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Sample records for bacterial sulfate reduction

  1. Controls on stable sulfur isotope fractionation during bacterial sulfate reduction in Arctic sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruchert, V.; Knoblauch, C.; Jørgensen, BB

    2001-01-01

    -specific sulfate reduction rates, these greater isotopic differences cannot be accounted for by significantly lower in situ bacterial sulfate reduction rates. Therefore, the remaining isotopic difference between sulfate and sulfide must derive from additional isotope effects that exist in the oxidative part of the...... fractionations varied by less than 5.8 parts per thousand with respect to temperature and sulfate reduction rate, whereas the difference in sulfur isotopic fractionation between bacteria with different carbon oxidation pathways was as large as 17.4 parts per thousand. Incubation of sediment slurries from two...... parts per thousand and 8 parts per thousand above 25 degreesC, respectively. In absence of significant differences in sulfate reduction rates in the high and low temperature range, respectively, we infer that different genera of sulfate-reducing bacteria dominate the sulfate-reducing bacterial community...

  2. Sulfur isotope fractionation during bacterial sulfate reduction in organic-rich sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habicht, K S; Canfield, D E

    1997-01-01

    Isotope fractionation during sulfate reduction by natural populations of sulfate-reducing bacteria was investigated in the cyanobacterial microbial mats of Solar Lake, Sinai and the sediments of Logten Lagoon sulfuretum, Denmark. Fractionation was measured at different sediment depths, sulfate...... natural populations of sulfate reducers and previous measurements from pure cultures. This was somewhat surprising given the extremely high rates of sulfate reduction in the experiments. Our results are explained if we conclude that the fractionation was mainly controlled by the specific rate of sulfate...... reduction (mass cell-1 time-1) and not by the absolute rate (mass volume-1 time-1). Sedimentary sulfides (mainly FeS2) were on average 40% depleted in 34S compared to seawater sulfate. This amount of depletion was more than could be explained by the isotopic fractionations that we measured during bacterial...

  3. Bacterial sulfate reduction in hydrothermal sediments of the Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California, Mexico

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, A.; Jørgensen, BB

    2002-01-01

    Depth distribution and temperature dependence of bacterial sulfate reduction were studied in hydrothermal surface sediments of the southern trough of the Guaymas Basin at 2000 m water depth. In situ temperatures ranged from 2.8 degreesC at the sediment surface to > 130degreesC at 30 cm depth in t...

  4. Role of sedimentary organic matter in bacterial sulfate reduction: the G model tested

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory study of the bacterial decomposition of Long Island Sound plankton in oxygenated seawater over a period of 2 years shows that the organic material undergoes decomposition via first-order kinetics and can be divided into two decomposable fractions, of considerably different reactivity, and a nonmetabolized fraction. This planktonic material, after undergoing varying degrees of oxic degradation, was added in the laboratory to anoxic sediment taken from a depth of 1 m at the NWC site of Long Island Sound and the rate of bacterial sulfate reduction in the sediment measured by the 35S radiotracer technique. The stimulated rate of sulfate reduction was in direct proportion to the amount of planktonic carbon added. This provides direct confirmation of the first-order decomposition, or G model, for marine sediments and proves that the in situ rate of sulfate reduction is organic-matter limited. Slower sulfate reduction rates resulted when oxically degraded plankton rather than fresh plankton was added, and the results confirm the presence of the same two fractions of organic matter deduced from the oxic degradation studies. Near-surface Long Island Sound sediment, which already contains abundant readily decomposable organic matter, was also subjected to anoxic decomposition by bacterial sulfate reduction. The decrease in sulfate reduction rate with time parallels decreases in the amount of organic matter, and these results also indicate the presence of two fractions of organic carbon of distinctly different reactivity. From plots of the log of reduction rate vs. time two first-order rate constants were obtained that agree well with those derived from the plankton addition experiment. Together, the two experiments confirm the use of a simple multi-first-order rate law for organic matter decomposition in marine sediments

  5. Comparative Study of Soluble Sulfate Reduction by Bacterial Consortia from Varied Regions of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Nasipuri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Soluble sulfate contamination in water is observed due to various industrial activities. Chemical means of reduction are available yet the biological approach is the preferred one. Problem statement: The problem addressed in this study was the isolation of efficient sulfate reducing bacterial consortia for bioremediation of soluble sulfate from mining effluent. Approach: The culture based method using the DSMZ specific media were used for isolation of sulfate reducing bacterial consortia. Their reduction efficiency was measured spectrophotometrically following growth under varied temperature and pH in specified media as well as in effluent water. The microbial consortia were analyzed at the 16SrDNA level to identify the members. The completeness as well as richness of the study was analyzed using OTU saturation curve, Shannon diversity index and equitability index. Results: All the eight consortia were able to tolerate vide range of pH (6-9 and temperature (20-40°C. They could reduce 63-99% of soluble sulfate (~2000 ppm in 48 h. Conclusion: This study reported about the enrichment of few of the most efficient anaerobic microbial consortia that could be employed for environmental soluble sulfate reduction under diverse pH and temperature conditions.

  6. Regulation of bacterial sulfate reduction and hydrogen sulfide fluxes in the central Namibian coastal upwelling zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruchert, V.; Jørgensen, BB; Neumann, K.;

    2003-01-01

    low capacity to oxidize and trap sulfide. The inner shelf break marks the seaward border of sulfidic bottom waters, and separates two different regimes of bacterial sulfate reduction. In the sulfidic bottom waters on the shelf, up to 55% of sulfide oxidation is mediated by the large nitrate......The coastal upwelling system off central Namibia is one of the most productive regions of the oceans and is characterized by frequently occurring shelf anoxia with severe effects for the benthic life and fisheries. We present data on water column dissolved oxygen, sulfide, nitrate and nitrite, pore...... water profiles for dissolved,sulfide and sulfate, S-35-sulfate reduction rates, as well as bacterial counts of large sulfur bacteria from 20 stations across the continental shelf and slope. The stations covered two transects and included the inner shelf with its anoxic and extremely oxygen...

  7. Bacterial Sulfate Reduction Above 100-Degrees-C in Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JØRGENSEN, BB; ISAKSEN, MF; JANNASCH, HW

    1992-01-01

    -reducing bacteria was done in hot deep-sea sediments at the hydrothermal vents of the Guaymas Basin tectonic spreading center in the Gulf of California. Radiotracer studies revealed that sulfate reduction can occur at temperatures up to 110-degrees-C, with an optimum rate at 103-degrees to 106-degrees-C. This...

  8. The Mineralogy and Microstructure of Sedimentary Zinc Sulfides Formed by Bacterial Sulfate Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, J. W.; Webb, R. I.; Banfield, J. F.

    2001-12-01

    Bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) is considered to be the predominant mechanism for low-temperature conversion of sulfate to sulfide [1] and is inferred to have existed since the early Proterozoic [2, 3]. Because BSR leads to precipitation of abundant metal sulfide minerals, some ancient, low-temperature sedimentary ore deposits are now hypothesized to have biogenic origins [4]. We have studied zinc sulfide minerals produced by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) living in anoxic, 8 oC waters of a flooded mine near Tennyson, Wisconsin [5]. Our objectives were to characterize the morphology, mineralogy, and microstructure of the biominerals and to look for potential biosignatures. Scanning electron microscope images from cryofixed, freeze-fractured samples and transmission electron microscope (TEM) images from ultramicrotomed samples show a close association between cells and spherical aggregates of ZnS. However, SRB cells are generally not coated by ZnS, implying that the particles form and aggregate in solution after sulfide is expelled from the cell. High-resolution TEM images reveal that the few-micron diameter spheres are comprised of about a billion ZnS particles that are typically 1.5-5 nm in diameter. More coarsely crystalline regions appear to have grown via oriented aggregation of smaller nanoparticles. In some cases, orientation gives rise to twinning on \\{111\\} sphalerite. ZnS particles are primarily sphalerite, but domains of wurtzite are not uncommon. Even some of the smallest particles have periodic structure and well-defined morphologies. Reasons for the formation of wurtzite remain unclear, but may be related to the sulfide concentration during aggregation of multinuclear clusters [6] or size-dependent phase stability. In addition, the ZnS spheres are not of uniform density throughout, but contain concentric zones separated from each other by 5-7 nm-wide (average) regions of low particle density. The number of zones per sphere is variable, as is the

  9. Kinetic studies of bacterial sulfate reduction in freshwater sediments by high-pressure liquid chromatography and microdistillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hordijk, K A; Hagenaars, C P; Cappenberg, T E

    1985-02-01

    Indirect photometric chromatography and microdistillation enabled a simultaneous measurement of sulfate depletion and sulfide production in the top 3 cm of freshwater sediments to be made. The simultaneous measurement of sulfate depletion and sulfide production rates provided added insight into microbial sulfur metabolism. The lower sulfate reduction rates, as derived from the production of acid-volatile S only, were explained by a conversion of this pool to an undistillable fraction under acidic conditions during incubation. A mathematical model was applied to calculate sulfate reduction from sulfate gradients at the sediment-water interface. To avoid disturbance of these gradients, the sample volume was reduced to 0.2 g (wet weight) of sediment. Sulfate diffusion coefficients in the model were determined (D(s) = 0.3 x 10 cm s at 6 degrees C). The results of the model were compared with those of radioactive sulfate turnover experiments by assessing the actual turnover rate constants (2 to 5 day) and pool sizes of sulfate at different sediment depths. PMID:16346732

  10. Effect of contaminant concentration on in situ bacterial sulfate reduction and methanogenesis in phenol-contaminated groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of dissolved O2 can limit biodegradation of organic compounds in aquifers. Where O2 is depleted, biodegradation proceeds via anaerobic processes, including NO3-, Mn(IV)-, Fe(III)- and SO4-reduction and fermentation/methanogenesis. The environmental controls on these anaerobic processes must be understood to support implementation of management strategies such as monitored natural attenuation (MNA). In this study stable isotope analysis is used to show that the relative significance of two key anaerobic biodegradation processes (bacterial SO4 reduction (BSR) and methanogenesis) in a phenol-contaminated sandstone aquifer is sensitive to spatial and temporal changes in total dissolved phenols concentration (TPC) (= phenol + cresols + dimethylphenols) over a 5-a period. In general, 34SO4-enrichment (characteristic of bacterial SO4 reduction) is restricted spatially to locations where TPC −1. In contrast, 13C-depleted CH4 and 13C-enriched CO2 isotope compositions (characteristic of methanogenesis) were measured at TPC up to 8000 mg L−1. This is consistent with previous studies that demonstrate suppression of BSR at TPC of >500 mg L−1, and suggests that methanogenic microorganisms may have a higher tolerance for TPC in this contaminant plume. It is concluded that isotopic enrichment trends can be used to identify conditions under which in situ biodegradation may be limited by the properties of the biodegradation substrate (in this case TPC). Such data may be used to deduce the performance of MNA for contaminated groundwater in similar settings.

  11. Sulfate reduction in freshwater peatlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This text consist of two parts: Part A is a literature review on microbial sulfate reduction with emphasis on freshwater peatlands, and part B presents the results from a study of the relative importance of sulfate reduction and methane formation for the anaerobic decomposition in a boreal peatland. The relative importance of sulfate reduction and methane production for the anaerobic decomposition was studied in a small raised bog situated in the boreal zone of southern Sweden. Depth distribution of sulfate reduction- and methane production rates were measured in peat sampled from three sites (A, B, and C) forming an minerotrophic-ombrotrophic gradient. SO42- concentrations in the three profiles were of equal magnitude and ranged from 50 to 150 μM. In contrast, rates of sulfate reduction were vastly different: Maximum rates in the three profiles were obtained at a depth of ca. 20 cm below the water table. In A it was 8 μM h-1 while in B and C they were 1 and 0.05 μM h-1, respectively. Methane production rates, however, were more uniform across the three nutrient regimes. Maximum rates in A (ca. 1.5 μg d-1 g-1) were found 10 cm below the water table, in B (ca. 1.0 μg d-1 g-1) in the vicinity of the water table, and in C (0.75 μg d-1 g-1) 20 cm below the water table. In all profiles both sulfate reduction and methane production rates were negligible above the water table. The areal estimates of methane production for the profiles were 22.4, 9.0 and 6.4 mmol m-2 d-1, while the estimates for sulfate reduction were 26.4, 2.5, and 0.1 mmol m-2 d-1, respectively. The calculated turnover times at the sites were 1.2, 14.2, and 198.7 days, respectively. The study shows that sulfate reducing bacteria are important for the anaerobic degradation in the studied peatland, especially in the minerotrophic sites, while methanogenic bacteria dominate in ombrotrophic sites Examination paper. 67 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  12. Highly-defective nanocrystals of ZnS formed via dissimilatory bacterial sulfate reduction: A comparative study with their abiogenic analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Murayama, Mitsuhiro; Roco, Charles M.; Veeramani, Harish; Michel, F. Marc; Rimstidt, J. Donald; Winkler, Christopher; Hochella, Michael F.

    2016-05-01

    The physicochemical properties of a (nano)mineral are strongly affected by its formation processes, and thus, may indicate the (nano)mineral's formation environment and mechanism. This correlation, although relevant to a myriad of geological, environmental, and material-science processes, has not yet been fully appreciated and systematically explored. Here, using the Zn-S system, we demonstrate that biological and abiotic processes at similar experimental conditions can produce distinctive particle size, morphology, and crystal structure in the formed ZnS. Specifically, bacterial sulfate reduction led to the formation of highly-defective nanocrystals of mixed sphalerite and wurtzite in a range of ∼4-12 nm. By comparison, the abiotic procedures of titration- or diffusion-controlled precipitation resulted in the formation of polycrystalline aggregates that contained randomly-oriented, ultrafine crystals below ∼2-3 nm. The poor crystallinity in the abiogenic samples, regardless of the sulfide addition rates, reveals an overall nucleation-dominated, crystal growth-restricted pathway for the formation of ZnS from low-temperature aqueous solutions. The difficulty in the ZnS crystallization likely stems from the intrinsic surface instability of the ZnS growth units (i.e., in the form of nanoclusters) resulting from the dipole-dipole interactions of the unit with surrounding water molecules. In the biogenic samples, the ZnS crystallinity was significantly improved, indicating that the presence of bacterial metabolites somehow promoted the crystallization process. With evidence for the enlarged {1 1 1} planes in the biogenic nanocrystals, we attribute this enhancement mainly to the selective interaction of the bacterial metabolites with polar faces of the ZnS growth units, which might have effectively screened the dipole moments in the growth units and enabled their crystallographic assembly. By revealing the intrinsic difficulty and specific pathways for the Zn

  13. Sulfate reduction and methanogenesis in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R. S.; Taylor, B. F.

    1978-01-01

    Methanogenesis and sulfate-reduction were followed in laboratory incubations of sediments taken from tropical seagrass beds. Methanogenesis and sulfate-reduction occurred simultaneously in sediments incubated under N2, thereby indicating that the two processes are not mutually exclusive. Sediments incubated under an atmosphere of H2 developed negative pressures due to the oxidation of H2 by sulfate-respiring bacteria. H2 also stimulated methanogenesis, but methanogenic bacteria could not compete for H2 with the sulfate-respiring bacteria.

  14. Enhanced sulfate reduction with acidogenic sulfate-reducing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulfate reduction in a continuous flow, acidogenic reactor using molasses wastewater as the carbon source was studied at varying chemical oxygen demand/sulfate (COD/SO42-) ratios. At a critical COD/SO42- ratio of 2.7, neither COD nor sulfate were in excess for extra production of ethanol or acetate in the reactor. An acetic-type microbial metabolism was established with sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) significantly consuming hydrogen and volatile fatty acids produced by acidogenic bacteria and hydrogen producing acetogens in degrading COD, thereby yielding sulfate removal rate >94.6%. A low critical COD/SO42- ratio of 1.6 was also observed with the enriched ASRB population in reactor which overcomes the barrier to the treatment capability of sulfate-laden wastewater treatment with limited COD supply

  15. Influence of the enzyme dissimilatory sulfite reductase on stable isotope fractionation during sulfate reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangalo, Muna; Einsiedl, Florian; Meckenstock, Rainer U.; Stichler, Willibald

    2008-03-01

    The stable isotopes of sulfate are often used as a tool to assess bacterial sulfate reduction on the macro scale. However, the mechanisms of stable isotope fractionation of sulfur and oxygen at the enzymatic level are not yet fully understood. In batch experiments with water enriched in 18O we investigated the effect of different nitrite concentrations on sulfur isotope fractionation by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. With increasing nitrite concentrations, we found sulfur isotope enrichment factors ranging from -11.2 ± 1.8‰ to -22.5 ± 3.2‰. Furthermore, the δ18O values in the remaining sulfate increased from approximately 50-120‰ when 18O-enriched water was supplied. Since 18O-exchange with ambient water does not take place in sulfate, but rather in intermediates of the sulfate reduction pathway (e.g. SO32-), we suggest that nitrite affects the steady-state concentration and the extent of reoxidation of the metabolic intermediate sulfite to sulfate during sulfate reduction. Given that nitrite is known to inhibit the production of the enzyme dissimilatory sulfite reductase, our results suggest that the activity of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase regulates the kinetic isotope fractionation of sulfur and oxygen during bacterial sulfate reduction. Our novel results also imply that isotope fractionation during bacterial sulfate reduction strongly depends on the cell internal enzymatic regulation rather than on the physico-chemical features of the individual enzymes.

  16. A revised isotope fractionation model for dissimilatory sulfate reduction in sulfate reducing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Benjamin; Bernasconi, Stefano M.

    2005-10-01

    Sulfur isotope fractionation during dissimilatory sulfate reduction has been conceptually described by the widely accepted Rees model as related to the stepwise reduction of sulfate to sulfide within the cells of bacteria. The magnitude of isotope fractionation is determined by the interplay between different reduction steps in a chain of reactions. Here we present a revision of Rees' model for bacterial sulfate reduction that includes revised fractionation factors for the sulfite-sulfide step and incorporates new forward and reverse steps in the reduction of sulfite to sulfide, as well as exchange of sulfide between the cell and ambient water. With this model we show that in contrast to the Rees model, isotope fractionations well in excess of -46‰ are possible. Therefore, some of the large sulfur isotope fractionations observed in nature can be explained without the need of alternate pathways involving the oxidative sulfur cycle. We use this model to predict that large fractionations should occur under hypersulfidic conditions and where electron acceptor concentrations are limiting.

  17. Experimental sulfate amendment alters peatland bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickman, R J S; Fulthorpe, R R; Coleman Wasik, J K; Engstrom, D R; Mitchell, C P J

    2016-10-01

    As part of a long-term, peatland-scale sulfate addition experiment, the impact of varying sulfate deposition on bacterial community responses was assessed using 16S tag encoded pyrosequencing. In three separate areas of the peatland, sulfate manipulations included an eight year quadrupling of atmospheric sulfate deposition (experimental), a 3-year recovery to background deposition following 5years of elevated deposition (recovery), and a control area. Peat concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg), a bioaccumulative neurotoxin, were measured, the production of which is attributable to a growing list of microorganisms, including many sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria. The total bacterial and Deltaproteobacterial community structures in the experimental treatment differed significantly from those in the control and recovery treatments that were either indistinguishable or very similar to one another. Notably, the relatively rapid return (within three years) of bacterial community structure in the recovery treatment to a state similar to the control, demonstrates significant resilience of the peatland bacterial community to changes in atmospheric sulfate deposition. Changes in MeHg accumulation between sulfate treatments correlated with changes in the Deltaproteobacterial community, suggesting that sulfate may affect MeHg production through changes in the community structure of this group. PMID:27267720

  18. Dimethylsulfoxide reduction by marine sulfate-reducing bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Jonkers, Henk M.; van der Maarel, Marc J. E. C.; van Gemerden, Hans; Hansen, Theo A.

    1996-01-01

    Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) reduction occurred in five out of nine strains of sulfate-reducing bacteria from marine or saline environments, but not in three freshwater isolates. DMSO reduction supported growth in all positive strains. In Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain PA2805, DMSO reduction occurred simultaneously-with sulfate reduction and was not effectively inhibited by molybdate, a specific inhibitor of sulfate reduction. The growth yield per mol lactate was 26% higher with DMSO than wit...

  19. Anaerobic BTEX biodegradation linked to nitrate and sulfate reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effective anaerobic BTEX biodegradation was obtained under nitrate and sulfate reducing conditions by the mixed bacterial consortium that were enriched from gasoline contaminated soil. Under the conditions of using nitrate or sulfate as reducing acceptor, the degradation rates of the six tested substrates decreased with toluene > ethylbenzene > m-xylene > o-xylene > benzene > p-xylene. The higher concentrations of BTEX were toxic to the mixed cultures and led to reduce the degradation rates of BTEX. Benzene and p-xylene were more toxic than toluene and ethylbenzene. Nitrate was a more favorable electron acceptor compared to sulfate. The measured ratios between the amount of nitrate consumed and the amount of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, o-xylene, m-xylene, p-xylene degraded were 9.47, 9.26, 11.14, 12.46, 13.36 and 13.02, respectively. The measured ratios between sulfate reduction and BTEX degradation were 3.51, 4.33, 4.89, 4.81, 4.86 and 4.76, respectively, which were nearly the same to theoretical ones, and the relative error between the measured and calculated ratios was less than 10%

  20. Sulfate reduction and anaerobic methane oxidation in Black Sea sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, BB; Weber, A.; Zopfi, J.

    2001-01-01

    Beyond the shelf break at ca. 150 m water depth, sulfate reduction is the only important process of organic matter oxidation in Black Sea sediments from the surface down to the sulfate-methane transition at 2-4 m depth. Sulfate reduction rates were measured experimentally with (SO42-)-S-35, and the...... the process was very sluggish with turnover times of methane within the sulfate-methane transition zone of 20 yr or more. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.Beyond the shelf break at ca. 150 m water depth, sulfate reduction is the only important process of organic matter oxidation in...... Black Sea sediments from the surface down to the sulfate-methane transition at 2-4 m depth. Sulfate reduction rates were measured experimentally with (SO42-)-S-35, and the rates were compared with results of two diffusion-reaction models. The results showed that, even in these non-bioirrigated sediments...

  1. Drag Reduction of Bacterial Cellulose Suspensions

    OpenAIRE

    Ogata, Satoshi; Numakawa, Tetsuya; Kubo, Takuya

    2010-01-01

    Drag reduction due to bacterial cellulose suspensions with small environmental loading was investigated. Experiments were carried out by measuring the pressure drop in pipe flow. It was found that bacterial cellulose suspensions give rise to drag reduction in the turbulent flow range. We observed a maximum drag reduction ratio of 11% and found that it increased with the concentration of the bacterial cellulose suspension. However, the drag reduction effect decreased in the presence of mechani...

  2. Drag Reduction of Bacterial Cellulose Suspensions

    OpenAIRE

    Satoshi Ogata; Tetsuya Numakawa; Takuya Kubo

    2011-01-01

    Drag reduction due to bacterial cellulose suspensions with small environmental loading was investigated. Experiments were carried out by measuring the pressure drop in pipe flow. It was found that bacterial cellulose suspensions give rise to drag reduction in the turbulent flow range. We observed a maximum drag reduction ratio of 11% and found that it increased with the concentration of the bacterial cellulose suspension. However, the drag reduction effect decreased in the presence of mechani...

  3. Terminal Processes in the Anaerobic Degradation of an Algal-Bacterial Mat in a High-Sulfate Hot Spring

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, David M.; Olson, Gregory J.

    1980-01-01

    The algal-bacterial mat of a high-sulfate hot spring (Bath Lake) provided an environment in which to compare terminal processes involved in anaerobic decomposition. Sulfate reduction was found to dominate methane production, as indicated by comparison of initial electron flow through the two processes, rapid conversion of [2-14C]acetate to 14CO2 and not to 14CH4, and the lack of rapid reduction of NaH14CO3 to 14CH4. Sulfate reduction was the dominant process at all depth intervals, but a mark...

  4. Terminal processes in the anaerobic degradation of an algal-bacterial mat in a high-sulfate hot spring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The algal-bacterial mat of a high-sulfate hot spring (Bath Lake) provided an environment in which to compare terminal processes involved in anaerobic decomposition. Sulfate reduction was found to dominate methane production, as indicated by comparison of initial electron flow through the two processes, rapid conversion of [2-14C]acetate to 14CO2 and not to 14CH4, and the lack of rapid reduction of NaH14CO3 to 14CH4. Sulfate reduction was the dominant process at all depth intervals, but a marked decrease of sulfate reduction and sulfate-reducing bacteria was observed with depth. Concurrent methanogenesis was indicated by the presence of viable methanogenic bacteria and very low but detectable rates of methane production. A marked increase in methane production was observed after sulfate depletion despite high concentrations of sulfide (>1.25 mM), indicating that methanogenesis was not inhibited by sulfide in the natural environment. Although a sulfate minimum and sulfide maximum occurred in the region of maximal sulfate reduction, the absence of sulfate depletion in interstitial water suggests that methanogenesis is always severely limited in Bath Lake sediments. Low initial methanogenesis was not due to anaerobic methane oxidation

  5. Chlorophenol Degradation Coupled to Sulfate Reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Häggblom, M M; Young, L. Y.

    1991-01-01

    We studied chlorophenol degradation under sulfate-reducing conditions with an estuarine sediment inoculum. These cultures degraded 0.1 mM 2-, 3-, and 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol within 120 to 220 days, but after refeeding with chlorophenols degradation took place in 40 days or less. Further refeeding greatly enhanced the rate of degradation. Sulfate consumption by the cultures corresponded to the stoichiometric values expected for complete oxidation of the chlorophenol to CO2. Forma...

  6. Sulfur and oxygen isotope studies of sulfate reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, J.; Canfield, D. E.; Bao, H.; Masterson, A.; Johnston, D. T.; Wing, B. A.

    2007-12-01

    I will discuss insights into sulfur and oxygen isotope fractionations of dissimilatory sulfate reduction and specifically insight provided by experiments with natural populations of sulfate-reducing bacteria from Faellestrand, Denmark. The experiments yielded relatively large magnitude sulfur isotope fractionations for dissimilatory sulfate reduction (up to approximately 45 ‰ for 34S/32S), with higher δ18O accompanying higher δ34S, similar to that observed in previous studies. The seawater used in the experiments was spiked by addition of 17O-labelled water and the 17O content of residual sulfate was found to depend on the fraction of sulfate reduced in the experiments. The 17O data provides evidence for recycling of sulfur from metabolic intermediates and for an 18O/16O fractionation of ~25-30 ‰ for dissimilatory sulfate reduction, a magnitude that is consistent with isotopic exchange between a sulfite species and cell water. The molar ratio of oxygen exchange to sulfate reduction was found to be about 2.5. Using recent models of sulfur isotope fractionations we find that our combined sulfur and oxygen isotopic data places constraints on the proportion of sulfate recycled to the medium (78-96 %), the proportion of sulfur intermediate sulfite that was recycled by way of APS to sulfate and released back to the external sulfate pool (~70%) and also that a fraction of the sulfur intermediates between sulfite and sulfide were recycled to sulfate. These parameters can be constrained because of the independent information provided by δ18O, δ34S, 17O labels, and Δ33S.

  7. Biotechnological aspects of sulfate reduction with methane as electron donor

    OpenAIRE

    Meulepas, R.J.W.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2010-01-01

    Biological sulfate reduction can be used for the removal and recovery of oxidized sulfur compounds and metals from waste streams. However, the costs of conventional electron donors, like hydrogen and ethanol, limit the application possibilities. Methane from natural gas or biogas would be a more attractive electron donor. Sulfate reduction with methane as electron donor prevails in marine sediments. Recently, several authors succeeded in cultivating the responsible microorganisms in vitro. In...

  8. Dimethylsulfoxide reduction by marine sulfate-reducing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, Henk M.; Maarel, Marc J.E.C. van der; Gemerden, Hans van; Hansen, Theo A.

    1996-01-01

    Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) reduction occurred in five out of nine strains of sulfate-reducing bacteria from marine or saline environments, but not in three freshwater isolates. DMSO reduction supported growth in all positive strains. In Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain PA2805, DMSO reduction occurre

  9. Sulfate reduction and methanogenesis at a freshwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Vibeke Margrethe Nyvang; Andersen, Martin Søgaard; Jakobsen, Rasmus

    enriched in dissolved sulfide, methane and bicarbonate. Under normal conditions the seawater-freshwater interface is found at a depth of 4 m at the coastline and reaches the bottom of the aquifer 40 m inland. However, occasional flooding of the area occurs, introducing sulfate to the aquifer. Groundwater...

  10. Sulfate Reduction Remediation of a Metals Plume Through Organic Injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory testing and a field-scale demonstration for the sulfate reduction remediation of an acidic/metals/sulfate groundwater plume at the Savannah River Site has been conducted. The laboratory testing consisted of the use of anaerobic microcosms to test the viability of three organic substrates to promote microbially mediated sulfate reduction. Based upon the laboratory testing, soybean oil and sodium lactate were selected for injection during the subsequent field-scale demonstration. The field-scale demonstration is currently ongoing. Approximately 825 gallons (3,123 L) of soybean oil and 225 gallons (852 L) of 60 percent sodium lactate have been injected into an existing well system within the plume. Since the injections, sulfate concentrations in the injection zone have significantly decreased, sulfate-reducing bacteria concentrations have significantly increased, the pH has increased, the Eh has decreased, and the concentrations of many metals have decreased. Microbially mediated sulfate reduction has been successfully promoted for the remediation of the acidic/metals/sulfate plume by the injection of soybean oil and sodium lactate within the plume

  11. Eutrophication, microbial-sulfate reduction and mass extinctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schobben, Martin; Stebbins, Alan; Ghaderi, Abbas; Strauss, Harald; Korn, Dieter; Korte, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    In post-Cambrian time, life on Earth experienced 5 major extinction events, likely instigated by adverse environmental conditions. Biodiversity loss among marine taxa, for at least 3 of these mass extinction events (Late Devonian, end-Permian and end-Triassic), has been connected with widespread oxygen-depleted and sulfide-bearing marine water. Furthermore, geochemical and sedimentary evidence suggest that these events correlate with rather abrupt climate warming and possibly increased terrestrial weathering. This suggests that biodiversity loss may be triggered by mechanisms intrinsic to the Earth system, notably, the biogeochemical sulfur and carbon cycle. This climate warming feedback produces large-scale eutrophication on the continental shelf, which, in turn, expands oxygen minimum zones by increased respiration, which can turn to a sulfidic state by increased microbial-sulfate reduction due to increased availability of organic matter. A plankton community turnover from a high-diversity eukaryote to high-biomass bacterial dominated food web is the catalyst proposed in this anoxia-extinction scenario and stands in stark contrast to the postulated productivity collapse suggested for the end-Cretaceous mass extinction. This cascade of events is relevant for the future ocean under predicted greenhouse driven climate change. The exacerbation of anoxic "dead" zones is already progressing in modern oceanic environments, and this is likely to increase due to climate induced continental weathering and resulting eutrophication of the oceans. PMID:27066181

  12. Arsenic mobilization from sediments in microcosms under sulfate reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Quicksall, Andrew N; Chillrud, Steven N; Mailloux, Brian J; Bostick, Benjamin C

    2016-06-01

    Arsenic is often assumed to be immobile in sulfidic environments. Here, laboratory-scale microcosms were conducted to investigate whether microbial sulfate reduction could control dissolved arsenic concentrations sufficiently for use in groundwater remediation. Sediments from the Vineland Superfund site and the Coeur d'Alene mining district were amended with different combination of lactate and sulfate and incubated for 30-40 days. In general, sulfate reduction in Vineland sediments resulted in transient and incomplete arsenic removal, or arsenic release from sediments. Sulfate reduction in the Coeur d'Alene sediments was more effective at removing arsenic from solution than the Vineland sediments, probably by arsenic substitution and adsorption within iron sulfides. X-ray absorption spectroscopy indicated that the Vineland sediments initially contained abundant reactive ferrihydrite, and underwent extensive sulfur cycling during incubation. As a result, arsenic in the Vineland sediments could not be effectively converted to immobile arsenic-bearing sulfides, but instead a part of the arsenic was probably converted to soluble thioarsenates. These results suggest that coupling between the iron and sulfur redox cycles must be fully understood for in situ arsenic immobilization by sulfate reduction to be successful. PMID:27037658

  13. Are oxygen isotopes of sulfate a useful tool for the quantification of sulfate reduction in a BTEX contaminated aquifer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mineralization of organic contaminants to carbon dioxide and water by naturally occurring in-situ biodegradation is the basic concept of the natural attenuation of polluted aquifers. Sulfate reducing bacteria can contribute extensively to the biodegradation of organic contaminants. During the dissimilatory reduction of sulfate, the microorganisms produce sulfide to obtain energy for the oxidation of organic carbon provided by the contaminants. The preferential utilization of the lighter isotopes by bacteria usually results in the enrichment of the lighter isotope in the produced sulfide and of the heavier isotope in the remaining sulfate. For sulfur, the isotopic enrichment in the remaining sulfate has been used quite successfully for the identification and quantification of bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR). However, only little is known about the behavior of oxygen isotopes in sulfate during sulfate reduction under the specific conditions of an organic contamination. Therefore one goal of this study was to specify the fractionation mechanisms of sulfate oxygen closely related to biodegradation. The contamination of the investigated Quaternary aquifer is related to the operation of an industrial site that was originally set up in 1938 for the production of gasoline and upgraded for the production of benzene in 1960. During the operation from 1938 to 1990, numerous production accidents and leaks contributed to BTEX-contamination of the groundwater. To obtain the basic fractionation parameters for sulfur and oxygen, experimental and field data were used. Microcosm experiments were inoculated with an enrichment culture from the study area. All experiments were conducted with toluene as the solely source of organic carbon. Groundwater samples were collected from multi-level sampling wells in a ca. 500 m2 area within the contaminant plume. The sampling area was selected in order to avoid a mixing of sulfate from different sources. Groundwater and laboratory samples

  14. Are oxygen isotopes of sulfate a useful tool for the quantification of sulfate reduction in a BTEX contaminated aquifer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mineralization of organic contaminants to carbon dioxide and water by naturally occurring in-situ biodegradation is the basic concept of the natural attenuation of polluted aquifers. Sulfate reducing bacteria can contribute extensively to the biodegradation of organic contaminants. During the dissimilatory reduction of sulfate, the microorganisms produce sulfide to obtain energy for the oxidation of organic carbon provided by the contaminants. The preferential utilization of the lighter isotopes by bacteria usually results in the enrichment of the lighter isotope in the produced sulfide and of the heavier isotope in the remaining sulfate. For sulfur, the isotopic enrichment in the remaining sulfate has been used quite successfully for the identification and quantification of bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR). However, only little is known about the behaviour of oxygen isotopes in sulfate during sulfate reduction under the specific conditions of an organic contamination. Therefore one goal of this study was to specify the fractionation mechanisms of sulfate oxygen closely related to biodegradation. The contamination of the investigated Quaternary aquifer is related to the operation of an industrial site that was originally set up in 1938 for the production of gasoline and upgraded for the production of benzene in 1960. During the operation from 1938 to 1990, numerous production accidents and leaks contributed to BTEX-contamination of the groundwater. To obtain the basic fractionation parameters for sulfur and oxygen, experimental and field data were used. Microcosm experiments were inoculated with an enrichment culture from the study area. All experiments were conducted with toluene as the solely source of organic carbon. Groundwater samples were collected from multi- level sampling wells in a ca. 500 m2 area within the contaminant plume. The sampling area was selected in order to avoid a mixing of sulfate from different sources. Groundwater and laboratory

  15. Effect of the cathode potential and sulfate ions on nitrate reduction in a microbial electrochemical denitrification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Van Khanh; Park, Younghyun; Yang, Heechun; Yu, Jaecheul; Lee, Taeho

    2016-06-01

    Recently, bioelectrochemical systems have been demonstrated as advantageous for denitrification. Here, we investigated the nitrate reduction rate and bacterial community on cathodes at different cathode potentials [-300, -500, -700, and -900 mV vs. standard hydrogen electrode (SHE)] in a two-chamber microbial electrochemical denitrification system and effects of sulfate, a common nitrate co-contaminant, on denitrification efficiency. The results indicated that the highest nitrate reduction rates (3.5 mg L(-1) days(-1)) were obtained at a cathode potential of -700 mV, regardless of sulfate presence, while a lower rate was observed at a more negative cathode potential (-900 mV). Notably, although sulfate ions generally inhibited nitrate reduction, this effect was absent at a cathode potential of -700 mV. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed that bacterial communities on the graphite-felt cathode were significantly affected by the cathode potential change and sulfate presence. Shinella-like and Alicycliphilus-like bacterial species were exclusively observed on cathodes in reactors without sulfate. Ochrobactrum-like and Sinorhizobium-like bacterial species, which persisted at different cathode potentials irrespective of sulfate presence, were shown to contribute to bioelectrochemical denitrification. This study suggested that a cathode potential of around -700 mV versus SHE would ensure optimal nitrate reduction rate and counteract inhibitory effects of sulfate. Additionally, sulfate presence considerably affects denitrification efficiency and microbial community of microbial electrochemical denitrification systems. PMID:27021845

  16. D-Area Sulfate Reduction Studty Comprehensive Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phifer, M

    2005-02-11

    An acidic/metals/sulfate, groundwater contaminant plume emanates from the D-Area Coal Pile Runoff Basin (DCPRB) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), due to the contaminated runoff the basin receives from the D-Area coal pile. A Treatability Study Work Plan (TSWP) (WSRC 2001) was implemented to evaluate the potential for the sulfate reduction remediation of the DCPRB acidic/metals/sulfate, groundwater contaminant plume. The following studies, implemented as part of the TSWP, are documented herein: Bacteria Population and Organic Selection Laboratory Testing; DTT-1 Trench Evaluation; DIW-1 Organic Application Field Study-Part 1; and DIW-1 Organic Application Field Study-Part 2. Evaluation of sulfate reduction applicability actually began with a literature search and feasibility report in mid 2001, which fed into the TSWP. Physical completion of TSWP work occurred in late 2004 with the completion of the DIW-1 Organic Application Field Study-Part 2. The following are the primary conclusions drawn based upon this 3-year effort: (1) Pure soybean oil provides a long-term, indirect, SRB carbon source that floats on top of the water table (by indirect it means that the soybean oil must be degraded by other microbes prior to utilization by SRB) for the promotion of sulfate reduction remediation. Soybean oil produces no known SRB inhibitory response and therefore large quantities can be injected. (2) Sodium lactate provides a short-term, immediately available, direct, SRB carbon source that is miscible with the groundwater and therefore flows with the groundwater until it has been completely utilized for the promotion of sulfate reduction remediation. Lactate at elevated concentrations (greater than 6 g/L) does produce a SRB inhibitory response and therefore small quantities must be injected frequently. (3) The use of limestone to buffer the contaminated groundwater facilitates sulfate reduction remediation through the injection of organic substrate. Additionally conclusions and

  17. Microbial minimalism: genome reduction in bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Nancy A

    2002-03-01

    When bacterial lineages make the transition from free-living or facultatively parasitic life cycles to permanent associations with hosts, they undergo a major loss of genes and DNA. Complete genome sequences are providing an understanding of how extreme genome reduction affects evolutionary directions and metabolic capabilities of obligate pathogens and symbionts. PMID:11893328

  18. An intertwined evolutionary history of methanogenic archaea and sulfate reduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Susanti

    Full Text Available Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and dissimilatory sulfate reduction, two of the oldest energy conserving respiratory systems on Earth, apparently could not have evolved in the same host, as sulfite, an intermediate of sulfate reduction, inhibits methanogenesis. However, certain methanogenic archaea metabolize sulfite employing a deazaflavin cofactor (F(420-dependent sulfite reductase (Fsr where N- and C-terminal halves (Fsr-N and Fsr-C are homologs of F(420H(2 dehydrogenase and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (Dsr, respectively. From genome analysis we found that Fsr was likely assembled from freestanding Fsr-N homologs and Dsr-like proteins (Dsr-LP, both being abundant in methanogens. Dsr-LPs fell into two groups defined by following sequence features: Group I (simplest, carrying a coupled siroheme-[Fe(4-S(4] cluster and sulfite-binding Arg/Lys residues; Group III (most complex, with group I features, a Dsr-type peripheral [Fe(4-S(4] cluster and an additional [Fe(4-S(4] cluster. Group II Dsr-LPs with group I features and a Dsr-type peripheral [Fe(4-S(4] cluster were proposed as evolutionary intermediates. Group III is the precursor of Fsr-C. The freestanding Fsr-N homologs serve as F(420H(2 dehydrogenase unit of a putative novel glutamate synthase, previously described membrane-bound electron transport system in methanogens and of assimilatory type sulfite reductases in certain haloarchaea. Among archaea, only methanogens carried Dsr-LPs. They also possessed homologs of sulfate activation and reduction enzymes. This suggested a shared evolutionary history for methanogenesis and sulfate reduction, and Dsr-LPs could have been the source of the oldest (3.47-Gyr ago biologically produced sulfide deposit.

  19. The effects of acid deposition on sulfate reduction and methane production in peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Georgia L.; Hines, Mark E.; Bayley, Suzanne E.

    1992-01-01

    Peatlands, as fens and bods, make up a large percentage of northern latitude terrestrial environments. They are organic rich and support an active community of anaerobic bacteria, such as methanogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria. The end products of these microbial activities, methane and hydrogen sulfide, are important components in the global biogeochemical cycles of carbon and sulfur. Since these two bacterial groups compete for nutritional substrates, increases in sulfate deposition due to acid rain potentially can disrupt the balance between these processes leading to a decrease in methane production and emission. This is significant because methane is a potent greenhouse gas that effects the global heat balance. A section of Mire 239 in the Experimental Lakes Area, in Northwestern Ontario, was artificially acidified and rates of sulfate reduction and methane production were measured with depth. Preliminary results suggested that methane production was not affected immediately after acidification. However, concentrations of dissolved methane decreased and dissolved sulfide increased greatly after acidification and both took several days to recover. The exact mechanism for the decrease in methane was not determined. Analyses are under way which will be used to determine rates of sulfate reduction. These results will be available by Spring and will be discussed.

  20. Anaerobic oxidation of methane associated with sulfate reduction in a natural freshwater gas source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmers, Peer Ha; Suarez-Zuluaga, Diego A; van Rossem, Minke; Diender, Martijn; Stams, Alfons Jm; Plugge, Caroline M

    2016-06-01

    The occurrence of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and trace methane oxidation (TMO) was investigated in a freshwater natural gas source. Sediment samples were taken and analyzed for potential electron acceptors coupled to AOM. Long-term incubations with (13)C-labeled CH4 ((13)CH4) and different electron acceptors showed that both AOM and TMO occurred. In most conditions, (13)C-labeled CO2 ((13)CO2) simultaneously increased with methane formation, which is typical for TMO. In the presence of nitrate, neither methane formation nor methane oxidation occurred. Net AOM was measured only with sulfate as electron acceptor. Here, sulfide production occurred simultaneously with (13)CO2 production and no methanogenesis occurred, excluding TMO as a possible source for (13)CO2 production from (13)CH4. Archaeal 16S rRNA gene analysis showed the highest presence of ANME-2a/b (ANaerobic MEthane oxidizing archaea) and AAA (AOM Associated Archaea) sequences in the incubations with methane and sulfate as compared with only methane addition. Higher abundance of ANME-2a/b in incubations with methane and sulfate as compared with only sulfate addition was shown by qPCR analysis. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene analysis showed the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria belonging to SEEP-SRB1. This is the first report that explicitly shows that AOM is associated with sulfate reduction in an enrichment culture of ANME-2a/b and AAA methanotrophs and SEEP-SRB1 sulfate reducers from a low-saline environment. PMID:26636551

  1. Role of dissimilatory sulfate reduction in wetlands constructed for acid coal mine drainage (AMD) treatment. Master's thesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five constructed wetlands with different organic substrates were exposed to the same quantity/quality of acid mine drainage (AMD). During the 16-month exposure to AMD, all wetlands accumulated S in the forms of organic and reduced inorganic S and Fe in the form of iron sulfides. Iron sulfide and probably most of the organic S(C-bonded S) accumulation were end products of bacterial dissimilatory sulfate reduction. Results of study support the notion that sulfate reduction and accumulation of Fe sulfides contribute to Fe retention in wetlands exposed to AMD. Detailed information is provided

  2. Susceptibility to bacterial pneumonia of animals exposed to sulfates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrlich, R.; Findlay, J.C.; Gardner, D.E.

    1978-03-01

    Susceptibility of mice to respiratory infections caused by exposure to sulfate aerosols was investigated. Inhalation of zinc sulfate or zinc ammonium sulfate followed by a respiratory challenge with airborne Streptococcus pyogenes resulted in excess mortality and reduced survival time. Estimated concentration of ZnSO4 that caused 20% excess mortality was 1.45 mg/cu m, and of Zn(NH4)2(SO4)2 was 2.40 mg/cu m for the 3 h inhalation exposure. Studies were extended to include the effects of various sulfates emitted from mobile and stationary sources to streptococcal pneumonia. (2 graphs, 7 references, 1 table)

  3. METHANOGENESIS AND SULFATE REDUCTION IN CHEMOSTATS: I. KINETIC STUDIES AND EXPERIMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Six anaerobic chemostats containing mixed microbial cultures were used to investigate the interactions between sulfate reduction and methanogenesis for three substrates: acetic acid, methanol and formic acid. Sulfate reducers outcompeted methanogens in acetate-fed chemostats whil...

  4. Sulfate reduction in higher plants: Molecular evidence for a novel 5′-adenylylsulfate reductase

    OpenAIRE

    SETYA, AMIT; Murillo, Michael; Leustek, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    Sulfate-assimilating organisms reduce inorganic sulfate for Cys biosynthesis. There are two leading hypotheses for the mechanism of sulfate reduction in higher plants. In one, adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate (APS) (5′-adenylylsulfate) sulfotransferase carries out reductive transfer of sulfate from APS to reduced glutathione. Alternatively, the mechanism may be similar to that in bacteria in which the enzyme, 3′-phosphoadenosine-5′-phosphosulfate (PAPS) reductase, catalyzes...

  5. The anaerobic degradation of organic matter in Danish coastal sediments - Iron reduction, manganese reduction, and sulfate reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Donald E.; Thamdrup, BO; Hansen, Jens W.

    1993-01-01

    A combination of porewater and solid phase analysis as well as a series of sediment incubations are used to quantify organic carbon oxidation by dissimilatory Fe reduction, Mn reduction, and sulfate reduction, in sediments from the Skagerrak (located off the northeast coast of Jutland, Denmark). Solid phase data are integrated with incubation results to define the zones of the various oxidation processes. At S(9), surface Mn enrichments of up to 3.5 wt pct were found, and with such a ready source of Mn, dissimilatory Mn reduction was the only significant anaerobic process of carbon oxidation in the surface 10 cm of the sediment. At S(4) and S(6), active Mn reduction occurred; however, most of the Mn reduction may have resulted from the oxidation of acid volatile sulfides and Fe(2+) rather than by a dissimilatory sulfate. Dissolved Mn(2+) was found to completely adsorb onto sediment containing fully oxidized Mn oxides.

  6. Mechanisms of bacterially catalyzed reductive dehalogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picardal, F.W.

    1992-12-31

    Nine bacteria were tested for the ability to dehalogenate tetrachloromethane (CT), tetrachloroethene (PCE), and 1, 1, 1-trichloroethane (TCA) under anaerobic conditions. Three bacteria were able to reductively dehalogenate CT. Dehalogenation ability was not readily linked to a common metabolism or changes in culture redox potential. None of the bacteria tested were able to dehalogenate PCE or TCA. One of the bacteria capable of dehalogenating CT, Shewanella putrefaciens, was chosen as a model organism to study mechanisms of bacterially catalyzed reductive dehalogenation. The effect of a variety of alternate electron acceptors on CT dehalogenation ability by S. putrefaciens was determined. oxygen and nitrogen oxides were inhibitory but Fe (III), trimethylamine oxide, and fumarate were not. A model of the electron transport chain of S. putrefaciens was developed to explain inhibition patterns. A period of microaerobic growth prior to CT exposure increased the ability of S. putrefaciens to dehalogenate CT. A microaerobic growth period also increased cytochrome concentrations. A relationship between cytochrome content and dehalogenation ability was developed from studies in which cytochrome concentrations in S. putrefaciens were manipulated by changing growth conditions. Stoichiometry studies using {sup 14}C-CT suggested that CT was first reduced to form a trichloromethyl radical. Reduction of the radical to produce chloroform and reaction of the radical with cellular biochemicals explained observed product distributions. Carbon dioxide or other fully dehalogenated products were not found.

  7. Microsensor Measurements of Sulfate Reduction and Sulfide Oxidation in Compact Microbial Communities of Aerobic Biofilms Rid A-1977-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    KUHL, M.; JØRGENSEN, BB

    1992-01-01

    The microzonation of O2 respiration, H2S oxidation, and SO4(2-) reduction in aerobic trickling-filter biofilms was studied by measuring concentration profiles at high spatial resolution (25 to 100-mu-m) with microsensors for O2, S2-, and pH. Specific reaction rates were calculated from measured......, whereas sulfate reduction occurred in deeper, anoxic parts of the biofilm. Sulfate reduction accounted for up to 50% of the total mineralization of organic carbon in the biofilms. All H2S produced from sulfate reduction was reoxidized by O2 in a narrow reaction zone, and no H2S escaped to the overlying...... water. Turnover times of H2S and O2 in the reaction zone were only a few seconds owing to rapid bacterial H2S oxidation. Anaerobic H2S oxidation with NO3- could be induced by addition of nitrate to the medium. Total sulfate reduction rates increased when the availability of SO4(2-) or organic substrate...

  8. Methanogenesis and Sulfate Reduction: Competitive and Noncompetitive Substrates in Estuarine Sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Oremland, Ronald S.; Polcin, Sandra

    1982-01-01

    Sulfate ions did not inhibit methanogenesis in estuarine sediments supplemented with methanol, trimethylamine, or methionine. However, sulfate greatly retarded methanogenesis when hydrogen or acetate was the substrate. Sulfate reduction was stimulated by acetate, hydrogen, and acetate plus hydrogen, but not by methanol or trimethylamine. These results indicate that sulfate-reducing bacteria will outcompete methanogens for hydrogen, acetate, or both, but will not compete with methanogens for c...

  9. The role of labile sulfur compounds in thermochemical sulfate reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrani, Alon; Zhang, Tongwei; Ma, Qisheng; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Tang, Yongchun

    2008-06-01

    The reduction of sulfate to sulfide coupled with the oxidation of hydrocarbons to carbon dioxide, commonly referred to as thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR), is an important abiotic alteration process that most commonly occurs in hot carbonate petroleum reservoirs. In the present study we focus on the role that organic labile sulfur compounds play in increasing the rate of TSR. A series of gold-tube hydrous pyrolysis experiments were conducted with n-octane and CaSO4 in the presence of reduced sulfur (e.g. H2S, S°, organic S) at temperatures of 330 and 356 °C under a constant confining pressure. The in-situ pH was buffered to 3.5 (∼6.3 at room temperature) with talc and silica. For comparison, three types of oil with different total S and labile S contents were reacted under similar conditions. The results show that the initial presence of organic or inorganic sulfur compounds increases the rate of TSR. However, organic sulfur compounds, such as 1-pentanethiol or diethyldisulfide, were significantly more effective in increasing the rate of TSR than H2S or elemental sulfur (on a mole S basis). The increase in rate is achieved at relatively low concentrations of 1-pentanethiol, less than 1 wt% of the total n-octane, which is comparable to the concentration of organic S that is common in many oils (∼0.3 wt%). We examined several potential reaction mechanisms to explain the observed reactivity of organic LSC. First, the release of H2S from the thermal degradation of thiols was discounted as an important mechanism due to the significantly greater reactivity of thiol compared to an equivalent amount of H2S. Second, we considered the generation of olefines in association with the elimination of H2S during thermal degradation of thiols because olefines are much more reactive than n-alkanes during TSR. In our experiments, olefines increased the rate of TSR, but were less effective than 1-pentanethiol and other organic LSC. Third, the thermal decomposition of

  10. COMPARISON OF UASB AND FLUIDIZED-BED REACTORS FOR SULFATE REDUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Bertolino

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Reactor hydrodynamics is important for sulfidogenesis because sulfate reduction bacteria (SRB do not granulate easily. In this work, the sulfate reduction performance of two continuous anaerobic bioreactors was investigated: (i an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB reactor and (ii a fluidized bed reactor (FBR. Organic loading, sulfate reduction, and COD removal were the main parameters monitored during lactate and glycerol degradation. The UASB reactor with biomass recirculation showed a specific sulfate reduction rate of 0.089±0.014 g.gSSV-1.d-1 (89% reduction, whereas values twice as high were achieved in the FBR treating either lactate (0.200±0.017 g.gSSV-1.d-1 or glycerol (0.178±0.010 g.gSSV-1.d-1. Sulfate reduction with pure glycerol produced a smaller residual COD (1700 mg.L-1 than that produced with lactate (2500 mg.L-1 at the same COD.sulfate-1 mass ratio. It was estimated that 50% of glycerol degradation was due to sulfate reduction and 50% to fermentation, which was supported by the presence of butyrate in the FBR effluent. The UASB reactor was unable to produce effluents with sulfate concentrations below 250 mg.L-1 due to poor mixing conditions, whereas the FBR consistently ensured residual sulfate concentrations below such a value.

  11. Modified radiorespirometric assay for determining the sulfate reduction activity of biofilms on metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A field method is described for the assay of [35S]sulfate reduction by sulfate-reducing bacteria in biofilms on metal surfaces. The assay is such that the biofilm can be studied without removing it from the substratum. The presence of the metal coupons, however, required preliminary optimisation of conditions for accurate determination of in situ sulfate reduction rates. Modifications to the radiorespirometric assay are described and successful field trials are presented. 18 refs.; 4 figs

  12. Effect of sulfate absence and nitrate addition on bacterial community in a sulfidogenic bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Yangguo [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Wang Aijie, E-mail: waj0578@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Ren Nanqi [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China)

    2009-12-30

    The characteristics and behavior of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), methane-producing bacteria (MPB) and denitrifying bacteria (DB) were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based methods under the transitory sulfate absence or nitrate addition conditions in a sulfidogenic continuously stirred tank reactor. The bioreactor started-up feeding with 4000 mg l{sup -1} COD (lactate) and 2000 mg l{sup -1} sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}). The sulfate removal efficiency reached 3.84 g l{sup -1} d{sup -1} when the activated sludge formed a stable bacterial community comprising of some members of genera Desulfobulbus, Desulfovibrio, Clostridium and Pseudomonas after 20 days' operation. And about 79% of reduced sulfate captured electrons from the oxidization of propionate. Sulfate absence influenced little on quantity and population structure of SRB and DB, while much on MPB and metabolic typing. And the acetate (up to 86% (w/w) of total end-products) in end-product profiles was replaced by the propionate (75% (w/w)). The addition of nitrate to sulfidogenic system suppressed the sulfidogenesis mainly by capturing the electron flow. These results suggested that sulfate absence or nitrate addition would not inhibit SRB permanently in a stable sulfidogenic community.

  13. Effect of sulfate absence and nitrate addition on bacterial community in a sulfidogenic bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics and behavior of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), methane-producing bacteria (MPB) and denitrifying bacteria (DB) were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based methods under the transitory sulfate absence or nitrate addition conditions in a sulfidogenic continuously stirred tank reactor. The bioreactor started-up feeding with 4000 mg l-1 COD (lactate) and 2000 mg l-1 sulfate (SO42-). The sulfate removal efficiency reached 3.84 g l-1 d-1 when the activated sludge formed a stable bacterial community comprising of some members of genera Desulfobulbus, Desulfovibrio, Clostridium and Pseudomonas after 20 days' operation. And about 79% of reduced sulfate captured electrons from the oxidization of propionate. Sulfate absence influenced little on quantity and population structure of SRB and DB, while much on MPB and metabolic typing. And the acetate (up to 86% (w/w) of total end-products) in end-product profiles was replaced by the propionate (75% (w/w)). The addition of nitrate to sulfidogenic system suppressed the sulfidogenesis mainly by capturing the electron flow. These results suggested that sulfate absence or nitrate addition would not inhibit SRB permanently in a stable sulfidogenic community.

  14. Precambrian sulfur isotopes and a possible role for sulfite in the evolution of biological sulfate reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines how and when the biochemical process of dissimilatory sulfate reduction evolved. During sulfate reduction by modern sulfate-reducing bacteria the sulfide produced is enriched in 32S compared to the starting sulfate. This phenomenon is used to interpret the origin of sulfide in both modern and ancient environments. The isotopic compositions of Precambrian sulfide and sulfate minerals suggests that until ca. 2.O Ga before present (B.P.) sulfide was the major S-component in sediments and the hydrosphere and was formed mainly by volcanogenic processes. After ca. 2.O Ga B.P., when free oxygen was maintained in the atmosphere by the biological and abiological sulfide formation. Dissimilatory sulfate reduction then became widespread. (Auth.)

  15. Model identification with BPNN on restrictive ecological factors of SRB for sulfate-reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The model of back-propagation neural network(BPNN)was presented to demonstrate the effect of restrictive ecological factors,COD/SO42-ratio,pH value,alkalinity(ALK)and SO42-loading rate(Ns),on sulfate-reduction of Sulfate Reducing Bacteria(SRB)in an acidogenic sulfate-reducing reactor supplied with molasses as sole organic carbon source and sodium sulfate as electron acceptor.The compare of experimental results and computer simulation was also discussed.It was shown that the method of BPNN had a powerful ability to analyze the ecological characteristic of acidogenic sulfate-reducing ecosystem quantitatively.

  16. Anaerobic degradation of landfill leachate using an upflow anaerobic fixed-bed reactor with microbial sulfate reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluated the anaerobic degradation of landfill leachate and sulfate reduction as a function of COD/(SO42-) ratio in an upflow anaerobic fixed-bed reactor. The reactor, which was inoculated with a mixed consortium, was operated under a constant hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 5 days. We investigated the effect of COD/(SO42-) ratio variation on the sulfate reduction efficiency, hydrogen sulfide production, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, conductivity, and pH variation. The best reactor performance, with significant sulfate reduction efficiency and COD removal efficiency of 91% and 87%, respectively, was reached under a COD/(SO42-) ratio of 1.17. Under these conditions, microscopic analysis showed the abundance of vibrios and rod-shaped bacterial cells. Two anaerobic bacteria were isolated from the reactor sludge. Phylogenetic studies performed on these strains identified strain A1 as affiliated to Clostridium genus and strain H1 as a new species of sulfate-reducing bacteria affiliated to the Desulfovibrio genus. The closest phylogenetic relative of strain H1 was Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, at 96% similarity for partial 16S RNA gene sequence data. Physiological and metabolic characterization was performed for this strain.

  17. Effects of bacterially produced precipitates on the metabolism of sulfate reducing bacteria during the bio-treatment process of copper-containing wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A large volume of bacterially produced precipitates are generated during the bio-treatment of heavy metal wastewater.The composition of the bacterially produced precipitates and its effects on sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) in copper-containing waste stream were evaluated in this study.The elemental composition of the microbial precipitate was studied using electrodispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX),and it was found that the ratio of S:Cu was 1.12.Combining with the results of copper distribution in the SRB metabolism culture,which was analyzed by the sequential extraction procedure,copper in the precipitates was determined as covellite (CuS).The bacterially produced precipitates caused a decrease of the sulfate reduction rate,and the more precipitates were generated,the lower the sulfate reduction rate was.The particle sizes of bacterially generated covellite were ranging from 0.03 to 2 m by particles size distribution (PSD) analysis,which was smaller than that of the SRB cells.Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed that the microbial covellite was deposited on the surface of the cell.The effects of the microbial precipitate on SRB metabolism were found to be weakened by increasing the precipitation time and adding microbial polymeric substances in later experiments.These results provided direct evidence that the SRB activity was inhibited by the bacterially produced covellite,which enveloped the bacterium and thus affected the metabolism of SRB on mass transfer.

  18. Bacterial disproportionation of elemental sulfur coupled to chemical reduction of iron or manganese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thamdrup, Bo; Finster, Kai; Hansen, Jens Würgler;

    1993-01-01

    A new chemolithotrophic bacterial metabolism was discovered in anaerobic marine enrichment cultures. Cultures in defined medium with elemental sulfur (S) and amorphous ferric hydroxide (FeOOH) as sole substrates showed intense formation of sulfate. Furthermore, precipitation of ferrous sulfide and...... the formed sulfide and the added FeOOH led to the observed precipitation of iron sulfides. Sulfate and iron sulfides were also produced when FeOOH was replaced by FeCO(3). Further enrichment with manganese oxide, MnO(2), instead of FeOOH yielded stable cultures which formed sulfate during concomitant...... reduction of MnO(2) to Mn. Growth of small rod-shaped bacteria was observed. When incubated without MnO(2), the culture did not grow but produced small amounts of SO(4) and H(2)S at a ratio of 1:3, indicating again a disproportionation of S. The observed microbial disproportionation of S only proceeds...

  19. Geochemistry at the sulfate reduction-methanogenesis transition zone in an anoxic aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Rasmus; Cold, L.

    2007-01-01

    The study addresses a 10 m deep phreatic postglacial sandy aquifer of vertically varying lithology and horizontally varying infiltration water chemistry, displaying calcite dissolution, ion-exchange, and anaerobic redox processes. The simple variations in lithology and infiltration combine into a...... complex groundwater chemistry, showing ongoing Fe-oxide reduction, sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. Rates of sulfate reduction, methanogenesis and methane oxidation were measured directly using radiotracers. Maximum rates were 1.5 mM/yr for sulfate reduction, 0.3 mM/yr for methanogenesis, and only 4...

  20. Reductive and sorptive properties of sulfate green rust (GRSO4)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedel, Sorin

    The Fe(II), Fe(III) hydroxide containing sulfate in its structure, called sulfate green rust (GRSO4), can effectively reduce and convert contaminants to less mobile and less toxic forms. However, the ability of GRSO4 to remove positively charged species from solution, via sorption, is very limited...

  1. Key factors influencing rates of heterotrophic sulfate reduction in active seafloor hydrothermal massive sulfide deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiana Laieikawai Frank

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermal vents are thermally and geochemically dynamic habitats, and the organisms therein are subject to steep gradients in temperature and chemistry. To date, the influence of these environmental dynamics on microbial sulfate reduction has not been well constrained. Here, via multivariate experiments, we evaluate the effects of key environmental variables (temperature, pH, H2S, SO42-, DOC on sulfate reduction rates and metabolic energy yields in material recovered from a hydrothermal flange from the Grotto edifice in the Main Endeavor Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Sulfate reduction was measured in batch reactions across a range of physico-chemical conditions. Temperature and pH were the strongest stimuli, and maximum sulfate reduction rates were observed at 50 °C and pH 6, suggesting that the in situ community of sulfate-reducing organisms in Grotto flanges may be most active in a slightly acidic and moderate thermal/chemical regime. At pH 4, sulfate reduction rates increased with sulfide concentrations most likely due to the mitigation of metal toxicity. While substrate concentrations also influenced sulfate reduction rates, energy-rich conditions muted the effect of metabolic energetics on sulfate reduction rates. We posit that variability in sulfate reduction rates reflect the response of the active microbial consortia to environmental constraints on in situ microbial physiology, toxicity, and the type and extent of energy limitation. These experiments help to constrain models of the spatial contribution of heterotrophic sulfate reduction within the complex gradients inherent to seafloor hydrothermal deposits.

  2. The anaerobic degradation of organic matter in Danish coastal sediments: iron reduction, manganese reduction, and sulfate reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canfield, Donald Eugene; Thamdrup, B; Hansen, Jens Würgler

    1993-01-01

    We used a combination of porewater and solid phase analysis, as well as a series of sediment incubations, to quantify organic carbon oxidation by dissimilatory Fe reduction, Mn reduction, and sulfate reduction, in sediments from the Skagerrak (located off the northeast coast of Jutland, Denmark......). In the deep portion of the basin, surface Mn enrichments reached 3.5 wt%, and Mn reduction was the only important anaerobic carbon oxidation process in the upper 10 cm of the sediment. In the less Mn-rich sediments from intermediate depths in the basin, Fe reduction ranged from somewhat less, to far......, encouraged by bioturbation. Recycling was so rapid that the residence time of Fe and Mn oxides, with respect to reduction, ranged from 70-250 days. These results require that, on average, an atom of Fe or Mn is oxidized and reduced between 100-300 times before ultimate burial into the sediment. We observed...

  3. The Microbial Metabolic Characteristics in the Course of Sulfate-Reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Acid-producing phase reactor of two-phase anaerobic treatment process has remarkable advantages treating sulfate-laden wastewater. In order to investigate SRB population's capability of utilizing substrate and the microbial acidification type formed during the course of sulfate reduction, continuous-flow and batch tests were conducted in a continuous stirred tank bio-film reactor supplied with sodium sulfate as electron acceptor. The experimental results demonstrated that the acidification type formed b...

  4. Chemical reduction and sulfur-isotope effects of sulfate by organic matter under hydrothermal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under hydrothermal conditions sulfuric acid, sodium bisulfate and sodium sulfate solutions were reduced by dextrose to hydrogen sulfide in order to clarify the origin of sulfide species in hot-springs, geothermal water and ore-forming fluids. At temperatures above 2500C, reduction of sulfuric acid and at above 3000C of sodium bisulfate and sodium sulfate was observed. The reduction rate depends fairly well on the temperatures, pH and sulfate species. The reduction of sulfate seems to be a first-order reaction. Sulfur-isotope compositions of sulfate and hydrogen sulfide were measured in order to disclose isotope effects in the reduction of sulfate. The reduction of sulfuric acid and sodium bisulfate solution results in enrichment of 32S in the hydrogen sulfide and of the heavy isotope into residual sulfate. The fractionation factor in the reduction is independent of the temperature and is seen to be 1.007 to 1.009, in agreement with previously published values. (Auth.)

  5. Role of sulfate reduction and methane production by organic carbon degradation ineutrophic fjord sediments (Limfjorden, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Parkes, R. John

    2010-01-01

    The anaerobic mineralization of buried organic matter through sulfate reduction and methanogenesis was studied in 2-m-long piston cores of organic-rich, silty-clay sediment from two sites in Limfjorden, Denmark. An extended sulfate-methane transition (SMT) zone was found at 1-1.5-m sediment depth...

  6. METHANOGENESIS AND SULFATE REDUCTION IN CHEMOSTATS: A FUNDAMENTAL EXPERIMENTAL KINETIC STUDY AND MODELING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Six chemostats containing mixed anaerobic cultures were used to investigate interactions between sulfate reduction and methanogenesis for three substrates: acetic acid, methanol, and formic acid. ulfate reducers outcompeted methanogens for acetic acid while methanol was not utili...

  7. Artificial electron acceptors decouple archaeal methane oxidation from sulfate reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Silvan; Yu, Hang; Chadwick, Grayson L; McGlynn, Shawn E; Orphan, Victoria J

    2016-02-12

    The oxidation of methane with sulfate is an important microbial metabolism in the global carbon cycle. In marine methane seeps, this process is mediated by consortia of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) that live in syntrophy with sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The underlying interdependencies within this uncultured symbiotic partnership are poorly understood. We used a combination of rate measurements and single-cell stable isotope probing to demonstrate that ANME in deep-sea sediments can be catabolically and anabolically decoupled from their syntrophic SRB partners using soluble artificial oxidants. The ANME still sustain high rates of methane oxidation in the absence of sulfate as the terminal oxidant, lending support to the hypothesis that interspecies extracellular electron transfer is the syntrophic mechanism for the anaerobic oxidation of methane. PMID:26912857

  8. Sulfate Reduction and Methanogenesis in the Sediment of a Saltmarsh on the East Coast of the United Kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Senior, Eric; Lindström, E. Börje; Banat, Ibrahim M.; Nedwell, David B.

    1982-01-01

    The rates of sulfate reduction, methanogenesis, and methane loss were measured in saltmarsh sediment at monthly intervals. In addition, dissolved methane and sulfate concentrations together with pS2− and pH were determined. Methane formation from carbon dioxide, but not from acetate, was detected within the same horizon of sediment where sulfate reduction was most active. Sulfate reduction was about three orders of magnitude greater than annual methanogenesis. The two processes were not separ...

  9. Thermophilic Sulfate Reduction in Hydrothermal Sediment of Lake Tanganyika, East-Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ELSGAARD, L.; PRIEUR, D.; MUKWAYA, GM;

    1994-01-01

    part of freshwater Lake Tanganyika (East Africa). Incubation of slurry samples at 8 to 90 degrees C demonstrated meso- and thermophilic sulfate reduction with optimum temperatures of 34 to 45 degrees C and 56 to 65 degrees C, respectively, and with an upper temperature limit of 80 degrees C. Sulfate...... up to 70 and 75 degrees C, with optima at 63 and 71 degrees C, respectively. Several sporulating thermophilic enrichments were morphologically similar to Desulfotomaculum spp. Dissimilatory sulfate reduction in the studied hydrothermal area of Lake Tanganyika apparently has an upper temperature limit...

  10. Mathematical modeling of biogenous sulfate reduction in flooded carbonate petroleum reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ametov, A.M.

    1981-07-01

    A mathematical model of the activity of biocenosis of hydrocarbon oxidizing and sulfate reducing bacteria in flooded carbonate petroleum reservoirs, which leads to hydrogen sulfide generation which makes the working of deposits difficult, is investigated. A method of suppressing the bacterial processes in the bottom hole zones of injection wells is proposed. It presupposes that no viable bacteria reach the stratum.

  11. Bacterial chromate reduction and product characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacillus subtilis reduced hexavalent chromate to trivalent chromium under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions. Reduction of CR(VI) and appearance of extracellular Cr(III) were demonstrated by electron spin resonance and spectrophotometry. Chromate reduction was stimulated more than five-fold by freeze-thawing, indicating that intracellular reductases or chemical reductants reduce chromate more rapidly than do intact cells. Moderately concentrated cells (10% pellet volume after centrifugation) reduced approximately 40 μM chromate/min (2 mg Cr/1-min) when exposed to 100 μM chromate (5 mg Cr/1). Highly concentrated cells (70% pellet volume) reduced more than 99.8% of 2 mM chromate (100 mg Cr/1) within 15 min. This rate of chromate reduction was of the same order of magnitude as the rate of respiration in aerobic cells. A substantial fraction of the reduction product (ca. 75%) was extracellular Cr(M), which could readily be separated from the cells by centrifugation. At high chromate concentrations, some fraction of reduced CR(VI) appeared to be taken up by cells, consistent with a detection of intracellular paramagnetic products. At low chromate concentrations, undefined growth medium alone reduced Cr(VI), but at a slow rate, relative to cells. Under appropriate conditions, B. subtilis appears to be an organism of choice for detoxifying chromate-contaminated soil and water

  12. Characterization of the sulfate uptake and assimilation pathway from Xanthomonas citri - targets for bacterial growth inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tambascia, C.; Balan, A. [Laboratorio Nacional de Biociencias - LNBIO, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Microorganisms require sulfur for growth and obtain it either for inorganic sulfate or organosulfur compounds. ATP-Binding Cassete (SulT family) or major facilitator superfamily-type (SulP) transporters are responsible for the sulfate transport into the cell. In Xanthomonas citri, the phytopathogenic bacterium that causes the canker citrus disease, there are no reports related to the importance of these transporters during in vitro or in vivo infection. We identified in X. citri genome all the genes that belong to the well-characterized cys regulon from Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, which includes three ABC transporters and all the enzymes necessary for sulfate oxide reduction to sulfide and cysteine. Once these genes have been shown to be extremely important for bacteria growth and development in different environments, we chose the sbpcysWUA and cysDNCHIJG operons, which encodes the ABC inorganic sulfate ABC transporter and all the enzymes necessary for conversion of sulfate in cysteine, respectively. As a step for crystallization trials and resolution of their tridimensional structures, the referred genes were amplified and cloned into the cloning vector pGEM T-easy. In addition, using bioinformatics tools and molecular modeling we characterized all the protein functions as well as built tridimensional models of their structure for determination of the active sites. The importance of each protein is discussed aiming the discovery of a good target for development of inhibitors that could block the bacterium growth. (author)

  13. Characterization of the sulfate uptake and assimilation pathway from Xanthomonas citri - targets for bacterial growth inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Microorganisms require sulfur for growth and obtain it either for inorganic sulfate or organosulfur compounds. ATP-Binding Cassete (SulT family) or major facilitator superfamily-type (SulP) transporters are responsible for the sulfate transport into the cell. In Xanthomonas citri, the phytopathogenic bacterium that causes the canker citrus disease, there are no reports related to the importance of these transporters during in vitro or in vivo infection. We identified in X. citri genome all the genes that belong to the well-characterized cys regulon from Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, which includes three ABC transporters and all the enzymes necessary for sulfate oxide reduction to sulfide and cysteine. Once these genes have been shown to be extremely important for bacteria growth and development in different environments, we chose the sbpcysWUA and cysDNCHIJG operons, which encodes the ABC inorganic sulfate ABC transporter and all the enzymes necessary for conversion of sulfate in cysteine, respectively. As a step for crystallization trials and resolution of their tridimensional structures, the referred genes were amplified and cloned into the cloning vector pGEM T-easy. In addition, using bioinformatics tools and molecular modeling we characterized all the protein functions as well as built tridimensional models of their structure for determination of the active sites. The importance of each protein is discussed aiming the discovery of a good target for development of inhibitors that could block the bacterium growth. (author)

  14. Microbial Reduction of Uranium under Iron- and Sulfate-reducing Conditions: Effect of Amended Goethite on Microbial Community Composition and Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Hee Sun; McGuinness, L.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Komlos, John; Kerkhoff, Lee; Long, Philip E.; Jaffe, Peter R.

    2010-07-01

    There is a growing need for a better understanding of the biogeochemical dynamics involved in microbial U(VI) reduction due to an increasing interest in using biostimulation via electron donor addition as a means to remediate uranium contaminated sites. U(VI) reduction has been observed to be maximized during iron reducing conditions and to decrease upon commencement of sulfate reducing conditions. There are many unknowns regarding the impact of iron/sulfate biogeochemistry on U(VI) reduction. This includes Fe(III) availability as well as the microbial community changes, including the activity of iron-reducers during the uranium biostimulation period even after the onset of sulfate reduction. Up-flow column experiments were conducted with Old Rifle site sediments containing Fe-oxides, Fe-clays, and sulfate rich groundwater. Half of the columns had sediment that was augmented with small amounts of small-particle 57Fe-goethite to track continuously minute goethite changes, and to study the effects of increased Fe(III) levels on the overall biostimulation dynamics. The addition of the 57Fe-goethite did not delay the onset of sulfate reduction, but slightly suppressed the overall rate of sulfate reduction and hence acetate utilization, it did not affect the bacterial numbers of Geobacter-like species throughout the experiment, but did lower the numbers of sulfate reducers in the sediments. 57Fe-Mössbauer analyses (a 57Fe-specific technique) confirmed that there was bioavailable iron present after the onset of sulfate reduction and that iron was still being reduced during sulfate reduction. Addition of the 57Fe-goethite to the sediment had a noticeable effect on the overall composition of the microbial population. 16S rRNA analyses of biostimulated sediment using TRFLP (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism) showed that Geobacter sp. (a known Fe-reducer) was still active and replicating during the period of significant sulfate reduction. DNA fingerprints of

  15. Trace methane oxidation and the methane dependency of sulfate reduction in anaerobic granular sludge

    KAUST Repository

    Meulepas, Roel J.W.

    2010-05-01

    This study investigates the oxidation of labeled methane (CH4) and the CH4 dependence of sulfate reduction in three types of anaerobic granular sludge. In all samples, 13C-labeled CH4 was anaerobically oxidized to 13C-labeled CO2, while net endogenous CH4 production was observed. Labeled-CH4 oxidation rates followed CH4 production rates, and the presence of sulfate hampered both labeled-CH4 oxidation and methanogenesis. Labeled-CH4 oxidation was therefore linked to methanogenesis. This process is referred to as trace CH4 oxidation and has been demonstrated in methanogenic pure cultures. This study shows that the ratio between labeled-CH4 oxidation and methanogenesis is positively affected by the CH4 partial pressure and that this ratio is in methanogenic granular sludge more than 40 times higher than that in pure cultures of methanogens. The CH4 partial pressure also positively affected sulfate reduction and negatively affected methanogenesis: a repression of methanogenesis at elevated CH4 partial pressures confers an advantage to sulfate reducers that compete with methanogens for common substrates, formed from endogenous material. The oxidation of labeled CH 4 and the CH4 dependence of sulfate reduction are thus not necessarily evidence of anaerobic oxidation of CH4 coupled to sulfate reduction. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  16. Thermochemical sulfate reduction in deep petroleum reservoirs: a molecular approach; Thermoreduction des sulfates dans les reservoirs petroliers: approche moleculaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanin, S.

    2002-11-01

    The thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) is a set of chemical reactions leading to hydrocarbon oxidation and production of carbon dioxide and sour gas (H{sub 2}S) which is observed in deep petroleum reservoirs enriched in anhydrites (calcium sulfate). Molecular and isotopic studies have been conducted on several crude oil samples to determine which types of compounds could have been produced during TSR. Actually, we have shown that the main molecules formed by TSR were organo-sulfur compounds. Indeed, sulfur isotopic measurements. of alkyl-di-benzothiophenes, di-aryl-disulfides and thia-diamondoids (identified by NMR or synthesis of standards) shows that they are formed during TSR as their value approach that of the sulfur of the anhydrite. Moreover, thia-diamondoids are apparently exclusively formed during this phenomenon and can thus be considered as true molecular markers of TSR. In a second part, we have investigated with laboratory experiments the formation mechanism of the molecules produced during TSR. A first model has shown that sulfur incorporation into the organic matter occurred with mineral sulfur species of low oxidation degree. The use of {sup 34}S allowed to show that the sulfates reduction occurred during these simulations. At least, some experiments on polycyclic hydrocarbons, sulfurized or not, allowed to establish that thia-diamondoids could be formed by acid-catalysed rearrangements at high temperatures in a similar way as the diamondoids. (author)

  17. Bacterial turbulence reduction by passive magnetic particle chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kuo-An; I, Lin

    2013-09-01

    We report the experimental observation of the bacterial turbulence reduction in dense E. coli suspensions by increasing the coupling of passive particle additives (paramagnetic particles). Applying an external magnetic field induces magnetic dipoles for particles and causes the formation of vertical chain bundles, which are hard for bacterial flows to tilt and break. The larger effective drag coefficient of chains causes slow horizontal motion of chains, which in turn form obstacles to suppress bacterial flows through the strong correlation in coherent bacterial clusters and intercluster interaction. The interruption of the upward energy flow from individual self-propelling bacteria to the larger scale in the bacterial turbulence with multiscaled coherent flow by the chain bundle leads to more severe suppression in the low frequency (wave number) regimes of the power spectra.

  18. [Advances in molecular mechanism of bacterial reduction of hexavalent chromium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dou; Zhao, You-Cai; Song, Li-Yan; Yin, Ya-Jie; Wang, Yang-Qing; Xu, Zhong-Hui

    2014-04-01

    Cr(VI) has been causing serious environmental pollution due to its carcinogenicity, teratogenicity and strong migration. Reduction of Cr( VI) to Cr(III), a precipitation that is much less toxic, is an efficient strategy to control Cr pollution. Within the strategy, bacterial reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) has been considered as one of the best bioremediation methods because of its efficiency, environment friendly, and low cost; however, the molecular mechanism remains large unknown. This review summarizes Cr(VI) reduction bacterial species and its application in pollution control, elaborates the pathways of Cr( VI) reduction and functional proteins involved, concludes the molecular mechanism of baterial reduction Cr(VI), and discusses the orientation of the future research. PMID:24946623

  19. Study of thermochemical sulfate reduction mechanism using compound specific sulfur isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshoulam, Alexander; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Said Ahmad, Ward; Deev, Andrei; Sessions, Alex L.; Tang, Yongchun; Adkins, Jess F.; Liu, Jinzhong; Gilhooly, William P.; Aizenshtat, Zeev; Amrani, Alon

    2016-09-01

    The sulfur isotopic fractionation associated with the formation of organic sulfur compounds (OSCs) during thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) was studied using gold-tube pyrolysis experiments to simulate TSR. The reactants used included n-hexadecane (n-C16) as a model organic compound with sulfate, sulfite, or elemental sulfur as the sulfur source. At the end of each experiment, the S-isotopic composition and concentration of remaining sulfate, H2S, benzothiophene, dibenzothiophene, and 2-phenylthiophene (PT) were measured. The observed S-isotopic fractionations between sulfate and BT, DBT, and H2S in experimental simulations of TSR correlate well with a multi-stage model of the overall TSR process. Large kinetic isotope fractionations occur during the first, uncatalyzed stage of TSR, 12.4‰ for H2S and as much as 22.2‰ for BT. The fractionations decrease as the H2S concentration increases and the reaction enters the second, catalyzed stage. Once all of the oxidizable hydrocarbons have been consumed, sulfate reduction ceases and equilibrium partitioning then dictates the fractionation between H2S and sulfate (∼17‰). Experiments involving sparingly soluble CaSO4 show that during the second catalytic phase of TSR the rate of sulfate reduction exceeds that of sulfate dissolution. In this case, there is no apparent isotopic fractionation between source sulfate and generated H2S, as all of the available sulfate is effectively reduced at all reaction times. When CaSO4 is replaced with fully soluble Na2SO4, sulfate dissolution is no longer rate limiting and significant S-isotopic fractionation is observed. This supports the notion that CaSO4 dissolution can lead to the apparent lack of fractionation between H2S and sulfate produced by TSR in nature. The S-isotopic composition of individual OSCs record information related to geochemical reactions that cannot be discerned from the δ34S values obtained from bulk phases such as H2S, oil, and sulfate minerals, and

  20. Galvanic interpretation of self-potential signals associated with microbial sulfate-reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Kenneth H; Hubbard, Susan S.; Banfield, Jillian F

    2007-01-01

    We have evaluated the usefulness of the self-potential (SP) geophysical method to track the onset and location of microbial sulfate-reduction in saturated sediments during organic carbon amendment. Following stimulation of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) by addition of lactate, anomalous voltages exceeding 600 mV correlated in space and time with the accumulation of dissolved sulfide. Abiotic experiments in which the sulfide concentration at the measurement electrode was systematically v...

  1. Seasonal influence on sulfate reduction and zinc sequestration in subsurface treatment wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Otto R; Borden-Stewart, Deborah J; Hook, Paul B; Jones, Warren L

    2007-08-01

    To characterize the effects of season, temperature, plant species, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) loading on sulfate reduction and metals removal in treatment wetlands we measured pore water redox potentials and concentrations of sulfate, sulfide, zinc and COD in subsurface wetland microcosms. Two batch incubations of 20 day duration were conducted in each of four seasons defined by temperature and daylight duration. Four treatments were compared: unplanted controls, Typha latifolia (broadleaf cattail), and Schoenoplectus acutus (hardstem bulrush), all at low COD loading (267 mg/L), plus bulrush at high COD loading (534 mg/L). Initial SO4-S and zinc concentrations were 67 and 24 mg/L, respectively. For all treatments, sulfate removal was least in winter (4 degrees C, plant dormancy) greatest in summer (24 degrees C, active plant growth) and intermediate in spring and fall (14 degrees C), but seasonal variation was greater in cattail, and especially, bulrush treatments. Redox measurements indicated that, in winter, plant-mediated oxygen transfer inhibited activity of sulfate reducing bacteria, exacerbating the reduction in sulfate removal due to temperature. Doubling the COD load in bulrush treatments increased sulfate removal by only 20-30% when averaged over all seasons and did not alter the basic pattern of seasonal variation, despite tempering the wintertime increase in redox potential. Seasonal and treatment effects on zinc removal were broadly consistent with sulfate removal and presumably reflected zinc-sulfide precipitation. Results strongly suggest that interactive effects of COD loading rate, temperature, season, and plant species control not only sulfate reduction and zinc sequestration, but also the balance of competition between various microbial consortia responsible for water treatment in constructed wetlands. PMID:17599383

  2. Algae as an electron donor promoting sulfate reduction for the bioremediation of acid rock drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Parra, Pedro; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-11-01

    This study assessed bioremediation of acid rock drainage in simulated permeable reactive barriers (PRB) using algae, Chlorella sorokiniana, as the sole electron donor for sulfate-reducing bacteria. Lipid extracted algae (LEA), the residues of biodiesel production, were compared with whole cell algae (WCA) as an electron donor to promote sulfate-reducing activity. Inoculated columns containing anaerobic granular sludge were fed a synthetic medium containing H2SO4 and Cu(2+). Sulfate, sulfide, Cu(2+) and pH were monitored throughout the experiment of 123d. Cu recovered in the column packing at the end of the experiment was evaluated using sequential extraction. Both WCA and LEA promoted 80% of sulfate removal (12.7mg SO4(2-) d(-1)) enabling near complete Cu removal (>99.5%) and alkalinity generation raising the effluent pH to 6.5. No noteworthy sulfate reduction, alkalinity formation and Cu(2+) removal were observed in the endogenous control. In algae amended-columns, Cu(2+) was precipitated with biogenic H2S produced by sulfate reduction. Formation of CuS was evidenced by sequential extraction and X-ray diffraction. LEA and WCA provided similar levels of electron donor based on the COD balance. The results demonstrate an innovative passive remediation system using residual algae biomass from the biodiesel industry. PMID:27318730

  3. Mathematical modeling of biogenic sulfate reduction in floodable carbonate oil collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ametov, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    A mathematical model for the activity of biocenosis of hydrocarbon-oxidizing and sulfate reducing bacteria is studied in floodable carbonate oil collectors. It results in the formation of hydrogen sulfide. This complicates working the fields. A method is proposed for suppressing bacterial processes in the near-face zone of the injection wells on the condition that the viable bacteria cease to enter the bed.

  4. Reduction and precipitation of neptunium(V) by sulfate-reducing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migration of neptunium, as NpO2+, has been identified as a potentially important pathway for actinide release at nuclear waste repositories and existing sites of subsurface contamination. Reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV) will likely reduce its volubility, resulting in lowered subsurface migration. The ability of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to utilize Np(V) as an electron acceptor was investigated, because these bacteria are active in many anaerobic aquifers and are known to facilitate the reduction of metals and radionuclides. Pure and mixed cultures of SRB were able to precipitate neptunium during utilization of pyruvate, lactate, and hydrogen as electron donors in the presence and absence of sulfate. The neptunium in the precipitate was identified as Np(IV) using X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis. In mixed-culture studies, the addition of hydrogen to consortia grown by pyruvate fermentation stimulated neptunium reduction and precipitation. Experiments with pure cultures of Desulfovibrio vulgaris, growing by lactate fermentation in the absence of sulfate or by sulfate reduction, confirm that the organism is active in neptunium reduction and precipitation. Based on our results, the activity of SRB in the subsurface may have a significant, and potentially beneficial, impact on actinide mobility by reducing neptunium volubility

  5. Interstitial water chemistry of Jamaican reef sediment: sulfate reduction and submarine cementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical and isotopic analyses of pore waters from Jamaican reef sediment suggest the importance of microbial sulfate reduction as a major control upon the origin, distribution, and composition of submarine cements in this fringing reef setting. Fore-reef sediment pore waters exhibit active sulfate reduction and enrichment in 18O which is consistent with associated active magnesian calcite cementation, alkalinity consumption, and cement enrichment in 18O. Conversely, lack of widespread submarine cementation in the back-reef corresponds to the diminished resupply of sulfate coupled with input of CO2-charged meteoric water from a nearby unconfined aquifer into the more stagnant pore waters which lower pore-water magnesian calcite saturation states and preclude active submarine cementation. (Auth.)

  6. Pathways and Microbiology of Thiosulfate Transformations and Sulfate Reduction in a Marine Sediment (Kattegat, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JØRGENSEN, BB; BAK, F.

    1991-01-01

    Reductive and oxidative pathways of the sulfur cycle were studied in a marine sediment by parallel radiotracer experiments with (SO4(2-))-S-35, (H2S)-S-35, and (S2O3(2-))-S-35 injected into undisturbed sediment cores. The distributions of viable populations of sulfate- and thiosulfate-reducing ba...

  7. METHANOGENESIS AND SULFATE REDUCTION IN CHEMOSTATS: II. MODEL DEVELOPMENT AND VERIFICATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    A comprehensive dynamic model is presented that simulates methanogenesis and sulfate reduction in a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). This model incorporates the complex chemistry of anaerobic systems. A salient feature of the model is its ability to predict the effluent ...

  8. Reduction of sulfate by hydrogen in natural systems: A literature review: Salt Repository Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of this literature search indicate that the reduction of sulfate by hydrogen gas can occur in nature, but that temperature appears to be a key factor in the rate of this reaction. At temperatures below 200/degree/C, the key factor in the rate of reaction appears to be extremely slow. At low pH the rate of reaction is faster than at high pH. The solution composition also influences the reaction rate; the most recent research available (Yanisagawa 1983) suggests that the concentration of sulfide in solution influences the rate of this reaction. The reduction reaction appears to proceed through a thiosulfate intermediate, so the presence and distribution of other sulfur species will influence the reaction rate. If the reaction mechanism proposed by Yanisagawa is correct, then higher concentrations of sulfide will result in faster rates of sulfate reduction. In conclusion, the reduction of sulfate by hydrogen to form significant amounts of sulfide is a function of temperature, sulfate and sulfide concentrations, pH, and solution composition. The rate of this reaction appears to be very slow under the conditions anticipated in this repository, but given the length of time required to maintain the integrity of the containers (300 to 1000 years) and the unusual solution compositions present, a better understanding of the reaction mechanism is needed. 16 refs., 1 tab

  9. Sulfate-reducing bacteria are common members of bacterial communities in Altamira Cave (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, M Carmen; Gonzalez, Juan M

    2009-01-15

    The conservation of paleolithic paintings such as those in Altamira Cave (Spain) is a primary objective. Recent molecular studies have shown the existence of unknown microbial communities in this cave including anaerobic microorganisms on cave walls. Herein, we analyzed an anaerobic microbial group, the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), from Altamira Cave with potential negative effects on painting conservation. In the present work, the communities of bacteria and SRB were studied through PCR-DGGE analysis. Data suggest that SRB communities represent a significant, highly diverse bacterial group in Altamira Cave. These findings represent a first report on this physiological group on caves with paleolithic paintings and their potential biodegradation consequences. Expanding our knowledge on microbial communities in Altamira Cave is a priority to design appropriate conservation strategies. PMID:19027143

  10. Biodegradation of munitions compounds by a sulfate reducing bacterial enrichment culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boopathy, R.; Manning, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Research Div.

    1997-08-01

    The degradation of several munitions compounds was studied. The compounds included 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine, octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazocine, 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TNB), and 2,4-dinitrotoluene. All of the compounds studied were degraded by the sulfate reducing bacterial (SRB) enrichment culture. The SRB culture did not use the munitions compounds as their sole source of carbon. However, all the munitions compounds tested served as the sole source of nitrogen for the SRB culture. Degradation of munitions compounds was achieved by a co-metabolic process. The SRB culture used a variety of carbon sources including pyruvate, ethanol, formate, lactate, and H{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}. The SRB culture was an incomplete oxidizer, unable to carry out the terminal oxidation of organic substrates to CO{sub 2} as the sole product, and it did not use acetate or methanol as a carbon source. In addition to serving as nitrogen sources, the munitions compounds also served as electron acceptors in the absence of sulfate. A soil slurry experiment with 5% and 10% munitions compounds-contaminated soil showed that the contaminant TNT was metabolized by the SRB culture in the presence of pyruvate as electron donor. This culture may be useful in decontaminating munitions compounds-contaminated soil and water under anaerobic conditions.

  11. Inhibition of bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron by lead nitrate in sulfate-rich systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongmei; Gong, Linfeng; Cravotta, Charles A., III; Yang, Xiaofen; Tuovinen, Olli H.; Dong, Hailiang; Fu, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) by Pb(NO3)2 was investigated with a mixed culture of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The culture was incubated at 30 °C in ferrous-sulfate medium amended with 0–24.2 mM Pb(II) added as Pb(NO3)2. Anglesite (PbSO4) precipitated immediately upon Pb addition and was the only solid phase detected in the abiotic controls. Both anglesite and jarosite (KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6) were detected in inoculated cultures. Precipitation of anglesite maintained dissolved Pb concentrations at 16.9–17.6 μM regardless of the concentrations of Pb(NO3)2 added. Fe(II) oxidation was suppressed by 24.2 mM Pb(NO3)2 addition even when anglesite was removed before inoculation. Experiments with 0–48 mM KNO3 demonstrated that bacterial Fe(II) oxidation decreased as nitrate concentration increased. Therefore, inhibition of Fe(II) oxidation at 24.2 mM Pb(NO3)2 addition resulted from nitrate toxicity instead of Pb addition. Geochemical modeling that considered the initial precipitation of anglesite to equilibrium followed by progressive oxidation of Fe(II) and the precipitation of jarosite and an amorphous iron hydroxide phase, without allowing plumbojarosite to precipitate were consistent with the experimental time-series data on Fe(II) oxidation under biotic conditions. Anglesite precipitation in mine tailings and other sulfate-rich systems maintains dissolved Pb concentrations below the toxicity threshold of A. ferrooxidans.

  12. Temperature effect on the sulfur isotope fractionation during sulfate reduction by two strains of the hyperthermophilic Archaeoglobus fulgidus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitchell, K.; Heyer, A.; Canfield, D.E.; Hoek, J.; Habicht, K.S.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Sulfur isotope fractionation during dissimilatory sulfate reduction by two strains of the thermophilic archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus (strains VC-16 and Z) was explored over the entire temperature range of growth. The optimal cell-specific sulfate reduction rate (14 fmol cell-1 h -1) was fo

  13. Comparative survey of potential nitrate and sulfate reduction rates in aquatic sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverman, Anniet M.; Pallud, Céline; Abell, Jeffrey; Cappellen, Philippe Van

    2012-01-01

    Nitrate and sulfate are two major terminal electron acceptors of anaerobic respiration in nearshore sediments. Potential nitrate and sulfate reduction rates (NRR and SRR) were determined on surficial sediments sampled at 14 sites representing a wide range of shallow-water depositional environments. The rates were obtained by supplying undisturbed slices of sediments with nitrate, sulfate or both using a flow-through reactor technique. No external electron donor was added to the sediments. The results indicate that all studied sediments harbored viable and coexisting nitrate- and sulfate-reducing communities, which were able to instantaneously consume the electron acceptors supplied to the reactors. On average, NRR exceeded SRR by about one order of magnitude (309 ± 180 nmol NO3- cm-3 h-1versus 37 ± 29 nmol SO42- cm-3 h-1). The NRR:SRR molar ratio, however, varied significantly from site to site, with values ranging from 1.7 to 59. Nitrite production, indicative of incomplete nitrate reduction, was observed in all studied sediments and, on average, accounted for 45% of NRR (range 3-80%). Production of sulfate under nitrate-reducing conditions was observed in 10 out of 14 of the studied sediments, suggesting a common occurrence of sulfide oxidation coupled to nitrate reduction. Oxidation of sulfide accounted for 0 to 40% of NRR in the nitrate-only experiments. When both electron acceptors were supplied simultaneously, net sulfate consumption decreased on average by 45%. The effect of nitrate on SRR was highly variable, however, ranging from near complete inhibition to a 25% enhancement of SRR. Overall, the results of this study point to the need to critically reassess the model formulations used to represent anaerobic respiration processes and their interactions in early diagenetic models.

  14. Microbial sulfate reduction and metal attenuation in pH 4 acid mine water

    OpenAIRE

    Alpers Charles N; Wilkin Richard T; Church Clinton D; Rye Robert O; McCleskey R Blaine

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Sediments recovered from the flooded mine workings of the Penn Mine, a Cu-Zn mine abandoned since the early 1960s, were cultured for anaerobic bacteria over a range of pH (4.0 to 7.5). The molecular biology of sediments and cultures was studied to determine whether sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were active in moderately acidic conditions present in the underground mine workings. Here we document multiple, independent analyses and show evidence that sulfate reduction and associated ...

  15. Selective catalytic reduction system and process using a pre-sulfated zirconia binder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A.

    2010-06-29

    A selective catalytic reduction (SCR) process with a palladium catalyst for reducing NOx in a gas, using hydrogen as a reducing agent is provided. The process comprises contacting the gas stream with a catalyst system, the catalyst system comprising (ZrO.sub.2)SO.sub.4, palladium, and a pre-sulfated zirconia binder. The inclusion of a pre-sulfated zirconia binder substantially increases the durability of a Pd-based SCR catalyst system. A system for implementing the disclosed process is further provided.

  16. Two Novel Vaginal Microbicides (Polystyrene Sulfonate and Cellulose Sulfate) Inhibit Gardnerella vaginalis and Anaerobes Commonly Associated with Bacterial Vaginosis

    OpenAIRE

    Simoes, Jose A.; Citron, Diane M.; Aroutcheva, Alla; Anderson, Robert A.; Chany II, Calvin J.; Waller, Donald P.; Faro, Sebastian; Lourens J. D. Zaneveld

    2002-01-01

    This is the first report demonstrating the in vitro inhibitory activity of two novel microbicides (cellulose sulfate and polystyrene sulfonate) against bacterial vaginosis (BV)-associated bacteria. Vaginal application of these microbicides not only may reduce the risk of acquisition of human immunodeficiency virus and other sexually transmitted infection-causing organisms but may also decrease the incidence of BV.

  17. Biodegradation of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate by local bacterial isolate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anionic surfactants, e.g., sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), as a main components in the detergent and cosmetic industries, contribute significantly to the pollution profile of sewage and wastewaters of all kinds. The purpose of this study was to isolate local SDS degrading bacteria. Screening was carried out by the conventional enrichment culture technique. One bacterial isolate was obtained; this isolate was primarily defined as gram-negative rods . It was capable of degrading 100% of 1000 and 2000 mg/l of SDS after 6 days of incubation. The isolate exhibited maximum growth at SDS concentration 4000 mg/I, but it was significantly decreased at higher concentration (16000 mg/I).All the carbon sources being tested repressed the degradation ability. Sodium nitrate at concentration of 2.0 g/I was the best nitrogen source for growth and SDS biodegradation, it enhanced the degradation of 3000 mg/I SDS by 95%,i.e., by 32% upon the control (broth medium containing NH4Cl). SDS degradation by the bacterium was optimum at initial ph 8.5, incubation temperature 35 degree C, and inoculum size 2% (v/v). Under the optimized conditions, almost 98% of initial SDS concentration (4000 mg/l) was degraded after 120 h of incubation. Gamma irradiation did not improve the biodegradation ability of this bacterial isolate.

  18. Linkage of High Rates of Sulfate Reduction in Yellowstone Hot Springs to Unique Sequence Types in the Dissimilatory Sulfate Respiration Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Fishbain, Susan; Dillon, Jesse G.; Heidi L Gough; Stahl, David A

    2003-01-01

    Diversity, habitat range, and activities of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes within hot springs in Yellowstone National Park were characterized using endogenous activity measurements, molecular characterization, and enrichment. Five major phylogenetic groups were identified using PCR amplification of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase genes (dsrAB) from springs demonstrating significant sulfate reduction rates, including a warm, acidic (pH 2.5) stream and several nearly neutral hot springs with ...

  19. Kinetics of uncatalyzed thermochemical sulfate reduction by sulfur-free paraffin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tongwei; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Ma, Qisheng; Amrani, Alon; Tang, Yongchun

    2012-11-01

    To determine kinetic parameters of sulfate reduction by hydrocarbons (HC) without the initial presence of low valence sulfur, we carried out a series of isothermal gold-tube hydrous-pyrolysis experiments at 320, 340, and 360 °C under a constant confined pressure of 24.1 MPa. The reactants used consisted of saturated HC (sulfur-free) and CaSO4 in an aqueous solution buffered to three different pH conditions without the addition of elemental sulfur (S8) or H2S as initiators. H2S produced in the course of reaction was proportional to the extent of the reduction of CaSO4 that was initially the only sulfur-containing reactant. Our results show that the in situ pH of the aqueous solution (herein, in situ pH refers to the calculated pH value of the aqueous solution at certain experimental conditions) can significantly affect the rate of the thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) reaction. A substantial increase in the TSR reaction rate was observed with a decrease in the in situ pH. Our experimental results show that uncatalyzed TSR is a first-order reaction. The temperature dependence of experimentally measured H2S yields from sulfate reduction was fit with the Arrhenius equation. The determined activation energy for HC (sulfur-free) reacting with HSO4- in our experiments is 246.6 kJ/mol at pH values ranging from 3.0 to 3.5, which is slightly higher than the theoretical value of 227.0 kJ/mol using ab initio quantum chemical calculations on a similar reaction. Although the availability of reactive sulfate significantly affects the rate of reaction, a consistent rate constant was determined by accounting for the HSO4- ion concentration. Our experimental and theoretical approach to the determination of the kinetics of TSR is further validated by a reevaluation of several published experimental TSR datasets without the initial presence of native sulfur or H2S. When the effect of reactive sulfate concentration is appropriately accounted for, the published experimental TSR

  20. Bacterial Reduction Of Barium Sulphate By Sulphate-Reducing Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luptáková Alena

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainage (AMD is a worldwide problem leading to contamination of water sources. AMD are characterized by low pH and high content of heavy metals and sulphates. The barium salts application presents one of the methods for the sulphates removing from AMD. Barium chloride, barium hydroxide and barium sulphide are used for the sulphates precipitation in the form of barium sulphate. Because of high investment costs of barium salts, barium sulphide is recycled from barium sulphate precipitates. It can be recycled by thermic or bacterial reduction of barium sulphate. The aim of our study was to verify experimentally the possibility of the bacterial transformation of BaSO4 to BaS by sulphate-reducing bacteria. Applied BaSO4 came from experiments of sulphates removal from Smolnik AMD using BaCl2.

  1. High rates of sulfate reduction in a low-sulfate hot spring microbial mat are driven by a low level of diversity of sulfate-respiring microorganisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dillon, Jesse G; Fishbain, Susan; Miller, Scott R;

    2007-01-01

    The importance of sulfate respiration in the microbial mat found in the low-sulfate thermal outflow of Mushroom Spring in Yellowstone National Park was evaluated using a combination of molecular, microelectrode, and radiotracer studies. Despite very low sulfate concentrations, this mat community...

  2. Geomicrobiological linkages between short-chain alkane consumption and sulfate reduction rates in seep sediments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita eBose

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Marine hydrocarbon seeps are ecosystems that are rich in methane, and, in some cases, short-chain (C2-C5 and longer alkanes. C2-C4 alkanes such as ethane, propane and butane can be significant components of seeping fluids. Some sulfate-reducing microbes oxidize short-chain alkanes anaerobically, and may play an important role in both the competition for sulfate and the local carbon budget. To better understand the anaerobic oxidation of short-chain n-alkanes coupled with sulfate-reduction, hydrocarbon-rich sediments from the Gulf of Mexico were amended with artificial, sulfate-replete seawater and one of four n-alkanes (C1-C4 then incubated under strict anaerobic conditions. Measured rates of alkane oxidation and sulfate reduction closely follow stoichiometric predictions that assume the complete oxidation of alkanes to CO2 (though other sinks for alkane carbon likely exist. Changes in the δ13C of all the alkanes in the reactors show enrichment over the course of the incubation, with the C3 and C4 incubations showing the greatest enrichment (4.4‰ and 4.5‰ respectively. The concurrent depletion in the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC implies a transfer of carbon from the alkane to the DIC pool (-3.5 and -6.7‰ for C3 and C4 incubations, respectively. Microbial community analyses reveal that certain members of the class Deltaproteobacteria are selectively enriched as the incubations degrade C1-C4 alkanes. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that distinct phylotypes are enriched in the ethane reactors, while phylotypes in the propane and butane reactors align with previously identified C3-C4 alkane-oxidizing sulfate-reducers. These data further constrain the potential influence of alkane oxidation on sulfate reduction rates in cold hydrocarbon-rich sediments, provide insight into their contribution to local carbon cycling, and illustrate the extent to which short-chain alkanes can serve as electron donors and govern microbial community

  3. Comparison of Mechanisms of Alkane Metabolism under Sulfate-Reducing Conditions among Two Bacterial Isolates and a Bacterial Consortium

    OpenAIRE

    Callaghan, Amy V.; Gieg, Lisa M.; Kropp, Kevin G.; Suflita, Joseph M.; Young, Lily Y.

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that fumarate addition and carboxylation are two possible mechanisms of anaerobic alkane degradation. In the present study, we surveyed metabolites formed during growth on hexadecane by the sulfate-reducing isolates AK-01 and Hxd3 and by a mixed sulfate-reducing consortium. The cultures were incubated with either protonated or fully deuterated hexadecane; the sulfate-reducing consortium was also incubated with [1,2-13C2]hexadecane. All cultures were extracted,...

  4. Biogeochemistry of a deep-sea whale fall: sulfate reduction, sulfide efflux and methanogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Treude, Tina; Smith, C. R.; Wenzhöfer, F.; Carney, E; Bernardino, A. F.; A. K. Hannides; Krüger, M.; A. Boetius

    2009-01-01

    Deep-sea whale falls create sulfidic habits Supporting chemoautotrophic communities, but microbial processes underlying the formation Of Such habitats remain poorly evaluated. Microbial degradation processes (sulfate reduction, methanogenesis) and biogeochemical gradients were studied in a whale-fall habitat created by a 30 t whale carcass deployed at 1675 m depth for 6 to 7 yr on the California margin. A variety of measurements were conducted including photomosaicking, microsensor measuremen...

  5. Compositional and stable carbon isotopic fractionation during non-autocatalytic thermochemical sulfate reduction by gaseous hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xinyu; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Ma, Qisheng; Tang, Yongchun

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of autocatalysis during thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) by gaseous hydrocarbons was investigated by examination of previously reported laboratory and field data. This reaction was found to be a kinetically controlled non-autocatalytic process, and the apparent lack of autocatalysis is thought to be due to the absence of the required intermediate species. Kinetic parameters for chemical and carbon isotopic fractionations of gaseous hydrocarbons affected by TSR were calculated and found to be consistent with experimentally derived values for TSR involving long-chain hydrocarbons. Model predictions based on these kinetic values indicate that TSR by gaseous hydrocarbon requires high-temperature conditions. The oxidation of C2–5 hydrocarbons by sulfate reduction is accompanied by carbon isotopic fractionation with the residual C2–5 hydrocarbons becoming more enriched in 13C. Kinetic parameters were calculated for the stable carbon isotopic fractionation of gaseous hydrocarbons that have experienced TSR. Model predictions based on these kinetics indicate that it may be difficult to distinguish the effects of TSR from those of thermal maturation at lower levels of hydrocarbon oxidation; however, unusually heavy δ13C2+ values (>−10‰) can be diagnostic of high levels of conversion (>50%). Stoichiometric and stable carbon isotopic data show that methane is stable under the investigated reaction conditions and is likely a product of TSR by other gaseous hydrocarbons rather than a significant reactant. These results indicate that the overall TSR reaction mechanism for oxidation of organic substrates containing long-chain hydrocarbons involves three distinct phases as follows: (1) an initial slow and non-autocatalytic stage characterized by the reduction of reactive sulfate by long-chain saturated hydrocarbons; (2) a second autocatalytic reaction phase dominated by reactions involving reduced sulfur species and partially oxidized hydrocarbons; (3

  6. Anaerobic biodegradation of nonylphenol in river sediment under nitrate- or sulfate-reducing conditions and associated bacterial community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • NP biodegradation can occur under both nitrate- and sulfate-reducing conditions. • Anaerobic condition affects sediment bacterial diversity during NP biodegradation. • NP-degrading bacterial community structure varies under different anaerobic conditions. - Abstract: Nonylphenol (NP) is a commonly detected pollutant in aquatic ecosystem and can be harmful to aquatic organisms. Anaerobic degradation is of great importance for the clean-up of NP in sediment. However, information on anaerobic NP biodegradation in the environment is still very limited. The present study investigated the shift in bacterial community structure associated with NP degradation in river sediment microcosms under nitrate- or sulfate-reducing conditions. Nearly 80% of NP (100 mg kg−1) could be removed under these two anaerobic conditions after 90 or 110 days’ incubation. Illumina MiSeq sequencing analysis indicated that Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Chloroflexi became the dominant phylum groups with NP biodegradation. The proportion of Gammaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria and Choloroflexi showed a marked increase in nitrate-reducing microcosm, while Gammaproteobacteria and Firmicutes in sulfate-reducing microcosm. Moreover, sediment bacterial diversity changed with NP biodegradation, which was dependent on type of electron acceptor

  7. Electrochemical Behavior of Antimicrobial Stainless Steel Bearing Copper in Sulfate Reducing Bacterial Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hua; LIANG Chenghao

    2008-01-01

    The electrochemical characteristic of antimicrobial stainless steel beating copper NSSAM3in sulfate reducing bacterial(SRB)was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy(EIS)and potentiodynamic polarization.The results show that inoculation of SRB into the culture medium significantly affects the anodic polarization behavior of NSSAM3 and accelerates anodic depolarization process,however,it has little effect on cathodic polarization curves of NSSAM3.Under the same exposure time,the anodic polarization curves of NSSAM3 in culture medium with SRB are in anodic active dissolution state when anodicpolarization potential value is below 0 V(SCE),whose anodic polarization current density is bigger than that of in culture medium without SRB.Moreover,when the concentration of Cu2+ in SRB medium increases,anodic polarization current density of NSSAM3 decreases and polarization resistance increases with increasing time.Scanning electron microscope(SEM)observations indicate that SRB unevenly attaches on the surface of NSSAM3,and induces the sensitivity to local corrosion.

  8. Microbial sulfate reduction and metal attenuation in pH 4 acid mine water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Clinton D; Wilkin, Richard T; Alpers, Charles N; Rye, Robert O; McCleskey, R Blaine

    2007-01-01

    Sediments recovered from the flooded mine workings of the Penn Mine, a Cu-Zn mine abandoned since the early 1960s, were cultured for anaerobic bacteria over a range of pH (4.0 to 7.5). The molecular biology of sediments and cultures was studied to determine whether sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were active in moderately acidic conditions present in the underground mine workings. Here we document multiple, independent analyses and show evidence that sulfate reduction and associated metal attenuation are occurring in the pH-4 mine environment. Water-chemistry analyses of the mine water reveal: (1) preferential complexation and precipitation by H2S of Cu and Cd, relative to Zn; (2) stable isotope ratios of 34S/32S and 18O/16O in dissolved SO4 that are 2-3 per thousand heavier in the mine water, relative to those in surface waters; (3) reduction/oxidation conditions and dissolved gas concentrations consistent with conditions to support anaerobic processes such as sulfate reduction. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses of sediment show 1.5-micrometer, spherical ZnS precipitates. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses of Penn Mine sediment show a high biomass level with a moderately diverse community structure composed primarily of iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Cultures of sediment from the mine produced dissolved sulfide at pH values near 7 and near 4, forming precipitates of either iron sulfide or elemental sulfur. DGGE coupled with sequence and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA gene segments showed populations of Desulfosporosinus and Desulfitobacterium in Penn Mine sediment and laboratory cultures. PMID:17956615

  9. Microbial sulfate reduction and metal attenuation in pH 4 acid mine water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alpers Charles N

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sediments recovered from the flooded mine workings of the Penn Mine, a Cu-Zn mine abandoned since the early 1960s, were cultured for anaerobic bacteria over a range of pH (4.0 to 7.5. The molecular biology of sediments and cultures was studied to determine whether sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB were active in moderately acidic conditions present in the underground mine workings. Here we document multiple, independent analyses and show evidence that sulfate reduction and associated metal attenuation are occurring in the pH-4 mine environment. Water-chemistry analyses of the mine water reveal: (1 preferential complexation and precipitation by H2S of Cu and Cd, relative to Zn; (2 stable isotope ratios of 34S/32S and 18O/16O in dissolved SO4 that are 2–3 ‰ heavier in the mine water, relative to those in surface waters; (3 reduction/oxidation conditions and dissolved gas concentrations consistent with conditions to support anaerobic processes such as sulfate reduction. Scanning electron microscope (SEM analyses of sediment show 1.5-micrometer, spherical ZnS precipitates. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE analyses of Penn Mine sediment show a high biomass level with a moderately diverse community structure composed primarily of iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Cultures of sediment from the mine produced dissolved sulfide at pH values near 7 and near 4, forming precipitates of either iron sulfide or elemental sulfur. DGGE coupled with sequence and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA gene segments showed populations of Desulfosporosinus and Desulfitobacterium in Penn Mine sediment and laboratory cultures.

  10. Kinetics of Reductive Acid Leaching of Cadmium-Bearing Zinc Ferrite Mixture Using Hydrazine Sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun; Zhang, Jianqiang; Min, Xiaobo; Wang, Mi; Zhou, Bosheng; Shen, Chen

    2015-09-01

    The reductive acid leaching kinetics of synthetic cadmium-bearing zinc ferrite was investigated, and the influence of reaction temperature, sulfuric acid and hydrazine sulfate were studied. The results illustrated that an increase in the reaction temperature, initial sulfuric acid and hydrazine sulfate significantly enhanced the extraction efficiencies of cadmium, zinc and iron. The leaching kinetics were controlled by a surface chemical reaction based on a shrinking core model. The empirical equation applied was found to fit well with the kinetics analysis; the leaching processes of cadmium, zinc and iron were similar and the activation energies were 79.9 kJ/mol, 77.9 kJ/mol and 79.7 kJ/mol, respectively. The apparent orders of cadmium-bearing zinc ferrite dissolution with respect to sulfuric acid concentration were 0.83, 0.83 and 0.84 for Cd, Zn and Fe, respectively.

  11. Toxicity of xenobiotics during sulfate, iron, and nitrate reduction in primary sewage sludge suspensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsgaard, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The effect and persistence of six organic xenobiotics was tested under sulfate-, iron-, and nitrate-reducing conditions in primary sewage sludge suspensions. The xenobiotics tested were acenaphthene, phenanthrene, di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP), 4-nonylphenol (4-NP), linear alkylbenzene sulfonate...... (LAS), and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (1,2,4-TCB) added to initial analytical concentrations of 54–117 mg L−1. The suspensions were incubated at 30 °C for 15 weeks and rates of sulfate, iron, and nitrate reduction were estimated from the time course of hydrogen sulfide accumulation, Fe(II) accumulation......, and nitrate depletion, respectively. Chemical analysis showed that the xenobiotics were persistent under the different electron acceptor regimes for the duration of the experiment. This was partly attributed to low bioavailability and microbial toxicity of the xenobiotics....

  12. Scientific evaluation of the remedial actions for underground sulfate reduction in the former Lausitz mining area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Lausitz brown coal mining area the largest technical engineered lake region in Europe is developed (14000 ha). The water quality is negatively influenced by oxidation of the iron sulfides from the original cap rocks. Low pH values and high iron and sulfate concentrations limit the economical use of the lakes. It is assumed that an improvement of the water quality can be reached by appropriate measures. The pilot project was aimed to the reduction of sulfates in the groundwater. The project demonstrates the possibility of a combination of several processes and the transfer to large-scale experiments. The report covers the following topics: theoretical fundamentals, site conditions and the experimental facilities, hydro-geologic exploration results and geochemistry of the evaluated area, boundary conditions of the experiment evaluation, development of the water quality in the reaction area, hydro-chemical effects of the remedial actions, flow modeling, modeling of the site conditions, summary and conclusions of the project.

  13. Effects of imposed salinity gradients on dissimilatory arsenate reduction, sulfate reduction, and other microbial processes in sediments from two California soda lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulp, T.R.; Han, S.; Saltikov, C.W.; Lanoil, B.D.; Zargar, K.; Oremland, R.S.

    2007-01-01

    Salinity effects on microbial community structure and on potential rates of arsenate reduction, arsenite oxidation, sulfate reduction, denitrification, and methanogenesis were examined in sediment slurries from two California soda lakes. We conducted experiments with Mono Lake and Searles Lake sediments over a wide range of salt concentrations (25 to 346 g liter-1). With the exception of sulfate reduction, rates of all processes demonstrated an inverse relationship to total salinity. However, each of these processes persisted at low but detectable rates at salt saturation. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of partial 16S rRNA genes amplified from As(V) reduction slurries revealed that distinct microbial populations grew at low (25 to 50 g liter-1), intermediate (100 to 200 g liter-1), and high (>300 g liter-1) salinity. At intermediate and high salinities, a close relative of a cultivated As-respiring halophile was present. These results suggest that organisms adapted to more dilute conditions can remain viable at high salinity and rapidly repopulate the lake during periods of rising lake level. In contrast to As reduction, sulfate reduction in Mono Lake slurries was undetectable at salt saturation. Furthermore, sulfate reduction was excluded from Searles Lake sediments at any salinity despite the presence of abundant sulfate. Sulfate reduction occurred in Searles Lake sediment slurries only following inoculation with Mono Lake sediment, indicating the absence of sulfate-reducing flora. Experiments with borate-amended Mono Lake slurries suggest that the notably high (0.46 molal) concentration of borate in the Searles Lake brine was responsible for the exclusion of sulfate reducers from that ecosystem. Copyright ?? 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Acetate, lactate, propionate, and isobutyrate as electron donors for iron and sulfate reduction in Arctic marine sediments, Svalbard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finke, Niko; Vandieken, Verona; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2007-01-01

    oxidized (0-2 cm) and the reduced (5-9 cm) zone. In the 0-2 cm layer, 2/3 of the mineralization could be attributed to sulfate reduction and 1/3 to iron reduction. In the 5-9 cm layer, sulfate reduction was the sole mineralization process. Acetate and lactate turnover rates were measured by radiotracer....... Inhibition of sulfate reduction with selenate resulted in the accumulation of acetate, propionate, and isobutyrate. The acetate turnover rates determined by radiotracer and accumulation after inhibition were similar. VFA turnover accounted for 21% and 52% of the mineralization through sulfate reduction in...... the 0-2 and 5-9 cm layer, respectively. Acetate and lactate turnover in the inhibited 0-2 cm slurry was attributed to iron reduction and accounted for 10% and 2% of the iron reduction. Therefore, 88% and 79% of the iron and sulfate reduction in the 0-2 cm layer, respectively, must be fueled by...

  15. Synergy in Sulfur Cycle: The Biogeochemical Significance of Sulfate Reducing Bacteria in Syntrophic Associations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.

    processes governing the composition of the oceans and the redox balance on the earth?s surface is the bacterial reduction of seawater sulfate to H2S. Rates of sulfate reduction in marine sediments can vary over eight orders of magnitude (Jorgensen... are closely related to microorganisms, which cannot perform anaerobic sulfate reduction for energy generation. They comprise a phylogeneticallly diverse assemblage of organisms consisting of members of at least 4 bacterial phyla and one-archael phyla. Archaea...

  16. Microbial Sulfate Reduction in Deep-Sea Sediments at the Guaymas Basin - Hydrothermal Vent Area - Influence of Temperature and Substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ELSGAARD, L.; ISAKSEN, MF; JØRGENSEN, BB; ALAYSE, AM; JANNASCH, HW

    1994-01-01

    -1 at 70-degrees-C. The rates of sulfate reduction rapidly decreased with depth in the upper 0- 10 cm of the sediment and the maximal depth-integrated rate (0-10 cm) was 70.3 mmol SO42- m-2 d-1 at 70-degrees-C. In comparison, the sulfate reduction rate in nonhydrothermal sediment from the vent area...... was 0.85 mmol m-2 d-1 at the in situ temperature of about 3-degrees-C. The high subsurface rates of sulfate reduction in the hydrothermal vent area was attributed to an enhanced local substrate availability. In slurries of hydrothermal sediment, incubated at 10-120-degrees-C, microbial sulfate....... Sulfate reduction was measured in intact cores of hydrothermal sediment at 3-degrees, 20-degrees, 35-degrees, 50-degrees, 70-degrees, and 90-degrees-C. The maximum rates of sulfate reduction were found in the upper 0-2 cm of the sediment and ranged from 32 nmol cm-3 d-1 at 90-degrees-C to 1563 nmol cm-3 d...

  17. Anaerobic oxidation of methane and sulfate reduction along the Chilean continental margin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treude, T.; Niggemann, J.; Kallmeyer, J.;

    2005-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and sulfate reduction (SR) were investigated in sediments of the Chilean upwelling region at three stations between 800 and 3000 In water depth. Major goals of this study were to quantify and evaluate rates of AOM and SR in a coastal marine upwelling system with...... peaks of 2 to 51 nmol cm(-3) d(-1), with highest rates at the shallowest station (800 m). The methane turnover was higher than in other diffusive systems of similar ocean depth. This higher turnover was most likely due to elevated organic matter input in this upwelling region offering significant...

  18. Sulfate reduction at low pH to remediate acid mine drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez-Andrea, Irene, E-mail: irene.sanchezandrea@wur.nl [Departamento de Biología Molecular, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Laboratory of Microbiology, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 10, 6703 HB Wageningen (Netherlands); Sanz, Jose Luis [Departamento de Biología Molecular, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Bijmans, Martijn F.M. [Wetsus, Centre of Sustainable Water Technology, P.O. Box 1113, 8900 CC Leeuwarden (Netherlands); Stams, Alfons J.M. [Laboratory of Microbiology, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 10, 6703 HB Wageningen (Netherlands); IBB – Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Centre of Biological Engineering, University of Minho, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Acid mine drainage (AMD) is an important environmental concern. • Remediation through biological sulfate reduction and metal recovery can be applied for AMD. • Microbial community composition has a major impact on the performance of bioreactors to treat AMD. • Acidophilic SRB are strongly influenced by proton, sulfide and organic acids concentration. - Abstract: Industrial activities and the natural oxidation of metallic sulfide-ores produce sulfate-rich waters with low pH and high heavy metals content, generally termed acid mine drainage (AMD). This is of great environmental concern as some heavy metals are highly toxic. Within a number of possibilities, biological treatment applying sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is an attractive option to treat AMD and to recover metals. The process produces alkalinity, neutralizing the AMD simultaneously. The sulfide that is produced reacts with the metal in solution and precipitates them as metal sulfides. Here, important factors for biotechnological application of SRB such as the inocula, the pH of the process, the substrates and the reactor design are discussed. Microbial communities of sulfidogenic reactors treating AMD which comprise fermentative-, acetogenic- and SRB as well as methanogenic archaea are reviewed.

  19. High-throughput screening to identify selective inhibitors of microbial sulfate reduction (and beyond)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, H. K.; Coates, J. D.; Deutschbauer, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The selective perturbation of complex microbial ecosystems to predictably influence outcomes in engineered and industrial environments remains a grand challenge for geomicrobiology. In some industrial ecosystems, such as oil reservoirs, sulfate reducing microorganisms (SRM) produce hydrogen sulfide which is toxic, explosive and corrosive. Current strategies to selectively inhibit sulfidogenesis are based on non-specific biocide treatments, bio-competitive exclusion by alternative electron acceptors or sulfate-analogs which are competitive inhibitors or futile/alternative substrates of the sulfate reduction pathway. Despite the economic cost of sulfidogenesis, there has been minimal exploration of the chemical space of possible inhibitory compounds, and very little work has quantitatively assessed the selectivity of putative souring treatments. We have developed a high-throughput screening strategy to target SRM, quantitatively ranked the selectivity and potency of hundreds of compounds and identified previously unrecognized SRM selective inhibitors and synergistic interactions between inhibitors. Once inhibitor selectivity is defined, high-throughput characterization of microbial community structure across compound gradients and identification of fitness determinants using isolate bar-coded transposon mutant libraries can give insights into the genetic mechanisms whereby compounds structure microbial communities. The high-throughput (HT) approach we present can be readily applied to target SRM in diverse environments and more broadly, could be used to identify and quantify the potency and selectivity of inhibitors of a variety of microbial metabolisms. Our findings and approach are relevant for engineering environmental ecosystems and also to understand the role of natural gradients in shaping microbial niche space.

  20. Sulfate reduction at low pH to remediate acid mine drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Acid mine drainage (AMD) is an important environmental concern. • Remediation through biological sulfate reduction and metal recovery can be applied for AMD. • Microbial community composition has a major impact on the performance of bioreactors to treat AMD. • Acidophilic SRB are strongly influenced by proton, sulfide and organic acids concentration. - Abstract: Industrial activities and the natural oxidation of metallic sulfide-ores produce sulfate-rich waters with low pH and high heavy metals content, generally termed acid mine drainage (AMD). This is of great environmental concern as some heavy metals are highly toxic. Within a number of possibilities, biological treatment applying sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is an attractive option to treat AMD and to recover metals. The process produces alkalinity, neutralizing the AMD simultaneously. The sulfide that is produced reacts with the metal in solution and precipitates them as metal sulfides. Here, important factors for biotechnological application of SRB such as the inocula, the pH of the process, the substrates and the reactor design are discussed. Microbial communities of sulfidogenic reactors treating AMD which comprise fermentative-, acetogenic- and SRB as well as methanogenic archaea are reviewed

  1. Sulfur and oxygen isotope study of sulfate reduction in experiments with natural populations from Fællestrand, Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, James; Canfield, Don E.; Masterson, Andrew; Bao, Huiming; Johnston, David

    2008-06-01

    This study investigates the sulfur and oxygen isotope fractionations of dissimilatory sulfate reduction and works to reconcile the relationships between the oxygen and sulfur isotopic and elemental systems. We report results of experiments with natural populations of sulfate-reducing bacteria using sediment and seawater from a marine lagoon at Fællestrand on the northern shore of the island of Fyn, Denmark. The experiments yielded relatively large magnitude sulfur isotope fractionations for dissimilatory sulfate reduction (up to approximately 45‰ for 34S/32S) with higher δ18O accompanying higher δ34S, similar to that observed in previous studies. The seawater used in the experiments was spiked by addition of 17O-labeled water and the 17O content of residual sulfate was found to depend on the fraction of sulfate reduced in the experiments. The 17O data provides evidence for recycling of sulfur from metabolic intermediates and for an 18O/16O fractionation of ∼25-30‰ for dissimilatory sulfate reduction. The close correlation between the 17O data and the sulfur isotope data suggests that isotopic exchange between cell water and external water (reactor water) was rapid under experimental conditions. The molar ratio of oxygen exchange to sulfate reduction was found to be about 2.5. This value is slightly lower than observed in studies of natural ecosystems [e.g., Wortmann U. G., Chernyavsky B., Bernasconi S. M., Brunner B., Böttcher M. E. and Swart P. K. (2007) Oxygen isotope biogeochemistry of pore water sulfate in the deep biosphere: dominance of isotope exchange reactions with ambient water during microbial sulfate reduction (ODP Site 1130). Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta71, 4221-4232]. Using recent models of sulfur isotope fractionations we find that our combined sulfur and oxygen isotopic data places constraints on the proportion of sulfate recycled to the medium (78-96%), the proportion of sulfur intermediate sulfite that was recycled by way of APS to sulfate

  2. Post-Translational Modifications of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Sulfate Reduction Pathway Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaucher, S.P.; Redding, A.M.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Keasling, J.D.; Singh, A.K.

    2008-03-01

    , Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20, also showed similar +42 Da modifications in the same pathway. Here, we discuss our methods and implications of potential trimethylation in the D. vulgaris sulfate reduction pathway.

  3. Methanotrophy and sulfate reduction at the interface between Mediterranean seawater and the MgCl2-dominated Kryos brine basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinle, Lea; Felber, Nicole; Casalino, Claudia; de Lange, Gert J.; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Stadnitskaia, Alina; Sinninghe Damste, Jaap S.; Tessarolo, Chiara; Treude, Tina; Zopfi, Jakob; Niemann, Helge

    2014-05-01

    The Kryos brine basin is located at ˜3000m water depth in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. The anoxic brine originates from subsurface Messinian evaporites and is dominated by very high concentrations of MgCl2-equivalents (˜5M), making this environment challenging for live. The strong density difference between the brine and the overlying Mediterranean seawater impedes mixing, and the seawater-brine interface is thus characterized by a strong redox gradient. In the redoxcline, we observed sharp sulfate, sulfide and methane concentration gradients, from seawater background concentrations to high concentrations in the brine (˜150 mM sulfate, ˜250 μM sulfide, ˜50 μM methane). Right at the interface, under micro-oxic conditions, we determined methane oxidation rates of up to 60 nM/day, and sulfate reduction rates of up to 15 μM/day. Our findings of 13C-depleted biomarkers typical for aerobic methanotrophs (diplopterol, fatty acid C16:1ω8) indicate an aerobic mode of methane oxidation independent of sulfate reduction. Below the interface (within the anoxic brine), the presence of both methane and sulfate would make the anaerobic oxidation of methane with sulfate (AOM) thermodynamically feasible. However, while sulfate reduction rates were very high (500 μM/day), methane oxidation rates were not detectable suggesting inhibition of AOM. In the brine, we detected high concentrations of an unusual fatty acid (10Me-C16:0) indicative for sulfate reducing bacteria, which might be responsible for the high sulfate reduction rates. In addition, we also found archaeal lipids (archaeol, PMI) moderately depleted in 13C. Considering the absence of AOM activity, these lipids suggest a methanogenic, rather than methanotrophic origin of the archaea within the brine. All these results provide new and exciting insight into life in an extreme environment.

  4. Inhibition of microbial sulfate reduction in a flow-through column system by (perchlorate treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eEngelbrektson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbial sulfate reduction is a primary cause of oil reservoir souring. Here we show that amendment with chlorate or perchlorate [collectively (perchlorate] potentially resolves this issue. Triplicate packed columns inoculated with marine sediment were flushed with coastal water amended with yeast extract and one of nitrate, chlorate, or perchlorate. Results showed that although sulfide production was dramatically reduced by all treatments, effluent sulfide was observed in the nitrate (10 mM treatment after an initial inhibition period. In contrast, no effluent sulfide was observed with (perchlorate (10 mM. Microbial community analyses indicated temporal community shifts and phylogenetic clustering by treatment. Nitrate addition stimulated Xanthomonadaceae and Rhizobiaceae growth, supporting their role in nitrate metabolism. (Perchlorate showed distinct effects on microbial community structure compared with nitrate and resulted in a general suppression of the community relative to the untreated control combined with a significant decrease in sulfate reducing species abundance indicating specific toxicity. Furthermore, chlorate stimulated Pseudomonadaceae and Pseudoalteromonadaceae, members of which are known chlorate respirers, suggesting that chlorate may also control sulfidogenesis by biocompetitive exclusion of sulfate-reduction. Perchlorate addition stimulated Desulfobulbaceae and Desulfomonadaceae, which contain sulfide oxidizing and elemental sulfur-reducing species respectively, suggesting that effluent sulfide concentrations may be controlled through sulfur redox cycling in addition to toxicity and biocompetitive exclusion. Sulfur isotope analyses further support sulfur cycling in the columns, even when sulfide is not detected. This study indicates that (perchlorate show great promise as inhibitors of sulfidogenesis in natural communities and provides insight into which organisms and respiratory processes are involved.

  5. Kinetics of sulfate reduction and sulfide precipitation rates in sediments of a bar-built estuary (Pescadero, California).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Chandra M; Pallud, Céline

    2016-05-01

    The bar-built Pescadero Estuary in Northern California is a major fish rearing habitat, though recently threatened by near-annual fish kill events, which occur when the estuary transitions from closed to open state. The direct and indirect effects of hydrogen sulfide are suspected to play a role in these mortalities, but the spatial variability of hydrogen sulfide production and its link to fish kills remains poorly understood. Using flow-through reactors containing intact littoral sediment slices, we measured potential sulfate reduction rates, kinetic parameters of microbial sulfate reduction (Rmax, the maximum sulfate reduction rate, and Km, the half-saturation constant for sulfate), potential sulfide precipitation rates, and potential hydrogen sulfide export rates to water at four sites in the closed and open states. At all sites, the Michaelis-Menten kinetic rate equation adequately describes the utilization of sulfate by the complex resident microbial communities. We estimate that 94-96% of hydrogen sulfide produced through sulfate reduction precipitates in the sediment and that only 4-6% is exported to water, suggesting that elevated sulfide concentrations in water, which would affect fish through toxicity and oxygen consumption, cannot be responsible for fish deaths. However, the indirect effects of sulfide precipitates, which chemically deplete, contaminate, and acidify the water column during sediment re-suspension and re-oxidation in the transition from closed to open state, can be implicated in fish mortalities at Pescadero Estuary. PMID:26925545

  6. Effect of methanogenic substrates on anaerobic oxidation of methane and sulfate reduction by an anaerobic methanotrophic enrichment

    OpenAIRE

    Meulepas, R.J.W.; Jagersma, C.G.; Khadem, A.F.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lens, P. N. L.

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction (SR) is assumed to be a syntrophic process, in which methanotrophic archaea produce an interspecies electron carrier (IEC), which is subsequently utilized by sulfate-reducing bacteria. In this paper, six methanogenic substrates are tested as candidate-IECs by assessing their effect on AOM and SR by an anaerobic methanotrophic enrichment. The presence of acetate, formate or hydrogen enhanced SR, but did not inhibit AOM, nor did ...

  7. Broad-Scale Evidence That pH Influences the Balance Between Microbial Iron and Sulfate Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Matthew F; Jin, Qusheng; Haller, Ben R

    2016-05-01

    Understanding basic controls on aquifer microbiology is essential to managing water resources and predicting impacts of future environmental change. Previous theoretical and laboratory studies indicate that pH can influence interactions between microorganisms that reduce ferric iron and sulfate. In this study, we test the environmental relevance of this relationship by examining broad-scale geochemical data from anoxic zones of aquifers. We isolated data from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System for 19 principal aquifer systems. We then removed samples with chemical compositions inconsistent with iron- and sulfate-reducing environments and evaluated the relationships between pH and other geochemical parameters using Spearman's rho rank correlation tests. Overall, iron concentration and the iron-sulfide concentration ratio of groundwater share a statistically significant negative correlation with pH (P < 0.0001). These relationships indicate that the significance of iron reduction relative to sulfate reduction tends to increase with decreasing pH. Moreover, thermodynamic calculations show that, as the pH of groundwater decreases, iron reduction becomes increasingly favorable relative to sulfate reduction. Hence, the relative significance of each microbial reaction may vary in response to thermodynamic controls on microbial activity. Our findings demonstrate that trends in groundwater geochemistry across different regional aquifer systems are consistent with pH as a control on interactions between microbial iron and sulfate reduction. Environmental changes that perturb groundwater pH can affect water quality by altering the balance between these microbial reactions. PMID:26284699

  8. Determination of kinetic coefficients for the simultaneous reduction of sulfate and uranium by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium contamination of groundwaters and surface waters near abandoned mill tailings piles is a serious concern in many areas of the western United States. Uranium usually exists in either the U(IV) or the U(VI) oxidation state. U(VI) is soluble in water and, as a result, is very mobile in the environment. U(IV), however, is generally insoluble in water and, therefore, is not subject to aqueous transport. In recent years, researchers have discovered that certain anaerobic microorganisms, such as the sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, can mediate the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). Although the ability of this microorganism to reduce U(VI) has been studied in some detail by previous researchers, the kinetics of the reactions have not been characterized. The purpose of this research was to perform kinetic studies on Desulfovibrio desulficans bacteria during simultaneous reduction of sulfate and uranium and to determine the phase in which uranium exists after it has been reduced and precipitated from solution. The studies were conducted in a laboratory-scale chemostat under substrate-limited growth conditions with pyruvate as the substrate. Kinetic coefficients for substrate utilization and cell growth were calculated using the Monod equation. The maximum rate of substrate utilization (k) was determined to be 4.70 days-1 while the half-velocity constant (Ks) was 140 mg/l COD. The yield coefficient (Y) was determined to be 0.17 mg cells/mg COD while the endogenous decay coefficient (kd) was calculated as 0.072 days-1. After reduction, U(IV) Precipitated from solution in the uraninite (UO2) phase. Uranium removal efficiency as high as 90% was achieved in the chemostat

  9. Determination of kinetic coefficients for the simultaneous reduction of sulfate and uranium by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, M.D.

    1995-05-01

    Uranium contamination of groundwaters and surface waters near abandoned mill tailings piles is a serious concern in many areas of the western United States. Uranium usually exists in either the U(IV) or the U(VI) oxidation state. U(VI) is soluble in water and, as a result, is very mobile in the environment. U(IV), however, is generally insoluble in water and, therefore, is not subject to aqueous transport. In recent years, researchers have discovered that certain anaerobic microorganisms, such as the sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, can mediate the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). Although the ability of this microorganism to reduce U(VI) has been studied in some detail by previous researchers, the kinetics of the reactions have not been characterized. The purpose of this research was to perform kinetic studies on Desulfovibrio desulficans bacteria during simultaneous reduction of sulfate and uranium and to determine the phase in which uranium exists after it has been reduced and precipitated from solution. The studies were conducted in a laboratory-scale chemostat under substrate-limited growth conditions with pyruvate as the substrate. Kinetic coefficients for substrate utilization and cell growth were calculated using the Monod equation. The maximum rate of substrate utilization (k) was determined to be 4.70 days{sup {minus}1} while the half-velocity constant (K{sub s}) was 140 mg/l COD. The yield coefficient (Y) was determined to be 0.17 mg cells/mg COD while the endogenous decay coefficient (k{sub d}) was calculated as 0.072 days{sup {minus}1}. After reduction, U(IV) Precipitated from solution in the uraninite (UO{sub 2}) phase. Uranium removal efficiency as high as 90% was achieved in the chemostat.

  10. Bacterially Induced Dolomite Formation in the Presence of Sulfate Ions under Aerobic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Roman, M.; McKenzie, J. A.; Vasconcelos, C.; Rivadeneyra, M.

    2005-12-01

    The origin of dolomite remains a long-standing enigma in sedimentary geology because, although thermodynamically favorable, precipitation of dolomite from modern seawater does not occur. Experiments conducted at elevated temperatures (200 oC) indicated that the presence of small concentrations of sulfate ions inhibits the transformation of calcite to dolomite [1]. Indeed, sulfate ions appeared to inhibit dolomite formation above 2 mM concentration (versus 28 mM in modern seawater). Recently, culture experiments have demonstrated that sulfate-reducing bacteria mediate the precipitation of dolomite at Earth surface conditions in the presence of sustained sulfate ion concentrations [2,3]. Additionally, in a number of modern hypersaline environments, dolomite forms from solutions with high sulfate ion concentrations (2 to 70 times seawater). These observations suggest that the experimentally observed sulfate-ion inhibition [1] may not apply to all ancient dolomite formation. Here, we report aerobic culture experiments conducted at low temperatures (25 and 35 oC) and variable sulfate ion concentrations (0, 0.5, 1 and 2 x seawater values) using moderately halophilic bacteria, Halomonas meridiana. After an incubation period of 15 days, experiments at 35 oC with variable sulfate ion concentrations (0, 0.5 x and seawater values) contained crystals of Ca-dolomite and stochiometric dolomite. The experiment at 35 oC with 2 x seawater sulfate ion concentration produced dolomite crystals after 20 days of incubation. In a parallel set of experiments at 25 oC, precipitation of dolomite was observed after 25 days of incubation in cultures with variable sulfate ion concentrations (0, 0.5 x and seawater values). In the culture with 2 x seawater sulfate ion concentration, dolomite crystals were observed after 30 days. Our study demonstrates that halophilic bacteria (or heterotrophic microorganisms), which do not require sulfate ions for metabolism, can mediate dolomite precipitation

  11. Formate, acetate, and propionate as substrates for sulfate reduction in sub-arctic sediments of Southwest Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glombitza, Clemens; Jaussi, Marion; Røy, Hans;

    2015-01-01

    Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) are key intermediates in the anaerobic mineralization of organic matter in marine sediments. We studied the role of VFAs in the carbon and energy turnover in the sulfate reduction zone of sediments from the sub-arctic Godthåbsfjord (SW Greenland) and the adjacent...... turnover times increased from several hours at the sediment surface to several years at the bottom of the sulfate reduction zone. Thus, diffusion was not limiting the VFA turnover. Despite constant VFA concentrations, the Gibbs energies (ΔGr) of VFA-dependent sulfate reduction decreased downcore, from −28...... energetic limit at ~ −30 kJ (mol acetate)−1. It is not clear what controls VFA concentrations in the porewater but cell physiological constraints such as energetic costs of VFA activation or uptake could be important. We suggest that such constraints control the substrate turnover and result in a minimum...

  12. Galvanic interpretation of self-potential signals associated withmicrobial sulfate-reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Kenneth H.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2007-05-02

    We have evaluated the usefulness of the self-potential (SP)geophysical method to track the onset and location of microbialsulfate-reduction in saturated sediments during organic carbon amendment.Following stimulation of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) by addition oflactate, anomalous voltages exceeding 600 mV correlated in space and timewith the accumulation of dissolved sulfide. Abiotic experiments in whichthe sulfide concentration at the measurement electrode was systematicallyvaried showed a positive correlation between the magnitude of the SPanomaly and differences in the half-cell potential associated with themeasurement and reference electrodes. Thus, we infer that the SPanomaliesresulted from electrochemical differences that developedbetween sulfide-rich regions and areas having higher oxidation potential.In neither experiment did generation of an SP anomaly require thepresence of an in situ electronic conductor, as is required by othermodels. These findings emphasize the importance of incorporation ofelectrochemical effects at electrode surfaces in interpretation of SPdata from geophysical studies. We conclude that SP measurements provide aminimally invasive means for monitoring stimulated sulfate-reductionwithin saturated sediments.

  13. Microbial links between sulfate reduction and metal retention in uranium- and heavy metal-contaminated soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sitte, Jana; Akob, Denise M.; Kaufmann, Christian;

    2010-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) can affect metal mobility either directly by reductive transformation of metal ions, e.g., uranium, into their insoluble forms or indirectly by formation of metal sulfides. This study evaluated in situ and biostimulated activity of SRB in groundwater-influenced soils...... from a creek bank contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides within the former uranium mining district of Ronneburg, Germany. In situ activity of SRB, measured by the 35SO42– radiotracer method, was restricted to reduced soil horizons with rates of 142 ± 20 nmol cm–3 day–1. Concentrations of...... heavy metals were enriched in the solid phase of the reduced horizons, whereas pore water concentrations were low. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) measurements demonstrated that 80% of uranium was present as reduced uranium but appeared to occur as a sorbed complex. Soil-based dsrAB clone...

  14. Geochemical signatures of thermochemical sulfate reduction in controlled hydrous pyrolysis experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T.; Ellis, G.S.; Walters, C.C.; Kelemen, S.R.; Wang, K.-s.; Tang, Y.

    2008-01-01

    A series of gold tube hydrous pyrolysis experiments was conducted in order to investigate the effect of thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) on gas generation, residual saturated hydrocarbon compositional alteration, and solid pyrobitumen formation. The intensity of TSR significantly depends on the H2O/MgSO4 mole ratio, the smaller the ratio, the stronger the oxidizing conditions. Under highly oxidizing conditions (MgSO4/hydrocarbon wt/wt 20/1 and hydrocarbon/H2O wt/wt 1/1), large amounts of H2S and CO2 are generated indicating that hydrocarbon oxidation coupled with sulfate reduction is the dominant reaction. Starting with a mixture of C21-C35 n-alkanes, these hydrocarbons are consumed totally at temperatures below the onset of hydrocarbon thermal cracking in the absence of TSR (400 ??C). Moreover, once the longer chain length hydrocarbons are oxidized, secondarily formed hydrocarbons, even methane, are oxidized to CO2. Using whole crude oils as the starting reactants, the TSR reaction dramatically lowers the stability of hydrocarbons leading to increases in gas dryness and gas/oil ratio. While their concentrations decrease, the relative distributions of n-alkanes do not change appreciably from the original composition, and consequently, are non-diagnostic for TSR. However, distinct molecular changes related to TSR are observed, Pr/n-C17 and Ph/n-C18 ratios decrease at a faster rate under TSR compared to thermal chemical alteration (TCA) alone. TSR promotes aromatization and the incorporation of sulfur and oxygen into hydrocarbons leading to a decrease in the saturate to aromatic ratio in the residual oil and in the generation of sulfur and oxygen rich pyrobitumen. These experimental findings could provide useful geochemical signatures to identify TSR in settings where TSR has occurred in natural systems. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Bacterial reduction of selenium in coal mine tailings pond sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddique, T.; Arocena, J.M.; Thring, R.W.; Zhang, Y.Q. [University of North British Columbia, Prince George, BC (Canada)

    2007-05-15

    Sediment from a storage facility for coal tailings solids was assessed for its capacity to reduce selenium (Se) by native bacterial community. One Se{sup 6+}-reducing bacterium Enterobacter hormaechei (Tar11) and four Se{sup 4+}-reducing bacteria, Klebsiella pneumoniae (Tar1), Pseudomonasfluorescens (Tar3), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (Tar6), and Enterobacter amnigenus (Tar8) were isolated from the sediment. Enterobacter horinaechei removed 96% of the added Se{sup 6+} (0.92 mg L{sup -1} from the effluents when Se6+ was determined after 5 d of incubation. Analysis of the red precipitates showed that Se{sup 6+} reduction resulted in the formation of spherical particles ({lt}1.0 {mu} m) of Se 0 as observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM) and confirmed by EDAX. Selenium speciation was performed to examine the fate of the added Se{sup 6+} in the sediment with or without addition of Enterobacter hormaechei cells. More than 99% of the added Se{sup 6+} (about 2.5 mg L{sup -1}) was transformed in the nonsterilized sediment (without Enterobacter hormaechei cells) as well as in the sterilized (heat-killed) sediment (with Enterobacter hormaechei cells). The results of this study suggest that the lagoon sediments at the mine site harbor Se{sup 6+}- and Se{sup 4+} -reducing bacteria and may be important sinks for soluble Se (Se{sup 6+} and Se{sup 4+}). Enterobacter hormaechei isolated from metal-contaminated sediment may have potential application in removing Se from industrial effluents.

  16. Effects of various pretreatments on biological sulfate reduction with waste activated sludge as electron donor and waste activated sludge diminution under biosulfidogenic condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current study focused on the influences of various pretreatments, including alkaline, ultrasonic and thermal pretreatments on biological sulfate reduction with waste activated sludge (WAS) as sole electron donor. Our results showed that thermal and ultrasonic pretreatments increased the sulfate reduction percentage by 14.8% and 7.1%, respectively, compared with experiment with raw WAS, while alkaline pretreatment decreased the sulfate reduction percentage by 46%. By analyzing the WAS structure, particle size distribution, organic component, and enzyme activity after different pretreatments, we studied the effects of these pretreatments on WAS as well as on the mechanisms of how biological sulfate reduction was affected. The reduction of WAS and variation of WAS structure in the process of sulfate reduction were investigated. Our results showed that biosulfidogenesis was an efficient method of diminishing WAS, and various pretreatments could enhance the reduction efficiency of volatile solid in the WAS.

  17. Kinetic analysis and modeling of oleate and ethanol stimulated uranium (VI) bio-reduction in contaminated sediments under sulfate reduction conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microcosm tests with uranium contaminated sediments were performed to explore the feasibility of using oleate as a slow-release electron donor for U(VI) reduction in comparison to ethanol. Oleate degradation proceeded more slowly than ethanol with acetate produced as an intermediate for both electron donors under a range of initial sulfate concentrations. A kinetic microbial reduction model was developed and implemented to describe and compare the reduction of sulfate and U(VI) with oleate or ethanol. The reaction path model considers detailed oleate/ethanol degradation and the production and consumption of intermediates, acetate and hydrogen. Although significant assumptions are made, the model tracked the major trend of sulfate and U(VI) reduction and describes the successive production and consumption of acetate, concurrent with microbial reduction of aqueous sulfate and U(VI) species. The model results imply that the overall rate of U(VI) bioreduction is influenced by both the degradation rate of organic substrates and consumption rate of intermediate products.

  18. Change of Ecological Characteristics Due to Decrease of COD/SO42- Ratio During Sulfate-reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王爱杰; 任南琪; 刘广民; 杜大仲

    2004-01-01

    In order to investigate the change of ecological characteristics due to the decrease of COD/SO42- ratio during sulfate reduction, continuous-flew tests were conducted in an acidogenic sulfate-reducing reactor with molasses wastewater as sole organic carbon source and sodium sulfate as electron acceptor, and the change of pH value, oxidation reduction potential (ORP), volatile fat acids (VFAs), alkalinity (ALK) and the predominant populations with COD/SO42- ratio decreasing from 4. 2 to 2. 0 were investigated. The experimental results demonstrated that, with decreasing COD/SO42- ratio, ORP and ALK increased, pH value decreased, and the proportion of acetic acid in terminal products decreased significantly, and a stable - type microbial community with high COD/SO42- ratio was converted into a sub -stable -type one with low COD/SO42- ratio.

  19. Effect of hydraulic retention time on sulfate reduction in a carbon monoxide fed thermophilic gas lift reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipma, J.; Osuna, M.B.; Lettinga, G.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2007-01-01

    Thermophilic hydrogenogenic carbon monoxide (CO) converting microorganisms present in anaerobic sludge play a crucial role in the application of CO as electron donor for sulfate reduction. Hydrogenogenic CO conversion was investigated in a gas lift reactor (55 °C) at different hydraulic retention ti

  20. Oxygen and sulfur isotope systematics of sulfate produced by bacterial and abiotic oxidation of pyrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, N.; Shanks, Wayne C., III; Mayer, B.; Mandernack, K.W.

    2007-01-01

    To better understand reaction pathways of pyrite oxidation and biogeochemical controls on ??18O and ??34S values of the generated sulfate in acid mine drainage (AMD) and other natural environments, we conducted a series of pyrite oxidation experiments in the laboratory. Our biological and abiotic experiments were conducted under aerobic conditions by using O2 as an oxidizing agent and under anaerobic conditions by using dissolved Fe(III)aq as an oxidant with varying ??18OH2O values in the presence and absence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. In addition, aerobic biological experiments were designed as short- and long-term experiments where the final pH was controlled at ???2.7 and 2.2, respectively. Due to the slower kinetics of abiotic sulfide oxidation, the aerobic abiotic experiments were only conducted as long term with a final pH of ???2.7. The ??34SSO4 values from both the biological and abiotic anaerobic experiments indicated a small but significant sulfur isotope fractionation (???-0.7???) in contrast to no significant fractionation observed from any of the aerobic experiments. Relative percentages of the incorporation of water-derived oxygen and dissolved oxygen (O2) to sulfate were estimated, in addition to the oxygen isotope fractionation between sulfate and water, and dissolved oxygen. As expected, during the biological and abiotic anaerobic experiments all of the sulfate oxygen was derived from water. The percentage incorporation of water-derived oxygen into sulfate during the oxidation experiments by O2 varied with longer incubation and lower pH, but not due to the presence or absence of bacteria. These percentages were estimated as 85%, 92% and 87% from the short-term biological, long-term biological and abiotic control experiments, respectively. An oxygen isotope fractionation effect between sulfate and water (??18 OSO4 s(-) H2 O) of ???3.5??? was determined for the anaerobic (biological and abiotic) experiments. This measured ??18 OSO42 - s(-) H2

  1. Recycling of autoclaved aerated concrete in floor screeds: Sulfate leaching reduction by ettringite formation

    OpenAIRE

    Bergmans, Jef; Nielsen, Peter; Snellings, Ruben; Broos, Kris

    2016-01-01

    Autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) is a lightweight cellular concrete. Recycling AAC in concrete or unbound applications may cause problems because of high amounts of leachable sulfate. This study evaluates the recycling of AAC demolition waste as a replacement of sand in floor screed. The cement binder reacted with sulfate released from the AAC waste to form ettringite. Sulfate release was in line with ettringite solubility control and below leaching limits defined by Dutch environmental legi...

  2. Evaluation of toxicity reduction of sodium dodecyl sulfate submitted to electron beam radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surfactants, as detergent active substances, are an important source of pollution causing biological adverse effects to aquatic organisms. Several data have been showing ecological disturbance due to the high concentration of surfactants on receiving waters and on wastewater treatment plants. Ionizing radiation has been proved as an effective technology to decompose organic substances and few papers have included ecotoxicological aspects. This paper shows the reduction of acute toxicity of a specific surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), when diluted in distilled water and submitted to electron beam radiation. The study included two test-organisms, the marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri and the crustacean Daphnia similis. Radiation processing resulted in an important acute toxicity removal for both assays, which can be summarized between 70% and 96%, using 3.0, 6.0, 9.0 and 12.0 kGy as radiation doses. Nevertheless, lower doses demonstrated better effect than 9.0 and 12.0 kGy and the bacterium assay was more sensitive to SDS than crustacean assay

  3. Evaluation of toxicity reduction of sodium dodecyl sulfate submitted to electron beam radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanelli, M. F.; Moraes, M. C. F.; Villavicencio, A. L. C. H.; Borrely, S. I.

    2004-09-01

    Surfactants, as detergent active substances, are an important source of pollution causing biological adverse effects to aquatic organisms. Several data have been showing ecological disturbance due to the high concentration of surfactants on receiving waters and on wastewater treatment plants. Ionizing radiation has been proved as an effective technology to decompose organic substances and few papers have included ecotoxicological aspects. This paper shows the reduction of acute toxicity of a specific surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), when diluted in distilled water and submitted to electron beam radiation. The study included two test-organisms, the marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri and the crustacean Daphnia similis. Radiation processing resulted in an important acute toxicity removal for both assays, which can be summarized between 70% and 96%, using 3.0, 6.0, 9.0 and 12.0 kGy as radiation doses. Nevertheless, lower doses demonstrated better effect than 9.0 and 12.0 kGy and the bacterium assay was more sensitive to SDS than crustacean assay.

  4. Evaluation of toxicity reduction of sodium dodecyl sulfate submitted to electron beam radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanelli, M.F. E-mail: mfromane@ipen.br; Moraes, M.C.F.; Villavicencio, A.L.C.H.; Borrely, S.I

    2004-10-01

    Surfactants, as detergent active substances, are an important source of pollution causing biological adverse effects to aquatic organisms. Several data have been showing ecological disturbance due to the high concentration of surfactants on receiving waters and on wastewater treatment plants. Ionizing radiation has been proved as an effective technology to decompose organic substances and few papers have included ecotoxicological aspects. This paper shows the reduction of acute toxicity of a specific surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), when diluted in distilled water and submitted to electron beam radiation. The study included two test-organisms, the marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri and the crustacean Daphnia similis. Radiation processing resulted in an important acute toxicity removal for both assays, which can be summarized between 70% and 96%, using 3.0, 6.0, 9.0 and 12.0 kGy as radiation doses. Nevertheless, lower doses demonstrated better effect than 9.0 and 12.0 kGy and the bacterium assay was more sensitive to SDS than crustacean assay.

  5. Assessing sulfate reduction and methane cycling in a high salinity pore water system in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlman, J.W.; Ruppel, C.; Hutchinson, D.R.; Downer, R.; Coffin, R.B.

    2008-01-01

    Pore waters extracted from 18 piston cores obtained on and near a salt-cored bathymetric high in Keathley Canyon lease block 151 in the northern Gulf of Mexico contain elevated concentrations of chloride (up to 838 mM) and have pore water chemical concentration profiles that exhibit extensive departures (concavity) from steady-state (linear) diffusive equilibrium with depth. Minimum ??13C dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) values of -55.9??? to -64.8??? at the sulfate-methane transition (SMT) strongly suggest active anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) throughout the study region. However, the nonlinear pore water chemistry-depth profiles make it impossible to determine the vertical extent of active AOM or the potential role of alternate sulfate reduction pathways. Here we utilize the conservative (non-reactive) nature of dissolved chloride to differentiate the effects of biogeochemical activity (e.g., AOM and/or organoclastic sulfate reduction) relative to physical mixing in high salinity Keathley Canyon sediments. In most cases, the DIC and sulfate concentrations in pore waters are consistent with a conservative mixing model that uses chloride concentrations at the seafloor and the SMT as endmembers. Conservative mixing of pore water constituents implies that an undetermined physical process is primarily responsible for the nonlinearity of the pore water-depth profiles. In limited cases where the sulfate and DIC concentrations deviated from conservative mixing between the seafloor and SMT, the ??13C-DIC mixing diagrams suggest that the excess DIC is produced from a 13C-depleted source that could only be accounted for by microbial methane, the dominant form of methane identified during this study. We conclude that AOM is the most prevalent sink for sulfate and that it occurs primarily at the SMT at this Keathley Canyon site.

  6. Influence of co-substrate on textile wastewater treatment and microbial community changes in the anaerobic biological sulfate reduction process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasool, Kashif; Mahmoud, Khaled A; Lee, Dae Sung

    2015-12-15

    This study investigated the anaerobic treatment of sulfate-rich synthetic textile wastewater in three sulfidogenic sequential batch reactors (SBRs). The experimental protocol was designed to examine the effect of three different co-substrates (lactate, glucose, and ethanol) and their concentrations on wastewater treatment performance. Sulfate reduction and dye degradation were improved when lactate and ethanol were used as electron donors, as compared with glucose. Moreover, under co-substrate limited concentrations, color, sulfate, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies were declined. By reducing co-substrate COD gradually from 3000 to 500 mg/L, color removal efficiencies were decreased from 98.23% to 78.46%, 63.37%, and 69.10%, whereas, sulfate removal efficiencies were decreased from 98.42%, 82.35%, and 87.0%, to 30.27%, 21.50%, and 10.13%, for lactate, glucose, and ethanol fed reactors, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and total aromatic amine analysis revealed lactate to be a potential co-substrate for further biodegradation of intermediate metabolites formed after dye degradation. Pyrosequencing analysis showed that microbial community structure was significantly affected by the co-substrate. The reactor with lactate as co-substrate showed the highest relative abundance of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRBs), followed by ethanol, whereas the glucose-fed reactor showed the lowest relative abundance of SRB. PMID:26241771

  7. Characterization of the sulfate-reducing bacterial population in sediments of acid mining lakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With respect to remediation of acid mine drainage (AMD), concomitant alteration of redox conditions, formation of metal sulfides and alkalinity generation are of special interest. The majority of lakes formed in the Lusatian lignite mining district bear waters of low pH and high ionic strength. For several of these acid mining lakes, sulfate-reducing activities have been demonstrated. The aim of our study was to find out which bacteria are responsible for these activities, whether these SRB exhibit special traits to thrive under extreme conditions, and whether the population differed from those inhabiting freshwater and marine environments. For this purpose we estimated the most probable number (MPN) of culturable SRB in surface sediments of three mining lakes (ML) and obtained isolates from the same sites. The strains were characterised physiologically and phylogenetically. (orig.)

  8. Inhibition of microbial sulfate reduction in a flow-through column system by (per)chlorate treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Anna eEngelbrektson; Christopher eHubbard; Lauren eTom; Aaron eBOUSSINA; Yong Tae eJin; Hayden eWong; Yvette Marisa Piceno; Hans Karl Carlson; Mark eConrad; Andersen, Gary L.; Coates, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction is a primary cause of oil reservoir souring. Here we show that amendment with chlorate or perchlorate [collectively (per)chlorate] potentially resolves this issue. Triplicate packed columns inoculated with marine sediment were flushed with coastal water amended with yeast extract and one of nitrate, chlorate, or perchlorate. Results showed that although sulfide production was dramatically reduced by all treatments, effluent sulfide was observed in the nitrate (10 m...

  9. Evaluation of Radiation Dose Reduction during CT Scans Using Oxide Bismuth and Nano-Barium Sulfate Shields

    OpenAIRE

    Seoung, Youl-Hun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate radiation dose reduction and image quality during CT scanning by using a new dose reduction fiber sheet (DRFS) with commercially available bismuth shields. These DRFS were composed of nano-barium sulfate (BaSO4), filling the gaps left by the large oxide bismuth (Bi2O3) particle sizes. The radiation dose was measured five times at directionss of 12 o'clock from the center of the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) head phantom to calculate an average...

  10. Reduction of Uranium(VI) under Sulfate-reducing Conditions in the Presence of Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sani, Rajesh K.; Peyton, Brent M.; Amonette, James E.; Geesey, Gill G.

    2004-06-01

    U(VI) dissolved in a modified lactate-C medium (either sulfate- or lactate-limited) was reacted with a mixture of an Fe(III)-(hydr)oxide mineral (hematite, goethite, or ferrihydrite) and quartz under anoxic conditions and equivalent mineral surface areas. After sorption equilibration, the suspensions were inoculated with a sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20). Inoculation of the suspensions containing sulfate-limited medium yielded significant SRB growth, along with concomitant reduction of sulfate and removal of U(VI) from solution. Inoculation of the suspensions containing lactate-limited medium yielded similar results while lactate was still present. Once the lactate was depleted, however, some of the U that had been removed from solution was re-solubilized in the hematite treatment and, to a lesser extent, in the goethite treatment. No re-solubilization was observed in the lactate-limited ferrihydrite treatment even after a prolonged incubation of four months. Analysis by U L3-edge XANES spectroscopy of mineral specimens sampled without inoculation yielded a typical U(VI) spectrum. Mineral specimens sampled at the end of the experiment yielded spectra similar to that of uraninite, thus providing strong evidence for SRB-promoted removal of U(VI) from solution by reductive precipitation of uraninite. Consequently, U re-solubilization was attributed to re-oxidation of the uraninite by Fe(III) present in the (hydr)oxide phases. Our results thus suggest that inoculation with SRB mediates reduction of soluble U(VI) to an insoluble U(IV) oxide so long as a suitable electron donor is available. Depletion of the electron donor may result in partial re-oxidation of the U(IV) to soluble U(VI) species when the surfaces of crystalline Fe(III) (hydr)oxides are incompletely reduced by reaction with SRB-generated sulfide.

  11. Examining Deep Subsurface Sulfate Reducing Bacterial Diversity to Test Spatial and Temporal Biogeography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, H. J.; Reese, B. K.

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we take advantage of the isolation and scale of the deep marine subsurface to examine microbial biogeography. Unlike other environments, deep marine subsurface provides a unique opportunity to study biogeography across four dimensions. These samples are not only isolated by linear space on a global scale, but they are also temporally isolated by, in some cases, tens of millions of years. Through the support of multiple Integrated Ocean Drilling Program expeditions, we characterized the metabolically active fraction of the subsurface microbial community by targeting and sequencing 16S rRNA gene transcripts (RNA-based analysis). By characterizing the metabolically active fraction, we described lineages that were currently under selective environmental pressure and not relic lineages that may have become dormant or dead at some point in the past. This study was narrowed from the total diversity obtained to provide a detailed examination of the distribution and diversity of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB); a functional group highly important to and ubiquitous in marine systems. The biogeochemical importance of this functional group, compounded with defined clades makes it a valuable and feasible target for a global biogeography study. SRB lineages from the deep subsurface were compared to contemporary lineages collected from multiple shallow sediment sites that had been extracted and sequenced using the same techniques. The SRB sequences acquired from our databases were clustered using 97% sequence similarity and analyzed using a suite of diversity and statistical tools. The geochemical conditions of the sediments sampled were considered when analyzing the resulting dendrograms and datasets. As hypothesized, lineages from the deep subsurface phylogenetically grouped together. However, similarities were detected to lineages from the shallow modern sediments, suggesting novel lineages may have evolved at a slow rate due to predicted lengthened life cycles

  12. Effect of activated sludge in the bottom zone on biogenic sulfate reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagafarov, G.G.; Bikchentayeva, A.G.; Yagafarov, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that sulfate destruction in the Arlansk group of fields is caused by infection of the formation by sulfate reducing bacteria in the drilling process and flooding by surface water. For the first time, the necessity is shown of considering the activated sludge formed from particles suspended in water and biocenosis of microorganisms during microbiological investigation of wells. It is suggested that biodecomposition of surfactants is possible only in the area of formation of activated sludge around the bottom of the injection well.

  13. Sulfate Reduction and Possible Aerobic Metabolism of the Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio oxyclinae in a Chemostat Coculture with Marinobacter sp. Strain MB under Exposure to Increasing Oxygen Concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Sigalevich, Pavel; Baev, Mark V.; Teske, Andreas; Cohen, Yehuda

    2000-01-01

    A chemostat coculture of the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio oxyclinae together with a facultative aerobe heterotroph tentatively identified as Marinobacter sp. strain MB was grown under anaerobic conditions and then exposed to a stepwise-increasing oxygen influx (0 to 20% O2 in the incoming gas phase). The coculture consumed oxygen efficiently, and no residual oxygen was detected with an oxygen supply of up to 5%. Sulfate reduction persisted at all levels of oxygen input, even at th...

  14. Rock magnetic properties in the sulfate reduction zone in IODP 350 Hole 1437B, Izu Bonin rear arc: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrave, R. J.; Kars, M. A. C.; Kodama, K.

    2014-12-01

    During the northern Spring 2014 (April-May), IODP Expedition 350 drilled a 1806.5 m deep hole at Site U1437 in the Izu-Bonin rear arc, in order to understand, among other objectives, the compositional evolution of the arc since the Miocene and track the missing half of the subduction factory. The good recovery of mostly fine grained sediments at this site enables a high resolution paleomagnetic and rock magnetic study. Particularly, variations in magnetic properties and mineralogy are well documented. The onboard magnetostratigraphy established from the study of the archive halves highlighted remagnetized intervals that produced "ghost" repetitions of geomagnetic reversals ~10's meters below their actual stratigraphic position in specific intervals. Onboard paleo- and rock magnetic analyses showed that remagnetization is probably due to a chemical remanence carried by iron sulfides (putatively identified as greigite). The rock magnetic parameters, SIRM/k and the S-ratio are consistent with the presence of ferromagnetic iron sulfides in Site U1437. A mixture of iron oxides and iron sulfides was found within the sulfate reduction zone, which was identified by onboard pore water analyses at ~50-60 meters below sea floor (mbsf) by a minimum in sulfate (~5 mM) coupled with a maximum in alkalinity. Below 50 mbsf, the sulfate content increases up to ~29 mM at ~460 mbsf. The particular downhole profile of the sulfate content in Site U1437 is probably triggered by fluid circulation. Evolution of sulfate content, pyritization process and fluid circulation are closely linked. Onshore research is focusing on further downhole characterization of the iron sulfides including their abundance, grain size and composition. Routine magnetic properties (NRM, magnetic susceptibility) and rock magnetic analyses at high resolution (every ~20-50 cm), including hysteresis properties and low temperature magnetic measurements, have been conducted on about 400 discrete samples in the first 200

  15. Bacteria and environment: bio-remediation of chromium by sulfate-reducing bacteria; Bacteries et environnement: bioremediation du chrome par les bacteries sulfato-reductrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, C.

    2001-11-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are good candidates for the bio-decontamination of environments polluted by heavy metals (bio-remediation). These bacteria are able to reduce metals such as Cr(VI), U(VI),... into Cr(III), U(IV),... Reduced forms are less toxic and insoluble, so that they can be extracted from waters or immobilized in soils. The reduction of heavy metals by SRB is chemical (reduction involving the hydrogen sulfide produced by the metabolism) and enzymatic (reduction involving metalloproteins such as cytochromes c3). While the reduction by H{sub 2}S is well known, the enzymatic reduction by SRB was recently discovered. The aim of this work was to characterise the enzymatic reduction of chromate by SRB at a cellular and a molecular level. A best understanding of this phenomenon is needed to optimize the bio-remediation ability of SRB in bio-processes, and to select enzymes that could be used in bio-sensors. We have compared various strains of SRB for the enzymatic reduction of Cr(VI), and select Desulfomicrobium norvegicum. This strain can grow in the presence of up to 500 {mu}M Cr(VI), even if Cr(VI) induced a stress at this concentration. This strain was thus chosen for feasibility tests in bioreactors with COGEMA, and then with BRGM (european program 5. PCRDT). The Cr(VI)-reductase activity of various wild type and mutated cytochromes c3 was tested. Cytochromes c3 are poly-hemic and peri-plasmic cytochromes with low redox potentials (-200 to -400 mV). Results suggest the involvement of a negative redox potential in metal-reduction. We have thus tested the ability of other peri-plasmic redox-proteins with low redox potentials for metal-reduction. Ours results have demonstrated for the first time a Cr(VI)-reductase activity for [Fe] and [NiFe] hydrogenases, which are the physiological partners for cytochromes c3. In order to determine, at a molecular level, the reduction mechanism of metals by c3-type cytochromes, we have studied the interaction

  16. An Estimate of Energy Available via Microbial Sulfate Reduction at a Quaternary Aquifer in Northern Japan considered for Low Temperature Thermal Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiichiro Ioka

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The energy available via microbial sulfate reduction was estimated for a Quaternary aquifer in northern Japan that is a candidate site for low temperature aquifer thermal energy storage. In evaluating whether microbial sulfate reduction proceeded or ceased, it was assumed that electron donor/acceptor concentrations were unchanged by temperature increase. The estimated energy availability via microbial sulfate reduction at 9 °C with no thermal disturbance was 37, 51, and 53 kJ·(mol SO42−−1. The low estimate of 37 kJ·(mol SO42−−1 was attributed to low concentration of SO42−. Excluding the sampling site with low concentration of electron acceptors, energy availability was estimated 52 and 54 kJ·(mol SO42−−1 at 20 °C; 54 and 57 kJ·(mol SO42−−1 at 40 °C; and 57 and 59 kJ·(mol SO42−−1 at 60 °C. These results indicate that possible energy availability via microbial sulfate reduction at approximately 40–60 °C exceeded the range of available energy (compiled from previous studies at which sulfate reduction would cease. Thus, microbial sulfate reduction at this site may proceed at approximately 40–60 °C.

  17. MICROBIAL SULFATE REDUCTION AND METAL ATTENUATION IN PH 4 ACID MINE WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sediments recovered from the flooded mine workings of the Penn Mine, a Cu-Zn mine abandoned since the early 1960s, were cultured for anaerobic bacteria over a range of pH (4 to 7.5). The molecular biology of sediments and cultures was studied to determine whether sulfate-reducing...

  18. Fructose-enhanced reduction of bacterial growth on nanorough surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durmus NG

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Naside Gozde Durmus1, Erik N Taylor1, Fatih Inci3,4, Kim M Kummer1, Keiko M Tarquinio5, Thomas J Webster1,21School of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 2Department of Orthopedics, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 3Bio-Acoustic-MEMS in Medicine (BAMM Laboratory, Center for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology, Harvard Medical School, MA, USA; 4Istanbul Technical University, Molecular Biology-Genetics and Biotechnology Program, Mobgam, Maslak, Istanbul, Turkey; 5Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Patients on mechanical ventilators for extended periods of time often face the risk of developing ventilator-associated pneumonia. During the ventilation process, patients incapable of breathing are intubated with polyvinyl chloride (PVC endotracheal tubes (ETTs. PVC ETTs provide surfaces where bacteria can attach and proliferate from the contaminated oropharyngeal space to the sterile bronchoalveolar area. To overcome this problem, ETTs can be coated with antimicrobial agents. However, such coatings may easily delaminate during use. Recently, it has been shown that changes in material topography at the nanometer level can provide antibacterial properties. In addition, some metabolites, such as fructose, have been found to increase the efficiency of antibiotics used to treat Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus infections. In this study, we combined the antibacterial effect of nanorough ETT topographies with sugar metabolites to decrease bacterial growth and biofilm formation on ETTs. We present for the first time that the presence of fructose on the nanorough surfaces decreases the number of planktonic S. aureus bacteria in the solution and biofilm formation on the surface after 24 hours. We thus envision that this method has the potential to impact the future of surface engineering of

  19. Inhibition of microbial sulfate reduction in a flow-through column system by (per)chlorate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrektson, Anna; Hubbard, Christopher G; Tom, Lauren M; Boussina, Aaron; Jin, Yong T; Wong, Hayden; Piceno, Yvette M; Carlson, Hans K; Conrad, Mark E; Anderson, Gary; Coates, John D

    2014-01-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction is a primary cause of oil reservoir souring. Here we show that amendment with chlorate or perchlorate [collectively (per)chlorate] potentially resolves this issue. Triplicate packed columns inoculated with marine sediment were flushed with coastal water amended with yeast extract and one of nitrate, chlorate, or perchlorate. Results showed that although sulfide production was dramatically reduced by all treatments, effluent sulfide was observed in the nitrate (10 mM) treatment after an initial inhibition period. In contrast, no effluent sulfide was observed with (per)chlorate (10 mM). Microbial community analyses indicated temporal community shifts and phylogenetic clustering by treatment. Nitrate addition stimulated Xanthomonadaceae and Rhizobiaceae growth, supporting their role in nitrate metabolism. (Per)chlorate showed distinct effects on microbial community structure compared with nitrate and resulted in a general suppression of the community relative to the untreated control combined with a significant decrease in sulfate reducing species abundance indicating specific toxicity. Furthermore, chlorate stimulated Pseudomonadaceae and Pseudoalteromonadaceae, members of which are known chlorate respirers, suggesting that chlorate may also control sulfidogenesis by biocompetitive exclusion of sulfate-reduction. Perchlorate addition stimulated Desulfobulbaceae and Desulfomonadaceae, which contain sulfide oxidizing and elemental sulfur-reducing species respectively, suggesting that effluent sulfide concentrations may be controlled through sulfur redox cycling in addition to toxicity and biocompetitive exclusion. Sulfur isotope analyses further support sulfur cycling in the columns, even when sulfide is not detected. This study indicates that (per)chlorate show great promise as inhibitors of sulfidogenesis in natural communities and provides insight into which organisms and respiratory processes are involved. PMID:25071731

  20. Seawater sulfate reduction and sulfur isotope fractionation in basaltic systems: interaction of seawater with fayalite and magnetite at 200-3500C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulfate reduction during seawater reaction with fayalite and with magnetite was rapid at 3500C, producing equilibrium assemblages of talc-pyrite-hematite-magnetite at low water/rock ratios and talc-pyrite-hematite-anhydrite at higher water/rock ratios. At 2500C, seawater reacting with fayalite produced detectable amounts of dissolved H2S. At 2000C, dissolved H2S was not detected, even after 219 days. Reaction stoichiometry indicates that sulfate reduction requires large amounts of H+, which, in subseafloor hydrothermal systems is provided by Mg metasomatism. Seawater contains sufficient Mg to supply all the H+ necessary for quantitative reduction of seawater sulfate. Systematics of sulfur isotopes in the 250 and 3500C experiments indicate that isotopic equilibrium is reached and can be modeled as a Rayleigh distillation process. Isotopic composition of hydrothermally produced H2S in natural systems is strongly dependent upon the seawater/basalt ratio in the geothermal system, which controls the relative sulfide contributions from the two important sulfur sources, seawater sulfate and sulfide phases in basalt. Anhydrite precipitation during geothermal heating severely limits sulfate ingress into high temperature interaction zones. Quantitative sulfate reduction can thus be accomplished without producing strongly oxidized rocks and resultant sulfide sulfur isotope values represent a mixture of seawater and basaltic sulfur. (author)

  1. Role of oxbow lakes in controlling redox geochemistry of shallow groundwater under a heterogeneous fluvial sedimentary environment in an agricultural field: Coexistence of iron and sulfate reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Byoung-Young; Yun, Seong-Taek; Kim, Kyoung-Ho

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to extend the knowledge of the vertical distribution of redox conditions of shallow groundwater in heterogeneous fluvial sediments near oxbow lakes. For this study, we revisited the study area of Kim et al. (2009) to examine the redox zoning in details. Three multi-level samplers were installed along a flow path near two oxbow lakes to obtain vertical profiles of the subsurface geology and hydrochemical and isotopic data (δ18O and δD of water, δ15N and δ18O of nitrate, and δ34S of sulfate) of groundwater. Geologic logging showed that characteristics of the heterogeneous subsurface geology are closely related to the pattern of vertical redox zoning. Hydrochemical data in conjunction with nitrogen and sulfur isotope data show that the redox status of groundwater near oxbow lakes is controlled by denitrification, iron reduction, and sulfate reduction. The oxidizing condition of groundwater occurs in the sand-dominant alluvium located in the up-gradient of oxbow lakes, whereas the reducing condition accompanying denitrification, iron reduction, and local sulfate reduction is developed in silt-rich alluvium in and the downgradient of oxbow lakes. The occurrence of sulfate reduction was newly found in this study. However, the vertical profiles of redox-sensitive parameters show that iron reduction and sulfate reduction occur concurrently near oxbow lakes, although the measured redox potentials suggest that thermodynamic conditions are controlled by the stability of Fe2 +/Fe-oxides. Therefore, this study shows that the redox condition of groundwater in the iron-rich zone should be carefully interpreted. For this purpose, depth-specific sampling and careful examination of sulfur isotope data will be very useful for identifying the redox processes occurring in the zone with overlapping iron reduction and sulfate reduction in heterogeneous fluvial sediments.

  2. Sulfate reduction in Black Sea sediments: in situ and laboratory radiotracer measurements from the shelf to 2000m depth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, A.; Riess, W.; Wenzhoefer, F.;

    2001-01-01

    Sulfate reduction rate measurements by the (SO42-)-S-35 core injection method were carried out in situ with a benthic lander, LUISE, and in parallel by shipboard incubations in sediments of the Black Sea. Eight stations were studied along a transect from the Romanian shelf to the deep western...... Black Sea sediments showed that the present results tend to be higher in shelf sediments and lower in the deep-sea than most other data. Based on the present water column H2S inventory and the H2S flux out of the sediment, the calculated turnover time of H2S below the chemocline is 2100 years. (C) 2001...... anoxic basin. The highest rates measured on an areal basis for the upper 0-15 cm were 1.97 mmol m(-2) d(-1) on the shelf and 1.54 mmol m(-2) d(-1) at 181 m water depth just below the chemocline. At all stations sulfate reduction rates decreased to values 50% just above the chemocline to 100% just below...

  3. Development of a risk reduction intervention to reduce bacterial and viral infections for injection drug users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kristina T.; Altman, Jennifer K.; Corsi, Karen F.; Stein, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infections are widespread problems among drug injectors, requiring novel preventive intervention. As part of a NIDA-funded study, we developed an intervention based on the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Model, past research, injection hygiene protocols, and data collected from focus groups with 32 injectors in Denver in 2009. Qualitative responses from focus groups indicated that most participants had experienced skin abscesses and believed that bacterial infections were commonly a result of drug cut, injecting intramuscularly, and reusing needles. Access to injection supplies and experiencing withdrawal were the most frequently reported barriers to utilizing risk reduction. Implications for intervention development are discussed. PMID:23017057

  4. Effect of dissimilatory iron and sulfate reduction on arsenic dynamics in the wetland rhizosphere and its bioaccumulation in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, P. R.; Zhang, Z.; Moon, H. S.; Myneni, S.

    2015-12-01

    The mobility of arsenic in soils is linked to biogeochemical redox processes. The presence of wetland plants in riparian wetlands has a significant impact on the biogeochemical dynamics of the soil/sediment-redoxcline due to the release of root exudates and root turnover and oxygen transfer from the roots into the surrounding sediment. Micro-environmental redox conditions in the rhizosphere affect As, Fe, and S speciation as well as Fe(III) plaque deposition, which affects arsenic transport and uptake by plants. To investigate the dynamics of As coupled to S and Fe cycling in wetlands, mesocosms were operated in a greenhouse under various conditions (high and low Fe, high and low sulfate, with plant and without plants) for four months. Results show that the presence of plants, high Fe, and high SO42- levels enhanced As sequestration in these soils. We hypothesize that this compounding effect is because plants release biodegradable organic carbon, which is used by microorganism to reduce ferrihydrite and SO42- to generate FeS, FeS2, and/or orpiment (As2S3). Over the concentration range studied, As immobilization in soil and uptake by Scirpus actus was mainly controlled by SO42- rather than Fe levels. Under high sulfate levels, As immobilization in soil increased by 50% and As concentrations in plant roots increased by 97%, whereas no significant changes in plant As levels were seen for varying Fe concentrations. More than 80% of As was sequestrated in soils rather than plant uptake. Pore water As speciation analyses indicate that 20% more As(V) was reduced to As(III) under high sulfate as than low sulfate levels and that low Fe was more favorable to the As dissimilatory reduction. More dissimilatory arsenate-respiring bacteria (DARB) under high sulfate were confirmed by quantitative PCR. Arsenic distribution in plant leafs and roots after 30 days of exposure to As was analyzed via Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence analyses. The uptake of As by plants was distributed

  5. 硫酸盐生物还原中电子供体的选择%Selection of electron donors for biological sulfate reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姬玉欣; 马春; 金仁村; 周萍

    2011-01-01

    Biological sulfate reduction is fit for treating sulfate-containing wastewaters.But sulfate rich wastewaters are usually deficient in electron donors.Theoretically,sulfate conversion requires electron donors,and requires external addition of electron donors in order to achieve complete sulfate reduction.In this papers,various electron donors employed in biological sulfate reduction are reviewed.Widely used electron donors include hydrogen,formate,methanol,ethanol,lactate,volatile fatty acids(VFA),sugar,hydrocarbons and organic waste.The selection criteria for suitable electron donors are discussed.%硫酸盐生物还原在含硫酸盐废水的处理中具有明显优势,然而富含硫酸盐的废水通常缺乏电子供体,因此电子供体的选择及添加就成了该工艺推广所面临的主要问题。本文综述了用于硫酸盐生物还原的各种电子供体,包括氢、甲酸、甲醇、乙醇、乳酸、挥发性脂肪酸、糖类、烃类和有机废物,讨论了适宜电子供体的选择标准。

  6. Isotopic modelling of the significance of bacterial sulphate reduction for phenol attenuation in a contaminated aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Michael J.; Bottrell, Simon H.; Thornton, Steven F.; Lerner, David N.

    2001-12-01

    A Triassic sandstone aquifer polluted with a mixture of phenolic hydrocarbons has been investigated by means of high-resolution groundwater sampling. Samples taken at depth intervals of 1 m have revealed the presence of a diving pollutant plume with a sharply defined upper margin. Concentrations of pollutant phenols exceed 4 g/l in the plume core, rendering it sterile but towards the diluted upper margin evidence for bacterial sulphate reduction (BSR) has been obtained. Groundwaters have been analysed for both δ34S-SO 4 and δ18O-SO 4. Two reservoirs have been identified with distinct sulphate-oxygen isotope ratios. Groundwater sulphate ( δ18O-SO 4=3-5‰) outside the plume shows a simple linear mixing trend with an isotopically uniform pollutant sulphate reservoir ( δ18O-SO 4=10-12‰) across the plume margin. The sulphur isotope ratios do not always obey a simple mixing relation, however, at one multilevel borehole, enrichment in 34SO 4 at the plume margin is inversely correlated with sulphate concentration. This and the presence of 34S-depleted dissolved sulphide indicate that enrichment in 34SO 4 is the result of bacterial sulphate reduction. δ34S analysis of trace hydrogen sulphide within the plume yielded an isotope enrichment factor ( ɛ) of -9.4‰ for present-day bacterial sulphate reduction. This value agrees with a long-term estimate (-9.9‰) obtained from a Rayleigh model of the sulphate reduction process. The model was also used to obtain an estimate of the pre-reduction sulphate concentration profile with depth. The difference between this and the present-day profiles then gave a mass balance for sulphate consumption. The organic carbon mineralisation that would account for this sulphate loss is shown to represent only 0.1‰ of the phenol concentration in this region of the plume. Hence, the contribution of bacterial sulphate reduction to biodegradation has thus far been small. The highest total phenolic concentration (TPC) at which there is

  7. "Scrub the hub": cleaning duration and reduction in bacterial load on central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Sarah; Bryson, Celestina; Porter, Susan

    2011-01-01

    This article reports the results of a study on the effect of alcohol disinfection duration on bacterial load on catheter hubs. Three different levels of disinfection (3, 10, and 15 seconds) were analyzed as well as a positive and negative control. All hubs with the exception of the negative controls were contaminated with a 10 bacterial solution and allowed to dry for 24 hours. Through each hub, 1 mL of sterile saline was flushed; a 10-μL calibrated loop was used to plate the flush onto blood agar. Colony counts were performed on the plates after a 24-hour incubation period. Results revealed that the 3 different levels of disinfection duration were not found to differ significantly in reduction in bacterial load. The duration of disinfection did not significantly change the bacterial load on the hub. However, any disinfection duration significantly decreased the bacterial load as compared to the positive control. A larger study would likely detect a significant result among the disinfections. PMID:21160298

  8. Effect of methanogenic substrates on anaerobic oxidation of methane and sulfate reduction by an anaerobic methanotrophic enrichment.

    KAUST Repository

    Meulepas, Roel J W

    2010-05-06

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction (SR) is assumed to be a syntrophic process, in which methanotrophic archaea produce an interspecies electron carrier (IEC), which is subsequently utilized by sulfate-reducing bacteria. In this paper, six methanogenic substrates are tested as candidate-IECs by assessing their effect on AOM and SR by an anaerobic methanotrophic enrichment. The presence of acetate, formate or hydrogen enhanced SR, but did not inhibit AOM, nor did these substrates trigger methanogenesis. Carbon monoxide also enhanced SR but slightly inhibited AOM. Methanol did not enhance SR nor did it inhibit AOM, and methanethiol inhibited both SR and AOM completely. Subsequently, it was calculated at which candidate-IEC concentrations no more Gibbs free energy can be conserved from their production from methane at the applied conditions. These concentrations were at least 1,000 times lower can the final candidate-IEC concentration in the bulk liquid. Therefore, the tested candidate-IECs could not have been produced from methane during the incubations. Hence, acetate, formate, methanol, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen can be excluded as sole IEC in AOM coupled to SR. Methanethiol did inhibit AOM and can therefore not be excluded as IEC by this study.

  9. Elevated acetate concentrations in the rhizosphere of Spartina alterniflora and potential influences on sulfate reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Mark E.; Tugel, Joyce B.; Giblin, A. E.; Banta, G. T.; Hobbie, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    Acetate is important in anaerobic metabolism of non-vegetated sediments but its role in salt marsh soils was not investigated thoroughly. Acetate concentrations, oxidation (C-14) and SO4(2-) reduction (S-35) were measured in S. alterniflora soils in NH and MA. Pore water from cores contained greater than 0.1 mM acetate and in some instances greater than 1.0 mM. Non-destructive samples contained less than 0.01 mM. Acetate was associated with roots and concentrations were highest during vegetative growth and varied with changes in plant physiology. Acetate turnover was very low whether whole core or slurry incubations were used. Radiotracers injected directly into soils yielded rates of SO4(2-) reduction and acetate oxidation not significantly different from core incubation techniques. Regardless of incubation method, acetate oxidation did not account for a significant percentage of SO4(2-) reduction. These results differ markedly from data for non-vegetated coastal sediments where acetate levels are low, oxidation rate constants are high and acetate oxidation rates greatly exceed rates of SO4(2-) reduction. The discrepancy between rates of acetate oxidation and SO4(2-) reduction in marsh soils may be due either to the utilization of substrates other than acetate by SO4(2-) reducers or artifacts associated with measurements of organic utilization by rhizosphere bacteria.

  10. TEM investigation of U6+ and Re7+ reduction by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, a sulfate-reducing bacterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium and its fission product Tc in aerobic environment will be in the forms of UO22+ and TcO4-. Reduced forms of tetravalent U and Tc are sparingly soluble. As determined by transmission electron microscopy, the reduction of uranyl acetate by immobilized cells of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans results in the production of black uraninite nanocrystals precipitated outside the cell. Some nanocrystals are associated with outer membranes of the cell as revealed from cross sections of these metabolic active sulfate-reducing bacteria. The nanocrystals have an average diameter of 5 nm and have anhedral shape. The reduction of Re7+ by cells of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans is fast in media containing H2 an electron donor, and slow in media containing lactic acid. It is proposed that the cytochrome in these cells has an important role in the reduction of uranyl and Re7+ is (a chemical analogue for Tc7+) through transferring an electron from molecular hydrogen or lactic acid to the oxyions of UO22+ and TcO4-

  11. Hexavalent Molybdenum Reduction to Mo-Blue by a Sodium-Dodecyl-Sulfate-Degrading Klebsiella oxytoca Strain DRY14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. E. Halmi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria with the ability to tolerate, remove, and/or degrade several xenobiotics simultaneously are urgently needed for remediation of polluted sites. A previously isolated bacterium with sodium dodecyl sulfate- (SDS- degrading capacity was found to be able to reduce molybdenum to the nontoxic molybdenum blue. The optimal pH, carbon source, molybdate concentration, and temperature supporting molybdate reduction were pH 7.0, glucose at 1.5% (w/v, between 25 and 30 mM, and 25°C, respectively. The optimum phosphate concentration for molybdate reduction was 5 mM. The Mo-blue produced exhibits an absorption spectrum with a maximum peak at 865 nm and a shoulder at 700 nm. None of the respiratory inhibitors tested showed any inhibition to the molybdenum-reducing activity suggesting that the electron transport system of this bacterium is not the site of molybdenum reduction. Chromium, cadmium, silver, copper, mercury, and lead caused approximately 77, 65, 77, 89, 80, and 80% inhibition of the molybdenum-reducing activity, respectively. Ferrous and stannous ions markedly increased the activity of molybdenum-reducing activity in this bacterium. The maximum tolerable concentration of SDS as a cocontaminant was 3 g/L. The characteristics of this bacterium make it a suitable candidate for molybdenum bioremediation of sites cocontaminated with detergent pollutant.

  12. Kinetic coefficients for simultaneous reduction of sulfate and uranium by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previously it was demonstrated that bacteria are capable of transforming soluble uranyl ion, U(VI), to insoluble uraninite, U(IV); however, the rate for this transformation has not been determined. We report the kinetic coefficients for Desulfovibrio desulfuricans DSM 1924 grown in a continuous-flow chemostat where pyruvate was the electron donor and sulfate was the electron acceptor. The medium was supplemented with 1 mM uranyl nitrate, and the chemostat flow rate ranged from 1.12 ml/h to 4.75 ml/h with incubation at 28 C. The maximum rate of pyruvate utilization (k) was determined to be 4.7 days-1, while the half-velocity constant (Ks) was 127 mg/l. The yield coefficient (Y) of cells per mole of pyruvate oxidized was calculated to be 0.021 g, while the endogenous decay coefficient (kd) was determined to be 0.072 days-1. More than 90% of U(VI) was transformed to U(VI) in the chemostat under the conditions employed. (orig.)

  13. Bioreactor performance and functional gene analysis of microbial community in a limited-oxygen fed bioreactor for co-reduction of sulfate and nitrate with high organic input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xi-jun; Chen, Chuan; Wang, Ai-jie; Yu, Hao; Zhou, Xu; Guo, Hong-liang; Yuan, Ye; Lee, Duu-jong; Zhou, Jizhong; Ren, Nan-qi

    2014-08-15

    Limited-oxygen mediated synergistic relationships between sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) and sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (SOB, including nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria NR-SOB) were predicted to simultaneously remove contaminants of nitrate, sulfate and high COD, and eliminate sulfide generation. A lab-scale experiment was conducted to examine the impact of limited oxygen on these oxy-anions degradation, sulfide oxidation and associated microbial functional responses. In all scenarios tested, the reduction of both nitrate and sulfate was almost complete. When limited-oxygen was fed into bioreactors, S(0) formation was significantly improved up to ∼ 70%. GeoChip 4.0, a functional gene microarray, was used to determine the microbial gene diversity and functional potential for nitrate and sulfate reduction, and sulfide oxidation. The diversity of the microbial community in bioreactors was increased with the feeding of limited oxygen. Whereas the intensities of the functional genes involved in sulfate reduction did not show a significant difference, the abundance of the detected denitrification genes decreased in limited oxygen samples. More importantly, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria may alter their populations/genes in response to limited oxygen potentially to function more effectively in sulfide oxidation, especially to elemental sulfur. The genes fccA/fccB from nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB), such as Paracoccus denitrificans, Thiobacillus denitrificans, Beggiatoa sp., Thiomicrospira sp., and Thioalkalivibrio sp., were more abundant under limited-oxygen condition. PMID:24981676

  14. Effect of the deletion of qmoABC and the promoter distal gene encoding a hypothetical protein on sulfate-reduction in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zane, Grant M.; Yen, Huei-chi Bill; Wall, Judy D.

    2010-03-18

    The pathway of electrons required for the reduction of sulfate in sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is not yet fully characterized. In order to determine the role of a transmembrane protein complex suggested to be involved in this process, a deletion of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was created by marker exchange mutagenesis that eliminated four genes putatively encoding the QmoABC complex and a hypothetical protein (DVU0851). The Qmo complex (quinone-interacting membrane-bound oxidoreductase) is proposed to be responsible for transporting electrons to the dissimilatory adenosine-5?phosphosulfate (APS) reductase in SRB. In support of the predicted role of this complex, the deletion mutant was unable to grow using sulfate as its sole electron acceptor with a range of electron donors. To explore a possible role for the hypothetical protein in sulfate reduction, a second mutant was constructed that had lost only the gene that codes for DVU0851. The second constructed mutant grew with sulfate as the sole electron acceptor; however, there was a lag that was not present with the wild-type or complemented strain. Neither deletion strain was significantly impaired for growth with sulfite or thiosulfate as terminal electron acceptor. Complementation of the D(qmoABC-DVU0851) mutant with all four genes or only the qmoABC genes restored its ability to grow by sulfate respiration. These results confirmed the prediction that the Qmo complex is in the electron pathway for sulfate-reduction and revealed that no other transmembrane complex could compensate when Qmo was lacking.

  15. Bacterial communities in haloalkaliphilic sulfate-reducing bioreactors under different electron donors revealed by 16S rRNA MiSeq sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jiemin [National Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 353, Beijing 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhou, Xuemei; Li, Yuguang [101 Institute, Ministry of Civil Affairs, Beijing 100070 (China); Xing, Jianmin, E-mail: jmxing@ipe.ac.cn [National Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 353, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Bacterial communities of haloalkaliphilic bioreactors were investigated. • MiSeq was first used in analysis of communities of haloalkaliphilic bioreactors. • Electron donors had significant effect on bacterial communities. - Abstract: Biological technology used to treat flue gas is useful to replace conventional treatment, but there is sulfide inhibition. However, no sulfide toxicity effect was observed in haloalkaliphilic bioreactors. The performance of the ethanol-fed bioreactor was better than that of lactate-, glucose-, and formate-fed bioreactor, respectively. To support this result strongly, Illumina MiSeq paired-end sequencing of 16S rRNA gene was applied to investigate the bacterial communities. A total of 389,971 effective sequences were obtained and all of them were assigned to 10,220 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at a 97% similarity. Bacterial communities in the glucose-fed bioreactor showed the greatest richness and evenness. The highest relative abundance of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) was found in the ethanol-fed bioreactor, which can explain why the performance of the ethanol-fed bioreactor was the best. Different types of SRB, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, and sulfur-reducing bacteria were detected, indicating that sulfur may be cycled among these microorganisms. Because high-throughput 16S rRNA gene paired-end sequencing has improved resolution of bacterial community analysis, many rare microorganisms were detected, such as Halanaerobium, Halothiobacillus, Desulfonatronum, Syntrophobacter, and Fusibacter. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of these bacteria would provide more functional and phylogenetic information about the bacterial communities.

  16. Bacterial communities in haloalkaliphilic sulfate-reducing bioreactors under different electron donors revealed by 16S rRNA MiSeq sequencing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Bacterial communities of haloalkaliphilic bioreactors were investigated. • MiSeq was first used in analysis of communities of haloalkaliphilic bioreactors. • Electron donors had significant effect on bacterial communities. - Abstract: Biological technology used to treat flue gas is useful to replace conventional treatment, but there is sulfide inhibition. However, no sulfide toxicity effect was observed in haloalkaliphilic bioreactors. The performance of the ethanol-fed bioreactor was better than that of lactate-, glucose-, and formate-fed bioreactor, respectively. To support this result strongly, Illumina MiSeq paired-end sequencing of 16S rRNA gene was applied to investigate the bacterial communities. A total of 389,971 effective sequences were obtained and all of them were assigned to 10,220 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at a 97% similarity. Bacterial communities in the glucose-fed bioreactor showed the greatest richness and evenness. The highest relative abundance of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) was found in the ethanol-fed bioreactor, which can explain why the performance of the ethanol-fed bioreactor was the best. Different types of SRB, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, and sulfur-reducing bacteria were detected, indicating that sulfur may be cycled among these microorganisms. Because high-throughput 16S rRNA gene paired-end sequencing has improved resolution of bacterial community analysis, many rare microorganisms were detected, such as Halanaerobium, Halothiobacillus, Desulfonatronum, Syntrophobacter, and Fusibacter. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of these bacteria would provide more functional and phylogenetic information about the bacterial communities

  17. Occurrence of benthic microbial nitrogen fixation coupled to sulfate reduction in the seasonally hypoxic Eckernförde Bay, Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertics, V. J.; Löscher, C. R.; Salonen, I.; Dale, A. W.; Gier, J.; Schmitz, R. A.; Treude, T.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the worldwide occurrence of marine hypoxic regions, benthic nitrogen (N) cycling within these areas is poorly understood and it is generally assumed that these areas represent zones of intense fixed N loss from the marine system. Sulfate reduction can be an important process for organic...... oxidation. The objective of this study was to evaluate if N2 fixation, possibly by SRB, plays a role in N cycling within the seasonally hypoxic sediments from the Eckernförde Bay, Baltic Sea. Monthly samplings were performed over the course of one year to measure nitrogenase activity (NA) and sulfate......-fixing community was examined via molecular tools. Integrated rates of N2 fixation (approximated from NA) and sulfate reduction showed a similar seasonality pattern, with highest rates occurring in August (approx. 22 and 880 nmol cm-3 d-1 of N and SO42−, respectively) and October (approx. 22 and 1300 nmol cm...

  18. Effect of sulfate on the methanogenic activity of a bacterial culture from a brewery Wastewater during glucose degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The maximum specific methanogenic activity (SMA) of a sludge originating from a brewery wastewater treatment plant on the degradation of glucose was investigated at various levels of sulfate on a specific loading basis. Batch experiments were conducted in serum bottles at pH 7 and 35℃.A comparison of the values indicates that the SMA of this mixed culture was increased and reached its highest level of 0.128g CH4 gas COD/(g VSS·d)when biomass was in contact with sulfate at a ratio of 1:0.114 by weight.

  19. Surface Treatments and Functional Coatings for Biocompatibility Improvement and Bacterial Adhesion Reduction in Dental Implantology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Mandracci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface modification of dental implants is a key process in the production of these medical devices, and especially titanium implants used in the dental practice are commonly subjected to surface modification processes before their clinical use. A wide range of treatments, such as sand blasting, acid etching, plasma etching, plasma spray deposition, sputtering deposition and cathodic arc deposition, have been studied over the years in order to improve the performance of dental implants. Improving or accelerating the osseointegration process is usually the main goal of these surface processes, but the improvement of biocompatibility and the prevention of bacterial adhesion are also of considerable importance. In this review, we report on the research of the recent years in the field of surface treatments and coatings deposition for the improvement of dental implants performance, with a main focus on the osseointegration acceleration, the reduction of bacterial adhesion and the improvement of biocompatibility.

  20. Evaluation of Radiation Dose Reduction during CT Scans Using Oxide Bismuth and Nano-Barium Sulfate Shields

    CERN Document Server

    Seoung, Youl-Hun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate radiation dose reduction and image quality during CT scanning by using a new dose reduction fiber sheet (DRFS) with commercially available bismuth shields. These DRFS were composed of nano-barium sulfate (BaSO4), filling the gaps left by the large oxide bismuth (Bi2O3) particle sizes. The radiation dose was measured five times at directionss of 12 o'clock from the center of the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) head phantom to calculate an average value using a CT ionization chamber. The image quality measured CT transverse images of the PMMA head phantom depending on X-ray tube voltages and the type of shielding. Two regions of interest in CT transverse images were chosen from the right and left areas under the surface of the PMMA head phantom and from ion chamber holes located at directions of 12 o'clock from the center of the PMMA head phantom. The results of this study showed that the new DRFS shields could reduce dosages to 15.61%, 23.05%, and 22.71% more in ...

  1. Sulfate reduction during the acidification of sucrose at pH 5 under thermophilic (55 degrees C) conditions. II: Effect of sulfide and COD/SO42- ratio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopes, S.I.C.; Capela, M.I.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2010-01-01

    This work studied the effect of the sulfide concentration and COD/SO42- ratios (4 and 1) on sulfate reduction and acidification in a thermophilic (55 degrees C) UASB reactor fed with sucrose (4 g COD (I-reactor d)(-1)) operated at a reactor mixed liquor pH controlled at 5 for a period of 301 days. W

  2. Sulfate reducing bacterial community and in situ activity in mature fine tailings analyzed by real time qPCR and microsensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Tan, Shuying; Yu, Tong; Liu, Yang

    2016-06-01

    Sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) play significant roles in anaerobic environments in oil sands mature fine tailings (MFTs). Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is produced during the biological sulfate reduction process. The production of toxic H2S is one of the concerns because it may hinder the landscape remediation efficiency of oil sands tailing ponds. In present study, the in situ activity and the community structure of SRB in MFT and gypsum amended MFT in two settling columns were investigated. Combined techniques of H2S microsensor and dissimilatory sulfite reductase β-subunit (dsrB) genes-based real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) were applied to detect the in situ H2S and the abundance of SRB. A higher diversity of SRB and more H2S were observed in gypsum amended MFT than that in MFT, indicating a higher sulfate reduction activity in gypsum amended MFT; in addition, the activity of SRB varied as depth in both MFT and gypsum amended MFT: the deeper the more H2S produced. Long-term plans for tailings management can be assessed more wisely with the information provided in this study. PMID:27266310

  3. Using a Statistical Model to Examine the Effect of COD: SO42− Ratio, HRT and LA Concentration on Sulfate Reduction in an Anaerobic Sequencing Batch Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh Singh; Chungman Moon; Sathyanarayan S. Veeravalli; Saravanan R. Shanmugam; Subba Rao Chaganti; Jerald A. Lalman

    2014-01-01

    Taguchi statistical design, an orthogonal array (OA) method, was used to study the impact of the COD/SO42− ratio, hydraulic retention time (HRT) and linoleic acid (LA) concentration on sulfate (SO42−) reduction in an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor using glucose as the electron donor. Based on the OA, optimum condition for maximum SO42− reduction was evaluated. Increasing the COD/SO42− ratio and HRT caused decreasing SO42− reduction while increased SO42− reduction was observed with increas...

  4. Sulfurization of Fe-Ni-Cu-Co Alloy to Matte Phase by Carbothermic Reduction of Calcium Sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Eui Hyuk; Nam, Chul Woo; Park, Kyung Ho; Park, Joo Hyun

    2016-04-01

    Calcium sulfate (CaSO4) is proposed as an alternative sulfur source to convert the Fe-Ni-Cu-Co alloy to the matte phase. Solid carbon was used as a reducing agent and the influence of oxide fluxes on the sulfurization efficiency at 1673 K (1400 °C) in a CO-CO2-SO2-Ar atmosphere was investigated. When CaSO4 was equilibrated with the Fe-Ni-Cu-Co alloy without any reducing agent, it was reduced by Fe in the liquid alloy, resulting in the formation of FeS. The sulfurization efficiency was about 56 pct, even though an excess amount of CaSO4 (gypsum equivalent, G eq = 1.7) was added. Adding solid carbon as the reducing agent significantly shortened the equilibration time from 36 to 3.5 hours and increased the sulfurization efficiency from 56 to 91 pct, even though the amount of carbon was lower than the theoretical equivalent for carbothermic reduction of CaSO4, viz. C eq = 0.7. Although CaS (not FeS) was formed as a primary reaction product, it continuously reacted with CaSO4, forming CaO-rich slag. Neither the carbothermic reduction time nor the sulfurization efficiency were affected by the addition of Al2O3 (-SiO2) fluxes, but the equilibration time fell to 2.5 hours with the addition of Al2O3-Fe2O3 flux because the former systems produced primarily calcium silicate and calcium aluminate, which have relatively high melting points, whereas the latter system produced calcium ferrite, which has a lower melting point. Consequently, calcium sulfate (waste gypsum) can replace expensive pure sulfur as a raw material in the sulfurization of Fe-Ni-Cu-Co alloy with small amounts of iron oxide (Fe2O3) as a flux material. The present results can be used to improve the recovery of rare metals, such as Ni and Co, from deep sea manganese nodules.

  5. Metagenome reveals potential microbial degradation of hydrocarbon coupled with sulfate reduction in an oil-immersed chimney from Guaymas Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying eHe

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea hydrothermal vent chimneys contain a high diversity of microorganisms, yet the metabolic activity and the ecological functions of the microbial communities remain largely unexplored. In this study, a metagenomic approach was applied to characterize the metabolic potential in a Guaymas hydrothermal vent chimney and to conduct comparative genomic analysis among a variety of environments with sequenced metagenomes. Complete clustering of functional gene categories with a comparative metagenomic approach showed that this Guaymas chimney metagenome was clustered most closely with a chimney metagenome from Juan de Fuca. All chimney samples were enriched with genes involved in recombination and repair, chemotaxis and flagellar assembly, highlighting their roles in coping with the fluctuating extreme deep-sea environments. A high proportion of transposases was observed in all the metagenomes from deep-sea chimneys, supporting the previous hypothesis that horizontal gene transfer may be common in the deep-sea vent chimney biosphere. In the Guaymas chimney metagenome, thermophilic sulfate reducing microorganisms including bacteria and archaea were found predominant, and genes coding for the degradation of refractory organic compounds such as cellulose, lipid, pullullan, as well as a few hydrocarbons including toluene, ethylbenzene and o-xylene were identified. Therefore, this oil-immersed chimney supported a thermophilic microbial community capable of oxidizing a range of hydrocarbons that served as electron donors for sulphate reduction under anaerobic conditions.

  6. Evaluation of radiation dose reduction during CT scans by using bismuth oxide and nano-barium sulfate shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoung, Youl-Hun

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the radiation dose reduction and the image quality during CT scanning by using a new dose reduction fiber sheet (DRFS) with commercially available bismuth shields. These DRFS, were composed of nano-barium sulfate (BaSO4) filling the gaps left by the large bismuth oxide (Bi2O3) particles. The radiation dose was measured five times at a direction of 12 o'clock from the center of the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) head phantom by using a CT ionization chamber to calculate an average value. The image quality of measured CT transverse images of the PMMA head phantom depended on the X-ray tube voltage and the type of shielding. Two regions of interest in the CT transverse images were chosen, one from the right area and the other from the left area under the surface of the PMMA head phantom and at a distance of ion chamber holes located in a direction of 12 o'clock from the center of the PMMA head phantom. The results of this study showed that the new DRFS shields could reduce the dosages by 15.61%, 23.05%, and 22.71% at 90 kVp, 120 kVp, and 140 kVp, respectively, than with these of a conventional bismuth shield of the same thickness while maintaining image quality. In addition, the DRFSs produced were about 25% thinness than conventional bismuth. We conclude, therefore, that a DRFS can replace conventional bismuth as a new shield.

  7. Photodynamic therapy on bacterial reduction in dental caries: in vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Alessandra; Araujo Prates, Renato; Kato, Ilka Tiemy; Amaral, Marcello Magri; Zanardi de Freitas, Anderson; Simões Ribeiro, Martha

    2010-04-01

    The reduction of pathogenic microorganisms in supragingival plaque is one of the principal factors in caries prevention and control. A large number of microorganisms have been reported to be inactivated in vitro by photodynamic therapy (PDT). The purpose of this study was to develop a rat model to investigate the effects of PDT on bacterial reduction in induced dental caries. Twenty four rats were orally inoculated with Streptococcus mutans cells (ATCC 25175) for three consecutive days. The animals were fed with a cariogenic diet and water with 10% of sucrose ad libitum, during all experimental period. Caries lesion formation was confirmed by Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) 5 days after the beginning of the experiment. Then, the animals were randomly divided into two groups: Control Group: twelve animals were untreated by either light or photosensitizer; and PDT Group: twelve animals were treated with 100μM of methylene blue for 5min and irradiated by a Light Emitting Diode (LED) at λ = 640+/-30nm, fluence of 172J/cm2, output power of 240mW, and exposure time of 3min. Microbiological samples were collected before, immediately after, 3, 7 and 10 days after treatment and the number of total microaerophiles was counted. OCT images showed areas of enamel demineralization on rat molars. Microbiological analysis showed a significant bacterial reduction after PDT. Furthermore, the number of total microaerophiles in PDT group remained lower than control group until 10 days posttreatment. These findings suggest that PDT could be an alternative approach to reduce bacteria in dental caries.

  8. Large-scale demonstration of the sulfate reduction autotrophic denitrification nitrification integrated (SANI(®)) process in saline sewage treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Ekama, George A; Chui, Ho-Kwong; Wang, Bo; Cui, Yan-Xiang; Hao, Tian-Wei; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the Sulfate reduction Autotrophic denitrification Nitrification Integrated (SANI(®)) process was developed for the removal of organics and nitrogen with sludge minimization in the treatment of saline sewage (with a Sulfate-to-COD ratio > 0.5 mg SO4(2-)-S/mg COD) generated from seawater used for toilet flushing or salt water intrusion. Previously investigated in lab- and pilot-scale, this process has now been scaled up to a 800-1000 m(3)/d full-scale demonstration plant. In this paper, the design and operating parameters of the SANI demo plant built in Hong Kong are analyzed. After a 4-month start-up period, a stable sulfur cycle-based biological nitrogen removal system having a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 12.5 h was developed, thereby reducing the amount of space needed by 30-40% compared with conventional activated sludge (CAS) plants in Hong Kong. The demo plant satisfactorily met the local effluent discharge limits during both the summer and winter periods. In winter (sewage temperature of 21 ± 1 °C), the maximum volumetric loading rates for organic conversion, nitrification, and denitrification were 2 kg COD/(m(3)·d), 0.39 kg N/(m(3)·d), and 0.35 kg N/(m(3)·d), respectively. The biological sludge production rate of SANI process was 0.35 ± 0.08 g TSSproduced/g BOD5 (or 0.19 ± 0.05 g TSS/g COD), which is 60-70% lower than that of the CAS process in Hong Kong. While further process optimization is possible, this study demonstrates the SANI process can be potentially implemented for the treatment of saline sewage. PMID:27232994

  9. Effects of condensed tannins on hydrogen sulfide production and the sulfate-reducing bacterial population of swine manure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condensed tannins are natural plant compounds that have antibacterial properties and have been used in studies to reduce methane emissions and frothy bloat in cattle. The objective of this study was to test the effects of condensed tannins on swine manure to target bacterial groups responsible for ...

  10. Introduction manner of sulfate acid for improving the performance of SO42-/CeO2 on selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋忠贤; 张秋林; 宁平; 刘昕; 樊洁; 黄真真

    2016-01-01

    A series of sulfated CeO2 catalysts were synthesized by impregnation and sol-gel methods and used for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx by NH3. The results showed that the sulfated CeO2 catalysts prepared by sol-gel method showed excellent catalytic activity at 150–450 °C, and more than 90% NOx conversion was obtained at 232–450 °C with a gas hourly space velocity of 60000 h–1. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption, Raman, thermogravimetry (TG), H2-tem-perature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR) and Py-infrared spectroscopy (Py-IR). The excellent SCR performance was associated with the surface acidity and the micro-structure. The introduction of sulfate acid into CeO2 could increase the amount of Brönsted and Lewis acid sites over the catalysts, resulting in the improvement of the low temperature activity. The sulfated CeO2 catalysts prepared by sol-gel method possessed lower crystallization degree, excellent redox property and larger specific surface areas, which were re-sponsible for the superior SCR performance.

  11. Microbiology and biogeochemistry of sediments and rhizosphere of mangroves: bacterial production, sulphate-reduction and methylation of mercury with methodological focus on incubation-extraction of 14C-leucine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangroves are one of the most important ecosystems when it comes to cycling of various elements, including carbon and mercury. Microbiological processes that occur in sediment are essential for carbon mineralization, its conversion into biomass and for availability of mercury to the food chain. Sulfate-reducing bacteria are one of the main groups responsible for degradation of organic compounds in marine sediments and mercury methylation, especially in the rhizosphere of macrophyte. The aim of this study was to evaluate bacterial production (BP) over different sedimentary profiles as well as mercury methylation (% MeHg), sulfate reduction rates (SRR) and bacterial production in the rhizosphere of a ubiquitous mangrove tree. Radiochemical approaches were used to access bacterial production (14C-leucine), sulfate reduction (35SO4) and mercury methylation (203Hg). Study area was located at Coroa Grande (Sepetiba bay) and Jequia mangrove (Guanabara bay). Methodological studies using 14C-leucine as a tool to assess bacterial production in mangrove sediment were not found. In this context, we tested two leucine uptake methodologies for measuring bacterial production in mangrove sediments according to Baath et al. (2001) Soil Biol. Biochem., v.33,p. 1571-1574 and Fischer and Pusch (1999) Appl. Environ. Microbiol., v.6, p.4411-4418. Our results suggest that an adaptation of both techniques were suitable to measure BP in mangrove sediment. We also provided underlying parameters of the method such as saturation level and linearity of leucine incorporation that can be used as guidance for future studies in mangrove. Once the methodology was established, we accessed BP along a shallow sedimentary profile in three physiographic mangroves types: basin, fringe and riverine. BP was highly heterogeneous in different physiographic types of mangroves and along the sediment profiles.The mangrove located at Guanabara bay presented BP which was 50 times higher than tho one located at

  12. Cold Plasma Inactivation of Bacterial Biofilms and Reduction of Quorum Sensing Regulated Virulence Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Ziuzina

    Full Text Available The main objectives of this work were to investigate the effect of atmospheric cold plasma (ACP against a range of microbial biofilms commonly implicated in foodborne and healthcare associated human infections and against P. aeruginosa quorum sensing (QS-regulated virulence factors, such as pyocyanin, elastase (Las B and biofilm formation capacity post-ACP treatment. The effect of processing factors, namely treatment time and mode of plasma exposure on antimicrobial activity of ACP were also examined. Antibiofilm activity was assessed for E. coli, L. monocytogenes and S. aureus in terms of reduction of culturability and retention of metabolic activity using colony count and XTT assays, respectively. All samples were treated 'inpack' using sealed polypropylene containers with a high voltage dielectric barrier discharge ACP generated at 80 kV for 0, 60, 120 and 300 s and a post treatment storage time of 24 h. According to colony counts, ACP treatment for 60 s reduced populations of E. coli to undetectable levels, whereas 300 s was necessary to significantly reduce populations of L. monocytogenes and S. aureus biofilms. The results obtained from XTT assay indicated possible induction of viable but non culturable state of bacteria. With respect to P. aeruginosa QS-related virulence factors, the production of pyocyanin was significantly inhibited after short treatment times, but reduction of elastase was notable only after 300 s and no reduction in actual biofilm formation was achieved post-ACP treatment. Importantly, reduction of virulence factors was associated with reduction of the cytotoxic effects of the bacterial supernatant on CHO-K1 cells, regardless of mode and duration of treatment. The results of this study point to ACP technology as an effective strategy for inactivation of established biofilms and may play an important role in attenuation of virulence of pathogenic bacteria. Further investigation is warranted to propose direct evidence

  13. Cold Plasma Inactivation of Bacterial Biofilms and Reduction of Quorum Sensing Regulated Virulence Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziuzina, Dana; Boehm, Daniela; Patil, Sonal; Cullen, P. J.; Bourke, Paula

    2015-01-01

    The main objectives of this work were to investigate the effect of atmospheric cold plasma (ACP) against a range of microbial biofilms commonly implicated in foodborne and healthcare associated human infections and against P. aeruginosa quorum sensing (QS)-regulated virulence factors, such as pyocyanin, elastase (Las B) and biofilm formation capacity post-ACP treatment. The effect of processing factors, namely treatment time and mode of plasma exposure on antimicrobial activity of ACP were also examined. Antibiofilm activity was assessed for E. coli, L. monocytogenes and S. aureus in terms of reduction of culturability and retention of metabolic activity using colony count and XTT assays, respectively. All samples were treated ‘inpack’ using sealed polypropylene containers with a high voltage dielectric barrier discharge ACP generated at 80 kV for 0, 60, 120 and 300 s and a post treatment storage time of 24 h. According to colony counts, ACP treatment for 60 s reduced populations of E. coli to undetectable levels, whereas 300 s was necessary to significantly reduce populations of L. monocytogenes and S. aureus biofilms. The results obtained from XTT assay indicated possible induction of viable but non culturable state of bacteria. With respect to P. aeruginosa QS-related virulence factors, the production of pyocyanin was significantly inhibited after short treatment times, but reduction of elastase was notable only after 300 s and no reduction in actual biofilm formation was achieved post-ACP treatment. Importantly, reduction of virulence factors was associated with reduction of the cytotoxic effects of the bacterial supernatant on CHO-K1 cells, regardless of mode and duration of treatment. The results of this study point to ACP technology as an effective strategy for inactivation of established biofilms and may play an important role in attenuation of virulence of pathogenic bacteria. Further investigation is warranted to propose direct evidence for the

  14. Bacterially mediated removal of phosphorus and cycling of nitrate and sulfate in the waste stream of a "zero-discharge" recirculating mariculture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krom, M D; Ben David, A; Ingall, E D; Benning, L G; Clerici, S; Bottrell, S; Davies, C; Potts, N J; Mortimer, R J G; van Rijn, J

    2014-06-01

    Simultaneous removal of nitrogen and phosphorus by microbial biofilters has been used in a variety of water treatment systems including treatment systems in aquaculture. In this study, phosphorus, nitrate and sulfate cycling in the anaerobic loop of a zero-discharge, recirculating mariculture system was investigated using detailed geochemical measurements in the sludge layer of the digestion basin. High concentrations of nitrate and sulfate, circulating in the overlying water (∼15 mM), were removed by microbial respiration in the sludge resulting in a sulfide accumulation of up to 3 mM. Modelling of the observed S and O isotopic ratios in the surface sludge suggested that, with time, major respiration processes shifted from heterotrophic nitrate and sulfate reduction to autotrophic nitrate reduction. The much higher inorganic P content of the sludge relative to the fish feces is attributed to conversion of organic P to authigenic apatite. This conclusion is supported by: (a) X-ray diffraction analyses, which pointed to an accumulation of a calcium phosphate mineral phase that was different from P phases found in the feces, (b) the calculation that the pore waters of the sludge were highly oversaturated with respect to hydroxyapatite (saturation index = 4.87) and (c) there was a decrease in phosphate (and in the Ca/Na molar ratio) in the pore waters simultaneous with an increase in ammonia showing there had to be an additional P removal process at the same time as the heterotrophic breakdown of organic matter. PMID:24657541

  15. Oxygen and sulfur isotope systematics of sulfate produced during abiotic and bacterial oxidation of sphalerite and elemental sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, N.; Mayer, B.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Mandernack, K.W.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of metal sulfide oxidation in acid mine drainage (AMD) systems have primarily focused on pyrite oxidation, although acid soluble sulfides (e.g., ZnS) are predominantly responsible for the release of toxic metals. We conducted a series of biological and abiotic laboratory oxidation experiments with pure and Fe-bearing sphalerite (ZnS & Zn 0.88Fe 0.12S), respectively, in order to better understand the effects of sulfide mineralogy and associated biogeochemical controls of oxidation on the resultant ?? 34S and ?? 18O values of the sulfate produced. The minerals were incubated in the presence and absence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans at an initial solution pH of 3 and with water of varying ?? 18O values to determine the relative contributions of H 2O-derived and O 2-derived oxygen in the newly formed sulfate. Experiments were conducted under aerobic and anaerobic conditions using O 2 and Fe(III) aq as the oxidants, respectively. Aerobic incubations with A. ferrooxidans, and S o as the sole energy source were also conducted. The ??34SSO4 values from both the biological and abiotic oxidation of ZnS and ZnS Fe by Fe(III) aq produced sulfur isotope fractionations (??34SSO4-ZnS) of up to -2.6???, suggesting the accumulation of sulfur intermediates during incomplete oxidation of the sulfide. No significant sulfur isotope fractionation was observed from any of the aerobic experiments. Negative sulfur isotope enrichment factors (??34SSO4-ZnS) in AMD systems could reflect anaerobic, rather than aerobic pathways of oxidation. During the biological and abiotic oxidation of ZnS and ZnS Fe by Fe(III) aq all of the sulfate oxygen was derived from water, with measured ?? 18OSO 4-H 2O values of 8.2??0.2??? and 7.5??0.1???, respectively. Also, during the aerobic oxidation of ZnS Fe and S o by A. ferrooxidans, all of the sulfate oxygen was derived from water with similar measured ?? 18OSO 4-H 2O values of 8.1??0.1??? and 8.3??0.3???, respectively. During biological oxidation

  16. Low pH (6, 5, and 4) sulfate reduction during the acidification of sucrose under thermophilic (55°C) conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopes, S.I.C.; Sulistyawati, I.; Capela, M.I.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of a low pH (6, 5 and 4) and different COD/SO42¿ ratios (9 and 3.5) on thermophilic (55 °C) sulfate reduction and acidification of sucrose was investigated using three upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactors fed with sucrose at an organic loading rate of 3.5 gCOD (lreactor d)¿1. The three re

  17. Sulfate reduction during the acidification of sucrose at pH 5 under thermophilic (55 degrees C) conditions. I: Effect of trace metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopes, S.I.C.; Capela, M.I.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2010-01-01

    This work studied the effect of supplying trace metals (7.5 mu M Fe and 0.5 mu M Co, Ni, Mn, Zn, Cu, B, Se, Mo and W) on sulfate reduction and acidification in thermophilic (55 degrees C) UASB reactors fed with sucrose (4 gCOD (I-reactor d)(-1)) operated at a reactor mixed liquor pH controlled at 5.

  18. Paper-based chromatic toxicity bioassay by analysis of bacterial ferricyanide reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol-Vila, F; Vigués, N; Guerrero-Navarro, A; Jiménez, S; Gómez, D; Fernández, M; Bori, J; Vallès, B; Riva, M C; Muñoz-Berbel, X; Mas, J

    2016-03-01

    Water quality assessment requires a continuous and strict analysis of samples to guarantee compliance with established standards. Nowadays, the increasing number of pollutants and their synergistic effects lead to the development general toxicity bioassays capable to analyse water pollution as a whole. Current general toxicity methods, e.g. Microtox(®), rely on long operation protocols, the use of complex and expensive instrumentation and sample pre-treatment, which should be transported to the laboratory for analysis. These requirements delay sample analysis and hence, the response to avoid an environmental catastrophe. In an attempt to solve it, a fast (15 min) and low-cost toxicity bioassay based on the chromatic changes associated to bacterial ferricyanide reduction is here presented. E. coli cells (used as model bacteria) were stably trapped on low-cost paper matrices (cellulose-based paper discs, PDs) and remained viable for long times (1 month at -20 °C). Apart from bacterial carrier, paper matrices also acted as a fluidic element, allowing fluid management without the need of external pumps. Bioassay evaluation was performed using copper as model toxic agent. Chromatic changes associated to bacterial ferricyanide reduction were determined by three different transduction methods, i.e. (i) optical reflectometry (as reference method), (ii) image analysis and (iii) visual inspection. In all cases, bioassay results (in terms of half maximal effective concentrations, EC50) were in agreement with already reported data, confirming the good performance of the bioassay. The validation of the bioassay was performed by analysis of real samples from natural sources, which were analysed and compared with a reference method (i.e. Microtox). Obtained results showed agreement for about 70% of toxic samples and 80% of non-toxic samples, which may validate the use of this simple and quick protocol in the determination of general toxicity. The minimum instrumentation

  19. Using Sulfate-Amended Sediment Slurry Batch Reactors to Evaluate Mercury Methylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the methylated form, mercury represents a concern to public health primarily through the consumption of contaminated fish tissue. Research conducted on the methylation of mercury strongly suggests the process is microbial in nature and facilitated principally by sulfate-reducing bacteria. This study addressed the potential for mercury methylation by varying sulfate treatments and wetland-based soil in microbial slurry reactors with available inorganic mercury. Under anoxic laboratory conditions conducive to growth of naturally occurring sulfate-reducing bacteria in the soil, it was possible to evaluate how various sulfate additions influenced the methylation of inorganic mercury added to overlying water. Treatments included sulfate amendments ranging FR-om 25 to 500 mg/L (0.26 to 5.2 mM) above the soil's natural sulfate level. This study also provided an assessment of mercury methylation relative to sulfate-reducing bacterial population growth and subsequent sulfide production. Mercury methylation in sulfate treatments did not exceed that of the non-amended control during a 35-day incubation. However, increases in methylmercury concentration were linked to bacterial growth and sulfate reduction. A time lag in methylation in the highest treatment correlated with an equivalent lag in bacterial growth

  20. [Achievement of Sulfate-Reducing Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation Reactor Started with Nitrate-Reducting Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng-chuan; Yuan, Lin-jiang; Zhou, Guo-biao; Li, Jing

    2015-09-01

    The transformation of nitrite-reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation to sulfate-reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation in an UASB was performed and the changes in microbial community were studied. The result showed that the sulfate reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation process was successfully accomplished after 177 days' operation. The removal rate of ammonium nitrogen and sulfate were up to 58. 9% and 15. 7%, the removing load of ammonium nitrogen and sulfate were 74. 3 mg.(L.d)-1 and 77. 5 mg.(L.d)-1 while concentration of ammonium nitrogen and sulfate of influent were 130 mg.(L.d)-1 and 500 mg.(L.d)-1, respectively. The lost nitrogen and sulphur was around 2 in molar ratio. The pH value of the effluent was lower than that of the influent. Instead of Candidatus brocadia in nitrite reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation granular sludge, Bacillus benzoevorans became the dominant species in sulfate reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation sludge. The dominant bacterium in the two kinds of anaerobic ammonium oxidation process is different. Our results imply that the two anaerobic ammonium oxidation processes are carried out by different kind of bacterium. PMID:26717697

  1. p-Cresyl sulfate suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced anti-bacterial immune responses in murine macrophages in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Takahiro; Makino, Ikuyo; Kawakami, Koji; Kato, Ikuo; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Kaneko, Kimiyuki

    2016-03-14

    p-Cresyl sulfate (pCS) is a known uremic toxin that is metabolized from p-cresol produced by intestinal bacteria. Abnormal accumulation of pCS in the blood is a characteristic of chronic kidney disease (CKD). pCS is suggested to cause immune dysfunction and increase the risk of infectious diseases in CKD patients. In this study, we focused on the effects of pCS on macrophage functions related to host defense. We evaluated the effects of pCS on cytokine production, nitric oxide (NO) production, arginase activity, expression of cell-surface molecules, and phagocytosis in the macrophage-like cell line, RAW264.7. pCS significantly decreased interleukin (IL)-12 p40 production and increased IL-10 production. pCS also decreased NO production, but did not influence arginase activity. pCS suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced CD40 expression on the cell surface, but did not influence phagocytosis. We further assessed whether the effects of pCS observed in the macrophage-like cell line were consistent in primary macrophages. Similar to RAW264.7 cells, pCS decreased IL-12 p40 and p70 production and increased IL-10 production in primary peritoneal macrophages. These data indicate that pCS suppresses certain macrophage functions that contribute to host defense, and may play a role in CKD-related immune dysfunction. PMID:26784855

  2. Bacterial diversity and mycotoxin reduction during maize fermentation (steeping for ogi production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiamaka A Okeke

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial diversity and community structure of two maize varieties (white and yellow during fermentation/steeping for ogi production, and the influence of spontaneous fermentation on mycotoxin reduction in the gruel were studied. A total of 142 bacterial isolates obtained at 24–96h intervals were preliminarily identified by conventional microbiological methods while 60 selected isolates were clustered into 39 OTUs consisting of 15 species, 10 genera and 3 phyla by 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Lactic acid bacteria constituted about 63% of all isolated bacteria and the genus Pediococcus dominated (white maize = 84.8%; yellow maize = 74.4%. Pediococcus acidilactici and Lactobacillus paraplantarum were found at all steeping intervals of white and yellow maize, respectively, while P. claussenii was present only at the climax stage of steeping white maize. In both maize varieties, P. pentosaceus was found at 24–72h. Mycotoxin concentrations (µg/kg in the unsteeped grains were: white maize (aflatoxin B1 = 0.60; citrinin = 85.8; cyclopiazonic acid = 23.5; fumonisins (B1/B2/B3 = 68.4–483; zearalenone = 3.3 and yellow maize (aflatoxins (B1/B2/M1 = 22.7–513; citrinin = 16,800; cyclopiazonic acid = 247; fumonisins (B1/B2/B3 = 252–1,586; zearalenone = 205. Mycotoxins in both maize varieties were significantly (p<0.05 reduced across steeping periods. This study reports for the first time: (a the association of L. paraplantarum, P. acidilactici and P. claussenii with ogi production from maize, (b citrinin occurrence in Nigerian maize and ogi, and (c aflatoxin M1, citrinin and cyclopiazonic acid degradation/loss due to fermentation in traditional cereal-based fermented food.

  3. USE OF ORGANIC MATERIALS WETLAND TO IMPROVING THE CAPACITY SULFATE REDUCTION BACTERIA (SRB) OF REDUCE SULFATE IN ACID MINE WATER (AMW)

    OpenAIRE

    Fahruddin

    2013-01-01

    Increasing mining activities in several regions in Indonesia, began to face problems, namely of environmental pollution. One of the mining waste that is liquid sulfur, or acid mine water, which can lower the pH of the water and dissolves heavy metals. Countermeasures for the chemical method is to use lime, but this is less effective. The method is good and is environmentally friendly way by using biological bacteria sulphate reduction bacteria (SRB) that naturally there are many in the sedime...

  4. Application of acidic calcium sulfate and e-polylysine to pre-rigor beef rounds for reduction of pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foodborne illness continues to be a serious public health problem and is a major concern for the United States food industry. This study evaluated the effectiveness of warm solutions of acidic calcium sulfate (ACS), lactic acid (LA), episolon-polylysine (EPL), ACS plus EPL, and sterile distilled wa...

  5. The ceric sulfate dosimeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergbakke, Erling

    The process employed for the determination of absorbed dose is the reduction of ceric ions to cerous ions in a solution of ceric sulfate and cerous sulfate in 0.8N sulfuric acid: Ce4+→Ce 3+ The absorbed dose is derived from the difference in ceric ion concentration before and after irradiation. The...

  6. New evidence for TiO2 uniform surfaces leading to complete bacterial reduction in the dark: critical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesic, Jelena; Rtimi, Sami; Laub, Danièle; Roglic, Goran M; Pulgarin, Cesar; Kiwi, John

    2014-11-01

    This study presents new evidence for the events leading to Escherichia coli reduction in the absence of light irradiation on TiO2-polyester (from now on TiO2-PES. By transmission electron microscopy (TEM) the diffusion of TiO2 NP's aggregates with the E. coli outer lipo-polyssacharide (LPS) layer is shown to be a prerequisite for the loss of bacterial cultivability. Within 30 min in the dark the TiO2 aggregates interact with E. coli cell wall leading within 120 min to the complete loss of bacterial cultivability on a TiO2-PES 5% TiO2 sample. The bacterial reduction was observed to increase with a higher TiO2 loading on the PES up to 5%. Bacterial disinfection on TiO2-PES in the dark was slower compared to the runs under low intensity simulated sunlight light irradiation. The interaction between the TiO2 aggregates and the E. coli cell wall is discussed in terms of the competition between the TiO2 units collapsing to form TiO2-aggregates at a physiologic pH-value followed by the electrostatic interaction with the bacteria surface. TiO2-PES samples were able to carry repetitive bacterial inactivation. This presents a potential for practical applications. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) evidence was found for the reduction of Ti4+ to Ti3+ contributing to redox interactions between TiO2-PES and the bacterial cell wall. Insight is provided into the mechanism of interaction between the E. coli cell wall and TiO2 NP's. The properties of the TiO2-PES surface like percentage atomic concentration, TiO2-loading, optical absorption, surface charge and crystallographic phases are reported in this study. PMID:25444660

  7. Chondroitin sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in combination with glucosamine sulfate, shark cartilage, and camphor. Some people also inject chondroitin sulfate into the ... in combination with glucosamine sulfate, shark cartilage, and camphor seems to reduce arthritis symptoms. However, any symptom ...

  8. Effect of COD:SO4 2− Ratio, HRT and Linoleic Acid Concentration on Mesophilic Sulfate Reduction: Reactor Performance and Microbial Population Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Chungman Moon; Rajesh Singh; Sathyanarayan S. Veeravalli; Saravanan R. Shanmugam; Subba Rao Chaganti; Jerald A. Lalman; Heath, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    Biological sulfate (SO42−) reduction was examined in anaerobic sequential batch reactors (ASBRs) operated under different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) ranging from 12 to 36 h and COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand)/SO42−) ratios of 2.4, 1.6 and 0.8. Competition between SO42− reducing bacteria (SRBs), methane producing archaea (MPAs) and homoacetogens (HACs) was examined in controls and cultures treated with linoleic acid (LA). The ASBR performance was influenced by the COD/SO42− ratio in control...

  9. Effects of Lead and Mercury on Sulfate-Reducing Bacterial Activity in a Biological Process for Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Lin, Xiaojuan; Wang, Jinting; Jiang, Feng; Wei, Li; Chen, Guanghao; Hao, Xiaodi

    2016-01-01

    Biological sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) may be effective in removing toxic lead and mercury ions (Pb(II) and Hg(II)) from wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater through anaerobic sulfite reduction. To confirm this hypothesis, a sulfite-reducing up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor was set up to treat FGD wastewater at metal loading rates of 9.2 g/m3-d Pb(II) and 2.6 g/m3-d Hg(II) for 50 days. The reactor removed 72.5 ± 7% of sulfite and greater than 99.5% of both Hg(II) and Pb(II). Most of the removed lead and mercury were deposited in the sludge as HgS and PbS. The contribution of cell adsorption and organic binding to Pb(II) and Hg(II) removal was 20.0 ± 0.1% and 1.8 ± 1.0%, respectively. The different bioavailable concentration levels of lead and mercury resulted in different levels of lethal toxicity. Cell viability analysis revealed that Hg(II) was less toxic than Pb(II) to the sludge microorganisms. In the batch tests, increasing the Hg(II) feeding concentration increased sulfite reduction rates. In conclusion, a sulfite-reducing reactor can efficiently remove sulfite, Pb(II) and Hg(II) from FGD wastewater. PMID:27455890

  10. Immunosuppressant dose reduction and long-term rejection risk in renal transplant recipients with severe bacterial pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Chia-Jen; Tarng, Der-Cherng; Yang, Wu-Chang; Yang, Chih-Yu

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Due to lifelong immunosuppression, renal transplant recipients (RTRs) are at risk of infectious complications such as pneumonia. Severe pneumonia results in respiratory failure and is life-threatening. We aimed to examine the influence of immunosuppressant dose reduction on RTRs with bacterial pneumonia and respiratory failure. METHODS From January 2001 to January 2011, 33 of 1,146 RTRs at a single centre developed bacterial pneumonia with respiratory failure. All patients were treated using mechanical ventilation and aggressive therapies in the intensive care unit. RESULTS Average time from kidney transplantation to pneumonia with respiratory failure was 6.8 years. In-hospital mortality rate was 45.5% despite intensive care and aggressive therapies. Logistic regression analysis indicated that a high serum creatinine level at the time of admission to the intensive care unit (odds ratio 1.77 per mg/dL, 95% confidence interval 1.01–3.09; p = 0.045) was a mortality determinant. Out of the 33 patients, immunosuppressive agents were reduced in 17 (51.5%). We found that although immunosuppressant dose reduction tended to improve in-hospital mortality, this was not statistically significant. Nevertheless, during a mean follow-up period of two years, none of the survivors (n = 18) developed acute rejection or allograft necrosis. CONCLUSION In RTRs with bacterial pneumonia and respiratory failure, higher serum creatinine levels were a mortality determinant. Although temporary immunosuppressant dose reduction might not reduce mortality, it was associated with a minimal risk of acute rejection during the two-year follow-up. Our results suggest that early immunosuppressant reduction in RTRs with severe pneumonia of indeterminate microbiology may be safe even when pathogens are bacterial in nature. PMID:25091886

  11. Bacterial reduction and release of adsorbed arsenate on Fe(Ⅲ)-, Al-and coprecipitated Fe(Ⅲ)/Al-hydroxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuexia Zhang; Yongfeng Jia; Shaofeng Wang; Rongrong Pan; Xudong Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Mobilization of arsenic under anaerobic conditions is of great concern in arsenic contaminated soils and sediments.Bacterial reduction of As(Ⅴ)and Fe(Ⅲ)influences the cycling and partitioning of arsenic between solid and aqueous phase.We investigated the impact of bacterially mediated reductions of Fe(Ⅲ)/A1 hydroxides-bound arsenic(Ⅴ)and iron(Ⅲ)oxides on arsenic release.Our results suggested that As(Ⅴ)reduction occurred prior to Fe(Ⅲ)reduction,and Fe(Ⅲ)reduction did not enhance the release of arsenic.Instead,Fe(Ⅲ)hydroxides retained their dissolved concentrations during the experimental process,even though the new iron mineral-magnetite formed.In contrast,the release of reduced As(Ⅲ)was promoted greatly when aluminum hydroxides was incorporated.Thus,the substitution of aluminum hydroxides may be responsible for the release of arsenic in the contaminated soils and sediments,since aluminum substitution of Fe(Ⅲ)hydroxides universally occurs under natural conditions.

  12. Using a Statistical Model to Examine the Effect of COD: SO42− Ratio, HRT and LA Concentration on Sulfate Reduction in an Anaerobic Sequencing Batch Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Singh

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Taguchi statistical design, an orthogonal array (OA method, was used to study the impact of the COD/SO42− ratio, hydraulic retention time (HRT and linoleic acid (LA concentration on sulfate (SO42− reduction in an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor using glucose as the electron donor. Based on the OA, optimum condition for maximum SO42− reduction was evaluated. Increasing the COD/SO42− ratio and HRT caused decreasing SO42− reduction while increased SO42− reduction was observed with increasing LA concentration (1 g L−1. In control (not fed LA cultures, higher SO42− reduction (87% ± 3% was observed at a low COD/SO42− ratio of 0.8. This indicates that increasing SO42− reduction was observed at increasing SO42− loading rates. In general, results from this study reveal that limiting the substrate concentration with high SO42− levels (low COD/SO42− ratio favors high SO42− removal. Surface plots were used to evaluate the significant interactions between the experimental factors. Accuracy of the model was verified using an analysis of residuals. Optimum conditions for maximum SO42− reduction (97.61% were observed at a COD/SO42− ratio of 0.8 (level 1, 12 h HRT (level 1 together with 1000 mg L−1 LA addition (level 3. In general, the Taguchi OA provided a useful approach for predicting the percent SO42− reduction in inhibited mixed anaerobic cultures within the factor levels investigated.

  13. Improved Understanding of Microbial Iron and Sulfate Reduction Through a Combination of Bottom-up and Top-down Functional Proteomics Assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, Ruth [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2016-02-28

    Our overall goal was to improve the understanding of microbial iron and sulfate reduction by evaluating a diverse iron and sulfate reducing organisms utilizing a multi-omics approach combining “top-down” and “bottom-up” omics methodologies. We initiated one of the first combined comparative genomics, shotgun proteomics, RTqPCR, and heterologous expression studies in pursuit of our project objectives. Within the first year of this project, we created a new bioinformatics tool for ortholog identification (“SPOCS”). SPOCS is described in our publication, Curtis et al., 2013. Using this tool we were able to identify conserved orthologous groups across diverse iron and sulfate reducing microorganisms from Firmicutes, gamma-proteobacteria and delta-proteobacteria. For six iron and sulfate reducers we also performed shotgun proteomics (“bottom-up” proteomics including accurate mass and time (AMT) tag and iTRAQ approaches). Cultures include Gram (-) and Gram (+) microbes. Gram (-) were: Geobacter sulfureducens (grown on iron citrate and fumarate), Geobacter bemidjiensis (grown on iron citrate and fumarate), Shewanella oneidiensis (grown on iron citrate and fumarate) and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans (grown on iron citrate and fumarate). Although all cultures grew on insoluble iron, the iron precipitates interfered with protein extraction and analysis; which remains a major challenge for researchers in disparate study systems. Among the Gram (-) organisms studied, Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans remains the most poorly characterized. Yet, it is arguably the most versatile organisms we studied. In this work we have used comparative proteomics to hypothesize which two of the dozens of predicted c-type cytochromes within Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans may be directly involved in soluble iron reduction. Unfortunately, heterologous expression of these Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans ctype cytochromes led to poor protein production and/or formation of inclusion bodies

  14. Health Effects of Alkaline Diet and Water, Reduction of Digestive-tract Bacterial Load, and Earthing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Haider Abdul-Lateef

    2016-04-01

    In the article, the author discusses the issue of chronic, low-grade acidosis that is thought to be brought about primarily by 2 factors: (1) advancing age, with a consequent decline in renal function; and (2) diet. An acid-forming diet can induce low-grade metabolic acidosis, which causes very small decreases in blood pH and plasma bicarbonate (HCO3-) that remain within the range considered to be normal. However, if the duration of the acidosis is prolonged or chronically present, even a low degree of acidosis can become significant. This article reviews supporting evidence in the literature that has shown that consumption of abundant alkaline-forming foods can result in improvement in bone mineral density (BMD) and muscle mass, protection from chronic illnesses, reduced tumor-cell invasion and metastasis, and effective excretion of toxins from the body. In addition, a large number of studies showing the benefits of alkaline water (mineral water) have revealed that people consuming water with a high level of total dissolved solids (TDS) (ie, with a high mineral content) have shown a lower incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD), cardiovascular disease (CVD), and cancer and lower total mortality rates. Consumption of alkaline water also may prevent osteoporosis and protect pancreatic beta cells with its antioxidant effects. In addition, this article discusses the literature that shows that reducing digestive-tract bacterial load can play an important role in increasing blood alkalinity toward the normal upper limit. That change occurs through good oral hygiene, flossing of teeth, perfect chewing of food, and bowel evacuation as soon as possible. Finally, the author reviews the literature that shows that earthing (ie, the direct contact of the human body with the earth) can supply a current of plentiful electrons. Earthing has been shown to reduce acute and chronic inflammation, blood glucose in patients with diabetes, red blood cell (RBC) aggregation, and blood

  15. Equilibrium oxygen isotope behavior of sulfate in marine sediments: A new paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, R.; Boettcher, M.; Surkov, A.; Ferdelman, T.; Jorgensen, B.

    2006-05-01

    We have determined the oxygen (18O/16O) and sulfur (34S/32S) isotope ratios of porewater sulfate to depths of over 400 mbsf in sediments from open-ocean and upwelling sites in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific ocean. Sulfate δ18O ranges from near-normal seawater values (9.5 permil) at organic-poor open-ocean sites, to approximately 30 permil at sites with higher organic matter content and higher associated microbial activity. Depth-correlative trends of δ18O, δ34S, alkalinity, methane, ammonium and the presence of sulfide, indicate significant oxidation of sedimentary organic matter by sulfate-reducing microbial populations as well as anaerobic oxidation of methane. δ18O ?SO4 values at low-activity sites reveal the presence of significant microbial sulfur-cycling activity despite relatively flat sulfate concentration and δ34S profiles. This activity may include contributions from several processes including: enzyme-catalyzed equilibration between oxygen in sulfate and water superimposed upon microbial sulfate reduction, sulfide oxidation, and bacterial disproportionation of sulfur intermediates. Positive correlation between water and sulfate δ18O values supports sulfate-water O isotope exchange as the dominant process controlling porewater sulfate δ18O values. Results of this study indicate that coupled measurements of S and O isotope ratios of porewater sulfate are essential for interpreting microbial sulfur cycling in marine sediments.

  16. Bacterial diversity and reductive dehalogenase redundancy in a 1,2-dichloroethane-degrading bacterial consortium enriched from a contaminated aquifer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wittebolle Lieven

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteria possess a reservoir of metabolic functionalities ready to be exploited for multiple purposes. The use of microorganisms to clean up xenobiotics from polluted ecosystems (e.g. soil and water represents an eco-sustainable and powerful alternative to traditional remediation processes. Recent developments in molecular-biology-based techniques have led to rapid and accurate strategies for monitoring and identification of bacteria and catabolic genes involved in the degradation of xenobiotics, key processes to follow up the activities in situ. Results We report the characterization of the response of an enriched bacterial community of a 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA contaminated aquifer to the spiking with 5 mM lactate as electron donor in microcosm studies. After 15 days of incubation, the microbial community structure was analyzed. The bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone library showed that the most represented phylogenetic group within the consortium was affiliated with the phylum Firmicutes. Among them, known degraders of chlorinated compounds were identified. A reductive dehalogenase genes clone library showed that the community held four phylogenetically-distinct catalytic enzymes, all conserving signature residues previously shown to be linked to 1,2-DCA dehalogenation. Conclusions The overall data indicate that the enriched bacterial consortium shares the metabolic functionality between different members of the microbial community and is characterized by a high functional redundancy. These are fundamental features for the maintenance of the community's functionality, especially under stress conditions and suggest the feasibility of a bioremediation treatment with a potential prompt dehalogenation and a process stability over time.

  17. Barium Sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barium sulfate is used to help doctors examine the esophagus (tube that connects the mouth and stomach), ... dimensional pictures of the inside of the body). Barium sulfate is in a class of medications called ...

  18. Glucosamine sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to control arthritis pain. These creams usually contain camphor and other ingredients in addition to glucosamine. Glucosamine ... in combination with chondroitin sulfate, shark cartilage, and camphor for up to 8 weeks. Glucosamine sulfate can ...

  19. Bacterially mediated removal of phosphorus and cycling of nitrate and sulfate in the waste stream of a "zero-discharge" recirculating mariculture system

    OpenAIRE

    M. D. Krom; A. Ben David; E. D. Ingall; Liane G. Benning; S. Clerici; S. Bottrell; C. Davies; N. J. Potts; R. J. G. Mortimer; J. van Rijn

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous removal of nitrogen and phosphorus by microbial biofilters has been used in a variety of water treatment systems including treatment systems in aquaculture. In this study, phosphorus, nitrate and sulfate cycling in the anaerobic loop of a zero-discharge, recirculating mariculture system was investigated using detailed geochemical measurements in the sludge layer of the digestion basin. High concentrations of nitrate and sulfate, circulating in the overlying water (∼15 mM), were r...

  20. INJECTION OF A FERROUS SULFATE/SODIUM DITHIONITE REDUCTANT FOR IN-SITU TREATMENT OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    An in situ pilot study was conducted to evaluate the performance of a ferrous iron-based reductant solution in treating hexavalent chromium within a saturated zone source area at a former industrial site in Charleston, South Carolina (USA). The hexavalent source area, consisting...

  1. Activation and transfer of sulfate in biological systems (1960)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It examines in this review the successive stages of active sulfate formation and its role in biological synthesis of sulfuric esters. The possible role of active sulfate as intermediary in sulfate reduction is also discussed. (author)

  2. Reduction of bacterial infections in newly hatched chicks by the use of antimicrobial dips: preliminary approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, E K; Nabbut, N H; Hinners, S W; Al-Nakhli, H M

    1985-01-01

    Bacteriological examination of hatchery waste eggs, identification of the isolated bacteria, and susceptibility testing against seven antimicrobial agents were used in an attempt to establish a rational basis for reducing bacterial infections in newly hatched chicks. Chloramphenicol at 1000 ppm was selected as the antibiotic for preliminary dipping trials and 0.45% iodophore (Wescodyne) was added for later trials. The control treatment consisted of formaldehyde fumigation. The following conclusions can be drawn: Hatchery waste eggs are highly contaminated (69.1%) and enterobacteriaceae predominate (26.6%). Chloramphenicol is the most effective antimicrobial tested. Dip treatments with either chloramphenicol alone or chloramphenicol plus Wescodyne result in a reduced percentage of abnormal navels (8.4% and 10.4%), as compared with 21.9% for the control treatment. Hatchability of either group of dipped eggs is reduced in comparison with fumigated eggs. Dip treatment with chloramphenicol plus Wescodyne significantly reduces the anal carrier rates for Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella spp., and Staphylococcus aureus. This treatment reduces the incidence of bacterial infection in abnormal navels to zero. PMID:3919494

  3. Determination of Natural 14C Abundances in Dissolved Organic Carbon in Organic-Rich Marine Sediment Porewaters by Thermal Sulfate Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L.; Komada, T.

    2010-12-01

    The abundances of natural 14C in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the marine environment hold clues regarding the processes that influence the biogeochemical cycling of this large carbon reservoir. At present, UV irradiation is the widely accepted method for oxidizing seawater DOC for determination of their 14C abundances. This technique yields precise and accurate values with low blanks, but it requires a dedicated vacuum line, and hence can be difficult to implement. As an alternative technique that can be conducted on a standard preparatory vacuum line, we modified and tested a thermal sulfate reduction method that was previously developed to determine δ13C values of marine DOC (Fry B. et al., 1996. Analysis of marine DOC using a dry combustion method. Mar. Chem., 54: 191-201.) to determine the 14C abundances of DOC in marine sediment porewaters. In this method, the sample is dried in a 100 ml round-bottom Pyrex flask in the presence of excess oxidant (K2SO4) and acid (H3PO4), and combusted at 550 deg.C. The combustion products are cryogenically processed to collect and quantify CO2 using standard procedures. Materials we have oxidized to date range from 6-24 ml in volume, and 95-1500 μgC in size. The oxidation efficiency of this method was tested by processing known amounts of reagent-grade dextrose and sucrose (as examples of labile organic matter), tannic acid and humic acid (as examples of complex natural organic matter), and porewater DOC extracted from organic-rich nearshore sediments. The carbon yields for all of these materials averaged 99±4% (n=18). The 14C abundances of standard materials IAEA C-6 and IAEA C-5 processed by this method using >1mgC aliquots were within error of certified values. The size and the isotopic value of the blank were determined by a standard dilution technique using IAEA C-6 and IAEA C-5 that ranged in size from 150 to 1500 μgC (n=4 and 2, respectively). This yielded a blank size of 6.7±0.7 μgC, and a blank isotopic

  4. Microbiology and biogeochemistry of sediments and rhizosphere of mangroves: bacterial production, sulphate-reduction and methylation of mercury with methodological focus on incubation-extraction of {sup 14}C-leucine; Microbiologia e biogeoquimica de sedimentos e rizosfera de manguezais: producao bacteriana, sulfato-reducao e metilacao do mercurio com enfoque metodologico na incubacao-extracao de {sup 14}C-leucina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feijo, Issabella Vitoria Abduche

    2015-07-01

    Mangroves are one of the most important ecosystems when it comes to cycling of various elements, including carbon and mercury. Microbiological processes that occur in sediment are essential for carbon mineralization, its conversion into biomass and for availability of mercury to the food chain. Sulfate-reducing bacteria are one of the main groups responsible for degradation of organic compounds in marine sediments and mercury methylation, especially in the rhizosphere of macrophyte. The aim of this study was to evaluate bacterial production (BP) over different sedimentary profiles as well as mercury methylation (% MeHg), sulfate reduction rates (SRR) and bacterial production in the rhizosphere of a ubiquitous mangrove tree. Radiochemical approaches were used to access bacterial production ({sup 14}C-leucine), sulfate reduction ({sup 35}SO{sub 4}) and mercury methylation ({sup 203}Hg). Study area was located at Coroa Grande (Sepetiba bay) and Jequia mangrove (Guanabara bay). Methodological studies using {sup 14}C-leucine as a tool to assess bacterial production in mangrove sediment were not found. In this context, we tested two leucine uptake methodologies for measuring bacterial production in mangrove sediments according to Baath et al. (2001) Soil Biol. Biochem., v.33,p. 1571-1574 and Fischer and Pusch (1999) Appl. Environ. Microbiol., v.6, p.4411-4418. Our results suggest that an adaptation of both techniques were suitable to measure BP in mangrove sediment. We also provided underlying parameters of the method such as saturation level and linearity of leucine incorporation that can be used as guidance for future studies in mangrove. Once the methodology was established, we accessed BP along a shallow sedimentary profile in three physiographic mangroves types: basin, fringe and riverine. BP was highly heterogeneous in different physiographic types of mangroves and along the sediment profiles.The mangrove located at Guanabara bay presented BP which was 50 times

  5. [Study of the bacterial reduction effects of dry hand rubbing without disinfectant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hira, Daichi; Ogawa, Midori; Ishii, Tatsuya; Gono, Kaishi; Sakamoto, Takuro; Yamamura, Sohei; Masumoto, Naoya; Yasutomi, Masamichi; You, Chunlin; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Taniguchi, Hatsumi

    2014-03-01

    Handwashing is the most basic method of preventing infection. Hand rubbing with an alcohol-based handrub, is the most efficient and popular method. We found in several case studies that 3 minutes of dry hand rubbing without any disinfectant decreases the number of hand bacteria. In this study of 54 samples taken from 47 test subjects, we tried to determine how effectively this method decreases hand bacterial numbers. Except for 12 samples that were indeterminate, the number of hand bacteria in 36 (85.7%) out of 42 samples decreased. The average rate of decrease was 49.4% and the maximum rate was 98.3%. Although the most effective duration of dry hand rubbing varied among individuals, we estimated that 2 minutes is optimal. As dry hand rubbing without disinfectants decreases hand bacteria, we suggest that it can be an effective alternate method in emergency situations when water, soap or disinfectants are unavailable. PMID:24633181

  6. Evaluation of a routine antiseptic and two disinfectants for reducing bacterial population of cow hoof

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moosa Javdani,

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A routine antiseptic and two disinfectant agents were used separately for reducing bacterial population of cow hoof: 1 7.5% povidone–iodine scrub mixed with 10% povidone–iodine solution, 2 10% copper sulfate, and 3 8% formaldehyde. Swabbing for microbial colony counts were used to evaluate pre and post–scrub of hooves of eight cows. The results revealed no significant differences in reduction of bacterial colony count between post–scrubs of povidone–iodine and formaldehyde. Bacterial colony counts after the povidone–iodine scrub solution and formaldehyde scrub were significantly different from those obtained after the copper sulfate scrub. Significant reduction in number of microbial colony in post–scrub by povidone–iodine, formaldehyde, and copper sulfate were observed which were different from the control (warm tap water.

  7. Biomass reduction of Salvinia molesta exposed to copper sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO4.5H2O

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Pedro Alves de Azevedo Barros

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Copper in the aquatic ecosystem may remain adsorbed or be incorporated into the biomass and undergo biomagnification causing unwanted effects to aquatic macrophyte communities. This study evaluated the biomass reduction of Salvinia molesta (Mitchell exposed to copper sulphate pentahydrate (CuSO4.5H2O under laboratory conditions. Approximately 20.5 g of fresh mass (FM of S. molesta (0.74 g dry matter, DM were placed in glass tanks with different concentrations (n = 3 of CuSO4.5H2O as follows: 0.0; 2.0; 4.0; 6.0; and 8.0 mg L-1 for 28 days. The dry mass was determined after each seven-day interval over 28 days and submitted to repeated ANOVA measures, followed by a Tukey test (P<0,05. The results show that macrophyte increased until the seventh day of exposure in all treatments. After this period, the biomass of S. molesta decreased; but there was no significant difference between treatments with copper, except for the 8.0 mg L-1 treatment. The copper treatments decreased the S. molesta biomass an average of 43.2% (0.50 g DM after 28 days. At the end of the experiment, copper absorption in the treatments with 6.0 and 8.0 mg L-1 was on average 77.9% higher than in the treatments with 2 and 4 mg L-1 . The treatments with 6.0 and 8.0 mg L-1 reached their maximum bioaccumulation capacity after 14 days. The results show that contamination of the aquatic environment at concentrations above 2 mg L-1 Cu2+ can reduce the S. molesta biomass by approximately 43%.

  8. Electron/proton coupling in bacterial nitric oxide reductase during reduction of oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flock, Ulrika; Watmough, Nicholas J; Adelroth, Pia

    2005-08-01

    The respiratory nitric oxide reductase (NOR) from Paracoccus denitrificans catalyzes the two-electron reduction of NO to N(2)O (2NO + 2H(+) + 2e(-) --> N(2)O + H(2)O), which is an obligatory step in the sequential reduction of nitrate to dinitrogen known as denitrification. NOR has four redox-active cofactors, namely, two low-spin hemes c and b, one high-spin heme b(3), and a non-heme iron Fe(B), and belongs to same superfamily as the oxygen-reducing heme-copper oxidases. NOR can also use oxygen as an electron acceptor; this catalytic activity was investigated in this study. We show that the product in the steady-state reduction of oxygen is water. A single turnover of the fully reduced NOR with oxygen was initiated using the flow-flash technique, and the progress of the reaction monitored by time-resolved optical absorption spectroscopy. Two major phases with time constants of 40 micros and 25 ms (pH 7.5, 1 mM O(2)) were observed. The rate constant for the faster process was dependent on the O(2) concentration and is assigned to O(2) binding to heme b(3) at a bimolecular rate constant of 2 x 10(7) M(-)(1) s(-)(1). The second phase (tau = 25 ms) involves oxidation of the low-spin hemes b and c, and is coupled to the uptake of protons from the bulk solution. The rate constant for this phase shows a pH dependence consistent with rate limitation by proton transfer from an internal group with a pK(a) = 6.6. This group is presumably an amino acid residue that is crucial for proton transfer to the catalytic site also during NO reduction. PMID:16060680

  9. Assessing the influence of the carbon oxidation-reduction state on organic pollutant biodegradation in algal-bacterial photobioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahr, Melanie; Garcia-Encina, Pedro A.; Munoz, Raul [Valladolid Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology; Stams, Alfons J.M. [Valladolid Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology; Wageningen Univ. (Netherlands). Lab. of Microbiology; Rosa, Francisco de la [Valladolid Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry

    2011-05-15

    The influence of the carbon oxidation-reduction state (CORS) of organic pollutants on their biodegradation in enclosed algal-bacterial photobioreactors was evaluated using a consortium of enriched wild-type methanotrophic bacteria and microalgae. Methane, methanol and glucose (with CORS -4, -2 and 0, respectively) were chosen as model organic pollutants. In the absence of external oxygen supply, microalgal photosynthesis was not capable of supporting a significant methane and methanol biodegradation due to their high oxygen demands per carbon unit, while glucose was fully oxidized by photosynthetic oxygenation. When bicarbonate was added, removal efficiencies of 37 {+-} 4% (20 days), 65 {+-} 4% (11 days) and 100% (2 days) were recorded for CH{sub 4}, CH{sub 3}OH and C{sub 6}H{sub 12}O{sub 6}, respectively due to the additional oxygen generated from photosynthetic bicarbonate assimilation. The use of NO{sub 3}{sup -} instead of NH{sub 4}{sup +} as nitrogen source (N oxidation-reduction state of +5 vs. -3) resulted in an increase in CH4 degradation from 0 to 33 {+-} 3% in the absence of bicarbonate and from 37 {+-} 4% to 100% in the presence of bicarbonate, likely due to a decrease in the stoichiometric oxygen requirements and the higher photosynthetic oxygen production. Hypothetically, the CORS of the substrates might affect the CORS of the microalgal biomass composition (higher lipid content). However, the total lipid content of the algal-bacterial biomass was 19 {+-} 7% in the absence and 16 {+-} 2% in the presence of bicarbonate. (orig.)

  10. Impacts of crab bioturbation and local pollution on sulfate reduction, Hg distribution and methylation in mangrove sediments, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Raquel Rose Silva; Guimarães, Jean Remy Davée

    2016-08-15

    Mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) are highly toxic and poorly studied in mangroves. Burrowing Uca crabs change sediment topography and biogeochemistry and thus may affect Hg distribution and MeHg formation. We studied added (203)Hg distribution, Me(203)Hg formation and sulfate reduction rates (SRR) in sediment aquariums containing Uca leptodactyla; and analyzed profiles of Me(203)Hg formation and SRR in sediment cores from two mangroves with distinct environmental impacts. MeHg formation and SRR were higher in the top (≤6cm) sediment and there was no significant difference in Hg methylation in more or less impacted mangroves. In aquariums, crab bioturbation favored Hg retention in the sediment. In the treatment without crabs, Hg volatilization and water Hg concentrations were higher. Hg methylation was higher in bioturbated aquariums but SRR were similar in both treatments. These findings suggest that bioturbating activity favors Hg retention in sediment but also promotes MeHg formation near the surface. PMID:27269386

  11. Effect of COD:SO4 2− Ratio, HRT and Linoleic Acid Concentration on Mesophilic Sulfate Reduction: Reactor Performance and Microbial Population Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chungman Moon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Biological sulfate (SO42− reduction was examined in anaerobic sequential batch reactors (ASBRs operated under different hydraulic retention times (HRTs ranging from 12 to 36 h and COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand/SO42− ratios of 2.4, 1.6 and 0.8. Competition between SO42− reducing bacteria (SRBs, methane producing archaea (MPAs and homoacetogens (HACs was examined in controls and cultures treated with linoleic acid (LA. The ASBR performance was influenced by the COD/SO42− ratio in control cultures with a SO42− reduction of 87% at a COD/SO42− ratio of 0.8. At a 12 h HRT, in both control and LA treated cultures, greater than 75% SO42− removal was observed under all the conditions examined. In control reactors operating at a 36 h HRT, high levels of MPAs belonging to Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales were detected; however, in comparison, under low COD/SO42− ratio and with decreasing HRT conditions, a relative increase in SRBs belonging to Desulfovibrio and Desulfatibacillum was observed. Adding 0.5 g·L−1 LA suppressed Methanobacteriales, while increasing the LA concentration to 1 g·L−1 completely suppressed MPAs with a relative increase in SRBs. HACs belonging to Bacteroidetes were observed in the control and in cultures operated at 12 h HRT with a COD/SO42− ratio of 1.6 and fed 0.5 g·L−1 LA; however, with all other LA levels (0.5 and 1.0 g·L−1 and HRTs (12, 24 and 36 h, HACs were not detected.

  12. Analysis of Diversity and Activity of Sulfate-Reducing Bacterial Communities in Sulfidogenic Bioreactors Using 16S rRNA and dsrB Genes as Molecular Markers▿

    OpenAIRE

    Dar, Shabir A.; Yao, Li; van Dongen, Udo; Kuenen, J. Gijs; Muyzer, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    Here we describe the diversity and activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in sulfidogenic bioreactors by using the simultaneous analysis of PCR products obtained from DNA and RNA of the 16S rRNA and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrAB) genes. We subsequently analyzed the amplified gene fragments by using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). We observed fewer bands in the RNA-based DGGE profiles than in the DNA-based profiles, indicating marked differences in the populations...

  13. Bacterial reduction of soluble uranium: the first step of in situ immobilization of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mobility of uranium in groundwater is a problem of considerable magnitude. One approach would be to control the distribution of uranium by converting the water-soluble uranium ion to one that is less soluble. This study focuses on the use of Desulfovibrio gigas, D. baculatus, D. vulgaris, D. desulfuricans, Pseudomonas putida, a denitrifying Pseudomonas strain and mixed cultures from sludge or uranium mill tailing sites for the bioconversion of uranyl, U(VI), to uraninite, U(IV). In general, 82% to 92% of U(VI) was reduced in pure cultures, while 45% to 99% of added uranium was transformed by diverse bacteria present in the groundwater. The oxyanions of selenium and vanadium had little effect on the uranium reduction by bacteria, while arsenic and molybdenum at 1.0 mM inhibited reduction of uranium. The product of uranium metabolism was U collected in needle-like crystals. A model is proposed for in situ bioremediation of uranium in groundwater at uranium mill tailing sites. (author) 4 figs., 5 tabs., 21 refs

  14. In planta reduction of maize seedling stalk lesions by the bacterial endophyte Bacillus mojavensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Charles W; Hinton, Dorothy M

    2011-06-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is susceptible to infection by Fusarium verticillioides through autoinfection and alloinfection, resulting in diseases and contamination of maize kernels with the fumonisin mycotoxins. Attempts at controlling this fungus are currently being done with biocontrol agents such as bacteria, and this includes bacterial endophytes, such as Bacillus mojavensis . In addition to producing fumonisins, which are phytotoxic and mycotoxic, F. verticillioides also produces fusaric acid, which acts both as a phytotoxin and as an antibiotic. The question now is Can B. mojavensis reduce lesion development in maize during the alloinfection process, simulated by internode injection of the fungus? Mutant strains of B. mojavensis that tolerate fusaric acid were used in a growth room study to determine the development of stalk lesions, indicative of maize seedling blight, by co-inoculations with a wild-type strain of F. verticillioides and with non-fusaric acid producing mutants of F. verticillioides. Lesions were measured on 14-day-old maize stalks consisting of treatment groups inoculated with and without mutants and wild-type strains of bacteria and fungi. The results indicate that the fusaric-acid-tolerant B. mojavensis mutant reduced stalk lesions, suggesting an in planta role for this substance as an antibiotic. Further, lesion development occurred in maize infected with F. verticillioides mutants that do not produce fusaric acid, indicating a role for other phytotoxins, such as the fumonisins. Thus, additional pathological components should be examined before strains of B. mojavensis can be identified as being effective as a biocontrol agent, particularly for the control of seedling disease of maize. PMID:21635192

  15. Simulating individual-based models of bacterial chemotaxis with asymptotic variance reduction

    CERN Document Server

    Rousset, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    We discuss variance reduced simulations for an individual-based model of chemotaxis of bacteria with internal dynamics. The variance reduction is achieved via a coupling of this model with a simpler process in which the internal dynamics has been replaced by a direct gradient sensing of the chemoattractants concentrations. In the companion paper \\cite{limits}, we have rigorously shown, using a pathwise probabilistic technique, that both processes converge towards the same advection-diffusion process in the diffusive asymptotics. In this work, a direct coupling is achieved between paths of individual bacteria simulated by both models, by using the same sets of random numbers in both simulations. This coupling is used to construct a hybrid scheme with reduced variance. We first compute a deterministic solution of the kinetic density description of the direct gradient sensing model; the deviations due to the presence of internal dynamics are then evaluated via the coupled individual-based simulations. We show th...

  16. Precipitation of technetium by subsurface sulfate-reducing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the interaction between Tc and subsurface bacteria, we conducted batch experiments with soil and groundwater or sterilized deionized water. The system water/soil was amended with lactate and phosphate for bacterial growth. Nitrate and sulfate were added to stimulate the growth of indigenous denitrifying and sulfate-reducing bacteria. During denitrification Tc-concentration did not change with time. In the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria, Tc-concentrations decreased in reacted waters which could be attributed to Tc(VII) reduction and precipitation of TcO2 and/or TcS2. Coprecipitation with newly formed iron sulfide is expected to contribute to Tc removal. Additional experiments with U and Tc showed that these elements were simultaneously reduced by sulfate-reducing bacteria. This work shows that 1) subsurface mixed cultures of denitrifying bacteria do not remove Tc from solution, this is different from uranium and 2) sulfate-reducing bacteria reduce and remove Tc from aqueous solutions and thus in situ bioremediation of subsurface waters and soils may be possible with such ubiquitous bacteria. (orig.)

  17. Identity and functional analysis of bacterial populations involved in reductive acetogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our current understanding of the microbial processes underpinning hydrogen utilization and methane production within the rumen is incomplete and the key to manipulating these emissions in the future will flow from fundamental improvements in our knowledge of methanogenesis and alternative hydrogenotrophic pathways. Reductive acetogenesis is an alternative hydrogen-utilising pathway to methanogenesis in the rumen and has potential as a strategy for reducing ruminant greenhouse gas emissions. The obligatory anaerobic bacteria responsible for reductive acetogenesis are known as homoacetogens. Homoacetogens use the acetyl-CoA pathway to reduce carbon dioxide to acetate, and most are able to use this pathway for growth on hydrogen and carbon dioxide as the sole energy source. Homoacetogens are present in the rumen and molecular tools are necessary to further investigate their ecology. The aim of the present work was to identify DNA sequences of genes present in homoacetogens that may be suitable as targets for the development of functional-group molecular tools for these microorganisms. The genes investigated were those of three key enzymes in the acetyl-CoA pathway: formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase (FTHFS), carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH) and acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS). Several batch fermentation systems inoculated with rumen microbes were established, with 13C-carbonate as the principal carbon source, and in the presence or absence of methanogen inhibitors. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was performed on samples to reveal minimal gross differences in community structure within the different systems. Metagenomic DNA was extracted and Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) was used to confirm the uptake of 13C, followed by the separation of 13C-labeled DNA via isopycnic gradient ultracentrifugation. The 13C-labeled DNA was used as a template for the production of 16S rDNA phylogenetic and formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase (FTHFS) libraries, as well

  18. Hypoxia induces NO-dependent release of heparan sulfate in fibroblasts from the Alzheimer mouse Tg2576 by activation of nitrite reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fang; Bourseau-Guilmain, Erika; Belting, Mattias; Fransson, Lars-Åke; Mani, Katrin

    2016-06-01

    There is a functional relationship between the heparan sulfate proteoglycan glypican-1 and the amyloid precursor protein (APP) of Alzheimer disease. In wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts, expression and processing of the APP is required for endosome-to-nucleus translocation of anhydromannose-containing heparan sulfate released from S-nitrosylated glypican-1 by ascorbate-induced, nitrosothiol-catalyzed deaminative cleavage. In fibroblasts from the transgenic Alzheimer mouse Tg2576, there is increased processing of the APP to amyloid-β peptides. Simultaneously, there is spontaneous formation of anhydromannose-containing heparan sulfate by an unknown mechanism. We have explored the effect of hypoxia on anhydromannose-containing heparan sulfate formation in wild-type and Tg2576 fibroblasts by deconvolution immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry using an anhydromannose-specific monoclonal antibody and by (35)SO4-labeling experiments. Hypoxia prevented ascorbate-induced heparan sulfate release in wild-type fibroblasts, but induced an increased formation of anhydromannose-positive and (35)S-labeled heparan sulfate in Tg2576 fibroblasts. This appeared to be independent of glypican-1 S-nitrosylation as demonstrated by using a monoclonal antibody specific for S-nitrosylated glypican-1. In hypoxic wild-type fibroblasts, addition of nitrite to the medium restored anhydromannose-containing heparan sulfate formation. The increased release of anhydromannose-containing heparan sulfate in hypoxic Tg2576 fibroblasts did not require addition of nitrite. However, it was suppressed by inhibition of the nitrite reductase activity of xanthine oxidoreductase/aldehyde oxidase or by inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase or by chelation of iron. We propose that normoxic Tg2576 fibroblasts maintain a high level of anhydromannose-containing heparan sulfate production by a stress-activated generation of nitric oxide from endogenous nitrite. This activation is enhanced

  19. Impact of well intake systems on bacterial, algae, and organic carbon reduction in SWRO desalination systems, SAWACO, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    Dehwah, Abdullah

    2014-07-18

    The intake system can play a significant role in improving the feed water quality and ultimately influence the performance of downstream components of the seawater reverse osmosis desalination processes. In most cases, open-ocean intakes produce poor feed water quality in terms of the abundance of naturally occurring organic matter, which increases the risk of membrane fouling. An alternative intake is the subsurface system, which is based on the riverbank filtration concept that provides natural filtration and biological treatment of the feed water prior to the entry of the water into the desalination plant. The use of subsurface intakes normally improves the raw water quality by reducing suspended solids, algae, bacterial, and dissolved organic carbon concentrations. Therefore, the risk of biofouling caused by these substances can be reduced by implementing the appropriate type of intake system. The use of well intake systems was investigated along the Red Sea shoreline of Saudi Arabia in the Jeddah region. Data were collected from a seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) plant with a capacity of 10,000 m3/d. The well system produces feed water from an artificial-fill peninsula that was constructed atop of the seabed. Ten wells have been constructed on the peninsula for extracting raw seawater. Water samples were collected from nearby surface seawater as a reference and from selected individual wells. The percentage of algae and bacterial removal by induced filtration process was evaluated by comparison of the seawater concentrations with the well discharges. Transparent exopolymer particles and organic carbon fractions reduction was also measured. The quality of raw water extracted from the well systems was highly improved compared with the raw seawater source. It was observed that algae were virtually 100% removed and the bacterial concentration was significantly removed by the aquifer matrix. The detailed analysis of organic carbon fraction using liquid

  20. Bacterial Community Succession During in situ Uranium Bioremediation: Spatial Similarities Along Controlled Flow Paths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Chiachi; Wu, Weimin; Gentry, Terry J.; Carley, Jack; Corbin, Gail A.; Carroll, Sue L.; Watson, David B.; Jardine, Phil M.; Zhou, Jizhong; Criddle, Craig S.; Fields, Matthew W.

    2009-05-22

    Bacterial community succession was investigated in a field-scale subsurface reactor formed by a series of wells that received weekly ethanol additions to re-circulating groundwater. Ethanol additions stimulated denitrification, metal reduction, sulfate reduction, and U(VI) reduction to sparingly soluble U(IV). Clone libraries of SSU rRNA gene sequences from groundwater samples enabled tracking of spatial and temporal changes over a 1.5 y period. Analyses showed that the communities changed in a manner consistent with geochemical variations that occurred along temporal and spatial scales. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that the levels of nitrate, uranium, sulfide, sulfate, and ethanol strongly correlated with particular bacterial populations. As sulfate and U(VI) levels declined, sequences representative of sulfate-reducers and metal-reducers were detected at high levels. Ultimately, sequences associated with sulfate-reducing populations predominated, and sulfate levels declined as U(VI) remained at low levels. When engineering controls were compared to the population variation via canonical ordination, changes could be related to dissolved oxygen control and ethanol addition. The data also indicated that the indigenous populations responded differently to stimulation for bio-reduction; however, the two bio-stimulated communities became more similar after different transitions in an idiosyncratic manner. The strong associations between particular environmental variables and certain populations provide insight into the establishment of practical and successful remediation strategies in radionuclide-contaminated environments with respect to engineering controls and microbial ecology.

  1. Bacterial Community Succession During in situ Uranium Bioremediation: Spatial Similarities Along Controlled Flow Paths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacterial community succession was investigated in a field-scale subsurface reactor formed by a series of wells that received weekly ethanol additions to re-circulating groundwater. Ethanol additions stimulated denitrification, metal reduction, sulfate reduction, and U(VI) reduction to sparingly soluble U(IV). Clone libraries of SSU rRNA gene sequences from groundwater samples enabled tracking of spatial and temporal changes over a 1.5 y period. Analyses showed that the communities changed in a manner consistent with geochemical variations that occurred along temporal and spatial scales. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that the levels of nitrate, uranium, sulfide, sulfate, and ethanol strongly correlated with particular bacterial populations. As sulfate and U(VI) levels declined, sequences representative of sulfate-reducers and metal-reducers were detected at high levels. Ultimately, sequences associated with sulfate-reducing populations predominated, and sulfate levels declined as U(VI) remained at low levels. When engineering controls were compared to the population variation via canonical ordination, changes could be related to dissolved oxygen control and ethanol addition. The data also indicated that the indigenous populations responded differently to stimulation for bio-reduction; however, the two bio-stimulated communities became more similar after different transitions in an idiosyncratic manner. The strong associations between particular environmental variables and certain populations provide insight into the establishment of practical and successful remediation strategies in radionuclide-contaminated environments with respect to engineering controls and microbial ecology.

  2. Sulfur geochemistry and microbial sulfate reduction during low-temperature alteration of uplifted lower oceanic crust: Insights from ODP Hole 735B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Susan E.; Alt, Jeffrey C.; Shanks, Wayne C., III

    2011-01-01

    Sulfide petrography plus whole rock contents and isotope ratios of sulfur were measured in a 1.5 km section of oceanic gabbros in order to understand the geochemistry of sulfur cycling during low-temperature seawater alteration of the lower oceanic crust, and to test whether microbial effects may be present. Most samples have low SO4/ΣS values (≤ 0.15), have retained igneous globules of pyrrhotite ± chalcopyrite ± pentlandite, and host secondary aggregates of pyrrhotite and pyrite laths in smectite ± iron-oxyhydroxide ± magnetite ± calcite pseudomorphs of olivine and clinopyroxene. Compared to fresh gabbro containing 100–1800 ppm sulfur our data indicate an overall addition of sulfide to the lower crust. Selection of samples altered only at temperatures ≤ 110 °C constrains microbial sulfate reduction as the only viable mechanism for the observed sulfide addition, which may have been enabled by the production of H2 from oxidation of associated olivine and pyroxene. The wide range in δ34Ssulfide values (− 1.5 to + 16.3‰) and variable additions of sulfide are explained by variable εsulfate-sulfide under open system pathways, with a possible progression into closed system pathways. Some samples underwent oxidation related to seawater penetration along permeable fault horizons and have lost sulfur, have high SO4/ΣS (≥ 0.46) and variable δ34Ssulfide (0.7 to 16.9‰). Negative δ34Ssulfate–δ34Ssulfide values for the majority of samples indicate kinetic isotope fractionation during oxidation of sulfide minerals. Depth trends in sulfide–sulfur contents and sulfide mineral assemblages indicate a late-stage downward penetration of seawater into the lower 1 km of Hole 735B. Our results show that under appropriate temperature conditions, a subsurface biosphere can persist in the lower oceanic crust and alter its geochemistry.

  3. Microbial fuel cell based on electroactive sulfate-reducing biofilm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Regulation and management of electricity generation by variation of residence time. ► Design of microbial fuel cell based on electroactive biofilm on zeolite. ► Engineering solution for removing of the obtained elemental sulfur. - abstract: A two chambered laboratory scale microbial fuel cell (MFC) has been developed, based on natural sulfate-reducing bacterium consortium in electroactive biofilm on zeolite. The MFC utilizes potassium ferricyanide in the cathode chamber as an electron acceptor that derives electrons from the obtained in anode chamber H2S. The molecular oxygen is finally used as a terminal electron acceptor at cathode compartment. The generated power density was 0.68 W m−2 with current density of 3.2 A m−2 at 150 Ω electrode resistivity. The hydrogen sulfide itself is produced by microbial dissimilative sulfate reduction process by utilizing various organic substrates. Finally, elemental sulfur was identified as the predominant final oxidation product in the anode chamber. It was removed from MFC through medium circulation and gathering in an external tank. This report reveals dependence relationship between the progress of general electrochemical parameters and bacterial sulfate-reduction rate. The presented MFC design can be used for simultaneous sulfate purification of mining drainage wastewater and generation of renewable electricity

  4. Metabolic Flexibility of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Plugge, Caroline M.; Zhang, Weiwen; Scholten, Johannes C. M.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRB) are a very diverse group of anaerobic bacteria that are omnipresent in nature and play an imperative role in the global cycling of carbon and sulfur. In anoxic marine sediments sulfate reduction accounts for up to 50% of the entire organic mineralization in coastal and shelf ecosystems where sulfate diffuses several meters deep into the sediment. As a consequence, SRB would be expected in the sulfate-containing upper sediment layers, whereas me...

  5. Evaluation of a routine antiseptic and two disinfectants for reducing bacterial population of cow hoof

    OpenAIRE

    Moosa Javdani,; Seifollah Dehghani,; Ali Ghashghaii; Zahra Nikousefat

    2011-01-01

    A routine antiseptic and two disinfectant agents were used separately for reducing bacterial population of cow hoof: 1) 7.5% povidone–iodine scrub mixed with 10% povidone–iodine solution, 2) 10% copper sulfate, and 3) 8% formaldehyde. Swabbing for microbial colony counts were used to evaluate pre and post–scrub of hooves of eight cows. The results revealed no significant differences in reduction of bacterial colony count between post–scrubs of povidone–iodine and formaldehyde. B...

  6. Influence of sulfate-reducing bacteria on the corrosion of steel in seawater: laboratory and in situ study; Influence des bacteries sulfato-reductrices sur la corrosion d'acier en milieu marin: etude au laboratoire et en milieu marin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benbouzid-Rollet, N

    1993-07-01

    A fouling reactor was designed to study, the influence of a mixed bio-film on AISI 316 L stainless steel. The bio-film was formed on the steel surface by the fermentative bacterium Vibrio natriegens. The sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris was then introduced in the reactor and colonized the surface, constituting approximately 5 % of the total population. The settlement of an anaerobic bacterium in the bio-film shows in it the existence of anaerobic micro-niches. Stainless steel electrochemical behavior was analyzed using open circuit potential and potentiodynamic polarization curves. Growth of the bio-film does not induce corrosion, but seems to change the cathodic oxygen reduction kinetics, diminishing the corrosion hazard. This effect increases when D. vulgaris grows in the bio-film. An ennobling of the open circuit potential was observed, similar to field cases already described. A case of drilling corrosion of carbon steel in a harbour area showed the characteristics of anaerobic corrosion related to sulfate-reducing bacteria. The total cultivatable SRB population was quantified and metabolic types were enumerated using specific electron donors. A maximum cell density of 1,1 x 10{sup 8} cells/ cm{sup 2} was estimated, revealing a very important growth of SRB on surfaces. Population structure was different in corroded and non-corroded areas. In corroded area, SRB utilizing benzoate and propionate were more abundant. A strain belonging to the sporulating genus Desulfotomaculum was isolated using these substrates, suggesting a partial aeration in the area of hole appearance. However, in vitro corrosion assays showed that the bacterial population sampled in this area induced a consequent weight loss of steel coupons, in the absence of oxygen. This was observed only with a diversified population, similar to that present in situ. It could not be reproduced with a mixed culture of two purified strains. (author)

  7. Sulfate-reducing bacteria in anaerobic bioreactors.

    OpenAIRE

    Oude Elferink, S.J.W.H.

    1998-01-01

    The treatment of industrial wastewaters containing high amounts of easily degradable organic compounds in anaerobic bioreactors is a well-established process. Similarly, wastewaters which in addition to organic compounds also contain sulfate can be treated in this way. For a long time, the occurrence of sulfate reduction was considered to be undesired. However, there are some recent developments in which sulfate reduction is optimized for the removal of sulfur compounds from waste streams. In...

  8. Barium Sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... using x-rays or computed tomography (CAT scan, CT scan; a type of body scan that uses ... be clearly seen by x-ray examination or CT scan. ... more times before an x-ray examination or CT scan.If you are using a barium sulfate ...

  9. Use of poly(lactic acid) amendments to promote the bacterial fixation of metals in zinc smelter tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edenborn, H M

    2004-04-01

    The ability of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) to serve as a long-term source of lactic acid for bacterial sulfate reduction activity in zinc smelter tailings was investigated. Solid PLA polymers mixed in water hydrolyzed abiotically to release lactic acid into solution over an extended period of time. The addition of both PLA and gypsum was required for indigenous bacteria to lower redox potential, raise pH, and stimulate sulfate reduction activity in highly oxidized smelter tailings after one year of treatment. Bioavailable cadmium, copper, lead and zinc were all lowered significantly in PLA/gypsum treated soil, but PLA amendments alone increased the bioavailability of lead, nickel and zinc. Similar PLA amendments may be useful in constructed wetlands and reactive barrier walls for the passive treatment of mine drainage, where enhanced rates of bacterial sulfate reduction are desirable. PMID:14693443

  10. Isotopic analysis of N and O in nitrite and nitrate by sequential selective bacterial reduction to N2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhlke, J.K.; Smith, R.L.; Hannon, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Nitrite is an important intermediate species in the biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen, but its role in natural aquatic systems is poorly understood. Isotopic data can be used to study the sources and transformations of NO 2- in the environment, but methods for independent isotopic analyses of NO2- in the presence of other N species are still new and evolving. This study demonstrates that isotopic analyses of N and O in NO2- can be done by treating whole freshwater or saltwater samples with the denitrifying bacterium Stenotrophomonas nitritireducens, which selectively reduces NO2- to N 2O for isotope ratio mass spectrometry. When calibrated with solutions containing NO2- with known isotopic compositions determined independently, reproducible ??15N and ??18O values were obtained at both natural-abundance levels (??0.2-0.5??? for ??15N and ?? 0.4-1.0%o for ??18O) and moderately enriched 15N tracer levels (??20-50%o for ??15N near 5000???) for 5-20 nmol of NO2- (1-20 ??mol/L in 1-5 mL aliquots). This method is highly selective for NO2- and was used for mixed samples containing both NO2- and NO3- with little or no measurable cross-contamination. In addition, mixed samples that were analyzed with S. nitritireducens were treated subsequently with Pseudomonas aureofaciens to reduce the NO3- in the absence of NO 2-, providing isotopic analyses of NO2- and NO3- separately in the same aliquot. Sequential bacterial reduction methods like this one should be useful for a variety of isotopic studies aimed at understanding nitrogen cycling in aquatic environments. A test of these methods in an agricultural watershed in Indiana provides isotopic evidence for both nitrification and denitrification as sources of NO2- in a small stream.

  11. Thermophilic (55 - 65°C) and extreme thermophilic (70 - 80°C) sulfate reduction in methanol and formate-fed UASB reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vallero, M.V.G.; Camarero, E.; Lettinga, G.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of thermophilic (55-65 degreesC) and extreme thermophilic (70-80 degreesC) sulfate-reducing processes was investigated in three lab-scale upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors fed with either methanol or formate as the sole substrates and inoculated with mesophilic granular slu

  12. Sulfur isotopes as a tracer for biogenic sulfate reduction in natural environments: A link between modern and ancient ecosystems. Geologica Ultraiectina (316)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, M.C.

    2010-01-01

    Sulfur isotopes have been widely used to trace the activity of sulfate reducing prokaryotes in modern and ancient geochemical settings and to estimate the role of this microbial metabolism in global sulfur cycling. Extensive pure culture data provide detailed insight into cellular mechanisms involve

  13. Halomonas desiderata as a bacterial model to predict the possible biological nitrate reduction in concrete cells of nuclear waste disposals

    OpenAIRE

    Alquier, Marjorie; Kassim, Caroline; Bertron, Alexandra; Sablayrolles, Caroline; Rafrafi, Yan; Albrecht, Achim; Erable, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    After closure of a waste disposal cell in a repository for radioactive waste, resaturation is likely to cause the release of soluble species contained in cement and bituminous matrices, such as ionic species (nitrates, sulfates, calcium and alkaline ions, etc.), organic matter (mainly organic acids), or gases (from steel containers and reinforced concrete structures as well as from radiolysis within the waste packages). However, in the presence of nitrates in the near-field of waste, the wast...

  14. Monitoring sulfide and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    Simple yet precise and accurate methods for monitoring sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfide remain useful for the study of bacterial souring and corrosion. Test kits are available to measure sulfide in field samples. A more precise methylene blue sulfide assay for both field and laboratory studies is described here. Improved media, compared to that in API RP-38, for enumeration of SRB have been formulated. One of these, API-RST, contained cysteine (1.1 mM) as a reducing agent, which may be a confounding source of sulfide. While cysteine was required for rapid enumeration of SRB from environmental samples, the concentration of cysteine in medium could be reduced to 0.4 mM. It was also determined that elevated levels of yeast extract (>1 g/liter) could interfere with enumeration of SRB from environmental samples. The API-RST medium was modified to a RST-11 medium. Other changes in medium composition, in addition to reduction of cysteine, included reduction of the concentration of phosphate from 3.4 mM to 2.2 mM, reduction of the concentration of ferrous iron from 0.8 mM to 0.5 mM and preparation of a stock mineral solution to ease medium preparation. SRB from environmental samples could be enumerated in a week in this medium.

  15. Effect of heavy metals and phenol on bacterial decolourisation and COD reduction of sucrose-aspartic acid Maillard product

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sangeeta Yadav; Ram Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Melanodins are amino-carbonyl complex,predominantly present in sugarcane molasses based distillery wastewater as major source of colourant.The microbial decolourisation of melanoidin is a challenge due to its binding property with other co-pollutants of distillery waste.Results revealed that the presence of Zn2+ (2.00-20.00 mg/L) in melanoidin solution (1200 mg/L) stimulated the bacterial growth and sucrose-aspartic acid Maillard product (SAA) decolourisation as compared to control,while Fe3+ and Mn2+ at the same concentration inhibited the process.However,the presence of phenol (100 mg/L) along with Zn2+,Fe3+ and Mn2+ suppressed the bacterial growth,SAA decolourisation and MnP activity.The shrinkage and reduced number of bacterial cell count at higher concentration of heavy metals in presence of phenol was also observed under scanning electron microscope.

  16. Nitrogen and Phosphorus Removal from Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluent via Bacterial Sulfate Reduction in an Anoxic Bioreactor Packed with Wood and Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Yamashita

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the removal of nitrogen and phosphate from the effluent of a sewage treatment plant over a long-term operation in bioreactors packed with different combinations of wood and iron, with a trickling filter packed with foam ceramics for nitrification. The average nitrification rate in the trickling filter was 0.17 kg N/m3∙day and remained at 0.11 kg N/m3∙day even when the water temperature was below 15 °C. The denitrification and phosphate removal rates in the bioreactor packed with aspen wood and iron were higher than those in the bioreactor packed with cedar chips and iron. The bioreactor packed with aspen wood and iron continued to remove nitrate and phosphate for >1200 days of operation. The nitrate removal activity of a biofilm attached to the aspen wood from the bioreactor after 784 days of operation was 0.42 g NO3-N/kg dry weight wood∙ day. There was no increase in the amount of dissolved organic matter in the outflow from the bioreactors.

  17. Effect of 2 different premilking teat sanitation routines on reduction of bacterial counts on teat skin of cows on commercial dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumberger, C; Guarín, J F; Ruegg, P L

    2016-04-01

    Premilking teat sanitation reduces the load of bacteria on teat skin before milking and it is a fundamental practice used to ensure collection of high-quality milk. The objective of this study was to compare reduction in bacterial populations of teat skin after premilking preparation using either predipping with 0.5% iodine followed by drying (conventional; CONV) or using a semiautomated teat scrubber that uses chlorine dioxide (TS; FutureCow, Longwood, FL). Ten farms currently using a commercial teat scrubber system were enrolled. Cows (n=40 per farm) were assigned to CONV (n=198) or TS (n=196) premilking udder preparation. Teat skin swabs were collected before and after udder preparation and analyzed for total bacterial count (TBC), Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and gram-negative bacteria (GNB). Reduction (RED) of each bacterial group was defined as the difference in the number of bacteria measured before and after udder preparation. Before udder preparation, Staphylococcus spp. (15,036 cfu/mL) and Streptococcus spp. (12,621 cfu/mL) were the most numerous microflora. Gram-negative bacteria were less numerous (1,538 cfu/mL). A significant treatment by farm interaction was identified for RED of all bacterial counts. Compared with teats prepared using TS, teats prepared using CONV preparation had greater RED of TBC on 3 farms, of Streptococcus spp. on 2 farms, and of Staphylococcus spp. on 1 farm. On all other farms, RED in TBC, Streptococcus spp., and Staphylococcus spp. did not differ based on teat preparation method. Use of TS resulted in greater RED of GNB of teats on 3 farms, but RED in GNB was greater for teats cleaned by CONV on 1 farm; for the other 6 farms, RED of GNB did not differ between methods. For all bacterial counts, an effect of chlorine dioxide concentration used in the teat scrubber was observed. Results from this study suggest both CONV and TS can effectively reduce bacterial counts, but farm conditions and management practices can

  18. Reduction in diversity of the colonic mucosa associated bacterial microflora in patients with active inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ott, S.J.; Musfeldt, M; Wenderoth, D F; Hampe, J; Brant, O; Fölsch, U R; Timmis, K N; Schreiber, S

    2004-01-01

    Background and aims: The intestinal bacterial microflora plays an important role in the aetiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). As most of the colonic bacteria cannot be identified by culture techniques, genomic technology can be used for analysis of the composition of the microflora.

  19. Reduction of bacterial growth by a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus in the rhizosphere of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H.; Jakobsen, I.

    1993-01-01

    incorporation of [H-3]-thymidine was around one order of magnitude lower compared to other rhizosphere measurements, probably because pseudomonads that did not incorporate [H-3]-thymidine dominated the bacterial population. The VAM probably decreased the amount of plant root-derived organic matter available for...

  20. Characterization of specific membrane fatty acids as chemotaxonomic markers for sulfate-reducing bacteria involved in anaerobic oxidation of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elvert, M.; Boetius, A.; Knittel, K.; Jørgensen, BB

    2003-01-01

    Membrane fatty acids were extracted from a sediment core above marine gas hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, NE Pacific. Anaerobic sediments from this environment are characterized by high sulfate reduction rates driven by the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). The assimilation of methane carbon into...... bacterial biomass is indicated by carbon isotope values of specific fatty acids as low as -103parts per thousand. Specific fatty acids released from bacterial membranes include C(16:1omega5c) , C(17:1omega6c) , and cyC(17:0omega5,6) , all of which have been fully characterized by mass spectrometry. These...

  1. IN SITU CHEMICAL REDUCTION OF CR(VI) IN GROUNDWATER USING A COMBINATION OF FERROUS SULFATE AND SODIUM DITHIONITE: A FIELD INVESTIGATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    A field pilot test was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a FeSO4 + Na2S2O4 reductant solution blend for in situ saturated zone treatment of dissolved-phase Cr(VI) at the former Macalloy Corporation site in Charleston, SC. The reductant blend was injected into the path o...

  2. Mercuric ion reduction and resistance in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants expressing a modified bacterial merA gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Rugh, C L; Wilde, H D; Stack, N M; Thompson, D. M.; Summers, A O; Meagher, R B

    1996-01-01

    With global heavy metal contamination increasing, plants that can process heavy metals might provide efficient and ecologically sound approaches to sequestration and removal. Mercuric ion reductase, MerA, converts toxic Hg2+ to the less toxic, relatively inert metallic mercury (Hg0) The bacterial merA sequence is rich in CpG dinucleotides and has a highly skewed codon usage, both of which are particularly unfavorable to efficient expression in plants. We constructed a mutagenized merA sequenc...

  3. Effect of promoters including WO3 and BaO on the activity and durability of V2O5/sulfated TiO2 catalyst for NO reduction by NH3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of tungsten and barium oxides on the activity and durability of V2O5/TiO2 catalyst for NO reduction by NH3 was examined. Tungsten enhanced the NO removal activity of V2O5 catalyst supported on sulfur-free TiO2, while no effect of tungsten was observed for the V2O5 catalyst supported on sulfated TiO2. The tungsten oxide promotes the formation of polymeric vanadate that is a strong active reaction site for NO reduction by NH3. When both tungsten and sulfur simultaneously exist on the surface of V2O5/TiO2, the sulfur species seems to play a more important role for NO removal activity than tungsten. The tungsten oxide on the V2O5/TiO2 catalyst also enhances the activity for SO2 oxidation by promoting the adsorption of SO2, regardless of the presence of sulfur species on the catalyst surface. The NO removal activity of V2O5 catalyst supported on sulfur-free TiO2 has been significantly reduced by barium oxide, mainly due to the formation of inactive V-O-Ba compound through the strong interaction of vanadia with barium oxide. No change of NO removal activity over V2O5-BaO/sulfated TiO2, however, was examined by the addition of barium oxide, since the structure of vanadium oxide was not altered on the surface of the sulfated TiO2. The SO2 oxidation reaction over V2O5-BaO/TiO2 catalysts was significantly suppressed by the addition of barium oxide to the catalyst. The barium oxide seems to reduce the redox ability of vanadium oxide on the catalyst surface as well as the adsorption capacity of SO2. Based on the temperature programmed reduction (TPR), Raman and XPS observations, the surface structure of vanadium and its interaction with tungsten and barium oxides has been illustrated when sulfur exists on the surface of TiO2

  4. Complete reduction of highly concentrated contaminants in piggery waste by a novel process scheme with an algal-bacterial symbiotic photobioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Shin; Han, Gee-Bong

    2016-07-15

    The complete reduction of highly concentrated contaminants in piggery waste was achieved with an innovative process scheme consecutively combining autothermal thermophilic aerobic digestion (ATAD), an expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) and a microalgal-bacterial symbiotic vertical photobioreactor (VPBR), followed by biomass recycling for effluent polishing. Contaminants in piggery waste, such as high organic and inorganic matter, total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP) contents, were successfully reduced in the newly implemented system. The concentrations of volatile solids (VS) and the chemical oxygen demand (COD) for organic matter in the feed were reduced by approximately 99.3% and 99.7%, respectively, in the innovative system. The overall reduction efficiencies in TN, ammoniacal nitrogen, and TP were 98.8, 98.4, and 93.5%, respectively, through ammonia gas emission, coagulated sludge disposal, and the algal-bacterial symbiotic polishing process. Fecal coliform density was decreased to <1.7 × 10(4) CFU g(-1) total solids. Biogas and CH4 in the EGSB were generated in the range of 0.36-0.79 and 0.18-0.44 L g(-1) [VS removed], respectively, and contained 245 ± 19 ppm (v/v) [H2S]. PMID:27100332

  5. Effect of gamma radiation on shellstock oysters. Extension of shelf-life and reduction in bacterial numbers, with particular reference to Vibrio vulnificus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shellstock oysters from Apalachicola Bay, Florida, United States of America, were irradiated at the nation's first commercial food irradiator, Vindicator, Inc. in Mulberry, Florida, with four doses, and analysed for their shelf-life and bacterial levels. A 2-3 log cycle reduction in bacterial numbers was observed at all the doses immediately after irradiation. The shelf-life was limited in that the D50 values were found to be 30, 25, 7 and 6 days at 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 kGy, respectively. The D20 values were calculated as 17, 9, 4 and 4 days at 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 kGy, respectively. Even though the bacterial numbers were significantly lower in the irradiated oysters, the shelf-life was reduced markedly at doses higher than 1 kGy. The irradiated shellstock did not demonstrate any extension in shelf-life, above that of the non-irradiated controls; in fact, they experienced a reduction in shelf-life and there was a growing back of the surviving organisms, which reached levels that were higher than those observed in the controls. Vibrio vulnificus demonstrated high radiosensitivity, with D10 values of 0.062 and 0.037 kGy for the virulent and avirulent forms, respectively. Preliminary data indicate that the viable but non-culturable form of V. vulnificus is more radioresistant than the corresponding viable and culturable forms, but this needs further elucidation. Also, current research is directed at analysing the effects of the shell to meat ratio of the oysters, and how this affects their radioresistance. Furthermore, oysters from different locations have different shell to meat weight ratios, and this can influence the efficiency of radiation treatment. (author)

  6. Extraction of up to 95% of wheat (Triticum aestivum) flour protein using warm sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) without reduction or sonication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuPont, Frances M; Samoil, Vitalie; Chan, Ronald

    2008-08-27

    Extraction of glutenin polymers without sonication is an essential prerequisite for accurate determination of their composition and molecular size distribution. Sequential fractionation of wheat flour with 0.1 M KCl and 0.25% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at 21 degrees C and 2% SDS at 60 degrees C extracted up to 95% of total protein. We propose that 2% SDS at 60 degrees C disrupts hydrogen bonds in glutenin and gliadin aggregates, reduces hydrophobic interactions, and facilitates solubilization. Analysis by size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography (SE-HPLC), reverse-phase (RP)-HPLC, and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) revealed that partitioning of gliadins and glutenins among the extracts differed for two flours with good baking quality (Butte 86 and Jagger) and one with poor baking quality (Chinese Spring). More gliadin was associated with the 0.25% SDS extract for Chinese Spring, whereas more gliadin was associated with the 2% SDS extract for Butte 86 and Jagger. Unextractable glutenin polymer was only 4-5% of total protein for Butte 86 and Chinese Spring and 14% for Jagger. PMID:18616274

  7. Thermophilic Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in Cold Marine Sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ISAKSEN, MF; BAK, F.; JØRGENSEN, BB

    1994-01-01

    P60, were isolated and characterized as Desulfotomaculum kuznetsovii. The temperature response of growth and respiration of strain P60 agreed well with the measured sulfate reduction at 50 degrees-70 degrees C. Bacteria similar to strain P60 could thus be responsible for the measured thermophilic...... C to search for presence of psychrophilic, mesophilic and thermophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria. Detectable activity was initially only in the mesophilic range, but after a lag phase sulfate reduction by thermophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria were observed. No distinct activity of psychrophilic...... sulfate-reducing bacteria was detected. Time course experiments showed constant sulfate reduction rates at 4 degrees C and 30 degrees C, whereas the activity at 60 degrees C increased exponentially after a lag period of one day. Thermophilic, endospore-forming sulfate-reducing bacteria, designated strain...

  8. Determination of plutonium in nitric acid solutions - Method by oxidation by cerium(IV), reduction by iron(II) ammonium sulfate and amperometric back-titration with potassium dichromate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This International Standard specifies a precise and accurate analytical method for determining plutonium in nitric acid solutions. Plutonium is oxidized to plutonium(VI) in a 1 mol/l nitric acid solution with cerium(IV). Addition of sulfamic acid prevents nitrite-induced side reactions. The excess of cerium(IV) is reduced by adding a sodium arsenite solution, catalysed by osmium tetroxide. A slight excess of arsenite is oxidized by adding a 0.2 mol/l potassium permanganate solution. The excess of permanganate is reduced by adding a 0.1 mol/l oxalic acid solution. Iron(III) is used to catalyse the reduction. A small excess of oxalic acid does not interfere in the subsequent plutonium determination. These reduction and oxidation stages can be followed amperometrically and the plutonium is left in the hexavalent state. The sulfuric acid followed by a measured amount of standardized iron(II) ammonium sulfate solution in excess of that required to reduce the plutonium(VI) to plutonium(IV) is added. The excess iron(II) and any plutonium(III) formed to produce iron(III) and plutonium(IV) is amperometrically back-titrated using a standard potassium dichromate solution. The method is almost specifically for plutonium. It is suitable for the direct determination of plutonium in materials ranging from pure product solutions, to fast reactor fuel solutions with a uranium/plutonium ratio of up to 10:1, either before or after irradiation

  9. Pathways of sulfate and hydrogen sulfide transformations in a BTEX- contaminated groundwater system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einsiedl, Florian; Anneser, B.; Griebler, C.

    2010-01-01

    The gradually increasing anthropogenic impact on the environment over the last 60 years has altered the groundwater quality in many areas around the world. Groundwater represents the main drinking water resource in nearly all European countries. Therefore, the task of ensuring good status of...... intermediate during abiotic oxidation of hydrogen sulphide, with the latter formed during bacterial sulfate reduction. The formed elemental sulfur may be used by the specific microbial community found in this aquifer for the oxidation of organic contaminants such as toluene. In contrast, reoxidation of...

  10. Evaluation of sulfate reduction at experimentally induced mixing interfaces using small-scale push-pull tests in an aquifer-wetland system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneeshaw, T.A.; McGuire, J.T.; Smith, E.W.; Cozzarelli, I.M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents small-scale push-pull tests designed to evaluate the kinetic controls on SO42 - reduction in situ at mixing interfaces between a wetland and aquifer impacted by landfill leachate at the Norman Landfill research site, Norman, OK. Quantifying the rates of redox reactions initiated at interfaces is of great interest because interfaces have been shown to be zones of increased biogeochemical transformations and thus may play an important role in natural attenuation. To mimic the aquifer-wetland interface and evaluate reaction rates, SO42 --rich anaerobic aquifer water (??? 100 mg / L SO42 -) was introduced into SO42 --depleted wetland porewater via push-pull tests. Results showed SO42 - reduction was stimulated by the mixing of these waters and first-order rate coefficients were comparable to those measured in other push-pull studies. However, rate data were complex involving either multiple first-order rate coefficients or a more complex rate order. In addition, a lag phase was observed prior to SO42 - reduction that persisted until the mixing interface between test solution and native water was recovered, irrespective of temporal and spatial constraints. The lag phase was not eliminated by the addition of electron donor (acetate) to the injected test solution. Subsequent push-pull tests designed to elucidate the nature of the lag phase support the importance of the mixing interface in controlling terminal electron accepting processes. These data suggest redox reactions may occur rapidly at the mixing interface between injected and native waters but not in the injected bulk water mass. Under these circumstances, push-pull test data should be evaluated to ensure the apparent rate is actually a function of time and that complexities in rate data be considered. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Single-Cell Imaging and Spectroscopic Analyses of Cr(VI) Reduction on the Surface of Bacterial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yuanmin; Sevinc, Papatya C.; Balchik, Sara M.; Fridrickson, Jim; Shi, Liang; Lu, H. Peter

    2013-01-01

    We investigate single-cell reduction of toxic Cr(VI) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1), an important bioremediation process, using Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Our experiments indicate that the toxic and highly soluble Cr(VI) can be efficiently reduced to the less toxic and non-soluble Cr2O3 nanoparticles by MR-1. Cr2O3 is observed to emerge as nanoparticles ads...

  12. Sulfate reducing bacteria and their activities in oil sands process-affected water biofilm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biofilm reactors were constructed to grow stratified multispecies biofilm in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) supplemented with growth medium. The development of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) within the biofilm and the biofilm treatment of OSPW were evaluated. The community structure and potential activity of SRB in the biofilm were investigated with H2S microsensor measurements, dsrB gene-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), and the real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Multispecies biofilm with a thickness of 1000 μm was successfully developed on engineered biocarriers. H2S production was observed in the deeper anoxic zone of the biofilm from around 750 μm to 1000 μm below the bulk water-biofilm interface, revealing sulfate reduction in the deeper zone of the stratified biofilm. The biofilm removed chemical oxygen demand (COD), sulfate, and nitrogen. The study expands current knowledge of biofilm treatment of OSPW and the function of anaerobic SRB in OSPW biofilm, and thus provides information for future bioreactor development in the reclamation of OSPW. - Graphical abstract: The development of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) within Oil Sands Process-affected Water (OSPW) biofilm and the biofilm treatment of OSPW were evaluated by Liu and coworkers. Combined microsensor and molecular biology techniques were utilized in this study. Their results demonstrated that multispecies biofilm with a thickness of 1000 μm was successfully developed on engineered biocarriers. H2S production was observed in the deeper anoxic zone of the biofilm from around 750 μm to 1000 μm below the bulk water-biofilm interface, revealing sulfate reduction in the deeper zone of the biofilm. The biofilm removed chemical oxygen demand (COD), sulfate, and nitrogen. - Highlights: • Biofilm in oil sands wastewater was developed on engineered biocarriers. • Bacterial community and in situ activity of SRB were studied in the biofilm. • Sulfate

  13. Sulfate reducing bacteria and their activities in oil sands process-affected water biofilm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hong; Yu, Tong, E-mail: tong.yu@ualberta.ca; Liu, Yang, E-mail: yang.liu@ualberta.ca

    2015-12-01

    Biofilm reactors were constructed to grow stratified multispecies biofilm in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) supplemented with growth medium. The development of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) within the biofilm and the biofilm treatment of OSPW were evaluated. The community structure and potential activity of SRB in the biofilm were investigated with H{sub 2}S microsensor measurements, dsrB gene-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), and the real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Multispecies biofilm with a thickness of 1000 μm was successfully developed on engineered biocarriers. H{sub 2}S production was observed in the deeper anoxic zone of the biofilm from around 750 μm to 1000 μm below the bulk water-biofilm interface, revealing sulfate reduction in the deeper zone of the stratified biofilm. The biofilm removed chemical oxygen demand (COD), sulfate, and nitrogen. The study expands current knowledge of biofilm treatment of OSPW and the function of anaerobic SRB in OSPW biofilm, and thus provides information for future bioreactor development in the reclamation of OSPW. - Graphical abstract: The development of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) within Oil Sands Process-affected Water (OSPW) biofilm and the biofilm treatment of OSPW were evaluated by Liu and coworkers. Combined microsensor and molecular biology techniques were utilized in this study. Their results demonstrated that multispecies biofilm with a thickness of 1000 μm was successfully developed on engineered biocarriers. H{sub 2}S production was observed in the deeper anoxic zone of the biofilm from around 750 μm to 1000 μm below the bulk water-biofilm interface, revealing sulfate reduction in the deeper zone of the biofilm. The biofilm removed chemical oxygen demand (COD), sulfate, and nitrogen. - Highlights: • Biofilm in oil sands wastewater was developed on engineered biocarriers. • Bacterial community and in situ activity of SRB were studied in the

  14. Metabolic Flexibility of Sulfate Reducing Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline M. Plugge

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Dissimilatory sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRB are a very diverse group of anaerobic bacteria that are omnipresent in nature and play an imperative role in the global cycling of carbon and sulfur. In anoxic marine sediments sulfate reduction accounts for up to 50% of the entire organic mineralization in coastal and shelf ecosystems where sulfate diffuses several meters deep into the sediment. As a consequence, SRB would be expected in the sulfate-containing upper sediment layers, whereas methanogenic Archaea would be expected to succeed in the deeper sulfate-depleted layers of the sediment. Where sediments are high in organic matter, sulfate is depleted at shallow sediment depths, and biogenic methane production will occur. In the absence of sulfate, many SRB ferment organic acids and alcohols, producing hydrogen, acetate, and carbon dioxide, and may even rely on hydrogen- and acetate-scavenging methanogens to convert organic compounds to methane. SRB can establish two different life styles, and these can be termed as sulfidogenic and acetogenic, hydrogenogenic metabolism. The advantage of having different metabolic capabilities is that it raises the chance of survival in environments when electron acceptors become depleted. In marine sediments, SRB and methanogens do not compete but rather complement each other in the degradation of organic matter.Also in freshwater ecosystems with sulfate concentrations of only 10-200 μM, sulfate is consumed efficiently within the top several cm of the sediments. Here, many of the δ-Proteobacteria present have the genetic machinery to perform dissimilatory sulfate reduction, yet they have an acetogenic, hydrogenogenic way of life.In this review we evaluate the physiology and metabolic mode of SRB in relation with their environment.

  15. Nano-sized Minerals of Elemental Selenium and Tellurium Formed by Bacterial Dissimilatory Reduction of Se- and Te-Oxyanions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R. S.

    2007-12-01

    Selenium and tellurium are both Group 16 elements that have curious opto-electrical properties making them of potential interest for photovoltaic applications. The process of dissimilatory reduction of selenate and selenite by 3 diverse species of anaerobes, Bacillus selenitireducens, Sulfurospirillum barnesii, and Selenihalanaerobacter shriftii resulted in the accumulation of many uniformly-sized nanospheres (diameter = approx. 300 nm) that aggregated on the outside of their cell envelopes (Oremland et al., 2004). Despite their uniformity of shape, purified Se-nanospheres from the 3 different species displayed significantly different spectral properties (UV- visible light and Raman) indicating differing internal arrangements of their Se atoms. Se-nanospheres from all 3 species also had lower bandgap energies than that of elemental selenium formed by chemical means. We subsequently determined that S. barnesii and B. selenitireducens could grow by dissimilatory reduction of Te- oxyanions, although progress was hampered by the fact that Te concentrations above 0.6 mM proved toxic to cells (Baesman et al., 2007). Unlike the case for Se-nanospheres, the Te-nanoparticles formed by the two microbes were entirely different. S. barnesii formed small, irregularly shaped spheroids (smaller than 50 nm diameter) that coalesced into larger aggregates. In contrast, B. selenitreducens formed nano-rods (10 nm diameter x 200 nm length) that coalesced into larger shards which formed even larger rosette-shaped aggregates once they sloughed off the cells. Spectroscopy of purified Te-rosettes indicated an internal trigonally-shaped array of Te atoms. Future research on Te(0) nano-materials formed by anaerobic bacteria would be aided by isolation of novel species adapted to growth at high batch culture concentrations of Te-oxyanions (approx. 10 mM). Furthermore, the ability of microbes like B. selenitreducens to form selenide by reduction of Se(0) suggests an application in the

  16. Bacterial sulphate reduction and mixing processes at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory indicated by groundwater δ34S isotope signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report includes data mostly obtained from δ34S isotope measurements of groundwater at the Aespoe Island and one sampling from the Laxemar site, southeastern Sweden, during tunnel construction. Early sampling at Aespoe (up to 1992), before tunnel excavation, indicates a groundwater system with multiple sulphur sources. The isotope changes over time in the dissolved sulphate were studied during a sampling campaign in the monitoring phase from 1993 to 1995. A total of 88 samples were collected by SKB between 1992 and 1995 from core-drilled surface boreholes and from boreholes drilled in the tunnel (34 of these samples were collected from the tunnel boreholes). The results of the analyses have been the focus of discussion of the isotope changes with time in the dissolved sulphate (SO42-). The results indicate that the sulphur isotope signatures in the dissolved sulphate of the groundwater and those from fracture-filling sulphides at Aespoe originate from multiple sulphur sources in the groundwater at Aespoe and Laxemar. The data may be grouped as follows: a) typically homogeneous marine signatures of dissolved SO42- are observed, with δ34S values of approximately +21 per mille CDT at intermediate depths of approximately 100-250 m; b) dissolved sulphate in the groundwater at greater depths (below 600 m) with average values of approximately +10 per mille CDT; and c) a dissolved SO42- originating from a mixture of these sulphur sources (100-600m), although there is a difference between a mixture and modification by reduction. Reduced sulphur with low δ34S values is also recorded in fracture-filling sulphides, with δ34S values of approximately 0 to -10 per mille CDT. This may contribute to small changes in the isotope signature of the dissolved SO42-, probably by sulphide oxidation in the past. The changes in the δ34S isotope data for dissolved SO42- over the 1992-1996 period suggest a complex situation, indicating both sulphate reduction by sulphate

  17. Extreme fractionation and micro-scale variation of sulphur isotopes during bacterial sulphate reduction in deep groundwater systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Henrik; Tullborg, Eva-Lena; Whitehouse, Martin; Sandberg, Bertil; Blomfeldt, Thomas; Åström, Mats E.

    2015-07-01

    This study conducted at the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory, SE Sweden, determines the extent and mechanisms of sulphur-isotope fractionation in permanently reducing groundwater in fractured crystalline rock. Two boreholes >400 m below the ground surface were investigated. In the 17-year-old boreholes, the Al instrumentation pipes had corroded locally (i.e., Al-[oxy]hydroxides had formed) and minerals (i.e., pyrite, iron monosulphide, and calcite) had precipitated on various parts on the equipment. By chemically and isotopically comparing the precipitates on the withdrawn instrumentation and the borehole waters, we gained new insight into the dynamics of sulphate reduction, sulphide precipitation, and sulphur-isotope fractionation in deep-seated crystalline-rock settings. An astonishing feature of the pyrite is its huge variability in δ34S, which can exceed 100‰ in total (i.e., -47.2 to +53.3‰) and 60‰ over 50 μm of growth in a single crystal. The values at the low end of the range are up to 71‰ lower than measured in the dissolved sulphate in the water (20-30‰), which is larger than the maximum difference reported between sulphate and sulphide in pure-culture experiments (66‰) but within the range reported from natural sedimentary settings. Although single-step reduction seems likely, further studies are needed to rule out the effects of possible S disproportionation. The values at the high end of the range (i.e., high δ34Spy) are much higher than could be produced from the measured sulphate under any biogeochemical conditions. This strongly suggests the development of closed-system conditions near the growing pyrite, i.e., the rate of sulphate reduction exceeds the rate of sulphate diffusion in the local fluid near the pyrite, causing the local aqueous phase (and thus the forming pyrite) to become successively enriched in heavy S (34S). Consequently, the δ34S values of the forming pyrite become exceptionally high and strongly decoupled from the δ34S

  18. Farklı Hidrolik Bekletme Sürelerinin Anaerobik Perdeli Reaktörde Sülfat İndirgenmesi Üzerine Etkisi / Effect of Different Hydraulic Retention Time (HRT on Sulfate Reduction in Anaerobic Baffled Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şebnem ÖZDEMİR

    2012-12-01

    üresinin 2 gün olduğu çalışma koşullarında çıkış suyundaki KOİ ve SO4-2 verimleri %84 ile %88 olarak gözlemlenirken bekleme süresinin 0,5 gün olduğu çalışma koşullarında ise bu değer %80 ve %75 olarak gözlemlenmiştir. Ayrıca bekleme süresinin 2 gün olduğu çalışma koşullarında son bölmedeki sülfür oluşum verimi % 75 iken, bekleme süresi 0,5 güne indirildiğinde aynı bölmedeki sülfür oluşum veriminin %96’a çıktığı gözlemlenmiştir. Çıkarımlar ve Özgün Değer: Yapılan bu çalışma ile yüksek sülfat konsantrasyona sahip atıksuların arıtımında anaerobik perdeli reaktörün iyi bir alternatif olabileceği kanıtlanmıştır. Ayrıca çıkış sülfat ve sülfür konsantrasyonlarının değişen HBS’den etkilenmediği gözlenmiştir. Effect of Different Hydraulic Retention Time (HRT on Sulfate Reduction in Anaerobic Baffled Reactor Design and Method: The anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR is a modification of up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB reactor. A laboratory scale ABR was inoculated with an effluent of a full scale anaerobic digester located in Kayseri Wastewater Treatment Plant, Turkey. Before inoculation, the sludge was sieved to remove coarse materials. The ABR was 20 cm wide, 80 cm long, 20 cm deep and constructed from glass, with a working volume of 19 L. Reactor was divided into four equal 4.75 L compartments by vertical baffles, each compartment having down-comer and riser regions created by further vertical baffle. The lower parts of down-comer baffles were angled at 450 in order to direct the flow evenly through the riser. Ethanol and sulfate are consumed as electron donor and electron acceptor, respectively. Sulfate, dissolved sulfide, pH, alkalinity and chemical oxygen demand (COD have measured three times a week. Aim: There are varying structures and concentrations of sulfate compounds in natural waters. In addition, the amount of sulfate is higher in some industrial wastewaters In addition, some

  19. Bacterial sulphate reduction and mixing processes at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory indicated by groundwater delta34S isotope signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallin, Bill (Geokema AB (Sweden))

    2011-04-15

    This report includes data mostly obtained from delta34S isotope measurements of groundwater at the Aespoe Island and one sampling from the Laxemar site, southeastern Sweden, during tunnel construction. Early sampling at Aespoe (up to 1992), before tunnel excavation, indicates a groundwater system with multiple sulphur sources. The isotope changes over time in the dissolved sulphate were studied during a sampling campaign in the monitoring phase from 1993 to 1995. A total of 88 samples were collected by SKB between 1992 and 1995 from core-drilled surface boreholes and from boreholes drilled in the tunnel (34 of these samples were collected from the tunnel boreholes). The results of the analyses have been the focus of discussion of the isotope changes with time in the dissolved sulphate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}). The results indicate that the sulphur isotope signatures in the dissolved sulphate of the groundwater and those from fracture-filling sulphides at Aespoe originate from multiple sulphur sources in the groundwater at Aespoe and Laxemar. The data may be grouped as follows: a) typically homogeneous marine signatures of dissolved SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} are observed, with delta34S values of approximately +21 per mille CDT at intermediate depths of approximately 100-250 m; b) dissolved sulphate in the groundwater at greater depths (below 600 m) with average values of approximately +10 per mille CDT; and c) a dissolved SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} originating from a mixture of these sulphur sources (100-600m), although there is a difference between a mixture and modification by reduction. Reduced sulphur with low delta34S values is also recorded in fracture-filling sulphides, with delta34S values of approximately 0 to -10 per mille CDT. This may contribute to small changes in the isotope signature of the dissolved SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, probably by sulphide oxidation in the past. The changes in the delta34S isotope data for dissolved SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} over the 1992-1996 period suggest a

  20. Acidic Electrolyzed Water as a Novel Transmitting Medium for High Hydrostatic Pressure Reduction of Bacterial Loads on Shelled Fresh Shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Suping; Zhang, Zhaohuan; Xiao, Lili; Lou, Yang; Pan, Yingjie; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Acidic electrolyzed water (AEW), a novel non-thermal sterilization technology, is widely used in the food industry. In this study, we firstly investigated the effect of AEW as a new pressure transmitting medium for high hydrostatic pressure (AEW-HHP) processing on microorganisms inactivation on shelled fresh shrimp. The optimal conditions of AEW-HHP for Vibrio parahaemolyticus inactivation on sterile shelled fresh shrimp were obtained using response surface methodology: NaCl concentration to electrolysis 1.5 g/L, treatment pressure 400 MPa, treatment time 10 min. Under the optimal conditions mentioned above, AEW dramatically enhanced the efficiency of HHP for inactivating V. parahaemolyticus and Listeria monocytogenes on artificially contaminated shelled fresh shrimp, and the log reductions were up to 6.08 and 5.71 log10 CFU/g respectively, while the common HHP could only inactivate the two pathogens up to 4.74 and 4.31 log10 CFU/g respectively. Meanwhile, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed the same phenomenon. For the naturally contaminated shelled fresh shrimp, AEW-HHP could also significantly reduce the micro flora when examined using plate count and PCR-DGGE. There were also no significant changes, histologically, in the muscle tissues of shrimps undergoing the AEW-HHP treatment. In summary, using AEW as a new transmitting medium for HHP processing is an innovative non thermal technology for improving the food safety of shrimp and other aquatic products. PMID:27014228

  1. Sulfated glycans in inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2015-03-01

    Sulfated glycans such as glycosaminoglycans on proteoglycans are key players in both molecular and cellular events of inflammation. They participate in leukocyte rolling along the endothelial surface of inflamed sites; chemokine regulation and its consequential functions in leukocyte guidance, migration and activation; leukocyte transendothelial migration; and structural assembly of the subendothelial basement membrane responsible to control tissue entry of cells. Due to these and other functions, exogenous sulfated glycans of various structures and origins can be used to interventionally down-regulate inflammation processes. In this review article, discussion is given primarily on the anti-inflammatory functions of mammalian heparins, heparan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate and related compounds as well as the holothurian fucosylated chondroitin sulfate and the brown algal fucoidans. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of action of these sulfated glycans in inflammation, helps research programs involved in developing new carbohydrate-based drugs aimed to combat acute and chronic inflammatory disorders. PMID:25576741

  2. Biochemistry, physiology and biotechnology of sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Larry L; Fauque, Guy D

    2009-01-01

    Chemolithotrophic bacteria that use sulfate as terminal electron acceptor (sulfate-reducing bacteria) constitute a unique physiological group of microorganisms that couple anaerobic electron transport to ATP synthesis. These bacteria (220 species of 60 genera) can use a large variety of compounds as electron donors and to mediate electron flow they have a vast array of proteins with redox active metal groups. This chapter deals with the distribution in the environment and the major physiological and metabolic characteristics of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). This chapter presents our current knowledge of soluble electron transfer proteins and transmembrane redox complexes that are playing an essential role in the dissimilatory sulfate reduction pathway of SRB of the genus Desulfovibrio. Environmentally important activities displayed by SRB are a consequence of the unique electron transport components or the production of high levels of H(2)S. The capability of SRB to utilize hydrocarbons in pure cultures and consortia has resulted in using these bacteria for bioremediation of BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene) compounds in contaminated soils. Specific strains of SRB are capable of reducing 3-chlorobenzoate, chloroethenes, or nitroaromatic compounds and this has resulted in proposals to use SRB for bioremediation of environments containing trinitrotoluene and polychloroethenes. Since SRB have displayed dissimilatory reduction of U(VI) and Cr(VI), several biotechnology procedures have been proposed for using SRB in bioremediation of toxic metals. Additional non-specific metal reductase activity has resulted in using SRB for recovery of precious metals (e.g. platinum, palladium and gold) from waste streams. Since bacterially produced sulfide contributes to the souring of oil fields, corrosion of concrete, and discoloration of stonework is a serious problem, there is considerable interest in controlling the sulfidogenic activity of the SRB. The

  3. Bacterial gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infectious diarrhea - bacterial gastroenteritis; Acute gastroenteritis; Gastroenteritis - bacterial ... Bacterial gastroenteritis can affect 1 person or a group of people who all ate the same food. It is ...

  4. Bacterial Reduction of Toxic Cr(Ⅵ)into Cr(Ⅲ)%利用细菌还原有毒Cr(Ⅵ)为Cr(Ⅲ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammad Faisal; Shahida Hasnain

    2004-01-01

    Two chromium-resistant bacterial strains CrT-1 and CrT-13,which can tolerate K2 CrO4 up to 40 mg·mL-1 on nutrient agar,25 mg·mL-1 K2 CrO4 in nutrient broth,and up to 10 mg·mL-1 in acetate-minimal media,were used in this study.On the basis of 16S rRNA,strain CrT-1 was identified as Ochrobactrum intermedium and CrT-13 as Brevibacterium sp..Uptake of chromate was greater in living cells than in heat-killed cells.Ochrobactrum intermedium CrT-1 reduced 73% and 41% of Cr(Ⅵ)while Brevibacterium CrT-13 reduced 62% and 48% Cr(Ⅵ) at an initial chromate concentration of 750,and 1500 μg·mL-1,after 96 hours with an inoculum size of 9.6×107 cells·mL-1.Different heavy metals at low concentrations did not affect the reduction potential of the strains significantly.Ochrobactrum intermedium CrT-1 reduced 84% and 65% while Brevibacterium CrT-13 reduced 60% and 44% of Cr(Ⅵ)at an initial Cr(Ⅵ)concentration of 250 and 500 μg·mL-1,espectively,in an industrial effluent sample.

  5. Peak to Average Power Ratio Reduction using a Hybrid of Bacterial Foraging and Modified Cuckoo Search Algorithm in MIMO-OFDM System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Manjith

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Partial Transmit Sequence which reduces the PAPR (Peak-to-Average Power Ratio in Multiple Input Multiple Output Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (MIMO-OFDM system using a novel optimization algorithm is proposed in this study. This novel optimization algorithm is based on a hybrid of Bacterial Foraging Optimization (BFO and Modified Cuckoo Search algorithm (MCS and is thus called HBFOMCS. In HBFOMCS, reproduction of individuals in a new generation is created, not only by swim and tumble operation as in BFO, but also by MCS. The natural reproduction step of BFO is swapped by the concept of searching best solutions as in MCS which then increases the possibility of generating the elite individuals for next generation. These enhanced reproduction step constitute the ready-to-perform population for the new generation once the initial population is performed by swim and tumble operation. Afterwards, discover probability is applied to abandon the worst solution due to the nature of MCS. HBFOMCS is applied to optimize the best combination from a set of allowed phase factors in Partial Transmit Sequence (PTS technique. The performance of HBFOMCS is compared with BFO, Cuckoo Search (CS and Modified cuckoo search MCS in the PAPR reduction in MIMO-OFDM system, accordingly proving its proficiency.

  6. Diversity of sulfur isotope fractionations by sulfate-reducing prokaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detmers, Jan; Brüchert, Volker; Habicht, K S;

    2001-01-01

    Batch culture experiments were performed with 32 different sulfate-reducing prokaryotes to explore the diversity in sulfur isotope fractionation during dissimilatory sulfate reduction by pure cultures. The selected strains reflect the phylogenetic and physiologic diversity of presently known.......0 to 42.0 per thousand. Salinity, incubation temperature, pH, and phylogeny had no systematic effect on the sulfur isotope fractionation. There was no correlation between isotope fractionation and sulfate reduction rate. The type of dissimilatory bisulfite reductase also had no effect on fractionation....... Sulfate reducers that oxidized the carbon source completely to CO2 showed greater fractionations than sulfate reducers that released acetate as the final product of carbon oxidation. Different metabolic pathways and variable regulation of sulfate transport across the cell membrane all potentially affect...

  7. Carbonate-associated sulfate in lucinid (Bivalvia) shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Y.; Bao, H.; Anderson, L.; Engel, A. S.

    2007-12-01

    Symbiosis is a fundamental driver of evolution, with examples ranging from mitochondria in eukaryotic cells to barnacle-whale commensalism. The association between sulfur-oxidizing (thiotrophic) bacteria and the lucinid bivalve clade is particularly intriguing because the inferred antiquity of the relationship (>400 m.y.) seems at odds with the relatively loose ecologic linkage of living members. Because only half of genus-level lucinid taxa are extant, and the δ13C of shell carbonate exhibits no systematic difference between symbiotic and non- symbiotic bivalves, a new morphologically-independent proxy to determine whether fossil taxa possessed thiotrophic endosymbionts is needed. The δ34S of carbonate-associated sulfate (CAS) in bivalve shells may hold promise because biogenic carbonate incorporates sulfate into its crystal structure during biomineralization. Incorporation of bacterially derived SO42- (with a more negative δ34S value due to its reduced sulfur origin) into the lucinid-shell crystal lattice would, therefore, impart a distinctly lower δ34SCAS value than that from seawater SO42-, and would be distinguishable from CAS values of co- occurring heterotrophic bivalves. We measured CAS contents, δ34SCAS and δ18OCAS values of 15 sets of lucinid and co-occurring infaunal and epifaunal heterotrophic bivalve shells collected from modern and Cenozoic shallow marine sites. The modern bivalve shells had variable CAS content, from 100 to 2600 ppm. Epifauna often had the highest concentrations relative to the other ecological groups. The δ34SCAS and δ18OCAS clustered at values corresponding to modern seawater sulfate, but with significant scatter. There was no systematic isotope- compositional difference among all bivalves in the same habitat, or among the same lucinid, infaunal, or epifaunal groups across different sites. The fossil bivalve shells tended to preserve lower CAS concentrations and the isotope compositions further deviated from seawater values

  8. Decontamination of acid mine water from Ronneburg/Thueringen which is high in sulfates and metals using sulfate-reducing bacteria. Subproject. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors analyzed and developed the fundamentals of a microbiological water treatment process for decontamination of acid water from a uranium mine which is high in sulfates and heavy metals. The process is based on microbiological sulfate reduction. In the pre-phase of the project, sulfate-reducing microorganisms were isolated and cultivation methods for these microorganisms developed

  9. Quantifying heavy metals sequestration by sulfate-reducing bacteria in an acid mine drainage-contaminated wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JohnWMoreau

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Bioremediation strategies that depend on bacterial sulfate reduction for heavy metals remediation harness the reactivity of these metals with biogenic aqueous sulfide. Quantitative knowledge of the degree to which specific toxic metals are partitioned into various sulfide, oxide, or other phases is important for predicting the long-term mobility of these metals under environmental conditions. Here we report the quantitative partitioning into sedimentary biogenic sulfides of a suite of metals and metalloids associated with acid mine drainage contamination of a natural estuarine wetland for over a century.

  10. Sulfate metabolism in mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelle, Michael W; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2006-10-01

    Pathogenic bacteria have developed numerous mechanisms to survive inside a hostile host environment. The human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) is thought to control the human immune response with diverse biomolecules, including a variety of exotic lipids. One prevalent M. tb-specific sulfated metabolite, termed sulfolipid-1 (SL-1), has been correlated with virulence though its specific biological function is not known. Recent advances in our understanding of SL-1 biosynthesis will help elucidate the role of this curious metabolite in M. tb infection. Furthermore, the study of SL-1 has led to questions regarding the significance of sulfation in mycobacteria. Examples of sulfated metabolites as mediators of interactions between bacteria and plants suggest that sulfation is a key modulator of extracellular signaling between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The discovery of novel sulfated metabolites in M. tb and related mycobacteria strengthens this hypothesis. Finally, mechanistic and structural data from sulfate-assimilation enzymes have revealed how M. tb controls the flux of sulfate in the cell. Mutants with defects in sulfate assimilation indicate that the fate of sulfur in M. tb is a critical survival determinant for the bacteria during infection and suggest novel targets for tuberculosis drug therapy. PMID:16933356

  11. Microbial dehalogenation of trichlorophenol by a bacterial consortium: characterization and mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Chlorinated phenolic compounds are a class of toxic and refractory organic pollutants. The pollution caused by chlorophenols poses serious ecological and environmental problems. A stable bacterial consortium capable of reductively dechlorinating trichlorophenol was isolated using chlorophenol as the sole source of carbon and energy. The physiological characteristics of the mixed cultures were studied and the results show that the consortium could use pyruvate as the carbon and energy source. The fermentation of pyruvate, sulfate reduction and dechlorination process proceeded strictly in succession within this consortium. The effect of specific inhibitors on the dechlorinating activity of the consortium was investigated, and the results indicate that sulfate and molybdate (1 mmol/L) have a strong inhibitive influence on the dechlorination activity. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique was applied to analyzing the composition of the consortium and the results reveal that one major subpopulation within the consortium was phylogenetically affiliated to gamma and delta subclass of Proteobacteria.

  12. Theoretical study on the reactivity of sulfate species with hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Q.; Ellis, G.S.; Amrani, A.; Zhang, T.; Tang, Y.

    2008-01-01

    The abiotic, thermochemically controlled reduction of sulfate to hydrogen sulfide coupled with the oxidation of hydrocarbons, is termed thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR), and is an important alteration process that affects petroleum accumulations in nature. Although TSR is commonly observed in high-temperature carbonate reservoirs, it has proven difficult to simulate in the laboratory under conditions resembling nature. The present study was designed to evaluate the relative reactivities of various sulfate species in order to provide greater insight into the mechanism of TSR and potentially to fill the gap between laboratory experimental data and geological observations. Accordingly, quantum mechanics density functional theory (DFT) was used to determine the activation energy required to reach a potential transition state for various aqueous systems involving simple hydrocarbons and different sulfate species. The entire reaction process that results in the reduction of sulfate to sulfide is far too complex to be modeled entirely; therefore, we examined what is believed to be the rate limiting step, namely, the reduction of sulfate S(VI) to sulfite S(IV). The results of the study show that water-solvated sulfate anions SO42 - are very stable due to their symmetrical molecular structure and spherical electronic distributions. Consequently, in the absence of catalysis, the reactivity of SO42 - is expected to be extremely low. However, both the protonation of sulfate to form bisulfate anions (HSO4-) and the formation of metal-sulfate contact ion-pairs could effectively destabilize the sulfate molecular structure, thereby making it more reactive. Previous reports of experimental simulations of TSR generally have involved the use of acidic solutions that contain elevated concentrations of HSO4- relative to SO42 -. However, in formation waters typically encountered in petroleum reservoirs, the concentration of HSO4- is likely to be significantly lower than the levels

  13. Heparan sulfate biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Multhaupt, Hinke A B; Couchman, John R

    2012-01-01

    Heparan sulfate is perhaps the most complex polysaccharide known from animals. The basic repeating disaccharide is extensively modified by sulfation and uronic acid epimerization. Despite this, the fine structure of heparan sulfate is remarkably consistent with a particular cell type. This suggests...... apparatus has not been carried out in a detailed way using high-resolution microscopy. We have begun this process, using well-known markers for the various Golgi compartments, coupled with the use of characterized antibodies and cDNA expression. Laser scanning confocal microscopy coupled with line scanning...

  14. Kinetic modeling and microbial assessment by fluorescent in situ hybridization in anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactors treating sulfate-rich wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Silva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of applying anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactors (AnSBBR for treating sulfate-rich wastewater. The reactor was filled with polyurethane foam matrices or with eucalyptus charcoal, used as the support for biomass attachment. Synthetic wastewater was prepared with two ratios between chemical oxygen demand (COD and sulfate concentration (COD/SO4(2- of 0.4 and 3.2. For a COD/SO4(2- ratio of 3.2, the AnSBBR performance was influenced by the support material used; the average levels of organic matter removal were 67% and 81% in the reactors filled with polyurethane foam and charcoal, respectively, and both support materials were associated with similar levels of sulfate reduction (above 90%. In both reactors, sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB represented more than 65% of the bacterial community. The kinetic model indicated equilibrium between complete- and incomplete-oxidizing SRB in the reactor filled with polyurethane foam and predominantly incomplete-oxidizing SRB in the reactor filled with charcoal. Methanogenic activity seems to have been the determining factor to explain the better performance of the reactor filled with charcoal to remove organic matter at a COD/SO4(2- ratio of 3.2. For a COD/SO4(2- ratio of 0.4, low values of sulfate reduction (around 32% and low reaction rates were observed as a result of the small SRB population (about 20% of the bacterial community. Although the support material did not affect overall performance for this condition, different degradation pathways were observed; incomplete oxidation of organic matter by SRB was the main kinetic pathway and methanogenesis was negligible in both reactors.

  15. Holothurian Fucosylated Chondroitin Sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor H. Pomin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FucCS is a structurally distinct glycosaminoglycan found in sea cucumber species. It has the same backbone composition of alternating 4-linked glucuronic acid and 3-linked N-acetyl galactosamine residues within disaccharide repeating units as regularly found in mammalian chondroitin sulfates. However, FucCS has also sulfated fucosyl branching units 3-O-linked to the acid residues. The sulfation patterns of these branches vary accordingly with holothurian species and account for different biological actions and responses. FucCSs may exhibit anticoagulant, antithrombotic, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antiviral, and pro-angiogenic activities, besides its beneficial effects in hemodialysis, cellular growth modulation, fibrosis and hyperglycemia. Through an historical overview, this document covers most of the science regarding the holothurian FucCS. Both structural and medical properties of this unique GAG, investigated during the last 25 years, are systematically discussed herein.

  16. Commercial Application of Technique for Removing Sulfates from Reforming Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JiChangqing

    2002-01-01

    In the course of reduction of reforming catalyst by not hydrogen a certain amount of chlorine containing compounds is added to the recycle hydrogen to facilitate the reduction of sulfates.The outcome of commercial application of this technique has revealed that the procedure of "regeneration by chlorination→reduction→sulfate removal→sulfiding and oil feed-in"aimed at sulate removal is very simple and can recover the reaction activity of reforming catalyst after having been poisoned by sulfates.This procedure can be disseminated for application in refineries.

  17. Performance of a haloalkaliphilic bioreactor and bacterial community shifts under different COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} ratios and hydraulic retention times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jie-Min [National Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 353, Beijing 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Song, Zi-Yu [National Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 353, Beijing 100190 (China); Yan, Dao-Jiang; Liu, Yi-Lan [National Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 353, Beijing 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yang, Mao-Hua [National Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 353, Beijing 100190 (China); Cao, Hong-Bin [National Engineering Laboratory for Hydrometallurgical Cleaner Production Technology, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 353, Beijing 100190 (China); Xing, Jian-Min, E-mail: jmxing@home.ipe.ac.cn [National Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 353, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Haloalkaliphilic microorganisms were used to reduce sulfate. • Sulfide concentration reached up to 1603 mg/L. • There was no sulfide inhibition to haloalkaliphilic microorganisms. • Bacterial community of haloalkaliphilic bioreactor was studied. - Abstract: Sulfur dioxide from flue gas was converted into sulfate after the absorption of alkaline solutions. Haloalkaliphilic microorganisms have been used in reducing sulfate to decrease expenses and avoid sulfide inhibition. The effects of different COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} ratios and hydraulic retention times (HRTs) on the sulfate removal efficiency and bacterial community were investigated in model experiments. Ethanol showed better performance as an electron donor than lactate. The optimum COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} ratio and HRT were 4.0 and 18 h, respectively, with respective sulfate removal efficiency and rate of 97.8 ± 1.11% and 6.26 ± 0.0710 g/L d. Sulfide concentrations reached 1603 ± 3.38 mg/L. Based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of 16S rDNA, the major sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) was Desulfonatronovibrio sp., which was only detected at a COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} ratio of 4.0 using ethanol as an electron donor. Different HRTs had no significant effect on the band corresponding to this species. PCR results show that methane-producing archaea (MPA) were from the acetoclastic methanogenic family Methanosarcinaceae. Quantitative real-time PCR did not demonstrate any significant competition between SRB and MPA. The findings of this study indicate that sulfate reduction, nitrate reduction, and sulfide oxidization may occur in the same bioreactor.

  18. Performance of a haloalkaliphilic bioreactor and bacterial community shifts under different COD/SO42− ratios and hydraulic retention times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Haloalkaliphilic microorganisms were used to reduce sulfate. • Sulfide concentration reached up to 1603 mg/L. • There was no sulfide inhibition to haloalkaliphilic microorganisms. • Bacterial community of haloalkaliphilic bioreactor was studied. - Abstract: Sulfur dioxide from flue gas was converted into sulfate after the absorption of alkaline solutions. Haloalkaliphilic microorganisms have been used in reducing sulfate to decrease expenses and avoid sulfide inhibition. The effects of different COD/SO42− ratios and hydraulic retention times (HRTs) on the sulfate removal efficiency and bacterial community were investigated in model experiments. Ethanol showed better performance as an electron donor than lactate. The optimum COD/SO42− ratio and HRT were 4.0 and 18 h, respectively, with respective sulfate removal efficiency and rate of 97.8 ± 1.11% and 6.26 ± 0.0710 g/L d. Sulfide concentrations reached 1603 ± 3.38 mg/L. Based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of 16S rDNA, the major sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) was Desulfonatronovibrio sp., which was only detected at a COD/SO42− ratio of 4.0 using ethanol as an electron donor. Different HRTs had no significant effect on the band corresponding to this species. PCR results show that methane-producing archaea (MPA) were from the acetoclastic methanogenic family Methanosarcinaceae. Quantitative real-time PCR did not demonstrate any significant competition between SRB and MPA. The findings of this study indicate that sulfate reduction, nitrate reduction, and sulfide oxidization may occur in the same bioreactor

  19. Direct Sulfation of Limestone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Guilin; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Wedel, Stig

    2007-01-01

    %) becomes negligible. In the temperature interval from 723 K to 973 K, an apparent activation energy of about 104 kJ/mol is observed for the direct sulfation of limestone. At low temperatures and low conversions, the sulfation process is most likely under mixed control by chemical reaction and solid......The direct sulfation of limestone was studied in a laboratory fixed-bed reactor. It is found that the direct sulfation of limestone involves nucleation and crystal grain growth of the solid product (anhydrite). At 823 K and at low-conversions (less than about 0.5 %), the influences of SO2, O-2 and...... CO2 on the direct sulfation of limestone corresponds to apparent reaction orders of about 0.2, 0.2 and -0.5, respectively. Water is observed to promote the sulfation reaction and increase the apparent reaction orders of SO2 and O-2. The influence of O-2 at high O-2 concentrations (> about 15...

  20. Sulfate-reducing bacteria and their activities in cyanobacterial mats of Solar Lake (Sinai, Egypt)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teske, A.; Ramsing, NB; Habicht, K.;

    1998-01-01

    aggregate formation were the most conspicuous adaptations of Solar Lake sulfate-reducing bacteria to the mat matrix and to diurnal oxygen stress. A comparison of sulfate reduction rates within the mat and previously published photosynthesis rates showed that CO2 from sulfate reduction in the upper 5 mm...... accounted for 7 to 8% of the total photosynthetic CO2 demand of the mat.......The sulfate-reducing bacteria within the surface layer of the hypersaline cyanobacterial mat of Solar Lake (Sinai, Egypt) were investigated with combined microbiological, molecular, and biogeochemical approaches. The diurnally oxic surface layer contained between 10(6) and 10(7) cultivable sulfate...

  1. Distribution of Methanogenic and Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in Near-Shore Marine Sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Hines, Mark E.; Buck, John D.

    1982-01-01

    The distribution of methanogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria was examined in sediments from three sites off the coast of eastern Connecticut and five sites in Long Island Sound. Both bacterial groups were detected at all sites. Three distributional patterns were observed: (i) four sites exhibited methanogenic and sulfate-reducing populations which were restricted to the upper 10 to 20 cm, with a predominance of sulfate reducers; (ii) three sites in western Long Island Sound exhibited a meth...

  2. 改性细菌纤维素硫酸酯对Pb(Ⅱ)吸附性能的影响%Influnce on adsorption property modified bacterial cellulose sulfate to Pb (Ⅱ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王吟; 孙凤玲; 杨一琼

    2016-01-01

    Taking bacterial cellulose (BC) as raw material,the paper prepared a modified bacterial cellulose sulphate adsorption material and carried out characterization analysis.It took the removal of Pb (Ⅱ) which is a typical heavy metal pollutant as the target,and investigated the impact of different reaction time,pH value of solution and reaction temperature on the adsorption behavior of Pb (Ⅱ).The results showed that the adsorption capacity of modified bacterial cellulose has been improved.The amount of adsorption on Pb (Ⅱ) by the material increases with the increase of pH and decreases with the increase of temperature.The adsorption process fits two stage reaction equation and Langmuir equation.%以廉价且资源丰富的细菌纤维素为原料,研究制备了改性细菌纤维素硫酸酯吸附材料,并对其进行表征分析.以典型重金属污染物Pb(Ⅱ)为去除目标,考察了不同反应时间、溶液pH和反应温度等对改性细菌纤维素吸附Pb(Ⅱ)的影响.结果表明:经改性后细菌纤维素的吸附性能有所增加;其对Pb(Ⅱ)的平衡吸附量随pH的增大而增加,随温度的增加而减小;吸附过程符合拟二级反应方程和Langmuir吸附等温方程.

  3. Techniques for the conversion to carbon dioxide of oxygen from dissolved sulfate in thermal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehring, N.L.; Bowen, P.A.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    The fractionation of oxygen isotopes between dissolved sulfate ions and water provides a useful geothermometer for geothermal waters. The oxygen isotope composition of dissolved sulfate may also be used to indicate the source of the sulfate and processes of formation. The methods described here for separation, purification and reduction of sulfate to prepare carbon dioxide for mass spectrometric analysis are modifications of methods by Rafter (1967), Mizutani (1971), Sakai and Krouse (1971), and Mizutani and Rafter (1969). ?? 1976.

  4. Localized corrosion of carbon steels due to sulfate-reducing bacteria. Development of a specific sensor; Corrosion localisee des aciers au carbone induite par des bacteries sulfato-reductrices. Developpement d'un capteur specifique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monfort Moros, N.

    2001-11-01

    This work concerns the microbiologically influenced corrosion of carbon steels in saline anaerobic media (3% of NaCl) containing sulfato-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio gabonensis, DSM 10636). In these media, extreme localised corrosion occurs by pitting under the bio-film covering the metallic substrate. A sensor with concentric electrodes was designed to initiate the phenomenon of bio-corrosion, recreating the favourable conditions for growth of a corrosion pit, and then measuring the corrosion current maintained by bacterial activity. The pit initiation was achieved through either of two methods. The electrochemical conditioning involved driving the potential difference between inner and outer electrodes to values corresponding to a galvanic corrosion that can be maintained by the bacterial metabolism. The mechanical process involved removal of a portion of the bio-film by scratching, yielding galvanic potential differences equivalent to that found by the conditioning technique. This protocol was found to be applicable to a bio-corrosion study on industrial site for the monitoring of the metallic structures deterioration (patent EN 00/06114, May 2000). Thereafter, a fundamental application uses the bio-corrosion sensor for Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS), Electrochemical Noise Analysis (ENA) and current density cartography by the means of micro-electrodes. Thus, the EIS technique reveals the importance of the FeS corrosion products for initiation of bio-corrosion start on carbon steel. In addition, depending on the method used to create a pit, the ENA gives rise to supplementary processes (gaseous release) disturbing the bio-corrosion detection. The beginning of a bio-corrosion process on a clean surface surrounded with bio-film was confirmed by the current density cartography. These different results establish the sensor with concentric electrodes as an indispensable tool for bio-corrosion studies, both in the laboratory and on industrial sites

  5. Stratified community responses to methane and sulfate supplies in mud volcano deposits: insights from an in vitro experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    Full Text Available Numerous studies on marine prokaryotic communities have postulated that a process of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM coupled with sulfate reduction (SR is the main methane sink in the world's oceans. AOM has also been reported in the deep biosphere. But the responses of the primary microbial players in eliciting changes in geochemical environments, specifically in methane and sulfate supplies, have yet to be fully elucidated. Marine mud volcanoes (MVs expel a complex fluid mixture of which methane is the primary component, forming an environment in which AOM is a common phenomenon. In this context, we attempted to identify how the prokaryotic community would respond to changes in methane and sulfate intensities, which often occur in MV environments in the form of eruptions, diffusions or seepage. We applied an integrated approach, including (i biochemical surveys of pore water originated from MV, (ii in vitro incubation of mud breccia, and (iii prokaryotic community structure analysis. Two distinct AOM regions were clearly detected. One is related to the sulfate methane transition zone (SMTZ at depth of 30-55 cm below the sea floor (bsf; the second is at 165-205 cm bsf with ten times higher rates of AOM and SR. This finding contrasts with the sulfide concentrations in pore waters and supports the suggestion that potential AOM activity below the SMTZ might be an important methane sink that is largely ignored or underestimated in oceanic methane budget calculations. Moreover, the incubation conditions below the SMTZ favor the growth of methanotrophic archaeal group ANME-2 compared to ANME-1, and promote the rapid growth and high diversity of bacterial communities. These incubation conditions also promote the increase of richness in bacterial communities. Our results provide direct evidence of the mechanisms by which deep AOM processes can affect carbon cycling in the deep biosphere and global methane biochemistry.

  6. Stratified community responses to methane and sulfate supplies in mud volcano deposits: insights from an in vitro experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Maignien, Lois; Stadnitskaia, Alina; Boeckx, Pascal; Xiao, Xiang; Boon, Nico

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies on marine prokaryotic communities have postulated that a process of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled with sulfate reduction (SR) is the main methane sink in the world's oceans. AOM has also been reported in the deep biosphere. But the responses of the primary microbial players in eliciting changes in geochemical environments, specifically in methane and sulfate supplies, have yet to be fully elucidated. Marine mud volcanoes (MVs) expel a complex fluid mixture of which methane is the primary component, forming an environment in which AOM is a common phenomenon. In this context, we attempted to identify how the prokaryotic community would respond to changes in methane and sulfate intensities, which often occur in MV environments in the form of eruptions, diffusions or seepage. We applied an integrated approach, including (i) biochemical surveys of pore water originated from MV, (ii) in vitro incubation of mud breccia, and (iii) prokaryotic community structure analysis. Two distinct AOM regions were clearly detected. One is related to the sulfate methane transition zone (SMTZ) at depth of 30-55 cm below the sea floor (bsf); the second is at 165-205 cm bsf with ten times higher rates of AOM and SR. This finding contrasts with the sulfide concentrations in pore waters and supports the suggestion that potential AOM activity below the SMTZ might be an important methane sink that is largely ignored or underestimated in oceanic methane budget calculations. Moreover, the incubation conditions below the SMTZ favor the growth of methanotrophic archaeal group ANME-2 compared to ANME-1, and promote the rapid growth and high diversity of bacterial communities. These incubation conditions also promote the increase of richness in bacterial communities. Our results provide direct evidence of the mechanisms by which deep AOM processes can affect carbon cycling in the deep biosphere and global methane biochemistry. PMID:25393146

  7. Sulfate attack expansion mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müllauer, Wolfram, E-mail: wolf_m@gmx.at; Beddoe, Robin E.; Heinz, Detlef

    2013-10-15

    A specially constructed stress cell was used to measure the stress generated in thin-walled Portland cement mortar cylinders caused by external sulfate attack. The effects of sulfate concentration of the storage solution and C{sub 3}A content of the cement were studied. Changes in mineralogical composition and pore size distribution were investigated by X-ray diffraction and mercury intrusion porosimetry, respectively. Damage is due to the formation of ettringite in small pores (10–50 nm) which generates stresses up to 8 MPa exceeding the tensile strength of the binder matrix. Higher sulfate concentrations and C{sub 3}A contents result in higher stresses. The results can be understood in terms of the effect of crystal surface energy and size on supersaturation and crystal growth pressure.

  8. Fermentation parameters, quality and losses in sugarcane silages treated with chemical additives and a bacterial inoculant

    OpenAIRE

    André de Faria Pedroso; Armando de Andrade Rodrigues; Waldomiro Barioni Júnior; Gilberto Batista de Souza

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this trial was to evaluate chemical additives and a bacterial inoculant on the inhibition of alcoholic fermentation and reduction of losses in sugarcane silages. Treatments were (doses on a fresh forage basis): without additive (control); urea (10 g/kg); urea (5 g/kg) + sodium benzoate (0.5 g/kg); sodium benzoate (1 g/kg); urea + ammonium sulfate in a 9:1 relation (10 g/kg); Lactobacillus buchneri (5 × 10(4) cfu/g). Silages were produced in 10.16- × 30-cm PVC tubes, provided ...

  9. Crystal structure of tris­(piperidinium) hydrogen sulfate sulfate

    OpenAIRE

    Lukianova, Tamara J.; Kinzhybalo, Vasyl; Pietraszko, Adam

    2015-01-01

    A novel mixed hydrogen sulfate–sulfate piperidinium salt comprises three protonated piperidinium cations, one hydrogen sulfate anion and one sulfate anion in the asymmetric unit. Strong hydrogen bonds exist between the cations and the anions giving rise to a three-dimensional structure.

  10. Hydrazine Sulfate (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... use of hydrazine sulfate as a complementary or alternative treatment for cancer? It has been known since the early 1900s ... of CAM therapies originally considered to be purely alternative approaches are finding a place in cancer treatment—not as cures, but as complementary therapies that ...

  11. Aluminum Sulfate 18 Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) of the chemical, aluminum sulfate 18 hydrate, is presented. The profile lists physical and harmful properties, exposure limits, reactivity risks, and symptoms of major exposure for the benefit of teachers and students using the chemical in the laboratory.

  12. Peak to Average Power Ratio Reduction using a Hybrid of Bacterial Foraging and Modified Cuckoo Search Algorithm in MIMO-OFDM System

    OpenAIRE

    R. Manjith; M. Suganthi

    2014-01-01

    The Partial Transmit Sequence which reduces the PAPR (Peak-to-Average Power Ratio) in Multiple Input Multiple Output Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (MIMO-OFDM) system using a novel optimization algorithm is proposed in this study. This novel optimization algorithm is based on a hybrid of Bacterial Foraging Optimization (BFO) and Modified Cuckoo Search algorithm (MCS) and is thus called HBFOMCS. In HBFOMCS, reproduction of individuals in a new generation is created, not only by swi...

  13. Biological sulfate removal from construction and demolition debris leachate: Effect of bioreactor configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Novel biological technique for gypsum removal from CDD. • CDDS leachate treatment performed using different sulfate reducing bioreactors. • Gypsum in CDD can be used as a source of sulfate for sulfate reducing bacteria. • High calcium concentration (1000 mg L−1) did not affect the bioreactor performance. - Abstract: Due to the contamination of construction and demolition debris (CDD) by gypsum drywall, especially, its sand fraction (CDD sand, CDDS), the sulfate content in CDDS exceeds the posed limit of the maximum amount of sulfate present in building sand (1.73 g sulfate per kg of sand for the Netherlands). Therefore, the CDDS cannot be reused for construction. The CDDS has to be washed in order to remove most of the impurities and to obtain the right sulfate content, thus generating a leachate, containing high sulfate and calcium concentrations. This study aimed at developing a biological sulfate reduction system for CDDS leachate treatment and compared three different reactor configurations for the sulfate reduction step: the upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor, inverse fluidized bed (IFB) reactor and gas lift anaerobic membrane bioreactor (GL-AnMBR). This investigation demonstrated that all three systems can be applied for the treatment of CDDS leachate. The highest sulfate removal efficiency of 75–85% was achieved at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 15.5 h. A high calcium concentration up to 1000 mg L−1 did not give any adverse effect on the sulfate removal efficiency of the IFB and GL-AnMBR systems

  14. Sulfate metabolism. I. Sulfate uptake and redistribution of acid rain sulfate by edible plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulfur is the major component of polluted air in industrialized societies. Atmospheric sulfur is converted to sulfuric acid through a series of chemical reactions which can eventually reenter many ecosystems. When edible plants are grown in soils containing varying amounts of sulfate, the roots take up and transport inorganic sulfate to the stems and leaves. The sulfate taken up by the roots and the amount transported to the stem and leaves was found to be a function of the concentration of sulfate in the soil. Inorganic sulfate taken up by a corn plant seedling can be rapidly converted to organic sulfate by the root system. Nine days after one of a pair of pea plants was inoculated with artificial acid rain sulfate (dilute H235SO4) it was found that the sulfate was translocated not only in the inoculated plant, but also to the uninoculated pea plant in the same container. Also, when the leaves of a mature potato plant were inoculated with artificial acid rain sulfate it was found that the sulfate was translocated into the edible potatoes. Fractionation of the potatoes showed that most of the sulfate was water soluble of which 30% was inorganic sulfate and 70% was in the form of organic sulfur. One third of the non-water soluble translocated acid rain sulfate was equally divided between lipid and non-lipid organic sulfur of the potato. 9 references, 2 figures, 5 tables

  15. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to Monurelle® and reduction of bacterial colonisation of the urinary tract by the inhibition of the adhesion of P-fimbriated E.coli to uroepithelial cells pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) extract (including 36 mg proanthocyanidins) and 60 mg of ascorbic acid, is sufficiently characterised. The claimed effect proposed by the applicant is reduction of E.coli adhesion to uroepithelial cells. The Panel considers that reduction of bacterial colonisation of the...

  16. Sulfate and dissolved sulfide variation under low COD/Sulfate ratio in Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB treating domestic wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérvio Túlio Alves Cassini

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the dynamics of sulfate reduction and dissolved sulfide generation (S2-, HS-, H2Saq in liquid phase was evaluated in an UASB reactor treating domestic wastewater with low COD/Sulfate content. The evaluation in the UASB reactor was performed at three sludge heights (0.25, 1.25, 2.25 taps and effluent of the reactor. Sulfate reduction was verified in the reactor, with an average reduction of 24 % throughout the experiment period. However, the dissolved sulfide concentration in the reactor was not higher than 5.0 mg Sdiss/L. The kinetic model of first order showed good fit to describe the sulfate reduction under different COD/sulfate ratio, with K1app between 2.94x10-5 s-1 and 1.17x10-5 s-1 with correlation coefficients for data over 91%. The maximum rate to sulfate reduction was 18.0 mg SO42-/L.h-1 and small variation in COD/sulfate ratio promotes a significant change both in sulfate and sulfide concentrations.

  17. Metabolism of Trimethylamine, Choline, and Glycine Betaine by Sulfate-Reducing and Methanogenic Bacteria in Marine Sediments †

    OpenAIRE

    King, Gary M.

    1984-01-01

    The response of methanogenesis and sulfate reduction to trimethylamine, choline, and glycine betaine was examined in surface sediments from the intertidal region of Lowes Cove, Maine. Addition of these substrates markedly stimulated methanogenesis in the presence of active sulfate reduction, whereas addition of other substrates, including glucose, acetate, and glycine, had no effect on methane production. Sulfate reduction was stimulated simultaneously with methanogenesis by the various quate...

  18. Radioimmunoassay of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of a radioimmunological method for the measurement of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate in serum is described. For the immunization of rabbits, a DHA-3-hemissuccinate-bovine serum albumin conjugate was synthetized and a highly specific anti-serum was produced. The method developed requires only simple dilution prior to assay and the normal values for the different age groups were determined in 146 normal individuals. (Author)

  19. Sulfation of chondroitin. Specificity, degree of sulfation, and detergent effects with 4-sulfating and 6-sulfating microsomal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microsomal preparations from chondroitin 6-sulfate-producing chick embryo epiphyseal cartilage, and from chondroitin 4-sulfate-producing mouse mastocytoma cells, were incubated with UDP-[14C]glucuronic acid and UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine to form non-sulfated proteo[14C]chondroitin. Aliquots of the incubations were then incubated with 3'-phosphoadenylylphosphosulfate (PAPS) in the presence or absence of various detergents. In the absence of detergents, there was good sulfation of this endogenous proteo[14C]chondroitin by the original microsomes from both sources. Detergents, with the exception of Triton X-100, markedly inhibited sulfation in the mast cell system but not in the chick cartilage system. These results indicate that sulfation and polymerization are closely linked on cell membranes and that in some cases this organization can be disrupted by detergents. When aliquots of the original incubation were heat inactivated, and then reincubated with new microsomes from chick cartilage and/or mouse mastocytoma cells plus PAPS, there was no significant sulfation of this exogenous proteo[14C] chondroitin with either system unless Triton X-100 was added. Sulfation of exogenous chondroitin and chondroitin hexasaccharide was compared with sulfation of endogenous and exogenous proteo[14C]chondroitin. Sulfate incorporation into hexasaccharide and chondroitin decreased as their concentrations (based on uronic acid) approached that of the proteo[14C]chondroitin. At the same time, the degree of sulfation in percent of substituted hexosamine increased. However, the degree of sulfation did not reach that of the endogenous proteo[14C]chondroitin. Hexasaccharide and chondroitin sulfation were stimulated by the presence of Triton X-100. However, in contrast to the exogenous proteo[14C]chondroitin, there was some sulfation of hexasaccharide and chondroitin in the absence of this detergent

  20. 34S/32S and 18O/16O ratios of dissolved sulfate from interstitial water samples above gas hydrate bearing sediments of IODP Expedition 311, Cascadia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortmann, U. G.; Chernyavsky, B. M.; Torres, M. E.; Kastner, M.

    2008-12-01

    Microbially mediated sulfate reduction affects the isotopic composition of dissolved and solid sulfur species in marine sediments. Although several details of the fractionation process remain controversial, the overall process is well understood and can be described as the sum of several mass dependent fractionations during the stepwise reduction of sulfate to sulfide. Experiments and field data show that the 18O/16O of sulfate is also modified in the presence of sulfate-reducing microorganisms. Here we use a reaction transport model to analyze these processes and to constrain the rates of organotrophic versus methanotrophic sulfate reduction. Our results show that even in cases where sulfate concentrations decline in a linear fashion, up to 50% of all sulfate is consumed by organotrophic sulfate reduction.

  1. Crystal structure of tris­(piperidinium) hydrogen sulfate sulfate

    OpenAIRE

    Tamara J. Lukianova; Vasyl Kinzhybalo; Adam Pietraszko

    2015-01-01

    In the title molecular salt, 3C5H12N+·HSO4−·SO42−, each cation adopts a chair conformation. In the crystal, the hydrogen sulfate ion is connected to the sulfate ion by a strong O—H...O hydrogen bond. The packing also features a number of N—H...O hydrogen bonds, which lead to a three-dimensional network structure. The hydrogen sulfate anion accepts four hydrogen bonds from two cations, whereas the sulfate ion, as an acceptor, binds to five separate piperidinium cations, forming seven hydrogen ...

  2. Binding of heparan sulfate to Staphylococcus aureus.

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, O D; Ascencio, F; Fransson, L A; Wadström, T

    1992-01-01

    Heparan sulfate binds to proteins present on the surface of Staphylococcus aureus cells. Binding of 125I-heparan sulfate to S. aureus was time dependent, saturable, and influenced by pH and ionic strength, and cell-bound 125I-heparan sulfate was displaced by unlabelled heparan sulfate or heparin. Other glycosaminoglycans of comparable size (chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate), highly glycosylated glycoprotein (hog gastric mucin), and some anionic polysaccharides (dextran sulfate and RNA...

  3. Application of Gray Relational Analysis to the Experimental Design on Reduction of U(VI) by Sulfate-reducing Bacteria%灰色关联分析在硫酸盐还原菌还原U(Ⅵ)试验设计中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    荣丽杉; 谢水波; 凌辉; 王水云

    2011-01-01

    This paper determines the main factors in the experiment of U (VI) Reduction by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) through gray correlation analysis, based on the experi- mental design. Results show that the method is simple, objective, reliable, and provides a scientific basis for experimental design to treat the wastewater containin~ ll( VIh%基于硫酸盐还原茵(SRB)还原U(Ⅵ)试验设计方案,通过灰色关联分析方法,确定在硫酸盐还原茵(SRB)还原u(Ⅵ)试验中主要的影响因素。结果表明,该方法计算简便,结果客观可靠,为含u(VI)废水处理试验设计提供了科学依据。

  4. Sulfation pattern of fucose branches affects the anti-hyperlipidemic activities of fucosylated chondroitin sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Nian; Zhang, Yu; Ye, Xingqian; Hu, Yaqin; Ding, Tian; Chen, Shiguo

    2016-08-20

    Fucosylated chondroitin sulfates (fCSs) are glycosaminoglycans extracted from sea cucumbers, consisting of chondroitin sulfate E (CSE) backbones and sulfated fucose branches. The biological properties of fCSs could be affected by the sulfation pattern of their fucose branches. In the present study, two fCSs were isolated from sea cucumbers Isostichopus badionotus (fCS-Ib) and Pearsonothuria graeffei (fCS-Pg). Their monosaccharide compositions of glucuronic acid (GlcA), N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), fucose (Fuc) and sulfate were at similar molar ratio with 1.0/0.7/0.9/3.1 for fCS-Ib and 1.0/0.8/1.5/2.6 for fCS-Pg. The two fCSs have different sulfation patterns on their fucose branches, fCS-Pg with 3,4-O-disulfation while fCS-Ib with 2,4-O-disulfation. Their antihyperlipidemic effects were compared using a high-fat high-fructose diet (HFFD)-fed C57BL/6J mice model. Both fCS-Ib and fCS-Pg had significant effects on lipid profile improvement, liver protection, blood glucose diminution and hepatic glycogen synthesis. Specifically, fCS-Pg with 3,4-O-disulfation fucose branches was more effective in reduction of blood cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein (LDL) and atherogenic index (AI). Our results indicate that both fCSs, especially fCS-Pg, could be used as a potential anti-hyperlipidemic drug. PMID:27178902

  5. Bacterial meningitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To demonstrate the epidemiology, clinical manifestations and bacteriological profile of bacterial meningitis in children beyond the neonatal period in our hospital. This was a retrospective descriptive study conducted at Prince Rashid Hospital in Irbid, Jordan. The medical records of 50 children with the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis during 4 years period, were reviewed. The main cause of infection was streptococcus pneumoniae, followed by Haemophilus influenza and Niesseria meningitides. Mortality was higher in infants and meningococcal infection, while complications were more encountered in cases of streptococcus pneumoniae. Cerebrospinal fluid culture was positive in 11 cases and Latex agglutination test in 39. There is a significant reduction of the numbers of bacterial meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenza type B species. (author)

  6. Diversity and abundance of sulfate-reducing microorganisms in the sulfate and methane zones of a marine sediment, Black Sea RID A-8182-2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leloup, Julie; Loy, Alexander; Knab, Nina J.;

    2007-01-01

    The Black Sea, with its highly sulfidic water column, is the largest anoxic basin in the world. Within its sediments, the mineralization of organic matter occurs essentially through sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. In this study, the sulfate-reducing community was investigated in order to...... branching sequences which might represent Gram-positive spore-forming sulfate- and/or sulfite-reducing microorganisms. We thus hypothesize that terminal carbon mineralization in surface sediments of the Black Sea is largely due to the sulfate reduction activity of previously hidden SRM. Although these novel...... SRM were also abundant in sulfate-poor, methanogenic areas of the Black Sea sediment, their activities and possibly very versatile metabolic capabilities remain subject of further study....

  7. Performance of sulfate-dependent anaerobic ammo-nium oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lei; ZHENG Ping; HE YuHui; JIN RenCun

    2009-01-01

    The performance of sulfate-dependent anaerobic ammonium oxidation was studied. The results showed that both SO42- and NH4+ were chemically stable under anaerobic conditions. They did not react with each other in the absence of biological catalyst (sludge). The anaerobic digested sludge cultivated in an anaerobic reactor for three years took on the ability of oxidizing ammonium with sulfate anaero-bically. The average reduction of sulfate and ammonium was 71.67 mg.L-1 and 56.82 mg.L-1 at high concentrations.The reaction between SO42- and NH4+ was difficult, though feasible, due to its low standard Gibbs free energy change. The experiment demonstrated that high substrate concentrations and low oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) may be favourable for the biological reaction.

  8. Performance of sulfate-dependent anaerobic ammonium oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The performance of sulfate-dependent anaerobic ammonium oxidation was studied.The results showed that both SO42-and NH4+ were chemically stable under anaerobic conditions.They did not react with each other in the absence of biological catalyst(sludge).The anaerobic digested sludge cultivated in an anaerobic reactor for three years took on the ability of oxidizing ammonium with sulfate anaero-bically.The average reduction of sulfate and ammonium was 71.67 mg.L-1 and 56.82 mg.L-1 at high concentrations.The reaction between SO42-and NH4+ was difficult,though feasible,due to its low standard Gibbs free energy change.The experiment demonstrated that high substrate concentrations and low oxidation-reduction potential(ORP) may be favourable for the biological reaction.

  9. Preparation of Barley Storage Protein, Hordein, for Analytical Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate-Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doll, Hans; Andersen, Bente

    1981-01-01

    The extraction, reduction, and alkylation of barley hordein for routine electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels were studied to set up a simple preparation procedure giving well-resolved bands in the electrophoresis gel. Hordein was extracted from single crushed seeds or flour...... in a buffer without propan-2-ol but containing sodium dodecyl sulfate....

  10. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 586. Related Content STDs during Pregnancy Fact Sheet Pregnancy and HIV, Viral Hepatitis, and STD Prevention Pelvic Inflammatory Disease ( ... Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) Chlamydia Gonorrhea Genital Herpes Hepatitis HIV/AIDS & STDs Human Papillomavirus ... STDs See Also Pregnancy Reproductive ...

  11. Bacterial Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Bacterial Meningitis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... serious disease. Laboratory Methods for the Diagnosis of Meningitis This manual summarizes laboratory methods used to isolate, ...

  12. Prostatitis - bacterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Any bacteria that can cause a urinary tract infection can cause acute bacterial prostatitis. Infections spread through sexual contact can cause prostatitis. These include chlamydia and gonorrhea . Sexually transmitted ...

  13. Identification and characterization of sulfated carbohydrate-binding protein from Lactobacillus reuteri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita Nishiyama

    Full Text Available We previously purified a putative sulfated-galactosylceramide (sulfatide-binding protein with a molecular weight of 47 kDa from the cell surface of Lactobacillus reuteri JCM1081. The aim of this study was to identify the 47-kDa protein, examine its binding to sulfated glycolipids and mucins, and evaluate its role in bacterial adhesion to mucosal surfaces. By cloning and sequencing analysis, the 47-kDa protein was identified as elongation factor-Tu (EF-Tu. Adhesion properties were examined using 6 × Histidine-fused EF-Tu (His6-EF-Tu. Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated pH-dependent binding of His6-EF-Tu to sulfated glycolipids, but not to neutral or sialylated glycolipids, suggesting that a sulfated galactose residue was responsible for EF-Tu binding. Furthermore, His6-EF-Tu was found to bind to porcine gastric mucin (PGM by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Binding was markedly reduced by sulfatase treatment of PGM and in the presence of acidic and desialylated oligosaccharide fractions containing sulfated carbohydrate residues prepared from PGM, demonstrating that sulfated carbohydrate moieties mediated binding. Histochemical staining revealed similar localization of His6-EF-Tu and high iron diamine staining in porcine mucosa. These results indicated that EF-Tu bound PGM via sulfated carbohydrate moieties. To characterize the contribution of EF-Tu to the interaction between bacterial cells and PGM, we tested whether anti-EF-Tu antibodies could inhibit the interaction. Binding of L. reuteri JCM1081 to PGM was significantly blocked in a concentration-dependent matter, demonstrating the involvement of EF-Tu in bacterial adhesion. In conclusion, the present results demonstrated, for the first time, that EF-Tu bound sulfated carbohydrate moieties of sulfated glycolipids and sulfomucin, thereby promoting adhesion of L. reuteri to mucosal surfaces.

  14. Bacterial Conjunctivitis

    OpenAIRE

    Köhle, Ülkü; Kükner, Şahap

    2003-01-01

    Conjunctivitis is an infection of the conjunctiva, generally characterized by irritation, itching, foreign body sensation, tearing and discharge. Bacterial conjunctivitis may be distinguished from other types of conjunctivitis by the presence of yellow–white mucopurulent discharge. It is the most common form of ocular infection all around the world. Staphylococcus species are the most common bacterial pathogenes, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus i...

  15. Studies on sulfate attack: Mechanisms, test methods, and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhanam, Manu

    The objective of this research study was to investigate various issues pertaining to the mechanism, testing methods, and modeling of sulfate attack in concrete. The study was divided into the following segments: (1) effect of gypsum formation on the expansion of mortars, (2) attack by the magnesium ion, (3) sulfate attack in the presence of chloride ions---differentiating seawater and groundwater attack, (4) use of admixtures to mitigate sulfate attack---entrained air, sodium citrate, silica fume, and metakaolin, (5) effects of temperature and concentration of the attack solution, (6) development of new test methods using concrete specimens, and (7) modeling of the sulfate attack phenomenon. Mortar specimens using portland cement (PC) and tricalcium silicate (C 3S), with or without mineral admixtures, were prepared and immersed in different sulfate solutions. In addition to this, portland cement concrete specimens were also prepared and subjected to complete and partial immersion in sulfate solutions. Physical measurements, chemical analyses and microstructural studies were performed periodically on the specimens. Gypsum formation was seen to cause expansion of the C3S mortar specimens. Statistical analyses of the data also indicated that the quantity of gypsum was the most significant factor controlling the expansion of mortar bars. The attack by magnesium ion was found to drive the reaction towards the formation of brucite. Decalcification of the C-S-H and its subsequent conversion to the non-cementitious M-S-H was identified as the mechanism of destruction in magnesium sulfate attack. Mineral admixtures were beneficial in combating sodium sulfate attack, while reducing the resistance to magnesium sulfate attack. Air entrainment did not change the measured physical properties, but reduced the visible distress of the mortars. Sodium citrate caused a substantial reduction in the rate of damage of the mortars due to its retarding effect. Temperature and

  16. DMBT1 functions as pattern-recognition molecule for poly-sulfated and poly-phosphorylated ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    End, Caroline; Bikker, Floris; Renner, Marcus;

    2009-01-01

    unraveling the molecular basis of its function in mucosal protection and of its broad pathogen-binding specificity. We report that DMBT1 directly interacts with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) and carrageenan, a structurally similar sulfated polysaccharide, which is used as a texturizer and thickener in human...... dietary products. However, binding of DMBT1 does not reduce the cytotoxic effects of these agents to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. DSS and carrageenan compete for DMBT1-mediated bacterial aggregation via interaction with its bacterial-recognition motif. Competition and ELISA studies identify poly-sulfated...... propose that DMBT1 functions as pattern-recognition molecule for poly-sulfated and poly-phosphorylated ligands providing a molecular basis for its broad bacterial-binding specificity and its inhibitory effects on LPS-induced TLR4-mediated NF-kappaB activation....

  17. Drag increase and drag reduction found in phytoplankton and bacterial cultures in laminar flow: Are cell surfaces and EPS producing rheological thickening and a Lotus-leaf Effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkinson, Ian R.; Sun, Jun

    2014-03-01

    The laminar-flow viscosity of ocean and other natural waters consists of a Newtonian aqueous component contributed by water and salts, and a non-Newtonian one contributed mainly by exopolymeric polymers (EPS) derived largely from planktonic algae and bacteria. Phytoplankton and EPS form thin layers in stratified waters, often associated with density discontinuities. A recent model (Jenkinson and Sun, 2011. J. Plankton Res., 33, 373-383) investigated possible thalassorheological control of pycnocline thickness (PT) by EPS secreted by the harmful dinoflagellate Karenia mikimotoi. The model, based on published measurements of viscosity increase by this species, found that whether it can influence PT depends on the relationship between increased viscosity, deformation rates/stresses and length scale, which the present work has investigated. To do this, flow rate vs. hydrostatic pressure (and hence wall stress) was measured in cultures (relative to that in reference water) in capillaries of 5 radii 0.35-1.5 mm, close to oceanic-turbulence Kolmogorov length. We compared cultures of the potentially harmful algae, K. mikimotoi, Alexandrium catenella, Prorocentrum donghaiense, Skeletonema costatum, Phaeodactylum tricornutum and the bacterium Escherichia coli. Drag increase, ascribed to rheological thickening by EPS, occurred in the smallest capillaries, but drag reduction (DR) occurred in the largest ones. Since this occurred at Reynolds numbers Re too small for turbulence (or turbulent DR) to occur, this was laminar-flow DR. It may have been superhydrophobic DR (SDR), associated with the surfaces of the plankton and bacteria. SDR is associated with the self-cleaning Lotus-leaf Effect, in which water and dirt are repelled from surfaces bearing nm- to µm-sized irregularities coated with hydrophobic polymers. Because DR decreased measured viscosity and EPS thickening increased it, we could not validate the model. DR, however, represents hitherto unknown phenomenon in the

  18. Reconstruction of secular variation in seawater sulfate concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algeo, T. J.; Luo, G. M.; Song, H. Y.; Lyons, T. W.; Canfield, D. E.

    2015-04-01

    Long-term secular variation in seawater sulfate concentrations ([SO42-]SW) is of interest owing to its relationship to the oxygenation history of Earth's surface environment. In this study, we develop two complementary approaches for quantification of sulfate concentrations in ancient seawater and test their application to late Neoproterozoic (635 Ma) to Recent marine units. The "rate method" is based on two measurable parameters of paleomarine systems: (1) the S-isotope fractionation associated with microbial sulfate reduction (MSR), as proxied by Δ34SCAS-PY, and (2) the maximum rate of change in seawater sulfate, as proxied by &partial; δ 34SCAS/∂ t(max). The "MSR-trend method" is based on the empirical relationship of Δ34SCAS-PY to aqueous sulfate concentrations in 81 modern depositional systems. For a given paleomarine system, the rate method yields an estimate of maximum possible [SO42-]SW (although results are dependent on assumptions regarding the pyrite burial flux, FPY), and the MSR-trend method yields an estimate of mean [SO42-]SW. An analysis of seawater sulfate concentrations since 635 Ma suggests that [SO42-]SW was low during the late Neoproterozoic (<5 mM), rose sharply across the Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary (~5-10 mM), and rose again during the Permian (~10-30 mM) to levels that have varied only slightly since 250 Ma. However, Phanerozoic seawater sulfate concentrations may have been drawn down to much lower levels (~1-4 mM) during short (<~2 Myr) intervals of the Cambrian, Early Triassic, Early Jurassic, and Cretaceous as a consequence of widespread ocean anoxia, intense MSR, and pyrite burial. The procedures developed in this study offer potential for future high-resolution quantitative analyses of paleo-seawater sulfate concentrations.

  19. MOLECULAR PHYLOGENETIC AND BIOGEOCHEMICAL STUDIES OF SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA IN THE RHIZOSPHERE OF SPARTINA ALTERNIFLORA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The population composition and biogeochemistry of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the rhizosphere of the marsh grass Spartina alterniflora was investigated over two growing seasons using molecular probing, enumerations of culturable SRB, and measurements of SO42- reduction rat...

  20. Biological sulfate removal from construction and demolition debris leachate: effect of bioreactor configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijjanapanich, Pimluck; Do, Anh Tien; Annachhatre, Ajit P; Esposito, Giovanni; Yeh, Daniel H; Lens, Piet N L

    2014-03-30

    Due to the contamination of construction and demolition debris (CDD) by gypsum drywall, especially, its sand fraction (CDD sand, CDDS), the sulfate content in CDDS exceeds the posed limit of the maximum amount of sulfate present in building sand (1.73 g sulfate per kg of sand for the Netherlands). Therefore, the CDDS cannot be reused for construction. The CDDS has to be washed in order to remove most of the impurities and to obtain the right sulfate content, thus generating a leachate, containing high sulfate and calcium concentrations. This study aimed at developing a biological sulfate reduction system for CDDS leachate treatment and compared three different reactor configurations for the sulfate reduction step: the upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor, inverse fluidized bed (IFB) reactor and gas lift anaerobic membrane bioreactor (GL-AnMBR). This investigation demonstrated that all three systems can be applied for the treatment of CDDS leachate. The highest sulfate removal efficiency of 75-85% was achieved at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 15.5h. A high calcium concentration up to 1,000 mg L(-1) did not give any adverse effect on the sulfate removal efficiency of the IFB and GL-AnMBR systems. PMID:24211179

  1. Bacterial carbonatogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several series of experiments in the laboratory as well as in natural conditions teach that the production of carbonate particles by heterotrophic bacteria follows different ways. The 'passive' carbonatogenesis is generated by modifications of the medium that lead to the accumulation of carbonate and bicarbonate ions and to the precipitation of solid particles. The 'active' carbonatogenesis is independent of the metabolic pathways. The carbonate particles are produced by ionic exchanges through the cell membrane following still poorly known mechanisms. Carbonatogenesis appears to be the response of heterotrophic bacterial communities to an enrichment of the milieu in organic matter. The active carbonatogenesis seems to start first. It is followed by the passive one which induces the growth of initially produced particles. The yield of heterotrophic bacterial carbonatogenesis and the amounts of solid carbonates production by bacteria are potentially very high as compared to autotrophic or chemical sedimentation from marine, paralic or continental waters. Furthermore, the bacterial processes are environmentally very ubiquitous; they just require organic matter enrichment. Thus, apart from purely evaporite and autotrophic ones, all Ca and/or Mg carbonates must be considered as from heterotrophic bacterial origin. By the way, the carbon of carbonates comes from primary organic matter. Such considerations ask questions about some interpretations from isotopic data on carbonates. Finally, bacterial heterotrophic carbonatogenesis appears as a fundamental phase in the relationships between atmosphere and lithosphere and in the geo-biological evolution of Earth. (author)

  2. Multistage Tandem Mass Spectrometry of Chondroitin Sulfate and Dermatan Sulfate

    OpenAIRE

    Bielik, Alicia M.; Zaia, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Chondroitin/dermatan sulfate (CS/DS) is a glycosaminoglycan (GAG) found in abundance in extracellular matrices. In connective tissue, CS/DS proteoglycans play structural roles in maintaining viscoelasticity through the large number of immobilized sulfate groups on CS/DS chains. CS/DS chains also bind protein families including growth factors and growth factor receptors. Through such interactions, CS/DS chains play important roles in neurobiochemical processes, connective tissue homeostasis, c...

  3. Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Slobodanka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis is a common, complex clinical syndrome characterized by alterations in the normal vaginal flora. When symptomatic, it is associated with a malodorous vaginal discharge and on occasion vaginal burning or itching. Under normal conditions, lactobacilli constitute 95% of the bacteria in the vagina. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with severe reduction or absence of the normal H2O2­producing lactobacilli and overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria and Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Mycoplasma hominis and Mobiluncus species. Most types of infectious disease are diagnosed by culture, by isolating an antigen or RNA/DNA from the microbe, or by serodiagnosis to determine the presence of antibodies to the microbe. Therefore, demonstration of the presence of an infectious agent is often a necessary criterion for the diagnosis of the disease. This is not the case for bacterial vaginosis, since the ultimate cause of the disease is not yet known. There are a variety of methods for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis but no method can at present be regarded as the best. Diagnosing bacterial vaginosis has long been based on the clinical criteria of Amsel, whereby three of four defined criteria must be satisfied. Nugent’s scoring system has been further developed and includes validation of the categories of observable bacteria structures. Up­to­date molecular tests are introduced, and better understanding of vaginal microbiome, a clear definition for bacterial vaginosis, and short­term and long­term fluctuations in vaginal microflora will help to better define molecular tests within the broader clinical context.

  4. Biological sulfate removal from construction and demolition debris leachate: Effect of bioreactor configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kijjanapanich, Pimluck, E-mail: som_cheng00@hotmail.com [Pollution Prevention and Resource Recovery Chair Group, UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education, Westvest 7, 2611 AX Delft (Netherlands); Do, Anh Tien [Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620 (United States); Annachhatre, Ajit P. [Environmental Engineering and Management, Asian Institute of Technology, PO Box 4, Klongluang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Esposito, Giovanni [Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering, University of Cassino and Southern Lazio, Via Di Biasio 43, 03043 Cassino (Italy); Yeh, Daniel H. [Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620 (United States); Lens, Piet N.L. [Pollution Prevention and Resource Recovery Chair Group, UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education, Westvest 7, 2611 AX Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Novel biological technique for gypsum removal from CDD. • CDDS leachate treatment performed using different sulfate reducing bioreactors. • Gypsum in CDD can be used as a source of sulfate for sulfate reducing bacteria. • High calcium concentration (1000 mg L{sup −1}) did not affect the bioreactor performance. - Abstract: Due to the contamination of construction and demolition debris (CDD) by gypsum drywall, especially, its sand fraction (CDD sand, CDDS), the sulfate content in CDDS exceeds the posed limit of the maximum amount of sulfate present in building sand (1.73 g sulfate per kg of sand for the Netherlands). Therefore, the CDDS cannot be reused for construction. The CDDS has to be washed in order to remove most of the impurities and to obtain the right sulfate content, thus generating a leachate, containing high sulfate and calcium concentrations. This study aimed at developing a biological sulfate reduction system for CDDS leachate treatment and compared three different reactor configurations for the sulfate reduction step: the upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor, inverse fluidized bed (IFB) reactor and gas lift anaerobic membrane bioreactor (GL-AnMBR). This investigation demonstrated that all three systems can be applied for the treatment of CDDS leachate. The highest sulfate removal efficiency of 75–85% was achieved at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 15.5 h. A high calcium concentration up to 1000 mg L{sup −1} did not give any adverse effect on the sulfate removal efficiency of the IFB and GL-AnMBR systems.

  5. Low-intensity electromagnetic irradiation of 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies enhances the effects of disulfide bonds reducer on Escherichia coli growth and affects the bacterial surface oxidation-reduction state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torgomyan, Heghine [Department of Biophysics of Biology Faculty, Yerevan State University, Yerevan 0025 (Armenia); Trchounian, Armen, E-mail: Trchounian@ysu.am [Department of Biophysics of Biology Faculty, Yerevan State University, Yerevan 0025 (Armenia)

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} Low intensity 70.6 and 73 GHz electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) strongly suppressed Escherichia coli growth at 73 GHz and pH 7.3. {yields} Reducer DL-dithiothreitol had bactericidal effect and disturbed the SH-groups number. {yields} EMI enhanced E. coli sensitivity toward dithiothreitol. {yields} EMI decreased the SH-groups number of membrane disturbed by ATP and N,N'-dicyclohexycarbodiimide. {yields} The changed membrane oxidation-reduction state could be the primary mechanisms in EMI effects. -- Abstract: Low-intensity electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) of 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies (flux capacity - 0.06 mW cm{sup -2}) had bactericidal effects on Escherichia coli. This EMI (1 h) exposure suppressed the growth of E. coli K-12({lambda}). The pH value (6.0-8.0) did not significantly affect the growth. The lag-phase duration was prolonged, and the growth specific rate was inhibited, and these effects were more noticeable after 73 GHz irradiation. These effects were enhanced by the addition of DL-dithiothreitol (DTT), a strong reducer of disulfide bonds in surface membrane proteins, which in its turn also has bactericidal effect. Further, the number of accessible SH-groups in membrane vesicles was markedly decreased by EMI that was augmented by N,N'-dicyclohexycarbodiimide and DTT. These results indicate a change in the oxidation-reduction state of bacterial cell membrane proteins that could be the primary membranous mechanism in the bactericidal effects of low-intensity EMI of the 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies.

  6. Low-intensity electromagnetic irradiation of 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies enhances the effects of disulfide bonds reducer on Escherichia coli growth and affects the bacterial surface oxidation-reduction state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Low intensity 70.6 and 73 GHz electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) strongly suppressed Escherichia coli growth at 73 GHz and pH 7.3. → Reducer DL-dithiothreitol had bactericidal effect and disturbed the SH-groups number. → EMI enhanced E. coli sensitivity toward dithiothreitol. → EMI decreased the SH-groups number of membrane disturbed by ATP and N,N'-dicyclohexycarbodiimide. → The changed membrane oxidation-reduction state could be the primary mechanisms in EMI effects. -- Abstract: Low-intensity electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) of 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies (flux capacity - 0.06 mW cm-2) had bactericidal effects on Escherichia coli. This EMI (1 h) exposure suppressed the growth of E. coli K-12(λ). The pH value (6.0-8.0) did not significantly affect the growth. The lag-phase duration was prolonged, and the growth specific rate was inhibited, and these effects were more noticeable after 73 GHz irradiation. These effects were enhanced by the addition of DL-dithiothreitol (DTT), a strong reducer of disulfide bonds in surface membrane proteins, which in its turn also has bactericidal effect. Further, the number of accessible SH-groups in membrane vesicles was markedly decreased by EMI that was augmented by N,N'-dicyclohexycarbodiimide and DTT. These results indicate a change in the oxidation-reduction state of bacterial cell membrane proteins that could be the primary membranous mechanism in the bactericidal effects of low-intensity EMI of the 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies.

  7. Sulfated compounds from marine organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornprobst, J M; Sallenave, C; Barnathan, G

    1998-01-01

    More than 500 sulfated compounds have been isolated from marine organisms so far but most of them originate from two phyla only, Spongia and Echinodermata. The sulfated compounds are presented according to the phyla they have been identified from and to their chemical structures. Biological activities, when available, are also given. Macromolecules have also been included in this review but without structural details. PMID:9530808

  8. Isolation and identification of bacteria responsible for simultaneous anaerobic ammonium and sulfate removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Sulfate-dependent anaerobic ammonium oxidation is a novel biological reaction,in which ammonium is oxidized with sulfate as the electron acceptor under anoxic conditions.Ammonium and sulfate are cosmopolitan chemical species which are an integral part of the global nitrogen and sulfur cycles.A detailed exploration of sulfate-dependent anaerobic ammonium oxidation is quite practical.In this work,a bacterial strain named ASR has been isolated from an anaerobic ammonia and sulfate removing reactor working under steady-state.On the basis of electron microscopy,physiological tests and 16S rDNA phylogenetic sequence analysis,the strain ASR is found to be related to Bacillus benzoevorans.According to the biological carbon source utilization test,the strain ASR could use many carbon sources.Its optimum pH value and temperature were 8.5 and 30 °C,respectively.The test proves that the strain ASR is able to use sulfate to oxidize ammonia anaerobically.The maximum ammonia and sulfate removal rates were 44.4% and 40.0%,respectively.The present study provided biological evidence for the confirmation and development of sulfate-dependent anaerobic ammonium oxidation and brought new insights into the global nitrogen and sulfur cycles.

  9. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    parameters, which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to...... tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion is...... the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental...

  10. Bacterial lipases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    1994-01-01

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation, mea

  11. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial ecology is concerned with the interactions between bacteria and their biological and nonbiological environments and with the role of bacteria in biogeochemical element cycling. Many fundamental properties of bacteria are consequences of their small size. Thus, they can efficiently exploit...

  12. Diversity of Dominant Bacterial Taxa in Activated Sludge Promotes Functional Resistance following Toxic Shock Loading

    KAUST Repository

    Saikaly, Pascal

    2010-12-14

    Examining the relationship between biodiversity and functional stability (resistance and resilience) of activated sludge bacterial communities following disturbance is an important first step towards developing strategies for the design of robust biological wastewater treatment systems. This study investigates the relationship between functional resistance and biodiversity of dominant bacterial taxa by subjecting activated sludge samples, with different levels of biodiversity, to toxic shock loading with cupric sulfate (Cu[II]), 3,5-dichlorophenol (3,5-DCP), or 4-nitrophenol (4-NP). Respirometric batch experiments were performed to determine the functional resistance of activated sludge bacterial community to the three toxicants. Functional resistance was estimated as the 30 min IC50 or the concentration of toxicant that results in a 50% reduction in oxygen utilization rate compared to a referential state represented by a control receiving no toxicant. Biodiversity of dominant bacterial taxa was assessed using polymerase chain reaction-terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-T-RFLP) targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene. Statistical analysis of 30 min IC50 values and PCR-T-RFLP data showed a significant positive correlation (P<0.05) between functional resistance and microbial diversity for each of the three toxicants tested. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing a positive correlation between biodiversity of dominant bacterial taxa in activated sludge and functional resistance. In this system, activated sludge bacterial communities with higher biodiversity are functionally more resistant to disturbance caused by toxic shock loading. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  13. Biphasic role of chondroitin sulfate in cardiac differentiation of embryonic stem cells through inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D Prinz

    Full Text Available The glycosaminoglycan chondroitin sulfate is a critical component of proteoglycans on the cell surface and in the extracellular matrix. As such, chondroitin sulfate side chains and the sulfation balance of chondroitin play important roles in the control of signaling pathways, and have a functional importance in human disease. In contrast, very little is known about the roles of chondroitin sulfate molecules and sulfation patterns during mammalian development and cell lineage specification. Here, we report a novel biphasic role of chondroitin sulfate in the specification of the cardiac cell lineage during embryonic stem cell differentiation through modulation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. Lineage marker analysis demonstrates that enzymatic elimination of endogenous chondroitin sulfates leads to defects specifically in cardiac differentiation. This is accompanied by a reduction in the number of beating cardiac foci. Mechanistically, we show that endogenous chondroitin sulfate controls cardiac differentiation in a temporal biphasic manner through inhibition of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway, a known regulatory pathway for the cardiac lineage. Treatment with a specific exogenous chondroitin sulfate, CS-E, could mimic these biphasic effects on cardiac differentiation and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. These results establish chondroitin sulfate and its sulfation balance as important regulators of cardiac cell lineage decisions through control of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway. Our work suggests that targeting the chondroitin biosynthesis and sulfation machinery is a novel promising avenue in regenerative strategies after heart injury.

  14. Correlations Between Bacterial Ecology and Mobile DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Newton, Irene L. G.; Bordenstein, Seth R.

    2010-01-01

    Several factors can affect the density of mobile DNA in bacterial genomes including rates of exposure to novel gene pools, recombination, and reductive evolution. These traits are difficult to measure across a broad range of bacterial species, but the ecological niches occupied by an organism provide some indication of the relative magnitude of these forces. Here, by analyzing 384 bacterial genomes assigned to three ecological categories (obligate intracellular, facultative intracellular, and...

  15. Evolution model of δ34S and δ18O in dissolved sulfate in volcanic fan aquifers from recharge to coastal zone and through the Jakarta urban area, Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sources of sulfate in an aquifer system, and its formation/degradation via biogeochemical reactions, were investigated by determining sulfate isotope ratios (δ34SSO4 and δ18OSO4) in dissolved sulfate in groundwater from the Jakarta Basin. The groundwater flow paths, water ages, and geochemical features are well known from previous studies, providing a framework for the groundwater chemical and isotopic data, which is supplemented with data for spring water, river water, hot spring water, seawater, detergents, and fertilizers within the basin. The sulfate isotope composition of groundwater samples varied widely from - 2.9 per mille to + 33.4 per mille for δ34SSO4 and + 4.9 per mille to + 17.8 per mille for δ18OSO4 and changed systematically along its flow direction from the mountains north to the coastal area. The groundwater samples were classified into three groups showing (1) relatively low and narrow δ34SSO4 (+ 2.3 per mille to + 7.6 per mille ) with low and varied δ18OSO4 (+ 4.9 per mille to + 12.9 per mille ) compositions, (2) high and varied δ34SSO4 (+ 10.2 per mille to + 33.4 per mille ) with high δ18OSO4 (+ 12.4 per mille to + 17.3 per mille ) compositions, and (3) low δ34SSO4 (18OSO4 (up to + 17.8 per mille ) compositions. These three types of groundwater were observed in the terrestrial unconfined aquifer, the coastal unconfined and confined aquifers, and the terrestrial confined aquifer, respectively. A combination of field measurements, concentrations, and previously determined δ15NNO3 data, showed that the observed isotopic heterogeneity was mainly the result of contributions of pollutants from domestic sewage in the rural area, mixing of seawater sulfate that had experienced previous bacterial sulfate reduction in the coastal area, and isotopic fractionation during the formation of sulfate through bacterial disproportionation of elemental sulfur. Our results clearly support the hypothesis that human impacts are important factors in

  16. Evolution model of {delta}{sup 34}S and {delta}{sup 18}O in dissolved sulfate in volcanic fan aquifers from recharge to coastal zone and through the Jakarta urban area, Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosono, Takahiro, E-mail: hosono@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Priority Organization for Innovation and Excellence, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Delinom, Robert [Research Centre for Geotechnology, Indonesia Institute of Science, Jln. Cisitu Sangkuriang, Bandung 40135 (Indonesia); Nakano, Takanori [Research Institute for Humanity and Nature, 457-4 Motoyama Kamigamo, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8047 (Japan); Kagabu, Makoto; Shimada, Jun [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2011-06-01

    The sources of sulfate in an aquifer system, and its formation/degradation via biogeochemical reactions, were investigated by determining sulfate isotope ratios ({delta}{sup 34}S{sub SO4} and {delta}{sup 18}O{sub SO4}) in dissolved sulfate in groundwater from the Jakarta Basin. The groundwater flow paths, water ages, and geochemical features are well known from previous studies, providing a framework for the groundwater chemical and isotopic data, which is supplemented with data for spring water, river water, hot spring water, seawater, detergents, and fertilizers within the basin. The sulfate isotope composition of groundwater samples varied widely from - 2.9 per mille to + 33.4 per mille for {delta}{sup 34}S{sub SO4} and + 4.9 per mille to + 17.8 per mille for {delta}{sup 18}O{sub SO4} and changed systematically along its flow direction from the mountains north to the coastal area. The groundwater samples were classified into three groups showing (1) relatively low and narrow {delta}{sup 34}S{sub SO4} (+ 2.3 per mille to + 7.6 per mille ) with low and varied {delta}{sup 18}O{sub SO4} (+ 4.9 per mille to + 12.9 per mille ) compositions, (2) high and varied {delta}{sup 34}S{sub SO4} (+ 10.2 per mille to + 33.4 per mille ) with high {delta}{sup 18}O{sub SO4} (+ 12.4 per mille to + 17.3 per mille ) compositions, and (3) low {delta}{sup 34}S{sub SO4} (<+6.1 per mille ) with high {delta}{sup 18}O{sub SO4} (up to + 17.8 per mille ) compositions. These three types of groundwater were observed in the terrestrial unconfined aquifer, the coastal unconfined and confined aquifers, and the terrestrial confined aquifer, respectively. A combination of field measurements, concentrations, and previously determined {delta}{sup 15}N{sub NO3} data, showed that the observed isotopic heterogeneity was mainly the result of contributions of pollutants from domestic sewage in the rural area, mixing of seawater sulfate that had experienced previous bacterial sulfate reduction in the

  17. Microbial degradation of toluene under sulfate-reducing conditions and the influence of iron on the process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toluene degradation occurred concomitantly with sulfate reduction in anaerobic microcosms inoculated with contaminated subsurface soil from an aviation fuel storage facility near the Patuxent River (Md.). Similar results were obtained for enrichment cultures in which toluene was the sole carbon source. Several lines of evidence suggest that toluene degradation was directly coupled to sulfate reduction in Patuxent River microcosms and enrichment cultures: (1) the two processes were synchronous and highly correlated, (2) the observed stoichiometric ratios of moles of sulfate consumed per mole of toluene consumed were consistent with the theoretical ratio for the oxidation of toluene to CO2 coupled with the reduction of sulfate to hydrogen sulfide, and (3) toluene degradation ceased when sulfate was depleted, and conversely, sulfate reduction ceased when toluene was depleted. Mineralization of toluene was confirmed in experiments with [ring-U-14C]toluene. The addition of millimolar concentrations of amorphous Fe(OH)3 to Patuxent River microcosms and enrichment cultures either greatly facilitated the onset of toluene degradation or accelerated the rate once degradation had begun. In iron-amended microcosms and enrichment cultures, ferric iron reduction proceeded concurrently with toluene degradation and sulfate reduction. Stoichiometric data and other observations indicate that ferric iron reduction was not directly coupled to toluene oxidation but was a secondary, presumably abiotic, reaction between ferric iron and biogenic hydrogen sulfide

  18. Oxygen-Dependent Growth of the Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio oxyclinae in Coculture with Marinobacter sp. Strain MB in an Aerated Sulfate-Depleted Chemostat

    OpenAIRE

    Sigalevich, Pavel; Cohen, Yehuda

    2000-01-01

    A chemostat coculture of the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio oxyclinae and the facultatively aerobic heterotroph Marinobacter sp. strain MB was grown for 1 week under anaerobic conditions at a dilution rate of 0.05 h−1. It was then exposed to an oxygen flux of 223 μmol min−1 by gassing the growth vessel with 5% O2. Sulfate reduction persisted under these conditions, though the amount of sulfate reduced decreased by 45% compared to the amount reduced during the initial anaerobic mode....

  19. Sulfate removal and sulfur transformation in constructed wetlands: The roles of filling material and plant biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Wen, Yue; Zhou, Qi; Huang, Jingang; Vymazal, Jan; Kuschk, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Sulfate in effluent is a challenging issue for wastewater reuse around the world. In this study, sulfur (S) removal and transformation in five batch constructed wetlands (CWs) treating secondary effluent were investigated. The results showed that the presence of the plant cattail (Typha latifolia) had little effect on sulfate removal, while the carbon-rich litter it generated greatly improved sulfate removal, but with limited sulfide accumulation in the pore-water. After sulfate removal, most of the S was deposited with the valence states S (-II) and S (0) on the iron-rich gravel surface, and acid volatile sulfide was the main S sink in the litter-added CWs. High-throughput pyrosequencing revealed that sulfate-reducing bacteria (i.e. Desulfobacter) and sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (i.e. Thiobacillus) were dominant in the litter-added CWs, which led to a sustainable S cycle between sulfate and sulfide. Overall, this study suggests that recycling plant litter and iron-rich filling material in CWs gives an opportunity to utilize the S in the wastewater as both an electron acceptor for sulfate reduction and as an electron donor for nitrate reduction coupled with sulfide oxidation. This leads to the simultaneous removal of sulfate, nitrate, and organics without discharging toxic sulfide into the receiving water body. PMID:27423407

  20. Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS)-Loaded Nanoporous Polymer as Anti-Biofilm Surface Coating Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Li; Molin, Søren; Yang, Liang;

    2013-01-01

    -b-polydimethylsiloxane (1,2-PB-b-PDMS) block copolymer via chemical cross-linking of the 1,2-PB block followed by quantitative removal of the PDMS block. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was loaded into the nanoporous 1,2-PB from aqueous solution. The SDS-loaded nanoporous polymer films were shown to block bacterial attachment...

  1. Effectiveness of copper sulfate and potassium permanganate on channel catfish infected with Flavobacterium columnare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copper sulfate (CuSO4) and potassium permanganate (KMnO4) were evaluated for their effectiveness to curtail mortality and decrease bacterial load in fish tissues and water in channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus naturally infected with Flavobacterium columnare, the causative agent of columnaris. Fis...

  2. Bacterial activities driving arsenic speciation and solubility in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia-Brunet, F.; Seby, F.; Crouzet, C.; Joulian, C.; Mamindy-Pajany, Y.; Guezennec, A. G.; Hurel, C.; Marmier, N.; Bataillard, P.

    2012-04-01

    Harbour and marina sediments represent particular environments, with high concentrations in organic carbon and pollutants. Over 50 million m3 of marine sediments are dredged every year in French maritime and commercial ports, to maintain the water depth suitable for navigation, and the most part of them is discharged in deeper sea zones. The present study aimed to elucidate, using a range of complementary approaches, the influence of bacterial activity on arsenic speciation and mobility in marina sediments. Two sites were considered: L'Estaque, impacted by metallurgical activities and by the commercial port of Marseille, and St-Mandrier, less polluted, affected by classical chemical pollutants associated to professional and recreational boating. Arsenic concentration was noticeably higher in l'Estaque sediment (200-350 mg/kg) than in St-Mandrier sediment (15-50 mg/kg). In the solid phases, As(III) was the dominant species in L'Estaque sediment, whereas As(V) was the main form in St Mandrier sediment. At both sites, arsenic was the major trace element detected in interstitial water. Free sulfide and thio-arsenic complexes were detected in the interstitial water of l'Estaque sediment, suggesting a role of sulfate-reduction bacterial activity on arsenic solubility. Anaerobic microcosm experiments confirmed this hypothesis, as stimulation of sulfate-reduction induced a dramatic increase of arsenic concentration in the liquid phase, linked to the formation of soluble thio-arsenic complexes. Nevertheless, microcosms performed in aerobic conditions showed that bacterial activity globally decreased the transfer of arsenic from the sediment toward the overlying water. A red-brown fine layer developed at the sediment-water interface. Altogether, these results suggest that the sediment-water interface zone and the close transition area between aerobic and anaerobic conditions host intense biogeochemical reactions involving As, Fe and S species. These reactions most probably

  3. Fermentation parameters, quality and losses in sugarcane silages treated with chemical additives and a bacterial inoculant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André de Faria Pedroso

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this trial was to evaluate chemical additives and a bacterial inoculant on the inhibition of alcoholic fermentation and reduction of losses in sugarcane silages. Treatments were (doses on a fresh forage basis: without additive (control; urea (10 g/kg; urea (5 g/kg + sodium benzoate (0.5 g/kg; sodium benzoate (1 g/kg; urea + ammonium sulfate in a 9:1 relation (10 g/kg; Lactobacillus buchneri (5 × 10(4 cfu/g. Silages were produced in 10.16- × 30-cm PVC tubes, provided with tight lids adapted with Bunsen valves for gas losses quantification. Minisilos were opened 139 days after ensiling. Ethanol content (227 g/kg dry matter - DM and total DM loss (30% were high in the control silage. All additives, except benzoate, decreased ethanol concentration in silages. Inoculation with L. buchneri increased acetic acid content in the silage, resulting in a 41% reduction in ethanol content and the lowest gas loss among treatments (15.2%. There was synergistic effect between additives for the combined use of urea and benzoate. Silage treated with urea + ammonium sulfate has higher content of total digestible nutrients than the silage treated with urea exclusively.

  4. Bioengineered heparins and heparan sulfates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Li; Suflita, Matthew; Linhardt, Robert J

    2016-02-01

    Heparin and heparan sulfates are closely related linear anionic polysaccharides, called glycosaminoglycans, which exhibit a number of important biological and pharmacological activities. These polysaccharides, having complex structures and polydispersity, are biosynthesized in the Golgi of animal cells. While heparan sulfate is a widely distributed membrane and extracellular glycosaminoglycan, heparin is found primarily intracellularly in the granules of mast cells. While heparin has historically received most of the scientific attention for its anticoagulant activity, interest has steadily grown in the multi-faceted role heparan sulfate plays in normal and pathophysiology. The chemical synthesis of these glycosaminoglycans is largely precluded by their structural complexity. Today, we depend on livestock animal tissues for the isolation and the annual commercial production of hundred ton quantities of heparin used in the manufacture of anticoagulant drugs and medical device coatings. The variability of animal-sourced heparin and heparan sulfates, their inherent impurities, the limited availability of source tissues, the poor control of these source materials and their manufacturing processes, suggest a need for new approaches for their production. Over the past decade there have been major efforts in the biotechnological production of these glycosaminoglycans, driven by both therapeutic applications and as probes to study their natural functions. This review focuses on the complex biology of these glycosaminoglycans in human health and disease, and the use of recombinant technology in the chemoenzymatic synthesis and metabolic engineering of heparin and heparan sulfates. PMID:26555370

  5. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Herrero, Daniel; Andreu Domingo, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the main cause of vaginal dysbacteriosis in the women during the reproductive age. It is an entity in which many studies have focused for years and which is still open for discussion topics. This is due to the diversity of microorganisms that cause it and therefore, its difficult treatment. Bacterial vaginosis is probably the result of vaginal colonization by complex bacterial communities, many of them non-cultivable and with interdependent metabolism where anaerobic populations most likely play an important role in its pathogenesis. The main symptoms are an increase of vaginal discharge and the unpleasant smell of it. It can lead to serious consequences for women, such as an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus and upper genital tract and pregnancy complications. Gram stain is the gold standard for microbiological diagnosis of BV, but can also be diagnosed using the Amsel clinical criteria. It should not be considered a sexually transmitted disease but it is highly related to sex. Recurrence is the main problem of medical treatment. Apart from BV, there are other dysbacteriosis less characterized like aerobic vaginitis of which further studies are coming slowly but are achieving more attention and consensus among specialists. PMID:27474242

  6. Effect of Influent HRT on Pretreatment of Sulfate-Laden Food Wastewater for Desulfurization-Denitrification Process

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Li; Jian-Guo Lin; Xiao Liang; Lei Liu

    2014-01-01

    In order to treat wastewater rich in sulfate and organic carbon, an anaerobic attached-growth bioreactor was set up. It was the pretreatment of mixotrophic desulfurization-denitrification process and the effect of influent HRT was considered. The HRT was decreased from 128 to 6.2 h, while the sulfate removal rate, the organic carbon removal rate and sulfide generating rate were analyzed, respectively. The results showed that the suitable HRT in sulfate reduction stage for the pretreatment of ...

  7. Optimizing substrate for sulfate-reducing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microbial sulfate reduction followed by sulfide precipitation effectively removes heavy metals from wastewaters. The substrate in the anaerobic zone in a constructed wetland can be designed to emphasize this removal process. This group of bacteria requires CH2O, P, N, and SO4=, reducing conditions, and pH range of 5-9 (pH=7 is optimum). The objective of this study was to find an inexpensive source of nutrients that would give the best initial production of sulfide and make a good wetland substrate. All tested materials contain sufficient P and N; mine drainage provides sulfate. Thus, tests focused on finding organic material that provides the proper nutrients and does not cause the culture to fall below pH of 5. Among chemical nutrients, sodium lactate combined with (NH4)2HPO4 were the only compounds that produced sulfide after 11 days. Among complex nutrients, only cow manure produced sulfide after 26 days. Among complex carbohydrates, cracked corn and raw rice produced sulfide after 10 days. Most substrates failed to produce sulfide because anaerobic fermentation reduced the pH below 5. Presently, cracked corn is the best candidate for a substrate. Five grams of cow manure produced 0.14 millimole of sulfide whereas 0.1 g of cracked corn produced 0.22 millimole

  8. Spot test analysis of microbial contents during composting of kitchen- and garden biowaste: sampling procedures, bacterial reductions, time-temperature relationships, and their relevance for EU-regulations concerning animal by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijlsma, P B; de Wit, D H; Duindam, J W; Elsinga, G J; Elsinga, W

    2013-01-30

    This study was aimed to collect data and develop methodologies to determine if and how Dutch biowaste composting plants can meet the microbiological requirements set out in EU-Regulations (EC) 1774/2002 and (EC) 1069/2009, and to provide the European Food and Safety Authority (EFSA) with data and analysis for evaluation of these regulations. We examined twenty plant locations and four types of composting technologies, all with forced aeration and without an anaerobic digestion phase. Raw biowaste, material after sanitation and compost were sampled by spot test analysis according to a standard protocol, and according to an additional protocol with enhanced hygienic precautions. Samples were analyzed for Escherichia coli, Enterococcaceae and Salmonella content. The latter protocol resulted in improved bacterial reductions after sanitation, whereas in compost Enterococcus levels but not E. coli levels increased substantially with both protocols, due to more thermo-resistant regrowth. Salmonella presence in compost coincided with low temperatures and increased levels of E. coli and Enterococcus, absence of Salmonella was associated with absence of E. coli (74%), but not with absence of Enterococcus (17%). In compost, E. coli and Salmonella showed a comparable time-temperature inactivation pattern. A pilot study with co-composting of biowaste and poultry manure indicated a similar inactivation pattern for ESBL-containing bacteria. We conclude that the abundance of Enterococcus in compost is caused by regrowth and not by (re)contamination, and that E. coli is a more reliable indicator species for the absence/presence of Salmonella in compost. Compliance with current EU-regulations concerning biowaste composting can be shown by spot test analysis at all examined plants, provided that adequate hygienic precautions are taken during sampling. PMID:23262408

  9. Tris(diisopropylammonium hydrogensulfate sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamhossein Sh. Mohammadnezhad

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The cations and anions of the title salt, 3C6H16N+·HSO4−·SO42−, are linked by N—H...O and O—H...O hydrogen bonds into a three-dimensional network. The hydrogensulfate ion, with a single S—O(H bond of 1.563 (2 Å, forms a short O—H...O hydrogen bond [O...O = 2.609 (2 Å] to the sulfate ion. The hydrogensulfate ion accepts two hydrogen bonds from two cations, whereas the sulfate ion, as an acceptor, binds to four cations. The sulfate ion is disordered approximately equally over two sites related by rotation around one of the O—S bonds.

  10. Acid Sulfate Alteration on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.

    2016-01-01

    A variety of mineralogical and geochemical indicators for aqueous alteration on Mars have been identified by a combination of surface and orbital robotic missions, telescopic observations, characterization of Martian meteorites, and laboratory and terrestrial analog studies. Acid sulfate alteration has been identified at all three landing sites visited by NASA rover missions (Spirit, Opportunity, and Curiosity). Spirit landed in Gusev crater in 2004 and discovered Fe-sulfates and materials that have been extensively leached by acid sulfate solutions. Opportunity landing on the plains of Meridiani Planum also in 2004 where the rover encountered large abundances of jarosite and hematite in sedimentary rocks. Curiosity landed in Gale crater in 2012 and has characterized fluvial, deltaic, and lacustrine sediments. Jarosite and hematite were discovered in some of the lacustrine sediments. The high elemental abundance of sulfur in surface materials is obvious evidence that sulfate has played a major role in aqueous processes at all landing sites on Mars. The sulfate-rich outcrop at Meridiani Planum has an SO3 content of up to 25 wt.%. The interiors of rocks and outcrops on the Columbia Hills within Gusev crater have up to 8 wt.% SO3. Soils at both sites generally have between 5 to 14 wt.% SO3, and several soils in Gusev crater contain around 30 wt.% SO3. After normalization of major element compositions to a SO3-free basis, the bulk compositions of these materials are basaltic, with a few exceptions in Gusev crater and in lacustrine mudstones in Gale crater. These observations suggest that materials encountered by the rovers were derived from basaltic precursors by acid sulfate alteration under nearly isochemical conditions (i.e., minimal leaching). There are several cases, however, where acid sulfate alteration minerals (jarosite and hematite) formed in open hydrologic systems, e.g., in Gale crater lacustrine mudstones. Several hypotheses have been suggested for the

  11. Structum (chondroitin sulfate in treatment of osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O J Varga

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess Structum (chondroitin sulfate efficacy in treatment of osteoarthritis in Republic of Karelia. Methods. 34 pts with osteoarthritis (mean disease duration 6,44±0,67 years were included. Functional Leken score (FLS, pain at rest and at walk on visual analog scale (VAS, pts nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID requirement (diclofenac daily requirement in mg, percent of pts refused NSAID treatment, achievement of clinically significant improvement (40% decrease of FLS and/or 50% decrease of NSAID requirement were regarded as variables for the evaluation of therapy efficacy. Results. Structum administration in pts with osteoarthritis provided reduction of FLS, pain at rest and at walk, NSAID requirement and in some cases allowed to withdraw of NSAID completely. Structum has good safety and is effective in doctor and pts opinion. Conclusion. Structum is an effective drug for treatment of osteoarthritis.

  12. Pengaruh Pemberian Sedimen Bakau dan Sedimen Rawa Terhadap Perubahan Populasi Bakteri dan Kandungan Sulfat Dalam Air Asam Tambang

    OpenAIRE

    Qalbi, Nur

    2014-01-01

    ???Influence of Mangrove Sediments and Marsh Sediments to change in Bacterial Population and Content of Sulfate in Acid mine Drainage??? By Nur Qalbi (H41110260) . This research aims to overcome the problem of acid mine drainage by using sulfate reducing bacteria on mangrove sediments and marsh sediments. Spesifically, this research aims to know the change of total number bacteria and raise the pH on water acid mine drainage after given a treatment of mangrove sediments and marsh sediments. P...

  13. Effect of sulfate on methanogenic communities that degrade unsaturated and saturated long-chain fatty acids (LCFA)

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, D.Z.; Alves, J.I.; Alves, M. M.; Smidt, Hauke; Stams, A.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria involved in the degradation of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA), in the presence of sulfate as electron acceptor, were studied by combined cultivation-dependent and molecular techniques. The bacterial diversity in four mesophilic sulfate-reducing enrichment cultures, growing on oleate (C18:1, unsaturated LCFA) or palmitate (C16:0, saturated LCFA), was studied by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiling of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified 16S rRNA gene ...

  14. Brittlestars contain highly sulfated chondroitin sulfates/dermatan sulfates that promote fibroblast growth factor 2-induced cell signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Ramachandra, Rashmi; Namburi, Ramesh B; Ortega-Martinez, Olga; Shi, Xiaofeng; Zaia, Joseph; Dupont, Sam T.; Thorndyke, Michael C; Lindahl, Ulf; Spillmann, Dorothe

    2013-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) isolated from brittlestars, Echinodermata class Ophiuroidea, were characterized, as part of attempts to understand the evolutionary development of these polysaccharides. A population of chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate (CS/DS) chains with a high overall degree of sulfation and hexuronate epimerization was the major GAG found, whereas heparan sulfate (HS) was below detection level. Enzymatic digestion with different chondroitin lyases revealed exceptionally high p...

  15. Reduced Sulfation of Chondroitin Sulfate but Not Heparan Sulfate in Kidneys of Diabetic db/db Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Reine, Trine M.; Grøndahl, Frøy; Jenssen, Trond G.; Hadler-Olsen, Elin; Prydz, Kristian; Kolset, Svein O.

    2013-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans are hypothesized to contribute to the filtration barrier in kidney glomeruli and the glycocalyx of endothelial cells. To investigate potential changes in proteoglycans in diabetic kidney, we isolated glycosaminoglycans from kidney cortex from healthy db/+ and diabetic db/db mice. Disaccharide analysis of chondroitin sulfate revealed a significant decrease in the 4-O-sulfated disaccharides (D0a4) from 65% to 40%, whereas 6-O-sulfated disaccharides (D0a6) were redu...

  16. Status of copper sulfate - 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is brief overview of the Technical Sections completed and being worked on for the New Animal Drug Application (NADA) for copper sulfate. Initial Label Claim (Ich on catfish): 1) Human Food Safety - Complete for all fin fish – February 2004. This includes human intestinal microflora issues,...

  17. Sulfate transport in toad skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Simonsen, K

    1988-01-01

    1. In short-circuited toad skin preparations exposed bilaterally to NaCl-Ringer's containing 1 mM SO2(-4), influx of sulfate was larger than efflux showing that the skin is capable of transporting sulfate actively in an inward direction. 2. This active transport was not abolished by substituting...... apical Na+ for K+. 3. Following voltage activation of the passive Cl- permeability of the mitochondria-rich (m.r.) cells sulfate flux-ratio increased to a value predicted from the Ussing flux-ratio equation for a monovalent anion. 4. In such skins, which were shown to exhibit vanishingly small leakage...... conductances, the variation of the rate coefficient for sulfate influx (y) was positively correlated with the rate coefficient for Cl- influx (x), y = 0.035 x - 0.0077 cm/sec (r = 0.9935, n = 15). 5. Addition of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine to the serosal bath of short...

  18. Chromium reduction in Pseudomonas putida.

    OpenAIRE

    Ishibashi, Y.; Cervantes, C; Silver, S

    1990-01-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium (chromate) to less-toxic trivalent chromium was studied by using cell suspensions and cell-free supernatant fluids from Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. Chromate reductase activity was associated with soluble protein and not with the membrane fraction. The crude enzyme activity was heat labile and showed a Km of 40 microM CrO4(2-). Neither sulfate nor nitrate affected chromate reduction either in vitro or with intact cells.

  19. Chromium reduction in Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Y; Cervantes, C; Silver, S

    1990-01-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium (chromate) to less-toxic trivalent chromium was studied by using cell suspensions and cell-free supernatant fluids from Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. Chromate reductase activity was associated with soluble protein and not with the membrane fraction. The crude enzyme activity was heat labile and showed a Km of 40 microM CrO4(2-). Neither sulfate nor nitrate affected chromate reduction either in vitro or with intact cells. PMID:2389940

  20. Reversibility of soil solution acidity and of sulfate retention in acid forest soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alewell, C.; Matzner, E. (Universitaet Bayreuth, Bayreuth (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Bodenoekologie)

    1993-11-01

    To quantify the effects of reduced sulfate input on the chemistry of soil solution and soil S storage in acid forest soils, an experiment with undisturbed soil columns from two different sites was implemented. The acid cambisol of the Solling is subjected to a high sulfate input and especially the B-horizon has a high sulfate content. On the contrary, the podzol of the Fuhrberg site is subjected to low input and has low sulfate content. Undisturbed soil columns were taken from both sites and were irrigated at 6[degree]C with a precipitation rate of 3 mmd[sup -1] over 10 mo. In treatment No. 1, an artificial throughfall with pH 5.2 and reduced sulfate load (45[mu]mol L[sup -1]) was applied. In treatment No. 2, an artificial throughfall representing a high sulfate deposition (427 [mu]mol L[sup -1], pH 3.2) was used. In the case of the Solling soil, the pH of soil solution was unaffected by treatments during the entire experiment. Alkalinity of the soil solution was slightly increased in treatment No. 1 at a depth of 20 cm. While treatment No. 1 resulted in a reduction of the sulfate concentrations of the soil solution in the top soil, sulfate concentrations were unaffected at a depth of 40 cm. The B-horizon of the Solling soil prevented deacidification of the soil solution by desorption of previously stored sulfate. In the case of the Fuhrberg soil, treatment No. 1 resulted in reduced sulfate concentrations of the soil solution even in deeper soil layers with concentrations approaching input levels. The pH of the solution was slightly elevated and the alkalinity of the solution increased. Organic S compounds in the soil seemed to have no influence on sulfate release in either soils. 37 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  2. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  3. 21 CFR 186.1797 - Sodium sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium sulfate. 186.1797 Section 186.1797 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1797 Sodium sulfate. (a) Sodium sulfate (Na2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7757-82-6... crystalline powder. It is prepared by the neutralization of sulfuric acid with sodium hydroxide. (b)...

  4. Sulfate-reducing prokaryotes in river floodplains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miletto, M.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis constitutes a pioneer attempt at elucidating the ecology of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes in river floodplains. These are non-typical sulfate-reducing environmental settings, given the generally low sulfate concentration that characterize freshwater habitats, and river flow regulation tha

  5. 21 CFR 582.5461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese sulfate. 582.5461 Section 582.5461 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Product. Manganese sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  6. 21 CFR 184.1461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Manganese sulfate. 184.1461 Section 184.1461 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Manganese sulfate (MnSO4·H2O, CAS... manganese compounds with sulfuric acid. It is also obtained as a byproduct in the manufacture...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium sulfate. 184.1443 Section 184.1443 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4·7H2O, CAS... magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate with sulfuric acid and evaporating the solution to...

  8. 21 CFR 582.5443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 582.5443 Section 582.5443 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Product. Magnesium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  9. Bacterial hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lauga, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass, and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micron scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically-complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, we review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  10. Pore-water sulfate concentration profiles of sediment cores from Krishna-Godavari and Goa basins, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mazumdar, A; Paropkari, A; Borole, D.V.; Rao, B.R.; Khadge, N.H.; Karisiddaiah, S.M; Kocherla, M; Joao, H.M

    . Authigenic carbonates with depleted carbon isotopic composition (Delta sup(13) C = - 48 to - 50 %) at the base of the sulfate reduction zone in a core from K -G suggests anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) process. The possibility. that the underlying methane...

  11. High sulfur isotope fractionation associated with anaerobic oxidation of methane in a low sulfate, iron rich environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Hannah; Thamdrup, Bo; Habicht, Kirsten

    2016-06-01

    Sulfur isotope signatures provide key information for the study of microbial activity in modern systems and the evolution of the Earth surface redox system. Microbial sulfate reducers shift sulfur isotope distributions by discriminating against heavier isotopes. This discrimination is strain-specific and often suppressed at sulfate concentrations in the lower micromolar range that are typical to freshwater systems and inferred for ancient oceans. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is a sulfate-reducing microbial process with a strong impact on global sulfur cycling in modern habitats and potentially in the geological past, but its impact on sulfur isotope signatures is poorly understood, especially in low sulfate environments. We investigated sulfur cycling and 34S fractionation in a low-sulfate freshwater sediment with biogeochemical conditions analogous to Early Earth environments. The zone of highest AOM activity was associated in situ with a zone of strong 34S depletions in the pool of reduced sulfur species, indicating a coupling of sulfate reduction and AOM at sulfate concentrations stimulated sulfate reduction and induced a bulk sulfur isotope effect of ~29 ‰. Our results imply that sulfur isotope signatures may be strongly impacted by AOM even at sulfate concentrations two orders of magnitude lower than at present oceanic levels. Therefore, we suggest that sulfur isotope fractionation during AOM must be considered when interpreting 34S signatures in modern and ancient environment.

  12. Methane Production by Microbial Mats Under Low Sulfate Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebout, Brad M.; Hoehler, Tori M.; Thamdrup, Bo; Albert, Dan; Carpenter, Steven P.; Hogan, Mary; Turk, Kendra; DesMarais, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Cyanobacterial mats collected in hypersaline salterns were incubated in a greenhouse under low sulfate concentrations ([SO4]) and examined for their primary productivity and emissions of methane and other major carbon species. Atmospheric greenhouse warming by gases such as carbon dioxide and methane must have been greater during the Archean than today in order to account for a record of moderate to warm paleoclemates, despite a less luminous early sun. It has been suggested that decreased levels of oxygen and sulfate in Archean oceans could have significantly stimulated microbial methanogenesis relative to present marine rates, with a resultant increase in the relative importance of methane in maintaining the early greenhouse. We maintained modern microbial mats, models of ancient coastal marine communities, in artificial brine mixtures containing both modern [SO4=] (ca. 70 mM) and "Archean" [SO4] (less than 0.2 mM). At low [SO4], primary production in the mats was essentially unaffected, while rates of sulfate reduction decreased by a factor of three, and methane fluxes increased by up to ten-fold. However, remineralization by methanogenesis still amounted to less than 0.4 % of the total carbon released by the mats. The relatively low efficiency of conversion of photosynthate to methane is suggested to reflect the particular geometry and chemical microenvironment of hypersaline cyanobacterial mats. Therefore, such mats w-ere probably relatively weak net sources of methane throughout their 3.5 Ga history, even during periods of low- environmental levels oxygen and sulfate.

  13. Isolation and Characterization of a Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium That Anaerobically Degrades Alkanes

    OpenAIRE

    So, Chi Ming; Young, L. Y.

    1999-01-01

    An alkane-degrading, sulfate-reducing bacterial strain, AK-01, was isolated from an estuarine sediment with a history of chronic petroleum contamination. The bacterium is a short, nonmotile, non-spore-forming, gram-negative rod. It is mesophilic and grows optimally at pH 6.9 to 7.0 and at an NaCl concentration of 1%. Formate, fatty acids (C4 to C16) and hydrogen were readily utilized as electron donors. Sulfate, sulfite, and thiosulfate were used as electron acceptors, but sulfur, nitrite, an...

  14. Methane and sulfate dynamics in sediments from mangrove-dominated tropical coastal lagoons, Yucatán, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, P.-C.; Young, M. B.; Miller, L. G.; Herrera-Silveira, J. A.; Paytan, A.

    2015-11-01

    Methane, sulfate and chloride concentrations in sediment porewater from two coastal mangrove ecosystems (Celestún and Chelem Lagoons) on the Yucatán Peninsula, Mexico were measured. In these sediments methane exists in shallow sediments where sulfate is not depleted, and sulfate reduction is actively occurring. A transport-reaction model depicting the various production and consumption processes for methane and sulfate is used to elucidate processes responsible for this observation. The model illustrates that methane in the upper sediments is produced in-situ supported by high dissolved organic matter as well as by non-competitive substrates. In addition methane is contributed to porewater in the upper sediments, where sulfate reduction occurs, by transport from deeper zones within the sedimentary column through bubbles dissolution and diffusion. The shallow methane production and accumulation depths in these sediments promote high methane fluxes to the water column and atmosphere.

  15. Sulfates on Mars: Indicators of Aqueous Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Lane, Melissa D.; Dyar, M. Darby; Brown, Adrian J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent analyses by MER instruments at Meridiani Planum and Gusev crater and the OMEGA instrument on Mars Express have provided detailed information about the presence of sulfates on Mars [1,2,3]. We are evaluating these recent data in an integrated multi-disciplinary study of visible-near-infrared, mid-IR and Mossbauer spectra of several sulfate minerals and sulfate-rich analog sites. Our analyses suggest that hydrated iron sulfates may account for features observed in Mossbauer and mid-IR spectra of Martian soils [4]. The sulfate minerals kieserite, gypsum and other hydrated sulfates have been identified in OMEGA spectra in the layered terrains in Valles Marineris and Terra Meridiani [2]. These recent discoveries emphasize the importance of studying sulfate minerals as tracers of aqueous processes. The sulfate-rich rock outcrops observed in Meridiani Planum may have formed in an acidic environment similar to acid rock drainage environments on Earth [5]. Because microorganisms typically are involved in the oxidation of sulfides to sulfates in terrestrial sites, sulfate-rich rock outcrops on Mars may be a good location to search for evidence of past life on that planet. Whether or not life evolved on Mars, following the trail of sulfate minerals will lead to a better understanding of aqueous processes and chemical weathering.

  16. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to proanthocyanidins in Urell® and reduction of bacterial colonisation of the urinary tract by inhibition of the adhesion of P-fimbriated E. coli to uroepithelial cells pursuant to Article 13(5 of Regulation (EC No 1924/2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Following an application from Pharmatoka, submitted pursuant to Article 13.5 of Regulation (EC No 1924/2006 via the Competent Authority of France, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA was asked to deliver an opinion on the scientific substantiation of a health claim related to a Urell® product containing cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon juice powder standardised for proanthocyanidins (PAC content and bacterial colonisation of the urinary tract by inhibition of the adhesion of P-fimbriated E. coli to uroepithelial cells. The food that is the subject of the health claim is PAC in Urell®. The Panel considers that the food constituent, PAC in Urell®, which is the subject of the claim, is sufficiently characterised. The Panel considers that reduction of bacterial colonisation of the urinary tract by inhibition of the adhesion of P-fimbriated E. coli to uroepithelial cells is a beneficial physiological effect. No human studies from which conclusions could be drawn for the scientific substantiation of the claim were provided by the applicant. The Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has not been established between the consumption of proanthocyanidins in Urell® and reduction of bacterial colonisation of the urinary tract by inhibition of the adhesion of P-fimbriated E. coli to uroepithelial cells.

  17. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to Monurelle® and reduction of bacterial colonisation of the urinary tract by the inhibition of the adhesion of P-fimbriated E.coli to uroepithelial cells pursuant to Article 13(5 of Regulation (EC No 1924/2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Following an application from Zambon B.V., submitted for authorisation of a health claim pursuant to Article 13(5 of Regulation (EC No 1924/2006 via the Competent Authority of the Netherlands, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA was asked to deliver an opinion on the scientific substantiation of a health claim related to Monurelle® and reduction of bacterial colonisation of the urinary tract by the inhibition of the adhesion of P-fimbriated E.coli to uroepithelial cells. The food that is the subject of the health claim, Monurelle®, which is a combination of 120 mg cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon extract (including 36 mg proanthocyanidins and 60 mg of ascorbic acid, is sufficiently characterised. The claimed effect proposed by the applicant is reduction of E.coli adhesion to uroepithelial cells. The Panel considers that reduction of bacterial colonisation of the urinary tract by inhibition of the adhesion of P-fimbriated E.coli to uroepithelial cells is a beneficial physiological effect. Several health claim applications on cranberry products standardised by their proanthocyanidin content have already been evaluated by EFSA with an unfavourable outcome. The Panel notes that no studies from which conclusions could be drawn for the scientific substantiation of the claim were provided by the applicant. The Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has not been established between the consumption of Monurelle® and reduction of bacterial colonisation of the urinary tract by inhibition of the adhesion of P-fimbriated E.coli to uroepithelial cells.

  18. Antimicrobial effect of a crude sulfated polysaccharide from the red seaweed Gracilaria ornata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo das Neves dos Santos Amorim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the yield, chemical composition, specific rotation (SR, infrared (IR spectroscopy and the effect on bacterial growth of a crude sulfated polysaccharide (SP from the red marine alga G. ornata (Go. Go-1 (25°C, Go-2 (80°C, and Go-3 (80°C were sequentially extracted and yielded 9.2%. The contents of sulfate (5.88-10.3% and proteins (0.1-3.7% were small. The values of SR were [µ]D20°f -19.0, -51.0, and -56.5, respectively. IR spectrums showed the presence of galactose-4 sulfate and absence of 3,6-anydrogalactose-2 sulfate, galactose-6 sulfate and galactose-2 sulfate. SR and IR techniques confirmed SPs. Go-3 was tested on the growth of bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter aerogens, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonela choleraesuis and Salmonela typhi, but only E. coli was inhibited.

  19. Comparison of bacterial and archaeal communities in depth-resolved zones in an LNAPL body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irianni-Renno, Maria; Akhbari, Daria; Olson, Mitchell R; Byrne, Adam P; Lefèvre, Emilie; Zimbron, Julio; Lyverse, Mark; Sale, Thomas C; De Long, Susan K

    2016-04-01

    Advances in our understanding of the microbial ecology at sites impacted by light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) are needed to drive development of optimized bioremediation technologies, support longevity models, and develop culture-independent molecular tools. In this study, depth-resolved characterization of geochemical parameters and microbial communities was conducted for a shallow hydrocarbon-impacted aquifer. Four distinct zones were identified based on microbial community structure and geochemical data: (i) an aerobic, low-contaminant mass zone at the top of the vadose zone; (ii) a moderate to high-contaminant mass, low-oxygen to anaerobic transition zone in the middle of the vadose zone; (iii) an anaerobic, high-contaminant mass zone spanning the bottom of the vadose zone and saturated zone; and (iv) an anaerobic, low-contaminant mass zone below the LNAPL body. Evidence suggested that hydrocarbon degradation is mediated by syntrophic fermenters and methanogens in zone III. Upward flux of methane likely contributes to promoting anaerobic conditions in zone II by limiting downward flux of oxygen as methane and oxygen fronts converge at the top of this zone. Observed sulfate gradients and microbial communities suggested that sulfate reduction and methanogenesis both contribute to hydrocarbon degradation in zone IV. Pyrosequencing revealed that Syntrophus- and Methanosaeta-related species dominate bacterial and archaeal communities, respectively, in the LNAPL body below the water table. Observed phylotypes were linked with in situ anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation in LNAPL-impacted soils. PMID:26691516

  20. Heparin cofactor II is degraded by heparan sulfate and dextran sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Akio

    2015-02-20

    Heparan sulfate normally binds to heparin cofactor II and modulates the coagulation pathway by inhibiting thrombin. However, when human heparin cofactor II was incubated with heparan sulfate, heparin cofactor II became degraded. Other glycosaminoglycans were tested, including hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfates, dermatan sulfate, and heparin, but only dextran sulfate also degraded heparin cofactor II. Pretreatment of heparan sulfate with heparinase reduced its heparin cofactor II-degrading activity. Heparan sulfate and dextran sulfate diminished the thrombin inhibitory activity of heparin cofactor II. Other serpins, including antithrombin III and pigment epithelium-derived factor, were also degraded by heparan sulfate. This is the first evidence of acidic polysaccharides exhibiting protein-degrading activity without the aid of other proteins. PMID:25600805

  1. Modeling of ferric sulfate decomposition and sulfation of potassium chloride during grate‐firing of biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hao; Jespersen, Jacob Boll; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming;

    2013-01-01

    Ferric sulfate is used as an additive in biomass combustion to convert the released potassium chloride to the less harmful potassium sulfate. The decomposition of ferric sulfate is studied in a fast heating rate thermogravimetric analyzer and a volumetric reaction model is proposed to describe the...... process. The yields of sulfur oxides from ferric sulfate decomposition under boiler conditions are investigated experimentally, revealing a distribution of approximately 40% SO3 and 60% SO2. The ferric sulfate decomposition model is combined with a detailed kinetic model of gas‐phase KCl sulfation and a...... model of K2SO4 condensation to simulate the sulfation of KCl by ferric sulfate addition. The simulation results show good agreements with experiments conducted in a biomass grate‐firing reactor. The results indicate that the SO3 released from ferric sulfate decomposition is the main contributor to KCl...

  2. Assimilation of terrigenous organic matter via bacterial biomass as a food source for a brackish clam, Corbicula japonica (Mollusca: Bivalva)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Toshiro; Mizota, Chitoshi; Maki, Yonosuke; Matsumasa, Masatoshi

    2013-07-01

    Corbicula japonica collected from the Kitakami River estuary, northeastern Japan, showed lower δ34S values in soft-body parts (+1.7 to +11.0‰) than the ambient seawater sulfate sulfur (+21‰), and this value gradually decreased at successive sites up to 15.8 km upstream from the river mouth. Previous study using carbon and nitrogen isotopes suggests that the bivalve nonselectively assimilates particulate organic matter of marine and terrestrial origin by filter feeding. This pattern in δ34S values may indicate a considerable contribution of a food source derived from terrigenous organic matter, which has low δ34S values close to 0‰, and the bivalve has been reported to have cellulase and hemicellulase activities. Unique fatty acids (iso 17:0 and anteiso 17:0 acids), both characteristic of sulfate-reducing bacteria, were observed in the salt-free, soft-body parts of the bivalve. The concentration of monounsaturated fatty acids, possibly derived from bacteria, was also high. Trace amounts of a polyunsaturated fatty acid (20:5ω3) specific to dinoflagellates were detected. In Corbicula habitats, reductive sandy layers with ample sulfides that were sporadically intercalated into the oxidative sandy sediment were often observed. The stable isotopic signatures of sediment sulfides (acid-volatile sulfide) and associated pore-water sulfates were -8.9 to +8.6‰ and +22.4 to +26.3‰, respectively, indicating the existence of bacterial sulfate-reducing activity and thiobios biomass. These isotopic signatures of the sediment, with the fatty acid composition of the bivalve, confirm the importance of a food source derived from bacteria belonging to the thiobios in the substrate sediments via pedal feeding, rather than direct digestion of terrigenous organic matter, in this estuarine ecosystem.

  3. Pedicle screw reduction and fixation combined with calcium sulfate cement vertebroplasty in the treatment of thoracolumbar fractures%椎弓根钉复位固定结合注射型硫酸钙椎体成形术治疗胸腰椎骨折

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏力今; 周业金; 刘艺明; 潘良春; 李春; 何高

    2011-01-01

    目的 总结椎弓根钉复位固定结合注射型硫酸钙(CSC) 椎体成形术治疗胸腰椎骨折的方法与疗效.方法 对23 例(25椎)胸腰椎骨折采用切开复位椎弓根钉固定,用特定注射器经伤椎椎弓根穿刺注入CSC进行椎体成形术治疗,影像学评估术前、术后及取钉12个月后矢状位指数(SI)及椎体前、后缘高度压缩率变化.结果 平均每个椎体注入CSC 5.34 ml,6例术中发生椎旁渗漏,无椎管内渗漏,术后患者神经功能Frankel分级较术前提高1~2级(P<0.05).术后8~12周影像学结果 提示,硫酸钙在椎体内完全消失,被正常骨组织吸收.术后及取钉12个月后SI角及椎体前、后缘高度压缩率均较术前有明显改善(P<0.01),术后至取钉12个月后椎体前缘无明显丢失,但椎体后缘有少量丢失(P<0.05).本组无椎弓根钉失败病例.结论 椎弓根钉复位固定结合CSC椎体成形术治疗胸腰椎骨折,能使复位后的伤椎恢复其完整形态及椎体强度,提高胸腰椎骨折的临床疗效,其方法简便、安全,近期疗效满意.%Objective To investigate the method and effect of pedicle screw reduction and fixation combined with calcium sulfate cement ( CSC ) vertebroplasty in the treatment of thoracolumbar fractures. Methods 23 cases ( 25 vertebrae ) with thoracolumbar fractures were treated with pedicle screw sagittal index( SI ) angle reduction and fixation combined with CSC vertebroplasty. According to imaging, we evaluated the change SI angle and compression ratio of vertebral body at the time of preoperation, postoperation and 12 months later. Results Each vertebra was injected with 5. 34 ml CSC on average. 6 cases got paravertebral leakage. No vertebral canal leakage was found.Frankel grading of neural function was improved. CSC disappeared in 8 ~12 weeks and substituted by bone. In the postoperative and 12 months films, the SI angle, vertebral height were improved ( P <0. 01 ). The anterior height did not

  4. Sulfate assimilation in eukaryotes: fusions, relocations and lateral transfers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durnford Dion G

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sulfate assimilation pathway is present in photosynthetic organisms, fungi, and many bacteria, providing reduced sulfur for the synthesis of cysteine and methionine and a range of other metabolites. In photosynthetic eukaryotes sulfate is reduced in the plastids whereas in aplastidic eukaryotes the pathway is cytosolic. The only known exception is Euglena gracilis, where the pathway is localized in mitochondria. To obtain an insight into the evolution of the sulfate assimilation pathway in eukaryotes and relationships of the differently compartmentalized isoforms we determined the locations of the pathway in lineages for which this was unknown and performed detailed phylogenetic analyses of three enzymes involved in sulfate reduction: ATP sulfurylase (ATPS, adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase (APR and sulfite reductase (SiR. Results The inheritance of ATPS, APR and the related 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase (PAPR are remarkable, with multiple origins in the lineages that comprise the opisthokonts, different isoforms in chlorophytes and streptophytes, gene fusions with other enzymes of the pathway, evidence a eukaryote to prokaryote lateral gene transfer, changes in substrate specificity and two reversals of cellular location of host- and endosymbiont-originating enzymes. We also found that the ATPS and APR active in the mitochondria of Euglena were inherited from its secondary, green algal plastid. Conclusion Our results reveal a complex history for the enzymes of the sulfate assimilation pathway. Whilst they shed light on the origin of some characterised novelties, such as a recently described novel isoform of APR from Bryophytes and the origin of the pathway active in the mitochondria of Euglenids, the many distinct and novel isoforms identified here represent an excellent resource for detailed biochemical studies of the enzyme structure/function relationships.

  5. Succession of lignocellulolytic bacterial consortia bred anaerobically from lake sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenblum, Elisa; Jiménez, Diego Javier; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2016-03-01

    Anaerobic bacteria degrade lignocellulose in various anoxic and organically rich environments, often in a syntrophic process. Anaerobic enrichments of bacterial communities on a recalcitrant lignocellulose source were studied combining polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and culturing. Three consortia were constructed using the microbiota of lake sediment as the starting inoculum and untreated switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) (acid or heat) or treated (with either acid or heat) as the sole source of carbonaceous compounds. Additionally, nitrate was used in order to limit sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. Bacterial growth took place, as evidenced from 3 to 4 log unit increases in the 16S rRNA gene copy numbers as well as direct cell counts through three transfers on cleaned and reused substrate placed in fresh mineral medium. After 2 days, Aeromonas bestiarum-like organisms dominated the enrichments, irrespective of the substrate type. One month later, each substrate revealed major enrichments of organisms affiliated with different species of Clostridium. Moreover, only the heat-treated substrate selected Dysgonomonas capnocytophagoides-affiliated bacteria (Bacteroidetes). Towards the end of the experiment, members of the Proteobacteria (Aeromonas, Rhizobium and/or Serratia) became dominant in all three types of substrates. A total of 160 strains was isolated from the enrichments. Most of the strains tested (78%) were able to grow anaerobically on carboxymethyl cellulose and xylan. The final consortia yield attractive biological tools for the depolymerization of recalcitrant lignocellulosic materials and are proposed for the production of precursors of biofuels. PMID:26875750

  6. Comparison of normal and asthmatic subjects' responses to sulfate pollutant aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utell, M.J.; Morrow, P.E.; Hyde, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    Epidemiological studies support an association between elevated levels of sulfates and acute respiratory disease. To determine if these pollutants produce airway hyperreactivity, 16 normal and 17 asthmatic subjects inhaled a control NaCl aerosol and the following sulfates: ammonium sulfate, sodium bisulfate, ammonium bisulfate, and sulfuric acid. A Lovelace generator produced particles with an average MMAD of approx. 1.0 ..mu..m (sigma/sub g/ approx. = 2.0) and concentrations of 0.1 and 1.0 mg/m/sup 3/. By double-blind randomization, all subjects breathed these aerosols for a 16-minute period. To determine if sulfate inhalation caused increased reactivity to a known bronchoconstrictor, all subjects inhaled carbachol following each 16-minute exposure. Before, during, and after exposure, pulmonary function studies were performed. When compared to NaCl, sulfate (1 mg/m/sup 3/) produced significant reductions in airway conductance and flow rates in asthmatics. The two most sensitive asthmatics demonstrated changes even at 0.1 mg/m/sup 3/ sulfate. To a far more significant degree, the bronchoconstrictor action of carbachol was potentiated by sulfates more or less in relation to their acidity in normals and asthmatics.

  7. Quantification and control of restrictive ecological factors in acidogenic de-sulfate bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王爱杰; 任南琪

    2002-01-01

    As an artificial microbial ecosystem, acidogenic de-sulfate bioreactor has high efficiency of sulfate removal. The restrictive ecological factors, including causing ecological factors, such as COD/SO42- ratio and sulfate loading rate (Ns), and following ecological factors, such as pH value, oxidation reduction potential (ORP) and alkalinity (ALK) have significant effect on the ability and stability of acidogenic de-sulfate bio-reactor. Continuous flow and batch test were carried out to investigate the quantification and control of COD/SO42- ratio, Ns, pH value, ORP and ALK in acidogenic de-sulfate bioreactor supplied with molasses wastewater as sole organic carbon source and sodium sulfate as electron donor. It was demonstrated that In order to maintain high sulfate removal rate (SRR) of 80% to 90%, the restrictive factors should meet all the requirement as follows: kCOD/ SO42- ratio≥2.0, Ns≤7.5 kg (m3·d)-1,pH=5.7~6.2,ORP=-320~-420 mV and ALK=1 500~2 000 mg/L.

  8. Host cell heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans are ligands for OspF-related proteins of the Lyme disease spirochete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Pin; Bhowmick, Rudra; Coburn, Jenifer; Leong, John M

    2015-10-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease, spreads from the site of the tick bite to tissues such as heart, joints and the nervous tissues. Host glycosaminoglycans, highly modified repeating disaccharides that are present on cell surfaces and in extracellular matrix, are common targets of microbial pathogens during tissue colonization. While several dermatan sulfate-binding B. burgdorferi adhesins have been identified, B. burgdorferi adhesins documented to promote spirochetal binding to heparan sulfate have not yet been identified. OspEF-related proteins (Erps), a large family of plasmid-encoded surface lipoproteins that are produced in the mammalian host, can be divided into the OspF-related, OspEF-leader peptide (Elp) and OspE-related subfamilies. We show here that a member of the OspF-related subfamily, ErpG, binds to heparan sulfate and when produced on the surface of an otherwise non-adherent B. burgdorferi strain, ErpG promotes heparan sulfate-mediated bacterial attachment to the glial but not the endothelial, synovial or respiratory epithelial cells. Six other OspF-related proteins were capable of binding heparan sulfate, whereas representative OspE-related and Elp proteins lacked this activity. These results indicate that OspF-related proteins are heparan sulfate-binding adhesins, at least one of which promotes bacterial attachment to glial cells. PMID:25864455

  9. Evaluating Deterioration of Concrete by Sulfate Attack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Effects of factors such as water to cement ratio, fly ash and silica fume on the resistance of concrete to sulfate attack were investigated by dry-wet cycles and immersion method. The index of the resistance to sulfate attack was used to evaluate the deterioration degree of concrete damaged by sulfate. The relationship between the resistance of concrete to sulfate attack and its permeability/porosity were analyzed as well as its responding mechanism. Results show that the depth of sulfate crystal attack from surface to inner of concrete can be reduced by decreasing w/c and addition of combining fly ash with silica fume. The variation of relative elastic modulus ratio and relative flexural strength ratio of various specimens before and after being subjected to sulfate attack was compared.

  10. Chondroitin Sulfate Perlecan Enhances Collagen Fibril Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, A. J.; Johnson, A. E.; Mörgelin, M.;

    2006-01-01

    disaccharides typical for chondroitin sulfate E. Indeed, purified glycosaminoglycans from perlecan-enriched fractions of cartilage extracts contain elevated levels of 4,6-disulfated chondroitin sulfate disaccharides and enhance collagen fibril formation. The effect on collagen assembly is proportional to the...... content of the 4,6-disulfated disaccharide in the different cartilage extracts, with growth plate cartilage glycosaminoglycan being the most efficient enhancer. These findings demonstrate a role for perlecan chondroitin sulfate side chains in cartilage extracellular matrix assembly and provide an...... collagen type II fibril assembly by perlecan-null chondrocytes. Cartilage perlecan is a heparin sulfate or a mixed heparan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. The latter form binds collagen and accelerates fibril formation in vitro, with more defined fibril morphology and increased fibril diameters...

  11. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to Monurelle® and reduction of bacterial colonisation of the urinary tract by the inhibition of the adhesion of P-fimbriated E.coli to uroepithelial cells pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA)

    2013-01-01

    Following an application from Zambon B.V., submitted for authorisation of a health claim pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 via the Competent Authority of the Netherlands, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to deliver an opinion on the scientific substantiation of a health claim related to Monurelle® and reduction of bacterial colonisation of the urinary tract by the inhibition of the adhesion of P-fimbriated E.coli to uroepithelial ...

  12. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to Monurelle® and reduction of bacterial colonisation of the urinary tract by the inhibition of the adhesion of P-fimbriated E.coli to uroepithelial cells pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    OpenAIRE

    Tetens, Inge

    2013-01-01

    Following an application from Zambon B.V., submitted for authorisation of a health claim pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 via the Competent Authority of the Netherlands, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to deliver an opinion on the scientific substantiation of a health claim related to Monurelle® and reduction of bacterial colonisation of the urinary tract by the inhibition of the adhesion of P-fimbriated E.coli to uroepithelial ...

  13. CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION IN ACID SULFATE LANDSCAPES

    OpenAIRE

    Chuxia Lin

    2012-01-01

    Oxidation of sulfide minerals produces sulfuric acid and consequently creates Acid Sulfate Landscapes (ASLs), which represent one of the most degraded types of land-surface environments. Although acid sulfate-producing weathering is a naturally occurring process, it is markedly facilitated by human intervention. Mining is by far the dominant anthropogenic cause for the creation of inland acid sulfate footprints while land reclamation in coastal lowlands is the driver for the formation of coas...

  14. Methods for sulfate air quality management

    OpenAIRE

    Cass, Glen R.; McMurry, Pamela S.; Houseworth, James E

    1980-01-01

    Executive Summary Abstract: A study of methods for sulfate air quality control strategy design has been conducted. Analytical tools developed were tested within a case study of the nature and causes of the high sulfate concentrations observed in the Los Angeles area. A principal objective was to investigate the least costly means for sulfate air quality improvement in that locale. A long-run average emissions to air quality model was derived which computes pollutant concentrations fr...

  15. Biochemical and molecular characterization of potential phosphate-solubilizing bacteria in acid sulfate soils and their beneficial effects on rice growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panhwar, Qurban Ali; Naher, Umme Aminun; Shamshuddin, Jusop; Jusop, Shamshuddin; Othman, Radziah; Latif, Md Abdul; Ismail, Mohd Razi

    2014-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the total microbial population, the occurrence of growth promoting bacteria and their beneficial traits in acid sulfate soils. The mechanisms by which the bacteria enhance rice seedlings grown under high Al and low pH stress were investigated. Soils and rice root samples were randomly collected from four sites in the study area (Kelantan, Malaysia). The topsoil pH and exchangeable Al ranged from 3.3 to 4.7 and 1.24 to 4.25 cmol(c) kg(-1), respectively, which are considered unsuitable for rice production. Total bacterial and actinomycetes population in the acidic soils were found to be higher than fungal populations. A total of 21 phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB) including 19 N2-fixing strains were isolated from the acid sulfate soil. Using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, three potential PSB strains based on their beneficial characteristics were identified (Burkholderia thailandensis, Sphingomonas pituitosa and Burkholderia seminalis). The isolated strains were capable of producing indoleacetic acid (IAA) and organic acids that were able to reduce Al availability via a chelation process. These PSB isolates solubilized P (43.65%) existing in the growth media within 72 hours of incubation. Seedling of rice variety, MR 219, grown at pH 4, and with different concentrations of Al (0, 50 and 100 µM) was inoculated with these PSB strains. Results showed that the bacteria increased the pH with a concomitant reduction in Al concentration, which translated into better rice growth. The improved root volume and seedling dry weight of the inoculated plants indicated the potential of these isolates to be used in a bio-fertilizer formulation for rice cultivation on acid sulfate soils. PMID:25285745

  16. Biochemical and molecular characterization of potential phosphate-solubilizing bacteria in acid sulfate soils and their beneficial effects on rice growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qurban Ali Panhwar

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to determine the total microbial population, the occurrence of growth promoting bacteria and their beneficial traits in acid sulfate soils. The mechanisms by which the bacteria enhance rice seedlings grown under high Al and low pH stress were investigated. Soils and rice root samples were randomly collected from four sites in the study area (Kelantan, Malaysia. The topsoil pH and exchangeable Al ranged from 3.3 to 4.7 and 1.24 to 4.25 cmol(c kg(-1, respectively, which are considered unsuitable for rice production. Total bacterial and actinomycetes population in the acidic soils were found to be higher than fungal populations. A total of 21 phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB including 19 N2-fixing strains were isolated from the acid sulfate soil. Using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, three potential PSB strains based on their beneficial characteristics were identified (Burkholderia thailandensis, Sphingomonas pituitosa and Burkholderia seminalis. The isolated strains were capable of producing indoleacetic acid (IAA and organic acids that were able to reduce Al availability via a chelation process. These PSB isolates solubilized P (43.65% existing in the growth media within 72 hours of incubation. Seedling of rice variety, MR 219, grown at pH 4, and with different concentrations of Al (0, 50 and 100 µM was inoculated with these PSB strains. Results showed that the bacteria increased the pH with a concomitant reduction in Al concentration, which translated into better rice growth. The improved root volume and seedling dry weight of the inoculated plants indicated the potential of these isolates to be used in a bio-fertilizer formulation for rice cultivation on acid sulfate soils.

  17. Bacterial β-(1,3)-glucan prevents DSS-induced IBD by restoring the reduced population of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang-Ho; Park, Min; Ji, Kon-Young; Lee, Hwa-Youn; Jang, Ji-Hun; Yoon, Il-Joo; Oh, Seung-Su; Kim, Su-Man; Jeong, Yun-Hwa; Yun, Chul-Ho; Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Lee, In-Young; Choi, Ha-Rim; Ko, Ki-sung; Kang, Hyung-Sik

    2014-10-01

    Bacterial β-(1,3)-glucan has more advantages in terms of cost, yield and efficiency than that derived from mushrooms, plants, yeasts and fungi. We have previously developed a novel and high-yield β-(1,3)-glucan produced by Agrobacterium sp. R259. This study aimed to elucidate the functional mechanism and therapeutic efficacy of bacterial β-(1,3)-glucan in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).Mice were orally pretreated with bacterial β-(1,3)-glucan at daily doses of 2.5 or 5mg/kg for 2 weeks. After 6 days of DSS treatment, clinical assessment of IBD severity and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines were evaluated. In vivo cell proliferation was examined by immunohistochemistry using Ki-67 and ER-TR7 antibodies. The frequency of regulatory T cells (Tregs) was analyzed by flow cytometry. Natural killer (NK) activity and IgA level were evaluated using NK cytotoxicity assay and ELISA.The deterioration of body weight gain, colonic architecture, disease score and histological score was recovered in DSS-induced IBD mice when pretreated with bacterial β-(1,3)-glucan. The recruitment of macrophages and the gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-17A/F, were markedly decreased in the colon of β-(1,3)-glucan-pretreated mice. β-(1,3)-Glucan induced the recovery of Tregs in terms of their frequency in DSS-induced IBD mice. Intriguingly, β-(1,3)-glucan reversed the functional defects of NK cells and excessive IgA production in DSS-induced IBD mice.We conclude that bacterial β-(1,3)-glucan prevented the progression of DSS-induced IBD by recovering the reduction of Tregs, functional defect of NK cells and excessive IgA production. PMID:25092569

  18. Influence of sulfate-reducing bacteria on the corrosion of steel in seawater: laboratory and in situ study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fouling reactor was designed to study, the influence of a mixed bio-film on AISI 316 L stainless steel. The bio-film was formed on the steel surface by the fermentative bacterium Vibrio natriegens. The sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris was then introduced in the reactor and colonized the surface, constituting approximately 5 % of the total population. The settlement of an anaerobic bacterium in the bio-film shows in it the existence of anaerobic micro-niches. Stainless steel electrochemical behavior was analyzed using open circuit potential and potentiodynamic polarization curves. Growth of the bio-film does not induce corrosion, but seems to change the cathodic oxygen reduction kinetics, diminishing the corrosion hazard. This effect increases when D. vulgaris grows in the bio-film. An ennobling of the open circuit potential was observed, similar to field cases already described. A case of drilling corrosion of carbon steel in a harbour area showed the characteristics of anaerobic corrosion related to sulfate-reducing bacteria. The total cultivatable SRB population was quantified and metabolic types were enumerated using specific electron donors. A maximum cell density of 1,1 x 108 cells/ cm2 was estimated, revealing a very important growth of SRB on surfaces. Population structure was different in corroded and non-corroded areas. In corroded area, SRB utilizing benzoate and propionate were more abundant. A strain belonging to the sporulating genus Desulfotomaculum was isolated using these substrates, suggesting a partial aeration in the area of hole appearance. However, in vitro corrosion assays showed that the bacterial population sampled in this area induced a consequent weight loss of steel coupons, in the absence of oxygen. This was observed only with a diversified population, similar to that present in situ. It could not be reproduced with a mixed culture of two purified strains. (author)

  19. Methane and sulfate dynamics in sediments from mangrove-dominated tropical coastal lagoons, Yucatan, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, P. C.; Young, Megan B.; Dale, Andrew W.; Miller, Laurence G.; Herrera-Silveira, Jorge A.; Paytan, Adina

    2016-01-01

    Porewater profiles in sediment cores from mangrove-dominated coastal lagoons (Celestún and Chelem) on the Yucatán Peninsula, Mexico, reveal the widespread coexistence of dissolved methane and sulfate. This observation is interesting since dissolved methane in porewaters is typically oxidized anaerobically by sulfate. To explain the observations we used a numerical transport-reaction model that was constrained by the field observations. The model suggests that methane in the upper sediments is produced in the sulfate reduction zone at rates ranging between 0.012 and 31 mmol m−2 d−1, concurrent with sulfate reduction rates between 1.1 and 24 mmol SO42− m−2 d−1. These processes are supported by high organic matter content in the sediment and the use of non-competitive substrates by methanogenic microorganisms. Indeed sediment slurry incubation experiments show that non-competitive substrates such as trimethylamine (TMA) and methanol can be utilized for microbial methanogenesis at the study sites. The model also indicates that a significant fraction of methane is transported to the sulfate reduction zone from deeper zones within the sedimentary column by rising bubbles and gas dissolution. The shallow depths of methane production and the fast rising methane gas bubbles reduce the likelihood for oxidation, thereby allowing a large fraction of the methane formed in the sediments to escape to the overlying water column.

  20. Anaerobic metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds by sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boopathy, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Kulpa, C.F. [Notre Dame Univ., IN (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1994-06-01

    Ecological observations suggest that sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria might metabolize nitroaromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions if appropriate electron donors and electron acceptors are present in the environment, but this ability had not been demonstrated until recently. Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds used aerobic microorganisms. In most cases no mineralization of nitroaromatics occurs, and only superficial modifications of the structures are reported. However, under anaerobic sulfate-reducing conditions, the nitroaromatic compounds reportedly undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. For example, trinitrotoluene under sulfate-reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of ammonia from triaminotoluene is achieved by reductive deamination catalyzed by the enzyme reductive deaminase, with the production of ammonia and toluene. Some sulfate reducers can metabolize toluene to CO{sub 2}. Similar metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. Many methanogenic bacteria can reduce nitroaromatic compounds to amino compounds. In this paper we review the anaerobic metabolic processes of nitroaromatic compounds under sulfate-reducing And methanogenic conditions.

  1. Anaerobic metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds by sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecological observations suggest that sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria might metabolize nitroaromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions if appropriate electron donors and electron acceptors are present in the environment, but this ability had not been demonstrated until recently. Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds used aerobic microorganisms. In most cases no mineralization of nitroaromatics occurs, and only superficial modifications of the structures are reported. However, under anaerobic sulfate-reducing conditions, the nitroaromatic compounds reportedly undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. For example, trinitrotoluene under sulfate-reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of ammonia from triaminotoluene is achieved by reductive deamination catalyzed by the enzyme reductive deaminase, with the production of ammonia and toluene. Some sulfate reducers can metabolize toluene to CO2. Similar metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. Many methanogenic bacteria can reduce nitroaromatic compounds to amino compounds. In this paper we review the anaerobic metabolic processes of nitroaromatic compounds under sulfate-reducing And methanogenic conditions

  2. Expanding the 3-O-Sulfate Proteome-Enhanced Binding of Neuropilin-1 to 3-O-Sulfated Heparan Sulfate Modulates Its Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, Bryan E; Seamen, Emylie; Lawrence, Roger; Parker, Matthew W; Xu, Yongmei; Liu, Jian; Vander Kooi, Craig W; Esko, Jeffrey D

    2016-04-15

    Binding of proteins to heparan sulfate is driven predominantly by electrostatic interactions between positively charged amino acid residues in the protein and negatively charged sulfate groups located at various positions along the polysaccharide chain. Although many heparin/heparan-sulfate-binding proteins have been described, few exhibit preferential binding for heparan sulfates containing relatively rare 3-O-sulfated glucosamine residues. To expand the "3-O-sulfate proteome," affinity matrices were created from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell heparan sulfate engineered in vitro with and without 3-O-sulfate groups. Fractionation of different animal sera yielded several proteins that bound specifically to columns containing 3-O-sulfated heparan sulfate modified by two members of the heparan sulfate 3-O-sulfotransferase superfamily, Hs3st1 and Hs3st2. Neuropilin-1 was analyzed in detail because it has been implicated in angiogenesis and axon guidance. We show that 3-O-sulfation enhanced the binding of neuropilin-1 to heparan sulfate immobilized on plastic plates and to heparan sulfate present on cultured cells. Chemoenzymatically synthesized 3-O-sulfated heparan sulfate dodecamers protected neuropilin-1 from thermal denaturation and inhibited neuropilin-1-dependent, semaphorin-3a-induced growth cone collapse of neurons derived from murine dorsal root ganglia. The effect of 3-O-sulfation was cell autonomous and specific to Hs3st2 based on collapse assays of neurons derived from Hs3st1- and Hs3st2-deficient mice. Finally, 3-O-sulfated heparan sulfate enhanced the inhibition of endothelial cell sprouting by exogenous heparan sulfate. These findings demonstrate a reliable method to identify members of the 3-O-sulfate proteome and that 3-O-sulfation of heparan sulfate can modulate axonal growth cone collapse and endothelial cell sprouting. PMID:26731579

  3. Bacterial Investigation of Ammonium-rich Sediment in the Pearl River Delta, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, K.; Chunbo, H.; Jiao, J. J.; Jidong, G.

    2011-12-01

    High ammonium loading of groundwater is a major concern because of the potential toxicity to ecosystem and human health. As one of the most complex large-scale delta systems in China, Pearl River Delta (PRD) was reported to have the highest ammonium concentration for natural groundwater ever reported globally. In this research, borehole SD14 was drilled through the aquitard into the basal aquifer in the PRD. 16S rRNA gene library construction and Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis were conducted to reveal bacterial community variation of different geology strata. A total of 161 clones from three 16S rRNA libraries were sequenced and clustered into 55 distinct operational taxonomic units (OTU) at 3% cutoff. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that the predominant bacterial phylum was Proteobacteria (50.9%), followed by Chloroflexi (16.8%), Acidobacteria (4.38%) and Firmicutes (3.73%). In the sediment samples from SD14 at the depths of 6.9m, 22.5m and 37.4m, Proteobacteria made up 60.3%, 42.0% and 35.3% of the communities respectively, showing a declining ratio with the depth. Most of the bacteria in all the samples were previously discovered in marine environments, indicating that SD14 used to be in a marine sedimentary environment. Bacteria associated with iron oxidation and nitrogen fixing were found in the sample at 6.9 m, while in the other two samples there existed bacteria which were associated with methane cycling, sulfate reducing and denitrifying. The DGGE results showed that microbial community structures varied significantly with the increase of depth, and that Delftia acidovorans, a species of Proteobacteria which was able to reduce nitrate to nitrite, was the predominant species in samples at 22.5 and 37.4 m, suggesting ammonium as a control factor shaping the bacterial community. The results of this research provided important information of the bacteria in the PRD sediments. High bacterial diversity was observed in samples, and

  4. CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION IN ACID SULFATE LANDSCAPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuxia Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation of sulfide minerals produces sulfuric acid and consequently creates Acid Sulfate Landscapes (ASLs, which represent one of the most degraded types of land-surface environments. Although acid sulfate-producing weathering is a naturally occurring process, it is markedly facilitated by human intervention. Mining is by far the dominant anthropogenic cause for the creation of inland acid sulfate footprints while land reclamation in coastal lowlands is the driver for the formation of coastal ASLs. The projected climate change highlights the possibility of an increase in the frequency and severity of extreme weather events such as droughts and heavy rains, which is likely to accelerate the acid generation in some circumstances and increase the frequency and magnitude of acid discharge. Sea level rise as a result of global warming will cause additional problems with the coastal ASLs. This is a review article. The following aspects are covered: (a the overriding biogeochemical processes leading to acid sulfate-producing weathering, (b a brief introduction to the inland acid sulfate landscapes, (c a brief introduction to the coastal acid sulfate landscapes, (d the likely impacts of climate change on ASLs and (e the possible measures to combat climate change-induced environmental degradation in the identified key acid sulfate footprints. The projected climate change is like to significantly affect the acid sulfate landscapes in different ways. Appropriate management strategies and cost-effective technologies need to be developed in order to minimize the climate change-induced ecological degradation.

  5. Rat pro-opiomelanocortin contains sulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshina, H.; Hortin, G.; Boime, I.

    1982-07-02

    Intermediate lobes isolated from rat pituitary glands incorporated (/sup 35/S)sulfate into pro-opiomelanocortin and other adrenocorticotropic hormone-containing peptides. Incubation of intermediate lobes in medium containing the arginine analog canavanine inhibited the cleavage of pro-opiomelanocortin into smaller products. Pro-opiomelanocortin that accumulated in the presence of canavanine was also sulfated.

  6. INFLUENCE OF THE SEAGRASS THALASSIA TESTUDINUM ON THE COMMUNITY COMPOSITION AND ACTIVITY OF SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA IN AN ESSENTIAL COAST MARINE HABITAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and sulfate reduction rates (SRR) were studied in relation to the community composition of sulfate-reducing bacteria SRB) in a Thalassia testudinum bed and in adjacent unvegetated areas. Sampling took place in Santa Rosa Sound, Pensacola, Flori...

  7. Scintillation properties of lead sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the scintillation properties of lead sulfate (PbSO4), a scintillator that show promise as a high energy photon detector. It physical properties are well suited for gamma detection, as its has a density of 6.4 gm/cm3, a 1/e attenuation length for 511 keV photons of 1.2 cm, is not affected by air or moisture, and is cut and polished easily. In 99.998% pure PbSO4 crystals at room temperature excited by 511 keV annihilation photons, the fluorescence decay lifetime contains significant fast components having 1.8 ns (5%) and 19 ns (36%) decay times, but with longer components having 95 ns (36%) and 425 ns (23%) decays times. The peak emission wavelength is 335 nm, which is transmitted by borosilicate glass windowed photomultiplier tubes. The total scintillation light output increases with decreasing temperature fro 3,200 photons/MeV at +45 degrees C to 4, 900 photons/MeV at room temperature (+25 degrees C) and 68,500 photons/MeV at -145 degrees C. In an imperfect, 3 mm cube of a naturally occurring mineral form of PbSO4 (anglesite) at room temperature, a 511 keV photopeak is seen with a total light output of 60% that BGO. There are significant sample to sample variations of the light output among anglesite samples, so the light output of lead sulfate may improve when large synthetic crystals become available. 10 refs

  8. Inhibition of hydrogen sulfide, methane, and total gas production and sulfate-reducing bacteria in in vitro swine manure by tannins, with focus on condensed quebracho tannins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Terence R; Spence, Cheryl; Cotta, Michael A

    2013-09-01

    Management practices from large-scale swine production facilities have resulted in the increased collection and storage of manure for off-season fertilization use. Odor and emissions produced during storage have increased the tension among rural neighbors and among urban and rural residents. Production of these compounds from stored manure is the result of microbial activity of the anaerobic bacteria populations during storage. In the current study, the inhibitory effects of condensed quebracho tannins on in vitro swine manure for reduction of microbial activity and reduced production of gaseous emissions, including the toxic odorant hydrogen sulfide produced by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), was examined. Swine manure was collected from a local swine facility, diluted in anaerobic buffer, and mixed with 1 % w/v fresh feces. This slurry was combined with quebracho tannins, and total gas and hydrogen sulfide production was monitored over time. Aliquots were removed periodically for isolation of DNA to measure the SRB populations using quantitative PCR. Addition of tannins reduced overall gas, hydrogen sulfide, and methane production by greater than 90 % after 7 days of treatment and continued to at least 28 days. SRB population was also significantly decreased by tannin addition. qRT-PCR of 16S rDNA bacteria genes showed that the total bacterial population was also decreased in these incubations. These results indicate that the tannins elicited a collective effect on the bacterial population and also suggest a reduction in the population of methanogenic microorganisms as demonstrated by reduced methane production in these experiments. Such a generalized effect could be extrapolated to a reduction in other odor-associated emissions during manure storage. PMID:23149758

  9. Analysis of tyrosine-O-sulfation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, J.R.; Sen, J.W.; Johnsen, A.H.; Rehfeld, Jens Frederik

    2008-01-01

    Tyrosine O-sulfation was first described about 50 years ago as a post-translational modification of fibrinogen. In the following 30 years it was considered to be a rare modification affecting only a few proteins and peptides. However, in the beginning of the 1980s tyrosine (Tyr) sulfation was shown...... to be a common modification and since then an increasing number of proteins have been identified as sulfated. The target proteins belong to the classes of secretory, plasma membrane, and lysosomal proteins, which reflects the intracellular localization of the enzymes catalyzing Tyr sulfation, the...... to demonstrate the presence of radioactively labeled tyrosine. These techniques have been described in detail previously. The aim of this chapter is to present alternative analytical methods of Tyr sulfation than radioisotope incorporation before analysis Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  10. Gaseous Sulfate Solubility in Glass: Experimental Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliss, Mary

    2013-11-30

    Sulfate solubility in glass is a key parameter in many commercial glasses and nuclear waste glasses. This report summarizes key publications specific to sulfate solubility experimental methods and the underlying physical chemistry calculations. The published methods and experimental data are used to verify the calculations in this report and are expanded to a range of current technical interest. The calculations and experimental methods described in this report will guide several experiments on sulfate solubility and saturation for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Enhanced Waste Glass Models effort. There are several tables of sulfate gas equilibrium values at high temperature to guide experimental gas mixing and to achieve desired SO3 levels. This report also describes the necessary equipment and best practices to perform sulfate saturation experiments for molten glasses. Results and findings will be published when experimental work is finished and this report is validated from the data obtained.

  11. Detergent (sodium dodecyl sulfate) shock proteins in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The protein composition of Escherichia coli W3110 grown in the presence and absence of 5% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was examined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In SDS-grown cells, at least 4 proteins were turned on, 13 were turned off, 15 were elevated, and 15 were depressed. The 19 unique and elevated SDS-induced spots constituted 7.91% of the total 35S-labeled protein. There was no apparent overlap between these 19 detergent (SDS) stress proteins and those of other known bacterial stress responses. The detergent stress stimulon is a distinct and independent stimulon. Its physiological relevance probably derives from the presence of bile salts in animal gastrointestinal tracts

  12. Modeling of sulfation of potassium chloride by ferric sulfate addition during grate-firing of biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hao; Jespersen, Jacob Boll; Aho, Martti;

    2013-01-01

    Potassium chloride, KCl, formed from critical ash-forming elements released during combustion may lead to severe ash deposition and corrosion problems in biomass-fired boilers. Ferric sulfate, Fe2(SO4)3 is an effective additive, which produces sulfur oxides (SO2 and SO3) to convert KCl to the less...... order to simulate the sulfation of KCl by ferric sulfate addition during grate-firing of biomass. The simulation results show good agreements with the experimental data obtained in a pilot-scale biomass grate-firing reactor, where different amounts of ferric sulfate was injected on the grate or into the...... freeboard. In addition, the simulations of elemental sulfur addition on the grate fit well with the experimental data. The results suggest that the SO3 released from ferric sulfate decomposition is the main contributor to KCl sulfation, and that the effectiveness of the ferric sulfate addition is sensitive...

  13. Bacterial Nail Infection (Paronychia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of nail infection is often caused by a bacterial infection but may also be caused by herpes, a ... to a type of yeast called Candida , or bacterial infection, and this may lead to abnormal nail growth. ...

  14. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach that....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will...

  15. Microbial community changes during sustained Cr(VI) reduction at the 100H site in Hanford, WA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Romy; Brodie, Eoin L; Faybishenko, Boris; Piceno, Yvette M; Tom, Lauren; Choudhuri, Swati; Beller, Harry R; Liu, Jenny; Torok, Tamas; Joyner, Dominique C; Joachimiak, Marcin P; Zhou, Aifen; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Zhou, Joe; Long, Phil E; Newcomer, Darrell R; Andersen, Gary L; Hazen, Terry C.

    2010-05-17

    Hexavalent Chromium is a widespread contaminant found in soil, sediment, and groundwater. In order to stimulate microbially-mediated reduction of Cr(VI), a poly-lactate compound (HRC) was injected into the Chromium-contaminated aquifer at the Hanford (WA) 100H site in 2004. Cr(VI) concentrations rapidly declined to below the detection limit and remained so for more than three years after injection. Based on the results of the bacterial community composition using high-density DNA 16S rRNA gene microarrays, we observed the community to transition through denitrifying, ironreducing and sulfate-reducing populations. As a result, we specifically focused isolation efforts on three bacterial species that were significant components of the community. Positive enrichments in defined anaerobic media resulted in the isolation of an iron-reducing Geobacter metallireducens-like isolate, a sulfate-reducing Desulfovibrio vukgaris-like strain and a nitrate-reducing Pseudomonas stutzeri-like isolate among several others. All of these isolates were capable of reducing Cr(VI) anoxically and have been submitted for genome sequencing to JGI. To further characterize the microbial, and geochemical mechanisms associated with in situ Cr(VI) reduction at the site, additional HRC was injected in 2008. The goal was to restimulate the indigenous microbial community and to regenerate the reducing conditions necessary for continued Cr(VI) bio-immobilization in the groundwater. Analysis of the microbial populations post-injection revealed that they recovered to a similar density as after the first injection in 2004. In this study, we present the results from our investigation into microbially-mediated Cr(VI) reduction at Hanford, and a comparison of the microbial community development following two HRC injections four years apart.

  16. Surfen, a small molecule antagonist of heparan sulfate

    OpenAIRE

    Schuksz, Manuela; Fuster, Mark M.; Brown, Jillian R.; Crawford, Brett E.; Ditto, David P.; Lawrence, Roger; Glass, Charles A; Wang, Lianchun; Tor, Yitzhak; Esko, Jeffrey D

    2008-01-01

    In a search for small molecule antagonists of heparan sulfate, we examined the activity of bis-2-methyl-4-amino-quinolyl-6-carbamide, also known as surfen. Fluorescence-based titrations indicated that surfen bound to glycosaminoglycans, and the extent of binding increased according to charge density in the order heparin > dermatan sulfate > heparan sulfate > chondroitin sulfate. All charged groups in heparin (N-sulfates, O-sulfates, and carboxyl groups) contributed to binding, consistent with...

  17. Impact of Organic Carbon Electron Donors on Microbial Community Development under Iron- and Sulfate-Reducing Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Man Jae; O'Loughlin, Edward J; Boyanov, Maxim I; Brulc, Jennifer M; Johnston, Eric R; Kemner, Kenneth M; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A

    2016-01-01

    Although iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in subsurface environments have crucial roles in biogeochemical cycling of C, Fe, and S, how specific electron donors impact the compositional structure and activity of native iron- and/or sulfate-reducing communities is largely unknown. To understand this better, we created bicarbonate-buffered batch systems in duplicate with three different electron donors (acetate, lactate, or glucose) paired with ferrihydrite and sulfate as the electron acceptors and inoculated them with subsurface sediment as the microbial inoculum. Sulfate and ferrihydrite reduction occurred simultaneously and were faster with lactate than with acetate. 16S rRNA-based sequence analysis of the communities over time revealed that Desulfotomaculum was the major driver for sulfate reduction coupled with propionate oxidation in lactate-amended incubations. The reduction of sulfate resulted in sulfide production and subsequent abiotic reduction of ferrihydrite. In contrast, glucose promoted faster reduction of ferrihydrite, but without reduction of sulfate. Interestingly, the glucose-amended incubations led to two different biogeochemical trajectories among replicate bottles that resulted in distinct coloration (white and brown). The two outcomes in geochemical evolution might be due to the stochastic evolution of the microbial communities or subtle differences in the initial composition of the fermenting microbial community and its development via the use of different glucose fermentation pathways available within the community. Synchrotron-based x-ray analysis indicated that siderite and amorphous Fe(II) were formed in the replicate bottles with glucose, while ferrous sulfide and vivianite were formed with lactate or acetate. These data sets reveal that use of different C utilization pathways projects significant changes in microbial community composition over time that uniquely impact both the geochemistry and mineralogy of subsurface environments

  18. Impact of Organic Carbon Electron Donors on Microbial Community Development under Iron- and Sulfate-Reducing Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Jae Kwon

    Full Text Available Although iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in subsurface environments have crucial roles in biogeochemical cycling of C, Fe, and S, how specific electron donors impact the compositional structure and activity of native iron- and/or sulfate-reducing communities is largely unknown. To understand this better, we created bicarbonate-buffered batch systems in duplicate with three different electron donors (acetate, lactate, or glucose paired with ferrihydrite and sulfate as the electron acceptors and inoculated them with subsurface sediment as the microbial inoculum. Sulfate and ferrihydrite reduction occurred simultaneously and were faster with lactate than with acetate. 16S rRNA-based sequence analysis of the communities over time revealed that Desulfotomaculum was the major driver for sulfate reduction coupled with propionate oxidation in lactate-amended incubations. The reduction of sulfate resulted in sulfide production and subsequent abiotic reduction of ferrihydrite. In contrast, glucose promoted faster reduction of ferrihydrite, but without reduction of sulfate. Interestingly, the glucose-amended incubations led to two different biogeochemical trajectories among replicate bottles that resulted in distinct coloration (white and brown. The two outcomes in geochemical evolution might be due to the stochastic evolution of the microbial communities or subtle differences in the initial composition of the fermenting microbial community and its development via the use of different glucose fermentation pathways available within the community. Synchrotron-based x-ray analysis indicated that siderite and amorphous Fe(II were formed in the replicate bottles with glucose, while ferrous sulfide and vivianite were formed with lactate or acetate. These data sets reveal that use of different C utilization pathways projects significant changes in microbial community composition over time that uniquely impact both the geochemistry and mineralogy of subsurface

  19. Electron-bifurcating transhydrogenase is central to hydrogen isotope fractionation during lipid biosynthesis in sulfate reducing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, W.; Flynn, T. M.; Suess, M.; Bradley, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    A significant range in microbial lipid 2H/1H ratios is observed in modern marine sediments [Li et al. 2009. GCA]. The magnitude of hydrogen isotope fractionation between microbial lipids and growth water (2ɛlipid-H2O) is hypothesized to relate to the central carbon and energy metabolism [Zhang et al. 2009. PNAS]. These observations have raised the intriguing possibility for culture independent identification of the dominant metabolic pathways operating in environments critical to the geological record. One such metabolism we would like to track for its global significance in sedimentary carbon cycling is bacterial sulfate reduction [Jørgensen. 1982. Nature]. To-date, heterotrophic sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) have been observed to produce lipids that are depleted in fatty acid H-isotope composition, relative to growth water (2ɛlipid-H2O ~ -125 to -175 ‰), with experiments on different substrates yielding little variability [Campbell et al. 2009. GCA; Osburn. 2013; Dawson et al. 2015. Geobiology]. In stark contrast, aerobic heterotrophs show a wide range in fractionations (2ɛlipid-H2O ~ +300 to -125‰) which seems to scale with the route cellular carbon metabolism [Zhang et al. 2009. PNAS; Heinzelmann et al. 2015. Front Microbio]. Recent work in aerobic methylotrophs [Bradley et al. 2014. AGU] implicates transhydrogenase (TH) activity as a critical control on 2ɛlipid-H2O. This work suggests a specific driving mechanism for this range in fractionation is the ratio of intracellular NADPH/NADH, and more fundamentally, the intracellular redox state. In SRB a key component of energy metabolism is the activity of electron-bifurcating TH [Price et al. 2014. Front Microbio], for which a recent transposon mutant library has generated a number of knockouts in the target gene [Kuehl et al. 2014. mBio] in the model organism Desulfovibrio alaskensis strain G20. In this study we compare growth rates, fatty acid concentrations and 2ɛlipid-H2O from wild type and TH

  20. ANTIBIOTIC SUSCEPTIBILITY OF BIODEGRADING BACTERIAL ISOLATES FROM DAIRY EFFLUENT

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the prevalence of antibiotic resistance among bacterial isolates from dairy effluent sample of two different seasons from Verka Milk Plant, Mohali. Twenty bacteria were isolated by spread plating and streaking method. Variable amount of reduction in BOD and COD was observed in dairy effluentafter the treatment with free and immobilized seven bacterial strains i.e. A3, A8, A11, A13, A19, A21 and A23. Bacterial isolates with degrading efficiency were identified on...

  1. Broad-spectrum biofilm inhibition by a secreted bacterial polysaccharide

    OpenAIRE

    Valle, Jaione; Da Re, Sandra; Henry, Nelly; Fontaine, Thierry; Balestrino, Damien; Latour-Lambert, Patricia; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2006-01-01

    The development of surface-attached biofilm bacterial communities is considered an important source of nosocomial infections. Recently, bacterial interference via signaling molecules and surface active compounds was shown to antagonize biofilm formation, suggesting that nonantibiotic molecules produced during competitive interactions between bacteria could be used for biofilm reduction. Hence, a better understanding of commensal/pathogen interactions within bacterial community could lead to a...

  2. Effect of Influent HRT on Pretreatment of Sulfate-Laden Food Wastewater for Desulfurization-Denitrification Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to treat wastewater rich in sulfate and organic carbon, an anaerobic attached-growth bioreactor was set up. It was the pretreatment of mixotrophic desulfurization-denitrification process and the effect of influent HRT was considered. The HRT was decreased from 128 to 6.2 h, while the sulfate removal rate, the organic carbon removal rate and sulfide generating rate were analyzed, respectively. The results showed that the suitable HRT in sulfate reduction stage for the pretreatment of desulfurization-denitrification process was 7.7 to 10.2 h.

  3. Sulfated Zirconia as Alkali-Resistant Support for Catalytic NOx Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The use of bio-fuels as alternatives to traditional fossil fuels has attracted much attention recent years since bio-fuels belong to a family of renewable types of energy sources and do not contribute to the green-house effect. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with ammonia as reductant ...... interact with potassium stronger than active metal species. Among potential carriers, sulfated zirconia is of high interest because its acidic and textural properties can be modified by varying preparation conditions....

  4. The Precipitation Process of Liquid Wastes Containing Contaminant Am withBarium Sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigated of the reduction volume liquid wastes containing ofAmericium nuclide contaminant has been done. The reduction volume was done byadding barium sulfate coagulant. The experimental procedure that has beendone by adding regent of barium nitrate and natrium sulfate to the wasteswith its preadjusted pH, then by utilizing the jar test equipment was carriedout the fast stirring speed for 5 minutes and the gentle agitation for 30minutes, therefor its floc and supernatant will be formed. The resultedbarium sulfate floc will trap radionuclide in the wastes. The Variableinvestigated were: the concentration of barium sulfate, pH of the wastes, theflash mixing rate, the gentle agitation rate. The investigated barium sulfateconcentration variable was started from 100 ppm up to 800 ppm. Theinvestigated pH variable was started from pH 7 up to pH 13. The investigatedflash mixing rate were 75, 100, 125, 150, 175, 200, 225, 250 rpm. Theinvestigated gentle agitation variable were 20, 30, 40, 50 rpm. The bestresult which was represented by decontaminating factor (DF) was found frombarium sulfate concentration of 300 ppm and pH 11, and the flash mixing rateof 200 rpm and the gentle agitation rate of 20 rpm, with the separationefficiency = 97.2 %. (author)

  5. Inhibitory concentrations of 2,4D and its possible intermediates in sulfate reducing biofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Cruz, Ulises [Department of Biotechnology, Environmental Science and Technology, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Ave. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Vicentina, 09340 D.F. (Mexico); Celis, Lourdes B. [Division de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Lomas 4a. Seccion, 78216 San Luis Potosi, S.L.P. (Mexico); Poggi, Hector [Department of Biotechnology and Bioengineering, CINVESTAV, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07360 D.F. (Mexico); Meraz, Monica, E-mail: meraz@xanum.uam.mx [Department of Biotechnology, Environmental Science and Technology, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Ave. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Vicentina, 09340 D.F. (Mexico)

    2010-07-15

    Different concentrations of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4D) and its possible intermediates such as 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4DCP), 4-chlorophenol (4CP), 2-chlorophenol (2CP) and phenol, were assayed to evaluate the inhibitory effect on sulfate and ethanol utilization in a sulfate reducing biofilm. Increasing concentrations of the chlorophenolic compounds showed an adverse effect on sulfate reduction rate and ethanol conversion to acetate, being the intermediate 2,4DCP most toxic than the herbicide. The monochlorophenol 4CP (600 ppm) caused the complete cessation of sulfate reduction and ethanol conversion. The ratio of the electron acceptor to the electron donor utilized as well as the sulfate utilization volumetric rates, diminished when chlorophenols and phenol concentrations were increased, pointing out to the inhibition of the respiratory process and electrons transfer. The difference found in the IC{sub 50} values obtained was due to the chemical structure complexity of the phenolic compounds, the number of chlorine atoms as much as the chlorine atom position in the phenol ring. The IC{sub 50} values (ppm) indicated that the acute inhibition on the biofilm was caused by 2,4DCP (17.4) followed by 2,4D (29.0), 2CP (99.8), 4CP (108.0) and phenol (143.8).

  6. High aerosol acidity despite declining atmospheric sulfate concentrations over the past 15 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Rodney J.; Guo, Hongyu; Russell, Armistead G.; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-04-01

    Particle acidity affects aerosol concentrations, chemical composition and toxicity. Sulfate is often the main acid component of aerosols, and largely determines the acidity of fine particles under 2.5 μm in diameter, PM2.5. Over the past 15 years, atmospheric sulfate concentrations in the southeastern United States have decreased by 70%, whereas ammonia concentrations have been steady. Similar trends are occurring in many regions globally. Aerosol ammonium nitrate concentrations were assumed to increase to compensate for decreasing sulfate, which would result from increasing neutrality. Here we use observed gas and aerosol composition, humidity, and temperature data collected at a rural southeastern US site in June and July 2013 (ref. ), and a thermodynamic model that predicts pH and the gas-particle equilibrium concentrations of inorganic species from the observations to show that PM2.5 at the site is acidic. pH buffering by partitioning of ammonia between the gas and particle phases produced a relatively constant particle pH of 0-2 throughout the 15 years of decreasing atmospheric sulfate concentrations, and little change in particle ammonium nitrate concentrations. We conclude that the reductions in aerosol acidity widely anticipated from sulfur reductions, and expected acidity-related health and climate benefits, are unlikely to occur until atmospheric sulfate concentrations reach near pre-anthropogenic levels.

  7. Inhibitory concentrations of 2,4D and its possible intermediates in sulfate reducing biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different concentrations of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4D) and its possible intermediates such as 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4DCP), 4-chlorophenol (4CP), 2-chlorophenol (2CP) and phenol, were assayed to evaluate the inhibitory effect on sulfate and ethanol utilization in a sulfate reducing biofilm. Increasing concentrations of the chlorophenolic compounds showed an adverse effect on sulfate reduction rate and ethanol conversion to acetate, being the intermediate 2,4DCP most toxic than the herbicide. The monochlorophenol 4CP (600 ppm) caused the complete cessation of sulfate reduction and ethanol conversion. The ratio of the electron acceptor to the electron donor utilized as well as the sulfate utilization volumetric rates, diminished when chlorophenols and phenol concentrations were increased, pointing out to the inhibition of the respiratory process and electrons transfer. The difference found in the IC50 values obtained was due to the chemical structure complexity of the phenolic compounds, the number of chlorine atoms as much as the chlorine atom position in the phenol ring. The IC50 values (ppm) indicated that the acute inhibition on the biofilm was caused by 2,4DCP (17.4) followed by 2,4D (29.0), 2CP (99.8), 4CP (108.0) and phenol (143.8).

  8. Electrochemical treatment of acidic aqueous ferrous sulfate and copper sulfate as models for acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunce, N J; Chartrand, M; Keech, P

    2001-12-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a serious environmental problem in the mining industry. The present work describes electrolytic reduction of solutions of synthetic AMD, comprising FeSO4/H2SO4 and CuSO4/H2SO4, in flow-through cells whose anode and cathode compartments were separated using ion exchange membranes. In the case of FeSO4/H2SO4 at constant flow rate, the pH of the effluent from the catholyte increased progressively with current at a variety of cathodes, due to electrolytic reduction of H+ ions to elemental hydrogen. Near-quantitative removal of iron was achieved by sparging air into the catholyte effluent, thereby precipitating iron outside the electrochemical cell, and avoiding fouling of the electrodes. The anode reaction was the oxidation of water to O2, a proton-releasing process. Using cation exchange membranes and sodium sulfate as the supporting electrolyte in the anode compartment, the efficiency of the process was compromised at high currents by transport of H+ competitively with Na+ from the anode to the cathode compartments. Higher efficiencies were obtained when anion exchange membranes were used, and in this case no additional supporting electrolyte other than dilute H2SO4 was needed, the net reaction being the electrochemically driven transfer of the elements of H2SO4 from the cathode to the anode compartments. Current efficiencies approximately 50% were achieved, the loss of efficiency being accounted for by ohmic heating of the solutions. In the case of CuSO4/H2SO4 and anion exchange membranes at high currents, reduction of Cu2+ and H+ ions and transport of SO4(2-) ions out of the catholyte caused unacceptably high potentials to be generated. PMID:11763043

  9. Heparan sulfate in skeletal muscle development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noonan, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    In this study, chick breast skeletal muscle cells developing in vitro from myoblasts to myotubes were found to synthesize heparan sulfate (HS), chrondroitin-6-sulfate, chrondroitin-4-sulfate, dermatan sulfate, unsulfated chrondroitin and hyaluronic acid in both the substratum attached material (SAM) and the cellular fraction. SAM was found to contain predominantly chrondroitin-6-sulfate and relatively little HS whereas the cellular fraction contained relatively higher levels of HS and lower levels of chrondroitin-6-sulfate. Hyaluronic acid was also a major component in both fractions with the other glycosaminoglycan isomers present as minor components. Muscle derived fibroblast cultures had higher levels of dermatan sulfate in the cell layer and higher levels of HS in the SAM fraction than did muscle cultures. The structure of the proteoglycans were partially characterized in /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ radio-labeled cultures which indicated an apparent increase in the hydrodynamic size of the cell fraction heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HS PG). Myotubes incorporated /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ into HS PG at a rate 3 times higher than myoblasts. The turnover rate of HS in the cellular fraction was the same for myoblasts and myotubes, with a t/sub 1/2/ of approximately 5 hours. Fibroblasts in culture synthesized the smallest HS PG, and incorporated /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ into HS PG at a rate lower than that of myotubes. Studies in which fusion was reversibly inhibited with decreased medium (Ca/sup + +/) closely linked the increased synthesis of cell fraction, but not SAM fraction, HS with myotube formation. However, decreasing medium calcium appeared to cause significant alterations in the metabolism of inorganic sulfate.

  10. Heparan sulfate in skeletal muscle development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, chick breast skeletal muscle cells developing in vitro from myoblasts to myotubes were found to synthesize heparan sulfate (HS), chrondroitin-6-sulfate, chrondroitin-4-sulfate, dermatan sulfate, unsulfated chrondroitin and hyaluronic acid in both the substratum attached material (SAM) and the cellular fraction. SAM was found to contain predominantly chrondroitin-6-sulfate and relatively little HS whereas the cellular fraction contained relatively higher levels of HS and lower levels of chrondroitin-6-sulfate. Hyaluronic acid was also a major component in both fractions with the other glycosaminoglycan isomers present as minor components. Muscle derived fibroblast cultures had higher levels of dermatan sulfate in the cell layer and higher levels of HS in the SAM fraction than did muscle cultures. The structure of the proteoglycans were partially characterized in 35SO42- radio-labeled cultures which indicated an apparent increase in the hydrodynamic size of the cell fraction heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HS PG). Myotubes incorporated 35SO42- into HS PG at a rate 3 times higher than myoblasts. The turnover rate of HS in the cellular fraction was the same for myoblasts and myotubes, with a t/sub 1/2/ of approximately 5 hours. Fibroblasts in culture synthesized the smallest HS PG, and incorporated 35SO42- into HS PG at a rate lower than that of myotubes. Studies in which fusion was reversibly inhibited with decreased medium [Ca++] closely linked the increased synthesis of cell fraction, but not SAM fraction, HS with myotube formation. However, decreasing medium calcium appeared to cause significant alterations in the metabolism of inorganic sulfate

  11. Sulfate-reducing bacteria colonize pouches formed for ulcerative colitis but not for familial adenomatous polyposis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duffy, M

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: Ileal pouch-anal anastomosis remains the "gold standard" in surgical treatment of ulcerative colitis and familial adenomatous polyposis. Pouchitis occurs mainly in patients with a background of ulcerative colitis, although the reasons for this are unknown. The aim of this study was to characterize differences in pouch bacterial populations between ulcerative colitis and familial adenomatous pouches. METHODS: After ethical approval was obtained, fresh stool samples were collected from patients with ulcerative colitis pouches (n = 10), familial adenomatous polyposis (n = 7) pouches, and ulcerative colitis ileostomies (n = 8). Quantitative measurements of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria were performed. RESULTS: Sulfate-reducing bacteria were isolated from 80 percent (n = 8) of ulcerative colitis pouches. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were absent from familial adenomatous polyposis pouches and also from ulcerative colitis ileostomy effluent. Pouch Lactobacilli, Bifidobacterium, Bacteroides sp, and Clostridium perfringens counts were increased relative to ileostomy counts in patients with ulcerative colitis. Total pouch enterococci and coliform counts were also increased relative to ileostomy levels. There were no significant quantitative or qualitative differences between pouch types when these bacteria were evaluated. CONCLUSIONS: Sulfate-reducing bacteria are exclusive to patients with a background of ulcerative colitis. Not all ulcerative colitis pouches harbor sulfate-reducing bacteria because two ulcerative colitis pouches in this study were free of the latter. They are not present in familial adenomatous polyposis pouches or in ileostomy effluent collected from patients with ulcerative colitis. Total bacterial counts increase in ulcerative colitis pouches after stoma closure. Levels of Lactobacilli, Bifidobacterium, Bacteroides sp, Clostridium perfringens, enterococci, and coliforms were similar in both pouch groups. Because sulfate-reducing bacteria are

  12. Molecular characterization of sulfate-reducing bacteria in the Guaymas Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Ashita; Teske, Andreas; Dillon, Jesse; Stahl, David A.; Sogin, Mitchell L.

    2003-01-01

    The Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California) is a hydrothermal vent site where thermal alteration of deposited planktonic and terrestrial organic matter forms petroliferous material which supports diverse sulfate-reducing bacteria. We explored the phylogenetic and functional diversity of the sulfate-reducing bacteria by characterizing PCR-amplified dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrAB) and 16S rRNA genes from the upper 4 cm of the Guaymas sediment. The dsrAB sequences revealed that there was a major clade closely related to the acetate-oxidizing delta-proteobacterial genus Desulfobacter and a clade of novel, deeply branching dsr sequences related to environmental dsr sequences from marine sediments in Aarhus Bay and Kysing Fjord (Denmark). Other dsr clones were affiliated with gram-positive thermophilic sulfate reducers (genus Desulfotomaculum) and the delta-proteobacterial species Desulforhabdus amnigena and Thermodesulforhabdus norvegica. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNAs from the same environmental samples resulted in identification of four clones affiliated with Desulfobacterium niacini, a member of the acetate-oxidizing, nutritionally versatile genus Desulfobacterium, and one clone related to Desulfobacula toluolica and Desulfotignum balticum. Other bacterial 16S rRNA bacterial phylotypes were represented by non-sulfate reducers and uncultured lineages with unknown physiology, like OP9, OP8, as well as a group with no clear affiliation. In summary, analyses of both 16S rRNA and dsrAB clone libraries resulted in identification of members of the Desulfobacteriales in the Guaymas sediments. In addition, the dsrAB sequencing approach revealed a novel group of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes that could not be identified by 16S rRNA sequencing.

  13. Genome degeneration affects both extracellular and intracellular bacterial endosymbionts

    OpenAIRE

    Feldhaar, Heike; Gross, Roy

    2009-01-01

    The obligate intracellular bacterial endosymbionts of insects are a paradigm for reductive genome evolution. A study published recently in BMC Biology demonstrates that similar evolutionary forces shaping genome structure may also apply to extracellular endosymbionts.

  14. Recrystallization of 223Ra with barium sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the kinetics of barium sulfate recrystallization has been studied in acidic 0.01 mol dm-3 sodium sulfate solution using 223Ra and 133Ba tracers at very low total radium concentration, i.e. less than 10-13 mol dm-3. It was found that the system follows the homogeneous recrystallization model and that recrystallization rates, inferred by the decrease of 223Ra and 133Ba in the aqueous solution, are fast. Therefore, even at very low concentrations, below the solubility limit, radium will be retained by barium sulfate-a mineral present in the deep underground repository. (author)

  15. Sulfate and chromate increased each other's uptake and translocation in As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Letúzia M; Gress, Julia; De, Jaysankar; Rathinasabapathi, Bala; Marchi, Giuliano; Chen, Yanshan; Ma, Lena Q

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the effects of chromate (CrVI) and sulfate on their uptake and translocation in As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata. Plants were exposed to 1) 0.1 mM CrVI and 0, 0.25, 1.25 or 2.5 mM sulfate or 2) 0.25 mM sulfate and 0, 0.5, 2.5 or 5.0 mM CrVI for 1 d in hydroponics. P. vittata accumulated 26 and 1261 mg kg(-1) Cr in the fronds and roots at CrVI0.1, and 2197 and 1589 mg kg(-1) S in the fronds and roots at S0.25. Increasing sulfate concentrations increased Cr root concentrations by 16-66% and helped CrVI reduction to CrIII whereas increasing CrVI concentrations increased frond sulfate concentrations by 3-27%. Increasing sulfate concentrations enhanced TBARS concentrations in the biomass, indicating oxidative stress caused lipid peroxidation in plant cell membranes. However, addition of 0.25-2.5 mM sulfate alleviated CrVI's toxic effects and decreased TBARS from 23.5 to 9.46-12.3 μmol g(-1) FW. Though CrVI was supplied, 78-96% of CrIII was in the biomass, indicating efficient CrVI reduction to CrIII by P. vittata. The data indicated the amazing ability of P. vittata in Cr uptake at 289 mg kg(-1) h(-1) with little translocation to the fronds. These results indicated that P. vittata had potential in Cr phytoremediation in contaminated sites but further studies are needed to evaluate this potential. The facts that CrVI and sulfate helped each other in uptake by P. vittata suggest that CrVI was not competing with sulfate uptake in P. vittata. However, the mechanisms of how sulfate and CrVI enhance each other's accumulation in P. vittata need further investigation. PMID:26761595

  16. Survival of bacterial indicators and the functional diversity of native microbial communities in the Floridan aquifer system, south Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisle, John T.

    2014-01-01

    model than when exposed to groundwater from the APPZ (range: 0.540–0.684 h-1). The inactivation rates for the first phase of the models for P. aeruginosa were not significantly different between the UFA (range: 0.144–0.770 h-1) and APPZ (range: 0.159–0.772 h-1) aquifer zones. The inactivation rates for the second phase of the model for this P. aeruginosa were also similar between UFA (range: 0.003–0.008 h-1) and APPZ (0.004–0.005 h-1) zones, although significantly slower than the model’s first phase rates for this bacterial species. Geochemical data were used to determine which dissimilatory biogeochemical reactions were most likely to occur under the native conditions in the UFA and APPZ zones using thermodynamics principles to calculate free energy yields and other cell-related energetics data. The biogeochemical processes of acetotrophic and hydrogenotrophic sulfate reduction, methanogenesis and anaerobic oxidation of methane dominated in all six groundwater sites. A high throughput DNA microarray sequencing technology was used to characterize the diversity in the native aquifer bacterial communities (bacteria and archaea) and assign putative physiological capabilities to the members of those communities. The bacterial communities in both zones of the aquifer were shown to possess the capabilities for primary and secondary fermentation, acetogenesis, methanogenesis, anaerobic methane oxidation, syntrophy with methanogens, ammonification, and sulfate reduction. The data from this study provide the first determination of bacterial indicator survival during exposure to native geochemical conditions of the Floridan aquifer in south Florida. Additionally, the energetics and functional bacterial diversity characterizations are the first descriptions of native bacterial communities in this region of the Floridan aquifer and reveal how these communities persist under such extreme conditions. Collectively, these types of data can be used to develop and refine

  17. Stratospheric sulfate geoengineering impacts on global agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, L.; Robock, A.; Lawrence, P.; Lombardozzi, D.

    2015-12-01

    Stratospheric sulfate geoengineering has been proposed to reduce the impacts of anthropogenic climate change. If it is ever used, it would change agricultural production, and so is one of the future climate scenarios for the third phase of the Global Gridded Crop Model Intercomparison. As an example of those impacts, we use the Community Land Model (CLM-crop 4.5) to simulate how climate changes from the G4 geoengineering scenario from the Geoengineering Modeling Intercomparison Project. The G4 geoengineering scenario specifies, in combination with RCP4.5 forcing, starting in 2020 daily injections of a constant amount of SO2 at a rate of 5 Tg SO2 per year at one point on the Equator into the lower stratosphere. Eight climate modeling groups have completed G4 simulations. We use the crop model to simulate the impacts of climate change (temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation) on the global agriculture system for five crops - rice, maize, soybeans, cotton, and sugarcane. In general, without irrigation, compared with the reference run (RCP4.5), global production of cotton, rice and sugarcane would increase significantly due to the cooling effect. Maize and soybeans show different regional responses. In tropical regions, maize and soybean have a higher yield in G4 compared with RCP4.5, while in the temperate regions they have a lower yield under a geoengineered climate. Impacts on specific countries in terms of different crop production depend on their locations. For example, the United States and Argentina show soybean production reduction of about 15% under G4 compared to RCP4.5, while Brazil increases soybean production by about 10%.

  18. Novel alkylsulfatases required for biodegradation of the branched primary alkyl sulfate surfactant 2-butyloctyl sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Andrew J; Hales, Stephen G; Ur-Rehman, Naheed G A; White, Graham F

    2002-01-01

    Recent reports show that contrary to common perception, branched alkyl sulfate surfactants are readily biodegradable in standard biodegradability tests. We report here the isolation of bacteria capable of biodegrading 2-butyloctyl sulfate and the identification of novel enzymes that initiate the process. Enrichment culturing from activated sewage sludge yielded several strains capable of growth on 2-butyloctyl sulfate. Of these, two were selected for further study and identified as members of the genus Pseudomonas. Strain AE-A was able to utilize either sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) or 2-butyloctyl sulfate as a carbon and energy source for growth, but strain AE-D utilized only the latter. Depending on growth conditions, strain AE-A produced up to three alkylsulfatases, as shown by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis zymography. Growth on either SDS or 2-butyloctyl sulfate or in nutrient broth produced an apparently constitutive, nonspecific primary alkylsulfatase, AP1, weakly active on SDS and on 2-butyloctyl sulfate. Growth on 2-butyloctyl sulfate produced a second enzyme, AP2, active on 2-butyloctyl sulfate but not on SDS, and growth on SDS produced a third enzyme, AP3, active on SDS but not on 2-butyloctyl sulfate. In contrast, strain AE-D, when grown on 2-butyloctyl sulfate (no growth on SDS), produced a single enzyme, DP1, active on 2-butyloctyl sulfate but not on SDS. DP1 was not produced in broth cultures. DP1 was induced when residual 2-butyloctyl sulfate was present in the growth medium, but the enzyme disappeared when the substrate was exhausted. Gas chromatographic analysis of products of incubating 2-butyloctyl sulfate with DP1 in gels revealed the formation of 2-butyloctanol, showing the enzyme to be a true sulfatase. In contrast, Pseudomonas sp. strain C12B, well known for its ability to degrade linear SDS, was unable to grow on 2-butyloctyl sulfate, and its alkylsulfatases responsible for initiating the degradation of SDS by releasing the parent

  19. Effects of Long-Term Acid-Mine Drainage Contamination on Diversity and Activity of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in a Natural Salt Marsh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, J. W.; Banfield, J. F.

    2003-12-01

    Constructed wetlands have been studied as sites or analogs for in situ bioremediation of metal contaminants from acid mine drainage (AMD) or industrial sources (e.g. Webb et al. 1998). Wetlands bioremediation necessarily invokes the ubiquity and robustness of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to sequester dissolved metals into various poorly soluble metal-sulfides (e.g. PbS, CdS). However, few studies of natural wetlands under long-term ecological forcing by AMD or other contaminant sources are available for context. We are investigating the microbial diversity, mineralogy and geochemistry of a highly contaminated salt marsh along the East Central San Francisco Bay. For nearly a half-century, areas within this marsh have received acidic and/or metal-rich groundwaters from near-surface pyrite tailings (transported there from Iron Mountain Mine, near Redding, CA) and local industrial sources (e.g. paint and explosives manufacturers). Sediment cores (30-40 cm long) were taken from six contaminated sites in the marsh with pH range of ˜2 to ˜8. Previous analyses (URS Corp. 2001) reported As, Cd, Cu, Se, Zn, and Pb present in sediments at extremely high concentrations (100s of ppm), yet our ICP-AES analyses of pore waters showed only As present at concentrations of 10-50 ppb. We infer, from high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) studies of biogenic (SRB biofilm) ZnS (Moreau et al. 2003, in review) and marsh sediments, that contaminant metals have been sequestered into aggregates of nanocrystalline metal-sulfides. Continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS) analyses of pore-water sulfate and sedimentary sulfides allow resolution of contributions to dissolved sulfate and sulfide from tailings oxidation and dissimilatory sulfate reduction. Sulfate analyses from subsections of three cores (pH 2-3, 6-7, 7-8, respectively) all yield δ 34S values consistent with bacterial sulfate reduction. We note that all three cores also contain very fine

  20. Cadmium Accumulation and DNA Homology with Metal Resistance Genes in Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Naz, Naghma; Young, Hilary K.; Ahmed, Nuzhat; Gadd, Geoffrey M.

    2005-01-01

    Cadmium resistance (0.1 to 1.0 mM) was studied in four pure and one mixed culture of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The growth of the bacteria was monitored with respect to carbon source (lactate) oxidation and sulfate reduction in the presence of various concentrations of cadmium chloride. Two strains Desulfovibrio desulfuricans DSM 1926 and Desulfococcus multivorans DSM 2059 showed the highest resistance to cadmium (0.5 mM). Transmission electron microscopy of the two strains showed intra...

  1. The fate of sulfate in acidified pig slurry during storage and following application to cropped soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jørgen; Sørensen, Peter; Elsgaard, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Received for publication June 18, 2007. Acidification of slurry with sulfuric acid is a recent agricultural practice that may serve a double purpose: reducing ammonia emission and ensuring crop sulfur sufficiency. We investigated S transformations in untreated and acidified pig slurry stored for up...... plant-available sulfate form. Microbial sulfate reduction during storage of acidified pig slurry was limited, presumably due to initial pH effects and a limitation in the availability of easily degradable organic matter. Sulfide accumulation was observed during storage but the sulfide levels in...

  2. Anaerobic degradation of 3-aminobenzoate by a newly isolated sulfate reducer and a methanogenic enrichment culture

    OpenAIRE

    Schnell, Sylvia; Schink, Bernhard

    1992-01-01

    A new rod-shaped, gram-negative, non-sporing sulfate reducer, strain mAB1, was enriched and isolated from marine sediment samples with 3-aminobenzoate as sole electron and carbon source. Strain mAB1 degraded 3-aminobenzoate completely to CO 2 and NH 3 with stoichiometric reduction of sulfate to sulfide. Ceils contained carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, cytochromes, and sulfite reductase P582. Strain mAB1 degraded also benzoate, 4-aminobenzoate, hydroxybenzoates, and some aliphatic compounds. Bes...

  3. ROE Wet Sulfate Deposition 2009-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The raster data represent the amount of wet sulfate deposition in kilograms per hectare from 2009 to 2011. Summary data in this indicator were provided by EPA’s...

  4. Sulfated cellulose thin films with antithrombin affinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose thin films were chemically modified by in situ sulfation to produce surfaces with anticoagulant characteristics. Two celluloses differing in their degree of polymerization (DP: CEL I (DP 215–240 and CEL II (DP 1300–1400 were tethered to maleic anhydride copolymer (MA layers and subsequently exposed to SO3•NMe3 solutions at elevated temperature. The impact of the resulting sulfation on the physicochemical properties of the cellulose films was investigated with respect to film thickness, atomic composition, wettability and roughness. The sulfation was optimized to gain a maximal surface concentration of sulfate groups. The scavenging of antithrombin (AT by the surfaces was determined to conclude on their potential anticoagulant properties.

  5. Potassium aquaterbium(III oxalate sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Guang Sun

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Single crystals of KTb(C2O4(SO4(H2O, potassium aquaterbium(III oxalate sulfate, were obtained under hydrothermal conditions. In the crystal structure, the Tb(III atom is coordinated by four O atoms from two oxalate anions, three O atoms from three sulfate anions and one O atom from a water molecule within a TbO8 distorted square antiprismatic coordination. The potassium and terbium(III atoms are bridged by the oxalate and sulfate groups, forming a three-dimensional structure. The coordination mode of the oxalate has not yet been reported. O—H...O hydrogen bonding between the water molecules and the oxygen atoms of oxalate and sulfate anions is also observed.

  6. Ferric Iron Reduction by Acidophilic Heterotrophic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, D. Barrie; McGinness, Stephen

    1991-01-01

    Fifty mesophilic and five moderately thermophilic strains of acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria were tested for the ability to reduce ferric iron in liquid and solid media under aerobic conditions; about 40% of the mesophiles (but none of the moderate thermophiles) displayed at least some capacity to reduce iron. Both rates and extents of ferric iron reduction were highly strain dependent. No acidophilic heterotroph reduced nitrate or sulfate, and (limited) reduction of manganese(IV) was note...

  7. Heparan Sulfate Dependent Mechanisms of Amyloidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Noborn, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    A common theme in amyloid disorders is the deposition of disease-specific protein aggregates in tissues. Amyloid proteins bind to heparan sulfate (HS), a sulfated glycosaminoglycan, and HS has been found to promote the aggregation process. The present work relates to HS mediated mechanisms of amyloidosis, particularly transthyretin (TTR) amyloidosis, AA-amyloidosis and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). TTR is a transport protein present in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid, which under unclear circum...

  8. Hormonal control of sulfate uptake and assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprivova, Anna; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2016-08-01

    Plant hormones have a plethora of functions in control of plant development, stress response, and primary metabolism, including nutrient homeostasis. In the plant nutrition, the interplay of hormones with responses to nitrate and phosphate deficiency is well described, but relatively little is known about the interaction between phytohormones and regulation of sulfur metabolism. As for other nutrients, sulfate deficiency results in modulation of root architecture, where hormones are expected to play an important role. Accordingly, sulfate deficiency induces genes involved in metabolism of tryptophane and auxin. Also jasmonate biosynthesis is induced, pointing to the need of increase the defense capabilities of the plants when sulfur is limiting. However, hormones affect also sulfate uptake and assimilation. The pathway is coordinately induced by jasmonate and the key enzyme, adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase, is additionally regulated by ethylene, abscisic acid, nitric oxid, and other phytohormones. Perhaps the most intriguing link between hormones and sulfate assimilation is the fact that the main regulator of the response to sulfate starvation, SULFATE LIMITATION1 (SLIM1) belongs to the family of ethylene related transcription factors. We will review the current knowledge of interplay between phytohormones and control of sulfur metabolism and discuss the main open questions. PMID:26810064

  9. Divergent Synthesis of Heparan Sulfate Oligosaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulaney, Steven B; Xu, Yongmei; Wang, Peng; Tiruchinapally, Gopinath; Wang, Zhen; Kathawa, Jolian; El-Dakdouki, Mohammad H; Yang, Bo; Liu, Jian; Huang, Xuefei

    2015-12-18

    Heparan sulfates are implicated in a wide range of biological processes. A major challenge in deciphering their structure and activity relationship is the synthetic difficulties to access diverse heparan sulfate oligosaccharides with well-defined sulfation patterns. In order to expedite the synthesis, a divergent synthetic strategy was developed. By integrating chemical synthesis and two types of O-sulfo transferases, seven different hexasaccharides were obtained from a single hexasaccharide precursor. This approach combined the flexibility of chemical synthesis with the selectivity of enzyme-catalyzed sulfations, thus simplifying the overall synthetic operations. In an attempt to establish structure activity relationships of heparan sulfate binding with its receptor, the synthesized oligosaccharides were incorporated onto a glycan microarray, and their bindings with a growth factor FGF-2 were examined. The unique combination of chemical and enzymatic approaches expanded the capability of oligosaccharide synthesis. In addition, the well-defined heparan sulfate structures helped shine light on the fine substrate specificities of biosynthetic enzymes and confirm the potential sequence of enzymatic reactions in biosynthesis. PMID:26574650

  10. Bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates: pathogen detection and inactivation methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Védy

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Whereas the reduction of transfusion related viral transmission has been a priority during the last decade, bacterial infection transmitted by transfusion still remains associated to a high morbidity and mortality, and constitutes the most frequent infectious risk of transfusion. This problem especially concerns platelet concentrates because of their favorable bacterial growth conditions. This review gives an overview of platelet transfusion-related bacterial contamination as well as on the different strategies to reduce this problem by using either bacterial detection or inactivation methods.

  11. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    -vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial......Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate...... filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge...

  12. Anaerobic biodegradation of soybean biodiesel and diesel blends under sulfate-reducing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuyun; Yassine, Mohamad H; Suidan, Makram T; Venosa, Albert D

    2016-10-01

    Biotransformation of soybean biodiesel and its biodiesel/petrodiesel blends were investigated under sulfate-reducing conditions. Three blends of biodiesel, B100, B50, and B0, were treated using microbial cultures pre-acclimated to B100 (biodiesel only) and B80 (80% biodiesel and 20% petrodiesel). Results indicate that the biodiesel could be effectively biodegraded in the presence or absence of petrodiesel, whereas petrodiesel could not be biodegraded at all under sulfate-reducing conditions. The kinetics of biodegradation of individual Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) compounds and their accompanying sulfate-reduction rates were studied using a serum bottle test. As for the biodegradation of individual FAME compounds, the biodegradation rates for the saturated FAMEs decreased with increasing carbon chain length. For unsaturated FAMEs, biodegradation rates increased with increasing number of double bonds. The presence of petrodiesel had a greater effect on the rate of biodegradation of biodiesel than on the extent of removal. PMID:27448319

  13. Comparative study on the mechanisms of rotavirus inactivation by sodium dodecyl sulfate and ethylenediaminetetraacetate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, R.L. (Sandia Labs., Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, C.S.

    1980-06-01

    This report describes a comparative study on the effects of the anionic detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate and the chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetate on purified rotavirus SA-11 particles. Both chemicals readily inactivated rotavirus at quite low concentrations and under very mild conditions. In addition, both agents modified the viral capsid and prevented the adsorption of inactivated virions to cells. Capsid damage by ethylenediaminetetraacetate caused a shift in the densities of rotavirions from about l.35 to about 1.37 g/ml and a reduction in their sedimentation coefficients. Sodium dodcyl sulfate, on the other hand, did not detectably alter either of these physical properties of rotavirions. Both agents caused some alteration of the isoelectric points of the virions. Finally, analysis of rotavirus proteins showed that ethylenediaminetetraacetate caused the loss of two protein peaks from the electrophoretic pattern of virions but sodium dodecyl sulfate caused the loss of only one of these same protein peaks.

  14. Demonstrating Bacterial Flagella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, John R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes an effective laboratory method for demonstrating bacterial flagella that utilizes the Proteus mirabilis organism and a special harvesting technique. Includes safety considerations for the laboratory exercise. (MDH)

  15. A Direct Sulfation Process of a Marine Polysaccharide in Ionic Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Chopin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available GY785 is an exopolysaccharide produced by a mesophilic bacterial strain Alteromonas infernus discovered in the deep-sea hydrothermal vents. GY785 highly sulfated derivative (GY785 DRS was previously demonstrated to be a promising molecule driving the efficient mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenesis for cartilage repair. This glycosaminoglycan- (GAG- like compound was modified in a classical solvent (N,N′-dimethylformamide. However, the use of classical solvents limits the polysaccharide solubility and causes the backbone degradation. In the present study, a one-step efficient sulfation process devoid of side effects (e.g., polysaccharide depolymerization and/or degradation was developed to produce GAG-like derivatives. The sulfation of GY785 derivative (GY785 DR was carried out using ionic liquid as a reaction medium. The successful sulfation of this anionic and highly branched heteropolysaccharide performed in ionic liquid would facilitate the production of new molecules of high specificity for biological targets such as tissue engineering or regenerative medicine.

  16. Poverty Reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Ortiz, Isabel

    2007-01-01

    The paper reviews poverty trends and measurements, poverty reduction in historical perspective, the poverty-inequality-growth debate, national poverty reduction strategies, criticisms of the agenda and the need for redistribution, international policies for poverty reduction, and ultimately understanding poverty at a global scale. It belongs to a series of backgrounders developed at Joseph Stiglitz's Initiative for Policy Dialogue.

  17. Urinary glycosaminoglycans excretion and the effect of dimethyl sulfoxide in an experimental model of non-bacterial cystitis

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Soler; Homero Bruschini; Jose C. Truzzi; Joao R. Martins; Niels O. Camara; Maria T. Alves; Katia R. Leite; Nader, Helena B.; Miguel Srougi; Valdemar Ortiz

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: We reproduced a non-bacterial experimental model to assess bladder inflammation and urinary glycosaminoglycans (GAG) excretion and examined the effect of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Female rats were instilled with either protamine sulfate (PS groups) or sterile saline (control groups). At different days after the procedure, 24 h urine and bladder samples were obtained. Urinary levels of hyaluronic acid (HA) and sulfated glycosaminoglycans (S-GAG) were determined...

  18. Impact of elevated nitrate on sulfate-reducing bacteria: A comparative study of Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Q.; He, Z.; Joyner, D.C.; Joachimiak, M.; Price, M.N.; Yang, Z.K.; Yen, H.-C. B.; Hemme, C. L.; Chen, W.; Fields, M.; Stahl, D. A.; Keasling, J. D.; Keller, M.; Arkin, A. P.; Hazen, T. C.; Wall, J. D.; Zhou, J.

    2010-07-15

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria have been extensively studied for their potential in heavy-metal bioremediation. However, the occurrence of elevated nitrate in contaminated environments has been shown to inhibit sulfate reduction activity. Although the inhibition has been suggested to result from the competition with nitrate-reducing bacteria, the possibility of direct inhibition of sulfate reducers by elevated nitrate needs to be explored. Using Desulfovibrio vulgaris as a model sulfate-reducing bacterium, functional genomics analysis reveals that osmotic stress contributed to growth inhibition by nitrate as shown by the upregulation of the glycine/betaine transporter genes and the relief of nitrate inhibition by osmoprotectants. The observation that significant growth inhibition was effected by 70 mM NaNO{sub 3} but not by 70 mM NaCl suggests the presence of inhibitory mechanisms in addition to osmotic stress. The differential expression of genes characteristic of nitrite stress responses, such as the hybrid cluster protein gene, under nitrate stress condition further indicates that nitrate stress response by D. vulgaris was linked to components of both osmotic and nitrite stress responses. The involvement of the oxidative stress response pathway, however, might be the result of a more general stress response. Given the low similarities between the response profiles to nitrate and other stresses, less-defined stress response pathways could also be important in nitrate stress, which might involve the shift in energy metabolism. The involvement of nitrite stress response upon exposure to nitrate may provide detoxification mechanisms for nitrite, which is inhibitory to sulfate-reducing bacteria, produced by microbial nitrate reduction as a metabolic intermediate and may enhance the survival of sulfate-reducing bacteria in environments with elevated nitrate level.

  19. Temperature dependence of crystals conductivity both potassium sulfates and ammonium sulfates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the work the results of temperature dependence of conductivity of crystals both potassium sulfate and ammonium sulfate are given. The superficial specific conductivity and its dependence on width of a backlash between the central and ring electrodes are determined. (author)

  20. Solubility in aqueous system of potassium sulfate, cadmium sulfate at 50 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solubility in system potassium sulfate-cadmium sulfate-water at 50 deg C is studied using isothermal method. Crystallization limits of K2SO4, CdSO4x8/3H2O double salt 2K2SO4x2CdSO4x3H2O at 50 deg C are determined

  1. 21 CFR 524.1484e - Neomycin sulfate and polymyxin B sulfate ophthalmic solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ophthalmic solution. 524.1484e Section 524.1484e Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS OPHTHALMIC AND TOPICAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.1484e Neomycin sulfate and polymyxin B sulfate ophthalmic solution....

  2. Sanfilippo disease type D: deficiency of N-acetylglucosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase required for heparan sulfate degradation.

    OpenAIRE

    Kresse, H.; Paschke, E; von Figura, K; Gilberg, W; Fuchs, W

    1980-01-01

    Skin fibroblasts from two patients who had symptoms of the Sanfilippo syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis III) accumulated excessive amounts of heparan sulfate and were unable to release sulfate from N-acetylglucosamine-6-sulfate linkages in heparan sulfate-derived oligosaccharides. Keratan sulfate-derived oligosaccharides bearing the same residue at the nonreducing end and p-nitrophenyl-6-sulfo-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-beta-D-glucopyranoside were degraded normally. Kinetic differences between th sulf...

  3. Enteral nutrient solutions. Limiting bacterial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paauw, J D; Fagerman, K E; McCamish, M A; Dean, R E

    1984-06-01

    Bacterial contamination of enteral nutrient solutions ( ENS ) in FFcess of food product standards is known to occur in the hospital setting. The large amounts of bacteria often given with ENS have been shown to create a reservoir for nosocomial infections, and nonpathogenic bacteria have been implicated. Patient tolerance is dependent on immune status and the bacterial load delivered to the gut. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bacterial growth-sustaining properties of various ENS and to devise methods to limit bacterial growth. Five commercial products were prepared under sterile conditions. After inoculation with approximately 5 X 10(3) organisms/cm3 of Enterobacter cloacae, each solution was hung at room temperature for 24 hours with samples drawn at fixed intervals and plated for bacterial counts. Bacterial growth rates in Ensure, Travasorb , and Vital were markedly higher than those in Precision and Vivonex. Vivonex was noted to contain potassium sorbate (KS) used as a fungistatic agent. Recent studies have identified KS as a broad-spectrum bacteriostatic food preservative that is federally approved for this use. KS (0.03%) was added to Travasorb inoculated with 5 X 10(3) organisms/cm(3) of E. cloacae. The bacterial growth rate was reduced by 75 per cent, and the final count of 2-3 X 10(4) organisms/ml was within the federally regulated limit for milk. This study suggests that initial inoculum, growth rate, and hang time can be altered to provide a significant reduction in final bacterial counts in ENS . PMID:6428286

  4. Shuffling bacterial metabolomes

    OpenAIRE

    Thomason, Brendan; Read, Timothy D.

    2006-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has a far more significant role than gene duplication in bacterial evolution. This has recently been illustrated by work demonstrating the importance of HGT in the emergence of bacterial metabolic networks, with horizontally acquired genes being placed in peripheral pathways at the outer branches of the networks.

  5. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection. PMID:27096872

  6. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach that ...... become valuable weapons for preventing pathogen contamination and fighting infectious diseases in the future....

  7. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim N. Mak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs. IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection.

  8. Bacterial community diversity in municipal waste landfill sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Liyan; Wang, Yangqing; Tang, Wei; Lei, Yu

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about the bacterial diversity of landfills and how environmental factors impact the diversity. In this study, PCR-based 454 pyrosequencing was used to investigate the bacterial communities of ten landfill leachate samples from five landfill sites in China. A total of 137 K useable sequences from the V3-V6 regions of the 16S rRNA gene were retrieved from 205 K reads. These sequences revealed the presence of a large number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in the landfills (709-1599 OTUs per sample). The most predominant bacterial representatives in the landfills investigated, regardless of geographic area, included Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. The phyla Fusobacteria and Tenericutes were also found for the first time to be predominant in the landfills. The phylum Fusobacteria predominated (51.5 and 48.8%) in two semi-arid landfills, and the phylum Tenericutes dominated (30.6%) at one humid, subtropical landfill. Further, a large number of Pseudomonas was detected in most samples, comprising the dominant group and accounting for 40.9 to 92.4% of the total abundance. Principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis based on OTU abundance showed that the abundant taxa separated the bacterial community. Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) suggested that precipitation and landfilling age significantly impact on the bacterial community structure. The bacterial community function (e.g., cellulolytic bacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), sulfate-oxidizing bacteria, and xenobiotic organic compound (XOC)-degrading bacteria) was also diverse, but the pattern is unclear. PMID:25981996

  9. Pathway of Fermentative Hydrogen Production by Sulfate-reducing Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Judy D. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2015-02-16

    Biofuels are a promising source of sustainable energy. Such biofuels are intermediate products of microbial metabolism of renewable substrates, in particular, plant biomass. Not only are alcohols and solvents produced in this degradative process but energy-rich hydrogen as well. Non photosynthetic microbial hydrogen generation from compounds other than sugars has not been fully explored. We propose to examine the capacity of the abundant soil anaerobes, sulfate-reducing bacteria, for hydrogen generation from organic acids. These apparently simple pathways have yet to be clearly established. Information obtained may facilitate the exploitation of other microbes not yet readily examined by molecular tools. Identification of the flexibility of the metabolic processes to channel reductant to hydrogen will be useful in consideration of practical applications. Because the tools for genetic and molecular manipulation of sulfate-reducing bacteria of the genus Desulfovibrio are developed, our efforts will focus on two strains, D. vulgaris Hildenborough and Desulfovibrio G20.Therefore total metabolism, flux through the pathways, and regulation are likely to be limiting factors which we can elucidate in the following experiments.

  10. Sulfate-reducing microorganisms in wetlands – fameless actors in carbon cycling and climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael ePester

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater wetlands are a major source of the greenhouse gas methane but at the same time can function as carbon sink. Their response to global warming and environmental pollution is one of the largest unknowns in the upcoming decades to centuries. In this review, we highlight the role of sulfate-reducing microorganisms (SRM in the intertwined element cycles of wetlands. Although regarded primarily as methanogenic environments, biogeochemical studies have revealed a previously hidden sulfur cycle in wetlands that can sustain rapid renewal of the small standing pools of sulfate. Thus, dissimilatory sulfate reduction, which frequently occurs at rates comparable to marine surface sediments, can contribute up to 36–50% to anaerobic carbon mineralization in these ecosystems. Since sulfate reduction is thermodynamically favored relative to fermentative processes and methanogenesis, it effectively decreases gross methane production thereby mitigating the flux of methane to the atmosphere. However, very little is known about wetland SRM. Molecular analyses using dsrAB [encoding subunit A and B of the dissimilatory (bisulfite reductase] as marker genes demonstrated that members of novel phylogenetic lineages, which are unrelated to recognized SRM, dominate dsrAB richness and, if tested, are also abundant among the dsrAB-containing wetland microbiota. These discoveries point towards the existence of so far unknown SRM that are an important part of the autochthonous wetland microbiota. In addition to these numerically dominant microorganisms, a recent stable isotope probing study of SRM in a German peatland indicated that rare biosphere members might be highly active in situ and have a considerable stake in wetland sulfate reduction. The hidden sulfur cycle in wetlands and the fact that wetland SRM are not well represented by described SRM species explains their so far neglected role as important actors in carbon cycling and climate change.

  11. New insights into the transport processes controlling the sulfate-methane-transition-zone near methane vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Nabil; Garziglia, Sébastien; Ruffine, Livio

    2016-05-01

    Over the past years, several studies have raised concerns about the possible interactions between methane hydrate decomposition and external change. To carry out such an investigation, it is essential to characterize the baseline dynamics of gas hydrate systems related to natural geological and sedimentary processes. This is usually treated through the analysis of sulfate-reduction coupled to anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Here, we model sulfate reduction coupled with AOM as a two-dimensional (2D) problem including, advective and diffusive transport. This is applied to a case study from a deep-water site off Nigeria’s coast where lateral methane advection through turbidite layers was suspected. We show by analyzing the acquired data in combination with computational modeling that a two-dimensional approach is able to accurately describe the recent past dynamics of such a complex natural system. Our results show that the sulfate-methane-transition-zone (SMTZ) is not a vertical barrier for dissolved sulfate and methane. We also show that such a modeling is able to assess short timescale variations in the order of decades to centuries.

  12. In vivo therapeutic efficacy and pharmacokinetics of colistin sulfate in an experimental model of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection in weaned pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhouma, Mohamed; Beaudry, Francis; Thériault, William; Bergeron, Nadia; Beauchamp, Guy; Laurent-Lewandowski, Sylvette; Fairbrother, John Morris; Letellier, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC: F4) associated with post-weaning diarrhea (PWD) in pigs has developed resistance against several antimicrobial families, leading to increased use of colistin sulfate (CS) for the treatment of this disease. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of oral CS treatment in experimental PWD due to ETEC: F4 challenge and determine the effect of this challenge on CS intestinal absorption. In this study, 96 pigs were divided into two trials based on CS dose (100 000 or 50 000 IU/kg). Fecal shedding of ETEC: F4, total E. coli, and CS-resistant E. coli, diarrhea scores, and weight changes were evaluated. Colistin sulfate plasma concentrations were determined by HPLC-MS/MS. Regardless of the dose, CS treatment resulted in a reduction of fecal ETEC: F4 and total E. coli shedding, and in diarrhea scores but only during the treatment period. However, CS treatment resulted in a slight increase in fecal shedding of CS resistant E. coli and did not prevent weight loss in challenged pigs. In addition, challenge with ETEC: F4 resulted in an increase of CS intestinal absorption. Our study is among the first to demonstrate that under controlled conditions, CS was effective in reducing fecal shedding of ETEC: F4 and total E. coli in experimental PWD. However, CS treatment was associated with a slight selection pressure on E. coli and did not prevent pig weight loss. Further studies are needed in field conditions, to better characterize CS therapeutic regimen efficacy and bacterial resistance dissemination. PMID:27234971

  13. Activity and phylogenetic diversity of sulfate-reducing microorganisms in low-temperature subsurface fluids within the upper oceanic crust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto eRobador

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The basaltic ocean crust is the largest aquifer system on Earth, yet the rates of biological activity in this environment are unknown. Low-temperature (<100 °C fluid samples were investigated from two borehole observatories in the Juan de Fuca Ridge flank, representing a range of upper oceanic basement thermal and geochemical properties. Microbial sulfate reduction rates were measured in laboratory incubations with 35S-sulfate over a range of temperatures, with microbial activity limited by the availability of organic electron donors. Thermodynamic calculations indicate energetic constraints for metabolism in the higher temperature, more altered and isolated fluids, which together with relatively higher cell-specific sulfate reduction rates reveal increased maintenance requirements, consistent with novel species-level dsrAB phylotypes of thermophilic sulfate-reducing microorganisms. Our estimates suggest that microbially-mediated sulfate reduction may account for the removal of organic matter in fluids within the upper oceanic crust and underscore the potential quantitative impact of microbial processes in deep subsurface marine crustal fluids on marine and global biogeochemical carbon cycling.

  14. Methane and sulfate dynamics in sediments from mangrove-dominated tropical coastal lagoons, Yucatán, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Pei-Chuan; Young, Megan B.; Dale, Andrew W.; Miller, Laurence G.; Herrera-Silveira, Jorge A.; Paytan, Adina

    2016-05-01

    Porewater profiles in sediment cores from mangrove-dominated coastal lagoons (Celestún and Chelem) on the Yucatán Peninsula, Mexico, reveal the widespread coexistence of dissolved methane and sulfate. This observation is interesting since dissolved methane in porewaters is typically oxidized anaerobically by sulfate. To explain the observations we used a numerical transport-reaction model that was constrained by the field observations. The model suggests that methane in the upper sediments is produced in the sulfate reduction zone at rates ranging between 0.012 and 31 mmol m-2 d-1, concurrent with sulfate reduction rates between 1.1 and 24 mmol SO42- m-2 d-1. These processes are supported by high organic matter content in the sediment and the use of non-competitive substrates by methanogenic microorganisms. Indeed sediment slurry incubation experiments show that non-competitive substrates such as trimethylamine (TMA) and methanol can be utilized for microbial methanogenesis at the study sites. The model also indicates that a significant fraction of methane is transported to the sulfate reduction zone from deeper zones within the sedimentary column by rising bubbles and gas dissolution. The shallow depths of methane production and the fast rising methane gas bubbles reduce the likelihood for oxidation, thereby allowing a large fraction of the methane formed in the sediments to escape to the overlying water column.

  15. Increasing sulfate concentrations result in higher sulfide production and phosphorous mobilization in a shallow eutrophic freshwater lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mo; Li, Xiao-Hong; He, Yu-Hong; Song, Na; Cai, Hai-Yuan; Wang, Changhui; Li, Yun-Tao; Chu, Hai-Yan; Krumholz, Lee R; Jiang, He-Long

    2016-06-01

    Increasing sulfate input has been seen as an issue in management of aquatic ecosystems, but its influences on eutrophic freshwater lakes is not clear. In this study, it was observed that increasing sulfate concentration without additional cyanobacterial bloom biomass (CBB) addition did not have an obvious effect on element cycling during 1-year continuous flow mesocosm experiments in which water and sediments were taken from a shallow eutrophic lake with sulfate levels near 1 mM. However, following addition of CBB to mesocosms, sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were observed in the water column, and increasing numbers of SRB in the water column were associated with higher sulfate input. Sulfate amendment (0-70 mg L(-1)) also resulted in a larger amount of total dissolved sulfide (peak values of 5.90 ± 0.36 to 7.60 ± 0.12 mg L(-1)) in the water column and acid volatile sulfide (1081.71 ± 69.91 to 1557.98 ± 41.72 mg kg(-1)) in 0-1 cm surface sediments due to sulfate reduction. During the period of CBB decomposition, increasing sulfate levels in the water column were positively correlated with increasing diffusive phosphate fluxes of 1.23 ± 0.32 to 2.17 ± 0.01 mg m(-2) d(-1) at the water-sediment interface. As increases in sulfide and phosphate release rates deteriorated the water quality/ecosystem and even spurred the occurrence of a black water problem in lakes, the control of sulfate input level should be considered for shallow eutrophic lake management, especially during cyanobacterial bloom periods. PMID:27023925

  16. Formation of the natural sulfate aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerminen, V.M.; Hillamo, R.; Maekinen, M.; Virkkula, A.; Maekelae, T.; Pakkanen, T. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Anthropogenic sulfate aerosol, together with particles from biomass burning, may significantly reduce the climatic warming due to man-made greenhouse gases. The radiative forcing of aerosol particles is based on their ability to scatter and absorb solar radiation (direct effect), and on their influences on cloud albedos and lifetimes (indirect effect). The direct aerosol effect depends strongly on the size, number and chemical composition of particles, being greatest for particles of 0.1-1 {mu}m in diameter. The indirect aerosol effect is dictated by the number of particles being able to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). For sulfate particles, the minimum CCN size in tropospheric clouds is of the order of 0.05-0.2 {mu}m. To improve aerosol parameterizations in future climate models, it is required that (1) both primary and secondary sources of various particle types will be characterized at a greater accuracy, and (2) the influences of various atmospheric processes on the spatial and temporal distribution of these particles and their physico-chemical properties are known much better than at the present. In estimating the climatic forcing due to the sulfate particles, one of the major problems is to distinguish between sulfur from anthropogenic sources and that of natural origin. Global emissions of biogenic and anthropogenic sulfate pre-cursors are comparable in magnitude, but over regional scales either of these two source types may dominate. The current presentation is devoted to discussing the natural sulfate aerosol, including the formation of sulfur-derived particles in the marine environment, and the use of particulate methanesulfonic acid (MSA) as a tracer for the natural sulfate

  17. 2-Amino­pyrimidinium hydrogen sulfate

    OpenAIRE

    Elboulali, Adel; Akriche, Samah Toumi; Salem S. Al-Deyab; Rzaigui, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    In the crystal structure of the title compound, C4H6N3 +·HSO4 −, hydrogen sulfate anions self-assemble through O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming chains along the b axis, while the cations form centrosymmetric pairs via N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds. The 2-amino­pyrimidinium pairs are linked to the sulfate anions via N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming a two-dimensional network parallel to (10 ). In addition, weak inter­molecular C—H⋯O contacts generate a three-dimensional network.

  18. On the evaporation of ammonium sulfate solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drisdell, Walter S.; Saykally, Richard J.; Cohen, Ronald C.

    2009-07-16

    Aqueous evaporation and condensation kinetics are poorly understood, and uncertainties in their rates affect predictions of cloud behavior and therefore climate. We measured the cooling rate of 3 M ammonium sulfate droplets undergoing free evaporation via Raman thermometry. Analysis of the measurements yields a value of 0.58 {+-} 0.05 for the evaporation coefficient, identical to that previously determined for pure water. These results imply that subsaturated aqueous ammonium sulfate, which is the most abundant inorganic component of atmospheric aerosol, does not affect the vapor-liquid exchange mechanism for cloud droplets, despite reducing the saturation vapor pressure of water significantly.

  19. Spectrophotometric determination of nitrite using salbutamol sulfate as a reagent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrawal, Y.K.; Bhatt, P.N.

    1988-01-01

    A simple spectrophotometric method for the trace determination of nitrite (NO/sub 2//sup /minus//) is described. Nitrite is reacted with Salbutamol sulfate in acidic medium which gives a yellow color in alkaline medium (less than or equal to pH 7) and can be determined in the presence of several cations and anions. Beer's law is obeyed in the range of 1.8 to 27.6 ppm of nitrite with the molar absorptivity 1.8 /times/ 10/sup 3/ 1 /times/ mole /sup /minus/1/ /times/ cm/sup /minus/1/ at 410 nm. The proposed method can also be utilized for the determination of nitrate (NO/sub 3//sup /minus//) after its reduction to nitrite. The method has been applied for the determination of various samples containing traces of nitrite.

  20. Fucans, but not fucomannoglucuronans, determine the biological activities of sulfated polysaccharides from Laminaria saccharina brown seaweed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego O Croci

    Full Text Available Sulfated polysaccharides from Laminaria saccharina (new name: Saccharina latissima brown seaweed show promising activity for the treatment of inflammation, thrombosis, and cancer; yet the molecular mechanisms underlying these properties remain poorly understood. The aim of this work was to characterize, using in vitro and in vivo strategies, the anti-inflammatory, anti-coagulant, anti-angiogenic, and anti-tumor activities of two main sulfated polysaccharide fractions obtained from L. saccharina: a L.s.-1.0 fraction mainly consisting of O-sulfated mannoglucuronofucans and b L.s.-1.25 fraction mainly composed of sulfated fucans. Both fractions inhibited leukocyte recruitment in a model of inflammation in rats, although L.s.-1.25 appeared to be more active than L.s.-1.0. Also, these fractions inhibited neutrophil adhesion to platelets under flow. Only fraction L.s.-1.25, but not L.s.-1.0, displayed anticoagulant activity as measured by the activated partial thromboplastin time. Investigation of these fractions in angiogenesis settings revealed that only L.s.-1.25 strongly inhibited fetal bovine serum (FBS induced in vitro tubulogenesis. This effect correlated with a reduction in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 levels in L.s.-1.25-treated endothelial cells. Furthermore, only parent sulfated polysaccharides from L. saccharina (L.s.-P and its fraction L.s.-1.25 were powerful inhibitors of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF induced pathways. Consistently, the L.s.-1.25 fraction as well as L.s.-P successfully interfered with fibroblast binding to human bFGF. The incorporation of L.s.-P or L.s.-1.25, but not L.s.-1.0 into Matrigel plugs containing melanoma cells induced a significant reduction in hemoglobin content as well in the frequency of tumor-associated blood vessels. Moreover, i.p. administrations of L.s.-1.25, as well as L.s.-P, but not L.s.-1.0, resulted in a significant reduction of tumor growth when inoculated into syngeneic mice