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Sample records for bacterial secondary production

  1. Production of fungal and bacterial growth modulating secondary metabolites is widespread among mycorrhiza-associated streptomycetes

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    Schrey Silvia D

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies on mycorrhiza associated bacteria suggest that bacterial-fungal interactions play important roles during mycorrhiza formation and affect plant health. We surveyed Streptomyces Actinobacteria, known as antibiotic producers and antagonists of fungi, from Norway spruce mycorrhizas with predominantly Piloderma species as the fungal partner. Results Fifteen Streptomyces isolates exhibited substantial variation in inhibition of tested mycorrhizal and plant pathogenic fungi (Amanita muscaria, Fusarium oxysporum, Hebeloma cylindrosporum, Heterobasidion abietinum, Heterobasidion annosum, Laccaria bicolor, Piloderma croceum. The growth of the mycorrhiza-forming fungus Laccaria bicolor was stimulated by some of the streptomycetes, and Piloderma croceum was only moderately affected. Bacteria responded to the streptomycetes differently than the fungi. For instance the strain Streptomyces sp. AcM11, which inhibited most tested fungi, was less inhibitory to bacteria than other tested streptomycetes. The determined patterns of Streptomyces-microbe interactions were associated with distinct patterns of secondary metabolite production. Notably, potentially novel metabolites were produced by strains that were less antagonistic to fungi. Most of the identified metabolites were antibiotics (e.g. cycloheximide, actiphenol and siderophores (e.g. ferulic acid, desferroxiamines. Plant disease resistance was activated by a single streptomycete strain only. Conclusions Mycorrhiza associated streptomycetes appear to have an important role in inhibiting the growth of fungi and bacteria. Additionally, our study indicates that the Streptomyces strains, which are not general antagonists of fungi, may produce still un-described metabolites.

  2. Production of fungal and bacterial growth modulating secondary metabolites is widespread among mycorrhiza-associated streptomycetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies on mycorrhiza associated bacteria suggest that bacterial-fungal interactions play important roles during mycorrhiza formation and affect plant health. We surveyed Streptomyces Actinobacteria, known as antibiotic producers and antagonists of fungi, from Norway spruce mycorrhizas with predominantly Piloderma species as the fungal partner. Results Fifteen Streptomyces isolates exhibited substantial variation in inhibition of tested mycorrhizal and plant pathogenic fungi (Amanita muscaria, Fusarium oxysporum, Hebeloma cylindrosporum, Heterobasidion abietinum, Heterobasidion annosum, Laccaria bicolor, Piloderma croceum). The growth of the mycorrhiza-forming fungus Laccaria bicolor was stimulated by some of the streptomycetes, and Piloderma croceum was only moderately affected. Bacteria responded to the streptomycetes differently than the fungi. For instance the strain Streptomyces sp. AcM11, which inhibited most tested fungi, was less inhibitory to bacteria than other tested streptomycetes. The determined patterns of Streptomyces-microbe interactions were associated with distinct patterns of secondary metabolite production. Notably, potentially novel metabolites were produced by strains that were less antagonistic to fungi. Most of the identified metabolites were antibiotics (e.g. cycloheximide, actiphenol) and siderophores (e.g. ferulic acid, desferroxiamines). Plant disease resistance was activated by a single streptomycete strain only. Conclusions Mycorrhiza associated streptomycetes appear to have an important role in inhibiting the growth of fungi and bacteria. Additionally, our study indicates that the Streptomyces strains, which are not general antagonists of fungi, may produce still un-described metabolites. PMID:22852578

  3. Virus-induced secondary bacterial infection: a concise review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendaus, Mohamed A; Jomha, Fatima A; Alhammadi, Ahmed H

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory diseases are a very common source of morbidity and mortality among children. Health care providers often face a dilemma when encountering a febrile infant or child with respiratory tract infection. The reason expressed by many clinicians is the trouble to confirm whether the fever is caused by a virus or a bacterium. The aim of this review is to update the current evidence on the virus-induced bacterial infection. We present several clinical as well in vitro studies that support the correlation between virus and secondary bacterial infections. In addition, we discuss the pathophysiology and prevention modes of the virus–bacterium coexistence. A search of the PubMed and MEDLINE databases was carried out for published articles covering bacterial infections associated with respiratory viruses. This review should provide clinicians with a comprehensive idea of the range of bacterial and viral coinfections or secondary infections that could present with viral respiratory illness. PMID:26345407

  4. Bacterial cholangitis causing secondary sclerosing cholangitis: a case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.R. van Buuren (Henk); A.C.T.M. Depla (Annekatrien); P.C.J. ter Borg (Pieter)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Although bacterial cholangitis is frequently mentioned as a cause of secondary sclerosing cholangitis, it appears to be extremely rare, with only one documented case ever reported. CASE PRESENTATION: A 48-year-old woman presented with an episode of acute bil

  5. Bacterial cholangitis causing secondary sclerosing cholangitis: A case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.C.J. ter Borg (Pieter); H.R. van Buuren (Henk); A.C.T.M. Depla (Annekatrien)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Although bacterial cholangitis is frequently mentioned as a cause of secondary sclerosing cholangitis, it appears to be extremely rare, with only one documented case ever reported. Case presentation: A 48-year-old woman presented with an episode of acute biliary pancreatitis

  6. Rhinovirus Infection Induces Degradation of Antimicrobial Peptides and Secondary Bacterial Infection in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick Mallia; Joseph Footitt; Rosa Sotero; Annette Jepson; Marco Contoli; Maria-Belen Trujillo-Torralbo; Tatiana Kebadze; Julia Aniscenko; Gregory Oleszkiewicz; Katrina Gray; Message, Simon D.; Kazuhiro Ito; Peter J Barnes; Ian M Adcock; Alberto Papi

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations are associated with virus (mostly rhinovirus) and bacterial infections, but it is not known whether rhinovirus infections precipitate secondary bacterial infections.

  7. Virus-induced secondary bacterial infection: a concise review

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    Hendaus MA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mohamed A Hendaus,1 Fatima A Jomha,2 Ahmed H Alhammadi3 1Department of Pediatrics, Academic General Pediatrics Division, Weill-Cornell Medical College, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar; 2School of Pharmacy, Lebanese International University, Khiara, Lebanon; 3Department of Pediatrics, Academic General Pediatrics Division, Weill-Cornell Medical College, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar Abstract: Respiratory diseases are a very common source of morbidity and mortality among children. Health care providers often face a dilemma when encountering a febrile infant or child with respiratory tract infection. The reason expressed by many clinicians is the trouble to confirm whether the fever is caused by a virus or a bacterium. The aim of this review is to update the current evidence on the virus-induced bacterial infection. We present several clinical as well in vitro studies that support the correlation between virus and secondary bacterial infections. In addition, we discuss the pathophysiology and prevention modes of the virus–bacterium coexistence. A search of the PubMed and MEDLINE databases was carried out for published articles covering bacterial infections associated with respiratory viruses. This review should provide clinicians with a comprehensive idea of the range of bacterial and viral coinfections or secondary infections that could present with viral respiratory illness. Keywords: bacteria, infection, risk, virus

  8. Genomic Analysis of Secondary Metabolite Production by Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a diverse bacterial species known for its ubiquity in natural habitats and its production of secondary metabolites. The high degree of ecological and metabolic diversity represented in P. fluorescens is reflected in the genomic diversity displayed among strains. Certain st...

  9. Secondary production in shallow marine environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomeroy, L.R. (ed.)

    1976-01-01

    Recommendations are discussed with regard to population ecology, microbial food webs, marine ecosystems, improved instrumentation, and effects of land and sea on shallow marine systems. The control of secondary production is discussed with regard to present status of knowledge; research needs for studies on dominant secondary producers, food webs that lead to commercial species, and significant features of the trophic structure of shallow water marine communities. Secondary production at the land-water interface is discussed with regard to present status of knowledge; importance of macrophytes to secondary production; export to secondary consumers; utilization of macrophyte primary production; and correlations between secondary production and river discharge. The role of microorganisms in secondary production is also discussed. (HLW)

  10. Bacterial mutants for enhanced succinate production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baart, G.J.E.; Beauprez, J.J.R.; Foulquie, M.M.R.; Heijnen, J.J.; Maertens, J.

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for obtaining enhanced metabolite production in micro-organisms, and to mutants and/or transformants obtained with said method. More particularly, it relates to bacterial mutants and/or transformants for enhanced succinate production, especially mutants and/

  11. Secondary liquefaction in ethanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of producing ethanol by fermentation, said method comprising a secondary liquefaction step in the presence of a themostable acid alpha-amylase or, a themostable maltogenic acid alpha-amylase.......The invention relates to a method of producing ethanol by fermentation, said method comprising a secondary liquefaction step in the presence of a themostable acid alpha-amylase or, a themostable maltogenic acid alpha-amylase....

  12. Recombinant protein production in bacterial hosts.

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    Overton, Tim W

    2014-05-01

    The production of recombinant proteins is crucial for both the development of new protein drugs and the structural determination of drug targets. As such, recombinant protein production has a major role in drug development. Bacterial hosts are commonly used for the production of recombinant proteins, accounting for approximately 30% of current biopharmaceuticals on the market. In this review, I introduce fundamental concepts in recombinant protein production in bacteria, from drug development to production scales. Recombinant protein production processes can often fail, but how can this failure be minimised to rapidly deliver maximum yields of high-quality protein and so accelerate drug discovery?

  13. Bacterial production of methyl ketones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beller, Harry R.; Goh, Ee-Been

    2017-01-31

    The present invention relates to methods and compositions for increasing production of methyl ketones in a genetically modified host cell that overproduces .beta.-ketoacyl-CoAs through a re-engineered .beta.-oxidation pathway and overexpresses FadM.

  14. Chasing the Treasures of the Sea – Bacterial Marine Natural Products

    OpenAIRE

    Gulder, Tobias A.M.; Moore, Bradley S.

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial marine natural products are an important source of novel lead structures for drug discovery. The cytotoxic properties of many of these secondary metabolites are of particular interest for the development of new anti-cancer agents. Tremendous advances in marine molecular biology, genome sequencing, and bioinformatics have paved the way to fully exploit the biomedical potential of marine bacterial products. In addition, unique biosynthetic enzymes discovered from bacteria from the sea...

  15. Bacterial and iron oxide aggregates mediate secondary iron mineral formation: green rust versus magnetite.

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    Zegeye, A; Mustin, C; Jorand, F

    2010-06-01

    In the presence of methanoate as electron donor, Shewanella putrefaciens, a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobe, is able to transform lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) to secondary Fe (II-III) minerals such as carbonated green rust (GR1) and magnetite. When bacterial cells were added to a gamma-FeOOH suspension, aggregates were produced consisting of both bacteria and gamma-FeOOH particles. Recently, we showed that the production of secondary minerals (GR1 vs. magnetite) was dependent on bacterial cell density and not only on iron reduction rates. Thus, gamma-FeOOH and S. putrefaciens aggregation pattern was suggested as the main mechanism driving mineralization. In this study, lepidocrocite bioreduction experiments, in the presence of anthraquinone disulfonate, were conducted by varying the [cell]/[lepidocrocite] ratio in order to determine whether different types of aggregate are formed, which may facilitate precipitation of GR1 as opposed to magnetite. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to analyze the relative cell surface area and lepidocrocite concentration within the aggregates and captured images were characterized by statistical methods for spatial data (i.e. variograms). These results suggest that the [cell]/[lepidocrocite] ratio influenced both the aggregate structure and the nature of the secondary iron mineral formed. Subsequently, a [cell]/[lepidocrocite] ratio above 1 x 10(7) cells mmol(-1) leads to densely packed aggregates and to the formation of GR1. Below this ratio, looser aggregates are formed and magnetite was systematically produced. The data presented in this study bring us closer to a more comprehensive understanding of the parameters governing the formation of minerals in dense bacterial suspensions and suggest that screening mineral-bacteria aggregate structure is critical to understanding (bio)mineralization pathways.

  16. PRODUCTION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ECONOMICAL BACTERIAL CELLULOSE

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    Houssni El-Saied

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the economical production of bacterial cellulose (BC by Gluconacetobacter subsp. Xylinus (ATCC 10245 in 250 ml Erlenmeyer flasks cultivated under static conditions. The fermentation media used contained food industrial by-product liquors, such as black strap molasses solution and corn steep liquor (CSL, which represents some of the most economical carbon and nitrogen sources. However, because of the presence of undesirable components in molasses (such as coloring substances, heavy metals, and other compounds that may act as inhibitors, and in order to eliminate them, crude molasses has been treated with an acid, as an attempt to increase BC productivity. The amount of BC produced using these carbon and nitrogen sources was determined and compared to that produced using previously reported fermentation media. The characterizations of the bacterial cellulose (BC pellicles obtained using either conventional or by-product media were studied by thermal and spectral techniques and compared to those of plant-derived cellulose such as cotton linter, viscose pulp, and microcrystalline cellulose.

  17. A STUDY OF SECONDARY BACTERIAL INFECTIONS IN DIABETES MELLITUS

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    Tirupati Reddy Chirra

    2016-09-01

    cystitis, 9 patients had acute pyelonephritis. In Bacterial skin and mucous membrane infection, 7 otitis externa patients were there, 2 cellulitis and 4 furuncles or abscess on nose were present. In mycotic skin and mucous membrane infections, 3 were thought to have skin candida infections. There is a strong association of the infections in the diabetic mellitus patients (P<0.05. CONCLUSION Diabetes Mellitus depresses the immunity and causes a plethora of infections. This study helps the practising physicians to understand the common secondary infections and thus help them to take immediate measures to prevent further complications and arrest the natural progression of the disease.

  18. Bacterial production of the biodegradable plastics polyhydroxyalkanoates.

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    Urtuvia, Viviana; Villegas, Pamela; González, Myriam; Seeger, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Petroleum-based plastics constitute a major environmental problem due to their low biodegradability and accumulation in various environments. Therefore, searching for novel biodegradable plastics is of increasing interest. Microbial polyesters known as polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are biodegradable plastics. Life cycle assessment indicates that PHB is more beneficial than petroleum-based plastics. In this report, bacterial production of PHAs and their industrial applications are reviewed and the synthesis of PHAs in Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 is described. PHAs are synthesized by a large number of microorganisms during unbalanced nutritional conditions. These polymers are accumulated as carbon and energy reserve in discrete granules in the bacterial cytoplasm. 3-hydroxybutyrate and 3-hydroxyvalerate are two main PHA units among 150 monomers that have been reported. B. xenovorans LB400 is a model bacterium for the degradation of polychlorobiphenyls and a wide range of aromatic compounds. A bioinformatic analysis of LB400 genome indicated the presence of pha genes encoding enzymes of pathways for PHA synthesis. This study showed that B. xenovorans LB400 synthesize PHAs under nutrient limitation. Staining with Sudan Black B indicated the production of PHAs by B. xenovorans LB400 colonies. The PHAs produced were characterized by GC-MS. Diverse substrates for the production of PHAs in strain LB400 were analyzed.

  19. Engineering antibiotic production and overcoming bacterial resistance.

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    Planson, Anne-Gaëlle; Carbonell, Pablo; Grigoras, Ioana; Faulon, Jean-Loup

    2011-07-01

    Progress in DNA technology, analytical methods and computational tools is leading to new developments in synthetic biology and metabolic engineering, enabling new ways to produce molecules of industrial and therapeutic interest. Here, we review recent progress in both antibiotic production and strategies to counteract bacterial resistance to antibiotics. Advances in sequencing and cloning are increasingly enabling the characterization of antibiotic biosynthesis pathways, and new systematic methods for de novo biosynthetic pathway prediction are allowing the exploration of the metabolic chemical space beyond metabolic engineering. Moreover, we survey the computer-assisted design of modular assembly lines in polyketide synthases and non-ribosomal peptide synthases for the development of tailor-made antibiotics. Nowadays, production of novel antibiotic can be tranferred into any chosen chassis by optimizing a host factory through specific strain modifications. These advances in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology are leading to novel strategies for engineering antimicrobial agents with desired specificities.

  20. Decreased effect of glucantime in cutaneous leishmaniasis complicated with secondary bacterial infection

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    G Sadeghian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glucantime is regarded as the first-line treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL; however, failure to treatment is a problem in many cases. Aim: The aim was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of glucantime in CL complicated with secondary bacterial infection compared to uncomplicated lesions. Methods: This experimental study was performed in Skin Diseases and Leishmaniasis Research Center, Isfahan, Iran. A total of 161 patients enrolled in the study had CL confirmed by positive smear of lesions. All the patients were treated with systemic glucantime for 3 weeks and followed for 2 months. Response to treatment was defined as loss of infiltration, reepithelization, and negative smear. Depending on the results of bacterial cultures, the lesions were divided into two groups and the efficacy of glucantime was compared. Results: A total of 123 patients (76.4% were negative, and 38 patients (23.6% were positive for secondary bacterial infection. In groups with negative bacterial culture response to treatment was 65% (80 patients and in the other positive group, it was 31.6% (12 patients, with a difference (χ2 = 13.77, P < 0.01. Conclusion: Therapeutic effect of glucantime showed a decrease in CL lesions with secondary bacterial infection. Therefore, in the cases of unresponsiveness to treatment, the lesions should be evaluated for bacterial infection, before repeating the treatment.

  1. Hypovitaminosis A coupled to secondary bacterial infection in beef cattle

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    He Xiuyuan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vitamin A is essential for normal growth, development, reproduction, cell proliferation, cell differentiation, immune function and vision. Hypovitaminosis A can lead to a series of pathological damage in animals. This report describes the case of hypovitaminosis A associated with secondary complications in calves. Case presentation From February to March in 2011, 2-and 3-month old beef calves presented with decreased eyesight, apparent blindness and persistent diarrhea occurred in a cattle farm of Hubei province, China. Based on history inspection and clinical observation, we made a tentative diagnosis of hypovitaminosis A. The disease was confirmed as a congenital vitamin A deficiency by determination of the concentrations of vitamin A in serum and feed samples. Furthermore, pathological and microbiological examination showed that the disease was associated with pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli infection and mucosal barriers damage in intestines. The corresponding treatments were taken immediately, and the disease was finally under control for a month. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report of hypovitaminosis A coupled to secondary infection of E. coli in beef cattle, advancing our knowledge of how vitamin A affects infection and immunity in animals. This study could also be contributed to scientific diagnosis and treatments of complex hypovitaminosis A in cattle.

  2. Influenza infection suppresses NADPH oxidase-dependent phagocytic bacterial clearance and enhances susceptibility to secondary MRSA infection

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    Sun, Keer; Metzger, Dennis W.

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a leading contributor to mortality during recent influenza pandemics. The mechanism for this influenza-induced susceptibility to secondary S. aureus infection is poorly understood. Here we show that innate antibacterial immunity was significantly suppressed during the recovery stage of influenza infection, despite the fact that MRSA super-infection had no significant effect on viral burdens. Compared to mice infected with bacteria alone, post-influenza MRSA infected mice exhibited impaired bacterial clearance, which was not due to defective phagocyte recruitment, but rather coincided with reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in alveolar macrophages and neutrophils. NADPH oxidase is responsible for ROS production during phagocytic bacterial killing, a process also known as oxidative burst. We found that gp91phox-containing NADPH oxidase activity in macrophages and neutrophils was essential for optimal bacterial clearance during respiratory MRSA infections. In contrast to WT animals, gp91phox−/− mice exhibited similar defects in MRSA clearance before and after influenza infection. Using gp91phox+/− mosaic mice, we further demonstrate that influenza infection inhibits a cell-intrinsic contribution of NADPH oxidase to phagocyte bactericidal activity. Together, our results establish that influenza infection suppresses NADPH oxidase-dependent bacterial clearance and leads to susceptibility to secondary MRSA infection. PMID:24563256

  3. Estimation of bacterial hydrogen sulfide production in vitro

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    Amina Basic

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Oral bacterial hydrogen sulfide (H2S production was estimated comparing two different colorimetric methods in microtiter plate format. High H2S production was seen for Fusobacterium spp., Treponema denticola, and Prevotella tannerae, associated with periodontal disease. The production differed between the methods indicating that H2S production may follow different pathways.

  4. Isolation of bacteria causing secondary bacterial infection in the lesions of cutaneous leishmaniasis

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    Ziaie Hengameh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL is a parasitic disease characterized by single or multiple ulcerations. Secondary bacterial infection is one of the complications of the disease that can increase the tissue destruction and the resulting scar. Objective: To effectively determine the incidence of real secondary bacteria infection in cutaneous leishmaniasis, we designed the current study. Methods and Materials: This was a cross-sectional study performed in Skin Diseases and Leishmaniasis Research Centre, Isfahan, Iran. In this study, 854 patients with confirmed CL were enrolled. Samples were taken from all the patients. Sterile swaps were achieved for the ulcer exudates and scraping was used for nonulcerated lesions. All the samples were transferred to tryptic soy broth medium. After 24 h of incubation in 37°C, they were transferred to eosin methylene blue agar (EBM and blood agar. Laboratory tests were used to determine the species of bacteria. All of the collected data were analyzed by SPSS software and chi-square. Results: Among 854 patients with confirmed cutaneous leishmaniasis, 177 patients (20.7% had positive cultures for secondary bacterial infection. Bacteria isolated from the lesions were as follows: Staphylococcus aureus - 123 cases (69.4%, coagulase negative Staphylococcus - 41 cases (23.1%, E. coil - 7 cases (3.9%, Proteus - 3 cases (1.7% and Klebsiella - 3 cases (1.7%. Conclusions: The incidence of secondary bacterial infection in lesions of CL was 20.7%. The most common isolated pathogen was Staphylococcus aureus . The incidence of secondary bacterial infection was significantly more in the ulcerated lesions as compared with nonulcerated lesions ( P = 0.00001.

  5. Investigating the adaptive immune response in influenza and secondary bacterial pneumonia and nanoparticle based therapeutic delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, Krishnan V.

    In early 2000, influenza and its associated complications were the 7 th leading cause of death in the United States[1-4]. As of today, this major health problem has become even more of a concern, with the possibility of a potentially devastating avian flu (H5N1) or swine flu pandemic (H1N1). According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), over 10 countries have reported transmission of influenza A (H5N1) virus to humans as of June 2006 [5]. In response to this growing concern, the United States pledged over $334 million dollars in international aid for battling influenza[1-4]. The major flu pandemic of the early 1900's provided the first evidence that secondary bacterial pneumonia (not primary viral pneumonia) was the major cause of death in both community and hospital-based settings. Secondary bacterial infections currently account for 35-40% mortality following a primary influenza viral infection [1, 6]. The first component of this work addresses the immunological mechanisms that predispose patients to secondary bacterial infections following a primary influenza viral infection. By assessing host immune responses through various immune-modulatory tools, such as use of volatile anesthetics (i.e. halothane) and Apilimod/STA-5326 (an IL-12/Il-23 transcription blocker), we provide experimental evidence that demonstrates that the overactive adaptive Th1 immune response is critical in mediating increased susceptibility to secondary bacterial infections. We also present data that shows that suppressing the adaptive Th1 immune response enhances innate immunity, specifically in alveolar macrophages, by favoring a pro anti-bacterial phenotype. The second component of this work addresses the use of nanotechnology to deliver therapeutic modalities that affect the primary viral and associated secondary bacterial infections post influenza. First, we used surface functionalized quantum dots for selective targeting of lung alveolar macrophages both in vitro and in vivo

  6. Bacterial profile of dairy products sold in Chandigarh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishnavi, C; Singh, S; Singh, K

    2002-01-01

    Gastrointestinal infections are known to occur due to bacterial contamination of dairy products. A total of 141 dairy products viz. kulfi, ice cream and softy samples were investigated bacteriologically. Staphylococcus was the predominant organism isolated followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli and Campylobacter. Two of the samples also yielded Yersinia. The total bacterial counts obtained ranged from 2 x 10(1) to 5.2 x 10(11) colony forming units per ml (CFU/ml) for kulfi, 4 x 10(1) to 9 x 10(9) CFU/ml for ice cream and 2 x 10(1) to 2 x 10(10) CFU/ml for softy samples. The high degree of bacterial contamination seen indicates poor hygienic conditions and faults in manufacturing/handling of dairy products during and after processing and production.

  7. Bacterial spoilage of meat and cured meat products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borch, E.; Kant-Muermans, M.L.T.; Blixt, Y.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of environmental factors (product composition and storage conditions) on the selection, growth rate and metabolic activity of the bacterial flora is presented for meat (pork and beef) and cooked, cured meat products. The predominant bacteria associated with spoilage of refrigerated bee

  8. Secondary Structure across the Bacterial Transcriptome Reveals Versatile Roles in mRNA Regulation and Function.

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    Cristian Del Campo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Messenger RNA acts as an informational molecule between DNA and translating ribosomes. Emerging evidence places mRNA in central cellular processes beyond its major function as informational entity. Although individual examples show that specific structural features of mRNA regulate translation and transcript stability, their role and function throughout the bacterial transcriptome remains unknown. Combining three sequencing approaches to provide a high resolution view of global mRNA secondary structure, translation efficiency and mRNA abundance, we unraveled structural features in E. coli mRNA with implications in translation and mRNA degradation. A poorly structured site upstream of the coding sequence serves as an additional unspecific binding site of the ribosomes and the degree of its secondary structure propensity negatively correlates with gene expression. Secondary structures within coding sequences are highly dynamic and influence translation only within a very small subset of positions. A secondary structure upstream of the stop codon is enriched in genes terminated by UAA codon with likely implications in translation termination. The global analysis further substantiates a common recognition signature of RNase E to initiate endonucleolytic cleavage. This work determines for the first time the E. coli RNA structurome, highlighting the contribution of mRNA secondary structure as a direct effector of a variety of processes, including translation and mRNA degradation.

  9. Secondary Structure across the Bacterial Transcriptome Reveals Versatile Roles in mRNA Regulation and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Campo, Cristian; Bartholomäus, Alexander; Fedyunin, Ivan; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-10-01

    Messenger RNA acts as an informational molecule between DNA and translating ribosomes. Emerging evidence places mRNA in central cellular processes beyond its major function as informational entity. Although individual examples show that specific structural features of mRNA regulate translation and transcript stability, their role and function throughout the bacterial transcriptome remains unknown. Combining three sequencing approaches to provide a high resolution view of global mRNA secondary structure, translation efficiency and mRNA abundance, we unraveled structural features in E. coli mRNA with implications in translation and mRNA degradation. A poorly structured site upstream of the coding sequence serves as an additional unspecific binding site of the ribosomes and the degree of its secondary structure propensity negatively correlates with gene expression. Secondary structures within coding sequences are highly dynamic and influence translation only within a very small subset of positions. A secondary structure upstream of the stop codon is enriched in genes terminated by UAA codon with likely implications in translation termination. The global analysis further substantiates a common recognition signature of RNase E to initiate endonucleolytic cleavage. This work determines for the first time the E. coli RNA structurome, highlighting the contribution of mRNA secondary structure as a direct effector of a variety of processes, including translation and mRNA degradation.

  10. Inhibition of secondary caries in a bacterial based in vitro caries model

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Franziska

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the preventive effect of fluoride precipitation with calcium hydroxide on secondary caries in a bacterial based in vitro caries model. Caries-free, retained wisdom teeth were randomly divided into four groups (n=30). The enamel was cut off and cylindrical cavities 3 mm in diameter and 1,5 mm in depth were prepared on each dentine surface. The cavities of Group A and B were restored with composite (Z100) only. A fluoride solution (43,500 ppm Fˉ as magne...

  11. Production of extremophilic bacterial cellulase enzymes in aspergillus niger.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladden, John Michael

    2013-09-01

    Enzymes can be used to catalyze a myriad of chemical reactions and are a cornerstone in the biotechnology industry. Enzymes have a wide range of uses, ranging from medicine with the production of pharmaceuticals to energy were they are applied to biofuel production. However, it is difficult to produce large quantities of enzymes, especially if they are non-native to the production host. Fortunately, filamentous fungi, such as Aspergillus niger, are broadly used in industry and show great potential for use a heterologous enzyme production hosts. Here, we present work outlining an effort to engineer A. niger to produce thermophilic bacterial cellulases relevant to lignocellulosic biofuel production.

  12. Marketing Secondary Information Products and Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Donald W.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the components of marketing (i.e., consumer markets, product development, sales, advertising and promotion, packaging, distribution, pricing, and market research), how information products and services relate to those components, and the pricing of products from a bibliographic database. Two figures and a 17-item reference list are…

  13. SECONDARY BACTERIAL INFECTION IN ADULT PATIENTS WITH PROLONGED AND SEVERE DENGUE FEVER

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    Anil Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Generally, in dengue shock syndrome antibiotics are not advised. But unrecognised bacterial infection is likely to contribute to morbidity and mortality, probably because of increased vascular permeability. OBJECTIVES To assess the incidence of secondary bacterial infection in adult patients with prolonged and severe dengue fever. METHODS A prospective study was conducted recruiting patients with confirmed acute dengue infection who had prolonged fever (>5 days. Prior to institution of antibiotic therapy, two sets of blood cultures were taken from patients. Demographic, clinical, haematological and biochemical parameters were recorded. Severity of fever & associated symptoms assessed. Ultrasonography done to find out development of ascites and pleural effusions. RESULTS Sixty patients (60.0% males with a mean age of 33.5 years (SD 12.1 were studied. The average duration of fever was 6.9 days (SD 1.6. Fifteen patients (25% had bacterial isolates in their blood cultures; Staphylococcus aureus (n=3, coliforms (n=7, pseudomonas (n=2 and 3 had mixed growths. The culture positive group had severe body aches and joints paint at admission and high grade fever, third space fluid accumulation and significant drop in platelets compared to culture-negative group. CONCLUSIONS A quarter of dengue patients with prolonged fever had a bacterial isolate. Culture-positive patients appeared more ill with body aches and had higher degrees of fever during the course of the illness. Increased vascular permeability may predispose to bacterial seepage into blood. Although white cell count is not helpful in detecting bacteraemia in dengue fever, low platelet count and severe symptoms at presentation may be helpful.

  14. Bacterial chromate reduction and product characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehlhorn, R.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Buchanan, B.B.; Leighton, T. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-11-01

    Bacillus subtilis reduced hexavalent chromate to trivalent chromium under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions. Reduction of CR(VI) and appearance of extracellular Cr(III) were demonstrated by electron spin resonance and spectrophotometry. Chromate reduction was stimulated more than five-fold by freeze-thawing, indicating that intracellular reductases or chemical reductants reduce chromate more rapidly than do intact cells. Moderately concentrated cells (10% pellet volume after centrifugation) reduced approximately 40 {mu}M chromate/min (2 mg Cr/1-min) when exposed to 100 {mu}M chromate (5 mg Cr/1). Highly concentrated cells (70% pellet volume) reduced more than 99.8% of 2 mM chromate (100 mg Cr/1) within 15 min. This rate of chromate reduction was of the same order of magnitude as the rate of respiration in aerobic cells. A substantial fraction of the reduction product (ca. 75%) was extracellular Cr(M), which could readily be separated from the cells by centrifugation. At high chromate concentrations, some fraction of reduced CR(VI) appeared to be taken up by cells, consistent with a detection of intracellular paramagnetic products. At low chromate concentrations, undefined growth medium alone reduced Cr(VI), but at a slow rate, relative to cells. Under appropriate conditions, B. subtilis appears to be an organism of choice for detoxifying chromate-contaminated soil and water.

  15. Bioassays for evaluation of medical products derived from bacterial toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesardic, Thea

    2012-06-01

    Bioassays play central role in evaluation of biological products and those derived from bacterial toxins often rely exclusively on in vivo models for assurance of safety and potency. This chapter reviews existing regulatory approved methods designed to provide information on potency and safety of complex biological medicines with an insight into strategies considered for alternative procedures.

  16. Influence of natural substrates and co-occurring marine bacteria on the production of secondary metabolites by Photobacterium halotolerans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Månsson, Maria; Giobergia, Sonia; Møller, Kirsten A.

    Genome sequences reveal that our current standard laboratory conditions only support a fraction of the potential secondary metabolism in bacteria. Thus, we must rethink cultivation, detection, and isolation strategies for bacterial secondary metabolites in order to explore the huge, so far unchar...... uncharacterized chemical potential of these organisms. We are currently investigating the use of natural substrates and co-cultures with commensal bacteria to elicit or alter production of antibacterial compounds in marine bacteria....

  17. Enteric bacterial catalysts for fuel ethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingram, L.O.; Aldrich, H.C.; Borges, A.C.C. [and others

    1999-10-01

    The technology is available to produce fuel ethanol from renewable lignocellulosic biomass. The current challenge is to assemble the various process options into a commercial venture and begin the task of incremental improvement. Current process designs for lignocellulose are far more complex than grain to ethanol processes. This complexity results in part from the complexity of the substrate and the biological limitations of the catalyst. Their work at the University of Florida has focused primarily on the genetic engineering of Enteric bacteria using genes encoding Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase. These two genes have been assembled into a portable ethanol production cassette, the PET operon, and integrated into the chromosome of Escherichia coli B for use with hemicellulose-derived syrups. The resulting strain, KO11, produces ethanol efficiently from all hexose and pentose sugars present in the polymers of hemicellulose. By using the same approach, the authors integrated the PET operon into the chromosome of Klebsiella oxytoca to produce strain P2 for use in the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process for cellulose. Strain P2 has the native ability to ferment cellobiose and cellotriose, eliminating the need for one class of cellulase enzymes.

  18. Plant secondary metabolite-induced shifts in bacterial community structure and degradative ability in contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlik, Ondrej; Musilova, Lucie; Ridl, Jakub; Hroudova, Miluse; Vlcek, Cestmir; Koubek, Jiri; Holeckova, Marcela; Mackova, Martina; Macek, Tomas

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate how selected natural compounds (naringin, caffeic acid, and limonene) induce shifts in both bacterial community structure and degradative activity in long-term polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated soil and how these changes correlate with changes in chlorobiphenyl degradation capacity. In order to address this issue, we have integrated analytical methods of determining PCB degradation with pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene tag-encoded amplicons and DNA-stable isotope probing (SIP). Our model system was set in laboratory microcosms with PCB-contaminated soil, which was enriched for 8 weeks with the suspensions of flavonoid naringin, terpene limonene, and phenolic caffeic acid. Our results show that application of selected plant secondary metabolites resulted in bacterial community structure far different from the control one (no natural compound amendment). The community in soil treated with caffeic acid is almost solely represented by Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia (together over 99 %). Treatment with naringin resulted in an enrichment of Firmicutes to the exclusion of Acidobacteria and Verrucomicrobia. SIP was applied in order to identify populations actively participating in 4-chlorobiphenyl catabolism. We observed that naringin and limonene in soil foster mainly populations of Hydrogenophaga spp., caffeic acid Burkholderia spp. and Pseudoxanthomonas spp. None of these populations were detected among 4-chlorobiphenyl utilizers in non-amended soil. Similarly, the degradation of individual PCB congeners was influenced by the addition of different plant compounds. Residual content of PCBs was lowest after treating the soil with naringin. Addition of caffeic acid resulted in comparable decrease of total PCBs with non-amended soil; however, higher substituted congeners were more degraded after caffeic acid treatment compared to all other treatments. Finally, it appears that plant secondary metabolites

  19. Effects of bacterial inoculants on the indigenous microbiome and secondary metabolites of chamomile plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth eSchmidt

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant-associated bacteria fulfil important functions for plant growth and health of their host. However, our knowledge about the impact of bacterial treatments on the host’s microbiome and physiology is limited. The present study was conducted to assess the impact of bacterial inoculants on the microbiome of chamomile plants Chamomilla recutita (L. Rauschert grown in a field under organic management in Egypt. Chamomile seedlings were inoculated with three indigenous Gram-positive strains (Streptomyces subrutilus Wbn2-11, Bacillus subtilis Co1-6, Paenibacillus polymyxa Mc5Re-14 from Egypt and three European Gram-negative strains (Pseudomonas fluorescens L13-6-12, Stenotrophomonas rhizophila P69, Serratia plymuthica 3Re4-18 already known for their beneficial plant-microbe interaction. Molecular fingerprints of 16S rRNA gene as well as real-time PCR analyses did not show statistically significant differences for all applied bacterial antagonists compared to the control. In contrast, a pyrosequencing analysis of the 16S rRNA gene libraries revealed significant differences in the community structure of bacteria between the treatments. These differences could be clearly shown by a shift within the community structure and corresponding beta-diversity indices. Moreover, B. subtilis Co1-6 and P. polymyxa Mc5Re-14 showed an enhancement of the bioactive secondary metabolite apigenin-7-O-glucoside. This indicates a possible new function of bacterial inoculants: to interact with the plant microbiome as well as with the plant metabolome.

  20. BILATERAL ENDOGENOUS BACTERIAL ENDOPHTHALMITIS SECONDARY TO PNEUMONIA IN AN AIDS PATIENT : A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Ku.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTI ON: Endogenous or metastatic endophthalmitis is a very rare sever form of ocular disease which is uncommon now - a - days. Prevalence of endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis is 2 - 8% of all cases of endophthalmitis 1 . Mostly it is associated with chronic disease like diabetes mellitus, renal failure, liver abscesses, prolong placement of catheter, IV line or central venous line, drug abusers and immunocompromise d patients. Gram +bacteria are the most common causative organism of the endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis . 1 A few cases of endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis due to klebsiella pneumonias, a gram - ve organism have been documented and majority of them were in Taiwan . 2, 3,4,5,6, 7 K. pneumonia endophthalmitis is associated with diabetes mellitus and hepatic abscesses can be bilateral and resulted into poor visual outcome . 2,3,4,5,6, 7 K. pneumonia pneumonia has been reported most frequently from patients with alcoholic liver diseases and one of the common cause of acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis . 8,9 In this scenario we report the case of a Malawian in African Continent who developed bilateral endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis after suffering from pneumonia in immunocompromise state. PURPOSE : to report a case bilateral endogenous endophthalmitis secondary to pneumonia in an AIDS patient . DESIGN : Observational case report . METHODS : A patient with bilateral pain full red eye with diminution of vision was seen in c onsultation by ophthalmology. RESULT : with clinical characteristic and laboratory diagnosis of sputum and blood conf i rmed the causative agent for pneumonia and endophthalmitis is K.pneumonia. CONCLUSION : it is unusual disease, required early detection and prompt treatment.

  1. Perinatal Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS Enhances Susceptibility to Viral and Secondary Bacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyn A. Claude

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies suggest childhood exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS leads to increased incidence of infections of the lower respiratory tract. The objective of this study was to determine whether perinatal exposure to ETS increases the incidence, morbidity and severity of respiratory influenza infection and whether a secondary bacterial challenge at the peak of a pre-existing viral infection creates an enhanced host-pathogen susceptibility to an opportunistic infection. Timed-pregnant female Balb/c mice were exposed to either ETS for 6 h/day, 7 d/week beginning on gestation day 14 and continuing with the neonates to 6 weeks of age. Control animals were exposed to filtered air (FA. At the end of exposure, mice were intranasally inoculated with a murine-adapted influenza A. One week later, an intranasal inoculation of S. aureus bacteria was administered. The respective treatment groups were: bacteria only, virus only or virus+bacteria for both FA and ETS-exposed animals for a total of six treatment groups. Animal behavior and body weights were documented daily following infection. Mice were necropsied 1-day post-bacterial infection. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF cell analysis demonstrated perinatal exposure to ETS, compared to FA, leads to delayed but enhanced clinical symptoms and enhanced total cell influx into the lungs associated with viral infection followed by bacterial challenge. Viral infection significantly increases the number of neutrophils entering the lungs following bacterial challenge with either FA or ETS exposure, while the influx of lymphocytes and monocytes is significantly enhanced only by perinatal ETS exposure. There is a significant increase in peribronchiolar inflammation following viral infection in pups exposed to ETS compared with pups exposed to FA, but no change is noted in the degree of lung injury between FA and ETS-exposed animals following bacterial challenge. The data suggests perinatal exposure to ETS

  2. Factors limiting heterotrophic bacterial production in the southern Pacific Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Van Wambeke

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The role of potential factors limiting bacterial growth was investigated along vertical and longitudinal gradients across the South Eastern Pacific Gyre. The effects of glucose, nitrate, ammonium and phosphate additions on heterotrophic bacterial production (using leucine technique were studied in parallel in unfiltered seawater samples incubated under natural daily irradiance. Longitudinally, the enrichments realized on the subsurface showed three types of responses. From the Marquesas plateau (8° W to approx 125° W, bacteria were not bottom-up controlled, as confirmed by the huge potential of growth in non-enriched seawater (43±24 times in 24 h. Within the Gyre (125° W–95° W, nitrogen alone stimulated leucine incorporation rates by a factor of 5.6±3.6, but rapidly labile carbon (glucose became a second limiting factor (enhancement factor 49±32 when the two elements were added. Finally from the border of the gyre to the Chilean upwelling (95° W–73° W, labile carbon was the only factor stimulating heterotrophic bacterial production. Interaction between phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacterial communities and the direct versus indirect effect of iron and macronutrients on bacterial production were also investigated in four selected sites: two sites on the vicinity of the Marquesas plateau, the centre of the gyre and the Eastern border of the gyre. Both phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria were limited by availability of nitrogen within the gyre, but not by iron. While iron limited phytoplankton at Marquesas plateau and at the eastern border of the gyre, heterotrophic bacteria were only limited by availability of labile DOC in those environments.

  3. Metabolic engineering of Arabidopsis for butanetriol production using bacterial genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Ghany, Salah E; Day, Irene; Heuberger, Adam L; Broeckling, Corey D; Reddy, Anireddy S N

    2013-11-01

    1,2,4-butanetriol (butanetriol) is a useful precursor for the synthesis of the energetic material butanetriol trinitrate and several pharmaceutical compounds. Bacterial synthesis of butanetriol from xylose or arabinose takes place in a pathway that requires four enzymes. To produce butanetriol in plants by expressing bacterial enzymes, we cloned native bacterial or codon optimized synthetic genes under different promoters into a binary vector and stably transformed Arabidopsis plants. Transgenic lines expressing introduced genes were analyzed for the production of butanetriol using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Soil-grown transgenic plants expressing these genes produced up to 20 µg/g of butanetriol. To test if an exogenous supply of pentose sugar precursors would enhance the butanetriol level, transgenic plants were grown in a medium supplemented with either xylose or arabinose and the amount of butanetriol was quantified. Plants expressing synthetic genes in the arabinose pathway showed up to a forty-fold increase in butanetriol levels after arabinose was added to the medium. Transgenic plants expressing either bacterial or synthetic xylose pathways, or the arabinose pathway showed toxicity symptoms when xylose or arabinose was added to the medium, suggesting that a by-product in the pathway or butanetriol affected plant growth. Furthermore, the metabolite profile of plants expressing arabinose and xylose pathways was altered. Our results demonstrate that bacterial pathways that produce butanetriol can be engineered into plants to produce this chemical. This proof-of-concept study for phytoproduction of butanetriol paves the way to further manipulate metabolic pathways in plants to enhance the level of butanetriol production.

  4. Teacher Qualifications and Productivity in Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuls, James V.; Trivitt, Julie R.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between observable teacher characteristics and productivity as measured by an increase in student achievement on a standardized test using a value-added approach. This analysis focused on teachers of algebra, geometry, and 11th grade English Language Arts in Arkansas. The authors generated a value-added score…

  5. Thiosulfate as a metabolic product: the bacterial fermentation of taurine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denger, K; Laue, H; Cook, A M

    1997-10-01

    Thiosulfate (S2O32-) is a natural product that is widely utilized in natural ecosystems as an electron sink or as an electron donor. However, the major biological source(s) of this thiosulfate is unknown. We present the first report that taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonate), the major mammalian solute, is subject to fermentation. This bacterial fermentation was found to be catalyzed by a new isolate, strain GKNTAU, a strictly anaerobic, gram-positive, motile rod that formed subterminal spores. Thiosulfate was a quantitative fermentation product. The other fermentation products were ammonia and acetate, and all could be formed by cell-free extracts.

  6. Bacterial Cellulose Production from Industrial Waste and by-Product Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsouko, Erminda; Kourmentza, Constantina; Ladakis, Dimitrios; Kopsahelis, Nikolaos; Mandala, Ioanna; Papanikolaou, Seraphim; Paloukis, Fotis; Alves, Vitor; Koutinas, Apostolis

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of fermentation media derived from waste and by-product streams from biodiesel and confectionery industries could lead to highly efficient production of bacterial cellulose. Batch fermentations with the bacterial strain Komagataeibacter sucrofermentans DSM (Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen) 15973 were initially carried out in synthetic media using commercial sugars and crude glycerol. The highest bacterial cellulose concentration was achieved when crude glycerol (3.2 g/L) and commercial sucrose (4.9 g/L) were used. The combination of crude glycerol and sunflower meal hydrolysates as the sole fermentation media resulted in bacterial cellulose production of 13.3 g/L. Similar results (13 g/L) were obtained when flour-rich hydrolysates produced from confectionery industry waste streams were used. The properties of bacterial celluloses developed when different fermentation media were used showed water holding capacities of 102–138 g·water/g·dry bacterial cellulose, viscosities of 4.7–9.3 dL/g, degree of polymerization of 1889.1–2672.8, stress at break of 72.3–139.5 MPa and Young’s modulus of 0.97–1.64 GPa. This study demonstrated that by-product streams from the biodiesel industry and waste streams from confectionery industries could be used as the sole sources of nutrients for the production of bacterial cellulose with similar properties as those produced with commercial sources of nutrients. PMID:26140376

  7. Bacterial Cellulose Production from Industrial Waste and by-Product Streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsouko, Erminda; Kourmentza, Constantina; Ladakis, Dimitrios; Kopsahelis, Nikolaos; Mandala, Ioanna; Papanikolaou, Seraphim; Paloukis, Fotis; Alves, Vitor; Koutinas, Apostolis

    2015-07-01

    The utilization of fermentation media derived from waste and by-product streams from biodiesel and confectionery industries could lead to highly efficient production of bacterial cellulose. Batch fermentations with the bacterial strain Komagataeibacter sucrofermentans DSM (Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen) 15973 were initially carried out in synthetic media using commercial sugars and crude glycerol. The highest bacterial cellulose concentration was achieved when crude glycerol (3.2 g/L) and commercial sucrose (4.9 g/L) were used. The combination of crude glycerol and sunflower meal hydrolysates as the sole fermentation media resulted in bacterial cellulose production of 13.3 g/L. Similar results (13 g/L) were obtained when flour-rich hydrolysates produced from confectionery industry waste streams were used. The properties of bacterial celluloses developed when different fermentation media were used showed water holding capacities of 102-138 g · water/g · dry bacterial cellulose, viscosities of 4.7-9.3 dL/g, degree of polymerization of 1889.1-2672.8, stress at break of 72.3-139.5 MPa and Young's modulus of 0.97-1.64 GPa. This study demonstrated that by-product streams from the biodiesel industry and waste streams from confectionery industries could be used as the sole sources of nutrients for the production of bacterial cellulose with similar properties as those produced with commercial sources of nutrients.

  8. Bacterial Cellulose Production from Industrial Waste and by-Product Streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erminda Tsouko

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of fermentation media derived from waste and by-product streams from biodiesel and confectionery industries could lead to highly efficient production of bacterial cellulose. Batch fermentations with the bacterial strain Komagataeibacter sucrofermentans DSM (Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen 15973 were initially carried out in synthetic media using commercial sugars and crude glycerol. The highest bacterial cellulose concentration was achieved when crude glycerol (3.2 g/L and commercial sucrose (4.9 g/L were used. The combination of crude glycerol and sunflower meal hydrolysates as the sole fermentation media resulted in bacterial cellulose production of 13.3 g/L. Similar results (13 g/L were obtained when flour-rich hydrolysates produced from confectionery industry waste streams were used. The properties of bacterial celluloses developed when different fermentation media were used showed water holding capacities of 102–138 g·water/g·dry bacterial cellulose, viscosities of 4.7–9.3 dL/g, degree of polymerization of 1889.1–2672.8, stress at break of 72.3–139.5 MPa and Young’s modulus of 0.97–1.64 GPa. This study demonstrated that by-product streams from the biodiesel industry and waste streams from confectionery industries could be used as the sole sources of nutrients for the production of bacterial cellulose with similar properties as those produced with commercial sources of nutrients.

  9. Using Hairy Roots for Production of Valuable Plant Secondary Metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Li

    2015-01-01

    Plants synthesize a wide variety of natural products, which are traditionally termed secondary metabolites and, more recently, coined specialized metabolites. While these chemical compounds are employed by plants for interactions with their environment, humans have long since explored and exploited plant secondary metabolites for medicinal and practical uses. Due to the tissue-specific and low-abundance accumulation of these metabolites, alternative means of production in systems other than intact plants are sought after. To this end, hairy root culture presents an excellent platform for producing valuable secondary metabolites. This chapter will focus on several major groups of secondary metabolites that are manufactured by hairy roots established from different plant species. Additionally, the methods for preservations of hairy roots will also be reviewed.

  10. Monascus secondary metabolites: production and biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patakova, Petra

    2013-02-01

    The genus Monascus, comprising nine species, can reproduce either vegetatively with filaments and conidia or sexually by the formation of ascospores. The most well-known species of genus Monascus, namely, M. purpureus, M. ruber and M. pilosus, are often used for rice fermentation to produce red yeast rice, a special product used either for food coloring or as a food supplement with positive effects on human health. The colored appearance (red, orange or yellow) of Monascus-fermented substrates is produced by a mixture of oligoketide pigments that are synthesized by a combination of polyketide and fatty acid synthases. The major pigments consist of pairs of yellow (ankaflavin and monascin), orange (rubropunctatin and monascorubrin) and red (rubropunctamine and monascorubramine) compounds; however, more than 20 other colored products have recently been isolated from fermented rice or culture media. In addition to pigments, a group of monacolin substances and the mycotoxin citrinin can be produced by Monascus. Various non-specific biological activities (antimicrobial, antitumor, immunomodulative and others) of these pigmented compounds are, at least partly, ascribed to their reaction with amino group-containing compounds, i.e. amino acids, proteins or nucleic acids. Monacolins, in the form of β-hydroxy acids, inhibit hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis in animals and humans.

  11. Secondary production of massive quarks in thrust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang, André H. [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Erwin Schrödinger International Institute for Mathematical Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 9, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Mateu, Vicent [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Pietrulewicz, Piotr [Theory Group, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-01-22

    We present a factorization framework that takes into account the production of heavy quarks through gluon splitting in the thrust distribution for e{sup +}e{sup −} → hadrons. The explicit factorization theorems and some numerical results are displayed in the dijet region where the kinematic scales are widely separated, which can be extended systematically to the whole spectrum. We account for the necessary two-loop matrix elements, threshold corrections, and include resummation up to N{sup 3}LL order. We include nonperturbative power corrections through a field theoretical shape function, and remove the O(Λ{sub QCD}) renormalon in the partonic soft function by appropriate mass-dependent subtractions. Our results hold for any value of the quark mass, from an infinitesimally small (merging to the known massless result) to an infinitely large one (achieving the decoupling limit). This is the first example of an application of a variable flavor number scheme to final state jets.

  12. Secondary production of massive quarks in thrust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang, Andre H. [Wien Univ. (Austria). Fakultaet fuer Physik; Vienna Univ. (Austria). Erwin Schroedinger International Institute for Mathematical Physics; Mateu, Vicent [Wien Univ. (Austria). Fakultaet fuer Physik; Pietrulewicz, Piotr [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Gruppe Theorie

    2014-12-15

    We present a factorization framework that takes into account the production of heavy quarks through gluon splitting in the thrust distribution for e{sup +}e{sup -}→hadrons. The explicit factorization theorems and some numerical results are displayed in the dijet region where the kinematic scales are widely separated, which can be extended systematically to the whole spectrum. We account for the necessary two-loop matrix elements, threshold corrections, and include resummation up to N{sup 3}LL order. We include nonperturbative power corrections through a field theoretical shape function, and remove the O(Λ{sub QCD}) renormalon in the partonic soft function by appropriate mass-dependent subtractions. Our results hold for any value of the quark mass, from an infinitesimally small (merging to the known massless result) to an infinitely large one (achieving the decoupling limit). This is the first example of an application of a variable flavor number scheme to final state jets.

  13. Biodiesel production from municipal secondary sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manish; Ghosh, Pooja; Khosla, Khushboo; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, feasibility of biodiesel production from freeze dried sewage sludge was studied and its yield was enhanced by optimization of the in situ transesterification conditions (temperature, catalyst and concentration of sludge solids). Optimized conditions (45°C, 5% catalyst and 0.16g/mL sludge solids) resulted in a 20.76±0.04% biodiesel yield. The purity of biodiesel was ascertained by GC-MS, FT-IR and NMR ((1)H and (13)C) spectroscopy. The biodiesel profile obtained revealed the predominance of methyl esters of fatty acids such as oleic, palmitic, myristic, stearic, lauric, palmitoleic and linoleic acids indicating potential use of sludge as a biodiesel feedstock.

  14. Bacterial spoilage of meat and cured meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borch, E; Kant-Muermans, M L; Blixt, Y

    1996-11-01

    The influence of environmental factors (product composition and storage conditions) on the selection, growth rate and metabolic activity of the bacterial flora is presented for meat (pork and beef) and cooked, cured meat products. The predominant bacteria associated with spoilage of refrigerated beef and pork, are Brochothrix thermosphacta, Carnobacterium spp., Enterobacteriaceae, Lactobacillus spp., Leuconostoc spp., Pseudomonas spp. and Shewanella putrefaciens. The main defects in meat are off-odours and off-flavours, but discolouration and gas production also occur. Bacteria associated with the spoilage of refrigerated meat products, causing defects such as sour off-flavours, discolouration, gas production, slime production and decrease in pH, consist of B. thermosphacta, Carnobacterium spp. Luctobacillus spp. Leuconostoc spp. and Weissella spp. Analysis of spoilage as measured by bacterial and chemical indicators is discussed. It is concluded that a multivariate approach based on spectra of chemical compounds, may be helpful in order to analyse spoilage, at least for spoilage caused by lactic acid bacteria. The consequences of bacteria bacteria interactions should be evaluated more.

  15. Vitamin C enhances bacterial cellulose production in Gluconacetobacter xylinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshk, Sherif M A S

    2014-01-01

    Influence of vitamin C (ascorbic acid) on bacterial cellulose (BC) production and crystal structure was studied using four strains of Gluconacetobacter xylinus (ATCC 10245, IFO 13693, 13772 and 13773). BC productivity of all strains was increased in presence of vitamin C (0.5% w/w), the average BC production reached 0.47 g/30 ml compared with 0.25 g/30 ml without vitamin C. Enhanced productivity is associated with a decrease in gluconic acid concentration that is produced from Gluconacetobacter xylinus during BC production. X-ray results showed that the crystallinity index of BC produced in presence of ascorbic acid was the lowest with remarkable change in d-spacing. These results were confirmed by using solid state (13)CNMR. The increase in BC yield in presence of vitamin C is due to its antioxidant behavior and confirms our past work on lignosulfonate influence on BC.

  16. Marketing Agricultural Products. Curriculum Guide Developed for Secondary and Post Secondary Agriculture Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, W. Wade; And Others

    This curriculum guide can be used by secondary and postsecondary agriculture instructors for a semester course in marketing agricultural products or individual units can be incorporated in other courses. The curriculum guide consists of six units of study made up of two to eight lessons each. The units cover the following topics: (1) marketing…

  17. Bacterial production in subarctic peatland lakes enriched by thawing permafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Bethany N.; Crevecoeur, Sophie; Matveev, Alex; Vincent, Warwick F.

    2016-08-01

    Peatlands extend over vast areas of the northern landscape. Within some of these areas, lakes and ponds are changing in size as a result of permafrost thawing and erosion, resulting in mobilization of the carbon-rich peatland soils. Our aims in the present study were to characterize the particle, carbon and nutrient regime of a set of thermokarst (thaw) lakes and their adjacent peatland permafrost soils in a rapidly degrading landscape in subarctic Québec, Canada, and by way of fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, production measurements and an in situ enrichment experiment, determine the bacterial characteristics of these waters relative to other thaw lakes and rock-basin lakes in the region. The soil active layer in a degrading palsa (peatland permafrost mound) adjacent to one of the lakes contained an elevated carbon content (51 % of dry weight), high C : N ratios (17 : 1 by mass), and large stocks of other elements including N (3 % of dry weight), Fe (0.6 %), S (0.5 %), Ca (0.5 %) and P (0.05 %). Two permafrost cores were obtained to a depth of 2.77 m in the palsa, and computerized tomography scans of the cores confirmed that they contained high concentrations (> 80 %) of ice. Upon thawing, the cores released nitrate and dissolved organic carbon (from all core depths sampled), and soluble reactive phosphorus (from bottom depths), at concentrations well above those in the adjacent lake waters. The active layer soil showed a range of particle sizes with a peak at 229 µm, and this was similar to the distribution of particles in the upper permafrost cores. The particle spectrum for the lake water overlapped with those for the soil, but extended to larger (surface water) or finer (bottom water) particles. On average, more than 50 % of the bacterial cells and bacterial production was associated with particles > 3 µm. This relatively low contribution of free-living cells (operationally defined as the < 1 µm fraction) to bacterial production was a general

  18. antiSMASH : rapid identification, annotation and analysis of secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters in bacterial and fungal genome sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, Marnix H.; Blin, Kai; Cimermancic, Peter; de Jager, Victor; Zakrzewski, Piotr; Fischbach, Michael A.; Weber, Tilmann; Takano, Eriko; Breitling, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial and fungal secondary metabolism is a rich source of novel bioactive compounds with potential pharmaceutical applications as antibiotics, anti-tumor drugs or cholesterol-lowering drugs. To find new drug candidates, microbiologists are increasingly relying on sequencing genomes of a wide var

  19. Residual structure of Streptococcus mutans biofilm following complete disinfection favors secondary bacterial adhesion and biofilm re-development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Ohsumi

    Full Text Available Chemical disinfection of oral biofilms often leaves biofilm structures intact. This study aimed to examine whether the residual structure promotes secondary bacterial adhesion. Streptococcus mutans biofilms generated on resin-composite disks in a rotating disc reactor were disinfected completely with 70% isopropyl alcohol, and were again cultured in the same reactor after resupplying with the same bacterial solution. Specimens were subjected to fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy, viable cell counts and PCR-Invader assay in order to observe and quantify secondarily adhered cells. Fluorescence microscopic analysis, particularly after longitudinal cryosectioning, demonstrated stratified patterns of viable cells on the disinfected biofilm structure. Viable cell counts of test specimens were significantly higher than those of controls, and increased according to the amount of residual structure and culture period. Linear regression analysis exhibited a high correlation between viable and total cell counts. It was concluded that disinfected biofilm structures favored secondary bacterial adhesion.

  20. The Bacterial Ghost platform system: production and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langemann, Timo; Koller, Verena Juliana; Muhammad, Abbas; Kudela, Pavol; Mayr, Ulrike Beate; Lubitz, Werner

    2010-01-01

    The Bacterial Ghost (BG) platform technology is an innovative system for vaccine, drug or active substance delivery and for technical applications in white biotechnology. BGs are cell envelopes derived from Gram-negative bacteria. BGs are devoid of all cytoplasmic content but have a preserved cellular morphology including all cell surface structures. Using BGs as delivery vehicles for subunit or DNA-vaccines the particle structure and surface properties of BGs are targeting the carrier itself to primary antigen-presenting cells. Furthermore, BGs exhibit intrinsic adjuvant properties and trigger an enhanced humoral and cellular immune response to the target antigen. Multiple antigens of the native BG envelope and recombinant protein or DNA antigens can be combined in a single type of BG. Antigens can be presented on the inner or outer membrane of the BG as well as in the periplasm that is sealed during BG formation. Drugs or supplements can also be loaded to the internal lumen or periplasmic space of the carrier. BGs are produced by batch fermentation with subsequent product recovery and purification via tangential flow filtration. For safety reasons all residual bacterial DNA is inactivated during the BG production process by the use of staphylococcal nuclease A and/or the treatment with β-propiolactone. After purification BGs can be stored long-term at ambient room temperature as lyophilized product. The production cycle from the inoculation of the pre-culture to the purified BG concentrate ready for lyophilization does not take longer than a day and thus meets modern criteria of rapid vaccine production rather than keeping large stocks of vaccines. The broad spectrum of possible applications in combination with the comparably low production costs make the BG platform technology a safe and sophisticated product for the targeted delivery of vaccines and active agents as well as carrier of immobilized enzymes for applications in white biotechnology.

  1. Secondary Broccoli Production Depending On Sowing And Planting Dates

    OpenAIRE

    Todorova, Desislava

    2014-01-01

    The investigation was carried out during the period of 2009-2011 at the Institute of Agriculture – Kyustendil, located in the Southwest Bulgaria. Four broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica Plenck) hybrids were grown by the technology of late field production with different sowing and planting dates. The aim of the research was to establish a relationship between planting time and secondary yield of broccoli. Some morphological characteristics and production traits of an additional yield of...

  2. Interleukin-35 is upregulated in response to influenza virus infection and secondary bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Wang, Chuan-jiang; Lin, Shi-hui; Zhang, Mu; Li, Sheng-yuan; Xu, Fang

    2016-05-01

    Postinfluenza pneumococcal pneumonia is an important cause of global morbidity and mortality. What causes this increased susceptibility is not well elucidated. IL-35 is a newly described cytokine in infectious tolerance. A murine model was established to study postinfluenza pneumococcal pneumonia and evaluate the role of IL-35 in host defense against postinfluenza pneumococcal pneumonia. Pulmonary IL-35 was rapidly up-regulated during murine influenza infection, which was partially mediated by type I IFN-α/β receptor signaling pathway. Secondary pneumococcal infection led to a synergistic IL-35 response in influenza-infected mice. Clinical analysis showed that IL-35 levels were significantly elevated in the patients with influenza infection compared with healthy individuals and influenza infection could induce IL-35 production from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These data suggest that IL-35 contributes to the increased susceptibility to secondary pneumococcal pneumonia at least in part by inhibiting the early immune response.

  3. Bacterial abundance and production in the central and eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.; Raghukumar, S.; Gauns, M.

    Seasonal and spatial variations in bacterial and picoplankton abundances and bacterial production (thymidine incorporation rates) were determined in the water column up to 150 m in several stations in the central and eastern Arabian Sea. Higher...

  4. Bacterial bioaugmentation for improving methane and hydrogen production from microalgae

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The recalcitrant cell walls of microalgae may limit their digestibility for bioenergy production. Considering that cellulose contributes to the cell wall recalcitrance of the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris, this study investigated bioaugmentation with a cellulolytic and hydrogenogenic bacterium, Clostridium thermocellum, at different inoculum ratios as a possible method to improve CH4 and H2 production of microalgae. Results Methane production was found to increase by 17?~?24% with the addition of C. thermocellum, as a result of enhanced cell disruption and excess hydrogen production. Furthermore, addition of C. thermocellum enhanced the bacterial diversity and quantities, leading to higher fermentation efficiency. A two-step process of addition of C. thermocellum first and methanogenic sludge subsequently could recover both hydrogen and methane, with a 9.4% increase in bioenergy yield, when compared with the one-step process of simultaneous addition of C. thermocellum and methanogenic sludge. The fluorescence peaks of excitation-emission matrix spectra associated with chlorophyll can serve as biomarkers for algal cell degradation. Conclusions Bioaugmentation with C. thermocellum improved the degradation of C. vulgaris biomass, producing higher levels of methane and hydrogen. The two-step process, with methanogenic inoculum added after the hydrogen production reached saturation, was found to be an energy-efficiency method for hydrogen and methane production. PMID:23815806

  5. Plants and endophytes: equal partners in secondary metabolite production?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig-Müller, Jutta

    2015-07-01

    Well known plant production systems should be re-evaluated due to findings that the interesting metabolite might actually be produced by microbes intimately associated with the plant, so-called endophytes. Endophytes can be bacteria or fungi and they are characterized usually by the feature that they do not cause any harm to the host. Indeed, in some cases, such as mycorrhizal fungi or other growth promoting endophytes, they can be beneficial for the plant. Here some examples are reviewed where the host plant and/or endophyte metabolism can be induced by the other partner. Also, partial or complete biosynthesis pathways for plant secondary metabolites can be attributed to such endophytes. In other cases the host plant is able to metabolize substances from fungal origin. The question of the natural role of such metabolic changes for the endophyte will be briefly touched. Finally, the consequences for the use of plant cultures for secondary metabolite production is discussed.

  6. Attitude and argumentation: an analysis of secondary school writing production

    OpenAIRE

    Abreu,Adriana Rodrigues de; Adriana Nogueira Accioly NÓBREGA

    2015-01-01

    This article aims at discussing argumentation in secondary school writing production considering resources of attitude, which may create writers’ authorial positioning (HYLAND, 2012). The study focuses on Systemic-Functional Linguistics (HALLIDAY; HASAN, 1989; HALLIDAY, 1994; HALLIDAY; MATTHIESSEN, 2004), in particular on the Appraisal System (MARTIN; WHITE, 2005), in interface with a social perspective of argumentation (BRETON, 2003). Two argumentative texts are analyzed through a qualitativ...

  7. Evaluation of in vitro gas production and rumen bacterial populations fermenting corn milling (co)products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, W L; Tedeschi, L O; Kononoff, P J; Callaway, T R; Dowd, S E; Karges, K; Gibson, M L

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the fermentation dynamics of 2 commonly fed corn (co)products in their intact and defatted forms, using the in vitro gas production (IVGP) technique, and to investigate the shifts of the predominant rumen bacterial populations using the 16S rDNA bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP) technique. The bTEFAP technique was used to determine the bacterial profile of each fermentation time at 24 and 48 h. Bacterial populations were identified at the species level. Species were grouped by substrate affinities (guilds) for cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin, starch, sugars, protein, lipids, and lactate. The 2 (co)products were a dried distillers grain (DDG) plus solubles produced from a low-heat drying process (BPX) and a high-protein DDG without solubles (HP). Chemical analysis revealed that BPX contained about 11.4% ether extract, whereas HP contained only 3.88%. Previous studies have indicated that processing methods, as well as fat content, of corn (co)products directly affect fermentation rate and substrate availability, but little information is available regarding changes in rumen bacterial populations. Fermentation profiles of intact and defatted BPX and HP were compared with alfalfa hay as a standard profile. Defatting before incubation had no effect on total gas production in BPX or HP, but reduced lag time and the fractional rate of fermentation of BPX by at least half, whereas there was no effect for HP. The HP feed supported a greater percentage of fibrolytic and proteolytic bacteria than did BPX. Defatting both DDG increased the fibrolytic (26.8 to 38.7%) and proteolytic (26.1 to 37.2%) bacterial guild populations and decreased the lactate-utilizing bacterial guild (3.06 to 1.44%). Information regarding the fermentation kinetics and bacterial population shifts when feeding corn (co)products may lead to more innovative processing methods that improve feed quality (e.g., deoiling) and consequently

  8. Metabolic flux analysis of Gluconacetobacter xylinus for bacterial cellulose production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Cheng; Zhang, Gui-Cai; Liu, Miao; Zheng, Xin-Tong; Han, Pei-Pei; Jia, Shi-Ru

    2013-07-01

    Metabolic flux analysis was used to reveal the metabolic distributions in Gluconacetobacter xylinus (CGMCC no. 2955) cultured on different carbon sources. Compared with other sources, glucose, fructose, and glycerol could achieve much higher bacterial cellulose (BC) yields from G. xylinus (CGMCC no. 2955). The glycerol led to the highest BC production with a metabolic yield of 14.7 g/mol C, which was approximately 1.69-fold and 2.38-fold greater than that produced using fructose and glucose medium, respectively. The highest BC productivity from G. xylinus CGMCC 2955 was 5.97 g BC/L (dry weight) when using glycerol as the sole carbon source. Metabolic flux analysis for the central carbon metabolism revealed that about 47.96 % of glycerol was transformed into BC, while only 19.05 % of glucose and 24.78 % of fructose were transformed into BC. Instead, when glucose was used as the sole carbon source, 40.03 % of glucose was turned into the by-product gluconic acid. Compared with BC from glucose and fructose, BC from the glycerol medium showed the highest tensile strength at 83.5 MPa, with thinner fibers and lower porosity. As a main byproduct of biodiesel production, glycerol holds great potential to produce BC with superior mechanical and microstructural characteristics.

  9. Media and growth conditions for induction of secondary metabolite production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2012-01-01

    Growth media and incubation conditions have a very strong influence of secondary metabolite production. There is no consensus on which media are the optimal for metabolite production, but a series of useful and effective media and incubation conditions have been listed here. Chemically well......-defined media are suited for biochemical studies, but in order to get chemical diversity expressed in filamentous fungi, sources rich in amino acids, vitamins, and trace metals have to be added, such as yeast extract and oatmeal. A battery of solid agar media is recommended for exploration of chemical diversity...

  10. Control of corrosion product transport in PWR secondary cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawochka, S.G.; Pearl, W.L. [NWT Corp., San Josa, CA (United States); Passell, T.O.; Welty, C.S. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1992-12-31

    Transport of corrosion products to PWR steam generators by the feedwater leads to sludge buildup on the tubesheets and fouling of tube-to-tube support crevices. In these regions, chemical impurities concentrate and accelerate tubing corrosion. Deposit buildup on the tubes also can lead to power generation limitations and necessitate chemical cleaning. Extensive corrosion product transport data for PWR secondary cycles has been developed employing integrating sampling techniques which facilitate identification of major corrosion product sources and assessments of the effectiveness of various control options. Plant data currently are available for assessing the impact of factors such as pH, pH control additive, materials of construction, blowdown, condensate treatment, and high temperature drains and feedwater filtration.

  11. Bacterial productivity in the Prydz Bay and its adjacent waters,Antarctic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱雨生; 黄奕普; 陈敏; 刘广山

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial productivity was measured using 3H-thymidine methods in the Prydz Bay and its adjacent waters in the Southern Ocean during the 16th National Antarctic Research Expedition of China (CHINARE). The results showed that bacteted for the Ross Sea. The mean ratio of bacterial productivity to primary productivity in our study areas was 41%. The general characteristics in the vertical profiles showed a subsurface maximum at most of the stations, which was also consistent with those observed in the other sea areas in the Southern Ocean. The spatial distribution of bacterial productivity and dissolved organic carbon in the surface waters showed that their variations were inversely correlative. The relationship among bacterial productivity, primary productivity and dissolved organic carbon suggested that bacterial productivity in the Prydz Bay and its adjacent water was influenced mostly by phytoplankton activities and the hydrologic conditions.

  12. Effect of inorganic salts on bacterial omega-3 PUFA production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Elrazak, Ahmed; Ward, Alan C; Glassey, Jarka

    2017-03-16

    The increasing demand of omega-3 in the market and the challenges facing its conventional supplies led to an increasing interest to microbial omega-3 sources. This research concentrates on the statistical role of some metal ions on the biosynthesis and productivity of eicosapentaenoic acid (essential omega-3 element) in bacterial isolate, Shewanella 717. A Plackett-Burman design was applied to screen the main effect of all metal salts entrenched in the artificial sea water medium components. Four salts, in particular, in addition to the interaction among them were highlighted as having a statistically significant effect upon the growth and/or eicosapentaenoic acid production. A subsequent central composite design was performed to determine the exact optimum concentration of each of the chosen variables which was found to be 2.5, 1.8, 1.2, and 23 g/l, for Na2HPO4, MgSO4, KCl, and NaCl, respectively. All the experiments were performed with the minimal amount of carbon and nitrogen to eliminate any potential masking effect. A bioreactor batch run was operated and the ion uptake was monitored, using EDAX® electron microscopy, concluding that the process of microbial omega-3 production could be a phosphate-limited process. Optimizing the concentration of the tested metal ions led to a remarkable increase in the omega-3 productivity resulted in a 30, 9, and 10 times increase in yield, concentration, and percentage to the total fatty acids, respectively, even though the carbon and nitrogen were kept constant all over the research work.

  13. Bacterial cellulose production from the litchi extract by Gluconacetobacter xylinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-Yan; Huang, Chao; Guo, Hai-Jun; Xiong, Lian; Luo, Jun; Wang, Bo; Lin, Xiao-Qing; Chen, Xue-Fang; Chen, Xin-De

    2016-01-01

    Although litchi has both nutrient and edible value, the extremely short preservation time limited its further market promotion. To explore processed litchi products with longer preservation time, litchi extract was selected as an alternative feedstock for production of bacterial cellulose (BC). After 2 weeks of static fermentation, 2.53 g/L of the BC membrane was obtained. The trace elements including magnesium (Mg) and sodium (Na) in the litchi extract were partly absorbed in the BC membrane, but no potassium (K) element was detected in it, curiously. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) photographs exhibited an ultrafine network nanostructure for the BC produced in the litchi extract. Analysis of the fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed the pellicles to be a cellulosic material. Interestingly, X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed the BC membrane obtained from litchi extract had higher crystallinity of 94.0% than that from HS medium. Overall, the work showed the potential of producing high value-added polymer from litchi resources.

  14. A windowless gas target for secondary beam production

    CERN Document Server

    Kishida, T; Shibata, M; Watanabe, H; Tsutsumi, T; Motomura, S; Ideguchi, E; Zhou, X H; Morikawa, T; Kubo, T; Ishihara, M

    1999-01-01

    A windowless gas target was developed for the production of secondary high-spin isomer beams (HSIB). An sup 1 sup 6 O target in the compound form of CO sub 2 gas was used to produce a sup 1 sup 4 sup 5 sup m Sm beam by using an sup 1 sup 6 O( sup 1 sup 3 sup 6 Xe, 7n) sup 1 sup 4 sup 5 sup m Sm reaction. The target gas pressure was kept constant at 50 Torr. A target thickness of about 1 mg/cm sup 2 was achieved with a 10 cm target length. Gas was recirculated and the consumption was very little.

  15. Heterotrophic bacterial production in the South East Pacific: longitudinal trends and coupling with primary production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Van Wambeke

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Spatial variations of heterotrophic bacterial production and phytoplankton primary production were investigated across South East Pacific Ocean (–141° W, –8° S to –72° W, –35° S in November–December 2004. Bacterial production (³H leucine incorporation integrated over the euphotic zone encompassed a wide range of values, from 43 mg C m−2 d−1 in the hyper-oligotrophic South Pacific Gyre to 392 mg C m−2 d−1 in the upwelling off Chile. Within the gyre (120° W, 22° S records of low phytoplankton biomass (7 mg TChla m−2 were obtained and in situ 14C based particulate primary production rates were as low as 153 mg C m−2 d−1, thus equal to the value considered as a limit for primary production under strong oligotrophic conditions. In the South Pacific gyre average rates of ³H leucine incorporation rates, and leucine incorporation rates per cell (5–21 pmol L−1 h−1 and 15–56×10−21 mol cell−1 h−1, respectively, were in the same range as those reported for other oligotrophic sub tropical and temperate waters. Rates of dark community respiration, determined at selected stations across the transect varied in a narrow range (42–97 mmol O2 m−2 d−1, except for one station in the upwelling off Chile (245 mmol O2 m−2 d−1. Bacterial growth efficiencies varied between 5 and 38% and bacterial carbon demand largely exceeded 14C particulate primary production across the South Pacific Ocean. Net community production also revealed negative values in the South Pacific Gyre (–13±20 to –37±40 mmol O2 m−2 d−1. Such imbalances being impossible in this area far from any external input, we discuss the techniques involved for determining the coupling between

  16. Bacterial Cellulose Production by Acetobacter xylinum Strains from Agricultural Waste Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongruang, Sasithorn

    Bacterial cellulose is a biopolysaccharide produced from the bacteria, Acetobacter xylinum. Static batch fermentations for bacterial cellulose production were studied in coconut and pineapple juices under 30 °C in 5-1 fermenters by using three Acetobacter strains: A. xylinum TISTR 998, A. xylinum TISTR 975, and A. xylinum TISTR 893. Experiments were carried out to compare bacterial cellulose yields along with growth kinetic analysis. Results showed that A. xylinum TISTR 998 produced a bacterial cellulose yield of 553.33 g/l, while A. xylinum TISTR 893 produced 453.33 g/l and A. xylinum TISTR 975 produced 243.33 g/l. In pineapple juice, the yields for A. xylinum TISTR 893, 975, and 998 were 576.66, 546.66, and 520 g/l, respectively. The strain TISTR 998 showed the highest productivity when using coconut juice. Morphological properties of cellulose pellicles, in terms of texture and color, were also measured, and the textures were not significantly different among treatments.

  17. Secondary Metabolites Production by Solid-State Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrios-González, J.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial secondary metabolites are useful high value products with an enormous range of biological activities. Moreover, the past two decades have been a phase of rapid discovery of new activities and development of major compounds for use in different industrial fields, mainly pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, food, agriculture and farming. Many of these metabolites could be produced advantageously in industry by solid–state fermentation (SSF. Two types of SSF can be distinguished, depending on the nature of the solid phase used: 1 Solid cultures of one support-substrate phase in which solid phase is constituted by a material that assumes, simultaneously, the functions of support and of nutrients source; and 2 Solid cultures of two substrate-support phases: solid phase is constituted by an inert support impregnated with a liquid medium. Besides good production performance, two phases systems have provided a convenient model for basic studies. Studies in our laboratory, as well as in others, have shown that physiology of idiophase (production phase in SSF share several similarities with the physiology in liquid medium, so similar strategies must be adapted for efficient production processes. However, our studies indicate the need to develop special strains for SSF since overproducing strains, generated for liquid fermentation, cannot be relied upon to perform well in SSF. On the other hand, there are important parameters, specific for SSF, that have to be optimized (pretreatment, initial moisture content, medium concentration and aeration. Respiration studies of secondary metabolites SSF, performed in our laboratory, have shown more subtle aspects of efficient production in SSF. This indicates that there are certain particularities of physiology in SSF that represent the point that needs a better understanding, and that promise to generate knowledge that will be the basis for efficient processes development and control strategies, as well as for

  18. Production rate calculations for a secondary beam facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, C.L.; Back, B.B.; Rehm, K.E.

    1995-08-01

    In order to select the most cost-effective method for the production of secondary ion beams, yield calculations for a variety of primary beams were performed ranging in mass from protons to {sup 18}O with energies of 100-200 MeV/u. For comparison, production yields for 600-1000 MeV protons were also calculated. For light ion-(A < {sup 4}He) induced reactions at energies above 50 MeV/u the LAHET code was used while the low energy calculations were performed with LPACE. Heavy-ion-induced production rates were calculated with the ISAPACE program. The results of these codes were checked against each other and wherever possible a comparison with experimental data was performed. These comparisons extended to very exotic reaction channels, such as the production of {sup 100}Sn from {sup 112}Sn and {sup 124}Xe induced fragmentation reactions. These comparisons indicate that the codes are able to predict production rates to within one order of magnitude.

  19. Evaluation of culture media for the production of secondary metabolites in a natural products screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandermolen, Karen M; Raja, Huzefa A; El-Elimat, Tamam; Oberlies, Nicholas H

    2013-12-17

    Variation in the growing environment can have significant impacts on the quantity and diversity of fungal secondary metabolites. In the industrial setting, optimization of growing conditions can lead to significantly increased production of a compound of interest. Such optimization becomes challenging in a drug-discovery screening situation, as the ideal conditions for one organism may induce poor metabolic diversity for a different organism. Here, the impact of different media types, including six liquid media and five solid media, on the secondary metabolite production of three fungal strains was examined in the context of the drug-discovery screening process. The relative production of marker compounds was used to evaluate the usefulness and reliability of each medium for the purpose of producing secondary metabolites.

  20. Large-scale production of magnetic nanoparticles using bacterial fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Ji-Won; Rawn, Claudia J; Rondinone, Adam J; Love, Lonnie J; Roh, Yul; Everett, S Michelle; Lauf, Robert J; Phelps, Tommy J

    2010-10-01

    Production of both nano-sized particles of crystalline pure phase magnetite and magnetite substituted with Co, Ni, Cr, Mn, Zn or the rare earths for some of the Fe has been demonstrated using microbial processes. This microbial production of magnetic nanoparticles can be achieved in large quantities and at low cost. In these experiments, over 1 kg (wet weight) of Zn-substituted magnetite (nominal composition of Zn(0.6)Fe(2.4)O4) was recovered from 30 l fermentations. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to confirm that the extracellular magnetites exhibited good mono-dispersity. TEM results also showed a highly reproducible particle size and corroborated average crystallite size (ACS) of 13.1 ± 0.8 nm determined through X-ray diffraction (N = 7) at a 99% confidence level. Based on scale-up experiments performed using a 35-l reactor, the increase in ACS reproducibility may be attributed to a combination of factors including an increase of electron donor input, availability of divalent substitution metal ions and fewer ferrous ions in the case of substituted magnetite, and increased reactor volume overcoming differences in each batch. Commercial nanometer sized magnetite (25-50 nm) may cost $500/kg. However, microbial processes are potentially capable of producing 5-90 nm pure or substituted magnetites at a fraction of the cost of traditional chemical synthesis. While there are numerous approaches for the synthesis of nanoparticles, bacterial fermentation of magnetite or metal-substituted magnetite may represent an advantageous manufacturing technology with respect to yield, reproducibility and scalable synthesis with low costs at low energy input.

  1. CLUSEAN: a computer-based framework for the automated analysis of bacterial secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, T; Rausch, C; Lopez, P; Hoof, I; Gaykova, V; Huson, D H; Wohlleben, W

    2009-03-10

    Bacterial secondary metabolites are an important source of antimicrobial and cytostatic drugs. These molecules are often synthesized in a stepwise fashion by multimodular megaenzymes that are encoded in clusters of genes encoding enzymes for precursor supply and modification. In this work,we present an open source software pipeline, CLUSEAN (CLUster SEquence ANalyzer) that helps to annotate and analyze such gene clusters. CLUSEAN integrates standard analysis tools, like BLAST and HMMer, with specific tools for the identification of the functional domains and motifs in nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS)/type I polyketide synthases (PKS) and the prediction of specificities of NRPS.

  2. Bacterial Cellulose Production by Gluconacetobacter sp. RKY5 in a Rotary Biofilm Contactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Jun; Kim, Jin-Nam; Wee, Young-Jung; Park, Don-Hee; Ryu, Hwa-Won

    A rotary biofilm contactor (RBC) inoculated with Gluconacetobacter sp. RKY5 was used as a bioreactor for improved bacterial cellulose production. The optimal number of disk for bacterial cellulose production was found to be eight, at which bacterial cellulose and cell concentrations were 5.52 and 4.98 g/L. When the aeration rate was maintained at 1.25 vvm, bacterial cellulose and cell concentrations were maximized (5.67 and 5.25 g/L, respectively). The optimal rotation speed of impeller in RBC was 15 rpm. When the culture pH in RBC was not controlled during fermentation, the maximal amount of bacterial cellulose (5.53 g/L) and cells (4.91 g/L) was obtained. Under the optimized culture conditions, bacterial cellulose and cell concentrations in RBC reached to 6.17 and 5.58 g/L, respectively.

  3. Chemical inhibition of bacterial protein tyrosine phosphatase suppresses capsule production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standish, Alistair J; Salim, Angela A; Zhang, Hua; Capon, Robert J; Morona, Renato

    2012-01-01

    Capsule polysaccharide is a major virulence factor for a wide range of bacterial pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae. The biosynthesis of Wzy-dependent capsules in both gram-negative and -positive bacteria is regulated by a system involving a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) and a protein tyrosine kinase. However, how the system functions is still controversial. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, a major human pathogen, the system is present in all but 2 of the 93 serotypes found to date. In order to study this regulation further, we performed a screen to find inhibitors of the phosphatase, CpsB. This led to the observation that a recently discovered marine sponge metabolite, fascioquinol E, inhibited CpsB phosphatase activity both in vitro and in vivo at concentrations that did not affect the growth of the bacteria. This inhibition resulted in decreased capsule synthesis in D39 and Type 1 S. pneumoniae. Furthermore, concentrations of Fascioquinol E that inhibited capsule also lead to increased attachment of pneumococci to a macrophage cell line, suggesting that this compound would inhibit the virulence of the pathogen. Interestingly, this compound also inhibited the phosphatase activity of the structurally unrelated gram-negative PTP, Wzb, which belongs to separate family of protein tyrosine phosphatases. Furthermore, incubation with Klebsiella pneumoniae, which contains a homologous phosphatase, resulted in decreased capsule synthesis. Taken together, these data provide evidence that PTPs are critical for Wzy-dependent capsule production across a spectrum of bacteria, and as such represents a valuable new molecular target for the development of anti-virulence antibacterials.

  4. Chemical inhibition of bacterial protein tyrosine phosphatase suppresses capsule production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair J Standish

    Full Text Available Capsule polysaccharide is a major virulence factor for a wide range of bacterial pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae. The biosynthesis of Wzy-dependent capsules in both gram-negative and -positive bacteria is regulated by a system involving a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP and a protein tyrosine kinase. However, how the system functions is still controversial. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, a major human pathogen, the system is present in all but 2 of the 93 serotypes found to date. In order to study this regulation further, we performed a screen to find inhibitors of the phosphatase, CpsB. This led to the observation that a recently discovered marine sponge metabolite, fascioquinol E, inhibited CpsB phosphatase activity both in vitro and in vivo at concentrations that did not affect the growth of the bacteria. This inhibition resulted in decreased capsule synthesis in D39 and Type 1 S. pneumoniae. Furthermore, concentrations of Fascioquinol E that inhibited capsule also lead to increased attachment of pneumococci to a macrophage cell line, suggesting that this compound would inhibit the virulence of the pathogen. Interestingly, this compound also inhibited the phosphatase activity of the structurally unrelated gram-negative PTP, Wzb, which belongs to separate family of protein tyrosine phosphatases. Furthermore, incubation with Klebsiella pneumoniae, which contains a homologous phosphatase, resulted in decreased capsule synthesis. Taken together, these data provide evidence that PTPs are critical for Wzy-dependent capsule production across a spectrum of bacteria, and as such represents a valuable new molecular target for the development of anti-virulence antibacterials.

  5. Charm and Beauty Production from Secondary Vertexing at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Paul [University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    Measurement of the Charm and Beauty Structure Functions using the H1 Vertex Detector at HERA Inclusive charm and beauty cross sections are measured in e{sup -} p and e{sup +}p neutral current collisions at HERA in the kinematic region of photon virtuality 5 < Q{sup 2} < 2000 GeV{sup 2} and Bjorken scaling variable 0.0002 < x < 0.05. The data were collected with the H1 detector in the years 2006 and 2007 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 189 pb{sup -1}. The numbers of charm and beauty events are determined using variables reconstructed by the H1 vertex detector including the impact parameter of tracks to the primary vertex and the position of the secondary vertex. The measurements are combined with previous data and compared to QCD predictions. Measurement of Charm and Beauty Jets in Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA Measurements of the charm and beauty jet cross sections have been made in deep inelastic scattering at HERA for the kinematic region of photon virtuality Q{sup 2} > 6 GeV{sup 2} and elasticity variable 0.07 < y < 0.625 for jets in the laboratory frame with transverse energy E{sub T}{sup jet} > 6 GeV and pseudorapidity -1.0 < {eta}{sup jet} < 1.5. Measurements are also made requiring a jet in the Breit frame with E{sub T}{sup jet} > 6 GeV. The data were collected with the H1 detector in the years 2006 and 2007 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 189 pb{sup -1}. The number of charm and beauty jets are determined using variables reconstructed by the H1 vertex detector including the impact parameter of tracks to the primary vertex and the position of the secondary vertex. The measurements are compared with QCD predictions and with previous measurements obtained using muon tagging. Charm and beauty production in deep inelastic scattering from inclusive secondary vertexing at ZEUS Charm and beauty production in deep inelastic scattering has been measured with the ZEUS detector using the full HERA II data set. The charm and beauty contents

  6. Chemical mediation of bacterial surface colonisation by secondary metabolites from the red alga Delisea pulchra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maximilien, Ria; de Nys, Rocky; Holmström, Carola;

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the effects of halogenated furanones from the red alga Delisea pulchra on colonisation of surfaces by marine bacteria. Bacterial abundance on the surface of D. pulchra, assessed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), was significantly lower than on the surfaces of 3 co-occurrin...

  7. Oxygenated products of sesquiterpenes in secondary organic aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eijck, A.; Kampf, C.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-04-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) has a huge impact on air quality and climate change. It influences the Earth radiative budget through absorbing, scattering and reflecting radiation as well as the formation of clouds because the particulates can act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Furthermore, it plays an important role for human health. SOA is formed from gaseous precursors which get oxidized by ozone, OH- and NO3-radicals in the atmosphere. Due to their low vapor pressure these degradation products can nucleate to form new particles or they can condense on existing aerosol particles. Despite the major progress in research during the last few years the actual chemical composition as well as the contribution of various volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the formation of secondary organic aerosol is still partially unknown. Recent studies indicate that sesquiterpenes play an important role in the formation of SOA because of the low volatility of their oxygenated products (Lee et al., 2006). Their emission is estimated to be about 14,8 Tg per year (Henze et al., 2008), however, these emission rates remain highly uncertain due to the lack of quantitative emission rate measurements. In addition, the knowledge about the actual atmospheric degradation mechanism and the main oxidation products of sesquiterpenes is quite limited. β-Caryophyllene, α-humulene, α-farnesene and β-farnesene are the most abundant sequiterpenes in many sesquiterpene emission profiles. But also aromadendren, α-bergamotene and δ-cadinene and germacrene-D can contribute significantly to some emission profiles (Duhl et al., 2008). To determine the major oxygenated products of sesquiterpenes in SOA, reaction chamber experiments with different sesquiterpenes and ozone were performed in a 100 L reaction chamber. To measure the time dependent formation of initial oxidation products, an APCI-IT-MS was directly connected to the reaction chamber. After 2 hours the APCI-IT-MS was replaced by a

  8. Comparison of Heterotrophic Bacterial Production-Rates in Early Spring in the Turbid Estuaries of the Scheldt and the Elbe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goosen, N.K.; Van Rijswijk, P.; Brockmann, U.

    1995-01-01

    In spring bacterial production rates were estimated by tritiated thymidine incorporation in the turbid estuaries of the rivers Scheldt and Elbe. Bacterial production rates in the Scheldt were 5 times higher than in the Elbe. In the Scheldt bacterial production rates correlated better with the DOC co

  9. THE EFFECT OF PROBIOTIC BACTERIAL CONCENTRATE "IMMUNOLAKT" ON BAKERY PRODUCTS QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Belokurova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the development of new food products is paid much attention in the food industry. These include also bakery products with lactic starter cultures which contain live microorganisms, vitamins of group B: B1, B2, B6, B12, B9, vitamins A, C, E, folic acid. In this article the technological aspects of the probiotic bacterial concentrate "Immunolakt" in the manufacture of bakery products were studied. The experimental product was developed on the basis of traditional technology taking into account the properties of the introduced additives to correct some technological parameters. The research resulted in the development of technology of bakery products with the introduction of probiotic bacterial concentrate "Immunolakt.". To develop the recipes of dough products probiotic bacterial concentrates "Immunolakt" at 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100% was used instead of a part of yeast in the recipe. Comparative studies of the microstructure of bakery products crumb with the addition of probiotic bacterial concentrate "Immunolakt" and the reference sample were carried out. The content of the probiotic bacterial concentrate of 40% and 60% promoted the formation of a more uniform pore structure and reduction in the number ruptures along their perimeter. Safety indicators of reference and test samples were determined. The number of bacteria of reference and experimental samples of bakery products are in the normal range. The number of mesophilic aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria in the test samples is less than in the reference one. Qualimetric evaluation of the quality of finished products was carried out. The developed products are of high organoleptic quality indexes, they are physically and chemically stable, with enhanced nutritional value. Products with the introduction of probiotic bacterial concentrate allow to expand the range of functional orientation bakery products. The use of probiotic bacterial concentrates allows to adjust the course of

  10. Metabolic engineering with systems biology tools to optimize production of prokaryotic secondary metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Hyun Uk; Charusanti, Pep; Lee, Sang Yup;

    2016-01-01

    for the optimal production of various prokaryotic secondary metabolites: native versus heterologous hosts (e.g., Escherichia coli) and rational versus random approaches. This comparative analysis is followed by discussions on systems biology tools deployed in optimizing the production of secondary metabolites....... The potential contributions of additional systems biology tools are also discussed in the context of current challenges encountered during optimization of secondary metabolite production....

  11. Oncostatin M production by human dendritic cells in response to bacterial products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Takafumi; Chida, Kingo; Todate, Akihito; Ide, Kyotaro; Asada, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Yutaro; Suzuki, Kenichiro; Kuwata, Hirofumi; Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2002-03-21

    Oncostatin M (OSM) is a pleiomorphic cytokine that belongs to the IL-6 cytokine family. It is produced by activated T cells and monocytes/macrophages and plays an important role in the process of inflammatory responses. Although dendritic cells (DCs) have been shown to secrete a variety of cytokines, it is not elucidated whether DCs are able to produce OSM. To clarify this, using human DCs derived from peripheral blood cells, we measured the protein levels of OSM in the supernatants of DC cultures by ELISA and examined the expression of OSM mRNA by RT-PCR after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or fixed Staphylococcus aureus (SACS). Upon stimulation with bacterial products, DCs secreted a large amount of OSM protein in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Concomitantly, the expression of OSM mRNA by DCs was markedly up-regulated. Compared the ability of DCs to produce OSM with that of monocytes, which are major producers of OSM, DCs released significantly higher amounts of OSM protein in the culture supernatants than monocytes. These findings indicate for the first time that human monocyte-derived DCs can synthesize and secrete large amounts of OSM in response to bacterial products, suggesting that OSM produced by DCs at infectious sites may play a role in modulating inflammatory responses.

  12. Production of transgenic medaka with increased resistance to bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmasik, Aliye; Warr, Gregory; Chen, Thomas T

    2002-06-01

    Cecropins, first identified in silk moth (Hyalophora cecropia), are a group of antimicrobial peptides with bactericidal activity against a broad spectrum of bacteria. In this study we investigated whether (1) this group of antimicrobial peptides could exhibit bactericidal activity toward known fish bacterial pathogens and (2) expression of cecropin transgenes in transgenic medaka (Oryzias latipas) could result in increasing resistance of the transgenic fish to infection by fish bacterial pathogens. Cecropin gene construct containing silk moth preprocecropin B, procecropin B and cecropin B, and porcine cecropin P1 driven by a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter were transfected into chinook salmon embryonic cells (CHSE-214) by lipofection, and the resulting permanent transformants were collected. In an "inhibition zone" assay medium isolated from each transformant exhibited strong bactericidal activity toward known fish bacterial pathogens such as Pseudomonas fluorescens, Aeromonas hydrophila, and Vibrio anguillarum. The same cecropin transgene constructs were introduced into newly fertilized medaka eggs by electroporation to produce transgenic fish. About 40% to 60% of the embryos survived from electroporation, and about 5% to 11% of the surviving fish were shown to contain cecropin transgenes by polymerase chain reaction analysis of genomic DNA samples isolated from presumptive transgenic fish. These P1 transgenic fish were used as founder stocks, and following generations of successive breeding, a total of 20 F2 families of transgenic fish were established. Expression of cecropin transgenes was detected in the F2 transgenics by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA isolated from different F2 fish showed that cecropin transgenes were integrated into the genomes of F2 transgenic fish. To determine whether transgenic fish carrying cecropin transgenes could exhibit resistance to infection by known fish bacterial

  13. Secondary Structure Preferences of Mn2+ Binding Sites in Bacterial Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Aleksandrovna Khrustaleva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 3D structures of proteins with coordinated Mn2+ ions from bacteria with low, average, and high genomic GC-content have been analyzed (149 PDB files were used. Major Mn2+ binders are aspartic acid (6.82% of Asp residues, histidine (14.76% of His residues, and glutamic acid (3.51% of Glu residues. We found out that the motif of secondary structure “beta strand-major binder-random coil” is overrepresented around all the three major Mn2+ binders. That motif may be followed by either alpha helix or beta strand. Beta strands near Mn2+ binding residues should be stable because they are enriched by such beta formers as valine and isoleucine, as well as by specific combinations of hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acid residues characteristic to beta sheet. In the group of proteins from GC-rich bacteria glutamic acid residues situated in alpha helices frequently coordinate Mn2+ ions, probably, because of the decrease of Lys usage under the influence of mutational GC-pressure. On the other hand, the percentage of Mn2+ sites with at least one amino acid in the “beta strand-major binder-random coil” motif of secondary structure (77.88% does not depend on genomic GC-content.

  14. Overview of secondary neutron production relevant to shielding inspace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heilbronn, L.; Nakamura, T.; Iwata, Y.; Kurosawa, T.; Iwase, H.; Townsend, L.W.

    2004-12-03

    An overview of experimental secondary neutron measurements relevant to space-related activities is presented. Stopping target yields and cross section measurements conducted at particle accelerators using heavy ions with energies >100 MeV per nucleon are discussed.

  15. Proceedings of Symposium on Utilization of Waste Glass in Secondary Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Papers are reported which were presented at the conference on waste glass recovery and re-use in secondary products. The uses considered include: road surfacing, asphaltic concretes, road construction, terrazzo, cement concrete, pozzolan, glass wool, glass-polymer composites, and tiles. Problems of recycling glass in remote areas, and the economics and markets for secondary glass products are discussed.

  16. Measuring spatial variation in secondary production and food quality using a common consumer approach in Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, James H.; Richardson, William B.; Evans, Mary Anne; Schaeffer, Jeff; Wynne, Timothy; Bartsch, Michelle; Bartsch, Lynn; Nelson, J. C.; Vallazza, Jon M.

    2016-01-01

    Lake Erie is a large lake straddling the border of the U.S. and Canada that has become increasingly eutrophic in recent years. Eutrophication is particularly focused in the shallow western basin. The western basin of Lake Erie is hydrodynamically similar to a large estuary, with riverine inputs from the Detroit and Maumee Rivers mixing together and creating gradients in chemical and physical conditions. This study was driven by two questions: How does secondary production and food quality for consumers vary across this large mixing zone? and Are there correlations between cyanobacterial abundance and secondary production or food quality for consumers? Measuring spatial and temporal variation in secondary production and food quality is difficult for a variety of logistical reasons, so here a common consumer approach was used. In a common consumer approach, individuals of a single species are raised under similar conditions until placed in the field across environmental gradients of interest. After some period of exposure, the response of that common consumer is measured to provide an index of spatial variation in conditions. Here, a freshwater mussel (Lampsilis siliquoidea) was deployed at 32 locations that spanned habitat types and a gradient in cyanobacterial abundance in the western basin of Lake Erie to measure spatial variation in growth (an index of secondary production) and fatty acid (FA) content (an index of food quality). We found secondary production was highest within the Maumee rivermouth and lowest in the open waters of the lake. Mussel tissues in the Maumee rivermouth also included more eicosapentaenoic and docosapentaenoic fatty acids (EPA and DPA, respectively), but fewer bacterial FAs, suggesting more algae at the base of the food web in the Maumee rivermouth compared to open lake sites. The satellite-derived estimate of cyanobacterial abundance was not correlated to secondary production, but was positively related to EPA and DPA content in the

  17. Use of chlorine dioxide in a secondary recovery process to inhibit bacterial fouling and corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knickrehm, M.; Caballero, E.; Romualdo, P.; Sandidge, J.

    1987-01-01

    A major oil company operates a secondary recovery waterflood in Inglewood, California. The waterflood currently processes 250,000 bbls. per day of produced fluid. The major economic and operational problems associated with a secondary recovery waterflood are: 1) corrosion due to oxygen, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, and bacteria (sulfate reducers and slime biomass), 2) plugging from deposits due to salts, sulfides, and biofilms. These problems lead to deterioration of water handling equipment, injection lines (surface and subsurface), and decreased water quality resulting in the plugging of injection wells. During the last 8 years the operator has used varying mechanical and chemical technology to solve these problems. From 1978 to 1982 traditional chemical programs were in effect. Over this time period there was a continuing decline in water quality, and a substantial increase in chemical and operational costs. It was determined at that time that the major reason for this was due to microbiological activity. With this in mind, the operator proceeded to test the effects of using Aqueous Chlorine Dioxide in one portion of their water handling facilities. Due to the success of the program it was applied field wide. Presently, the primary problems associated with bacteria have been arrested. Solving one corrosion problem can lead to the onset of another. The operator is now in the process of making a concentrated effort to eliminate the other synergistically related corrosive and plugging agents (O/sub 2/, CO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/S). A field history of the problems, findings, and solutions, are discussed along with an overview of our present direction.

  18. Anti-Biofilm Performance of Three Natural Products against Initial Bacterial Attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith R. Stokes

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Marine bacteria contribute significantly towards the fouling consortium, both directly (modern foul release coatings fail to prevent “slime” attachment and indirectly (biofilms often excrete chemical cues that attract macrofouling settlement. This study assessed the natural product anti-biofilm performance of an extract of the seaweed, Chondrus crispus, and two isolated compounds from terrestrial sources, (+-usnic acid and juglone, against two marine biofilm forming bacteria, Cobetia marina and Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus. Bioassays were developed using quantitative imaging and fluorescent labelling to test the natural products over a range of concentrations against initial bacterial attachment. All natural products affected bacterial attachment; however, juglone demonstrated the best anti-biofilm performance against both bacterial species at a concentration range between 5–20 ppm. In addition, for the first time, a dose-dependent inhibition (hormetic response was observed for natural products against marine biofilm forming bacteria.

  19. Comparison of Bacterial Cellulose Production among Different Strains and Fermented Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Jalili Tabaii

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different carbon sources on bacterial cellulose production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus (PTCC 1734 and two newly isolated strains (from vinegar under static culture conditions was studied. The production of bacterial cellulose was examined in modified Hestrin-Shramm medium by replacing D-glucose with other carbon sources. The results showed that the yield and characteristics of bacterial cellulose were influenced by the type of carbon source. Glycerol gave the highest yield in all of the studied strains (6%, 9.7% and 3.8% for S, A2 strain and Gluconacetobacter xylinus (PTCC 1734, respectively. The maximum dry bacterial cellulose weight in the glycerol containing medium is due to A2 strain (1.9 g l-1 in comparison to Gluconacetobacter xylinus as reference strain (0.76 g l-1. Although all of the studied strains were in Gluconacetobacter family, each used different sugars for maximum production after glycerol (mannitol and fructose for two newly isolated strains and glucose for Gluconacetobacter xylinus. The maximum moisture content was observed when sucrose and food-grade sucrose were used as carbon source. Contrary to expectations, while the maximum thickness of bacterial cellulose membrane was attained when glycerol was used, bacterial cellulose from glycerol had less moisture content than the others. The oxidized cellulose showed antibacterial activities, which makes it as a good candidate for food-preservatives.

  20. Fungi as chemical industries and genetic engineering for the production of biologically active secondary metabolites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abid; Ali; Khan; Nafees; Bacha; Bashir; Ahmad; Ghosia; Lutfullah; Umar; Farooq; Russell; John; Cox

    2014-01-01

    Fungi is somewhere in between the micro and macro organisms which is a good source of producing biologically active secondary metabolites.Fungi have been used as tool for producing different types of secondary metabolites by providing different nutrients at different laboratory conditions.The fungi have been engineered for the desired secondary metabolites by using different laboratory techniques,for example,homologous and heterologous expressions.This review reported how the fungi are used as chemical industry for the production of secondary metabolites and how they are engineered in laboratory for the production of desirable metabolites:also the biosynthetic pathways of the bio-organic-molecules were reported.

  1. Fungi as chemical industries and genetic engineering for the production of biologically active secondary metabolites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abid Ali Khan; Nafees Bacha; Bashir Ahmad; Ghosia Lutfullah; Umar Farooq; Russell John Cox

    2014-01-01

    Fungi is somewhere in between the micro and macro organisms which is a good source of producing biologically active secondary metabolites. Fungi have been used as tool for producing different types of secondary metabolites by providing different nutrients at different laboratory conditions. The fungi have been engineered for the desired secondary metabolites by using different laboratory techniques, for example, homologous and heterologous expressions. This review reported how the fungi are used as chemical industry for the production of secondary metabolites and how they are engineered in laboratory for the production of desirable metabolites;also the biosynthetic pathways of the bio-organic-molecules were reported.

  2. Production of secondary Deuterium in the atmosphere at various latitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papini, P. [Florence Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Florence (Italy); Grimani, C. [Perugia Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Perugia (Italy); Stephens, S.A. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bombay (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements)

    1995-09-01

    Secondary deuterium in the atmosphere are produced in interactions by primary cosmic rays. The shape of their energy spectrum depends on the primary cosmic ray spectrum incident at the top of the atmosphere. At high energies, the spectral shape depends on the primary spectrum of helium and heavy nuclei. However, at very low energies, specially below the geomagnetic cut-off, the spectral shape depends on the evaporation and recoil processes and hence almost independent of the spectral shape of the primary radiation. It is undertaken a calculation of the secondary deuterium spectrum at small atmospheric depths at various latitudes and the results will be presented.

  3. Increasing secondary bacterial infections with Enterobacteriaceae harboring blaCTX-M-15 and blaCMY-6 in patients with bronchogenic carcinoma:an emerging point of concern

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammed Shahid; Abida Malik; Rakesh Bhargava

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To look for secondary bacterial infections in bronchogenic carcinoma (BCA) with resistant organisms harboring bla genes considering the paucity of relevant studies. Methods:A total of 137 confirmed cases of BCA and 34 healthy volunteers were studied for the occurrence and prevalence of blaCTX-M and and blaAmpC harboring-enterobacteriaceae. A subset of these patients (n=69) was previously reported for the secondary infection with the Aspergillus species. Bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) were subjected for bacterial and fungal cultures and the bacterial isolates were screened by multiplex PCRs for the presence of blaCTX-M and blaAmpC. The isolates were also screened for the association of insertion sequence (IS26) by PCR and characterized by RAPD for any clonal relatedness. Results: A total of 143 bacterial isolates were obtained from 137 BAL specimens of BCA patients. The Enterobacteriaceae-isolates were multidrug-resistant showing concomitant resistance to fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides. Both blaCTX-M and blaAmpC of CIT family were detected in 77.4% and 27.4% isolates, respectively. Sequencing revealed the presence of blaCTX-M-15 and blaCMY-6. Twenty one percent of the isolates were simultaneously harboring blaampC and blaCTX-M-15. IS26 PCR and RAPD typing revealed the presence of diverse bacterial population but no predominant clone was identified. The present study also suggests strong association of aspergillosis with lung cancer and further strengthens the potential use of non-validated serological tests suggested earlier. Conclusions: We emphasize that all patients of bronchogenic carcinoma should also be screened for secondary bacterial infections, along with secondary fungal infections, so as to introduce early and specific antimicrobial therapy and to prevent unwanted deaths.

  4. Gender Differences of Popular Music Production in Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramo, Joseph Michael

    2011-01-01

    In this case study, the author investigated how students' gender affected their participation in a secondary popular music class in which participants wrote and performed original music. Three same-gendered rock groups and two mixed-gendered rock groups were observed. Would students of different genders rehearse and compose differently? How would…

  5. Effects of dissolved and complexed copper on heterotrophic bacterial production in San Diego bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Thomas J; Wolgast, David M; Rivera-Duarte, Ignacio; Holm-Hansen, Osmund; Hewes, Christopher D; Zirino, Alberto; Chadwick, D Bart

    2005-04-01

    Bacterial abundance and production, free (uncomplexed) copper ion concentration, total dissolved copper concentration, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total suspended solids (TSS), and chlorophyll a were measured over the course of 1 year in a series of 27 sample "Boxes" established within San Diego Bay. Water was collected through a trace metal-clean system so that each Box's sample was a composite of all the surface water in that Box. Bacterial production, chlorophyll a, TSS, DOC, and dissolved copper all generally increased from Box 1 at the mouth of the Bay to Box 27 in the South or back Bay. Free copper ion concentration generally decreased from Box 1 to Box 27 presumably due to increasing complexation capacity within natural waters. Based on correlations between TSS, chlorophyll a, bacterial production or DOC and the ratio of dissolved to free Cu ion, both DOC and particulate (bacteria and algae) fractions were potentially responsible for copper complexation, each at different times of the year. CuCl2 was added to bacterial production assays from 0 to 10 microg L(-1) to assess acute copper toxicity to the natural microbial assemblage. Interestingly, copper toxicity appeared to increase with decreases in free copper from the mouth of the Bay to the back Bay. This contrasts the free-ion activity model in which higher complexation capacity should afford greater copper protection. When cell-specific growth rates were calculated, faster growing bacteria (i.e. toward the back Bay) appeared to be more susceptible to free copper toxicity. The protecting effect of natural dissolved organic material (DOM) concentrated by tangential flow ultrafiltration (>1 kDa), illite and kaolinite minerals, and glutathione (a metal chelator excreted by algae under copper stress) was assessed in bacterial production assays. Only DOM concentrate offered any significant protection to bacterial production under increased copper concentrations. Although the potential copper protecting

  6. Inactivating effects of the lactoperoxidase system on bacterial lyases involved in oral malodour production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Manabu; Shin, Kouichirou; Wakabayashi, Hiroyuki; Yamauchi, Koji; Abe, Fumiaki; Hironaka, Shouji

    2015-10-01

    The main components of oral malodour have been identified as volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs), including hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) and methyl mercaptan (CH(3)SH). The lactoperoxidase (LPO) system (consisting of LPO, glucose oxidase, glucose and thiocyanate) was previously shown to exhibit antimicrobial activities against some oral bacteria in vitro and suppressive effects on VSCs in mouth air in a clinical trial. Here, we examined the in vitro effects of the LPO system on the activities of the bacterial lyases involved in the production of VSCs by oral anaerobes. The exposure of crude bacterial extracts of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis or purified methionine γ-lyase to the LPO system resulted in the inactivation of their lyase activities through l-cysteine and l-methionine, which was linked to the production of H(2)S and CH(3)SH, respectively. The exposure of living F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis cells to the LPO system resulted in the suppression of cell numbers and lyase activities. The inactivation of the crude bacterial extracts of F. nucleatum and purified methionine γ-lyase by the LPO system was partly recovered by the addition of DTT. Therefore, the LPO system may inactivate bacterial lyases including methionine γ-lyase by reacting with the free cysteine residues of lyases. These results suggested that the LPO system suppresses the production of VSCs not only through its antimicrobial effects, but also by its inactivating effects on the bacterial lyases of F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis.

  7. RAPA: a novel in vitro method to evaluate anti-bacterial skin cleansing products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, S A; Gafur, R B; Jones, K; Espada, L A; Polefka, T G

    2010-04-01

    Development of efficacious anti-bacterial skin cleansing products has been limited by the availability of a pre-clinical (in vitro) method to predict clinical efficacy adequately. We report a simple and rapid method, designated as rapid agar plate assay (RAPA), that uses the bacteriological agar surface as a surrogate substrate for skin and combines elements of two widely used in vivo (clinical) methods (Agar Patch and Cup Scrub). To simulate the washing of the human hand or forearm skin with the test product, trypticase soy agar plates were directly washed with the test product and rinsed under running tap water. After air-drying the washed plates, test bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli) were applied and the plates were incubated at 37 degrees C for 18-24 h. Using S. aureus as the test organism, anti-bacterial bar soap containing triclocarbanilide showed a strong linear relationship (R(2) = 0.97) between bacterial dose and their per cent reduction. A similar dose-response relationship (R(2) = 0.96) was observed for anti-bacterial liquid hand soap against E. coli. RAPA was able to distinguish between anti-bacterial products based on the nature and level of actives in them. In limited comparative tests, results obtained by RAPA were comparable with the results obtained by clinical agar patch and clinical cup scrub methods. In conclusion, RAPA provides a simple, rugged and reproducible in vitro method for testing the relative efficacy of anti-bacterial skin cleansing products with a likelihood of comparable clinical efficacy. Further testing is warranted to improve the clinical predictability of this method.

  8. A Comment on Class Productions in Elite Secondary Schools in Twenty-First-Century Global Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Lois

    2014-01-01

    In this closing essay, Lois Weis offers a broad overview of the contributions of this Special Issue on class production in elite secondary schools in the twenty-first-century global context. Drawing upon her own research within US privileged secondary schools, Weis explores the contemporary social, economic and political landscape as connected to…

  9. Analysis of bacterial spore permeability to water and ions using Nano-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosal, S; Fallon, S; Leighton, T; Wheeler, K; Hutcheon, I; Weber, P K

    2005-11-17

    Regulation of bacterial spore solvent and solute permeability is a fundamental feature of dormancy but is poorly understood. Here we present a new technique, nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) that allows the direct visualization and quantification of chemical gradients within spores. Using NanoSIMS, we demonstrate the penetration of water and a simple ionic salt, LiF, into the core of Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti) spores. The results demonstrate chemical gradients spanning the outer coat to the inner spore core that are driven by concentration-dependent ionic fluxes. Using deuterated water (D{sub 2}O), we have shown that external water is either retained or exchanged with water contained within the spore. Hydration and exchange are rapid, on a timescale of < 1 minute. Our results suggest a permeation mechanism by which short-time scale diffusion into and out of the spore can occur along hydration pathways. Additional studies are in progress to define the flux rates and mechanisms controlling these processes.

  10. Removal of 2,4,5-trichlorophenol by bacterial isolates from the secondary sludge of pulp and paper mill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karn, Santosh Kr; Reddy, M Sudhakara

    2013-09-01

    2,4,5-trichlorophenol (2,4,5-TCP) mineralizing bacteria were isolated from the secondary sludge of pulp and paper industry. These isolates used 2,4,5-TCP as a source of carbon and energy and were capable of degrading this compound, as indicated by stoichimetric release of chloride and biomass formation. Based on 16S rRNA sequence analysis, these bacteria were identified as Kocuria sp. (CL2), Bacillus pumillus (CL5), Pseudomonas stutzeri (CL7). HPLC analysis revealed that these isolates were able to degrade 2,4,5-TCP at higher concentrations (600 mg/l or 3.0 mM). A consortia of these isolates completely removed 2,4,5-TCP from the sludge obtained from pulp and paper mill within 2 weeks when supplemented at a rate of 100 mg l(-1) . Bacterial consortium also significantly reduced absorbable organic halogen (AOX) and extractable organic halogen (EOX) by 61% and 63%, respectively from the sludge. These isolates have high potential to remove 2,4,5-TCP and may be used for remediation of pulp paper mill waste containing 2,4,5-TCP.

  11. Identification of genes and gene products necessary for bacterial bioluminescence.

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Expression of luminescence in Escherichia coli was recently achieved by cloning genes from the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. One DNA fragment on a hybrid plasmid encoded regulatory functions and enzymatic activities necessary for light production. We report the results of a genetic analysis to identify the luminescence genes (lux) that reside on this recombinant plasmid. lux gene mutations were generated by hydroxylamine treatment, and these mutations were ordered on a linear map by compl...

  12. Engineering analysis of potential photosynthetic bacterial hydrogen-production systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlevich, A.; Karpuk, M. E.

    1982-06-01

    Photosynthetic bacteria (PSB) are capable of generating hydrogen from organics in effluents from food processing, pulp and paper, and chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Hydrogen evolution takes place under light in the absence of air. The rate of hydrogen production is expected to range between 300 to 600 scf of hydrogen per 1000 galloons of waste stream treated per hour. This hydrogen production system has been demonstrated at a bench-scale level and is ready for engineering development. A conceptual design for a PSB hydrogen production system is described. The system is expected to be sited adjacent to a waste stream source which will be pretreated by fermentation and pH adjustment, innoculated with bacteria, and then passed into the reactor. The reactor effluent can either be discharged into a rapid infiltration system, an irrigation ditch, and/or recycled back into the reactor. Several potential reactor designs have been developed, analyzed, and costed. A large covered pond appears to be the most economical design approach.

  13. Micropollutant degradation, bacterial inactivation and regrowth risk in wastewater effluents: Influence of the secondary (pre)treatment on the efficiency of Advanced Oxidation Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakis, Stefanos; Voumard, Margaux; Grandjean, Dominique; Magnet, Anoys; De Alencastro, Luiz Felippe; Pulgarin, César

    2016-10-01

    In this work, disinfection by 5 Advanced Oxidation Processes was preceded by 3 different secondary treatment systems present in the wastewater treatment plant of Vidy, Lausanne (Switzerland). 5 AOPs after two biological treatment methods (conventional activated sludge and moving bed bioreactor) and a physiochemical process (coagulation-flocculation) were tested in laboratory scale. The dependence among AOPs efficiency and secondary (pre)treatment was estimated by following the bacterial concentration i) before secondary treatment, ii) after the different secondary treatment methods and iii) after the various AOPs. Disinfection and post-treatment bacterial regrowth were the evaluation indicators. The order of efficiency was Moving Bed Bioreactor > Activated Sludge > Coagulation-Flocculation > Primary Treatment. As far as the different AOPs are concerned, the disinfection kinetics were: UVC/H2O2 > UVC and solar photo-Fenton > Fenton or solar light. The contextualization and parallel study of microorganisms with the micropollutants of the effluents revealed that higher exposure times were necessary for complete degradation compared to microorganisms for the UV-based processes and inversed for the Fenton-related ones. Nevertheless, in the Fenton-related systems, the nominal 80% removal of micropollutants deriving from the Swiss legislation, often took place before the elimination of bacterial regrowth risk.

  14. Human neuromodulator SLURP-1: bacterial expression, binding to muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, secondary structure, and conformational heterogeneity in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulepko, M A; Lyukmanova, E N; Paramonov, A S; Lobas, A A; Shenkarev, Z O; Kasheverov, I E; Dolgikh, D A; Tsetlin, V I; Arseniev, A S; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2013-02-01

    Human protein SLURP-1 is an endogenous neuromodulator belonging to the Ly-6/uPAR family and acting on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. In the present work, the gene of SLURP-1 was expressed in E. coli. The bacterial systems engineered for SLURP-1 expression as fused with thioredoxin and secretion with leader peptide STII failed in the production of milligram quantities of the protein. The SLURP-1 was produced with high-yield in the form of inclusion bodies, and different methods of the protein refolding were tested. Milligram quantities of recombinant SLURP-1 and its (15)N-labeled analog were obtained. The recombinant SLURP-1 competed with (125)I-α-bungarotoxin for binding to muscle-type Torpedo californica nAChR at micromolar concentrations, indicating a partial overlap in the binding sites for SLURP-1 and α-neurotoxins on the receptor surface. NMR study revealed conformational heterogeneity of SLURP-1 in aqueous solution, which was associated with cis-trans isomerization of the Tyr39-Pro40 peptide bond. The two structural forms of the protein have almost equal population in aqueous solution, and exchange process between them takes place with characteristic time of about 4 ms. Almost complete (1)H and (15)N resonance assignment was obtained for both structural forms of SLURP-1. The secondary structure of SLURP-1 involves two antiparallel β-sheets formed from five β-strands and closely resembles those of three-finger snake neurotoxins.

  15. Side effects of extra tRNA supplied in a typical bacterial protein production scenario

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Karina Marie; Nørholm, Morten H. H.

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant protein production is at the core of biotechnology and numerous molecular tools and bacterial strains have been developed to make the process more efficient. One commonly used generic solution is to supply extra copies of low-abundance tRNAs to compensate for the presence of complemen...

  16. Polysaccharides enriched in rare sugars: bacterial sources, production and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe eRoca

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Microbial extracellular polysaccharides (EPS, produced by a wide range of bacteria, are high molecular weight biopolymers, presenting an extreme diversity in terms of chemical structure and composition. They may be used in many applications, depending on their chemical and physical properties. A rather unexplored aspect is the presence of rare sugars in the composition of some EPS. Rare sugars, such as rhamnose or fucose, may provide EPS with additional biological properties compared to those composed of more common sugar monomers.This review gives a brief overview of these specific EPS and their producing bacteria. Cultivation conditions are summarized, demonstrating their impact on the EPS composition, together with downstream processing. Finally, their use in different areas, including cosmetics, food products, pharmaceuticals and biomedical applications, are discussed.

  17. Application of Bacterial Laccases for Sustainable Energy Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lörcher, Samuel; Koschorreck, Katja; Shipovskov, Stepan

    production. Progress in enzyme biotechnology and electrochemistry enables now construction of biofuel cells exploiting a wide spectrum of enzymes wired to electrodes, able of prolonged for up to several months function.1-3 One of the most attractive designs exploits direct electronic communication between...... in vivo glucose monitoring in diabetes patients). However, the most attractive are oxygen-reducing enzymes such as blue-copper-containing laccases coupled to electrodes, which provide the 4e- bioelectroreduction of O2 to H2O (1.23 V vs. NHE) at potentials approaching the thermodynamic ones. Exploitation...... of laccase-based biocathodes in the biofuel cells and in the hybrid biobattery-type or photovoltaic power sources could essentially broaden their application, enabling extraction of energy from the sea water/water dissolved oxygen. Here we demonstrate up to 0.8 mW cm-2 extracted power densities and 1.5 month...

  18. Suppositional area for the search of bacterial products for anticancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abashina, Tatiana; Laurinavichius, Kestutis; Vainshtein, Mikhail

    2016-07-01

    It is well-known that bacteria can produce compounds which show anticancer effects. In present time, it is impossible to check all bacterial species on their possible production of anticancer compounds (AC) under different conditions. Thus, it is necessary to limit the area for search of bacterial products for the anticancer therapy. We propose that production of AC by bacteria is a part of microbial biological strategy under natural conditions. We propose that bacteria in soils, in water and on plants do not meet human tumors and their AC serve for the competition with eukaryotic organisms. Most probably, an epiphytic growth of bacilli is accompanied with production of compounds inhibiting eukaryotes. According to awaited profit for the AC-producing bacteria, the epiphytic groups of bacilli show inhibition of mycelial fungi which are a natural model of eukaryotic cells. An example of strain isolation and a primary test is presented.

  19. Bacterial reduction of alcohol-based liquid and gel products on hands soiled with blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawagoe, Julia Y; Graziano, Kazuko Uchikawa; Martino, Marines Dalla Valle; Siqueira, Itacy; Correa, Luci

    2011-11-01

    The antibacterial efficacy of three alcohol-based products (liquid and gel) were tested on the hands with blood and contaminated with Serratia marcescens (ATCC 14756), using EN 1500 procedures in 14 healthy volunteers. The alcohol-based products tested, either gel or liquid-based, reached bacterial reduction levels higher than 99.9% in the presence of blood and did not differ significantly (ANOVA test; P = 0.614).

  20. Bacterial cellulose production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus by employing alternative culture media

    OpenAIRE

    Jozala,Angela Faustino; Pértile, Renata Aparecida Nedel; Santos, Carolina Alves dos; Ebinuma, Valéria de Carvalho Santos; Seckler, Marcelo Martins; Gama, F. M.; Pessoa Júnior, Adalberto

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) is used in different fields as a biological material due to its unique properties. Despite there being many BC applications, there still remain many problems associated with bioprocess technology, such as increasing productivity and decreasing production cost. New technologies that use waste from the food industry as raw materials for culture media promote economic advantages because they reduce environmental pollution and stimulate new research for science sustainabi...

  1. Variable effects of dispersal on productivity of bacterial communities due to changes in functional trait composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Severin

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown variable relationships between dispersal rate and ecosystem functioning, but the reasons for and mechanisms behind variable dispersal rate-functioning patterns are currently unknown. In this study we used six bacterial lake water communities in a laboratory experiment in order to investigate how dispersal among communities influences community productivity by evaluating three different mechanisms: 1 changes in taxonomic diversity, 2 changes in phylogenetic diversity or 3 changes in the composition of functional traits. The experiment was conducted in two phases; (A a dialysis bag experiment where the dispersal rate among six communities was manipulated and the subsequent change in bacterial diversity and growth rate was recorded, and (B a regrowth experiment where we manipulated available resources to study how well a taxon grows on certain organic carbon resources, i.e. their functional traits. From experiment (B we could thus estimate changes in functional traits in communities in experiment (A. Bacterial production was affected by dispersal, but not consistently among lakes. Neither change in taxonomic or phylogenetic diversity with dispersal could explain the observed dispersal-productivity relationships. Instead, changes in trait composition with dispersal, especially the communities' ability to use p-coumaric acid, an aromatic compound, could explain the observed dispersal-productivity relationships. Changes in this trait caused by dispersal seemed especially important for bacterial productivity in waters with a high aromaticity of the organic matter pool. We conclude that the effect of dispersal on bacterial communities can affect ecosystem functioning in different ways, through changes in functional key-traits which are important for the local environment.

  2. Heterologous production of fungal secondary metabolites in Aspergilli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anyaogu, Diana Chinyere; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    2015-01-01

    Fungal natural products comprise a wide range of compounds. Some are medically attractive as drugs and drug leads, some are used as food additives, while others are harmful mycotoxins. In recent years the genome sequence of several fungi has become available providing genetic information of a large...... number of putative biosynthetic pathways. However, compound discovery is difficult as the genes required for the production of the compounds often are silent or barely expressed under laboratory conditions. Furthermore, the lack of available tools for genetic manipulation of most fungal species hinders...... pathway discovery. Heterologous expression of the biosynthetic pathway in model systems or cell factories facilitates product discovery, elucidation, and production. This review summarizes the recent strategies for heterologous expression of fungal biosynthetic pathways in Aspergilli....

  3. Characterization of Bacterial Communities in Selected Smokeless Tobacco Products Using 16S rDNA Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert E Tyx

    Full Text Available The bacterial communities present in smokeless tobacco (ST products have not previously reported. In this study, we used Next Generation Sequencing to study the bacteria present in U.S.-made dry snuff, moist snuff and Sudanese toombak. Sample diversity and taxonomic abundances were investigated in these products. A total of 33 bacterial families from four phyla, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, were identified. U.S.-produced dry snuff products contained a diverse distribution of all four phyla. Moist snuff products were dominated by Firmicutes. Toombak samples contained mainly Actinobacteria and Firmicutes (Aerococcaceae, Enterococcaceae, and Staphylococcaceae. The program PICRUSt (Phylogenetic Investigation of Communities by Reconstruction of Unobserved States was used to impute the prevalence of genes encoding selected bacterial toxins, antibiotic resistance genes and other pro-inflammatory molecules. PICRUSt also predicted the presence of specific nitrate reductase genes, whose products can contribute to the formation of carcinogenic nitrosamines. Characterization of microbial community abundances and their associated genomes gives us an indication of the presence or absence of pathways of interest and can be used as a foundation for further investigation into the unique microbiological and chemical environments of smokeless tobacco products.

  4. Characterization of Bacterial Communities in Selected Smokeless Tobacco Products Using 16S rDNA Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyx, Robert E; Stanfill, Stephen B; Keong, Lisa M; Rivera, Angel J; Satten, Glen A; Watson, Clifford H

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial communities present in smokeless tobacco (ST) products have not previously reported. In this study, we used Next Generation Sequencing to study the bacteria present in U.S.-made dry snuff, moist snuff and Sudanese toombak. Sample diversity and taxonomic abundances were investigated in these products. A total of 33 bacterial families from four phyla, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, were identified. U.S.-produced dry snuff products contained a diverse distribution of all four phyla. Moist snuff products were dominated by Firmicutes. Toombak samples contained mainly Actinobacteria and Firmicutes (Aerococcaceae, Enterococcaceae, and Staphylococcaceae). The program PICRUSt (Phylogenetic Investigation of Communities by Reconstruction of Unobserved States) was used to impute the prevalence of genes encoding selected bacterial toxins, antibiotic resistance genes and other pro-inflammatory molecules. PICRUSt also predicted the presence of specific nitrate reductase genes, whose products can contribute to the formation of carcinogenic nitrosamines. Characterization of microbial community abundances and their associated genomes gives us an indication of the presence or absence of pathways of interest and can be used as a foundation for further investigation into the unique microbiological and chemical environments of smokeless tobacco products.

  5. Screening of Bacterial Strains for Polygalacturonase Activity: Its Production by Bacillus sphaericus (MTCC 7542

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranveer Singh Jayani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available At present almost all the pectinolytic enzymes used for industrial applications are produced by fungi. There are a few reports of pectinase production by bacterial strains. Therefore, in the present study, seventy-four bacterial strains, isolated from soil and rotten vegetable samples, were screened for polygalacturonase production. The strain PG-31, which gave maximum activity, was identified as Bacillus sphaericus (MTCC 7542. Maximal quantities of polygalacturonase were produced when a 16-hours-old inoculum was used at 7.5% (v/v in production medium and incubated in shaking conditions (160 rpm for 72 hours. The optimal temperature and pH for bacterial growth and polygalacturonase production were found to be 30∘C and 6.8, respectively. Maximum enzyme production resulted when citrus pectin was used as the carbon source at a concentration of 1.25% (w/v, whereas other carbon sources led to a decrease (30%–70% in enzyme production. Casein hydrolysate and yeast extract used together as organic nitrogen source gave best results, and ammonium chloride was found to be the most suitable inorganic nitrogen source. The supplementation of media with 0.9% (w/v D-galacturonic acid led to a 23% increase in activity. Bacillus sphaericus, a bacterium isolated from soil, produced good amount of polygalacturonase activity at neutral pH; hence, it would be potentially useful to increase the yield of banana, grape, or apple juice.

  6. Enhanced production of bacterial cellulose by using Gluconacetobacter hansenii NCIM 2529 strain under shaking conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohite, Bhavna V; Salunke, Bipinchandra K; Patil, Satish V

    2013-03-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC), a biopolymer, due to its unique properties is valuable for production of vital products in food, textile, medicine, and agriculture. In the present study, the optimal fermentation conditions for enhanced BC production by Gluconacetobacter hansenii NCIM 2529 were investigated under shaking conditions. The investigation on media components and culture parameters revealed that 2 % (w/v) sucrose as carbon source, 0.5 % (w/v) potassium nitrate as nitrogen source, 0.4 % (w/v) disodium phosphate as phosphate source, 0.04 % (w/v) magnesium sulfate, and 0.8 % (w/v) calcium chloride as trace elements, pH5.0, temperature 25 °C, and agitation speed 170 rpm with 6 days of fermentation period are optimal for maximum BC production. Production of BC using optimized media components and culture parameters was 1.66 times higher (5.0 g/l) than initial non optimized media (3.0 g/l). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectrum and comparison with the available literature suggests that the produced component by G. hansenii in the present study is pure bacterial cellulose. The specific action of cellulase out of the investigated hydrolytic enzymes (cellulase, amylase, and protease) further confirmed purity of the produced BC. These findings give insight into conditions necessary for enhanced production of bacterial cellulose, which can be used for a variety of applications.

  7. Biogas production from coumarin-rich plants--inhibition by coumarin and recovery by adaptation of the bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Denny; Schrader, Steffi; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Harms, Hauke; Sträuber, Heike

    2015-09-01

    Plants like sweet clover (Melilotus spp.) are not suitable as fodder for cattle because of harmful effects of the plant secondary metabolite coumarin. As an alternative usage, the applicability of coumarin-rich plants as substrates for biogas production was investigated. When coumarin was added to continuous fermentation processes codigesting grass silage and cow manure, it caused a strong inhibition noticeable as decrease of biogas production by 19% and increase of metabolite concentrations to an organic acids/alkalinity ratio higher than 0.3(gorganic acids) gCaCO3 (-1). Microbial communities of methanogenic archaea were dominated by the genera Methanosarcina (77%) and Methanoculleus (11%). This community composition was not influenced by coumarin addition. The bacterial community analysis unraveled a divergence caused by coumarin addition correlating with the anaerobic degradation of coumarin and the recovery of the biogas process. As a consequence, biogas production resumed similar to the coumarin-free control with a biogas yield of 0.34 LN g(volatile solids) (-1) and at initial metabolite concentrations (∼ 0.2 g(organic acids) gCaCO3 (-1)). Coumarin acts as inhibitor and as substrate during anaerobic digestion. Hence, coumarin-rich plants might be suitable for biogas production, but should only be used after adaptation of the microbial community to coumarin.

  8. Production and characterization of bacterial cellulose by Leifsonia sp. CBNU-EW3 isolated from the earthworm, Eisenia fetida

    Science.gov (United States)

    A total of five bacterial strains were isolated from earthworm, Eisenia fetida and examined for bacterial cellulose (BC) production in Hestrin–Schramm medium (HS). Among the five strains tested, CBNU-EW3 exhibited excellent BC production and was identified as Leifsonia sp. by 16S rDNA sequence analy...

  9. Shielding calculations for a production target for secondary beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehm, K.E.; Back, B.B.; Jiang, C.L. [and others

    1995-08-01

    In order to estimate the amount of shielding required for a radioactive beam facility dose rate were performed. The calculations for production targets with different geometries were performed. The calculations were performed with the MSU shielding code assuming a 500-p{mu}A 200-MeV deuteron beam stopped in a thick Al target. The target and the ion-optical elements for beam extraction are located in a 2 m{sup 3} large volume at the center of the production cell. These dose rate calculations show that with a combination of Fe and concrete it is possible to reduce the dose rate expected at the surface of a 7-m-wide cube housing the production target to less than 2 mrem/hr.

  10. Use of Natural Antimicrobial Peptides and Bacterial Biopolymers for Cultured Pearl Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Colin, Christelle; Gueguen, Yannick; Bachere, Evelyne; Kouzayha, Achraf; Saulnier, Denis; Gayet, Nicolas; Guezennec, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Cultured pearls are the product of grafting and rearing of Pinctada margaritifera pearl oysters in their natural environment. Nucleus rejections and oyster mortality appear to result from bacterial infections or from an inappropriate grafting practice. To reduce the impact of bacterial infections, synthetic antibiotics have been applied during the grafting practice. However, the use of such antibiotics presents a number of problems associated with their incomplete biodegradability, limited efficacy in some cases, and an increased risk of selecting for antimicrobial resistant bacteria. We investigated the application of a marine antimicrobial peptide, tachyplesin, which is present in the Japanese horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus, in combination with two marine bacterial exopolymers as alternative treatment agents. In field studies, the combination treatment resulted in a significant reduction in graft failures vs. untreated controls. The combination of tachyplesin (73 mg/L) with two bacterial exopolysaccharides (0.5% w/w) acting as filming agents, reduces graft-associated bacterial contamination. The survival data were similar to that reported for antibiotic treatments. These data suggest that non-antibiotic treatments of pearl oysters may provide an effective means of improving oyster survival following grafting procedures. PMID:26110895

  11. Use of Natural Antimicrobial Peptides and Bacterial Biopolymers for Cultured Pearl Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Simon-Colin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cultured pearls are the product of grafting and rearing of Pinctada margaritifera pearl oysters in their natural environment. Nucleus rejections and oyster mortality appear to result from bacterial infections or from an inappropriate grafting practice. To reduce the impact of bacterial infections, synthetic antibiotics have been applied during the grafting practice. However, the use of such antibiotics presents a number of problems associated with their incomplete biodegradability, limited efficacy in some cases, and an increased risk of selecting for antimicrobial resistant bacteria. We investigated the application of a marine antimicrobial peptide, tachyplesin, which is present in the Japanese horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus, in combination with two marine bacterial exopolymers as alternative treatment agents. In field studies, the combination treatment resulted in a significant reduction in graft failures vs. untreated controls. The combination of tachyplesin (73 mg/L with two bacterial exopolysaccharides (0.5% w/w acting as filming agents, reduces graft-associated bacterial contamination. The survival data were similar to that reported for antibiotic treatments. These data suggest that non-antibiotic treatments of pearl oysters may provide an effective means of improving oyster survival following grafting procedures.

  12. Use of Natural Antimicrobial Peptides and Bacterial Biopolymers for Cultured Pearl Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Colin, Christelle; Gueguen, Yannick; Bachere, Evelyne; Kouzayha, Achraf; Saulnier, Denis; Gayet, Nicolas; Guezennec, Jean

    2015-06-11

    Cultured pearls are the product of grafting and rearing of Pinctada margaritifera pearl oysters in their natural environment. Nucleus rejections and oyster mortality appear to result from bacterial infections or from an inappropriate grafting practice. To reduce the impact of bacterial infections, synthetic antibiotics have been applied during the grafting practice. However, the use of such antibiotics presents a number of problems associated with their incomplete biodegradability, limited efficacy in some cases, and an increased risk of selecting for antimicrobial resistant bacteria. We investigated the application of a marine antimicrobial peptide, tachyplesin, which is present in the Japanese horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus, in combination with two marine bacterial exopolymers as alternative treatment agents. In field studies, the combination treatment resulted in a significant reduction in graft failures vs. untreated controls. The combination of tachyplesin (73 mg/L) with two bacterial exopolysaccharides (0.5% w/w) acting as filming agents, reduces graft-associated bacterial contamination. The survival data were similar to that reported for antibiotic treatments. These data suggest that non-antibiotic treatments of pearl oysters may provide an effective means of improving oyster survival following grafting procedures.

  13. Characterization of salt cake from secondary aluminum production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao-Lan; Badawy, Amro El; Arambewela, Mahendranath; Ford, Robert; Barlaz, Morton; Tolaymat, Thabet

    2014-05-30

    Salt cake is a major waste component generated from the recycling of secondary aluminum processing (SAP) waste. Worldwide, the aluminum industry produces nearly 5 million tons of waste annually and the end-of-life management of these wastes is becoming a challenge in the U.S. and elsewhere. In this study, the mineral phases, metal content and metal leachability of 39 SAP waste salt cake samples collected from 10 different facilities across the U.S. were determined. The results showed that aluminum (Al), aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride and its oxides, spinel and elpasolite are the dominant aluminum mineral phases in salt cake. The average total Al content was 14% (w/w). The overall percentage of the total leachable Al in salt cake was 0.6% with approximately 80% of the samples leaching at a level less than 1% of the total aluminum content. The extracted trace metal concentrations in deionized water were relatively low (μgL(-1) level). The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) was employed to further evaluate leachability and the results indicated that the leached concentrations of toxic metals from salt cake were much lower than the EPA toxicity limit set by USEPA.

  14. Recombinant production of bacterial toxins and their derivatives in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurkan Cemal

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris is a popular heterologous expression host for the recombinant production of a variety of prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins. The rapid emergence of P. pastoris as a robust heterologous expression host was facilitated by the ease with which it can be manipulated and propagated, which is comparable to that of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. P. pastoris offers further advantages such as the tightly-regulated alcohol oxidase promoter that is particularly suitable for heterologous expression of foreign genes. While recombinant production of bacterial toxins and their derivatives is highly desirable, attempts at their heterologous expression using the traditional E. coli expression system can be problematic due to the formation of inclusion bodies that often severely limit the final yields of biologically active products. However, recent literature now suggests that P. pastoris may be an attractive alternative host for the heterologous production of bacterial toxins, such as those from the genera Bacillus, Clostridium, and Corynebacterium, as well as their more complex derivatives. Here, we review the recombinant production of bacterial toxins and their derivatives in P. pastoris with special emphasis on their potential clinical applications. Considering that de novo design and construction of synthetic toxin genes have often been necessary to achieve optimal heterologous expression in P. pastoris, we also present general guidelines to this end based on our experience with the P. pastoris expression of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cyt2Aa1 toxin.

  15. Heterotrophic bacterial production and metabolic balance during the VAHINE mesocosm experiment in the New Caledonia lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wambeke, F.; Pfreundt, U.; Barani, A.; Berthelot, H.; Moutin, T.; Rodier, M.; Hess, W. R.; Bonnet, S.

    2015-12-01

    N2 fixation fuels ~ 50 % of new primary production in the oligotrophic South Pacific Ocean. The VAHINE mesocosm experiment designed to track the fate of diazotroph derived nitrogen (DDN) in the New Caledonia lagoon. Here, we examined the temporal dynamics of heterotrophic bacterial production during this experiment. Three replicate large-volume (~ 50 m3) mesocosms were deployed and were intentionally fertilized with dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) to stimulate N2 fixation. We specifically examined relationships between N2 fixation rates and primary production, determined bacterial growth efficiency and established carbon budgets of the system from the DIP fertilization to the end of the experiment (days 5-23). Heterotrophic bacterioplankton production (BP) and alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) were statistically higher during the second phase of the experiment (P2: days 15-23), when chlorophyll biomass started to increase compared to the first phase (P1: days 5-14). Among autotrophs, Synechococcus abundances increased during P2, possibly related to its capacity to assimilate leucine and to produce alkaline phosphatase. Bacterial growth efficiency based on the carbon budget was notably higher than generally cited for oligotrophic environments (27-43 %), possibly due to a high representation of proteorhodopsin-containing organisms within the picoplanctonic community. The carbon budget showed that the main fate of gross primary production (particulate + dissolved) was respiration (67 %), and export through sedimentation (17 %). BP was highly correlated with particulate primary production and chlorophyll biomass during both phases of the experiment but slightly correlated, and only during P2 phase, with N2 fixation rates. Our results suggest that most of the DDN reached the heterotrophic bacterial community through indirect processes, like mortality, lysis and grazing.

  16. Heterotrophic bacterial production and metabolic balance during the VAHINE mesocosm experiment in the New Caledonia lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Van Wambeke

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available N2 fixation fuels ~ 50 % of new primary production in the oligotrophic South Pacific Ocean. The VAHINE mesocosm experiment designed to track the fate of diazotroph derived nitrogen (DDN in the New Caledonia lagoon. Here, we examined the temporal dynamics of heterotrophic bacterial production during this experiment. Three replicate large-volume (~ 50 m3 mesocosms were deployed and were intentionally fertilized with dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP to stimulate N2 fixation. We specifically examined relationships between N2 fixation rates and primary production, determined bacterial growth efficiency and established carbon budgets of the system from the DIP fertilization to the end of the experiment (days 5–23. Heterotrophic bacterioplankton production (BP and alkaline phosphatase activity (APA were statistically higher during the second phase of the experiment (P2: days 15–23, when chlorophyll biomass started to increase compared to the first phase (P1: days 5–14. Among autotrophs, Synechococcus abundances increased during P2, possibly related to its capacity to assimilate leucine and to produce alkaline phosphatase. Bacterial growth efficiency based on the carbon budget was notably higher than generally cited for oligotrophic environments (27–43 %, possibly due to a high representation of proteorhodopsin-containing organisms within the picoplanctonic community. The carbon budget showed that the main fate of gross primary production (particulate + dissolved was respiration (67 %, and export through sedimentation (17 %. BP was highly correlated with particulate primary production and chlorophyll biomass during both phases of the experiment but slightly correlated, and only during P2 phase, with N2 fixation rates. Our results suggest that most of the DDN reached the heterotrophic bacterial community through indirect processes, like mortality, lysis and grazing.

  17. Intracellular cytokine production by dengue virus-specific T cells correlates with subclinical secondary infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Steven; Endy, Tim P; Thomas, Stephen; Mathew, Anuja; Potts, James; Pazoles, Pamela; Libraty, Daniel H; Gibbons, Robert; Rothman, Alan L

    2011-05-01

    The pathophysiology of dengue virus infection remains poorly understood, although secondary infection is strongly associated with more severe disease. In the present study, we performed a nested, case-control study comparing the responses of pre-illness peripheral blood mononuclear cells between children who would subsequently develop either subclinical or symptomatic secondary infection 6-11 months after the baseline blood samples were obtained and frozen. We analyzed intracellular cytokine production by CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells in response to stimulation with dengue antigen. We found higher frequencies of dengue virus-specific TNFα, IFNγ-, and IL-2-producing T cells among schoolchildren who subsequently developed subclinical infection, compared with those who developed symptomatic secondary dengue virus infection. Although other studies have correlated immune responses during secondary infection with severity of disease, to our knowledge this is the first study to demonstrate a pre-infection dengue-specific immune response that correlates specifically with a subclinical secondary infection.

  18. Preliminary consultation on preferred product characteristics of benzathine penicillin G for secondary prophylaxis of rheumatic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyber, Rosemary; Boyd, Ben J; Colquhoun, Samantha; Currie, Bart J; Engel, Mark; Kado, Joseph; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Sullivan, Mark; Saxena, Anita; Sheel, Meru; Steer, Andrew; Mucumbitsi, Joseph; Zühlke, Liesl; Carapetis, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    Rheumatic fever is caused by an abnormal immune reaction to group A streptococcal infection. Secondary prophylaxis with antibiotics is recommended for people after their initial episode of rheumatic fever to prevent recurrent group A streptococcal infections, recurrences of rheumatic fever and progression to rheumatic heart disease. This secondary prophylaxis must be maintained for at least a decade after the last episode of rheumatic fever. Benzathine penicillin G is the first line antibiotic for secondary prophylaxis, delivered intramuscularly every 2 to 4 weeks. However, adherence to recommended secondary prophylaxis regimens is a global challenge. This paper outlines a consultation with global experts in rheumatic heart disease on the characteristics of benzathine penicillin G formulations which could be changed to improve adherence with secondary prophylaxis. Characteristics included dose interval, pain, administration mechanism, cold chain independence and cost. A sample target product profile for reformulated benzathine penicillin G is presented.

  19. Cleaning products and air fresheners: exposure to primary and secondary air pollutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazaroff, W.; Weschler, Charles J.

    2004-01-01

    . More than two dozen research articles present evidence of adverse health effects from inhalation exposure associated with cleaning or cleaning products. Exposure to primary and secondary pollutants depends on the complex interplay of many sets of factors and processes, including cleaning product...... by the US federal government as hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). California's Proposition 65 list of species recognized as carcinogens or reproductive toxicants also includes constituents of certain cleaning products and air fresheners. In addition, many cleaning agents and air fresheners contain chemicals...... that can react with other air contaminants to yield potentially harmful secondary products. For example, terpenes can react rapidly with ozone in indoor air generating many secondary pollutants, including TACs such as formaldehyde. Furthermore, ozone-terpene reactions produce the hydroxyl radical, which...

  20. Indoor secondary pollutants from cleaning product and air freshener use in the presence of ozone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singer, B.C.; Coleman, B.K.; Destaillats, H.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the formation of secondary pollutants resulting from household product use in the presence of ozone. Experiments were conducted in a 50-m(3) chamber simulating a residential room. The chamber was operated at conditions relevant to US residences in polluted areas during warm......-oil air freshener (AFR) was operated for several days. Cleaning products were applied realistically with quantities scaled to simulate residential use rates. Concentrations of organic gases and secondary organic aerosol from the terpene-containing consumer products were measured with and without ozone...... than 100 mu g m(-3)) in some experiments. Ozone consumption and elevated hydroxyl radical concentrations persisted for 10-12 h following brief cleaning events, indicating that secondary pollutant production can persist for extended periods. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  1. Production and excretion of secondary metabolites by plant cell cultures of Tagetes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buitelaar, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    In this thesis, the results are presented of several approaches to improve the production and excretion of thiophenes by cell cultures or hairy roots of Tagetes spp.In chapter one, most of the techniques to improve the production and/or excretion of secondary metabolites with plant cell cultures are

  2. Bacterial symbionts: prospects for the sustainable production of invertebrate-derived pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, J

    2006-01-01

    Invertebrate animals, such as sponges, tunicates and bryozoans, are among the most important sources of biomedically relevant natural products. However, as these animals generally contain only low quantities of the compounds, further pharmacological development is in most cases difficult. There is increasing evidence that many metabolites, in particular polyketides and nonribosomally synthesized peptides, are not produced by the animals themselves but by associated bacterial symbionts. This symbiont hypothesis currently attracts considerable interest, since it implicates that animal-independent production systems based on bacterial fermentation processes could be created. This review gives an overview about recent developments in the research on natural product symbiosis. Different techniques will be discussed that have been employed to pinpoint the actual producer. Since bacterial symbionts are highly fastidious and have been generally resistant to cultivation attempts, emphasis will be laid on culture-independent strategies, such as cell separation approaches and the cloning of biosynthetic genes. These strategies have provided insights into possible sources of several natural products, e.g. the bryostatins, pederin, the onnamides, swinholide A and theopalauamide. Finally, potential techniques for the generation of renewable supplies of symbiont-derived drug candidates will be discussed. Cultivation approaches and the heterologous expression of cloned biosynthesis genes from uncultured symbionts could in future provide access to several important marine drug candidates, including bryostatin 1, halichondrin or ET-743.

  3. Secondary proton production at small atmospheric depths as a function of the geomagnetic cut-off

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papini, P. [Florence Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Florence (Italy); Grimani, C. [Perugia Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Perugia (Italy); Stephens, S.A. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bombay (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements)

    1995-09-01

    A detailed calculation of the energy spectrum of secondary protons in the atmosphere is being carried out in the energy range 20 MeV - 40 GeV. In this calculation, it is taken into account all processes leading to the production of secondary protons as a function of the atmospheric depth has been calculated using all relevant energy loss processes. In this paper, it is examine the effect of the geomagnetic cut-off on the spectral shape of secondary protons specially at energies below the geomagnetic cut-off for small atmospheric depths.

  4. Bacterial production and transformation of dissolved neutral sugars and amino acids in seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, L.; Lechtenfeld, O.; Benner, R.; Middelboe, M.; Stedmon, C. A.

    2014-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the ocean consists of a heterogeneous mixture of molecules, most of which are of unknown origin. Neutral sugars and amino acids are among the few recognizable biomolecules in DOM, and the molecular composition of these biomolecules is shaped primarily by biological production and degradation processes. This study provides insight into the bioavailability of biomolecules as well as the chemical composition of DOM produced by bacteria. The molecular compositions of neutral sugars and amino acids were investigated in DOM produced by bacteria and in DOM remaining after long-term bacterial degradation. Results from bioassay incubations (32 days) with natural and artificial seawater, indicate that the molecular compositions following bacterial degradation are not strongly influenced by the initial substrate or bacterial community. The molecular composition of neutral sugars released by bacteria was characterized by a high glucose content (47 mol%) and heterogeneous contributions from other neutral sugars (3-14 mol%). DOM remaining after bacterial degradation was characterized by a high galactose content (33 mol%), followed by glucose (22 mol%) and the remaining neutral sugars (7-11 mol%). The ratio of D-amino acids to L-amino acids increased during the experiments as a response to bacterial degradation, and after 32 days the D/L ratios of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine and alanine reached around 0.79, 0.32, 0.30 and 0.51 in all treatments, respectively. The striking similarity in neutral sugar and amino acid compositions between natural and artificial seawater samples, suggests that the microbial carbon pump also applies for neutral sugars and amino acids and that bacterially-produced biomolecules persist for long periods in the ocean.

  5. Bacterial production and transformation of dissolved neutral sugars and amino acids in seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Jørgensen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved organic matter (DOM in the ocean consists of a heterogeneous mixture of molecules, most of which are of unknown origin. Neutral sugars and amino acids are among the few recognizable biomolecules in DOM, and the molecular composition of these biomolecules is shaped primarily by biological production and degradation processes. This study provides insight into the bioavailability of biomolecules as well as the chemical composition of DOM produced by bacteria. The molecular compositions of neutral sugars and amino acids were investigated in DOM produced by bacteria and in DOM remaining after long-term bacterial degradation. Results from bioassay incubations (32 days with natural and artificial seawater, indicate that the molecular compositions following bacterial degradation are not strongly influenced by the initial substrate or bacterial community. The molecular composition of neutral sugars released by bacteria was characterized by a high glucose content (47 mol% and heterogeneous contributions from other neutral sugars (3–14 mol%. DOM remaining after bacterial degradation was characterized by a high galactose content (33 mol%, followed by glucose (22 mol% and the remaining neutral sugars (7–11 mol%. The ratio of D-amino acids to L-amino acids increased during the experiments as a response to bacterial degradation, and after 32 days the D/L ratios of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine and alanine reached around 0.79, 0.32, 0.30 and 0.51 in all treatments, respectively. The striking similarity in neutral sugar and amino acid compositions between natural and artificial seawater samples, suggests that the microbial carbon pump also applies for neutral sugars and amino acids and that bacterially-produced biomolecules persist for long periods in the ocean.

  6. Thin stillage supplementation greatly enhances bacterial cellulose production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jyh-Ming; Liu, Ren-Han

    2012-09-01

    Thin stillage (TS), a wastewater from rice wine distillery can well sustain the growth of Gluconacetobacter xylinus for production of bacterial cellulose (BC). When used as a supplement to the traditional BC production medium (Hestrin and Schramm medium), the enhancement of BC production increased with the amount of TS supplemented in a static culture of G. xylinus. When TS was employed to replace distilled water for preparing HS medium (100%TS-HS medium), the BC production in this 100%TS-HS medium was enhanced 2.5-fold to a concentration of 10.38 g/l with sugar to BC conversion yield of 57% after 7 days cultivation. The cost-free TS as a supplement in BC production medium not only can greatly enhance the BC production, but also can effectively dispose the nuisance wastewater of rice wine distillery.

  7. Hairy root culture for mass-production of high-value secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Smita; Srivastava, Ashok K

    2007-01-01

    Plant cell cultivations are being considered as an alternative to agricultural processes for producing valuable phytochemicals. Since many of these products (secondary metabolites) are obtained by direct extraction from plants grown in natural habitat, several factors can alter their yield. The use of plant cell cultures has overcome several inconveniences for the production of these secondary metabolites. Organized cultures, and especially root cultures, can make a significant contribution in the production of secondary metabolites. Most of the research efforts that use differentiated cultures instead of cell suspension cultures have focused on transformed (hairy) roots. Agrobacterium rhizogenes causes hairy root disease in plants. The neoplastic (cancerous) roots produced by A. rhizogenes infection are characterized by high growth rate, genetic stability and growth in hormone free media. These genetically transformed root cultures can produce levels of secondary metabolites comparable to that of intact plants. Hairy root cultures offer promise for high production and productivity of valuable secondary metabolites (used as pharmaceuticals, pigments and flavors) in many plants. The main constraint for commercial exploitation of hairy root cultivations is the development and scaling up of appropriate reactor vessels (bioreactors) that permit the growth of interconnected tissues normally unevenly distributed throughout the vessel. Emphasis has focused on designing appropriate bioreactors suitable to culture the delicate and sensitive plant hairy roots. Recent reactors used for mass production of hairy roots can roughly be divided as liquid-phase, gas-phase, or hybrid reactors. The present review highlights the nature, applications, perspectives and scale up of hairy root cultures for the production of valuable secondary metabolites.

  8. Biodegradation of Leonardite by an alkali-producing bacterial community and characterization of the degraded products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tong-Guo; Jiang, Feng; Yang, Jin-Shui; Li, Bao-Zhen; Yuan, Hong-Li

    2012-03-01

    In this study, three bacterial communities were obtained from 12 Leonardite samples with the aim of identifying a clean, effective, and economic technique for the dissolution of Leonardite, a type of low-grade coal, in the production of humic acid (HA). The biodegradation ability and characteristics of the degraded products of the most effective bacterial community (MCSL-2), which degraded 50% of the Leonardite within 21 days, were further investigated. Analyses of elemental composition, (13)C NMR, and Fourier transform infrared revealed that the contents of C, O, and aliphatic carbon were similar in biodegraded humic acid (bHA) and chemically (alkali) extracted humic acid (cHA). However, the N and carboxyl carbon contents of bHA was higher than that of cHA. Furthermore, a positive correlation was identified between the degradation efficiency and the increasing pH of the culture medium, while increases of manganese peroxidase and esterase activities were also observed. These data demonstrated that both alkali production and enzyme reactions were involved in Leonardite solubilization by MCSL-2, although the former mechanism predominated. No fungus was observed by microscopy. Only four bacterial phylotypes were recognized, and Bacillus licheniformis-related bacteria were identified as the main group in MCSL-2 by analysis of amplified 16S rRNA genes, thus demonstrating that Leonardite degradation ability has a limited distribution in bacteria. Hormone-like bioactivities of bHA were also detected. In this study, a bacterial community capable of Leonardite degradation was identified and the products characterized. These data implicate the use of such bacteria for the exploitation of Leonardite as a biofertilizer.

  9. Production of bacterial cellulose by Gluconacetobacter hansenii UAC09 using coffee cherry husk

    OpenAIRE

    Rani, M. Usha; Appaiah, K. A. Anu

    2011-01-01

    The work is aimed to investigate the suitability of underutilized coffee cherry husk (CCH) for the production and optimization of bacterial cellulose (BC) by Gluconacetobacter hansenii UAC09 and to study the physico-mechanical properties of BC films. CCH extract was used as a carbon source in various concentrations along with other nutritional components such as nitrogen (corn steep liquor, urea) and additives (ethyl alcohol, acetic acid). Concentration of CCH extract at 1:1 (w/v) along with ...

  10. The effect of antibiotics on associated bacterial community of stored product mites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kopecky

    Full Text Available Bacteria are associated with the gut, fat bodies and reproductive organs of stored product mites (Acari: Astigmata. The mites are pests due to the production of allergens. Addition of antibiotics to diets can help to characterize the association between mites and bacteria.Ampicillin, neomycin and streptomycin were added to the diets of mites and the effects on mite population growth (Acarus siro, Lepidoglyphus destructor and Tyrophagus putrescentiae and associated bacterial community structure were assessed. Mites were treated by antibiotic supplementation (1 mg g(-1 of diet for 21 days and numbers of mites and bacterial communities were analyzed and compared to the untreated control. Bacterial quantities, determined by real-time PCR, significantly decreased in antibiotic treated specimens from 5 to 30 times in A. siro and T. putrescentiae, while no decline was observed in L. destructor. Streptomycin treatment eliminated Bartonella-like bacteria in the both A. siro and T. putrescentiae and Cardinium in T. putrescentiae. Solitalea-like bacteria proportion increased in the communities of neomycin and streptomycin treated A. siro specimens. Kocuria proportion increased in the bacterial communities of ampicillin and streptomycin treated A. siro and neomycin and streptomycin treated L. destructor.The work demonstrated the changes of mite associated bacterial community under antibiotic pressure in pests of medical importance. Pre-treatment of mites by 1 mg g(-1 antibiotic diets improved mite fitness as indicated accelerated population growth of A. siro pretreated streptomycin and neomycin and L. destructor pretreated by neomycin. All tested antibiotics supplemented to diets caused the decrease of mite growth rate in comparison to the control diet.

  11. Production of a Recombinant Vaccine Candidate against Burkholderia pseudomallei Exploiting the Bacterial N-Glycosylation Machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima eGarcia-Quintanilla

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines developing immune responses towards surface carbohydrates conjugated to proteins are effective in preventing infection and death by bacterial pathogens. Traditional production of these vaccines utilizes complex synthetic chemistry to acquire and conjugate the glycan to a protein. However, glycoproteins produced by bacterial protein glycosylation systems are significantly easier to produce, and could possible be used as vaccine candidates. In this work we functionally expressed the B. pseudomallei O polysaccharide (OPS II, the C. jejuni oligosaccharyltransferase (OTase, and a suitable glycoprotein (AcrA in a designer E. coli strain with a higher efficiency for production of glycoconjugates. We were able to produce and purify the OPS II-AcrA glycoconjugate, and MS analysis confirmed correct glycan was produced and attached. We observed the attachment of the O-acetylated deoxyhexose directly to the acceptor protein, which expands the range of substrates utilized by the OTase PglB. Injection of the glycoprotein into mice generated an IgG immune response against B. pseudomallei, and this response was partially protective against an intranasal challenge. Our experiments show that bacterial engineered glycoconjugates can be utilized as vaccine candidates against B. pseudomallei. Additionally, our new E. coli strain SDB1 is more efficient in glycoprotein production, and could have additional applications in the future.

  12. Heterotrophic bacterial production and metabolic balance during the VAHINE mesocosm experiment in the New Caledonia lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wambeke, France; Pfreundt, Ulrike; Barani, Aude; Berthelot, Hugo; Moutin, Thierry; Rodier, Martine; Hess, Wolfgang R.; Bonnet, Sophie

    2016-06-01

    Studies investigating the fate of diazotrophs through the microbial food web are lacking, although N2 fixation can fuel up to 50 % of new production in some oligotrophic oceans. In particular, the role played by heterotrophic prokaryotes in this transfer is largely unknown. In the frame of the VAHINE (VAriability of vertical and tropHIc transfer of diazotroph derived N in the south wEst Pacific) experiment, three replicate large-volume (˜ 50 m3) mesocosms were deployed for 23 days in the new Caledonia lagoon and were intentionally fertilized on day 4 with dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) to stimulate N2 fixation. We specifically examined relationships between heterotrophic bacterial production (BP) and N2 fixation or primary production, determined bacterial growth efficiency and established carbon budgets. BP was statistically higher during the second phase of the experiment (P2: days 15-23), when chlorophyll biomass started to increase compared to the first phase (P1: days 5-14). Phosphatase alkaline activity increased drastically during the second phase of the experiment, showing adaptations of microbial populations after utilization of the added DIP. Notably, among autotrophs, Synechococcus abundances increased during P2, possibly related to its capacity to assimilate leucine and to produce alkaline phosphatase. Bacterial growth efficiency based on the carbon budget (27-43 %), was notably higher than generally cited for oligotrophic environments and discussed in links with the presence of abundant species of bacteria expressing proteorhodopsin. The main fates of gross primary production (particulate + dissolved) were respiration (67 %) and export through sedimentation (17 %). BP was highly correlated with particulate primary production and chlorophyll biomass during both phases of the experiment but was slightly correlated, and only during P2 phase, with N2 fixation rates. Heterotrophic bacterial production was strongly stimulated after mineral N enrichment

  13. Improvement production of bacterial cellulose by semi-continuous process in molasses medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakar, Fatih; Ozer, Işılay; Aytekin, A Özhan; Sahin, Fikrettin

    2014-06-15

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) has unique properties such as structural, functional, physical and chemical. The mass production of BC for industrial application has recently become attractive to produce more economical and high productive cellulose. In this study, to improve the productivity of bacterial cellulose (BC), BC production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus FC01 was investigated in molasses medium with static semi-continuous operation mode. Cell dry weight, polysaccharide, sugar and cellulose concentrations were monitored and cellulose was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The highest cellulose yield (1.637 g/L) was obtained in SCP50-7d, which molasses of 1/2 ratio for 7 days by static semi-continuous operation mode. The results show that BC can be highly produced by G. xylinus in molasses with static semi-continuous process than batch process. We claimed that low-cost medium with semi-continuous operation mode in static culture is a good candidate for industrial scale BC productions.

  14. Characterization of the bacterial metagenome in an industrial algae bioenergy production system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shi [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Fulbright, Scott P [Colorado State University; Zeng, Xiaowei [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Yates, Tracy [Solix Biofuels; Wardle, Greg [Solix Biofuels; Chisholm, Stephen T [Colorado State University; Xu, Jian [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Lammers, Peter [New Mexico State University

    2011-03-16

    Cultivation of oleaginous microalgae for fuel generally requires growth of the intended species to the maximum extent supported by available light. The presence of undesired competitors, pathogens and grazers in cultivation systems will create competition for nitrate, phosphate, sulfate, iron and other micronutrients in the growth medium and potentially decrease microalgal triglyceride production by limiting microalgal health or cell density. Pathogenic bacteria may also directly impact the metabolism or survival of individual microalgal cells. Conversely, symbiotic bacteria that enhance microalgal growth may also be present in the system. Finally, the use of agricultural and municipal wastes as nutrient inputs for microalgal production systems may lead to the introduction and proliferation of human pathogens or interfere with the growth of bacteria with beneficial effects on system performance. These considerations underscore the need to understand bacterial community dynamics in microalgal production systems in order to assess microbiome effects on microalgal productivity and pathogen risks. Here we focus on the bacterial component of microalgal production systems and describe a pipeline for metagenomic characterization of bacterial diversity in industrial cultures of an oleaginous alga, Nannochloropsis salina. Environmental DNA was isolated from 12 marine algal cultures grown at Solix Biofuels, a region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified by PCR, and 16S amplicons were sequenced using a 454 automated pyrosequencer. The approximately 70,000 sequences that passed quality control clustered into 53,950 unique sequences. The majority of sequences belonged to thirteen phyla. At the genus level, sequences from all samples represented 169 different genera. About 52.94% of all sequences could not be identified at the genus level and were classified at the next highest possible resolution level. Of all sequences, 79.92% corresponded to 169 genera and 70 other taxa. We

  15. Bioaugmentation of Hydrogenispora ethanolica LX-B affects hydrogen production through altering indigenous bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiman; Guo, Rongbo; Shi, Xiaoshuang; He, Shuai; Wang, Lin; Dai, Meng; Qiu, Yanling; Dang, Xiaoxiao

    2016-07-01

    Bioaugmentation can facilitate hydrogen production from complex organic substrates, but it still is unknown how indigenous microbial communities respond to the added bacteria. Here, using a Hydrogenispora ethanolica LX-B (named as LX-B) bioaugmentation experiments, the distribution of metabolites and the responses of indigenous bacterial communities were investigated via batch cultivation (BC) and repeated batch cultivation (RBC). In BC the LX-B/sludge ratio of 0.12 achieved substantial high hydrogen yield, which was over twice that of control. In RBC one-time bioaugmentation and repeated batch bioaugmentation of LX-B resulted in the hydrogen yield that was average 1.2-fold and 0.8-fold higher than that in control, respectively. This improved hydrogen production performance mainly benefited from a shift in composition of the indigenous bacterial community caused by LX-B bioaugmentation. The findings represented an important step in understanding the relationship between bioaugmentation, a shift in bacterial communities, and altered bioreactor performance.

  16. Variable effects of dispersal on productivity of bacterial communities due to changes in functional trait composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severin, Ina; Östman, Örjan; Lindström, Eva S.

    2013-01-01

    ) a dialysis bag experiment where the dispersal rate among six communities was manipulated and the subsequent change in bacterial diversity and growth rate was recorded, and (B) a regrowth experiment where we manipulated available resources to study how well a taxon grows on certain organic carbon resources, i......Previous studies have shown variable relationships between dispersal rate and ecosystem functioning, but the reasons for and mechanisms behind variable dispersal rate - functioning patterns are currently unknown. In this study we used six bacterial lake water communities in a laboratory experiment...... in order to investigate how dispersal among communities influences community productivity by evaluating three different mechanisms: 1) changes in taxonomic diversity, 2) changes in phylogenetic diversity or 3) changes in the composition of functional traits. The experiment was conducted in two phases; (A...

  17. Bacterial Glycosyltransferases: Challenges and opportunities of a highly diverse enzyme class toward tailoring natural products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen eSchmid

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The enzyme subclass of glycosyltransferases (EC 2.4 currently comprises 97 families as specified by CAZy classification. One of their important roles is in the biosynthesis of disaccharides, oligosaccharides and polysaccharides by catalyzing the transfer of sugar moieties from activated donor molecules to other sugar molecules. In addition glycosyltransferases also catalyze the transfer of sugar moieties onto aglycons, which is of great relevance for the synthesis of many high value natural products. Bacterial glycosyltransferases show a higher sequence similarity in comparison to mammalian ones. Even when most glycosyltransferases are poorly explored, state of the art technologies, such as protein engineering, domain swapping or computational analysis strongly enhance our understanding and utilization of these very promising classes of proteins. This perspective article will focus on bacterial glycosyltransferases, especially on classification, screening and engineering strategies to alter substrate specificity. The future development in these fields as well as obstacles and challenges will be highlighted and discussed.

  18. Auto-production of biosurfactants reverses the coffee ring effect in a bacterial system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sempels, Wouter; de Dier, Raf; Mizuno, Hideaki; Hofkens, Johan; Vermant, Jan

    2013-04-01

    The deposition of material at the edge of evaporating droplets, known as the ‘coffee ring effect’, is caused by a radially outward capillary flow. This phenomenon is common to a wide array of systems including colloidal and bacterial systems. The role of surfactants in counteracting these coffee ring depositions is related to the occurrence of local vortices known as Marangoni eddies. Here we show that these swirling flows are universal, and not only lead to a uniform deposition of colloids but also occur in living bacterial systems. Experiments on Pseudomonas aeruginosa suggest that the auto-production of biosurfactants has an essential role in creating a homogeneous deposition of the bacteria upon drying. Moreover, at biologically relevant conditions, intricate time-dependent flows are observed in addition to the vortex regime, which are also effective in reversing the coffee ring effect at even lower surfactant concentrations.

  19. Secondary Metabolites from Penicillium roqueforti, A Starter for the Production of Gorgonzola Cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardini, Alberto; Soncini, Gabriella

    2014-01-01

    The presence of mold in food, although necessary for production, can involve the presence of secondary metabolites, which are sometimes toxic. Penicillium roqueforti is a common saprophytic fungus but it is also the essential fungus used in the production of Roquefort cheese and other varieties of blue cheese containing internal mold. The study was conducted on industrial batches of Penicillium roqueforti starters used in the production of the Gorgonzola cheese, with the aim to verify the production of secondary metabolites. Nine Penicillium roqueforti strains were tested. The presence of roquefortine C, PR toxin and mycophenolic acid was tested first in vitro, then on bread-like substrate and lastly in vivo in nine cheese samples produced with the same starters and ready to market. In vitro, only Penicillium out of nine produced roquefortine C, four starters showed mycophenolic acid production, while no significant amounts of PR toxin were detected. In the samples grown on bread-like substrate, Penicillium did not produce secondary metabolites, likewise with each cheese samples tested. To protect consumers’ health and safety, the presence of mycotoxins needs to be verified in food which is widely consumed, above all for products protected by the protected denomination of origin (DOP) label (i.e. a certificate guaranteeing the geographic origin of the product), such as Gorgonzola cheese.

  20. 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene mineralization and bacterial production rates of natural microbial assemblages from coastal sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, Michael T., E-mail: michael.montgomery@nrl.navy.mil [Naval Research Laboratory, Marine Biogeochemistry Section, Code 6114, 4555 Overlook Avenue, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Coffin, Richard B., E-mail: richard.coffin@nrl.navy.mil [Naval Research Laboratory, Marine Biogeochemistry Section, Code 6114, 4555 Overlook Avenue, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Boyd, Thomas J., E-mail: thomas.boyd@nrl.navy.mil [Naval Research Laboratory, Marine Biogeochemistry Section, Code 6114, 4555 Overlook Avenue, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Smith, Joseph P., E-mail: joseph.smith@nrl.navy.mil [Naval Research Laboratory, Marine Biogeochemistry Section, Code 6114, 4555 Overlook Avenue, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Walker, Shelby E., E-mail: Shelby.Walker@noaa.gov [Naval Research Laboratory, Marine Biogeochemistry Section, Code 6114, 4555 Overlook Avenue, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Osburn, Christopher L., E-mail: chris_osburn@ncsu.edu [Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    The nitrogenous energetic constituent, 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT), is widely reported to be resistant to bacterial mineralization (conversion to CO{sub 2}); however, these studies primarily involve bacterial isolates from freshwater where bacterial production is typically limited by phosphorus. This study involved six surveys of coastal waters adjacent to three biome types: temperate broadleaf, northern coniferous, and tropical. Capacity to catabolize and mineralize TNT ring carbon to CO{sub 2} was a common feature of natural sediment assemblages from these coastal environments (ranging to 270+/-38 {mu}g C kg{sup -1} d{sup -1}). More importantly, these mineralization rates comprised a significant proportion of total heterotrophic production. The finding that most natural assemblages surveyed from these ecosystems can mineralize TNT ring carbon to CO{sub 2} is consistent with recent reports that assemblage components can incorporate TNT ring carbon into bacterial biomass. These data counter the widely held contention that TNT is recalcitrant to bacterial catabolism of the ring carbon in natural environments. - Highlights: > TNT mineralization is a common feature of natural bacterial assemblages in coastal sediments. > TNT mineralization rates comprised a significant proportion of total heterotrophic production. > These data counter the widely held contention that TNT is recalcitrant to bacterial catabolism of the ring carbon in natural environments. - The capacity to mineralize TNT ring carbon to CO{sub 2} is a common feature of natural bacterial assemblages in coastal sediment.

  1. Utilization of secondary-treated wastewater for the production of freshwater microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Serrano, C; Morales-Amaral, M M; Acién, F G; Escudero, R; Fernández-Sevilla, J M; Molina-Grima, E

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we studied the potential use of secondary-treated wastewater as nutrient source in the production of freshwater microalgae strains. Experiments were performed indoors in a semicontinuous mode, at 0.3 day(-1), simulating outdoor conditions. We demonstrated that all the tested strains can be produced by using only secondary-treated wastewater as the nutrient source. The utilization of secondary-treated wastewater imposes nutrient-limiting conditions, with maximal biomass productivity dropping to 0.5 g l(-1) day(-1) and modifies the biochemical composition of the biomass by increasing the amount of lipids and carbohydrates while reducing the biomass protein content. We measured fatty acid content and productivity of up to 25 %d.wt. and 110 mg l(-1) day(-1), respectively. We demonstrated that all the tested strains were capable of completely removing the nitrogen and phosphorus contained in the secondary-treated wastewater, and while the use of this effluent reduced the cells' photosynthetic efficiency, the nitrogen and phosphorus coefficient yield increased. Muriellopsis sp. and S. subpicatus were selected as the most promising strains for outdoor production using secondary-treated wastewater as the culture medium; this was not only because of their high productivity but also their photosynthetic efficiency, of up to 2.5 %, along with nutrient coefficient yields of up to 96 gbiomass gN (-1) and 166 gbiomass gP (-1). Coupling microalgae production processes to tertiary treatment in wastewater treatment plants make it possible to recover nutrients contained in the water and to produce valuable biomass, especially where nutrient removal is required prior to wastewater discharge.

  2. Dynamics of interleukin-21 production during the clinical course of primary and secondary dengue virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivanco-Cid, H; Maldonado-Rentería, M J; Sánchez-Vargas, L A; Izaguirre-Hernández, I Y; Hernández-Flores, K G; Remes-Ruiz, R

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies have revealed the clinical relevance of pro-inflammatory cytokine production during dengue virus (DENV) infections. In this study, we evaluated the production of interleukin-21 (IL-21), a key soluble mediator mainly produced by CD4+ T cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of IL-21 production during the clinical course of primary and secondary DENV infections and the potential association of IL-21 serum levels with the disease pathogenesis. Blood samples from DENV-infected patients were collected on different days after the onset of symptoms. Patients were classified according to their phase of disease (acute vs. convalescent phases), the type of infection (primary vs. secondary), and the clinical severity of their disease (dengue fever (DF) vs. dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF)). IL-21 levels were measured using a quantitative capture ELISA assay. The levels of IL-21 were significantly elevated in the disease group compared with the control group. IL-21 was detected in primary and secondary DENV infections, with a significantly higher concentration in the convalescent phase of primary infections. IL-21 levels were significantly higher in patients with secondary acute DHF infections when compared with those with secondary acute DF infection. There was a relationship between the elevated serum levels of IL-21 and the production of DENV-specific IgM and IgG antibodies. Taking together, our results show for the first time the involvement of IL-21 during the clinical course of DENV infections. We speculate that IL-21 may play a protective role in the context of the convalescent phase of primary infections and the acute phase of secondary infections.

  3. Exploring Informal Mathematical Products of Low Achievers at the Secondary School Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsenty, Ronnie; Arcavi, Abraham; Hadas, Nurit

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the notion of informal mathematical products, in the specific context of teaching mathematics to low achieving students at the secondary school level. The complex and relative nature of this notion is illustrated and some of its characteristics are suggested. These include the use of ad-hoc strategies, mental calculations,…

  4. Magnesium aminoclay enhances lipid production of mixotrophic Chlorella sp. KR-1 while reducing bacterial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bohwa; Praveenkumar, Ramasamy; Lee, Jiye; Nam, Bora; Kim, Dong-Myung; Lee, Kyubock; Lee, Young-Chul; Oh, You-Kwan

    2016-11-01

    Improving lipid productivity and preventing overgrowth of contaminating bacteria are critical issues relevant to the commercialization of the mixotrophic microalgae cultivation process. In this paper, we report the use of magnesium aminoclay (MgAC) nanoparticles for enhanced lipid production from oleaginous Chlorella sp. KR-1 with simultaneous control of KR-1-associated bacterial growth in mixotrophic cultures with glucose as the model substrate. Addition of 0.01-0.1g/L MgAC promoted microalgal biomass production better than the MgAC-less control, via differential biocidal effects on microalgal and bacterial cells (the latter being more sensitive to MgAC's bio-toxicity than the former). The inhibition effect of MgAC on co-existing bacteria was, as based on density-gradient-gel-electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, largely dosage-dependent and species-specific. MgAC also, by inducing an oxidative stress environment, increased both the cell size and lipid content of KR-1, resulting in a considerable, ∼25% improvement of mixotrophic algal lipid productivity (to ∼410mgFAME/L/d) compared with the untreated control.

  5. The inclusion of fermented dairy products in the diet of secondary school

    OpenAIRE

    VOLMANOVÁ, Miloslava

    2015-01-01

    The theoretical section of the Bachelor Paper deals with the production of milk, kinds of milk and the processes applied to produce milk. Special attention is paid to the Fermented Milk Products (further only FMP), their types and processes of manufacture. The practical section surveys the consumption of milk and FMP, paying also attention to the general awareness of FMP among secondary-school students within the Czech Republic. The last section concentrates on the physiology of digestive tra...

  6. Effect of ammonia on ozone-initiated formation of indoor secondary products with emissions from cleaning products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; Lee, Shun Cheng; Ho, Kin Fai; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Cao, Nanying; Cheng, Yan; Gao, Yuan

    2012-11-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emitted from cleaning products and air fresheners indoors are prone to oxidation resulting in the formation of secondary pollutants that can pose health risks on residents. Ammonia (NH3) is ubiquitous in ambient and indoor environments. In this study, we investigated the effect of ammonia (NH3) on secondary pollutants formation from the ozonolysis of BVOCs emitted from cleaning products including floor cleaner (FC), kitchen cleaner (KC) and dishwashing detergent (DD) in a large environmental chamber. Our results demonstrated that the presence of NH3 (maximum concentration is 240 ppb) could significantly enhance secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) formation from the ozonolysis of all the three categories of cleaning products. For example, for the FC sample, the maximum total particle concentration was up to 2.0 × 104 # cm-3 in the presence of NH3, while it was 1.3 × 104 # cm-3 which was 35% lower without NH3. However, it was found that the extent of NH3 effect on SOAs formation from the ozonolysis of BVOCs emissions was component-dependent. The presence of NH3 in the reaction systems could increase the consumptions of d-limonene that is the dominant BVOC species as identified in cleaning products. The percent yields (%) of secondary carbonyl compounds generated from the ozonolysis of BVOCs emitted from three categories of cleaning products were identified in the presence and absence of NH3, respectively. The increase in SOAs particle number concentration can be attributed to the formation of condensable salts from reactions between NH3 and organic compounds generated from the BVOCs ozonolysis processes. By investigating the NH3 effect on the ozonolysis of BVOCs mixtures in contrast to the chemistry of individual compounds, a better assessment can be made of the overall impact cleaning products have on real indoor environments.

  7. Development of a yeast cell factory for production of aromatic secondary metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez Prado, Edith Angelica

    secondary metabolites in cell factories. In this research project, we developed a yeast platform strain for the production of p-coumaric acid an intermediate compound for the synthesis of aromatic secondary metabolites. Subsequently, we performed a systems biology analysis of the strain and finally we...... developed an array of yeast strains expressing flavonoid metabolic pathways containing up to ten heterologous genes. The platform strain was capable of producing 1.93 ± 0.26 g L-1 of p-coumaric acid in fed-batch fermentation, which is the highest titer that has been reported for a yeast cell factory so far...

  8. Patulin and secondary metabolite production by marine-derived Penicillium strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vansteelandt, Marieke; Kerzaon, Isabelle; Blanchet, Elodie

    2012-01-01

    of Penicillium expansum, and was also isolated from Penicillium antarcticum cultures, whose secondary metabolome is still to be done. These detections constituted the first descriptions of patulin in marine strains of Penicillium, highlighting the risk for shellfish and their consumers due to the presence......Genus Penicillium represents an important fungal group regarding to its mycotoxin production. Secondary metabolomes of eight marine-derived strains belonging to subgenera Furcatum and Penicillium were investigated using dereplication by liquid chromatography (LC)–Diode Array Detector (DAD...

  9. Production of bacterial cellulose membranes in a modified airlift bioreactor by Gluconacetobacter xylinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sheng-Chi; Li, Meng-Hsun

    2015-10-01

    In this study, a novel bioreactor for producing bacterial cellulose (BC) is proposed. Traditional BC production uses static culture conditions and produces a gelatinous membrane. The potential for using various types of bioreactor, including a stirred tank, conventional airlift, and modified airlift with a rectangular wire-mesh draft tube, in large-scale production has been investigated. The BC obtained from these bioreactors is fibrous or in pellet form. Our proposed airlift bioreactor produces a membrane-type BC from Gluconacetobacter xylinus, the water-holding capacity of which is greater than that of cellulose types produced using static cultivation methods. The Young's modulus of the product can be manipulated by varying the number of net plates in the modified airlift bioreactor. The BC membrane produced using the proposed bioreactor exhibits potential for practical application.

  10. Utilization of residues from agro-forest industries in the production of high value bacterial cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreira, Pedro; Mendes, Joana A S; Trovatti, Eliane; Serafim, Luísa S; Freire, Carmen S R; Silvestre, Armando J D; Neto, Carlos Pascoal

    2011-08-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC), a very peculiar form of cellulose, is gaining considerable importance due to its unique properties. In this study, several residues, from agro-forestry industries, namely grape skins aqueous extract, cheese whey, crude glycerol and sulfite pulping liquor were evaluated as economic carbon and nutrient sources for the production of BC. The most relevant BC amounts attained with the residues from the wine and pulp industries were 0.6 and 0.3 g/L, respectively, followed by biodiesel crude residue and cheese whey with productions of about, 0.1 g/L after 96 h of incubation. Preliminary results on the addition of other nutrient sources (yeast extract, nitrogen and phosphate) to the residues-based culture media indicated that, in general, these BC productions could be increased by ~200% and ~100% for the crude glycerol and grape skins, respectively, after the addition organic or inorganic nitrogen.

  11. Partial Characteristics of Hydrogen Production by Fermentative Hydrogen-producing Bacterial Strain B49

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xiangjing(王相晶); Ren Nanqi; Xiang Wensheng; Lin Ming; Guo Wanqian

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the characteristics of hydrogen production by a novel fermentative hydrogen-producing bacterial strain B49 (AF481148 in EMBL), batch experiments are conducted under different conditions. Hydrogen production has a correlation with cell growth and the consumption of glucose and soluble protein. The optimum pH for cell growth is 4.5±0.15. At acidic pH 4.0±0.15, the bacteria has the maximum accumulated hydrogen volume of 2382 ml/L culture and the maximum hydrogen evolution rate of 339.9 ml/L culture*h with 1% glucose. The optimum temperature for cell growth and hydrogen production is 35℃. In addition, fermentative hydrogen-producing bacterial strain B49 can generate hydrogen from the decomposition of other organic substrates such as wheat, soybean, corn, and potato. Moreover, it can also produce hydrogen from molasses wastewater and brewage wastewater, and hydrogen yields are 137.9 ml H2/g COD and 49.9 ml H2/g COD, respectively.

  12. Methane production and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in children living in a slum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carolina Santos Mello; Soraia Tahan; Lígia Cristina FL Melli; Mirian Silva do Carmo Rodrigues; Ricardo Martin Pereira de Mello; Isabel Cristina Affonso Scaletsky; Mauro Batista de Morais

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To analyze small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in school-aged children and the relationship between hydrogen and methane production in breath tests.METHODS:This transversal study included 85 children residing in a slum and 43 children from a private school,all aged between 6 and 10 years,in Osasco,Brazil.For characterization of the groups,data regarding the socioeconomic status and basic housing sanitary conditions were collected.Anthropometric data was obtained in children from both groups.All children completed the hydrogen (H2) and methane (CH4) breath test in order to assess small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO).SIBO was diagnosed when there was an increase in H2 ≥ 20 ppm or CH4 ≥ 10 ppm with regard to the fasting value until 60 min after lactulose ingestion.RESULTS:Children from the slum group had worse living conditions and lower nutritional indices than children from the private school.SIBO was found in 30.9% (26/84) of the children from the slum group and in 2.4% (1/41) from the private school group (P =0.0007).Greater hydrogen production in the small intestine was observed in children from the slum group when compared to children from the private school (P =0.007).A higher concentration of hydrogen in the small intestine (P < 0.001) and in the colon (P < 0.001) was observed among the children from the slum group with SIBO when compared to children from the slum group without SIBO.Methane production was observed in 63.1% (53/84) of the children from the slum group and in 19.5% (8/41) of the children from the private school group (P < 0.0001).Methane production was observed in 38/58 (65.5%) of the children without SIBO and in 15/26 (57.7%) of the children with SIBO from the slum.Colonic production of hydrogen was lower in methaneproducing children (P =0.017).CONCLUSION:Children who live in inadequate environmental conditions are at risk of bacterial overgrowth and methane production.Hydrogen is a substrate for methane

  13. Modeling of corrosion product migration in the secondary circuit of nuclear power plants with WWER-1200

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritskii, V. G.; Berezina, I. G.; Gavrilov, A. V.; Motkova, E. A.; Zelenina, E. V.; Prokhorov, N. A.; Gorbatenko, S. P.; Tsitser, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    Models of corrosion and mass transfer of corrosion products in the pipes of the condensate-feeding and steam paths of the secondary circuit of NPPs with WWER-1200 are presented. The mass transfer and distribution of corrosion products over the currents of the working medium of the secondary circuit were calculated using the physicochemical model of mass transfer of corrosion products in which the secondary circuit is regarded as a cyclic system consisting of a number of interrelated elements. The circuit was divided into calculated regions in which the change in the parameters (flow rate, temperature, and pressure) was traced and the rates of corrosion and corrosion products entrainment, high-temperature pH, and iron concentration were calculated. The models were verified according to the results of chemical analyses at Kalinin NPP and iron corrosion product concentrations in the feed water at different NPPs depending on pH at 25°C (pH25) for service times τ ≥ 5000 h. The calculated pH values at a coolant temperature t (pH t ) in the secondary circuit of NPPs with WWER-1200 were presented. The calculation of the distribution of pH t and ethanolamine and ammonia concentrations over the condensate feed (CFC) and steam circuits is given. The models are designed for developing the calculation codes. The project solutions of ATOMPROEKT satisfy the safety and reliability requirements for power plants with WWER-1200. The calculated corrosion and corrosion product mass transfer parameters showed that the model allows the designer to choose between the increase of the correcting reagent concentration, the use of steel with higher chromium contents, and intermittent washing of the steam generator from sediments as the best solution for definite regions of the circuit.

  14. Bacterial cellulose production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus by employing alternative culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozala, Angela Faustino; Pértile, Renata Aparecida Nedel; dos Santos, Carolina Alves; de Carvalho Santos-Ebinuma, Valéria; Seckler, Marcelo Martins; Gama, Francisco Miguel; Pessoa, Adalberto

    2015-02-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) is used in different fields as a biological material due to its unique properties. Despite there being many BC applications, there still remain many problems associated with bioprocess technology, such as increasing productivity and decreasing production cost. New technologies that use waste from the food industry as raw materials for culture media promote economic advantages because they reduce environmental pollution and stimulate new research for science sustainability. For this reason, BC production requires optimized conditions to increase its application. The main objective of this study was to evaluate BC production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus using industry waste, namely, rotten fruits and milk whey, as culture media. Furthermore, the structure of BC produced at different conditions was also determined. The culture media employed in this study were composed of rotten fruit collected from the disposal of free markets, milk whey from a local industrial disposal, and their combination, and Hestrin and Schramm media was used as standard culture media. Although all culture media studied produced BC, the highest BC yield-60 mg/mL-was achieved with the rotten fruit culture. Thus, the results showed that rotten fruit can be used for BC production. This culture media can be considered as a profitable alternative to generate high-value products. In addition, it combines environmental concern with sustainable processes that can promote also the reduction of production cost.

  15. Endophytes as in vitro production platforms of high value plant secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopalan, Aarthi; Srivastava, Smita

    2015-11-01

    Many reports have been published on bioprospecting of endophytic fungi capable of producing high value bioactive molecules like, paclitaxel, vincristine, vinblastine, camptothecin and podophyllotoxin. However, commercial exploitation of endophytes for high value-low volume plant secondary metabolites remains elusive due to widely reported genomic instability of endophytes in the axenic culture. While most of the endophyte research focuses on screening endophytes for novel or existing high value biomolecules, very few reports seek to explore the possible mechanisms of production of host-plant associated or novel secondary metabolites in these organisms. With an overview of host-endophyte relationship and its possible impact on the secondary metabolite production potential of endophytes, the review highlights the evidence reported for and against the presence of host-independent biosynthetic machinery in endophytes. The review aims to address the question, why should and how can endophytes be exploited for large scale in vitro production of high value phytochemicals? In this regard, various bioprocess optimization strategies that have been applied to sustain and enhance the product yield from the endophytes have also been described in detail. Further, techniques like mixed fermentation/co-cultivation and use of epigenetic modifiers have also been discussed as potential strategies to activate cryptic gene clusters in endophytes, thereby aiding in novel metabolite discovery and overcoming the limitations associated with axenic culture of endophytes.

  16. Fed-Batch Production of Bacterial Ghosts Using Dielectric Spectroscopy for Dynamic Process Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Meitz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Bacterial Ghost (BG platform technology evolved from a microbiological expression system incorporating the ϕX174 lysis gene E. E-lysis generates empty but structurally intact cell envelopes (BGs from Gram-negative bacteria which have been suggested as candidate vaccines, immunotherapeutic agents or drug delivery vehicles. E-lysis is a highly dynamic and complex biological process that puts exceptional demands towards process understanding and control. The development of a both economic and robust fed-batch production process for BGs required a toolset capable of dealing with rapidly changing concentrations of viable biomass during the E-lysis phase. This challenge was addressed using a transfer function combining dielectric spectroscopy and soft-sensor based biomass estimation for monitoring the rapid decline of viable biomass during the E-lysis phase. The transfer function was implemented to a feed-controller, which followed the permittivity signal closely and was capable of maintaining a constant specific substrate uptake rate during lysis phase. With the described toolset, we were able to increase the yield of BG production processes by a factor of 8–10 when compared to currently used batch procedures reaching lysis efficiencies >98%. This provides elevated potentials for commercial application of the Bacterial Ghost platform technology.

  17. EFFECT OF REFINED PETROLEUM PRODUCTS CONTAMINATION ON BACTERIAL POPULATION AND PHYSICOCHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CULTIVATED AGRICULTURAL SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adewale Sogo Olalemi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available An investigation into the effect of refined petroleum products contamination on bacterial population and physicochemical characteristics of cultivated agricultural soil was carried out. The soil samples obtained from the Teaching and Research Farm, Obakekere, Federal University of Technology, Akure, Ondo State were contaminated with varying volumes of petrol, diesel and kerosene. The results revealed higher bacterial populations in uncontaminated soils than contaminated soils. The counts of bacteria ranged from 3.0 × 105 to 5.0 × 105 cfu/g in uncontaminated soils and 1.0 × 105 to 3.0 × 105 cfu/g in contaminated soils. The isolated bacteria were identified as Bacillus subtilis, Flavobacterium lutescens, Micrococcus luteus, Corynebacterium variabilis, Pseudomonas fluorescens. The contamination had no significant effect on pH, potassium, sodium, organic carbon and nitrogen content of the soils, while the moisture, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium content of the contaminated soils were significantly different (P < 0.05 compared with the uncontaminated soils. The ability of Bacillus subtilis, Flavobacterium lutescens, Micrococcus luteus, and Pseudomonas fluorescens to utilize the refined petroleum products suggest that these bacteria had potential to bioremediate petroleum contaminated soils.

  18. Fed-Batch Production of Bacterial Ghosts Using Dielectric Spectroscopy for Dynamic Process Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meitz, Andrea; Sagmeister, Patrick; Lubitz, Werner; Herwig, Christoph; Langemann, Timo

    2016-03-24

    The Bacterial Ghost (BG) platform technology evolved from a microbiological expression system incorporating the ϕX174 lysis gene E. E-lysis generates empty but structurally intact cell envelopes (BGs) from Gram-negative bacteria which have been suggested as candidate vaccines, immunotherapeutic agents or drug delivery vehicles. E-lysis is a highly dynamic and complex biological process that puts exceptional demands towards process understanding and control. The development of a both economic and robust fed-batch production process for BGs required a toolset capable of dealing with rapidly changing concentrations of viable biomass during the E-lysis phase. This challenge was addressed using a transfer function combining dielectric spectroscopy and soft-sensor based biomass estimation for monitoring the rapid decline of viable biomass during the E-lysis phase. The transfer function was implemented to a feed-controller, which followed the permittivity signal closely and was capable of maintaining a constant specific substrate uptake rate during lysis phase. With the described toolset, we were able to increase the yield of BG production processes by a factor of 8-10 when compared to currently used batch procedures reaching lysis efficiencies >98%. This provides elevated potentials for commercial application of the Bacterial Ghost platform technology.

  19. Effect of grazers and viruses on bacterial community structure and production in two contrasting trophic lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domaizon Isabelle

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last 30 years, extensive studies have revealed the crucial roles played by microbes in aquatic ecosystems. It has been shown that bacteria, viruses and protozoan grazers are dominant in terms of abundance and biomass. The frequent interactions between these microbiological compartments are responsible for strong trophic links from dissolved organic matter to higher trophic levels, via heterotrophic bacteria, which form the basis for the important biogeochemical roles of microbial food webs in aquatic ecosystems. To gain a better understanding of the interactions between bacteria, viruses and flagellates in lacustrine ecosystems, we investigated the effect of protistan bacterivory on bacterial abundance, production and structure [determined by 16S rRNA PCR-DGGE], and viral abundance and activity of two lakes of contrasting trophic status. Four experiments were conducted in the oligotrophic Lake Annecy and the mesotrophic Lake Bourget over two seasons (early spring vs. summer using a fractionation approach. In situ dark vs. light incubations were performed to consider the effects of the different treatments in the presence and absence of phototrophic activity. Results The presence of grazers (i.e. Conclusions Our results highlight the importance of a synergistic effect, i.e. the positive influence of grazers on viral activities in sustaining (directly and indirectly bacterial production and affecting composition, in both oligotrophic and mesotrophic lakes.

  20. Macrophage activation induced by Brucella DNA suppresses bacterial intracellular replication via enhancing NO production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Wang, Lin; Sun, Changjiang; Yang, Li; Tang, Bin; Sun, Wanchun; Peng, Qisheng

    2015-12-01

    Brucella DNA can be sensed by TLR9 on endosomal membrane and by cytosolic AIM2-inflammasome to induce proinflammatory cytokine production that contributes to partially activate innate immunity. Additionally, Brucella DNA has been identified to be able to act as a major bacterial component to induce type I IFN. However, the role of Brucella DNA in Brucella intracellular growth remains unknown. Here, we showed that stimulation with Brucella DNA promote macrophage activation in TLR9-dependent manner. Activated macrophages can suppresses wild type Brucella intracellular replication at early stage of infection via enhancing NO production. We also reported that activated macrophage promotes bactericidal function of macrophages infected with VirB-deficient Brucella at the early or late stage of infection. This study uncovers a novel function of Brucella DNA, which can help us further elucidate the mechanism of Brucella intracellular survival.

  1. Bacterial communities associated with production facilities of two newly drilled thermogenic natural gas wells in the Barnett Shale (Texas, USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, James P; Struchtemeyer, Christopher G; Elshahed, Mostafa S

    2012-11-01

    We monitored the bacterial communities in the gas-water separator and water storage tank of two newly drilled natural gas wells in the Barnett Shale in north central Texas, using a 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing approach over a period of 6 months. Overall, the communities were composed mainly of moderately halophilic and halotolerant members of the phyla Firmicutes and Proteobacteria (classes Βeta-, Gamma-, and Epsilonproteobacteria) in both wells at all sampling times and locations. Many of the observed lineages were encountered in prior investigations of microbial communities from various fossil fluid formations and production facilities. In all of the samples, multiple H(2)S-producing lineages were encountered; belonging to the sulfate- and sulfur-reducing class Deltaproteobacteria, order Clostridiales, and phylum Synergistetes, as well as the thiosulfate-reducing order Halanaerobiales. The bacterial communities from the separator and tank samples bore little resemblance to the bacterial communities in the drilling mud and hydraulic-fracture waters that were used to drill these wells, suggesting the in situ development of the unique bacterial communities in such well components was in response to the prevalent geochemical conditions present. Conversely, comparison of the bacterial communities on temporal and spatial scales suggested the establishment of a core microbial community in each sampled location. The results provide the first overview of bacterial dynamics and colonization patterns in newly drilled, thermogenic natural gas wells and highlights patterns of spatial and temporal variability observed in bacterial communities in natural gas production facilities.

  2. Methane Production in Dairy Cows Correlates with Rumen Methanogenic and Bacterial Community Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsson, Rebecca; Dicksved, Johan; Sun, Li; Gonda, Horacio; Müller, Bettina; Schnürer, Anna; Bertilsson, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Methane (CH4) is produced as an end product from feed fermentation in the rumen. Yield of CH4 varies between individuals despite identical feeding conditions. To get a better understanding of factors behind the individual variation, 73 dairy cows given the same feed but differing in CH4 emissions were investigated with focus on fiber digestion, fermentation end products and bacterial and archaeal composition. In total 21 cows (12 Holstein, 9 Swedish Red) identified as persistent low, medium or high CH4 emitters over a 3 month period were furthermore chosen for analysis of microbial community structure in rumen fluid. This was assessed by sequencing the V4 region of 16S rRNA gene and by quantitative qPCR of targeted Methanobrevibacter groups. The results showed a positive correlation between low CH4 emitters and higher abundance of Methanobrevibacter ruminantium clade. Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) on operational taxonomic unit (OTU) level of bacteria showed two distinct clusters (P Fermentation pattern of volatile fatty acids showed that proportion of propionate was higher in cluster L, while proportion of butyrate was higher in cluster H. No difference was found in milk production or organic matter digestibility between cows. Cows in cluster L had lower CH4/kg energy corrected milk (ECM) compared to cows in cluster H, 8.3 compared to 9.7 g CH4/kg ECM, showing that low CH4 cows utilized the feed more efficient for milk production which might indicate a more efficient microbial population or host genetic differences that is reflected in bacterial and archaeal (or methanogens) populations. PMID:28261182

  3. Differential effects of gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial products on morphine induced inhibition of phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninkovic, Jana; Jana, Ninkovic; Anand, Vidhu; Vidhu, Anand; Dutta, Raini; Raini, Dutta; Zhang, Li; Saluja, Anuj; Meng, Jingjing; Koodie, Lisa; Lisa, Koodie; Banerjee, Santanu; Santanu, Banerjee; Roy, Sabita; Sabita, Roy

    2016-02-19

    Opioid drug abusers have a greater susceptibility to gram positive (Gram (+)) bacterial infections. However, the mechanism underlying opioid modulation of Gram (+) versus Gram (-) bacterial clearance has not been investigated. In this study, we show that opioid treatment resulted in reduced phagocytosis of Gram (+), when compared to Gram (-) bacteria. We further established that LPS priming of chronic morphine treated macrophages leads to potentiated phagocytosis and killing of both Gram (+) and Gram (-) bacteria in a P-38 MAP kinase dependent signaling pathway. In contrast, LTA priming lead to inhibition of both phagocytosis and bacterial killing. This study demonstrates for the first time the differential effects of TLR4 and TLR2 agonists on morphine induced inhibition of phagocytosis. Our results suggest that the incidence and severity of secondary infections with Gram (+) bacteria would be higher in opioid abusers.

  4. Modelling ramp-up curves to reflect learning: improving capacity planning in secondary pharmaceutical production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Reinholdt Nyhuus; Grunow, Martin

    2015-01-01

    are overestimated. We develop a new method, which captures ramp-up as a function of the cumulative production volume to better reflect the experience gained while producing the new product. The use of the more accurate and computationally effective approach is demonstrated for the case of secondary pharmaceutical...... production. Due to its regulatory framework, this industry cannot fully exploit available capacities during ramp-up. We develop a capacity planning model for a new pharmaceutical drug, which determines the number and location of new production lines and the build-up of inventory such that product...... availability at market launch is ensured. Our MILP model is applied to a real industry case study using three empirically observed ramp-up curves to demonstrate its value as decision support tool. We demonstrate the superiority of our volume-dependent method over the traditional time-dependent ramp...

  5. Secondary Plant Products Causing Photosensitization in Grazing Herbivores: Their Structure, Activity and Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane C. Quinn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Photosensitivity in animals is defined as a severe dermatitis that results from a heightened reactivity of skin cells and associated dermal tissues upon their exposure to sunlight, following ingestion or contact with UV reactive secondary plant products. Photosensitivity occurs in animal cells as a reaction that is mediated by a light absorbing molecule, specifically in this case a plant-produced metabolite that is heterocyclic or polyphenolic. In sensitive animals, this reaction is most severe in non-pigmented skin which has the least protection from UV or visible light exposure. Photosensitization in a biological system such as the epidermis is an oxidative or other chemical change in a molecule in response to light-induced excitation of endogenous or exogenously-delivered molecules within the tissue. Photo-oxidation can also occur in the plant itself, resulting in the generation of reactive oxygen species, free radical damage and eventual DNA degradation. Similar cellular changes occur in affected herbivores and are associated with an accumulation of photodynamic molecules in the affected dermal tissues or circulatory system of the herbivore. Recent advances in our ability to identify and detect secondary products at trace levels in the plant and surrounding environment, or in organisms that ingest plants, have provided additional evidence for the role of secondary metabolites in photosensitization of grazing herbivores. This review outlines the role of unique secondary products produced by higher plants in the animal photosensitization process, describes their chemistry and localization in the plant as well as impacts of the environment upon their production, discusses their direct and indirect effects on associated animal systems and presents several examples of well-characterized plant photosensitization in animal systems.

  6. Target Product Profile for a Diagnostic Assay to Differentiate between Bacterial and Non-Bacterial Infections and Reduce Antimicrobial Overuse in Resource-Limited Settings: An Expert Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Sabine; Tadesse, Birkneh Tilahun; Moussy, Francis; Chua, Arlene; Zorzet, Anna; Tängdén, Thomas; Dolinger, David L; Page, Anne-Laure; Crump, John A; D'Acremont, Valerie; Bassat, Quique; Lubell, Yoel; Newton, Paul N; Heinrich, Norbert; Rodwell, Timothy J; González, Iveth J

    2016-01-01

    Acute fever is one of the most common presenting symptoms globally. In order to reduce the empiric use of antimicrobial drugs and improve outcomes, it is essential to improve diagnostic capabilities. In the absence of microbiology facilities in low-income settings, an assay to distinguish bacterial from non-bacterial causes would be a critical first step. To ensure that patient and market needs are met, the requirements of such a test should be specified in a target product profile (TPP). To identify minimal/optimal characteristics for a bacterial vs. non-bacterial fever test, experts from academia and international organizations with expertise in infectious diseases, diagnostic test development, laboratory medicine, global health, and health economics were convened. Proposed TPPs were reviewed by this working group, and consensus characteristics were defined. The working group defined non-severely ill, non-malaria infected children as the target population for the desired assay. To provide access to the most patients, the test should be deployable to community health centers and informal health settings, and staff should require 90% and >80% for sensitivity and specificity, respectively. Other key characteristics, to account for the challenging environment at which the test is targeted, included: i) time-to-result targeted and timely efforts by industry partners and academic institutions.

  7. Screening of marine bacterial producers of polyunsaturated fatty acids and optimisation of production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El Razak, Ahmed; Ward, Alan C; Glassey, Jarka

    2014-02-01

    Water samples from three different environments including Mid Atlantic Ridge, Red Sea and Mediterranean Sea were screened in order to isolate new polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) bacterial producers especially eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Two hundred and fifty-one isolates were screened for PUFA production and among them the highest number of producers was isolated from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge followed by the Red Sea while no producers were found in the Mediterranean Sea samples. The screening strategy included a simple colourimetric method followed by a confirmation via GC/MS. Among the tested producers, an isolate named 66 was found to be a potentially high PUFA producer producing relatively high levels of EPA in particular. A Plackett-Burman statistical design of experiments was applied to screen a wide number of media components identifying glycerol and whey as components of a production medium. The potential low-cost production medium was optimised by applying a response surface methodology to obtain the highest productivity converting industrial by-products into value-added products. The maximum achieved productivity of EPA was 20 mg/g, 45 mg/l, representing 11% of the total fatty acids, which is approximately five times more than the amount produced prior to optimisation. The production medium composition was 10.79 g/l whey and 6.87 g/l glycerol. To our knowledge, this is the first investigation of potential bacteria PUFA producers from Mediterranean and Red Seas providing an evaluation of a colourimetric screening method as means of rapid screening of a large number of isolates.

  8. The Primary and Secondary Production of Germanium: A Life-Cycle Assessment of Different Process Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertz, Benedicte; Verhelle, Jensen; Schurmans, Maarten

    2015-02-01

    Germanium is a semiconducting metalloid element used in optical fibers, catalysis, infrared optics, solar cells, and light-emitting diodes. The need for Ge in these markets is considered to increase by a steady ~1% on a yearly basis. Its economic importance, coupled with the identified supply risks, has led to the classification of germanium as a critical raw material within Europe. Since the early 1950s, Umicore Electro-Optic Materials has supplied germanium-based materials solutions to its markets around the world. Umicore extracts germanium from a wide range of refining and recycling feeds. The main objectives of this study were to quantify the potential environmental impacts of the production of germanium from production scraps from the photovoltaic industry and to compare them with the potential impacts of the primary production of germanium from coal. The data related to the secondary production are Umicore-specific data. Environmental impact scores have been calculated for the impact categories recommended by the International reference life cycle data system. The comparison of the primary and secondary production highlights the benefit linked to the recycling of metals.

  9. Co-production of two new peptide antibiotics by a bacterial isolate Paenibacillus alvei NP75.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandaraj, Balaiah; Vellaichamy, Adaikkalam; Kachman, Maureen; Selvamanikandan, Athinarayanan; Pegu, Shyamanta; Murugan, Vadivel

    2009-02-06

    Two new peptide antibiotics were secreted by a Gram-positive bacterial strain isolated from fermented tomato fruit. Based on its 99% 16S rDNA sequence similarity with Paenibacillus alvei, the isolate was designated as P. alvei NP75. Among these two peptides, one is active against Gram-positive pathogens while the other against Gram-negative pathogens; thus these peptides were named as paenibacillin P and paenibacillin N, respectively. After the purification of those peptide antibiotics from the cell free culture supernatant by RP-HPLC, they were analyzed for their temperature sensitivity and susceptibility to proteases. Higher-temperature tolerant paenibacillin N was easily degraded by proteinase K, while the temperature sensitive paenibacillin P was not affected by any of the proteases used in this study other than a specific protease that was secreted by the same NP75 strain. Mass-spectrometry analysis of the above peptide antibiotics further confirmed their distinction among the known peptide antibiotics. We are reporting first of its kind the co-production of two different new peptide antibiotics from a single bacterial isolate of P. alvei strain.

  10. To Stretch the Boundary of Secondary Metabolite Production in Plant Cell-Based Bioprocessing: Anthocyanin as a Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Zhang; Chris Franco; Chris Curtin; Simon Conn

    2004-01-01

    Plant cells and tissue cultures hold great promise for controlled production of a myriad of useful secondary metabolites on demand. The current yield and productivity cannot fulfill the commercial goal of a plant cell-based bioprocess for the production of most secondary metabolites. In order to stretch the boundary, recent advances, new directions and opportunities in plant cell-based bioprocessing, have been critically examined for the 10 years from 1992 to 2002. A review of the literature ...

  11. Beneficial Effect of Acetic Acid on the Xylose Utilization and Bacterial Cellulose Production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-Yan; Huang, Chao; Guo, Hai-Jun; Xiong, Lian; Luo, Jun; Wang, Bo; Chen, Xue-Fang; Lin, Xiao-Qing; Chen, Xin-De

    2014-09-01

    In this work, acetic acid was found as one promising substrate to improve xylose utilization by Gluconacetobacter xylinus CH001. Also, with the help of adding acetic acid into medium, the bacterial cellulose (BC) production by G. xylinus was increased significantly. In the medium containing 3 g l(-1) acetic acid, the optimal xylose concentration for BC production was 20 g l(-1). In the medium containing 20 g l(-1) xylose, the xylose utilization and BC production by G. xylinus were stimulated by acetic acid within certain concentration. The highest BC yield (1.35 ± 0.06 g l(-1)) was obtained in the medium containing 20 g l(-1) xylose and 3 g l(-1) acetic acid after 14 days. This value was 6.17-fold higher than the yield (0.21 ± 0.01 g l(-1)) in the medium only containing 20 g l(-1) xylose. The results analyzed by FE-SEM, FTIR, and XRD showed that acetic acid affected little on the microscopic morphology and physicochemical characteristics of BC. Base on the phenomenon observed, lignocellulosic acid hydrolysates (xylose and acetic acid are main carbon sources present in it) could be considered as one potential substrate for BC production.

  12. Optimization of bacterial cellulose production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus using carob and haricot bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgi, Eyup; Bayir, Ece; Sendemir-Urkmez, Aylin; Hames, E Esin

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) can be used in medical, biomedical, electronic, food, and paper industries because of its unique properties distinguishing it from plant cellulose. BC production was statistically optimized by Gluconacetobacter xylinus strain using carob and haricot bean (CHb) medium. Eight parameters were evaluated by Plackett-Burman Design and significant three parameters were optimized by Central Composite Design. Optimal conditions for production of BC in static culture were found as: 2.5g/L carbon source, 2.75g/L protein source, 9.3% inoculum ratio, 1.15g/L citric acid, 2.7g/L Na2HPO4, 30°C incubation temperature, 5.5 initial pH, and 9days of incubation. This study reveals that BC production can be carried out using carob and haricot bean extracts as carbon and nitrogen sources, and CHb medium has higher buffering capacity compared to Hestrin and Schramm media. Model obtained from this study is used to predict and optimize BC production yield using CHb medium.

  13. Effect of pamamycin-607 on secondary metabolite production by Streptomyces spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Makoto; Katsura, Hirotaka; Kato, Risako; Kawaide, Hiroshi; Natsume, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the aerial mycelium-inducing compound, pamamycin-607, on antibiotic production by several Streptomyces spp. was examined. Exposure to 6.6 µM pamamycin-607 stimulated by 2.7 fold the puromycin production by Streptomyces alboniger NBRC 12738, in which pamamycin-607 had first been isolated, and restored aerial mycelium formation. Pamamycin-607 also stimulated the respective production of streptomycin by S. griseus NBRC 12875 and that of cinerubins A and B by S. tauricus JCM 4837 by approximately 1.5, 1.7 and 1.9 fold. The antibiotic produced by Streptomyces sp. 91-a was identified as virginiamycin M(1), and its synthesis was enhanced 2.6 fold by pamamycin-607. These results demonstrate that pamamycin-607 not only restored or stimulated aerial mycelium formation, but also stimulated secondary metabolite production.

  14. Enhanced production of bacterial cellulose by using a biofilm reactor and its material property analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demirci Ali

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bacterial cellulose has been used in the food industry for applications such as low-calorie desserts, salads, and fabricated foods. It has also been used in the paper manufacturing industry to enhance paper strength, the electronics industry in acoustic diaphragms for audio speakers, the pharmaceutical industry as filtration membranes, and in the medical field as wound dressing and artificial skin material. In this study, different types of plastic composite support (PCS were implemented separately within a fermentation medium in order to enhance bacterial cellulose (BC production by Acetobacter xylinum. The optimal composition of nutritious compounds in PCS was chosen based on the amount of BC produced. The selected PCS was implemented within a bioreactor to examine the effects on BC production in a batch fermentation. The produced BC was analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. Among thirteen types of PCS, the type SFYR+ was selected as solid support for BC production by A. xylinum in a batch biofilm reactor due to its high nitrogen content, moderate nitrogen leaching rate, and sufficient biomass attached on PCS. The PCS biofilm reactor yielded BC production (7.05 g/L that was 2.5-fold greater than the control (2.82 g/L. The XRD results indicated that the PCS-grown BC exhibited higher crystallinity (93% and similar crystal size (5.2 nm to the control. FESEM results showed the attachment of A. xylinum on PCS, producing an interweaving BC product. TGA results demonstrated that PCS-grown BC had about 95% water retention ability, which was lower than BC produced within suspended-cell reactor. PCS-grown BC also exhibited higher Tmax compared to the control. Finally, DMA results showed that BC from the PCS biofilm reactor increased its mechanical property values, i.e., stress at break and Young's modulus when compared to

  15. Food additives reduce lactic acid bacterial growth in culture medium and in meat products, increasing product shelf life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleonice Mendes Pereira Sarmento

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The uncontrolled growth of lactic acid bacteria (LAB in meat and meat products leads to product spoilage, and thus shortens product shelf life. Although food additives are known to decrease LAB growth, this effect has not been analyzed in detail. Here, a detailed analysis was performed of the effects of sodium chloride, sodium polyphosphate, sodium lactate, sodium nitrite/nitrate, and garlic on the growth of the Lactobacillus plantarum in culture medium. The results were used to design and test experimental formulations of meat products. Initially, the effect of food additives on L. plantarum was evaluated using a Fractional Factorial Design (FFD, followed by a Central Composite Rotatable Design (CCRD. The Modified Gompertz Model was adjusted to the growth curves to determine the Kinetic parameters of bacterial growth (logarithmic increase in the population, specific growth rate, and lag phase extension. Higher sodium lactate and sodium chloride levels had a negative impact on L. plantarum growth parameters (p?0.05. Therefore, we designed experimental formulations of mortadella and smoked pork sausages containing 4% sodium lactate (w w-1 and 2.4-3.5% sodium chloride (w w-1, and determined LAB growth from samples of stored products produced according to these formulations, in order to determine product shelf life. There was an increased lag phase of LAB growth for most experimental formulations. Also, the experimental smoked pork sausages had a longer shelf life, which was increased by at least 22 days, suggesting that the proposed formulation, with higher than standard lactate concentration, increased the product’s shelf life.

  16. Bacterial production and their role in the removal of dissolved organic matter from tributaries of drinking water reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamjunke, Norbert; Oosterwoud, Marieke R; Herzsprung, Peter; Tittel, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Enhanced concentrations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in freshwaters are an increasing problem in drinking water reservoirs. In this study we investigated bacterial DOM degradation rates in the tributaries of the reservoirs and tested the hypotheses that (1) DOM degradation is high enough to decrease DOM loads to reservoirs considerably, (2) DOM degradation is affected by stream hydrology, and (3) phosphorus addition may stimulate bacterial DOM degradation. Bacterial biomass production, which was used as a measure of DOM degradation, was highest in summer, and was usually lower at upstream than at downstream sites. An important proportion of bacterial production was realized in epilithic biofilms. Production of planktonic and biofilm bacteria was related to water temperature. Planktonic production weakly correlated to DOM quality and to total phosphorus concentration. Addition of soluble reactive phosphorus did not stimulate bacterial DOM degradation. Overall, DOM was considerably degraded in summer at low discharge levels, whereas degradation was negligible during flood events (when DOM load in reservoirs was high). The ratio of DOM degradation to total DOM release was negatively related to discharge. On annual average, only 0.6-12% of total DOM released by the catchments was degraded within the tributaries.

  17. The bacterivory of interstitial ciliates in association with bacterial biomass and production in the hyporheic zone of a lowland stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Königs, Sascha; Cleven, Ernst-Josef

    2007-07-01

    Rates of bacteria ingestion by interstitial ciliates were estimated and compared to bacterial biomass and production. Investigation was carried out in the hyporheic zone of a lowland stream. FISH was applied to quantitatively determine bacteria within the ciliate's food vacuoles. To estimate bacteria ingestion rates using FISH, we had to strike a new path. When numbers of bacteria in the food vacuoles remains constant with time (bacterial digestion and ingestion are at equilibrium), ingestion rate can be estimated based on the digestion time and the average number of bacteria per cell. Ciliate community was predominantly composed of bacterivorous ciliates. FISH-signals deriving from ingested bacteria were detected in Cinetochilum margaritaceum, 'other small scuticociliates', Pleuronema spp., and Vorticella spp. Ingestion rates for these taxa were 78, 150, 86, and 38 bacteria ind(-1) h(-1), respectively. The grazing impacts on bacterial biomass and carbon production were calculated based on these ingestion rates. Ciliate grazing caused a decrease in bacterial biomass of 0.024% day(-1) and in bacterial carbon production of 1.60%. These findings suggest that interstitial ciliate grazing impact on bacteria biomass and production was too low to represent an important link in the carbon flow of the hyporheic zone under study.

  18. Bacterial production, glucosidase activity and particle-associated carbohydrates in Dona Paula bay, west coast of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, P. V.; Bhosle, N. B.

    2008-11-01

    Size-fractionated bacterial production, abundance and α- and β- glucosidase enzyme activities were studied with respect to changes in hydrography, total suspended matter (TSM), chlorophyll a, particulate organic carbon and nitrogen ratio (POC:PON), 1.5 M NaCl-soluble and 10 mM EDTA-soluble carbohydrates (Sal-PCHO and CPCHO) and transparent exopolymeric particles (TEP) in the surface waters from July 1999-2000 at a shallow coastal station in Dona Paula Bay, west coast of India. The bulk of the total bacterial production and glucosidase activity were associated with particles (75% and >80%, respectively). Total bacterial production was linearly correlated to chlorophyll a ( r = 0.513; p Paula Bay.

  19. Nitrogen fertilization of the host plant influences production and pathogenicity of Botrytis cinerea secondary inoculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abro, Manzoor Ali; Lecompte, François; Bryone, Florian; Nicot, Philippe C

    2013-03-01

    The influence of nitrogen (N) nutrition on a plant's susceptibility to Botrytis spp. and other pathogens is well documented. However, little is known of possible effects on sporulation of the pathogen on diseased tissue and on the pathogenicity of resulting secondary inoculum. To address this question, sporulation by two strains of Botrytis cinerea was quantified on tomato plants produced under different N irrigation regimes with inputs of NO(3)- at 0.5 to 45 mmol liter(-1) (mM). Sporulation decreased significantly (P fertilization up to NO(3)- at 15 to 30 mM. The secondary inoculum was collected and used to inoculate pruning wounds on tomato plants produced under a standard fertilization regime. Pathogenicity of the spores was significantly influenced by the nutritional status of their production substrate. Disease severity was highest with spores produced on plants with very low or very high N fertilization (NO(3)- at 0.5 or 30 mM). It was lowest for inoculum from plants with moderate levels of N fertilization. These results suggest that it may be possible to find an optimum level of N fertilization to reduce the production of secondary inoculum and its pathogenicity to tomato.

  20. Bacterial production in Guanabara Bay (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil evaluated by ³H-leucine incorporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra M. Gonzalez

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate the necessary ³H-leucine concentration to estimate bacterial production in Guanabara Bay through saturation curves. A second aim was to collect preliminary data of bacterial production in two distinct sites corresponding to different water qualities: Urca inlet and Governador Island. Saturation curves were made with water samples taken at the main circulation channel of the bay, Paquetá Island, and the two sites mentioned before. The ³H-leucine curves showed similar pattern for all studied areas, indicating the ideal isotope concentration to be 10 nM. Bacterial biomass production ranged from 0.40 to 4.53 µgC L-1 h-1 in Urca and from 3.86 to 73.72 µgC L-1 h-1 in Governador Island indicating the relationship between nutrients and organic matter supply and bacterial productivity. This work is an important reference for studies on trophodynamics, biogeochemical cycles and modelling in Guanabara Bay.O objetivo desse trabalho foi realizar curvas de saturação a fim de otimizar a concentração de ³H-leucina necessária para avaliar produção bacteriana na Baía de Guanabara. Objetivou-se ainda a aquisição de dados preliminares de produção bacteriana em dois locais distintos em termos de qualidade de água : enseada da Urca e Ilha do Governador. As amostras para as curvas foram obtidas na região do Canal Central e na Ilha de Paquetá, além dos dois locais de coleta citados acima. Seguiu-se a metodologia descrita por Kirchman et al. (1985 e modificada por Smith & Azam (1992. As curvas de ³H-leucina mostraram um padrão semelhante para todas as áreas estudadas, indicando a concentração ótima de isótopo de 10 nM. A produção de biomassa bacteriana variou de 0,40 a 4,53 µgC L-1 h-1 na Urca e de 3,86 a 73,72 µgC L-1 h-1 na Ilha do Governador confirmando a relação entre a disponibilidade de nutrientes e matéria orgânica e o aumento da produtividade bacteriana. Essas análises poderão ser

  1. Secondary Neutron Production from Space Radiation Interactions: Advances in Model and Experimental Data Base Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Braley, G. Scott; Iwata, Yoshiyuki; Iwase, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Takashi; Ronningen, Reginald M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    For humans engaged in long-duration missions in deep space or near-Earth orbit, the risk from exposure to galactic and solar cosmic rays is an important factor in the design of spacecraft, spacesuits, and planetary bases. As cosmic rays are transported through shielding materials and human tissue components, a secondary radiation field is produced. Neutrons are an important component of that secondary field, especially in thickly-shielded environments. Calculations predict that 50% of the dose-equivalent in a lunar or Martian base comes from neutrons, and a recent workshop held at the Johnson Space Center concluded that as much as 30% of the dose in the International Space Station may come from secondary neutrons. Accelerator facilities provide a means for measuring the effectiveness of various materials in their ability to limit neutron production, using beams and energies that are present in cosmic radiation. The nearly limitless range of beams, energies, and target materials that are present in space, however, means that accelerator-based experiments will not provide a complete database of cross sections and thick-target yields that are necessary to plan and design long-duration missions. As such, accurate nuclear models of neutron production are needed, as well as data sets that can be used to compare with, and verify, the predictions from such models. Improvements in a model of secondary neutron production from heavy-ion interactions are presented here, along with the results from recent accelerator-based measurements of neutron-production cross sections. An analytical knockout-ablation model capable of predicting neutron production from high-energy hadron-hadron interactions (both nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions) has been previously developed. In the knockout stage, the collision between two nuclei result in the emission of one or more nucleons from the projectile and/or target. The resulting projectile and target remnants, referred to as

  2. Bioreactor production of secondary metabolites from cell cultures of periwinkle and sandalwood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valluri, Jagan V

    2009-01-01

    A bench-top bioreactor allowing continuous extraction of secondary metabolites is designed for Catharanthus roseus L. (G.) Don (periwinkle) and Santalum album L. (sandalwood) plant cell suspensions. Periwinkle cell cultures are exposed to biotic elicitors (Aspergillus niger, crude chitin) and abiotic elicitors (mannitol, methyl jasmonate) to induce alkaloid production. Whereas most of the biotic elicitors are effective when added on day 15 of culture, the abiotic elicitors are effective when added on day 20. The use of trans-cinnamic acid, an inhibitor of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activity, results in significant increase in the alkaloid production of periwinkle cell cultures. Exposure of the cells to mannitol-induced osmotic stress produced marked increment in the total alkaloid production. When biotic and abiotic stress treatments are applied sequentially, an additive effect in alkaloid accumulation is observed. Although no essential oils are detected, secondary metabolites in the form of phenolics are produced by the sandalwood cell cultures in the bioreactor environment. The use of morphologic modification such as organ cultures and transformed cultures is believed to be required for both production and storage of essential oil constituents in sandalwood. The present chapter demonstrates that periwinkle and sandalwood cell suspensions could be developed and successfully cultured in a modified air-lift bioreactor. The exploitation of variant cell strains and biotransformation of added precursors can certainly improve the use of periwinkle and sandalwood cell cultures for the bioproduction of desired compounds.

  3. Secondary metabolite production in Hypericum perforatum L. cell suspensions upon elicitation with fungal mycelia from Aspergillus flavus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadzovska-Simic Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the production of phenylpropanoids (phenolic compounds, flavanols, flavonols and anthocyanins and naphtodianthrones (hypericins in elicited Hypericum perforatum L. cell suspensions. To determine whether secondary metabolite production could be enhanced, Hypericum cell suspensions were exposed to mycelia extract from the fungus Aspergillus flavus. Elicited Hypericum cell suspension cultures displayed reduced growth and viability and a modification of secondary metabolites production. Anthocyanins were only stimulated in fungal-elicited cell suspensions. Secondary metabolite production in elicited Hypericum cells revealed an antagonism between the flavonoid/naphtodianthrone and anthocyanin pathways. The data suggest a modification of the channeling of the phenylpropanoid compounds. Together, these results represent useful data for monitoring the channeling in different secondary metabolite pathways during the scaled-up production of naphtodianthrones for medicinal uses.

  4. Bacterial indicator of agricultural management for soil under no-till crop production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva L M Figuerola

    Full Text Available The rise in the world demand for food poses a challenge to our ability to sustain soil fertility and sustainability. The increasing use of no-till agriculture, adopted in many areas of the world as an alternative to conventional farming, may contribute to reduce the erosion of soils and the increase in the soil carbon pool. However, the advantages of no-till agriculture are jeopardized when its use is linked to the expansion of crop monoculture. The aim of this study was to survey bacterial communities to find indicators of soil quality related to contrasting agriculture management in soils under no-till farming. Four sites in production agriculture, with different soil properties, situated across a west-east transect in the most productive region in the Argentinean pampas, were taken as the basis for replication. Working definitions of Good no-till Agricultural Practices (GAP and Poor no-till Agricultural Practices (PAP were adopted for two distinct scenarios in terms of crop rotation, fertilization, agrochemicals use and pest control. Non-cultivated soils nearby the agricultural sites were taken as additional control treatments. Tag-encoded pyrosequencing was used to deeply sample the 16S rRNA gene from bacteria residing in soils corresponding to the three treatments at the four locations. Although bacterial communities as a whole appeared to be structured chiefly by a marked biogeographic provincialism, the distribution of a few taxa was shaped as well by environmental conditions related to agricultural management practices. A statistically supported approach was used to define candidates for management-indicator organisms, subsequently validated using quantitative PCR. We suggest that the ratio between the normalized abundance of a selected group of bacteria within the GP1 group of the phylum Acidobacteria and the genus Rubellimicrobium of the Alphaproteobacteria may serve as a potential management-indicator to discriminate between

  5. Bacterial indicator of agricultural management for soil under no-till crop production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figuerola, Eva L M; Guerrero, Leandro D; Rosa, Silvina M; Simonetti, Leandro; Duval, Matías E; Galantini, Juan A; Bedano, José C; Wall, Luis G; Erijman, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    The rise in the world demand for food poses a challenge to our ability to sustain soil fertility and sustainability. The increasing use of no-till agriculture, adopted in many areas of the world as an alternative to conventional farming, may contribute to reduce the erosion of soils and the increase in the soil carbon pool. However, the advantages of no-till agriculture are jeopardized when its use is linked to the expansion of crop monoculture. The aim of this study was to survey bacterial communities to find indicators of soil quality related to contrasting agriculture management in soils under no-till farming. Four sites in production agriculture, with different soil properties, situated across a west-east transect in the most productive region in the Argentinean pampas, were taken as the basis for replication. Working definitions of Good no-till Agricultural Practices (GAP) and Poor no-till Agricultural Practices (PAP) were adopted for two distinct scenarios in terms of crop rotation, fertilization, agrochemicals use and pest control. Non-cultivated soils nearby the agricultural sites were taken as additional control treatments. Tag-encoded pyrosequencing was used to deeply sample the 16S rRNA gene from bacteria residing in soils corresponding to the three treatments at the four locations. Although bacterial communities as a whole appeared to be structured chiefly by a marked biogeographic provincialism, the distribution of a few taxa was shaped as well by environmental conditions related to agricultural management practices. A statistically supported approach was used to define candidates for management-indicator organisms, subsequently validated using quantitative PCR. We suggest that the ratio between the normalized abundance of a selected group of bacteria within the GP1 group of the phylum Acidobacteria and the genus Rubellimicrobium of the Alphaproteobacteria may serve as a potential management-indicator to discriminate between sustainable vs. non

  6. Effect of competition on the production and activity of secondary metabolites in Aspergillus species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Losada, L.; Ajayi, O.; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2009-01-01

    and in the presence of other fungal species. However, it is not known whether secreted secondary metabolites provide a competitive advantage over other fungal species, or whether competition has any effect on the production of those metabolites. Here, we have performed co-cultivation competition assays among...... different species of Aspergillus to determine relative species fitness in culture, and to analyze the presence of possible antifungal activity of secondary metabolites in extracts. The results show that, for the most part, at 30C only one species is able to survive direct competition with a second species...... activity, but in general, the extracts had greater antifungal activity when species were grown in the presence of a competitor. Using gas chromatography it was determined that the composition of extracts changed due to competition and a shift in temperature. These findings indicate that co...

  7. Bacteria in the injection water differently impacts the bacterial communities of production wells in high-temperature petroleum reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan eRen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Water flooding is widely used for oil recovery. However, how the introduction of bacteria via water flooding affects the subsurface ecosystem remains unknown. In the present study, the distinct bacterial communities of an injection well and 6 adjacent production wells were revealed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE and pyrosequencing. All sequences of the variable region 3 of the 16S rRNA gene retrieved from pyrosequencing were divided into 543 operational taxonomic units (OTUs based on 97% similarity. Approximately 13.5% of the total sequences could not be assigned to any recognized phylum. The Unifrac distance analysis showed significant differences in the bacterial community structures between the production well and injection water samples. However, highly similar bacterial structures were shown for samples obtained from the same oil-bearing strata. More than 69% of the OTUs detected in the injection water sample were absent or detected in low abundance in the production wells. However, the abundance of two OTUs reached as high as 17.5% and 26.9% in two samples of production water, although the OTUs greatly varied among all samples. Combined with the differentiated water flow rate measured through ion tracing, we speculated that the transportation of injected bacteria was impacted through the varied permeability from the injection well to each of the production wells. Whether the injected bacteria predominate the production well bacterial community might depend both on the permeability of the strata and the reservoir conditions.

  8. Metabolic Investigation in Gluconacetobacter xylinus and Its Bacterial Cellulose Production under a Direct Current Electric Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Miao; Zhong, Cheng; Zhang, Yu Ming; Xu, Ze Ming; Qiao, Chang Sheng; Jia, Shi Ru

    2016-01-01

    The effects of a direct current (DC) electric field on the growth and metabolism of Gluconacetobacter xylinus were investigated in static culture. When a DC electric field at 10 mA was applied using platinum electrodes to the culture broth, bacterial cellulose (BC) production was promoted in 12 h but was inhibited in the last 12 h as compared to the control (without DC electric field). At the cathode, the presence of the hydrogen generated a strong reductive environment that is beneficial to cell growth. As compared to the control, the activities of glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle, as well as BC productivity were observed to be slightly higher in the first 12 h. However, due to the absence of sufficient oxygen, lactic acid was accumulated from pyruvic acid at 18 h, which was not in favor of BC production. At the anode, DC inhibited cell growth in 6 h when compared to the control. The metabolic activity in G. xylinus was inhibited through the suppression of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glycolysis. At 18-24 h, cell density was observed to decrease, which might be due to the electrolysis of water that significantly dropped the pH of cultural broth far beyond the optimal range. Meanwhile, metabolites for self-protection were accumulated, for instance proline, glutamic acid, gluconic acid, and fatty acids. Notably, the accumulation of gluconic acid and lactic acid made it a really tough acid stress to cells at the anode and finally led to depression of cell growth.

  9. Agricultural and management practices and bacterial contamination in greenhouse versus open field lettuce production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holvoet, Kevin; Sampers, Imca; Seynnaeve, Marleen; Jacxsens, Liesbeth; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2014-12-23

    The aim of this study was to gain insight into potential differences in risk factors for microbial contamination in greenhouse versus open field lettuce production. Information was collected on sources, testing, and monitoring and if applicable, treatment of irrigation and harvest rinsing water. These data were combined with results of analysis on the levels of Escherichia coli as a fecal indicator organism and the presence of enteric bacterial pathogens on both lettuce crops and environmental samples. Enterohemorragic Escherichia coli (EHEC) PCR signals (vt1 or vt2 positive and eae positive), Campylobacter spp., and Salmonella spp. isolates were more often obtained from irrigation water sampled from open field farms (21/45, 46.7%) versus from greenhouse production (9/75, 12.0%). The open field production was shown to be more prone to fecal contamination as the number of lettuce samples and irrigation water with elevated E. coli was significantly higher. Farmers comply with generic guidelines on good agricultural practices available at the national level, but monitoring of microbial quality, and if applicable appropriateness of water treatment, or water used for irrigation or at harvest is restricted. These results indicate the need for further elaboration of specific guidelines and control measures for leafy greens with regard to microbial hazards.

  10. Agricultural and Management Practices and Bacterial Contamination in Greenhouse versus Open Field Lettuce Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Holvoet

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to gain insight into potential differences in risk factors for microbial contamination in greenhouse versus open field lettuce production. Information was collected on sources, testing, and monitoring and if applicable, treatment of irrigation and harvest rinsing water. These data were combined with results of analysis on the levels of Escherichia coli as a fecal indicator organism and the presence of enteric bacterial pathogens on both lettuce crops and environmental samples. Enterohemorragic Escherichia coli (EHEC PCR signals (vt1 or vt2 positive and eae positive, Campylobacter spp., and Salmonella spp. isolates were more often obtained from irrigation water sampled from open field farms (21/45, 46.7% versus from greenhouse production (9/75, 12.0%. The open field production was shown to be more prone to fecal contamination as the number of lettuce samples and irrigation water with elevated E. coli was significantly higher. Farmers comply with generic guidelines on good agricultural practices available at the national level, but monitoring of microbial quality, and if applicable appropriateness of water treatment, or water used for irrigation or at harvest is restricted. These results indicate the need for further elaboration of specific guidelines and control measures for leafy greens with regard to microbial hazards.

  11. Production of bacterial cellulose by Gluconacetobacter hansenii UAC09 using coffee cherry husk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, M Usha; Appaiah, K A Anu

    2013-08-01

    The work is aimed to investigate the suitability of underutilized coffee cherry husk (CCH) for the production and optimization of bacterial cellulose (BC) by Gluconacetobacter hansenii UAC09 and to study the physico-mechanical properties of BC films. CCH extract was used as a carbon source in various concentrations along with other nutritional components such as nitrogen (corn steep liquor, urea) and additives (ethyl alcohol, acetic acid). Concentration of CCH extract at 1:1 (w/v) along with 8% (v/v) corn steep liquor, 0.2% (w/v) urea, combination of 1.5% ethyl alcohol and 1.0% (v/v) acetic acid resulted in the production of 5.6-8.2 g/L of BC. BC had tensile strength varying between 28.5 and 42.4 MPa. BC produced with CCH and Hestrin and Schramm (HS) media did not differ in structure as analyzed by FT-IR. Scanning electron microscopic studies indicated BC to contain reticulated network of fine fibers. Under optimized condition, based on the other additives, CCH produced more than three folds yield of BC (5.6-8.2 g/L) than control medium (1.5 g/L). This is the first report on the use of CCH for the production of BC and paved way for the utilization of organic wastes with pectin and high polyphenol content.

  12. Production of bacterial cellulose using different carbon sources and culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadkazemi, Faranak; Azin, Mehrdad; Ashori, Alireza

    2015-03-01

    In this work, the effects of carbon sources and culture media on the production and structural properties of bacterial cellulose (BC) have been studied. BC nanofibers were synthesized using Gluconacetobacter xylinus strain PTCC 1734. Media used were Hestrin-Schramm (H), Yamanaka (Y), and Zhou (Z). Five different carbon sources, namely date syrup, glucose, mannitol, sucrose, and food-grade sucrose were used in these media. All the produced BC pellicles were characterized in terms of dry weight production, biomass yield, thermal stability, crystallinity and morphology by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The obtained results showed that mannitol lead to the highest yield, followed by sucrose. The highest production efficiency of mannitol might be due to the nitrogen source, which plays an important role. The maximum improvement on the thermal stability of the composites was achieved when mannitol was used in H medium. In addition, the crystallinity was higher in BC formed in H medium compared to other media. FE-SEM micrographs illustrated that the BC pellicles, synthesized in the culture media H and Z, were stable, unlike those in medium Y that were unstable. The micrographs of BC produced in media containing mannitol and sucrose provided evidence of the strong interfacial adhesion between the BC fibers without noticeable aggregates.

  13. Utilization of corncob acid hydrolysate for bacterial cellulose production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Yang, Xiao-Yan; Xiong, Lian; Guo, Hai-Jun; Luo, Jun; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Hai-Rong; Lin, Xiao-Qing; Chen, Xin-De

    2015-02-01

    In this study, corncob acid hydrolysate was used as a substrate for bacterial cellulose (BC) production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus. After 2 weeks' static fermentation, a BC yield of 4 g/L could be obtained. Both effects of medium composition and fermentation condition on the BC production were evaluated. Most extra substrates (carbon and nitrogen sources) except mannitol, butyric acid, and levulinic acid showed no effect on the improvement of BC yield. Fermentation condition including fermentation mode, inoculation concentration, and initial pH showed certain influence on the BC yield and thus should be well controlled. The analysis by field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that the BC sample had obvious nano-network structure, clear functional groups that were found in cellulose, and relatively high crystallinity and crystallinity index value. Moreover, the BC sample had great water-holding capacity. Overall, corncob acid hydrolysate could be one promising substrate for BC production.

  14. Copepod egg production, moulting and growth rates and secondary production in the Skagerrak in August 1988

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, W.T.; Tiselius, P.; Kiørboe, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of hydrography, chlorophyll, moulting rates of juvenile copepods and egg production rates of adult female copepods were made at eight stations along a transect across the Skagerrak. The goals of the study were to determine (i) if there were correlations between spatial variations in ...

  15. Emission of reactive compounds and secondary products from wood-based furniture coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salthammer, T.; Schwarz, A.; Fuhrmann, F.

    Emissions of organic fragmentation products, so-called "secondary emission products" and reactive species from wood-based furniture coatings have been studied in 1 m 3 test chambers. the climatic conditions were representative of indoor environments. Relevant compounds and compound groups were the wetting agent 2,4,7,9-tetramethyl-5-dicyne-4,7-diol (T4MDD), the plasticiser di-2-ethyl-hexyl-phthalate (DEHP), aliphatic aldehydes, monoterpenes, photoinitiator fragments, acrylic monomers/reactive solvents and diisocyanate monomers. Such substances may affect human health in several ways. Aliphatic aldehydes and some photoinitiator fragments are of strong odour, while acrylates and diisocyanates cause irritation of skin, eyes and upper airways. Terpenes and reactive solvents like styrene undergo indoor chemistry in the presence of ozone, nitrogen oxides or hydroxy radicals. Secondary emission products and reactive species can achieve significant indoor concentrations. On the other hand, it has been reported that even small quantities can cause health effects. In the cases of indoor studies with special regard to emissions from furniture, chemical analysis should always include these compounds.

  16. Genes Linked to Production of Secondary Metabolites in Talaromyces atroroseus Revealed Using CRISPR-Cas9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Maria Lund; Isbrandt, Thomas; Rasmussen, Kasper Bøwig; Thrane, Ulf; Hoof, Jakob Blæsbjerg; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    2017-01-01

    The full potential of fungal secondary metabolism has until recently been impeded by the lack of universal genetic tools for most species. However, the emergence of several CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing systems adapted for several genera of filamentous fungi have now opened the doors for future efforts in discovery of novel natural products and elucidation and engineering of their biosynthetic pathways in fungi where no genetic tools are in place. So far, most studies have focused on demonstrating the performance of CRISPR-Cas9 in various fungal model species, and recently we presented a versatile CRISPR-Cas9 system that can be successfully applied in several diverse Aspergillus species. Here we take it one step further and show that our system can be used also in a phylogenetically distinct and largely unexplored species from the genus of Talaromyces. Specifically, we exploit CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing to identify a new gene in T. atroroseus responsible for production of polyketide-nonribosomal peptide hybrid products, hence, linking fungal secondary metabolites to their genetic origin in a species where no genetic engineering has previously been performed. PMID:28056079

  17. Genes Linked to Production of Secondary Metabolites in Talaromyces atroroseus Revealed Using CRISPR-Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Maria Lund; Isbrandt, Thomas; Rasmussen, Kasper Bøwig; Thrane, Ulf; Hoof, Jakob Blæsbjerg; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    2017-01-01

    The full potential of fungal secondary metabolism has until recently been impeded by the lack of universal genetic tools for most species. However, the emergence of several CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing systems adapted for several genera of filamentous fungi have now opened the doors for future efforts in discovery of novel natural products and elucidation and engineering of their biosynthetic pathways in fungi where no genetic tools are in place. So far, most studies have focused on demonstrating the performance of CRISPR-Cas9 in various fungal model species, and recently we presented a versatile CRISPR-Cas9 system that can be successfully applied in several diverse Aspergillus species. Here we take it one step further and show that our system can be used also in a phylogenetically distinct and largely unexplored species from the genus of Talaromyces. Specifically, we exploit CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing to identify a new gene in T. atroroseus responsible for production of polyketide-nonribosomal peptide hybrid products, hence, linking fungal secondary metabolites to their genetic origin in a species where no genetic engineering has previously been performed.

  18. Production of nano bacterial cellulose from waste water of candied jujube-processing industry using Acetobacter xylinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Wang, Lifen; Hua, Jiachuan; Jia, Shiru; Zhang, Jianfei; Liu, Hao

    2015-04-20

    The work is aimed to investigate the suitability of waste water of candied jujube-processing industry for the production of bacterial cellulose (BC) by Gluconacetobacter xylinum CGMCC No.2955 and to study the structure properties of bacterial cellulose membranes. After acid pretreatment, the glucose of hydrolysate was higher than that of waste water of candied jujube. The volumetric yield of bacterial cellulose in hydrolysate was 2.25 g/L, which was 1.5-folds of that in waste water of candied jujube. The structures indicated that the fiber size distribution was 3-14 nm in those media with an average diameter being around 5.9 nm. The crystallinity index of BC from pretreatment medium was lower than that of without pretreatment medium and BCs from various media had similar chemical binding. Ammonium citrate was a key factor for improving production yield and the crystallinity index of BC.

  19. Production of biocompatible and antimicrobial bacterial cellulose polymers functionalized by RGDC grafting groups and gentamicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Asselin, Jérémie; Tazi, Neftaha; Messaddeq, Younès; Levinson, Dennis; Zhang, Ze

    2014-02-12

    Bacterial cellulose (BC), a three-dimensional fibril, is a natural polymer that can be used for many applications. BC effectiveness may be improved by enhancing surface characteristics contributing to a better physiologic interaction with human and animal cells and to intrinsically present antimicrobial agents. In the present study, gentamicin-activated BC membranes were obtained by chemically grafting RGDC peptides (R: arginine; G: glycine; D: aspartic acid; C: cysteine) using coupling agent 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) followed by covalent attachment of gentamicin onto the surface of the BC membrane network. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses showed that the BC-APTES contained 0.7% of silicon in terms of elemental composition, corresponding to a grafting ratio of 1:12. The presence of silicon and nitrogen in the BC-APTES confirmed the surface functionalization of the BC membrane. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) analyses show the formation of the secondary amide as supported by the valence bond C═O (ν(C═O)), a characteristic vibrational transition at 1650 cm(-1) which is particularly intense with the BC-RGDC-gentamicin membrane. Energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analyses showed a low level of carbon and nitrogen (C + N) in pure BC but a high level of (C + N) in BC-RGDC-gentamicin confirming the surface modification of the BC membrane by RGDC and gentamicin enrichment. Of great interest, the gentamicin-RGDC-grafted BC membranes are bactericidal against Streptococcus mutans but nontoxic to human dermal fibroblasts and thus may be useful for multiple applications such as improved wound healing and drug delivery systems.

  20. Patulin and secondary metabolite production by marine-derived Penicillium strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vansteelandt, Marieke; Kerzaon, Isabelle; Blanchet, Elodie; Fossi Tankoua, Olivia; Robiou Du Pont, Thibaut; Joubert, Yolaine; Monteau, Fabrice; Le Bizec, Bruno; Frisvad, Jens C; Pouchus, Yves François; Grovel, Olivier

    2012-09-01

    Genus Penicillium represents an important fungal group regarding to its mycotoxin production. Secondary metabolomes of eight marine-derived strains belonging to subgenera Furcatum and Penicillium were investigated using dereplication by liquid chromatography (LC)-Diode Array Detector (DAD)-mass spectrometry (MS)/MS. Each strain was grown on six different culture media to enhance the number of observable metabolites. Thirty-two secondary metabolites were detected in crude extracts with twenty first observations for studied species. Patulin, a major mycotoxin, was classically detected in extracts of Penicillium expansum, and was also isolated from Penicillium antarcticum cultures, whose secondary metabolome is still to be done. These detections constituted the first descriptions of patulin in marine strains of Penicillium, highlighting the risk for shellfish and their consumers due to the presence of these fungi in shellfish farming areas. Patulin induced acute neurotoxicity on Diptera larvae, indicating the interest of this bioassay as an additional tool for detection of this major mycotoxin in crude extracts.

  1. Leaky RAG Deficiency in Adult Patients with Impaired Antibody Production against Bacterial Polysaccharide Antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, Christoph B; Piller, Alexander; Linder, Angela; Sauerwein, Kai M T; Eibl, Martha M; Wolf, Hermann M

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function mutations in the recombination activating genes RAG1 and RAG2 have been reported to cause a T-B-NK+ type of severe combined immunodeficiency. In addition identification of hypomorphic mutations in RAG1 and RAG2 has led to an expansion of the spectrum of disease to include Omenn syndrome, early onset autoimmunity, granuloma, chronic cytomegalovirus- or EBV-infection with expansion of gamma/delta T-cells, idiophatic CD4 lymphopenia and a phenotype resembling common variable immunodeficiency. Herein we describe a novel presentation of leaky RAG1 and RAG2 deficiency in two unrelated adult patients with impaired antibody production against bacterial polysaccharide antigens. Clinical manifestation included recurrent pneumonia, sinusitis, otitis media and in one patient recurrent cutaneous vasculitis. Both patients harbored a combination of a null mutation on one allele with a novel hypomorphic RAG1/2 mutation on the other allele. One of these novel mutations affected the start codon of RAG1 and resulted in an aberrant gene and protein expression. The second novel RAG2 mutation leads to a truncated RAG2 protein, lacking the C-terminus with intact core RAG2 and reduced VDJ recombination capacity as previously described in a mouse model. Both patients presented with severely decreased numbers of naïve CD4+ T cells and defective T independent IgG responses to bacterial polysaccharide antigens, while T cell-dependent IgG antibody formation e.g. after tetanus or TBEV vaccination was intact. In conclusion, hypomorphic mutations in genes responsible for SCID should be considered in adults with predominantly antibody deficiency.

  2. Leaky RAG Deficiency in Adult Patients with Impaired Antibody Production against Bacterial Polysaccharide Antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph B Geier

    Full Text Available Loss of function mutations in the recombination activating genes RAG1 and RAG2 have been reported to cause a T-B-NK+ type of severe combined immunodeficiency. In addition identification of hypomorphic mutations in RAG1 and RAG2 has led to an expansion of the spectrum of disease to include Omenn syndrome, early onset autoimmunity, granuloma, chronic cytomegalovirus- or EBV-infection with expansion of gamma/delta T-cells, idiophatic CD4 lymphopenia and a phenotype resembling common variable immunodeficiency. Herein we describe a novel presentation of leaky RAG1 and RAG2 deficiency in two unrelated adult patients with impaired antibody production against bacterial polysaccharide antigens. Clinical manifestation included recurrent pneumonia, sinusitis, otitis media and in one patient recurrent cutaneous vasculitis. Both patients harbored a combination of a null mutation on one allele with a novel hypomorphic RAG1/2 mutation on the other allele. One of these novel mutations affected the start codon of RAG1 and resulted in an aberrant gene and protein expression. The second novel RAG2 mutation leads to a truncated RAG2 protein, lacking the C-terminus with intact core RAG2 and reduced VDJ recombination capacity as previously described in a mouse model. Both patients presented with severely decreased numbers of naïve CD4+ T cells and defective T independent IgG responses to bacterial polysaccharide antigens, while T cell-dependent IgG antibody formation e.g. after tetanus or TBEV vaccination was intact. In conclusion, hypomorphic mutations in genes responsible for SCID should be considered in adults with predominantly antibody deficiency.

  3. Population structure and secondary production of Siriella clausii, a dominant detritus feeding mysid in Posidonia oceanica meadows (W Mediterranean Sea)

    OpenAIRE

    Barberá Cebrián, Carmen; Sanchez-Jerez, Pablo; Sorbe, Jean Claude

    2013-01-01

    Temporal trends in abundance, demographic structure of the population and secondary production of Siriella clausii were studied at three different sectors of Posidonia oceanica meadows in the SE Iberian Peninsula, with different levels of habitat complexity. Secondary production was calculated through three methods widely employed in marine invertebrates: the Hynes method (based on demographic structure data) and models by Morin-Bourassa and Brey (based on biomass data). This filter/grazer an...

  4. Fermentative hydrogen production from hydrolyzed cellulosic feedstock prepared with a thermophilic anaerobic bacterial isolate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Yung Chung [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1 University Road, Tainan 701 (China); Huang, Chi-Yu.; Fu, Tzu-Ning [Department of Environmental Engineering and Science, Tunghai University, Taichung 407 (China); Chen, Chun-Yen; Chang, Jo-Shu [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1 University Road, Tainan 701 (China); Sustainable Environment Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan (China)

    2009-08-15

    Hydrogen gas was produced via dark fermentation from natural cellulosic materials and {alpha}-cellulose via a two-step process, in which the cellulosic substrates were first hydrolyzed by an isolated cellulolytic bacterium Clostridium strain TCW1, and the resulting hydrolysates were then used as substrate for fermentative H{sub 2} production. The TCW1 strain was able to hydrolyze all the cellulosic materials examined to produce reducing sugars (RS), attaining the best reducing sugar production yield of 0.65 g reducing sugar/g substrate from hydrolysis of {alpha}-cellulose. The hydrolysates of those cellulosic materials were successfully converted to H{sub 2} via dark fermentation using seven H{sub 2}-producing bacterial isolates. The bioH{sub 2} production performance was highly dependent on the type of cellulosic feedstock used, the initial reducing sugar concentration (C{sub RS,o}) (ranging from 0.7 to 4.5 mg/l), as well as the composition of sugar and soluble metabolites present in the cellulosic hydrolysates. It was found that Clostridium butyricum CGS5 displayed the highest H{sub 2}-producing efficiency with a cumulative H{sub 2} production of 270 ml/l from {alpha}-cellulose hydrolysate (C{sub RS,o} = 4.52 mg/l) and a H{sub 2} yield of 7.40 mmol/g RS (or 6.66 mmol/g substrate) from napier grass hydrolysate (C{sub RS,o} = 1.22 g/l). (author)

  5. Screening of bacterial strains producing maltotetraose-forming amylase and the conditions for enzyme production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Z; She, X; Li, M; Zhang, S

    1992-01-01

    The authors isolated 1380 bacterial strains from 290 soil samples collected in China and 490 strains were received from other research teams in this institute. By screening 707 strains showed starch-hydrolyzing activity. By further screening and paper chromatographic test, three strains with maltotetraose as the major product were obtained. The maltotetraose was further confirmed by treatment with beta-amylase splitting to maltose and with glucoamylase to glucose. The most promising strain was 537.1, which produced maltotetraose about 90% (w/w) in the starch hydrolysate. While the other two strains produced maltose and maltotriose besides maltotetraose. Strain 537.1 was tentatively identified as Alcaligenes sp. The optimum conditions for enzyme production were as follows: medium composition: 1.5% maltose; 0.5% peptone with initial pH of 7.0-7.5; cultured at 27-28 degrees C for 48 hours on rotary shaker. The culture supernatant of the strain 537.1 can hydrolyze starch and different kinds of cereal flour with a high yield of maltotetraose in the hydrolysate.

  6. Nitric oxide production in celomocytes of the earthworm Eisenia hortensis following bacterial challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SR Cook

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this in vitro investigation, nitric oxide (NO production was induced within celomocytes of the earthworm Eisenia hortensis following microbial challenge. Celomocytes were pre-loaded with the fluorescent indicator 4-amino-5-methylamino-2’, 7’-difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF-FM DA in order to detect the presence of intracellular nitric oxide subsequent to a 16 h incubation with chemically-fixed soil bacteria including Bacillus megaterium, Arthrobacter globiformis, Pseudomonas stutzeri, and Azotobacter chroococcum at a range of multiplicities of infection (MOIs. Flow cytometric analysis measuring increases in relative fluorescence intensity (RFI, which is directly proportional to the amount of intracellular NO produced, permitted determination of statistical significance (p < 0.05 of exposed celomocytes compared to baseline controls. Significant increases in NO were detected reproducibly in celomocytes treated with all bacterial species used. The most prominent results were observed after exposure to Gram positive B. megaterium and A. globiformis where 100 % of earthworms tested exhibited statistically significant increases of RFI at MOIs of 100:1 and 500:1, respectively. Furthermore, significant decreases in NO production in bacteria-stimulated earthworm celomocytes incubated with the NOS inhibitor aminoguanidine hydrochloride were observed. These results demonstrate microbial induction of NO synthesis in earthworms and provide evidence of an antimicrobial role of NO in the innate immune system.

  7. Biocontrol of Fusarium graminearum Growth and Deoxynivalenol Production in Wheat Kernels with Bacterial Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuijuan Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium graminearum is the main causal pathogen affecting small-grain cereals, and it produces deoxynivalenol, a kind of mycotoxin, which displays a wide range of toxic effects in human and animals. Bacterial strains isolated from peanut shells were investigated for their activities against F. graminearum by dual-culture plate and tip-culture assays. Among them, twenty strains exhibited potent inhibition to the growth of F. graminearum, and the inhibition rates ranged from 41.41% to 54.55% in dual-culture plate assay and 92.70% to 100% in tip-culture assay. Furthermore, eighteen strains reduced the production of deoxynivalenol by 16.69% to 90.30% in the wheat kernels assay. Finally, the strains with the strongest inhibitory activity were identified by morphological, physiological, biochemical methods and also 16S rDNA and gyrA gene analysis as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. The current study highlights the potential application of antagonistic microorganisms and their metabolites in the prevention of fungal growth and mycotoxin production in wheat kernels. As a biological strategy, it might avoid safety problems and nutrition loss which always caused by physical and chemical strategies.

  8. Using wastewater after lipid fermentation as substrate for bacterial cellulose production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Guo, Hai-Jun; Xiong, Lian; Wang, Bo; Shi, Si-Lan; Chen, Xue-Fang; Lin, Xiao-Qing; Wang, Can; Luo, Jun; Chen, Xin-De

    2016-01-20

    In this study, lipid fermentation wastewater (fermentation broth after separation with yeast biomass) with high Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) value of 25,591 mg/L was used as substrate for bacterial cellulose (BC) production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus for the first time. After 5 days of fermentation, the highest BC yield (0.659 g/L) was obtained. Both monosaccharide and polysaccharides present in lipid fermentation wastewater could be utilized by G. xylinus simultaneously during fermentation. By this bioconversion, 30.0% of COD could be removed after 10 days of fermentation and the remaining wastewater could be used for further BC fermentation. The crystallinity of BC samples in lipid fermentation wastewater increased gradually during fermentation but overall the environment of lipid fermentation wastewater showed small influence on BC structure by comparison with that in traditional HS medium by using FE-SEM, FTIR, and XRD. By this work, the possibility of using lipid fermentation wastewater containing low value carbohydrate polymer (extracellular polysaccharides) for high value carbohydrate polymer (BC) production was proven.

  9. Regulation of secondary metabolite production in the fungal tomato pathogen Cladosporium fulvum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Scott; Saccomanno, Benedetta; de Wit, Pierre J G M; Collemare, Jérôme

    2015-11-01

    Cladosporium fulvum is a non-obligate biotrophic fungal tomato pathogen for which fifteen secondary metabolite (SM) gene clusters were previously identified in its genome. However, most of these SM biosynthetic pathways remain cryptic during growth in planta and in different in vitro conditions. The sole SM produced in vitro is the pigment cladofulvin. In this study, we attempted to activate cryptic pathways in order to identify new compounds produced by C. fulvum. For this purpose, we manipulated orthologues of the global regulators VeA, LaeA and HdaA known to regulate SM biosynthesis in other fungal species. In C. fulvum, deleting or over-expressing these regulators yielded no new detectable SMs. Yet, quantification of cladofulvin revealed that CfHdaA is an activator whilst CfVeA and CfLaeA seemed to act as repressors of cladofulvin production. In the wild type strain, cladofulvin biosynthesis was affected by the carbon source, with highest production under carbon limitation and traces only in presence of saccharose. Repression of cladofulvin production by saccharose was dependent on both CfVeA and CfLaeA. Deletion of CfVeA or CfLaeA caused production of sterile mycelia, whilst Δcfhdaa deletion mutants sporulated, suggesting that cladofulvin production is not linked to asexual reproduction. Profiling the transcription of these regulators showed that CfHdaA-mediated regulation of cladofulvin production is independent of both CfVeA and CfLaeA. Our data suggest CfLaeA directly affects cladofulvin production whilst the effect of CfVeA is indirect, suggesting a role for CfLaeA outside of the Velvet complex. In conclusion, our results showed that regulation of SM production in C. fulvum is different from other fungi and indicate that manipulation of global regulators is not a universal tool to discover new fungal natural products.

  10. Improvement of bacterial cellulose production by manipulating the metabolic pathways in which ethanol and sodium citrate involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanjing; Tian, Chunjie; Tian, Hua; Zhang, Jiliang; He, Xin; Ping, Wenxiang; Lei, Hong

    2012-12-01

    Nowadays, bacterial cellulose has played more and more important role as new biological material for food industry and medical and industrial products based on its unique properties. However, it is still a difficult task to improve the production of bacterial cellulose, especially a large number of byproducts are produced in the metabolic biosynthesis processes. To improve bacterial cellulose production, ethanol and sodium citrate are added into the medium during the fermentation, and the activities of key enzymes and concentration of extracellular metabolites are measured to assess the changes of the metabolic flux of the hexose monophosphate pathway (HMP), the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway (EMP), and the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA). Our results indicate that ethanol functions as energy source for ATP generation at the early stage of the fermentation in the HMP pathway and the supplementation of ethanol significantly reduces glycerol generation (a major byproduct). While in the EMP pathway, sodium citrate plays a key role, and its supplementation results in the byproducts (mainly acetic acid and pyruvic acid) entering the gluconeogenesis pathway for cellulose synthesis. Furthermore, by adding ethanol and sodium citrate, the main byproduct citric acid in the TCA cycle is also reduced significantly. It is concluded that bacterial cellulose production can be improved by increasing energy metabolism and reducing the formation of metabolic byproducts through the metabolic regulations of the bypasses.

  11. RNA secondary structures regulate three steps of Rho-dependent transcription termination within a bacterial mRNA leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriner, Michelle A; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2017-01-25

    Transcription termination events in bacteria often require the RNA helicase Rho. Typically, Rho promotes termination at the end of coding sequences, but it can also terminate transcription within leader regions to implement regulatory decisions. Rho-dependent termination requires initial recognition of a Rho utilization (rut) site on a nascent RNA by Rho's primary binding surface. However, it is presently unclear what factors determine the location of transcription termination, how RNA secondary structures influence this process and whether mechanistic differences distinguish constitutive from regulated Rho-dependent terminators. We previously demonstrated that the 5' leader mRNA of the Salmonella corA gene can adopt two mutually exclusive conformations that dictate accessibility of a rut site to Rho. We now report that the corA leader also controls two subsequent steps of Rho-dependent termination. First, the RNA conformation that presents an accessible rut site promotes pausing of RNA polymerase (RNAP) at a single Rho-dependent termination site over 100 nt downstream. Second, an additional RNA stem-loop promotes Rho activity and controls the location at which Rho-dependent termination occurs, despite having no effect on initial Rho binding to the corA leader. Thus, the multi-step nature of Rho-dependent termination may facilitate regulation of a given coding region by multiple cytoplasmic signals.

  12. Reactions between ozone and building products: Impact on primary and secondary emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Mélanie; Ramalho, Olivier; Maupetit, François

    Reactions of ozone on common building products were studied in a dedicated emission test chamber system. Fourteen new and unused products were exposed to 100-160 ppb of ozone at 23 °C and 50% RH during 48 h experiments. Ozone deposition velocities calculated at steady state were between 0.003 cm s -1 (alkyd paint on polyester film) and 0.108 cm s -1 (pine wood board). All tested product showed modified emissions when exposed to ozone and secondary emissions of several aldehydes were identified. Carpets and wall coverings emitted mainly C 5-C 10n-aldehydes, typical by-products of surface reactions. Linoleum, polystyrene tiles and pine wood boards also showed increased emissions of formaldehyde, benzaldehyde and hexanal associated with reduced emissions of unsaturated compounds suggesting the occurrence of gas-phase reactions. The ozone removal on the different tested products was primarily associated with surface reactions. The relative contribution of gas-phase reactions to the total ozone removal was estimated to be between 5% and 30% for pine wood boards depending on relative humidity (RH) and on the incoming ozone concentration and 2% for polystyrene tiles. On pine wood board, decreasing ozone deposition velocities were measured with increasing ozone concentrations and with RH increasing in the range 30-50%.

  13. USING OF SECONDARY PRODUCTS OF RAPESEED PROCESSING IN THE FOOD INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Raksha-Slusareva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available When oil and biodiesel are extracted from rapeseed, secondary derived products are formed, which are not used effectively at the moment. The article deals with the problems of possible their use in food industry. During food product preparation for special dietary consumption we used electrophysical (processing by hydroelectropulse and physical (drying, grinding, steam treatment processing of raw materials. Through the developed technology for rapeseed cake processing, we received raw materials suitable for use in food industry. On the basis of these raw materials, the «Nutrition product for special dietary consumption “Ripakovyi”» was developed. It is a part of rape seed meal obtained from the seeds with low content of glucosinolates and erucic acid processed by hydroelectropulse dried in the cabinet oven or in the convective dryer, crushed and disinfected based on a developed soft technology for biologically active substances conservation. The production of this product solves the problem of rational utilization of rapeseed meal and diversification of foods for special dietary consumption.

  14. Metabolic investigation in Gluconacetobacter xylinus and its bacterial cellulose production under a direct current electric field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao eLiu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of a direct current (DC electric field on the growth and metabolism of Gluconacetobacter xylinus were investigated in static culture. When a DC electric field at 10 mA was applied using platinum electrodes to the culture broth, bacterial cellulose (BC production was promoted in 12 hours (h but was inhibited in the last 12 h as compared to the control (without DC electric field. At the cathode, the presence of the hydrogen generated a strong reductive environment that is beneficial to cell growth. As compared to the control, the activities of glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle, as well as BC productivity were observed to be slightly higher in the first 12 h. However, due to the absence of sufficient oxygen, lactic acid was accumulated from pyruvic acid at 18 h, which was not in favor of BC production. At the anode, DC inhibited cell growth in 6 h when compared to the control. The metabolic activity in G. xylinus was inhibited through the suppression of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glycolysis. At 18-24 h, cell density was observed to decrease, which might be due to the electrolysis of water that significantly dropped the pH of cultural broth far beyond the optimal range. Meanwhile, metabolites for self-protection were accumulated, for instance proline, glutamic acid, gluconic acid and fatty acids. Notably, the accumulation of gluconic acid and lactic acid made it a really tough acid stress to cells at the anode and finally led to depression of cell growth.

  15. Yield improvement strategies for the production of secondary metabolites in plant tissue culture: silymarin from Silybum marianum tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbouZid, S

    2014-01-01

    Plant cell culture can be a potential source for the production of important secondary metabolites. This technology bears many advantages over conventional agricultural methods. The main problem to arrive at a cost-effective process is the low productivity. This is mainly due to lack of differentiation in the cultured cells. Many approaches have been used to maximise the yield of secondary metabolites produced by cultured plant cells. Among these approaches: choosing a plant with a high biosynthetic capacity, obtaining efficient cell line for growth and production of metabolite of interest, manipulating culture conditions, elicitation, metabolic engineering and organ culture. This article gives an overview of the various approaches used to maximise the production of pharmaceutically important secondary metabolites in plant cell cultures. Examples of using these different approaches are shown for the production of silymarin from Silybum marianum tissue culture.

  16. Characterization of primary and secondary wood combustion products generated under different burner loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, E. A.; Krapf, M.; Orasche, J.; Huang, Y.; Zimmermann, R.; Drinovec, L.; Močnik, G.; El-Haddad, I.; Slowik, J. G.; Dommen, J.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2015-03-01

    Residential wood burning contributes to the total atmospheric aerosol burden; however, large uncertainties remain in the magnitude and characteristics of wood burning products. Primary emissions are influenced by a variety of parameters, including appliance type, burner wood load and wood type. In addition to directly emitted particles, previous laboratory studies have shown that oxidation of gas-phase emissions produces compounds with sufficiently low volatility to readily partition to the particles, forming considerable quantities of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). However, relatively little is known about wood burning SOA, and the effects of burn parameters on SOA formation and composition are yet to be determined. There is clearly a need for further study of primary and secondary wood combustion aerosols to advance our knowledge of atmospheric aerosols and their impacts on health, air quality and climate. For the first time, smog chamber experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of wood loading on both primary and secondary wood combustion products. Products were characterized using a range of particle- and gas-phase instrumentation, including an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). A novel approach for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) quantification from AMS data was developed and results were compared to those from GC-MS analysis of filter samples. Similar total particle mass emission factors were observed under high and average wood loadings; however, high fuel loadings were found to generate significantly higher contributions of PAHs to the total organic aerosol (OA) mass compared to average loadings. PAHs contributed 15 ± 4% (mean ±2 sample standard deviations) to the total OA mass in high-load experiments, compared to 4 ± 1% in average-load experiments. With aging, total OA concentrations increased by a factor of 3 ± 1 for high load experiments compared to 1.6 ± 0.4 for average-load experiments. In the AMS, an increase in PAH and

  17. Characterization of primary and secondary wood combustion products generated under different burner loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Bruns

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Residential wood burning contributes significantly to the total atmospheric aerosol burden; however, large uncertainties remain in the magnitude and characteristics of wood burning products. Primary emissions are influenced by a variety of parameters, including appliance type, burner wood load and wood type. In addition to directly emitted particles, previous laboratory studies have shown that oxidation of gas phase emissions produces compounds with sufficiently low volatility to readily partition to the particles, forming significant quantities of secondary organic aerosol (SOA. However, relatively little is known about wood burning SOA and the effects of burn parameters on SOA formation and composition are yet to be determined. There is clearly a need for further study of primary and secondary wood combustion aerosols to advance our knowledge of atmospheric aerosols and their impacts on health, air quality and climate. For the first time, smog chamber experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of wood loading on both primary and secondary wood combustion products. Products were characterized using a range of particle and gas phase instrumentation, including an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS. A novel approach for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH quantification from AMS data was developed and results were compared to those from GC-MS analysis of filter samples. Similar total particle mass emission factors were observed under high and average wood loadings, however, high fuel loadings were found to generate significantly higher contributions of PAHs to the total organic aerosol (OA mass compared to average loadings. PAHs contributed 15 ± 4% (mean ± 2 sample standard deviations to the total OA mass in high load experiments, compared to 4 ± 1% in average load experiments. With aging, total OA concentrations increased by a factor of 3 ± 1 for high load experiments compared to 1.6 ± 0.4 for average load experiments. In the AMS, an

  18. Extracellular Lipase and Protease Production from a Model Drinking Water Bacterial Community Is Functionally Robust to Absence of Individual Members.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham G Willsey

    Full Text Available Bacteria secrete enzymes into the extracellular space to hydrolyze macromolecules into constituents that can be imported for microbial nutrition. In bacterial communities, these enzymes and their resultant products can be modeled as community property. Our goal was to investigate the impact of individual community member absence on the resulting community production of exoenzymes (extracellular enzymes involved in lipid and protein hydrolysis. Our model community contained nine bacteria isolated from the potable water system of the International Space Station. Bacteria were grown in static conditions individually, all together, or in all combinations of eight species and exoproduct production was measured by colorimetric or fluorometric reagents to assess short chain and long chain lipases, choline-specific phospholipases C, and proteases. The exoenzyme production of each species grown alone varied widely, however, the enzyme activity levels of the mixed communities were functionally robust to absence of any single species, with the exception of phospholipase C production in one community. For phospholipase C, absence of Chryseobacterium gleum led to increased choline-specific phospholipase C production, correlated with increased growth of Burkholderia cepacia and Sphingomonas sanguinis. Because each individual species produced different enzyme activity levels in isolation, we calculated an expected activity value for each bacterial mixture using input levels or known final composition. This analysis suggested that robustness of each exoenzyme activity is not solely mediated by community composition, but possibly influenced by bacterial communication, which is known to regulate such pathways in many bacteria. We conclude that in this simplified model of a drinking water bacterial community, community structure imposes constraints on production and/or secretion of exoenzymes to generate a level appropriate to exploit a given nutrient environment.

  19. Intrathecal production of interleukin-12 and gamma-interferon in patients with bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kornelisse, R.F.; Hack, C.E.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Pouw-Kraan, van der T.C.T.M.; Hop, W.C.J.; Mierlo, van G.; Suur, M.H.; Neijens, H.J.; Groot, de R.

    1997-01-01

    To assess the role of interleukin-12 (IL-12) and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) in children with bacterial meningitis, bioactive IL-12 (p70) and the inactive subunit p40 and IFN-gamma were measured in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 35 children with bacterial meningitis and 10 control subject

  20. Production and Characterization of a New Bacterial Cellulose/Poly(Vinyl Alcohol Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Gama

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cellulose (BC is characterized for its high water holding capacity, high crystallinity, an ultrafine fiber network and high tensile strength. This work demonstrates the production of a new interpenetrated polymer network nanocomposite obtained through the incorporation of poly(vinyl alcohol (PVA on the BC matrix and evaluates the effect of oven drying on the morphological, mechanical and mass transfer properties of the composite membranes. Both the addition of PVA and oven drying induce the appearance of larger pores (circa 1–3 µm in average diameter in dried BC/PVA membranes. Both types of treatments also affect the permeability of the composite, as assessed by the diffusion coefficients of polyethylene glycol (PEG molecules (900, 8,000, 35,000 and 100,000 Da across the membranes. Finally, the Young’s modulus of dry pristine BC decreases following PVA incorporation, resulting in a change from 3.5 GPa to 1 GPa and a five-fold loss in tensile strength.

  1. The mito-DAMP cardiolipin blocks IL-10 production causing persistent inflammation during bacterial pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Krishnendu; Raundhal, Mahesh; Chen, Bill B.; Morse, Christina; Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Khare, Anupriya; Oriss, Timothy B.; Huff, Rachael; Lee, Janet S.; St. Croix, Claudette M.; Watkins, Simon; Mallampalli, Rama K.; Kagan, Valerian E.; Ray, Anuradha; Ray, Prabir

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a significant healthcare burden worldwide. Failure to resolve inflammation after infection precipitates lung injury and an increase in morbidity and mortality. Gram-negative bacteria are common in pneumonia and increased levels of the mito-damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) cardiolipin can be detected in the lungs. Here we show that mice infected with Klebsiella pneumoniae develop lung injury with accumulation of cardiolipin. Cardiolipin inhibits resolution of inflammation by suppressing production of anti-inflammatory IL-10 by lung CD11b+Ly6GintLy6CloF4/80+ cells. Cardiolipin induces PPARγ SUMOylation, which causes recruitment of a repressive NCOR/HDAC3 complex to the IL-10 promoter, but not the TNF promoter, thereby tipping the balance towards inflammation rather than resolution. Inhibition of HDAC activity by sodium butyrate enhances recruitment of acetylated histone 3 to the IL-10 promoter and increases the concentration of IL-10 in the lungs. These findings identify a mechanism of persistent inflammation during pneumonia and indicate the potential of HDAC inhibition as a therapy. PMID:28074841

  2. Effect of heavy metals and phenol on bacterial decolourisation and COD reduction of sucrose-aspartic acid Maillard product

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sangeeta Yadav; Ram Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Melanodins are amino-carbonyl complex,predominantly present in sugarcane molasses based distillery wastewater as major source of colourant.The microbial decolourisation of melanoidin is a challenge due to its binding property with other co-pollutants of distillery waste.Results revealed that the presence of Zn2+ (2.00-20.00 mg/L) in melanoidin solution (1200 mg/L) stimulated the bacterial growth and sucrose-aspartic acid Maillard product (SAA) decolourisation as compared to control,while Fe3+ and Mn2+ at the same concentration inhibited the process.However,the presence of phenol (100 mg/L) along with Zn2+,Fe3+ and Mn2+ suppressed the bacterial growth,SAA decolourisation and MnP activity.The shrinkage and reduced number of bacterial cell count at higher concentration of heavy metals in presence of phenol was also observed under scanning electron microscope.

  3. Secondary neutron-production cross sections from heavy-ioninteractions in composite targets.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heilbronn, L.; Iwata, Y.; Iwase,H.; Murakami, T.; Sato, H.; Nakamura, T.; Ronningen, R.M.; Ieki, K.; Gudowska, I.; Sobolevsky, N.

    2005-12-19

    Secondary neutron-production cross-sections have been measured from interactions of 290 MeV/nucleon C and 600 MeV/nucleon Ne in a target composed of simulated Martian regolith and polyethylene, and from 400 MeV/nucleon Ne interactions in wall material from the International Space Station. The data were measured between 5 and 80 deg in the laboratory. We report the double-differential cross sections, angular distributions, and total neutron-production cross sections from all three systems. The spectra from all three systems exhibit behavior previously reported in other heavy-ion, neutron production experiments; namely, a peak at forward angles near the energy corresponding to the beam velocity, with the remaining spectra generated by pre-equilibrium and equilibrium processes. The double differential cross sections are fitted with a moving-source parameterization. Also reported are the data without corrections for neutron flux attenuation in the target and other intervening materials, and for neutron production in non-target materials near the target position. These uncorrected spectra are compared with SHIELD-HIT and PHITS transport model calculations. The transport model calculations reproduce the spectral shapes well, but, on average, underestimate the magnitudes of the cross sections.

  4. Effects of magnetization on fusion product trapping and secondary neutron spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Hansen, S. B.; Gomez, M. R.; Hahn, K. D.; Sinars, D. B.; Peterson, K. J.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Awe, T. J.; Harding, E.; Jennings, C. A.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Cuneo, M. E.; Geissel, M.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Porter, J. L.; Rochau, G. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    By magnetizing the fusion fuel in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) systems, the required stagnation pressure and density can be relaxed dramatically. This happens because the magnetic field insulates the hot fuel from the cold pusher and traps the charged fusion burn products. This trapping allows the burn products to deposit their energy in the fuel, facilitating plasma self-heating. Here, we report on a comprehensive theory of this trapping in a cylindrical DD plasma magnetized with a purely axial magnetic field. Using this theory, we are able to show that the secondary fusion reactions can be used to infer the magnetic field-radius product, BR, during fusion burn. This parameter, not ρR, is the primary confinement parameter in magnetized ICF. Using this method, we analyze data from recent Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion experiments conducted on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories. We show that in these experiments BR ≈ 0.34(+0.14/−0.06) MG · cm, a ∼ 14× increase in BR from the initial value, and confirming that the DD-fusion tritons are magnetized at stagnation. This is the first experimental verification of charged burn product magnetization facilitated by compression of an initial seed magnetic flux.

  5. Regulation of a novel gene cluster involved in secondary metabolite production in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindra; Pak, Patricia; Elliot, Marie A

    2010-10-01

    Antibiotic biosynthesis in the streptomycetes is a complex and highly regulated process. Here, we provide evidence for the contribution of a novel genetic locus to antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor. The overexpression of a gene cluster comprising four protein-encoding genes (abeABCD) and an antisense RNA-encoding gene (α-abeA) stimulated the production of the blue-pigmented metabolite actinorhodin on solid medium. Actinorhodin production also was enhanced by the overexpression of an adjacent gene (abeR) encoding a predicted Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory protein (SARP), while the deletion of this gene impaired actinorhodin production. We found the abe genes to be differentially regulated and controlled at multiple levels. Upstream of abeA was a promoter that directed the transcription of abeABCD at a low but constitutive level. The expression of abeBCD was, however, significantly upregulated at a time that coincided with the initiation of aerial development and the onset of secondary metabolism; this expression was activated by the binding of AbeR to four heptameric repeats upstream of a promoter within abeA. Expressed divergently to the abeBCD promoter was α-abeA, whose expression mirrored that of abeBCD but did not require activation by AbeR. Instead, α-abeA transcript levels were subject to negative control by the double-strand-specific RNase, RNase III.

  6. Fungal secondary metabolites from Monascus spp. reduce rumen methane production in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgavi, D P; Martin, C; Boudra, H

    2013-02-01

    Decreasing methanogenesis without affecting fermentation and digestion of feeds in the rumen can reduce the environmental impact of ruminant production and have a beneficial effect on feed conversion efficiency. In this work, metabolites produced by Monascus spp. molds were assayed for their antimethanogenic activity in vitro and in vivo. The capacity of 7 strains of Monascus to produce secondary metabolites was assessed in solid media. Monitored metabolites included the statins monacolin K, pravastatin, and mevastatin, and the mycotoxin citrinin. Ethanolic extracts from 5 different solid media from 2 selected strains were tested in vitro. Fermentation was not negatively affected by any treatment, but one extract decreased methane production (P 0.05). Rice on which the selected Monascus sp. was grown also decreased methane production when used as substrate for in vitro incubations (P Monascus-fermented rice on methane production was then assayed in vivo. Six wethers were adapted to a diet containing rice grain and hay (1:1 ratio). Rice was then replaced by fermented rice and given to animals for nearly 2 wk. Animals were monitored for a further 2 wk after the treatment. Daily methane emissions decreased (P Monascus appear to have an inhibitory effect on methanogens and decreased methanogenesis in vitro and in short-term in vivo without any apparent negative effect on rumen fermentation. This strategy deserves to be further explored and could be an abatement option under certain feeding situations.

  7. Effects of Plant Secondary Metabolites on Methane Production and Fermentation Parameters in In vitro Ruminal Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Giuburunca

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Enteric fermentation process is of concern worldwide for its contribution to global warming. It is known that ruminant animals, due to natural fermentation process contribute substantially to the increase in methane production. Methanogenesis process represents besides its contribution to greenhouse gases emissions an energy loss to the animal. To reduce ruminal methane productions in an ecologically and sustainable way, many attempts have been initiated, such as: uses of chemicals additives or ionophore antibiotics, defaunation process or immunization against ruminal methanogenesis. In the last years, a new strategy has been evaluated whether plant secondary metabolites can be used as natural additives to reduce ruminal methane emissions. The present study has been conducted to investigate the effects of trans-cinnamic, caffeic, p-coumaric acids and catechin hydrate, four plant secondary metabolites (PSMs on methane production and fermentation in in vitro ruminal cultures. The four PSMs were added anaerobically in a 6 mM concentration to 100 ml serum bottles containing 500 mg grass hay as a substrate, 10 ml rumen fluid collected from a fistulated sheep before morning feeding and 40 ml 141 DSM culture medium. The bottles were incubated at 39 ̊C. After 24 h, the following variables were measured: total gas volume, pH, methane and volatile fatty acids (VFAs production. The results showed that caffeic (p = 0.058 and p-coumaric (p = 0.052 acids tended to decrease methane production in comparison to control but the decrease was not statistic significantly at α= 0.05. The other two PSMs had no significant effect on methane production. Addition of PSMs did not affected the total gas volume, the pH and VFAs profile (P>0.05 in relation to the control (no PSM added. In conclusion, caffeic and p-coumaric acids in 6 mM concentration showed some promising effects for decreasing ruminal methane emissions without affecting ruminal fermentation parameters but

  8. Insights into the lifestyle of uncultured bacterial natural product factories associated with marine sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackner, Gerald; Peters, Eike Edzard; Helfrich, Eric J N; Piel, Jörn

    2017-01-17

    The as-yet uncultured filamentous bacteria "Candidatus Entotheonella factor" and "Candidatus Entotheonella gemina" live associated with the marine sponge Theonella swinhoei Y, the source of numerous unusual bioactive natural products. Belonging to the proposed candidate phylum "Tectomicrobia," Candidatus Entotheonella members are only distantly related to any cultivated organism. The Ca E. factor has been identified as the source of almost all polyketide and modified peptides families reported from the sponge host, and both Ca Entotheonella phylotypes contain numerous additional genes for as-yet unknown metabolites. Here, we provide insights into the biology of these remarkable bacteria using genomic, (meta)proteomic, and chemical methods. The data suggest a metabolic model of Ca Entotheonella as facultative anaerobic, organotrophic organisms with the ability to use methanol as an energy source. The symbionts appear to be auxotrophic for some vitamins, but have the potential to produce most amino acids as well as rare cofactors like coenzyme F420 The latter likely accounts for the strong autofluorescence of Ca Entotheonella filaments. A large expansion of protein families involved in regulation and conversion of organic molecules indicates roles in host-bacterial interaction. In addition, a massive overrepresentation of members of the luciferase-like monooxygenase superfamily points toward an important role of these proteins in Ca Entotheonella. Furthermore, we performed mass spectrometric imaging combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization to localize Ca Entotheonella and some of the bioactive natural products in the sponge tissue. These metabolic insights into a new candidate phylum offer hints on the targeted cultivation of the chemically most prolific microorganisms known from microbial dark matter.

  9. Denitrifying bacterial communities affect current production and nitrous oxide accumulation in a microbial fuel cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadna Vilar-Sanz

    Full Text Available The biocathodic reduction of nitrate in Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs is an alternative to remove nitrogen in low carbon to nitrogen wastewater and relies entirely on microbial activity. In this paper the community composition of denitrifiers in the cathode of a MFC is analysed in relation to added electron acceptors (nitrate and nitrite and organic matter in the cathode. Nitrate reducers and nitrite reducers were highly affected by the operational conditions and displayed high diversity. The number of retrieved species-level Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs for narG, napA, nirS and nirK genes was 11, 10, 31 and 22, respectively. In contrast, nitrous oxide reducers remained virtually unchanged at all conditions. About 90% of the retrieved nosZ sequences grouped in a single OTU with a high similarity with Oligotropha carboxidovorans nosZ gene. nirS-containing denitrifiers were dominant at all conditions and accounted for a significant amount of the total bacterial density. Current production decreased from 15.0 A · m(-3 NCC (Net Cathodic Compartment, when nitrate was used as an electron acceptor, to 14.1 A · m(-3 NCC in the case of nitrite. Contrarily, nitrous oxide (N2O accumulation in the MFC was higher when nitrite was used as the main electron acceptor and accounted for 70% of gaseous nitrogen. Relative abundance of nitrite to nitrous oxide reducers, calculated as (qnirS+qnirK/qnosZ, correlated positively with N2O emissions. Collectively, data indicate that bacteria catalysing the initial denitrification steps in a MFC are highly influenced by main electron acceptors and have a major influence on current production and N2O accumulation.

  10. Effect of addition of sodium alginate on bacterial cellulose production by Acetobacter xylinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L L; Sun, D P; Hu, L Y; Li, Y W; Yang, J Z

    2007-07-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) production by Acetobacter xylinum NUST4.1 was carried out in the shake flask and in a stirred-tank reactor by means of adding sodium alginate (NaAlg) into the medium. When 0.04% (w/v) NaAlg was added in the shake flask, BC production reached 6.0 g/l and the terminal yield of the cellulose was 27% of the total sugar initially added, compared with 3.7 g/l and 24% in the control, respectively. The variation between replicates in all determinations was less than 5%. During the cultivation in the stirred-tank reactor, the addition of NaAlg changed the morphology of cellulose from the irregular clumps and fibrous masses entangled in the internals to discrete masses dispersing into the broth, which indicates that NaAlg hinders formation of large clumps of BC, and enhances cellulose yield. Because the structure of cellulose is changed depending on the culture condition such as additives, structural characteristics of BC produced in the NaAlg-free and NaAlg medium are compared using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD). SEM photographs show some differences in reticulated structures and ribbon width and FT-IR spectra indicate that there is the hydrogen bonding interaction between BC and NaAlg, then X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis reveals that BC produced with NaAlg-added has a lower crystallinity and a smaller crystalline size. The results show that enhanced yields and modification of cellulose structure occur in the presence of NaAlg.

  11. N-acetyl-L-cysteine affects growth, extracellular polysaccharide production, and bacterial biofilm formation on solid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, Ann-Cathrin; Hermansson, Malte; Elwing, Hans

    2003-08-01

    N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) is used in medical treatment of patients with chronic bronchitis. The positive effects of NAC treatment have primarily been attributed to the mucus-dissolving properties of NAC, as well as its ability to decrease biofilm formation, which reduces bacterial infections. Our results suggest that NAC also may be an interesting candidate for use as an agent to reduce and prevent biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces in environments typical of paper mill plants. Using 10 different bacterial strains isolated from a paper mill, we found that the mode of action of NAC is chemical, as well as biological, in the case of bacterial adhesion to stainless steel surfaces. The initial adhesion of bacteria is dependent on the wettability of the substratum. NAC was shown to bind to stainless steel, increasing the wettability of the surface. Moreover, NAC decreased bacterial adhesion and even detached bacteria that were adhering to stainless steel surfaces. Growth of various bacteria, as monocultures or in a multispecies community, was inhibited at different concentrations of NAC. We also found that there was no detectable degradation of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) by NAC, indicating that NAC reduced the production of EPS, in most bacteria tested, even at concentrations at which growth was not affected. Altogether, the presence of NAC changes the texture of the biofilm formed and makes NAC an interesting candidate for use as a general inhibitor of formation of bacterial biofilms on stainless steel surfaces.

  12. Altering the thermal resistance of foodborne bacterial pathogens with an eggshell membrane waste by-product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, A L; Sheldon, B W

    2001-04-01

    Eggshells from egg-breaking operations are a significant waste disposal problem. Thus, the development of value-added by-products from this waste would be welcomed by the industry. The ability of extracted eggshell membranes containing, several bacteriolytic enzymes (i.e., lysozyme and beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase) or other membrane components to alter the thermal resistance of gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial pathogens was evaluated. Mid-log phase cells of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE), Salmonella Typhimurium (ST), Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EC), Listeria monocytogenes Scott A (LM), and Staphylococcus aureus (SA) were suspended in 100 ml of 0.1% peptone water (pH 6.9, 10(7-8) CFU/ml) containing either 0 (control) or 10 g of an eggshell membrane extract and incubated at 37 degrees C for 45 min. Following exposure, membrane-free samples (1.5 ml) were heated in a 56 degrees C (LM, SA), 54 degrees C (SE, ST), or 52 degrees C (EC) water bath from 0 to 14 min in sealed glass reaction vials (12 by 32 mm), and the survivors were recovered on brain heart infusion agar. Population reductions ranging from 27.6% (SA) to 99.8% (LM) (ST, 43.8%; SE, 47.5%; EC, 71.8%) were observed for cells treated for 45 min with extracted membrane, as compared to controls. D-value reductions ranging from 0 (LM) to 87.2% (SE) (SA, 36.7%; EC, 83.3%; ST, 86.3%) were observed when membrane-treated cells were subsequently heat inactivated. The effects of exposure pH, time, temperature, and organic load on membrane activity were also evaluated with Salmonella Typhimurium. Exposure pH (5.0 versus 6.9), time (15 versus 45 min), and temperature (4 degrees C versus 37 degrees C) did not significantly reduce the impact of eggshell membranes on D-values. However, the presence of organic matter (0.1% peptone water versus skim milk) significantly reduced the thermal resistance-reducing capacity of the membranes. These preliminary findings provide information on the potential use of extracted eggshell

  13. IMG-ABC: new features for bacterial secondary metabolism analysis and targeted biosynthetic gene cluster discovery in thousands of microbial genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjithomas, Michalis; Chen, I-Min A.; Chu, Ken; Huang, Jinghua; Ratner, Anna; Palaniappan, Krishna; Andersen, Evan; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Ivanova, Natalia N.

    2017-01-01

    Secondary metabolites produced by microbes have diverse biological functions, which makes them a great potential source of biotechnologically relevant compounds with antimicrobial, anti-cancer and other activities. The proteins needed to synthesize these natural products are often encoded by clusters of co-located genes called biosynthetic gene clusters (BCs). In order to advance the exploration of microbial secondary metabolism, we developed the largest publically available database of experimentally verified and predicted BCs, the Integrated Microbial Genomes Atlas of Biosynthetic gene Clusters (IMG-ABC) (https://img.jgi.doe.gov/abc/). Here, we describe an update of IMG-ABC, which includes ClusterScout, a tool for targeted identification of custom biosynthetic gene clusters across 40 000 isolate microbial genomes, and a new search capability to query more than 700 000 BCs from isolate genomes for clusters with similar Pfam composition. Additional features enable fast exploration and analysis of BCs through two new interactive visualization features, a BC function heatmap and a BC similarity network graph. These new tools and features add to the value of IMG-ABC's vast body of BC data, facilitating their in-depth analysis and accelerating secondary metabolite discovery. PMID:27903896

  14. Indoor terpene emissions from cooking with herbs and pepper and their secondary organic aerosol production potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Felix; Farren, Naomi J.; Bozzetti, Carlo; Daellenbach, Kaspar R.; Kilic, Dogushan; Kumar, Nivedita K.; Pieber, Simone M.; Slowik, Jay G.; Tuthill, Rosemary N.; Hamilton, Jacqueline F.; Baltensperger, Urs; Prévôt, André S. H.; El Haddad, Imad

    2016-11-01

    Cooking is widely recognized as an important source of indoor and outdoor particle and volatile organic compound emissions with potential deleterious effects on human health. Nevertheless, cooking emissions remain poorly characterized. Here the effect of herbs and pepper on cooking emissions was investigated for the first time to the best of our knowledge using state of the art mass spectrometric analysis of particle and gas-phase composition. Further, the secondary organic aerosol production potential of the gas-phase emissions was determined by smog chamber aging experiments. The emissions of frying meat with herbs and pepper include large amounts of mono-, sesqui- and diterpenes as well as various terpenoids and p-cymene. The average total terpene emission rate from the use of herbs and pepper during cooking is estimated to be 46 ± 5 gg-1Herbs min-1. These compounds are highly reactive in the atmosphere and lead to significant amounts of secondary organic aerosol upon aging. In summary we demonstrate that cooking with condiments can constitute an important yet overlooked source of terpenes in indoor air.

  15. Is a Schools' Performance Related to Technical Change?--A Study on the Relationship between Innovations and Secondary School Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haelermans, Carla; Blank, Jos L. T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the relation between innovations and productivity in Dutch secondary schools. Innovation clusters are directly included in the production model. In order to correct for differences between schools, we add school type, region and year controls. The results indicate that process innovations, teacher professionalization…

  16. Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions inthe Presence of Ozone: A Bench-Scale Chamber Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Destaillats, Hugo; Lunden, Melissa M.; Singer, Brett C.; Coleman,Beverly K.; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Weschler, Charles J.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2005-10-01

    Ozone-driven chemistry is a major source of indoor secondary pollutants of health concern. This study investigates secondary air pollutants formed from reactions between constituents of household products and ozone. Gas-phase product emissions were introduced along with ozone at constant rates into a 198-L Teflon-lined reaction chamber. Gas-phase concentrations of reactive terpenoids and oxidation products were measured. Formaldehyde was a predominant oxidation byproduct for the three studied products, with yields under most conditions of 20-30% with respect to ozone consumed. Acetaldehyde, acetone, glycolaldehyde, formic acid and acetic acid were each also detected for two or three of the products. Immediately upon mixing of reactants, a scanning mobility particle sizer detected particle nucleation events that were followed by a significant degree of ultrafine particle growth. The production of secondary gaseous pollutants and particles depended primarily on the ozone level and was influenced by other parameters such as the air-exchange rate. Hydroxyl radical concentrations in the range 0.04-200 x 10{sup 5} molecules cm{sup -3} were measured. OH concentrations were observed to vary strongly with residual ozone level in the chamber, which was in the range 1-25 ppb, as is consistent with expectations from a simplified kinetic model. In a separate test, we exposed the dry residue of two products to ozone in the chamber and observed the formation of gas-phase and particle-phase secondary oxidation products.

  17. Abundance and diversity of sedimentary bacterial communities in a coastal productive setting in the Western Irish Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, S. S.; Pentlavalli, P.; Flanagan, P. V.; Allen, C. C. R.; Monteys, X.; Szpak, M. T.; Murphy, B. T.; Jordan, S. F.; Kelleher, B. P.

    2016-02-01

    The bacterial community composition and biomass abundance from a depositional mud belt in the western Irish Sea and regional sands were investigated by phospholipid ester-linked fatty acid profiling, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and barcoded pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The study area varied by water depth (12-111 m), organic carbon content (0.09-1.57% TOC), grain size, hydrographic regime (well-mixed vs. stratified), and water column phytodetrital input (represented by algal polyunsaturated PLFA). The relative abundance of bacterial-derived PLFA (sum of methyl-branched, cyclopropyl and odd-carbon number PLFA) was positively correlated with fine-grained sediment, and was highest in the depositional mud belt. A strong association between bacterial biomass and eukaryote primary production was suggested based on observed positive correlations with total nitrogen and algal polyunsaturated fatty acids. In addition, 16S rRNA genes affiliated to the classes Clostridia and Flavobacteria represented a major proportion of total 16S rRNA gene sequences. This suggests that benthic bacterial communities are also important degraders of phytodetrital organic matter and closely coupled to water column productivity in the western Irish Sea.

  18. Genes Linked to Production of Secondary Metabolites in Talaromyces atroroseus Revealed Using CRISPR-Cas9

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Maria Lund; Petersen, Thomas Isbrandt; Rasmussen, Kasper Bøwig

    2017-01-01

    The full potential of fungal secondary metabolism has until recently been impeded by the lack of universal genetic tools for most species. However, the emergence of several CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing systems adapted for several genera of filamentous fungi have now opened the doors for future...... efforts in discovery of novel natural products and elucidation and engineering of their biosynthetic pathways in fungi where no genetic tools are in place. So far, most studies have focused on demonstrating the performance of CRISPR-Cas9 in various fungal model species, and recently we presented...... a versatile CRISPR-Cas9 system that can be successfully applied in several diverse Aspergillus species. Here we take it one step further and show that our system can be used also in a phylogenetically distinct and largely unexplored species from the genus of Talaromyces. Specifically, we exploit CRISPR-Cas9...

  19. Discovery and characterization of novel bioactive peptides from marine secondary products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkenberg, Susan Skanderup

    antioxidative, antihypertensive, antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, anticancer and diabetes 2 effects among others. However, majority of the research has been focusing on the peptides derived from hydrolysis with commercial industrial enzymes and the usefulness of these hydrolysates.It could be interesting......) and intestinal dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP-IV) inhibiting properties and protease inhibiting activity in tissue of secondary products such as gills, belly flap muscle and skin from salmon (Salmo salar). This was conducted in extracts from untreated and heattreated tissue by using in vitro assays. Furthermore......, if any detected, an aim was to characterize the corresponding candidate bioactive molecules. Part II was to investigate peptides in hydrolysates from salmon (Salmo salar) belly flap muscle and skin generated by gastrointestinal proteases for radical scavenging activity, DPP-IV and ACE inhibiting...

  20. Effect of inoculum conditioning on hydrogen fermentation and pH effect on bacterial community relevant to hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawagoshi, Yasunori; Hino, Naoe; Fujimoto, Aya; Nakao, Masaharu; Fujita, Yukiko; Sugimura, Seiji; Furukawa, Kenji

    2005-11-01

    The effect of conditioning for a variety of inoculums on fermentative hydrogen production was investigated. In addition, the effects of pH condition on hydrogen fermentation and bacterial community were investigated. The effect of conditioning on hydrogen production was different depending on the inoculum types. An appreciable hydrogen production was shown with anaerobic digested sludge and lake sediment without conditioning, however, no hydrogen was produced when refuse compost and kiwi grove soil were used as inoculums without conditioning. The highest hydrogen production was obtained with heat-conditioned anaerobic digested sludge, almost the same production was also obtained with unconditioned digested sludge. The pH condition considerably affected hydrogen fermentation, hydrogen gas was efficiently produced with unconditioned anaerobic sludge when the pH was controlled at 6.0 throughout the culture period and not when only the initial pH was adjusted to 6.0 and 7.0. Hydrogen production decreased when the culture pH was only adjusted at the beginning of each batch in continuous batch culture, and additionally, bacterial community varied with the change in hydrogen production. It was suggested that Clostridium and Coprothermobacter species played important role in hydrogen fermentation, and Lactobacillus species had an adverse effect on hydrogen production.

  1. Secondary organic aerosol from ozone-initiated reactions with terpene-rich household products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Beverly; Coleman, Beverly K.; Lunden, Melissa M.; Destaillats, Hugo; Nazaroff, William W.

    2008-01-01

    We analyzed secondary organic aerosol (SOA) data from a series of small-chamber experiments in which terpene-rich vapors from household products were combined with ozone under conditions analogous to product use indoors. Reagents were introduced into a continuously ventilated 198 L chamber at steady rates. Consistently, at the time of ozone introduction, nucleation occurred exhibiting behavior similar to atmospheric events. The initial nucleation burst and growth was followed by a period in which approximately stable particle levels were established reflecting a balance between new particle formation, condensational growth, and removal by ventilation. Airborne particles were measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, 10 to 400 nm) in every experiment and with an optical particle counter (OPC, 0.1 to 2.0 ?m) in a subset. Parameters for a three-mode lognormal fit to the size distribution at steady state were determined for each experiment. Increasing the supply ozone level increased the steady-state mass concentration and yield of SOA from each product tested. Decreasing the air-exchange rate increased the yield. The steady-state fine-particle mass concentration (PM1.1) ranged from 10 to> 300 mu g m-3 and yields ranged from 5percent to 37percent. Steady-state nucleation rates and SOA mass formation rates were on the order of 10 cm-3 s-1 and 10 mu g m-3 min-1, respectively.

  2. Gaseous products and Secondary Organic Aerosol formation during long term oxidation of isoprene and methacrolein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Brégonzio-Rozier

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available First- and higher-generation products from the oxidation of isoprene and methacrolein with OH radicals in the presence of NOx have been studied in a simulation chamber: (1 significant oxidation rates have been maintained for up to 7 h allowing the study of highly oxidized products, (2 gas-phase products distribution and yields are provided, and show good agreement with previous studies. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation resulting from these experiments has also been investigated. Among the general dispersion exhibited by SOA mass yields from previous studies, the mass yields obtained here were consistent with the lowest values found in the literature, and more specifically in agreement with studies carried out with natural light or artificial lamps with emission spectrum similar to the solar one. An effect of light source is hence proposed to explain, at least in part, the discrepancies observed between different studies in the literature for both isoprene- and methacrolein-SOA mass yields. A high degree of similarity is shown in the comparison of SOA mass spectra from isoprene and methacrolein photooxidation, thus strengthening the importance of the role of methacrolein in SOA formation from isoprene photooxidation under our experimental conditions (i.e. presence of NOx and long term oxidation. Overall, if these results are further confirmed, SOA mass yields from both isoprene and methacrolein in the atmosphere could be lower than suggested by most of the current chamber studies.

  3. Production of Magnesium and Aluminum-Magnesium Alloys from Recycled Secondary Aluminum Scrap Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesing, Adam J.; Das, Subodh K.; Loutfy, Raouf O.

    2016-02-01

    An experimental proof of concept was demonstrated for a patent-pending and trademark-pending RE12™ process for extracting a desired amount of Mg from recycled scrap secondary Al melts. Mg was extracted by electrorefining, producing a Mg product suitable as a Mg alloying hardener additive to primary-grade Al alloys. This efficient electrorefining process operates at high current efficiency, high Mg recovery and low energy consumption. The Mg electrorefining product can meet all the impurity specifications with subsequent melt treatment for removing alkali contaminants. All technical results obtained in the RE12™ project indicate that the electrorefining process for extraction of Mg from Al melt is technically feasible. A techno-economic analysis indicates high potential profitability for applications in Al foundry alloys as well as beverage—can and automotive—sheet alloys. The combination of technical feasibility and potential market profitability completes a successful proof of concept. This economical, environmentally-friendly and chlorine-free RE12™ process could be disruptive and transformational for the Mg production industry by enabling the recycling of 30,000 tonnes of primary-quality Mg annually.

  4. Secondary formation of disinfection by-products by UV treatment of swimming pool water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Hansen, Kamilla M S; Andersen, Henrik R

    2015-07-01

    Formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during experimental UV treatment of pool water has previously been reported with little concurrence between laboratory studies, field studies and research groups. In the current study, changes in concentration of seven out of eleven investigated volatile DBPs were observed in experiments using medium pressure UV treatment, with and without chlorine and after post-UV chlorination. Results showed that post-UV chlorine consumption increased, dose-dependently, with UV treatment dose. A clear absence of trihalomethane formation by UV and UV with chlorine was observed, while small yet statistically significant increases in dichloroacetonitrile and dichloropropanone concentrations were detected. Results indicate that post-UV chlorination clearly induced secondary formation of several DBPs. However, the formation of total trihalomethanes was no greater than what could be replicated by performing the DBP formation assay with higher chlorine concentrations to simulate extended chlorination. Post-UV chlorination of water from a swimming pool that continuously uses UV treatment to control combined chlorine could not induce secondary formation for most DBPs. Concurrence for induction of trihalomethanes was identified between post-UV chlorination treatments and simulated extended chlorination time treatment. Trihalomethanes could not be induced by UV treatment of water from a continuously UV treated pool. This indicates that literature reports of experimentally induced trihalomethane formation by UV may be a result of kinetic increase in formation by UV. However, this does not imply that higher trihalomethane concentrations would occur in pools that apply continuous UV treatment. The bromine fraction of halogens in formed trihalomethanes increased with UV dose. This indicates that UV removes bromine atoms from larger molecules that participate in trihalomethane production during post-UV chlorination. Additionally, no significant

  5. Organic loading rates affect composition of soil-derived bacterial communities during continuous, fermentative biohydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Yonghua; Bruns, Mary Ann [Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Zhang, Husen; Salerno, Michael; Logan, Bruce E. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Bacterial community composition during steady-state, fermentative H{sub 2} production was compared across a range of organic loading rates (OLRs) of 0.5-19 g COD l{sup -1} h{sup -1} in a 2-l continuous flow reactor at 30 C. The varied OLRs were achieved with glucose concentrations of 2.5-10 g l{sup -1} and hydraulic retention times of 1-10 h. The synthetic wastewater feed was amended with L-cysteine and maintained at a pH of 5.5. For each run at a given glucose concentration, the reactor was inoculated with an aliquot of well-mixed agricultural topsoil that had been heat-treated to reduce numbers of vegetative cells. At OLRs less than 2 g COD l{sup -1} h{sup -1}, DNA sequences from ribosomal RNA intergenic spacer analysis profiles revealed more diverse and variable populations (Selenomonas, Enterobacter, and Clostridium spp.) than were observed above 2 g COD l{sup -1} h{sup -1} (Clostridium spp. only). An isolate, LYH1, was cultured from a reactor sample (10 g glucose l{sup -1} at a 10-h HRT) on medium containing L-cysteine. In confirming H{sub 2} production by LYH1 in liquid batch culture, lag periods for H{sub 2} production in the presence and absence of L-cysteine were 5 and 50 h, respectively. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of LYH1 indicated that the isolate was a Clostridium sp. affiliated with RNA subcluster Ic, with >99% similarity to Clostridium sp. FRB1. In fluorescent in situ hybridization tests, an oligonucleotide probe complementary to the 16S rRNA of LYH1 hybridized with 90% of cells observed at an OLR of 2 g COD h{sup -1}, compared to 26% of cells at an OLR of 0.5 g COD l{sup -1} h{sup -1}. An OLR of 2 g COD l{sup -1} h{sup -1} appeared to be a critical threshold above which clostridia were better able to outcompete Enterobacteriaceae and other organisms in the mixed soil inoculum. Our results are discussed in light of other biohydrogen studies employing pure cultures and mixed inocula. (author)

  6. Light-stimulated bacterial production and amino acid assimilation by cyanobacteria and other microbes in the North Atlantic ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelou, Vanessa K; Cottrell, Matthew T; Kirchman, David L

    2007-09-01

    We examined the contribution of photoheterotrophic microbes--those capable of light-mediated assimilation of organic compounds--to bacterial production and amino acid assimilation along a transect from Florida to Iceland from 28 May to 9 July 2005. Bacterial production (leucine incorporation at a 20 nM final concentration) was on average 30% higher in light than in dark-incubated samples, but the effect varied greatly (3% to 60%). To further characterize this light effect, we examined the abundance of potential photoheterotrophs and measured their contribution to bacterial production and amino acid assimilation (0.5 nM addition) using flow cytometry. Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus were abundant in surface waters where light-dependent leucine incorporation was observed, whereas aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria were abundant but did not correlate with the light effect. The per-cell assimilation rates of Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus were comparable to or higher than those of other prokaryotes, especially in the light. Picoeukaryotes also took up leucine (20 nM) and other amino acids (0.5 nM), but rates normalized to biovolume were much lower than those of prokaryotes. Prochlorococcus was responsible for 80% of light-stimulated bacterial production and amino acid assimilation in surface waters south of the Azores, while Synechococcus accounted for on average 12% of total assimilation. However, nearly 40% of the light-stimulated leucine assimilation was not accounted for by these groups, suggesting that assimilation by other microbes is also affected by light. Our results clarify the contribution of cyanobacteria to photoheterotrophy and highlight the potential role of other photoheterotrophs in biomass production and dissolved-organic-matter assimilation.

  7. Development of a Low Input and sustainable Switchgrass Feedstock Production System Utilizing Beneficial Bacterial Endophytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, Chuansheng [IALR; Nowak, Jerzy [VPISU; Seiler, John [VPISU

    2014-10-24

    Switchgrass represents a promising feedstock crop for US energy sustainability. However, its broad utilization for bioenergy requires improvements of biomass yields and stress tolerance. In this DOE funded project, we have been working on harnessing beneficial bacterial endophytes to enhance switchgrass performance and to develop a low input feedstock production system for marginal lands that do not compete with the production of food crops. We have demonstrated that one of most promising plant growth-promoting bacterial endophytes, Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN, is able to colonize roots and significantly promote growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under in vitro, growth chamber, greenhouse, as well as field conditions. Furthermore, PsJN bacterization improved growth and development of switchgrass seedlings, significantly stimulated plant root and shoot growth, and tiller number in the field, and enhanced biomass accumulation on both poor (p<0.001) and rich (p<0.05) soils, with more effective stimulation of plant growth in low fertility soil. Plant physiology measurements showed that PsJN inoculated Alamo had consistently lower transpiration, lower stomatal conductance, and higher water use efficiency in greenhouse conditions. These physiological changes may significantly contribute to the recorded growth enhancement. PsJN inoculation rapidly results in an increase in photosynthetic rates which contributes to the advanced growth and development. Some evidence suggests that this initial growth advantage decreases with time when resources are not limited such as in greenhouse studies. Additionally, better drought resistance and drought hardening were observed in PsJN inoculated switchgrass. Using the DOE-funded switchgrass EST microarray, in a collaboration with the Genomics Core Facility at the Noble Foundation, we have determined gene expression profile changes in both responsive switchgrass cv. Alamo and non-responsive cv. Cave-in-Rock (CR) following Ps

  8. Using the overlay assay to qualitatively measure bacterial production of and sensitivity to pneumococcal bacteriocins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maricic, Natalie; Dawid, Suzanne

    2014-09-30

    Streptococcus pneumoniae colonizes the highly diverse polymicrobial community of the nasopharynx where it must compete with resident organisms. We have shown that bacterially produced antimicrobial peptides (bacteriocins) dictate the outcome of these competitive interactions. All fully-sequenced pneumococcal strains harbor a bacteriocin-like peptide (blp) locus. The blp locus encodes for a range of diverse bacteriocins and all of the highly conserved components needed for their regulation, processing, and secretion. The diversity of the bacteriocins found in the bacteriocin immunity region (BIR) of the locus is a major contributor of pneumococcal competition. Along with the bacteriocins, immunity genes are found in the BIR and are needed to protect the producer cell from the effects of its own bacteriocin. The overlay assay is a quick method for examining a large number of strains for competitive interactions mediated by bacteriocins. The overlay assay also allows for the characterization of bacteriocin-specific immunity, and detection of secreted quorum sensing peptides. The assay is performed by pre-inoculating an agar plate with a strain to be tested for bacteriocin production followed by application of a soft agar overlay containing a strain to be tested for bacteriocin sensitivity. A zone of clearance surrounding the stab indicates that the overlay strain is sensitive to the bacteriocins produced by the pre-inoculated strain. If no zone of clearance is observed, either the overlay strain is immune to the bacteriocins being produced or the pre-inoculated strain does not produce bacteriocins. To determine if the blp locus is functional in a given strain, the overlay assay can be adapted to evaluate for peptide pheromone secretion by the pre-inoculated strain. In this case, a series of four lacZ-reporter strains with different pheromone specificity are used in the overlay.

  9. Production and propagation of secondary particles near the earth; Production et propagation de particules secondaires au voisinage de la Terre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derome, L

    2008-01-15

    A few years ago the AMS01 embarked experiment showed a particular high component of the cosmic particle flux detected below the geo-magnetic cut which was surprising because this cut represents the minimal energy that is required for cosmic radiation to reach the earth and any cosmic ray below the cut is pushed away by the earth's magnetic field. This work is based on Monte-Carlo simulations involving the generation of primary cosmic particles, their propagation in the earth magnetic field, their interaction with earth's atmosphere and the production of secondary particles. These simulations have shown that the particles below the cut are in fact particles generated in the upper part of the atmosphere, escaping from it and being trapped by the earth's magnetic field. These Monte-Carlo simulations have also been used to assess the composition of below-the-cut flux in terms of protons, electrons, positrons and light nuclei, to check the production of anti-matter in the atmosphere, and to estimate the flux of atmospheric neutrinos. (A.C.)

  10. Bacterial production and microbial food web structure in a large arctic river and the coastal Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallières, Catherine; Retamal, Leira; Ramlal, Patricia; Osburn, Christopher L.; Vincent, Warwick F.

    2008-12-01

    Globally significant quantities of organic carbon are stored in northern permafrost soils, but little is known about how this carbon is processed by microbial communities once it enters rivers and is transported to the coastal Arctic Ocean. As part of the Arctic River-Delta Experiment (ARDEX), we measured environmental and microbiological variables along a 300 km transect in the Mackenzie River and coastal Beaufort Sea, in July-August 2004. Surface bacterial concentrations averaged 6.7 × 10 5 cells mL - 1 with no significant differences between sampling zones. Picocyanobacteria were abundant in the river, and mostly observed as cell colonies. Their concentrations in the surface waters decreased across the salinity gradient, dropping from 51,000 (river) to 30 (sea) cells mL - 1 . There were accompanying shifts in protist community structure, from diatoms, cryptophytes, heterotrophic protists and chrysophytes in the river, to dinoflagellates, prymnesiophytes, chrysophytes, prasinophytes, diatoms and heterotrophic protists in the Beaufort Sea. Size-fractionated bacterial production, as measured by 3H-leucine uptake, varied from 76 to 416 ng C L - 1 h - 1 . The contribution of particle-attached bacteria (> 3 µm fraction) to total bacterial production decreased from > 90% at the Mackenzie River stations to importance of this particle-based fraction was inversely correlated with salinity and positively correlated with particulate organic carbon concentrations. Glucose enrichment experiments indicated that bacterial metabolism was carbon limited in the Mackenzie River but not in the coastal ocean. Prior exposure of water samples to full sunlight increased the biolability of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the Mackenzie River but decreased it in the Beaufort Sea. Estimated depth-integrated bacterial respiration rates in the Mackenzie River were higher than depth-integrated primary production rates, while at the marine stations bacterial respiration rates were near or

  11. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF FOOD ADDITIVES FROM PUMPKIN PROCESSING SECONDARY RESOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kupin G. A.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents data characterizing the composition of macro and micronutrients from secondary resources of pumpkin processing – pumpkin pomace. We have found that extracts of pumpkin are valuable raw materials for the production of food additives, as they contain proteins, dietary fiber, including pectin and protopectin, minerals, as well as such biologically active substances as vitamin C, β- carotene and P-active substances using nuclear magnetic relaxation, it is shown that pretreatment of pomace pumpkin in the microwave electromagnetic field of certain parameters before IR drying allows to transfer part of the bound moisture free moisture, that allows to intensify the subsequent process IR drying. We have developed an innovative technology of production of food supplements from pumpkin extracts, which is protected by Russian patent for the invention and having the “know-how” status. The article presents data describing the organoleptic and physical and chemical indicators of quality nutritional supplements, formulated according to the developed technological regimes

  12. Temporal Trends in the Secondary Metabolite Production of the Sponge Aplysina aerophoba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikel A. Becerro

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Temporal changes in the production of secondary metabolites are far from being fully understood. Our study quantified, over a two-year period, the concentrations of brominated alkaloids in the ectosome and the choanosome of Aplysina aerophoba, and examined the temporal patterns of these natural products. Based on standard curves, we quantified the concentrations of aerophobin-2, aplysinamisin-1, and isofistularin-3: three of the four major peaks obtained through chemical profiling with high-performance liquid chromatography. Our results showed a striking variation in compound abundance between the outer and inner layers of the sponge. The ectosome showed high concentrations of bromocompounds during the summer months, while the choanosome followed no pattern. Additionally, we found that, from the outer layer of the sponge, aerophobin-2 and isofistularin-3 were significantly correlated with water temperature. The present study is one of the first to document quantitative seasonal variations in individual compounds over multiple years. Further studies will clarify the role of environmental, biological, and physiological factors in determining the seasonal patterns in the concentration of brominated alkaloids.

  13. Development of a Low Input and sustainable Switchgrass Feedstock Production System Utilizing Beneficial Bacterial Endophytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, Chuansheng [IALR; Nowak, Jerzy [VPISU; Seiler, John [VPISU

    2014-10-24

    Switchgrass represents a promising feedstock crop for US energy sustainability. However, its broad utilization for bioenergy requires improvements of biomass yields and stress tolerance. In this DOE funded project, we have been working on harnessing beneficial bacterial endophytes to enhance switchgrass performance and to develop a low input feedstock production system for marginal lands that do not compete with the production of food crops. We have demonstrated that one of most promising plant growth-promoting bacterial endophytes, Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN, is able to colonize roots and significantly promote growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under in vitro, growth chamber, greenhouse, as well as field conditions. Furthermore, PsJN bacterization improved growth and development of switchgrass seedlings, significantly stimulated plant root and shoot growth, and tiller number in the field, and enhanced biomass accumulation on both poor (p<0.001) and rich (p<0.05) soils, with more effective stimulation of plant growth in low fertility soil. Plant physiology measurements showed that PsJN inoculated Alamo had consistently lower transpiration, lower stomatal conductance, and higher water use efficiency in greenhouse conditions. These physiological changes may significantly contribute to the recorded growth enhancement. PsJN inoculation rapidly results in an increase in photosynthetic rates which contributes to the advanced growth and development. Some evidence suggests that this initial growth advantage decreases with time when resources are not limited such as in greenhouse studies. Additionally, better drought resistance and drought hardening were observed in PsJN inoculated switchgrass. Using the DOE-funded switchgrass EST microarray, in a collaboration with the Genomics Core Facility at the Noble Foundation, we have determined gene expression profile changes in both responsive switchgrass cv. Alamo and non-responsive cv. Cave-in-Rock (CR) following Ps

  14. Bacteriophage secondary infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephen; T; Abedon

    2015-01-01

    Phages are credited with having been first described in what we now, officially, are commemorating as the 100 th anniversary of their discovery. Those one-hundred years of phage history have not been lacking in excitement, controversy, and occasional convolution. One such complication is the concept of secondary infection, which can take on multiple forms with myriad consequences. The terms secondary infection and secondary adsorption, for example, can be used almost synonymously to describe virion interaction with already phage-infected bacteria, and which can result in what are described as superinfection exclusion or superinfection immunity. The phrase secondary infection also may be used equivalently to superinfection or coinfection, with each of these terms borrowed from medical microbiology, and can result in genetic exchange between phages, phage-on-phage parasitism, and various partial reductions in phage productivity that have been termed mutual exclusion, partial exclusion, or the depressor effect. Alternatively, and drawing from epidemiology, secondary infection has been used to describe phage population growth as that can occur during active phage therapy as well as upon phage contamination of industrial ferments. Here primary infections represent initial bacterial population exposure to phages while consequent phage replication can lead to additional, that is, secondary infections of what otherwise are not yet phage-infected bacteria. Here I explore the varying meanings and resultant ambiguity that has been associated with the term secondary infection. I suggest in particular that secondary infection, as distinctly different phenomena, can in multiple ways influence the success of phage-mediated biocontrol of bacteria, also known as, phage therapy.

  15. Production of Secondary Metabolites in Extreme Environments: Food- and Airborne Wallemia spp. Produce Toxic Metabolites at Hypersaline Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisvad, Jens C.; Kocev, Dragi; Džeroski, Sašo; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2016-01-01

    The food- and airborne fungal genus Wallemia comprises seven xerophilic and halophilic species: W. sebi, W. mellicola, W. canadensis, W. tropicalis, W. muriae, W. hederae and W. ichthyophaga. All listed species are adapted to low water activity and can contaminate food preserved with high amounts of salt or sugar. In relation to food safety, the effect of high salt and sugar concentrations on the production of secondary metabolites by this toxigenic fungus was investigated. The secondary metabolite profiles of 30 strains of the listed species were examined using general growth media, known to support the production of secondary metabolites, supplemented with different concentrations of NaCl, glucose and MgCl2. In more than two hundred extracts approximately one hundred different compounds were detected using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD). Although the genome data analysis of W. mellicola (previously W. sebi sensu lato) and W. ichthyophaga revealed a low number of secondary metabolites clusters, a substantial number of secondary metabolites were detected at different conditions. Machine learning analysis of the obtained dataset showed that NaCl has higher influence on the production of secondary metabolites than other tested solutes. Mass spectrometric analysis of selected extracts revealed that NaCl in the medium affects the production of some compounds with substantial biological activities (wallimidione, walleminol, walleminone, UCA 1064-A and UCA 1064-B). In particular an increase in NaCl concentration from 5% to 15% in the growth media increased the production of the toxic metabolites wallimidione, walleminol and walleminone. PMID:28036382

  16. Controls on bacterial and archaeal community structure and greenhouse gas production in natural, mined, and restored Canadian peatlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan eBasiliko

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Northern peatlands are important global C reservoirs, largely because of their slow rates of microbial C mineralization. Particularly in sites that are heavily influenced by anthropogenic disturbances, there is scant information about microbial ecology and whether or not microbial community structure influences greenhouse gas production. This work characterized communities of bacteria and archaea using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA and functional genes across eight natural, mined, or restored peatlands in two locations in eastern Canada. Correlations were explored among chemical properties of peat, bacterial and archaeal community structure, and carbon dioxide and methane production rates under oxic and anoxic conditions. Bacteria and archaea similar to those found in other peat soil environments were detected. In contrast to other reports, methanogen diversity was low in our study, with only 2 groups of known or suspected methanogens. Although mining and restoration affected substrate availability and microbial activity, these land-uses did not consistently affect bacterial or archaeal community composition. In fact, larger differences were observed between the two locations and between oxic and anoxic peat samples than between mined and restored sites, with anoxic samples characterized by less detectable bacterial diversity and stronger dominance by members of the phylum Acidobacteria. There were also no apparent strong linkages between prokaryote community structure and methane or carbon dioxide production, suggesting that different organisms exhibit functional redundancy and/or that the same taxa function at very different rates when exposed to different peat substrates. In contrast to other earlier work focusing on fungal communities across similar mined and restored peatlands, bacterial and archaeal communities appeared to be more resistant or resilient to peat substrate changes brought

  17. A strategy for bacterial production of a soluble functional human neonatal Fc receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Jan Terje; Justesen, Sune; Berntzen, Gøril; Michaelsen, Terje E; Lauvrak, Vigdis; Fleckenstein, Burkhard; Buus, Søren; Sandlie, Inger

    2008-02-29

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I related receptor, the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn), rescues immunoglobulin G (IgG) and albumin from lysosomal degradation by recycling in endothelial cells. FcRn also contributes to passive immunity by mediating transport of IgG from mother to fetus (human) or newborn (rodents), and may translocate IgG over mucosal surfaces. FcRn interacts with the Fc-region of IgG and domain III of albumin with binding at pH 6.0 and release at pH 7.4. Knowledge of these interactions has facilitated design of recombinant proteins with altered serum half-lives and/or altered biodistribution. To generate further research in this field, there is a great need for large amounts of soluble human FcRn (shFcRn) for in vitro interaction studies. In this report, we describe a novel laboratory scale production of functional shFcRn in Escherichia coli (E. coli) at milligram level. Truncated wild type hFcRn heavy chains were expressed, extracted, purified from inclusion bodies under denaturing non-reducing conditions, and subsequently refolded in the presence of human beta(2)-microglobulin (hbeta(2)m). The secondary structural elements of refolded heterodimeric shFcRn were correctly formed as demonstrated by circular dichroism (CD). Furthermore, functional and stringent pH dependent binding to IgG and human serum albumin were demonstrated by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). This method may be easily adapted for the expression of large amounts of other FcRn species and MHC class I related molecules.

  18. Secondary formation of disinfection by-products by UV treatment of swimming pool water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini [Water ApS, Farum Gydevej 64, 3520 Farum (Denmark); Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljøvej, Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Hansen, Kamilla M.S., E-mail: kmsh@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljøvej, Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Andersen, Henrik R. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljøvej, Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2015-07-01

    Formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during experimental UV treatment of pool water has previously been reported with little concurrence between laboratory studies, field studies and research groups. In the current study, changes in concentration of seven out of eleven investigated volatile DBPs were observed in experiments using medium pressure UV treatment, with and without chlorine and after post-UV chlorination. Results showed that post-UV chlorine consumption increased, dose-dependently, with UV treatment dose. A clear absence of trihalomethane formation by UV and UV with chlorine was observed, while small yet statistically significant increases in dichloroacetonitrile and dichloropropanone concentrations were detected. Results indicate that post-UV chlorination clearly induced secondary formation of several DBPs. However, the formation of total trihalomethanes was no greater than what could be replicated by performing the DBP formation assay with higher chlorine concentrations to simulate extended chlorination. Post-UV chlorination of water from a swimming pool that continuously uses UV treatment to control combined chlorine could not induce secondary formation for most DBPs. Concurrence for induction of trihalomethanes was identified between post-UV chlorination treatments and simulated extended chlorination time treatment. Trihalomethanes could not be induced by UV treatment of water from a continuously UV treated pool. This indicates that literature reports of experimentally induced trihalomethane formation by UV may be a result of kinetic increase in formation by UV. However, this does not imply that higher trihalomethane concentrations would occur in pools that apply continuous UV treatment. The bromine fraction of halogens in formed trihalomethanes increased with UV dose. This indicates that UV removes bromine atoms from larger molecules that participate in trihalomethane production during post-UV chlorination. Additionally, no significant

  19. Bacterial production, primary production, phytoplankton, zooplankton, biological analysis of fish, and massive fish length data from the EVRIKA and other platforms in the Antarctic from 23 February 1980 to 09 December 1988 (NODC Accession 9600039)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bacterial production, primary production, phytoplankton, zooplankton, biological analysis of fish, and massive fish length data were collected from the EVRIKA and...

  20. Secondary organic aerosol production from diesel vehicle exhaust: impact of aftertreatment, fuel chemistry and driving cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, T. D.; Presto, A. A.; Nguyen, N. T.; Robertson, W. H.; Na, K.; Sahay, K. N.; Zhang, M.; Maddox, C.; Rieger, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Maldonado, H.; Maricq, M. M.; Robinson, A. L.

    2014-05-01

    Environmental chamber ("smog chamber") experiments were conducted to investigate secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production from dilute emissions from two medium-duty diesel vehicles (MDDVs) and three heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDDVs) under urban-like conditions. Some of the vehicles were equipped with emission control aftertreatment devices, including diesel particulate filters (DPFs), selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs). Experiments were also performed with different fuels (100% biodiesel and low-, medium- or high-aromatic ultralow sulfur diesel) and driving cycles (Unified Cycle,~Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule, and creep + idle). During normal operation, vehicles with a catalyzed DPF emitted very little primary particulate matter (PM). Furthermore, photooxidation of dilute emissions from these vehicles produced essentially no SOA (below detection limit). However, significant primary PM emissions and SOA production were measured during active DPF regeneration experiments. Nevertheless, under reasonable assumptions about DPF regeneration frequency, the contribution of regeneration emissions to the total vehicle emissions is negligible, reducing PM trapping efficiency by less than 2%. Therefore, catalyzed DPFs appear to be very effective in reducing both primary PM emissions and SOA production from diesel vehicles. For both MDDVs and HDDVs without aftertreatment substantial SOA formed in the smog chamber - with the emissions from some vehicles generating twice as much SOA as primary organic aerosol after 3 h of oxidation at typical urban VOC / NOx ratios (3 : 1). Comprehensive organic gas speciation was performed on these emissions, but less than half of the measured SOA could be explained by traditional (speciated) SOA precursors. The remainder presumably originates from the large fraction (~30%) of the nonmethane organic gas emissions that could not be speciated using traditional one-dimensional gas chromatography. The

  1. Role of growth media and chemical enhancers in secondary metabolites production from Aspergillus carbonarius (NRL-369) and their pharmaceutical potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abid Ali; Bacha, Nafess; Ahmad, Bashir; Cox, R J; Bakht, Jehan

    2016-07-01

    The present study investigates the effect of different growth media and chemical enhancer on silent genes in Aspergillus carbonarius (NRL-369) for secondary metabolites production and its in vitro biological activities. Results revealed that Aspergillus carbonarius (NRL-369) grown in Czapeak yeast extract broth medium produced more metabolites compared with other media. Chemical epigenetic modifiers (suberoyl-anilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and 5-azacytidine (5-AZA) at concentration of 15mM were effective for the expression of silent genes resulting in increased secondary metabolites production. Secondary metabolites extracted in ethyl acetate and fractionized in n-Hexane showed variable degree of growth inhibitions of the tested microorganisms. Similarly, these samples were also active against brine shrimps and Lemna.

  2. Production of Secondary Metabolites in Extreme Environments: Food- and Airborne Wallemia spp. Produce Toxic Metabolites at Hypersaline Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jančič, Sašo; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Kocev, Dragi

    2016-01-01

    to support the production of secondary metabolites, supplemented with different concentrations of NaCl, glucose and MgCl2. In more than two hundred extracts approximately one hundred different compounds were detected using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD). Although......The food- and airborne fungal genus Wallemia comprises seven xerophilic and halophilic species: W. sebi, W. mellicola, W. canadensis, W. tropicalis, W. muriae, W. hederae and W. ichthyophaga. All listed species are adapted to low water activity and can contaminate food preserved with high amounts...... of salt or sugar. In relation to food safety, the effect of high salt and sugar concentrations on the production of secondary metabolites by this toxigenic fungus was investigated. The secondary metabolite profiles of 30 strains of the listed species were examined using general growth media, known...

  3. Establishment of rumen-mimic bacterial consortia: A functional union for bio-hydrogen production from cellulosic bioresource

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jui-Jen [Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 115 (China); Lin, Jia-Jen; Ho, Cheng-Yu.; Chin, Wei-Chih; Huang, Chieh-Chen [Department of Life Sciences, National Chung Hsing University,Taichung (China)

    2010-12-15

    The study aimed to establish stable rumen-mimic bacterial consortia as a functional union for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation from cellulosic bioresource. The consortia was constructed by repeated-batch culture with ruminal microflora and napiergrass at 38 C. The major bacterial composition of batch culture was monitored by 16S rRNA gene-targeted denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The result showed that a stable consortia constituted by ruminal microflora was formed, and the consortia includes bacterial strains such as Clostridium xylanolyticum, Clostridium papyrosolvens, Clostridium beijerinckii, Ruminococcus sp., Ethanoligenens harbinense, and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. The Clostridium genus was showed as the dominant population in the system and contributed to the biohydrogen production. During each eight days incubation period, the functional consortia could degrade an average of 27% hemicellulose and 2% cellulose from napiergrass biomass. While the increasing of the reducing sugars and their converting to biohydrogen gas productivity were also observed. The time course profile for cellulytic enzymes showed that the hydrolysis of complex lignocellulosic material may occur through the ordered actions of xylenase and cellulase activities. (author)

  4. Systems biology and biotechnology of Streptomyces species for the production of secondary metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwang, Kyu-Sang; Kim, Hyun Uk; Charusanti, Pep

    2014-01-01

    have been more systematized with high-throughput techniques through inspections of correlations among components of the primary and secondary metabolisms at the genome scale. Moreover, up-to-date information on the genome of Streptomyces species with emphasis on their secondary metabolism has been...... collected in the form of databases and knowledgebases, providing predictive information and enabling one to explore experimentally unrecognized biological spaces of secondary metabolism. Herein, we review recent trends in the systems biology and biotechnology of Streptomyces species....

  5. Glibenclamide reduces pro-inflammatory cytokine production by neutrophils of diabetes patients in response to bacterial infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kewcharoenwong, Chidchamai; Rinchai, Darawan; Utispan, Kusumawadee; Suwannasaen, Duangchan; Bancroft, Gregory J.; Ato, Manabu; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana

    2013-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor for melioidosis, which is caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei. Our previous study has shown that polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) from diabetic subjects exhibited decreased functions in response to B. pseudomallei. Here we investigated the mechanisms regulating cytokine secretion of PMNs from diabetic patients which might contribute to patient susceptibility to bacterial infections. Purified PMNs from diabetic patients who had been treated with glibenclamide (an ATP-sensitive potassium channel blocker for anti-diabetes therapy), showed reduction of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-8 secretion when exposed to B. pseudomallei. Additionally, reduction of these pro-inflammatory cytokines occurred when PMNs from diabetic patients were treated in vitro with glibenclamide. These findings suggest that glibenclamide might be responsible for the increased susceptibility of diabetic patients, with poor glycemic control, to bacterial infections as a result of its effect on reducing IL-1β production by PMNs.

  6. An overview of food safety and bacterial foodborne zoonoses in food production animals in the Caribbean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Maria Manuela Mendes; de Almeida, Andre M; Willingham, Arve Lee

    2016-08-01

    Foodborne diseases (FBDs) in the Caribbean have a high economic burden. Public health and tourism concerns rise along with the increasing number of cases and outbreaks registered over the last 20 years. Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., and Campylobacter spp. are the main bacteria associated with these incidents. In spite of undertaking limited surveillance on FBD in the region, records related to bacterial foodborne zoonoses in food-producing animals and their associated epidemiologic significance are poorly documented, giving rise to concerns about the importance of the livestock, food animal product sectors, and consumption patterns. In this review, we report the available published literature over the last 20 years on selected bacterial foodborne zoonoses in the Caribbean region and also address other food safety-related aspects (e.g., FBD food attribution, importance, surveillance), mainly aiming at recognizing data gaps and identifying possible research approaches in the animal health sector.

  7. Engineering control of bacterial cellulose production using a genetic toolkit and a new cellulose-producing strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florea, Michael; Hagemann, Henrik; Santosa, Gabriella; Abbott, James; Micklem, Chris N; Spencer-Milnes, Xenia; de Arroyo Garcia, Laura; Paschou, Despoina; Lazenbatt, Christopher; Kong, Deze; Chughtai, Haroon; Jensen, Kirsten; Freemont, Paul S; Kitney, Richard; Reeve, Benjamin; Ellis, Tom

    2016-06-14

    Bacterial cellulose is a strong and ultrapure form of cellulose produced naturally by several species of the Acetobacteraceae Its high strength, purity, and biocompatibility make it of great interest to materials science; however, precise control of its biosynthesis has remained a challenge for biotechnology. Here we isolate a strain of Komagataeibacter rhaeticus (K. rhaeticus iGEM) that can produce cellulose at high yields, grow in low-nitrogen conditions, and is highly resistant to toxic chemicals. We achieved external control over its bacterial cellulose production through development of a modular genetic toolkit that enables rational reprogramming of the cell. To further its use as an organism for biotechnology, we sequenced its genome and demonstrate genetic circuits that enable functionalization and patterning of heterologous gene expression within the cellulose matrix. This work lays the foundations for using genetic engineering to produce cellulose-based materials, with numerous applications in basic science, materials engineering, and biotechnology.

  8. Allochthonous Organic Matter Subsidize the High Secondary Production of the Invasive Bivalve Corbicula fluminea in Minho Estuary (N-Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Asian clam Corbicula fluminea is one of the most invasive species in freshwater ecosystems. In Minho estuary, this species colonize all the middle and upper part of the estuary, dominating the abundance, biomass and secondary production in River Minho tidal freshwater area (T...

  9. Reading and Writing to Learn in Secondary Education: Online Processing Activity and Written Products in Summarizing and Synthesizing Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, Mar; Martin, Elena; Villalon, Ruth; Luna, Maria

    2008-01-01

    The research reported here employed a multiple-case study methodology to assess the online cognitive and metacognitive activities of 15-year-old secondary students as they read informational texts and wrote a new text in order to learn, and the relation of these activities to the written products they were asked to generate. To investigate the…

  10. Bacterial Production of Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate): An Undergraduate Student Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Kristi L.; Oldham, Charlie D.; May, Sheldon W.

    2009-01-01

    As part of a multidisciplinary course that is cross-listed between five departments, we developed an undergraduate student laboratory experiment for culturing, isolating, and purifying the biopolymer, poly(3-hydroxybutyrate), PHB. This biopolyester accumulates in the cytoplasm of bacterial cells under specific growth conditions, and it has…

  11. Bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck Simulation of Runaway Avalanche from Secondary Knock-on Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, S. C.; Chan, V. S.; Harvey, R. W.; Rosenbluth, M. N.

    1996-11-01

    It has been pointed out that secondary production of runaway electrons by knock-on collisions with very energetic confined electrons can significantly change the runaway rate,(M.N. Rosenbluth, Bull. Amer. Phys. Soc. 40), 1804 (1995).^,(N.T. Besedin, I.M. Pankratov, Nucl. Fusion 26), 807 (1986).^,(R. Jaspers, K.H. Finden, G. Mank et al.), Nucl. Fusion 33, 1775 (1993). and is potentially a serious problem in reactors. Previous calculations of the effect have only partially included important effects such as toroidal trapping, synchrotron radiation, and bremsstrahlung. Furthermore, in a normal constant current operation, the increase of the density of runaway electrons causes a decrease of the ohmic field and all these effects can balance to a steady-state. The purpose of the present paper is to present results on bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck simulations of knock-on avalanching runaways including these effects. Initially, an energetic seed component is inserted to initiate knock-on avalanching. Results on the dependence of the steady-state runaway current on Z_eff, density, and radial location will be presented.

  12. Assessing Forest Plantation Productivity of Exotic and Indigenous Species on Degraded Secondary Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yetti Heryati

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: There is general agreement that human activities such as deforestation and land use change to other land use types have contributed to degraded secondary forests or forestland and increases the emission of greenhouse gases which ultimately led to global climate change. An establishment of forest plantation in particular is regarded as an important approach for sequestering carbon. However, limited information exists on productivity and potential of fast growth exotic and indigenous tree plantations for sequestering CO2 from the atmosphere through photosynthesis. This study aimed at assessing the productivity and biomass accumulation along with the potential for sequestering CO2 of planted exotic and indigenous species on degraded forestland. Approach: This study was conducted at Khaya ivorensis and Hopea odorata plantations, which was planted at the Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM Research Station in Segamat Johor, Malaysia five years ago. In order, to evaluate the forest productivity and biomass accumulation of both species, we established plots with a size of 40 × 30 m in three replications in each stand, followed by measuring all trees in the plots in terms of height and Diameter at Breast Height (DBH. To develop allometric equation, five representative trees at each stand were chosen for destructive sampling. Results: The growth performance in terms of mean height, DBH, annual increment of height and diameter and basal area of exotic species (K. ivorensis was significantly higher than that of the indigenous species (H. odorata. We used the diameter alone as independent variable to estimate stem volume and biomass production of both species. The stem volume of K. ivorensis stand was 43.13 m3ha-1 and was significantly higher than H. odorata stands (33.66 m3 ha-1. The results also showed that the K. ivorensis and H. odorata stands have the potential to absorb CO2 from the atmosphere which was stored in aboveground

  13. Reactive oxidation products promote secondary organic aerosol formation from green leaf volatiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Hamilton

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Green leaf volatiles (GLVs are an important group of chemicals released by vegetation which have emission fluxes that can be significantly increased when plants are damaged or stressed. A series of simulation chamber experiments has been conducted at the European Photoreactor in Valencia, Spain, to investigate secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation from the atmospheric oxidation of the major GLVs cis-3-hexenylacetate and cis-3-hexen-1-ol. Liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry was used to identify chemical species present in the SOA. Cis-3-hexen-1-ol proved to be a more efficient SOA precursor due to the high reactivity of its first generation oxidation product, 3-hydroxypropanal, which can hydrate and undergo further reactions with other aldehydes resulting in SOA dominated by higher molecular weight oligomers. The lower SOA yields produced from cis-3-hexenylacetate are attributed to the acetate functionality, which inhibits oligomer formation in the particle phase. Based on observed SOA yields and best estimates of global emissions, these compounds may be calculated to be a substantial unidentified global source of SOA, contributing 1–5 TgC yr−1, equivalent to around a third of that predicted from isoprene. Molecular characterization of the SOA, combined with organic mechanistic information, has provided evidence that the formation of organic aerosols from GLVs is closely related to the reactivity of their first generation atmospheric oxidation products, and indicates that this may be a simple parameter that could be used in assessing the aerosol formation potential for other unstudied organic compounds in the atmosphere.

  14. Environmental assessment of sewage sludge as secondary raw material in cement production--a case study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jinglan; Li, Xiangzhi

    2011-06-01

    A life cycle assessment was carried out to estimate the environmental impact of sewage sludge as secondary raw material in cement production. To confirm and add credibility to the study, uncertainty analysis was conducted. Results showed the impact generated from respiratory inorganics, terrestrial ecotoxicity, global warming, and non-renewable energy categories had an important contribution to overall environmental impact, due to energy, clinker, and limestone production stages. Also, uncertainty analysis results showed the technology of sewage sludge as secondary raw material in cement production had little or no effect on changing the overall environmental potential impact generated from general cement production. Accordingly, using the technology of sewage sludge as secondary raw material in cement production is a good choice for reducing the pressure on the environment from dramatically increased sludge disposal. In addition, increasing electricity recovery rate, choosing natural gas fired electricity generation technology, and optimizing the raw material consumption in clinker production are highly recommended to reduce the adverse effects on the environment.

  15. Ocular bacterial flora, tear production, and intraocular pressure in a captive flock of Humboldt penguins (Spheniscus humboldti).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinger, Robert L; Langan, Jennifer N; Hamor, Ralph

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine normal ocular surface bacterial flora, tear production, and intraocular pressure in a captive flock of Humboldt penguins, Spheniscus humboldti. Twenty-eight healthy penguins were studied and equally divided between fresh- and saltwater habitats. The population consisted of 15 female and 13 male penguins, ranging from 3-20 years of age. Following complete ophthalmic exam, 4 penguins with cataracts were removed from the study. Eight penguins from each habitat were randomly selected for ocular surface aerobic bacterial culture. Corynebacterium spp. and Staphylococcus spp. were the most common isolates. Twenty-five organisms consisting of 17 species, and 15 organisms consisting of 9 species, were identified in fresh- and saltwater groups, respectively. Tear production and intraocular pressures were evaluated on 24 penguins with normal ocular exams. The range and mean (+/- standard deviation) tear production, measured with the Schirmer tear test, was 1-12 mm/min and 6.45 mm/min +/- 2.9, respectively. The mean tear production for penguins housed in the freshwater habitat was greater (8.5 mm/min) than those in saltwater (4.8 mm/min). The range and mean (+/- standard deviation) intraocular pressure, measured by applanation tonometry using a Tono-Pen XL tonometer, was 10-27 mmHg and 20.36 mmHg +/- 4.1, respectively. This data should be utilized as a reliable resource for those involved in avian and zoo medicine.

  16. The bacterial abundance and production in the East China Sea:seasonal variations and relationships with the phytoplankton biomass and production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Bingzhang; HUANG Bangqin; XIE Yuyuan; GUO Cui; SONG Shuqun; LI Hongbo; LIU Hongbin

    2014-01-01

    The East China Sea is a productive marginal sea with a wide continental shelf and plays an important role in absorbing atmospheric carbon dioxide and transferring terrigenous organic matter to the open ocean. To investigate the roles of heterotrophic bacteria in the biogeochemical dynamics in the East China Sea, bacterial biomasses (BB) and productions (BP) were measured in four cruises. The spatial distributions of the BB and the BP were highly season-dependent. Affected by the Changjiang River discharge, the BB and the BP were high in shelf waters (bottom depth not deeper than 50 m) and generally decreased offshore in August 2009. In December 2009 to January 2010, and November to December 2010, the BB and the BP were high in waters with medium bottom depth. The onshore-offshore decreasing trends of the BB and the BP also existed in May-June 2011, when the BB was significantly higher than in other cruises in shelf break waters (bottom depth deeper than 50 m but not deeper than 200 m). The results of generalized additive models (GAM) suggest that the BB increased with the temperature at a range of 8-20°C, increased with the chlorophyll concentration at a range of 0.02-3.00 mg/m3 and then declining, and decreased with the salinity from 28 to 35. The relationship between the temperature and the log-transformed bacterial specific growth rate (SGR) was linear. The estimated temperature coefficient (Q10) of the SGR was similar with that of the phytoplankton growth. The SGR also increased with the chlorophyll concentration. The ratio of the bacterial to phytoplankton production ranged from less than 0.01 to 0.40, being significantly higher in November-December 2010 than in May-June 2011. Calculated from the bacterial production and growth efficiency, the bacterial respiration consumed, on average, 59%, 72%and 23%of the primary production in August 2009, November-December 2010, and May-June 2011, respectively.

  17. Comparison and Validation of FLUKA and HZETRN as Tools for Investigating the Secondary Neutron Production in Large Space Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Koontz, Steve; Reddell, Brandon; Atwell, William; Boeder, Paul

    2015-01-01

    NASA's exploration goals are focused on deep space travel and Mars surface operations. To accomplish these goals, large structures will be necessary to transport crew and logistics in the initial stages, and NASA will need to keep the crew and the vehicle safe during transport and any surface activities. One of the major challenges of deep space travel is the space radiation environment and its impacts on the crew, the electronics, and the vehicle materials. The primary radiation from the sun (solar particle events) and from outside the solar system (galactic cosmic rays) interact with materials of the vehicle. These interactions lead to some of the primary radiation being absorbed, being modified, or producing secondary radiation (primarily neutrons). With all vehicles, the high energy primary radiation is of most concern. However, with larger vehicles that have large shielding masses, there is more opportunity for secondary radiation production, and this secondary radiation can be significant enough to cause concern. When considering surface operations, there is also a secondary radiation source from the surface of the planet, known as albedo, with neutrons being one of the most significant species. Given new vehicle designs for deep space and Mars missions, the secondary radiation environment and the implications of that environment is currently not well understood. Thus, several studies are necessary to fill the knowledge gaps of this secondary radiation environment. In this paper, we put forth the initial steps to increasing our understanding of neutron production from large vehicles by comparing the neutron production resulting from our radiation transport codes and providing a preliminary validation of our results against flight data. This paper will review the details of these results and discuss the finer points of the analysis.

  18. Distinct Anaerobic Bacterial Consumers of Cellobiose-Derived Carbon in Boreal Fens with Different CO2/CH4 Production Ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juottonen, Heli; Eiler, Alexander; Biasi, Christina; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina; Yrjälä, Kim; Fritze, Hannu

    2017-02-15

    Northern peatlands in general have high methane (CH4) emissions, but individual peatlands show considerable variation as CH4 sources. Particularly in nutrient-poor peatlands, CH4 production can be low and exceeded by carbon dioxide (CO2) production from unresolved anaerobic processes. To clarify the role anaerobic bacterial degraders play in this variation, we compared consumers of cellobiose-derived carbon in two fens differing in nutrient status and the ratio of CO2 to CH4 produced. After [(13)C]cellobiose amendment, the mesotrophic fen produced equal amounts of CH4 and CO2 The oligotrophic fen had lower CH4 production but produced 3 to 59 times more CO2 than CH4 RNA stable-isotope probing revealed that in the mesotrophic fen with higher CH4 production, cellobiose-derived carbon was mainly assimilated by various recognized fermenters of Firmicutes and by Proteobacteria The oligotrophic peat with excess CO2 production revealed a wider variety of cellobiose-C consumers, including Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, but also more unconventional degraders, such as Telmatobacter-related Acidobacteria and subphylum 3 of Verrucomicrobia Prominent and potentially fermentative Planctomycetes and Chloroflexi did not appear to process cellobiose-C. Our results show that anaerobic degradation resulting in different levels of CH4 production can involve distinct sets of bacterial degraders. By distinguishing cellobiose degraders from the total community, this study contributes to defining anaerobic bacteria that process cellulose-derived carbon in peat. Several of the identified degraders, particularly fermenters and potential Fe(III) or humic substance reducers in the oligotrophic peat, represent promising candidates for resolving the origin of excess CO2 production in peatlands.

  19. Both plant and bacterial nitrate reductases contribute to nitric oxide production in Medicago truncatula nitrogen-fixing nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horchani, Faouzi; Prévot, Marianne; Boscari, Alexandre; Evangelisti, Edouard; Meilhoc, Eliane; Bruand, Claude; Raymond, Philippe; Boncompagni, Eric; Aschi-Smiti, Samira; Puppo, Alain; Brouquisse, Renaud

    2011-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling and defense molecule of major importance in living organisms. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, NO production has been detected in the nitrogen fixation zone of the nodule, but the systems responsible for its synthesis are yet unknown and its role in symbiosis is far from being elucidated. In this work, using pharmacological and genetic approaches, we explored the enzymatic source of NO production in M. truncatula-Sinorhizobium meliloti nodules under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. When transferred from normoxia to hypoxia, nodule NO production was rapidly increased, indicating that NO production capacity is present in functioning nodules and may be promptly up-regulated in response to decreased oxygen availability. Contrary to roots and leaves, nodule NO production was stimulated by nitrate and nitrite and inhibited by tungstate, a nitrate reductase inhibitor. Nodules obtained with either plant nitrate reductase RNA interference double knockdown (MtNR1/2) or bacterial nitrate reductase-deficient (napA) and nitrite reductase-deficient (nirK) mutants, or both, exhibited reduced nitrate or nitrite reductase activities and NO production levels. Moreover, NO production in nodules was found to be inhibited by electron transfer chain inhibitors, and nodule energy state (ATP-ADP ratio) was significantly reduced when nodules were incubated in the presence of tungstate. Our data indicate that both plant and bacterial nitrate reductase and electron transfer chains are involved in NO synthesis. We propose the existence of a nitrate-NO respiration process in nodules that could play a role in the maintenance of the energy status required for nitrogen fixation under oxygen-limiting conditions.

  20. Culture-independent bacterial community analysis of the salty-fermented fish paste products of Thailand and Laos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marui, Junichiro; Boulom, Sayvisene; Panthavee, Wanchai; Momma, Mari; Kusumoto, Ken-Ichi; Nakahara, Kazuhiko; Saito, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    A bacterial community analysis, using a culture-independent method (polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis), detected 17 species of bacteria including species of the genera Tetragenococcus, Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, Weissella Halanaerobium, Clostridium, and Sphingomonas in a traditional salty-fermented fish paste known as pla-ra or pa-daek in Thailand and Laos, which is used as a storage-stable multi-purpose seasoning. The representative genus of lactic acid bacteria seemed to vary in the 10 products collected from Thailand and Laos. Tetragenococci were common in products from central Thailand and Vientiane in Laos which had salinities of not less than 11% and pH values ranging from 5.6 to 6.1. However, lactobacilli were common in products from northern Thailand which had the lowest salinities (8.3-8.6%) and pH values (4.5-4.8) of all the samples examined. Two Lactobacillus and one Tetragenococcus species were detected in one product from northeastern Thailand containing 10% salt. These results suggest that salinity in pla-ra/pa-daek is an important determinant of the representative genus of lactic acid bacteria such as, Tetragenococcus or Lactobacillus. Additionally, differences in the acidity between these two groups seemed to be related to the production of d-/l-lactic acid in the lactic acid bacteria in each product. This is the first study to report a correlation between bacterial community structure and taste components in pla-ra/pa-daek products from various regions. This scientific work on a traditional fermented food will be useful in helping local producers meet differing consumer preferences in various regions.

  1. Secondary product glucosyltransferase and putative glucosyltransferase expression during Citrus paradisi (c.v. Duncan) growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Jala J; Owens, Daniel K; McIntosh, Cecilia A

    2011-10-01

    Flavonoids are secondary metabolites that have significant roles in plant defense and human nutrition. Glucosyltransferases (GTs) catalyze the transfer of sugars from high energy sugar donors to other substrates. Several different secondary product GTs exist in the tissues of grapefruit making it a model plant for studying their structure and function. The goal of this investigation was to determine the expression patterns of seven putative secondary product GTs during grapefruit growth and development by quantifying mRNA expression levels in the roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and mature fruit to establish whether the genes are expressed constitutively or if one or more could be expressed in a tissue specific manner and/or developmentally regulated. Six growth stages were defined from which RNA was extracted, and expression levels were quantified by standardized densitometry of gene-specific RT-PCR products. Results show that there were variable degrees of PGT expression in different tissues and at different developmental stages. These results add to the growing knowledge base of dynamics of expression and potential regulation of secondary metabolism in Citrus paradisi.

  2. Aryl Polyenes, a Highly Abundant Class of Bacterial Natural Products, Are Functionally Related to Antioxidative Carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöner, Tim A; Gassel, Sören; Osawa, Ayako; Tobias, Nicholas J; Okuno, Yukari; Sakakibara, Yui; Shindo, Kazutoshi; Sandmann, Gerhard; Bode, Helge B

    2016-02-02

    Bacterial pigments of the aryl polyene type are structurally similar to the well-known carotenoids with respect to their polyene systems. Their biosynthetic gene cluster is widespread in taxonomically distant bacteria, and four classes of such pigments have been found. Here we report the structure elucidation of the aryl polyene/dialkylresorcinol hybrid pigments of Variovorax paradoxus B4 by HPLC-UV-MS, MALDI-MS and NMR. Furthermore, we show for the first time that this pigment class protects the bacterium from reactive oxygen species, similarly to what is known for carotenoids. An analysis of the distribution of biosynthetic genes for aryl polyenes and carotenoids in bacterial genomes is presented; it shows a complementary distribution of these protective pigments in bacteria.

  3. Bacterial Production and Contamination Mineralization in Sediments of the Ala Wai Canal, Oahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-29

    Apple, L.J. Hamdan, C.L. Osburn, and M.T. Montgomery. 2008. Evaluating PAH biodegradation relative to bacterial carbon demand in coastal...metabolism and PAH biodegradation in bioturbated and unbioturbated marine sediments. US Naval Research Laboratory, Formal Report, NRL/FR/6114—03...Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon ( PAH ) mineralization was relatively low compared with other urbanized watersheds. Even with enhanced flow associated

  4. Populations of Stored Product Mite Tyrophagus putrescentiae Differ in Their Bacterial Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Erban

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tyrophagus putrescentiae colonizes different human-related habitats and feeds on various post-harvest foods. The microbiota acquired by these mites can influence the nutritional plasticity in different populations. We compared the bacterial communities of five populations of T. putrescentiae and one mixed population of T. putrescentiae and T. fanetzhangorum collected from different habitats. Material: The bacterial communities of the six mite populations from different habitats and diets were compared by Sanger sequencing of cloned 16S rRNA obtained from amplification with universal eubacterial primers and using bacterial taxon-specific primers on the samples of adults/juveniles or eggs. Microscopic techniques were used to localize bacteria in food boli and mite bodies. The morphological determination of the mite populations was confirmed by analyses of CO1 and ITS fragment genes.Results: The following symbiotic bacteria were found in compared mite populations: Wolbachia (2 populations, Cardinium (5 populations, Bartonella-like (5 populations, Blattabacterium-like symbiont (3 populations and Solitalea-like (6 populations. From 35 identified OTUs97, only Solitalea was identifed in all populations. The next most frequent and abundant sequences were Bacillus, Moraxella, Staphylococcus, Kocuria and Microbacterium. We suggest that some bacterial species may occasionally be ingested with food. The bacteriocytes were observed in some individuals in all mite populations. Bacteria were not visualized in food boli by staining, but bacteria were found by histological means in ovaria of Wolbachia-infested populations.Conclusion: The presence of Blattabacterium-like, Cardinium, Wolbachia and Solitalea-like in the eggs of T. putrescentiae indicates mother to offspring (vertical transmission. Results of this study indicate that diet and habitats influence not only the ingested bacteria but also the symbiotic bacteria of T. putrescentiae.

  5. Production of putrescine-capped stable silver nanoparticle: its characterization and antibacterial activity against multidrug-resistant bacterial strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saswati Saha

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Integration of biology with nanotechnology is now becoming attention-grabbing area of research. The antimicrobial potency of silver has been eminent from antiquity. Due to the recent desire for the enhancement of antibacterial efficacy of silver, various synthesis methods of silver in their nano dimensions are being practiced using a range of capping material. The present work highlights a facile biomimetic approach for production of silver nanoparticle being capped and stabilized by putrescine, possessing a diameter of 10–25 ± 1.5 nm. The synthesized nanoparticles have been analyzed spectrally and analytically. Morphological studies are carried out by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and crystallinity by selected area electron diffraction patterns. Moreover, the elemental composition of the capped nanoparticles was confirmed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis. A comparative study (zone of inhibition and minimum inhibitory concentration regarding the interactions and antibacterial potentiality of the capped silver nanoparticles with respect to the bare ones reveal the efficiency of the capped one over the bare one. The bacterial kinetic study was executed to monitor the interference of nanoparticles with bacterial growth rate. The results also highlight the efficacy of putrescine-capped silver nanoparticles as effective growth inhibitors against multi-drug resistant human pathogenic bacterial strains, which may, thus, potentially be applicable as an effective antibacterial control system to fight diseases.

  6. Production of putrescine-capped stable silver nanoparticle: its characterization and antibacterial activity against multidrug-resistant bacterial strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Saswati; Gupta, Bhaskar; Gupta, Kamala; Chaudhuri, Mahua Ghosh

    2016-04-01

    Integration of biology with nanotechnology is now becoming attention-grabbing area of research. The antimicrobial potency of silver has been eminent from antiquity. Due to the recent desire for the enhancement of antibacterial efficacy of silver, various synthesis methods of silver in their nano dimensions are being practiced using a range of capping material. The present work highlights a facile biomimetic approach for production of silver nanoparticle being capped and stabilized by putrescine, possessing a diameter of 10-25 ± 1.5 nm. The synthesized nanoparticles have been analyzed spectrally and analytically. Morphological studies are carried out by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and crystallinity by selected area electron diffraction patterns. Moreover, the elemental composition of the capped nanoparticles was confirmed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis. A comparative study (zone of inhibition and minimum inhibitory concentration) regarding the interactions and antibacterial potentiality of the capped silver nanoparticles with respect to the bare ones reveal the efficiency of the capped one over the bare one. The bacterial kinetic study was executed to monitor the interference of nanoparticles with bacterial growth rate. The results also highlight the efficacy of putrescine-capped silver nanoparticles as effective growth inhibitors against multi-drug resistant human pathogenic bacterial strains, which may, thus, potentially be applicable as an effective antibacterial control system to fight diseases.

  7. Production of putrescine-capped stable silver nanoparticle: its characterization and antibacterial activity against multidrug-resistant bacterial strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Saswati; Gupta, Bhaskar; Gupta, Kamala; Chaudhuri, Mahua Ghosh

    2016-11-01

    Integration of biology with nanotechnology is now becoming attention-grabbing area of research. The antimicrobial potency of silver has been eminent from antiquity. Due to the recent desire for the enhancement of antibacterial efficacy of silver, various synthesis methods of silver in their nano dimensions are being practiced using a range of capping material. The present work highlights a facile biomimetic approach for production of silver nanoparticle being capped and stabilized by putrescine, possessing a diameter of 10-25 ± 1.5 nm. The synthesized nanoparticles have been analyzed spectrally and analytically. Morphological studies are carried out by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and crystallinity by selected area electron diffraction patterns. Moreover, the elemental composition of the capped nanoparticles was confirmed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis. A comparative study (zone of inhibition and minimum inhibitory concentration) regarding the interactions and antibacterial potentiality of the capped silver nanoparticles with respect to the bare ones reveal the efficiency of the capped one over the bare one. The bacterial kinetic study was executed to monitor the interference of nanoparticles with bacterial growth rate. The results also highlight the efficacy of putrescine-capped silver nanoparticles as effective growth inhibitors against multi-drug resistant human pathogenic bacterial strains, which may, thus, potentially be applicable as an effective antibacterial control system to fight diseases.

  8. Characterization of corrosive bacterial consortia isolated from petroleum-product-transporting pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekar, Aruliah; Anandkumar, Balakrishnan; Maruthamuthu, Sundaram; Ting, Yen-Peng; Rahman, Pattanathu K S M

    2010-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion is a problem commonly encountered in facilities in the oil and gas industries. The present study describes bacterial enumeration and identification in diesel and naphtha pipelines located in the northwest and southwest region in India, using traditional cultivation technique and 16S rDNA gene sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA sequences of the isolates was carried out, and the samples obtained from the diesel and naphtha-transporting pipelines showed the occurrence of 11 bacterial species namely Serratia marcescens ACE2, Bacillus subtilis AR12, Bacillus cereus ACE4, Pseudomonas aeruginosa AI1, Klebsiella oxytoca ACP, Pseudomonas stutzeri AP2, Bacillus litoralis AN1, Bacillus sp., Bacillus pumilus AR2, Bacillus carboniphilus AR3, and Bacillus megaterium AR4. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were not detected in samples from both pipelines. The dominant bacterial species identified in the petroleum pipeline samples were B. cereus and S. marcescens in the diesel and naphtha pipelines, respectively. Therefore, several types of bacteria may be involved in biocorrosion arising from natural biofilms that develop in industrial facilities. In addition, localized (pitting) corrosion of the pipeline steel in the presence of the consortia was observed by scanning electron microscopy analysis. The potential role of each species in biofilm formation and steel corrosion is discussed.

  9. Effect of Cultivation Time and Medium Condition in Production of Bacterial Cellulose Nanofiber for Urease Immobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pesaran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new nanoporous biomatrix originated from bacterial resources has been chosen for urease immobilization. Urease has been immobilized on synthesized bacterial cellulose nanofiber since this enzyme has a key role in nitrogen metabolism. Gluconacetobacter xylinum ATCC 10245 has been cultivated for synthesis of a nanofiber with the diameter of 30–70 nm. Different cultivation processes in the aspect of time and cultivation medium conditions were chosen to study the performance of immobilized enzyme on four types of bacterial cellulose nanofibers (BCNs. Urease immobilization into the nanofiber has been done in two steps: enzyme adsorption and glutaraldehyde cross-linking. The results showed that the immobilized enzymes were relatively active and highly stable compared to the control samples of free enzymes. Optimum pH was obtained 6.5 and 7 for different synthesized BCNs, while the optimum temperature for immobilized urease was 50°C. Finding of the current experiment illustrated that the immobilized enzyme in optimum condition lost its initial activity by 41% after 15 weeks.

  10. Characterization of corrosive bacterial consortia isolated from petroleum-product-transporting pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajasekar, Aruliah; Ting, Yen-Peng [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Anandkumar, Balakrishnan [Sourashtra Coll., Madurai (India). Dept. of Biotechnology; Maruthamuthu, Sundaram [Central Electrochemical Research Inst., Karaikudi (India). Biocorrosion Group; Rahman, Pattanathu K.S.M. [Teesside Univ., Tees Valley (United Kingdom). Chemical and Bioprocess Engineering Group

    2010-01-15

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion is a problem commonly encountered in facilities in the oil and gas industries. The present study describes bacterial enumeration and identification in diesel and naphtha pipelines located in the northwest and southwest region in India, using traditional cultivation technique and 16S rDNA gene sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA sequences of the isolates was carried out, and the samples obtained from the diesel and naphtha-transporting pipelines showed the occurrence of 11 bacterial species namely Serratia marcescens ACE2, Bacillus subtilis AR12, Bacillus cereus ACE4, Pseudomonas aeruginosa AI1, Klebsiella oxytoca ACP, Pseudomonas stutzeri AP2, Bacillus litoralis AN1, Bacillus sp., Bacillus pumilus AR2, Bacillus carboniphilus AR3, and Bacillus megaterium AR4. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were not detected in samples from both pipelines. The dominant bacterial species identified in the petroleum pipeline samples were B. cereus and S. marcescens in the diesel and naphtha pipelines, respectively. Therefore, several types of bacteria may be involved in biocorrosion arising from natural biofilms that develop in industrial facilities. In addition, localized (pitting) corrosion of the pipeline steel in the presence of the consortia was observed by scanning electron microscopy analysis. The potential role of each species in biofilm formation and steel corrosion is discussed. (orig.)

  11. N-terminal fusion tags for effective production of g-protein-coupled receptors in bacterial cell-free systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyukmanova, E N; Shenkarev, Z O; Khabibullina, N F; Kulbatskiy, D S; Shulepko, M A; Petrovskaya, L E; Arseniev, A S; Dolgikh, D A; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2012-10-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) constitute one of the biggest families of membrane proteins. In spite of the fact that they are highly relevant to pharmacy, they have remained poorly explored. One of the main bottlenecks encountered in structural-functional studies of GPCRs is the difficulty to produce sufficient amounts of the proteins. Cell-free systems based on bacterial extracts fromE. colicells attract much attention as an effective tool for recombinant production of membrane proteins. GPCR production in bacterial cell-free expression systems is often inefficient because of the problems associated with the low efficiency of the translation initiation process. This problem could be resolved if GPCRs were expressed in the form of hybrid proteins with N-terminal polypeptide fusion tags. In the present work, three new N-terminal fusion tags are proposed for cell-free production of the human β2-adrenergic receptor, human M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, and human somatostatin receptor type 5. It is demonstrated that the application of an N-terminal fragment (6 a.a.) of bacteriorhodopsin fromExiguobacterium sibiricum(ESR-tag), N-terminal fragment (16 а.о.) of RNAse A (S-tag), and Mistic protein fromB. subtilisallows to increase the CF synthesis of the target GPCRs by 5-38 times, resulting in yields of 0.6-3.8 mg from 1 ml of the reaction mixture, which is sufficient for structural-functional studies.

  12. Population structure and secondary production of Siriella clausii, a dominant detritus feeding mysid in Posidonia oceanica meadows (W Mediterranean Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberá, Carmen; Sanchez-Jerez, Pablo; Sorbe, Jean Claude

    2013-10-01

    Temporal trends in abundance, demographic structure of the population and secondary production of Siriella clausii were studied at three different sectors of Posidonia oceanica meadows in the SE Iberian Peninsula, with different levels of habitat complexity. Secondary production was calculated through three methods widely employed in marine invertebrates: the Hynes method (based on demographic structure data) and models by Morin-Bourassa and Brey (based on biomass data). This filter/grazer and detritus feeder is the most abundant mysid in P. oceanica seagrass meadows in the Mediterranean. The population structure was similar in the three sectors, but the temporal pattern of abundance was different, at times even opposite. This pattern may be related to the aggregated spatial distribution, metapopulation dynamics or stochastic factors, but other potential factors could be involved, such as habitat features or predation rates. The values of production oscillated between 25 and 60 mgAFDW/m2/year, depending on the calculation method that was applied, and showed differences between sites and seagrass complexity. The present values are intermediate between those characterising highly productive systems, such as estuaries, and systems of limited productivity (bathyal habitats). Compared to other peracarids, mysid production is greater than that of isopods and less than amphipod production. This is possibly related to the life cycle and reproductive strategies. Detritus feeders such as S. clausii may play an important trophic role due their capacity to use as food the biomass associated to detritus, which constitutes larges reservoirs of carbon derived from seagrass primary production.

  13. Use of Response Surface Methodology to Optimize Culture Conditions for Hydrogen Production by an Anaerobic Bacterial Strain from Soluble Starch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieu, Hoa Thi Quynh; Nguyen, Yen Thi; Dang, Yen Thi; Nguyen, Binh Thanh

    2016-05-01

    Biohydrogen is a clean source of energy that produces no harmful byproducts during combustion, being a potential sustainable energy carrier for the future. Therefore, biohydrogen produced by anaerobic bacteria via dark fermentation has attracted attention worldwide as a renewable energy source. However, the hydrogen production capability of these bacteria depends on major factors such as substrate, iron-containing hydrogenase, reduction agent, pH, and temperature. In this study, the response surface methodology (RSM) with central composite design (CCD) was employed to improve the hydrogen production by an anaerobic bacterial strain isolated from animal waste in Phu Linh, Soc Son, Vietnam (PL strain). The hydrogen production process was investigated as a function of three critical factors: soluble starch concentration (8 g L-1 to 12 g L-1), ferrous iron concentration (100 mg L-1 to 200 mg L-1), and l-cysteine concentration (300 mg L-1 to 500 mg L-1). RSM analysis showed that all three factors significantly influenced hydrogen production. Among them, the ferrous iron concentration presented the greatest influence. The optimum hydrogen concentration of 1030 mL L-1 medium was obtained with 10 g L-1 soluble starch, 150 mg L-1 ferrous iron, and 400 mg L-1 l-cysteine after 48 h of anaerobic fermentation. The hydrogen concentration produced by the PL strain was doubled after using RSM. The obtained results indicate that RSM with CCD can be used as a technique to optimize culture conditions for enhancement of hydrogen production by the selected anaerobic bacterial strain. Hydrogen production from low-cost organic substrates such as soluble starch using anaerobic fermentation methods may be one of the most promising approaches.

  14. Nonstarch polysaccharides modulate bacterial microbiota, pathways for butyrate production, and abundance of pathogenic Escherichia coli in the pig gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U; Hooda, Seema; Pieper, Robert; Zijlstra, Ruurd T; van Kessel, Andrew G; Mosenthin, Rainer; Gänzle, Michael G

    2010-06-01

    The impact of nonstarch polysaccharides (NSP) differing in their functional properties on intestinal bacterial community composition, prevalence of butyrate production pathway genes, and occurrence of Escherichia coli virulence factors was studied for eight ileum-cannulated growing pigs by use of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) and quantitative PCR. A cornstarch- and casein-based diet was supplemented with low-viscosity, low-fermentability cellulose (CEL), with high-viscosity, low-fermentability carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), with low-viscosity, high-fermentability oat beta-glucan (LG), and with high-viscosity, high-fermentability oat beta-glucan (HG). Only minor effects of NSP fractions on the ileal bacterial community were observed, but NSP clearly changed the digestion in the small intestine. Compared to what was observed for CMC, more fermentable substrate was transferred into the large intestine with CEL, LG, and HG, resulting in higher levels of postileal dry-matter disappearance. Linear discriminant analysis of NSP and TRFLP profiles and 16S rRNA gene copy numbers for major bacterial groups revealed that CMC resulted in a distinctive bacterial community in comparison to the other NSP, which was characterized by higher gene copy numbers for total bacteria, Bacteroides-Prevotella-Porphyromonas, Clostridium cluster XIVa, and Enterobacteriaceae and increased prevalences of E. coli virulence factors in feces. The numbers of butyryl-coenzyme A (CoA) CoA transferase gene copies were higher than those of butyrate kinase gene copies in feces, and these quantities were affected by NSP. The present results suggest that the NSP fractions clearly and distinctly affected the taxonomic composition and metabolic features of the fecal microbiota. However, the effects were more linked to the individual NSP and to their effect on nutrient flow into the large intestine than to their shared functional properties.

  15. Systems biology and biotechnology of Streptomyces species for the production of secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kyu-Sang; Kim, Hyun Uk; Charusanti, Pep; Palsson, Bernhard Ø; Lee, Sang Yup

    2014-01-01

    Streptomyces species continue to attract attention as a source of novel medicinal compounds. Despite a long history of studies on these microorganisms, they still have many biochemical mysteries to be elucidated. Investigations of novel secondary metabolites and their biosynthetic gene clusters have been more systematized with high-throughput techniques through inspections of correlations among components of the primary and secondary metabolisms at the genome scale. Moreover, up-to-date information on the genome of Streptomyces species with emphasis on their secondary metabolism has been collected in the form of databases and knowledgebases, providing predictive information and enabling one to explore experimentally unrecognized biological spaces of secondary metabolism. Herein, we review recent trends in the systems biology and biotechnology of Streptomyces species.

  16. Evaluation of MODIS-LAI products in the tropical dry secondary forest of Mata Seca, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamarte Loreto, Payri Alejandra

    Leaf Area Index (LAI) advances scientific knowledge of the role of secondary forests in forest area conservation. MODIS-LAI products provide an alternative, efficient and cost-effective method for measuring LAI in Tropical Dry Forests (TDFs). The performance of MODIS-LAI satellite products in a TDF was studied as a function of successional stages by (1) estimating seasonal LAI variations compared to in situ LAI values (2) using dry season MODIS-LAI products to estimate Woody Area Index (WAI) (3) estimating phenology changes through comparisons to in situ data. The study demonstrates (1) MODIS-LAI product showed agreement with in situ values with increasing successional stage. (2) MODIS-LAI product showed best agreement to in situ WAI values in the intermediate successional stage. (3) TIMESAT analysis indicated that MODIS-LAI products detected start-of-season 1-2 weeks before in situ values and end-of-season 20-30 days after in situ values, indicating that MODIS-LAI product captures canopy leafing, but is not suitable for detecting senescence. Keywords: Leaf Area Index, Validation, MODIS, Woody Area Index, Phenology, Tropical Secondary Forest Succession, Hemispherical Photography, LAI-2000,.

  17. Production of secondary particles and nuclei in cosmic rays collisions with the interstellar gas using the FLUKA code

    CERN Document Server

    Mazziotta, M N; Ferrari, A; Gaggero, D; Loparco, F; Sala, P R

    2016-01-01

    The measured fluxes of secondary particles produced by the interactions of Cosmic Rays (CRs) with the astronomical environment play a crucial role in understanding the physics of CR transport. In this work we present a comprehensive calculation of the secondary hadron, lepton, gamma-ray and neutrino yields produced by the inelastic interactions between several species of stable or long-lived cosmic rays projectiles (p, D, T, 3He, 4He, 6Li, 7Li, 9Be, 10Be, 10B, 11B, 12C, 13C, 14C, 14N, 15N, 16O, 17O, 18O, 20Ne, 24Mg and 28Si) and different target gas nuclei (p, 4He, 12C, 14N, 16O, 20Ne, 24Mg, 28Si and 40Ar). The yields are calculated using FLUKA, a simulation package designed to compute the energy distributions of secondary products with large accuracy in a wide energy range. The present results provide, for the first time, a complete and self-consistent set of all the relevant inclusive cross sections regarding the whole spectrum of secondary products in nuclear collisions. We cover, for the projectiles, a ki...

  18. A hybrid DNA extraction method for the qualitative and quantitative assessment of bacterial communities from poultry production samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothrock, Michael J; Hiett, Kelli L; Gamble, John; Caudill, Andrew C; Cicconi-Hogan, Kellie M; Caporaso, J Gregory

    2014-12-10

    The efficacy of DNA extraction protocols can be highly dependent upon both the type of sample being investigated and the types of downstream analyses performed. Considering that the use of new bacterial community analysis techniques (e.g., microbiomics, metagenomics) is becoming more prevalent in the agricultural and environmental sciences and many environmental samples within these disciplines can be physiochemically and microbiologically unique (e.g., fecal and litter/bedding samples from the poultry production spectrum), appropriate and effective DNA extraction methods need to be carefully chosen. Therefore, a novel semi-automated hybrid DNA extraction method was developed specifically for use with environmental poultry production samples. This method is a combination of the two major types of DNA extraction: mechanical and enzymatic. A two-step intense mechanical homogenization step (using bead-beating specifically formulated for environmental samples) was added to the beginning of the "gold standard" enzymatic DNA extraction method for fecal samples to enhance the removal of bacteria and DNA from the sample matrix and improve the recovery of Gram-positive bacterial community members. Once the enzymatic extraction portion of the hybrid method was initiated, the remaining purification process was automated using a robotic workstation to increase sample throughput and decrease sample processing error. In comparison to the strict mechanical and enzymatic DNA extraction methods, this novel hybrid method provided the best overall combined performance when considering quantitative (using 16S rRNA qPCR) and qualitative (using microbiomics) estimates of the total bacterial communities when processing poultry feces and litter samples.

  19. Manipulating the glycosylation pathway in bacterial and lower eukaryotes for production of therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyaogu, Diana Chinyere; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    2015-12-01

    The medical use of pharmaceutical proteins is rapidly increasing and cheap, fast and efficient production is therefore attractive. Microbial production hosts are promising candidates for development and production of pharmaceutical proteins. However, as most therapeutic proteins are secreted proteins, they are frequently N-glycosylated. This hampers production in microbes as these hosts glycosylate proteins differently. The resulting products may therefore be immunogenic, unstable and show reduced efficacy. Recently, successful glycoengineering of microbes has demonstrated that it is possible to produce proteins with humanlike glycan structures setting the stage for production of pharmaceutical proteins in bacteria, yeasts and algae.

  20. Multi-parameter flow cytometry as a process analytical technology (PAT) approach for the assessment of bacterial ghost production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langemann, Timo; Mayr, Ulrike Beate; Meitz, Andrea; Lubitz, Werner; Herwig, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) is a tool for the analysis of single-cell properties in a cell suspension. In this contribution, we present an improved FCM method for the assessment of E-lysis in Enterobacteriaceae. The result of the E-lysis process is empty bacterial envelopes-called bacterial ghosts (BGs)-that constitute potential products in the pharmaceutical field. BGs have reduced light scattering properties when compared with intact cells. In combination with viability information obtained from staining samples with the membrane potential-sensitive fluorescent dye bis-(1,3-dibutylarbituric acid) trimethine oxonol (DiBAC4(3)), the presented method allows to differentiate between populations of viable cells, dead cells, and BGs. Using a second fluorescent dye RH414 as a membrane marker, non-cellular background was excluded from the data which greatly improved the quality of the results. Using true volumetric absolute counting, the FCM data correlated well with cell count data obtained from colony-forming units (CFU) for viable populations. Applicability of the method to several Enterobacteriaceae (different Escherichia coli strains, Salmonella typhimurium, Shigella flexneri 2a) could be shown. The method was validated as a resilient process analytical technology (PAT) tool for the assessment of E-lysis and for particle counting during 20-l batch processes for the production of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 BGs.

  1. Heterotrophic bacterial production and extracellular enzymatic activity in sinking particulate matter in the western North Pacific Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namiha eYamada

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Heterotrophic activities on sinking particulate matter (SPM play an important role in SPM fluxes in the ocean. To demonstrate regional differences in heterotrophic activities on SPM, we measured heterotrophic bacterial production (HBP in seawater and SPM as well as potential extracellular enzyme activity (EEA in SPM on a transect along 155°E in the western North Pacific Ocean in the subarctic (44°N, the Kuroshio Extension area (35°N, and the subtropical gyre (20°N. Depth-integrated HBP in seawater from the surface to 500 m was comparable between the locations, whereas HBP in SPM at 44°N was substantially lower than at the other sites. We found the highest particulate organic carbon (POC export flux and export efficiency to bathypelagic depths, and the lowest water temperatures, at 44°N. We found significant correlations between leucine aminopeptidase (LAPase activity, ß-glucosidase (BGase activity, POC flux and particulate organic nitrogen flux. LAPase activity was two orders of magnitude higher than BGase activity, with a BGase:LAPase activity ratio of 0.027. There were no significant correlations between HBP and EEA in SPM except for lipase, and lipase activity was significantly correlated with temperature. We propose that hydrographic conditions are an important factor controlling heterotrophic bacterial activity and export efficiency of organic carbon to the deep ocean, as are the sources and abundance of SPM produced in the euphotic zone via primary production.

  2. Salmonella Infection Enhances Erythropoietin Production by the Kidney and Liver, Which Correlates with Elevated Bacterial Burdens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin-Xi; Benoun, Joseph M; Weiskopf, Kipp; Garcia, K Christopher; McSorley, Stephen J

    2016-10-01

    Salmonella infection profoundly affects host erythroid development, but the mechanisms responsible for this effect remain poorly understood. We monitored the impact of Salmonella infection on erythroid development and found that systemic infection induced anemia, splenomegaly, elevated erythropoietin (EPO) levels, and extramedullary erythropoiesis in a process independent of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI2) or flagellin. The circulating EPO level was also constitutively higher in mice lacking the expression of signal-regulatory protein α (SIRPα). The expression level of EPO mRNA was elevated in the kidney and liver but not increased in the spleens of infected mice despite the presence of extramedullary erythropoiesis in this tissue. In contrast to data from a previous report, mice lacking EPO receptor (EPOR) expression on nonerythroid cells (EPOR rescued) had bacterial loads similar to those of wild-type mice following Salmonella infection. Indeed, treatment to reduce splenic erythroblasts and mature red blood cells correlated with elevated bacterial burdens, implying that extramedullary erythropoiesis benefits the host. Together, these findings emphasize the profound effect of Salmonella infection on erythroid development and suggest that the modulation of erythroid development has both positive and negative consequences for host immunity.

  3. Engineering bacterial biopolymers for the biosorption of heavy metals; new products and novel formulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutnick, D.L.; Bach, H. [Tel-Aviv Univ. (Israel). Dept. of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology

    2000-07-01

    Bioremediation of heavy metal pollution remains a major challenge in environmental biotechnology. One of the approaches considered for application involves biosorption either to biomass or to isolated biopolymers. Many bacterial polysaccharides have been shown to bind heavy metals with varying degrees of specificity and affinity. While various approaches have been adopted to generate polysaccharide variants altered in both structure and activity, metal biosorption has not been examined. Polymer engineering has included structural modification through the introduction of heterologous genes of the biosynthetic pathway into specific mutants, leading either to alterations in polysaccharide backbone or side chains, or to sugar modification. In addition, novel formulations can be designed which enlarge the family of available bacterial biopolymers for metal-binding and subsequent recovery. An example discussed here is the use of amphipathic bioemulsifiers such as emulsan, produced by the oil-degrading Acinetobacter lwoffii RAG-1, that forms stable, concentrated (70%), oil-in-water emulsions (emulsanosols). In this system metal ions bind primarily at the oil/water interface, enabling their recovery and concentration from relatively dilute solutions. In addition to the genetic modifications described above, a new approach to the generation of amphipathic bioemulsifying formulations is based on the interaction of native or recombinant esterase and its derivatives with emulsan and other water-soluble biopolymers. Cation-binding emulsions are generated from a variety of hydrophobic substrates. The features of these and other systems will be discussed, together with a brief consideratiton of possible applications. (orig.)

  4. Production and characterization of bacterial cellulose membranes with hyaluronic acid from chicken comb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Sabrina Alves; da Silva, Bruno Campos; Riegel-Vidotti, Izabel Cristina; Urbano, Alexandre; de Sousa Faria-Tischer, Paula Cristina; Tischer, Cesar Augusto

    2017-04-01

    The bacterial cellulose (BC), from Gluconacetobacter hansenii, is a biofilm with a high degree of crystallinity that can be used for therapeutic purposes and as a candidate for healing wounds. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a constitutive polysaccharide found in the extracellular matrix and is a material used in tissue engineering and scaffolding for tissue regeneration. In this study, polymeric composites were produced in presence of hyaluronic acid isolated from chicken comb on different days of fermentation, specifically on the first (BCHA-SABT0) and third day (BCHA-SABT3) of fermentation. The structural characteristics, thermal stability and molar mass of hyaluronic acid from chicken comb were evaluated. Native membrane and polymeric composites were characterized with respect to their morphology and crystallinity. The optimized process of extraction and purification of hyaluronic acid resulted in low molar mass hyaluronic acid with structural characteristics similar to the standard commercial hyaluronic acid. The results demonstrate that the polymeric composites (BC/HA-SAB) can be produced in situ. The membranes produced on the third day presented better incorporation of HA-SAB between cellulose microfiber, resulting in membranes with higher thermal stability, higher roughness and lower crystallinity. The biocompatiblily of bacterial cellulose and the importance of hyaluronic acid as a component of extracellular matrix qualify the polymeric composites as promising biomaterials for tissue engineering.

  5. Bacterial degradation of synthetic and kraft lignin by axenic and mixed culture and their metabolic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Ram; Bharagava, Ram Naresh

    2013-11-01

    Pulp paper mill effluent has high pollution load due to presence of lignin and its derivatives as major colouring and polluting constituents. In this study, two lignin degrading bacteria IITRL1 and IITRSU7 were isolated and identified as Citrobacter freundii (FJ581026) and Citrobacter sp. (FJ581023), respectively. In degradation study by axenic and mixed culture, mixed bacterial culture was found more effective compared to axenic culture as it decolourized 85 and 62% of synthetic and kraft lignin whereas in axenic conditions, bacterium IITRL1 and IITRSU7 decolourized 61 and 64% synthetic and 49 and 54% kraft lignin, respectively. Further, the mixed bacterial culture also showed the removal of 71, 58% TOC; 78, 53% AOX; 70, 58% COD and 74, 58% lignin from synthetic and kraft lignin, respectively. The ligninolytic enzyme was characterized as manganese peroxidase by SDS-PAGE yielding a single band of 43 KDa. The HPLC analysis of degraded samples showed reduction as well as shifting of peaks compared to control indicating the degradation as well as transformation of compounds. Further, in GC-MS analysis of synthetic and kraft lignin degraded samples, hexadecanoic acid was found as recalcitrant compounds while 2,4,6-trichloro-phenol, 2,3,4,5-tetrachloro-phenol and pentachloro-phenol were detected as new metabolites.

  6. Salmonella Infection Enhances Erythropoietin Production by the Kidney and Liver, Which Correlates with Elevated Bacterial Burdens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin-Xi; Benoun, Joseph M.; Weiskopf, Kipp; Garcia, K. Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella infection profoundly affects host erythroid development, but the mechanisms responsible for this effect remain poorly understood. We monitored the impact of Salmonella infection on erythroid development and found that systemic infection induced anemia, splenomegaly, elevated erythropoietin (EPO) levels, and extramedullary erythropoiesis in a process independent of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI2) or flagellin. The circulating EPO level was also constitutively higher in mice lacking the expression of signal-regulatory protein α (SIRPα). The expression level of EPO mRNA was elevated in the kidney and liver but not increased in the spleens of infected mice despite the presence of extramedullary erythropoiesis in this tissue. In contrast to data from a previous report, mice lacking EPO receptor (EPOR) expression on nonerythroid cells (EPOR rescued) had bacterial loads similar to those of wild-type mice following Salmonella infection. Indeed, treatment to reduce splenic erythroblasts and mature red blood cells correlated with elevated bacterial burdens, implying that extramedullary erythropoiesis benefits the host. Together, these findings emphasize the profound effect of Salmonella infection on erythroid development and suggest that the modulation of erythroid development has both positive and negative consequences for host immunity. PMID:27456828

  7. Effects of different fermentation methods on bacterial cellulose and acid production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus in Cantonese-style rice vinegar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Liang; Chen, Siqian; Yi, Jiulong; Hou, Zongxia

    2014-07-01

    A strain of acidogenic bacterium was isolated from the fermentation liquid of Cantonese-style rice vinegar produced by traditional surface fermentation. 16S rDNA identification confirmed the bacterium as Gluconacetobacter xylinus, which synthesizes bacterial cellulose, and the acid productivity of the strain was investigated. In the study, the effects of the membrane integrity and the comparison of the air-liquid interface membrane with immerged membrane on total acidity, cellulose production, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity and number of bacteria were investigated. The cellulose membrane and the bacteria were observed under SEM for discussing their relationship. The correlations between oxygen consumption and total acid production rate were compared in surface and shake flask fermentation. The results showed the average acid productivity of the strain was 0.02g/(100mL/h), and the integrity of cellulose membrane in surface fermentation had an important effect on total acidity and cellulose production. With a higher membrane integrity, the total acidity after 144 h of fermentation was 3.75 g/100 mL, and the cellulose production was 1.71 g/100 mL after 360 h of fermentation. However, when the membrane was crushed by mechanical force, the total acidity and the cellulose production were as low as 0.36 g/100 mL and 0.14 g/100 mL, respectively. When the cellulose membrane was forced under the surface of fermentation liquid, the total acid production rate was extremely low, but the activity of ADH in the cellulose membrane was basically the same with the one above the liquid surface. The bacteria were mainly distributed in the cellulose membrane during the fermentation. The bacterial counts in surface fermentation were more than in the shake flask fermentation and G. xylinus consumed the substrate faster, in surface fermentation than in shake flask fermentation. The oxygen consumption rate and total acid production rate of surface fermentation were respectively 26

  8. Carbon cycling and net ecosystem production at an early stage of secondary succession in an abandoned coppice forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki; Shizu, Yoko; Nishiwaki, Ai; Yashiro, Yuichiro; Koizumi, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    Secondary mixed forests are one of the dominant forest cover types in human-dominated temperate regions. However, our understanding of how secondary succession affects carbon cycling and carbon sequestration in these ecosystems is limited. We studied carbon cycling and net ecosystem production (NEP) over 4 years (2004-2008) in a cool-temperate deciduous forest at an early stage of secondary succession (18 years after clear-cutting). Net primary production of the 18-year-old forest in this study was 5.2 tC ha(-1 )year(-1), including below-ground coarse roots; this was partitioned into 2.5 tC ha(-1 )year(-1) biomass increment, 1.6 tC ha(-1 )year(-1) foliage litter, and 1.0 tC ha(-1 )year(-1) other woody detritus. The total amount of annual soil surface CO(2) efflux was 6.8 tC ha(-1 )year(-1), which included root respiration (1.9 tC ha(-1 )year(-1)) and heterotrophic respiration (RH) from soils (4.9 tC ha(-1 )year(-1)). The 18-year forest at this study site exhibited a great increase in biomass pool as a result of considerable total tree growth and low mortality of tree stems. In contrast, the soil organic matter (SOM) pool decreased markedly (-1.6 tC ha(-1 )year(-1)), although further study of below-ground detritus production and RH of SOM decomposition is needed. This young 18-year forest was a weak carbon sink (0.9 tC ha(-1 )year(-1)) at this stage of secondary succession. The NEP of this 18-year forest is likely to increase gradually because biomass increases with tree growth and with the improvement of the SOM pool through increasing litter and dead wood production with stand development.

  9. Rethinking the global secondary organic aerosol (SOA) budget: stronger production, faster removal, shorter lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodzic, Alma; Kasibhatla, Prasad S.; Jo, Duseong S.; Cappa, Christopher D.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Madronich, Sasha; Park, Rokjin J.

    2016-06-01

    Recent laboratory studies suggest that secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation rates are higher than assumed in current models. There is also evidence that SOA removal by dry and wet deposition occurs more efficiently than some current models suggest and that photolysis and heterogeneous oxidation may be important (but currently ignored) SOA sinks. Here, we have updated the global GEOS-Chem model to include this new information on formation (i.e., wall-corrected yields and emissions of semi-volatile and intermediate volatility organic compounds) and on removal processes (photolysis and heterogeneous oxidation). We compare simulated SOA from various model configurations against ground, aircraft and satellite measurements to assess the extent to which these improved representations of SOA formation and removal processes are consistent with observed characteristics of the SOA distribution. The updated model presents a more dynamic picture of the life cycle of atmospheric SOA, with production rates 3.9 times higher and sinks a factor of 3.6 more efficient than in the base model. In particular, the updated model predicts larger SOA concentrations in the boundary layer and lower concentrations in the upper troposphere, leading to better agreement with surface and aircraft measurements of organic aerosol compared to the base model. Our analysis thus suggests that the long-standing discrepancy in model predictions of the vertical SOA distribution can now be resolved, at least in part, by a stronger source and stronger sinks leading to a shorter lifetime. The predicted global SOA burden in the updated model is 0.88 Tg and the corresponding direct radiative effect at top of the atmosphere is -0.33 W m-2, which is comparable to recent model estimates constrained by observations. The updated model predicts a population-weighed global mean surface SOA concentration that is a factor of 2 higher than in the base model, suggesting the need for a reanalysis of the contribution of

  10. Optimization of rhamnolipid production by biodegrading bacterial isolates using Plackett-Burman design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mariam; Essam, Tamer; Yassin, Aymen S; Salama, Aisha

    2016-01-01

    Biosurfactants are biological surfactants produced by microorganisms. Pseudomonas species are well known for the production of the rhamnolipid biosurfactant. In this work, the production of rhamnolipid biosurfactant by Pseudomonas spp. was investigated and further optimized. Two Plackett-Burman designs to study the effect of carbon source, nitrogen source, C/N ratio, iron concentration, magnesium concentration, phenol toxicity, pH, temperature, agitation and sampling time were tested. The first design revealed an optimization that increased biosurfactant productivity by almost two to fivefolds for the tested isolates. However, using the second design showed no remarkable increase in biosurfactant productivity. An additional validation run was adopted using the predicted optimal medium with predicted optimal conditions. The validation run showed remarkable increase in the productivity of the tested isolates. The use of microorganisms with biodegradation ability coupled with optimization of the parameters affecting productivity provides an efficient strategy for biosurfactant production.

  11. To Stretch the Boundary of Secondary Metabolite Production in Plant Cell-Based Bioprocessing: Anthocyanin as a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant cells and tissue cultures hold great promise for controlled production of a myriad of useful secondary metabolites on demand. The current yield and productivity cannot fulfill the commercial goal of a plant cell-based bioprocess for the production of most secondary metabolites. In order to stretch the boundary, recent advances, new directions and opportunities in plant cell-based bioprocessing, have been critically examined for the 10 years from 1992 to 2002. A review of the literature indicated that most of the R&D work was devoted predominantly to studies at an empirical level. A rational approach to molecular plant cell bioprocessing based on the fundamental understanding of metabolic pathways and their regulations is urgently required to stimulate further advances; however, the strategies and technical framework are still being developed. It is the aim of this review to take a step forward in framing workable strategies and technologies for molecular plant cell-based bioprocessing. Using anthocyanin biosynthesis as a case study, an integrated postgenomic approach has been proposed. This combines the functional analysis of metabolic pathways for biosynthesis of a particular metabolite from profiling of gene expression and protein expression to metabolic profiling. A global correlation not only can thus be established at the three molecular levels, but also places emphasis on the interactions between primary metabolism and secondary metabolism; between competing and/or complimentary pathways; and between biosynthetic and post-biosynthetic events.

  12. To Stretch the Boundary of Secondary Metabolite Production in Plant Cell-Based Bioprocessing: Anthocyanin as a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Franco, Chris; Curtin, Chris; Conn, Simon

    2004-01-01

    Plant cells and tissue cultures hold great promise for controlled production of a myriad of useful secondary metabolites on demand. The current yield and productivity cannot fulfill the commercial goal of a plant cell-based bioprocess for the production of most secondary metabolites. In order to stretch the boundary, recent advances, new directions and opportunities in plant cell-based bioprocessing, have been critically examined for the 10 years from 1992 to 2002. A review of the literature indicated that most of the R&D work was devoted predominantly to studies at an empirical level. A rational approach to molecular plant cell bioprocessing based on the fundamental understanding of metabolic pathways and their regulations is urgently required to stimulate further advances; however, the strategies and technical framework are still being developed. It is the aim of this review to take a step forward in framing workable strategies and technologies for molecular plant cell-based bioprocessing. Using anthocyanin biosynthesis as a case study, an integrated postgenomic approach has been proposed. This combines the functional analysis of metabolic pathways for biosynthesis of a particular metabolite from profiling of gene expression and protein expression to metabolic profiling. A global correlation not only can thus be established at the three molecular levels, but also places emphasis on the interactions between primary metabolism and secondary metabolism; between competing and/or complimentary pathways; and between biosynthetic and post-biosynthetic events.

  13. Metabolomics and bioanalysis of terpenoid derived secondary metabolites : Analysis of Cannabis sativa L. metabolite production and prenylases for cannabinoid production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muntendam, Remco

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoid research has gained a renenewed interest by both the public and scientist. Focus is mainly directed to the medicinal activities, as reported for various cannabinoid structures. This thesis focusses on prenyl-derived secondary metabolites with main focus on cannabinoids. Firstly the produ

  14. 2007 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Secondary Food Products (Meats). (Program CIP: 01.0401 - Agricultural and Food Products Processing)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research and Curriculum Unit, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Secondary vocational-technical education programs in Mississippi are faced with many challenges resulting from sweeping educational reforms at the national and state levels. Schools and teachers are increasingly being held accountable for providing true learning activities to every student in the classroom. This accountability is measured through…

  15. Characterization of a mutant strain of a filamentous fungus Cladosporium phlei for the mass production of the secondary metabolite phleichrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Min-Hee; Kim, Jung-Ae; Kim, Jung-Mi; Park, Jin-Ah; Kim, Beom-Tae; Park, Seung-Moon; Yang, Moon-Sik; Hwang, Ki-Jun; Kim, Dae-Hyuk

    2011-08-01

    UV-mutagenesis was performed to obtain mutant strains that demonstrate altered production of phleichrome, a secondary metabolite of Cladosporium phlei. Among fifty mutants selected, based on the increased area and intensity of the purple pigment surrounding the colonies, the strain M0035 showed the highest production of phleichrome, more than seven fold over wild type. Plate cultures of the M0035 strain resulted in a total of 592 mg phleichrome consisting of 146 mg and 446 mg from the mycelia and agar media, respectively. The M0035 strain displayed a growth rate and a mycelial mass comparable to the parental strain but had significantly reduced asexual sporulation.

  16. Cross-talk between signaling pathways: the link between plant secondary metabolite production and wounding stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobo-Velázquez, Daniel A; González-Agüero, Mauricio; Cisneros-Zevallos, Luis

    2015-02-25

    Plants subjected to wounding stress produce secondary metabolites. Several of these metabolites prevent chronic diseases and can be used as colorants, flavors, and as antimicrobials. This wound-induced production of plant secondary metabolites is mediated by signaling-molecules such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), ethylene (ET) and jasmonic acid (JA). However, their specific role and interactions that modulate the wound-respond in plants is not fully understood. In the present study, a subtractive cDNA library was generated, to better understand the global response of plants to wounding stress. Carrot (Daucus carota) was used as a model system for this study. A total of 335 unique expressed sequence tags (ESTs) sequences were obtained. ESTs sequences with a putative identity showed involvement in stress-signaling pathways as well as on the primary and secondary metabolism. Inhibitors of ROS biosynthesis, ET action, and JA biosynthesis alone and in combination were applied to wounded-carrots in order to determine, based on relative gene expression data, the regulatory role of ET, JA, and ROS on the wound-response in plants. Our results demonstrate that ROS play a key role as signaling-molecules for the wound-induced activation of the primary and secondary metabolism whereas ET and JA are essential to modulate ROS levels.

  17. UTILIZATION OF SECONDARY COMBUSTIBLE POWER RESOURCES FOR PRODUCTION OF MUNICIPAL AND HOUSEHOLD FUEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Berezovsky

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows an advantage to utilize secondary power resources (lignin, wastes of fine coal with its dressing, sawdust in mixture with local types of fuel (peat in order to fulfill power supply purpose, namely: obtaining hot water in boilers of small capacity and obtaining household fuel.

  18. Secondary formation of disinfection by-products by UV treatment of swimming pool water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    be replicated by performing the DBP formation assay with higher chlorine concentrations to simulate extended chlorination. Post-UV chlorination of water from a swimming pool that continuously uses UV treatment to control combined chlorine could not induce secondary formation for most DBPs. Concurrence...

  19. Effect of Competition on the Production and Activity of Secondary Metabolites in Aspergillus species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secondary metabolites are of intense interest to humans due to their pharmaceutical and/or toxic properties. Aspergillus species secrete these metabolites by themselves and in the presence of other fungal species. Here, we have performed co-cultivation competition assays among different Aspergillu...

  20. Introduction of a bacterial acetyl-CoA synthesis pathway improves lactic acid production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ji-Yoon; Park, Joon-Song; Kang, Chang Duk; Cho, Hwa-Young; Yang, Dongsik; Lee, Seunghyun; Cho, Kwang Myung

    2016-05-01

    Acid-tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered to produce lactic acid by expressing heterologous lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) genes, while attenuating several key pathway genes, including glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase1 (GPD1) and cytochrome-c oxidoreductase2 (CYB2). In order to increase the yield of lactic acid further, the ethanol production pathway was attenuated by disrupting the pyruvate decarboxylase1 (PDC1) and alcohol dehydrogenase1 (ADH1) genes. Despite an increase in lactic acid yield, severe reduction of the growth rate and glucose consumption rate owing to the absence of ADH1 caused a considerable decrease in the overall productivity. In Δadh1 cells, the levels of acetyl-CoA, a key precursor for biologically applicable components, could be insufficient for normal cell growth. To increase the cellular supply of acetyl-CoA, we introduced bacterial acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (A-ALD) enzyme (EC 1.2.1.10) genes into the lactic acid-producing S. cerevisiae. Escherichia coli-derived A-ALD genes, mhpF and eutE, were expressed and effectively complemented the attenuated acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALD)/acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) pathway in the yeast. The engineered strain, possessing a heterologous acetyl-CoA synthetic pathway, showed an increased glucose consumption rate and higher productivity of lactic acid fermentation. The production of lactic acid was reached at 142g/L with production yield of 0.89g/g and productivity of 3.55gL(-1)h(-1) under fed-batch fermentation in bioreactor. This study demonstrates a novel approach that improves productivity of lactic acid by metabolic engineering of the acetyl-CoA biosynthetic pathway in yeast.

  1. Utilization of makgeolli sludge filtrate (MSF) as low-cost substrate for bacterial cellulose production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Jo Yi; Mahanty, Biswanath; Kim, Chang Gyun

    2014-04-01

    Search for efficient low-cost substrate/additives are gaining significant impetus in bacterial cellulose (BC) production. Makgeolli sludge (a traditional Korean wine distillery waste) is enriched with organic acid, alcohol, and sugar. Using makgeolli sludge filtrate (MSF) and Hestrin-Schramm (HS) medium (g/l of distilled water: glucose, 10.0; peptone, 5.0; yeast extract, 5.0; disodium phosphate, 2.7; citric acid, 1.15; pH 5.0), two different media-namely the modified HS media (ingredients of HS media except glucose dissolved in MSF) and mixed modified HS media (equal volume mixture of original and modified HS media)-were formulated. BC production with Gluconacetobacter xylinus was studied using the two above referred medium. Keeping HS medium as reference, effect of initial pH, glucose, ethanol, and organic acid concentration on BC production was also studied. It suggests that increasing initial glucose (up to 25 g/l) though improves BC production but results in poor BC yield above 15 g/l of glucose. However, addition of alcohol (up to 1%v/v) or citric acid (up to 20 mM) escalate productivity up to four and two times, respectively. In both modified HS media and mixed modified HS medium, BC production was four to five times higher than that of original HS medium. Even MSF alone surpassed HS medium in BC production. Scanning electron microscopy showed that BC microfibrils from MSF based media were several micrometers long and about 25-60 nm widths. X-ray diffraction patterns suggested the produced BC were of cellulose I polymorph.

  2. Application of bacterial cytological profiling to crude natural product extracts reveals the antibacterial arsenal of Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonejuie, Poochit; Trial, Rachelle M; Newton, Gerald L; Lamsa, Anne; Ranmali Perera, Varahenage; Aguilar, Julieta; Liu, Wei-Ting; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Pogliano, Joe; Pogliano, Kit

    2016-05-01

    Although most clinically used antibiotics are derived from natural products, identifying new antibacterial molecules from natural product extracts is difficult due to the complexity of these extracts and the limited tools to correlate biological activity with specific molecules. Here, we show that bacterial cytological profiling (BCP) provides a rapid method for mechanism of action determination on plates and in complex natural product extracts and for activity-guided purification. We prepared an extract from Bacillus subtilis 3610 that killed the Escherichia coli lptD mutant and used BCP to observe two types of bioactivities in the unfractionated extract: inhibition of translation and permeablization of the cytoplasmic membrane. We used BCP to guide purification of the molecules responsible for each activity, identifying the translation inhibitors bacillaene and bacillaene B (glycosylated bacillaene) and demonstrating that two molecules contribute to cell permeabilitization, the bacteriocin subtilosin and the cyclic peptide sporulation killing factor. Our results suggest that bacillaene mediates translational arrest, and show that bacillaene B has a minimum inhibitory concentration 10 × higher than unmodified bacillaene. Finally, we show that BCP can be used to screen strains on an agar plate without the need for extract preparation, greatly saving time and improving throughput. Thus, BCP simplifies the isolation of novel natural products, by identifying strains, crude extracts and fractions with interesting bioactivities even when multiple activities are present, allowing investigators to focus labor-intensive steps on those with desired activities.

  3. Thermal-to-fusion neutron convertor and Monte Carlo coupled simulation of deuteron/triton transport and secondary products generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guan-bo; Liu, Han-gang; Wang, Kan; Yang, Xin; Feng, Qi-jie

    2012-09-01

    Thermal-to-fusion neutron convertor has being studied in China Academy of Engineering Physics (CAEP). Current Monte Carlo codes, such as MCNP and GEANT, are inadequate when applied in this multi-step reactions problems. A Monte Carlo tool RSMC (Reaction Sequence Monte Carlo) has been developed to simulate such coupled problem, from neutron absorption, to charged particle ionization and secondary neutron generation. "Forced particle production" variance reduction technique has been implemented to improve the calculation speed distinctly by making deuteron/triton induced secondary product plays a major role. Nuclear data is handled from ENDF or TENDL, and stopping power from SRIM, which described better for low energy deuteron/triton interactions. As a validation, accelerator driven mono-energy 14 MeV fusion neutron source is employed, which has been deeply studied and includes deuteron transport and secondary neutron generation. Various parameters, including fusion neutron angle distribution, average neutron energy at different emission directions, differential and integral energy distributions, are calculated with our tool and traditional deterministic method as references. As a result, we present the calculation results of convertor with RSMC, including conversion ratio of 1 mm 6LiD with a typical thermal neutron (Maxwell spectrum) incidence, and fusion neutron spectrum, which will be used for our experiment.

  4. Reactive processing of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde in aqueous aerosol mimics: surface tension depression and secondary organic products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Li

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The reactive uptake of carbonyl-containing volatile organic compounds (cVOCs by aqueous atmospheric aerosols is a likely source of particulate organic material. The aqueous-phase secondary organic products of some cVOCs are surface-active. Therefore, cVOC uptake can lead to organic film formation at the gas-aerosol interface and changes in aerosol surface tension. We examined the chemical reactions of two abundant cVOCs, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, in water and aqueous ammonium sulfate (AS solutions mimicking tropospheric aerosols. Secondary organic products were identified using Aerosol Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Aerosol-CIMS, and changes in surface tension were monitored using pendant drop tensiometry. Hemiacetal oligomers and aldol condensation products were identified using Aerosol-CIMS. A hemiacetal sulfate ester was tentatively identified in the formaldehyde-AS system. Acetaldehyde depresses surface tension to 65(±2 dyn cm−1 in pure water and 62(±1 dyn cm−1 in AS solutions. Surface tension depression by formaldehyde in pure water is negligible; in AS solutions, a 9 % reduction in surface tension is observed. Mixtures of these species were also studied in combination with methylglyoxal in order to evaluate the influence of cross-reactions on surface tension depression and product formation in these systems. We find that surface tension depression in the solutions containing mixed cVOCs exceeds that predicted by an additive model based on the single-species isotherms.

  5. The Effect of Antibiotics on Associated Bacterial Community of Stored Product Mites

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacteria are associated with the gut, fat bodies and reproductive organs of stored product mites (Acari: Astigmata). The mites are pests due to the production of allergens. Addition of antibiotics to diets can help to characterize the association between mites and bacteria. Methodology and Principal Findings Ampicillin, neomycin and streptomycin were added to the diets of mites and the effects on mite population growth (Acarus siro, Lepidoglyphus destructor and Tyrophagus putrescen...

  6. Magnesium improves hydrogen production by a novel fermentative hydrogen-producing bacterial strain B49

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiang-jing; REN Nan-qi; XIANG Wen-sheng

    2005-01-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of magnesium on glucose metabolism, including growth and hydrogen-producing capacity of fermentative hydrogen-producing bacterial strain B49. These abilities were enhanced with an increase in magnesium concentration. At the end of fermentation from 10 g/L ratio of ethanol amount (mg/L) to acetate amount (mg/L) was 1.1, and the accumulated hydrogen volume hydrogen volume was increased to 2 360. 5 mL H2/L culture, the ratio of ethanol amount (mg/L) to acetate amount (mg/L) was increased to 1.3 and polysaccharide was decreased to 2. 5 mg/L. Moreover, the magnesium solution addition to the medium at different fermentation times affected hydrogen-producing ability. However,the later the addition time was postponed, the less the effect was on hydrogen evolution. Further experiments confirmed the enhancement was dependent on magnesium ions and not on the other inorganic ions such as SO42- or Cl-, which constituted the magnesium salts.

  7. Receptor-binding domain of ephrin-A1: production in bacterial expression system and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekrasova, O V; Sharonov, G V; Tikhonov, R V; Kolosov, P M; Astapova, M V; Yakimov, S A; Tagvey, A I; Korchagina, A A; Bocharova, O V; Wulfson, A N; Feofanov, A V; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2012-12-01

    Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and their ligands, the ephrins, perform an important regulatory function in tissue organization, as well as participate in malignant transformation of cells. Ephrin-A1, a ligand of A class Eph receptors, is a modulator of tumor growth and progression, and the mechanism of its action needs detailed investigation. Here we report on the development of a system for bacterial expression of an ephrin-A1 receptor-binding domain (eA1), a procedure for its purification, and its renaturation with final yield of 50 mg/liter of culture. Functional activity of eA1 was confirmed by immunoblotting, laser scanning confocal microscopy, and flow cytometry. It is shown that monomeric non-glycosylated receptor-binding domain of ephrin-A1 is able to activate cellular EphA2 receptors, stimulating their phosphorylation. Ligand eA1 can be used to study the features of ephrin-A1 interactions with different A class Eph receptors. The created expression cassette is suitable for the development of ligands with increased activity and selectivity and experimental systems for the delivery of cytotoxins into tumor cells that overexpress EphA2 or other class A Eph receptors.

  8. Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs)-on-Beads™ as a diagnostic platform for the rapid aneuploidy screening of products of conception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheath, Karen L; Duffy, Lisa; Asquith, Philip; Love, Donald R; George, Alice M

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of KaryoLite™ bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs)‑on‑Beads™ (BoBs) technology for the rapid screening of products of conception (POC). Validation and prospective studies were carried out on 85 and 95 patient samples, respectively. Validation studies had previously been analyzed using routine culture and G-banded karyotyping. BoBs resulted in an abnormality detection frequency of 27%, with a failure rate of <3%. The time required for processing was significantly lower compared with that of tissue culture. In conclusion, BoBs technology decreased the failure rate, while increasing the analytical sensitivity compared with G-banded karyotype analysis alone. Additionally, significant cost savings may be achieved with regard to the time of processing and analysis of specimens.

  9. Endogenous ethanol production in a patient with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinucci, Giulio; Guidetti, Mariacristina; Lanzoni, Elisabetta; Pironi, Loris

    2006-07-01

    The case of the gastrointestinal production of ethanol from Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a Caucasian man with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction is reported. The patient, who declared to have always abstained from alcohol, was hospitalized for abdominal pain, belching and mental confusion. The laboratory findings showed the presence of ethanol in the blood. Gastric juice and faecal microbiological cultures were positive for C. albicans and S. cerevisiae. At home, he was on oral antibiotic therapy with amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid for a small bowel bacterial overgrowth, associated with a simple sugar-rich diet. Twenty-four hours after stopping both the antibiotic therapy and the simple sugar-rich diet, the blood ethanol disappeared. A provocative test, performed by giving amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid associated with the simple sugar-rich diet was followed by the reappearance of ethanol in the blood. A review of the literature is reported.

  10. Cost-effective production of bacterial cellulose in static cultures using distillery wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jyh-Ming; Liu, Ren-Han

    2013-03-01

    Thin stillage (TS), wastewater from rice wine distillery, was used as a cost-free feedstock to replace the costly traditional Hestrin and Schramm (HS) medium for BC production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus. Due to the rich organic acids and amino acids content in TS, BC production was significantly enhanced as 50 (v/v) % of HS medium was replaced with TS. In the 50/50 TS-HS medium, BC concentration of 6.26 g/l could be obtained after 7 days static cultivation which is approximately 50% higher than that could be produced in HS-only medium. The BC produced by TS containing medium had slightly denser reticulated structures and higher crystallinity index values but with lower water holding capacities than that obtained from HS medium. Based on the 50% cost-free TS, the 50/50 TS-HS medium had a BC production feedstock cost about 67% lower than that of traditional HS medium. The employment of cost-free TS to replace a portion of HS medium to achieve a higher BC production not only can reduce the BC production cost but also solve the wastewater disposal problem of winery industry.

  11. Exposure to bacterial signals does not alter pea aphids' survival upon a second challenge or investment in production of winged offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas ter Braak

    Full Text Available Pea aphids have an obligate nutritional symbiosis with the bacteria Buchneraaphidicola and frequently also harbor one or more facultative symbionts. Aphids are also susceptible to bacterial pathogen infections, and it has been suggested that aphids have a limited immune response towards such pathogen infections compared to other, more well-studied insects. However, aphids do possess at least some of the genes known to be involved in bacterial immune responses in other insects, and immune-competent hemocytes. One possibility is that immune priming with microbial elicitors could stimulate immune protection against subsequent bacterial infections, as has been observed in several other insect systems. To address this hypothesis we challenged aphids with bacterial immune elicitors twenty-four hours prior to live bacterial pathogen infections and then compared their survival rates to aphids that were not pre-exposed to bacterial signals. Using two aphid genotypes, we found no evidence for immune protection conferred by immune priming during infections with either Serratia marcescens or with Escherichia coli. Immune priming was not altered by the presence of facultative, beneficial symbionts in the aphids. In the absence of inducible immune protection, aphids may allocate energy towards other defense traits, including production of offspring with wings that could escape deteriorating conditions. To test this, we monitored the ratio of winged to unwinged offspring produced by adult mothers of a single clone that had been exposed to bacterial immune elicitors, to live E. coli infections or to no challenge. We found no correlation between immune challenge and winged offspring production, suggesting that this mechanism of defense, which functions upon exposure to fungal pathogens, is not central to aphid responses to bacterial infections.

  12. Secondary Neutron-Production Cross Sections from Heavy-IonInteractions between 230 and 600 MeV/nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heilbronn, L.H.; Zeitlin, C.J.; Iwata, Y.; Murakami, T.; Iwase,H.; Nakamura, T.; Nunomiya, T.; Sato, H.; Yashima, H.; Ronningen, R.M.; Ieki, K.

    2006-10-04

    Secondary neutron-production cross-sections have beenmeasured from interactions of 230 MeV/nucleon He, 400 MeV/nucleon N, 400MeV/nucleon Kr, 400 MeV/nucleon Xe, 500 MeV/nucleon Fe, and 600MeV/nucleon Ne interacting in a variety of elemental and compositetargets. We report the double-differential production cross sections,angular distributions, energy spectra, and total cross sections from allsystems. Neutron energies were measured using the time-of-flighttechnique, and were measured at laboratory angles between 5 deg and 80deg. The spectra exhibit behavior previously reported in otherheavy-ion-induced neutron production experiments; namely, a peak atforward angles near the energy corresponding to the beam velocity, withthe remaining spectra generated by preequilibrium and equilibriumprocesses. The double-differential spectra are fitted with amoving-source parameterization. Observations on the dependence of thetotal cross sections on target and projectile mass arediscussed.

  13. Product formation from thiophene by a mixed bacterial culture. Influence of benzene as growth substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rivas, Isabelle Marie; Mosbæk, Hans; Arvin, Erik

    2003-01-01

    The influence of benzene as a growth substrate on the cometabolic conversion of thiophene was investigated in batch systems with microorganisms originating from an creosote contaminated site. Benzene was shown to stimulate the conversion of thiophene with a first-order rate, during the initial...... phase of transformation. The microorganisms were able to transform thiophene in the absence of benzene at a zero-order rate. Thiophene was converted to five oxidation products, regardless of the presence of benzene. Benzene had no influence on the distribution of these oxidation products. The main...

  14. Antibiotics production by bacterial agents and its role in biological control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, G.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Using bacteria to control plant diseases is one of the main strategies in plant protection, and its mechanism is commonly thought to be the production of antibiotics by bacteria. The produced antibiotics not only have structural diversity, but also have broad-spectrum activity against many pathogens

  15. A secretory system for bacterial production of high-profile protein targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotzsch, Alexander; Vernet, Erik; Hammarström, Martin;

    2011-01-01

    Escherichia coli represents a robust, inexpensive expression host for the production of recombinant proteins. However, one major limitation is that certain protein classes do not express well in a biologically relevant form using standard expression approaches in the cytoplasm of E. coli. To impr...

  16. Diurnal variations in bacterial and viral production in Cochin estuary, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parvathi, A; Jasna, V.; Haridevi, C.K.; Jina, S.; Greeshma, M.; Breezy, J.; Nair, M.

    intensity as photosynthetically active radiation, temperature, salinity, nutrients like NO3–N, SiO4–Si, and PO4–P, and chlorophyll a (Chl a) were measured along with BP, VP, and net primary production (NPP). NPP showed a...

  17. Production of bacterial endoglucanase from pretreated oil palm empty fruit bunch by bacillus pumilus EB3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariffin, Hidayah; Hassan, Mohd Ali; Shah, Umi Kalsom Md; Abdullah, Norhafizah; Ghazali, Farinazleen Mohd; Shirai, Yoshihito

    2008-09-01

    In this study, endoglucanase was produced from oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) by a locally isolated aerobic bacterium, Bacillus pumilus EB3. The effects of the fermentation parameters such as initial pH, temperature, and nitrogen source on the endoglucanase production were studied using carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) as the carbon source. Endoglucanase from B. pumilus EB3 was maximally secreted at 37 degrees C, initial pH 7.0 with 10 g/l of CMC as carbon source, and 2 g/l of yeast extract as organic nitrogen source. The activity recorded during the fermentation was 0.076 U/ml. The productivity of the enzyme increased twofold when 2 g/l of yeast extract was used as the organic nitrogen supplement as compared to the non-supplemented medium. An interesting finding from this study is that pretreated OPEFB medium showed comparable results to CMC medium in terms of enzyme production with an activity of 0.063 U/ml. As OPEFB is an abundant solid waste at palm oil mills, it has the potential of acting as a substrate in cellulase production.

  18. Reactive processing of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde in aqueous aerosol mimics: Surface tension depression and secondary organic products

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhi; Sareen, Neha; McNeill, V Faye

    2011-01-01

    The reactive uptake of carbonyl-containing volatile organic compounds (cVOCs) by aqueous atmospheric aerosols is a likely source of particulate organic material. The aqueous-phase secondary organic products of some cVOCs are surface-active. Therefore, cVOC uptake can lead to organic film formation at the gas-aerosol interface and changes in aerosol surface tension. We examined the chemical reactions of two abundant cVOCs, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, in water and aqueous ammonium sulfate (AS) solutions mimicking tropospheric aerosols. Secondary organic products were identified using Aerosol Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Aerosol-CIMS), and changes in surface tension were monitored using pendant drop tensiometry. Hemiacetal oligomers and aldol condensation products were identified using Aerosol-CIMS. A hemiacetal sulfate ester was tentatively identified in the formaldehyde-AS system. Acetaldehyde depresses surface tension to 65(\\pm2) dyn/cm in pure water and 62(\\pm1) dyn/cm in AS solutions. Surface t...

  19. Lithium production on a low-mass secondary in a black hole soft X-ray transient

    CERN Document Server

    Fujimoto, Shin-ichiro; Arai, Kenzo

    2007-01-01

    We examine production of Li on the surface of a low-mass secondary in a black hole soft X-ray transient (BHSXT) through the spallation of CNO nuclei by neutrons which are ejected from a hot (> 10 MeV) advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) around the black hole. Using updated binary parameters, cross sections of neutron-induced spallation reactions, and mass accretion rates in ADAF derived from the spectrum fitting of multi-wavelength observations of quiescent BHSXTs, we obtain the equilibrium abundances of Li by equating the production rate of Li and the mass transfer rate through accretion to the black hole. The resulting abundances are found to be in good agreement with the observed values in seven BHSXTs. We note that the abundances vary in a timescale longer than a few months in our model. Moreover, the isotopic ratio Li6/Li7 is calculated to be about 0.7--0.8 on the secondaries, which is much higher than the ratio measured in meteorites. Detection of such a high value is favorable to the production o...

  20. Community structure, life histories and secondary production of stoneflies in two small mountain streams with different degree of forest cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Beracko

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Our study examines community structure and nymphal biology (life cycles and secondary production of stoneflies in two adjacent mountain streams with different degree of forest cover in the Prosiečanka River Basin (Chočské Vrchy Mts., West Carpathians. One of the streams has non-forested catchment, converted to meadows and pastures, while the other one has catchment with 60% covered by spruce forest. Differences in forest cover and in thermal regime of the streams were reflected by the difference of stonefly communities at their structural and functional level. Species Nemoura cinerea and Leuctra aurita created stonefly assemblage in non-forested stream, whereas Nemoura cinerea also occurred in naturally forested stream together with species Leuctra armata, Leuctra nigra, Leuctra prima, Siphonoperla neglecta and Arcynopteryx dichroa. All examined species had maximally annual life cycle and in eudominant species Nemoura cinerea one month shift was found in nymphal hatching and adult emergence between streams. Total secondary production of stoneflies in undisturbed stream (126.46 mg DW m-2 y-1 was more than two times higher than the production in non-forested stream (47.39 mg DW m-2 y-1. 

  1. Production of secondaries in soft p+Pb collisions at LHC and Alice data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merino, C.; Pajares, C. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, y Instituto Galego de Fisica de Altas Enerxias (IGFAE), Galicia (Spain); Shabelski, Yu.M. [NCR Kurchatov Institute, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2013-01-15

    We calculate the inclusive spectra of secondaries produced in soft (minimum bias) p+Pb collisions in the framework of Quark-Gluon String Model at LHC energy, and by taking into account the inelastic screening corrections (percolation effects). The role of these effects is expected to be very large at very high energies, and they should decrease the spectra more than 1.5 times in the midrapidity region and increase them about 1.5 times in the fragmentation region at the energy of LHC. (orig.)

  2. Importance and Implications of the Production of Phenolic Secondary Metabolites by Endophytic Fungi: A Mini-Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negreiros de Carvalho, Patrícia Lunardelli; Silva, Eliane de Oliveira; Chagas-Paula, Daniela Aparecida; Hortolan Luiz, Jaine Honorata; Ikegaki, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    In the natural products research, a valuable approach is the prospection of uncommon sources and unexplored habitat. Special attention has been given to endophytic fungi because of their ability to produce new and interesting secondary metabolites, which have several biological applications. The endophytes establish exclusive symbiotic relationships with plants and the metabolic interactions may support the synthesis of some similar valuables compounds. Among secondary metabolites, phenol-derived structures are responsible for several bioactivities such as antioxidant, cytotoxic, antimicrobial, among others. Phenolic compounds might be biosynthesized from the shikimate pathway. Although shikimic acid is a common precursor in plants, it is described as rare in microorganisms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review about phenolic compounds produced by endophytic fungi and a comparison has been made with those produced by the plant host. This review covers 124 phenolic secondary metabolites produced by endophytic fungi. Considering the data analyzed by us, only seven of such compounds were isolated from fungi and from their hosts. These observations claim for more attention to phenolic compounds produced by endophytic fungi with a view to understand the real importance of these compounds to endophytes survival.

  3. In vitro Applications for the Increasing of Root-Related Secondary Metabolite Production in Medicinal Plants and Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunhan Demirci

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Secondary metabolites, gaining importance in pharmaceutical, cosmetic, perfumery, food industry and agrarian struggle, are synthesized in different organs such as root, leaves, shoot and seed in plants. These compounds are defined as “light in bulk” because of the low synthesis rate but “high in value” because of the wide range of applications, activities and economic values. Obtaining of the secondary metabolites found in roots by conventional methods is based on dismantling of these plants from the nature or the cultural field and isolating by the different methods. Detachment of plants from nature causes the loss of genetic resources. And it has some difficulties as the challenges and differences in terrain and climate conditions, low metabolite yield and quality and more labor. Thus a new approaches is needed to enable more economic, higher metabolite yield and quality compared to the conventional methods. Therefore, in vitro techniques have gained importance. With this review, it was aimed to inform in vitro applications used to increase root-related secondary metabolites production in order to guide future researches.

  4. Optimization of biohydrogen yield produced by bacterial consortia using residual glycerin from biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Mariana de Oliveira; Ferreira-Leitão, Viridiana Santana

    2016-11-01

    The aims of this study were to simplify the fermentation medium and to optimize the conditions of dark fermentation of residual glycerin to produce biohydrogen. It was possible to remove all micronutrients of fermentation medium and improve biohydrogen production by applying residual glycerin as feedstock. After statistical analysis of the following parameters pH, glycerin concentration and volatile suspended solids, the values of 5.5; 0.5g.L(-1) and 8.7g.L(-1), respectively, were defined as optimum condition for this process. It generated 2.44molH2/molglycerin, an expressive result when compared to previous results reported in literature and considering that theoretical yield of H2 from glycerol in dark fermentation process is 3molH2/molglycerol. This study allowed the improvement of yield and productivity by 68% and 67%, respectively.

  5. Influences of environmental factors on bacterial extracellular polymeric substances production in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lu; Zheng, Xilai; Shao, Haibing; Xin, Jia; Peng, Tao

    2014-11-01

    Bioclogging of natural porous media occurs frequently under a wide range of conditions. It may influence the performance of permeable reactive barrier and constructed wetland. It is also one of the factors that determine the effect of artificial groundwater recharge and in situ bioremediation process. In this study, a series of percolation column experiments were conducted to simulate bioclogging process in porous media. The predominant bacteria in porous media which induced clogging were identified to be Methylobacterium, Janthinobacterium, Yersinia, Staphylococcus and Acidovorax, most of which had been shown to effectively produce viscous extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The column in which EPS production was maximized also coincided with the largest reduction in saturated hydraulic conductivity of porous media. In addition, carbon concentration was the most significant factor to affect polysaccharide, protein and EPS secretion, followed by phosphorus concentration and temperature. The coupled effect of carbon and phosphorus concentration was also very important to stimulate polysaccharide and EPS production.

  6. Bacterial Sugar 3,4-Ketoisomerases: Structural Insight into Product Stereochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoden, James B; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Gilbert, Michel; Salinger, Ari J; Holden, Hazel M

    2015-07-28

    3-Acetamido-3,6-dideoxy-d-galactose (Fuc3NAc) and 3-acetamido-3,6-dideoxy-d-glucose (Qui3NAc) are unusual sugars found on the lipopolysaccharides of Gram-negative bacteria and on the S-layers of Gram-positive bacteria. The 3,4-ketoisomerases, referred to as FdtA and QdtA, catalyze the third steps in the respective biosynthetic pathways for these sugars. Whereas both enzymes utilize the same substrate, the stereochemistries of their products are different. Specifically, the hydroxyl groups at the hexose C-4' positions assume the "galactose" and "glucose" configurations in the FdtA and QdtA products, respectively. In 2007 we reported the structure of the apoform of FdtA from Aneurinibacillus thermoaerophilus, which was followed in 2014 by the X-ray analysis of QdtA from Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum as a binary complex. Both of these enzymes belong to the cupin superfamily. Here we report a combined structural and enzymological study to explore the manner in which these enzymes control the stereochemistry of their products. Various site-directed mutant proteins of each enzyme were constructed, and their dTDP-sugar products were analyzed by NMR spectroscopy. In addition, the kinetic parameters for these protein variants were measured, and the structure of one, namely, the QdtA Y17R/R97H double mutant form, was determined to 2.3-Å resolution. Finally, in an attempt to obtain a model of FdtA with a bound dTDP-linked sugar, the 3,4-ketoisomerase domain of a bifunctional enzyme from Shewanella denitrificans was cloned, purified, and crystallized in the presence of a dTDP-linked sugar analogue. Taken together, the results from this investigation demonstrate that it is possible to convert a "galacto" enzyme into a "gluco" enzyme and vice versa.

  7. Strategies for production of active eukaryotic proteins in bacterial expression system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Orawan Khow; Sunutcha Suntrarachun

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria have long been the favorite expression system for recombinant protein production. However, the flaw of the system is that insoluble and inactive proteins are co-produced due to codon bias, protein folding, phosphorylation, glycosylation, mRNA stability and promoter strength. Factors are cited and the methods to convert to soluble and active proteins are described, for example a tight control of Escherichia coli milieu, refolding from inclusion body and through fusion technology.

  8. Food safety in raw milk production: risk factors associated to bacterial DNA contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerva, Cristine; Bremm, Carolina; Reis, Emily Marques dos; Bezerra, André Vinícius Andrade; Loiko, Márcia Regina; Cruz, Cláudio Estêvão Farias da; Cenci, Alexander; Mayer, Fabiana Quoos

    2014-06-01

    While human illness from milkborne pathogens may be linked to contamination of the product after pasteurization or improper pasteurization, such diseases are usually associated with consumption of raw milk or its by-products. Molecular biology tools were applied to investigate contamination by Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., some pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli, and Campylobacter jejuni in 548 raw milk samples from 125 dairy farms established in two regions from southern Brazil. Moreover, 15 variables were evaluated for their association with raw milk contamination levels, and the risk factors were determined by multiple regression analysis. Salmonella spp. were more frequently detected, followed by pathogenic E. coli. There was difference in contamination index between the regions, in which risk factors such as temporary cattle confinement, low milk production, low milking machine cleaning frequency, and milk storage area without tile walls were identified. The risk factors were specific to each region studied. Nevertheless, the data can be used to improve milk quality of dairy farms/herds with similar management practices.

  9. Lactic acid bacterial fermentation on the production of functional antioxidant herbal Anoectochilus formosanus Hayata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chang-Chai; Wang, Chung-Yi; Wang, Ya-Ping; Tzeng, Wen-Sheng; Shyu, Yuan-Tay

    2011-03-01

    This study evaluated a novel use of the traditional Asian herb Anoectochilus formosanus. This plant is a traditional food item, generally used for the treatment of liver disorder, hepatitis, hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disorder, etc. In this study, the root, stem, and leaf of A. formosanus were used as substrates for lactic fermentation. The fermentation products were analyzed for their total antioxidant activity, reducing power, and scavenging effect on superoxide anion radicals and hydrogen peroxide. The pH of the fermentation medium reached its lowest value, 3.5, at the 35th hour of fermentation. Antioxidant activity of A. formosanus was found to be 61-78%. Lactobacillus longum-led fermentation exhibited the greatest reducing power with an average of 0.3. The products of fermentations utilizing the three plant parts as substrates exhibited a similar scavenging activity (27-30%) on free radicals. This study may suggest a novel use of lactic-fermenting A. formosanus in the production of functional food.

  10. Production of secondary particles and nuclei in cosmic rays collisions with the interstellar gas using the FLUKA code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazziotta, M. N.; Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Gaggero, D.; Loparco, F.; Sala, P. R.

    2016-08-01

    The measured fluxes of secondary particles produced by the interactions of Cosmic Rays (CRs) with the astronomical environment play a crucial role in understanding the physics of CR transport. In this work we present a comprehensive calculation of the secondary hadron, lepton, gamma-ray and neutrino yields produced by the inelastic interactions between several species of stable or long-lived cosmic rays projectiles (p, D, T, 3He, 4He, 6Li, 7Li, 9Be, 10Be, 10B, 11B, 12C, 13C, 14C, 14N, 15N, 16O, 17O, 18O, 20Ne, 24Mg and 28Si) and different target gas nuclei (p, 4He, 12C, 14N, 16O, 20Ne, 24Mg, 28Si and 40Ar). The yields are calculated using FLUKA, a simulation package designed to compute the energy distributions of secondary products with large accuracy in a wide energy range. The present results provide, for the first time, a complete and self-consistent set of all the relevant inclusive cross sections regarding the whole spectrum of secondary products in nuclear collisions. We cover, for the projectiles, a kinetic energy range extending from 0.1 GeV/n up to 100 TeV/n in the lab frame. In order to show the importance of our results for multi-messenger studies about the physics of CR propagation, we evaluate the propagated spectra of Galactic secondary nuclei, leptons, and gamma rays produced by the interactions of CRs with the interstellar gas, exploiting the numerical codes DRAGON and GammaSky. We show that, adopting our cross section database, we are able to provide a good fit of a complete sample of CR observables, including: leptonic and hadronic spectra measured at Earth, the local interstellar spectra measured by Voyager, and the gamma-ray emissivities from Fermi-LAT collaboration. We also show a set of gamma-ray and neutrino full-sky maps and spectra.

  11. Root bacterial endophytes alter plant phenotype, but not physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henning, Jeremiah A.; Weston, David J.; Pelletier, Dale A.

    2016-01-01

    Plant traits, such as root and leaf area, influence how plants interact with their environment and the diverse microbiota living within plants can influence plant morphology and physiology. Here, we explored how three bacterial strains isolated from the Populus root microbiome, influenced plant...... phenotype. We chose three bacterial strains that differed in predicted metabolic capabilities, plant hormone production and metabolism, and secondary metabolite synthesis. We inoculated each bacterial strain on a single genotype of Populus trichocarpa and measured the response of plant growth related traits...... (root:shoot, biomass production, root and leaf growth rates) and physiological traits (chlorophyll content, net photosynthesis, net photosynthesis at saturating light-Asat, and saturating CO2-Amax). Overall, we found that bacterial root endophyte infection increased root growth rate up to 184% and leaf...

  12. Effect of the fast pyrolysis temperature on the primary and secondary products of lignin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Shuai; Garcia Perez, Manuel; Pecha, Brennan; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; McDonald, Armando G.; Westerhof, Roel J.M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents results on the primary pyrolysis products of organosolv lignin at temperatures between 360 and 700 °C. To study the primary products, a vacuum screen heater (heating rate of 8000 °C/s, deep vacuum of 0.7 mbar, and very fast cooling at the wall temperature of −100 °C) was used. Th

  13. Production of Bacterial Cellulose by Kombucha%红茶菌制备细菌纤维素的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐水佳; 杨雪霞; 洪枫

    2012-01-01

    To find an efficient manufacturing strain and fermentation technology as well as a cost-effective medium are important strategies to solve the bottleneck problems that the industrialization of bacterial cellulose (BC) is facing, such as high production cost and low productivity. This paper investigated the effects of various carbon and nitrogen sources as well as concentration of tea water on the BC production by Kombucha (black tea fimgus) and Gluconacetobacter xylinus. The results showed that no big difference was found in the BC produced by the two types of microorganism. Kombucha had higher productivity of BC than Gluconacetobacter xylinus. The yield from Kombucha fermentation could be 3 times higher or more than G. xylinus.%寻找高效的生产菌和发酵工艺以及廉价高效的培养基是解决当前细菌纤维素产业化面临的高生产成本和低产率等瓶颈问题的重要手段。以红茶菌和木葡糖酸醋杆菌作为生产菌株,比较研究了不同碳源、氮源以及茶叶浓度对两种菌合成细菌纤维素的影响。结果表明,以红茶菌制备的细菌纤维素与木葡糖酸醋杆菌无本质区别;红茶菌生产细菌纤维素的效率显著高于木葡糖酸醋杆菌,产量可提高3倍以上。

  14. Commercialization of bacterial cell factories for the sustainable production of polyhydroxyalkanoate thermoplastics: progress and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhishek; Srivastava, Janmejai K; Mallick, Nirupama; Singh, Akhilesh K

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitous conventional plastics, generally manufactured from finite, nonsustainable fossil fuels are non-biodegradable wonder entities but their ill effect on Mother Nature has subsequently raised major environmental concerns like their safe disposal, solid waste management and several potential hazards. Such concerns have fuelled initiatives for research globally towards development of sustainable and eco-friendly bioplastics. The new generation of plastics called 'bioplastics' are polymers of long chain of repeating monomer units that are classified as photodegradable, semi-biodegradable, chemically synthesized and polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). The commonly emerged novel bioplastics are polyesters of hydroxyalkanoates (HAs) called PHAs, which are lipoidic storage materials found in the cytosol of vast and diverse forms of bacteria. Among 150 different PHAs known so far, poly- 3-hydroxybutyrate is the most common and comprehensively characterized PHA. Interestingly, PHAs are only completely biodegradable plastics with material properties comparable to conventional plastics that can be achieved by regulating the co-monomers incorporation into PHAs backbone. PHA bioplastics are exploited in the form of user-friendly goods viz. films, absorbable sutures, bone plates, drug carriers, etc. Besides advantages, such useful entity(s) has major shortcomings as well like high production cost compared to conventional plastics. Precisely, in PHAs production, about fifty percent of the overall price is due to the carbon substrates. Consequently, exploring novel cost-effective substrates is a major compulsion for successful commercialization of this bioplastic, which is anticipated to reduce the cost of production as a result of advancing and intensifying research work. This review presents an insight and patent developments in the field of PHAs bioplastics.

  15. A Clostridium difficile Cell Wall Glycopolymer Locus Influences Bacterial Shape, Polysaccharide Production and Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolo, Lisa; Monteiro, Mario A.; Agellon, Al; Viswanathan, V. K.; Vedantam, Gayatri

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a diarrheagenic pathogen associated with significant mortality and morbidity. While its glucosylating toxins are primary virulence determinants, there is increasing appreciation of important roles for non-toxin factors in C. difficile pathogenesis. Cell wall glycopolymers (CWGs) influence the virulence of various pathogens. Five C. difficile CWGs, including PSII, have been structurally characterized, but their biosynthesis and significance in C. difficile infection is unknown. We explored the contribution of a conserved CWG locus to C. difficile cell-surface integrity and virulence. Attempts at disrupting multiple genes in the locus, including one encoding a predicted CWG exporter mviN, were unsuccessful, suggesting essentiality of the respective gene products. However, antisense RNA-mediated mviN downregulation resulted in slight morphology defects, retarded growth, and decreased surface PSII deposition. Two other genes, lcpA and lcpB, with putative roles in CWG anchoring, could be disrupted by insertional inactivation. lcpA- and lcpB- mutants had distinct phenotypes, implying non-redundant roles for the respective proteins. The lcpB- mutant was defective in surface PSII deposition and shedding, and exhibited a remodeled cell surface characterized by elongated and helical morphology, aberrantly-localized cell septae, and an altered surface-anchored protein profile. Both lcpA- and lcpB- strains also displayed heightened virulence in a hamster model of C. difficile disease. We propose that gene products of the C. difficile CWG locus are essential, that they direct the production/assembly of key antigenic surface polysaccharides, and thereby have complex roles in virulence. PMID:27741317

  16. Production of bacterial cellulose by Gluconacetobacter hansenii CGMCC 3917 using only waste beer yeast as nutrient source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dehui; Lopez-Sanchez, Patricia; Li, Rui; Li, Zhixi

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the use of waste beer yeast (WBY) for bacterial cellulose production by Gluconacetobacter hansenii CGMCC 3917, a two-step pre-treatment was designed. First WBY was treated by 4 methods: 0.1M NaOH treatment, high speed homogenizer, ultrasonication and microwave treatment followed by hydrolysis (121°C, 20 min) under mild acid condition (pH 2). The optimal pre-treatment conditions were evaluated by the reducing sugar yield after hydrolysis. 15% WBY treated by ultrasonication for 40 min had the highest reducing sugar yield (29.19%), followed by NaOH treatment (28.98%), high speed homogenizer (13.33%) and microwaves (13.01%). Treated WBY hydrolysates were directly supplied as only nutrient source for BC production. A sugar concentration of 3% WBY hydrolysates treated by ultrasonication gave the highest BC yield (7.02 g/L), almost 6 times as that from untreated WBY (1.21 g/L). Furthermore, the properties of the BC were as good as those obtained from the conventional chemical media.

  17. Production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) by bacterial consortium from excess sludge fermentation liquid at laboratory and pilot scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Qianqian; Xiong, Huilei; Wang, Hui; Shi, Hanchang; Sheng, Xinying; Sun, Run; Chen, Guoqiang

    2014-11-01

    The generation of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) from excess sludge fermentation liquid (SFL) was studied at lab and pilot scale. A PHA-accumulated bacterial consortium (S-150) was isolated from activated sludge using simulated SFL (S-SFL) contained high concentration volatile fatty acids (VFA) and nitrogen. The maximal PHA content accounted for 59.18% in S-SFL and dropped to 23.47% in actual SFL (L-SFL) of the dry cell weight (DCW) at lab scale. The pilot-scale integrated system comprised an anaerobic fermentation reactor (AFR), a ceramic membrane system (CMS) and a PHA production bio-reactor (PHAR). The PHA content from pilot-scale SFL (P-SFL) finally reached to 59.47% DCW with the maximal PHA yield coefficient (YP/S) of 0.17 g PHA/g COD. The results indicated that VFA-containing SFL was suitable for PHA production. The adverse impact of excess nitrogen and non-VFAs in SFL might be eliminated by pilot-scale domestication, which might resulted in community structure optimization and substrate selective ability improvement of S-150.

  18. Inhibitory effects of devil's claw (secondary root of Harpagophytum procumbens) extract and harpagoside on cytokine production in mouse macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Kazunori; Murata, Kazuya; Naruto, Shunsuke; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2010-04-01

    Successive oral administration (50 mg/kg) of a 50% ethanolic extract (HP-ext) of devil's claw, the secondary root of Harpagophytum procumbens, showed a significant anti-inflammatory effect in the rat adjuvant-induced chronic arthritis model. HP-ext dose-dependently suppressed the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of inflammatory cytokines [interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)] in mouse macrophage cells (RAW 264.7). Harpagoside, a major iridoid glycoside present in devil's claw, was found to be one of the active agents in HP-ext and inhibited the production of IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha by RAW 264.7.

  19. Saponin, an inhibitory agent of carbon dioxide production by white cells : its use in the microbiologic examination of blood components in an automated bacterial culture system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorne, H; van der Tuuk Adriani, WPA; van de Ven, LI; Bosch, EH; de Natris, T; Sibinga, CTS

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blood components with a white cell count >100 x 10(9) per L may cause false-positive results when the BacT/Alert system is used for the microbiologic examination. The effects of different concentrations of saponin on bacterial growth and on carbon dioxide production by blood fractions wi

  20. Transmutation studies using SSNTD and radiochemistry and the associated production of secondary neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, R; Wan, J S; Schmidt, T; Langrock, E J; Vater, P; Adam, J; Bamblevski, V P; Bradnova, V; Gelovani, L K; Kalinnikov, V K; Krivopustov, M I; Kulakov, B A; Sosnin, A N; Perelygin, V P; Pronskikh, V S; Stegailov, V I; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, V M; Modolo, G; Odoj, R; Philippen, P W; Adloff, J C; Pape, F; Debeauvais, M; Zamani-Valassiadou, M; Hashemi-Nezhad, S R; Dwivedi, K K; Guo Shi Lun; Li, L; Wang, Y L; Wilson, B

    1999-01-01

    Experiments using 1.5 GeV, 3.7 GeV and 7.4 GeV protons from the Synchrophasotron, LHE, JINR, Dubna, Russia, on extended Pb- and U- targets were carried out using SSNTD and radiochemical sensors for the study of secondary neutron $9 fluences. We also carried out first transmutation studies on the long-lived radwaste nuclei /sup 129/I and /sup 237/Np. In addition, we carried out computer code simulation studies on these systems using LAHET and DCM/CEM codes. We $9 have difficulties to understand rather large transmutation rates observed experimentally when they are compared with computer simulations. There seems to be a rather fundamental problem understanding the large transmutation rates as $9 observed experimentally in Dubna and CERN, as compared to those theoretical computer simulations mentioned above. (10 refs).

  1. Cell cytotoxicity and mycotoxin and secondary metabolite production by common penicillia on cheese agar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gareis, M.; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2002-01-01

    Known or potential new fungal starter culture species such as Penicillium camemberti, P. roqueforti, P. nalgiovense, P. caseifulvum, and P. solitum have been cultivated on a cheese agar medium together with the common cheese contaminants P. commune, P. crustosum, P. discolor, P. atramentosum, and P....... nordicum. Secondary metabolites were extracted and analyzed by HPLC-DAD and tested for cytotoxicity by using the MTT-cell culture assay. Metabolites such as cyclopiazonic acid, roquefortine C, and penitrem A, previously reported from cheese, were detected together with sclerotigenin, solistatin, meleagrin......, oxaline, compactins, diaportins, chaetoglobosins, rugulovasines, verrucolones, anacines, verrucines, cyclopeptines, viridicatins, and viridic acid, all metabolites not previously reported from cheese. The two P. nalgiovense extracts were the most toxic in the MTT-cell culture test. These extracts...

  2. Light-induced biochemical variations in secondary metabolite production and antioxidant activity in callus cultures of Stevia rebaudiana (Bert).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Naveed; Rab, Abdur; Ahmad, Nisar

    2016-01-01

    Stevia rebaudiana (S. rebaudiana) is a very important species with worldwide medicinal and commercial uses. Light is one of the major elicitors that fluctuate morphogenic potential and biochemical responses. In the present study, we investigated the effect of various spectral lights on biomass accumulation and secondary metabolite production in callus cultures of S. rebaudiana. Leaf explants were placed on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium and exposed to various spectral lights. 6-Benzyle adenine (BA) and 2, 4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2, 4-D; 2.0 mgl(-1)) were used for callus induction. The control light (16/8h) produced optimum callogenic response (92.73%) than other colored lights. Compared to other colored lights, control grown cultures displayed maximum biomass accumulation (5.78 gl(-1)) during a prolonged log phase at the 18th day of growth kinetics. Cultures grown under blue light enhanced total phenolic content (TPC; 102.32 μg/g DW), total flavonoid content (TFC; 22.07 μg/g DW) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC; 11.63 μg/g DW). On the contrary, green and red lights improved reducing power assay (RPA; 0.71Fe(II)g(-1) DW) and DPPH-radical scavenging activity (DRSA; 80%). Herein, we concluded that the utilization of colored lights is a promising strategy for enhanced production of antioxidant secondary metabolites in callus cultures of S. rebaudiana.

  3. Effects of High Salt Stress on Secondary Metabolite Production in the Marine-Derived Fungus Spicaria elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiming Zhu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available To obtain structurally novel and bioactive natural compounds from marine-derived microorganisms, the effect of high salt stress on secondary metabolite production in the marine-derived fungal strain, Spicaria elegans KLA-03, was investigated. The organism, which was isolated from marine sediment, produced different secondary metabolites when cultured in 3% and 10% saline conditions. Four characteristic metabolites, only produced in the 10% salinity culture, were isolated, and their structures were identified as (2E,2'Z-3,3'-(6,6'-dihydroxybiphenyl-3,3'-diyldiacrylic acid (1, aspulvinone E (2, aspochalasin E (3 and trichodermamide B (6, according to their 1D and 2D NMR spectra. Compound 1 is a new compound. High salt stress may therefore be a promising means to induce the production of new and chlorinated compounds in halotolerant fungi. Compound 1 showed moderate antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values of 0.038 and 0.767 mM, respectively.

  4. Life Cycle and Secondary Production of Four Species from Functional Feeding Groups in a Tropical Stream of South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankarappan Anbalagan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on life strategies of species from functional feeding groups (FFGs found in a tropical stream of the Sirumalai hills, South India. We examined the life cycle and secondary production of species of shredders (Lepidostoma nuburagangai, scrapers (Baetis sp., collectors (Choroterpes alagarensis, and predators (Neoperla biseriata. In addition, we studied the assemblage structure of functional feeding groups. We found the collectors occupied the highest percentage, followed in turn by scrapers, predators, and shredders. The diversity of FFGs was higher at riffle areas and assemblage with stream substrates differing in each functional group. An asynchronous life cycle was observed for Baetis, C. alagarensis, and N. biseriata, while L. nuburagangai was found in four to five generations per year. We acquired data on secondary production of scraper species of Baetis, which reached the highest values among all investigated species. This observation stresses the importance of scrapers as playing a key role in converting coarse particulate organic matter to fine particulate organic matter with low or high abundances of shredder population and maintaining the food chain in tropical streams.

  5. Reactive processing of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde in aqueous aerosol mimics: surface tension depression and secondary organic products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Li

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The reactive uptake of carbonyl-containing volatile organic compounds (cVOCs by aqueous atmospheric aerosols is a likely source of particulate organic material. The aqueous-phase secondary organic products of some cVOCs are surface-active. Therefore, cVOC uptake can lead to organic film formation at the gas-aerosol interface and changes in aerosol surface tension. We examined the chemical reactions of two abundant cVOCs, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, in water and aqueous ammonium sulfate (AS solutions mimicking tropospheric aerosols. Secondary organic products were identified using Aerosol Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Aerosol-CIMS, and changes in surface tension were monitored using pendant drop tensiometry. Hemiacetal oligomers and aldol condensation products were identified using Aerosol-CIMS. Acetaldehyde depresses surface tension to 65(±2 dyn cm−1 in pure water (a 10% surface tension reduction from that of pure water and 62(±1 dyn cm−1 in AS solutions (a 20.6% reduction from that of a 3.1 M AS solution. Surface tension depression by formaldehyde in pure water is negligible; in AS solutions, a 9% reduction in surface tension is observed. Mixtures of these species were also studied in combination with methylglyoxal in order to evaluate the influence of cross-reactions on surface tension depression and product formation in these systems. We find that surface tension depression in the solutions containing mixed cVOCs exceeds that predicted by an additive model based on the single-species isotherms.

  6. Secondary production in wetlands of the Lacreek National Wildlife refuge : 2003 progress report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Productivity of prairie wetlands is maintained through the natural wet/dry climatic cycles of the region. Periodic drying is required to oxidize sediments and...

  7. Secondary production in wetlands of the Lacreek National Wildlife refuge : 2002 progress report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Productivity of prairie wetlands is maintained through the natural wet/dry climatic cycles of the region. Periodic drying is required to oxidize sediments and...

  8. Harvesting microalgae using activated sludge can decrease polymer dosing and enhance methane production via co-digestion in a bacterial-microalgal process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wágner, Dorottya Sarolta; Radovici, Maria; Smets, Barth F.

    2016-01-01

    Third generation biofuels, e.g. biofuels production from algal biomass, have gained attention due to increased interest on global renewable energy. However, crop-based biofuels compete with food production and should be avoided. Microalgal cultivation for biofuel production offers an alternative...... to crops and can become economically viable when combined with the use of used water resources. Besides nutrients and water, harvesting microalgal biomass represents one of the major costs related to biofuel production and thus efficient and cheap solutions are needed. In bacterial-algal systems......, there is the potential to produce energy by co-digesting the two types of biomass. We present an innovative approach to recover microalgal biomass via a two-step flocculation using bacterial biomass after the destabilisation of microalgae with conventional cationic polymer. A short solids retention time (SRT) enhanced...

  9. The Strategy of New Product Introduction in Durable Goods with Secondary Market: Application of the Optimization Method to Supply Chain Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to address how the secondary market affects the strategy of the manufacturer’s new product introduction by using the optimization method. To do so, we develop a two-period model in which a monopolistic manufacturer sells its new durable products directly to end consumers in both periods, while an entrant operates a reverse channel selling used products in the secondary market. We assume that the manufacturer launches a higher quality product in the second period for the technological innovation. We find that the secondary market can actually increase the manufacturer’s profitability and drives the new product introduction in the second period. We also derive the effect of the durability and the degree of quality improvement on the pricing of supply chain partners.

  10. Production of D-lactic acid by bacterial fermentation of rice starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Kazuki; Sogo, Kazuaki; Miura, Shigenobu; Kimura, Yoshiharu

    2004-11-20

    D-Lactic acid was synthesized by the fermentation of rice starch using microorganisms. Two species: Lactobacillus delbrueckii and Sporolactobacillus inulinus were found to be active in producing D-lactic acid of high optical purity after an intensive screening test for D-lactic acid bacteria using glucose as substrate. Rice powder used as the starch source was hydrolyzed with a combination of enzymes: alpha-amylase, beta-amylase, and pullulanase to obtain rice saccharificate consisting of maltose as the main component. Its average gross yield was 82.5%. Of the discovered D-lactic acid bacteria, only Lactobacillus delbrueckii could ferment both maltose and the rice saccharificate. After optimizing the fermentation of the rice saccharificate using this bacterium, pilot scale fermentation was conducted to convert the rice saccharificate into D-lactic acid with a D-content higher than 97.5% in a yield of 70%. With this yield, the total yield of D-lactic acid from brown rice was estimated to be 47%, which is almost equal to the L-lactic acid yield from corn. The efficient synthesis of D-lactic acid can open a way to the large scale application of high-melting poly(lactic acid) that is a stereocomplex of poly(L-lactide) and poly(D-lactide). Schematic representation of the production of D-lactic acid starting from brown rice as described here.

  11. Catalytic irreversible inhibition of bacterial and plant arginine decarboxylase activities by novel substrate and product analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitonti, A J; Casara, P J; McCann, P P; Bey, P

    1987-02-15

    Arginine decarboxylase (ADC) activity from Escherichia coli and two plant species (oats and barley) was inhibited by five new substrate (arginine) and product (agmatine) analogues. The five compounds, (E)-alpha-monofluoromethyldehydroarginine (delta-MFMA), alpha-monofluoromethylarginine (MFMA), alpha-monofluoromethylagatine (FMA), alpha-ethynylagmatine (EA) and alpha-allenylagmatine (AA), were all more potent inhibitors of ADC activity than was alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), the only irreversible inhibitor of this enzyme described previously. The inhibition caused by the five compounds was apparently enzyme-activated and irreversible, since the loss of enzyme activity followed pseudo-first-order kinetics, was time-dependent, the natural substrate of ADC (arginine) blocked the effects of the inhibitors, and the inhibition remained after chromatography of inhibited ADC on Sephadex G-25 or on overnight dialysis of the enzyme. DFMA, FMA, delta-MFMA and MFMA were effective at very low concentrations (10 nM-10 microM) at inhibiting ADC activity in growing E. coli. FMA was also shown to deplete putrescine effectively in E. coli, particularly when combined with an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, alpha-monofluoromethyl-putrescine. The potential uses of the compounds for the study of the role of polyamine biosynthesis in bacteria and plants is discussed.

  12. Determination of the bacterial processes which are sources of nitrous oxide production in marine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Patricia; Tamburini, Christian; Michotey, Valerie

    2002-02-01

    Partial denitrification and the initial step of nitrification are the main biological processes which produce nitrous oxide. In order to determine the contribution that these processes have in nitrous oxide production, the efficiency of different inhibitors on nitrifying activity has been tested, and the effect on denitrifying activity has been investigated, using culture strains and natural marine samples. A good nitrification inhibitor should not affect denitrification. A low partial pressure of C2H2 provided the best conditions, inhibiting 75%, Nitrosococcus oceanus (culture sample) and 100% (natural sample) of the nitrifying activity and having only a small inhibitory effect (12%) on denitrifying activity. These conditions have been applied on samples from the dilution plume of the Rhĵne River, an area characterized as a source of nitrous oxide. Using these inhibitors, it has been shown that in this area, incomplete denitrification is the main process producing nitrous oxide in the surface layers at the mouth of the river and in the bottom nepheloid layer, whereas in the marine surface layer the dominant process is nitrification.

  13. Real-Time PCR Methods for Detection of Foodborne Bacterial Pathogens in Meat and Meat Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Marta; Hansen, Flemming; Cook, Nigel; Rodríguez-Lázaro, David

    As a consequence of the potential hazards posed by the presence of microbial pathogens, microbiological quality control programmes are being increasingly applied throughout the meat production chain in order to minimize the risk of infection for the consumer. Classical microbiological methods to detect the presence of microorganisms, involving enrichment and isolation of presumptive colonies of bacteria on solid media, and final confirmation by biochemical and/or serological identification, although remaining the approach of choice in routine analytical laboratories, can be laborious and time consuming. The adoption of molecular techniques in microbial diagnostics has become a promising alternative approach, as they possess inherent advantages such as shorter time to results, excellent detection limits, specificity and potential for automation. Several molecular detection techniques have been devised in the last two decades, such as nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) (Cook, 2003; Rodriguez-Lazaro, Hernandez, D’Agostino, & Cook, 2006) and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (Notomi et al., 2000), but the one which has undergone the most extensive development as a practical food analytical tool is the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (Hoorfar & Cook, 2003; Malorny, Tassios, et al., 2003).

  14. Bioelectricity production from microbial fuel cell using mixed bacterial culture isolated from distillery wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsudeen, N; Radhakrishnan, T K; Matheswaran, Manickam

    2015-11-01

    The effect of various system parameters such as wastewater Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) concentration, pH, conductivity, membrane size and thickness on efficient energy production using mixed isolated culture from the distillery wastewater in the MFC was studied. The power density increased with increase in the anolyte pH from 6 to 8. The peak power density and COD removal efficiency was observed as 63.8±0.65 mW/m(2) and 63.5±1.5% at pH 8, respectively. The MFC performance increased with increasing COD concentration (800-3200 mg/l), conductivity (1.1-9.7 mS/cm) and membrane area (8-24 cm(2)). The MFC operating with wastewater COD concentration of 3200 mg/l and its conductivity of 9.7 mS/cm produced the highest power density of 202±6 mW/m(2) with a corresponding current density of 412±12 mA/m(2). The results showed that the efficient electricity generation and simultaneous treatment of distillery wastewater can be attained in the MFC.

  15. Production of cocktail of polyclonal antibodies using bacterial expressed recombinant protein for multiple virus detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Reetika; Mandal, Bikash; Paul, Prabir Kumar; Chigurupati, Phaneendra; Jain, Rakesh Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Cocktail of polyclonal antibodies (PAb) were produced that will help in multiple virus detection and overcome the limitation of individual virus purification, protein expression and purification as well as immunization in multiple rabbits. A dual fusion construct was developed using conserved coat protein (CP) sequences of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) and Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) in an expression vector, pET-28a(+). The fusion protein (∼40kDa) was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Likewise, a triple fusion construct was developed by fusing conserved CP sequences of CMV and PRSV with conserved nucleocapsid protein (N) sequence of Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV) and expressed as a fusion protein (∼50kDa) in pET-28a(+). PAb made separately to each of these three viruses recognized the double and triple fusion proteins in Western blot indicating retention of desired epitopes for binding with target antibodies. The fusion proteins (∼40kDa and ∼50kDa) were used to produce cocktail of PAb by immunizing rabbits, which simultaneously detected natural infection of CMV and PRSV or CMV, PRSV and GBNV in Cucurbitaceous, Solanaceous and other hosts in DAC-ELISA. This is the first report on production of a cocktail of PAb to recombinant fusion protein of two or three distinct viruses.

  16. The opposing effects of bacterial activity and gas production on anaerobic TCE degradation in soil columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Naresh; Jaffé, Peter; Maier, Walter; Jho, Eun Hea

    2007-11-01

    This laboratory study explores the effect of growth substrate concentration on the anaerobic degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in sand packed columns. In all columns the growth substrate rapidly degraded to gas, that formed a separate phase. Biomass accumulated in the 0-4.8 cm section of the columns in proportion to the influent growth substrate concentration and biomass concentrations in the remaining sections of all columns were similar to the column receiving the lowest substrate concentration. Increases in growth substrate concentration up to 3030 mg-CODl(-1) promoted TCE degradation, but a further increase to 14300 mg-CODl(-1) reduced the amount of TCE completely dechlorinated but did not affect the production of chlorinated TCE intermediates. The mathematical model developed here satisfactorily described the enhancement in TCE dehalogenation for substrate concentration up to 3030 mg-CODl(-1); reproducing TCE dehalogenation for 14300 mg-CODl(-1) required that the moisture content used in simulation be lowered to 0.1. The study shows that volatilization of TCE can be significant and volatilization losses should be taken into account when anaerobic activity in in-situ bioremediation applications is stimulated via addition of growth substrates. An implication of the modeling simulations is that maintaining a lower, but uniform, substrate concentration over the contaminated region may lead to faster contaminant degradation.

  17. Acute drug induced hepatitis secondary to a weight loss product purchased over the internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cross Tim JS

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many people now seek alternative methods of weight loss. The internet provides a readily available source of weight reduction products, the ingredients of which are often unclear. The authors describe a case of acute hepatitis in a 20 year old woman caused by such a product purchased over the internet. Case Presentation A 20-year old woman presented with a two day history of abdominal pain, vomiting and jaundice. There were no identifiable risk factors for chronic liver disease. Liver function tests demonstrated an acute hepatitis (aminoaspartate transaminase 1230 IU/L. A chronic liver disease screen was negative. The patient had started a weight loss product (Pro-Lean, purchased over the internet two weeks prior to presentation. The patient was treated conservatively, and improved. The sequence of events suggests an acute hepatitis caused by an herbal weight loss product. Conclusion This case report highlights the dangers of weight loss products available to the public over the internet, and the importance of asking specifically about alternative medicines in patients who present with an acute hepatitis.

  18. Litter fall production and decomposition in a fragment of secondary Atlantic Forest of São Paulo, sp, southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Lamano Ferreira

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Litter fall consists of all organic material deposited on the forest floor, being of extremely important for the structure and maintenance of the ecosystem through nutrient cycling. This study aimed to evaluate the production and decomposition of litter fall in a secondary Atlantic forest fragment of secondary Atlantic Forest, at the Guarapiranga Ecological Park, in São Paulo, SP. The litter samples were taken monthly from May 2012 to May 2013. To assess the contribution of litter fall forty collectors were installed randomly within an area of 0.5 ha. The collected material was sent to the laboratory to be dried at 65 °C for 72 hours, being subsequently separated into fractions of leaves, twigs, reproductive parts and miscellaneous, and weighed to obtain the dry biomass. Litterbags were placed and tied close to the collectors to estimate the decomposition rate in order to evaluate the loss of dry biomass at 30, 60, 90, 120 and 150 days. After collection, the material was sent to the laboratory to be dried and weighed again. Total litter fall throughout the year reached 5.7 Mg.ha-1.yr-1 and the major amount of the material was collected from September till March. Leaves had the major contribution for total litter fall (72%, followed by twigs (14%, reproductive parts (11% and miscellaneous (3%. Reproductive parts had a peak during the wet season. Positive correlation was observed between total litter and precipitation, temperature and radiation (r = 0.66, p<0.05; r = 0.76, p<0.05; r = 0.58, p<0.05, respectively. The multiple regression showed that precipitation and radiation contributed significantly to litter fall production. Decomposition rate was in the interval expected for secondary tropical forest and was correlated to rainfall. It was concluded that this fragment of secondary forest showed a seasonality effect driven mainly by precipitation and radiation, both important components of foliage renewal for the plant community and that

  19. Life history, secondary production and trophic basis of two dominant mayflies in a subtropical stream of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Yunjun; LI Xiaoyu

    2007-01-01

    Mayflies constitute a major part of macroinvertebrate biomass and production in lotic ecosystems, and play an important role in material cycle and energy flow. There are more than 250 species of mayflies in rivers and streams of China. In order to learn their ecological functions, an investigation on life cycle,production and trophic basis of dominant species of mayflies in a second-order branch_of Hanjiang River basin,Hubei, China was carried out during June 2003 to June 2004. The results showed that the dominant mayfly species Epeorus sp. and Caenis sp. developed two generations per year; in term of Epeorus sp., pupation mainly occurred in spring and then from late summer to early autumn, while Caenis sp. pupated in spring and autumn. The abundance and biomass of the Epeorus sp. population peaked twice (1 226 ind/m2, 3.142 5g/m2)in April and June. Caenis sp. also had two peaks (307ind/m2, 1.590 g/m2), but in February and June. Cohort production and cohort P/B ratio ofEpeorus sp. were 161.009 g/m2 wet weight and 7.7, respectively, and annual production and P/B ratio were 267.46g/m2.a wet weight and 15.4, respectively; cohort production and P/B ratio of Caenis sp. were 26.7995g/m2 wet weight and 4.7, its annual production and P/B ratio were 53.60g/m2.a wet weight and 9.4, respectively. For Epeorus sp., the proportions contributing to secondary production of the main food types were: amorphous detritus, 33.46%; fungi, 10.83%; vascular plant detritus, 1.80%; diatoms, 53.90%; for Caenis sp., the proportions were 70.79%, 6.90%, 3.52% and 18.77%, respectively.

  20. Characterization of certain bacterial strains for potential use as starter or probiotic cultures in dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteagudo-Mera, A; Caro, I; Rodríguez-Aparicio, L B; Rúa, J; Ferrero, M A; García-Armesto, M R

    2011-08-01

    The present work was aimed at characterizing 12 strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to obtain improved potential starter or probiotic cultures that could be used for making dairy products from ewe's milk and cow's milk. Eight strains with antimicrobial properties, isolated from ewe's milk and from cheese made from ewe's and/or cow's milk, were studied. They were identified as Enterococcus faecalis (five strains), Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei (one strain of each species). Additionally, four strains were obtained from the American Type Culture Collection: Lactobacillus casei 393 (isolated from cheese), L. lactis subsp. lactis 11454 (origin nonspecified and a producer of nisin), and two strains isolated from human feces (L. paracasei subsp. paracasei 27092 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus 53103, antibacterial agent producer). All E. faecalis strains showed at least one virulence factor (either hemolysin or gelatinase), which emphasizes the importance of these studies in this species. Both L. lactis strains and most Lactobacillus spp. were good acidifiers in ewe's milk and cow's milk at 30°C. High β-galactosidase activity, as well as aminopeptidase activities that favor the development of desirable flavors in cheese, were detected in all Lactobacillus spp. strains. Furthermore, L. rhamnosus ATCC 53103 showed α-fucosidase activity (thought to help colonization of the intestine) and lack of α-glucosidase activity (a trait considered positive for diabetic and obese humans). This last enzymatic activity was also lacking in L. lactis ATCC 11454. L. mesenteroides was the only strain D(2)-lactic acid producer. The selection of any particular strain for probiotic or dairy cultures should be performed according to the technological and/or functional abilities needed.

  1. Single-step production of a recyclable nanobiocatalyst for organophosphate pesticides biodegradation using functionalized bacterial magnetosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Ginet

    Full Text Available Enzymes are versatile catalysts in laboratories and on an industrial scale; improving their immobilization would be beneficial to broadening their applicability and ensuring their (reuse. Lipid-coated nano-magnets produced by magnetotactic bacteria are suitable for a universally applicable single-step method of enzyme immobilization. By genetically functionalizing the membrane surrounding these magnetite particles with a phosphohydrolase, we engineered an easy-to-purify, robust and recyclable biocatalyst to degrade ethyl-paraoxon, a commonly used pesticide. For this, we genetically fused the opd gene from Flavobacterium sp. ATCC 27551 encoding a paraoxonase to mamC, an abundant protein of the magnetosome membrane in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1. The MamC protein acts as an anchor for the paraoxonase to the magnetosome surface, thus producing magnetic nanoparticles displaying phosphohydrolase activity. Magnetosomes functionalized with Opd were easily recovered from genetically modified AMB-1 cells: after cellular disruption with a French press, the magnetic nanoparticles are purified using a commercially available magnetic separation system. The catalytic properties of the immobilized Opd were measured on ethyl-paraoxon hydrolysis: they are comparable with the purified enzyme, with K(m (and k(cat values of 58 µM (and 178 s(-1 and 43 µM (and 314 s(-1 for the immobilized and purified enzyme respectively. The Opd, a metalloenzyme requiring a zinc cofactor, is thus properly matured in AMB-1. The recycling of the functionalized magnetosomes was investigated and their catalytic activity proved to be stable over repeated use for pesticide degradation. In this study, we demonstrate the easy production of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles with suitably genetically modified magnetotactic bacteria that are efficient as a reusable nanobiocatalyst for pesticides bioremediation in contaminated effluents.

  2. Plant Secondary Metabolites in some Medicinal Plants of Mongolia Used for Enhancing Animal Health and Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makkar, HPS.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The levels and activities of a number of plant secondary metabolites (PSMs are known to increase in response to increase in stress. The Mongolian plants considered to possess medicinal properties may contain novel compounds since they are exposed to severe conditions; such plants could become good candidates for modern drug discovery programmes. Information on distribution, palatability to livestock and opinion of local people on their nutritive and medicinal values was compiled for 15 plant materials from 14 plant species considered important for medicinal purposes. These plants were evaluated for nutritive value and PSMs: tannins, saponins, lectins, alkaloids and cyanogens. High levels of tannins were found in roots of Bergenia crassifolia and in leaves of B. crassifolia, Vaccinium vitisidaea and Rheum undulatum. High lectin activity (haemagglutination was present in B. crassifolia roots, and leaves of R. undulatum, Iris lacteal and Thymus gobicus contained weak lectin activity. Tanacetum vulgare, Serratula centauroids, Taraxacum officinale and Delphinum elatum leaves contained saponin activity (haemolysis. Alkaloids and cyanogens were not present in any of the samples. The paper discusses the known medicinal uses of these plants in light of the PSMs levels, and identifies plant samples for future applications in human and livestock health, welfare and safety.

  3. Production of glycolipidic bio surfactants by environment bacteria: diversity and physiological part; Production de biosurfactants glycolipidiques par les bacteries de l`environnement: diversite et role physiologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arino, S.

    1996-10-09

    About a hundred bacterial strains, isolated from soils, polluted or not by hydrocarbons, were tested for their capacity to excrete glycosides. The biggest productions were obtained for a soluble carbon source (glycerol) in a culture medium limited in the nitrogen source. In these conditions, 18 g/l of rhamnose lipids were produced by train Pseudomonas aeruginosa GL1 in a 200 h culture. Pseudomonas aeruginosa GL1, Cellulomonas celulans SA43 and Rhodococcus erythropolis DSM 43060 were studied in detail. The bio-surfactants produced were identified respectively as rhamnose lipids, oligosaccharide lipids and trehalose lipids, using various original analytical methods. Sugars and fatty acids composing these glycolipids had been shown to be usual components of the outer part of the cell wall in these microbial species. Moreover, cell hydrophobicity of the producing bacteria varied in time during culture. These results showed that both the cell wall and the extracellular glycolipids take part in the process of hydrocarbon uptake in the polluted environments. As other bacteria of the same species from different origins present the same characteristics, it may be concluded that glycolipid excretion does not constitute a specific response for hydrocarbon assimilation. In fact, a more general physiological role of glycolipids, concerning modifications of hydrophobic interfaces between the producing bacteria and their surrounding environment, could explain the production of glycolipids, and could also be utilized in hydrocarbon uptake. (author)

  4. Influence of Leadership Style on Teacher's Job Productivity in Public Secondary Schools in Taraba State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamaki, E. B.

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to find out the appropriate leadership style that could make teachers to be effective in their job productivity. One hundred and sixty-five teachers were used in the study. Frequency counts, percentage and chi-square test were used in data analysis. Research survey was used as a method of research and stratified…

  5. Influence of ultrasound enhancement on chlorine dioxide consumption and disinfection by-products formation for secondary effluents disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoqin; Zhao, Junyuan; Li, Zifu; Lan, Juanru; Li, Yajie; Yang, Xin; Wang, Dongling

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) has been promoted as an alternative disinfectant because of its high disinfection efficiency and less formation of organic disinfection by-products (DBPs). However, particle-associated microorganisms could be protected during the disinfection process, which decreases the disinfection efficiency or increases the required dosage. Besides, the formation of inorganic disinfection by-products is a significant concern in environment health. Ultrasound (US)-combined disinfection methods are becoming increasingly attractive because they are efficient and environmentally friendly. In this study, US was introduced as an enhancement method to identify its influence on ClO2 demand reduction and to minimize the production of potential DBPs for secondary effluents disinfection. Fecal coliform was used as an indicator, and DBPs, including trichloromethane (TCM), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), chlorite (ClO2(-)), and chlorate (ClO3(-)), were analyzed to observe the potential DBPs formation. Results show that US pretreatment could reduce half of ClO2 dosage compared with ClO2 disinfection alone for the same disinfection efficiency, and that an input power density of 2.64 kJ/L pretreatment with the 1.5mg/L ClO2 was enough to meet the discharge requirement in China (i.e., fecal coliform below 1000 CFU/L for Class 1A) for secondary effluent disinfection, and the ClO2(-) concentration in the disinfection effluent was only 1.37 mg/L at the same time. Furthermore, the different effects of US on the two processes (US as pretreatment and simultaneous US/ClO2 disinfection) were also analyzed, including deagglomerating, cell damage, and synergistic disinfection as well as degasing/sonolysis. It was proved that the production of TCM, DCAA, and TCAA was insignificantly influenced with the introduction of US, but US pretreatment did reduce the production of ClO2(-) and ClO3(-) effectually. In general, US pretreatment could be a better option for

  6. Significant alteration of soil bacterial communities and organic carbon decomposition by different long-term fertilization management conditions of extremely low-productivity arable soil in South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xun, Weibing; Zhao, Jun; Xue, Chao; Zhang, Guishan; Ran, Wei; Wang, Boren; Shen, Qirong; Zhang, Ruifu

    2016-06-01

    Different fertilization managements of red soil, a kind of Ferralic Cambisol, strongly affected the soil properties and associated microbial communities. The association of the soil microbial community and functionality with long-term fertilization management in the unique low-productivity red soil ecosystem is important for both soil microbial ecology and agricultural production. Here, 454 pyrosequencing analysis of 16S recombinant ribonucleic acid genes and GeoChip4-NimbleGen-based functional gene analysis were used to study the soil bacterial community composition and functional genes involved in soil organic carbon degradation. Long-term nitrogen-containing chemical fertilization-induced soil acidification and fertility decline and significantly altered the soil bacterial community, whereas long-term organic fertilization and fallow management improved the soil quality and maintained the bacterial diversity. Short-term quicklime remediation of the acidified soils did not change the bacterial communities. Organic fertilization and fallow management supported eutrophic ecosystems, in which copiotrophic taxa increased in relative abundance and have a higher intensity of labile-C-degrading genes. However, long-term nitrogen-containing chemical fertilization treatments supported oligotrophic ecosystems, in which oligotrophic taxa increased in relative abundance and have a higher intensity of recalcitrant-C-degrading genes but a lower intensity of labile-C-degrading genes. Quicklime application increased the relative abundance of copiotrophic taxa and crop production, although these effects were utterly inadequate. This study provides insights into the interaction of soil bacterial communities, soil functionality and long-term fertilization management in the red soil ecosystem; these insights are important for improving the fertility of unique low-productivity red soil.

  7. Viral and bacterial production in the North Water: in situ measurements, batch-culture experiments and characterization and distribution of a virus host system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelboe, Mathias; Nielsen, Torkel G.; Bjørnsen, Peter K.

    Growth and viral lysis of bacterioplankton at subzero temperatures were measured in the North Water polynya in July 1998. In situ measurements of bacterial carbon consumption in surface waters ranged from 15 to 63 μg C l -1 d -1 in the eastern and 6 to 7 μg C l -1 d -1 in the northern part of the polynya. Both bacterial abundance and activity appeared to increase in response to the decay of the phytoplankton bloom that developed in the North Water. Organic carbon was the limiting substrate for bacteria in the polynya since addition of glucose, but not inorganic nutrients, to batch cultures increased both the carrying capacity of the substrate and the growth rate of the bacteria. Bacterial growth rates ranged from 0.11 to 0.40 d -1, corresponding to bacterial generation times of 1.7-6.3 d. The in situ viral production rate was estimated both from the frequency of visibly infected cells and from the rate of viral production in batch cultures; it ranged from 0.04 to 0.52 d -1 and from 0.25 to 0.47 d -1, respectively. From 6% to 28% of bacterial production was found to be lost due to viral lysis. The average virus-bacteria ratio was 5.1±3.1, with the abundance of viruses being correlated positively with bacterial production. A Pseudoalteromonas sp. bacterial host and an infective virus were isolated from the polynya; characteristics and distribution of the virus-host system were examined. The Pseudoalteromonas sp. showed psychrotolerant growth and sustained significant production of viruses at 0°C. The virus-host system was found throughout the polynya. Overall the results suggested that a large amount of organic carbon released during the development and breakdown of the spring phytoplankton bloom was consumed by planktonic bacteria and that the microbial food web was an important and dynamic component of the planktonic food web in the North Water.

  8. Bacterial community structure and variation in a full-scale seawater desalination plant for drinking water production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belila, A; El-Chakhtoura, J; Otaibi, N; Muyzer, G; Gonzalez-Gil, G; Saikaly, P E; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2016-05-01

    Microbial processes inevitably play a role in membrane-based desalination plants, mainly recognized as membrane biofouling. We assessed the bacterial community structure and diversity during different treatment steps in a full-scale seawater desalination plant producing 40,000 m(3)/d of drinking water. Water samples were taken over the full treatment train consisting of chlorination, spruce media and cartridge filters, de-chlorination, first and second pass reverse osmosis (RO) membranes and final chlorine dosage for drinking water distribution. The water samples were analyzed for water quality parameters (total bacterial cell number, total organic carbon, conductivity, pH, etc.) and microbial community composition by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. The planktonic microbial community was dominated by Proteobacteria (48.6%) followed by Bacteroidetes (15%), Firmicutes (9.3%) and Cyanobacteria (4.9%). During the pretreatment step, the spruce media filter did not impact the bacterial community composition dominated by Proteobacteria. In contrast, the RO and final chlorination treatment steps reduced the Proteobacterial relative abundance in the produced water where Firmicutes constituted the most dominant bacterial group. Shannon and Chao1 diversity indices showed that bacterial species richness and diversity decreased during the seawater desalination process. The two-stage RO filtration strongly reduced the water conductivity (>99%), TOC concentration (98.5%) and total bacterial cell number (>99%), albeit some bacterial DNA was found in the water after RO filtration. About 0.25% of the total bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were present in all stages of the desalination plant: the seawater, the RO permeates and the chlorinated drinking water, suggesting that these bacterial strains can survive in different environments such as high/low salt concentration and with/without residual disinfectant. These bacterial strains were not caused by contamination during

  9. Bacterial community structure and variation in a full-scale seawater desalination plant for drinking water production

    KAUST Repository

    Belila, Abdelaziz

    2016-02-18

    Microbial processes inevitably play a role in membrane-based desalination plants, mainly recognized as membrane biofouling. We assessed the bacterial community structure and diversity during different treatment steps in a full-scale seawater desalination plant producing 40,000 m3/d of drinking water. Water samples were taken over the full treatment train consisting of chlorination, spruce media and cartridge filters, de-chlorination, first and second pass reverse osmosis (RO) membranes and final chlorine dosage for drinking water distribution. The water samples were analyzed for water quality parameters (total bacterial cell number, total organic carbon, conductivity, pH, etc.) and microbial community composition by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. The planktonic microbial community was dominated by Proteobacteria (48.6%) followed by Bacteroidetes (15%), Firmicutes (9.3%) and Cyanobacteria (4.9%). During the pretreatment step, the spruce media filter did not impact the bacterial community composition dominated by Proteobacteria. In contrast, the RO and final chlorination treatment steps reduced the Proteobacterial relative abundance in the produced water where Firmicutes constituted the most dominant bacterial group. Shannon and Chao1 diversity indices showed that bacterial species richness and diversity decreased during the seawater desalination process. The two-stage RO filtration strongly reduced the water conductivity (>99%), TOC concentration (98.5%) and total bacterial cell number (>99%), albeit some bacterial DNA was found in the water after RO filtration. About 0.25% of the total bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were present in all stages of the desalination plant: the seawater, the RO permeates and the chlorinated drinking water, suggesting that these bacterial strains can survive in different environments such as high/low salt concentration and with/without residual disinfectant. These bacterial strains were not caused by contamination during

  10. Enhancement of methane production in mesophilic anaerobic digestion of secondary sewage sludge by advanced thermal hydrolysis pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelleira-Pereira, Jose M; Pérez-Elvira, Sara I; Sánchez-Oneto, Jezabel; de la Cruz, Roberto; Portela, Juan R; Nebot, Enrique

    2015-03-15

    Studies on the development and evolution of anaerobic digestion (AD) pretreatments are nowadays becoming widespread, due to the outstanding benefits that these processes could entail in the management of sewage sludge. Production of sewage sludge in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is becoming an extremely important environmental issue. The work presented in this paper is a continuation of our previous studies with the aim of understanding and developing the advanced thermal hydrolysis (ATH) process. ATH is a novel AD pretreatment based on a thermal hydrolysis (TH) process plus hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) addition that takes advantage of a peroxidation/direct steam injection synergistic effect. The main goal of the present research was to compare the performance of TH and ATH, conducted at a wide range of operating conditions, as pretreatments of mesophilic AD with an emphasis on methane production enhancement as a key parameter and its connection with the sludge solubilization. Results showed that both TH and ATH patently improved methane production in subsequent mesophilic BMP (biochemical methane potential) tests in comparison with BMP control tests (raw secondary sewage sludge). Besides other interesting results and discussions, a promising result was obtained since ATH, operated at temperature (115 °C), pretreatment time (5 min) and pressure (1 bar) considerably below those typically used in TH (170 °C, 30 min, 8 bar), managed to enhance the methane production in subsequent mesophilic BMP tests [biodegradability factor (fB) = cumulative CH4production/cumulative CH4production (Control) = 1.51 ± 0.01] to quite similar levels than conventional TH pretreatment [fB = 1.52 ± 0.03].

  11. Effects of inorganic seed aerosols on the particulate products of aged 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene secondary organic aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mingqiang; Hao, Liqing; Cai, Shunyou; Gu, Xuejun; Zhang, Weixiong; Hu, Changjin; Wang, Zhenya; Fang, Li; Zhang, Weijun

    2017-03-01

    Inorganic aerosols such as (NH4)2SO4, NaNO3 and CaCl2 are commonly present in the Chinese urban atmosphere. They could significantly affect the formation and aging of ambient secondary organic aerosols (SOA), but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. In this work we studied SOA formation from the photooxidation reaction of 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (135-TMB) with 100 μg/m3 of the above three types of inorganic aerosols as seeds in a laboratory chamber. We focused on the aging products of SOA particles by exposing them to high levels of oxidizing hydroxyl radicals (OH). The particulate products of SOA were measured using an aerosol laser time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ALTOFMS) and Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) were applied to organic mass spectra for clustering. In the presence of (NH4)2SO4 seeds, 4-methyl-1H-imidazole, 4-methyl-imidazole-2-acetaldehyde and other imidazole derivative compounds formed from reactions of NH4+ with methylglyoxal were detected as new aged products. We also observed aromatic nitrogen-containing organic compounds as the major aged products in the presence of NaNO3 seeds as a consequence of reaction with OH and NO2 radicals, which were generated by UV irradiation of acidic aqueous nitrate, inducing nitration reactions with phenolic compounds. As CaCl2 has the strongest hygroscopic properties of the three salt particles tested, the greater water content on the surface of the aerosol may facilitate the condensing of more gas-phase organic acid products to the hygroscopic CaCl2 seeds, forming H+ ions that catalyze the heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes, products of photooxidation of 135-TMB, and forming high-molecular-weight (HMW) compounds. These results provide new insight into the aromatic SOA aging mechanisms.

  12. Long-term organic-inorganic fertilization ensures great soil productivity and bacterial diversity after natural-to-agricultural ecosystem conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xun, Weibing; Xu, Zhihui; Li, Wei; Ren, Yi; Huang, Ting; Ran, Wei; Wang, Boren; Shen, Qirong; Zhang, Ruifu

    2016-09-01

    Natural ecosystems comprise the planet's wild plant and animal resources, but large tracts of land have been converted to agroecosystems to support the demand for agricultural products. This conversion limits the number of plant species and decreases the soil biological diversity. Here we used high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing to evaluate the responses of soil bacterial communities in long-term converted and fertilized red soils (a type of Ferralic Cambisol). We observed that soil bacterial diversity was strongly affected by different types of fertilization management. Oligotrophic bacterial taxa demonstrated large relative abundances in chemically fertilized soil, whereas copiotrophic bacterial taxa were found in large relative abundances in organically fertilized and fallow management soils. Only organic-inorganic fertilization exhibited the same local taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity as that of a natural ecosystem. However, the independent use of organic or inorganic fertilizer reduced local taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity and caused biotic homogenization. This study demonstrated that the homogenization of bacterial communities caused by natural-to-agricultural ecosystem conversion can be mitigated by employing rational organic-inorganic fertilization management.

  13. Secondary Waste Form Screening Test Results—THOR® Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Product in a Geopolymer Matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, Richard P.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Mattigod, Shas V.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Parker, Kent E.

    2011-07-14

    Screening tests are being conducted to evaluate waste forms for immobilizing secondary liquid wastes from the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Plans are underway to add a stabilization treatment unit to the Effluent Treatment Facility to provide the needed capacity for treating these wastes from WTP. The current baseline is to use a Cast Stone cementitious waste form to solidify the wastes. Through a literature survey, DuraLith alkali-aluminosilicate geopolymer, fluidized-bed steam reformation (FBSR) granular product encapsulated in a geopolymer matrix, and a Ceramicrete phosphate-bonded ceramic were identified both as candidate waste forms and alternatives to the baseline. These waste forms have been shown to meet waste disposal acceptance criteria, including compressive strength and universal treatment standards for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals (as measured by the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure [TCLP]). Thus, these non-cementitious waste forms should also be acceptable for land disposal. Information is needed on all four waste forms with respect to their capability to minimize the release of technetium. Technetium is a radionuclide predicted to be in the secondary liquid wastes in small quantities, but the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) risk assessment analyses show that technetium, even at low mass, produces the largest contribution to the estimated IDF disposal impacts to groundwater.

  14. Oxygenated compounds in aged biomass burning plumes over the Eastern Mediterranean: evidence for strong secondary production of methanol and acetone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Holzinger

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Airborne measurements of acetone, methanol, PAN, acetonitrile (by Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry, and CO (by Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy have been performed during the Mediterranean Intensive Oxidants Study (MINOS, August 2001. In the course of the campaign 10 biomass burning plumes, identified by strongly elevated acetonitrile mixing ratios, were found. The characteristic biomass burning signatures obtained from these plumes reveal secondary production of acetone and methanol, while CO photochemically declines in the plumes. Mean excess mixing ratios – normalized to CO – of 1.8%, 0.20%, 3.8%, and 0.65% for acetone, acetonitrile, methanol, and PAN, respectively, were found in the plumes. By scaling to an assumed global annual source of 663–807 Tg CO, biomass burning emissions of 25–31 and 29–35 Tg/yr for acetone and methanol are estimated, respectively. Our measurements suggest that the present biomass burning contributions of acetone and methanol are significantly underestimated due to the neglect of secondary formation. Median acetonitrile mixing ratios throughout the troposphere were around 150 pmol/mol; this is in accord with current biomass burning inventories and an atmospheric lifetime of ~6 months.

  15. THEORETICAL METHOD FOR PREDICTION OF THE CUTTING EDGE RECESSION DURING MILLING WOOD AND SECONDARY WOOD PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolesław Porankiewicz

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical method for prediction of cutting edge recession during milling wood and wood-based products, due to the presence of hard mineral contamination, High Temperature Tribochemical Reactions (HTTR, and frictional wearing, based on 3D random distribution of contaminant particles is presented and positively verified based on the example of three experiments from the literature, showing good correlation between the predicted and observed cutting edge recession.

  16. Recent advances in plant biotechnology and genetic engineering for production of secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheludko, Y V

    2010-01-01

    For a long time people are using plants not only as crop cultures but also for obtaining of various chemicals. Currently plants remain one of the most important and essential sources of biologically active compounds in spite of progress in chemical or microbial synthesis. In our review we compare potentials and perspectives of modern genetic engineering approaches for pharmaceutical biotechnology and give examples of actual biotechnological systems used for production of several promising natural compounds: artemisinin, paclitaxel and scopolamine.

  17. Secondary production, calcification and CO2 fluxes in the cirripedes Chthamalus montagui and Elminius modestus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golléty, Claire; Gentil, Franck; Davoult, Dominique

    2008-02-01

    Calcification, a process common to numerous marine taxa, has traditionally been considered to be a significant source of CO(2) in tropical waters only. A number of relatively recent studies, however, have shown that significant amounts of CO(2) are also produced in temperate waters, although none of these studies was carried out on rocky shores, which are considered to be very productive systems. We compared the CO(2) fluxes due to respiration and calcification in two temperate species, the cirripedes Chthamalus montagui and Elminius modestus. The population dynamics of both species were estimated at two sites during a 1-year experimental period in order to establish mean organic (ash-free dry weight) and CaCO(3) (dry shell weight) production. Based on these parameters, we estimated the CO(2) fluxes due to respiration and calcification. CaCO(3) production was estimated to be 481.0 and 1,803.9 g(CaCO3) m(-2) year(-1) at each site, representing 3.4 and 12.7 mol(CO2) m(-2) year(-1) respectively, of released CO(2). These fluxes represent each 47% of the CO(2) released as a result of respiration and calcification. The production of CaCO(3) at the high-density site was: (1) among the highest values obtained for temperate organisms, and (2) comparable to the estimated CO(2) fluxes for coral reefs. As calcifying organisms are well represented in temperate ecosystems in terms of both density and biomass, our results provide clear evidence that calcification of temperate organisms should not be underestimated. Additional studies on other rocky shore taxa are needed before the relative importance of calcification in rocky intertidal carbon budgets can be generalized.

  18. Production of secondary metabolite E2.2 from Phaleria macrocarpa endophytic fungus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Beatrix Trikurnia Gasong; Raymond Rubianto Tjandrawinata

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To isolate new endophytic fungus from Phaleria macrocarpa (P. macrocarpa) that is able to produce E2.2 compound. Methods: Endophytic fungi were isolated from P. macrocarpa. Morphological and molecular identification was done to determine the species of the endophytic fungus. High performance liquid chromatography was used to determine the ability of this fungus to produce E2.2 compound and to quantify the total yield of E2.2 from fungal fermen-tation. Fermentation process was optimized by observing suitable medium, pH and length of fermentation process. Phloroglucinol and gallic acid addition were examined to determine the effect of each compound on E2.2 production. Results: One endophytic fungus was successfully isolated from P. macrocarpa plant. Morphological and molecular identification showed that it was a Colletotrichum gloeo-sporioides which belonged to Glomerellaceae family. This fungus showed highest pro-duction of E2.2 when incubated in potato dextrose broth with initial pH value of the medium at 5, and was incubated for 15 days. Phloroglucinol was found to better enhance E2.2 production. Conclusions: Colletotrichum gloeosporioides found in P. macrocarpa plant is prom-ising as a potential alternative source of E2.2.

  19. Bacterial Cellulose Production by Fruit Juice Fermentation%果汁发酵生产细菌纤维素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张俊娜; 甘峰; 李志西; 林德慧; 潘凯旋

    2012-01-01

    为提高果汁发酵生产细菌纤维素的产量,开发特色纤维素功能性食品,以葡糖醋杆菌CGMCC 3917为实验菌种,以苹果汁和梨汁为发酵培养基生产细菌纤维素(BC),研究果汁用量和酵母膏添加量对细菌纤维素产量的影响,比较分析两种果汁生产的细菌纤维素在产量、结构和性质方面的差别。结果表明:梨汁发酵生产的细菌纤维素产量明显高于苹果汁,可达46.343g/100mL;其BC干膜复水率显著高于苹果汁,BC干膜的总糖含量稍高于苹果汁。两种果汁发酵生产的细菌纤维素在湿膜持水量及干膜的纤维素含量、蛋白质含量、脂肪含量以及微观结构上没有明显差异。%To improve bacterial cellulose (BC) production and to develop specific cellulose functional food products, BC was prepared from the fermentation of apple juice or pear juice by Gluconoacetobacter hanseni CGMCC 3917. The influence of fruit juice dilution and amount of added yeast extract on BC yield was evaluated. Meanwhile, further studies were done to investigate the influence of fruit juice type on BC production, structure and properties. The results showed that pear juice provided more production of BC than apple juice, reaching 46.343 g/100 mL. Moreover, dried BC membranes from pear juice showed a significantly higher rehydration rate, and a slightly higher total sugar content than those from apple juice. There were no pronounced differences in water content of wet BC membranes and cellulose, protein and fat contents and microstructure of dry BC membranes between both fruit juices.

  20. Room Temperature Reactivity Of Silicon Nanocrystals With Solvents: The Case Of Ketone And Hydrogen Production From Secondary Alcohols: Catalysis?

    KAUST Repository

    El Demellawi, Jehad K.

    2015-05-29

    Although silicon nanoparticles dispersed in liquids are used in various applications ranging from bio-labeling to hydrogen production, their reactivities with their solvents and their catalytic properties re-main still unexplored. Here, we discovered that, because of their surface structures and mechanical strain, silicon nanoparticles react strongly with their solvents and may act as catalysts for the dehydrogenation, at room temperature, of secondary alcohols (e.g. isopropanol) to ketones and hydrogen. This catalytic reaction was followed by gas chromatography, pH measurements, mass spectroscopy and solidstate NMR. This discovery provides new understanding of the role played by silicon nanoparticles, and nanosilicon in general, in their stability in solvents in general as well as being candidates in catalysis.

  1. Secondary organic material formed by methylglyoxal in aqueous aerosol mimics – Part 2: Product identification using Aerosol-CIMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. McNeill

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We used chemical ionization mass spectrometry with a volatilization flow tube inlet (Aerosol-CIMS to characterize secondary organic material formed by methylglyoxal with ammonium sulfate in aqueous aerosol mimics. Bulk reaction mixtures were diluted and atomized to form submicron aerosol particles. Organics were detected using Aerosol-CIMS in positive and negative ion mode using I− and H3O+·(H2On as reagent ions. The results are consistent with aldol condensation products, carbon-nitrogen species, sulfur-containing compounds, and oligomeric species up to 759 amu. These results support previous observations by us and others that ammonium sulfate plays a critical role in the SOA formation chemistry of dicarbonyl compounds.

  2. Seagrass burial by dredged sediments: benthic community alteration, secondary production loss, biotic index reaction and recovery possibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu Do, V; de Montaudouin, Xavier; Blanchet, Hugues; Lavesque, Nicolas

    2012-11-01

    In 2005, dredging activities in Arcachon Bay (France) led in burying 320,000 m(2) of Zostera noltii intertidal seagrass. Recovery by macrobenthos and seagrass was monitored. Six months after works, seagrass was absent and macrobenthos drastically different from surrounding vegetated stations. Rapidly and due to sediment dispersal, disposal area was divided into a sandflat with a specific benthic community which maintained its difference until the end of the survey (2010), and a mudflat where associated fauna became similar to those in adjacent seagrass. Macrobenthic community needs 3 years to recover while seagrass needs 5 years to recover in the station impacted by mud. The secondary production loss due to works was low. In this naturally carbon enriched system, univariate biotic indices did not perform well to detect seagrass destruction and recovery. Multivariate index MISS gave more relevant conclusions and a simplified version was tested with success, at this local scale.

  3. Production of {sup 48}V in a nuclear reactor via secondary tritons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siri, S. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Ezeiza, Gerencia de Capacitacion, Quimica Nuclear y Ciencias de la Salud, Ezeiza, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cohen, I.M. [Univ. Tecnologica Nacional, Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-07-01

    The production of {sup 48}V in a nuclear reactor, induced on titanium by tritons generated from the {sup 6}Li(n, t){sup 4} He reaction, and eventually {sup 7}Li(n, n't){sup 4}He, is described. Samples of lithium titanate were irradiated for an irradiation cycle (120 h) in the RA-3 reactor, belonging to Ezeiza Atomic Centre. After a radiochemical separation, the characteristic radiations from {sup 48}V were identified in the gamma ray spectra of the vanadium fractions. (orig.)

  4. Chemical characterization of the main secondary organic aerosol (SOA products formed through aqueous-phase photonitration of guaiacol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Kitanovski

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol and its derivatives can be emitted into the atmosphere by thermal degradation (i.e. burning of wood lignins. Due to its volatility, guaiacol is predominantly distributed in the atmospheric gaseous phase. Recent studies have shown the importance of aqueous-phase reactions in addition to the dominant gas-phase and heterogeneous reactions of guaiacol, in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA in the atmosphere. The main objectives of the present study were to chemically characterize the low-volatility SOA products of the aqueous-phase photonitration of guaiacol and examine their possible presence in urban atmospheric aerosols. The aqueous-phase reactions were carried out under simulated sunlight and in the presence of H2O2 and nitrite. The formed guaiacol reaction products were concentrated by using solid-phase extraction (SPE and then purified by means of semi-preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. The fractionated individual compounds were isolated as pure solids and further analyzed with liquid-state 1H, 13C and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy and direct infusion negative ion electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry ((–ESI-MS/MS. The NMR and product ion (MS2 spectra were used for unambiguous product structure elucidation. The main products of guaiacol photonitration are 4-nitroguaiacol (4NG, 6-nitroguaiacol (6NG, and 4,6-dinitroguaiacol (4,6DNG. Using the isolated compounds as standards, 4NG and 4,6DNG were unambiguously identified in winter PM10 aerosols from the city of Ljubljana (Slovenia by means of HPLC/(–ESI-MS/MS. Owing to the strong absorption of UV and visible light, 4,6DNG could be an important constituent of atmospheric "brown" carbon, especially in regions affected by biomass burning.

  5. High-time resolved measurements of biogenic and anthropogenic secondary organic aerosol precursors and products in urban air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Rosa M.; Doskey, Paul V.

    2016-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are present in the atmosphere entirely in the gas phase are directly emitted by biogenic (~1089 Tg yr-1) and anthropogenic sources (~185 Tg yr-1). However, the sources and molecular speciation of intermediate VOCs (IVOCs), which are for the most part also present almost entirely in the gas phase, are not well characterized. The VOCs and IVOCs participate in reactions that form ozone and semivolatile OC (SVOC) that partition into the aerosol phase. Formation and evolution of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are part of a complex dynamic process that depends on the molecular speciation and concentration of VOCs, IVOCs, primary organic aerosol (POA), and the level of oxidants (NO3, OH, O3). The current lack of understanding of OA properties and their impact on radiative forcing, ecosystems, and human health is partly due to limitations of models to predict SOA production on local, regional, and global scales. More accurate forecasting of SOA production requires high-temporal resolution measurement and molecular characterization of SOA precursors and products. For the subject study, the IVOCs and aerosol-phase organic matter were collected using the high-volume sampling technique and were analyzed by multidimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-ToFMS). The IVOCs included terpenes, terpenoids, n-alkanes, branched alkanes, isoprenoids, alkylbenzenes, cycloalkylbenzenes, PAH, alkyl PAH, and an unresolved complex mixture (UCM). Diurnal variations of OA species containing multiple oxygenated functionalities and selected SOA tracers of isorprene, α-pinene, toluene, cyclohexene, and n-dodecane oxidation were also quantified. The data for SOA precursor and oxidation products presented here will be useful for evaluating the ability of molecular-specific SOA models to forecast SOA production in and downwind of urban areas.

  6. Measurement of charm and beauty jet production cross sections using secondary vertices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arslan, Ozan; Brock, Ian; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Schoenberg, Verena [Bonn University (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    A measurement of beauty and charm jet production cross sections in photoproduction (Q{sup 2}<1 GeV{sup 2}) in ep-collision events at HERA with a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}(s)= 320 GeV is presented. The analysis is based on the data which were recorded with the ZEUS detector during the years 2004 to 2007 and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of {proportional_to} 300 pb{sup -1}. The beauty and charm signal was discriminated from the light flavour background by exploiting the characteristic distributions of the decay length of the b and c hadrons and the invariant mass of the tracks fitted to the reconstructed decay vertex. Total visible as well as differential cross sections as a function of P{sub T}{sup jet} and {eta}{sup jet} for beauty and charm jet production are presented and the results are compared with leading-order Monte-Carlo simulations and theory predictions at next-to-leading order.

  7. Activation of dormant secondary metabolite production by introducing neomycin resistance into the deep-sea fungus, Aspergillus versicolor ZBY-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yuan; Cui, Cheng-Bin; Li, Chang-Wei; Hua, Wei; Wu, Chang-Jing; Zhu, Tian-Jiao; Gu, Qian-Qun

    2014-07-29

    A new ultrasound-mediated approach has been developed to introduce neomycin-resistance to activate silent pathways for secondary metabolite production in a bio-inactive, deep-sea fungus, Aspergillus versicolor ZBY-3. Upon treatment of the ZBY-3 spores with a high concentration of neomycin by proper ultrasound irradiation, a total of 30 mutants were obtained by single colony isolation. The acquired resistance of the mutants to neomycin was confirmed by a resistance test. In contrast to the ZBY-3 strain, the EtOAc extracts of 22 of the 30 mutants inhibited the human cancer K562 cells, indicating that these mutants acquired a capability to produce antitumor metabolites. HPLC-photodiode array detector (PDAD)-UV and HPLC-electron spray ionization (ESI)-MS analyses of the EtOAc extracts of seven bioactive mutants and the ZBY-3 strain indicated that diverse secondary metabolites have been newly produced in the mutant extracts in contrast to the ZBY-3 extract. The followed isolation and characterization demonstrated that six metabolites, cyclo(D-Pro-D-Phe) (1), cyclo(D-Tyr-D-Pro) (2), phenethyl 5-oxo-L-prolinate (3), cyclo(L-Ile-L-Pro) (4), cyclo(L-Leu-L-Pro) (5) and 3β,5α,9α-trihydroxy-(22E,24R)-ergosta-7,22-dien-6-one (6), were newly produced by the mutant u2n2h3-3 compared to the parent ZBY-3 strain. Compound 3 was a new compound; 2 was isolated from a natural source for the first time, and all of these compounds were also not yet found in the metabolites of other A. versicolor strains. Compounds 1-6 inhibited the K562 cells, with inhibition rates of 54.6% (1), 72.9% (2), 23.5% (3), 29.6% (4), 30.9% (5) and 51.1% (6) at 100 μg/mL, and inhibited also other human cancer HL-60, BGC-823 and HeLa cells, to some extent. The present study demonstrated the effectiveness of the ultrasound-mediated approach to activate silent metabolite production in fungi by introducing acquired resistance to aminoglycosides and its potential for discovering new compounds from silent fungal

  8. Activation of Dormant Secondary Metabolite Production by Introducing Neomycin Resistance into the Deep-Sea Fungus, Aspergillus versicolor ZBY-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Dong

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A new ultrasound-mediated approach has been developed to introduce neomycin-resistance to activate silent pathways for secondary metabolite production in a bio-inactive, deep-sea fungus, Aspergillus versicolor ZBY-3. Upon treatment of the ZBY-3 spores with a high concentration of neomycin by proper ultrasound irradiation, a total of 30 mutants were obtained by single colony isolation. The acquired resistance of the mutants to neomycin was confirmed by a resistance test. In contrast to the ZBY-3 strain, the EtOAc extracts of 22 of the 30 mutants inhibited the human cancer K562 cells, indicating that these mutants acquired a capability to produce antitumor metabolites. HPLC-photodiode array detector (PDAD-UV and HPLC-electron spray ionization (ESI-MS analyses of the EtOAc extracts of seven bioactive mutants and the ZBY-3 strain indicated that diverse secondary metabolites have been newly produced in the mutant extracts in contrast to the ZBY-3 extract. The followed isolation and characterization demonstrated that six metabolites, cyclo(d-Pro-d-Phe (1, cyclo(d-Tyr-d-Pro (2, phenethyl 5-oxo-l-prolinate (3, cyclo(l-Ile-l-Pro (4, cyclo(l-Leu-l-Pro (5 and 3β,5α,9α-trihydroxy-(22E,24R-ergosta-7,22-dien-6-one (6, were newly produced by the mutant u2n2h3-3 compared to the parent ZBY-3 strain. Compound 3 was a new compound; 2 was isolated from a natural source for the first time, and all of these compounds were also not yet found in the metabolites of other A. versicolor strains. Compounds 1–6 inhibited the K562 cells, with inhibition rates of 54.6% (1, 72.9% (2, 23.5% (3, 29.6% (4, 30.9% (5 and 51.1% (6 at 100 μg/mL, and inhibited also other human cancer HL-60, BGC-823 and HeLa cells, to some extent. The present study demonstrated the effectiveness of the ultrasound-mediated approach to activate silent metabolite production in fungi by introducing acquired resistance to aminoglycosides and its potential for discovering new compounds from silent

  9. Sewage sludge ash — A promising secondary phosphorus source for fertilizer production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzel, Hannes, E-mail: hannes.herzel@bam.de [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing Richard-Willstätter-Straße 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Krüger, Oliver [BAM Federal Institute of Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany); Hermann, Ludwig [Outotec GmbH & Co KG, Ludwig-Erhard-Straße 21, 61440 Oberursel (Germany); Adam, Christian [BAM Federal Institute of Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Sewage sludge incineration is extensively practiced in some European countries such as the Netherlands, Switzerland, Austria and Germany. A survey of German sewage sludge ash showed that the recovery potential is high, approx. 19,000 t of phosphorus per year. However, the survey also discovered that the bioavailability of phosphorus in the sewage sludge ash is poor and that more than half of the ashes cannot be used as fertilizers due to high heavy metal content. A new thermochemical process for sewage sludge ash treatment was developed that transforms the ash into marketable fertilizer products. Sewage sludge ash was thermochemically treated with sodium and potassium additives under reducing conditions, whereby the phosphate-bearing mineral phases were transformed into plant available phosphates. High P-bioavailability was achieved with a molar Na/P ratio > 1.75 in the starting materials. Sodium sulfate, carbonate and hydroxide performed comparably as additives for this calcination process. Potassium carbonate and -hydroxide have to be added in a molar K/P ratio > 2.5 to achieve comparable P-solubility. The findings of the laboratory scale investigations were confirmed by an industrial demonstration trial for an ash treatment with sodium sulfate. Simultaneously, the volatile transition metal arsenic (61% removal) as well as volatile heavy metals such as cadmium (80%), mercury (68%), lead (39%) and zinc (9%) were removed via the off-gas treatment system. The product of the demonstration trial is characterized by high bioavailability and a toxic trace element mass fraction below the limit values of the German fertilizer ordinance, thus fulfilling the quality parameters for a P-fertilizer. - Highlights: • Direct use of sewage sludge ashes (SSA) as fertilizer often not possible • New approach of SSA treatment aiming at P-fertilizers with high P-bioavailability • Comparison of different Na- and K-bearing additives for the thermochemical process • Evaporation of

  10. Link between Domoic Acid Production and Cell Physiology after Exchange of Bacterial Communities between Toxic Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries and Non-Toxic Pseudo-nitzschia delicatissima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Lelong

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria are known to influence domoic acid (DA production by Pseudo-nitzschia spp., but the link between DA production and physiology of diatoms requires more investigation. We compared a toxic P. multiseries to a non-toxic P. delicatissima, investigating links between DA production, physiological parameters, and co-occurring bacteria. Bacterial communities in cultures of both species were reduced by antibiotic treatment, and each of the diatoms was inoculated with the bacterial community of the other species. The physiology of P. delicatissima was minimally affected by the absence of bacteria or the presence of alien bacteria, and no DA was detected. P. multiseries grew faster without bacteria, did not produce a significant amount of DA, and exhibited physiological characteristics of healthy cells. When grown with alien bacteria, P. multiseries did not grow and produced more DA; the physiology of these cells was affected, with decreases in chlorophyll content and photosynthetic efficiency, an increase in esterase activity, and almost 50% mortality of the cells. The alien bacterial community had morphological and cellular characteristics very different from the original bacteria, and the number of free-living bacteria per algal cell was much higher, suggesting the involvement of bacteria in DA production.

  11. Evidence for methane-subsidised secondary production in a groundwater-fed lowland river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimmer, M.; Grey, J.; Hildrew, A.; Jackson, M.

    2009-04-01

    We are probably familiar with the chemosynthetic ecosystems of the deep Pacific, where life in the dark is coupled to the oxidation of sulphur from ‘black smokers' rather than the sun, but few, if any, would suspect such a mode of life in the classic chalk rivers of southern England. We measured the delta13C values of dominant primary consumers and their potential food sources in a groundwater-fed lowland river. The delta13C of most consumers, such as Gammarus and Simulium, reflected that of the dominant forms of photosynthetic production, whereas the cased larvae of two caddis flies (Agapetus and Silo) were consistently 13C-depleted throughout the year. The river water was supersaturated (50-60 times atmospheric) with methane, reflecting both supersaturation in the groundwater and local production in fine sediments. We measured significant rates of methane oxidation, which generates 13C-depleted organic carbon, in the biofilms on gravel, on the caddis fly cases, and on the bottom of larger rocks. In addition, there was a marked difference in the ratio of methane oxidising potential to chlorophyll a across those substrata. This ratio was below detection in the biofilm (i.e. no methane oxidation) on the tops of rocks, greater on the bottom of rocks, and maximal for the gravels and the caddis cases. If the caddis larvae acquire most of their carbon by grazing the tops of such rocks (where they are normally found), then they must acquire their depleted delta13C values by occasionally grazing biofilm where the ratio of methane oxidation to chlorophyll was much greater, and the most likely candidate is from their own cases. Grazing methane oxidising bacteria could provide the caddis larvae with up to 30 % of their carbon, which could represent a true subsidy from an ancient groundwater source.

  12. Coupled Response of Bacterial Production to a Wind-induced Fall Phytoplankton Bloom and Sediment Resuspension in the Chukchi Sea Shelf, Western Arctic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Uchimiya

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Heterotrophic bacterial abundance and production, dissolved free amino acid (DFAA and dissolved combined amino acid (DCAA concentrations, and other microbial parameters were determined for seawater samples collected at a fixed station (maximum water depth, 56 m deployed on the Chukchi Sea Shelf, in the western Arctic Ocean, during a 16-day period in September 2013. During the investigation period, the sampling station experienced strong winds and a subsequent phytoplankton bloom, which was thought to be triggered by enhanced vertical mixing and upward nutrient fluxes. In this study, we investigated whether bacterial and dissolved amino acid parameters changed in response to these physical and biogeochemical events. Bacterial abundance and production in the upper layer increased with increasing chlorophyll a concentration, despite a concomitant decrease in seawater temperature from 3.2°C to 1.5°C. The percentage of bacteria with high nucleic acid content during the bloom was significantly higher than that during the prebloom period. The ratio of the depth-integrated (0–20 m bacterial production to primary production differed little between the prebloom and bloom period, with an overall average value of 0.14 ± 0.03 (± standard deviation, n = 8. DFAA and DCAA concentrations varied over a limited range throughout the investigation, indicating that the supply and consumption of labile dissolved amino acids were balanced. These results indicate that there was a tightly coupled, large flow of organic carbon from primary producers to heterotrophic bacteria during the fall bloom. Our data also revealed that bacterial production and abundance were high in the bottom nepheloid (low transmittance layer during strong wind events, which was associated with sediment resuspension due to turbulence near the seafloor. The impacts of fall wind events, which are predicted to become more prominent with the extension of the ice-free period, on bacterial

  13. Effects of dietary inulin on bacterial growth, short-chain fatty acid production and hepatic lipid metabolism in gnotobiotic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitkunat, Karolin; Schumann, Sara; Petzke, Klaus Jürgen; Blaut, Michael; Loh, Gunnar; Klaus, Susanne

    2015-09-01

    In literature, contradictory effects of dietary fibers and their fermentation products, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), are described: On one hand, they increase satiety, but on the other hand, they provide additional energy and promote obesity development. We aimed to answer this paradox by investigating the effects of fermentable and non-fermentable fibers on obesity induced by high-fat diet in gnotobiotic C3H/HeOuJ mice colonized with a simplified human microbiota. Mice were fed a high-fat diet supplemented either with 10% cellulose (non-fermentable) or inulin (fermentable) for 6 weeks. Feeding the inulin diet resulted in an increased diet digestibility and reduced feces energy, compared to the cellulose diet with no differences in food intake, suggesting an increased intestinal energy extraction from inulin. However, we observed no increase in body fat/weight. The additional energy provided by the inulin diet led to an increased bacterial proliferation in this group. Supplementation of inulin resulted further in significantly elevated concentrations of total SCFA in cecum and portal vein plasma, with a reduced cecal acetate:propionate ratio. Hepatic expression of genes involved in lipogenesis (Fasn, Gpam) and fatty acid elongation/desaturation (Scd1, Elovl3, Elovl6, Elovl5, Fads1 and Fads2) were decreased in inulin-fed animals. Accordingly, plasma and liver phospholipid composition were changed between the different feeding groups. Concentrations of omega-3 and odd-chain fatty acids were increased in inulin-fed mice, whereas omega-6 fatty acids were reduced. Taken together, these data indicate that, during this short-term feeding, inulin has mainly positive effects on the lipid metabolism, which could cause beneficial effects during obesity development in long-term studies.

  14. Bacterial species associated with traditional starter cultures used for fermented bamboo shoot production in Manipur state of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyaram, K; Romi, W; Singh, Th Anand; Devi, A Ranjita; Devi, S Soni

    2010-09-30

    Soidon is a non-salted acidic fermented food prepared from the succulent bamboo shoot tip of Schizostachyum capitatum Munro by using a traditional liquid starter called "soidon mahi" in Manipur state of India. In this study, 163 bacterial isolates associated with this starter samples were identified and their population distribution was investigated by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA), 16S rDNA sequencing and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. This acidic starter (pH 4.5+/-0.15) was dominated by a characteristic association of Bacillus and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) together. The population distribution of dominant species were Bacillus subtilis 29.3%, Bacillus cereus 35.7%, Bacillus pumilus 2.6%, Lactobacillus brevis 9.6%, Lactobacillus plantarum 5.1%, Carnobacterium sp. 11.9%, Enterococcus faecium 1.2% and Pseudomonas fluorescens 4.6%. Alarming population load (10(6)-10(7)cfu/ml) of B. cereus in 87% of starter samples studied should raise concern regarding biosafety of soidon consumption. PCR amplification of 16S-23S rDNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) region and ITS-RFLP profiles revealed a high diversity with eight subgroups in B. subtilis, five subgroups in B. cereus and three subgroups in L. brevis isolates. The most abundant B. subtilis subgroup IB.1 distributed in most of the samples showed very less clonal variability during RAPD analysis. The molecular methods used in this study identified the dominant strains of Bacillus and LAB distributed in most of the starter samples. These dominant strains of B. subtilis, L. brevis and L. plantarum would allow for developing a defined starter culture for the production of quality soidon.

  15. Analysis of the Impact of Rosuvastatin on Bacterial Mevalonate Production Using a UPLC-Mass Spectrometry Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, J A; Kinsella, M; Hill, C; Joyce, S A; Gahan, C G M

    2016-07-01

    Statins are widely prescribed cholesterol-lowering medications and act through inhibition of the human enzyme 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG-R) which produces mevalonate (MVAL), a key substrate for cholesterol biosynthesis. Some important microbial species also express an isoform of HMG-R; however, the nature of the interaction between statins and bacteria is currently unclear and studies would benefit from protocols to quantify MVAL in complex microbial environments. The objective of this study was to develop a protocol for the analytical quantification of MVAL in bacterial systems and to utilise this approach to analyse the effects of Rosuvastatin (RSV) on bacterial MVAL formation. To determine the effective concentration range of RSV, we examined the dose-dependent inhibition of growth in the HMG-R(+) bacterial pathogens Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecium at various concentrations of pure RSV. Growth inhibition generally correlated with a reduction in bacterial MVAL levels, particularly in culture supernatants at high RSV concentrations, as determined using our ultra-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry protocol. This work therefore outlines a refined protocol for the analysis of MVAL in microbial cultures and provides evidence for statin-mediated inhibition of bacterial HMG-R. Furthermore, we show that MVAL is readily transported and secreted from bacterial cells into the growth media.

  16. Production of Some Biologically Active Secondary Metabolites From Marine-derived Fungus Varicosporina ramulosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atalla, M. M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In a screening of fungal isolates associated with marine algae collected from Abou-keer, Alexanderia during the four seasons of 2004, to obtain new biologically active compounds. Varicosporina ramulosa isolate was identified and selected as a producer of 13 compounds. Out of 13 pure compounds produced, compounds 3 and 10 were considered as antibacterial and antifungal compounds, respectively as they were active against gram positive, gram negative bacteria and a fungus. Optimization of conditions (fermentation media, incubation period, temperature, initial pH, aeration levels which activate compounds 3 and 10 production were studied. Also the spectral properties (UV, MS, GC/MS, IR and 1H-NMR of the purified compounds were determined. Compound 3 suggested to be dibutyl phthalate and compound 10 may be ergosterol or one of its isomers. Biological evaluation of the two compounds towards 6 different types of tumor cell lines showed weak effect of compound 3 at different concentrations on the viable cell count of the different tumor cell lines. While compound 10 showed different activities against the viable cell count of the 6 different tumor cell lines. It kills 50% of the viable infected liver and lung cells at concentrations equal to 99.7 µg/mL, 74.9µg/mL, respectively. Compound 10 can be recommended as new anticancer compounds.

  17. Castor oil as secondary carbon source for production of sophorolipids using Starmerella bombicola NRRL Y-17069.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Vinit Kamalkishor; Annapure, Uday S

    2015-01-01

    Sophorolipids (SLs), a prominent member of the biosurfactants family are produced in acidic and/or lactonic form by yeast Starmerella bombicola NRRL Y-17069 when grown on hydrophilic or hydrophobic or both carbon sources. In current study, ricinoleic acid rich castor oil (10%) was used as hydrophobic and glycerol (10%) was used as hydrophilic carbon source. The yields of 24.5 ± 0.25 g/l sophorolipids were analyzed by anthrone and HPLC method which further increased upto 40.24 ± 0.76 g/l sophorolipids using fed batch process at 5L fermenter level. The structures of sophorolipids synthesized on castor oil were elucidated by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometer (LC-MS), (13)C and (1)H NMR. The results indicated that the ricinoleic acid (RA) gets hydroxylated at ω-1 position but incorporated into sophorolipids through already available hydroxyl group at 12(th) position. It resulted in the production of a novel sophorolipids with hydroxyl fatty acid as side chain and has applications as surfactant for novel drug delivery, anti microbial agent, cosmetic ingredient and emulsifier.

  18. Two-phase photoperiodic cultivation of algal-bacterial consortia for high biomass production and efficient nutrient removal from municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Soo; Oh, Hyung-Seok; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Hee-Sik; Ahn, Chi-Yong

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the photoperiodic effects on the biomass production and nutrient removal in the algal-bacterial wastewater treatment, under the following three conditions: (1) a natural 12h:12h LD cycle, (2) a dark-elongated 12h:60h LD cycle, and (3) a two-phase photoperiodic 12h:60h LD, followed by 12h:12h LD cycles. The two-phase photoperiodic operation showed the highest dry cell weight and lipid productivity (282.6mgL(-1)day(-1), 71.4mgL(-1)day(-1)) and most efficient nutrient removals (92.3% COD, 95.8% TN, 98.1% TP). The genetic markers and sequencing analyses indicated rapid increments of bacteria, subsequent growths of Scenedesmus, and stabilized population balances between algae and bacteria. In addition, the two-phase photoperiod provided a higher potential for the algal-bacterial consortia to utilize various organic carbon substrates.

  19. Population biology and secondary production of the stout razor clam Tagelus plebeius (Bivalvia, Solecurtidae on a sandflat in southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolnnye R. Abrahão

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The population biology and production of the stout razor clam Tagelus plebeius Lightfoot, 1786 were investigated on an intertidal sandflat on the southeast coast of Brazil (Enseada Beach, São Sebastião, state of São Paulo between April 1997 and April 1998. Two rectangular sites of 50 X 10 m parallel to the waterline were established, site A (upper intertidal level and site B (middle intertidal level, where the samples were taken in an 0.5 x 0.5 m quadrat. High abundances were recorded in winter and spring, with no significant differences between the sites. The high bivalve abundances were related to the presence of very fine homogeneous sediment with low salinities. Tagelus plebeius had negative allometric growth, characteristic of deep burrowers for the relationships DM/SL and AFDM/SL. Parameters of the modified von Bertalanffy growth function were: L∞ = 67.01 mm, K = 1.73 year-1, t0 = -0.11 year, C = 0.43, WP = 0.96. The instantaneous mortality (Z was 3.12 year-1, relatively high in comparison to other tropical bivalve populations. Secondary production was 1.53 g AFDM m-2 year-1, with a P/B ratio reaching 1.37 year-1. This high turnover ratio (P/B was related to a rapid population replacement, connected with the short life span and high mortality of the species.

  20. Kinetic modeling of Secondary Organic Aerosol formation: effects of particle- and gas-phase reactions of semivolatile products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. H. Chan

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The distinguishing mechanism of formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA is the partitioning of semivolatile hydrocarbon oxidation products between the gas and aerosol phases. While SOA formation is typically described in terms of partitioning only, the rate of formation and ultimate yield of SOA can also depend on the kinetics of both gas- and aerosol-phase processes. We present a general equilibrium/kinetic model of SOA formation that provides a framework for evaluating the extent to which the controlling mechanisms of SOA formation can be inferred from laboratory chamber data. With this model we examine the effect on SOA formation of gas-phase oxidation of first-generation products to either more or less volatile species, of particle-phase reaction (both first- and second-order kinetics, of the rate of parent hydrocarbon oxidation, and of the extent of reaction of the parent hydrocarbon. The effect of pre-existing organic aerosol mass on SOA yield, an issue of direct relevance to the translation of laboratory data to atmospheric applications, is examined. The importance of direct chemical measurements of gas- and particle-phase species is underscored in identifying SOA formation mechanisms.

  1. Kinetic modeling of secondary organic aerosol formation: effects of particle- and gas-phase reactions of semivolatile products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. H. Chan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The distinguishing mechanism of formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA is the partitioning of semivolatile hydrocarbon oxidation products between the gas and aerosol phases. While SOA formation is typically described in terms of partitioning only, the rate of formation and ultimate yield of SOA can also depend on the kinetics of both gas- and aerosol-phase processes. We present a general equilibrium/kinetic model of SOA formation that provides a framework for evaluating the extent to which the controlling mechanisms of SOA formation can be inferred from laboratory chamber data. With this model we examine the effect on SOA formation of gas-phase oxidation of first-generation products to either more or less volatile species, of particle-phase reaction (both first- and second-order kinetics, of the rate of parent hydrocarbon oxidation, and of the extent of reaction of the parent hydrocarbon. The effect of pre-existing organic aerosol mass on SOA yield, an issue of direct relevance to the translation of laboratory data to atmospheric applications, is examined. The importance of direct chemical measurements of gas- and particle-phase species is underscored in identifying SOA formation mechanisms.

  2. Metacommunity dynamics of bacteria in an arctic lake: the impact of species sorting and mass effects on bacterial production and biogeography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather E. Adams

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To understand mechanisms linking ecosystem processes and microbial diversity in freshwater ecosystems, bacterial productivity and the metacommunity dynamics of species sorting and mass effects were investigated in an 18 ha headwater lake in northern Alaska. On most sampling dates, the phylogenetic composition of bacterial communities in inflowing streams (inlets was strikingly different than that in the lake and the outflowing stream (outlet (16S DGGE fingerprinting, demonstrating the shift in composition that occurs as these communities transit the lake. Outlet and downstream communities were also more productive than inlet and upstream communities (14C-leucine incorporation. Inlet bacteria transplanted to the outlet stream in dialysis bags were equally or less productive than control bacteria, suggesting that the inlet bacteria are capable of growing under lake conditions, but do not remain abundant because of species sorting in the lake. Outlet bacteria (representative of epilimnetic bacteria transplanted to the inlet stream were less productive than control bacteria, suggesting that lake bacteria are not as well adapted to growing under inlet conditions. Based on water density, inlet stream water and bacteria generally entered the lake at the base of the epilimnion. However, during low to medium flow in the inlet stream the residence time of the epilimnion was too long relative to bacterial doubling times for these allochthonous bacteria to have a mass effect on the composition of outlet bacteria. The highest community similarity between inlet and outlet bacteria was detected after a large rain event in 2003, with over 61% similarity (average non-storm similarities were 39% ± 8%. While mass effects may be important during large storm events, species sorting appears to be the predominant mechanism structuring bacterial communities within the lake, leading to the assembly of a lake community that has lost some ability to function in stream

  3. The 2-Methoxy Group Orientation Regulates the Redox Potential Difference between the Primary (QA) and Secondary (QB) Quinones of Type II Bacterial Photosynthetic Reaction Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that only quinones with a 2-methoxy group can act simultaneously as the primary (QA) and secondary (QB) electron acceptors in photosynthetic reaction centers from purple bacteria such as Rb. sphaeroides. 13C HYSCORE measurements of the 2-methoxy group in the semiquinone states, SQA and SQB, were compared with DFT calculations of the 13C hyperfine couplings as a function of the 2-methoxy dihedral angle. X-ray structure comparisons support 2-methoxy dihedral angle assignments corresponding to a redox potential gap (ΔEm) between QA and QB of 175–193 mV. A model having a methyl group substituted for the 2-methoxy group exhibits no electron affinity difference. This is consistent with the failure of a 2-methyl ubiquinone analogue to function as QB in mutant reaction centers with a ΔEm of ∼160–195 mV. The conclusion reached is that the 2-methoxy group is the principal determinant of electron transfer from QA to QB in type II photosynthetic reaction centers with ubiquinone serving as both acceptor quinones. PMID:25126386

  4. The 2-Methoxy Group Orientation Regulates the Redox Potential Difference between the Primary (QA) and Secondary (QB) Quinones of Type II Bacterial Photosynthetic Reaction Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Wagner B; Taguchi, Alexander T; Dikanov, Sergei A; Wraight, Colin A; O'Malley, Patrick J

    2014-08-07

    Recent studies have shown that only quinones with a 2-methoxy group can act simultaneously as the primary (QA) and secondary (QB) electron acceptors in photosynthetic reaction centers from purple bacteria such as Rb. sphaeroides. (13)C HYSCORE measurements of the 2-methoxy group in the semiquinone states, SQA and SQB, were compared with DFT calculations of the (13)C hyperfine couplings as a function of the 2-methoxy dihedral angle. X-ray structure comparisons support 2-methoxy dihedral angle assignments corresponding to a redox potential gap (ΔEm) between QA and QB of 175-193 mV. A model having a methyl group substituted for the 2-methoxy group exhibits no electron affinity difference. This is consistent with the failure of a 2-methyl ubiquinone analogue to function as QB in mutant reaction centers with a ΔEm of ∼160-195 mV. The conclusion reached is that the 2-methoxy group is the principal determinant of electron transfer from QA to QB in type II photosynthetic reaction centers with ubiquinone serving as both acceptor quinones.

  5. Bacterial wall products induce downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors on endothelial cells via a CD14-dependent mechanism: implications for surgical wound healing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, C

    2012-02-03

    INTRODUCTION: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent mitogenic cytokine which has been identified as the principal polypeptide growth factor influencing endothelial cell (EC) migration and proliferation. Ordered progression of these two processes is an absolute prerequisite for initiating and maintaining the proliferative phase of wound healing. The response of ECs to circulating VEGF is determined by, and directly proportional to, the functional expression of VEGF receptors (KDR\\/Flt-1) on the EC surface membrane. Systemic sepsis and wound contamination due to bacterial infection are associated with significant retardation of the proliferative phase of wound repair. The effects of the Gram-negative bacterial wall components lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) on VEGF receptor function and expression are unknown and may represent an important biological mechanism predisposing to delayed wound healing in the presence of localized or systemic sepsis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We designed a series of in vitro experiments investigating this phenomenon and its potential implications for infective wound repair. VEGF receptor density on ECs in the presence of LPS and BLP was assessed using flow cytometry. These parameters were assessed in hypoxic conditions as well as in normoxia. The contribution of CD14 was evaluated using recombinant human (rh) CD14. EC proliferation in response to VEGF was quantified in the presence and absence of LPS and BLP. RESULTS: Flow cytometric analysis revealed that LPS and BLP have profoundly repressive effects on VEGF receptor density in normoxic and, more pertinently, hypoxic conditions. The observed downregulation of constitutive and inducible VEGF receptor expression on ECs was not due to any directly cytotoxic effect of LPS and BLP on ECs, as measured by cell viability and apoptosis assays. We identified a pivotal role for soluble\\/serum CD14, a highly specific bacterial wall product receptor, in

  6. Simulated moose (Alces alces L.) browsing increases accumulation of secondary metabolites in bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) along gradients of habitat productivity and solar radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Inga-Lill; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Bergström, Roger; Wallgren, Märtha; Suominen, Otso; Danell, Kjell

    2012-10-01

    We have addressed the impact of moose (Alces alces L.) on accumulation of secondary metabolites, lignin, and nitrogen in bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) along gradients of habitat productivity and solar radiation. The study was conducted within a long-term research project on direct and indirect impacts of moose on the ecosystem. In the experiment, browsing, defecation, and urination corresponding to four different moose densities were simulated for eight years before bilberry tissue was collected and analyzed. Some quantitatively dominant flavonoids were affected by the simulated moose browsing and by habitat productivity and light. The content of flavonoids increased with increasing moose density and light, and decreased with increasing habitat productivity. The higher concentration of secondary metabolites in bilberry from nutrient-poor sites may have resulted from the increased photosynthesis relative to growth, which facilitated secondary metabolism. The higher concentration of secondary metabolites in plants subjected to simulated moose- herbivory might have been caused in part by loss of biomass. In addition, in areas with high biomass loss, i.e., high moose density, a more open canopy was created and more solar radiation could have induced secondary metabolism.

  7. Differential response of planktonic primary, bacterial, and dimethylsulfide production rates to vertically-moving and static incubations in upper mixed-layer summer sea waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galí, M.; Simó, R.; Pérez, G. L.; Ruiz-González, C.; Sarmento, H.; Royer, S.-J.; Fuentes-Lema, A.; Gasol, J. M.

    2013-05-01

    Microbial plankton experience fluctuations in total solar irradiance and in its spectral composition as they are vertically moved by turbulence in the oceanic upper mixed layer (UML). The fact that the light exposure is not static but dynamic may have important consequences for biogeochemical processes and ocean-atmosphere fluxes. However, most biogeochemical processes other than primary production, like bacterial production or dimethylsulfide (DMS) production, are seldom measured in sunlight and even less often in dynamic light fields. We conducted four experiments in oligotrophic summer stratified Mediterranean waters, where a sample from the UML was incubated in ultraviolet (UV)-transparent bottles at three fixed depths within the UML and on a vertically-moving basket across the same depth range. We assessed the response of the phyto- and bacterioplankton community with physiological indicators based on flow cytometry singe-cell measurements, Fast Repetition Rate fluorometry (FRRf), phytoplankton pigment concentrations and particulate light absorption. Dynamic light exposure caused a disruption of the photoinhibition and photoacclimation processes associated to ultraviolet radiation (UVR), which slightly alleviated bacterial photoinhibition but did not favor primary production. Gross DMS production (GPDMS) decreased sharply with depth in parallel to shortwave UVR, and displayed a dose-dependent response that mixing did not significantly disrupt. To our knowledge, we provide the first measurements of GPDMS under in situ UV-inclusive optical conditions.

  8. Differential response of planktonic primary, bacterial, and dimethylsulfide production rates to static vs. dynamic light exposure in upper mixed-layer summer sea waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galí, M.; Simó, R.; Pérez, G. L.; Ruiz-González, C.; Sarmento, H.; Royer, S.-J.; Fuentes-Lema, A.; Gasol, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial plankton experience short-term fluctuations in total solar irradiance and in its spectral composition as they are vertically moved by turbulence in the oceanic upper mixed layer (UML). The fact that the light exposure is not static but dynamic may have important consequences for biogeochemical processes and ocean-atmosphere fluxes. However, most biogeochemical processes other than primary production, like bacterial production or dimethylsulfide (DMS) production, are seldom measured in sunlight and even less often in dynamic light fields. We conducted four experiments in oligotrophic summer stratified Mediterranean waters, where a sample from the UML was incubated in ultraviolet (UV)-transparent bottles at three fixed depths within the UML and on a vertically moving basket across the same depth range. We assessed the response of the phyto- and bacterioplankton community with physiological indicators based on flow cytometry singe-cell measurements, fast repetition rate fluorometry (FRRf), phytoplankton pigment concentrations and particulate light absorption. Dynamic light exposure caused a subtle disruption of the photoinhibition and photoacclimation processes associated with ultraviolet radiation (UVR), which slightly alleviated bacterial photoinhibition but did not favor primary production. Gross DMS production (GPDMS) decreased sharply with depth in parallel to shortwave UVR, and displayed a dose-dependent response that mixing did not significantly disrupt. To our knowledge, we provide the first measurements of GPDMS under in situ UV-inclusive optical conditions.

  9. Statistical optimization of medium composition for bacterial cellulose production by Gluconacetobacter hansenii UAC09 using coffee cherry husk extract--an agro-industry waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Mahadevaswamy Usha; Rastogi, Navin K; Appaiah, K A Anu

    2011-07-01

    During the production of grape wine, the formation of thick leathery pellicle/bacterial cellulose (BC) at the airliquid interface was due to the bacterium, which was isolated and identified as Gluconacetobacter hansenii UAC09. Cultural conditions for bacterial cellulose production from G. hansenii UAC09 were optimized by central composite rotatable experimental design. To economize the BC production, coffee cherry husk (CCH) extract and corn steep liquor (CSL) were used as less expensive sources of carbon and nitrogen, respectively. CCH and CSL are byproducts from the coffee processing and starch processing industry, respectively. The interactions between pH (4.5- 8.5), CSL (2-10%), alcohol (0.5-2%), acetic acid (0.5- 2%), and water dilution rate to CCH ratio (1:1 to 1:5) were studied using response surface methodology. The optimum conditions for maximum BC production were pH (6.64), CSL (10%), alcohol (0.5%), acetic acid (1.13%), and water to CCH ratio (1:1). After 2 weeks of fermentation, the amount of BC produced was 6.24 g/l. This yield was comparable to the predicted value of 6.09 g/l. This is the first report on the optimization of the fermentation medium by RSM using CCH extract as the carbon source for BC production by G. hansenii UAC09.

  10. Differential response of planktonic primary, bacterial, and dimethylsulfide production rates to vertically-moving and static incubations in upper mixed-layer summer sea waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Galí

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Microbial plankton experience fluctuations in total solar irradiance and in its spectral composition as they are vertically moved by turbulence in the oceanic upper mixed layer (UML. The fact that the light exposure is not static but dynamic may have important consequences for biogeochemical processes and ocean-atmosphere fluxes. However, most biogeochemical processes other than primary production, like bacterial production or dimethylsulfide (DMS production, are seldom measured in sunlight and even less often in dynamic light fields. We conducted four experiments in oligotrophic summer stratified Mediterranean waters, where a sample from the UML was incubated in ultraviolet (UV-transparent bottles at three fixed depths within the UML and on a vertically-moving basket across the same depth range. We assessed the response of the phyto- and bacterioplankton community with physiological indicators based on flow cytometry singe-cell measurements, Fast Repetition Rate fluorometry (FRRf, phytoplankton pigment concentrations and particulate light absorption. Dynamic light exposure caused a disruption of the photoinhibition and photoacclimation processes associated to ultraviolet radiation (UVR, which slightly alleviated bacterial photoinhibition but did not favor primary production. Gross DMS production (GPDMS decreased sharply with depth in parallel to shortwave UVR, and displayed a dose-dependent response that mixing did not significantly disrupt. To our knowledge, we provide the first measurements of GPDMS under in situ UV-inclusive optical conditions.

  11. Use of primer selection and restriction enzymes to assess bacterial community diversity in an agricultural soil used for potato production via terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Ann-Marie; Marsh, Terence L; Honeycutt, C Wayne; Halteman, William A

    2011-08-01

    Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) can be used to assess how land use management changes the dominant members of bacterial communities. We compared T-RFLP profiles obtained via amplification with forward primers (27, 63F) each coupled with the fluorescently labeled reverse primer (1392R) and multiple restriction enzymes to determine the best combination for interrogating soil bacterial populations in an agricultural soil used for potato production. Both primer pairs provide nearly universal recognition of a 1,400-bp sequence of the bacterial domain in the V(1)-V(3) region of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene relative to known sequences. Labeling the reverse primer allowed for direct comparison of each forward primer and the terminal restriction fragments' relative migration units obtained with each primer pair and restriction enzyme. Redundancy analysis (RDA) and nested multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) were used to assess the effects of primer pair and choice of restriction enzyme on the measured relative migration units. Our research indicates that the 63F-1392R amplimer pair provides a more complete description with respect to the bacterial communities present in this potato (Solanum tuberosum L.)-barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) rotation over seeded to crimson clover (Trifolium praense L.). Domain-specific 16S rRNA gene primers are rigorously tested to determine their ability to amplify across a target region of the gene. Yet, variability within or between T-RFLP profiles can result from factors independent of the primer pair. Therefore, researchers should use RDA and MANOVA analyses to evaluate the effects that additional laboratory and environmental variables have on bacterial diversity.

  12. Impact of the freeze-drying process on product appearance, residual moisture content, viability, and batch uniformity of freeze-dried bacterial cultures safeguarded at culture collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiren, Jindrich; Hellemans, Ann; De Vos, Paul

    2016-07-01

    In this study, causes of collapsed bacterial cultures in glass ampoules observed after freeze-drying were investigated as well as the influence of collapse on residual moisture content (RMC) and viability. Also, the effect of heat radiation and post freeze-drying treatments on the RMC was studied. Cake morphologies of 21 bacterial strains obtained after freeze-drying with one standard protocol could be classified visually into four major types: no collapse, porous, partial collapse, and collapse. The more pronounced the collapse, the higher residual moisture content of the freeze-dried product, ranging from 1.53 % for non-collapsed products to 3.62 % for collapsed products. The most important cause of collapse was the mass of the inserted cotton plug in the ampoule. Default cotton plugs with a mass between 21 and 30 mg inside the ampoule did not affect the viability of freeze-dried Aliivibrio fischeri LMG 4414(T) compared to ampoules without cotton plugs. Cotton plugs with a mass higher than 65 mg inside the ampoule induced a full collapsed product with rubbery look (melt-back) and decreasing viability during storage. Heat radiation effects in the freeze-drying chamber and post freeze-drying treatments such as exposure time to air after freeze-drying and manifold drying time prior to heat sealing of ampoules influenced the RMC of freeze-dried products. To produce uniform batches of freeze-dried bacterial strains with intact cake structures and highest viabilities, inserted cotton plugs should not exceed 21 mg per ampoule. Furthermore, heat radiation effects should be calculated in the design of the primary drying phase and manifold drying time before heat sealing should be determined as a function of exposure time to air.

  13. Comprehensive separation of secondary metabolites in natural products by high-speed counter-current chromatography using a three-phase solvent system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagida, Akio; Yamakawa, Yutaka; Noji, Ryoko; Oda, Ako; Shindo, Heisaburo; Ito, Yoichiro; Shibusawa, Yoichi

    2007-06-01

    High-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) using the three-phase solvent system n-hexane-methyl acetate-acetonitrile-water at a volume ratio of 4:4:3:4 was applied to the comprehensive separation of secondary metabolites in several natural product extracts. A wide variety of secondary metabolites in each natural product was effectively extracted with the three-phase solvent system, and the filtered extract was directly submitted to the HSCCC separation using the same three-phase system. In the HSCCC profiles of crude natural drugs listed in the Japanese Pharmacopoeia, several physiologically active compounds were clearly separated from other components in the extracts. The HSCCC profiles of several tea products, each manufactured by a different process, clearly showed their compositional difference in main compounds such as catechins, caffeine, and pigments. These HSCCC profiles also provide useful information about hydrophobic diversity of whole components present in each natural product.

  14. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues > Conditions > Sexually Transmitted > Bacterial Vaginosis Health Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Bacterial Vaginosis Page Content Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal infection in sexually active teenaged girls . It appears to be caused by ...

  15. Student Work Products as a Teaching Tool for Nature of Science Pedagogical Knowledge: A Professional Development Project with In-Service Secondary Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Erin Peters

    2013-01-01

    The purpose was to examine NOS knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge about NOS of in-service secondary science teachers. Data sources included Views of Science and Education scale, lesson plans with rationales for choices, examples of student work products, videotapes of lesson peer reviews, and interviews conducted after the experience.…

  16. A Simulation Model for Studying Effects of Pollution and Freshwater Inflow on Secondary Productivity in an Ecosystem. Ph.D. Thesis - North Carolina State Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    A mathematical model of an ecosystem is developed. Secondary productivity is evaluated in terms of man related and controllable factors. Information from an existing physical parameters model is used as well as pertinent biological measurements. Predictive information of value to estuarine management is presented. Biological, chemical, and physical parameters measured in order to develop models of ecosystems are identified.

  17. Impact of In-Service Training and Staff Development on Workers' Job Performance and Optimal Productivity in Public Secondary Schools in Osun State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejoh, Johnson; Faniran, Victoria Loveth

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of in-service training and staff development on workers' job performance and optimal productivity in public secondary schools in Osun State, Nigeria. The study used the ex-post-facto research design. Three research questions and three hypotheses were generated and tested using questionnaire items adapted from…

  18. Characterization of particulate products for aging of ethylbenzene secondary organic aerosol in the presence of ammonium sulfate seed aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mingqiang; Zhang, Jiahui; Cai, Shunyou; Liao, Yingmin; Zhao, Weixiong; Hu, Changjin; Gu, Xuejun; Fang, Li; Zhang, Weijun

    2016-09-01

    Aging of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles formed from OH- initiated oxidation of ethylbenzene in the presence of high mass (100-300μg/m(3)) concentrations of (NH4)2SO4 seed aerosol was investigated in a home-made smog chamber in this study. The chemical composition of aged ethylbenzene SOA particles was measured using an aerosol laser time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ALTOFMS) coupled with a Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) clustering algorithm. Experimental results showed that nitrophenol, ethyl-nitrophenol, 2,4-dinitrophenol, methyl glyoxylic acid, 5-ethyl-6-oxo-2,4-hexadienoic acid, 2-ethyl-2,4-hexadiendioic acid, 2,3-dihydroxy-5-ethyl-6-oxo-4-hexenoic acid, 1H-imidazole, hydrated N-glyoxal substituted 1H-imidazole, hydrated glyoxal dimer substituted imidazole, 1H-imidazole-2-carbaldehyde, N-glyoxal substituted hydrated 1H-imidazole-2-carbaldehyde and high-molecular-weight (HMW) components were the predominant products in the aged particles. Compared to the previous aromatic SOA aging studies, imidazole compounds, which can absorb solar radiation effectively, were newly detected in aged ethylbenzene SOA in the presence of high concentrations of (NH4)2SO4 seed aerosol. These findings provide new information for discussing aromatic SOA aging mechanisms.

  19. Rapid method for determining malondialdehyde as secondary oxidation product in palm olein system by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirghani, M E S; Che Man, Y B; Jinap, S; Baharin, B S; Bakar, J

    2002-01-01

    A simple and rapid Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic method has been developed for the quantitative determination of malondialdehyde as secondary oxidation product in a palm olein system. The FTIR method was based on a sodium chloride transmission cell and utilised a partial least square statistical approach to derive a calibration model. The frequency region combinations that gave good calibration were 2900-2800, and 1800-1600 cm-1. The precision and accuracy, in the range 0-60 mumol malondialdehyde/kg oil, were comparable to those of the modified distillation method with a coefficient of determination (r2) of 0.9891 and standard error of calibration of 1.49. The calibration was cross-validated and produced an r2 of 0.9786 and standard error of prediction of 2.136. The results showed that the FTIR method is versatile, efficient and accurate, and suitable for routine quality control analysis with the result obtainable in about 2 min from a sample of less than 2 mL.

  20. Benthic invertebrate density, biomass, and instantaneous secondary production along a fifth-order human-impacted tropical river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Anna Carolina Fornero; Gücker, Björn; Brauns, Mario; Hille, Sandra; Boëchat, Iola Gonçalves

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess land use effects on the density, biomass, and instantaneous secondary production (IP) of benthic invertebrates in a fifth-order tropical river. Invertebrates were sampled at 11 stations along the Rio das Mortes (upper Rio Grande, Southeast Brazil) in the dry and the rainy season 2010/2011. Invertebrates were counted, determined, and measured to estimate their density, biomass, and IP. Water chemical characteristics, sediment heterogeneity, and habitat structural integrity were assessed in parallel. Total invertebrate density, biomass, and IP were higher in the dry season than those in the rainy season, but did not differ significantly among sampling stations along the river. However, taxon-specific density, biomass, and IP differed similarly among sampling stations along the river and between seasons, suggesting that these metrics had the same bioindication potential. Variability in density, biomass, and IP was mainly explained by seasonality and the percentage of sandy sediment in the riverbed, and not directly by urban or agricultural land use. Our results suggest that the consistently high degradation status of the river, observed from its headwaters to mouth, weakened the response of the invertebrate community to specific land use impacts, so that only local habitat characteristics and seasonality exerted effects.

  1. The cross-pathway control system regulates production of the secondary metabolite toxin, sirodesmin PL, in the ascomycete, Leptosphaeria maculans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fox Ellen M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sirodesmin PL is a secondary metabolite toxin made by the ascomycetous plant pathogen, Leptosphaeria maculans. The sirodesmin biosynthetic genes are clustered in the genome. The key genes are a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase, sirP, and a pathway-specific transcription factor, sirZ. Little is known about regulation of sirodesmin production. Results Genes involved in regulation of sirodesmin PL in L. maculans have been identified. Two hundred random insertional T-DNA mutants were screened with an antibacterial assay for ones producing low levels of sirodesmin PL. Three such mutants were isolated and each transcribed sirZ at very low levels. One of the affected genes had high sequence similarity to Aspergillus fumigatus cpcA, which regulates the cross-pathway control system in response to amino acid availability. This gene was silenced in L. maculans and the resultant mutant characterised. When amino acid starvation was artificially-induced by addition of 3-aminotriazole for 5 h, transcript levels of sirP and sirZ did not change in the wild type. In contrast, levels of sirP and sirZ transcripts increased in the silenced cpcA mutant. After prolonged amino acid starvation the silenced cpcA mutant produced much higher amounts of sirodesmin PL than the wild type. Conclusions Production of sirodesmin PL in L. maculans is regulated by the cross pathway control gene, cpcA, either directly or indirectly via the pathway-specific transcription factor, sirZ.

  2. A hybrid DNA extraction method for the qualitative and quantitative assessment of bacterial communities from poultry production samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    The efficacy of DNA extraction protocols can be highly dependent upon both the type of sample being investigated and the types of downstream analyses performed. Considering that the use of new bacterial community analysis techniques (e.g., microbiomics, metagenomics) is becoming more prevalent in th...

  3. Bacterial canker of plum caused by Pseudomonas syringae pathovars, as a serious threat for plum production in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenneker, M.; Janse, J.D.; Bruine, de A.; Vink, P.; Pham, K.T.K.

    2012-01-01

    In the Netherlands, bacterial canker of plum trees (Prunus domestica) caused by Pseudomonas syringae pathovars syringae and morsprunorum is a recent and serious problem. The trunks of the affected plum trees are girdled by cankers resulting in relatively sudden death of the trees 1 to 4 years after

  4. Genomics-guided discovery of secondary metabolites and their regulation in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a well-characterized rhizosphere bacterium known for its production of a diverse spectrum of secondary metabolites and its capacity to suppress plant diseases caused by soilborne fungal, bacterial and oomycete pathogens. Metabolites produced by Pf-5 include 2,4-...

  5. The expanding roles of c-di-GMP in the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides and secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhao-Xun

    2015-05-01

    The cyclic dinucleotide c-di-GMP has emerged in the last decade as a prevalent intracellular messenger that orchestrates the transition between the motile and sessile lifestyles of many bacterial species. The motile-to-sessile transition is often associated with the formation of extracellular matrix-encased biofilm, an organized community of bacterial cells that often contributes to antibiotic resistance and host-pathogen interaction. It is increasingly clear that c-di-GMP controls motility, biofilm formation and bacterial pathogenicity partially through regulating the production of exopolysaccharides (EPS) and small-molecule secondary metabolites. This review summarizes our current understanding of the regulation of EPS biosynthesis by c-di-GMP in a diversity of bacterial species and highlights the emerging role of c-di-GMP in the biosynthesis of small-molecule secondary metabolites.

  6. Activation of the Silent Secondary Metabolite Production by Introducing Neomycin-Resistance in a Marine-Derived Penicillium purpurogenum G59

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Jing Wu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of neomycin-resistance into a marine-derived, wild-type Penicillium purpurogenum G59 resulted in activation of silent biosynthetic pathways for the secondary metabolite production. Upon treatment of G59 spores with neomycin and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO, a total of 56 mutants were obtained by single colony isolation. The acquired resistance of mutants to neomycin was testified by the resistance test. In contrast to the G59 strain, the EtOAc extracts of 28 mutants inhibited the human cancer K562 cells, indicating that the 28 mutants have acquired the capability to produce bioactive metabolites. HPLC-photodiode array detector (PDAD-UV and HPLC-electron spray ionization (ESI-MS analyses further indicated that diverse secondary metabolites have been newly produced in the bioactive mutant extracts. Followed isolation and characterization demonstrated that five bioactive secondary metabolites, curvularin (1, citrinin (2, penicitrinone A (3, erythro-23-O-methylneocyclocitrinol (4 and 22E-7α-methoxy-5α, 6α-epoxyergosta-8(14,22-dien-3β-ol (5, were newly produced by a mutant, 4-30, compared to the G59 strain. All 1–5 were also not yet found in the secondary metabolites of other wild type P. purpurogenum strains. Compounds 1–5 inhibited human cancer K562, HL-60, HeLa and BGC-823 cells to varying extents. Both present bioassays and chemical investigations demonstrated that the introduction of neomycin-resistance into the marine-derived fungal G59 strain could activate silent secondary metabolite production. The present work not only extended the previous DMSO-mediated method for introducing drug-resistance in fungi both in DMSO concentrations and antibiotics, but also additionally exemplified effectiveness of this method for activating silent fungal secondary metabolites. This method could be applied to other fungal isolates to elicit their metabolic potentials to investigate secondary metabolites from silent biosynthetic pathways.

  7. Activation of the silent secondary metabolite production by introducing neomycin-resistance in a marine-derived Penicillium purpurogenum G59.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chang-Jing; Yi, Le; Cui, Cheng-Bin; Li, Chang-Wei; Wang, Nan; Han, Xiao

    2015-04-22

    Introduction of neomycin-resistance into a marine-derived, wild-type Penicillium purpurogenum G59 resulted in activation of silent biosynthetic pathways for the secondary metabolite production. Upon treatment of G59 spores with neomycin and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a total of 56 mutants were obtained by single colony isolation. The acquired resistance of mutants to neomycin was testified by the resistance test. In contrast to the G59 strain, the EtOAc extracts of 28 mutants inhibited the human cancer K562 cells, indicating that the 28 mutants have acquired the capability to produce bioactive metabolites. HPLC-photodiode array detector (PDAD)-UV and HPLC-electron spray ionization (ESI)-MS analyses further indicated that diverse secondary metabolites have been newly produced in the bioactive mutant extracts. Followed isolation and characterization demonstrated that five bioactive secondary metabolites, curvularin (1), citrinin (2), penicitrinone A (3), erythro-23-O-methylneocyclocitrinol (4) and 22E-7α-methoxy-5α, 6α-epoxyergosta-8(14),22-dien-3β-ol (5), were newly produced by a mutant, 4-30, compared to the G59 strain. All 1-5 were also not yet found in the secondary metabolites of other wild type P. purpurogenum strains. Compounds 1-5 inhibited human cancer K562, HL-60, HeLa and BGC-823 cells to varying extents. Both present bioassays and chemical investigations demonstrated that the introduction of neomycin-resistance into the marine-derived fungal G59 strain could activate silent secondary metabolite production. The present work not only extended the previous DMSO-mediated method for introducing drug-resistance in fungi both in DMSO concentrations and antibiotics, but also additionally exemplified effectiveness of this method for activating silent fungal secondary metabolites. This method could be applied to other fungal isolates to elicit their metabolic potentials to investigate secondary metabolites from silent biosynthetic pathways.

  8. The effects of indoor and outdoor dust exposure on the growth, sensitivity to oxidative-stress, and biofilm production of three opportunistic bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suraju, Mohammed O; Lalinde-Barnes, Sloan; Sanamvenkata, Sachindra; Esmaeili, Mahsa; Shishodia, Shishir; Rosenzweig, Jason A

    2015-12-15

    Within the last decade, many studies have highlighted the radical changes in the components of indoor and outdoor dust. For example, agents like automobile emitted platinum group elements and different kinds of organic phthalates and esters have been reported to be accumulating in the biosphere. Humans consistently face dermal, respiratory, and dietary exposures to these particles while indoors and outdoors. In fact, dust particulate matter has been associated with close to 500,000 deaths per year in Europe and about 200,000 deaths per year in the United States. To date, there has been limited examination of the physiological impact of indoor and outdoor dust exposure on normal flora microbes. In this study, the effect of indoor- and outdoor-dust exposure on three opportunistic bacterial species (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) was assessed. Specifically, bacterial growth, oxidative stress resistance, and biofilm production were measured following indoor- and outdoor-dust exposures. Studies were conducted in nutritionally-rich and -poor environments typically encountered by bacteria. Surprisingly, indoor-dust (200μg/mL), enhanced the growth of all three bacterial species in nutrient-poor conditions, but slowed growth in nutrient-rich conditions. In nutrient-rich medium, 100μg/mL exposure of either indoor- or outdoor-dust resulted in significantly reduced oxidative stress resistance in E. coli. Most interestingly, dust (indoor and outdoor), either in nutrient-rich or -poor conditions, significantly increased biofilm production in all three bacterial species. These data suggest that indoor and outdoor dust, can modify opportunistic bacteria through altering growth, sensitivity to oxidative stress, and their virulence potential through enhanced biofilm formation.

  9. Influence of the cycle length on the production of PHA and polyglucose from glycerol by bacterial enrichments in sequencing batch reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moralejo-Gárate, Helena; Palmeiro-Sánchez, Tania; Kleerebezem, Robbert; Mosquera-Corral, Anuska; Campos, José Luis; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2013-12-01

    PHA, a naturally occurring biopolymer produced by a wide range of microorganisms, is known for its applications as bioplastic. In recent years the use of agro-industrial wastewater as substrate for PHA production by bacterial enrichments has attracted considerable research attention. Crude glycerol as generated during biodiesel production is a waste stream that due to its high organic matter content and low price could be an interesting substrate for PHA production. Previously we have demonstrated that when glycerol is used as substrate in a feast-famine regime, PHA and polyglucose are simultaneously produced as storage polymers. The work described in this paper aimed at understanding the effect of the cycle length on the bacterial enrichment process with emphasis on the distribution of glycerol towards PHA and polyglucose. Two sequencing batch reactors where operated with the same hydraulic and biomass retention time. A short cycle length (6 h) favored polyglucose production over PHA, whereas at long cycle length (24 h) PHA was more favored. In both communities the same microorganism appeared dominating, suggesting a metabolic rather than a microbial competition response. Moreover, the presence of ammonium during polymer accumulation did not influence the maximum amount of PHA that was attained.

  10. Fermentative hydrogen production and bacterial community structure in high-rate anaerobic bioreactors containing silicone-immobilized and self-flocculated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shu-Yii; Hung, Chun-Hsiung; Lin, Chi-Neng; Chen, Hsin-Wei; Lee, An-Sheng; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2006-04-01

    A novel continuously stirred anaerobic bioreactor (CSABR) seeded with silicone-immobilized sludge was developed for high-rate fermentative H2 production using sucrose as the limiting substrate. The CSABR system was operated at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 0.5-6 h and an influent sucrose concentration of 10-40 g COD/L. With a high feeding sucrose concentration (i.e., 30-40 g COD/L) and a short HRT (0.5 h), the CSABR reactor produced H2 more efficiently with the highest volumetric rate (VH2) of 15 L/h/L (i.e., 14.7 mol/d/L) and an optimal yield of ca. 3.5 mol H2/mol sucrose. The maximum VH2 value obtained from this work is much higher than any other VH2 values ever documented. Formation of self-flocculated granular sludge occurred during operation at a short HRT. The granule formation is thought to play a pivotal role in the dramatic enhancement of H2 production rate, because it led to more efficient biomass retention. A high biomass concentration of up to 35.4 g VSS/L was achieved even though the reactor was operated at an extremely low HRT (i.e., 0.5 h). In addition to gaining high biomass concentrations, formation of granular sludge also triggered a transition in bacterial community structure, resulting in a nearly twofold increase in the specific H2 production rate. According to denatured-gradient-gel-electrophoresis analysis, operations at a progressively decreasing HRT resulted in a decrease in bacterial population diversity. The culture with the best H2 production performance (at HRT = 0.5 h and sucrose concentration = 30 g COD/L) was eventually dominated by a presumably excellent H2-producing bacterial species identified as Clostridium pasteurianum.

  11. Induction of secondary metabolite production by UV-C radiation in Vitis vinifera L. Öküzgözü callus cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Cetin, Emine Sema

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of the present work was to examine the role of UV-C irradiation on the production of secondary metabolites (total phenolic, total flavanols, total flavonols, catechin, ferulic acid and trans-resveratrol in phenolic compounds and α-, β-, γ- δ-tocopherols) in callus cultures. Studies on the effects of UV-C treatment on callus culture are seldom and generally focused on UV-B. However UV-C radiation play an important role in accumule secondary metabolites. Results In this study...

  12. Production of bacterial blight resistant lines from somatic hybridization between Oryza sativa L. and Oryza meyeriana L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严成其; 钱凯先; 薛刚平; 吴忠长; 陈跃磊; 颜秋生; 张雪琴; 吴平

    2004-01-01

    Novel bacterial blight (BB) resistance gene(s) for rice was (were) introduced into a cultivated japonica rice variety Oryza sativa (cv. 8411), via somatic hybridization using the wild rice Oryza meyeriana as the donor of the resistance gene(s). Twenty-nine progenies of somatically hybridized plants were obtained. Seven somatically hybridized plants and their parents were used for AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism) analysis using 8 primer pairs. Results confirmed that these plants were somatic hybrids containing the characteristic bands of both parents. The morphology of the regenerated rice showed characters of both O.sativa and O.meyeriana. Two somatic hybrids showed highest BB resistance and the other 8 plants showed moderate resistance. The new germplasms with highest resistance have been used in the rice breeding program for the improvement of bacterial blight resistance.

  13. Production of bacterial blight resistant lines from somatic hybridization between Oryza sativa L.and Oryza meyeriana L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严成其; 钱凯先; 薛刚平; 吴忠长; 陈跃磊; 颜秋生; 张雪琴; 吴平

    2004-01-01

    Novel bacterial blight (BB) resistance gene(s) for rice was (were) introduced into a cultivated japonica rice variety Oryza sativa (cv. 8411), via somatic hybridization using the wild rice Oryza meyeriana as the donor of the resistance gene(s). Twenty-nine progenies of somatically hybridized plants were obtained. Seven somatically hybridized plants and their parents were used for AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism) analysis using 8 primer pairs. Results confirmed that these plants were somatic hybrids containing the characteristic bands of both parents. The morphology of the regenerated rice showed characters of both O. sativa and O. meyeriana. Two somatic hybrids showed highest BB resistance and the other 8 plants showed moderate resistance. The new germplasms with highest resistance have been used in the rice bfeeding program for the improvement of bacterial blight resistance.

  14. Bacterial production, glucosidase activity and particle-associated carbohydrates in Dona Paula bay, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhaskar, P.V.; Bhosle, N.B.

    theaquaticenvironmentcontributingupto80%ofthedissolvedand 5–25% of the particulate organic carbon (Decho,1990; Benner et al., 1992; Biersmith and Benner, 1998). Although free and combined amino acids are the most preferred carbon and nitrogen source 1. Introduction... of bulk bacterial biomass and enzyme activity is varyingly attributed to particle-associated bacteria and free-living bacteria (Palumbo et al., 1984; Griffith et al., 1990; Karner and Herndl,1992; Bidle and Fletcher,1995). The enzymatic breakdown...

  15. Assessment of toxicological interactions of benzene and its primary degradation products (catechol and phenol) using a lux-modified bacterial bioassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, E.M. [Inst. of Terrestrial Ecology, Huntingdon (United Kingdom)]|[Univ. of Aberdeen (United Kingdom). Dept. of Plant and Soil Science; Meharg, A.A.; Wright, J. [Inst. of Terrestrial Ecology, Huntingdon (United Kingdom); Killham, K. [Univ. of Aberdeen (United Kingdom). Dept. of Plant and Soil Science

    1997-05-01

    A bacterial bioassay has been developed to assess the relative toxicities of xenobiotics commonly found in contaminated soils, river waters, and ground waters. The assay utilized decline in luminescence of lux-marked Pseudomonas fluorescens on exposure to xenobiotics. Pseudomonas fluorescens is a common bacterium in the terrestrial environment, providing environmental relevance to soil, river, and ground water systems. Three principal environmental contaminants associated with benzene degradation were exposed to the luminescence-marked bacterial biosensor to assess their toxicity individually and in combination. Median effective concentration (EC50) values for decline in luminescence were determined for benzene, catechol, and phenol and were found to be 39.9, 0.77, and 458.6 mg/L, respectively. Catechol, a fungal and bacterial metabolite of benzene, was found to be significantly more toxic to the biosensor than was the parent compound benzene, showing that products of xenobiotic biodegradation may be more toxic than the parent compounds. Combinations of parent compounds and metabolites were found to be significantly more toxic to the bioassay than were the individual compounds themselves. Development of this bioassay has provided a rapid screening system suitable for assessing the toxicity of xenobiotics commonly found in contaminated soil, river, and ground-water environments. The assay can be utilized over a wide pH range is therefore more applicable to such environmental systems than bioluminescence-based bioassays that utilize marine organisms and can only be applied over a limited pH and salinity range.

  16. Bacterial CD1d-restricted glycolipids induce IL-10 production by human regulatory T cells upon cross-talk with invariant NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venken, Koen; Decruy, Tine; Aspeslagh, Sandrine; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Lambrecht, Bart N; Elewaut, Dirk

    2013-09-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells and CD4(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important immune regulatory T cells with Ag reactivity to glycolipids and peptides, respectively. However, the functional interplay between these cells in humans is poorly understood. We show that Tregs suppress iNKT cell proliferation induced by CD1d-restricted glycolipids, including bacterial-derived diacylglycerols, as well as by innate-like activation. Inhibition was related to the potency of iNKT agonists, making diacylglycerol iNKT responses very prone to suppression. Cytokine production by iNKT cells was differentially modulated by Tregs because IL-4 production was reduced more profoundly compared with IFN-γ. A compelling observation was the significant production of IL-10 by Tregs after cell contact with iNKT cells, in particular in the presence of bacterial diacylglycerols. These iNKT-primed Tregs showed increased FOXP3 expression and superior suppressive function. Suppression of iNKT cell responses, but not conventional T cell responses, was IL-10 dependent, suggesting that there is a clear difference in mechanism between the Treg-mediated inhibition of these cell types. Our data highlight a physiologically relevant interaction between human iNKT and Tregs upon pathogen-derived glycolipid recognition that has a significant impact on the design of iNKT cell-based therapeutics.

  17. Selection of potent bacterial strain for over-production of PHB by using low cost carbon source for eco-friendly bioplastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahat Abdul Rehman

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The microbial PHB production is a promising tool for the plastic industry for the synthesis of environmental friendly, biodegradable plastic in contrast to the conventional petro-chemical based non-degradable plastics. The selection of potent bacterial strains, inexpensive carbon source, efficient fermentation and recovery processes are important aspects that were taken into account during this study. Methods: Different bacterial strains i.e. Bacillus Spp, P. putida and P. fluorescens were screened for maximum PHB production. Under media optimization, various carbon and nitrogen sources (alone or in combination were used to achieve the maximum PHB production. Finally the degradation tests of the PHB sheet were also performed to test its biodegradability potential. Results: Shake flask studies have shown the PHB concentrations upto 7.02, 4.50 and 34.4 mg/g of dry cell mass of P. putida, P. fluorescens and Bacillus Spp. respectively. Almost same results were observed at laboratory scale production of PHB in 10 L fermenter i.e. 6.28, 6.23 and 39.5 mg/