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Sample records for bacterial toxin inhibitors

  1. Bacterial glycosyltransferase toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jank, Thomas; Belyi, Yury; Aktories, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    Mono-glycosylation of host proteins is a common mechanism by which bacterial protein toxins manipulate cellular functions of eukaryotic target host cells. Prototypic for this group of glycosyltransferase toxins are Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, which modify guanine nucleotide-binding proteins of the Rho family. However, toxin-induced glycosylation is not restricted to the Clostridia. Various types of bacterial pathogens including Escherichia coli, Yersinia, Photorhabdus and Legionella species produce glycosyltransferase toxins. Recent studies discovered novel unexpected variations in host protein targets and amino acid acceptors of toxin-catalysed glycosylation. These findings open new perspectives in toxin as well as in carbohydrate research.

  2. Autoproteolytic Activation of Bacterial Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee Shen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Protease domains within toxins typically act as the primary effector domain within target cells. By contrast, the primary function of the cysteine protease domain (CPD in Multifunctional Autoprocessing RTX-like (MARTX and Clostridium sp. glucosylating toxin families is to proteolytically cleave the toxin and release its cognate effector domains. The CPD becomes activated upon binding to the eukaryotic-specific small molecule, inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP6, which is found abundantly in the eukaryotic cytosol. This property allows the CPD to spatially and temporally regulate toxin activation, making it a prime candidate for developing anti-toxin therapeutics. In this review, we summarize recent findings related to defining the regulation of toxin function by the CPD and the development of inhibitors to prevent CPD-mediated activation of bacterial toxins.

  3. Inhibiting bacterial toxins by channel blockage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezrukov, Sergey M; Nestorovich, Ekaterina M

    2016-03-01

    Emergent rational drug design techniques explore individual properties of target biomolecules, small and macromolecule drug candidates, and the physical forces governing their interactions. In this minireview, we focus on the single-molecule biophysical studies of channel-forming bacterial toxins that suggest new approaches for their inhibition. We discuss several examples of blockage of bacterial pore-forming and AB-type toxins by the tailor-made compounds. In the concluding remarks, the most effective rationally designed pore-blocking antitoxins are compared with the small-molecule inhibitors of ion-selective channels of neurophysiology.

  4. Food irradiation and bacterial toxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tranter, H.S.; Modi, N.K.; Hambleton, P.; Melling, J.; Rose, S.; Stringer, M.F.

    1987-07-04

    The authors' findings indicate that irradiation confers no advantage over heat processing in respect of bacterial toxins (clostridium botulinum, neurotoxin A and staphylococcal enterotoxin A). It follows that irradiation at doses less than the ACINF recommended upper limit of 10 kGy could not be used to improve the ambient temperature shelf life on non-acid foods.

  5. Rho-modifying bacterial protein toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktories, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    Rho proteins are targets of numerous bacterial protein toxins, which manipulate the GTP-binding proteins by covalent modifications, including ADP ribosylation, glycosylation, adenylylation, proteolytic cleavage and deamidation. Bacterial toxins are important virulence factors but are also potent and efficient pharmacological tools to study the physiological functions of their eukaryotic targets. Recent studies indicate that amazing variations exist in the molecular mechanisms by which toxins attack Rho proteins, which are discussed here.

  6. Designing Inhibitors of Anthrax Toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestorovich, Ekaterina M.; Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Present-day rational drug design approaches are based on exploiting unique features of the target biomolecules, small- or macromolecule drug candidates, and physical forces that govern their interactions. The 2013 Nobel Prize in chemistry awarded “for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems” once again demonstrated the importance of the tailored drug discovery that reduces the role of the trial and error approach to a minimum. The “rational drug design” term is rather comprehensive as it includes all contemporary methods of drug discovery where serendipity and screening are substituted by the information-guided search for new and existing compounds. Successful implementation of these innovative drug discovery approaches is inevitably preceded by learning the physics, chemistry, and physiology of functioning of biological structures under normal and pathological conditions. Areas covered This article provides an overview of the recent rational drug design approaches to discover inhibitors of anthrax toxin. Some of the examples include small-molecule and peptide-based post-exposure therapeutic agents as well as several polyvalent compounds. The review also directs the reader to the vast literature on the recognized advances and future possibilities in the field. Expert opinion Existing options to combat anthrax toxin lethality are limited. With the only anthrax toxin inhibiting therapy (PA-targeting with a monoclonal antibody, raxibacumab) approved to treat inhalational anthrax, in our view, the situation is still insecure. The FDA’s animal rule for drug approval, which clears compounds without validated efficacy studies on humans, creates a high level of uncertainty, especially when a well-characterized animal model does not exist. Besides, unlike PA, which is known to be unstable, LF remains active in cells and in animal tissues for days. Therefore, the effectiveness of the post-exposure treatment of the individuals

  7. Novel receptors for bacterial protein toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Gudula; Papatheodorou, Panagiotis; Aktories, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    While bacterial effectors are often directly introduced into eukaryotic target cells by various types of injection machines, toxins enter the cytosol of host cells from endosomal compartments or after retrograde transport via Golgi from the ER. A first crucial step of toxin-host interaction is receptor binding. Using optimized protocols and new methods novel toxin receptors have been identified, including metalloprotease ADAM 10 for Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin, laminin receptor Lu/BCAM for Escherichia coli cytotoxic necrotizing factor CNF1, lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) for Clostridium difficile transferase CDT and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) 1 for Clostridium perfringens TpeL toxin.

  8. Bacterial protein toxins in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosadi, Francesca; Fiorentini, Carla; Fabbri, Alessia

    2016-02-01

    Many bacteria causing persistent infections produce toxins whose mechanisms of action indicate that they could have a role in carcinogenesis. Some toxins, like CDT and colibactin, directly attack the genome by damaging DNA whereas others, as for example CNF1, CagA and BFT, impinge on key eukaryotic processes, such as cellular signalling and cell death. These bacterial toxins, together with other less known toxins, mimic carcinogens and tumour promoters. The aim of this review is to fulfil an up-to-date analysis of toxins with carcinogenic potential that have been already correlated to human cancers. Bacterial toxins-induced carcinogenesis represents an emerging aspect in bacteriology, and its significance is increasingly recognized.

  9. Developing New Tools for the in vivo Generation/Screening of Cyclic Peptide Libraries. A New Combinatorial Approach for the Detection of Bacterial Toxin Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarero, J A

    2006-11-28

    A new combinatorial approach for the biosynthesis and screening of small drug-like toxin inhibitors inside living cells is presented. This approach has been initially used as proof of principle for finding inhibitors against the LF factor from Bacillus anthracis. Key to our ''living combinatorial'' approach is the use of a living cell as a micro-chemical factory for both synthesis and screening of potential inhibitors for a given molecular recognition event (see Scheme 1). This powerful technique posses the advantage that both processes synthesis and screening happen inside the cell thus accelerating the whole screening/selection process.

  10. THE SYNERGY OF BACTERIAL TOXINS,

    Science.gov (United States)

    TOXINS AND ANTITOXINS, STRENGTH(PHYSIOLOGY), BACTERIA, CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS, CLOSTRIDIUM TETANI , CLOSTRIDIUM , STAPHYLOCOCCUS, ESCHERICHIA COLI, PROTEUS, ETIOLOGY, ANTIGENS, ANTIBODIES, AMINO ACIDS.

  11. Bacterial Toxins as Pathogen Weapons Against Phagocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Vale, Ana; Cabanes, Didier; Sousa, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial toxins are virulence factors that manipulate host cell functions and take over the control of vital processes of living organisms to favor microbial infection. Some toxins directly target innate immune cells, thereby annihilating a major branch of the host immune response. In this review we will focus on bacterial toxins that act from the extracellular milieu and hinder the function of macrophages and neutrophils. In particular, we will concentrate on toxins from Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that manipulate cell signaling or induce cell death by either imposing direct damage to the host cells cytoplasmic membrane or enzymatically modifying key eukaryotic targets. Outcomes regarding pathogen dissemination, host damage and disease progression will be discussed.

  12. Bacterial toxins as pathogen weapons against phagocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana edo Vale

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial toxins are virulence factors that manipulate host cell functions and take over the control of vital processes of living organisms to favour microbial infection. Some toxins directly target innate immune cells, thereby annihilating a major branch of the host immune response. In this review we will focus on bacterial toxins that act from the extracellular milieu and hinder the function of macrophages and neutrophils. In particular, we will concentrate on toxins from Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that manipulate cell signalling or induce cell death by either imposing direct damage to the host cells cytoplasmic membrane or enzymatically modifying key eukaryotic targets. Outcomes regarding pathogen dissemination, host damage and disease progression will be discussed.

  13. Bacterial protein toxins : tools to study mammalian molecular cell biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wüthrich, I.W.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial protein toxins are genetically encoded proteinaceous macromolecules that upon exposure causes perturbation of cellular metabolism in a susceptible host. A bacterial toxin can work at a distance from the site of infection, and has direct and quantifiable actions. Bacterial protein toxins ca

  14. The most important marine bacterial toxins; a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Najafi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bacterial toxins are toxic compounds which are produced in order to present microbial pathogenicity or to combat with the host immune system response. There is a cumulating evidence indicating bacterial origin for marine toxins such as tetrodotoxin, palytoxin, neosurugatoxin, etc. The most important marine toxins produced by different marine bacteria, their origin, structure and mechanisms of action were evaluated in a systematic review. Materials & Methods: Marine bacteria, marine bacterial toxins, and their mechanisms of action and structure were keywords for a comprehensive search in online databases including Pubmed, Science Direct, Google Scholar and Scirus. A total of 120 papers were evaluated, however, by omitting similar reports, 103 papers were included in the study. Results: The most of marine bacterial toxins are classified in one of the following groups: neurotoxins, hepatotoxins and cytotoxins. These toxins have distinct mechanisms of action including blocking of sodium channels in nerve cells, functioning as agonists of acetylcholine receptors, inhibiting of membrane pumps, the inhibition of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A types' enzyme activities and inhibiting of protein synthesis. Conclusion: The clarification of the marine bacterial toxins structures and their mechanisms of action may be helpful for novel drug design, therapeutic measures and to overcome against bacterial pathogenicity.

  15. Retrocyclins neutralize bacterial toxins by potentiating their unfolding.

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    Kudryashova, Elena; Seveau, Stephanie; Lu, Wuyuan; Kudryashov, Dmitri S

    2015-04-15

    Defensins are a class of immune peptides with a broad range of activities against bacterial, fungal and viral pathogens. Besides exerting direct anti-microbial activity via dis-organization of bacterial membranes, defensins are also able to neutralize various unrelated bacterial toxins. Recently, we have demonstrated that in the case of human α- and β-defensins, this later ability is achieved through exploiting toxins' marginal thermodynamic stability, i.e. defensins act as molecular anti-chaperones unfolding toxin molecules and exposing their hydrophobic regions and thus promoting toxin precipitation and inactivation [Kudryashova et al. (2014) Immunity 41, 709-721]. Retrocyclins (RCs) are humanized synthetic θ-defensin peptides that possess unique cyclic structure, differentiating them from α- and β-defensins. Importantly, RCs are more potent against some bacterial and viral pathogens and more stable than their linear counterparts. However, the mechanism of bacterial toxin inactivation by RCs is not known. In the present study, we demonstrate that RCs facilitate unfolding of bacterial toxins. Using differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF), limited proteolysis and collisional quenching of internal tryptophan fluorescence, we show that hydrophobic regions of toxins normally buried in the molecule interior become more exposed to solvents and accessible to proteolytic cleavage in the presence of RCs. The RC-induced unfolding of toxins led to their precipitation and abrogated activity. Toxin inactivation by RCs was strongly diminished under reducing conditions, but preserved at physiological salt and serum concentrations. Therefore, despite significant structural diversity, α-, β- and θ-defensins employ similar mechanisms of toxin inactivation, which may be shared by anti-microbial peptides from other families.

  16. Host defenses against bacterial pore-forming toxins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Los, F.C.O.

    2011-01-01

    Pore-forming toxins (PFTs), the most common bacterial toxins, contribute to infection by perforating host cell membranes. Excessive use and lack of new development of antibiotics are causing increasing numbers of drug-resistant bacteria, like methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and My

  17. Interactions between Autophagy and Bacterial Toxins: Targets for Therapy?

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    Jacques Mathieu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a physiological process involved in defense mechanisms for clearing intracellular bacteria. The autophagic pathway is finely regulated and bacterial toxins interact with this process in a complex manner. Bacterial toxins also interact significantly with many biochemical processes. Evaluations of the effects of bacterial toxins, such as endotoxins, pore-forming toxins and adenylate cyclases, on autophagy could support the development of new strategies for counteracting bacterial pathogenicity. Treatment strategies could focus on drugs that enhance autophagic processes to improve the clearance of intracellular bacteria. However, further in vivo studies are required to decipher the upregulation of autophagy and potential side effects limiting such approaches. The capacity of autophagy activation strategies to improve the outcome of antibiotic treatment should be investigated in the future.

  18. Interactions between Autophagy and Bacterial Toxins: Targets for Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Jacques

    2015-08-04

    Autophagy is a physiological process involved in defense mechanisms for clearing intracellular bacteria. The autophagic pathway is finely regulated and bacterial toxins interact with this process in a complex manner. Bacterial toxins also interact significantly with many biochemical processes. Evaluations of the effects of bacterial toxins, such as endotoxins, pore-forming toxins and adenylate cyclases, on autophagy could support the development of new strategies for counteracting bacterial pathogenicity. Treatment strategies could focus on drugs that enhance autophagic processes to improve the clearance of intracellular bacteria. However, further in vivo studies are required to decipher the upregulation of autophagy and potential side effects limiting such approaches. The capacity of autophagy activation strategies to improve the outcome of antibiotic treatment should be investigated in the future.

  19. Fold modulating function: Bacterial toxins to functional amyloids

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    Adnan Khawaja Syed

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteria produce cytolytic toxins that target host cells or other competing microbes. It is well known that environmental factors control toxin expression, however recent work suggests that some bacteria manipulate the fold of these protein toxins to control their function. The β-sheet rich amyloid fold is a highly stable ordered aggregate that many toxins form in response to specific environmental conditions. When in the amyloid state, toxins become inert, losing the cytolytic activity they display in the soluble form. Emerging evidence suggest that some amyloids function as toxin storage systems until they are again needed, while other bacteria utilize amyloids as a structural matrix component of biofilms. This amyloid matrix component facilitates resistance to biofilm disruptive challenges. The bacterial amyloids discussed in this review reveal an elegant system where changes in protein fold and solubility dictate the function of proteins in response to the environment.

  20. Stealth and mimicry by deadly bacterial toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yates, S.P.; Jørgensen, Rene; Andersen, Gregers Rom;

    2006-01-01

    Diphtheria toxin and exotoxin A are well-characterized members of the ADP-ribosyltransferase toxin family that serve as virulence factors in the pathogenic bacteria, Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.  New high-resolution structural data of the Michaelis complex...

  1. Hijacking mitochondria: bacterial toxins that modulate mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jhih-Hang; Tong, Janette; Gabriel, Kipros

    2012-05-01

    Bacterial infection has enormous global social and economic impacts stemming from effects on human health and agriculture. Although there are still many unanswered questions, decades of research has uncovered many of the pathogenic mechanisms at play. It is now clear that bacterial pathogens produce a plethora of proteins known as "toxins" and "effectors" that target a variety of physiological host processes during the course of infection. One of the targets of host targeted bacterial toxins and effectors are the mitochondria. The mitochondrial organelles are major players in many biological functions, including energy conversion to ATP and cell death pathways, which inherently makes them targets for bacterial proteins. We present a summary of the toxins targeted to mitochondria and for those that have been studied in finer detail, we also summarize what we know about the mechanisms of targeting and finally their action at the organelle.

  2. Tetra- versus Pentavalent Inhibitors of Cholera Toxin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, Ou; Pukin, Aliaksei V.; Quarles Van Ufford, Linda; Branson, Thomas R.; Thies-Weesie, Dominique M E; Turnbull, W. Bruce; Visser, Gerben M.; Pieters, Roland J.

    2015-01-01

    The five B-subunits (CTB5) of the Vibrio cholerae (cholera) toxin can bind to the intestinal cell surface so the entire AB5 toxin can enter the cell. Simultaneous binding can occur on more than one of the monosialotetrahexosylganglioside (GM1) units present on the cell surface.

  3. Channel-forming bacterial toxins in biosensing and macromolecule delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnev, Philip A; Nestorovich, Ekaterina M

    2014-08-21

    To intoxicate cells, pore-forming bacterial toxins are evolved to allow for the transmembrane traffic of different substrates, ranging from small inorganic ions to cell-specific polypeptides. Recent developments in single-channel electrical recordings, X-ray crystallography, protein engineering, and computational methods have generated a large body of knowledge about the basic principles of channel-mediated molecular transport. These discoveries provide a robust framework for expansion of the described principles and methods toward use of biological nanopores in the growing field of nanobiotechnology. This article, written for a special volume on "Intracellular Traffic and Transport of Bacterial Protein Toxins", reviews the current state of applications of pore-forming bacterial toxins in small- and macromolecule-sensing, targeted cancer therapy, and drug delivery. We discuss the electrophysiological studies that explore molecular details of channel-facilitated protein and polymer transport across cellular membranes using both natural and foreign substrates. The review focuses on the structurally and functionally different bacterial toxins: gramicidin A of Bacillus brevis, α-hemolysin of Staphylococcus aureus, and binary toxin of Bacillus anthracis, which have found their "second life" in a variety of developing medical and technological applications.

  4. Emerging Roles of Toxin-Antitoxin Modules in Bacterial Pathogenesis

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    Barbara Kędzierska

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Toxin-antitoxin (TA cassettes are encoded widely by bacteria. The modules typically comprise a protein toxin and protein or RNA antitoxin that sequesters the toxin factor. Toxin activation in response to environmental cues or other stresses promotes a dampening of metabolism, most notably protein translation, which permits survival until conditions improve. Emerging evidence also implicates TAs in bacterial pathogenicity. Bacterial persistence involves entry into a transient semi-dormant state in which cells survive unfavorable conditions including killing by antibiotics, which is a significant clinical problem. TA complexes play a fundamental role in inducing persistence by downregulating cellular metabolism. Bacterial biofilms are important in numerous chronic inflammatory and infectious diseases and cause serious therapeutic problems due to their multidrug tolerance and resistance to host immune system actions. Multiple TAs influence biofilm formation through a network of interactions with other factors that mediate biofilm production and maintenance. Moreover, in view of their emerging contributions to bacterial virulence, TAs are potential targets for novel prophylactic and therapeutic approaches that are required urgently in an era of expanding antibiotic resistance. This review summarizes the emerging evidence that implicates TAs in the virulence profiles of a diverse range of key bacterial pathogens that trigger serious human disease.

  5. Identification of inhibitors against the potential ligandable sites in the active cholera toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangopadhyay, Aditi; Datta, Abhijit

    2015-04-01

    The active cholera toxin responsible for the massive loss of water and ions in cholera patients via its ADP ribosylation activity is a heterodimer of the A1 subunit of the bacterial holotoxin and the human cytosolic ARF6 (ADP Ribosylation Factor 6). The active toxin is a potential target for the design of inhibitors against cholera. In this study we identified the potential ligandable sites of the active cholera toxin which can serve as binding sites for drug-like molecules. By employing an energy-based approach to identify ligand binding sites, and comparison with the results of computational solvent mapping, we identified two potential ligandable sites in the active toxin which can be targeted during structure-based drug design against cholera. Based on the probe affinities of the identified ligandable regions, docking-based virtual screening was employed to identify probable inhibitors against these sites. Several indole-based alkaloids and phosphates showed strong interactions to the important residues of the ligandable region at the A1 active site. On the other hand, 26 top scoring hits were identified against the ligandable region at the A1 ARF6 interface which showed strong hydrogen bonding interactions, including guanidines, phosphates, Leucopterin and Aristolochic acid VIa. This study has important implications in the application of hybrid structure-based and ligand-based methods against the identified ligandable sites using the identified inhibitors as reference ligands, for drug design against the active cholera toxin.

  6. Bithionol blocks pathogenicity of bacterial toxins, ricin, and Zika virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disease pathways form overlapping networks, and hub proteins represent attractive targets for broad-spectrum drugs. Using bacterial toxins as a proof of concept, we describe a new approach of discovering broad-spectrum therapies capable of inhibiting host proteins that mediate multiple pathogenic pa...

  7. Channel-Forming Bacterial Toxins in Biosensing and Macromolecule Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip A. Gurnev

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available To intoxicate cells, pore-forming bacterial toxins are evolved to allow for the transmembrane traffic of different substrates, ranging from small inorganic ions to cell-specific polypeptides. Recent developments in single-channel electrical recordings, X-ray crystallography, protein engineering, and computational methods have generated a large body of knowledge about the basic principles of channel-mediated molecular transport. These discoveries provide a robust framework for expansion of the described principles and methods toward use of biological nanopores in the growing field of nanobiotechnology. This article, written for a special volume on “Intracellular Traffic and Transport of Bacterial Protein Toxins”, reviews the current state of applications of pore-forming bacterial toxins in small- and macromolecule-sensing, targeted cancer therapy, and drug delivery. We discuss the electrophysiological studies that explore molecular details of channel-facilitated protein and polymer transport across cellular membranes using both natural and foreign substrates. The review focuses on the structurally and functionally different bacterial toxins: gramicidin A of Bacillus brevis, α-hemolysin of Staphylococcus aureus, and binary toxin of Bacillus anthracis, which have found their “second life” in a variety of developing medical and technological applications.

  8. Bioassays for evaluation of medical products derived from bacterial toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesardic, Thea

    2012-06-01

    Bioassays play central role in evaluation of biological products and those derived from bacterial toxins often rely exclusively on in vivo models for assurance of safety and potency. This chapter reviews existing regulatory approved methods designed to provide information on potency and safety of complex biological medicines with an insight into strategies considered for alternative procedures.

  9. Functional characterization of cholera toxin inhibitors using human intestinal organoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomer-van Ommen, Domenique D.; Pukin, Aliaksei V.; Fu, Ou; Quarles Van Ufford, Linda H C; Janssens, Hettie M.; Beekman, Jeffrey M.; Pieters, Roland J.

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical drug testing in primary human cell models that recapitulate disease can significantly reduce animal experimentation and time-to-the-clinic. We used intestinal organoids to quantitatively study the potency of multivalent cholera toxin inhibitors. The method enabled the determination of IC

  10. Discovery of inhibitors of bacterial histidine kinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velikova, N.R.

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of Inhibitors of Bacterial Histidine Kinases

    Summary

    The thesis is on novel antibacterial drug discovery (http://youtu.be/NRMWOGgeysM). Using structure-based and fragment-based dru

  11. Heterologous Expression of Toxins from Bacterial Toxin-Antitoxin Systems in Eukaryotic Cells: Strategies and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chew Chieng Yeo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Toxin-antitoxin (TA systems are found in nearly all prokaryotic genomes and usually consist of a pair of co-transcribed genes, one of which encodes a stable toxin and the other, its cognate labile antitoxin. Certain environmental and physiological cues trigger the degradation of the antitoxin, causing activation of the toxin, leading either to the death or stasis of the host cell. TA systems have a variety of functions in the bacterial cell, including acting as mediators of programmed cell death, the induction of a dormant state known as persistence and the stable maintenance of plasmids and other mobile genetic elements. Some bacterial TA systems are functional when expressed in eukaryotic cells and this has led to several innovative applications, which are the subject of this review. Here, we look at how bacterial TA systems have been utilized for the genetic manipulation of yeasts and other eukaryotes, for the containment of genetically modified organisms, and for the engineering of high expression eukaryotic cell lines. We also examine how TA systems have been adopted as an important tool in developmental biology research for the ablation of specific cells and the potential for utility of TA systems in antiviral and anticancer gene therapies.

  12. Heterologous Expression of Toxins from Bacterial Toxin-Antitoxin Systems in Eukaryotic Cells: Strategies and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Chew Chieng; Abu Bakar, Fauziah; Chan, Wai Ting; Espinosa, Manuel; Harikrishna, Jennifer Ann

    2016-02-19

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are found in nearly all prokaryotic genomes and usually consist of a pair of co-transcribed genes, one of which encodes a stable toxin and the other, its cognate labile antitoxin. Certain environmental and physiological cues trigger the degradation of the antitoxin, causing activation of the toxin, leading either to the death or stasis of the host cell. TA systems have a variety of functions in the bacterial cell, including acting as mediators of programmed cell death, the induction of a dormant state known as persistence and the stable maintenance of plasmids and other mobile genetic elements. Some bacterial TA systems are functional when expressed in eukaryotic cells and this has led to several innovative applications, which are the subject of this review. Here, we look at how bacterial TA systems have been utilized for the genetic manipulation of yeasts and other eukaryotes, for the containment of genetically modified organisms, and for the engineering of high expression eukaryotic cell lines. We also examine how TA systems have been adopted as an important tool in developmental biology research for the ablation of specific cells and the potential for utility of TA systems in antiviral and anticancer gene therapies.

  13. Bithionol blocks pathogenicity of bacterial toxins, ricin, and Zika virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, William; Zilbermintz, Leeor; Cheng, Luisa W.; Zozaya, Josue; Tran, Sharon H.; Elliott, Jeffrey H.; Polukhina, Kseniya; Manasherob, Robert; Li, Amy; Chi, Xiaoli; Gharaibeh, Dima; Kenny, Tara; Zamani, Rouzbeh; Soloveva, Veronica; Haddow, Andrew D.; Nasar, Farooq; Bavari, Sina; Bassik, Michael C.; Cohen, Stanley N.; Levitin, Anastasia; Martchenko, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Diverse pathogenic agents often utilize overlapping host networks, and hub proteins within these networks represent attractive targets for broad-spectrum drugs. Using bacterial toxins, we describe a new approach for discovering broad-spectrum therapies capable of inhibiting host proteins that mediate multiple pathogenic pathways. This approach can be widely used, as it combines genetic-based target identification with cell survival-based and protein function-based multiplex drug screens, and concurrently discovers therapeutic compounds and their protein targets. Using B-lymphoblastoid cells derived from the HapMap Project cohort of persons of African, European, and Asian ancestry we identified host caspases as hub proteins that mediate the lethality of multiple pathogenic agents. We discovered that an approved drug, Bithionol, inhibits host caspases and also reduces the detrimental effects of anthrax lethal toxin, diphtheria toxin, cholera toxin, Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A, Botulinum neurotoxin, ricin, and Zika virus. Our study reveals the practicality of identifying host proteins that mediate multiple disease pathways and discovering broad-spectrum therapies that target these hub proteins. PMID:27686742

  14. Bacterial meningitis and diseases caused by bacterial toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rings, D M

    1987-03-01

    Bacterial meningitis most commonly occurs in young calves secondary to septicemia. Clinical signs of hyperirritability are usually seen. Meningitis can be confirmed by cerebrospinal fluid analysis and culture or by necropsy. Intoxications by the exotoxins of Clostridium perfringens types C and D, C. botulinum, and C. tetani are difficult to confirm. The clinical signs of these intoxications vary from flaccid paralysis (botulism) to muscular rigidity (tetanus). Treatment of affected cattle has been unrewarding in botulism and enterotoxemia, whereas early aggressive treatment of tetanus cases can often be successfully resolved. Botulism and enterotoxemia can be proved using mouse inoculation tests, whereas tetanus is diagnosed largely by ruling out other diseases.

  15. Cationic PAMAM dendrimers as pore-blocking binary toxin inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förstner, Philip; Bayer, Fabienne; Kalu, Nnanya; Felsen, Susanne; Förtsch, Christina; Aloufi, Abrar; Ng, David Y W; Weil, Tanja; Nestorovich, Ekaterina M; Barth, Holger

    2014-07-14

    Dendrimers are unique highly branched macromolecules with numerous groundbreaking biomedical applications under development. Here we identified poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers as novel blockers for the pore-forming B components of the binary anthrax toxin (PA63) and Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin (C2IIa). These pores are essential for delivery of the enzymatic A components of the internalized toxins from endosomes into the cytosol of target cells. We demonstrate that at low μM concentrations cationic PAMAM dendrimers block PA63 and C2IIa to inhibit channel-mediated transport of the A components, thereby protecting HeLa and Vero cells from intoxication. By channel reconstitution and high-resolution current recording, we show that the PAMAM dendrimers obstruct transmembrane PA63 and C2IIa pores in planar lipid bilayers at nM concentrations. These findings suggest a new potential role for the PAMAM dendrimers as effective polyvalent channel-blocking inhibitors, which can protect human target cells from intoxication with binary toxins from pathogenic bacteria.

  16. Staphylococcus aureus α toxin potentiates opportunistic bacterial lung infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Taylor S; Hilliard, Jamese J; Jones-Nelson, Omari; Keller, Ashley E; O'Day, Terrence; Tkaczyk, Christine; DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Hamilton, Melissa; Pelletier, Mark; Wang, Qun; Diep, Binh An; Le, Vien T M; Cheng, Lily; Suzich, JoAnn; Stover, C Kendall; Sellman, Bret R

    2016-03-01

    Broad-spectrum antibiotic use may adversely affect a patient's beneficial microbiome and fuel cross-species spread of drug resistance. Although alternative pathogen-specific approaches are rationally justified, a major concern for this precision medicine strategy is that co-colonizing or co-infecting opportunistic bacteria may still cause serious disease. In a mixed-pathogen lung infection model, we find that the Staphylococcus aureus virulence factor α toxin potentiates Gram-negative bacterial proliferation, systemic spread, and lethality by preventing acidification of bacteria-containing macrophage phagosomes, thereby reducing effective killing of both S. aureus and Gram-negative bacteria. Prophylaxis or early treatment with a single α toxin neutralizing monoclonal antibody prevented proliferation of co-infecting Gram-negative pathogens and lethality while also promoting S. aureus clearance. These studies suggest that some pathogen-specific, antibody-based approaches may also work to reduce infection risk in patients colonized or co-infected with S. aureus and disparate drug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial opportunists.

  17. Selectivity and self-assembly in the control of a bacterial toxin by an antitoxic noncoding RNA pseudoknot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Francesca L; Pei, Xue Y; Blower, Tim R; Ong, Shue-Li; Fineran, Peter C; Luisi, Ben F; Salmond, George P C

    2013-01-15

    Bacterial small RNAs perform numerous regulatory roles, including acting as antitoxic components in toxin-antitoxin systems. In type III toxin-antitoxin systems, small processed RNAs directly antagonize their toxin protein partners, and in the systems characterized the toxin and antitoxin components together form a trimeric assembly. In the present study, we sought to define how the RNA antitoxin, ToxI, inhibits its potentially lethal protein partner, ToxN. We show through cross-inhibition experiments with the ToxIN systems from Pectobacterium atrosepticum (ToxIN(Pa)) and Bacillus thuringiensis (ToxIN(Bt)) that ToxI RNAs are highly selective enzyme inhibitors. Both systems have an "addictive" plasmid maintenance phenotype. We demonstrate that ToxI(Pa) can inhibit ToxN(Pa) in vitro both in its processed form and as a repetitive precursor RNA, and this inhibition is linked to the self-assembly of the trimeric complex. Inhibition and self-assembly are both mediated entirely by the ToxI(Pa) RNA, with no requirement for cellular factors or exogenous energy. Finally, we explain the origins of ToxI antitoxin selectivity through our crystal structure of the ToxIN(Bt) complex. Our results show how a processed RNA pseudoknot can inhibit a deleterious protein with exquisite molecular specificity and how these self-contained and addictive RNA-protein pairs can confer different adaptive benefits in their bacterial hosts.

  18. Bacterial toxin-antitoxin gene system as containment control in yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, P.; Jensen, G. B.; Gerdes, K.;

    2000-01-01

    The potential of a bacterial toxin-antitoxin gene system for use in containment control in eukaryotes was explored. The Escherichia coli relE and relB genes were expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Expression of the relE gene was highly toxic to yeast cells. However, expression...... of the relB gene counteracted the effect of relE to some extent, suggesting that toxin-antitoxin interaction also occurs in S. cerevisiae, Thus, bacterial toxin-antitoxin gene systems also have potential applications in the control of cell proliferation in eukaryotic cells, especially in those industrial...

  19. Pore-Forming Toxins Induce Macrophage Necroptosis during Acute Bacterial Pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norberto González-Juarbe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Necroptosis is a highly pro-inflammatory mode of cell death regulated by RIP (or RIPK1 and RIP3 kinases and mediated by the effector MLKL. We report that diverse bacterial pathogens that produce a pore-forming toxin (PFT induce necroptosis of macrophages and this can be blocked for protection against Serratia marcescens hemorrhagic pneumonia. Following challenge with S. marcescens, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Listeria monocytogenes, uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC, and purified recombinant pneumolysin, macrophages pretreated with inhibitors of RIP1, RIP3, and MLKL were protected against death. Alveolar macrophages in MLKL KO mice were also protected during S. marcescens pneumonia. Inhibition of caspases had no impact on macrophage death and caspase-1 and -3/7 were determined to be inactive following challenge despite the detection of IL-1β in supernatants. Bone marrow-derived macrophages from RIP3 KO, but not caspase-1/11 KO or caspase-3 KO mice, were resistant to PFT-induced death. We explored the mechanisms for PFT-induced necroptosis and determined that loss of ion homeostasis at the plasma membrane, mitochondrial damage, ATP depletion, and the generation of reactive oxygen species were together responsible. Treatment of mice with necrostatin-5, an inhibitor of RIP1; GW806742X, an inhibitor of MLKL; and necrostatin-5 along with co-enzyme Q10 (N5/C10, which enhances ATP production; reduced the severity of S. marcescens pneumonia in a mouse intratracheal challenge model. N5/C10 protected alveolar macrophages, reduced bacterial burden, and lessened hemorrhage in the lungs. We conclude that necroptosis is the major cell death pathway evoked by PFTs in macrophages and the necroptosis pathway can be targeted for disease intervention.

  20. Learning from the past: historical aspects of bacterial toxins as pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellett, Sabine

    2012-06-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are the most poisonous substances known to humankind, but also are the bacterial toxins most frequently used as pharmaceuticals to benefit humans. The discovery of botulinum toxins and development into a useful drug is unique and fascinating, dating back to the early 19th century, when Justinus Kerner first recognized that botulism was caused by a biological toxin and suggested its use for medicinal purposes. This was translated into reality in 1980, when Alan Scott for the first time used the toxins to successfully treat strabismus. Now a subset of botulinum toxins are widely used for cosmetic applications, treatment of various movement disorders, pain and many other syndromes, and further developments using other botulinum toxins or recombinant molecules engineered from subdomains are promising.

  1. Rho-modifying bacterial protein toxins from Photorhabdus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jank, Thomas; Lang, Alexander E; Aktories, Klaus

    2016-06-15

    Photorhabdus bacteria live in symbiosis with entomopathogenic nematodes. The nematodes invade insect larvae, where they release the bacteria, which then produce toxins to kill the insects. Recently, the molecular mechanisms of some toxins from Photorhabdus luminescens and asymbiotica have been elucidated, showing that GTP-binding proteins of the Rho family are targets. The tripartite Tc toxin PTC5 from P. luminescens activates Rho proteins by ADP-ribosylation of a glutamine residue, which is involved in GTP hydrolysis, while PaTox from Photorhabdus asymbiotica inhibits the activity of GTPases by N-acetyl-glucosaminylation at tyrosine residues and activates Rho proteins indirectly by deamidation of heterotrimeric G proteins.

  2. The action of the bacterial toxin, microcin B17, on DNA gyrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, William M; Bottrill, Andrew R; Pierrat, Olivier A; Durrant, Marcus C; Maxwell, Anthony

    2007-04-01

    Microcin B17 (MccB17) is a peptide-based bacterial toxin that targets DNA gyrase, the bacterial enzyme that introduces supercoils into DNA. The site and mode of action of MccB17 on gyrase are unclear. We review what is currently known about MccB17-gyrase interactions and summarise approaches to understanding its mode of action that involve modification of the toxin. We describe experiments in which treatment of the toxin at high pH leads to the deamidation of two asparagine residues to aspartates. The modified toxin was found to be inactive in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that the Asn residues are essential for activity. Following on from these studies we have used molecular modelling to suggest a 3D structure for microcin B17. We discuss the implications of this model for MccB17 action and investigate the possibility that it binds metal ions.

  3. Targeted delivery of an ADP-ribosylating bacterial toxin into cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahaf , N.-I.; Lang, A. E.; Kaiser, L.; Fichter, C. D.; Lassmann, S.; McCluskey, A.; Augspach, A.; Aktories, K.; Schmidt, G.

    2017-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is an attractive target for bacterial toxins. The ADP-ribosyltransferase TccC3 from the insect bacterial pathogen Photorhabdus luminescence modifies actin to force its aggregation. We intended to transport the catalytic part of this toxin preferentially into cancer cells using a toxin transporter (Protective antigen, PA) which was redirected to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors (EGFR) or to human EGF receptors 2 (HER2), which are overexpressed in several cancer cells. Protective antigen of anthrax toxin forms a pore through which the two catalytic parts (lethal factor and edema factor) or other proteins can be transported into mammalian cells. Here, we used PA as a double mutant (N682A, D683A; mPA) which cannot bind to the two natural anthrax receptors. Each mutated monomer is fused either to EGF or to an affibody directed against the human EGF receptor 2 (HER2). We established a cellular model system composed of two cell lines representing HER2 overexpressing esophageal adenocarcinomas (EACs) and EGFR overexpressing esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCCs). We studied the specificity and efficiency of the re-directed anthrax pore for transport of TccC3 toxin and established Photorhabdus luminescence TccC3 as a toxin suitable for the development of a targeted toxin selectively killing cancer cells. PMID:28128281

  4. Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxins are substances created by plants and animals that are poisonous to humans. Toxins also include some medicines that are helpful in small doses, but poisonous in large amounts. Most toxins that cause problems ...

  5. Epidemiology of bacterial toxin-mediated foodborne gastroenteritis outbreaks in Australia, 2001 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Fiona J; Polkinghorne, Benjamin G; Fearnley, Emily J

    2016-12-24

    Bacterial toxin-mediated foodborne outbreaks, such as those caused by Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus, are an important and preventable cause of morbidity and mortality. Due to the short incubation period and duration of illness, these outbreaks are often under-reported. This is the first study to describe the epidemiology of bacterial toxin-mediated outbreaks in Australia. Using data collected between 2001 and 2013, we identify high risk groups and risk factors to inform prevention measures. Descriptive analyses of confirmed bacterial toxin-mediated outbreaks between 2001 and 2013 were undertaken using data extracted from the OzFoodNet Outbreak Register, a database of all outbreaks of gastrointestinal disease investigated by public health authorities in Australia. A total of 107 laboratory confirmed bacterial toxin-mediated outbreaks were reported between 2001 and 2013, affecting 2,219 people, including 47 hospitalisations and 13 deaths. Twelve deaths occurred in residents of aged care facilities. Clostridium perfringens was the most commonly reported aetiological agent (81 outbreaks, 76%). The most commonly reported food preparation settings were commercial food preparation services (51 outbreaks, 48%) and aged care facilities (42 outbreaks, 39%). Bacterial toxin outbreaks were rarely associated with food preparation in the home (2 outbreaks, 2%). In all outbreaks, the primary factor contributing to the outbreak was inadequate temperature control of the food. Public health efforts aimed at improving storage and handling practices for pre-cooked and re-heated foods, especially in commercial food preparation services and aged care facilities, could help to reduce the magnitude of bacterial toxin outbreaks.

  6. A comparative structure-function analysis of active-site inhibitors of Vibrio cholerae cholix toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, Miguel R; Merrill, A Rod

    2015-09-01

    Cholix toxin from Vibrio cholerae is a novel mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase (mART) toxin that shares structural and functional properties with Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A and Corynebacterium diphtheriae diphtheria toxin. Herein, we have used the high-resolution X-ray structure of full-length cholix toxin in the apo form, NAD(+) bound, and 10 structures of the cholix catalytic domain (C-domain) complexed with several strong inhibitors of toxin enzyme activity (NAP, PJ34, and the P-series) to study the binding mode of the ligands. A pharmacophore model based on the active pose of NAD(+) was compared with the active conformation of the inhibitors, which revealed a cationic feature in the side chain of the inhibitors that may determine the active pose. Moreover, a conformational search was conducted for the missing coordinates of one of the main active-site loops (R-loop). The resulting structural models were used to evaluate the interaction energies and for 3D-QSAR modeling. Implications for a rational drug design approach for mART toxins were derived.

  7. Structural basis for the reversible activation of a Rho protein by the bacterial toxin SopE

    OpenAIRE

    Buchwald, Gretel; Friebel, Andrea; Galán, Jorge E.; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Scheffzek, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    The bacterial enteropathogen Salmonella typhimurium employs a type III secretion system to inject bacterial toxins into the host cell cytosol. These toxins transiently activate Rho family GTP-binding protein-dependent signaling cascades to induce cytoskeletal rearrangements. One of these translocated Salmonella toxins, SopE, can activate Cdc42 in a Dbl-like fashion despite its lack of sequence similarity to Dbl-like proteins, the Rho-specific eukaryotic guanine nucleotide exchange factors. To...

  8. Recombinant production of bacterial toxins and their derivatives in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurkan Cemal

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris is a popular heterologous expression host for the recombinant production of a variety of prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins. The rapid emergence of P. pastoris as a robust heterologous expression host was facilitated by the ease with which it can be manipulated and propagated, which is comparable to that of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. P. pastoris offers further advantages such as the tightly-regulated alcohol oxidase promoter that is particularly suitable for heterologous expression of foreign genes. While recombinant production of bacterial toxins and their derivatives is highly desirable, attempts at their heterologous expression using the traditional E. coli expression system can be problematic due to the formation of inclusion bodies that often severely limit the final yields of biologically active products. However, recent literature now suggests that P. pastoris may be an attractive alternative host for the heterologous production of bacterial toxins, such as those from the genera Bacillus, Clostridium, and Corynebacterium, as well as their more complex derivatives. Here, we review the recombinant production of bacterial toxins and their derivatives in P. pastoris with special emphasis on their potential clinical applications. Considering that de novo design and construction of synthetic toxin genes have often been necessary to achieve optimal heterologous expression in P. pastoris, we also present general guidelines to this end based on our experience with the P. pastoris expression of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cyt2Aa1 toxin.

  9. LYSIS OF BACTERIAL PROTOPLASTS AND SPHEROPLASTS BY STAPHYLOCOCCAL ALPHA-TOXIN AND STREPTOLYSIN S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BERNHEIMER, A W; SCHWARTZ, L L

    1965-05-01

    Bernheimer, Alan W. (New York University School of Medicine, New York, N.Y.), and Lois L. Schwartz. Lysis of bacterial protoplasts and spheroplasts by staphylococcal alpha-toxin and streptolysin S. J. Bacteriol. 89:1387-1392. 1965.-Protoplasts of Bacillus megaterium, Sarcina lutea, and Streptococcus pyogenes, and spheroplasts of Escherichia coli were lysed by staphylococcal alpha-toxin, whereas spheroplasts of Vibrio metschnikovii and V. comma were not. In the spectrum of its lytic action, streptolysin S qualitatively resembled staphylococcal alpha-toxin except for failure to lyse S. pyogenes protoplasts. In contrast to the two foregoing agents, streptolysin O did not lyse protoplasts and spheroplasts. The observations are interpreted in relation to similarities and differences in lipid composition of bacterial and mammalian cell membranes.

  10. Modification of plant Rac/Rop GTPase signalling using bacterial toxin transgenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manoj K; Ren, Fugang; Giesemann, Torsten; Dal Bosco, Cristina; Pasternak, Taras P; Blein, Thomas; Ruperti, Benedetto; Schmidt, Gudula; Aktories, Klaus; Molendijk, Arthur J; Palme, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial protein toxins which modify Rho GTPase are useful for the analysis of Rho signalling in animal cells, but these toxins cannot be taken up by plant cells. We demonstrate in vitro deamidation of Arabidopsis Rop4 by Escherichia coli Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 (CNF1) and glucosylation by Clostridium difficile toxin B. Expression of the catalytic domain of CNF1 caused modification and activation of co-expressed Arabidopsis Rop4 GTPase in tobacco leaves, resulting in hypersensitive-like cell death. By contrast, the catalytic domain of toxin B modified and inactivated co-expressed constitutively active Rop4, blocking the hypersensitive response caused by over-expression of active Rops. In transgenic Arabidopsis, both CNF1 and toxin B inhibited Rop-dependent polar morphogenesis of leaf epidermal cells. Toxin B expression also inhibited Rop-dependent morphogenesis of root hairs and trichome branching, and resulted in root meristem enlargement and dwarf growth. Our results show that CNF1 and toxin B transgenes are effective tools in Rop GTPase signalling studies.

  11. Targeting c-kit receptor in neuroblastomas and colorectal cancers using stem cell factor (SCF)-based recombinant bacterial toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Swati; Pardo, Alessa; Rosinke, Reinhard; Batra, Janendra K; Barth, Stefan; Verma, Rama S

    2016-01-01

    Autocrine activation of c-kit (KIT receptor tyrosine kinase) has been postulated to be a potent oncogenic driver in small cell lung cancer, neuroblastoma (NB), and poorly differentiated colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Although targeted therapy involving tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as imatinib mesylate is highly effective for gastrointestinal stromal tumor carrying V560G c-kit mutation, it does not show much potential for targeting wild-type KIT (WT-KIT). Our study demonstrates the role of stem cell factor (SCF)-based toxin conjugates for targeting WT-KIT-overexpressing malignancies such as NBs and CRCs. We constructed SCF-based recombinant bacterial toxins by genetically fusing mutated form of natural ligand SCF to receptor binding deficient forms of Diphtheria toxin (DT) or Pseudomonas exotoxin A (ETA') and evaluated their efficacy in vitro. Efficient targeting was achieved in all receptor-positive neuroblastoma (IMR-32 and SHSY5Y) and colon cancer cell lines (COLO 320DM, HCT 116, and DLD-1) but not in receptor-negative breast carcinoma cell line (MCF-7) thereby proving specificity. While dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity was observed in both neuroblastoma cell lines, COLO 320DM and HCT 116 cells, only an anti-proliferative effect was observed in DLD-1 cells. We prove that these novel targeting agents have promising potential as KIT receptor tyrosine kinase targeting system.

  12. Synthetic ganglioside analogues for sensitive biosensing : improved probes for antibodies and bacterial toxins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pukin, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes the synthesis of analogues of human gangliosides and applications thereof for the detection and inhibition of bacterial toxins and antibodies. An efficient glycosylation method was developed for the synthesis of ω-functionalized alkyl lactosides (Chapter 2). These lactosides we

  13. A Bacterial Cell Shape-Determining Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanjie; Frirdich, Emilisa; Taylor, Jennifer A; Chan, Anson C K; Blair, Kris M; Vermeulen, Jenny; Ha, Reuben; Murphy, Michael E P; Salama, Nina R; Gaynor, Erin C; Tanner, Martin E

    2016-04-15

    Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni are human pathogens and causative agents of gastric ulcers/cancer and gastroenteritis, respectively. Recent studies have uncovered a series of proteases that are responsible for maintaining the helical shape of these organisms. The H. pylori metalloprotease Csd4 and its C. jejuni homologue Pgp1 cleave the amide bond between meso-diaminopimelate and iso-d-glutamic acid in truncated peptidoglycan side chains. Deletion of either csd4 or pgp1 results in bacteria with a straight rod phenotype, a reduced ability to move in viscous media, and reduced pathogenicity. In this work, a phosphinic acid-based pseudodipeptide inhibitor was designed to act as a tetrahedral intermediate analog against the Csd4 enzyme. The phosphinic acid was shown to inhibit the cleavage of the alternate substrate, Ac-l-Ala-iso-d-Glu-meso-Dap, with a Ki value of 1.5 μM. Structural analysis of the Csd4-inhibitor complex shows that the phosphinic acid displaces the zinc-bound water and chelates the metal in a bidentate fashion. The phosphinate oxygens also interact with the key acid/base residue, Glu222, and the oxyanion-stabilizing residue, Arg86. The results are consistent with the "promoted-water pathway" mechanism for carboxypeptidase A catalysis. Studies on cultured bacteria showed that the inhibitor causes significant cell straightening when incubated with H. pylori at millimolar concentrations. A diminished, yet observable, effect on the morphology of C. jejuni was also apparent. Cell straightening was more pronounced with an acapsular C. jejuni mutant strain compared to the wild type, suggesting that the capsule impaired inhibitor accessibility. These studies demonstrate that a highly polar compound is capable of crossing the outer membrane and altering cell shape, presumably by inhibiting cell shape determinant proteases. Peptidoglycan proteases acting as cell shape determinants represent novel targets for the development of antimicrobials

  14. Mass Spectrometric Detection of Bacterial Protein Toxins and Their Enzymatic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalb, Suzanne R; Boyer, Anne E; Barr, John R

    2015-08-31

    Mass spectrometry has recently become a powerful technique for bacterial identification. Mass spectrometry approaches generally rely upon introduction of the bacteria into a matrix-assisted laser-desorption time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometer with mass spectrometric recognition of proteins specific to that organism that form a reliable fingerprint. With some bacteria, such as Bacillus anthracis and Clostridium botulinum, the health threat posed by these organisms is not the organism itself, but rather the protein toxins produced by the organisms. One such example is botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), a potent neurotoxin produced by C. botulinum. There are seven known serotypes of BoNT, A-G, and many of the serotypes can be further differentiated into toxin variants, which are up to 99.9% identical in some cases. Mass spectrometric proteomic techniques have been established to differentiate the serotype or toxin variant of BoNT produced by varied strains of C. botulinum. Detection of potent biological toxins requires high analytical sensitivity and mass spectrometry based methods have been developed to determine the enzymatic activity of BoNT and the anthrax lethal toxins produced by B. anthracis. This enzymatic activity, unique for each toxin, is assessed with detection of the toxin-induced cleavage of strategically designed peptide substrates by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry offering unparalleled specificity. Furthermore, activity assays allow for the assessment of the biological activity of a toxin and its potential health risk. Such methods have become important diagnostics for botulism and anthrax. Here, we review mass spectrometry based methods for the enzymatic activity of BoNT and the anthrax lethal factor toxin.

  15. Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor and bacterial infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valls Serón, M.

    2011-01-01

    Mercedes Valls Serón onderzocht een onderdeel van het fibrinolytische systeem dat verantwoordelijk is voor het oplossen van bloedstolsels. Ze keek naar de wisselwerking tussen de zogenaamde trombine-activeerbare fibrinolyse inhibitors - of TAFI - en bacteriën. De binding van TAFI aan een specifieke

  16. Repair of a Bacterial Small β-Barrel Toxin Pore Depends on Channel Width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hoven, Gisela; Rivas, Amable J; Neukirch, Claudia; Meyenburg, Martina; Qin, Qianqian; Parekh, Sapun; Hellmann, Nadja; Husmann, Matthias

    2017-02-14

    Membrane repair emerges as an innate defense protecting target cells against bacterial pore-forming toxins. Here, we report the first paradigm of Ca(2+)-dependent repair following attack by a small β-pore-forming toxin, namely, plasmid-encoded phobalysin of Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae In striking contrast, Vibrio cholerae cytolysin, the closest ortholog of phobalysin, subverted repair. Mutational analysis uncovered a role of channel width in toxicity and repair. Thus, the replacement of serine at phobalysin´s presumed channel narrow point with the bulkier tryptophan, the corresponding residue in Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (W318), modulated Ca(2+) influx, lysosomal exocytosis, and membrane repair. And yet, replacing tryptophan (W318) with serine in Vibrio cholerae cytolysin enhanced toxicity. The data reveal divergent strategies evolved by two related small β-pore-forming toxins to manipulate target cells: phobalysin leads to fulminant perturbation of ion concentrations, closely followed by Ca(2+) influx-dependent membrane repair. In contrast, V. cholerae cytolysin causes insidious perturbations and escapes control by the cellular wounded membrane repair-like response.IMPORTANCE Previous studies demonstrated that large transmembrane pores, such as those formed by perforin or bacterial toxins of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin family, trigger rapid, Ca(2+) influx-dependent repair mechanisms. In contrast, recovery from attack by the small β-pore-forming Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin or aerolysin is slow in comparison and does not depend on extracellular Ca(2+) To further elucidate the scope of Ca(2+) influx-dependent repair and understand its limitations, we compared the cellular responses to phobalysin and V. cholerae cytolysin, two related small β-pore-forming toxins which create membrane pores of slightly different sizes. The data indicate that the channel width of a small β-pore-forming toxin is a critical determinant of both primary

  17. Bacteriophage-encoded shiga toxin gene in atypical bacterial host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casas Veronica

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contamination from fecal bacteria in recreational waters is a major health concern since bacteria capable of causing human disease can be found in animal feces. The Dog Beach area of Ocean Beach in San Diego, California is a beach prone to closures due to high levels of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB. A potential source of these FIB could be the canine feces left behind by owners who do not clean up after their pets. We tested this hypothesis by screening the DNA isolated from canine feces for the bacteriophage-encoded stx gene normally found in the virulent strains of the fecal bacterium Escherichia coli. Results Twenty canine fecal samples were collected, processed for total and bacterial fraction DNA, and screened by PCR for the stx gene. The stx gene was detected in the total and bacterial fraction DNA of one fecal sample. Bacterial isolates were then cultivated from the stx-positive fecal sample. Eighty nine of these canine fecal bacterial isolates were screened by PCR for the stx gene. The stx gene was detected in five of these isolates. Sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA gene PCR products from the canine fecal bacterial isolates indicated that they were Enterococcus and not E. coli. Conclusions The bacteriophage-encoded stx gene was found in multiple species of bacteria cultivated from canine fecal samples gathered at the shoreline of the Dog Beach area of Ocean Beach in San Diego, California. The canine fecal bacteria carrying the stx gene were not the typical E. coli host and were instead identified through phylogenetic analyses as Enterococcus. This suggests a large degree of horizontal gene transfer of exotoxin genes in recreational waters.

  18. Bacterial and fungal keratitis in Upper Egypt: In vitro screening of enzymes, toxins and antifungal activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah A Gharamah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This work was conducted to study the ability of bacterial and fungal isolates from keratitis cases in Upper Egypt to produce enzymes, toxins, and to test the isolated fungal species sensitivity to some therapeutic agents. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifteen patients clinically diagnosed to have microbial keratitis were investigated. From these cases, 37 bacterial isolates and 25 fungal isolates were screened for their ability to produce extra-cellular enzymes in solid media. In addition, the ability of fungal isolates to produce mycotoxins and their sensitivity to 4 antifungal agents were tested. Results: Protease, lipase, hemolysins, urease, phosphatase, and catalase were detected respectively in 48.65%, 37.84%, 59.46%, 43.24%, 67.57%, and 100% out of 37 bacterial isolates tested. Out of 25 fungal isolates tested during the present study, 80% were positive for protease, 84% for lipase and urease, 28% for blood hemolysis, and 100% for phosphatase and catalase enzymes. Thirteen fungal isolates were able to produce detectable amounts of 7 mycotoxins in culture medium (aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1, and G2, sterigmatocystin, fumagillin, diacetoxyscirpenol, zearalenone, T-2 toxin, and trichodermin. Among the antifungal agents tested in this study, terbinafine showed the highest effect against most isolates in vitro. Conclusion: In conclusion, the ability of bacterial and fungal isolates to produce extracellular enzymes and toxins may be aid in the invasion and destruction of eye tissues, which, in turn, lead to vision loss.

  19. Plasma membrane association of three classes of bacterial toxins is mediated by a basic-hydrophobic motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Brett; Ahrens, Sebastian; Satchell, Karla J F

    2012-02-01

    Plasma membrane targeting is essential for the proper function of many bacterial toxins. A conserved fourhelical bundle membrane localization domain (4HBM) was recently identified within three diverse families of toxins: clostridial glucosylating toxins, MARTX toxins and Pasteurella multocida-like toxins. When expressed in tissue culture cells or in yeast, GFP fusions to at least one 4HBM from each toxin family show significant peripheral membrane localization but with differing profiles. Both in vivo expression and in vitro binding studies reveal that the ability of these domains to localize to the plasma membrane and bind negatively charged phospholipids requires a basic-hydrophobic motif formed by the L1 and L3 loops. The different binding capacity of each 4HBM is defined by the hydrophobicity of an exposed residue within the motif. This study establishes that bacterial effectors utilize a normal host cell mechanism to locate the plasma membrane where they can then access their intracellular targets.

  20. Recent Developments in Antibody-Based Assays for the Detection of Bacterial Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui Zhu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Considering the urgent demand for rapid and accurate determination of bacterial toxins and the recent promising developments in nanotechnology and microfluidics, this review summarizes new achievements of the past five years. Firstly, bacterial toxins will be categorized according to their antibody binding properties into low and high molecular weight compounds. Secondly, the types of antibodies and new techniques for producing antibodies are discussed, including poly- and mono-clonal antibodies, single-chain variable fragments (scFv, as well as heavy-chain and recombinant antibodies. Thirdly, the use of different nanomaterials, such as gold nanoparticles (AuNPs, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs, quantum dots (QDs and carbon nanomaterials (graphene and carbon nanotube, for labeling antibodies and toxins or for readout techniques will be summarized. Fourthly, microscale analysis or minimized devices, for example microfluidics or lab-on-a-chip (LOC, which have attracted increasing attention in combination with immunoassays for the robust detection or point-of-care testing (POCT, will be reviewed. Finally, some new materials and analytical strategies, which might be promising for analyzing toxins in the near future, will be shortly introduced.

  1. Recent developments in antibody-based assays for the detection of bacterial toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Kui; Dietrich, Richard; Didier, Andrea; Doyscher, Dominik; Märtlbauer, Erwin

    2014-04-11

    Considering the urgent demand for rapid and accurate determination of bacterial toxins and the recent promising developments in nanotechnology and microfluidics, this review summarizes new achievements of the past five years. Firstly, bacterial toxins will be categorized according to their antibody binding properties into low and high molecular weight compounds. Secondly, the types of antibodies and new techniques for producing antibodies are discussed, including poly- and mono-clonal antibodies, single-chain variable fragments (scFv), as well as heavy-chain and recombinant antibodies. Thirdly, the use of different nanomaterials, such as gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), quantum dots (QDs) and carbon nanomaterials (graphene and carbon nanotube), for labeling antibodies and toxins or for readout techniques will be summarized. Fourthly, microscale analysis or minimized devices, for example microfluidics or lab-on-a-chip (LOC), which have attracted increasing attention in combination with immunoassays for the robust detection or point-of-care testing (POCT), will be reviewed. Finally, some new materials and analytical strategies, which might be promising for analyzing toxins in the near future, will be shortly introduced.

  2. Fragments of the bacterial toxin microcin B17 as gyrase poisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Frédéric; Thompson, Robert E; Jolliffe, Katrina A; Payne, Richard J; Maxwell, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones are very important drugs in the clinical antibacterial arsenal; their success is principally due to their mode of action: the stabilisation of a gyrase-DNA intermediate (the cleavage complex), which triggers a chain of events leading to cell death. Microcin B17 (MccB17) is a modified peptide bacterial toxin that acts by a similar mode of action, but is unfortunately unsuitable as a therapeutic drug. However, its structure and mechanism could inspire the design of new antibacterial compounds that are needed to circumvent the rise in bacterial resistance to current antibiotics. Here we describe the investigation of the structural features responsible for MccB17 activity and the identification of fragments of the toxin that retain the ability to stabilise the cleavage complex.

  3. Fragments of the bacterial toxin microcin B17 as gyrase poisons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Collin

    Full Text Available Fluoroquinolones are very important drugs in the clinical antibacterial arsenal; their success is principally due to their mode of action: the stabilisation of a gyrase-DNA intermediate (the cleavage complex, which triggers a chain of events leading to cell death. Microcin B17 (MccB17 is a modified peptide bacterial toxin that acts by a similar mode of action, but is unfortunately unsuitable as a therapeutic drug. However, its structure and mechanism could inspire the design of new antibacterial compounds that are needed to circumvent the rise in bacterial resistance to current antibiotics. Here we describe the investigation of the structural features responsible for MccB17 activity and the identification of fragments of the toxin that retain the ability to stabilise the cleavage complex.

  4. Structure-based receptor MIMICS targeted against bacterial superantigen toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Goutam; Hong-Geller, Elizabeth; Shiflett, Patrick R.; Lehnert, Nancy M.

    2009-08-18

    The invention provides therapeutic compositions useful in the treatment of bacterial superantigen mediated conditions, such as Toxic Shock Syndrome. The compositions comprise genetically engineered bifunctional polypeptides containing a specific T-cell receptor binding domain and a specific MHC class II receptor binding domain, each targeting non-overlapping epitopes on a superantigen molecule against which they are designed. The anti-superantigen "receptor mimetics" or "chimeras" are rationally designed to recreate the modality of superantigen binding directly to both the TCR and the MHC-II receptor, and are capable of acting as decoys for superantigen binding, effectively out-competing the host T-cell and MHC-II receptors, the natural host receptors.

  5. Statistical pattern matching facilitates the design of polyvalent inhibitors of anthrax and cholera toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Prakash; Padala, Chakradhar; Poon, Vincent; Saraph, Arundhati; Basha, Saleem; Kate, Sandesh; Tao, Kevin; Mogridge, Jeremy; Kane, Ravi S

    2006-05-01

    Numerous biological processes involve the recognition of a specific pattern of binding sites on a target protein or surface. Although ligands displayed by disordered scaffolds form stochastic rather than specific patterns, theoretical models predict that recognition will occur between patterns that are characterized by similar or "matched" statistics. Endowing synthetic biomimetic structures with statistical pattern matching capabilities may improve the specificity of sensors and resolution of separation processes. We demonstrate that statistical pattern matching enhances the potency of polyvalent therapeutics. We functionalized liposomes with an inhibitory peptide at different densities and observed a transition in potency at an interpeptide separation that matches the distance between ligand-binding sites on the heptameric component of anthrax toxin. Pattern-matched polyvalent liposomes inhibited anthrax toxin in vitro at concentrations four orders of magnitude lower than the corresponding monovalent peptide, and neutralized this toxin in vivo. Statistical pattern matching also enhanced the potency of polyvalent inhibitors of cholera toxin. This facile strategy should be broadly applicable to the detection and neutralization of toxins and pathogens.

  6. Earthworm-derived pore-forming toxin lysenin and screening of its inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumwang, Neelanun; Umezawa, Kazuo

    2013-08-08

    Lysenin is a pore-forming toxin from the coelomic fluid of earthworm Eisenia foetida. This protein specifically binds to sphingomyelin and induces erythrocyte lysis. Lysenin consists of 297 amino acids with a molecular weight of 41 kDa. We screened for cellular signal transduction inhibitors of low molecular weight from microorganisms and plants. The purpose of the screening was to study the mechanism of diseases using the obtained inhibitors and to develop new chemotherapeutic agents acting in the new mechanism. Therefore, our aim was to screen for inhibitors of Lysenin-induced hemolysis from plant extracts and microbial culture filtrates. As a result, we isolated all-E-lutein from an extract of Dalbergia latifolia leaves. All-E-lutein is likely to inhibit the process of Lysenin-membrane binding and/or oligomer formation rather than pore formation. Additionally, we isolated tyrosylproline anhydride from the culture filtrate of Streptomyces as an inhibitor of Lysenin-induced hemolysis.

  7. cNMP-AMs mimic and dissect bacterial nucleotidyl cyclase toxin effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckert, Ulrike; Grundmann, Manuel; Wolter, Sabine; Schwede, Frank; Rehmann, Holger; Kaever, Volkhard; Kostenis, Evi; Seifert, Roland

    2014-09-05

    In addition to the well-known second messengers cAMP and cGMP, mammalian cells contain the cyclic pyrimidine nucleotides cCMP and cUMP. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin ExoY massively increases cGMP and cUMP in cells, whereas the Bordetella pertussis toxin CyaA increases cAMP and, to a lesser extent, cCMP. To mimic and dissect toxin effects, we synthesized cNMP-acetoxymethylesters as prodrugs. cNMP-AMs rapidly and effectively released the corresponding cNMP in cells. The combination of cGMP-AM plus cUMP-AM mimicked cytotoxicity of ExoY. cUMP-AM and cGMP-AM differentially activated gene expression. Certain cCMP and cUMP effects were independent of the known cNMP effectors protein kinases A and G and guanine nucleotide exchange factor Epac. In conclusion, cNMP-AMs are useful tools to mimic and dissect bacterial nucleotidyl cyclase toxin effects.

  8. Prokaryotic toxin-antitoxin systems--the role in bacterial physiology and application in molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Michal; Rojowska, Anna; Wladyka, Benedykt

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria have developed multiple complex mechanisms ensuring an adequate response to environmental changes. In this context, bacterial cell division and growth are subject to strict control to ensure metabolic balance and cell survival. A plethora of studies cast light on toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems as metabolism regulators acting in response to environmental stress conditions. Many of those studies suggest direct relations between the TA systems and the pathogenic potential or antibiotic resistance of relevant bacteria. Other studies point out that TA systems play a significant role in ensuring stability of mobile genetic material. The evolutionary origin and relations between various TA systems are still a subject of a debate. The impact of toxin-antitoxin systems on bacteria physiology prompted their application in molecular biology as tools allowing cloning of some hard-to-maintain genes, plasmid maintenance and production of recombinant proteins.

  9. Recent progresses on AI-2 bacterial quorum sensing inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Peng; Li, Minyong

    2012-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a communication procedure that predominates gene expression in response to cell density and fluctuations in the neighboring environment as a result of discerning molecules termed autoinducers (AIs). It has been embroiled that QS can govern bacterial behaviors such as the secretion of virulence factors, biofilm formation, bioluminescence production, conjugation, sporulation and swarming motility. Autoinducer 2 (AI-2), a QS signaling molecule brought up to be involved in interspecies communication, exists in both gram-negative and -positive bacteria. Therefore, novel approaches to interrupt AI-2 quorum sensing are being recognized as next generation antimicrobials. In the present review article, we summarized recent progresses on AI-2 bacterial quorum sensing inhibitors and discussed their potential as the antibacterial agents.

  10. Urokinase-targeted recombinant bacterial protein toxins-a rationally designed and engineered anticancer agent for cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yizhen LIU; Shi-Yan LI

    2009-01-01

    Urokinase-targeted recombinant bacterial protein toxins are a sort of rationally designed and engineered anticancer recombinant fusion proteins representing a novel class of agents for cancer therapy.Bacterial protein toxins have long been known as the primary virulence factor(s) for a variety of pathogenic bacteria and are the most powerful human poisons.On the other hand,it has been well documented that urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR),making up the uPA system,are overexpressed in a variety of human tumors and tumor cell lines.The expression of uPA system is highly correlated with tumor invasion and metastasis.To exploit these characteristics in the design of tumor cell-selective cytotoxins,two prominent bacterial protein toxins,i.e.,the diphtheria toxin and anthrax toxin are deliberately engineered through placing a sequence targeted specifically by the uPA system to form anticancer recombinant fusion proteins.These uPA system-targeted bacterial protein toxins are activated selectively on the surface of uPA systemexpressing tumor cells,thereby killing these cells.This article provides a review on the latest progress in the exploitation of these recombinant fusion proteins as potent tumoricidal agents.It is perceptible that the strategies for cancer therapy are being innovated by this novel therapeutic approach.

  11. Quantitative Mass Spectrometry for Bacterial Protein Toxins — A Sensitive, Specific, High-Throughput Tool for Detection and Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Kalb

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Matrix-assisted laser-desorption time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS is a valuable high-throughput tool for peptide analysis. Liquid chromatography electrospray ionization (LC-ESI tandem-MS provides sensitive and specific quantification of small molecules and peptides. The high analytic power of MS coupled with high-specificity substrates is ideally suited for detection and quantification of bacterial enzymatic activities. As specific examples of the MS applications in disease diagnosis and select agent detection, we describe recent advances in the analyses of two high profile protein toxin groups, the Bacillus anthracis toxins and the Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins. The two binary toxins produced by B. anthracis consist of protective antigen (PA which combines with lethal factor (LF and edema factor (EF, forming lethal toxin and edema toxin respectively. LF is a zinc-dependent endoprotease which hydrolyzes specific proteins involved in inflammation and immunity. EF is an adenylyl cyclase which converts ATP to cyclic-AMP. Toxin-specific enzyme activity for a strategically designed substrate, amplifies reaction products which are detected by MALDI-TOF-MS and LC-ESI-MS/MS. Pre-concentration/purification with toxin specific monoclonal antibodies provides additional specificity. These combined technologies have achieved high specificity, ultrasensitive detection and quantification of the anthrax toxins. We also describe potential applications to diseases of high public health impact, including Clostridium difficile glucosylating toxins and the Bordetella pertussis adenylyl cyclase.

  12. Repair of a Bacterial Small β-Barrel Toxin Pore Depends on Channel Width

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hoven, Gisela; Rivas, Amable J.; Neukirch, Claudia; Meyenburg, Martina; Qin, Qianqian; Parekh, Sapun

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Membrane repair emerges as an innate defense protecting target cells against bacterial pore-forming toxins. Here, we report the first paradigm of Ca2+-dependent repair following attack by a small β-pore-forming toxin, namely, plasmid-encoded phobalysin of Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae. In striking contrast, Vibrio cholerae cytolysin, the closest ortholog of phobalysin, subverted repair. Mutational analysis uncovered a role of channel width in toxicity and repair. Thus, the replacement of serine at phobalysin´s presumed channel narrow point with the bulkier tryptophan, the corresponding residue in Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (W318), modulated Ca2+ influx, lysosomal exocytosis, and membrane repair. And yet, replacing tryptophan (W318) with serine in Vibrio cholerae cytolysin enhanced toxicity. The data reveal divergent strategies evolved by two related small β-pore-forming toxins to manipulate target cells: phobalysin leads to fulminant perturbation of ion concentrations, closely followed by Ca2+ influx-dependent membrane repair. In contrast, V. cholerae cytolysin causes insidious perturbations and escapes control by the cellular wounded membrane repair-like response. PMID:28196960

  13. Bacterial infections in cirrhosis: Role of proton pump inhibitors and intestinal permeability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.G. van Vlerken (Lotte); E.J. Huisman (Ellen); B. van Hoek (Bart); W. Renooij (W.); F.W.M. de Rooij (Felix); P.D. Siersema (Peter); K.J. van Erpecum (Karel)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground Cirrhotic patients are at considerable risk for bacterial infections, possibly through increased intestinal permeability and bacterial overgrowth. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may increase infection risk. We aimed to explore the potential association between PPI use and bacte

  14. Highly predictive support vector machine (SVM) models for anthrax toxin lethal factor (LF) inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xia; Amin, Elizabeth Ambrose

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax is a highly lethal, acute infectious disease caused by the rod-shaped, Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus anthracis. The anthrax toxin lethal factor (LF), a zinc metalloprotease secreted by the bacilli, plays a key role in anthrax pathogenesis and is chiefly responsible for anthrax-related toxemia and host death, partly via inactivation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK) enzymes and consequent disruption of key cellular signaling pathways. Antibiotics such as fluoroquinolones are capable of clearing the bacilli but have no effect on LF-mediated toxemia; LF itself therefore remains the preferred target for toxin inactivation. However, currently no LF inhibitor is available on the market as a therapeutic, partly due to the insufficiency of existing LF inhibitor scaffolds in terms of efficacy, selectivity, and toxicity. In the current work, we present novel support vector machine (SVM) models with high prediction accuracy that are designed to rapidly identify potential novel, structurally diverse LF inhibitor chemical matter from compound libraries. These SVM models were trained and validated using 508 compounds with published LF biological activity data and 847 inactive compounds deposited in the Pub Chem BioAssay database. One model, M1, demonstrated particularly favorable selectivity toward highly active compounds by correctly predicting 39 (95.12%) out of 41 nanomolar-level LF inhibitors, 46 (93.88%) out of 49 inactives, and 844 (99.65%) out of 847 Pub Chem inactives in external, unbiased test sets. These models are expected to facilitate the prediction of LF inhibitory activity for existing molecules, as well as identification of novel potential LF inhibitors from large datasets.

  15. A novel mechanism of bacterial toxin transfer within host blood cell-derived microvesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-lie Ståhl

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin (Stx is the main virulence factor of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, which are non-invasive strains that can lead to hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS, associated with renal failure and death. Although bacteremia does not occur, bacterial virulence factors gain access to the circulation and are thereafter presumed to cause target organ damage. Stx was previously shown to circulate bound to blood cells but the mechanism by which it would potentially transfer to target organ cells has not been elucidated. Here we show that blood cell-derived microvesicles, shed during HUS, contain Stx and are found within patient renal cortical cells. The finding was reproduced in mice infected with Stx-producing Escherichia coli exhibiting Stx-containing blood cell-derived microvesicles in the circulation that reached the kidney where they were transferred into glomerular and peritubular capillary endothelial cells and further through their basement membranes followed by podocytes and tubular epithelial cells, respectively. In vitro studies demonstrated that blood cell-derived microvesicles containing Stx undergo endocytosis in glomerular endothelial cells leading to cell death secondary to inhibited protein synthesis. This study demonstrates a novel virulence mechanism whereby bacterial toxin is transferred within host blood cell-derived microvesicles in which it may evade the host immune system.

  16. Inhibition of Bacterial Toxin Activity by the Nuclear Stain, DRAQ5™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Joshua N; Koufos, Evan; Brown, Angela C

    2016-08-01

    The repeats-in-toxin family of toxins includes proteins produced by Gram negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli (α-hemolysin), Bordetella pertussis (adenylate cyclase toxin), and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (LtxA), which contribute to the pathogenesis of these organisms by killing host cells. In the case of LtxA produced by A. actinomycetemcomitans, white blood cells are targeted, allowing the bacteria to avoid clearance by the host immune system. In its association with target cells, LtxA binds to a receptor, lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1, as well as membrane lipids and cholesterol, before being internalized via a lysosomal-mediated pathway. The motivation for this project comes from our discovery that DRAQ5™, a membrane-permeable nuclear stain, prevents the internalization of LtxA in a Jurkat T cell line. We hypothesized that DRAQ5™, in crossing the plasma membrane, alters the properties of the membrane to inhibit LtxA internalization. To investigate how DRAQ5™ interacts with the lipid membrane to prevent LtxA internalization, we used studied DRAQ5™-mediated membrane changes in model membranes using a variety of techniques, including differential scanning calorimetry and fluorescence spectroscopy. Our results suggest that DRAQ5™ inhibits the activity of LtxA by decreasing the fluidity of the cellular lipid membrane, which decreases LtxA binding. These results present an interesting possible anti-virulence strategy; by altering bacterial toxin activity by modifying membrane fluidity, it may be possible to inhibit the pathogenicity of A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  17. Incorporation of a non-human glycan mediates human susceptibility to a bacterial toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byres, Emma; Paton, Adrienne W.; Paton, James C.; Löfling, Jonas C.; Smith, David F.; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Talbot, Ursula M.; Chong, Damien C.; Yu, Hai; Huang, Shengshu; Chen, Xi; Varki, Nissi M.; Varki, Ajit; Rossjohn, Jamie; Beddoe, Travis (Emory-MED); (UCD); (Adelaide); (Monash)

    2009-01-30

    AB{sub 5} toxins comprise an A subunit that corrupts essential eukaryotic cell functions, and pentameric B subunits that direct target-cell uptake after binding surface glycans. Subtilase cytotoxin (SubAB) is an AB{sub 5} toxin secreted by Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC), which causes serious gastrointestinal disease in humans. SubAB causes haemolytic uraemic syndrome-like pathology in mice through SubA-mediated cleavage of BiP/GRP78, an essential endoplasmic reticulum chaperone. Here we show that SubB has a strong preference for glycans terminating in the sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc), a monosaccharide not synthesized in humans. Structures of SubB-Neu5Gc complexes revealed the basis for this specificity, and mutagenesis of key SubB residues abrogated in vitro glycan recognition, cell binding and cytotoxicity. SubAB specificity for Neu5Gc was confirmed using mouse tissues with a human-like deficiency of Neu5Gc and human cell lines fed with Neu5Gc. Despite lack of Neu5Gc biosynthesis in humans, assimilation of dietary Neu5Gc creates high-affinity receptors on human gut epithelia and kidney vasculature. This, and the lack of Neu5Gc-containing body fluid competitors in humans, confers susceptibility to the gastrointestinal and systemic toxicities of SubAB. Ironically, foods rich in Neu5Gc are the most common source of STEC contamination. Thus a bacterial toxin's receptor is generated by metabolic incorporation of an exogenous factor derived from food.

  18. Nonmalignant T cells stimulate growth of T-cell lymphoma cells in the presence of bacterial toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woetmann, Anders; Lovato, Paola; Eriksen, Karsten W;

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial toxins including staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs). Here, we investigate SE-mediated interactions between nonmalignant T cells and malignant T-cell lines established from skin and blood of CTCL patients...

  19. The interaction of DNA gyrase with the bacterial toxin CcdB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Howells, A J; Maxwell, A

    1999-01-01

    CcdB is a bacterial toxin that targets DNA gyrase. Analysis of the interaction of CcdB with gyrase reveals two distinct complexes. An initial complex (alpha) is formed by direct interaction between GyrA and CcdB; this complex can be detected by affinity column and gel-shift analysis, and has...... of this initial complex with ATP in the presence of GyrB and DNA slowly converts it to a second complex (beta), which has a lower rate of ATP hydrolysis and is unable to catalyse supercoiling. The efficiency of formation of this inactive complex is dependent on the concentrations of ATP and CcdB. We suggest...

  20. Tumor endothelium marker-8 based decoys exhibit superiority over capillary morphogenesis protein-2 based decoys as anthrax toxin inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenguang Cai

    Full Text Available Anthrax toxin is the major virulence factor produced by Bacillus anthracis. The toxin consists of three protein subunits: protective antigen (PA, lethal factor, and edema factor. Inhibition of PA binding to its receptors, tumor endothelium marker-8 (TEM8 and capillary morphogenesis protein-2 (CMG2 can effectively block anthrax intoxication, which is particularly valuable when the toxin has already been overproduced at the late stage of anthrax infection, thus rendering antibiotics ineffectual. Receptor-like agonists, such as the mammalian cell-expressed von Willebrand factor type A (vWA domain of CMG2 (sCMG2, have demonstrated potency against the anthrax toxin. However, the soluble vWA domain of TEM8 (sTEM8 was ruled out as an anthrax toxin inhibitor candidate due to its inferior affinity to PA. In the present study, we report that L56A, a PA-binding-affinity-elevated mutant of sTEM8, could inhibit anthrax intoxication as effectively as sCMG2 in Fisher 344 rats. Additionally, pharmacokinetics showed that L56A and sTEM8 exhibit advantages over sCMG2 with better lung-targeting and longer plasma retention time, which may contribute to their enhanced protective ability in vivo. Our results suggest that receptor decoys based on TEM8 are promising anthrax toxin inhibitors and, together with the pharmacokinetic studies in this report, may contribute to the development of novel anthrax drugs.

  1. Isolation and Characterization of Gut Bacterial Proteases Involved in Inducing Pathogenicity of Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin in Cotton Bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regode, Visweshwar; Kuruba, Sreeramulu; Mohammad, Akbar S.; Sharma, Hari C.

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis toxin proteins are deployed in transgenic plants for pest management. The present studies were aimed at characterization of gut bacterial proteases involved in activation of inactive Cry1Ac protoxin (pro-Cry1Ac) to active toxin in Helicoverpa armigera. Bacterial strains were isolated from H. armigera midgut and screened for their proteolytic activation toward pro-Cry1Ac. Among 12 gut bacterial isolates seven isolates showed proteolytic activity, and proteases from three isolates (IVS1, IVS2, and IVS3) were found to be involved in the proteolytic conversion of pro-Cry1Ac into active toxin. The proteases from IVS1, IVS2, and IVS3 isolates were purified to 11.90-, 15.50-, and 17.20-fold, respectively. The optimum pH and temperature for gut bacterial protease activity was 8.0 and 40°C. Maximum inhibition of total proteolytic activity was exerted by phenylmethane sulfonyl fluoride followed by EDTA. Fluorescence zymography revealed that proteases from IVS1, IVS2, and IVS3 were chymotrypsin-like and showing protease band at ~15, 65, and 15 kDa, respectively. Active Cry1Ac formed from processing pro-Cry1Ac by gut bacterial proteases exhibited toxicity toward H. armigera. The gut bacterial isolates IVS1, IVS2, and IVS3 showed homology with B. thuringiensis (CP003763.1), Vibrio fischeri (CP000020.2), and Escherichia coli (CP011342.1), respectively. Proteases produced by midgut bacteria are involved in proteolytic processing of B. thuringiensis protoxin and play a major role in inducing pathogenicity of B. thuringiensis toxins in H. armigera. PMID:27766093

  2. Isolation and characterization of gut bacterial proteases involved in inducing pathogenicity of Bacillus thuringiensis toxin in cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visweshwar Regode

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt toxin proteins are deployed in transgenic plants for pest management. The present studies were aimed at characterization of gut bacterial proteases involved in activation of inactive Cry1Ac protoxin (pro-Cry1Ac to active toxin in Helicoverpa armigera. Bacterial strains were isolated from H. armigera midgut and screened for their proteolytic activation towards pro-Cry1Ac. Among twelve gut bacterial isolates seven isolates showed proteolytic activity, and proteases from three isolates (IVS1, IVS2 and IVS3 were found to be involved in the proteolytic conversion of pro-Cry1Ac into active toxin. The proteases from IVS1, IVS2 and IVS3 isolates were purified to 11.90-, 15.50- and 17.20-fold, respectively. The optimum pH and temperature for gut bacterial protease activity was 8.0 and 40 oC. Maximum inhibition of total proteolytic activity was exerted by PMSF followed by EDTA. Fluorescence zymography revealed that proteases from IVS1, IVS2, and IVS3 were chymotrypsin-like and showing protease band at ~15, 65 and 15 kDa, respectively. Active Cry1Ac formed from processing pro-Cry1Ac by gut bacterial proteases exhibited toxicity towards H. armigera. The gut bacterial isolates IVS1, IVS2 and IVS3 showed homology with Bacillus thuringiensis (CP003763.1, Vibrio fischeri (CP000020.2 and Escherichia coli (CP011342.1, respectively. Proteases produced by midgut bacteria are involved in proteolytic processing of Bt protoxin and play a major role in inducing pathogenicity of Bt toxins in H. armigera.

  3. Spider, bacterial and fungal phospholipase D toxins make cyclic phosphate products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajoie, Daniel M; Cordes, Matthew H J

    2015-12-15

    Phospholipase D (PLD) toxins from sicariid spiders, which cause disease in mammals, were recently found to convert their primary substrates, sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylcholine, to cyclic phospholipids. Here we show that two PLD toxins from pathogenic actinobacteria and ascomycete fungi, which share distant homology with the spider toxins, also generate cyclic phospholipids. This shared function supports divergent evolution of the PLD toxins from a common ancestor and suggests the importance of cyclic phospholipids in pathogenicity.

  4. A biomimetic nanosponge that absorbs pore-forming toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Che-Ming J.; Fang, Ronnie H.; Copp, Jonathan; Luk, Brian T.; Zhang, Liangfang

    2013-05-01

    Detoxification treatments such as toxin-targeted anti-virulence therapy offer ways to cleanse the body of virulence factors that are caused by bacterial infections, venomous injuries and biological weaponry. Because existing detoxification platforms such as antisera, monoclonal antibodies, small-molecule inhibitors and molecularly imprinted polymers act by targeting the molecular structures of toxins, customized treatments are required for different diseases. Here, we show a biomimetic toxin nanosponge that functions as a toxin decoy in vivo. The nanosponge, which consists of a polymeric nanoparticle core surrounded by red blood cell membranes, absorbs membrane-damaging toxins and diverts them away from their cellular targets. In a mouse model, the nanosponges markedly reduce the toxicity of staphylococcal alpha-haemolysin (α-toxin) and thus improve the survival rate of toxin-challenged mice. This biologically inspired toxin nanosponge presents a detoxification treatment that can potentially treat a variety of injuries and diseases caused by pore-forming toxins.

  5. Association Between Proton Pump Inhibitor Use and Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis in Cirrhotic Patients with Ascites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélissa Ratelle

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are data suggesting a link between proton pump inhibitor (PPI use and the development of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP in cirrhotic patients with ascites; however, these data are controversial.

  6. Implementation of a Permeable Membrane Insert-based Infection System to Study the Effects of Secreted Bacterial Toxins on Mammalian Host Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Rebecca A; Lee, Shaun W

    2016-08-19

    Many bacterial pathogens secrete potent toxins to aid in the destruction of host tissue, to initiate signaling changes in host cells or to manipulate immune system responses during the course of infection. Though methods have been developed to successfully purify and produce many of these important virulence factors, there are still many bacterial toxins whose unique structure or extensive post-translational modifications make them difficult to purify and study in in vitro systems. Furthermore, even when pure toxin can be obtained, there are many challenges associated with studying the specific effects of a toxin under relevant physiological conditions. Most in vitro cell culture models designed to assess the effects of secreted bacterial toxins on host cells involve incubating host cells with a one-time dose of toxin. Such methods poorly approximate what host cells actually experience during an infection, where toxin is continually produced by bacterial cells and allowed to accumulate gradually during the course of infection. This protocol describes the design of a permeable membrane insert-based bacterial infection system to study the effects of Streptolysin S, a potent toxin produced by Group A Streptococcus, on human epithelial keratinocytes. This system more closely mimics the natural physiological environment during an infection than methods where pure toxin or bacterial supernatants are directly applied to host cells. Importantly, this method also eliminates the bias of host responses that are due to direct contact between the bacteria and host cells. This system has been utilized to effectively assess the effects of Streptolysin S (SLS) on host membrane integrity, cellular viability, and cellular signaling responses. This technique can be readily applied to the study of other secreted virulence factors on a variety of mammalian host cell types to investigate the specific role of a secreted bacterial factor during the course of infection.

  7. Structure–Activity Relationship Study of Spider Polyamine Toxins as Inhibitors of Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiong, Xiaofeng; Poulsen, Mette H; Hussein, Rama A;

    2014-01-01

    The spider polyamine toxins Joro spider toxin-3 (JSTX-3) and Nephila polyamine toxins-1 and -8 (NPTX-1 and NPTX-8) are isolated from the venom of the orb-weaver spider Nephila clavata (Joro spider). They share a high degree of structural resemblance, their aromatic head groups being the only...

  8. [Immunoenzimatic detection of the Clostridium tetani bacterial toxin: an alternative to mice bioassays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Fernando; León, Guillermo; Hernández-Chavarría, Francisco

    2006-06-01

    Cell-free extracts from 20 strains of Clostridium tetani isolated from soil samples, were tested for tetanus toxin production using an enzyme immunoassay. All the extracts were classified as positive for the toxin presence, and eight of them showed absorbance values corresponding to tetanus toxin concentrations between 3.2 and 88 ng/ml; thus, they fell within the linear absorbance range (0.135-0.317). All dilutions of toxin used to obtain the calibration curve (0.0071 to 1.1 ng) were lethal for mice.

  9. The ARTT motif and a unified structural understanding of substraterecognition in ADP ribosylating bacterial toxins and eukaryotic ADPribosyltransferases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, S.; Tainer, J.A.

    2001-08-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a widely occurring and biologically critical covalent chemical modification process in pathogenic mechanisms, intracellular signaling systems, DNA repair, and cell division. The reaction is catalyzed by ADP-ribosyltransferases, which transfer the ADP-ribose moiety of NAD to a target protein with nicotinamide release. A family of bacterial toxins and eukaryotic enzymes has been termed the mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases, in distinction to the poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases, which catalyze the addition of multiple ADP-ribose groups to the carboxyl terminus of eukaryotic nucleoproteins. Despite the limited primary sequence homology among the different ADP-ribosyltransferases, a central cleft bearing NAD-binding pocket formed by the two perpendicular b-sheet core has been remarkably conserved between bacterial toxins and eukaryotic mono- and poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases. The majority of bacterial toxins and eukaryotic mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases are characterized by conserved His and catalytic Glu residues. In contrast, Diphtheria toxin, Pseudomonas exotoxin A, and eukaryotic poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases are characterized by conserved Arg and catalytic Glu residues. The NAD-binding core of a binary toxin and a C3-like toxin family identified an ARTT motif (ADP-ribosylating turn-turn motif) that is implicated in substrate specificity and recognition by structural and mutagenic studies. Here we apply structure-based sequence alignment and comparative structural analyses of all known structures of ADP-ribosyltransfeases to suggest that this ARTT motif is functionally important in many ADP-ribosylating enzymes that bear a NAD binding cleft as characterized by conserved Arg and catalytic Glu residues. Overall, structure-based sequence analysis reveals common core structures and conserved active sites of ADP-ribosyltransferases to support similar NAD binding mechanisms but differing mechanisms of target protein binding via sequence variations within the ARTT

  10. General synthesis of β-alanine-containing spider polyamine toxins and discovery of nephila polyamine toxins 1 and 8 as highly potent inhibitors of ionotropic glutamate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucas, Simon; Poulsen, Mette H; Nørager, Niels G

    2012-01-01

    Certain spiders contain large pools of polyamine toxins, which are putative pharmacological tools awaiting further discovery. Here we present a general synthesis strategy for this class of toxins and prepare five structurally varied polyamine toxins. Electrophysiological testing at three ionotrop...

  11. Activation of the unfolded protein response is required for defenses against bacterial pore-forming toxin in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry J Bischof

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Pore-forming toxins (PFTs constitute the single largest class of proteinaceous bacterial virulence factors and are made by many of the most important bacterial pathogens. Host responses to these toxins are complex and poorly understood. We find that the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response (UPR is activated upon exposure to PFTs both in Caenorhabditis elegans and in mammalian cells. Activation of the UPR is protective in vivo against PFTs since animals that lack either the ire-1-xbp-1 or the atf-6 arms of the UPR are more sensitive to PFT than wild-type animals. The UPR acts directly in the cells targeted by the PFT. Loss of the UPR leads to a normal response against unrelated toxins or a pathogenic bacterium, indicating its PFT-protective role is specific. The p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAPK kinase pathway has been previously shown to be important for cellular defenses against PFTs. We find here that the UPR is one of the key downstream targets of the p38 MAPK pathway in response to PFT since loss of a functional p38 MAPK pathway leads to a failure of PFT to properly activate the ire-1-xbp-1 arm of the UPR. The UPR-mediated activation and response to PFTs is distinct from the canonical UPR-mediated response to unfolded proteins both in terms of its activation and functional sensitivities. These data demonstrate that the UPR, a fundamental intracellular pathway, can operate in intrinsic cellular defenses against bacterial attack.

  12. Neuronal Goα and CAPS regulate behavioral and immune responses to bacterial pore-forming toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los, Ferdinand C O; Ha, Christine; Aroian, Raffi V

    2013-01-01

    Pore-forming toxins (PFTs) are abundant bacterial virulence factors that attack host cell plasma membranes. Host defense mechanisms against PFTs described to date all function in the host tissue that is directly attacked by the PFT. Here we characterize a rapid and fully penetrant cessation of feeding of Caenorhabditis elegans in response to PFT attack. We demonstrate via analyses of C. elegans mutants that inhibition of feeding by PFT requires the neuronal G protein Goα subunit goa-1, and that maintenance of this response requires neuronally expressed calcium activator for protein secretion (CAPS) homolog unc-31. Independently from their role in feeding cessation, we find that goa-1 and unc-31 are additionally required for immune protection against PFTs. We thus demonstrate that the behavioral and immune responses to bacterial PFT attack involve the cross-talk between the nervous system and the cells directly under attack.

  13. Neuronal Goα and CAPS regulate behavioral and immune responses to bacterial pore-forming toxins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinand C O Los

    Full Text Available Pore-forming toxins (PFTs are abundant bacterial virulence factors that attack host cell plasma membranes. Host defense mechanisms against PFTs described to date all function in the host tissue that is directly attacked by the PFT. Here we characterize a rapid and fully penetrant cessation of feeding of Caenorhabditis elegans in response to PFT attack. We demonstrate via analyses of C. elegans mutants that inhibition of feeding by PFT requires the neuronal G protein Goα subunit goa-1, and that maintenance of this response requires neuronally expressed calcium activator for protein secretion (CAPS homolog unc-31. Independently from their role in feeding cessation, we find that goa-1 and unc-31 are additionally required for immune protection against PFTs. We thus demonstrate that the behavioral and immune responses to bacterial PFT attack involve the cross-talk between the nervous system and the cells directly under attack.

  14. Host adaptation of a bacterial toxin from the human pathogen Salmonella Typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lingquan; Song, Jeongmin; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Jiawei; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Varki, Nissi; Naito-Matsui, Yuko; Galán, Jorge E; Varki, Ajit

    2014-12-04

    Salmonella Typhi is an exclusive human pathogen that causes typhoid fever. Typhoid toxin is a S. Typhi virulence factor that can reproduce most of the typhoid fever symptoms in experimental animals. Toxicity depends on toxin binding to terminally sialylated glycans on surface glycoproteins. Human glycans are unusual because of the lack of CMAH, which in other mammals converts N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) to N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc). Here, we report that typhoid toxin binds to and is toxic toward cells expressing glycans terminated in Neu5Ac (expressed by humans) over glycans terminated in Neu5Gc (expressed by other mammals). Mice constitutively expressing CMAH thus displaying Neu5Gc in all tissues are resistant to typhoid toxin. The atomic structure of typhoid toxin bound to Neu5Ac reveals the structural bases for its binding specificity. These findings provide insight into the molecular bases for Salmonella Typhi's host specificity and may help the development of therapies for typhoid fever.

  15. Prolonged exposure to bacterial toxins downregulated expression of toll-like receptors in mesenchymal stromal cell-derived osteoprogenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Yu

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, also known as mesenchymal stem cells are multipotent cells with potential therapeutic value. Owing to their osteogenic capability, MSCs may be clinically applied for facilitating osseointegration in dental implants or orthopedic repair of bony defect. However, whether wound infection or oral microflora may interfere with the growth and osteogenic differentiation of human MSCs remains unknown. This study investigated whether proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs would be affected by potent gram-positive and gram-negative derived bacterial toxins commonly found in human settings. Results We selected lipopolysaccharide (LPS from Escherichia coli and lipoteichoic acid (LTA from Streptococcus pyogenes as our toxins of choice. Our findings showed both LPS and LTA did not affect MSC proliferation, but prolonged LPS challenge upregulated the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs, as assessed by alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition. Because toll-like receptors (TLRs, in particularly TLR4 and TLR2, are important for the cellular responsiveness to LPS and LTA respectively, we evaluated their expression profiles serially from MSCs to osteoblasts by quantitative PCR. We found that during osteogenic differentiation, MSC-derived osteoprogenitors gradually expressed TLR2 and TLR4 by Day 12. But under prolonged incubation with LPS, MSC-derived osteoprogenitors had reduced TLR2 and TLR4 gene expression. This peculiar response to LPS suggests a possible adaptive mechanism when MSCs are subjected to continuous exposure with bacteria. Conclusion In conclusion, our findings support the potential of using human MSCs as a biological graft, even under a bacterial toxin-rich environment.

  16. Aromatic inhibitors derived from ammonia-pretreated lignocellulose hinder bacterial ethanologenesis by activating regulatory circuits controlling inhibitor efflux and detoxification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H. Keating

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Efficient microbial conversion of lignocellulosic hydrolysates to biofuels is a key barrier to the economically viable deployment of lignocellulosic biofuels. A chief contributor to this barrier is the impact on microbial processes and energy metabolism of lignocellulose-derived inhibitors, including phenolic carboxylates, phenolic amides (for ammonia-pretreated biomass, phenolic aldehydes, and furfurals. To understand the bacterial pathways induced by inhibitors present in ammonia-pretreated biomass hydrolysates, which are less well studied than acid-pretreated biomass hydrolysates, we developed and exploited synthetic mimics of ammonia-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH. To determine regulatory responses to the inhibitors normally present in ACSH, we measured transcript and protein levels in an Escherichia coli ethanologen using RNA-seq and quantitative proteomics during fermentation to ethanol of synthetic hydrolysates containing or lacking the inhibitors. Our study identified four major regulators mediating these responses, the MarA/SoxS/Rob network, AaeR, FrmR, and YqhC. Induction of these regulons was correlated with a reduced rate of ethanol production, buildup of pyruvate, depletion of ATP and NAD(PH, and an inhibition of xylose conversion. The aromatic aldehyde inhibitor 5-hydroxymethylfurfural appeared to be reduced to its alcohol form by the ethanologen during fermentation whereas phenolic acid and amide inhibitors were not metabolized. Together, our findings establish that the major regulatory responses to lignocellulose-derived inhibitors are mediated by transcriptional rather than translational regulators, suggest that energy consumed for inhibitor efflux and detoxification may limit biofuel production, and identify a network of regulators for future synthetic biology efforts.

  17. 抗炭疽毒素的小分子药物研究进展%Recent advances in development of small molecule inhibitors of anthrax toxin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘家阔; 顾为; 聂爱华

    2011-01-01

    炭疽是由炭疽芽孢杆菌引起的一种人畜共患烈性传染病.炭疽菌主要通过释放炭疽毒素使宿主致病.炭疽毒素包括致死毒素和水肿毒素,这两种毒素是使炭疽感染者死亡的主要因素.该文综述了抗炭疽毒素小分子药物的研究进展.%Anthrax is a severe epidemic disease caused by Bacillus anthracis, and acts mainly by releasing anthrax toxin that consists of two toxins, lethal toxin (LT) and edema toxin (ET), which are the primary factors of death. In this review the recent advances in the development of small molecule inhibitors of anthrax toxin are discussed.

  18. [Bacterial efflux pumps - their role in antibiotic resistance and potential inhibitors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hricová, Kristýna; Kolář, Milan

    2014-12-01

    Efflux pumps capable of actively draining antibiotic agents from bacterial cells may be considered one of potential mechanisms of the development of antimicrobial resistance. The most important group of efflux pumps capable of removing several types of antibiotics include RND (resistance - nodulation - division) pumps. These are three proteins that cross the bacterial cell wall, allowing direct expulsion of the agent out from the bacterial cell. The most investigated efflux pumps are the AcrAB-TolC system in Escherichia coli and the MexAB-OprM system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Moreover, efflux pumps are able to export other than antibacterial agents such as disinfectants, thus decreasing their effectiveness. One potential approach to inactivation of an efflux pump is to use the so-called efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs). Potential inhibitors tested in vitro involve, for example, phenylalanyl-arginyl-b-naphthylamide (PAbN), carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) or agents of the phenothiazine class.

  19. Structure-activity relationship study of spider polyamine toxins as inhibitors of ionotropic glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiao-Feng; Poulsen, Mette H; Hussein, Rama A; Nørager, Niels G; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2014-12-01

    The spider polyamine toxins Joro spider toxin-3 (JSTX-3) and Nephila polyamine toxins-1 and -8 (NPTX-1 and NPTX-8) are isolated from the venom of the orb-weaver spider Nephila clavata (Joro spider). They share a high degree of structural resemblance, their aromatic head groups being the only difference, and were recently found to be very potent open-channel blockers of ionotropic glutamate (iGlu) receptors. In this study we designed and synthesized a collection of 24 analogues of these toxins using a recently developed solid-phase synthetic methodology. Systematic variation in two regions of the toxins and subsequent evaluation of biological activity at AMPA and NMDA subtypes of iGlu receptors provided succinct information on structure-activity relationships. In particular, one set of analogues were found to display exquisite selectivity and potency for AMPA receptors relative to the natural products. Thus, this systematic SAR study has provided new pharmacological tools for studies of iGlu receptors.

  20. Manipulation of electrostatic and saccharide linker interactions in the design of efficient glycopolypeptide-based cholera toxin inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Ronak; Levenson, Eric A; Kiick, Kristi L

    2010-01-11

    Multivalent, glycopolymer inhibitors designed for the treatment of disease and pathogen infection have shown improvements in binding correlated with general changes in glycopolymer architecture and composition. We have previously demonstrated that control of glycopolypeptide backbone extension and ligand spacing significantly impacts the inhibition of the cholera toxin B subunit pentamer (CT B(5)) by these polymers. In the studies reported here, we elucidate the role of backbone charge and linker length in modulating the inhibition event. Peptides of the sequence AXPXG (where X is a positive, neutral or negative amino acid), equipped with the alkyne functionality of propargyl glycine, were designed and synthesized via solid-phase peptide synthetic methods and glycosylated via Cu(I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition reactions. The capacity of the glycopeptides to inhibit the binding of the B(5) subunit of cholera toxin was evaluated. These studies indicated that glycopeptides with a negatively charged backbone show improved inhibition of the binding event relative to the other glycopeptides. In addition, variations in the length of the linker between the peptide and the saccharide ligand also affected the inhibition of CT by the glycopeptides. Our findings suggest that, apart from appropriate saccharide spacing and polypeptide chain extension, saccharide linker conformation and the systematic placement of charges on the polypeptide backbone are also significant variables that can be tuned to improve the inhibitory potencies of glycopolypeptide-based multivalent inhibitors.

  1. General synthesis of β-alanine-containing spider polyamine toxins and discovery of nephila polyamine toxins 1 and 8 as highly potent inhibitors of ionotropic glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Simon; Poulsen, Mette H; Nørager, Niels G; Barslund, Anne F; Bach, Tinna B; Kristensen, Anders S; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2012-11-26

    Certain spiders contain large pools of polyamine toxins, which are putative pharmacological tools awaiting further discovery. Here we present a general synthesis strategy for this class of toxins and prepare five structurally varied polyamine toxins. Electrophysiological testing at three ionotropic glutamate receptor subtypes reveals that two of these, Nephila polyamine toxins 1 (NPTX-1) and 8 (NPTX-8), comprise intriguing pharmacological activities by having subnanomolar IC(50) values at kainate receptors.

  2. Identification of Small Molecule Inhibitors of Clostridium perfringens ε-Toxin Cytotoxicity Using a Cell-Based High-Throughput Screen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. McClain

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin, a select agent, is responsible for a severe, often fatal enterotoxemia characterized by edema in the heart, lungs, kidney, and brain. The toxin is believed to be an oligomeric pore-forming toxin. Currently, there is no effective therapy for countering the cytotoxic activity of the toxin in exposed individuals. Using a robust cell-based high-throughput screening (HTS assay, we screened a 151,616-compound library for the ability to inhibit e-toxin-induced cytotoxicity. Survival of MDCK cells exposed to the toxin was assessed by addition of resazurin to detect metabolic activity in surviving cells. The hit rate for this screen was 0.6%. Following a secondary screen of each hit in triplicate and assays to eliminate false positives, we focused on three structurally-distinct compounds: an N-cycloalkylbenzamide, a furo[2,3-b]quinoline, and a 6H-anthra[1,9-cd]isoxazol. None of the three compounds appeared to inhibit toxin binding to cells or the ability of the toxin to form oligomeric complexes. Additional assays demonstrated that two of the inhibitory compounds inhibited ε-toxin-induced permeabilization of MDCK cells to propidium iodide. Furthermore, the two compounds exhibited inhibitory effects on cells pre-treated with toxin. Structural analogs of one of the inhibitors identified through the high-throughput screen were analyzed and provided initial structure-activity data. These compounds should serve as the basis for further structure-activity refinement that may lead to the development of effective anti-ε-toxin therapeutics.

  3. Using bacterial inclusion bodies to screen for amyloid aggregation inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villar-Piqué Anna

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amyloid-β peptide (Aβ42 is the main component of the inter-neuronal amyloid plaques characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD. The mechanism by which Aβ42 and other amyloid peptides assemble into insoluble neurotoxic deposits is still not completely understood and multiple factors have been reported to trigger their formation. In particular, the presence of endogenous metal ions has been linked to the pathogenesis of AD and other neurodegenerative disorders. Results Here we describe a rapid and high-throughput screening method to identify molecules able to modulate amyloid aggregation. The approach exploits the inclusion bodies (IBs formed by Aβ42 when expressed in bacteria. We have shown previously that these aggregates retain amyloid structural and functional properties. In the present work, we demonstrate that their in vitro refolding is selectively sensitive to the presence of aggregation-promoting metal ions, allowing the detection of inhibitors of metal-promoted amyloid aggregation with potential therapeutic interest. Conclusions Because IBs can be produced at high levels and easily purified, the method overcomes one of the main limitations in screens to detect amyloid modulators: the use of expensive and usually highly insoluble synthetic peptides.

  4. Haemolysis induced by α-toxin from Staphylococcus aureus requires P2X receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skals, Marianne Gerberg; Leipziger, Jens Georg; Prætorius, Helle

    2011-01-01

    -forming bacterial toxins. In this context, it is essential to know whether this is specific to HlyA-induced cell damage or if other bacterial pore-forming toxins involve purinergic signals to orchestrate haemolysis. Here, we investigate if the haemolysis produced by α-toxin from Staphylococcus aureus involves P2...... receptor activation. We observed that α-toxin-induced haemolysis is completely blocked by the unselective P2 receptor antagonist pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid. Moreover, several selective blockers of P2X1 and P2X7 ionotropic receptors abolished haemolysis in murine and equine...... erythrocytes. Inhibitors of pannexin channels partially reduced the α-toxin induced lysis. Thus, we conclude that α-toxin, similar to HlyA from E. coli produces cell damage by specific activation of a purinergic signalling cascade. These data indicate that pore-forming toxins in general require purinergic...

  5. Photodynamic therapy for inactivating endodontic bacterial biofilms and effect of tissue inhibitors on antibacterial efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Annie; Kishen, Anil

    Complex nature of bacterial cell membrane and structure of biofilm has challenged the efficacy of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDT) to achieve effective disinfection of infected root canals. In addition, tissue-inhibitors present inside the root canals are known to affect APDT activity. This study was aimed to assess the effect of APDT on bacterial biofilms and evaluate the effect of tissue-inhibitors on the APDT. Rose-bengal (RB) and methylene-blue (MB) were tested on Enterococcus faecalis (gram-positive) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (gram-negative) biofilms. In vitro 7- day old biofilms were sensitized with RB and MB, and photodynamically activated with 20-60 J/cm2. Photosensitizers were pre-treated with different tissue-inhibitors (dentin, dentin-matrix, pulp tissue, bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS), and bovine serum albumin (BSA)) and tested for antibacterial effect of APDT. Microbiological culture based analysis was used to analyze the cell viability, while Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSCM) was used to examine the structure of biofilm. Photoactivation resulted in significant reduction of bacterial biofilms with RB and MB. The structure of biofilm under LSCM was found to be disrupted with reduced biofilm thickness. Complete biofilm elimination could not be achieved with both tested photosensitizers. APDT effect using MB and RB was inhibited in a decreasing order by dentin-matrix, BSA, pulp, dentin and LPS (P< 0.05). Both strains of bacterial biofilms resisted complete elimination after APDT and the tissue inhibitors existing within the root canal reduced the antibacterial activity at varying degrees. Further research is required to enhance the antibacterial efficacy of APDT in an endodontic environment.

  6. The action of the bacterial toxin microcin B17. Insight into the cleavage-religation reaction of DNA gyrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrat, Olivier A; Maxwell, Anthony

    2003-09-12

    We have examined the effects of the bacterial toxin microcin B17 (MccB17) on the reactions of Escherichia coli DNA gyrase. MccB17 slows down but does not completely inhibit the DNA supercoiling and relaxation reactions of gyrase. A kinetic analysis of the cleavage-religation equilibrium of gyrase was performed to determine the effect of the toxin on the forward (cleavage) and reverse (religation) reactions. A simple mechanism of two consecutive reversible reactions with a nicked DNA intermediate was used to simulate the kinetics of cleavage and religation. The action of MccB17 on the kinetics of cleavage and religation was compared with that of the quinolones ciprofloxacin and oxolinic acid. With relaxed DNA as substrate, only a small amount of gyrase cleavage complex is observed with MccB17 in the absence of ATP, whereas the presence of the nucleotide significantly enhances the effect of the toxin on both the cleavage and religation reactions. In contrast, ciprofloxacin, oxolinic acid, and Ca2+ show lesser dependence on ATP to stabilize the cleavage complex. MccB17 enhances the overall rate of DNA cleavage by increasing the forward rate constant (k2) of the second equilibrium. In contrast, ciprofloxacin increases the amount of cleaved DNA by a combined effect on the forward and reverse rate constants of both equilibria. Based on these results and on the observations that MccB17 only slowly inhibits the supercoiling and relaxation reactions, we suggest a model of the interaction of MccB17 with gyrase.

  7. Complex structure of a bacterial class 2 histone deacetylase homologue with a trifluoromethylketone inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Tine Kragh [Abteilung für Molekulare Strukturbiologie, Institut für Mikrobiologie und Genetik and GZMB, Justus-von-Liebig Weg 11, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Hildmann, Christian; Riester, Daniel; Wegener, Dennis; Schwienhorst, Andreas [Abteilung für Molekulare Genetik und Präparative Molekularbiologie, Institut für Mikrobiologie und Genetik, Grisebachstrasse 8, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Ficner, Ralf, E-mail: rficner@gwdg.de [Abteilung für Molekulare Strukturbiologie, Institut für Mikrobiologie und Genetik and GZMB, Justus-von-Liebig Weg 11, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2007-04-01

    The crystal structure of HDAH FB188 in complex with a trifluoromethylketone at 2.2 Å resolution is reported and compared to a previously determined inhibitor complex. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) have emerged as attractive targets in anticancer drug development. To date, a number of HDAC inhibitors have been developed and most of them are hydroxamic acid derivatives, typified by suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). Not surprisingly, structural information that can greatly enhance the design of novel HDAC inhibitors is so far only available for hydroxamic acids in complex with HDAC or HDAC-like enzymes. Here, the first structure of an enzyme complex with a nonhydroxamate HDAC inhibitor is presented. The structure of the trifluoromethyl ketone inhibitor 9,9,9-trifluoro-8-oxo-N-phenylnonanamide in complex with bacterial FB188 HDAH (histone deacetylase-like amidohydrolase from Bordetella/Alcaligenes strain FB188) has been determined. HDAH reveals high sequential and functional homology to human class 2 HDACs and a high structural homology to human class 1 HDACs. Comparison with the structure of HDAH in complex with SAHA reveals that the two inhibitors superimpose well. However, significant differences in binding to the active site of HDAH were observed. In the presented structure the O atom of the trifluoromethyl ketone moiety is within binding distance of the Zn atom of the enzyme and the F atoms participate in interactions with the enzyme, thereby involving more amino acids in enzyme–inhibitor binding.

  8. Identification of novel bacterial histidine biosynthesis inhibitors using docking, ensemble rescoring, and whole-cell assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Signe Teuber; Liu, J.; Estiu, G.;

    2010-01-01

    in the early stages of drug discovery attractive if sufficient accuracy can be achieved. Computational target identification using systems-level methods suggested the histidine biosynthesis pathway as an attractive target against S. aureus. Potential inhibitors for the pathway were identified through docking...... histidine biosynthesis pathway, which is predicted to be essential for bacterial biomass productions. Virtual screening of a library of similar to 10(6) compounds identified 49 potential inhibitors of three enzymes of this pathway. Eighteen representative compounds were directly tested on three S. aureus...... of this novel strategy to the histidine biosynthesis pathway....

  9. Fragment-based discovery of 6-azaindazoles as inhibitors of bacterial DNA ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Steven; Amin, Nader; Benowitz, Andrew B; Chiarparin, Elisabetta; Cui, Haifeng; Deng, Xiaodong; Heightman, Tom D; Holmes, David J; Hopkins, Anna; Huang, Jianzhong; Jin, Qi; Kreatsoulas, Constantine; Martin, Agnes C L; Massey, Frances; McCloskey, Lynn; Mortenson, Paul N; Pathuri, Puja; Tisi, Dominic; Williams, Pamela A

    2013-12-12

    Herein we describe the application of fragment-based drug design to bacterial DNA ligase. X-ray crystallography was used to guide structure-based optimization of a fragment-screening hit to give novel, nanomolar, AMP-competitive inhibitors. The lead compound 13 showed antibacterial activity across a range of pathogens. Data to demonstrate mode of action was provided using a strain of S. aureus, engineered to overexpress DNA ligase.

  10. No effect of Bt Cry1Ie toxin on bacterial diversity in the midgut of the Chinese honey bees, Apis cerana cerana (Hymenoptera, Apidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hui-Ru; Dai, Ping-Li; Geng, Li-Li; Jack, Cameron J.; Li, Yun-He; Wu, Yan-Yan; Diao, Qing-Yun; Ellis, James D.

    2017-01-01

    Cry1Ie protein derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) has been proposed as a promising candidate for the development of a new Bt-maize variety to control maize pests in China. We studied the response of the midgut bacterial community of Apis cerana cerana to Cry1Ie toxin under laboratory conditions. Newly emerged bees were fed one of the following treatments for 15 and 30 days: three concentrations of Cry1Ie toxin (20 ng/mL, 200 ng/mL, and 20 μg/mL) in sugar syrup, pure sugar syrup as a negative control and 48 ng/mL imidacloprid as a positive control. The relative abundance of 16S rRNA genes was measured by Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction and no apparent differences were found among treatments for any of these counts at any time point. Furthermore, the midgut bacterial structure and compositions were determined using high-throughput sequencing targeting the V3-V4 regions of the 16S rDNA. All core honey bee intestinal bacterial genera such as Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Snodgrassella, and Gilliamella were detected, and no significant changes were found in the species diversity and richness for any bacterial taxa among treatments at different time points. These results suggest that Cry1Ie toxin may not affect gut bacterial communities of Chinese honey bees. PMID:28139751

  11. Modulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC by bacterial metalloproteases and protease inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Butterworth

    Full Text Available The serralysin family of metalloproteases is associated with the virulence of multiple gram-negative human pathogens, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens. The serralysin proteases share highly conserved catalytic domains and show evolutionary similarity to the mammalian matrix metalloproteases. Our previous studies demonstrated that alkaline protease (AP from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of activating the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC, leading to an increase in sodium absorption in airway epithelia. The serralysin proteases are often co-expressed with endogenous, intracellular or periplasmic inhibitors, which putatively protect the bacterium from unwanted or unregulated protease activities. To evaluate the potential use of these small protein inhibitors in regulating the serralysin induced activation of ENaC, proteases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens were purified for characterization along with a high affinity inhibitor from Pseudomonas. Both proteases showed activity against in vitro substrates and could be blocked by near stoichiometric concentrations of the inhibitor. In addition, both proteases were capable of activating ENaC when added to the apical surfaces of multiple epithelial cells with similar slow activation kinetics. The high-affinity periplasmic inhibitor from Pseudomonas effectively blocked this activation. These data suggest that multiple metalloproteases are capable of activating ENaC. Further, the endogenous, periplasmic bacterial inhibitors may be useful for modulating the downstream effects of the serralysin virulence factors under physiological conditions.

  12. Modulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) by bacterial metalloproteases and protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, Michael B; Zhang, Liang; Liu, Xiaoning; Shanks, Robert M; Thibodeau, Patrick H

    2014-01-01

    The serralysin family of metalloproteases is associated with the virulence of multiple gram-negative human pathogens, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens. The serralysin proteases share highly conserved catalytic domains and show evolutionary similarity to the mammalian matrix metalloproteases. Our previous studies demonstrated that alkaline protease (AP) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of activating the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), leading to an increase in sodium absorption in airway epithelia. The serralysin proteases are often co-expressed with endogenous, intracellular or periplasmic inhibitors, which putatively protect the bacterium from unwanted or unregulated protease activities. To evaluate the potential use of these small protein inhibitors in regulating the serralysin induced activation of ENaC, proteases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens were purified for characterization along with a high affinity inhibitor from Pseudomonas. Both proteases showed activity against in vitro substrates and could be blocked by near stoichiometric concentrations of the inhibitor. In addition, both proteases were capable of activating ENaC when added to the apical surfaces of multiple epithelial cells with similar slow activation kinetics. The high-affinity periplasmic inhibitor from Pseudomonas effectively blocked this activation. These data suggest that multiple metalloproteases are capable of activating ENaC. Further, the endogenous, periplasmic bacterial inhibitors may be useful for modulating the downstream effects of the serralysin virulence factors under physiological conditions.

  13. Thermal stability and structural changes in bacterial toxins responsible for food poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regenthal, Paulina; Hansen, Jesper S.; André, Ingemar

    2017-01-01

    The staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) are secreted by the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and are the most common causative agent in staphylococcal food poisoning. The staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) has been associated with large staphylococcal food poisoning outbreaks, but newer identified SEs, like staphylococcal enterotoxin H (SEH) has recently been shown to be present at similar levels as SEA in food poisoning outbreaks. Thus, we set out to investigate the thermo-stability of the three-dimensional structures of SEA, SEH and staphylococcal enterotoxin E (SEE), since heat inactivation is a common method to inactivate toxins during food processing. Interestingly, the investigated toxins behaved distinctly different upon heating. SEA and SEE were more stable at slightly acidic pH values, while SEH adopted an extremely stable structure at neutral pH, with almost no effects on secondary structural elements upon heating to 95°C, and with reversible formation of tertiary structure upon subsequent cooling to room temperature. Taken together, the data suggests that the family of staphylococcal enterotoxins have different ability to withstand heat, and thus the exact profile of heat inactivation for all SEs causing food poisoning needs to be considered to improve food safety. PMID:28207867

  14. (p)ppGpp controls bacterial persistence by stochastic induction of toxin-antitoxin activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisonneuve, Etienne; Castro-Camargo, Manuela; Gerdes, Kenn

    2013-08-29

    Persistence refers to the phenomenon in which isogenic populations of antibiotic-sensitive bacteria produce rare cells that transiently become multidrug tolerant. Whether slow growth in a rare subset of cells underlies the persistence phenotype has not be examined in wild-type bacteria. Here, we show that an exponentially growing population of wild-type Escherichia coli cells produces rare cells that stochastically switch into slow growth, that the slow-growing cells are multidrug tolerant, and that they are able to resuscitate. The persistence phenotype depends hierarchically on the signaling nucleotide (p)ppGpp, Lon protease, inorganic polyphosphate, and toxin-antitoxins. We show that the level of (p)ppGpp varies stochastically in a population of exponentially growing cells and that the high (p)ppGpp level in rare cells induces slow growth and persistence. (p)ppGpp triggers slow growth by activating toxin-antitoxin loci through a regulatory cascade depending on inorganic polyphosphate and Lon protease.

  15. Neutralization of Bacterial YoeBSpn Toxicity and Enhanced Plant Growth in Arabidopsis thaliana via Co-Expression of the Toxin-Antitoxin Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauziah Abu Bakar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial toxin-antitoxin (TA systems have various cellular functions, including as part of the general stress response. The genome of the Gram-positive human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae harbors several putative TA systems, including yefM-yoeBSpn, which is one of four systems that had been demonstrated to be biologically functional. Overexpression of the yoeBSpn toxin gene resulted in cell stasis and eventually cell death in its native host, as well as in Escherichia coli. Our previous work showed that induced expression of a yoeBSpn toxin-Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP fusion gene apparently triggered apoptosis and was lethal in the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, we investigated the effects of co-expression of the yefMSpn antitoxin and yoeBSpn toxin-GFP fusion in transgenic A. thaliana. When co-expressed in Arabidopsis, the YefMSpn antitoxin was found to neutralize the toxicity of YoeBSpn-GFP. Interestingly, the inducible expression of both yefMSpn antitoxin and yoeBSpn toxin-GFP fusion in transgenic hybrid Arabidopsis resulted in larger rosette leaves and taller plants with a higher number of inflorescence stems and increased silique production. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a prokaryotic antitoxin neutralizing its cognate toxin in plant cells.

  16. Bacterial toxins fuel disease progression in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev-Olsen, Andreas; Krejsgaard, Thorbjørn; Lindahl, Lise M

    2013-01-01

    In patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) bacterial infections constitute a major clinical problem caused by compromised skin barrier and a progressive immunodeficiency. Indeed, the majority of patients with advanced disease die from infections with bacteria, e.g., Staphylococcus aureus...

  17. A highly efficient molecular cloning platform that utilises a small bacterial toxin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Wendy W K; Li, Yingfu

    2013-04-15

    Molecular cloning technologies that have emerged in recent years are more efficient and simpler to use than traditional strategies, but many have the disadvantages of requiring multiple steps and expensive proprietary enzymes. We have engineered cloning vectors containing variants of IbsC, a 19-residue toxin from Escherichia coli K-12. These toxic peptides offer selectivity to minimise the background, labour, and cost associated with conventional molecular cloning. As demonstrated with the cloning of reporter genes, this "detox cloning" system consistently produced over 95 % positive clones. Purification steps between digestion and ligation are not necessary, and the total time between digestion and plating of transformants can be as little as three hours. Thus, these IbsC-based cloning vectors are as reliable and amenable to high-throughput cloning as commercially available systems, and have the advantage of being more time-efficient and cost-effective.

  18. Transfer of toxin genes to alternate bacterial hosts for mosquito control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Orduz

    1995-02-01

    Full Text Available Mosquitoes are vector of serious human and animal diseases, such as malaria, dengue, yellow fever, among others. The use of biological control agents has provide an environmentally safe and highly specific alternative to the use of chemical insecticides in the control of vector borne diseases. Bacillus thuringiensis and B. sphaericus produce toxic proteins to mosquito larvae. Great progress has been made on the biochemical and molecular characterization of such proteins and the genes encoding them. Nevertheless, the low residuality of these biological insecticides is one of the major drawbacks. This article present some interesting aspects of the mosquito larvae feeding habits and review the attempts that have been made to genetically engineer microorganisms that while are used by mosquito larvae as a food source should express the Bacillus toxin genes in order to improve the residuality and stability in the mosquito breeding ponds.

  19. Physical understanding of pore formation on supported lipid bilayer by bacterial toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, R.; Agrawal, A.; Ayappa, K. G.; Visweswariah, S. S.; Basu, J. K.

    2013-02-01

    Pore forming toxins are being classified in the protein community based on their ability of forming pores in living cell membranes. Some initial study has apparently pointed out the crystallographic pathway rather can be viewed as a structural as well as morphological changes of proteins in terms of self assembly before and during the pore formation process in surfactant medium. Being a water soluble compound, it changes its conformation and originates some pre-pore complex, which later partially goes inside the cell membrane causing a pore. The physical mechanism for this whole process is still unknown. In this study we have tried to understand these types of biological processes from physical point of view by using supported lipid bilayer as a model system.

  20. Observing the confinement potential of bacterial pore-forming toxin receptors inside rafts with nonblinking Eu(3+)-doped oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkcan, Silvan; Masson, Jean-Baptiste; Casanova, Didier; Mialon, Geneviève; Gacoin, Thierry; Boilot, Jean-Pierre; Popoff, Michel R; Alexandrou, Antigoni

    2012-05-16

    We track single toxin receptors on the apical cell membrane of MDCK cells with Eu-doped oxide nanoparticles coupled to two toxins of the pore-forming toxin family: α-toxin of Clostridium septicum and ε-toxin of Clostridium perfringens. These nonblinking and photostable labels do not perturb the motion of the toxin receptors and yield long uninterrupted trajectories with mean localization precision of 30 nm for acquisition times of 51.3 ms. We were thus able to study the toxin-cell interaction at the single-molecule level. Toxins bind to receptors that are confined within zones of mean area 0.40 ± 0.05 μm(2). Assuming that the receptors move according to the Langevin equation of motion and using Bayesian inference, we determined mean diffusion coefficients of 0.16 ± 0.01 μm(2)/s for both toxin receptors. Moreover, application of this approach revealed a force field within the domain generated by a springlike confining potential. Both toxin receptors were found to experience forces characterized by a mean spring constant of 0.30 ± 0.03 pN/μm at 37°C. Furthermore, both toxin receptors showed similar distributions of diffusion coefficient, domain area, and spring constant. Control experiments before and after incubation with cholesterol oxidase and sphingomyelinase show that these two enzymes disrupt the confinement domains and lead to quasi-free motion of the toxin receptors. Our control data showing cholesterol and sphingomyelin dependence as well as independence of actin depolymerization and microtubule disruption lead us to attribute the confinement of both receptors to lipid rafts. These toxins require oligomerization to develop their toxic activity. The confined nature of the toxin receptors leads to a local enhancement of the toxin monomer concentration and may thus explain the virulence of this toxin family.

  1. Design of benzimidazole- and benzoxazole-2-thione derivatives as inhibitors of bacterial hyaluronan lyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Stephan; Botzki, Alexander; Salmen, Sunnhild; Textor, Christian; Bernhardt, Günther; Dove, Stefan; Buschauer, Armin

    2011-09-01

    Bacterial hyaluronan lyases (Hyal) degrade hyaluronan, an important component of the extracellular matrix, and are involved in microbial spread. Hyal inhibitors may serve as tools to study the role of the enzyme, its substrates and products in the course of bacterial infections. Moreover, such enzyme inhibitors are potential candidates for antibacterial combination therapy. Based on crystal structures of Streptococcus pneumoniae Hyal in complex with a hexasaccharide substrate and with different inhibitors, 1-acylated benzimidazole-2-thiones and benzoxazole-2-thiones were derived as new leads for the inhibition of Streptococcus agalactiae strain 4755 Hyal. Structure-based optimization led to N-(3-phenylpropionyl)benzoxazole-2-thione, one of the most potent compounds known to date (IC(50) values: 24 μM at pH 7.4, 15 μM at pH 5). Among the 27 new derivatives, other N-acylated benzimidazoles and benzoxazoles are just as active at pH 7.4, but not at pH 5. The results support a binding mode characterized by interactions with residues in the catalytic site and with a hydrophobic patch.

  2. Horizontal gene transfer of a bacterial insect toxin gene into the Epichloë fungal symbionts of grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Karen V.; Koppenhöfer, Albrecht M.; Belanger, Faith C.

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer is recognized as an important factor in genome evolution, particularly when the newly acquired gene confers a new capability to the recipient species. We identified a gene similar to the makes caterpillars floppy (mcf1 and mcf2) insect toxin genes in Photorhabdus, bacterial symbionts of nematodes, in the genomes of the Epichloë fungi, which are intercellular symbionts of grasses. Infection by Epichloë spp. often confers insect resistance to the grass hosts, largely due to the production of fungal alkaloids. A mcf-like gene is present in all of the Epichloë genome sequences currently available but in no other fungal genomes. This suggests the Epichloë genes were derived from a single lineage-specific HGT event. Molecular dating was used to estimate the time of the HGT event at between 7.2 and 58.8 million years ago. The mcf-like coding sequence from Epichloë typhina subsp. poae was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. E. coli cells expressing the Mcf protein were toxic to black cutworms (Agrotis ipsilon), whereas E. coli cells containing the vector only were non-toxic. These results suggest that the Epichloë mcf-like genes may be a component, in addition to the fungal alkaloids, of the insect resistance observed in Epichloë-infected grasses. PMID:24990771

  3. Vibrio type III effector VPA1380 is related to the cysteine protease domain of large bacterial toxins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Calder

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a Gram-negative halophilic bacterium and one of the leading causes of food-borne gastroenteritis. Its genome harbors two Type III Secretion Systems (T3SS1 and T3SS2, but only T3SS2 is required for enterotoxicity seen in animal models. Effector proteins secreted from T3SS2 have been previously shown to promote colonization of the intestinal epithelium, invasion of host cells, and destruction of the epithelial monolayer. In this study, we identify VPA1380, a T3SS2 effector protein that is toxic when expressed in yeast. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that VPA1380 is highly similar to the inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6-inducible cysteine protease domains of several large bacterial toxins. Mutations in conserved catalytic residues and residues in the putative IP6-binding pocket abolished toxicity in yeast. Furthermore, VPA1380 was not toxic in IP6 deficient yeast cells. Therefore, our findings suggest that VPA1380 is a cysteine protease that requires IP6 as an activator.

  4. EFFECTS OF PSYCHOTROPIC DRUGS AS BACTERIAL EFFLUX PUMP INHIBITORS ON QUORUM SENSING REGULATED BEHAVIORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur Aybey

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Psychotropic drugs are known to have antimicrobial activity against several groups of microorganisms. The antidepressant agents such as duloxetine, paroxetine, hydroxyzine and venlafaxine are shown to act as efflux pump inhibitors in bacterial cells. In order to the investigation of the effects of psychotropic drugs were determined for clinically significant pathogens by using standart broth microdillusion method. The anti-quorum sensing (anti-QS activity of psychotropic drugs was tested against four test pathogens using the agar well diffusion method. All drugs showed strong inhibitory effect on the growth of S. typhimurium. Additionally, quorum sensing-regulated behaviors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, including swarming, swimming and twitching motility and alkaline protease production were investigated. Most effective drugs on swarming, swimming and twitching motility and alkaline protease production, respectively, were paroxetine and duloxetine; duloxetine; hydroxyzine and venlafaxine; paroxetine and venlafaxine; venlafaxine. Accordingly, psychotropic drugs were shown strongly anti-QS activity by acting as bacterial efflux pump inhibitors and effection on motility and alkaline protease production of P. aeruginosa.

  5. A computational perspective of molecular interactions through virtual screening, pharmacokinetic and dynamic prediction on ribosome toxin A chain and inhibitors of Ricinus communis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Barani Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ricin is considered to be one of the most deadly toxins and gained its favor as a bioweapon that has a serious social and biological impact, due to its widespread nature and abundant availability. The hazardous effects of this toxin in human being are seen in almost all parts of the organ system. The severe consequences of the toxin necessitate the need for developing potential inhibitors that can effectively block its interaction with the host system. Materials and Methods: In order to identify potential inhibitors that can effectively block ricin, we employed various computational approaches. In this work, we computationally screened and analyzed 66 analogs and further tested their ADME/T profiles. From the kinetic and toxicity studies we selected six analogs that possessed appropriate pharmacokinetic and dynamic property. We have also performed a computational docking of these analogs with the target. Results: On the basis of the dock scores and hydrogen bond interactions we have identified analog 64 to be the best interacting molecule. Molecule 64 seems to have stable interaction with the residues Tyr80, Arg180, and Val81. The pharmacophore feature that describes the key functional features of a molecule was also studied and presented. Conclusion: The pharmacophore features of the drugs provided suggests the key functional groups that can aid in the design and synthesis of more potential inhibitors.

  6. RhoA S-nitrosylation as a regulatory mechanism influencing endothelial barrier function in response to G(+)-bacterial toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, F; Wang, Y; Rafikov, R; Haigh, S; Zhi, W B; Kumar, S; Doulias, P T; Rafikova, O; Pillich, H; Chakraborty, T; Lucas, R; Verin, A D; Catravas, J D; She, J X; Black, S M; Fulton, D J R

    2017-03-01

    Disruption of the endothelial barrier in response to Gram positive (G(+)) bacterial toxins is a major complication of acute lung injury (ALI) and can be further aggravated by antibiotics which stimulate toxin release. The integrity of the pulmonary endothelial barrier is mediated by the balance of disruptive forces such as the small GTPase RhoA, and protective forces including endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO). How NO protects against the barrier dysfunction is incompletely understood and our goal was to determine whether NO and S-nitrosylation can modulate RhoA activity and whether this mechanism is important for G(+) toxin-induced microvascular permeability. We found that the G(+) toxin listeriolysin-O (LLO) increased RhoA activity and that NO and S-NO donors inhibit RhoA activity. RhoA was robustly S-nitrosylated as determined by biotin-switch and mercury column analysis. MS revealed that three primary cysteine residues are S-nitrosylated including cys16, cys20 and cys159. Mutation of these residues to serine diminished S-nitrosylation to endogenous NO and mutant RhoA was less sensitive to inhibition by S-NO. G(+)-toxins stimulated the denitrosylation of RhoA which was not mediated by S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR), thioredoxin (TRX) or thiol-dependent enzyme activity but was instead stimulated directly by elevated calcium levels. Calcium-promoted the direct denitrosylation of WT but not mutant RhoA and mutant RhoA adenovirus was more effective than WT in disrupting the barrier integrity of human lung microvascular endothelial cells. In conclusion, we reveal a novel mechanism by which NO and S-nitrosylation reduces RhoA activity which may be of significance in the management of pulmonary endothelial permeability induced by G(+)-toxins.

  7. Identification of novel bacterial histidine biosynthesis inhibitors using docking, ensemble rescoring, and whole-cell assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, S T; Liu, J; Estiu, G; Oltvai, Z N; Wiest, O

    2010-07-15

    The rapid spread on multidrug-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus requires not just novel treatment options, but the development of faster methods for the identification of new hits for drug development. The exponentially increasing speed of computational methods makes a more extensive use in the early stages of drug discovery attractive if sufficient accuracy can be achieved. Computational target identification using systems-level methods suggested the histidine biosynthesis pathway as an attractive target against S. aureus. Potential inhibitors for the pathway were identified through docking, followed by ensemble rescoring, that is sufficiently accurate to justify immediate testing of the identified compounds by whole-cell assays, avoiding the need for time-consuming and often difficult intermediary enzyme assays. This novel strategy is demonstrated for three key enzymes of the S. aureus histidine biosynthesis pathway, which is predicted to be essential for bacterial biomass productions. Virtual screening of a library of approximately 10(6) compounds identified 49 potential inhibitors of three enzymes of this pathway. Eighteen representative compounds were directly tested on three S. aureus- and two Escherichia coli strains in standard disk inhibition assays. Thirteen compounds are inhibitors of some or all of the S. aureus strains, while 14 compounds weakly inhibit growth in one or both E. coli strains. The high hit rate obtained from a fast virtual screen demonstrates the applicability of this novel strategy to the histidine biosynthesis pathway.

  8. Nanomaterial-based sensors for detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens and toxins as well as pork adulteration in meat products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Stephen Inbaraj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Food safety draws considerable attention in the modern pace of the world owing to rapid-changing food recipes and food habits. Foodborne illnesses associated with pathogens, toxins, and other contaminants pose serious threat to human health. Besides, a large amount of money is spent on both analyses and control measures, which causes significant loss to the food industry. Conventional detection methods for bacterial pathogens and toxins are time consuming and laborious, requiring certain sophisticated instruments and trained personnel. In recent years, nanotechnology has emerged as a promising field for solving food safety issues in terms of detecting contaminants, enabling controlled release of preservatives to extend the shelf life of foods, and improving food-packaging strategies. Nanomaterials including metal oxide and metal nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and quantum dots are gaining a prominent role in the design of sensors and biosensors for food analysis. In this review, various nanomaterial-based sensors reported in the literature for detection of several foodborne bacterial pathogens and toxins are summarized highlighting their principles, advantages, and limitations in terms of simplicity, sensitivity, and multiplexing capability. In addition, the application through a noncross-linking method without the need for any surface modification is also presented for detection of pork adulteration in meat products.

  9. RAB-5- and RAB-11-dependent vesicle-trafficking pathways are required for plasma membrane repair after attack by bacterial pore-forming toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los, Ferdinand C O; Kao, Cheng-Yuan; Smitham, Jane; McDonald, Kent L; Ha, Christine; Peixoto, Christina A; Aroian, Raffi V

    2011-02-17

    Pore-forming toxins (PFTs) secreted by pathogenic bacteria are the most common bacterial protein toxins and are important virulence factors for infection. PFTs punch holes in host cell plasma membranes, and although cells can counteract the resulting membrane damage, the underlying mechanisms at play remain unclear. Using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model, we demonstrate in vivo and in an intact epithelium that intestinal cells respond to PFTs by increasing levels of endocytosis, dependent upon RAB-5 and RAB-11, which are master regulators of endocytic and exocytic events. Furthermore, we find that RAB-5 and RAB-11 are required for protection against PFT and to restore integrity to the plasma membrane. One physical mechanism involved is the RAB-11-dependent expulsion of microvilli from the apical side of the intestinal epithelial cells. Specific vesicle-trafficking pathways thus protect cells against an attack by PFTs on plasma membrane integrity, via altered plasma membrane dynamics.

  10. Antibiotics GE23077, novel inhibitors of bacterial RNA polymerase. Part 3: Chemical derivatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Riccardo; Granata, Giorgio; Maffioli, Sonia I; Serina, Stefania; Brunati, Cristina; Sosio, Margherita; Marazzi, Alessandra; Vannini, Alfredo; Patel, Dinesh; White, Richard; Ciabatti, Romeo

    2005-08-15

    GE23077 is a novel RNA polymerase inhibitor that is isolated from the fermentation broth of an Actinomadura sp. It is a cyclic heptapeptide complex made up of four factors, differing in the structure of acyl group connected to the side chain of an alpha,beta-diaminopropanoic acid moiety and in the configuration of the stereocenter of an alpha-amino-malonic acid residue. Although GE23077 shows strong inhibitory activity on both Rifampicin-sensitive and -resistant polymerases, it exhibits poor antimicrobial activity. The most reasonable explanation for this property has been based on the lack of penetration of the molecule across the bacterial membrane, owing to its strong hydrophilic character. To improve penetration, several parts of the molecule were accordingly modified with the aim of altering the physico-chemical properties of GE23077. The current SAR study has identified moieties important for RNA polymerase activity.

  11. Extremely high frequency electromagnetic radiation enforces bacterial effects of inhibitors and antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadevosyan, Hasmik; Kalantaryan, Vitaly; Trchounian, Armen

    2008-01-01

    The coherent electromagnetic radiation (EMR) of the frequency of 51.8 and 53 GHz with low intensity (the power flux density of 0.06 mW/cm(2)) affected the growth of Escherichia coli K12(lambda) under fermentation conditions: the lowering of the growth specific rate was considerably (approximately 2-fold) increased with exposure duration of 30-60 min; a significant decrease in the number of viable cells was also shown. Moreover, the enforced effects of the N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), inhibitor of H(+)-transporting F(0)F(1)-ATPase, on energy-dependent H(+) efflux by whole cells and of antibiotics like tetracycline and chloramphenicol on the following bacterial growth and survival were also determined after radiation. In addition, the lowering in DCCD-inhibited ATPase activity of membrane vesicles from exposed cells was defined. The results confirmed the input of membranous changes in bacterial action of low intensity extremely high frequency EMR, when the F(0)F(1)-ATPase is probably playing a key role. The radiation of bacteria might lead to changed metabolic pathways and to antibiotic resistance. It may also give bacteria with a specific role in biosphere.

  12. Pertussis toxin, an inhibitor of G(αi PCR, inhibits bile acid- and cytokine-induced apoptosis in primary rat hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golnar Karimian

    Full Text Available Excessive hepatocyte apoptosis is a common event in acute and chronic liver diseases leading to loss of functional liver tissue. Approaches to prevent apoptosis have therefore high potential for the treatment of liver disease. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR play crucial roles in cell fate (proliferation, cell death and act through heterotrimeric G-proteins. G(αiPCRs have been shown to regulate lipoapoptosis in hepatocytes, but their role in inflammation- or bile acid-induced apoptosis is unknown. Here, we analyzed the effect of inhibiting G(αiPCR function, using pertussis toxin (PT, on bile acid- and cytokine-induced apoptosis in hepatocytes. Primary rat hepatocytes, HepG2-rNtcp cells (human hepatocellular carcinoma cells or H-4-II-E cells (rat hepatoma cells were exposed to glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα/actinomycin D (ActD. PT (50-200 nmol/L was added 30 minutes prior to the apoptotic stimulus. Apoptosis (caspase-3 activity, acridine orange staining and necrosis (sytox green staining were assessed. PT significantly reduced GCDCA- and TNFα/ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes (-60%, p<0.05 in a dose-dependent manner (with no shift to necrosis, but not in HepG2-rNtcp cells or rat H-4-II-E cells. The protective effect of pertussis toxin was independent of the activation of selected cell survival signal transduction pathways, including ERK, p38 MAPK, PI3K and PKC pathways, as specific protein kinase inhibitors did not reverse the protective effects of pertussis toxin in GCDCA-exposed hepatocytes.Pertussis toxin, an inhibitor of G(αiPCRs, protects hepatocytes, but not hepatocellular carcinoma cells, against bile acid- and cytokine-induced apoptosis and has therapeutic potential as primary hepatoprotective drug, as well as adjuvant in anti-cancer therapy.

  13. Lipophilic Cationic Cyanines Are Potent Complex I Inhibitors and Specific in Vitro Dopaminergic Toxins with Mechanistic Similarities to Both Rotenone and MPP(.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadigamuwa, Chamila C; Mapa, Mapa S T; Wimalasena, Kandatege

    2016-09-19

    We have recently reported that simple lipophilic cationic cyanines are specific and potent dopaminergic toxins with a mechanism of toxicity similar to that of the Parkinsonian toxin MPP(+). In the present study, a group of fluorescent lipophilic cyanines have been used to further exploit the structure-activity relationship of the specific dopaminergic toxicity of cyanines. Here, we report that all cyanines tested were highly toxic to dopaminergic MN9D cells with IC50s in the range of 60-100 nM and not toxic to non-neuronal HepG2 cells parallel to that previously reported for 2,2'- and 4,4'-cyanines. All cyanines nonspecifically accumulate in the mitochondria of both MN9D and HepG2 cells at high concentrations, inhibit the mitochondrial complex I with the inhibition potencies similar to the potent complex I inhibitor, rotenone. They increase the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production specifically in dopaminergic cells causing apoptotic cell death. These and other findings suggest that the complex I inhibition, the expression of low levels of antioxidant enzymes, and presence of high levels of oxidatively labile radical propagator, dopamine, could be responsible for the specific increase in ROS production in dopaminergic cells. Thus, the predisposition of dopaminergic cells to produce high levels of ROS in response to mitochondrial toxins together with their inherent greater demand for energy may contribute to their specific vulnerability toward these toxins. The novel findings that cyanines are an unusual class of potent mitochondrial toxins with specific dopaminergic toxicity suggest that their presence in the environment could contribute to the etiology of PD similar to that of MPP(+) and rotenone.

  14. Co-evolution of quaternary organization and novel RNA tertiary interactions revealed in the crystal structure of a bacterial protein-RNA toxin-antitoxin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Feng; Short, Francesca L; Voss, Jarrod E; Blower, Tim R; Orme, Anastasia L; Whittaker, Tom E; Luisi, Ben F; Salmond, George P C

    2015-10-30

    Genes encoding toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are near ubiquitous in bacterial genomes and they play key roles in important aspects of bacterial physiology, including genomic stability, formation of persister cells under antibiotic stress, and resistance to phage infection. The CptIN locus from Eubacterium rectale is a member of the recently-discovered Type III class of TA systems, defined by a protein toxin suppressed by direct interaction with a structured RNA antitoxin. Here, we present the crystal structure of the CptIN protein-RNA complex to 2.2 Å resolution. The structure reveals a new heterotetrameric quaternary organization for the Type III TA class, and the RNA antitoxin bears a novel structural feature of an extended A-twist motif within the pseudoknot fold. The retention of a conserved ribonuclease active site as well as traits normally associated with TA systems, such as plasmid maintenance, implicates a wider functional role for Type III TA systems. We present evidence for the co-variation of the Type III component pair, highlighting a distinctive evolutionary process in which an enzyme and its substrate co-evolve.

  15. PCR amplfication on a microarray of gel-immobilized oligonucleotides : detection of bacterial toxin- and drug-resistent genes and their mutations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strizhkov, B. N.; Drobyshev, A. L.; Mikhailovich, V. M.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Biochip Technology Center; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology

    2000-10-01

    PCR amplification on a microarray of gel-immobilized primers (microchip) has been developed. One of a pair of PCR primers was immobilized inside a separate microchip polyacrylamide porous gel pad of 0.1 x 0.1 x 0.02 (or 0.04) micron in size and 0.2 (or 0.4) nL in volume. The amplification was carried out simultaneously both in solution covering the microchip array and inside gel pads. Each gel pad contained the immobilized forward primers, while the fluorescently labeled reverse primers, as well as all components of the amplification reaction, diffused into the gel pads from the solution. To increase the amplification efficiency, the forward primers were also added into the solution. The kinetics of amplification was measured in real time in parallel for all gel pads with a fluorescent microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The accuracy of the amplification was assessed by using the melting curves obtained for the duplexes formed by the labeled amplification product and the gel-immobilized primers during the amplification process; alternatively, the duplexes were produced by hybridization of the extended immobilized primers with labeled oligonucleotide probes. The on-chip amplification was applied to detect the anthrax toxin genes and the plasmid-borne beta-lactamase gene responsible for bacterial ampicillin resistance. The allele-specific type of PCR amplification was used to identify the Shiga toxin gene and discriminate it from the Shiga-like one. The genomic mutations responsible for rifampicin resistance of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains were detected by the same type of PCR amplification of the rpoB gene fragment isolated from sputum of tuberculosis patients. The on-chip PCR amplification has been shown to be a rapid, inexpensive and powerful tool to test genes responsible for bacterial toxin production and drug resistance, as well as to reveal point nucleotide mutations.

  16. HLH-30/TFEB-mediated autophagy functions in a cell-autonomous manner for epithelium intrinsic cellular defense against bacterial pore-forming toxin in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huan-Da; Kao, Cheng-Yuan; Liu, Bang-Yu; Huang, Shin-Whei; Kuo, Cheng-Ju; Ruan, Jhen-Wei; Lin, Yen-Hung; Huang, Cheng-Rung; Chen, Yu-Hung; Wang, Horng-Dar; Aroian, Raffi V; Chen, Chang-Shi

    2017-02-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved intracellular system that maintains cellular homeostasis by degrading and recycling damaged cellular components. The transcription factor HLH-30/TFEB-mediated autophagy has been reported to regulate tolerance to bacterial infection, but less is known about the bona fide bacterial effector that activates HLH-30 and autophagy. Here, we reveal that bacterial membrane pore-forming toxin (PFT) induces autophagy in an HLH-30-dependent manner in Caenorhabditis elegans. Moreover, autophagy controls the susceptibility of animals to PFT toxicity through xenophagic degradation of PFT and repair of membrane-pore cell-autonomously in the PFT-targeted intestinal cells in C. elegans. These results demonstrate that autophagic pathways and autophagy are induced partly at the transcriptional level through HLH-30 activation and are required to protect metazoan upon PFT intoxication. Together, our data show a new and powerful connection between HLH-30-mediated autophagy and epithelium intrinsic cellular defense against the single most common mode of bacterial attack in vivo.

  17. The papain inhibitor (SPI) of Streptomyces mobaraensis inhibits bacterial cysteine proteases and is an antagonist of bacterial growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Zindel (Stephan); W.E. Kaman (Wendy); S. Fröls (Sabrina); F. Pfeifer (Felicitas); A. Peters (Annette); J.P. Hays (John); H.-L. Fuchsbauer (Hans-Lothar)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractA novel papain inhibitory protein (SPI) from Streptomyces mobaraensis was studied to measure its inhibitory effect on bacterial cysteine protease activity (Staphylococcus aureus SspB) and culture supernatants (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Bacillus anthracis). Further, growth of Bacillus ant

  18. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and rectoanal junction persistence in ruminants: a study of bacterial-epithelial interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157) was the first Shiga toxin-producing E. coli serotype to be associated with bloody diarrhea or hemorrhagic colitis (HC) and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in humans. It has since been implicated in several outbreaks in the U.S. and globally. Non-O157 STEC have not bee...

  19. Anti-bacterial and anti-toxic immunity induced by a killed whole-cell-cholera toxin B subunit cholera vaccine is essential for protection against lethal bacterial infection in mouse pulmonary cholera model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S-S; Yang, J S; Kim, K W; Yun, C-H; Holmgren, J; Czerkinsky, C; Han, S H

    2013-07-01

    The lack of appropriate animal model for studying protective immunity has limited vaccine development against cholera. Here, we demonstrate a pulmonary cholera model conferred by intranasal administration of mice with live Vibrio cholerae. The bacterial components, but not cholera toxin, caused lethal and acute pneumonia by inducing massive inflammation. Intranasal immunization with Dukoral, comprising killed whole bacteria and recombinant cholera toxin B subunit (rCTB), developed both mucosal and systemic antibody responses with protection against the lethal challenge. Either rCTB-free Dukoral or rCTB alone partially protected the mice against the challenge. However, reconstitution of rCTB-free Dukoral with rCTB restored full protection. Parenteral immunization with Dukoral evoked strong systemic immunity without induction of mucosal immunity or protection from the challenge. These results suggest that both anti-bacterial and anti-toxic immunity are required for protection against V. cholerae-induced pneumonia, and this animal model is useful for pre-clinical evaluation of candidate cholera vaccines.

  20. Remodeling a DNA-binding protein as a specific in vivo inhibitor of bacterial secretin PulD

    OpenAIRE

    Mouratou, Barbara; Schaeffer, Francis; Guilvout, Ingrid; Tello-Manigne, Diana; Pugsley, Anthony P.; Alzari, Pedro M.; Pecorari, Frédéric

    2007-01-01

    We engineered a class of proteins that binds selected polypeptides with high specificity and affinity. Use of the protein scaffold of Sac7d, belonging to a protein family that binds various ligands, overcomes limitations inherent in the use of antibodies as intracellular inhibitors: it lacks disulfide bridges, is small and stable, and can be produced in large amounts. An in vitro combinatorial/selection approach generated specific, high-affinity (up to 140 pM) binders against bacterial outer ...

  1. Subtype-specific suppression of Shiga toxin 2 released from Escherichia coli upon exposure to protein synthesis inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Malene Gantzhorn; Hansen, Claus; Riise, Erik;

    2008-01-01

    Shiga toxins (Stx) are important virulence factors in the pathogenesis of severe disease including hemolytic-uremic syndrome, caused by Stx-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). STEC strains increase the release of Stx in vitro following the addition of fluoroquinolones, whereas protein synthesis...

  2. Mixed biofilm formation by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium enhanced bacterial resistance to sanitization due to extracellular polymeric substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Kalchayanand, Norasak; Schmidt, John W; Harhay, Dayna M

    2013-09-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium are important foodborne pathogens capable of forming single-species biofilms or coexisting in multispecies biofilm communities. Bacterial biofilm cells are usually more resistant to sanitization than their planktonic counterparts, so these foodborne pathogens in biofilms pose a serious food safety concern. We investigated how the coexistence of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium strains would affect bacterial planktonic growth competition and mixed biofilm composition. Furthermore, we also investigated how mixed biofilm formation would affect bacterial resistance to common sanitizers. Salmonella Typhimurium strains were able to outcompete E. coli strains in the planktonic growth phase; however, mixed biofilm development was highly dependent upon companion strain properties in terms of the expression of bacterial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), including curli fimbriae and exopolysaccharide cellulose. The EPS-producing strains with higher biofilm-forming abilities were able to establish themselves in mixed biofilms more efficiently. In comparison to single-strain biofilms, Salmonella or E. coli strains with negative EPS expression obtained significantly enhanced resistance to sanitization by forming mixed biofilms with an EPS-producing companion strain of the other species. These observations indicate that the bacterial EPS components not only enhance the sanitizer resistance of the EPS-producing strains but also render protections to their companion strains, regardless of species, in mixed biofilms. Our study highlights the potential risk of cross-contamination by multispecies biofilms in food safety and the need for increased attention to proper sanitization practices in food processing facilities.

  3. Bisamidate Prodrugs of 2-Substituted 9-[2-(Phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine (PMEA, adefovir) as Selective Inhibitors of Adenylate Cyclase Toxin from Bordetella pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Česnek, Michal; Jansa, Petr; Šmídková, Markéta; Mertlíková-Kaiserová, Helena; Dračínský, Martin; Brust, Tarsis F; Pávek, Petr; Trejtnar, František; Watts, Val J; Janeba, Zlatko

    2015-08-01

    Novel small-molecule agents to treat Bordetella pertussis infections are highly desirable, as pertussis (whooping cough) remains a serious health threat worldwide. In this study, a series of 2-substituted derivatives of 9-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine (PMEA, adefovir), in their isopropyl ester bis(L-phenylalanine) prodrug form, were designed and synthesized as potent inhibitors of adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) isolated from B. pertussis. The series consists of PMEA analogues bearing either a linear or branched aliphatic chain or a heteroatom at the C2 position of the purine moiety. Compounds with a small C2 substituent showed high potency against ACT without cytotoxic effects as well as good selectivity over human adenylate cyclase isoforms AC1, AC2, and AC5. The most potent ACT inhibitor was found to be the bisamidate prodrug of the 2-fluoro PMEA derivative (IC50 =0.145 μM). Although the bisamidate prodrugs reported herein exhibit overall lower activity than the bis(pivaloyloxymethyl) prodrug (adefovir dipivoxil), their toxicity and plasma stability profiles are superior. Furthermore, the bisamidate prodrug was shown to be more stable in plasma than in macrophage homogenate, indicating that the free phosphonate can be effectively distributed to target tissues, such as the lungs. Thus, ACT inhibitors based on acyclic nucleoside phosphonates may represent a new strategy to treat whooping cough.

  4. A sodium channel inhibitor ISTX-I with a novel structure provides a new hint at the evolutionary link between two toxin folds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Mingqiang; Liu, Jiangxin; Zhang, Meilin; Wang, Gan; Zhao, Gang; Wang, Guodong; Zhang, Yaping; Hu, Kaifeng; Lai, Ren

    2016-01-01

    Members of arachnida, such as spiders and scorpions, commonly produce venom with specialized venom glands, paralyzing their prey with neurotoxins that specifically target ion channels. Two well-studied motifs, the disulfide-directed hairpin (DDH) and the inhibitor cystine knot motif (ICK), are both found in scorpion and spider toxins. As arachnids, ticks inject a neurotoxin-containing cocktail from their salivary glands into the host to acquire a blood meal, but peptide toxins acting on ion channels have not been observed in ticks. Here, a new neurotoxin (ISTX-I) that acts on sodium channels was identified from the hard tick Ixodes scapularis and characterized. ISTX-I exhibits a potent inhibitory function with an IC50 of 1.6 μM for sodium channel Nav1.7 but not other sodium channel subtypes. ISTX-I adopts a novel structural fold and is distinct from the canonical ICK motif. Analysis of the ISTX-I, DDH and ICK motifs reveals that the new ISTX-I motif might be an intermediate scaffold between DDH and ICK, and ISTX-I is a clue to the evolutionary link between the DDH and ICK motifs. These results provide a glimpse into the convergent evolution of neurotoxins from predatory and blood-sucking arthropods. PMID:27407029

  5. Dual function of a bee (Apis cerana) inhibitor cysteine knot peptide that acts as an antifungal peptide and insecticidal venom toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee Geun; Kyung, Seung Su; Lee, Kwang Sik; Kim, Bo Yeon; Choi, Yong Soo; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Kwon, Hyung Wook; Je, Yeon Ho; Jin, Byung Rae

    2014-12-01

    Inhibitor cysteine knot (ICK) peptides exhibit ion channel blocking, insecticidal, and antimicrobial activities, but currently, no functional roles for bee-derived ICK peptides have been identified. In this study, a bee (Apis cerana) ICK peptide (AcICK) that acts as an antifungal peptide and as an insecticidal venom toxin was identified. AcICK contains an ICK fold that is expressed in the epidermis, fat body, or venom gland and is present as a 6.6-kDa peptide in bee venom. Recombinant AcICK peptide (expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells) bound directly to Beauveria bassiana and Fusarium graminearum, but not to Escherichia coli or Bacillus thuringiensis. Consistent with these findings, AcICK showed antifungal activity, indicating that AcICK acts as an antifungal peptide. Furthermore, AcICK expression is induced in the fat body and epidermis after injection with B. bassiana. These results provide insight into the role of AcICK during the innate immune response following fungal infection. Additionally, we show that AcICK has insecticidal activity. Our results demonstrate a functional role for AcICK in bees: AcICK acts as an antifungal peptide in innate immune reactions in the body and as an insecticidal toxin in venom. The finding that the AcICK peptide functions with different mechanisms of action in the body and in venom highlights the two-pronged strategy that is possible with the bee ICK peptide.

  6. Stool C difficile toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... toxin; Colitis - toxin; Pseudomembranous - toxin; Necrotizing colitis - toxin; C difficile - toxin ... be analyzed. There are several ways to detect C difficile toxin in the stool sample. Enzyme immunoassay ( ...

  7. Inhibition of cholera toxin and other AB toxins by polyphenolic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    All AB-type protein toxins have intracellular targets despite an initial extracellular location. These toxins use different methods to reach the cytosol and have different effects on the target cell. Broad-spectrum inhibitors against AB toxins are therefore hard to develop because the toxins use dif...

  8. [Protein toxins of Staphylococcus aureus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsutdinov, A F; Tiurin, Iu A

    2014-01-01

    Main scientific-research studies regarding protein bacterial toxins of the most widespread bacteria that belong to Staphylococcus spp. genus and in particular the most pathogenic species for humans--Staphylococcus aureus, are analyzed. Structural and biological properties of protein toxins that have received the name of staphylococcus pyrogenic toxins (PTSAg) are presented. Data regarding genetic regulation of secretion and synthesis of these toxins and 3 main regulatory genetic systems (agr--accessory gene regulator, xpr--extracellular protein regulator, sar--staphylococcal accessory regulator) that coordinate synthesis of the most important protein toxins and enzymes for virulence of S. aureus, are presented.

  9. A Cell-Based Approach for the Biosynthesis/Screening of Cyclic Peptide Libraries against Bacterial Toxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarero, J A; Kimura, R; Woo, Y; Cantor, J; Steenblock, E

    2007-10-24

    Available methods for developing and screening small drug-like molecules able to knockout toxins or pathogenic microorganisms have some limitations. In order to be useful, these new methods must provide high-throughput analysis and identify specific binders in a short period of time. To meet this need, we are developing an approach that uses living cells to generate libraries of small biomolecules, which are then screened inside the cell for activity. Our group is using this new, combined approach to find highly specific ligands capable of disabling anthrax Lethal Factor (LF) as proof of principle. Key to our approach is the development of a method for the biosynthesis of libraries of cyclic peptides, and an efficient screening process that can be carried out inside the cell.

  10. The bacterial toxin RelE induces specific mRNA cleavage in the A site of the eukaryote ribosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, Dmitri; Hauryliuk, Vasili; Terenin, Ilya; Dmitriev, Sergey; Ehrenberg, Måns; Shatsky, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    RelE/RelB is a well-characterized toxin–anti-toxin pair involved in nutritional stress responses in Bacteria and Archae. RelE lacks any eukaryote homolog, but we demonstrate here that it efficiently and specifically cleaves mRNA in the A site of the eukaryote ribosome. The cleavage mechanism is similar to that in bacteria, showing the feasibility of A-site cleavage of mRNA for regulatory purposes also in eukaryotes. RelE cleavage in the A-site codon of a stalled eukaryote ribosome is precise and easily monitored, making “RelE printing” a useful complement to toeprinting to determine the exact mRNA location on the eukaryote ribosome and to probe the occupancy of its A site. PMID:18083838

  11. Unique conformer selection of human growth-regulatory lectin galectin-1 for ganglioside GM1 versus bacterial toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Hans-Christian; André, Sabine; Lu, Shan-Yun; Frank, Martin; Kaltner, Herbert; van Kuik, J Albert; Korchagina, Elena Y; Bovin, Nicolai; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Kaptein, Robert; Vliegenthart, Johannes F G; von der Lieth, Claus-Wilhelm; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Kopitz, Jürgen; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2003-12-23

    Endogenous lectins induce effects on cell growth by binding to antennae of natural glycoconjugates. These complex carbohydrates often present more than one potential lectin-binding site in a single chain. Using the growth-regulatory interaction of the pentasaccharide of ganglioside GM(1) with homodimeric galectin-1 on neuroblastoma cell surfaces as a model, we present a suitable strategy for addressing this issue. The approach combines NMR spectroscopic and computational methods and does not require isotope-labeled glycans. It involves conformational analysis of the two building blocks of the GM(1) glycan, i.e., the disaccharide Galbeta1-3GalNAc and the trisaccharide Neu5Acalpha2-3Galbeta1-4Glc. Their bound-state conformations were determined by transferred nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy. Next, measurements on the lectin-pentasaccharide complex revealed differential conformer selection regarding the sialylgalactose linkage in the tri- versus pentasaccharide (Phi and Psi value of -70 degrees and 15 degrees vs 70 degrees and 15 degrees, respectively). To proceed in the structural analysis, the characteristic experimentally detected spatial vicinity of a galactose unit and Trp68 in the galectin's binding site offered a means, exploiting saturation transfer from protein to carbohydrate protons. Indeed, we detected two signals unambiguously assigned to the terminal Gal and the GalNAc residues. Computational docking and interaction energy analyses of the entire set of ligands supported and added to experimental results. The finding that the ganglioside's carbohydrate chain is subject to differential conformer selection at the sialylgalactose linkage by galectin-1 and GM(1)-binding cholera toxin (Phi and Psi values of -172 degrees and -26 degrees, respectively) is relevant for toxin-directed drug design. In principle, our methodology can be applied in studies aimed at blocking galectin functionality in malignancy and beyond glycosciences.

  12. Shiga Toxin 1, as DNA Repair Inhibitor, Synergistically Potentiates the Activity of the Anticancer Drug, Mafosfamide, on Raji Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Sestili

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin 1 (Stx1, produced by pathogenic Escherichia coli, targets a restricted subset of human cells, which possess the receptor globotriaosylceramide (Gb3Cer/CD77, causing hemolytic uremic syndrome. In spite of the high toxicity, Stx1 has been proposed in the treatment of Gb3Cer/CD77-expressing lymphoma. Here, we demonstrate in a Burkitt lymphoma cell model expressing this receptor, namely Raji cells, that Stx1, at quasi-non-toxic concentrations (0.05–0.1 pM, inhibits the repair of mafosfamide-induced DNA alkylating lesions, synergistically potentiating the cytotoxic activity of the anticancer drug. Conversely, human promyelocytic leukemia cells HL-60, which do not express Gb3Cer/CD77, were spared by the toxin as previously demonstrated for CD34+ human progenitor cells, and hence, in this cancer model, no additive nor synergistic effects were observed with the combined Stx1/mafosfamide treatment. Our findings suggest that Stx1 could be used to improve the mafosfamide-mediated purging of Gb3Cer/CD77+ tumor cells before autologous bone marrow transplantation.

  13. Variations in the binding pocket of an inhibitor of the bacterial division protein FtsZ across genotypes and species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Miguel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The recent increase in antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria calls for new approaches to drug-target selection and drug development. Targeting the mechanisms of action of proteins involved in bacterial cell division bypasses problems associated with increasingly ineffective variants of older antibiotics; to this end, the essential bacterial cytoskeletal protein FtsZ is a promising target. Recent work on its allosteric inhibitor, PC190723, revealed in vitro activity on Staphylococcus aureus FtsZ and in vivo antimicrobial activities. However, the mechanism of drug action and its effect on FtsZ in other bacterial species are unclear. Here, we examine the structural environment of the PC190723 binding pocket using PocketFEATURE, a statistical method that scores the similarity between pairs of small-molecule binding sites based on 3D structure information about the local microenvironment, and molecular dynamics (MD simulations. We observed that species and nucleotide-binding state have significant impacts on the structural properties of the binding site, with substantially disparate microenvironments for bacterial species not from the Staphylococcus genus. Based on PocketFEATURE analysis of MD simulations of S. aureus FtsZ bound to GTP or with mutations that are known to confer PC190723 resistance, we predict that PC190723 strongly prefers to bind Staphylococcus FtsZ in the nucleotide-bound state. Furthermore, MD simulations of an FtsZ dimer indicated that polymerization may enhance PC190723 binding. Taken together, our results demonstrate that a drug-binding pocket can vary significantly across species, genetic perturbations, and in different polymerization states, yielding important information for the further development of FtsZ inhibitors.

  14. CXCL1 can be regulated by IL-6 and promotes granulocyte adhesion to brain capillaries during bacterial toxin exposure and encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Monica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Granulocytes generally exert protective roles in the central nervous system (CNS, but recent studies suggest that they can be detrimental in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the most common model of multiple sclerosis. While the cytokines and adhesion molecules involved in granulocyte adhesion to the brain vasculature have started to be elucidated, the required chemokines remain undetermined. Methods CXCR2 ligand expression was examined in the CNS of mice suffering from EAE or exposed to bacterial toxins by quantitative RT-PCR and in situ hybridization. CXCL1 expression was analyzed in IL-6-treated endothelial cell cultures by quantitative RT-PCR and ELISA. Granulocytes were counted in the brain vasculature after treatment with a neutralizing anti-CXCL1 antibody using stereological techniques. Results CXCL1 was the most highly expressed ligand of the granulocyte receptor CXCR2 in the CNS of mice subjected to EAE or infused with lipopolysaccharide (LPS or pertussis toxin (PTX, the latter being commonly used to induce EAE. IL-6 upregulated CXCL1 expression in brain endothelial cells by acting transcriptionally and mediated the stimulatory effect of PTX on CXCL1 expression. The anti-CXCL1 antibody reduced granulocyte adhesion to brain capillaries in the three conditions under study. Importantly, it attenuated EAE severity when given daily for a week during the effector phase of the disease. Conclusions This study identifies CXCL1 not only as a key regulator of granulocyte recruitment into the CNS, but also as a new potential target for the treatment of neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis.

  15. PEROXOTITANATE- AND MONOSODIUM METAL-TITANATE COMPOUNDS AS INHIBITORS OF BACTERIAL GROWTH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D.

    2011-01-19

    Sodium titanates are ion-exchange materials that effectively bind a variety of metal ions over a wide pH range. Sodium titanates alone have no known adverse biological effects but metal-exchanged titanates (or metal titanates) can deliver metal ions to mammalian cells to alter cell processes in vitro. In this work, we test a hypothesis that metal-titanate compounds inhibit bacterial growth; demonstration of this principle is one prerequisite to developing metal-based, titanate-delivered antibacterial agents. Focusing initially on oral diseases, we exposed five species of oral bacteria to titanates for 24 h, with or without loading of Au(III), Pd(II), Pt(II), and Pt(IV), and measuring bacterial growth in planktonic assays through increases in optical density. In each experiment, bacterial growth was compared with control cultures of titanates or bacteria alone. We observed no suppression of bacterial growth by the sodium titanates alone, but significant (p < 0.05, two-sided t-tests) suppression was observed with metal-titanate compounds, particularly Au(III)-titanates, but with other metal titanates as well. Growth inhibition ranged from 15 to 100% depending on the metal ion and bacterial species involved. Furthermore, in specific cases, the titanates inhibited bacterial growth 5- to 375-fold versus metal ions alone, suggesting that titanates enhanced metal-bacteria interactions. This work supports further development of metal titanates as a novel class of antibacterials.

  16. Deciphering the role of coumarin as a novel quorum sensing inhibitor suppressing virulence phenotypes in bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Barranquero, José A; Reen, F Jerry; McCarthy, Ronan R; O'Gara, Fergal

    2015-04-01

    The rapid unchecked rise in antibiotic resistance over the last few decades has led to an increased focus on the need for alternative therapeutic strategies for the treatment and clinical management of microbial infections. In particular, small molecules that can suppress microbial virulence systems independent of any impact on growth are receiving increased attention. Quorum sensing (QS) is a cell-to-cell signalling communication system that controls the virulence behaviour of a broad spectrum of bacterial pathogens. QS systems have been proposed as an effective target, particularly as they control biofilm formation in pathogens, a key driver of antibiotic ineffectiveness. In this study, we identified coumarin, a natural plant phenolic compound, as a novel QS inhibitor, with potent anti-virulence activity in a broad spectrum of pathogens. Using a range of biosensor systems, coumarin was active against short, medium and long chain N-acyl-homoserine lactones, independent of any effect on growth. To determine if this suppression was linked to anti-virulence activity, key virulence systems were studied in the nosocomial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Consistent with suppression of QS, coumarin inhibited biofilm, the production of phenazines and swarming motility in this organism potentially linked to reduced expression of the rhlI and pqsA quorum sensing genes. Furthermore, coumarin significantly inhibited biofilm formation and protease activity in other bacterial pathogens and inhibited bioluminescence in Aliivibrio fischeri. In light of these findings, coumarin would appear to have potential as a novel quorum sensing inhibitor with a broad spectrum of action.

  17. Traffic jam at the bacterial sec translocase: targeting the SecA nanomotor by small-molecule inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segers, Kenneth; Anné, Jozef

    2011-06-24

    The rapid rise of drug-resistant bacteria is one of the most serious unmet medical needs facing the world. Despite this increasing problem of antibiotic resistance, the number of different antibiotics available for the treatment of serious infections is dwindling. Therefore, there is an urgent need for new antibacterial drugs, preferably with novel modes of action to potentially avoid cross-resistance with existing antibacterial agents. In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to bacterial protein secretion as a potential antibacterial target. Among the different protein secretion pathways that are present in bacterial pathogens, the general protein secretory (Sec) pathway is widely considered as an attractive target for antibacterial therapy. One of the key components of the Sec pathway is the peripheral membrane ATPase SecA, which provides the energy for the translocation of preproteins across the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. In this review, we will provide an overview of research efforts on the discovery and development of small-molecule SecA inhibitors. Furthermore, recent advances on the structure and function of SecA and their potential impact on antibacterial drug discovery will be discussed.

  18. Giardia duodenalis infection reduces granulocyte infiltration in an in vivo model of bacterial toxin-induced colitis and attenuates inflammation in human intestinal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, James A; Motta, Jean-Paul; Schenck, L Patrick; Hirota, Simon A; Beck, Paul L; Buret, Andre G

    2014-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis (syn. G. intestinalis, G. lamblia) is a predominant cause of waterborne diarrheal disease that may lead to post-infectious functional gastrointestinal disorders. Although Giardia-infected individuals could carry as much as 106 trophozoites per centimetre of gut, their intestinal mucosa is devoid of overt signs of inflammation. Recent studies have shown that in endemic countries where bacterial infectious diseases are common, Giardia infections can protect against the development of diarrheal disease and fever. Conversely, separate observations have indicated Giardia infections may enhance the severity of diarrheal disease from a co-infecting pathogen. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes or neutrophils (PMNs) are granulocytic, innate immune cells characteristic of acute intestinal inflammatory responses against bacterial pathogens that contribute to the development of diarrheal disease following recruitment into intestinal tissues. Giardia cathepsin B cysteine proteases have been shown to attenuate PMN chemotaxis towards IL-8/CXCL8, suggesting Giardia targets PMN accumulation. However, the ability of Giardia infections to attenuate PMN accumulation in vivo and how in turn this effect may alter the host inflammatory response in the intestine has yet to be demonstrated. Herein, we report that Giardia infection attenuates granulocyte tissue infiltration induced by intra-rectal instillation of Clostridium difficile toxin A and B in an isolate-dependent manner. This attenuation of granulocyte infiltration into colonic tissues paralled decreased expression of several cytokines associated with the recruitment of PMNs. Giardia trophozoite isolates that attenuated granulocyte infiltration in vivo also decreased protein expression of cytokines released from inflamed mucosal biopsy tissues collected from patients with active Crohn's disease, including several cytokines associated with PMN recruitment. These results demonstrate for the first time that certain

  19. Giardia duodenalis infection reduces granulocyte infiltration in an in vivo model of bacterial toxin-induced colitis and attenuates inflammation in human intestinal tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A Cotton

    Full Text Available Giardia duodenalis (syn. G. intestinalis, G. lamblia is a predominant cause of waterborne diarrheal disease that may lead to post-infectious functional gastrointestinal disorders. Although Giardia-infected individuals could carry as much as 106 trophozoites per centimetre of gut, their intestinal mucosa is devoid of overt signs of inflammation. Recent studies have shown that in endemic countries where bacterial infectious diseases are common, Giardia infections can protect against the development of diarrheal disease and fever. Conversely, separate observations have indicated Giardia infections may enhance the severity of diarrheal disease from a co-infecting pathogen. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes or neutrophils (PMNs are granulocytic, innate immune cells characteristic of acute intestinal inflammatory responses against bacterial pathogens that contribute to the development of diarrheal disease following recruitment into intestinal tissues. Giardia cathepsin B cysteine proteases have been shown to attenuate PMN chemotaxis towards IL-8/CXCL8, suggesting Giardia targets PMN accumulation. However, the ability of Giardia infections to attenuate PMN accumulation in vivo and how in turn this effect may alter the host inflammatory response in the intestine has yet to be demonstrated. Herein, we report that Giardia infection attenuates granulocyte tissue infiltration induced by intra-rectal instillation of Clostridium difficile toxin A and B in an isolate-dependent manner. This attenuation of granulocyte infiltration into colonic tissues paralled decreased expression of several cytokines associated with the recruitment of PMNs. Giardia trophozoite isolates that attenuated granulocyte infiltration in vivo also decreased protein expression of cytokines released from inflamed mucosal biopsy tissues collected from patients with active Crohn's disease, including several cytokines associated with PMN recruitment. These results demonstrate for the first time

  20. Amidate prodrugs of 9-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine as inhibitors of adenylate cyclase toxin from Bordetella pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šmídková, Markéta; Dvoráková, Alexandra; Tloust'ová, Eva; Česnek, Michal; Janeba, Zlatko; Mertlíková-Kaiserová, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) is the key virulence factor of Bordetella pertussis that facilitates its invasion into the mammalian body. 9-[2-(Phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine diphosphate (PMEApp), the active metabolite of the antiviral drug bis(POM)PMEA (adefovir dipivoxil), has been shown to inhibit ACT. The objective of this study was to evaluate six novel amidate prodrugs of PMEA, both phenyloxy phosphonamidates and phosphonodiamidates, for their ability to inhibit ACT activity in the J774A.1 macrophage cell line. The two phenyloxy phosphonamidate prodrugs exhibited greater inhibitory activity (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 22 and 46 nM) than the phosphonodiamidates (IC50 = 84 to 3,960 nM). The inhibitory activity of the prodrugs correlated with their lipophilicity and the degree of their hydrolysis into free PMEA in J774A.1 cells. Although the prodrugs did not inhibit ACT as effectively as bis(POM)PMEA (IC50 = 6 nM), they were significantly less cytotoxic. Moreover, they all reduced apoptotic effects of ACT and prevented an ACT-induced elevation of intracellular [Ca(2+)]i. The amidate prodrugs were less susceptible to degradation in Caco-2 cells compared to bis(POM)PMEA, while they exerted good transepithelial permeability in this assay. As a consequence, a large amount of intact amidate prodrug is expected to be available to target macrophages in vivo. This feature makes nontoxic amidate prodrugs attractive candidates for further investigation as novel antimicrobial agents.

  1. Chloroquine derivatives block the translocation pores and inhibit cellular entry of Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin and Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreidler, Anna-Maria; Benz, Roland; Barth, Holger

    2017-03-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium botulinum and Bacillus anthracis produce the binary protein toxins C2 and lethal toxin (LT), respectively. These toxins consist of a binding/transport (B7) component that delivers the separate enzyme (A) component into the cytosol of target cells where it modifies its specific substrate and causes cell death. The B7 components of C2 toxin and LT, C2IIa and PA63, respectively, are ring-shaped heptamers that bind to their cellular receptors and form complexes with their A components C2I and lethal factor (LF), respectively. After receptor-mediated endocytosis of the toxin complexes, C2IIa and PA63 insert into the membranes of acidified endosomes and form trans-membrane pores through which C2I and LF translocate across endosomal membranes into the cytosol. C2IIa and PA63 also form channels in planar bilayer membranes, and we used this approach earlier to identify chloroquine as a potent blocker of C2IIa and PA63 pores. Here, a series of chloroquine derivatives was investigated to identify more efficient toxin inhibitors with less toxic side effects. Chloroquine, primaquine, quinacrine, and fluphenazine blocked C2IIa and PA63 pores in planar lipid bilayers and in membranes of living epithelial cells and macrophages, thereby preventing the pH-dependent membrane transport of the A components into the cytosol and protecting cells from intoxication with C2 toxin and LT. These potent inhibitors of toxin entry underline the central role of the translocation pores for cellular uptake of binary bacterial toxins and as relevant drug targets, and might be lead compounds for novel pharmacological strategies against severe enteric diseases and anthrax.

  2. Multicenter evaluation of the BD max enteric bacterial panel PCR assay for rapid detection of Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Campylobacter spp. (C. jejuni and C. coli), and Shiga toxin 1 and 2 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, S M; Buchan, B W; Doern, C; Fader, R; Ferraro, M J; Pillai, D R; Rychert, J; Doyle, L; Lainesse, A; Karchmer, T; Mortensen, J E

    2015-05-01

    Diarrhea due to enteric bacterial pathogens causes significant morbidity and mortality in the United States and worldwide. However, bacterial pathogens may be infrequently identified. Currently, culture and enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) are the primary methods used by clinical laboratories to detect enteric bacterial pathogens. We conducted a multicenter evaluation of the BD Max enteric bacterial panel (EBP) PCR assay in comparison to culture for the detection of Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Campylobacter jejuni, and Campylobacter coli and an EIA for Shiga toxins 1 and 2. A total of 4,242 preserved or unpreserved stool specimens, including 3,457 specimens collected prospectively and 785 frozen, retrospective samples, were evaluated. Compared to culture or EIA, the positive percent agreement (PPA) and negative percent agreement (NPA) values for the BD Max EBP assay for all specimens combined were as follows: 97.1% and 99.2% for Salmonella spp., 99.1% and 99.7% for Shigella spp., 97.2% and 98.4% for C. jejuni and C. coli, and 97.4% and 99.3% for Shiga toxins, respectively. Discrepant results for prospective samples were resolved with alternate PCR assays and bidirectional sequencing of amplicons. Following discrepant analysis, PPA and NPA values were as follows: 97.3% and 99.8% for Salmonella spp., 99.2% and 100% for Shigella spp., 97.5% and 99.0% for C. jejuni and C. coli, and 100% and 99.7% for Shiga toxins, respectively. No differences in detection were observed for samples preserved in Cary-Blair medium and unpreserved samples. In this large, multicenter study, the BD Max EBP assay showed superior sensitivity compared to conventional methods and excellent specificity for the detection of enteric bacterial pathogens in stool specimens.

  3. Staphylococcus aureus toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a dangerous pathogen that causes a variety of severe diseases. The virulence of S. aureus is defined by a large repertoire of virulence factors, among which secreted toxins play a preeminent role. Many S. aureus toxins damage biological membranes, leading to cell death. In particular, S. aureus produces potent hemolysins and leukotoxins. Among the latter, some were recently identified to lyse neutrophils after ingestion, representing an especially powerful weapon against bacterial elimination by innate host defense. Furthermore, S. aureus secretes many factors that inhibit the complement cascade or prevent recognition by host defenses. Several further toxins add to this multi-faceted program of S. aureus to evade elimination in the host. This review will give an overview over S. aureus toxins focusing on recent advances in our understanding of how leukotoxins work in receptor-mediated or receptor-independent fashions.

  4. Molecular Motions as a Drug Target: Mechanistic Simulations of Anthrax Toxin Edema Factor Function Led to the Discovery of Novel Allosteric Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Blondel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Edema Factor (EF is a component of Bacillus anthracis toxin essential for virulence. Its adenylyl cyclase activity is induced by complexation with the ubiquitous eukaryotic cellular protein, calmodulin (CaM. EF and its complexes with CaM, nucleotides and/or ions, have been extensively characterized by X-ray crystallography. Those structural data allowed molecular simulations analysis of various aspects of EF action mechanism, including the delineation of EF and CaM domains through their association energetics, the impact of calcium binding on CaM, and the role of catalytic site ions. Furthermore, a transition path connecting the free inactive form to the CaM-complexed active form of EF was built to model the activation mechanism in an attempt to define an inhibition strategy. The cavities at the surface of EF were determined for each path intermediate to identify potential sites where the binding of a ligand could block activation. A non-catalytic cavity (allosteric was found to shrink rapidly at early stages of the path and was chosen to perform virtual screening. Amongst 18 compounds selected in silico and tested in an enzymatic assay, 6 thiophen ureidoacid derivatives formed a new family of EF allosteric inhibitors with IC50 as low as 2 micromolars.

  5. Design, synthesis and antibacterial activity of cinnamaldehyde derivatives as inhibitors of the bacterial cell division protein FtsZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Sheng, Juzheng; Huang, Guihua; Ma, Ruixin; Yin, Fengxin; Song, Di; Zhao, Can; Ma, Shutao

    2015-06-05

    In an attempt to discover potential antibacterial agents against the increasing bacterial resistance, novel cinnamaldehyde derivatives as FtsZ inhibitors were designed, synthesized and evaluated for their antibacterial activity against nine significant pathogens using broth microdilution method, and their cell division inhibitory activity against four representative strains. In the in vitro antibacterial activity, the newly synthesized compounds generally displayed better efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC25923 than the others. In particular, compounds 3, 8 and 10 exerted superior or comparable activity to all the reference drugs. In the cell division inhibitory activity, all the compounds showed the same trend as their in vitro antibacterial activity, exhibiting better activity against S. aureus ATCC25923 than the other strains. Additionally, compounds 3, 6, 7 and 8 displayed potent cell division inhibitory activity with an MIC value of below 1 μg/mL, over 256-fold better than all the reference drugs.

  6. An inhibitor of bacterial quorum sensing reduces mortalities caused by vibriosis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Maria; Buch, Christiane; Austin, B.

    2004-01-01

    The fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum produces quorum sensing signal molecules, N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), which in several Gram-negative human and plant pathogenic bacteria regulate virulence factors. Expression of these factors can be blocked using specific quorum-sensing inhibitors (QSIs......). The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a QSI, furanone C-30, on mortality of rainbow trout during challenge with V. anguillarum. Addition of 0.01 or 0.1 muM furanone C-30 to rainbow trout infected by cohabitation caused a significant reduction in accumulated mortality from 80...... experiments, thus avoiding selection for resistance. To elucidate the mechanism of disease control by furanone C-30, we determined its effect on the bacterial proteome, motility, and respiration. No effects were seen of furanone C-30 in any of these experiments. Although no cytotoxic effect on HeLa cells were...

  7. Quorum Sensing Inhibitors from the Sea Discovered Using Bacterial N-acyl-homoserine Lactone-Based Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurav, Kumar; Costantino, Valeria; Venturi, Vittorio; Steindler, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Marine natural products with antibiotic activity have been a rich source of drug discovery; however, the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains has turned attention towards the discovery of alternative innovative strategies to combat pathogens. In many pathogenic bacteria, the expression of virulence factors is under the regulation of quorum sensing (QS). QS inhibitors (QSIs) present a promising alternative or potential synergistic treatment since they disrupt the signaling pathway used for intra- and interspecies coordination of expression of virulence factors. This review covers the set of molecules showing QSI activity that were isolated from marine organisms, including plants (algae), animals (sponges, cnidarians, and bryozoans), and microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, and cyanobacteria). The compounds found and the methods used for their isolation are the emphasis of this review. PMID:28241461

  8. Identification of inhibitors of a bacterial sigma factor using a new high-throughput screening assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mowafi, S A; Sineva, E; Alumasa, J N; Nicoloff, H; Tomsho, J W; Ades, S E; Keiler, K C

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria are formidable pathogens because their cell envelope presents an adaptable barrier to environmental and host-mediated challenges. The stress response pathway controlled by the alternative sigma factor σ(E) is critical for maintenance of the cell envelope. Because σ(E) is required for the virulence or viability of several Gram-negative pathogens, it might be a useful target for antibiotic development. To determine if small molecules can inhibit the σ(E) pathway, and to permit high-throughput screening for antibiotic lead compounds, a σ(E) activity assay that is compatible with high-throughput screening was developed and validated. The screen employs a biological assay with positive readout. An Escherichia coli strain was engineered to express yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) under negative regulation by the σ(E) pathway, such that inhibitors of the pathway increase the production of YFP. To validate the screen, the reporter strain was used to identify σ(E) pathway inhibitors from a library of cyclic peptides. Biochemical characterization of one of the inhibitory cyclic peptides showed that it binds σ(E), inhibits RNA polymerase holoenzyme formation, and inhibits σ(E)-dependent transcription in vitro. These results demonstrate that alternative sigma factors can be inhibited by small molecules and enable high-throughput screening for inhibitors of the σ(E) pathway.

  9. Germa-gamma-lactones as novel inhibitors of bacterial urease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amtul, Zareen; Follmer, Cristian; Mahboob, Sumera; Atta-Ur-Rahman; Mazhar, Muhammad; Khan, Khalid M; Siddiqui, Rafat A; Muhammad, Sajjad; Kazmi, Syed A; Choudhary, Mohammad Iqbal

    2007-05-04

    Organogermanium compounds have been used as pharmacological agents. However, very few reports are available on the synthesis and antibacterial activities of lactones containing organogermaniums. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine the effects of different lactone-substituted organogermaniums on bacterial growth and their urease activity. We report synthesis of 12 germa-gamma-lactones (GeL) and their antimicrobial activities against several bacterial pathogens. Antibacterial action of all GeL was highly selective against Gram-negative bacilli, particularly Proteus mirabilis, an important pathogen infecting the urinary tract. Furthermore, our data indicate that 8-quinoline derivatives were more potent against P. mirabilis than 2-methyl-8-quinoline. For example, the beta-(o-methylphenyl)-gamma,gamma-bis(8-quinolinoxy)germa-gamma-lactone and beta-(o-methoxyphenyl)-gamma,gamma-bis(8-quinolinoxy)germa-gamma-lactone were maximally active with MIC(90) of 61 and 94 microM, respectively. In vitro studies demonstrated a linear correlation between antibacterial activity and inhibition of P. mirabilis urease enzyme. Further kinetic analyses revealed that inhibition occurred in a noncompetitive and concentration-dependent manner with the minimum IC(50) of 31 microM for beta-(o-methoxyphenyl)-gamma,gamma-bis(8-quinolinoxy)germa-gamma-lactone. In conclusion, these findings suggest that GeL have potential to be developed as antimicrobial agents against P. mirabilis infection.

  10. Structure-activity relationship studies of N-methylated and N-hydroxylated spider polyamine toxins as inhibitors of ionotropic glutamate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørager, Niels G; Poulsen, Mette H; Jensen, Anna G;

    2014-01-01

    Polyamine toxins from spiders and wasps are potent open-channel blockers of ionotropic glutamate (iGlu) receptors. It is well-established that secondary amino groups in the polyamine moiety of these toxins are key to both selectivity and potency at iGlu receptors, still some native spider polyamine...... toxins comprise both N-methyl and N-hydroxy functionalities. Here, we investigate the effect of both N-methylation and N-hydroxylation of spider polyamine toxins by the synthesis and biological evaluation of the naturally occurring N-methylated argiopinines and pseudoargiopinines I and II, N...

  11. Characterization of the sulfate uptake and assimilation pathway from Xanthomonas citri - targets for bacterial growth inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tambascia, C.; Balan, A. [Laboratorio Nacional de Biociencias - LNBIO, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Microorganisms require sulfur for growth and obtain it either for inorganic sulfate or organosulfur compounds. ATP-Binding Cassete (SulT family) or major facilitator superfamily-type (SulP) transporters are responsible for the sulfate transport into the cell. In Xanthomonas citri, the phytopathogenic bacterium that causes the canker citrus disease, there are no reports related to the importance of these transporters during in vitro or in vivo infection. We identified in X. citri genome all the genes that belong to the well-characterized cys regulon from Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, which includes three ABC transporters and all the enzymes necessary for sulfate oxide reduction to sulfide and cysteine. Once these genes have been shown to be extremely important for bacteria growth and development in different environments, we chose the sbpcysWUA and cysDNCHIJG operons, which encodes the ABC inorganic sulfate ABC transporter and all the enzymes necessary for conversion of sulfate in cysteine, respectively. As a step for crystallization trials and resolution of their tridimensional structures, the referred genes were amplified and cloned into the cloning vector pGEM T-easy. In addition, using bioinformatics tools and molecular modeling we characterized all the protein functions as well as built tridimensional models of their structure for determination of the active sites. The importance of each protein is discussed aiming the discovery of a good target for development of inhibitors that could block the bacterium growth. (author)

  12. Novel bacterial bioassay for a high-throughput screening of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocaboy-Faquet, Emilie; Noguer, Thierry; Romdhane, Sana; Bertrand, Cédric; Dayan, Franck Emmanuel; Barthelmebs, Lise

    2014-08-01

    Plant 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) is the molecular target of a range of synthetic β-triketone herbicides that are currently used commercially. Their mode of action is based on an irreversible inhibition of HPPD. Therefore, this inhibitory capacity was used to develop a whole-cell colorimetric bioassay with a recombinant Escherichia coli expressing a plant HPPD for the herbicide analysis of β-triketones. The principle of the bioassay is based on the ability of the recombinant E. coli clone to produce a soluble melanin-like pigment, from tyrosine catabolism through p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate and homogentisate. The addition of sulcotrione, a HPPD inhibitor, decreased the pigment production. With the aim to optimize the assay, the E. coli recombinant clone was immobilized in sol-gel or agarose matrix in a 96-well microplate format. The limit of detection for mesotrione, tembotrione, sulcotrione, and leptospermone was 0.069, 0.051, 0.038, and 20 μM, respectively, allowing to validate the whole-cell colorimetric bioassay as a simple and cost-effective alternative tool for laboratory use. The bioassay results from sulcotrione-spiked soil samples were confirmed with high-performance liquid chromatography.

  13. Expression screening of bacterial libraries of recombinant alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor variants for candidates with thrombin inhibitory capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakta, Varsha; Gierczak, Richard F; Sheffield, William P

    2013-12-01

    Exhaustive mutagenesis studies of the reactive centre loop (RCL), a key structural component of proteins belonging to the serpin superfamily of protease inhibitors, are complicated by the size of the RCL, serpin conformational complexity, and, for most serpins, the lack of a serpin-dependent phenotype of expressing cells. Here, we describe a thrombin capture assay that distinguished thrombin-inhibitory recombinant human alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor (API M358R) from non-inhibitory API variants in Escherichia coli lysates prepared from either single clones or pools. Binding of API proteins in the lysates to thrombin immobilized on microtiter plate wells was quantified via colour generated by a peroxidase-coupled anti-API antibody. Bacterial expression plasmids encoding inhibitory API M358R were mixed 1:99 with plasmids encoding non-inhibitory API T345R/M358R and the resulting library screened in pools of 10. All above-background signals arising from pools or subsequently re-probed single clones were linked to the presence of plasmids encoding API M358R. Screening of a portion of another expression library encoding hypervariable API with all possibilities at codons 352-358 also yielded only novel, thrombin-inhibitory variants. Probing a smaller library expressing all possible codons at Ala347 yielded the wild type, 6 different functional variants, one partially active variant, and two variants with no thrombin-inhibitory activity. API antigen levels varied considerably less among Ala347 variants than activity levels, and comparison of rate constants of inhibition of purified API variants to their corresponding thrombin capture assay lysate values was used to establish the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. The results indicate that the approach is sufficiently robust to correctly identify functional versus non-functional candidates in API expression libraries, and could be of value in systematically probing structure/function relationships not only in the API

  14. Augmentation of Cationic Antimicrobial Peptide Production with Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors as a Novel Epigenetic Therapy for Bacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan D. Yedery

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of antibiotic resistance seriously threatens our ability to treat many common and medically important bacterial infections. Novel therapeutics are needed that can be used alone or in conjunction with antibiotics. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs are important effectors of the host innate defense that exhibit broad-spectrum activity against a wide range of microorganisms. CAMPs are carried within phagocytic granules and are constitutively or inducibly expressed by multiple cell types, including epithelial cells. The role of histone modification enzymes, specifically the histone deacetylases (HDAC, in down-regulating the transcription of CAMP-encoding genes is increasingly appreciated as is the capacity of HDAC inhibitors (HDACi to block the action of HDACs to increase CAMP expression. The use of synthetic and natural HDACi molecules to increase CAMPs on mucosal surfaces, therefore, has potential therapeutic applications. Here, we review host and pathogen regulation of CAMP expression through the induction of HDACs and assess the therapeutic potential of natural and synthetic HDACi based on evidence from tissue culture systems, animal models, and clinical trials.

  15. Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin triggers the synthesis of B-cell lymphoma 3 by human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Sebastian; Schwertz, Hansjörg; Weyrich, Andrew S; Franks, Zechariah G; Lindemann, Stephan; Otto, Monika; Behr, Hagen; Loppnow, Harald; Schlitt, Axel; Russ, Martin; Presek, Peter; Werdan, Karl; Buerke, Michael

    2011-02-01

    The frequency and severity of bacteremic infections has increased over the last decade and bacterial endovascular infections (i.e., sepsis or endocarditis) are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Bacteria or secreted bacterial products modulate platelet function and, as a result, affect platelet accumulation at sites of vascular infection and inflammation. However, whether bacterial products regulate synthetic events in platelets is not known. In the present study, we determined if prolonged contact with staphylococcal α-toxin signals platelets to synthesize B-cell lymphoma (Bcl-3), a protein that regulates clot retraction in murine and human platelets. We show that α-toxin induced α(IIb)β(3)-dependent aggregation (EC(50) 2.98 µg/mL ± 0.64 µg/mL) and, over time, significantly altered platelet morphology and stimulated de novo accumulation of Bcl-3 protein in platelets. Adherence to collagen or fibrinogen also increased the expression of Bcl-3 protein by platelets. α-toxin altered Bcl-3 protein expression patterns in platelets adherent to collagen, but not fibrinogen. Pretreatment of platelets with inhibitors of protein synthesis or the mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) decreased Bcl-3 protein expression in α-toxin stimulated platelets. In conclusion, Staphylococcusaureus-derived α-toxin, a pore forming exotoxin, exerts immediate (i.e., aggregation) and prolonged (i.e., protein synthesis) responses in platelets, which may contribute to increased thrombotic events associated with gram-positive sepsis or endocarditis.

  16. Marine organisms as source of extracts to disrupt bacterial communication: bioguided isolation and identification of quorum sensing inhibitors from Ircinia felix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Quintana

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIn this study, 39 extracts from marine organisms were evaluated as quorum sensing inhibitors, collected in the Colombian Caribbean Sea and the Brazilian Coast including 26 sponges, seven soft corals, five algae and one zooanthid. The results showed that crude extracts from the soft coral Eunicea laciniata, and the sponges Svenzea tubulosa, Ircinia felix and Neopetrosia carbonaria were the most promising source of quorum sensing inhibitors compounds without affecting bacterial growth, unlike the raw extracts of Agelas citrina, Agelas tubulata, Iotrochota arenosa, Topsentia ophiraphidites, Niphates caycedoi, Cliona tenuis, Ptilocaulis walpersi, Petrosia pellasarca, and the algae Laurencia catarinensis and Laurencia obtusa, which displayed potent antibacterial activity against the biosensors employed. The crude extract from the sponge I. felix was fractionated, obtaining furanosesterterpenes which were identified and evaluated as quorum sensing inhibitors, showing a moderate activity without affecting the biosensor's growth.

  17. Pertussis toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekura, R.D.; Moss, J.; Vaughan, M.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 selections. Some of the titles are: Genetic and Functional Studies of Pertussis Toxin Substrates; Effect of Pertussis Toxin on the Hormonal Responsiveness of Different Tissues; Extracellular Adenylate Cyclase of Bordetella pertussis; and GTP-Regulatory Proteins are Introcellular Messagers: A Model for Hormone Action.

  18. Polyamine toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømgaard, Kristian; Jensen, Lars S; Vogensen, Stine B

    2005-01-01

    Polyamine toxins, isolated from spiders and wasps, have been used as pharmacological tools for the study of ionotropic receptors, but their use have so far been hampered by their lack of selectivity. In this mini-review, we describe how careful synthetic modification of native polyamine toxins have...

  19. New strategy for the determination of microcystins and diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) toxins, two potent phosphatases 1 and 2A inhibitors and tumor promoters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummert, C.; Reichelt, M.; Luckas, B. [Univ. of Jena (Germany). Faculty of Biology and Pharmacy

    2000-03-01

    A new analytical strategy was established to improve the determination and identification performance during analyses of microcystins and diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) toxins in different matrices. Automated high performance size exclusion chromatography (gel permeation chromatography, SEC) was applied for the clean-up of raw extracts from algae and mussel tissue containing either microcystins or DSP toxins. The cleaned raw extracts are well suited for the direct determination of microcystins and DSP toxins by HPLC/MS. The analyses of cleaned raw extracts containing microcystin by HPLC and UV/diode array detection (DAD) revealed chromatograms without interfering peaks. Additionally, methods for the identification of unknown microcystins and those not available as standards were developed and established. The proposed strategy is exemplarily demonstrated for the analyses of a natural algae community from a lake in Slowakia and a naturally contaminated mussel from Portugal. (orig.)

  20. Shiga toxin-negative attaching and effacing Escherichia coli : distinct clinical associations with bacterial phylogeny and virulence traits and inferred in-host pathogen evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bielaszewska, Martina; Middendorf, Barbara; Köck, Robin; Friedrich, Alexander W; Fruth, Angelika; Karch, Helge; Schmidt, M Alexander; Mellmann, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Attaching and effacing Escherichia coli (AEEC) that lack Shiga toxin genes (stx) and the enteropathogenic E. coli adherence factor (EAF) plasmid (stx-/EAF-) are classified as atypical enteropathogenic E. coli and cause diarrhea worldwide. However, it is unknown whether there are bacteria

  1. Stool Test: C. Difficile Toxin (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If You Have Questions en español Muestra de materia fecal: toxina C. difficile What It Is A ... may produce toxins (harmful substances) if the bacterial balance in the colon is disrupted. This might happen ...

  2. Toxins-antitoxins: diversity, evolution and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Finbarr; Van Melderen, Laurence

    2011-10-01

    Genes for toxin-antitoxin (TA) complexes are widespread in prokaryote genomes, and species frequently possess tens of plasmid and chromosomal TA loci. The complexes are categorized into three types based on genetic organization and mode of action. The toxins universally are proteins directed against specific intracellular targets, whereas the antitoxins are either proteins or small RNAs that neutralize the toxin or inhibit toxin synthesis. Within the three types of complex, there has been extensive evolutionary shuffling of toxin and antitoxin genes leading to considerable diversity in TA combinations. The intracellular targets of the protein toxins similarly are varied. Numerous toxins, many of which are sequence-specific endoribonucleases, dampen protein synthesis levels in response to a range of stress and nutritional stimuli. Key resources are conserved as a result ensuring the survival of individual cells and therefore the bacterial population. The toxin effects generally are transient and reversible permitting a set of dynamic, tunable responses that reflect environmental conditions. Moreover, by harboring multiple toxins that intercede in protein synthesis in response to different physiological cues, bacteria potentially sense an assortment of metabolic perturbations that are channeled through different TA complexes. Other toxins interfere with the action of topoisomersases, cell wall assembly, or cytoskeletal structures. TAs also play important roles in bacterial persistence, biofilm formation and multidrug tolerance, and have considerable potential both as new components of the genetic toolbox and as targets for novel antibacterial drugs.

  3. 细菌群体感应抑制剂的研究进展%Research Progress on Bacterial Quorum Sensing Inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙琦; 梁经纬; 王琳; 张廷剑; 孟繁浩

    2016-01-01

    在菌群生长过程中,细菌能不断产生化学信号分子并分泌到周围环境中,当信号分子的数量达到一定阈值时,可调控菌体相关基因的表达如生物膜的形成、生物发光等,以适应环境的变化,这种现象称为细菌群体感应(quorum sensing,QS)。细菌群体感应抑制剂(quorum sensing inhibitor,QSI)以细菌的群体感应为靶点,只针对病原菌的群体感应系统起抑制作用,并不杀死体内的正常细菌或干扰其正常生命活动,为人类提供了一种新型抗菌途径。综述了细菌群体感应信号分子的调控系统和细菌群体感应抑制剂的研究进展。%Bacteria can produce chemical signal molecules and secret them into the surrounding environment during their growth processes.When the number of signal molecules reaches to a certain threshold,the related genes expression,such as biofilm formation or bioluminescent,will be regulated,in order to adapt to such envi-ronmental changes.This phenomenon is called bacterial quorum sensing(QS).Using bacterial quorum sensing as a target,bacterial quorum sensing inhibitors(QSI)make pathogens lose pathogenicity by blocking the expres-sion of harmful genes,whilst do not kill the normal bacteria or interfere with the normal physiological activity of bacteria,which providing a new antibacterial way for mankind.Research progress on signal molecules regula-tion system of bacterial quorum sensing system and bacterial quorum sensing inhibitors are reviewed in this paper.

  4. The Structure of the Toxin and Type Six Secretion System Substrate Tse2 in Complex with Its Immunity Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Craig S; Robb, Melissa; Nano, Francis E; Boraston, Alisdair B

    2016-02-01

    Tse2 is a cytoactive toxin secreted by a type six secretion apparatus of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The Tse2 toxin naturally attacks a target in the cytoplasm of bacterial cells, and can cause toxicity if artificially introduced into eukaryotic cells. The X-ray crystal structure of the complex of Tse2 and its cognate immunity protein Tsi2 revealed a heterotetrameric structure with an extensive binding interface. Structural identity was found between Tse2 and NAD-dependent enzymes, especially ADP-ribosylating toxins, which facilitated the identification of the Tse2 active site and revealed it to be occluded upon binding the inhibitor Tsi2. The structural identity shared with NAD-dependent enzymes, including conserved catalytic residues, suggests that the mechanism of Tse2 toxicity may be NAD dependent.

  5. From the Gastrointestinal Tract (GIT to the Kidneys: Live Bacterial Cultures (Probiotics Mediating Reductions of Uremic Toxin Levels via Free Radical Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Vitetta

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A host of compounds are retained in the body of uremic patients, as a consequence of progressive renal failure. Hundreds of compounds have been reported to be retention solutes and many have been proven to have adverse biological activity, and recognized as uremic toxins. The major mechanistic overview considered to contribute to uremic toxin overload implicates glucotoxicity, lipotoxicity, hexosamine, increased polyol pathway activity and the accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs. Until recently, the gastrointestinal tract (GIT and its associated micro-biometabolome was a neglected factor in chronic disease development. A systematic underestimation has been to undervalue the contribution of GIT dysbiosis (a gut barrier-associated abnormality whereby low-level pro-inflammatory processes contribute to chronic kidney disease (CKD development. Gut dysbiosis provides a plausible clue to the origin of systemic uremic toxin loads encountered in clinical practice and may explain the increasing occurrence of CKD. In this review, we further expand a hypothesis that posits that environmentally triggered and maintained microbiome perturbations drive GIT dysbiosis with resultant uremia. These subtle adaptation responses by the GIT microbiome can be significantly influenced by probiotics with specific metabolic properties, thereby reducing uremic toxins in the gut. The benefit translates to a useful clinical treatment approach for patients diagnosed with CKD. Furthermore, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS in different anatomical locales is highlighted as a positive process. Production of ROS in the GIT by the epithelial lining and the commensal microbe cohort is a regulated process, leading to the formation of hydrogen peroxide which acts as an essential second messenger required for normal cellular homeostasis and physiological function. Whilst this critical review has focused on end-stage CKD (type 5, our aim was to build a plausible

  6. From the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) to the kidneys: live bacterial cultures (probiotics) mediating reductions of uremic toxin levels via free radical signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitetta, Luis; Linnane, Anthony W; Gobe, Glenda C

    2013-11-07

    A host of compounds are retained in the body of uremic patients, as a consequence of progressive renal failure. Hundreds of compounds have been reported to be retention solutes and many have been proven to have adverse biological activity, and recognized as uremic toxins. The major mechanistic overview considered to contribute to uremic toxin overload implicates glucotoxicity, lipotoxicity, hexosamine, increased polyol pathway activity and the accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). Until recently, the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and its associated micro-biometabolome was a neglected factor in chronic disease development. A systematic underestimation has been to undervalue the contribution of GIT dysbiosis (a gut barrier-associated abnormality) whereby low-level pro-inflammatory processes contribute to chronic kidney disease (CKD) development. Gut dysbiosis provides a plausible clue to the origin of systemic uremic toxin loads encountered in clinical practice and may explain the increasing occurrence of CKD. In this review, we further expand a hypothesis that posits that environmentally triggered and maintained microbiome perturbations drive GIT dysbiosis with resultant uremia. These subtle adaptation responses by the GIT microbiome can be significantly influenced by probiotics with specific metabolic properties, thereby reducing uremic toxins in the gut. The benefit translates to a useful clinical treatment approach for patients diagnosed with CKD. Furthermore, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in different anatomical locales is highlighted as a positive process. Production of ROS in the GIT by the epithelial lining and the commensal microbe cohort is a regulated process, leading to the formation of hydrogen peroxide which acts as an essential second messenger required for normal cellular homeostasis and physiological function. Whilst this critical review has focused on end-stage CKD (type 5), our aim was to build a plausible hypothesis

  7. Botulinum toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigam P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin, one of the most poisonous biological substances known, is a neurotoxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. C. botulinum elaborates eight antigenically distinguishable exotoxins (A, B, C 1 , C 2 , D, E, F and G. All serotypes interfere with neural transmission by blocking the release of acetylcholine, the principal neurotransmitter at the neuromuscular junction, causing muscle paralysis. The weakness induced by injection with botulinum toxin A usually lasts about three months. Botulinum toxins now play a very significant role in the management of a wide variety of medical conditions, especially strabismus and focal dystonias, hemifacial spasm, and various spastic movement disorders, headaches, hypersalivation, hyperhidrosis, and some chronic conditions that respond only partially to medical treatment. The list of possible new indications is rapidly expanding. The cosmetological applications include correction of lines, creases and wrinkling all over the face, chin, neck, and chest to dermatological applications such as hyperhidrosis. Injections with botulinum toxin are generally well tolerated and side effects are few. A precise knowledge and understanding of the functional anatomy of the mimetic muscles is absolutely necessary to correctly use botulinum toxins in clinical practice.

  8. Mixed biofilm formation by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium enhanced bacterial resistance to sanitization due to extracellular polymeric substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium are important foodborne pathogens capable of forming single-species biofilms or coexisting in multispecies biofilm communities. Bacterial biofilm cells are usually more resistant to sanitization than their pla...

  9. Bacterial toxin-inducible gene expression of cathelicidin-B1 in the chicken bursal lymphoma-derived cell line DT40: functional characterization of cathelicidin-B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Asuna; Tsubaki, Takashi; Sagae, Nozomi; Onda, Yumiko; Inada, Yuri; Mochizuki, Takuya; Okumura, Kazuo; Kikuyama, Sakae; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Iwamuro, Shawichi

    2014-09-01

    Chicken cathelicidin-B1 (chCATH-B1) is a major host defense peptide of the chicken bursa of Fabricius (BF). To investigate the mechanisms of chCATH-B1 gene expression in the BF, we focused on the DT40 cell line derived from chicken bursal lymphoma as a model for analysis. A cDNA encoding chCATH-B1 precursor was cloned from DT40 cells. The nucleotide sequence of the cDNA was identical with that of the BF chCATH-B1. A broth dilution analysis showed that the synthetic chCATH-B1 exhibited a significant defensive activity against both Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. A scanning microscopic analysis demonstrated that chCATH-B1 inhibited bacterial growth through membrane destruction with formation of blebs and spheroplasts. Limulus amoebocyte lysate assay and electromobility shift assay results revealed that chCATH-B1 bound to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA), which are the surface substances of the E. coli and S. aureus cell, respectively. A chemotactic assay results revealed that chCATH-B1 showed mouse-derived P-815 mastocytoma migrating activity dose-dependently but with a higher concentration, resulting in a loss of the activity. A semi-quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that LPS stimulated chCATH-B1 gene expression in a dose-dependent manner and that the LPS-inducible chCATH-B1 gene expression was inhibited by the administration of dexamethasone. The chCATH-B1 mRNA levels in DT40 cells were also increased by the administration of bacterial LTA. The results indicate that bacterial toxins induce chCATH-B1 gene expression in the chicken BF and the peptide expressed in the organ would act against pathogenic microorganisms not only directly but also indirectly by attracting mast cells.

  10. MARTX toxins as effector delivery platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, Hannah E; Satchell, Karla J F

    2015-12-01

    Bacteria frequently manipulate their host environment via delivery of microbial 'effector' proteins to the cytosol of eukaryotic cells. In the case of the multifunctional autoprocessing repeats-in-toxins (MARTX) toxin, this phenomenon is accomplished by a single, >3500 amino acid polypeptide that carries information for secretion, translocation, autoprocessing and effector activity. MARTX toxins are secreted from bacteria by dedicated Type I secretion systems. The released MARTX toxins form pores in target eukaryotic cell membranes for the delivery of up to five cytopathic effectors, each of which disrupts a key cellular process. Targeted cellular processes include modulation or modification of small GTPases, manipulation of host cell signaling and disruption of cytoskeletal integrity. More recently, MARTX toxins have been shown to be capable of heterologous protein translocation. Found across multiple bacterial species and genera--frequently in pathogens lacking Type 3 or Type 4 secretion systems--MARTX toxins in multiple cases function as virulence factors. Innovative research at the intersection of toxin biology and bacterial genetics continues to elucidate the intricacies of the toxin as well as the cytotoxic mechanisms of its diverse effector collection.

  11. eIF2α confers cellular tolerance to S. aureus α-toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela evon Hoven

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on the role of conserved stress-response pathways for cellular tolerance to a pore formingtoxin. First, we observed that small molecular weight inhibitors including of eIF2α-phosphatase, jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK, and PI3-kinase sensitized normal mouse embryonal fibroblasts (MEFs to the small pore forming S. aureus α-toxin. Sensitization depended on expression of mADAM10, the murine ortholog of a proposed high affinity-receptor for α-toxin in human cells. Similarly, eIF2αS51A/S51A MEFs, which harbor an Ala knock-in mutation at the regulated Ser51 phosphorylation site of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2, were hyper-sensitive to α-toxin. Inhibition of translation with Cycloheximide did not mimic the tolerogenic effect of eIF2α-phosphorylation. Notably, eIF2α-dependent tolerance of MEFs was toxin-selective, as wild type-MEFs and eIF2αS51A/S51A MEFs exhibited virtually equal sensitivity to Vibrio cholerae cytolysin. Binding of S. aureus α-toxin to eIF2αS51A/S51A MEFs and toxicity in these cells were enhanced as compared to wild type cells. This led to the unexpected finding that the mutant cells carried more ADAM10. Because basal phosphorylation of eIF2α in MEFs required amino acid deprivation-activated eIF2α-kinase 4/GCN2, the data reveal that basal activity of this kinase mediates tolerance of MEFs to α-toxin. Further, they suggest that modulation of ADAM10 is involved. During infection, bacterial growth may cause nutrient shortage in tissues which might activate this response. Tolerance to α-toxin was robust in macrophages and did not depend on GCN2. However, JNKs appeared to play a role, suggesting differential cell type- and toxin-selectivity of tolerogenic stress-responses. Understanding their function or failure will be important to comprehend anti-bacterial immune responses.

  12. Progress in The Study of Bacterial Toxin-antitoxin System%细菌毒素-抗毒素系统的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓蕾; 赵龙旋; 张俊杰

    2008-01-01

    毒素-抗毒素系统(toxin-antitoxin system,TA)由两个共表达的基因组成,其中一个基因编码不稳定的抗毒素蛋白(antitoxin),另一个基因编码稳定的毒素蛋白(toxin).毒素-抗毒素系统最早发现于一些低拷贝的质粒,用来维持低拷贝质粒在菌群中的稳定存在.随后的研究表明,毒素-抗毒素系统广泛存在于细菌,包括一些致病菌的染色体上.在营养缺乏等不良生长条件下,由于基因表达的抑制和蛋白酶的降解作用,不稳定的抗毒素蛋白减少,从而产生游离的毒素蛋白,导致细菌的生长抑制和死亡.毒素-抗毒素系统的生理功能目前还存在争议,有学者认为细茼染色体上的毒素-抗毒素系统可以在不良生长状况下介导细菌的死亡,即细茼程序性细胞死亡(baeterial programmedcell death).但也有证据显示,毒素-抗毒素系统的功能更偏向于应激状态下的生理调节方面,即只起应激状态下的抑菌作用而不是杀菌作用.对细菌生长调控中毒素-抗毒素系统的作用机理进行综述,并探讨毒素-抗毒素系统研究的理论和应用价值.

  13. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of α-substituted isonipecotic acid benzothiazole analogues as potent bacterial type II topoisomerase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axford, Lorraine C; Agarwal, Piyush K; Anderson, Kelly H; Andrau, Laura N; Atherall, John; Barker, Stephanie; Bennett, James M; Blair, Michael; Collins, Ian; Czaplewski, Lloyd G; Davies, David T; Gannon, Carlie T; Kumar, Dushyant; Lancett, Paul; Logan, Alastair; Lunniss, Christopher J; Mitchell, Dale R; Offermann, Daniel A; Palmer, James T; Palmer, Nicholas; Pitt, Gary R W; Pommier, Stéphanie; Price, Daniel; Narasinga Rao, B; Saxena, Rashmi; Shukla, Tarun; Singh, Amit K; Singh, Mahipal; Srivastava, Anil; Steele, Christopher; Stokes, Neil R; Thomaides-Brears, Helena B; Tyndall, Edward M; Watson, David; Haydon, David J

    2013-12-15

    The discovery and optimisation of a new class of benzothiazole small molecules that inhibit bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV are described. Antibacterial properties have been demonstrated by activity against DNA gyrase ATPase and potent activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenes and Haemophilus influenzae. Further refinements to the scaffold designed to enhance drug-likeness included analogues bearing an α-substituent to the carboxylic acid group, resulting in excellent solubility and favourable pharmacokinetic properties.

  14. Inhibitors of Helicobacter pylori Protease HtrA Found by ‘Virtual Ligand’ Screening Combat Bacterial Invasion of Epithelia

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Löwer; Tim Geppert; Petra Schneider; Benjamin Hoy; Silja Wessler; Gisbert Schneider

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The human pathogen Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a main cause for gastric inflammation and cancer. Increasing bacterial resistance against antibiotics demands for innovative strategies for therapeutic intervention. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present a method for structure-based virtual screening that is based on the comprehensive prediction of ligand binding sites on a protein model and automated construction of a ligand-receptor interaction map. Pharmacophoric featur...

  15. Inhibitors of Helicobacter pylori protease HtrA found by 'virtual ligand' screening combat bacterial invasion of epithelia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Löwer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human pathogen Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a main cause for gastric inflammation and cancer. Increasing bacterial resistance against antibiotics demands for innovative strategies for therapeutic intervention. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present a method for structure-based virtual screening that is based on the comprehensive prediction of ligand binding sites on a protein model and automated construction of a ligand-receptor interaction map. Pharmacophoric features of the map are clustered and transformed in a correlation vector ('virtual ligand' for rapid virtual screening of compound databases. This computer-based technique was validated for 18 different targets of pharmaceutical interest in a retrospective screening experiment. Prospective screening for inhibitory agents was performed for the protease HtrA from the human pathogen H. pylori using a homology model of the target protein. Among 22 tested compounds six block E-cadherin cleavage by HtrA in vitro and result in reduced scattering and wound healing of gastric epithelial cells, thereby preventing bacterial infiltration of the epithelium. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates that receptor-based virtual screening with a permissive ('fuzzy' pharmacophore model can help identify small bioactive agents for combating bacterial infection.

  16. Bacterial Cytotoxins Target Rho GTPases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Gudula; Aktories, Klaus

    1998-06-01

    Low molecular mass GTPases of the Rho family, which are involved in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and in various signal transduction processes, are the eukaryotic targets of bacterial protein toxins. The toxins covalently modify Rho proteins by ADP ribosylation, glucosylation, and deamidation, thereby inactivating and activating the GTPases.

  17. Identification of a Potent Allosteric Inhibitor of Human Protein Kinase CK2 by Bacterial Surface Display Library Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienberg, Christian; Garmann, Claudia; Gratz, Andreas; Bollacke, Andre; Götz, Claudia; Jose, Joachim

    2017-01-05

    Human protein kinase CK2 has emerged as promising target for the treatment of neoplastic diseases. The vast majority of kinase inhibitors known today target the ATP binding site, which is highly conserved among kinases and hence leads to limited selectivity. In order to identify non-ATP competitive inhibitors, a 12-mer peptide library of 6 × 10⁵ variants was displayed on the surface of E. coli by autodisplay. Screening of this peptide library on variants with affinity to CK2 was performed by fluorophore-conjugated CK2 and subsequent flow cytometry. Single cell sorting of CK2-bound E. coli yielded new peptide variants, which were tested on inhibition of CK2 by a CE-based assay. Peptide B2 (DCRGLIVMIKLH) was the most potent inhibitor of both, CK2 holoenzyme and the catalytic CK2α subunit (IC50 = 0.8 µM). Using different ATP concentrations and different substrate concentrations for IC50 determination, B2 was shown to be neither ATP- nor substrate competitive. By microscale thermophoresis (MST) the KD value of B2 with CK2α was determined to be 2.16 µM, whereas no binding of B2 to CK2β-subunit was detectable. To our surprise, besides inhibition of enzymatic activity, B2 also disturbed the interaction of CK2α with CK2β at higher concentrations (≥25 µM).

  18. Identification of a Potent Allosteric Inhibitor of Human Protein Kinase CK2 by Bacterial Surface Display Library Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Nienberg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human protein kinase CK2 has emerged as promising target for the treatment of neoplastic diseases. The vast majority of kinase inhibitors known today target the ATP binding site, which is highly conserved among kinases and hence leads to limited selectivity. In order to identify non-ATP competitive inhibitors, a 12-mer peptide library of 6 × 105 variants was displayed on the surface of E. coli by autodisplay. Screening of this peptide library on variants with affinity to CK2 was performed by fluorophore-conjugated CK2 and subsequent flow cytometry. Single cell sorting of CK2-bound E. coli yielded new peptide variants, which were tested on inhibition of CK2 by a CE-based assay. Peptide B2 (DCRGLIVMIKLH was the most potent inhibitor of both, CK2 holoenzyme and the catalytic CK2α subunit (IC50 = 0.8 µM. Using different ATP concentrations and different substrate concentrations for IC50 determination, B2 was shown to be neither ATP- nor substrate competitive. By microscale thermophoresis (MST the KD value of B2 with CK2α was determined to be 2.16 µM, whereas no binding of B2 to CK2β-subunit was detectable. To our surprise, besides inhibition of enzymatic activity, B2 also disturbed the interaction of CK2α with CK2β at higher concentrations (≥25 µM.

  19. Comparison of mammalian and bacterial expression library screening to detect recombinant alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor variants with enhanced thrombin inhibitory capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierczak, Richard F; Bhakta, Varsha; Xie, Michael; Sheffield, William P

    2015-08-20

    Serpins are a widely distributed family of serine proteases. A key determinant of their specificity is the reactive centre loop (RCL), a surface motif of ∼20 amino acids in length. Expression libraries of variant serpins could be rapidly probed with proteases to develop novel inhibitors if optimal systems were available. The serpin variant alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor M358R (API M358R) inhibits the coagulation protease thrombin, but at sub-maximal rates compared to other serpins. Here we compared two approaches to isolate functional API variants from serpin expression libraries, using the same small library of API randomized at residue 358 (M358X): flow cytometry of transfected HEK 293 cells expressing membrane-displayed API; and a thrombin capture assay (TCA) performed on pools of bacterial lysates expressing soluble API. No enrichment for specific P1 residues was observed when the RCL codons of the 1% of sorted transfected 293 cells with the highest fluorescent thrombin-binding signals were subcloned and sequenced. In contrast, screening of 16 pools of bacterial API-expressing transformants led to the facile identification of API M358R and M358K as functional variants. Kinetic characterization showed that API M358R inhibited thrombin 17-fold more rapidly than API M358K. Reducing the incubation time with immobilized thrombin improved the sensitivity of TCA to detect supra-active API M358R variants and was used to screen a hypervariable library of API variants expressing 16 different amino acids at residues 352-357. The most active variant isolated, with TLSATP substituted for FLEAI, inhibited thrombin 2.9-fold more rapidly than API M358R. Our results indicate that flow cytometric approaches used in protein engineering of antibodies are not appropriate for serpins, and highlight the utility of the optimized TCA for serpin protein engineering.

  20. Immunotoxins: The Role of the Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David FitzGerald

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Immunotoxins are antibody-toxin bifunctional molecules that rely on intracellular toxin action to kill target cells. Target specificity is determined via the binding attributes of the chosen antibody. Mostly, but not exclusively, immunotoxins are purpose-built to kill cancer cells as part of novel treatment approaches. Other applications for immunotoxins include immune regulation and the treatment of viral or parasitic diseases. Here we discuss the utility of protein toxins, of both bacterial and plant origin, joined to antibodies for targeting cancer cells. Finally, while clinical goals are focused on the development of novel cancer treatments, much has been learned about toxin action and intracellular pathways. Thus toxins are considered both medicines for treating human disease and probes of cellular function.

  1. Interplay between toxin transport and flotillin localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pust, Sascha; Dyve, Anne Berit; Torgersen, Maria L;

    2010-01-01

    The flotillin proteins are localized in lipid domains at the plasma membrane as well as in intracellular compartments. In the present study, we examined the importance of flotillin-1 and flotillin-2 for the uptake and transport of the bacterial Shiga toxin (Stx) and the plant toxin ricin and we...... investigated whether toxin binding and uptake were associated with flotillin relocalization. We observed a toxin-induced redistribution of the flotillins, which seemed to be regulated in a p38-dependent manner. Our experiments provide no evidence for a changed endocytic uptake of Stx or ricin in cells silenced...... for flotillin-1 or -2. However, the Golgi-dependent sulfation of both toxins was significantly reduced in flotillin knockdown cells. Interestingly, when the transport of ricin to the ER was investigated, we obtained an increased mannosylation of ricin in flotillin-1 and flotillin-2 knockdown cells. The toxicity...

  2. Improved purification process for cholera toxin and its application to the quantification of residual toxin in cholera vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyun; Kim, Hyo Seung; Kim, Jeong Ah; Seo, Jin Ho; Carbis, Rodney

    2009-01-01

    A simplified method for the purification of cholera toxin was developed. The 569B strain of Vibrio cholerae, a recognized hyper-producer of cholera toxin, was propagated in a bioreactor under conditions that promote the production of the toxin. The toxin was separated from the bacterial cells using 0.2-microm crossflow microfiltration, the clarified toxin was passed through the membrane into the permeate, and the bacterial cells were retained in the retentate. The 0.2-microm permeate was then concentrated 3-fold and diafiltered against 10 mM phosphate buffer, pH 7.6, using 30-kDa crossflow ultrafiltration. The concentrated toxin was loaded onto a cation exchange column, the toxin was bound to the column, and most of the impurities were passed unimpeded through the column. The toxin was eluted with a salt gradient of phosphate buffer, pH7.0, containing 1.0M NaCl. The peak containing the toxin was assayed for cholera toxin and protein and the purity was determined to be 92%. The toxin peak had a low endotoxin level of 3.1 EU/microg of toxin. The purified toxin was used to prepare antiserum against whole toxin, which was used in a G(M1) ganglioside-binding ELISA to determine residual levels of toxin in an oral inactivated whole-cell cholera vaccine. The G(M1) ganglioside-binding ELISA was shown to be very sensitive and capable of detecting as little as 1 ng/ml of cholera toxin.

  3. Characterisation of botulinum toxins type A and B, by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation and electrospray mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baar, B.L.M. van; Hulst, A.G.; Jong, A.L. de; Wils, E.R.J.

    2002-01-01

    A method earlier developed for the mass spectrometric (MS) identification of tetanus toxin (TTx) was applied to botulinum toxins type A and B (BTxA and BTxB). Botulinum toxins are extremely neurotoxic bacterial toxins, likely to be used as biological warfare agent. Biologically active BTxA and BTxB

  4. Molecular Docking Studies of Catechin and Its Derivatives as Anti-bacterial Inhibitor for Glucosamine-6-Phosphate Synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikrika, H.; Ambarsari, L.; Sumaryada, T.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular docking simulation of catechin and its derivatives on Glucosamine-6- Phosphate Synthase (GlmS) has been performed in this research. GlmS inhibition by a particular ligand will suppress the production of bacterial cell wall and significantly reduce the population of invading bacteria. In this study, catechin derivatives i.e epicatechin, galloatechin and epigalloatechin were found to have stronger binding affinities as compared to natural ligand of GlmS, Fructose-6-Phosphate (F6P). Those three ligands were docked on the same pocket in GlmS target as F6P, with 70% binding sites similarity. Based on the docking results, gallocatechin turns out to be the most potent ligand for anti-bacterial agent with ΔG= -8.00 kcal/mol. The docking between GlmS and catechin derivatives are characterized by a constant present of a strong hydrogen bond between functional group O3 and Ser-349. This hydrogen bond most likely plays a significant role in the docking mechanism and binding modes selection. The surprising result is catechin itself exhibited a quite strong binding with GlmS (ΔG= -7.80 kcal.mol), but docked on a completely different pocket compared to other ligands. This results suggest that catechin might still have a curing effect but with a completely different pathway and mechanism as compared to its derivatives.

  5. Cytolethal Distending Toxin From Campylobacter jejuni Requires the Cytoskeleton for Toxic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Olvera, Estela T.; Bustos-Martínez, Jaime A.; López-Vidal, Yolanda; Verdugo-Rodríguez, Antonio; Martínez-Gómez, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background Campylobacter jejuni is one of the major causes of infectious diarrhea worldwide. The distending cytolethal toxin (CDT) of Campylobacter spp. interferes with normal cell cycle progression. This toxic effect is considered a result of DNase activity that produces chromosomal DNA damage. To perform this event, the toxin must be endocytosed and translocated to the nucleus. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the cytoskeleton in the translocation of CDT to the nucleus. Methods Campylobacter jejuni ATCC 33291 and seven isolates donated from Instituto de Biotecnologia were used in this study. The presence of CDT genes in C. jejuni strains was determined by PCR. To evaluate the effect of CDT, HeLa cells were treated with bacterial lysate, and the damage and morphological changes were analyzed by microscopy, immunofluorescence staining, and flow cytometry. To evaluate the role of the cytoskeleton, HeLa cells were treated with either latrunculin A or by nocodazole and analyzed by microscopy, flow cytometry, and immunoquantification (ELISA). Results The results obtained showed that the eight strains of C. jejuni, including the reference strain, had the ability to produce the toxin. Usage of latrunculin A and nocodazole, two cytoskeletal inhibitors, blocked the toxic effect in cells treated with the toxin. This phenomenon was evident in flow cytometry analysis and immunoquantification of Cdc2-phosphorylated. Conclusions This work showed that the cytotoxic activity of the C. jejuni CDT is dependent on its endocytosis. The alteration in the microtubules and actin filaments caused a blockage transit of the toxin, preventing it from reaching the nucleus of the cell, as well as preventing DNA fragmentation and alteration of the cell cycle. The CDT toxin appears to be an important element for the pathogenesis of campylobacteriosis, since all clinical isolates showed the presence of cdtA, cdtB and cdtC genes. PMID:27942359

  6. From indole to pyrrole, furan, thiophene and pyridine: Search for novel small molecule inhibitors of bacterial transcription initiation complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thach, Oscar; Mielczarek, Marcin; Ma, Cong; Kutty, Samuel K; Yang, Xiao; Black, David StC; Griffith, Renate; Lewis, Peter J; Kumar, Naresh

    2016-03-15

    The search for small molecules capable of inhibiting transcription initiation in bacteria has resulted in the synthesis of N,N'-disubstituted hydrazines and imine-carbohydrazides comprised of indole, pyridine, pyrrole, furan and thiophene using the respective trichloroacetyl derivatives, carbohydrazides and aldehydes. Replacement of the indole moiety by smaller heterocycles linked by CONHNC linkers afforded a broad variety of compounds efficiently targeting the RNA polymerase-σ(70)/σ(A) interaction as determined by ELISA and exhibiting increased inhibition of the growth of Escherichia coli compared to Bacillus subtilis in culture. The structural features of the synthesized transcription initiation inhibitors needed for antibacterial activity were identified employing molecular modelling and structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies.

  7. JcTI-I, a novel trypsin inhibitor from Jatropha curcas seed cake with potential for bacterial infection treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Paula S Costa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas seed cake is a low-value by-product resulting from biodiesel production. The seed cake is highly toxic, but it has great potential for biotechnology applications as it is a repository of biomolecules that could be important in agriculture, medicine and industry. To explore this potential, a novel trypsin inhibitor called JcTI-I was purified by fractionation of the crude extract with trichloroacetic acid (2.5%, v/v followed by affinity chromatography (Trypsin-Sepharose 4B and molecular exclusion (Sephacryl S-200. Non-reducing SDS-PAGE and gel filtration showed that JcTI-I has approximately 20.0 kDa. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the intact molecular mass of JcTI-I is 10.252 kDa. Moreover, JcTI-I is a glycoprotein with 6.4% (m/m carbohydrates, pI of 6.6, N-terminal sequence similarity around 60% to plant albumins and high stability to heat, pH and salinity. JcTI-I presented antibacterial activity against the human pathogenic bacteria Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar choleraesuis and Staphylococcus aureus, with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC less than 5 µg/mL. Furthermore, JcTI-I did have inhibitory activity against the serine proteases from the tested bacteria. Otherwise, no hemolytic activity of human erythrocytes and signs of acute toxicity to mice were observed for JcTI-I. The results demonstrate the benefits of J. curcas seed cake as a source of trypsin inhibitor with potential for biotechnological application as a new antimicrobial agent against human pathogenic bacteria.

  8. Plant insecticidal toxins in ecological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibanez, Sébastien; Gallet, Christiane; Després, Laurence

    2012-04-01

    Plant secondary metabolites play a key role in plant-insect interactions, whether constitutive or induced, C- or N-based. Anti-herbivore defences against insects can act as repellents, deterrents, growth inhibitors or cause direct mortality. In turn, insects have evolved a variety of strategies to act against plant toxins, e.g., avoidance, excretion, sequestration and degradation of the toxin, eventually leading to a co-evolutionary arms race between insects and plants and to co-diversification. Anti-herbivore defences also negatively impact mutualistic partners, possibly leading to an ecological cost of toxin production. However, in other cases toxins can also be used by plants involved in mutualistic interactions to exclude inadequate partners and to modify the cost/benefit ratio of mutualism to their advantage. When considering the whole community, toxins have an effect at many trophic levels. Aposematic insects sequester toxins to defend themselves against predators. Depending on the ecological context, toxins can either increase insects' vulnerability to parasitoids and entomopathogens or protect them, eventually leading to self-medication. We conclude that studying the community-level impacts of plant toxins can provide new insights into the synthesis between community and evolutionary ecology.

  9. Plant Insecticidal Toxins in Ecological Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Ibanez

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Plant secondary metabolites play a key role in plant-insect interactions, whether constitutive or induced, C- or N-based. Anti-herbivore defences against insects can act as repellents, deterrents, growth inhibitors or cause direct mortality. In turn, insects have evolved a variety of strategies to act against plant toxins, e.g., avoidance, excretion, sequestration and degradation of the toxin, eventually leading to a co-evolutionary arms race between insects and plants and to co-diversification. Anti-herbivore defences also negatively impact mutualistic partners, possibly leading to an ecological cost of toxin production. However, in other cases toxins can also be used by plants involved in mutualistic interactions to exclude inadequate partners and to modify the cost/benefit ratio of mutualism to their advantage. When considering the whole community, toxins have an effect at many trophic levels. Aposematic insects sequester toxins to defend themselves against predators. Depending on the ecological context, toxins can either increase insects’ vulnerability to parasitoids and entomopathogens or protect them, eventually leading to self-medication. We conclude that studying the community-level impacts of plant toxins can provide new insights into the synthesis between community and evolutionary ecology.

  10. Bacterial Toxin Fusion Proteins Elicit Mucosal Immunity against a Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Antigen When Administered Intranasally to Guinea Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreerupa Challa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Peptides corresponding to the foot-and-mouth disease virus VP1 G-H loop are capable of inducing neutralizing antibodies in some species but are considered relatively poor immunogens, especially at mucosal surfaces. However, intranasal administration of antigens along with the appropriate delivery vehicle/adjuvant has been shown to induce mucosal immune responses, and bacterial enterotoxins have long been known to be effective in this regard. In the current study, two different carrier/adjuvant approaches were used to augment mucosal immunity to the FMDV O1 BFS G-H loop epitope, in which the G-H loop was genetically coupled to the E. coli LT-B subunit and coexpressed with the LTA2 fragment (LTA2B-GH, or the nontoxic pseudomonas exotoxin A (ntPE was fused to LTA2B-GH at LT-A2 to enhance receptor targeting. Only guinea pigs that were inoculated intranasally with ntPE-LTA2B-GH and LTA2B-GH induced significant anti-G-H loop IgA antibodies in nasal washes at weeks 4 and 6 when compared to ovalbumin or G-H loop immunized animals. These were also the only groups that exhibited G-H loop-specific antigen-secreting cells in the nasal mucosa. These data demonstrate that fusion of nonreplicating antigens to LTA2B and ntPE-LTA2B has the potential to be used as carriers/adjuvants to induce mucosal immune responses against infectious diseases.

  11. Mechanism of action of the antibiotic NXL101, a novel nonfluoroquinolone inhibitor of bacterial type II topoisomerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Michael T; Stachyra, Thérèse; Platel, Denis; Girard, Anne-Marie; Claudon, Monique; Bruneau, Jean-Michel; Miossec, Christine

    2008-09-01

    NXL101 is one of a new class of quinoline antibacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV inhibitors showing potent activity against gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin- and fluoroquinolone-resistant strains. NXL101 inhibited topoisomerase IV more effectively than gyrase from Escherichia coli, whereas the converse is true of enzymes from Staphylococcus aureus. This apparent target preference is opposite to that which is associated with most fluoroquinolone antibiotics. In vitro isolation of S. aureus mutants resistant to NXL101 followed by cloning and sequencing of the genes encoding gyrase and topoisomerase IV led to the identification of several different point mutations within, or close to, the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of GyrA. However, the mutations were not those that are most frequently associated with decreased sensitivity to quinolones. A fluoroquinolone-resistant mutant variant of gyrase generated in vitro was highly resistant to inhibition by the fluoroquinolones ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin but remained fully susceptible to inhibition by NXL101. Two mutant gyrases constructed in vitro, with mutations in gyrA engineered according to those most frequently found in S. aureus strains resistant to NXL101, were insensitive to inhibition by NXL101 and had a diminished sensitivity to ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin. Certain combinations of mutations giving rise to NXL101 resistance and those giving rise to fluoroquinolone resistance may be mutually exclusive.

  12. Bacterial Resistance to Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase Inhibitor GSK2251052 Develops during Treatment of Complicated Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, Karen; Spivak, Aaron T.; Ingraham, Karen; Min, Sharon; Holmes, David J.; Jakielaszek, Charles; Rittenhouse, Stephen; Kwan, Alan L.; Livi, George P.; Sathe, Ganesh; Thomas, Elizabeth; Van Horn, Stephanie; Miller, Linda A.; Twynholm, Monique; Tomayko, John; Dalessandro, Marybeth; Caltabiano, Madelyn; Scangarella-Oman, Nicole E.

    2014-01-01

    GSK2251052, a novel leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) inhibitor, was in development for the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. In a phase II study (study LRS114688) evaluating the efficacy of GSK2251052 in complicated urinary tract infections, resistance developed very rapidly in 3 of 14 subjects enrolled, with ≥32-fold increases in the GSK2251052 MIC of the infecting pathogen being detected. A fourth subject did not exhibit the development of resistance in the baseline pathogen but posttherapy did present with a different pathogen resistant to GSK2251052. Whole-genome DNA sequencing of Escherichia coli isolates collected longitudinally from two study LRS114688 subjects confirmed that GSK2251052 resistance was due to specific mutations, selected on the first day of therapy, in the LeuRS editing domain. Phylogenetic analysis strongly suggested that resistant Escherichia coli isolates resulted from clonal expansion of baseline susceptible strains. This resistance development likely resulted from the confluence of multiple factors, of which only some can be assessed preclinically. Our study shows the challenges of developing antibiotics and the importance of clinical studies to evaluate their effect on disease pathogenesis. (These studies have been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01381549 for the study of complicated urinary tract infections and registration no. NCT01381562 for the study of complicated intra-abdominal infections.) PMID:25348524

  13. Structure activity relationship of pyridoxazinone substituted RHS analogs of oxabicyclooctane-linked 1,5-naphthyridinyl novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors as broad-spectrum antibacterial agents (Part-6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sheo B; Kaelin, David E; Wu, Jin; Miesel, Lynn; Tan, Christopher M; Meinke, Peter T; Olsen, David B; Lagrutta, Armando; Wei, Changqing; Liao, Yonggang; Peng, Xuanjia; Wang, Xiu; Fukuda, Hideyuki; Kishii, Ryuta; Takei, Masaya; Yajima, Masanobu; Shibue, Taku; Shibata, Takeshi; Ohata, Kohei; Nishimura, Akinori; Fukuda, Yasumichi

    2015-09-01

    Oxabicyclooctane linked 1,5-naphthyridinyl-pyridoxazinones are novel broad-spectrum bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors (NBTIs) targeting bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV at a site different than quinolones. Due to lack of cross-resistance to known antibiotics they present excellent opportunity to combat drug-resistant bacteria. A structure activity relationship of the pyridoxazinone moiety is described in this Letter. Chemical synthesis and activities of NBTIs with substitutions at C-3, C-4 and C-7 of the pyridoxazinone moiety with halogens, alkyl groups and methoxy group has been described. In addition, substitutions of the linker NH proton and its transformation into amide analogs of AM-8085 and AM-8191 have been reported. Fluoro, chloro, and methyl groups at C-3 of the pyridoxazinone moiety retained the potency and spectrum. In addition, a C-3 fluoro analog showed 4-fold better oral efficacy (ED50 3.9 mg/kg) as compared to the parent AM-8085 in a murine bacteremia model of infection of Staphylococcus aureus. Even modest polarity (e.g., methoxy) is not tolerated at C-3 of the pyridoxazinone unit. The basicity and NH group of the linker is important for the activity when CH2 is at the linker position-8. However, amides (with linker position-8 ketone) with a position-7 NH or N-methyl group retained potency and spectrum suggesting that neither basicity nor hydrogen-donor properties of the linker amide NH is essential for the activity. This would suggest likely an altered binding mode of the linker position-7,8 amide containing compounds. The amides showed highly improved hERG (functional IC50 >30 μM) profile.

  14. Structure-based design of a new series of D-glutamic acid based inhibitors of bacterial UDP-N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine:D-glutamate ligase (MurD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasić, Tihomir; Zidar, Nace; Sink, Roman; Kovac, Andreja; Blanot, Didier; Contreras-Martel, Carlos; Dessen, Andréa; Müller-Premru, Manica; Zega, Anamarija; Gobec, Stanislav; Kikelj, Danijel; Masic, Lucija Peterlin

    2011-07-14

    MurD ligase is one of the key enzymes participating in the intracellular steps of peptidoglycan biosynthesis and constitutes a viable target in the search for novel antibacterial drugs to combat bacterial drug-resistance. We have designed, synthesized, and evaluated a new series of D-glutamic acid-based Escherichia coli MurD inhibitors incorporating the 5-benzylidenethiazolidin-4-one scaffold. The crystal structure of 16 in the MurD active site has provided a good starting point for the design of structurally optimized inhibitors 73-75 endowed with improved MurD inhibitory potency (IC(50) between 3 and 7 μM). Inhibitors 74 and 75 showed weak activity against Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. Compounds 73-75, with IC(50) values in the low micromolar range, represent the most potent D-Glu-based MurD inhibitors reported to date.

  15. Jun N-Terminal Protein Kinase Enhances Middle Ear Mucosal Proliferation during Bacterial Otitis Media▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Masayuki; Ebmeyer, Jörg; Pak, Kwang; Austin, Darrell A.; Melhus, Åsa; Webster, Nicholas J. G.; Ryan, Allen F.

    2007-01-01

    Mucosal hyperplasia is a characteristic component of otitis media. The present study investigated the participation of signaling via the Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein kinase in middle ear mucosal hyperplasia in animal models of bacterial otitis media. Otitis media was induced by the inoculation of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae into the middle ear cavity. Western blotting revealed that phosphorylation of JNK isoforms in the middle ear mucosa preceded but paralleled mucosal hyperplasia in this in vivo rat model. Nuclear JNK phosphorylation was observed in many cells of both the mucosal epithelium and stroma by immunohistochemistry. In an in vitro model of primary rat middle ear mucosal explants, bacterially induced mucosal growth was blocked by the Rac/Cdc42 inhibitor Clostridium difficile toxin B, the mixed-lineage kinase inhibitor CEP11004, and the JNK inhibitor SP600125. Finally, the JNK inhibitor SP600125 significantly inhibited mucosal hyperplasia during in vivo bacterial otitis media in guinea pigs. Inhibition of JNK in vivo resulted in a diminished proliferative response, as shown by a local decrease in proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein expression by immunohistochemistry. We conclude that activation of JNK is a critical pathway for bacterially induced mucosal hyperplasia during otitis media, influencing tissue proliferation. PMID:17325051

  16. Nanoparticle-detained toxins for safe and effective vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Che-Ming J.; Fang, Ronnie H.; Luk, Brian T.; Zhang, Liangfang

    2013-12-01

    Toxoid vaccines--vaccines based on inactivated bacterial toxins--are routinely used to promote antitoxin immunity for the treatment and prevention of bacterial infections. Following chemical or heat denaturation, inactivated toxins can be administered to mount toxin-specific immune responses. However, retaining faithful antigenic presentation while removing toxin virulence remains a major challenge and presents a trade-off between efficacy and safety in toxoid development. Here, we show a nanoparticle-based toxin-detainment strategy that safely delivers non-disrupted pore-forming toxins for immune processing. Using erythrocyte membrane-coated nanoparticles and staphylococcal α-haemolysin, we demonstrate effective virulence neutralization via spontaneous particle entrapment. Compared with vaccination with heat-denatured toxin, mice vaccinated with the nanoparticle-detained toxin showed superior protective immunity against toxin-mediated adverse effects. We find that the non-disruptive detoxification approach benefited the immunogenicity and efficacy of toxoid vaccines. We anticipate that this study will open new possibilities in the preparation of antitoxin vaccines against the many virulence factors that threaten public health.

  17. Overview of scorpion species from China and their toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhijian; Di, Zhiyong; Wu, Yingliang; Li, Wenxin

    2014-02-26

    Scorpions are one of the most ancient groups of terrestrial animals. They have maintained a steady morphology over more than 400 million years of evolution. Their venom arsenals for capturing prey and defending against predators may play a critical role in their ancient and conservative appearance. In the current review, we present the scorpion fauna of China: 53 species covering five families and 12 genera. We also systematically list toxins or genes from Chinese scorpion species, involving eight species covering four families. Furthermore, we review the diverse functions of typical toxins from Chinese scorpion species, involving Na+ channel modulators, K+ channel blockers, antimicrobial peptides and protease inhibitors. Using scorpion species and their toxins from China as an example, we build the bridge between scorpion species and their toxins, which helps us to understand the molecular and functional diversity of scorpion venom arsenal, the dynamic and functional evolution of scorpion toxins, and the potential relationships of scorpion species and their toxins.

  18. Botulinum Toxin Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care Kids’ zone Video library Find a dermatologist Botulinum toxin therapy Overview Before treatment: This woman disliked her deep frown lines. Botulinum toxin therapy: Overview Also called botulinum rejuvenation Brand names: ...

  19. Mtx toxins from Lysinibacillus sphaericus enhance mosquitocidal cry-toxin activity and suppress cry-resistance in Culex quinquefasciatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Margaret C; Berry, Colin; Walton, William E; Federici, Brian A

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of Mtx toxins from Lysinibacillus sphaericus (formerly Bacillus sphaericus) with Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis Cry toxins and the influence of such interactions on Cry-resistance were evaluated in susceptible and Cry-resistant Culex quinquefasciatus larvae. Mtx-1 and Mtx-2 were observed to be active against both susceptible and resistant mosquitoes; however varying levels of cross-resistance toward Mtx toxins were observed in the resistant mosquitoes. A 1:1 mixture of either Mtx-1 or Mtx-2 with different Cry toxins generally showed moderate synergism, but some combinations were highly toxic to resistant larvae and suppressed resistance. Toxin synergy has been demonstrated to be a powerful tool for enhancing activity and managing Cry-resistance in mosquitoes, thus Mtx toxins may be useful as components of engineered bacterial larvicides.

  20. Streptococcal toxins: role in pathogenesis and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Timothy C; Cole, Jason N; Rivera-Hernandez, Tania; Henningham, Anna; Paton, James C; Nizet, Victor; Walker, Mark J

    2015-12-01

    Group A Streptococcus (Streptococcus pyogenes), group B Streptococcus (Streptococcus agalactiae) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) are host-adapted bacterial pathogens among the leading infectious causes of human morbidity and mortality. These microbes and related members of the genus Streptococcus produce an array of toxins that act against human cells or tissues, resulting in impaired immune responses and subversion of host physiological processes to benefit the invading microorganism. This toxin repertoire includes haemolysins, proteases, superantigens and other agents that ultimately enhance colonization and survival within the host and promote dissemination of the pathogen.

  1. EGA Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile CDT, Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Sadi, Mirko; Popoff, Michel R; Schwan, Carsten; Aktories, Klaus; Mattarei, Andrea; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-04-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum produce the binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins CDT, iota and C2, respectively. These toxins are composed of a transport component (B) and a separate enzyme component (A). When both components assemble on the surface of mammalian target cells, the B components mediate the entry of the A components via endosomes into the cytosol. Here, the A components ADP-ribosylate G-actin, resulting in depolymerization of F-actin, cell-rounding and eventually death. In the present study, we demonstrate that 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA), a compound that protects cells from multiple toxins and viruses, also protects different mammalian epithelial cells from all three binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. In contrast, EGA did not inhibit the intoxication of cells with Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, indicating a possible different entry route for this toxin. EGA does not affect either the binding of the C2 toxin to the cells surface or the enzyme activity of the A components of CDT, iota and C2, suggesting that this compound interferes with cellular uptake of the toxins. Moreover, for C2 toxin, we demonstrated that EGA inhibits the pH-dependent transport of the A component across cell membranes. EGA is not cytotoxic, and therefore, we propose it as a lead compound for the development of novel pharmacological inhibitors against clostridial binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins.

  2. Bioterrorism: toxins as weapons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Peter D

    2012-04-01

    The potential for biological weapons to be used in terrorism is a real possibility. Biological weapons include infectious agents and toxins. Toxins are poisons produced by living organisms. Toxins relevant to bioterrorism include ricin, botulinum, Clostridium perfrigens epsilson toxin, conotoxins, shigatoxins, saxitoxins, tetrodotoxins, mycotoxins, and nicotine. Toxins have properties of biological and chemical weapons. Unlike pathogens, toxins do not produce an infection. Ricin causes multiorgan toxicity by blocking protein synthesis. Botulinum blocks acetylcholine in the peripheral nervous system leading to muscle paralysis. Epsilon toxin damages cell membranes. Conotoxins block potassium and sodium channels in neurons. Shigatoxins inhibit protein synthesis and induce apoptosis. Saxitoxin and tetrodotoxin inhibit sodium channels in neurons. Mycotoxins include aflatoxins and trichothecenes. Aflatoxins are carcinogens. Trichothecenes inhibit protein and nucleic acid synthesis. Nicotine produces numerous nicotinic effects in the nervous system.

  3. Growth factor toxin fusion proteins for the treatment of leukemia: Preclinical animal studies relevant for human acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Rozemuller (Henk)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractIn the development of new therapeutic agents to treat malignancies. bacterial and plant toxins are being investigated. Targeting cells with these toxins has been facilitated by chemical conjugation or genetic engineering of the toxin to proteins with cellular binding potential, such as a

  4. Cloning and characterization of the biosynthetic gene cluster of the bacterial RNA polymerase inhibitor tirandamycin from marine-derived Streptomyces sp. SCSIO1666.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Xuhua; Wang, Zhongwen; Wang, Bo; Ma, Junying; Huang, Hongbo; Tian, Xinpeng; Zhang, Si; Zhang, Changsheng; Ju, Jianhua

    2011-03-18

    Tirandamycins are bacterial RNA polymerase inhibitors holding great potential for antibacterial agent design. To elucidate the biosynthetic machinery and generate new derivatives, the tirandamycin biosynthetic gene cluster was cloned and sequenced from marine-derived Streptomyces sp. SCSIO1666. The biosynthetic gene cluster of tirandamycin spans a DNA region of ∼56kb and consists of 15 open reading frames (ORFs) which encode three type I polyketide synthases (TrdAI, AII, AIII), one non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (TrdD), one phosphopantetheinyl transferase (TrdM), one Type II thioesterase (TrdB), one FAD-dependent oxidoreductase (TrdL), one cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (TrdI), three proteins related to resistance and regulations (TrdHJK), and four proteins with unknown function (TrdCEFG). To investigate the roles of the genes played in the biosynthetic machinery, seven genes (trdAI and trdBDFHIK) were inactivated via in frame replacement with an apramycin gene cassette using λ-RED recombination technology. The ΔtrdAI and ΔtrdD mutants targeting the ketosynthase and adenylation domain of TrdAI and TrdD, respectively, abolished the production of tirandamycins, confirming their involvement in the tirandamycin biosynthesis. TrdH showed high homology to LuxR family transcriptional regulatory proteins, disruption of which abolished the production of tirandamycins, indicating that TrdH is a positive regulator for tirandamycin biosynthesis. On the other hand, TrdK showed high homology to TetR-family transcriptional regulatory proteins, disruption of which significantly increased the yields of tirandamycins almost one-fold, implicating that TrdK is a negative regulator for tirandamycin biosynthesis. Disruption of the gene trdI resulted in the accumulation of the intermediate tirandamycin C (3) and a trace amount of new product tirandamycin C2 (5). A model of tirandamycin biosynthesis was proposed based on bioinformatics analyses, gene inactivation experiments and

  5. Radiolabelling of cholera toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, R.G.; Neves, Nicoli M.J. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Abdalla, L.F.; Brandao, R.L.; Etchehebehere, L. [Ouro Preto Univ., MG (Brazil). Escola de Farmacia. Lab. de Fisiologia e Bioquimica de Microorganismos; Lima, M.E. de [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biologicas. Dept. de Bioquimica e Imunologia; Nicoli, J.R. [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biologicas. Dept. de Microbiologia

    1999-11-01

    Binding of cholera toxin to ganglioside receptors of enterocyte microvilli catalyzes the activation of adenylate cyclase causing a rise in cAMP which final result is a copious diarrhea. Saccharomyces boulardii, a nonpathogenic yeast has been used to prevent diarrhea. Although the antidiarrheic properties of S. boulardii are widely recognized, this yeast has been used on empirical basis, and the mechanism of this protective effect is unknown. The addition of cholera toxin to S. boulardii induces the raising of cAMP that triggers the activation of neutral trehalase. This suggests that toxin specifically binding to cells, is internalized and active the protein phosphorylation cascade. Our objective is labeling the cholera toxin to verify the presence of binding sites on yeast cell surfaces for the cholera toxin. Cholera toxin was radiolabelled with Na {sup 125} I by a chloramine-T method modified from Cuatrecasas and Griffiths et alii. The {sup 125} I-Cholera toxin showed a specific radioactivity at about 1000 cpm/fmol toxin. Biological activity of labeled cholera toxin measured by trehalase activation was similar to the native toxin. (author) 5 refs., 3 figs.; e-mail: nevesmj at urano.cdtn.br

  6. Prokaryotic adenylate cyclase toxin stimulates anterior pituitary cells in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronin, M.J.; Evans, W.S.; Rogol, A.D.; Weiss, A.A.; Thorner, M.O.; Orth, D.N.; Nicholson, W.E.; Yasumoto, T.; Hewlett, E.L.

    1986-08-01

    Bordetella pertussis synthesis a variety of virulence factors including a calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase (AC) toxin. Treatment of anterior pituitary cells with this AC toxin resulted in an increase in cellular cAMP levels that was associated with accelerated exocytosis of growth hormone (GH), prolactin, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and luteinizing hormone (LH). The kinetics of release of these hormones, however, were markedly different; GH and prolactin were rapidly released, while LH and ACTH secretion was more gradually elevated. Neither dopamine agonists nor somatostatin changes the ability of AC toxin to generate cAMP (up to 2 h). Low concentrations of AC toxin amplified the secretory response to hypophysiotrophic hormones. The authors conclude that bacterial AC toxin can rapidly elevate cAMP levels in anterior pituitary cells and that it is the response that explains the subsequent acceleration of hormone release.

  7. [Intoxication of botulinum toxin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudzicka, Aleksandra

    2015-09-01

    Botulinum toxin is an egzotoxin produced by Gram positive bacteria Clostridium botulinum. It is among the most potent toxins known. The 3 main clinical presentations of botulism are as follows: foodborne botulism, infant botulism and wound botulism. The main symptom of intoxication is flat muscles paralysis. The treatment is supportive care and administration of antitoxin. In prevention the correct preparing of canned food is most important. Botulinum toxin is accepted as a biological weapon.

  8. Clostridial toxins: potent poisons, potent medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Baldassi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium is an anaerobic bacterial genus. The clostridia produce more protein toxins than any other bacterial genus and are a rich reservoir of toxins for research and medicinal uses. Clostridia are widely spread in the environment: soil, dust and water, presenting more than 120 described species, although few can cause diseases. Diseases can grossly be divided into neurotropic disorders (nervous system is primarily affected, enterotoxemias (affecting intestinal tract and parenchymatous organs, and gas gangrene (myonecrosis with toxemia. Undoubtedly the most widely recognized infection due to anaerobes was clostridial myonecrosis, but recently interest has arisen for the role of clostridia in intestinal diseases. This report describes the most important species, the diseases caused by them, and their occurrence in Brazil, focusing on cattle raising.

  9. Chorea caused by toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaki, Janis M

    2011-01-01

    Chorea is uncommonly caused by toxins. Anecdotal evidence from cases of toxin-induced chorea assists in our understanding of neurodegenerative diseases associated with chorea. Beginning in medieval Europe with ergotism and the "fire that twisted people," spanning to crack dancing in contemporary times and the coexistence of alcohol abuse with chorea, toxins may exert direct effects to enhance mesolimbic dopamine transmission or indirect effects through gamma-aminobutyric acid modulation. The following chapter will discuss toxins associated with chorea and the presumed pathophysiology underlying the movement disorders in these case series.

  10. Study on immunopathogenic effect of bacterial protein antigen and the cytolytic toxin antigen of vibrio vulnificus in BALB / c Mice%创伤弧菌菌体抗原及溶细胞毒素蛋白抗原对BALB/c小鼠的免疫病理研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王贵明; 钟碧玲; 陈艳宇; 李亦明; 申洪

    2012-01-01

    目的 观察创伤弧菌菌体抗原及溶细胞毒素蛋白抗原对Vv感染小鼠的免疫保护作用,以期为Vv防治提供实验数据.方法 制作创伤弧菌菌体抗原及溶细胞毒素蛋白抗原,免疫BALB/c小鼠后观察免疫状态改变及其对Vv感染小鼠的免疫保护效应.结果 免疫后小鼠实验组CD19+B淋巴细胞百分比高于对照组,并产生相应特异性抗体,效价最高达1∶25600,创伤弧菌攻击实验实验组小鼠存活率为100%,显著高于对照组的13.33%.结论 创伤弧菌菌体抗原及溶细胞毒素蛋白抗原主动免疫能产生特异性抗体,能够有效对抗创伤弧菌感染,并明显提高小鼠的存活率.%Objective To investigate whether Vibrio vulnificus bacterial protein antigen and the cytolytic toxin antigen can induce the effective immune protection against Vibrio vulnificus infection.Methods BALB/c mice were immunized with bacterial cytolytic toxin antigen protein antigen of Vibrio vulnificus to evaluate its ability to stimulate immune response.The protective efficacy of immunized mice was evaluated by active immunization and intraperitoneal challenge with V.vulnificus in mice.Results The immunized mice produced higher percentage of CD19+ B lymphocytes and high level specific antibodies (titers up to 1∶25600).All immunized mice survived from lethal challenge with V.vulnificus,while only 13.33% of mice in control group survived at the end of challenged experiment.Conclusions The bacterial protein antigen and cytolytic toxin antigen of Vibrio vulnificus are capable of inducing specific antibody response in mice to confer effective protection against lethal challenge with V.vulnificus.

  11. Development and validation of a UHPLC-MS/MS procedure for quantification of the Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal in bacterial culture after acetylation for characterization of new quorum sensing inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Christine K; Steinbach, Anke; Hartmann, Rolf W

    2013-12-01

    The appearance of antibiotic resistance requires novel therapeutic strategies. One approach is to selectively attenuate bacterial pathogenicity by interfering with bacterial cell-to-cell communication known as quorum sensing. The PQS quorum sensing system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs as signal molecule the Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal (PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-(1H)-quinolone), a key contributor to virulence and biofilm formation. Thus, interference with PQS production is considered as promising approach for the development of novel anti-infectives. Therefore, in this study, we developed and validated an ultra-high performance liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric approach for reliable quantification of PQS in P. aeruginosa cultures for activity determination of new quorum sensing inhibitors. The poor chromatographic properties of PQS reported by others could be overcome by fast microwave-assisted acetylation. The validation procedure including matrix effects, recovery, process efficiency, selectivity, carry-over, accuracy and precision, stability of the processed sample, and limit of quantification demonstrated that the method fulfilled all requirements of common validation guidelines. Its applicability was successfully proven in routine testing. In addition, two-point calibration was shown to be applicable for fast and reliable PQS quantification saving time and resources. In summary, the described method provides a powerful tool for the discovery of new quorum sensing inhibitors as potential anti-infectives and illustrated the usefulness of chemical derivatization, acetylation, in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis.

  12. Anthrax lethal and edema toxins in anthrax pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shihui; Moayeri, Mahtab; Leppla, Stephen H

    2014-06-01

    The pathophysiological effects resulting from many bacterial diseases are caused by exotoxins released by the bacteria. Bacillus anthracis, a spore-forming bacterium, is such a pathogen, causing anthrax through a combination of bacterial infection and toxemia. B. anthracis causes natural infection in humans and animals and has been a top bioterrorism concern since the 2001 anthrax attacks in the USA. The exotoxins secreted by B. anthracis use capillary morphogenesis protein 2 (CMG2) as the major toxin receptor and play essential roles in pathogenesis during the entire course of the disease. This review focuses on the activities of anthrax toxins and their roles in initial and late stages of anthrax infection.

  13. Protection against Shiga Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Kavaliauskiene

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxins consist of an A-moiety and five B-moieties able to bind the neutral glycosphingolipid globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 on the cell surface. To intoxicate cells efficiently, the toxin A-moiety has to be cleaved by furin and transported retrogradely to the Golgi apparatus and to the endoplasmic reticulum. The enzymatically active part of the A-moiety is then translocated to the cytosol, where it inhibits protein synthesis and in some cell types induces apoptosis. Protection of cells can be provided either by inhibiting binding of the toxin to cells or by interfering with any of the subsequent steps required for its toxic effect. In this article we provide a brief overview of the interaction of Shiga toxins with cells, describe some compounds and conditions found to protect cells against Shiga toxins, and discuss whether they might also provide protection in animals and humans.

  14. Effects of Clostridium difficile Toxin A and B on Human T Lymphocyte Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Francis Lin; Xiuli Ma; Jody Berry; Marianela Lopez; Dan Wu; Antony George Joyee; Saravanan Nandagopal

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial products such as toxins can interfere with a variety of cellular processes, leading to severe human diseases. Clostridium difficile toxins, TcdA and TcdB are the primary contributing factors to the pathogenesis of C. difficile-associated diseases (CDAD). While the mechanisms for TcdA and TcdB mediated cellular responses are complex, it has been shown that these toxins can alter chemotactic responses of neutrophils and intestinal epithelial cells leading to innate immune responses an...

  15. Understanding malarial toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkl Renar, Katarina; Iskra, Jernej; Križaj, Igor

    2016-09-01

    Recognized since antiquity, malaria is one of the most infamous and widespread infectious diseases in humans and, although the death rate during the last century has been diminishing, it still accounts for more than a half million deaths annually. It is caused by the Plasmodium parasite and typical symptoms include fever, shivering, headache, diaphoresis and nausea, all resulting from an excessive inflammatory response induced by malarial toxins released into the victim's bloodstream. These toxins are hemozoin and glycosylphosphatidylinositols. The former is the final product of the parasite's detoxification of haeme, a by-product of haemoglobin catabolism, while the latter anchor proteins to the Plasmodium cell surface or occur as free molecules. Currently, only two groups of antimalarial toxin drugs exist on the market, quinolines and artemisinins. As we describe, they both target biosynthesis of hemozoin. Other substances, currently in various phases of clinical trials, are directed towards biosynthesis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol, formation of hemozoin, or attenuation of the inflammatory response of the patient. Among the innovative approaches to alleviating the effects of malarial toxins, is the development of antimalarial toxin vaccines. In this review the most important lessons learned from the use of treatments directed against the action of malarial toxins in antimalarial therapy are emphasized and the most relevant and promising directions for future research in obtaining novel antimalarial agents acting on malarial toxins are discussed.

  16. Effect of Cyclodextrins on Spectroscopic Properties of Fluorescent Derivatives of T-2 Toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    T-2 toxin is a Fusarium mycotoxin that can occur in several cereals and cereal-based products. It is a potent inhibitor of DNA, RNA and protein synthesis, and shows immunosuppressive and cytotoxic effects both in vivo and in vitro. EU maximum admissible levels for T-2 (and HT-2) toxin in unprocess...

  17. Reevaluation of Production of Paralytic Shellfish Toxin by Bacteria Associated with Dinoflagellates of the Portuguese Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Claudia A.; Alvito, Paula; Tavares, Maria João; Pereira, Paulo; Doucette, Gregory; Franca, Susana

    2003-01-01

    Paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) are potent neurotoxins produced by certain dinoflagellate and cyanobacterial species. The autonomous production of PSTs by bacteria remains controversial. In this study, PST production by two bacterial strains, isolated previously from toxic dinoflagellates, was evaluated using biological and analytical methods. Analyses were performed under conditions determined previously to be optimal for toxin production and detection. Our data are inconsistent with autonomous bacterial PST production under these conditions, thereby challenging previous findings for the same strains. PMID:12957964

  18. Cellular and molecular responses of periodontal connective tissue cells to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans cytolethal distending toxin

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is present in elevated proportions and numbers in dental bacterial biofilms of patients with localized aggressive periodontitis. This variant of periodontal disease, occurring in adolescents and young adults, is characterized by rapid and severe destruction of the connective tissues and bone supporting the teeth, eventually culminating in tooth loss. The cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt) is a newly discovered bacterial protein toxin, uniquely present in A....

  19. Characterisation of botulinum toxins type C, D, E, and F by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation and electrospray mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baar, B.L.M. van; Hulst, A.G.; Jong, A.L. de; Wils, E.R.J.

    2004-01-01

    In a follow-up of the earlier characterisation of botulinum toxins type A and B (BTxA and BTxB) by mass spectrometry (MS), types C, D, E, and F (BTxC, BTxD, BTxE, BTxF) were now investigated. Botulinum toxins are extremely neurotoxic bacterial toxins, likely to be used as biological warfare agent. B

  20. Investigation of specificity determinants in bacterial tRNA-guanine transglycosylase reveals queuine, the substrate of its eucaryotic counterpart, as inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna Biela

    Full Text Available Bacterial tRNA-guanine transglycosylase (Tgt catalyses the exchange of the genetically encoded guanine at the wobble position of tRNAs(His,Tyr,Asp,Asn by the premodified base preQ1, which is further converted to queuine at the tRNA level. As eucaryotes are not able to synthesise queuine de novo but acquire it through their diet, eucaryotic Tgt directly inserts the hypermodified base into the wobble position of the tRNAs mentioned above. Bacterial Tgt is required for the efficient pathogenicity of Shigella sp, the causative agent of bacillary dysentery and, hence, it constitutes a putative target for the rational design of anti-Shigellosis compounds. Since mammalian Tgt is known to be indirectly essential to the conversion of phenylalanine to tyrosine, it is necessary to create substances which only inhibit bacterial but not eucaryotic Tgt. Therefore, it seems of utmost importance to study selectivity-determining features within both types of proteins. Homology models of Caenorhabditis elegans Tgt and human Tgt suggest that the replacement of Cys158 and Val233 in bacterial Tgt (Zymomonas mobilis Tgt numbering by valine and accordingly glycine in eucaryotic Tgt largely accounts for the different substrate specificities. In the present study we have created mutated variants of Z. mobilis Tgt in order to investigate the impact of a Cys158Val and a Val233Gly exchange on catalytic activity and substrate specificity. Using enzyme kinetics and X-ray crystallography, we gained evidence that the Cys158Val mutation reduces the affinity to preQ1 while leaving the affinity to guanine unaffected. The Val233Gly exchange leads to an enlarged substrate binding pocket, that is necessary to accommodate queuine in a conformation compatible with the intermediately covalently bound tRNA molecule. Contrary to our expectations, we found that a priori queuine is recognised by the binding pocket of bacterial Tgt without, however, being used as a substrate.

  1. 群体感应抑制剂对海洋生态功能菌生物膜形成的影响%The influence of quorum sensing inhibitors against marine functional bacterial biofilm formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟有朋; 董昆明; 周惠茹; 姜芸; 丁碧婷; 缪莉

    2013-01-01

    [目的]研究天然群体感应抑制剂(Quorum sensing inhibitors,QSI)分子对海洋生态功能菌生物膜形成的影响.[方法]以对污损生物幼虫附着具有诱导作用的海洋细菌为目标菌,通过在其生物膜的形成过程中添加天然群体感应抑制剂,研究其对目标菌成膜细菌数和浮游细菌数、生物膜形态以及生物膜表面胞外多糖含量的影响.[结果]呋喃酮和吡啶在50 mg/L时,对8株目标菌的成膜有显著的抑制作用,抑制率在80%左右,吲哚、青霉烷酸和香豆素在较高浓度800 mg/L才有比较好的抑制活性.生长抑制实验结果显示,同等浓度下,QSI分子对目标菌成膜的抑制活性明显高于其对浮游细菌生长的抑制活性.结果表明,QSI分子主要通过干扰目标菌群体感应系统以抑制生物膜的形成.[结论]研究证实QSI分子在海洋菌生物膜形成过程中具有一定的调控作用.通过添加QSI可能能够间接抑制由生物膜诱导的污损生物附着,从而以新的角度研制新型抗污损物质.%[Objective] To study the influence of natural quorum sensing inhibitors (QSI)against marine functional bacterial biofilm formation.[Methods] Some marine bacterial strains,which could induce the larval settlement of fouling organism,were regarded as target bacteria.Through adding natural quorum sensing inhibitors into the target bacterial cultures during their biofilm formation process,the influence of QSI on the biofilm and planktonic bacteria quantity,biofilm morphology as well as the surface extracellular polysaccharide were studied.[Results] Furanone and pyridine significantly inhibited the biofilm formation of all target bacterial strains at the concentration of 50 mg/L,with the inhibition rate of about 80%.However,indole,penicillanic acid and coumarin exhibited good inhibitory activity only at higher concentrations of 800 mg/L.The results of growth inhibition experiment showed that the inhibitory activity of QSI

  2. Removal of Cholera Toxin from Aqueous Solution by Probiotic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussi A. O. Meriluoto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Cholera remains a serious health problem, especially in developing countries where basic hygiene standards are not met. The symptoms of cholera are caused by cholera toxin, an enterotoxin, which is produced by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. We have recently shown that human probiotic bacteria are capable of removing cyanobacterial toxins from aqueous solutions. In the present study we investigate the ability of the human probiotic bacteria, Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG (ATCC 53103 and Bifidobacterium longum 46 (DSM 14583, to remove cholera toxin from solution in vitro. Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG and Bifidobacterium longum 46 were able to remove 68% and 59% of cholera toxin from aqueous solutions during 18 h of incubation at 37 °C, respectively. The effect was dependent on bacterial concentration and L. rhamnosus GG was more effective at lower bacterial concentrations. No significant effect on cholera toxin concentration was observed when nonviable bacteria or bacterial supernatant was used.

  3. Okadaic Acid: More than a Diarrheic Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefina Méndez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Okadaic acid (OA is one of the most frequent and worldwide distributed marine toxins. It is easily accumulated by shellfish, mainly bivalve mollusks and fish, and, subsequently, can be consumed by humans causing alimentary intoxications. OA is the main representative diarrheic shellfish poisoning (DSP toxin and its ingestion induces gastrointestinal symptoms, although it is not considered lethal. At the molecular level, OA is a specific inhibitor of several types of serine/threonine protein phosphatases and a tumor promoter in animal carcinogenesis experiments. In the last few decades, the potential toxic effects of OA, beyond its role as a DSP toxin, have been investigated in a number of studies. Alterations in DNA and cellular components, as well as effects on immune and nervous system, and even on embryonic development, have been increasingly reported. In this manuscript, results from all these studies are compiled and reviewed to clarify the role of this toxin not only as a DSP inductor but also as cause of alterations at the cellular and molecular levels, and to highlight the relevance of biomonitoring its effects on human health. Despite further investigations are required to elucidate OA mechanisms of action, toxicokinetics, and harmful effects, there are enough evidences illustrating its toxicity, not related to DSP induction, and, consequently, supporting a revision of the current regulation on OA levels in food.

  4. Inhibition of Cholera Toxin and Other AB Toxins by Polyphenolic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherubin, Patrick; Garcia, Maria Camila; Curtis, David; Britt, Christopher B. T.; Craft, John W.; Burress, Helen; Berndt, Chris; Reddy, Srikar; Guyette, Jessica; Zheng, Tianyu; Huo, Qun; Quiñones, Beatriz; Briggs, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Cholera toxin (CT) is an AB-type protein toxin that contains a catalytic A1 subunit, an A2 linker, and a cell-binding B homopentamer. The CT holotoxin is released into the extracellular environment, but CTA1 attacks a target within the cytosol of a host cell. We recently reported that grape extract confers substantial resistance to CT. Here, we used a cell culture system to identify twelve individual phenolic compounds from grape extract that inhibit CT. Additional studies determined the mechanism of inhibition for a subset of the compounds: two inhibited CT binding to the cell surface and even stripped CT from the plasma membrane of a target cell; two inhibited the enzymatic activity of CTA1; and four blocked cytosolic toxin activity without directly affecting the enzymatic function of CTA1. Individual polyphenolic compounds from grape extract could also generate cellular resistance to diphtheria toxin, exotoxin A, and ricin. We have thus identified individual toxin inhibitors from grape extract and some of their mechanisms of inhibition against CT. PMID:27829022

  5. Inhibition of Cholera Toxin and Other AB Toxins by Polyphenolic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherubin, Patrick; Garcia, Maria Camila; Curtis, David; Britt, Christopher B T; Craft, John W; Burress, Helen; Berndt, Chris; Reddy, Srikar; Guyette, Jessica; Zheng, Tianyu; Huo, Qun; Quiñones, Beatriz; Briggs, James M; Teter, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Cholera toxin (CT) is an AB-type protein toxin that contains a catalytic A1 subunit, an A2 linker, and a cell-binding B homopentamer. The CT holotoxin is released into the extracellular environment, but CTA1 attacks a target within the cytosol of a host cell. We recently reported that grape extract confers substantial resistance to CT. Here, we used a cell culture system to identify twelve individual phenolic compounds from grape extract that inhibit CT. Additional studies determined the mechanism of inhibition for a subset of the compounds: two inhibited CT binding to the cell surface and even stripped CT from the plasma membrane of a target cell; two inhibited the enzymatic activity of CTA1; and four blocked cytosolic toxin activity without directly affecting the enzymatic function of CTA1. Individual polyphenolic compounds from grape extract could also generate cellular resistance to diphtheria toxin, exotoxin A, and ricin. We have thus identified individual toxin inhibitors from grape extract and some of their mechanisms of inhibition against CT.

  6. Crystal structure of the MazE/MazF complex: molecular bases of antidote-toxin recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Katsuhiko; Hanaoka, Fumio; Burley, Stephen K

    2003-04-01

    A structure of the Escherichia coli chromosomal MazE/MazF addiction module has been determined at 1.7 A resolution. Addiction modules consist of stable toxin and unstable antidote proteins that govern bacterial cell death. MazE (antidote) and MazF (toxin) form a linear heterohexamer composed of alternating toxin and antidote homodimers (MazF(2)-MazE(2)-MazF(2)). The MazE homodimer contains a beta barrel from which two extended C termini project, making interactions with flanking MazF homodimers that resemble the plasmid-encoded toxins CcdB and Kid. The MazE/MazF heterohexamer structure documents that the mechanism of antidote-toxin recognition is common to both chromosomal and plasmid-borne addiction modules, and provides general molecular insights into toxin function, antidote degradation in the absence of toxin, and promoter DNA binding by antidote/toxin complexes.

  7. Clostridial pore-forming toxins: powerful virulence factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoff, Michel R

    2014-12-01

    Pore formation is a common mechanism of action for many bacterial toxins. More than one third of clostridial toxins are pore-forming toxins (PFTs) belonging to the β-PFT class. They are secreted as soluble monomers rich in β-strands, which recognize a specific receptor on target cells and assemble in oligomers. Then, they undergo a conformational change leading to the formation of a β-barrel, which inserts into the lipid bilayer forming functional pore. According to their structure, clostridial β-PFTs are divided into several families. Clostridial cholesterol-dependent cytolysins form large pores, which disrupt the plasma membrane integrity. They are potent virulence factors mainly involved in myonecrosis. Clostridial heptameric β-PFTs (aerolysin family and staphylococcal α-hemolysin family) induce small pores which trigger signaling cascades leading to different cell responses according to the cell types and toxins. They are mainly responsible for intestinal diseases, like necrotic enteritis, or systemic diseases/toxic shock from intestinal origin. Clostridial intracellularly active toxins exploit pore formation through the endosomal membrane to translocate the enzymatic component or domain into the cytosol. Single chain protein toxins, like botulinum and tetanus neurotoxins, use hydrophobic α-helices to form pores, whereas clostridial binary toxins encompass binding components, which are structurally and functionally related to β-PFTs, but which have acquired the specific activity to internalize their corresponding enzymatic components. Structural analysis suggests that β-PFTs and binding components share a common evolutionary origin.

  8. Diagnostic multiplex PCR for toxin genotyping of Clostridium perfringens isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baums, Christoph G; Schotte, Ulrich; Amtsberg, Gunter; Goethe, Ralph

    2004-05-20

    In this study we provide a protocol for genotyping Clostridium perfringens with a new multiplex PCR. This PCR enables reliable and specific detection of the toxin genes cpa, cpb, etx, iap, cpe and cpb2 from heat lysed bacterial suspensions. The efficiency of the protocol was demonstrated by typing C. perfringens reference strains and isolates from veterinary bacteriological routine diagnostic specimens.

  9. Targeting Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin as a novel approach to reduce severity of recurrent skin and soft-tissue infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampedro, Georgia R; DeDent, Andrea C; Becker, Russell E N; Berube, Bryan J; Gebhardt, Michael J; Cao, Hongyuan; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane

    2014-10-01

    Staphyococcus aureus frequently causes recurrent skin and soft-tissue infection (SSTI). In the pediatric population, elevated serum antibody targeting S. aureus α-toxin is correlated with a reduced incidence of recurrent SSTI. Using a novel model of recurrent SSTI, we demonstrated that expression of α-toxin during primary infection increases the severity of recurrent disease. Antagonism of α-toxin by either a dominant-negative toxin mutant or a small molecule inhibitor of the toxin receptor ADAM10 during primary infection reduces reinfection abscess severity. Early neutralization of α-toxin activity during S. aureus SSTI therefore offers a new therapeutic strategy to mitigate primary and recurrent disease.

  10. Crystal structures of the staphylococcal toxin SSL5 in complex with sialyl Lewis X reveal a conserved binding site that shares common features with viral and bacterial sialic acid binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Heather M; Basu, Indira; Chung, Matthew C; Caradoc-Davies, Tom; Fraser, John D; Baker, Edward N

    2007-12-14

    Staphylococcus aureus is a significant human pathogen. Among its large repertoire of secreted toxins is a group of staphylococcal superantigen-like proteins (SSLs). These are homologous to superantigens but do not have the same activity. SSL5 is shown here to bind to human granulocytes and to the cell surface receptors for human IgA (Fc alphaRI) and P-selectin [P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1)] in a sialic acid (Sia)-dependent manner. Co-crystallization of SSL5 with the tetrasaccharide sialyl Lewis X (sLe(X)), a key determinant of PSGL-1 binding to P-selectin, led to crystal structures of the SSL5-sLe(X) complex at resolutions of 1.65 and 2.75 A for crystals at two pH values. In both structures, sLe(X) bound to a specific site on the surface of the C-terminal domain of SSL5 in a conformation identical with that bound by P-selectin. Conservation of the key carbohydrate binding residues indicates that this ability to bind human glycans is shared by a substantial subgroup of the SSLs, including SSL2, SSL3, SSL4, SSL5, SSL6, and SSL11. This indicates that the ability to target human glycans is an important property of this group of toxins. Structural comparisons also showed that the Sia binding site in SSL5 contains a substructure that is shared by other Sia binding proteins from bacteria as well as viruses and represents a common binding motif.

  11. Crystal Structures of the Staphylococcal Toxin SSL5 in Complex With Sialyl-Lewis X Reveal a Conserved Binding Site That Shares Common Features With Viral And Bacterial Sialic Acid-Binding Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, H.M.; Basu, I.; Chung, M.C.; Caradoc-Davies, T.; Fraser, J.D.; Baker, E.N.

    2009-06-02

    Staphylococcus aureus is a significant human pathogen. Among its large repertoire of secreted toxins is a group of staphylococcal superantigen-like proteins (SSLs). These are homologous to superantigens but do not have the same activity. SSL5 is shown here to bind to human granulocytes and to the cell surface receptors for human IgA (Fc alphaRI) and P-selectin [P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1)] in a sialic acid (Sia)-dependent manner. Co-crystallization of SSL5 with the tetrasaccharide sialyl Lewis X (sLe(X)), a key determinant of PSGL-1 binding to P-selectin, led to crystal structures of the SSL5-sLe(X) complex at resolutions of 1.65 and 2.75 A for crystals at two pH values. In both structures, sLe(X) bound to a specific site on the surface of the C-terminal domain of SSL5 in a conformation identical with that bound by P-selectin. Conservation of the key carbohydrate binding residues indicates that this ability to bind human glycans is shared by a substantial subgroup of the SSLs, including SSL2, SSL3, SSL4, SSL5, SSL6, and SSL11. This indicates that the ability to target human glycans is an important property of this group of toxins. Structural comparisons also showed that the Sia binding site in SSL5 contains a substructure that is shared by other Sia binding proteins from bacteria as well as viruses and represents a common binding motif.

  12. Structure activity relationship of C-2 ether substituted 1,5-naphthyridine analogs of oxabicyclooctane-linked novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors as broad-spectrum antibacterial agents (Part-5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sheo B; Kaelin, David E; Meinke, Peter T; Wu, Jin; Miesel, Lynn; Tan, Christopher M; Olsen, David B; Lagrutta, Armando; Fukuda, Hideyuki; Kishii, Ryuta; Takei, Masaya; Takeuchi, Tomoko; Takano, Hisashi; Ohata, Kohei; Kurasaki, Haruaki; Nishimura, Akinori; Shibata, Takeshi; Fukuda, Yasumichi

    2015-09-01

    Oxabicyclooctane linked novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors (NBTIs) are new class of recently reported broad-spectrum antibacterial agents. They target bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV and bind to a site different than quinolones. They show no cross-resistance to known antibiotics and provide opportunity to combat drug-resistant bacteria. A structure activity relationship of the C-2 substituted ether analogs of 1,5-naphthyridine oxabicyclooctane-linked NBTIs are described. Synthesis and antibacterial activities of a total of 63 analogs have been summarized representing alkyl, cyclo alkyl, fluoro alkyl, hydroxy alkyl, amino alkyl, and carboxyl alkyl ethers. All compounds were tested against three key strains each of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as for hERG binding activities. Many key compounds were also tested for the functional hERG activity. Six compounds were evaluated for efficacy in a murine bacteremia model of Staphylococcus aureus infection. Significant tolerance for the ether substitution (including polar groups such as amino and carboxyl) at C-2 was observed for S. aureus activity however the same was not true for Enterococcus faecium and Gram-negative strains. Reduced clogD generally showed reduced hERG activity and improved in vivo efficacy but was generally associated with decreased overall potency. One of the best compounds was hydroxy propyl ether (16), which mainly retained the potency, spectrum and in vivo efficacy of AM8085 associated with the decreased hERG activity and improved physical property.

  13. Proteolytic cleavage of pertussis toxin S1 subunit is not essential for its activity in mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plaut Roger D

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pertussis toxin (PT is an exotoxin virulence factor produced by Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough. PT consists of an active subunit (S1 that ADP-ribosylates the alpha subunit of several mammalian G proteins, and a B oligomer (S2–S5 that binds glycoconjugate receptors on cells. PT appears to enter cells by endocytosis, and retrograde transport through the Golgi apparatus may be important for its cytotoxicity. A previous study demonstrated that proteolytic processing of S1 occurs after PT enters mammalian cells. We sought to determine whether this proteolytic processing of S1 is necessary for PT cytotoxicity. Results Protease inhibitor studies suggested that S1 processing may involve a metalloprotease, and processing does not involve furin, a mammalian cell protease that cleaves several other bacterial toxins. However, inhibitor studies showed a general lack of correlation of S1 processing with PT cellular activity. A combination of replacement, insertion and deletion mutations in the C-terminal region of S1, as well as mass spectrometry data, suggested that the cleavage site is located around residue 203–204, but that cleavage is not strongly sequence-dependent. Processing of S1 was abolished by each of 3 overlapping 8 residue deletions just downstream of the putative cleavage site, but not by smaller deletions in the same region. Processing of the various mutant forms of PT did not correlate with cellular activity of the toxin, nor with the ability of the bacteria producing them to infect the mouse respiratory tract. In addition, S1 processing was not detected in transfected cells expressing S1, even though S1 was fully active in these cells. Conclusions S1 processing is not essential for the cellular activity of PT. This distinguishes it from the processing of various other bacterial toxins, which has been shown to be important for their cytotoxicity. S1 processing may be mediated primarily by a

  14. Antimicrobials for bacterial bioterrorism agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Atkins, Helen S

    2011-06-01

    The limitations of current antimicrobials for highly virulent pathogens considered as potential bioterrorism agents drives the requirement for new antimicrobials that are suitable for use in populations in the event of a deliberate release. Strategies targeting bacterial virulence offer the potential for new countermeasures to combat bacterial bioterrorism agents, including those active against a broad spectrum of pathogens. Although early in the development of antivirulence approaches, inhibitors of bacterial type III secretion systems and cell division mechanisms show promise for the future.

  15. Comparative genomics of Shiga toxin encoding bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Darren L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stx bacteriophages are responsible for driving the dissemination of Stx toxin genes (stx across their bacterial host range. Lysogens carrying Stx phages can cause severe, life-threatening disease and Stx toxin is an integral virulence factor. The Stx-bacteriophage vB_EcoP-24B, commonly referred to as Ф24B, is capable of multiply infecting a single bacterial host cell at a high frequency, with secondary infection increasing the rate at which subsequent bacteriophage infections can occur. This is biologically unusual, therefore determining the genomic content and context of Ф24B compared to other lambdoid Stx phages is important to understanding the factors controlling this phenomenon and determining whether they occur in other Stx phages. Results The genome of the Stx2 encoding phage, Ф24B was sequenced and annotated. The genomic organisation and general features are similar to other sequenced Stx bacteriophages induced from Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC, however Ф24B possesses significant regions of heterogeneity, with implications for phage biology and behaviour. The Ф24B genome was compared to other sequenced Stx phages and the archetypal lambdoid phage, lambda, using the Circos genome comparison tool and a PCR-based multi-loci comparison system. Conclusions The data support the hypothesis that Stx phages are mosaic, and recombination events between the host, phages and their remnants within the same infected bacterial cell will continue to drive the evolution of Stx phage variants and the subsequent dissemination of shigatoxigenic potential.

  16. Pyridine-3-carboxamide-6-yl-ureas as novel inhibitors of bacterial DNA gyrase: structure based design, synthesis, SAR and antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, Ian A; Czaplewski, Lloyd G; Pommier, Stephanie; Davies, David T; Narramore, Sarah K; Fishwick, Colin W G

    2014-10-30

    The development of antibacterial drugs based on novel chemotypes is essential to the future management of serious drug resistant infections. We herein report the design, synthesis and SAR of a novel series of N-ethylurea inhibitors based on a pyridine-3-carboxamide scaffold targeting the ATPase sub-unit of DNA gyrase. Consideration of structural aspects of the GyrB ATPase site has aided the development of this series resulting in derivatives that demonstrate excellent enzyme inhibitory activity coupled to potent Gram positive antibacterial efficacy.

  17. Novel Structure and Function of Typhoid Toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Matters NIH Research Matters July 29, 2013 Novel Structure and Function of Typhoid Toxin Structure of typhoid toxin, showing the 2 A subunits ( ... to cultured cells. The scientists next determined the structure of the typhoid toxin. The toxin was already ...

  18. Botulinum Toxin (Botox) for Facial Wrinkles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Botulinum Toxin (Botox) for Facial Wrinkles Sections Botulinum Toxin (Botox) ... Facial Wrinkles How Does Botulinum Toxin (Botox) Work? Botulinum Toxin (Botox) for Facial Wrinkles Written by: Kierstan Boyd ...

  19. Horizontal gene transfer of chromosomal Type II toxin-antitoxin systems of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramisetty, Bhaskar Chandra Mohan; Santhosh, Ramachandran Sarojini

    2016-02-01

    Type II toxin-antitoxin systems (TAs) are small autoregulated bicistronic operons that encode a toxin protein with the potential to inhibit metabolic processes and an antitoxin protein to neutralize the toxin. Most of the bacterial genomes encode multiple TAs. However, the diversity and accumulation of TAs on bacterial genomes and its physiological implications are highly debated. Here we provide evidence that Escherichia coli chromosomal TAs (encoding RNase toxins) are 'acquired' DNA likely originated from heterologous DNA and are the smallest known autoregulated operons with the potential for horizontal propagation. Sequence analyses revealed that integration of TAs into the bacterial genome is unique and contributes to variations in the coding and/or regulatory regions of flanking host genome sequences. Plasmids and genomes encoding identical TAs of natural isolates are mutually exclusive. Chromosomal TAs might play significant roles in the evolution and ecology of bacteria by contributing to host genome variation and by moderation of plasmid maintenance.

  20. Botulinum toxin: yesterday, today, tomorrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Artemenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin (BoNT is a bacterial neurotoxin presented with seven serotypes that inhibit neurotransmitter release from nerve endings. The serotypes of BoNT are antigenically dissimilar, act via different, but interconnected mechanisms, and are not interchangeable. The activity of BoNT is associated with impaired neuroexocytosis occurring in several steps: from the binding of BoNT to its specific receptor on the axon terminal membrane to the proteolytic enzymatic cleavage of SNARE substrate. The effect of BoNT is considered to be restricted to the peripheral nervous system, but when given in particularly high doses, it has been recently shown to affect individual brain structures. In addition, by modulating peripheral afferentation, BoNT may influence the excitability of central neuronal structures at both spinal and cortical levels. Only BoNT serotypes A and B are used in clinical practice and aesthetic medicine. The type A has gained the widest acceptance as a therapeutic agent for more than 100 abnormalities manifesting themselves as muscular hyperactivity, hyperfunction of endocrine gland, and chronic pain. The effect of BoNT preparations shows itself 2-5 days after injection, lasts 3 months or more, and gradually decreases with as a result of pharmacokinetic and intracellular reparative processes. Biotechnology advances and potentialities allow purposefully modification of the protein molecular structure of BoNT, which expands the use and efficiency of performed therapy with neurotoxins. Recombinant technologies provide a combination of major therapeutic properties of each used BoNT serotype and expand indications for recombinant chimeric toxins.

  1. Mycoplasma pneumoniae CARDS toxin is internalized via clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manickam Krishnan

    Full Text Available Bacterial toxins possess specific mechanisms of binding and uptake by mammalian cells. Mycoplasma pneumoniae CARDS (Community Acquired Respiratory Distress Syndrome toxin is a 68 kDa protein, which demonstrates high binding affinity to human surfactant protein-A and exhibits specific biological activities including mono-ADP ribosylation and vacuolization. These properties lead to inflammatory processes in the airway and a range of cytopathologies including ciliostasis, loss of tissue integrity and injury, and cell death. However, the process by which CARDS toxin enters target cells is unknown. In this study, we show that CARDS toxin binds to mammalian cell surfaces and is internalized rapidly in a dose and time-dependent manner using a clathrin-mediated pathway, as indicated by inhibition of toxin internalization by monodansylcadaverine but not by methyl-β-cyclodextrin or filipin. Furthermore, the internalization of CARDS toxin was markedly inhibited in clathrin-depleted cells.

  2. The RTX pore-forming toxin α-hemolysin of uropathogenic Escherichia coli: progress and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Travis J; Mulvey, Matthew A

    2013-01-01

    Members of the RTX family of protein toxins are functionally conserved among an assortment of bacterial pathogens. By disrupting host cell integrity through their pore-forming and cytolytic activities, this class of toxins allows pathogens to effectively tamper with normal host cell processes, promoting pathogenesis. Here, we focus on the biology of RTX toxins by describing salient properties of a prototype member, α-hemolysin, which is often encoded by strains of uropathogenic Escherichia coli. It has long been appreciated that RTX toxins can have distinct effects on host cells aside from outright lysis. Recently, advances in modeling and analysis of host-pathogen interactions have led to novel findings concerning the consequences of pore formation during host-pathogen interactions. We discuss current progress on longstanding questions concerning cell specificity and pore formation, new areas of investigation that involve toxin-mediated perturbations of host cell signaling cascades and perspectives on the future of RTX toxin investigation.

  3. Proton pump inhibitors and gastroenteritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J. Hassing (Robert); A. Verbon (Annelies); H. de Visser (Herman); A. Hofman (Albert); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAn association between proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy and bacterial gastroenteritis has been suggested as well as contradicted. The aim of this study was to examine the association between the use of PPIs and occurrence of bacterial gastroenteritis in the prospective Rotterdam Study

  4. THE NATURE OF THE TOXIN-ANTITOXIN FLOCCULATION PHENOMENON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfenbrenner, J J; Reichert, P

    1926-09-30

    1. Animals immunized with the formalinized filtrates of young toxic cultures of B. botulinus produce an antitoxic serum poor in precipitins. 2. Animals immunized with the formalinized filtrates of old and partly autolyzed toxic cultures produce an antitoxic serum containing precipitins. 3. Animals immunized with toxin-free autolyzed bacteria produce a serum free from antitoxin but rich in specific precipitins. 4. Animals immunized with the filtrates of an atoxic variant produce a serum free from antitoxin but rich in precipitins for the homologous toxin. 5. Animals immunized with the washed bacteria of the atoxic variant produce a serum that contains no antitoxin, but is rich in precipitins for the homologous toxin. 6. Removal of the precipitins by flocculation with a non-toxic antigen does not materially reduce the antitoxic value of a serum. 7. Removal of the proteins of the antigen by add coagulation removes the specific precipitable substance. 8. All the sera that contain precipitins produce the specific flocculus when combined with homologous toxins, anatoxins, or with the filtrates of the atoxic variant. The flocculation is restricted within the type. The amount of the precipitate and the width of the zone vary approximately with the estimated amount of bacterial protein in the antigen that is used for the immunization of animals. We conclude, therefore, that the toxin-antitoxin flocculation is a specific bacterial precipitation phenomenon.

  5. Transglutaminase inhibitor from milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, G.A.H. de; Wijngaards, G.; Koppelman, S.J.

    2003-01-01

    Cross-linking experiments of skimmed bovine milk with bacterial transglutaminase isolated from Streptoverticillium mobaraense showed only some degree of formation of high-molecular-weight casein polymers. Studies on the nature of this phenomenon revealed that bovine milk contains an inhibitor of tra

  6. A virtual high-throughput screening approach to the discovery of novel inhibitors of the bacterial leucine transporter, LeuT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Katie J; Gotfryd, Kamil; Billesbølle, Christian B; Loland, Claus J; Gether, Ulrik; Fishwick, Colin W G; Johnson, A Peter

    2013-03-01

    Membrane proteins are intrinsically involved in both human and pathogen physiology, and are the target of 60% of all marketed drugs. During the past decade, advances in the studies of membrane proteins using X-ray crystallography, electron microscopy and NMR-based techniques led to the elucidation of over 250 unique membrane protein crystal structures. The aim of the European Drug Initiative for Channels and Transporter (EDICT) project is to use the structures of clinically significant membrane proteins for the development of lead molecules. One of the approaches used to achieve this is a virtual high-throughput screening (vHTS) technique initially developed for soluble proteins. This paper describes application of this technique to the discovery of inhibitors of the leucine transporter (LeuT), a member of the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter (NSS) family.

  7. A virtual high-throughput screening approach to the discovery of novel inhibitors of the bacterial leucine transporter, LeuT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simmons, Katie J; Gotfryd, Kamil; Billesbølle, Christian B

    2013-01-01

    this is a virtual high-throughput screening (vHTS) technique initially developed for soluble proteins. This paper describes application of this technique to the discovery of inhibitors of the leucine transporter (LeuT), a member of the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter (NSS) family.......Abstract Membrane proteins are intrinsically involved in both human and pathogen physiology, and are the target of 60% of all marketed drugs. During the past decade, advances in the studies of membrane proteins using X-ray crystallography, electron microscopy and NMR-based techniques led...... to the elucidation of over 250 unique membrane protein crystal structures. The aim of the European Drug Initiative for Channels and Transporter (EDICT) project is to use the structures of clinically significant membrane proteins for the development of lead molecules. One of the approaches used to achieve...

  8. Structural and functional characterization of cleavage and inactivation of human serine protease inhibitors by the bacterial SPATE protease EspPα from enterohemorrhagic E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Weiss

    Full Text Available EspPα and EspI are serine protease autotransporters found in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli. They both belong to the SPATE autotransporter family and are believed to contribute to pathogenicity via proteolytic cleavage and inactivation of different key host proteins during infection. Here, we describe the specific cleavage and functional inactivation of serine protease inhibitors (serpins by EspPα and compare this activity with the related SPATE EspI. Serpins are structurally related proteins that regulate vital protease cascades, such as blood coagulation and inflammatory host response. For the rapid determination of serpin cleavage sites, we applied direct MALDI-TOF-MS or ESI-FTMS analysis of coincubations of serpins and SPATE proteases and confirmed observed cleavage positions using in-gel-digest of SDS-PAGE-separated degradation products. Activities of both serpin and SPATE protease were assessed in a newly developed photometrical assay using chromogenic peptide substrates. EspPα cleaved the serpins α1-protease inhibitor (α1-PI, α1-antichymotrypsin, angiotensinogen, and α2-antiplasmin. Serpin cleavage led to loss of inhibitory function as demonstrated for α1-PI while EspPα activity was not affected. Notably, EspPα showed pronounced specificity and cleaved procoagulatory serpins such as α2-antiplasmin while the anticoagulatory antithrombin III was not affected. Together with recently published research, this underlines the interference of EspPα with hemostasis or inflammatory responses during infection, while the observed interaction of EspI with serpins is likely to be not physiologically relevant. EspPα-mediated serpin cleavage occurred always in flexible loops, indicating that this structural motif might be required for substrate recognition.

  9. Cholera- and anthrax-like toxins are among several new ADP-ribosyltransferases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Fieldhouse

    Full Text Available Chelt, a cholera-like toxin from Vibrio cholerae, and Certhrax, an anthrax-like toxin from Bacillus cereus, are among six new bacterial protein toxins we identified and characterized using in silico and cell-based techniques. We also uncovered medically relevant toxins from Mycobacterium avium and Enterococcus faecalis. We found agriculturally relevant toxins in Photorhabdus luminescens and Vibrio splendidus. These toxins belong to the ADP-ribosyltransferase family that has conserved structure despite low sequence identity. Therefore, our search for new toxins combined fold recognition with rules for filtering sequences--including a primary sequence pattern--to reduce reliance on sequence identity and identify toxins using structure. We used computers to build models and analyzed each new toxin to understand features including: structure, secretion, cell entry, activation, NAD+ substrate binding, intracellular target binding and the reaction mechanism. We confirmed activity using a yeast growth test. In this era where an expanding protein structure library complements abundant protein sequence data--and we need high-throughput validation--our approach provides insight into the newest toxin ADP-ribosyltransferases.

  10. Dominant negative mutants of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab toxin function as anti-toxins: demonstration of the role of oligomerization in toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Rodríguez-Almazán

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins, that are used worldwide in insect control, kill insects by a mechanism that depends on their ability to form oligomeric pores that insert into the insect-midgut cells. These toxins are being used worldwide in transgenic plants or spray to control insect pests in agriculture. However, a major concern has been the possible effects of these insecticidal proteins on non-target organisms mainly in ecosystems adjacent to agricultural fields. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We isolated and characterized 11 non-toxic mutants of Cry1Ab toxin affected in different steps of the mechanism of action namely binding to receptors, oligomerization and pore-formation. These mutant toxins were analyzed for their capacity to block wild type toxin activity, presenting a dominant negative phenotype. The dominant negative phenotype was analyzed at two levels, in vivo by toxicity bioassays against susceptible Manduca sexta larvae and in vitro by pore formation activity in black lipid bilayers. We demonstrate that some mutations located in helix alpha-4 completely block the wild type toxin activity at sub-stoichiometric level confirming a dominant negative phenotype, thereby functioning as potent antitoxins. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first reported case of a Cry toxin dominant inhibitor. These data demonstrate that oligomerization is a fundamental step in Cry toxin action and represent a potential mechanism to protect special ecosystems from the possible effect of Cry toxins on non-target organisms.

  11. The Biology of the Cytolethal Distending Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Frisan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The cytolethal distending toxins (CDTs, produced by a variety of Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, are the first bacterial genotoxins described, since they cause DNA damage in the target cells. CDT is an A-B2 toxin, where the CdtA and CdtC subunits are required to mediate the binding on the surface of the target cells, allowing internalization of the active CdtB subunit, which is functionally homologous to the mammalian deoxyribonuclease I. The nature of the surface receptor is still poorly characterized, however binding of CDT requires intact lipid rafts, and its internalization occurs via dynamin-dependent endocytosis. The toxin is retrograde transported through the Golgi complex and the endoplasmic reticulum, and subsequently translocated into the nuclear compartment, where it exerts the toxic activity. Cellular intoxication induces DNA damage and activation of the DNA damage responses, which results in arrest of the target cells in the G1 and/or G2 phases of the cell cycle and activation of DNA repair mechanisms. Cells that fail to repair the damage will senesce or undergo apoptosis. This review will focus on the well-characterized aspects of the CDT biology and discuss the questions that still remain unanswered.

  12. NVC-422 inactivates Staphylococcus aureus toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jekle, Andreas; Yoon, Jungjoo; Zuck, Meghan; Najafi, Ramin; Wang, Lu; Shiau, Timothy; Francavilla, Charles; Rani, Suriani Abdul; Eitzinger, Christian; Nagl, Markus; Anderson, Mark; Debabov, Dmitri

    2013-02-01

    Bacterial pathogens have specific virulence factors (e.g., toxins) that contribute significantly to the virulence and infectivity of microorganisms within the human hosts. Virulence factors are molecules expressed by pathogens that enable colonization, immunoevasion, and immunosuppression, obtaining nutrients from the host or gaining entry into host cells. They can cause pathogenesis by inhibiting or stimulating certain host functions. For example, in systemic Staphylococcus aureus infections, virulence factors such as toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1), staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA), and staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) cause sepsis or toxic shock by uncontrolled stimulation of T lymphocytes and by triggering a cytokine storm. In vitro, these superantigens stimulate the proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the release of many cytokines. NVC-422 (N,N-dichloro-2,2-dimethyltaurine) is a broad-spectrum, fast-acting topical anti-infective agent against microbial pathogens, including antibiotic-resistant microbes. Using mass spectrometry, we demonstrate here that NVC-422 oxidizes methionine residues of TSST-1, SEA, SEB, and exfoliative toxin A (ETA). Exposure of virulence factors to 0.1% NVC-422 for 1 h prevented TSST-1-, SEA-, SEB-, and ETA-induced cell proliferation and cytokine release. Moreover, NVC-422 also delayed and reduced the protein A- and clumping factor-associated agglutination of S. aureus cultures. These results show that, in addition to its well-described direct microbicidal activity, NVC-422 can inactivate S. aureus virulence factors through rapid oxidation of methionines.

  13. Ceftolozane/tazobactam and ceftazidime/avibactam: two novel β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combination agents for the treatment of resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liscio, Jordan L; Mahoney, Monica V; Hirsch, Elizabeth B

    2015-09-01

    The rise in resistant Gram-negative bacteria is a major concern and has led to difficulty in treating multidrug-resistant (MDR) infections. Two recently approved combination antibiotics, ceftolozane/tazobactam and ceftazidime/avibactam, may be effective in treating these resistant infections. Ceftolozane is a novel cephalosporin that has been developed in combination with tazobactam, a recognised β-lactamase inhibitor (BLI). Avibactam is a novel BLI combined with ceftazidime, a cephalosporin with an established history. Both of these β-lactam/BLI combination agents have been shown to retain in vitro activity against selected resistant Gram-negative pathogens, including Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa; notably, ceftazidime/avibactam has demonstrated consistent activity against Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing organisms. Both agents have been approved for the indications of complicated intra-abdominal infection (with metronidazole) and complicated urinary tract infection, and have ongoing phase 3 trials for the treatment of ventilator-associated and nosocomial pneumonia. This manuscript will review current data available regarding the spectrum of activity and clinical trials that led to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of these agents. Both agents appear to be well tolerated and show promise in the treatment of MDR Gram-negative infections.

  14. Delayed toxicity associated with soluble anthrax toxin receptor decoy-Ig fusion protein treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Thomas

    Full Text Available Soluble receptor decoy inhibitors, including receptor-immunogloubulin (Ig fusion proteins, have shown promise as candidate anthrax toxin therapeutics. These agents act by binding to the receptor-interaction site on the protective antigen (PA toxin subunit, thereby blocking toxin binding to cell surface receptors. Here we have made the surprising observation that co-administration of receptor decoy-Ig fusion proteins significantly delayed, but did not protect, rats challenged with anthrax lethal toxin. The delayed toxicity was associated with the in vivo assembly of a long-lived complex comprised of anthrax lethal toxin and the receptor decoy-Ig inhibitor. Intoxication in this system presumably results from the slow dissociation of the toxin complex from the inhibitor following their prolonged circulation. We conclude that while receptor decoy-Ig proteins represent promising candidates for the early treatment of B. anthracis infection, they may not be suitable for therapeutic use at later stages when fatal levels of toxin have already accumulated in the bloodstream.

  15. Dissecting the role of ADAM10 as a mediator of Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hoven, Gisela; Rivas, Amable J; Neukirch, Claudia; Klein, Stefan; Hamm, Christian; Qin, Qianqian; Meyenburg, Martina; Füser, Sabine; Saftig, Paul; Hellmann, Nadja; Postina, Rolf; Husmann, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of bacterial infections in humans, including life-threatening diseases such as pneumonia and sepsis. Its small membrane-pore-forming α-toxin is considered an important virulence factor. By destroying cell-cell contacts through cleavage of cadherins, the metalloproteinase ADAM10 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 10) critically contributes to α-toxin-dependent pathology of experimental S. aureus infections in mice. Moreover, ADAM10 was proposed to be a receptor for α-toxin. However, it is unclear whether the catalytic activity or specific domains of ADAM10 are involved in mediating binding and/or subsequent cytotoxicity of α-toxin. Also, it is not known how α-toxin triggers ADAM10's enzymatic activity, and whether ADAM10 is invariably required for all α-toxin action on cells. In the present study, we show that efficient cleavage of the ADAM10 substrate epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) requires supra-cytotoxic concentrations of α-toxin, leading to significant increases in intracellular [Ca(2+)]; the fall in cellular ATP levels, typically following membrane perforation, became observable at far lower concentrations. Surprisingly, ADAM10 was dispensable for α-toxin-dependent xenophagic targeting of S. aureus, whereas a role for α-toxin attack on the plasma membrane was confirmed. The catalytic site of ADAM10, furin cleavage site, cysteine switch and intracellular domain of ADAM10 were not required for α-toxin binding and subsequent cytotoxicity. In contrast, an essential role for the disintegrin domain and the prodomain emerged. Thus, co-expression of the prodomain with prodomain-deficient ADAM10 reconstituted binding of α-toxin and susceptibility of ADAM10-deficient cells. The results of the present study may help to inform structural analyses of α-toxin-ADAM10 interactions and to design novel strategies to counteract S. aureus α-toxin action.

  16. The roles of carboxylesterase and CYP isozymes on the in vitro metabolism of T-2 toxin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ni-ni Lin; Jia Chen; Bin Xu; Xia Wei; Lei Guo; Jian-wei Xie

    2015-01-01

    Background: T-2 toxin poses a great threat to human health because it has the highest toxicity of the currently known trichothecene mycotoxins. To understand thein vivo toxicity and transformation mechanism of T-2 toxin, we investigated the role of two principal phaseⅠ drug-metabolizing enzymes (cytochrome P450 [CYP450] enzymes) on the metabolism of T-2 toxin, which are crucial to the metabolism of endogenous substances and xenobiotics. We also investigated carboxylesterase, which also plays an important role in the metabolism of toxic substances. Methods: A chemical inhibition method and a recombinant method were employed to investigate the metabolism of the T-2 toxin by the CYP450 enzymes, and a chemical inhibition method was used to study carboxylesterase metabolism. Samples incubated with human liver microsomes were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (HPLC- QqQ MS) after a simple pretreatment. Results: In the presence of a carboxylesterase inhibitor, only 20% T-2 toxin was metabolized. When CYP enzyme inhibitors and a carboxylesterase inhibitor were both present, only 3% of the T-2 toxin was metabolized. The contributions of the CYP450 enzyme family to T-2 toxin metabolism followed the descending order CYP3A4, CYP2E1, CYP1A2, CYP2B6 or CYP2D6 or CYP2C19. Conclusions: Carboxylesterase and CYP450 enzymes are of great importance in T-2 toxin metabolism, in which carboxylesterase is predominant and CYP450 has a subordinate role. CYP3A4 is the principal member of the CYP450 enzyme family responsible for T-2 toxin metabolism. The metabolite produced by carboxylesterase is HT-2, and the metabolite produced by CYP 3A4 is 3’-OH T-2. The different metabolites show different toxicities. Our results will provide useful data concerning the toxic mechanism, the safety evaluation, and the health risk assessment of T-2 toxin.

  17. Converting a Staphylococcus aureus toxin into effective cyclic pseudopeptide antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solecki, Olivia; Mosbah, Amor; Baudy Floc'h, Michèle; Felden, Brice

    2015-03-19

    Staphylococcus aureus produces peptide toxins that it uses to respond to environmental cues. We previously characterized PepA1, a peptide toxin from S. aureus, that induces lytic cell death of both bacterial and host cells. That led us to suggest that PepA1 has an antibacterial activity. Here, we demonstrate that exogenously provided PepA1 has activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. We also see that PepA1 is significantly hemolytic, thus limiting its use as an antibacterial agent. To overcome these limitations, we converted PepA1 into nonhemolytic derivatives. Our most promising derivative is a cyclic heptapseudopeptide with inconsequential toxicity to human cells, enhanced stability in human sera, and sharp antibacterial activity. Mechanistically, linear and helical PepA1 derivatives form pores at the bacterial and erythrocyte surfaces, while the cyclic peptide induces bacterial envelope reorganization, with insignificant action on the erythrocytes. Our work demonstrates that bacterial toxins might be an attractive starting point for antibacterial drug development.

  18. Roles of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein in the apoptosis of human monocytic cells induced by t-toxin from Staphylococcus aureus%X连锁凋亡抑制蛋白通路在金黄色葡萄球菌α-毒素诱导人外周血单核细胞凋亡过程中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    喻博; 佡剑非; 张萌; 阚亮; 王佳贺

    2013-01-01

    目的 研究金黄色葡萄球菌的主要毒力因子α-毒素感染人外周血单核细胞后细胞的凋亡率及X连锁凋亡抑制蛋白(XIAP)、凋亡抑制蛋白1/2 (cIAP1/2)、Survivin、Bcl-2、Bax和半胱氨酸的天冬氨酸蛋白酶(caspase-3)等的表达.方法 以Annexin V异硫氰酸荧光素(FITC)/碘化丙啶(PI)双染流式细胞仪检测人外周血单核细胞的凋亡率,Western blot法检测XIAP、cIAP1/2、Survivin、Bc1-2、Bax和caspase-3等的表达,采用荧光比色法测定细胞内caspase-3蛋白酶活性.结果 α-毒素能够以时间依赖的方式诱导人外周血单核细胞凋亡,α-毒素感染30、60和90 min凋亡率与感染0 min比较,其差异有统计学意义(P<0.05或P<0.001).随着作用时间的延长,XIAP、cIAP1/2、Survivin和Bcl-2表达逐渐下降,而Bax和caspase-3表达逐渐增加.结论 α-毒素可诱导人外周血单核细胞凋亡,XIAP信号通路在金黄色葡萄球菌的致病过程中起重要作用.%Objective To investigate the roles of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP),cellular inhibitor of apoptosis proteinl/2 (cIAP1/2),Survivin,Bcl-2,Bax,and cysteine aspartic acid specific protease-3 (caspase-3) in the apoptosis of human monocytic cells induced by α-toxin from Staphylococcus aureus.Methods Apoptosis rates of human monocytic cells were detected by Annexin V fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide assay.Western blot was performed to detect the expressions of XIAP,cIAP1/2,Survivin,Bcl-2,Bax,and caspase-3.Results The results showed that α-toxin induced apoptosis in human monocytic cells in a time-dependent manner.The apoptosis rates in the groups of 30,60 and 90 min increased significantly than those in the group of 0 min(P < 0.05 or P < 0.001).With the time extension,there was downregulation of XIAP,cIAP1/2,Survivin and Bcl-2,and upregulation of Bax and caspase-3.Conclusion α-toxin from Staphylococcus aureus can induce the apoptosis of human monocytic cells.It is

  19. Prokaryotic toxin-antitoxin systems: novel regulations of the toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Yuichi

    2016-05-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are widely conserved in prokaryotic plasmids and chromosomes and are linked to many roles in cell physiology, including plasmid maintenance, stress response, persistence and protection from phage infection. A TA system is composed of a stable toxin and a labile antitoxin that inhibits a harmful effect of the cognate toxin. When gene expression from the TA loci is repressed under certain conditions such as nutrient starvation, the toxin is freed from the rapidly degrading antitoxin and obstructs an essential cellular process, such as DNA replication, translation and peptidoglycan synthesis, which subsequently causes growth arrest. TA systems are classified into five types according to the nature and the function of antitoxins, and the activity of toxins is tightly regulated in a variety of ways. This short-review highlights several novel regulatory mechanisms for Escherichia coli toxins that we recently discovered.

  20. The uptake machinery of clostridial actin ADP-ribosylating toxins--a cell delivery system for fusion proteins and polypeptide drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Holger; Blöcker, Dagmar; Aktories, Klaus

    2002-12-01

    Several bacterial protein toxins, including Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin, Clostridum perfringens iota toxin, Clostridium difficile ADP-ribosyltransferase, and the Bacillus-produced vegetative insecticidal proteins, target the cytoskeleton by ADP-ribosylation of actin. All these toxins are binary in structure and consist of an enzyme component, possessing ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and a separated binding and translocation component, which is involved in the delivery of the enzyme component into the cell. The toxins are not only important virulence factors but also cell biological tools to study the function of the actin cytoskeleton. Moreover, the binary toxins turned out to be effective transporter systems for the delivery of specific fusion toxins (e.g., Rho-ADP-ribosylating C3 exoenzyme) into cells. The present review describes the biological functions of the toxins, focuses on recent studies on the uptake and delivery mechanism and discusses the usage as a drug delivery system.

  1. [Cytolethal distending toxins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curová, K; Kmeťová, M; Siegfried, L

    2014-06-01

    Cytolethal distending toxins (CDT) are intracellularly acting proteins which interfere with the eukaryotic cell cycle. They are produced by Gram-negative bacteria with affinity to mucocutaneous surfaces and could play a role in the pathogenesis of various mammalian diseases. The functional toxin is composed of three proteins: CdtB entering the nucleus and by its nuclease activity inducing nuclear fragmentation and chromatin disintegration, CdtA, and CdtC, the two latter being responsible for toxin attachment to the surface of the target cell. Cytotoxic effect of CDT leads to the cell cycle arrest before the cell enters mitosis and to further changes (cell distension and death, apoptosis) depending on the cell type. Thus, CDT may function as a virulence factor in pathogenic bacteria that produce it and thus may contribute to the initiation of certain diseases. Most important are inflammatory bowel diseases caused by intestinal bacteria, periodontitis with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans as the aetiologic agent and ulcus molle where Haemophilus ducreyi is the causative agent.

  2. Strategies to improve the insecticidal activity of Cry toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-López, L; Muñoz-Garay, C; Porta, H; Rodríguez-Almazán, C; Soberón, M; Bravo, A

    2009-03-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins have been widely used in the control of insect pests either as spray products or expressed in transgenic crops. These proteins are pore-forming toxins with a complex mechanism of action that involves the sequential interaction with several toxin-receptors. Cry toxins are specific against susceptible larvae and although they are often highly effective, some insect pests are not affected by them or show low susceptibility. In addition, the development of resistance threatens their effectiveness, so strategies to cope with all these problems are necessary. In this review we will discuss and compare the different strategies that have been used to improve insecticidal activity of Cry toxins. The activity of Cry toxins can be enhanced by using additional proteins in the bioassay like serine protease inhibitors, chitinases, Cyt toxins, or a fragment of cadherin receptor containing a toxin-binding site. On the other hand, different modifications performed in the toxin gene such as site-directed mutagenesis, introduction of cleavage sites in specific regions of the protein, and deletion of small fragments from the amino-terminal region lead to improved toxicity or overcome resistance, representing interesting alternatives for insect pest control.

  3. Using phenotype microarrays to determine culture conditions that induce or repress toxin production by Clostridium difficile and other microorganisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-He Lei

    Full Text Available Toxin production is a central issue in the pathogenesis of Clostridium difficile and many other pathogenic microorganisms. Toxin synthesis is influenced by a variety of known and unknown factors of genetics, physiology, and environment. To facilitate the study of toxin production by C. difficile, we have developed a new, reliable, quantitative, and robust cell-based cytotoxicity assay. Then we combined this new assay with Phenotype MicroArrays (PM technology which provides high throughput testing of culture conditions. This allowed us to quantitatively measure toxin production by C. difficile type strain ATCC 9689 under 768 culture conditions. The culture conditions include different carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur sources. Among these, 89 conditions produced strong toxin induction and 31 produced strong toxin repression. Strong toxin inducers included adenine, guanosine, arginine dipeptides, γ-D-Glu-Gly, methylamine, and others. Some leucine dipeptides and the triple-leucine tripeptide were among the strongest toxin repressors. While some results are consistent with previous observations, others are new observations that provide insights into toxin regulation and pathogenesis of C. difficile. Additionally, we have demonstrated that this combined assay technology can be applied broadly to a wide range of toxin producing microorganisms. This study is the first demonstration of simultaneous assessment of a large number of culture conditions influencing bacterial toxin production. The new functional cytotoxin quantitation method developed provides a valuable tool for studying toxigenic microorganisms and may also find applications in clinical and epidemiological research.

  4. Structure, Function and Evolution of Clostridium botulinum C2 and C3 Toxins: Insight to Poultry and Veterinary Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellapandi, P; Prisilla, A

    2016-12-01

    Clostridium botulinum group III strains are able to produce cytotoxins, C2 toxin and C3 exotoxin, along with botulinum neurotoxin types C and D. C2 toxin and C3 exotoxin produced from this organism are the most important members of bacterial ADP-ribosyltransferase superfamily. Both toxins have distinct pathophysiological functions in the avian and mammalian hosts. The members of this superfamily transfer an ADP-ribose moiety of NAD+ to specific eukaryotic target proteins. The present review describes the structure, function and evolution aspects of these toxins with a special emphasis to the development of veterinary vaccines. C2 toxin is a binary toxin that consists of a catalytic subunit (C2I) and a translocation subunit (C2II). C2I component is structurally and functionally similar to the VIP2 and iota A toxin whereas C2II component shows a significant homology with the protective antigen from anthrax toxin and iota B. Unlike C2 toxin, C3 toxin is devoid of translocation/binding subunit. Extensive studies on their sequence-structure-function link spawn additional efforts to understand the catalytic mechanisms and target recognition. Structural and functional relationships of them are often determined by using evolutionary constraints as valuable biological measures. Enzyme-deficient mutants derived from these toxins have been used as drug/protein delivery systems to eukaryotic cells. Thus, current knowledge on their molecular diversity is a well-known perspective to design immunotoxin or subunit vaccine for C. botulinum infection.

  5. Method for detecting biological toxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligler, F.S.; Campbell, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    Biological toxins are indirectly detected by using polymerase chain reaction to amplify unique nucleic acid sequences coding for the toxins or enzymes unique to toxin synthesis. Buffer, primers coding for the unique nucleic acid sequences and an amplifying enzyme are added to a sample suspected of containing the toxin. The mixture is then cycled thermally to exponentially amplify any of these unique nucleic acid sequences present in the sample. The amplified sequences can be detected by various means, including fluorescence. Detection of the amplified sequences is indicative of the presence of toxin in the original sample. By using more than one set of labeled primers, the method can be used to simultaneously detect several toxins in a sample.

  6. Review of the Inhibition of Biological Activities of Food-Related Selected Toxins by Natural Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reuven Rasooly

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a need to develop food-compatible conditions to alter the structures of fungal, bacterial, and plant toxins, thus transforming toxins to nontoxic molecules. The term ‘chemical genetics’ has been used to describe this approach. This overview attempts to survey and consolidate the widely scattered literature on the inhibition by natural compounds and plant extracts of the biological (toxicological activity of the following food-related toxins: aflatoxin B1, fumonisins, and ochratoxin A produced by fungi; cholera toxin produced by Vibrio cholerae bacteria; Shiga toxins produced by E. coli bacteria; staphylococcal enterotoxins produced by Staphylococcus aureus bacteria; ricin produced by seeds of the castor plant Ricinus communis; and the glycoalkaloid α-chaconine synthesized in potato tubers and leaves. The reduction of biological activity has been achieved by one or more of the following approaches: inhibition of the release of the toxin into the environment, especially food; an alteration of the structural integrity of the toxin molecules; changes in the optimum microenvironment, especially pH, for toxin activity; and protection against adverse effects of the toxins in cells, animals, and humans (chemoprevention. The results show that food-compatible and safe compounds with anti-toxin properties can be used to reduce the toxic potential of these toxins. Practical applications and research needs are suggested that may further facilitate reducing the toxic burden of the diet. Researchers are challenged to (a apply the available methods without adversely affecting the nutritional quality, safety, and sensory attributes of animal feed and human food and (b educate food producers and processors and the public about available approaches to mitigating the undesirable effects of natural toxins that may present in the diet.

  7. Recombinant Toxins for Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastan, Ira; Fitzgerald, David

    1991-11-01

    Recombinant toxins target cell surface receptors and antigens on tumor cells. They kill by mechanisms different from conventional chemotherapy, so that cross resistance to conventional chemotherapeutic agents should not be a problem. Furthermore, they are not mutagens and should not induce secondary malignancies or accelerate progression of benign malignancies. They can be mass-produced cheaply in bacteria as homogeneous proteins. Either growth factor-toxin fusions or antibody-toxin fusions can be chosen, depending on the cellular target.

  8. Pore formation by Cry toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soberón, Mario; Pardo, Liliana; Muñóz-Garay, Carlos; Sánchez, Jorge; Gómez, Isabel; Porta, Helena; Bravo, Alejandra

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) bacteria produce insecticidal Cry and Cyt proteins used in the biological control of different insect pests. In this review, we will focus on the 3d-Cry toxins that represent the biggest group of Cry proteins and also on Cyt toxins. The 3d-Cry toxins are pore-forming toxins that induce cell death by forming ionic pores into the membrane of the midgut epithelial cells in their target insect. The initial steps in the mode of action include ingestion of the protoxin, activation by midgut proteases to produce the toxin fragment and the interaction with the primary cadherin receptor. The interaction of the monomeric CrylA toxin with the cadherin receptor promotes an extra proteolytic cleavage, where helix alpha-1 of domain I is eliminated and the toxin oligomerization is induced, forming a structure of 250 kDa. The oligomeric structure binds to a secondary receptor, aminopeptidase N or alkaline phosphatase. The secondary receptor drives the toxin into detergent resistant membrane microdomains formingpores that cause osmotic shock, burst of the midgut cells and insect death. Regarding to Cyt toxins, these proteins have a synergistic effect on the toxicity of some Cry toxins. Cyt proteins are also proteolytic activated in the midgut lumen of their target, they bind to some phospholipids present in the mosquito midgut cells. The proposed mechanism of synergism between Cry and Cyt toxins is that Cyt1Aa function as a receptor for Cry toxins. The Cyt1A inserts into midgut epithelium membrane and exposes protein regions that are recognized by Cry11Aa. It was demonstrated that this interaction facilitates the oligomerization of Cry11Aa and also its pore formation activity.

  9. T-2 Toxin-induced Toxicity in Pregnant Mice and Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Sehata

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available T-2 toxin is a cytotoxic secondary fungal metabolite that belongs to the trichothecene mycotoxin family. This mycotoxin is a well known inhibitor of protein synthesis through its high binding affinity to peptidyl transferase, which is an integral part of the ribosomal 60s subunit, and it also inhibits the synthesis of DNA and RNA, probably secondary to the inhibition of protein synthesis. In addition, T-2 toxin is said to induce apoptosis in many types of cells bearing high proliferating activity. T-2 toxin readily passes the placenta and is distributed to embryo/fetal tissues, which include many component cells bearing high proliferating activity. This paper reviews the reported data related to T-2 toxin-induced maternal and fetal toxicities in pregnant mice and rats. The mechanisms of T-2 toxin-induced apoptosis in maternal and fetal tissues are also discussed in this paper.

  10. Role of Pore-Forming Toxins in Neonatal Sepsis

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    Andreas F.-P. Sonnen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein toxins are important virulence factors contributing to neonatal sepsis. The major pathogens of neonatal sepsis, group B Streptococci, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus, secrete toxins of different molecular nature, which are key for defining the disease. Amongst these toxins are pore-forming exotoxins that are expressed as soluble monomers prior to engagement of the target cell membrane with subsequent formation of an aqueous membrane pore. Membrane pore formation is not only a means for immediate lysis of the targeted cell but also a general mechanism that contributes to penetration of epithelial barriers and evasion of the immune system, thus creating survival niches for the pathogens. Pore-forming toxins, however, can also contribute to the induction of inflammation and hence to the manifestation of sepsis. Clearly, pore-forming toxins are not the sole factors that drive sepsis progression, but they often act in concert with other bacterial effectors, especially in the initial stages of neonatal sepsis manifestation.

  11. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues > Conditions > Sexually Transmitted > Bacterial Vaginosis Health Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Bacterial Vaginosis Page Content Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal infection in sexually active teenaged girls . It appears to be caused by ...

  12. Efficient synthesis of mosquitocidal toxins in Asticcacaulis excentricus demonstrates potential of gram-negative bacteria in mosquito control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J W; Yap, W H; Thanabalu, T; Porter, A G

    1996-03-01

    The control of mosquitoes with chemical insecticides pollutes the environment and leads to resistance in mosquito populations. Bacterial control of mosquito larvae with Bacillus sphaericus and Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis, which produce protein toxins, has proved useful, safe, and nonpolluting. These bacteria do, however, suffer from disadvantages, including rapid setting, UV sensitivity, and lack of persistance of spores, proteolysis of toxins, narrow host range, and high production costs. Here we show that the Gram-negative bacterium Asticcacaulis excentricus is a promising host for delivering toxins to mosquito larvae. Plasmid-transformed A. excentricus cells expressing the binary toxin of B. sphaericus exhibited toxicity to Culex and Anopheles mosquito larvae similar to that of the high-toxicity strains of B. sphaericus which produce several toxins. A. excentricus has potential advantages as a larvicide compared with the bacilli, especially persistance in the larval feeding zone, resistance to UV light, lack of toxin-degrading proteases, and low production costs.

  13. MucoRice-cholera toxin B-subunit, a rice-based oral cholera vaccine, down-regulates the expression of α-amylase/trypsin inhibitor-like protein family as major rice allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Shiho; Nakamura, Rika; Mejima, Mio; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Kuroda, Masaharu; Takeyama, Natsumi; Oyama, Masaaki; Satoh, Shigeru; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Masumura, Takehiro; Teshima, Reiko; Yuki, Yoshikazu

    2013-07-05

    To develop a cold chain- and needle/syringe-free rice-based cholera vaccine (MucoRice-CTB) for human use, we previously advanced the MucoRice system by introducing antisense genes specific for endogenous rice storage proteins and produced a molecularly uniform, human-applicable, high-yield MucoRice-CTB devoid of plant-associated sugar. To maintain the cold chain-free property of this vaccine for clinical application, we wanted to use a polished rice powder preparation of MucoRice-CTB without further purification but wondered whether this might cause an unexpected increase in rice allergen protein expression levels in MucoRice-CTB and prompt safety concerns. Therefore, we used two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis and shotgun MS/MS proteomics to compare rice allergen protein expression levels in MucoRice-CTB and wild-type (WT) rice. Both proteomics analyses showed that the only notable change in the expression levels of rice allergen protein in MucoRice-CTB, compared with those in WT rice, was a decrease in the expression levels of α-amylase/trypsin inhibitor-like protein family such as the seed allergen protein RAG2. Real-time PCR analysis showed mRNA of RAG2 reduced in MucoRice-CTB seed. These results demonstrate that no known rice allergens appear to be up-reregulated by genetic modification of MucoRice-CTB, suggesting that MucoRice-CTB has potential as a safe oral cholera vaccine for clinical application.

  14. Botulinum toxin: bioweapon & magic drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaked, Ram Kumar; Singh, Manglesh Kumar; Singh, Padma; Gupta, Pallavi

    2010-11-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins, causative agents of botulism in humans, are produced by Clostridium botulinum, an anaerobic spore-former Gram positive bacillus. Botulinum neurotoxin poses a major bioweapon threat because of its extreme potency and lethality; its ease of production, transport, and misuse; and the need for prolonged intensive care among affected persons. A single gram of crystalline toxin, evenly dispersed and inhaled, can kill more than one million people. The basis of the phenomenal potency of botulinum toxin is enzymatic; the toxin is a zinc proteinase that cleaves neuronal vesicle associated proteins responsible for acetylcholine release into the neuromuscular junction. As a military or terrorist weapon, botulinum toxin could be disseminated via aerosol or by contamination of water or food supplies, causing widespread casualties. A fascinating aspect of botulinum toxin research in recent years has been development of the most potent toxin into a molecule of significant therapeutic utility . It is the first biological toxin which is licensed for treatment of human diseases. In the late 1980s, Canada approved use of the toxin to treat strabismus, in 2001 in the removal of facial wrinkles and in 2002, the FDA in the United States followed suit. The present review focuses on both warfare potential and medical uses of botulinum neurotoxin.

  15. Cholix Toxin, a Novel ADP-ribosylating Factor from Vibrio cholerae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorgensen, Rene; Purdy, Alexandra E.; Fieldhouse, Robert J.; Kimber, Matthew S.; Bartlett, Douglas H.; Merrill, A. Rod (Guelph); (NIH); (UCSD)

    2008-07-15

    The ADP-ribosyltransferases are a class of enzymes that display activity in a variety of bacterial pathogens responsible for causing diseases in plants and animals, including those affecting mankind, such as diphtheria, cholera, and whooping cough. We report the characterization of a novel toxin from Vibrio cholerae, which we call cholix toxin. The toxin is active against mammalian cells (IC50 = 4.6 {+-} 0.4 ng/ml) and crustaceans (Artemia nauplii LD50 = 10 {+-} 2 {mu}g/ml). Here we show that this toxin is the third member of the diphthamide-specific class of ADP-ribose transferases and that it possesses specific ADP-ribose transferase activity against ribosomal eukaryotic elongation factor 2. We also describe the high resolution crystal structures of the multidomain toxin and its catalytic domain at 2.1- and 1.25-{angstrom} resolution, respectively. The new structural data show that cholix toxin possesses the necessary molecular features required for infection of eukaryotes by receptor-mediated endocytosis, translocation to the host cytoplasm, and inhibition of protein synthesis by specific modification of elongation factor 2. The crystal structures also provide important insight into the structural basis for activation of toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. These results indicate that cholix toxin may be an important virulence factor of Vibrio cholerae that likely plays a significant role in the survival of the organism in an aquatic environment.

  16. Bile salt inhibition of host cell damage by Clostridium difficile toxins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Darkoh

    Full Text Available Virulent Clostridium difficile strains produce toxin A and/or toxin B that are the etiological agents of diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. Treatment of C. difficile infections (CDI has been hampered by resistance to multiple antibiotics, sporulation, emergence of strains with increased virulence, recurrence of the infection, and the lack of drugs that preserve or restore the colonic bacterial flora. As a result, there is new interest in non-antibiotic CDI treatments. The human conjugated bile salt taurocholate was previously shown in our laboratory to inhibit C. difficile toxin A and B activities in an in vitro assay. Here we demonstrate for the first time in an ex vivo assay that taurocholate can protect Caco-2 colonic epithelial cells from the damaging effects of the C. difficile toxins. Using caspase-3 and lactate dehydrogenase assays, we have demonstrated that taurocholate reduced the extent of toxin B-induced apoptosis and cell membrane damage. Confluent Caco-2 cells cultured with toxin B induced elevated caspase-3 activity. Remarkably, addition of 5 mM taurocholate reduced caspase-3 activity in cells treated with 2, 4, 6, and 12 µg/ml of toxin B by 99%, 78%, 64%, and 60%, respectively. Furthermore, spent culture medium from Caco-2 cells incubated with both toxin B and taurocholate exhibited significantly decreased lactate dehydrogenase activity compared to spent culture medium from cells incubated with toxin B only. Our results suggest that the mechanism of taurocholate-mediated inhibition functions at the level of toxin activity since taurocholate did not affect C. difficile growth and toxin production. These findings open up a new avenue for the development of non-antibiotic therapeutics for CDI treatment.

  17. A Polychaete's powerful punch: venom gland transcriptomics of Glycera reveals a complex cocktail of toxin homologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Reumont, Björn M; Campbell, Lahcen I; Richter, Sandy; Hering, Lars; Sykes, Dan; Hetmank, Jörg; Jenner, Ronald A; Bleidorn, Christoph

    2014-09-05

    Glycerids are marine annelids commonly known as bloodworms. Bloodworms have an eversible proboscis adorned with jaws connected to venom glands. Bloodworms prey on invertebrates, and it is known that the venom glands produce compounds that can induce toxic effects in animals. Yet, none of these putative toxins has been characterized on a molecular basis. Here we present the transcriptomic profiles of the venom glands of three species of bloodworm, Glycera dibranchiata, Glycera fallax and Glycera tridactyla, as well as the body tissue of G. tridactyla. The venom glands express a complex mixture of transcripts coding for putative toxin precursors. These transcripts represent 20 known toxin classes that have been convergently recruited into animal venoms, as well as transcripts potentially coding for Glycera-specific toxins. The toxins represent five functional categories: Pore-forming and membrane-disrupting toxins, neurotoxins, protease inhibitors, other enzymes, and CAP domain toxins. Many of the transcripts coding for putative Glycera toxins belong to classes that have been widely recruited into venoms, but some are homologs of toxins previously only known from the venoms of scorpaeniform fish and monotremes (stonustoxin-like toxin), turrid gastropods (turripeptide-like peptides), and sea anemones (gigantoxin I-like neurotoxin). This complex mixture of toxin homologs suggests that bloodworms employ venom while predating on macroscopic prey, casting doubt on the previously widespread opinion that G. dibranchiata is a detritivore. Our results further show that researchers should be aware that different assembly methods, as well as different methods of homology prediction, can influence the transcriptomic profiling of venom glands.

  18. Phosphatase-dependent regulation of epithelial mitogen-activated protein kinase responses to toxin-induced membrane pores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge L Aguilar

    Full Text Available Diverse bacterial species produce pore-forming toxins (PFT that can puncture eukaryotic cell membranes. Host cells respond to sublytic concentrations of PFT through conserved intracellular signaling pathways, including activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK, which are critical to cell survival. Here we demonstrate that in respiratory epithelial cells p38 and JNK MAPK were phosphorylated within 30 min of exposure to pneumolysin, the PFT from Streptococcus pneumoniae. This activation was tightly regulated, and dephosphorylation of both MAPK occurred within 60 min following exposure. Pretreatment of epithelial cells with inhibitors of cellular phosphatases, including sodium orthovanadate, calyculin A, and okadaic acid, prolonged and intensified MAPK activation. Specific inhibition of MAPK phosphatase-1 did not affect the kinetics of MAPK activation in PFT-exposed epithelial cells, but siRNA-mediated knockdown of serine/threonine phosphatases PP1 and PP2A were potent inhibitors of MAPK dephosphorylation. These results indicate an important role for PP1 and PP2A in termination of epithelial responses to PFT and only a minor contribution of dual-specificity phosphatases, such as MAPK phosphatase-1, which are the major regulators of MAPK signals in other cell types. Epithelial regulation of MAPK signaling in response to membrane disruption involves distinct pathways and may require different strategies for therapeutic interventions.

  19. Quorum sensing inhibitors disable bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael

    2011-01-01

    It is now evident that bacteria assume the biofilm mode of growth during chronic infections. The important hallmarks of biofilm infections are development of local inflammations, extreme tolerance to the action of conventional antimicrobial agents and an almost infinite capacity to evade the host...... defence systems in particular innate immunity. In the biofilm mode, bacteria use cell to cell communication termed quorum-sensing (QS) to coordinate expression of virulence, tolerance towards a number of antimicrobial agents and shielding against the host defence system. Chemical biology approaches may...

  20. Enhanced detection and identification of Shiga toxin 1 and 2 from pathogenic bacteria by MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS/MS-PSD and top-down proteomic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) represent a continuing threat to the Nation’s food supply and public health. Shiga toxin genes (stx) are encoded in lambda-like bacteriophages whose genome is inserted into the bacterial DNA. Environmental stress can trigger bacteriophage replication a...

  1. Comparison of anorectic potencies of the trichothecenes T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin and satratoxin G to the ipecac alkaloid emetine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenda Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Trichothecene mycotoxins, potent translational inhibitors that are associated with human food poisonings and damp-building illnesses, are of considerable concern to animal and human health. Food refusal is a hallmark of exposure of experimental animals to deoxynivalenol (DON and other Type B trichothecenes but less is known about the anorectic effects of foodborne Type A trichothecenes (e.g., T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin, airborne Type D trichothecenes (e.g., satratoxin G [SG] or functionally analogous metabolites that impair protein synthesis. Here, we utilized a well-described mouse model of food intake to compare the anorectic potencies of T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin, and SG to that of emetine, a medicinal alkaloid derived from ipecac that inhibits translation. Intraperitoneal (IP administration with T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin, emetine and SG evoked anorectic responses that occurred within 0.5 h that lasted up to 96, 96, 3 and 96 h, respectively, with lowest observed adverse effect levels (LOAELs being 0.1, 0.1, 2.5 and 0.25 mg/kg BW, respectively. When delivered via natural routes of exposure, T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin, emetine (oral and SG (intranasal induced anorectic responses that lasted up to 48, 48, 3 and 6 h, respectively with LOAELs being 0.1, 0.1, 0.25, and 0.5 mg/kg BW, respectively. All four compounds were generally much more potent than DON which was previously observed to have LOAELs of 1 and 2.5 mg/kg BW after IP and oral dosing, respectively. Taken together, these anorectic potency data will be valuable in discerning the relative risks from trichothecenes and other translational inhibitors of natural origin.

  2. Effects of Small Molecule Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel Inhibitors on Structure and Function of Accessory Cholera Enterotoxin (Ace of Vibrio cholerae.

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    Tanaya Chatterjee

    Full Text Available Cholera pathogenesis occurs due to synergistic pro-secretory effects of several toxins, such as cholera toxin (CTX and Accessory cholera enterotoxin (Ace secreted by Vibrio cholerae strains. Ace activates chloride channels stimulating chloride/bicarbonate transport that augments fluid secretion resulting in diarrhea. These channels have been targeted for drug development. However, lesser attention has been paid to the interaction of chloride channel modulators with bacterial toxins. Here we report the modulation of the structure/function of recombinant Ace by small molecule calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC inhibitors, namely CaCCinh-A01, digallic acid (DGA and tannic acid. Biophysical studies indicate that the unfolding (induced by urea free energy increases upon binding CaCCinh-A01 and DGA, compared to native Ace, whereas binding of tannic acid destabilizes the protein. Far-UV CD experiments revealed that the α-helical content of Ace-CaCCinh-A01 and Ace-DGA complexes increased relative to Ace. In contrast, binding to tannic acid had the opposite effect, indicating the loss of protein secondary structure. The modulation of Ace structure induced by CaCC inhibitors was also analyzed using docking and molecular dynamics (MD simulation. Functional studies, performed using mouse ileal loops and Ussing chamber experiments, corroborate biophysical data, all pointing to the fact that tannic acid destabilizes Ace, inhibiting its function, whereas DGA stabilizes the toxin with enhanced fluid accumulation in mouse ileal loop. The efficacy of tannic acid in mouse model suggests that the targeted modulation of Ace structure may be of therapeutic benefit for gastrointestinal disorders.

  3. Effects of Small Molecule Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel Inhibitors on Structure and Function of Accessory Cholera Enterotoxin (Ace) of Vibrio cholerae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Tanaya; Sheikh, Irshad Ali; Chakravarty, Devlina; Chakrabarti, Pinak; Sarkar, Paramita; Saha, Tultul; Chakrabarti, Manoj K.; Hoque, Kazi Mirajul

    2015-01-01

    Cholera pathogenesis occurs due to synergistic pro-secretory effects of several toxins, such as cholera toxin (CTX) and Accessory cholera enterotoxin (Ace) secreted by Vibrio cholerae strains. Ace activates chloride channels stimulating chloride/bicarbonate transport that augments fluid secretion resulting in diarrhea. These channels have been targeted for drug development. However, lesser attention has been paid to the interaction of chloride channel modulators with bacterial toxins. Here we report the modulation of the structure/function of recombinant Ace by small molecule calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) inhibitors, namely CaCCinh-A01, digallic acid (DGA) and tannic acid. Biophysical studies indicate that the unfolding (induced by urea) free energy increases upon binding CaCCinh-A01 and DGA, compared to native Ace, whereas binding of tannic acid destabilizes the protein. Far-UV CD experiments revealed that the α-helical content of Ace-CaCCinh-A01 and Ace-DGA complexes increased relative to Ace. In contrast, binding to tannic acid had the opposite effect, indicating the loss of protein secondary structure. The modulation of Ace structure induced by CaCC inhibitors was also analyzed using docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Functional studies, performed using mouse ileal loops and Ussing chamber experiments, corroborate biophysical data, all pointing to the fact that tannic acid destabilizes Ace, inhibiting its function, whereas DGA stabilizes the toxin with enhanced fluid accumulation in mouse ileal loop. The efficacy of tannic acid in mouse model suggests that the targeted modulation of Ace structure may be of therapeutic benefit for gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:26540279

  4. Food toxin detection with atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Externally introduced toxins or internal spoilage correlated pathogens and their metabolites are all potential sources of food toxins. To prevent and protect unsafe food, many food toxin detection techniques have been developed to detect various toxins for quality control. Although several routine m...

  5. Shiga Toxin Producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Allen; Youngster, Ilan; McAdam, Alexander J

    2015-06-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is among the common causes of foodborne gastroenteritis. STEC is defined by the production of specific toxins, but within this pathotype there is a diverse group of organisms. This diversity has important consequences for understanding the pathogenesis of the organism, as well as for selecting the optimum strategy for diagnostic testing in the clinical laboratory. This review includes discussions of the mechanisms of pathogenesis, the range of manifestations of infection, and the several different methods of laboratory detection of Shiga toxin-producing E coli.

  6. Bacterial Genotoxins: Merging the DNA Damage Response into Infection Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Grasso

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial genotoxins are unique among bacterial toxins as their molecular target is DNA. The consequence of intoxication or infection is induction of DNA breaks that, if not properly repaired, results in irreversible cell cycle arrest (senescence or death of the target cells. At present, only three bacterial genotoxins have been identified. Two are protein toxins: the cytolethal distending toxin (CDT family produced by a number of Gram-negative bacteria and the typhoid toxin produced by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. The third member, colibactin, is a peptide-polyketide genotoxin, produced by strains belonging to the phylogenetic group B2 of Escherichia coli. This review will present the cellular effects of acute and chronic intoxication or infection with the genotoxins-producing bacteria. The carcinogenic properties and the role of these effectors in the context of the host-microbe interaction will be discussed. We will further highlight the open questions that remain to be solved regarding the biology of this unusual family of bacterial toxins.

  7. Cloning eleven midgut trypsin cDNAs and evaluating the interaction of proteinase inhibitors with Cry1Ac against the tobacco budworm Heliothis virescens (F.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgut trypsins are associated with Bt protoxin activation and toxin degradation. Proteinase inhibitors have potential insecticidal toxicity against a wide range of insect species. Proactive action to examine trypsin gene profiles and proteinase inhibitors for interaction with Bt toxin is necessary ...

  8. sRNA Antitoxins: More than One Way to Repress a Toxin

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    Jia Wen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial toxin-antitoxin loci consist of two genes: one encodes a potentially toxic protein, and the second, an antitoxin to repress its function or expression. The antitoxin can either be an RNA or a protein. For type I and type III loci, the antitoxins are RNAs; however, they have very different modes of action. Type I antitoxins repress toxin protein expression through interacting with the toxin mRNA, thereby targeting the mRNA for degradation or preventing its translation or both; type III antitoxins directly bind to the toxin protein, sequestering it. Along with these two very different modes of action for the antitoxin, there are differences in the functions of the toxin proteins and the mobility of these loci between species. Within this review, we discuss the major differences as to how the RNAs repress toxin activity, the potential consequences for utilizing different regulatory strategies, as well as the confirmed and potential biological roles for these loci across bacterial species.

  9. The adherens junctions control susceptibility to Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Lauren M; Marceau, Caleb D; Starkl, Philipp M; Lumb, Jennifer H; Shah, Jimit; Guerrera, Diego; Cooper, Rachel L; Merakou, Christina; Bouley, Donna M; Meng, Wenxiang; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Takeichi, Masatoshi; Galli, Stephen J; Bagnoli, Fabio; Citi, Sandra; Carette, Jan E; Amieva, Manuel R

    2015-11-17

    Staphylococcus aureus is both a transient skin colonizer and a formidable human pathogen, ranking among the leading causes of skin and soft tissue infections as well as severe pneumonia. The secreted bacterial α-toxin is essential for S. aureus virulence in these epithelial diseases. To discover host cellular factors required for α-toxin cytotoxicity, we conducted a genetic screen using mutagenized haploid human cells. Our screen identified a cytoplasmic member of the adherens junctions, plekstrin-homology domain containing protein 7 (PLEKHA7), as the second most significantly enriched gene after the known α-toxin receptor, a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10). Here we report a new, unexpected role for PLEKHA7 and several components of cellular adherens junctions in controlling susceptibility to S. aureus α-toxin. We find that despite being injured by α-toxin pore formation, PLEKHA7 knockout cells recover after intoxication. By infecting PLEKHA7(-/-) mice with methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 LAC strain, we demonstrate that this junctional protein controls disease severity in both skin infection and lethal S. aureus pneumonia. Our results suggest that adherens junctions actively control cellular responses to a potent pore-forming bacterial toxin and identify PLEKHA7 as a potential nonessential host target to reduce S. aureus virulence during epithelial infections.

  10. Epsilon toxin: a fascinating pore-forming toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoff, Michel R

    2011-12-01

    Epsilon toxin (ETX) is produced by strains of Clostridium perfringens classified as type B or type D. ETX belongs to the heptameric β-pore-forming toxins including aerolysin and Clostridium septicum alpha toxin, which are characterized by the formation of a pore through the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells consisting in a β-barrel of 14 amphipatic β strands. By contrast to aerolysin and C. septicum alpha toxin, ETX is a much more potent toxin and is responsible for enterotoxemia in animals, mainly sheep. ETX induces perivascular edema in various tissues and accumulates in particular in the kidneys and brain, where it causes edema and necrotic lesions. ETX is able to pass through the blood-brain barrier and stimulate the release of glutamate, which accounts for the symptoms of nervous excitation observed in animal enterotoxemia. At the cellular level, ETX causes rapid swelling followed by cell death involving necrosis. The precise mode of action of ETX remains to be determined. ETX is a powerful toxin, however, it also represents a unique tool with which to vehicle drugs into the central nervous system or target glutamatergic neurons.

  11. Extraction of Staphylococcus aureus toxin from minced meat in Mosul City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. H. Sheet

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to isolate and identify of Staph.aureus with its toxin from (41 sample of minced meat from different areas of Mosul city collected between April to July 2007. The positive samples to bacterial isolation reached 14.6%.In order to search the effect of bacterial toxin 0.2 ml and 0.4 ml of the toxins have been give orally and injected interperitonealy , respectively in albino mice. Histopathological changes of this toxin were described, the results showed the presence of vascular degeneration and apoptosis in hepatocyt as well as vascular and fatty degeneration in the tubercular epithelium of kidney. In the brain tissue the lesion was characterize by presence of vacuolation, gliosis and privascular odema, also the results revealed elongation and blunting of villi associated with lymphocytic proliferation in lamina properia of intestine. The histopathological changes were more severe in dose 0.4 ml as compared with 0.2 ml bacterial toxin.

  12. An Overview of Helicobacter pylori VacA Toxin Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora J. Foegeding

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The VacA toxin secreted by Helicobacter pylori enhances the ability of the bacteria to colonize the stomach and contributes to the pathogenesis of gastric adenocarcinoma and peptic ulcer disease. The amino acid sequence and structure of VacA are unrelated to corresponding features of other known bacterial toxins. VacA is classified as a pore-forming toxin, and many of its effects on host cells are attributed to formation of channels in intracellular sites. The most extensively studied VacA activity is its capacity to stimulate vacuole formation, but the toxin has many additional effects on host cells. Multiple cell types are susceptible to VacA, including gastric epithelial cells, parietal cells, T cells, and other types of immune cells. This review focuses on the wide range of VacA actions that are detectable in vitro, as well as actions of VacA in vivo that are relevant for H. pylori colonization of the stomach and development of gastric disease.

  13. Repurposing a Prokaryotic Toxin-Antitoxin System for the Selective Killing of Oncogenically Stressed Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Mark A; Pimentel, Belén; Bermejo-Rodríguez, Camino; Dionne, Isabelle; Turnbull, Alice; de la Cueva-Méndez, Guillermo

    2016-07-15

    Prokaryotes express intracellular toxins that pass unnoticed to carrying cells until coexpressed antitoxin partners are degraded in response to stress. Although not evolved to function in eukaryotes, one of these toxins, Kid, induces apoptosis in mammalian cells, an effect that is neutralized by its cognate antitoxin, Kis. Here we engineered this toxin-antitoxin pair to create a synthetic system that becomes active in human cells suffering a specific oncogenic stress. Inspired by the way Kid becomes active in bacterial cells, we produced a Kis variant that is selectively degraded in human cells expressing oncoprotein E6. The resulting toxin-antitoxin system functions autonomously in human cells, distinguishing those that suffer the oncogenic insult, which are killed by Kid, from those that do not, which remain protected by Kis. Our results provide a framework for developing personalized anticancer strategies avoiding off-target effects, a challenge that has been hardly tractable by other means thus far.

  14. Oral toxicity of bacterial toxins against thrips species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, L.J.M.; Visser, J.H.; Jongsma, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    The oral toxicity of excretion products of several Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus strains was tested on two thrips species: Frankliniella occidentalis and Thrips tabaci. Out of 46 Photorhabdus isolates and 6 Xenorhabdus isolates only 6 North American P. temperata isolates were toxic to the thrips spec

  15. Effect of Gating Modifier Toxins on Membrane Thickness: Implications for Toxin Effect on Gramicidin and Mechanosensitive Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Ho Chung

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Various gating modifier toxins partition into membranes and interfere with the gating mechanisms of biological ion channels. For example, GsMTx4 potentiates gramicidin and several bacterial mechanosensitive channels whose gating kinetics are sensitive to mechanical properties of the membrane, whereas binding of HpTx2 shifts the voltage-activity curve of the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv4.2 to the right. The detailed process by which the toxin partitions into membranes has been difficult to probe using molecular dynamics due to the limited time scale accessible. Here we develop a protocol that allows the spontaneous assembly of a polypeptide toxin into membranes in atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of tens of nanoseconds. The protocol is applied to GsMTx4 and HpTx2. Both toxins, released in water at the start of the simulation, spontaneously bind into the lipid bilayer within 50 ns, with their hydrophobic patch penetrated into the bilayer beyond the phosphate groups of the lipids. It is found that the bilayer is about 2 Å thinner upon the binding of a GsMTx4 monomer. Such a thinning effect of GsMTx4 on membranes may explain its potentiation effect on gramicidin and mechanosensitive channels.

  16. Discovery of Functional Toxin/Antitoxin Systems in Bacteria by Shotgun Cloning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sberro, Hila; Leavitt, Azita; Kiro, Ruth; Koh, Eugene; Peleg, Yoav; Qimron, Udi; Sorek, Rotem

    2013-04-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules, composed of a toxic protein and a counteracting antitoxin, play important roles in bacterial physiology. We examined the experimental insertion of 1.5 million genes from 388 microbial genomes into an Escherichia coli host using over 8.5 million random clones. This revealed hundreds of genes (toxins) that could only be cloned when the neighboring gene (antitoxin) was present on the same clone. Clustering of these genes revealed TA families widespread in bacterial genomes, some of which deviate from the classical characteristics previously described for such modules. Introduction of these genes into E. coli validated that the toxin toxicity is mitigated by the antitoxin. Infection experiments with T7 phage showed that two of the new modules can provide resistance against phage. Moreover, our experiments revealed an 'anti-defense' protein in phage T7 that neutralizes phage resistance. Our results expose active fronts in the arms race between bacteria and phage.

  17. East1 toxin and its presence in a changing microbial world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. Sousa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This review shows the structure, mode of action, and actual epidemiological data about EAST1 toxin. It is a particularly intriguing bacterial toxin that may subvert multiple cellular processes to yield intestinal epithelial cell secretion. EAST1 toxin was first described in strains of EAggEC that were associated with persistent diarrhea primarily in developing world countries. Molecular organization, mobility, and data in literature are suggesting that EAST1 could be a transposon. The insertion sequences in Escherichia coli and some of the usual transposition mechanisms as well as regulation are reviewed. This review emphasizes the presence of the gene astA in EPEC, EAggEC, A-EPEC, ETEC, DAEC, EIEC, and in non-diarrheagenic E. coli. It also discusses here the presence of the astA gene in Salmonella spp. and future perspectives for understanding its role in diarrheal disease in both bacterial genera.

  18. Clostridium difficile toxin CDT hijacks microtubule organization and reroutes vesicle traffic to increase pathogen adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwan, Carsten; Kruppke, Anna S; Nölke, Thilo; Schumacher, Lucas; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich; Kudryashev, Mikhail; Stahlberg, Henning; Aktories, Klaus

    2014-02-11

    Clostridium difficile causes antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis by the actions of Rho-glucosylating toxins A and B. Recently identified hypervirulent strains, which are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, additionally produce the actin-ADP-ribosylating toxin C. difficile transferase (CDT). CDT depolymerizes actin, causes formation of microtubule-based protrusions, and increases pathogen adherence. Here we show that CDT-induced protrusions allow vesicle traffic and contain endoplasmic reticulum tubules, connected to microtubules via the calcium sensor Stim1. The toxin reroutes Rab11-positive vesicles containing fibronectin, which is involved in bacterial adherence, from basolateral to the apical membrane sides in a microtubule- and Stim1-dependent manner. The data yield a model of C. difficile adherence regulated by actin depolymerization, microtubule restructuring, subsequent Stim1-dependent Ca(2+) signaling, vesicle rerouting, and secretion of ECM proteins to increase bacterial adherence.

  19. Discovery of functional toxin/antitoxin systems in bacteria by shotgun cloning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sberro, Hila; Leavitt, Azita; Kiro, Ruth; Koh, Eugene; Peleg, Yoav; Qimron, Udi; Sorek, Rotem

    2013-04-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules, composed of a toxic protein and a counteracting antitoxin, play important roles in bacterial physiology. We examined the experimental insertion of 1.5 million genes from 388 microbial genomes into an Escherichia coli host using over 8.5 million random clones. This revealed hundreds of genes (toxins) that could only be cloned when the neighboring gene (antitoxin) was present on the same clone. Clustering of these genes revealed TA families widespread in bacterial genomes, some of which deviate from the classical characteristics previously described for such modules. Introduction of these genes into E. coli validated that the toxin toxicity is mitigated by the antitoxin. Infection experiments with T7 phage showed that two of the new modules can provide resistance against phage. Moreover, our experiments revealed an 'anti-defense' protein in phage T7 that neutralizes phage resistance. Our results expose active fronts in the arms race between bacteria and phage.

  20. Alpha-Toxin Promotes Mucosal Biofilm Formation by Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele J Anderson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus causes numerous diseases in humans ranging from the mild skin infections to serious, life-threatening, superantigen-mediated Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS. S. aureus may also be asymptomatically carried in the anterior nares, vagina or on the skin, which serve as reservoirs for infection. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis clonal type USA200 is the most widely disseminated colonizer and a major cause of TSS. Our prior studies indicated that α-toxin was a major epithelial proinflammatory exotoxin produced by TSS S. aureus USA200 isolates. It also facilitated the penetration of TSS Toxin-1 (TSST-1 across vaginal mucosa. However, the majority of menstrual TSS isolates produce low α-toxin due to a nonsense point mutation at codon 113, designated hly, suggesting mucosal adaptation. The aim of this study was to characterize the differences between TSS USA200 strains [high (hla+ and low (hly+ α-toxin producers] in their abilities to infect and disrupt vaginal mucosal tissue. A mucosal model was developed using ex vivo porcine vaginal mucosa, LIVE/DEAD® staining and confocal microscropy to characterize biofilm formation and tissue viability of TSS USA 200 isolates CDC587 and MN8, which contain the α-toxin pseudogene (hly, MNPE (hla+ and MNPE isogenic hla knockout (hlaKO. All TSS strains grew to similar bacterial densities (1-5 x 108 CFU on the mucosa and were proinflammatory over 3 days. However, MNPE formed biofilms with significant reductions in the mucosal viability whereas neither CDC587, MN8 (hly+, or MNPE hlaKO, formed biofilms and were less cytotoxic. The addition of exogenous, purified α-toxin to MNPE hlaKO restored the biofilm phenotype. Our studies suggest α-toxin affects S. aureus phenotypic growth on vaginal mucosa, by promoting tissue disruption and biofilm formation; and α–toxin mutants (hly are not benign colonizers, but rather form a different type of infection, which we have termed high density pathogenic

  1. Interferon-γ Protects from Staphylococcal Alpha Toxin-Induced Keratinocyte Death through Apolipoprotein L1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauweiler, Anne M; Goleva, Elena; Leung, Donald Y M

    2016-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a bacterial pathogen that frequently infects the skin, causing lesions and cell destruction through its primary virulence factor, alpha toxin. Here we show that interferon gamma (IFN-?) protects human keratinocytes from cell death induced by staphylococcal alpha toxin. We find that IFN-? prevents alpha toxin binding and reduces expression of the alpha toxin receptor, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 10 (ADAM10). We determine that the mechanism for IFN-?-mediated resistance to alpha toxin involves the induction of autophagy, a process of cellular adaptation to sublethal damage. We find that IFN-? potently stimulates activation of the primary autophagy effector, light chain 3 (LC3). This process is dependent on upregulation of apolipoprotein L1. Depletion of apolipoprotein L1 by small interfering RNA significantly increases alpha toxin-induced lethality and inhibits activation of light chain 3. We conclude that IFN-? plays a significant role in protecting human keratinocytes from the lethal effects of staphylococcal alpha toxin through apolipoprotein L1-induced autophagy.

  2. Clostridium difficile toxin CDT induces formation of microtubule-based protrusions and increases adherence of bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Schwan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile causes antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis by production of the Rho GTPase-glucosylating toxins A and B. Recently emerging hypervirulent Clostridium difficile strains additionally produce the binary ADP-ribosyltransferase toxin CDT (Clostridium difficile transferase, which ADP-ribosylates actin and inhibits actin polymerization. Thus far, the role of CDT as a virulence factor is not understood. Here we report by using time-lapse- and immunofluorescence microscopy that CDT and other binary actin-ADP-ribosylating toxins, including Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin and Clostridium perfringens iota toxin, induce redistribution of microtubules and formation of long (up to >150 microm microtubule-based protrusions at the surface of intestinal epithelial cells. The toxins increase the length of decoration of microtubule plus-ends by EB1/3, CLIP-170 and CLIP-115 proteins and cause redistribution of the capture proteins CLASP2 and ACF7 from microtubules at the cell cortex into the cell interior. The CDT-induced microtubule protrusions form a dense meshwork at the cell surface, which wrap and embed bacterial cells, thereby largely increasing the adherence of Clostridia. The study describes a novel type of microtubule structure caused by less efficient microtubule capture and offers a new perspective for the pathogenetic role of CDT and other binary actin-ADP-ribosylating toxins in host-pathogen interactions.

  3. Programmed cellular necrosis mediated by the pore-forming alpha-toxin from Clostridium septicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Catherine L; Smith, Danielle J; Lyras, Dena; Chakravorty, Anjana; Rood, Julian I

    2009-07-01

    Programmed necrosis is a mechanism of cell death that has been described for neuronal excitotoxicity and ischemia/reperfusion injury, but has not been extensively studied in the context of exposure to bacterial exotoxins. The alpha-toxin of Clostridium septicum is a beta-barrel pore-forming toxin and a potent cytotoxin; however, the mechanism by which it induces cell death has not been elucidated in detail. We report that alpha-toxin formed Ca(2+)-permeable pores in murine myoblast cells, leading to an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) levels. This Ca(2+) influx did not induce apoptosis, as has been described for other small pore-forming toxins, but a cascade of events consistent with programmed necrosis. Ca(2+) influx was associated with calpain activation and release of cathepsins from lysosomes. We also observed deregulation of mitochondrial activity, leading to increased ROS levels, and dramatically reduced levels of ATP. Finally, the immunostimulatory histone binding protein HMGB1 was found to be released from the nuclei of alpha-toxin-treated cells. Collectively, these data show that alpha-toxin initiates a multifaceted necrotic cell death response that is consistent with its essential role in C. septicum-mediated myonecrosis and sepsis. We postulate that cellular intoxication with pore-forming toxins may be a major mechanism by which programmed necrosis is induced.

  4. Tissue-specific patterning of host innate immune responses by Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Russell E N; Berube, Bryan J; Sampedro, Georgia R; DeDent, Andrea C; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane

    2014-01-01

    Immunomodulatory cytotoxins are prominent virulence factors produced by Staphylococcus aureus, a leading cause of bacterial sepsis, skin infection, and pneumonia. S. aureus α-toxin is a pore-forming toxin that utilizes a widely expressed receptor, ADAM10, to injure the host epithelium, endothelium, and immune cells. As each host tissue is characterized by a unique composition of resident cells and recruited immune cells, the outcome of α-toxin-mediated injury may depend on the infected tissue environment. Utilizing myeloid lineage-specific Adam10 knockout mice, we show that α-toxin exerts tissue-specific effects on innate immunity to staphylococcal infection. Loss of ADAM10 expression exacerbates skin infection, yet affords protection against lethal pneumonia. These diverse outcomes are not related to altered immune cell recruitment, but rather correlate with a defect in toxin-induced IL-1β production. Extension of these studies through analysis of ADAM10 double-knockout mice affecting both the myeloid lineage and either the skin or lung epithelium highlight the prominence of toxin-induced injury to the epithelium in governing the outcome of infection. Together, these studies provide evidence of tissue specificity of pore-forming cytotoxin action in the modulation of host immunity, and illustrate that the outcome of infection is a collective manifestation of all effects of the toxin within the tissue microenvironment.

  5. Marine Toxins Targeting Ion Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo R. Arias

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This introductory minireview points out the importance of ion channels for cell communication. The basic concepts on the structure and function of ion channels triggered by membrane voltage changes, the so-called voltage-gated ion channels (VGICs, as well as those activated by neurotransmitters, the so-called ligand-gated ion channel (LGICs, are introduced. Among the most important VGIC superfamiles, we can name the voltage-gated Na+ (NaV, Ca2+ (CaV, and K+ (KV channels. Among the most important LGIC super families, we can include the Cys-loop or nicotinicoid, the glutamate-activated (GluR, and the ATP-activated (P2XnR receptor superfamilies. Ion channels are transmembrane proteins that allow the passage of different ions in a specific or unspecific manner. For instance, the activation of NaV, CaV, or KV channels opens a pore that is specific for Na+, Ca2+, or K+, respectively. On the other hand, the activation of certain LGICs such as nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, GluRs, and P2XnRs allows the passage of cations (e.g., Na+, K+, and/or Ca2+, whereas the activation of other LGICs such as type A γ-butyric acid and glycine receptors allows the passage of anions (e.g., Cl− and/or HCO3−. In this regard, the activation of NaV and CaV as well as ligand-gated cation channels produce membrane depolarization, which finally leads to stimulatory effects in the cell, whereas the activation of KV as well as ligand-gated anion channels induce membrane hyperpolarization that finally leads to inhibitory effects in the cell. The importance of these ion channel superfamilies is emphasized by considering their physiological functions throughout the body as well as their pathophysiological implicance in several neuronal diseases. In this regard, natural molecules, and especially marine toxins, can be potentially used as modulators (e.g., inhibitors or prolongers of ion channel functions to treat or to alleviate a specific

  6. Toxin-mediated effects on the innate mucosal defenses: implications for enteric vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glenn, Gregory M; Francis, David H; Danielsen, E Michael

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have confirmed older observations that the enterotoxins enhance enteric bacterial colonization and pathogenicity. How and why this happens remains unknown at this time. It appears that toxins such as the heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) from Escherichia coli can help overcome the innate...

  7. Caspase-2 is an initiator caspase responsible for pore-forming toxin-mediated apoptosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imre, Gergely; Heering, Jan; Takeda, Armelle-Natsuo; Husmann, Matthias; Thiede, Bernd; Heringdorf, Dagmar Meyer Zu; Green, Douglas R.; van der Goot, F. Gisou; Sinha, Bhanu; Doetsch, Volker; Rajalingam, Krishnaraj

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens modulate host cell apoptosis to establish a successful infection. Pore-forming toxins (PFTs) secreted by pathogenic bacteria are major virulence factors and have been shown to induce various forms of cell death in infected cells. Here we demonstrate that the highly conserved casp

  8. Antibody-based biological toxin detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menking, D.E.; Goode, M.T. [Army Edgewood Research, Development and Engineering Center, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Fiber optic evanescent fluorosensors are under investigation in our laboratory for the study of drug-receptor interactions for detection of threat agents and antibody-antigen interactions for detection of biological toxins. In a direct competition assay, antibodies against Cholera toxin, Staphylococcus Enterotoxin B or ricin were noncovalently immobilized on quartz fibers and probed with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) - labeled toxins. In the indirect competition assay, Cholera toxin or Botulinum toxoid A was immobilized onto the fiber, followed by incubation in an antiserum or partially purified anti-toxin IgG. These were then probed with FITC-anti-IgG antibodies. Unlabeled toxins competed with labeled toxins or anti-toxin IgG in a dose dependent manner and the detection of the toxins was in the nanomolar range.

  9. Contribution of pertussis toxin to the pathogenesis of pertussis disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonetti, Nicholas H

    2015-11-01

    Pertussis toxin (PT) is a multisubunit protein toxin secreted by Bordetella pertussis, the bacterial agent of the disease pertussis or whooping cough. PT in detoxified form is a component of all licensed acellular pertussis vaccines, since it is considered to be an important virulence factor for this pathogen. PT inhibits G protein-coupled receptor signaling through Gi proteins in mammalian cells, an activity that has led to its widespread use as a cell biology tool. But how does this activity of PT contribute to pertussis, including the severe respiratory symptoms of this disease? In this minireview, the contribution of PT to the pathogenesis of pertussis disease will be considered based on evidence from both human infections and animal model studies. Although definitive proof of the role of PT in humans is lacking, substantial evidence supports the idea that PT is a major contributor to pertussis pathology, including the severe respiratory symptoms associated with this disease.

  10. Bacterial gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial gastroenteritis is present when bacteria cause an infection of the stomach and intestines ... has not been treated Many different types of bacteria can cause ... Campylobacter jejuni E coli Salmonella Shigella Staphylococcus ...

  11. Picomolar inhibition of cholera toxin by a pentavalent ganglioside GM1os-calix[5]arene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Hartjes, J.; Bernardi, S.; Weijers, C.A.G.M.; Wennekes, T.; Gilbert, M.; Sansone, F.; Casnati, A.; Zuilhof, H.

    2013-01-01

    Cholera toxin (CT), the causative agent of cholera, displays a pentavalent binding domain that targets the oligosaccharide of ganglioside GM1 (GM1os) on the periphery of human abdominal epithelial cells. Here, we report the first GM1os-based CT inhibitor that matches the valency of the CT binding do

  12. Characterization of cereulide synthetase, a toxin-producing macromolecular machine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego A Alonzo

    Full Text Available Cereulide synthetase is a two-protein nonribosomal peptide synthetase system that produces a potent emetic toxin in virulent strains of Bacillus cereus. The toxin cereulide is a depsipeptide, as it consists of alternating aminoacyl and hydroxyacyl residues. The hydroxyacyl residues are derived from keto acid substrates, which cereulide synthetase selects and stereospecifically reduces with imbedded ketoreductase domains before incorporating them into the growing depsipeptide chain. We present an in vitro biochemical characterization of cereulide synthetase. We investigate the kinetics and side chain specificity of α-keto acid selection, evaluate the requirement of an MbtH-like protein for adenylation domain activity, assay the effectiveness of vinylsulfonamide inhibitors on ester-adding modules, perform NADPH turnover experiments and evaluate in vitro depsipeptide biosynthesis. This work also provides biochemical insight into depsipeptide-synthesizing nonribosomal peptide synthetases responsible for other bioactive molecules such as valinomycin, antimycin and kutzneride.

  13. Scorpion toxins prefer salt solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikouee, Azadeh; Khabiri, Morteza; Cwiklik, Lukasz

    2015-11-01

    There is a wide variety of ion channel types with various types of blockers, making research in this field very complicated. To reduce this complexity, it is essential to study ion channels and their blockers independently. Scorpion toxins, a major class of blockers, are charged short peptides with high affinities for potassium channels. Their high selectivity and inhibitory properties make them an important pharmacological tool for treating autoimmune or nervous system disorders. Scorpion toxins typically have highly charged surfaces and-like other proteins-an intrinsic ability to bind ions (Friedman J Phys Chem B 115(29):9213-9223, 1996; Baldwin Biophys J 71(4):2056-2063, 1996; Vrbka et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 103(42):15440-15444, 2006a; Vrbka et al. J Phys Chem B 110(13):7036-43, 2006b). Thus, their effects on potassium channels are usually investigated in various ionic solutions. In this work, computer simulations of protein structures were performed to analyze the structural properties of the key residues (i.e., those that are presumably involved in contact with the surfaces of the ion channels) of 12 scorpion toxins. The presence of the two most physiologically abundant cations, Na(+) and K(+), was considered. The results indicated that the ion-binding properties of the toxin residues vary. Overall, all of the investigated toxins had more stable structures in ionic solutions than in water. We found that both the number and length of elements in the secondary structure varied depending on the ionic solution used (i.e., in the presence of NaCl or KCl). This study revealed that the ionic solution should be chosen carefully before performing experiments on these toxins. Similarly, the influence of these ions should be taken into consideration in the design of toxin-based pharmaceuticals.

  14. Bt toxin modification for enhanced efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deist, Benjamin R; Rausch, Michael A; Fernandez-Luna, Maria Teresa; Adang, Michael J; Bonning, Bryony C

    2014-10-22

    Insect-specific toxins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) provide a valuable resource for pest suppression. Here we review the different strategies that have been employed to enhance toxicity against specific target species including those that have evolved resistance to Bt, or to modify the host range of Bt crystal (Cry) and cytolytic (Cyt) toxins. These strategies include toxin truncation, modification of protease cleavage sites, domain swapping, site-directed mutagenesis, peptide addition, and phage display screens for mutated toxins with enhanced activity. Toxin optimization provides a useful approach to extend the utility of these proteins for suppression of pests that exhibit low susceptibility to native Bt toxins, and to overcome field resistance.

  15. Cross-reactivity of anthrax and C2 toxin: protective antigen promotes the uptake of botulinum C2I toxin into human endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Kronhardt

    Full Text Available Binary toxins are among the most potent bacterial protein toxins performing a cooperative mode of translocation and exhibit fatal enzymatic activities in eukaryotic cells. Anthrax and C2 toxin are the most prominent examples for the AB(7/8 type of toxins. The B subunits bind both host cell receptors and the enzymatic A polypeptides to trigger their internalization and translocation into the host cell cytosol. C2 toxin is composed of an actin ADP-ribosyltransferase (C2I and C2II binding subunits. Anthrax toxin is composed of adenylate cyclase (EF and MAPKK protease (LF enzymatic components associated to protective antigen (PA binding subunit. The binding and translocation components anthrax protective antigen (PA(63 and C2II of C2 toxin share a sequence homology of about 35%, suggesting that they might substitute for each other. Here we show by conducting in vitro measurements that PA(63 binds C2I and that C2II can bind both EF and LF. Anthrax edema factor (EF and lethal factor (LF have higher affinities to bind to channels formed by C2II than C2 toxin's C2I binds to anthrax protective antigen (PA(63. Furthermore, we could demonstrate that PA in high concentration has the ability to transport the enzymatic moiety C2I into target cells, causing actin modification and cell rounding. In contrast, C2II does not show significant capacity to promote cell intoxication by EF and LF. Together, our data unveiled the remarkable flexibility of PA in promoting C2I heterologous polypeptide translocation into cells.

  16. Hydralysins, a new category of beta-pore-forming toxins in cnidaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Daniel; Fishman, Yelena; Zhang, Mingliang; Lebendiker, Mario; Gaathon, Ariel; Mancheño, José-Miguel; Zlotkin, Eliahu

    2005-06-17

    Cnidaria are venomous animals that produce diverse protein and polypeptide toxins, stored and delivered into the prey through the stinging cells, the nematocytes. These include pore-forming cytolytic toxins such as well studied actinoporins. In this work, we have shown that the non-nematocystic paralytic toxins, hydralysins, from the green hydra Chlorohydra viridissima comprise a highly diverse group of beta-pore-forming proteins, distinct from other cnidarian toxins but similar in activity and structure to bacterial and fungal toxins. Functional characterization of hydralysins reveals that as soluble monomers they are rich in beta-structure, as revealed by far UV circular dichroism and computational analysis. Hydralysins bind erythrocyte membranes and form discrete pores with an internal diameter of approximately 1.2 nm. The cytolytic effect of hydralysin is cell type-selective, suggesting a specific receptor that is not a phospholipid or carbohydrate. Multiple sequence alignment reveals that hydralysins share a set of conserved sequence motifs with known pore-forming toxins such as aerolysin, epsilon-toxin, alpha-toxin, and LSL and that these sequence motifs are found in and around the poreforming domains of the toxins. The importance of these sequence motifs is revealed by the cloning, expression, and mutagenesis of three hydralysin isoforms that strongly differ in their hemolytic and paralytic activities. The correlation between the paralytic and cytolytic activities of hydralysin suggests that both are a consequence of receptor-mediated pore formation. Hydralysins and their homologues exemplify the wide distribution of beta-pore formers in biology and provide a useful model for the study of their molecular mode of action.

  17. Genetic diversity within Clostridium botulinum serotypes, botulinum neurotoxin gene clusters and toxin subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Karen K; Smith, Theresa J

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a species of spore-forming anaerobic bacteria defined by the expression of any one or two of seven serologically distinct botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) designated BoNT/A-G. This Gram-positive bacterium was first identified in 1897 and since then the paralyzing and lethal effects of its toxin have resulted in the recognition of different forms of the intoxication known as food-borne, infant, or wound botulism. Early microbiological and biochemical characterization of C. botulinum isolates revealed that the bacteria within the species had different characteristics and expressed different toxin types. To organize the variable bacterial traits within the species, Group I-IV designations were created. Interestingly, it was observed that isolates within different Groups could express the same toxin type and conversely a single Group could express different toxin types. This discordant phylogeny between the toxin and the host bacteria indicated that horizontal gene transfer of the toxin was responsible for the variation observed within the species. The recent availability of multiple C. botulinum genomic sequences has offered the ability to bioinformatically analyze the locations of the bont genes, the composition of their toxin gene clusters, and the genes flanking these regions to understand their variation. Comparison of the genomic sequences representing multiple serotypes indicates that the bont genes are not in random locations. Instead the analyses revealed specific regions where the toxin genes occur within the genomes representing serotype A, B, C, E, and F C. botulinum strains and C. butyricum type E strains. The genomic analyses have provided evidence of horizontal gene transfer, site-specific insertion, and recombination events. These events have contributed to the variation observed among the neurotoxins, the toxin gene clusters and the bacteria that contain them, and has supported the historical microbiological, and biochemical

  18. Comparative toxicity and efficacy of engineered anthrax lethal toxin variants with broad anti-tumor activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Diane E. [Proteases and Tissue Remodeling Section, Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Program of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Hoover, Benjamin [Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Cloud, Loretta Grey [Proteases and Tissue Remodeling Section, Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Liu, Shihui [Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Molinolo, Alfredo A. [Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Leppla, Stephen H. [Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Bugge, Thomas H., E-mail: thomas.bugge@nih.go [Proteases and Tissue Remodeling Section, Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We have previously designed and characterized versions of anthrax lethal toxin that are selectively cytotoxic in the tumor microenvironment and which display broad and potent anti-tumor activities in vivo. Here, we have performed the first direct comparison of the safety and efficacy of three engineered anthrax lethal toxin variants requiring activation by either matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs), urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) or co-localized MMP/uPA activities. C57BL/6J mice were challenged with six doses of engineered toxins via intraperitoneal (I.P.) or intravenous (I.V.) dose routes to determine the maximum tolerated dose for six administrations (MTD6) and dose-limiting toxicities. Efficacy was evaluated using the B16-BL6 syngraft model of melanoma; mice bearing established tumors were treated with six I.P. doses of toxin and tumor measurements and immunohistochemistry, paired with terminal blood work, were used to elaborate upon the anti-tumor mechanism and relative efficacy of each variant. We found that MMP-, uPA- and dual MMP/uPA-activated anthrax lethal toxins exhibited the same dose-limiting toxicity; dose-dependent GI toxicity. In terms of efficacy, all three toxins significantly reduced primary B16-BL6 tumor burden, ranging from 32% to 87% reduction, and they also delayed disease progression as evidenced by dose-dependent normalization of blood work values. While target organ toxicity and effective doses were similar amongst the variants, the dual MMP/uPA-activated anthrax lethal toxin exhibited the highest I.P. MTD6 and was 1.5–3-fold better tolerated than the single MMP- and uPA-activated toxins. Overall, we demonstrate that this dual MMP/uPA-activated anthrax lethal toxin can be administered safely and is highly effective in a preclinical model of melanoma. This modified bacterial cytotoxin is thus a promising candidate for further clinical development and evaluation for use in treating human cancers. - Highlights: • Toxicity and anti

  19. Bacillus bombysepticus α-Toxin Binding to G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Regulates cAMP/PKA Signaling Pathway to Induce Host Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Lin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens and their toxins target host receptors, leading to aberrant behavior or host death by changing signaling events through subversion of host intracellular cAMP level. This is an efficient and widespread mechanism of microbial pathogenesis. Previous studies describe toxins that increase cAMP in host cells, resulting in death through G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR signaling pathways by influencing adenylyl cyclase or G protein activity. G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2 has a central role in regulation of GPCR desensitization. However, little information is available about the pathogenic mechanisms of toxins associated with GRK2. Here, we reported a new bacterial toxin-Bacillus bombysepticus (Bb α-toxin that was lethal to host. We showed that Bb α-toxin interacted with BmGRK2. The data demonstrated that Bb α-toxin directly bound to BmGRK2 to promote death by affecting GPCR signaling pathways. This mechanism involved stimulation of Gαs, increase level of cAMP and activation of protein kinase A (PKA. Activated cAMP/PKA signal transduction altered downstream effectors that affected homeostasis and fundamental biological processes, disturbing the structural and functional integrity of cells, resulting in death. Preventing cAMP/PKA signaling transduction by inhibitions (NF449 or H-89 substantially reduced the pathogenicity of Bb α-toxin. The discovery of a toxin-induced host death specifically linked to GRK2 mediated signaling pathway suggested a new model for bacterial toxin action. Characterization of host genes whose expression and function are regulated by Bb α-toxin and GRK2 will offer a deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of infectious diseases caused by pathogens that elevate cAMP.

  20. Toxin Mediates Sepsis Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Li; Da, Fei; Tan, Daniel C. S.; Nguyen, Thuan H.; Fu, Chih-Lung; Tan, Vee Y.; Sturdevant, Daniel E.

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial sepsis is a major killer in hospitalized patients. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) with the leading species Staphylococcus epidermidis are the most frequent causes of nosocomial sepsis, with most infectious isolates being methicillin-resistant. However, which bacterial factors underlie the pathogenesis of CNS sepsis is unknown. While it has been commonly believed that invariant structures on the surface of CNS trigger sepsis by causing an over-reaction of the immune system, we show here that sepsis caused by methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis is to a large extent mediated by the methicillin resistance island-encoded peptide toxin, PSM-mec. PSM-mec contributed to bacterial survival in whole human blood and resistance to neutrophil-mediated killing, and caused significantly increased mortality and cytokine expression in a mouse sepsis model. Furthermore, we show that the PSM-mec peptide itself, rather than the regulatory RNA in which its gene is embedded, is responsible for the observed virulence phenotype. This finding is of particular importance given the contrasting roles of the psm-mec locus that have been reported in S. aureus strains, inasmuch as our findings suggest that the psm-mec locus may exert effects in the background of S. aureus strains that differ from its original role in the CNS environment due to originally “unintended” interferences. Notably, while toxins have never been clearly implied in CNS infections, our tissue culture and mouse infection model data indicate that an important type of infection caused by the predominant CNS species is mediated to a large extent by a toxin. These findings suggest that CNS infections may be amenable to virulence-targeted drug development approaches. PMID:28151994

  1. Entry of Shiga toxin into cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvig, Kirsten; van Deurs, Bo

    1994-01-01

    Cellebiologi, Shiga toxin, receptors, glycolipids, endocytosis, trans-Golgi network, endoplasmic reticulum, retrograde transport......Cellebiologi, Shiga toxin, receptors, glycolipids, endocytosis, trans-Golgi network, endoplasmic reticulum, retrograde transport...

  2. Role of receptor-mediated endocytosis, endosomal acidification and cathepsin D in cholera toxin cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hage, Tatiana; Merlen, Clémence; Fabrega, Sylvie; Authier, François

    2007-05-01

    Using the in situ liver model system, we have recently shown that, after cholera toxin binding to hepatic cells, cholera toxin accumulates in a low-density endosomal compartment, and then undergoes endosomal proteolysis by the aspartic acid protease cathepsin-D [Merlen C, Fayol-Messaoudi D, Fabrega S, El Hage T, Servin A, Authier F (2005) FEBS J272, 4385-4397]. Here, we have used a subcellular fractionation approach to address the in vivo compartmentalization and cytotoxic action of cholera toxin in rat liver parenchyma. Following administration of a saturating dose of cholera toxin to rats, rapid endocytosis of both cholera toxin subunits was observed, coincident with massive internalization of both the 45 kDa and 47 kDa Gsalpha proteins. These events coincided with the endosomal recruitment of ADP-ribosylation factor proteins, especially ADP-ribosylation factor-6, with a time course identical to that of toxin and the A subunit of the stimulatory G protein (Gsalpha) translocation. After an initial lag phase of 30 min, these constituents were linked to NAD-dependent ADP-ribosylation of endogenous Gsalpha, with maximum accumulation observed at 30-60 min postinjection. Assessment of the subsequent postendosomal fate of internalized Gsalpha revealed sustained endolysosomal transfer of the two Gsalpha isoforms. Concomitantly, cholera toxin increased in vivo endosome acidification rates driven by the ATP-dependent H(+)-ATPase pump and in vitro vacuolar acidification in hepatoma HepG2 cells. The vacuolar H(+)-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin and the cathepsin D inhibitor pepstatin A partially inhibited, both in vivo and in vitro, the cAMP response to cholera toxin. This cathepsin D-dependent action of cholera toxin under the control of endosomal acidity was confirmed using cellular systems in which modification of the expression levels of cathepsin D, either by transfection of the cathepsin D gene or small interfering RNA, was followed by parallel changes in the cytotoxic

  3. Expression of a functional recombinant Phoneutria nigriventer toxin active on K+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, A M D; Kushmerick, C; Koenen, J; Arndt, M H L; Cordeiro, M N; Chavez-Olortegui, C; Diniz, C R; Gomez, M V; Kalapothakis, E; Prado, M A M; Prado, V F

    2003-03-01

    PnTx3-1 is a peptide isolated from the venom of the spider Phoneutria nigriventer that specifically inhibits A-type K(+) currents (I(A)) in GH(3) cells. Here we used a bacterial expression system to produce an NH(2)-extended mutant of PnTx3-1 (ISEF-PnTx3-1) and tested whether the toxin is functional. The recombinant toxin was purified from bacterial extracts by a combination of affinity and ion-exchange chromatography. The recombinant toxin blocked A-type K(+) currents in GH(3) cells in a fashion similar to that observed with the wild-type toxin purified from the spider venom. These results suggest that recombinant cDNA methods provide a novel source for the production of functional Phoneutria toxins. The recombinant ISEF-PnTx3-1 should be useful for further understanding of the role of A-type K(+) currents in biological processes.

  4. Synergistic proinflammatory interactions of microbial toxins and structural components characteristic to moisture-damaged buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkalainen, M; Täubel, M; Naarala, J; Kirjavainen, P; Koistinen, A; Hyvärinen, A; Komulainen, H; Viluksela, M

    2017-01-01

    Indoor exposure to microbes and their structural and metabolic compounds is notoriously complex. To study proinflammatory interactions between the multiple microbial agents, macrophages derived from human THP-1 monocytic cells were exposed to several concentrations of microbial toxins alone (emodin, enniatin B, physcion, sterigmatocystin, valinomycin) and in combination with microbial structural components (bacterial lipopolysaccharide [LPS] or fungal β-glucan). While the expression of proinflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-1β to single toxins alone was modest, low-dose co-exposure with structural components increased the responses of emodin, enniatin B, and valinomycin synergistically, both at the mRNA and protein level, as measured by RT-qPCR and ELISA, respectively. Co-exposure of toxins and β-glucan resulted in consistent synergistically increased expression of several inflammation-related genes, while some of the responses with LPS were also inhibitory. Co-exposure of toxins with either β-glucan or LPS induced also mitochondrial damage and autophagocytosis. The results demonstrate that microbial toxins together with bacterial and fungal structural components characteristic to moisture-damaged buildings can have drastic synergistic proinflammatory interactions at low exposure levels.

  5. Development of an antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for Clostridium perfringens beta2-toxin in porcine feces and the neonatal piglet intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kircanski, Jasmina; Hodgins, Douglas; Soltes, Glenn; Pei, Yanlong; Parreira, Valeria R; Songer, J Glenn; Prescott, John F

    2012-09-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for detection and quantitation of beta2-toxin in neonatal piglet intestinal contents. Polystyrene plates were coated with polyclonal capture antibodies prepared against consensus recombinant beta2-toxin. The ELISA was developed using consensus recombinant beta2-toxin, atypical recombinant beta2-toxin, purified consensus native beta2-toxin, and field samples of neonatal porcine intestinal contents. Captured antigen was detected using a horseradish peroxidase-labeled monoclonal antibody against consensus recombinant beta2-toxin. The limit of detection of the ELISA for consensus beta2-toxin was between 2.0 and 3.5 ng/ml. The ELISA detected atypical recombinant beta2-toxin only weakly. Optical density was protein concentration dependent. The test confirmed differences between consensus and atypical recombinant beta2-toxin, but similar results obtained when testing pure consensus recombinant beta2-toxin and native beta2-toxin. Results obtained from intestinal content samples, particularly from the small intestine, were highly inconsistent and suggested variable protease activity. Addition of protease inhibitors partially prevented degradation of the toxin; however, sample processing at low temperature, at a lower pH (citrate buffer with 5% of bovine serum albumin, pH 6.1), and "cold incubation" of applied antigens abolished protease activity. The recombinant toxin was preserved in spiked intestinal samples by freezing at -70°C, suggesting that necropsy samples can be stored frozen for periodic testing. With appropriate sample preparation, antigen-capture ELISA can detect beta2-toxin in the intestinal content and feces of neonatal piglets.

  6. Toxin synergism in snake venoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard

    2016-01-01

    Synergism between venom toxins exists for a range of snake species. Synergism can be derived from both intermolecular interactions and supramolecular interactions between venom components, and can be the result of toxins targeting the same protein, biochemical pathway or physiological process. Few...... simple systematic tools and methods for determining the presence of synergism exist, but include co-administration of venom components and assessment of Accumulated Toxicity Scores. A better understanding of how to investigate synergism in snake venoms may help unravel strategies for developing novel...

  7. Determination of cyanobacteria toxins (microcystins): current situation; Problematica y situacion actual de la determinacion de toxinas de cianobacterias: microcistinas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno Navarro, I. M.; Pichardo Sanchez, S.; Carmean Fernandez, A. M. [Universidad de Sevilla (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    A review of the different biological and chemical methods developed to determine cyano bacterial toxins, microcystins (MC), in freshwater has been carried out. However, any of them have been accepted as a standard method by the official environmental agencies. Biological methods as the mouse bioassays, immunoassays or protein phosphatase, inhibition assays are used as screening methods to detect MC. Analytical methods as High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) or Capillary Electrophoresis (CE), with different detectors, allow to identify and quantify the individual toxins produced by different cyano bacterial species. (Author) 40 refs.

  8. Binding of cholera toxin to Giardia lamblia.

    OpenAIRE

    McCardell, B. A.; Madden, J M; Stanfield, J T; Tall, B D; Stephens, M. J.

    1987-01-01

    Binding of cholera toxin to Giardia lamblia was demonstrated by two slightly different methods: an immunofluorescence technique using antibody to cholera toxin and anti-rabbit immunoglobulin G conjugated to fluorescein isothiocyanate, and a one-step fluorescence method in which G. lamblia was incubated with the B subunit of cholera toxin conjugated to fluorescein isothiocyanate.

  9. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion...... is the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental parameters......, which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to significantly...

  10. Bacterial lipases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    1994-01-01

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation, mea

  11. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial ecology is concerned with the interactions between bacteria and their biological and nonbiological environments and with the role of bacteria in biogeochemical element cycling. Many fundamental properties of bacteria are consequences of their small size. Thus, they can efficiently exploit...

  12. Regulating Toxin-Antitoxin Expression: Controlled Detonation of Intracellular Molecular Timebombs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finbarr Hayes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Genes for toxin-antitoxin (TA complexes are widely disseminated in bacteria, including in pathogenic and antibiotic resistant species. The toxins are liberated from association with the cognate antitoxins by certain physiological triggers to impair vital cellular functions. TAs also are implicated in antibiotic persistence, biofilm formation, and bacteriophage resistance. Among the ever increasing number of TA modules that have been identified, the most numerous are complexes in which both toxin and antitoxin are proteins. Transcriptional autoregulation of the operons encoding these complexes is key to ensuring balanced TA production and to prevent inadvertent toxin release. Control typically is exerted by binding of the antitoxin to regulatory sequences upstream of the operons. The toxin protein commonly works as a transcriptional corepressor that remodels and stabilizes the antitoxin. However, there are notable exceptions to this paradigm. Moreover, it is becoming clear that TA complexes often form one strand in an interconnected web of stress responses suggesting that their transcriptional regulation may prove to be more intricate than currently understood. Furthermore, interference with TA gene transcriptional autoregulation holds considerable promise as a novel antibacterial strategy: artificial release of the toxin factor using designer drugs is a potential approach to induce bacterial suicide from within.

  13. Synergy between toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and Bacillus sphaericus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Margaret C; Jiannino, Joshua A; Federici, Brian A; Walton, William E

    2004-09-01

    Synergistic interactions among the multiple endotoxins of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis de Barjac play an important role in its high toxicity to mosquito larvae and the absence of insecticide resistance in populations treated with this bacterium. A lack of toxin complexity and synergism are the apparent causes of resistance to Bacillus sphaericus Neide in particular Culex field populations. To identify endotoxin combinations of the two Bacillus species that might improve insecticidal activity and manage mosquito resistance to B. sphaericus, we tested their toxins alone and in combination. Most combinations of B. sphaericus and B. t. subsp. israelensis toxins were synergistic and enhanced toxicity relative to B. sphaericus, particularly against Culex quinquefasciatus Say larvae resistant to B. sphaericus and Aedes aegypti (L.), a species poorly susceptible to B. sphaericus. Toxicity also improved against susceptible Cx. quinquefasciatus. For example, when the CytlAa toxin from B. t. subsp. israelensis was added to Bin and Cry toxins, or when native B. t. subsp. israelensis was combined with B. sphaericus, synergism values as high as 883-fold were observed and combinations were 4-59,000-fold more active than B. sphaericus. These data, and previous studies using cytolytic toxins, validate proposed strategies for improving bacterial larvicides by combining B. sphaericus with B. t. subsp. israelensis or by engineering recombinant bacteria that express endotoxins from both strains. These combinations increase both endotoxin complexity and synergistic interactions and thereby enhance activity and help avoid insecticide resistance.

  14. Effects of Clostridium difficile toxin A and B on human T lymphocyte migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Joyee, Antony George; Nandagopal, Saravanan; Lopez, Marianela; Ma, Xiuli; Berry, Jody; Lin, Francis

    2013-05-03

    Bacterial products such as toxins can interfere with a variety of cellular processes, leading to severe human diseases. Clostridium difficile toxins, TcdA and TcdB are the primary contributing factors to the pathogenesis of C. difficile-associated diseases (CDAD). While the mechanisms for TcdA and TcdB mediated cellular responses are complex, it has been shown that these toxins can alter chemotactic responses of neutrophils and intestinal epithelial cells leading to innate immune responses and tissue damages. The effects of C. difficile toxins on the migration and trafficking of other leukocyte subsets, such as T lymphocytes, are not clear and may have potential implications for adaptive immunity. We investigated here the direct and indirect effects of TcdA and TcdB on the migration of human blood T cells using conventional cell migration assays and microfluidic devices. It has been found that, although both toxins decrease T cell motility, only TcdA but not TcdB decreases T cell chemotaxis. Similar effects are observed in T cell migration toward the TcdA- or TcdB-treated human epithelial cells. Our study demonstrated the primary role of TcdA (compared to TcdB) in altering T cell migration and chemotaxis, suggesting possible implications for C. difficile toxin mediated adaptive immune responses in CDAD.

  15. Anthrax lethal toxin induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cytosolic cathepsin release is Nlrp1b/Nalp1b-dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen M Averette

    Full Text Available NOD-like receptors (NLRs are a group of cytoplasmic molecules that recognize microbial invasion or 'danger signals'. Activation of NLRs can induce rapid caspase-1 dependent cell death termed pyroptosis, or a caspase-1 independent cell death termed pyronecrosis. Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin (LT, is recognized by a subset of alleles of the NLR protein Nlrp1b, resulting in pyroptotic cell death of macrophages and dendritic cells. Here we show that LT induces lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP. The presentation of LMP requires expression of an LT-responsive allele of Nlrp1b, and is blocked by proteasome inhibitors and heat shock, both of which prevent LT-mediated pyroptosis. Further the lysosomal protease cathepsin B is released into the cell cytosol and cathepsin inhibitors block LT-mediated cell death. These data reveal a role for lysosomal membrane permeabilization in the cellular response to bacterial pathogens and demonstrate a shared requirement for cytosolic relocalization of cathepsins in pyroptosis and pyronecrosis.

  16. Crystallization of Escherichia coli CdtB, the biologically active subunit of cytolethal distending toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hontz, Jill S.; Villar-Lecumberri, Maria T.; Dreyfus, Lawrence A.; Yoder, Marilyn D.

    2006-01-01

    Cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) is a secreted protein toxin produced by several bacterial pathogens. The biologically active CDT subunit CdtB is an active homolog of mammalian type I DNase. Internalization of CdtB and subsequent translocation into the nucleus of target cells results in DNA-strand breaks, leading to cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. CdtB crystals were grown using microbatch methods with polyethylene glycol 8000 as the precipitant. The CdtB crystals contain one molecule of MW 30.5 kDa per asymmetric unit, belong to space group P212121 and diffract to 1.72 Å. PMID:16511299

  17. Botulinum toxin in gastric submucosa reduces stimulated HCl production in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panunzi Simona

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Botulinum toxin blocks acetylcholine release from nerve endings and acts as a long term, reversible inhibitor of muscle contraction as well as of salivary, sweat gland, adrenal and prostatic secretions. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether gastric submucosal injection of botulinum toxin type A reduces stimulated gastric production of HCl. Methods Sixty-four rats were randomized in two groups and laparotomized. One group was treated with botulinum toxin-A 10 U by multiple submucosal gastric injections, while the second group was injected with saline. Two weeks later, acid secretion was stimulated by pyloric ligation and acid output was measured. Body weight, food and water intake were also recorded daily. Results HCl production after pyloric ligation was found to be significantly lower in botulinum toxin-treated rats (657 ± 90.25 micromol HCl vs. 1247 ± 152. P = 0.0017. Botulinum toxin-treated rats also showed significantly lower food intake and weight gain. Conclusions Botulinum toxin type A reduces stimulated gastric acidity. This is likely due either to inhibition of the cholinergic stimulation of gastric parietal cells, or to an action on the myenteric nervous plexuses. Reduction of growth and food intake may reflect both impaired digestion and decreased gastric motility.

  18. The mechanism underlying the cardiotoxic effect of the toxin from the jellyfish Chironex fleckeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, M R; White, E; Hongo, K; Othman, I; Orchard, C H

    1995-08-01

    We have investigated the mechanisms underlying the cardiac effects of the toxin from the box jellyfish Chironex fleckeri. Papillary muscles isolated from the hearts of ferrets and ventricular myocytes isolated from the hearts of ferrets and rats were used. Force, intracellular [Ca2+], and membrane potential were monitored in the papillary muscles; contraction, intracellular [Ca2+], intracellular [Na+], and membrane currents were monitored in the isolated myocytes. Application of the toxin to these preparations resulted in a large increase in intracellular [Ca2+] and the adverse symptoms of Ca2+ overload (aftercontractions, spontaneous contractions, a decrease in developed force, and an increase in resting force). The response of papillary muscles to the toxin was not inhibited by blockers of Ca2+ or Na+ channels or by inhibitors of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, Na+/K+ ATPase, or Na+/H+ exchange. The response to the toxin was, however, blocked by prior exposure to a solution which contained no Na+ and by Ni2+. In the isolated myocytes, as well as an increase in intracellular [Ca2+], the toxin also caused an increase in intracellular [Na+] and the appearance of a current which was inward at negative potentials and reversed at about -10 mV. These data can be explained by the toxin increasing Na+ influx into the cell. The increase in intracellular [Na+] will then increase intracellular [Ca2+] via the Na+/Ca2+ exchange mechanism, thus producing the observed Ca2+ overload.

  19. Risk Assessment of Shellfish Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rex Munday

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Complex secondary metabolites, some of which are highly toxic to mammals, are produced by many marine organisms. Some of these organisms are important food sources for marine animals and, when ingested, the toxins that they produce may be absorbed and stored in the tissues of the predators, which then become toxic to animals higher up the food chain. This is a particular problem with shellfish, and many cases of poisoning are reported in shellfish consumers each year. At present, there is no practicable means of preventing uptake of the toxins by shellfish or of removing them after harvesting. Assessment of the risk posed by such toxins is therefore required in order to determine levels that are unlikely to cause adverse effects in humans and to permit the establishment of regulatory limits in shellfish for human consumption. In the present review, the basic principles of risk assessment are described, and the progress made toward robust risk assessment of seafood toxins is discussed. While good progress has been made, it is clear that further toxicological studies are required before this goal is fully achieved.

  20. Polymer antidotes for toxin sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisman, Adam; Chou, Beverly; O'Brien, Jeffrey; Shea, Kenneth J

    2015-08-01

    Toxins delivered by envenomation, secreted by microorganisms, or unintentionally ingested can pose an immediate threat to life. Rapid intervention coupled with the appropriate antidote is required to mitigate the threat. Many antidotes are biological products and their cost, methods of production, potential for eliciting immunogenic responses, the time needed to generate them, and stability issues contribute to their limited availability and effectiveness. These factors exacerbate a world-wide challenge for providing treatment. In this review we evaluate a number of polymer constructs that may serve as alternative antidotes. The range of toxins investigated includes those from sources such as plants, animals and bacteria. The development of polymeric heavy metal sequestrants for use as antidotes to heavy metal poisoning faces similar challenges, thus recent findings in this area have also been included. Two general strategies have emerged for the development of polymeric antidotes. In one, the polymer acts as a scaffold for the presentation of ligands with a known affinity for the toxin. A second strategy is to generate polymers with an intrinsic affinity, and in some cases selectivity, to a range of toxins. Importantly, in vivo efficacy has been demonstrated for each of these strategies, which suggests that these approaches hold promise as an alternative to biological or small molecule based treatments.

  1. Shigella Sonnei and Shiga Toxin

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-07-28

    Katherine Lamba, an infectious disease epidemiologist with the California Department of Public Health, discusses Shiga Toxin producing Shigella sonnei.  Created: 7/28/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 7/28/2016.

  2. Myeloid Cell Sirtuin-1 Expression Does Not Alter Host Immune Responses to Gram-Negative Endotoxemia or Gram-Positive Bacterial Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crotty Alexander, Laura E.; Marsh, Brenda J.; Timmer, Anjuli M.; Lin, Ann E.; Zainabadi, Kayvan; Czopik, Agnieszka; Guarente, Leonard; Nizet, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The role of sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) in innate immunity, and in particular the influence of SIRT1 on antimicrobial defense against infection, has yet to be reported but is important to define since SIRT1 inhibitors are being investigated as therapeutic agents in the treatment of cancer, Huntington’s disease, and autoimmune diseases. Given the therapeutic potential of SIRT1 suppression, we sought to characterize the role of SIRT1 in host defense. Utilizing both pharmacologic methods and a genetic knockout, we demonstrate that SIRT1 expression has little influence on macrophage and neutrophil antimicrobial functions. Myeloid SIRT1 expression does not change mortality in gram-negative toxin-induced shock or gram-positive bacteremia, suggesting that therapeutic suppression of SIRT1 may be done safely without suppression of myeloid cell-specific immune responses to severe bacterial infections. PMID:24386389

  3. Myeloid cell sirtuin-1 expression does not alter host immune responses to Gram-negative endotoxemia or Gram-positive bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E Crotty Alexander

    Full Text Available The role of sirtuin-1 (SIRT1 in innate immunity, and in particular the influence of SIRT1 on antimicrobial defense against infection, has yet to be reported but is important to define since SIRT1 inhibitors are being investigated as therapeutic agents in the treatment of cancer, Huntington's disease, and autoimmune diseases. Given the therapeutic potential of SIRT1 suppression, we sought to characterize the role of SIRT1 in host defense. Utilizing both pharmacologic methods and a genetic knockout, we demonstrate that SIRT1 expression has little influence on macrophage and neutrophil antimicrobial functions. Myeloid SIRT1 expression does not change mortality in gram-negative toxin-induced shock or gram-positive bacteremia, suggesting that therapeutic suppression of SIRT1 may be done safely without suppression of myeloid cell-specific immune responses to severe bacterial infections.

  4. Antibody microarrays for native toxin detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Victor C; Havenstrite, Karen L; Herr, Amy E

    2005-04-15

    We have developed antibody-based microarray techniques for the multiplexed detection of cholera toxin beta-subunit, diphtheria toxin, anthrax lethal factor and protective antigen, Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B, and tetanus toxin C fragment in spiked samples. Two detection schemes were investigated: (i) a direct assay in which fluorescently labeled toxins were captured directly by the antibody array and (ii) a competition assay that employed unlabeled toxins as reporters for the quantification of native toxin in solution. In the direct assay, fluorescence measured at each array element is correlated with labeled toxin concentration to yield baseline binding information (Langmuir isotherms and affinity constants). Extending from the direct assay, the competition assay yields information on the presence, identity, and concentration of toxins. A significant advantage of the competition assay over reported profiling assays is the minimal sample preparation required prior to analysis because the competition assay obviates the need to fluorescently label native proteins in the sample of interest. Sigmoidal calibration curves and detection limits were established for both assay formats. Although the sensitivity of the direct assay is superior to that of the competition assay, detection limits for unmodified toxins in the competition assay are comparable to values reported previously for sandwich-format immunoassays of antibodies arrayed on planar substrates. As a demonstration of the potential of the competition assay for unlabeled toxin detection, we conclude with a straightforward multiplexed assay for the differentiation and identification of both native S. aureus enterotoxin B and tetanus toxin C fragment in spiked dilute serum samples.

  5. Promotion of colonization and virulence by cholera toxin is dependent on neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queen, Jessica; Satchell, Karla J F

    2013-09-01

    The innate immune response to Vibrio cholerae infection is poorly understood, but this knowledge is critical for the design of safe, effective vaccines. Using an adult mouse intestinal infection model, this study examines the contribution of neutrophils to host immunity, as well as the effect of cholera toxin and other secreted factors on this response. Depletion of neutrophils from mice with anti-Ly6G IA8 monoclonal antibody led to similar survival rates of mice infected with low or moderate doses of toxigenic V. cholerae El Tor O1. At a high dose, neutropenic mice showed increased rates of survival compared to neutrophil-replete animals. Expression of cholera toxin was found to be protective to the neutropenic host, and this phenotype can be replicated by the administration of purified toxin. Neutrophils do not effectively clear colonizing bacteria from the small intestine, nor do they alter induction of early immune-modulating signals. In both neutropenic and neutrophil-replete animals, the local response to infection is characterized by expression of interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-10, and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 alpha (MIP-2). Overall, these data indicate that the innate immune response to toxigenic V. cholerae infection differs dramatically from the host response to nontoxigenic infection or vaccination, where neutrophils are protective to the host. In the absence of neutrophils, cholera toxin induces immunomodulatory effects that increase host survival. In cholera toxin-producing strains, similar to nontoxigenic infection, accessory toxins are critical to virulence, indicating that cholera toxin and the other secreted toxins modulate the host response by different mechanisms, with both contributing to bacterial persistence and virulence.

  6. Revisiting the Concept of Targeting Only Bacillus anthracis Toxins as a Treatment for Anthrax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinert, Itai; Bar-David, Elad; Sittner, Assa; Weiss, Shay; Schlomovitz, Josef; Ben-Shmuel, Amir; Mechaly, Adva; Altboum, Zeev; Kobiler, David; Levy, Haim

    2016-08-01

    Protective antigen (PA)-based vaccines are effective in preventing the development of fatal anthrax disease both in humans and in relevant animal models. The Bacillus anthracis toxins lethal toxin (lethal factor [LF] plus PA) and edema toxin (edema factor [EF] plus PA) are essential for the establishment of the infection, as inactivation of these toxins results in attenuation of the pathogen. Since the toxins reach high toxemia levels at the bacteremic stages of the disease, the CDC's recommendations include combining antibiotic treatment with antitoxin (anti-PA) immunotherapy. We demonstrate here that while treatment with a highly potent neutralizing monoclonal antibody was highly efficient as postexposure prophylaxis treatment, it failed to protect rabbits with any detectable bacteremia (≥10 CFU/ml). In addition, we show that while PA vaccination was effective against a subcutaneous spore challenge, it failed to protect rabbits against systemic challenges (intravenous injection of vegetative bacteria) with the wild-type Vollum strain or a toxin-deficient mutant. To test the possibility that additional proteins, which are secreted by the bacteria under pathogenicity-stimulating conditions in vitro, may contribute to the vaccine's potency, we immunized rabbits with a secreted protein fraction from a toxin-null mutant. The antiserum raised against the secreted fraction reacts with the bacteria in an immunofluorescence assay. Immunization with the secreted protein fraction did not protect the rabbits against a systemic challenge with the fully pathogenic bacteria. Full protection was obtained only by a combined vaccination with PA and the secreted protein fraction. Therefore, these results indicate that an effective antiserum treatment in advanced stages of anthrax must include toxin-neutralizing antibodies in combination with antibodies against bacterial cell targets.

  7. Triacontyl p-coumarate: an inhibitor of snake venom metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, M M; Vieira, S A P B; Gomes, M S R; Paula, V F; Alcântara, T M; Homsi-Brandeburgo, M I; dos Santos, J I; Magro, A J; Fontes, M R M; Rodrigues, V M

    2013-02-01

    Snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) participate in a number of important biological, physiological and pathophysiological processes and are primarily responsible for the local tissue damage characteristic of viperid snake envenomations. The use of medicinal plant extracts as antidotes against animal venoms is an old practice, especially against snake envenomations. Such plants are sources of many pharmacologically active compounds and have been shown to antagonize the effects of some venoms and toxins. The present study explores the activity of triacontyl p-coumarate (PCT), an active compound isolated from root bark of Bombacopsis glabra vegetal extract (Bg), against harmful effects of Bothropoides pauloensis snake venom and isolated toxins (SVMPs or phospholipase A(2)). Before inhibition assays, Bg or PCT was incubated with venom or toxins at ratios of 1:1 and 1:5 (w/w; venom or isolated toxins/PCT) for 30 min at 37°C. Treatment conditions were also assayed to simulate snakebite with PCT inoculated at either the same venom or toxin site. PCT neutralized fibrinogenolytic activity and plasmatic fibrinogen depletion induced by B. pauloensis venom or isolated toxin. PCT also efficiently inhibited the hemorrhagic (3MDH - minimum hemorrhagic dose injected i.d into mice) and myotoxic activities induced by Jararhagin, a metalloproteinase from B. jararaca at 1:5 ratio (toxin: inhibitor, w/w) when it was previously incubated with PCT and injected into mice or when PCT was administered after toxin injection. Docking simulations using data on a metalloproteinase (Neuwiedase) structure suggest that the binding between the protein and the inhibitor occurs mainly in the active site region causing blockade of the enzymatic reaction by displacement of catalytic water. Steric hindrance may also play a role in the mechanism since the PCT hydrophobic tail was found to interact with the loop associated with substrate anchorage. Thus, PCT may provide a alternative to complement

  8. Bioluminescent bioreporter sensing of foodborne toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraley, Amanda C.; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary S.

    2004-06-01

    Histamine is the primary etiological agent in the foodborne disease scombrotoxicosis, one of the most common food toxicities related to fish consumption. Procedures for detecting histamine in fish products are available, but are often too expensive or too complex for routine use. As an alternative, a bacterial bioluminescent bioreporter has been constructed to develop a biosensor system that autonomously responds to low levels of histamine. The bioreporter contains a promoterless Photorhabdus luminescens lux operon (luxCDABE) fused with the Vibrio anguillarum angR regulatory gene promoter of the anguibactin biosynthetic operon. The bioreporter emitted 1.46 times more bioluminescence than background, 30 minutes after the addition of 100mM histamine. However, specificity was not optimal, as this biosensor generated significant bioluminescence in the presence of L-proline and L-histidine. As a means towards improving histamine specificity, the promoter region of a histamine oxidase gene from Arthrobacter globiformis was cloned upstream of the promotorless lux operon from Photorhabdus luminescens. This recently constructed whole-cell, lux-based bioluminescent bioreporter is currently being tested for optimal performance in the presence of histamine in order to provide a rapid, simple, and inexpensive model sensor for the detection of foodborne toxins.

  9. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Herrero, Daniel; Andreu Domingo, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the main cause of vaginal dysbacteriosis in the women during the reproductive age. It is an entity in which many studies have focused for years and which is still open for discussion topics. This is due to the diversity of microorganisms that cause it and therefore, its difficult treatment. Bacterial vaginosis is probably the result of vaginal colonization by complex bacterial communities, many of them non-cultivable and with interdependent metabolism where anaerobic populations most likely play an important role in its pathogenesis. The main symptoms are an increase of vaginal discharge and the unpleasant smell of it. It can lead to serious consequences for women, such as an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus and upper genital tract and pregnancy complications. Gram stain is the gold standard for microbiological diagnosis of BV, but can also be diagnosed using the Amsel clinical criteria. It should not be considered a sexually transmitted disease but it is highly related to sex. Recurrence is the main problem of medical treatment. Apart from BV, there are other dysbacteriosis less characterized like aerobic vaginitis of which further studies are coming slowly but are achieving more attention and consensus among specialists.

  10. Insights into Diphthamide, Key Diphtheria Toxin Effector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffael Schaffrath

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Diphtheria toxin (DT inhibits eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2 (eEF2 by ADP-ribosylation in a fashion that requires diphthamide, a modified histidine residue on eEF2. In budding yeast, diphthamide formation involves seven genes, DPH1-DPH7. In an effort to further study diphthamide synthesis and interrelation among the Dph proteins, we found, by expression in E. coli and co-immune precipitation in yeast, that Dph1 and Dph2 interact and that they form a complex with Dph3. Protein-protein interaction mapping shows that Dph1-Dph3 complex formation can be dissected by progressive DPH1 gene truncations. This identifies N- and C-terminal domains on Dph1 that are crucial for diphthamide synthesis, DT action and cytotoxicity of sordarin, another microbial eEF2 inhibitor. Intriguingly, dph1 truncation mutants are sensitive to overexpression of DPH5, the gene necessary to synthesize diphthine from the first diphthamide pathway intermediate produced by Dph1-Dph3. This is in stark contrast to dph6 mutants, which also lack the ability to form diphthamide but are resistant to growth inhibition by excess Dph5 levels. As judged from site-specific mutagenesis, the amidation reaction itself relies on a conserved ATP binding domain in Dph6 that, when altered, blocks diphthamide formation and confers resistance to eEF2 inhibition by sordarin.

  11. Recent advances in the understanding of brown spider venoms: From the biology of spiders to the molecular mechanisms of toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gremski, Luiza Helena; Trevisan-Silva, Dilza; Ferrer, Valéria Pereira; Matsubara, Fernando Hitomi; Meissner, Gabriel Otto; Wille, Ana Carolina Martins; Vuitika, Larissa; Dias-Lopes, Camila; Ullah, Anwar; de Moraes, Fábio Rogério; Chávez-Olórtegui, Carlos; Barbaro, Katia Cristina; Murakami, Mario Tyago; Arni, Raghuvir Krishnaswamy; Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea; Chaim, Olga Meiri; Veiga, Silvio Sanches

    2014-06-01

    The Loxosceles genus spiders (the brown spiders) are encountered in all the continents, and the clinical manifestations following spider bites include skin necrosis with gravitational lesion spreading and occasional systemic manifestations, such as intravascular hemolysis, thrombocytopenia and acute renal failure. Brown spider venoms are complex mixtures of toxins especially enriched in three molecular families: the phospholipases D, astacin-like metalloproteases and Inhibitor Cystine Knot (ICK) peptides. Other toxins with low level of expression also present in the venom include the serine proteases, serine protease inhibitors, hyaluronidases, allergen factors and translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP). The mechanisms by which the Loxosceles venoms act and exert their noxious effects are not fully understood. Except for the brown spider venom phospholipase D, which causes dermonecrosis, hemolysis, thrombocytopenia and renal failure, the pathological activities of the other venom toxins remain unclear. The objective of the present review is to provide insights into the brown spider venoms and loxoscelism based on recent results. These insights include the biology of brown spiders, the clinical features of loxoscelism and the diagnosis and therapy of brown spider bites. Regarding the brown spider venom, this review includes a description of the novel toxins revealed by molecular biology and proteomics techniques, the data regarding three-dimensional toxin structures, and the mechanism of action of these molecules. Finally, the biotechnological applications of the venom components, especially for those toxins reported as recombinant molecules, and the challenges for future study are discussed.

  12. Anthrax toxin receptor 2-dependent lethal toxin killing in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather M Scobie

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Anthrax toxin receptors 1 and 2 (ANTXR1 and ANTXR2 have a related integrin-like inserted (I domain which interacts with a metal cation that is coordinated by residue D683 of the protective antigen (PA subunit of anthrax toxin. The receptor-bound metal ion and PA residue D683 are critical for ANTXR1-PA binding. Since PA can bind to ANTXR2 with reduced affinity in the absence of metal ions, we reasoned that D683 mutant forms of PA might specifically interact with ANTXR2. We show here that this is the case. The differential ability of ANTXR1 and ANTXR2 to bind D683 mutant PA proteins was mapped to nonconserved receptor residues at the binding interface with PA domain 2. Moreover, a D683K mutant form of PA that bound specifically to human and rat ANTXR2 mediated killing of rats by anthrax lethal toxin, providing strong evidence for the physiological importance of ANTXR2 in anthrax disease pathogenesis.

  13. Disorder-to-Order Transition in the CyaA Toxin RTX Domain: Implications for Toxin Secretion

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    Ana-Cristina Sotomayor-Pérez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The past decade has seen a fundamental reappraisal of the protein structure-to-function paradigm because it became evident that a significant fraction of polypeptides are lacking ordered structures under physiological conditions. Ligand-induced disorder-to-order transition plays a key role in the biological functions of many proteins that contain intrinsically disordered regions. This trait is exhibited by RTX (Repeat in ToXin motifs found in more than 250 virulence factors secreted by Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria. We have investigated several RTX-containing polypeptides of different lengths, all derived from the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin, CyaA. Using a combination of experimental approaches, we showed that the RTX proteins exhibit the hallmarks of intrinsically disordered proteins in the absence of calcium. This intrinsic disorder mainly results from internal electrostatic repulsions between negatively charged residues of the RTX motifs. Calcium binding triggers a strong reduction of the mean net charge, dehydration and compaction, folding and stabilization of secondary and tertiary structures of the RTX proteins. We propose that the intrinsically disordered character of the RTX proteins may facilitate the uptake and secretion of virulence factors through the bacterial secretion machinery. These results support the hypothesis that the folding reaction is achieved upon protein secretion and, in the case of proteins containing RTX motifs, could be finely regulated by the calcium gradient across bacterial cell wall.

  14. An efficient method for the purification of proteins from four distinct toxin-antitoxin modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterckx, Yann G-J; De Gieter, Steven; Zorzini, Valentina; Hadži, San; Haesaerts, Sarah; Loris, Remy; Garcia-Pino, Abel

    2015-04-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules are stress response elements that are ubiquitous in the genomes of bacteria and archaea. Production and subsequent purification of individual TA proteins is anything but straightforward as over-expression of the toxin gene is lethal to bacterial and eukaryotic cells and over-production of the antitoxin leads to its proteolytic degradation because of its inherently unstructured nature. Here we describe an effective production and purification strategy centered on an on-column denaturant-induced dissociation of the toxin-antitoxin complex. The success of the method is demonstrated by its application on four different TA families, encoding proteins with distinct activities and folds. A series of biophysical and in vitro activity tests show that the purified proteins are of high quality and suitable for structural studies.

  15. [Determination of Escherichia coli Shiga-like toxins by means of the MTT bioassay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörmansdorfer, S; Gareis, M; Bauer, J; Mayr, A

    1995-09-01

    Tissue culture cells' metabolism and viability are measured by the mitochondrial reduction rate of a yellow tetrazolium salt (MTT) to blue formazan crystals in the MTT-bioassay. Thus the MTT-bioassay is a standardizable and reproducible bioassay for measuring cytotoxicity or cytostimulation. It is shown that the MTT-bioassay is also very suitable for determining bacterial cytotoxins using Escherichia coli's Shiga-like toxins as example. 177 strains of E. coli, isolated from carcasses and organs of cattle, are classified biochemically and tested for cytotoxin production by means of the MTT-bioassay. One of these strains is recognized as producer of Shiga-like toxin 2. 4 Enterohemolysin-producing strains of E. coli are cultivated from a feces sample of a diarrhoeic nubian ibex and identified as Shiga-like toxin 1 producers by help of the MTT-bioassay.

  16. Effect of environmental conditions on production of toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, A C; Bergdoll, M S

    1990-01-01

    The kinetics of toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) production by Staphylococcus aureus was studied in a fermentor in which aeration rate, atmospheric composition, pH, and temperature were controlled. The toxin was synthesized at a maximal rate during the exponential phase. High bacterial populations were not necessarily accompanied by high TSST-1 yields. Aerobiosis increased TSST-1 production, but excessive aeration had an adverse effect. Addition of CO2 enhanced TSST-1 yield by increasing toxin production rate and efficiency. Cultures with no pH control made more TSST-1 than those maintained at pH 5.5 to 7.5. Maximum TSST-1 yields were obtained when cultures were supplied with air (20 cm3/min) and CO2 (5 cm3/min) via a sintered glass sparger. PMID:2108084

  17. Crystallization of Escherichia coli CdtB, the biologically active subunit of cytolethal distending toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hontz, Jill S.; Villar-Lecumberri, Maria T.; Dreyfus, Lawrence A.; Yoder, Marilyn D., E-mail: yoderm@umkc.edu [Division of Cell Biology and Biophysics, School of Biological Sciences, University of Missouri-Kansas City, 5007 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110-2499 (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Cytolethal distending toxin subunit CdtB from E. coli strain 9142-88 was purified and crystallized. Crystals belonging to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} diffract to a resolution of 1.72 Å. Cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) is a secreted protein toxin produced by several bacterial pathogens. The biologically active CDT subunit CdtB is an active homolog of mammalian type I DNase. Internalization of CdtB and subsequent translocation into the nucleus of target cells results in DNA-strand breaks, leading to cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. CdtB crystals were grown using microbatch methods with polyethylene glycol 8000 as the precipitant. The CdtB crystals contain one molecule of MW 30.5 kDa per asymmetric unit, belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and diffract to 1.72 Å.

  18. Isolation, purification and spectrometric analysis of PSP toxins from moraxella sp., a bacterium associated with a toxic dinoflagellate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyce, S.D.; Doucette, G.J.

    1994-12-31

    Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) is a seafood intoxication syndrome caused by the injestion of shellfish contaminated with toxins produced by algae known as dinoflagellates. The PSP toxins, saxitoxin and its derivatives, act to block voltage-dependent sodium channels and can cause paralysis and even death at higher doses. It is well documented that bacteria coexist with many harmful or toxic algal species, though the exact nature of the association in relation to toxin production is unknown. Recently, the bacterium Moraxella sp. was isolated from the PSP toxin producing dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense. Through HPLC analysis and saxitoxin receptor binding assays performed on crude bacterial extracts, it appears that Moraxella sp. is capable of producing saxitoxin and several of its derivatives. However, physical confirmation (e.g. mass spectrometry) of these results is still needed.

  19. Exfoliative Toxins of Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Bukowski

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen of humans and livestock. It causes a diverse array of diseases, ranging from relatively harmless localized skin infections to life-threatening systemic conditions. Among multiple virulence factors, staphylococci secrete several exotoxins directly associated with particular disease symptoms. These include toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1, enterotoxins, and exfoliative toxins (ETs. The latter are particularly interesting as the sole agents responsible for staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS, a disease predominantly affecting infants and characterized by the loss of superficial skin layers, dehydration, and secondary infections. The molecular basis of the clinical symptoms of SSSS is well understood. ETs are serine proteases with high substrate specificity, which selectively recognize and hydrolyze desmosomal proteins in the skin. The fascinating road leading to the discovery of ETs as the agents responsible for SSSS and the characterization of the molecular mechanism of their action, including recent advances in the field, are reviewed in this article.

  20. Structure-Based Design of Ricin Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon D. Robertus

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Ricin is a potent cytotoxin easily purified in large quantities. It presents a significant public health concern due to its potential use as a bioterrorism agent. For this reason, extensive efforts have been underway to develop antidotes against this deadly poison. The catalytic A subunit of the heterodimeric toxin has been biochemically and structurally well characterized, and is an attractive target for structure-based drug design. Aided by computer docking simulations, several ricin toxin A chain (RTA inhibitors have been identified; the most promising leads belonging to the pterin family. Development of these lead compounds into potent drug candidates is a challenging prospect for numerous reasons, including poor solubility of pterins, the large and highly polar secondary binding pocket of RTA, as well as the enzyme’s near perfect catalytic efficiency and tight binding affinity for its natural substrate, the eukaryotic ribosome. To date, the most potent RTA inhibitors developed using this approach are only modest inhibitors with apparent IC50 values in the 10−4 M range, leaving significant room for improvement. This review highlights the variety of techniques routinely employed in structure-based drug design projects, as well as the challenges faced in the design of RTA inhibitors.

  1. Neurotransmitter evaluation in the hippocampus of rats after intracerebral injection of TsTX scorpion toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALA Nencioni

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available TsTX is an α-type sodium channel toxin that stimulates the discharge of neurotransmitters from neurons. In the present study we investigated which neurotransmitters are released in the hippocampus after TsTX injection and if they are responsible for electrographic or histopathological effects. Microdialysis revealed that the toxin increased glutamate extracellular levels in the hippocampus; however, levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, glycine, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA, homovanillic acid (HVA and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC were not significantly altered. Neurodegeneration in pyramidal cells of hippocampus and electroencephalographic alterations caused by the toxin were blocked by pretreatment with riluzole, a glutamate release inhibitor. The present results suggest a specific activity of TsTX in the hippocampus which affects only glutamate release.

  2. Detection of E. coli O157:H7 and Shigella dysenteriae toxins in clinical samples by PCR-ELISA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Amani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin producing bacteria are potential causes of serious human disease such as hemorrhagic colitis, severe inflammations of ileocolonic regions of gastrointestinal tract, thrombocytopenia, septicemia, malignant disorders in urinary ducts, hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS Shiga toxin 1 (stx1, shiga toxin 2 (stx2, or a combination of both are responsible for most clinical symptoms of these diseases. A lot of methods have been developed so far to detect shiga toxins such as cell culture, ELISA, and RFPLA, but due to high costs and labor time in addition to low sensitivity, they have not received much attention. In this study, PCR-ELISA method was used to detect genes encoding shiga toxins 1 and 2 (stx1 and stx2. To detect stx1 and stx2 genes, two primer pairs were designed for Multiplex-PCR then PCR-ELISA. PCR products (490 and 275, respectively were subsequently verified by sequencing. Sensitivity and specificity of PCR-ELISA method were determined by using genome serial dilution and Enterobacteriastrains. PCR-ELISA method used in this study proved to be a rapid and precise approach to detect different types of shiga toxins and can be used to detect bacterial genes encoding shiga toxins.

  3. The art of blocking ADP-ribosyltransferases (ARTs): nanobodies as experimental and therapeutic tools to block mammalian and toxin ARTs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Stephan; Rissiek, Björn; Haag, Friedrich; Goldbaum, Fernando A; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich

    2013-08-01

    In 1901, the first Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to Emil von Behring for his ground-breaking discovery of serum therapy: serum from horses vaccinated with toxin-containing culture medium of Corynebacterium diphtheriae contained life-saving 'antitoxins'. The molecular nature of the ADP-ribosylating toxin and the neutralizing antibodies were unraveled only 50 years later. Today, von Behring's antibody therapy is being refined with a new generation of recombinant antibodies and antibody fragments. Nanobodies, which are single-domain antibodies derived from the peculiar heavy-chain antibodies of llamas and other camelids, are emerging as a promising new class of highly specific enzyme inhibitors. In this review, we illustrate the potential of nanobodies as tools to block extracellular and intracellular ADP-ribosyltransferases (ARTs), using the toxin-related membrane-bound mammalian ecto-enzyme ARTC2 and the actin-ADP-ribosylating Salmonella virulence plasmid factor B toxin of Salmonella enterica as examples.

  4. The Potential Contributions of Lethal and Edema Toxins to the Pathogenesis of Anthrax Associated Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Q. Eichacker

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Outbreaks of Bacillus anthracis in the US and Europe over the past 10 years have emphasized the health threat this lethal bacteria poses even for developed parts of the world. In contrast to cutaneous anthrax, inhalational disease in the US during the 2001 outbreaks and the newly identified injectional drug use form of disease in the UK and Germany have been associated with relatively high mortality rates. One notable aspect of these cases has been the difficulty in supporting patients once shock has developed. Anthrax bacilli produce several different components which likely contribute to this shock. Growing evidence indicates that both major anthrax toxins may produce substantial cardiovascular dysfunction. Lethal toxin (LT can alter peripheral vascular function; it also has direct myocardial depressant effects. Edema toxin (ET may have even more pronounced peripheral vascular effects than LT, including the ability to interfere with the actions of conventional vasopressors. Additionally, ET also appears capable of interfering with renal sodium and water retention. Importantly, the two toxins exert their actions via quite different mechanisms and therefore have the potential to worsen shock and outcome in an additive fashion. Finally, both toxins have the ability to inhibit host defense and microbial clearance, possibly contributing to the very high bacterial loads noted in patients dying with anthrax. This last point is clinically relevant since emerging data has begun to implicate other bacterial components such as anthrax cell wall in the shock and organ injury observed with infection. Taken together, accumulating evidence regarding the potential contribution of LT and ET to anthrax-associated shock supports efforts to develop adjunctive therapies that target both toxins in patients with progressive shock.

  5. Ingested Shiga Toxin 2 (Stx2) Causes Histopathological Changes in Kidney, Spleen and Thymus Tissues and Mortality in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Shiga toxin (Stxs) producing bacterial strain, Escherichia coli O157:H7, colonizes the distal small intestine and the colon, initiating a very broad spectrum of illnesses such as hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and acute renal ...

  6. Biotinylation of environmentally isolated Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) – specific bacteriophages for biosensor and biocontrol applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Like common bacteriophages, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) bacteriophages are viruses that recognize and bind to specific bacterial host (STEC) for propagation. They co-exist with STEC hosts, which cause epidemic food and waterborne illnesses, but may act as host populations limiting ...

  7. Larvicidal activity of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis Cry11Aa toxin against Haemonchus contortus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE Lara, Ana Paula DE Souza Stori; Lorenzon, Lucas Bigolin; Vianna, Ana Muñoz; Santos, Francisco Denis Souza; Pinto, Luciano Silva; Aires Berne, Maria Elisabeth; Leite, Fábio Pereira Leivas

    2016-10-01

    Effective control of gastrointestinal parasites is necessary in sheep production. The development of anthelmintics resistance is causing the available chemically based anthelmintics to become less effective. Biological control strategies present an alternative to this problem. In the current study, we tested the larvicidal effects of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis Cry11Aa toxin against Haemonchus contortus larvae. Bacterial suspensions [2 × 108 colony-forming units (CFU) g-1 of the feces] of B. thuringiensis var. israelensis and recombinant Escherichia coli expressing Cry11Aa toxin were added to naturally H. contortus egg-contaminated feces. The larvae were quantified, and significant reductions of 62 and 81% (P < 0·001) were, respectively observed, compared with the control group. A 30 mL bacterial suspension (1 × 108 CFU mL-1) of B. thuringiensis var. israelensis and recombinant E. coli expressing Cry11Aa toxin were then orally administered to lambs naturally infected with H. contortus. Twelve hours after administration, feces were collected and submitted to coprocultures. Significant larvae reductions (P < 0·001) of 79 and 90% were observed respectively compared with the control group. The results suggest that the Cry11Aa toxin of B. thuringiensis var. israelensis is a promising new class of biological anthelmintics for treating sheep against H. contortus.

  8. Expression of recombinant Clostridium difficile toxin A and B in Bacillus megaterium

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    Nie Weijia

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major Clostridium difficile virulence factors are the exotoxins TcdA and TcdB. Due to the large size and poor stability of the proteins, the active recombinant TcdA and TcdB have been difficult to produce. Results The toxin genes tcdA and tcdB were amplified by PCR using chromosomal DNA from a toxigenic strain as a template, and cloned into a shuttle vector pHis1522. The sequences of both tcdA and tcdB genes in the vector have been verified by DNA sequencing. The constructs were transformed into B. megaterium protoplasts and the protein expression was controlled under a xylose promoter. The recombinant toxins (rTcdA and rTcdB were purified from bacterial crude extracts. Approximately 5 – 10 mg of highly purified recombinant toxins were obtained from one liter of bacterial culture. The resulting rTcdA and rTcdB had similar molecular masses to the native toxins, and their biological activities were found to be similar to their native counterparts after an extensive examination. Conclusion We have generated the full length and active recombinant TcdA and TcdB in Bacillus megaterium.

  9. High instability of a nematicidal Cry toxin plasmid in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Anna E; Nakad, Rania; Saebelfeld, Manja; Masche, Anna C; Dierking, Katja; Schulenburg, Hinrich

    2016-01-01

    In bacterial pathogens, virulence factors are often carried on plasmids and other mobile genetic elements, and as such, plasmid evolution is central in understanding pathogenicity. Bacillus thuringiensis is an invertebrate pathogen that uses plasmid-encoded crystal (Cry) toxins to establish infections inside the host. Our study aimed to quantify stability of two Cry toxin-encoding plasmids, BTI_23p and BTI_16p, under standard laboratory culturing conditions. These two plasmids are part of the genome of the B. thuringiensis strain MYBT18679, which is of particular interest because of its high pathogenicity towards nematodes. One of the plasmids, BTI_23p, was found to be highly unstable, with substantial loss occurring within a single growth cycle. Nevertheless, longer term experimental evolution in the absence of a host revealed maintenance of the plasmid at low levels in the bacterial populations. BTI_23p encodes two nematicidal Cry toxins, Cry21Aa2 and Cry14Aa1. Consistent with previous findings, loss of the plasmid abolished pathogenicity towards the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, which could be rescued by addition of Cry21Aa2-expressing Escherichia coli. These results implicate BTI_23p as a plasmid that is required for successful infection, yet unstable when present at high frequency in the population, consistent with the role of Cry toxins as public goods.

  10. A widespread bacteriophage abortive infection system functions through a Type IV toxin-antitoxin mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dy, Ron L; Przybilski, Rita; Semeijn, Koen; Salmond, George P C; Fineran, Peter C

    2014-04-01

    Bacterial abortive infection (Abi) systems are 'altruistic' cell death systems that are activated by phage infection and limit viral replication, thereby providing protection to the bacterial population. Here, we have used a novel approach of screening Abi systems as a tool to identify and characterize toxin-antitoxin (TA)-acting Abi systems. We show that AbiE systems are encoded by bicistronic operons and function via a non-interacting (Type IV) bacteriostatic TA mechanism. The abiE operon was negatively autoregulated by the antitoxin, AbiEi, a member of a widespread family of putative transcriptional regulators. AbiEi has an N-terminal winged-helix-turn-helix domain that is required for repression of abiE transcription, and an uncharacterized bi-functional C-terminal domain, which is necessary for transcriptional repression and sufficient for toxin neutralization. The cognate toxin, AbiEii, is a predicted nucleotidyltransferase (NTase) and member of the DNA polymerase β family. AbiEii specifically bound GTP, and mutations in conserved NTase motifs (I-III) and a newly identified motif (IV), abolished GTP binding and subsequent toxicity. The AbiE systems can provide phage resistance and enable stabilization of mobile genetic elements, such as plasmids. Our study reveals molecular insights into the regulation and function of the widespread bi-functional AbiE Abi-TA systems and the biochemical properties of both toxin and antitoxin proteins.

  11. Coenzyme depletion by members of the aerolysin family of pore-forming toxins leads to diminished ATP levels and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennessey, Christine M; Ivie, Susan E; McClain, Mark S

    2012-08-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that a variety of bacterial pore-forming toxins induce cell death through a process of programmed necrosis characterized by the rapid depletion of cellular ATP. However, events leading to the necrosis and depletion of ATP are not thoroughly understood. We demonstrate that ATP-depletion induced by two pore-forming toxins, the Clostridium perfringens epsilon-toxin and the Aeromonas hydrophila aerolysin toxin, is associated with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. To gain further insight into the toxin-induced metabolic changes contributing to necrosis and depletion of ATP, we analyzed the biochemical profiles of 251 distinct compounds by GC/MS or LC/MS/MS following exposure of a human kidney cell line to the epsilon-toxin. As expected, numerous biochemicals were seen to increase or decrease in response to epsilon-toxin. However, the pattern of these changes was consistent with the toxin-induced disruption of major energy-producing pathways in the cell including disruptions to the beta-oxidation of lipids. In particular, treatment with epsilon-toxin led to decreased levels of key coenzymes required for energy production including carnitine, NAD (and NADH), and coenzyme A. Independent biochemical assays confirmed that epsilon-toxin and aerolysin induced the rapid decrease of these coenzymes or their synthetic precursors. Incubation of cells with NADH or carnitine-enriched medium helped protect cells from toxin-induced ATP depletion and cell death. Collectively, these results demonstrate that members of the aerolysin family of pore-forming toxins lead to decreased levels of essential coenzymes required for energy production. The resulting loss of energy substrates is expected to contribute to dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential, opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, and ultimately cell death.

  12. Inhibitors of snake venoms and development of new therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Elda E; Rodríguez-Acosta, Alexis

    2008-01-01

    Natural inhibitors of snake venoms play a significant role in the ability to neutralize the degradation effects induced by venom toxins. It has been known for many years that animal sera and some plant extracts are competent in neutralizing snake venoms. The purpose of this review is to highlight the recent work that has been accomplished with natural inhibitors of snake venoms as well as revisiting the past research including those found in plants. The biomedical value of these natural inhibitors can lead to the development of new therapeutics for an assortment of diseases as well as contributing to efficient antivenoms for the treatment of ophidic accidents.

  13. Perfringolysin O: the underrated Clostridium perfringens toxin?

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanie Verherstraeten; Evy Goossens; Bonnie Valgaeren; Bart Pardon; Leen Timbermont; Freddy Haesebrouck; Richard Ducatelle; Piet Deprez; Kristin R. Wade; Rodney Tweten; Filip Van Immerseel

    2015-01-01

    The anaerobic bacterium Clostridium perfringens expresses multiple toxins that promote disease development in both humans and animals. One such toxin is perfringolysin O (PFO, classically referred to as theta toxin), a pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC). PFO is secreted as a water-soluble monomer that recognizes and binds membranes via cholesterol. Membrane-bound monomers undergo structural changes that culminate in the formation of an oligomerized prepore complex on the membr...

  14. Collaborative Research Program on Seafood Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-14

    Crystallographic Structures of Saxitoxins Cl and C2 Appendix C: Collaborative Research Program an Seafcod Toxins Progress Report on Ciguatera and Related...radioimmunoassay for PSP were also evalumted. The Hokama stick test for ciguatera toxin was also evaluated. 4. initiate Studies on the Accumulation...tco•d which caie a form of b-mnn poisoning referred to as ciguatera . The respcnsible toxins originate from ll1ular rine algae of the division

  15. Fighting Cholera One-on-One: The Development and Efficacy of Multivalent Cholera-Toxin-Binding Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuilhof, Han

    2016-02-16

    A series of diseases, ranging from cholera via travelers' diarrhea to hamburger disease, are caused by bacterially produced toxic proteins. In particular, a toxic protein unit is brought into the host cell upon binding to specific membrane-bound oligosaccharides on the host cell membrane. For example, the protein that causes cholera, cholera toxin (CT), has five identical, symmetrically placed binding pockets (B proteins), on top of which the toxic A protein resides. A promising strategy to counteract the devastating biological effects of this AB5 protein involves the development of inhibitors that can act as mimics of membrane-bound GM1 molecules, i.e., that can bind CT strongly and selectively. To reach this goal, two features are essential: First of all, the inhibitor should display oligosaccharides that resemble as much as possible the naturally occurring cell-surface pentasaccharide onto which CT normally binds, the so-called GM1 sugar (the oligosaccharide part of which is then labeled GM1os). Second, the inhibitor should be able to bind CT via multivalent interactions so as to bind CT as strongly as possible to allow for a real competition with the cell-membrane-bound GM1 molecules. In this Account, we present elements of the path that leads to strong CT inhibition by outlining the roles of multivalency and the development and use of GM1 mimics. First, multivalency effects were investigated using "sugar-coated" platforms, ranging from dendritic structures with up to eight oligosaccharides to platforms that mimicked the fivefold symmetry of CT itself. The latter goal was reached either via synthetic scaffolds like corannulene or calix[5]arene or via the development of a neolectin CT mimic that itself carries five GM1os groups. Second, the effect of the nature of the oligosaccharide appended to this platform was investigated via the use of oligosaccharides of increasing complexity, from galactose and lactose to the tetrasaccharide GM2os and eventually to GM1os

  16. Application of botulinum toxin in pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Woo Seog

    2011-03-01

    Botulinum toxin has been used for the treatment of many clinical disorders by producing temporary skeletal muscle relaxation. In pain management, botulinum toxin has demonstrated an analgesic effect by reducing muscular hyperactivity, but recent studies suggest this neurotoxin could have direct analgesic mechanisms different from its neuromuscular actions. At the moment, botulinum toxin is widely investigated and used in many painful diseases such as myofascial syndrome, headaches, arthritis, and neuropathic pain. Further studies are needed to understand the exact analgesic mechanisms, efficacy and complications of botulinum toxin in chronic pain disorders.

  17. Botulinum Toxin; Bioterror and Biomedicinal Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Patocka

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin is a group of seven homologous, highly poisonous proteins isolated fromfermentation of the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum, which naturally occurs in soiland can grow on many meats and vegetables. Botulinum toxin causes neuromuscular disordercalled botulism, which is a potentially lethal disease. There are three types of botulism: Food,wound, and infant botulism. It can lead to death unless appropriate therapy is done. Due to theseverity and potency of botulinum toxin, its importance as a biological weapon is of majorconcern to public health officials. Nevertheless, botulinum toxin is also medicament.

  18. Hemolytic anemia caused by chemicals and toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This list is not all-inclusive. Alternative Names Anemia - hemolytic - caused by chemicals or toxins References Michel M. Autoimmune and intravascular hemolytic anemias. In: Goldman L, Schafer ...

  19. Viral evasion of a bacterial suicide system by RNA-based molecular mimicry enables infectious altruism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blower, Tim R; Evans, Terry J; Przybilski, Rita; Fineran, Peter C; Salmond, George P C

    2012-01-01

    Abortive infection, during which an infected bacterial cell commits altruistic suicide to destroy the replicating bacteriophage and protect the clonal population, can be mediated by toxin-antitoxin systems such as the Type III protein-RNA toxin-antitoxin system, ToxIN. A flagellum-dependent bacteriophage of the Myoviridae, ΦTE, evolved rare mutants that "escaped" ToxIN-mediated abortive infection within Pectobacterium atrosepticum. Wild-type ΦTE encoded a short sequence similar to the repetitive nucleotide sequence of the RNA antitoxin, ToxI, from ToxIN. The ΦTE escape mutants had expanded the number of these "pseudo-ToxI" genetic repeats and, in one case, an escape phage had "hijacked" ToxI from the plasmid-borne toxIN locus, through recombination. Expression of the pseudo-ToxI repeats during ΦTE infection allowed the phage to replicate, unaffected by ToxIN, through RNA-based molecular mimicry. This is the first example of a non-coding RNA encoded by a phage that evolves by selective expansion and recombination to enable viral suppression of a defensive bacterial suicide system. Furthermore, the ΦTE escape phages had evolved enhanced capacity to transduce replicons expressing ToxIN, demonstrating virus-mediated horizontal transfer of genetic altruism.

  20. Viral evasion of a bacterial suicide system by RNA-based molecular mimicry enables infectious altruism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim R Blower

    Full Text Available Abortive infection, during which an infected bacterial cell commits altruistic suicide to destroy the replicating bacteriophage and protect the clonal population, can be mediated by toxin-antitoxin systems such as the Type III protein-RNA toxin-antitoxin system, ToxIN. A flagellum-dependent bacteriophage of the Myoviridae, ΦTE, evolved rare mutants that "escaped" ToxIN-mediated abortive infection within Pectobacterium atrosepticum. Wild-type ΦTE encoded a short sequence similar to the repetitive nucleotide sequence of the RNA antitoxin, ToxI, from ToxIN. The ΦTE escape mutants had expanded the number of these "pseudo-ToxI" genetic repeats and, in one case, an escape phage had "hijacked" ToxI from the plasmid-borne toxIN locus, through recombination. Expression of the pseudo-ToxI repeats during ΦTE infection allowed the phage to replicate, unaffected by ToxIN, through RNA-based molecular mimicry. This is the first example of a non-coding RNA encoded by a phage that evolves by selective expansion and recombination to enable viral suppression of a defensive bacterial suicide system. Furthermore, the ΦTE escape phages had evolved enhanced capacity to transduce replicons expressing ToxIN, demonstrating virus-mediated horizontal transfer of genetic altruism.

  1. Augmenting the Efficacy of Immunotoxins and Other Targeted Protein Toxins by Endosomal Escape Enhancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik Fuchs

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The toxic moiety of almost all protein-based targeted toxins must enter the cytosol of the target cell to mediate its fatal effect. Although more than 500 targeted toxins have been investigated in the past decades, no antibody-targeted protein toxin has been approved for tumor therapeutic applications by the authorities to date. Missing efficacy can be attributed in many cases to insufficient endosomal escape and therefore subsequent lysosomal degradation of the endocytosed toxins. To overcome this drawback, many strategies have been described to weaken the membrane integrity of endosomes. This comprises the use of lysosomotropic amines, carboxylic ionophores, calcium channel antagonists, various cell-penetrating peptides of viral, bacterial, plant, animal, human and synthetic origin, other organic molecules and light-induced techniques. Although the efficacy of the targeted toxins was typically augmented in cell culture hundred or thousand fold, in exceptional cases more than million fold, the combination of several substances harbors new problems including additional side effects, loss of target specificity, difficulties to determine the therapeutic window and cell type-dependent variations. This review critically scrutinizes the chances and challenges of endosomal escape enhancers and their potential role in future developments.

  2. Uptake and Processing of the Cytolethal Distending Toxin by Mammalian Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. DiRienzo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt is a heterotrimeric holotoxin produced by a diverse group of Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria. The Cdts expressed by the members of this group comprise a subclass of the AB toxin superfamily. Some AB toxins have hijacked the retrograde transport pathway, carried out by the Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum (ER, to translocate to cytosolic targets. Those toxins have been used as tools to decipher the roles of the Golgi and ER in intracellular transport and to develop medically useful delivery reagents. In comparison to the other AB toxins, the Cdt exhibits unique properties, such as translocation to the nucleus, that present specific challenges in understanding the precise molecular details of the trafficking pathway in mammalian cells. The purpose of this review is to present current information about the mechanisms of uptake and translocation of the Cdt in relation to standard concepts of endocytosis and retrograde transport. Studies of the Cdt intoxication process to date have led to the discovery of new translocation pathways and components and most likely will continue to reveal unknown features about the mechanisms by which bacterial proteins target the mammalian cell nucleus. Insight gained from these studies has the potential to contribute to the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  3. Inhibition of Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2) in apple juices and its resistance to pasteurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasooly, Reuven; Do, Paula M; Levin, Carol E; Friedman, Mendel

    2010-06-01

    In the present study, we evaluated Shiga toxin (Stx2) activity in apple juices by measuring a decrease in dehydrogenase activity of Vero cells with the microculture tetrazolium (MTT) assay. Freshly prepared juice from Red Delicious apples and Golden Delicious apples inhibited the biological activity of the bacterial toxin Stx2 produced by E. coli O157:H7 strains. Studies with immunomagnetic beads bearing specific antibodies against the toxin revealed that Stx2 activity was restored when removed from the apple juice. SDS gel electrophoresis revealed no difference (P juices. These results suggest that Stx2 may be reversibly bound to small molecular weight constituents in the juice. The Stx2 toxin was not inactivated on exposure to heat programs (63 degrees C for 30 min, 72 degrees C for 15 s, 89 degrees C for 1 s) commonly used to pasteurize apple juice, but lost all activity when exposed to 100 degrees C for 5 min. The results suggest that pasteurization of apple juice used to inactivate E. coli O157:H7 has no effect on Stx2, and that food-compatible and safe antitoxin compounds can be used to inhibit the biological activity of the Shiga toxin.

  4. Characterization of a novel toxin-antitoxin module, VapBC, encoded by Leptospira interrogans chromosome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Xuan ZHANG; Xiao Kui GUO; Chuan WU; Bo BI; Shuang Xi REN; Chun Fu WU; Guo Ping ZHAO

    2004-01-01

    Comparative genomic analysis of the coding sequences (CDSs) of Leptospira interrogans revealed a pair of closely linked genes homologous to the vapBC loci of many other bacteria with respect to both deduced amino acid sequences and operon organizations. Expression of single vapC gene in Escherichia coli resulted in inhibition of bacterial growth,whereas co-expression of vapBC restored the growth effectively. This phenotype is typical for three other characterized toxin-antitoxin systems of bacteria, i.e., mazEF[1], relBE[2] and chpIK[3]. The VapC proteins of bacteria and a thermophilic archeae, Solfolobus tokodaii, form a structurally distinguished group of toxin different from the other known toxins of bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis of both toxins and antitoxins of all categories indicated that although toxins were evolved from divergent sources and may or may not follow their speciation paths (as indicated by their 16s RNA sequences), co-evolution with their antitoxins was obvious.

  5. Host-Pathogen Coevolution: The Selective Advantage of Bacillus thuringiensis Virulence and Its Cry Toxin Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Masri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Reciprocal coevolution between host and pathogen is widely seen as a major driver of evolution and biological innovation. Yet, to date, the underlying genetic mechanisms and associated trait functions that are unique to rapid coevolutionary change are generally unknown. We here combined experimental evolution of the bacterial biocontrol agent Bacillus thuringiensis and its nematode host Caenorhabditis elegans with large-scale phenotyping, whole genome analysis, and functional genetics to demonstrate the selective benefit of pathogen virulence and the underlying toxin genes during the adaptation process. We show that: (i high virulence was specifically favoured during pathogen-host coevolution rather than pathogen one-sided adaptation to a nonchanging host or to an environment without host; (ii the pathogen genotype BT-679 with known nematocidal toxin genes and high virulence specifically swept to fixation in all of the independent replicate populations under coevolution but only some under one-sided adaptation; (iii high virulence in the BT-679-dominated populations correlated with elevated copy numbers of the plasmid containing the nematocidal toxin genes; (iv loss of virulence in a toxin-plasmid lacking BT-679 isolate was reconstituted by genetic reintroduction or external addition of the toxins. We conclude that sustained coevolution is distinct from unidirectional selection in shaping the pathogen's genome and life history characteristics. To our knowledge, this study is the first to characterize the pathogen genes involved in coevolutionary adaptation in an animal host-pathogen interaction system.

  6. Mode of action of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry and Cyt toxins and their potential for insect control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Alejandra; Gill, Sarjeet S; Soberón, Mario

    2007-03-15

    Bacillus thuringiensis Crystal (Cry) and Cytolitic (Cyt) protein families are a diverse group of proteins with activity against insects of different orders--Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, Diptera and also against other invertebrates such as nematodes. Their primary action is to lyse midgut epithelial cells by inserting into the target membrane and forming pores. Among this group of proteins, members of the 3-Domain Cry family are used worldwide for insect control, and their mode of action has been characterized in some detail. Phylogenetic analyses established that the diversity of the 3-Domain Cry family evolved by the independent evolution of the three domains and by swapping of domain III among toxins. Like other pore-forming toxins (PFT) that affect mammals, Cry toxins interact with specific receptors located on the host cell surface and are activated by host proteases following receptor binding resulting in the formation of a pre-pore oligomeric structure that is insertion competent. In contrast, Cyt toxins directly interact with membrane lipids and insert into the membrane. Recent evidence suggests that Cyt synergize or overcome resistance to mosquitocidal-Cry proteins by functioning as a Cry-membrane bound receptor. In this review we summarize recent findings on the mode of action of Cry and Cyt toxins, and compare them to the mode of action of other bacterial PFT. Also, we discuss their use in the control of agricultural insect pests and insect vectors of human diseases.

  7. xMAP-based analysis of three most prevalent staphylococcal toxins in Staphylococcus aureus cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonova, Maria A; Petrova, Elena E; Dmitrenko, Olga A; Komaleva, Ravilya L; Shoshina, Natalia S; Samokhvalova, Larisa V; Valyakina, Tatiana I; Grishin, Eugene V

    2014-10-01

    Detection of staphylococcal toxins presents a great interest for medical diagnostics. Screening of clinical samples for the presence of several types of staphylococcal toxins using traditional methods-biological tests on animals or cell cultures as well as ELISA-is laborious. Multiplex detection methods would simplify testing. We have designed an xMAP-based assay to detect three staphylococcal toxins-enterotoxins A and B (SEA and SEB) and toxic shock syndrome toxin (TSST)-in cultural supernatants obtained from different strains of Staphylococcus aureus. The limits of detection of SEA, SEB, and TSST multiplex detection in S. aureus growth medium were 10, 1,000, and 5 pg/mL, respectively. Fifty-nine samples of S. aureus cultural supernatants were tested with the xMAP assay. The developed assay has proved highly effective detection of the natural toxins in the samples obtained due to bacterial cells cultivation. In prospect, the developed test system can be used in clinical diagnostics and in monitoring of foodstuffs and environmental objects.

  8. The Typhoid Toxin Promotes Host Survival and the Establishment of a Persistent Asymptomatic Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Del Bel Belluz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial genotoxins, produced by several Gram-negative bacteria, induce DNA damage in the target cells. While the responses induced in the host cells have been extensively studied in vitro, the role of these effectors during the course of infection remains poorly characterized. To address this issue, we assessed the effects of the Salmonella enterica genotoxin, known as typhoid toxin, in in vivo models of murine infection. Immunocompetent mice were infected with isogenic S. enterica, serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium strains, encoding either a functional or an inactive typhoid toxin. The presence of the genotoxic subunit was detected 10 days post-infection in the liver of infected mice. Unexpectedly, its expression promoted the survival of the host, and was associated with a significant reduction of severe enteritis in the early phases of infection. Immunohistochemical and transcriptomic analysis confirmed the toxin-mediated suppression of the intestinal inflammatory response. The presence of a functional typhoid toxin further induced an increased frequency of asymptomatic carriers. Our data indicate that the typhoid toxin DNA damaging activity increases host survival and favours long-term colonization, highlighting a complex cross-talk between infection, DNA damage response and host immune response. These findings may contribute to understand why such effectors have been evolutionary conserved and horizontally transferred among Gram-negative bacteria.

  9. A Bioanalytical Platform for Simultaneous Detection and Quantification of Biological Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Sigrist

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Prevalent incidents support the notion that toxins, produced by bacteria, fungi, plants or animals are increasingly responsible for food poisoning or intoxication. Owing to their high toxicity some toxins are also regarded as potential biological warfare agents. Accordingly, control, detection and neutralization of toxic substances are a considerable economic burden to food safety, health care and military biodefense. The present contribution describes a new versatile instrument and related procedures for array-based simultaneous detection of bacterial and plant toxins using a bioanalytical platform which combines the specificity of covalently immobilized capture probes with a dedicated instrumentation and immuno-based microarray analytics. The bioanalytical platform consists of a microstructured polymer slide serving both as support of printed arrays and as incubation chamber. The platform further includes an easy-to-operate instrument for simultaneous slide processing at selectable assay temperature. Cy5 coupled streptavidin is used as unifying fluorescent tracer. Fluorescence image analysis and signal quantitation allow determination of the toxin’s identity and concentration. The system’s performance has been investigated by immunological detection of Botulinum Neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A, Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB, and the plant toxin ricin. Toxins were detectable at levels as low as 0.5–1 ng·mL−1 in buffer or in raw milk.

  10. Cellular vacuoles induced by Mycoplasma pneumoniae CARDS toxin originate from Rab9-associated compartments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coreen Johnson

    Full Text Available Recently, we identified an ADP-ribosylating and vacuolating cytotoxin in Mycoplasma pneumoniae designated Community Acquired Respiratory Distress Syndrome (CARDS toxin. In this study we show that vacuoles induced by recombinant CARDS (rCARDS toxin are acidic and derive from the endocytic pathway as determined by the uptake of neutral red and the fluid-phase marker, Lucifer yellow, respectively. Also, we demonstrate that the formation of rCARDS toxin-associated cytoplasmic vacuoles is inhibited by the vacuolar ATPase inhibitor, bafilomycin A1, and the ionophore, monensin. To examine the ontogeny of these vacuoles, we analyzed the distribution of endosomal and lysosomal membrane markers during vacuole formation and observed the enrichment of the late endosomal GTPase, Rab9, around rCARDS toxin-induced vacuoles. Immunogold-labeled Rab9 and overexpression of green fluorescent-tagged Rab9 further confirmed vacuolar association. The late endosomal- and lysosomal-associated membrane proteins, LAMP1 and LAMP2, also localized to the vacuolar membranes, while the late endosomal protein, Rab7, and early endosomal markers, Rab5 and EEA1, were excluded. HeLa cells expressing dominant-negative (DN Rab9 exhibited markedly reduced vacuole formation in the presence of rCARDS toxin, in contrast to cells expressing DN-Rab7, highlighting the importance of Rab9 function in rCARDS toxin-induced vacuolation. Our findings reveal the unique Rab9-association with rCARDS toxin-induced vacuoles and its possible relationship to the characteristic histopathology that accompanies M. pneumoniae infection.

  11. Evidences for involvement of endogenous cAMP in Arabidopsis defense responses to Verticillium toxins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing JIANG; Ling Wen FAN; Wei Hua WU

    2005-01-01

    Although there were reports suggesting the involvement of endogenous cAMP in plant defense signaling cascades,there is no direct evidence supporting this notion yet and the detailed mechanism is unclear. In the present study, we have used pathogenic fungi Verticillium dahliae and Arabidopsis plants as a model system of plant-microb interaction to demonstrate the function of endogenous cAMP in Arabidopsis defense responses. Both V. dahliae inoculation and Verticillium toxins injection induced typical "wilt" symptoms in Arabidopsis seedlings. When either 8-Br-AMP (a membrane permeable cAMP analogue) or salicylic acid (SA) was applied to Arabidopsis, the plants became resistant to V. dahliae toxins. However, addition of 8-Br-AMP did not increase the resistance of Arabidopsis transgenic plants deficient in SA to the toxins, suggesting that cAMP might act upstream of SA in plant defense signaling pathway.Indeed, 8-Br-cAMP and forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, significantly stimulated the endogenous SA level in plants, whereas DDA, an inhibitor of adenylyl cyclase dramatically reduced toxin-induced SA increase. Both the endogenous cAMP and SA increased significantly in Arabidopsis seedlings treated with toxins. Furthermore, transcription level of pathogenesis-related protein 1 gene (PR1) was strongly induced by both 8-Br-cAMP and the toxin treatment. Taken together, our data demonstrate that endogenous cAMP is involved in plant defense responses against Verticilliumsecreted toxins by regulating the production of the known signal SA in plant defense pathway.

  12. Marine toxins and their toxicological significance: An overview

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.

    , hemorrhagic toxin, hepatotoxin, nephrotoxins, presynaptic and postsynaptic neurotoxins, ion-channel and sodiumion binding toxins. It provides an insight into analytical techniques for isolation of toxins and their structural elucidation by different...

  13. Bacterial hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lauga, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass, and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micron scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically-complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, we review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  14. Staphylococcal β-Toxin Modulates Human Aortic Endothelial Cell and Platelet Function through Sphingomyelinase and Biofilm Ligase Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Alfa; Kulhankova, Katarina; Sonkar, Vijay K.; Dayal, Sanjana; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus causes many infections, such as skin and soft tissue, pneumonia, osteomyelitis, and infective endocarditis (IE). IE is an endovascular infection of native and prosthetic valves and the lining of the heart; it is characterized by the formation of cauliflower-like “vegetations” composed of fibrin, platelets, other host factors, bacteria, and bacterial products. β-Toxin is an S. aureus virulence factor that contributes to the microorganism’s ability to cause IE. This cytolysin has two enzymatic activities: sphingomyelinase (SMase) and biofilm ligase. Although both activities have functions in a rabbit model of IE, the mechanism(s) by which β-toxin directly affects human cells and is involved in the infectious process has not been elucidated. Here, we compared the in vitro effects of purified recombinant wild-type β-toxin, SMase-deficient β-toxin (H289N), and biofilm ligase-deficient β-toxin (H162A and/or D163A) on human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) and platelets. β-Toxin was cytotoxic to HAECs and inhibited the production of interleukin 8 (IL-8) from these cells by both SMase and biofilm ligase activities. β-Toxin altered HAEC surface expression of CD40 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1). HAECs treated with β-toxin displayed granular membrane morphology not seen in treatment with the SMase-deficient mutant. The altered morphology resulted in two possibly separable activities, cell rounding and redistribution of cell membranes into granules, which were not the result of endosome production from the Golgi apparatus or lysosomes. β-Toxin directly aggregated rabbit platelets via SMase activity. PMID:28325766

  15. Identification and validation of a linear protective neutralizing epitope in the β-pore domain of alpha toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Oscherwitz

    Full Text Available The plethora of virulence factors associated with Staphylococcus aureus make this bacterium an attractive candidate for a molecularly-designed epitope-focused vaccine. This approach, which necessitates the identification of neutralizing epitopes for incorporation into a vaccine construct, is being evaluated for pathogens where conventional approaches have failed to elicit protective humoral responses, like HIV-1 and malaria, but may also hold promise for pathogens like S. aureus, where the elicitation of humoral immunity against multiple virulence factors may be required for development of an effective vaccine. Among the virulence factors employed by S. aureus, animal model and epidemiological data suggest that alpha toxin, a multimeric β-pore forming toxin like protective antigen from Bacillus anthracis, is particularly critical, yet no candidate neutralizing epitopes have been delineated in alpha toxin to date. We have previously shown that a linear determinant in the 2β2-2β3 loop of the pore forming domain of B. anthracis protective antigen is a linear neutralizing epitope. Antibody against this site is highly potent for neutralizing anthrax lethal toxin in vitro and for protection of rabbits in vivo from virulent B. anthracis. We hypothesized that sequences in the β-pore of S. aureus alpha toxin that share structural and functional homology to β-pore sequences in protective antigen would contain a similarly critical neutralizing epitope. Using an in vivo mapping strategy employing peptide immunogens, an optimized in vitro toxin neutralization assay, and an in vivo dermonecrosis model, we have now confirmed the presence of this epitope in alpha toxin, termed the pore neutralizing determinant. Antibody specific for this determinant neutralizes alpha toxin in vitro, and is highly effective for mitigating dermonecrosis and bacterial growth in a mouse model of S. aureus USA300 skin infection. The delineation of this linear neutralizing

  16. Identification and validation of a linear protective neutralizing epitope in the β-pore domain of alpha toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscherwitz, Jon; Cease, Kemp B

    2015-01-01

    The plethora of virulence factors associated with Staphylococcus aureus make this bacterium an attractive candidate for a molecularly-designed epitope-focused vaccine. This approach, which necessitates the identification of neutralizing epitopes for incorporation into a vaccine construct, is being evaluated for pathogens where conventional approaches have failed to elicit protective humoral responses, like HIV-1 and malaria, but may also hold promise for pathogens like S. aureus, where the elicitation of humoral immunity against multiple virulence factors may be required for development of an effective vaccine. Among the virulence factors employed by S. aureus, animal model and epidemiological data suggest that alpha toxin, a multimeric β-pore forming toxin like protective antigen from Bacillus anthracis, is particularly critical, yet no candidate neutralizing epitopes have been delineated in alpha toxin to date. We have previously shown that a linear determinant in the 2β2-2β3 loop of the pore forming domain of B. anthracis protective antigen is a linear neutralizing epitope. Antibody against this site is highly potent for neutralizing anthrax lethal toxin in vitro and for protection of rabbits in vivo from virulent B. anthracis. We hypothesized that sequences in the β-pore of S. aureus alpha toxin that share structural and functional homology to β-pore sequences in protective antigen would contain a similarly critical neutralizing epitope. Using an in vivo mapping strategy employing peptide immunogens, an optimized in vitro toxin neutralization assay, and an in vivo dermonecrosis model, we have now confirmed the presence of this epitope in alpha toxin, termed the pore neutralizing determinant. Antibody specific for this determinant neutralizes alpha toxin in vitro, and is highly effective for mitigating dermonecrosis and bacterial growth in a mouse model of S. aureus USA300 skin infection. The delineation of this linear neutralizing determinant in alpha

  17. Structural and functional diversity of acidic scorpion potassium channel toxins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zong-Yun Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the basic scorpion K(+ channel toxins (KTxs are well-known pharmacological tools and potential drug candidates, characterization the acidic KTxs still has the great significance for their potential selectivity towards different K(+ channel subtypes. Unfortunately, research on the acidic KTxs has been ignored for several years and progressed slowly. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we describe the identification of nine new acidic KTxs by cDNA cloning and bioinformatic analyses. Seven of these toxins belong to three new α-KTx subfamilies (α-KTx28, α-KTx29, and α-KTx30, and two are new members of the known κ-KTx2 subfamily. ImKTx104 containing three disulfide bridges, the first member of the α-KTx28 subfamily, has a low sequence homology with other known KTxs, and its NMR structure suggests ImKTx104 adopts a modified cystine-stabilized α-helix-loop-β-sheet (CS-α/β fold motif that has no apparent α-helixs and β-sheets, but still stabilized by three disulfide bridges. These newly described acidic KTxs exhibit differential pharmacological effects on potassium channels. Acidic scorpion toxin ImKTx104 was the first peptide inhibitor found to affect KCNQ1 channel, which is insensitive to the basic KTxs and is strongly associated with human cardiac abnormalities. ImKTx104 selectively inhibited KCNQ1 channel with a K(d of 11.69 µM, but was less effective against the basic KTxs-sensitive potassium channels. In addition to the ImKTx104 toxin, HeTx204 peptide, containing a cystine-stabilized α-helix-loop-helix (CS-α/α fold scaffold motif, blocked both Kv1.3 and KCNQ1 channels. StKTx23 toxin, with a cystine-stabilized α-helix-loop-β-sheet (CS-α/β fold motif, could inhibit Kv1.3 channel, but not the KCNQ1 channel. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings characterize the structural and functional diversity of acidic KTxs, and could accelerate the development and clinical use of acidic KTxs as pharmacological tools and

  18. Cardiac-specific catalase overexpression rescues anthrax lethal toxin-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction: role of oxidative stress and autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandadi Machender R

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lethal and edema toxins secreted by Bacillus anthracis during anthrax infection were found to incite serious cardiovascular complications. However, the underlying mechanisms in anthrax lethal toxin-induced cardiac anomalies remain unknown. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of antioxidant enzyme catalase in anthrax lethal toxin-induced cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction. Methods Wild type (WT and cardiac-specific catalase overexpression mice were challenged with lethal toxin (2 μg/g, intraperotineally (i.p.. Cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca2+ properties were assessed 18 h later using an IonOptix edge-detection system. Proteasome function was assessed using chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like activities. GFP-LC3 puncta and Western blot analysis were used to evaluate autophagy and protein ubiquitination. Results Lethal toxin exposure suppressed cardiomyocyte contractile function (suppressed peak shortening, maximal velocity of shortening/re-lengthening, prolonged duration of shortening/re-lengthening, and impaired intracellular Ca2+ handling, the effects of which were alleviated by catalase. In addition, lethal toxin triggered autophagy, mitochondrial and ubiquitin-proteasome defects, the effects of which were mitigated by catalase. Pretreatment of cardiomyocytes from catalase mice with the autophagy inducer rapamycin significantly attenuated or ablated catalase-offered protection against lethal toxin-induced cardiomyocyte dysfunction. On the other hand, the autophagy inhibitor 3-MA ablated or significantly attenuated lethal toxin-induced cardiomyocyte contractile anomalies. Conclusions Our results suggest that catalase is protective against anthrax lethal toxin-induced cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca2+ anomalies, possibly through regulation of autophagy and mitochondrial function.

  19. Mapping of scorpion toxin receptor sites at voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevitz, Michael

    2012-09-15

    Scorpion alpha and beta toxins interact with voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(v)s) at two pharmacologically distinct sites. Alpha toxins bind at receptor site-3 and inhibit channel inactivation, whereas beta toxins bind at receptor site-4 and shift the voltage-dependent activation toward more hyperpolarizing potentials. The two toxin classes are subdivided to distinct pharmacological groups according to their binding preferences and ability to compete for the receptor sites at Na(v) subtypes. To elucidate the toxin-channel surface of interaction at both receptor sites and clarify the molecular basis of varying toxin preferences, an efficient bacterial system for their expression in recombinant form was established. Mutagenesis accompanied by toxicity, binding and electrophysiological assays, in parallel to determination of the three-dimensional structure using NMR and X-ray crystallography uncovered a bipartite bioactive surface in toxin representatives of all pharmacological groups. Exchange of external loops between the mammalian brain channel rNa(v)1.2a and the insect channel DmNa(v)1 highlighted channel regions involved in the varying sensitivity to assorted toxins. In parallel, thorough mutagenesis of channel external loops illuminated points of putative interaction with the toxins. Amino acid substitutions at external loops S1-S2 and S3-S4 of the voltage sensor module in domain II of rNa(v)1.2a had prominent impact on the activity of the beta-toxin Css4 (from Centruroides suffusus suffusus), and substitutions at external loops S1-S2 and S3-S4 of the voltage sensor module in domain IV affected the activity of the alpha-toxin Lqh2 (from Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus). Rosetta modeling of toxin-Na(v) interaction using the voltage sensor module of the potassium channel as template raises commonalities in the way alpha and beta toxins interact with the channel. Css4 interacts with rNa(v)1.2a at a crevice between S1-S2 and S3-S4 transmembrane segments in domain

  20. Synthesis and biology of cyclic imine toxins, an emerging class of potent, globally distributed marine toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stivala, Craig E; Benoit, Evelyne; Aráoz, Rómulo; Servent, Denis; Novikov, Alexei; Molgó, Jordi; Zakarian, Armen

    2015-03-01

    From a small group of exotic compounds isolated only two decades ago, Cyclic Imine (CI) toxins have become a major class of marine toxins with global distribution. Their distinct chemical structure, biological mechanism of action, and intricate chemistry ensures that CI toxins will continue to be the subject of fascinating fundamental studies in the broad fields of chemistry, chemical biology, and toxicology. The worldwide occurrence of potent CI toxins in marine environments, their accumulation in shellfish, and chemical stability are important considerations in assessing risk factors for human health. This review article aims to provide an account of chemistry, biology, and toxicology of CI toxins from their discovery to the present day.

  1. Staphylococcus hyicus exfoliative toxin: Purification and demonstration of antigenic diversity among toxins from virulent strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Lars Ole; Bille-Hansen, Vivi; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    1997-01-01

    of 0.5 mM CuSO4 to the purified toxin resulted in more intense skin alterations comparable to lesions caused by precipitated culture supernatant diluted 1:10. These results indicated that the activity of the exfoliative toxin was dependent on the presence of Cu2+. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies...... were prepared against the exfoliative toxin from strain 1289D-88. The in vivo activity of the exfoliative toxin could be neutralized by antibodies. It was shown that polyclonal as well as monoclonal antibodies only reacted with the toxin produced by two of nine well-defined virulent strains of S...

  2. Ligand-induced expansion of the S1' site in the anthrax toxin lethal factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maize, Kimberly M.; Kurbanov, Elbek K.; Johnson, Rodney L.; Amin, Elizabeth Ambrose; Finzel, Barry C. (UMM)

    2016-07-05

    The Bacillus anthracis lethal factor (LF) is one component of a tripartite exotoxin partly responsible for persistent anthrax cytotoxicity after initial bacterial infection. Inhibitors of the zinc metalloproteinase have been investigated as potential therapeutic agents, but LF is a challenging target because inhibitors lack sufficient selectivity or possess poor pharmaceutical properties. These structural studies reveal an alternate conformation of the enzyme, induced upon binding of specific inhibitors, that opens a previously unobserved deep pocket termed S1'* which might afford new opportunities to design selective inhibitors that target this subsite.

  3. Botulinum Toxin Injections: A Treatment for Muscle Spasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Health Resources Drugs, Procedures & Devices Procedures & Devices Botulinum Toxin Injections: A Treatment for Muscle Spasms Botulinum Toxin Injections: A Treatment for Muscle Spasms Drugs, Procedures & ...

  4. Bacterial colonization of host cells in the absence of cholesterol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey D Gilk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reports implicating important roles for cholesterol and cholesterol-rich lipid rafts in host-pathogen interactions have largely employed sterol sequestering agents and biosynthesis inhibitors. Because the pleiotropic effects of these compounds can complicate experimental interpretation, we developed a new model system to investigate cholesterol requirements in pathogen infection utilizing DHCR24(-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs. DHCR24(-/- MEFs lack the Δ24 sterol reductase required for the final enzymatic step in cholesterol biosynthesis, and consequently accumulate desmosterol into cellular membranes. Defective lipid raft function by DHCR24(-/- MEFs adapted to growth in cholesterol-free medium was confirmed by showing deficient uptake of cholera-toxin B and impaired signaling by epidermal growth factor. Infection in the absence of cholesterol was then investigated for three intracellular bacterial pathogens: Coxiella burnetii, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Chlamydia trachomatis. Invasion by S. Typhimurium and C. trachomatis was unaltered in DHCR24(-/- MEFs. In contrast, C. burnetii entry was significantly decreased in -cholesterol MEFs, and also in +cholesterol MEFs when lipid raft-associated α(Vβ(3 integrin was blocked, suggesting a role for lipid rafts in C. burnetii uptake. Once internalized, all three pathogens established their respective vacuolar niches and replicated normally. However, the C. burnetii-occupied vacuole within DHCR24(-/- MEFs lacked the CD63-positive material and multilamellar membranes typical of vacuoles formed in wild type cells, indicating cholesterol functions in trafficking of multivesicular bodies to the pathogen vacuole. These data demonstrate that cholesterol is not essential for invasion and intracellular replication by S. Typhimurium and C. trachomatis, but plays a role in C. burnetii-host cell interactions.

  5. Protein C Inhibitor-A Novel Antimicrobial Agent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malmström, E.; Mörgelin, M.; Malmsten, M.; Johansson, L.; Norrby-Teglund, A.; Shannon, O.; Schmidtchen, A.; Meijers, J.C.M.; Herwald, H.

    2009-01-01

    Protein C inhibitor (PCI) is a heparin-binding serine proteinase inhibitor belonging to the family of serpin proteins. Here we describe that PCI exerts broad antimicrobial activity against bacterial pathogens. This ability is mediated by the interaction of PCI with lipid membranes, which subsequentl

  6. NMR detection of slow conformational dynamics in an endonuclease toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittaker, Sara B.-M.; Boetzel, Ruth; MacDonald, Colin [University of East Anglia, School of Chemical Sciences (United Kingdom); Lian Luyun [Leicester University, Biological NMR Centre (United Kingdom); Pommer, Ansgar J. [University of East Anglia, School of Biological Sciences (United Kingdom); Reilly, Ann; James, Richard; Kleanthous, Colin [Leicester University, Biological NMR Centre (United Kingdom); Moore, Geoffrey R. [University of East Anglia, School of Chemical Sciences (United Kingdom)

    1998-07-15

    The cytotoxic activity of the secreted bacterial toxin colicin E9 is due to a non-specific DNase housed in the C-terminus of the protein. Double-resonance and triple-resonance NMR studies of the 134-amino acid{sup 15} N- and {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labelled DNase domain are presented. Extensive conformational heterogeneity was evident from the presence of far more resonances than expected based on the amino acid sequence of the DNase, and from the appearance of chemical exchange cross-peaks in TOCSY and NOESY spectra. EXSY spectra were recorded to confirm that slow chemical exchange was occurring. Unambiguous sequence-specific resonance assignments are presented for one region of the protein, Pro{sup 65}-Asn{sup 72}, which exists in two slowly exchanging conformers based on the identification of chemical exchange cross-peaks in 3D {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H-{sup 15}N EXSY-HSQC, NOESY-HSQC and TOCSY-HSQC spectra, together with C{sup {alpha}} and C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts measured in triple-resonance spectra and sequential NH NOEs. The rates of conformational exchange for backbone amide resonances in this stretch of amino acids, and for the indole NH of either Trp{sup 22} or Trp{sup 58}, were determined from the intensity variation of the appropriate diagonal and chemical exchange cross-peaks recorded in 3D{sup 1} H-{sup 1}H-{sup 15}N NOESY-HSQC spectra. The data fitted a model in which this region of the DNase has two conformers, N{sub A} and N{sub B}, which interchange at 15 {sup o}C with a forward rate constant of 1.61 {+-} 0.5 s{sup -1} and a backward rate constant of 1.05 {+-} 0.5 s{sup -1}. Demonstration of this conformational equilibrium has led to a reappraisal of a previously proposed kinetic scheme describing the interaction of E9 DNase with immunity proteins [Wallis et al. (1995) Biochemistry, 34, 13743-13750 and 13751-13759]. The revised scheme is consistent with the specific inhibitor protein for the E9 DNase, Im9, associating with both the N{sub A} and N{sub B

  7. Kunitz Trypsin Inhibitor: An Antagonist of Cell Death Triggered by Phytopathogens and Fumonisin B1 in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Li; Günter Brader; E. Tapio Palva

    2008-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a central regulatory process in both plant development and in plant responses to pathogens. PCD requires a coordinate activation of pro-apoptotic factors such as proteases and suppressors inhibiting and modulating these processes. In plants, various caspase-like cysteine proteases as well as serine proteases have been implicated in PCD. Here, we show that a serine protease (Kunitz trypsin) inhibitor (KTI1) of Arabidopsis acts as a functional KTI when produced in bacteria and in planta. Expression of AtKTI1 is induced late in response to bacterial and fungal elicitors and to salicylic acid. RNAi silencing of the AtKTI1 gene results in enhanced lesion development after infiltration of leaf tissue with the PCD-eliciting fungal toxin fumonisin B1 (FB1) or the avirulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 carrying avrB (Pst avrB). Overexpression of AtKTI1 results in reduced lesion development after Pst avrB and FB1 infiltration. Interestingly, RNAi silencing of AtKTI1 leads to enhanced resistance to the virulent pathogen Erwinia carotovora subsp, carotovora SCC1, while overexpression of AtKTI1 leads to higher susceptibility towards this pathogen. Together, these data indicate that AtKTI1 is involved in modulating PCD in plant-pathogen interactions.

  8. Secreted bacterial effectors that inhibit host protein synthesis are critical for induction of the innate immune response to virulent Legionella pneumophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary F Fontana

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The intracellular bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila causes an inflammatory pneumonia called Legionnaires' Disease. For virulence, L. pneumophila requires a Dot/Icm type IV secretion system that translocates bacterial effectors to the host cytosol. L. pneumophila lacking the Dot/Icm system is recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLRs, leading to a canonical NF-κB-dependent transcriptional response. In addition, L. pneumophila expressing a functional Dot/Icm system potently induces unique transcriptional targets, including proinflammatory genes such as Il23a and Csf2. Here we demonstrate that this Dot/Icm-dependent response, which we term the effector-triggered response (ETR, requires five translocated bacterial effectors that inhibit host protein synthesis. Upon infection of macrophages with virulent L. pneumophila, these five effectors caused a global decrease in host translation, thereby preventing synthesis of IκB, an inhibitor of the NF-κB transcription factor. Thus, macrophages infected with wildtype L. pneumophila exhibited prolonged activation of NF-κB, which was associated with transcription of ETR target genes such as Il23a and Csf2. L. pneumophila mutants lacking the five effectors still activated TLRs and NF-κB, but because the mutants permitted normal IκB synthesis, NF-κB activation was more transient and was not sufficient to fully induce the ETR. L. pneumophila mutants expressing enzymatically inactive effectors were also unable to fully induce the ETR, whereas multiple compounds or bacterial toxins that inhibit host protein synthesis via distinct mechanisms recapitulated the ETR when administered with TLR ligands. Previous studies have demonstrated that the host response to bacterial infection is induced primarily by specific microbial molecules that activate TLRs or cytosolic pattern recognition receptors. Our results add to this model by providing a striking illustration of how the host immune response to a virulent

  9. Combination treatments with the PKC inhibitor, enzastaurin, enhance the cytotoxicity of the anti-mesothelin immunotoxin, SS1P.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abid R Mattoo

    Full Text Available Activated protein kinase C (PKC contributes to tumor survival and proliferation, provoking the development of inhibitory agents as potential cancer therapeutics. Immunotoxins are antibody-based recombinant proteins that employ antibody fragments for cancer targeting and bacterial toxins as the cytotoxic agent. Pseudomonas exotoxin-based immunotoxins act via the ADP-ribosylation of EF2 leading to the enzymatic inhibition of protein synthesis. Combining PKC inhibitors with the immunotoxin SS1P, targeted to surface mesothelin, was undertaken to explore possible therapeutic strategies. Enzastaurin but not two other PKC inhibitors combined with SS1P to produce synergistic cell death via apoptosis. Mechanistic insights of the synergistic killing centered on the complete loss of the prosurvival Bcl2 protein, Mcl-1, the loss of AKT and the activation of caspase 3/7. Synergy was most evident when cells exhibited resistance to the immunotoxin alone. Further, because PKC inhibition by itself was not sufficient to enhance SS1P action, enzastaurin must target other kinases that are involved in the immunotoxin pathway.

  10. Botulinum toxin — therapeutic effect in cosmetology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morrison A.V.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This review presents the data from published literatures and the research works conducted by the authors about mechanisms of action of botulinum toxin and its use in the practical medicine (particularly in dermatology and cosmetology. Indications and contraindications of botulinum toxin use in cosmetology are also considered in this work.

  11. Toxin-Antitoxin Battle in Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cataudella, Ilaria

    This PhD thesis consists of three research projects revolving around the common thread of investigation of the properties and biological functions of Toxin-Antitoxin loci. Toxin-Antitoxin (TA) loci are transcriptionally regulated via an auto-inhibition mechanism called conditional cooperativity, ...

  12. Target-Driven Evolution of Scorpion Toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shangfei; Gao, Bin; Zhu, Shunyi

    2015-10-07

    It is long known that peptide neurotoxins derived from a diversity of venomous animals evolve by positive selection following gene duplication, yet a force that drives their adaptive evolution remains a mystery. By using maximum-likelihood models of codon substitution, we analyzed molecular adaptation in scorpion sodium channel toxins from a specific species and found ten positively selected sites, six of which are located at the core-domain of scorpion α-toxins, a region known to interact with two adjacent loops in the voltage-sensor domain (DIV) of sodium channels, as validated by our newly constructed computational model of toxin-channel complex. Despite the lack of positive selection signals in these two loops, they accumulated extensive sequence variations by relaxed purifying selection in prey and predators of scorpions. The evolutionary variability in the toxin-bound regions of sodium channels indicates that accelerated substitutions in the multigene family of scorpion toxins is a consequence of dealing with the target diversity. This work presents an example of atypical co-evolution between animal toxins and their molecular targets, in which toxins suffered from more prominent selective pressure from the channels of their competitors. Our discovery helps explain the evolutionary rationality of gene duplication of toxins in a specific venomous species.

  13. [Axillary hyperhidrosis, botulinium A toxin treatment: Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerico, C; Fernandez, J; Camuzard, O; Chignon-Sicard, B; Ihrai, T

    2016-02-01

    Injection of type A botulinum toxin in the armpits is a temporary treatment for axillary hyperhidrosis. This technique described in 1996 by Bushara et al., is known to be efficient and safe. The purpose of this article was to review the data concerning the treatment of axillary hyperhidrosis with botulinum toxin type A, and discuss the other treatment modalities for this socially disabling entity.

  14. Presence of Clostridium botulinum and botulinum toxin in milk and udder tissue of dairy cows with suspected botulism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhnel, H; Gessler, F

    2013-04-13

    Clostridium botulinum is an anaerobic spore-forming bacterium prevalent in the environment, and causes botulism in man and animals via toxins. Dairy cattle may be contaminated or infected by feed, water or other environmental factors. Milk may also carry the pathogen. Hence, milk and udder samples need to be tested. The number of clinical cases of bovine botulism in Germany has been increasing since the mid-1990s. Besides routine samples, additional 99 milk samples from 37 farms, and 51 udder samples from 51 farms from sick animals presumably affected by botulism were tested microbiologically by the mouse bioassay. Milk from three farms (8.1 per cent) contained botulinum toxin, and from two (5.4 per cent) bacterial states of C botulinum. Ten udder samples (19.6 per cent) contained toxin, and 7 (13.7 per cent) bacterial forms, including one case where both toxin and bacteria were found. The findings are discussed. Positive milk samples containing botulinum toxin or bacteria raise concern of food safety for the human consumer. Pathological udder samples may show either infection prior to, or contamination after death.

  15. Bacterial vaginosis -- aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000687.htm Bacterial vaginosis - aftercare To use the sharing features on this ... to back after you use the bathroom. Preventing Bacterial Vaginosis You can help prevent bacterial vaginosis by: Not ...

  16. Pregnancy Complications: Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please ... this page It's been added to your dashboard . Bacterial vaginosis (also called BV or vaginitis) is an infection ...

  17. Measuring Immunoglobulin G Antibodies to Tetanus Toxin, Diphtheria Toxin, and Pertussis Toxin with Single-Antigen Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays and a Bead-Based Multiplex Assay▿

    OpenAIRE

    Reder, Sabine; Riffelmann, Marion; Becker, Christian; Wirsing von König, Carl Heinz

    2008-01-01

    Bead-based assay systems offer the possibility of measuring several specific antibodies in one sample simultaneously. This study evaluated a vaccine panel of a multianalyte system that measures antibodies to tetanus toxin, diphtheria toxin, and pertussis toxin (PT) from Bordetella pertussis. The antibody concentrations of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) to PT, tetanus toxin, and diphtheria toxin were measured in 123 serum pairs (total of 246 sera) from a vaccine study. The multianalyte bead assa...

  18. Polymorphic toxin systems: Comprehensive characterization of trafficking modes, processing, mechanisms of action, immunity and ecology using comparative genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Dapeng

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteinaceous toxins are observed across all levels of inter-organismal and intra-genomic conflicts. These include recently discovered prokaryotic polymorphic toxin systems implicated in intra-specific conflicts. They are characterized by a remarkable diversity of C-terminal toxin domains generated by recombination with standalone toxin-coding cassettes. Prior analysis revealed a striking diversity of nuclease and deaminase domains among the toxin modules. We systematically investigated polymorphic toxin systems using comparative genomics, sequence and structure analysis. Results Polymorphic toxin systems are distributed across all major bacterial lineages and are delivered by at least eight distinct secretory systems. In addition to type-II, these include type-V, VI, VII (ESX, and the poorly characterized “Photorhabdus virulence cassettes (PVC”, PrsW-dependent and MuF phage-capsid-like systems. We present evidence that trafficking of these toxins is often accompanied by autoproteolytic processing catalyzed by HINT, ZU5, PrsW, caspase-like, papain-like, and a novel metallopeptidase associated with the PVC system. We identified over 150 distinct toxin domains in these systems. These span an extraordinary catalytic spectrum to include 23 distinct clades of peptidases, numerous previously unrecognized versions of nucleases and deaminases, ADP-ribosyltransferases, ADP ribosyl cyclases, RelA/SpoT-like nucleotidyltransferases, glycosyltranferases and other enzymes predicted to modify lipids and carbohydrates, and a pore-forming toxin domain. Several of these toxin domains are shared with host-directed effectors of pathogenic bacteria. Over 90 families of immunity proteins might neutralize anywhere between a single to at least 27 distinct types of toxin domains. In some organisms multiple tandem immunity genes or immunity protein domains are organized into polyimmunity loci or polyimmunity proteins. Gene-neighborhood-analysis of

  19. Staphylococcus epidermidis Antimicrobial δ-Toxin (Phenol-Soluble Modulin-γ) Cooperates with Host Antimicrobial Peptides to Kill Group A Streptococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogen, Anna L.; Yamasaki, Kenshi; Muto, Jun; Sanchez, Katheryn M.; Crotty Alexander, Laura; Tanios, Jackelyn; Lai, Yuping; Kim, Judy E.; Nizet, Victor; Gallo, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides play an important role in host defense against pathogens. Recently, phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) from Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) were shown to interact with lipid membranes, form complexes, and exert antimicrobial activity. Based on the abundance and innocuity of the cutaneous resident S. epidermidis, we hypothesized that their PSMs contribute to host defense. Here we show that S. epidermidis δ-toxin (PSMγ) is normally present in the epidermis and sparsely in the dermis of human skin using immunohistochemistry. Synthetic δ-toxin interacted with neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and colocalized with cathelicidin while also inducing NET formation in human neutrophils. In antimicrobial assays against Group A Streptococcus (GAS), δ-toxin cooperated with CRAMP, hBD2, and hBD3. In whole blood, addition of δ-toxin exerted a bacteriostatic effect on GAS, and in NETs, δ-toxin increased their killing capacity against this pathogen. Coimmunoprecipitation and tryptophan spectroscopy demonstrated direct binding of δ-toxin to host antimicrobial peptides LL-37, CRAMP, hBD2, and hBD3. Finally, in a mouse wound model, GAS survival was reduced (along with Mip-2 cytokine levels) when the wounds were pretreated with δ-toxin. Thus, these data suggest that S. epidermidis–derived δ-toxin cooperates with the host-derived antimicrobial peptides in the innate immune system to reduce survival of an important human bacterial pathogen. PMID:20052280

  20. Staphylococcus epidermidis antimicrobial delta-toxin (phenol-soluble modulin-gamma cooperates with host antimicrobial peptides to kill group A Streptococcus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna L Cogen

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides play an important role in host defense against pathogens. Recently, phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs from Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis were shown to interact with lipid membranes, form complexes, and exert antimicrobial activity. Based on the abundance and innocuity of the cutaneous resident S. epidermidis, we hypothesized that their PSMs contribute to host defense. Here we show that S. epidermidis delta-toxin (PSMgamma is normally present in the epidermis and sparsely in the dermis of human skin using immunohistochemistry. Synthetic delta-toxin interacted with neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs and colocalized with cathelicidin while also inducing NET formation in human neutrophils. In antimicrobial assays against Group A Streptococcus (GAS, delta-toxin cooperated with CRAMP, hBD2, and hBD3. In whole blood, addition of delta-toxin exerted a bacteriostatic effect on GAS, and in NETs, delta-toxin increased their killing capacity against this pathogen. Coimmunoprecipitation and tryptophan spectroscopy demonstrated direct binding of delta-toxin to host antimicrobial peptides LL-37, CRAMP, hBD2, and hBD3. Finally, in a mouse wound model, GAS survival was reduced (along with Mip-2 cytokine levels when the wounds were pretreated with delta-toxin. Thus, these data suggest that S. epidermidis-derived delta-toxin cooperates with the host-derived antimicrobial peptides in the innate immune system to reduce survival of an important human bacterial pathogen.

  1. Mass Spectrometry-Based Method of Detecting and Distinguishing Type 1 and Type 2 Shiga-Like Toxins in Human Serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Christopher J; Erickson-Beltran, Melissa L; Skinner, Craig B; Patfield, Stephanie A; He, Xiaohua

    2015-12-02

    Shiga-like toxins (verotoxins) are responsible for the virulence associated with a variety of foodborne bacterial pathogens. Direct detection of toxins requires a specific and sensitive technique. In this study, we describe a mass spectrometry-based method of analyzing the tryptic decapeptides derived from the non-toxic B subunits. A gene encoding a single protein that yields a set of relevant peptides upon digestion with trypsin was designed. The (15)N-labeled protein was prepared by growing the expressing bacteria in minimal medium supplemented with (15)NH₄Cl. Trypsin digestion of the (15)N-labeled protein yields a set of (15)N-labeled peptides for use as internal standards to identify and quantify Shiga or Shiga-like toxins. We determined that this approach can be used to detect, quantify and distinguish among the known Shiga toxins (Stx) and Shiga-like toxins (Stx1 and Stx2) in the low attomole range (per injection) in complex media, including human serum. Furthermore, Stx1a could be detected and distinguished from the newly identified Stx1e in complex media. As new Shiga-like toxins are identified, this approach can be readily modified to detect them. Since intact toxins are digested with trypsin prior to analysis, the handling of intact Shiga toxins is minimized. The analysis can be accomplished within 5 h.

  2. Clostridium botulinum Type E Toxins Bind to Caco-2 Cells by a Different Mechanism from That of Type A Toxins

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    Zhang,Kai

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Cultured Clostridium botulinum strains produce progenitor toxins designated as 12S, 16S, and 19S toxins. The 12S toxin consists of a neurotoxin (NTX, 7S and a non-toxic non-hemagglutinin (NTNH. The 16S and 19S toxins are formed by conjugation of the 12S toxin with hemagglutinin (HA, and the 19S toxin is a dimer of the 16S toxin. Type A cultures produce all 3 of these progenitor toxins, while type E produces only the 12S toxin. The 7S toxin is cleaved into heavy (H and light (L chains by a protease(s in some strains, and the H chain has 2 domains, the N-terminus (Hn and C-terminus (Hc. It has been reported that type A toxins bind to the intestinal cells or cultured cells via either HA or Hc. In this study, we investigated the binding of type A and E toxins to Caco-2 cells using Western blot analysis. Both the type E 7S and 12S toxins bound to the cells, with the 7S toxin binding more strongly, whereas, in the type A strain, only the 16S/19S toxins showed obvious binding. Pre-incubation of the type E 7S toxin with IgG against recombinant type E Hc significantly inhibited the 7S toxin binding, indicating that Hc might be a main binding domain of the type E toxin.

  3. Toxins and Secretion Systems of Photorhabdus luminescens

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    Athina Rodou

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Photorhabdus luminescens is a nematode-symbiotic, gram negative, bioluminescent bacterium, belonging to the family of Enterobacteriaceae.Recent studies show the importance of this bacterium as an alternative source of insecticides, as well as an emerging human pathogen. Various toxins have been identified and characterized in this bacterium. These toxins are classified into four major groups: the toxin complexes (Tcs, the Photorhabdus insect related (Pir proteins, the “makes caterpillars floppy” (Mcf toxins and the Photorhabdus virulence cassettes (PVC; the mechanisms however of toxin secretion are not fully elucidated. Using bioinformatics analysis and comparison against the components of known secretion systems, multiple copies of components of all known secretion systems, except the ones composing a type IV secretion system, were identified throughout the entire genome of the bacterium. This indicates that Photorhabdus luminescens has all the necessary means for the secretion of virulence factors, thus it is capable of establishing a microbial infection.

  4. Molecular cloning, bioinformatics analysis and functional characterization of HWTX-XI toxin superfamily from the spider Ornithoctonus huwena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liping; Deng, Meichun; Duan, Zhigui; Tang, Xing; Liang, Songping

    2014-04-01

    Spider venom contains a very valuable repertoire of natural resources to discover novel components for molecular diversity analyses and therapeutic applications. In this study, HWTX-XI toxins from the spider venom glands of Ornithoctonus huwena which are Kunitz-type toxins (KTTs) and were directly cloned, analyzed and functionally characterized. To date, the HWTX-XI superfamily consists of 38 members deduced from 121 high-quality expressed sequence tags, which is the largest spider KTT superfamily with significant molecular diversity mainly resulted from cDNA tandem repeats as well as focal hypermutation. Among them, HW11c40 and HW11c50 may be intermediate variants between native Kunitz toxins and sub-Kunitz toxins based on evolutionary analyses. In order to elucidate their biological activities, recombinant HW11c4, HW11c24, HW11c27 and HW11c39 were successfully expressed, further purified and functionally characterized. Both HW11c4 and HW11c27 display inhibitory activities against trypsin, chymotrypsin and kallikrein. Moreover, HW11c4 is also an inhibitor relatively specific for Kv1.1 channels. HW11c24 and HW11c39 are found to be inactive on chymotrysin, trypsin, kallikrein, thrombin and ion channels. These findings provide molecular evidence for toxin diversification of the HWTX-XI superfamily and useful molecular templates of serine protease inhibitors and ion channel blockers for the development of potentially clinical applications.

  5. Future of Bacterial Therapy of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial therapy of cancer has a centuries-long history and was first-line therapy at the hospital in New York City that would become Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, under Dr. William B. Coley. However, after Coley's death in 1936, bacterial therapy of cancer ceased in the clinic until the present century. Clinical trials have been recently carried out for strains of the obligate anaerobe Clostridium novyi with the toxin gene deleted, and on an attenuated strain of Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium), which is a facultative anaerobe that can grow in viable, as well as necrotic, areas of tumors, unlike Clostridium, which can only grow in the hypoxic areas. Our laboratory has developed the novel strain S. typhimurium A1-R that is effective against all tumor types in clinically-relevant mouse models, including patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) mouse models. This chapter suggests future clinical applications for S. typhimurium A1-R.

  6. Structure and operation of bacterial tripartite pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchliffe, Philip; Symmons, Martyn F; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2013-01-01

    In bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, tripartite membrane machineries, or pumps, determine the efflux of small noxious molecules, such as detergents, heavy metals, and antibiotics, and the export of large proteins including toxins. They are therefore influential in bacterial survival, particularly during infections caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens. In these tripartite pumps an inner membrane transporter, typically an ATPase or proton antiporter, binds and translocates export or efflux substrates. In cooperation with a periplasmic adaptor protein it recruits and opens a TolC family cell exit duct, which is anchored in the outer membrane and projects across the periplasmic space between inner and outer membranes. Assembled tripartite pumps thus span the entire bacterial cell envelope. We review the atomic structures of each of the three pump components and discuss how these have allowed high-resolution views of tripartite pump assembly, operation, and possible inhibition.

  7. Bacteriocin-Mediated Competitive Interactions of Bacterial Populations and Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Margaret A.

    Explaining the coexistence of competing species is a major challenge in community ecology. In bacterial systems, competition is often driven by the production of bacteriocins; narrow spectrum proteinaceous toxins that serve to kill closely related species providing the producer better access to limited resources. Bacteriocin producers have been shown to competitively exclude sensitive, nonproducing strains. However, the interaction dynamics between bacteriocin producers, each lethal to its competitor, are largely unknown. Several recent studies have revealed some of the complexity of these interactions, employing a suite of in vitro, in vivo, and in silico bacterial model systems. This chapter describes the current state of knowledge regarding the population and community ecology of this potent family of toxins.

  8. SINGLE CHAIN VARIABLE FRAGMENTS OF ANTIBODIES AGAINST DIPHTHERIA TOXIN B-SUBUNIT ISOLATED FROM PHAGE DISPLAY HUMAN ANTIBODY LIBRARY

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    Oliinyk O. S.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Diphtheria toxin is an exoantigen of Corynebacterium diphtheriae that inhibits protein synthesis and kills sensitive cells. The aim of this study was to obtain human recombinant single-chain variable fragment (scFv antibodies against receptor-binding B subunit of diphtheria toxin. 12 specific clones were selected after three rounds of a phage display naїve (unimmunized human antibody library against recombinant B-subunit. scFv DNA inserts from these 12 clones were digested with MvaI, and 6 unique restriction patterns were found. Single-chain antibodies were expressed in Escherichia coli XL1-blue. The recombinant proteins were characterized by immunoblotting of bacterial extracts and detection with an anti-E-tag antibody. The toxin B-subunit-binding function of the single-chain antibody was shown by ELISA. The affinity constants for different clones were found to be from 106 to 108 М–1. Due to the fact, that these antibody fragments recognized epitopes in the receptor-binding Bsubunit of diphtheria toxin, further studies are interesting to evaluate their toxin neutralization properties and potential for therapeutic applications. Obtained scFv-antibodies can also be used for detection and investigation of biological properties of diphtheria toxin.

  9. An Aromatic Hydroxyamide Attenuates Multiresistant Staphylococcus aureus Toxin Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vomacka, Jan; Korotkov, Vadim S; Bauer, Bianca; Weinandy, Franziska; Kunzmann, Martin H; Krysiak, Joanna; Baron, Oliver; Böttcher, Thomas; Lorenz-Baath, Katrin; Sieber, Stephan A

    2016-01-26

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) causes severe infections with only few effective antibiotic therapies currently available. To approach this challenge, chemical entities with a novel and resistance-free mode of action are desperately needed. Here, we introduce a new hydroxyamide compound that effectively reduces the expression of devastating toxins in various S. aureus and MRSA strains. The molecular mechanism was investigated by transcriptome analysis as well as by affinity-based protein profiling. Down-regulation of several pathogenesis associated genes suggested the inhibition of a central virulence-related pathway. Mass spectrometry-based chemical proteomics revealed putative molecular targets. Systemic treatment with the hydroxyamide showed significant reduction of abscess sizes in a MRSA mouse skin infection model. The absence of resistance development in vitro further underlines the finding that targeting virulence could lead to prolonged therapeutic options in comparison to antibiotics that directly address bacterial survival.

  10. Structure of the yellow sac spider Cheiracanthium punctorium genes provides clues to evolution of insecticidal two-domain knottin toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachkova, M Y; Slavokhotova, A A; Grishin, E V; Vassilevski, A A

    2014-08-01

    Yellow sac spiders (Cheiracanthium punctorium, family Miturgidae) are unique in terms of venom composition, because, as we show here, two-domain toxins have replaced the usual one-domain peptides as the major constituents. We report the structure of the two-domain Che. punctorium toxins (CpTx), along with the corresponding cDNA and genomic DNA sequences. At least three groups of insecticidal CpTx were identified, each consisting of several members. Unlike many cone snail and snake toxins, accelerated evolution is not typical of cptx genes, which instead appear to be under the pressure of purifying selection. Both CpTx modules present the inhibitor cystine knot (ICK), or knottin signature; however, the sequence similarity between the domains is low. Conversely, notable similarity was found between separate domains of CpTx and one-domain toxins from spiders of the Lycosidae family. The observed chimerism is a landmark of exon shuffling events, but in contrast to many families of multidomain protein genes no introns were found in the cptx genes. Considering the possible scenarios, we suggest that an early transcription-mediated fusion event between two related one-domain toxin genes led to the emergence of a primordial cptx-like sequence. We conclude that evolution of toxin variability in spiders appears to be quite different from other venomous animals.

  11. Atypical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Secretes Plasmid Encoded Toxin

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    Rita C. Ruiz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasmid encoded toxin (Pet is a serine protease originally described in enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC prototype strain 042 whose entire characterization was essentially obtained from studies performed with the purified toxin. Here we show that Pet is not exclusive to EAEC. Atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC strains, isolated from diarrhea cases, express Pet and its detection in supernatants of infected HEp-2 cells coincides with the appearance of cell damage, which, in turn, were similar to those described with purified Pet. Pet secretion and the cytotoxic effects are time and culture medium dependent. In presence of DMEM supplemented with tryptone cell rounding and detachment were observed after just 5 h of incubation with the bacteria. In the absence of tryptone, the cytotoxic effects were detected only after 24 h of infection. We also show that, in addition to the prototype EAEC, other pet+ EAEC strains, also isolated from diarrhea cases, induce cellular damage in the same degree as the aEPEC. The cytotoxic effects of EAEC and aEPEC strains were significantly reduced in the presence of a serine protease inhibitor or anti-Pet IgG serum. Our results show a common aspect between the aEPEC and EAEC and provide the first evidence pointing to a role of Pet in aEPEC pathogenesis.

  12. The pore-forming toxin proaerolysin is activated by furin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrami, L; Fivaz, M; Decroly, E; Seidah, N G; Jean, F; Thomas, G; Leppla, S H; Buckley, J T; van der Goot, F G

    1998-12-04

    Aerolysin is secreted as an inactive dimeric precursor by the bacterium Aeromonas hydrophila. Proteolytic cleavage within a mobile loop near the C terminus of the protoxin is required for oligomerization and channel formation. This loop contains the sequence KVRRAR432, which should be recognized by mammalian proprotein convertases such as furin, PACE4, and PC5/6A. Here we show that these three proteases cleave proaerolysin after Arg-432 in vitro, yielding active toxin. We also investigated the potential role of these enzymes in the in vivo activation of the protoxin. We found that Chinese hamster ovary cells were able to convert the protoxin to aerolysin in the absence of exogenous proteases and that activation did not require internalization of the toxin. The furin inhibitor alpha1-antitrypsin Portland reduced the rate of proaerolysin activation in vivo, and proaerolysin processing was even further reduced in furin-deficient FD11 Chinese hamster ovary cells. The cells were also less sensitive to proaerolysin than wild type cells; however, transient transfection of FD11 cells with the cDNA encoding furin conferred normal sensitivity to the protoxin. Together these findings argue that furin catalyzes the cell-surface activation of proaerolysin in vivo.

  13. P2X7 receptors mediate resistance to toxin-induced cell lysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenauer, Roman; Atanassoff, Alexander P; Wolfmeier, Heidi; Pelegrin, Pablo; Babiychuk, Eduard B; Draeger, Annette

    2014-05-01

    In the majority of cells, the integrity of the plasmalemma is recurrently compromised by mechanical or chemical stress. Serum complement or bacterial pore-forming toxins can perforate the plasma membrane provoking uncontrolled Ca(2+) influx, loss of cytoplasmic constituents and cell lysis. Plasmalemmal blebbing has previously been shown to protect cells against bacterial pore-forming toxins. The activation of the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R), an ATP-gated trimeric membrane cation channel, triggers Ca(2+) influx and induces blebbing. We have investigated the role of the P2X7R as a regulator of plasmalemmal protection after toxin-induced membrane perforation caused by bacterial streptolysin O (SLO). Our results show that the expression and activation of the P2X7R furnishes cells with an increased chance of surviving attacks by SLO. This protective effect can be demonstrated not only in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK) cells transfected with the P2X7R, but also in human mast cells (HMC-1), which express the receptor endogenously. In addition, this effect is abolished by treatment with blebbistatin or A-438079, a selective P2X7R antagonist. Thus blebbing, which is elicited by the ATP-mediated, paracrine activation of the P2X7R, is part of a cellular non-immune defense mechanism. It pre-empts plasmalemmal damage and promotes cellular survival. This mechanism is of considerable importance for cells of the immune system which carry the P2X7R and which are specifically exposed to toxin attacks.

  14. A Simple Model for Assessment of Anti-Toxin Antibodies

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    Alex Skvortsov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The toxins associated with infectious diseases are potential targets for inhibitors which have the potential for prophylactic or therapeutic use. Many antibodies have been generated for this purpose, and the objective of this study was to develop a simple mathematical model that may be used to evaluate the potential protective effect of antibodies. This model was used to evaluate the contributions of antibody affinity and concentration to reducing antibody-receptor complex formation and internalization. The model also enables prediction of the antibody kinetic constants and concentration required to provide a specified degree of protection. We hope that this model, once validated experimentally, will be a useful tool for in vitro selection of potentially protective antibodies for progression to in vivo evaluation.

  15. A Simple Model for Assessment of Anti-Toxin Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skvortsov, Alex; Gray, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The toxins associated with infectious diseases are potential targets for inhibitors which have the potential for prophylactic or therapeutic use. Many antibodies have been generated for this purpose, and the objective of this study was to develop a simple mathematical model that may be used to evaluate the potential protective effect of antibodies. This model was used to evaluate the contributions of antibody affinity and concentration to reducing antibody-receptor complex formation and internalization. The model also enables prediction of the antibody kinetic constants and concentration required to provide a specified degree of protection. We hope that this model, once validated experimentally, will be a useful tool for in vitro selection of potentially protective antibodies for progression to in vivo evaluation. PMID:23862138

  16. Single toxin dose-response models revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaholt, SP; Kyker-Snowman, E; Shaw, JR; Chen, CY

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to offer a rigorous analysis of the sigmoid shape single toxin dose-response relationship. The toxin efficacy function is introduced and four special points, including maximum toxin efficacy and inflection points, on the dose-response curve are defined. The special points define three phases of the toxin effect on mortality: (1) toxin concentrations smaller than the first inflection point or (2) larger then the second inflection point imply low mortality rate, and (3) concentrations between the first and the second inflection points imply high mortality rate. Probabilistic interpretation and mathematical analysis for each of four models, Hill, logit, probit, and Weibull is provided. Two general model extensions are introduced: (1) the multi-target hit model that accounts for the existence of several vital receptors affected by the toxin, and (2) model with a nonzero mortality at zero concentration to account for natural mortality. Special attention is given to statistical estimation in the framework of the generalized linear model with the binomial dependent variable as the mortality count in each experiment, contrary to the widespread nonlinear regression treating the mortality rate as continuous variable. The models are illustrated using standard EPA Daphnia acute (48 hours) toxicity tests with mortality as a function of NiCl or CuSO4 toxin. PMID:27847315

  17. Genetic exchange of the S2 and S3 subunits in pertussis toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raze, Dominique; Veithen, Alex; Sato, Hiroko; Antoine, Rudy; Menozzi, Franco D; Locht, Camille

    2006-06-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough, produces a complex hetero-oligomeric exotoxin, named pertussis toxin (PTX), which is responsible for several of the clinical manifestations associated with whooping cough. The toxin is composed of five dissimilar subunits, named S1 through S5 and arranged in a hexameric structure with a 1S1:1S2:1S3:2S4:1S5 stoichiometry. Although S2 and S3 share 70% amino acid identity, these two subunits were previously thought not to be able to substitute for each other in toxin assembly/secretion and the biological activities of PTX. Here, we show that toxin analogues containing two S3 subunits and lacking S2 (PTXdeltaS2), or containing two S2 subunits and lacking S3 (PTXdeltaS3), can be produced, assembled and secreted by B. pertussis strains, in which the S2-encoding cistron or the S3-coding cistrons have been inactivated by internal in-frame deletions that avoid downstream effects. In fact, PTXdeltaS3 was produced in higher amounts in the bacterial culture supernatants than natural PTX, whereas PTXdeltaS2 was produced in lower amounts than PTX. The action of the toxin analogues on the clustering of Chinese Hamster Ovary cells was also affected differentially by the S2-S3 substitution. These toxin analogues constitute thus interesting probes for the study of cellular functions, in particular immune cell functions, for which natural PTX has already shown its usefulness.

  18. Infectious Keratitis: Secreted Bacterial Proteins That Mediate Corneal Damage

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    Mary E. Marquart

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocular bacterial infections are universally treated with antibiotics, which can eliminate the organism but cannot reverse the damage caused by bacterial products already present. The three very common causes of bacterial keratitis—Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumoniae—all produce proteins that directly or indirectly cause damage to the cornea that can result in reduced vision despite antibiotic treatment. Most, but not all, of these proteins are secreted toxins and enzymes that mediate host cell death, degradation of stromal collagen, cleavage of host cell surface molecules, or induction of a damaging inflammatory response. Studies of these bacterial pathogens have determined the proteins of interest that could be targets for future therapeutic options for decreasing corneal damage.

  19. Development and characterization of recombinant antibody fragments that recognize and neutralize in vitro Stx2 toxin from Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli.

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    Daniela Luz

    Full Text Available Stx toxin is a member of the AB5 family of bacterial toxins: the active A subunit has N-glycosidase activity against 28S rRNA, resulting in inhibition of protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells, and the pentamer ligand B subunits (StxB bind to globotria(tetraosylceramide receptors (Gb3/Gb4 on the cell membrane. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli strains (STEC may produce Stx1 and/or Stx2 and variants. Strains carrying Stx2 are considered more virulent and related to the majority of outbreaks, besides being usually associated with hemolytic uremic syndrome in humans. The development of tools for the detection and/or neutralization of these toxins is a turning point for early diagnosis and therapeutics. Antibodies are an excellent paradigm for the design of high-affinity, protein-based binding reagents used for these purposes.In this work, we developed two recombinant antibodies; scFv fragments from mouse hybridomas and Fab fragments by phage display technology using a human synthetic antibody library. Both fragments showed high binding affinity to Stx2, and they were able to bind specifically to the GKIEFSKYNEDDTF region of the Stx2 B subunit and to neutralize in vitro the cytotoxicity of the toxin up to 80%. Furthermore, the scFv fragments showed 79% sensitivity and 100% specificity in detecting STEC strains by ELISA.In this work, we developed and characterized two recombinant antibodies against Stx2, as promising tools to be used in diagnosis or therapeutic approaches against STEC, and for the first time, we showed a human monovalent molecule, produced in bacteria, able to neutralize the cytotoxicity of Stx2 in vitro.

  20. Development and Characterization of Recombinant Antibody Fragments That Recognize and Neutralize In Vitro Stx2 Toxin from Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Daniela; Chen, Gang; Maranhão, Andrea Q.; Rocha, Leticia B.; Sidhu, Sachdev; Piazza, Roxane M. F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Stx toxin is a member of the AB5 family of bacterial toxins: the active A subunit has N-glycosidase activity against 28S rRNA, resulting in inhibition of protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells, and the pentamer ligand B subunits (StxB) bind to globotria(tetra)osylceramide receptors (Gb3/Gb4) on the cell membrane. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli strains (STEC) may produce Stx1 and/or Stx2 and variants. Strains carrying Stx2 are considered more virulent and related to the majority of outbreaks, besides being usually associated with hemolytic uremic syndrome in humans. The development of tools for the detection and/or neutralization of these toxins is a turning point for early diagnosis and therapeutics. Antibodies are an excellent paradigm for the design of high-affinity, protein-based binding reagents used for these purposes. Methods and Findings In this work, we developed two recombinant antibodies; scFv fragments from mouse hybridomas and Fab fragments by phage display technology using a human synthetic antibody library. Both fragments showed high binding affinity to Stx2, and they were able to bind specifically to the GKIEFSKYNEDDTF region of the Stx2 B subunit and to neutralize in vitro the cytotoxicity of the toxin up to 80%. Furthermore, the scFv fragments showed 79% sensitivity and 100% specificity in detecting STEC strains by ELISA. Conclusion In this work, we developed and characterized two recombinant antibodies against Stx2, as promising tools to be used in diagnosis or therapeutic approaches against STEC, and for the first time, we showed a human monovalent molecule, produced in bacteria, able to neutralize the cytotoxicity of Stx2 in vitro. PMID:25790467

  1. Engineering modified Bt toxins to counter insect resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soberón, Mario; Pardo-López, Liliana; López, Idalia; Gómez, Isabel; Tabashnik, Bruce E; Bravo, Alejandra

    2007-12-07

    The evolution of insect resistance threatens the effectiveness of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins that are widely used in sprays and transgenic crops. Resistance to Bt toxins in some insects is linked with mutations that disrupt a toxin-binding cadherin protein. We show that susceptibility to the Bt toxin Cry1Ab was reduced by cadherin gene silencing with RNA interference in Manduca sexta, confirming cadherin's role in Bt toxicity. Native Cry1A toxins required cadherin to form oligomers, but modified Cry1A toxins lacking one alpha-helix did not. The modified toxins killed cadherin-silenced M. sexta and Bt-resistant Pectinophora gossypiella that had cadherin deletion mutations. Our findings suggest that cadherin promotes Bt toxicity by facilitating toxin oligomerization and demonstrate that the modified Bt toxins may be useful against pests resistant to standard Bt toxins.

  2. Hybrid microarray based on double biomolecular markers of DNA and carbohydrate for simultaneous genotypic and phenotypic detection of cholera toxin-producing Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hwa Hui; Seo, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Chang Sup; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2016-05-15

    Life-threatening diarrheal cholera is usually caused by water or food contaminated with cholera toxin-producing Vibrio cholerae. For the prevention and surveillance of cholera, it is crucial to rapidly and precisely detect and identify the etiological causes, such as V. cholerae and/or its toxin. In the present work, we propose the use of a hybrid double biomolecular marker (DBM) microarray containing 16S rRNA-based DNA capture probe to genotypically identify V. cholerae and GM1 pentasaccharide capture probe to phenotypically detect cholera toxin. We employed a simple sample preparation method to directly obtain genomic DNA and secreted cholera toxin as target materials from bacterial cells. By utilizing the constructed DBM microarray and prepared samples, V. cholerae and cholera toxin were detected successfully, selectively, and simultaneously; the DBM microarray was able to analyze the pathogenicity of the identified V. cholerae regardless of whether the bacteria produces toxin. Therefore, our proposed DBM microarray is a new effective platform for identifying bacteria and analyzing bacterial pathogenicity simultaneously.

  3. Keeping the wolves at bay: antitoxins of prokaryotic type II toxin-antitoxin systems

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    Wai Ting eChan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In their initial stages of discovery, prokaryotic toxin-antitoxin (TA systems were confined to bacterial plasmids where they function to mediate the maintenance and stability of usually low- to medium-copy number plasmids through the post-segregational killing of any plasmid-free daughter cells that developed. Their eventual discovery as nearly ubiquitous and repetitive elements in bacterial chromosomes led to a wealth of knowledge and scientific debate as to their diversity and functionality in the prokaryotic lifestyle. Currently categorized into six different types designated types I – VI, type II TA systems are the best characterized. These generally comprised of two genes encoding a proteic toxin and its corresponding proteic antitoxin, respectively. Under normal growth conditions, the stable toxin is prevented from exerting its lethal effect through tight binding with the less stable antitoxin partner, forming a non-lethal TA protein complex. Besides binding with its cognate toxin, the antitoxin also plays a role in regulating the expression of the type II TA operon by binding to the operator site, thereby repressing transcription from the TA promoter. In most cases, full repression is observed in the presence of the TA complex as binding of the toxin enhances the DNA binding capability of the antitoxin. TA systems have been implicated in a gamut of prokaryotic cellular functions such as being mediators of programmed cell death as well as persistence or dormancy, biofilm formation, as defensive weapons against bacteriophage infections and as virulence factors in pathogenic bacteria. It is thus apparent that these antitoxins, as DNA-binding proteins, play an essential role in modulating the prokaryotic lifestyle whilst at the same time preventing the lethal action of the toxins under normal growth conditions, i.e., keeping the proverbial wolves at bay. In this review, we will cover the diversity and characteristics of various type II TA

  4. Protease inhibitor in scorpion (Mesobuthus eupeus) venom prolongs the biological activities of the crude venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hakim; Xiao-Peng, Tang; Yang, Shi-Long; Lu, Qiu-Min; Lai, Ren

    2016-08-01

    It is hypothesized that protease inhibitors play an essential role in survival of venomous animals through protecting peptide/protein toxins from degradation by proteases in their prey or predators. However, the biological function of protease inhibitors in scorpion venoms remains unknown. In the present study, a trypsin inhibitor was purified and characterized from the venom of scorpion Mesobuthus eupeus, which enhanced the biological activities of crude venom components in mice when injected in combination with crude venom. This protease inhibitor, named MeKTT-1, belonged to Kunitz-type toxins subfamily. Native MeKTT-1 selectively inhibited trypsin with a Kivalue of 130 nmol·L(-1). Furthermore, MeKTT-1 was shown to be a thermo-stable peptide. In animal behavioral tests, MeKTT-1 prolonged the pain behavior induced by scorpion crude venom, suggesting that protease inhibitors in scorpion venom inhibited proteases and protect the functionally important peptide/protein toxins from degradation, consequently keeping them active longer. In conclusion, this was the first experimental evidence about the natural existence of serine protease inhibitor in the venom of scorpion Mesobuthus eupeus, which preserved the activity of venom components, suggests that scorpions may use protease inhibitors for survival.

  5. Inhibitors of the Cellular Trafficking of Ricin

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    Daniel Gillet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the last decade, efforts to identify and develop effective inhibitors of the ricin toxin have focused on targeting its N-glycosidase activity. Alternatively, molecules disrupting intracellular trafficking have been shown to block ricin toxicity. Several research teams have recently developed high-throughput phenotypic screens for small molecules acting on the intracellular targets required for entry of ricin into cells. These screens have identified inhibitory compounds that can protect cells, and sometimes even animals against ricin. We review these newly discovered cellular inhibitors of ricin intoxication, discuss the advantages and drawbacks of chemical-genetics approaches, and address the issues to be resolved so that the therapeutic development of these small-molecule compounds can progress.

  6. Identification of Fic-1 as an enzyme that inhibits bacterial DNA replication by AMPylating GyrB, promoting filament formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Canhua; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Zhang, Li-Qun; Luo, Zhao-Qing

    2016-01-26

    The morphology of bacterial cells is important for virulence, evasion of the host immune system, and coping with environmental stresses. The widely distributed Fic proteins (filamentation induced by cAMP) are annotated as proteins involved in cell division because of the presence of the HPFx[D/E]GN[G/K]R motif. We showed that the presence of Fic-1 from Pseudomonas fluorescens significantly reduced the yield of plasmid DNA when expressed in Escherichia coli or P. fluorescens. Fic-1 interacted with GyrB, a subunit of DNA gyrase, which is essential for bacterial DNA replication. Fic-1 catalyzed the AMPylation of GyrB at Tyr(109), a residue critical for binding ATP, and exhibited auto-AMPylation activity. Mutation of the Fic-1 auto-AMPylated site greatly reduced AMPylation activity toward itself and toward GyrB. Fic-1-dependent AMPylation of GyrB triggered the SOS response, indicative of DNA replication stress or DNA damage. Fic-1 also promoted the formation of elongated cells when the SOS response was blocked. We identified an α-inhibitor protein that we named anti-Fic-1 (AntF), encoded by a gene immediately upstream of Fic-1. AntF interacted with Fic-1, inhibited the AMPylation activity of Fic-1 for GyrB in vitro, and blocked Fic-1-mediated inhibition of DNA replication in bacteria, suggesting that Fic-1 and AntF comprise a toxin-antitoxin module. Our work establishes Fic-1 as an AMPylating enzyme that targets GyrB to inhibit DNA replication and may target other proteins to regulate bacterial morphology.

  7. The assembly dynamics of the cytolytic pore toxin ClyA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benke, Stephan; Roderer, Daniel; Wunderlich, Bengt; Nettels, Daniel; Glockshuber, Rudi; Schuler, Benjamin

    2015-02-01

    Pore-forming toxins are protein assemblies used by many organisms to disrupt the membranes of target cells. They are expressed as soluble monomers that assemble spontaneously into multimeric pores. However, owing to their complexity, the assembly processes have not been resolved in detail for any pore-forming toxin. To determine the assembly mechanism for the ring-shaped, homododecameric pore of the bacterial cytolytic toxin ClyA, we collected a diverse set of kinetic data using single-molecule spectroscopy and complementary techniques on timescales from milliseconds to hours, and from picomolar to micromolar ClyA concentrations. The entire range of experimental results can be explained quantitatively by a surprisingly simple mechanism. First, addition of the detergent n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside to the soluble monomers triggers the formation of assembly-competent toxin subunits, accompanied by the transient formation of a molten-globule-like intermediate. Then, all sterically compatible oligomers contribute to assembly, which greatly enhances the efficiency of pore formation compared with simple monomer addition.

  8. Investigation of Various Tissue Culture Monolayers Sensitivity in Detection of Clostridium difficile Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Salari

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Backround: Clostridium difficile is the most common cause of nosocomial diarrhea. It is usually a consequence of antibi­otic treatment, but sporadic cases can occur. The purpose of this study was to investigate five tissue culture monolayers sen­sitivity in detection of C. difficile-toxin. Methods: A total of 402 stool samples from patients with nosocomial diarrhea hospitalized in three hospitals of Tehran Uni­versity of Medical Sciences (TUMS were collected. The samples were cultured on a selective cycloserine cefoxitin fructose agar (CCFA and incubated in anaerobic conditions, at 37 °C for 4 days. Isolates were characterized to species level by con­ventional biochemical tests. Bacterial cytotoxicity was assayed on five tissue culture monolayers. Results: Our findings show that of the total patients, 24 toxigenic C. difficile (6% were isolated. All 24 C. difficile toxins showed cytotoxic effect at ³ 1:10 dilution on Hela, Hep2, Vero, McCoy and Mdck cells after 16, 20, 24, 24 and 30 hours, re­spectively. C. difficile toxin showed cytotoxic effect at ³ 1:100 dilutions only on Hela cell monolayer after 48 hours. Conclusion: Hela cell monolayer may be a satisfactory substitute for the detection of C. difficile toxin in clinical specimens.   

  9. Cholera toxin subunit B-mediated intracellular trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles toward the endoplasmic reticulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, William Andrew

    In recent decades, pharmaceutical research has led to the development of numerous treatments for human disease. Nanoscale delivery systems have the potential to maximize therapeutic outcomes by enabling target specific delivery of these therapeutics. The intracellular localization of many of these materials however, is poorly controlled, leading to sequestration in degradative cellular pathways and limiting the efficacy of their payloads. Numerous proteins, particularly bacterial toxins, have evolved mechanisms to subvert the degradative mechanisms of the cell. Here, we have investigated a possible strategy for shunting intracellular delivery of encapsulated cargoes from these pathways by modifying mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) with the well-characterized bacterial toxin Cholera toxin subunit B (CTxB). Using established optical imaging methods we investigated the internalization, trafficking, and subcellular localization of our modified MSNs in an in vitro animal cell model. We then attempted to demonstrate the practical utility of this approach by using CTxB-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles to deliver propidium iodide, a membrane-impermeant fluorophore.

  10. Toxin Detection by Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Significant efforts have been invested in the past years for the development of analytical methods for fast toxin detection in food and water. Immunochemical methods like ELISA, spectroscopy and chromatography are the most used in toxin detection. Different methods have been linked, e.g. liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (LC-MS, in order to detect as low concentrations as possible. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR is one of the new biophysical methods which enables rapid toxin detection. Moreover, this method was already included in portable sensors for on-site determinations. In this paper we describe some of the most common methods for toxin detection, with an emphasis on SPR.

  11. Clostridium difficile and C. difficile Toxin Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... C. difficile Toxin, A and B; C. difficile Cytotoxin Assay; Glutamate Dehydrogenase Test Related tests: Stool Culture ; ... test that looks for the effects of the cytotoxin (cytotoxicity) on human cells grown in culture. It ...

  12. NNDSS - Table II. Shiga toxin to Shigellosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Shiga toxin to Shigellosis - 2015. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  13. NNDSS - Table II. Shiga toxin to Shigellosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Shiga toxin to Shigellosis - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected†notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  14. The Regulation of Expression of the Stx2d Toxins in Shiga Toxin-producing Escherichia coli O91:H21 Strain B2F1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    EHEC 1 group consists only of O157:H7 and O157:NM, two serotypes that appear to represent recent clones that have spread globally . Members of the...which carnitine is used in the bacterial cell (Fig. 22). The role this gene might have as a global regulator is unclear; however, the caiD-coding...mRNA secondary structure in differential expression of Shiga toxin genes J.Bacteriol. 175: 597-603. Hamilton,C.M., Aldea ,M., Washburn,B.K

  15. Tailored Cyclodextrin Pore Blocker Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile Binary Toxin CDT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice Roeder

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Some Clostridium difficile strains produce, in addition to toxins A and B, the binary toxin Clostridium difficile transferase (CDT, which ADP-ribosylates actin and may contribute to the hypervirulence of these strains. The separate binding and translocation component CDTb mediates transport of the enzyme component CDTa into mammalian target cells. CDTb binds to its receptor on the cell surface, CDTa assembles and CDTb/CDTa complexes are internalised. In acidic endosomes, CDTb mediates the delivery of CDTa into the cytosol, most likely by forming a translocation pore in endosomal membranes. We demonstrate that a seven-fold symmetrical positively charged β-cyclodextrin derivative, per-6-S-(3-aminomethylbenzylthio-β-cyclodextrin, which was developed earlier as a potent inhibitor of the translocation pores of related binary toxins of Bacillus anthracis, Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium perfringens, protects cells from intoxication with CDT. The pore blocker did not interfere with the CDTa-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of actin or toxin binding to Vero cells but inhibited the pH-dependent membrane translocation of CDTa into the cytosol. In conclusion, the cationic β-cyclodextrin could serve as the lead compound in a development of novel pharmacological strategies against the CDT-producing strains of C. difficile.

  16. Multivalent drug design and inhibition of cholera toxin by specific and transient protein-ligand interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiyun; Begley, Darren; Mitchell, Daniel D; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Varani, Gabriele; Fan, Erkang

    2008-05-01

    Multivalent inhibitors of the cholera toxin B pentamer are potential therapeutic drugs for treating cholera and serve as models for demonstrating multivalent ligand effects through a structure-based approach. A crucial yet often overlooked aspect of multivalent drug design is the length, rigidity and chemical composition of the linker used to connect multiple binding moieties. To specifically study the role of chemical linkers in multivalent ligand design, we have synthesized a series of compounds with one and two binding motifs connected by several different linkers. These compounds have affinity for and potency against the cholera toxin B pentamer despite the fact that none can simultaneously bind two toxin receptor sites. Results from saturation transfer difference NMR reveal transient, non-specific interactions between the cholera toxin and linker groups contribute significantly to overall binding affinity of monovalent compounds. However, the same random protein-ligand interactions do not appear to affect binding of bivalent molecules. Moreover, the binding affinities and potencies of these 'non-spanning' bivalent ligands appear to be wholly independent of linker length. Our detailed analysis identifies multiple effects that account for the improved inhibitory potencies of bivalent ligands and suggest approaches to further improve the activity of this class of compounds.

  17. Targeting bacterial topoisomerase I to meet the challenge of finding new antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Resistance of bacterial pathogens to current antibiotics has grown to be an urgent crisis. Approaches to overcome this challenge include identification of novel targets for discovery of new antibiotics. Bacterial topoisomerase I is present in all bacterial pathogens as a potential target for bactericidal topoisomerase poison inhibitors. Recent efforts have identified inhibitors of bacterial topoisomerase I with antibacterial activity. Additional research on the mode of action and binding site of these inhibitors would provide further validation of the target and establish that bacterial topoisomerase I is druggable. Bacterial topoisomerase I is a potentially high value target for discovery of new antibiotics. Demonstration of topoisomerase I as the cellular target of an antibacterial compound would provide proof-of-concept validation.

  18. Updates on tetanus toxin: a fundamental approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Ahaduzzaman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium tetani is an anaerobic bacterium that produces second most poisonous protein toxins than any other bacteria. Tetanus in animals is sporadic in nature but difficult to combat even by using antibiotics and antiserum. It is crucial to understand the fundamental mechanisms and signals that control toxin production for advance research and medicinal uses. This review was intended for better understanding the basic patho-physiology of tetanus and neurotoxins (TeNT among the audience of related field.

  19. Cry1A toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis bind specifically to a region adjacent to the membrane-proximal extracellular domain of BT-R(1) in Manduca sexta: involvement of a cadherin in the entomopathogenicity of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsch, J A; Candas, M; Griko, N B; Maaty, W S A; Midboe, E G; Vadlamudi, R K; Bulla, L A

    2002-09-01

    Many subspecies of the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis produce various parasporal crystal proteins, also known as Cry toxins, that exhibit insecticidal activity upon binding to specific receptors in the midgut of susceptible insects. One such receptor, BT-R(1) (210 kDa), is a cadherin located in the midgut epithelium of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. It has a high binding affinity (K(d) approximately 1nM) for the Cry1A toxins of B. thuringiensis. Truncation analysis of BT-R(1) revealed that the only fragment capable of binding the Cry1A toxins of B. thuringiensis was a contiguous 169-amino acid sequence adjacent to the membrane-proximal extracellular domain. The purified toxin-binding fragment acted as an antagonist to Cry1Ab toxin by blocking the binding of toxin to the tobacco hornworm midgut and inhibiting insecticidal action. Exogenous Cry1Ab toxin bound to intact COS-7 cells expressing BT-R(1) cDNA, subsequently killing the cells. Recruitment of BT-R(1) by B. thuringiensis indicates that the bacterium interacts with a specific cell adhesion molecule during its pathogenesis. Apparently, Cry toxins, like other bacterial toxins, attack epithelial barriers by targeting cell adhesion molecules within susceptible insect hosts.

  20. Sea Anemone Toxins Affecting Potassium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diochot, Sylvie; Lazdunski, Michel

    The great diversity of K+ channels and their wide distribution in many tissues are associated with important functions in cardiac and neuronal excitability that are now better understood thanks to the discovery of animal toxins. During the past few decades, sea anemones have provided a variety of toxins acting on voltage-sensitive sodium and, more recently, potassium channels. Currently there are three major structural groups of sea anemone K+ channel (SAK) toxins that have been characterized. Radioligand binding and electrophysiological experiments revealed that each group contains peptides displaying selective activities for different subfamilies of K+ channels. Short (35-37 amino acids) peptides in the group I display pore blocking effects on Kv1 channels. Molecular interactions of SAK-I toxins, important for activity and binding on Kv1 channels, implicate a spot of three conserved amino acid residues (Ser, Lys, Tyr) surrounded by other less conserved residues. Long (58-59 amino acids) SAK-II peptides display both enzymatic and K+ channel inhibitory activities. Medium size (42-43 amino acid) SAK-III peptides are gating modifiers which interact either with cardiac HERG or Kv3 channels by altering their voltage-dependent properties. SAK-III toxins bind to the S3C region in the outer vestibule of Kv channels. Sea anemones have proven to be a rich source of pharmacological tools, and some of the SAK toxins are now useful drugs for the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  1. Toxin-Antitoxin Systems of Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F. Schuster

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Toxin-antitoxin (TA systems are small genetic elements found in the majority of prokaryotes. They encode toxin proteins that interfere with vital cellular functions and are counteracted by antitoxins. Dependent on the chemical nature of the antitoxins (protein or RNA and how they control the activity of the toxin, TA systems are currently divided into six different types. Genes comprising the TA types I, II and III have been identified in Staphylococcus aureus. MazF, the toxin of the mazEF locus is a sequence-specific RNase that cleaves a number of transcripts, including those encoding pathogenicity factors. Two yefM-yoeB paralogs represent two independent, but auto-regulated TA systems that give rise to ribosome-dependent RNases. In addition, omega/epsilon/zeta constitutes a tripartite TA system that supposedly plays a role in the stabilization of resistance factors. The SprA1/SprA1AS and SprF1/SprG1 systems are post-transcriptionally regulated by RNA antitoxins and encode small membrane damaging proteins. TA systems controlled by interaction between toxin protein and antitoxin RNA have been identified in S. aureus in silico, but not yet experimentally proven. A closer inspection of possible links between TA systems and S. aureus pathophysiology will reveal, if these genetic loci may represent druggable targets. The modification of a staphylococcal TA toxin to a cyclopeptide antibiotic highlights the potential of TA systems as rather untapped sources of drug discovery.

  2. Toxin-Antitoxin Systems of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Christopher F; Bertram, Ralph

    2016-05-05

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are small genetic elements found in the majority of prokaryotes. They encode toxin proteins that interfere with vital cellular functions and are counteracted by antitoxins. Dependent on the chemical nature of the antitoxins (protein or RNA) and how they control the activity of the toxin, TA systems are currently divided into six different types. Genes comprising the TA types I, II and III have been identified in Staphylococcus aureus. MazF, the toxin of the mazEF locus is a sequence-specific RNase that cleaves a number of transcripts, including those encoding pathogenicity factors. Two yefM-yoeB paralogs represent two independent, but auto-regulated TA systems that give rise to ribosome-dependent RNases. In addition, omega/epsilon/zeta constitutes a tripartite TA system that supposedly plays a role in the stabilization of resistance factors. The SprA1/SprA1AS and SprF1/SprG1 systems are post-transcriptionally regulated by RNA antitoxins and encode small membrane damaging proteins. TA systems controlled by interaction between toxin protein and antitoxin RNA have been identified in S. aureus in silico, but not yet experimentally proven. A closer inspection of possible links between TA systems and S. aureus pathophysiology will reveal, if these genetic loci may represent druggable targets. The modification of a staphylococcal TA toxin to a cyclopeptide antibiotic highlights the potential of TA systems as rather untapped sources of drug discovery.

  3. Antibacterial activity of plant extracts on foodborne bacterial pathogens and food spoilage bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial foodborne diseases are caused by consumption of foods contaminated with bacteria and/or their toxins. In this study, we evaluated antibacterial properties of twelve different extracts including turmeric, lemon and different kinds of teas against four major pathogenic foodborne bacteria inc...

  4. Picomolar inhibition of cholera toxin by a pentavalent ganglioside GM1os-calix[5]arene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Hartjes, Jaime; Bernardi, Silvia; Weijers, Carel A G M; Wennekes, Tom; Gilbert, Michel; Sansone, Francesco; Casnati, Alessandro; Zuilhof, Han

    2013-07-14

    Cholera toxin (CT), the causative agent of cholera, displays a pentavalent binding domain that targets the oligosaccharide of ganglioside GM1 (GM1os) on the periphery of human abdominal epithelial cells. Here, we report the first GM1os-based CT inhibitor that matches the valency of the CT binding domain (CTB). This pentavalent inhibitor contains five GM1os moieties linked to a calix[5]arene scaffold. When evaluated by an inhibition assay, it achieved a picomolar inhibition potency (IC50 = 450 pM) for CTB. This represents a significant multivalency effect, with a relative inhibitory potency of 100,000 compared to a monovalent GM1os derivative, making GM1os-calix[5]arene one of the most potent known CTB inhibitors.

  5. Shiga toxin receptor Gb3Cer/CD77 : tumor-association and promising therapeutic target in pancreas and colon cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Distler, Ute; Souady, Jamal; Hülsewig, Marcel; Drmić-Hofman, Irena; Haier, Jörg; Friedrich, Alexander W; Karch, Helge; Senninger, Norbert; Dreisewerd, Klaus; Berkenkamp, Stefan; Schmidt, M Alexander; Peter-Katalinić, Jasna; Müthing, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite progress in adjuvant chemotherapy in the recent decades, pancreatic and colon cancers remain common causes of death worldwide. Bacterial toxins, which specifically bind to cell surface-exposed glycosphingolipids, are a potential novel therapy. We determined the expression of glob

  6. Mass spectrometry-based method of detecting and distinguishing type 1 and type 2 Shiga-like toxins in human serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiga-like toxins (verotoxins) are a class of AB5 holotoxins that are responsible for the virulence associated with bacterial pathogens such as Shigella dysenteriae, shigatoxigenic and enterohemorrhagic strains of Escherichia coli (STEC and EHEC), and some Enterobacter strains. The actual expression...

  7. Use of proton pump inhibitor and risk of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth:a meta-analysis of observational studies%质子泵抑制剂与小肠细菌过度增长关系的 Meta 分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    全晓静; 罗和生; 陈炜

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the associations between Proton Pump inhibitor(PPI)therapy and risk of bacterial overgrowth using Meta-analysis.Methods We searched MEDLINE(PubMed),the Cochrane Library,China Biological Medicine in December 2012.Two evaluators independently reviewed and selected articles,based on pre-determined selection criteria.Results Eight observational studies, which involved 576 participants,were included in the final analysis.The overall use of PPI was significant-ly associated with the risk of bacterial overgrowth in a fixed-effects model meta-analysis of all 8 observa-tional studies(OR =13.46,95%CI:7.00 ~25.88).Also,in Subgroup analysis of bacterial overgrowth positivity in PPI users based on PPI dose,there was a association between PPI use of 20 mg/d or 40 mg/d and the risk of bacterial overgrowth in a fixed-effects meta-analysis(P 0.05),while in treatment more than 1 month,there has a significant association(OR =16.47%, 95%CI:7.82 ~34.71 ).Based on diagnostic methods of bacterial overgrowth,there was a association between PPI use of bacterial culture or GHBT and the risk of bacterial overgrowth in a fixed-effects meta-analysis(P <0.01).Conclusion PPI therapy is associated with an increased risk of bacterial over-growth,But short-term management may not affect hydrochloric acid preventing bacteria from colonisation in gastrointestine.%目的评价质子泵抑制剂(PPI)与小肠细菌过度增长之间的关系。方法检索MEDLINE /PubMed、Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials、中国生物医学文献数据库等,按标准纳入 PPI 导致细菌过度增长的所有观察性研究。采用 Cochrane 协作网提供的 RevMan 5.1软件进行荟萃分析。结果8项观察性研究共576例患者纳入分析。结果显示,PPI 显著增加发生胃肠道细菌过度增长的风险(阳性率为46.61%),与对照组比较差异有统计学意义[风险比(OR)=13.46,95%可信区间(CI):7.00~25.88

  8. Experimental Study on Resistance to Bacterial Toxin Role for Ten Kinds Chinese Herb Medicines with Clearing away Heat and Toxic Material in Guangdong Area%10种广东本地清热解毒中草药抗细菌内毒素作用实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张健民; 蒋三元; 李雁玲; 郑国燊; 唐荣德

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Explore the role of resistance to bacterial endotoxin for ten kinds Chinese herb medicines with the clearing away heat and toxic material in Guangdong area. Methods: The limulus reagent tests were used in vitro anti -endotoxin agglutinate reaction experiment. Results; Ten kinds Chinese herb medicines with the clearing away heat and toxic material in Guangdong area all have tuba] agglutinate reactions of resistance to limulus reagent ( namely, all have anti - bacterial endotoxin actions) when the concentration is in 1.0g/mL. Other Chinese herb medicines have anti - bacterial endotoxin actions besides Jin niu kou and Xi huang cao when the concentration is in 0.5g/mL and besides Jin niu kou.Xi huang cao and Gang mei gen when the concentration is in 0. 3g/mL. Tian ji huang,Hu lu cha and Jiu bi ying have anti - bacterial endotoxin actions when the concentration is in 0. Lg/mL. These results point out that the various medicinal materials have different anti - bacterial endotoxin actions. Conclusions: Ten kinds Chinese herb medicines with the clearing away heat and toxic material in Guangdong area all have the roles of resistance to bacterial endotoxin. Tian ji huang、Hu lu cha and Jiu bi ying have strongest actions. Jin niu kou, Xi huang cao have relatively weak actions.%目的:探讨10种广东本地清热解毒中草药的抗细菌内毒素作用.方法:采用鲎试剂试管凝集反应进行体外抗内毒素实验.结果:所研究的10种广东本地清热解毒中草药,药液浓度为1.0g/mL时,10种中草药均有抗鲎试剂试管凝集反应,均具有抗细菌内毒素的作用;调整浓度为0.5g/mL时,除金扭扣、溪黄草外,其余中草药具有抗细菌内毒素作用;浓度为0.3g/mL时,除金扭扣、溪黄草、岗梅根外,其余中草药具有抗细菌内毒素作用;浓度为0.1g/mL时,田基黄、葫芦茶、救必应具有抗细菌内毒素作用,提示不同的药材存在抗细菌内毒素作用的差异.结论:广东10种本地清

  9. Alleviating Cancer Drug Toxicity by Inhibiting a Bacterial Enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, Bret D.; Wang, Hongwei; Lane, Kimberly T.; Scott, John E.; Orans, Jillian; Koo, Ja Seol; Venkatesh, Madhukumar; Jobin, Christian; Yeh, Li-An; Mani, Sridhar; Redinbo, Matthew R. (Einstein); (UNC); (North Carolina Central University)

    2011-08-12

    The dose-limiting side effect of the common colon cancer chemotherapeutic CPT-11 is severe diarrhea caused by symbiotic bacterial {beta}-glucuronidases that reactivate the drug in the gut. We sought to target these enzymes without killing the commensal bacteria essential for human health. Potent bacterial {beta}-glucuronidase inhibitors were identified by high-throughput screening and shown to have no effect on the orthologous mammalian enzyme. Crystal structures established that selectivity was based on a loop unique to bacterial {beta}-glucuronidases. Inhibitors were highly effective against the enzyme target in living aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, but did not kill the bacteria or harm mammalian cells. Finally, oral administration of an inhibitor protected mice from CPT-11-induced toxicity. Thus, drugs may be designed to inhibit undesirable enzyme activities in essential microbial symbiotes to enhance chemotherapeutic efficacy.

  10. Clostridium perfringens Delta-Toxin Induces Rapid Cell Necrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soshi Seike

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens delta-toxin is a β-pore-forming toxin and a putative pathogenic agent of C. perfringens types B and C. However, the mechanism of cytotoxicity of delta-toxin remains unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of cell death induced by delta-toxin in five cell lines (A549, A431, MDCK, Vero, and Caco-2. All cell lines were susceptible to delta-toxin. The toxin caused rapid ATP depletion and swelling of the cells. Delta-toxin bound and formed oligomers predominantly in plasma membrane lipid rafts. Destruction of the lipid rafts with methyl β-cyclodextrin inhibited delta-toxin-induced cytotoxicity and ATP depletion. Delta-toxin caused the release of carboxyfluorescein from sphingomyelin-cholesterol liposomes and formed oligomers; toxin binding to the liposomes declined with decreasing cholesterol content in the liposomes. Flow cytometric assays with annexin V and propidium iodide revealed that delta-toxin treatment induced an elevation in the population of annexin V-negative and propidium iodide-positive cells. Delta-toxin did not cause the fragmentation of DNA or caspase-3 activation. Furthermore, delta-toxin caused damage to mitochondrial membrane permeability and cytochrome c release. In the present study, we demonstrate that delta-toxin produces cytotoxic activity through necrosis.

  11. Structural studies of the toxin-antitoxin proteins RelE and RelB from E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper Røjkjær; Overgaard, Martin; Gerdes, Kenn;

    the special tRNA-mRNA mimic, tmRNA [1]. Questions to be addressed Many questions remain to be answered in the bacterial toxin-antitoxin system. The crystal structure of RelBE from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 was previously solved at 2.3Å [2]. This structure shows the molecule in an inactive state, but OT3......The bacterial toxin-antitoxin system The relBE operon in E. coli encodes two small proteins: A toxin, RelE (12 kDa) and an antitoxin, RelB (9 kDa). RelE is activated under nutritional stress and is able to inhibit protein synthesis by cleaving the mRNA in the ribosomal A-site. This stress response...... serves to down-regulate metabolism in the cell when growth conditions are limited. RelB is expressed in excess over RelE during balanced growth, and inhibits the toxicity of RelE by forming an extremely stable toxin-antitoxin complex. The activation of RelE is induced when the labile RelB protein...

  12. P-glycoprotein expression in Perna viridis after exposure to Prorocentrum lima, a dinoflagellate producing DSP toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lu; Wang, Jie; Chen, Wen-Chang; Li, Hong-Ye; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Tao Jiang; Yang, Wei-Dong

    2014-08-01

    Bivalves naturally exposed to toxic algae have mechanisms to prevent from harmful effects of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) toxins. However, quite few studies have examined the mechanisms associated, and the information currently available is still insufficient. Multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) is ubiquitous in aquatic invertebrates and plays an important role in defense against xenobiotics. Here, to explore the roles of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in the DSP toxins resistance in shellfish, complete cDNA of P-gp gene in the mussel Perna viridis was cloned and analyzed. The accumulation of okadaic acid (OA), a main component of DSP toxins, MXR activity and expression of P-gp in gills of P. viridis were detected after exposure to Prorocentrum lima, a dinoflagellate producing DSP toxins in the presence or absence of P-gp inhibitors PGP-4008, verapamil (VER) and cyclosporin A (CsA). The mussel P. viridis P-gp closely matches MDR/P-gp/ABCB protein from various organisms, having a typical sequence organization as full transporters from the ABCB family. After exposure to P. lima, OA accumulation, MXR activity and P-gp expression significantly increased in gills of P. viridis. The addition of P-gp-specific inhibitors PGP-4008 and VER decreased MXR activity induced by P. lima, but had no effect on the OA accumulation in gills of P. viridis. However, CsA, a broad-spectrum inhibitor of ABC transporter not only decreased MXR activity, but also increased OA accumulation in gills of P. viridis. Together with the ubiquitous presence of other ABC transporters such as MRP/ABCC in bivalves and potential compensatory mechanism in P-gp and MRP-mediated resistance, we speculated that besides P-gp, other ABC transporters, especially MRP might be involved in the resistance mechanisms to DSP toxins.

  13. Inhibition of Binding of the AB5-Type Enterotoxins LT-I and Cholera Toxin to Ganglioside GM1 by Galactose-Rich Dietary Components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, P.M.; Widjaja-Greefkes, H.C.A.; Wikselaar, van P.G.

    2010-01-01

    Cholera, travelers' diarrhea, or colibacillosis in pigs can possibly be prevented or attenuated by dietary provision of competitive inhibitors that react with the GM1-binding sites of the enterotoxins cholera toxin (CT), human Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin of serogroup I (LTh-I), and porc

  14. A cocktail of humanized anti-pertussis toxin antibodies limits disease in murine and baboon models of whooping cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Annalee W; Wagner, Ellen K; Laber, Joshua R; Goodfield, Laura L; Smallridge, William E; Harvill, Eric T; Papin, James F; Wolf, Roman F; Padlan, Eduardo A; Bristol, Andy; Kaleko, Michael; Maynard, Jennifer A

    2015-12-01

    Despite widespread vaccination, pertussis rates are rising in industrialized countries and remain high worldwide. With no specific therapeutics to treat disease, pertussis continues to cause considerable infant morbidity and mortality. The pertussis toxin is a major contributor to disease, responsible for local and systemic effects including leukocytosis and immunosuppression. We humanized two murine monoclonal antibodies that neutralize pertussis toxin and expressed them as human immunoglobulin G1 molecules with no loss of affinity or in vitro neutralization activity. When administered prophylactically to mice as a binary cocktail, antibody treatment completely mitigated the Bordetella pertussis-induced rise in white blood cell counts and decreased bacterial colonization. When administered therapeutically to baboons, antibody-treated, but not untreated control animals, experienced a blunted rise in white blood cell counts and accelerated bacterial clearance rates. These preliminary findings support further investigation into the use of these antibodies to treat human neonatal pertussis in conjunction with antibiotics and supportive care.

  15. Simultaneous Microcystis Algicidal and Microcystin Degrading Capability by a Single Acinetobacter Bacterial Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Ai, Hainan; Kang, Li; Sun, Xingfu; He, Qiang

    2016-11-01

    Measures for removal of toxic harmful algal blooms often cause lysis of algal cells and release of microcystins (MCs). In this study, Acinetobacter sp. CMDB-2 that exhibits distinct algal lysing activity and MCs degradation capability was isolated. The physiological response and morphological characteristics of toxin-producing Microcystis aeruginosa, the dynamics of intra- and extracellular MC-LR concentration were studied in an algal/bacterial cocultured system. The results demonstrated that Acinetobacter sp. CMDB-2 caused thorough decomposition of algal cells and impairment of photosynthesis within 24 h. Enhanced algal lysis and MC-LR release appeared with increasing bacterial density from 1 × 10(3) to 1 × 10(7) cells/mL; however, the MC-LR was reduced by nearly 94% within 14 h irrespective of bacterial density. Measurement of extracellular and intracellular MC-LR revealed that the toxin was decreased by 92% in bacterial cell incubated systems relative to control and bacterial cell-free filtrate systems. The results confirmed that the bacterial metabolite caused 92% lysis of Microcystis aeruginosa cells, whereas the bacterial cells were responsible for approximately 91% reduction of MC-LR. The joint efforts of the bacterium and its metabolite accomplished the sustainable removal of algae and MC-LR. This is the first report of a single bacterial strain that achieves these dual actions.

  16. Effect of the Food Additives Sodium Citrate and Disodium Phosphate on Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli and Production of stx-Phages and Shiga toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzi, Lucas J.; Lucchesi, Paula M. A.; Medico, Lucía; Burgán, Julia; Krüger, Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    Induction and propagation of bacteriophages along the food production chain can represent a significant risk when bacteriophages carry genes for potent toxins. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different compounds used in the food industry on the growth of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and the production of stx-phage particles and Shiga toxin. We tested the in vitro effect of lactic acid, acetic acid, citric acid, disodium phosphate, and sodium citrate on STEC growth. A bacteriostatic effect was observed in most of treated cultures. The exceptions were those treated with sodium citrate and disodium phosphate in which similar growth curves to the untreated control were observed, but with reduced OD600 values. Evaluation of phage production by plaque-based assays showed that cultures treated with sodium citrate and disodium phosphate released phages in similar o lower levels than untreated cultures. However, semi-quantification of Stx revealed higher levels of extracellular Stx in STEC cultures treated with 2.5% sodium citrate than in untreated cultures. Our results reinforce the importance to evaluate if additives and other treatments used to decrease bacterial contamination in food induce stx-phage and Stx production. PMID:27446032

  17. Effect of the Food Additives Sodium Citrate and Disodium Phosphate on Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli and Production of stx-Phages and Shiga toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzi, Lucas J; Lucchesi, Paula M A; Medico, Lucía; Burgán, Julia; Krüger, Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    Induction and propagation of bacteriophages along the food production chain can represent a significant risk when bacteriophages carry genes for potent toxins. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different compounds used in the food industry on the growth of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and the production of stx-phage particles and Shiga toxin. We tested the in vitro effect of lactic acid, acetic acid, citric acid, disodium phosphate, and sodium citrate on STEC growth. A bacteriostatic effect was observed in most of treated cultures. The exceptions were those treated with sodium citrate and disodium phosphate in which similar growth curves to the untreated control were observed, but with reduced OD600 values. Evaluation of phage production by plaque-based assays showed that cultures treated with sodium citrate and disodium phosphate released phages in similar o lower levels than untreated cultures. However, semi-quantification of Stx revealed higher levels of extracellular Stx in STEC cultures treated with 2.5% sodium citrate than in untreated cultures. Our results reinforce the importance to evaluate if additives and other treatments used to decrease bacterial contamination in food induce stx-phage and Stx production.

  18. Mtx toxins synergize Bacillus sphaericus and Cry11Aa against susceptible and insecticide-resistant Culex quinquefasciatus larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Margaret C; Yang, Yangkun; Walton, William E; Federici, Brian A; Berry, Colin

    2007-10-01

    Two mosquitocidal toxins (Mtx) of Bacillus sphaericus, which are produced during vegetative growth, were investigated for their potential to increase toxicity and reduce the expression of insecticide resistance through their interactions with other mosquitocidal proteins. Mtx-1 and Mtx-2 were fused with glutathione S-transferase and produced in Escherichia coli, after which lyophilized powders of these fusions were assayed against Culex quinquefasciatus larvae. Both Mtx proteins showed a high level of activity against susceptible C. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes, with 50% lethal concentrations (LC(50)) of Mtx-1 and Mtx-2 of 0.246 and 4.13 microg/ml, respectively. The LC(50)s were 0.406 to 0.430 microg/ml when Mtx-1 or Mtx-2 was mixed with B. sphaericus, and synergy improved activity and reduced resistance levels. When the proteins were combined with a recombinant Bacillus thuringiensis strain that produces Cry11Aa, the mixtures were highly active against Cry11A-resistant larvae and resistance was also reduced. The mixture of two Mtx toxins and B. sphaericus was 10 times more active against susceptible mosquitoes than B. sphaericus alone, demonstrating the influence of relatively low concentrations of these toxins. These results show that, similar to Cyt toxins from B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis, Mtx toxins can increase the toxicity of other mosquitocidal proteins and may be useful for both increasing the activity of commercial bacterial larvicides and managing potential resistance to these substances among mosquito populations.

  19. Probing of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae ApxIIIA toxin-dependent cytotoxicity towards mammalian peripheral blood mononucleated cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fett Thomas

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, the causative bacterial agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, produces Apx toxins which belong to RTX toxin family and are recognized as the major virulence factors. So far, their target receptor(s has not been identified and the disease cytopathogenesis remains poorly understood. Production of an active Apx toxin and characterization of its toxic activity constitute the premises necessary to the description of its interaction with a potential receptor. From this point of view, we produced an active recombinant ApxIIIA toxin in order to characterize its toxicity on peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMCs isolated from several species. Findings Toxin preparation exercises a strong cytotoxic action on porcine PBMCs which is directly related to recombinant ApxIIIA since preincubation with polymyxin B does not modify the cytotoxicity rate while preincubation with a monospecific polyclonal antiserum directed against ApxIIIA does. The cell death process triggered by ApxIIIA is extremely fast, the maximum rate of toxicity being already reached after 20 minutes of incubation. Moreover, ApxIIIA cytotoxicity is species-specific because llama, human, dog, rat and mouse PBMCs are resistant. Interestingly, bovine and caprine PBMCs are slightly sensitive to ApxIIIA toxin too. Finally, ApxIIIA cytotoxicity is cell type-specific as porcine epithelial cells are resistant. Conclusion We have produced an active recombinant ApxIIIA toxin and characterized its specific cytotoxicity on porcine PBMCs which will allow us to get new insights on porcine pleuropneumonia pathogenesis in the future.

  20. Classification of Na channel receptors specific for various scorpion toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, K P; Watt, D D; Lazdunski, M

    1983-04-01

    1. The specific binding to rat brain synaptosomes of a radiolabelled derivative of toxin II from the scorpion Centruroides suffusus suffusus could be prevented by toxins III and IV, but not by toxin V or variants 1-3, from the venom of Centruroides sculpturatus. 2. The specific binding of a similar derivative of toxin II from Androctonus australis Hector was not affected by any of the toxins from Centruroides sculpturatus. 3. There is biochemical evidence for only two distinct classes of Na channel receptors specific for known scorpion toxins.