis, we show that RyhB base pairs to the erpA mRNA, inducing its disappearance. In addition, IscR, the master regulator of Fe-S homeostasis, represses expression of erpA at the transcriptional level when iron is abundant, but depleting iron from the medium alleviates this repression. The conjunction of transcriptional derepression by IscR and posttranscriptional repression by RyhB under Fe-limiting conditions is best described as an incoherent regulatory circuit. This double regulation allows full expression of erpA at iron concentrations for which Fe-S biogenesis switches from the ISC to the SUF system. We further provide evidence that this regulatory circuit coordinates ATC usage to iron availability.

  14. The transcriptional regulatory network of Corynebacterium jeikeium K411 and its interaction with metabolic routes contributing to human body odor formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzantny, Helena; Schröder, Jasmin; Strotmeier, Jasmin; Fredrich, Eugenie; Brune, Iris; Tauch, Andreas

    2012-06-15

    Lipophilic corynebacteria are involved in the generation of volatile odorous products in the process of human body odor formation by degrading skin lipids and specific odor precursors. Therefore, these bacteria represent appropriate model systems for the cosmetic industry to examine axillary malodor formation on the molecular level. To understand the transcriptional control of metabolic pathways involved in this process, the transcriptional regulatory network of the lipophilic axilla isolate Corynebacterium jeikeium K411 was reconstructed from the complete genome sequence. This bioinformatic approach detected a gene-regulatory repertoire of 83 candidate proteins, including 56 DNA-binding transcriptional regulators, nine two-component systems, nine sigma factors, and nine regulators with diverse physiological functions. Furthermore, a cross-genome comparison among selected corynebacterial species of the taxonomic cluster 3 revealed a common gene-regulatory repertoire of 44 transcriptional regulators, including the MarR-like regulator Jk0257, which is exclusively encoded in the genomes of this taxonomical subline. The current network reconstruction comprises 48 transcriptional regulators and 674 gene-regulatory interactions that were assigned to five interconnected functional modules. Most genes involved in lipid degradation are under the combined control of the global cAMP-sensing transcriptional regulator GlxR and the LuxR-family regulator RamA, probably reflecting the essential role of lipid degradation in C. jeikeium. This study provides the first genome-scale in silico analysis of the transcriptional regulation of metabolism in a lipophilic bacterium involved in the formation of human body odor.

  15. Comparative study of discretization methods of microarray data for inferring transcriptional regulatory networks

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    Ji Wei

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray data discretization is a basic preprocess for many algorithms of gene regulatory network inference. Some common discretization methods in informatics are used to discretize microarray data. Selection of the discretization method is often arbitrary and no systematic comparison of different discretization has been conducted, in the context of gene regulatory network inference from time series gene expression data. Results In this study, we propose a new discretization method "bikmeans", and compare its performance with four other widely-used discretization methods using different datasets, modeling algorithms and number of intervals. Sensitivities, specificities and total accuracies were calculated and statistical analysis was carried out. Bikmeans method always gave high total accuracies. Conclusions Our results indicate that proper discretization methods can consistently improve gene regulatory network inference independent of network modeling algorithms and datasets. Our new method, bikmeans, resulted in significant better total accuracies than other methods.

  16. Bacterial β-(1,3)-glucan prevents DSS-induced IBD by restoring the reduced population of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang-Ho; Park, Min; Ji, Kon-Young; Lee, Hwa-Youn; Jang, Ji-Hun; Yoon, Il-Joo; Oh, Seung-Su; Kim, Su-Man; Jeong, Yun-Hwa; Yun, Chul-Ho; Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Lee, In-Young; Choi, Ha-Rim; Ko, Ki-sung; Kang, Hyung-Sik

    2014-10-01

    Bacterial β-(1,3)-glucan has more advantages in terms of cost, yield and efficiency than that derived from mushrooms, plants, yeasts and fungi. We have previously developed a novel and high-yield β-(1,3)-glucan produced by Agrobacterium sp. R259. This study aimed to elucidate the functional mechanism and therapeutic efficacy of bacterial β-(1,3)-glucan in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).Mice were orally pretreated with bacterial β-(1,3)-glucan at daily doses of 2.5 or 5mg/kg for 2 weeks. After 6 days of DSS treatment, clinical assessment of IBD severity and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines were evaluated. In vivo cell proliferation was examined by immunohistochemistry using Ki-67 and ER-TR7 antibodies. The frequency of regulatory T cells (Tregs) was analyzed by flow cytometry. Natural killer (NK) activity and IgA level were evaluated using NK cytotoxicity assay and ELISA.The deterioration of body weight gain, colonic architecture, disease score and histological score was recovered in DSS-induced IBD mice when pretreated with bacterial β-(1,3)-glucan. The recruitment of macrophages and the gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-17A/F, were markedly decreased in the colon of β-(1,3)-glucan-pretreated mice. β-(1,3)-Glucan induced the recovery of Tregs in terms of their frequency in DSS-induced IBD mice. Intriguingly, β-(1,3)-glucan reversed the functional defects of NK cells and excessive IgA production in DSS-induced IBD mice.We conclude that bacterial β-(1,3)-glucan prevented the progression of DSS-induced IBD by recovering the reduction of Tregs, functional defect of NK cells and excessive IgA production.

  17. Possible interaction between the bacterial transcription factor ArtA and the eukaryotic RNA polymerase III promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsutani, Sachiko

    2016-06-01

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerase III (RNAP III) transcribes tRNA genes and short interspersed elements that have internal promoters consisting of A- and B-blocks. The B-block binding subunit of the transcription initiation factor TFIIIC binds to the B-block. The mobile bacterial insertion sequence (IS) 1 contains a RNAP III promoter-like sequence, which stimulates bacterial transcription along with the bacterial ArtA protein. Here, the DNA-binding ability of ArtA was examined in vitro using a simple, newly developed method. Various DNA fragments, including RNAP III promoter fragments, were separately incubated with purified ArtA, and then loaded onto a polyacrylamide gel. Since DNAs bound by ArtA remain in the gel wells during electrophoresis, SDS was added into the wells at the electrophoresis halfway point. It was hypothesized that SDS would dissociate the DNA-ArtA complexes in the wells, and then the DNAs would begin to migrate. In fact, new bands appeared in all of the lanes at similar intensities, indicating that ArtA binds nonspecifically to DNA. Therefore, labeled wild-type RNAP III promoter fragments were incubated with either the unlabeled wild-type or mutant fragments and ArtA, and electrophoresed. The B-block(-like) sequences of IS1, a human Alu element, and an anuran tRNA gene were important for binding to ArtA. Additionally, in silico analyses revealed the presence of the RNAP III promoter-like structures in the IS1 isoforms and the IS3 family elements. These results suggest the presence of parts of the RNAP III transcription machinery in bacteria, and might imply that its prototype existed in the common ancestor.

  18. Fruit specific variability in capsaicinoid accumulation and transcription of structural and regulatory genes in Capsicum fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyhaninejad, Neda; Curry, Jeanne; Romero, Joslynn; O'Connell, Mary A

    2014-02-01

    Accumulation of capsaicinoids in the placental tissue of ripening chile (Capsicum spp.) fruit follows the coordinated expression of multiple biosynthetic enzymes producing the substrates for capsaicin synthase. Transcription factors are likely agents to regulate expression of these biosynthetic genes. Placental RNAs from habanero fruit (Capsicum chinense) were screened for expression of candidate transcription factors; with two candidate genes identified, both in the ERF family of transcription factors. Characterization of these transcription factors, Erf and Jerf, in nine chile cultivars with distinct capsaicinoid contents demonstrated a correlation of expression with pungency. Amino acid variants were observed in both ERF and JERF from different chile cultivars; none of these changes involved the DNA binding domains. Little to no transcription of Erf was detected in non-pungent Capsium annuum or C. chinense mutants. This correlation was characterized at an individual fruit level in a set of jalapeño (C. annuum) lines again with distinct and variable capsaicinoid contents. Both Erf and Jerf are expressed early in fruit development, 16-20 days post-anthesis, at times prior to the accumulation of capsaicinoids in the placental tissues. These data support the hypothesis that these two members of the complex ERF family participate in regulation of the pungency phenotype in chile.

  19. Differentiation state-specific mitochondrial dynamic regulatory networks are revealed by global transcriptional analysis of the developing chicken lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauss, Daniel; Basu, Subhasree; Rajakaruna, Suren; Ma, Zhiwei; Gau, Victoria; Anastas, Sara; Brennan, Lisa A; Hejtmancik, J Fielding; Menko, A Sue; Kantorow, Marc

    2014-06-13

    The mature eye lens contains a surface layer of epithelial cells called the lens epithelium that requires a functional mitochondrial population to maintain the homeostasis and transparency of the entire lens. The lens epithelium overlies a core of terminally differentiated fiber cells that must degrade their mitochondria to achieve lens transparency. These distinct mitochondrial populations make the lens a useful model system to identify those genes that regulate the balance between mitochondrial homeostasis and elimination. Here we used an RNA sequencing and bioinformatics approach to identify the transcript levels of all genes expressed by distinct regions of the lens epithelium and maturing fiber cells of the embryonic Gallus gallus (chicken) lens. Our analysis detected more than 15,000 unique transcripts expressed by the embryonic chicken lens. Of these, more than 3000 transcripts exhibited significant differences in expression between lens epithelial cells and fiber cells. Multiple transcripts coding for separate mitochondrial homeostatic and degradation mechanisms were identified to exhibit preferred patterns of expression in lens epithelial cells that require mitochondria relative to lens fiber cells that require mitochondrial elimination. These included differences in the expression levels of metabolic (DUT, PDK1, SNPH), autophagy (ATG3, ATG4B, BECN1, FYCO1, WIPI1), and mitophagy (BNIP3L/NIX, BNIP3, PARK2, p62/SQSTM1) transcripts between lens epithelial cells and lens fiber cells. These data provide a comprehensive window into all genes transcribed by the lens and those mitochondrial regulatory and degradation pathways that function to maintain mitochondrial populations in the lens epithelium and to eliminate mitochondria in maturing lens fiber cells.

  20. The colitis-associated transcriptional profile of commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron enhances adaptive immune responses to a bacterial antigen.

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    Jonathan J Hansen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD may be caused in part by aberrant immune responses to commensal intestinal microbes including the well-characterized anaerobic gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (B. theta. Healthy, germ-free HLA-B27 transgenic (Tg rats develop chronic colitis when colonized with complex gut commensal bacteria whereas non-transgenic (nTg rats remain disease-free. However, the role of B. theta in causing disease in Tg rats is unknown nor is much known about how gut microbes respond to host inflammation. METHODS: Tg and nTg rats were monoassociated with a human isolate of B. theta. Colonic inflammation was assessed by histologic scoring and tissue pro-inflammatory cytokine measurement. Whole genome transcriptional profiling of B. theta recovered from ceca was performed using custom GeneChips and data analyzed using dChip, Significance Analysis of Microarrays, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA software. Western Blots were used to determine adaptive immune responses to a differentially expressed B. theta gene. RESULTS: B. theta monoassociated Tg rats, but not nTg or germ-free controls, developed chronic colitis. Transcriptional profiles of cecal B. theta were significantly different in Tg vs. nTg rats. GSEA revealed that genes in KEGG canonical pathways involved in bacterial growth and metabolism were downregulated in B. theta from Tg rats with colitis though luminal bacterial concentrations were unaffected. Bacterial genes in the Gene Ontology molecular function "receptor activity", most of which encode nutrient binding proteins, were significantly upregulated in B. theta from Tg rats and include a SusC homolog that induces adaptive immune responses in Tg rats. CONCLUSIONS: B. theta induces colitis in HLA-B27 Tg rats, which is associated with regulation of bacterial genes in metabolic and nutrient binding pathways that may affect host immune responses. These studies of the host-microbial dialogue may lead to

  1. Transcriptional Landscape of Human Tissue Lymphocytes Unveils Uniqueness of Tumor-Infiltrating T Regulatory Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Simone, M.; Arrigoni, A.; Rossetti, G.; Gruarin, P.; Ranzani, V.; Politano, C.; Bonnal, R.J.; Provasi, E.; Sarnicola, M.L.; Panzeri, I.; Moro, M.; Crosti, M.; Mazzara, S.; Vaira, V.; Bosari, S.; Palleschi, A.; Santambrogio, L.; Bovo, G.; Zucchini, N.; Totis, M.; Gianotti, L.; Cesana, G.; Perego, R.A.; Maroni, N.; Pisani Ceretti, A.; Opocher, E.; De Francesco, R.; Geginat, J.; Stunnenberg, H.; Abrignani, S.; Pagani, M.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating regulatory T lymphocytes (Treg) can suppress effector T cells specific for tumor antigens. Deeper molecular definitions of tumor-infiltrating-lymphocytes could thus offer therapeutic opportunities. Transcriptomes of T helper 1 (Th1), Th17, and Treg cells infiltrating colorectal or

  2. Analysis of transcription regulatory regions of embryonic chicken pepsinogen (ECPg) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanuki, Kumiko; Yasugi, Sadao

    2003-09-01

    Genes encoding pepsinogens, zymogens of digestive enzyme pepsins, are expressed specifically in the gland epithelial cells of the vertebrate stomach, and their expression is also developmentally regulated, therefore providing a good model for the analysis of transcriptional regulation of genes. In the development of chicken embryonic stomach, the epithelium invaginates into the mesenchyme and forms glands and gland epithelial cells then begin to express embryonic chicken pepsinogen (ECPg) gene. It has been shown that cGATA5 binds directly GATA binding sites located within 1.1-kbp upstream of ECPg gene and activates its transcription. To find more precisely the sequences necessary for ECPg gene transcription, we carried out deletion and mutation analysis with 1.1-kbp upstream region. The results suggest that binding of GATA factor to three GATA binding sites within the upstream region -656 to -419 synergistically regulates ECPg expression in the gland epithelial cells.

  3. Bovine proteins containing poly-glutamine repeats are often polymorphic and enriched for components of transcriptional regulatory complexes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whan, Vicki

    2010-11-23

    Abstract Background About forty human diseases are caused by repeat instability mutations. A distinct subset of these diseases is the result of extreme expansions of polymorphic trinucleotide repeats; typically CAG repeats encoding poly-glutamine (poly-Q) tracts in proteins. Polymorphic repeat length variation is also apparent in human poly-Q encoding genes from normal individuals. As these coding sequence repeats are subject to selection in mammals, it has been suggested that normal variations in some of these typically highly conserved genes are implicated in morphological differences between species and phenotypic variations within species. At present, poly-Q encoding genes in non-human mammalian species are poorly documented, as are their functions and propensities for polymorphic variation. Results The current investigation identified 178 bovine poly-Q encoding genes (Q ≥ 5) and within this group, 26 genes with orthologs in both human and mouse that did not contain poly-Q repeats. The bovine poly-Q encoding genes typically had ubiquitous expression patterns although there was bias towards expression in epithelia, brain and testes. They were also characterised by unusually large sizes. Analysis of gene ontology terms revealed that the encoded proteins were strongly enriched for functions associated with transcriptional regulation and many contributed to physical interaction networks in the nucleus where they presumably act cooperatively in transcriptional regulatory complexes. In addition, the coding sequence CAG repeats in some bovine genes impacted mRNA splicing thereby generating unusual transcriptional diversity, which in at least one instance was tissue-specific. The poly-Q encoding genes were prioritised using multiple criteria for their likelihood of being polymorphic and then the highest ranking group was experimentally tested for polymorphic variation within a cattle diversity panel. Extensive and meiotically stable variation was identified

  4. Bovine proteins containing poly-glutamine repeats are often polymorphic and enriched for components of transcriptional regulatory complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barendse William

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About forty human diseases are caused by repeat instability mutations. A distinct subset of these diseases is the result of extreme expansions of polymorphic trinucleotide repeats; typically CAG repeats encoding poly-glutamine (poly-Q tracts in proteins. Polymorphic repeat length variation is also apparent in human poly-Q encoding genes from normal individuals. As these coding sequence repeats are subject to selection in mammals, it has been suggested that normal variations in some of these typically highly conserved genes are implicated in morphological differences between species and phenotypic variations within species. At present, poly-Q encoding genes in non-human mammalian species are poorly documented, as are their functions and propensities for polymorphic variation. Results The current investigation identified 178 bovine poly-Q encoding genes (Q ≥ 5 and within this group, 26 genes with orthologs in both human and mouse that did not contain poly-Q repeats. The bovine poly-Q encoding genes typically had ubiquitous expression patterns although there was bias towards expression in epithelia, brain and testes. They were also characterised by unusually large sizes. Analysis of gene ontology terms revealed that the encoded proteins were strongly enriched for functions associated with transcriptional regulation and many contributed to physical interaction networks in the nucleus where they presumably act cooperatively in transcriptional regulatory complexes. In addition, the coding sequence CAG repeats in some bovine genes impacted mRNA splicing thereby generating unusual transcriptional diversity, which in at least one instance was tissue-specific. The poly-Q encoding genes were prioritised using multiple criteria for their likelihood of being polymorphic and then the highest ranking group was experimentally tested for polymorphic variation within a cattle diversity panel. Extensive and meiotically stable variation was

  5. The BAF complex interacts with Pax6 in adult neural progenitors to establish a neurogenic cross-regulatory transcriptional network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninkovic, Jovica; Steiner-Mezzadri, Andrea; Jawerka, Melanie; Akinci, Umut; Masserdotti, Giacomo; Petricca, Stefania; Fischer, Judith; von Holst, Alexander; Beckers, Johanes; Lie, Chichung D; Petrik, David; Miller, Erik; Tang, Jiong; Wu, Jiang; Lefebvre, Veronique; Demmers, Jeroen; Eisch, Amelia; Metzger, Daniel; Crabtree, Gerald; Irmler, Martin; Poot, Raymond; Götz, Magdalena

    2013-10-03

    Numerous transcriptional regulators of neurogenesis have been identified in the developing and adult brain, but how neurogenic fate is programmed at the epigenetic level remains poorly defined. Here, we report that the transcription factor Pax6 directly interacts with the Brg1-containing BAF complex in adult neural progenitors. Deletion of either Brg1 or Pax6 in the subependymal zone (SEZ) causes the progeny of adult neural stem cells to convert to the ependymal lineage within the SEZ while migrating neuroblasts convert to different glial lineages en route to or in the olfactory bulb (OB). Genome-wide analyses reveal that the majority of genes downregulated in the Brg1 null SEZ and OB contain Pax6 binding sites and are also downregulated in Pax6 null SEZ and OB. Downstream of the Pax6-BAF complex, we find that Sox11, Nfib, and Pou3f4 form a transcriptional cross-regulatory network that drives neurogenesis and can convert postnatal glia into neurons. Taken together, elements of our work identify a tripartite effector network activated by Pax6-BAF that programs neuronal fate.

  6. The post-transcriptional regulatory system CSR controls the balance of metabolic pools in upper glycolysis of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Manon; Ropers, Delphine; Letisse, Fabien; Laguerre, Sandrine; Portais, Jean-Charles; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel; Enjalbert, Brice

    2016-05-01

    Metabolic control in Escherichia coli is a complex process involving multilevel regulatory systems but the involvement of post-transcriptional regulation is uncertain. The post-transcriptional factor CsrA is stated as being the only regulator essential for the use of glycolytic substrates. A dozen enzymes in the central carbon metabolism (CCM) have been reported as potentially controlled by CsrA, but its impact on the CCM functioning has not been demonstrated. Here, a multiscale analysis was performed in a wild-type strain and its isogenic mutant attenuated for CsrA (including growth parameters, gene expression levels, metabolite pools, abundance of enzymes and fluxes). Data integration and regulation analysis showed a coordinated control of the expression of glycolytic enzymes. This also revealed the imbalance of metabolite pools in the csrA mutant upper glycolysis, before the phosphofructokinase PfkA step. This imbalance is associated with a glucose-phosphate stress. Restoring PfkA activity in the csrA mutant strain suppressed this stress and increased the mutant growth rate on glucose. Thus, the carbon storage regulator system is essential for the effective functioning of the upper glycolysis mainly through its control of PfkA. This work demonstrates the pivotal role of post-transcriptional regulation to shape the carbon metabolism.

  7. Homeostatic regulation of supercoiling sensitivity coordinates transcription of the bacterial genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blot, Nicolas; Mavathur, Ramesh; Geertz, Marcel; Travers, Andrew; Muskhelishvili, Georgi

    2006-07-01

    Regulation of cellular growth implies spatiotemporally coordinated programmes of gene transcription. A central question, therefore, is how global transcription is coordinated in the genome. The growth of the unicellular organism Escherichia coli is associated with changes in both the global superhelicity modulated by cellular topoisomerase activity and the relative proportions of the abundant DNA-architectural chromatin proteins. Using a DNA-microarray-based approach that combines mutations in the genes of two important chromatin proteins with induced changes of DNA superhelicity, we demonstrate that genomic transcription is tightly associated with the spatial distribution of supercoiling sensitivity, which in turn depends on chromatin proteins. We further demonstrate that essential metabolic pathways involved in the maintenance of growth respond distinctly to changes of superhelicity. We infer that a homeostatic mechanism organizing the supercoiling sensitivity is coordinating the growth-phase-dependent transcription of the genome.

  8. Functionally distinct regulatory RNAs generated by bidirectional transcription and processing of microRNA loci.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tyler, D.M.; Okamura, K.; Chung, W.J.; Hagen, J.W.; Berezikov, E.; Hannon, G.J.; Lai, E.C

    2008-01-01

    Many microRNA (miRNA) loci exhibit compelling hairpin structures on both sense and antisense strands; however, the possibility that a miRNA gene might produce functional species from its antisense strand has not been examined. We report here that antisense transcription of the Hox miRNA locus mir-ia

  9. Generalized stochastic profiling of transcriptional regulatory heterogeneities in tissues, tumors, and cultured cells

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Single-cell variations in gene and protein expression are important during development and disease. Cell-to-cell heterogeneities can be directly inspected one cell at a time, but global methods are usually not sensitive enough to work with such a small amount of starting material. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for stochastic profiling, a method that infers single-cell regulatory heterogeneities by repeatedly sampling small collections of cells at random. Repeated stochastic sampling is...

  10. Evolutionary remodeling of global regulatory networks during long-term bacterial adaptation to human hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren Damkiær; Yang, Lei; Molin, Søren

    2013-01-01

    The genetic basis of bacterial adaptation to a natural environment has been investigated in a highly successful Pseudomonas aeruginosa lineage (DK2) that evolved within the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) for more than 35 y. During evolution in the CF airways, the DK2 lineage underw...

  11. Architecture of transcriptional regulatory circuits is knitted over the topology of bio-molecular interaction networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soberano de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb; Nielsen, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Background: Uncovering the operating principles underlying cellular processes by using 'omics' data is often a difficult task due to the high-dimensionality of the solution space that spans all interactions among the bio-molecules under consideration. A rational way to overcome this problem...... is to use the topology of bio-molecular interaction networks in order to constrain the solution space. Such approaches systematically integrate the existing biological knowledge with the 'omics' data. Results: Here we introduce a hypothesis-driven method that integrates bio-molecular network topology...... with transcriptome data, thereby allowing the identification of key biological features (Reporter Features) around which transcriptional changes are significantly concentrated. We have combined transcriptome data with different biological networks in order to identify Reporter Gene Ontologies, Reporter Transcription...

  12. Complementary Post Transcriptional Regulatory Information is Detected by PUNCH-P and Ribosome Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zur, Hadas; Aviner, Ranen; Tuller, Tamir

    2016-01-01

    Two novel approaches were recently suggested for genome-wide identification of protein aspects synthesized at a given time. Ribo-Seq is based on sequencing all the ribosome protected mRNA fragments in a cell, while PUNCH-P is based on mass-spectrometric analysis of only newly synthesized proteins. Here we describe the first Ribo-Seq/PUNCH-P comparison via the analysis of mammalian cells during the cell-cycle for detecting relevant differentially expressed genes between G1 and M phase. Our analyses suggest that the two approaches significantly overlap with each other. However, we demonstrate that there are biologically meaningful proteins/genes that can be detected to be post-transcriptionally regulated during the mammalian cell cycle only by each of the approaches, or their consolidation. Such gene sets are enriched with proteins known to be related to intra-cellular signalling pathways such as central cell cycle processes, central gene expression regulation processes, processes related to chromosome segregation, DNA damage, and replication, that are post-transcriptionally regulated during the mammalian cell cycle. Moreover, we show that combining the approaches better predicts steady state changes in protein abundance. The results reported here support the conjecture that for gaining a full post-transcriptional regulation picture one should integrate the two approaches. PMID:26898226

  13. Regulatory role of DREB transcription factors in plant drought, salt and cold tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    rd29A gene of Arabidopsis encodes a LEA-like hydrophilic protein, its expression is induced by drought, high-salt and cold stress. In the promoter region of rd29A gene, there are 2 DRE cis-acting elements involved in responses to these environmental stresses. 5 cDNAs (DREB1A~C and DREB2A~B) encoding DREB transcription factors, which specifically bind to DRE element and control the expression of reporter gene under drought, high-salt and stress, have been isolated by One-Hybrid screening method and with DRE element of rd29A promoter. DREB transcription factors and DRE element function in signal transduction of drought, high-salt and cold stress. One DREB transcription factor can control the expression of several target functional genes involved in plant tolerance to drought, high-salt and cold stress. Thus, it may be an effective strategy to achieve ideal, multiple and fundamental effect for improving plant stress-resistance by DREB gene transfer.

  14. Transcriptional signatures of regulatory and toxic responses to benzo-[a]-pyrene exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schirmer Kristin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small molecule ligands often have multiple effects on the transcriptional program of a cell: they trigger a receptor specific response and additional, indirect responses ("side effects". Distinguishing those responses is important for understanding side effects of drugs and for elucidating molecular mechanisms of toxic chemicals. Results We explored this problem by exposing cells to the environmental contaminant benzo-[a]-pyrene (B[a]P. B[a]P exposure activates the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr and causes toxic stress resulting in transcriptional changes that are not regulated through Ahr. We sought to distinguish these two types of responses based on a time course of expression changes measured after B[a]P exposure. Using Random Forest machine learning we classified 81 primary Ahr responders and 1,308 genes regulated as side effects. Subsequent weighted clustering gave further insight into the connection between expression pattern, mode of regulation, and biological function. Finally, the accuracy of the predictions was supported through extensive experimental validation. Conclusion Using a combination of machine learning followed by extensive experimental validation, we have further expanded the known catalog of genes regulated by the environmentally sensitive transcription factor Ahr. More broadly, this study presents a strategy for distinguishing receptor-dependent responses and side effects based on expression time courses.

  15. Uncovering MicroRNA and Transcription Factor Mediated Regulatory Networks in Glioblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jingchun Sun; Xue Gong; Benjamin Purow; Zhongming Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal brain tumor in humans. Recent studies revealed that patterns of microRNA (miRNA) expression in GBM tissue samples are different from those in normal brain tissues, suggesting that a number of miRNAs play critical roles in the pathogenesis of GBM. However, little is yet known about which miRNAs play central roles in the pathology of GBM and their regulatory mechanisms of action. To address this issue, in this study, we systematically ...

  16. Post-Transcriptional Regulation by the Csr Global Regulatory System in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Kazushi; 鈴木, 一史

    2007-01-01

    In many species of bacteria, the Csr (carbon storage regulator) global regulatory system coordinates the expression of various genes. In Escherichia coli, the central component of this system, CsrA, is a RNA-binding protein. The CsrA is a homodimer and binds to leader segments of target mRNAs, affecting their translation and stability. CsrA activity is regulated by two small non-coding RNAs, CsrB and CsrC. These RNAs contain multiple CsrA-binding sequences and act by sequestering CsrA. In thi...

  17. RNA secondary structures regulate three steps of Rho-dependent transcription termination within a bacterial mRNA leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriner, Michelle A; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2017-01-25

    Transcription termination events in bacteria often require the RNA helicase Rho. Typically, Rho promotes termination at the end of coding sequences, but it can also terminate transcription within leader regions to implement regulatory decisions. Rho-dependent termination requires initial recognition of a Rho utilization (rut) site on a nascent RNA by Rho's primary binding surface. However, it is presently unclear what factors determine the location of transcription termination, how RNA secondary structures influence this process and whether mechanistic differences distinguish constitutive from regulated Rho-dependent terminators. We previously demonstrated that the 5' leader mRNA of the Salmonella corA gene can adopt two mutually exclusive conformations that dictate accessibility of a rut site to Rho. We now report that the corA leader also controls two subsequent steps of Rho-dependent termination. First, the RNA conformation that presents an accessible rut site promotes pausing of RNA polymerase (RNAP) at a single Rho-dependent termination site over 100 nt downstream. Second, an additional RNA stem-loop promotes Rho activity and controls the location at which Rho-dependent termination occurs, despite having no effect on initial Rho binding to the corA leader. Thus, the multi-step nature of Rho-dependent termination may facilitate regulation of a given coding region by multiple cytoplasmic signals.

  18. GATA transcription factor required for immunity to bacterial and fungal pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Kerry

    Full Text Available In the past decade, Caenorhabditis elegans has been used to dissect several genetic pathways involved in immunity; however, little is known about transcription factors that regulate the expression of immune effectors. C. elegans does not appear to have a functional homolog of the key immune transcription factor NF-kappaB. Here we show that that the intestinal GATA transcription factor ELT-2 is required for both immunity to Salmonella enterica and expression of a C-type lectin gene, clec-67, which is expressed in the intestinal cells and is a good marker of S. enterica infection. We also found that ELT-2 is required for immunity to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, and Cryptococcus neoformans. Lack of immune inhibition by DAF-2, which negatively regulates the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16, rescues the hypersusceptibility to pathogens phenotype of elt-2(RNAi animals. Our results indicate that ELT-2 is part of a multi-pathogen defense pathway that regulates innate immunity independently of the DAF-2/DAF-16 signaling pathway.

  19. Transcriptional and antagonistic responses of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 to phylogenetically different bacterial competitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garbeva, P.; Silby, M.W.; Raaijmakers, J.M.; Levy, S.B.; Boer, de W.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of soil bacteria to successfully compete with a range of other microbial species is crucial for their growth and survival in the nutrient-limited soil environment. In the present work, we studied the behavior and transcriptional responses of soil-inhabiting Pseudomonas fluorescens strain

  20. Transcript Profile of Flowering Regulatory Genes in VcFT-Overexpressing Blueberry Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walworth, Aaron E; Chai, Benli; Song, Guo-Qing

    2016-01-01

    In order to identify genetic components in flowering pathways of highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.), a transcriptome reference composed of 254,396 transcripts and 179,853 gene contigs was developed by assembly of 72.7 million reads using Trinity. Using this transcriptome reference and a query of flowering pathway genes of herbaceous plants, we identified potential flowering pathway genes/transcripts of blueberry. Transcriptome analysis of flowering pathway genes was then conducted on leaf tissue samples of transgenic blueberry cv. Aurora ('VcFT-Aurora'), which overexpresses a blueberry FLOWERING LOCUS T-like gene (VcFT). Sixty-one blueberry transcripts of 40 genes showed high similarities to 33 known flowering-related genes of herbaceous plants, of which 17 down-regulated and 16 up-regulated genes were identified in 'VcFT-Aurora'. All down-regulated genes encoded transcription factors/enzymes upstream in the signaling pathway containing VcFT. A blueberry CONSTANS-LIKE 5-like (VcCOL5) gene was down-regulated and associated with five other differentially expressed (DE) genes in the photoperiod-mediated flowering pathway. Three down-regulated genes, i.e., a MADS-AFFECTING FLOWERING 2-like gene (VcMAF2), a MADS-AFFECTING FLOWERING 5-like gene (VcMAF5), and a VERNALIZATION1-like gene (VcVRN1), may function as integrators in place of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) in the vernalization pathway. Because no CONSTAN1-like or FLOWERING LOCUS C-like genes were found in blueberry, VcCOL5 and VcMAF2/VcMAF5 or VRN1 might be the major integrator(s) in the photoperiod- and vernalization-mediated flowering pathway, respectively. The major down-stream genes of VcFT, i.e., SUPPRESSOR of Overexpression of Constans 1-like (VcSOC1), LEAFY-like (VcLFY), APETALA1-like (VcAP1), CAULIFLOWER 1-like (VcCAL1), and FRUITFULL-like (VcFUL) genes were present and showed high similarity to their orthologues in herbaceous plants. Moreover, overexpression of VcFT promoted expression of all of these

  1. Cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of a transcriptional regulatory protein (Rv3291c) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Tripti; Kumar, Sandeep; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2004-10-01

    Rv3291c, the translational product of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv3291c gene, is an 18 kDa protein. It is a putative transcriptional regulatory protein belonging to the leucine-responsive regulatory protein/asparagine synthase C (Lrp/AsnC) family, which are proteins that have been identified in archaea and bacteria. Rv3291c probably plays a significant role during the persistent/latent phase of M. tuberculosis, as supported by its up-regulation several-fold during this stage. Orthorhombic crystals of recombinant Rv3291c have been grown from trisodium citrate dihydrate-buffered solutions containing monoammonium dihydrogen phosphate. Diffraction data extending to 2.7 A have been collected from a single crystal with unit-cell parameters a = 99.6, b = 100.7, c = 100.6 A. Assuming an octamer in the asymmetric unit results in a Matthews coefficient (VM) of 1.75 A3 Da(-1), corresponding to a solvent content of about 30%.

  2. Transcriptional regulatory network triggered by oxidative signals configures the early response mechanisms of japonica rice to chilling stress

    KAUST Repository

    Yun, Kil-Young

    2010-01-25

    Background: The transcriptional regulatory network involved in low temperature response leading to acclimation has been established in Arabidopsis. In japonica rice, which can only withstand transient exposure to milder cold stress (10C), an oxidative-mediated network has been proposed to play a key role in configuring early responses and short-term defenses. The components, hierarchical organization and physiological consequences of this network were further dissected by a systems-level approach.Results: Regulatory clusters responding directly to oxidative signals were prominent during the initial 6 to 12 hours at 10C. Early events mirrored a typical oxidative response based on striking similarities of the transcriptome to disease, elicitor and wounding induced processes. Targets of oxidative-mediated mechanisms are likely regulated by several classes of bZIP factors acting on as1/ocs/TGA-like element enriched clusters, ERF factors acting on GCC-box/JAre-like element enriched clusters and R2R3-MYB factors acting on MYB2-like element enriched clusters.Temporal induction of several H2O2-induced bZIP, ERF and MYB genes coincided with the transient H2O2spikes within the initial 6 to 12 hours. Oxidative-independent responses involve DREB/CBF, RAP2 and RAV1 factors acting on DRE/CRT/rav1-like enriched clusters and bZIP factors acting on ABRE-like enriched clusters. Oxidative-mediated clusters were activated earlier than ABA-mediated clusters.Conclusion: Genome-wide, physiological and whole-plant level analyses established a holistic view of chilling stress response mechanism of japonica rice. Early response regulatory network triggered by oxidative signals is critical for prolonged survival under sub-optimal temperature. Integration of stress and developmental responses leads to modulated growth and vigor maintenance contributing to a delay of plastic injuries. 2010 Yun et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  3. Genomic analysis of host - Peste des petits ruminants vaccine viral transcriptome uncovers transcription factors modulating immune regulatory pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunath, Siddappa; Kumar, Gandham Ravi; Mishra, Bishnu Prasad; Mishra, Bina; Sahoo, Aditya Prasad; Joshi, Chaitanya G; Tiwari, Ashok K; Rajak, Kaushal Kishore; Janga, Sarath Chandra

    2015-02-24

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), is an acute transboundary viral disease of economic importance, affecting goats and sheep. Mass vaccination programs around the world resulted in the decline of PPR outbreaks. Sungri 96 is a live attenuated vaccine, widely used in Northern India against PPR. This vaccine virus, isolated from goat works efficiently both in sheep and goat. Global gene expression changes under PPR vaccine virus infection are not yet well defined. Therefore, in this study we investigated the host-vaccine virus interactions by infecting the peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from goat with PPRV (Sungri 96 vaccine virus), to quantify the global changes in the transcriptomic signature by RNA-sequencing. Viral genome of Sungri 96 vaccine virus was assembled from the PPRV infected transcriptome confirming the infection and demonstrating the feasibility of building a complete non-host genome from the blood transcriptome. Comparison of infected transcriptome with control transcriptome revealed 985 differentially expressed genes. Functional analysis showed enrichment of immune regulatory pathways under PPRV infection. Key genes involved in immune system regulation, spliceosomal and apoptotic pathways were identified to be dysregulated. Network analysis revealed that the protein - protein interaction network among differentially expressed genes is significantly disrupted in infected state. Several genes encoding TFs that govern immune regulatory pathways were identified to co-regulate the differentially expressed genes. These data provide insights into the host - PPRV vaccine virus interactome for the first time. Our findings suggested dysregulation of immune regulatory pathways and genes encoding Transcription Factors (TFs) that govern these pathways in response to viral infection.

  4. A model for genetic and epigenetic regulatory networks identifies rare pathways for transcription factor induced pluripotency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artyomov, Maxim; Meissner, Alex; Chakraborty, Arup

    2010-03-01

    Most cells in an organism have the same DNA. Yet, different cell types express different proteins and carry out different functions. This is because of epigenetic differences; i.e., DNA in different cell types is packaged distinctly, making it hard to express certain genes while facilitating the expression of others. During development, upon receipt of appropriate cues, pluripotent embryonic stem cells differentiate into diverse cell types that make up the organism (e.g., a human). There has long been an effort to make this process go backward -- i.e., reprogram a differentiated cell (e.g., a skin cell) to pluripotent status. Recently, this has been achieved by transfecting certain transcription factors into differentiated cells. This method does not use embryonic material and promises the development of patient-specific regenerative medicine, but it is inefficient. The mechanisms that make reprogramming rare, or even possible, are poorly understood. We have developed the first computational model of transcription factor-induced reprogramming. Results obtained from the model are consistent with diverse observations, and identify the rare pathways that allow reprogramming to occur. If validated, our model could be further developed to design optimal strategies for reprogramming and shed light on basic questions in biology.

  5. Genetic Code Expansion as a Tool to Study Regulatory Processes of Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Moritz; Summerer, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    The expansion of the genetic code with noncanonical amino acids (ncAA) enables the chemical and biophysical properties of proteins to be tailored, inside cells, with a previously unattainable level of precision. A wide range of ncAA with functions not found in canonical amino acids have been genetically encoded in recent years and have delivered insights into biological processes that would be difficult to access with traditional approaches of molecular biology. A major field for the development and application of novel ncAA-functions has been transcription and its regulation. This is particularly attractive, since advanced DNA sequencing- and proteomics-techniques continue to deliver vast information on these processes on a global level, but complementing methodologies to study them on a detailed, molecular level and in living cells have been comparably scarce. In a growing number of studies, genetic code expansion has now been applied to precisely control the chemical properties of transcription factors, RNA polymerases and histones, and this has enabled new insights into their interactions, conformational changes, cellular localizations and the functional roles of posttranslational modifications.

  6. Different papillomaviruses have different repertoires of transcription factor binding sites: convergence and divergence in the upstream regulatory region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso Ángel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Papillomaviruses (PVs infect stratified squamous epithelia in warm-blooded vertebrates and have undergone a complex evolutionary process. The control of the expression of the early ORFs in PVs depends on the binding of cellular and viral transcription factors to the upstream regulatory region (URR of the virus. It is believed that there is a core of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS common to all PVs, with additional individual differences, although most of the available information focuses only on a handful of viruses. Results We have studied the URR of sixty-one PVs, covering twenty different hosts. We have predicted the TFBS present in the URR and analysed these results by principal component analysis and genetic algorithms. The number and nature of TFBS in the URR might be much broader than thus far described, and different PVs have different repertoires of TFBS. Conclusion There are common fingerprints in the URR in PVs that infect primates, although the ancestors of these viruses diverged a long time ago. Additionally, there are obvious differences between the URR of alpha and beta PVs, despite these PVs infect similar histological cell types in the same host, i.e. human. A thorough analysis of the TFBS in the URR might provide crucial information about the differential biology of cancer-associated PVs.

  7. Avoiding the Enumeration of Infeasible Elementary Flux Modes by Including Transcriptional Regulatory Rules in the Enumeration Process Saves Computational Costs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Jungreuthmayer

    Full Text Available Despite the significant progress made in recent years, the computation of the complete set of elementary flux modes of large or even genome-scale metabolic networks is still impossible. We introduce a novel approach to speed up the calculation of elementary flux modes by including transcriptional regulatory information into the analysis of metabolic networks. Taking into account gene regulation dramatically reduces the solution space and allows the presented algorithm to constantly eliminate biologically infeasible modes at an early stage of the computation procedure. Thereby, computational costs, such as runtime, memory usage, and disk space, are extremely reduced. Moreover, we show that the application of transcriptional rules identifies non-trivial system-wide effects on metabolism. Using the presented algorithm pushes the size of metabolic networks that can be studied by elementary flux modes to new and much higher limits without the loss of predictive quality. This makes unbiased, system-wide predictions in large scale metabolic networks possible without resorting to any optimization principle.

  8. A regulatory pathway, ecdysone-transcription factor relish-cathepsin L, is involved in insect fat body dissociation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Zhang

    Full Text Available Insect fat body is the organ for intermediary metabolism, comparable to vertebrate liver and adipose tissue. Larval fat body is disintegrated to individual fat body cells and then adult fat body is remodeled at the pupal stage. However, little is known about the dissociation mechanism. We find that the moth Helicoverpa armigera cathepsin L (Har-CL is expressed heavily in the fat body and is released from fat body cells into the extracellular matrix. The inhibitor and RNAi experiments demonstrate that Har-CL functions in the fat body dissociation in H. armigera. Further, a nuclear protein is identified to be transcription factor Har-Relish, which was found in insect immune response and specifically binds to the promoter of Har-CL gene to regulate its activity. Har-Relish also responds to the steroid hormone ecdysone. Thus, the dissociation of the larval fat body is involved in the hormone (ecdysone-transcription factor (Relish-target gene (cathepsin L regulatory pathway.

  9. Comparison of stationary and oscillatory dynamics described by differential equations and Boolean maps in transcriptional regulatory circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye Weiming [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing-Hong Kong-Singapore Joint Center of Nonlinear and Complex Systems, Beijing Normal University Branch, Beijing (China); Li Pengfei; Huang Xuhui; Xia Qinzhi; Mi Yuanyuan [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Chen Runsheng, E-mail: crs@sun5.ibp.ac.c [Bioinformatics Laboratory, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Hu Gang, E-mail: ganghu@bnu.edu.c [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing-Hong Kong-Singapore Joint Center of Nonlinear and Complex Systems, Beijing Normal University Branch, Beijing (China)

    2010-10-25

    Exploring the principle and relationship of gene transcriptional regulations (TR) has been becoming a generally researched issue. So far, two major mathematical methods, ordinary differential equation (ODE) method and Boolean map (BM) method have been widely used for these purposes. It is commonly believed that simplified BMs are reasonable approximations of more realistic ODEs, and both methods may reveal qualitatively the same essential features though the dynamical details of both systems may show some differences. In this Letter we exhaustively enumerated all the 3-gene networks and many autonomous randomly constructed TR networks with more genes by using both the ODE and BM methods. In comparison we found that both methods provide practically identical results in most of cases of steady solutions. However, to our great surprise, most of network structures showing periodic cycles with the BM method possess only stationary states in ODE descriptions. These observations strongly suggest that many periodic oscillations and other complicated oscillatory states revealed by the BM rule may be related to the computational errors of variable and time discretizations and rarely have correspondence in realistic biology transcriptional regulatory circuits.

  10. Expression Pattern of Myogenic Regulatory Transcription Factor mRNAs in the Embryo and Adult Labeo rohita (Hamilton, 1822

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archya Sengupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the regulation of skeletal muscle development is important to meet the increasing demand of Indian major carp Labeo rohita. Myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs along with myocyte specific enhancer factor 2 (MEF2 play the pivotal role in the determination and differentiation of skeletal muscle. The majority of skeletal muscle genes require both MRFs and MEF2 family members to activate their transcription. In this study, the expression pattern of MyoD, myf-5, myogenin, and MEF2A was observed from 6 h after fertilization to 12 months of age using semiquantitative RT-PCR as well as real-time PCR method. MyoD and myf-5 mRNAs were expressed at high level at the early embryonic stages. Myogenin and MEF2A were expressed after MyoD and myf-5 and remained active up to adult stage. Expression of MyoD was lower than that of Myf-5 after the 5th month. Partial sequencing of MyoD, myf-5, and MEF2A was done to draw phylogeny. In phylogenetic study, Labeo MyoD, MEF2A and myf-5 were found to be closely related to those of common carp. The present investigation suggests that the four transcription factors play pivotal role in the regulation of muscle growth of Labeo rohita in an overlapping and interconnected way.

  11. Functional genomics in chickens: development of integrated-systems microarrays for transcriptional profiling and discovery of regulatory pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogburn, L A; Wang, X; Carre, W; Rejto, L; Aggrey, S E; Duclos, M J; Simon, J; Porter, T E

    2004-01-01

    The genetic networks that govern the differentiation and growth of major tissues of economic importance in the chicken are largely unknown. Under a functional genomics project, our consortium has generated 30 609 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and developed several chicken DNA microarrays, which represent the Chicken Metabolic/Somatic (10 K) and Neuroendocrine/Reproductive (8 K) Systems (http://udgenome.ags.udel.edu/cogburn/). One of the major challenges facing functional genomics is the development of mathematical models to reconstruct functional gene networks and regulatory pathways from vast volumes of microarray data. In initial studies with liver-specific microarrays (3.1 K), we have examined gene expression profiles in liver during the peri-hatch transition and during a strong metabolic perturbation-fasting and re-feeding-in divergently selected broiler chickens (fast vs. slow-growth lines). The expression of many genes controlling metabolic pathways is dramatically altered by these perturbations. Our analysis has revealed a large number of clusters of functionally related genes (mainly metabolic enzymes and transcription factors) that control major metabolic pathways. Currently, we are conducting transcriptional profiling studies of multiple tissues during development of two sets of divergently selected broiler chickens (fast vs. slow growing and fat vs. lean lines). Transcriptional profiling across multiple tissues should permit construction of a detailed genetic blueprint that illustrates the developmental events and hierarchy of genes that govern growth and development of chickens. This review will briefly describe the recent acquisition of chicken genomic resources (ESTs and microarrays) and our consortium's efforts to help launch the new era of functional genomics in the chicken.

  12. Transcriptional regulatory effects of lymphoma-associated NFKB2/lyt10 protooncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K E; Gu, C; Thakur, S; Vieira, E; Lin, J C; Rabson, A B

    2000-03-01

    C-terminal truncations of the NFKB2 p100 gene product have been observed in a number of cases of human cutaneous T cell lymphomas, as well as human B-cell lymphomas and myelomas. The contribution of these alterations to lymphomagenesis is not understood; however, truncation at amino acid 666 to generate 80 - 85 kD proteins in the HUT78 cell line is associated with addition of a short (serine-alanine-serine) fusion at the 3' end of p80HT, as well as with increased expression of NFKB2 mRNA. We therefore examined the effects of p80HT on the regulation of NFKB2 expression, as well as the properties of a series of other tumor-associated, and site directed mutations of NFKB2. While p80HT had not itself acquired novel transcriptional activation properties with respect to the NFKB2 P1 or P2 promoters or the IL-6 kappaB promoter, p80HT had lost the potent inhibitory (IkappaB-like) activity associated with the wild-type, p100 gene product. Loss of the inhibitory property depended on the SAS residues in the fusion protein, direct truncation at aa666 was fully inhibitory, as was a substitution of three alanines for the SAS residues. The presence of as few as two C-terminal ankyrin motifs was sufficient for inhibition of NF-kappaB-mediated transcriptional activation. Assays of a series of additional lymphoma-associated NF-kappaB-2 truncation suggested that the C-terminal truncation associated with these proteins was also associated with a loss of the IkappaB-like activities of p100 NF-kappaB-2, for at least some NF-kappaB target promoters. Thus, the loss of IkappaB-like activity of lymphoma-associated NFKB2 mutations may play an important role in the genesis of a subset of human lymphomas.

  13. Decoding genome-wide GadEWX-transcriptional regulatory networks reveals multifaceted cellular responses to acid stress in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; O'Brien, Edward J.;

    2015-01-01

    The regulators GadE, GadW and GadX (which we refer to as GadEWX) play a critical role in the transcriptional regulation of the glutamate-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. However, the genome-wide regulatory role of GadEWX is still unknown. Here we comprehens...

  14. Combined Analysis of Variation in Core, Accessory and Regulatory Genome Regions Provides a Super-Resolution View into the Evolution of Bacterial Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Alan; Oren, Yaara; Kelly, Darren; Sreecharan, Tristan; Vehkala, Minna; Välimäki, Niko; Prentice, Michael B.; Ashour, Amgad; Avram, Oren; Pupko, Tal; Literak, Ivan; Guenther, Sebastian; Schaufler, Katharina; Wieler, Lothar H.; Zhiyong, Zong; Sheppard, Samuel K.; Corander, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    The use of whole-genome phylogenetic analysis has revolutionized our understanding of the evolution and spread of many important bacterial pathogens due to the high resolution view it provides. However, the majority of such analyses do not consider the potential role of accessory genes when inferring evolutionary trajectories. Moreover, the recently discovered importance of the switching of gene regulatory elements suggests that an exhaustive analysis, combining information from core and accessory genes with regulatory elements could provide unparalleled detail of the evolution of a bacterial population. Here we demonstrate this principle by applying it to a worldwide multi-host sample of the important pathogenic E. coli lineage ST131. Our approach reveals the existence of multiple circulating subtypes of the major drug–resistant clade of ST131 and provides the first ever population level evidence of core genome substitutions in gene regulatory regions associated with the acquisition and maintenance of different accessory genome elements. PMID:27618184

  15. Impact of the Staphylococcus epidermidis LytSR two-component regulatory system on murein hydrolase activity, pyruvate utilization and global transcriptional profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Fangyou

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus epidermidis has emerged as one of the most important nosocomial pathogens, mainly because of its ability to colonize implanted biomaterials by forming a biofilm. Extensive studies are focused on the molecular mechanisms involved in biofilm formation. The LytSR two-component regulatory system regulates autolysis and biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus. However, the role of LytSR played in S. epidermidis remained unknown. Results In the present study, we demonstrated that lytSR knock-out in S. epidermidis did not alter susceptibility to Triton X-100 induced autolysis. Quantitative murein hydrolase assay indicated that disruption of lytSR in S. epidermidis resulted in decreased activities of extracellular murein hydrolases, although zymogram showed no apparent differences in murein hydrolase patterns between S. epidermidis strain 1457 and its lytSR mutant. Compared to the wild-type counterpart, 1457ΔlytSR produced slightly more biofilm, with significantly decreased dead cells inside. Microarray analysis showed that lytSR mutation affected the transcription of 164 genes (123 genes were upregulated and 41 genes were downregulated. Specifically, genes encoding proteins responsible for protein synthesis, energy metabolism were downregulated, while genes involved in amino acid and nucleotide biosynthesis, amino acid transporters were upregulated. Impaired ability to utilize pyruvate and reduced activity of arginine deiminase was observed in 1457ΔlytSR, which is consistent with the microarray data. Conclusions The preliminary results suggest that in S. epidermidis LytSR two-component system regulates extracellular murein hydrolase activity, bacterial cell death and pyruvate utilization. Based on the microarray data, it appears that lytSR inactivation induces a stringent response. In addition, LytSR may indirectly enhance biofilm formation by altering the metabolic status of the bacteria.

  16. Uncovering early response of gene regulatory networks in ES cells by systematic induction of transcription factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Akira; Xin, Li; Sharov, Alexei A.; Thomas, Marshall; Mowrer, Gregory; Meyers, Emily; Piao, Yulan; Mehta, Samir; Yee, Sarah; Nakatake, Yuhki; Stagg, Carole; Sharova, Lioudmila; Correa-Cerro, Lina S.; Bassey, Uwem; Hoang, Hien; Kim, Eugene; Tapnio, Richard; Qian, Yong; Dudekula, Dawood; Zalzman, Michal; Li, Manxiang; Falco, Geppino; Yang, Hsih-Te; Lee, Sung-Lim; Monti, Manuela; Stanghellini, Ilaria; Islam, Md. Nurul; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Goldberg, Ilya; Wang, Weidong; Longo, Dan L.; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY To examine transcription factor (TF) network(s), we created mouse ES cell lines, in each of which one of 50 TFs tagged with a FLAG moiety is inserted into a ubiquitously controllable tetracycline-repressible locus. Of the 50 TFs, Cdx2 provoked the most extensive transcriptome perturbation in ES cells, followed by Esx1, Sox9, Tcf3, Klf4, and Gata3. ChIP-Seq revealed that CDX2 binds to promoters of up-regulated target genes. By contrast, genes down-regulated by CDX2 did not show CDX2 binding, but were enriched with binding sites for POU5F1, SOX2, and NANOG. Genes with binding sites for these core TFs were also down-regulated by the induction of at least 15 other TFs, suggesting a common initial step for ES cell differentiation mediated by interference with the binding of core TFs to their target genes. These ES cell lines provide a fundamental resource to study biological networks in ES cells and mice. PMID:19796622

  17. Measurement and modeling of transcriptional noise in the cell cycle regulatory network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, David A; Adames, Neil R; Reischmann, Nadine; Barik, Debashis; Franck, Christopher T; Tyson, John J; Peccoud, Jean

    2013-10-01

    Fifty years of genetic and molecular experiments have revealed a wealth of molecular interactions involved in the control of cell division. In light of the complexity of this control system, mathematical modeling has proved useful in analyzing biochemical hypotheses that can be tested experimentally. Stochastic modeling has been especially useful in understanding the intrinsic variability of cell cycle events, but stochastic modeling has been hampered by a lack of reliable data on the absolute numbers of mRNA molecules per cell for cell cycle control genes. To fill this void, we used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to collect single molecule mRNA data for 16 cell cycle regulators in budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. From statistical distributions of single-cell mRNA counts, we are able to extract the periodicity, timing, and magnitude of transcript abundance during the cell cycle. We used these parameters to improve a stochastic model of the cell cycle to better reflect the variability of molecular and phenotypic data on cell cycle progression in budding yeast.

  18. Selective translational control of the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein transcript by iron regulatory protein-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun-Hee; Cahill, Catherine M; Vanderburg, Charles R; Scherzer, Clemens R; Wang, Bin; Huang, Xudong; Rogers, Jack T

    2010-10-08

    Iron influx increases the translation of the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein (APP) via an iron-responsive element (IRE) RNA stem loop in its 5'-untranslated region. Equal modulated interaction of the iron regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2) with canonical IREs controls iron-dependent translation of the ferritin subunits. However, our immunoprecipitation RT-PCR and RNA binding experiments demonstrated that IRP1, but not IRP2, selectively bound the APP IRE in human neural cells. This selective IRP1 interaction pattern was evident in human brain and blood tissue from normal and Alzheimer disease patients. We computer-predicted an optimal novel RNA stem loop structure for the human, rhesus monkey, and mouse APP IREs with reference to the canonical ferritin IREs but also the IREs encoded by erythroid heme biosynthetic aminolevulinate synthase and Hif-2α mRNAs, which preferentially bind IRP1. Selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension analysis was consistent with a 13-base single-stranded terminal loop and a conserved GC-rich stem. Biotinylated RNA probes deleted of the conserved CAGA motif in the terminal loop did not bind to IRP1 relative to wild type probes and could no longer base pair to form a predicted AGA triloop. An AGU pseudo-triloop is key for IRP1 binding to the canonical ferritin IREs. RNA probes encoding the APP IRE stem loop exhibited the same high affinity binding to rhIRP1 as occurs for the H-ferritin IRE (35 pm). Intracellular iron chelation increased binding of IRP1 to the APP IRE, decreasing intracellular APP expression in SH-SY5Y cells. Functionally, shRNA knockdown of IRP1 caused increased expression of neural APP consistent with IRP1-APP IRE-driven translation.

  19. Brain in situ hybridization maps as a source for reverse-engineering transcriptional regulatory networks: Alzheimer's disease insights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acquaah-Mensah, George K.; Taylor, Ronald C.

    2016-07-01

    Microarray data have been a valuable resource for identifying transcriptional regulatory relationships among genes. As an example, brain region-specific transcriptional regulatory events have the potential of providing etiological insights into Alzheimer Disease (AD). However, there is often a paucity of suitable brain-region specific expression data obtained via microarrays or other high throughput means. The Allen Brain Atlas in situ hybridization (ISH) data sets (Jones et al., 2009) represent a potentially valuable alternative source of high-throughput brain region-specific gene expression data for such purposes. In this study, Allen BrainAtlasmouse ISH data in the hippocampal fields were extracted, focusing on 508 genes relevant to neurodegeneration. Transcriptional regulatory networkswere learned using three high-performing network inference algorithms. Only 17% of regulatory edges from a network reverse-engineered based on brain region-specific ISH data were also found in a network constructed upon gene expression correlations inmousewhole brain microarrays, thus showing the specificity of gene expression within brain sub-regions. Furthermore, the ISH data-based networks were used to identify instructive transcriptional regulatory relationships. Ncor2, Sp3 and Usf2 form a unique three-party regulatory motif, potentially affecting memory formation pathways. Nfe2l1, Egr1 and Usf2 emerge among regulators of genes involved in AD (e.g. Dhcr24, Aplp2, Tia1, Pdrx1, Vdac1, andSyn2). Further, Nfe2l1, Egr1 and Usf2 are sensitive to dietary factors and could be among links between dietary influences and genes in the AD etiology. Thus, this approach of harnessing brain region-specific ISH data represents a rare opportunity for gleaning unique etiological insights for diseases such as AD.

  20. Functional Analysis of Multiple Transcription Factor Sites in a Regulatory Element of Human ε-Globin Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Hui HOU; Jian HUANG; Ruo-Lan QIAN

    2004-01-01

    The developmental control of the human ε-globin gene expression is mediated by transcriptional regulatory elements in the 5' flanking DNA of this gene. A previously identified negative regulatory element (-3028 to -2902 bp, termed ε-NRAII) was analyzed and one putative NF-κB site and two GATA sites locate at -3004 bp, -2975 bp and -2948 bp were characterized. Electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA)showed that the putative NF-κB site was specifically bound by nuclear proteins of K562 cells. Data obtained from transient transfection showed that the expression of reporter gene could be upregulated about 50% or 100% respectively when ε-NRAII was inserted upstream of the SV40 promoter or ε-globin gene proximal promoter (-177 bp to +1 bp), suggesting that ε-NRAII might not be a classic silencer. Mutation in the putative NF-κB site or in the GATA site (at-2975 bp) slightly reduced the expression of reporter gene driven by SV40 promoter or ε-globin gene proximal promoter. However, the mutation of GATA site at -2948 bp remarkably reduced the reporter gene activity driven by SV40 promoter, but not by ε-globin gene proximal promoter. Further mutation analysis showed that the negative effect of mutation in GATA site at -2948 bp on SV40 promoter was not affected by the mutation of the putative NF-κB site, whereas it could be abolished by the mutation of GATA site at -2975 bp. Furthermore, the mutation of both GATA sites could synergistically reduce the reporter gene activity driven by ε-globin gene proximal promoter. Those results suggested that ε-NRAII might function differently on the SV40 promoter and ε-globin gene proximal promoter.

  1. Transcriptional profiling at different sites in lungs of pigs during acute bacterial respiratory infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Shila; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Hedegaard, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    The local transcriptional response was studied in different locations of lungs from pigs experimentally infected with the respiratory pathogen Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 5B, using porcine cDNA microarrays. This infection gives rise to well-demarcated infection loci in the lung...... of apoptosis and the complement system. Interferon-g was downregulated in both necrotic and bordering areas. Evidence of neutrophil recruitment was seen by the up-regulation of chemotactic factors for neutrophils. In conclusion, we found subsets of genes expressed at different levels in the three selected...... of induced genes as, in unaffected areas a large part of differently expressed genes were involved in systemic reactions to infections, while differently expressed genes in necrotic areas were mainly concerned with homeostasis regulation....

  2. Transcriptional analysis of the jamaicamide gene cluster from the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula and identification of possible regulatory proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorrestein Pieter C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula is a prolific producer of bioactive secondary metabolites. Although biosynthetic gene clusters encoding several of these compounds have been identified, little is known about how these clusters of genes are transcribed or regulated, and techniques targeting genetic manipulation in Lyngbya strains have not yet been developed. We conducted transcriptional analyses of the jamaicamide gene cluster from a Jamaican strain of Lyngbya majuscula, and isolated proteins that could be involved in jamaicamide regulation. Results An unusually long untranslated leader region of approximately 840 bp is located between the jamaicamide transcription start site (TSS and gene cluster start codon. All of the intergenic regions between the pathway ORFs were transcribed into RNA in RT-PCR experiments; however, a promoter prediction program indicated the possible presence of promoters in multiple intergenic regions. Because the functionality of these promoters could not be verified in vivo, we used a reporter gene assay in E. coli to show that several of these intergenic regions, as well as the primary promoter preceding the TSS, are capable of driving β-galactosidase production. A protein pulldown assay was also used to isolate proteins that may regulate the jamaicamide pathway. Pulldown experiments using the intergenic region upstream of jamA as a DNA probe isolated two proteins that were identified by LC-MS/MS. By BLAST analysis, one of these had close sequence identity to a regulatory protein in another cyanobacterial species. Protein comparisons suggest a possible correlation between secondary metabolism regulation and light dependent complementary chromatic adaptation. Electromobility shift assays were used to evaluate binding of the recombinant proteins to the jamaicamide promoter region. Conclusion Insights into natural product regulation in cyanobacteria are of significant value to drug discovery

  3. Genetic variation in metallothionein and metal-regulatory transcription factor 1 in relation to urinary cadmium, copper, and zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Scott V.; Barrick, Brian; Freney, Emily P.; Shafer, Martin M.; Makar, Karen; Song, Xiaoling; Lampe, Johanna; Vilchis, Hugo; Ulery, April; Newcomb, Polly A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Metallothionein (MT) proteins play critical roles in the physiological handling of both essential (Cu and Zn) and toxic (Cd) metals. MT expression is regulated by metal-regulatory transcription factor 1 (MTF1). Hence, genetic variation in the MT gene family and MTF1 might therefore influence excretion of these metals. Methods 321 women were recruited in Seattle, WA and Las Cruces, NM and provided demographic information, urine samples for measurement of metal concentrations by mass spectrometry and creatinine, and blood or saliva for extraction of DNA. Forty-one single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MTF1 gene region and the region of chromosome 16 encoding the MT gene family were selected for genotyping in addition to an ancestry informative marker panel. Linear regression was used to estimate the association of SNPs with urinary Cd, Cu, and Zn, adjusted for age, urinary creatinine, smoking history, study site, and ancestry. Results Minor alleles of rs28366003 and rs10636 near the MT2A gene were associated with lower urinary Cd, Cu, and Zn. Minor alleles of rs8044719 and rs1599823, near MT1A and MT1B, were associated with lower urinary Cd and Zn, respectively. Minor alleles of rs4653329 in MTF1 was associated with lower urinary Cd. Conclusions These results suggest that genetic variation in the MT gene region and MTF1 influences urinary Cd, Cu, and Zn excretion. PMID:26529669

  4. Does positive selection drive transcription factor binding site turnover? A test with Drosophila cis-regulatory modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Z He

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factor binding site(s (TFBS gain and loss (i.e., turnover is a well-documented feature of cis-regulatory module (CRM evolution, yet little attention has been paid to the evolutionary force(s driving this turnover process. The predominant view, motivated by its widespread occurrence, emphasizes the importance of compensatory mutation and genetic drift. Positive selection, in contrast, although it has been invoked in specific instances of adaptive gene expression evolution, has not been considered as a general alternative to neutral compensatory evolution. In this study we evaluate the two hypotheses by analyzing patterns of single nucleotide polymorphism in the TFBS of well-characterized CRM in two closely related Drosophila species, Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans. An important feature of the analysis is classification of TFBS mutations according to the direction of their predicted effect on binding affinity, which allows gains and losses to be evaluated independently along the two phylogenetic lineages. The observed patterns of polymorphism and divergence are not compatible with neutral evolution for either class of mutations. Instead, multiple lines of evidence are consistent with contributions of positive selection to TFBS gain and loss as well as purifying selection in its maintenance. In discussion, we propose a model to reconcile the finding of selection driving TFBS turnover with constrained CRM function over long evolutionary time.

  5. Discovery of transcription factors and regulatory regions driving in vivo tumor development by ATAC-seq and FAIRE-seq open chromatin profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristofer Davie

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Genomic enhancers regulate spatio-temporal gene expression by recruiting specific combinations of transcription factors (TFs. When TFs are bound to active regulatory regions, they displace canonical nucleosomes, making these regions biochemically detectable as nucleosome-depleted regions or accessible/open chromatin. Here we ask whether open chromatin profiling can be used to identify the entire repertoire of active promoters and enhancers underlying tissue-specific gene expression during normal development and oncogenesis in vivo. To this end, we first compare two different approaches to detect open chromatin in vivo using the Drosophila eye primordium as a model system: FAIRE-seq, based on physical separation of open versus closed chromatin; and ATAC-seq, based on preferential integration of a transposon into open chromatin. We find that both methods reproducibly capture the tissue-specific chromatin activity of regulatory regions, including promoters, enhancers, and insulators. Using both techniques, we screened for regulatory regions that become ectopically active during Ras-dependent oncogenesis, and identified 3778 regions that become (over-activated during tumor development. Next, we applied motif discovery to search for candidate transcription factors that could bind these regions and identified AP-1 and Stat92E as key regulators. We validated the importance of Stat92E in the development of the tumors by introducing a loss of function Stat92E mutant, which was sufficient to rescue the tumor phenotype. Additionally we tested if the predicted Stat92E responsive regulatory regions are genuine, using ectopic induction of JAK/STAT signaling in developing eye discs, and observed that similar chromatin changes indeed occurred. Finally, we determine that these are functionally significant regulatory changes, as nearby target genes are up- or down-regulated. In conclusion, we show that FAIRE-seq and ATAC-seq based open chromatin profiling

  6. The Transcription Factor IRF3 Triggers “Defensive Suicide” Necrosis in Response to Viral and Bacterial Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson C. Di Paolo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Although molecular components that execute noninflammatory apoptotic cell death are well defined, molecular pathways that trigger necrotic cell death remain poorly characterized. Here, we show that in response to infection with adenovirus or Listeria monocytogenes, macrophages in vivo undergo rapid proinflammatory necrotic death that is controlled by interferon-regulatory factor 3 (IRF3. The transcriptional activity of IRF3 is, surprisingly, not required for the induction of necrosis, and it proceeds normally in mice deficient in all known regulators of necrotic death or IRF3 activation, including RIPK3, caspases 1, 8, or 11, STING, and IPS1/MAVS. Although L. monocytogenes triggers necrosis to promote the infection, IRF3-dependent necrosis is required for reducing pathogen burden in the models of disseminated infection with adenovirus. Therefore, our studies implicate IRF3 as a principal and nonredundant component of a physiologically regulated necrotic cell-death pathway that operates as an effective innate immune mechanism of host protection against disseminated virus infection.

  7. Overexpression of E2F mRNAs associated with gastric cancer progression identified by the transcription factor and miRNA co-regulatory network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, XiaoTian; Ni, ZhaoHui; Duan, ZiPeng; Xin, ZhuoYuan; Wang, HuaiDong; Tan, JiaYi; Wang, GuoQing; Li, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated at the transcription and translation levels; thus, both transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs (miRNA) play roles in regulation of gene expression. This study profiled differentially expressed mRNAs and miRNAs in gastric cancer tissues to construct a TF and miRNA co-regulatory network in order to identify altered genes in gastric cancer progression. A total of 70 cases gastric cancer and paired adjacent normal tissues were subjected to cDNA and miRNA microarray analyses. We obtained 887 up-regulated and 93 down-regulated genes and 41 down-regulated and 4 up-regulated miRNAs in gastric cancer tissues. Using the Transcriptional Regulatory Element Database, we obtained 105 genes that are regulated by the E2F family of genes and using Targetscan, miRanda, miRDB and miRWalk tools, we predicted potential targeting genes of these 45 miRNAs. We then built up the E2F-related TF and miRNA co-regulatory gene network and identified 9 hub-genes. Furthermore, we found that levels of E2F1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 7 mRNAs associated with gastric cancer cell invasion capacity, and has associated with tumor differentiation. These data showed Overexpression of E2F mRNAs associated with gastric cancer progression.

  8. MAGIA2: from miRNA and genes expression data integrative analysis to microRNA–transcription factor mixed regulatory circuits (2012 update)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisognin, Andrea; Sales, Gabriele; Coppe, Alessandro; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Romualdi, Chiara

    2012-01-01

    MAGIA2 (http://gencomp.bio.unipd.it/magia2) is an update, extension and evolution of the MAGIA web tool. It is dedicated to the integrated analysis of in silico target prediction, microRNA (miRNA) and gene expression data for the reconstruction of post-transcriptional regulatory networks. miRNAs are fundamental post-transcriptional regulators of several key biological and pathological processes. As miRNAs act prevalently through target degradation, their expression profiles are expected to be inversely correlated to those of the target genes. Low specificity of target prediction algorithms makes integration approaches an interesting solution for target prediction refinement. MAGIA2 performs this integrative approach supporting different association measures, multiple organisms and almost all target predictions algorithms. Nevertheless, miRNAs activity should be viewed as part of a more complex scenario where regulatory elements and their interactors generate a highly connected network and where gene expression profiles are the result of different levels of regulation. The updated MAGIA2 tries to dissect this complexity by reconstructing mixed regulatory circuits involving either miRNA or transcription factor (TF) as regulators. Two types of circuits are identified: (i) a TF that regulates both a miRNA and its target and (ii) a miRNA that regulates both a TF and its target. PMID:22618880

  9. MAGIA²: from miRNA and genes expression data integrative analysis to microRNA-transcription factor mixed regulatory circuits (2012 update).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisognin, Andrea; Sales, Gabriele; Coppe, Alessandro; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Romualdi, Chiara

    2012-07-01

    MAGIA(2) (http://gencomp.bio.unipd.it/magia2) is an update, extension and evolution of the MAGIA web tool. It is dedicated to the integrated analysis of in silico target prediction, microRNA (miRNA) and gene expression data for the reconstruction of post-transcriptional regulatory networks. miRNAs are fundamental post-transcriptional regulators of several key biological and pathological processes. As miRNAs act prevalently through target degradation, their expression profiles are expected to be inversely correlated to those of the target genes. Low specificity of target prediction algorithms makes integration approaches an interesting solution for target prediction refinement. MAGIA(2) performs this integrative approach supporting different association measures, multiple organisms and almost all target predictions algorithms. Nevertheless, miRNAs activity should be viewed as part of a more complex scenario where regulatory elements and their interactors generate a highly connected network and where gene expression profiles are the result of different levels of regulation. The updated MAGIA(2) tries to dissect this complexity by reconstructing mixed regulatory circuits involving either miRNA or transcription factor (TF) as regulators. Two types of circuits are identified: (i) a TF that regulates both a miRNA and its target and (ii) a miRNA that regulates both a TF and its target.

  10. TALE-induced bHLH transcription factors that activate a pectate lyase contribute to water soaking in bacterial spot of tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Allison R.; Morbitzer, Robert; Lahaye, Thomas; Staskawicz, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    AvrHah1 [avirulence (avr) gene homologous to avrBs3 and hax2, no. 1] is a transcription activator-like (TAL) effector (TALE) in Xanthomonas gardneri that induces water-soaked disease lesions on fruits and leaves during bacterial spot of tomato. We observe that water from outside the leaf is drawn into the apoplast in X. gardneri-infected, but not X. gardneriΔavrHah1 (XgΔavrHah1)-infected, plants, conferring a dark, water-soaked appearance. The pull of water can facilitate entry of additional bacterial cells into the apoplast. Comparing the transcriptomes of tomato infected with X. gardneri vs. XgΔavrHah1 revealed the differential up-regulation of two basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) transcription factors with predicted effector binding elements (EBEs) for AvrHah1. We mined our RNA-sequencing data for differentially up-regulated genes that could be direct targets of the bHLH transcription factors and therefore indirect targets of AvrHah1. We show that two pectin modification genes, a pectate lyase and pectinesterase, are targets of both bHLH transcription factors. Designer TALEs (dTALEs) for the bHLH transcription factors and the pectate lyase, but not for the pectinesterase, complement water soaking when delivered by XgΔavrHah1. By perturbing transcriptional networks and/or modifying the plant cell wall, AvrHah1 may promote water uptake to enhance tissue damage and eventual bacterial egression from the apoplast to the leaf surface. Understanding how disease symptoms develop may be a useful tool for improving the tolerance of crops from damaging disease lesions. PMID:28100489

  11. Impact of the regulatory loci agr, sarA and sae of Staphylococcus aureus on the induction of alpha-toxin during device-related infection resolved by direct quantitative transcript analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerke, C; Fluckiger, U; Steinhuber, A; Zimmerli, W; Wolz, C

    2001-06-01

    The cytotoxic alpha-toxin (encoded by hla) of Staphylococcus aureus is regulated by three loci, agr, sarA and sae, in vitro. Here, we assess the regulation of hla in a guinea pig model of device-related infection by quantifying RNAIII (the effector molecule of agr) and hla directly in exudates accumulating in infected devices without subculturing of the bacteria. LightCycler reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to quantify the transcripts. Strains RN6390 and Newman expressed considerably smaller amounts of RNAIII in the guinea pig than during in vitro growth. The residual RNAIII expression decreased during the course of infection and was negatively correlated with bacterial densities. As with RNAIII, the highest hla expression was detected in both strains early in infection. Even in strain Newman, a weak hla producer in vitro, a pronounced expression of hla was observed during infection. Likewise, four S. aureus isolates from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients expressed Q1hla despite an inactive agr during device-related infection as in the CF lung. Mutation of agr and sarA in strain Newman and RN6390 had no consequence for hla expression in vivo. In contrast, the mutation in sae resulted in severe downregulation of hla in vitro as well as in vivo. In conclusion, S. aureus seems to be provided with regulatory circuits different from those characterized in vitro to ensure alpha-toxin synthesis during infections.

  12. Reconstruction and analysis of transcription factor-miRNA co-regulatory feed-forward loops in human cancers using filter-wrapper feature selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Peng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As one of the most common types of co-regulatory motifs, feed-forward loops (FFLs control many cell functions and play an important role in human cancers. Therefore, it is crucial to reconstruct and analyze cancer-related FFLs that are controlled by transcription factor (TF and microRNA (miRNA simultaneously, in order to find out how miRNAs and TFs cooperate with each other in cancer cells and how they contribute to carcinogenesis. Current FFL studies rely on predicted regulation information and therefore suffer the false positive issue in prediction results. More critically, FFLs generated by existing approaches cannot represent the dynamic and conditional regulation relationship under different experimental conditions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we proposed a novel filter-wrapper feature selection method to accurately identify co-regulatory mechanism by incorporating prior information from predicted regulatory interactions with parallel miRNA/mRNA expression datasets. By applying this method, we reconstructed 208 and 110 TF-miRNA co-regulatory FFLs from human pan-cancer and prostate datasets, respectively. Further analysis of these cancer-related FFLs showed that the top-ranking TF STAT3 and miRNA hsa-let-7e are key regulators implicated in human cancers, which have regulated targets significantly enriched in cellular process regulations and signaling pathways that are involved in carcinogenesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this study, we introduced an efficient computational approach to reconstruct co-regulatory FFLs by accurately identifying gene co-regulatory interactions. The strength of the proposed feature selection method lies in the fact it can precisely filter out false positives in predicted regulatory interactions by quantitatively modeling the complex co-regulation of target genes mediated by TFs and miRNAs simultaneously. Moreover, the proposed feature selection method can be generally applied to

  13. Id3 Maintains Foxp3 Expression in Regulatory T Cells by Controlling a Transcriptional Network of E47, Spi-B, and SOCS3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Katharina S; Hils, Miriam; Lupar, Ekaterina; Minguet, Susana; Sigvardsson, Mikael; Rottenberg, Martin E; Izcue, Ana; Schachtrup, Christian; Schachtrup, Kristina

    2016-12-13

    The transcription factor Foxp3 dominantly controls regulatory T (Treg) cell function, and only its continuous expression guarantees the maintenance of full Treg cell-suppressive capacity. However, transcriptional regulators maintaining Foxp3 transcription are incompletely described. Here, we report that high E47 transcription factor activity in Treg cells resulted in unstable Foxp3 expression. Under homeostatic conditions, Treg cells expressed high levels of the E47 antagonist Id3, thus restricting E47 activity and maintaining Foxp3 expression. In contrast, stimulation of Id3-deficient or E47-overexpressing Treg cells resulted in the loss of Foxp3 expression in a subset of Treg cells in vivo and in vitro. Mechanistic analysis indicated that E47 activated expression of the transcription factor Spi-B and the suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3), which both downregulated Foxp3 expression. These findings demonstrate that the balance of Id3 and E47 controls the maintenance of Foxp3 expression in Treg cells and, thus, contributes to Treg cell plasticity.

  14. Menin and RNF20 recruitment is associated with dynamic histone modifications that regulate signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1-activated transcription of the interferon regulatory factor 1 gene (IRF1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buro Lauren J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT activation of gene expression is both rapid and transient, and when properly executed it affects growth, differentiation, homeostasis and the immune response, but when dysregulated it contributes to human disease. Transcriptional activation is regulated by alterations to the chromatin template. However, the role of histone modification at gene loci that are activated for transcription in response to STAT signaling is poorly defined. Results Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we profiled several histone modifications during STAT1 activation of the interferon regulatory factor 1 gene (IRF1. Methylated lysine histone proteins H3K4me2, H3K4me3, H3K79me3, H3K36me3 and monoubiquitinated histone ubH2B are dynamic and correlate with interferon (IFNγ induction of STAT1 activity. Chemical inhibition of H3K4 methylation downregulates IRF1 transcription and decreases RNA polymerase II (Pol II occupancy at the IRF1 promoter. MEN1, a component of a complex proteins associated with Set1 (COMPASS-like complex and the hBRE1 component, RNF20, are localized to IRF1 in the uninduced state and are further recruited when IRF1 is activated. RNAi-mediated depletion of RNF20 lowers both ubH2B and H3K4me3, but surprisingly, upregulates IFNγ induced IRF1 transcription. The dynamics of phosphorylation in the C-terminal domain (CTD of Pol II are disrupted during gene activation as well. Conclusions H2B monoubiquitination promotes H3K4 methylation, but the E3 ubiquitin ligase, RNF20, is repressive of inducible transcription at the IRF1 gene locus, suggesting that ubH2B can, directly or indirectly, affect Pol II CTD phosphorylation cycling to exert control on ongoing transcription.

  15. Dissecting the expression relationships between RNA-binding proteins and their cognate targets in eukaryotic post-transcriptional regulatory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishtala, Sneha; Neelamraju, Yaseswini; Janga, Sarath Chandra

    2016-05-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are pivotal in orchestrating several steps in the metabolism of RNA in eukaryotes thereby controlling an extensive network of RBP-RNA interactions. Here, we employed CLIP (cross-linking immunoprecipitation)-seq datasets for 60 human RBPs and RIP-ChIP (RNP immunoprecipitation-microarray) data for 69 yeast RBPs to construct a network of genome-wide RBP- target RNA interactions for each RBP. We show in humans that majority (~78%) of the RBPs are strongly associated with their target transcripts at transcript level while ~95% of the studied RBPs were also found to be strongly associated with expression levels of target transcripts when protein expression levels of RBPs were employed. At transcript level, RBP - RNA interaction data for the yeast genome, exhibited a strong association for 63% of the RBPs, confirming the association to be conserved across large phylogenetic distances. Analysis to uncover the features contributing to these associations revealed the number of target transcripts and length of the selected protein-coding transcript of an RBP at the transcript level while intensity of the CLIP signal, number of RNA-Binding domains, location of the binding site on the transcript, to be significant at the protein level. Our analysis will contribute to improved modelling and prediction of post-transcriptional networks.

  16. The upstream regulatory sequence of the light harvesting complex Lhcf2 gene of the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum enhances transcription in an orientation- and distance-independent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Monia Teresa; Annunziata, Rossella; Sanges, Remo; Ferrante, Maria Immacolata; Falciatore, Angela

    2015-12-01

    Diatoms are a key phytoplankton group in the contemporary ocean, showing extraordinary adaptation capacities to rapidly changing environments. The recent availability of whole genome sequences from representative species has revealed distinct features in their genomes, like novel combinations of genes encoding distinct metabolisms and a significant number of diatom-specific genes. However, the regulatory mechanisms driving diatom gene expression are still largely uncharacterized. Considering the wide variety of fields of study orbiting diatoms, ranging from ecology, evolutionary biology to biotechnology, it is thus essential to increase our understanding of fundamental gene regulatory processes such as transcriptional regulation. To this aim, we explored the functional properties of the 5'-flanking region of the Phaeodatylum tricornutum Lhcf2 gene, encoding a member of the Light Harvesting Complex superfamily and we showed that this region enhances transcription of a GUS reporter gene in an orientation- and distance-independent fashion. This represents the first example of a cis-regulatory sequence with enhancer-like features discovered in diatoms and it is instrumental for the generation of novel genetic tools and diatom exploitation in different areas of study.

  17. Hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein-5A activates sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c through transcription factor Sp1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Zhonghua; Qiao, Ling; Zhou, Yan [Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N 5E3 (Canada); Babiuk, Lorne A. [University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Liu, Qiang, E-mail: qiang.liu@usask.ca [Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N 5E3 (Canada)

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} A chimeric subgenomic HCV replicon expresses HCV-3a NS5A in an HCV-1b backbone. {yields} HCV-3a NS5A increases mature SREBP-1c protein level. {yields} HCV-3a NS5A activates SREBP-1c transcription. {yields} Domain II of HCV-3a NS5A is more effective in SREBP-1c promoter activation. {yields} Transcription factor Sp1 is required for SREBP-1c activation by HCV-3a NS5A. -- Abstract: Steatosis is an important clinical manifestation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The molecular mechanisms of HCV-associated steatosis are not well understood. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) is a key transcription factor which activates the transcription of lipogenic genes. Here we showed that the nuclear, mature SREBP-1c level increases in the nucleus of replicon cells expressing HCV-3a nonstructural protein-5A (NS5A). We further showed that HCV-3a NS5A up-regulates SREBP-1c transcription. Additional analysis showed that transcriptional factor Sp1 is involved in SREBP-1c activation by HCV-3a NS5A because inhibition of Sp1 activity by mithramycin A or a dominant-negative Sp1 construct abrogated SREBP-1c promoter activation by HCV-3a NS5A. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated enhanced binding of Sp1 on the SREBP-1c promoter in HCV-3a NS5A replicon cells. These results showed that HCV-3a NS5A activates SREBP-1c transcription through Sp1. Taken together, our results suggest that HCV-3a NS5A is a contributing factor for steatosis caused by HCV-3a infection.

  18. Modus operandi of the bacterial RNA polymerase containing the sigma54 promoter-specificity factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigneshweraraj, Sivaramesh; Bose, Daniel; Burrows, Patricia C; Joly, Nicolas; Schumacher, Jörg; Rappas, Mathieu; Pape, Tillmann; Zhang, Xiaodong; Stockley, Peter; Severinov, Konstantin; Buck, Martin

    2008-05-01

    Bacterial sigma (sigma) factors confer gene specificity upon the RNA polymerase, the central enzyme that catalyses gene transcription. The binding of the alternative sigma factor sigma(54) confers upon the RNA polymerase special functional and regulatory properties, making it suited for control of several major adaptive responses. Here, we summarize our current understanding of the interactions the sigma(54) factor makes with the bacterial transcription machinery.

  19. Functional homology between the yeast regulatory proteins GAL4 and LAC9: LAC9-mediated transcriptional activation in Kluyveromyces lactis involves protein binding to a regulatory sequence homologous to the GAL4 protein-binding site.

    OpenAIRE

    Breunig, K D; Kuger, P

    1987-01-01

    As shown previously, the beta-galactosidase gene of Kluyveromyces lactis is transcriptionally regulated via an upstream activation site (UASL) which contains a sequence homologous to the GAL4 protein-binding site in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (M. Ruzzi, K.D. Breunig, A.G. Ficca, and C.P. Hollenberg, Mol. Cell. Biol. 7:991-997, 1987). Here we demonstrate that the region of homology specifically binds a K. lactis regulatory protein. The binding activity was detectable in protein extracts from wil...

  20. Genome-wide Reconstruction of OxyR and SoxRS Transcriptional Regulatory Networks under Oxidative Stress in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; Szubin, Richard;

    2015-01-01

    Three transcription factors (TFs), OxyR, SoxR, and SoxS, play a critical role in transcriptional regulation of the defense system for oxidative stress in bacteria. However, their full genome-wide regulatory potential is unknown. Here, we perform a genome-scale reconstruction of the OxyR, SoxR, an...

  1. Epithelial Expression of Human ABO Blood Group Genes Is Dependent upon a Downstream Regulatory Element Functioning through an Epithelial Cell-specific Transcription Factor, Elf5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Rie; Nakajima, Tamiko; Takahashi, Yoichiro; Kubo, Rieko; Kobayashi, Momoko; Takahashi, Keiko; Takeshita, Haruo; Ogasawara, Kenichi; Kominato, Yoshihiko

    2016-10-21

    The human ABO blood group system is of great importance in blood transfusion and organ transplantation. The ABO system is composed of complex carbohydrate structures that are biosynthesized by A- and B-transferases encoded by the ABO gene. However, the mechanisms regulating ABO gene expression in epithelial cells remain obscure. On the basis of DNase I-hypersensitive sites in and around ABO in epithelial cells, we prepared reporter plasmid constructs including these sites. Subsequent luciferase assays and histone modifications indicated a novel positive regulatory element, designated the +22.6-kb site, downstream from ABO, and this was shown to enhance ABO promoter activity in an epithelial cell-specific manner. Expression of ABO and B-antigen was reduced in gastric cancer KATOIII cells by biallelic deletion of the +22.6-kb site using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that the site bound to an epithelial cell-specific transcription factor, Elf5. Mutation of the Ets binding motifs to abrogate binding of this factor reduced the regulatory activity of the +22.6-kb site. Furthermore, ELF5 knockdown with shRNA reduced both endogenous transcription from ABO and B-antigen expression in KATOIII cells. Thus, Elf5 appeared to be involved in the enhancer potential of the +22.6-kb site. These results support the contention that ABO expression is dependent upon a downstream positive regulatory element functioning through a tissue-restricted transcription factor, Elf5, in epithelial cells.

  2. FT I,a novel positive myeloid—lineage—specific transcription regulatory element within the mouse myeloperoxidase gene enhancer,En 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUJINGDE

    1995-01-01

    FT I (AAAAGGGGAAGCAGAG),a poly purine element within the myeloid-lineage specific enhancer(En 1) of the mouse myeloperoxidase gene[1,2] has been further characterised.1,FT I functions as a myeloid-lineage specific transcription regulatory element;2,WEHI 3BD+ cells have higher binding activity to FT I and express the proteins which could form the unique DNA-protein complex(es) of FT I;.3,The essential sequence for the specific DNA-protein interactions of FT I is AAAAGGGGAAGC;4,South-western analysis in conjunction with the competition assay of the proteins binding to FT I,has revealed a 28 kd protein in WEHI 3BD+ cells that displays the properties of the putative transcription factor which acts through FT I.These new findings have demonstrated both the functional myeloid-lineage specificity and the novelty of FT I.

  3. Mathematical model of a telomerase transcriptional regulatory network developed by cell-based screening: analysis of inhibitor effects and telomerase expression mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan E Bilsland

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells depend on transcription of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT. Many transcription factors affect TERT, though regulation occurs in context of a broader network. Network effects on telomerase regulation have not been investigated, though deeper understanding of TERT transcription requires a systems view. However, control over individual interactions in complex networks is not easily achievable. Mathematical modelling provides an attractive approach for analysis of complex systems and some models may prove useful in systems pharmacology approaches to drug discovery. In this report, we used transfection screening to test interactions among 14 TERT regulatory transcription factors and their respective promoters in ovarian cancer cells. The results were used to generate a network model of TERT transcription and to implement a dynamic Boolean model whose steady states were analysed. Modelled effects of signal transduction inhibitors successfully predicted TERT repression by Src-family inhibitor SU6656 and lack of repression by ERK inhibitor FR180204, results confirmed by RT-QPCR analysis of endogenous TERT expression in treated cells. Modelled effects of GSK3 inhibitor 6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime (BIO predicted unstable TERT repression dependent on noise and expression of JUN, corresponding with observations from a previous study. MYC expression is critical in TERT activation in the model, consistent with its well known function in endogenous TERT regulation. Loss of MYC caused complete TERT suppression in our model, substantially rescued only by co-suppression of AR. Interestingly expression was easily rescued under modelled Ets-factor gain of function, as occurs in TERT promoter mutation. RNAi targeting AR, JUN, MXD1, SP3, or TP53, showed that AR suppression does rescue endogenous TERT expression following MYC knockdown in these cells and SP3 or TP53 siRNA also cause partial recovery. The model therefore successfully predicted several

  4. Homeobox genes and melatonin synthesis: regulatory roles of the cone-rod homeobox transcription factor in the rodent pineal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Kristian; Møller, Morten; Rath, Martin Fredensborg

    2014-01-01

    Nocturnal synthesis of melatonin in the pineal gland is controlled by a circadian rhythm in arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) enzyme activity. In the rodent, Aanat gene expression displays a marked circadian rhythm; release of norepinephrine in the gland at night causes a cAMP-based induction of Aanat transcription. However, additional transcriptional control mechanisms exist. Homeobox genes, which are generally known to encode transcription factors controlling developmental processes, are also expressed in the mature rodent pineal gland. Among these, the cone-rod homeobox (CRX) transcription factor is believed to control pineal-specific Aanat expression. Based on recent advances in our understanding of Crx in the rodent pineal gland, we here suggest that homeobox genes play a role in adult pineal physiology both by ensuring pineal-specific Aanat expression and by facilitating cAMP response element-based circadian melatonin production.

  5. Homeobox Genes and Melatonin Synthesis: Regulatory Roles of the Cone-Rod Homeobox Transcription Factor in the Rodent Pineal Gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Rohde

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nocturnal synthesis of melatonin in the pineal gland is controlled by a circadian rhythm in arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT enzyme activity. In the rodent, Aanat gene expression displays a marked circadian rhythm; release of norepinephrine in the gland at night causes a cAMP-based induction of Aanat transcription. However, additional transcriptional control mechanisms exist. Homeobox genes, which are generally known to encode transcription factors controlling developmental processes, are also expressed in the mature rodent pineal gland. Among these, the cone-rod homeobox (CRX transcription factor is believed to control pineal-specific Aanat expression. Based on recent advances in our understanding of Crx in the rodent pineal gland, we here suggest that homeobox genes play a role in adult pineal physiology both by ensuring pineal-specific Aanat expression and by facilitating cAMP response element-based circadian melatonin production.

  6. Two different modes of oscillation in a gene transcription regulatory network with interlinked positive and negative feedback loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Rajesh

    2016-12-01

    We study the oscillatory behavior of a gene regulatory network with interlinked positive and negative feedback loop. The frequency and amplitude are two important properties of oscillation. The studied network produces two different modes of oscillation. In one mode (mode-I), frequency of oscillation remains constant over a wide range of amplitude and in the other mode (mode-II) the amplitude of oscillation remains constant over a wide range of frequency. Our study reproduces both features of oscillations in a single gene regulatory network and shows that the negative plus positive feedback loops in gene regulatory network offer additional advantage. We identified the key parameters/variables responsible for different modes of oscillation. The network is flexible in switching between different modes by choosing appropriately the required parameters/variables.

  7. Bacterial CD1d-restricted glycolipids induce IL-10 production by human regulatory T cells upon cross-talk with invariant NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venken, Koen; Decruy, Tine; Aspeslagh, Sandrine; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Lambrecht, Bart N; Elewaut, Dirk

    2013-09-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells and CD4(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important immune regulatory T cells with Ag reactivity to glycolipids and peptides, respectively. However, the functional interplay between these cells in humans is poorly understood. We show that Tregs suppress iNKT cell proliferation induced by CD1d-restricted glycolipids, including bacterial-derived diacylglycerols, as well as by innate-like activation. Inhibition was related to the potency of iNKT agonists, making diacylglycerol iNKT responses very prone to suppression. Cytokine production by iNKT cells was differentially modulated by Tregs because IL-4 production was reduced more profoundly compared with IFN-γ. A compelling observation was the significant production of IL-10 by Tregs after cell contact with iNKT cells, in particular in the presence of bacterial diacylglycerols. These iNKT-primed Tregs showed increased FOXP3 expression and superior suppressive function. Suppression of iNKT cell responses, but not conventional T cell responses, was IL-10 dependent, suggesting that there is a clear difference in mechanism between the Treg-mediated inhibition of these cell types. Our data highlight a physiologically relevant interaction between human iNKT and Tregs upon pathogen-derived glycolipid recognition that has a significant impact on the design of iNKT cell-based therapeutics.

  8. Characterisation of multiple regulatory domains spanning the major transcriptional start site of the FUS gene, a candidate gene for motor neurone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khursheed, Kejhal; Wilm, Thomas P; Cashman, Christine; Quinn, John P; Bubb, Vivien J; Moss, Diana J

    2015-01-21

    Fused-In-Sarcoma (FUS) is a candidate gene for neurological disorders including motor neurone disease and Parkinson׳s disease in addition to various types of cancer. Recently it has been reported that over expression of FUS causes motor neurone disease in mouse models hence mutations leading to changes in gene expression may contribute to the development of neurodegenerative disease. Genome evolutionary conservation was used to predict important cis-acting DNA regulators of the FUS gene promoter that direct transcription. The putative regulators identified were analysed in reporter gene assays in cells and in chick embryos. Our analysis indicated in addition to regulatory domains 5' of the transcriptional start site an important regulatory domain resides in intron 1 of the gene itself. This intronic domain functioned both in cell lines and in vivo in the neural tube of the chick embryo including developing motor neurones. Our data suggest the interaction of multiple domains including intronic domains are involved in expression of FUS. A better understanding of the regulation of expression of FUS may give insight into how its stimulus inducible expression may be associated with neurological disorders.

  9. MtrR control of a transcriptional regulatory pathway in Neisseria meningitidis that influences expression of a gene (nadA) encoding a vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloward, Jason M; Shafer, William M

    2013-01-01

    The surface-exposed NadA adhesin produced by a subset of capsular serogroup B strains of Neisseria meningitidis is currently being considered as a vaccine candidate to prevent invasive disease caused by a hypervirulent lineage of meningococci. Levels of NadA are known to be controlled by both transcriptional regulatory factors and a component of human saliva, 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid. Herein, we confirmed the capacity of a DNA-binding protein termed FarR to negatively control nadA expression. We also found that a known transcriptional regulator of farR in N. gonorrhoeae termed MtrR can have a negative regulatory impact on farR and nadA expression, especially when over-expressed. MtrR-mediated repression of nadA was found to be direct, and its binding to a target DNA sequence containing the nadA promoter influenced formation and/or stability of FarR::nadA complexes. The complexity of the multi-layered regulation of nadA uncovered during this investigation suggests that N. meningitidis modulates NadA adhesin protein levels for the purpose of interacting with host cells yet avoiding antibody directed against surface exposed epitopes.

  10. Transcriptional pausing at the translation start site operates as a critical checkpoint for riboswitch regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvier, Adrien; Picard-Jean, Frédéric; Berger-Dancause, Jean-Christophe; Bastet, Laurène; Naghdi, Mohammad Reza; Dubé, Audrey; Turcotte, Pierre; Perreault, Jonathan; Lafontaine, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    On the basis of nascent transcript sequencing, it has been postulated but never demonstrated that transcriptional pausing at translation start sites is important for gene regulation. Here we show that the Escherichia coli thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) thiC riboswitch contains a regulatory pause site in the translation initiation region that acts as a checkpoint for thiC expression. By biochemically probing nascent transcription complexes halted at defined positions, we find a narrow transcriptional window for metabolite binding, in which the downstream boundary is delimited by the checkpoint. We show that transcription complexes at the regulatory pause site favour the formation of a riboswitch intramolecular lock that strongly prevents TPP binding. In contrast, cotranscriptional metabolite binding increases RNA polymerase pausing and induces Rho-dependent transcription termination at the checkpoint. Early transcriptional pausing may provide a general mechanism, whereby transient transcriptional windows directly coordinate the sensing of environmental cues and bacterial mRNA regulation. PMID:28071751

  11. Amplification of pico-scale DNA mediated by bacterial carrier DNA for small-cell-number transcription factor ChIP-seq

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Janus S; Bagger, Frederik O; Hasemann, Marie S;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chromatin-Immunoprecipitation coupled with deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) is used to map transcription factor occupancy and generate epigenetic profiles genome-wide. The requirement of nano-scale ChIP DNA for generation of sequencing libraries has impeded ChIP-seq on in vivo tissues of low...... transcription factor (CEBPA) and histone mark (H3K4me3) ChIP. We further demonstrate that genomic profiles are highly resilient to changes in carrier DNA to ChIP DNA ratios. CONCLUSIONS: This represents a significant advance compared to existing technologies, which involve either complex steps of pre...... cell numbers. RESULTS: We describe a robust, simple and scalable methodology for ChIP-seq of low-abundant cell populations, verified down to 10,000 cells. By employing non-mammalian genome mapping bacterial carrier DNA during amplification, we reliably amplify down to 50 pg of ChIP DNA from...

  12. Linking Hematopoietic Differentiation to Co-Expressed Sets of Pluripotency-Associated and Imprinted Genes and to Regulatory microRNA-Transcription Factor Motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Mohamed; Trumm, Johannes; Spaniol, Christian; Sethi, Riccha; Irhimeh, Mohammad R.; Fuellen, Georg; Paulsen, Martina

    2017-01-01

    Maintenance of cell pluripotency, differentiation, and reprogramming are regulated by complex gene regulatory networks (GRNs) including monoallelically-expressed imprinted genes. Besides transcriptional control, epigenetic modifications and microRNAs contribute to cellular differentiation. As a model system for studying the capacity of cells to preserve their pluripotency state and the onset of differentiation and subsequent specialization, murine hematopoiesis was used and compared to embryonic stem cells (ESCs) as a control. Using published microarray data, the expression profiles of two sets of genes, pluripotent and imprinted, were compared to a third set of known hematopoietic genes. We found that more than half of the pluripotent and imprinted genes are clearly upregulated in ESCs but subsequently repressed during hematopoiesis. The remaining genes were either upregulated in hematopoietic progenitors or in differentiated blood cells. The three gene sets each consist of three similarly behaving gene groups with similar expression profiles in various lineages of the hematopoietic system as well as in ESCs. To explain this co-regulation behavior, we explored the transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms of pluripotent and imprinted genes and their regulator/target miRNAs in six different hematopoietic lineages. Therewith, lineage-specific transcription factor (TF)-miRNA regulatory networks were generated and their topologies and functional impacts during hematopoiesis were analyzed. This led to the identification of TF-miRNA co-regulatory motifs, for which we validated the contribution to the cellular development of the corresponding lineage in terms of statistical significance and relevance to biological evidence. This analysis also identified key miRNAs and TFs/genes that might play important roles in the derived lineage networks. These molecular associations suggest new aspects of the cellular regulation of the onset of cellular differentiation and

  13. Regulatory mechanisms for 3'-end alternative splicing and polyadenylation of the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein, GFAP, transcript

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blechingberg, Jenny; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick;

    2007-01-01

    The glial fibrillary acidic protein, GFAP, forms the intermediate cytoskeleton in cells of the glial lineage. Besides the common GFAP alpha transcript, the GFAP epsilon and GFAP kappa transcripts are generated by alternative mRNA 3'-end processing. Here we use a GFAP minigene to characterize...... molecular mechanisms participating in alternative GFAP expression. Usage of a polyadenylation signal within the alternatively spliced exon 7a is essential to generate the GFAP kappa and GFAP kappa transcripts. The GFAP kappa mRNA is distinct from GFAP epsilon mRNA given that it also includes intron 7a...... with the selection of the exon 7a polyadenylation site being the essential and primary event for regulating GFAP alternative processing. Udgivelsesdato: 2007...

  14. Transcriptional regulatory program in wild-type and retinoblastoma gene-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts during adipocyte differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hakim-Weber, Robab; Krogsdam, Anne-M; Jørgensen, Claus;

    2011-01-01

    this dual role of pRb in the early and late stages of adipogenesis we used microarrays to perform a comprehensive systems-level analysis of the common transcriptional program of the classic 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cell line, wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), and retinoblastoma gene-deficient MEFs...... of experimental data and computational analyses pinpointed a feedback-loop between Pparg and Foxo1.To analyze the effects of the retinoblastoma protein at the transcriptional level we chose a perturbated system (Rb-/- MEFs) for comparison to the transcriptional program of wild-type MEFs. Gene ontology analysis......Although many molecular regulators of adipogenesis have been identified a comprehensive catalogue of components is still missing. Recent studies showed that the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) was expressed in the cell cycle and late cellular differentiation phase during adipogenesis. To investigate...

  15. Sex Chromosome-wide Transcriptional Suppression and Compensatory Cis-Regulatory Evolution Mediate Gene Expression in the Drosophila Male Germline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily L Landeen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes has repeatedly resulted in the evolution of sex chromosome-specific forms of regulation, including sex chromosome dosage compensation in the soma and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in the germline. In the male germline of Drosophila melanogaster, a novel but poorly understood form of sex chromosome-specific transcriptional regulation occurs that is distinct from canonical sex chromosome dosage compensation or meiotic inactivation. Previous work shows that expression of reporter genes driven by testis-specific promoters is considerably lower-approximately 3-fold or more-for transgenes inserted into X chromosome versus autosome locations. Here we characterize this transcriptional suppression of X-linked genes in the male germline and its evolutionary consequences. Using transgenes and transpositions, we show that most endogenous X-linked genes, not just testis-specific ones, are transcriptionally suppressed several-fold specifically in the Drosophila male germline. In wild-type testes, this sex chromosome-wide transcriptional suppression is generally undetectable, being effectively compensated by the gene-by-gene evolutionary recruitment of strong promoters on the X chromosome. We identify and experimentally validate a promoter element sequence motif that is enriched upstream of the transcription start sites of hundreds of testis-expressed genes; evolutionarily conserved across species; associated with strong gene expression levels in testes; and overrepresented on the X chromosome. These findings show that the expression of X-linked genes in the Drosophila testes reflects a balance between chromosome-wide epigenetic transcriptional suppression and long-term compensatory adaptation by sex-linked genes. Our results have broad implications for the evolution of gene expression in the Drosophila male germline and for genome evolution.

  16. Sex Chromosome-wide Transcriptional Suppression and Compensatory Cis-Regulatory Evolution Mediate Gene Expression in the Drosophila Male Germline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landeen, Emily L; Muirhead, Christina A; Wright, Lori; Meiklejohn, Colin D; Presgraves, Daven C

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes has repeatedly resulted in the evolution of sex chromosome-specific forms of regulation, including sex chromosome dosage compensation in the soma and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in the germline. In the male germline of Drosophila melanogaster, a novel but poorly understood form of sex chromosome-specific transcriptional regulation occurs that is distinct from canonical sex chromosome dosage compensation or meiotic inactivation. Previous work shows that expression of reporter genes driven by testis-specific promoters is considerably lower-approximately 3-fold or more-for transgenes inserted into X chromosome versus autosome locations. Here we characterize this transcriptional suppression of X-linked genes in the male germline and its evolutionary consequences. Using transgenes and transpositions, we show that most endogenous X-linked genes, not just testis-specific ones, are transcriptionally suppressed several-fold specifically in the Drosophila male germline. In wild-type testes, this sex chromosome-wide transcriptional suppression is generally undetectable, being effectively compensated by the gene-by-gene evolutionary recruitment of strong promoters on the X chromosome. We identify and experimentally validate a promoter element sequence motif that is enriched upstream of the transcription start sites of hundreds of testis-expressed genes; evolutionarily conserved across species; associated with strong gene expression levels in testes; and overrepresented on the X chromosome. These findings show that the expression of X-linked genes in the Drosophila testes reflects a balance between chromosome-wide epigenetic transcriptional suppression and long-term compensatory adaptation by sex-linked genes. Our results have broad implications for the evolution of gene expression in the Drosophila male germline and for genome evolution.

  17. Control of Vibrio fischeri lux gene transcription by a cyclic AMP receptor protein-luxR protein regulatory circuit.

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    Expression of the Vibrio fischeri luminescence genes (lux genes) requires two transcriptional activators: the V. fischeri luxR gene product with autoinducer and the cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) with cAMP. It has been established that autoinducer and the luxR gene product are required for transcriptional activation of the luxICDABE operon, which contains a gene required for autoinducer synthesis and genes required for light emission. However, the role of cAMP-CRP in the induction o...

  18. Ciliary dyslexia candidate genes DYX1C1 and DCDC2 are regulated by Regulatory Factor X (RFX) transcription factors through X-box promoter motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammimies, Kristiina; Bieder, Andrea; Lauter, Gilbert; Sugiaman-Trapman, Debora; Torchet, Rachel; Hokkanen, Marie-Estelle; Burghoorn, Jan; Castrén, Eero; Kere, Juha; Tapia-Páez, Isabel; Swoboda, Peter

    2016-01-01

    DYX1C1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319 are three of the most replicated dyslexia candidate genes (DCGs). Recently, these DCGs were implicated in functions at the cilium. Here, we investigate the regulation of these DCGs by Regulatory Factor X transcription factors (RFX TFs), a gene family known for transcriptionally regulating ciliary genes. We identify conserved X-box motifs in the promoter regions of DYX1C1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319 and demonstrate their functionality, as well as the ability to recruit RFX TFs using reporter gene and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Furthermore, we uncover a complex regulation pattern between RFX1, RFX2, and RFX3 and their significant effect on modifying the endogenous expression of DYX1C1 and DCDC2 in a human retinal pigmented epithelial cell line immortalized with hTERT (hTERT-RPE1). In addition, induction of ciliogenesis increases the expression of RFX TFs and DCGs. At the protein level, we show that endogenous DYX1C1 localizes to the base of the cilium, whereas DCDC2 localizes along the entire axoneme of the cilium, thereby validating earlier localization studies using overexpression models. Our results corroborate the emerging role of DCGs in ciliary function and characterize functional noncoding elements, X-box promoter motifs, in DCG promoter regions, which thus can be targeted for mutation screening in dyslexia and ciliopathies associated with these genes.—Tammimies, K., Bieder, A., Lauter, G., Sugiaman-Trapman, D., Torchet, R., Hokkanen, M.-E., Burghoorn, J., Castrén, E., Kere, J., Tapia-Páez, I., Swoboda, P. Ciliary dyslexia candidate genes DYX1C1 and DCDC2 are regulated by Regulatory Factor (RF) X transcription factors through X-box promoter motifs. PMID:27451412

  19. Ciliary dyslexia candidate genes DYX1C1 and DCDC2 are regulated by Regulatory Factor X (RFX) transcription factors through X-box promoter motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammimies, Kristiina; Bieder, Andrea; Lauter, Gilbert; Sugiaman-Trapman, Debora; Torchet, Rachel; Hokkanen, Marie-Estelle; Burghoorn, Jan; Castrén, Eero; Kere, Juha; Tapia-Páez, Isabel; Swoboda, Peter

    2016-10-01

    DYX1C1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319 are three of the most replicated dyslexia candidate genes (DCGs). Recently, these DCGs were implicated in functions at the cilium. Here, we investigate the regulation of these DCGs by Regulatory Factor X transcription factors (RFX TFs), a gene family known for transcriptionally regulating ciliary genes. We identify conserved X-box motifs in the promoter regions of DYX1C1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319 and demonstrate their functionality, as well as the ability to recruit RFX TFs using reporter gene and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Furthermore, we uncover a complex regulation pattern between RFX1, RFX2, and RFX3 and their significant effect on modifying the endogenous expression of DYX1C1 and DCDC2 in a human retinal pigmented epithelial cell line immortalized with hTERT (hTERT-RPE1). In addition, induction of ciliogenesis increases the expression of RFX TFs and DCGs. At the protein level, we show that endogenous DYX1C1 localizes to the base of the cilium, whereas DCDC2 localizes along the entire axoneme of the cilium, thereby validating earlier localization studies using overexpression models. Our results corroborate the emerging role of DCGs in ciliary function and characterize functional noncoding elements, X-box promoter motifs, in DCG promoter regions, which thus can be targeted for mutation screening in dyslexia and ciliopathies associated with these genes.-Tammimies, K., Bieder, A., Lauter, G., Sugiaman-Trapman, D., Torchet, R., Hokkanen, M.-E., Burghoorn, J., Castrén, E., Kere, J., Tapia-Páez, I., Swoboda, P. Ciliary dyslexia candidate genes DYX1C1 and DCDC2 are regulated by Regulatory Factor (RF) X transcription factors through X-box promoter motifs.

  20. The IgH 3′ regulatory region governs μ chain transcription in mature B lymphocytes and the B cell fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saintamand, Alexis; Rouaud, Pauline; Garot, Armand; Saad, Faten; Carrion, Claire; Oblet, Christelle; Cogné, Michel; Pinaud, Eric; Denizot, Yves

    2015-01-01

    We report that the IgH 3′ regulatory region (3′RR) has no role on μ chain transcription and pre-BCR expression in B cell progenitors. In contrast, analysis of heterozygous IgH aΔ3′RR/bwt mice indicated that the 3′RR controls μ chain transcripts in mature splenocytes and impacts membrane IgM density without obvious effect on BCR signals (colocalisation with lipid rafts and phosphorylation of Erk and Akt after BCR crosslinking). Deletion of the 3′RR modulates the B cell fate to less marginal zone B cells. In conclusion, the 3′RR is dispensable for pre-BCR expression and necessary for optimal commitments toward the marginal zone B cell fate. These results reinforce the concept of a dual regulation of the IgH locus transcription and accessibility by 5′ elements at immature B cell stages, and by the 3′RR as early as the resting mature B cell stage and then along further activation and differentiation. PMID:25742787

  1. Genome-wide Reconstruction of OxyR and SoxRS Transcriptional Regulatory Networks under Oxidative Stress in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Woo Seo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Three transcription factors (TFs, OxyR, SoxR, and SoxS, play a critical role in transcriptional regulation of the defense system for oxidative stress in bacteria. However, their full genome-wide regulatory potential is unknown. Here, we perform a genome-scale reconstruction of the OxyR, SoxR, and SoxS regulons in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. Integrative data analysis reveals that a total of 68 genes in 51 transcription units (TUs belong to these regulons. Among them, 48 genes showed more than 2-fold changes in expression level under single-TF-knockout conditions. This reconstruction expands the genome-wide roles of these factors to include direct activation of genes related to amino acid biosynthesis (methionine and aromatic amino acids, cell wall synthesis (lipid A biosynthesis and peptidoglycan growth, and divalent metal ion transport (Mn2+, Zn2+, and Mg2+. Investigating the co-regulation of these genes with other stress-response TFs reveals that they are independently regulated by stress-specific TFs.

  2. CONREAL : conserved regulatory elements anchored alignment algorithm for identification of transcription factor binding sites by phylogenetic footprinting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berezikov, Eugene; Guryev, Victor; Plasterk, Ronald H A; Cuppen, Edwin

    2004-01-01

    Prediction of transcription-factor target sites in promoters remains difficult due to the short length and degeneracy of the target sequences. Although the use of orthologous sequences and phylogenetic footprinting approaches may help in the recognition of conserved and potentially functional sequen

  3. Next-Generation Sequencing of Genomic DNA Fragments Bound to a Transcription Factor in Vitro Reveals Its Regulatory Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukio Kurihara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Several transcription factors (TFs coordinate to regulate expression of specific genes at the transcriptional level. In Arabidopsis thaliana it is estimated that approximately 10% of all genes encode TFs or TF-like proteins. It is important to identify target genes that are directly regulated by TFs in order to understand the complete picture of a plant’s transcriptome profile. Here, we investigate the role of the LONG HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5 transcription factor that acts as a regulator of photomorphogenesis. We used an in vitro genomic DNA binding assay coupled with immunoprecipitation and next-generation sequencing (gDB-seq instead of the in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-based methods. The results demonstrate that the HY5-binding motif predicted here was similar to the motif reported previously and that in vitro HY5-binding loci largely overlapped with the HY5-targeted candidate genes identified in previous ChIP-chip analysis. By combining these results with microarray analysis, we identified hundreds of HY5-binding genes that were differentially expressed in hy5. We also observed delayed induction of some transcripts of HY5-binding genes in hy5 mutants in response to blue-light exposure after dark treatment. Thus, an in vitro gDNA-binding assay coupled with sequencing is a convenient and powerful method to bridge the gap between identifying TF binding potential and establishing function.

  4. Mapping mammalian cell-type-specific transcriptional regulatory networks using KD-CAGE and ChIP-seq data in the TC-YIK cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina eLizio

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Mammals are composed of hundreds of different cell types with specialized functions. Each of these cellular phenotypes are controlled by different combinations of transcription factors. Using a human non islet cell insulinoma cell line (TC-YIK which expresses insulin and the majority of known pancreatic beta cell specific genes as an example, we describe a general approach to identify key cell-type-specific transcription factors (TFs and their direct and indirect targets. By ranking all human TFs by their level of enriched expression in TC-YIK relative to a broad collection of samples (FANTOM5, we confirmed known key regulators of pancreatic function and development. Systematic siRNA mediated perturbation of these TFs followed by qRT-PCR revealed their interconnections with NEUROD1 at the top of the regulation hierarchy and its depletion drastically reducing insulin levels. For 15 of the TF knock-downs (KD, we then used Cap Analysis of Gene Expression (CAGE to identify thousands of their targets genome-wide (KD-CAGE. The data confirm NEUROD1 as a key positive regulator in the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN, and ISL1 and PROX1 as antagonists. As a complimentary approach we used ChIP-seq on four of these factors to identify NEUROD1, LMX1A, PAX6 and RFX6 binding sites in the human genome. Examining the overlap between genes perturbed in the KD-CAGE experiments and genes with a ChIP-seq peak within 1kb of their promoter, we identified direct transcriptional targets of these TFs. Integration of KD-CAGE and ChIP-seq data shows that both NEUROD1 and LMX1A work as the main transcriptional activators. In the core TRN (i.e. TF-TF only, NEUROD1 directly transcriptionally activates the pancreatic TFs HSF4, INSM1, MLXIPL, MYT1, NKX6-3, ONECUT2, PAX4, PROX1, RFX6, ST18, DACH1 and SHOX2, while LMX1A directly transcriptionally activates DACH1, SHOX2, PAX6 and PDX1. Analysis of these complementary datasets suggests the need for caution in interpreting

  5. Mapping Mammalian Cell-type-specific Transcriptional Regulatory Networks Using KD-CAGE and ChIP-seq Data in the TC-YIK Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizio, Marina; Ishizu, Yuri; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Hasegawa, Akira; Kubosaki, Atsutaka; Severin, Jessica; Kawaji, Hideya; Nakamura, Yukio; Suzuki, Harukazu; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R R

    2015-01-01

    Mammals are composed of hundreds of different cell types with specialized functions. Each of these cellular phenotypes are controlled by different combinations of transcription factors. Using a human non islet cell insulinoma cell line (TC-YIK) which expresses insulin and the majority of known pancreatic beta cell specific genes as an example, we describe a general approach to identify key cell-type-specific transcription factors (TFs) and their direct and indirect targets. By ranking all human TFs by their level of enriched expression in TC-YIK relative to a broad collection of samples (FANTOM5), we confirmed known key regulators of pancreatic function and development. Systematic siRNA mediated perturbation of these TFs followed by qRT-PCR revealed their interconnections with NEUROD1 at the top of the regulation hierarchy and its depletion drastically reducing insulin levels. For 15 of the TF knock-downs (KD), we then used Cap Analysis of Gene Expression (CAGE) to identify thousands of their targets genome-wide (KD-CAGE). The data confirm NEUROD1 as a key positive regulator in the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN), and ISL1, and PROX1 as antagonists. As a complimentary approach we used ChIP-seq on four of these factors to identify NEUROD1, LMX1A, PAX6, and RFX6 binding sites in the human genome. Examining the overlap between genes perturbed in the KD-CAGE experiments and genes with a ChIP-seq peak within 50 kb of their promoter, we identified direct transcriptional targets of these TFs. Integration of KD-CAGE and ChIP-seq data shows that both NEUROD1 and LMX1A work as the main transcriptional activators. In the core TRN (i.e., TF-TF only), NEUROD1 directly transcriptionally activates the pancreatic TFs HSF4, INSM1, MLXIPL, MYT1, NKX6-3, ONECUT2, PAX4, PROX1, RFX6, ST18, DACH1, and SHOX2, while LMX1A directly transcriptionally activates DACH1, SHOX2, PAX6, and PDX1. Analysis of these complementary datasets suggests the need for caution in interpreting Ch

  6. Influence of cAMP receptor protein (CRP) on bacterial virulence and transcriptional regulation of allS by CRP in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jian; Tan, Bin; Yang, Shiya; Luo, Mei; Xia, Huiming; Zhang, Xian; Zhou, Xipeng; Yang, Xianxian; Yang, Ruifu; Li, Yingli; Qiu, Jingfu

    2016-11-15

    cAMP receptor protein (CRP) is one of the most important transcriptional regulators, which can regulate large quantities of operons in different bacteria. The gene allS was well-known as allantoin-utilizing capability and involving in bacterial virulence in Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae). The specific DNA recognition motif of transcription regulator CRP was found in allS promoter region. Therefore, this study is aimed to investigate the function of CRP on virulence and its transcriptional regulation mechanism to gene allS in K. pneumoniae. The wild-type (WT) K. pneumoniae NTUH-2044, crp knockout (Kp-Δcrp) and the complemented knockout (KpC-Δcrp) strains were used to determine the function of crp gene. The lacZ fusion, qRT-PCR, electrophoretic mobility shift and DNase I footprinting assays were performed to study the transcriptional regulation of CRP on allS. The result showed a decreased virulence in crp knockout strain. Complement through supplementing crp fragment in expression plasmid partially restore virulence of knockout bacteria. The CRP could bind to the allS promoter-proximal region and the binding site was further refined to be located from 60bp to 94bp upstream of the allS promoter. Based on these results, we proposed that CRP is an essential virulence regulator and knock out of crp gene will result in reduced virulence in K. pneumoniae. In the meantime, the transcription of gene allS is positively regulated by CRP via directly binding to upstream of allS promoter.

  7. Foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase inhibits dsRNA-induced type I interferon transcription by decreasing interferon regulatory factor 3/7 in protein levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dang; Fang, Liurong; Luo, Rui; Ye, Rui; Fang, Ying; Xie, Lilan; Chen, Huanchun [Division of Animal Infectious Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Xiao, Shaobo, E-mail: shaoboxiao@yahoo.com [Division of Animal Infectious Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2010-08-13

    Research highlights: {yields} FMDV L{sup pro} inhibits poly(I:C)-induced IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} mRNA expression. {yields} L{sup pro} inhibits MDA5-mediated activation of the IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter. {yields} L{sup pro} significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes. {yields} L{sup pro} inhibits IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter activation by decreasing IRF-3/7 in protein levels. {yields} The ability to process eIF-4G of L{sup pro} is not necessary to inhibit IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} activation. -- Abstract: The leader proteinase (L{sup pro}) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) has been identified as an interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) antagonist that disrupts the integrity of transcription factor nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). In this study, we showed that the reduction of double stranded RNA (dsRNA)-induced IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} expression caused by L{sup pro} was also associated with a decrease of interferon regulatory factor 3/7 (IRF-3/7) in protein levels, two critical transcription factors for activation of IFN-{alpha}/{beta}. Furthermore, overexpression of L{sup pro} significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes including 2',5'-OAS, ISG54, IP-10, and RANTES. Screening L{sup pro} mutants indicated that the ability to process eIF-4G of L{sup pro} is not required for suppressing dsRNA-induced activation of the IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter and decreasing IRF-3/7 expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that, in addition to disrupting NF-{kappa}B, L{sup pro} also decreases IRF-3/7 expression to suppress dsRNA-induced type I IFN production, suggesting multiple strategies used by FMDV to counteract the immune response to viral infection.

  8. Nature of bacterial colonization influences transcription of mucin genes in mice during the first week of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, Anders; Kristensen, Matilde Bylov; Bahl, Martin Iain

    2012-01-01

    In summary, our data show that development of the expression of genes encoding secreted (Muc2/Tff3) and membrane-bound (Muc1/Muc3/Muc4) mucus regulatory proteins, respectively, is distinct and that the onset of this development may be accelerated by specific groups of bacteria present or absent a...

  9. Regulatory and Functional Connection of Microphthalmia-Associated Transcription Factor and Anti-Metastatic Pigment Epithelium Derived Factor in Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asunción Fernández-Barral

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF, a member of the serine protease inhibitor superfamily, has potent anti-metastatic effects in cutaneous melanoma through its direct actions on endothelial and melanoma cells. Here we show that PEDF expression positively correlates with microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF in melanoma cell lines and human samples. High PEDF and MITF expression is characteristic of low aggressive melanomas classified according to molecular and pathological criteria, whereas both factors are decreased in senescent melanocytes and naevi. Importantly, MITF silencing down-regulates PEDF expression in melanoma cell lines and primary melanocytes, suggesting that the correlation in the expression reflects a causal relationship. In agreement, analysis of Chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to high throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq data sets revealed three MITF binding regions within the first intron of SERPINF1, and reporter assays demonstrated that the binding of MITF to these regions is sufficient to drive transcription. Finally, we demonstrate that exogenous PEDF expression efficiently halts in vitro migration and invasion, as well as in vivo dissemination of melanoma cells induced by MITF silencing. In summary, these results identify PEDF as a novel transcriptional target of MITF and support a relevant functional role for the MITF-PEDF axis in the biology of melanoma.

  10. Genetic variants in SIRT3 transcriptional regulatory region affect promoter activity and fat deposition in three cattle breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Linsheng; Hong, Jieyun; Raza, Sayed Haidar Abbas; Zan, Linsen

    2016-12-12

    Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) is a mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent deacetylase. It has crucial roles in regulating the respiratory chain, in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, and in both the citric acid and urea cycles. The aim of this study was to investigate whether SIRT3 could be used as a candidate gene in the breeding of cattle. Expression analysis by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions (qPCR) indicated that expression levels of SIRT3 were highest in the kidney, rumen, liver, omasum and muscle. Using sequencing technology on a total of 913 cattle representing three indigenous Chinese beef cattle breeds, three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in the promoter region of SIRT3, and five haplotypes representing five potential transcription factor compositions of polymorphic potential cis-acting elements. Association analysis indicated that the Hap3/8 diplotype performed better than other combinations in intramuscular fat content. In addition, the promoter activity with Hap1 haplotype was higher than the Hap8 haplotype, consistent with the association analysis. The results indicate that the polymorphisms in transcription factor binding sites of SIRT3 promoter may affect the transcriptional activity of SIRT3, and thus alter intramuscular fat content in beef cattle.

  11. Transcriptional regulatory program in wild-type and retinoblastoma gene-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts during adipocyte differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen Jacob B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although many molecular regulators of adipogenesis have been identified a comprehensive catalogue of components is still missing. Recent studies showed that the retinoblastoma protein (pRb was expressed in the cell cycle and late cellular differentiation phase during adipogenesis. To investigate this dual role of pRb in the early and late stages of adipogenesis we used microarrays to perform a comprehensive systems-level analysis of the common transcriptional program of the classic 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cell line, wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs, and retinoblastoma gene-deficient MEFs (Rb-/- MEFs. Findings Comparative analysis of the expression profiles of 3T3-L1 cells and wild-type MEFs revealed genes involved specifically in early regulation of the adipocyte differentiation as well as secreted factors and signaling molecules regulating the later phase of differentiation. In an attempt to identify transcription factors regulating adipogenesis, bioinformatics analysis of the promoters of coordinately and highly expressed genes was performed. We were able to identify a number of high-confidence target genes for follow-up experimental studies. Additionally, combination of experimental data and computational analyses pinpointed a feedback-loop between Pparg and Foxo1. To analyze the effects of the retinoblastoma protein at the transcriptional level we chose a perturbated system (Rb-/- MEFs for comparison to the transcriptional program of wild-type MEFs. Gene ontology analysis of 64 deregulated genes showed that the Rb-/- MEF model exhibits a brown(-like adipocyte phenotype. Additionally, the analysis results indicate a different or additional role for pRb family member involvement in the lineage commitment. Conclusion In this study a number of commonly modulated genes during adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells and MEFs, potential transcriptional regulation mechanisms, and differentially regulated targets during adipocyte

  12. Unmasking risk loci: DNA methylation illuminates the biology of cancer predisposition: analyzing DNA methylation of transcriptional enhancers reveals missed regulatory links between cancer risk loci and genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aran, Dvir; Hellman, Asaf

    2014-02-01

    Paradoxically, DNA sequence polymorphisms in cancer risk loci rarely correlate with the expression of cancer genes. Therefore, the molecular mechanism underlying an individual's susceptibility to cancer has remained largely unknown. However, recent evaluations of the correlations between DNA methylation and gene expression levels across healthy and cancerous genomes have revealed enrichment of disease-related DNA methylation variations within disease-associated risk loci. Moreover, it appears that transcriptional enhancers embedded in cancer risk loci often contain DNA methylation sites that closely define the expression of prominent cancer genes, despite the lack of significant correlations between gene expression levels and the surrounding disease-associated polymorphic sequences. We suggest that DNA methylation variations may obscure the effect of co-residing risk sequence alleles. Analysis of enhancer methylation data may help to reveal the regulatory circuits underlying predisposition to cancers and other common diseases.

  13. TFmiR: a web server for constructing and analyzing disease-specific transcription factor and miRNA co-regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Mohamed; Spaniol, Christian; Nazarieh, Maryam; Helms, Volkhard

    2015-07-01

    TFmiR is a freely available web server for deep and integrative analysis of combinatorial regulatory interactions between transcription factors, microRNAs and target genes that are involved in disease pathogenesis. Since the inner workings of cells rely on the correct functioning of an enormously complex system of activating and repressing interactions that can be perturbed in many ways, TFmiR helps to better elucidate cellular mechanisms at the molecular level from a network perspective. The provided topological and functional analyses promote TFmiR as a reliable systems biology tool for researchers across the life science communities. TFmiR web server is accessible through the following URL: http://service.bioinformatik.uni-saarland.de/tfmir.

  14. Modification of the FoxP3 transcription factor principally affects inducible T regulatory cells in a model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Verhagen

    Full Text Available T regulatory (Treg cells expressing the transcription factor FoxP3 play a key role in protection against autoimmune disease. GFP-FoxP3 reporter mice have been used widely to study the induction, function and stability of both thymically- and peripherally-induced Treg cells. The N-terminal modification of FoxP3, however, affects its interaction with transcriptional co-factors; this can alter Treg cell development and function in certain self-antigen specific animal models. Interestingly, Treg cell function can be negatively or positively affected, depending on the nature of the model. In this study, we focused on the effect of the GFP-FoxP3 reporter on Treg cell development and function in the Tg4 mouse model. In this model, T cells express a transgenic T cell receptor (TCR specific for the Myelin Basic Protein (MBP peptide Ac1-9, making the animals susceptible to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a disease akin to multiple sclerosis in humans. Unlike diabetes-susceptible mice, Tg4 FoxP3(gfp mice did not develop spontaneous autoimmune disease and did not demonstrate augmented susceptibility to induced disease. Concurrently, thymic generation of natural Treg cells was not negatively affected. The induction of FoxP3 expression in naive peripheral T cells was, however, significantly impaired as a result of the transgene. This study shows that the requirements for the interaction of FoxP3 with co-factors, which governs its regulatory ability, differ not only between natural and inducible Treg cells but also between animal models of diseases such as diabetes and EAE.

  15. Regulatory Interactions of Csr Components: the RNA Binding Protein CsrA Activates csrB Transcription in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Gudapaty, Seshagirirao; Suzuki, Kazushi; Wang, Xin; Babitzke, Paul; Romeo, Tony

    2002-01-01

    The global regulator CsrA (carbon storage regulator) of Escherichia coli is a small RNA binding protein that represses various metabolic pathways and processes that are induced in the stationary phase of growth, while it activates certain exponential phase functions. Both repression and activation by CsrA involve posttranscriptional mechanisms, in which CsrA binding to mRNA leads to decreased or increased transcript stability, respectively. CsrA also binds to a small untranslated RNA, CsrB, f...

  16. Functional expression of SAV3818, a putative TetR-family transcriptional regulatory gene from Streptomyces avermitilis, stimulates antibiotic production in Streptomyces species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Cac Thi Phung; Lee, Han-Na; Choi, Si-Sun; Lee, Sang Yup; Kim, Eung-Soo

    2009-02-01

    Avermectin and its analogs are major commercial antiparasitic agents in the fields of animal health, agriculture, and human infections. Previously, comparative transcriptome analysis between the low-producer S. avermitilis ATCC31267 and the high-producer S. avermitilis ATCC31780 using a S. avermitilis whole genome chip revealed that 50 genes were overexpressed at least two-fold higher in S. avermitilis ATCC31780. To verify the biological significance of some of the transcriptomics-guided targets, five putative regulatory genes were individually cloned under the strong-andconstitutive promoter of the Streptomyces expression vector pSE34, followed by the transformation into the lowproducer S. avermitilis ATCC31267. Among the putative genes tested, three regulatory genes including SAV213, SAV3818, and SAV4023 exhibited stimulatory effects on avermectin production in S. avermitilis ATCC31267. Moreover, overexpression of SAV3818 also stimulated actinorhodin production in both S. coelicolor M145 and S. lividans TK21, implying that the SAV3818, a putative TetR-family transcriptional regulator, could be a global upregulator acting in antibiotic production in Streptomyces species.

  17. Interleukin 10 acts on regulatory T cells to maintain expression of the transcription factor Foxp3 and suppressive function in mice with colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Masako; Turovskaya, Olga; Kim, Gisen; Madan, Rajat; Karp, Christopher L; Cheroutre, Hilde; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2009-11-01

    Regulatory T cells (T(reg) cells) that express the transcription factor Foxp3 suppress the activity of other cells. Here we show that interleukin 10 (IL-10) produced by CD11b(+) myeloid cells in recombination-activating gene 1-deficient (Rag1(-/-)) recipient mice was needed to prevent the colitis induced by transferred CD4(+)CD45RB(hi) T cells. In Il10(-/-)Rag1(-/-) mice, T(reg) cells failed to maintain Foxp3 expression and regulatory activity. The loss of Foxp3 expression occurred only in recipients with colitis, which indicates that the requirement for IL-10 is manifested in the presence of inflammation. IL-10 receptor-deficient (Il10rb(-/-)) T(reg) cells also failed to maintain Foxp3 expression, which suggested that host IL-10 acted directly on the T(reg) cells. Our data indicate that IL-10 released from myeloid cells acts in a paracrine manner on T(reg) cells to maintain Foxp3 expression.

  18. The transcriptional regulatory network in the drought response and its crosstalk in abiotic stress responses including drought, cold and heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo eNakashima

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Drought negatively impacts plant growth and the productivity of crops around the world. Understanding the molecular mechanisms in the drought response is important for improvement of drought tolerance using molecular techniques. In plants, abscisic acid (ABA is accumulated under osmotic stress conditions caused by drought, and has a key role in stress responses and tolerance. Comprehensive molecular analyses have shown that ABA regulates the expression of many genes under osmotic stress conditions, and the ABA-responsive element (ABRE is the major cis-element for ABA-responsive gene expression. Transcription factors (TFs are master regulators of gene expression. ABRE-binding protein (AREB and ABRE-binding factor (ABF TFs control gene expression in an ABA-dependent manner. SNF1-related protein kinases 2, group A 2C-type protein phosphatases, and ABA receptors were shown to control the ABA signaling pathway. ABA-independent signaling pathways such as dehydration-responsive element-binding protein (DREB TFs and NAC TFs are also involved in stress responses including drought, heat and cold. Recent studies have suggested that there are interactions between the major ABA signaling pathway and other signaling factors in stress responses. The important roles of these transcription factors in crosstalk among abiotic stress responses will be discussed. Control of ABA or stress signaling factor expression can improve tolerance to environmental stresses. Recent studies using crops have shown that stress-specific overexpression of TFs improves drought tolerance and grain yield compared with controls in the field.

  19. Sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1 expression and genetic polymorphism significantly affect intramuscular fat deposition in the longissimus muscle of Erhualian and Sutai pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Yang, X J; Xia, D; Chen, J; Wegner, J; Jiang, Z; Zhao, R Q

    2008-01-01

    Two experiments were performed to elucidate the role of sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1 (SREBF1) in i.m. fat (IMF) deposition in pigs. In Exp. 1, LM samples were removed from 4 male and 4 female Erhualian piglets at 3, 20, and 45 d of age, and SREBF1 mRNA expression level and IMF content were measured. Intramuscular fat content and expression of SREBF1 mRNA was greater (P Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the reverse transcription PCR products of the SREBF1 gene revealed 3 genotypes in Sutai pigs with frequencies of 50% for AA, 36% for AB, and 14% for BB, respectively. Both SREBF1 mRNA level and IMF content in muscle were greater (P < 0.05) in AB and BB animals than in AA animals, whereas no difference in backfat thickness was observed among the 3 genotypes. Sequencing analysis identified 2 SNP at T1006C and C1033T within the open reading frame of the SREBF1 gene (NM_214157). Although both are silent mutations, they affected the secondary structure of SREBF1 mRNA. These results suggest that SREBF1 might play an important role in regulation of muscle fat deposition during postnatal growth of pigs. The SNP identified in the SREBF1 gene suggest that it could be used as a genetic marker to improve IMF content in pigs.

  20. NECK LEAF 1, a GATA type transcription factor, modulates organogenesis by regulating the expression of multiple regulatory genes during reproductive development in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liping Wang; Hengfu Yin; Qian Qian; Jun Yang; Chaofeng Huang; Xiaohe Hu; Da Luo

    2009-01-01

    In the monocot rice species Oryza sativa L., one of the most striking morphological processes during reproductive development is the concurrence of panicle development with the sequential elongation of upper internodes (UPIs). To elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms, we cloned the rice gene NECK LEAF 1 (NL1), which when mutated results in delays in flowering time, smaller panicles with overgrown bracts and abnormal UPI elongation patterns. The NL1 gene encodes a GATA-type transcription factor with a single zinc finger domain, and its transcripts are de-tected predominantly in the bract primordia, which normally degenerate in the wild-type plants. Overexpression of NL1 in transgenic plants often gives rise to severe growth retardation, less vegetative phytomers and smaller leaves, suggesting that NL1 plays an important role in organ differentiation. A novel mutant allele of PLASTOCHRON1 (PLA1), a gene known to play a key role in regulating leaf initiation, was identified in this study. Genetic analysis demonstrated an interaction between nll and plal, with NL1 acting upstream of PLA1. The expression level and spatial pattern of PLA1 were found to be altered in the nll mutant. Furthermore, the expression of two regulators of flowering, Hd3a and OsMADS1, was also affected in the nll mutant. On the basis of these findings, we propose that NL1 is an intrinsic factor that modulates and coordinates organogenesis through regulating the expression of PLA1 and other regulatory genes during reproductive development in rice.

  1. Recruitment and subnuclear distribution of the regulatory machinery during 1α,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3-mediated transcriptional upregulation in osteoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriagada, Gloria; Henriquez, Berta; Moena, Daniel; Merino, Paola; Ruiz-Tagle, Cinthya; Lian, Jane B.; Stein, Gary S.; Stein, Janet L.; Montecino, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The architectural organization of the genome and regulatory proteins within the nucleus supports gene expression in a physiologically-regulated manner. In osteoblastic cells ligand activation induces a nuclear punctate distribution of the 1α,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 (1α,25(OH)2D3) receptor (VDR) and promotes its interaction with transcriptional coactivators such as SRC-1, NCoA-62/Skip, and DRIP205. Here, we discuss evidence demonstrating that in osteoblastic cells VDR binds to the nuclear matrix fraction in a 1α,25(OH)2D3-dependent manner. This interaction occurs rapidly after exposure to 1α,25(OH)2D3 and does not require a functional VDR DNA binding domain. The nuclear matrix-bound VDR molecules colocalize with the also nuclear matrix-associated coactivator DRIP205. We propose a model where the rapid association of VDR with the nuclear matrix fraction represents an event that follows 1α,25(OH)2D3-dependent nuclear localization of VDR, but that precedes 1α,25(OH)2D3-dependent transcriptional upregulation at target genes. PMID:20171279

  2. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein in white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus): cDNA cloning, sites of expression and transcript abundance in corticosteroidogenic tissue after an acute stressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusakabe, Makoto; Zuccarelli, Micah D; Nakamura, Ikumi; Young, Graham

    2009-06-01

    The white sturgeon, Acipenser transmontanus, is a primitive bony fish that is recognized as an important emerging species for aquaculture. However, many aspects of its stress and reproductive physiology remain unclear. These processes are controlled by various steroid hormones. In order to investigate the regulation of steroidogenesis associated with acute stress in sturgeon, a cDNA-encoding steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) was isolated from white sturgeon. The putative amino acid sequence of sturgeon StAR shares high homology (over 60%) with other vertebrates. Phylogenetic analysis grouped sturgeon StAR within Actinopterygii, but it was clearly segregated from teleost StARs. RT-PCR analysis revealed that transcripts were most abundant in yellow corpuscles found throughout the kidney and weaker signals were detected in gonad and kidney. Very weak signals were also detected in brain and spleen by quantitative real-time PCR. In situ hybridization revealed that StAR is expressed in the cells of yellow corpuscles. No significant changes in StAR gene expression were detected in response to an acute handling stress. These results suggest that StAR is highly conserved throughout vertebrates, but the expression of the functional protein during the stress response may be partially regulated post-transcriptionally.

  3. Disruption of mutually negative regulatory feedback loop between interferon-inducible p202 protein and the E2F family of transcription factors in lupus-prone mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchanathan, Ravichandran; Xin, Hong; Choubey, Divaker

    2010-01-01

    Summary Studies have identified interferon-inducible Ifi202 gene as a lupus susceptibility gene (encoding p202 protein) in mouse models of lupus disease. However, signaling pathways that regulate the Ifi202 expression in cells remain to be elucidated. We found that steady-state levels of Ifi202 mRNA and protein were high in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from E2F1-knockout (E2F1-/-) and E2F1 and E2F2 double knockout (E2F1-/- E2F2-/-) mice than isogenic wild type MEFs. Moreover, overexpression of E2F1 in mouse fibroblasts decreased expression of p202. Furthermore, expression of E2F1, but not E2F4, transcription factor in mouse fibroblasts repressed the activity of 202-luc-reporter in promoter-reporter assays. Interestingly, the E2F1-mediated transcriptional repression of the 202-luc-reporter was independent of p53 and pRb expression. However, the repression was dependent on the ability of E2F1 to bind DNA. We have identified a potential E2F DNA-binding site in the 5′-regulatory region of the Ifi202 gene and mutations in this E2F DNA-binding site reduced the E2F1-mediated transcriptional repression of 202-luc-reporter. Because p202 inhibits the E2F1-mediated transcriptional activation of genes, we compared the expression of E2F1 and its target genes in splenic cells from lupus-prone B6.Nba2 congenic mice, which express increased levels of p202, with age-matched C57BL/6 mice. We found that increased expression of Ifi202 in the congenic mice was associated with inhibition of E2F1-mediated transcription and decreased expression of E2F1 and its target genes that encode pro-apoptotic proteins. Our observations support for the idea that increased Ifi202 expression in certain strain of mice contributes to lupus susceptibility in part by inhibiting E2F1-mediated functions. PMID:18424712

  4. From indole to pyrrole, furan, thiophene and pyridine: Search for novel small molecule inhibitors of bacterial transcription initiation complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thach, Oscar; Mielczarek, Marcin; Ma, Cong; Kutty, Samuel K; Yang, Xiao; Black, David StC; Griffith, Renate; Lewis, Peter J; Kumar, Naresh

    2016-03-15

    The search for small molecules capable of inhibiting transcription initiation in bacteria has resulted in the synthesis of N,N'-disubstituted hydrazines and imine-carbohydrazides comprised of indole, pyridine, pyrrole, furan and thiophene using the respective trichloroacetyl derivatives, carbohydrazides and aldehydes. Replacement of the indole moiety by smaller heterocycles linked by CONHNC linkers afforded a broad variety of compounds efficiently targeting the RNA polymerase-σ(70)/σ(A) interaction as determined by ELISA and exhibiting increased inhibition of the growth of Escherichia coli compared to Bacillus subtilis in culture. The structural features of the synthesized transcription initiation inhibitors needed for antibacterial activity were identified employing molecular modelling and structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies.

  5. Common and distinct DNA-binding and regulatory activities of the BEN-solo transcription factor family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qi; Ren, Aiming; Westholm, Jakub O; Duan, Hong; Patel, Dinshaw J; Lai, Eric C

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the BEN (BANP, E5R, and NAC1) domain was recognized as a new class of conserved DNA-binding domain. The fly genome encodes three proteins that bear only a single BEN domain ("BEN-solo" factors); namely, Insensitive (Insv), Bsg25A (Elba1), and CG9883 (Elba2). Insv homodimers preferentially bind CCAATTGG palindromes throughout the genome to mediate transcriptional repression, whereas Bsg25A and Elba2 heterotrimerize with their obligate adaptor, Elba3 (i.e., the ELBA complex), to recognize a CCAATAAG motif in the Fab-7 insulator. While these data suggest distinct DNA-binding properties of BEN-solo proteins, we performed reporter assays that indicate that both Bsg25A and Elba2 can individually recognize Insv consensus sites efficiently. We confirmed this by solving the structure of Bsg25A complexed to the Insv site, which showed that key aspects of the BEN:DNA recognition strategy are similar between these proteins. We next show that both Insv and ELBA proteins are competent to mediate transcriptional repression via Insv consensus sequences but that the ELBA complex appears to be selective for the ELBA site. Reciprocally, genome-wide analysis reveals that Insv exhibits significant cobinding to class I insulator elements, indicating that it may also contribute to insulator function. Indeed, we observed abundant Insv binding within the Hox complexes with substantial overlaps with class I insulators, many of which bear Insv consensus sites. Moreover, Insv coimmunoprecipitates with the class I insulator factor CP190. Finally, we observed that Insv harbors exclusive activity among fly BEN-solo factors with respect to regulation of Notch-mediated cell fate choices in the peripheral nervous system. This in vivo activity is recapitulated by BEND6, a mammalian BEN-solo factor that conserves the Notch corepressor function of Insv but not its capacity to bind Insv consensus sites. Altogether, our data define an array of common and distinct biochemical and functional

  6. Hsa-miR-590-5p Interaction with SMAD3 Transcript Supports Its Regulatory Effect on The TGFβ Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meisam Jafarzadeh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: SMAD proteins are the core players of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ signaling pathway, a pathway which is involved in cell proliferation, differentiation and migration. On the other hand, hsa-miRNA-590-5p (miR-590-5p is known to have a negative regulatory effect on TGFβ signaling pathway receptors. Since, RNAhybrid analysis suggested SMAD3 as a bona fide target gene for miR-590, we intended to investigate the effect of miR-590-5p on SMAD3 transcription. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, miR-590-5p was overexpressed in different cell lines and its increased expression was detected through quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR. Western blot analysis was then used to investigate the effect of miR-590-5p overexpression on SMAD3 protein level. Next, the direct interaction of miR-590-5p with the 3´-UTR sequence of SMAD3 transcript was investigated using the dual luciferase assay. Finally, flow cytometery was used to investigate the effect of miR-590-5p overexpression on cell cycle progression in HeLa and SW480 cell lines. Results: miR-590-5p was overexpressed in the SW480 cell line and its overexpression resulted in significant reduction of the SMAD3 protein level. Consistently, direct interaction of miR-590-5p with 3´-UTR sequence of SMAD3 was detected. Finally, miR-590-5p overexpression did not show a significant effect on cell cycle progression of Hela and SW480 cell lines. Conclusion: Consistent with previous reports about the negative regulatory effect of miR-590 on TGFβ receptors, our data suggest that miR-590-5p also attenuates the TGFβ signaling pathway through down-regulation of SMAD3.

  7. The post-transcriptional regulator CsrA plays a central role in the adaptation of bacterial pathogens to different stages of infection in animal hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchetti-Miganeh, Céline; Burrowes, Elizabeth; Baysse, Christine; Ermel, Gwennola

    2008-01-01

    The importance of Csr post-transcriptional systems is gradually emerging; these systems control a variety of virulence-linked physiological traits in many pathogenic bacteria. This review focuses on the central role that Csr systems play in the pathogenesis of certain bacteria and in the establishment of successful infections in animal hosts. Csr systems appear to control the 'switch' between different physiological states in the infection process; for example switching pathogens from a colonization state to a persistence state. Csr systems are controlled by two-component sensor/regulator systems and by non-coding RNAs. In addition, recent findings suggest that the RNA chaperone Hfq may play an integral role in Csr-mediated bacterial adaptation to the host environment.

  8. The bacterial effector HopX1 targets JAZ transcriptional repressors to activate jasmonate signaling and promote infection in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selena Gimenez-Ibanez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenicity of Pseudomonas syringae is dependent on a type III secretion system, which secretes a suite of virulence effector proteins into the host cytoplasm, and the production of a number of toxins such as coronatine (COR, which is a mimic of the plant hormone jasmonate-isoleuce (JA-Ile. Inside the plant cell, effectors target host molecules to subvert the host cell physiology and disrupt defenses. However, despite the fact that elucidating effector action is essential to understanding bacterial pathogenesis, the molecular function and host targets of the vast majority of effectors remain largely unknown. Here, we found that effector HopX1 from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci (Pta 11528, a strain that does not produce COR, interacts with and promotes the degradation of JAZ proteins, a key family of JA-repressors. We show that hopX1 encodes a cysteine protease, activity that is required for degradation of JAZs by HopX1. HopX1 associates with JAZ proteins through its central ZIM domain and degradation occurs in a COI1-independent manner. Moreover, ectopic expression of HopX1 in Arabidopsis induces the expression of JA-dependent genes, represses salicylic acid (SA-induced markers, and complements the growth of a COR-deficient P. syringae pv. tomato (Pto DC3000 strain during natural bacterial infections. Furthermore, HopX1 promoted susceptibility when delivered by the natural type III secretion system, to a similar extent as the addition of COR, and this effect was dependent on its catalytic activity. Altogether, our results indicate that JAZ proteins are direct targets of bacterial effectors to promote activation of JA-induced defenses and susceptibility in Arabidopsis. HopX1 illustrates a paradigm of an alternative evolutionary solution to COR with similar physiological outcome.

  9. A Two-Tube Multiplex Reverse Transcription PCR Assay for Simultaneous Detection of Viral and Bacterial Pathogens of Infectious Diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diarrhea caused by viral and bacterial infections is a major health problem in developing countries. The purpose of this study is to develop a two-tube multiplex PCR assay using automatic electrophoresis for simultaneous detection of 13 diarrhea-causative viruses or bacteria, with an intended application in provincial Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention, China. The assay was designed to detect rotavirus A, norovirus genogroups GI and GII, human astrovirus, enteric adenoviruses, and human bocavirus (tube 1, and Salmonella, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, diarrheagenic Escherichia coli, Campylobacter jejuni, Shigella, Yersinia, and Vibrio cholera (tube 2. The analytical specificity was examined with positive controls for each pathogen. The analytical sensitivity was evaluated by performing the assay on serial tenfold dilutions of in vitro transcribed RNA, recombinant plasmids, or bacterial culture. A total of 122 stool samples were tested by this two-tube assay and the results were compared with those obtained from reference methods. The two-tube assay achieved a sensitivity of 20–200 copies for a single virus and 102-103 CFU/mL for bacteria. The clinical performance demonstrated that the two-tube assay had comparable sensitivity and specificity to those of reference methods. In conclusion, the two-tube assay is a rapid, cost-effective, sensitive, specific, and high throughput method for the simultaneous detection of enteric bacteria and virus.

  10. Characterization of the regulatory domains of the human skn-1a/Epoc-1/Oct-11 POU transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildesheim, J; Foster, R A; Chamberlin, M E; Vogel, J C

    1999-09-10

    The Skn-1a POU transcription factor is primarily expressed in keratinocytes of murine embryonic and adult epidermis. Although some POU factors expressed in a tissue-specific manner are important for normal differentiation, the biological function of Skn-1a remains unknown. Previous in vitro studies indicate that Skn-1a has the ability to transactivate markers of keratinocyte differentiation. In this study, we have characterized Skn-1a's transactivation domain(s) and engineered a dominant negative protein that lacked this transactivation domain. Deletional analysis of the human homologue of Skn-1a with three target promoters revealed the presence of two functional domains: a primary C-terminal transactivation domain and a combined N-terminal inhibitory domain and transactivation domain. Skn-1a lacking the C-terminal region completely lost transactivation ability, irrespective of the promoter tested, and was able to block transactivation by normal Skn-1a in competition assays. Compared with full-length, Skn-1a lacking the N-terminal region demonstrated either increased transactivation (bovine cytokeratin 6 promoter), comparable transactivation (human papillomavirus type 1a long control region), or loss of transactivation (human papillomavirus type 18 long control region). The identification of a primary C-terminal transactivation domain enabled us to generate a dominant negative Skn-1a factor, which will be useful in the quest for a better understanding of this keratinocyte-specific gene regulator.

  11. Identification of an upstream regulatory sequence that mediates the transcription of mox genes in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; FitzGerald, Kelly A; Lidstrom, Mary E

    2005-11-01

    A multiple A-tract sequence has been identified in the promoter regions for the mxaF, pqqA, mxaW, mxbD and mxcQ genes involved in methanol oxidation in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1, a facultative methylotroph. Site-directed mutagenesis was exploited to delete or change this conserved sequence. Promoter-xylE transcriptional fusions were used to assess promoter activity in these mutants. A fiftyfold drop in the XylE activity was observed for the mxaF and pqqA promoters without this sequence, and a five- to sixfold drop in the XylE activity was observed for the mxbD and mxcQ promoters without this sequence. Mutants were generated in the chromosomal copies in which this sequence was either deleted or altered, and these mutants were unable to grow on methanol. When one of these sequences was added to Plac of Escherichia coli, which is a weak constitutive promoter in M. extorquens AM1, the activity increased two- to threefold. These results suggest that this sequence is essential for normal expression of these genes in M. extorquens AM1, and may serve as a general enhancer element for genetic constructs in this bacterium.

  12. First Insights into the Subterranean Crustacean Bathynellacea Transcriptome: Transcriptionally Reduced Opsin Repertoire and Evidence of Conserved Homeostasis Regulatory Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bo-Mi; Kang, Seunghyun; Ahn, Do-Hwan; Kim, Jin-Hyoung; Ahn, Inhye; Lee, Chi-Woo; Cho, Joo-Lae; Min, Gi-Sik; Park, Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Bathynellacea (Crustacea, Syncarida, Parabathynellidae) are subterranean aquatic crustaceans that typically inhabit freshwater interstitial spaces (e.g., groundwater) and are occasionally found in caves and even hot springs. In this study, we sequenced the whole transcriptome of Allobathynella bangokensis using RNA-seq. De novo sequence assembly produced 74,866 contigs including 28,934 BLAST hits. Overall, the gene sequences were most similar to those of the waterflea Daphnia pulex. In the A. bangokensis transcriptome, no opsin or related sequences were identified, and no contig aligned to the crustacean visual opsins and non-visual opsins (i.e. arthropsins, peropsins, and melaopsins), suggesting potential regressive adaptation to the dark environment. However, A. bangokensis expressed conserved gene family sets, such as heat shock proteins and those related to key innate immunity pathways and antioxidant defense systems, at the transcriptional level, suggesting that this species has evolved adaptations involving molecular mechanisms of homeostasis. The transcriptomic information of A. bangokensis will be useful for investigating molecular adaptations and response mechanisms to subterranean environmental conditions. PMID:28107438

  13. A Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals a Group of MocR Bacterial Transcriptional Regulators Linked to a Family of Genes Coding for Membrane Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Milano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The MocR bacterial transcriptional regulators are characterized by an N-terminal domain, 60 residues long on average, possessing the winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH architecture responsible for DNA recognition and binding, linked to a large C-terminal domain (350 residues on average that is homologous to fold type-I pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP dependent enzymes like aspartate aminotransferase (AAT. These regulators are involved in the expression of genes taking part in several metabolic pathways directly or indirectly connected to PLP chemistry, many of which are still uncharacterized. A bioinformatics analysis is here reported that studied the features of a distinct group of MocR regulators predicted to be functionally linked to a family of homologous genes coding for integral membrane proteins of unknown function. This group occurs mainly in the Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria phyla. An analysis of the multiple sequence alignments of their wHTH and AAT domains suggested the presence of specificity-determining positions (SDPs. Mapping of SDPs onto a homology model of the AAT domain hinted at possible structural/functional roles in effector recognition. Likewise, SDPs in wHTH domain suggested the basis of specificity of Transcription Factor Binding Site recognition. The results reported represent a framework for rational design of experiments and for bioinformatics analysis of other MocR subgroups.

  14. A Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals a Group of MocR Bacterial Transcriptional Regulators Linked to a Family of Genes Coding for Membrane Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    The MocR bacterial transcriptional regulators are characterized by an N-terminal domain, 60 residues long on average, possessing the winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH) architecture responsible for DNA recognition and binding, linked to a large C-terminal domain (350 residues on average) that is homologous to fold type-I pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) dependent enzymes like aspartate aminotransferase (AAT). These regulators are involved in the expression of genes taking part in several metabolic pathways directly or indirectly connected to PLP chemistry, many of which are still uncharacterized. A bioinformatics analysis is here reported that studied the features of a distinct group of MocR regulators predicted to be functionally linked to a family of homologous genes coding for integral membrane proteins of unknown function. This group occurs mainly in the Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria phyla. An analysis of the multiple sequence alignments of their wHTH and AAT domains suggested the presence of specificity-determining positions (SDPs). Mapping of SDPs onto a homology model of the AAT domain hinted at possible structural/functional roles in effector recognition. Likewise, SDPs in wHTH domain suggested the basis of specificity of Transcription Factor Binding Site recognition. The results reported represent a framework for rational design of experiments and for bioinformatics analysis of other MocR subgroups. PMID:27446613

  15. Transcript levels of several epigenome regulatory genes in bovine somatic donor cells are not correlated with their cloning efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenli; Sadeghieh, Sanaz; Abruzzese, Ronald; Uppada, Subhadra; Meredith, Justin; Ohlrichs, Charletta; Broek, Diane; Polejaeva, Irina

    2009-09-01

    Among many factors that potentially affect somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryo development is the donor cell itself. Cloning potentials of somatic donor cells vary greatly, possibly because the cells have different capacities to be reprogrammed by ooplasma. It is therefore intriguing to identify factors that regulate the reprogrammability of somatic donor cells. Gene expression analysis is a widely used tool to investigate underlying mechanisms of various phenotypes. In this study, we conducted a retrospective analysis investigating whether donor cell lines with distinct cloning efficiencies express different levels of genes involved in epigenetic reprogramming including histone deacetylase-1 (HDAC1), -2 (HDAC2); DNA methyltransferase-1 (DNMT1), -3a (DNMT3a),-3b (DNMT3b), and the bovine homolog of yeast sucrose nonfermenting-2 (SNF2L), a SWI/SNF family of ATPases. Cell samples from 12 bovine donor cell lines were collected at the time of nuclear transfer experiments and expression levels of the genes were measured using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Our results show that there are no significant differences in expression levels of these genes between donor cell lines of high and low cloning efficiency defined as live calving rates, although inverse correlations are observed between in vitro embryo developmental rates and expression levels of HDAC2 and SNF2L. We also show that selection of stable reference genes is important for relative quantification, and different batches of cells can have different gene expression patterns. In summary, we demonstrate that expression levels of these epigenome regulatory genes in bovine donor cells are not correlated with cloning potential. The experimental design and data analysis method reported here can be applied to study any genes expressed in donor cells.

  16. The transcriptional repressor Bcl6 controls the stability of regulatory T cells by intrinsic and extrinsic pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Deepali V; Wu, Hao; Yao, Weiguo; Sehra, Sarita; Kaplan, Mark H; Dent, Alexander L

    2015-01-01

    Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells are essential to maintain immune homeostasis, yet controversy exists about the stability of this cell population. Bcl6-deficient (Bcl6−/−) mice develop severe and spontaneous T helper type 2 (Th2) inflammation and Bcl6-deficient Treg cells are ineffective at controlling Th2 responses. We used a lineage tracing approach to analyse the fate of Treg cells in these mice. In the periphery of Bcl6−/− mice, increased numbers of Foxp3-negative ‘exTreg’ cells were found, particularly in the CD25+ population. ExTreg cells from Bcl6−/− mice expressed increased interleukin-17 (IL-17) and extremely elevated levels of Th2 cytokines compared with wild-type exTreg cells. Although Treg cells normally express only low levels of cytokines, Treg cells from Bcl6−/− mice secreted higher levels of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 and IL-17 than wild-type conventional T cells. Next, Treg-specific conditional Bcl6-deficient (Bcl6Foxp3−/−) mice were analysed. Bcl6Foxp3−/− mice do not develop inflammatory disease, indicating a requirement for non-Treg cells for inflammation in Bcl6−/− mice, and have normal numbers of exTreg cells. We induced Th2-type allergic airway inflammation in Bcl6Foxp3−/− mice, and found that while exTreg cytokine expression was normal, Bcl6-deficient Treg cells expressed higher levels of the Th2-specific regulator Gata3 than Bcl6+ Treg cells. Bcl6Foxp3−/− mice had increased numbers of Th2 cells after induction of airway inflammation and increased T cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. These data show both Treg-intrinsic and Treg-extrinsic roles for Bcl6 in controlling Treg cell stability and Th2 inflammation, and support the idea that Bcl6 expression in Treg cells is critical for controlling Th2 responses. PMID:25262912

  17. Preliminary identification and analysis of point mutations corre-lated with response to interferon-α in hepatitis B virus post-transcriptional regulatory elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING Tong-jing; LUO Kang-xian; HOU Jin-lin

    2005-01-01

    Background It is still unclear whether viral genetic variability influences response to interferon(IFN)-α treatment. Recent reports suggest that IFN-α effects may be associated with hepatitis B virus(HBV) post-transcriptional regulation. This study was designed to explore the heterogeneity of HBV post-transcriptional regulatory elements (HPRE) and the relationship between the diversity of HPRE and the response to IFN-α treatment. Methods The HPRE sequences from 31 Chinese patients infected with HBV were determined by directly sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product, and comparing them to those from Caucasian patients. Subsequently, eukaryotic expression vectors containing HPRE at various points were constructed and transfected into HepG2 cells, which were then exposed to recombinant human cytokines. Results The T to C point mutation at nt 1504 and the C to T (G) at nt 1508 in HPRE were found in 21 and 19 patients with chronic hepatitis B, respectively; the C to T point mutation at nt 1509 was found in 17 patients. These point mutations did not exist in the HPRE of the Caucasian patients. The activity of the CAT gene obviously increased in the case of T to C point mutation at nt 1504, but did not change in the case of the C to T (G) mutations at nt 1508 and 1509. The activity of the CAT gene at these point mutations of HPRE could be inhibited by IFN-α/γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α except for the point mutations at nt 1508 of HPRE which may escape the suppression role of IFN-α on HPRE. Conclusions There are point mutations between the HPRE of Chinese and Caucasian HBV patients, which might be correlated with response to IFN-α. The variation of HPRE might affect the function of HPRE and influence the regulative function of IFN-α other than that of IFN-γ or TNF-α on HPRE.

  18. Unique conformer selection of human growth-regulatory lectin galectin-1 for ganglioside GM1 versus bacterial toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Hans-Christian; André, Sabine; Lu, Shan-Yun; Frank, Martin; Kaltner, Herbert; van Kuik, J Albert; Korchagina, Elena Y; Bovin, Nicolai; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Kaptein, Robert; Vliegenthart, Johannes F G; von der Lieth, Claus-Wilhelm; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Kopitz, Jürgen; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2003-12-23

    Endogenous lectins induce effects on cell growth by binding to antennae of natural glycoconjugates. These complex carbohydrates often present more than one potential lectin-binding site in a single chain. Using the growth-regulatory interaction of the pentasaccharide of ganglioside GM(1) with homodimeric galectin-1 on neuroblastoma cell surfaces as a model, we present a suitable strategy for addressing this issue. The approach combines NMR spectroscopic and computational methods and does not require isotope-labeled glycans. It involves conformational analysis of the two building blocks of the GM(1) glycan, i.e., the disaccharide Galbeta1-3GalNAc and the trisaccharide Neu5Acalpha2-3Galbeta1-4Glc. Their bound-state conformations were determined by transferred nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy. Next, measurements on the lectin-pentasaccharide complex revealed differential conformer selection regarding the sialylgalactose linkage in the tri- versus pentasaccharide (Phi and Psi value of -70 degrees and 15 degrees vs 70 degrees and 15 degrees, respectively). To proceed in the structural analysis, the characteristic experimentally detected spatial vicinity of a galactose unit and Trp68 in the galectin's binding site offered a means, exploiting saturation transfer from protein to carbohydrate protons. Indeed, we detected two signals unambiguously assigned to the terminal Gal and the GalNAc residues. Computational docking and interaction energy analyses of the entire set of ligands supported and added to experimental results. The finding that the ganglioside's carbohydrate chain is subject to differential conformer selection at the sialylgalactose linkage by galectin-1 and GM(1)-binding cholera toxin (Phi and Psi values of -172 degrees and -26 degrees, respectively) is relevant for toxin-directed drug design. In principle, our methodology can be applied in studies aimed at blocking galectin functionality in malignancy and beyond glycosciences.

  19. A Novel Sucrose-Regulatory MADS-Box Transcription Factor GmNMHC5 Promotes Root Development and Nodulation in Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The MADS-box protein family includes many transcription factors that have a conserved DNA-binding MADS-box domain. The proteins in this family were originally recognized to play prominent roles in floral development. Recent findings, especially with regard to the regulatory roles of the AGL17 subfamily in root development, have greatly broadened their known functions. In this study, a gene from soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr., GmNMHC5, was cloned from the Zigongdongdou cultivar and identified as a member of the AGL17 subfamily. Real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR analysis showed that GmNMHC5 was expressed at much higher levels in roots and nodules than in other organs. The activation of expression was first examined in leaves and roots, followed by shoot apexes. GmNMHC5 expression levels rose sharply when the plants were treated under short-day conditions (SD and started to pod, whereas low levels were maintained in non-podding plants under long-day conditions (LD. Furthermore, overexpression of GmNMHC5 in transgenic soybean significantly promoted lateral root development and nodule building. Moreover, GmNMHC5 is upregulated by exogenous sucrose. These results indicate that GmNMHC5 can sense the sucrose signal and plays significant roles in lateral root development and nodule building.

  20. The RNA-mediated, asymmetric ring regulatory mechanism of the transcription termination Rho helicase decrypted by time-resolved nucleotide analog interference probing (trNAIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Emilie; Schwartz, Annie; Nollmann, Marcello; Margeat, Emmanuel; Boudvillain, Marc

    2014-08-01

    Rho is a ring-shaped, ATP-dependent RNA helicase/translocase that dissociates transcriptional complexes in bacteria. How RNA recognition is coupled to ATP hydrolysis and translocation in Rho is unclear. Here, we develop and use a new combinatorial approach, called time-resolved Nucleotide Analog Interference Probing (trNAIP), to unmask RNA molecular determinants of catalytic Rho function. We identify a regulatory step in the translocation cycle involving recruitment of the 2'-hydroxyl group of the incoming 3'-RNA nucleotide by a Rho subunit. We propose that this step arises from the intrinsic weakness of one of the subunit interfaces caused by asymmetric, split-ring arrangement of primary RNA tethers around the Rho hexamer. Translocation is at highest stake every seventh nucleotide when the weak interface engages the incoming 3'-RNA nucleotide or breaks, depending on RNA threading constraints in the Rho pore. This substrate-governed, 'test to run' iterative mechanism offers a new perspective on how a ring-translocase may function or be regulated. It also illustrates the interest and versatility of the new trNAIP methodology to unveil the molecular mechanisms of complex RNA-based systems.

  1. Construction and analysis of regulatory genetic networks in cervical cancer based on involved microRNAs, target genes, transcription factors and host genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Xu, Zhiwen; Wang, Kunhao; Zhu, Minghui; Li, Yang

    2014-04-01

    Over recent years, genes and microRNA (miRNA/miR) have been considered as key biological factors in human carcinogenesis. During cancer development, genes may act as multiple identities, including target genes of miRNA, transcription factors and host genes. The present study concentrated on the regulatory networks consisting of the biological factors involved in cervical cancer in order to investigate their features and affect on this specific pathology. Numerous raw data was collected and organized into purposeful structures, and adaptive procedures were defined for application to the prepared data. The networks were therefore built with the factors as basic components according to their interacting associations. The networks were constructed at three levels of interdependency, including a differentially-expressed network, a related network and a global network. Comparisons and analyses were made at a systematic level rather than from an isolated gene or miRNA. Critical hubs were extracted in the core networks and notable features were discussed, including self-adaption feedback regulation. The present study expounds the pathogenesis from a novel point of view and is proposed to provide inspiration for further investigation and therapy.

  2. In Vitro Whole Genome DNA Binding Analysis of the Bacterial Replication Initiator and Transcription Factor DnaA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet L Smith

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available DnaA, the replication initiation protein in bacteria, is an AAA+ ATPase that binds and hydrolyzes ATP and exists in a heterogeneous population of ATP-DnaA and ADP-DnaA. DnaA binds cooperatively to the origin of replication and several other chromosomal regions, and functions as a transcription factor at some of these regions. We determined the binding properties of Bacillus subtilis DnaA to genomic DNA in vitro at single nucleotide resolution using in vitro DNA affinity purification and deep sequencing (IDAP-Seq. We used these data to identify 269 binding regions, refine the consensus sequence of the DnaA binding site, and compare the relative affinity of binding regions for ATP-DnaA and ADP-DnaA. Most sites had a slightly higher affinity for ATP-DnaA than ADP-DnaA, but a few had a strong preference for binding ATP-DnaA. Of the 269 sites, only the eight strongest binding ones have been observed to bind DnaA in vivo, suggesting that other cellular factors or the amount of available DnaA in vivo restricts DnaA binding to these additional sites. Conversely, we found several chromosomal regions that were bound by DnaA in vivo but not in vitro, and that the nucleoid-associated protein Rok was required for binding in vivo. Our in vitro characterization of the inherent ability of DnaA to bind the genome at single nucleotide resolution provides a backdrop for interpreting data on in vivo binding and regulation of DnaA, and is an approach that should be adaptable to many other DNA binding proteins.

  3. Investigating the Ustilago maydis/Zea mays pathosystem: transcriptional responses and novel functional aspects of a fungal calcineurin regulatory B subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Michael E; Meng, Shaowu; Gagarinova, Alla; Babu, Mohan; Lambie, Scott C; Swiadek, Alexander A; Saville, Barry J

    2013-01-01

    The sustainable control of basidiomycete biotrophic plant pathogenesis requires an understanding of host responses to infection, as well as the identification and functional analysis of fungal genes involved in disease development. The creation and analysis of a suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library from Ustilago maydis-infected Zea mays seedlings enabled the identification of fungal and plant genes expressed during disease development, and uncovered new insights into the interactions of this model system. Candidate U. maydis pathogenesis genes were identified by using the current SSH cDNA library analysis, and by knowledge generated from previous cDNA microarray and comparative genomic analyses. These identifications were supported by the independent determination of transcript level changes in different cell-types and during pathogenic development. The basidiomycete specific um01632, the highly in planta expressed um03046 (zig1), and the calcineurin regulatory B subunit (um10226, cnb1), were chosen for deletion experiments. um01632 and zig1 mutants showed no difference in morphology and did not have a statistically significant impact on pathogenesis. cnb1 mutants had a distinct cell division phenotype and reduced virulence in seedling assays. Infections with reciprocal wild-type×Δcnb1 haploid strain crosses revealed that the wild-type allele was unable to fully compensate for the lack of a second cnb1 allele. This haploinsufficiency was undetected in other fungal cnb1 mutational analyses. The reported data improves U. maydis genome annotation and expands on the current understanding of pathogenesis genes in this model basidiomycete.

  4. CluGene: A Bioinformatics Framework for the Identification of Co-Localized, Co-Expressed and Co-Regulated Genes Aimed at the Investigation of Transcriptional Regulatory Networks from High-Throughput Expression Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Dottorini

    Full Text Available The full understanding of the mechanisms underlying transcriptional regulatory networks requires unravelling of complex causal relationships. Genome high-throughput technologies produce a huge amount of information pertaining gene expression and regulation; however, the complexity of the available data is often overwhelming and tools are needed to extract and organize the relevant information. This work starts from the assumption that the observation of co-occurrent events (in particular co-localization, co-expression and co-regulation may provide a powerful starting point to begin unravelling transcriptional regulatory networks. Co-expressed genes often imply shared functional pathways; co-expressed and functionally related genes are often co-localized, too; moreover, co-expressed and co-localized genes are also potential targets for co-regulation; finally, co-regulation seems more frequent for genes mapped to proximal chromosome regions. Despite the recognized importance of analysing co-occurrent events, no bioinformatics solution allowing the simultaneous analysis of co-expression, co-localization and co-regulation is currently available. Our work resulted in developing and valuating CluGene, a software providing tools to analyze multiple types of co-occurrences within a single interactive environment allowing the interactive investigation of combined co-expression, co-localization and co-regulation of genes. The use of CluGene will enhance the power of testing hypothesis and experimental approaches aimed at unravelling transcriptional regulatory networks. The software is freely available at http://bioinfolab.unipg.it/.

  5. The Novel Transcriptional Regulator SA1804 Is Involved in Mediating the Invasion and Cytotoxicity of Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The two-component regulatory system, SaeRS, controls expression of important virulence factors, including toxins and invasins, which contribute to the pathogenicity of Staphylococcus aureus. Previously, we conducted a transcriptomics study for identification of SaeRS regulon and found that inactivation of SaeRS dramatically enhances the transcription of a novel transcriptional regulator (SA1804). This led us to question whether SA1804 is involved in bacterial pathogenicity by regulating the e...

  6. Comparative genomic reconstruction of transcriptional networks controlling central metabolism in the Shewanella genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovaleva Galina

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-scale prediction of gene regulation and reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria is one of the critical tasks of modern genomics. The Shewanella genus is comprised of metabolically versatile gamma-proteobacteria, whose lifestyles and natural environments are substantially different from Escherichia coli and other model bacterial species. The comparative genomics approaches and computational identification of regulatory sites are useful for the in silico reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria. Results To explore conservation and variations in the Shewanella transcriptional networks we analyzed the repertoire of transcription factors and performed genomics-based reconstruction and comparative analysis of regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The inferred regulatory network includes 82 transcription factors and their DNA binding sites, 8 riboswitches and 6 translational attenuators. Forty five regulons were newly inferred from the genome context analysis, whereas others were propagated from previously characterized regulons in the Enterobacteria and Pseudomonas spp.. Multiple variations in regulatory strategies between the Shewanella spp. and E. coli include regulon contraction and expansion (as in the case of PdhR, HexR, FadR, numerous cases of recruiting non-orthologous regulators to control equivalent pathways (e.g. PsrA for fatty acid degradation and, conversely, orthologous regulators to control distinct pathways (e.g. TyrR, ArgR, Crp. Conclusions We tentatively defined the first reference collection of ~100 transcriptional regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The resulting regulatory network contains ~600 regulated genes per genome that are mostly involved in metabolism of carbohydrates, amino acids, fatty acids, vitamins, metals, and stress responses. Several reconstructed regulons including NagR for N-acetylglucosamine catabolism were experimentally validated in S

  7. Collective decision making in bacterial viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, Joshua S; Mileyko, Yuriy; Joh, Richard I; Voit, Eberhard O

    2008-09-15

    For many bacterial viruses, the choice of whether to kill host cells or enter a latent state depends on the multiplicity of coinfection. Here, we present a mathematical theory of how bacterial viruses can make collective decisions concerning the fate of infected cells. We base our theory on mechanistic models of gene regulatory dynamics. Unlike most previous work, we treat the copy number of viral genes as variable. Increasing the viral copy number increases the rate of transcription of viral mRNAs. When viral regulation of cell fate includes nonlinear feedback loops, very small changes in transcriptional rates can lead to dramatic changes in steady-state gene expression. Hence, we prove that deterministic decisions can be reached, e.g., lysis or latency, depending on the cellular multiplicity of infection within a broad class of gene regulatory models of viral decision-making. Comparisons of a parameterized version of the model with molecular studies of the decision structure in the temperate bacteriophage lambda are consistent with our conclusions. Because the model is general, it suggests that bacterial viruses can respond adaptively to changes in population dynamics, and that features of collective decision-making in viruses are evolvable life history traits.

  8. A gonococcal homologue of meningococcal γ-glutamyl transpeptidase gene is a new type of bacterial pseudogene that is transcriptionally active but phenotypically silent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watanabe Haruo

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been speculated that the γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (ggt gene is present only in Neisseria meningitidis and not among related species such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria lactamica, because N. meningitidis is the only bacterium with GGT activity. However, nucleotide sequences highly homologous to the meningococcal ggt gene were found in the genomes of N. gonorrhoeae isolates. Results The gonococcal homologue (ggt gonococcal homologue; ggh was analyzed. The nucleotide sequence of the ggh gene was approximately 95 % identical to that of the meningococcal ggt gene. An open reading frame in the ggh gene was disrupted by an ochre mutation and frameshift mutations induced by a 7-base deletion, but the amino acid sequences deduced from the artificially corrected ggh nucleotide sequences were approximately 97 % identical to that of the meningococcal ggt gene. The analyses of the sequences flanking the ggt and ggh genes revealed that both genes were localized in a common DNA region containing the fbp-ggt (or ggh-glyA-opcA-dedA-abcZ gene cluster. The expression of the ggh RNA could be detected by dot blot, RT-PCR and primer extension analyses. Moreover, the truncated form of ggh-translational product was also found in some of the gonococcal isolates. Conclusion This study has shown that the gonococcal ggh gene is a pseudogene of the meningococcal ggt gene, which can also be designated as Ψggt. The gonococcal ggh (Ψggt gene is the first identified bacterial pseudogene that is transcriptionally active but phenotypically silent.

  9. Studying Dynamic Features in Myocardial Infarction Progression by Integrating miRNA-Transcription Factor Co-Regulatory Networks and Time-Series RNA Expression Data from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo Shi

    Full Text Available Myocardial infarction (MI is a serious heart disease and a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Although some molecules (genes, miRNAs and transcription factors (TFs associated with MI have been studied in a specific pathological context, their dynamic characteristics in gene expressions, biological functions and regulatory interactions in MI progression have not been fully elucidated to date. In the current study, we analyzed time-series RNA expression data from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We observed that significantly differentially expressed genes were sharply up- or down-regulated in the acute phase of MI, and then changed slowly until the chronic phase. Biological functions involved at each stage of MI were identified. Additionally, dynamic miRNA-TF co-regulatory networks were constructed based on the significantly differentially expressed genes and miRNA-TF co-regulatory motifs, and the dynamic interplay of miRNAs, TFs and target genes were investigated. Finally, a new panel of candidate diagnostic biomarkers (STAT3 and ICAM1 was identified to have discriminatory capability for patients with or without MI, especially the patients with or without recurrent events. The results of the present study not only shed new light on the understanding underlying regulatory mechanisms involved in MI progression, but also contribute to the discovery of true diagnostic biomarkers for MI.

  10. Bacterial lipoprotein delays apoptosis in human neutrophils through inhibition of caspase-3 activity: regulatory roles for CD14 and TLR-2.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, Colm P

    2012-02-03

    The human sepsis syndrome resulting from bacterial infection continues to account for a significant proportion of hospital mortality. Neutralizing strategies aimed at individual bacterial wall products (such as LPS) have enjoyed limited success in this arena. Bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) is a major constituent of the wall of diverse bacterial forms and profoundly influences cellular function in vivo and in vitro, and has been implicated in the etiology of human sepsis. Delayed polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) apoptosis is a characteristic feature of human sepsis arising from Gram-negative or Gram-positive bacterial infection. Bacterial wall product ligation and subsequent receptor-mediated events upstream of caspase inhibition in neutrophils remain incompletely understood. BLP has been shown to exert its cellular effects primarily through TLR-2, and it is now widely accepted that lateral associations with the TLRs represent the means by which CD14 communicates intracellular messages. In this study, we demonstrate that BLP inhibits neutrophil mitochondrial membrane depolarization with a subsequent reduction in caspase-3 processing, ultimately leading to a significant delay in PMN apoptosis. Pretreatment of PMNs with an anti-TLR-2 mAb or anti-CD14 mAb prevented BLP from delaying PMN apoptosis to such a marked degree. Combination blockade using both mAbs completely prevented the effects of BLP (in 1 and 10 ng\\/ml concentrations) on PMN apoptosis. At higher concentrations of BLP, the antiapoptotic effects were observed, but were not as pronounced. Our findings therefore provide the first evidence of a crucial role for both CD14 and TLR-2 in delayed PMN apoptosis arising from bacterial infection.

  11. Structural coupling between RNA polymerase composition and DNA supercoiling in coordinating transcription: a global role for the omega subunit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geertz, Marcel; Travers, Andrew; Mehandziska, Sanja; Sobetzko, Patrick; Chandra-Janga, Sarath; Shimamoto, Nobuo; Muskhelishvili, Georgi

    2011-01-01

    In growing bacterial cells, the global reorganization of transcription is associated with alterations of RNA polymerase composition and the superhelical density of the DNA. However, the existence of any regulatory device coordinating these changes remains elusive. Here we show that in an exponentially growing Escherichia coli rpoZ mutant lacking the polymerase ω subunit, the impact of the Eσ(38) holoenzyme on transcription is enhanced in parallel with overall DNA relaxation. Conversely, overproduction of σ(70) in an rpoZ mutant increases both overall DNA supercoiling and the transcription of genes utilizing high negative superhelicity. We further show that transcription driven by the Eσ(38) and Eσ(70) holoenzymes from cognate promoters induces distinct superhelical densities of plasmid DNA in vivo. We thus demonstrate a tight coupling between polymerase holoenzyme composition and the supercoiling regimen of genomic transcription. Accordingly, we identify functional clusters of genes with distinct σ factor and supercoiling preferences arranging alternative transcription programs sustaining bacterial exponential growth. We propose that structural coupling between DNA topology and holoenzyme composition provides a basic regulatory device for coordinating genome-wide transcription during bacterial growth and adaptation. IMPORTANCE Understanding the mechanisms of coordinated gene expression is pivotal for developing knowledge-based approaches to manipulating bacterial physiology, which is a problem of central importance for applications of biotechnology and medicine. This study explores the relationships between variations in the composition of the transcription machinery and chromosomal DNA topology and suggests a tight interdependence of these two variables as the major coordinating principle of gene regulation. The proposed structural coupling between the transcription machinery and DNA topology has evolutionary implications and suggests a new methodology for

  12. Senescence-associated Barley NAC (NAM, ATAF1,2, CUC) Transcription Factor Interacts with Radical-induced Cell Death 1 through a Disordered Regulatory Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærsgaard, Trine; Jensen, Michael Krogh; Wagner, Michael;

    2011-01-01

    Senescence in plants involves massive nutrient relocation and age-related cell death. Characterization of the molecular components, such as transcription factors (TFs), involved in these processes is required to understand senescence. We found that HvNAC005 and HvNAC013 of the plant-specific NAC...... as a transcriptional activator suggesting that an involvement of HvNAC013 and HvNAC005 in senescence will be different. HvNAC013 interacted with barley radical-induced cell death 1 (RCD1) via the very C-terminal part of its TRD, outside of the region containing the LP motif. No significant secondary structure...

  13. Mutant Forms of the Azotobacter vinelandii Transcriptional Activator NifA Resistant to Inhibition by the NifL Regulatory Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Reyes-Ramirez, Francisca; Little, Richard; Dixon, Ray

    2002-01-01

    The Azotobacter vinelandii σ54-dependent transcriptional activator protein NifA is regulated by the NifL protein in response to redox, carbon, and nitrogen status. Under conditions inappropriate for nitrogen fixation, NifL inhibits transcription activation by NifA through the formation of the NifL-NifA protein complex. NifL inhibits the ATPase activity of the central AAA+ domain of NifA required to drive open complex formation by σ54-RNA polymerase and may also inhibit the activator-polymeras...

  14. Identification of hoxb1b downstream genes: hoxb1b as a regulatory factor controlling transcriptional networks and cell movement during zebrafish gastrulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Akker, W.M.; Durston, A.J.; Spaink, H.P.

    2010-01-01

    Hox proteins are homeobox containing transcription factors that play important roles in patterning the presumptive central nervous system and the axial mesoderm in the early vertebrate embryo. Hox genes are first expressed during gastrula stages and recent studies suggest that their function goes be

  15. Cross-talk between a regulatory small RNA, cyclic-di-GMP signalling and flagellar regulator FlhDC for virulence and bacterial behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaochen; Khokhani, Devanshi; Wu, Xiaogang; Yang, Fenghuan; Biener, Gabriel; Koestler, Benjamin J; Raicu, Valerica; He, Chenyang; Waters, Christopher M; Sundin, George W; Tian, Fang; Yang, Ching-Hong

    2015-11-01

    Dickeya dadantii is a globally dispersed phytopathogen which causes diseases on a wide range of host plants. This pathogen utilizes the type III secretion system (T3SS) to suppress host defense responses, and secretes pectate lyase (Pel) to degrade the plant cell wall. Although the regulatory small RNA (sRNA) RsmB, cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP) and flagellar regulator have been reported to affect the regulation of these two virulence factors or multiple cell behaviours such as motility and biofilm formation, the linkage between these regulatory components that coordinate the cell behaviours remain unclear. Here, we revealed a sophisticated regulatory network that connects the sRNA, c-di-GMP signalling and flagellar master regulator FlhDC. We propose multi-tiered regulatory mechanisms that link the FlhDC to the T3SS through three distinct pathways including the FlhDC-FliA-YcgR3937 pathway; the FlhDC-EcpC-RpoN-HrpL pathway; and the FlhDC-rsmB-RsmA-HrpL pathway. Among these, EcpC is the most dominant factor for FlhDC to positively regulate T3SS expression.

  16. Transcriptional responses of Italian ryegrass during interaction with Xanthomonas translucens pv. graminis reveal novel candidate genes for bacterial wilt resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wichmann, Fabienne; Asp, Torben; Widmer, Franko

    2011-01-01

    selection, the partial transcriptomes of two Italian ryegrass genotypes, one resistant and one susceptible to bacterial wilt were compared at four time points after Xtg infection. A cDNA microarray developed from a perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) expressed sequence tag set consisting of 9,990 unique...... assisted resistance breeding....

  17. Comparative genomic reconstruction of transcriptional networks controlling central metabolism in the Shewanella genus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Novichkov, Pavel; Stavrovskaya, Elena D.; Rodionova, Irina A.; Li, Xiaoqing; Kazanov, Marat D.; Ravcheev, Dmitry A.; Gerasimova, Anna V.; Kazakov, Alexey E.; Kovaleva, Galina Y.; Permina, Elizabeth A.; Laikova, Olga N.; Overbeek, Ross; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Arkin, Adam P.; Dubchak, Inna; Osterman, Andrei L.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.

    2011-06-15

    Genome-scale prediction of gene regulation and reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria is one of the critical tasks of modern genomics. Despite the growing number of genome-scale gene expression studies, our abilities to convert the results of these studies into accurate regulatory annotations and to project them from model to other organisms are extremely limited. The comparative genomics approaches and computational identification of regulatory sites are useful for the in silico reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria. The Shewanella genus is comprised of metabolically versatile gamma-proteobacteria, whose lifestyles and natural environments are substantially different from Escherichia coli and other model bacterial species. To explore conservation and variations in the Shewanella transcriptional networks we analyzed the repertoire of transcription factors and performed genomics-based reconstruction and comparative analysis of regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The inferred regulatory network includes 82 transcription factors and their DNA binding sites, 8 riboswitches and 6 translational attenuators. Forty five regulons were newly inferred from the genome context analysis, whereas others were propagated from previously characterized regulons in the Enterobacteria and Pseudomonas spp.. However, even orthologous regulators with conserved DNA-binding motifs may control substantially different gene sets, revealing striking differences in regulatory strategies between the Shewanella spp. and E. coli. Multiple examples of regulatory network rewiring include regulon contraction and expansion (as in the case of PdhR, HexR, FadR), and numerous cases of recruiting non-orthologous regulators to control equivalent pathways (e.g. NagR for N-acetylglucosamine catabolism and PsrA for fatty acid degradation) and, conversely, orthologous regulators to control distinct pathways (e.g. TyrR, ArgR, Crp).

  18. The transcription factor Ste12 mediates the regulatory role of the Tmk1 MAP kinase in mycoparasitism and vegetative hyphal fusion in the filamentous fungus Trichoderma atroviride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Sabine; Zeilinger, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Mycoparasitic species of the fungal genus Trichoderma are potent antagonists able to combat plant pathogenic fungi by direct parasitism. An essential step in this mycoparasitic fungus-fungus interaction is the detection of the fungal host followed by activation of molecular weapons in the mycoparasite by host-derived signals. The Trichoderma atroviride MAP kinase Tmk1, a homolog of yeast Fus3/Kss1, plays an essential role in regulating the mycoparasitic host attack, aerial hyphae formation and conidiation. However, the transcription factors acting downstream of Tmk1 are hitherto unknown. Here we analyzed the functions of the T. atroviride Ste12 transcription factor whose orthologue in yeast is targeted by the Fus3 and Kss1 MAP kinases. Deletion of the ste12 gene in T. atroviride not only resulted in reduced mycoparasitic overgrowth and lysis of host fungi but also led to loss of hyphal avoidance in the colony periphery and a severe reduction in conidial anastomosis tube formation and vegetative hyphal fusion events. The transcription of several orthologues of Neurospora crassa hyphal fusion genes was reduced upon ste12 deletion; however, the Δste12 mutant showed enhanced expression of mycoparasitism-relevant chitinolytic and proteolytic enzymes and of the cell wall integrity MAP kinase Tmk2. Based on the comparative analyses of Δste12 and Δtmk1 mutants, an essential role of the Ste12 transcriptional regulator in mediating outcomes of the Tmk1 MAPK pathway such as regulation of the mycoparasitic activity, hyphal fusion and carbon source-dependent vegetative growth is suggested. Aerial hyphae formation and conidiation, in contrast, were found to be independent of Ste12.

  19. Close linkage of the mouse and human CD3. gamma. - and delta-chain genes suggests that their transcription is controlled by common regulatory elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, H.; Koyama, T.; Georgopoulos, K.; Clevers, H.; Haser, W.G.; LeBien, T.; Tonegawa, S.; Terhorst, C.

    1987-12-01

    Antigen receptors on the T-cell surface are noncovalently associated with at least four invariant polypeptide chains, CD3-..gamma.., -delta, -epsilon, and -zeta. The mouse CD3-..gamma.. gene, consisting of seven exons, was found to be highly homologous to the CD3-..gamma.. described earlier. Both the high level of sequence homology and the exon/intron organization indicate that the CD3-..gamma.. and -delta genes arose by gene duplication. Surprisingly, murine and human genomic DNA clones could be isolated that contained elements of both the CD3-..gamma.. and CD3-delta genes. In fact, the putative transcription start site of the mouse CD3-..gamma.. gene is less than 1.4 kilobases from the transcription initiation site of the mouse CD3-delta gene. Common elements that regulate the divergent transcription of the two genes are therefore proposed to be located in the intervening 1.4-kilobase DNA segment. This might contribute to the coordinate expression of the CD3-..gamma.. and -delta genes during intrathymic maturation of T lymphocytes.

  20. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation in planta via synthetic dCas9-based transcription factors

    KAUST Repository

    Piatek, Agnieszka Anna

    2014-11-14

    Targeted genomic regulation is a powerful approach to accelerate trait discovery and development in agricultural biotechnology. Bacteria and archaea use clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) regulatory systems for adaptive molecular immunity against foreign nucleic acids introduced by invading phages and conjugative plasmids. The type II CRISPR/Cas system has been adapted for genome editing in many cell types and organisms. A recent study used the catalytically inactive Cas9 (dCas9) protein combined with guide-RNAs (gRNAs) as a DNA-targeting platform to modulate gene expression in bacterial, yeast, and human cells. Here, we modified this DNA-targeting platform for targeted transcriptional regulation in planta by developing chimeric dCas9-based transcriptional activators and repressors. To generate transcriptional activators, we fused the dCas9 C-terminus with the activation domains of EDLL and TAL effectors. To generate a transcriptional repressor, we fused the dCas9 C-terminus with the SRDX repression domain. Our data demonstrate that dCas9 fusion with the EDLL activation domain (dCas9:EDLL) and the TAL activation domain (dCas9:TAD), guided by gRNAs complementary to selected promoter elements, induce strong transcriptional activation on Bs3

  1. Reanalysis of microarray data reveals insights into altered transcriptional activity of T helper 17 and regulatory T cell signaling in psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotb I

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Iman Kotb,1 Caroline Meharg,2 Robert N Barker,1 Anthony Ormerod11Institute of Medical Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, Scotland, UK; 2Institute for Global Food Security, Queen's University, Belfast, Northern IrelandAbstract: Identifying differential expression of genes in psoriatic and healthy skin by microarray data analysis is a key approach to understand the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Analysis of more than one dataset to identify genes commonly upregulated reduces the likelihood of false positives and narrows down the possible signature genes. Genes controlling the critical balance between T helper 17 and regulatory T cells are of special interest in psoriasis. Our objectives were to identify genes that are consistently upregulated in lesional skin from three published microarray datasets. We carried out a reanalysis of gene expression data extracted from three experiments on samples from psoriatic and nonlesional skin using the same stringency threshold and software and further compared the expression levels of 92 genes related to the T helper 17 and regulatory T cell signaling pathways. We found 73 probe sets representing 57 genes commonly upregulated in lesional skin from all datasets. These included 26 probe sets representing 20 genes that have no previous link to the etiopathogenesis of psoriasis. These genes may represent novel therapeutic targets and surely need more rigorous experimental testing to be validated. Our analysis also identified 12 of 92 genes known to be related to the T helper 17 and regulatory T cell signaling pathways, and these were found to be differentially expressed in the lesional skin samples.Keywords: psoriasis, gene array analysis, gene expression profiling

  2. Amplification of pico-scale DNA mediated by bacterial carrier DNA for small-cell-number transcription factor ChIP-seq

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Janus S; Bagger, Frederik O; Hasemann, Marie S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chromatin-Immunoprecipitation coupled with deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) is used to map transcription factor occupancy and generate epigenetic profiles genome-wide. The requirement of nano-scale ChIP DNA for generation of sequencing libraries has impeded ChIP-seq on in vivo tissues of lo...

  3. A bacterial community analysis using reverse transcription (RT) PCR which detects the bacteria with high activity in a wastewater treatment reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    This research used reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method to help detect active bacteria in a single-tank deammonification reactor combining partial nitritation and anammox. The single-tank aerobic deammonification reactor effectively removed the ammonia in anaerobically di...

  4. A Novel WRKY transcription factor is required for induction of PR-1a gene expression by salicylic acid and bacterial elicitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Verk, Marcel C; Pappaioannou, Dimitri; Neeleman, Lyda; Bol, John F; Linthorst, Huub J M

    2008-01-01

    PR-1a is a salicylic acid-inducible defense gene of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). One-hybrid screens identified a novel tobacco WRKY transcription factor (NtWRKY12) with specific binding sites in the PR-1a promoter at positions -564 (box WK(1)) and -859 (box WK(2)). NtWRKY12 belongs to the class of t

  5. A saturation screen for cis-acting regulatory DNA in the Hox genes of Ciona intestinalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keys, David N.; Lee, Byung-in; Di Gregorio, Anna; Harafuji, Naoe; Detter, Chris; Wang, Mei; Kahsai, Orsalem; Ahn, Sylvia; Arellano, Andre; Zhang, Quin; Trong, Stephan; Doyle, Sharon A.; Satoh, Noriyuki; Satou, Yutaka; Saiga, Hidetoshi; Christian, Allen; Rokhsar, Dan; Hawkins, Trevor L.; Levine, Mike; Richardson, Paul

    2005-01-05

    A screen for the systematic identification of cis-regulatory elements within large (>100 kb) genomic domains containing Hox genes was performed by using the basal chordate Ciona intestinalis. Randomly generated DNA fragments from bacterial artificial chromosomes containing two clusters of Hox genes were inserted into a vector upstream of a minimal promoter and lacZ reporter gene. A total of 222 resultant fusion genes were separately electroporated into fertilized eggs, and their regulatory activities were monitored in larvae. In sum, 21 separable cis-regulatory elements were found. These include eight Hox linked domains that drive expression in nested anterior-posterior domains of ectodermally derived tissues. In addition to vertebrate-like CNS regulation, the discovery of cis-regulatory domains that drive epidermal transcription suggests that C. intestinalis has arthropod-like Hox patterning in the epidermis.

  6. Collagen induced arthritis (CIA) in mice features regulatory transcriptional network connecting major histocompatibility complex (MHC H2) with autoantigen genes in the thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donate, Paula B; Fornari, Thaís A; Junta, Cristina M; Magalhães, Danielle A; Macedo, Cláudia; Cunha, Thiago M; Nguyen, Catherine; Cunha, Fernando Q; Passos, Geraldo A

    2011-05-01

    Considering that imbalance of central tolerance in the thymus contributes to aggressive autoimmunity, we compared the expression of peripheral tissue autoantigens (PTA) genes, which are involved in self-representation in the thymic stroma, of two mouse strains; DBA-1/J (MHC-H2(q)) susceptible and DBA-2/J (MHC-H2(d)) resistant to collagen induced arthritis (CIA). We evaluate whether these strains differ in their thymic gene expression, allowing identification of genes that might play a role in susceptibility/resistance to CIA. Microarray profiling showed that 1093 PTA genes were differentially modulated between collagen immunized DBA-1/J and DBA-2/J mice. These genes were assigned to 17 different tissues/organs, including joints/bone, characterizing the promiscuous gene expression (PGE), which is implicated in self-representation. Hierarchical clustering of microarray data and quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that Aire (autoimmune regulator), an important regulator of the PGE process, Aire-dependent (insulin), Aire-independent (Col2A1 and Gad67), and other 22 joint/bone autoantigen genes were down-regulated in DBA-1/J compared with DBA-2/J in the thymus. Considering the importance of MHC-H2 in peptide-self presentation and autoimmunity susceptibility, we reconstructed transcriptional networks of both strains based on actual microarray data. The networks clearly demonstrated different MHC-H2 transcriptional interactions with PTAs genes. DBA-1/J strain featured MHC-H2 as a node influencing downstream genes. Differently, in DBA-2/J strain network MHC-H2 was exclusively self-regulated and does not control other genes. These findings provide evidence that CIA susceptibility in mice may be a reflex of a cascade-like transcriptional control connecting different genes to MHC-H2 in the thymus.

  7. Evolution of transcriptional regulation in closely related bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsoy Olga V

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The exponential growth of the number of fully sequenced genomes at varying taxonomic closeness allows one to characterize transcriptional regulation using comparative-genomics analysis instead of time-consuming experimental methods. A transcriptional regulatory unit consists of a transcription factor, its binding site and a regulated gene. These units constitute a graph which contains so-called “network motifs”, subgraphs of a given structure. Here we consider genomes of closely related Enterobacteriales and estimate the fraction of conserved network motifs and sites as well as positions under selection in various types of non-coding regions. Results Using a newly developed technique, we found that the highest fraction of positions under selection, approximately 50%, was observed in synvergon spacers (between consecutive genes from the same strand, followed by ~45% in divergon spacers (common 5’-regions, and ~10% in convergon spacers (common 3’-regions. The fraction of selected positions in functional regions was higher, 60% in transcription factor-binding sites and ~45% in terminators and promoters. Small, but significant differences were observed between Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. This fraction is similar to the one observed in eukaryotes. The conservation of binding sites demonstrated some differences between types of regulatory units. In E. coli, strains the interactions of the type “local transcriptional factor gene” turned out to be more conserved in feed-forward loops (FFLs compared to non-motif interactions. The coherent FFLs tend to be less conserved than the incoherent FFLs. A natural explanation is that the former imply functional redundancy. Conclusions A naïve hypothesis that FFL would be highly conserved turned out to be not entirely true: its conservation depends on its status in the transcriptional network and also from its usage. The fraction of positions under selection in

  8. The regulatory mechanism of fruit ripening revealed by analyses of direct targets of the tomato MADS-box transcription factor RIPENING INHIBITOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Masaki; Ito, Yasuhiro

    2013-06-01

    The developmental process of ripening is unique to fleshy fruits and a key factor in fruit quality. The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) MADS-box transcription factor RIPENING INHIBITOR (RIN), one of the earliest-acting ripening regulators, is required for broad aspects of ripening, including ethylene-dependent and -independent pathways. However, our knowledge of direct RIN target genes has been limited, considering the broad effects of RIN on ripening. In a recent work published in The Plant Cell, we identified 241 direct RIN target genes by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with DNA microarray (ChIP-chip) and transcriptome analysis. Functional classification of the targets revealed that RIN participates in the regulation of many biological processes including well-known ripening processes such as climacteric ethylene production and lycopene accumulation. In addition, we found that ethylene is required for the full expression of RIN and several RIN-targeting transcription factor genes at the ripening stage. Here, based on our recently published findings and additional data, we discuss the ripening processes regulated by RIN and the interplay between RIN and ethylene.

  9. Prediction of regulatory elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandelin, Albin

    2008-01-01

    Finding the regulatory mechanisms responsible for gene expression remains one of the most important challenges for biomedical research. A major focus in cellular biology is to find functional transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) responsible for the regulation of a downstream gene. As wet-lab...

  10. The bacterial-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isozyme from developing castor oil seeds is subject to in vivo regulatory phosphorylation at serine-451.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalziel, Katie J; O'Leary, Brendan; Brikis, Carolyne; Rao, Srinath K; She, Yi-Min; Cyr, Terry; Plaxton, William C

    2012-04-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a tightly controlled anaplerotic enzyme situated at a pivotal branch point of plant carbohydrate-metabolism. In developing castor oil seeds (COS) a novel allosterically-densensitized 910-kDa Class-2 PEPC hetero-octameric complex arises from a tight interaction between 107-kDa plant-type PEPC and 118-kDa bacterial-type PEPC (BTPC) subunits. Mass spectrometry and immunoblotting with anti-phosphoSer451 specific antibodies established that COS BTPC is in vivo phosphorylated at Ser451, a highly conserved target residue that occurs within an intrinsically disordered region. This phosphorylation was enhanced during COS development or in response to depodding. Kinetic characterization of a phosphomimetic (S451D) mutant indicated that Ser451 phosphorylation inhibits the catalytic activity of BTPC subunits within the Class-2 PEPC complex.

  11. Effects of transcriptional pausing on gene expression dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiina Rajala

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Stochasticity in gene expression affects many cellular processes and is a source of phenotypic diversity between genetically identical individuals. Events in elongation, particularly RNA polymerase pausing, are a source of this noise. Since the rate and duration of pausing are sequence-dependent, this regulatory mechanism of transcriptional dynamics is evolvable. The dependency of pause propensity on regulatory molecules makes pausing a response mechanism to external stress. Using a delayed stochastic model of bacterial transcription at the single nucleotide level that includes the promoter open complex formation, pausing, arrest, misincorporation and editing, pyrophosphorolysis, and premature termination, we investigate how RNA polymerase pausing affects a gene's transcriptional dynamics and gene networks. We show that pauses' duration and rate of occurrence affect the bursting in RNA production, transcriptional and translational noise, and the transient to reach mean RNA and protein levels. In a genetic repressilator, increasing the pausing rate and the duration of pausing events increases the period length but does not affect the robustness of the periodicity. We conclude that RNA polymerase pausing might be an important evolvable feature of genetic networks.

  12. Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in Yersinia species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea A Schiano

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Proper regulation of gene expression is required by bacterial pathogens to respond to continually changing environmental conditions and the host response during the infectious process. While transcriptional regulation is perhaps the most well understood form of controlling gene expression, recent studies have demonstrated the importance of post-transcriptional mechanisms of gene regulation that allow for more refined management of the bacterial response to host conditions. Yersinia species of bacteria are known to use various forms of post-transcriptional regulation for control of many virulence-associated genes. These include regulation by cis- and trans-acting small non-coding RNAs, RNA-binding proteins, RNases, and thermoswitches. The effects of these and other regulatory mechanisms on Yersinia physiology can be profound and have been shown to influence type III secretion, motility, biofilm formation, host cell invasion, intracellular survival and replication, and more. In this review, we will discuss these and other post-transcriptional mechanisms and their influence on virulence gene regulation, with a particular emphasis on how these processes influence the virulence of Yersinia in the host.

  13. The TrmB family: a versatile group of transcriptional regulators in Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gindner, Antonia; Hausner, Winfried; Thomm, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Microbes are organisms which are well adapted to their habitat. Their survival depends on the regulation of gene expression levels in response to environmental signals. The most important step in regulation of gene expression takes place at the transcriptional level. This regulation is intriguing in Archaea because the eu-karyotic-like transcription apparatus is modulated by bacterial-like transcription regulators. The transcriptional regulator of mal operon (TrmB) family is well known as a very large group of regulators in Archaea with more than 250 members to date. One special feature of these regulators is that some of them can act as repressor, some as activator and others as both repressor and activator. This review gives a short updated overview of the TrmB family and their regulatory patterns in different Archaea as a lot of new data have been published on this topic since the last review from 2008.

  14. Molecular characterization of collagen IV evidences early transcription expression related to the immune response against bacterial infection in the red abalone (Haliotis rufescens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chovar-Vera, Ornella; Valenzuela-Muñoz, Valentina; Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian

    2015-02-01

    Collagen IV has been described as a structural protein of the basement membrane, which as a whole forms a specialized extracellular matrix. Recent studies have indicated a possible relationship between collagen IV and the innate immune response of invertebrate organisms. The present study characterized the alpha-1 chain of collagen IV in the red abalone Haliotis rufescens (Hr-ColIV) and evaluated its association with the innate immune response against Vibrio anguillarum. To further evidence the immune response, the matrix metalloproteinase-1 (Hr-MMP-1) and C-type lectin (Hr-CLEC) genes were also assessed. The complete sequence of Hr-ColIV was composed of 6658 bp, with a 5'UTR of 154 bp, a 3'UTR of 1177 bp, and an ORF of 5327 bp that coded for 1776 amino acids. The innate immune response generated against V. anguillarum resulted in a significant increase in the transcript levels of Hr-ColIV between 3 and 6 hpi, whereas Hr-MMP-1 and Hr-CLEC had the highest transcript activity 6 and 12 hpi, respectively. The results obtained in this study propose a putative biological function for collagen IV involved in the early innate immune response of the red abalone H. rufescens.

  15. H2-Producing Bacterial Community during Rice Straw Decomposition in Paddy Field Soil: Estimation by an Analysis of [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Gene Transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Ryuko; Asakawa, Susumu; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2016-09-29

    The transcription patterns of [FeFe]-hydrogenase genes (hydA), which encode the enzymes responsible for H2 production, were investigated during rice straw decomposition in paddy soil using molecular biological techniques. Paddy soil amended with and without rice straw was incubated under anoxic conditions. RNA was extracted from the soil, and three clone libraries of hydA were constructed using RNAs obtained from samples in the initial phase of rice straw decomposition (day 1 with rice straw), methanogenic phase of rice straw decomposition (day 14 with rice straw), and under a non-amended condition (day 14 without rice straw). hydA genes related to Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, and Thermotogae were mainly transcribed in paddy soil samples; however, their proportions markedly differed among the libraries. Deltaproteobacteria-related hydA genes were predominantly transcribed on day 1 with rice straw, while various types of hydA genes related to several phyla were transcribed on day 14 with rice straw. Although the diversity of transcribed hydA was significantly higher in the library on day 14 with rice straw than the other two libraries, the composition of hydA transcripts in the library was similar to that in the library on day 14 without rice straw. These results indicate that the composition of active H2 producers and/or H2 metabolic patterns dynamically change during rice straw decomposition in paddy soil.

  16. A Regulatory Element Near the 3′ End of the Adeno-Associated Virus rep Gene Inhibits Adenovirus Replication in cis by Means of p40 Promoter-Associated Short Transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Eva; Gonsior, Melanie; Stutika, Catrin; Heilbronn, Regine

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has long been known to inhibit helper adenovirus (Ad) replication independently of AAV Rep protein expression. More recently, replication of Ad serotype 5 (Ad5)/AAV serotype 2 (AAV-2) hybrid vectors was shown to be inhibited in cis by a sequence near the 3′ end of AAV rep, termed the Rep inhibition sequence for adenoviral replication (RIS-Ad). RIS-Ad functions independently of Rep protein expression. Here we demonstrate that inhibition of adenoviral replication by RIS-Ad requires an active AAV p40 promoter and the 5′ half of the intron. In addition, Ad inhibition is critically dependent on the integrity of the p40 transcription start site (TSS) leading to short p40-associated transcripts. These do not give rise to effector molecules capable of inhibiting adenoviral replication in trans, like small polypeptides or microRNAs. Our data point to an inhibitory mechanism in which RNA polymerase II (Pol II) pauses directly downstream of the p40 promoter, leading to interference of the stalled Pol II transcription complex with the adenoviral replication machinery. Whereas inhibition by RIS-Ad is mediated exclusively in cis, it can be overcome by providing a replication-competent adenoviral genome in trans. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of RIS-Ad is not limited to AAV-2 but could also be shown for the corresponding regions of other AAV serotypes, including AAV-5. These findings have important implications for the future generation of Ad5/AAV hybrid vectors. IMPORTANCE Insertion of sequences from the 3′ part of the rep gene of adeno-associated virus (AAV) into the genome of its helper adenovirus strongly reduces adenoviral genome replication. We could show that this inhibition is mediated exclusively in cis without the involvement of trans-acting regulatory RNAs or polypeptides but nevertheless requires an active AAV-2 p40 promoter and p40-associated short transcripts. Our results suggest a novel inhibitory mechanism that has so

  17. Regulatory agencies and regulatory risk

    OpenAIRE

    Knieps, Günter; Weiß, Hans-Jörg

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show that regulatory risk is due to the discretionary behaviour of regulatory agencies, caused by a too extensive regulatory mandate provided by the legislator. The normative point of reference and a behavioural model of regulatory agencies based on the positive theory of regulation are presented. Regulatory risk with regard to the future behaviour of regulatory agencies is modelled as the consequence of the ex ante uncertainty about the relative influence of inter...

  18. Novel positive regulatory role for the SPL6 transcription factor in the N TIR-NB-LRR receptor-mediated plant innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenu S Padmanabhan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Following the recognition of pathogen-encoded effectors, plant TIR-NB-LRR immune receptors induce defense signaling by a largely unknown mechanism. We identify a novel and conserved role for the SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN (SBP-domain transcription factor SPL6 in enabling the activation of the defense transcriptome following its association with a nuclear-localized immune receptor. During an active immune response, the Nicotiana TIR-NB-LRR N immune receptor associates with NbSPL6 within distinct nuclear compartments. NbSPL6 is essential for the N-mediated resistance to Tobacco mosaic virus. Similarly, the presumed Arabidopsis ortholog AtSPL6 is required for the resistance mediated by the TIR-NB-LRR RPS4 against Pseudomonas syringae carrying the avrRps4 effector. Transcriptome analysis indicates that AtSPL6 positively regulates a subset of defense genes. A pathogen-activated nuclear-localized TIR-NB-LRR like N can therefore regulate defense genes through SPL6 in a mechanism analogous to the induction of MHC genes by mammalian immune receptors like CIITA and NLRC5.

  19. Topological effects of data incompleteness of gene regulatory networks

    CERN Document Server

    Sanz, J; Borge-Holthoefer, J; Moreno, Y

    2012-01-01

    The topological analysis of biological networks has been a prolific topic in network science during the last decade. A persistent problem with this approach is the inherent uncertainty and noisy nature of the data. One of the cases in which this situation is more marked is that of transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs) in bacteria. The datasets are incomplete because regulatory pathways associated to a relevant fraction of bacterial genes remain unknown. Furthermore, direction, strengths and signs of the links are sometimes unknown or simply overlooked. Finally, the experimental approaches to infer the regulations are highly heterogeneous, in a way that induces the appearance of systematic experimental-topological correlations. And yet, the quality of the available data increases constantly. In this work we capitalize on these advances to point out the influence of data (in)completeness and quality on some classical results on topological analysis of TRNs, specially regarding modularity at different level...

  20. Modulating the bacterial surface with small RNAs: a new twist on PhoP/Q-mediated lipopolysaccharide modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Martin; Kallipolitis, Birgitte; Valentin-Hansen, Poul

    2009-01-01

    Summary In recent years, small non-coding RNAs have emerged as important regulatory components in bacterial stress responses and in bacterial virulence. Many of these are conserved in related species and act on target mRNAs by sequence complementarity. They are tightly controlled...... of bacterial surface properties by regulating lipopolysaccharide modification. The small RNA is expressed as part of the PhoP/PhoQ two-component system that plays a major role in virulence of pathogenic species. This work expands the list of global regulators known to control small RNA expression...... at the transcription level, and are frequently elements of global regulatory systems. In Escherichia coli and Salmonella, almost one-third of the functional characterized small RNAs participate in control of outer membrane protein production. A subset of these genes is under the control of the sigma...

  1. Analysis of transcriptional and upstream regulatory sequence activity of two environmental stress-inducible genes, NBS-Str1 and BLEC-Str8, of rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Swatismita; Kapoor, Sanjay; Tyagi, Akhilesh K

    2012-04-01

    Two abiotic stress-inducible upstream regulatory sequences (URSs) from rice have been identified and functionally characterized in rice. NBS-Str1 and BLEC-Str8 genes have been identified, by analysing the transcriptome data of cold, salt and desiccation stress-treated 7-day-old rice (Oryza sativa L. var. IR64) seedling, to be preferentially responsive to desiccation and salt stress, respectively. NBS-Str1 and BLEC-Str8 genes code for putative NBS (nucleotide binding site)-LRR (leucine rich repeat) and β-lectin domain protein, respectively. NBS-Str1 URS is induced in root tissue, preferentially in vascular bundle, during 3 and 24 h of desiccation stress condition in transgenic 7-day-old rice seedling. In mature transgenic plants, this URS shows induction in root and shoot tissue under desiccation stress as well as under prolonged (1 and 2 day) salt stress. BLEC-Str8 URS shows basal activity under un-stressed condition, however, it is inducible under salt stress condition in both root and leaf tissues in young seedling and mature plants. Activity of BLEC-Str8 URS has been found to be vascular tissue preferential, however, under salt stress condition its activity is also found in the mesophyll tissue. NBS-Str1 and BLEC-Str8 URSs are inducible by heavy metal, copper and manganese. Interestingly, both the URSs have been found to be non responsive to ABA treatment, implying them to be part of ABA-independent abiotic stress response pathway. These URSs could prove useful for expressing a transgene in a stress responsive manner for development of stress tolerant transgenic systems.

  2. Transcriptional profiling of the two-component regulatory system VraSR in Staphylococcus aureus with low-level vancomycin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongbin; Xiong, Zhujia; Liu, Kuoyue; Li, Shuguang; Wang, Ruobing; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Yawei; Wang, Hui

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to comprehensively identify the target genes regulated by the two-component regulatory system VraSR in Staphylococcus aureus and to clarify the role of VraSR in low-level vancomycin resistance. Expression of vraS was determined by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR). A clinical heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (hVISA) strain B6D and a vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA) strain D7 that was induced from a meticillin-resistant S. aureus strain were selected to construct vraSR null mutants by allelic replacement. The vraSR-complemented strain B6D_c was also constructed by allelic replacement. Genes differentially expressed in the wild-type, vraSR null mutant and complemented strains were detected using RNA-Seq and were validated by qRT-PCR. Compared with vancomycin-susceptible S. aureus strains, expression of vraS was upregulated in all four isogenic hVISA strains. Vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) in the vraSR null mutants B6D-ΔvraSR and D7-ΔvraSR were significantly lower than in the wild-type strains B6D and D7 and the complemented strain B6D_c. RNA-Seq and qRT-PCR data showed that expression of genes encoding FmtA protein, foldase protein PrsA, capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis glycosyltransferase, TcaA, a putative membrane protein, and six hypothetical proteins was down regulated in both vraSR-null mutants B6D-ΔvraSR and D7-ΔvraSR. Most of these differentially expressed proteins are involved in cell wall biosynthesis, which is associated with vancomycin resistance in S. aureus. In conclusion, VraSR plays an important role in S. aureus strains with low-level vancomycin resistance. PrsA, FmtA, glycosyltransferase and TcaA are regulated directly or indirectly by VraSR.

  3. Application of a fuzzy neural network model in predicting polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-mediated perturbations of the Cyp1b1 transcriptional regulatory network in mouse skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larkin, Andrew [Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University (United States); Department of Statistics, Oregon State University (United States); Superfund Research Center, Oregon State University (United States); Siddens, Lisbeth K. [Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University (United States); Superfund Research Center, Oregon State University (United States); Krueger, Sharon K. [Superfund Research Center, Oregon State University (United States); Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University (United States); Tilton, Susan C.; Waters, Katrina M. [Superfund Research Center, Oregon State University (United States); Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Williams, David E., E-mail: david.williams@oregonstate.edu [Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University (United States); Superfund Research Center, Oregon State University (United States); Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University (United States); Environmental Health Sciences Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Baird, William M. [Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University (United States); Superfund Research Center, Oregon State University (United States); Environmental Health Sciences Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are present in the environment as complex mixtures with components that have diverse carcinogenic potencies and mostly unknown interactive effects. Non-additive PAH interactions have been observed in regulation of cytochrome P450 (CYP) gene expression in the CYP1 family. To better understand and predict biological effects of complex mixtures, such as environmental PAHs, an 11 gene input-1 gene output fuzzy neural network (FNN) was developed for predicting PAH-mediated perturbations of dermal Cyp1b1 transcription in mice. Input values were generalized using fuzzy logic into low, medium, and high fuzzy subsets, and sorted using k-means clustering to create Mamdani logic functions for predicting Cyp1b1 mRNA expression. Model testing was performed with data from microarray analysis of skin samples from FVB/N mice treated with toluene (vehicle control), dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC), benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), or 1 of 3 combinations of diesel particulate extract (DPE), coal tar extract (CTE) and cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) using leave-one-out cross-validation. Predictions were within 1 log{sub 2} fold change unit of microarray data, with the exception of the DBC treatment group, where the unexpected down-regulation of Cyp1b1 expression was predicted but did not reach statistical significance on the microarrays. Adding CTE to DPE was predicted to increase Cyp1b1 expression, whereas adding CSC to CTE and DPE was predicted to have no effect, in agreement with microarray results. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (Ahrr) was determined to be the most significant input variable for model predictions using back-propagation and normalization of FNN weights. - Highlights: ► Tested a model to predict PAH mixture-mediated changes in Cyp1b1 expression ► Quantitative predictions in agreement with microarrays for Cyp1b1 induction ► Unexpected difference in expression between DBC and other treatments predicted ► Model predictions

  4. N-termini of fungal CSL transcription factors are disordered, enriched in regulatory motifs and inhibit DNA binding in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Převorovský

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CSL (CBF1/RBP-Jκ/Suppressor of Hairless/LAG-1 transcription factors are the effector components of the Notch receptor signalling pathway, which is critical for metazoan development. The metazoan CSL proteins (class M can also function in a Notch-independent manner. Recently, two novel classes of CSL proteins, designated F1 and F2, have been identified in fungi. The role of the fungal CSL proteins is unclear, because the Notch pathway is not present in fungi. In fission yeast, the Cbf11 and Cbf12 CSL paralogs play antagonistic roles in cell adhesion and the coordination of cell and nuclear division. Unusually long N-terminal extensions are typical for fungal and invertebrate CSL family members. In this study, we investigate the functional significance of these extended N-termini of CSL proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identify 15 novel CSL family members from 7 fungal species and conduct bioinformatic analyses of a combined dataset containing 34 fungal and 11 metazoan CSL protein sequences. We show that the long, non-conserved N-terminal tails of fungal CSL proteins are likely disordered and enriched in phosphorylation sites and PEST motifs. In a case study of Cbf12 (class F2, we provide experimental evidence that the protein is proteolytically processed and that the N-terminus inhibits the Cbf12-dependent DNA binding activity in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides insight into the characteristics of the long N-terminal tails of fungal CSL proteins that may be crucial for controlling DNA-binding and CSL function. We propose that the regulation of DNA binding by Cbf12 via its N-terminal region represents an important means by which fission yeast strikes a balance between the class F1 and class F2 paralog activities. This mode of regulation might be shared with other CSL-positive fungi, some of which are relevant to human disease and biotechnology.

  5. RhoA S-nitrosylation as a regulatory mechanism influencing endothelial barrier function in response to G(+)-bacterial toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, F; Wang, Y; Rafikov, R; Haigh, S; Zhi, W B; Kumar, S; Doulias, P T; Rafikova, O; Pillich, H; Chakraborty, T; Lucas, R; Verin, A D; Catravas, J D; She, J X; Black, S M; Fulton, D J R

    2017-03-01

    Disruption of the endothelial barrier in response to Gram positive (G(+)) bacterial toxins is a major complication of acute lung injury (ALI) and can be further aggravated by antibiotics which stimulate toxin release. The integrity of the pulmonary endothelial barrier is mediated by the balance of disruptive forces such as the small GTPase RhoA, and protective forces including endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO). How NO protects against the barrier dysfunction is incompletely understood and our goal was to determine whether NO and S-nitrosylation can modulate RhoA activity and whether this mechanism is important for G(+) toxin-induced microvascular permeability. We found that the G(+) toxin listeriolysin-O (LLO) increased RhoA activity and that NO and S-NO donors inhibit RhoA activity. RhoA was robustly S-nitrosylated as determined by biotin-switch and mercury column analysis. MS revealed that three primary cysteine residues are S-nitrosylated including cys16, cys20 and cys159. Mutation of these residues to serine diminished S-nitrosylation to endogenous NO and mutant RhoA was less sensitive to inhibition by S-NO. G(+)-toxins stimulated the denitrosylation of RhoA which was not mediated by S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR), thioredoxin (TRX) or thiol-dependent enzyme activity but was instead stimulated directly by elevated calcium levels. Calcium-promoted the direct denitrosylation of WT but not mutant RhoA and mutant RhoA adenovirus was more effective than WT in disrupting the barrier integrity of human lung microvascular endothelial cells. In conclusion, we reveal a novel mechanism by which NO and S-nitrosylation reduces RhoA activity which may be of significance in the management of pulmonary endothelial permeability induced by G(+)-toxins.

  6. Mutations in the control of virulence sensor gene from Streptococcus pyogenes after infection in mice lead to clonal bacterial variants with altered gene regulatory activity and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, Jeffrey A; Liang, Zhong; Agrahari, Garima; Lee, Shaun W; Donahue, Deborah L; Ploplis, Victoria A; Castellino, Francis J

    2014-01-01

    The cluster of virulence sensor (CovS)/responder (CovR) two-component operon (CovRS) regulates ∼15% of the genes of the Group A Streptococcal pyogenes (GAS) genome. Bacterial clones containing inactivating mutations in the covS gene have been isolated from patients with virulent invasive diseases. We report herein an assessment of the nature and types of covS mutations that can occur in both virulent and nonvirulent GAS strains, and assess whether a nonvirulent GAS can attain enhanced virulence through this mechanism. A group of mice were infected with a globally-disseminated clonal M1T1 GAS (isolate 5448), containing wild-type (WT) CovRS (5448/CovR+S+), or less virulent engineered GAS strains, AP53/CovR+S+ and Manfredo M5/CovR+S+. SpeB negative GAS clones from wound sites and/or from bacteria disseminated to the spleen were isolated and the covS gene was subjected to DNA sequence analysis. Numerous examples of inactivating mutations were found in CovS in all regions of the gene. The mutations found included frame-shift insertions and deletions, and in-frame small and large deletions in the gene. Many of the mutations found resulted in early translation termination of CovS. Thus, the covS gene is a genomic mutagenic target that gives GAS enhanced virulence. In cases wherein CovS- was discovered, these clonal variants exhibited high lethality, further suggesting that randomly mutated covS genes occur during the course of infection, and lead to the development of a more invasive infection.

  7. Mutations in the control of virulence sensor gene from Streptococcus pyogenes after infection in mice lead to clonal bacterial variants with altered gene regulatory activity and virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Mayfield

    Full Text Available The cluster of virulence sensor (CovS/responder (CovR two-component operon (CovRS regulates ∼15% of the genes of the Group A Streptococcal pyogenes (GAS genome. Bacterial clones containing inactivating mutations in the covS gene have been isolated from patients with virulent invasive diseases. We report herein an assessment of the nature and types of covS mutations that can occur in both virulent and nonvirulent GAS strains, and assess whether a nonvirulent GAS can attain enhanced virulence through this mechanism. A group of mice were infected with a globally-disseminated clonal M1T1 GAS (isolate 5448, containing wild-type (WT CovRS (5448/CovR+S+, or less virulent engineered GAS strains, AP53/CovR+S+ and Manfredo M5/CovR+S+. SpeB negative GAS clones from wound sites and/or from bacteria disseminated to the spleen were isolated and the covS gene was subjected to DNA sequence analysis. Numerous examples of inactivating mutations were found in CovS in all regions of the gene. The mutations found included frame-shift insertions and deletions, and in-frame small and large deletions in the gene. Many of the mutations found resulted in early translation termination of CovS. Thus, the covS gene is a genomic mutagenic target that gives GAS enhanced virulence. In cases wherein CovS- was discovered, these clonal variants exhibited high lethality, further suggesting that randomly mutated covS genes occur during the course of infection, and lead to the development of a more invasive infection.

  8. Top-level dynamics and the regulated gene response of feed-forward loop transcriptional motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Michael; Abdelzaher, Ahmed; Perkins, Edward J.; Ghosh, Preetam

    2014-09-01

    Feed-forward loops are hierarchical three-node transcriptional subnetworks, wherein a top-level protein regulates the activity of a target gene via two paths: a direct-regulatory path, and an indirect route, whereby the top-level proteins act implicitly through an intermediate transcription factor. Using a transcriptional network of the model bacterium Escherichia coli, we confirmed that nearly all types of feed-forward loop were significantly overrepresented in the bacterial network. We then used mathematical modeling to study their dynamics by manipulating the rise times of the top-level protein concentration, termed the induction time, through alteration of the protein destruction rates. Rise times of the regulated proteins exhibited two qualitatively different regimes, depending on whether top-level inductions were "fast" or "slow." In the fast regime, rise times were nearly independent of rapid top-level inductions, indicative of biological robustness, and occurred when RNA production rate-limits the protein yield. Alternatively, the protein rise times were dependent upon slower top-level inductions, greater than approximately one bacterial cell cycle. An equation is given for this crossover, which depends upon three parameters of the direct-regulatory path: transcriptional cooperation at the DNA-binding site, a protein-DNA dissociation constant, and the relative magnitude of the top-level protien concentration.

  9. Genome engineering and gene expression control for bacterial strain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chan Woo; Lee, Joungmin; Lee, Sang Yup

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a number of techniques and tools have been developed for genome engineering and gene expression control to achieve desired phenotypes of various bacteria. Here we review and discuss the recent advances in bacterial genome manipulation and gene expression control techniques, and their actual uses with accompanying examples. Genome engineering has been commonly performed based on homologous recombination. During such genome manipulation, the counterselection systems employing SacB or nucleases have mainly been used for the efficient selection of desired engineered strains. The recombineering technology enables simple and more rapid manipulation of the bacterial genome. The group II intron-mediated genome engineering technology is another option for some bacteria that are difficult to be engineered by homologous recombination. Due to the increasing demands on high-throughput screening of bacterial strains having the desired phenotypes, several multiplex genome engineering techniques have recently been developed and validated in some bacteria. Another approach to achieve desired bacterial phenotypes is the repression of target gene expression without the modification of genome sequences. This can be performed by expressing antisense RNA, small regulatory RNA, or CRISPR RNA to repress target gene expression at the transcriptional or translational level. All of these techniques allow efficient and rapid development and screening of bacterial strains having desired phenotypes, and more advanced techniques are expected to be seen.

  10. A Small Group Activity About Bacterial Regulation And Complementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Merkel

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available As teachers, we well understand the need for activities that help develop critical-thinking skills in microbiology. In our experience, one concept that students have difficulty understanding is transcriptional regulation of bacterial genes. To help with this, we developed and evaluated a paper-based activity to help students understand and apply the concepts of bacterial transcriptional regulation. While we don't identify it as such, we use a complementation experiment to assess student understanding of how regulation changes when new DNA is introduced. In Part 1 of this activity, students complete an open book, take-home assignment that asks them to define common terminology related to regulation, and draw the regulatory components of different scenarios involving positive and negative regulation. In Part 2, students work in small groups of 3-4 to depict the regulatory components for a different scenario. They are asked to explain the results of a complementation experiment based on this scenario. They then predict the results of a slightly different experiment. Students who completed the Regulation Activity did significantly better on post-test questions related to regulation, compared to pre-test questions.

  11. Integrated Approach to Reconstruction of Microbial Regulatory Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodionov, Dmitry A [Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute; Novichkov, Pavel S [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    2013-11-04

    This project had the goal(s) of development of integrated bioinformatics platform for genome-scale inference and visualization of transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs) in bacterial genomes. The work was done in Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (SBMRI, P.I. D.A. Rodionov) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL, co-P.I. P.S. Novichkov). The developed computational resources include: (1) RegPredict web-platform for TRN inference and regulon reconstruction in microbial genomes, and (2) RegPrecise database for collection, visualization and comparative analysis of transcriptional regulons reconstructed by comparative genomics. These analytical resources were selected as key components in the DOE Systems Biology KnowledgeBase (SBKB). The high-quality data accumulated in RegPrecise will provide essential datasets of reference regulons in diverse microbes to enable automatic reconstruction of draft TRNs in newly sequenced genomes. We outline our progress toward the three aims of this grant proposal, which were: Develop integrated platform for genome-scale regulon reconstruction; Infer regulatory annotations in several groups of bacteria and building of reference collections of microbial regulons; and Develop KnowledgeBase on microbial transcriptional regulation.

  12. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any,...

  13. Genetic and computational identification of a conserved bacterial metabolic module.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara C Boutte

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We have experimentally and computationally defined a set of genes that form a conserved metabolic module in the alpha-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus and used this module to illustrate a schema for the propagation of pathway-level annotation across bacterial genera. Applying comprehensive forward and reverse genetic methods and genome-wide transcriptional analysis, we (1 confirmed the presence of genes involved in catabolism of the abundant environmental sugar myo-inositol, (2 defined an operon encoding an ABC-family myo-inositol transmembrane transporter, and (3 identified a novel myo-inositol regulator protein and cis-acting regulatory motif that control expression of genes in this metabolic module. Despite being encoded from non-contiguous loci on the C. crescentus chromosome, these myo-inositol catabolic enzymes and transporter proteins form a tightly linked functional group in a computationally inferred network of protein associations. Primary sequence comparison was not sufficient to confidently extend annotation of all components of this novel metabolic module to related bacterial genera. Consequently, we implemented the Graemlin multiple-network alignment algorithm to generate cross-species predictions of genes involved in myo-inositol transport and catabolism in other alpha-proteobacteria. Although the chromosomal organization of genes in this functional module varied between species, the upstream regions of genes in this aligned network were enriched for the same palindromic cis-regulatory motif identified experimentally in C. crescentus. Transposon disruption of the operon encoding the computationally predicted ABC myo-inositol transporter of Sinorhizobium meliloti abolished growth on myo-inositol as the sole carbon source, confirming our cross-genera functional prediction. Thus, we have defined regulatory, transport, and catabolic genes and a cis-acting regulatory sequence that form a conserved module required for myo

  14. Precise Identification of Genome-Wide Transcription Start Sites in Bacteria by 5'-Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (5'-RACE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteau, Dominick; Rodrigue, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Transcription start sites are commonly used to locate promoter elements in bacterial genomes. TSS were previously studied one gene at a time, often through 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends (5'-RACE). This technique has now been adapted for high-throughput sequencing and can be used to precisely identify TSS in a genome-wide fashion for practically any bacterium, which greatly contributes to our understanding of gene regulatory networks in microorganisms.

  15. Pervasive transcription: detecting functional RNAs in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lybecker, Meghan; Bilusic, Ivana; Raghavan, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Pervasive, or genome-wide, transcription has been reported in all domains of life. In bacteria, most pervasive transcription occurs antisense to protein-coding transcripts, although recently a new class of pervasive RNAs was identified that originates from within annotated genes. Initially considered to be non-functional transcriptional noise, pervasive transcription is increasingly being recognized as important in regulating gene expression. The function of pervasive transcription is an extensively debated question in the field of transcriptomics and regulatory RNA biology. Here, we highlight the most recent contributions addressing the purpose of pervasive transcription in bacteria and discuss their implications.

  16. CRISPR/Cas systems: new players in gene regulation and bacterial physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eWeiss

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available CRISPR-Cas systems are bacterial defenses against foreign nucleic acids derived from bacteriophages, plasmids or other sources. These systems are targeted in an RNA-dependent, sequence-specific manner, and are also adaptive, providing protection against previously encountered foreign elements. In addition to their canonical function in defense against foreign nucleic acid, their roles in various aspects of bacterial physiology are now being uncovered. We recently revealed a role for a Cas9-based Type II CRISPR-Cas system in the control of endogenous gene expression, a novel form of prokaryotic gene regulation. Cas9 functions in association with two small RNAs to target and alter the stability of an endogenous transcript encoding a bacterial lipoprotein (BLP. Since BLPs are recognized by the host innate immune protein Toll-like Receptor 2 (TLR2, CRISPR-Cas-mediated repression of BLP expression facilitates evasion of TLR2 by the intracellular bacterial pathogen Francisella novicida, and is essential for its virulence. Here we describe the Cas9 regulatory system in detail, as well as data on its role in controlling virulence traits of Neisseria meningitidis and Campylobacter jejuni. We also discuss potential roles of CRISPR-Cas systems in the response to envelope stress and other aspects of bacterial physiology. Since ~45% of bacteria and ~83% of Archaea encode these machineries, the newly appreciated regulatory functions of CRISPR-Cas systems are likely to play broad roles in controlling the pathogenesis and physiology of diverse prokaryotes.

  17. A transcription activator-like effector (TALE) induction system mediated by proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Matthew F; Politz, Mark C; Johnson, Charles B; Markley, Andrew L; Pfleger, Brian F

    2016-04-01

    Simple and predictable trans-acting regulatory tools are needed in the fields of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering to build complex genetic circuits and optimize the levels of native and heterologous gene products. Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are bacterial virulence factors that have recently gained traction in biotechnology applications owing to their customizable DNA-binding specificity. In this work we expanded the versatility of these transcription factors to create an inducible TALE system by inserting tobacco-etch virus (TEV) protease recognition sites into the TALE backbone. The resulting engineered TALEs maintain transcriptional repression of their target genes in Escherichia coli, but are degraded after induction of the TEV protease, thereby promoting expression of the previously repressed target gene of interest. This TALE-TEV technology enables both repression and induction of plasmid or chromosomal target genes in a manner analogous to traditional repressor proteins but with the added flexibility of being operator-agnostic.

  18. Properties of the phage-shock-protein (Psp) regulatory complex that govern signal transduction and induction of the Psp response in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Jovanovic, Goran; Engl, Christoph; Mayhew, Antony J.; Burrows, Patricia C.; Buck, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The phage-shock-protein (Psp) response maintains the proton-motive force (pmf) under extracytoplasmic stress conditions that impair the inner membrane (IM) in bacterial cells. In Escherichia coli transcription of the pspABCDE and pspG genes requires activation of σ 54-RNA polymerase by the enhancer-binding protein PspF. A regulatory network comprising PspF–A–C–B–ArcB controls psp expression. One key regulatory point is the negative control of PspF imposed by its binding to PspA. It has been p...

  19. Gene expression profiling of cultured human NF1 heterozygous (NF1+/-) melanocytes reveals downregulation of a transcriptional cis-regulatory network mediating activation of the melanocyte-specific dopachrome tautomerase (DCT) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucneau, Joachim; De Schepper, Sofie; Vuylsteke, Marnik; Van Hummelen, Paul; Naeyaert, Jean-Marie; Lambert, Jo

    2005-08-01

    One of the major primary features of the neurocutaneous genetic disorder Neurofibromatosis type 1 are the hyperpigmentary café-au-lait macules where disregulation of melanocyte biology is supposed to play a key etiopathogenic role. To gain better insight into the possible role of the tumor suppressor gene NF1, a transcriptomic microarray analysis was performed on human NF1 heterozygous (NF1+/-) melanocytes of a Neurofibromatosis type 1 patient and NF1 wild type (NF1+/+) melanocytes of a healthy control patient, both cultured from normally pigmented skin and hyperpigmented lesional café-au-lait skin. From the magnitude of gene effects, we found that gene expression was affected most strongly by genotype and less so by lesional type. A total of 137 genes had a significant twofold or more up- (72) or downregulated (65) expression in NF1+/- melanocytes compared with NF1+/+ melanocytes. Melanocytes cultured from hyperpigmented café-au-lait skin showed 37 upregulated genes whereas only 14 were downregulated compared with normal skin melanocytes. In addition, significant genotype xlesional type interactions were observed for 465 genes. Differentially expressed genes were mainly involved in regulating cell proliferation and cell adhesion. A high number of transcription factor genes, among which a specific subset important in melanocyte lineage development, were downregulated in the cis-regulatory network governing the activation of the melanocyte-specific dopachrome tautomerase (DCT) gene. Although the results presented have been obtained with a restricted number of patients (one NF1 patient and one control) and using cDNA microarrays that may limit their interpretation, the data nevertheless addresses for the first time the effect of a heterozygous NF1 gene on the expression of the human melanocyte transcriptome and has generated several interesting candidate genes helpful in elucidating the etiopathology of café-au-lait macules in NF1 patients.

  20. Reconstructing the Prostate Cancer Transcriptional Regulatory Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Jul 3;4(7):e6146. Lapointe J, Li C, Higgins JP, van de Rijn M, Bair E, Montgomery K, Ferrari M, Egevad L, Rayford W, Bergerheim U, Ekman P...Adrienne Pollack for the DR-Integrator logo art. Funding: National Institutes of Health (CA97139 and CA112016 to J.R.P.); Paul & Daisy Soros...RO1 AG14358, NIH RO1 CA098415, NIH RO1 CA95717, NIH U24 CA80295, DOD PC060595, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Institutional Funds, Paul and

  1. Transcriptional analysis of exopolysaccharides biosynthesis gene clusters in Lactobacillus plantarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vastano, Valeria; Perrone, Filomena; Marasco, Rosangela; Sacco, Margherita; Muscariello, Lidia

    2016-04-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPS) from lactic acid bacteria contribute to specific rheology and texture of fermented milk products and find applications also in non-dairy foods and in therapeutics. Recently, four clusters of genes (cps) associated with surface polysaccharide production have been identified in Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1, a probiotic and food-associated lactobacillus. These clusters are involved in cell surface architecture and probably in release and/or exposure of immunomodulating bacterial molecules. Here we show a transcriptional analysis of these clusters. Indeed, RT-PCR experiments revealed that the cps loci are organized in five operons. Moreover, by reverse transcription-qPCR analysis performed on L. plantarum WCFS1 (wild type) and WCFS1-2 (ΔccpA), we demonstrated that expression of three cps clusters is under the control of the global regulator CcpA. These results, together with the identification of putative CcpA target sequences (catabolite responsive element CRE) in the regulatory region of four out of five transcriptional units, strongly suggest for the first time a role of the master regulator CcpA in EPS gene transcription among lactobacilli.

  2. Regulatory Snapshots: integrative mining of regulatory modules from expression time series and regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana P Gonçalves

    Full Text Available Explaining regulatory mechanisms is crucial to understand complex cellular responses leading to system perturbations. Some strategies reverse engineer regulatory interactions from experimental data, while others identify functional regulatory units (modules under the assumption that biological systems yield a modular organization. Most modular studies focus on network structure and static properties, ignoring that gene regulation is largely driven by stimulus-response behavior. Expression time series are key to gain insight into dynamics, but have been insufficiently explored by current methods, which often (1 apply generic algorithms unsuited for expression analysis over time, due to inability to maintain the chronology of events or incorporate time dependency; (2 ignore local patterns, abundant in most interesting cases of transcriptional activity; (3 neglect physical binding or lack automatic association of regulators, focusing mainly on expression patterns; or (4 limit the discovery to a predefined number of modules. We propose Regulatory Snapshots, an integrative mining approach to identify regulatory modules over time by combining transcriptional control with response, while overcoming the above challenges. Temporal biclustering is first used to reveal transcriptional modules composed of genes showing coherent expression profiles over time. Personalized ranking is then applied to prioritize prominent regulators targeting the modules at each time point using a network of documented regulatory associations and the expression data. Custom graphics are finally depicted to expose the regulatory activity in a module at consecutive time points (snapshots. Regulatory Snapshots successfully unraveled modules underlying yeast response to heat shock and human epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, based on regulations documented in the YEASTRACT and JASPAR databases, respectively, and available expression data. Regulatory players involved in

  3. Genetic analysis of riboswitch-mediated transcriptional regulation responding to Mn2+ in Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yixin; Zhao, Guang; Kong, Wei

    2014-04-18

    Riboswitches are a class of cis-acting regulatory RNAs normally characterized from the 5'-UTR of bacterial transcripts that bind a specific ligand to regulate expression of associated genes by forming alternative conformations. Here, we present a riboswitch that contributes to transcriptional regulation through sensing Mn(2+) in Salmonella typhimurium. We characterized a 5'-UTR (UTR1) from the mntH locus encoding a Mn(2+) transporter, which forms a Rho-independent terminator to implement transcription termination with a high Mn(2+) selectivity both in vivo and in vitro. Nucleotide substitutions that cause disruption of the terminator interfere with the regulatory function of UTR1. RNA probing analyses outlined a specific UTR1 conformation that favors the terminator structure in Mn(2+)-replete condition. Switch sequence GCUAUG can alternatively base pair duplicated hexanucleotide CAUAGC to form either a pseudoknot or terminator stem. Mn(2+), but not Mg(2+), and Ca(2+), can enhance cleavage at specific nucleotides in UTR1. We conclude that UTR1 is a riboswitch that senses cytoplasmic Mn(2+) and therefore participates in Mn(2+)-responsive mntH regulation in Salmonella. This riboswitch domain is also conserved in several Gram-negative enteric bacteria, indicating that this Mn(2+)-responsive mechanism could have broader implications in bacterial gene expression. Additionally, a high level of cytoplasmic Mn(2+) can down-regulate transcription of the Salmonella Mg(2+) transporter mgtA locus in a Mg(2+) riboswitch-dependent manner. On the other hand, these two types of cation riboswitches do not share similarity at the primary or secondary structural levels. Taken together, characterization of Mn(2+)-responsive riboswitches should expand the scope of RNA regulatory elements in response to inorganic ions.

  4. Computational Analysis of the Transcriptional Regulation of the Actin Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑家顺; 吴加金; 孙之荣

    2002-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is a very important regulatory step in the regulation of gene expression. Transcription factors (TFs) play an important role in controlling the temporal special specificity of gene expression. The regulation area of actin genes was analyzed statistically to predict the transcription factor binding sites in the regulatory area. A group of transcription factors located in most of the sequences is believed to play an important role in co-regulating the expression of actin genes.

  5. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues > Conditions > Sexually Transmitted > Bacterial Vaginosis Health Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Bacterial Vaginosis Page Content Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal infection in sexually active teenaged girls . It appears to be caused by ...

  6. Expression of sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor (SREBF 2 and SREBF cleavage-activating protein (SCAP in human atheroma and the association of their allelic variants with sudden cardiac death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kytömäki Leena

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disturbed cellular cholesterol homeostasis may lead to accumulation of cholesterol in human atheroma plaques. Cellular cholesterol homeostasis is controlled by the sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor 2 (SREBF-2 and the SREBF cleavage-activating protein (SCAP. We investigated whole genome expression in a series of human atherosclerotic samples from different vascular territories and studied whether the non-synonymous coding variants in the interacting domains of two genes, SREBF-2 1784G>C (rs2228314 and SCAP 2386A>G, are related to the progression of coronary atherosclerosis and the risk of pre-hospital sudden cardiac death (SCD. Methods Whole genome expression profiling was completed in twenty vascular samples from carotid, aortic and femoral atherosclerotic plaques and six control samples from internal mammary arteries. Three hundred sudden pre-hospital deaths of middle-aged (33–69 years Caucasian Finnish men were subjected to detailed autopsy in the Helsinki Sudden Death Study. Coronary narrowing and areas of coronary wall covered with fatty streaks or fibrotic, calcified or complicated lesions were measured and related to the SREBF-2 and SCAP genotypes. Results Whole genome expression profiling showed a significant (p = 0.02 down-regulation of SREBF-2 in atherosclerotic carotid plaques (types IV-V, but not in the aorta or femoral arteries (p = NS for both, as compared with the histologically confirmed non-atherosclerotic tissues. In logistic regression analysis, a significant interaction between the SREBF-2 1784G>C and the SCAP 2386A>G genotype was observed on the risk of SCD (p = 0.046. Men with the SREBF-2 C allele and the SCAP G allele had a significantly increased risk of SCD (OR 2.68, 95% CI 1.07–6.71, compared to SCAP AA homologous subjects carrying the SREBF-2 C allele. Furthermore, similar trends for having complicated lesions and for the occurrence of thrombosis were found, although the

  7. Preaxial polydactyly/triphalangeal thumb is associated with changed transcription factor-binding affinity in a family with a novel point mutation in the long-range cis-regulatory element ZRS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farooq, Muhammad; Troelsen, Jesper T; Boyd, Mette

    2010-01-01

    A cis-regulatory sequence also known as zone of polarizing activity (ZPA) regulatory sequence (ZRS) located in intron 5 of LMBR1 is essential for expression of sonic hedgehog (SHH) in the developing posterior limb bud mesenchyme. Even though many point mutations causing preaxial duplication defects...

  8. Bacterial Chromosome Organization and Segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Toro, Esteban; Shapiro, Lucy

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial chromosomes are generally ∼1000 times longer than the cells in which they reside, and concurrent replication, segregation, and transcription/translation of this crowded mass of DNA poses a challenging organizational problem. Recent advances in cell-imaging technology with subdiffraction resolution have revealed that the bacterial nucleoid is reliably oriented and highly organized within the cell. Such organization is transmitted from one generation to the next by progressive segrega...

  9. Identification and genomic analysis of transcription factors in archaeal genomes exemplifies their functional architecture and evolutionary origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto; Janga, Sarath Chandra

    2010-06-01

    Archaea, which represent a large fraction of the phylogenetic diversity of organisms, are prokaryotes with eukaryote-like basal transcriptional machinery. This organization makes the study of their DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) and their transcriptional regulatory networks particularly interesting. In addition, there are limited experimental data regarding their TFs. In this work, 3,918 TFs were identified and exhaustively analyzed in 52 archaeal genomes. TFs represented less than 5% of the gene products in all the studied species comparable with the number of TFs identified in parasites or intracellular pathogenic bacteria, suggesting a deficit in this class of proteins. A total of 75 families were identified, of which HTH_3, AsnC, TrmB, and ArsR families were universally and abundantly identified in all the archaeal genomes. We found that archaeal TFs are significantly small compared with other protein-coding genes in archaea as well as bacterial TFs, suggesting that a large fraction of these small-sized TFs could supply the probable deficit of TFs in archaea, by possibly forming different combinations of monomers similar to that observed in eukaryotic transcriptional machinery. Our results show that although the DNA-binding domains of archaeal TFs are similar to bacteria, there is an underrepresentation of ligand-binding domains in smaller TFs, which suggests that protein-protein interactions may act as mediators of regulatory feedback, indicating a chimera of bacterial and eukaryotic TFs' functionality. The analysis presented here contributes to the understanding of the details of transcriptional apparatus in archaea and provides a framework for the analysis of regulatory networks in these organisms.

  10. Transcription Factor Networks in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Y. Rhee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Specific cellular fates and functions depend on differential gene expression, which occurs primarily at the transcriptional level and is controlled by complex regulatory networks of transcription factors (TFs. TFs act through combinatorial interactions with other TFs, cofactors, and chromatin-remodeling proteins. Here, we define protein-protein interactions using a coaffinity purification/mass spectrometry method and study 459 Drosophila melanogaster transcription-related factors, representing approximately half of the established catalog of TFs. We probe this network in vivo, demonstrating functional interactions for many interacting proteins, and test the predictive value of our data set. Building on these analyses, we combine regulatory network inference models with physical interactions to define an integrated network that connects combinatorial TF protein interactions to the transcriptional regulatory network of the cell. We use this integrated network as a tool to connect the functional network of genetic modifiers related to mastermind, a transcriptional cofactor of the Notch pathway.

  11. Concentration and length dependence of DNA looping in transcriptional regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Han

    Full Text Available In many cases, transcriptional regulation involves the binding of transcription factors at sites on the DNA that are not immediately adjacent to the promoter of interest. This action at a distance is often mediated by the formation of DNA loops: Binding at two or more sites on the DNA results in the formation of a loop, which can bring the transcription factor into the immediate neighborhood of the relevant promoter. These processes are important in settings ranging from the historic bacterial examples (bacterial metabolism and the lytic-lysogeny decision in bacteriophage, to the modern concept of gene regulation to regulatory processes central to pattern formation during development of multicellular organisms. Though there have been a variety of insights into the combinatorial aspects of transcriptional control, the mechanism of DNA looping as an agent of combinatorial control in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes remains unclear. We use single-molecule techniques to dissect DNA looping in the lac operon. In particular, we measure the propensity for DNA looping by the Lac repressor as a function of the concentration of repressor protein and as a function of the distance between repressor binding sites. As with earlier single-molecule studies, we find (at least two distinct looped states and demonstrate that the presence of these two states depends both upon the concentration of repressor protein and the distance between the two repressor binding sites. We find that loops form even at interoperator spacings considerably shorter than the DNA persistence length, without the intervention of any other proteins to prebend the DNA. The concentration measurements also permit us to use a simple statistical mechanical model of DNA loop formation to determine the free energy of DNA looping, or equivalently, the for looping.

  12. The Role of Multiple Transcription Factors In Archaeal Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles J. Daniels

    2008-09-23

    Since the inception of this research program, the project has focused on two central questions: What is the relationship between the 'eukaryal-like' transcription machinery of archaeal cells and its counterparts in eukaryal cells? And, how does the archaeal cell control gene expression using its mosaic of eukaryal core transcription machinery and its bacterial-like transcription regulatory proteins? During the grant period we have addressed these questions using a variety of in vivo approaches and have sought to specifically define the roles of the multiple TATA binding protein (TBP) and TFIIB-like (TFB) proteins in controlling gene expression in Haloferax volcanii. H. volcanii was initially chosen as a model for the Archaea based on the availability of suitable genetic tools; however, later studies showed that all haloarchaea possessed multiple tbp and tfb genes, which led to the proposal that multiple TBP and TFB proteins may function in a manner similar to alternative sigma factors in bacterial cells. In vivo transcription and promoter analysis established a clear relationship between the promoter requirements of haloarchaeal genes and those of the eukaryal RNA polymerase II promoter. Studies on heat shock gene promoters, and the demonstration that specific tfb genes were induced by heat shock, provided the first indication that TFB proteins may direct expression of specific gene families. The construction of strains lacking tbp or tfb genes, coupled with the finding that many of these genes are differentially expressed under varying growth conditions, provided further support for this model. Genetic tools were also developed that led to the construction of insertion and deletion mutants, and a novel gene expression scheme was designed that allowed the controlled expression of these genes in vivo. More recent studies have used a whole genome array to examine the expression of these genes and we have established a linkage between the expression of

  13. Comparative genomics of transcriptional regulation of methionine metabolism in Proteobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semen A Leyn

    Full Text Available Methionine metabolism and uptake genes in Proteobacteria are controlled by a variety of RNA and DNA regulatory systems. We have applied comparative genomics to reconstruct regulons for three known transcription factors, MetJ, MetR, and SahR, and three known riboswitch motifs, SAH, SAM-SAH, and SAM_alpha, in ∼ 200 genomes from 22 taxonomic groups of Proteobacteria. We also identified two novel regulons: a SahR-like transcription factor SamR controlling various methionine biosynthesis genes in the Xanthomonadales group, and a potential RNA regulatory element with terminator-antiterminator mechanism controlling the metX or metZ genes in beta-proteobacteria. For each analyzed regulator we identified the core, taxon-specific and genome-specific regulon members. By analyzing the distribution of these regulators in bacterial genomes and by comparing their regulon contents we elucidated possible evolutionary scenarios for the regulation of the methionine metabolism genes in Proteobacteria.

  14. Transcription regulation mechanisms of bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haiquan; Ma, Yingfang; Wang, Yitian; Yang, Haixia; Shen, Wei; Chen, Xianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Phage diversity significantly contributes to ecology and evolution of new bacterial species through horizontal gene transfer. Therefore, it is essential to understand the mechanisms underlying phage-host interactions. After initial infection, the phage utilizes the transcriptional machinery of the host to direct the expression of its own genes. This review presents a view on the transcriptional regulation mechanisms of bacteriophages, and its contribution to phage diversity and classification. Through this review, we aim to broaden the understanding of phage-host interactions while providing a reference source for researchers studying the regulation of phage transcription. PMID:25482231

  15. Evolutionary dynamics and functional roles of regulatory systems in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berke, L.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription, the process of generating RNA copies of the genetic information stored in the DNA, is crucial for every organism. As with other essential processes in life, correct activation and repression of transcription is governed by complex regulatory mechanisms. These regulatory mechanisms ope

  16. Structural biology of bacterial RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Katsuhiko S

    2015-05-11

    Since its discovery and characterization in the early 1960s (Hurwitz, J. The discovery of RNA polymerase. J. Biol. Chem. 2005, 280, 42477-42485), an enormous amount of biochemical, biophysical and genetic data has been collected on bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP). In the late 1990s, structural information pertaining to bacterial RNAP has emerged that provided unprecedented insights into the function and mechanism of RNA transcription. In this review, I list all structures related to bacterial RNAP (as determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR methods available from the Protein Data Bank), describe their contributions to bacterial transcription research and discuss the role that small molecules play in inhibiting bacterial RNA transcription.

  17. A growth-dependent transcription initiation factor (TIF-IA) interacting with RNA polymerase I regulates mouse ribosomal RNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnapp, A; Pfleiderer, C; Rosenbauer, H; Grummt, I

    1990-09-01

    Control of mouse ribosomal RNA synthesis in response to extracellular signals is mediated by TIF-IA, a regulatory factor whose amount or activity correlates with cell proliferation. Factor TIF-IA interacts with RNA polymerase I (pol I), thus converting it into a transcriptionally active holoenzyme, which is able to initiate specifically at the rDNA promoter in the presence of the other auxiliary transcription initiation factors, designated TIF-IB, TIF-IC and UBF. With regard to several criteria, the growth-dependent factor TIF-IA behaves like a bacterial sigma factor: (i) it associates physically with pol I, (ii) it is required for initiation of transcription, (iii) it is present in limiting amounts and (iv) under certain salt conditions, it is chromatographically separable from the polymerase. In addition, evidence is presented that dephosphorylation of pol I abolishes in vitro transcription initiation from the ribosomal gene promoter without significantly affecting the polymerizing activity of the enzyme at nonspecific templates. The involvement of both a regulatory factor and post-translational modification of the transcribing enzyme provides an efficient and versatile mechanism of rDNA transcription regulation which enables the cell to adapt ribosome synthesis rapidly to a variety of extracellular signals.

  18. Transcriptional Regulation of Heart Development in Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fei; Langenbacher, Adam D.; Chen, Jau-Nian

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac transcription factors orchestrate the complex cellular and molecular events required to produce a functioning heart. Misregulation of the cardiac transcription program leads to embryonic developmental defects and is associated with human congenital heart diseases. Recent studies have expanded our understanding of the regulation of cardiac gene expression at an additional layer, involving the coordination of epigenetic and transcriptional regulators. In this review, we highlight and discuss discoveries made possible by the genetic and embryological tools available in the zebrafish model organism, with a focus on the novel functions of cardiac transcription factors and epigenetic and transcriptional regulatory proteins during cardiogenesis. PMID:27148546

  19. The Novel Transcriptional Regulator SA1804 Is Involved in Mediating the Invasion and Cytotoxicity of Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUNSHU eYANG

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The two-component regulatory system, SaeRS, controls expression of important virulence factors, including toxins and invasins, which contribute to the pathogenicity of Staphylococcus aureus. Previously, we conducted a transcriptomics study for identification of SaeRS regulon and found that inactivation of SaeRS dramatically enhances the transcription of a novel transcriptional regulator (SA1804. This led us to question whether SA1804 is involved in bacterial pathogenicity by regulating the expression of virulence factors. To address this question, we created sa1804, saeRS, and sa1804/saeRS double deletion mutants in a USA300 community-acquired MRSA strain, 923, and determined their impact on the pathogenicity. The deletion of sa1804 dramatically increased the cytotoxicity and enhanced the capacity of bacteria to invade into the epithelial cells (A549, whereas the deletion of saeRS eliminated the cytotoxicity and abolished the bacterial ability to invade into the epithelial cells. Moreover, the double deletions of sa1804 and saeRS appeared a similar phenotype with the saeRS null mutation. Furthermore, we determined the regulatory mechanism of SA1804 using qPCR and gel-shift approaches. Our data indicate that the novel virulence repressor SA1804 is dependent on the regulation of SaeRS. This study sheds light on the regulatory mechanism of virulence factors and allows for us further elucidate the molecular pathogenesis of S. aureus.

  20. Tea tree oil-induced transcriptional alterations in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuaron, Jesus A; Dulal, Santosh; Song, Yang; Singh, Atul K; Montelongo, Cesar E; Yu, Wanqin; Nagarajan, Vijayaraj; Jayaswal, Radheshyam K; Wilkinson, Brian J; Gustafson, John E

    2013-03-01

    Tea tree oil (TTO) is a steam distillate of Melaleuca alternifolia that demonstrates broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. This study was designed to document how TTO challenge influences the Staphylococcus aureus transcriptome. Overall, bioinformatic analyses (S. aureus microarray meta-database) revealed that both ethanol and TTO induce related transcriptional alterations. TTO challenge led to the down-regulation of genes involved with energy-intensive transcription and translation, and altered the regulation of genes involved with heat shock (e.g. clpC, clpL, ctsR, dnaK, groES, groEL, grpE and hrcA) and cell wall metabolism (e.g. cwrA, isaA, sle1, vraSR and vraX). Inactivation of the heat shock gene dnaK or vraSR which encodes a two-component regulatory system that responds to peptidoglycan biosynthesis inhibition led to an increase in TTO susceptibility which demonstrates a protective role for these genes in the S. aureus TTO response. A gene (mmpL) encoding a putative resistance, nodulation and cell division efflux pump was also highly induced by TTO. The principal antimicrobial TTO terpene, terpinen-4-ol, altered ten genes in a transcriptional direction analogous to TTO. Collectively, this study provides additional insight into the response of a bacterial pathogen to the antimicrobial terpene mixture TTO.

  1. Control and signal processing by transcriptional interference

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    A transcriptional activator can suppress gene expression by interfering with transcription initiated by another activator. Transcriptional interference has been increasingly recognized as a regulatory mechanism of gene expression. The signals received by the two antagonistically acting activators are combined by the polymerase trafficking along the DNA. We have designed a dual-control genetic system in yeast to explore this antagonism systematically. Antagonism by an upstream activator bears ...

  2. Bacterial and Fungal Pattern Recognition Receptors in Homologous Innate Signaling Pathways of Insects and Mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany A Stokes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In response to bacterial and fungal infections in insects and mammals, distinct families of innate immune pattern recognition receptors initiate highly complex intracellular signaling cascades. Those cascades induce a variety of immune functions that restrain the spread of microbes in the host. Insect and mammalian innate immune receptors include molecules that recognize conserved microbial molecular patterns. Innate immune recognition leads to the recruitment of adaptor molecules forming multi-protein complexes that include kinases, transcription factors and other regulatory molecules. Innate immune signaling cascades induce the expression of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides and other key factors that mount and regulate the immune response against microbial challenge. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the bacterial and fungal pattern recognition receptors for homologous innate signaling pathways of insects and mammals in an effort to provide a framework for future studies.

  3. Biophysics and bioinformatics of transcription regulation in bacteria and bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Marko

    2005-11-01

    Due to rapid accumulation of biological data, bioinformatics has become a very important branch of biological research. In this thesis, we develop novel bioinformatic approaches and aid design of biological experiments by using ideas and methods from statistical physics. Identification of transcription factor binding sites within the regulatory segments of genomic DNA is an important step towards understanding of the regulatory circuits that control expression of genes. We propose a novel, biophysics based algorithm, for the supervised detection of transcription factor (TF) binding sites. The method classifies potential binding sites by explicitly estimating the sequence-specific binding energy and the chemical potential of a given TF. In contrast with the widely used information theory based weight matrix method, our approach correctly incorporates saturation in the transcription factor/DNA binding probability. This results in a significant reduction in the number of expected false positives, and in the explicit appearance---and determination---of a binding threshold. The new method was used to identify likely genomic binding sites for the Escherichia coli TFs, and to examine the relationship between TF binding specificity and degree of pleiotropy (number of regulatory targets). We next address how parameters of protein-DNA interactions can be obtained from data on protein binding to random oligos under controlled conditions (SELEX experiment data). We show that 'robust' generation of an appropriate data set is achieved by a suitable modification of the standard SELEX procedure, and propose a novel bioinformatic algorithm for analysis of such data. Finally, we use quantitative data analysis, bioinformatic methods and kinetic modeling to analyze gene expression strategies of bacterial viruses. We study bacteriophage Xp10 that infects rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae. Xp10 is an unusual bacteriophage, which has morphology and genome organization that most closely

  4. Mapping yeast transcriptional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Timothy R; de Boer, Carl G

    2013-09-01

    The term "transcriptional network" refers to the mechanism(s) that underlies coordinated expression of genes, typically involving transcription factors (TFs) binding to the promoters of multiple genes, and individual genes controlled by multiple TFs. A multitude of studies in the last two decades have aimed to map and characterize transcriptional networks in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We review the methodologies and accomplishments of these studies, as well as challenges we now face. For most yeast TFs, data have been collected on their sequence preferences, in vivo promoter occupancy, and gene expression profiles in deletion mutants. These systematic studies have led to the identification of new regulators of numerous cellular functions and shed light on the overall organization of yeast gene regulation. However, many yeast TFs appear to be inactive under standard laboratory growth conditions, and many of the available data were collected using techniques that have since been improved. Perhaps as a consequence, comprehensive and accurate mapping among TF sequence preferences, promoter binding, and gene expression remains an open challenge. We propose that the time is ripe for renewed systematic efforts toward a complete mapping of yeast transcriptional regulatory mechanisms.

  5. Evolution of transcriptional networks in yeast: alternative teams of transcriptional factors for different species

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Muñoz; Daniella Santos Muñoz; Aleksey Zimin; Yorke, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The diversity in eukaryotic life reflects a diversity in regulatory pathways. Nocedal and Johnson argue that the rewiring of gene regulatory networks is a major force for the diversity of life, that changes in regulation can create new species. Results We have created a method (based on our new “ping-pong algorithm) for detecting more complicated rewirings, where several transcription factors can substitute for one or more transcription factors in the regulation of a family of co-r...

  6. Themes and Variations: Regulation of RpoN-Dependent Flagellar Genes across Diverse Bacterial Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Tsang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Flagellar biogenesis in bacteria is a complex process in which the transcription of dozens of structural and regulatory genes is coordinated with the assembly of the flagellum. Although the overall process of flagellar biogenesis is conserved among bacteria, the mechanisms used to regulate flagellar gene expression vary greatly among different bacterial species. Many bacteria use the alternative sigma factor σ54 (also known as RpoN to transcribe specific sets of flagellar genes. These bacteria include members of the Epsilonproteobacteria (e.g., Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni, Gammaproteobacteria (e.g., Vibrio and Pseudomonas species, and Alphaproteobacteria (e.g., Caulobacter crescentus. This review characterizes the flagellar transcriptional hierarchies in these bacteria and examines what is known about how flagellar gene regulation is linked with other processes including growth phase, quorum sensing, and host colonization.

  7. Regulatory network operations in the Pathway Tools software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paley Suzanne M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biologists are elucidating complex collections of genetic regulatory data for multiple organisms. Software is needed for such regulatory network data. Results The Pathway Tools software supports storage and manipulation of regulatory information through a variety of strategies. The Pathway Tools regulation ontology captures transcriptional and translational regulation, substrate-level regulation of enzyme activity, post-translational modifications, and regulatory pathways. Regulatory visualizations include a novel diagram that summarizes all regulatory influences on a gene; a transcription-unit diagram, and an interactive visualization of a full transcriptional regulatory network that can be painted with gene expression data to probe correlations between gene expression and regulatory mechanisms. We introduce a novel type of enrichment analysis that asks whether a gene-expression dataset is over-represented for known regulators. We present algorithms for ranking the degree of regulatory influence of genes, and for computing the net positive and negative regulatory influences on a gene. Conclusions Pathway Tools provides a comprehensive environment for manipulating molecular regulatory interactions that integrates regulatory data with an organism’s genome and metabolic network. Curated collections of regulatory data authored using Pathway Tools are available for Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Shewanella oneidensis.

  8. Orthologous transcription factors in bacteria have different functions and regulate different genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan N Price

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors (TFs form large paralogous gene families and have complex evolutionary histories. Here, we ask whether putative orthologs of TFs, from bidirectional best BLAST hits (BBHs, are evolutionary orthologs with conserved functions. We show that BBHs of TFs from distantly related bacteria are usually not evolutionary orthologs. Furthermore, the false orthologs usually respond to different signals and regulate distinct pathways, while the few BBHs that are evolutionary orthologs do have conserved functions. To test the conservation of regulatory interactions, we analyze expression patterns. We find that regulatory relationships between TFs and their regulated genes are usually not conserved for BBHs in Escherichia coli K12 and Bacillus subtilis. Even in the much more closely related bacteria Vibrio cholerae and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, predicting regulation from E. coli BBHs has high error rates. Using gene-regulon correlations, we identify genes whose expression pattern differs between E. coli and S. oneidensis. Using literature searches and sequence analysis, we show that these changes in expression patterns reflect changes in gene regulation, even for evolutionary orthologs. We conclude that the evolution of bacterial regulation should be analyzed with phylogenetic trees, rather than BBHs, and that bacterial regulatory networks evolve more rapidly than previously thought.

  9. Regulatory Anatomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeyer, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes the term “safety logics” to understand attempts within the European Union (EU) to harmonize member state legislation to ensure a safe and stable supply of human biological material for transplants and transfusions. With safety logics, I refer to assemblages of discourses, le...... they arise. In short, I expose the regulatory anatomy of the policy landscape....

  10. A non canonical subtilase attenuates the transcriptional activation of defence responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Irene; Buscaill, Pierre; Audran, Corinne; Pouzet, Cécile; Jauneau, Alain; Rivas, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Proteases play crucial physiological functions in all organisms by controlling the lifetime of proteins. Here, we identified an atypical protease of the subtilase family [SBT5.2(b)] that attenuates the transcriptional activation of plant defence independently of its protease activity. The SBT5.2 gene produces two distinct transcripts encoding a canonical secreted subtilase [SBT5.2(a)] and an intracellular protein [SBT5.2(b)]. Concomitant to SBT5.2(a) downregulation, SBT5.2(b) expression is induced after bacterial inoculation. SBT5.2(b) localizes to endosomes where it interacts with and retains the defence-related transcription factor MYB30. Nuclear exclusion of MYB30 results in its reduced transcriptional activation and, thus, suppressed resistance. sbt5.2 mutants, with abolished SBT5.2(a) and SBT5.2(b) expression, display enhanced defence that is suppressed in a myb30 mutant background. Moreover, overexpression of SBT5.2(b), but not SBT5.2(a), in sbt5.2 plants reverts the phenotypes displayed by sbt5.2 mutants. Overall, we uncover a regulatory mode of the transcriptional activation of defence responses previously undescribed in eukaryotes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19755.001 PMID:27685353

  11. Mitotic Transcriptional Activation: Clearance of Actively Engaged Pol II via Transcriptional Elongation Control in Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kaiwei; Woodfin, Ashley R; Slaughter, Brian D; Unruh, Jay R; Box, Andrew C; Rickels, Ryan A; Gao, Xin; Haug, Jeffrey S; Jaspersen, Sue L; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-11-05

    Although it is established that some general transcription factors are inactivated at mitosis, many details of mitotic transcription inhibition (MTI) and its underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We have identified mitotic transcriptional activation (MTA) as a key regulatory step to control transcription in mitosis for genes with transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to activate and transcribe until the end of the gene to clear Pol II from mitotic chromatin, followed by global impairment of transcription reinitiation through MTI. Global nascent RNA sequencing and RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrate the existence of transcriptionally engaged Pol II in early mitosis. Both genetic and chemical inhibition of P-TEFb in mitosis lead to delays in the progression of cell division. Together, our study reveals a mechanism for MTA and MTI whereby transcriptionally engaged Pol II can progress into productive elongation and finish transcription to allow proper cellular division.

  12. Small Regulatory RNAs of Rickettsia conorii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narra, Hema P.; Schroeder, Casey L. C.; Sahni, Abha; Rojas, Mark; Khanipov, Kamil; Fofanov, Yuriy; Sahni, Sanjeev K.

    2016-01-01

    Small regulatory RNAs comprise critically important modulators of gene expression in bacteria, yet very little is known about their prevalence and functions in Rickettsia species. R. conorii, the causative agent of Mediterranean spotted fever, is a tick-borne pathogen that primarily infects microvascular endothelium in humans. We have determined the transcriptional landscape of R. conorii during infection of Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells (HMECs) by strand-specific RNA sequencing to identify 4 riboswitches, 13 trans-acting (intergenic), and 22 cis-acting (antisense) small RNAs (termed ‘Rc_sR’s). Independent expression of four novel trans-acting sRNAs (Rc_sR31, Rc_sR33, Rc_sR35, and Rc_sR42) and known bacterial sRNAs (6S, RNaseP_bact_a, ffs, and α-tmRNA) was next confirmed by Northern hybridization. Comparative analysis during infection of HMECs vis-à-vis tick AAE2 cells revealed significantly higher expression of Rc_sR35 and Rc_sR42 in HMECs, whereas Rc_sR31 and Rc_sR33 were expressed at similar levels in both cell types. We further predicted a total of 502 genes involved in all important biological processes as potential targets of Rc_sRs and validated the interaction of Rc_sR42 with cydA (cytochrome d ubiquinol oxidase subunit I). Our findings constitute the first evidence of the existence of post-transcriptional riboregulatory mechanisms in R. conorii and interactions between a novel Rc_sR and its target mRNA. PMID:27834404

  13. 乳腺癌组织学分级下目标基因提取及转录调控网络构建%Aimed genes' extraction and construction of transcription regulatory network under different grading levels of breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔薇; 李海燕; 牟晓阳; 杨旸

    2014-01-01

    目的乳腺癌类型和分级多样性导致其预后差别显著,探寻乳腺癌不同分级情况下的基因表达差异及调控关系能够为乳腺癌致病机制的发现提供重要依据。方法对不同分级下的乳腺癌基因表达数据利用快速独立成分分析( FastICA)方法提取特征基因,并结合人类蛋白质相互作用( PPI)数据选取目标基因。在此基础上,结合转录因子对靶基因调控的先验信息,利用网络成分分析( NCA)方法对与乳腺癌发病有密切关系的转录因子及其靶基因构建转录调控网络。结果筛选出的基因经过数据库验证与乳腺癌相关的占48.15%,构建的调控网络发现了多个转录因子及靶基因在不同分级情况下的活性变化趋势。结论 FastICA算法结合PPI数据提取目标基因的方法较为有效,通过NCA算法构建的转录调控网络为研究乳腺癌发生发展机制提供了新的方法。%Objective The diversities of breast cancer types and grading levels lead to distinct difference for breast cancer prognosis. Studying the gene difference expression and regulatory relationship among genes under different grading levels of breast cancer could provide an important basis for finding breast cancer pathogenesis. MethodsUsing fast independent component analysis ( FastICA ) method to extract feature genes of gene expression data of breast cancer, and then selected the aimed genes by combining with human protein-protein interaction data ( PPI) . On this basis, introducing prior information which described regulatory relationships about how transcription factors regulated their target genes, we continued to analize transcription factors and their target genes, which were closely associated with the incidence of breast cancer, by using network components analysis method ( NCA) , and then constructed a transcriptional regulatory network. Results Selected aimed gene which was closely associated with breast cancer is

  14. Growth phase- and nutrient limitation-associated transcript abundance regulation in Bordetella pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Mari M; Liew, Sin-Yee; Cummings, Craig A; Brinig, Mary M; Dieterich, Christine; Relman, David A

    2006-10-01

    To survive in a host environment, microbial pathogens must sense local conditions, including nutrient availability, and adjust their growth state and virulence functions accordingly. No comprehensive investigation of growth phase-related gene regulation in Bordetella pertussis has been reported previously. We characterized changes in genome-wide transcript abundance of B. pertussis as a function of growth phase and availability of glutamate, a key nutrient for this organism. Using a Bordetella DNA microarray, we discovered significant changes in transcript abundance for 861 array elements during the transition from log phase to stationary phase, including declining transcript levels of many virulence factor genes. The responses to glutamate depletion exhibited similarities to the responses induced by exit from log phase, including decreased virulence factor transcript levels. However, only 23% of array elements that showed at least a fourfold growth phase-associated difference in transcript abundance also exhibited glutamate depletion-associated changes, suggesting that nutrient limitation may be one of several interacting factors affecting gene regulation during stationary phase. Transcript abundance patterns of a Bvg+ phase-locked mutant revealed that the BvgAS two-component regulatory system is a key determinant of growth phase- and nutrient limitation-related transcriptional control. Several adhesin genes exhibited lower transcript abundance during stationary phase and under glutamate restriction conditions. The predicted bacterial phenotype was confirmed: adherence to bronchoepithelial cells decreased 3.3- and 4.4-fold at stationary phase and with glutamate deprivation, respectively. Growth phase and nutrient availability may serve as cues by which B. pertussis regulates virulence according to the stage of infection or the location within the human airway.

  15. Bacterial gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial gastroenteritis is present when bacteria cause an infection of the stomach and intestines ... has not been treated Many different types of bacteria can cause ... Campylobacter jejuni E coli Salmonella Shigella Staphylococcus ...

  16. Reconstruction of the core and extended regulons of global transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann S Dufour

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The processes underlying the evolution of regulatory networks are unclear. To address this question, we used a comparative genomics approach that takes advantage of the large number of sequenced bacterial genomes to predict conserved and variable members of transcriptional regulatory networks across phylogenetically related organisms. Specifically, we developed a computational method to predict the conserved regulons of transcription factors across alpha-proteobacteria. We focused on the CRP/FNR super-family of transcription factors because it contains several well-characterized members, such as FNR, FixK, and DNR. While FNR, FixK, and DNR are each proposed to regulate different aspects of anaerobic metabolism, they are predicted to recognize very similar DNA target sequences, and they occur in various combinations among individual alpha-proteobacterial species. In this study, the composition of the respective FNR, FixK, or DNR conserved regulons across 87 alpha-proteobacterial species was predicted by comparing the phylogenetic profiles of the regulators with the profiles of putative target genes. The utility of our predictions was evaluated by experimentally characterizing the FnrL regulon (a FNR-type regulator in the alpha-proteobacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Our results show that this approach correctly predicted many regulon members, provided new insights into the biological functions of the respective regulons for these regulators, and suggested models for the evolution of the corresponding transcriptional networks. Our findings also predict that, at least for the FNR-type regulators, there is a core set of target genes conserved across many species. In addition, the members of the so-called extended regulons for the FNR-type regulators vary even among closely related species, possibly reflecting species-specific adaptation to environmental and other factors. The comparative genomics approach we developed is readily applicable to other

  17. Genetic flexibility of regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunziker, Alexander; Tuboly, Csaba; Horváth, Péter; Krishna, Sandeep; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2010-07-20

    Gene regulatory networks are based on simple building blocks such as promoters, transcription factors (TFs) and their binding sites on DNA. But how diverse are the functions that can be obtained by different arrangements of promoters and TF binding sites? In this work we constructed synthetic regulatory regions using promoter elements and binding sites of two noninteracting TFs, each sensing a single environmental input signal. We show that simply by combining these three kinds of elements, we can obtain 11 of the 16 Boolean logic gates that integrate two environmental signals in vivo. Further, we demonstrate how combination of logic gates can result in new logic functions. Our results suggest that simple elements of transcription regulation form a highly flexible toolbox that can generate diverse functions under natural selection.

  18. NAC transcription factors in senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podzimska-Sroka, Dagmara; O'Shea, Charlotte; Gregersen, Per L.;

    2015-01-01

    Within the last decade, NAC transcription factors have been shown to play essential roles in senescence, which is the focus of this review. Transcriptome analyses associate approximately one third of Arabidopsis NAC genes and many crop NAC genes with senescence, thereby implicating NAC genes...... as important regulators of the senescence process. The consensus DNA binding site of the NAC domain is used to predict NAC target genes, and protein interaction sites can be predicted for the intrinsically disordered transcription regulatory domains of NAC proteins. The molecular characteristics...

  19. Transcriptional regulation of the operon encoding stress-responsive ECF sigma factor SigH and its anti-sigma factor RshA, and control of its regulatory network in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busche Tobias

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression of genes in Corynebacterium glutamicum, a Gram-positive non-pathogenic bacterium used mainly for the industrial production of amino acids, is regulated by seven different sigma factors of RNA polymerase, including the stress-responsive ECF-sigma factor SigH. The sigH gene is located in a gene cluster together with the rshA gene, putatively encoding an anti-sigma factor. The aim of this study was to analyze the transcriptional regulation of the sigH and rshA gene cluster and the effects of RshA on the SigH regulon, in order to refine the model describing the role of SigH and RshA during stress response. Results Transcription analyses revealed that the sigH gene and rshA gene are cotranscribed from four sigH housekeeping promoters in C. glutamicum. In addition, a SigH-controlled rshA promoter was found to only drive the transcription of the rshA gene. To test the role of the putative anti-sigma factor gene rshA under normal growth conditions, a C. glutamicum rshA deletion strain was constructed and used for genome-wide transcription profiling with DNA microarrays. In total, 83 genes organized in 61 putative transcriptional units, including those previously detected using sigH mutant strains, exhibited increased transcript levels in the rshA deletion mutant compared to its parental strain. The genes encoding proteins related to disulphide stress response, heat stress proteins, components of the SOS-response to DNA damage and proteasome components were the most markedly upregulated gene groups. Altogether six SigH-dependent promoters upstream of the identified genes were determined by primer extension and a refined consensus promoter consisting of 45 original promoter sequences was constructed. Conclusions The rshA gene codes for an anti-sigma factor controlling the function of the stress-responsive sigma factor SigH in C. glutamicum. Transcription of rshA from a SigH-dependent promoter may serve to quickly

  20. High-throughput, kingdom-wide prediction and annotation of bacterial non-coding RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Livny

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diverse bacterial genomes encode numerous small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs that regulate myriad biological processes. While bioinformatic algorithms have proven effective in identifying sRNA-encoding loci, the lack of tools and infrastructure with which to execute these computationally demanding algorithms has limited their utilization. Genome-wide predictions of sRNA-encoding genes have been conducted in less than 3% of all sequenced bacterial strains, leading to critical gaps in current annotations. The relative paucity of genome-wide sRNA prediction represents a critical gap in current annotations of bacterial genomes and has limited examination of larger issues in sRNA biology, such as sRNA evolution. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have developed and deployed SIPHT, a high throughput computational tool that utilizes workflow management and distributed computing to effectively conduct kingdom-wide predictions and annotations of intergenic sRNA-encoding genes. Candidate sRNA-encoding loci are identified based on the presence of putative Rho-independent terminators downstream of conserved intergenic sequences, and each locus is annotated for several features, including conservation in other species, association with one of several transcription factor binding sites and homology to any of over 300 previously identified sRNAs and cis-regulatory RNA elements. Using SIPHT, we conducted searches for putative sRNA-encoding genes in all 932 bacterial replicons in the NCBI database. These searches yielded nearly 60% of previously confirmed sRNAs, hundreds of previously annotated cis-encoded regulatory RNA elements such as riboswitches, and over 45,000 novel candidate intergenic loci. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Candidate loci were identified across all branches of the bacterial evolutionary tree, suggesting a central and ubiquitous role for RNA-mediated regulation among bacterial species. Annotation of candidate loci by SIPHT provides clues

  1. Dynamic regulation of the transcription initiation landscape at single nucleotide resolution during vertebrate embryogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Nepal (Chirag); Y. Hadzhiev (Yavor); C. Previti (Christopher); V. Haberle (Vanja); N. Li (Nan); H. Takahashi (Hiroyuki); A.M. Suzuki (Ana Maria); Y. Sheng (Ying); R.F. Abdelhamid (Rehab); S. Anand (Santosh); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); A. Akalin (Altuna); C. Kockx (Christel); A. Van Der Sloot (Antoine); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); O. Armant (Olivier); S. Rastegar (Sepand); C. Watson (Craig); U. Strähle (Uwe); E. Stupka (Elia); P. Carninci (Piero); B. Lenhard (Boris); F. Müller (Ferenc)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractSpatiotemporal control of gene expression is central to animal development. Core promoters represent a previously unanticipated regulatory level by interacting with cis-regulatory elements and transcription initiation in different physiological and developmental contexts. Here, we provid

  2. Phylogeny based discovery of regulatory elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Barak A

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Algorithms that locate evolutionarily conserved sequences have become powerful tools for finding functional DNA elements, including transcription factor binding sites; however, most methods do not take advantage of an explicit model for the constrained evolution of functional DNA sequences. Results We developed a probabilistic framework that combines an HKY85 model, which assigns probabilities to different base substitutions between species, and weight matrix models of transcription factor binding sites, which describe the probabilities of observing particular nucleotides at specific positions in the binding site. The method incorporates the phylogenies of the species under consideration and takes into account the position specific variation of transcription factor binding sites. Using our framework we assessed the suitability of alignments of genomic sequences from commonly used species as substrates for comparative genomic approaches to regulatory motif finding. We then applied this technique to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and related species by examining all possible six base pair DNA sequences (hexamers and identifying sequences that are conserved in a significant number of promoters. By combining similar conserved hexamers we reconstructed known cis-regulatory motifs and made predictions of previously unidentified motifs. We tested one prediction experimentally, finding it to be a regulatory element involved in the transcriptional response to glucose. Conclusion The experimental validation of a regulatory element prediction missed by other large-scale motif finding studies demonstrates that our approach is a useful addition to the current suite of tools for finding regulatory motifs.

  3. Mutational robustness of gene regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aalt D J van Dijk

    Full Text Available Mutational robustness of gene regulatory networks refers to their ability to generate constant biological output upon mutations that change network structure. Such networks contain regulatory interactions (transcription factor-target gene interactions but often also protein-protein interactions between transcription factors. Using computational modeling, we study factors that influence robustness and we infer several network properties governing it. These include the type of mutation, i.e. whether a regulatory interaction or a protein-protein interaction is mutated, and in the case of mutation of a regulatory interaction, the sign of the interaction (activating vs. repressive. In addition, we analyze the effect of combinations of mutations and we compare networks containing monomeric with those containing dimeric transcription factors. Our results are consistent with available data on biological networks, for example based on evolutionary conservation of network features. As a novel and remarkable property, we predict that networks are more robust against mutations in monomer than in dimer transcription factors, a prediction for which analysis of conservation of DNA binding residues in monomeric vs. dimeric transcription factors provides indirect evidence.

  4. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion...... is the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental parameters......, which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to significantly...

  5. Bacterial lipases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    1994-01-01

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation, mea

  6. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial ecology is concerned with the interactions between bacteria and their biological and nonbiological environments and with the role of bacteria in biogeochemical element cycling. Many fundamental properties of bacteria are consequences of their small size. Thus, they can efficiently exploit...

  7. A genome-wide analysis of small regulatory RNAs in the human pathogen group A Streptococcus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataly Perez

    Full Text Available The coordinated regulation of gene expression is essential for pathogens to infect and cause disease. A recently appreciated mechanism of regulation is that afforded by small regulatory RNA (sRNA molecules. Here, we set out to assess the prevalence of sRNAs in the human bacterial pathogen group A Streptococcus (GAS. Genome-wide identification of candidate GAS sRNAs was performed through a tiling Affymetrix microarray approach and identified 40 candidate sRNAs within the M1T1 GAS strain MGAS2221. Together with a previous bioinformatic approach this brings the number of novel candidate sRNAs in GAS to 75, a number that approximates the number of GAS transcription factors. Transcripts were confirmed by Northern blot analysis for 16 of 32 candidate sRNAs tested, and the abundance of several of these sRNAs were shown to be temporally regulated. Six sRNAs were selected for further study and the promoter, transcriptional start site, and Rho-independent terminator identified for each. Significant variation was observed between the six sRNAs with respect to their stability during growth, and with respect to their inter- and/or intra-serotype-specific levels of abundance. To start to assess the contribution of sRNAs to gene regulation in M1T1 GAS we deleted the previously described sRNA PEL from four clinical isolates. Data from genome-wide expression microarray, quantitative RT-PCR, and Western blot analyses are consistent with PEL having no regulatory function in M1T1 GAS. The finding that candidate sRNA molecules are prevalent throughout the GAS genome provides significant impetus to the study of this fundamental gene-regulatory mechanism in an important human pathogen.

  8. DNA topology and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzine, Fedor; Levens, David; Baranello, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is a complex assembly that compacts DNA inside the nucleus while providing the necessary level of accessibility to regulatory factors conscripted by cellular signaling systems. In this superstructure, DNA is the subject of mechanical forces applied by variety of molecular motors. Rather than being a rigid stick, DNA possesses dynamic structural variability that could be harnessed during critical steps of genome functioning. The strong relationship between DNA structure and key genomic processes necessitates the study of physical constrains acting on the double helix. Here we provide insight into the source, dynamics, and biology of DNA topological domains in the eukaryotic cells and summarize their possible involvement in gene transcription. We emphasize recent studies that might inspire and impact future experiments on the involvement of DNA topology in cellular functions.

  9. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Herrero, Daniel; Andreu Domingo, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the main cause of vaginal dysbacteriosis in the women during the reproductive age. It is an entity in which many studies have focused for years and which is still open for discussion topics. This is due to the diversity of microorganisms that cause it and therefore, its difficult treatment. Bacterial vaginosis is probably the result of vaginal colonization by complex bacterial communities, many of them non-cultivable and with interdependent metabolism where anaerobic populations most likely play an important role in its pathogenesis. The main symptoms are an increase of vaginal discharge and the unpleasant smell of it. It can lead to serious consequences for women, such as an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus and upper genital tract and pregnancy complications. Gram stain is the gold standard for microbiological diagnosis of BV, but can also be diagnosed using the Amsel clinical criteria. It should not be considered a sexually transmitted disease but it is highly related to sex. Recurrence is the main problem of medical treatment. Apart from BV, there are other dysbacteriosis less characterized like aerobic vaginitis of which further studies are coming slowly but are achieving more attention and consensus among specialists.

  10. Evolutionary aspects of plastid proteins involved in transcription: the transcription of a tiny genome is mediated by a complicated machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Yusuke; Shiina, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Chloroplasts in land plants have a small genome consisting of only 100 genes encoding partial sets of proteins for photosynthesis, transcription and translation. Although it has been thought that chloroplast transcription is mediated by a basically cyanobacterium-derived system, due to the endosymbiotic origin of plastids, recent studies suggest the existence of a hybrid transcription machinery containing non-bacterial proteins that have been newly acquired during plant evolution. Here, we highlight chloroplast-specific non-bacterial transcription mechanisms by which land plant chloroplasts have gained novel functions.

  11. GTPases involved in bacterial ribosome maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Simon; Muto, Akira; Himeno, Hyouta

    2013-05-01

    The ribosome is an RNA- and protein-based macromolecule having multiple functional domains to facilitate protein synthesis, and it is synthesized through multiple steps including transcription, stepwise cleavages of the primary transcript, modifications of ribosomal proteins and RNAs and assemblies of ribosomal proteins with rRNAs. This process requires dozens of trans-acting factors including GTP- and ATP-binding proteins to overcome several energy-consuming steps. Despite accumulation of genetic, biochemical and structural data, the entire process of bacterial ribosome synthesis remains elusive. Here, we review GTPases involved in bacterial ribosome maturation.

  12. Inferring latent gene regulatory network kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    González, Javier; Vujačić, Ivan; Wit, Ernst

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory networks consist of genes encoding transcription factors (TFs) and the genes they activate or repress. Various types of systems of ordinary differential equations (ODE) have been proposed to model these networks, ranging from linear to Michaelis-Menten approaches. In practice, a serious d

  13. HIDEN: Hierarchical decomposition of regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülsoy Günhan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factors regulate numerous cellular processes by controlling the rate of production of each gene. The regulatory relations are modeled using transcriptional regulatory networks. Recent studies have shown that such networks have an underlying hierarchical organization. We consider the problem of discovering the underlying hierarchy in transcriptional regulatory networks. Results We first transform this problem to a mixed integer programming problem. We then use existing tools to solve the resulting problem. For larger networks this strategy does not work due to rapid increase in running time and space usage. We use divide and conquer strategy for such networks. We use our method to analyze the transcriptional regulatory networks of E. coli, H. sapiens and S. cerevisiae. Conclusions Our experiments demonstrate that: (i Our method gives statistically better results than three existing state of the art methods; (ii Our method is robust against errors in the data and (iii Our method’s performance is not affected by the different topologies in the data.

  14. Multivariate Hawkes process models of the occurrence of regulatory elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, L; Sandelin, A; Winther, Ole

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A central question in molecular biology is how transcriptional regulatory elements (TREs) act in combination. Recent high-throughput data provide us with the location of multiple regulatory regions for multiple regulators, and thus with the possibility of analyzing the multivariate di...

  15. Epigenetics and bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierne, Hélène; Hamon, Mélanie; Cossart, Pascale

    2012-12-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms regulate expression of the genome to generate various cell types during development or orchestrate cellular responses to external stimuli. Recent studies highlight that bacteria can affect the chromatin structure and transcriptional program of host cells by influencing diverse epigenetic factors (i.e., histone modifications, DNA methylation, chromatin-associated complexes, noncoding RNAs, and RNA splicing factors). In this article, we first review the molecular bases of the epigenetic language and then describe the current state of research regarding how bacteria can alter epigenetic marks and machineries. Bacterial-induced epigenetic deregulations may affect host cell function either to promote host defense or to allow pathogen persistence. Thus, pathogenic bacteria can be considered as potential epimutagens able to reshape the epigenome. Their effects might generate specific, long-lasting imprints on host cells, leading to a memory of infection that influences immunity and might be at the origin of unexplained diseases.

  16. Potential RNA polymerase II-induced interactions of transcription factor TFIIB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, S; Lee, D K; Roeder, R G

    1993-10-01

    The ubiquitous transcription factor TFIIB is required for initiation by RNA polymerase II and serves as a target of some regulatory factors. The carboxy-terminal portion of TFIIB contains a large imperfect direct repeat reminiscent of the structural organization of the TATA-binding component (TBP) of TFIID, as well as sequence homology to conserved regions of bacterial sigma factors. The present study shows that the carboxy-terminal portion of TFIIB, like that of TBP, is folded into a compact protease-resistant core. The TFIIB core, unlike the TBP core, is inactive in transcription but retains structural features that enable it to form a complex with promoter-bound TFIID. The protease-susceptible amino terminus appears to contain components responsible for direct interaction with RNA polymerase II (in association with TFIIF) either on the promoter (in association with TFIID) or independently. In addition, core TFIIB (but not intact TFIIB) extends the footprint of TBP on promoter DNA, suggesting that TFIIB has a cryptic DNA-binding potential. These results are consistent with a model in which TFIIB, in a manner functionally analogous to that of bacterial sigma factors, undergoes an RNA polymerase II-dependent conformational change with resultant DNA interactions during the pathway leading to a functional preinitiation complex.

  17. The Lrp family of transcriptional regulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, A.B.; Ettema, T.J.G.; Vos, de W.M.; Oost, van der J.

    2003-01-01

    Genome analysis has revealed that members of the Lrp family of transcriptional regulators are widely distributed among prokaryotes, both bacteria and archaea. The archetype Leucine-responsive Regulatory Protein from Escherichia coli is a global regulator involved in modulating a variety of metabolic

  18. Complex regulatory network controls initial adhesion and biofilm formation in Escherichia coli via regulation of the csgD gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigent-Combaret, C; Brombacher, E; Vidal, O; Ambert, A; Lejeune, P; Landini, P; Dorel, C

    2001-12-01

    The Escherichia coli OmpR/EnvZ two-component regulatory system, which senses environmental osmolarity, also regulates biofilm formation. Up mutations in the ompR gene, such as the ompR234 mutation, stimulate laboratory strains of E. coli to grow as a biofilm community rather than in a planktonic state. In this report, we show that the OmpR234 protein promotes biofilm formation by binding the csgD promoter region and stimulating its transcription. The csgD gene encodes the transcription regulator CsgD, which in turn activates transcription of the csgBA operon encoding curli, extracellular structures involved in bacterial adhesion. Consistent with the role of the ompR gene as part of an osmolarity-sensing regulatory system, we also show that the formation of biofilm by E. coli is inhibited by increasing osmolarity in the growth medium. The ompR234 mutation counteracts adhesion inhibition by high medium osmolarity; we provide evidence that the ompR234 mutation promotes biofilm formation by strongly increasing the initial adhesion of bacteria to an abiotic surface. This increase in initial adhesion is stationary phase dependent, but it is negatively regulated by the stationary-phase-specific sigma factor RpoS. We propose that this negative regulation takes place via rpoS-dependent transcription of the transcription regulator cpxR; cpxR-mediated repression of csgB and csgD promoters is also triggered by osmolarity and by curli overproduction, in a feedback regulation loop.

  19. Histone variants in plant transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Danhua; Berger, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Chromatin based organization of eukaryotic genome plays a profound role in regulating gene transcription. Nucleosomes form the basic subunits of chromatin by packaging DNA with histone proteins, impeding the access of DNA to transcription factors and RNA polymerases. Exchange of histone variants in nucleosomes alters the properties of nucleosomes and thus modulates DNA exposure during transcriptional regulation. Growing evidence indicates the important function of histone variants in programming transcription during developmental transitions and stress response. Here we review how histone variants and their deposition machineries regulate the nucleosome stability and dynamics, and discuss the link between histone variants and transcriptional regulation in plants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Gene Regulatory Mechanisms and Networks, edited by Dr. Erich Grotewold and Dr. Nathan Springer.

  20. Alternative spliced CD1d transcripts in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambez Hajipouran Benam

    Full Text Available CD1d is a MHC I like molecule which presents glycolipid to natural killer T (NKT cells, a group of cells with diverse but critical immune regulatory functions in the immune system. These cells are required for optimal defence against bacterial, viral, protozoan, and fungal infections, and control of immune-pathology and autoimmune diseases. CD1d is expressed on antigen presenting cells but also found on some non-haematopoietic cells. However, it has not been observed on bronchial epithelium, a site of active host defence in the lungs. Here, we identify for the first time, CD1D mRNA variants and CD1d protein expression on human bronchial epithelial cells, describe six alternatively spliced transcripts of this gene in these cells; and show that these variants are specific to epithelial cells. These findings provide the basis for investigations into a role for CD1d in lung mucosal immunity.

  1. eRNAs promote transcription by establishing chromatin accessibility at defined genomic loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousavi, Kambiz; Zare, Hossein; Dell'orso, Stefania;

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors and DNA regulatory binding motifs are fundamental components of the gene regulatory network. Here, by using genome-wide binding profiling, we show extensive occupancy of transcription factors of myogenesis (MyoD and Myogenin) at extragenic enhancer regions coinciding with RN...

  2. Characterizing regulatory path motifs in integrated networks using perturbational data

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Anagha Madhusudan; Van Parys, Thomas; de Peer, Yves Van; Michoel, Tom

    2010-01-01

    We introduce Pathicular http://bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/software/details/Pathicular, a Cytoscape plugin for studying the cellular response to perturbations of transcription factors by integrating perturbational expression data with transcriptional, protein-protein and phosphorylation networks. Pathicular searches for 'regulatory path motifs', short paths in the integrated physical networks which occur significantly more often than expected between transcription factors and their targets in...

  3. FRUITING GENES OF SCHIZOPHYLLUM-COMMUNE ARE TRANSCRIPTIONALLY REGULATED

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHUREN, FHJ; VANDERLENDE, TR; WESSELS, JGH

    1993-01-01

    Fruiting genes in Schizophyllum commune are controlled by the mating-type genes and other regulatory genes. To examine whether differential accumulation of mRNAs for these fruiting genes is caused by transcriptional regulation, run-on transcription assaYs were performed with nuclei isolated from cul

  4. A central role for TFIID in the pluripotent transcription circuitry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijnappel, W.W.M.P.; Esch, D.; Baltissen, M.P.A.; Wu, G.; Mischerikow, N.; Bergsma, A.J.; Wal, E. van de; Han, D.W.; Bruch, H.; Moritz, S.; Lijnzaad, P.; Altelaar, A.F.; Sameith, K.; Zaehres, H.; Heck, A.J.R. van; Holstege, F.C.; Scholer, H.R.; Timmers, H.T.M.

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are pluripotent and characterized by open chromatin and high transcription levels, achieved through auto-regulatory and feed-forward transcription factor loops. ES-cell identity is maintained by a core of factors including Oct4 (also known as Pou5f1), Sox2, Klf4, c-Myc (OSK

  5. Genome Binding and Gene Regulation by Stem Cell Transcription Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Brandsma (Johan)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractNearly all cells of an individual organism contain the same genome. However, each cell type transcribes a different set of genes due to the presence of different sets of cell type-specific transcription factors. Such transcription factors bind to regulatory regions such as promoters

  6. Yin Yang 1: a multifaceted protein beyond a transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhiyong; Cao, Paul; Wan, Mei Mei; Sui, Guangchao

    2010-01-01

    As a transcription factor, Yin Yang 1 (YY1) regulates the transcription of a dazzling list of genes and the number of its targets still mounts. Recent studies revealed that YY1 possesses functions independent of its DNA binding activity and its regulatory role in tumorigenesis has started to emerge.

  7. Human cytomegalovirus IE2 protein interacts with transcription activating factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Jinping(徐进平); YE; Linbai(叶林柏)

    2002-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) IE86 Cdna was cloned into Pgex-2T and fusion protein GST-IE86 was expressed in E. Coli. SDS-PAGE and Western blot assay indicated that fusion protein GST-IE86 with molecular weight of 92 ku is soluble in the supernatant of cell lysate. Protein GST and fusion protein GST-IE86 were purified by affinity chromatography. The technology of co-separation and specific affinity chromatography was used to study the interactions of HCMV IE86 protein with some transcriptional regulatory proteins and transcriptional factors. The results indicated that IE86 interacts separately with transcriptional factor TFIIB and promoter DNA binding transcription trans-activating factors SP1, AP1 and AP2 to form a heterogenous protein complex. These transcriptional trans-activating factors, transcriptional factor and IE86 protein were adsorbed and retained in the affinity chromatography simultaneously. But IE86 protein could not interact with NF-Кb, suggesting that the function of IE86 protein that can interact with transcriptional factor and transcriptional trans-activating factors has no relevance to protein glycosylation. IE86 protein probably has two domains responsible for binding transcriptional trans-activating regulatory proteins and transcriptional factors respectively, thus activating the transcription of many genes. The interactions accelerated the assembly of the transcriptional initiation complexes.

  8. Transcription-dependent degradation controls the stability of the SREBP family of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundqvist, Anders; Ericsson, Johan

    2003-11-25

    Cholesterol metabolism is tightly controlled by members of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) family of transcription factors. Here we demonstrate that the ubiquitination and degradation of SREBPs depend on their transcriptional activity. Mutations in the transactivation or DNA-binding domains of SREBPs inhibit their transcriptional activity and stabilize the proteins. The transcriptional activity and degradation of these mutants are restored when fused to heterologous transactivation or DNA-binding domains. When SREBP1a was fused to the DBD of Gal4, the ubiquitination and degradation of the fusion protein depended on coexpression of a promoter-reporter gene containing Gal4-binding sites. In addition, disruption of the interaction between WT SREBP and endogenous p300/CBP resulted in inhibition of SREBP-dependent transcription and stabilization of SREBP. Chemical inhibitors of transcription reduced the degradation of transcriptionally active SREBP1a, whereas they had no effect on the stability of transcriptionally inactive mutants, demonstrating that transcriptional activation plays an important role in the degradation of SREBPs. Thus, transcription-dependent degradation of SREBP constitutes a feedback mechanism to regulate the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism and may represent a general mechanism to regulate the duration of transcriptional responses.

  9. From DNA sequence to transcriptional behaviour: a quantitative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Eran; Widom, Jonathan

    2009-07-01

    Complex transcriptional behaviours are encoded in the DNA sequences of gene regulatory regions. Advances in our understanding of these behaviours have been recently gained through quantitative models that describe how molecules such as transcription factors and nucleosomes interact with genomic sequences. An emerging view is that every regulatory sequence is associated with a unique binding affinity landscape for each molecule and, consequently, with a unique set of molecule-binding configurations and transcriptional outputs. We present a quantitative framework based on existing methods that unifies these ideas. This framework explains many experimental observations regarding the binding patterns of factors and nucleosomes and the dynamics of transcriptional activation. It can also be used to model more complex phenomena such as transcriptional noise and the evolution of transcriptional regulation.

  10. Transcription factor CTCF and mammalian genome organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotova E. S.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The CTCF transcription factor is thought to be one of the main participants in various gene regulatory networks including transcription activation and repression, formation of independently functioning chromatin domains, regulation of imprinting etc. Sequencing of human and other genomes opened up a possibility to ascertain the genomic distribution of CTCF binding sites and to identify CTCF-dependent cis-regulatory elements, including insulators. In the review, we summarized recent data on CTCF functioning within a framework of the chromatin loop domain hypothesis of large-scale regulation of the genome activity. Its fundamental properties allow CTCF to serve as a transcription factor, an insulator protein and a dispersed genome-wide demarcation tool able to recruit various factors that emerge in response to diverse external and internal signals, and thus to exert its signal-specific function(s.

  11. Battles and hijacks: noncoding transcription in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, Federico; Romero-Barrios, Natali; Jégu, Teddy; Benhamed, Moussa; Crespi, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Noncoding RNAs have emerged as major components of the eukaryotic transcriptome. Genome-wide analyses revealed the existence of thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in several plant species. Plant lncRNAs are transcribed by the plant-specific RNA polymerases Pol IV and Pol V, leading to transcriptional gene silencing, as well as by Pol II. They are involved in a wide range of regulatory mechanisms impacting on gene expression, including chromatin remodeling, modulation of alternative splicing, fine-tuning of miRNA activity, and the control of mRNA translation or accumulation. Recently, dual noncoding transcription by alternative RNA polymerases was implicated in epigenetic and chromatin conformation dynamics. This review integrates the current knowledge on the regulatory mechanisms acting through plant noncoding transcription.

  12. Battles and hijacks: Noncoding transcription in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Ariel, Federico

    2015-06-01

    Noncoding RNAs have emerged as major components of the eukaryotic transcriptome. Genome-wide analyses revealed the existence of thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in several plant species. Plant lncRNAs are transcribed by the plant-specific RNA polymerases Pol IV and Pol V, leading to transcriptional gene silencing, as well as by Pol II. They are involved in a wide range of regulatory mechanisms impacting on gene expression, including chromatin remodeling, modulation of alternative splicing, fine-tuning of miRNA activity, and the control of mRNA translation or accumulation. Recently, dual noncoding transcription by alternative RNA polymerases was implicated in epigenetic and chromatin conformation dynamics. This review integrates the current knowledge on the regulatory mechanisms acting through plant noncoding transcription. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Heritable change caused by transient transcription errors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alasdair J E Gordon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of cellular identity relies on the faithful transfer of information from the mother to the daughter cell. This process includes accurate replication of the DNA, but also the correct propagation of regulatory programs responsible for cellular identity. Errors in DNA replication (mutations and protein conformation (prions can trigger stable phenotypic changes and cause human disease, yet the ability of transient transcriptional errors to produce heritable phenotypic change ('epimutations' remains an open question. Here, we demonstrate that transcriptional errors made specifically in the mRNA encoding a transcription factor can promote heritable phenotypic change by reprogramming a transcriptional network, without altering DNA. We have harnessed the classical bistable switch in the lac operon, a memory-module, to capture the consequences of transient transcription errors in living Escherichia coli cells. We engineered an error-prone transcription sequence (A9 run in the gene encoding the lac repressor and show that this 'slippery' sequence directly increases epigenetic switching, not mutation in the cell population. Therefore, one altered transcript within a multi-generational series of many error-free transcripts can cause long-term phenotypic consequences. Thus, like DNA mutations, transcriptional epimutations can instigate heritable changes that increase phenotypic diversity, which drives both evolution and disease.

  14. Bacterial hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lauga, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass, and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micron scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically-complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, we review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  15. CoSMoS unravels mysteries of transcription initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourse, Richard L; Landick, Robert

    2012-02-17

    Using a fluorescence method called colocalization single-molecule spectroscopy (CoSMoS), Friedman and Gelles dissect the kinetics of transcription initiation at a bacterial promoter. Ultimately, CoSMoS could greatly aid the study of the effects of DNA sequence and transcription factors on both prokaryotic and eukaryotic promoters.

  16. CoSMoS Unravels Mysteries of Transcription Initiation

    OpenAIRE

    Gourse, Richard L.; Landick, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Using a fluorescence method called colocalization single-molecule spectroscopy (CoSMoS), Friedman and Gelles dissect the kinetics of transcription initiation at a bacterial promoter. Ultimately, CoSMoS could greatly aid the study of the effects of DNA sequence and transcription factors on both prokaryotic and eukaryotic promoters.

  17. Reactive oxygen species trigger a regulatory module invovled in the early responses of rice seedlings to cold stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plants respond to low temperature through an intricately coordinated transcriptional network controlled by specific groups of transcription factors. Major regulatory pathways in plants that evolved to withstand freezing by cold acclimation have been elucidated in Arabidopsis. A prominent pathway i...

  18. Multivariate Hawkes process models of the occurrence of regulatory elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, L; Sandelin, A; Winther, Ole;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A central question in molecular biology is how transcriptional regulatory elements (TREs) act in combination. Recent high-throughput data provide us with the location of multiple regulatory regions for multiple regulators, and thus with the possibility of analyzing the multivariate di...... occurrences of multiple TREs along the genome that is capable of providing new insights into dependencies among elements involved in transcriptional regulation. The method is available as an R package from http://www.math.ku.dk/~richard/ppstat/.......BACKGROUND: A central question in molecular biology is how transcriptional regulatory elements (TREs) act in combination. Recent high-throughput data provide us with the location of multiple regulatory regions for multiple regulators, and thus with the possibility of analyzing the multivariate...

  19. Molecular cloning, construction of the expression vector and detection of transcription activity of vasa regulatory regions in half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis)%半滑舌鳎vasa调控区的克隆、表达载体构建及其驱动活性检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄进强; 陈松林; 邵长伟; 刘洋; 林帆; 李亚亚; 王娜

    2015-01-01

    . However, the function of vasa gene (Csvasa) regulatory regions in tongue sole remains unknown. We aimed to isolate the regulatory regions of the Csvasa gene, examine its transcriptional activity in transgenic medaka fish, and identify the conditions required for manipulation of PGCs. Two DNA fragments, including a 5166-bp 5′region and a 1655-bp 3′region, were obtained by genome walking and polymerase chain reaction of genomic DNA. The 5′ region of Csvasa contains the major promoter region, exon 1, intron 1 and exon 2. The transcription initiation site and a putative TATA box were identified and potential transcription factor binding sites were bioinformatically analyzed. Several potential transcription factor binding sites that may perform important function relating to gene transcription, such as SRY, Oct-1, Sox-5, CREB, GATA, AP-1, C/EBP, Sp-1, c-Myc, HNF, NKX2-5, and V-Myb were predicted. Based on the above information, the Csvasa regulatory regions were inserted into a pEGFP-N3 vector lacking the CMV promoter. This vector expresses the green fluorescent protein(GFP). The recombinant pCsvasa-GFP-T plasmid was injected into medaka fertilized eggs by microinjection. Microfluoroscopy revealed that the level of GFP expression was 81% in the injected embryos. GFP-fluorescent medaka embryos were cul-tured to adult fish and the integration efficiency of pCsvasa-GFP-T was 11.5% in these samples. These results show that the Csvasa promoter can efficiently drive GFP expression in medaka embryos, and lay the foundations for identifying, labeling and tracing PGCs, investigating germ cell biology, and manipulating the sex of half-smooth tongue sole.

  20. Co-regulation of Iron Metabolism and Virulence Associated Functions by Iron and XibR, a Novel Iron Binding Transcription Factor, in the Plant Pathogen Xanthomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sheo Shankar; Patnana, Pradeep Kumar; Lomada, Santosh Kumar; Tomar, Archana; Chatterjee, Subhadeep

    2016-11-01

    Abilities of bacterial pathogens to adapt to the iron limitation present in hosts is critical to their virulence. Bacterial pathogens have evolved diverse strategies to coordinately regulate iron metabolism and virulence associated functions to maintain iron homeostasis in response to changing iron availability in the environment. In many bacteria the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) functions as transcription factor that utilize ferrous form of iron as cofactor to regulate transcription of iron metabolism and many cellular functions. However, mechanisms of fine-tuning and coordinated regulation of virulence associated function beyond iron and Fur-Fe2+ remain undefined. In this study, we show that a novel transcriptional regulator XibR (named Xanthomonas iron binding regulator) of the NtrC family, is required for fine-tuning and co-coordinately regulating the expression of several iron regulated genes and virulence associated functions in phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc). Genome wide expression analysis of iron-starvation stimulon and XibR regulon, GUS assays, genetic and functional studies of xibR mutant revealed that XibR positively regulates functions involved in iron storage and uptake, chemotaxis, motility and negatively regulates siderophore production, in response to iron. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by quantitative real-time PCR indicated that iron promoted binding of the XibR to the upstream regulatory sequence of operon's involved in chemotaxis and motility. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that purified XibR bound ferric form of iron. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that iron positively affected the binding of XibR to the upstream regulatory sequences of the target virulence genes, an effect that was reversed by ferric iron chelator deferoxamine. Taken together, these data revealed that how XibR coordinately regulates virulence associated and iron metabolism functions in Xanthomonads in

  1. Preliminary structural studies of the transcriptional regulator CmeR from Campylobacter jejuni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Chih-Chia [Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Shi, Feng [Department of Veterinary Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Gu, Ruoyu; Li, Ming [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); McDermott, Gerry [Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Yu, Edward W., E-mail: ewyu@iastate.edu [Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Zhang, Qijing [Department of Veterinary Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The transcriptional regulator CmeR from C. jejuni has been purified and crystallized and X-ray diffraction data have been collected to a resolution of 2.2 Å. In Campylobacter jejuni, a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen causing gastroenteritis in humans, the CmeR regulatory protein controls transcription of the multidrug transporter gene operon cmeABC. CmeR belongs to the TetR family of transcriptional regulators. The 210-residue CmeR consists of two functional motifs: an N-terminal DNA-binding domain and a C-terminal ligand-binding domain. It is predicted that the DNA-binding domain interacts directly with target promoters, while the C-terminal motif interacts with inducing ligands (such as bile salts). As an initial step towards confirming this structural model, recombinant CmeR protein containing a 6×His tag at the N-terminus was crystallized. Crystals of ligand-free CmeR belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 37.4, b = 57.6, c = 93.3 Å. Diffraction was observed to at least 2.2 Å at 100 K. Analysis of the detailed CmeR structure is currently in progress.

  2. Gene-Transformation-Induced Changes in Chemical Functional Group Features and Molecular Structure Conformation in Alfalfa Plants Co-Expressing Lc-bHLH and C1-MYB Transcriptive Flavanoid Regulatory Genes: Effects of Single-Gene and Two-Gene Insertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra G. Heendeniya

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. genotypes transformed with Lc-bHLH and Lc transcription genes were developed with the intention of stimulating proanthocyanidin synthesis in the aerial parts of the plant. To our knowledge, there are no studies on the effect of single-gene and two-gene transformation on chemical functional groups and molecular structure changes in these plants. The objective of this study was to use advanced molecular spectroscopy with multivariate chemometrics to determine chemical functional group intensity and molecular structure changes in alfalfa plants when co-expressing Lc-bHLH and C1-MYB transcriptive flavanoid regulatory genes in comparison with non-transgenic (NT and AC Grazeland (ACGL genotypes. The results showed that compared to NT genotype, the presence of double genes (Lc and C1 increased ratios of both the area and peak height of protein structural Amide I/II and the height ratio of α-helix to β-sheet. In carbohydrate-related spectral analysis, the double gene-transformed alfalfa genotypes exhibited lower peak heights at 1370, 1240, 1153, and 1020 cm−1 compared to the NT genotype. Furthermore, the effect of double gene transformation on carbohydrate molecular structure was clearly revealed in the principal component analysis of the spectra. In conclusion, single or double transformation of Lc and C1 genes resulted in changing functional groups and molecular structure related to proteins and carbohydrates compared to the NT alfalfa genotype. The current study provided molecular structural information on the transgenic alfalfa plants and provided an insight into the impact of transgenes on protein and carbohydrate properties and their molecular structure’s changes.

  3. The Transcription Bubble of the RNA Polymerase-Promoter Open Complex Exhibits Conformational Heterogeneity and Millisecond-Scale Dynamics : Implications for Transcription Start-Site Selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robb, Nicole C.; Cordes, Thorben; Hwang, Ling Chin; Gryte, Kristofer; Duchi, Diego; Craggs, Timothy D.; Santoso, Yusdi; Weiss, Shimon; Ebright, Richard H.; Kapanidis, Achillefs N.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial transcription is initiated after RNA polymerase (RNAP) binds to promoter DNA, melts similar to 14 bp around the transcription start site and forms a single-stranded "transcription bubble" within a catalytically active RNAP-DNA open complex (RPo). There is significant flexibility in the tra

  4. Transcriptional networks in leaf senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schippers, Jos H M

    2015-10-01

    Plant senescence is a natural phenomenon known for the appearance of beautiful autumn colors and the ripening of cereals in the field. Senescence is a controlled process that plants utilize to remobilize nutrients from source leaves to developing tissues. While during the past decades, molecular components underlying the onset of senescence have been intensively studied, knowledge remains scarce on the age-dependent mechanisms that control the onset of senescence. Recent advances have uncovered transcriptional networks regulating the competence to senesce. Here, gene regulatory networks acting as internal timing mechanisms for the onset of senescence are highlighted, illustrating that early and late leaf developmental phases are highly connected.

  5. Sequencing the transcriptional network of androgen receptor in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chng, Kern Rei; Cheung, Edwin

    2013-11-01

    The progression of prostate cancer is largely dependent on the activity of the androgen receptor (AR), which in turn, correlates with the net output of the AR transcriptional regulatory network. A detailed and thorough understanding of the AR transcriptional regulatory network is therefore critical in the strategic manipulation of AR activity for the targeted eradication of prostate cancer cells. In this mini-review, we highlight some of the novel and unexpected mechanistic and functional insights of the AR transcriptional network derived from recent targeted sequencing (ChIP-Seq) studies of AR and its coregulatory factors in prostate cancer cells.

  6. Screening Driving Transcription Factors in the Processing of Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangzhong Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Construction of the transcriptional regulatory network can provide additional clues on the regulatory mechanisms and therapeutic applications in gastric cancer. Methods. Gene expression profiles of gastric cancer were downloaded from GEO database for integrated analysis. All of DEGs were analyzed by GO enrichment and KEGG pathway enrichment. Transcription factors were further identified and then a global transcriptional regulatory network was constructed. Results. By integrated analysis of the six eligible datasets (340 cases and 43 controls, a bunch of 2327 DEGs were identified, including 2100 upregulated and 227 downregulated DEGs. Functional enrichment analysis of DEGs showed that digestion was a significantly enriched GO term for biological process. Moreover, there were two important enriched KEGG pathways: cell cycle and homologous recombination. Furthermore, a total of 70 differentially expressed TFs were identified and the transcriptional regulatory network was constructed, which consisted of 566 TF-target interactions. The top ten TFs regulating most downstream target genes were BRCA1, ARID3A, EHF, SOX10, ZNF263, FOXL1, FEV, GATA3, FOXC1, and FOXD1. Most of them were involved in the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. Conclusion. The transcriptional regulatory network can help researchers to further clarify the underlying regulatory mechanisms of gastric cancer tumorigenesis.

  7. [The Effect of Transcription on Enhancer Activity in Drosophila melanogaster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erokhin, M M; Davydova, A I; Lomaev, D V; Georgiev, P G; Chetverina, D A

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the level of gene transcription is under the control of DNA regulatory elements, such as promoter, from which transcription is initiated with the participation of RNA polymerase II and general transcription factors, as well as the enhancer, which increase the rate of transcription with the involvement of activator proteins and cofactors. It was demonstrated that enhancers are often located in the transcribed regions of the genome. We showed earlier that transcription negatively affected the activity of enhancers in Drosophila in model transgenic systems. In this study, we tested the effect of the distance between the leading promoter, enhancer, and target promoter on the inhibitory effect of transcriptions of different strengths. It was demonstrated that the negative effect of transcription remained, but weakened with increased distance between the leading promoter and enhancer and with decreased distance between the enhancer and target promoter. Thus, transcription can modulate the activity of enhancers by controlling its maximum level.

  8. Transcription factors in alkaloid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2013-01-01

    Higher plants produce a large variety of low-molecular weight secondary compounds. Among them, nitrogen-containing alkaloids are the most biologically active and are often used pharmaceutically. Whereas alkaloid chemistry has been intensively investigated, alkaloid biosynthesis, including the relevant biosynthetic enzymes, genes and their regulation, and especially transcription factors, is largely unknown, as only a limited number of plant species produce certain types of alkaloids and they are difficult to study. Recently, however, several groups have succeeded in isolating the transcription factors that are involved in the biosynthesis of several types of alkaloids, including bHLH, ERF, and WRKY. Most of them show Jasmonate (JA) responsiveness, which suggests that the JA signaling cascade plays an important role in alkaloid biosynthesis. Here, we summarize the types and functions of transcription factors that have been isolated in alkaloid biosynthesis, and characterize their similarities and differences compared to those in other secondary metabolite pathways, such as phenylpropanoid and terpenoid biosyntheses. The evolution of this biosynthetic pathway and regulatory network, as well as the application of these transcription factors to metabolic engineering, is discussed.

  9. Transcriptional networks in plant immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Kenichi; Somssich, Imre E

    2015-05-01

    Next to numerous abiotic stresses, plants are constantly exposed to a variety of pathogens within their environment. Thus, their ability to survive and prosper during the course of evolution was strongly dependent on adapting efficient strategies to perceive and to respond to such potential threats. It is therefore not surprising that modern plants have a highly sophisticated immune repertoire consisting of diverse signal perception and intracellular signaling pathways. This signaling network is intricate and deeply interconnected, probably reflecting the diverse lifestyles and infection strategies used by the multitude of invading phytopathogens. Moreover it allows signal communication between developmental and defense programs thereby ensuring that plant growth and fitness are not significantly retarded. How plants integrate and prioritize the incoming signals and how this information is transduced to enable appropriate immune responses is currently a major research area. An important finding has been that pathogen-triggered cellular responses involve massive transcriptional reprogramming within the host. Additional key observations emerging from such studies are that transcription factors (TFs) are often sites of signal convergence and that signal-regulated TFs act in concert with other context-specific TFs and transcriptional co-regulators to establish sensory transcription regulatory networks required for plant immunity.

  10. Arabidopsis WRKY33 transcription factor is required for resistance to necrotrophic fungal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zuyu; Qamar, Synan Abu; Chen, Zhixiang; Mengiste, Tesfaye

    2006-11-01

    Plant WRKY transcription factors are key regulatory components of plant responses to microbial infection. In addition to regulating the expression of defense-related genes, WRKY transcription factors have also been shown to regulate cross-talk between jasmonate- and salicylate-regulated disease response pathways. The two pathways mediate resistance against different types of microbial pathogens, and there are numerous reports of antagonistic interactions between them. Here we show that mutations of the Arabidopsis WRKY33 gene encoding a WRKY transcription factor cause enhanced susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungal pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria brassicicola concomitant with reduced expression of the jasmonate-regulated plant defensin PDF1.2 gene. Ectopic over-expression of WRKY33, on the other hand, increases resistance to the two necrotrophic fungal pathogens. The wrky33 mutants do not show altered responses to a virulent strain of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, although the ectopic expression of WRKY33 results in enhanced susceptibility to this pathogen. The susceptibility of WRKY33-over-expressing plants to P. syringae is associated with reduced expression of the salicylate-regulated PR-1 gene. The WRKY33 transcript is induced in response to pathogen infection, or treatment with salicylate or the paraquat herbicide that generates activated oxygen species in exposed cells. WRKY33 is localized to the nucleus of plant cells and recognizes DNA molecules containing the TTGACC W-box sequence. Together, these results indicate that pathogen-induced WRKY33 is an important transcription factor that regulates the antagonistic relationship between defense pathways mediating responses to P. syringae and necrotrophic pathogens.

  11. Bacterial vaginosis -- aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000687.htm Bacterial vaginosis - aftercare To use the sharing features on this ... to back after you use the bathroom. Preventing Bacterial Vaginosis You can help prevent bacterial vaginosis by: Not ...

  12. Pregnancy Complications: Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please ... this page It's been added to your dashboard . Bacterial vaginosis (also called BV or vaginitis) is an infection ...

  13. Pleiotropic action of aldosterone in epithelia mediated by transcription and post-transcription mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrey, F; Pearce, D; Pfeiffer, R; Spindler, B; Mastroberardino, L; Summa, V; Zecevic, M

    2000-04-01

    The aldosterone-induced increase in sodium reabsorption across tight epithelia can be divided schematically into two functional phases: an early regulatory phase starting after a lag period of 20 to 60 minutes, during which the pre-existing transport machinery is activated, and a late phase (>2.5 h), which can be viewed as an anabolic action leading to a further amplification/differentiation of the Na+ transport machinery. At the transcriptional level, both early and late responses are initiated during the lag period, but the functional impact of newly synthesized regulatory proteins is faster than that of the structural ones. K-Ras2 and SGK were identified as the first early aldosterone-induced regulatory proteins in A6 epithelia. Their mRNAs also were shown to be regulated in vivo by aldosterone, and their expression (constitutively active K-Ras2 and wild-type SGK) was shown to increase the function of ENaC coexpressed in Xenopus oocytes. Recently, aldosterone was also shown to act on transcription factors in A6 epithelia: It d