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Sample records for bacterial strains involved

  1. Epidemiological analysis of bacterial strains involved in hospital infection in a University Hospital from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MORAES Bianca Aguiar de

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Hospital infections cause an increase in morbidity and mortality of hospitalized patients with significant rise in hospital costs. The aim of this work was an epidemiological analysis of hospital infection cases occurred in a public University Hospital in Rio de Janeiro. Hence, 238 strains were isolated from 14 different clinical materials of 166 patients hospitalized in the period between August 1995 and July 1997. The average age of the patients was 33.4 years, 72.9% used antimicrobials before having a positive culture. The most common risk conditions were surgery (19.3%, positive HIV or AIDS (18.1% and lung disease (16.9%. 24 different bacterial species were identified, S. aureus (21% and P. aeruginosa (18.5% were predominant. Among 50 S. aureus isolated strains 36% were classified as MRSA (Methicillin Resistant S. aureus. The Gram negative bacteria presented high resistance to aminoglycosides and cephalosporins. A diarrhea outbreak, detected in high-risk neonatology ward, was caused by Salmonella serovar Infantis strain, with high antimicrobial resistance and a plasmid of high molecular weight (98Mda containing virulence genes and positive for R factor.

  2. Involvement of hrpX and hrpG in the Virulence of Acidovorax citrulli Strain Aac5, Causal Agent of Bacterial Fruit Blotch in Cucurbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxiao Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Acidovorax citrulli causes bacterial fruit blotch, a disease that poses a global threat to watermelon and melon production. Despite its economic importance, relatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms of pathogenicity and virulence of A. citrulli. Like other plant-pathogenic bacteria, A. citrulli relies on a type III secretion system (T3SS for pathogenicity. On the basis of sequence and operon arrangement analyses, A. citrulli was found to have a class II hrp gene cluster similar to those of Xanthomonas and Ralstonia spp. In the class II hrp cluster, hrpG and hrpX play key roles in the regulation of T3SS effectors. However, little is known about the regulation of the T3SS in A. citrulli. This study aimed to investigate the roles of hrpG and hrpX in A. citrulli pathogenicity. We found that hrpG or hrpX deletion mutants of the A. citrulli group II strain Aac5 had reduced pathogenicity on watermelon seedlings, failed to induce a hypersensitive response in tobacco, and elicited higher levels of reactive oxygen species in Nicotiana benthamiana than the wild-type strain. Additionally, we demonstrated that HrpG activates HrpX in A. citrulli. Moreover, transcription and translation of the type 3-secreted effector (T3E gene Aac5_2166 were suppressed in hrpG and hrpX mutants. Notably, hrpG and hrpX appeared to modulate biofilm formation. These results suggest that hrpG and hrpX are essential for pathogenicity, regulation of T3Es, and biofilm formation in A. citrulli.

  3. Endolymphatic sac involvement in bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Brandt, Christian; Østergaard, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The commonest sequelae of bacterial meningitis are related to the inner ear. Little is known about the inner ear immune defense. Evidence suggests that the endolymphatic sac provides some protection against infection. A potential involvement of the endolymphatic sac in bacterial meningitis...... is largely unaccounted for, and thus the object of the present study. A well-established adult rat model of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis was employed. Thirty adult rats were inoculated intrathecally with Streptococcus pneumoniae and received no additional treatment. Six rats were sham...... days. Bacteria invaded the inner ear through the cochlear aquaduct. On days 5-6, the bacteria invaded the endolymphatic sac through the endolymphatic duct subsequent to invasion of the vestibular endolymphatic compartment. No evidence of direct bacterial invasion of the sac through the meninges...

  4. Bacterial Extracellular Polysaccharides Involved in Biofilm Formation

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    Elena P. Ivanova

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS produced by microorganisms are a complex mixture of biopolymers primarily consisting of polysaccharides, as well as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids and humic substances. EPS make up the intercellular space of microbial aggregates and form the structure and architecture of the biofilm matrix. The key functions of EPS comprise the mediation of the initial attachment of cells to different substrata and protection against environmental stress and dehydration. The aim of this review is to present a summary of the current status of the research into the role of EPS in bacterial attachment followed by biofilm formation. The latter has a profound impact on an array of biomedical, biotechnology and industrial fields including pharmaceutical and surgical applications, food engineering, bioremediation and biohydrometallurgy. The diverse structural variations of EPS produced by bacteria of different taxonomic lineages, together with examples of biotechnological applications, are discussed. Finally, a range of novel techniques that can be used in studies involving biofilm-specific polysaccharides is discussed.

  5. Bacterial extracellular polysaccharides involved in biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Barbara; Chen, Miao; Crawford, Russell J; Ivanova, Elena P

    2009-07-13

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) produced by microorganisms are a complex mixture of biopolymers primarily consisting of polysaccharides, as well as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids and humic substances. EPS make up the intercellular space of microbial aggregates and form the structure and architecture of the biofilm matrix. The key functions of EPS comprise the mediation of the initial attachment of cells to different substrata and protection against environmental stress and dehydration. The aim of this review is to present a summary of the current status of the research into the role of EPS in bacterial attachment followed by biofilm formation. The latter has a profound impact on an array of biomedical, biotechnology and industrial fields including pharmaceutical and surgical applications, food engineering, bioremediation and biohydrometallurgy. The diverse structural variations of EPS produced by bacteria of different taxonomic lineages, together with examples of biotechnological applications, are discussed. Finally, a range of novel techniques that can be used in studies involving biofilm-specific polysaccharides is discussed.

  6. Identification of bacterial strains in viili by molecular taxonomy and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Identification of bacterial strains in viili by molecular taxonomy and their synergistic effects on milk curd and exopolysaccharides production. T Chen, Q Tan, M Wang, S Xiong, S Jiang, Q Wu, S Li, C Luo, H Wei ...

  7. Biodegradation of phenol by a newly isolated marine bacterial strain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-12-26

    peptone agar plates with. 1500 mg/L phenol. ... biodegradation of the strain was up to 92.0% under the optimum conditions even when the phenol ... Growth of marine bacterial isolates in various concentration of phenol. Isolate.

  8. Antimicrobial resistance of bacterial strains isolated from orange ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The organisms encountered include Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces sp, Rhodotorula sp, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes and Micrococcus sp. The resistances of thirty bacterial strains isolated from orange juice products to the commonly used ...

  9. Forces involved in bacterial adhesion to hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, N.P.; Norde, W.; Meil, H.C.; Busscher, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Using a parallel-plate flow chamber, the hydrodynamic shear forces to prevent bacterial adhesion (F-prev) and to detach adhering bacteria (F-det) were evaluated for hydrophilic glass, hydrophobic, dimethyldichlorosilane (DDS)-coated glass and six different bacterial strains, in order to test the

  10. Forces involved in bacterial adhesion to hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, Niels P.; Norde, Willem; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2008-01-01

    Using a parallel-plate flow chamber, the hydrodynamic shear forces to prevent bacterial adhesion (F(prev)) and to detach adhering bacteria (F(det)) were evaluated for hydrophilic glass, hydrophobic, dimethyldichlorosilane (DDS)-coated glass and six different bacterial strains, in order to test the

  11. Hexadecane degradation by bacterial strains isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was undertaken to detect and monitor the degradation of hexadecane by three potential degrading bacteria (Pseudomonas putida, Rhodococcus erythroplolis and Bacillus thermoleovorans) isolated from contaminated soils in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The extraction of the bacterial populations from these polluted soils ...

  12. Antifungal activity of bacterial strains from the rhizosphere of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-06-08

    Jun 8, 2011 ... This study evaluated the antifungal action of biomolecules produced from the secondary metabolism of bacterial strains found in the rhizosphere of semi arid plants against human pathogenic Candida albicans. Crude extracts were obtained using ethyl acetate as an organic solvent and the bioactivity was.

  13. Biodegradation of orange G by a novel isolated bacterial strain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research article deals with biodegradation of azo dyes by a newly isolated bacterial strain from soil. Azo dyes are recalcitrant to the conventional modes of treatment due to their complex structure. This article reports decolorization of azo dye by, Gram positive, endospore forming and azo reducing, Bacillus megaterium ...

  14. Diversity of Streptococcus mutans strains in bacterial interspecies interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X.; Hoogenkamp, M.A.; Ling, J.; Crielaard, W.; Deng, D.M.

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are matrix-enclosed microbial population adhere to each other and to surfaces. Compared to planktonic bacterial cells, biofilm cells show much higher levels of antimicrobial resistance. We aimed to investigate Streptococcus mutans strain diversity in biofilm formation and chlorhexidine

  15. Antifungal activity of bacterial strains from the rhizosphere of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluated the antifungal action of biomolecules produced from the secondary metabolism of bacterial strains found in the rhizosphere of semi arid plants against human pathogenic Candida albicans. Crude extracts were obtained using ethyl acetate as an organic solvent and the bioactivity was assessed with a ...

  16. In silico comparison of bacterial strains using mutual information

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fast-sequencing throughput methods have increased the number of completely sequenced bacterial genomes to about 400 by December 2006, with the number increasing rapidly. These include several strains. In silico methods of comparative genomics are of use in categorizing and phylogenetically sorting these bacteria ...

  17. Antibiotic Activity Assessment of Bacterial Strains Isolated from Urine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are common worldwide and affect all sexes and age groups. An estimated 20% or more of the female population suffers from some form of UTIs in their lifetime. Although antibiotics are the first choice of treatment for many urinary tract infections, antibiotic-resistant strains of bacterial species ...

  18. Identification and characterisation of potential biofertilizer bacterial strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagöz, Kenan; Kotan, Recep; Dadaşoǧlu, Fatih; Dadaşoǧlu, Esin

    2016-04-01

    In this study we aimed that isolation, identification and characterizations of PGPR strains from rhizosphere of legume plants. 188 bacterial strains isolated from different legume plants like clover, sainfoin and vetch in Erzurum province of Turkey. These three plants are cultivated commonly in the Erzurum province. It was screen that 50 out of 188 strains can fix nitrogen and solubilize phosphate. These strains were identified via MIS (Microbial identification system). According to MIS identification results, 40 out of 50 strains were identified as Bacillus, 5 as Pseudomonas, 3 as Paenibacillus, 1 as Acinetobacter, 1 as Brevibacterium. According to classical test results, while the catalase test result of all isolates are positive, oxidase, KOH and starch hydrolysis rest results are variable.

  19. Antimicrobial effect against different bacterial strains and bacterial adaptation to essential oils used as feed additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Antonio Diego Brandão; Amaral, Amanda Figueiredo; Schaefer, Gustavo; Luciano, Fernando Bittencourt; de Andrade, Carla; Costa, Leandro Batista; Rostagno, Marcos Horácio

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity and determine the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of the essential oils derived from Origanum vulgare (oregano), Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree), Cinnamomum cassia (cassia), and Thymus vulgaris (white thyme) against Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. The study also investigated the ability of these different bacterial strains to develop adaptation after repetitive exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of these essential oils. The MBC of the essential oils studied was determined by disc diffusion and broth dilution methods. All essential oils showed antimicrobial effect against all bacterial strains. In general, the development of adaptation varied according to the bacterial strain and the essential oil (tea tree > white thyme > oregano). Therefore, it is important to use essential oils at efficient bactericidal doses in animal feed, food, and sanitizers, since bacteria can rapidly develop adaptation when exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of these oils.

  20. Antimicrobial resistance of bacterial strains isolated from avian cellulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MM Santos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Avian cellulitis is an inflammatory process in the subcutaneous tissue, mainly located in the abdomen and thighs. This problem is commonly observed in poultry at slaughter and it is considered one of the major causes of condemnation of carcasses in Brazil. The aim of this study was to perform the microbial isolation of lesions of avian cellulitis from a processing plant located in the State of Goiás in order to analyze antimicrobial resistance by antibiogram test and to detect resistance genes by polymerase chain reaction. A total of 25 samples of avian cellulitis lesions were analyzed, from which 30 bacterial strains were isolated. There were eleven (44% strains of Escherichia coli, nine (36% strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis, seven (28% strains of Proteus mirabilis and three (12% strains of Manheimiahaemolytica. The antibiogram test showed that all strains were resistant to at least one antimicrobial. The gene of antimicrobial resistance tetB was detected in E. coli, S. epidermidis and P. mirabilis strains, and was the most frequently observed gene. The gene of antimicrobial resistance Sul1 was detected in all bacterial species, while tetA was found in E. coli and S. epidermidis strains, SHV in E. coli strains, S. epidermidis and P. mirabilis,and cat1 in one P. mirabilis strain. The results suggest a potential public health hazard due to the ability of these microorganisms to transmit antimicrobial resistancegenes to other microorganisms present in the intestinal tract of humans and animals, which may affect clinical-medical usage of these drugs.

  1. Carbazole degradation in the soil microcosm by tropical bacterial strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lateef B. Salam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In a previous study, three bacterial strains isolated from tropical hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and phylogenetically identified as Achromobacter sp. strain SL1, Pseudomonassp. strain SL4 and Microbacterium esteraromaticum strain SL6 displayed angular dioxygenation and mineralization of carbazole in batch cultures. In this study, the ability of these isolates to survive and enhance carbazole degradation in soil were tested in field-moist microcosms. Strain SL4 had the highest survival rate (1.8 x 107 cfu/g after 30 days of incubation in sterilized soil, while there was a decrease in population density in native (unsterilized soil when compared with the initial population. Gas chromatographic analysis after 30 days of incubation showed that in sterilized soil amended with carbazole (100 mg/kg, 66.96, 82.15 and 68.54% were degraded by strains SL1, SL4 and SL6, respectively, with rates of degradation of 0.093, 0.114 and 0.095 mg kg−1 h−1. The combination of the three isolates as inoculum in sterilized soil degraded 87.13% carbazole at a rate of 0.121 mg kg−1 h−1. In native soil amended with carbazole (100 mg/kg, 91.64, 87.29 and 89.13% were degraded by strains SL1, SL4 and SL6 after 30 days of incubation, with rates of degradation of 0.127, 0.121 and 0.124 mg kg−1h−1, respectively. This study successfully established the survivability (> 106 cfu/g detected after 30 days and carbazole-degrading ability of these bacterial strains in soil, and highlights the potential of these isolates as seed for the bioremediation of carbazole-impacted environments.

  2. Detection of antibiotic resistance in clinical bacterial strains from pets

    OpenAIRE

    Poeta, P.; Rodrigues, J.

    2008-01-01

    The identification of different bacterial strains and the occurrence of antibiotic resistance were investigated in several infection processes of pets as skin abscess with purulent discharge, bronco alveolar fluid, earwax, urine, mammary, and eye fluid. Streptococcus spp. and Staphylococcus spp. were the most detected in the different samples. A high frequency of antimicrobial resistance has been observed and this could reflect the wide use of antimicrobials in pets, making the effectiveness ...

  3. Evaluation of different lactic acid bacterial strains for probiotic characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    B. Srinu,; T. Madhava Rao,; P. V. Mallikarjuna Reddy; K. Kondal Reddy

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to collect different Lactic acid bacterial strains from culture collection centers and screen their functional probiotic characteristics such as acid tolerance, bile tolerance, antibacterial activity and antibiotic sensitivity for their commercial use. Materials and Methods: Acid and bile tolerence of selected LAB(Lactic acid bacteria) was determined. The antibiotic resistance of Lactobacillus species was assessed using different antibiotic di...

  4. Diversity of Streptococcus mutans strains in bacterial interspecies interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaolan; Hoogenkamp, Michel A; Ling, Junqi; Crielaard, Wim; Deng, Dong Mei

    2014-02-01

    Biofilms are matrix-enclosed microbial population adhere to each other and to surfaces. Compared to planktonic bacterial cells, biofilm cells show much higher levels of antimicrobial resistance. We aimed to investigate Streptococcus mutans strain diversity in biofilm formation and chlorhexidine (CHX) resistance of single S. mutans and dual S. mutans-Enterococcus faecalis biofilms. Four clinical S. mutans strains (C180-2, C67-1, HG723 and UA159) formed 24-h biofilms with or without an E. faecalis strain. These biofilms were treated for 10 min with 0.025% CHX. Biofilm formation, CHX resistance and S.mutans-E. faecalis interactions were evaluated by biomass staining, resazurin metabolism, viable count and competition agar assays. The main finding is that the presence of E. faecalis generally reduced all dual-species biofilm formation, but the proportions of S. mutans in the dual-species biofilms as well as CHX resistance displayed a clear S. mutans strain dependence. In particular, decreased resistance against CHX was observed in dual S. mutans C67-1 biofilms, while increased resistance was found in dual S. mutans UA159 biofilms. In conclusion, the interaction of S. mutans with E. faecalis in biofilms varies between strains, which underlines the importance of studying strain diversity in inter-species virulence modulation and biofilm antimicrobial resistance. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Method for construction of bacterial strains with increased succinic acid production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Mark I.; Sanville-Millard, Cynthia; Chatterjee, Ranjini

    2000-01-01

    A fermentation process for producing succinic acid is provided comprising selecting a bacterial strain that does not produce succinic acid in high yield, disrupting the normal regulation of sugar metabolism of said bacterial strain, and combining the mutant bacterial strain and selected sugar in anaerobic conditions to facilitate production of succinic acid. Also provided is a method for changing low yield succinic acid producing bacteria to high yield succinic acid producing bacteria comprising selecting a bacterial strain having a phosphotransferase system and altering the phosphotransferase system so as to allow the bacterial strain to simultaneously metabolize different sugars.

  6. Prevalence and antibiotic sensitivity of bacterial agents involved in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence and antibiotic sensitivity pattern of bacterial agents involved in Lower Respiratory Tract Infections (LRTI) was investigated. A total of 285 patients presenting with LRTI defined by a new or increasing cough, productive sputum, chest pain, fever, anorexia, haemoptysis, headache and throat ache were enrolled ...

  7. Pyroprinting: a rapid and flexible genotypic fingerprinting method for typing bacterial strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Michael W; VanderKelen, Jennifer; Montana, Aldrin; Dekhtyar, Alexander; Neal, Emily; Goodman, Anya; Kitts, Christopher L

    2014-10-01

    Bacterial strain typing is commonly employed in studies involving epidemiology, population ecology, and microbial source tracking to identify sources of fecal contamination. Methods for differentiating strains generally use either a collection of phenotypic traits or rely on some interrogation of the bacterial genotype. This report introduces pyroprinting, a novel genotypic strain typing method that is rapid, inexpensive, and discriminating compared to the most sensitive methods already in use. Pyroprinting relies on the simultaneous pyrosequencing of polymorphic multicopy loci, such as the intergenic transcribed spacer regions of rRNA operons in bacterial genomes. Data generated by sequencing combinations of variable templates are reproducible and intrinsically digitized. The theory and development of pyroprinting in Escherichia coli, including the selection of similarity thresholds to define matches between isolates, are presented. The pyroprint-based strain differentiation limits and phylogenetic relevance compared to other typing methods are also explored. Pyroprinting is unique in its simplicity and, paradoxically, in its intrinsic complexity. This new approach serves as an excellent alternative to more cumbersome or less phylogenetically relevant strain typing methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Transforming microbial genotyping: a robotic pipeline for genotyping bacterial strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian O'Farrell

    Full Text Available Microbial genotyping increasingly deals with large numbers of samples, and data are commonly evaluated by unstructured approaches, such as spread-sheets. The efficiency, reliability and throughput of genotyping would benefit from the automation of manual manipulations within the context of sophisticated data storage. We developed a medium- throughput genotyping pipeline for MultiLocus Sequence Typing (MLST of bacterial pathogens. This pipeline was implemented through a combination of four automated liquid handling systems, a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS consisting of a variety of dedicated commercial operating systems and programs, including a Sample Management System, plus numerous Python scripts. All tubes and microwell racks were bar-coded and their locations and status were recorded in the LIMS. We also created a hierarchical set of items that could be used to represent bacterial species, their products and experiments. The LIMS allowed reliable, semi-automated, traceable bacterial genotyping from initial single colony isolation and sub-cultivation through DNA extraction and normalization to PCRs, sequencing and MLST sequence trace evaluation. We also describe robotic sequencing to facilitate cherrypicking of sequence dropouts. This pipeline is user-friendly, with a throughput of 96 strains within 10 working days at a total cost of 200,000 items were processed by two to three people. Our sophisticated automated pipeline can be implemented by a small microbiology group without extensive external support, and provides a general framework for semi-automated bacterial genotyping of large numbers of samples at low cost.

  9. Antimicrobial effect against different bacterial strains and bacterial adaptation to essential oils used as feed additives

    OpenAIRE

    Melo, Antonio Diego Brandão; Amaral, Amanda Figueiredo; Schaefer, Gustavo; Luciano, Fernando Bittencourt; de Andrade, Carla; Costa, Leandro Batista; Rostagno, Marcos Horácio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity and determine the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of the essential oils derived from Origanum vulgare (oregano), Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree), Cinnamomum cassia (cassia), and Thymus vulgaris (white thyme) against Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. The study also investigated the ability of these different bacterial strains to develop ad...

  10. Drug resistance analysis of bacterial strains isolated from burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L F; Li, J L; Ma, W H; Li, J Y

    2014-01-22

    This study aimed to analyze the spectrum and drug resistance of bacteria isolated from burn patients to provide a reference for rational clinical use of antibiotics. Up to 1914 bacterial strain specimens isolated from burn patients admitted to hospital between 2001 and 2010 were subjected to resistance monitoring by using the K-B paper disk method. Retrospective analysis was performed on drug resistance analysis of burn patients. The top eight bacterium strains according to detection rate. A total of 1355 strains of Gram-negative (G(-)) bacteria and 559 strains of Gram-positive (G(+)) bacteria were detected. The top eight bacterium strains, according to detection rate, were Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, and Enterococcus. Drug resistance rates were higher than 90% in A. baumannii, P. aeruginosa, S. epidermidis, and S. aureus, which accounted for 52.2, 21.7, 27.8, and 33.3%, respectively, of the entire sample. Those with drug resistance rates lower than 30% accounted for 4.3, 30.4, 16.7, and 16.7%, respectively. Multidrug-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE) accounted for 49.2 and 76.4% of the S. epidermis and S. aureus resistance, respectively. Antibacterial drugs that had drug resistance rates to MRSE and MRSA higher than 90% accounted for 38.9 and 72.2%, respectively, whereas those with lower than 30% drug resistance rates accounted for 11.1 and 16.7%, respectively. The burn patients enrolled in the study were mainly infected with G(-) bacteria. These results strongly suggest that clinicians should practice rational use of antibiotics based on drug susceptibility test results.

  11. Effect of isolate of ruminal fibrolytic bacterial culture supplementation on fibrolytic bacterial population and survivability of inoculated bacterial strain in lactating Murrah buffaloes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brishketu Kumar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of bacterial culture supplementation on ruminal fibrolytic bacterial population as well as on survivability of inoculated bacterial strain in lactating Murrah buffaloes kept on high fibre diet. Materials and Methods: Fibrolytic bacterial strains were isolated from rumen liquor of fistulated Murrah buffaloes and live bacterial culture were supplemented orally in treatment group of lactating Murrah buffaloes fed on high fibre diet to see it's effect on ruminal fibrolytic bacterial population as well as to see the effect of survivability of the inoculated bacterial strain at three different time interval in comparison to control group. Results: It has been shown by real time quantification study that supplementation of bacterial culture orally increases the population of major fibre degrading bacteria i.e. Ruminococcus flavefaciens, Ruminococcus albus as well as Fibrobacter succinogenes whereas there was decrease in secondary fibre degrading bacterial population i.e. Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens over the different time periods. However, the inoculated strain of Ruminococcus flavefaciens survived significantly over the period of time, which was shown in stability of increased inoculated bacterial population. Conclusion: The isolates of fibrolytic bacterial strains are found to be useful in increasing the number of major ruminal fibre degrading bacteria in lactating buffaloes and may act as probiotic in large ruminants on fibre-based diets. [Vet World 2013; 6(1.000: 14-17

  12. Interaction between selected bacterial strains and Arabidopsis halleri modulates shoot proteome and cadmium and zinc accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigati, Monica; Furini, Antonella

    2011-01-01

    The effects of plant–microbe interactions between the hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri and eight bacterial strains, isolated from the rhizosphere of A. halleri plants grown in a cadmium- and zinc-contaminated site, were analysed for shoot metal accumulation, shoot proteome, and the transcription of genes involved in plant metal homeostasis and hyperaccumulation. Cadmium and zinc concentrations were lower in the shoots of plants cultivated in the presence of these metals plus the selected bacterial strains compared with plants grown solely with these metals or, as previously reported, with plants grown with these metals plus the autochthonous rhizosphere-derived microorganisms. The shoot proteome of plants cultivated in the presence of these selected bacterial strains plus metals, showed an increased abundance of photosynthesis- and abiotic stress-related proteins (e.g. subunits of the photosynthetic complexes, Rubisco, superoxide dismutase, and malate dehydrogenase) counteracted by a decreased amount of plant defence-related proteins (e.g. endochitinases, vegetative storage proteins, and β-glucosidase). The transcription of several homeostasis genes was modulated by the microbial communities and by Cd and Zn content in the shoot. Altogether these results highlight the importance of plant-microbe interactions in plant protein expression and metal accumulation and emphasize the possibility of exploiting microbial consortia for increasing or decreasing shoot metal content. PMID:21357773

  13. Evaluation of different lactic acid bacterial strains for probiotic characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Srinu,

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of the present study was to collect different Lactic acid bacterial strains from culture collection centers and screen their functional probiotic characteristics such as acid tolerance, bile tolerance, antibacterial activity and antibiotic sensitivity for their commercial use. Materials and Methods: Acid and bile tolerence of selected LAB(Lactic acid bacteria was determined. The antibiotic resistance of Lactobacillus species was assessed using different antibiotic discs on de Mann Rogosa Sharpe broth (MRS agar plates seeded with the test probiotic organism. The antibacterial activity of LAB was assessed by using well diffusion method.Results: Among the six probiotic strains tested, all showed good survivability at high bile salt concentration (0.3 to 2.0 % oxgall and good growth at a low pH of 1.5 to 3.5. These probiotic species showed good survival abilities in acidic pH of 2.0 to 3.5 except Lactobacillus delbrueckii subspp. bulgaricus 281 which did not grown at pH of 2.0. Lactobacillus fermentum 141 was able to grow even at pH of 1.5 also. Among the six lactic acid species, Lactobacillus fermentum 141 (except Tetracycline, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subspp. Bulgaricus 281 except (Cefpodoxime and all other LAB were resistant to all the antibiotics tested (Ampicillin, Nalidixic acid , Ciprofloxacin ,Co-Trimoxazole, Gentamicin and Cefpodoxime. All these probiotic organisms were screened for their in vitro inhibition ability against pathogenic microorganisms namely, E.coli ATCC (American type culture collection centre, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella paratyphi, Staphylococcus aureus. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subspp. bulgaricus 281, Lactobacillus casei 297 and Lactobacillus fermentum 141 inhibited the growth of all the pathogenic bacteria used in the study. Conclusion: The study indicated Lactobacillus fermentum 141 and Lactobacillus casei 297 as potential functional probiotics for future in vivo studies for

  14. Comparison of Bacterial Cellulose Production among Different Strains and Fermented Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Jalili Tabaii

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different carbon sources on bacterial cellulose production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus (PTCC 1734 and two newly isolated strains (from vinegar under static culture conditions was studied. The production of bacterial cellulose was examined in modified Hestrin-Shramm medium by replacing D-glucose with other carbon sources. The results showed that the yield and characteristics of bacterial cellulose were influenced by the type of carbon source. Glycerol gave the highest yield in all of the studied strains (6%, 9.7% and 3.8% for S, A2 strain and Gluconacetobacter xylinus (PTCC 1734, respectively. The maximum dry bacterial cellulose weight in the glycerol containing medium is due to A2 strain (1.9 g l-1 in comparison to Gluconacetobacter xylinus as reference strain (0.76 g l-1. Although all of the studied strains were in Gluconacetobacter family, each used different sugars for maximum production after glycerol (mannitol and fructose for two newly isolated strains and glucose for Gluconacetobacter xylinus. The maximum moisture content was observed when sucrose and food-grade sucrose were used as carbon source. Contrary to expectations, while the maximum thickness of bacterial cellulose membrane was attained when glycerol was used, bacterial cellulose from glycerol had less moisture content than the others. The oxidized cellulose showed antibacterial activities, which makes it as a good candidate for food-preservatives.

  15. Laboratory-Cultured Strains of the Sea Anemone Exaiptasia Reveal Distinct Bacterial Communities

    KAUST Repository

    Herrera Sarrias, Marcela

    2017-05-02

    Exaiptasia is a laboratory sea anemone model system for stony corals. Two clonal strains are commonly used, referred to as H2 and CC7, that originate from two genetically distinct lineages and that differ in their Symbiodinium specificity. However, little is known about their other microbial associations. Here, we examined and compared the taxonomic composition of the bacterial assemblages of these two symbiotic Exaiptasia strains, both of which have been cultured in the laboratory long-term under identical conditions. We found distinct bacterial microbiota for each strain, indicating the presence of host-specific microbial consortia. Putative differences in the bacterial functional profiles (i.e., enrichment and depletion of various metabolic processes) based on taxonomic inference were also detected, further suggesting functional differences of the microbiomes associated with these lineages. Our study contributes to the current knowledge of the Exaiptasia holobiont by comparing the bacterial diversity of two commonly used strains as models for coral research.

  16. Characterization of Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 23726 adhesins involved in strain-specific attachment to Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jane; Shokeen, Bhumika; Haake, Susan K; Lux, Renate

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial adherence is an essential virulence factor in pathogenesis and infection. Fusobacterium nucleatum has a central role in oral biofilm architecture by acting as a bridge between early Gram-positive and late Gram-negative colonizers that do not otherwise adhere to each other. In this study, we survey a key adherence interaction of F. nucleatum with Porphyromonas gingivalis, and present evidence that multiple fusobacterial adhesins have a role in the attachment of F. nucleatum ATCC 23726 to P. gingivalis in a highly strain-dependent manner. Interaction between these species displayed varying sensitivities to arginine, galactose and lactose. Arginine was found to hamper coaggregation by at least 62% and up to 89% with several P. gingivalis strains and galactose inhibition ranged from no inhibition up to 58% with the same P. gingivalis strains. Lactose consistently inhibited F. nucleatum interaction with these P. gingivalis strains ranging from 40% to 56% decrease in coaggregation. Among the adhesins involved are the previously described Fap2 and surprisingly, RadD, which was described in an earlier study for its function in attachment of F. nucleatum to Gram-positive species. We also provide evidence for the presence of at least one additional adhesin that is sensitive to arginine but unlike Fap2 and RadD, is not a member of the autotransporter family type of fusobacterial large outer membrane proteins. The strain-specific binding profile of multiple fusobacterial adhesins to P. gingivalis highlights the heterogeneity and complexity of interspecies interactions in the oral cavity.

  17. Biodegradation of petroleum oil by certain bacterial strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakaria, A.E.M.

    1998-01-01

    Balaeam base oil was chosen as a model oil in the present study through which some abiotic treatments were implemented aiming at attenuating its naphthenic and aromatic contents; such as the adsorptive technique and the gamma-irradiation technique . In an attempt to apply the biodegrading bacteria as oil pollutant bio indicators upon coastal water samples, a correlation between hydrocarbon concentration and the relative enumeration of the bacterial oil degraders was detected for some litter locations along the mediterranean Sea shore west and east Delta, Suez canal. and suez gulf. 24 petroleum utilizing bacterial isolates were isolated from El-Zayteia port (suez) and identified by morphological, physiological and environmental examination . the biodegradation capacity of the isolates towards the chosen model oil and its separate components was studied in comparison with the standard isolate pseudomonas aeruginosa. Further, the role of the bacterial plasmids taking part in the biodegradation process was investigated as well

  18. Volatile emissions from Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis mirror bacterial growth and enable distinction of different strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trefz, Phillip; Koehler, Heike; Klepik, Klaus; Moebius, Petra; Reinhold, Petra; Schubert, Jochen K; Miekisch, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    Control of paratuberculosis in livestock is hampered by the low sensitivity of established direct and indirect diagnostic methods. Like other bacteria, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) emits volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Differences of VOC patterns in breath and feces of infected and not infected animals were described in first pilot experiments but detailed information on potential marker substances is missing. This study was intended to look for characteristic volatile substances in the headspace of cultures of different MAP strains and to find out how the emission of VOCs was affected by density of bacterial growth. One laboratory adapted and four field strains, three of MAP C-type and one MAP S-type were cultivated on Herrold's egg yolk medium in dilutions of 10(-0), 10(-2), 10(-4) and 10(-6). Volatile substances were pre-concentrated from the headspace over the MAP cultures by means of Solid Phase Micro Extraction (SPME), thermally desorbed from the SPME fibers and separated and identified by means of GC-MS. Out of the large number of compounds found in the headspace over MAP cultures, 34 volatile marker substances could be identified as potential biomarkers for growth and metabolic activity. All five MAP strains could clearly be distinguished from blank culture media by means of emission patterns based on these 34 substances. In addition, patterns of volatiles emitted by the reference strain were significantly different from the field strains. Headspace concentrations of 2-ethylfuran, 2-methylfuran, 3-methylfuran, 2-pentylfuran, ethyl acetate, 1-methyl-1-H-pyrrole and dimethyldisulfide varied with density of bacterial growth. Analysis of VOCs emitted from mycobacterial cultures can be used to identify bacterial growth and, in addition, to differentiate between different bacterial strains. VOC emission patterns may be used to approximate bacterial growth density. In a perspective volatile marker substances could be used to diagnose MAP

  19. Volatile emissions from Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis mirror bacterial growth and enable distinction of different strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Trefz

    Full Text Available Control of paratuberculosis in livestock is hampered by the low sensitivity of established direct and indirect diagnostic methods. Like other bacteria, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP emits volatile organic compounds (VOCs. Differences of VOC patterns in breath and feces of infected and not infected animals were described in first pilot experiments but detailed information on potential marker substances is missing. This study was intended to look for characteristic volatile substances in the headspace of cultures of different MAP strains and to find out how the emission of VOCs was affected by density of bacterial growth. One laboratory adapted and four field strains, three of MAP C-type and one MAP S-type were cultivated on Herrold's egg yolk medium in dilutions of 10(-0, 10(-2, 10(-4 and 10(-6. Volatile substances were pre-concentrated from the headspace over the MAP cultures by means of Solid Phase Micro Extraction (SPME, thermally desorbed from the SPME fibers and separated and identified by means of GC-MS. Out of the large number of compounds found in the headspace over MAP cultures, 34 volatile marker substances could be identified as potential biomarkers for growth and metabolic activity. All five MAP strains could clearly be distinguished from blank culture media by means of emission patterns based on these 34 substances. In addition, patterns of volatiles emitted by the reference strain were significantly different from the field strains. Headspace concentrations of 2-ethylfuran, 2-methylfuran, 3-methylfuran, 2-pentylfuran, ethyl acetate, 1-methyl-1-H-pyrrole and dimethyldisulfide varied with density of bacterial growth. Analysis of VOCs emitted from mycobacterial cultures can be used to identify bacterial growth and, in addition, to differentiate between different bacterial strains. VOC emission patterns may be used to approximate bacterial growth density. In a perspective volatile marker substances could be used to

  20. In silico comparison of bacterial strains using mutual information

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    Mutual information M(k) vs base separation k : Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus cereus strains : Ames ancestor – red; Ames. – green; Sterne – blue; cereus: ATCC 10987 – pink; ATCC 14579 – turquoise; E33 – yellow; smoothened plot : Ames ancestor – black;. ATCC 10987 – rust; Bacillus thuringiensis konkukian – grey. 0.01.

  1. Effect of Selected Azotobacter Bacterial Strains on the Enrichment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Target Audience: Local farmers, Livestock researchers, microbiologist. The effect of three different strains of Azotobacter bacteria in solid substrate fermentation on cassava waste was evaluated. The substrate was incubated at 300c for 10 days inoculation with the Azotobacter bacteria species. One non-inoculated batch ...

  2. Increasing antibiotic resistance in preservative-tolerant bacterial strains isolated from cosmetic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orús, Pilar; Gomez-Perez, Laura; Leranoz, Sonia; Berlanga, Mercedes

    2015-03-01

    To ensure the microbiological quality, consumer safety and organoleptic properties of cosmetic products, manufacturers need to comply with defined standards using several preservatives and disinfectants. A drawback regarding the use of these preservatives is the possibility of generating cross-insusceptibility to other disinfectants or preservatives, as well as cross resistance to antibiotics. Therefore, the objective of this study was to understand the adaptive mechanisms of Enterobacter gergoviae, Pseudomonas putida and Burkholderia cepacia that are involved in recurrent contamination in cosmetic products containing preservatives. Diminished susceptibility to formaldehyde-donors was detected in isolates but not to other preservatives commonly used in the cosmetics industry, although increasing resistance to different antibiotics (β-lactams, quinolones, rifampicin, and tetracycline) was demonstrated in these strains when compared with the wild-type strain. The outer membrane protein modifications and efflux mechanism activities responsible for the resistance trait were evaluated. The development of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms due to the selective pressure from preservatives included in cosmetic products could be a risk for the emergence and spread of bacterial resistance in the environment. Nevertheless, the large contribution of disinfection and preservation cannot be denied in cosmetic products. Copyright© by the Spanish Society for Microbiology and Institute for Catalan Studies.

  3. Use of colony-based bacterial strain typing for tracking the fate of Lactobacillus strains during human consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drevinek Pavel

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB are important components of the healthy gut flora and have been used extensively as probiotics. Understanding the cultivable diversity of LAB before and after probiotic administration, and being able to track the fate of administered probiotic isolates during feeding are important parameters to consider in the design of clinical trials to assess probiotic efficacy. Several methods may be used to identify bacteria at the strain level, however, PCR-based methods such as Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD are particularly suited to rapid analysis. We examined the cultivable diversity of LAB in the human gut before and after feeding with two Lactobacillus strains, and also tracked the fate of these two administered strains using a RAPD technique. Results A RAPD typing scheme was developed to genetically type LAB isolates from a wide range of species, and optimised for direct application to bacterial colony growth. A high-throughput strategy for fingerprinting the cultivable diversity of human faeces was developed and used to determine: (i the initial cultivable LAB strain diversity in the human gut, and (ii the fate of two Lactobacillus strains (Lactobacillus salivarius NCIMB 30211 and Lactobacillus acidophilus NCIMB 30156 contained within a capsule that was administered in a small-scale human feeding study. The L. salivarius strain was not cultivated from the faeces of any of the 12 volunteers prior to capsule administration, but appeared post-feeding in four. Strains matching the L. acidophilus NCIMB 30156 feeding strain were found in the faeces of three volunteers prior to consumption; after taking the Lactobacillus capsule, 10 of the 12 volunteers were culture positive for this strain. The appearance of both Lactobacillus strains during capsule consumption was statistically significant (p Conclusion We have shown that genetic strain typing of the cultivable human gut microbiota can be

  4. Specificity of monoclonal antibodies to strains of Dickeya sp. that cause bacterial heart rot of pineapple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, Gabriel D; Kaneshiro, Wendy S; Luu, Van; Berestecky, John M; Alvarez, Anne M

    2010-10-01

    During a severe outbreak of bacterial heart rot that occurred in pineapple plantations on Oahu, Hawaii, in 2003 and years following, 43 bacterial strains were isolated from diseased plants or irrigation water and identified as Erwinia chrysanthemi (now Dickeya sp.) by phenotypic, molecular, and pathogenicity assays. Rep-PCR fingerprint patterns grouped strains from pineapple plants and irrigation water into five genotypes (A-E) that differed from representatives of other Dickeya species, Pectobacterium carotovorum and other enteric saprophytes isolated from pineapple. Monoclonal antibodies produced following immunization of mice with virulent type C Dickeya sp. showed only two specificities. MAb Pine-1 (2D11G1, IgG1 with kappa light chain) reacted to all 43 pineapple/water strains and some reference strains (D. dianthicola, D. chrysanthemi, D. paradisiaca, some D. dadantii, and uncharacterized Dickeya sp.) but did not react to reference strains of D. dieffenbachiae, D. zeae, or one of the two Malaysian pineapple strains. MAb Pine-2 (2A7F2, IgG3 with kappa light chain) reacted to all type B, C, and D strains but not to any A or E strains or any reference strains except Dickeya sp. isolated from Malaysian pineapple. Pathogenicity tests showed that type C strains were more aggressive than type A strains when inoculated during cool months. Therefore, MAb Pine-2 distinguishes the more virulent type C strains from less virulent type A pineapple strains and type E water strains. MAbs with these two specificities enable development of rapid diagnostic tests that will distinguish the systemic heart rot pathogen from opportunistic bacteria associated with rotted tissues. Use of the two MAbs in field assays also permits the monitoring of a known subpopulation and provides additional decision tools for disease containment and management practices.

  5. Characterization and optimization of antibiotic resistant bacterial strains for polyhydroxyalkanoates (phas) production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, S. U.; Jamil, N.; Hussain, S.

    2005-01-01

    In this investigation, sugarcane soil, sewage water and soil containing long chain hydrocarbons was screened to obtain bacterial strains that were able to synthesize poly-beta-hydroxyalkanoates (PHA). The potential to synthesize PHA was tested qualitatively by Sudan Black staining of colonies growing in glucose and sucrose. Sixteen bacterial strains were isolated, purified and characterized for Gram reaction, biochemical analysis and PHA production. Isolates showed a wide range of tolerance to different commonly used antibiotics. PHA extraction was done by solvent extraction and hypochlorite digestion method. PHA production was optimized for different nitrogen concentrations. (author)

  6. Isolation of Bacterial Strain for Biodegradation of Fats, Oil and Grease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkhatib, M.F.; Mohd Zahangir Alam; Shabana, H.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Fat, oil and grease (FOG) deposition is one of the major problems that harm the environment and cause dissatisfaction for human. Uncontrolled and un-pre-treated FOG removal from the kitchen could lead to its accumulation in the piping system. Problems include the interference of fat with the aerobic microorganisms that are responsible in treating the wastewater by reducing oxygen transfer rates and for anaerobic microorganisms; their efficiency could also be reduced due to the reduction of the transport of soluble substrates to the bacterial biomass. Biodegradation could be one of the effective means to treat FOG. The main objective of this study is to isolate bacterial strains from the FOG waste and identify the strains that are capable in biodegrading FOG waste. FOG sample was collected from a sewer manhole. Enrichment technique was applied, followed by isolation of bacterial strains to determine which strain is able to degrade the FOG deposition. Some morphology for the bacterial strain was done to determine its characteristics. (author)

  7. Isolation and characterization of gut bacterial proteases involved in inducing pathogenicity of Bacillus thuringiensis toxin in cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visweshwar Regode

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt toxin proteins are deployed in transgenic plants for pest management. The present studies were aimed at characterization of gut bacterial proteases involved in activation of inactive Cry1Ac protoxin (pro-Cry1Ac to active toxin in Helicoverpa armigera. Bacterial strains were isolated from H. armigera midgut and screened for their proteolytic activation towards pro-Cry1Ac. Among twelve gut bacterial isolates seven isolates showed proteolytic activity, and proteases from three isolates (IVS1, IVS2 and IVS3 were found to be involved in the proteolytic conversion of pro-Cry1Ac into active toxin. The proteases from IVS1, IVS2 and IVS3 isolates were purified to 11.90-, 15.50- and 17.20-fold, respectively. The optimum pH and temperature for gut bacterial protease activity was 8.0 and 40 oC. Maximum inhibition of total proteolytic activity was exerted by PMSF followed by EDTA. Fluorescence zymography revealed that proteases from IVS1, IVS2, and IVS3 were chymotrypsin-like and showing protease band at ~15, 65 and 15 kDa, respectively. Active Cry1Ac formed from processing pro-Cry1Ac by gut bacterial proteases exhibited toxicity towards H. armigera. The gut bacterial isolates IVS1, IVS2 and IVS3 showed homology with Bacillus thuringiensis (CP003763.1, Vibrio fischeri (CP000020.2 and Escherichia coli (CP011342.1, respectively. Proteases produced by midgut bacteria are involved in proteolytic processing of Bt protoxin and play a major role in inducing pathogenicity of Bt toxins in H. armigera.

  8. Radioprotective effect of garlic extract on some bacterial strains with different radiation sensitivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawfik, Z.S.; Abushady, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    The radioprotective effect of garlic on four bacterial strains with different degrees of radiation sensitivities was investigated. The presence of garlic led to an increase in d-10 value of Ps. Aeruginosa, S. aureus and S. typhimurium by 160%, 50%, and 30% respectively. The protective efficiency of garlic against radiation was noticed to be proportional to its concentration in a given inoculum size. Garlic extract up to 180 micro liter per 10 8 inoculum size of B. cereus showed no protective effect. This fact was attributed to the existence of sulphur compounds in the given strain. Higher garlic concentrations appeared to affect the cloning efficiency of a given strain. 4fig., 2tab

  9. Effect of CuO Nanoparticles over Isolated Bacterial Strains from Agricultural Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concha-Guerrero, S.I.; Pinon-Castillo, H.A.; Luna-Velasco, A.; Orrantia-Borunda, E.; Brito, E.M.S.; Tarango-Rivero, S.H.; Caretta, C.A.; Duran, R.

    2014-01-01

    The increased use of the nanoparticles (NPs) on several processes is notorious. In contrast the eco toxicological effects of NPs have been scarcely studied. The main current researches are related to the oxide metallic NPs. In the present work, fifty-six bacterial strains were isolated from soil, comprising 17 different OTUs distributed into 3 classes: Bacilli (36 strains), Flavobacteria (2 strains), and Gamma proteobacteria (18 strains). Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuONPs) were synthesized using a process of chemical precipitation. The obtained CuONPs have a spherical shape and primary size less than 17 nm. Twenty-one strains were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of CuONPs and 11 of these strains showed high sensibility. Among those 11 strains, 4 (Brevibacillus later osporus strain CSS8, Chryseobacterium indoltheticum strain CSA28, and Pantoea ananatis strains CSA34 and CSA35) were selected to determine the kind of damage produced. The CuONPs toxic effect was observed at expositions over 25 mg·L -1 and the damage to cell membrane above 160 mg·L -1 . The electron microscopy showed the formation of cavities, holes, membrane degradation, blebs, cellular collapse, and lysis. These toxic effects may probably be due to the ions interaction, the oxide-reduction reactions, and the generation of reactive species

  10. Exploring the Potentiality of Novel Rhizospheric Bacterial Strains against the Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amruta, Narayanappa; Prasanna Kumar, M. K.; Puneeth, M. E.; Sarika, Gowdiperu; Kandikattu, Hemanth Kumar; Vishwanath, K.; Narayanaswamy, Sonnappa

    2018-01-01

    Rice blast caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is a major disease. In the present study, we aimed to identify and evaluate the novel bacterial isolates from rice rhizosphere for biocontrol of M. oryzae pathogen. Sixty bacterial strains from the rice plant’s rhizosphere were tested for their biocontrol activity against M. oryzae under in vitro and in vivo. Among them, B. amyloliquefaciens had significant high activity against the pathogen. The least disease severity and highest germination were recorded in seeds treated with B. amyloliquefaciens UASBR9 (0.96 and 98.00%) compared to untreated control (3.43 and 95.00%, respectively) under in vivo condition. These isolates had high activity of enzymes in relation to growth promoting activity upon challenge inoculation of the pathogen. The potential strains were identified based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing and dominance of these particular genes were associated in Bacillus strains. These strains were also confirmed for the presence of antimicrobial peptide biosynthetic genes viz., srfAA (surfactin), fenD (fengycin), spaS (subtilin), and ituC (iturin) related to secondary metabolite production (e.g., AMPs). Overall, the results suggested that application of potential bacterial strains like B. amyloliquefaciens UASBR9 not only helps in control of the biological suppression of one of the most devastating rice pathogens, M. grisea but also increases plant growth along with a reduction in application of toxic chemical pesticides. PMID:29628819

  11. Biodegradation of Ochratoxin A by Bacterial Strains Isolated from Vineyard Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmira De Bellis

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ochratoxin A (OTA is a mycotoxin with a main nephrotoxic activity contaminating several foodstuffs. In the present report, five soil samples collected from OTA-contaminated vineyards were screened to isolate microorganisms able to biodegrade OTA. When cultivated in OTA-supplemented medium, OTA was converted in OTα by 225 bacterial isolates. To reveal clonal relationships between isolates, molecular typing by using an automated rep-PCR system was carried out, thus showing the presence of 27 different strains (rep-PCR profiles. The 16S-rRNA gene sequence analysis of an isolate representative of each rep-PCR profiles indicated that they belonged to five bacterial genera, namely Pseudomonas, Leclercia, Pantoea, Enterobacter, and Acinetobacter. However, further evaluation of OTA-degrading activity by the 27 strains revealed that only Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain 396.1 and Acinetobacter sp. strain neg1, consistently conserved the above property; their further characterization showed that they were able to convert 82% and 91% OTA into OTα in six days at 24 °C, respectively. The presence of OTα, as the unique OTA-degradation product was confirmed by LC-HRMS. This is the first report on OTA biodegradation by bacterial strains isolated from agricultural soils and carried out under aerobic conditions and moderate temperatures. These microorganisms might be used to detoxify OTA-contaminated feed and could be a new source of gene(s for the development of a novel enzymatic detoxification system.

  12. Detoxification of mercury pollutant leached from spent fluorescent lamps using bacterial strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghouti, Mohammad A; Abuqaoud, Reem H; Abu-Dieyeh, Mohammed H

    2016-03-01

    The spent fluorescent lamps (SFLs) are being classified as a hazardous waste due to having mercury as one of its main components. Mercury is considered the second most toxic heavy metal (arsenic is the first) with harmful effects on animal nervous system as it causes different neurological disorders. In this research, the mercury from phosphor powder was leached, then bioremediated using bacterial strains isolated from Qatari environment. Leaching of mercury was carried out with nitric and hydrochloric acid solutions using two approaches: leaching at ambient conditions and microwave-assisted leaching. The results obtained from this research showed that microwave-assisted leaching method was significantly better in leaching mercury than the acid leaching where the mercury leaching efficiency reached 76.4%. For mercury bio-uptake, twenty bacterial strains (previously isolated and purified from petroleum oil contaminated soils) were sub-cultured on Luria Bertani (LB) plates with mercury chloride to check the bacterial tolerance to mercury. Seven of these twenty strains showed a degree of tolerance to mercury. The bio-uptake capacities of the promising strains were investigated using the mercury leached from the fluorescent lamps. Three of the strains (Enterobacter helveticus, Citrobacter amalonaticus, and Cronobacter muytjensii) showed bio-uptake efficiency ranged from 28.8% to 63.6%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. New lactic acid bacterial strains from traditional Mongolian fermented milk products have altered adhesion to porcine gastric mucin depending on the carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto-Nira, Hiromi; Yamasaki, Seishi; Sasaki, Keisuke; Moriya, Naoko; Takenaka, Akio; Suzuki, Chise

    2015-03-01

    Attachment of lactic acid bacteria to the mucosal surface of the gastrointestinal tract is a major property of probiotics. Here, we examined the ability of 21 lactic acid bacterial strains isolated from traditional fermented milk products in Mongolia to adhere to porcine gastric mucin in vitro. Higher attachment was observed with Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus strains 6-8 and 8-1 than with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (positive control). Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strain 7-1 adhered to mucin as effectively as did strain GG. Heat inactivation decreased the adhesive ability of strains 6-8 and 8-1 but did not affect strain 7-1. The adhesion of strains 6-8, 7-1 and 8-1 was significantly inhibited when the cells were pretreated with periodate and trypsin, indicating that proteinaceous and carbohydrate-like cell surface compounds are involved in the adhesion of these strains. The adhesion of strain 7-1 was affected by the type of carbohydrate present in the growth medium, being higher with fructose than with lactose, galactose or xylose as the carbon source. The sugar content of 7-1 cells grown on various carbohydrates was negatively correlated with its adhesive ability. We provide new probiotic candidate strains and new information regarding carbohydrate preference that influences lactic acid bacterial adhesion to mucin. © 2014 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  14. Limited diffusive fluxes of substrate facilitate coexistence of two competing bacterial strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Or, D.; Smets, Barth F.

    2008-01-01

    . It has been proposed, but never unambiguously experimentally tested, that a low substrate diffusive flux would impact bacterial diversity, by promoting the coexistence between slow-growing bacteria and their potentially faster-growing competitors. We used a simple experimental system, based on a Petri...... dish and a perforated Teflon((R)) membrane to control diffusive fluxes of substrate (benzoate) whilst permitting direct observation of bacterial colonies. The system was inoculated with prescribed strains of Pseudomonas, whose growth was quantified by microscopic monitoring of the fluorescent proteins...... they produced. We observed that substrate diffusion limitation reduced the growth rate of the otherwise fast-growing Pseudomonas putida KT2440 strain. This strain out-competed Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 in liquid culture, but its competitive advantage was less marked on solid media, and even disappeared under...

  15. Enzymes activities involving bacterial cytochromes incorporated in clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lojou, E.; Giudici-Orticoni, M.Th.; Bianco, P.

    2005-01-01

    With the development of bio electrochemistry, researches appeared on the enzymes immobilization at the surface of electrodes for the realization of bioreactors and bio sensors. One of the main challenges is the development of host matrix able to immobilize the protein material preserving its integrity. In this framework the authors developed graphite electrodes modified by clay films. These electrodes are examined for two enzyme reactions involving proteins of sulfate-reduction bacteria. Then in the framework of the hydrogen biological production and bioreactors for the environmental pollution de-pollution, the electrochemical behavior of the cytochrome c3 in two different clays deposed at the electrode is examined

  16. Effect of microstructure on anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour of bacterial cellulose hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xing; Shi, Zhijun; Lau, Andrew; Liu, Changqin; Yang, Guang; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2016-05-01

    This study is focused on anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour of bacterial cellulose (BC) hydrogel that can be strain-rate insensitive, hardening, softening, or strain-rate insensitive in various ranges of strain rate. BC hydrogel consists of randomly distributed nanofibres and a large content of free water; thanks to its ideal biocompatibility, it is suitable for biomedical applications. Motivated by its potential applications in complex loading conditions of body environment, its time-dependent behaviour was studied by means of in-aqua uniaxial tension tests at constant temperature of 37 °C at various strain rates ranging from 0.000 1s(-1) to 0.3s(-1). Experimental results reflect anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour that was not documented before. Micro-morphological observations allowed identification of deformation mechanisms at low and high strain rates in relation to microstructural changes. Unlike strain-rate softening behaviours in other materials, reorientation of nanofibres and kinematics of free-water flow dominate the softening behaviour of BC hydrogel at high strain rates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Antimicrobial sensitivity and frequency of DRUG resistance among bacterial strains isolated from cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faiz, M.; Bashir, T.

    2004-01-01

    Blood stream infections (bacteremia) is potentially life threatening. Concomitant with a change in the incidence and epidemiology of infecting organisms, there has been an increase in resistance to many antibiotic compounds. The widespread emergence of resistance among bacterial pathogens has an impact on our ability to treat patients effectively. The changing spectrum of microbial pathogens and widespread emergence of microbial resistance to antibiotic drugs has emphasized the need to monitor the prevalence of resistance in these strains. In the present study frequency of isolation of clinically significant bacteria and their susceptibility and resistance pattern against a wide range of antimicrobial drugs from positive blood cultures collected during 2001-2003 was studied. A total of 102 consecutive isolates were found with 63% gram positive and 44% gram negative strains. The dominating pathogens were Staphylococcus aureus (51%), Streptococci (31%), Pseudomonas (40%), Proteus (13%), Klebsiella (13%). The isolated strains were tested against a wide range of antibiotics belonging to cephalosporins, aminoglycosides and quinolone derivative group by disk diffusion method. It has been observed that isolated strains among gram positive and negative strains showed different level of resistance against aminoglycosides and cephalosporin group of antibiotics with gram positives showing highest number and frequency of resistance against aminoglycosides (40-50%) and cephalosporins.(35-45%) whereas cephalosporins were found to be more effective against gram negatives with low frequency of resistant strains. Cabapenem and quinolone derivative drugs were found to be most effective among other groups in both gram positive and negative strains with 23-41% strains found sensitive to these two drugs. The frequency of sensitive strains against aminoglycoside and cephalosporin in gram negative and gram positive strains were found to be decreasing yearwise with a trend towards an

  18. ANTIMICROBIAL POTENTIAL OF GARLIC AND OREGANO EXTRACTS AND ESSENTIAL OILS AGAINST DIFFERENT BACTERIAL STRAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionica Deliu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The modern world is often concerned about the bacterial diseases and the diversity of treatment possibilities. The herbal medicines overreach the medical world because the less number of side effects than synthetic drugs and their low costs. In addition to conventional drugs, the natural remedies can solve exceptional health problems. In this study the antibacterial actions of ethanolic, methanolic and aqueous plant extracts (Allium sativum L. and Origanum vulgare L. were tested. Also, we tested the antimicrobial effects of garlic and oregano essential oils against three bacterial strains. The extracts were tested by diffusion method and certain variants were used. The antibacterial effects were read after 24h of incubation at 37°C. The most obvious effect was observed for oregano essential oil and the smallest growth inhibition was registered for aqueous extracts. The alcoholic extracts were more efficient after concentration by evaporation. The most sensitive bacterial strain was Staphylococcus aureus strain. However the Citrobacter freundii clinical strain had not so high sensitivity at plant extracts, we shall consider the plant extracts as a good alternative to synthetic drugs.

  19. Solubilization of municipal sewage waste activated sludge by novel lytic bacterial strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, M Veera; Merrylin, J; Kavitha, S; Kumar, S Adish; Banu, J Rajesh; Yeom, Ick-Tae

    2014-02-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are an extracellular matrix found in sludge which plays a crucial role in flocculation by interacting with the organic solids. Therefore, to enhance pretreatment of sludge, EPS have to be removed. In this study, EPS were removed with a chemical extractant, NaOH, to enhance the bacterial pretreatment. A lysozyme secreting bacterial consortium was isolated from the waste activated sludge (WAS). The result of density gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis revealed that the isolated consortium consists of two strains. The two novel strains isolated were named as Jerish03 (NCBI accession number KC597266) and Jerish 04 (NCBI accession number KC597267) and they belong to the genus Bacillus. Pretreatment with these novel strains enhances the efficiency of the aerobic digestion of sludge. Sludge treated with the lysozyme secreting bacterial consortium produced 29 % and 28.5 % increase in suspended solids (SS) reduction and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal compared to the raw activated sludge (without pretreatment) during aerobic digestion. It is specified that these two novel strains had a high potential to enhance WAS degradation efficiency in aerobic digestion.

  20. Characterization and degradation potential of diesel-degrading bacterial strains for application in bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balseiro-Romero, María; Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Kidd, Petra S; Van Hamme, Jonathan; Weyens, Nele; Monterroso, Carmen; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2017-10-03

    Bioremediation of polluted soils is a promising technique with low environmental impact, which uses soil organisms to degrade soil contaminants. In this study, 19 bacterial strains isolated from a diesel-contaminated soil were screened for their diesel-degrading potential, biosurfactant (BS) production, and biofilm formation abilities, all desirable characteristics when selecting strains for re-inoculation into hydrocarbon-contaminated soils. Diesel-degradation rates were determined in vitro in minimal medium with diesel as the sole carbon source. The capacity to degrade diesel range organics (DROs) of strains SPG23 (Arthobacter sp.) and PF1 (Acinetobacter oleivorans) reached 17-26% of total DROs after 10 days, and 90% for strain GK2 (Acinetobacter calcoaceticus). The amount and rate of alkane degradation decreased significantly with increasing carbon number for strains SPG23 and PF1. Strain GK2, which produced BSs and biofilms, exhibited a greater extent, and faster rate of alkane degradation compared to SPG23 and PF1. Based on the outcomes of degradation experiments, in addition to BS production, biofilm formation capacities, and previous genome characterizations, strain GK2 is a promising candidate for microbial-assisted phytoremediation of diesel-contaminated soils. These results are of particular interest to select suitable strains for bioremediation, not only presenting high diesel-degradation rates, but also other characteristics which could improve rhizosphere colonization.

  1. Metabolic fingerprinting of bacterial strains isolated from northern areas of Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaheer, A.; Latif, Z.

    2017-01-01

    The diversity of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) in the rhizosphere plays a key role in the maintenance of sustainable agricultural system. In this study, samples were obtained from northern areas of Pakistan. Thirty bacterial strains were isolated, purified, characterized biochemically and subjected to the metabolic fingerprinting by performing nitrogen fixation, phosphate solubilization, protease, indole acetic acid (IAA) production, antibiotic susceptibility and heavy metal resistance test, lead acetate assay for the H2S production. Strains showing distinct characteristics were further characterized by 16S rDNA sequencing and characterized as Bacillus pumilus (KT273321), Acinetobacter baumanii (KT273323), Acinetobacter junii (KT273324), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (KT273325), Bacillus circulans (KT273326) and Bacillus cereus (KT273327). As most of the strains show positive results for resistance against heavy metals, phosphate solubilization, nitrogen fixation, IAA production, and so these strains might be utilized for the removal of heavy metals from the ecosystem as well as biofertilizer in agriculture lands of northern areas. (author)

  2. The antimicrobial activity of thyme essential oil against multidrug resistant clinical bacterial strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sienkiewicz, Monika; Łysakowska, Monika; Denys, Paweł; Kowalczyk, Edward

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of thyme essential oil against clinical multidrug resistant strains of Staphylococcus, Enterococcus, Escherichia, and Pseudomonas genus. The antibacterial activity of oil was tested against standard strains of bacteria and 120 clinical strains isolated from patients with infections of the oral cavity, abdominal cavity, respiratory and genitourinary tracts, skin, and from the hospital environment. Agar diffusion was used to determine the microbial growth inhibition of bacterial growth at various concentrations of oil from Thymus vulgaris. Susceptibility testing to antibiotics was carried out using disk diffusion. Thyme essential oil strongly inhibited the growth of the clinical strains of bacteria tested. The use of phytopharmaceuticals based on an investigated essential oil from thyme in the prevention and treatment of various human infections may be reasonable.

  3. A rapid colorimetric screening method for vanillic acid and vanillin-producing bacterial strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamzuri, N A; Abd-Aziz, S; Rahim, R A; Phang, L Y; Alitheen, N B; Maeda, T

    2014-04-01

    To isolate a bacterial strain capable of biotransforming ferulic acid, a major component of lignin, into vanillin and vanillic acid by a rapid colorimetric screening method. For the production of vanillin, a natural aroma compound, we attempted to isolate a potential strain using a simple screening method based on pH change resulting from the degradation of ferulic acid. The strain Pseudomonas sp. AZ10 UPM exhibited a significant result because of colour changes observed on the assay plate on day 1 with a high intensity of yellow colour. The biotransformation of ferulic acid into vanillic acid by the AZ10 strain provided the yield (Yp/s ) and productivity (Pr ) of 1·08 mg mg(-1) and 53·1 mg L(-1) h(-1) , respectively. In fact, new investigations regarding lignin degradation revealed that the strain was not able to produce vanillin and vanillic acid directly from lignin; however, partially digested lignin by mixed enzymatic treatment allowed the strain to produce 30·7 mg l(-1) and 1·94 mg l(-1) of vanillic acid and biovanillin, respectively. (i) The rapid colorimetric screening method allowed the isolation of a biovanillin producer using ferulic acid as the sole carbon source. (ii) Enzymatic treatment partially digested lignin, which could then be utilized by the strain to produce biovanillin and vanillic acid. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the use of a rapid colorimetric screening method for bacterial strains producing vanillin and vanillic acid from ferulic acid. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Comparison of two multimetal resistant bacterial strains: Enterobacter sp. YSU and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia ORO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Andrew; Vinayak, Anubhav; Benton, Cherise; Esbenshade, Aaron; Heinselman, Carlisle; Frankland, Daniel; Kulkarni, Samatha; Kurtanich, Adrienne; Caguiat, Jonathan

    2009-11-01

    The Y-12 plant in Oak Ridge, TN, which manufactured nuclear weapons during World War II and the Cold War, contaminated East Fork Poplar Creek with heavy metals. The multimetal resistant bacterial strain, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Oak Ridge strain O2 (S. maltophilia O2), was isolated from East Fork Poplar Creek. Sequence analysis of 16s rDNA suggested that our working strain of S. maltophilia O2 was a strain of Enterobacter. Phylogenetic tree analysis and biochemical tests confirmed that it belonged to an Enterobacter species. This new strain was named Enterobacter sp. YSU. Using a modified R3A growth medium, R3A-Tris, the Hg(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Cu(II), Au(III), Cr(VI), Ag(I), As(III), and Se(IV) MICs for a confirmed strain of S. maltophilia O2 were 0.24, 0.33, 5, 5, 0.25, 7, 0.03, 14, and 40 mM, respectively, compared to 0.07, 0.24, 0.8, 3, 0.05, 0.4, 0.08, 14, and 40 mM, respectively, for Enterobacter sp. YSU. Although S. maltophilia O2 was generally more metal resistant than Enterobacter sp. YSU, in comparison to Escherichia coli strain HB101, Enterobacter sp. YSU was resistant to Hg(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Au(III), Ag(I), As(III), and Se(IV). By studying metal resistances in these two strains, it may be possible to understand what makes one microorganism more metal resistant than another microorganism. This work also provided benchmark MICs that can be used to evaluate the metal resistance properties of other bacterial isolates from East Fork Poplar Creek and other metal contaminated sites.

  5. Synergism between hydrogen peroxide and seventeen acids against six bacterial strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, H; Maris, P

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the bactericidal efficacy of hydrogen peroxide administered in combination with 17 mineral and organic acids authorized for use in the food industry. The assays were performed on a 96-well microplate using a microdilution technique based on the checkerboard titration method. The six selected strains were reference strains and strains representative of contaminating bacteria in the food industry. Each synergistic hydrogen peroxide/acid combination found after 5-min contact time at 20°C in distilled water was then tested in conditions simulating four different use conditions. Thirty-two combinations were synergistic in distilled water; twenty-five of these remained synergistic with one or more of the four mineral and organic interfering substances selected. Hydrogen peroxide/formic acid combination was synergistic for all six bacterial strains in distilled water and remained synergistic with interfering substances. Six other combinations maintained their synergistic effect in the presence of an organic load but only for one or two bacterial strains. Synergistic combinations of disinfectants were revealed, among them the promising hydrogen peroxide/formic acid combination. A rapid screening method was proposed and used to reveal the synergistic potential of disinfectant and/or sanitizer combinations. © 2012 ANSES Fougères Laboratory Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Strain Library Imaging Protocol for high-throughput, automated single-cell microscopy of large bacterial collections arrayed on multiwell plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Handuo; Colavin, Alexandre; Lee, Timothy K; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2017-02-01

    Single-cell microscopy is a powerful tool for studying gene functions using strain libraries, but it suffers from throughput limitations. Here we describe the Strain Library Imaging Protocol (SLIP), which is a high-throughput, automated microscopy workflow for large strain collections that requires minimal user involvement. SLIP involves transferring arrayed bacterial cultures from multiwell plates onto large agar pads using inexpensive replicator pins and automatically imaging the resulting single cells. The acquired images are subsequently reviewed and analyzed by custom MATLAB scripts that segment single-cell contours and extract quantitative metrics. SLIP yields rich data sets on cell morphology and gene expression that illustrate the function of certain genes and the connections among strains in a library. For a library arrayed on 96-well plates, image acquisition can be completed within 4 min per plate.

  7. Antibacterial activity of fumaria indica (hausskn.) pugsley against selected bacterial strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toor, Y.; Nawaz, K.; Hussain, K.

    2015-01-01

    Antibacterial properties of methanolic extracts of F. indica prepared in different doses against seven Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains i.e. Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus (1), Staphylococcus aureus (2), Shigella sonnei, Escherichia coli (1), Escherichia coli (2) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae using agar well diffusion method (inhibition zone measurements) compared to gentamicin as standard antibiotic. Results showed significant activities against the test organisms with overall satisfactory statistics. Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus strains as well as Neisseria gonorrhoeae showed more inhibition to methanolic extracts of F. indica. Minimum inhibitory as well as minimum bactericidal concentrations against all strains except Shigella sonnei were also recorded. Studies showed promising horizons for the use of F. indica as an active antibacterial component in modern drug formulations. (author)

  8. Screening of bacterial strains for pectinolytic activity: characterization of the polygalacturonase produced by Bacillus sp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares Márcia M.C.N.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred sixty eight bacterial strains, isolated from soil and samples of vegetable in decomposition, were screened for the use of citrus pectin as the sole carbon source. 102 were positive for pectinase depolymerization in assay plates as evidenced by clear hydrolization halos. Among them, 30% presented considerable pectinolytic activity. The cultivation of these strains by submerged and semi-solid fermentation for polygalacturonase production indicated that five strains of Bacillus sp produced high quantities of the enzyme. The physico-chemical characteristics, such as optimum pH of 6.0 - 7.0, optimum temperatures between 45oC and 55oC, stability at temperatures above 40oC and in neutral and alkaline pH, were determined.

  9. Strain Dependent Genetic Networks for Antibiotic-Sensitivity in a Bacterial Pathogen with a Large Pan-Genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim van Opijnen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between an antibiotic and bacterium is not merely restricted to the drug and its direct target, rather antibiotic induced stress seems to resonate through the bacterium, creating selective pressures that drive the emergence of adaptive mutations not only in the direct target, but in genes involved in many different fundamental processes as well. Surprisingly, it has been shown that adaptive mutations do not necessarily have the same effect in all species, indicating that the genetic background influences how phenotypes are manifested. However, to what extent the genetic background affects the manner in which a bacterium experiences antibiotic stress, and how this stress is processed is unclear. Here we employ the genome-wide tool Tn-Seq to construct daptomycin-sensitivity profiles for two strains of the bacterial pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. Remarkably, over half of the genes that are important for dealing with antibiotic-induced stress in one strain are dispensable in another. By confirming over 100 genotype-phenotype relationships, probing potassium-loss, employing genetic interaction mapping as well as temporal gene-expression experiments we reveal genome-wide conditionally important/essential genes, we discover roles for genes with unknown function, and uncover parts of the antibiotic's mode-of-action. Moreover, by mapping the underlying genomic network for two query genes we encounter little conservation in network connectivity between strains as well as profound differences in regulatory relationships. Our approach uniquely enables genome-wide fitness comparisons across strains, facilitating the discovery that antibiotic responses are complex events that can vary widely between strains, which suggests that in some cases the emergence of resistance could be strain specific and at least for species with a large pan-genome less predictable.

  10. Strain Dependent Genetic Networks for Antibiotic-Sensitivity in a Bacterial Pathogen with a Large Pan-Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Opijnen, Tim; Dedrick, Sandra; Bento, José

    2016-09-01

    The interaction between an antibiotic and bacterium is not merely restricted to the drug and its direct target, rather antibiotic induced stress seems to resonate through the bacterium, creating selective pressures that drive the emergence of adaptive mutations not only in the direct target, but in genes involved in many different fundamental processes as well. Surprisingly, it has been shown that adaptive mutations do not necessarily have the same effect in all species, indicating that the genetic background influences how phenotypes are manifested. However, to what extent the genetic background affects the manner in which a bacterium experiences antibiotic stress, and how this stress is processed is unclear. Here we employ the genome-wide tool Tn-Seq to construct daptomycin-sensitivity profiles for two strains of the bacterial pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. Remarkably, over half of the genes that are important for dealing with antibiotic-induced stress in one strain are dispensable in another. By confirming over 100 genotype-phenotype relationships, probing potassium-loss, employing genetic interaction mapping as well as temporal gene-expression experiments we reveal genome-wide conditionally important/essential genes, we discover roles for genes with unknown function, and uncover parts of the antibiotic's mode-of-action. Moreover, by mapping the underlying genomic network for two query genes we encounter little conservation in network connectivity between strains as well as profound differences in regulatory relationships. Our approach uniquely enables genome-wide fitness comparisons across strains, facilitating the discovery that antibiotic responses are complex events that can vary widely between strains, which suggests that in some cases the emergence of resistance could be strain specific and at least for species with a large pan-genome less predictable.

  11. Clinical predictors of bacterial involvement in exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, P.D.L.P.M. van der; Monninkhof, E.M.; Palen, J.A.M. van der; Zielhuis, G.A.; Herwaarden, C.L.A. van; Hendrix, R.G.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The wide use of antibiotics for treatment of exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) lacks evidence. The efficacy is debatable, and bacterial involvement in exacerbation is difficult to verify. The aim of this prospective study was to identify factors that can help

  12. Isolation and Purification of Bacterial Strains from Treatment Plants for Effective and Efficient Bioconversion of Domestic Wastewater Sludge

    OpenAIRE

    K. C.A. Jalal; Md. Z.   Alam; Suleyman A.   Muyibi; P. Jamal

    2006-01-01

    Forty six bacterial strains were isolated from nine different sources in four treatment plants namely Indah Water Konsortium (IWK) sewage treatment plant, International Islamic University Malaysia (IIUM) treatment plant-1,-2 and 3 to evaluate the bioconversion process in terms of efficient biodegradation and bioseparation. The bacterial strains isolated were found to be 52.2% (24 isolates) and 47.8% (22 isolates) in the IWK and IIUM treatment plants respectively. The results showed that the h...

  13. Cockroaches as a Source of High Bacterial Pathogens with Multidrug Resistant Strains in Gondar Town, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moges, Feleke; Eshetie, Setegn; Endris, Mengistu; Huruy, Kahsay; Muluye, Dagnachew; Feleke, Tigist; G/Silassie, Fisha; Ayalew, Getenet; Nagappan, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cockroaches are source of bacterial infections and this study was aimed to assess bacterial isolates and their antimicrobial profiles from cockroaches in Gondar town, Ethiopia. Methods. A total of 60 cockroaches were collected from March 1 to May 30, 2014, in Gondar town. Bacterial species were isolated from external and internal parts of cockroaches. Disk diffusion method was used to determine antibiotic susceptibility patterns. Data were entered and analyzed by using SPSS version 20; P values cockroaches, respectively. Klebsiella pneumoniae 32 (17.7%), Escherichia coli 29 (16%), and Citrobacter spp. 27 (15%) were the predominant isolates. High resistance rate was observed to cotrimoxazole, 60 (33.1%), and least resistance rate was noted to ciprofloxacin, 2 (1.1%). Additionally, 116 (64.1%) of the isolates were MDR strains; Salmonella spp. were the leading MDR isolates (100%) followed by Enterobacter (90.5%) and Shigella spp. (76.9%). Conclusion. Cockroaches are the potential source of bacteria pathogens with multidrug resistant strains and hence effective preventive and control measures are required to minimize cockroach related infections.

  14. Identification of bacterial strains isolated from the Mediterranean Sea exhibiting different abilities of biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian-Jaisson, Florence; Ortalo-Magné, Annick; Guentas-Dombrowsky, Linda; Armougom, Fabrice; Blache, Yves; Molmeret, Maëlle

    2014-07-01

    The Mediterranean Sea has rarely been investigated for the characterization of marine bacteria as compared to other marine environments such as the Atlantic or Pacific Ocean. Bacteria recovered from inert surfaces are poorly studied in these environments, when it has been shown that the community structure of attached bacteria can be dissimilar from that of planktonic bacteria present in the water column. The objectives of this study were to identify and characterize marine bacteria isolated from biofilms developed on inert surfaces immersed in the Mediterranean Sea and to evaluate their capacity to form a biofilm in vitro. Here, 13 marine bacterial strains have been isolated from different supports immersed in seawater in the Bay of Toulon (France). Phylogenetic analysis and different biological and physico-chemical properties have been investigated. Among the 13 strains recovered, 8 different genera and 12 different species were identified including 2 isolates of a novel bacterial species that we named Persicivirga mediterranea and whose genus had never been isolated from the Mediterranean Sea. Shewanella sp. and Pseudoalteromonas sp. were the most preponderant genera recovered in our conditions. The phenotypical characterization revealed that one isolate belonging to the Polaribacter genus differed from all the other ones by its hydrophobic properties and poor ability to form biofilms in vitro. Identifying and characterizing species isolated from seawater including from Mediterranean ecosystems could be helpful for example, to understand some aspects of bacterial biodiversity and to further study the mechanisms of biofilm (and biofouling) development in conditions approaching those of the marine environment.

  15. [Effects of co-substrates on biodegradation of pyrene by ten bacterial strains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Dan; Li, Pei-Jun; Wang, Xin

    2007-03-01

    A total of 10 bacterial strains represented as from SB01 to SB10 were isolated from a petrolium-contaminated sludge, and their potential of degrading pyrene (PYR) was investigated on the substrates pyrene (MS1) , pyrene plus glucose (MS2), and pyrene plus phenanthrene (MS3). The results showed that on MS1, the degradation rate of PYR by SB01 was the highest, with 30.4% of PYR degraded after 5 days. On MS2, the degradation rate of PYR by SB09 was the highest, being 37.7% after 5 days, while on MS3, 50.2% of PYR was removed by SB01. The degradation of PYR by SB01 and SB03 was inhibited by glucose, which was more obvious for SB01, but no significant difference was observed among SB02, SB07, SB08 and SB10. The biodegradation rate of PYR by all the ten bacterial strains was enhanced on MS3, and that by SB10 was increased by 29.8%. For SB04 and SB09, the biodegradation rate of PYR had no significant difference between MS1 and MS2, but for other strains, the stimulation effect of phenanthrene on PYR degradation was higher than that of glucose.

  16. Conductivity-Dependent Strain Response of Carbon Nanotube Treated Bacterial Nanocellulose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Farjana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the strain sensitivity of flexible, electrically conductive, and nanostructured cellulose which was prepared by modification of bacterial cellulose with double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. The electrical conductivity depends on the modifying agent and its dispersion process. The conductivity of the samples obtained from bacterial cellulose (BNC pellicles modified with DWCNT was in the range from 0.034 S·cm−1 to 0.39 S·cm−1, and for BNC pellicles modified with MWCNTs it was from 0.12 S·cm−1 to 1.6 S·cm−1. The strain-induced electromechanical response, resistance versus strain, was monitored during the application of tensile force in order to study the sensitivity of the modified nanocellulose. A maximum gauge factor of 252 was found from the highest conductive sample treated by MWCNT. It has been observed that the sensitivity of the sample depends on the conductivity of the modified cellulose.

  17. Antimicrobial Activity of Monoramnholipids Produced by Bacterial Strains Isolated from the Ross Sea (Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Tedesco

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms living in extreme environments represent a huge reservoir of novel antimicrobial compounds and possibly of novel chemical families. Antarctica is one of the most extraordinary places on Earth and exhibits many distinctive features. Antarctic microorganisms are well known producers of valuable secondary metabolites. Specifically, several Antarctic strains have been reported to inhibit opportunistic human pathogens strains belonging to Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc. Herein, we applied a biodiscovery pipeline for the identification of anti-Bcc compounds. Antarctic sub-sea sediments were collected from the Ross Sea, and used to isolate 25 microorganisms, which were phylogenetically affiliated to three bacterial genera (Psychrobacter, Arthrobacter, and Pseudomonas via sequencing and analysis of 16S rRNA genes. They were then subjected to a primary cell-based screening to determine their bioactivity against Bcc strains. Positive isolates were used to produce crude extracts from microbial spent culture media, to perform the secondary screening. Strain Pseudomonas BNT1 was then selected for bioassay-guided purification employing SPE and HPLC. Finally, LC-MS and NMR structurally resolved the purified bioactive compounds. With this strategy, we achieved the isolation of three rhamnolipids, two of which were new, endowed with high (MIC < 1 μg/mL and unreported antimicrobial activity against Bcc strains.

  18. Involvement of bacterial migration in the development of complex multicellular structures in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Mikkel; Aaes-Jorgensen, A.; Molin, Søren

    2003-01-01

    development, we have performed an investigation with time-lapse confocal laser scanning microscopy of biofilms formed by various combinations of colour-coded P. aeruginosa wild type and motility mutants. We show that mushroom-shaped multicellular structures in P. aeruginosa biofilms can form in a sequential...... process involving a non-motile bacterial subpopulation and a migrating bacterial subpopulation. The non-motile bacteria form the mushroom stalks by growth in certain foci of the biofilm. The migrating bacteria form the mushroom caps by climbing the stalks and aggregating on the tops in a process which...

  19. The Genomic Sequence of the Oral Pathobiont Strain NI1060 Reveals Unique Strategies for Bacterial Competition and Pathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef Darzi

    Full Text Available Strain NI1060 is an oral bacterium responsible for periodontitis in a murine ligature-induced disease model. To better understand its pathogenicity, we have determined the complete sequence of its 2,553,982 bp genome. Although closely related to Pasteurella pneumotropica, a pneumonia-associated rodent commensal based on its 16S rRNA, the NI1060 genomic content suggests that they are different species thriving on different energy sources via alternative metabolic pathways. Genomic and phylogenetic analyses showed that strain NI1060 is distinct from the genera currently described in the family Pasteurellaceae, and is likely to represent a novel species. In addition, we found putative virulence genes involved in lipooligosaccharide synthesis, adhesins and bacteriotoxic proteins. These genes are potentially important for host adaption and for the induction of dysbiosis through bacterial competition and pathogenicity. Importantly, strain NI1060 strongly stimulates Nod1, an innate immune receptor, but is defective in two peptidoglycan recycling genes due to a frameshift mutation. The in-depth analysis of its genome thus provides critical insights for the development of NI1060 as a prime model system for infectious disease.

  20. Identification of electrode respiring, hydrocarbonoclastic bacterial strain Stenotrophomonas maltophilia MK2 highlights the untapped potential for environmental bioremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnaveni Venkidusamy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrode respiring bacteria (ERB possess a great potential for many biotechnological applications such as microbial electrochemical remediation systems (MERS because of their exoelectrogenic capabilities to degrade xenobiotic pollutants. Very few ERB have been isolated from MERS, those exhibited a bioremediation potential towards organic contaminants. Here we report once such bacterial strain, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia MK2, a facultative anaerobic bacterium isolated from a hydrocarbon fed MERS, showed a potent hydrocarbonoclastic behavior under aerobic and anaerobic environments. Distinct properties of the strain MK2 were anaerobic fermentation of the amino acids, electrode respiration, anaerobic nitrate reduction and the ability to metabolize n-alkane components (C8-C36 of petroleum hydrocarbons including the biomarkers, pristine and phytane. The characteristic of diazoic dye decolorization was used as a criterion for pre-screening the possible electrochemically active microbial candidates. Bioelectricity generation with concomitant dye decolorization in MERS showed that the strain is electrochemically active. In acetate fed microbial fuel cells, maximum current density of 273±8 mA/m2 (1000Ω was produced (power density 113±7 mW/m2 by strain MK2 with a coulombic efficiency of 34.8 %. Further, the presence of possible alkane hydroxylase genes (alkB and rubA in the strain MK2 indicated that the genes involved in hydrocarbon degradation are of diverse origin. Such observations demonstrated the potential of facultative hydrocarbon degradation in contaminated environments. Identification of such a novel petrochemical hydrocarbon degrading ERB is likely to offer a new route to the sustainable bioremedial process of source zone contamination with simultaneous energy generation through MERS.

  1. Impact of in Situ Isolated Bacterial Strains on Nitrogen Fixation in Alfalfa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Dragomir

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Symbiosis relationships among legumes and nitrogen fixing bacteria play a crucial role in agriculture since they provide the opportunity of converting atmospheric molecular nitrogen into an ammonia form of nitrogen that the plants can use in protein formation. To enhance this process we have selected nitrogen fixing bacterial strains commercialised under different forms depending on the cultivation technologies in legume species. In our research, we have pointed out the efficacy of in situ isolated nitrogen fixing bacteria in alfalfa in two ways: rhizobia taken directly from the nodosities on the alfalfa roots and rhizobia taken from the alfalfa root system.

  2. Seaweed as source of energy. 1: effect of a specific bacterial strain on biogas production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreenivasa R.P.; Tarwade, S.J.; Sarma, K.S.R.

    1980-09-01

    Only certain marine bacteria capable of digesting the special type of polysaccharide - agar and alginic acid can bring about the biodegradation of these substances and utilise them as carbon source to produce the organics which will be utilised by the methane bacteria to produce methane. When bacterial strain was used in conjunction with cowdung as a source of methane bacteria in seaweed digester, production of biogas from seaweed was accelerated. Adding of small amount of Ulva to seaweed digester increased the output of gas. (Refs. 4).

  3. Biodegradation of malathion, α- and β-endosulfan by bacterial strains isolated from agricultural soil in Veracruz, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Torres, Catya; Ortiz, Irmene; San-Martin, Pablo; Hernandez-Herrera, R Idalia

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the capacity of two bacterial strains isolated, cultivated, and purified from agricultural soils of Veracruz, Mexico, for biodegradation and mineralisation of malathion (diethyl 2-(dimethoxyphosphorothioyl) succinate) and α- and β-endosulfan (6,7,8,9,10,10-hexachloro-1,5,5a,6,9,9a-hexahydro-6-9-methano-2,4,3-benzodioxathiepine-3-oxide). The isolated bacterial strains were identified using biochemical and morphological characterization and the analysis of their 16S rDNA gene, as Enterobacter cloacae strain PMM16 (E1) and E. amnigenus strain XGL214 (M1). The E1 strain was able to degrade endosulfan, whereas the M1 strain was capable of degrading both pesticides. The E1 strain degraded 71.32% of α-endosulfan and 100% of β-endosulfan within 24 days. The absence of metabolites, such as endosulfan sulfate, endosulfan lactone, or endosulfan diol, would suggest degradation of endosulfan isomers through non-oxidative pathways. Malathion was completely eliminated by the M1 strain. The major metabolite was butanedioic acid. There was a time-dependent increase in bacterial biomass, typical of bacterial growth, correlated with the decrease in pesticide concentration. The CO 2 production also increased significantly with the addition of pesticides to the bacterial growth media, demonstrating that, under aerobic conditions, the bacteria utilized endosulfan and malathion as a carbon source. Here, two bacterial strains are shown to metabolize two toxic pesticides into non-toxic intermediates.

  4. Strain ŽP - the first bacterial conjugation-based "kill"-"anti-kill" antimicrobial system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starčič Erjavec, Marjanca; Petkovšek, Živa; Kuznetsova, Marina V; Maslennikova, Irina L; Žgur-Bertok, Darja

    2015-11-01

    As multidrug resistant bacteria pose one of the greatest risks to human health new alternative antibacterial agents are urgently needed. One possible mechanism that can be used as an alternative to traditional antibiotic therapy is transfer of killing agents via conjugation. Our work was aimed at providing a proof of principle that conjugation-based antimicrobial systems are possible. We constructed a bacterial conjugation-based "kill"-"anti-kill" antimicrobial system employing the well known Escherichia coli probiotic strain Nissle 1917 genetically modified to harbor a conjugative plasmid carrying the "kill" gene (colicin ColE7 activity gene) and a chromosomally encoded "anti-kill" gene (ColE7 immunity gene). The constructed strain acts as a donor in conjugal transfer and its efficiency was tested in several types of conjugal assays. Our results clearly demonstrate that conjugation-based antimicrobial systems can be highly efficient. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. A host defense mechanism involving CFTR-mediated bicarbonate secretion in bacterial prostatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prostatitis is associated with a characteristic increase in prostatic fluid pH; however, the underlying mechanism and its physiological significance have not been elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study a primary culture of rat prostatic epithelial cells and a rat prostatitis model were used. Here we reported the involvement of CFTR, a cAMP-activated anion channel conducting both Cl(- and HCO(3(-, in mediating prostate HCO(3(- secretion and its possible role in bacterial killing. Upon Escherichia coli (E. coli-LPS challenge, the expression of CFTR and carbonic anhydrase II (CA II, along with several pro-inflammatory cytokines was up-regulated in the primary culture of rat prostate epithelial cells. Inhibiting CFTR function in vitro or in vivo resulted in reduced bacterial killing by prostate epithelial cells or the prostate. High HCO(3(- content (>50 mM, rather than alkaline pH, was found to be responsible for bacterial killing. The direct action of HCO(3(- on bacterial killing was confirmed by its ability to increase cAMP production and suppress bacterial initiation factors in E. coli. The relevance of the CFTR-mediated HCO(3(- secretion in humans was demonstrated by the upregulated expression of CFTR and CAII in human prostatitis tissues. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The CFTR and its mediated HCO(3(- secretion may be up-regulated in prostatitis as a host defense mechanism.

  6. Cj1411c GENE OF CAMPYLOBACTER JEJUNI 11168 ENCODES FOR A CYTOCHROME P450 INVOLVED IN BACTERIAL CAPSULE SUGAR METABOLISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CORCIONIVOSCHI N.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available After isolation in 1970s, Campylobacter jejuni become the most commonlyrecognized cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in man. In animals is frequently foundin bovines on ovines. Publishing of the genome sequence of Campylobacter jejuni11168 (Parkhill, 2000 revealed the presence of only one cytochrome P450 in anoperon involved in sugar and cell surface biosynthesis. The gene name is Cj1411c, is1359 bp long and encodes 453 aa. The sequence is strictly conserved inCampylobacter jejuni RM221. Similarities with two cytochrome P450s, one formSilicobacter sp. and one form Poloromonas sp., were identified. These two enzymesare known to be involved in ascorbate and aldarate metabolism. The recombinantconstruct allowed the expression of active P450 enzyme with a 450 nm peak whenbinds CO. The protein was purified in proportion of ~ 70 %. By deleting the P450gene from the Campylobacter jejuni 11168 genome clear changes in cellmorphology were identified cells becoming wider and shorter. The capsular sugarprofile of the NCI strain reveals the presence of arabinose which was not found inthe wild type strain. The arabinose was identified by both High Performance LiquidChromatography (HPLC and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR.

  7. Bioremediation of crude oil polluted seawater by a hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial strain immobilized on chitin and chitosan flakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentili, A.R.; Cubitto, M.A.; Ferrero, M.; Rodriguez, M.S.

    2006-01-01

    In this laboratory-scale study, we examined the potential of chitin and chitosan flakes obtained from shrimp wastes as carrier material for a hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial strain. Flakes decontamination, immobilization conditions and the survival of the immobilized bacterial strain under different storage temperatures were evaluated. The potential of immobilized hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial strain for crude oil polluted seawater bioremediation was tested in seawater microcosms. In terms of removal percentage of crude oil after 15 days, the microcosms treated with the immobilized inoculants proved to be the most successful. The inoculants formulated with chitin and chitosan as carrier materials improved the survival and the activity of the immobilized strain. It is important to emphasize that the inoculants formulated with chitin showed the best performance during storage and seawater bioremediation. (author)

  8. Analysis of bacterial strains with pyrolysis-gas chromatography/differential mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Satendra; Schmidt, Hartwig; Lampen, Peter; Wang, Mei; Güth, Robert; Rao, Jaya V; Smith, Geoffrey B; Eiceman, Gary A

    2006-11-01

    Eight vegetative bacterial strains and two spores were characterized by pyrolysis-gas chromatography with differential mobility spectrometry (py-GC/DMS) yielding topographic plots of ion intensity, retention time, and compensation voltage simultaneously for ions in positive and negative polarity. Biomarkers were found in the pyrolysate at characteristic retention times and compensation voltages and were confirmed by standard addition with GC/MS analyses providing discrimination between Gram negative and Gram positive bacterial types, but no recognition of individual strains within the Gram negative bacteria. Principal component analysis was applied using two dimensional data sets of ion intensity versus retention time at five compensation voltages including the reactant ion peaks all in positive and negative ion polarity. Clustering was observed with compensation voltage (CV) chromatograms associated with ion separation in the DMS detector and little or no clustering was observed with the reactant ion peaks or CV chromatograms where ion separation is poor. Consistent clustering of Gram positive B. odysseyi and Gram negative E. coli in both positive and negative polarities with the reactant ion peak chromatograms and key CV chromatograms suggests common but unknown common chemical compositions in the pyrolysate.

  9. A type VI secretion system is involved in Pseudomonas fluorescens bacterial competition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victorien Decoin

    Full Text Available Protein secretion systems are crucial mediators of bacterial interactions with other organisms. Among them, the type VI secretion system (T6SS is widespread in Gram-negative bacteria and appears to inject toxins into competitor bacteria and/or eukaryotic cells. Major human pathogens, such as Vibrio cholerae, Burkholderia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, express T6SSs. Bacteria prevent self-intoxication by their own T6SS toxins by producing immunity proteins, which interact with the cognate toxins. We describe here an environmental P. fluorescens strain, MFE01, displaying an uncommon oversecretion of Hcp (hemolysin-coregulated protein and VgrG (valine-glycine repeat protein G into the culture medium. These proteins are characteristic components of a functional T6SS. The aim of this study was to attribute a role to this energy-consuming overexpression of the T6SS. The genome of MFE01 contains at least two hcp genes (hcp1 and hcp2, suggesting that there may be two putative T6SS clusters. Phenotypic studies have shown that MFE01 is avirulent against various eukaryotic cell models (amebas, plant or animal cell models, but has antibacterial activity against a wide range of competitor bacteria, including rhizobacteria and clinical bacteria. Depending on the prey cell, mutagenesis of the hcp2 gene in MFE01 abolishes or reduces this antibacterial killing activity. Moreover, the introduction of T6SS immunity proteins from S. marcescens, which is not killed by MFE01, protects E. coli against MFE01 killing. These findings suggest that the protein encoded by hcp2 is involved in the killing activity of MFE01 mediated by effectors of the T6SS targeting the peptidoglycan of Gram-negative bacteria. Our results indicate that MFE01 can protect potato tubers against Pectobacterium atrosepticum, which causes tuber soft rot. Pseudomonas fluorescens is often described as a major PGPR (plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium, and our results suggest that there may be a

  10. Isolation, screening and molecular identification of novel bacterial strain removing methylene blue from water solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilany, Mona

    2017-11-01

    The potentially deleterious effects of methylene blue (MB) on human health drove the interest in its removal promptly. Bioremediation is an effective and eco friendly for removing MB. Soil bacteria were isolated and examined for their potential to remove MB. The most potent bacterial candidate was characterized and identified using 16S rRNA sequence technique. The evolutionary history of the isolate was conducted by maximum likelihood method. Some physiochemical parameters were optimized for maximum decolorization. Decolorization mechanism and microbial toxicity study of MB (100 mg/l) and by-products were investigated. Participation of heat killed bacteria in color adsorption have been investigated too. The bacterial isolate was identified as Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strain Kilany_MB 16S ribosomal RNA gene with 99% sequence similarity. The sequence was submitted to NCBI (Accession number = KU533726). Phylogeny depicted the phylogenetic relationships between 16S ribosomal RNA gene, partial sequence (1442 bp), of the isolated strain and other strains related to Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in the GenBank database. The optimal conditions were investigated to be pH 5 at 30 °C, after 24 h using 5 mg/l MB showing optimum decolorization percentage (61.3%). Microbial toxicity study demonstrated relative reduction in the toxicity of MB decolorized products on test bacteria. Mechanism of color removal was proved by both biosorption and biodegradation, where heat-killed and live cells showed 43 and 52% of decolorization, respectively, as a maximum value after 24-h incubation. It was demonstrated that the mechanism of color removal is by adsorption. Therefore, good performance of S maltophilia in MB color removal reinforces the exploitation of these bacteria in environmental clean-up and restoration of the ecosystem.

  11. Screening of strains of soil micromycetes – antagonists of fungal and bacterial plant pathogens

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    O. A. Drehval

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The antagonistic activity of 23 strains of micromycetes belonging to different taxonomic groups, against phythopathogenic bacteria and fungi was studied. The antagonistic activity of the micromycetes was tested by agar diffusion (the method of blocks. For the determination of the influence of the micromycetes on plants, spring barley seeds were treated by cultural liquid of fungi (dilution 1 : 10 for 24 hours and germinated in Petri dishes on moist filter paper. Two strains Trichoderma longibrachiatum 17 and T. lignorum 14 showed the highest antagonistic activity against the phytopathogenic bacteria and fungi. T. longibrachiatum 17 actively suppressed the growth of fungi Fusarium oxysporum 54201, F. culmorum 50716, F. oxysporum 12, F. moniliforme 23, Cladosporium herbarum 16878, Alternaria alternata 16, Aspergillus niger 25 and bacteria Agrobacterium tumefaciens 8628, Xanthomonas campestris 8003b, Pectobacterium carotovorum 8982, Pseudomonas syringae pv. atrofaciens 8254, P. syringae pv. lachrymans 7595, zones inhibition of growth were 20.7–38.3 and 14.7–24.7 mm, respectively. The strain of T. lignorum 14 inhibited the growth of fungi F. culmorum 50716, C. herbarum 16878, F. moniliforme 23, A. alternata 16, A. niger 25 and bacteria A. tumefaciens 8628, P. carotovorum 8982, P. syringae pv. atrofaciens 8254, P. syringae pv. lachrymans 7595, zones of inhibition of growth were 14.0–38.7 and 12.3–23.3 mm, respectively. Treatment of spring barley seeds by T. longibrachiatum 17 cultural liquid showed a positive effect on seed germination, both strains T. longibrachiatum 17 and T. lignorum 14 increased the dry weight of the roots (by 17.5% and 22.0%, respectively and the stems (by 8.0% of spring barley plants compared with the water-treated controls. The results presented in this article indicate that the strains T. longibrachiatum 17 and T. lignorum 14 can be recommended as promising microbial agents to protect plants from fungal and

  12. Evaluation of indigenous bacterial strains for biocontrol of the frogeye leaf spot of soya bean caused by Cercospora sojina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonetti, E; Carmona, M A; Scandiani, M M; García, A F; Luque, A G; Correa, O S; Balestrasse, K B

    2012-08-01

    Assessment of biological control of Cercospora sojina, causal agent of frogeye leaf spot (FLS) of soya bean, using three indigenous bacterial strains, BNM297 (Pseudomonas fluorescens), BNM340 and BNM122 (Bacillus amyloliquefaciens). From cultures of each bacterial strain, cell suspensions and cell-free supernatants were obtained and assayed to determine their antifungal activity against C. sojina. Both mycelial growth and spore germination in vitro were more strongly inhibited by bacterial cell suspensions than by cell-free supernatants. The Bacillus strains BNM122 and BNM340 inhibited the fungal growth to a similar degree (I ≈ 52-53%), while cells from P. fluorescens BNM297 caused a lesser reduction (I ≈ 32-34%) in the fungus colony diameter. The foliar application of the two Bacillus strains on soya bean seedlings, under greenhouse conditions, significantly reduced the disease severity with respect to control soya bean seedlings and those sprayed with BNM297. This last bacterial strain was not effective in controlling FLS in vivo. Our data demonstrate that the application of antagonistic bacteria may be a promising and environmentally friendly alternative to control the FLS of soya bean.   To our knowledge, this is the first report of biological control of C. sojina by using native Bacillus strains. © 2012 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Characterization of Klebsiella sp. strain S1: a bacterial producer of secoisolariciresinol through biotransformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu-Jie; Zhu, Songling; Yang, Dong-Hui; Zhao, Dan-Dan; Li, Jia-Jing; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Secoisolariciresinol (SECO) is a lignan of potential therapeutic value for diseases such as cancer, but its use has been limited by the lack of ideal production methods, even though its precursors are abundant in plants, such as flaxseeds. Here, we report the characterization of a bacterial strain, S1, isolated from the human intestinal flora, which could produce secoisolariciresinol by biotransformation of precursors in defatted flaxseeds. This bacterium was a Gram-negative and facultatively anaerobic straight rod without capsules. Biochemical assays showed that it was negative for production of oxidase, lysine decarboxylase, ornithine decarboxylase, arginine dihydrolase, and β-glucolase. The G + C content of genomic DNA was 57.37 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis by 16S rRNA and rpoB gene sequences demonstrated S1's close relatedness to Klebsiella. No homologues were found for wzb or wzc (capsular genes), which may explain why Klebsiella sp. strain S1 does not have the capsule and was isolated from a healthy human individual. Based on the percentages of homologous genes with identical nucleotide sequences between the bacteria in comparison, we found that clear-cut genetic boundaries had been formed between S1 and any other Klebsiella strains compared, dividing them into distinct phylogenetic lineages. This work demonstrates that the intestinal Klebsiella, well known as important opportunistic pathogens prevalent in potentially fatal nosocomial infections, may contain lineages that are particularly beneficial to the human health.

  14. Pathogenicity of a Very Virulent Strain of Marek's Disease Herpesvirus Cloned as Infectious Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes

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    Lorraine P. Smith

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC vectors containing the full-length genomes of several herpesviruses have been used widely as tools to enable functional studies of viral genes. Marek's disease viruses (MDVs are highly oncogenic alphaherpesviruses that induce rapid-onset T-cell lymphomas in chickens. Oncogenic strains of MDV reconstituted from BAC clones have been used to examine the role of viral genes in inducing tumours. Past studies have demonstrated continuous increase in virulence of MDV strains. We have previously reported on the UK isolate C12/130 that showed increased virulence features including lymphoid organ atrophy and enhanced tropism for the central nervous system. Here we report the construction of the BAC clones (pC12/130 of this strain. Chickens were infected with viruses reconstituted from the pC12/130 clones along with the wild-type virus for the comparison of the pathogenic properties. Our studies show that BAC-derived viruses induced disease similar to the wild-type virus, though there were differences in the levels of pathogenicity between individual viruses. Generation of BAC clones that differ in the potential to induce cytolytic disease provide the opportunity to identify the molecular determinants of increased virulence by direct sequence analysis as well as by using reverse genetics approaches on the infectious BAC clones.

  15. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus strains involved in human and bovine mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Susana; García, Pilar; Fernández, Leonides; Jiménez, Esther; Rodríguez-Baños, Mercedes; del Campo, Rosa; Rodríguez, Juan M

    2011-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the main etiological agents of mastitis in different mammalian species. At present, it is unknown whether strains isolated from human mastitis cases share phenotypic properties and genetic background with those obtained from animal mastitis cases. Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize S. aureus strains isolated from women with lactational mastitis and to compare them with the strains responsible for bovine mastitis and noninfectious strains. All the strains were genotyped by both pulsed field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing and submitted to a characterization scheme that included diverse assays related to pathogenic potential and antibiotic resistance. Apart from siderophore production, no significant association was observed between the strains from bovine and human mastitis. Statistical differences between human- and bovine-mastitis-associated strains were detected for some traits and virulence determinants, such as the presence of prophages and cna and hlb genes, which were more frequently found within the bovine group. On the contrary, resistance to penicillin was significantly higher among strains isolated from human lactational mastitis, probably related to the common presence of the blaZ gene. A high genetic diversity was found among the strains involved in mastitis in breastfeeding women. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Structural Insights into Protein-Protein Interactions Involved in Bacterial Cell Wall Biogenesis

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    Federica Laddomada

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial cell wall is essential for survival, and proteins that participate in its biosynthesis have been the targets of antibiotic development efforts for decades. The biosynthesis of its main component, the peptidoglycan, involves the coordinated action of proteins that are involved in multi-member complexes which are essential for cell division (the “divisome” and/or cell wall elongation (the “elongasome”, in the case of rod-shaped cells. Our knowledge regarding these interactions has greatly benefitted from the visualization of different aspects of the bacterial cell wall and its cytoskeleton by cryoelectron microscopy and tomography, as well as genetic and biochemical screens that have complemented information from high resolution crystal structures of protein complexes involved in divisome or elongasome formation. This review summarizes structural and functional aspects of protein complexes involved in the cytoplasmic and membrane-related steps of peptidoglycan biosynthesis, with a particular focus on protein-protein interactions whereby disruption could lead to the development of novel antibacterial strategies.

  17. A suite of recombinant luminescent bacterial strains for the quantification of bioavailable heavy metals and toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivask, Angela; Rõlova, Taisia; Kahru, Anne

    2009-05-08

    Recombinant whole-cell sensors have already proven useful in the assessment of the bioavailability of environmental pollutants like heavy metals and organic compounds. In this work 19 recombinant bacterial strains representing various Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens) bacteria were constructed to express the luminescence encoding genes luxCDABE (from Photorhabdus luminescens) as a response to bioavailable heavy metals ("lights-on" metal sensors containing metal-response elements, 13 strains) or in a constitutive manner ("lights-off" constructs, 6 strains). The bioluminescence of all 13 "lights-on" metal sensor strains was expressed as a function of the sub-toxic metal concentrations enabling the quantitative determination of metals bioavailable for these strains. Five sensor strains, constructed for detecting copper and mercury, proved to be target metal specific, whereas eight other sensor strains were simultaneously induced by Cd2+, Hg2+, Zn2+and Pb2+. The lowest limits of determination of the "lights-on" sensor strains for the metals tested in this study were (microg l-1): 0.002 of CH3HgCl, 0.03 of HgCl2, 1.8 of CdCl2, 33 of Pb(NO3)2, 1626 of ZnSO4, 24 of CuSO4 and 340 of AgNO3. In general, the sensitivity of the "lights-on" sensor strains was mostly dependent on the metal-response element used while the selection of host bacterium played a relatively minor role. In contrast, toxicity of metals to the "lights-off" strains was only dependent on the bacterial host so that Gram-positive strains were remarkably more sensitive than Gram-negative ones. The constructed battery of 19 recombinant luminescent bacterial strains exhibits several novel aspects as it contains i) metal sensor strains with similar metal-response elements in different host bacteria; ii) metal sensor strains with metal-response elements in different copies and iii) a "lights-off" construct (control) for every

  18. A suite of recombinant luminescent bacterial strains for the quantification of bioavailable heavy metals and toxicity testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahru Anne

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant whole-cell sensors have already proven useful in the assessment of the bioavailability of environmental pollutants like heavy metals and organic compounds. In this work 19 recombinant bacterial strains representing various Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria were constructed to express the luminescence encoding genes luxCDABE (from Photorhabdus luminescens as a response to bioavailable heavy metals ("lights-on" metal sensors containing metal-response elements, 13 strains or in a constitutive manner ("lights-off" constructs, 6 strains. Results The bioluminescence of all 13 "lights-on" metal sensor strains was expressed as a function of the sub-toxic metal concentrations enabling the quantitative determination of metals bioavailable for these strains. Five sensor strains, constructed for detecting copper and mercury, proved to be target metal specific, whereas eight other sensor strains were simultaneously induced by Cd2+, Hg2+, Zn2+and Pb2+. The lowest limits of determination of the "lights-on" sensor strains for the metals tested in this study were (μg l-1: 0.002 of CH3HgCl, 0.03 of HgCl2, 1.8 of CdCl2, 33 of Pb(NO32, 1626 of ZnSO4, 24 of CuSO4 and 340 of AgNO3. In general, the sensitivity of the "lights-on" sensor strains was mostly dependent on the metal-response element used while the selection of host bacterium played a relatively minor role. In contrast, toxicity of metals to the "lights-off" strains was only dependent on the bacterial host so that Gram-positive strains were remarkably more sensitive than Gram-negative ones. Conclusion The constructed battery of 19 recombinant luminescent bacterial strains exhibits several novel aspects as it contains i metal sensor strains with similar metal-response elements in different host bacteria; ii metal sensor strains with metal-response elements in different copies and iii

  19. Seaweed as source of energy. I: effect of a specific bacterial strain on biogas production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, P.S.; Tarwade, S.J.; Sarma, K.S.R.

    1980-01-01

    Biogas was produced from seaweed by making use of alginate-digesting marine bacteria that were isolated from decomposing seaweed and can digest seaweed carbohydrates (agar and alginic acid). Laboratory digesters containing 100 g seaweed were inoculated with 50 mL broth cultures of different seaweed-derived bacterial strains, and the maximum amount of degradation obtained was 28% (compared with 13% for a bacteria-free digestion). Cow dung was added as a source of methanogenic bacteria, and the amount of biogas produced was more than double the amount obtained when seaweed and cow dung were digested in the absence of the seaweed-derived bacteria. Adding a small amount of Ulva to the seaweed digester increased the production of biogas.

  20. Bacterial Feeders, the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the Flagellate Cercomonas longicauda, have different Effects on Outcome of Competition among the Pseudomonas Biocontrol Strains CHA0 and DSS73

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Annette; Nybroe, Ole; Winding, Anne

    2009-01-01

    50090 or one of two biocontrol strains P. fluorescens CHA0 or Pseudomonas sp. DSS73) or combinations of two bacterial strains. DSM50090 is a suitable food bacterium, DSS73 is of intermediate food quality, and CHA0 is inedible to the bacterial feeders. Bacterial and protozoan cell numbers were measured......How bacterial feeding fauna affects colonization and survival of bacteria in soil is not well understood, which constrains the applicability of bacterial inoculants in agriculture. This study aimed to unravel how food quality of bacteria and bacterial feeders with different feeding habits (the...

  1. Biodegradation of alpha and beta endosulfan in broth medium and soil microcosm by bacterial strain Bordetella sp. B9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Supriya; Singh, Dileep K

    2009-04-01

    Bacterial strains were isolated from endosulfan treated soil to study the microbial degradation of this pesticide in broth medium and soil microcosm. The isolates were grown in minimal medium and screened for endosulfan degradation. The strain, which utilized endosulfan and showed maximum growth, was selected for detail studies. Maximum degrading capability in shake flask culture was shown by Bordetella sp. B9 which degraded 80% of alpha endosulfan and 86% of beta endosulfan in 18 days. Soil microcosm study was also carried out using this strain in six different treatments. Endosulfan ether and endosulfan lactone were the main metabolites in broth culture, while in soil microcosm endosulfan sulfate was also found along with endosulfan ether and endosulfan lactone. This bacterial strain has a potential to be used for bioremediation of the contaminated sites.

  2. Molecular identification and pectate lyase production by Bacillus strains involved in cocoa fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouattara, Honoré G; Reverchon, Sylvie; Niamke, Sébastien L; Nasser, William

    2011-02-01

    We have previously reported the implication of Bacillus in the production of pectinolytic enzymes during cocoa fermentation. The objective of this work was to identify the Bacillus strains isolated from cocoa fermentation and study their ability to produce pectate lyase (PL) in various growth conditions. Ninety-eight strains were analyzed by Amplified Ribosomal DNA Restriction Analysis (ARDRA). Four different banding patterns were obtained leading to the clustering of the bacterial isolates into 4 distinct ARDRA groups. A subset of representative isolates for each group was identified by 16S rRNA gene partial sequencing. Six species were identified: Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus sphaericus, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis, together with Bacillus fusiformis which was isolated for the first time from cocoa fermentation. The best PL producers, yielding at least 9 U/mg of bacterial dry weight, belonged to B. fusiformis, B. subtilis, and B. pumilus species while those belonging to B. sphaericus, B. cereus and B. thuringiensis generally showed a low level of activity. Two kinds of PL were produced, as revealed by isoelectrofocusing: one with a pI of 9.8 produced by B. subtilis and B. fusiformis, the other with a pI of 10.5 was produced by B. pumilus. Strains yielded about 2 fold more PL in a pectic compound medium than in glucose medium and maximum enzyme production occurred in the late stationary bacterial growth phase. Together all these results indicate that PL production in the bacilli studied is modulated by the growth phase and by the carbon source present in the medium. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigation of lateral strains involved in ultrasonic pulse velocity test by using finite element methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study it was found that dynamic modulus (E) obtained from Impulse Load Test (ILT) is lower than dynamic modulus obtained from Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity Test (UPVT), which is theoretically not correct. In order to investigate this problem, the theoretical aspects involved in E-Calculations were checked by calculating the lateral strain involved in UPVT. Two finite element software programs (Marc and Patran) were selected for this purpose. In addition the effect of diameter on lateral strains of 12 inch length concrete samples was also investigated. (author)

  4. Evaluation of antibacterial activity of three selected fruit juices on clinical endodontic bacterial strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subasish Behera

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The increasing problem of antibiotic drug resistance by pathogenic microorganisms in the past few decades has recently led to the continuous exploration of natural plant products for new antibiotic agents. Many consumable food materials have good as well as their bad effects, good effect includes their antibacterial effects on different microorganisms present in the oral cavity. Recently, natural products have been evaluated as source of antimicrobial agent with efficacies against a variety of microorganisms. Methodology: The present study describes the antibacterial activity of three selected fruit juices (Apple, Pomegranate and Grape on endodontic bacterial strains. Antimicrobial activity of fruit juices were tested by wel l diffusion assay by an inhibition zone surrounding the well. The aim of the study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of three fruit juises on different endodontic strains. Result: Agar well diffusion method was adopted for determining antibacterial potency. Antibacterial activity present on the plates was indicated by an inhibition zone surrounding the well containing the fruit juice. The zone of inhibition was measured by measuring scale in millimeter. Comparision between antibacterial efficacy of all three fruit juices against Enterococcus feacalis and Streptococcus mutans was observed with significant value of P ≤ 0.05. Conclusion: The results obtained in this study clearly demonstrated a significant antimicrobial effect of apple fruit juice against Enterococcus fecalis and Streptococcus mutans. However, preclinical and clinical trials are needed to evaluate biocompatibility & safety before apple can conclusively be recommended in endodontic therapy, but in vitro observation of apple effectiveness appears promising.

  5. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-supplemented formula expands butyrate-producing bacterial strains in food allergic infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Sangwan, Naseer; Stefka, Andrew T; Nocerino, Rita; Paparo, Lorella; Aitoro, Rosita; Calignano, Antonio; Khan, Aly A; Gilbert, Jack A; Nagler, Cathryn R

    2016-03-01

    Dietary intervention with extensively hydrolyzed casein formula supplemented with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (EHCF+LGG) accelerates tolerance acquisition in infants with cow's milk allergy (CMA). We examined whether this effect is attributable, at least in part, to an influence on the gut microbiota. Fecal samples from healthy controls (n=20) and from CMA infants (n=19) before and after treatment with EHCF with (n=12) and without (n=7) supplementation with LGG were compared by 16S rRNA-based operational taxonomic unit clustering and oligotyping. Differential feature selection and generalized linear model fitting revealed that the CMA infants have a diverse gut microbial community structure dominated by Lachnospiraceae (20.5±9.7%) and Ruminococcaceae (16.2±9.1%). Blautia, Roseburia and Coprococcus were significantly enriched following treatment with EHCF and LGG, but only one genus, Oscillospira, was significantly different between infants that became tolerant and those that remained allergic. However, most tolerant infants showed a significant increase in fecal butyrate levels, and those taxa that were significantly enriched in these samples, Blautia and Roseburia, exhibited specific strain-level demarcations between tolerant and allergic infants. Our data suggest that EHCF+LGG promotes tolerance in infants with CMA, in part, by influencing the strain-level bacterial community structure of the infant gut.

  6. Biotransformation of tetracycline by a novel bacterial strain Stenotrophomonas maltophilia DT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Yifei; Bao, Jianguo; Chang, Gaofeng; Zheng, Han; Li, Xingxing; Du, Jiangkun; Snow, Daniel; Li, Xu

    2016-11-15

    Although several abiotic processes have been reported that can transform antibiotics, little is known about whether and how microbiological processes may degrade antibiotics in the environment. This work isolated one tetracycline degrading bacterial strain, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strain DT1, and characterized the biotransformation of tetracycline by DT1 under various environmental conditions. The biotransformation rate was the highest when the initial pH was 9 and the reaction temperature was at 30°C, and can be described using the Michaelis-Menten model under different initial tetracycline concentrations. When additional substrate was present, the substrate that caused increased biomass resulted in a decreased biotransformation rate of tetracycline. According to disk diffusion tests, the biotransformation products of tetracycline had lower antibiotic potency than the parent compound. Six possible biotransformation products were identified, and a potential biotransformation pathway was proposed that included sequential removal of N-methyl, carbonyl, and amine function groups. Results from this study can lead to better estimation of the fate and transport of antibiotics in the environment and has the potential to be utilized in designing engineering processes to remove tetracycline from water and soil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of rhamnolipid biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens on model bacterial strains and isolates from industrial wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileva-Tonkova, Evgenia; Sotirova, Anna; Galabova, Danka

    2011-02-01

    In this study, the effect of rhamnolipid biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens on bacterial strains, laboratory strains, and isolates from industrial wastewater was investigated. It was shown that biosurfactant, depending on the concentration, has a neutral or detrimental effect on the growth and protein release of model Gram (+) strain Bacillus subtilis 168. The growth and protein release of model Gram (-) strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1390 was not influenced by the presence of biosurfactant in the medium. Rhamnolipid biosurfactant at the used concentrations supported the growth of some slow growing on hexadecane bacterial isolates, members of the microbial community. Changes in cell surface hydrophobicity and permeability of some Gram (+) and Gram (-) isolates in the presence of rhamnolipid biosurfactant were followed in experiments in vitro. It was found that bacterial cells treated with biosurfactant became more or less hydrophobic than untreated cells depending on individual characteristics and abilities of the strains. For all treated strains, an increase in the amount of released protein was observed with increasing the amount of biosurfactant, probably due to increased cell permeability as a result of changes in the organization of cell surface structures. The results obtained could contribute to clarify the relationships between members of the microbial community as well as suggest the efficiency of surface properties of rhamnolipid biosurfactant from Pseudomonas fluorescens making it potentially applicable in bioremediation of hydrocarbon-polluted environments.

  8. Occurrence of Antibiotic resistance in some bacterial strains due to gamma radiation, heavy metals or food preservatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattar, Z.A.; Bashandy, A.S.

    2006-01-01

    The susceptibility of bacterial strains (B. cereus, Staph. aureus, Escherichia coli and Salmonella) against 10 different antibiotics that are commonly used against food borne pathogens was studied. All the tested strains were observed to tolerate up to 100 mg/l copper sulphate or lead acetate, and there was a positive correlations between the tolerance to high levels of Cu or Pb and multiple antibiotic resistance was investigated. When the food preservatives (potassium sorbate or sodium benzoate) were added to the growth medium at different concentrations, the bacterial strains were able to tolerate up to 1000 ppm potassium sorbate or sodium benzoate (MIC). The antibiotic resistance of these strains was increased when grown on media supplemented with the MIC of sodium sorbate or potassium benzoate. When these bacterial strains were irradiated at dose levels of 1 or 3 or 5 KGy and examined for antibiotic sensitivity, a correlation was observed between the increases of radiation dose up to 5 KGy and the antibiotic resistance in all the studied strains

  9. Identification of a genetic marker of Helicobacter pylori strains involved in gastric extranodal marginal zone B cell lymphoma of the MALT-type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehours, P; Dupouy, S; Bergey, B; Ruskoné-Foumestraux, A; Delchier, J C; Rad, R; Richy, F; Tankovic, J; Zerbib, F; Mégraud, F; Ménard, A

    2004-01-01

    Background and aims: Gastric extranodal marginal zone B cell lymphoma of the mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT)-type (MZBL) is a rare complication of Helicobacter pylori infection. Currently, no bacterial factor has been associated with the development of this disease. Our aim was to identify genes associated with lymphoma development. Methods: We used subtractive hybridisation as a tool for comparative genomics between H pylori strains isolated from a patient with gastric MZBL and from a patient with gastritis only. Results: When gastric MZBL strains were compared with gastritis strains, two open reading frames (ORFs) were significantly associated with gastric MZBL: JHP950 (74.4% v 48.7%, respectively; p = 0.023) and JHP1462 (25.6% v 2.6%, respectively; p = 0.004). The prevalence of JHP950 was 48.8% (p = 0.024) in duodenal ulcer strains and 39.3% (p = 0.006) in gastric adenocarcinoma strains, which makes this ORF a specific marker for gastric MZBL strains. In contrast, the prevalence of JHP1462 was 16% (p = 0.545) and 35.7% (p = 0.429) in duodenal ulcer and adenocarcinoma strains, respectively. These ORFs were present in reference strain J99 but not in reference strain 26695. JHP950 is located in the plasticity zone whereas the other, JHP1462, is located outside. Both encode for H pylori putative proteins with unknown functions. Conclusion: Despite its low prevalence, the ORF JHP1462 can be considered a candidate marker for H pylori strains involved in severe gastroduodenal diseases. In contrast, the ORF JHP950 has a high prevalence, and is the first candidate marker for strains giving rise to an increased risk of gastric MZBL strains. Further confirmation in other studies is needed. PMID:15194637

  10. ‘Olegusella massiliensis’ strain KHD7, a new bacterial genus isolated from the female genital tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Diop

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the main characteristics of ‘Olegusella massiliensis’ gen. nov., sp. nov., strain KHD7 (= CSUR P2268=DSM 101849, a new member of the Coriobacteriaceae family isolated from the vaginal flora of a patient with bacterial vaginosis.

  11. Identification of polymorphic tandem repeats by direct comparison of genome sequence from different bacterial strains : a web-based resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vergnaud Gilles

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphic tandem repeat typing is a new generic technology which has been proved to be very efficient for bacterial pathogens such as B. anthracis, M. tuberculosis, P. aeruginosa, L. pneumophila, Y. pestis. The previously developed tandem repeats database takes advantage of the release of genome sequence data for a growing number of bacteria to facilitate the identification of tandem repeats. The development of an assay then requires the evaluation of tandem repeat polymorphism on well-selected sets of isolates. In the case of major human pathogens, such as S. aureus, more than one strain is being sequenced, so that tandem repeats most likely to be polymorphic can now be selected in silico based on genome sequence comparison. Results In addition to the previously described general Tandem Repeats Database, we have developed a tool to automatically identify tandem repeats of a different length in the genome sequence of two (or more closely related bacterial strains. Genome comparisons are pre-computed. The results of the comparisons are parsed in a database, which can be conveniently queried over the internet according to criteria of practical value, including repeat unit length, predicted size difference, etc. Comparisons are available for 16 bacterial species, and the orthopox viruses, including the variola virus and three of its close neighbors. Conclusions We are presenting an internet-based resource to help develop and perform tandem repeats based bacterial strain typing. The tools accessible at http://minisatellites.u-psud.fr now comprise four parts. The Tandem Repeats Database enables the identification of tandem repeats across entire genomes. The Strain Comparison Page identifies tandem repeats differing between different genome sequences from the same species. The "Blast in the Tandem Repeats Database" facilitates the search for a known tandem repeat and the prediction of amplification product sizes. The "Bacterial

  12. Ciliates rapidly enhance the frequency of conjugation between Escherichia coli strains through bacterial accumulation in vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Junji; Oguri, Satoshi; Nakamura, Shinji; Hanawa, Tomoko; Fukumoto, Tatsuya; Hayashi, Yasuhiro; Kawaguchi, Kouhei; Mizutani, Yoshihiko; Yao, Takashi; Akizawa, Kouzi; Suzuki, Haruki; Simizu, Chikara; Matsuno, Kazuhiko; Kamiya, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki

    2010-10-01

    The mechanism underlying bacterial conjugation through protozoa was investigated. Kanamycin-resistant Escherichia coli SM10λ+ carrying pRT733 with TnphoA was used as donor bacteria and introduced by conjugation into ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli clinical isolate recipient bacteria. Equal amounts of donor and recipient bacteria were mixed together in the presence or absence of protozoa (ciliates, free-living amoebae, myxamoebae) in Page's amoeba saline for 24 h. Transconjugants were selected with Luria broth agar containing kanamycin and ciprofloxacin. The frequency of conjugation was estimated as the number of transconjugants for each recipient. Conjugation frequency in the presence of ciliates was estimated to be approximately 10⁻⁶, but in the absence of ciliates, or in the presence of other protozoa, it was approximately 10⁻⁸. Conjugation also occurred in culture of ciliates at least 2 h after incubation. Successful conjugation was confirmed by the polymerase chain reaction. Addition of cycloheximide or latrunculin B resulted in suppression of conjugation. Heat killing the ciliates or bacteria had no effect on conjugation frequency. Co-localization of green fluorescent protein-expressing E. coli and PKH-67-vital-stained E. coli was observed in the same ciliate vesicles, suggesting that both donor and recipient bacteria had accumulated in the same vesicle. In this study, the conjugation frequency of bacteria was found to be significantly higher in vesicles purified from ciliates than those in culture suspension. We conclude that ciliates rapidly enhance the conjugation of E. coli strains through bacterial accumulation in vesicles. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Bioremediation of PCB-contaminated shallow river sediments: The efficacy of biodegradation using individual bacterial strains and their consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváthová, Hana; Lászlová, Katarína; Dercová, Katarína

    2018-02-01

    Elimination of dangerous toxic and hydrophobic chlorinated aromatic compounds, mainly PCBs from the environment, is one of the most important aims of the environmental biotechnologies. In this work, biodegradation of an industrial mixture of PCBs (Delor 103, equivalent to Aroclor 1242) was performed using bacterial consortia composed of four bacterial strains isolated from the historically PCB-contaminated sediments and characterized as Achromobacter xylosoxidans, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Ochrobactrum anthropi and Rhodococcus ruber. The objective of this research was to determine the biodegradation ability of the individual strains and artificially prepared consortia composed of two or three bacterial strains mentioned above. Based on the growth parameters, six consortia were constructed and inoculated into the historically contaminated sediment samples collected in the efflux canal of Chemko Strážske plant - the former producer of the industrial mixtures of PCBs. The efficacy of the biotreatment, namely bioaugmentation, was evaluated by determination of ecotoxicity of treated and non-treated sediments. The most effective consortia were those containing the strain R. ruber. In the combination with A. xylosoxidans, the biodegradation of the sum of the indicator congeners was 85% and in the combination with S. maltophilia nearly 80%, with inocula applied in the ratio 1:1 in both cases. Consortium containing the strain R. ruber and S. maltophilia showed pronounced degradation of the highly chlorinated PCB congeners. Among the consortia composed of three bacterial strains, only that consisting of O. anthropi, R. ruber and A. xylosoxidans showed higher biodegradation (73%). All created consortia significally reduced the toxicity of the contaminated sediment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of bacterial strains capable of desulphurisation in soil and sediment samples from Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniek, Douglas; Figueiredo, Débora; Pylro, Victor Satler; Duarte, Gabriela Frois

    2010-09-01

    The presence of sulphur in fossil fuels and the natural environment justifies the study of sulphur-utilising bacterial species and genes involved in the biodesulphurisation process. Technology has been developed based on the natural ability of microorganisms to remove sulphur from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon chains. This biotechnology aims to minimise the emission of sulphur oxides into the atmosphere during combustion and prevent the formation of acid rain. In this study, the isolation and characterization of desulphurising microorganisms in rhizosphere and bulk soil samples from Antarctica that were either contaminated with oil or uncontaminated was described. The growth of selected isolates and their capacity to utilise sulphur based on the formation of the terminal product of desulphurisation via the 4S pathway, 2-hydroxybiphenyl, was analysed. DNA was extracted from the isolates and BOX-PCR and DNA sequencing were performed to obtain a genomic diversity profile of cultivable desulphurising bacterial species. Fifty isolates were obtained showing the ability of utilising dibenzothiophene as a substrate and sulphur source for maintenance and growth when plated on selective media. However, only seven genetically diverse isolates tested positive for sulphur removal using the Gibbs assay. DNA sequencing revealed that these isolates were related to the genera Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas.

  15. Antimicrobial activity of some plant extracts against bacterial strains causing food poisoning diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf A. Mostafa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Prevention of food spoilage and food poisoning pathogens is usually achieved by use of chemical preservatives which have negative impacts including: human health hazards of the chemical applications, chemical residues in food & feed chains and acquisition of microbial resistance to the used chemicals. Because of such concerns, the necessity to find a potentially effective, healthy safer and natural alternative preservatives is increased. Within these texts, Plant extracts have been used to control food poisoning diseases and preserve foodstuff. Antimicrobial activity of five plant extracts were investigated against Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhi using agar disc diffusion technique. Ethanolic extracts of Punica granatum, Syzygium aromaticum, Zingiber officinales and Thymus vulgaris were potentially effective with variable efficiency against the tested bacterial strains at concentration of 10 mg/ml while extract of Cuminum cyminum was only effective against S. aureus respectively. P. granatum and S. aromaticum ethanolic extracts were the most effective plant extracts and showed bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities against the highly susceptible strains of food borne pathogenic bacteria (S. aureus and P. aeruginosa with MIC's ranged from 2.5 to 5.0 mg/ml and MBC of 5.0 and 10 mg/ml except P. aeruginosa which was less sensitive and its MBC reached to 12.5 mg/ml of S. aromaticum respectively. These plant extracts which proved to be potentially effective can be used as natural alternative preventives to control food poisoning diseases and preserve food stuff avoiding healthy hazards of chemically antimicrobial agent applications.

  16. Antimicrobial activity of some plant extracts against bacterial strains causing food poisoning diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Ashraf A; Al-Askar, Abdulaziz A; Almaary, Khalid S; Dawoud, Turki M; Sholkamy, Essam N; Bakri, Marwah M

    2018-02-01

    Prevention of food spoilage and food poisoning pathogens is usually achieved by use of chemical preservatives which have negative impacts including: human health hazards of the chemical applications, chemical residues in food & feed chains and acquisition of microbial resistance to the used chemicals. Because of such concerns, the necessity to find a potentially effective, healthy safer and natural alternative preservatives is increased. Within these texts, Plant extracts have been used to control food poisoning diseases and preserve foodstuff. Antimicrobial activity of five plant extracts were investigated against Bacillus cereus , Staphylococcus aureus , Escherichia coli , Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhi using agar disc diffusion technique. Ethanolic extracts of Punica granatum, Syzygium aromaticum , Zingiber officinales and Thymus vulgaris were potentially effective with variable efficiency against the tested bacterial strains at concentration of 10 mg/ml while extract of Cuminum cyminum was only effective against S. aureus respectively. P. granatum and S. aromaticum ethanolic extracts were the most effective plant extracts and showed bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities against the highly susceptible strains of food borne pathogenic bacteria ( S. aureus and P. aeruginosa ) with MIC's ranged from 2.5 to 5.0 mg/ml and MBC of 5.0 and 10 mg/ml except P . aeruginosa which was less sensitive and its MBC reached to 12.5 mg/ml of S. aromaticum respectively. These plant extracts which proved to be potentially effective can be used as natural alternative preventives to control food poisoning diseases and preserve food stuff avoiding healthy hazards of chemically antimicrobial agent applications.

  17. Resistance and inactivation kinetics of bacterial strains isolated from the non-chlorinated and chlorinated effluents of a WWTP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Hernández, Sylvia; Vázquez-Rodríguez, Gabriela A; Beltrán-Hernández, Rosa I; Prieto-García, Francisco; Miranda-López, José M; Franco-Abuín, Carlos M; Álvarez-Hernández, Alejandro; Iturbe, Ulises; Coronel-Olivares, Claudia

    2013-08-06

    The microbiological quality of water from a wastewater treatment plant that uses sodium hypochlorite as a disinfectant was assessed. Mesophilic aerobic bacteria were not removed efficiently. This fact allowed for the isolation of several bacterial strains from the effluents. Molecular identification indicated that the strains were related to Aeromonas hydrophila, Escherichia coli (three strains), Enterobacter cloacae, Kluyvera cryocrescens (three strains), Kluyvera intermedia, Citrobacter freundii (two strains), Bacillus sp. and Enterobacter sp. The first five strains, which were isolated from the non-chlorinated effluent, were used to test resistance to chlorine disinfection using three sets of variables: disinfectant concentration (8, 20 and 30 mg·L(-1)), contact time (0, 15 and 30 min) and water temperature (20, 25 and 30 °C). The results demonstrated that the strains have independent responses to experimental conditions and that the most efficient treatment was an 8 mg·L(-1) dose of disinfectant at a temperature of 20 °C for 30 min. The other eight strains, which were isolated from the chlorinated effluent, were used to analyze inactivation kinetics using the disinfectant at a dose of 15 mg·L(-1) with various retention times (0, 10, 20, 30, 60 and 90 min). The results indicated that during the inactivation process, there was no relationship between removal percentage and retention time and that the strains have no common response to the treatments.

  18. Resistance and Inactivation Kinetics of Bacterial Strains Isolated from the Non-Chlorinated and Chlorinated Effluents of a WWTP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Coronel-Olivares

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The microbiological quality of water from a wastewater treatment plant that uses sodium hypochlorite as a disinfectant was assessed. Mesophilic aerobic bacteria were not removed efficiently. This fact allowed for the isolation of several bacterial strains from the effluents. Molecular identification indicated that the strains were related to Aeromonas hydrophila, Escherichia coli (three strains, Enterobacter cloacae, Kluyvera cryocrescens (three strains, Kluyvera intermedia, Citrobacter freundii (two strains, Bacillus sp. and Enterobacter sp. The first five strains, which were isolated from the non-chlorinated effluent, were used to test resistance to chlorine disinfection using three sets of variables: disinfectant concentration (8, 20 and 30 mg·L−1, contact time (0, 15 and 30 min and water temperature (20, 25 and 30 °C. The results demonstrated that the strains have independent responses to experimental conditions and that the most efficient treatment was an 8 mg·L−1 dose of disinfectant at a temperature of 20 °C for 30 min. The other eight strains, which were isolated from the chlorinated effluent, were used to analyze inactivation kinetics using the disinfectant at a dose of 15 mg·L−1 with various retention times (0, 10, 20, 30, 60 and 90 min. The results indicated that during the inactivation process, there was no relationship between removal percentage and retention time and that the strains have no common response to the treatments.

  19. Plant domestication and the assembly of bacterial and fungal communities associated with strains of the common sunflower, Helianthus annuus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, Jonathan W; Lynch, Ryan C; Kane, Nolan C; Fierer, Noah

    2017-04-01

    Root and rhizosphere microbial communities can affect plant health, but it remains undetermined how plant domestication may influence these bacterial and fungal communities. We grew 33 sunflower (Helianthus annuus) strains (n = 5) that varied in their extent of domestication and assessed rhizosphere and root endosphere bacterial and fungal communities. We also assessed fungal communities in the sunflower seeds to investigate the degree to which root and rhizosphere communities were influenced by vertical transmission of the microbiome through seeds. Neither root nor rhizosphere bacterial communities were affected by the extent of sunflower domestication, but domestication did affect the composition of rhizosphere fungal communities. In particular, more modern sunflower strains had lower relative abundances of putative fungal pathogens. Seed-associated fungal communities strongly differed across strains, but several lines of evidence suggest that there is minimal vertical transmission of fungi from seeds to the adult plants. Our results indicate that plant-associated fungal communities are more strongly influenced by host genetic factors and plant breeding than bacterial communities, a finding that could influence strategies for optimizing microbial communities to improve crop yields. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Application of two bacterial strains for wastewater bioremediation and assessment of phenolics biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paisio, Cintia E; Quevedo, María R; Talano, Melina A; González, Paola S; Agostini, Elizabeth

    2014-08-01

    The use of native bacteria is a useful strategy to decontaminate industrial effluents. In this work, two bacterial strains isolated from polluted environments constitutes a promising alternative since they were able to remove several phenolic compounds not only from synthetic solutions but also from effluents derived from a chemical industry and a tannery which are complex matrices. Acinetobacter sp. RTE 1.4 showed ability to completely remove 2-methoxyphenol (1000 mg/L) while Rhodococcus sp. CS 1 not only degrade the same concentration of this compound but also removed 4- chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol with high efficiency. Moreover, both bacteria degraded phenols naturally present or even exogenously added at high concentrations in effluents from the chemical industry and a tannery in short time (up to 5 d). In addition, a significant reduction of biological oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand values was achieved after 7 d of treatment for both effluents using Acinetobacter sp. RTE 1.4 and Rhodococcus sp. CS1, respectively. These results showed that Acinetobacter sp. RTE1.4 and Rhodococcus sp. CS 1 might be considered as useful biotechnological tools for an efficient treatment of different effluents, since they showed wide versatility to detoxify these complex matrices, even supplemented with high phenol concentrations.

  1. Biodegradation of hexavalent chromium (Cr+6) in wastewater using Pseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp. bacterial strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qasim, Muhammad [Department of Chemical Engineering, American University of Sharjah (United Arab Emirates)

    2013-07-01

    The recovery of toxic metal compounds is a deep concern in all industries. Hexavalent chromium is particularly worrying because of its toxic influence on human health. In this paper, biodegradation of hexavalent chromium (Cr+6) present in wastewater has been studied using two different bacterial strains; Pseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp. A chemostat (with and without recycle of cells) with 10 L liquid culture volume was used to study the substrate and the biomass cell concentrations with time. Also, the degree of substrate conversion was studied by the varying the dilution rate as an independent parameter. The dilution rate (ratio of feed flow rate to the culture volume) was varied by varying the feed volumetric rate from 110-170 mL/h for inlet hexavalent chromium concentrations of 70 mg/dm3. The results show that a chemostat with recycle gives a better performance in terms of substrate conversion than a chemostat without a recycle. Moreover, the degree of substrate conversion decreases as the dilution rate is increased. Also, Bacillus sp. was found to give higher conversions compared to pseudomonas sp.

  2. Metabolic pathways of Pseudomonas aeruginosa involved in competition with respiratory bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie eBeaume

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic airway infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa considerably contributes to lung tissue destruction and impairment of pulmonary function in cystic-fibrosis (CF patients. Complex interplays between P. aeruginosa and other co-colonizing pathogens including Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia spp and Klebsiella pneumoniae may be crucial for pathogenesis and disease progression.Methods: We generated a library of PA14 transposon insertion mutants to identify P. aeruginosa genes required for exploitative and direct competitions with S. aureus, B. cenocepacia, and K. pneumoniae. Results: Whereas wild type PA14 inhibited S. aureus growth, two transposon insertions located in pqsC and carB, resulted in reduced growth inhibition. PqsC is involved in the synthesis of 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolines (HAQs, a family of molecules having antibacterial properties, while carB is a key gene in pyrimidine biosynthesis. The carB mutant was also unable to grow in the presence of B. cepacia and K. pneumoniae but not E. coli and S. epidermidis. We further identified a transposon insertion in purF, encoding a key enzyme of purine metabolism. This mutant displayed a severe growth deficiency in the presence of Gram-negative but not of Gram-positive bacteria. We identified a beneficial interaction in a bioA transposon mutant, unable to grow on rich medium. This growth defect could be restored either by addition of biotin or by co-culturing the mutant in the presence of K. pneumoniae or E. coli.Conclusions: Complex interactions take place between the various bacterial species colonizing CF-lungs. This work identified both detrimental and beneficial interactions occurring between P. aeruginosa and three other respiratory pathogens involving several major metabolic pathways. Manipulating these pathways could be used to interfere with bacterial interactions and influence the colonization by respiratory pathogens.

  3. Isolation of genes involved in biofilm formation of a Klebsiella pneumoniae strain causing pyogenic liver abscess.

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    Meng-Chuan Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Community-acquired pyogenic liver abscess (PLA complicated with meningitis and endophthalmitis caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae is an emerging infectious disease. To investigate the mechanisms and effects of biofilm formation of K. pneumoniae causing PLA, microtiter plate assays were used to determine the levels of biofilm formed by K. pneumoniae clinical isolates and to screen for biofilm-altered mutants from a transposon mutant library of a K. pneumoniae PLA-associated strain. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The biofilm formation of K. pneumoniae was examined by microtiter plate assay. Higher levels of biofilm formation were demonstrated by K. pneumoniae strains associated with PLA. A total of 23 biofilm-decreased mutants and 4 biofilm-increased mutants were identified. Among these mutants, a biofilm-decreased treC mutant displayed less mucoviscosity and produced less capsular polysaccharide (CPS, whereas a biofilm-increased sugE mutant displayed higher mucoviscosity and produced more CPS. The biofilm phenotypes of treC and sugE mutants also were confirmed by glass slide culture. Deletion of treC, which encodes trehalose-6-phosphate hydrolase, impaired bacterial trehalose utilization. Addition of glucose to the culture medium restored the capsule production and biofilm formation in the treC mutant. Transcriptional profile analysis suggested that the increase of CPS production in ΔsugE may reflect elevated cps gene expression (upregulated through rmpA in combination with increased treC expression. In vivo competition assays demonstrated that the treC mutant strain was attenuated in competitiveness during intragastric infection in mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Genes important for biofilm formation by K. pneumoniae PLA strain were identified using an in vitro assay. Among the identified genes, treC and sugE affect biofilm formation by modulating CPS production. The importance of treC in gastrointestinal tract colonization suggests

  4. Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacterial and Archaeal Type Strains, Phase III: the genomes of soil and plant-associated and newly described type strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, William B; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Zhou, Yuguang; Lilburn, Timothy G; Beck, Brian J; De Vos, Paul; Vandamme, Peter; Eisen, Jonathan A; Garrity, George; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2015-01-01

    The Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA) project was launched by the JGI in 2007 as a pilot project to sequence about 250 bacterial and archaeal genomes of elevated phylogenetic diversity. Herein, we propose to extend this approach to type strains of prokaryotes associated with soil or plants and their close relatives as well as type strains from newly described species. Understanding the microbiology of soil and plants is critical to many DOE mission areas, such as biofuel production from biomass, biogeochemistry, and carbon cycling. We are also targeting type strains of novel species while they are being described. Since 2006, about 630 new species have been described per year, many of which are closely aligned to DOE areas of interest in soil, agriculture, degradation of pollutants, biofuel production, biogeochemical transformation, and biodiversity.

  5. An Inducible Operon Is Involved in Inulin Utilization in Lactobacillus plantarum Strains, as Revealed by Comparative Proteogenomics and Metabolic Profiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buntin, Nirunya; Hongpattarakere, Tipparat; Ritari, Jarmo; Shetty, S.; Vos, de W.M.

    2016-01-01

    The draft genomes of Lactobacillus plantarum strains isolated from Asian fermented foods, infant feces, and shrimp intestines were sequenced and compared to those of well-studied strains. Among 28 strains of L. plantarum, variations in the genomic features involved in ecological adaptation were

  6. Enzymes Involved in the Aerobic Bacterial Degradation of N-Heteroaromatic Compounds: Molybdenum Hydroxylases and Ring-Opening 2,4-Dioxygenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetzner, S.

    Many N-heteroaromatic compounds are utilized by micro-organisms as a source of carbon (and nitrogen) and energy. The aerobic bacterial degradation of these growth substrates frequently involves several hydroxylation steps and subsequent dioxygenolytic cleavage of (di)hydroxy-substituted heteroaromatic intermediates to aliphatic metabolites which finally are channeled into central metabolic pathways. As a rule, the initial bacterial hydroxylation of a N-heteroaromatic compound is catalyzed by a molybdenum hydroxylase, which uses a water molecule as source of the incorporated oxygen. The enzyme's redox-active centers - the active site molybdenum ion coordinated to a distinct pyranopterin cofactor, two different [2Fe2S] centers, and in most cases, flavin adenine dinucleotide - transfer electrons from the N-heterocyclic substrate to an electron acceptor, which for many molybdenum hydroxylases is still unknown. Ring-opening 2,4-dioxygenases involved in the bacterial degradation of quinaldine and 1H-4-oxoquinoline catalyze the cleavage of two carbon-carbon bonds with concomitant formation of carbon monoxide. Since they contain neither a metal center nor an organic cofactor, and since they do not show any sequence similarity to known oxygenases, these unique dioxygenases form a separate enzyme family. Quite surprisingly, however, they appear to be structurally and mechanistically related to enzymes of the α/β hydrolase fold superfamily. Microbial enzymes are a great resource for biotechnological applications. Microbial strains or their enzymes may be used for degradative (bioremediation) or synthetic (biotransformation) purposes. Modern bioremediation or biotransformation strategies may even involve microbial catalysts or strains designed by protein engineering or pathway engineering. Prerequisite for developing such modern tools of biotechnology is a comprehensive understanding of microbial metabolic pathways, of the structure and function of enzymes, and of the

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup A Strain NMA510612, Isolated from a Patient with Bacterial Meningitis in China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yan; Yang, Jian; Xu, Li; Zhu, Yafang; Liu, Bo; Shao, Zhujun; Zhang, Xiaobing; Jin, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Serogroup A meningococcal strains have been involved in several pandemics and a series of epidemics worldwide in the past. Determination of the genome sequence of the prevalent genotype strain will help us understand the genetic background of the evolutionary and epidemiological properties of these bacteria. We sequenced the complete genome of Neisseria meningitidis NMA510612, a clinical isolate from a patient with meningococcal meningitis.

  8. Strains of bacterial species induce a greatly varied acute adaptive immune response: The contribution of the accessory genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela, Uri; Euler, Chad W; Correa da Rosa, Joel; Fischetti, Vincent A

    2018-01-01

    A fundamental question in human susceptibility to bacterial infections is to what extent variability is a function of differences in the pathogen species or in individual humans. To focus on the pathogen species, we compared in the same individual the human adaptive T and B cell immune response to multiple strains of two major human pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. We found wide variability in the acute adaptive immune response induced by various strains of a species, with a unique combination of activation within the two arms of the adaptive response. Further, this was also accompanied by a dramatic difference in the intensity of the specific protective T helper (Th) response. Importantly, the same immune response differences induced by the individual strains were maintained across multiple healthy human donors. A comparison of isogenic phage KO strains, demonstrated that of the pangenome, prophages were the major contributor to inter-strain immune heterogeneity, as the T cell response to the remaining "core genome" was noticeably blunted. Therefore, these findings extend and modify the notion of an adaptive response to a pathogenic bacterium, by implying that the adaptive immune response signature of a bacterial species should be defined either per strain or alternatively to the species' 'core genome', common to all of its strains. Further, our results demonstrate that the acquired immune response variation is as wide among different strains within a single pathogenic species as it is among different humans, and therefore may explain in part the clinical heterogeneity observed in patients infected with the same species.

  9. Strains of bacterial species induce a greatly varied acute adaptive immune response: The contribution of the accessory genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uri Sela

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental question in human susceptibility to bacterial infections is to what extent variability is a function of differences in the pathogen species or in individual humans. To focus on the pathogen species, we compared in the same individual the human adaptive T and B cell immune response to multiple strains of two major human pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. We found wide variability in the acute adaptive immune response induced by various strains of a species, with a unique combination of activation within the two arms of the adaptive response. Further, this was also accompanied by a dramatic difference in the intensity of the specific protective T helper (Th response. Importantly, the same immune response differences induced by the individual strains were maintained across multiple healthy human donors. A comparison of isogenic phage KO strains, demonstrated that of the pangenome, prophages were the major contributor to inter-strain immune heterogeneity, as the T cell response to the remaining "core genome" was noticeably blunted. Therefore, these findings extend and modify the notion of an adaptive response to a pathogenic bacterium, by implying that the adaptive immune response signature of a bacterial species should be defined either per strain or alternatively to the species' 'core genome', common to all of its strains. Further, our results demonstrate that the acquired immune response variation is as wide among different strains within a single pathogenic species as it is among different humans, and therefore may explain in part the clinical heterogeneity observed in patients infected with the same species.

  10. Determination of dehydrogenase activities involved in D-glucose oxidation in Gluconobacter and Acetobacter strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencia Sainz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Acetic acid bacteria (AAB are known for rapid and incomplete oxidation of an extensively variety of alcohols and carbohydrates, resulting in the accumulation of organic acids as the final products. These oxidative fermentations in AAB are catalyzed by PQQ- or FAD- dependent membrane bound dehydrogenases. In the present study, the enzyme activity of the membrane bound dehydrogenases (membrane-bound PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase (mGDH, D-gluconate dehydrogenase (GADH and membrane-bound glycerol dehydrogenase (GLDH involved in the oxidation of D-glucose and D-gluconic acid (GA was determined in six strains of three different species of AAB (three natural and three type strains. Moreover, the effect of these activities on the production of related metabolites (GA, 2-keto-D-gluconic acid (2KGA and 5-keto-D-gluconic acid (5KGA was analyzed. The natural strains belonging to Gluconobacter showed a high mGDH activity and low activity in GADH and GLDH, whereas the A. malorum strain presented low activity in the three enzymes. Nevertheless, no correlation was observed between the activity of these enzymes and the concentration of the corresponding metabolites. In fact, all the tested strains were able to oxidize D-glucose to GA, being maximal at the late exponential phase of the AAB growth (24 h, which coincided with glucose exhaustion and the maximum mGDH activity. Instead, only some of the tested strains were capable of producing 2KGA and/or 5KGA. In the case of G. oxydans strains, no 2KGA production was detected which is related to the absence of GADH activity after 24 h, while in the remaining strains, detection of GADH activity after 24h resulted in a high accumulation of 2KGA. Therefore, it is possible to choose the best strain depending on the desired product composition.Moreover, the sequences of these genes were used to construct phylogenetic trees. According to the sequence of gcd, gene coding for mGDH, Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter were

  11. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel aryldiketo acids with enhanced antibacterial activity against multidrug resistant bacterial strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvijetić, Ilija N; Verbić, Tatjana Ž; Ernesto de Resende, Pedro; Stapleton, Paul; Gibbons, Simon; Juranić, Ivan O; Drakulić, Branko J; Zloh, Mire

    2018-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a major health problem worldwide, because of ability of bacteria, fungi and viruses to evade known therapeutic agents used in treatment of infections. Aryldiketo acids (ADK) have shown antimicrobial activity against several resistant strains including Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. Our previous studies revealed that ADK analogues having bulky alkyl group in ortho position on a phenyl ring have up to ten times better activity than norfloxacin against the same strains. Rational modifications of analogues by introduction of hydrophobic substituents on the aromatic ring has led to more than tenfold increase in antibacterial activity against multidrug resistant Gram positive strains. To elucidate a potential mechanism of action for this potentially novel class of antimicrobials, several bacterial enzymes were identified as putative targets according to literature data and pharmacophoric similarity searches for potent ADK analogues. Among the seven bacterial targets chosen, the strongest favorable binding interactions were observed between most active analogue and S. aureus dehydrosqualene synthase and DNA gyrase. Furthermore, the docking results in combination with literature data suggest that these novel molecules could also target several other bacterial enzymes, including prenyl-transferases and methionine aminopeptidase. These results and our statistically significant 3D QSAR model could be used to guide the further design of more potent derivatives as well as in virtual screening for novel antibacterial agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. In vitro antibacterial activity of venom protein isolated from sea snake Enhydrina schistosa against drugresistant human pathogenic bacterial strains

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    Palani Damotharan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antibacterial activity of sea snake (Enhydrina schistosa venom protein against drug-resistant human pathogenic bacterial strains. Methods: The venom was collected by milking process from the live specimens of sea snake are using capillary tubes or glass plates. Venom was purified by ion exchange chromatography and it was tested for in-vitro antibacterial activity against 10 drug-resistant human pathogenic bacterial strains using the standard disc diffusion method. Results: The notable antibacterial activity was observed at 150 µg/mL concentration of purified venom and gave its minimum inhibitory concentrations values exhibited between 200-100 µg/mL against all the tested bacterial strains. The maximum zone of inhibition was observed at 16.4 mm against Salmonella boydii and the minimum activity was observed at 7.5 mm against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. After the sodium-dodecyl-sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis there were a clear single band was detected in the gel that corresponding to purified venom protein molecular weight of 44 kDa. Conclusions: These results suggested that the sea snake venom might be a feasible source for searching potential antibiotics agents against human pathogenic diseases.

  13. Frequent major errors in antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bacterial strains distributed under the Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Quality Assurance Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, R

    2012-07-01

    The Quality Assurance Program (QAP) of the Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) was a proficiency testing system developed to service the laboratory animal discipline. The QAP comprised the distribution of bacterial strains from various species of animals for identification to species level and antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST). Identification capabilities were below acceptable standards. This study evaluated AST results using the DKFZ compilations of test results for all bacterial strains showing the number of participants reporting the strain as resistant (R), sensitive (S) or intermediate susceptible (I) to each antibiotic substance used. Due to lack of information about methods used, it was assumed that what the majority of the participants reported (R or S) was the correct test result and that an opposite result was a major error (ME). MEs occurred in 1375 of 14,258 (9.7%) of test results and ME% ranged from 0% to 23.2% per bacterial group-agent group combination. Considerable variation in MEs was found within groups of bacteria and within groups of agents. In addition to poor performance in proper species classification, the quality of AST in laboratory animal diagnostic laboratories seems far below standards considered acceptable in human diagnostic microbiology.

  14. Use of plant growth promoting bacterial strains to improve Cytisus striatus and Lupinus luteus development for potential application in phytoremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balseiro-Romero, María; Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Kidd, Petra S; Van Hamme, Jonathan; Weyens, Nele; Monterroso, Carmen; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2017-03-01

    Plant growth promoting (PGP) bacterial strains possess different mechanisms to improve plant development under common environmental stresses, and are therefore often used as inoculants in soil phytoremediation processes. The aims of the present work were to study the effects of a collection of plant growth promoting bacterial strains on plant development, antioxidant enzyme activities and nutritional status of Cytisus striatus and/or Lupinus luteus plants a) growing in perlite under non-stress conditions and b) growing in diesel-contaminated soil. For this, two greenhouse experiments were designed. Firstly, C. striatus and L. luteus plants were grown from seeds in perlite, and periodically inoculated with 6 PGP strains, either individually or in pairs. Secondly, L. luteus seedlings were grown in soil samples of the A and B horizons of a Cambisol contaminated with 1.25% (w/w) of diesel and inoculated with best PGP inoculant selected from the first experiment. The results indicated that the PGP strains tested in perlite significantly improved plant growth. Combination treatments provoked better growth of L. luteus than the respective individual strains, while individual inoculation treatments were more effective for C. striatus. L. luteus growth in diesel-contaminated soil was significantly improved in the presence of PGP strains, presenting a 2-fold or higher increase in plant biomass. Inoculants did not provoke significant changes in plant nutritional status, with the exception of a subset of siderophore-producing and P-solubilising bacterial strains that resulted in significantly modification of Fe or P concentrations in leaf tissues. Inoculants did not cause significant changes in enzyme activities in perlite experiments, however they significantly reduced oxidative stress in contaminated soils suggesting an improvement in plant tolerance to diesel. Some strains were applied to non-host plants, indicating a non-specific performance of their plant growth promotion

  15. The strains recommended for use in the bacterial reverse mutation test (OECD guideline 471) can be certified as non-genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Kei-Ichi; Yamada, Masami; Awogi, Takumi; Hakura, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial reverse mutation test, commonly called Ames test, is used worldwide. In Japan, the genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are regulated under the Cartagena Domestic Law, and organisms obtained by self-cloning and/or natural occurrence would be exempted from the law case by case. The strains of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli recommended for use in the bacterial reverse mutation test (OECD guideline 471), have been considered as non-GMOs because they can be constructed by self-cloning or naturally occurring bacterial strains, or do not disturb the biological diversity. The present article explains the reasons why these tester strains should be classified as non-GMOs.

  16. Implications of Genome-Based Discrimination between Clostridium botulinum Group I and Clostridium sporogenes Strains for Bacterial Taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigand, Michael R; Pena-Gonzalez, Angela; Shirey, Timothy B; Broeker, Robin G; Ishaq, Maliha K; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T; Raphael, Brian H

    2015-08-15

    Taxonomic classification of Clostridium botulinum is based on the production of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), while closely related, nontoxic organisms are classified as Clostridium sporogenes. However, this taxonomic organization does not accurately mirror phylogenetic relationships between these species. A phylogenetic reconstruction using 2,016 orthologous genes shared among strains of C. botulinum group I and C. sporogenes clearly separated these two species into discrete clades which showed ∼93% average nucleotide identity (ANI) between them. Clustering of strains based on the presence of variable orthologs revealed 143 C. sporogenes clade-specific genetic signatures, a subset of which were further evaluated for their ability to correctly classify a panel of presumptive C. sporogenes strains by PCR. Genome sequencing of several C. sporogenes strains lacking these signatures confirmed that they clustered with C. botulinum strains in a core genome phylogenetic tree. Our analysis also identified C. botulinum strains that contained C. sporogenes clade-specific signatures and phylogenetically clustered with C. sporogenes strains. The genome sequences of two bont/B2-containing strains belonging to the C. sporogenes clade contained regions with similarity to a bont-bearing plasmid (pCLD), while two different strains belonging to the C. botulinum clade carried bont/B2 on the chromosome. These results indicate that bont/B2 was likely acquired by C. sporogenes strains through horizontal gene transfer. The genome-based classification of these species used to identify candidate genes for the development of rapid assays for molecular identification may be applicable to additional bacterial species that are challenging with respect to their classification. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Propagation of an Aβ Dodecamer Strain Involves a Three-Step Mechanism and a Key Intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Dexter N; Rana, Pratip; Campbell, Ryan P; Ghosh, Preetam; Rangachari, Vijayaraghavan

    2018-02-06

    Proteinaceous deposits composed of fibrillar amyloid-β (Aβ) are the primary neuropathological hallmarks in Alzheimer disease (AD) brains. The nucleation-dependent aggregation of Aβ is a stochastic process with frequently observed heterogeneity in aggregate size, structure, and conformation that manifests in fibril polymorphism. Emerging evidence indicates that polymorphic variations in Aβ fibrils contribute to phenotypic diversity and the rate of disease progression in AD. We recently demonstrated that a dodecamer strain derived from synthetic Aβ42 propagates to morphologically distinct fibrils and selectively induces cerebral amyloid angiopathy phenotype in transgenic mice. This report supports the growing contention that stable oligomer strains can influence phenotypic outcomes by faithful propagation of their structures. Although we determined the mechanism of dodecamer propagation on a mesoscopic scale, the molecular details of the microscopic reactions remained unknown. Here, we have dissected and evaluated individually the kinetics of macroscopic phases in aggregation to gain insight into the process of strain propagation. The bulk rates determined experimentally in each phase were used to build an ensemble kinetic simulation model, which confirmed our observation that dodecamer seeds initially grow by monomer addition toward the formation of a key intermediate. This is followed by conversion of the intermediate to fibrils by oligomer elongation and association mechanisms. Overall, this report reveals important insights into the molecular details of oligomer strain propagation involved in AD pathology. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Sustained involvement in youth sports activities predicts reduced chronic job strain in early midlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X; Telama, R; Hirvensalo, M; Hintsanen, M; Hintsa, T; Pulkki-Råback, L; Mansikkaniemi, K; Viikari, J S A; Keltikangas-Järvinen, L; Raitakari, O T

    2010-12-01

    We examined the long-term effects of youth leisure time physical activity (LTPA) and sports participation on the prevalence of chronic work stress in adulthood. Participants (326 men and 338 women) aged 9 to 18 years were initially enrolled in 1980 and followed until 2007. Data were collected using questionnaires and bicycle ergometry in a subgroup. High youth LTPA and sports participation predicted lower chronic job strain in both sexes. The association was mediated by type A leadership. Participation and persistence in organized youth sports followed a similar pattern. In the subgroup, adult physical fitness only partly accounted for the association. Sustained involvement in youth physical activity and sport lasting at least 3 years is associated with reduced chronic job strain in adulthood. The association was partially explained by type A leadership and physical fitness.

  19. Functional and Evolutionary Characterization of a UDP-Xylose Synthase Gene from the Plant Pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, Involved in the Synthesis of Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alencar, Valquíria Campos; Jabes, Daniela Leite; Menegidio, Fabiano Bezerra; Sassaki, Guilherme Lanzi; de Souza, Lucas Rodrigo; Puzer, Luciano; Meneghetti, Maria Cecília Zorél; Lima, Marcelo Andrade; Tersariol, Ivarne Luis Dos Santos; de Oliveira, Regina Costa; Nunes, Luiz R

    2017-02-07

    Xylella fastidiosa is a plant-infecting bacillus, responsible for many important crop diseases, such as Pierce's disease of vineyards, citrus variegated chlorosis, and coffee leaf scorch (CLS), among others. Recent genomic comparisons involving two CLS-related strains, belonging to X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca, revealed that one of them carries a frameshift mutation that inactivates a gene encoding an oxidoreductase of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily, which may play important roles in determining structural variations in bacterial glycans and glycoconjugates. However, the exact nature of this SDR has been a matter of controversy, as different annotations of X. fastidiosa genomes have implicated it in distinct reactions. To confirm the nature of this mutated SDR, a comparative analysis was initially performed, suggesting that it belongs to a subgroup of SDR decarboxylases, representing a UDP-xylose synthase (Uxs). Functional assays, using a recombinant derivative of this enzyme, confirmed its nature as XfUxs, and carbohydrate composition analyses, performed with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules obtained from different strains, indicate that inactivation of the X. fastidiosa uxs gene affects the LPS structure among CLS-related X. fastidiosa strains. Finally, a comparative sequence analysis suggests that this mutation is likely to result in a morphological and evolutionary hallmark that differentiates two subgroups of CLS-related strains, which may influence interactions between these bacteria and their plant and/or insect hosts.

  20. Role of the Genes of Type VI Secretion System in Virulence of Rice Bacterial Brown Stripe Pathogen Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae Strain RS-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Mahidul Islam Masum

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Type VI secretion system (T6SS is a class of macromolecular machine that is required for the virulence of gram-negative bacteria. However, it is still not clear what the role of T6SS in the virulence of rice bacterial brown stripe pathogen Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae (Aaa is. The aim of the current study was to investigate the contribution of T6SS in Aaa strain RS2 virulence using insertional deletion mutation and complementation approaches. This strain produced weak virulence but contains a complete T6SS gene cluster based on a genome-wide analysis. Here we compared the virulence-related phenotypes between the wild-type (RS-2 and 25 T6SS mutants, which were constructed using homologous recombination methods. The mutation of 15 T6SS genes significantly reduced bacterial virulence and the secretion of Hcp protein. Additionally, the complemented 7 mutations ΔpppA, ΔclpB, Δhcp, ΔdotU, ΔicmF, ΔimpJ, and ΔimpM caused similar virulence characteristics as RS-2. Moreover, the mutant ΔpppA, ΔclpB, ΔicmF, ΔimpJ and ΔimpM genes caused by a 38.3~56.4% reduction in biofilm formation while the mutants ΔpppA, ΔclpB, ΔicmF and Δhcp resulted in a 37.5~44.6% reduction in motility. All together, these results demonstrate that T6SS play vital roles in the virulence of strain RS-2, which may be partially attributed to the reductions in Hcp secretion, biofilm formation and motility. However, differences in virulence between strain RS-1 and RS-2 suggest that other factors may also be involved in the virulence of Aaa.

  1. Role of the Genes of Type VI Secretion System in Virulence of Rice Bacterial Brown Stripe Pathogen Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae Strain RS-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masum, Md Mahidul Islam; Yang, Yingzi; Li, Bin; Olaitan, Ogunyemi Solabomi; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Yang; Fang, Yushi; Qiu, Wen; Wang, Yanli; Sun, Guochang

    2017-09-21

    The Type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a class of macromolecular machine that is required for the virulence of gram-negative bacteria. However, it is still not clear what the role of T6SS in the virulence of rice bacterial brown stripe pathogen Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae (Aaa) is. The aim of the current study was to investigate the contribution of T6SS in Aaa strain RS2 virulence using insertional deletion mutation and complementation approaches. This strain produced weak virulence but contains a complete T6SS gene cluster based on a genome-wide analysis. Here we compared the virulence-related phenotypes between the wild-type (RS-2) and 25 T6SS mutants, which were constructed using homologous recombination methods. The mutation of 15 T6SS genes significantly reduced bacterial virulence and the secretion of Hcp protein. Additionally, the complemented 7 mutations Δ pppA , Δ clpB , Δ hcp , Δ dotU , Δ icmF , Δ impJ , and Δ impM caused similar virulence characteristics as RS-2. Moreover, the mutant Δ pppA , Δ clpB , Δ icmF , Δ impJ and Δ impM genes caused by a 38.3~56.4% reduction in biofilm formation while the mutants Δ pppA , Δ clpB , Δ icmF and Δ hcp resulted in a 37.5~44.6% reduction in motility. All together, these results demonstrate that T6SS play vital roles in the virulence of strain RS-2, which may be partially attributed to the reductions in Hcp secretion, biofilm formation and motility. However, differences in virulence between strain RS-1 and RS-2 suggest that other factors may also be involved in the virulence of Aaa.

  2. Genes involved in alkane degradation in the Alcanivorax hongdengensis strain A-11-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wanpeng [State Oceanic Administration, Xiamen (China). Key Lab. of Marine Biogenetic Resources; Xiamen Univ. (China). School of Life Sciences; Shao, Zongze [State Oceanic Administration, Xiamen (China). Key Lab. of Marine Biogenetic Resources

    2012-04-15

    Alcanivorax hongdengensis A-11-3 is a newly identified type strain isolated from the surface water of the Malacca and Singapore Straits that can degrade a wide range of alkanes. To understand the degradation mechanism of this strain, the genes encoding alkane hydroxylases were obtained by PCR screening and shotgun sequencing of a genomic fosmid library. Six genes involved in alkane degradation were found, including alkB1, alkB2, p450-1, p450-2, p450-3 and almA. Heterogeneous expression analysis confirmed their functions as alkane oxidases in Pseudomonas putida GPo12 (pGEc47{delta}B) or Pseudomonas fluorescens KOB2{delta}1. Q-PCR revealed that the transcription of alkB1 and alkB2 was enhanced in the presence of n-alkanes C{sub 12} to C{sub 24}; three p450 genes were up-regulated by C{sub 8}-C{sub 16} n-alkanes at different levels, whereas enhanced expression of almA was observed when strain A-11-3 grew with long-chain alkanes (C{sub 24} to C{sub 36}). In the case of branched alkanes, pristane significantly enhanced the expression of alkB1, p450-3 and almA. The six genes enable strain A-11-3 to degrade short (C{sub 8}) to long (C{sub 36}) alkanes that are straight or branched. The ability of A. hongdengensis A-11-3 to thrive in oil-polluted marine environments may be due to this strain's multiple systems for alkane degradation and its range of substrates. (orig.)

  3. Antibiotic Resistance and Virulence Phenotypes of Recent Bacterial Strains Isolated from Urinary Tract Infections in Elderly Patients with Prostatic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcaru, Cristina; Podgoreanu, Paulina; Alexandru, Ionela; Popescu, Nela; Măruţescu, Luminiţa; Bleotu, Coralia; Mogoşanu, George Dan; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Gluck, Marinela; Lazăr, Veronica

    2017-05-31

    Acute bacterial prostatitis is one of the frequent complications of urinary tract infection (UTI). From the approximately 10% of men having prostatitis, 7% experience a bacterial prostatitis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of uropathogens associated with UTIs in older patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and to assess their susceptibility to commonly prescribed antibiotics as well as the relationships between microbial virulence and resistance features. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli was found to be the most frequent bacterial strain isolated from patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia, followed by Enterococcus spp., Enterobacter spp., Klebsiella spp., Proteus spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa , and Serratia marcescens . Increased resistance rates to tetracyclines, quinolones, and sulfonamides were registered. Besides their resistance profiles, the uropathogenic isolates produced various virulence factors with possible implications in the pathogenesis process. The great majority of the uropathogenic isolates revealed a high capacity to adhere to HEp-2 cell monolayer in vitro, mostly exhibiting a localized adherence pattern. Differences in the repertoire of soluble virulence factors that can affect bacterial growth and persistence within the urinary tract were detected. The Gram-negative strains produced pore-forming toxins-such as hemolysins, lecithinases, and lipases-proteases, siderophore-like molecules resulted from the esculin hydrolysis and amylases, while Enterococcus sp. strains were positive only for caseinase and esculin hydrolase. Our study demonstrates that necessity of investigating the etiology and local resistance patterns of uropathogenic organisms, which is crucial for determining appropriate empirical antibiotic treatment in elderly patients with UTI, while establishing correlations between resistance and virulence profiles could provide valuable input about the clinical evolution and recurrence rates of UTI.

  4. Antibiotic Resistance and Virulence Phenotypes of Recent Bacterial Strains Isolated from Urinary Tract Infections in Elderly Patients with Prostatic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Delcaru

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute bacterial prostatitis is one of the frequent complications of urinary tract infection (UTI. From the approximately 10% of men having prostatitis, 7% experience a bacterial prostatitis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of uropathogens associated with UTIs in older patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and to assess their susceptibility to commonly prescribed antibiotics as well as the relationships between microbial virulence and resistance features. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli was found to be the most frequent bacterial strain isolated from patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia, followed by Enterococcus spp., Enterobacter spp., Klebsiella spp., Proteus spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Serratia marcescens. Increased resistance rates to tetracyclines, quinolones, and sulfonamides were registered. Besides their resistance profiles, the uropathogenic isolates produced various virulence factors with possible implications in the pathogenesis process. The great majority of the uropathogenic isolates revealed a high capacity to adhere to HEp-2 cell monolayer in vitro, mostly exhibiting a localized adherence pattern. Differences in the repertoire of soluble virulence factors that can affect bacterial growth and persistence within the urinary tract were detected. The Gram-negative strains produced pore-forming toxins—such as hemolysins, lecithinases, and lipases—proteases, siderophore-like molecules resulted from the esculin hydrolysis and amylases, while Enterococcus sp. strains were positive only for caseinase and esculin hydrolase. Our study demonstrates that necessity of investigating the etiology and local resistance patterns of uropathogenic organisms, which is crucial for determining appropriate empirical antibiotic treatment in elderly patients with UTI, while establishing correlations between resistance and virulence profiles could provide valuable input about the clinical evolution and

  5. Antimicrobial activity of plant essential oils against bacterial and fungal species involved in food poisoning and/or food decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lixandru, Brînduşa-Elena; Drăcea, Nicoleta Olguţa; Dragomirescu, Cristiana Cerasella; Drăgulescu, Elena Carmina; Coldea, Ileana Luminiţa; Anton, Liliana; Dobre, Elena; Rovinaru, Camelia; Codiţă, Irina

    2010-01-01

    The currative properties of aromatic and medicinal plants have been recognized since ancient times and, more recently, the antimicrobial activity of plant essential oils has been used in several applications, including food preservation. The purpose of this study was to create directly comparable, quantitative data on the antimicrobial activity of some plant essential oils prepared in the National Institute of Research-Development for Chemistry and Petrochemistry, Bucharest to be used for the further development of food packaging technology, based on their antibacterial and antifungal activity. The essential oils extracted from thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), basil (Ocimum basilicum L.), coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.), sage (Salvia officinalis L.), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare L.), spearmint (Mentha spicata L.) and carraway (Carum carvi L.) were investigated for their antimicrobial activity against eleven different bacterial and three fungal strains belonging to species reported to be involved in food poisoning and/or food decay: S. aureus ATCC 25923, S. aureus ATCC 6538, S. aureus ATCC 25913, E. coli ATCC 25922, E. coli ATCC 35218, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Cantacuzino Institute Culture Collection (CICC) 10878, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19112, Bacillus cereus CIP 5127, Bacillus cereus ATCC 11778, Candida albicans ATCC 10231, Aspergillus niger ATCC 16404, Penicillium spp. CICC 251 and two E. coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis clinical isolates. The majority of the tested essential oils exibited considerable inhibitory capacity against all the organisms tested, as supported by growth inhibition zone diameters, MICs and MBC's. Thyme, coriander and basil oils proved the best antibacterial activity, while thyme and spearmint oils better inhibited the fungal species.

  6. Activation of the bacterial thermosensor DesK involves a serine zipper dimerization motif that is modulated by bilayer thickness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cybulski, Larisa; Ballering, Joost|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325784876; Moussatova, Anastassiia; Inda, Maria Eugenia; Vazquez, Daniela B; Wassenaar, Tsjerk A; de Mendoza, Diego; Tieleman, D Peter; Killian, J Antoinette|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071792317

    2015-01-01

    DesK is a bacterial thermosensor protein involved in maintaining membrane fluidity in response to changes in environmental temperature. Most likely, the protein is activated by changes in membrane thickness, but the molecular mechanism of sensing and signaling is still poorly understood. Here we

  7. New Parameters to Quantitatively Express the Invasiveness of Bacterial Strains from Implant-Related Orthopaedic Infections into Osteoblast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Campoccia

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Complete eradication of bacterial infections is often a challenging task, especially in presence of prosthetic devices. Invasion of non-phagocytic host cells appears to be a critical mechanism of microbial persistence in host tissues. Hidden within host cells, bacteria elude host defences and antibiotic treatments that are intracellularly inactive. The intracellular invasiveness of bacteria is generally measured by conventional gentamicin protection assays. The efficiency of invasion, however, markedly differs across bacterial species and adjustments to the titre of the microbial inocula used in the assays are often needed to enumerate intracellular bacteria. Such changes affect the standardisation of the method and hamper a direct comparison of bacteria on a same scale. This study aims at investigating the precise relation between inoculum, in terms of multiplicity of infection (MOI, and internalised bacteria. The investigation included nine Staphylococcus aureus, seven Staphylococcus epidermidis, five Staphylococcus lugdunensis and two Enterococcus faecalis clinical strains, which are co-cultured with MG63 human osteoblasts. Unprecedented insights are offered on the relations existing between MOI, number of internalised bacteria and per cent of internalised bacteria. New parameters are identified that are of potential use for qualifying the efficiency of internalization and compare the behaviour of bacterial strains.

  8. New Parameters to Quantitatively Express the Invasiveness of Bacterial Strains from Implant-Related Orthopaedic Infections into Osteoblast Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campoccia, Davide; Montanaro, Lucio; Ravaioli, Stefano; Cangini, Ilaria; Testoni, Francesca; Visai, Livia; Arciola, Carla Renata

    2018-04-03

    Complete eradication of bacterial infections is often a challenging task, especially in presence of prosthetic devices. Invasion of non-phagocytic host cells appears to be a critical mechanism of microbial persistence in host tissues. Hidden within host cells, bacteria elude host defences and antibiotic treatments that are intracellularly inactive. The intracellular invasiveness of bacteria is generally measured by conventional gentamicin protection assays. The efficiency of invasion, however, markedly differs across bacterial species and adjustments to the titre of the microbial inocula used in the assays are often needed to enumerate intracellular bacteria. Such changes affect the standardisation of the method and hamper a direct comparison of bacteria on a same scale. This study aims at investigating the precise relation between inoculum, in terms of multiplicity of infection (MOI), and internalised bacteria. The investigation included nine Staphylococcus aureus , seven Staphylococcus epidermidis , five Staphylococcus lugdunensis and two Enterococcus faecalis clinical strains, which are co-cultured with MG63 human osteoblasts. Unprecedented insights are offered on the relations existing between MOI, number of internalised bacteria and per cent of internalised bacteria. New parameters are identified that are of potential use for qualifying the efficiency of internalization and compare the behaviour of bacterial strains.

  9. Influence of bacterial strains isolated from lead-polluted soil and their interactions with arbuscular mycorrhizae on the growth of Trifolium pratense L. under lead toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivas, A; Azcón, R; Biró, B; Barea, J M; Ruiz-Lozano, J M

    2003-10-01

    We isolated two bacterial strains from an experimentally lead (Pb)-polluted soil in Hungary, 10 years after soil contamination. These strains represented the two most abundant cultivable bacterial groups in such soil, and we tested their influence on Trifolium pratense L. growth and on the functioning of native mycorrhizal fungi under Pb toxicity in a second Pb-spiked soil. Our results showed that bacterial strain A enhanced plant growth, nitrogen and phosphorus accumulations, nodule formation, and mycorrhizal infection, demonstrating its plant-growth-promoting activity. In addition, strain A decreased the amount of Pb absorbed by plants, when expressed on a root weight basis, because of increased root biomass due to the production of indoleacetic acid. The positive effect of strain A was not only evident after a single inoculation but also in dual inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Strain A also exhibited higher tolerance than strain B when cultivated under increasing Pb levels in the spiked soil. Molecular identification unambiguously placed strain A within the genus Brevibacillus. We showed that it is important to select the most tolerant and efficient bacterial strain for co-inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi to promote effective symbiosis and thus stimulate plant growth under adverse environmental conditions, such as heavy-metal contamination.

  10. Streptomyces lunalinharesii Strain 235 Shows the Potential to Inhibit Bacteria Involved in Biocorrosion Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Pacheco da Rosa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Four actinomycete strains previously isolated from Brazilian soils were tested for their antimicrobial activity against Bacillus pumilus LF-4 and Desulfovibrio alaskensis NCIMB 13491, bacteria that are well known to be involved in biofilm formation and biocorrosion. Strain 235, belonging to the species Streptomyces lunalinharesii, inhibited the growth of both bacteria. The antimicrobial activity was seen over a wide range of pH, and after treatment with several chemicals and heat but not with proteinase K and trypsin. The antimicrobial substances present in the concentrated supernatant from growth media were partially characterized by SDS-PAGE and extracellular polypeptides were seen. Bands in the size range of 12 to 14.4 kDa caused antimicrobial activity. Transmission electron microscopy of D. alaskensis cells treated with the concentrated supernatant containing the antimicrobial substances revealed the formation of prominent bubbles, the spherical double-layered structures on the cell membrane, and the periplasmic space completely filled with electron-dense material. This is the first report on the production of antimicrobial substances by actinomycetes against bacteria involved in biocorrosion processes, and these findings may be of great relevance as an alternative source of biocides to those currently employed in the petroleum industry.

  11. Short term memory of Caenorhabditis elegans against bacterial pathogens involves CREB transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prithika, Udayakumar; Vikneswari, Ramaraj; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy

    2017-04-01

    One of the key issues pertaining to the control of memory is to respond to a consistently changing environment or microbial niche present in it. Human cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) transcription factor which plays a crucial role in memory has a homolog in C. elegans, crh-1. crh-1 appears to influence memory processes to certain extent by habituation of the host to a particular environment. The discrimination between the pathogen and a non-pathogen is essential for C. elegans in a microbial niche which determines its survival. Training the nematodes in the presence of a virulent pathogen (S. aureus) and an opportunistic pathogen (P. mirabilis) separately exhibits a different behavioural paradigm. This appears to be dependent on the CREB transcription factor. Here we show that C. elegans homolog crh-1 helps in memory response for a short term against the interacting pathogens. Following conditioning of the nematodes to S. aureus and P. mirabilis, the wild type nematodes exhibited a positive response towards the respective pathogens which diminished slowly after 2h. By contrast, the crh-1 deficient nematodes had a defective memory post conditioning. The molecular data reinforces the importance of crh-1 gene in retaining the memory of nematode. Our results also suggest that involvement of neurotransmitters play a crucial role in modulating the memory of the nematode with the assistance of CREB. Therefore, we elucidate that CREB is responsible for the short term memory response in C. elegans against bacterial pathogens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. MALDI-TOF-MS with PLS Modeling Enables Strain Typing of the Bacterial Plant Pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindt, Nathan M.; Robison, Faith; Brick, Mark A.; Schwartz, Howard F.; Heuberger, Adam L.; Prenni, Jessica E.

    2017-11-01

    Matrix-assisted desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) is a fast and effective tool for microbial species identification. However, current approaches are limited to species-level identification even when genetic differences are known. Here, we present a novel workflow that applies the statistical method of partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) to MALDI-TOF-MS protein fingerprint data of Xanthomonas axonopodis, an important bacterial plant pathogen of fruit and vegetable crops. Mass spectra of 32 X. axonopodis strains were used to create a mass spectral library and PLS-DA was employed to model the closely related strains. A robust workflow was designed to optimize the PLS-DA model by assessing the model performance over a range of signal-to-noise ratios (s/n) and mass filter (MF) thresholds. The optimized parameters were observed to be s/n = 3 and MF = 0.7. The model correctly classified 83% of spectra withheld from the model as a test set. A new decision rule was developed, termed the rolled-up Maximum Decision Rule (ruMDR), and this method improved identification rates to 92%. These results demonstrate that MALDI-TOF-MS protein fingerprints of bacterial isolates can be utilized to enable identification at the strain level. Furthermore, the open-source framework of this workflow allows for broad implementation across various instrument platforms as well as integration with alternative modeling and classification algorithms. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Identification of a New Marine Bacterial Strain SD8 and Optimization of Its Culture Conditions for Producing Alkaline Protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hongxia; Yang, Muyang; Wang, Liping; Xian, Cory J.

    2015-01-01

    While much attention has been given to marine microorganisms for production of enzymes, which in general are relatively more stable and active compared to those from plants and animals, studies on alkaline protease production from marine microorganisms have been very limited. In the present study, the alkaline protease producing marine bacterial strain SD8 isolated from sea muds in the Geziwo Qinhuangdao sea area of China was characterized and its optimal culture conditions were investigated. Strain SD8 was initially classified to belong to genus Pseudomonas by morphological, physiological and biochemical characterizations, and then through 16S rDNA sequence it was identified to be likely Pseudomonas hibiscicola. In addition, the culture mediums, carbon sources and culture conditions of strain SD8 were optimized for maximum production of alkaline protease. Optimum enzyme production (236U/mL when cultured bacteria being at 0.75 mg dry weight/mL fermentation broth) was obtained when the isolate at a 3% inoculum size was grown in LB medium at 20 mL medium/100mL Erlenmeyer flask for 48h culture at 30°C with an initial of pH 7.5. This was the first report of strain Pseudomonas hibiscicola secreting alkaline protease, and the data for its optimal cultural conditions for alkaline protease production has laid a foundation for future exploration for the potential use of SD8 strain for alkaline protease production. PMID:26716833

  14. Hemolysin, Protease, and EPS Producing Pathogenic Aeromonas hydrophila Strain An4 Shows Antibacterial Activity against Marine Bacterial Fish Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Pandey

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A pathogenic Aeromonas hydrophila strain An4 was isolated from marine catfish and characterized with reference to its proteolytic and hemolytic activity along with SDS-PAGE profile (sodium dodecyl sulphate-Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of ECPs (extracellular proteins showing hemolysin (approximately 50 kDa. Agar well diffusion assay using crude cell extract of the bacterial isolate clearly demonstrated antibacterial activity against indicator pathogenic bacteria, Staphylococcus arlettae strain An1, Acinetobacter sp. strain An2, Vibrio parahaemolyticus strain An3, and Alteromonas aurentia SE3 showing inhibitory zone >10 mm well comparable to common antibiotics. Further GC-MS analysis of crude cell extract revealed several metabolites, namely, phenolics, pyrrolo-pyrazines, pyrrolo-pyridine, and butylated hydroxytoluene (well-known antimicrobials. Characterization of EPS using FTIR indicated presence of several protein-related amine and amide groups along with peaks corresponding to carboxylic and phenyl rings which may be attributed to its virulent and antibacterial properties, respectively. Besides hemolysin, EPS, and protease, Aeromonas hydrophila strain An4 also produced several antibacterial metabolites.

  15. Procedures involving lipid media for detection of bacterial contamination in breweries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vuuren, H J; Louw, H A; Loos, M A; Meisel, R

    1977-01-01

    The liquid equivalent of universal beer agar, designated universal beer liquid medium, and its beer-free equivalent, universal liquid medium (UL), were equally effective in demonstrating bacterial contamination in 120 of 200 samples from different stages of commercial brewing process. Growth of the contaminants after 3 days was consistently more luxuriant in the UL medium. A yeast-water substrate medium failed to reveal many contaminants detected with UL in 392 samples from three breweries and revealed only a few not detected with UL. The use of UL and a lactose-peptone medium, with microscope examination of the media for bacterial growth, permitted detection of 93% of the known contaminants compared to 87%, detected with UL alone; this combination or universal beer liquid medium plus lactose-peptone medium can therefore be recommended for the detection of bacterial contaminants in brewery samples. Bacterial contamination of pitching yeasts appeared to be a particular problem in the breweries investigated. PMID:848948

  16. Engineering control of bacterial cellulose production using a genetic toolkit and a new cellulose-producing strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florea, Michael; Hagemann, Henrik; Santosa, Gabriella; Micklem, Chris N.; Spencer-Milnes, Xenia; de Arroyo Garcia, Laura; Paschou, Despoina; Lazenbatt, Christopher; Kong, Deze; Chughtai, Haroon; Jensen, Kirsten; Freemont, Paul S.; Kitney, Richard; Reeve, Benjamin; Ellis, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose is a strong and ultrapure form of cellulose produced naturally by several species of the Acetobacteraceae. Its high strength, purity, and biocompatibility make it of great interest to materials science; however, precise control of its biosynthesis has remained a challenge for biotechnology. Here we isolate a strain of Komagataeibacter rhaeticus (K. rhaeticus iGEM) that can produce cellulose at high yields, grow in low-nitrogen conditions, and is highly resistant to toxic chemicals. We achieved external control over its bacterial cellulose production through development of a modular genetic toolkit that enables rational reprogramming of the cell. To further its use as an organism for biotechnology, we sequenced its genome and demonstrate genetic circuits that enable functionalization and patterning of heterologous gene expression within the cellulose matrix. This work lays the foundations for using genetic engineering to produce cellulose-based materials, with numerous applications in basic science, materials engineering, and biotechnology. PMID:27247386

  17. Involvement of Bacterial Quorum-Sensing Signals in Spoilage of Bean Sprouts

    OpenAIRE

    Rasch, Maria; Andersen, Jens Bo; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Flodgaard, Lars Ravn; Christensen, Henrik; Givskov, Michael; Gram, Lone

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial communication signals, acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs), were extracted from samples of commercial bean sprouts undergoing soft-rot spoilage. Bean sprouts produced in the laboratory did not undergo soft-rot spoilage and did not contain AHLs or AHL-producing bacteria, although the bacterial population reached levels similar to those in the commercial sprouts, 108 to 109 CFU/g. AHL-producing bacteria (Enterobacteriaceae and pseudomonads) were isolated from commercial sprouts, and s...

  18. The FhaB/FhaC two-partner secretion system is involved in adhesion of Acinetobacter baumannii AbH12O-A2 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, A; Merino, M; Rumbo-Feal, S; Álvarez-Fraga, L; Vallejo, J A; Beceiro, A; Ohneck, E J; Mateos, J; Fernández-Puente, P; Actis, L A; Poza, M; Bou, G

    2017-08-18

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a hospital-acquired pathogen that shows an extraordinary capacity to stay in the hospital environment. Adherence of the bacteria to eukaryotic cells or to abiotic surfaces is the first step for establishing an infection. The A. baumannii strain AbH12O-A2 showed an exceptional ability to adhere to A549 epithelial cells. The AbFhaB/FhaC 2-partner secretion (TPS) system involved in adhesion was discovered after the screening of the recently determined A. baumannii AbH12O-A2 strain genome (CP009534.1). The AbFhaB is a large exoprotein which transport to the bacterial surface is mediated by the AbFhaC protein. In the present study, the role of this TPS system in the AbH12O-A2 adherence phenotype was investigated. The functional inactivation of this 2-partner secretion system was addressed by analyzing the outer membrane vesicles (OMV) proteomic profile from the wild-type strain and its derivative mutant AbH12O-A2ΔfhaC demonstrating that AbFhaB is no longer detected in the absence of AbFhaC. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and adhesion experiments demonstrated that inactivation of the AbFhaB/FhaC system significantly decreases bacterial attachment to A549 alveolar epithelial cells. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that this 2-partner secretion system is involved in fibronectin-mediated adherence of the A. baumannii AbH12O-A2 isolate. Finally, we report that the AbFhaB/FhaC system is involved in virulence when tested using invertebrate and vertebrate hosts. These data suggest the potential role that this AbFhaB/FhaC secretion system could play in the pathobiology of A. baumannii.

  19. Characterization of a salt resistant bacterial strain Proteus sp. NA6 capable of decolorizing reactive dyes in presence of multi-metal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Naila; Hussain, Sabir; Azeem, Farrukh; Shahzad, Tanvir; Bhatti, Sajjad Haider; Imran, Muhammad; Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Maqbool, Zahid; Abid, Muhammad

    2016-11-01

    Microbial biotechnologies for the decolorization of textile wastewaters have attracted worldwide attention because of their economic suitability and easiness in handling. However, the presence of high amounts of salts and metal ions in textile wastewaters adversely affects the decolorization efficiency of the microbial bioresources. In this regard, the present study was conducted to isolate salt tolerant bacterial strains which might have the potential to decolorize azo dyes even in the presence of multi-metal ion mixtures. Out of the tested 48 bacteria that were isolated from an effluent drain, the strain NA6 was found relatively more efficient in decolorizing the reactive yellow-2 (RY2) dye in the presence of 50 g L(-1) NaCl. Based on the similarity of its 16S rRNA gene sequence and its position in a phylogenetic tree, this strain was designated as Proteus sp. NA6. The strain NA6 showed efficient decolorization (>90 %) of RY2 at pH 7.5 in the presence of 50 g L(-1) NaCl under static incubation at 30 °C. This strain also had the potential to efficiently decolorize other structurally related azo dyes in the presence of 50 g L(-1) NaCl. Moreover, Proteus sp. NA6 was found to resist the presence of different metal ions (Co(+2), Cr(+6), Zn(+2), Pb(+2), Cu(+2), Cd(+2)) and was capable of decolorizing reactive dyes in the presence of different levels of the mixtures of these metal ions along with 50 g L(-1) NaCl. Based on the findings of this study, it can be suggested that Proteus sp. NA6 might serve as a potential bioresource for the biotechnologies involving bioremediation of textile wastewaters containing the metal ions and salts.

  20. Two-component systems are involved in the regulation of botulinum neurotoxin synthesis in Clostridium botulinum type A strain Hall.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloé Connan

    Full Text Available Clostridium botulinum synthesizes a potent neurotoxin (BoNT which associates with non-toxic proteins (ANTPs to form complexes of various sizes. The bont and antp genes are clustered in two operons. In C. botulinum type A, bont/A and antp genes are expressed during the end of the exponential growth phase and the beginning of the stationary phase under the control of an alternative sigma factor encoded by botR/A, which is located between the two operons. In the genome of C. botulinum type A strain Hall, 30 gene pairs predicted to encode two-component systems (TCSs and 9 orphan regulatory genes have been identified. Therefore, 34 Hall isogenic antisense strains on predicted regulatory genes (29 TCSs and 5 orphan regulatory genes have been obtained by a mRNA antisense procedure. Two TCS isogenic antisense strains showed more rapid growth kinetics and reduced BoNT/A production than the control strain, as well as increased bacterial lysis and impairment of the bacterial cell wall structure. Three other TCS isogenic antisense strains induced a low level of BoNT/A and ANTP production. Interestingly, reduced expression of bont/A and antp genes was shown to be independent of botR/A. These results indicate that BoNT/A synthesis is under the control of a complex network of regulation including directly at least three TCSs.

  1. Genome Sequence of the Banana Pathogen Dickeya zeae Strain MS1, Which Causes Bacterial Soft Rot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing-Xin; Lin, Bi-Run; Shen, Hui-Fang; Pu, Xiao-Ming

    2013-06-13

    We report a draft genome sequence of Dickeya zeae strain MS1, which is the causative agent of banana soft rot in China, and we show several of its specific properties compared with those of other D. zeae strains. Genome sequencing provides a tool for understanding the genomic determination of the pathogenicity and phylogeny placement of this pathogen.

  2. Genome Sequence of the Banana Pathogen Dickeya zeae Strain MS1, Which Causes Bacterial Soft Rot

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jing-Xin; Lin, Bi-Run; Shen, Hui-Fang; Pu, Xiao-Ming

    2013-01-01

    We report a draft genome sequence of Dickeya zeae strain MS1, which is the causative agent of banana soft rot in China, and we show several of its specific properties compared with those of other D.?zeae strains. Genome sequencing provides a tool for understanding the genomic determination of the pathogenicity and phylogeny placement of this pathogen.

  3. Isolation and Characterization of Rhamnolipid-Producing Bacterial Strains from a Biodiesel Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel strains of rhamnolipid-producing bacteria were isolated from soils at a biodiesel facility on the basis of their ability to grow on glycerol as a sole carbon source. Strains were identified as Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Enterobacter asburiae, E. hormaecheii, Pantoea stewartii and Pseudomona...

  4. Exposure of bovine cornea to different strains of Moraxella bovis and to other bacterial species in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, R L; Smith, K; Turfrey, B A

    1985-07-01

    A collection of strains of Moraxella bovis, some pathogenic and some non-pathogenic in cattle, together with other M. bovis preparations, Neisseria ovis, Staphylococcus aureus and Moraxella non-liquefaciens were studied by scanning electron microscopy for their affinity to bovine corneal preparations in vitro. The in vitro procedure provides a convenient method for studies on host-pathogen interactions at the early stage of pathogenesis. The results corresponded well with the pathogenicity of the respective strains and species in cattle. It is considered that the pathogenicity of M. bovis is associated with at least two factors, piliation and the ability to produce pit-like depressions in corneal epithelial cells. The other bacterial species, which are not thought to play an important role in infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis, had the ability to adhere to the bovine cornea but did not produce pits. The pitting factor of M. bovis is of interest in relation to studies on vaccination against infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis.

  5. Use of Response Surface Methodology to Optimize Culture Conditions for Hydrogen Production by an Anaerobic Bacterial Strain from Soluble Starch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieu, Hoa Thi Quynh; Nguyen, Yen Thi; Dang, Yen Thi; Nguyen, Binh Thanh

    2016-05-01

    Biohydrogen is a clean source of energy that produces no harmful byproducts during combustion, being a potential sustainable energy carrier for the future. Therefore, biohydrogen produced by anaerobic bacteria via dark fermentation has attracted attention worldwide as a renewable energy source. However, the hydrogen production capability of these bacteria depends on major factors such as substrate, iron-containing hydrogenase, reduction agent, pH, and temperature. In this study, the response surface methodology (RSM) with central composite design (CCD) was employed to improve the hydrogen production by an anaerobic bacterial strain isolated from animal waste in Phu Linh, Soc Son, Vietnam (PL strain). The hydrogen production process was investigated as a function of three critical factors: soluble starch concentration (8 g L-1 to 12 g L-1), ferrous iron concentration (100 mg L-1 to 200 mg L-1), and l-cysteine concentration (300 mg L-1 to 500 mg L-1). RSM analysis showed that all three factors significantly influenced hydrogen production. Among them, the ferrous iron concentration presented the greatest influence. The optimum hydrogen concentration of 1030 mL L-1 medium was obtained with 10 g L-1 soluble starch, 150 mg L-1 ferrous iron, and 400 mg L-1 l-cysteine after 48 h of anaerobic fermentation. The hydrogen concentration produced by the PL strain was doubled after using RSM. The obtained results indicate that RSM with CCD can be used as a technique to optimize culture conditions for enhancement of hydrogen production by the selected anaerobic bacterial strain. Hydrogen production from low-cost organic substrates such as soluble starch using anaerobic fermentation methods may be one of the most promising approaches.

  6. The involvement of prostaglandin E2in interleukin-1β evoked anorexia is strain dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Anna; Elander, Louise; Hallbeck, Martin; Örtegren Kugelberg, Unn; Engblom, David; Blomqvist, Anders

    2017-02-01

    From experiments in mice in which the prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) synthesizing enzyme mPGES-1 was genetically deleted, as well as from experiments in which PGE 2 was injected directly into the brain, PGE 2 has been implicated as a mediator of inflammatory induced anorexia. Here we aimed at examining which PGE 2 receptor (EP 1-4 ) that was critical for the anorexic response to peripherally injected interleukin-1β (IL-1β). However, deletion of neither EP receptor in mice, either globally (for EP 1 , EP 2 , and EP 3 ) or selectively in the nervous system (EP 4 ), had any effect on the IL-1β induced anorexia. Because these mice were all on a C57BL/6 background, whereas previous observations demonstrating a role for induced PGE 2 in IL-1β evoked anorexia had been carried out on mice on a DBA/1 background, we examined the anorexic response to IL-1β in mice with deletion of mPGES-1 on a C57BL/6 background and a DBA/1 background, respectively. We confirmed previous findings that mPGES-1 knock-out mice on a DBA/1 background displayed attenuated anorexia to IL-1β; however, mice on a C57BL/6 background showed the same profound anorexia as wild type mice when carrying deletion of mPGES-1, while displaying almost normal food intake after pretreatment with a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor. We conclude that the involvement of induced PGE 2 in IL-1β evoked anorexia is strain dependent and we suggest that different routes that probably involve distinct prostanoids exist by which inflammatory stimuli may evoke an anorexic response and that these routes may be of different importance in different strains of mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of some indigenous bacterial strains of pseudomonas ssp. for production of biosurfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahafeeq, M.; Kokub, D.; Khalid, Z.M.; Malik, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Some indigenous pseudomonas spp. were found to have the ability of emulsification, lowering the surface and interfacial tensions, and formation of high reciprocal CMCs. Six strains of Pseudomonas spp were compared for biosurfactant production grown on hexadecane. Supernatant from whole culture broth of these strains could lower surface tension from 65 mN/m to 28-32 nM/m, interfacial tension from 40 nM/m to 1-3 mN/m and had high reciprocal CMCs. When compared for emulsification ability by the culture broth of these strains, the emulsification index (E24) was found to range between 60-65. Biosurfactant containing culture broth of some strains could retain the property up to 80 C, pH of 13 and sodium chloride concentration for 17% which indicates their possible role in some depleted oil well. (author)

  8. Molecular characterization of Xanthomonas strains responsible for bacterial leaf spot of tomato in Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial spot of tomato (BST) is a major constraint to tomato production in Ethiopia and many other countries leading to significant crop losses. In the present study, using pathogenicity tests, sensitivity to copper and streptomycin, and multilocus sequence analysis, a diverse group of Xanthomonas...

  9. A novel, sensitive method to evaluate potato germplasm for bacterial wilt resistance using a luminescent Ralstonia solanacearum reporter strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Andrea Paola Zuluaga; Ferreira, Virginia; Pianzzola, María Julia; Siri, María Inés; Coll, Núria S; Valls, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Several breeding programs are under way to introduce resistance to bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum in solanaceous crops. The lack of screening methods allowing easy measurement of pathogen colonization and the inability to detect latent (i.e., symptomless) infections are major limitations when evaluating resistance to this disease in plant germplasm. We describe a new method to study the interaction between R. solanacearum and potato germplasm that overcomes these restrictions. The R. solanacearum UY031 was genetically modified to constitutively generate light from a synthetic luxCDABE operon stably inserted in its chromosome. Colonization of this reporter strain on different potato accessions was followed using life imaging. Bacterial detection in planta by this nondisruptive system correlated with the development of wilting symptoms. In addition, we demonstrated that quantitative detection of the recombinant strain using a luminometer can identify latent infections on symptomless potato plants. We have developed a novel, unsophisticated, and accurate method for high-throughput evaluation of pathogen colonization in plant populations. We applied this method to compare the behavior of potato accessions with contrasting resistance to R. solanacearum. This new system will be especially useful to detect latency in symptomless parental lines before their inclusion in long-term breeding programs for disease resistance.

  10. Biodegradation and detoxification of melanoidin from distillery effluent using an aerobic bacterial strain SAG{sub 5} of Alcaligenes faecalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santal, Anita Rani, E-mail: anita.gangotra@gmail.com [Department of Microbiology, Maharshi Dayanand University, Rohtak-124001, Haryana (India); Singh, N.P. [Centre for Biotechnology, Maharshi Dayanand University, Rohtak-124001, Haryana (India); Saharan, Baljeet Singh [Department of Microbiology, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra-136119, Haryana (India)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} The Alcaligenes faecalis strain SAG{sub 5} decolorizes 72.6 {+-} 0.56% of melanoidins. {yields} The decolorization was achieved at pH 7.5 and temperature 37 {sup o}C on 5th day. {yields} The distillery effluent after biological treatment is environmentally safe. - Abstract: Distillery effluent retains very dark brown color even after anaerobic treatment due to presence of various water soluble, recalcitrant and coloring compounds mainly melanoidins. In laboratory conditions, melanoidin decolorizing bacteria was isolated and optimized the cultural conditions at various incubation temperatures, pH, carbon sources, nitrogen sources and combined effect of both carbon and nitrogen sources. The optimum decolorization (72.6 {+-} 0.56%) of melanoidins was achieved at pH 7.5 and temperature 37 {sup o}C on 5th day of cultivation. The toxicity evaluation with mung bean (Vigna radiata) revealed that the raw distillery effluent was environmentally highly toxic as compared to biologically treated distillery effluent, which indicated that the effluent after bacterial treatment is environmentally safe. This proves to be novel biological treatment technique for biodegradation and detoxification of melanoidin from distillery effluent using the bacterial strain SAG{sub 5}.

  11. Bacterial infections in Wegener's granulomatosis : mechanisms potentially involved in autoimmune pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tadema, Henko; Heeringa, Peter; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    Purpose of review Wegener's granulomatosis is associated with bacterial infection, in particular nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus. Infection may play a role in the induction of autoimmunity as well as in the effector phase of the disease. Here, the current hypotheses aiming to explain the

  12. Selection of bacterial populations in the mycosphere of Laccaria proxima : is type III secretion involved?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warmink, Jan Aaldrik; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    The bacterial communities in the Laccaria proxima mycosphere (soil from beneath fruiting bodies) and the corresponding bulk soil were compared by cultivation-dependent and cultivation-independent methods. To assess the distribution of type III secretion systems (TTSS), a PCR-based system for the

  13. Production of putrescine-capped stable silver nanoparticle: its characterization and antibacterial activity against multidrug-resistant bacterial strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Saswati; Gupta, Bhaskar; Gupta, Kamala; Chaudhuri, Mahua Ghosh

    2016-11-01

    Integration of biology with nanotechnology is now becoming attention-grabbing area of research. The antimicrobial potency of silver has been eminent from antiquity. Due to the recent desire for the enhancement of antibacterial efficacy of silver, various synthesis methods of silver in their nano dimensions are being practiced using a range of capping material. The present work highlights a facile biomimetic approach for production of silver nanoparticle being capped and stabilized by putrescine, possessing a diameter of 10-25 ± 1.5 nm. The synthesized nanoparticles have been analyzed spectrally and analytically. Morphological studies are carried out by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and crystallinity by selected area electron diffraction patterns. Moreover, the elemental composition of the capped nanoparticles was confirmed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis. A comparative study (zone of inhibition and minimum inhibitory concentration) regarding the interactions and antibacterial potentiality of the capped silver nanoparticles with respect to the bare ones reveal the efficiency of the capped one over the bare one. The bacterial kinetic study was executed to monitor the interference of nanoparticles with bacterial growth rate. The results also highlight the efficacy of putrescine-capped silver nanoparticles as effective growth inhibitors against multi-drug resistant human pathogenic bacterial strains, which may, thus, potentially be applicable as an effective antibacterial control system to fight diseases.

  14. [Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of probiotic bacterial strains used in medicinal products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiatrzyk, Aldona; Polak, Maciej; Czajka, Urszula; Krysztopa-Grzybowska, Katarzyna; Lutyńska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The optimization of quality testing strategy of products containing probiotics might allow to general improvement of its safer use in humans. The goal of the study was the evaluation of quality expressed by identity, colony forming unit (CFU) and antibiotic sensitivity ofprobiotics used in medicinal products available in Poland using the appropriate and validated procedures. The medicinal products containing L. rhamnosus, L. acidophilus, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and B. animalis subsp. lactis, L. helveticus, and L. gasseri were tested for species identity performed with validated rep-PCR (BOXA 1R) method. The antimicrobial susceptibility of working seeds and strains isolated to 26 antibiotics were tested by disk diffusion and E-test methods using relevant references as recommended by EUCAST. The numbers of probiotic strains, expressed as cfu count per package, was done using plating plunge method. All strains tested, except B. lactis, were found to be resistant to trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole, nalidixic acid, metronidazole, and colistin. B. lactis was resistant to aminoglycosides. L. rhamnosus strains were found to be resistant to vancomycin, (MIC > 256 microg/ml) similarly to ATCC strains (L. rhamnosus GG 53103 and 244). The sensitivity to other antibiotics was strain specific. The rep-PCR method was found species and strain specific. All products tested fulfilled declared countent as measured by cfu count/package. Quality of medicinal products containing probiotics was found undoubted and confirmed. The optimized strategy of quality monitoring of probiotics used in medicinal products can be used in dietary supplements and foodstuffs intended for particular nutritional uses.

  15. Isolation and partial characterization of bacterial strains on low organic carbon medium from soils fertilized with different organic amendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senechkin, Ilya V; Speksnijder, Adrianus G C L; Semenov, Alexander M; van Bruggen, Ariena H C; van Overbeek, Leonard S

    2010-11-01

    A total of 720 bacterial strains were isolated from soils with four different organic amendment regimes on a low organic carbon (low-C) agar medium (10 µg C ml(-1)) traditionally used for isolation of oligotrophs. Organic amendments in combination with field history resulted in differences in dissolved organic carbon contents in these soils. There were negative correlations between total and dissolved organic carbon content and the number of isolates on low-C agar medium, whereas these correlations were absent for bacterial strains isolated from the same soil on high-C agar medium (1,000 µg C ml(-1)). Repeated transfers (up to ten times) of the isolates from low-C agar medium to fresh low- and high-C agar media were done to test for exclusive growth under oligotrophic conditions. The number of isolates exclusively growing under oligotrophic conditions dropped after each subsequent transfer from 241 after the first to 98 after the third transfer step. Identification on the basis of partial 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that most of the 241 isolates (as well as the subset of 98 isolates) belong to widespread genera such as Streptomyces, Rhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, and Mesorhizobium, and the taxonomic composition of dominant genera changed from the first transfer step to the third. A selected subset of 17 isolates were further identified and characterized for exclusive growth on low-C agar medium. Two isolates continued to grow only on low-C agar medium up to the tenth transfer step and matched most closely with Rhizobium sullae and an uncultured bacterium on the basis of the almost full-length 16S rRNA gene. It was concluded that the vast majority of strains which are isolated on low-C agar media belong to the trophic group of microorganisms adapted to a "broad range" of carbon concentrations, including well-known and widespread bacterial genera. Oligotrophy is a physiological, not a taxonomic property, and can only be identified by cultural means so far. We

  16. Chip-based bioassay using bacterial sensor strains immobilized in three-dimensional microfluidic network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Hirofumi; Maehana, Koji; Kamidate, Tamio

    2004-11-15

    A whole-cell bioassay has been performed using Escherichia coli sensor strains immobilized in a chip assembly, in which a silicon substrate is placed between two poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) substrates. Microchannels fabricated on the two separate PDMS layers are connected via perforated microwells on the silicon chip, and thus, a three-dimensional microfluidic network is constructed in the assembly. Bioluminescent sensor strains mixed with agarose are injected into the channels on one of the two PDMS layers and are immobilized in the microwells by gelation. Induction of the firefly luciferase gene expression in the sensor strains can be easily carried out by filling the channels on the other layer with sample solutions containing mutagen. Bioluminescence emissions from each well are detected after injection of luciferin/ATP mixtures into the channels. In this assay format using two multichannel layers and one microwell array chip, the interactions between various types of samples and strains can be monitored at each well on one assembly in a combinatorial fashion. Using several genotypes of the sensor strains or concentrations of mitomycin C in this format, the dependence of bioluminescence on these factors was obtained simultaneously in the single screening procedure. The present method could be a promising on-chip format for high-throughput whole-cell bioassays.

  17. Impact on bacterial community in midguts of the Asian corn borer larvae by transgenic Trichoderma strain overexpressing a heterologous chit42 gene with chitin-binding domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Li

    Full Text Available This paper is the first report of the impact on the bacterial community in the midgut of the Asian corn borer (Ostrinia furnacalis by the chitinase from the transgenic Trichoderma strain. In this study, we detected a change of the bacterial community in the midgut of the fourth instar larvae by using a culture-independent method. Results suggested that Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were the most highly represented phyla, being present in all the midgut bacterial communities. The observed species richness was simple, ranging from four to five of all the 16S rRNA clone libraries. When using Trichoderma fermentation liquids as additives, the percentages of the dominant flora in the total bacterial community in larval midgut changed significantly. The community of the genus Ochrobactrum in the midgut decreased significantly when the larvae were fed with the fermentation liquids of the transgenic Trichoderma strain Mc4. However, the Enterococcus community increased and then occupied the vacated niche of the Ochrobactrum members. Furthermore, the Shannon-Wiener (H and the Simpson (1-D indexes of the larval midgut bacterial library treated by feeding fermentation liquids of the transgenic Trichoderma strain Mc4 was the lowest compared with the culture medium, fermentation liquids of the wild type strain T30, and the sterile artificial diet. The Enterococcus sp. strain was isolated and characterized from the healthy larvae midgut of the Asian corn borer. An infection study of the Asian corn borer larvae using Enterococcus sp. ACB-1 revealed that a correlation existed between the increased Enterococcus community in the larval midgut and larval mortality. These results demonstrated that the transgenic Trichoderma strain could affect the composition of the midgut bacterial community. The change of the midgut bacterial community might be viewed as one of the factors resulting in the increased mortality of the Asian corn borer larvae.

  18. Biodegradation of oil spill by petroleum refineries using consortia of novel bacterial strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bina; Bhattacharya, Amit; Channashettar, Veeranna A; Jeyaseelan, C Paul; Gupta, Sachin; Sarma, Priyangshu M; Mandal, Ajoy K; Lal, Banwari

    2012-08-01

    Feasibility study carried out at the site prior to the full scale study showed that the introduced bacterial consortium effectively adapted to the local environment of the soil at bioremediation site. The soil samples were collected from the contaminated fields after treatment with bacterial consortium at different time intervals and analyzed by gas chromatography after extraction with hexane and toluene. At time zero (just before initiation of bioremediation), the concentration of total petroleum hydrocarbons in the soil (25-cm horizon) of plot A, B, C and D was 30.90 %, 18.80 %, 25.90 % and 29.90 % respectively, after 360 days of treatment with microbial consortia was reduced to 0.97 %, 1.0 %, 1.0 %, and 1.1 % respectively. Whereas, only 5 % degradation was observed in the control plot after 365 days (microbial consortium not applied).

  19. Ciliates rapidly enhance the frequency of conjugation between Escherichia coli strains through bacterial accumulation in vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuo, Junji; Oguri, Satoshi; Nakamura, Shinji; Hanawa, Tomoko; Fukumoto, Tatsuya; Hayashi, Yasuhiro; Kawaguchi, Kouhei; Mizutani, Yoshihiko; Yao, Takashi; Akizawa, Kouzi; Suzuki, Haruki; Simizu, Chikara; Matsuno, Kazuhiko; Kamiya, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism underlying bacterial conjugation through protozoa was investigated. Kanamycin-resistant Escherichia coli SM10λ+ carrying pRT733 with TnphoA was used as donor bacteria and introduced by conjugation into ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli clinical isolate recipient bacteria. Equal amounts of donor and recipient bacteria were mixed together in the presence or absence of protozoa (ciliates, free-living amoebae, myxamoebae) in Page's amoeba saline for 24 h. Transconjugants were selected...

  20. Bacterial succession during curing process of a skate (Dipturus batis) and isolation of novel strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynisson, E; Thornór Marteinsson, V; Jónsdóttir, R; Magnússon, S H; Hreggvidsson, G O

    2012-08-01

    To study the succession of cultivated and uncultivated microbes during the traditional curing process of skate. The microbial diversity was evaluated by sequencing 16Sr RNA clone libraries and cultivation in variety of media from skate samples taken periodically during a 9-day curing process. A pH shift was observed (pH 6·64-9·27) with increasing trimethylamine (2·6 up to 75·6 mg N per 100 g) and total volatile nitrogen (TVN) (from 58·5 to 705·8 mg N per 100 g) but with relatively slow bacterial growth. Uncured skate was dominated by Oceanisphaera and Pseudoalteromonas genera but was substituted after curing by Photobacterium and Aliivibrio in the flesh and Pseudomonas on the skin. Almost 50% of the clone library is derived from putative undiscovered species. Cultivation and enrichment strategies resulted in isolation of putatively new species belonging to the genera Idiomarina, Rheinheimera, Oceanisphaera, Providencia and Pseudomonas. The most abundant genera able to hydrolyse urea to ammonia were Oceanisphaera, Psychrobacter, Pseudoalteromonas and isolates within the Pseudomonas genus. The curing process of skate is controlled and achieved by a dynamic bacterial community where the key players belong to Oceanisphaera, Pseudoalteromonas, Photobacterium, Aliivibrio and Pseudomonas. For the first time, the bacterial population developments in the curing process of skate are presented and demonstrate a reservoir of many yet undiscovered bacterial species. No Claim to Norwegian Government works Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Screening and characterization of lactic acid bacterial strains that produce fermented milk and reduce cholesterol levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefang Guan

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To screen for and characterize lactic acid bacteria strains with the ability to produce fermented milk and reduce cholesterol levels. Methods The strains were isolated from traditional fermented milk in China. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of cholesterol-reduction were used to identify and verify strains of interest. Characteristics were analyzed using spectrophotometry and plate counting assays. Results The isolate HLX37 consistently produced fermented milk with strong cholesterol-reducing properties was identified as Lactobacillus plantarum (accession number: KR105940 and was thus selected for further study. The cholesterol reduction by strain HLX37 was 45.84%. The isolates were acid-tolerant at pH 2.5 and bile-tolerant at 0.5% (w/v in simulated gastric juice (pH 2.5 for 2 h and in simulated intestinal fluid (pH 8.0 for 3 h. The auto-aggregation rate increased to 87.74% after 24 h, while the co-aggregation with Escherichia coli DH5 was 27.76%. Strain HLX37 was intrinsically resistant to antibiotics such as penicillin, tobramycin, kanamycin, streptomycin, vancomycin and amikacin. Compared with rats in the model hyperlipidemia group, the total cholesterol content in the serum and the liver as well as the atherogenic index of rats in the viable fermented milk group significantly decreased by 23.33%, 32.37% and 40.23%, respectively. Fewer fat vacuoles and other lesions in liver tissue were present in both the inactivated and viable fermented milk groups compared to the model group. Conclusion These studies indicate that strain HLX37 of L. plantarum demonstrates probiotic potential, potential for use as a candidate for commercial use for promoting health.

  2. WxcX is involved in bacterial attachment and virulence in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Fan; Liao, Chao-Tsai; Chiang, Ying-Chuan; Li, Chih-En; Hsiao, Yi-Min

    2018-03-05

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) is the causative agent of black rot in crucifers. Here, one EZ-Tn5 transposon mutant of Xcc, altered in bacterial attachment, was isolated. Further analysis revealed that the transposon was inserted in the wxcX gene (encodes a hypothetical protein) of the transposon mutant. Sequence analysis revealed that WxcX is highly conserved in Xanthomonas, but none has been characterized. In this study, it was indicated that mutation of wxcX resulted in enhanced bacterial attachment, reduced virulence on the host cabbage, and increased sensitivity to sodium dodecyl sulfate. The affected phenotypes of the wxcX mutant could be complemented to wild-type levels by the intact wxcX gene. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that E408 and E411 are critical amino acid residues for WxcX function in bacterial attachment. Taken together, our results demonstrate the roles of wxcX in attachment, virulence, and tolerance to sodium dodecyl sulfate in Xanthomonas for the first time. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Control Efficacy of an Endophytic Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Strain BZ6-1 against Peanut Bacterial Wilt, Ralstonia solanacearum

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    Xiaobing Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to isolate and identify endophytic bacteria that might have efficacy against peanut bacterial wilt (BW caused by Ralstonia solanacearum. Thirty-seven endophytic strains were isolated from healthy peanut plants in R. solanacearum-infested fields and eight showed antagonistic effects against R. solanacearum. Strain BZ6-1 with the highest antimicrobial activity was identified as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens based on morphology, biochemistry, and 16S rRNA analysis. Culture conditions of BZ6-1 were optimized using orthogonal test method and inhibitory zone diameter in dual culture plate assay reached 34.2 mm. Furthermore, main antimicrobial substances of surfactin and fengycin A homologues produced by BZ6-1 were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Finally, pot experiments were adopted to test the control efficiency of BZ6-1 against peanut BW. Disease incidence decreased significantly from 84.5% in the control to 12.1% with addition of 15 mL (108 cfu mL−1 culture broth for each seedling, suggesting the feasibility of strain BZ6-1 in the biological control of peanut plants BW.

  4. Bacterial biodiversity analysis of a contaminated soil from the Chernobyl exclusion zone and characterization of the committed interaction of a Microbacterium strain with uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theodorakopoulos, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear power plants accidents of Chernobyl and Fukushima demonstrate the importance of the understanding of the transfer of the radioactive contamination in the environment and its ecological consequences. Although certain studies have been realized on superior organisms of the food chain, studies on telluric bacterial communities are scarce. The latter play nevertheless an essential role in the mobility of contaminants in soils by decreasing or improving their transfer towards other compartments (water, vegetables and animals). Moreover radionuclides (RNs) can have toxic effects on bacteria, leading to an inhibition of their participation in such transfer. The objectives of this study were (1) to estimate the impact of the radioactive contamination on bacterial communities belonging to a soil of the Chernobyl exclusion zone (trench T22) and (2) to study the uranium-bacteria interactions of a resistant strain, isolated from this soil. The various techniques used to characterize the bacterial diversity (culture of bacteria, DGGE, 454 pyro-sequencing) all testified of the multiplicity and the abundance of the bacterial communities in spite of the contamination. An impact on the community structure was difficult to assess by DGGE or cultural approach, but was nevertheless highlighted by the use of pyro-sequencing, suggesting the presence of species more adapted to the contaminated soil conditions. A specific molecular tool dedicated to the search of bacteria affiliated to the known radiation resistant Deinococcus-Thermus phylum (for example the Deinococcus radiodurans specie survives after an irradiation of several kGy) was developed. However it did not reveal the presence of bacteria affiliated to such a phylum in the studied soil. In parallel to the study of the bacterial biodiversity, about fifty culturable bacteria were isolated from this site and were used as a support to select a species (Microbacterium) capable to survive strong U(VI) concentrations. The

  5. Isolation and characterization of bacterial strains Paenibacillus sp. and Bacillus sp. for kraft lignin decolorization from pulp paper mill waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Ram; Singh, Shail; Krishna Reddy, M M; Patel, D K; Purohit, Hemant J; Kapley, Atya

    2008-12-01

    Eight aerobic bacterial strains were isolated from pulp paper mill waste and screened for tolerance of kraft lignin (KL) using the nutrient enrichment technique in mineral salt media (MSM) agar plate (15 g/L) amended with different concentrations of KL (100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600 ppm) along with 1% glucose and 0.5% peptone (w/v) as additional carbon and nitrogen sources. The strains ITRC S6 and ITRC S8 were found to have the most potential for tolerance of the highest concentration of KL. These organisms were characterized by biochemical tests and further 16S rRNA gene (rDNA) sequencing, which showed 96.5% and 95% sequence similarity of ITRC S(6) and ITRC S(8) and confirmed them as Paenibacillus sp. and Bacillus sp., respectively. KL decolorization was routinely monitored with a spectrophotometer and further confirmed by HPLC analysis. Among eight strains, ITRC S(6) and ITRC S(8) were found to degrade 500 mg/L of KL up to 47.97% and 65.58%, respectively, within 144 h of incubation in the presence of 1% glucose and 0.5% (w/v) peptone as a supplementary source of carbon and nitrogen. In the absence of glucose and peptone, these bacteria were unable to utilize KL. The analysis of lignin degradation products by GC-MS analysis revealed the formation of various acids as lignin monomers which resulted in a decrease in pH and a major change in the chromatographic profile of the bacterial degraded sample as compared to the control clear indications of biochemical modification of KL due to the bacterial ligninolytic system by ITRC S(6), namely, acetic acid, propanoic acid, butanoic acid, guaiacol, hexanoic acid, and ITRC S(8), namely acetic acid, propanoic acid, ethanedioic acid, furan carboxylic acid, 2-propanoic acid, butanoic acid, 3-acetoxybutyric acid, propanedioic acid, acetoguiacone, 1,2,3-thiadiazole, 5-carboxaldixime, 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxyphenol, and dibutyl phthalate, indicating the bacterium characteristic to degrade G and S units of lignin polymer.

  6. Mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of Artemisia absinthium volatile oil by the bacterial reverse mutation assay in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100

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    Mahboubeh Taherkhani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of Artemisia absinthium L. (A. absinthium essential oil by the bacterial reverse mutation assay in Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium strains. Methods: Water-distilled essential oil of A. absinthium collected from Ardabil, NorthWestern Iran, was investigated for mutagenic and antimutagenic activities. In present study, the mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of A. absinthium oil were investigated by the bacterial revere mutation assay in S. typhimurium TA98 and TA100 strains with and without S9 (microsomal mutagenesis assay. Results: The comparative mutagenicity effect was seen in 1.5 mg/plate by the bacterial reverse mutation assay in S. typhimurium TA98 strains, without S9 and the excellent antimutagenicity effect was seen in 1.5 mg/plate against S. typhimurium TA100, without S9. Conclusions: The mutagenicity and antimutagenicity effects of the volatile oil of A. absinthium were seen without the presence of metabolic activation.

  7. An Inducible Operon Is Involved in Inulin Utilization in Lactobacillus plantarum Strains, as Revealed by Comparative Proteogenomics and Metabolic Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Buntin, Nirunya; Hongpattarakere, Tipparat; Ritari, Jarmo; Douillard, Fran��ois P.; Paulin, Lars; Boeren, Sjef; Shetty, Sudarshan A.; de Vos, Willem M.

    2016-01-01

    The draft genomes of Lactobacillus plantarum strains isolated from Asian fermented foods, infant feces, and shrimp intestines were sequenced and compared to those of well-studied strains. Among 28 strains of L. plantarum, variations in the genomic features involved in ecological adaptation were elucidated. The genome sizes ranged from approximately 3.1 to 3.5 Mb, of which about 2,932 to 3,345 protein-coding sequences (CDS) were predicted. The food-derived isolates contained a higher number of...

  8. Quality and characteristics of fermented ginseng seed oil based on bacterial strain and extraction method

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    Myung-Hee Lee

    2017-07-01

    Results and Conclusion: The color of the fermented ginseng seed oil did not differ greatly according to the fermentation or extraction method. The highest phenolic compound content recovered with the use of supercritical fluid extraction combined with fermentation using the Bacillus subtilis Korea Food Research Institute (KFRI 1127 strain. The fatty acid composition did not differ greatly according to fermentation strain and extraction method. The phytosterol content of ginseng seed oil fermented with Bacillus subtilis KFRI 1127 and extracted using the supercritical fluid method was highest at 983.58 mg/100 g. Therefore, our results suggested that the ginseng seed oil fermented with Bacillus subtilis KFRI 1127 and extracted using the supercritical fluid method can yield a higher content of bioactive ingredients, such as phenolics, and phytosterols, without impacting the color or fatty acid composition of the product.

  9. Natural history of the infant gut microbiome and impact of antibiotic treatment on bacterial strain diversity and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassour, Moran; Vatanen, Tommi; Siljander, Heli; Hämäläinen, Anu-Maaria; Härkönen, Taina; Ryhänen, Samppa J; Franzosa, Eric A; Vlamakis, Hera; Huttenhower, Curtis; Gevers, Dirk; Lander, Eric S; Knip, Mikael; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2016-06-15

    The gut microbial community is dynamic during the first 3 years of life, before stabilizing to an adult-like state. However, little is known about the impact of environmental factors on the developing human gut microbiome. We report a longitudinal study of the gut microbiome based on DNA sequence analysis of monthly stool samples and clinical information from 39 children, about half of whom received multiple courses of antibiotics during the first 3 years of life. Whereas the gut microbiome of most children born by vaginal delivery was dominated by Bacteroides species, the four children born by cesarean section and about 20% of vaginally born children lacked Bacteroides in the first 6 to 18 months of life. Longitudinal sampling, coupled with whole-genome shotgun sequencing, allowed detection of strain-level variation as well as the abundance of antibiotic resistance genes. The microbiota of antibiotic-treated children was less diverse in terms of both bacterial species and strains, with some species often dominated by single strains. In addition, we observed short-term composition changes between consecutive samples from children treated with antibiotics. Antibiotic resistance genes carried on microbial chromosomes showed a peak in abundance after antibiotic treatment followed by a sharp decline, whereas some genes carried on mobile elements persisted longer after antibiotic therapy ended. Our results highlight the value of high-density longitudinal sampling studies with high-resolution strain profiling for studying the establishment and response to perturbation of the infant gut microbiome. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. Eggplant Resistance to the Ralstonia solanacearum Species Complex Involves Both Broad-Spectrum and Strain-Specific Quantitative Trait Loci

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    Sylvia Salgon

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial wilt (BW is a major disease of solanaceous crops caused by the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex (RSSC. Strains are grouped into five phylotypes (I, IIA, IIB, III, and IV. Varietal resistance is the most sustainable strategy for managing BW. Nevertheless, breeding to improve cultivar resistance has been limited by the pathogen’s extensive genetic diversity. Identifying the genetic bases of specific and non-specific resistance is a prerequisite to breed improvement. A major gene (ERs1 was previously mapped in eggplant (Solanum melongena L. using an intraspecific population of recombinant inbred lines derived from the cross of susceptible MM738 (S × resistant AG91-25 (R. ERs1 was originally found to control three strains from phylotype I, while being totally ineffective against a virulent strain from the same phylotype. We tested this population against four additional RSSC strains, representing phylotypes I, IIA, IIB, and III in order to clarify the action spectrum of ERs1. We recorded wilting symptoms and bacterial stem colonization under controlled artificial inoculation. We constructed a high-density genetic map of the population using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs developed from genotyping-by-sequencing and added 168 molecular markers [amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs, simple sequence repeats (SSRs, and sequence-related amplified polymorphisms (SRAPs] developed previously. The new linkage map based on a total of 1,035 markers was anchored on eggplant, tomato, and potato genomes. Quantitative trait locus (QTL mapping for resistance against a total of eight RSSC strains resulted in the detection of one major phylotype-specific QTL and two broad-spectrum QTLs. The major QTL, which specifically controls three phylotype I strains, was located at the bottom of chromosome 9 and corresponded to the previously identified major gene ERs1. Five candidate R-genes were underlying this QTL, with different alleles

  11. Synergistic and additive effect of oregano essential oil and biological silver nanoparticles against multidrug-resistant bacterial strains

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    Sara eScandorieiro

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics has become a clinical and public health problem, making therapeutic decisions more challenging. Plant compounds and nanodrugs have been proposed as potential antimicrobial alternatives. Studies have shown that oregano (Origanum vulgare essential oil (OEO and silver nanoparticles have potent antibacterial activity, also against multidrug-resistant strains; however, the strong organoleptic characteristics of OEO and the development of resistance to these metal nanoparticles can limit their use. This study evaluated the antibacterial effect of a two-drug combination of biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles (bio-AgNP, produced by Fusarium oxysporum, and OEO against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including multidrug-resistant strains. OEO and bio-AgNP showed bactericidal effects against all seventeen strains tested, with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC ranging from 0.298 to 1.193 mg/mL and 62.5 to 250 µM, respectively. Time-kill curves indicated that OEO acted rapidly (within 10 min, while the metallic nanoparticles took 4 h to kill Gram-negative bacteria and 24 h to kill Gram-positive bacteria. The combination of the two compounds resulted in a synergistic or additive effect, reducing their MIC values and reducing the time of action compared to bio-AgNP used alone, i.e., 20 min for Gram-negative bacteria and 7 h for Gram-positive bacteria. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM revealed similar morphological alterations in Staphylococcus aureus (non-methicillin-resistant S. aureus, non-MRSA cells exposed to three different treatments (OEO, bio-AgNP and combination of the two, which appeared cell surface blebbing. Individual and combined treatments showed reduction in cell density and decrease in exopolysaccharide matrix compared to untreated bacterial cells. It indicated that this composition have an antimicrobial activity against S. aureus by disrupting cells. Both compounds

  12. Construction of a full-length infectious bacterial artificial chromosome clone of duck enteritis virus vaccine strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Duck enteritis virus (DEV) is the causative agent of duck viral enteritis, which causes an acute, contagious and lethal disease of many species of waterfowl within the order Anseriformes. In recent years, two laboratories have reported on the successful construction of DEV infectious clones in viral vectors to express exogenous genes. The clones obtained were either created with deletion of viral genes and based on highly virulent strains or were constructed using a traditional overlapping fosmid DNA system. Here, we report the construction of a full-length infectious clone of DEV vaccine strain that was cloned into a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC). Methods A mini-F vector as a BAC that allows the maintenance of large circular DNA in E. coli was introduced into the intergenic region between UL15B and UL18 of a DEV vaccine strain by homologous recombination in chicken embryoblasts (CEFs). Then, the full-length DEV clone pDEV-vac was obtained by electroporating circular viral replication intermediates containing the mini-F sequence into E. coli DH10B and identified by enzyme digestion and sequencing. The infectivity of the pDEV-vac was validated by DEV reconstitution from CEFs transfected with pDEV-vac. The reconstructed virus without mini-F vector sequence was also rescued by co-transfecting the Cre recombinase expression plasmid pCAGGS-NLS/Cre and pDEV-vac into CEF cultures. Finally, the in vitro growth properties and immunoprotection capacity in ducks of the reconstructed viruses were also determined and compared with the parental virus. Results The full genome of the DEV vaccine strain was successfully cloned into the BAC, and this BAC clone was infectious. The in vitro growth properties of these reconstructions were very similar to parental DEV, and ducks immunized with these viruses acquired protection against virulent DEV challenge. Conclusions DEV vaccine virus was cloned as an infectious bacterial artificial chromosome maintaining full

  13. Degradation of nicosulfuron by a novel isolated bacterial strain Klebsiella sp. Y1: condition optimization, kinetics and degradation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Zhang, Xiaolin; Li, Yongmei

    2016-01-01

    A novel bacterial strain Klebsiella sp. Y1 was isolated from the soil of a constructed wetland, and it was identified based on the 16S rDNA sequence analysis. The co-metabolic degradation of nicosulfuron with glucose by Klebsiella sp. Y1 was investigated. The response surface methodology analysis indicated that the optimal pH and temperature were 7.0 and 35 °C, respectively, for the degradation of nicosulfuron. Under the optimal conditions, the degradation of nicosulfuron fitted Haldane kinetics model well. The removal of nicosulfuron was triggered by the acidification of glucose, which accelerated the hydrolysis of nicosulfuron. Then, the C-N bond of the sulfonylurea bridge was attacked and cleaved. Finally, the detected intermediate 2-amino-4,6-dimethoxypyrimidine was further biodegraded.

  14. Broad-spectrum bactericidal activity of a new bioactive grafting material (F18) against clinically important bacterial strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, M T; Campanini, L A; Chinaglia, C R; Peitl, O; Zanotto, E D; Souza, C W O

    2017-12-01

    Infection is the most relevant surgical complication in implant or grafting procedures. Osteomyelitis and other chronic conditions pose a constant challenge in current medical practice. In this context, a grafting biomaterial that possesses antibacterial properties combined with bioactivity could have great clinical impact. Researchers at the Vitreous Materials Laboratory (LaMaV-UFSCar) recently developed a glass composition, named F18, that presents an improved workability range combined with high bioactivity. With F18, one can easily manufacture complex shapes, such as scaffolds, continuous fibres and coat implants. This biomaterial has proven to be a viable alternative for bone and skin regeneration in in vivo tests, however its antimicrobial properties have not been explored. Hence, the purpose of this study was to systematically investigate the antibacterial activity of F18 in powder and fibre forms according to the JIS Z 2801:2010 standard. Whether incorporation of silver into F18 glass could impact its antimicrobial activity was also evaluated. Four clinically relevant Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogenic bacterial strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) were used in this study. In both powder and fibre forms, F18 presented extremely efficient bactericidal activity against all strains tested, eliminating virtually 100% of the bacterial cells after 24 h. Kinetic tests showed that silver doping further increased the bactericidal activity, leading to S. aureus eradication in only 30 min after incubation. Both doped and non-doped glasses demonstrated very high bactericidal activity, making F18 a promising infection-preventing alternative for bone and wound regeneration in clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  15. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) producing bacterial strains of municipal wastewater sludge: isolation, molecular identification, EPS characterization and performance for sludge settling and dewatering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala Subramanian, S; Yan, S; Tyagi, R D; Surampalli, R Y

    2010-04-01

    Wastewater treatment plants often face the problems of sludge settling mainly due to sludge bulking. Generally, synthetic organic polymer and/or inorganic coagulants (ferric chloride, alum and quick lime) are used for sludge settling. These chemicals are very expensive and further pollute the environment. Whereas, the bioflocculants are environment friendly and may be used to flocculate the sludge. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) produced by sludge microorganisms play a definite role in sludge flocculation. In this study, 25 EPS producing strains were isolated from municipal wastewater treatment plant. Microorganisms were selected based on EPS production properties on solid agar medium. Three types of EPS (slime, capsular and bacterial broth mixture of both slime and capsular) were harvested and their characteristics were studied. EPS concentration (dry weight), viscosity and their charge (using a Zetaphoremeter) were also measured. Bioflocculability of obtained EPS was evaluated by measuring the kaolin clay flocculation activity. Six bacterial strains (BS2, BS8, BS9, BS11, BS15 and BS25) were selected based on the kaolin clay flocculation. The slime EPS was better for bioflocculation than capsular EPS and bacterial broth. Therefore, extracted slime EPS (partially purified) from six bacterial strains was studied in terms of sludge settling [sludge volume index (SVI)] and dewatering [capillary suction time (CST)]. Biopolymers produced by individual strains substantially improved dewaterability. The extracted slime EPS from six different strains were partially characterized. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Antibacterial activity of the essential oil of Origanum vulgare L. (Lamiaceae against bacterial multiresistant strains isolated from nosocomial patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalberto Coelho da Costa

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are considered the main therapeutic option to treat bacterial infections; however, there is the disadvantage of increasing bacterial resistance. Thus, the research of antimicrobials of plant origin has been an important alternative. This work aimed at determining the in vitro antibacterial activity of the essential oil of Origanum vulgare L. (Lamiaceae on multiresistant bacteria isolated from biological materials. 24 strains of nosocomial bacteria were used and divided into six different species that were inhibited by the essential oil in the preliminary "screening" which was accomplished by the diffusion technique in agar. MIC was determined by the microdilution method, beginning with solutions with the final concentrations: 8 up to 0.125% with the following results: The four samples (100% of Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis and MRSA were inhibited by the essential oil at the concentration of 0.125%. Three samples (75% of Acinetobacter baumannii at 0.125% and a sample (25% at 0.5%; Klebsiella pneumoniae (75% at 0.125% and 25% at 0.25%; Pseudomonas aeruginosa (75% at 0.5% and 25% at 0.25%. MIC varied from 78 to 83%. It was concluded through the obtained data that there was not difference in the minimum bactericidal concentration (0.5% of the referred oil for Gram positive as well for Gram negative microorganisms.

  17. Activation of dormant bacterial genes by Nonomuraea sp. strain ATCC 39727 mutant-type RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talà, Adelfia; Wang, Guojun; Zemanova, Martina; Okamoto, Susumu; Ochi, Kozo; Alifano, Pietro

    2009-02-01

    There is accumulating evidence that the ability of actinomycetes to produce antibiotics and other bioactive secondary metabolites has been underestimated due to the presence of cryptic gene clusters. The activation of dormant genes is therefore one of the most important areas of experimental research for the discovery of drugs in these organisms. The recent observation that several actinomycetes possess two RNA polymerase beta-chain genes (rpoB) has opened up the possibility, explored in this study, of developing a new strategy to activate dormant gene expression in bacteria. Two rpoB paralogs, rpoB(S) and rpoB(R), provide Nonomuraea sp. strain ATCC 39727 with two functionally distinct and developmentally regulated RNA polymerases. The product of rpoB(R), the expression of which increases after transition to stationary phase, is characterized by five amino acid substitutions located within or close to the so-called rifampin resistance clusters that play a key role in fundamental activities of RNA polymerase. Here, we report that rpoB(R) markedly activated antibiotic biosynthesis in the wild-type Streptomyces lividans strain 1326 and also in strain KO-421, a relaxed (rel) mutant unable to produce ppGpp. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the rpoB(R)-specific missense H426N mutation was essential for the activation of secondary metabolism. Our observations also indicated that mutant-type or duplicated, rpoB often exists in nature among rare actinomycetes and will thus provide a basis for further basic and applied research.

  18. Enhanced biodegradation of alkane hydrocarbons and crude oil by mixed strains and bacterial community analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Li, Chen; Zhou, Zhengxi; Wen, Jianping; You, Xueyi; Mao, Youzhi; Lu, Chunzhe; Huo, Guangxin; Jia, Xiaoqiang

    2014-04-01

    In this study, two strains, Acinetobacter sp. XM-02 and Pseudomonas sp. XM-01, were isolated from soil samples polluted by crude oil at Bohai offshore. The former one could degrade alkane hydrocarbons (crude oil and diesel, 1:4 (v/v)) and crude oil efficiently; the latter one failed to grow on alkane hydrocarbons but could produce rhamnolipid (a biosurfactant) with glycerol as sole carbon source. Compared with pure culture, mixed culture of the two strains showed higher capability in degrading alkane hydrocarbons and crude oil of which degradation rate were increased from 89.35 and 74.32 ± 4.09 to 97.41 and 87.29 ± 2.41 %, respectively. In the mixed culture, Acinetobacter sp. XM-02 grew fast with sufficient carbon source and produced intermediates which were subsequently utilized for the growth of Pseudomonas sp. XM-01 and then, rhamnolipid was produced by Pseudomonas sp. XM-01. Till the end of the process, Acinetobacter sp. XM-02 was inhibited by the rapid growth of Pseudomonas sp. XM-01. In addition, alkane hydrocarbon degradation rate of the mixed culture increased by 8.06 to 97.41 % compared with 87.29 % of the pure culture. The surface tension of medium dropping from 73.2 × 10(-3) to 28.6 × 10(-3) N/m. Based on newly found cooperation between the degrader and the coworking strain, rational investigations and optimal strategies to alkane hydrocarbons biodegradation were utilized for enhancing crude oil biodegradation.

  19. Structure and function of Helicobacter pylori CagA, the first-identified bacterial protein involved in human cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    HATAKEYAMA, Masanori

    2017-01-01

    Chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori cagA-positive strains is the strongest risk factor of gastric cancer. The cagA gene-encoded CagA protein is delivered into gastric epithelial cells via bacterial type IV secretion, where it undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation at the Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala (EPIYA) motifs. Delivered CagA then acts as a non-physiological scaffold/hub protein by interacting with multiple host signaling molecules, most notably the pro-oncogenic phosphatase SHP2 and the polarity-regulating kinase PAR1/MARK, in both tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent and -independent manners. CagA-mediated manipulation of intracellular signaling promotes neoplastic transformation of gastric epithelial cells. Transgenic expression of CagA in experimental animals has confirmed the oncogenic potential of the bacterial protein. Structural polymorphism of CagA influences its scaffold function, which may underlie the geographic difference in the incidence of gastric cancer. Since CagA is no longer required for the maintenance of established gastric cancer cells, studying the role of CagA during neoplastic transformation will provide an excellent opportunity to understand molecular processes underlying “Hit-and-Run” carcinogenesis. PMID:28413197

  20. Investigation of polymerase chain reaction assays to improve detection of bacterial involvement in bovine respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Colin J; Blackburn, Paul; Elliott, Mark; Patterson, Tony I A P; Ellison, Sean; Lahuerta-Marin, Angela; Ball, Hywel J

    2014-09-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) causes severe economic losses to the cattle farming industry worldwide. The major bacterial organisms contributing to the BRD complex are Mannheimia haemolytica, Histophilus somni, Mycoplasma bovis, Pasteurella multocida, and Trueperella pyogenes. The postmortem detection of these organisms in pneumonic lung tissue is generally conducted using standard culture-based techniques where the presence of therapeutic antibiotics in the tissue can inhibit bacterial isolation. In the current study, conventional and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were used to assess the prevalence of these 5 organisms in grossly pneumonic lung samples from 150 animals submitted for postmortem examination, and the results were compared with those obtained using culture techniques. Mannheimia haemolytica was detected in 51 cases (34%) by PCR and in 33 cases (22%) by culture, H. somni was detected in 35 cases (23.3%) by PCR and in 6 cases (4%) by culture, Myc. bovis was detected in 53 cases (35.3%) by PCR and in 29 cases (19.3%) by culture, P. multocida was detected in 50 cases (33.3%) by PCR and in 31 cases (20.7%) by culture, and T. pyogenes was detected in 42 cases (28%) by PCR and in 31 cases (20.7%) by culture, with all differences being statistically significant. The PCR assays indicated positive results for 111 cases (74%) whereas 82 cases (54.6%) were culture positive. The PCR assays have demonstrated a significantly higher rate of detection of all 5 organisms in cases of pneumonia in cattle in Northern Ireland than was detected by current standard procedures. © 2014 The Author(s).

  1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains Potentially Involved in the TB Epidemic in Sweden a Century Ago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenheit, Ramona; Ghebremichael, Solomon; Pennhag, Alexandra; Jonsson, Jerker; Hoffner, Sven; Couvin, David; Koivula, Tuija; Rastogi, Nalin; Källenius, Gunilla

    2012-01-01

    A hundred years ago the prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) in Sweden was one of the highest in the world. In this study we conducted a population-based search for distinct strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolated from patients born in Sweden before 1945. Many of these isolates represent the M. tuberculosis complex population that fueled the TB epidemic in Sweden during the first half of the 20th century. Methods Genetic relationships between strains that caused the epidemic and present day strains were studied by spoligotyping and restriction fragment length polymorphism. Results The majority of the isolates from the elderly population were evolutionary recent Principal Genetic Group (PGG)2/3 strains (363/409 or 88.8%), and only a low proportion were ancient PGG1 strains (24/409 or 5.9%). Twenty-two were undefined. The isolates demonstrated a population where the Euro-American superlineage dominated; in particular with Haarlem (41.1%) and T (37.7%) spoligotypes and only 21.2% belonged to other spoligotype families. Isolates from the elderly population clustered much less frequently than did isolates from a young control group population. Conclusions A closely knit pool of PGG2/3 strains restricted to Sweden and its immediate neighbours appears to have played a role in the epidemic, while PGG1 strains are usually linked to migrants in todaýs Sweden. Further studies of these outbreak strains may give indications of why the epidemic waned. PMID:23056484

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains potentially involved in the TB epidemic in Sweden a century ago.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona Groenheit

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: A hundred years ago the prevalence of tuberculosis (TB in Sweden was one of the highest in the world. In this study we conducted a population-based search for distinct strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolated from patients born in Sweden before 1945. Many of these isolates represent the M. tuberculosis complex population that fueled the TB epidemic in Sweden during the first half of the 20(th century. METHODS: Genetic relationships between strains that caused the epidemic and present day strains were studied by spoligotyping and restriction fragment length polymorphism. RESULTS: The majority of the isolates from the elderly population were evolutionary recent Principal Genetic Group (PGG2/3 strains (363/409 or 88.8%, and only a low proportion were ancient PGG1 strains (24/409 or 5.9%. Twenty-two were undefined. The isolates demonstrated a population where the Euro-American superlineage dominated; in particular with Haarlem (41.1% and T (37.7% spoligotypes and only 21.2% belonged to other spoligotype families. Isolates from the elderly population clustered much less frequently than did isolates from a young control group population. CONCLUSIONS: A closely knit pool of PGG2/3 strains restricted to Sweden and its immediate neighbours appears to have played a role in the epidemic, while PGG1 strains are usually linked to migrants in todaýs Sweden. Further studies of these outbreak strains may give indications of why the epidemic waned.

  3. Antibacterial action of doped CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocrystals on multidrug resistant bacterial strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velho-Pereira, S.; Noronha, A.; Mathias, A.; Zakane, R.; Naik, V.; Naik, P. [Department of Biotechnology, St. Xavier' s College, Goa (India); Salker, A.V. [Department of Chemistry, Goa University, Goa (India); Naik, S.R., E-mail: srnaik19@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, St. Xavier' s College, Goa (India)

    2015-07-01

    The bactericidal effect of pristine and doped cobalt ferrite nanoparticles has been evaluated against multiple drug resistant clinical strains by assessing the number of colony-forming units (CFU). Monophasic polycrystalline ferrites have been prepared by the malate–glycolate sol–gel autocombustion method as confirmed by the X-ray diffraction study. Various changes occurring during the preparative stages have been demonstrated using TG–DTA analysis which is well complemented by the FTIR spectroscopy. The antibacterial studies carried out demonstrate a bactericidal effect of the nanoparticles wherein the number of CFU has been found to decrease with doping. Cellular distortions have been revealed through SEM. Variation in the number of CFU with dopant type has also been reported herein. - Graphical abstract: Antibacterial action of doped cobalt ferrites resulting in the lyses of multi-drug resistant bacterial strains. - Highlights: • The paper reports an antibacterial study of rare earth doped cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. • Monophasic compounds have been prepared by the sol–gel autocombustion method. • Bactericidal property has been evaluated based on the number of colony forming units. • Variation in bactericidal action with respect to the dopant type has been observed. • Cellular distortions resulting in cell lysis are confirmed from the SEM images.

  4. Characterization of biocontrol bacterial strains isolated from a suppressiveness-induced soil after amendment with composted almond shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vida, Carmen; Cazorla, Francisco M; de Vicente, Antonio

    The improvement in soil quality of avocado crops through organic amendments with composted almond shells has a positive effect on crop yield and plant health, and enhances soil suppressiveness against the phytopathogenic fungus Rosellinia necatrix. In previous studies, induced soil suppressiveness against this pathogen was related to stimulation of Gammaproteobacteria, especially some members of Pseudomonas spp. with biocontrol-related activities. In this work, we isolated bacteria from this suppressiveness-induced amended soil using a selective medium for Pseudomonas-like microorganisms. We characterized the obtained bacterial collection to aid in identification, including metabolic profiles, antagonistic responses, hybridization to biosynthetic genes of antifungal compounds, production of lytic exoenzymatic activities and plant growth-promotion-related traits, and sequenced and compared amplified 16S rDNA genes from representative bacteria. The final selection of representative strains mainly belonged to the genus Pseudomonas, but also included the genera Serratia and Stenotrophomonas. Their biocontrol-related activities were assayed using the experimental avocado model, and results showed that all selected strains protected the avocado roots against R. necatrix. This work confirmed the biocontrol activity of these Gammaproteobacteria-related members against R. necatrix following specific stimulation in a suppressiveness-induced soil after a composted almond shell application. Copyright © 2017 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Antimicrobial and Anti-Swarming Effects of Bacteriocins and Biosurfactants from Probiotic Bacterial Strains against Proteus spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Goudarzi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background:   Proteus spp. belongs to the family of Enterobacteriaceae. These bacteria are Gram-negative and motile microorganisms and known as the third most common causes of urinary tract infections. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of some secondary metabolites from probiotic strains of Lactobacillus spp. on swarming and growth of Proteus mirabilis and P. vulgaris. Methods:   After determination of optimal conditions for the growth and production of antimicrobials, bacteriocins and biosurfactants were partially purified from Lactobacillus culture supernatants. Then, effects of the purified compounds on growth and swarming migration of Proteus spp. were examined in the presence of various concentrations of semi-purified compounds. Results:  Results showed that the partially purified bacteriocins inhibited Proteus spp. swarming distance and had a significant reduction on the bacterial growth curves. Biosurfactants in a solvent form did not have any considerable effects on factors produced by Proteus spp. Conclusion:  According to the results, the secondary metabolites, especially bacteriocins or bacteriocin-like substances derived from Lactobacillus strains, can inhibit or reduce growth and swarming migration of Proteus spp. which are considered as the bacteria major virulence factors.

  6. Bioconversion of styrene to poly(hydroxyalkanoate) (PHA) by the new bacterial strain Pseudomonas putida NBUS12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Giin-Yu Amy; Chen, Chia-Lung; Ge, Liya; Li, Ling; Tan, Swee Ngin; Wang, Jing-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Styrene is a toxic pollutant commonly found in waste effluents from plastic processing industries. We herein identified and characterized microorganisms for bioconversion of the organic eco-pollutant styrene into a valuable biopolymer medium-chain-length poly(hydroxyalkanoate) (mcl-PHA). Twelve newly-isolated styrene-degrading Pseudomonads were obtained and partial phaC genes were detected by PCR in these isolates. These isolates assimilated styrene to produce mcl-PHA, forming PHA contents between 0.05±0.00 and 23.10±3.25% cell dry mass (% CDM). The best-performing isolate was identified as Pseudomonas putida NBUS12. A genetic analysis of 16S rDNA and phaZ genes revealed P. putida NBUS12 as a genetically-distinct strain from existing phenotypically-similar bacterial strains. This bacterium achieved a final biomass of 1.28±0.10 g L(-1) and PHA content of 32.49±2.40% CDM. The extracted polymer was mainly comprised of 3-hydroxyhexanoate (C6 ), 3-hydroxyoctanoate (C8 ), 3-hydroxydecanoate (C10 ), 3-hydroxydodecanoate (C12 ), and 3-hydroxytetradecanoate (C14 ) monomers at a ratio of 2:42:1257:17:1. These results collectively suggested that P. putida NBUS12 is a promising candidate for the biotechnological conversion of styrene into mcl-PHA.

  7. Emergence of macrolide-resistant Campylobacter strains in chicken meat in Poland and the resistance mechanisms involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rożynek, Elżbieta; Maćkiw, Elżbieta; Kamińska, Wanda; Tomczuk, Katarzyna; Antos-Bielska, Małgorzata; Dzierżanowska-Fangrat, Katarzyna; Korsak, Dorota

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms involved in erythromycin resistance in the first resistant Campylobacter strains isolated from chicken meat in Poland, and analyzed their genetic relatedness. A total of 297 samples of raw chicken meat and giblets from retail trade in the Warsaw area collected between 2006 and 2009 were examined. Among 211 Campylobacter strains (52 C. jejuni and 159 C. coli), 10 C. coli isolates (4.7%) were resistant to erythromycin. All the C. jejuni strains were susceptible. Among the high-level macrolide-resistant isolates, two different point mutations within the domain V of the 23S rRNA gene were observed. Eight of the strains had adenine→guanine transitions at position 2075, two other isolates at position 2074. Sequence analysis of ribosomal proteins L4 (rplD) and L22 (rplV) indicated that ribosomal protein modifications did not contribute to macrolide resistance. A mutation in the inverted repeat in the cmeR and cmeABC intergenic region was found in a single resistant strain. The genetic relatedness of Campylobacter isolates showed that two resistant strains obtained from the same production plant in a 2-month interval were genetically identical. The risk of transmission of resistant strains via the food chain highlights the need for constant monitoring of resistance in Campylobacter isolates of human and animal hosts.

  8. Recovery and screening for antibiotic susceptibility of potential bacterial pathogens from the oral cavity of shark species involved in attacks on humans in Recife, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interaminense, J A; Nascimento, D C O; Ventura, R F; Batista, J E C; Souza, M M C; Hazin, F H V; Pontes-Filho, N T; Lima-Filho, J V

    2010-08-01

    The number of incidents involving sharks and humans at beaches in Recife, on the north-eastern Brazilian coast, is among the highest worldwide. In addition, wound infections in survivors are common; but the nature and risk of the aetiological agents is unknown. In the present study, 81 potential bacterial pathogens were identified in the oral cavity of sharks involved in attacks in Recife, and were subjected to antibiotic susceptibility tests using the standardized disc-diffusion method. The majority were enterobacteria such as Enterobacter spp., Citrobacter spp., Proteus spp., Providencia alcalifaciens, Escherichia coli, Moellerella wisconcensis and Leclercia adecarboxylata. Other Gram-negative bacteria included Vibrio spp., Burkholderia cepacia, Acinetobacter spp. and Pseudomonas spp. In addition, coagulase-positive and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp., Enterococcus spp. and Micrococcus spp. were identified, besides Streptococcus spp. from the viridans group. Resistance was especially found in the Proteus mirabilis and Citrobacter freundii, and ranged from 4 to 6 antibiotics out of the 13 tested. Gentamicin and vancomycin were the most effective against Gram-positive cocci strains, whereas levofloxacin was fully inhibitory against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. These data are discussed in light of a retrospective evaluation of the medical records of three shark victims treated at Restauração Hospital in Recife.

  9. Rhizospheric Bacterial Strain Brevibacterium casei MH8a Colonizes Plant Tissues and Enhances Cd, Zn, Cu Phytoextraction by White Mustard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płociniczak, Tomasz; Sinkkonen, Aki; Romantschuk, Martin; Sułowicz, Sławomir; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pollution by heavy metals has become a serious problem in the world. Phytoextraction, which is one of the plant-based technologies, has attracted the most attention for the bioremediation of soils polluted with these contaminants. The aim of this study was to determine whether the multiple-tolerant bacterium, Brevibacterium casei MH8a isolated from the heavy metal-contaminated rhizosphere soil of Sinapis alba L., is able to promote plant growth and enhance Cd, Zn, and Cu uptake by white mustard under laboratory conditions. Additionally, the ability of the rifampicin-resistant spontaneous mutant of MH8a to colonize plant tissues and its mechanisms of plant growth promotion were also examined. In order to assess the ecological consequences of bioaugmentation on autochthonous bacteria, the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis was used. The MH8a strain exhibited the ability to produce ammonia, 1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase, indole 3-acetic acid and HCN but was not able to solubilize inorganic phosphate and produce siderophores. Introduction of MH8a into soil significantly increased S. alba biomass and the accumulation of Cd (208%), Zn (86%), and Cu (39%) in plant shoots in comparison with those grown in non-inoculated soil. Introduced into the soil, MH8a was able to enter the plant and was found in the roots and leaves of inoculated plants thus indicating its endophytic features. PLFA analysis revealed that the MH8a that was introduced into soil had a temporary influence on the structure of the autochthonous bacterial communities. The plant growth-promoting features of the MH8a strain and its ability to enhance the metal uptake by white mustard and its long-term survival in soil as well as its temporary impact on autochthonous microorganisms make the strain a suitable candidate for the promotion of plant growth and the efficiency of phytoextraction.

  10. Rhizospheric bacterial strain Brevibacterium casei MH8a colonizes plant tissues and enhances Cd, Zn, Cu phytoextraction by white mustard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz ePłociniczak

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Environmental pollution by heavy metals has become a serious problem in the world. Phytoextraction, which is one of the plant-based technologies, has attracted the most attention for the bioremediation of soils polluted with these contaminants.The aim of this study was to determine whether the multiple-tolerant bacterium, Brevibacterium casei MH8a isolated from the heavy metal-contaminated rhizosphere soil of Sinapis alba L., is able to promote plant growth and enhance Cd, Zn and Cu uptake by white mustard under laboratory conditions. Additionally, the ability of the rifampicin-resistant spontaneous mutant of MH8a to colonize plant tissues and its mechanisms of plant growth promotion were also examined. In order to assess the ecological consequences of bioaugmentation on autochthonous bacteria, the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA analysis was used. The MH8a strain exhibited the ability to produce ammonia, 1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase, indole 3-acetic acid and HCN but was not able to solubilize inorganic phosphate and produce siderophores. Introduction of MH8a into soil significantly increased S. alba biomass and the accumulation of Cd (208%, Zn (86% and Cu (39% in plant shoots in comparison with those grown in non-inoculated soil. Introduced into the soil, MH8a was able to enter the plant and was found in the roots and leaves of inoculated plants thus indicating its endophytic features. PLFA analysis revealed that the MH8a that was introduced into soil had a temporary influence on the structure of the autochthonous bacterial communities. The plant growth-promoting features of the MH8a strain and its ability to enhance the metal uptake by white mustard and its long-term survival in soil as well as its temporary impact on autochthonous microorganisms make the strain a suitable candidate for the promotion of plant growth and the efficiency of phytoextraction.

  11. Bioremediation of petroleum based contaminants with biosurfactant produced by a newly isolated petroleum oil degrading bacterial strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debajit Borah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum based hydrocarbon degrading and biosurfactant producing bacterial strain was isolated from an automobile engine. The strain was identified as Bacillus cereus DRDU1 on the basis of 16S rDNA sequencing analysis. The strain was found to be efficiently degrading 96% of kerosene making it a potential tool for bioremediation of petroleum based contaminants. Production and optimization of the biosurfactant produced by the isolate were also carried out. Surface hydrophobicity trait of isolate was found to be 60.67 ± 1.53% and foaming percentage of the crude biosurfactant was found to be 31.33 ± 0.58%. The presence of amino acids and sugar moieties in the biosurfactant was confirmed by biochemical tests and were further validated by FTIR (the Fourier transform infrared spectrometric analysis revealing the presence of υOH, υCOO, υCOOH, υCH (stretching, υNH, υCH2, υCH3, and υCH (bending, and υCO (ester in the surfactant. The decrease in contact angle of hydrocarbon oil from (30.67 ± 1.15° to (21.3 ± 1.53° respectively after 3 and 6 days of incubation reveals its potential to emulsify petroleum oil. Further, emulsification index (E24 of biosurfactant against kerosene, crude oil, and used engine oil were determined to be 55.33 ± 1.53%, 29.67 ± 1.53%, and 20 ± 1% respectively which attracts its future application in MEOR (microbial enhanced oil recovery process.

  12. Endozoicomonas genomes reveal functional adaptation and plasticity in bacterial strains symbiotically associated with diverse marine hosts

    KAUST Repository

    Neave, Matthew J.

    2017-01-17

    Endozoicomonas bacteria are globally distributed and often abundantly associated with diverse marine hosts including reef-building corals, yet their function remains unknown. In this study we generated novel Endozoicomonas genomes from single cells and metagenomes obtained directly from the corals Stylophora pistillata, Pocillopora verrucosa, and Acropora humilis. We then compared these culture-independent genomes to existing genomes of bacterial isolates acquired from a sponge, sea slug, and coral to examine the functional landscape of this enigmatic genus. Sequencing and analysis of single cells and metagenomes resulted in four novel genomes with 60–76% and 81–90% genome completeness, respectively. These data also confirmed that Endozoicomonas genomes are large and are not streamlined for an obligate endosymbiotic lifestyle, implying that they have free-living stages. All genomes show an enrichment of genes associated with carbon sugar transport and utilization and protein secretion, potentially indicating that Endozoicomonas contribute to the cycling of carbohydrates and the provision of proteins to their respective hosts. Importantly, besides these commonalities, the genomes showed evidence for differential functional specificity and diversification, including genes for the production of amino acids. Given this metabolic diversity of Endozoicomonas we propose that different genotypes play disparate roles and have diversified in concert with their hosts.

  13. CMEIAS-Aided Microscopy of the Spatial Ecology of Individual Bacterial Interactions Involving Cell-to-Cell Communication within Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank B. Dazzo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes how the quantitative analytical tools of CMEIAS image analysis software can be used to investigate in situ microbial interactions involving cell-to-cell communication within biofilms. Various spatial pattern analyses applied to the data extracted from the 2-dimensional coordinate positioning of individual bacterial cells at single-cell resolution indicate that microbial colonization within natural biofilms is not a spatially random process, but rather involves strong positive interactions between communicating cells that influence their neighbors’ aggregated colonization behavior. Geostatistical analysis of the data provide statistically defendable estimates of the micrometer scale and interpolation maps of the spatial heterogeneity and local intensity at which these microbial interactions autocorrelate with their spatial patterns of distribution. Including in situ image analysis in cell communication studies fills an important gap in understanding the spatially dependent microbial ecophysiology that governs the intensity of biofilm colonization and its unique architecture.

  14. CMEIAS-aided microscopy of the spatial ecology of individual bacterial interactions involving cell-to-cell communication within biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazzo, Frank B

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes how the quantitative analytical tools of CMEIAS image analysis software can be used to investigate in situ microbial interactions involving cell-to-cell communication within biofilms. Various spatial pattern analyses applied to the data extracted from the 2-dimensional coordinate positioning of individual bacterial cells at single-cell resolution indicate that microbial colonization within natural biofilms is not a spatially random process, but rather involves strong positive interactions between communicating cells that influence their neighbors' aggregated colonization behavior. Geostatistical analysis of the data provide statistically defendable estimates of the micrometer scale and interpolation maps of the spatial heterogeneity and local intensity at which these microbial interactions autocorrelate with their spatial patterns of distribution. Including in situ image analysis in cell communication studies fills an important gap in understanding the spatially dependent microbial ecophysiology that governs the intensity of biofilm colonization and its unique architecture.

  15. An Arabidopsis Homolog of the Bacterial Cell Division Inhibitor SulA Is Involved in Plastid DivisionW⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynaud, Cécile; Cassier-Chauvat, Corinne; Perennes, Claudette; Bergounioux, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    Plastids have evolved from an endosymbiosis between a cyanobacterial symbiont and a eukaryotic host cell. Their division is mediated both by proteins of the host cell and conserved bacterial division proteins. Here, we identified a new component of the plastid division machinery, Arabidopsis thaliana SulA. Disruption of its cyanobacterial homolog (SSulA) in Synechocystis and overexpression of an AtSulA-green fluorescent protein fusion in Arabidopsis demonstrate that these genes are involved in cell and plastid division, respectively. Overexpression of AtSulA inhibits plastid division in planta but rescues plastid division defects caused by overexpression of AtFtsZ1-1 and AtFtsZ2-1, demonstrating that its role in plastid division may involve an interaction with AtFtsZ1-1 and AtFtsZ2-1. PMID:15208387

  16. Genome sequencing of a virulent avian Pasteurella multocida strain GX-Pm reveals the candidate genes involved in the pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chengjie; Sizhu, Suolang; Luo, Qingping; Xu, Xuewen; Fu, Lei; Zhang, Anding

    2016-04-01

    Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida) was first shown to be the causative agent of fowl cholera by Louis Pasteur in 1881. First genomic study was performed on an avirulent avian strain Pm70, and until 2013, two genomes of virulent avian strains X73 and P1059 were sequenced. Comparative genome study supplied important information for further study on the pathogenesis of fowl cholera. In the previous study, a capsular serotype A strain GX-Pm was isolated from the liver of a chicken, which died during an outbreak of fowl cholera in 2011. The strain showed multiple drug resistance and was highly virulent to chickens. Therefore, the present study performed the genome sequencing and a comparative genomic analysis to reveal the candidate genes involved in virulence of P. multocida. Sequenced draft genome sequence of GX-Pm was 2,292,886 bp, contained 2941 protein-coding genes, 5 genomic islands, 4 IS elements and 2 prophage regions. Notability, all the predicted drug-resistance genes were included in predicted genomic islands. A comparative genome study on virulent avian strains P1059, X73 and GX-Pm with the avirulent avian strain Pm 70 indicated that 475 unique genes were only identified in either of virulent strains but absent in the avirulent strain. Among these genes, 20 genes were contained within genomes of all three virulent strains, including a few of putative virulence genes. Further characterization of the pathogenic functions of these genes would benefit the understanding of pathogenesis of fowl cholera. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Voice Prosthetic Biofilm Formation and Candida Morphogenic Conversions in Absence and Presence of Different Bacterial Strains and Species on Silicone-Rubber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Mei, Henny C.; Buijssen, Kevin J. D. A.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; Ovchinnikova, Ekatarina; Geertsema-Doornbusch, Gesinda I.; Atema-Smit, Jelly; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Busscher, Henk J.

    2014-01-01

    Morphogenic conversion of Candida from a yeast to hyphal morphology plays a pivotal role in the pathogenicity of Candida species. Both Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis, in combination with a variety of different bacterial strains and species, appear in biofilms on silicone-rubber voice

  18. Cytokine responses in primary chicken embryo intestinal cells infected with Campylobacter jejuni strains of human and chicken origin and the expression of bacterial virulence-associated genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yiping; Ingmer, Hanne; Madsen, Mogens

    2008-01-01

    . jejuni strains are capable of invading the CEICs and stimulate these cells in a pro-inflammatory manner and during this interaction the expression of the bacterial virulence-associated genes ciaB, dnaJ and racR is increased. Furthermore, incubation of bacteria with conditioned cell- and bacteria...

  19. In vitro antibacterial activity of methanol and water extracts of adiantum capillus veneris and tagetes patula against multidrug resistant bacterial strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, M.M.; Ahmad, B.; Bashid, E.; Hashim, S.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of present study was to screen the antimicrobial activities of extracts of leaves and stems of Adiantum capillus veneris and Tagetes patula against multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial strains. Extracts from the leaves and stems of these plants were extracted with methanol and water and tested for their antibacterial activity by disc diffusion method against ten MDR bacterial strains i.e., Citrobacter freundii, Escherichia coli, Providencia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus vulgaris, Salmonella typhi, Shigella and Vibrio cholerae. Leaves methanol extract (LME) of Adiantum showed maximum Zone of Inhibition (ZI) against Providencia, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Shigella, Vibrio cholerae, Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus vulgaris and Salmonella typhi, whereas its stem methanol extract (SME) was very active against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella typhi. Similarly LME of Tagetes showed highest ZI against Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae while SME showed highest ZI to Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae, Providencia, Shigella and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Leaves water extract (LWE) of Adiantum was very active against all ten bacterial strains while its stem water extract (SWE) showed maximum ZI against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella typhi, Shigella, Proteus vulgaris and Providencia. LWE of Tagetes was only active against Vibrio cholerae whereas SWE was very active against Salmonella typhi and active against P. vulgaris, Citrobacter freundii and Vibrio cholerae. It was concluded from this study that extracts of both Adiantum and Tagetes have prominent activities against most of the MDR bacterial strains and needs further studies for utmost benefits. (author)

  20. Bacterial Polymertropism, the Response to Strain-Induced Alignment of Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, David J.

    In nature, bacteria often live in surface-associated communities known as biofilms. Biofilm-forming bacteria deposit a layer of polysaccharide on the surfaces they inhabit; hence, polysaccharide is their immediate environment on any surface. In this study, we examined how the physical characteristics of polysaccharide substrates influence the behavior of the biofilm-forming bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. M. xanthus colonies, and indeed those of the majority of biofilm-forming species tested, respond to the compression-induced deformation of polysaccharide substrates by preferentially spreading across the surface perpendicular to the axis of compression. This response is conserved across multiple distantly related phyla and is found in species with an array of distinct motility apparatuses.The birefringence and small angle X-ray scattering patterns of compressed polysaccharide substrates indicate that the directed surface movements of these bacteria consistently match the orientation of the long axes of aligned and tightly packed polysaccharide fibers in compressed substrates. Therefore, we refer to this behavior as polymertropism to denote that the directed movements are a response to the physical arrangement of the change in packing and alignment of the polymers in the substrate. In addition to altering the colony morphology we find the behavior of groups of cells, called flares, is also affected in several species resulting in increased flare speed, duration, and displacement on compressed gel substrates.We suggest that polymertropism, which requires a downward-facing motility apparatus in M. xanthus, may be responsible for the observed tendency of bacterial cells to follow trails of extruded and presumably aligned polysaccharides, which their neighbors secrete and deposit on the substrate as they move across it. Polymertropism may also play a role in the organization of bacteria in a biofilm, as the iterative process of polysaccharide trail deposition and

  1. Efficient biotransformation of herbicide diuron by bacterial strain Micrococcus sp. PS-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Priyanka; Chopra, Adity; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh; Suri, C Raman

    2010-11-01

    A Gram-positive, Micrococcus sp. strain PS-1 capable of utilizing phenylurea herbicide diuron as a sole carbon source at a high concentration (up to 250 ppm) was isolated from diuron storage site by selective enrichment study. The taxonomic characterization with 16S rRNA gene sequencing (1,477 bp) identified PS-1 as a member of Micrococcus sp. It was studied for the degradation of diuron and a range of its analogues (monuron, linuron, monolinuron, chlortoluron and fenuron). The shake flasks experiments demonstrated fast degradation of diuron (up to 96% at 250 ppm within 30 h incubation) with the addition of small quantity (0.01%) of non-ionic detergent. The relative degradation profile by the isolate was in the order of fenuron > monuron > diuron > linuron > monolinuron > chlortoluron. Further, the biochemical characterization of catabolic pathway by spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques demonstrated that the degradation proceeded via formation of dealkylated metabolites to form 3,4-dichloroaniline (3,4-DCA). It was the major metabolite formed, associated with profound increase in degradation kinetics in presence of appropriate additive.

  2. Characterization of a novel oxyfluorfen-degrading bacterial strain Chryseobacterium aquifrigidense and its biochemical degradation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huanhuan; Xu, Jun; Dong, Fengshou; Liu, Xingang; Wu, Yanbing; Wu, Xiaohu; Zheng, Yongquan

    2016-08-01

    Persistent use of the diphenyl ether herbicides oxyfluorfen may seriously increase the health risks and ecological safety problems. A newly bacterium R-21 isolated from active soil was able to degrade and utilize oxyfluorfen as the sole carbon source. R-21 was identified as Chryseobacterium aquifrigidense by morphology, physiobiochemical characteristics, and genetic analysis. Under the optimum cultural conditions (pH 6.9, temperature 33.4 °C, and inoculum size 0.2 g L(-1)), R-21 could degrade 92.1 % of oxyfluorfen at 50 mg L(-1) within 5 days. During oxyfluorfen degradation, six metabolites were detected and identified by atmospheric pressure gas chromatography coupled to quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry and ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry, and a plausible degradation pathway was deduced. Strain R-21 is a promising potential in bioremediation of oxyfluorfen-contaminated environments.

  3. Detection of bacterial species involved in perimplantitis concerned with cultural and RT-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Gatti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Dental implants offer new treatment options for edentulous either partially or completely, now represent a viable alternative to conventional fixed protheses. Dental implants are colonized by a flora dominated by Gram-positive facultative aerobic, while in patients with bone loss and formation of pockets peri-implant diseases was found a significant difference in the composition of microflora, bacteria, Gram-negative anaerobes in particular Fusobacterium spp., Treponema denticola (Spirochetes, Tannerella forsythensis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Prevotella intermedia as interim black-pigmented bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis, often in high concentrations. Aims. The purpose of this study was to identify those at risk of perimplantitis using 2 techniques: RT-PCR examination of trade and culture. The results were compared taking into consideration the advantages and disadvantages of both methods. Materials and methods.We studied 24 patients (14 women and 10 men, aged, women between 43 and 76 years, with an average of 63.8 + / - 10.9 years, men between 45 and 88 years with a average of 64.3 years + / - 12.5 years. Was performed a double levy of sub-gingival plaque at multiple sites that had an implant CAL (clinical attachment level> 4mm in order to assess the microbiological identification with the two techniques: Examining culture and Real-Time PCR of Commerce ( Gum-Sunstar that identifies 4 bacterial species: A. actinomycetemcomitans (A.a., P.gingivalis (P.g., T.forsythensis (T.f., and T.denticola (T.d.. Results. All patients studied were positive to both tests with charger high: the consideration of tenure, with CFU / ml > 105, was positive in 66.6% of samples by:T.f., and P.g., in 12.5% for A.a., while T.d. not been sought by examining culture, the RT-PCR was positive, with high loads, in 95.8% of samples for T.f., in 79.1% for P.g., in 12.5% for A.a. and 20.8% for T.d.The test crop showed the presence of even P.intermedia in 91

  4. Involvement of a bacterial microcompartment in the metabolism of fucose and rhamnose by Clostridium phytofermentans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Petit

    Full Text Available Clostridium phytofermentans, an anaerobic soil bacterium, can directly convert plant biomass into biofuels. The genome of C. phytofermentans contains three loci with genes encoding shell proteins of bacterial microcompartments (BMC, organelles composed entirely of proteins.One of the BMC loci has homology to a BMC-encoding locus implicated in the conversion of fucose to propanol and propionate in a human gut commensal, Roseburia inulinivorans. We hypothesized that it had a similar role in C. phytofermentans. When C. phytofermentans was grown on fucose, the major products identified were ethanol, propanol and propionate. Transmission electron microscopy of fucose- and rhamnose-grown cultures revealed polyhedral structures, presumably BMCs. Microarray analysis indicated that during growth on fucose, operons coding for the BMC locus, fucose dissimilatory enzymes, and an ATP-binding cassette transporter became the dominant transcripts. These data are consistent with fucose fermentation producing a 1,2-propanediol intermediate that is further metabolized in the microcompartment encoded in the BMC locus. Growth on another deoxyhexose sugar, rhamnose, resulted in the expression of the same BMC locus and similar fermentation products. However, a different set of dissimilatory enzymes and transport system genes were induced. Quite surprisingly, growth on fucose or rhamnose also led to the expression of a diverse array of complex plant polysaccharide-degrading enzymes.Based on physiological, genomic, and microarray analyses, we propose a model for the fermentation of fucose and rhamnose in C. phytofermentans that includes enzymes encoded in the same BMC locus. Comparative genomic analysis suggests that this BMC may be present in other clostridial species.

  5. Characterization and evaluation of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain WF02 regarding its biocontrol activities and genetic responses against bacterial wilt in two different resistant tomato cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chu-Ning; Lin, Chan-Pin; Hsieh, Feng-Chia; Lee, Sook-Kuan; Cheng, Kuan-Chen; Liu, Chi-Te

    2016-11-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain WF02, isolated from soil collected at Wufeng Mountain, Taiwan, has siderophore-producing ability and in vitro antagonistic activity against bacterial wilt pathogen. To determine the impact of plant genotype on biocontrol effectiveness, we treated soil with this strain before infecting susceptible (L390) and moderately resistant (Micro-Tom) tomato cultivars with Ralstonia solanacearum strain Pss4. We also compared the efficacy of this strain with that of commercial Bacillus subtilis strain Y1336. Strain WF02 provided longer lasting protection against R. solanacearum than did strain Y1336 and controlled the development of wilt in both cultivars. To elucidate the genetic responses in these plants under WF02 treatment, we analyzed the temporal expression of defense-related genes in leaves. The salicylic acid pathway-related genes phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and pathogenesis-related protein 1a were up-regulated in both cultivars, whereas expression of the jasmonic acid pathway-related gene lipoxygenase was only elevated in the susceptible tomato cultivar (L390). These results suggest that WF02 can provide protection against bacterial wilt in tomato cultivars with different levels of disease resistance via direct and indirect modes of action.

  6. Gram-positive bacterial resistant strains of interest in animal and public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Antonio Pilegi Sfaciotte

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Among multiresistant Gram-positive microorganisms, stands out methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus (MRS, an opportunistic pathogen associated with hospital acquired and community infections reported in medicine and large increase in reports of veterinary medicine. In veterinary medicine, numerous reports regarding several species of animals have been described. MRS is intrinsically resistant to all ?-lactam drugs. In veterinary medicine, numerous reports regarding several species of animals have been described, but Staphylococcus aureus with intermediate resistance and resistant to vancomycin (VISA/VRSA has not yet been reported in veterinary medicine, still need further study. Staphylococcus spp. are also related to antimicrobial resistance of macrolides, lincosamides, and streptogramin B (MLSB group, that has the same mechanism of action, although the drugs belong to different classes. In veterinary medicine, clindamycin (lincosamide class is widely used for skin infections, wounds, bone infections, pneumonia, infections of the oral cavity, and infections caused by anaerobic bacteria, besides being used for treatments of MRS infections. Enterococcus is another resistant Gram-positive microorganism, from which vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VREs are the most important strains. There are several reports of VREs in veterinary medicine due the use of a similar antimicrobial (avoparcin in livestock; therefore this group of microorganisms has now acquired great prominence since vancomycin is considered as the last resort for the treatment of MRS and Enterococcus associated with nosocomial infections in humans. The biggest problem these microorganisms and their resistance mechanisms cause is related to its huge impact on public health due to the increasing close contact between animals and humans. The objective of this review was to identify the main Gram-positive microorganisms associated with animals, describing their mechanisms of action that

  7. Involvement of Trichoderma asperellum strain T6 in regulating iron acquisition in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Yaqing; Zhang, Jiaojiao

    2014-07-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a major plant nutritional disorder in many parts of the world, particularly in areas with saline soils. Among the numerous root-associated microbes that are beneficial for plant nutrient uptake, Trichoderma spp. are the most effective rhizosphere fungi for enhancing plant growth and plant resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. To investigate the potential mechanisms of action of Trichoderma on insoluble Fe in the soil, which is difficult for plants to absorb and utilize, a high siderophore-producing strain of Trichoderma T6, was isolated from the rhizosphere of cucumber plants. The strain was identified as T. asperellum based on the morphological features and molecular phylogenetic analyses. Applying strain T6 to sterile soil could increase soil levels of Fe(2+) and siderophores, as well as increase Fe(2+) and Fe(3+)-chelate reductase (FCR) activity in cucumber tissues. Purified siderophore eluent (PSE) increased plant growth, thus confirming its role in plant growth promotion. Moreover, extracellular Fe(3+) reducing activity and three kinds of organic acids were detected in the culture filtrate of strain T6. These results indicate that strain T6 influences plant Fe absorption in several ways. Siderophore-based Fe chelation is effective in providing Fe to plants, organic acids, and Fe(3+) reducing enzymes may participate in the solubilization and reduction of insoluble Fe(3+) to Fe(2+). © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Growth promotion and colonization of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum cv. Alamo by bacterial endophyte Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Seonhwa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Switchgrass is one of the most promising bioenergy crop candidates for the US. It gives relatively high biomass yield and can grow on marginal lands. However, its yields vary from year to year and from location to location. Thus it is imperative to develop a low input and sustainable switchgrass feedstock production system. One of the most feasible ways to increase biomass yields is to harness benefits of microbial endophytes. Results We demonstrate that one of the most studied plant growth promoting bacterial endophytes, Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN, is able to colonize and significantly promote growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under in vitro, growth chamber, and greenhouse conditions. In several in vitro experiments, the average fresh weight of PsJN-inoculated plants was approximately 50% higher than non-inoculated plants. When one-month-old seedlings were grown in a growth chamber for 30 days, the PsJN-inoculated Alamo plants had significantly higher shoot and root biomass compared to controls. Biomass yield (dry weight averaged from five experiments was 54.1% higher in the inoculated treatment compared to non-inoculated control. Similar results were obtained in greenhouse experiments with transplants grown in 4-gallon pots for two months. The inoculated plants exhibited more early tillers and persistent growth vigor with 48.6% higher biomass than controls. We also found that PsJN could significantly promote growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under sub-optimal conditions. However, PsJN-mediated growth promotion in switchgrass is genotype specific. Conclusions Our results show B. phytofirmans strain PsJN significantly promotes growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under different conditions, especially in the early growth stages leading to enhanced production of tillers. This phenomenon may benefit switchgrass establishment in the first year. Moreover, PsJN significantly stimulated growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under sub

  9. Effects of forest management practices in temperate beech forests on bacterial and fungal communities involved in leaf litter degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purahong, Witoon; Kapturska, Danuta; Pecyna, Marek J; Jariyavidyanont, Katalee; Kaunzner, Jennifer; Juncheed, Kantida; Uengwetwanit, Tanaporn; Rudloff, Renate; Schulz, Elke; Hofrichter, Martin; Schloter, Michael; Krüger, Dirk; Buscot, François

    2015-05-01

    Forest management practices (FMPs) significantly influence important ecological processes and services in Central European forests, such as leaf litter decomposition and nutrient cycling. Changes in leaf litter diversity, and thus, its quality as well as microbial community structure and function induced by different FMPs were hypothesized to be the main drivers causing shifts in decomposition rates and nutrient release in managed forests. In a litterbag experiment lasting 473 days, we aimed to investigate the effects of FMPs (even-aged timber management, selective logging and unmanaged) on bacterial and fungal communities involved in leaf litter degradation over time. Our results showed that microbial communities in leaf litter were strongly influenced by both FMPs and sampling date. The results from nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) ordination revealed distinct patterns of bacterial and fungal successions over time in leaf litter. We demonstrated that FMPs and sampling dates can influence a range of factors, including leaf litter quality, microbial macronutrients, and pH, which significantly correlate with microbial community successions.

  10. Bacterial community involved in the nitrogen cycle in a down-flow sponge-based trickling filter treating UASB effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Conell, E F A; Almeida, P G S; Martins, K E L; Araújo, J C; Chernicharo, C A L

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial community composition of a down-flow sponge-based trickling filter treating upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) effluent was investigated by pyrosequencing. Bacterial community composition considerably changed along the reactor and over the operational period. The dominant phyla detected were Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Planctomycetes. The abundance of denitrifiers decreased from the top to the bottom and it was consistent with the organic matter concentration gradients. At lower loadings (organic and nitrogen loading rates), the abundance of anammox bacteria was higher than that of the ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in the upper portion of the reactor, suggesting that aerobic and anaerobic ammonium oxidation occurred. Nitrification occurred in all the compartments, while anammox bacteria prominently appeared even in the presence of high organic carbon to ammonia ratios (around 1.0-2.0 gCOD gN(-1)). The results suggest that denitrifiers, nitrifiers, and anammox bacteria coexisted in the reactor; thus, different metabolic pathways were involved in ammonium removal in the post-UASB reactor sponge-based.

  11. An Inducible Operon Is Involved in Inulin Utilization in Lactobacillus plantarum Strains, as Revealed by Comparative Proteogenomics and Metabolic Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buntin, Nirunya; Hongpattarakere, Tipparat; Ritari, Jarmo; Douillard, François P; Paulin, Lars; Boeren, Sjef; Shetty, Sudarshan A; de Vos, Willem M

    2017-01-15

    The draft genomes of Lactobacillus plantarum strains isolated from Asian fermented foods, infant feces, and shrimp intestines were sequenced and compared to those of well-studied strains. Among 28 strains of L. plantarum, variations in the genomic features involved in ecological adaptation were elucidated. The genome sizes ranged from approximately 3.1 to 3.5 Mb, of which about 2,932 to 3,345 protein-coding sequences (CDS) were predicted. The food-derived isolates contained a higher number of carbohydrate metabolism-associated genes than those from infant feces. This observation correlated to their phenotypic carbohydrate metabolic profile, indicating their ability to metabolize the largest range of sugars. Surprisingly, two strains (P14 and P76) isolated from fermented fish utilized inulin. β-Fructosidase, the inulin-degrading enzyme, was detected in the supernatants and cell wall extracts of both strains. No activity was observed in the cytoplasmic fraction, indicating that this key enzyme was either membrane-bound or extracellularly secreted. From genomic mining analysis, a predicted inulin operon of fosRABCDXE, which encodes β-fructosidase and many fructose transporting proteins, was found within the genomes of strains P14 and P76. Moreover, pts1BCA genes, encoding sucrose-specific IIBCA components involved in sucrose transport, were also identified. The proteomic analysis revealed the mechanism and functional characteristic of the fosRABCDXE operon involved in the inulin utilization of L. plantarum The expression levels of the fos operon and pst genes were upregulated at mid-log phase. FosE and the LPXTG-motif cell wall anchored β-fructosidase were induced to a high abundance when inulin was present as a carbon source. Inulin is a long-chain carbohydrate that may act as a prebiotic, which provides many health benefits to the host by selectively stimulating the growth and activity of beneficial bacteria in the colon. While certain lactobacilli can catabolize

  12. Antimicrobial properties of arginine- and lysine-rich histones and involvement of bacterial outer membrane protease T in their differential mode of actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagai, Chihiro; Morita, Shuu; Shiraishi, Takayuki; Miyaji, Kazuyuki; Iwamuro, Shawichi

    2011-10-01

    There is growing evidence of the antimicrobial properties of histones and histone-derived peptides; however, most of them are specific to lysine (Lys)-rich histones (H1, H2A, and H2B). In the present study, we focused on arginine (Arg)-rich histones (H3 and H4) and investigated their antimicrobial properties in comparison with those of histone H2B. In a standard microdilution assay, calf thymus histones H2B, H3, and H4 showed growth inhibitory activity against the bacterial outer membrane protease T (OmpT) gene-expressing Escherichia coli strain JCM5491 with calculated 50% growth inhibitory concentrations of 3.8, 10, and 12.7 μM, respectively. A lysate prepared from the JCM5491 cells was capable of strongly, moderately, and slightly fragmenting histones H2B, H3, and H4, respectively. While the lysate prepared from the cells of the ompT-deleted E. coli strain BL21(DE3) did not digest these histones, the ompT-transformed BL21(DE3), termed BL21/OmpT(+), cell lysate digested the histones more strongly than the JCM5491 cell lysate. Laser confocal and scanning electron microscopic analyses demonstrated that while histone H2B penetrated the cell membrane of JCM5491 or BL21/OmpT(+) cells, histones H3 and H4 remained on the cell surface and subsequently disrupted the cell membrane structure with bleb formation in a manner similar to general antimicrobial peptides. The BL21(DE3) cells treated with each histone showed no bleb formation, but cell integrity was affected and the cell surface was corrugated. Consequently, it is suggested that OmpT is involved in the antimicrobial properties of Arg- and Lys-rich histones and that the modes of antimicrobial action of these histones are different. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Functional Identification of Conserved Residues Involved in Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strain GG Sortase Specificity and Pilus Biogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douillard, F.P.; Rasinkangas, P.; Ossowski, von I.; Reunanen, J.; Palva, A.; Vos, de W.M.

    2014-01-01

    In Gram-positive bacteria, sortase-dependent pili mediate the adhesion of bacteria to host epithelial cells and play a pivotal role in colonization, host signaling, and biofilm formation. Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG, a well known probiotic bacterium, also displays on its cell surface

  14. Evaluation of different extraction methods on antimicrobial potency of Adenium obesum stem against food borne pathogenic bacterial strains in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Amzad Hossain

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine and compare the effect on antimicrobial potency of crude stems extract of Adenium obesum (A. obesum by Soxhlet and maceration extraction methods. Methods: The crude extracts were prepared from the coarse samples of stems with methanol by using Soxhlet and maceration extraction methods. Both the crude extracts from two extraction methods were dissolved in water and successively extracted by different polarities solvents with increasing polarities. In vitro antimicrobial potency of different polarities crude extracts obtained from Soxhlet and maceration methods was determined by agar gel diffusion method against different food borne pathogenic bacterial strains. Results: The results for antimicrobial potency of different crude extracts were almost similar by Soxhlet and maceration and methods. The average range of inhibition potency of different polarities crude extracts was 0%-17% by Soxhlet method and inhibition potency 0%-24% by maceration method. Conclusions: These results obtained from in vitro approach give promising basic information about this plant as well as some potential crude extracts can be used for the treatment of infectious diseases.

  15. The waaL gene is involved in lipopolysaccharide synthesis and plays a role on the bacterial pathogenesis of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yue; Han, Xiangan; Wang, Shaohui; Meng, Qingmei; Zhang, Yuxi; Ding, Chan; Yu, Shengqing

    2014-08-27

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes avian colibacillosis, resulting in economically devastating to poultry industries worldwide. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been identified as an important virulence factor of E. coli. The waaL gene encodes O-antigen ligase, which is responsible for attaching the O-antigen to lipid A-core oligosaccharide. In this study, a mutant strain ΔwaaL was constructed from APEC serotype 2 strain DE17. The mutant strain showed a decreased swimming motility and resistance to complement-mediated killing but a similar growth rate in the culture, compared with its parent strain. In addition, the mutant LPS demonstrated different patterns in SDS-PAGE followed by silver staining and western blotting. Besides, the mutant strain significantly decreased its adherence and invasion abilities to DF-1 cells, compared to its parent strain DE17. Deletion of the waaL gene in DE17 reduced the bacterial virulence by 42.2-fold in ducklings, based on measurement of the median lethal dose (LD50). Additional analysis indicated that deletion of the waaL gene increased the biofilm formation ability and reduced the resistance to environmental stress. These results suggest that the waaL gene functions on the APEC LPS synthesis and bacterial pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Anti-bacterial Efficacy of Bacteriocin Produced by Marine Bacillus subtilis Against Clinically Important Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase Strains and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Mickymaray

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the anti-bacterial efficacy of bacteriocin produced by Bacillus subtilis SM01 (GenBank accession no: KY612347, a Gram-positive marine bacterium, against Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL producing Gram-negative pathogens Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli, and Gram-positive pathogen Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. Methods: A marine bacterium was isolated from mangrove sediment from the Red Sea coast of Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, and identified based on its morphological, biochemical, and molecular characteristics. The bacteriocin production using this isolate was carried out in brain heart infusion broth (BHIB medium. The Anti-bacterial activity of bacteriocin was evaluated against selected ESBL strains and MRSA by the well agar method. The effects of incubation time, pH, and temperature on the Anti-bacterial activity were studied. Results: The bacteriocin Bac-SM01 produced by B. subtilis SM01 demonstrated broad-spectrum Anti-bacterial activity against both Gram-negative and -positive bacteria. The present study is the first report that the bacteriocin Bac-SM01 inhibits the growth of ESBL producing Gram-negative strains A. baumannii, P. aeruginosa, and E. coli, and a Gram-positive MRSA strain. The optimum incubation time, pH, and temperature for the Anti-bacterial activity of Bac-SM01 was 24 h, 7, and 37°C respectively. Conclusion: The overall investigation can conclude that the bacteriocin Bac-SM01 from the marine isolate Bacillus subtilis SM01 could be used as an alternative Anti-bacterial agent in pharmaceutical products.

  17. The involvement of bacterial quorum sensing in the spoilage of refrigerated Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Suqin; Wu, Haohao; Zeng, Mingyong; Liu, Zunying; Wang, Ying

    2015-01-02

    quorum sensing involves the spoilage of refrigerated Litopenaeus vannamei. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Experimental infection with different bacterial strains in larvae and juvenile Litopenaeus vannamei reared in Santa Catarina State, Brazil - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v32i3.5471 Experimental infection with different bacterial strains in larvae and juvenile Litopenaeus vannamei reared in Santa Catarina State, Brazil - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v32i3.5471

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Jatoba

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the pathogenic characteristics of bacteria isolated from Litopenaeus vannamei during an outbreak at the Laboratory of Marine Shrimp, UFSC, Santa Catarina State, Brazil. Their virulence potential in larvae and juvenile shrimp and the effects on the total haemocyte count, phenoloxidase activity and serum agglutinate titre were examined after experimental infection. Bacterial strains were isolated from larvae and adult shrimps, identified by the AP120E biochemical system as: two strains of Vibrio alginolyticus, three of Aeromonas salmonicida and one of Pasteurella multocida sp. and Pasteurella sp. All the bacterial strains isolated in this study caused mortality in shrimp. One strain of V. alginolyticus was responsible for 97.3 and 88.7% mortality in larvae and juvenil shrimps, respectively. The shrimp immunological system was influenced by experimental infection with V. alginolyticus. Decrease in the total haemocyte count and increase in the phenoloxidase activity and the serum agglutinate titre (p V. alginolyticus isolated from larvae and juvenile reared marine shrimp.This study evaluated the pathogenic characteristics of bacteria isolated from Litopenaeus vannamei during an outbreak at the Laboratory of Marine Shrimp, UFSC, Santa Catarina State, Brazil. Their virulence potential in larvae and juvenile shrimp and the effects on the total haemocyte count, phenoloxidase activity and serum agglutinate titre were examined after experimental infection. Bacterial strains were isolated from larvae and adult shrimps, identified by the AP120E biochemical system as: two strains of Vibrio alginolyticus, three of Aeromonas salmonicida and one of Pasteurella multocida sp. and Pasteurella sp. All the bacterial strains isolated in this study caused mortality in shrimp. One strain of V. alginolyticus was responsible for 97.3 and 88.7% mortality in larvae and juvenil shrimps, respectively. The shrimp immunological system was influenced by

  19. The formyl peptide receptor like-1 and scavenger receptor MARCO are involved in glial cell activation in bacterial meningitis

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    Jansen Sandra

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have suggested that the scavenger receptor MARCO (macrophage receptor with collagenous structure mediates activation of the immune response in bacterial infection of the central nervous system (CNS. The chemotactic G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR formyl-peptide-receptor like-1 (FPRL1 plays an essential role in the inflammatory responses of host defence mechanisms and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD. Expression of the antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin CRAMP/LL-37 is up-regulated in bacterial meningitis, but the mechanisms underlying CRAMP expression are far from clear. Methods Using a rat meningitis model, we investigated the influence of MARCO and FPRL1 on rCRAMP (rat cathelin-related antimicrobial peptide expression after infection with bacterial supernatants of Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP and Neisseria meningitides (NM. Expression of FPRL1 and MARCO was analyzed by immunofluorescence and real-time RT-PCR in a rat meningitis model. Furthermore, we examined the receptor involvement by real-time RT-PCR, extracellular-signal regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cAMP level measurement in glial cells (astrocytes and microglia and transfected HEK293 cells using receptor deactivation by antagonists. Receptors were inhibited by small interference RNA and the consequences in NM- and SP-induced Camp (rCRAMP gene expression and signal transduction were determined. Results We show an NM-induced increase of MARCO expression by immunofluorescence and real-time RT-PCR in glial and meningeal cells. Receptor deactivation by antagonists and small interfering RNA (siRNA verified the importance of FPRL1 and MARCO for NM- and SP-induced Camp and interleukin-1β expression in glial cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated a functional interaction between FPRL1 and MARCO in NM-induced signalling by real-time RT-PCR, ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cAMP level measurement and show differences between

  20. Effect Of GAMMA-Irradiation On Production And Characteristics Of Chitosan Produced From Crustacean Waste By Using Some Bacterial Strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INAS ISMAIL MAHMOUD RAAFAT

    2015-01-01

    The main study focused on separation of chitin from crustacean waste (shrimp shell) using some proteolytic bacterial isolates. After that, chitosan was obtained by deactylation and its characteristics were studied using some characterizing tools. The produced chitosan was degraded to different molecular weights and evaluated as an antibacterial agent. Seventy bacterial isolates were obtained from different sources (soil, plant roots and shrimp shell waste) and tested for their ability to produce proteolytic enzymes. One isolate was selected, due its high proteolytic activity and ability to grow using shrimp as carbon and nitrogen source on shrimp shell agar medium and identified as Bacillus subtilis NA12 by 16S-rRNA gene sequences with a high degree of similarity (99 %) as a gene bank database. Factors affecting deproteinization (DP) and demineralization (DM) efficiency of shrimp shell waste (SSW) (carbon source and its optimal concentration, shrimp shell waste concentration, inoculum size and fermentation time) were studied. The most efficient DP (92.40 %) and DM (81.37 %) of SSW by B. subtilis NA12 were sucrose 10 % (w/v) and inoculum size 15 % (v/v 35 x 108 CFU/ml ) to ferment shrimp shell waste 5 % (w/v) for 6 days of fermentation time. The effect of γ-irradiation on the performance of selected bacterial strain was studied to maximize chitin yield. Box-Behnken design using response surface methodology was employed to establish the relationship between the previous variables, implied that the model was highly significant. It was found that a sucrose concentration of 5 % (w/v), SSW of 12.5 % (w/v), inoculum size of 10 % (v/v) and fermentation time of 7 days; had a predicted value of DP of 97.65 % whereas the actual experiment gave 96.37 %. The predicted value of DM was 82.94 % whereas the actual experiment gave 82.19 %. Chitosan polymer was successfully prepared by the deacetylation reaction from fermented shrimp shell waste (SSW) by Bacillus subtilis NA12

  1. The efficacy of different anti-microbial metals at preventing the formation of, and eradicating bacterial biofilms of pathogenic indicator strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugala, Natalie; Lemire, Joe A; Turner, Raymond J

    2017-06-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens and the prevalence of biofilm-related infections have generated a demand for alternative anti-microbial therapies. Metals have not been explored in adequate detail for their capacity to combat infectious disease. Metal compounds can now be found in textiles, medical devices and disinfectants-yet, we know little about their efficacy against specific pathogens. To help fill this knowledge gap, we report on the anti-microbial and antibiofilm activity of seven metals: silver, copper, titanium, gallium, nickel, aluminum and zinc against three bacterial strains, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. To evaluate the capacity of metal ions to prevent the growth of, and eradicate biofilms and planktonic cells, bacterial cultures were inoculated in the Calgary Biofilm Device (minimal biofilm eradication concentration) in the presence of the metal salts. Copper, gallium and titanium were capable of preventing planktonic and biofilm growth, and eradicating established biofilms of all tested strains. Further, we observed that the efficacies of the other tested metal salts displayed variable efficacy against the tested strains. Further, contrary to the enhanced resistance anticipated from bacterial biofilms, particular metal salts were observed to be more effective against biofilm communities versus planktonic cells. In this study, we have demonstrated that the identity of the bacterial strain must be considered before treatment with a particular metal ion. Consequent to the use of metal ions as anti-microbial agents to fight multidrug-resistant and biofilm-related infections increases, we must aim for more selective deployment in a given infectious setting.

  2. Hsp12p and PAU genes are involved in ecological interactions between natural yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Damaríz; Berná, Luisa; Stefanini, Irene; Baruffini, Enrico; Bergerat, Agnes; Csikász-Nagy, Attila; De Filippo, Carlotta; Cavalieri, Duccio

    2015-08-01

    The coexistence of different yeasts in a single vineyard raises the question on how they communicate and why slow growers are not competed out. Genetically modified laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are extensively used to investigate ecological interactions, but little is known about the genes regulating cooperation and competition in ecologically relevant settings. Here, we present evidences of Hsp12p-dependent altruistic and contact-dependent competitive interactions between two natural yeast isolates. Hsp12p is released during cell death for public benefit by a fast-growing strain that also produces a killer toxin to inhibit growth of a slow grower that can enjoy the benefits of released Hsp12p. We also show that the protein Pau5p is essential in the defense against the killer effect. Our results demonstrate that the combined action of Hsp12p, Pau5p and a killer toxin is sufficient to steer a yeast community. © 2015 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The efficacy of Carica papaya leaf extract on some bacterial and a fungal strain by well diffusion method

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    C. Baskaran

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the antimicrobial activity and phytochemical screening Ethanol, methanol, Ethyl acetate, acetone, chloroform, Petroleum ether, hexane, hot water, and extracts of Carica papaya. Methods: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the qualitative analysis of phytochemicals and antimicrobial activity of various solvent extracts of Carica papaya. The antimicrobial activities of different solvent extracts of Carica papaya were tested against the Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains and fungus by observing the zone of inhibition. The Gram-positive bacteria used in the test were Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus and Micrococcus luteus, and the Gram-negative bacteria were Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella pneumoniae, fungus like Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Candida kefyr. Results: It was observed that ethanol, methanol, ethyl acetate, aceton, chloroform, petroleum ether, hexane and aquas extracts showed activity against bacteria and fungus. The chloroform extract of Carica papaya showed more activity against Micrococcus luteus, zone of diameter 15.17暲0.29mm and acetone extract of Carica papaya showed more activity against Candida albicans, zone of diameter 11.23暲0.25mm compared to other solvent extracts. Conclusions: In this study chloroform extract in bacteria and acetone extract in fungus showed a varying degree of inhibition to the growth of tested organism, than Ethanol, methanol, Ethyl acetate, Petroleum ether, hexane and hot water extracts. The results confirmed the presence of antibacterial and antifungal activity of Carica papaya extract against various human pathogenic bacteria. Presences of phytochemical and antimicrobial activity are confirmed.

  4. In vitro activity of tigecycline, a new glycylcycline, tested against 1,326 clinical bacterial strains isolated from Latin America

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    Ana C. Gales

    Full Text Available The in vitro activity of tigecycline (former GAR-936, a new semisynthetic tetracycline, was evaluated in comparison with tetracycline and other antimicrobial agents. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 1,326 contemporary clinical isolates collected from the Latin American region were collected in 2000-2002 period and tested with microdilution broth according to the CLSI guidelines. The bacterial pathogens evaluated included Staphylococcus aureus (505, Streptococcus pneumoniae (269, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS; 227, Haemophilus influenzae (129, Enterococcus spp. (80, Moraxella catarrhalis (54, beta-haemolytic streptococci (28, viridans group streptococci (26, and Neisseria meningitidis (8 RESULTS:Tigecycline demonstrated excellent activity against all Gram-positive cocci, with 90% of penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae strains being inhibited at 0.12 µg/mL, while the same isolates had an MIC90 of > 16 µg/mL for tetracycline. All Enterococcus spp. were inhibited at 0.25 µg/mL of tigecycline. Tigecycline (MIC50, 0.25 µg/mL was eight-fold more potent than minocycline (MIC50, 2 µg/mL against oxacillin-resistant S. aureus (ORSA; all ORSA were inhibited at < 2 µg/mL of tigecycline. Tigecycline demonstrated excellent activity (MIC50, 0.5 µg/mL against CoNS with reduced susceptibility to teicoplanin (MIC, 16 µg/mL. Tigecycline also showed high potency against respiratory pathogens such as M. catarrhalis (MIC50, 0.12 µg/mL and H. influenzae (MIC50, 0.5 µg/mL. No tigecycline resistant isolates were detected when the proposed susceptible breakpoints (< 4 µg/mL was applied. CONCLUSIONS: This results indicate that tigecycline has potent in vitro activity against clinically important pathogenic bacteria, including Gram-positive isolates resistant to both tetracycline and minocycline.

  5. A possible mechanism of action of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) strain Bacillus pumilus WP8 via regulation of soil bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yijun; Shen, Min; Wang, Huanli; Zhao, Qingxin

    2013-01-01

    According to the traditional view, establishment and maintenance of critical population densities in the rhizosphere was the premise of PGPR to exert growth-promoting effects. In light of the facts that soil bacterial community structures can be changed by some PGPR strains including Bacillus pumilus WP8, we hypothesize that regulation of soil bacterial community structure is one of the plant growth-promoting mechanisms of B. pumilus WP8, rather than depending on high-density cells in soil. In this study, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) was performed to evaluate the relationship between changes in soil bacterial community structure and growth-promoting effect on the seedling growth of fava beans (Vicia faba L.) during three successive cultivations. We found that B. pumilus WP8 lacks capacity to reproduce in large enough numbers to survive in bulk soil more than 40 days, yet the bacterial community structures were gradually influenced by inoculation of WP8, especially on dominant populations. Despite WP8 being short-lived, it confers the ability of steadily promoting fava bean seedling growth on soil during the whole growing period for at least 90 days. Pseudomonas chlororaphis RA6, another tested PGPR strain, exists in large numbers for at least 60 days but less than 90 days, whilst giving rise to slight influence on bacterial community structure. In addition, along with the extinction of RA6 cells in bulk soils, the effect of growth promotion disappeared simultaneously. Furthermore, the increment of soil catalase activity from WP8 treatment implied the ability to stimulate soil microbial activity, which may be the reason why the dominant population changed and increased as time passed. Our study suggests that regulation of treated soil bacterial community structure may be another possible action mechanism.

  6. Colonization of Vitis vinifera by a green fluorescence protein-labeled, gfp-marked strain of Xylophilus ampelinus, the causal agent of bacterial necrosis of grapevine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grall, Sophie; Manceau, Charles

    2003-04-01

    The dynamics of Xylophilus ampelinus were studied in Vitis vinifera cv. Ugni blanc using gfp-marked bacterial strains to evaluate the relative importance of epiphytic and endophytic phases of plant colonization in disease development. Currently, bacterial necrosis of grapevine is of economic importance in vineyards in three regions in France: the Cognac, Armagnac, and Die areas. This disease is responsible for progressive destruction of vine shoots, leading to their death. We constructed gfp-marked strains of the CFBP2098 strain of X. ampelinus for histological studies. We studied the colonization of young plants of V. vinifera cv. Ugni blanc by X. ampelinus after three types of artificial contamination in a growth chamber and in a greenhouse. (i) After wounding of the stem and inoculation, the bacteria progressed down to the crown through the xylem vessels, where they organized into biofilms. (ii) When the bacteria were forced into woody cuttings, they rarely colonized the emerging plantlets. Xylem vessels could play a key role in the multiplication and conservation of the bacteria, rather than being a route for plant colonization. (iii) When bacterial suspensions were sprayed onto the plants, bacteria progressed in two directions: both in emerging organs and down to the crown, thus displaying the importance of epiphytic colonization in disease development.

  7. Screening of bacterial strains capable of converting biodiesel-derived raw glycerol into 1,3-propanediol, 2,3-butanediol and ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metsoviti, Maria; Paramithiotis, Spiros; Drosinos, Eleftherios H.; Galiotou-Panayotou, Maria; Nychas, George-John E.; Papanikolaou, Seraphim [Department of Food Science and Technology, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Zeng, An-Ping [Institute of Bioprocess and Biosystems Engineering, Hamburg University of Technology (TUHH), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    The ability of bacterial strains to assimilate glycerol derived from biodiesel facilities to produce metabolic compounds of importance for the food, textile and chemical industry, such as 1,3-propanediol (PD), 2,3-butanediol (BD) and ethanol (EtOH), was assessed. The screening of 84 bacterial strains was performed using glycerol as carbon source. After initial trials, 12 strains were identified capable of consuming raw glycerol under anaerobic conditions, whereas 5 strains consumed glycerol under aerobiosis. A plethora of metabolic compounds was synthesized; in anaerobic batch-bioreactor cultures PD in quantities up to 11.3 g/L was produced by Clostridium butyricum NRRL B-23495, while the respective value was 10.1 g/L for a newly isolated Citrobacter freundii. Adaptation of Cl. butyricum at higher initial glycerol concentration resulted in a PD{sub max} concentration of {proportional_to}32 g/L. BD was produced by a new Enterobacter aerogenes isolate in shake-flask experiments, under fully aerobic conditions, with a maximum concentration of {proportional_to}22 g/L which was achieved at an initial glycerol quantity of 55 g/L. A new Klebsiella oxytoca isolate converted waste glycerol into mixtures of PD, BD and EtOH at various ratios. Finally, another new C. freundii isolate converted waste glycerol into EtOH in anaerobic batch-bioreactor cultures with constant pH, achieving a final EtOH concentration of 14.5 g/L, a conversion yield of 0.45 g/g and a volumetric productivity of {proportional_to}0.7 g/L/h. As a conclusion, the current study confirmed the utilization of biodiesel-derived raw glycerol as an appropriate substrate for the production of PD, BD and EtOH by several newly isolated bacterial strains under different experimental conditions. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Activation of the bacterial thermosensor DesK involves a serine zipper dimerization motif that is modulated by bilayer thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulski, Larisa Estefanía; Ballering, Joost; Moussatova, Anastassiia; Inda, Maria Eugenia; Vazquez, Daniela B; Wassenaar, Tsjerk A; de Mendoza, Diego; Tieleman, D Peter; Killian, J Antoinette

    2015-05-19

    DesK is a bacterial thermosensor protein involved in maintaining membrane fluidity in response to changes in environmental temperature. Most likely, the protein is activated by changes in membrane thickness, but the molecular mechanism of sensing and signaling is still poorly understood. Here we aimed to elucidate the mode of action of DesK by studying the so-called "minimal sensor DesK" (MS-DesK), in which sensing and signaling are captured in a single transmembrane segment. This simplified version of the sensor allows investigation of membrane thickness-dependent protein-lipid interactions simply by using synthetic peptides, corresponding to the membrane-spanning parts of functional and nonfunctional mutants of MS-DesK incorporated in lipid bilayers with varying thicknesses. The lipid-dependent behavior of the peptides was investigated by circular dichroism, tryptophan fluorescence, and molecular modeling. These experiments were complemented with in vivo functional studies on MS-DesK mutants. Based on the results, we constructed a model that suggests a new mechanism for sensing in which the protein is present as a dimer and responds to an increase in bilayer thickness by membrane incorporation of a C-terminal hydrophilic motif. This results in exposure of three serines on the same side of the transmembrane helices of MS-DesK, triggering a switching of the dimerization interface to allow the formation of a serine zipper. The final result is activation of the kinase state of MS-DesK.

  9. The bacterial two-hybrid system uncovers the involvement of acetylation in regulating of Lrp activity in Salmonella Typhimurium

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    Ran Qin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Nε-lysine acetylation is an abundant and important Post-translational modification in bacteria. We used the bacterial two-hybrid system to screen the genome library of the Salmonella Typhimurium to identify potential proteins involved in acetyltransferase Pat - or deacetylase CobB-mediated acetylation. Then, the in vitro (deacetylation assays were used to validate the potential targets, such as STM14_1074, NrdF, RhaR. Lrp, a leucine-responsive regulatory protein and global regulator, was shown to interact with Pat. We further demonstrate that Lrp could be acetylated by Pat and deacetylated by NAD+-dependent CobB in vitro. Specifically, the conserved lysine residue 36 (K36 in helix-turn-helix (HTH DNA-binding domain of Lrp was acetylated. Acetylation of K36 impaired the function of Lrp through altering the affinity with the target promoter. The mutation of K36 in chromosome mimicking acetylation enhanced the transcriptional level of itself and attenuated the mRNA levels of Lrp-regulated genes including fimA, which was confirmed by yeast agglutination assay. These findings demonstrate that the acetylation regulates the DNA-binding activity of Lrp, suggesting that acetylation modification of transcription factors is a conserved regulatory manner to modulate gene expression in bacteria and eukaryotes.

  10. An endoglucanase is involved in infection of rice roots by the not-cellulose-metabolizing endophyte Azoarcus sp. strain BH72.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara; Maes, Tamara; Gemmer, Sabrina; Van Montagu, Marc; Hurek, Thomas

    2006-02-01

    The nitrogen-fixing endophyte Azoarcus sp. strain BH72 infects roots of Kallar grass and rice inter- and intra-cellularly and can spread systemically into shoots without causing symptoms of plant disease. Although cellulose or its breakdown products do not support growth, this strain expresses an endoglucanase, which might be involved in infection. Sequence analysis of eglA places the secreted 34-kDa protein into the glycosyl hydrolases family 5, with highest relatedness (40% identity) to endoglucanases of the phytopathogenic bacteria Xanthomonas campestris and Ralstonia solanacearum. Transcriptional regulation studied by eglA:: gusA fusion was not significantly affected by cellulose or its breakdown products or by microaerobiosis. Strongest induction (threefold) was obtained in bacteria grown in close vicinity to rice roots. Visible sites of expression were the emergence points of lateral roots and root tips, which are the primary regions of ingress into the root. To study the role in endophytic colonization, eglA was inactivated by transposon mutagenesis. Systemic spreading of the eglA mutant and of a pilAB mutant into the rice shoot could no longer be detected by polymerase chain reaction. Microscopic inspection of infection revealed that the intracellular colonization of root epidermis cells was significantly reduced in the eglA- mutant BHE6 compared with the wild type and partially restored in the complementation mutant BHRE2 expressing eglA. This provides evidence that Azoarcus sp. endoglucanase is an important determinant for successful endophytic colonization of rice roots, suggesting an active bacterial colonization process.

  11. Assessment of the relevance of the antibiotic 2-amino-3-(oxirane-2,3-dicarboxamido)-propanoyl-valine from Pantoea agglomerans biological control strains against bacterial plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammer, Ulrike F; Reiher, Katharina; Spiteller, Dieter; Wensing, Annette; Völksch, Beate

    2012-12-01

    The epiphyte Pantoea agglomerans 48b/90 (Pa48b) is a promising biocontrol strain against economically important bacterial pathogens such as Erwinia amylovora. Strain Pa48b produces the broad-spectrum antibiotic 2-amino-3-(oxirane-2,3-dicarboxamido)-propanoyl-valine (APV) in a temperature-dependent manner. An APV-negative mutant still suppressed the E. amylovora population and fire blight disease symptoms in apple blossom experiments under greenhouse conditions, but was inferior to the Pa48b wild-type indicating the influence of APV in the antagonism. In plant experiments with the soybean pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea both, Pa48b and the APV-negative mutant, successfully suppressed the pathogen. Our results demonstrate that the P. agglomerans strain Pa48b is an efficient biocontrol organism against plant pathogens, and we prove its ability for fast colonization of plant surfaces over a wide temperature range. © 2012 The Authors. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Functional identification of conserved residues involved in Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG sortase specificity and pilus biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douillard, François P; Rasinkangas, Pia; von Ossowski, Ingemar; Reunanen, Justus; Palva, Airi; de Vos, Willem M

    2014-05-30

    In Gram-positive bacteria, sortase-dependent pili mediate the adhesion of bacteria to host epithelial cells and play a pivotal role in colonization, host signaling, and biofilm formation. Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG, a well known probiotic bacterium, also displays on its cell surface mucus-binding pilus structures, along with other LPXTG surface proteins, which are processed by sortases upon specific recognition of a highly conserved LPXTG motif. Bioinformatic analysis of all predicted LPXTG proteins encoded by the L. rhamnosus GG genome revealed a remarkable conservation of glycine residues juxtaposed to the canonical LPXTG motif. Here, we investigated and defined the role of this so-called triple glycine (TG) motif in determining sortase specificity during the pilus assembly and anchoring. Mutagenesis of the TG motif resulted in a lack or an alteration of the L. rhamnosus GG pilus structures, indicating that the TG motif is critical in pilus assembly and that they govern the pilin-specific and housekeeping sortase specificity. This allowed us to propose a regulatory model of the L. rhamnosus GG pilus biogenesis. Remarkably, the TG motif was identified in multiple pilus gene clusters of other Gram-positive bacteria, suggesting that similar signaling mechanisms occur in other, mainly pathogenic, species. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Isolation of bacterial strains able to degrade biphenyl, diphenyl ether and the heat transfer fluid used in thermo-solar plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Moreno, Rafael; Sáez, Lara P; Luque-Almagro, Víctor M; Roldán, M Dolores; Moreno-Vivián, Conrado

    2017-03-25

    Thermo-solar plants use eutectic mixtures of diphenyl ether (DE) and biphenyl (BP) as heat transfer fluid (HTF). Potential losses of HTF may contaminate soils and bioremediation is an attractive tool for its treatment. DE- or BP-degrading bacteria are known, but up to now bacteria able to degrade HTF mixture have not been described. Here, five bacterial strains which are able to grow with HTF or its separate components DE and BP as sole carbon sources have been isolated, either from soils exposed to HTF or from rhizospheric soils of plants growing near a thermo-solar plant. The organisms were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Achromobacter piechaudii strain BioC1, Pseudomonas plecoglossicida strain 6.1, Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains HBD1 and HBD3, and Pseudomonas oleovorans strain HBD2. Activity of 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl dioxygenase (BphC), a key enzyme of the biphenyl upper degradation pathway, was detected in all isolates. Pseudomonas strains almost completely degraded 2000ppm HTF after 5-day culture, and even tolerated and grew in the presence of 150,000ppm HTF, being suitable candidates for in situ soil bioremediation. Degradation of both components of HTF is of particular interest since in the DE-degrader Sphingomonas sp. SS3, growth on DE or benzoate was strongly inhibited by addition of BP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of an Alcaligenes faecalis inoculant strain on bacterial communities in flooded soil microcosms planted with rice seedlings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, M.; Smalla, K.; Heuer, H.; Elsas, van J.D.

    2000-01-01

    The fate and impact of Alcaligenes faecalis strain A1501R, a rifampicin-resistant derivative of a rice inoculant strain, were studied in flooded silt loam microcosms planted with rice seedlings. Selective plating revealed that strain A1501R survived at high, initially stable and later slowly

  15. Molecular characterization of genes of Pseudomonas sp. strain HR199 involved in bioconversion of vanillin to protocatechuate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priefert, H; Rabenhorst, J; Steinbüchel, A

    1997-01-01

    The gene loci vdh, vanA, and vanB, which are involved in the bioconversion of vanillin to protocatechuate by Pseudomonas sp. strain HR199 (DSM 7063), were identified as the structural genes of a novel vanillin dehydrogenase (vdh) and the two subunits of a vanillate demethylase (vanA and vanB), respectively. These genes were localized on an EcoRI fragment (E230), which was cloned from a Pseudomonas sp. strain HR199 genomic library in the cosmid pVK100. The vdh gene was identified on a subfragment (HE35) of E230, and the vanA and vanB genes were localized on a different subfragment (H110) of E230. The nucleotide sequences of fragment HE35 and part of fragment H110 were determined, revealing open reading frames of 1062, 951, and 1446 bp, representing vanA, vanB, and vdh, respectively. The vdh gene was organized in one operon together with a fourth open reading frame (ORF2), of 735 bp, which was located upstream of vdh. The deduced amino acid sequences of vanA and vanB exhibited 78.8 and 62.1% amino acid identity, respectively, to the corresponding gene products from Pseudomonas sp. strain ATCC 19151 (F. Brunel and J. Davison, J. Bacteriol. 170:4924-4930, 1988). The deduced amino acid sequence of the vdh gene exhibited up to 35.3% amino acid identity to aldehyde dehydrogenases from different sources. The deduced amino acid sequence of ORF2 exhibited up to 28.4% amino acid identity to those of enoyl coenzyme A hydratases. Escherichia coli strains harboring fragment E230 cloned in pBluescript SK- converted vanillin to protocatechuate via vanillate, indicating the functional expression of vdh, vanA, and vanB in E. coli. High expression of vdh in E. coli was achieved with HE35 cloned in pBluescript SK-. The resulting recombinant strains converted vanillin to vanillate at a rate of up to 0.3 micromol per min per ml of culture. Transfer of vanA, vanB, and vdh to Alcaligenes eutrophus and to different Pseudomonas strains, which were unable to utilize vanillin or vanillate as

  16. Bacterial membrane activity of a-peptide/b-peptoid chimeras: Influence of amino acid composition and chain length on the activity against different bacterial strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein-Kristensen, Line; Knapp, Kolja M; Franzyk, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    acid only had a minor effect on MIC values, whereas chain length had a profound influence on activity. All chimeras were less active against Serratia marcescens (MICs above 46 μM). The chimeras were bactericidal and induced leakage of ATP from Staphylococcus aureus and S. marcescens with similar time......BACKGROUND: Characterization and use of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) requires that their mode of action is determined. The interaction of membrane-active peptides with their target is often established using model membranes, however, the actual permeabilization of live bacterial cells...... and subsequent killing is usually not tested. In this report, six α-peptide/β-peptoid chimeras were examined for the effect of amino acid/peptoid substitutions and chain length on the membrane perturbation and subsequent killing of food-borne and clinical bacterial isolates. RESULTS: All six AMP analogues...

  17. Population genomic analysis of strain variation in Leptospirillum group II bacteria involved in acid mine drainage formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheri L Simmons

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Deeply sampled community genomic (metagenomic datasets enable comprehensive analysis of heterogeneity in natural microbial populations. In this study, we used sequence data obtained from the dominant member of a low-diversity natural chemoautotrophic microbial community to determine how coexisting closely related individuals differ from each other in terms of gene sequence and gene content, and to uncover evidence of evolutionary processes that occur over short timescales. DNA sequence obtained from an acid mine drainage biofilm was reconstructed, taking into account the effects of strain variation, to generate a nearly complete genome tiling path for a Leptospirillum group II species closely related to L. ferriphilum (sampling depth approximately 20x. The population is dominated by one sequence type, yet we detected evidence for relatively abundant variants (>99.5% sequence identity to the dominant type at multiple loci, and a few rare variants. Blocks of other Leptospirillum group II types ( approximately 94% sequence identity have recombined into one or more variants. Variant blocks of both types are more numerous near the origin of replication. Heterogeneity in genetic potential within the population arises from localized variation in gene content, typically focused in integrated plasmid/phage-like regions. Some laterally transferred gene blocks encode physiologically important genes, including quorum-sensing genes of the LuxIR system. Overall, results suggest inter- and intrapopulation genetic exchange involving distinct parental genome types and implicate gain and loss of phage and plasmid genes in recent evolution of this Leptospirillum group II population. Population genetic analyses of single nucleotide polymorphisms indicate variation between closely related strains is not maintained by positive selection, suggesting that these regions do not represent adaptive differences between strains. Thus, the most likely explanation for the

  18. Molecular epidemiological characteristics of Streptococcus pyogenes strains involved in an outbreak of scarlet fever in China, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yuan Hai; Song, Yan Yan; Yan, Xiao Mei; Wang, Hai Bin; Zhang, Meng Han; Tao, Xiao Xia; Li, Lei Lei; Zhang, Yu Xin; Jiang, Xi Hong; Zhang, Bing Hua; Zhou, Hao; Xiao, Di; Jin, Lian Mei; Feng, Zi Jian; Luo, Feng Ji; Zhang, Jian Zhong

    2013-11-01

    To investigate molecular characterization of streptococcus pyogenes isolates involved in an outbreak of scarlet fever in China in 2011. Seventy-four Streptococcal pyogenes involved in an outbreak of scarlet fever were isolated from pediatric patients in the areas with high incidence in China from May to August of 2011. Emm genotyping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), superantigen (SAg) genes and antimicrobial susceptibility profiling were analyzed for these isolates. A total of 4 different emm types were identified. Emm12 was the most prevalent type which contained four predominating PFGE patterns corresponding to four different virulence and superantigen profiles. Emm12 (79.7%) and emm1 (14.9%) accounted for approximately 94% of all the isolates. The speA gene was all negative in emm12 isolates and positive in emm1 isolates. All strains were resistant to erythromycin, and 89.4% of them were resistant to erythromycin, tracycline, and clindamycin simultaneously. Several highly diversified clones with a high macrolide resistance rate comprise a predominant proportion of circulating strains, though no new emm type was found in this outbreak. The data provide a baseline for further surveillance of scarlet fever, which may contribute to the explanation of the outbreak and development of a GAS vaccine in China. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  19. Multiple infections by the anther smut pathogen are frequent and involve related strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela López-Villavicencio

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Population models of host-parasite interactions predict that when different parasite genotypes compete within a host for limited resources, those that exploit the host faster will be selected, leading to an increase in parasite virulence. When parasites sharing a host are related, however, kin selection should lead to more cooperative host exploitation that may involve slower rates of parasite reproduction. Despite their potential importance, studies that assess the prevalence of multiple genotype infections in natural populations remain rare, and studies quantifying the relatedness of parasites occurring together as natural multiple infections are particularly scarce. We investigated multiple infections in natural populations of the systemic fungal plant parasite Microbotryum violaceum, the anther smut of Caryophyllaceae, on its host, Silene latifolia. We found that multiple infections can be extremely frequent, with different fungal genotypes found in different stems of single plants. Multiple infections involved parasite genotypes more closely related than would be expected based upon their genetic diversity or due to spatial substructuring within the parasite populations. Together with previous sequential inoculation experiments, our results suggest that M. violaceum actively excludes divergent competitors while tolerating closely related genotypes. Such an exclusion mechanism might explain why multiple infections were less frequent in populations with the highest genetic diversity, which is at odds with intuitive expectations. Thus, these results demonstrate that genetic diversity can influence the prevalence of multiple infections in nature, which will have important consequences for their optimal levels of virulence. Measuring the occurrence of multiple infections and the relatedness among parasites within hosts in natural populations may be important for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of disease, the consequences of vaccine use

  20. Xenorhabdus bovienii CS03, the bacterial symbiont of the entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema weiseri, is a non-virulent strain against lepidopteran insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisch, Gaëlle; Pagès, Sylvie; McMullen, John G; Stock, S Patricia; Duvic, Bernard; Givaudan, Alain; Gaudriault, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Xenorhabdus bacteria (γ-proteobacteria: Enterobacteriaceae) have dual lifestyles. They have a mutualistic relationship with Steinernema nematodes (Nematoda: Steinernematidae) and are pathogenic to a wide range of insects. Each Steinernema nematode associates with a specific Xenorhabdus species. However, a Xenorhabdus species can have multiple nematode hosts. For example, Xenorhabdus bovienii (Xb) colonizes at least nine Steinernema species from two different phylogenetic clades. The Steinernema-Xb partnership has been found in association with different insect hosts. Biological and molecular data on the Steinernema jollieti-Xb strain SS-2004 pair have recently been described. In particular, the Xb SS-2004 bacteria are virulent alone after direct injection into insect, making this strain a model for studying Xb virulence. In this study, we searched for Xb strains attenuated in virulence. For this purpose, we underwent infection assays with five Steinernema spp.-Xb pairs with two insects, Galleria mellonella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) and Spodoptera littoralis (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). The S. weiseri-Xb CS03 pair showed attenuated virulence and lower fitness in S. littoralis in comparison to the other nematode-bacteria pairs. Furthermore, when injected alone into the hemolymph of G. mellonella or S. littoralis, the Xb CS03 bacterial strain was the only non-virulent strain. By comparison with the virulent Xb SS-2004 strain, Xb CS03 showed an increased sensitivity to the insect antimicrobial peptides, suggesting an attenuated response to the insect humoral immunity. To our current knowledge, Xb CS03 is the first non-virulent Xb strain identified. We propose this strain as a new model for studying the Xenorhabdus virulence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Bacterial evolution through the selective loss of beneficial Genes. Trade-offs in expression involving two loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinser, Erik R; Schneider, Dominique; Blot, Michel; Kolter, Roberto

    2003-08-01

    The loss of preexisting genes or gene activities during evolution is a major mechanism of ecological specialization. Evolutionary processes that can account for gene loss or inactivation have so far been restricted to one of two mechanisms: direct selection for the loss of gene activities that are disadvantageous under the conditions of selection (i.e., antagonistic pleiotropy) and selection-independent genetic drift of neutral (or nearly neutral) mutations (i.e., mutation accumulation). In this study we demonstrate with an evolved strain of Escherichia coli that a third, distinct mechanism exists by which gene activities can be lost. This selection-dependent mechanism involves the expropriation of one gene's upstream regulatory element by a second gene via a homologous recombination event. Resulting from this genetic exchange is the activation of the second gene and a concomitant inactivation of the first gene. This gene-for-gene expression tradeoff provides a net fitness gain, even if the forfeited activity of the first gene can play a positive role in fitness under the conditions of selection.

  2. Biodegradation of anthracene by a newly isolated bacterial strain, Bacillus thuringiensis AT.ISM.1, isolated from a fly ash deposition site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarafdar, A; Sinha, A; Masto, R E

    2017-10-01

    The current study is aimed to evaluate the mechanism of anthracene degradation by a bacterial strain isolated from fly ash deposition site near Jamadoba Coal Preparation Plant, Jharkhand, India. The Bushnell-Haas media cultured (containing anthracene as sole carbon source) bacterial isolate was identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence coding as the Bacillus thuringiensis strain, which showed the efficiency to degrade anthracene. The degradation efficiency of the strain has been estimated to be around 91% (for 40 mg l -1 of anthracene concentration) after 2 weeks of incubation at 33-36°C and initial pH of 6·8-7. The growth kinetics of the isolated strain has been described well by the Haldane-Andrews model of microbial growth pattern for inhibitory substrate, with a correlation factor (R 2 value) of 0·9790. The maximum specific growth rate (μ max ) was 0·01053 h -1 and the value of inhibition coefficient for Haldane model was specified as 18·2448 mg l -1 . In the present study, some diphenol metabolites were identified besides the known possible biodegradation products. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are recognized as significant health risks and consequently listed as priority pollutants by environmental protection agencies across the globe. The aim of the present study was to degrade one of the important PAHs, anthracene, by a newly isolated Bacillus thuringiensis strain. This is the first report of anthracene degradation by B. thuringiensis. This is also the very first growth kinetic study of a bacteria in an anthracene-containing medium. Some diphenol metabolites were found for the first time as anthracene biodegradation by-products, which can be an indication towards a new pathway. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Effect of the Mycorrhizosphere on the Genotypic and Metabolic Diversity of the Bacterial Communities Involved in Mineral Weathering in a Forest Soil▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uroz, S.; Calvaruso, C.; Turpault, M. P.; Pierrat, J. C.; Mustin, C.; Frey-Klett, P.

    2007-01-01

    To date, several bacterial species have been described as mineral-weathering agents which improve plant nutrition and growth. However, the possible relationships between mineral-weathering potential, taxonomic identity, and metabolic ability have not been investigated thus far. In this study, we characterized a collection of 61 bacterial strains isolated from Scleroderma citrinum mycorrhizae, the mycorrhizosphere, and the adjacent bulk soil in an oak forest. The ability of bacteria to weather biotite was assessed with a new microplate bioassay that measures the pH and the quantity of iron released from this mineral. We showed that weathering bacteria occurred more frequently in the vicinity of S. citrinum than in the bulk soil. Moreover, the weathering efficacy of the mycorrhizosphere bacterial isolates was significantly greater than that of the bulk soil isolates. All the bacterial isolates were identified by partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis as members of the genera Burkholderia, Collimonas, Pseudomonas, and Sphingomonas, and their carbon metabolism was characterized by the BIOLOG method. The most efficient isolates belonged to the genera Burkholderia and Collimonas. Multivariate analysis resulted in identification of three metabolic groups, one of which contained mainly bacterial isolates associated with S. citrinum and exhibiting high mineral-weathering potential. Therefore, our results support the hypothesis that by its carbon metabolism this fungus selects in the bulk soil reservoir a bacterial community with high weathering potential, and they also address the question of functional complementation between mycorrhizal fungi and bacteria in the ectomycorrhizal complex for the promotion of tree nutrition. PMID:17351101

  4. The probiotic bacterial strain Lactobacillus fermentum D3 increases in vitro the bioavailability of Ca, P, and Zn in fermented goat milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergillos-Meca, Triana; Navarro-Alarcón, Miguel; Cabrera-Vique, Carmen; Artacho, Reyes; Olalla, Manuel; Giménez, Rafael; Moreno-Montoro, Miriam; Ruiz-Bravo, Alfonso; Lasserrot, Agustín; Ruiz-López, Ma Dolores

    2013-02-01

    We determined calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and zinc levels in a total of 27 samples of commercial goat- and cow-milk fermented products and 9 samples of a goat-milk fermented product with addition of a probiotic bacterial strain, Lactobacillus fermentum D3, manufactured experimentally by our research group. Atomic absorption spectroscopy with flame atomization and UV/VIS spectrophotometry were used as analytic techniques. The results of an in vitro digestion process showed that the bioavailability of calcium, phosphorus, and zinc was significantly higher in our fermented milk containing the probiotic bacterial strain than it was in commercial goat-milk fermented products. Furthermore, our product showed a significantly higher bioavailability of calcium and zinc compared to goat- and cow-milk fermented products made with other microorganisms. We conclude that, in in vitro assays, strain D3 seems to increase the bioavailability of these minerals and that this new product may constitute a better source of bioavailable minerals compared to other products already on the market.

  5. A multi-channel bioluminescent bacterial biosensor for the on-line detection of metals and toxicity. Part I: design and optimization of bioluminescent bacterial strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charrier, Thomas; Durand, Marie-Jose; Jouanneau, Sulivan; Thouand, Gerald [UMR CNRS 6144 GEPEA, CBAC, Nantes University, PRES UNAM, Campus de la Courtaisiere-IUT, La Roche-sur-Yon cedex (France); Dion, Michel [UMR CNRS 6204, Nantes University, PRES UNAM, Biotechnologie, Biocatalyse, Bioregulation, 2, Rue de la Houssiniere, BP 92208, Nantes cedex 3 (France); Pernetti, Mimma; Poncelet, Denis [ONIRIS-ENITIAA, UMR CNRS GEPEA, Rue de la Geraudiere, BP 82225, Nantes cedex 3 (France)

    2011-05-15

    This study describes the construction of inducible bioluminescent strains via genetic engineering along with their characterization and optimization in the detection of heavy metals. Firstly, a preliminary comparative study enabled us to select a suitable carbon substrate from pyruvate, glucose, citrate, diluted Luria-Bertani, and acetate. The latter carbon source provided the best induction ratios for comparison. Results showed that the three constructed inducible strains, Escherichia coli DH1 pBzntlux, pBarslux, and pBcoplux, were usable when conducting a bioassay after a 14-h overnight culture at 30 C. Utilizing these sensors gave a range of 12 detected heavy metals including several cross-detections. Detection limits for each metal were often close to and sometimes lower than the European standards for water pollution. Finally, in order to maintain sensitive bacteria within the future biosensor-measuring cell, the agarose immobilization matrix was compared to polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Agarose was selected because the detection limits of the bioluminescent strains were not affected, in contrast to PVA. Specific detection and cross-detection ranges determined in this study will form the basis of a multiple metals detection system by the new multi-channel Lumisens3 biosensor. (orig.)

  6. Absence of phosphatidylcholine in bacterial membranes facilitates translocation of Sec-dependent β-lactamase AmpC from cytoplasm to periplasm in two Pseudomonas strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Sun, Yufang; Cao, Fang; Xiong, Min; Yang, Sheng; Li, Yang; Yu, Xuejing; Li, Yadong; Wang, Xingguo

    2017-05-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is a rare membrane lipid in bacteria but crucial for virulence of various plant and animal pathogens. The pcs- mutant lacking PC in bacterial membranes of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae van Hall 1336 displayed more ampicillin resistance. Ampicillin susceptibility tests gave an IC50 (half maximal inhibitory concentration) of 52 mg/ml for Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae van Hall 1336, 53 mg/ml for the complemented strain 1336 RM (pcs-/+) and 90 mg/ml for the 1336 pcs- mutant. Activity assay of β-lactamase in periplasmic extracts gave 0.050 U/mg for the 1336 wild type, 0.052 U/mg for the 1336RM (pcs-/+), 0.086 U/mg for the 1336 pcs- mutant. Analysis by western blotting showed that the content of AmpC enzyme was markedly different in periplasmic extracts between the wild-type and pcs- mutant strains. Reverse transcriptase PCR also showed that the presence or absence of PC in bacterial membranes did not affect the transcription of ampC gene. The phenotype of the pcs- mutant was able to be recovered to the wild type by introducing a wild-type pcs gene into the pcs- mutant. Similar results were also obtained from the soil-dwelling bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 593. Our results demonstrate that the absence of PC in bacterial membranes facilitates the translocation of Sec-dependent β-lactamase AmpC from cytoplasm to periplasm, and the enhanced ampicillin-resistance in the pcs- strains mainly comes from effective translocation of AmpC via Sec-pathway. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. View of the bacterial strains of Escherichia coli M-17 and its interaction with the nanoparticles of zinc oxide by means of atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagitova, A; Yaminsky, I; Meshkov, G

    2016-01-01

    Visualization of the structure of biological objects plays a key role in medicine, biotechnology, nanotechnology and IT-technology. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a promising method of studying of objects’ morphology and structure. In this work, AFM was used to determine the size and shape of the bacterial strains of Escherichia coli M-17 and visualization its interaction with the nanoparticles of zinc oxide. The suspension of E.coli bacteria was applied to natural mica and studied by contact mode using the FemtoScan multifunctional scanning probe microscope. (paper)

  8. Polyester production by halophilic and halotolerant bacterial strains obtained from mangrove soil samples located in Northern Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van-Thuoc, Doan; Huu-Phong, Tran; Thi-Binh, Nguyen; Thi-Tho, Nguyen; Minh-Lam, Duong; Quillaguamán, Jorge

    2012-12-01

    This research article reports halophilic and halotolerant bacteria isolated from mangrove forests located in Northern Vietnam. Several of these bacteria were able to synthesize polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). PHAs are polyesters stored by microorganisms under the presence of considerable amounts of a carbon source and deficiency of other essential nutrient such as nitrogen or phosphorous. Mangrove forests in Northern Vietnam are saline coastal habitats that have not been microbiologically studied. Mangrove ecosystems are, in general, rich in organic matter, but deficient in nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus. We have found about 100 microorganisms that have adapted to mangrove forests by accumulating PHAs. The production of polyesters might therefore be an integral part of the carbon cycle in mangrove forests. Three of the strains (ND153, ND97, and QN194) isolated from the Vietnamese forests were identified as Bacillus species, while other five strains (QN187, ND199, ND218, ND240, and QN271) were phylogenetically close related to the α-proteobacterium Yangia pacifica. These strains were found to accumulate PHAs in noticeable amounts. Polymer inclusions and chemical structure were studied by transmission electron microscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy analyses, respectively. Strains ND153, ND97, QN194, QN187, ND240, and QN271 synthesized poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) from glucose, whereas strains ND199 and ND218 synthesized poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) from this carbohydrate. With the exception of strain QN194, the strains accumulated PHBV when a combination of glucose and propionate was included in the culture medium. The polymer yields and cell growth reached by one Bacillus isolate, strain ND153, and one Gram-negative bacterium, strain QN271, were high and worth to be researched further. For experiments performed in shake flasks, strain ND153 reached a maximum PHBV yield of 71 wt% and a cell dry weight

  9. Characterization of lipoteichoic acid structures from three probiotic Bacillus strains: involvement of D-alanine in their biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villéger, Romain; Saad, Naima; Grenier, Karine; Falourd, Xavier; Foucat, Loïc; Urdaci, Maria C; Bressollier, Philippe; Ouk, Tan-Sothea

    2014-10-01

    Probiotics represent a potential strategy to influence the host's immune system thereby modulating immune response. Lipoteichoic Acid (LTA) is a major immune-stimulating component of Gram-positive cell envelopes. This amphiphilic polymer, anchored in the cytoplasmic membrane by means of its glycolipid component, typically consists of a poly (glycerol-phosphate) chain with D-alanine and/or glycosyl substitutions. LTA is known to stimulate macrophages in vitro, leading to secretion of inflammatory mediators such as Nitric Oxide (NO). This study investigates the structure-activity relationship of purified LTA from three probiotic Bacillus strains (Bacillus cereus CH, Bacillus subtilis CU1 and Bacillus clausii O/C). LTAs were extracted from bacterial cultures and purified. Chemical modification by means of hydrolysis at pH 8.5 was performed to remove D-alanine. The molecular structure of native and modified LTAs was determined by (1)H NMR and GC-MS, and their inflammatory potential investigated by measuring NO production by RAW 264.7 macrophages. Structural analysis revealed several differences between the newly characterized LTAs, mainly relating to their D-alanylation rates and poly (glycerol-phosphate) chain length. We observed induction of NO production by LTAs from B. subtilis and B. clausii, whereas weaker NO production was observed with B. cereus. LTA dealanylation abrogated NO production independently of the glycolipid component, suggesting that immunomodulatory potential depends on D-alanine substitutions. D-alanine may control the spatial configuration of LTAs and their recognition by cell receptors. Knowledge of molecular mechanisms behind the immunomodulatory abilities of probiotics is essential to optimize their use.

  10. Genetic diversity and dynamics of bacterial and yeast strains associated to Spanish-style green table-olive fermentations in large manufacturing companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena-Padrós, Helena; Caballero-Guerrero, Belén; Maldonado-Barragán, Antonio; Ruiz-Barba, José Luis

    2014-11-03

    We have genotyped a total of 1045 microbial isolates obtained along the fermentation time of Spanish-style green table olives from the fermentation yards (patios) of two large manufacturing companies in the Province of Sevilla, south of Spain. Genotyping was carried out using RAPD-PCR fingerprinting. In general, isolates clustered well into the relevant phylogenetic dendrograms, forming separate groups in accordance to their species adscription. We could identify which bacterial and yeast genotypes (strains) persisted throughout the fermentation at each patio. Also, which of them were more adapted to any of the three stages, i.e. initial, middle and final, described for this food fermentation. A number of genotypes were found to be shared by both patios. Fifty seven of these belonged to five different bacterial species, i.e. Lactobacillus pentosus, Lactobacillus paracollinoides/collinoides, Lactobacillus rapi, Pediococcus ethanolidurans and Staphylococcus sp., although most of them (51) belonged to L. pentosus. Four yeast genotypes were also shared, belonging to the species Candida thaimueangensis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Hanseniaspora sp. Two genotypes of L. pentosus were found to be grouped with those of two strains used in commercially available starter cultures, one of them bacteriocinogenic, which were used up to three years before this study in these patios, demonstrating the persistence of selected strains in this environment. Biodiversity was assessed though different indexes, including richness, diversity and dominance. A statistically significant decrease in biodiversity between the initial and final stages of the fermentation was found in both patios. However, values of biodiversity indexes in the fermenters were very similar, and no significant differences were found in the total biodiversity between both patios. This study allowed us to identify a range of well adapted strains (genotypes), especially those belonging to the lactic acid bacteria

  11. A three-scale analysis of bacterial communities involved in rocks colonization and soil formation in high mountain environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Alfonso; Ciccazzo, Sonia; Borruso, Luigimaria; Zerbe, Stefan; Daffonchio, Daniele; Brusetti, Lorenzo

    2013-10-01

    Alpha and beta diversities of the bacterial communities growing on rock surfaces, proto-soils, riparian sediments, lichen thalli, and water springs biofilms in a glacier foreland were studied. We used three molecular based techniques to allow a deeper investigation at different taxonomic resolutions: denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, length heterogeneity-PCR, and automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis. Bacterial communities were mainly composed of Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Cyanobacteria with distinct variations among sites. Proteobacteria were more represented in sediments, biofilms, and lichens; Acidobacteria were mostly found in proto-soils; and Cyanobacteria on rocks. Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were mainly found in biofilms. UniFrac P values confirmed a significant difference among different matrices. Significant differences (P rocks which shared a more similar community structure, while at deep taxonomic resolution two distinct bacterial communities between lichens and rocks were found.

  12. Characterization of three Bacillus cereus strains involved in a major outbreak of food poisoning after consumption of fermented black beans (Douchi) in Yunan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guoping; Bester, Kai; Liao, Bin; Yang, Zushun; Jiang, Rongrong; Hendriksen, Niels Bohse

    2014-10-01

    Three Bacillus cereus strains isolated from an outbreak of food poisoning caused by the consumption of fermented black beans (douchi) containing B. cereus is described. The outbreak involved 139 persons who had nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The strains were isolated from vomit and the unprepared douchi. Two of the strains produced the emetic toxin cereulide, as evidenced by polymerase chain reaction analysis for the presence of the nonribosomal synthetase cluster responsible for the synthesis of cereulide and by chemical analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. These two strains belong to genetic group III of B. cereus, and multiple locus sequence typing revealed that the type was ST26, as a major part of B. cereus emetic strains. One of these strains produced significantly more cereulide at 37°C than the type cereulide producer (F4810/72), and it was also able to produce the toxin at 40°C and 42°C. The third strain belongs to genetic group IV, and it is a new multiple locus sequence type closely related to strains that are cytotoxic and enterotoxigenic. It possesses genes for hemolysin BL, nonhemolytic enterotoxin, and cytotoxin K2; however, it varies from the majority of strains possessing genes for hemolysin BL by not being hemolytic. Thus, two B. cereus strains producing the emetic toxin cereulide and a strain producing enterotoxins might have been involved in this food-poisoning incident caused by the consumption of a natural fermented food. The ability of one of the strains to produce cereulide at ≥37°C makes it possible that it is produced in the human gut in addition to occurring in the food.

  13. Role of the PhoP-PhoQ system in the virulence of Erwinia chrysanthemi strain 3937: involvement in sensitivity to plant antimicrobial peptides, survival at acid Hh, and regulation of pectolytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llama-Palacios, Arancha; López-Solanilla, Emilia; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, Pablo

    2005-03-01

    Erwinia chrysanthemi is a phytopathogenic bacterium that causes soft-rot diseases in a broad number of crops. The PhoP-PhoQ system is a key factor in pathogenicity of several bacteria and is involved in the bacterial resistance to different factors, including acid stress. Since E. chrysanthemi is confronted by acid pH during pathogenesis, we have studied the role of this system in the virulence of this bacterium. In this work, we have isolated and characterized the phoP and phoQ mutants of E. chrysanthemi strain 3937. It was found that: (i) they were not altered in their growth at acid pH; (ii) the phoQ mutant showed diminished ability to survive at acid pH; (iii) susceptibility to the antimicrobial peptide thionin was increased; (iv) the virulence of the phoQ mutant was diminished at low and high magnesium concentrations, whereas the virulence of the phoP was diminished only at low magnesium concentrations; (v) in planta Pel activity of both mutant strains was drastically reduced; and (vi) both mutants lagged behind the wild type in their capacity to change the apoplastic pH. These results suggest that the PhoP-PhoQ system plays a role in the virulence of this bacterium in plant tissues, although it does not contribute to bacterial growth at acid pH.

  14. [Identification of a high ammonia nitrogen tolerant and heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacterial strain TN-14 and its nitrogen removal capabilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Xin; Yao, Li; Lu, Lei; Leng, Lu; Zhou, Ying-Qin; Guo, Jun-Yuan

    2014-10-01

    A new strain of high ammonia nitrogen tolerant and heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacterium TN-14 was isolated from the environment. Its physiological and biochemical characteristics and molecular identification, performences of heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic, the abilities of resistance to ammonia nitrogen as well as the decontamination abilities were studied, respectively. It was preliminary identified as Acinetobacter sp. according to its physiological and biochemical characteristics and molecular identification results. In heterotrophic nitrification system, the ammonia nitrogen and total nitrogen removal rate of the bacterial strain TN-14 could reach 97.13% and 93.53% within 24 h. In nitrates denitrification system, the nitrate concentration could decline from 94.24 mg · L(-1) to 39.32 mg · L(-1) within 24 h, where the removal rate was 58.28% and the denitrification rate was 2.28 mg · (L · h)(-1); In nitrite denitrification systems, the initial concentration of nitrite could be declined from 97.78 mg · L(-1) to 21.30 mg x L(-1), with a nitrite nitrogen removal rate of 78.22%, and a denitrification rate of 2.55 mg · (L· h)(-1). Meanwhile, strain TN-14 had the capability of flocculant production, and the flocculating rate could reach 94.74% when its fermentation liquid was used to treat 0.4% kaolin suspension. Strain TN-14 could grow at an ammonia nitrogen concentration as high as 1200 mg · L(-1). In the aspect of actual piggery wastewater treatment by strain TN-14, the removal rate of COD, ammonia nitrogen, TN and TP cloud reached 85.30%, 65.72%, 64.86% and 79.41%, respectively. Strain TN-14 has a good application prospect in biological treatment of real high- ammonia wastewater.

  15. Complementary degradation mechanisms of inulin-type fructans and arabinoxylan-oligosaccharides among bifidobacterial strains suggest bacterial cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivière, Audrey; Selak, Marija; Geirnaert, Annelies; Van den Abbeele, Pieter; De Vuyst, Luc

    2018-03-02

    Inulin-type fructans (ITF) and arabinoxylan-oligosaccharides (AXOS) are broken down to different extents by various bifidobacterial strains present in the human colon. To date, phenotypic heterogeneity in the consumption of these complex oligosaccharides at strain level remains poorly studied. To examine mechanistic variations in ITF and AXOS constituent preferences present in one individual, ITF and AXOS consumption by bifidobacterial strains isolated from the simulator of the human intestinal microbial ecosystem (SHIME®), inoculated with feces from one healthy individual, was investigated.Among the 18 strains identified, four species-independent clusters displaying different ITF and AXOS degradation mechanisms and preferences were found. Bifidobacterium bifidum B46 showed limited growth on all substrates, whereas B. longum B24 and B. longum B18 could grow better on short chain length fractions of FOS than on fructose. B. longum B24 could cleave arabinose substituents of AXOS extracellularly, without using the AXOS-derived xylose backbones, whereas B. longum B18 was able to consume oligosaccharides (up to xylotetraose) preferentially, and consume AXOS to a limited extent. B. adolescentis B72 degraded all chain length fractions of FOS simultaneously, partially degraded inulin, and could use xylose backbones longer than xylotetraose extracellularly. The strain-specific degradation mechanisms suggested to be complementary and indicated resource partitioning. Specialization in degradation of complex carbohydrates by bifidobacteria present on the individual level could have in vivo implications for the successful implementation of ITF and AXOS aiming at bifidogenic and/or butyrogenic effects. Finally, this work shows the importance of taking microbial strain-level differences into account in gut microbiota research. Importance of the study It is well known that bifidobacteria degrade undigestible complex polysaccharides, such as inulin-type fructans (ITF) and

  16. Evidence for growth of strains of the plant epiphytic bacterium Erwinia herbicola and transconjugation among the bacterial strains in guts of the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K; Hara, W; Sato, M

    1998-09-01

    Growth of plant epiphytic bacteria Erwinia herbicola and Pseudomonas syringae in guts of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, was studied. Fifth instar silkworm larvae were fed artificial diets supplemented with these bacteria for 6 to 12 h followed by uncontaminated diets. At 1, 3, and 6 days after feeding, bacteria were isolated from insect guts and feces. A much larger population of E. herbicola was detected in the samples collected 3 and 6 days after the inoculation than in samples collected after 1 day, indicating that these bacteria grew in the insect gut, while P. syringae was unable to survive. Transconjugation between E. herbicola strains in the insect gut was also examined. First, either a donor or a recipient strain was fed to the insects in artificial diets containing the bacteria during 12 h, and then pairing strains were fed during 12 h after starvation for 12 h. The conjugative plasmid pBPW1::Tn7 was transferred into recipient cells at very high frequencies (10(-1)/recipient after 3 days and 10(-3) after 6 days) in insect guts. Indigenous plasmids of E. herbicola mobilized RSF1010 plasmid into recipient cells at frequencies of 10(-4) in insect guts. These transconjugants were detected in the feces of the insects. Thus, plasmid-mediated gene transfer among the epiphytic bacteria in insect guts was demonstrated. The results obtained suggest that in insecta gene transfer may play an important role in the evolution of plant epiphytic bacteria. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  17. Characterization of CRISPR-Cas system in clinical Staphylococcus epidermidis strains revealed its potential association with bacterial infection sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qiuchun; Xie, Xiaolei; Yin, Kequan

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is considered as a major cause of nosocomial infections, bringing an immense burden to healthcare systems. Virulent phages have been confirmed to be efficient in combating the pathogen, but the prensence of CRISPR-Cas system, which is a bacterial immune system eliminating...

  18. Evaluation of assembling methods on determination of whole genome sequence of Xylella fastidiosa blueberry bacterial leaf scorch strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blueberry bacterial leaf scorch (BBLS) disease, a threat to blueberry production in the Southern USA and potentially elsewhere, is caused by Xylella fastidiosa. Efficient control of BBLS requires knowledge of the pathogen. However, this is challenging because Xylella fastidiosa is difficult to cultu...

  19. Evaluation of Anti-adherent Activity of Excretions of Irradiated Lucilia sericata Maggot and Certain Essential Oils against Some Pathogenic Bacterial Strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eltablawy, S.Y.; Amin, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Essential Oils are widely used for their medicinal properties. They block adhesion and colonization of pathogenic microbes to epithelial cells which associated with bacterial resistance to antibiotics. So, this study investigates the effect of Lu cilia sacarato (flesh fly-an ectoparasitic) excretions of non-irradiated and irradiated maggot and some essential oils on biofilm formation by tube method, antimicrobial susceptibility by agar disc diffusion method as well as on their anti-adherent activity by spectrophotometric method. The results showed that excretions and secretions (E/S) of non-irradiated and irradiated maggots (at 20 Gy), as well as (clove and cinnamon oils) did not have antibacterial activity against the tested bacterial strains Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), Staphylococcus aureus (St. aureus) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (St. epidermidis) except marjoram oil which has low antimicrobial activity against all the tested strains. The results also showed that the most potent oil was clove which decrease biofilm of P. aeruginosa by 83%, followed by marjoram (69%), then E/S of non-irradiated maggots (66%). Whiles, biofilm was less affected by cinnamon oil and E/S of irradiated maggots by 50 % and 36%, respectively. In addition, clove oil and E/S of non-irradiated maggots affect the pre-adhered biofilm of P. aeruginosa by 57 and 45 %, respectively. Conclusion: Clove oil flowed by marjoram had anti-adherent effect on P. aeruginosa. Greater inhibition of adhesion was observed by excretions of non-irradiated lucilia sericata.

  20. The effect of new probiotic strain Lactobacillus plantarum on counts of coliforms, lactobacilli and bacterial enzyme activities in rats exposed to N,N-dimethylhydrazine (chemical carcinogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denisa Čokášová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the new probiotic strain Lactobacillus plantarum on chemically induced carcinogenesis in rats. Sprague dowley rats (n = 33 were divided into control and experimental groups and were fed a conventional laboratory diet. In the experimental group, rats were treated with the probiotic at the dose of 1 × 109 CFU (colony-forming units/ml. Two weeks after the beginning of the trial, N,N-dimethylhydrazine (chemical carcinogen injections were applied s.c. at the dose of 21 mg/kg b.w., 5 × weekly. At the end of the 8-month experimental period, faeces samples were taken from the rats and used for laboratory analysis. The counts of lactobacilli and coliforms and bacterial enzyme activity were determined. The probiotic strain L. plantarum as single species or in combination with oil (Lini oleum virginale decreased the count of total coliforms and increased lactobacilli in faeces of rats. Application of probiotic microorganisms significantly (P < 0.05 decreased the activities of bacterial enzymes (β-galactosidase and β-glucuronidase compared to the control group rats. The results of this study indicate that probiotic microorganisms could exert a preventive effect on colon carcinogenesis induced by N,N-dimethylhydrazine.

  1. Improvement of bacterial cellulose production by manipulating the metabolic pathways in which ethanol and sodium citrate involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanjing; Tian, Chunjie; Tian, Hua; Zhang, Jiliang; He, Xin; Ping, Wenxiang; Lei, Hong

    2012-12-01

    Nowadays, bacterial cellulose has played more and more important role as new biological material for food industry and medical and industrial products based on its unique properties. However, it is still a difficult task to improve the production of bacterial cellulose, especially a large number of byproducts are produced in the metabolic biosynthesis processes. To improve bacterial cellulose production, ethanol and sodium citrate are added into the medium during the fermentation, and the activities of key enzymes and concentration of extracellular metabolites are measured to assess the changes of the metabolic flux of the hexose monophosphate pathway (HMP), the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway (EMP), and the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA). Our results indicate that ethanol functions as energy source for ATP generation at the early stage of the fermentation in the HMP pathway and the supplementation of ethanol significantly reduces glycerol generation (a major byproduct). While in the EMP pathway, sodium citrate plays a key role, and its supplementation results in the byproducts (mainly acetic acid and pyruvic acid) entering the gluconeogenesis pathway for cellulose synthesis. Furthermore, by adding ethanol and sodium citrate, the main byproduct citric acid in the TCA cycle is also reduced significantly. It is concluded that bacterial cellulose production can be improved by increasing energy metabolism and reducing the formation of metabolic byproducts through the metabolic regulations of the bypasses.

  2. The Kolumbo submarine volcano of Santorini island is a large pool of bacterial strains with antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourbouli, Maria; Katsifas, Efstathios A; Papathanassiou, Evangelos; Karagouni, Amalia D

    2015-05-01

    Microbes in hydrothermal vents with their unique secondary metabolism may represent an untapped potential source of new natural products. In this study, samples were collected from the hydrothermal field of Kolumbo submarine volcano in the Aegean Sea, in order to isolate bacteria with antimicrobial activity. Eight hundred and thirty-two aerobic heterotrophic bacteria were isolated and then differentiated through BOX-PCR analysis at the strain level into 230 genomic fingerprints, which were screened against 13 different type strains (pathogenic and nonpathogenic) of Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. Forty-two out of 176 bioactive-producing genotypes (76 %) exhibited antimicrobial activity against at least four different type strains and were selected for 16S rDNA sequencing and screening for nonribosomal peptide (NRPS) and polyketide (PKS) synthases genes. The isolates were assigned to genus Bacillus and Proteobacteria, and 20 strains harbored either NRPS, PKS type I or both genes. This is the first report on the diversity of culturable mesophilic bacteria associated with antimicrobial activity from Kolumbo area; the extremely high proportion of antimicrobial-producing strains suggested that this unique environment may represent a potential reservoir of novel bioactive compounds.

  3. Selection of potent bacterial strain for over-production of PHB by using low cost carbon source for eco-friendly bioplastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahat Abdul Rehman

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The microbial PHB production is a promising tool for the plastic industry for the synthesis of environmental friendly, biodegradable plastic in contrast to the conventional petro-chemical based non-degradable plastics. The selection of potent bacterial strains, inexpensive carbon source, efficient fermentation and recovery processes are important aspects that were taken into account during this study. Methods: Different bacterial strains i.e. Bacillus Spp, P. putida and P. fluorescens were screened for maximum PHB production. Under media optimization, various carbon and nitrogen sources (alone or in combination were used to achieve the maximum PHB production. Finally the degradation tests of the PHB sheet were also performed to test its biodegradability potential. Results: Shake flask studies have shown the PHB concentrations upto 7.02, 4.50 and 34.4 mg/g of dry cell mass of P. putida, P. fluorescens and Bacillus Spp. respectively. Almost same results were observed at laboratory scale production of PHB in 10 L fermenter i.e. 6.28, 6.23 and 39.5 mg/g of dry cell mass by P. putida, P. fluorescens and Bacillus Spp. respectively. On the basis of these observations, Bacillus Spp. was chosen for laboratory scale PHB production. Corn steep liquor (4% was chosen as the best medium to achieve the highest PHB contents. Isolated PHB has shown biodegradation in soil up to 86.7% at 37oC. Conclusion: The Bacillus Spp. Proved to be the best strain for PHB production on only 4% CSL which is cheapest and easily available.

  4. Biomimetic synthesis of selenium nanospheres by bacterial strain JS-11 and its role as a biosensor for nanotoxicity assessment: a novel se-bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Sourabh; Alkhedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Ahamed, Maqusood; Musarrat, Javed

    2013-01-01

    Selenium nanoparticles (Se-NPs) were synthesized by green technology using the bacterial isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain JS-11. The bacteria exhibited significant tolerance to selenite (SeO3(2-)) up to 100 mM concentration with an EC50 value of 140 mM. The spent medium (culture supernatant) contains the potential of reducing soluble and colorless SeO3(2-) to insoluble red elemental selenium (Se(0)) at 37°C. Characterization of red Se° product by use of UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectrum (EDX) analysis revealed the presence of stable, predominantly monodispersed and spherical selenium nanoparticles (Se-NPs) of an average size of 21 nm. Most likely, the metabolite phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) released by strain JS-11 in culture supernatant along with the known redox agents like NADH and NADH dependent reductases are responsible for biomimetic reduction of SeO3(2-) to Se° nanospheres. Based on the bioreduction of a colorless solution of SeO3(2-) to elemental red Se(0), a high throughput colorimetric bioassay (Se-Assay) was developed for parallel detection and quantification of nanoparticles (NPs) cytotoxicity in a 96 well format. Thus, it has been concluded that the reducing power of the culture supernatant of strain JS-11 could be effectively exploited for developing a simple and environmental friendly method of Se-NPs synthesis. The results elucidated that the red colored Se° nanospheres may serve as a biosensor for nanotoxicity assessment, contemplating the inhibition of SeO3(2-) bioreduction process in NPs treated bacterial cell culture supernatant, as a toxicity end point.

  5. Identification of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae strains causing bacterial canker of kiwifruit in the Anhui Province of China, and determination of their streptomycin sensitivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X; Yi, X-K; Chen, Y; Zhang, A-F; Zhang, J-Y; Gao, Z-H; Qi, Y-J; Xu, Y-L

    2015-07-27

    Bacterial canker, caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae, is one of the most severe diseases of kiwifruit. It has become an international pandemic and threatens the sustainable development of kiwifruit production in all main kiwi-growing regions worldwide. Streptomycin has been the major bactericide for the control of kiwifruit canker, especially in Anhui Province, one of the main kiwifruit production regions in China. However, until now, no studies on the baseline sensitivity to streptomycin of field isolates of P. syringae pv. actinidiae from China have been available. During 2012-2013, a total of 102 single-colony P. syringae pv. actinidiae strains were isolated: 36, 12, 13, 26, and 15 strains from Yuexi, Jinzhai, Huoshan, Qianshan, and Taihu counties, respectively. All strains were confirmed by production of a 280-bp fragment using the specific primers PsaF1/R2 upon polymerase chain reaction amplification, followed by an assay for confirmation of pathogenicity to fulfill Koch's postulates. In this study, the streptomycin sensitivity of the 102 isolated strains was determined. The half-maximal effective concentration values for inhibition of growth by streptomycin were 0.03-0.42 μg/mL (average 0.12 ± 0.06 μg/mL). The baseline sensitivity curve was unimodal, representing range-of-variation factors of 14.0. No resistant subpopulation was identified among the strains used in the study. Thus, these sensitivity data could be used as a baseline for monitoring the shift in sensitivity of P. syringae pv. actinidiae populations to streptomycin in Anhui Province. Continuous resistance monitoring should be carried out, as streptomycin is an at-risk bactericide agent.

  6. Promising Biological Indicator of Heavy Metal Pollution: Bioluminescent Bacterial Strains Isolated and Characterized from Marine Niches of Goa, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakre, Neha A; Shanware, Arti S

    2015-09-01

    In present study, several marine water samples collected from the North Goa Beaches, India for isolation of luminescent bacterial species. Isolates obtained labelled as DP1-5 and AB1-6. Molecular characterization including identification of a microbial culture using 16S rRNA gene based molecular technique and phylogenetic analysis confirmed that DP3 & AB1 isolates were Vibrio harveyi. All of the isolates demonstrated multiple metal resistances in terms of growth, with altered luminescence with variable metal concentration. Present investigations were an attempt towards exploring and reporting an updated diversity of bioluminescent bacterial species from various sites around the Goa, India which would be explored in future for constructing luminescence based biosensor for efficiently monitoring the level of hazardous metals in the environment.

  7. Probiotic features of Lactobacillus plantarum mutant strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, Pasquale; Gallone, Anna; Russo, Pasquale; Capozzi, Vittorio; Albenzio, Marzia; Spano, Giuseppe; Fiocco, Daniela

    2012-10-01

    In this study, the probiotic potential of Lactobacillus plantarum wild-type and derivative mutant strains was investigated. Bacterial survival was evaluated in an in vitro system, simulating the transit along the human oro-gastro-intestinal tract. Interaction with human gut epithelial cells was studied by assessing bacterial adhesive ability to Caco-2 cells and induction of genes involved in innate immunity. L. plantarum strains were resistant to the combined stress at the various steps of the simulated gastrointestinal tract. Major decreases in the viability of L. plantarum cells were observed mainly under drastic acidic conditions (pH ≤ 2.0) of the gastric compartment. Abiotic stresses associated to small intestine poorly affected bacterial viability. All the bacterial strains significantly adhered to Caco-2 cells, with the ΔctsR mutant strain exhibiting the highest adhesion. Induction of immune-related genes resulted higher upon incubation with heat-inactivated bacteria rather than with live ones. For specific genes, a differential transcriptional pattern was observed upon stimulation with different L. plantarum strains, evidencing a possible role of the knocked out bacterial genes in the modulation of host cell response. In particular, cells from Δhsp18.55 and ΔftsH mutants strongly triggered immune defence genes. Our study highlights the relevance of microbial genetic background in host-probiotic interaction and might contribute to identify candidate bacterial genes and molecules involved in probiosis.

  8. Soil factors involved in the diversity and structure of soil bacterial communities in commercial organic olive orchards in Southern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, B B; Montes-Borrego, M; Aranda, S; Soriano, M A; Gómez, J A; Navas-Cortés, J A

    2014-04-01

    Nowadays, there is a tendency in olive production systems to reduce tillage or keep a vegetative cover to reduce soil erosion and degradation. However, there is scarce information on the effects of different soil management systems (SMS) in soil bacterial community composition of olive groves. In this study, we have evaluated the effects of soil type and different SMS implemented to control weeds in the structure and diversity of bacterial communities of 58 soils in the two geographic areas that best represent the organic olive production systems in Spain. Bacterial community composition assessed by frequency and intensity of occurrence of terminal restriction profiles (TRFs) derived from terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of amplified 16S ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid were strongly correlated with soil type/field site (Eutric/Calcaric) that differed mainly in soil particle size distribution and soil pH, followed by a strong effect of SMS, in that order. Canonical discriminant (CD) analysis of TRFs properly classified all of the olive orchard soils as belonging to their respective soil type or SMS. Furthermore, only a small set of TRFs were enough to clearly and significantly differentiate soil samples according to soil type or SMS. Those specific TRFs could be used as bioindicators to assess the effect of changes in SMS aimed to enhance soil quality in olive production systems. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Isolation of identical nitrilase genes from multiple bacterial strains and real-time PCR detection of the genes from soils provides evidence of horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Lee; Clarke, Adrienne; Duggan, Patrick; Tambling, Karen; Horgan, Serenia; Dowling, David; O'Reilly, Catherine

    2009-10-01

    Bacterial enzymes capable of nitrile hydrolysis have significant industrial potential. Microbacterium sp. AJ115, Rhodococcus erythropolis AJ270 and AJ300 were isolated from the same location in England and harbour identical nitrile hydratase/amidase gene clusters. Strain AJ270 has been well studied due to its nitrile hydratase and amidase activity. R. erythropolis ITCBP was isolated from Denmark and carries a very similar nitrile hydratase/amidase gene cluster. In this study, an identical nitrilase gene (nit1) was isolated from the four strains, and the nitrilase from strain AJ270 cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Analysis of the recombinant nitrilase has shown it to be functional with activity demonstrated towards phenylacetonitrile. A real-time PCR TaqMan assay was developed that allowed nit1 detection directly from soil enrichment cultures without DNA extraction, with nit1 detected in all samples tested. Real-time PCR screening of isolates from these soils resulted in the isolation of nit1 and also very similar nitrilase gene nit2 from a number of Burkholderia sp. The genes nit1 and nit2 have also been detected in many bacteria of different genera but are unstable in these isolates. It is likely that the genes were acquired by horizontal gene transfer and may be wide-spread in the environment.

  10. Chemical moieties and interactions involved in the binding of zearalenone to the surface of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains GG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nezami, Hani; Polychronaki, Nektaria; Lee, Yuan Kun; Haskard, Carolyn; Juvonen, Risto; Salminen, Seppo; Mykkänen, Hannu

    2004-07-14

    Viable, heat-and acid-killed Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG (LGG) has shown high binding properties with zearalenone (ZEN). To identify the type of chemical moieties and interactions involved in binding with the ZEN, LGG was subjected to different chemical and enzymatical treatments, prior to the binding experiments. Pretreating the viable, heat- and acid-killed bacteria with m-periodate significantly decreased ZEN binding, suggesting that ZEN binds predominantly to carbohydrate components. Pretreatment with Pronase E had no effect on the ability of viable cells to bind ZEN, however, a reduction in the binding of ZEN by heat- and acid-killed cells, suggesting that the new binding sites exposed by heat or acid are proteins in nature. Pretreatment with urea also decreased binding, suggesting that hydrophobic interactions play a role in ZEN binding. The binding of ZEN in concentrations ranging from 0.79 to 62.82 microM and its subsequent dissociation by repetitive aqueous washes was also studied. The binding sites of the bacteria were not saturated by the maximum ZEN concentration studied.

  11. Evolution of Bacterial Global Modulators: Role of a Novel H-NS Paralogue in the EnteroaggregativeEscherichia coliStrain 042.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, A; Bernabeu, M; Aznar, S; Ruiz-Cruz, S; Bravo, A; Queiroz, M H; Juárez, A

    2018-01-01

    Bacterial genomes sometimes contain genes that code for homologues of global regulators, the function of which is unclear. In members of the family Enterobacteriaceae , cells express the global regulator H-NS and its paralogue StpA. In Escherichia coli , out of providing a molecular backup for H-NS, the role of StpA is poorly characterized. The enteroaggregative E. coli strain 042 carries, in addition to the hns and stpA genes, a third gene encoding an hns paralogue ( hns2 ). We present in this paper information about its biological function. Transcriptomic analysis has shown that the H-NS2 protein targets a subset of the genes targeted by H-NS. Genes targeted by H-NS2 correspond mainly with horizontally transferred (HGT) genes and are also targeted by the Hha protein, a fine-tuner of H-NS activity. Compared with H-NS, H-NS2 expression levels are lower. In addition, H-NS2 expression exhibits specific features: it is sensitive to the growth temperature and to the nature of the culture medium. This novel H-NS paralogue is widespread within the Enterobacteriaceae . IMPORTANCE Global regulators such as H-NS play key relevant roles enabling bacterial cells to adapt to a changing environment. H-NS modulates both core and horizontally transferred (HGT) genes, but the mechanism by which H-NS can differentially regulate these genes remains to be elucidated. There are several instances of bacterial cells carrying genes that encode homologues of the global regulators. The question is what the roles of these proteins are. We noticed that the enteroaggregative E. coli strain 042 carries a new hitherto uncharacterized copy of the hns gene. We decided to investigate why this pathogenic E. coli strain requires an extra H-NS paralogue, termed H-NS2. In our work, we show that H-NS2 displays specific expression and regulatory properties. H-NS2 targets a subset of H-NS-specific genes and may help to differentially modulate core and HGT genes by the H-NS cellular pool.

  12. The longitudinal effect of a multi-strain probiotic on the intestinal bacterial microbiota of neonatal foals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoster, Angelika; Guardabassi, Luca; Staempfli, H. R.

    2016-01-01

    or class level between treatment groups at any age (all p>0.08) but some significant changes in relative abundance of families. Probiotic administration did not result in an increased relative abundance of lactobacilli or bifidobacteria at any age (Lactobacillus: p = 0.95, p = 0.1 and p = 0...... applied (all p>0.65). CONCLUSIONS: There were limited effects of probiotic treatment on the bacterial microbiota of foals. The studied probiotic based on lactobacilli and bifidobacteria has a limited potential for therapeutic modification of the gastrointestinal microbiota. This article is protected...

  13. BACTERIAL CONSORTIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payel Sarkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum aromatic hydrocarbons like benzen e, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene, together known as BTEX, has almost the same chemical structure. These aromatic hydrocarbons are released as pollutants in th e environment. This work was taken up to develop a solvent tolerant bacterial cons ortium that could degrade BTEX compounds as they all share a common chemical structure. We have isolated almost 60 different types of bacterial strains from different petroleum contaminated sites. Of these 60 bacterial strains almost 20 microorganisms were screene d on the basis of capability to tolerate high concentration of BTEX. Ten differe nt consortia were prepared and the compatibility of the bacterial strains within the consortia was checked by gram staining and BTEX tolerance level. Four successful mi crobial consortia were selected in which all the bacterial strains concomitantly grew in presence of high concentration of BTEX (10% of toluene, 10% of benzene 5% ethyl benzene and 1% xylene. Consortium #2 showed the highest growth rate in pr esence of BTEX. Degradation of BTEX by consortium #2 was monitored for 5 days by gradual decrease in the volume of the solvents. The maximum reduction observed wa s 85% in 5 days. Gas chromatography results also reveal that could completely degrade benzene and ethyl benzene within 48 hours. Almost 90% degradation of toluene and xylene in 48 hours was exhibited by consortium #2. It could also tolerate and degrade many industrial solvents such as chloroform, DMSO, acetonitrile having a wide range of log P values (0.03–3.1. Degradation of aromatic hydrocarbon like BTEX by a solvent tolerant bacterial consortium is greatly significant as it could degrade high concentration of pollutants compared to a bacterium and also reduces the time span of degradation.

  14. Involvement of bacterial TonB-dependent signaling in the generation of an oligogalacturonide damage-associated molecular pattern from plant cell walls exposed to Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris pectate lyases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Efficient perception of attacking pathogens is essential for plants. Plant defense is evoked by molecules termed elicitors. Endogenous elicitors or damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) originate from plant materials upon injury or pathogen activity. While there are comparably well-characterized examples for DAMPs, often oligogalacturonides (OGAs), generated by the activity of fungal pathogens, endogenous elicitors evoked by bacterial pathogens have been rarely described. In particular, the signal perception and transduction processes involved in DAMP generation are poorly characterized. Results A mutant strain of the phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris deficient in exbD2, which encodes a component of its unusual elaborate TonB system, had impaired pectate lyase activity and caused no visible symptoms for defense on the non-host plant pepper (Capsicum annuum). A co-incubation of X. campestris pv. campestris with isolated cell wall material from C. annuum led to the release of compounds which induced an oxidative burst in cell suspension cultures of the non-host plant. Lipopolysaccharides and proteins were ruled out as elicitors by polymyxin B and heat treatment, respectively. After hydrolysis with trifluoroacetic acid and subsequent HPAE chromatography, the elicitor preparation contained galacturonic acid, the monosaccharide constituent of pectate. OGAs were isolated from this crude elicitor preparation by HPAEC and tested for their biological activity. While small OGAs were unable to induce an oxidative burst, the elicitor activity in cell suspension cultures of the non-host plants tobacco and pepper increased with the degree of polymerization (DP). Maximal elicitor activity was observed for DPs exceeding 8. In contrast to the X. campestris pv. campestris wild type B100, the exbD2 mutant was unable to generate elicitor activity from plant cell wall material or from pectin. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the

  15. Multiplex cytokine analyses in dogs with pyometra suggest involvement of KC-like chemokine in canine bacterial sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Iulia; Hagman, Ragnvi; Johannisson, Anders; Wang, Liya; Södersten, Fredrik; Wernersson, Sara

    2016-02-01

    Clinical diagnostic criteria for sepsis (systemic inflammatory response syndrome caused by infection) are unspecific and, therefore, biomarkers for sepsis diagnosis are needed for appropriate treatment and patient survival. Pyometra, a common disease caused by bacterial infection of the uterus, results in sepsis in nearly 60% of cases in dogs. We used dogs with pyometra as a natural model for sepsis and collected serum samples from 39 dogs, of which 22 with pyometra and 17 healthy controls. Dogs with pyometra were further grouped into dogs with sepsis (n=18) and without sepsis (n=4). Serum concentrations of a panel of cytokines, including keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC)-like, granulocyte-macrophages colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-15, IL-18, chemokine C-X-C motif ligand (CXCL)10 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, were measured using multiplex analyses. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were determined using an automated immunoturbidimetric assay. In addition to physical examination hematological and serum biochemical analyses were performed to evaluate the overall status of the dogs. Significantly higher concentrations of KC-like (757 vs 304 pg/ml) were detected in dogs with pyometra as compared to healthy dogs. Within the pyometra group, dogs with sepsis compared to dogs without sepsis had a higher KC-like concentration (873 vs 300 pg/ml). Hemoglobin levels were significantly lower in dogs with pyometra compared to healthy dogs, regardless of the presence or absence of sepsis, and correlated negatively with KC-like. KC-like concentrations correlated positively with CRP, number of hospitalization days, number of monocytes, concentrations of IL-8, and percentage band neutrophils. Our data suggest that bacterial infection triggers the expression of KC-like and further studies are warranted of KC-like as a possible biomarker for diagnosing sepsis and uterine bacterial infection in dogs. Copyright

  16. Differential mRNA expression of seven genes involved in cholesterol metabolism and transport in the liver of atherosclerosis-susceptible and -resistant Japanese quail strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xinrui

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two atherosclerosis-susceptible and -resistant Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica strains obtained by divergent selection are commonly used as models to study atherosclerosis, but no genetic characterization of their phenotypic differences has been reported so far. Our objective was to examine possible differences in the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism and transport in the liver between these two strains and to evaluate the value of this model to analyze the gene system affecting cholesterol metabolism and transport. Methods A factorial study with both strains (atherosclerosis-susceptible versus atherosclerosis-resistant and two diets (control versus cholesterol was carried out. The mRNA concentrations of four genes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis (HMGCR, FDFT1, SQLE and DHCR7 and three genes in cholesterol transport (ABCG5, ABCG8 and APOA1 were assayed using real-time quantitative PCR. Plasma lipids were also assayed. Results Expression of ABCG5 (control diet and ABCG8 (regardless of dietary treatment and expression of HMGCR, FDFT1 and SQLE (regardless of dietary treatment were significantly higher in the atherosclerosis-resistant than in the atherosclerosis-susceptible strain. Plasma triglyceride and LDL levels, and LDL/HDL ratio were significantly higher in the atherosclerosis-susceptible than in the atherosclerosis-resistant strain fed the cholesterol diet. In the atherosclerosis-susceptible strain, ABCG5 expression regressed significantly and positively on plasma LDL level, whereas DHCR7 and SQLE expression regressed significantly and negatively on plasma triglyceride level. Conclusions Our results provide support for the hypothesis that the atherosclerosis-resistant strain metabolizes and excretes cholesterol faster than the atherosclerosis-susceptible strain. We have also demonstrated that these quail strains are a useful model to study cholesterol metabolism and transport in relation with

  17. Isolation and Identification of an Indigenous Probiotic Lactobacillus Strain: Its Encapsulation with Natural Branched Polysaccharids to Improve Bacterial Viability

    OpenAIRE

    Nafiseh Sadat Foroutan; Fatemeh Tabandeh; Mahvash Khodabandeh; Naheed Mojgani; Amir Maghsoudi; Meisam Moradi

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objective: Probiotics have to reach their site of action in certain numbers in order to exhibit positive health effects. Encapsulation has shown remarkable enhancing effects on probiotic survival in simulated gastric conditions compared to free bacteria. The purpose of this study was identification and evaluation of a potential probiotic strain using encapsulation process by new carriers in order to improve probiotic viability during in vitro simulated conditions.Material and M...

  18. Biosurfactant production from marine hydrocarbon-degrading consortia and pure bacterial strains using crude oil as carbon source

    OpenAIRE

    Antoniou, Eleftheria; Fodelianakis, Stilianos; Korkakaki, Emmanouela; Kalogerakis, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Biosurfactants (BS) are green amphiphilic molecules produced by microorganisms during biodegradation, increasing the bioavailability of organic pollutants. In this work, the BS production yield of marine hydrocarbon degraders isolated from Elefsina bay in Eastern Mediterranean Sea has been investigated. The drop collapse test was used as a preliminary screening test to confirm biosurfactant producing strains or mixed consortia. The community structure of the best consortia based on the drop c...

  19. Isolation and Identification of an Indigenous Probiotic Lactobacillus Strain: Its Encapsulation with Natural Branched Polysaccharids to Improve Bacterial Viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafiseh Sadat Foroutan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Probiotics have to reach their site of action in certain numbers in order to exhibit positive health effects. Encapsulation has shown remarkable enhancing effects on probiotic survival in simulated gastric conditions compared to free bacteria. The purpose of this study was identification and evaluation of a potential probiotic strain using encapsulation process by new carriers in order to improve probiotic viability during in vitro simulated conditions.Material and Methods: A native Lactobacillus was isolated from yogurt, identified as Lactobacillus casei PM01 (NCBI registered and analyzed for probiotic properties alongside established probiotic strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 43556, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 7469. Acid and bile resistance, adhesion to Caco-2 cells and antibiotic resistance were evaluated. Lactobacillus casei PM01 was encapsulated with alginate, chitosan and natural branched polysaccharides (pectin, tragacanth gum and gum Arabic by using extrusion technique. Encapsulation efficiency, acidification activity and viability of entrapped Lactobacillus casei PM01 in simulated gastric pH were determined. Results and Conclusion: Based on the results, all the three strains could be considered as potential probiotics, and are good candidates for further in vitro and in vivo evaluation. The results showed that the survival of encapsulated Lactobacillus casei PM01 was significantly (p≤0.05 increased when it was incubated in simulated gastric pH. It can be concluded that indigenous Lactobacillus casei PM01 in encapsulated form is introduced as an efficient probiotic strain for using in dairy products.Conflict of interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

  20. Comparative study of wild and transformed salt tolerant bacterial strains on Triticum aestivum growth under salt stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shazia Afrasayab

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Eleven salt tolerant bacteria isolated from different sources (soil, plants and their transformed strains were used to study their influence on Triticum aestivum var. Inqlab-91 growth under salt (100 mM NaCl stress. Salt stress caused reduction in germination (19.4%, seedling growth (46% and fresh weight (39% in non-inoculated plants. In general, both wild and transformed strains stimulated germination, seedling growth and fresh weight in salt free and salt stressed conditions. At 100 mM NaCl, Staphylococcus xylosus ST-1 caused 25% increments in seedling length over respective control. Soluble protein content significantly enhanced (49% under salt stress as compared to salt free control. At 100 mM NaCl parental strain PT-5 resulted about 32% enhancement in protein content over respective control treatment. Salt stress induced the promotion of auxin content in seedlings. Overall, Bacillus subtilis HAa2 and transformed E. coli-SP-7-T, caused 33% and 30% increases in auxin content, respectively, were recorded under salt stress in comparison to control.

  1. Activity of solvent extracts of Prosopis spicigera, Zingiber officinale and Trachyspermum ammi against multidrug resistant bacterial and fungal strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Rosina; Zakir, Mohammad; Afaq, Sadul H; Latif, Abdul; Khan, Asad U

    2010-06-03

    The emerging trends of multidrug resistance among several groups of microorganisms against different classes of antibiotics led different researchers to develop efficient drugs from plant sources to counter multidrug resistant strains. This study investigated different solvent extracts of Prosopis spicigera (P. Spicigera), Zingiber officinale, and Trachyspermum ammi (T. ammi) to determine their efficacy against multidrug resistant microbes. Successive extractions of these plants were performed using a Soxhlet apparatus, using solvents with increasing polarities. Preliminary phytochemical analysis was also performed. Minimum inhibitory concentration was determined by a two-fold serial dilution method followed by determination of minimum bactericidal/fungicidal concentration. Multidrug resistant (MDR) strains of Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, Escherichia coli and reference strains of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus bovis were used in the study. The ethanolic fraction of P. spicigera (least minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] - 4.88 microg/ml) demonstrated a remarkable inhibition of the microorganisms while fractions obtained from those of Zingiber officinale (least MIC-78.125 microg/ml) exhibited little activity. The petroleum ether fraction of T. ammi (least MIC- 625 microg/ml) showed best activity when compared to its other fractions. Qualitative analysis of the phytoconstituents was also performed. The potency shown by these extracts recommends their use against multidrug resistant microorganisms. This study also showed that P. spicigera could be a potential source of new antimicrobial agents.

  2. Caprolactam-silica network, a strong potentiator of the antimicrobial activity of kanamycin against gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voicu, Georgeta; Grumezescu, Valentina; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Ficai, Anton; Ficai, Denisa; Ghitulica, Cristina Daniela; Gheorghe, Irina; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen

    2013-03-25

    Here, we report the fabrication of a novel ε-caprolactam-silica (ε-SiO2) network and assessed its biocompatibility and ability to improve the antimicrobial activity of kanamycin. The results of the quantitative antimicrobial assay demonstrate that the obtained ε-SiO2 network has efficiently improved the kanamycin activity on Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 strains, with a significant decrease of the minimum inhibitory concentration. The ε-SiO2 network could be feasibly obtained and represents an alternative for the design of new antibiotic drug carriers or delivery systems to control bacterial infections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of Different Carbon Sources on Bacterial Nanocellulose Production and Structure Using the Low pH Resistant Strain Komagataeibacter Medellinensis

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    Carlos Molina-Ramírez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cellulose (BC is a polymer obtained by fermentation with microorganism of different genera. Recently, new producer species have been discovered, which require identification of the most important variables affecting cellulose production. In this work, the influence of different carbon sources in BC production by a novel low pH-resistant strain Komagataeibacter medellinensis was established. The Hestrin-Schramm culture medium was used as a reference and was compared to other media comprising glucose, fructose, and sucrose, used as carbon sources at three concentrations (1, 2, and 3% w/v. The BC yield and dynamics of carbon consumption were determined at given fermentation times during cellulose production. While the carbon source did not influence the BC structural characteristics, different production levels were determined: glucose > sucrose > fructose. These results highlight considerations to improve BC industrial production and to establish the BC property space for applications in different fields.

  4. [Biofilms of the oral cavity. Formation, development and involvement in the onset of diseases related to bacterial plaque increase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolaia, C; Sbordone, L

    2002-05-01

    Biofilm is defined as a community of bacteria intimately associated with each other and included within an exopolymer matrix: this biological unit exhibits its own properties, quite different in comparison with those showed by the single species in planktonic form. The oral cavity appears as an open ecosystem, with a dynamic balance between the entrance of microrganisms, colonisation modalities and host defences aimed to their removal: to avoid elimination, bacteria need to adhere to either hard dental surfaces or epithelial surfaces. The oral biofilm formation and development, and the inside selection of specific microrganisms have been correlated with the most common oral pathologies, such as dental caries, periodontal disease and peri-implantitis. Many of these bacteria are usual saprophytes of the oral environment, that, in particular situations, can overcome and express their virulence factors: to better understand the mechanisms of these pathologies it's necessary to know the complex interactions between all the bacterial species inside the biofilm and host tissues and responses. The present paper is a review of the most significant studies on the biofilm development modalities, their correlations with either health or illness of the oral cavity, the bacterial co-aggregation strategies and the biofilm response to antimicrobial agents.

  5. Silver- and fluoride-containing mesoporous bioactive glasses versus commonly used antibiotics: Activity against multidrug-resistant bacterial strains isolated from patients with burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholipourmalekabadi, M; Sameni, M; Hashemi, A; Zamani, F; Rostami, A; Mozafari, M

    2016-02-01

    The wound healing process is frequently associated with a number of major clinical challenges, due to the failure of commonly used antibiotics as a remedy for wounds. There have always been fascinating questions about the novel applications of bioactive glasses (BGs) and it is expected that in the next few years these types of materials may play an important role in many aspects of soft tissue regeneration. This research focuses on the feasibility of using silver- and fluoride-containing BGs against multidrug-resistant bacterial strains isolated from patients with burns. According to the results obtained, fluoride did not exhibit antibacterial activity against the tested bacteria, while both 1% and 2% silver-containing BGs inhibited the bacterial growth. It is an important finding that 1% silver-containing BGs showed a potential antibacterial activity without any toxicity against fibroblasts, suggesting that this class of BGs could play a key role in the prevention of infection, reduction of pain, and removal of excessive exudates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  6. The Effect of Specific Conditions on Cu, Ni, Zn and Al Recovery from PCBS Waste Using Acidophilic Bacterial Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrážiková A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the influence of static, stirring and shaking conditions on copper, zinc, nickel and aluminium dissolution from printed circuit boards (PCBs using the mixed acidophilic bacterial culture of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. The results revealed that static conditions were the most effective in zinc and aluminium dissolution. Zinc was removed almost completely under static conditions, whereas maximum of nickel dissolution was reached under the stirring conditions. The highest copper recovery (36% was reached under stirring conditions. The shaking conditions appeared to be the least suitable. The relative importance of these systems for the bioleaching of copper and nickel decreased in the order: stirring, static conditions, shaking.

  7. Oil-degrading properties of a psychrotolerant bacterial strain, Rhodococcus sp. Y2-2, in liquid and soil media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hong Thi Pham; Chaudhary, Dhiraj Kumar; Jeong, Seung-Woo; Kim, Jaisoo

    2018-02-06

    The aim of this study was to investigate oil-degrading ability of newly isolated strain Rhodococcus Y2-2 at low temperature. Rhodococcus sp. Y2-2 was isolated from oil-contaminated soil sampled at the end of winter using a newly developed transwell plate method. In the liquid phase, the oil-degradation efficiency of strain Rhodococcus sp. Y2-2 was about 84% with an initial concentration of 1500 ppm TPH (500 ppm each of kerosene, gasoline, and diesel) when incubated for 2 weeks under optimal conditions: 10 °C, pH 7, and 0.5 g L - 1 inoculum. In the soil phase, the isolate showed 80% oil degradation efficiency using glucose as a carbon source, with an initial concentration of 4000 ppm TPH and the addition of water during 14 days of incubation at 10 °C. Additionally, the degradation efficiency of the isolate was increased by the addition of mixture of surfactant alpha olefin sulfonate and gelatin, although strain Y2-2 also produced many biosurfactant components. This study shows Rhodococcus sp. Y2-2 can degrade oil components both in liquid and soil media by consuming kerosene, gasoline, and diesel as a carbon and energy source. Therefore, the crude oil-degrading ability of Rhodococcus sp. Y2-2 at low temperature provides proper bioremediation tool to clean up oil-contaminated sites especially in cold area or during winter season.

  8. Biosurfactant production from marine hydrocarbon-degrading consortia and pure bacterial strains using crude oil as carbon source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleftheria eAntoniou

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Biosurfactants (BS are green amphiphilic molecules produced by microorganisms during biodegradation, increasing the bioavailability of organic pollutants. In this work, the BS production yield of marine hydrocarbon degraders isolated from Elefsina bay in Eastern Mediterranean Sea has been investigated. The drop collapse test was used as a preliminary screening test to confirm biosurfactant producing strains or mixed consortia. The community structure of the best consortia based on the drop collapse test was determined by 16S-rDNA pyrotag screening. Subsequently, the effect of incubation time, temperature, substrate and supplementation with inorganic nutrients, on biosurfactant production, was examined. Two types of BS - lipid mixtures were extracted from the culture broth; the low molecular weight BS Rhamnolipids and Sophorolipids. Crude extracts were purified by silica gel column chromatography and then identified by thin layer chromatography (TLC and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR. Results indicate that biosurfactant production yield remains constant and low while it is independent of the total culture biomass, carbon source, and temperature. A constant BS concentration in a culture broth with continuous degradation of crude oil implies that the BS producing microbes generate no more than the required amount of biosurfactants that enables biodegradation of the crude oil. Isolated pure strains were found to have higher specific production yields than the complex microbial marine community-consortia. The heavy oil fraction of crude oil has emerged as a promising substrate for BS production (by marine BS producers with fewer impurities in the final product. Furthermore, a particular strain isolated from sediments, Paracoccus marcusii, may be an optimal choice for bioremediation purposes as its biomass remains trapped in the hydrocarbon phase, not suffering from potential dilution effects by sea currents.

  9. Biosurfactant production from marine hydrocarbon-degrading consortia and pure bacterial strains using crude oil as carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, Eleftheria; Fodelianakis, Stilianos; Korkakaki, Emmanouela; Kalogerakis, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Biosurfactants (BSs) are "green" amphiphilic molecules produced by microorganisms during biodegradation, increasing the bioavailability of organic pollutants. In this work, the BS production yield of marine hydrocarbon degraders isolated from Elefsina bay in Eastern Mediterranean Sea has been investigated. The drop collapse test was used as a preliminary screening test to confirm BS producing strains or mixed consortia. The community structure of the best consortia based on the drop collapse test was determined by 16S-rDNA pyrotag screening. Subsequently, the effect of incubation time, temperature, substrate and supplementation with inorganic nutrients, on BS production, was examined. Two types of BS - lipid mixtures were extracted from the culture broth; the low molecular weight BS Rhamnolipids and Sophorolipids. Crude extracts were purified by silica gel column chromatography and then identified by thin layer chromatography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results indicate that BS production yield remains constant and low while it is independent of the total culture biomass, carbon source, and temperature. A constant BS concentration in a culture broth with continuous degradation of crude oil (CO) implies that the BS producing microbes generate no more than the required amount of BSs that enables biodegradation of the CO. Isolated pure strains were found to have higher specific production yields than the complex microbial marine community-consortia. The heavy oil fraction of CO has emerged as a promising substrate for BS production (by marine BS producers) with fewer impurities in the final product. Furthermore, a particular strain isolated from sediments, Paracoccus marcusii, may be an optimal choice for bioremediation purposes as its biomass remains trapped in the hydrocarbon phase, not suffering from potential dilution effects by sea currents.

  10. Biosurfactant production from marine hydrocarbon-degrading consortia and pure bacterial strains using crude oil as carbon source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, Eleftheria; Fodelianakis, Stilianos; Korkakaki, Emmanouela; Kalogerakis, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Biosurfactants (BSs) are “green” amphiphilic molecules produced by microorganisms during biodegradation, increasing the bioavailability of organic pollutants. In this work, the BS production yield of marine hydrocarbon degraders isolated from Elefsina bay in Eastern Mediterranean Sea has been investigated. The drop collapse test was used as a preliminary screening test to confirm BS producing strains or mixed consortia. The community structure of the best consortia based on the drop collapse test was determined by 16S-rDNA pyrotag screening. Subsequently, the effect of incubation time, temperature, substrate and supplementation with inorganic nutrients, on BS production, was examined. Two types of BS – lipid mixtures were extracted from the culture broth; the low molecular weight BS Rhamnolipids and Sophorolipids. Crude extracts were purified by silica gel column chromatography and then identified by thin layer chromatography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results indicate that BS production yield remains constant and low while it is independent of the total culture biomass, carbon source, and temperature. A constant BS concentration in a culture broth with continuous degradation of crude oil (CO) implies that the BS producing microbes generate no more than the required amount of BSs that enables biodegradation of the CO. Isolated pure strains were found to have higher specific production yields than the complex microbial marine community-consortia. The heavy oil fraction of CO has emerged as a promising substrate for BS production (by marine BS producers) with fewer impurities in the final product. Furthermore, a particular strain isolated from sediments, Paracoccus marcusii, may be an optimal choice for bioremediation purposes as its biomass remains trapped in the hydrocarbon phase, not suffering from potential dilution effects by sea currents. PMID:25904907

  11. BACTERIAL PLASMIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Dinic

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasmids, extrachromosomal DNA, were identified in bacteria pertaining to family of Enterobacteriacae for the very first time. After that, they were discovered in almost every single observed strain. The structure of plasmids is made of circular double chain DNA molecules which are replicated autonomously in a host cell. Their length may vary from few up to several hundred kilobase (kb. Among the bacteria, plasmids are mostly transferred horizontally by conjugation process. Plasmid replication process can be divided into three stages: initiation, elongation, and termination. The process involves DNA helicase I, DNA gyrase, DNA polymerase III, endonuclease, and ligase.Plasmids contain genes essential for plasmid function and their preservation in a host cell (the beginning and the control of replication. Some of them possess genes whichcontrol plasmid stability. There is a common opinion that plasmids are unnecessary fora growth of bacterial population and their vital functions; thus, in many cases they can be taken up or kicked out with no lethal effects to a plasmid host cell. However,there are numerous biological functions of bacteria related to plasmids. Plasmids identification and classification are based upon their genetic features which are presented permanently in all of them, and these are: abilities to preserve themselves in a host cell and to control a replication process. In this way, plasmids classification among incompatibility groups is performed. The method of replicon typing, which is based on genotype and not on phenotype characteristics, has the same results as in compatibility grouping.

  12. Quantitative analysis of ruminal bacterial populations involved in lipid metabolism in dairy cows fed different vegetable oils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vargas-Bello-Pérez, E.; Cancino-Padilla, N.; Romero, J.

    2016-01-01

    Vegetable oils are used to increase energy density of dairy cow diets, although they can provoke changes in rumen bacteria populations and have repercussions on the biohydrogenation process. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two sources of dietary lipids: soybean oil (SO......, an unsaturated source) and hydrogenated palm oil (HPO, a saturated source) on bacterial populations and the fatty acid profile of ruminal digesta. Three non-lactating Holstein cows fitted with ruminal cannulae were used in a 3×3 Latin square design with three periods consisting of 21 days. Dietary treatments...... parameters, whereas HPO can increase load of ruminal P. bryantii. Also, results observed in our targeted bacteria may have depended on the saturation degree of dietary oils....

  13. Phylogeny of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains constructed from polymorphisms in genes involved in DNA replication, recombination and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, Olga; Luo, Tao; Dos Vultos, Tiago; Kremer, Kristin; Murray, Alan; Namouchi, Amine; Jackson, Céline; Rauzier, Jean; Bifani, Pablo; Warren, Rob; Rasolofo, Voahangy; Mei, Jian; Gao, Qian; Gicquel, Brigitte

    2011-01-20

    The Beijing family is a successful group of M. tuberculosis strains, often associated with drug resistance and widely distributed throughout the world. Polymorphic genetic markers have been used to type particular M. tuberculosis strains. We recently identified a group of polymorphic DNA repair replication and recombination (3R) genes. It was shown that evolution of M. tuberculosis complex strains can be studied using 3R SNPs and a high-resolution tool for strain discrimination was developed. Here we investigated the genetic diversity and propose a phylogeny for Beijing strains by analyzing polymorphisms in 3R genes. A group of 3R genes was sequenced in a collection of Beijing strains from different geographic origins. Sequence analysis and comparison with the ones of non-Beijing strains identified several SNPs. These SNPs were used to type a larger collection of Beijing strains and allowed identification of 26 different sequence types for which a phylogeny was constructed. Phylogenetic relationships established by sequence types were in agreement with evolutionary pathways suggested by other genetic markers, such as Large Sequence Polymorphisms (LSPs). A recent Beijing genotype (Bmyc10), which included 60% of strains from distinct parts of the world, appeared to be predominant. We found SNPs in 3R genes associated with the Beijing family, which enabled discrimination of different groups and the proposal of a phylogeny. The Beijing family can be divided into different groups characterized by particular genetic polymorphisms that may reflect pathogenic features. These SNPs are new, potential genetic markers that may contribute to better understand the success of the Beijing family.

  14. Phylogeny of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains constructed from polymorphisms in genes involved in DNA replication, recombination and repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Mestre

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Beijing family is a successful group of M. tuberculosis strains, often associated with drug resistance and widely distributed throughout the world. Polymorphic genetic markers have been used to type particular M. tuberculosis strains. We recently identified a group of polymorphic DNA repair replication and recombination (3R genes. It was shown that evolution of M. tuberculosis complex strains can be studied using 3R SNPs and a high-resolution tool for strain discrimination was developed. Here we investigated the genetic diversity and propose a phylogeny for Beijing strains by analyzing polymorphisms in 3R genes.A group of 3R genes was sequenced in a collection of Beijing strains from different geographic origins. Sequence analysis and comparison with the ones of non-Beijing strains identified several SNPs. These SNPs were used to type a larger collection of Beijing strains and allowed identification of 26 different sequence types for which a phylogeny was constructed. Phylogenetic relationships established by sequence types were in agreement with evolutionary pathways suggested by other genetic markers, such as Large Sequence Polymorphisms (LSPs. A recent Beijing genotype (Bmyc10, which included 60% of strains from distinct parts of the world, appeared to be predominant.We found SNPs in 3R genes associated with the Beijing family, which enabled discrimination of different groups and the proposal of a phylogeny. The Beijing family can be divided into different groups characterized by particular genetic polymorphisms that may reflect pathogenic features. These SNPs are new, potential genetic markers that may contribute to better understand the success of the Beijing family.

  15. Reference genes for quantitative, reverse-transcription PCR in Bacillus cereus group strains throughout the bacterial life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Lillian; Kolstø, Anne-Brit; Piehler, Armin P

    2011-08-01

    Quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) has become a major tool to better understand the biology and pathogenesis of bacteria. One prerequisite of valid RT-qPCR data is their proper normalization to stably expressed reference genes. To identify and evaluate reference genes suitable for normalization of gene expression data in Bacillus cereus group strains, mRNA levels of eleven candidate reference genes (rpsU, nifU, udp (UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase), BT9727_5154/BC_5475, BT9727_4034/BC_4293, BT9727_4549/BC_4813, pspA, gatB_Yqey (gatB_Yqey domain containing protein), helicase (SWF/SNF family protein), adk and pta) and a target gene (BT9727_3305/BC3547+BC3546) were quantified by RT-qPCR at different time points throughout the entire life cycle of the wild-type B. cereus ATCC 14579 and Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. konkukian 97-27, a phylogenetically closely related strain to Bacillus anthracis. The programs geNorm and Normfinder were used to calculate expression stabilities and identified the genes gatB_Yqey, rpsU and udp as the most stably expressed reference genes. Compared to this combination or the sets of reference genes as recommended by geNorm or Normfinder, normalization using a traditional housekeeping gene (adk) alone resulted in significantly different gene expression results and in a significant overestimation of the target gene transcription. Normalization of the data to the reference gene gatB_Yqey alone showed no or only small differences to the reference gene combinations indicating that gatB_Yqey may be used as a single reference gene when investigating rather large changes in mRNA transcription. Otherwise, a combination of the stably expressed reference genes is recommended. In conclusion, the present study underlines the importance of normalization to stably expressed reference genes and presents valid endogenous controls suitable for normalization of transcriptional data throughout the life cycle of B. cereus group strains

  16. Biodegradation of kraft lignin by a bacterial strain Comamonas sp. B-9 isolated from eroded bamboo slips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y H; Chai, L Y; Zhu, Y H; Yang, Z H; Zheng, Y; Zhang, H

    2012-05-01

    The aim was to obtain evidences for lignin degradation by unicellular bacterium Comamonas sp. B-9. Comamonas sp. B-9 was inoculated into kraft lignin-mineral salt medium (KL-MSM) at pH 7·0 and 30°C for 7 days of incubation. The bacterial growth, chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction, secretion of ligninolytic enzymes and productions of low-molecular-weight compounds revealed that Comamonas sp. B-9 was able to degrade kraft lignin (KL). COD in KL-MSM reduced by 32% after 7 days of incubation. The maximum activities of manganese peroxidase (MnP) of 2903·2 U l(-1) and laccase (Lac) of 1250 U l(-1) were observed at 4th and 6th day, respectively. The low-molecular-weight compounds such as ethanediol, 3, 5-dimethyl-benzaldehyde and phenethyl alcohol were formed in the degradation of KL by Comamonas sp. B-9 based on GC-MS analysis. This study confirmed that Comamonas sp. B-9 could utilize KL as a sole carbon source and degrade KL to low-molecular-weight compounds. Comamonas sp. B-9 may be useful in the utilization and bioconversion of lignin and lignin-derived aromatic compounds in biotechnological applications. Meanwhile, using Comamonas sp. B-9 in treatment of wastewater in pulp and paper industry is a meaningful work. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Analysis for the presence of determinants involved in the transport of mercury across bacterial membrane from polluted water bodies of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Arif Tasleem; Azam, Mudsser; Choi, Inho; Ali, Arif; Haq, Qazi Mohd Rizwanul

    2016-01-01

    Mercury, which is ubiquitous and recalcitrant to biodegradation processes, threatens human health by escaping to the environment via various natural and anthropogenic activities. Non-biodegradability of mercury pollutants has necessitated the development and implementation of economic alternatives with promising potential to remove metals from the environment. Enhancement of microbial based remediation strategies through genetic engineering approaches provides one such alternative with a promising future. In this study, bacterial isolates inhabiting polluted sites were screened for tolerance to varying concentrations of mercuric chloride. Following identification, several Pseudomonas and Klebsiella species were found to exhibit the highest tolerance to both organic and inorganic mercury. Screened bacterial isolates were examined for their genetic make-up in terms of the presence of genes (merP and merT) involved in the transport of mercury across the membrane either alone or in combination to deal with the toxic mercury. Gene sequence analysis revealed that the merP gene showed 86-99% homology, while the merT gene showed >98% homology with previously reported sequences. By exploring the genes involved in imparting metal resistance to bacteria, this study will serve to highlight the credentials that are particularly advantageous for their practical application to remediation of mercury from the environment. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Quantitative analysis of ruminal bacterial populations involved in lipid metabolism in dairy cows fed different vegetable oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Bello-Pérez, E; Cancino-Padilla, N; Romero, J; Garnsworthy, P C

    2016-11-01

    Vegetable oils are used to increase energy density of dairy cow diets, although they can provoke changes in rumen bacteria populations and have repercussions on the biohydrogenation process. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two sources of dietary lipids: soybean oil (SO, an unsaturated source) and hydrogenated palm oil (HPO, a saturated source) on bacterial populations and the fatty acid profile of ruminal digesta. Three non-lactating Holstein cows fitted with ruminal cannulae were used in a 3×3 Latin square design with three periods consisting of 21 days. Dietary treatments consisted of a basal diet (Control, no fat supplement) and the basal diet supplemented with SO (2.7% of dry matter (DM)) or HPO (2.7% of DM). Ruminal digesta pH, NH3-N and volatile fatty acids were not affected by dietary treatments. Compared with control and HPO, total bacteria measured as copies of 16S ribosomal DNA/ml by quantitative PCR was decreased (Poils.

  19. Physiological Adaptations Involved in Alkane Assimilation at a Low Temperature by Rhodococcus sp. Strain Q15†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, L. G.; Slagman, S. J.; Pietrantonio, F.; Bourbonnière, L.; Koval, S. F.; Lawrence, J. R.; Inniss, W. E.; Greer, C. W.

    1999-01-01

    We examined physiological adaptations which allow the psychrotroph Rhodococcus sp. strain Q15 to assimilate alkanes at a low temperature (alkanes are contaminants which are generally insoluble and/or solid at low temperatures). During growth at 5°C on hexadecane or diesel fuel, strain Q15 produced a cell surface-associated biosurfactant(s) and, compared to glucose-acetate-grown cells, exhibited increased cell surface hydrophobicity. A transmission electron microscopy examination of strain Q15 grown at 5°C revealed the presence of intracellular electron-transparent inclusions and flocs of cells connected by an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) when cells were grown on a hydrocarbon and morphological differences between the EPS of glucose-acetate-grown and diesel fuel-grown cells. A lectin binding analysis performed by using confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) showed that the EPS contained a complex mixture of glycoconjugates, depending on both the growth temperature and the carbon source. Two glycoconjugates [β-d-Gal-(1-3)-d-GlcNAc and α-l-fucose] were detected only on the surfaces of cells grown on diesel fuel at 5°C. Using scanning electron microscopy, we observed strain Q15 cells on the surfaces of octacosane crystals, and using CSLM, we observed strain Q15 cells covering the surfaces of diesel fuel microdroplets; these findings indicate that this organism assimilates both solid and liquid alkane substrates at a low temperature by adhering to the alkane phase. Membrane fatty acid analysis demonstrated that strain Q15 adapted to growth at a low temperature by decreasing the degree of saturation of membrane lipid fatty acids, but it did so to a lesser extent when it was grown on hydrocarbons at 5°C; these findings suggest that strain Q15 modulates membrane fluidity in response to the counteracting influences of low temperature and hydrocarbon toxicity. PMID:10388690

  20. Comparative genome analysis of an avirulent and two virulent strains of avian Pasteurella multocida reveals candidate genes involved in fitness and pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Pasteurella multocida is the etiologic agent of fowl cholera, a highly contagious and severe disease of poultry causing significant mortality and morbidity throughout the world. All types of poultry are susceptible to fowl cholera. Turkeys are most susceptible to the peracute/acute forms of the disease while chickens are most susceptible to the acute and chronic forms of the disease. The whole genome of the Pm70 strain of P. multocida was sequenced and annotated in 2001. The Pm70 strain is not virulent to chickens and turkeys. In contrast, strains X73 and P1059 are highly virulent to turkeys, chickens, and other poultry species. In this study, we sequenced the genomes of P. multocida strains X73 and P1059 and undertook a detailed comparative genome analysis with the avirulent Pm70 strain. The goal of this study was to identify candidate genes in the virulent strains that may be involved in pathogenicity of fowl cholera disease. Results Comparison of virulent versus avirulent avian P. multocida genomes revealed 336 unique genes among the P1059 and/or X73 genomes compared to strain Pm70. Genes of interest within this subset included those encoding an L-fucose transport and utilization system, several novel sugar transport systems, and several novel hemagglutinins including one designated PfhB4. Additionally, substantial amino acid variation was observed in many core outer membrane proteins and single nucleotide polymorphism analysis confirmed a higher dN/dS ratio within proteins localized to the outer membrane. Conclusions Comparative analyses of highly virulent versus avirulent avian P. multocida identified a number of genomic differences that may shed light on the ability of highly virulent strains to cause disease in the avian host, including those that could be associated with enhanced virulence or fitness. PMID:23672515

  1. Different flour microbial communities drive to sourdoughs characterized by diverse bacterial strains and free amino acid profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GIUSEPPE CELANO

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to investigate whether different microbial assemblies in flour may influence the microbiological and biochemical characteristics of traditional sourdough. To reach this purpose, members of lactic acid bacteria, enterobacteria, and yeasts were isolated from durum wheat flour. Secondly, the isolated microorganisms (Pediococcus pentosaceus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pantoea agglomerans, and Escherichia hermanni were inoculated in doughs prepared with irradiated flour (gamma rays at 10 kGy, so that eight different microbial assemblies were obtained. Two non-inoculated controls were prepared, one of which (C-IF using irradiated flour and the other (C using non-irradiated flour.As shown by plate counts, irradiation of flour caused total inactivation of yeasts and a decrease of all the other microbial populations. However acidification occurred also in the dough C-IF, due to metabolic activity of P. pentosaceus that had survived irradiation. After six fermentations, P. pentosaceus was the dominant lactic acid bacterium species in all the sourdoughs produced with irradiated flour (IF. Yet, IF-based sourdoughs broadly differed from each other in terms of strains of P. pentosaceus, probably due to the different microorganisms initially inoculated. Quantitative and qualitative differences of free amino acids concentration were found among the sourdoughs, possibly because of different microbial communities. In addition, as shown by culture-independent analysis (16S metagenetics, irradiation of flour lowered and modified microbial diversity of sourdough ecosystem.

  2. Isolation of a bacterial strain, Acinetobacter sp. from centrate wastewater and study of its cooperation with algae in nutrients removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Lu, Qian; Wang, Qin; Liu, Wen; Wei, Qian; Ren, Hongyan; Ming, Caibing; Min, Min; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2017-07-01

    Algae were able to grow healthy on bacteria-containing centrate wastewater in a pilot-scale bioreactor. The batch experiment indicated that the co-cultivation of algae and wastewater-borne bacteria improved the removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand and total phosphorus in centrate wastewater to 93.01% and 98.78%, respectively. A strain of beneficial aerobic bacteria, Acinetobacter sp., was isolated and its biochemical characteristics were explored. Synergistic cooperation was observed in the growth of algae and Acinetobacter sp. Removal efficiencies of some nutrients were improved significantly by the co-cultivation of algae and Acinetobacter sp. After treatment, residual nutrients in centrate wastewater reached the permissible discharge limit. The cooperation between algae and Acinetobacter sp. was in part attributed to the exchange of carbon dioxide and oxygen between the algae and bacteria. This synergetic relationship between algae and Acinetobacter sp. provided a promising way to treat the wastewater by improving the nutrients removal and biomass production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Different Flour Microbial Communities Drive to Sourdoughs Characterized by Diverse Bacterial Strains and Free Amino Acid Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celano, Giuseppe; De Angelis, Maria; Minervini, Fabio; Gobbetti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This work aimed to investigate whether different microbial assemblies in flour may influence the microbiological and biochemical characteristics of traditional sourdough. To reach this purpose, members of lactic acid bacteria, enterobacteria, and yeasts were isolated from durum wheat flour. Secondly, the isolated microorganisms (Pediococcus pentosaceus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pantoea agglomerans, and Escherichia hermannii) were inoculated in doughs prepared with irradiated flour (gamma rays at 10 kGy), so that eight different microbial assemblies were obtained. Two non-inoculated controls were prepared, one of which (C-IF) using irradiated flour and the other (C) using non-irradiated flour. As shown by plate counts, irradiation of flour caused total inactivation of yeasts and a decrease of all the other microbial populations. However, acidification occurred also in the dough C-IF, due to metabolic activity of P. pentosaceus that had survived irradiation. After six fermentations, P. pentosaceus was the dominant lactic acid bacterium species in all the sourdoughs produced with irradiated flour (IF). Yet, IF-based sourdoughs broadly differed from each other in terms of strains of P. pentosaceus, probably due to the different microorganisms initially inoculated. Quantitative and qualitative differences of free amino acids concentration were found among the sourdoughs, possibly because of different microbial communities. In addition, as shown by culture-independent analysis (16S metagenetics), irradiation of flour lowered and modified microbial diversity of sourdough ecosystem. PMID:27877165

  4. Structural and Molecular Mechanism of CdpR Involved in Quorum-Sensing and Bacterial Virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingru Zhao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Although quorum-sensing (QS systems are important regulators of virulence gene expression in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, their detailed regulatory mechanisms have not been fully characterized. Here, we show that deletion of PA2588 resulted in increased production of pyocyanin and biofilm, as well as enhanced pathogenicity in a mouse model. To gain insights into the function of PA2588, we performed a ChIP-seq assay and identified 28 targets of PA2588, including the intergenic region between PA2588 and pqsH, which encodes the key synthase of Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS. Though the C-terminal domain was similar to DNA-binding regions of other AraC family members, structural studies revealed that PA2588 has a novel fold at the N-terminal region (NTR, and its C-terminal HTH (helix-turn-helix domain is also unique in DNA recognition. We also demonstrated that the adaptor protein ClpS, an essential regulator of ATP-dependent protease ClpAP, directly interacted with PA2588 before delivering CdpR to ClpAP for degradation. We named PA2588 as CdpR (ClpAP-degradation and pathogenicity Regulator. Moreover, deletion of clpP or clpS/clpA promotes bacterial survival in a mouse model of acute pneumonia infection. Taken together, this study uncovered that CdpR is an important QS regulator, which can interact with the ClpAS-P system to regulate the expression of virulence factors and pathogenicity.

  5. Identification and molecular characterization of a Bacillus subtilis IS13 strain involved in the biodegradation of 4,5,6-trichloroguaiacol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andretta, C W S; Rosa, R M; Tondo, E C; Gaylarde, C C; Henriques, J A P

    2004-04-01

    4,5,6-Trichloroguaiacol (4,5,6-TCG) is a recalcitrant organochlorine compound produced during pulp bleaching and a potential environmental hazard in paper mill effluents. We report here the identification by biochemical tests and molecular biological analysis, using 16S ribotyping, of a 4,5,6-TCG-degrading bacterium, identified as a strain of Bacillus subtilis that is most closely related according to the phylogenetic analysis to B. subtilis strain Lactipan (alignment score 99%). Biodegradation of 4,5,6-TCG by this organism in a mineral salts medium was shown to occur only when the inoculum was composed of cells in the stationary phase of growth and to be accelerated by an additional carbon source, such as glucose, sucrose, glycerol or molasses. An additional nitrogen source (as ammonium sulfate) did not affect the rate of 4,5,6-TGC removal. No plasmids were detected in the bacterial cells. This is the first strain of B. subtilis which degrades chlorophenols and shows that 4,5,6-TCG is not degraded by cometabolism and that the gene encoding this characteristic is probably located on the chromosome. The lack of requirement for additional nitrogen source, the ability to enhance biodegradation by adding cheap carbon sources such as molasses, and the fact the trait is likely to be stable since it is encoded on the cell chromosome, are all characteristics that make the organism an attractive possibility for treatment of wastes and environments polluted with organochlorine compounds.

  6. Effect of feeding tannin degrading bacterial culture (Streptococcus gallolyticus strain TDGB 406) on nutrient utilization, urinary purine derivatives and growth performance of goats fed on Quercus semicarpifolia leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K; Chaudhary, L C; Agarwal, N; Kamra, D N

    2014-10-01

    To study the effect of supplementation of tannin degrading bacterial culture (Streptococcus gallolyticus strain TDGB 406) on growth performance, nutrient utilization and urinary purine derivatives of goats fed on oak (Quercus semicarpifolia) leaves. For growth study, eighteen billy goats (4 month old, average body weight 9.50 ± 1.50 kg) were distributed into three groups of six animals each. The animals of group 1 served as control while animals of groups 2 (T1) and 3 (T2) were given (@ 5 ml/kg live weight) autoclaved and live culture of isolate TDGB 406 (10(6) cells/ml) respectively. The animals were fed measured quantity of dry oak leaves as the main roughage source and ad libitum maize hay along with fixed quantity of concentrate mixture. The feeding of live culture of isolate TDGB 406 (probiotic) did not affect dry matter intake and digestibility of nutrients except that of dry matter and crude protein, which was higher in T2 group as compared to control. All the animals were in positive nitrogen balance. There was no significant effect of feeding isolate TDGB 406 on urinary purine derivatives (microbial protein production) in goats. The body weight gain and average live weight gain was significantly higher (p = 0.071) in T2 group as compared to control. Feed conversion efficiency was also better in the goats fed on live culture of TDGB 406 (T2). The feeding of tannin degrading bacterial isolate TDGB 406 as probiotic resulted in improved growth performance and feed conversion ratio in goats fed on oak leaves as one of the main roughage source. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Enzymes activities involving bacterial cytochromes incorporated in clays; Activites enzymatiques impliquant des cytochromes bacteriens incorpores dans des matrices argileuses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lojou, E.; Giudici-Orticoni, M.Th.; Bianco, P. [Laboratoire de Bioenergetique et Ingenierie des Proteines, Institut de Biologie Structurale et Microbiologie, CNRS, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2005-07-01

    With the development of bio electrochemistry, researches appeared on the enzymes immobilization at the surface of electrodes for the realization of bioreactors and bio sensors. One of the main challenges is the development of host matrix able to immobilize the protein material preserving its integrity. In this framework the authors developed graphite electrodes modified by clay films. These electrodes are examined for two enzyme reactions involving proteins of sulfate-reduction bacteria. Then in the framework of the hydrogen biological production and bioreactors for the environmental pollution de-pollution, the electrochemical behavior of the cytochrome c3 in two different clays deposed at the electrode is examined.

  8. A bighorn sheep die-off in southern Colorado involving a Pasteurellaceae strain that may have originated from syntopic cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Lisa L; Diamond, Brandon; Spraker, Terry R; Sirochman, Michael A; Walsh, Daniel P; Machin, Chandra M; Bade, Donald J; Miller, Michael W

    2010-10-01

    We investigated a pasteurellosis epizootic in free-ranging bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) wherein a Pasteurellaceae strain carried by syntopic cattle (Bos taurus) under severe winter conditions appeared to contribute to pneumonia in affected bighorns. Twenty-one moribund or dead bighorn sheep were found on the "Fossil Ridge" herd's winter range, Colorado, USA, between 13 December 2007 and 29 February 2008. Eight carcasses examined showed gross or microscopic evidence of acute to subacute fibrinous bronchopneumonia. All eight carcasses yielded at least one β-hemolytic Mannheimia haemolytica biogroup 1(±(G)) strain, and seven also yielded a β-hemolytic Bibersteinia trehalosi biogroup 4 (CDS) strain; evidence of Pasteurella multocida, Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae, and parainfluenza 3 and bovine respiratory syncytial viruses was also detected. Isolates of β-hemolytic Manneimia haemolytica biogroup 1(G) from a bighorn carcass and a syntopic cow showed 99.5% similarity in genetic fingerprints; B. trehalosi biogroup 4(CDS) isolates were ≥94.9% similar to an isolate from a nearby bighorn herd. Field and laboratory observations suggested that pneumonia in affected bighorns may have been caused by a combination of pathogens including two pathogenic Pasteurellaceae strains--one likely of cattle origin and one likely of bighorn origin--with infections in some cases perhaps exacerbated by other respiratory pathogens and severe weather conditions. Our and others' findings suggest that intimate interactions between wild sheep and cattle should be discouraged as part of a comprehensive approach to health management and conservation of North American wild sheep species.

  9. Differential expression of hepatic genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis in high- and low-responding strains of laboratory opossums

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chan, Jeannie; Donalson, Lisa M.; Kushwaha, Rampratap S.; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Vandeberg, Jane F.; Vandeberg, John L.

    2008-01-01

    Plasma very low-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein (VLDL+LDL) cholesterol levels of 2 partially inbred strains of opossums (Monodelphis domestica) differ markedly when they are fed a high-cholesterol and low-fat (HCLF) diet. High-responding opossums exhibit a dramatic increase

  10. Mercury (II) removal by resistant bacterial isolates and mercuric (II) reductase activity in a new strain of Pseudomonas sp. B50A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovanella, Patricia; Cabral, Lucélia; Bento, Fátima Menezes; Gianello, Clesio; Camargo, Flávio Anastácio Oliveira

    2016-01-25

    This study aimed to isolate mercury resistant bacteria, determine the minimum inhibitory concentration for Hg, estimate mercury removal by selected isolates, explore the mer genes, and detect and characterize the activity of the enzyme mercuric (II) reductase produced by a new strain of Pseudomonas sp. B50A. The Hg removal capacity of the isolates was determined by incubating the isolates in Luria Bertani broth and the remaining mercury quantified by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. A PCR reaction was carried out to detect the merA gene and the mercury (II) reductase activity was determined in a spectrophotometer at 340 nm. Eight Gram-negative bacterial isolates were resistant to high mercury concentrations and capable of removing mercury, and of these, five were positive for the gene merA. The isolate Pseudomonas sp. B50A removed 86% of the mercury present in the culture medium and was chosen for further analysis of its enzyme activity. Mercuric (II) reductase activity was detected in the crude extract of this strain. This enzyme showed optimal activity at pH 8 and at temperatures between 37 °C and 45 °C. The ions NH4(+), Ba(2+), Sn(2+), Ni(2+) and Cd(2+) neither inhibited nor stimulated the enzyme activity but it decreased in the presence of the ions Ca(2+), Cu(+) and K(+). The isolate and the enzyme detected were effective in reducing Hg(II) to Hg(0), showing the potential to develop bioremediation technologies and processes to clean-up the environment and waste contaminated with mercury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The use of quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction to quantify some rumen bacterial strains in an in vitro rumen system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Onime

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to quantify four rumen bacterial strains (Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, Ruminococcus albus, Streptococcus bovis, Megasphaera elsdenii in an in vitro batch rumen fermentative system by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR. The experiment was a 2×2 factorial arrangement with two types of liquid rumen, collected from dairy cows (DC and fattening bulls (FB and two types of fermentation substrate (forage:concentrate ratios, 75:25 and 25:75 and was replicated in two fermentation runs. Fermentation fluids from FB compared to those from DC had lower pH, higher total VFA concentrations (averages of 0 and 24 h samplings, 6.70 vs 7.04 and 72.6 vs 42.7 mmol/l P<0.001 and contained less acetic (P=0.014 and more propionic (P<0.01 and butyric (P=0.029 acids. The two types of substrates incubated produced very small differences in the end fermentation products. B. fibrosolvens concentrations were higher (P<0.001 in the DC fermentation fluids compared to that from bulls (averages of 0 and 24 h sampling times, 3.47 vs 1.38 x109 copies /mL, while M. elsdenii was detected only in FB fermentation fluids. R. albus and S. bovis concentrations were not different between the two types of rumen liquid. With the only exception for B. fibrosolvens, bacteria strains considered in this study increased their concentrations in the fermentation fluid during the 24 h of in vitro incubation.

  12. Insecticide Resistance and Metabolic Mechanisms Involved in Larval and Adult Stages of Aedes aegypti Insecticide-Resistant Reference Strains from Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisset, Juan Andrés; Rodríguez, María Magdalena; French, Leydis; Severson, David W; Gutiérrez, Gladys; Hurtado, Daymi; Fuentes, Ilario

    2014-12-01

    Studies were conducted to compare levels of insecticide resistance and to determine the metabolic resistance mechanisms in larval and adult stages of Aedes aegypti from Cuba. Three insecticide-resistant reference strains of Ae. aegypti from Cuba were examined. These strains were derived from a Santiago de Cuba strain isolated in 1997; it was previously subjected to a strong selection for resistance to temephos (SAN-F6), deltamethrin (SAN-F12), and propoxur (SAN-F13) and routinely maintained in the laboratory under selection pressure up to the present time, when the study was carried out. In addition, an insecticide-susceptible strain was used for comparison. The insecticide resistance in larvae and adults was determined using standard World Health Organization methodologies. Insecticide resistance mechanisms were determined by biochemical assays. The esterases (α EST and β EST) and mixed function oxidase (MFO) activities were significantly higher in adults than in the larvae of the three resistant strains studied. The association of resistance level with the biochemical mechanism for each insecticide was established for each stage. The observed differences between larval and adult stages of Ae. aegypti in their levels of insecticide resistance and the biochemical mechanisms involved should be included as part of monitoring and surveillance activities in Ae. aegypti vector control programs.

  13. A case of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome which developed during chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer. The involvement of bacterial translocation was considered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Shinya; Terao, Hajime; Sanbe, Takeyuki; Katsuno, Masahiro; Takemura, Hideki

    2007-01-01

    Combination therapy such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy is often chosen, depending on the case, for head and neck cancer in view of the preservation of potency. However, on the other hand, it is necessary to note the onset of therapeutic side effects. The patient was a 35-year-old woman. During chemoradiotherapy for mesopharyngeal carcinoma, she suddenly developed shock and multiple organ failure, requiring intensive treatment. She also developed reversible central nerve symptoms during the course. The involvement of bacterial translocation was thought to be the cause of shock, and the reversible central nerve symptoms were considered to be a pathological condition, known as reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. We discuss these conditions on the basis of the clinical features, and the process that led to diagnosis in this case. (author)

  14. Evaluation of Reciprocal Pharmaceutical Effects and Antibacterial Activity of Silver Nanoparticles and Methanolic Extract of Crocus sativus L. (Saffron on Some Bacterial Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahita Samiee Zafarghandi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs are the most prominent nanoparticles which are recognized for their high antimicrobial efficacy. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the reciprocal pharmaceutical effects and antibacterial activity of Ag-NPs and methanolic extract of Crocus sativus L. (saffron on some bacterial strains. Materials and Methods: For evaluation of antibacterial activity of Ag-NPs and methanolic extract of C. sativus L. (saffron on some bacteria, agar well diffusion method was used. Minimal inhibition concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC were determined for saffron extract, Ag-NPs, and their combination on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and S. pyogenes and S. epidermidis. Results: The combination of medium concentrations of Ag-NPs (500 μg/mL and saffron extract (50 mg/mL was in the optimum mode to eliminate S. epidermidis and S. pyogenes. The results showed that saffron extract, Ag-NPs, and their combined form had antibacterial effects on these bacteria. Conclusion: It is suggested to evaluate the synergistic effects of active components of the extract and antimicrobial preservatives used in food, health, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries.

  15. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain UFMG 905 protects against bacterial translocation, preserves gut barrier integrity and stimulates the immune system in a murine intestinal obstruction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generoso, Simone V; Viana, Mirelle; Santos, Rosana; Martins, Flaviano S; Machado, José A N; Arantes, Rosa M E; Nicoli, Jacques R; Correia, Maria I T D; Cardoso, Valbert N

    2010-06-01

    Probiotic is a preparation containing microorganisms that confers beneficial effect to the host. This work assessed whether oral treatment with viable or heat-killed yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain UFMG 905 prevents bacterial translocation (BT), intestinal barrier integrity, and stimulates the immunity, in a murine intestinal obstruction (IO) model. Four groups of mice were used: mice undergoing only laparotomy (CTL), undergoing intestinal obstruction (IO) and undergoing intestinal obstruction after previous treatment with viable or heat-killed yeast. BT, determined as uptake of (99m)Tc-E. coli in blood, mesenteric lymph nodes, liver, spleen and lungs, was significantly higher in IO group than in CTL group. Treatments with both yeasts reduced BT in blood and all organs investigated. The treatment with both yeasts also reduced intestinal permeability as determined by blood uptake of (99m)Tc-DTPA. Immunological data demonstrated that both treatments were able to significantly increase IL-10 levels, but only viable yeast had the same effect on sIgA levels. Intestinal lesions were more severe in IO group when compared to CTL and yeasts groups. Concluding, both viable and heat-killed cells of yeast prevent BT, probably by immunomodulation and by maintaining gut barrier integrity. Only the stimulation of IgA production seems to depend on the yeast viability.

  16. Direct bacterial loop-mediated isothermal amplification detection on the pathogenic features of the nosocomial pathogen - Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains with respiratory origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qun; Xu, Pusheng; Li, Jiaowu; Chen, Yin; Feng, Jieyi

    2017-08-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification based detection assays using bacterial culture or colony for direct detection of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA) had been developed and evaluated, followed by its extensive application on a large scale of clinical MRSA isolated from respiratory origins, including nasal swabs and sputums. Six primers, including outer primers, inner primers and loop primers, were specifically designed for recognizing eight distinct sequences on four targets: 16SrRNA, femA, mecA and orfX. Twenty-seven reference strains were used to develop, evaluate and optimize this assay. Then, a total of 532 clinical MRSA isolates were employed for each detected targets. And the results were determined through both visual observation of the color change by naked eye and electrophoresis. The specific of each primer had been confirmed, and the optimal amplification was obtained under 65 °C for 40 min. The limit of detections (LOD) of bacteria culture LAMP assays were determined to be 10 4  CFU/ml for 16S rRNA, femA, as well as orfX and 10 5  CFU/ml for mecA, respectively. The established novel assays on MRSA detection may provide new strategies for rapid detection of foodborne pathogens. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Halomonas elongata Strain K4, an Endophytic Growth-Promoting Bacterium Enhancing Salinity Tolerance In Planta

    KAUST Repository

    Lafi, Feras Fawzi

    2016-11-04

    Halomonas elongata strain K4 is an endophytic bacterial strain that was isolated from roots of Cyperus conglomeratus collected at the Red Sea coast in Thuwal, Saudi Arabia. Here, we present a draft genome sequence of this strain, highlighting a number of pathways involved in plant growth promotion under salt stress.

  18. Vaginal epithelial cells regulate membrane adhesiveness to co-ordinate bacterial adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, Jessica A; Klappe, Karin; Kok, Jan Willem; Busscher, Henk J; Reid, Gregor; van der Mei, Henny C

    2016-04-01

    Vaginal epithelium is colonized by different bacterial strains and species. The bacterial composition of vaginal biofilms controls the balance between health and disease. Little is known about the relative contribution of the epithelial and bacterial cell surfaces to bacterial adhesion and whether and how adhesion is regulated over cell membrane regions. Here, we show that bacterial adhesion forces with cell membrane regions not located above the nucleus are stronger than with regions above the nucleus both for vaginal pathogens and different commensal and probiotic lactobacillus strains involved in health. Importantly, adhesion force ratios over membrane regions away from and above the nucleus coincided with the ratios between numbers of adhering bacteria over both regions. Bacterial adhesion forces were dramatically decreased by depleting the epithelial cell membrane of cholesterol or sub-membrane cortical actin. Thus, epithelial cells can regulate membrane regions to which bacterial adhesion is discouraged, possibly to protect the nucleus. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Hemolytic uremic syndrome with mild renal involvement due to Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC O145 strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Pérez

    Full Text Available Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is a disorder characterized by the presence of the classic triad: microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and acute renal injury. HUS without acute renal failure can be confused with other hematologic diseases. An infantile HUS caused by a Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC O145 strain carrying genotype stx2, ehxA, eae subtype ?1 is herein reported. The infant did not require dialysis during the acute stage of HUS, evolved favorably, maintained normal blood pressure and normal renal function and had no recurrence until the last control. This could be due to several factors, such as the characteristics of infecting STEC strain and a reduction in host susceptibility to renal injury. This report highlights the regional participation of non-O157 STEC in childhood diseases and the importance of performing active surveillance for all forms of HUS.

  20. Conserved hypothetical protein Rv1977 in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains contains sequence polymorphisms and might be involved in ongoing immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yi; Liu, Haican; Wang, Xuezhi; Li, Guilian; Qiu, Yan; Dou, Xiangfeng; Wan, Kanglin

    2015-01-01

    Host immune pressure and associated parasite immune evasion are key features of host-pathogen co-evolution. A previous study showed that human T cell epitopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are evolutionarily hyperconserved and thus it was deduced that M. tuberculosis lacks antigenic variation and immune evasion. Here, we selected 151 clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from China, amplified gene encoding Rv1977 and compared the sequences. The results showed that Rv1977, a conserved hypothetical protein, is not conserved in M. tuberculosis strains and there are polymorphisms existed in the protein. Some mutations, especially one frameshift mutation, occurred in the antigen Rv1977, which is uncommon in M.tb strains and may lead to the protein function altering. Mutations and deletion in the gene all affect one of three T cell epitopes and the changed T cell epitope contained more than one variable position, which may suggest ongoing immune evasion.

  1. The efficacy of CP7_E2alf: an animal study involving piglets from C–strain vaccinated sows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rangelova, Desislava Yordanova; Nielsen, Jens; Strandbygaard, Bertel

    previously vaccinated with C-strain interferes with the efficacy of CP7_E2alf vaccination. To study the interaction with maternal antibodies, the efficacy of CP7_E2alf in piglets from C-strain vaccinated sows was examined. At 5 or at 8 weeks of age, piglets were vaccinated with CP7_E2alf. The vaccinated....... Interestingly, the antibodies in the mock-vaccinated control piglets partly neutralized the challenge virus. In earlier studies CSFV Koslov has resulted in 100% mortality in naïve piglets, in this study mortality was reduced to 30% in the piglets infected at 7 weeks of age and to 50% in the piglets infected...... at 10 weeks of age. In the present study optimal time point for vaccination of piglets with passive immunity was found to be 5 weeks of age....

  2. Novel Accurate Bacterial Discrimination by MALDI-Time-of-Flight MS Based on Ribosomal Proteins Coding in S10-spc-alpha Operon at Strain Level S10-GERMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Hiroto; Hotta, Yudai; Sato, Hiroaki

    2013-08-01

    Matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is one of the most widely used mass-based approaches for bacterial identification and classification because of the simple sample preparation and extremely rapid analysis within a few minutes. To establish the accurate MALDI-TOF MS bacterial discrimination method at strain level, the ribosomal subunit proteins coded in the S 10-spc-alpha operon, which encodes half of the ribosomal subunit protein and is highly conserved in eubacterial genomes, were selected as reliable biomarkers. This method, named the S10-GERMS method, revealed that the strains of genus Pseudomonas were successfully identified and discriminated at species and strain levels, respectively; therefore, the S10-GERMS method was further applied to discriminate the pathovar of P. syringae. The eight selected biomarkers (L24, L30, S10, S12, S14, S16, S17, and S19) suggested the rapid discrimination of P. syringae at the strain (pathovar) level. The S10-GERMS method appears to be a powerful tool for rapid and reliable bacterial discrimination and successful phylogenetic characterization. In this article, an overview of the utilization of results from the S10-GERMS method is presented, highlighting the characterization of the Lactobacillus casei group and discrimination of the bacteria of genera Bacillus and Sphingopyxis despite only two and one base difference in the 16S rRNA gene sequence, respectively.

  3. QTL Analysis of High Thermotolerance with Superior and Downgraded Parental Yeast Strains Reveals New Minor QTLs and Converges on Novel Causative Alleles Involved in RNA Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yudi; Foulquié-Moreno, Maria R.; Clement, Lieven; Erdei, Éva; Tanghe, An; Schaerlaekens, Kristien; Dumortier, Françoise; Thevelein, Johan M.

    2013-01-01

    Revealing QTLs with a minor effect in complex traits remains difficult. Initial strategies had limited success because of interference by major QTLs and epistasis. New strategies focused on eliminating major QTLs in subsequent mapping experiments. Since genetic analysis of superior segregants from natural diploid strains usually also reveals QTLs linked to the inferior parent, we have extended this strategy for minor QTL identification by eliminating QTLs in both parent strains and repeating the QTL mapping with pooled-segregant whole-genome sequence analysis. We first mapped multiple QTLs responsible for high thermotolerance in a natural yeast strain, MUCL28177, compared to the laboratory strain, BY4742. Using single and bulk reciprocal hemizygosity analysis we identified MKT1 and PRP42 as causative genes in QTLs linked to the superior and inferior parent, respectively. We subsequently downgraded both parents by replacing their superior allele with the inferior allele of the other parent. QTL mapping using pooled-segregant whole-genome sequence analysis with the segregants from the cross of the downgraded parents, revealed several new QTLs. We validated the two most-strongly linked new QTLs by identifying NCS2 and SMD2 as causative genes linked to the superior downgraded parent and we found an allele-specific epistatic interaction between PRP42 and SMD2. Interestingly, the related function of PRP42 and SMD2 suggests an important role for RNA processing in high thermotolerance and underscores the relevance of analyzing minor QTLs. Our results show that identification of minor QTLs involved in complex traits can be successfully accomplished by crossing parent strains that have both been downgraded for a single QTL. This novel approach has the advantage of maintaining all relevant genetic diversity as well as enough phenotypic difference between the parent strains for the trait-of-interest and thus maximizes the chances of successfully identifying additional minor

  4. QTL analysis of high thermotolerance with superior and downgraded parental yeast strains reveals new minor QTLs and converges on novel causative alleles involved in RNA processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudi Yang

    Full Text Available Revealing QTLs with a minor effect in complex traits remains difficult. Initial strategies had limited success because of interference by major QTLs and epistasis. New strategies focused on eliminating major QTLs in subsequent mapping experiments. Since genetic analysis of superior segregants from natural diploid strains usually also reveals QTLs linked to the inferior parent, we have extended this strategy for minor QTL identification by eliminating QTLs in both parent strains and repeating the QTL mapping with pooled-segregant whole-genome sequence analysis. We first mapped multiple QTLs responsible for high thermotolerance in a natural yeast strain, MUCL28177, compared to the laboratory strain, BY4742. Using single and bulk reciprocal hemizygosity analysis we identified MKT1 and PRP42 as causative genes in QTLs linked to the superior and inferior parent, respectively. We subsequently downgraded both parents by replacing their superior allele with the inferior allele of the other parent. QTL mapping using pooled-segregant whole-genome sequence analysis with the segregants from the cross of the downgraded parents, revealed several new QTLs. We validated the two most-strongly linked new QTLs by identifying NCS2 and SMD2 as causative genes linked to the superior downgraded parent and we found an allele-specific epistatic interaction between PRP42 and SMD2. Interestingly, the related function of PRP42 and SMD2 suggests an important role for RNA processing in high thermotolerance and underscores the relevance of analyzing minor QTLs. Our results show that identification of minor QTLs involved in complex traits can be successfully accomplished by crossing parent strains that have both been downgraded for a single QTL. This novel approach has the advantage of maintaining all relevant genetic diversity as well as enough phenotypic difference between the parent strains for the trait-of-interest and thus maximizes the chances of successfully identifying

  5. Antibiotic sensitivity of bacterial strains isolated from newborn infants Sensibilidad a los antibióticos de bacterias aisladas de neonatos hospitalizados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Uribe

    1990-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Eighty nine bacterial strains isolated from newborn infants hospitalized at a Special Care Unit in Medellin, Colombia, were studied. The sensitivity of each one was determined by the Minimallnhibitory Concentration method against 21 antibiotics; a high frequency of resistance was found toward gentamycin, netilmycin, oxacillin, penicillin G and ampicillin, that are often employed as initial therapy in newborn infants; on the other hand both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria exhibited high percentages of sensitivity against quinolones; aztreonam and third generation cephalosporins were also highly effective against Gram negative bacilli. On the basis of this new information the need to restate therapeutic conducts in the case of serious bacterial neonatal infections is emphasized.

    Se estudiaron 89 cepas bacterianas aisladas de neonatos hospitalizados en la sala de cuidados especiales de la Fundación Hospitalaria San Vicente de Paúl, de Medellín; a cada una se le determinó la sensibilidad frente a 21 antibióticos por el método de la concentración inhibitoria mínima (CIM; se halló una alta frecuencia de resistencia hacia la gentamicina, la netilmicina, la oxacilina y la ampicilina que se usan a menudo en esta institución como terapia inicial en las infecciones del recién nacido; por otra parte se demostraron altos porcentajes de sensibilidad hacia las quinolonas tanto de las bacterias gram positivas como de las gram negativas; contra estas últimas también fueron muy efectivos el aztreonam y las cefalosporinas de tercera generación. A la luz de esta nueva información se llama la atención hacia la necesidad de revaluar las normas de la antibioterapia en las infecciones graves del recién nacido.

  6. Hemolytic uremic syndrome with mild renal involvement due to Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O145 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Lucía; Apezteguía, Lucía; Piñeyrúa, Cecilia; Dabezies, Agustín; Bianco, María N; Schelotto, Felipe; Varela, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a disorder characterized by the presence of the classic triad: microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and acute renal injury. HUS without acute renal failure can be confused with other hematologic diseases. An infantile HUS caused by a Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O145 strain carrying genotype stx2, ehxA, eae subtype β1 is herein reported. The infant did not require dialysis during the acute stage of HUS, evolved favorably, maintained normal blood pressure and normal renal function and had no recurrence until the last control. This could be due to several factors, such as the characteristics of infecting STEC strain and a reduction in host susceptibility to renal injury. This report highlights the regional participation of non-O157 STEC in childhood diseases and the importance of performing active surveillance for all forms of HUS. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  7. The involvement of tetA and tetE tetracycline resistance genes in plasmid and chromosomal resistance of Aeromonas in Brazilian strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana Teruszkin Balassiano

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the involvement of tetA and tetE genes in the tetracycline resistance of 16 strains of genus Aeromonas, isolated from clinical and food sources. Polymerase chain reactions revealed that 37.5% of the samples were positive for tetA, and also 37.5% were tetE positive. One isolate was positive for both genes. Only the isolate A. caviae 5.2 had its resistance associated to the presence of a plasmid, pSS2. The molecular characterization of pSS2 involved the construction of its restriction map and the determination of its size. The digestion of pSS2 with HindIII originated two fragments (A and B that were cloned separately into the pUC18 vector. The tetA gene was shown to be located on the HindIII-A fragment by PCR. After transforming a tetracycline-sensitive strain with pSS2, the transformants expressed the resistance phenotype and harbored a plasmid whose size was identical to that of pSS2. The results confirmed the association between pSS2 and the tetracycline resistance phenotype, and suggest a feasible dissemination of tetA and tetE among strains of Aeromonas. This study suggests the spreading tetA and tetE genes in Aeromonas in Brazil and describes a resistance plasmid that probably contributes to the dissemination of the resistance.

  8. Plant growth-promoting bacterial endophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoyo, Gustavo; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Orozco-Mosqueda, Ma del Carmen; Glick, Bernard R

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial endophytes ubiquitously colonize the internal tissues of plants, being found in nearly every plant worldwide. Some endophytes are able to promote the growth of plants. For those strains the mechanisms of plant growth-promotion known to be employed by bacterial endophytes are similar to the mechanisms used by rhizospheric bacteria, e.g., the acquisition of resources needed for plant growth and modulation of plant growth and development. Similar to rhizospheric plant growth-promoting bacteria, endophytic plant growth-promoting bacteria can act to facilitate plant growth in agriculture, horticulture and silviculture as well as in strategies for environmental cleanup (i.e., phytoremediation). Genome comparisons between bacterial endophytes and the genomes of rhizospheric plant growth-promoting bacteria are starting to unveil potential genetic factors involved in an endophytic lifestyle, which should facilitate a better understanding of the functioning of bacterial endophytes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. T-cell involvement in adoptive transfer of line 10 tumor immunity in strain 2 guinea pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Jong, W.H.; Steerenberg, P.A.; van de Plas, M.M.; Kruizinga, W.; Ruitenberg, J.

    1985-01-01

    Several aspects of adoptive transfer of tumor immunity were studied in the line 10 hepatocarcinoma in the syngeneic Sewall-Wright strain 2 guinea pig. In particular, the need for cooperation between donor and recipient T-cells was investigated. Donor immune spleen cells remained immunologically capable of inducing tumor rejection for at least 160 days after adoptive transfer. Irradiated (1,000 rad) or mitomycin-treated immune spleen cells lacked tumor-rejection activity, which is indicative of the necessity for in vivo proliferation after adoptive transfer of immunity. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of tumor immunity was abrogated after treatment of the line 10 immune spleen cells with rabbit anti-guinea pig-thymocyte serum (ATS) plus complement. The role of recipient T-cells was investigated in strain 2 guinea pigs which were T-cell depleted by thymectomy, irradiation, and bone marrow reconstitution (T-XBM animals). Severe suppression of T-cell activity was present at 2 and 6 weeks after irradiation and bone marrow reconstitution. At 10 weeks nonspecific T-cell activity was partially restored. The induction of antigen-specific responses, measured by delayed-type hypersensitivity skin testing in vivo and antigenic stimulation in vitro, was suppressed at 2 weeks after irradiation and bone marrow reconstitution. Additional in vivo treatment of T-XBM animals with a rabbit ATS improved the T-cell depletion only moderately. Tumor growth and tumor rejection after adoptive transfer of immunity were equal in normal and T-cell-deprived recipient animals, thus indicating that recipient T-cells are not needed for tumor rejection after adoptive transfer of line 10 tumor immunity

  10. Construction of a Recombinant Allergen-Producing Probiotic Bacterial Strain: Introduction of a New Line for a Live Oral Vaccine Against Chenopodium album Pollen Allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Roozbeh Nasiraie

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: During the last two decades, significant advances have been made in the fields of lactococcal genetics and protein expression. Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis is an effective vector for protein expression and can be used as an antigen delivery system. Hence, L. lactis is an ideal candidate for mucosal immunotherapy. Profilin (Che a 2, the major allergen in Chenopodium album, is one of the most important causes of allergic diseases in desert and semi-desert areas, especially in Iran, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait that was cloned and expressed in L. lactis for the first time. Methods: To construct L. lactis that expressed Che a 2, a DNA sequence was cloned and used to transform bacteria. Expression of Che a 2 was analyzed via monitoring of related RNA and protein. Hydrophobicity, adherence to HT-29 cells, antibiotic resistance, resistance to gastrointestinal contents, pH, and bile salt in recombinant and native L. lactis were evaluated. Results: Immunoblot analyses demonstrated that recombinant Che a 2 is expressed as a 32 kDa dimeric protein immunological studies showed it can bind human IgE. Both native and recombinant bacteria were sensitive to low pH and simulated gastric conditions. Bacterial survival was reduced 80-100% after 2 h of exposure to pH 1.5-2. Both native and recombinant bacteria were able to grow in 0.3 and 2% bile salts. After incubation of recombinant L. lactis in simulated gastric and intestinal juices for one and two hours, respectively, cell survival was reduced by 100%. Adhesion capability in both strains was minimal and there were no significant differences in any of our tests between native and recombinant bacteria. Conclusion: Successfully recombinant L. lactis with capability of expression Che a 2 was produced and revealed it is sensitive to gastrointestinal contents.

  11. Independent behavior of bacterial laccases to inducers and metal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laccase, a blue copper oxidase, is an enzyme that is involved in the oxidation of aromatic compounds which prove otherwise difficult to degrade in the environment. The substrates of laccase are xenobiotics and synthetic dyes. The isolation of bacterial strains was investigated for laccase production and its activity.

  12. Aspartic protease from Aspergillus (Eurotium) repens strain MK82 is involved in the hydrolysis and decolourisation of dried bonito (Katsuobushi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Kenji; Matsubara, Sayaka; Umeda, Mayo; Tachibanac, Shusaku; Doi, Mikiharu; Takenaka, Shinji

    2013-04-01

    Katsuobushi is a dried, smoked and fermented bonito used in Japanese cuisine. During the fermentation process with several Aspergillus species, the colour of Katsuobushi gradually changes from a dark reddish-brown derived from haem proteins to pale pink. The change in colour gives Katsuobushi a higher ranking and price. This study aimed to elucidate the mechanism of decolourisation of Katsuobushi. A decolourising factor from the culture supernatant of Aspergillus (Eurotium) repens strain MK82 was purified to homogeneity. The purification was monitored by measuring the decolourising activity using equine myoglobin and bovine haemoglobin as substrates. It was found that the decolourising factor had protease activity towards myoglobin and haemoglobin. Complete inhibition of the enzyme by the inhibitor pepstatin A and the internal amino acid sequence classified the protein as an aspartic protease. The enzyme limitedly hydrolysed myoglobin between 1-Met and 2-Gly, 43-Lys and 44-Phe, and 70-Leu and 71-Thr. The purified enzyme decolourised blood of Katsuwonus pelamis (bonito) and a slice of dried bonito. It is proposed that aspartic protease plays a role in the decolourisation of Katsuobushi by the hydrolysis of haem proteins that allows the released haem to aggregate in the dried bonito. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Restoring Functional Status: A Long-Term Case Report of Severe Lung and Ventilatory Muscle Pump Dysfunction Involving Recurrent Bacterial Pneumonias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobush, Dennis C.; Laatsch, Linda; Lipchik, Randolph J.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Prolonged mechanical ventilation contributes to immobility and deconditioning making efforts to safely discontinue ventilator support desirable. This case report documents how implementing physical therapy treatment interventions, based on the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice, can help to restore a person's functional status even after multiple years of mechanical ventilation dependency. Case Description A patient (female; aged 63 years) with severe restrictive and obstructive ventilatory impairment has survived 34 recurrent pneumonias involving 6 bacterial pathogens while being mechanically ventilated at home. A 3-year study was approved and informed consent obtained for a home exercise program of resistive extremity and inspiratory muscle training along with exercise reconditioning. Tolerable distances walked, maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures, hours spent on versus off mechanical ventilation, activities performed within and around her home, and community excursions taken were charted. Outcomes Daily time tolerated off the ventilator improved from less than one to 12 hours, distance walked in 6 minutes increased 33%, and maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures improved 62% and 9.6% respectively. These improvements made out-of-home social excursions possible. Discussion and Conclusions This patient's functional status improved following multiple physical therapy interventions dictated by the evaluation of initial physical therapy examination findings according to the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice. Long term mechanical ventilator dependency in the home environment did not exclude this patient from achieving clinically significant gains in functional status even when having severe restrictive and obstructive ventilator impairment. PMID:22833704

  14. Restoring functional status: a long-term case report of severe lung and ventilatory muscle pump dysfunction involving recurrent bacterial pneumonias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobush, Dennis C; Laatsch, Linda; Lipchik, Randolph J

    2012-06-01

    Prolonged mechanical ventilation contributes to immobility and deconditioning making efforts to safely discontinue ventilator support desirable. This case report documents how implementing physical therapy treatment interventions, based on the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice, can help to restore a person's functional status even after multiple years of mechanical ventilation dependency. A patient (female; aged 63 years) with severe restrictive and obstructive ventilatory impairment has survived 34 recurrent pneumonias involving 6 bacterial pathogens while being mechanically ventilated at home. A 3-year study was approved and informed consent obtained for a home exercise program of resistive extremity and inspiratory muscle training along with exercise reconditioning. Tolerable distances walked, maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures, hours spent on versus off mechanical ventilation, activities performed within and around her home, and community excursions taken were charted. Daily time tolerated off the ventilator improved from less than one to 12 hours, distance walked in 6 minutes increased 33%, and maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures improved 62% and 9.6% respectively. These improvements made out-of-home social excursions possible. This patient's functional status improved following multiple physical therapy interventions dictated by the evaluation of initial physical therapy examination findings according to the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice. Long term mechanical ventilator dependency in the home environment did not exclude this patient from achieving clinically significant gains in functional status even when having severe restrictive and obstructive ventilator impairment.

  15. Investigation of lactic acid bacterial strains for meat fermentation and the product's antioxidant and angiotensin-I-converting-enzyme inhibitory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Shiro; Matsufuji, Hisashi; Nakade, Koji; Takenoyama, Shin-Ichi; Ahhmed, Abdulatef; Sakata, Ryoichi; Kawahara, Satoshi; Muguruma, Michio

    2017-03-01

    In the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains screened from our LAB collection, Lactobacillus (L.) sakei strain no. 23 and L. curvatus strain no. 28 degraded meat protein and tolerated salt and nitrite in vitro. Fermented sausages inoculated strains no. 23 and no. 28 showed not only favorable increases in viable LAB counts and reduced pH, but also the degradation of meat protein. The sausages fermented with these strains showed significantly higher antioxidant activity than those without LAB or fermented by each LAB type strain. Angiotensin-I-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity was also significantly higher in the sausages fermented with strain no. 23 than in those fermented with the type strain. Higher ACE inhibitory activity was also observed in the sausages fermented with strain no. 28, but did not differ significantly from those with the type strain. An analysis of the proteolysis and degradation products formed by each LAB in sausages suggested that those bioactivities yielded fermentation products such as peptides. Therefore, LAB starters that can adequately ferment meat, such as strains no. 23 and no. 28, should contribute to the production of bioactive compounds in meat products. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  16. Alternative primer sets for PCR detection of genotypes involved in bacterial aerobic BTEX degradation : Distribution of the genes in BTEX degrading isolates and in subsurface soils of a BTEX contaminated industrial site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrickx, B; Junca, H; Vosahlova, J; Lindner, A; Ruegg, [No Value; Bucheli-Witschel, M; Faber, F; Egli, T; Mau, M; Schlomann, M; Brennerova, M; Brenner, [No Value; Pieper, DH; Top, EM; Dejonghe, W; Bastiaens, L; Springael, D

    Eight new primer sets were designed for PCR detection of (i) mono-oxygenase and dioxygenase gene sequences involved in initial attack of bacterial aerobic BTEX degradation and of (ii) catechol 2,3-dioxygenase gene sequences responsible for metacleavage of the aromatic ring. The new primer sets

  17. Stress Survival Islet 2, Predominantly Present in Listeria monocytogenes Strains of Sequence Type 121, Is Involved in the Alkaline and Oxidative Stress Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harter, Eva; Wagner, Eva Maria; Zaiser, Andreas; Halecker, Sabrina; Wagner, Martin; Rychli, Kathrin

    2017-08-15

    The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is able to survive a variety of stress conditions leading to the colonization of different niches like the food processing environment. This study focuses on the hypervariable genetic hot spot lmo0443 to lmo0449 haboring three inserts: the stress survival islet 1 (SSI-1), the single-gene insert LMOf2365_0481 , and two homologous genes of the nonpathogenic species Listeria innocua : lin0464 , coding for a putative transcriptional regulator, and lin0465 , encoding an intracellular PfpI protease. Our prevalence study revealed a different distribution of the inserts between human and food-associated isolates. The lin0464-lin0465 insert was predominantly found in food-associated strains of sequence type 121 (ST121). Functional characterization of this insert showed that the putative PfpI protease Lin0465 is involved in alkaline and oxidative stress responses but not in acidic, gastric, heat, cold, osmotic, and antibiotic stresses. In parallel, deletion of lin0464 decreased survival under alkaline and oxidative stresses. The expression of both genes increased significantly under oxidative stress conditions independently of the alternative sigma factor σ B Furthermore, we showed that the expression of the protease gene lin0465 is regulated by the transcription factor lin0464 under stress conditions, suggesting that lin0464 and lin0465 form a functional unit. In conclusion, we identified a novel stress survival islet 2 (SSI-2), predominantly present in L. monocytogenes ST121 strains, beneficial for survival under alkaline and oxidative stresses, potentially supporting adaptation and persistence of L. monocytogenes in food processing environments. IMPORTANCE Listeria monocytogenes strains of ST121 are known to persist for months and even years in food processing environments, thereby increasing the risk of food contamination and listeriosis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this remarkable niche-specific adaptation

  18. Stress Survival Islet 2, Predominantly Present in Listeria monocytogenes Strains of Sequence Type 121, Is Involved in the Alkaline and Oxidative Stress Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harter, Eva; Wagner, Eva Maria; Zaiser, Andreas; Halecker, Sabrina; Wagner, Martin

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is able to survive a variety of stress conditions leading to the colonization of different niches like the food processing environment. This study focuses on the hypervariable genetic hot spot lmo0443 to lmo0449 haboring three inserts: the stress survival islet 1 (SSI-1), the single-gene insert LMOf2365_0481, and two homologous genes of the nonpathogenic species Listeria innocua: lin0464, coding for a putative transcriptional regulator, and lin0465, encoding an intracellular PfpI protease. Our prevalence study revealed a different distribution of the inserts between human and food-associated isolates. The lin0464-lin0465 insert was predominantly found in food-associated strains of sequence type 121 (ST121). Functional characterization of this insert showed that the putative PfpI protease Lin0465 is involved in alkaline and oxidative stress responses but not in acidic, gastric, heat, cold, osmotic, and antibiotic stresses. In parallel, deletion of lin0464 decreased survival under alkaline and oxidative stresses. The expression of both genes increased significantly under oxidative stress conditions independently of the alternative sigma factor σB. Furthermore, we showed that the expression of the protease gene lin0465 is regulated by the transcription factor lin0464 under stress conditions, suggesting that lin0464 and lin0465 form a functional unit. In conclusion, we identified a novel stress survival islet 2 (SSI-2), predominantly present in L. monocytogenes ST121 strains, beneficial for survival under alkaline and oxidative stresses, potentially supporting adaptation and persistence of L. monocytogenes in food processing environments. IMPORTANCE Listeria monocytogenes strains of ST121 are known to persist for months and even years in food processing environments, thereby increasing the risk of food contamination and listeriosis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this remarkable niche

  19. The Gene tia, Harbored by the Subtilase-Encoding Pathogenicity Island, Is Involved in the Ability of Locus of Enterocyte Effacement-Negative Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Strains To Invade Monolayers of Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondì, Roslen; Chiani, Paola; Michelacci, Valeria; Minelli, Fabio; Caprioli, Alfredo; Morabito, Stefano

    2017-12-01

    Locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE)-negative Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains are human pathogens that lack the LEE locus, a pathogenicity island (PAI) involved in the intimate adhesion of LEE-positive strains to the host gut epithelium. The mechanism used by LEE-negative STEC strains to colonize the host intestinal mucosa is still not clear. The cell invasion determinant tia , previously described in enterotoxigenic E. coli strains, has been identified in LEE-negative STEC strains that possess the subtilase-encoding pathogenicity island (SE-PAI). We evaluated the role of the gene tia , present in these LEE-negative STEC strains, in the invasion of monolayers of cultured cells. We observed that these strains were able to invade Caco-2 and HEp-2 cell monolayers and compared their invasion ability with that of a mutant strain in which the gene tia had been inactivated. Mutation of the gene tia resulted in a strong reduction of the invasive phenotype, and complementation of the tia mutation with a functional copy of the gene restored the invasion activity. Moreover, we show that the gene tia is overexpressed in bacteria actively invading cell monolayers, demonstrating that tia is involved in the ability to invade cultured monolayers of epithelial cells shown by SE-PAI-positive E. coli , including STEC, strains. However, the expression of the tia gene in the E. coli K-12 strain JM109 was not sufficient, in its own right, to confer to this strain the ability to invade cell monolayers, suggesting that at least another factor must be involved in the invasion ability displayed by the SE-PAI-positive strains. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. Florfenicol concentrations in ovine tear fluid following intramuscular and subcutaneous administration and comparison with the minimum inhibitory concentrations against mycoplasmal strains potentially involved in infectious keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnier, Alain; Laroute, Valérie; Gautier-Bouchardon, Anne; Gayrard, Véronique; Picard-Hagen, Nicole; Toutain, Pierre-Louis

    2013-02-01

    To measure florfenicol concentrations in ovine tear fluid after IM and SC administration and determine minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of florfenicol against field isolates of Mycoplasma organisms potentially involved in infectious keratoconjunctivitis. 9 healthy adult Lacaune ewes. Animals received an IM and SC administration of florfenicol (20 mg/kg) in a 2-way crossover design. Samples of blood and tear fluid were collected before and for 24 hours after administration. Concentrations of florfenicol in plasma and tear fluid were measured via high-performance liquid chromatography. The MIC of florfenicol for various Mycoplasma strains cultured from sheep and goats was determined via an agar dilution method. Mean florfenicol concentration in tear fluid for the 24-hour period was significantly higher after IM administration (0.70 μg/mL) than after SC administration (0.22 μg/mL) and was maintained for a longer duration. The lacrimal fluid-to-plasma concentration ratio was not different between the 2 routes of administration, with mean values of 40.2% and 32.5% after IM and SC administration, respectively. The MIC for Mycoplasma agalactiae, Mycoplasma conjunctivae, and Mycoplasma mycoides isolates ranged from 0.5 to 8 μg of florfenicol/mL. Two strains of M agalactiae could be considered resistant to florfenicol. Florfenicol readily penetrated the preocular tear fluid of sheep after IM and SC administration. For both routes of administration, doses > 20 mg/kg would be necessary to achieve tear fluid concentrations of florfenicol greater than the MICs for most strains of Mycoplasma organisms.

  1. Comparison of advanced whole genome sequence-based methods to distinguish strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg involved in foodborne outbreaks in Québec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Caroline; Usongo, Valentine; Berry, Chrystal; Tremblay, Denise M; Moineau, Sylvain; Yousfi, Khadidja; Doualla-Bell, Florence; Fournier, Eric; Nadon, Céline; Goodridge, Lawrence; Bekal, Sadjia

    2018-08-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg (S. Heidelberg) is one of the top serovars causing human salmonellosis. This serovar ranks second and third among serovars that cause human infections in Québec and Canada, respectively, and has been associated with severe infections. Traditional typing methods such as PFGE do not display adequate discrimination required to resolve outbreak investigations due to the low level of genetic diversity of isolates belonging to this serovar. This study evaluates the ability of four whole genome sequence (WGS)-based typing methods to differentiate among 145 S. Heidelberg strains involved in four distinct outbreak events and sporadic cases of salmonellosis that occurred in Québec between 2007 and 2016. Isolates from all outbreaks were indistinguishable by PFGE. The core genome single nucleotide variant (SNV), core genome multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and whole genome MLST approaches were highly discriminatory and separated outbreak strains into four distinct phylogenetic clusters that were concordant with the epidemiological data. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) typing method was less discriminatory. However, CRISPR typing may be used as a secondary method to differentiate isolates of S. Heidelberg that are genetically similar but epidemiologically unrelated to outbreak events. WGS-based typing methods provide a highly discriminatory alternative to PFGE for the laboratory investigation of foodborne outbreaks. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Draft genome sequence of Mesotoga strain PhosAC3, a mesophilic member of the bacterial order Thermotogales, isolated from a digestor treating phosphogypsum in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Hania, Wajdi; Fadhlaoui, Khaled; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Persillon, Cécile; Postec, Anne; Hamdi, Moktar; Dolla, Alain; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Le Mer, Jean; Erauso, Gaël

    2015-01-01

    Mesotoga strain PhosAc3 was the first mesophilic cultivated member of the order Thermotogales. This genus currently contain two described species, M. prima and M. infera. Strain PhosAc3, isolated from a Tunisian digestor treating phosphogypsum, is phylogenetically closely related to M. prima strain MesG1.Ag.4.2(T). Strain PhosAc3 has a genome of 3.1 Mb with a G+C content of 45.2%. It contains 3,051 protein-coding genes of which 74.6% have their best reciprocal BLAST hit in the genome of the type species, strain MesG1.Ag.4.2(T). For this reason we propose to assign strain PhosAc3 as a novel ecotype of the Mesotoga prima species. However, in contrast with the M. prima type strain, (i) it does not ferment sugars but uses them only in the presence of elemental sulfur as terminal electron acceptor, (ii) it produces only acetate and CO2 from sugars, whereas strain MesG1.Ag.4.2(T) produces acetate, butyrate, isobutyrate, isovalerate, 2-methyl-butyrate and (iii) sulfides are also end products of the elemental sulfur reduction in theses growth conditions.

  3. Possible involvement of ROS generation in vorinostat pretreatment induced enhancement of the antibacterial activity of ciprofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masadeh, Majed M; Alzoubi, Karem H; Al-Azzam, Sayer I; Al-Buhairan, Ahlam M

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism underlying ciprofloxacin action involves interference with transcription and replication of bacterial DNA and, thus, the induction of double-strand breaks in DNA. It also involves elevated oxidative stress, which might contribute to bacterial cell death. Vorinostat was shown to induce oxidative DNA damage. The current work investigated a possible interactive effect of vorinostat on ciprofloxacin-induced cytotoxicity against a number of reference bacteria. Standard bacterial strains were Escherichia coli ATCC 35218, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC29213, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027, Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 12228, Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 17978, Proteus mirabilis ATCC 12459, Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 13883, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (ATCC 43300), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (ATCC 25923). The antibacterial activity of ciprofloxacin, with or without pretreatment of bacterial cells by vorinostat, was examined using the disc diffusion procedure and determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and zones of inhibition of bacterial growth. All tested bacterial strains showed sensitivity to ciprofloxacin. When pretreated with vorinostat, significantly larger zones of inhibition and smaller MIC values were observed in all bacterial strains compared to those treated with ciprofloxacin alone. In correlation, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by the antibacterial action of ciprofloxacin was enhanced by treatment of bacterial cells with vorinostat. Results showed the possible agonistic properties of vorinostat when used together with ciprofloxacin. This could be related to the ability of these agents to enhance oxidative stress in bacterial cells.

  4. Wpływ szczepów bakterii wyizolowanych z hydroponicznej uprawy sałaty (Lactuca sativa L. na wzrost siewek sałaty, rosnących w obecnosci rożnych form pożywienia azotowego [Influence of bacterial strains isolated from hydroponic cultures of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. on the growth of lettuce seedlings growing in the presence of various forms of nitrogen nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Kobierzyńska-Gołąb

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available 320 bacterial strains isolated from the surface of cultivated plants, as well as from other parts of hydroponic cultures showed stimulating (49 bacterial strains or inhibitory (9 bacterial strains properties in respect to the investigated plant. The following bacteria were isolated: Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium, Agrobacterium, Achromobacter and Chromobacterium. The effects of active bacterial strains on the growth of seedlings were investigated in dependence on the kind of inorganic form of nitrogen present in the nutrient solutions. The same bacterial strains exerted a stimulating effect on seedlings growing on nitrates, weaker stimulation was observed in cultures with ammonium nitrate; the growth of lettuce seedlings on nutrient solution with ammonium only, was, as a rule, inhibited by the bacteria.

  5. Type IX secretion: the generation of bacterial cell surface coatings involved in virulence, gliding motility and the degradation of complex biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veith, Paul D; Glew, Michelle D; Gorasia, Dhana G; Reynolds, Eric C

    2017-10-01

    The Type IX secretion system (T9SS) is present in over 1000 sequenced species/strains of the Fibrobacteres-Chlorobi-Bacteroidetes superphylum. Proteins secreted by the T9SS have an N-terminal signal peptide for translocation across the inner membrane via the SEC translocon and a C-terminal signal for secretion across the outer membrane via the T9SS. Nineteen protein components of the T9SS have been identified including three, SigP, PorX and PorY that are involved in regulation. The inner membrane proteins PorL and PorM and the outer membrane proteins PorK and PorN interact and a complex comprising PorK and PorN forms a large ring structure of 50 nm in diameter. PorU, PorV, PorQ and PorZ form an attachment complex on the cell surface of the oral pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis. P. gingivalis T9SS substrates bind to PorV suggesting that after translocation PorV functions as a shuttle protein to deliver T9SS substrates to the attachment complex. The PorU component of the attachment complex is a novel Gram negative sortase which catalyses the cleavage of the C-terminal signal and conjugation of the protein substrates to lipopolysaccharide, anchoring them to the cell surface. This review presents an overview of the T9SS focusing on the function of T9SS substrates and machinery components. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Screening bacterial species for antagonistic activities against the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, 23 bacteria strains that belong to 19 bacterial species were tested against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) De Bary. In vivo and in vitro testing of bacterial strains showed that Serratia plymuthica strains IK-150 and IK-139, Burkholderia cepacia strain IK-16, Pseudomonas flourocens strain IK-3, Pseudomonas ...

  7. Plant growth promotion properties of bacterial strains isolated from the rhizosphere of the Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) adapted to saline-alkaline soils and their effect on wheat growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaolin; Li, Xiangyue; Li, Yan; Li, Runzhi; Xie, Zhihong

    2017-03-01

    The Jerusalem artichoke (JA; Helianthus tuberosus), known to be tolerant to saline-alkaline soil conditions, has been cultivated for many years in the Yellow River delta, Shandong Province coastal zone, in China. The aim of our study was to isolate nitrogen-fixing bacteria colonizing the rhizosphere of JA and to characterize other plant growth promotion properties. The ultimate goal was to identify isolates that could be used as inoculants benefiting an economic crop, in particular for improving wheat growth production in the Yellow River delta. Bacterial strains were isolated from the rhizosphere soil of JA on the basis of growth on nitrogen-free Ashby medium. Identification and phylogenetic analysis was performed after nucleotide sequencing of 16S rRNA gene. Plant-growth-promoting traits, such as nitrogen fixation activity, phosphate solubilization activity, indole-3-acetic acid production, were determined using conventional methods. Eleven strains were isolated and 6 of them were further examined for their level of salt tolerance and their effect on plant growth promotion. Inoculation of Enterobacter sp. strain N10 on JA and wheat led to significant increases in both root and shoot dry mass and shoot height. Enterobacter sp. strain N10 appeared to be the best plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria to increase wheat productivity in future field applications.

  8. Mesorhizobium bacterial strains isolated from the legume Lotus corniculatus are an alternative source for the production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) to obtain bioplastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos-García, Marta; García-Fraile, Paula; Filipová, Alena; Menéndez, Esther; Mateos, Pedro F; Velázquez, Encarna; Cajthaml, Tomáš; Rivas, Raúl

    2017-07-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoic acids (PHAs) are natural polyesters that can be used to produce bioplastics which are biodegradable. Numerous microorganisms accumulate PHAs as energy reserves. Combinations of different PHAs monomers lead to the production of bioplastics with very different properties. In the present work, we show the capability of strains belonging to various phylogenetic lineages within the genus Mesorhizobium, isolated from Lotus corniculatus nodules, to produce different PHA monomers. Among our strains, we found the production of 3-hydroxybutyrate, 3-hydroxyvalerate, 3-hydroxydodecanoate, and 3-hydroxyhexadecanoate. Most of the PHA-positive strains were phylogenetically related to the species M. jarvisii. However, our findings suggest that the ability to produce different monomers forming PHAs is strain-dependent.

  9. Isolation and characterization of bacterial strains with the ability to utilize high concentrations of levulinic acid, a platform chemical from inedible biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habe, Hiroshi; Sato, Shun; Morita, Tomotake; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Kirimura, Kohtaro; Kitamoto, Dai

    2015-01-01

    Nineteen levulinic acid (LA)-utilizing bacteria were isolated from environmental samples. Following examination of the use of 80 g/L LA by some isolated strains, Brevibacterium epidermidis LA39-2 consumed 62.6 g/L LA following 8 days incubation. The strain also utilized both 90 and 100 g/L LA, with consumption ratio of 84.3 and 53.3%, respectively, after 10 days incubation.

  10. Involvement of the Cytochrome P450 System EthBAD in the N-Deethoxymethylation of Acetochlor by Rhodococcus sp. Strain T3-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Zhou, Jie; Li, Zhoukun; Dong, Weiliang; Hou, Ying; Huang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Acetochlor [2-chloro-N-(ethoxymethyl)-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-acetamide] is a widely applied herbicide with potential carcinogenic properties. N-Deethoxymethylation is the key step in acetochlor biodegradation. N-Deethoxymethylase is a multicomponent enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of acetochlor to 2′-methyl-6′-ethyl-2-chloroacetanilide (CMEPA). Fast detection of CMEPA by a two-enzyme (N-deethoxymethylase–amide hydrolase) system was established in this research. Based on the fast detection method, a three-component enzyme was purified from Rhodococcus sp. strain T3-1 using ammonium sulfate precipitation and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The molecular masses of the components of the purified enzyme were estimated to be 45, 43, and 11 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Based on the results of peptide mass fingerprint analysis, acetochlor N-deethoxymethylase was identified as a cytochrome P450 system, composed of a cytochrome P450 oxygenase (43-kDa component; EthB), a ferredoxin (45 kDa; EthA), and a reductase (11 kDa; EthD), that is involved in the degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether. The gene cluster ethABCD was cloned by PCR amplification and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). Resting cells of a recombinant E. coli strain showed deethoxymethylation activity against acetochlor. Subcloning of ethABCD showed that ethABD expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3) has the activity of acetochlor N-deethoxymethylase and is capable of converting acetochlor to CMEPA. PMID:25595756

  11. A TaqMan-based real time PCR assay for specific detection and quantification of Xylella fastidiosa strains causing bacterial leaf scorch in oleander.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Wei; Shao, Jonathan; Singh, Raghuwinder; Davis, Robert E; Zhao, Tingchang; Huang, Qi

    2013-02-15

    A TaqMan-based real-time PCR assay was developed for specific detection of strains of X. fastidiosa causing oleander leaf scorch. The assay uses primers WG-OLS-F1 and WG-OLS-R1 and the fluorescent probe WG-OLS-P1, designed based on unique sequences found only in the genome of oleander strain Ann1. The assay is specific, allowing detection of only oleander-infecting strains, not other strains of X. fastidiosa nor other plant-associated bacteria tested. The assay is also sensitive, with a detection limit of 10.4fg DNA of X. fastidiosa per reaction in vitro and in planta. The assay can also be applied to detect low numbers of X. fastidiosa in insect samples, or further developed into a multiplex real-time PCR assay to simultaneously detect and distinguish diverse strains of X. fastidiosa that may occupy the same hosts or insect vectors. Specific and sensitive detection and quantification of oleander strains of X. fastidiosa should be useful for disease diagnosis, epidemiological studies, management of oleander leaf scorch disease, and resistance screening for oleander shrubs. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Bacterial Keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Bacterial Keratitis Sections What Is Bacterial Keratitis? Bacterial Keratitis Symptoms ... Lens Care Bacterial Keratitis Treatment What Is Bacterial Keratitis? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es la Queratitis Bacteriana? ...

  13. A novel ion-beam-mutation effect application in identification of gene involved in bacterial antagonism to fungal infection of ornamental crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahadtanapuk, S.; Teraarusiri, W.; Nanakorn, W.; Yu, L.D.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Ion beam bombardment induced mutation in bacterial B. licheniformis. • A mutant lost antifungal activity. • DNA fingerprint of the mutant was analyzed. • The lost gene was indentified to code for TrxR gene. • TrxR gene from B. licheniformis expressed the flower antagonism to fungi. - Abstract: This work is on a novel application of ion beam effect on biological mutation. Bacillus licheniformis (B. licheniformis) is a common soil bacterium with an antagonistic effect on Curcuma alismatifolia Gagnep. and Chrysanthemum indicum Linn. In an attempt to control fungal diseases of local crops by utilizing B. licheniformis, we carried out gene analysis of the bacterium to understand the bacterial antagonistic mechanism. The bacterial cells were bombarded to induce mutations using nitrogen ion beam. After ion bombardment, DNA analysis revealed that the modified polymorphism fragment present in the wild type was missing in a bacterial mutant which lost the antifungal activity. The fragments conserved in the wild type but lost in the mutant bacteria was identified to code for the thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) gene. The gene analysis showed that the TrxR gene from B. licheniformis had the expression of the antagonism to fungi in a synchronous time evolution with the fungus inhibition when the bacteria were co-cultivated with the fungi. The collective results indicate the TrxR gene responsible for the antagonism of bacteria B. licheniformis to fungal infection

  14. A novel ion-beam-mutation effect application in identification of gene involved in bacterial antagonism to fungal infection of ornamental crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahadtanapuk, S. [Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Phayao, Maeka, Muang, Phayao 56000 (Thailand); Teraarusiri, W. [Central Laboratory, University of Phayao, Maeka, Muang, Phayao 56000 (Thailand); Nanakorn, W. [The Crown Property Bureau, 173 Nakhonratchasrima Road, Dusit, Bangkok 10300 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@thep-center.org [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Thongkumkoon, P. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Anuntalabhochai, S., E-mail: soanu.1@gmail.com [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Ion beam bombardment induced mutation in bacterial B. licheniformis. • A mutant lost antifungal activity. • DNA fingerprint of the mutant was analyzed. • The lost gene was indentified to code for TrxR gene. • TrxR gene from B. licheniformis expressed the flower antagonism to fungi. - Abstract: This work is on a novel application of ion beam effect on biological mutation. Bacillus licheniformis (B. licheniformis) is a common soil bacterium with an antagonistic effect on Curcuma alismatifolia Gagnep. and Chrysanthemum indicum Linn. In an attempt to control fungal diseases of local crops by utilizing B. licheniformis, we carried out gene analysis of the bacterium to understand the bacterial antagonistic mechanism. The bacterial cells were bombarded to induce mutations using nitrogen ion beam. After ion bombardment, DNA analysis revealed that the modified polymorphism fragment present in the wild type was missing in a bacterial mutant which lost the antifungal activity. The fragments conserved in the wild type but lost in the mutant bacteria was identified to code for the thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) gene. The gene analysis showed that the TrxR gene from B. licheniformis had the expression of the antagonism to fungi in a synchronous time evolution with the fungus inhibition when the bacteria were co-cultivated with the fungi. The collective results indicate the TrxR gene responsible for the antagonism of bacteria B. licheniformis to fungal infection.

  15. Molecular complexity of successive bacterial epidemics deconvoluted by comparative pathogenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beres, Stephen B; Carroll, Ronan K; Shea, Patrick R; Sitkiewicz, Izabela; Martinez-Gutierrez, Juan Carlos; Low, Donald E; McGeer, Allison; Willey, Barbara M; Green, Karen; Tyrrell, Gregory J; Goldman, Thomas D; Feldgarden, Michael; Birren, Bruce W; Fofanov, Yuriy; Boos, John; Wheaton, William D; Honisch, Christiane; Musser, James M

    2010-03-02

    Understanding the fine-structure molecular architecture of bacterial epidemics has been a long-sought goal of infectious disease research. We used short-read-length DNA sequencing coupled with mass spectroscopy analysis of SNPs to study the molecular pathogenomics of three successive epidemics of invasive infections involving 344 serotype M3 group A Streptococcus in Ontario, Canada. Sequencing the genome of 95 strains from the three epidemics, coupled with analysis of 280 biallelic SNPs in all 344 strains, revealed an unexpectedly complex population structure composed of a dynamic mixture of distinct clonally related complexes. We discovered that each epidemic is dominated by micro- and macrobursts of multiple emergent clones, some with distinct strain genotype-patient phenotype relationships. On average, strains were differentiated from one another by only 49 SNPs and 11 insertion-deletion events (indels) in the core genome. Ten percent of SNPs are strain specific; that is, each strain has a unique genome sequence. We identified nonrandom temporal-spatial patterns of strain distribution within and between the epidemic peaks. The extensive full-genome data permitted us to identify genes with significantly increased rates of nonsynonymous (amino acid-altering) nucleotide polymorphisms, thereby providing clues about selective forces operative in the host. Comparative expression microarray analysis revealed that closely related strains differentiated by seemingly modest genetic changes can have significantly divergent transcriptomes. We conclude that enhanced understanding of bacterial epidemics requires a deep-sequencing, geographically centric, comparative pathogenomics strategy.

  16. A novel ion-beam-mutation effect application in identification of gene involved in bacterial antagonism to fungal infection of ornamental crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadtanapuk, S.; Teraarusiri, W.; Nanakorn, W.; Yu, L. D.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2014-05-01

    This work is on a novel application of ion beam effect on biological mutation. Bacillus licheniformis (B. licheniformis) is a common soil bacterium with an antagonistic effect on Curcuma alismatifolia Gagnep. and Chrysanthemum indicum Linn. In an attempt to control fungal diseases of local crops by utilizing B. licheniformis, we carried out gene analysis of the bacterium to understand the bacterial antagonistic mechanism. The bacterial cells were bombarded to induce mutations using nitrogen ion beam. After ion bombardment, DNA analysis revealed that the modified polymorphism fragment present in the wild type was missing in a bacterial mutant which lost the antifungal activity. The fragments conserved in the wild type but lost in the mutant bacteria was identified to code for the thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) gene. The gene analysis showed that the TrxR gene from B. licheniformis had the expression of the antagonism to fungi in a synchronous time evolution with the fungus inhibition when the bacteria were co-cultivated with the fungi. The collective results indicate the TrxR gene responsible for the antagonism of bacteria B. licheniformis to fungal infection.

  17. Introduction of an Aliphatic Ketone into Recombinant Proteins in a Bacterial Strain that Overexpresses an Editing-Impaired Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yi; Wang, Pin; Van Deventer, James A.; Link, A. James; Tirrell, David A.

    2011-01-01

    A leucine analog containing a ketone has been incorporated into proteins in E. coli. Only E. coli strains overexpressing an editing-deficient leucyl-tRNA synthetase were capable of synthesizing proteins with the aliphatic ketone amino acid. Modification of ketone-containing proteins under mild conditions has been demonstrated. PMID:19670197

  18. Comparative genomics of pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains of Xanthomonas arboricola unveil molecular and evolutionary events linked to pathoadaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie eCesbron

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial species Xanthomonas arboricola contains plant pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains. It includes the pathogen X. arboricola pv. juglandis, causing the bacterial blight of Juglans regia. The emergence of a new bacterial disease of Juglans regia in France called vertical oozing canker (VOC was previously described and the causal agent was identified as a distinct genetic lineage within the pathovar juglandis. Symptoms on walnut leaves and fruits are similar to those of a bacterial blight but VOC includes also cankers on trunk and branches. In this work, we used comparative genomics and physiological tests to detect differences between four X. arboricola strains isolated from walnut tree: strain CFBP 2528 causing walnut blight, strain CFBP 7179 causing VOC and two nonpathogenic strains, CFBP 7634 and CFBP 7651, isolated from healthy walnut buds. Whole genome sequence comparisons revealed that pathogenic strains possess a larger and wider range of mobile genetic elements than nonpathogenic strains. One pathogenic strain, CFBP 7179, possessed a specific integrative and conjugative element of 95 kb encoding genes involved in copper resistance, transport and regulation. The type three effector repertoire was larger in pathogenic strains than in nonpathogenic strains. Moreover, CFBP 7634 strain lacked the type three secretion system encoding genes. The flagellar system appeared incomplete and nonfunctional in the pathogenic strain CFBP 2528. Differential sets of chemoreceptor and different repertoires of genes coding adhesins were identified between pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains. Besides these differences, some strain-specific differences were also observed. Altogether, this study provides valuable insights to highlight the mechanisms involved in ecology, environment perception, plant adhesion and interaction, leading to the emergence of new strains in a dynamic environment.

  19. Diversity and transcription of proteases involved in the maturation of hydrogenases in Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133 and Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindblad Peter

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The last step in the maturation process of the large subunit of [NiFe]-hydrogenases is a proteolytic cleavage of the C-terminal by a hydrogenase specific protease. Contrary to other accessory proteins these hydrogenase proteases are believed to be specific whereby one type of hydrogenases specific protease only cleaves one type of hydrogenase. In cyanobacteria this is achieved by the gene product of either hupW or hoxW, specific for the uptake or the bidirectional hydrogenase respectively. The filamentous cyanobacteria Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133 and Nostoc sp strain PCC 7120 may contain a single uptake hydrogenase or both an uptake and a bidirectional hydrogenase respectively. Results In order to examine these proteases in cyanobacteria, transcriptional analyses were performed of hupW in Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133 and hupW and hoxW in Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120. These studies revealed numerous transcriptional start points together with putative binding sites for NtcA (hupW and LexA (hoxW. In order to investigate the diversity and specificity among hydrogeanse specific proteases we constructed a phylogenetic tree which revealed several subgroups that showed a striking resemblance to the subgroups previously described for [NiFe]-hydrogenases. Additionally the proteases specificity was also addressed by amino acid sequence analysis and protein-protein docking experiments with 3D-models derived from bioinformatic studies. These studies revealed a so called "HOXBOX"; an amino acid sequence specific for protease of Hox-type which might be involved in docking with the large subunit of the hydrogenase. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the hydrogenase specific proteases are under similar regulatory control as the hydrogenases they cleave. The result from the phylogenetic study also indicates that the hydrogenase and the protease have co-evolved since ancient time and suggests that at least one major horizontal gene transfer

  20. Antibacterial activity of Artemisia asiatica essential oil against some common respiratory infection causing bacterial strains and its mechanism of action in Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiehui; Qian, Chao; Xu, Hongjie; Huang, Yanjie

    2018-01-01

    The main objective of the current study was to investigate the chemical composition of the essential oil of Artemisia asiatica together with investigating the antibacterial effects it exerts on several common respiratory infection causing bacteria including Haemophilus influenzae. Its mechanism of action was studied using various state-of-the-art assays like scanning electron microscopy, DNA, RNA and protein leakage assays, growth curve assays etc. The essential oil was extracted from the leaves of A. asiatica by supercritical CO 2 fluid extraction technology. Chemical composition of essential oils was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass-spectrometry (GC-MS). The antibacterial activity was evaluated against 6 bacteria by the paper disc diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericide concentration (MBC) values of the essential oil were estimated by agar dilution method. The antibacterial mechanism was evaluated by growth curve, the integrity of cell membrane and scanning electronmicroscope (SEM). Gas chromatographic analysis of the A. asiatica essential oil led to the identification of 16 chemical constituents accounting for 97.2% of the total oil composition. The major components were found to be Piperitone, (z)-davanone, p-cymene and 1, 8-cineole. The essential oil showed maximum growth inhibition against Haemophilus influenzae with a zone of inhibition of 24.5 mm and MIC/MBC values of 1.9/4.5 mg/mL respectively. Bacteria treated with the essential oil led to a rapid decrease in the number of viable cells. On adding the essential oil of A. asiatica to the bacterial culture, the constituents of the bacterial cell got released into the medium and this cell constituent release increased with increasing doses of the essential oil. SEM showed that the bacterial cells treated with the essential oil showed damaged cell wall, deformed cell morphology and shrunken cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Immune response elicited by two rBCG strains devoid of genes involved in c-di-GMP metabolism affect protection versus challenge with M. tuberculosis strains of different virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Cerda, Cristian Alfredo; Aceves-Sánchez, Michel de Jesús; Marquina-Castillo, Brenda; Mata-Espinoza, Dulce; Barrios-Payán, Jorge; Vega-Domínguez, Perla Jazmín; Pedroza-Roldán, César; Bravo-Madrigal, Jorge; Vallejo-Cardona, Alba Adriana; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Flores-Valdez, Mario Alberto

    2018-04-12

    Pellicles, a type of biofilm, have gathered a renewed interest in the field of tuberculosis as a structure that mimics some characteristics occurring during M. tuberculosis infection, such as antibiotic recalcitrance and chronicity of infection, and as a source of antigens for humoral response in infected guinea pigs. In other bacteria, it has been well documented that the second messenger c-di-GMP modulates the transition from planktonic cells to biofilm formation. In this work, we used the live vaccine Mycobacterium bovis BCG to determine whether deletion of genes involved in c-di-GMP metabolism would affect interaction with macrophages, capacity to induce immune response in a murine cell line and mice, and how the protein profile was modified when grown as surface pellicles. We found that deletion of the BCG1419c (Delta c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase, ΔPDE) gene, or deletion of the BCG1416c (Delta c-di-GMP diguanylate cyclase, ΔDGC) gene, altered production of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β, in murine macrophages, and resulted in attenuation in intra-macrophage replication. Moreover, in addition to the improved immunogenicity of the BCGΔBCG1419c mutant already reported, deletion of the BCG1416c gene leads to increased T CD4 + and T CD8 + activation. This correlated with protection versus lethality in mice infected with the highly virulent M. tuberculosis 5186 afforded by vaccination with all the tested BCG strains, and controlled the growth of the mildly virulent M. tuberculosis H37Rv in lungs by vaccination with BCGΔBCG1419c during chronic late infection from 4 to 6 months after challenge. Furthermore, when grown as surface pellicles, a condition used to manufacture BCG vaccine, in comparison to BCG wild type, both rBCGs changed expression of antigenic proteins such as DnaK, HbhA, PstS2, 35KDa antigen, GroEL2, as well as AcpM, a protein involved in synthesis of mycolic acids, molecules relevant to modulate inflammatory responses. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All

  2. A glutathione S-transferase with activity towards cis-1,2-dichloroepoxyethane is involved in isoprene utilization by Rhodococcus sp. strain AD45

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hylckama Vlieg, J.E T; Kingma, J; van den Wijngaard, A.J.; Janssen, D.B.

    Rhodococcus sp. strain AD45 was isolated from an enrichment culture on isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene). Isoprene-grown cells of strain AD45 oxidized isoprene to 3,4-epoxy-3-methyl-1-butene, cis-1,2 dichloroethene to cis-1,2-dichloroepoxyethane, and trans-1,2-dichloroethene to

  3. Noncontiguous Finished Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus aureus KLT6, a Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B-Positive Strain Involved in a Food Poisoning Outbreak in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobes, Raquel; Manrique, Marina; Brozynska, Marta; Stephan, Roger; Pareja, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    We present the first complete genome sequence of a Staphylococcus aureus strain assigned to clonal complex 12. The strain was isolated in a food poisoning outbreak due to contaminated potato salad in Switzerland in 2009, and it produces staphylococcal enterotoxin B. PMID:23704175

  4. Auranofin and related heterometallic gold(I)-thiolates as potent inhibitor/span>s of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacterial strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokai, Yozane; Jurkowicz, Boruch; Fernández-Gallardo, Jacob; Zakirkhodjaev, Nuruddinkodja; Sanaú, Mercedes; Muth, Theodore R; Contel, María

    2014-09-01

    A series of new heterometallic gold(I) thiolates containing ferrocenyl-phoshines were synthesized. Their antimicrobial properties were studied and compared to that of FDA-approved drug, auranofin (Ridaura), prescribed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. MIC in the order of one digit micromolar were found for most of the compounds against Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and CA MRSA strains US300 and US400. Remarkably, auranofin inhibited S. aureus, US300 and US400 in the order of 150-300 nM. This is the first time that the potent inhibitory effect of auranofin on MRSA strains has been described. The effects of a selected heterometallic compound and auranofin were also studied in a non-tumorigenic human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK-293). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Studies On Optimization Of Protease Production Using Bacterial Isolate Clri Strain 5468 And Its Application In Dehairing And Hydrolysis Of Tannery Fleshings Solid Waste Management

    OpenAIRE

    Vimala Devi Seenivasagham; C. Rose

    2015-01-01

    The strain which produces protease was originally isolated characterized in Biotechnology laboratory at CLRI and was maintained. The microorganism was growned on several proteolytic media and the maximum activity was observed. The characterization of enzyme was analysed for different pH temperature size of inoculum inhibitors age of the culture. Then the enzyme was observed for the unhairing of skin and the disadvantage in chemical treatment was studied. The conformation of unhairing was stud...

  6. Development of a duplex Taqman real-time PCR assay for rapid identification of Vibrio splendidus-related and V. aestuarianus strains from bacterial cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulnier, Denis; De Decker, Sophie; Tourbiez, Delphine; Travers, Marie Agnès

    2017-09-01

    To enable the rapid and accurate identification of Vibrio splendidus-related and V. aestuarianus strains associated with Pacific cupped oyster Crassostrea gigas mortality, we developed a duplex Taqman real-time PCR assay and evaluated its efficacy. This technique proved to be rapid, sensitive, and specific and will be particularly valuable for epidemiologic studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Experimental infection with different bacterial strains in larvae and juvenile Litopenaeus vannamei reared in Santa Catarina State, Brazil = Infecção experimental em larvas e juvenis de Litopaenaeus vannamei cultivados no Estado de Santa Catarina, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Carlos Buglione

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the pathogenic characteristics of bacteria isolated from Litopenaeus vannamei during an outbreak at the Laboratory of Marine Shrimp, UFSC, Santa Catarina State, Brazil. Their virulence potential in larvae and juvenile shrimp and theeffects on the total haemocyte count, phenoloxidase activity and serum agglutinate titre were examined after experimental infection. Bacterial strains were isolated from larvae and adult shrimps, identified by the AP120E biochemical system as: two strains of Vibrioalginolyticus, three of Aeromonas salmonicida and one of Pasteurella multocida sp. and Pasteurella sp. All the bacterial strains isolated in this study caused mortality in shrimp. One strain of V. alginolyticus was responsible for 97.3 and 88.7% mortality in larvae and juvenil shrimps, respectively. The shrimp immunological system was influenced by experimental infection with V. alginolyticus. Decrease in the total haemocyte count and increase in the phenoloxidase activity and the serum agglutinate titre (p Este estudo avaliou as características patogênicas de cepas de bactérias isoladas de Litopenaeus vannamei durante surto de mortalidade no Laboratório de Camarões Marinhos, UFSC, Estado de Santa Catarina, Brasil. Seu potencial de virulência em larvas e juvenis de camarão marinho e os efeitos sobre a contagem total de hemócito, atividade de fenoloxidase e título aglutinante do soro foramavaliados após infecção experimental. As cepas bacterianas foram isoladas de larvas e de camarões adultos e identificadas bioquimicamente pelo sistema API20E como: duas cepas de Vibrio alginolyticus, três de Aeromonas salmonicida e uma de Pasteurella sp. e P. multocida. Todas as cepas isoladas provocaram mortalidade em L. vannamei, e uma de V. alginolyticus resultou em mortalidade de 97,3 e 88,7% para larvas e juvenis de camarões, respectivamente. O sistema imunológico dos camarões juvenis sofreu influência da infecção experimental

  8. Involvement of cell shape and flagella in the bacterial retention during percolation of contaminated water through soil columns in tropical region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nola, Moise; Ewoti, Olive V Noah; Nougang, Mireille; Moungang, Marlyse L; Chihib, Nour-Eddine; Krier, Francois; Servais, Pierre; Hornez, Jean-Pierre; Njine, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    Microorganisms' retention in soil contributes to the natural purification of groundwater. Bacteria found in groundwater are generally of various shapes. The aim of this study was to assess the importance of cell shape and flagella in bacterial retention during polluted water percolation through two soil columns CA and CB, in the equatorial region in Central Africa. Percolation tests were carried out using different water loads samples which were contaminated by Escherichia coli (straight rods, peritrichous flagella), Vibrio parahaemolyticus (rods bacteria, polar flagella), and Staphylococcus saprophyticus (spherical, free-flagellum). It has been noted that showed that through soil column CA, the mean values of cells retention ratios (T(R)) varied with bacteria species considered, and from one applied water load sample to another. E. coli T(R) and that of S. saprophyticus were not significantly different (P> 0.05) for the two soil columns. V. parahaemolyticus T(R) significantly differed from that of E. coli and S. saprophyticus through soil column CA (Psoil column CB (Psoil columns. S. saprophyticus in most cases was more retained than others. The physical properties of the bacterial cell must be taken into consideration when evaluating the transfer of bacteriological pollutants towards groundwater.

  9. Putative bacterial interactions from metagenomic knowledge with an integrative systems ecology approach

    OpenAIRE

    Bordron, P.; Latorre, M.; Cortés, M.; González, M.; Thiele, S.; Siegel, A.; Maass, A.; Eveillard, D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Following the trend of studies that investigate microbial ecosystems using different metagenomic techniques, we propose a new integrative systems ecology approach that aims to decipher functional roles within a consortium through the integration of genomic and metabolic knowledge at genome scale. For the sake of application, using public genomes of five bacterial strains involved in copper bioleaching: Acidiphilium cryptum, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidan...

  10. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge...... about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria......-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial...

  11. Backbone dynamics of a bacterially expressed peptide from the receptor binding domain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pilin strain PAK from heteronuclear 1H-15N NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, A. Patricia [University of Washington, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy (United States); Spyracopoulos, Leo [Department of Biochemistry (Canada); Irvin, Randall T. [University of Alberta, Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology (Canada); Sykes, Brian D. [Department of Biochemistry (Canada)

    2000-07-15

    The backbone dynamics of a {sup 15}N-labeled recombinant PAK pilin peptide spanning residues 128-144 in the C-terminal receptor binding domain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pilin protein strain PAK (Lys{sup 128}-Cys-Thr-Ser-Asp-Gln-Asp-Glu-Gln-Phe-Ile-Pro-Lys-Gly-Cys-Ser-Lys{sup 144}) were probed by measurements of {sup 15}N NMR relaxation. This PAK(128-144) sequence is a target for the design of a synthetic peptide vaccine effective against multiple strains of P. aeruginosa infection. The {sup 15}N longitudinal (T{sub 1}) and transverse (T{sub 2}) relaxation rates and the steady-state heteronuclear {l_brace}{sup 1}H{r_brace}-{sup 15}N NOE were measured at three fields (7.04, 11.74 and 14.1 Tesla), five temperatures (5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 deg. C ) and at pH 4.5 and 7.2. Relaxation data was analyzed using both the 'model-free' formalism [Lipari, G. and Szabo, A. (1982) J. Am. Chem. Soc., 104, 4546-4559 and 4559-4570] and the reduced spectral density mapping approach [Farrow, N.A., Szabo, A., Torchia, D.A. and Kay, L.E. (1995) J. Biomol. NMR, 6, 153-162]. The relaxation data, spectral densities and order parameters suggest that the type I and type II {beta}-turns spanning residues Asp{sup 134}-Glu-Gln-Phe{sup 137} and Pro{sup 139}-Lys-Gly-Cys{sup 142}, respectively, are the most ordered and structured regions of the peptide. The biological implications of these results will be discussed in relation to the role that backbone motions play in PAK pilin peptide immunogenicity, and within the framework of developing a pilin peptide vaccine capable of conferring broad immunity across P. aeruginosa strains.

  12. Characterization of bacterial strains isolated from a beef-processing plant following cleaning and disinfection - Influence of isolated strains on biofilm formation by Sakaï and EDL 933 E. coli O157:H7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marouani-Gadri, Nesrine; Augier, Gladys; Carpentier, Brigitte

    2009-07-31

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects on Escherichia coli O157:H7 biofilm formation of bacteria isolated from meat site surfaces following cleaning and disinfection. We first isolated and identified, to the genus level, strains of the latter organisms. Samples were obtained by swabbing the surfaces of equipment or floors over areas ranging from 315 to 3200 cm(2) in a slaughter hall, a meat cutting room and a meat boning room of a meat-processing plant. The number of bacteria recovered from these surfaces ranged from 10(5) CFU/cm(2). In the slaughter hall, stainless steel was in one case one of the most contaminated materials and in other cases one of the less contaminated. The same observation was made for conveyor belts made of polyvinyl chloride in the boning room. Dominant genera in the meat plant were Staphylococcus and Bacillus which were both 34% of the isolates from the slaughter hall and 14 and 4% respectively of the isolates from the cutting room. Randomly selected isolates of each of the genera recovered from the slaughter hall were cultured with E. coli O157:H7 in meat exudate at 15 degrees C to form dual-organism biofilms on polyurethane. In all cases but one, the isolates increased the numbers of attached E. coli O157:H7. The effects ranged from 0.37 to 1.11 for EDL 933 strain and from 0.19 to 1.38 log (CFU/cm(2)) for Sakaï strain. This is the first time that a resident microbiota of a meat-processing plant has been shown to have a favourable effect on E. coli O157:H7 colonization of a solid surface, which is of great interest from a food safety standpoint.

  13. Characterizing a novel strain of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens BAC03 for potential biological control application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aims: Identify and characterize a bacterial strain from suppressive soil, BAC03, evaluate its antimicrobial activity against Streptomyces scabies and other microorganisms, and characterize an antimicrobial substance produced by this strain. Methods and Results: Bacterial strain BAC03 (isolated from ...

  14. Involvement of an ATP-dependent carboxylase in a CO2-dependent pathway of acetone metabolism by Xanthobacter strain Py2.

    OpenAIRE

    Sluis, M K; Small, F J; Allen, J R; Ensign, S A

    1996-01-01

    The metabolism of acetone by the aerobic bacterium Xanthobacter strain Py2 was investigated. Cell suspensions of Xanthobacter strain Py2 grown with propylene or glucose as carbon sources were unable to metabolize acetone. The addition of acetone to cultures grown with propylene or glucose resulted in a time-dependent increase in acetone-degrading activity. The degradation of acetone by these cultures was prevented by the addition of rifampin and chloramphenicol, demonstrating that new protein...

  15. Recombination and Insertion Events Involving the Botulinum Neurotoxin Complex Genes in Clostridium botulinum Types A, B, E and F and Clostridium butyricum Type E Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-05

    Clostridium botulinum types A, B, E and F and Clostridium butyricum type E strains Karen K Hill*1, Gary Xie2, Brian T Foley3, Theresa J Smith4, Amy C Munk2...ornl.gov; John C Detter - cdetter@lanl.gov * Corresponding author Abstract Background: Clostridium botulinum is a taxonomic designation for at least... botulinum neurotoxin complex genes in Clostridium botulinum types A, B, E and F and Clostridium butyricum type E strains. BMC Genomics 7:1-18 5a

  16. The role of bacterial fermentation in the hydrolysis and oxidation of sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar proteins in Harbin dry sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Kong, Baohua; Han, Qi; Liu, Qian; Xu, Li

    2016-11-01

    Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactobacillus curvatus, Lactobacillus sake and Staphylococcus xylosus were evaluated to determine their role in the hydrolysis and oxidation of sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar proteins in Harbin dry sausages. Electrophoresis analysis showed that the hydrolysis of sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar proteins in dry sausages inoculated with bacterial strains was more severe than that in the non-inoculated control. The predominant free amino acids at the end of the fermentation were glutamic acid and alanine, both of which are involved in creating a desirable taste. The inoculation of dry sausages with bacterial strains, especially mixed strains, significantly decreased carbonyl formation and sulfhydryl loss in sausages (Psausage with multiple bacterial strains could contribute to flavour formation via flavour precursors. The results demonstrate that Harbin dry sausage can be inoculated with a starter culture mixture of P. pentosaceus, L. curvatus and S. xylosus to improve flavour formation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, Karen L.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a neurological emergency. Empiric antimicrobial and adjunctive therapy should be initiated as soon as a single set of blood cultures has been obtained. Clinical signs suggestive of bacterial meningitis include fever, headache, meningismus, vomiting, photophobia, and an

  18. Studies On Optimization Of Protease Production Using Bacterial Isolate Clri Strain 5468 And Its Application In Dehairing And Hydrolysis Of Tannery Fleshings Solid Waste Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vimala Devi Seenivasagham

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The strain which produces protease was originally isolated characterized in Biotechnology laboratory at CLRI and was maintained. The microorganism was growned on several proteolytic media and the maximum activity was observed. The characterization of enzyme was analysed for different pH temperature size of inoculum inhibitors age of the culture. Then the enzyme was observed for the unhairing of skin and the disadvantage in chemical treatment was studied. The conformation of unhairing was studied using histology studies. The tannery waste solid fleshings as it is cannot be directly disposed off to the environment. It was treated with the microbial proteases. The hydrolysis of waste was done using proteases. The solid waste was converted to protien fat and the salt matter. Future work is to optimize the cheap media for the production of the enzyme for large scale applications in various industries.

  19. Molecular approaches for bacterial azoreductases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montira Leelakriangsak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Azo dyes are the dominant types of synthetic dyes, widely used in textiles, foods, leather, printing, tattooing, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries. Many microorganisms are able to decolorize azo dyes, and there is increasing interest in biological waste treatment methods. Bacterial azoreductases can cleave azo linkages (-N=N- in azo dyes, forming aromatic amines. This review mainly focuses on employing molecular approaches, including gene manipulation and recombinant strains, to study bacterial azoreductases. The construction of the recombinant protein by cloning and the overexpression of azoreductase is described. The mechanisms and function of bacterial azoreductases can be studied by other molecular techniques discussed in this review, such as RT-PCR, southern blot analysis, western blot analysis, zymography, and muta-genesis in order to understand bacterial azoreductase properties, function and application. In addition, understanding the regulation of azoreductase gene expression will lead to the systematic use of gene manipulation in bacterial strains for new strategies in future waste remediation technologies.

  20. Evaluation of Antimicrobial Activity of Cuminum Cyminum Essential Oil and Extract against Bacterial Strains Isolated from Patients with Symptomatic Urinary Tract Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasaman Saee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many efforts have been done to find effective agents against resistant pathogens. Cuminum cyminum L. (Cumin is an aromatic plant within the Apiaceae family. It has a variety of purposes and demonstrates antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. This study evaluated the activity of C. cyminum extract and essential oil against bacterial isolates which cause urinary tract infection, including Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus agalactiae, group A streptococci, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus saprophyticus isolated from patients with urinary tract infection.Materials and Methods: Extract was prepared by maceration and essential oil was prepared by hydrodistillation from C. cyminum seeds. The study population was 95 patients with urinary tract infection without malignant diseases, diabetes and immunosupression. After identification of organism, susceptibility testing was carried out by disc diffusion method and MIC values by broth microdilution testing.Results: C. cyminum essential oil can have a better effect on the gram-negative bacteria causing urinary tract infection than gram-positive bacteria. In addition, C. cyminum extract have good activity against both gram- positive and gram-negative bacteria. Our findings also showed that essential oil and extract of C. cyminum has better antibacterial activity on uropathogen isolates than amoxicillin and the difference was significant (P value<0.05 but the activity is not superior to other antibiotics.Conclusion: These results suggest that the essential oil and extract of C. cyminum seeds might be considered as interesting sources of antibacterial components against uropathogenic bacteria.

  1. Involvement of CD252 (CD134L) and IL-2 in the expression of cytotoxic proteins in bacterial- or viral-activated human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Michael; Rampini, Silvana K; Stoeckli, Isabelle; Latinovic-Golic, Sonja; Dumrese, Claudia; Sundstrom, Hanna; Vogetseder, Alexander; Marino, Joseph; Glauser, Daniel L; van den Broek, Maries; Sander, Peter; Groscurth, Peter; Ziegler, Urs

    2009-06-15

    Regulation of cytotoxic effector molecule expression in human CTLs after viral or bacterial activation is poorly understood. By using human autologous dendritic cells (DCs) to prime T lymphocytes, we found perforin only highly up-regulated in virus- (HSV-1, vaccinia virus) but not in intracellular bacteria- (Listeria innocua, Listeria monocytogenes, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Chlamydophila pneumoniae) activated CTLs. In contrast, larger quantities of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha were produced in Listeria-stimulated cultures. Granzyme B and granulysin were similarly up-regulated by all tested viruses and intracellular bacteria. DCs infected with HSV-1 showed enhanced surface expression of the costimulatory molecule CD252 (CD134L) compared with Listeria-infected DC and induced enhanced secretion of IL-2. Adding blocking CD134 or neutralizing IL-2 Abs during T cell activation reduced the HSV-dependent up-regulation of perforin. These data indicate a distinct CTL effector function in response to intracellular pathogens triggered via differing endogenous IL-2 production upon costimulation through CD252.

  2. Lack of Involvement of Fenton Chemistry in Death of Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Sensitive Strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Destruction of Their Genomes on Wet or Dry Copper Alloy Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnes, Sarah L; Keevil, C William

    2016-01-29

    The pandemic of hospital-acquired infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has declined, but the evolution of strains with enhanced virulence and toxins and the increase of community-associated infections are still a threat. In previous studies, 10(7) MRSA bacteria applied as simulated droplet contamination were killed on copper and brass surfaces within 90 min. However, contamination of surfaces is often via finger tips and dries rapidly, and it may be overlooked by cleaning regimes (unlike visible droplets). In this new study, a 5-log reduction of a hardy epidemic strain of MRSA (epidemic methicillin-resistant S. aureus 16 [EMRSA-16]) was observed following 10 min of contact with copper, and a 4-log reduction was observed on copper nickel and cartridge brass alloys in 15 min. A methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) strain from an osteomyelitis patient was killed on copper surfaces in 15 min, and 4-log and 3-log reductions occurred within 20 min of contact with copper nickel and cartridge brass, respectively. Bacterial respiration was compromised on copper surfaces, and superoxide was generated as part of the killing mechanism. In addition, destruction of genomic DNA occurs on copper and brass surfaces, allaying concerns about horizontal gene transfer and copper resistance. Incorporation of copper alloy biocidal surfaces may help to reduce the spread of this dangerous pathogen. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Interaction of Prevotella intermedia strain 17 leucine-rich repeat domain protein AdpF with eukaryotic cells promotes bacterial internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Dipanwita; Kang, Dae-Joong; Anaya-Bergman, Cecilia; Wyant, Tiana; Ghosh, Arnab K; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Lewis, Janina P

    2014-06-01

    Prevotella intermedia is an oral bacterium implicated in a variety of oral diseases. Although internalization of this bacterium by nonphagocytic host cells is well established, the molecular players mediating the process are not well known. Here, the properties of a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain protein, designated AdpF, are described. This protein contains a leucine-rich region composed of 663 amino acid residues, and molecular modeling shows that it folds into a classical curved solenoid structure. The cell surface localization of recombinant AdpF (rAdpF) was confirmed by electron and confocal microscopy analyses. The recombinant form of this protein bound fibronectin in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the protein was internalized by host cells, with the majority of the process accomplished within 30 min. The internalization of rAdpF was inhibited by nystatin, cytochalasin, latrunculin, nocodazole, and wortmannin, indicating that microtubules, microfilaments, and signal transduction are required for the invasion. It is noteworthy that preincubation of eukaryotic cells with AdpF increased P. intermedia 17 internalization by 5- and 10-fold for HeLa and NIH 3T3 fibroblast cell lines, respectively. The addition of the rAdpF protein was also very effective in inducing bacterial internalization into the oral epithelial cell line HN4, as well as into primary cells, including human oral keratinocytes (HOKs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Finally, cells exposed to P. intermedia 17 internalized the bacteria more readily upon reinfection. Taken together, our data demonstrate that rAdpF plays a role in the internalization of P. intermedia 17 by a variety of host cells.

  4. Bacterial Larvicide, Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis Strain AM 65-52 Water Dispersible Granule Formulation Impacts Both Dengue Vector, Aedes aegypti (L.) Population Density and Disease Transmission in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setha, To; Chantha, Ngan; Benjamin, Seleena; Socheat, Doung

    2016-09-01

    A multi-phased study was conducted in Cambodia from 2005-2011 to measure the impact of larviciding with the bacterial larvicide, Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti), a water dispersible granule (WG) formulation on the vector, Aedes aegypti (L.) and the epidemiology. In our studies, all in-use containers were treated at 8 g/1000 L, including smaller containers and animal feeders which were found to contribute 23% of Ae aegypti pupae. The treated waters were subjected to routine water exchange activities. Pupal production was suppressed by an average 91% for 8 weeks. Pupal numbers continued to remain significantly lower than the untreated commune (UTC) for 13 weeks post treatment in the peak dengue vector season (ptreated commune. An average 70% of the household harbored 0-5 Ae aegypti mosquitoes per home for 8 weeks post treatment, but in the same period of time >50% of the household in the UTC harbored ≥11 mosquitoes per home. The adult population continued to remain at significantly much lower numbers in the Bti treated commune than in the UTC for 10-12 weeks post treatment (ptreatment in the 6 months monsoon season with complete coverage of the target districts achieved an overall dengue case reduction of 48% in the 6 treated districts compared to the previous year, 2010. Five untreated districts in the same province had an overwhelming increase of 352% of dengue cases during the same period of time. The larvicide efficacy, treatment of all in-use containers at the start of the monsoon season, together with treatment coverage of entire districts interrupted disease transmission in the temephos resistant province.

  5. Interfering with bacterial gossip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael

    2011-01-01

    defense. Antibiotics exhibit a rather limited effect on biofilms. Furthermore, antibiotics have an ‘inherent obsolescence’ because they select for development of resistance. Bacterial infections with origin in bacterial biofilms have become a serious threat in developed countries. Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... that appropriately target bacteria in their relevant habitat with the aim of mitigating their destructive impact on patients. In this review we describe molecular mechanisms involved in “bacterial gossip” (more scientifically referred to as quorum sensing (QS) and c-di-GMP signaling), virulence, biofilm formation......, resistance and QS inhibition as future antimicrobial targets, in particular those that would work to minimize selection pressures for the development of resistant bacteria....

  6. Comparative evaluation of culture and PCR for the detection and determination of persistence of bacterial strains and DNAs in the Chinchilla laniger model of otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aul, J J; Anderson, K W; Wadowsky, R M; Doyle, W J; Kingsley, L A; Post, J C; Ehrlich, G D

    1998-06-01

    This study was designed to determine the persistence of culturable bacteria versus DNA in the presence of a middle ear effusion in a chinchilla model of otitis media. Cohorts of animals were either infected with an ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae strain or injected with a tripartite inoculum consisting of freeze-thawed Streptococcus pneumoniae; pasteurized Moraxella catarrhalis; and DNA from H influenzae. The H influenzae-infected animals displayed culture positivity and polymerase chain reaction positivity through day 35. In the chinchillas infected with the low-copy number inocula of S pneumoniae, DNA was not detectable after day 1 from the co-inoculated pasteurized M catarrhalis bacteria or the purified H influenzae DNA; however, amplifiable DNA from the live low-copy number bacteria persisted through day 21 even though they were not culture-positive past day 3. These results demonstrate that DNA, and DNA from intact but nonviable bacteria, does not persist in an amplifiable form for more than a day in the presence of an effusion; however, live bacteria, while not culturable, persist in a viable state for weeks.

  7. Growth of Ag-nanoparticles in an aqueous solution and their antimicrobial activities against Gram positive, Gram negative bacterial strains and Candida fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aazam, Elham Shafik; Zaheer, Zoya

    2016-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized using Ocimum sanctum (Tulsi) leaves aqueous extract as reducing as well as a capping agent in absence and presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The resulting nanomaterials were characterized by UV-visible spectrophotometer, and transmission electron microscope. The UV-Vis spectroscopy revealed the formation of AgNPs at 400-450 nm. TEM photographs indicate that the truncated triangular silver nanoplates and/or spherical morphology of the AgNPs with an average diameter of 25 nm have been distorted markedly in presence of CTAB. The AgNPs were almost mono disperse in nature. Antimicrobial activities of AgNPs were determined by using two bacteria (Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus MTCC-3160), Gram negative Escherichia coli MTCC-450) and one species of Candida fungus (Candida albicans ATCC 90030) with Kirby-Bauer or disc diffusion method. The zone of inhibition seems extremely good showing a relatively large zone of inhibition in both Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Candida albicans strains.

  8. Microbiological and physicochemical characterization of small-scale cocoa fermentations and screening of yeast and bacterial strains to develop a defined starter culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Gilberto Vinícius de Melo; Miguel, Maria Gabriela da Cruz Pedrozo; Ramos, Cíntia Lacerda; Schwan, Rosane Freitas

    2012-08-01

    Spontaneous cocoa bean fermentations performed under bench- and pilot-scale conditions were studied using an integrated microbiological approach with culture-dependent and culture-independent techniques, as well as analyses of target metabolites from both cocoa pulp and cotyledons. Both fermentation ecosystems reached equilibrium through a two-phase process, starting with the simultaneous growth of the yeasts (with Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the dominant species) and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) (Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus plantarum were the dominant species), which were gradually replaced by the acetic acid bacteria (AAB) (Acetobacter tropicalis was the dominant species). In both processes, a sequence of substrate consumption (sucrose, glucose, fructose, and citric acid) and metabolite production kinetics (ethanol, lactic acid, and acetic acid) similar to that of previous, larger-scale fermentation experiments was observed. The technological potential of yeast, LAB, and AAB isolates was evaluated using a polyphasic study that included the measurement of stress-tolerant growth and fermentation kinetic parameters in cocoa pulp media. Overall, strains L. fermentum UFLA CHBE8.12 (citric acid fermenting, lactic acid producing, and tolerant to heat, acid, lactic acid, and ethanol), S. cerevisiae UFLA CHYC7.04 (ethanol producing and tolerant to acid, heat, and ethanol), and Acetobacter tropicalis UFLA CHBE16.01 (ethanol and lactic acid oxidizing, acetic acid producing, and tolerant to acid, heat, acetic acid, and ethanol) were selected to form a cocktail starter culture that should lead to better-controlled and more-reliable cocoa bean fermentation processes.

  9. Infection of human islets of Langerhans with two strains of Coxsackie B virus serotype 1: assessment of virus replication, degree of cell death and induction of genes involved in the innate immunity pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagandula, Mahesh; Richardson, Sarah J; Oberste, M Steven; Sioofy-Khojine, Amir-Babak; Hyöty, Heikki; Morgan, Noel G; Korsgren, Olle; Frisk, Gun

    2014-08-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is believed to be triggered, in part, by one or more environmental factors and human enteroviruses (HEVs) are among the candidates. Therefore, this study has examined whether two strains of HEV may differentially affect the induction of genes involved in pathways leading to the synthesis of islet hormones, chemokines and cytokines in isolated, highly purified, human islets. Isolated, purified human pancreatic islets were infected with strains of Coxsackievirus B1.Viral replication and the degree of CPE/islet dissociation were monitored. The expression of insulin, glucagon, CXCL10, TLR3, IF1H1, CCL5, OAS-1, IFNβ, and DDX58 was analyzed. Both strains replicated in islets but only one of strain caused rapid islet dissociation/CPE. Expression of the insulin gene was reduced during infection of islets with either viral strain but the gene encoding glucagon was unaffected. All genes analyzed which are involved in viral sensing and the development of innate immunity were induced by Coxsackie B viruses, with the notable exception of TLR3. There was no qualitative difference in the expression pattern between each strain but the magnitude of the response varied between donors. The lack of virus induced expression of TLR3, together with the differential regulation of IF1H1, OAS1 and IFNβ, (each of which has polymorphic variants influence the predisposition to type 1 diabetes), that might result in defective clearance of virus from islet cells. The reduced expression of the insulin gene and the unaffected expression of the gene encoding glucagon by Coxsackie B1 infection is consistent with the preferential β-cell tropism of the virus. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Bacterial Prostatitis: Bacterial Virulence, Clinical Outcomes, and New Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, John N; Thumbikat, Praveen

    2016-02-01

    Four prostatitis syndromes are recognized clinically: acute bacterial prostatitis, chronic bacterial prostatitis, chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, and asymptomatic prostatitis. Because Escherichia coli represents the most common cause of bacterial prostatitis, we investigated the importance of bacterial virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance in E. coli strains causing prostatitis and the potential association of these characteristics with clinical outcomes. A structured literature review revealed that we have limited understanding of the virulence-associated characteristics of E. coli causing acute prostatitis. Therefore, we completed a comprehensive microbiological and molecular investigation of a unique strain collection isolated from healthy young men. We also considered new data from an animal model system suggesting certain E. coli might prove important in the etiology of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Our human data suggest that E. coli needs multiple pathogenicity-associated traits to overcome anatomic and immune responses in healthy young men without urological risk factors. The phylogenetic background and accumulation of an exceptional repertoire of extraintestinal pathogenic virulence-associated genes indicate that these E. coli strains belong to a highly virulent subset of uropathogenic variants. In contrast, antibiotic resistance confers little added advantage to E. coli strains in these healthy outpatients. Our animal model data also suggest that certain pathogenic E. coli may be important in the etiology of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome through mechanisms that are dependent on the host genetic background and the virulence of the bacterial strain.

  11. Purification of a glutathione S-transferase and a glutathione conjugate-specific dehydrogenase involved in isoprene metabolism in Rhodococcus sp. strain AD45

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hylckama Vlieg , van Johannes; Kingma, Jaap; Kruizinga, Wim; Janssen, Dick B.

    A glutathione S transferase (GST) with activity toward 1,2-eposy-2-methyl-3-butene (isoprene monoxide) and cis-1,2-dichloroepoxyethane was purified from the isoprene-utilizing bacterium Rhodococcus sp. strain AD45, The homodimeric enzyme (two subunits of 27 kDa each) catalyzed the glutathione

  12. Decreased virulence of a pneumolysin-deficient strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae in murine meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellmer, Andreas; Zysk, Gregor; Gerber, Joachim; Kunst, Tammo; Von Mering, Matthias; Bunkowski, Stefanie; Eiffert, Helmut; Nau, Roland

    2002-11-01

    Pneumolysin, neuraminidases A and B, and hyaluronidase are virulence factors of Streptococcus pneumoniae that appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of meningitis. In a murine model of meningitis after intracerebral infection using mutants of S. pneumoniae D39, only mice infected with a pneumolysin-deficient strain were healthier at 32 and 36 h, had lower bacterial titers in blood at 36 h, and survived longer than the D39 parent strain. Cerebellar and spleen bacterial titers, meningeal inflammation, and neuronal damage scores remained uninfluenced by the lack of any of the virulence factors.

  13. 3-D analysis of bacterial cell-(iron)mineral aggregates formed during Fe(II) oxidation by the nitrate-reducing Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 using complementary microscopy tomography approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, G; Zeitvogel, F; Hao, L; Ingino, P; Floetenmeyer, M; Stierhof, Y-D; Schroeppel, B; Burkhardt, C J; Kappler, A; Obst, M

    2014-07-01

    The formation of cell-(iron)mineral aggregates as a consequence of bacterial iron oxidation is an environmentally widespread process with a number of implications for processes such as sorption and coprecipitation of contaminants and nutrients. Whereas the overall appearance of such aggregates is easily accessible using 2-D microscopy techniques, the 3-D and internal structure remain obscure. In this study, we examined the 3-D structure of cell-(iron)mineral aggregates formed during Fe(II) oxidation by the nitrate-reducing Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 using a combination of advanced 3-D microscopy techniques. We obtained 3-D structural and chemical information on different cellular encrustation patterns at high spatial resolution (4-200 nm, depending on the method): more specifically, (1) cells free of iron minerals, (2) periplasm filled with iron minerals, (3) spike- or platelet-shaped iron mineral structures, (4) bulky structures on the cell surface, (5) extracellular iron mineral shell structures, (6) cells with iron mineral filled cytoplasm, and (7) agglomerations of extracellular globular structures. In addition to structural information, chemical nanotomography suggests a dominant role of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in controlling the formation of cell-(iron)mineral aggregates. Furthermore, samples in their hydrated state showed cell-(iron)mineral aggregates in pristine conditions free of preparation (i.e., drying/dehydration) artifacts. All these results were obtained using 3-D microscopy techniques such as focused ion beam (FIB)/scanning electron microscopy (SEM) tomography, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tomography, scanning transmission (soft) X-ray microscopy (STXM) tomography, and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). It turned out that, due to the various different contrast mechanisms of the individual approaches, and due to the required sample preparation steps, only the combination of these techniques was able to provide a

  14. Obturator internus muscle strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caoimhe Byrne, MB BCh, BAO

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We report 2 cases of obturator internus muscle strains. The injuries occurred in young male athletes involved in kicking sports. Case 1 details an acute obturator internus muscle strain with associated adductor longus strain. Case 2 details an overuse injury of the bilateral obturator internus muscles. In each case, magnetic resonance imaging played a crucial role in accurate diagnosis.

  15. Tiny but mighty: bacterial membrane vesicles in food biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yue; Alexeeva, Svetlana; Defourny, Kyra Ay; Smid, Eddy J; Abee, Tjakko

    2018-02-01

    Membrane vesicle (MV) production is observed in all domains of life. Evidence of MV production accumulated in recent years among bacterial species involved in fermentation processes. These studies revealed MV composition, biological functions and properties, which made us recognize the potential of MVs in food applications as delivery vehicles of various compounds to other bacteria or the human host. Moreover, MV producing strains can deliver benefits as probiotics or starters in fermentation processes. Next to the natural production of MVs, we also highlight possible methods for artificial generation of bacterial MVs and cargo loading to enhance their applicability. We believe that a more in-depth understanding of bacterial MVs opens new avenues for their exploitation in biotechnological applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Involvement of the MexXY-OprM efflux system in emergence of cefepime resistance in clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocquet, Didier; Nordmann, Patrice; El Garch, Farid; Cabanne, Ludovic; Plésiat, Patrick

    2006-04-01

    Cefepime (FEP) and ceftazidime (CAZ) are potent beta-lactam antibiotics with similar MICs (1 to 2 mug/ml) for wild-type strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, recent epidemiological studies have highlighted the occurrence of isolates more resistant to FEP than to CAZ (FEPr/CAZs profile). We thus investigated the mechanisms conferring such a phenotype in 38 clonally unrelated strains collected in two French teaching hospitals. Most of the bacteria (n=32; 84%) appeared to stably overexpress the mexY gene, which codes for the RND transporter of the multidrug efflux system MexXY-OprM. MexXY up-regulation was the sole FEP resistance mechanism identified (n=12) or was associated with increased levels of pump MexAB-OprM (n=5) or MexJK (n=2), synthesis of secondary beta-lactamase PSE-1 (n=10), derepression of cephalosporinase AmpC (n=1), coexpression of both OXA-35 and MexJK (n=1), or production of both PSE-1 and MexAB-OprM (n=1). Down-regulation of the mexXY operon in seven selected strains by the plasmid-borne repressor gene mexZ decreased FEP resistance from two- to eightfold, thereby demonstrating the significant contribution of MexXY-OprM to the FEPr/CAZs phenotype. The six isolates of this series that exhibited wild-type levels of the mexY gene were found to produce beta-lactamase PSE-1 (n=1), OXA-35 (n=4), or both PSE-1 and OXA-35 (n=1). Altogether, these data provide evidence that MexXY-OprM plays a major role in the development of FEP resistance among clinical strains of P. aeruginosa.

  17. Leukocyte-subset counts in idiopathic parkinsonism provide clues to a pathogenic pathway involving small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. A surveillance study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobbs R

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following Helicobacter pylori eradication in idiopathic parkinsonism (IP, hypokinesia improved but flexor-rigidity increased. Small intestinal bacterial-overgrowth (SIBO is a candidate driver of the rigidity: hydrogen-breath-test-positivity is common in IP and case histories suggest that Helicobacter keeps SIBO at bay. Methods In a surveillance study, we explore relationships of IP-facets to peripheral immune/inflammatory-activation, in light of presence/absence of Helicobacter infection (urea-breath- and/or stool-antigen-test: positivity confirmed by gastric-biopsy and hydrogen-breath-test status for SIBO (positivity: >20 ppm increment, 2 consecutive 15-min readings, within 2h of 25G lactulose. We question whether any relationships found between facets and blood leukocyte subset counts stand in patients free from anti-parkinsonian drugs, and are robust enough to defy fluctuations in performance consequent on short t½ therapy. Results Of 51 IP-probands, 36 had current or past Helicobacter infection on entry, 25 having undergone successful eradication (median 3.4 years before. Thirty-four were hydrogen-breath-test-positive initially, 42 at sometime (343 tests during surveillance (2.8 years. Hydrogen-breath-test-positivity was associated inversely with Helicobacter-positivity (OR 0.20 (95% CI 0.04, 0.99, p In 38 patients (untreated (17 or on stable long-t½ IP-medication, the higher the natural-killer count, the shorter stride, slower gait and greater flexor-rigidity (by mean 49 (14, 85 mm, 54 (3, 104 mm.s-1, 89 (2, 177 Nm.10-3, per 100 cells.μl-1 increment, p=0.007, 0.04 & 0.04 respectively, adjusted for patient characteristics. T-helper count was inversely associated with flexor-rigidity before (p=0.01 and after adjustment for natural-killer count (-36(-63, -10 Nm.10-3 per 100 cells.μl-1, p=0.007. Neutrophil count was inversely associated with tremor (visual analogue scale, p=0.01. Effect-sizes were independent of IP

  18. Phenotypic signatures arising from unbalanced bacterial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Cheemeng; Smith, Robert Phillip; Tsai, Ming-Chi; Schwartz, Russell; You, Lingchong

    2014-08-01

    Fluctuations in the growth rate of a bacterial culture during unbalanced growth are generally considered undesirable in quantitative studies of bacterial physiology. Under well-controlled experimental conditions, however, these fluctuations are not random but instead reflect the interplay between intra-cellular networks underlying bacterial growth and the growth environment. Therefore, these fluctuations could be considered quantitative phenotypes of the bacteria under a specific growth condition. Here, we present a method to identify "phenotypic signatures" by time-frequency analysis of unbalanced growth curves measured with high temporal resolution. The signatures are then applied to differentiate amongst different bacterial strains or the same strain under different growth conditions, and to identify the essential architecture of the gene network underlying the observed growth dynamics. Our method has implications for both basic understanding of bacterial physiology and for the classification of bacterial strains.

  19. Bacterial Proteasomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrab, Jordan B; Darwin, K Heran

    2015-01-01

    Interest in bacterial proteasomes was sparked by the discovery that proteasomal degradation is required for the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, one of the world's deadliest pathogens. Although bacterial proteasomes are structurally similar to their eukaryotic and archaeal homologs, there are key differences in their mechanisms of assembly, activation, and substrate targeting for degradation. In this article, we compare and contrast bacterial proteasomes with their archaeal and eukaryotic counterparts, and we discuss recent advances in our understanding of how bacterial proteasomes function to influence microbial physiology.

  20. Pseudomonas corrugata crpCDE is part of the cyclic lipopeptide corpeptin biosynthetic gene cluster and is involved in bacterial virulence in tomato and in hypersensitive response in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strano, Cinzia Patricia; Bella, Patrizia; Licciardello, Grazia; Fiore, Alberto; Lo Piero, Angela Roberta; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Venturi, Vittorio; Catara, Vittoria

    2015-06-01

    Pseudomonas corrugata CFBP 5454 produces two kinds of cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs), cormycin A and corpeptins, both of which possess surfactant, antimicrobial and phytotoxic activities. In this study, we identified genes coding for a putative non-ribosomal peptide synthetase and an ABC-type transport system involved in corpeptin production. These genes belong to the same transcriptional unit, designated crpCDE. The genetic organization of this locus is highly similar to other Pseudomonas CLP biosynthetic clusters. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) analysis revealed that transporter and synthetase genomic knock-out mutants were unable to produce corpeptins, but continued to produce cormycin A. This suggests that CrpCDE is the only system involved in corpeptin production in P. corrugata CFBP 5454. In addition, phylogenetic analysis revealed that the CrpE ABC transporter clustered with the transporters of CLPs with a long peptide chain. Strains depleted in corpeptin production were significantly less virulent than the wild-type strain when inoculated in tomato plants and induced only chlorosis when infiltrated into Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Thus, corpeptins are important effectors of P. corrugata interaction with plants. Expression analysis revealed that crpC transcription occurs at high cell density. Two LuxR transcriptional regulators, PcoR and RfiA, have a pivotal role in crpC expression and thus in corpeptin production. © 2014 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  1. Possible involvement of ROS generation in vorinostat pretreatment induced enhancement of the antibacterial activity of ciprofloxacin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masadeh MM

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Majed M Masadeh,1 Karem H Alzoubi,2 Sayer I Al-azzam,2 Ahlam M Al-buhairan3 1Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, 2Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan; 3Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Abstract: The mechanism underlying ciprofloxacin action involves interference with transcription and replication of bacterial DNA and, thus, the induction of double-strand breaks in DNA. It also involves elevated oxidative stress, which might contribute to bacterial cell death. Vorinostat was shown to induce oxidative DNA damage. The current work investigated a possible interactive effect of vorinostat on ciprofloxacin-induced cytotoxicity against a number of reference bacteria. Standard bacterial strains were Escherichia coli ATCC 35218, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC29213, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027, Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 12228, Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 17978, Proteus mirabilis ATCC 12459, Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 13883, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA (ATCC 43300, and Streptococcus pneumoniae (ATCC 25923. The antibacterial activity of ciprofloxacin, with or without pretreatment of bacterial cells by vorinostat, was examined using the disc diffusion procedure and determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and zones of inhibition of bacterial growth. All tested bacterial strains showed sensitivity to ciprofloxacin. When pretreated with vorinostat, significantly larger zones of inhibition and smaller MIC values were observed in all bacterial strains compared to those treated with ciprofloxacin alone. In correlation, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS induced by the antibacterial action of ciprofloxacin was enhanced by treatment of bacterial cells with vorinostat. Results showed the possible agonistic properties of vorinostat when used together with ciprofloxacin. This could be related to the

  2. Cognitive outcome in adults after bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogman, Martine; van de Beek, Diederik; Weisfelt, Martijn; de Gans, Jan; Schmand, Ben

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate cognitive outcome in adult survivors of bacterial meningitis. METHODS: Data from three prospective multicentre studies were pooled and reanalysed, involving 155 adults surviving bacterial meningitis (79 after pneumococcal and 76 after meningococcal meningitis) and 72 healthy

  3. Cognitive outcome in adults after bacterial meningitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogman, M.; Beek, D. van de; Weisfelt, M.; Gans, J. de; Schmand, B.A.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate cognitive outcome in adult survivors of bacterial meningitis. METHODS: Data from three prospective multicentre studies were pooled and reanalysed, involving 155 adults surviving bacterial meningitis (79 after pneumococcal and 76 after meningococcal meningitis) and 72 healthy

  4. Bacterial adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loosdrecht, van M.C.M.

    1988-01-01

    As mentioned in the introduction of this thesis bacterial adhesion has been studied from a variety of (mostly practice oriented) starting points. This has resulted in a range of widely divergent approaches. In order to elucidate general principles in bacterial adhesion phenomena, we felt it

  5. Animal Models of Bacterial Keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquart, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial keratitis is a disease of the cornea characterized by pain, redness, inflammation, and opacity. Common causes of this disease are Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Animal models of keratitis have been used to elucidate both the bacterial factors and the host inflammatory response involved in the disease. Reviewed herein are animal models of bacterial keratitis and some of the key findings in the last several decades. PMID:21274270

  6. Microbiological study of a crushed 'core heart' packaged under sterile atmosphere and isolation of different bacterial strains from the Callovo-Oxfordian argillaceous rock (Bure, France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayeux, B.; Daumas, S.; Vinsot, A.; Labat, M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. To study the feasibility of a reversible storage of high activity and long life radioactive waste, many parameters have to be take into account, including microbiological parameters. Indeed, it is necessary to determine the extent of biological reactions that could develop in a disposal. For example, processes such as canister corrosion, retention and transport of radionuclides and gas production may be partially mediated by microbial activities. An initial microbiological characterization of the Callovo- Oxfordian clay-rock was conducted in 2006 by S. Poulain. This previous work highlighted a number of bacterial strains responsible for the disturbances of some geochemical parameters observed in experiments performed in the Andra's Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory (URL). A thoroughly metabolic study on each isolated strain was then launched after a new phase of microorganism isolation. The purpose of this new study is to analyse the gas produced by bacteria (like CO 2 , H 2 or H 2 S) and the products of their metabolism, in particular corrosive molecules. The microflora was mainly studied on solid samples. These samples came from a 5-m long borehole drilled using aseptic techniques on June, 2009. All parts of the drilling equipment were cleaned with bleach, rinsed with demineralized water, and wrapped in sterile foil and clean plastic, prior to arrival on site. The equipment was handled with ethanol-sterilized gloves and when needed (i.e., after each retraction from the borehole to remove core sections), re-cleaned on site with ethanol. The borehole was drilled with compressed N 2 to avoid air contamination. After retrieval of the cores, they were conditioned on site on a conditioning table prepared for working under clean conditions. The sample were placed in sterile plastic bags, flushed with filter-sterilized N 2 and closed by thermal sealing at ambient temperature. The samples were further

  7. Bacterial exopolysaccharide and biofilm formation stimulate chickpea growth and soil aggregation under salt stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha Waheed Qurashi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available To compensate for stress imposed by salinity, biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide production are significant strategies of salt tolerant bacteria to assist metabolism. We hypothesized that two previously isolated salt-tolerant strains Halomonas variabilis (HT1 and Planococcus rifietoensis (RT4 have an ability to improve plant growth, These strains can form biofilm and accumulate exopolysacharides at increasing salt stress. These results showed that bacteria might be involved in developing microbial communities under salt stress and helpful in colonizing of bacterial strains to plant roots and soil particles. Eventually, it can add to the plant growth and soil structure. We investigated the comparative effect of exopolysacharide and biofilm formation in two bacterial strains Halomonas variabilis (HT1 and Planococcus rifietoensis (RT4 in response to varying salt stress. We found that biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide accumulation increased at higher salinity. To check the effect of bacterial inoculation on the plant (Cicer arietinum Var. CM-98 growth and soil aggregation, pot experiment was conducted by growing seedlings under salt stress. Inoculation of both strains increased plant growth at elevated salt stress. Weight of soil aggregates attached with roots and present in soil were added at higher salt concentrations compared to untreated controls. Soil aggregation was higher at plant roots under salinity. These results suggest the feasibility of using above strains in improving plant growth and soil fertility under salinity.

  8. Identification and localization of the CupB protein involved in constitutive CO2 uptake in the cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Min; Ogawa, Teruo; Pakrasi, Himadri B; Mi, Hualing

    2008-06-01

    Antibody against cMyc cross-reacted strongly with the CupB protein tagged with His6-cMyc (HM) in thylakoid membrane of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 but only faintly with the cytoplasmic membrane fraction. The protein was not detected in the membranes of the DeltandhD4 and DeltandhF4 mutants in which CupB was tagged with HM. We concluded that a CupB complex containing NdhD4 and NdhF4 is largely, if not exclusively, confined to the thylakoid membrane. Both CupB and NdhH were detected in a fraction containing protein complexes of > 450 kDa, obtained after nickel column and gel filtration chromatography of the membranes solubilized with n-dodecyl-beta-maltoside.

  9. Bacterial cheating limits antibiotic resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao Chao, Hui; Yurtsev, Eugene; Datta, Manoshi; Artemova, Tanya; Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has led to the evolution of resistance in bacteria. Bacteria can gain resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin by acquiring a plasmid carrying the gene beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. This inactivation may represent a cooperative behavior, as the entire bacterial population benefits from removing the antibiotic. The cooperative nature of this growth suggests that a cheater strain---which does not contribute to breaking down the antibiotic---may be able to take advantage of cells cooperatively inactivating the antibiotic. Here we find experimentally that a ``sensitive'' bacterial strain lacking the plasmid conferring resistance can invade a population of resistant bacteria, even in antibiotic concentrations that should kill the sensitive strain. We observe stable coexistence between the two strains and find that a simple model successfully explains the behavior as a function of antibiotic concentration and cell density. We anticipate that our results will provide insight into the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors.

  10. The Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi ltrR-ompR-ompC-ompF genes are involved in resistance to the bile salt sodium deoxycholate and in bacterial transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, J M; Becerra-Lobato, N; Rebollar-Flores, J E; Medina-Aparicio, L; Carbajal-Gómez, E; Zavala-García, M L; Vázquez, A; Gutiérrez-Ríos, R M; Olvera, L; Encarnación, S; Martínez-Batallar, A G; Calva, E; Hernández-Lucas, I

    2014-06-01

    A characterization of the LtrR regulator, an S. Typhi protein belonging to the LysR family is presented. Proteomics, outer membrane protein profiles and transcriptional analyses demonstrated that LtrR is required for the synthesis of OmpR, OmpC and OmpF. DNA-protein interaction analysis showed that LtrR binds to the regulatory region of ompR and then OmpR interacts with the ompC and ompF promoters inducing porin synthesis. LtrR-dependent and independent ompR promoters were identified, and both promoters are involved in the synthesis of OmpR for OmpC and OmpF production. To define the functional role of the ltrR-ompR-ompC-ompF genetic network, mutants in each gene were obtained. We found that ltrR, ompR, ompC and ompF were involved in the control of bacterial transformation, while the two regulators and ompC are necessary for the optimal growth of S. Typhi in the presence of one of the major bile salts found in the gut, sodium deoxycholate. The data presented establish the pivotal role of LtrR in the regulatory network of porin synthesis and reveal new genetic strategies of survival and cellular adaptation to the environment used by Salmonella. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Substrate Diffusion Heterogeneity Controls Bacterial Competition and Coexistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechesne, A.; Or, D.; Smets, B. F.

    2005-12-01

    Diffusion has long been recognized as a key process affecting bacterial physiological functions ranging from nutrient uptake to removal of metabolic waste products. In the vadose zone, significant convective flows are limited and bacteria rely primarily on diffusion for nutrient supply. Even under relatively "wet" conditions (e.g. matric potentials -20 J/kg), soil water is fragmented and exists as thin liquid films or held in crevices imposing constraints on substrate diffusion. Our objective was to investigate the role of diffusion on soil microbial diversity, by focusing on one of the processes that shapes the structure of bacterial communities: competitive interactions. We used a simplified setup, in which the substrate (citrate) fluxes were controlled by different agar gels thicknesses and spatially heterogeneous diffusive pathways were created by an impermeable film with prescribed hole sizes and patterns. Our competition experiments involved two soil bacteria: Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 and Pseudomonas putida KT2440, which were tagged with different constitutive fluorescent markers, allowing for their on line microscopic detection. The growth parameters on citrate of these strains were thoroughly assessed. B. xenovorans LB400 is the weaker competitor. As a result, this strain was outcompeted by KT2440 under high substrate diffusivity and homogeneous conditions. Conversely, the disadvantage of the weakest competitor was not so marked under low substrate diffusivity condition. These results suggest that dry conditions in soil would provide conditions allowing the sustaining of weak bacterial competitors, resulting in the maintenance of high bacterial diversity.

  12. In Vitro and In Vivo Survival and Transit Tolerance of Potentially Probiotic Strains Carried by Artichokes in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    OpenAIRE

    Valerio, Francesca; De Bellis, Palmira; Lonigro, Stella Lisa; Morelli, Lorenzo; Visconti, Angelo; Lavermicocca, Paola

    2006-01-01

    The ability of potentially probiotic strains of Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus paracasei to survive on artichokes for at least 90 days was shown. The anchorage of bacterial strains to artichokes improved their survival in simulated gastrointestinal digestion. L. paracasei IMPC2.1 was further used in an artichoke human feeding study involving four volunteers, and it was shown that the organism could be recovered from stools.

  13. Detecção da resistência a antibióticos de bactérias isoladas de casos clínicos ocorridos em animais de companhia Detection of antibiotic resistance in clinical bacterial strains from pets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Poeta

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The identification of different bacterial strains and the occurrence of antibiotic resistance were investigated in several infection processes of pets as skin abscess with purulent discharge, bronco alveolar fluid, earwax, urine, mammary, and eye fluid. Streptococcus spp. and Staphylococcus spp. were the most detected in the different samples. A high frequency of antimicrobial resistance has been observed and this could reflect the wide use of antimicrobials in pets, making the effectiveness of antibiotic treatment to become more complicated.

  14. Efficiency of Vanilla, Patchouli and Ylang Ylang Essential Oils Stabilized by Iron Oxide@C14 Nanostructures against Bacterial Adherence and Biofilms Formed by Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae Clinical Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Bilcu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms formed by bacterial cells are associated with drastically enhanced resistance against most antimicrobial agents, contributing to the persistence and chronicization of the microbial infections and to therapy failure. The purpose of this study was to combine the unique properties of magnetic nanoparticles with the antimicrobial activity of three essential oils to obtain novel nanobiosystems that could be used as coatings for catheter pieces with an improved resistance to Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strains adherence and biofilm development. The essential oils of ylang ylang, patchouli and vanilla were stabilized by the interaction with iron oxide@C14 nanoparticles to be further used as coating agents for medical surfaces. Iron oxide@C14 was prepared by co-precipitation of Fe+2 and Fe+3 and myristic acid (C14 in basic medium. Vanilla essential oil loaded nanoparticles pelliculised on the catheter samples surface strongly inhibited both the initial adherence of S. aureus cells (quantified at 24 h and the development of the mature biofilm quantified at 48 h. Patchouli and ylang-ylang essential oils inhibited mostly the initial adherence phase of S. aureus biofilm development. In the case of K. pneumoniae, all tested nanosystems exhibited similar efficiency, being active mostly against the adherence K. pneumoniae cells to the tested catheter specimens. The new nanobiosystems based on vanilla, patchouli and ylang-ylang essential oils could be of a great interest for the biomedical field, opening new directions for the design of film-coated surfaces with anti-adherence and anti-biofilm properties.

  15. Efficiency of vanilla, patchouli and ylang ylang essential oils stabilized by iron oxide@C14 nanostructures against bacterial adherence and biofilms formed by Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilcu, Maxim; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Oprea, Alexandra Elena; Popescu, Roxana Cristina; Mogoșanu, George Dan; Hristu, Radu; Stanciu, George A; Mihailescu, Dan Florin; Lazar, Veronica; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen

    2014-11-04

    Biofilms formed by bacterial cells are associated with drastically enhanced resistance against most antimicrobial agents, contributing to the persistence and chronicization of the microbial infections and to therapy failure. The purpose of this study was to combine the unique properties of magnetic nanoparticles with the antimicrobial activity of three essential oils to obtain novel nanobiosystems that could be used as coatings for catheter pieces with an improved resistance to Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strains adherence and biofilm development. The essential oils of ylang ylang, patchouli and vanilla were stabilized by the interaction with iron oxide@C14 nanoparticles to be further used as coating agents for medical surfaces. Iron oxide@C14 was prepared by co-precipitation of Fe+2 and Fe+3 and myristic acid (C14) in basic medium. Vanilla essential oil loaded nanoparticles pelliculised on the catheter samples surface strongly inhibited both the initial adherence of S. aureus cells (quantified at 24 h) and the development of the mature biofilm quantified at 48 h. Patchouli and ylang-ylang essential oils inhibited mostly the initial adherence phase of S. aureus biofilm development. In the case of K. pneumoniae, all tested nanosystems exhibited similar efficiency, being active mostly against the adherence K. pneumoniae cells to the tested catheter specimens. The new nanobiosystems based on vanilla, patchouli and ylang-ylang essential oils could be of a great interest for the biomedical field, opening new directions for the design of film-coated surfaces with anti-adherence and anti-biofilm properties.

  16. Evaluation of cell-mediated immune responses and bacterial clearance in 6-10 months old water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) experimentally vaccinated with four dosages of commercial Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diptee, M D; Adesiyun, A A; Asgarali, Z; Campbell, M; Fosgate, G T

    2005-07-15

    Thirty water buffalo, obtained from a brucellosis-free farm, were used to evaluate cell-mediated immune responses and bacterial clearance in response to vaccination with Brucella abortus strain RB51 (RB51) in a dose-response study. The animals were randomly divided into five treatment groups. Groups I--V received the recommended dose (RD) of RB51 vaccine once, RD twice 4 weeks apart, double RD once, double RD twice 4 weeks apart and saline once, respectively. Cell-mediated immune response to RB51 was assessed by the histological examination of haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained sections of lymph nodes draining the sites of inoculation and by comparison of stimulation indices (SI) derived from gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) assay. A mixture of cytoplasmic proteins from B. melitensis B115 (brucellergene) was used as a specific antigenic stimulus to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and lymph node mononuclear cells (LNMC) up to 22 post-initial-inoculation week (PIW). Supernatants harvested at 18-24h after the in vitro antigenic stimulus were assayed for their IFN-gamma content by using a commercial sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. Clearance of RB51 was assessed by the sequential immunohistochemical examination of sections of draining lymph nodes post-inoculation. There was no observable expansion of the deep cortex of lymph nodes on H&E sections indicating poor T-cell stimulation. All group V (control) water buffalo PBMC ELISA values were negative (SIRB51 occurred between 4 and 6 PIW in treatment groups I and III and between 6 and 12 PIW in groups II and IV. RB51 was not detected in any of the control animals at sampling intervals post-inoculation.

  17. Nutritional evaluation of soybean meal after fermentation with two fish gut bacterial strains, Bacillus cereus LRF5 and Staphylococcus caprae CCF2 in for-mulated diets for Labeo rohita fingerlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhas Kumar Dan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Twelve isonitrogenous (35 % crude protein and isocaloric (18.0 kJ/g diets were formulated incorporating raw and fermented soybean meal (SBM at 15%, 30%, 45% and 60% levels by weight. Two phytase-producing bacterial strains, Bacillus cereus LRF5 and Staphylococcus caprae CCF2 isolated from the gut of adult Labeo rohita and Catla catla, respectively were used for fermentation of SBM. Fermentation of SBM was effective in reducing the anti-nutritional factors, trypsin inhibitor and phytic acid and enhancing protein, lipid and mineral concentration. The response of L. rohita, fingerlings (initial weight 3.33±0.07 g fed the experimental diets for 100 days was compared with fish fed a fish meal based diet. In terms of growth, feed conversion ratio and protein efficiency ratio, diet S7 containing 45% SBM fermented with B. cereus LRF5 resulted in a significantly (P<0.05 better performance of fish. The overall performance of L. rohita fed fermented SBM incorporated diets was better in comparison to those fed raw SBM incorporated diets. The apparent digestibility of nutrients and minerals was significantly (P<0.05 higher in fish fed diet S7. The maximum deposition of protein in the carcass was recorded in fish fed diet S7. Diets containing fermented SBM reduced fecal P levels. The use of this fermented feed will definitely increase the production in fish farm. Furthermore, it will also reduce the production cost, as fish meal protein is costly in the market.

  18. Calcium carbonate precipitation by different bacterial strains ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacteria are capable of performing metabolic activities which thereby promote precipitation of calcium carbonate in the form of calcite. In this study, it is shown that microbial mineral precipitation was a result of metabolic activities of some specific microorganisms. Concrete microorganisms were used to improve the overall ...

  19. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Archive STDs Home Page Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) Chlamydia Gonorrhea Genital Herpes Hepatitis HIV/AIDS & STDs Human Papillomavirus ( ... of getting other STDs, such as chlamydia and gonorrhea . These bacteria can sometimes cause pelvic inflammatory disease ( ...

  20. Photosynthetic Electron Transport Involved in PxcA-Dependent Proton Extrusion in Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC6803: Effect of pxcA Inactivation on CO2, HCO3−, and NO3− Uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Sonoda, Masatoshi; Katoh, Hirokazu; Vermaas, Wim; Schmetterer, George; Ogawa, Teruo

    1998-01-01

    The product of pxcA (formerly known as cotA) is involved in light-induced Na+-dependent proton extrusion. In the presence of 2,5-dimethyl-p-benzoquinone, net proton extrusion by Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 ceased after 1 min of illumination and a postillumination influx of protons was observed, suggesting that the PxcA-dependent, light-dependent proton extrusion equilibrates with a light-independent influx of protons. A photosystem I (PS I) deletion mutant extruded a large number of prot...

  1. Bacterial evolution: Resistance is a numbers game

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, J.P.J.; Harrison, E.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmids are well known for spreading antibiotic-resistance genes between bacterial strains. Recent experiments show that they can also act as catalysts for evolutionary innovation, promoting rapid evolution of novel antibiotic resistance.

  2. Phytohormone Involvement in the Ustilago maydis- Zea mays Pathosystem: Relationships between Abscisic Acid and Cytokinin Levels and Strain Virulence in Infected Cob Tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin N Morrison

    Full Text Available Ustilago maydis is the causative agent of common smut of corn. Early studies noted its ability to synthesize phytohormones and, more recently these growth promoting substances were confirmed as cytokinins (CKs. Cytokinins comprise a group of phytohormones commonly associated with actively dividing tissues. Lab analyses identified variation in virulence between U. maydis dikaryon and solopathogen infections of corn cob tissue. Samples from infected cob tissue were taken at sequential time points post infection and biochemical profiling was performed using high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI MS/MS. This hormone profiling revealed that there were altered levels of ABA and major CKs, with a marked reduction in CK glucosides, increases in methylthiol CKs and a particularly dramatic increase in cisZ CK forms, in U. maydis infected tissue. These changes were more pronounced in the more virulent dikaryon relative to the solopathogenic strain suggesting a role for cytokinins in moderating virulence during biotrophic infection. These findings highlight the fact that U. maydis does not simply mimic a fertilized seed but instead reprograms the host tissue. Results underscore the suitability of the Ustilago maydis- Zea mays model as a basis for investigating the control of phytohormone dynamics during biotrophic infection of plants.

  3. Bacterial enzymes involved in lignin degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gonzalo, Gonzalo; Colpa, Dana I; Habib, Mohamed H M; Fraaije, Marco W

    2016-01-01

    Lignin forms a large part of plant biomass. It is a highly heterogeneous polymer of 4-hydroxyphenylpropanoid units and is embedded within polysaccharide polymers forming lignocellulose. Lignin provides strength and rigidity to plants and is rather resilient towards degradation. To improve the

  4. PRETERM LABOUR - IS BACTERIAL VAGINOSIS INVOLVED?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    metronidazole, or 100 mg vitamin C orally twice daily for. 2 days. The Gram's stain was repeated after 4 weeks. If BV. W?S found again, treatment with the same drug was repeated. Outcome measures. Preterm delivery, birth weight and perinatal deaths. Results. One thousand and five patients entered the study, but. 40 were ...

  5. Bacterial Extracellular Polysaccharides Involved in Biofilm Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Elena P. Ivanova; Russell J. Crawford; Barbara Vu; Miao Chen

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) produced by microorganisms are a complex mixture of biopolymers primarily consisting of polysaccharides, as well as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids and humic substances. EPS make up the intercellular space of microbial aggregates and form the structure and architecture of the biofilm matrix. The key functions of EPS comprise the mediation of the initial attachment of cells to different substrata and protection against environmental stress and dehydrati...

  6. Ultraviolet radiation response of two heterotropy Antarctic marine bacterial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, Edgardo A.; Ferreyra, Gustavo A.; Mac Cormack, Walter P.

    2004-01-01

    Two Antarctic marine bacterial strains, were exposed to different irradiance of ultraviolet (UV) solar radiation using several experimental protocols and interferential filters. Results showed that both, UV-A and UV-B radiation produce deleterious effects on two tested bacterial strains. The mortality values under UVB treatments were higher than those observed under UVA treatments. UVvi strain proved to be more resistant to UV radiation than the UVps strain. (author) [es

  7. Enrichment and isolation of microbial strains degrading bioplastic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) degrading bacterial strains were isolated from various environmental sites rich in plastic wastes by using the enrichment culture technique. Among the various isolated strains, the selected potent PVA degrading bacterial strains were tentatively characterized as Bacillus and Pseudomonas sp.

  8. BACTERIAL DESTRUCTION OF EPSILON-CAPROLACTAM,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three bacterial strains capable of utilizing caprolactam (hexahydro azepin-2-one) as the only source of nitrogen, carbon and energy were isolated...from active silt of aerotanks used to purify waste water from Caprolactam production. They were identified as Pseudomonas dacunnae and Bacterium agile 1...and 2. The P. dacunnae strain is most active with respect to Caprolactam . Bacterial utilization of caprolactam has a marked adaptive character

  9. Identification of genetic components involved in Lotus-endophyte interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zgadzaj, Rafal Lukasz

    colonisation of below-ground plant organs. It focused on bacterial endophyte, Rhizobium KAW12, colonisation of spontaneously formed nodules in snf1 mutants and symbiotic signalling mutants in a snf1 background. Additionally, participation of genes required for rhizobial accomodation during endophytic invasion...... was tested by coinoculation experiments with Rhizobium KAW12 and nodule inducing strains or their symbiotically deficient mutants. Such approaches allowed to identify genes possibly involved in host-endophyte recognition. Additionally, bacterial mutants used in these screenings pointed towards...... testing single host-single microsymbiont interactions, an effort was made to study relationships in between plants and the soil microbiome. Comparison of results for the nfr5 mutant of Lotus with results previously obtained for Arabidopsis suggested that plants were able to build specific bacterial...

  10. Bacterial blight of cotton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aïda JALLOUL

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial blight of cotton (Gossypium ssp., caused by Xanthomonas citri pathovar malvacearum, is a severe disease occurring in all cotton-growing areas. The interactions between host plants and the bacteria are based on the gene-for-gene concept, representing a complex resistance gene/avr gene system. In light of the recent data, this review focuses on the understanding of these interactions with emphasis on (1 the genetic basis for plant resistance and bacterial virulence, (2 physiological mechanisms involved in the hypersensitive response to the pathogen, including hormonal signaling, the oxylipin pathway, synthesis of antimicrobial molecules and alteration of host cell structures, and (3 control of the disease.

  11. Comparative Investigation of the Genomic Regions Involved in Antigenic Variation of the TprK Antigen among Treponemal Species, Subspecies, and Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Stephanie L.; Puray-Chavez, Maritza; Reid, Tara Brinck; Godornes, Charmie; Molini, Barbara J.; Benzler, Martin; Hartig, Jörg S.; Lukehart, Sheila A.; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    Although the three Treponema pallidum subspecies (T. pallidum subsp. pallidum, T. pallidum subsp. pertenue, and T. pallidum subsp. endemicum), Treponema paraluiscuniculi, and the unclassified Fribourg-Blanc treponeme cause clinically distinct diseases, these pathogens are genetically and antigenically highly related and are able to cause persistent infection. Recent evidence suggests that the putative surface-exposed variable antigen TprK plays an important role in both treponemal immune evasion and persistence. tprK heterogeneity is generated by nonreciprocal gene conversion between the tprK expression site and donor sites. Although each of the above-mentioned species and subspecies has a functional tprK antigenic variation system, it is still unclear why the level of expression and the rate at which tprK diversifies during infection can differ significantly among isolates. To identify genomic differences that might affect the generation and expression of TprK variants among these pathogens, we performed comparative sequence analysis of the donor sites, as well as the tprK expression sites, among eight T. pallidum subsp. pallidum isolates (Nichols Gen, Nichols Sea, Chicago, Sea81-4, Dal-1, Street14, UW104, and UW126), three T. pallidum subsp. pertenue isolates (Gauthier, CDC2, and Samoa D), one T. pallidum subsp. endemicum isolate (Iraq B), the unclassified Fribourg-Blanc isolate, and the Cuniculi A strain of T. paraluiscuniculi. Synteny and sequence conservation, as well as deletions and insertions, were found in the regions harboring the donor sites. These data suggest that the tprK recombination system is harbored within dynamic genomic regions and that genomic differences might be an important key to explain discrepancies in generation and expression of tprK variants among these Treponema isolates. PMID:22661689

  12. Bacterial membrane proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poetsch, Ansgar; Wolters, Dirk

    2008-10-01

    About one quarter to one third of all bacterial genes encode proteins of the inner or outer bacterial membrane. These proteins perform essential physiological functions, such as the import or export of metabolites, the homeostasis of metal ions, the extrusion of toxic substances or antibiotics, and the generation or conversion of energy. The last years have witnessed completion of a plethora of whole-genome sequences of bacteria important for biotechnology or medicine, which is the foundation for proteome and other functional genome analyses. In this review, we discuss the challenges in membrane proteome analysis, starting from sample preparation and leading to MS-data analysis and quantification. The current state of available proteomics technologies as well as their advantages and disadvantages will be described with a focus on shotgun proteomics. Then, we will briefly introduce the most abundant proteins and protein families present in bacterial membranes before bacterial membrane proteomics studies of the last years will be presented. It will be shown how these works enlarged our knowledge about the physiological adaptations that take place in bacteria during fine chemical production, bioremediation, protein overexpression, and during infections. Furthermore, several examples from literature demonstrate the suitability of membrane proteomics for the identification of antigens and different pathogenic strains, as well as the elucidation of membrane protein structure and function.

  13. Current concepts in the management of bacterial skin infections in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palit Aparna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial skin infections in children vary widely clinically, starting from mild superficial folliculitis to deep necrotizing fasciitis. The causative organisms are mostly Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus, with occasional involvement of Gram-negative organisms. Treatment of even the milder forms of bacterial skin infections is of importance because of the long-term morbidity associated with them. However, because of global emergence of resistant strains of bacteria, treatment of these conditions is becoming increasingly difficult. The current antibacterial resistance patterns in organisms causing skin and soft tissue infections and the problems encountered in their management in children have been discussed.

  14. Gelation of edible blue-green algae protein isolate (Spirulina platensis Strain Pacifica): thermal transitions, rheological properties, and molecular forces involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronakis, I S

    2001-02-01

    Proteins isolated from blue-green algae Spirulina platensis strain Pacifica were characterized by visible absorption, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), viscometry, and dynamic oscillatory rheological measurements. Unique thermal unfolding, denaturation, aggregation, and gelation of the algal protein isolate are presented. DSC analysis showed that thermal transitions occur at about 67 and 109 degrees C at neutral pH. Calcium chloride stabilized the quaternary structure against denaturation and shifted the transitions at higher temperatures. Viscometric studies of Spirulina protein isolate as a function of temperature showed that the onset of the viscosity increase is closely related to the dissociation-denaturation process. Lower viscosities were observed for the protein solutions dissolved at pH 9 due to an increased protein solubility. Solutions of Spirulina protein isolate form elastic gels during heating to 90 degrees C. Subsequent cooling at ambient temperatures caused a further pronounced increase in the elastic moduli and network elasticity. Spirulina protein isolate has good gelling properties with fairly low minimum critical gelling concentrations of about 1.5 and 2.5 wt % in 0.1 M Tris buffer, pH 7, and with 0.02 M CaCl(2) in the same buffer, respectively. It is suggested that mainly the interactions of exposed hydrophobic regions generate the molecular association, initial aggregation, and gelation of the protein isolate during the thermal treatment. Hydrogen bonds reinforce the network rigidity of the protein on cooling and further stabilize the structure of Spirulina protein gels but alone are not sufficient to form a network structure. Intermolecular sulfhydryl and disulfide bonds were found to play a minor role for the network strength of Spirulina protein gels but affect the elasticity of the structures formed. Both time and temperature at isothermal heat-induced gelation within 40-80 degrees C affect substantially the network formation and

  15. Discovery of proteins involved in the interaction between prebiotics carbohydrates and probiotics & whole proteome analysis of the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis susp. lactis BB-12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilad, Ofir

    in the human gastrointestinal tract. Despite an increased scientific focus within this field, the mechanisms behind the beneficial effects exerted by pre- and probiotics are still far from fully understood. The purpose of the present industrial-PhD project was to identify proteins involved in interactions......Probiotic bacteria, which primarily belong to the genera Lactobascillus and Bifidobacterium, are live microorganisms that have been related to a variety of health-promoting effects. Prebiotics are indigestible food components that specifically stimulate the growth of probiotic organisms...... on these results and on chromatographic analysis of XOS consumption in BB-12 cultures, a model for XOS utilisation in BB-12 was established. The subsequent phase of the PhD project included extracellular proteome analysis, giving rise to the identification of 86 unique proteins. Of these proteins, 33...

  16. Interfering with bacterial gossip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm resilience poses major challenges to the development of novel antimicrobial agents. Biofilm bacteria can be considered small groups of “Special Forces” capable of infiltrating the host and destroying important components of the cellular defense system with the aim of crippling the host...... defense. Antibiotics exhibit a rather limited effect on biofilms. Furthermore, antibiotics have an ‘inherent obsolescence’ because they select for development of resistance. Bacterial infections with origin in bacterial biofilms have become a serious threat in developed countries. Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... that appropriately target bacteria in their relevant habitat with the aim of mitigating their destructive impact on patients. In this review we describe molecular mechanisms involved in “bacterial gossip” (more scientifically referred to as quorum sensing (QS) and c-di-GMP signaling), virulence, biofilm formation...

  17. Host Immune Response to Bacterial Cyclic Diguanylic Acid (c-di-GMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Immunostimulatory Molecule Against Pneumococcal Infection Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of bacterial pneumonia, meningitis, and otitis media in...biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus, including human methicillin- resistant S. aureus strains and animal clinical isolates (6,19). We have also...immunostimulation does not involve any known TLR or Nod. We propose that cyclic dinucleotides like c-di-GMP can be used clinically in humans and animals as

  18. Role of antibiosis on suppression of bacterial common blight ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paenibacillus polymyxa strain HKA-15, a soybean bacterial endophyte showed strong antagonism against bacterial common blight pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli strains M-5 and CP-1-1. In agar diffusion assay, the antibacterial metabolite from P. polymyxa HKA-15 showed a clear zone of inhibition ...

  19. Genomic characterization, phylogenetic analysis, and identification of virulence factors in Aerococcus sanguinicola and Aerococcus urinae strains isolated from infection episodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carkaci, Derya; Højholt, Katrine; Nielsen, Xiaohui Chen

    2017-01-01

    Aerococcus sanguinicola and Aerococcus urinae are emerging pathogens in clinical settings mostly being causative agents of urinary tract infections (UTIs), urogenic sepsis and more seldomly complicated infective endocarditis (IE). Limited knowledge exists concerning the pathogenicity of these two...... species. Eight clinical A. sanguinicola (isolated from 2009 to 2015) and 40 clinical A. urinae (isolated from 1984 to 2015) strains from episodes of UTIs, bacteremia, and IE were whole-genome sequenced (WGS) to analyze genomic diversity and characterization of virulence genes involved in the bacterial....... Phylogenetic analyses showed the 40 A. urinae strains formed two clusters according to two time periods: 1984–2004 strains and 2010–2015 strains. Genes that were homologs to virulence genes associated with bacterial adhesion and antiphagocytosis were identified by aligning A. sanguinicola and A. urinae pan...

  20. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial ecology is concerned with the interactions between bacteria and their biological and nonbiological environments and with the role of bacteria in biogeochemical element cycling. Many fundamental properties of bacteria are consequences of their small size. Thus, they can efficiently exploit...

  1. Bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heckenberg, Sebastiaan G. B.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a neurologic emergency. Vaccination against common pathogens has decreased the burden of disease. Early diagnosis and rapid initiation of empiric antimicrobial and adjunctive therapy are vital. Therapy should be initiated as soon as blood cultures have been obtained,

  2. Bacterial lipases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation,

  3. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    , the production and oxidation of methane, nitrate reduction and fixation of atmospheric nitrogen are exclusively carried out by different groups of bacteria. Some bacterial species – ‘extremophiles’ – thrive in extreme environments in which no eukaryotic organisms can survive with respect to temperature, salinity...

  4. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that coats the walls of the vagina Vaginal discharge with an unpleasant or fishlike odor Vaginal pain or itching Burning during urination Doctors are unsure of the incubation period for bacterial vaginosis. How Is the Diagnosis Made? Your child’s pediatrician can make the diagnosis ...

  5. Bacterial stress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Bacterial stress. Physicochemical and chemical parameters: temperature, pressure, pH, salt concentration, oxygen, irradiation. Nutritional depravation: nutrient starvation, water shortage. Toxic compounds: Antibiotics, heavy metals, toxins, mutagens. Interactions with other cells: ...

  6. Genetic signatures for Helicobacter pylori strains of West African origin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennady K Bullock

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a genetically diverse bacterial species that colonizes the stomach in about half of the human population. Most persons colonized by H. pylori remain asymptomatic, but the presence of this organism is a risk factor for gastric cancer. Multiple populations and subpopulations of H. pylori with distinct geographic distributions are recognized. Genetic differences among these populations might be a factor underlying geographic variation in gastric cancer incidence. Relatively little is known about the genomic features of African H. pylori strains compared to other populations of strains. In this study, we first analyzed the genomes of H. pylori strains from seven globally distributed populations or subpopulations and identified encoded proteins that exhibited the highest levels of sequence divergence. These included secreted proteins, an LPS glycosyltransferase, fucosyltransferases, proteins involved in molybdopterin biosynthesis, and Clp protease adaptor (ClpS. Among proteins encoded by the cag pathogenicity island, CagA and CagQ exhibited the highest levels of sequence diversity. We then identified proteins in strains of Western African origin (classified as hspWAfrica by MLST analysis with sequences that were highly divergent compared to those in other populations of strains. These included ATP-dependent Clp protease, ClpS, and proteins of unknown function. Three of the divergent proteins sequences identified in West African strains were characterized by distinct insertions or deletions up to 8 amino acids in length. These polymorphisms in rapidly evolving proteins represent robust genetic signatures for H. pylori strains of West African origin.

  7. Are grazer-induced adaptations of bacterial abundance and morphology timedependent?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca CORNO

    2006-02-01

    predators belong to two voracious species: Spumella sp. and Ochromonas sp., strictly heterotrophic and mixotrophic, respectively. For all the treatments, it was impossible to find any clear evidence of a morphological adaptation stimulated by the mere presence of flagellates. On the other hand, for all bacterial strains the enrichment of the media due to the release of exudates, resulted in higher growth rates and higher abundances, confirming that grazers are fundamental actors involved in the inner recycling of the microbial loop.

  8. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    reduce or delay bacterial biofilm formation of a range of urinary tract infectious E.coli and Klebsiella isolates. Several other proteinaceous coatings were also found to display anti-adhesive properties, possibly providing a measure for controlling the colonization of implant materials. Several other...... components. These substances may both mediate and stabilize the bacterial biofilm. Finally, several adhesive structures were examined, and a novel physiological biofilm phenotype in E.coli biofilms was characterized, namely cell chain formation. The autotransporter protein, antigen 43, was implicated...

  9. Platelet-rich plasma affects bacterial growth in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Erminia; Filardo, Giuseppe; Canella, Valentina; Berlingeri, Andrea; Bielli, Alessandra; Cattini, Luca; Landini, Maria Paola; Kon, Elizaveta; Marcacci, Maurilio; Facchini, Andrea

    2014-09-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP), a blood derivative rich in platelets, is a relatively new technique used in tissue regeneration and engineering. The increased quantity of platelets makes this formulation of considerable value for their role in tissue healing and microbicidal activity. This activity was investigated against five of the most important strains involved in nosocomial infections (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Streptococcus faecalis) to understand the prophylactic role of pure (P)-PRP. Microbicidal proteins released from activated P-PRP platelets were also determined. The microbicidal activity of P-PRP and platelet-poor plasma (PPP) was evaluated on different concentrations of the five bacterial strains incubated for 1, 2, 4 and 18 h and plated on agar for 18-24 h. P-PRP and PPP-released microbicidal proteins were evaluated by means of multiplex bead-based immunoassays. P-PRP and PPP inhibited bacterial growth for up to 2 h of incubation. The effect of P-PRP was significantly higher than that of PPP, mainly at the low seeding concentrations and/or shorter incubation times, depending on the bacterial strain. Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand-3, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand-5 and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand-1 were the molecules mostly related to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus faecalis inhibition. Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae were less influenced. The present results show that P-PRP might supply an early protection against bacterial contaminations during surgical interventions because the inhibitory activity is already evident from the first hour of treatment, which suggests that physiological molecules supplied in loco might be important in the time frame needed for the activation of the innate immune response. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Utilization of fluoranthene by Pseudomonas paucimobilis strain EPA505

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.G.; Chapman, P.J.; Blattmann, B.O.; Pritchard, P.H.

    1990-01-01

    Pseudomonas paucimobilis strain EPA505 was previously purified from a 7-membered bacterial community originally isolated from a creosote-contaminaated siol for its ability to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) components of creosote. The unique ability of this organism to utilize fluoranthene as sole source of carbon and energy for growth in pure culture was demonstrated by increase in bacterial biomass, changes in UV-absorption, decrease in aqueous fluoranthene concentration, and the production of metabolites when fluoranthene was supplied as sole carbon source in liquid culture. Compounds accumulating in fluoranthene culture medium during growth of EPA505 have been distinguished by HPLC and UV-absorption properties. Based on precedents established for bacterial degradation of similar compounds, speculative pathways aare proposed to illustrate the novel biochemistry employed by strain EPA505 in the utilization of fluoranthene. Whereas utilization of fluoranthene appears to involve previously undefined variations on established oxygenation and ring cleavage processes, these findings suggest the potential of this and other organisms for accelerating the biotransformation of other environmental pollutants currently considered recalcitrant to microbiological attack. Hence, strain EPA505 and other organisms similarly isolated for their ability to degrade fluoranthene and related compounds may prove useful to remediation efforts employing biological processes

  11. Role of antibiosis on suppression of bacterial common blight ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Magesh

    2012-07-26

    Jul 26, 2012 ... Paenibacillus polymyxa strain HKA-15, a soybean bacterial endophyte showed strong antagonism against bacterial common ... with positive chemical control in suppression of bacterial common blight disease in French bean plants. ... known to induce systemic resistance in host plant and competing out the ...

  12. Strain-specific and recessive QTLs involved in the control of partial resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis race 1.2 in a recombinant inbred line population of melon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchepied, L; Dogimont, C; Pitrat, M

    2005-06-01

    Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis (FOM) causes serious economic losses in melon (Cucumis melo L.). Two dominant resistance genes have been identified, Fom-1 and Fom-2, which provide resistance to races 0 and 2 and races 0 and 1, respectively, however FOM race 1.2 overcomes these resistance genes. A partial resistance to FOM race 1.2 that has been found in some Far East accessions is under polygenic control. A genetic map of melon was constructed to tag FOM race 1.2 resistance with DNA markers on a recombinant inbred line population derived from a cross between resistant (Isabelle) and susceptible (cv. Védrantais) lines. Artificial root inoculations on plantlets of this population using two strains, one that causes wilting (FOM 1.2w) and one that causes yellowing (FOM 1.2y), resulted in phenotypic and genotypic data that enabled the identification of nine quantitative trait loci (QTLs). These QTLs were detected on five linkage groups by composite interval mapping and explained between 41.9% and 66.4% of the total variation. Four digenic epistatic interactions involving seven loci were detected and increased the total phenotypic variation that was explained. Co-localizations between QTLs and resistance gene homologs or resistance genes, such as Fom-2 and Vat, were observed. A strain-specific QTL was detected, and some QTLs appeared to be recessive.

  13. Dielectrophoretic assay of bacterial resistance to antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johari, Juliana; Huebner, Yvonne; Hull, Judith C; Dale, Jeremy W; Hughes, Michael P

    2003-01-01

    The dielectrophoretic collection spectra of antibiotic-sensitive and antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis have been determined. These indicate that in the absence of antibiotic treatment there is a strong similarity between the dielectric properties of sensitive and resistant strains, and that there is a significant difference between the sensitive strains before and after treatment with the antibiotic streptomycin after 24 h exposure. This method offers possibilities for the assessment of bacterial resistance to antibiotics. (note)